High School Course Offerings Fall 2015

High School Course Offerings Fall 2015

Prince George’s County Public Schools

Courses and Programs of Study

Fall 2015

HIGH SCHOOL

(GRADES 9-12)

PGCPS COURSES AND PROGRAMS OF STUDY

Courses listed in this publication make up the instructional program for the school system’s middle schools. Only approved core curricula are available at all sites, and courses may not be offered during this school year if enrollment does not permit. Prerequisites are conditions that must be met in order to enroll in a course. Credits are used for scheduling and grade point average calculations.

Information in this publication may change.

Contact the content area office listed in the Phone Directory for updates.

Published by the Office of Teaching and Learning, Department of Curriculum and Instruction

August 2015

BOARD OF EDUCATION OF PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

SEGUN C. EUBANKS, ED.D., BOARD CHAIR

CAROLYN M. BOSTON, VICE CHAIR, DISTRICT 6

ZABRINA EPPS, M.P.M., DISTRICT 1

LUPI QUINTEROS-GRADY, DISTRICT 2

DINORA A. HERNANDEZ, ESQ., DISTRICT 3

PATRICIA EUBANKS, DISTRICT 4

VERJEANA M. JACOBS, ESQ., DISTRICT 5

VACANT, DISTRICT 7

EDWARD BURROUGHS III, DISTRICT 8

SONYA WILLIAMS, DISTRICT 9

BEVERLY ANDERSON, PH.D., BOARD MEMBER

VACANT, BOARD MEMBER

CURTIS VALENTINE, M.P.P., BOARD MEMBER

AVA PERRY, STUDENT BOARD MEMBER

KEVIN M. MAXWELL, PH.D., SECRETARY-TREASURER AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

The Board of Education of Prince George’s County Public Schools does not discriminate in admissions, treatment, or employment on the basis of race, color, sex, age, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, or disability.

For TTD Services/Hearing & Speech Impaired, call 301-952-6068.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

GENERAL INFORMATION

How to use this Publication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Planning a High School Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Changes in Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

High School Graduation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

High School Core Curriculum Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

MSDE’s High School Graduation Q&A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Educational Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

The College Preparation Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

College Admissions Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

SAT Preparation Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Credentialing Opportunities in High School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

University System of Maryland Admission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

High School Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265

Phone Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266

HIGH SCHOOL COURSE OFFERINGS

Career Academies and Programs of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Architecture and Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Aviation and Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Business and Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Consumer Services, Hospitality, and Tourism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Engineering and Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Environmental Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Global Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

Graphic Arts, Media, and Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

Health and Biosciences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

Homeland Security and Military Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

Information Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

Law, Education, and Public Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Career and Technology Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

Business Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

Experiential Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

Family and Consumer Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

Technical Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

Advanced Technology Education, Technology Education, CTE Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

Community Referenced Instruction (CRI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

Dance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97

Drama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100

Dual Credit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103

English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107

English for Speakers of Other Languages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Health Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

International Baccalaureate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127

Maryland Virtual Learning Opportunities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139

MVLO Art. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139

MVLO Career and Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

MVLO English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

MVLO Health Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144

MVLO HTML and Web Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145

MVLO Mathematics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145

MVLO Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150

MVLO Social Studies, Political Science, and Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153

MVLO World Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157

Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159

Military Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168

Aerospace Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169

Army JROTC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172

Navy JROTC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174

Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175

Instrumental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175

Vocal and General. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178

Physical Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183

Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185

Science and Technology Program (S/T) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197

Social Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203

Visual Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216

Visual and Performing Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226

Dance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226

Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230

Television Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234

Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235

Visual Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238

World Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

HOW TO USE THIS PUBLICATION

1. The courses listed make up the instructional program for the school system’s secondary schools. However, only approved core curricula are available at all sites, and courses may not be offered during this school year if enrollment does not permit.

2. Fees are not included in the description of courses.

3. Courses appear in order within alphabetized departments.

4. Course codes are used by the school system to schedule students electronically.

5. The 6 th

digit in the 6-digit Course Code may be interpreted as follows:

1=first semester;

2=second semester;

3=full year;

0=first or second semester (high school).

6. Credits are awarded for successful demonstration of a specified unit of study.

1.0 = full year;

.50 = half year;

.25 = one quarter;

0 = full year, half year, or quarter.

7. After required specified credits have been earned, all other credits are elective.

8. Prerequisites are conditions that must be met in order to enroll in a course.

9. Students may need assistance from parents, counselors, administrators, and teachers in interpreting information within the publication.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

PLANNING A HIGH SCHOOL SCHEDULE

All students are expected to either be state-approved Career and Technology Education program completers or meet University System of Maryland entrance requirements, or both, upon graduating from high school. Careful and informed course planning is necessary to accomplish this goal:

1. Review credits you have earned to determine whether you are meeting graduation requirements.

2. Complete registration forms accurately.

3. Some courses have a limited enrollment based on capacities of the physical facilities of the school. Counselors will work with the teachers involved to register students in those classes.

4. Courses will be taught only if the enrollment is large enough to justify formation of a section. If a course must be canceled because of low enrollment, every effort will be made to notify students.

5. Because of the large number of courses offered only once, twice or three times, which result in scheduling conflicts, it is imperative for students to make alternate selections. When contact cannot be made, the alternate selection is the only aid available in resolving conflicts.

CHANGES IN SCHEDULE

It is very difficult to make satisfactory adjustments at the last moment. Your selections should be considered final. Requests for schedule changes will be honored only under extenuating circumstances.

Only in unusual circumstances will schedule changes be made after the fourth week in either semester.

Requests for schedule changes will be considered for the following reasons only:

I. Course prerequisites not met;

II. Seniors needing specific courses to meet Maryland graduation requirements;

III. To correct an obvious error;

IV. Failing or non-qualifying grades in summer school courses;

V. Authentic, documented health reasons; and

VI. Certain circumstances requiring administrative approval.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

HIGH SCHOOL

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Effective with the Graduating class of 2018 (entering freshman in Fall 2014), graduation requirements to earn a Maryland High School diploma are as follows. See the

Required Subject Area Descriptions

pages in

Administrative Procedure 6150 for further descriptions of enrollment requirements.

SUBJECT AREA

English

Mathematics

Science

Social Studies

SPECIFIC CREDIT

REQUIREMENTS

4 credits

4 credits

√ 1 in Algebra 1 Common Core

√ 1 in Geometry Common Core

√ 1 in Algebra 2 Common Core

√ 1 additional mathematics credit

3 credits

√ 1 in Biology

√ 2 additional credits that must include laboratory experience in any or all of the following areas: earth science, life science, physical science

3 credits

√ 1 in U.S. History

√ 1 in Local, State, and National

Government

√ 1 in World History

ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS

Grade 9 (effective School Year 2014-2015)

PARCC English 9

PARCC Algebra 1

HSA Biology

HSA Government

Grade 10 (effective School Year 2015-2016)

PARCC Algebra 1 or PARCC Geometry or PARCC Algebra 2

PARCC English 10

HSA Biology

HSA Government

Retake opportunities for HSAs/PARCC

Grade 11 (effective School Year 2016-2017)

PARCC Algebra 1 or PARCC Geometry or PARCC Algebra 2

PARCC English 11*

HSA Biology

HSA Government

Retake opportunities for HSAs/PARCC

*College and Career Ready Determination

Grade 12 (effective School Year 2017-2018)

PARCC Algebra 1 or PARCC Geometry or PARCC Algebra 2

HSA Biology

HSA Government

Retake opportunities for HSAs/PARCC

Transition courses if a student is not college and career ready

OTHER REQUIREMENTS

Fine Arts

1 credit

Physical

Education

Health

Education

Technology

Education

.50 credit √ Your Personal Fitness

.50 credit √ Health Issues

1 credit √ Foundations of Technology

Completer**

and

Electives

2 credits of either World Language or American Sign Language (both credits must be in the same language per local requirements) and 2 credits in electives

OR

2 credits of Advanced Technology Education and 2 credits in electives

OR

Complete (4–9 credits) a Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE)-Approved sequence of courses

Credits: Twenty-one (21) credits are required. Per COMAR 13A.03.02.01C, PGCPS has notified the Maryland State Department of

Education (MSDE) that four (4) credits must be earned after completion of Grade 11.

Enrollment: The student shall satisfactorily complete four years of approved study beyond the 8th grade unless on an approved option.

Student Service-Learning: The student shall complete a locally-developed, state-approved program that includes service learning infusion in designated courses, preparation, reflection and a specified number of hours of independent service.

**Completer refers to a specified sequence of courses required for completing graduation requirements

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

6

HIGH SCHOOL

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Effective with the Graduating classes of 2009 through 2017 (entering freshman in Fall 2005 through Fall

2013), graduation requirements to earn a Maryland High School diploma are as follows:

SUBJECT AREA

English

Mathematics

Science

Social Studies

SPECIFIC CREDIT

REQUIREMENTS

4 credits

3 credits

√ 1 in Algebra 1 or Algebra 1

Common Core

√ 1 in Geometry or Geometry

Common Core

√ 1 additional mathematics credit

3 credits

√ 1 in Biology

√ 2 additional credits that must include laboratory experience in any or all of the following areas: earth science, life science, physical science

3 credits

√ 1 in U.S. History

√ 1 in Local, State, and National

Government

√ 1 in World History

HIGH SCHOOL ASSESSMENT (HSA)

REQUIREMENTS*

Algebra/Data Analysis, English 10, and Biology: Students who entered grade 9 in the fall of 2005 and later (COMAR 13A.03.02.09) must obtain either a passing score on Algebra/Data Analysis, English

10, and Biology or obtain an overall combined score of 1208 or 1602

(see below). Students who meet specific criteria may use the Bridge

Plan for Academic Validation to meet the passing requirement. See questions 20 and 21 (pages 10-11) in the High School Graduation

Requirements Questions and Answers (http://hsaexam.org/img/HS_

Grad_Q_A.pdf) for information about the Bridge Plan option.

Government: Students entering 9th grade in the 2012-13, 2011-

12, 2010-11, or 2009-2010 school years do not need to pass the

Government HSA for graduation, but may use it if they pursue a combined score to satisfy this requirement. These students have two options: o Students MAY achieve a combined score of 1602 for English,

Algebra/Data Analysis, Biology, and Government.OR

o Students MAY achieve a combined score of 1208 for English,

Algebra/Data Analysis, and Biology.

Students entering 9th grade in school year 2013-14 and beyond

MUST either pass the Government HSA or include the Government

HSA score to meet a combined score of 1602.

OTHER REQUIREMENTS

Fine Arts

1 credit

Physical

Education

Health

Education

Technology

Education

.50 credit √ Your Personal Fitness

.50 credit √ Health Issues

1 credit √ Foundations of Technology

Completer**

and

Electives

2 credits of either World Language or American Sign Language (both credits must be in the same language per local requirements) and 3 credits in electives

OR

2 credits of Advanced Technology Education and 3 credits in electives

OR

Complete (4–9 credits) a Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE)-Approved sequence of courses

and any remaining credits in electives

Credits: Twenty-one (21) credits are required. Per COMAR 13A.03.02.01C, PGCPS has notified the Maryland State Department of

Education (MSDE) that four (4) credits must be earned after completion of Grade 11.

Enrollment: The student shall satisfactorily complete four years of approved study beyond the 8th grade unless on an approved option.

Student Service-Learning: The student shall complete a locally-developed, state-approved program that includes service learning infusion in designated courses, preparation, reflection and a specified number of hours of independent service..

**Completer refers to a specified sequence of courses required for completing graduation requirements.

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

7

CONTENT

Mathematics

English

Science

Social Studies

HIGH SCHOOL

Core Curriculum Course Sequence

GRADE 9 GRADE 10 GRADE 11 GRADE 12

• Algebra 1 Common

Core

• Geometry Common

Core

• Algebra 2 Common

Core

• Applications in

Algebra for ELLs

(ESOL)

• Algebra 1 Common

Core

• Geometry Common

Core

• Algebra 2 Common

Core

• Trig / Analysis

• Probability and

Statistics

• Pre-Calculus

• Linear Algebra

• English 9

• English 9 Honors

• ESOL Newcomer,

Beginner,

Intermediate,

Advanced

• English 10

• English 10 Honors

• ESOL Beginner,

Intermediate,

Advanced

• Integrating the

Sciences

• Biology (Honors)

• Integrating the

Sciences (ESOL)

• Language of Science

(ESOL)

• Biology

• Chemistry (Honors)

• Integrating the

Sciences (ESOL)

• Geometry Common

Core

• Integrated Math

• Algebra 2 Common

Core

• Trig / Analysis

• Pre-Calculus

• AP Statistics

• AP Computer

Science

• AP Calculus AB

• Integrated Math

• Algebra 2 Common

Core

• Trig / Analysis

• Probability and

Statistics

• Pre-Calculus

• AP Statistics

• AP Computer

Science

• AP Calculus AB

• AP Calculus BC

• Calc II /

Diff Equations

• English 12

• AP Language

• AP Literature

• English 10 (ESOL)

• ESOL Advanced

• English 11

• English 11 Honors

• AP Language

• ESOL Intermediate,

Advanced

• English 10 (ESOL)

• Chemistry

• Biology

• Physics

• AP Physics B

• AP Physics C

• AP Biology

• AP Chemistry

• AP Environmental

Science

• Environmental

Science

• Physics (Honors)

• Earth / Space

Systems

• Physics

• AP Biology

• AP Physics B

• AP Physics C

• AP Chemistry

• AP Environmental

Science

• Environmental

Science

• Physics (Honors)

• United States History

II, Reconstruction to

Present

• Language of

American History

(ESOL)

• Local, State, and

National Government

• United States History

II, Reconstruction to

Present (ESOL)

• AP Government &

Politics

• World History

• AP World History

• Local, State, and

National Government

(ESOL)

• AP World History

• AP US History

• AP Psychology

• AP Government &

Politics

• AP European History

• AP Human

Geography

• World History

(ESOL)

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

Provided by the Maryland State Department of Education, January 2013

Check the MSDE website, marylandpublicschools.org, for updates to this information.

