A-Gas Carbon Dioxide

A-Gas Carbon Dioxide
Carbon Dioxide, 99.99%
A-Gas (Australia) Pty Ltd
Chemwatch Hazard Alert Code: 4
Chemwatch: 21-5561
Version No: 2.1.1.1
Material Safety Data Sheet according to NOHSC and ADG requirements
Issue Date: 01/01/2013
Print Date: 13/02/2014
Initial Date: Not Available
S.Local.AUS.EN
SECTION 1 IDENTIFICATION OF THE SUBSTANCE / MIXTURE AND OF THE COMPANY / UNDERTAKING
Product Identifier
Product name
Chemical Name
Synonyms
Proper shipping name
Chemical formula
Other means of identification
CAS number
Carbon Dioxide, 99.99%
CARBON DIOXIDE, 99.99%
Not Available
CARBON DIOXIDE
Not Applicable
Not Available
124-38-9
Relevant identified uses of the substance or mixture and uses advised against
Relevant identified uses
Beer and soft drink dispensing, gas purging, food packaging, welding, fire fighting, scientific equipment testing applications.
Details of the supplier of the safety data sheet
Registered company name
Address
Telephone
Fax
Website
Email
A-Gas (Australia) Pty Ltd
9-11 Oxford Road Laverton North VIC 3026
Australia
[+61] (0) 3 93689222
[+61] (0) 3 93689233
www.agas.com
[email protected]
Emergency telephone number
Association / Organisation
Not Available
Emergency telephone numbers
TOLL: [+61] 1800 024 973
Other emergency telephone numbers
TOLL: [+61] 1800 024 973
CHEMWATCH EMERGENCY RESPONSE
Primary Number
Alternative Number 1
Alternative Number 2
1800 039 008
+612 9186 1132
Not Available
Once connected and if the message is not in your prefered language then please dial 01
SECTION 2 HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION
Classification of the substance or mixture
DANGEROUS GOODS. NON-HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE. According to NOHSC Criteria, and ADG Code.
CHEMWATCH HAZARD RATINGS
Min
Flammability
Toxicity
Body Contact
Reactivity
Chronic
Max
0
2
4
0
2
0 = Minimum
1 = Low
2 = Moderate
3 = High
4 = Extreme
Poisons Schedule
Risk Phrases [1]
Legend:
GHS Classification [1]
None
R58
May cause long-term adverse effects in the environment.
R44
Risk of explosion if heated under confinement.
1. Classified by Chemwatch; 2. Classification drawn from HSIS ; 3. Classification drawn from EC Directive 1272/2008 - Annex VI
Gas under Pressure (Liquefied gas)
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Carbon Dioxide, 99.99%
Print Date: 13/02/2014
1. Classified by Chemwatch; 2. Classification drawn from HSIS ; 3. Classification drawn from EC Directive 1272/2008 - Annex VI
Label elements
GHS label elements
SIGNAL WORD
WARNING
Hazard statement(s)
H280
AUH044
Contains gas under pressure; may explode if heated
Risk of explosion if heated under confinement
Precautionary statement(s): Prevention
Not Applicable
Precautionary statement(s): Response
Not Applicable
Precautionary statement(s): Storage
P410+P403
Protect from sunlight. Store in a well-ventilated place.
Precautionary statement(s): Disposal
Not Applicable
Label elements
Relevant risk statements are found in section 2
Indication(s) of danger
N
SAFETY ADVICE
S15
Keep away from heat.
S29
Do not empty into drains.
S35
This material and its container must be disposed of in a safe way.
S40
To clean the floor and all objects contaminated by this material, use water and detergent.
S56
Dispose of this material and its container at hazardous or special waste collection point.
S57
S61
Use appropriate container to avoid environmental contamination.
Avoid release to the environment. Refer to special instructions/Safety data sheets.
Other hazards
Inhalation may produce health damage*.
Cumulative effects may result following exposure*.
Vapours potentially cause drowsiness and dizziness*.
