Emerson Epsilon EP Drive 400518-01 Installation manual

Emerson Epsilon EP Drive 400518-01 Installation manual
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive
Reference Manual
P/N 400518-03
Revision: A1
Date: April 9, 2007
© Control Techniques Americas LLC 2007
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive
Reference Manual
Information furnished by Control Techniques Drives Inc. (Control Techniques) is believed to be accurate and reliable. However, no
responsibility is assumed by Control Techniques for its use. Control Techniques reserves the right to change the design or operation
of the equipment described herein and any associated motion products without notice. Control Techniques also assumes no
responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document. Information in this document is subject to change without notice.
P/N 400518-03
Revision: A1
Date: April 9, 2007
© Control Techniques Americas LLC 2007
© Control Techniques Americas LLC 2007
Part Number: 400518-03
Revision: A1
Date: April 2007
Printed in United States of America
Information in this document is subject to change without notice. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any
form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, for any purpose, without the express written permission of Control Techniques.
The following are trademarks of Control Techniques and may not be reproduced in any fashion without written approval of Control
Techniques: EMERSON Motion Control,
EMERSON Motion Control PowerTools, AXIMA, “Motion Made Easy.”
Control Techniques is a division of EMERSON Co.
Control Techniques is not affiliated with Microsoft Corporation, owner of the Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT trademarks.
Modbus is a registered trademark of Gould, Inc.
Schaffner is a registered trademark of Schaffner
This document has been prepared to conform to the current released version of the product. Because of our extensive development
efforts and our desire to further improve and enhance the product, inconsistencies may exist between the product and documentation
in some instances. Call your customer support representative if you encounter an inconsistency.
ii
Customer Support
Control Techniques Americas LLC
12005 Technology Drive
Eden Prairie, Minnesota 55344-3620
U.S.A.
Telephone: (952) 995-8000 or (800) 893-2321
It is Control Techniques’ goal to ensure your greatest possible satisfaction with the operation of our products. We are
dedicated to providing fast, friendly, and accurate assistance. That is why we offer you so many ways to get the support
you need. Whether it’s by phone, fax or modem, you can access Control Techniques support information 24 hours a
day, seven days a week. Our wide range of services include:
FAX
(952) 995-8099
You can FAX questions and comments to Control Techniques. Just send a FAX to the number listed above.
Website and Email
www.emersonct.com
Website: www.emersonct.com
Email: [email protected]
If you have Internet capabilities, you also have access to technical support using our website. The website includes
technical notes, frequently asked questions, release notes and other technical documentation. This direct technical
support connection lets you request assistance and exchange software files electronically.
Technical Support
(952) 995-8033 or (800) 893-2321
Email: [email protected]
Control Techniques’ “Motion Made Easy” products are backed by a team of professionals who will service your
installation. Our technical support center in Eden Prairie, Minnesota is ready to help you solve those occasional
problems over the telephone. Our technical support center is available 24 hours a day for emergency service to help
speed any problem solving. Also, all hardware replacement parts, if needed, are available through our customer service
organization.
When you call, please be at your computer, with your documentation easily available, and be prepared to provide the
following information:
• Product version number, found by choosing About from the Help menu
• The type of controller or product you are using
• Exact wording of any messages that appear on your screen
• What you were doing when the problem occurred
• How you tried to solve the problem
Need on-site help? Control Techniques provides service, in most cases, the next day. Just call Control Techniques’
technical support center when on-site service or maintenance is required.
Training Services
(952) 995-8000 or (800) 893-2321
Email: [email protected]
Control Techniques maintains a highly trained staff of instructors to familiarize customers with Control Techniques’
“Motion Made Easy” products and their applications. A number of courses are offered, many of which can be taught in
your plant upon request.
Application Engineering
(952) 995-8000 or (800) 893-2321
Email: [email protected]
An experienced staff of factory application engineers provides complete customer support for tough or complex
applications. Our engineers offer you a broad base of experience and knowledge of electronic motion control
applications.
Customer Service (Sales)
(952) 995-8000 or (800) 893-2321
Email: [email protected]
Authorized Control Techniques distributors may place orders directly with our Customer Service department. Contact
the Customer Service department at this number for the distributor nearest you.
iii
Document Conventions
Manual conventions have been established to help you learn to use this manual quickly and easily. As much as possible,
these conventions correspond to those found in other Microsoft® Windows® compatible software documentation.
Menu names and options are printed in bold type: the File menu.
Dialog box names begin with uppercase letters: the Axis Limits dialog box.
Dialog box field names are in quotes: “Field Name.”
Button names are in italic: OK button.
Source code is printed in Courier font: Case ERMS.
In addition, you will find the following typographic conventions throughout this manual.
This
Represents
bold
Characters that you must type exactly as they appear. For example, if you are directed to type
a:setup, you should type all the bold characters exactly as they are printed.
italic
Placeholders for information you must provide. For example, if you are directed to type
filename, you should type the actual name for a file instead of the word shown in italic type.
ALL CAPITALS
Directory names, file names, key names, and acronyms.
SMALL CAPS
Non-printable ASCII control characters.
KEY1+KEY2
example: (Alt+F)
A plus sign (+) between key names means to press and hold down the first key while you press
the second key.
KEY1,KEY2
example: (Alt,F)
A comma (,) between key names means to press and release the keys one after the other.
Reference Materials
The following related reference and installation manuals may be useful with your particular system.
• Epsilon EP Drive Installation Manual (P/N 400518-01)
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Safety Information
Safety Precautions
This product is intended for professional incorporation into a complete system by qualified persons. If you install the
product incorrectly, it may present a safety hazard. The product and system may use high voltages and currents, carry
a high level of stored electrical energy, or are used to control mechanical equipment that can cause injury.
You must give close attention to the electrical installation and system design to avoid hazards either in normal operation
or in the event of equipment malfunction. System design, installation, commissioning and maintenance must be carried
out by personnel who have the necessary training and experience. Read and follow all safety information in this
instruction manual and the Epsilon EP Drive Installation Manual (400518-01) carefully.
Qualified Person
For the purpose of this manual and product, a “qualified person” is one who is familiar with the installation, construction
and operation of the equipment and the hazards involved. In addition, this individual has the following qualifications:
Is trained and authorized to energize, de-energize, clear and ground and tag circuits and equipment in accordance with
established safety practices.
Is trained in the proper care and use of protective equipment in accordance with established safety practices.
Is trained in rendering first aid.
Setup, Commissioning and Maintenance
It is essential that you give careful consideration to changes to drive settings. Depending on the application, a change
could have an impact on safety. You must take appropriate precautions against inadvertent changes or tampering.
Restoring default parameters in certain applications may cause unpredictable or hazardous operation.
Safety of Machinery
Within the European Union all machinery in which this product is used must comply with Directive 89/392/EEC, Safety
of Machinery.
The product has been designed and tested to a high standard, and failures are very unlikely. However the level of
integrity offered by the product’s control function – for example stop/start, forward/reverse and maximum speed – is not
sufficient for use in safety-critical applications without additional independent channels of protection. All applications
where malfunction could cause injury or loss of life must be subject to a risk assessment, and further protection provided
where needed.
Identification of Safety Information
Safety related information through out this manual is identified with the following markings.
“Warning” indicates a potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury.
"Caution indicates a potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, may result in minor or moderate injury.
“Caution” used without the safety alert symbol indicates a potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided,
may result in property damage
For the purpose of this manual and product, “Note” indicates essential information about the product or the
respective part of the manual.
Throughout this manual, the word “drive” refers to an Epsilon EP-B drive.
General warning
Failure to follow safe installation guidelines can cause death or serious injury. The voltages used in this unit can cause
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
severe electric shock and/or burns, and could be lethal. Extreme care is necessary at all times when working with or
adjacent to this equipment. The installation must comply with all relevant safety legislation in the country of use.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Table of Contents
Customer Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii
Reference Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
Safety Information
v
Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .v
Introduction
1
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Quick Start
3
Offline Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Online Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Operational Overview
9
User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
How Motion Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Functional Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Drive Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Current Foldback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Shunt Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Brake Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Analog Command Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Analog Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Digital Inputs and Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
How Communications Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Setting Up Parameters
Graph View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setup View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Motor View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Position View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Velocity View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ramps View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Torque View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuning View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shunt View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Teach View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Faults View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Setup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input Lines View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Output Lines View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analog Inputs View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analog Outputs View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Status View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuning Procedures
39
39
41
48
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
62
63
63
64
66
68
69
73
PID vs. State-Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Tuning Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Tuning Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Diagnostics and Troubleshooting
79
Diagnostic Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Fault Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Drive Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Watch Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Glossary
87
Specifications
91
Epsilon EP Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Epsilon EP Drive Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Cable Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Index
viii
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Introduction
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive
The Epsilon EP-B drives are stand-alone, fully digital brushless servo drives designed and built to reliably provide high
performance and flexibility without sacrificing ease of use.
The use of State-Space algorithms make tuning very simple and forgiving. The drives are designed to operate with up
to a 10:1 inertia mismatch right out of the box. Higher (50:1 and more) inertial mismatches are possible with two simple
parameter settings.
The Epsilon EP-B drive can be quickly configured to many applications in less than 5 minutes with Emerson Control
Techniques PowerTools Pro v4.01 software on a PC running Windows® 98, NT 4.0, 2000, ME or XP.
Complete diagnostics are provided for quick troubleshooting. A status/diagnostic display on the front of the drive informs
the user of the operational or fault status. The last 10 faults are stored in non-volatile memory along with a time stamp
for easy recall.
Shunt Connector (J8)
Status/Diagnostic Display
Reset Button
AC Power Connections (J1)
Motor Connections (J1)
24 Vdc Logic Power Supply Connections (J1)
Serial
Connectors (J2)
Digital I/O Connctor (J3)
EP20X-XXX-XX00
9606XX-XX A1
SN 0610E014
Sync Input Connector (J10)
Analog/Sync Output
Connector (J5)
Encoder Feedback Connector (J6)
Figure 1: Epsilon EP-B Drive Feature Location
Epsilon EP drives are rated at 240 Vac input voltage and can operate with an input voltage from 20 to 264 Vac. The
Epsilon EP drives are available in three current ratings.
Drive Model
Continuous Power Rating
Continuous Current
Peak Current
EP202-Bxx-EN00
670 W
2.2 A RMS
4.4 A RMS
EP204-Bxx-EN00
1140 W
4.0 A RMS
8.0 A RMS
EP206-Bxx-EN00
1610 W
6.5 A RMS
13.0 A RMS
The NT and MG motors that are matched to the Epsilon drive provide low inertia, high power to size ratios, and encoder
feedback for accurate positioning.
1.In this manual Emerson Control Techniques PowerTools Pro v4.0 will be referred to as PowerTools Pro.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
2
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Quick Start
Offline Setup
Generally, online setup is used when editing parameters in a device. Offline setup editing is usually only done
when not connected to a device.
Step 1: Opening an Offline Configuration Window
To open an offline Configuration Window, click the New button from the toolbar or select New from the File menu.
Figure 2:
New Dialog Box
When the New dialog box appears, select the drive setup selection and click the OK button. A new Configuration Window
will be displayed.
Figure 3:
Offline Configuration Window
All drive setup parameters are accessible in the hierarchy tree of the offline configuration window.
You can now proceed to setup the drive parameters as desired.
Step 2: Entering General Drive Setup Information
The Setup view contains system data such as drive type, motor type and axis name.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Figure 4:
Setup View
Entering Identification Parameters:
1. Enter an axis identifying name for the drive you are setting up. You can use up to 24 alpha-numeric characters.
2. Enter the Axis Address to which you wish to download the setup information. Unless you have changed the
Modbus address of your device, leave this parameter set to the default value of 1.
Entering Configuration Parameters:
1. Click the down arrow of the Drive Type list box, then select the drive model of the drive you are currently
setting up.
2. Click the down arrow of the Motor Type list box, then select the motor connected to the drive you are setting
up.
Selecting the wrong motor type can cause poor performance and may even damage the motor and/or drive.
Entering Positive Direction Selections:
1. Click which direction, clockwise (CW) or counterclockwise (CCW), to be considered as motion in the positive
direction.
CW and CCW rotation is determined by viewing the motor from the shaft end.
Figure 5:
4
Motor Rotation
Quick Start
Step 3: Assigning Inputs
Inputs are assigned in the Inputs view which is divided into two windows. The “Input Functions” window, on the left side,
displays the input functions available, the function polarity and the always active state. The “Input Lines” window, on the
right side, displays the drive enable input, four input lines, the debounce value and input function assignments.
You cannot assign functions or Debounce the Drive Enable input line.
Figure 6:
Inputs View
To assign an Input Function to an Input line:
1. Assign an input by highlighting an input function in the “Input Functions” window and drag the highlighted input
function to the desired input line in the “Input Lines” window.
2. To unassign an input function from an input line, select the desired input function from the “Input Functions”
window, then drag the highlighted input assignment back to the “Input Functions” window.
To make an Input Function “Active Off”:
1. Select the desired input function in the “Input Functions” window.
2. Click the “Active Off” check box. The Active State column in the “Input Functions” window will automatically
update to the current setup.
To make an input function “Always Active”:
1. Select the desired input function in the “Input Functions” window.
2. Click the “Always Active” check box. The Active State column in the “Input Functions” window will
automatically update to the current setup.
Step 4:
Assigning Outputs
Output functions are assigned in the Outputs view which is divided into two windows. The “Output Functions” window,
on the left side, displays the output functions available. The “Output Lines” window, on the right side, displays the output
lines, the line active state and the output function assignments.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Figure 7:
Outputs View
To assign an Output Function to an Output Line:
1. Assign an output by highlighting an output function in the “Output Function” window and drag the highlighted
output function to the desired output line in the "Output Line" window.
To unassign an Output Function from an Output Line:
1. To unassign an output function from an output line, select the desired output function from the "Output Line"
window, then drag the highlighted output assignment back to the "Output Function" window.
To make an Output Function “Active Off”:
1. Select the desired output line in the "Output Line" window.
2. Click the “Active Off” check box. The Configuration column in the "Output Line" window will automatically
update to the current setup.
Online Setup
These steps assume you have already created a configuration file. If you have already downloaded the configuration
file, go to Step 3. If you have not yet created the configuration file, go to Offline Setup Step 1. Do Steps 1 through 7 in
the previous section, “Offline Setup”, before establishing communications.
Generally, online setup is used when editing parameters in a device. Offline setup editing is usually only done
when not connected to a device.
Step 1: Establishing Communications with Drive
Now that the basic device setup parameters are entered, it is time to establish communications with the device and
download the configuration data. Before proceeding, be sure to connect the serial communication cable between your
PC and the device.
When attempting to download a configuration using PowerTools Pro, the software may need to be configured to the
correct communication settings for the intended connection.
To configure the preferences, select the Options|Preferences|Ptools Operations from the menu bar then select the
Communications tab see Figure 8. This dialog box allows the user to configure which communication connections are
scanned when performing any communication operations. Default is all ports are scanned.
The serial communication baud rate can be changed, the drive baud rate and PowerTools Pro baud rate must match.
Default drive baud rate = 19200. PowerTools Pro will not check to see if any devices with node addresses higher than
the number entered are available on the network. The default number is 4 with a maximum number of 32 node
addresses.
6
Quick Start
Figure 8:
Communications Setup Screen
After communications are established the baud rate can be changed by selecting from the Device menu, choose
Change Baud Rate.
Step 2: Downloading the Configuration File
When you are ready to download the information in the current Configuration Window, go to the Setup view and enter
the address of the device you wish to download to in the “Axis Address” text box.
Click the Download button in the toolbar or from the Device menu, Download.
PowerTools Pro will establish communications and transfer all the information in the current Configuration Window to
the device you select.
Downloading will automatically clear an Invalid Configuration fault (“U” fault).
Step 3: Opening an Online Configuration Window
If you are not already online with the device, use this section to upload a configuration for online editing.
To open an online Configuration Window, click the Upload button on the toolbar. PowerTools Pro will display the Change
Path dialog box while it scans your PC’s ports for any compatible devices. Next, select the device you wish to upload
into a Configuration window.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Figure 9:
Upload Drive Configuration Dialog Box
Step 4: Operation Verification
After downloading a configuration file to the device the user may want to verify the operation of the system using the
checklist below.
1. I/O powered and Logic powered
2. Connections installed
3. Enable the drive
4. Verify “R” on the drive status/diagnostic display
Step 5: Saving the Configuration File
To save the drive setup information, select Save from the File menu. Follow the dialog box instructions.
Step 6: Printing the Configuration File
To generate a printed copy of all the data in the drive configuration, select Print from the File menu. If you print while
online, the print-out will include several pages of useful online diagnostic information.
Step 7: Disconnecting Communications
After you successfully download to the drive, you may want to disconnect the serial communications link between the
drive and your PC to clear the serial port or to access some PowerTools Pro options only available when offline.
To disconnect serial communications, click the Disconnect button on the toolbar (or select the Disconnect command
from the Device menu).
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Operational Overview
User Interface
The Epsilon EP-B Base Drive is set up using PowerTools Pro software. PowerTools Pro is an easy-to-use Windowsbased setup and diagnostics tool. It provides you with the ability to create, edit and maintain your drive’s setup. You can
download or upload your setup data to or from a device. You can also save it to a file on your PC or print it for review or
permanent storage.
Figure 10:
PowerTools Pro Setup View For An Epsilon EP-B Drive
How Motion Works
Below is a list of details related to motion in a drive.
• The Stop input function overrides motion in all operating modes including Pulse and Torque mode. It shifts the mode
to Velocity mode and decelerates the axis according to the Stop deceleration ramp.
• The Travel Limits work in all operating modes including; Pulse, Velocity and Torque modes.
• When a Travel Limit has been activated in a particular direction, uninhibited motion is allowed in the opposite direction.
• The Positive Direction parameter affects all motion by specifying which direction the motor shaft will rotate (CW or
CCW) when the command position is increasing.
• When changing modes with Torque Mode Enable input function, no ramping occurs between the two different
commands.
• When using Analog + Preset Summation mode, the properties of both summed modes are honored.
Functional Overview
The drive is a digital servo drive which provides four modes of operation: Pulse, Velocity, Torque and Analog Position.
The Operating Mode selection defines the basic operation of the drive.
External control capability is provided through the use of input and output functions. These functions may be assigned
to any input or output line which may be controlled by external devices, such as a PLC or multi-axis controller, to affect
the drive operation.
Drive parameters can be modified using PowerTools Pro software. All drive parameters have a pre-assigned Modbus
address which allows you to access them using a Modbus interface.
Velocity Mode
Three sub-modes are associated with Velocity mode: Analog Velocity, Preset Velocity and Analog + Preset Summation.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Analog Velocity Sub-Mode
The Analog Input receives an analog voltage which is converted to the Velocity Command Analog parameter using the
Full Scale Velocity, Analog Input Full Scale, and Analog Input Zero Offset parameters. The equation for this conversion
is:
VCA =
((AI − AZO) FSV)
AFS
Where:
VCA = Velocity Command Analog (RPM)
AI = Analog Input (volts)
AZO = Analog Input Zero Offset (volts)
FSV = Full Scale Velocity (RPM)
AFS = Analog Input Full Scale (volts)
The Velocity Command is always equal to the Velocity Command Analog in Analog Velocity mode. The Velocity
Command is the command received by the velocity closed loop control.
Analog Accel/Decel Limit
This feature in the Analog sub-mode allows you to limit the accel and decel rate when using the analog input for velocity
control. This makes it very simple to use the drive in high performance, variable speed, start-stop applications such as
Clutch-Brake replacements without requiring a sophisticated controller to control the acceleration ramps. In applications
which do not require the drive to limit the ramps such as when using an external position controller, the parameter can
be set to “0” (its default value). If the Analog Accel/Decel Limit parameter value is changed during a ramp, the new ramp
limit is imposed within the next servo loop update.
The Analog Accel/Decel Limit parameter is accessed on the Ramps view. Its range is 0.0 to 32700.0 ms/kRPM.
Preset Velocity Sub-Mode
Preset Velocity sub-mode provides up to eight digital Velocity Presets and associated Accel/Decel Presets. At any time
only one Velocity Preset can be selected. They are selected using the Velocity Preset 1, Velocity Preset 2 and Velocity
Preset 3 input functions (see table below).
*
Velocity Preset 3
Velocity Preset 2
Velocity Preset 1
Selected Preset #
Velocity and Accel / Decel
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
2
0
1
1
3
1
0
0
4
1
0
1
5
1
1
0
6
1
1
1
7
(0) = Inactive input function, (1) = Active input function
When one of the Velocity Presets is selected, the Target Velocity is set equal to the Preset Velocity value and the accel/
decel ramp rate is set to the Preset Accel/Decel value associated with that velocity preset.
If the Velocity Command Preset is not equal to the Target Velocity, an acceleration (or deceleration) ramp is in progress.
In this state, the Velocity Command Preset will be increased (or decreased) based upon the acceleration (or
deceleration) ramp rate of the selected velocity preset. During the acceleration/deceleration ramp, the At Velocity output
function is inactive.
If the Velocity Command Preset is equal to the Target Velocity, all ramping is complete, the Velocity Command Preset
is constant and the At Velocity output function is active.
The Velocity Command is always equal to the Velocity Command Preset in Preset Velocity sub-mode.