LATEST NEWS

Government High School Assessment (HSA) Reinstated

Beginning in the 2012-13 school year, all students enrolled in the Government course will take the Government High

School Assessment. The first administration will occur in January 2013. The Government High School Assessment will become a graduation requirement for students entering the 9th grade in the 2013-14 school year and each school year thereafter.

The following information contains answers to the most frequently asked questions related to high school graduation in

Maryland. Questions are categorized by topic as much as possible; however, some questions may be related to more than one topic. Answers will be updated as new information becomes available and new regulations are adopted. The

Code of Maryland Regulations (COMAR) is available on line at http://www.dsd.state.md.us/comar/comar.aspx

Maryland Requirements for High School Graduation

1. Can a local school system have local graduation requirements beyond the minimum requirements established

by the state? Yes. For specific graduation requirements, contact the appropriate school system personnel listed at the end of this document. See COMAR 13A.03.02.01C.

High School Graduation Requirements Questions & Answers

2. How does a student meet both the Maryland and the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) high school reading requirement

for graduation?

For Students Who Entered Grade 9 in the 2005-06 School Year and Later

To fulfill the Maryland High School Assessment requirement for graduation, the student must pass the English assessment.

The English course is defined as the second year of high school English, typically taken after the student completes the grade 10 English course. The assessment will be scored and reported in two ways: Basic, Proficient, or Advanced for

NCLB accountability and numerically for the HSAs.

3. What are the graduation credit requirements for students with disabilities who are placed in non-public schools?

The answer to this question was the subject of a memo to local school superintendents from Former Superintendent, Dr.

Grasmick dated November 14, 2005 regarding Graduation Requirements for Students in Non-Public Placements. State regulations address disparities between local school system graduation requirements and those of non-public special education schools. COMAR 13A.03.02.08B requires students in a non-public special education school to meet the graduation requirements of the placing local school system. There are alternative ways to do so. COMAR 13A.03.02.11 provides local school systems with an opportunity to develop “alternative ways for individuals or groups of students to fulfill graduation requirements.”

Local school systems can work with the non-public school to agree on a curricular program that meets the instructional needs of the student and addresses the normal content specified generally in the local school system’s graduation requirements. The curricular program for these students can include fewer than the requisite number of credits in the local school system graduation requirements, but no fewer than the state minimum of 21 credits as identified in COMAR

13A.03.02-.04A. The student must also meet the service learning requirement, and he or she must take and pass the

Maryland High School Assessments as appropriate to the date of entry into grade 9 or satisfy the HSA graduation

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

requirement by achieving the required combined score or successfully complete the Bridge Plan for Academic Validation

(see section on High School Assessments).

4. What notification must parents or guardians and students receive? In accordance with COMAR 13A.03.02.12(C), each principal shall inform all students and their parents or guardians annually of no less than the following:

•Maryland’s graduation requirements and any local graduation requirements;

•the student’s progress on fulfilling the credit, HSA, service, and any applicable IEP requirements for graduation;

•the schedule for administering the HSA, the results of each HSA taken by the student; and

•a plan for appropriate assistance or remediation for the student if he or she did not pass the HSA.

5. Up to what age may a student remain in school if he/she is working to complete the requirements for a high

school diploma? A student may remain in school if he/she is working to meet the requirements for a high school diploma until the age of 21. As defined in COMAR 13A.02.06.02B(4), age 21 means the student is not 21 years old on the first day of the school year. See also COMAR 13A.02.06.03A(1) and §7-101(a) of the Annotated Code of Maryland.

Graduation Credits: Defined/Earning

1. How are units of high school credit defined? A credit means successful demonstration of a specified unit of study. See

COMAR 13A.03.02.02B(2).

2. Can high school credits be earned in ways other than going to school during regular days/year? Yes. See

COMAR 13A.03.02.05 Other Provisions for Earning Credit.

3. Can a student earn a Maryland High School Diploma online? No. The Maryland Virtual Learning Opportunity (MVLO) program has a state-run virtual school project, Maryland Virtual School (MVS) that is managed by MSDE. MVS is primarily used for supplemental instruction. Students cannot earn a high school diploma by solely completing online courses. MVS does not offer a high school diploma online. The majority of students served take one or two online courses to supplement their traditional school program. Enrollment in MVS online courses requires local school system approval.

4. Can online courses be accepted for credit by a school? Is there a criterion by which these courses are evaluated?

For students currently enrolled in a Maryland public school, credit can only be awarded for MSDE-approved online courses. See COMAR 13A.03.02.05D. Correspondence and Online Courses. An online course is a course provided through the Internet and other technologies in which 80% or more of the instruction is conducted online with the teacher and student separated by distance or time or both and in which two-way communication between the teacher and student is required. For online courses, COMAR 13A.03.02.05D(1) specifies that “Consistent with local school system policy and procedure, credit may be given…for Department-approved online courses. If credit is to be applied toward minimum graduation requirements, the…Department-approved online course shall be provided by the local school system.”

The State Department of Education has developed an approval process for online courses that are administered by a local school system. This approval process helps ensure the quality of the online courses offered by our public schools and ensures that such courses align with state content standards and core learning goals. A list of MSDE-approved online courses is updated periodically and available on the MVLO website at http://www.mdk12online.org. For students transferring into a Maryland public school, see Question 2 under Transfer Students.

5. Can a local school system award high school credit to a middle school student who completes a high school

course? Yes. See COMAR 13A.03.02.05I(2) and (3).

6. Can a student exclude from the transcript an 8th grade course for which high school credit was received? No. If a student receives credit, the credit needs to be on the transcript.

7. What alternatives can local school systems offer/provide students so they can fulfill graduation requirements?

At the discretion of the local school superintendent an alternative plan to fulfill graduation requirements may be developed as described in COMAR 13A.03.02.11 Alternatives For Structuring Programs. In addition, graduation requirements may also be fulfilled through the Early College Admission Program or the Early Admission to Approved Vocational, Technical or Other Postsecondary School Program as described in COMAR 13A.03.02.10. See also COMAR 13A.03.02.05 Other

Provisions for Earning Credit.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

8. Can students receive credits for subjects taken previously from a school when no official transcript is available?

Yes. There are several ways as described in COMAR 13A.03.02.12B(4) Unavailability of Official Transcript. A local superintendent of schools shall determine by an evaluation of a student whether credits earned at a high school will be accepted at the public high school to which the student transfers. This evaluation may include administration of standardized tests and examinations, observation of student in a classroom setting, and the use of interviews, as well as the inspection of transcripts, report cards, and other documentation.

9. Is biology required? Yes, since 2001. Students are required to take both the biology course and the High School

Assessment for biology. See COMAR 13A.03.02.04(A)(6). Also, see question 2 under Transfer Students.

10. Is algebra/data analysis required? Yes. Students are required to take both the algebra/data analysis course and the

High School Assessment for algebra/data analysis. See COMAR 13A.03.02.04(A)(3).

11. Do credits in American Sign Language satisfy the requirement for credits in foreign language? COMAR

13A.03.02.04, adopted by the State Board of Education in 2007, allows students to earn two credits in foreign language or two credits in American Sign Language. The COMAR regulation does not allow students to meet the graduation requirement by taking one credit in foreign language and one credit in American Sign Language.

12. Can local school systems add endorsements to the Maryland High School Diploma to recognize students for

achievement? Yes. Local school systems have the option to add endorsements to the diploma as incentives for students to meet locally established requirements and outcomes in instruction beyond the minimums specified by the

State. See COMAR 13A.03.02.08D and COMAR 13A.03.02.09E.

Graduation Records

1. How can I obtain my student records or a duplicate high school diploma? Contact the student records department in the local school system where you (the student) attended high school to request a copy of the transcript or a copy of the diploma. All school systems may not have copies of the diploma. There may be a fee for copies.

2. How can a foreign student receive a translated transcript? Call World Educational Services at (212) 966-6311 for assistance.

High School Assessments

1. When do students take the High School Assessment? Students who take high school level courses take the Maryland

High School Assessment after the student completes the required course. See COMAR 13A.03.02.07. Awarding credit for the course is the acceptable definition for completing the course. Some students enrolled in HSA courses may show indications they will not receive credit for the course before the HSA is administered. In such cases, the school system will determine whether it is in the best interest of the student to sit for the test prior to completing the course or to take the

HSA at a later date following the student’s successful completion of the course.

2. Do students who take “on-line” or “virtual” courses have to take the High School Assessments? Yes. If the student receives credit and the course is one of the courses for which the high school assessment is given, the student must take the high school assessment regardless of how the student received the instruction for the course. See COMAR

13A.03.02.05J.

3. Is a student required to take the High School Assessments if the student is home-schooled, moves here from

another state or foreign country, or transfers from a private school, and is granted credits in the HSA-aligned

courses? Transfer students who receive credit for HSA-aligned course(s) taken prior to enrolling in a Maryland public school do not have to take the assessment for those courses. See COMAR 13A.03.02.12B(2). The Maryland public school principal makes the decision on whether or not to award credit.

4. Are students who are on home and hospital instruction required to take HSA exams if they are taking/enrolled

in an HSA course? Who administers the exam(s)? Students on home and hospital teaching who are completing a course for which there is a High School Assessment must participate in the HSA testing. These students would take the test on the same primary administration or make-up testing day as students attending school but would have the test administered in their home and hospital setting. The test examiner administering the test in the home and hospital setting, just like an in-school test examiner, must meet all the qualifications to be a Certified Test Examiner as outlined in the Test

Administration and Coordination Manual (TACM) for the High School Assessments.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

5. Is a student required to take the HSA if the student transfers from one public school to another in Maryland

and the student’s record indicates the student took an HSA-aligned course but there is no record of taking the

HSA? Yes. Check the roster for the names of students who took the test at the school. The school must maintain a roster of who took the HSA. Students who entered grade 9 in the 2005-06 school year or later are required to pass the High

School Assessments to graduate. Students may also satisfy the HSA graduation requirement by achieving the required combined score or successfully completing the Bridge Plan for Academic Validation (see questions 20 and 21 later in this section).

6. Does a public school student who takes an HSA-aligned course at a private school during the summer term still

have to take the HSA? Yes. See COMAR 13A.03.02.05J.

7. Does a foreign exchange student enrolled in an HSA-aligned course have to take the HSA? No, as long as the student is definitely returning to his/her own country and has no expectation of receiving a Maryland diploma. If, however, the student requests a Maryland High School Diploma, the student must satisfy the applicable assessment requirements.

8. Does a student have to retake the HSA if the student is repeating an HSA-aligned course? The high school graduation regulations passed by the State Board specify testing requirements for students. Students who entered ninth grade in the fall of 2005 and later must pass the High School Assessments to receive the Maryland High School Diploma.

There are multiple options available to help students meet the passing requirement. A student who passes an HSA test but fails the corresponding HSA course does not have to take the HSA test again.

9. What are the passing scores for the HSA? The HSA passing scores are:

Biology 400

Algebra/Data Analysis 412

English 396

Government 394

For information about HSA scores and scoring, contact your school counselor.

10. D o students have to pass all HSAs?

Algebra/Data Analysis, English 10, and Biology - Students who entered grade 9 in the fall of 2005 and later

(COMAR 13A.03.02.09) must obtain either a passing score on Algebra/Data Analysis, English 10, and Biology or obtain an overall combined score. Students who meet specific criteria may use the Bridge Plan for Academic

Validation to meet the passing requirement. See questions 20 and 21 for information about the Bridge Plan option.

Government - Starting with the administration of the Government HSA in the 2012-13 school year, the following rules apply: Students entering 9th grade in the 2012-13 school year or in a prior year (including students who entered 9th grade in 2011-12, 2010-11, or 2009-2010) do not need to pass the Government HSA for graduation but may use it for a combined score. These students have two options: o Students MAY achieve a combined score of 1602 for English, Algebra/Data Analysis, Biology, and

Government. OR o Students MAY achieve a combined score of 1208 for English, Algebra/Data Analysis, and Biology.

Students entering 9th grade in school year 2013-14 and beyond MUST pass the Government HSA or meet a combined score of 1602.

11. Can a student who has met all other graduation requirements except passing an HSA be kept from graduation?

Yes. Students who entered grade 9 in the fall of 2005 and later are required to pass the HSA. Students may also satisfy the HSA requirement by obtaining the combined score or successfully completing the Bridge Plan for Academic

Validation.

12. Must a middle school student take the HSA even if the school system does not award credit for the course? Any student who takes a high school course based on the Core Learning Goals must take the HSA regardless of whether or not the student receives credit for the course.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

13. Are students who do not pass the HSA required to attend remediation? School systems are required to offer remediation to students. Students and their parents should be made aware of the availability of different types of remediation, the benefits of remediation, and the risks of choosing not to attend remediation. There is no Maryland law or regulation that requires students to attend remediation. However, school systems can develop their own local policy about participation requirements related to remediation. School systems will need to maintain documentation that remediation was offered to students who did not pass any or all of the HSAs.

14. What is the combined-score option? The combined-score option allows a student to offset lower performance on one test with higher performance on another. Students who use the combined-score option must obtain an overall combined score on the Algebra/Data Analysis, Biology, Government, and English HSAs to meet the HSA passing requirement. The student does NOT have to attain a minimum score on each test.

15. Can a student take an HSA multiple times in order to raise his/her score to meet the combined score passing

option? Yes, but there is no mandate to provide additional instructional assistance if the student has already passed the

HSA. Additional instructional assistance must be offered to students who do not achieve the passing score on the HSA before they can retake the test.

16. When a student retakes an HSA and scores lower than the first time, which score counts toward the combined

score? The higher score counts toward the combined score.

17. Can a student use the combined-score option regardless of how many assessments the student actually passes?

Yes.

18. Is the local school system required to offer the combined-score option for students? Yes. COMAR 13A.03.02.09B(3)

(b) provides the combined-score option for students. All students must have access to options provided under the regulations.