SECTION 3 COMPOSITION / INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS
Substances
See section below for composition of Mixtures
Mixtures
CAS No
%[weight]
Name
124-38-9
>=99.9
Carbon Dioxide, 99.99%
SECTION 4 FIRST AID MEASURES
Description of first aid measures
Eye Contact
If product comes in contact with eyes remove the patient from gas source or contaminated area.
Take the patient to the nearest eye wash, shower or other source of clean water.
Open the eyelid(s) wide to allow the material to evaporate.
Gently rinse the affected eye(s) with clean, cool water for at least 15 minutes. Have the patient lie or sit down and tilt the head back. Hold the
eyelid(s) open and pour water slowly over the eyeball(s) at the inner corners, letting the water run out of the outer corners.
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The patient may be in great pain and wish to keep the eyes closed. It is important that the material is rinsed from the eyes to prevent further
damage.
Ensure that the patient looks up, and side to side as the eye is rinsed in order to better reach all parts of the eye(s)
Transport to hospital or doctor.
Even when no pain persists and vision is good, a doctor should examine the eye as delayed damage may occur.
If the patient cannot tolerate light, protect the eyes with a clean, loosely tied bandage.
Ensure verbal communication and physical contact with the patient.
DO NOT allow the patient to rub the eyes
DO NOT allow the patient to tightly shut the eyes
DO NOT introduce oil or ointment into the eye(s) without medical advice
DO NOT use hot or tepid water.
Skin Contact
If skin or hair contact occurs:
Flush skin and hair with running water (and soap if available).
Seek medical attention in event of irritation.
For hypothermia:
Move person to a warm place.
Wrap in blankets.
Shock may occur during the correction of hypothermia; cardiac dysrhythmias may be associated with severe hypothermia.
Seek medical attention.
Avoid direct heat.
Arrange for admission to hospital for observation
In case of cold burns (frost-bite):
Move casualty into warmth before thawing the affected part; if feet are affected carry if possible
Bathe the affected area immediately in luke-warm water (not more than 35 deg C) for 10 to 15 minutes, immersing if possible and without
rubbing
DO NOT apply hot water or radiant heat.
Apply a clean, dry, light dressing of "fluffed-up" dry gauze bandage
If a limb is involved, raise and support this to reduce swelling
If an adult is involved and where intense pain occurs provide pain killers such as paracetomol
Transport to hospital, or doctor
Subsequent blackening of the exposed tissue indicates potential of necrosis, which may require amputation.
Inhalation
Following exposure to gas, remove the patient from the gas source or contaminated area.
NOTE: Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), including positive pressure self-contained breathing apparatus may be required to assure the
safety of the rescuer.
Prostheses such as false teeth, which may block the airway, should be removed, where possible, prior to initiating first aid procedures.
If the patient is not breathing spontaneously, administer rescue breathing.
If the patient does not have a pulse, administer CPR.
If medical oxygen and appropriately trained personnel are available, administer 100% oxygen.
Summon an emergency ambulance. If an ambulance is not available, contact a physician, hospital, or Poison Control Centre for further
instruction.
Keep the patient warm, comfortable and at rest while awaiting medical care.
MONITOR THE BREATHING AND PULSE, CONTINUOUSLY.
Administer rescue breathing (preferably with a demand-valve resuscitator, bag-valve mask-device, or pocket mask as trained) or CPR if
necessary.
Ingestion
Not considered a normal route of entry.
Indication of any immediate medical attention and special treatment needed
For frost-bite caused by liquefied petroleum gas:
If part has not thawed, place in warm water bath (41-46 C) for 15-20 minutes, until the skin turns pink or red.
Analgesia may be necessary while thawing.
If there has been a massive exposure, the general body temperature must be depressed, and the patient must be immediately rewarmed by
whole-body immersion, in a bath at the above temperature.
Shock may occur during rewarming.
Administer tetanus toxoid booster after hospitalization.
Prophylactic antibiotics may be useful.