10
Operational Overview
VELOCITY
(+)
2200
2000
1800
1600
1400
1200
1000
800
600
400
200
0
-200
-400
-600
-800
-1000
-1200
-1400
-1600
-1800
-2000
-2200
A/D 1
A/D 2
A/D 0
A/D 3
TIME
A/D 2
Preset
Velocity 0
Preset
Velocity 1
Preset
Velocity 2
Preset
Velocity 3
Preset
Velocity 0
A/D = Acceleration/Deceleration Ramp
Figure 11:
Velocity vs. Time Diagram using Preset Velocities
Analog + Preset Summation Sub-Mode
In Analog + Preset Summation sub-mode the Velocity Command is the result of the sum of the Velocity Command
Analog and the Velocity Command Preset values:
VC = AC + PC
Where:
VC = Velocity Command
AC = Velocity Command Analog
PC = Velocity Command Preset
Example 1:
Use of Velocity Presets in a phase advance/retard application. Velocity Preset 0 is set to 0 RPM, Velocity Preset 1 is set
to +5 RPM, and Velocity Preset 2 is set to -5 RPM. The Analog Input is the command source for a web application where
a phase adjustment may be useful. Without interrupting the operation, you may select either Velocity Preset 1 or 2 to
speed up or slow down the motor thereby advancing or retarding the phase between the motor and the web material.
Example 2:
Use the Velocity Command Analog as a trim adjustment to the digital Velocity Presets. Velocity Preset 2 is selected with
Analog Input at 0, so the Velocity Command Preset and Velocity Command are equal (set to match a conveyor speed).
You can use the Analog Input (Velocity Command Analog) as a fine adjust for the Velocity Command to exactly match
the conveyor speed.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Preset
Velocity 0
Preset
Velocity 1
Preset
Velocity
Command
Preset
Velocity 2
Summation Point
Preset
Velocity 3
Velocity Command
Analog
Velocity
Command
Analog
Input
Figure 12:
Summation Mode Block Diagram
.
VELOCITY
(+)
2200
2000
1800
1600
1400
1200
1000
800
600
400
200
0
Figure 13:
Velocity Command
Analog Velocity Command
Preset Velocity Command
TIME
Velocity vs. Time Diagram, Analog + Preset Summation Sub-Mode
Torque Mode
In Torque mode both the position and velocity loops are disabled and only the torque loop is enabled.
Velocity related faults and velocity related input and output functions are still enabled (including Stop and Travel
Limits).
In Torque mode the drive receives an Analog Input which is scaled to the Analog Torque Command by the Full Scale
Torque, Analog Input Full Scale, and Analog Input Zero Offset parameters. The equation is:
TC =
Where:
((AI − AZO) FST)
AFS
TC = Torque Command
AI = Analog Input (volts)
AZO = Analog Input Zero Offset (volts)
FST = Full Scale Torque (%)
AFS = Analog Full Scale (volts)
Pulse Mode
In Pulse mode, the drive will receive pulses which are used to control the position and velocity of the motor.
There are three pulse interpretations associated with Pulse mode: Pulse/Pulse, Pulse/Direction and Pulse/Quadrature.
These selections determine how the input pulses are interpreted by the drive.
12
Operational Overview
Figure 14:
Setup View - Pulse Mode
High Performance Gains Enable check box in PowerTools Pro software is typically enabled when Pulse mode is
used (the default is enabled).
Interpretation Mode Group
Pulse/Pulse Interpretation
In Pulse/Pulse interpretation, pulses received on the A channel are interpreted as positive changes to the Pulse Position
Input. Pulses received on the B channel are interpreted as negative changes to the Pulse Position Input.
Motion occurs
on rising edge
Channel A (CW)
Channel B (CCW)
Figure 15:
+ Pulse Input
- Pulse Input
Pulse/Pulse Signals, Differential Inputs
Pulse/Direction Interpretation
In Pulse/Direction interpretation, pulses are received on the A channel and the direction is received on the B channel. If
the B is high, pulses received on the A are interpreted as positive changes to the Pulse Position Input. If the B is low,
pulses received on the A are interpreted as negative changes to the Pulse Position Input.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Motion occurs
on rising edge
Pulse
CW
CCW
Figure 16:
Direction
Pulse/Direction Signals, Differential Inputs
Pulse/Quadrature Interpretation
In Pulse/Quadrature interpretation, a full quadrature encoder signal is used as the command. When B leads A encoder
counts are received they are interpreted as positive changes to the Pulse Position Input. When A leads B encoder counts
are received they are interpreted as negative changes to the Pulse Position Input. All edges of A and B are counted,
therefore one revolution of a 2048 line encoder will produce an 8192 count change on the Pulse Position Input. Any two
consecutive edges must be separated by .2/f max in time for correct interpretation.
B leads A = + Pulse Position Inputs
Channel A
Channel B
Figure 17:
Pulse/Quadrature Signals, + Command
A leads B = - Pulse Position Inputs
Channel A
Channel B
Figure 18:
Pulse/Quadrature Signals, – Command
Pulse Signal Type
The drive provides two types of pulse input circuits which allows you to choose the appropriate input type to match the
device generating the position pulses. The selection is done by wiring to the desired input pins of the Analog/Sync Output
connector (J5) or the Sync Input connector (J10) and setting the Pulse Signal type selection in the Setup view. The
Differential setting (default) is perfect for most encoders or upstream drives. The Single Ended setting is a good match
for any open collector driver that requires an external pull up resistor or 5 Volt logic driver making it ideal for most stepper
controllers, PLC stepper cards and PC computer parallel printer ports.
The two hardware input circuits are included in the drive and are accessible through the drives Analog/Sync Output
connector or the Sync Input connector. The differential input circuit is RS-485 compatible making it inherently noise
immune while being able to accept pulse rates of up to 1 Mhz per channel. The single ended inputs have internal pullup resistors to the drive’s 5 Volt logic supply so external pull-ups and biasing circuitry is not required. When proper
14
Operational Overview
installation techniques are followed, the differential input setup will provide a more robust and noise immune system than
a single ended input setup.
Differential input is recommended under any of the following conditions:
• Pulse width < 2 µs
• Pulse frequency > 250 kHz
• Pulse command cable length > 25 feet
• Noisy electrical environments
Differential input circuit specifications:
Input frequency maximum (f max):
1 Mhz (4 million counts per second quadrature)
Input device:
AM26C32 - RS-485 receiver
Input impedance:
12 Kohms
Maximum voltage applied to input pins (A, A/) or (B, B/):
Single Ended (referenced to 0V drive logic):+12/-7 V
NOTE: As long as each is in single ended range, differential is O.K.
Maximum common mode voltage:
+/-7 V
Minimum differential voltage required:
200 mV
Input voltage hysteresis:
60 mV
STI-SNCI Terminal
Sync Input Connector (J10)
Pin #
Pulse-Direction
Signal
Pulse-Pulse
Signal
Pulse Quadrature
Signal
1
1
Pulse
Pulse +
A
2
2
Pulse/
Pulse +/
A/
3
3
Direction
Pulse -
B
5
5
Direction/
Pulse -/
B/
Single ended input circuit specifications:
Input frequency maximum (f max):
500 khz (2 million counts per second quadrature)
Input electrical description:
Internal 390 ohms pull-up to 5 Volt 9non-isolated)
Input Low Voltage (Vil):
1.5 Volt max.
Input high Voltage (Vhl):
3.5 Volt min.
Output driver requirements:
15 mA sinking (open collector) min at 0.4V max
Can drive to 5.5 V max. (will work with TTL or 5V CMOS outputs)
Output driver requirements:
• 15 mA sinking (open collector)
• 5 Volt capacity
• Signal common connected to Drive Logic 0V (Sync Encoder Common 0V)
STI-SNCOA Terminal
Analog/Sync Output Connector (J5) Pin #
Pulse-Direction
Signal
Pulse-Pulse
Signal
Pulse Quadrature
Signal
4
4
Pulse /
Pulse CW /
A
12
12
Direction
Pulse CCW /
B
Pulse /:
Commands motion on the falling edge (active edge).
Direction:
Positive (+) motion when high (inactive) and Negative (-) motion when low (active).
Pulse CW /:
Commands positive (+) motion on the falling edge (active edge) of a pulse.
Pulse CCW /:
Commands negative (-) motion on the falling edge (active edge) of a pulse.
A and B:
Encoder Quadrature signal interpretation. When B leads A Positive (+) motion commands will
be generated, When A leads B, negative (-) motion commands will be generated.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Actual motor rotation direction will depend on pulse ratio polarity and setting of the Positive Direction bit.
Pulse Mode Parameters
The Pulse Position Input parameter shows the total pulse count received by the drive since the last power-up.
The Pulse Position Input, Position Command, Position Feedback Encoder and Position Feedback are initialized to zero
on power-up. Only Position Feedback Encoder can be pre-loaded serially with a value after power-up.
The Pulse Mode Ratio parameter includes a numerator which represents motor revolutions, and a denominator which
represents master pulses. The Pulse Ratio Revolutions is allowed to be negative which reverses all Pulse mode motion.
The Pulse Position Input is multiplied by the Pulse Mode Ratio to produce the Position Command.
Following Error/Following Error Limit
The Following Error is the algebraic difference between the Position Command and the Position Feedback. It is positive
when the Position Command is greater than the Position Feedback. All accumulated Following Error will be cleared
when the drive is disabled.
The Following Error Limit is functional in Pulse mode only. A Following Error Limit can be set using PowerTools Pro.
This limit is in motor revolutions and has a range of .001 to 10.000 revolutions. The Following Error Limit can be enabled
or disabled.
Pulse Mode Following Error
In Pulse Mode, the range of the Following Error is ±2863.3 revolutions. If the Following Error Limit is not enabled and
the Following Error exceeds 2863.3 revolutions, the displayed value is limited to this maximum value and will not rollover.
If the Following Error Limit Enable is enabled, the absolute value of the Following Error will be compared to the Following
Error Limit. If the limit is exceeded, a fault will be generated. If the Following Error Limit Enable is disabled, the Following
Error Limit is not used.
Velocity Mode Following Error
In Velocity mode, the maximum Following Error possible varies based on the gain and torque limit settings. When the
Actual Torque Command reaches the maximum possible level, the following error will stop increasing and any additional
position error will be dropped. In Velocity mode, when the following error exceeds the Following Error Limit parameter
there is no action.
Encoder Position and Position Feedback
Encoder Position and Position Feedback are two separate parameters which indicate the same physical motor position.
Encoder Position is the position change since power up in motor encoder counts and Position Feedback is the total
position change since power up in motor revolutions. The Position Direction parameter setting will change which
direction the motor rotates when the position feedback and position command are counting up. In the default setting the
position counts up when the motor shaft rotates clockwise (when viewed from the shaft end).
The Encoder Position parameter can be pre-loaded serially by setting the Position Feedback Encoder Modbus
parameter.
Analog Position Mode
Analog Position Mode Description
Analog position is an operating mode for the Epsilon EP-B drive. The drive receives an analog input signal and drives
the motor to a corresponding absolute position. The analog signal has a range of +/- 10 volts and is scaled to a motor
position in revolutions or other motor user units. An analog output on the drive can also be setup to provide an analog
output feedback signal.
An example of a basic analog position setup would be as follows: An input voltage of 0 volts can be setup to equal a
position of zero revolutions and a voltage of 10 volts can be setup to be a position of 10 revolutions. Therefore, if the
analog input signal on the drive reads 5 volts the position would equal 5 revolutions. An analog input signal of 10 volts
would equal 10 motor revolutions.
The analog position parameters can be setup using PowerTools Pro 4.0 software or can be taught by manually moving
the axis, setting the corresponding analog input and activating the “teach” input function.
16
Operational Overview
Analog Position Mode Setup
Within the PowerTools Pro click on Setup in the hierarchy tree and then select Analog Position Mode in the Setup view.
The Analog Position Mode Setup tab will appear underneath where you made the operating mode selection.
Figure 19:
Setup View - Analog Position Mode
Velocity Limit Starting
This is a velocity limit during the initial analog command motion. If the analog position command does not match your
current position when the Analog Input mode is enabled, the drive will move the motor to match the commanded vs.
17
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
actual position. This move may occur more rapidly than the user would like. To have a slower and safer initial startup,
the “Velocity Limit Starting” is used. It is only valid from the “Analog Position Mode Enable” until the position is reached.
The acceleration is limited by “Analog Accel/Decel Limit”.
Define Home Position
The Home Position value is used by the drive to set the actual position to this value after the “Home” input is activated.
A “Home” input is defined during the teach function
• Distance units (revs) has a range of -214748.3647 to +2147483647
Analog Deadband
• Provides a deadband around the current position to filter out noise and prevent the motor from following the noise
signal
• Range: Volts 0 – 10.000
Following Error Limit
• Defines maximum position error between commanded position and the actual motor position.
• Drive will generate fault if following error is exceeded
Mode Selection
Once the analog position settings have been entered you can keep “Analog Position mode” selected and the drive will
operate in the analog position mode. Or you can select another operating mode such as Velocity and the drive will
operate in velocity mode until analog position mode is enabled via an input. The analog position settings window will
disappear but the values entered will still be set in the drive.
Analog Input Setup
Analog Input is used for Analog Velocity, Analog Torque and Analog Position.
Both Analog Velocity and Analog Torque use the settings of scale and offset while Analog Position uses a two point
definition. The two point definition allows for a teach method to define and calibrate the analog input settings to encoder
values by using an input function.
Figure 20:
Analog Inputs View
Bandwidth
• Bandwidth provides a lowpass filter on the analog input. Frequencies above this value will be ignored.
Analog Full Scale
• Range -10.000 to +10.000
• Defines the “Full Scale Velocity” or “Full Scale Torque” analog scaling.
18
Operational Overview
Analog Zero offset
• Range -10.000 to +10.000
• Provides an offset voltage to zero the signal. For example, if your analog source has a 100mV signal when the velocity
command is zero, this value can be set to -100mV so that the drive is commanding zero velocity.
Analog Input – Position Group
The four values in this box define the Voltage to Position relationship, by setting the endpoints of a straight line.
Voltage
Position, Voltage:
Max Values
Position, Voltage:
Min Values
Position
Figure 21:
Shows The Relationship Between The Min And Max Values
Analog Max Position
• The upper value in the point set (Value,Voltage):
• RW Distance units (revs) -214748.3647 – +214748.3647
• Note: This is not the limit the distance.
• This value will update upon a Teach input
Analog Max Voltage
• The upper Voltage in the point set (Value,Voltage):
• RW Voltage units (volts) -10.000 – +10.000
• Note: This is not the limit the input voltage
• This value will update upon a Teach input
Analog Min Position
• The lower Value in the point set (Value,Voltage):
• RW Distance units (revs) -214748.3647 – +214748.3647
• Note: This is not the limit the input voltage
• This value will update upon a Teach input
Analog Min Voltage
• The lower Voltage in the point set (Value,Voltage):
• RW voltage units (volts) -10.000 – +10.000
• Note: This is not the limit the input voltage
• This value will update upon a Teach input
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Position Limit Min
• If “Position Limit Enable” is set, the value of “Position Limit Min” will be the lower limit of the allowable travel range.
The motor will stop at this location when the analog input is commanding a position beyond this location. No fault is
genterated.
Position Limit Max
• If “Position Limit Enable” is set, the value of “Position Limit Max” will be the upper limit of the allowable travel range.
The motor will stop at this location when the analog input is commanding a position beyond this location. No fault is
genterated.
Analog Output Setup
The user is allowed to use two different modes to define the Analog Output scaling:
1. Directly define the Scale and Offset
2. Define two data points
The concept of two points is to define the Analog Output’s profile (slope and offset). These points do not limit the Analog
Output range. The range is limited by the digital to analog converter’s (D/A) -10 to +10 volts range.
Analog Output Min/Max Mode
• This selects which Analog Output scaling mode to use.
Source
• Defines what the data source is to be converted from binary data to an analog signal.
• The source selection sets the decimal and units in the Analog Max and Min Values as well as the Offset and Scale.
Analog Max Value
• The upper Value in the point set (Value,Voltage):
• RW
• Units are defined by the source selected
• Note: This is does not limit the D/A output value
Analog Max Voltage
• The upper Voltage in the point set (Value,Voltage):
• RW Voltage units (volts) -10.000 – +10.000
• Units are defined by the source selected
• Note: This is not limit the D/A output value
Analog Min Value
• The lower Value in the point set (Value,Voltage):
• RW
20
Operational Overview
• Units are defined by the source selected
• Note: This is does not limit the D/A output value
Analog Min Voltage
• The lower Voltage in the point set (Value,Voltage):
• RW Voltage units (volts) -10.000 – +10.000
• Units are defined by the source selected
• Note: This is not limit the D/A output value
Read taught values from the drive
The Analog Outputs Max and Min values and voltages are read from the drive and loaded into the application. This
selection is enabled only when PowerTools Pro is online. This allows the Min and Max points, which can be taught, to
be uploaded into the application. In most cases, this feature is only used for debugging as the teach mode will have set
the limits in the drive already.
Teach Analog Position Mode Setup
Teach Min Group
On the first pulse of the teach function these functions are executed provided the item is selected.
Define Home
• Load “Position Command” with the “Define Home Position” value.
• Note: Set “Define Home Position” within the throw of the linear arm.
• Note: Adjust analog input so “Analog Position Cmd” is equal to the homed “Position Command” before “Enable analog
position” to minimize motor movement.
Set Analog In Position
• On teach, load the Analog Input’s “Analog Min Value” with current “Position Command”
Set Analog In Voltage
• On teach, load the Analog Input’s “Analog Min Voltage” with current “A/D value”
Set Analog Out Ch1 Position
• On teach, load the Channel 1 Analog Output’s “Analog Min Value” with current “Position Command”
Set Analog Out Ch1 Voltage
• On teach, load the Channel 1 Analog Output’s “Analog Min Voltage” with current “A/D value”
Set Analog Out Ch2 Position
• On teach, load the Channel 2 Analog Output’s “Analog Min Value” with current “Position Command”
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Set Analog Out Ch2 Voltage
• On teach, load the Channel 2 Analog Output’s “Analog Min Voltage” with current “A/D value”
Set Position Limit
• On teach, load the “Motion Limit Min” with current “Position Command”.
Teach Max Group
• On the second pulse of the teach function these functions are executed.
Define Home
• Set “Position Command” equal to “Define Home Position”
• Note: Set “Define Home Position” within the throw of the linear arm.
• Note: Adjust analog input so “Analog Position Cmd” is equal to the homed “Position Command” before “Enable analog
position” to minimize motor movement.
• Note: We do not expect this check box to be selected, as most cases you want to set home on the Min teach.
Set Analog In Position
• On teach, load the Analog Input’s “Analog Max Value” with current “Position Command”
Set Analog In Voltage
• On teach, load the Analog Input’s “Analog Max Voltage” with current “A/D value”
Set Analog Out Ch1 Position
• On teach, load the Channel 1 Analog Output’s “Analog Max Value” with current “Position Command”
Set Analog Out Ch1 Voltage
• On teach, load the Channel 1 Analog Output’s “Analog Max Voltage” with current “A/D value”
Set Analog Out Ch2 Position
• On teach, load the Channel 2 Analog Output’s “Analog Max Value” with current “Position Command”
Set Analog Out Ch2 Position
• On teach, load the Channel 2 Analog Output’s “Analog Max Voltage” with current “A/D value”
Set Position Limit
• On teach, load the “Motion Limit Max” with current “Position Command”.
22
Operational Overview
Digital Input Setup for Analog Position Mode
Analog Position Mode Enable
• Move Motor from Starting “Position Command” to “Analog Position Command”
Note: if the two values are equal no motion is expected
• Motion is limited by “Accel Limit Starting”
Define Analog Position
• Set “Position Command” equal to “Analog Position Cmd”
• Note: No motion is executed
• Note: “Enable Analog Position” must be disabled.
• Note: This basically redefines the home.
Teach Analog Position
• Pulsed twice. First pulse sets the Min values second pulse sets the Max values.
• The teach Function is user definable. The teach navigation tree icon indicates what will be executed during the Min
pulse and what will be executed in the Max pulse.
Example: Setting up Analog Positioner with Teach Mode
Step 1:
1. On the Setup view, select the operating mode “Analog Position Mode” to display analog positioner settings.
2. Enable and type in the “Velocity Limit Starting” value to define a safe velocity to get into the initial analog
position on enabling analog position.
3. Type in the “End of Home Position” value to reset the position to a known value. Zero is a good value for this
example.
4. Type in the “Analog Deadband” to reduce flutter. Zero is a good value for this example.
5. If desired, enable and define the Following Error Limit parameter. Have it disabled for this example.
Step 2:
1. On the Setup view, select the operating mode “Velocity Mode” to display Velocity Mode Setup tab.
2. Select the Velocity Sub-Mode of Preset Velocity
3. Define Preset 0 and 1 as zero velocity, Preset 2 as 50 rpm and Preset 3 as -50.
We will set two input lines to presets, one line will select direction (-50 or +50) while the other enables or
disables (selects 0 velocity or one of the presets)
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
4. Leave the operating mode in Velocity Presets.
Step 3:
1. On the Input Lines view select the input functions to operate Analog Positioner.
2. Line 1 assign Velocity Preset #1
3. Line 2 assign Velocity Preset #2 and Velocity Preset#3, Line 1 and 2 will provide a jog to position capability.
a. If both 1 and 2 inputs are off then it is Preset 0 which is 0 velocity.
b. If both 1 and 2 switches are on then it is Preset 3 which is -50 rpm.
c.
If 1 is off and 2 is on then it is Preset 2 which is 50 rpm.
4. Line 3 assign Teach Analog Position
Line 3 provides a method to load the two position points to define the Analog Positioner profile.
5. Line 4 assign Analog Position Mode Enable
Line 4 provides the enable to go from Velocity Preset into Analog Position mode
Step 4:
1. The Teach view defines the “Teach Input Function” operation. The idea here will be to jog to the minimum
position, set the analog input value to match that position and toggle the teach function to set the minimum
point into the Analog Input profile. Then jog to the maximum position, set it’s analog value and toggle teach
again to set the maximum point.