19. Can high school students opt to substitute certain AP and IB tests for High School Assessments? Yes. Students can substitute certain AP and IB tests for the HSA in English, algebra/data analysis, and biology if they achieve specific scores on the AP and IB tests. See the following table:

HSA

High School Assessment

Allowable substitute tests for students who entered grade 9 in or after 2005-06 school year

Algebra/data analysis

AP exam

(must have score of 3, 4 or 5)

• Calculus AB

IB exam

(must have score of 5, 6, or 7)

• Mathematical Studies SL

• Calculus BC • Mathematics SL

English 2

Biology

• Statistics

• English Language

• English Literature

• Biology

• Mathematics HL

• English A1

• Biology SL

• Biology HL

20. What is the Bridge Plan for Academic Validation? The Bridge Plan for Academic Validation offers students the opportunity to complete an Academic Validation Project package that is selected to help the student demonstrate the content and skills related to one or more HSAs that the student has failed to pass after at least two attempts. Participation in the Bridge Plan is voluntary.

21. Who can participate in the Bridge Plan? Participation in the Bridge Plan is earned by students as they work toward their high school diploma. To participate, students must:

• have passed or be enrolled in the HSA-related course, taken the specific HSA or Mod-HSA test twice without passing or earning a score that would satisfy the combined-score option (juniors and seniors may begin Bridge

Plan projects and submit them for scoring before results are received from a second HSA administration),

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

• be firmly on the path to completing other graduation requirements,

• have participated in approved assistance, and

• have met the local school system’s attendance requirement.

22. Is a student who has not passed an HSA exam or met the testing requirement using the combined-score or Bridge

options required to retake the exam every time it is offered? No, once a student has failed an HSA twice, the student has the option of retaking the exam, but the student is not required to take the exam every time it is offered. Students may satisfy the HSA graduation requirement by the combined-score or Bridge options. However, school systems may encourage students to retake HSAs to achieve the passing score.

Transfer Students

1. Do students transferring to another high school have to be in attendance at the new school a certain period of

time before they can receive a high school diploma from that school? Yes. Students must attend the new school for one full semester preceding graduation to receive a high school diploma from the newly attended school. Exceptions may be made if this creates undue hardship for a transferring student or for special education students in state-approved, nonpublic programs. See COMAR 13A.03.02.12B(1) Transfer Students. A school superintendent may arrange for students to have credits transferred back to their prior high school in order for the students to graduate from their prior high school.

This option would have to be approved by the prior system/school.

2. Can students be admitted to a public high school if transcript records or report cards are not available? Yes. A local school superintendent or the superintendent’s designee shall make this determination. See COMAR 13A.03.02.12B(4)

Unavailability of Official Transcript or School Report Card. See also question 6 under Graduation Credits: Defined/

Earning. Student transcripts that contain out-of-state or non-MSDE approved online courses should be reviewed based on Local School System policies.

3. Can a 19 year old who has not earned a diploma return to school to earn a diploma? A person who is a bona fide resident of Maryland and under 21 years of age can return to school to earn a diploma. Also, persons 16 years of age who have dropped out of school and want to earn a diploma by examination may enroll in a GED preparation program. A third option is the Adult External Diploma Program. Persons 18 years of age may be eligible to enroll in the Adult External

Diploma Program. See COMAR 13.A.03.03.01 for information about the GED and Adult External Diploma programs.

4. Do transfer students who complete algebra/data analysis in a middle school outside the Maryland Public School

System or who complete algebra/data analysis in a Maryland non- public school and who do not receive a

credit have to take the algebra/data analysis High School Assessment? Students who have completed and passed algebra/data analysis in a non-public middle school or out-of-state middle school and have mastered the core learning goals as evidenced from (1) the successful completion of subsequent mathematics courses or (2) through an evaluation of the acquisition of the core learning goals are exempt from the algebra/data analysis HSA. These students may fulfill the state graduation requirements by earning three credits in subsequent mathematics courses for which algebra/data analysis was a prerequisite.

5. Can a student use the combined-score option to meet the graduation requirement for passing the high school

assessment if the student completes algebra/data analysis in a middle school outside the Maryland Public

School System or completes algebra/data analysis in a Maryland non-public school, does not receive a credit,

and does not have to take the algebra/data analysis High School Assessment (see previous question)? Yes. If the student chooses to use the combined-score option, the student will be assigned the passing score for the algebra/ data analysis High School Assessment for the purpose of calculating the combined score.

Other

1. Can a student complete high school graduation requirements by attending an accredited college or approved

vocational, technical or other postsecondary school program? Yes. A student may receive a Maryland High School

Diploma through acceptance in the early college admission program when:

• All Maryland High School Assessment and student service learning requirements have been met; and

• A written request by the student and parent or guardian is made to and approved by the local superintendent of schools; and

• The student’s program for the first year of college is approved by the local superintendent of schools if this program is included toward the issuance of a diploma; and

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

• At the conclusion of the first year of study, a written request and a transcript is submitted to the local superintendent requesting a Maryland High School Diploma. (COMAR 13A.03.02.10 Alternatives to 4-Year Enrollment)

2. Can a student attend high school and college simultaneously? Yes. Students may opt for a dual enrollment program during their junior and/or senior year of high school. Dual enrollment is defined in COMAR regulations governing higher education. COMAR 13B.07.01.02B(10) defines a “dual enrollment student” as a “secondary student who is enrolled in college courses and receives high school and college credit for the courses completed.”

3. Can a student complete “dual enrollment” if he or she is enrolled in online college courses? Yes. Credit can be awarded for college online courses that are MSDE-approved. See COMAR 13A.03.02.05D. Correspondence and Online

Courses. Higher education institutions must have online courses reviewed and approved by MSDE. See also question 4 under Graduation Credits: Defined/Earning.

4. Can a student attend college after the junior year if all graduation requirements have been met? Yes. Local school systems may develop alternative plans for students who have completed all credit, assessment, and service learning graduation requirements, which may include a waiver of the fourth year of high school if the local superintendent of schools or designee determines that his waiver is in the best interest of the student. (COMAR 13A.03.02.11B Alternatives

Structuring Programs)

5. Can a non-failing student opt to spend five years in high school to gain extra credits and become better prepared

for college? No. Once a student has fulfilled all state and local credit, assessment, and service-learning requirements, the student is eligible for a high school diploma and can no longer be enrolled in high school. See COMAR 13A.03.02.01-

.12.

6. What options are available to permit a student to graduate early?

COMAR 13A.03.02.03 specifies “The student shall satisfactorily complete 4 years of approved study beyond the eighth grade unless one of the alternatives in Regulation .10 or 11 of this chapter is satisfied.”

COMAR 13A.03.02.10 Alternatives to a 4-year Enrollment Requirement recognizes that four- year enrollment in a public high school may not serve the best interests of some students and allows for early college admission and early admission to approved vocational, technical, or other postsecondary school program. See the regulation for specific details.

COMAR 13A.03.02.11 Alternatives for Structuring Programs permits a local school system to develop alternative ways for individual or groups of students to fulfill graduation requirements. This includes a waiver of the fourth year enrollment requirement if all credit, assessments, and student service requirements are met and if the local superintendent of schools or designee determines that the waiver is in the best interest of the student. See the regulation for specific details.

7. Can a military veteran who withdrew from school to enlist in the armed forces obtain a high school diploma?

Maryland Education Code Annotated § 7-206.1 permits the awarding of a high school diploma to certain individuals who were unable to complete their high school graduation requirements because they enlisted in the armed forces. An individual honorably discharged from military service may apply to obtain a diploma if the individual withdrew from a regular full-time public or private high school accredited by the State Board to enlist in the armed forces during World War

II, The Korean Conflict, or The Vietnam Conflict. The individual shall apply to the county board in the county where the individual resides or where the school from which the individual withdrew was located. Each county shall adopt rules and regulations to establish procedures for awarding diplomas under this section.

8. Who is eligible to take the GED examination? The GED Tests offer an alternate and acceptable way for an individual to earn a high school diploma by written examination. An applicant is eligible if the applicant is a resident of Maryland, at least 16 years old, and not currently enrolled in school. For more information, call the GED testing office at 410-767-

0538.

9. How does someone become eligible for the Maryland Adult External High School Diploma Program? The

Maryland Adult External High School Diploma is designed to recognize demonstrated competence in adults regardless of whether the knowledge and skills were acquired in a formal school setting. Residents of Maryland 18 years old or older who are not currently enrolled in a high school, who are not high school graduates, and who pass a screening test, are eligible to register for the program. See COMAR 13A.03.03.02. For more information, call 410-767-0334.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

10. Do students who complete their high school education through home schooling receive the Maryland High

School Diploma? No. For additional information about home schooling, contact the Student Services and Alternative

Programs Branch at MSDE at 410-767-0288.

11. Is Maryland a member of the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children? Yes. For more information, go to http://www.marylandpublicschools.org/MSDE/programs/brac/ic .

Educational Options Available to Students

In recognition of the fact that the four-year, full-time enrollment requirement may not serve the best interest of some students, Prince George’s County Public Schools provides several educational options.

To be informed about these options and to receive help in developing and updating a sound educational plan, each student must meet regularly with his/her guidance counselor. Parent(s) or guardian(s) are required to meet with appropriate school staff in person, at a pre-arranged conference, to discuss available options and the plans being considered by their children (wards).

The following education options are available to students presently enrolled in Prince George’s County Public

Schools.

Concurrent and Dual Enrollment

A student may fulfill graduation requirements by being enrolled in both high school and college. A student wishing to apply for concurrent enrollment must apply for and secure approval from the local school principal. The student and parent(s) or guardian(s) must work very closely with the school counselor in preparation for this option.

The number of courses approved to be taken beyond the school day should be based on what is educationally sound and the student’s past performance. See Concurrent Enrollment and Dual Enrollment descriptions in

Administrative Procedure 6150.

Early Admissions

Students may opt to pursue an alternative to the four-year enrollment requirement by applying for an early admissions program.

Students may be considered for an early admissions program if they meet either of the following criteria:

Option 1: For students who will complete their high school requirements in three years and desire to graduate early.

Option 2: For students who plan to attend an accredited post-high school institution as a full-time student for one year in lieu of the final year of high school.

Students may be considered for an early admissions program if they meet either of the following criteria:

1. Students who have demonstrated success clearly by their scholastic achievement and academic precociousness.

2. Students who have demonstrated success clearly by their school achievement and a readiness for vocational training.

Procedures for Early Admissions

To apply for Early Admissions the following steps must be taken:

During the Fourth Quarter of the Tenth Grade

1. The counselor should have a conference with the parents or guardians and the student to discuss the requirements for Early Admissions.

2. Recommendations from two major subject area teachers must be obtained.

3. A complete Request for Early Admissions to Post High School Institution form (PS-109) including the plan

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

for completion of graduation requirements must be submitted to the counselor.

4. The early admissions form, current transcripts, a program report and teacher recommendations must be submitted to the principal for approval to pursue the process.

5. The pre-approval letter will be forwarded to the student and parent or guardian from the principal.

6. The letter of approval to pursue the process from the principal and the application packet should be placed in the student’s cumulative folder.

During the First Quarter of the Third Year of High School

The counselor must complete the Graduation Agreement with the student.

Before the End of the Third Quarter of the Third Year in High School

1. The completed pre-approved packet with the letter of acceptance from the post-secondary institution and an up-to-date transcript and progress report will be forwarded to the Supervisor of Guidance and

Counseling.

2. A final letter of approval for the Early Admissions option will be forwarded from the Superintendent.

Fulfilling Graduation Requirements

High school graduation will occur at the end of the fourth year of enrollment. The student must provide copies of college transcripts so that high school credit can be granted.

Work/Study Waiver

Any grade 12 student who has requested to be on work release and cannot enroll in the Career Research and

Development course and can provide documentation of financial hardship may request a half-day academic schedule. The following steps must be implemented:

1. The student meets all of the requirements identified above.

2. The student provides a letter to the principal documenting the reasons for requesting a work/study waiver that substantiates financial hardship. The letter must be written by the parent/guardian and confirmed by the principal or his/her designee via telephone. The principal will then determine approval or denial.

Communication must be made by the principal to the parent and student informing them of his/her decision.

3. If approved, the student must present a letter from his or her employer on letterhead within 5 school days stating that the student is currently employed with the company. Once this information is received the student is granted a half-day schedule.

4. The student is then required to provide a letter of work confirmation from the employer quarterly. The window for accepting the letter is listed below: a. End of 1 st

Quarter

If the student fails to provide employment documentation, the parent will receive written notification from the school that the student will possibly be enrolled in a full day schedule.

b. End of 2 nd

Quarter

If the student fails to provide employment documentation, the parent will receive written notification from the school that the student will be enrolled in a full day schedule.

c. End of 3 rd

Quarter

If the student fails to provide employment documentation, the parent will receive written notification from the school that the student will possibly be enrolled in a full day schedule.

5. All work/study approval files must be kept in the principal’s office for further review if needed. Contents of the student file are as follows: a. Letter from parent requesting work/study waiver due to financial hardship. Notes from principal stating approval or denial of request and time/date of verbal confirmation with parent. b. Letter from employer on letterhead confirming student is currently employed.

c. Quarterly documentation showing proof of employment or letters from the school informing the parent that the student will be placed on a full day schedule.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

17

THE COLLEGE PREPARATION CHECKLIST

It is never too early to begin planning for college.

The following checklist may help you in preparing for college, beginning where you are now.

9

TH

GRADE:

r

Work closely with counselors to select courses that will prepare you for college; r

Check entrance requirements for a variety of colleges and programs; r

Become involved in school activities; r

Use a career interest inventory to refine career and educational possibilities; r

Review career interest inventory results to explore educational possibilities; r

Visit your College/Career Resource Center; r

Explore volunteer opportunities for the summer; and r

Take the PSAT/NMSQT (October).

11

TH

GRADE:

r

Take the PSAT/NMSQT to qualify for scholarship consideration (October); r

Review your academic and extracurricular program — Are you prepared for a career/ college?; r

Begin writing colleges for detailed information; r

Narrow down your college choices; r

Visit schools which interest you

(Spring-Summer); r

Attend a National College Fair; r

Discuss finances with parents/guardians; r

Investigate ROTC application; r

Begin application process for military academies; r

Attend a Financial Aid Workshop

(December, January, February); r

Attend the Prince George’s County College

Fair; r

Take SAT 1 workshops and/or enroll in the

SAT course offered at your school, prior to taking the test; r

Take the SAT I and/or ACT (Spring); r

Explore early decision options at colleges; r

Take SAT II, AP (May); r

Develop your resume for use with college recommendations (Summer); and r

Investigate summer courses and programs offered to juniors by colleges.