The patient may require anticoagulants and oxygen.
[Shell Australia 22/12/87]
for gas exposures:
-------------------------------------------------------------BASIC TREATMENT
-------------------------------------------------------------Establish a patent airway with suction where necessary.
Watch for signs of respiratory insufficiency and assist ventilation as necessary.
Administer oxygen by non-rebreather mask at 10 to 15 l/min.
Monitor and treat, where necessary, for pulmonary oedema .
Monitor and treat, where necessary, for shock.
Anticipate seizures.
-------------------------------------------------------------ADVANCED TREATMENT
-------------------------------------------------------------Consider orotracheal or nasotracheal intubation for airway control in unconscious patient or where respiratory arrest has occurred.
Positive-pressure ventilation using a bag-valve mask might be of use.
Monitor and treat, where necessary, for arrhythmias.
Start an IV D5W TKO. If signs of hypovolaemia are present use lactated Ringers solution. Fluid overload might create complications.
Drug therapy should be considered for pulmonary oedema.
Hypotension with signs of hypovolaemia requires the cautious administration of fluids. Fluid overload might create complications.
Treat seizures with diazepam.
Proparacaine hydrochloride should be used to assist eye irrigation.
BRONSTEIN, A.C. and CURRANCE, P.L.
EMERGENCY CARE FOR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EXPOSURE: 2nd Ed. 1994
SECTION 5 FIREFIGHTING MEASURES
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Extinguishing media
SMALL FIRE: Use extinguishing agent suitable for type of surrounding fire.
LARGE FIRE: Cool cylinder.
Special hazards arising from the substrate or mixture
Fire Incompatibility
None known.
Advice for firefighters
Cryogens can be particularly dangerous during fires.
Cryogenic liquids can freeze water very rapidly.
Careless use of water can lead to heavy icing, possibly blocking pressure relief valves.
The relatively warm water can also cause a cryogenic liquid to vapourise more rapidly.
Fire Fighting
Fire/Explosion Hazard
Non combustible.
Not considered a significant fire risk, however containers may burn.
Contains low boiling substance: Closed containers may rupture due to pressure buildup under fire conditions.
SECTION 6 ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
Personal precautions, protective equipment and emergency procedures
Minor Spills
Environmental hazard - contain spillage.
Avoid breathing vapour and any contact with liquid or gas. Protective equipment including respirator should be used.
DO NOT
Major Spills
Environmental hazard - contain spillage.
Clear area of all unprotected personnel and move upwind.
Alert Emergency Authority and advise them of the location and nature of hazard.
Wear breathing apparatus and protective gloves.
Personal Protective Equipment advice is contained in Section 8 of the MSDS.
SECTION 7 HANDLING AND STORAGE
Precautions for safe handling
Anyone who handles, stores or transfers cryogenic liquids requires instruction on safe handling practices. Specific areas of instruction
should include:
Safe handling
1. properties of the cryogen both as a liquid and a gas
2. specific instructions on the equipment being used, including safety devices
Other information
Store in an upright position.
Cylinders should be stored in a purpose-built compound with good ventilation, preferably in the open.
Such compounds should be sited and built in accordance with statutory requirements.
The storage compound should be kept clear and access restricted to authorised personnel only.
Conditions for safe storage, including any incompatibilities
Suitable container
Storage incompatibility
Equipment must be able to withstand process pressure and especially cryogenic temperature.
Commonly used materials are copper or stainless steel.
Mild steel must NOT be used.
Most plastics and rubbers are not suitable as they become brittle.