2. In “Teach Min” group
a. Select the “Define Home” check box so on the first teach pulse the home will be defined. This will reset
the command position to the “End of Home Position”. No motion is executed.
b. Select the “Set Analog In Position” check box so the Position command at the first teach point will load
the position value for the minimum point.
c.
Select the “Set Analog In Voltage” check box so the A/D value at the first teach point will load the voltage
value for the minimum point.
d. Select the “Set Analog Out Ch1 Position” so the analog Output will reflect the analog input through
command position monitoring.
e. Select the “Set Analog Out Ch1 Voltage” check box so the analog Output will reflect the analog input
through command position monitoring.
f.
Select the “Set Position Limit” check box so the minimum point will also restrict the Analog Position
Command so it does not go below this point.
3. In “Teach Max” group a. Clear the “Define Home” check box. For this example, we only want to home on the minimum point
b. Select the “Set Analog In Position” check box so the Position command at the second teach point will load
the position value for the maximum point
c.
Select the “Set Analog In Voltage” check box so the A/D value at the second teach point will load the
voltage value for the maximum point
d. Select the “Set Analog Out Ch1 Position” check box so the Analog Output will reflect the analog input
through command position monitoring
e. Select the “Set Analog Out Ch1 Voltage” check box so the Analog Output will reflect the analog input
through command position monitoring
24
Operational Overview
f.
Select the “Set Position Limit” check box so the maximum point will also restrict the Analog Position
Command so it does not go above this point
Step 5:
1. In the Analog Inputs view, for this example we will not do much setup on this view. The teach function will load
all the “Analog Input – Position” values and we will not be using the “Analog Input Velocity, Torque”. For
Bandwidth the default will do for now
2. Select the “Position Limit Enable” check box to enable motion Limits
3. Use the “Read taught values from the drive” button after executing teach. This will give you an indication as
to what teach defined
Step 6:
1. Open the Analog Output view. In this example we are using Channel 1 to reflect the Analog Input through the
Position. There are two ways to define analog output scaling – Scale/Offset or Min/Max. Since we are teaching
the Analog Output channel 1 for Position, channel 1 must be in Min/Max mode. We do not have to enter values
as teach mode is setup to do that for us
2. For channel 1 select the “Analog Output Min/Max Mode” check box
3. For channel 1 select the source to Position Feedback
4. Warning the teach mode will overwrite the Analog Min/Max points if the teach bits are set regardless of the
source selection
5. Use the “Read taught values from the Drive” button after executing teach. This will give you an indication as
to what teach defined
Step 7:
1. Go the to the Analog Input view to monitor teach operations
2. Use Input lines 1 and 2 to jog to the minimum position. Adjust the analog input to match the minimum position.
Toggle Line 3 to teach the minimum point
3. Use Lines 1 and 2 to jog to the maximum position. Adjust the analog input to match the maximum position.
Toggle Line 3 to teach the maximum point
4. Use Lines 1 and 2 to jog to the maximum position or the adjust the analog input to match to the Analog Position
Command to the actual position
5. Use Line 4 to enable Analog position
Drive Modifiers
This section describes functions that can modify the operation of the drive.
Stop
The Stop input function, when activated, will cause motion to stop regardless of motor direction or the operating mode.
The Stop Deceleration Ramp defines the rate of velocity change to zero speed.
Activating the Stop input function causes the drive to change to Velocity mode. Therefore, if you are operating in Torque
mode, the drive must be tuned to the load to prevent instability when activating the Stop input function.
For example, if an application is operating in Torque mode at 1000 RPM, and the Stop input function is activated with a
Stop Deceleration Ramp of 500 ms/kRPM, the motor will decelerate to a stop in 500 ms.
When the Stop input function is deactivated, the previous operating mode is restored within 400 µs and the drive and
motor will respond immediately with no ramping unless ramping is part of the selected mode.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
+/- Travel Limits
The + and - Travel Limit input functions will stop motion in the direction indicated by the input function using the Travel
Limit Deceleration ramp. This feature is active in all modes. When an axis is stopped by a Travel Limit function, it will
maintain position until it receives a command that moves it in the opposite direction of the active Travel Limit.
For example, the + Travel Limit will stop motion only if the motor is moving + but allows - motion to move off the limit
switch. Conversely, the - Travel Limit will stop motion only if the motor is moving - but allows + motion to move off the
limit switch.
If both input functions are active at the same time, no motion in either direction will be possible until at least one of the
inputs is released.
When either + or - Travel Limit input function is activated, a fault will be logged into the Fault Log, and the drive will
display an “L” on the status/diagnostics display on the front of the drive. Once the axis is driven off the limit switch, the
fault will be cleared and the “L” will disappear.
If both Travel Limit input functions are activated simultaneously, the drive will respond as if the Stop input function has
been activated and will use the Stop Deceleration ramp.
Travel Limit Application Notes
Torque Mode
If you are operating in Torque mode, the drive must be tuned to the load to prevent instability when activating the Travel
Limit input functions.
Host Controller Travel Limits
If the host controller decelerates the drive faster than the Travel Limit Deceleration ramp, the drive allows the controller
to maintain full control of the axis during the deceleration. This results in no following error build up in the controller and
easier recovery.
Vertical Loads in Velocity Mode
In applications with horizontal, counterbalanced or un-counterbalanced vertical loads, the load will held in position when
motion is stopped due to a + or - Travel Limit. The position will be held until the controller commands motion in the
opposite direction of the activated Travel Limit.
Vertical Loads in Torque Mode
In applications with horizontal or counterbalanced vertical loads, the load will held in position when motion is stopped
due to a + or - Travel Limit. The position will be held until the controller commands motion in the opposite direction of
the activated Travel Limit.
When an axis is stopped by the upper Travel Limit with a vertical load, the controller must maintain a torque command
at a minimum level to hold the load or the load may drop.
In applications with un-counterbalanced vertical loads, you must be careful not to set the controller’s torque command
to zero when the upper Travel limit is activated. Setting the controllers analog torque command to zero in this situation
will command the axis to move off the limit switch causing the load to drop.
If your controller removes the torque command (zeroes the analog command output) when a Travel Limit is activated,
you have a number of choices to prevent the load from dropping. All of which require some external logic to determine
when the controller can actually take control again.
• Activate the opposite Travel Limit input function, then release it when the controller is operational again.
• Activate the Stop input function, then release it when the controller is operational again.
• Apply the axis brake, then release it when the controller is operational again
Vertical Loads in Pulse Mode
In applications with horizontal, counterbalanced or un-counterbalanced vertical loads, the load will be held in position
when motion is stopped due to a + or - Travel Limit. The position will be held until the controller commands motion in the
opposite direction of the activated Travel Limit.
When the travel limits are activated, the drive will decelerate at the Travel Limit Deceleration Ramp and will continue to
store all the command pulses received up to ±232 counts. The stored pulses need to be cleared out before the axis will
move off the Travel Limit. This can be done if the controller generates command pulses in the direction opposite the
activated Travel limit. The stored command pulses can also be cleared by activating both Travel Limit input functions at
the same time, activating the Stop input function or disabling the drive for as little as 5 msec (plus any debounce time).
26
Operational Overview
Torque Limiting
The Torque Command is calculated as shown previously, but its value is limited by the Torque Limit parameter and the
current foldback function (see "Torque Limit" and "Current Foldback"). The result of this limiting function is Torque
Command Actual. This is the command that drives the Power Stage to generate current in the motor. The Torque Limit
Active output function is active whenever the Torque Command Actual is less than the Torque Command. This will be
true when motion is stopped due to a Travel Limit input function.
Torque Limit Function
The Torque Limit Enable input function allows an external controller to limit the Actual Torque Command to a lower
value. The Torque Limit parameter is active only when the Torque Limit Enable input function is active.
TTL = PMT, PDT, RFL, SFL or PTL (whichever is lower)
Where:
TTL = Total Torque Limit
PMT = Peak motor torque
PDT = Peak drive torque
RFL = RMS foldback limit (80 percent of continuous system torque rating)
SFL = Stall foldback limit (80 percent of drive stall current rating)
PTL = Programmable Torque Limit
The Torque Limit Enable input must be active to use PTL.
If the application requires that the Torque Limit be enabled at all times, the Torque Limit Enable input function may be
setup to be Always Active to avoid the use of an input line.
Velocity Limiting
The drive commanded velocity is limited to 112.5% of the motor’s maximum operating speed. Depending on AC supply
voltage, it may or may not be possible to get to the motor maximum operating speed.
Overspeed Velocity Parameter
Motor speed is continuously monitored against the Overspeed Velocity parameter whether the drive is enabled or not
and when the motor speed exceeds the limit, or Overspeed Velocity Limit, a fault is issued. The default value for
Overspeed Velocity Limit is 13000 RPM.
The drive has an internal overspeed velocity limit. This limit is the maximum of the Overspeed Velocity parameter and
150% of the motor maximum operating speed. For example, an NT-320 with 4000 RPM maximum speed the internal
limit is 6000 RPM.
The Overspeed fault will be activated when either one of these two conditions are met:
1. When the actual motor speed exceeds the Overspeed Velocity Limit parameter.
2. If the combination of command pulse frequency and Pulse Ratio can generate a motor command speed in
excess of the fixed limit of 13000 RPM. In Pulse mode operation and any Summation mode which uses Pulse
mode, the input pulse command frequency is monitored and this calculation is made. For example: with a
Pulse Ratio of 10 pulses per motor revolution, the first pulse received will cause an Overspeed fault even
before there is any motor motion.
In Motion Velocity
The In Motion Velocity parameter defaults to a value of 10 RPM. If the motor Velocity Feedback is above the In Motion
Velocity value, the In + Motion or In - Motion output function is active. When the motor velocity falls below one half of
the In Motion Velocity, the In + Motion or In - Motion output function is inactive.
The maximum value for In Motion Velocity is 100 RPM and is intended to be used to indicate “in motion” not “at speed”.
The In Motion Velocity detect is monitored every 400 µs so machine jitter and torque ripple could cause flicker in
this signal if the commanded velocity is near the In Motion Velocity parameter value.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Motor Direction Polarity
The direction that the motor turns with a positive command can be changed with the Positive Direction parameter in
PowerTools Pro. The positive direction by default causes the motor to turn CW as viewed looking at the shaft.
CW and CCW rotation is determined by viewing the motor from the shaft end.
Figure 22:
Motor Rotation
Positive direction is defined as the command which causes the internal position counter to count "Up". They are:
• A positive analog velocity or torque command (i.e., a higher voltage on the (+) differential input than on the
(-) input).
• A positive direction (+) pulse command.
• A positive preset velocity or torque command.
Encoder Output Scaling
This feature allows you to change the drive encoder output resolution in increments of one line per revolution up to the
density of the encoder in the motor. If the Encoder Output Scaling parameter is set to a value higher than the motor
encoder density, the drive encoder output density will equal that of the motor encoder. Select the Encoder Output
Scaling Enable check box to enable this feature in PowerTools Pro.
You can setup this feature from the Setup view in PowerTools Pro or using the MODBUS® parameters, Encoder Output
Scaling and Encoder Output Scaling Enable.
Current Foldback
Current foldback is used to protect the motor and drive from overload. There are two levels of current foldback: RMS
Foldback and Stall Foldback. RMS and Stall Foldback are displayed on the diagnostic display as a "C" and "c"
respectively.
RMS Foldback
RMS foldback protects the motor and drive from overheating. The RMS Foldback parameter models the thermal heating
and cooling of the drive and motor based on the commanded current and the motor velocity. On power-up, the RMS
Foldback level is zero and is continually updated. When the RMS Foldback level reaches 100 percent, current foldback
is activated and the Foldback Active output function is active.
Each drive is designed to deliver up to 300 percent of the motor’s continuous torque or up to 200 percent of drive rated
current for no less the two seconds when running at 100 RPM or more. If only 150 percent of continuous torque is
required, several seconds of operation before RMS foldback is typical.
During current foldback the Torque Command Actual will be limited to 80 percent continuous motor torque. Current
foldback is cancelled when the RMS Foldback level falls below 70 percent. This could take several seconds or several
minutes depending on the load.
The RMS Foldback value is dependent on both torque and velocity. At low speeds (<20 percent of maximum motor
speed) the RMS Foldback will closely follow the Torque Command Actual. At high speeds (>50 percent of maximum
motor speed) the RMS Foldback will read higher than the Torque Command Actual.
The time constant for RMS Foldback is 10 seconds. This means that if the load is 150 percent of continuous, it will take
about 10 seconds to reach the foldback trip point.
28
Operational Overview
Figure 23:
RMS Foldback Trip Point (this graph is accurate to ±5 percent)
Stall Foldback
Stall Foldback will also be triggered when the drive sees repeated high currents in one of the three motor phases. This
can occur when a motor is moved back and forth between two of its electrical poles.
• For 4 pole motors such as MG-205 or MG-208 this distance is 90º mechanical
• For 6 pole motors such as MG-316 through the MG-4120 this distance is 60º mechanical
• For 8 pole motors this distance is 45º mechanical
Once Stall Foldback is activated, the drive current is reduced to 80 percent of the stall current threshold until the Torque
Command Actual is reduced to less that 70 percent of the stall current threshold for about 200 ms or until the motor
velocity exceeds 100 RPM.
Shunt Operation
Shunt Operation
The EP204 and EP206 drives provide an internal shunt transistor. This transistor is active when the bus voltage reaches
405Vdc and shuts off when the bus voltage falls below 390 Vdc.
External Shunt Operation
The DC bus is accessible for applications requiring additional regenerative power dissipation. Control Techniques offers
an external shunt resistor kit for this use, model number: SM-Heatsink DBR-1. Optionally, the shunt output may be wired
to a customer supplied shunt resistor of appropriate rating.
Shunt Control
An internal shunt control algorithm is used to prevent the external shunt resistor from overloading. It is necessary to
provide the appropriate shunt resistor ratings in the PowerTools Pro software. Default values are in place for the Control
Techniques shunt resistor kit.
Brake Operation
Motor brake operation can be controlled by the Brake Release and Brake Control input functions. These input functions
can be used together to control the state of the Brake output function. The table below shows the relationship between
the Brake input and Brake output functions (see “Diagnostic Display”).
No motion should be commanded while the brake is engaged.
Brake Release Input
Brake Control Input
Drive Power
Stage
*
Off
On
On
Off
On
Off
Enabled
0
1
1
1
Disabled
0
0
1
1
(1) = Active output function
(0) = Inactive output function
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Brake Release
The Brake Release input function will release the brake under all conditions. When this input function is on, the Brake
output function will be on (i.e., release brake). This input function overrides all other brake control, thus allowing the
brake to be released while a fault is active or the power stage is disabled. See also Brake output function.
Brake Control
This input function, when active, will engage the brake unless overridden by the Brake Release input function. This input
lets you externally engage the brake while allowing the drive to also control the brake during fault and disabled
conditions.
Brake
The Brake output function is used to control the motor holding brake. If the Brake output function is off, the brake is
mechanically engaged. When the brake is engaged, the diagnostic display on the front of the drive will display a “b”.
The drive outputs are limited to 150 mA capacity, therefore, a suppressed relay is required to control motor coil. Control
Techniques offers a relay, model; BRM-1.
Analog Command Input
The Analog Command Input can be used as a velocity, torque or analog position command. The drive has one analog
input channel that accepts a +10 V to -10 V signal. The drive has a 12-bit over sampled to 14-bit analog to digital
converter (A/D), which is used to transform the analog voltage to a usable parameter. The analog input is scanned by
the drive every 100 microseconds.
The Analog Inputs Bandwidth, Analog Full Scale and Analog Zero Offset parameters are applied to the Analog Input to
generate either an analog velocity or torque command. These three parameters can be edited using PowerTools Pro or
serially using Modbus.
Bandwidth
This parameter sets the low-pass filter cutoff frequency applied to the analog input. Signals exceeding this frequency
will be filtered at a rate of 20 db per decade.
Analog Full Scale
This parameter specifies the full scale voltage for the analog input. When the drive receives an analog command input
equal to the Analog Input Full Scale parameter, the drive will command either Full Scale Velocity or Full Scale Torque
depending on the operating mode. Valid range for this parameter is -10 to +10 volts.
Analog Zero Offset
This parameter is used to null any input voltage that may be present at the drive when a zero velocity or torque is
commanded by a controller. Valid range for this parameter is a range from -10 to 10 volts.
Analog Outputs
The drive has two 10 bit Analog Outputs which may be used for diagnostics, monitoring or control purposes. These
outputs are referred to as Channel 1 and Channel 2. They can be accessed from the Analog/Sync Output connector (J5).
Each Channel provides a programmable Analog Output Source.
Analog Output Source options are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Analog Input
Velocity Command
Velocity Feedback
Torque Command
Torque Feedback
Following Error
Position Feedback
Default Analog Output Source:
Output
Source
Offset
Scale
1
Velocity Command
0
600 RPM/volt
2
Velocity Command
0
600 RPM/volt
Each channel includes a programmable Analog Output Offset and an Analog Output Scale. This feature allows you to
“zoom in” to a desired range effectively increasing the resolution. The units for both of these parameters is dependent
upon the Analog Output Source selection.
30
Operational Overview
Analog Output Offset units:
• Velocity Command = RPM
• Velocity Feedback = RPM
• Torque Command = Percent of continuous torque
• Torque Feedback = Percent of continuous torque
• Position Feedback = Revs
• Following Error = Revs
Analog Output Scale units:
• Velocity Command = RPM/volt
• Velocity Feedback = RPM/volt
• Torque Command = Percent of continuous torque/volt
• Torque Feedback = Percent of continuous torque/volt
• Position Feedback = Revs/volts
• Following Error = Revs/volts
Example:
You could use the Analog Outputs to accurately measure velocity overshoot. For example, to measure a target velocity
of 2000 RPM at a resolution of ±10V = ±200 RPM do the following.
1. Selected Velocity Feedback for the Analog Output Source.
2. Set the Analog Output Offset to 2000 RPM.
3. Set the Analog Output Scale to 20 RPM/VOLT.
This will provide an active range from -10 to +10 Volts to represent 1800 to 2200 RPM. Therefore, the measured
resolution has been increased.
Digital Inputs and Outputs
External control capability is provided through the use of input and output functions. These functions may be assigned
to any input or output line on the drive or the module. After they are assigned to lines, external controllers, such as a
PLC or other motion controllers, may be used to affect or monitor the drive’s operation.
Drives are equipped with five optically isolated input lines (one dedicated to a Drive Enable function) and three optically
isolated output lines.
The drive’s input and output lines can be accessed through the 26-pin digital I/O connector (J3) on the front of the drive.
All inputs and outputs are configured as sourcing and are designed to operate from a +10 Vdc to +30 Vdc power source.
The user is responsible for limiting the output current to less than 150 mA for each digital output.
Input Lines
Active State
The active state of an input function can be programmed to be "Active Off” or “Active On” using PowerTools Pro. Making
an input function “Active On” means that it will be active when 10 Vdc to 30 Vdc is applied to the input line it is assigned
to, and is not active when no voltage is applied to the line. Making an input function "Active Off" means that it will be
active when no voltage is applied to the input line and not active while 10 Vdc to 30 Vdc is being applied.
Always Active
The user can also make an input function "Always Active", which means that it is active regardless of whether or not it
is assigned to an input line, and, if the function is assigned to an input line, it will be active whether or not voltage is
applied to that line. This is useful for testing the drive operation before I/O wiring is complete.
Debounce Time
The user can program a “Debounce Time” which means the line will need to be “On” for at least the debounce time
before it is recognized. This feature helps prevent false triggering in applications in noisy electrical environments.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Input Lines
Force On/Off
Enable
Input
Terminal
Input Line
Raw Status
Debounce
Timer
Input Line
Debounced
Status
Input Line
Status
Input Lines
Force On/Off
Command
Figure 24:
Input Line Diagram
If the Input Line attached to the home sensor is debounced, the actual rising edge of the Home Sensor is used to
determine the Home Reference Position (the debounce time ensures a minimum pulse width).
Forced On and Forced Off
An input line can be forced to a level by using the "Forced On" and "Forced Off" check boxes. When you force an input
line “On” or “Off”, all the functions assigned to that line will be affected.
The forced state of input and output lines are not saved to NVM and will reset to normal operation when the drive
is powered up or re-booted.
Input Functions
Brake Control
This input function, when active, will engage the brake unless overridden by the Brake Release input function. This input
function lets you externally engage the brake, while allowing the drive to also control the brake during fault and disabled
conditions.
Brake Release
This input function will release the brake under all conditions. If this input function is active, the brake output function is
switched to active (i.e. release brake). This overrides all other brake control, thus allowing the brake to be released while
a fault is active or the power stage is disabled.
Reset
This input function is used to reset fault conditions and is logically OR’ed with the Reset/Setup button on the front of the
drive’s. A rising edge is required to reset faults.
Stop
The Stop input function uses the Stop Deceleration Ramp to decelerate the motor to zero velocity and hold position. If
the Stop input function is activated when a Jog, Index or Home is in progress, it will be terminated. When this function
is active, all Jog, Index and Home input functions will be ignored.
When it is deactivated, all level sensitive and active input functions (Jog +, Jog -, Jog Fast) will become operational. For
example, if the Jog + input function is active when the Stop input function is deactivated, the Jog + motion will initiate
using the Jog Acceleration parameter.
The decimal point on the base drive status/diagnostic display goes “Off” when the stop function is activated (or the drive
is disabled).
Velocity Preset Lines 1, 2 and 3
The Velocity Preset Lines are used to select one of the eight pre-defined velocities using a binary selection pattern.