10

TH

GRADE:

r

Continue to plan your academic program and maintain involvement in school activities; r

Make sure your high school program is meeting career and college admissions requirements; r

Review career interest inventory results to explore career and educational possibilities; and r

Take the PSAT/NMSQT (October).

12

TH

GRADE:

r

Apply to take the SAT I or ACT

(if you haven’t already taken them or if you want to improve your scores, consider taking a refresher SAT workshop and/or the

SAT course); r

Apply to take the SAT II tests; r

Apply to take the TOEFL (students who have taken ESOL); r

Apply for college admissions (Fall); r

Investigate early decision programs — check deadline (September, October); r

Find out about your school’s transcript request process; r

Continue campus visits; r

Attend the National College Fair; r

Apply for college housing early

(University of Maryland, December); r

Make sure your letters of recommendation are completed (November, December); r

Attend financial aid night

(December, January, February); r

Apply for financial aid (January, March; by

February 1 for the University of Maryland); r

Attend the Prince George’s College Fair

(in the evening); r

Take Advanced Placement tests (May); r

Take the SAT Prep class prior to taking the test; r

Take time to decide which college is “right” for you; and r

Weigh the college’s offer against your personal and financial requirements (May).

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

COLLEGE ADMISSIONS TESTS

Your high school academic record is a good indicator of your potential for success in college. However, because high schools throughout the country differ widely in course offerings, academic standards, and grading policies, colleges need some standard measure of academic ability when they compare the applications of candidates for admission. Colleges in the admissions process use scores on the college entrance tests, along with your academic and extracurricular record. Tests give you an opportunity to display your knowledge. Students have the responsibility of registering for college entrance tests. High school counselors will assist students in test selection and registration.

PSAT/NMSQT

The Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test is a three-hour test administered in October of each year. It is designed to aid high school sophomores and juniors in planning for college and to serve juniors wishing to be considered for scholarships administered by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. This examination provides an early measure of the reading, writing, and mathematical abilities tested by the SAT.

ACT

The ACT is a three hour examination given six times during the school year. It consists of four tests in the areas of English, reading, mathematics, and science. Scores are reported in each of these areas along with a composite score. University System of Maryland schools accept either ACT or SAT scores.

SAT

The SAT measures mathematical, critical reading and writing skills. Scores on this four-hour test allow you to compare yourself in these areas with other college-bound students. Students are encouraged to take the SAT

I in the spring of their junior year, especially if they are considering academy appointments, ROTC programs, early admission programs at colleges and universities, and special scholarship programs. Maryland private and state four-year colleges/universities accept SAT I for admission.

SAT II

SAT II are one-hour examinations which measure what you have learned in one of twenty specific subjects in the areas of English, social studies, science, mathematics and language. All colleges do not require SAT II scores as a part of the admissions process. In some instances, only scholarship applicants may be required to take specific tests. Consult the catalog of the college being considered to be sure which tests, if any, are required.

TOEFL

The Test of English as a Foreign Language is designed to measure the level of English proficiency of individuals whose native language is not English. Many colleges and universities require foreign students to submit TOEFL scores as a part of the application process. The test is divided into three parts and measures important language skills.

SAT PREPARATION COURSE .50 CREDIT

Seniors and juniors who plan to take the SAT for college admission should enroll in this semester course. Students will become familiar with the SAT format, test taking strategies, and critical thinking skills. Students will review basic arithmetic, algebraic, and geometric concepts for the mathematics section with particular attention to the formats.

In addition, students will review reading and writing strategies and vocabulary development for the verbal section of the SAT. There will be extensive work in critical and comparative reading as well as analogical reasoning. Simulated test taking and regular feedback will be an integral part of this class. Participants will be required to take the SAT in 11th grade during the spring of the school year. Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry and concurrent enrollment in

Algebra II.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

COLLEGE CREDIT, CERTIFICATION, AND

LICENSURE OPPORTUNITIES IN HIGH SCHOOL

Advanced Placement (AP)

The Advanced Placement (AP) program was developed by The College Board to facilitate the transition of high school students into successful college experiences. The AP program allows students to pursue collegelevel studies while still in high school. The courses are designed to prepare students to take and pass the AP examinations administered nationally through the Educational Testing Service. College credit is awarded to students who meet specific college or university requirements for the respective courses.

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

College Level Examination Program (CLEP) provides a means for persons who have reached the college level of education in non-traditional ways to demonstrate their academic achievement and earn college credits by taking an exam. For further information, contact the college admissions office.

International Baccalaureate (IB)

International Baccalaureate (IB) tests may be taken by students who have successfully completed IB courses in high school. The IB Program is recognized for admission to colleges and universities throughout the world.

Many colleges award credit for IB Diploma recipients for advanced placement as sophomores.

TECH PREP (2+2) College Credit Programs

TECH PREP (2+2) Programs offer students technical instruction which links directly with existing programs at

Prince George’s Community College, Montgomery College, or the Community College of Baltimore County.

Students who complete Accounting, Finance, Early Childhood Education, Computer Networking Systems, Pre-

Engineering, Construction, Printing Management, Drafting/CAD, and Automotive Technology earn articulated credit toward an Associate degree.

Certification and Licensure Programs

Certification and Licensure Programs lead to certification or licensure examinations that students are prepared to take in order to earn industry credentials. Students who complete the following programs may take the industry exam: Publishing and Graphics (PrintED); Business Administrative Services (Microsoft Office Specialist);

Drafting (American Design Drafting Association); Carpentry, Electrical, HVAC, Masonry, and Plumbing (National

Center for Construction Education and Research); Barbering (Maryland State Board of Barbers); Cosmetology

(Maryland State Board of Cosmetologists); Culinary Arts (ServSafe); Hospitality and Restaurant Management

(ServSafe and ProStart); Nursing (Maryland Board of Nursing); Child Development (Senior Staff 90 Clock

Hour); Teacher Academy (Praxis 1 and Para Pro); Computer Networking (Cisco Certified Networking Associate,

Certified Entry Level Networking Technician, Internetworking Cisco Devices); IT Essentials (COMPTIA A+ and

CCENT); and Automotive Body and Automotive Technician (Automotive Service Excellence).

Dual Enrollment

Dual enrollment is an opportunity for a PGCPS high school student to also take courses at a college or university. PGCPS will pay the tuition for students who meet the minimum eligibility qualifications at any Maryland public university or college. For more information email [email protected] or check the website http:// www1.pgcps.org/dualenrollment/.

19

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

English

UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF MARYLAND

REQUIREMENTS

Source: University System of Maryland Website — www.usmd.edu

For more information, check with the USM campus of your choice.

GRADE 9 GRADE 10 GRADE 11 GRADE 12

English English English

Algebra 1

Science (Lab)

Social Studies

Foreign Language 1,

American Sign Language 1,

OR *Advanced Technology

Geometry

Biology

Social Studies

Foreign Language 2,

American Sign Language 2,

OR *Advanced Technology

Algebra 2

Chemistry

Social Studies

Fine Arts

Academic Elective

Students who complete

Algebra 2 prior to their final year must complete the four year mathematics requirement by taking a course or courses that utilize non-trivial algebra**.

Academic Elective (or

Science for STEM majors)

Academic Elective

Academic Elective

Academic Elective

Grade Point Average

Test Score

Other Criteria

*Advanced Technology

Academic Electives

Senior Year

**Non-trivial algebra

A high school grade point average equivalent to a “C” or better is required for admission of full-time and part-time entering freshmen who have graduated from high school within three years of intended enrollment.

A score on a nationally standardized examination such as the SAT or ACT is required of all applicants who have graduated from high school within three years of intended enrollment.

Each institution shall publish other criteria for admission that may include (a) rigor of the high school curriculum as demonstrated by advanced level coursework, (b) academic electives, (c) performance on high school assessments, (d) trends in performance, (e) citizenship and leadership, (f) special talents, and (g) personal circumstances.

Students should consult the admissions office of the particular institution they are seeking to attend to determine if advanced technology is accepted in fulfillment of this requirement.

Students should choose academic electives based on their intended course of study, special interests, and personal needs.

The University System of Maryland strongly encourages students to prepare for college during their senior year of high school by continuing to take a challenging academic program. In a significant number of cases, the senior year curriculum and grades are examined closely during the admissions review process.

The level of mathematical concepts and problems would be at least as sophisticated as those that relate to problems appearing in the Achieve ADP Algebra II test. Examples of

courses meeting this requirement include Algebra II, Trigonometry, Precalculus, Calculus

and successor courses, Statistics, and College Algebra.

20

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Career Academies and Programs of Study

ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

CARPENTRY

College and Career Readiness Exploration

Course Code: 983023

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This introductory course is designed for 9th grade students who have been accepted into a Technical Career

Academy Program. This full-year course is designed to expose students to the skills and competencies necessary to experience success in a technical academy program of study as well as prepare them to make sound choices about college and career opportunities. Emphasis will be placed on acquiring industry specific knowledge, technical employability skills, college and career awareness and exploration, basic financial literacy, expanding higher order thinking, and improving study skills. Students will also be engaged in a variety of strategies to improve and enrich mathematical and literacy skills. Upon completion of this course, students will be required to present a written career plan and portfolio that reflects their designated area of study in a technical career academy program.

Textbook(s): TBA

Construction Core

Course Code: 871613

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The course of study includes demonstration of student mastery of the following topics: Basic Safety - personal protective equipment, performance safety, and what to do if an accident occurs; Introduction to Construction

Math - prepares students to do the calculations they’ll be performing on the job site; Introduction to Hand

Tools - covers basic tools, equipment used in the field, maintenance instructions and safety tips; Introduction to Power Tools - provides instructions for tools powered by electricity, batteries, and pressurized air, such as drills, saws, grinders and sanders, and other common construction equipment, maintenance instructions and safety tips; Introduction to Blueprints - introduces students to different types of plans and how they represent a finished building. Shows the parts of blueprint in detail, including symbols, title block, and gridlines; Basic

Rigging - covers the slings, hardware, hoists, and hitches used in rigging operations, critical safety issues and accepted rigging techniques and practices; Hands-On Experiences - provides hands-on experiences in each of the trades areas, Carpentry, Masonry, Construction Electricity and/or HVAC so that students can gain a working knowledge of the construction industry.

Textbook(s): Core Curriculum Introductory Craft Skills Contren Learning Series, ISBN 9780136086369;

Careers in Construction, ISBN 978-0-13-228605-3

Carpentry 1

Course Code: 871623

Prerequisites: Construction Core

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The course of study for Carpentry I (Level I) includes demonstration of student mastery of the following topics:

Wood Building Materials, Fasteners, and Adhesives - Sources and uses of various softwoods and hardwoods, the grading systems for lumber and plywood, the composition and uses of various engineered sheet materials and laminated lumber products, and fasteners and adhesives used with wood and masonry; Hand and Power

Tools - detailed descriptions and explanation of the use of hand-operated and power tools used by carpenters, emphasizing safe and proper operation of tools as well as care and maintenance; Floor Systems - covers framing basics as well as the procedures for laying out and constructing a wood floor using common lumber as well as engineered building materials; Wall and Ceiling Framing -describes the procedures for laying out and framing walls and ceilings, including roughing-in door and window openings, constructing corners and partition

Ts, bracing wall and ceilings, and applying sheathing; Roof Framing - describes the various kinds of roof and

21

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

instructions for laying out rafters for gable roofs, hip roofs, and valley intersections including both stick-built and truss-built roofs; Windows and Exterior Doors - describes the various types of windows, skylights, and exterior doors, and provides instruction for installing them. Also includes instruction for installing weather-stripping and locksets.

Textbook(s): Carpentry Fundamentals (Level I), 9780132292689

Carpentry 2

Course Code: 871633

Prerequisites: Carpentry 1

Credits: 2.0 Completer

The course of study for Carpentry 2 includes demonstration of student mastery of the following topics: Reading

Plans and Elevations - techniques for reading and using blueprints and specifications with an emphasis placed on those drawings and information relevant to the carpentry trade, including an introduction to the subject of quantity takeoffs; Site Layout One Distance Measurement and Leveling - covers principles, equipment, and methods used to perform the site layout tasks of distance measurement and differential leveling, layout responsibilities of surveyors, field engineers, carpenters and using site drawings and on-site communications.

Introduction to Concrete and Reinforcing Materials - describes the properties, characteristics, and uses of various types of cement, aggregates, and other materials, procedures for concrete volume estimates and testing of mixed concrete, methods and materials for curing concrete and reinforcement materials used in concrete, such as reinforcement bars, bar supports, and welded-wire fabrics; Foundations and Flatwork - covers construction of forms for continuous, stepped and grade beam concrete footings and edge forms used for on-grade concrete slabs; Concrete Forms - covers the application and construction methods for various types of forms, including wall, column, slab and beam, and stair; Reinforcing Concrete - explains the selection and uses of different types of reinforcing materials and general requirements for cutting, bending, splicing, and tying reinforcing steel; Handling and Placing Concrete - covers the tools, equipment and procedures for handling, placing, and finishing concrete at the job site. Safety procedures are emphasized; Manufactured Forms - covers the types of forma and hardware systems used in the construction of walls, columns, deck and roof slabs, beams and girders, culverts, and highways including flying forms, slipforms, shoring and architectural finishes.

Textbook(s): Carpentry Framing and Finishing (Level II), 9780136144106

Introduction to Construction and Design

Course Code: 871903

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Introduction to Construction and Design is a one-credit course designed to introduce ninth grade students to the knowledge and skills provided in the programs of the Academy of Architecture & Design. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to identify and explain the role of professionals and skilled technicians in areas such as architecture, interior design, HVAC, plumbing, engineering, electrical, and carpentry.

Knowledge will be demonstrated by success on formative and summative assessments given throughout the course. Students will create a hands-on example of a work product for each area and compile a portfolio of their work in the course. Emphasis is placed on career preparation and identification.