Carbon dioxide:
reacts violently with strong bases and alkali metals (especially their dusts)
may ignite or explode when heated or in suspended chemically active metals (and their hydrides) such as aluminium, chromium, manganese,
magnesium (above 775 C), titanium (above 550 C), uranium (above 750 C) or zirconium , diethylmagnesium
is incompatible with water, acrolein, acrylaldehyde, amines, anhydrous ammonia, aziridine, metal acetylides (such as lithium acetylide),
caesium monoxide (moist), lithium, potassium, sodium, sodium carbide, sodium-potassium alloy, sodium peroxide, titanium
PACKAGE MATERIAL INCOMPATIBILITIES
SECTION 8 EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
Control parameters
OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE LIMITS (OEL)
INGREDIENT DATA
Source
Ingredient
Material name
TWA
STEL
Peak
Notes
Australia Exposure Standards
Carbon Dioxide,
99.99%
Carbon dioxide / Carbon
dioxide in coal mines
9000 (mg/m3) / 22500 (mg/m3) /
5000 (ppm) / 12500 (ppm)
54000 (mg/m3) /
30000 (ppm)
Not
Available
Not
Available
EMERGENCY LIMITS
Ingredient
TEEL-0
TEEL-1
TEEL-2
TEEL-3
Carbon Dioxide, 99.99%
5000(ppm)
30000(ppm)
40000(ppm)
40000(ppm)
Ingredient
Original IDLH
Revised IDLH
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50,000(ppm)
40,000(ppm)
Exposure controls
Appropriate engineering controls
Engineering controls are used to remove a hazard or place a barrier between the worker and the hazard. Well-designed engineering controls
can be highly effective in protecting workers and will typically be independent of worker interactions to provide this high level of protection.
The basic types of engineering controls are:
Process controls which involve changing the way a job activity or process is done to reduce the risk.
Personal protection
Eye and face protection
Skin protection
For cryogenic liquids:
The eyes are the most sensitive body part to the extreme cold of the liquid and vapours.
A full face shield over safe glasses is recommended when handling cryogens.
Chemical goggles.
See Hand protection below
Hand protection
Insulated gloves:
NOTE: Insulated gloves should be loose fitting so that may be removed quickly if liquid is spilled upon them. Insulated gloves are not made to
permit hands to be placed in the liquid; they provide only short-term protection from accidental contact with the liquid.
When handling sealed and suitably insulated cylinders wear cloth or leather gloves.
Body protection
See Other protection below
Other protection
For cryogenic liquids
Cryogenic liquids flow very freely and can penetrate woven or other porous clothing much faster than water
Wear a non-porous, knee length laboratory coat, without pockets or cuffs which could catch the liquid.
If using larger quantities of cryogenic liquids, wear an apron of a non-woven material such as leather.
Thermal hazards
Recommended material(s)
Respiratory protection
GLOVE SELECTION INDEX
Not Applicable
Glove selection is based on a modified presentation of the:
"Forsberg Clothing Performance Index".
The effect(s) of the following substance(s) are taken into account in the
Carbon Dioxide, 99.99% Not Available
Material
CPI
* CPI - Chemwatch Performance Index
A: Best Selection
B: Satisfactory; may degrade after 4 hours continuous immersion
C: Poor to Dangerous Choice for other than short term immersion
SECTION 9 PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
Information on basic physical and chemical properties
Appearance
Cryogenic liquid; Such liquids are defined as those with a normal boiling point below -150 deg. C Liquefied refrigerated gases are generally
cryogens. These gases must cooled below room temperature before an increase in pressure can liquefy them.them
Gases are processed into cryogenic liquids by a combination of pressurisation, cooling, and ultimately, release of pressure.
Physical state
Liquified Gas
Relative density (Water = 1)
Not Available
Odour
Not Available
Partition coefficient n-octanol / water
Not Available
Odour threshold
Not Available
Auto-ignition temperature (°C)
pH (as supplied)
Not Available
Decomposition temperature
Not Available
Melting point / freezing point (°C)
Not Available
Viscosity (cSt)
Not Available
Initial boiling point and boiling range
(°C)
Not Available
Molecular weight (g/mol)
Not Applicable
24
Flash point (°C)
Not Available
Taste
Not Available
Evaporation rate
Not Available
Explosive properties
Not Available
Flammability
Not Available
Oxidising properties
Not Available
Upper Explosive Limit (%)
Not Available
Surface Tension (dyn/cm or mN/m)
Not Available
Lower Explosive Limit (%)
Not Available
Volatile Component (%vol)
Not Available
Vapour pressure (kPa)
6300 @ 25C
Gas group
Not Available
Solubility in water (g/L)
Not Applicable
pH as a solution(1%)
Not Available
Vapour density (Air = 1)
1.53
VOC g/L
Not Available
SECTION 10 STABILITY AND REACTIVITY
Reactivity
See section 7
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Chemical stability
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Print Date: 13/02/2014
Presence of incompatible materials.