Velocity Preset Line #1 has a binary value of 1, Velocity Preset Line #2 has a value of 2, and Velocity Preset Line #3
has a value of 4. If all three Velocity Preset Line are inactive (0) then Velocity Preset 0 has been selected. If Velocity
Preset Line #2 is active (1) and the other two lines are inactive (0) then Velocity Preset 2 is selected.
If you select a different Preset Velocity, the drive will immediately ramp to the new velocity using the new acceleration
ramp without stopping.
Torque Limit Enable
This input function, when active, causes the Torque Command to be limited to the value of the Torque Limit parameter.
32
Operational Overview
Torque Mode Enable
This Torque Mode Enable input function, when active, causes the drive to change operating mode to torque mode. When
this input function is deactivated the default operating mode is enabled with no transitional ramping.
Travel Limit + and The Travel Limit + and - input functions will stop motion in the direction indicated by the input function using the Travel
Limit Deceleration rate. This feature is active in all modes. When an axis is stopped by a Travel Limit function, it will
maintain position until it receives a command that moves it in the opposite direction of the active Travel Limit.
For example, the + Travel Limit will stop motion only if the motor is moving + but allows - motion to move off the limit
switch. Conversely, the - Travel Limit will stop motion only if the motor is moving - but allows + motion to move off the
limit switch.
If both input functions are active at the same time, no motion in either direction will be possible until at least one of the
inputs is released.
When either + or - Travel Limit input function is activated, a fault will be logged into the Fault Log, and the drive will
display an “L” on the status/diagnostics display on the front of the drive. Once the axis is driven off the limit switch, the
fault will be cleared and the “L” will disappear.
If both Travel Limit input functions are activated simultaneously, the drive will respond as if the Stop input function has
been activated and will use the Stop Deceleration ramp.
Enable Analog Position
This input function, when active, will switch the drive into Analog Position Mode. This will move the motor from starting
Position Command to Analog Position Command unless the two values are equal then no motion is expected. Motion
is limited by the Accel Limit Starting parameter.
Define Analog Position
This input function, when active, is used to set Position Command equal to Analog Position Command. No motion is
executed, the Enable Analog Position must be disabled.
Teach Analog Position
This input function is used to set the Minimum and Maximum Analog Positioner mode parameters. The first pulse of the
input sets the minimum values and the second pulse will define the max
Output Lines
Active State
The default active state of an output line is “Active On”. This means that the output line will supply a voltage when the
result of the logical Or of the output function(s) assigned to that output line is active.
Making an output line "Active Off" means that the line will be “Off” (not conducting) when the result of the logical Or of
the output function(s) assigned to that output line is active, and will supply a voltage when the logical Or of the output
function(s) is not active.
Forced On and Forced Off
You can force an output line to a level by using the Forced On and Forced Off check boxes. When you force an output
line “On” or “Off”, the output functions are not affected.
The forced state of input and output lines are not saved to NVM and will reset to normal operation when the drive
is powered up or re-booted.
Output Functions
At Velocity
This output function is active whenever the motor is at the peak commanded velocity of a home, jog or index. It activates
when the acceleration ramp completes and deactivates when the deceleration ramp begins.
Brake
The Brake output function must be used to control the motor holding brake. If the Brake output function is off, the brake
is mechanically engaged. When the brake is engaged, the diagnostic display on the front of the drive will display a “b”.
Drive OK
This output function is active whenever no fault condition exists. Travel limits and the Drive Enable have no effect on
this output function.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Fault
This output function is active whenever a drive fault condition exists.
Foldback Active
This output function is active when the drive is limiting motor current. If the RMS Foldback value exceeds 100 percent
of the continuous rating, the current foldback circuit will limit the current delivered to the motor to 80 percent of the
continuous rating.
In + and In - Motion
This output function is activated whenever the velocity is greater than the In Motion Velocity parameter in the positive or
negative direction. The default value for the In Motion Velocity parameter is 10 RPM. Hysteresis is used to avoid a high
frequency toggling of this output function. This function is deactivated when the motor velocity slows to less than 1/2 of
the In Motion Velocity parameter.
Power Stage Enabled
This output is active when the drive is OK and enabled. It will go inactive when anything happens to disable the output
power stage.
Shunt Active
This is a real time indicator of the internal shunt activity.
Travel Limit + and These output functions are active when the associated Travel Limit input functions are active.
Torque at Max Velocity
This output function is active only when the drive is in Analog Torque Mode. When "Torque Velocity Limiting" is enabled
and the velocity feedback reaches the specified "Max Velocity" this output is activated and the motor velocity reaches a
ceiling.
Torque Level 1 and 2 Active
This output is active if the Torque Command exceeds the specified Torque Level 1 value.
Torque Limit Active
This output is active if the Torque Command exceeds the specified Torque Limit value. (The Torque Command Actual
is limited to the torque limit).
Velocity Limiting Active
This output function is active when the Actual Velocity Command is being limited. The velocity limit is dependent upon
the maximum motor speed for the Motor Type selected.
34
Operational Overview
How Communications Work
Configuring Communication
Before attempting to upload or download a configuration file using PowerTools Pro, the software must be configured to
the correct communication settings for the intended communication connection.
The communication connection may be selected in the Upload Drive Configuration, Download to Device IDx or the
Change Path dialog boxes. From the Device menu, choose Upload Drive, Download or Path Change to open the
dialog box or the toolbar buttons can also used, see below.
Uploading
Uploading is the process of reading information back from the drive to the PowerTools Pro configuration file views.
To upload information from a drive, click on the Upload All button, on the PowerTools Pro toolbar or from the
Device menu, choose Upload All or Upload Drive. The Upload Drive Configuration dialog box will open, all
communication connections are scanned and the results appear. In Figure 25, it shows that one device on
COM 1 was found, an Epsilon Eb-205 drive. The Upload Drive Configuration dialog box contains the following
information for every device found:
• Ip Address/COM
• Modbus Address ID
• Drive Type
• Module Type
• Communication Options
• Base/Drive FW Revision
• Module FW Revision
• Module Serial Number
• Drive Serial Number
.
Figure 25:
Upload Drive Configuration Dialog Box
Select the device to upload and click Upload.
Downloading
Downloading is the process of sending the configuration created with PowerTools Pro from the PC to the device.
Changes made in PowerTools Pro will not take effect until the information has been downloaded or the Update to RAM
button has been clicked.
To download information to a device, click the Download button on the PowerTools Pro toolbar or from the
Device menu, choose Download. The Download to Device IDx dialog box will open, all communication
connections are scanned and the results appear. In Figure 26, one device on COM port 1 was found. The
Upload Drive Configuration dialog box contains the following information for every device found:
• Ip Address/COM
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Modbus Address ID
Drive Type
Module Type
Communication Options
Base/Drive FW Revision
Module FW Revision
Module Serial Number
Drive Serial Number
Figure 26:
Download to Device ID 1 Dialog Box
Select the device to download to and click OK.
Change Path Connection
This function allows the user to change the drive and Ip address/Com port used for download and upload. It is used
when the user has already selected one Ip address/Com port and wishes to change to another.
The dialog box provides the user with communication information available on the Modbus and Ethernet network (if
appropriate). This information contains:
• Ip Address/COM
• Modbus Address ID
• Drive Type
• Module Type
• Communication Options
• Base/Drive FW Revision
• Module FW Revision
• Module Serial Number
• Drive Serial Number
36
Operational Overview
Figure 27:
Change Path Dialog Box
Select the device in the list and then click OK. The communication connection path will then be displayed in the status
bar at the bottom of PowerTools Pro window.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
38
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Setting Up Parameters
Graph View
The Graph view is only available when online with the drive. The Graphing function in the drive makes use of an internal
high speed data capture. After this capture is “Arm”ed, the capture will begin to fill a rolling buffer with the data as
specified by Channel 1 - Channel 4. Once triggered, the data capture will fill the rest of the allocated memory. After the
buffers are completely filled and the trigger activated, the “Upload and Plot” button may be used to upload data which
will be displayed in a graphical format, see figure 29.
The User may trigger by entering a trigger level for one of the four channels or using the manual trigger button.
Figure 28:
Graph View
Data Capture Group
Graph State
There are three graph state conditions in the following order: Filling Buffer, Filled. Waiting for Trigger, and Filled and
Triggered.
Run
The Run button commands the drive to begin a high speed data capture of the parameters as selected in each of the
four data channels. After the Run command button is activated the buffer will fill up to the trigger offset while the words
“Filling Buffer” appear indicating this Graph State. Once the trigger offset level is reached the words “Waiting Trigger”
will appear next to the Graph State indicating that graphical monitor is now ready to be triggered based on the trigger
level selected. The Run command button may be activated by the letter “R” on the keyboard.
Upload and Plot
The Upload and Plot button will upload captured data from the drive and display this data in the Graph window. The user
should wait for the Graph State to read “Filled and Triggered” before the data is uploaded.
Stop
The Stop button stops the data capture with the data captured at that point. You can upload and plot that data. If the
buffer is only partially filled you will get a combination of good and bad data. Stop works well as a manual trigger, in place
of the configured trigger.
Automatically Re-trigger and Plot Check Box
Select the check box and the Automatically Re-trigger and Plot tells PowerTools to monitor the graph state for the
triggered condition. When this condition occurs, it automatically initiates the UploadPlot command, waits for a brief time
then initiates the Run button to repeat the cycle. Initial the user must press the Run button to start the auto cycle.
This mechanism is only active when the Graph view is displayed, If the user enters a different PowerTools Pro view the
auto update will stop and it will restart when returning to the Graph view.
Print
The Print button is used to print the graph in the Graph window.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Timing Group
The sliders can be moved in several different ways.
1. With the mouse pointer over the slider, left click and hold while dragging the slider back or forth to the desire
setting.
2. With the mouse pointer over the slider, left click on the slider and then the arrow keys on the PC keyboard can
be used to move the slider in fine increments. The Page Up and Page Down keys move the slider in course
increments. The Home key will move the slider all the way to the left and the End key will all the way to the
right.
Sample Rate
The Sample Rate slider gives the user control of time spacing for the captured date. To give the user a better idea of
what this number means, the total number of samples and total capture time is displayed on the bottom of the “Timing”
group box.
Trigger Offset
The Trigger Offset slider corresponds to the number of samples that will be included on the graph display and data
capture prior to the actual trigger. If the Trigger offset slider is completely to the left (min samples), the data capture and
graphing will start at the trigger location. If the slider is completely to the right (max samples) the graph will capture data
until the trigger point.
Buffer Upload Size
The buffer upload size slider truncates the drive captured data. If the slider is completely to the right (max) the complete
buffer will be uploaded. If the slider is completely to the left, only 1% of the buffer will be uploaded. This parameter does
not effect the data capture size, it only defines how much of the buffer will be uploaded.
Data Group
Data Channel 1 - 4 Select List Boxes
The Channel 1 through Channel 4 list boxes give the user options for parameter display. If parameters with the same
units are mapped on adjacent channels then the graphical display will show these two parameters overlapped on the
same x/y axis. If it is desirable to have two adjacent Channels with the same units mapped to separate axis on the graph
then the selection (none) should be used on the channel in between these two parameters.
Trigger Radio Buttons
Selecting the radio button will cause the graphical capture to trigger the capture off the selected Channel. The “Trigger
Level” text box on the bottom of the display will change units to the selected channel's parameter units. This trigger level
may be changed at any time but the change must be sent to the drive via the Update to RAM or Download button. If a
manual trigger is desired, set the channel to None and select the corresponding trigger radio button. If no trigger is
selected the capture will begin when the Run button is clicked and end at the end of the Sample Rate.
Module Parameter
A Module parameter text box is only available once the user has selected Module Parameter from the Select list box.
This field is used to define what parameter will be plotted on that channel. The module parameter can be entered two
ways: by just typing any module parameter using the program format for the variable, or click the Popup Variables button
and the variable window will open. Then select the variable and drag it over to the channel module parameter text box.
Trigger Mask List Box
This list box is only available when Drive Inputs, Drive Outputs, Module Inputs or Module Outputs is selected in the
channel select list box and the Trigger radio button is selected for that channel. The Trigger Mask list box will only list
the inputs or outputs for the selected channel parameter.
Trigger Falling Edge Check Box
When the Trigger Falling Edge check box is selected, the trigger is detected when the data transitions below the trigger
level. When the Trigger Falling Edge check box is clear, the trigger is detected when the data transitions above the
trigger level.
Trigger Level
This is the level at which the graph is triggered. The “Trigger Level” text box will change units to the selected channel's
parameter unit. This trigger level may be changed at any time but the change must be sent to the drive via the Update
to RAM or Download button.
40
Setting Up Parameters
Figure 29:
Graphical Plot
Setup View
The Setup View contains all of the primary system setup parameters. These parameters must be setup prior to using
your system.
By selecting Setup in the Hierarchy Tree, the Setup view will appear on the right side of the view (see Figure 30). The
Setup view is divided into five groups. The groups are Identification, Configuration, Drive Encoder Output, Positive
Direction, and Operating Mode with an explanation of each function.
Figure 30:
Epsilon EP-B Setup View
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Identification Group
The identification group consists of the Axis and the Axis Address.
Axis
Enter a 24 character alpha/numeric name for the device you are currently setting up. Assigning a unique name for each
device in your system allows you to quickly identify a device when downloading, editing and troubleshooting. All
keyboard characters are valid.
Axis Address
Enter the “Axis Address” to which you wish to download the configuration file information. Unless you have changed the
Modbus address of your device, leave this parameter set to the default value of 1.
Configuration Group
Drive Type
Select the drive model for the application you are currently setting up.
Motor Type
Select the motor type for the application. PowerTools Pro software will display all the motor models that are available
and any user defined motors.
Selecting the wrong motor type can cause poor performance and may even damage the motor and/or drive.
Drive Encoder Output Group
Encoder Output Scaling Enable Check Box
Select this check box to enable the Encoder Scaling parameter of the Drive Encoder Output.
Encoder Scaling
This parameter defines the encoder resolution (lines per revolution) of the drive’s encoder output. This feature allows
the user to change the drive encoder output resolution in increments of 1 line per revolution up to the density of the
encoder in the motor. If the Encoder Output Scaling parameter is set to a value higher than the motor encoder density,
the drive encoder output density will equal that of the motor encoder. The default is to the motor encoder density.
Operating Mode
Disabled
Selecting this radio button to put the drive in the disabled mode. This is equivalent to removing the Drive Enable input.
Velocity Mode
Selecting this radio button puts the drive into Velocity mode which includes three sub-modes: Analog Velocity, Preset
Velocity and Analog + Preset Summation.
Velocity Mode Setup Tab
Velocity Sub-Mode Selection Group
Analog Velocity
Selecting this radio button puts the drive into Analog Velocity sub-mode. In Velocity mode the drive develops velocity in
proportion to the voltage received on the Analog Input. The Analog Input is scaled to the Analog Velocity Command by
the Full Scale Velocity, Analog Input Full Scale, and Analog Input Zero Offset parameters.
For example:
+5V = 2000 RPM CW
-5V = 2000 RPM CCW
Analog Input Full Scale = 10V
42
Setting Up Parameters
Full Scale Velocity = 4000 RPM
Figure 31:
Velocity Mode Setup Tab - Analog Velocity Sub-Mode
Full Scale Velocity
This parameter is the maximum motor velocity (in RPM) desired when the drive receives an analog voltage equal to the
Analog Input Full Scale parameter setting.
Full Scale Velocity and Analog Input Full Scale do not set limits. They only set the proportion of motor speed to
Analog Input Voltage.
The Full Scale Velocity and Analog Input Full Scale parameters are used in the Analog Velocity or Analog + Preset
Summation operating modes.
Preset Velocity
Selecting this radio button puts the drive into Preset Velocity sub-mode. Preset Velocity sub-mode provides up to eight
digital Preset Velocities and associated Preset Accel/Decel. At any time, only one Preset Velocity can be selected. They
are selected using the Velocity Preset 1, the Velocity Preset 2 and the Velocity Preset 3 input functions.
Figure 32:
Velocity Mode Setup Tab - Preset Velocity Sub-Mode
Preset Number
Use the scroll arrows to scroll up or down when setting up Preset Velocities.
Preset Velocity
Enter a value for each of the Preset Velocity you wish to use. The units are RPM and the range is from ± maximum motor
velocity. A positive value will cause CW motion and a negative value will cause CCW motion. (Motor direction is
determined as you face the shaft end of the motor).
Preset Accel/Decel
Enter an Preset Accel/Decel value for each of the velocity presets you are using. The units are milliseconds per 1000
RPM and the range is from 0 to 32700.0.
Analog + Preset Summation
Selecting this radio button puts the drive into Analog + Preset Summation sub-mode. Analog + Preset Summation
Velocity operating mode is defined as the summation of the Analog Velocity Command and the Preset Velocity
Command to produce the Velocity Command.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Figure 33:
Velocity Mode Setup Tab - Analog + Preset Summation Sub-Mode
Full Scale Velocity
This parameter is the motor velocity (in RPM) desired when the drive receives an analog voltage equal to the Analog
Input Full Scale parameter setting.
Preset Number
Use the scroll arrows to select the Preset Velocity Number you are configuring.
Preset Velocity
Enter a value for each of the Preset Velocity you wish to use. The units are RPM and the range is from ± maximum motor
velocity. A positive value will cause CW motion and a negative value will cause CCW motion. (Motor direction is
determined as you face the shaft end of the motor).
Preset Accel/Decel
Enter a Preset Accel/Decel value for each of the Preset Velocities you are using. The units are milliseconds per 1000
RPM and the range is from 0 to 32700.0. Default is 1000 ms/kRPM.
Full Scale Velocity and Analog Input Full Scale do not set limits. They only set the proportion of motor speed to
Analog Input Voltage.
The Full Scale Velocity and Analog Input Full Scale parameters are used in the Analog or Summation operating modes.
Torque Mode
Selecting this radio button will put the drive in Torque mode and activates the Full Scale Torque text box. In Torque mode
the drive develops torque in proportion to the voltage received on the Analog Input. The Analog Input is scaled to the
Analog Torque Command by the Full Scale Torque, Analog Input Full Scale and Analog Input Zero Offset parameters.
44
Setting Up Parameters
Figure 34:
Torque Mode Setup Tab
Full Scale Torque
This parameter specifies the Torque Command when the Analog Input voltage is equal to the Analog Full Scale
parameter.
Peak Torque Available
This displays the maximum torque available from the selected drive and motor combination. This is calculated by
PowerTools Pro and is not a drive parameter.
Pulse Mode
Selecting this radio button puts your drive into Pulse mode and displays three Interpretations: Pulse/Pulse, Pulse/
Direction and Pulse/Quadrature. In Pulse mode the drive will receive pulses which are used to control the position and
velocity of a move.
Figure 35:
Pulse Mode Setup
Interpretation Mode Group
Pulse/Pulse Radio Button
Selecting this radio button puts your drive in Pulse/Pulse interpretation. In Pulse/Pulse mode, pulses received on the A
channel are interpreted as positive changes to the Pulse Position Input, and pulses received on the B channel are
interpreted as negative changes to the Pulse Position Input.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Pulse/Direction Radio Button
Selecting this radio button puts your drive in Pulse/Direction interpretation. In Pulse Direction mode, pulses are received
on the A channel, and the direction is received on the B channel. If the B is high, pulses received on the A are interpreted
as positive changes to the Pulse Position Input. If the B is low, pulses received on the A are interpreted as negative
changes to the Pulse Position Input.
Pulse/Quadrature Radio Button
Selecting this radio button puts your drive in Pulse/Quadrature interpretation. If Pulse Quadrature is selected, a full
quadrature encoder signal is used as the command. When B leads A encoder counts received are interpreted positive
changes to the Pulse Position Input. When A leads B encoder counts received are interpreted as negative changes to
the Pulse Position Input. All edges of A and B are counted, therefore one revolution of a 2048 line encoder will produce
a 8192 count change on the Pulse Position Input.
Signal Type Group
Differential Radio Button
Selects the differential hardware input of the drive to receive pulses (default) these pulse inputs are as follows:
STI-SNCI
Terminal
Sync Input Connector (J10)
Pin #
Pulse-Direction
Signal
Pulse-Pulse
Signal
Pulse Quadrature
Signal
1
1
Pulse
Pulse +
A
2
2
Pulse/
Pulse +/
A/
3
3
Direction
Pulse -
B
5
5
Direction/
Pulse -/
B/
Differential Inputs are typically needed for pulse rate 250 kHz or high ambient noise environments.
Single Ended Radio Button
Selects the single ended hardware input of the drive to receive pulses (default) these pulse inputs are as follows:
STI-SNCOA
Terminal
Analog/Sync Output Connector (J5)
Pin #
Pulse-Direction
Signal
Pulse-Pulse
Signal
Pulse Quadrature
Signal
4
4
Pulse /
Pulse CW /
A
12
12
Direction
Pulse CCW /
B
Actual motor rotation direction will depend on pulse ratio polarity and setting of the Polarity Direction bit.
Pulse Mode Ratio Setup Group
Ratio Formula
Defines the number of command pulses it will take to move the motor the distance specified in the Pulse Mode Ratio
Revolutions. The default value is 1 motor revolution per 8192 counts.
The coarsest ratio possible is 10 input counts per motor revolution. Setting a ratio to fewer than 10 input counts per motor
revolution will cause an Overspeed fault without generating motion.
46
Setting Up Parameters
Analog Position Mode
Figure 36:
Setup View-Analog Position Mode
Analog Position Mode Setup Tab
Analog Limit Starting Enable
Select this check box to enable the Velocity Limit Starting feature.
Velocity Limit Starting
The value entered here will be used to limit the starting velocity when the Analog Position Mode is enabled using the
Enable Analog Position Input.
Define Home Posn
The value entered here will be used to define the home position of the Analog Position mode.