Textbook(s): NCCER Careers in Construction, ISBN 978132286053

ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

CONSTRUCTION DESIGN MANAGEMENT

Introduction to Construction Design and Management

Course Code: 871513

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course provides an overview of the design and construction process as well as an introduction to the many career options within the field of construction. Students will be introduced to core concepts in design and

22

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

construction including construction methods and materials, fundamental elements of design, and innovative technologies including Green Construction and Design. Students will be introduced to design software as they complete basic design projects such as floor plans. In addition, students will begin to develop a better understanding of the fields’ interrelationships.

Textbook(s): TBA

Principles of Construction Design

Course Code: 871523

Prerequisites: Introduction to Construction Design and Management

Credits: 1.0 Drafting/CAD CTE Completer

The Principles of Construction Design course provides students with an in-depth understanding of the construction design process. Students will complete a series of increasingly complex construction design projects in which they incorporate all aspects of the construction process, including zoning and regulation requirements; construction methods and materials, energy conservation; surveying; and project planning. Students will use design software to generate site plans (topography) as well as detailed building plans. Portfolios are used to show the developmental stages of a design project. Students will work in teams to develop each aspect of a construction project including developing a proposal, site plans, and construction management documents.

Textbook(s): TBA

Advanced Design & 3D Modeling

Course Code: 871533

Prerequisites: Introduction to Construction Design and Management, Principles of Construction Design

Credits: 1.0 Drafting/CAD CTE Completer

This is the third course in the Construction Design Program. Students will work in teams to fully develop designs and a construction management plan for a pre-determined site. In this year-long project, students begin with the legal description and topography of the site and create a proposal for development. The construction design project must meet the client’s needs, budget, and the site characteristics. Students will generate a series of plans to be included with the proposal for submission to an industry review panel for approval. Upon completion of the course, students will demonstrate advanced design/drafting skills and be prepared for the AutoCAD certification exam.

Textbook(s): TBA

Advanced Construction Management

Course Code: 871543

Prerequisites: Introduction to Construction Design and Management, Principles of Construction Design, and

Credits:

Advanced Design and 3-D Modeling

1.0 Drafting/CAD CTE Completer

This is the fourth and final course in the Construction Design Management Program. This course builds on an understanding of the construction design process to advanced knowledge and skill in construction management.

In this course, students will be required to work in teams to complete a project from existing plans. The yearlong project will focus on building codes and standards, coordination of the construction process, estimating, planning and scheduling; and site management. Students will complete a portfolio of their design and construction management projects for review by an industry panel.

Textbook(s): TBA

ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

ELECTRICAL

College and Career Readiness Exploration

Course Code: 938023

Prerequisites: None

23

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See previous description.

Construction Core

Course Code: 871613

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Completer

See previous description.

Electrical 1

Course Code: 871643

Prerequisites: Construction Core

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The course of study for Electrical 1 includes demonstration of student mastery of the following topics with emphasis on National Electrical Code requirements: Electrical Safety - Covers safety rules and regulations for electricians, necessary precautions to take for various electrical hazards found on the job, and OSHA-mandated lockout/tagout procedure; Hand Bending - provides an introduction to conduit bending and installation and the techniques for using hand-operated and step conduit benders, as well as cutting, reaming, and threading conduit; Fasteners and Anchors - covers hardware and systems used by electricians to mount and support boxes, receptacles, and other electrical components and the types of anchors and supports, their applications, and safe installation; Electrical Theory One - offers a general introduction to the electrical concepts used in

Ohm’s law applied to DC series circuits including atomic theory, electromotive force, resistance, and electric power equations; Electrical Theory Two - introduces series, parallel, and series-parallel circuits, resistive circuits,

Kirchoff’s voltage and current laws, and circuit analysis; Electrical Test Equipment - focuses on proper selection, inspection, use, and maintenance of common electrical test equipment and the appropriate test procedures and safety rules; Introduction to the National Electrical Code - provides a navigational road map for using the NEC, layout of the NEC and the types of information found within the code book; Raceways, Boxes, and Fittings - introduces the types and application of raceways, wireways, and ducts; Conductors - focuses on the types and applications of conductors, proper wiring techniques; Introduction to Electrical Blueprints - focuses on electrical prints, drawings, and symbols in schematics, one-liners, and wiring diagrams; Wiring, Commercial and Industrial

- covers the electrical devices and wiring techniques common to commercial and industrial construction and maintenance; Wiring Residential - covers the electrical devices and wiring techniques common to residential construction and maintenance and service calculations.

Textbook(s): Electrical (Level I), 9780132571241

Electrical 2

Course Code: 871653

Prerequisites: Electrical 1

Credits: 2.0 Completer

The course of study for Electrical 2 includes demonstration of student mastery of the following topics: Alternating

Current focuses on forces that are characteristic of alternating-current systems and the application of Ohm’s law to AC circuits. Motors: Theory and Application covers AD and DC motors including the main parts, circuits, and connections. Grounding focuses on the purpose of grounding and bonding electrical systems and NEC regulations. Conduit Bending covers all types of bends in sizes of conduit up to 6 inches, mechanical, hydraulic, and electrical benders. Boxes and Fittings is an NEC-driven module that explains how to select and size outlet boxes, pull boxes, and junction boxes. Conductor Installation covers the transportation, storage, and setup of cable reels; methods of rigging; and procedures for complete cable pulls in raceways and cable trays. Cable

Tray focuses on NEMA and NEC installation requirements for cable tray, including modifications and cable installations. Conductor Termination and Splices describes methods of terminating and splicing conductors of all types and sizes, including the preparation and taping of conductors. Installation of Electric Services covers methods and techniques for both single- and three-phase services, including metering equipment and

NEC regulations. Circuit Breakers and Fuses describes fuses and circuit breakers along with their practical applications and short-circuit calculations. Contactors and Relays gives basic descriptions of various types of

24

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

contactors and relays, along with their practical applications. Electric Lighting introduces the basic principles of human vision and the characteristics of light, the handling and installation of the different kinds of lamps

(incandescent, fluorescent, and HID), and lighting fixtures (surface-mounted, recesses, suspended, and track lighting).

Textbook(s): Electrical (Level I), ISBN 9780132571241

Introduction to Construction and Design

Course Code: 871903

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See description on previous page

ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

HEATING, VENTILATION, AND AIR CONDITIONING (HVAC)

College and Career Readiness Exploration

Course Code: 938023

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See previous description.

Construction Core

Course Code: 871613

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Completer

See previous description

HVAC 1

Course Code: 871663

Prerequisites: Construction Core

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The course of study for HVAC 1 includes demonstration of student mastery of the following topics: Trade

Mathematics explains how to solve problems involving the measurement of lines, area, volume weights, angles, pressure, vacuum, temperature, scientific notation, powers, roots, and basic algebra and geometry; Tools of the Trade describes the purpose and use of tools such as wrenches, saws, hammers, drills, and measuring instruments, along with instructions on their safe use and maintenance; Copper and Plastic Piping Practices covers the selection, preparation, joining, and support of copper and plastic piping and fittings; Soldering and

Brazing covers tools, materials, and safety precautions and depicts step-by-step procedures for soldering and brazing piping; Ferrous Metal Piping Practices covers various types of iron and steel pipe and fittings, and provides step-by step instructions for cutting, threading, and joining ferrous piping; Basic Electricity teaches power generation and distribution, electrical components, DC circuits, and electrical safety; Introduction to

Cooling covers the basic principles of heat transfer, refrigeration, and pressure-temperature relationships and describes the components and accessories used in air conditioning systems; Introduction to Heating covers heating fundamentals, types and designs of furnaces and their components, and basic procedures for installing and servicing furnaces.

Textbook(s): HVAC (Level I), NCCER, Pearson Education, 2007, Third Edition

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

HVAC 2

Course Code: 871673

Prerequisites: HVAC 1

Credits: 2.0 Completer

The course of study for HVAC 2 includes demonstration of student mastery of the following topics: Air

Distribution Systems describes air distribution systems and their components, air flow measurement, ductwork, installation principles, and the use of instruments for measuring temperature, humidity, pressure, and velocity.

Chimney, Vents, and Flues describes the principles of furnace venting of fossil-fuel furnaces and the proper methods for selecting and installing vent systems for gas-fired heating equipment. Maintenance Skills for the

Service Technician covers the application and installation of various types of fasteners, gaskets, seals, and lubricants, as well as the installation and adjustment of different types of belt drives, bearings, and couplings, job documentation and customer relations. Alternating Current covers transformers, single-phase and three-phase power distribution, capacitors, the theory and operation of induction motors, the instruments and techniques used in testing AC circuits and components and reviews electrical safety. Basic Electronics explains the theory of solid-state electronics, as well as the operation, use, testing of the various electronic components used in HVAC equipment and introduces computers. Electric Heating covers the operation and testing of electric furnaces and their components, with emphasis on the operation of electric furnace control circuits. Introduction to Control

Circuit Troubleshooting covers the operation, testing, and adjustment of conventional and electronic thermostats as well as the operation of common electrical, electronic, and pneumatic circuits used to control HVAC systems, how to analyze circuit diagrams for electronic and microprocessor based controls used in comfort heating and cooling equipment and how to troubleshoot systems that use these controls. Accessories and Optional

Equipment covers the basic principles, process, and devices used to control humidity and air cleanliness, as well as devices used to conserve energy in HVAC systems. Metering Devices covers the operating principles, applications, installation, and adjustment of the various types of fixed and adjustable expansion devices used in air conditioning equipment. Compressors explains the operating principles of the different types of compressors used in comfort air conditioning systems as well as basic installation service and repair procedures for these compressors. Heat Pumps covers the principles of reverse cycle heating, describes the operation of the various type of heat pumps, and analysis of heat pump control circuits, heat pump installation and service procedures.

Leak Detection, Evacuation Recovery, and Charging covers the entire basic refrigerant handling and equipment servicing procedures that a technician must know in order to service HVAC systems in a manner that is safe for the environment.

Textbook(s): HVAC (Level II), NCCER, Pearson Education, 2007, Third Edition

Introduction to Construction and Design

Course Code: 871903

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See description on previous page

ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

INTERIOR DESIGN

Interior Design

Course Code: 685713

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This yearlong course includes units on the elements and principles of design, surface and window treatments, lighting, selecting and buying furniture, furniture styles, room arrangement of furniture, kitchens and other service areas, and accessories. In depth study of career opportunities in the field of interior design and the preparation of a design portfolio are essential components. The class may participate in selecting and decorating furnishings for the student-built house project. Students who entered high school before Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may take this course for Technology Education credit through school year

2012-2013. All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT,

26

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

preferably in their freshman year. After SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): Homes: Today & Tomorrow, ISBN 9780078744211

Introduction to Construction and Design

Course Code: 871903

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See description on previous page

ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

MASONRY

College and Career Readiness Exploration

Course Code: 938023

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See previous description.

Construction Core

Course Code: 871613

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Completer

See previous description

Masonry 1

Course Code: 871683

Prerequisites: Construction Core

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The course of study for includes demonstration of student mastery of the following topics: Introduction to

Masonry covers the historic and current methods and procedures used in the masonry trade, brick and block manufacturing, the types of brick and block that are currently used in various types of masonry construction,

Knowledge, skill, and ability requirements of a mason. Safety Requirements provides an overview of the basic safety practices and requirements found in the masonry trade and covers the use of appropriate personal protective equipment, handling hazardous materials, and work safety. Tools and Equipment presents and describes the tools and equipment used in the production of mortar, cutting of masonry units, and placing of masonry units, safe operation and maintenance requirements, larger pieces of power equipment, and the opportunity to operate each hand tool.Mathematics, Drawings, and Specifications guides the trainee in the process of using mathematics to figure distances, areas, and volumes for masonry construction work, describes the information typically found on drawings and construction plans for residential construction, addresses the specifications used in the construction process, and includes a set of drawings. Mortar explains the properties of mortar and the components that make up the mixture, describes the chemical and physical properties of cement, sand, and various types of admixtures, and discusses procedures for storing materials and mixing mortar. Masonry Units and Installation Techniques introduces the methods and procedures used in masonry unit installation. Topics include basic techniques for laying brick and block, using mortar to bond masonry units, and patterns.

Textbook(s): Masonry (Level I), NCCER, Pearson Education, 2004, Third Edition

Masonry 2

Course Code: 871693

Prerequisites: Masonry 1

27

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Credits: 2.0 Completer

The course of study for Masonry II includes demonstration of student mastery of the following topics: Residential

Plans and Drawings Interpretation covers information the mason will need to work with residential plans and construction drawings and be able to convert that information into action on the job including understanding the organization and format of plans, dimensioning and scaling, and estimating materials quantities from information on the plans. Residential Masonry covers the construction techniques for residential and small structure foundations, steps, patios, decks, chimneys, and fireplaces, work activities that the mason must perform as well as those that tie into the masonry work are described. Grout and Other Reinforcement focuses on the use of grout and other types of reinforcement such as reinforcing steel to strengthen and support masonry structures, the locations where grout can be used, the techniques for placement, and the use and application of various types of reinforcing steel bars. Metal Work in Masonry exposes the mason with the various types of metal components and how they are installed including metal rods, joint reinforcements, plates, anchors, fasteners, and hollow metal frames for doors and windows. Advanced Laying Techniques contains detailed information on the actual construction of walls, arches, and other useful structures.Construction Techniques and Moisture Control describes techniques used to construct openings in masonry walls, the application of insulation, and methods of moisture control as they relate to the mason’s trade, properties and used of materials used in moisture control, and various methods of insulating structures. Elevated Work describes the basic types of scaffolding used in masonry construction, the requirements for the erection, inspection, and removal of scaffolding, safety requirements, and techniques for stocking and placing masonry units on elevated work spaces are presented. Construction Inspection and Quality Control introduces the quality control requirements for masonry construction, procedures for inspection and testing of masonry materials, and finished masonry construction.

Textbook(s): Masonry (Level II), NCCER, Pearson Education, 2005, Third Edition

Introduction to Construction and Design

Course Code: 871903

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See description on previous page

ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

PLUMBING

College and Career Readiness Exploration

Course Code: 938023

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See previous description.