Product is considered stable.
Hazardous polymerisation will not occur.
Possibility of hazardous reactions
See section 7
Conditions to avoid
See section 7
Incompatible materials
See section 7
Hazardous decomposition products
See section 5
SECTION 11 TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Information on toxicological effects
Inhaled
Ingestion
Skin Contact
Eye
Chronic
The material is not thought to produce respiratory irritation (as classified by EC Directives using animal models). Nevertheless inhalation, of the
material, especially for prolonged periods, may produce respiratory discomfort and occasionally, distress.
Inhalation of vapours may cause drowsiness and dizziness. This may be accompanied by narcosis, reduced alertness, loss of reflexes, lack of
coordination and vertigo.
Overexposure is unlikely in this form.
Not normally a hazard due to physical form of product.
Considered an unlikely route of entry in commercial/industrial environments
Open cuts, abraded or irritated skin should not be exposed to this material
Entry into the blood-stream through, for example, cuts, abrasions, puncture wounds or lesions, may produce systemic injury with harmful effects.
Examine the skin prior to the use of the material and ensure that any external damage is suitably protected.
Vapourising liquid causes rapid cooling and contact may cause cold burns, frostbite, even through normal gloves.
Although the material is not thought to be an irritant (as classified by EC Directives), direct contact with the eye may produce transient discomfort
characterised by tearing or conjunctival redness (as with windburn).
Vapourising liquid causes rapid cooling and contact may cause cold burns, frostbite, even through normal gloves. Frozen skin tissues are
painless and appear waxy and yellow. Signs and symptoms of frost-bite may include "pins and needles", paleness followed by numbness, a
hardening an stiffening of the skin, a progression of colour changes in the affected area, (first white, then mottled and blue and eventually black;
on recovery, red, hot, painful and blistered).
Limited evidence suggests that repeated or long-term occupational exposure may produce cumulative health effects involving organs or
biochemical systems.
Principal route of occupational exposure to the gas is by inhalation.
Although prolonged exposure to carbon dioxide, at levels up to 1.5% in inhaled air, are well tolerated, calcium/ phosphorus metabolism may be
affected. Serum levels of calcium and urinary phosphorus progressively fall.
TOXICITY
IRRITATION
Not Available
Not Available
Carbon Dioxide, 99.99%
Not available. Refer to individual constituents.
CARBON DIOXIDE, 99.99%
- pulmonary effects IDLH: 50,000 ppm
Acute Toxicity
Not Applicable
Carcinogenicity
Not Applicable
Skin Irritation/Corrosion
Not Applicable
Reproductivity
Not Applicable
Serious Eye Damage/Irritation
Not Applicable
STOT - Single Exposure
Not Applicable
Respiratory or Skin sensitisation
Not Applicable
STOT - Repeated Exposure
Not Applicable
Mutagenicity
Not Applicable
Aspiration Hazard
Not Applicable
CMR STATUS
SECTION 12 ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Toxicity
On the basis of available evidence concerning either toxicity, persistence, potential to accumulate and or observed environmental fate and behaviour, the material may present a danger, immediate
or long-term and /or delayed, to the structure and/ or functioning of natural ecosystems.
For carbon dioxide:
Environmental fate:
Carbon dioxide in earth's atmosphere is considered a trace gas currently occurring at an average concentration of about 385 parts per
million by volume or 582 parts per million by mass.