Dead Band
The value entered here will filter low pass noise on the analog input signal, the range is 0 to 10 volts.
Following Error Limit Enable
Select this check box to enable the Following Error Limit feature of the drive or clear the check box to disable the feature.
Following Error Limit
Following Error is the difference between the Position Command and the Position Feedback. It is positive when the
Position Command is greater than the Position Feedback. If the absolute value of the following error exceeds the value
entered here, the drive will generate a Following Error Fault (F). All accumulated Following Error will be cleared when
the drive is disabled.
The Following Error Limit is in user units and has a range of .001 to 10.000.
Positive Direction Group
The Positive Direction group consists of a CW (clockwise) Motor Rotation radio button and a CCW (counter-clockwise)
Motor Rotation radio button.
Positive motion will move in either a CW direction or CCW direction depending on which direction is selected.
Perspective of rotation is defined as you face the motor shaft from the front of the motor.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Figure 37:
Motor Rotation Perspective
CW Motor Rotation Option Button
Select this option button for applications in which CW motor rotation is considered to be motion in the positive direction
(increasing absolute position).
CCW Motor Rotation Option Button
Select this option button for applications in which CCW motor rotation is considered to be motion in the positive direction
(increasing absolute position).
Motor View
The Motor view under Setup view is used for many different functions:
1. To see/verify the motor data for a standard motor that had been selected
2.
To create a new motor entry in the .ddf file
3.
To Run the Auto-Tune feature
4. To store Auto-Tune results into an existing configuration
The primary function of this view is to define the parameters for the given motor that is to be connected to the drive.
Following is a description of all the different functions on the Motor view.
Figure 38:
48
Motor View
Setting Up Parameters
Motor Type List Box
Use this list box to select the motor type. PowerTools Pro software will display all the standard motor models and any
user defined motors.
Selecting the wrong motor type can cause instability and may cause property damage to the motor and/or drive.
Use Motor Data From .ddf File Check box
When selecting a motor for use with the Epsilon drive or a MDS/FM-2 module combination, the user has two basic
options:
1. Use a motor that already exists in the standard motor definition file (StdMotor.ddf) or custom motor definition
file (Motor.ddf).
2. Create a custom motor that has not been used before.
When selecting option 1 from above (use an existing motor), the user simply selects one of the motors from the Motor
Type list at the top of the Motor view. Once the user selects a motor from the Motor Type list, the data for that motor is
read from the pertinent .ddf file and then is displayed in the Motor Parameters column on the Motor view (see Figure
38). The parameters in this column will be dimmed and unavailable because the motor information comes directly from
the .ddf file.
If the user wishes to edit one or more of the parameters read from the .ddf file, it is necessary to clear the “User Motor
Data From .ddf File” check box. Clearing the check box will break the “link” between the motor data displayed on this
view, and the motor data in the .ddf file. This is necessary because as soon as the user changes any of the values, it no
longer matches the .ddf file, and is now in effect a “custom motor”. When the “User Motor Data From .ddf File” check
box is cleared, all of the values in the Motor Parameters column will become available, and the Motor Name will be
changed to “New Motor” so that there is no association with the existing motor that was previously selected. The user
can now change any of the values as desired and give the motor a new name. Once the values have been changed,
the motor data only exists within the active configuration. To save the new values into the .ddf file, the user must click
on the Save .ddf Values button on the right side of the view.
Motor Parameters Column
Motor Parameters column is a column of data displayed on the Motor view under the Setup view (See Figure 38). This
column of data contains the values for each of the motor data parameters. The values in this column are unavailable for
edit if the “Use Motor Data From .ddf File” check box is selected. This means that since the data is associated with the
.ddf file, it cannot be changed. The values in this column become available when the “Use Motor Data From .ddf File”
check box is cleared. The user can then change one or more of the parameter values because there no longer is a link
to the data in the .ddf file.
If the user does edit motor parameter values on this view, those values are only stored within that particular configuration
file. In order to save the values to the .ddf file, the user must click the “Save .ddf Values” button on the right side of the
view. Below are the motor parameter with a brief description.
Motor Name
The motor name is limited to 12 characters and must begin with an alpha character (non-numeric character). This is the
motor name that will appear in the “Motor Type” list box above.
Peak Current
Specifies the peak current allowed by the motor. The motor manufacturer typically provides the peak current data.
If a system is “drive limited” (meaning that the motor can handle more current than the drive can deliver), the peak current
actually used by the system may be lower than the value specified here.
Continuous Current Rating
Specifies the continuous current allowed by the motor. It is used to determine the drive continuous current and peak
current limits. The drive can also limit the continuous current to the motor based on the drive capacity. The motor
manufacturer typically provides the continuous current data.
If a system is “drive limited” (meaning that the motor can handle more current than the drive can deliver), the continuous
current actually used by the system may be lower than the value specified here.
Motor Poles
Specifies the number of magnetic pole pairs (N-S) on the motor. The supported values are 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16
poles. The motor manufacturer typically provides the motor pole information.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Rotor Inertia
This parameter specifies the inertia of the motor rotor. The drive uses this parameter to interpret the “Inertia Ratio”
parameter. “Inertia Ratio” is specified as a ratio of reflected load inertia to motor inertia.
Motor KE
Specifies the Ke of the motor. The units are Vrms/ kRPM. The line-to-line voltage will have this RMS value when the
motor is rotated at 1000 RPM. The range is 5.0 to 500.0 Vrms/ kRPM. The motor manufacturer will typically provide the
Ke data.
Phase Resistance
Specifies the phase-to-phase resistance of the motor. This value is determined by measuring the resistance between
any two motor stator terminals with an ohm meter. The range is.1 to 50 ohms.
Phase Inductance
Specifies the phase-to-phase inductance of the motor.
Max Operating Speed
This parameter specifies the maximum speed of the motor when used with a variable speed drive to achieve velocities
over the rated base speed of the motor.
Encoder Lines/Rev
Specifies a coefficient for determining the number of encoder lines per mechanical revolution. The supported values are
1 to 16383. The equation for determining the total number of encoder lines per revolutions is:
nLines = n*10x
where:
nLines = Total number of Encoder Lines
n = Motor Encoder Lines per Rev Coefficient
x = Motor Encoder Exponent
The total number of encoder lines is used both for commutation and for position/velocity control. To properly commutate
the motor, the drive must know the electrical angle (the angle between the motor magnetic field and stator coils).
Encoder Lines/Rev Exponent
Specifies a coefficient for determining the number of encoder lines per mechanical revolution. The supported values are
1 to 16383. The equation for determining the total number of encoder lines per revolutions is:
nLines = n*10x
where:
nLines = Total number of Encoder Lines
n = Motor Encoder Lines per Rev Coefficient
x = Motor Encoder Exponent
The total number of encoder lines is used both for commutation and for position/velocity control. To properly commutate
the motor, the drive must know the electrical angle (the angle between the motor magnetic field and stator coils).
Encoder Marker Angle
Specifies the electrical angle at which the marker (Z) pulse occurs with reference to VTS when the motor is spun in the
encoder reference direction. At power-up the drive obtains an initial estimate of the electrical angle from the status of
the U, V and W commutation tracks. This estimate can be off by as much as 30 °.
When the drive receives the marker pulse, the drive will, within one second, gradually shift the commutation to the more
accurate electrical angle specified by this parameter. The system will then operate more efficiently.
Encoder U-track Angle
Specifies the electrical angle at which the rising edge of the U commutation track will occur with reference to VTS when
the motor is spun in the encoder reference direction.
At power-up the drive looks at the status of the U, V and W commutation tracks and, using this parameter, obtains a
crude (± 30 °) estimate of the electrical angle.
Encoder Reference Motion
Specifies the direction of motion assumed in phase plots of the encoder’s quadrature and summation signals. The
supported values are CW(1) and CCW(0). Your encoder may have the same phase plot but is generated from a different
direction of rotation. This parameter affects the way the drive interprets the quadrature and commutation signals.
50
Setting Up Parameters
Encoder Type
The supported values for this parameter are 1 and 0. If set to a 1 the drive uses the Encoder Marker angle as well as
the Encoder U Angle for commutation. If this parameter is set to a 0, the drive uses only the Encoder U Angle.
Values from Drive Column
The Values from Drive column is a group of parameters that are constantly being read from the drive. The theory of
operation is that the user will often perform an Auto-Tune function that reads/measures/calculates data. The results of
those measurements are read from the drive and displayed in the Values from Drive column. Once they are displayed
in PowerTools Pro (in the Values From Drive column) the user can apply those values to the Motor Parameters column
by clicking on the Apply to Config. button, in the middle of the Motor view (this button looks like a series of arrows pointing
from the Values from Drive column towards the Motor Parameters column).
The values in the Values from Drive column are not saved as part of the configuration file. To save these values, the
user must use the “Apply to Config” button to save them.
This column is only functional when online with the device. When offline, the values in the Values from Drive column will
all read zero.
Apply to Config. Button
When the user runs the Auto-Tune feature PowerTools Pro reads the results of the Auto-Tune and displays them in the
Values from Drive column of the Motor view. After the Auto-Tune, the measured values are only saved in the Drive NVM,
and not in the FM3/4 module. Therefore, in order to store the values in the FM module, the Auto-Tune values must be
applied to the configuration file. When the user presses “Apply to Config.”, the values in the “Values From Drive” column
are transferred into the Motor Parameters column. Then the values must be downloaded by downloading the entire
configuration file using Device > Download.
Run Auto-Tune Button
The drive has the ability to run an Auto-Tune operation thereby measuring several different motor parameters. Doing so
allows the drive to obtain certain parameters that are not typically provided by the motor manufacturer, and also
optimizes other drive parameters to work properly with the connected motor/load.
PowerTools Pro allows the user to initiate the Auto-Tune feature from the Motor view.
The following table shows which parameters must be entered in order to run the Auto-Tune feature, and which
parameters are measured by the Auto-Tune.
Motor Parameters
Needed to Run Auto-Tune
Measured by Auto-Tune Mode #
Motor Name
Peak Current
•
Continuous Current Rating
•
Motor Poles
•
Rotor Inertia
3
Motor Ke
3
Phase Resistance
2,3
Phase Inductance
2,3
Max Operation Speed
•
Encoder Lines/Rev
•
1,2,3
Encoder Lines/Rev
Exponent
•
1,2,3
Encoder Marker Angle
1,2,3
Encoder U-Marker
1,2,3
Encoder Reference Motion
1,2,3
Encoder Type
Some Auto-Tunes cause motion while others do not. It is important to read and understand the warnings and instructions
on the Auto-Tune windows. It is strongly recommended to unload the motor if Auto-Tune Mode #3 is commanded.
When online with the drive, to initiate an Auto-Tune, click RunAuto-Tune button. The Auto-Tune dialog box opens and
contains warnings and instructions related to the Auto-Tune procedure, as well as selection of the Auto-Tune mode. An
example of one of the Auto-Tune windows is shown in Figure 39.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Figure 39:
Auto-Tune Dialog Box - Auto-Tune Mode 3
After the Auto-Tune Mode has been selected, click Proceed, to start the Auto-Tune. When the Auto-Tune is completed
the results will be in the Values from Drive column on the Motor view.
Save .ddf Values Button
Once the user has entered the data for the motor they are using, they may or may not wish to save the motor data to
the Motor.ddf file so it can be easily recalled at a later time. If the user does not save the motor data to the Motor.ddf file,
then the motor data will only reside in the specific application configuration file that it has been entered into.
In order to save the motor data to the Motor.ddf file, click the Save .ddf Values button. This takes all the parameter values
and writes them to the Motor.ddf file.
When saving to the .ddf file, if PowerTools Pro finds that a motor already exists with the same name, the User Defined
Motor Name Conflict dialog box will appear. The user must then decide how to proceed with saving the motor data .ddf
file.
User Defined Motor Name Conflict Dialog Box
The purpose of this dialog box is to resolve conflicts between the application’s motor settings and those defined in the
.ddf file.
The User Defined Motor Name Conflict dialog box opens during the following conditions:
1. From the Motor view, click the Save .ddf values button and the motor already exists with the same name but
has different motor parameters
2. Opening an application (or uploading a application), where the Use Motor data from the .ddf file check box is
select but the data in the application no longer matches the .ddf file.
This occasionally occurs when a newer version of PowerTools Pro is installed and the parameters for the
standard motors has been updated in the .ddf file.
If the motor name does not exist in the .ddf file, it will be written into the file.
52
Setting Up Parameters
Figure 40:
The User Defined Motor Name Conflict Dialog Box
The User Defined Motor Name Conflict dialog box presents the user with four options on how to proceed with saving the
motor data. Those four options are:
Create new motor entry In .ddf File
The user can select to keep the existing data and create a new entry into the motor.ddf file with a different name. After
selecting this option, the user simply enters a new name in the Please enter a new motor name text box. Then click OK,
the data will be written to the .ddf file using the new motor name.
Overwrite existing .ddf file motor entry
The user can select to overwrite the existing data in the .ddf file with the current data in the Motor Parameters column.
If this option is selected, the data in the .ddf file will be overwritten and the overwritten data will be lost forever. The
overwritten data cannot be recovered.
If the user attempts to overwrite data for a Standard Motor (in the stdmotor.ddf file), the operation will be canceled and
the user will be notified that they cannot proceed. The figure below shows the error message that will be produced when
the user attempts to overwrite a standard motor. In this case, the user would need to change the motor name before
saving to the .ddf file.
Load and use motor parameters from matching motor in .ddf file
If this option is selected, the motor data in the Motor.ddf or stdmotor.ddf file for the matching Motor Name will overwrite
the data in the Motor Parameters column. After this option is selected, the “Use Motor Data From .ddf File” check box
will be selected, and all the parameter values will be unavailable.
Retain existing Motor Parameters without saving to .ddf
If the user selects this option, the values in the Motor Parameters column will not be written to the motor.ddf file, and the
values will only reside within the configuration file. The specific motor data values will not be available for selection in
the Motor Type list box because they are not saved to the .ddf file. The “Save .ddf Values” operation is in effect canceled.
Existing Motor Names List Box
This list box is part of the User Defined Motor Name Conflict dialog box and contains all the names of the motors that
exist in the motor.ddf and stdmotor.ddf files. When selecting a new name, it is important to select a name that is not
already displayed in this list box.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Parameters Not Matching List
This list is part of the User Defined Motor Name Conflict dialog box and displays the parameter value(s) from the Motor
Parameters column that do not match the equivalent parameter value in either the motor.ddf or stdmotor.ddf files, for
the motor with the matching name.
This helps the user to determine whether they wish to overwrite, cancel, or create a new motor with this Save .ddf Values
operation.
Position View
The Position View allows you to set up and view the parameters related to drive positioning. In, Position has been
selected in the Hierarchy Tree. The right side of the view is divided into groups. An explanation of the groups and their
functions is provided below.
Figure 41:
Position View
Following Error Group
Following Error Limit Enable Check Box
Select this check box to enable (or clear this check box to disable) the Following Error Limit. If enabled, a fault will be
generated if the absolute value of the following error ever exceeds the value in the following error parameter. If disabled,
a Following Error fault will never be generated.
Following Error Limit
Following Error is the difference between the Position Command and the Position Feedback. It is positive when the
Position Command is greater than the Position Feedback. If the absolute value of the following error exceeds the value
entered here, the drive will generate a Following Error Fault (F). All accumulated Following Error will be cleared when
the drive is disabled.
Online Tab
While online with the device, the lower half of the view is the Online tab and the following real-time data will be displayed.
Motor Position Group
Position Command
This is the commanded position in user units generated by the device. This is set to zero when the Absolute Position
Valid output function is activated. The Position Command is specified in user units.
Position Feedback
This is the feedback position of the motor. It is set to zero when the Absolute Position Valid output function is activated.
Position Feedback is specified in user units.
Following Error
The Following Error is the difference (in user units) between the Position Command and the Position Feedback. It is
positive when the Position Command is greater than the Position Feedback.
54
Setting Up Parameters
Encoder Position
The motor position in encoder counts since power up when the value was set to zero. This is a signed 32 bit value. This
is set to zero when the Absolute Position Valid output function is activated.
Velocity View
This view allows the user to set the drive limits, and if online, view the velocity feedback parameters.
Figure 42:
Velocity View - Online
Limits Group
Overspeed Velocity
This parameter specifies the maximum allowable speed. If the Velocity Feedback exceeds either the drive’s internal
overspeed fault limit or the value of the Overspeed Velocity, an Overspeed Fault will be generated. The internal
overspeed fault limit is equal to 150 percent of the Motor Maximum Operating Speed.
Trigger Group
In Motion Velocity
This parameter sets the activation point for both the In + Motion and In - Motion output functions. The output function
will deactivate when the motor velocity slows to half of this value.
Online Tab
Velocity Group
All parameters in this group are only available when online with the device.
Velocity Command
The Velocity Command is the actual command received by the velocity loop.
Velocity Feedback
This parameter is the actual feedback motor velocity.
Analog Command Velocity
The drive is in Analog Velocity mode this parameter gives the current velocity commanded due to the Analog input
function.
Preset Velocity Command
With the drive in Preset Velocity mode this parameter is the actual commanded preset velocity. The units are RPM and
the range is from ± maximum motor velocity. A positive value reflects the direction selected by the Positive Direction
option buttons on the Setup view. (Motor direction is determined as you face the shaft end of the motor).
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Ramps View
Figure 43:
Ramps View
Ramps Group
Stop Deceleration
The value the user enters here defines the rate of velocity change to zero speed when a Stop input function is activated.
Travel Limit Deceleration
The value the user enters here defines the rate of velocity change to zero speed when a Travel Limit input function is
activated.
Limits Group
Analog Accel/Decel Limit
This feature allows the user to limit the accel and decel rate when using the analog input for velocity control. This makes
it very simple to use the drive in high performance, variable speed, start-stop applications such as Clutch-Brake
replacements without requiring a sophisticated controller to control the acceleration ramps. In applications which do not
require the drive to limit the ramps such as when using an external position controller, the parameter can be set to “0”
(its default value). If the Analog Accel/Decel Limit parameter value is changed during a ramp, the new ramp limit is
imposed within the next servo loop update.
56
Setting Up Parameters
Torque View
This view allows the user to edit the Torque Limit and when online with the device view the torque parameters.
Figure 44:
Torque View - Online
The Torque Limit value takes effect only when the Torque Limit Enable input function is active.
These parameters are continuously updated while online with the drive.
Settings Group
Torque Limit
This value is the level which the Torque Command will be limited to when the Torque Limit Enable input function is active.
To make the Torque Limit always active, set the Torque Limit Enable Input function to be Always Active.
Torque Level 1 and 2
This parameter sets the activation level for the Torque Level 1 Active and Torque Level 2 Active output functions.
Peak Torque Available
This displays the maximum torque available from the selected drive and motor combination. This is calculated by
PowerTools Pro and is not a drive parameter.
Online Tab
Torque Group
Torque Command
The torque available from the particular drive and motor combination.
This parameter returns the torque command value before it is limited. The torque command may be limited by either the
Torque Limit (if the Torque Limit Enable input function is active) or Current Foldback.
Torque Cmd Limited
This displays the percent of torque being commanded to the motor. This value is the result of the Torque Command after
being limited by the current foldback and the Torque Limit value (if active).
Foldback RMS
This parameter accurately models the thermal heating and cooling of the drive and motor. When it reaches 100 percent,
current foldback will be activated.
Shunt Power RMS
This parameter models the thermal heating and cooling of the drive internal shunt. This parameter indicates the percent
of shunt capacity utilization. When this value reaches 100 percent, the drive will generate an RMS Shunt Power Fault.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Tuning View
All parameters on the Tuning view are related to the load on the motor and application requirements.
The load on the motor is specified by two parameters: Inertia Ratio and Friction. Typical application requirements are
specified by the response adjustment and Feedforward Gains. Position Error Integral is provided to compensate for
systems with high friction or vertical loads. Low Pass Filter is provided to filter machine resonance that are present in
some applications.
Figure 45:
Tuning View
Load Group
Inertia Ratio
Inertia Ratio specifies the load to motor inertia ratio and has a range of 0.0 to 50.0. If the exact inertia is unknown, a
conservative approximate value should be used. If you enter an inertia value higher than the actual inertia, the resultant
motor response will tend to be more oscillatory.
Friction
This parameter is characterized in terms of the rate of friction increase per 100 motor RPM. If estimated, always use a
conservative (less than or equal to actual) estimate. If the friction is completely unknown, a value of zero should be used.
A typical value used here is less than one percent.
Tuning Group
Velocity Response
The Velocity Response parameter adjusts the velocity loop bandwidth with a range of 1 to 500 Hertz. In general, it affects
how quickly the drive will respond to commands, load disturbances and velocity corrections. A good value to start with
(the default) is 50 Hz. The maximum value recommended is 80 Hz.
Feedforwards Enable
Select the check box to enable the feedforwards, the accuracy of the Inertia and Friction parameters is very important.
If the Inertia parameter is larger than the actual inertia, the result could be a significant overshoot during ramping. If the
Inertia parameter is smaller than the actual inertia, following error during ramping will be reduced but not eliminated. If
the Friction parameter is greater than the actual friction, it may result in velocity error or instability. If the Friction
parameter is less than the actual friction, velocity error will be reduced but not eliminated.
High Performance Gains Enable
Enabling the High Performance Gains increases closed loop stiffness, which can be beneficial in open loop velocity
applications and Pulse mode. When enabled, they make the system less forgiving in applications where the actual
inertia varies or the coupling between the motor and the load has excessive windup or backlash.
When using an external position controller in Velocity mode, High Performance Gains should not be enabled.