Construction Core

Course Code: 871613

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Completer

See previous description

Plumbing 1

Course Code: 871703

Prerequisites: Construction Core

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The course of study for Plumbing I includes demonstration of student mastery of the following topics: Introduction to the Plumbing Trade covers the history of plumbing from ancient times to current plumbing training programs,

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

professional practices, career opportunities, and some basic safety information. Plumbing Tools covers the tools that plumbers used in their daily work, including measuring tools, leveling tools, wrenches, pliers, hammers, screwdrivers, vises, saws, pipe cutters, drills threaders, and soldering equipment. Introduction to

Plumbing Math reviews basic math principles and then moves on to plumbing-specific math problems, including calculating pipe lengths, runs, and offsets for 45-degree angles. Introduction to Plumbing Drawings reviews the blueprints that are included in a building’s plans and then moves on to specific plumbing drawings, such as isometric and oblique pictorial drawings, orthographic drawings, schematic drawings, drawings of fixtures, assembly drawings, and cutaway drawings. Plastic Pipe and Fittings describes the various types of plastic piping and fittings, what each is used for, the measuring, cutting, and joining techniques for each type, and the hangers and supports used with plastic pipe. Copper Pipe and Fittings describes the various types of copper piping and fittings, what each is used for, the measuring, cutting, and joining techniques for each type, and the hangers and supports used with copper pipe. Cast-Iron Pipe and Fittings describes the two types of cast-iron pipe (hub and no-hub), fittings used with each, how each is measured, cut, joined, and assembled, and the hangers and supports used with cast-iron pipe. Carbon Steel Pipe and Fittings describes carbon steel pipe, fittings used with it, how it is measured, cut, threaded, joined, and assembled, and the hangers and supports used with carbon steel pipe.Fixtures and Faucets covers various types of fixtures that plumbers install including sinks and lavatories, tubs and showers, disposals and dishwashers, and laundry trays and mop basins, compression and non-compression faucets for sinks and lavatories. Introduction to Drain, Waste, and Vent (DWV) Systems provides an overview of the drawing, waste, vent (DWV) system from inside the building, where the liquid drains into pipes, to the sewer and waste treatment facilities and the basics of traps, drawings, vents, DWV fittings, and cleanouts. Introduction to Water Distribution Systems provides an overview of the water distribution system from its source municipal water system or private well to water treatment and distribution, the water distribution system within buildings and the basics of valves, fixtures, and faucets.

Textbook(s): Plumbing (Level I), ISBN 9781401848910

Plumbing 2

Course Code: 871713

Prerequisites: Plumbing 1

Credits: 2.0 Completer

The course of study for Plumbing 2 includes demonstration of student mastery of the following topics: Intermediate

Math explains the techniques for calculating simple, rolling and parallel offsets. Reading Commercial Drawings teaches how to interpret and use civil, architectural, structural, mechanical, plumbing, and electrical drawings when installing plumbing systems. Installing and Testing DWV Piping explains how to locate, install, connect, and test a complete drain, waste, and vent (DWV) system. Installing Roof, Floor and Area Drains covers techniques for locating, installing, and connecting roof, floor and area drains according to code. Types of Valves reviews the many types and uses of valves and introduces trainees to valve repair and replacement. Installing and Testing Water Supply Piping teaches the trainee how to locate, install, connect, and test water supply piping while observing safety guidelines. Installing Fixtures, Valves, and Faucets covers the installation of basic plumbing fixtures, including bathtubs, shower stalls, lavatories, sinks, water closets, and urinals, as well as their valves and faucets. Installing Water Heaters teaches trainees about gas-fired, electric, solar, and indirect water heaters and reviews the proper installation and testing techniques. Fuel Gas Systems introduces trainees to the techniques for handling fuel gas and fuel oil safely and for installing and testing gas and oil systems.

Servicing of Fixtures, Valves, and Faucets covers the troubleshooting and repair of fixtures, valves, and faucets in accordance with safety guidelines.

Textbook(s): Plumbing (Level II), ISBN 9781401848910

Introduction to Construction and Design

Course Code: 871903

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See description on previous page

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

AVIATION AND TRANSPORTATION

AUTOMOTIVE BODY REPAIR

College and Career Readiness Exploration

Course Code: 938023

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See previous description.

Introduction to Automotive

Course Code: 875803

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course introduces students to various automotive fields. The course covers work-place safety, hazardous material and environmental regulations and procedures, proper use of hand tools, use of service information resources, and the basic concepts, systems and terms of automotive technology. Topics include familiarization with vehicle systems along with identification and proper use of various automotive hand and power tools.

Textbook(s): Modern Automotive Technology, ISBN 9781590709566

Nonstructural Analysis & Damage Repair

Course Code: 872803

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to pass the written NA3SA

Collision Repair and Refinishing End-of Program Exam for Non-Structural Analysis & Damage Repair (B3) and immediately enter a career in this area and/or attend postsecondary education and/or training. Students develop diagnostic, technical and academic skills through classroom instruction and hands-on non-structural analysis and damage repair applications. Through theory and real-world experiences, students master the concepts and the ability to identify and perform necessary Non-Structural Analysis and Damage Repair tasks utilizing the latest techniques and applications. In addition, this course will address an introduction to welding; personal and environmental safety practices associated with clothing; respiratory protection, eye protection; entry level automotive service technology principles and practices; hand tools; power tools/equipment; proper ventilation; and the handling, storage, measuring and mixing procedures, raising and supporting vehicles, damage report principles and disposal of chemicals/materials in accordance with local, state, and federal safety and environmental regulations. I-CAR Live Curriculum and NATEF Task List mastery for this area are used to formulate accurate estimates of cost of repairs.

Textbook(s): Auto Body Repair Technology, ISBN 9781418073534

Painting and Refinishing

Course Code: 872813

Prerequisites: Nonstructural Analysis & Damage Repair

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to pass the written NATEF Painting and Refinishing NA3SA Exam for Paint and Refinishing and immediately enter a career in this area and/or attend postsecondary education and/or training. Utilizing the I-CAR Live Curriculum, students develop diagnostic, technical and academic skills through their participation in classroom instruction and hands-on applications in the areas of surface preparation; paint mixing, matching, application and paint equipment preparation; identification and correction of defects; final detailing and the ability to identify and perform other necessary

Painting and Refinishing tasks.

Textbook(s): Auto Body Repair Technology, ISBN 9781418073534

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Structural Analysis & Damage Repair

Course Code: 872823

Prerequisites: Painting and Refinishing

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to pass the written NATEF Structural

Analysis and Damage Repair Exam and immediately enter a career in this area and/or attend postsecondary education and/or training. Students develop diagnostic, technical and academic skills through classroom instruction and hands-on structural analysis and damage repair applications. Through theory and real-world experiences, students master the concepts and the ability to identify and perform necessary Structural Analysis and Damage Repair tasks utilizing the latest techniques and applications. The course provides a theoretical study of structural collision damage, its analysis and repair. The course emphasizes the proper procedures for measuring, analyzing and developing correct repair procedures for unibody and body-over-frame vehicles.

Student technicians develop repair plans and discuss their implementation. The course also emphasizes the restoring of vehicles to their pre-accident condition using manufacturer and industry recommendations. This course equips the student with the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary for immediate employment in the

Transportation Equipment Pathway and/or continuing postsecondary education. Students utilize I-CAR Live

Curriculum and NATEF Collision Repair Program Standards/Task List.

Textbook(s): Auto Body Repair Technology, ISBN 9781418073534

AVIATION AND TRANSPORTATION

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN

Automotive Technician Work Experience

Course Code: 875853

Prerequisites: Grade 12 student; concurrent enrollment in Engine Performance

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Work-based learning is an integral component of the Automotive Technician program. This course will provide students the opportunity to extend and apply classroom content in real-life situations through experiential learning.

Students may be placed at a variety of paid and unpaid automotive sites.

Textbook(s): Modern Automotive Technology, ISBN 9781590709566

Brakes

Course Code: 875813

Prerequisites: Suspension and Steering

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to pass the NA3SA end-of-course assessment for Automobile Brakes and immediately enter a career in this area and/or attend postsecondary education and/or training. Students develop diagnostic, technical problem-solving and academic skills through classroom instruction and hands-on maintenance applications. Through theory and real-world experiences, students master the concepts and the ability to research applicable vehicle and service information, collect and analyze relevant data, troubleshoot, identify, formulate proposed solutions to problems and perform necessary automobile brake diagnosis and repair tasks. Students will use state-of-the-art precision brake measurement tools and equipment to gather, analyze make necessary NATEF required brake repairs tasks.

Textbook(s): Modern Automotive Technology, ISBN 9781590709566

College and Career Readiness Exploration

Course Code: 938023

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See previous description.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Electrical/Electronic Systems

Course Code: 875833

Prerequisites: Brakes

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to pass the NA3SA end-of-course assessment for Automobile Electrical/Electronic Systems and immediately enter a career in this area and/or attend postsecondary education and/or training. Students develop diagnostic, technical problem-solving and academic skills through classroom instruction and hands-on maintenance applications. Through theory and real-world experiences, students master the concepts and the ability to research applicable vehicle and service information, collect and analyze relevant data, troubleshoot, identify, formulate proposed solutions to problems and perform necessary automobile electrical and electronic systems repair tasks. Students will use state-ofthe-art precision electronic measurement tools, fault code readers and equipment to gather, analyze, and make necessary NATEF required electrical and electronic system repairs.

Textbook(s): Modern Automotive Technology, ISBN 9781590709566

Engine Performance

Course Code: 875843

Prerequisites: Electrical/Electronic Systems

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to pass the NA3SA end-of-course assessment for Automobile Engine Performance and immediately enter a career in this area and/or attend postsecondary education and/or training. Students develop diagnostic, technical problem-solving and academic skills through classroom instruction and hands-on maintenance applications. Through theory and real-world experiences, students master the concepts and the ability to research applicable vehicle and service information, collect and analyze relevant data, troubleshoot, identify, formulate proposed solutions to problems and perform necessary automobile engine performance troubleshooting and repair tasks. Students will use state-of-the-art precision electronic engine performance measurement tools, fault code readers and equipment to gather, analyze, and make necessary NATEF required engine performance repairs.

Textbook(s): Modern Automotive Technology, ISBN 9781590709566

Introduction to Automotive

Course Code: 875803

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See description on previous page

Suspension and Steering

Course Code: 875823

Prerequisites: Algebra 1, Enrollment in the Automotive Technician program of study

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to pass the NA3SA end-of course assessment for Automobile Suspension and Steering and immediately enter a career in this area and/or attend post-secondary education and/or training. Students develop diagnostic, technical, problem-solving and academic skills through classroom instruction and hands-on maintenance applications. Through theory and real-world experiences, students master the concepts and the ability to research applicable vehicle and service information, collect and analyze relevant data, troubleshoot, identify, formulate proposed solutions to problems and perform necessary automobile suspension and steering repair tasks. Students will use state-of-the art precision steering and alignment measurement tools and equipment to gather, analyze and make necessary repairs.

Textbook(s): Modern Automotive Technology, ISBN 9781590709566

32

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

AVIATION AND TRANSPORTATION

AVIATION - AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLER

Aviation History and Development of Flight

Course Code: 991000

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

History of Aviation and Development of Flight is an introductory course and customized textbook that focuses on the history of aviation and flight. It introduces students to how airplanes fly, how weather conditions affect on flight, flight and the human body, and flight navigation. The course is designed to complement materials taught in math, physics, and other science-related courses and is aligned with the National Science Education Standards, the

Math Standards and Expectations, and ISTE National Educational Technology Standards for students.

Textbook(s): The Science of Flight: A Gateway to New Horizons, ISBN 9781449630652

Meterology

Course Code: 991010

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

This course explores how weather conditions affect flight. The course allow students to analyze Earth’s atmosphere, atmospheric motion, cloud types and how they form, and how the atmospheric layers impact flight.

Students examine air masses and fronts, high-and low pressure systems, and terrain factors that affect weather.

Textbook(s): The Science of Flight: A Gateway to New Horizons, ISBN 9781449630652

BUSINESS AND FINANCE

ACCOUNTING

Accounting Capstone

Course Code: 536003

Prerequisites: Advanced Accounting, Business Management & Finance Academy student, Grade 12

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The Capstone Project is a personally designed independently conducted activity which enables students to further knowledge/skill in one or more course topics of interest or beneficial in the Accounting pathway. The capstone project provides students with a forum for analyzing, synthesizing and implementing skills and knowledge. It offers an opportunity to think critically about a subject of profound interest to each student. While demonstrating a mastered content area, students apply their knowledge by creating a tangible product or service. Students are required to present the Capstone Project before their class and if possible business partners. Some skills include complex problem solving, evaluation, and synthesis of research, writing, communication, organization, accounting, budgeting, spread sheet presentation skills.

Textbook(s): TBA

Advanced Accounting

Course Code: 535203

Prerequisites: Principles of Accounting and Finance

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The Advanced Accounting course provides students with accounting knowledge that will prepare them for post-high school levels of education and entry-level positions in the workforce. Focus will be on accounting procedures necessary to address long- and short-term assets and investments, long- and short-term liabilities, inventory management and accounting ratios used in the decision-making process. A comprehensive study of the accounting procedures used in establishing corporations, declaring and paying dividends, the formation and dissolution of partnerships, distribution of net income and owners’ equity statements is included in this course.

Career pathways for accounting will be examined and the use of accounting knowledge in a variety of career

33

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

clusters is also explored. Awareness of ethical issues and application of ethical decision-making models will be reinforced throughout the course. Excel, Peachtree, and Quick Books will be used.

Textbook(s): Accounting: Real-World Applications & Connections, ISBN 9780078935671

Business Communications

Course Code: 551100

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

The first quarter of this semester long course is designed to teach students to efficiently use a keyboard in order to prepare and format documents relevant in a business environment and communicate effectively. Emphasis will be placed on proper keyboarding technique inclusive of spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and word usage. The second quarter of the course will teach students to communicate in a clear, courteous, concise, and correct manner on both personal and professional levels. Competency will be developed in oral, written, social, technological, employment, and organizational communication with listening skills incorporated throughout the semester. Students will complete the course with a greater understanding of the importance of technology and the need for effective communication skills to advance in a business career.