Persistence and degradability
Ingredient
Persistence: Water/Soil
Persistence: Air
Not Available
Not Available
Not Available
Bioaccumulative potential
Ingredient
Bioaccumulation
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Not Available
Mobility in soil
Ingredient
Mobility
Not Available
Not Available
SECTION 13 DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS
Waste treatment methods
Evaporate residue at an approved site.
Return empty containers to supplier. If containers are marked non-returnable establish means of disposal with manufacturer prior to
purchase.
Ensure damaged or non-returnable cylinders are gas-free before disposal.
Product / Packaging disposal
SECTION 14 TRANSPORT INFORMATION
Labels Required
Marine Pollutant
HAZCHEM
NO
2T
Land transport (ADG)
UN number
Packing group
UN proper shipping name
Environmental hazard
1013
Not Available
CARBON DIOXIDE
No relevant data
Class
2.2
Transport hazard class(es)
Subrisk
Special provisions
Special precautions for user
limited quantity
120 ml
Air transport (ICAO-IATA / DGR)
UN number
Packing group
1013
Not Available
UN proper shipping name
Carbon dioxide †
Environmental hazard
No relevant data
ICAO/IATA Class
Transport hazard class(es)
2.2
ICAO / IATA Subrisk
ERG Code
2L
Special provisions
Special precautions for user
Cargo Only Packing Instructions
200
Cargo Only Maximum Qty / Pack
150 kg
Passenger and Cargo Packing Instructions
200
Passenger and Cargo Maximum Qty / Pack
75 kg
Passenger and Cargo Limited Quantity Packing Instructions
Forbidden
Passenger and Cargo Maximum Qty / Pack
Forbidden
Sea transport (IMDG-Code / GGVSee)
UN number
Packing group
UN proper shipping name
Environmental hazard
Transport hazard class(es)
1013
Not Available
CARBON DIOXIDE
No relevant data
IMDG Class
2.2
IMDG Subrisk
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SECTION 15 REGULATORY INFORMATION
Safety, health and environmental regulations / legislation specific for the substance or mixture
Carbon Dioxide, 99.99%(124-38-9) is
found on the following regulatory lists
"International Maritime Dangerous Goods Requirements (IMDG Code)","International Maritime Dangerous Goods Requirements (IMDG
Code) - Substance Index","Australia Exposure Standards","United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods Model
Regulations (English)","Australia Dangerous Goods Code (ADG Code) - List of Emergency Action Codes","OECD List of High Production
Volume (HPV) Chemicals","International Numbering System for Food Additives","United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of
Dangerous Goods Model Regulations (Spanish)","Sigma-AldrichTransport Information","Australia High Volume Industrial Chemical List
(HVICL)","Australia Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVM) Record of approved active constituents","Australia
Dangerous Goods Code (ADG Code) - Packing Instruction - Liquefied and Dissolved Gases","CODEX General Standard for Food Additives
(GSFA) - Additives Permitted for Use in Food in General, Unless Otherwise Specified, in Accordance with GMP","Regulations concerning the
International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Rail - Table A: Dangerous Goods List - RID 2013 (English)","International Air Transport
Association (IATA) Dangerous Goods Regulations","Australia Dangerous Goods Code (ADG Code) - Dangerous Goods List","Australia
Hazardous Substances Information System - Consolidated Lists","Acros Transport Information"
SECTION 16 OTHER INFORMATION
Other information
Classification of the preparation and its individual components has drawn on official and authoritative sources as well as independent review by the Chemwatch Classification committee using
available literature references.
A list of reference resources used to assist the committee may be found at:
www.chemwatch.net/references
The (M)SDS is a Hazard Communication tool and should be used to assist in the Risk Assessment. Many factors determine whether the reported Hazards are Risks in the workplace or other
settings. Risks may be determined by reference to Exposures Scenarios. Scale of use, frequency of use and current or available engineering controls must be considered.
This document is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purposes of private study, research, review or criticism, as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any
process without written permission from CHEMWATCH. TEL (+61 3) 9572 4700.
end of SDS
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