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Setting Up Parameters
Low Pass Filter Group
Low Pass Filter Enable Check Box
This check box when selected enables a low pass filter applied to the output of the velocity command before the torque
compensator. The low pass filter is not active in Torque Modes.
Low Pass Frequency
This parameter defines the low pass filter cut-off frequency. Signals exceeding this frequency will be filtered at a rate of
40 dB per decade.
Position Error Integral Group
Position Error Integral Enable Check Box
When selected this enables the Time Constant parameter.
Time Constant
Position Error Integral is a control term which can be used to compensate for the continuous torque required to hold a
vertical load against gravity. It is also useful in low speed applications which have high friction.
It also helps maintain accurate command execution during steady state or low frequency torque disturbances (typically
less than 10 Hz) or when holding a non-counterbalanced vertical load in position.
The adjustment parameter is Position Error Integral Time Constant which is available in the Tuning View of PowerTools
Pro. This parameter determines how quickly the drive will attempt to eliminate the following error. The time constant is
in milliseconds and defines how long it will take to decrease the following error by 63%. (3 time constants will reduce the
following error by 96%). The range for this parameter is 5 to 500 milliseconds. In certain circumstances the value actually
used by the drive will be greater than the value specified in PowerTools Pro because the minimum allowed time constant
value is a function of the ‘Response’ parameter. The formula is Min. Time Constant = 1000/Response.
For example, with ‘Response’ set to 50, the minimum time constant value is 1000/50 = 20 msec. A higher time constant
value will minimize instability with more compliant loads such as long drive shafts, or spring loads. A lower time constant
setting will increase the response and will stiffen the system.
Shunt View
The Shunt view is used to configure the external shunt for the EP204 and EP206 drives.
External Shunt Resistor Group
Max Energy
The total energy that can be absorbed by the resistor when its initial temperature is ambient temperature.
Average Power
The average power rating of the shunt resistor.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Resistance
The resistance value of the shunt.
Shunt Control Group
Shunt Power RMS
This parameter models the thermal heating and cooling of the drive internal shunt. This parameter indicates the percent
of shunt capacity utilization. When this value reaches 100 percent, the drive will generate an RMS Shunt Power Fault.
Bus Voltage
Displays the actual measured voltage on the DC power bus.
Teach View
The Teach view is used with Analog Position mode to setup the two points (min and max) needed
Figure 46:
Teach View
Teach Min
Define Home
When this check box is selected, on the first teach pulse of the teach function the position command is loaded into the
Define Home Posn text box (located on the Setup view).
Set Analog In Position
Select this check box to load the position command value into the Analog Min Position parameter (on the Analog Inputs
view) on the first pulse of the teach function.
Set Analog In Voltage
Select this check box to load the current A/D value in the Analog Min Voltage parameter (on the Analog Inputs view) on
the first pulse of the teach function.
Set Analog Out Ch 1 Position
Select this check box to load the position command value in the Analog Min Value for Channel 1 (on the Analog Outputs
view) on the first pulse of the teach function.
Set Analog Out Ch 1 Voltage
Select this check box to load the position command value in the Analog Min Voltage for Channel 1 (on the Analog
Outputs view) on the first pulse of the teach function.
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Setting Up Parameters
Set Analog Out Ch 2 Position
Select this check box to load the position command value in the Analog Min Value for Channel 2 (on the Analog Outputs
view) on the first pulse of the teach function.
Set Analog Out Ch 2 Voltage
Select this check box to load the position command value in the Analog Min Voltage for Channel 2 (on the Analog
Outputs view) on the first pulse of the teach function.
Set Position Limit
Select this check box to load the position command value in the Position Limit Min parameter (on the Analog Inputs view)
on the first pulse of the teach function.
Teach Max
Define Home
When this check box is selected, on the second teach pulse of the teach function the position command is loaded into
the Define Home Posn text box (located on the Setup view).
Set Analog In Position
Select this check box to load the position command value into the Analog Max Position parameter (on the Analog Inputs
view) on the second pulse of the teach function.
Set Analog In Voltage
Select this check box to load the current A/D value in the Analog Max Voltage parameter (on the Analog Inputs view) on
the second pulse of the teach function.
Set Analog Out Ch 1 Position
Select this check box to load the position command value in the Analog Max Value for Channel 1 (on the Analog Outputs
view) on the second pulse of the teach function.
Set Analog Out Ch 1 Voltage
Select this check box to load the position command value in the Analog Max Voltage for Channel 1 (on the Analog
Outputs view) on the second pulse of the teach function.
Set Analog Out Ch 2 Position
Select this check box to load the position command value in the Analog Max Value for Channel 2 (on the Analog Outputs
view) on the second pulse of the teach function.
Set Analog Out Ch 2 Voltage
Select this check box to load the position command value in the Analog Max Voltage for Channel 2 (on the Analog
Outputs view) on the second pulse of the teach function.
Set Position Limit
Select this check box to load the position command value in the Position Limit Max parameter (on the Analog Inputs
view) on the second pulse of the teach function.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Faults View
Figure 47:
Faults View - Online
Fault Enable Group
Low DC Bus Fault Enable
This parameter’s default setting is enabled. When enabled, the drive will detect a low DC bus at 60 Vdc and will log a
Low DC Bus Fault if a power down is not completed after the low DC bus is detected. Clearing this check box will disable
the Low DC Bus Voltage Fault. This will allow the drive to operate at a DC bus voltage below 60 Vdc as long as the logic
power is supplied by the Logic Power Supply.
Encoder State Fault Enable
This parameter’s default setting is enabled. When enabled, the drive will detect encoder state faults. Refer to Fault
Codes in the Diagnostic and Troubleshooting section of this manual. The drive will not detect Encoder State faults when
the fault is disabled. Disabling encoder faults is necessary for some types of programmable encoders when the state
transitions are not always deterministic.
Commutation Hardware Fault Enable
When this check box is selected, faults occurring from the commutation tracks U, V, and W will be recognized as "E"
faults in the drive. When this check box is clear, no fault will occur due to the commutation tracks. This functionality can
be useful to diagnose the nature of the "E" fault. If the check box is clear and "E" faults are still occurring, then the
encoder lines
(A, A/, B, B/, Z, Z/) are the most likely source of the "E" fault.
62
Setting Up Parameters
I/O Setup
Input Lines View
The Input Lines view is used to assign an input function to an input line. This view is divided into two windows. The “Input
Function” window, on the left side, displays the input functions available and the function configuration. The “Input Line”
window, on the right side, displays the input lines, attached input functions and the debounce value.
To assign an input function, position the mouse pointer over the function on the left to assign it to the line on the right.
Press the left mouse button while over the function, and hold the button down. While holding the left button down, drag
the function until the pointer is positioned over the desired line and release the left mouse button.
To unassign an input function, position the pointer over the function on the left. Press the left mouse button while over
the function, and hold the button down. While holding the left button down, drag the function over to the right and release
the left mouse button.
Figure 48:
Input Lines View for an Epsilon EP-B drive
Input Function Window
This window allows the user to select an input function and assign it to an input line. When online with the device there
will be a virtual LED to the left of the input function name that shows the state of the input function.
Configuration
The configuration of each input function is displayed next to the input function when the active state is changed from
default. The default configuration is Active On.
Input Functions Group
Active Off Check Box
This check box allows you to change the “Active On/Off” state. Select the desired input function in the input function
window, then select or clear the “Active Off” check box.
Making an input function “Active On” means that it will be active when 10 Vdc to 30 Vdc is applied to the input line it’s
assigned to and is inactive when no voltage is applied to the line. Making an input function "Active Off" means that it will
be active when no voltage is applied to the input line and inactive while 10 Vdc to 30 Vdc is being applied.
Always Active Check Box
This check box is used to make an input function “Always Active”. When you make an input function always active, it’s
active whether assigned to an input line or not. If you make an input function “Always Active” then assign it to an input
line, that function will be active whether or not voltage is applied to the assigned line.
Input Line Window
This window displays the input function assigned to the input line and the configuration of the input line and input
function.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Attached Function
This displays the Input Function assigned each particular Input Line.
Configuration
The debounce value is displayed next to each input line, the active state for the attached input function is shown next to
the input function.
Input Lines Group
Debounce Text box
The debounce value is displayed next to each input line. This feature helps prevent false input triggering in noisy
electrical environments. Enter a “Debounce Time” in milliseconds. The value entered here is the minimum amount of
time the input line will need to be active before it is recognized as a valid input.
Input Lines
Force On/Off
Enable
Input
Terminal
Input Line
Raw Status
Debounce
Timer
Input Line
Debounced
Status
Input Line
Status
Input Lines
Force On/Off
Command
Figure 49:
Input Line Diagram
Forced Off and Forced On Check Boxes
You can force an input line to a level by using the Forced On and Forced Off check boxes. When you force an input line
on or off, all the functions assigned to that line will be affected. This check box is only available to select when online
with the drive.
The forced state of the input and output lines are not saved to NVM and will reset to normal operation when the
drive is powered up or re-booted.
Output Lines View
This view is divided into two windows. The “Output Function” window, on the left side, displays the available output
functions. The “Output Line” window, on the right side, displays the output lines, the attached output function and the
line configuration (Active Off).
64
Setting Up Parameters
Figure 50:
Output Lines View for a Epsilon EP-B Drive
For wiring information, refer to the “Installation” section of the Epsilon EP Installation Manual (P/N 400518-01).
Output Function Window
This window allows selection of the output function to be assigned to an output line.
To assign an output function, position the mouse pointer over the function on the left to assign it to the line on the right.
Press the left mouse button while over the function, and hold the button down. While holding the left button down, drag
the function until the pointer is positioned over the desired line and release the left mouse button.
To unassign an output function, position the pointer over the function on the left. Press the left mouse button while over
the function, and hold the button down. While holding the left button down, drag the function over to the right and release
the left mouse button.
Output Lines Window
Attached Function
This feature displays the Output Function assigned to each particular Output Line.
Configuration
The configuration of each output line is displayed nest to the output line when the active state is changed from default.
The default configuration is Active On, see Active Off check box below.
Output Lines Group
Active Off Check Box
The default active state of an output line is "Active On". This means that the output line will supply a voltage when the
result of the logical Or of the output function(s) assigned to that output line is active.
Making an output line "Active Off" means that the line will be “Off” (not conducting) when the result of the logical Or of
the output function(s) assigned to that output line is active, and will supply a voltage when the logical Or of the output
function(s) is not active.
Forced Off and Forced On Check Boxes
You can force an input line to a level by using the Forced On and Forced Off check boxes. When you force an input line
on or off, all the functions assigned to that line will be affected. This check box is only available to select when online
with the drive.
The forced state of the input and output lines are not saved to NVM and will reset to normal operation when the
drive is powered up or re-booted.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Analog Inputs View
The drive has one analog input channel that accepts a +10 V to -10 V signal. The drive has a 12-bit over sampled to 14bit analog to digital converter (A/D), which is used to transform the analog voltage to a usable parameter. The analog
input is scanned by the drive every 100 microseconds and the module at the trajectory update rate.
Figure 51:
Analog Inputs View
Analog Input Group
Bandwidth
This parameter sets the low-pass filter cutoff frequency applied to the analog input. Signals exceeding this frequency
will be filtered at a rate of 20 db per decade.
Analog Input - Velocity, Torque Group
Analog Full Scale
This voltage sets the maximum value that the analog input will reach in normal operation. Valid range for this parameter
is +10 volts to -10 volts.
Analog Zero Offset
This parameter is used to null any voltage present at the drive when a zero analog velocity command is provided. The
amount of offset can be measured by the Analog Input parameter when a zero analog velocity command is supplied.
Default = 0 Volts
Analog Input - Position Group
This group of parameters are filled after a teach function has been run and the Read taught values for Drive button has
been clicked on.
Analog Max Position
This parameter sets the upper value in the point set in revs.
Analog Max Voltage
This parameter sets the upper value in the point set in volts.
Analog Min Position
This parameter sets the lower value in the point set in revs.
66
Setting Up Parameters
Analog Min Voltage
This parameter sets the lower value in the point set in volts.
Position Limit Enable
Select this check box to enable the Position Limit Max and Position Limit Min feature.
Position Limit Max
When enabled the parameter entered here will be the upper limit of the Analog Position Command.
Position Limit Min
When enabled the parameter entered here will be the lower limit of the Analog Position Command.
Read taught values from Drive Button
The Analog Outputs Min and Max values and voltages are read from the drive and loaded into the application. This
button is available only when online. This button allows the Min and Max points, which can be taught, to be uploaded
into the application. In most cases, this feature is only used for debugging as the teach mode will have set the limits in
the drive already.
Online Tab
Analog Input Status Group
Analog Input
This is a display of the real time status of the analog input in volts. It is only available when you are online with a device.
Analog Input Position Status Group
Position Command
This is the commanded position generated by the drive. This is set to zero when the Absolute Position Valid output
function is activated.
Analog Posn Cmd
Commanded position based on Analog Position mode setup when Enable Analog Position input is activated.
Following Error
This displays the Following Error, which is the difference between the Position Command and the Position Feedback. It
is positive when the Position Command is greater than the Position Feedback.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Analog Outputs View
This view displays the setup and feedback data for the two Analog Output channels.
Figure 52:
Analog Outputs View - Online
Analog Outputs Group
Source
Select the signal to use as the source for the Analog Output. There are six options: Velocity Feedback, Velocity
Command, Torque Feedback, Torque Command, Position Feedback and Following Error. The scaling and offset are
affected by the source parameter selected. The units of the scaling and offset are adjusted according to the source
parameter.
Offset
Each analog output channel includes a programmable Analog Output Offset. This feature allows you to “zoom in” to a
desired range effectively increasing the resolution. The units of this parameter is dependent upon the Analog Output
Source selection.
Scale
Each analog output channel includes a programmable Analog Output Scale. This feature allows you to “zoom in” to a
desired range effectively increasing the resolution. The units of this parameter is dependent upon the Analog Output
Source selection.
Analog Output Min/Max Mode Check Box
Select this check box to enable the four parameter fields listed below. This group of parameters are filled after a teach
function has been run and the Read taught values for Drive button has been clicked on.
Analog Max Value
The upper Value in the point set (Value,Voltage):
• RW
• Units are defined by the source selected
• Note: This does not limit the D/A output value
Analog Max Voltage
• The upper Voltage in the point set (Value,Voltage):
• RW Voltage units (volts) -10.000 to +10.000
• Units are defined by the source selected
68
Setting Up Parameters
• Note: This does not limit the D/A output voltage
Analog Min Value
• The lower Value in the point set (Value,Voltage):
• RW
• Units are defined by the source selected
• Note: This does not limit the D/A output value
Analog Min Voltage
• The lower Voltage in the point set (Value,Voltage):
• RW Voltage units (volts) -10.000 to +10.000
• Units are defined by the source selected
• Note: This does not limit the D/A output voltage
Online Tab
Analog Out Feedback
This is a display of the real time status of the two analog outputs in volts. It is only available when you are online with a
device.
Status View
This view has two tabs, the Status Online tab displays the drive status in real time and the Information tab displays
general information about the drive/module the user is online with.
Status Online Tab
The information in this view is divided into five categories: Position, Velocity, Torque, Drive Status and Index.
Figure 53:
Status View - Status Online Tab - Online
The information in this view is for diagnostics purposes only and cannot be changed from within this view.
Position Group
Pulse Position Input
This parameter returns the total number of actual pulses received on the pulse input hardware. This value is active in all
operating modes.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Position Command
This is the commanded position generated by the device.
Following Error
The Following Error is the difference between the Position Command and the Position Feedback. It is positive when the
Position Command is greater than the Position Feedback.
Encoder Position
The motor position in encoder counts since power up when the value was set to zero. This is a signed 32 bit value.
Position Feedback
This is the feedback position of the motor.
Analog Posn Cmd
Commanded position based on Analog Position mode setup when Enable Analog Position input is activated.
Velocity Group
Preset Velocity
The value of the Preset Velocity Command. The units are RPM and the range is from ± maximum motor velocity. A
positive value reflects the direction selected by the Positive Direction option buttons on the Setup view. (Motor direction
is determined as you face the shaft end of the motor).
Analog Command
The analog command voltage currently being applied to the analog command input on the analog/sync output
connector.
Velocity Command
The Velocity Command is the actual command received by the velocity loop.
Velocity Feedback
This parameter is the actual feedback motor velocity in RPMs.
Torque Group
Analog Torque
Displays the Analog input value converted to a percent of torque command.
Torque Command
This parameter returns the torque command value before it is limited. The torque command may be limited by either the
Torque Limit (if the Torque Limit Enable input function is active) or current foldback.
Torque Cmd Limited
This displays the percent of torque being commanded to the motor. The value is the result of the Torque Command after
being limited by Current Foldback and the Torque Limit value (if enabled).
Torque Feedback
The actual percentage of torque generated by motor, this is calculated using motor current
Drive Status Group
Drive Status
This reflects the state of the diagnostic LED on the drive. (i.e., Ready, Indexing, Homing, Jogging, etc.).
Foldback RMS
This parameter accurately models the thermal heating and cooling of the drive and motor. When it reaches 100 percent,
current foldback will be activated.
Segment Display
Character currently being displayed by the diagnostic display on the front of the drive.
Bus Voltage
Displays the actual measured voltage on the DC power bus.
70
Setting Up Parameters
Shunt Control Group
Shunt Power RMS
This parameter models the thermal heating and cooling of the drive internal shunt. This parameter indicates the percent
of shunt capacity utilization. When this value reaches 100 percent the drive will generate an RMS Shunt Power Fault.
Information Tab
ID Group
Firmware Revision
Displays the revision of the firmware in the drive you are currently online with.
Serial Number
Displays the serial number of the drive with which you are currently online.
Interface Revision
Displays the application interface revision.
Time Group
Power Up Time Total
Total amount of times the drive has been powered up since leaving the factory.
Power Up Count
Number of times the drive has been powered up since leaving the factory.
Power Up Time
Amount of time the drive has been powered up since last power up.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Tuning Procedures
The drive uses closed loop controllers to control the position and velocity Travel Limit of the attached motor. These
position and velocity controllers and the associated tuning parameters are in effect when the drive is in velocity or pulse
mode and have no effect when the drive is in Torque mode.
Many closed loop controllers require tuning using individual user-specified proportional, integral and derivative (PID)
gains which require skilled “tweaking” to optimize. The combination of these gains along with the drive gain, motor gain,
and motor inertia, define the system bandwidth. The overall system bandwidth is usually unknown at the end of the
tweaking process. The drive closes the control loops for the user using a state-space pole placement technique. Using
this method, the drive’s position control can be simply and accurately tuned. The overall system’s bandwidth can be
defined by a single user-specified value (Response).
The drive’s default settings are designed to work in applications with up to a 10:1 load to motor inertia mismatch. Most
applications can operate with this default setting.
Some applications may have performance requirements which are not attainable with the factory settings. For these
applications a set of measurable parameters can be specified which will set up the internal control functions to optimize
the drive performance. The parameters include Inertia Ratio, Friction, Response and Line Voltage. All the values needed
for optimization are “real world” values that can be determined by calculation or some method of dynamic measurement.
PID vs. State-Space
The power of the state-space control algorithm is that there is no guessing and no “fine tuning” as needed with PID
methods. PID methods work well in controlled situations but tend to be difficult to setup in applications where all the
effects of the system are not compensated for in the PID loop. The results are that the system response is compromised
to avoid instability.
The drive state-space control algorithm uses a number of internally calculated gains that represent the wide variety of
effects present in a servo system. This method gives a more accurate representation of the system and maximizes the
performance by minimizing the compromises.
You need only to setup the system and enter three parameters to describe the load and the application needs. Once the
entries are made the tuning is complete - no guessing and no “tweaking”. The drive uses these entries plus motor and
amplifier information to setup the internal digital gain values. These values are used in the control loops to accurately
set up a stable, repeatable and highly responsive system.
Tuning Procedure
Once the initial setup has been completed, you can run the system to determine if the level of tuning is adequate for the
application. A drive can be tuned basically to four levels.
• No Tuning
• Basic Level
• Intermediate Level
• Fully Optimized Level
Each level is slightly more involved than the previous one requiring you to enter more information. If your system needs
optimization, we recommend that you start with the Basic Level, then determine if further tuning is needed based on axis
performance.
The setup procedures explained here assume that you are using PowerTools Pro software.
Initial Settings
Set the drive tuning parameters as follows:
• Inertia Ratio = 0
• Friction = 0
• Response = 50
• High Performance Gains = Enabled
• Feedforwards = Disabled
Tuning steps
If your Inertia Ratio is greater than 10 times the motor inertia, go directly to the Intermediate Level tuning.
No Tuning
No tuning will be required in most applications where the load inertia is 10 times the motor inertia or less.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Basic Level
Adjust Response to obtain the best performance.
Intermediate Level
1. Calculate or estimate the load inertia. It is always better to estimate low.
2. Disable the drive.
3. Enter the inertia value calculated into the Inertia Ratio parameter.
4. Set the Line Voltage to the applied voltage (default is 230 Vac).
5. Leave all other tuning parameters at the initial values.
6. Enable the drive and run the system.
7. Adjust Response to obtain the best performance.
Fully Optimized Level
1. Determine the actual system parameters.
2. Disable the drive.
3. Enter the parameters.
4. Line Voltage set to the applied voltage (default is 230 Vac).
5. Enable the drive and run the system.
6. Adjust Response to obtain the best performance.
General Tuning Hints
General Tuning Procedure:
1. Calculate inertia of the system
The inertia of the system up to the motor shaft should be calculated using CT-Size software or some other inertia
calculating software. Under perfect mechanical conditions, entering this number into the “Inertia” parameter will produce
a well-matched system tuning. Because most systems include mechanics that are less than ideal, a number less than
the inertia parameter will need to be used to avoid bandwidth issues or “buzzing” of the motor.