Textbook(s): Business Communications, ISBN 9780538436823

Computer Software Applications

Course Code: 534000

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn commercial software application programs similar to those commonly used in college and industry. It will acquaint students with ways to use a microcomputer as a tool for schoolwork as well as current uses in the workplace. The major software applications used in the course will include software for information processing, database, spreadsheets, graphics and integrated software. *Students who entered high school before Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may take this course for Technology Education credit through school year 2012-2013.

All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): Integrated Computer Applications, ISBN 9781111988098

Principles of Accounting and Finance

Course Code: 553133

Prerequisites: Grade 11, Principles of Business Administrations and Management,

Business Management & Finance student

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The course provides students with knowledge necessary to manage and maintain a company’s financial resources in daily operating decisions. A mastery of fundamental accounting concepts, skills and competencies is essential to making informed business decisions. Students will learn to apply generally accepted accounting principles to determine the value of assets, liabilities, and owner’s equity as they apply to various forms of business ownership. Students will prepare, interpret, and analyze financial statements using manual and computerized systems for service and merchandising businesses. Students will apply appropriate accounting principles to payroll and tax liabilities. Students will identify positions and career paths in the field of accounting.

Students will examine the role of ethics and social responsibility in decision-making.

Textbook(s): Accounting: Real-World Applications & Connections, ISBN 9780078935671

Principles of Business Administration and Management

Course Code: 553103

Prerequisites: Grade 10, Business Management and Finance student

Credits: 1.0 Completer

34

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

This course provides students with knowledge of the types of businesses, as well as various applications, laws and theories of business. Along with a brief historical perspective, business terminology and principles will be emphasized. Students will learn to analyze the functions of business through evaluating, planning, organizing, and controlling. Students will develop the communication skills that will be necessary for success in the workplace and college. Students will be expected to think analytically, improve written and oral communication skills, enhance listening and questioning skills, learn and practice the art of conversation, improve public speaking skills, broaden their awareness of career options, practice using teamwork to make decisions and solve problems, and learn why people skills, communication skills and networking skills can help them succeed in their careers. Students will develop human resource skills including: diversity training, attitude, attendance, accountability, employer/employee rights, discrimination, availability of information as well as time management and setting priorities. Students will write grammatically correct correspondence and communicate orally.

Students will understand the business world and be more prepared to meet their career goals and objectives.

Textbook(s): Principles of Business, ISBN 9781111426941

BUSINESS AND FINANCE

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

Business Communications

Course Code: 551100

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

See description on previous page.

Computer Software Applications

Course Code: 534000

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

See description on previous page.

Internship

Course Code: 500010, 500013

Prerequisites: Successful completion of three hours of business academy pathways courses

Credits: .50 - 1.0 Elective

This course will provide students the opportunity to become completers in the Accounting, Business Management,

Finance and Business Administrative Services strands. Students will complete a specialized project specific to the strand or spend the year working in a department approved internship.

Textbook(s): TBA

Office Systems Management 1

Course Code: 553123

Prerequisites: Grade 11, Principles of Business Administrations and Management,

Business Management and Finance student

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The Office Systems Management course provides students with a study of basic business practices, information systems and computer applications. Students develop managerial and technical skills for business support operations through applied learning. Problem-solving skill development is incorporated throughout the course to meet the recommendations made through the Maryland Skills for Success. Competencies include applying emerging technologies in order to complete appropriate office operations; using spreadsheets, desktop publishing and/or word processing software in order to create business documents and professional presentations; exhibiting appropriate interpersonal teamwork and leadership skills in order to succeed in the business world;

35

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

demonstrating a knowledge of acceptable values and behaviors in order to become ethically responsible employees; and developing an appreciation of diversity in the workplace. Industry standard office equipment and the most current Microsoft Office software available will be used in this course.

Textbook(s): Office Systems Management 1, ISBN 13-9781269259002

Office Systems Management 2

Course Code: 553143

Prerequisites: Office Systems Management 1, Business Management & Finance Academy student, Grade 12

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course provides students with advanced technology skills. Students will develop advanced skills using

Microsoft’s leading business desktop software and acquire the Microsoft Office Specialist credential in Word and Excel. Students will be expected to think analytically, manipulate information, and use the computer as a productivity tool through integrated application programs. Expertise in technology will contribute to students’ future career mobility, advancement potential, compensation and job satisfaction.

Textbook(s): Office Systems Management ISBN 9781269601628

Principles of Accounting and Finance

Course Code: 553133

Prerequisites: Grade 11, Principles of Business Administrations and Management,

Business Management & Finance student

Credits: 1.0 Completer

See description on previous page.

Principles of Business Administration and Management

Course Code: 553103

Prerequisites: Grade 10, Business Management and Finance student

Credits: 1.0 Completer

See description on previous page.

BUSINESS AND FINANCE

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Advanced Business Management

Course Code: 553113

Prerequisites: Grade 11, Principles of Business Administration and Management, Business

Credits:

Management & Finance student

1.0 Completer

The Advanced Business Administration course provides students with the knowledge that will prepare them for post-high school levels of education and entry-level positions in the work force. It is followed by the Capstone course. Focus will be on the role of business in society; the changing nature of contemporary business practices; major management concepts, theories, and theorists, the processes of management (functional, operational, human relations), business law and ethics, and business communications. Career pathways will be examined and the use of business management knowledge in a variety of career clusters is also explored. Awareness of ethical issues and application of ethical decision-making models will be reinforced throughout the course. Students will understand the business world and be more prepared to meet their career goals and objectives. This course will help students to contribute to the improvement of economic citizenship and professional literacy through analysis of the business and economic environment.

Textbook(s): TBA

36

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Business Communications

Course Code: 551100

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

See description on previous page.

Business Management Capstone

Course Code: 553213

Prerequisites: Advanced Management, Business Management & Finance Academy student, Grade 12

Credits: .50 Elective

The Capstone Project is a personally designed independently conducted activity which enables students to further knowledge/skill in one or more of the course topics of interest or beneficial in the Business Management pathway. The capstone project provides students with a forum for analyzing, synthesizing and implementing tskills and knowledge. It offers an opportunity to think critically about a subject of profound interest to each student. While demonstrating a mastered content area, students apply their knowledge by creating a tangible product or service. Students are required to present the Capstone Project before their class and if possible business partners. Some skills include complex problem solving, evaluation, and synthesis of research, writing, communication, organization, time-management and presentation skills.

Textbook(s): NO TEXT

Computer Software Applications

Course Code: 534000

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

See description on previous page.

Internship

Course Code: 500010, 500013

Prerequisites: Successful completion of three hours of business academy pathways courses

Credits: .50 - 1.0 Elective

See description on previous page.

Principles of Accounting and Finance

Course Code: 553133

Prerequisites: Grade 11, Principles of Business Administrations and Management,

Business Management & Finance student

Credits: 1.0 Completer

See description on previous page.

Principles of Business Administration and Management

Course Code: 553103

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer

See description on previous page.

BUSINESS AND FINANCE

FINANCE - NATIONAL ACADEMY FOUNDATION (NAF)

Applied Finance NAF

Course Code: 511160

37

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Prerequisites: 11th Grade, Financial Services, Academy of Finance Student

Credits: .50 Completer

This course delves into the financial concepts introduced in Principles of Finance. Students learn to identify the legal forms of business organization and continue to develop an understanding of profit. They learn about various financial analysis strategies and the methods by which businesses raise capital. Students also have the chance to explore, in depth, topics of high interest in the field of finance, and explore the types of careers that exist in finance today.

Textbook(s): National Academy Foundation curriculum and resources online

Business Communications

Course Code: 551100

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

See description on previous page.

Business Economics - NAF

Course Code: 540000

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Completer

Business Economics introduces students to the key concepts of economics as they pertain to business. This course discusses the American economy and the factors that influence the success of businesses and products.

It describes forms of business ownership, discusses the relationship of labor and business, and provides a broad overview of the global economy. Students also examine careers in business, both as employees and as business owners.

Textbook(s): National Academy Foundation curriculum and resources online

Computer Software Applications

Course Code: 534000

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

See description on previous page.

Ethics in Business - NAF

Course Code: 511140

Prerequisites: Academy of Finance student

Credits: .50 Completer

This course introduces the importance of ethics in business. Students focus on the significance of ethics to stakeholders, examine who bears responsibility for monitoring ethics, and explore ethical situations common in organizations. Students examine how ethics affects various business disciplines and consider the impact of organizational culture. Students also explore ethics as social responsibility, the evolution of ethics in international business, and how the free market and ethics can coexist.

Textbook(s): National Academy Foundation curriculum and resources online

Financial Planning - NAF

Course Code: 576600

Prerequisites: Academy of Finance Student

Credits: .50 Completer

This one-semester course introduces students to the financial planning process and the components of a comprehensive financial plan. Students learn how to prepare a financial plan that includes saving, investing,

38

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

borrowing, risk management (insurance), and retirement and estate planning.

Textbook(s): National Academy Foundation curriculum and resources online

Financial Services - NAF

Course Code: 510000

Prerequisites: Academy of Finance Student

Credits: .50 Completer

This course gives students an overview of banks and other financial services companies. It introduces students to the origins of money and banking and examines the early history of banking in the United States. Students study the financial services industry and the types of companies it includes in depth. They learn about the services offered by such companies and analyze the ways these companies earn profits. Finally, students examine careers in financial services.

Textbook(s): National Academy Foundation curriculum and resources online

Internship

Course Code: 500010, 500013

Prerequisites: Successful completion of three hours of business academy pathways courses

Credits: .50 - 1.0 Elective

See description on previous page. NO TEXT

Managerial Accounting - NAF

Course Code: 511130

Prerequisites: Academy of Finance student

Credits: .50 Completer

Managerial Accounting introduces the fundamentals of management accounting, including manufacturing and cost accounting, budgeting, accounting for managerial decision-making, and financial statement analysis.

Students learn how to use accounting information for internal decision-making and planning and control.

Regardless of the career path they choose, this course gives students the financial acumen necessary to make informed personal and business decisions.

Textbook(s): National Academy Foundation curriculum and resources online

NAF Entrepreneurship

Course Code: 511150

Prerequisites: Academy of Finance student

Credits: .50 Completer

Entrepreneurship introduces students to the critical role entrepreneurs play in the national and global economy. Students learn the skills, attitudes, characteristics, and techniques necessary to become successful entrepreneurs. They explore starting a business and learn about the operational issues and financial risks that new businesses face. Students examine ethical issues and develop a framework for managing them. Finally, students identify the risks, returns, and other aspects of entrepreneurship as a potential career.

Textbook(s): National Academy Foundation curriculum and resources online

Principles of Accounting - NAF

Course Code: 511000

Prerequisites: Academy of Finance student

Credits: .50 Completer

Principles of Accounting provides students with an understanding of the accounting process and how it facilitates decision making by providing data and information to internal and external stakeholders. Students learn that accounting is an integral part of all business activities. They learn how to apply technology to accounting by creating formulas and inputting data into spreadsheets. Students also examine career opportunities and the

39

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

professional certifications and designations earned by individuals in the accounting profession.

Textbook(s): National Academy Foundation curriculum and resources online

Principles of Finance - NAF

Course Code: 511110

Prerequisites: Academy of Finance Student

Credits: .50 Completer

This is the first course students take in the Academy of Finance and introduces students to the financial world.

Students develop financial literacy as they learn about the function of finance in society. They study income and wealth; examine financial institutions; learn how businesses raise capital; and study key investment-related terms and concepts. They also research how innovations have changed the financial services field. Finally, students explore careers that exist in finance today.

Textbook(s): National Academy Foundation curriculum and resources online

CONSUMER SERVICES, HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM

BARBERING

Barbering 1

Course Code: 884113

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 2.0 Completer

Barbering 1 is required for the Barbering program of study.

Textbook(s): Milady Barbering, ISBN 9781435497153

Barbering 2

Course Code: 884123

Prerequisites: Grade 11, Barbering 1, Barbering student

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course continues the practical application as well as clinical practice. The program prepares students to become licensed professional barber stylists. Skills taught include basic to advanced hair cutting techniques for men and women; fundamentals and techniques of shaving, beard and mustache trimming, skin care, massage and various chemical services. Emphasis is placed on hygiene, safety, sanitation and state board rules and regulations. Related areas of instruction include human anatomy, physiology, chemistry, consumer relations and employability skills. Students must pass all courses and take the Maryland State Board assessment prior to graduation. Students must be accepted through an application process.

Textbook(s): Milady Barbering, ISBN 9781435497153

Barbering 3

Course Code: 884133

Prerequisites: Barbering 2

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course provides students the opportunity to further refine and apply skills that support all aspects of the barbering industry. It will assist in preparing students to obtain employment and advance in the field upon passing the State Board licensing examination.

Textbook(s): Milady Barbering, ISBN 9781435497153

Barbering/Cosmetology Internship

Course Code: 884143

Prerequisites: Barbering 3, Grade 12 student

Credits: 1.0 Completer

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

This course provides students the opportunity to further refine and apply skills that support all aspects of the cosmetology industry. It assists in preparing students for employment and advancement in the field of barbering and cosmetology. Students complete an industry mentored work based learning experience.

Textbook(s): TBA

College and Career Readiness Exploration

Course Code: 938023

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See previous description.

Introduction to Barbering and Cosmetology

Course Code: 884003

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course is designed for the Barbering and Hairstyling and Careers in Cosmetology Programs of Study.

Textbook(s): TBA

CONSUMER SERVICES, HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM

COSMETOLOGY

Advanced Cosmetology

Course Code: 880303

Prerequisites: Principles of Cosmetology 2

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course allows students to develop and practice more advanced techniques in the field of cosmetology.

Textbook(s): Milady Cosmo, ISBN 9781439059302

College and Career Readiness Exploration

Course Code: 938023

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See previous description.

Introduction to Barbering and Cosmetology

Course Code: 884003

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course is designed for the Barbering and Hairstyling and Careers in Cosmetology Programs of Study.