Figure 54:
74
Default Inertia Setting (0)
Tuning Procedures
Figure 55:
Inertia Setting (5)
2. Increase the response parameter
The Response is normally the next adjustment when tuning. For best performance the Response should be lower with
a higher inertia mismatch (>10:1) and higher with a lower inertia mismatch.
This is because most higher inertia systems have torsional compliance in the frequency range of interest. Torsional
compliance is specially noticed in a jaw type coupling with a rubber spider, or if there is a long drive shaft, the Response
should be decreased. The highest recommended Response with High Performance Gains enabled is 100 Hz.
The next step in tuning the system to its optimal level is to move the response of the system up to the point of the desired
system rigidity. A standard way of accomplishing this is to slowly increase the response of the system until the system
becomes unstable (an audible noise will emit from the motor in the form of a buzz or hum). To verify stability at varying
loads, this process should be completed with the smallest load on the motor shaft. Once a state of instability is reached
back the response off by 20% to insure stable operation for years to come.
Figure 56:
Inertia Setting (5) Response
3. Position Error Integral
The difference in motion when this parameter is disabled and enabled can be observed in the following graphs. The first
graph shows motion with the position error integral turned off. The second graph shows motion with the position error
integral enabled and the time constant set for 20ms. Note the settling time difference of the two indexes.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Figure 57:
PEI = off
Figure 58:
PEI = on
Feedforwards gain can be enabled if the performance requirements are very demanding. However, when using them
make sure the Inertia Ratio and Friction values are an accurate representation of the load. Otherwise, the system
performance can actually be degraded or stability will suffer. Enabling Feedforwards makes the system less tolerant of
inertia or friction variations during operation.
Tuning Parameters
Inertia Ratio
Inertia Ratio specifies the load to motor inertia ratio and has a range of 0.0 to 50.0. A value of 1.0 specifies that load
inertia equals the motor inertia (1:1 load to motor inertia). The drives can control up to a 10:1 inertia mismatch with the
default Inertia Ratio value of 0.0. Inertial mismatches of over 50:1 are possible if response is reduced.
The Inertia Ratio value is used to set the internal gains in the velocity and position loops, including feedforward
compensation if enabled.
To calculate the Inertia Ratio value, divide the load inertia reflected to the motor by the motor inertia of the motor. Include
the motor brake as a load where applicable. The resulting value should be entered as the Inertia Ratio parameter.
IR =
RLI
MI
Where:
IR = Inertia Ratio
RLI = Reflected Load Inertia (lb-in-sec2)
MI = Motor Inertia (lb-in- sec2)
If the exact inertia is unknown, a conservative approximate value should be used. If you enter an inertia value higher
than the actual inertia, the resultant motor response will tend to be more oscillatory.
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Tuning Procedures
If you enter an inertia value lower than the actual inertia, but is between 10 and 90 percent of the actual, the drive will
tend to be more sluggish than optimum but will usually operate satisfactorily. If the value you enter is less than 10 percent
of the actual inertia, the drive will have a low frequency oscillation at speed.
There are three guidelines for defining the inertia ratio:
1. In most applications the default value of 0 (zero) will be used.
2. If the inertia of the machines varies or there is uncertainty in the estimate, use the lowest value for inertia.
3. The machine system bandwidth is reduced if the inertia estimate is low. Consequently a low inertia estimate
can sometimes add a level of robustness.
Friction
In the drive, this is a viscous friction parameter, characterized in terms of the rate of friction increase per 100 motor RPM.
The range is 0.00 to 100.00 in units of percent continuous torque of the specified motor/drive combination. The Friction
value can either be estimated or measured. For most servo drives viscous friction is 0.
If estimated, always use a conservative (less than or equal to actual) estimate. If the friction is completely unknown, a
value of zero should be used. A typical value used here would be less than one percent.
If the value entered is higher than the actual, system oscillation is likely. If the value entered is lower than the actual a
more sluggish response is likely but generally results in good operation.
Response
The Response adjusts the velocity loop bandwidth with a range of 1 to 500 Hz. In general, it affects how quickly the drive
will respond to commands, load disturbances and velocity corrections.
The drive’s position velocity loop is designed to be a second order system with a gain of one, a natural frequency
specified in the Response scroll box, and a damping factor of 0.8. If the drive’s bandwidth is defined to be the 3dB point of the response, the idealized bandwidth of the system is approximately 2.2 times greater than the
natural frequency.
For example:
When the Response is set to 50, the idealized bandwidth is 110 Hz.
High Performance Gains
Enabling High Performance Gains fundamentally affects the closed loop operation of the drive and greatly modifies the
effect of the Response parameter. High Performance Gains are most beneficial when the Inertia Ratio and Friction
parameters are accurate.
High Performance Gains, when enabled, make the system less forgiving in applications where the actual inertia varies
or the coupling between the motor and the load has excessive windup or backlash.
When using an external position controller, High Performance Gains should not be enabled.
Feedforwards
Feedforward gains are essentially open loop gains that generate torque commands based on the commanded velocity,
accel/decel and the known load parameters (Inertia Ratio and Friction). Using the feedforwards reduces velocity error
during steady state and reduces overshoot during ramping. This is because the Feedforwards do not wait for error to
build up to generate current commands.
Feedforwards should be disabled unless the absolute maximum performance is required from the system. Using them
reduces the forgiveness of the servo loop and can create instability if the actual inertia and/or friction of the machine
varies greatly during operation or if the Inertia Ratio or Friction parameters are not correct.
The internal feedforward velocity and acceleration gains are calculated by using the Inertia Ratio and Friction
parameters. The feedforward acceleration gain is calculated from the Inertia Ratio parameter and the feedforward
velocity gain is calculated from the Friction parameter.
When Feedforwards are enabled, the accuracy of the Inertia Ratio and Friction parameters is very important. If the
Inertia Ratio parameter is larger than the actual inertia, the result would be a significant velocity overshoot during
ramping. If the Inertia parameter is smaller than the actual inertia, velocity error during ramping will be reduced but not
eliminated. If the Friction parameter is greater than the actual friction, it may result in velocity error or instability. If the
Friction parameter is less than the actual friction, velocity error will be reduced by not eliminated.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Feedforwards can be enabled in any operating mode, however, in certain modes they do not function. These modes are
described in table below.
Operating Mode
Feedforward Parameters Active
Accel FF
Vel FF
Analog Velocity
No
Yes
Preset Velocity
Yes
Yes
Pulse/Position
No
No
Summation
No
Yes
Low Pass Filter Group
The Low Pass Filter will reduce machine resonance due to mechanical coupling and other flexible drive/load
components by filtering the command generated by the velocity loop. A check box on the Tuning view enables a low
pass filter applied to the output of the velocity command before the torque compensator. The low pass filter frequency
parameter defines the low pass filter cut-off frequency. Signals exceeding this frequency will be filtered at a rate of 40
dB per decade. The default value is 600Hz.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Diagnostics and Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Display
The diagnostic display on the front of the drive shows drive status and fault codes. When a fault condition occurs, the
drive will display the fault code, overriding the status code.
The decimal point is “On” when the drive is enabled and the stop input is not active. This indicates that the drive is ready
to run and any motion command will cause motion. Motion commands will not cause motion unless you are Ready (R)
and the decimal point is “On”.
Display Indication
Status
Description
Brake Engaged (Output
“Off”)
Motor brake is mechanically engaged. This character will only
appear if the Brake output function is assigned to an output line.
Disabled
Power Stage is disabled.
Ready
The Epsilon or FM-2/MDS drive system is functioning normally and
is ready to execute a motion command.
Torque Mode
Analog Torque Mode Operation
Velocity Mode
Analog Velocity Mode Operation
Pulse Mode
Pulse Mode Operation
Stop or Travel Limit Decel
Stop or Travel Limit Decel in progress. The ramp is displayed while
decelerating, and the display will go back to normal after completing
the decel ramp.
RMS Foldback
Motor torque is limited to 80 percent.
Stall Foldback
(EN drive only)
Drive output current is limited to 80 percent of drive stall current.
Ready to Run
Drive enabled, no Stop input.
Fault Codes
A number of diagnostic and fault detection circuits are incorporated to protect the drive. Some faults, like high DC bus
and amplifier or motor over temperature, can be reset with the Reset button on the front of the drive or the Reset input
function. Other faults, such as encoder faults, can only be reset by cycling power “Off” (wait until the diagnostics display
turns “Off”), then power “On”.
The drive accurately tracks motor position during fault conditions. For example, if there is a “Low DC Bus” fault where
the power stage is disabled, the drive will continue to track the motor’s position provided the logic power is not
interrupted.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
The +/- Limit faults are automatically cleared when the fault condition is removed. The table below lists all the fault codes
in priority order from highest to lowest. This means that if two faults are active, only the higher priority fault will be
displayed.
Display
80
Fault
Action to Reset
Bridge Disabled
Flash Invalid
Reprogram the Flash
Yes
Drive Overtemp\
Allow Drive to Cool down,
Cycle Power or Cycle Logic
Power
Yes
Power Up Test
Cycle Power or Cycle Logic
Power
Yes
NVM Invalid
Reset Button or Input Line
Yes
Invalid Configuration
Reset Button or Input Line
Yes
Power Module
Reset Button or Input Line
Cycle Logic Power
Yes
High DC Bus
Reset Button or Input Line
Yes
Low DC Bus
Reset Button or Input Line
Yes
Encoder State
Cycle Power or Cycle Logic
Power
Yes
Encoder Hardware
Cycle Power or Cycle Logic
Power
Yes
Motor Overtemp
Allow Motor to cool down,
Reset Button or Input Line
Yes
RMS Shunt Power
Reset Button or Input Line
Yes
Overspeed
Reset Button or Input Line
Yes
Diagnostics and Troubleshooting
Display
Fault
Action to Reset
Bridge Disabled
Following Error
(Position mode) (Pulse mode)
Reset Button or Input Line
Yes
Travel Limit +/-
Auto
No
All “On”
Normally "On" for one
second during power up
Yes
Fault Descriptions
Flash Invalid
This fault indicates that the firmware checksum has failed. From the Tools menu, Flash Upgrade to reprogram/upgrade
the firmware stored in flash memory. If this problem persists, call Control Techniques. A common cause would be an
interrupted F/W Flash upgrade (cable disconnected in the middle of an upgrade process).
Drive Overtemp
Indicates the drive IGBT temperature has reached 100ºC (212ºF).
Power Up Test
This fault indicates that the power-up self-test has failed. This fault cannot be reset with the reset command or reset
button.
NVM Invalid
At power-up the drive tests the integrity of the non-volatile memory. This fault is generated if the contents of the nonvolatile memory are invalid.
Invalid Configuration
If this occurs call Technical Support at Control Techniques.
Power Module
This fault is generated when a power stage over-temperature, over-current or loss of power stage logic supply occurs.
This can be the result of a motor short to ground, a short in the motor windings, a motor cable short or the failure of a
switching transistor.
It can also occur if the drive enable input is cycled “Off” and “On” rapidly (>10 Hz).
High DC Bus
This fault will occur whenever the voltage on the DC bus exceeds 440 Vdc. The most likely cause of this fault would be
an open shunt fuse, a high AC line condition or an application that requires an external shunt (e.g., a large load with
rapid deceleration).
Low DC Bus
This fault will occur whenever the voltage on the DC bus drops below 60 Vdc. The most likely cause of this fault is a
reduction (or loss) of AC power. A 50 ms debounce time is used with this fault to avoid faults caused by intermittent
power disruption. For some types of custom motors it may be necessary to disable this fault. Refer to “Low DC Bus Fault
Enable” on page 62 of the Faults view section of Setting Up Parameters for more information.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Encoder State
Certain encoder states and state transitions are invalid and will cause the drive to report an encoder state fault. This is
usually the result of noisy encoder feedback caused by poor shielding. For some types of custom motors it may be
necessary to disable this fault. See Faults view section for more information.
Encoder Hardware
If any pair of encoder lines are in the same state, an encoder line fault is generated. The most likely cause is a missing
or bad encoder connection.
Motor Overtemp
This fault is generated when the motor thermal switch is open due to motor over-temperature or incorrect wiring.
RMS Shunt Power
This fault is generated when RMS shunt power dissipation is greater than the design rating of the internal shunt.
Overspeed
This fault occurs when the actual motor speed exceeds the Overspeed Velocity Limit parameter. This parameter can be
accessed with PowerTools Pro software.
Max Following Error
This fault is generated when the following error exceeds the following error limit (default following error limit is 0.2 revs).
With PowerTools Pro you can change the Following Error Limit value or disable it on the Position view.
Travel Limit +/This fault is caused when either the + or - Travel Limit input function is active.
All “On”
This is a normal condition during power up of the drive. It will last for less than 1 second. If this display persists, call
Technical Service at Control Techniques.
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Diagnostics and Troubleshooting
Drive Faults
Faults View
The Faults view displays any active faults in the system. Those faults that do not require a reboot, can be cleared by
clicking on the Reset button on the front of the drive or module.
Figure 59:
Faults View
Resetting Faults
Some drive faults are automatically reset when the fault condition is cleared. Others require drive power to be cycled,
logic power to be cycled, or the drive to be “rebooted” to be cleared. If you wish to continue working in the PowerTools
Pro software without resetting the fault, click the Ignore Fault button.
To reset faults that can be reset with the Reset button, simply click the Reset button in the Faults view or push the Reset
button on the front of the drive where the fault occurred.
Viewing Active Drive Faults
To view all active drive faults, select the View Faults command from the Device menu when online with the drive.
Rebooting the Drive
To reboot the drive, cycle power, cycle logic power or select the Reboot Drive command from the Device menu. This
command reboots the drive attached to the active Configuration Window.
Watch Window
PowerTools Pro contains a diagnostic utility called the Watch Window. The Watch Window can be used while
PowerTools Pro is running and the PC is online with the device. The Watch Window allows the user to monitor the status
of all the desired system parameters in one location. An example of the Watch Window is found in Figure 61 below.
To setup the Watch Window, select Tools\Watch Window from the PowerTools Pro menu. If not online with the device,
the Watch Window will be unavailable on the menu. Upon selecting Watch Window, the following Select Parameters
window will appear.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Figure 60:
Watch Window - Select Parameters Window
The Select Parameters window as seen in Figure 60 allows the user to specify which parameters are to be seen in the
Watch Window. To select a parameter for the Watch Window, simple double-click on the parameter in the "Drag Source"
window or drag and drop the parameter from the "Drag Source" window on the left over to the "Parameters Displayed
in Watch Window" on the right and it will be added to the Watch Window.
Figure 61:
The Watch Window
Once a parameter is added to the Watch Window, it’s current value or state is constantly monitored. If a parameter in
the window changes value or state, it will change to a red color. It will remain red until it hasn’t changed for a period of
4 seconds. After 4 seconds, the parameter will turn back to black in color. This allows the user to see what has changed
recently without looking directly at every parameter.
The following are descriptions of the buttons and controls on the Select Parameters window:
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Diagnostics and Troubleshooting
Clear All Button
This button is used to clear all the parameter selections in the "Parameter Displayed in Watch Window" pane that were
previously selected and the Watch Window will close.
Save Selections Button
This button saves the parameter selections. This enables the user to restore the same list of parameters for use in future
online sessions. Once the selections have been saved, the Restore Selections button can be used to monitor all the
same parameters the next time the user opens the Watch Window. Therefore, if there is a list of helpful diagnostic
parameters the user wishes to see when online, those specific parameters can be saved and recalled in the Watch
Window at any time. The settings are saved in a file named “fm3watch.wch”
Restore Selections Button
This button restores the parameter selections that were last saved using the Save Selections button. This enables the
user to restore the list of parameters created in a previous online session.
Select Defaults
The Select Defaults button adds the most commonly used parameters to the Watch Window.
Select I/O
The Select I/O button will add the module/base drive or drive digital inputs and outputs to the Watch Window.
Close
The Close button will close the Select Parameters window, while the Watch Window will remain open.
Help
The help button will give associated help on the Watch Window setup.
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Error Messages
PowerTools Pro will pop-up an error message box to alert you to any errors it encounters. These message boxes will
describe the error and offer a possible solution.
The table below list the of common problems you might encounter when working with PowerTools Pro software along
with the error message displayed, the most likely cause and solution.
86
Problem/Message
Cause
Solution
Time-out while waiting for device
response. The attempted operation has
been cancelled. (see fault: No device
selected)
Loss of serial communications.
Check the serial connection to the device
and try operation again.
The attached device(s) do not have valid
revisions, or do not have matching
revisions.
Attempting to broadcast to drive without
matching firmware revisions.
Program each drive individually.
Unable to communicate with device
[Address x]
The device that you are attempting to
communicate with is no longer available.
Check all connections and verify that you
are using the correct baud rate then try
again.
The specified drive type (name) does not
match the actual drive type (name).
Please make necessary corrections.
The drive type you selected in the “Drive
Type” list box does not match the drive
you are downloading to.
Change the drive type selected in the
“Drive Type” list box to match the drive
you are downloading to.
Non-Control Techniques device attached
(address). When trying to program more
than one drive, only EMC drives of the
same type can be attached to the
network.
This error is caused When you
attempting to perform an upload or
download to multiple drives and one or
more of the drives are not the same type.
Disconnect the device(s) that has been
specified and try the operation again or
program each device individually.
You have changed a parameter which
will not take effect until the drive has
been rebooted. Before you reboot the
drive, you will need to save your setup to
NVM. Do you wish to save your setup to
drive NVM now?
See message.
Yes/No.
(Operation Name) The attempted
operation has been cancelled.
Communication error.
Retry operation. Check connection to
drive.
Invalid entry. The entry exceeds the
precision allowed by this field. The finest
resolution this field accepts is (value).
Entered a value out of range.
Enter a value within the range of that
field. The status bar displays information
on the currently selected object or action.
The device was disconnected during the
upload. The upload was not complete.
Connection to the device was lost (a
time-out occurred).
Check the connection to the device and
try again.
The device was disconnected during the
download. The download was not
complete.
Connection to the device was lost (a
time-out occurred).
Check the connection to the device and
try again.
No device selected.
The device you are attempting to
communicate with is not responding.
Check all connections.
Verify the baudrate.
Verify that the “Maximum Node Address”
value is at least the value of the address
of the drive connected.
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Glossary
µs
Microsecond, which is 0.000001 seconds.
A
Ampere. The unit of electrical current.
Amplifier
Servo drive.
ARMS
Ampere (RMS).Root Mean Square.
AWG
American Wire Gauge.
Baud Rate
The number of binary bits transmitted per second on a serial communications link such as RS-232. (1 character is
usually 10 bits.)
Check Box
In a dialog box, a check box is a small box that the user can turn “On” or “Off” with the mouse. When “On” it displays an
X in a square; when “Off” the square is blank. Unlike option buttons, check boxes do not affect each other; any check
box can be “On” or “Off” independently of all the others.
Configuration
The user-created application. It can be saved as a disk file or downloaded to configure the FM-3. It includes all the userdefined setup, assignments and programs.
CRC
Cyclical Redundancy Check.
Dialog Box
A dialog box is a window that appears in order to collect information from the user. When the user has filled in the
necessary information, the dialog box disappears.
DIN Rail
Deutsche Industrie Norm Rail
DLL
In Microsoft Window, a Dynamic Link Library contains a library of machine-language procedures that can be linked to
programs as needed at run time.
Downloading
The transfer of a complete set of parameters from a PC to a drive.
Drive
Servo drive or amplifier.
EEPROM
An EEPROM chip is an Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory; that is, its contents can be both
recorded and erased by electrical signals, but they do not go blank when power is removed.
EMC
Electromagnetic Compatibility
EMI - Electro-Magnetic Interference
EMI is noise which, when coupled into sensitive electronic circuits, may cause problems.
Firmware
The term firmware refers to software (i.e., computer programs) that are stored in some fixed form, such as read-only
memory (ROM).
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Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Flash
Another type of EEPROM.
Flash File
This file loads the firmware into the drive. Flash files can field upgrade the firmware.
Hysteresis
For a system with an analog input, the output tends to maintain its current value until the input level changes past the
point that set the current output value. The difference in response of a system to an increasing input signal versus a
decreasing input signal.
I/O
Input/Output. The reception and transmission of information between control devices. In modern control systems, I/O
has two distinct forms: switches, relays, etc., which are in either an on or off state, or analog signals that are continuous
in nature generally depicting values for speed, temperature, flow, etc.
Inertia
The property of an object to resist changes in rotary velocity unless acted upon by an outside force. Higher inertia objects
require larger torque to accelerate and decelerate. Inertia is dependent upon the mass and shape of the object.
Input Function
A function (i.e., Stop, Preset) that may be attached to an input line.
Input Line
The terminals of a device or circuit to which energy is applied.
Least Significant Bit
The bit in a binary number that is the least important or having the least weight.
LED
Light Emitting Diode.
List Box
In a dialog box, a list box is an area in which the user can choose among a list of items, such as files, directories, printers
or the like.
mA
Milliamp, which is 1/1000th of an Ampere.
MB
Mega-byte.
MODBUS®
Communication Protocol by Gould, Inc. for industrial communications systems comprised of programmable controller
interface units, protocol software and modems. The MDS drive module follows the Modbus specification outlined in the
Modicon Modbus Protocol Reference Manual, PI-MBNS-300 Revision G, November 1994.
Most Significant Bit
The bit in a binary number that is the most important or that has the most weight.
ms
Millisecond.
NVM
Non-Volatile Memory. NVM stores specifically defined variables as the variables dynamically change. It is used to store
changes through a power loss.
Option Button
Also known as the Radio Button. Round button used to select one of a group of mutually exclusive options.
Opto-isolated
A method of sending a signal from one piece of equipment to another without the usual requirement of common ground
potentials. The signal is transmitted optically with a light source (usually a Light Emitting Diode) and a light sensor
(usually a photosensitive transistor). These optical components provide electrical isolation.
88
Glossary
Output Function
A function (i.e., Drive OK, Fault) that may be assigned to an output line.
Output Line
The actual transistor or relay controlled output signal.
Parameters
User read only or read/write parameters that indicate and control the drive operation. These variables generally hold
numerical data defined in the Setup Views.
PE
Protective Earth.
PID
Proportional-Integral-Derivative. An acronym that describes the compensation structure that can be used in many
closed-loop systems.
PLC
Programmable Logic Controller. Also known as a programmable controller, these devices are used for machine control
and sequencing.
PowerTools Pro
Windows®-based software to interface with the Epsilon EP drives, MDS system, and FM-2/3/4 Function Modules.
Radio Button
See Option Button.
RAM
RAM is an acronym for Random-Access Memory, which is a memory device whereby any location in memory can be
found, on average, as quickly as any other location.
RMS
RMS is an acronym for Root Mean Squared. For an intermittent duty cycle application, the RMS is equal to the value of
steady state current which would produce the equivalent heating over a long period of time.
ROM
ROM is an acronym for Read-Only Memory. A ROM contains computer instructions that do not need to be changed,
such as permanent parts of the operating system.
RPM
Revolutions Per Minute.
Serial Port
A digital data communications port configured with a minimum number of signal lines. This is achieved by passing binary
information signals as a time series of 1’s and Ø’s on a single line.
Travel Limit
The distance that is limited by either a travel limit switch or the software.
Torque
The moment of force, a measure of its tendency to produce torsion and rotation about an axis.
Uploading
The transfer of a complete set of parameters from a drive to a PC.
Vac
Volts, Alternating Current.
Variable
A labeled value that encompasses numeric boolean, input function, and output functions.
Vdc
Volts, Direct Current.
89
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Velocity
The rate of change in position in a given direction during a certain time interval.
Windows, Microsoft
Microsoft Windows is an operating system that provides a graphical user interface, extended memory and multi-tasking.
The screen is divided into windows and the user uses a mouse to start programs and make menu choices.
90
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Specifications
Epsilon EP Specifications
Epsilon EP Series
20 Vac-264 Vac, 1 Ø, 47-63 Hz
(240 Vac for rated performance)
Type TN (Grounded) Installation Category III
Power Requirements
SCCR
(Short Circuit Current Rating)
Rated Output Current and Power
Continuous Input Current
(AC Input)
Logic Power Supply Input
10,000 Symmetrical RMS Amps
Model
Continuous Power
Continuous Current
Peak Current
EP202
670 W
2.2 A RMS at 40°C or 50°C
4.4 A RMS
EP204
1140 W
4.0 A RMS at 40° C
3.6 A RMS at 50° C
8 A RMS
EP206
1610 W
6.5 A RMS at 40° C
5.2 A RMS at 50° C
13 A RMS
Model
Continuous Current
Inrush Current
EP202
5.0 A RMS at 40° C or 50° C
40 A RMS for 5 ms
EP204
8.5 A RMS at 40° C
7.6 A RMS at 50° C
65 A RMS for 5 ms
EP206
12.0 A RMS at 40° C
9.6 A RMS at 50° C
100 A RMS for 5 ms
24 Vdc ±10%
EP-P: 0.50 A without master encoder,
0.57 A with master encoder
Other models: 0.31 A without motor encoder,
0.38 A with master motor encoder
Switching Frequency
10 kHz
Power Supply Output
5 Vdc, 250 mA maximum (for master encoder)
Efficiency - Drive
95% at full rated output power for each model
Ingress Protection (IP) Rating
Serial Interface
Drive: IP20
NT motors: IP65/IP54
Molded motor and feedback cables: IP65
RS-485
Modbus protocol with 32 bit data extension
19.2 k baud (default) or 9600 baud
Analog command: ±10 Vdc 14 bit, 100 kohm impedance, differential
Absolute Maximum Input Voltage Input: +/- 14 Vdc to ground or differential, including
drive enable
Control Inputs
Digital Inputs: 5 on the EP-B including the drive enable input, 10 Vdc - 30 Vdc, 4.8 kohm
impedance; current sourcing signal compatible (active high); max input response time is
500 µs; optically isolated.
Input debounce: 0-2000 ms configured in PowerTools Pro
Diagnostic Analog Outputs: (2) ±10 Vdc into 10 kohm (single ended), short circuit proof to
ground, 10 bit, software selectable output signals
Control Outputs
Digital Outputs: 3 on EP-B, 150 mA max each, short circuit proof, current source from 10
Vdc - 30 Vdc I/O power supply, 3.5 Vdc max supply to output voltage drop @ 150 mA,
opto-isolated
Motor temp sensor: Contact: 5 Vdc O.C. (tripped), 0.5 mA S.C. (normal)
Compatible with PTC thermistor with 1 kohm resistance at trip point
Interface: Software selectable differential (RS485) or single ended (TTL Schmitt Trigger)
Pulse Mode
Maximum input frequency:
Differential - 1 MHz per channel; (4 million counts/second in quadrature),
0.5 µs minimum pulse width
Single ended - 500 kHz per channel; (2 million counts/second in quadrature),
1 µs minimum pulse width
Ratio Capabilities: 20 to 163,840,000 PPR
Single ended inputs have 390 ohm pull-up to 5 V
91
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Epsilon EP Series
Differential line driver, RS-422 and TTL compatible
Encoder Output Signal
Shunt Resistor Capacity/
Regeneration Capacity
Scalable in one line increment resolution up to 2048 lines/rev of the motor (NT)
Energy storage available in bus caps:
EP202: 15 J @ 240 Vac, 30 J @ 120 Vac
EP204: 24 J @ 240 Vac, 63 J @ 120 Vac
EP206: 40 J @ 240 Vac, 104 J @ 120 Vac
EP204/EP206 External Shunt Control:
12 A peak, 2 kW max average power, 33 ohm minimum external resistor
Earth Leakage Current and RCD
Compatibility
Fault Detection Capability
Cooling Method
Environmental
Standards and Agency Approvals
Drive Weights
92
25 mA AC and < 0.1 mA DC with 15 ft (4.6 m) CMDS motor power cable and NT-330
motor at 240 Vac. Leakage is higher with longer cables.
The EP drive is compatible with a Type A Residual current Detector (RCD) that allows
expected leakage currents.
Low DC bus (can be disabled)
High DC bus
Power Stage fault
Logic power
Encoder state
Encoder line break
Drive overtemperature
Motor overtemperature
Overspeed
Travel limit (+)
Travel limit (-)
Following error
Power-up self test failure
Non-volatile memory invalid
EP202, EP204, EP206: Natural Convection
Pollution degree 2 environment, Maximum surrounding air temperature: 40°C full rating,
50°C with derating
Minimum operating temperature: 0°C
Storage Temperature: -25°C to 75°C
Rated Altitude: 3250 ft [1000 m]
Higher Altitude: Derate output current; 1% / 100m above 1000m
Humidity: 10% to 95% - non-condensing
Vibration: 2g, 10 Hz to 2000 Hz
UL listed
Canadian UL listed
CE Mark: Low voltage directive; EMC directive
EP202-B
EP204-B
EP206-B
3.6 lb (1.63 kg)
3.6 lb (1.63 kg)
4.2 lb (1.91 kg)
Specifications
Epsilon EP Drive Dimensions
The following table applies to A* and B* as shown in the figure below.
Drive Model
Dimension A*
(shown in inches/mm)
Dimension B*
(shown in inches/mm)
EP202-B,-I,-IDN
2.11 [53.59]
0.45 [11.4]
EP204-B,-I,-IDN
2.11 [53.59]
0.45 [11.4]
EP206-B,-I,-IDN
2.82 [71.63]
0.45 [11.4]
EP202-P
2.69 [68.3]
1.03 [26.16]
EP204-P
2.69 [68.3]
1.03 [26.16]
EP206-P
3.40 [86.9]
1.03 [26.16]
5.94
[150.88]
5.22
[132.59]
“A”
1.20
[30.48]
2.5
[63.50]
“B”
.200
[5.08]
DDC-RJ45
(4X)Ø.219
[5.56]
8.099
[205.72]
7.70
[195.58]
3.50
[88.0]
Cable
Clearence
0.75
[19.05]
EIO26 Cable
93
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Cable Diagrams
EIO26 Cable
1.530
0.770
EIO
PIN 1
10
LT. BLU
INPUT LINE 1
1
RED/WHT
INPUT LINE 2
11
ENABLE
INPUT LINE 3
2
INPUT LINE 4
12
INPUT LINE 5
3
INPUT LINE 6
13
INPUT LINE 7
4
OUTPUT LINE 1
7
OUTPUT LINE 2
17
OUTPUT LINE 3
8
OUTPUT LINE 4
18
I/O +V
19
I/O COM
20
INPUT LINE 8
14
INPUT LINE 9
5
INPUT LINE 10
15
INPUT LINE 11
6
INPUT LINE12
16
OUTPUT LINE 8
21
INPUT LINE 13
22
INPUT LINE 14
23
INPUT LINE15
24
OUTPUT LINE 5
9
OUTPUT LINE 6
25
OUTPUT LINE 7
26
LT. BLU/WHT
ORG/WHT
LT. GRN/WHT
GRN/WHT
YEL/GRY
PNK/WHT
ORG
YEL
PNK
BLU
RED
BLK
BLU/WHT
GRY/WHT
PUR/WHT
BRN/WHT
BRN
BLK/WHT
WHT/BLK
GRN
LIGHT GRN
GRY
PUR
WHT
DRAIN WIRE
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
SOLDER SIDE
Socket
94
Specifications
XV Motor Cables
XTMDS Cable
PIN 1
PE/GND
4
R
1
S
3
T
2
BRAID SHIELD
GRN/YEL
FORM WIRE
BRN
BLK
BLU
1
2
3
4
REAR VIEW OF
CONNECTOR
XCMDS Cable
PE/GND
D
U
A
V
C
W
B
BRAID SHIELD
GRN/YEL
FORM WIRE
BRN
BLK
BLU
BLU
(20 AWG)
BLU/WHT (20 AWG)
Drain Wire
D
A
C
B
SOLDER SIDE
Socket
95
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
XCMDBS Cable
PE/GND
D
U
A
V
C
W
B
BRK+
E
BRK -
BRAID SHIELD
GRN/YEL
BRN
BLK
BLU
BLU
(20 AWG)
BLU/WHT (20 AWG)
F
Drain Wire
F
A
G
E
D
B
C
SOLDER SIDE
Socket
XTBMS Cable
PIN 1
+24V
1
0V
2
RED
BLK
DRAIN WIRE
1
2
REAR VIEW OF
CONNECTOR
96
FORM WIRE
Specifications
XEFTS / XUFTS Cable
Pin 1
Pin 1
GRN
3
A
4
A/
BLU
1
B
BLK
Z
5
Z/
6
U
9
U/
10
WHT/GRY
P
P
RED/ORG
P
ORG/RED
RED/BLU (18 ga.)
13
BLU/RED (18 ga.)
14
0V
Inner Drain Wire
BRN/WHT
12
+5 VDC
P
WHT/BRN
11
W/
Inner Drain Wire
GRY/WHT
8
V/
W
P
YEL
7
V
Inner Drain Wire
ORN
2
B/
P
BRN
RED/GRN
P
Inner Drain Wire
GRN/RED
1
A
2
A/
3
B
4
B/
5
Z
6
Z/
7
U
8
U/
9
V
10
11
V/
W
12
W/
13
+5 VDC
14
COMMON
15
MOTOR TEMP
P
15
SHIELD
Overall Shield Drain Wire
1
2
3
4
5
10
6
9
7
11 12 13 14 15
8
REAR VIEW OF
CONNECTOR
5 4 3 2 1
10 9 8 7 6
15 14 13 12 11
SOLDER SIDE
Pin
97
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
XEFCS / XUFCS Cable
1 1/2" MAX.
Pin 1
GRN
C
A
A/
D
B
A
B/
B
Z
E
BLU
U
M
U/
N
V
K
BLK
P
W/
R
+5 Vdc
H
0V
G
P
Inner Drain Wire
P
YEL
WHT/GRY
Inner Drain Wire
P
GRY/WHT
WHT/BRN
P
BRN/WHT
L
V/
W
Inner Drain Wire
ORN
F
Z/
P
BRN
RED/ORG
P
ORG/RED
RED/BLU (18 ga.)
BLU/RED (18 ga.)
RED/GRN
P
Inner Drain Wire
GRN/RED
1
A
2
A/
3
B
4
B/
5
Z
6
Z/
7
U
8
U/
9
V
10
11
V/
W
12
W/
13
+5 Vdc
14
COMMON
15
MOTOR TEMP
P
J
SHIELD
Overall Shield Drain Wire
A
M
L
P
T
K
H
G
C
D
E
R
S
J
B
N
F
SOLDER SIDE
Socket
98
5 4 3 2 1
10 9 8 7 6
15 14 13 12 11
SOLDER SIDE
Pin
Specifications
NT and MG Motor Cables
CMDS Cable
1 1/2" MAX.
3 3/4" MAX.
PE/GND
D
R
A
S
B
T
C
FORM WIRE
BRN
BLK
BLU
A
G
F
BRAID SHIELD
GRN/YEL
B
H
E
C
D
SOLDER SIDE
Socket
CMMS Cable
PE/GND
D
R
A
S
B
T
C
F
BRAID SHIELD
GRN/YEL
BRN
BLK
BLU
A
G
E
D
FORM WIRE
B
C
SOLDER SIDE
Socket
99
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
CBMS Cable
RED
B
BLK
C
DRAIN WIRE
A
GND
C
A
B
SOLDER SIDE
Socket
EFCS / UFCS Cable
Pin 1
A
N
A/
P
B
B
B/
C
Z
M
Z/
U
U
F
U/
S
V
E
V/
W
R
G
W/
H
+5 VDC
K
GND
T
MOTOR OVERTEMP
A
NOT USED
V
GRN
BLU
BLK
GRY/WHT
BRN/WHT
ORG/RED
P
P
RED/BLU
BLU/RED
P
RED/GRN Inner Drain Wire
GRN/RED
P
1
A
2
A/
3
B
4
B/
5
Z
6
Z/
7
U
8
U/
9
V
10
11
V/
W
12
W/
13
+5 VDC
14
COMMON
15
MOTOR TEMP
Outer Drain Wire
A
Z
B
S
V
G
U
C
D
E
5 4 3 2 1
10 9 8 7 6
15 14 13 12 11
F
SOLDER SIDE
Socket
To Motor MG/NT/MH
100
P
RED/ORG
T
H
P
WHT/BRN
R
X
W
K
J
Inner Drain Wire
WHT/GRY Inner Drain Wire
P
L
P
YEL
N
Y
Inner Drain Wire
ORN
Z
M
P
BRN
SOLDER SIDE
Pin
Specifications
Sync Cables
SNCE
Pin 1
A+
1
A-
2
B+
3
B-
5
Z+
6
Z-
7
+5 Vdc
4
GND
8
RED/WHT
P
YEL/WHT
BLU/WHT
P
BLK/WHT
YEL
P
BLU
RED
P
BLK
A
A+
H
A-
B
B+
I
B-
C
Z+
J
Z-
D
+5 Vdc
F
GND
DRAIN WIRE
SNCDD-915
Pin 1
Pin 1
RED
1
A
A
2
B
3
B
5
Z
6
Z
7
GND
8
5V
4
P
ORG
GRN
P
YEL
BLK
P
BRN
PUR
1
A
9
A
2
B
10
B
3
Z
11
Z
8
GND
4
3
P
BLU
Drain Wire
4
5
9
3
8
2
7
1
6
SOLDER SIDE
Pin
8
7
6
5
2
1
15 14 13 12 11 10 9
SOLDER SIDE
Pin
101
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
SNCFLOA
Pin 1
Blunt end
BLU
1
ENCODER OUT A
ENCODER OUT A
9
ENCODER OUT B
2
ENCODER OUT B
10
GRN
P
BRN
BLK
ENCODER OUT Z
3
ENCODER OUT Z
11
P
YEL
WHT/BRN
PULSE IN A (SINGLE ENDED)
4
PULSE IN B (SINGLE ENDED)
12
P
BRN/WHT
WHT/GRY
ANALOG OUT CHANNEL 1 +
7
ANALOG OUT CHANNEL 2 +
15
P
GRY/WHT
RED/ORG
ANALOG OUT 0V
6
ANALOG OUT 0V
14
P
ORG/RED
RED/BLU
ANALOG COMMAND IN +
5
ANALOG COMMAND IN -
13
P
BLU/RED
GRN/RED
8
GND
P
ORN
P
RED/GRN
8
7
6
4
5
3
2
1
15 14 13 12 11 10 9
SOLDER SIDE
Pin
SNCMD-815
Pin 1
+A
-A
+B
-B
+Z
-Z
GND
+5 VDC
RED
ORG
GRN
YEL
BLK
BRN
PUR
BLU
DRAIN WIRE
1
2
3
5
6
7
8
4
6
3
1
4
2
5
CONNECTOR END VIEW
Pin
102
1
P
9
2
10
P
3
11
8
P
P
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
7
8
15 14 13 12 11 10 9
SOLDER SIDE
Pin
1
Specifications
SNCFLI
Pin 1
Blunt end
A
1
A
2
B
3
B
5
Z
6
Z
7
GND
8
5V
4
RED
ORG
YEL
BRN
9
P
PUR
BLU
P
Drain Wire
4
5
P
BLK
9
N/C
P
GRN
3
8
2
7
1
6
SOLDER SIDE
Pin
SNCMD-89
Pin 1
A
1
A
2
B
3
B
5
Z
6
Z
7
GND
8
5V
4
RED
ORG
2
GRN
YEL
3
P
5
BLK
BRN
6
P
7
PUR
BLU
8
P
4 Pin removed
Drain Wire
9
N/C
1
P
Completely remove pin 4
4
5
3
2
1
6
3
9
8
7
6
1
4
2
5
7
8
SOLDER SIDE
Pin
CONNECTOR END VIEW
Pin
103
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Communications Cables
ESA-SP-485
Drain Wire
7
WHT/BLU
P
10 TXRX-
WHT/ORG
5
P
ORG
6
220 Ω
BLU
7
15
16
WHT/BRN
1
18
P
BRN
8
SIGNAL GND
22 TXRX+
470 Ω
TXRX+ 2
TXRX-
5
P
GRN
3
470 Ω
SIGNAL GND
4
WHT/GRN
4
25
470 Ω
13 12 11 10 9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15
220 Ω
1
14
470 Ω
SOLDER SIDE
Pin
PIN 1
Pin 1
ETH-PATCH
8
1
1
8
1
2
3
6
4
5
7
8
104
WHITE
ORANGE
P
LIGHT GREEN
GREEN
6
4
P
LIGHT BROWN
BROWN
2
3
P
BLUE
LIGHT BLUE
1
5
7
P
8
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
Index
A
O
Analog Outputs, 30
Analog Velocity Submode, 10
Assigning Outputs, 5
Operational Overview, 9
C
Cable Diagrams, 94
CMDS-XXX Cable, 99
CMMS-XXX Cable, 99
D
Diagnostics and Troubleshooting, 79
Diagnostic Display, 79
Drive Faults, 83
Error Messages, 86
Fault Codes, 79
Watch Window, 83
Differential input, 15
Differential Input Spec, 15
Drive Modifiers, 25
E
EIO26-XXX Cable, 94
Epsilon EP Specifications, 91
F
Fault Codes, 79
Functional Overview, 9
G
Glossary, 87
I
Index, 105
Introduction, 1
Reference Materials, iv
P
Presets Submode, 10
Pulse Mode, 12
Pulse Mode Parameters, 16
Pulse Signal Type, 14
Pulse/Direction Submode, 13
Pulse/Pulse Submode, 13
Pulse/Quadrature Submode, 14
Q
Qualified Person, v
Quick Start, 3
Brake Operation, 29
Current Foldback, 28
Digital Inputs and Outputs, 31
Encoder Output Scaling, 28
How Motion Works, 9
Offline Setup, 3
Online Setup, 6
Shunt Operation, 29
User Interface, 9
S
Safety Information, v
Safety of Machinery, v
Safety Precautions, v
Setting Up Parameters, 39
Analog View, 68
Setup View, 41
Status View, 69
Setup, Commissioning and Maintenance, v
Single Ended Input Spec, 15
Specifications, 91
status codes
decimal point, 79
Ready, 79
Ready to Run, 79
Stop, 79
Travel Limit Decel, 79
Summation Submode, 11
105
Epsilon EP-B Base Drive Reference Manual
T
Torque Limiting, 27
Torque Mode, 12
Travel Limit Application Notes, 26
Tuning Procedures, 73
Fault Codes, 79
PID vs. State-Space, 73
Tuning Procedure, 73
V
Velocity Limiting, 27
Velocity Mode, 12
106
Since 1979, the “Motion Made Easy” products, designed and manufactured in
Minnesota U.S.A., are renowned in the motion control industry for their ease of
use, reliability and high performance.
For more information about Control Techniques “Motion Made Easy” products
and services, call (800) 397-3786 or contact our website at
www.emersonct.com.
Control Techniques Drives, Inc
Division of EMERSON Co.
12005 Technology Drive
Eden Prairie, Minnesota 55344
U.S.A.
Customer Service
Phone: (952) 995-8000 or (800) 397-3786
Fax: (952) 995-8129
Technical Support
Phone: (952) 995-8033 or (800) 397-3786
Fax (952) 9995-8020
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