Textbook(s): TBA

Mastery of Cosmetology

Course Code: 880403

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course is designed for the Barbering and Hairstyling and Careers in Cosmetology Programs of Study.

Textbook(s): Milady Cosmo, ISBN 9781439059302

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Principles of Cosmetology 1

Course Code: 882003

Prerequisites: Cosmetology student

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course provides an introduction to the field of cosmetology. Students develop and practice basic skills in cosmetology; develop a broad understanding of the variety of career options available to a licenses cosmetologist; and learn how science and math are fundamental aspects of the practice of cosmetology.

Textbook(s): TBA

Principles of Cosmetology 2

Course Code: 882013

Prerequisites: Principles of Cosmetology 1

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course provides further knowledge of the field of cosmetology. Students develop and practice basic skills in cosmetology; develop a broad understanding of the variety of career options available to a licensed cosmetologist; and learn how science and math are fundamental aspects of the practice of cosmetology.

Textbook(s): TBA

CONSUMER SERVICES, HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM

CULINARY ARTS

Culinary Arts Internship

Course Code: 684753

Prerequisites: Grade 12, Culinary Arts Academy student,

Credits: concurrent enrollment in Professional Cooking 2 or Baking/Pastry 2

1.0 Completer

Students participating in an internship will be placed in a professional setting under the supervision of a chef or pastry chef to allows students to apply the skills and knowledge of professional cooking or baking acquired from their previous coursework. The internship includes a minimum of 135 hours, which may be paid or unpaid.

This experience is directed by an agreement developed by the culinary arts instructor, the work based learning coordinator, the employer and the student. The agreement identifies the appropriate competencies, duties and tasks in academic, technical and work readiness areas that apply directly to students’ goals in professional cooking or baking. The work based learning coordinator and the instructor are responsible for monitoring students’ placements and documenting students’ progress.

Textbook(s): TBA

Culinary Basics: Foundations of Professional Cooking

Course Code: 684543

Prerequisites: Grade 10, Culinary Arts Academy Student

Credits: 4.0 Completer

This course is the introduction to the fundamental concepts and techniques in the profession of culinary arts. It provides hands-on clinical experience through school-based enterprises, giving the students the opportunity to develop the technical skills required in future culinary and baking courses as well as the foodservice industry.

Students will be introduced to professional standards of the industry, safety and sanitation procedures, knife skills, including handling and care, cooking processes and procedures, product identification, vocabulary and terminology, industry equipment, recipe costing and quantity adjustments. Students participate in demonstrations and group exercises to supplement their development of technical skills and knowledge..

Textbook(s): Culinary Essentials, ISBN 9780078883590

Food Trends and Technology 1

Course Code: 684100

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Prerequisites: Foods and Nutrition 1

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester course presents a variety of units to assist high school students to appreciate the interrelationship of food science and nutrition. Emphasis is placed on food and its affects on the body. A scientific approach to purposeful laboratory experiences allows students to evaluate specific foods and their properties. Students cooperatively research the role technology plays in food processing and study appliances of the past, today, and into the future. This course is a prerequisite for the Food and Beverage Management (ProStart) state approved completer program. Students who entered high school before Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may take this course for Technology Education credit through school year

2012-2013. All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): Food Science, ISBN 9780078226038

Foods and Nutrition 1

Course Code: 682000

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester course is designed to strengthen the understanding and importance of nutrition as it relates to wellness. The focus of this course is to assist students in making healthy food choices based on the dietary guidelines, food guide pyramid, and nutrient groups. Knowledge and understanding of these elements enable students to select, plan, prepare and serve nutritious meals. Safety and sanitation of food are emphasized.

Students practice effective management skills and apply consumer decision-making skills in all aspects of meal planning and food preparation. Weight control and exercise are examined as factors promoting wellness.

Students develop a portfolio and explore career paths that lead to employment in the field of nutrition. Field experiences in this course include interviewing and job shadowing professionals. This course is a prerequisite for the Food and Beverage Management (ProStart) state approved completer program. Students who entered high school before Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may take this course for

Technology Education credit through school year 2012-2013. All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): Food for Today, ISBN 9780078616440

Professional Baking/Pastry 1

Course Code: 684723

Prerequisites: Grade 11, Culinary Basics: Foundations of Professional Cooking, Culinary Arts student

Credits: 2.0 Completer

Students in this course explore the fundamental concepts and techniques in baking. They will be instructed in the fundamentals of baking science, terminology, equipment, ingredients, weights and measurements, formula conversion and costing of recipes while maintaining the professional standards of the food service industry.

Students will prepare a variety of baked goods including breads, rolls, cakes, pies, and cookies. Students participate in demonstrations, group exercises and school-based enterprises to supplement the students’ developmental of technical skills and knowledge. There will be a lab fee for this course.

Textbook(s): On Baking, ISBN 9780132374569

Professional Baking/Pastry 2

Course Code: 684743

Prerequisites: Grade 12, Professional Baking/Pastry 1, Culinary Arts Student

Credits: 2.0 Completer

Students in this course continue the application of the fundamental concepts and techniques in baking. They will be instructed in the fundamentals of baking science, terminology, equipment, ingredients, weights and measurements, formula conversion and costing of recipes while maintaining the professional standards of the foodservice industry. Students will prepare a variety of baked goods including breads, rolls, cakes, pies, and

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

cookies. Students participate in demonstrations, group exercises and school-based enterprises to supplement the students’ development of technical skills and knowledge.

Textbook(s): On Baking, ISBN 9780132374569

Professional Cooking 1

Course Code: 684713

Prerequisites: Culinary Basics: Foundations of Professional Cooking, Culinary Arts student

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course continues to build on the foundation concepts and techniques from the Culinary Basics course.

Students will be instructed on the fundamental concepts, techniques, theories, ingredients, and methodologies involved in the preparation of basic menu items. Students rotate through food handling methods and techniques, portion control, costing, production, plating and garnishing of soups, salads, starches, vegetables, and entrees.

Students participate in demonstrations, group exercises and school based enterprises to supplement the students’ development of technical skills and knowledge. There will be a lab fee for this course.

Textbook(s): On Cooking, ISBN 9780137155767

Professional Cooking 2

Course Code: 684733

Prerequisites: Grade 12, Professional Cooking 1, Culinary Arts Student

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course continues student application of concepts and techniques from the Culinary Basics course. Students will be instructed on the fundamental concepts, techniques, theories, ingredients, and methodologies involved in the preparation of basic menu items. Students rotate through food handling methods and techniques, portion control, costing, production, plating and garnishing of soups, salads, starches, vegetables, and entrees.

Students participate in demonstrations, group exercises and school-based enterprises to supplement the students’ development of technical skills and knowledge.

Textbook(s): On Cooking, ISBN 9780137155767

CONSUMER SERVICES, HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM

PROSTART

Food Trends and Technology 1

Course Code: 684100

Prerequisites: Foods and Nutrition 1

Credits: .50 Elective

See description on previous page.

Foods and Nutrition 1

Course Code: 682000

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

See description on previous page.

Food Service Professional 1 (ProStart 1)

Course Code: 684503

Prerequisites: Foods and Nutrition 1 and Food Trends and Technology 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course provides an introduction to the food service and hospitality industry. Students develop and demonstrate skills in safe and sanitary food handling and preparation techniques. Students learn to prepare a variety of foods.

They develop a broad understanding of the variety of career options available in the food service and hospitality

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

industry, and have the opportunity to earn the ServSafe credential. Students can begin to accrue hours to meet the 400 hour work based learning experience requirement. One-hundred and fifty (150) of the 400 hours can be earned through in-class clinical experience. All students enrolled in this course must take the National Restaurant

Association Educational Foundation end-of course exam. This course is for 11th graders only.

Textbook(s): Becoming a Food Service Professional 1, ISBN 9781582801179; ServSafe Essentials

Food Service Professional 2 (ProStart 2)

Course Code: 684603

Prerequisites: ProStart 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Students enrolled in this course continue to prepare a variety of foods. They create menus, demonstrate various types of restaurant service, apply purchasing techniques and demonstrate an understanding of inventory monitoring and control. Students have the opportunity for an authentic, mentored work-based learning experience and can continue to accrue hours to meet the 400 hour work based learning experience requirement.

One-hundred and fifty (150) of the 400 hours can be earned through in-class clinical experience. All students enrolled in this course must take the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation end-of course exam. This course is for 12th graders who have taken ProStart 1. Students enrolled in ProStart 2 must also be enrolled in ProStart Internship. This course is for 12th graders who have taken ProStart 1. Students enrolled in ProStart 2 must also be enrolled in ProStart Internship.

Textbook(s): Becoming a Food Service Professional 2, ISBN 9781582801254; ServSafe Essentials

ProStart Internship

Course Code: 684703

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ProStart 1 and 2; Grade 12 student; teacher approval;

Credits: concurrent enrollment in ProStart 2

2.0 Completer

This course provides students the opportunity to further refine and apply skills that support all aspects of the hospitality industry. It assists in preparing students for employment and advancement in the field of hospitality and food and beverage management. Students complete an industry-mentored work-based learning experience.

Students enrolled in ProStart Internship must also be enrolled in ProStart 2.

Textbook(s): Becoming a Food Service Professional 2, ISBN 9781582801254; ServSafe Essentials

ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE

COMPUTER SCIENCE

Advanced Placement Computer Science

Course Code: 867323

Prerequisites: Foundations of Computer Science

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This is an advanced course in computer science. Because the design and implementation of computer programs to solve problems involve skills that are fundamental to the study of computer science, a large part of the course is built around the development of computer programs that correctly solve a given problem. These programs should be understandable, adaptable, and, when appropriate, reusable. At the same time, the design and implementation of computer programs is used as a context for introducing other important aspects of computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, the study of standard algorithms and typical applications, and the use of logic and formal methods.

In addition, the responsible use of these systems is an integral part of the course.

Textbook(s): TBA

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Computer Science Principles

Course Code: 867313

Prerequisites: Foundations of Computer Science

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course advances students’ understanding of the technical aspects of computing including, programming and algorithm design, computer system organization and operation, and data representation and information organization. Specific programming languages may include Processing, C++, and Java.

Textbook(s): TBA

Foundations of Computer Science

Course Code: 867303

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course is designed to introduce students to the breadth of the field of computer science through an exploration of engaging and accessible topics. Rather than focusing the entire course on learning particular software tools or programming languages, the course is designed to focus on the conceptual ideas of computing and help students understand why certain tools or languages might be utilized to solve particular problems. This course includes a broad range of topics in computing, including robotics; programming in several languages such as Processing and Java; and cyber security. The goal is to develop in students the computational thinking practices of algorithm development, problem solving and programming within the context of problems that are relevant. Students will also be introduced to topics such as interface design, limits of computers and societal and ethical issues.

Textbook(s): TBA

ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE

PRE-ENGINEERING (PROJECT LEAD THE WAY)

Aerospace Engineering

Course Code: 867903

Prerequisites: Principles of Engineering; Introduction to Engineering Design;

Digital Electronics; completion of Geometry and Algebra 2 is recommended

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Aerospace Engineering serves as a specialization course option within the PLTW sequence. Students learn about aerodynamics, astronautics, space-life sciences, and systems engineering through hands-on engineering problems and projects. Transcripted college credit is available to students who receive a grade of 85% in the course and pass an assessment administered by the national affiliate for PLTW, Rochester Institute of

Technology (RIT)

Textbook(s): Introduction to Flight; Fundamentals of Aerodynamics

Civil Engineering and Architecture

Course Code: 867703

Prerequisites: Principles of Engineering; Introduction to Engineering Design;

Digital Electronics; completion of Geometry and Algebra 2 is recommended.

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Civil Engineering and Architecture serves as a specialization course option within the PLTW sequence. Students are introduced to the interdependent fields of Civil Engineering and Architecture and learn project planning, site planning and building design. Transcripted college credit is available to students who receive a grade of 85% in the course and pass an assessment administered by the national affiliate for PLTW, Rochester Institute of

Technology (RIT).

Textbook(s): Architectural Drafting and Design, ISBN 9780766815469

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Digital Electronics

Course Code: 867603

Prerequisites: Principles of Engineering; Introduction to Engineering Design; Geometry and Algebra 2 recommended

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Digital Electronics serves as a foundations course within the PLTW sequence. Students use computer simulation to learn about the logic of electronics as they design, test, and actually construct circuits. Transcripted college credit is available to students who receive a grade of 85% in the course and pass an assessment administered by the national affiliate for PLTW, Rochester Institute of Technology.

Books/Materials: Digital Electronics Principles and Applications or Digital Electronics, ISBN 9780078289002;

Digital Electronics Lab Manual

Engineering Design and Development

Course Code: 867803

Prerequisites: Principles of Engineering; Introduction to Engineering Design; Digital Electronics; one specialization course; completion of Algebra 2/Trig is recommended.

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This capstone course allows teams of students, guided by community mentors, to work together to research, design, and construct solutions to engineering problems.

Textbook(s): TBA

Introduction to Engineering Design

Course Code: 867503

Prerequisites: Algebra 1 recommended; PLTW student

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Introduction to Engineering Design serves as a foundations course within the PLTW sequence. Using 3D computer modeling software, students learn the design process and solve design problems for which they develop, analyze, and create products. Transcripted college credit is available to students who receive a grade of 85% in the course and pass an assessment administered by the national affiliate for PLTW, Rochester

Institute of Technology (RIT).

Textbook(s): Engineering Drawing and Design, ISBN 9780766816343

Principles of Engineering

Course Code: 867403

Prerequisites: Algebra 1 and Geometry recommended; PLTW student

Credits: 1.0 Completer; Technology Education

Principles of Engineering serves as a foundations course within the PLTW sequence. Students explore technology systems and engineering processes to find out how math, science, and technology help people.

Transcripted college credit is available to students who receive a grade of 85% in the course and pass an assessment administered by the national affiliate for PLTW, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT). PLTW students may also meet their technology education credit through this course or use as one of the courses in the

CTE sequence—It may not be used for both. In order to receive Technology Education credit for Principles of

Engineering, students must be enrolled in the PLTW Pre-Engineering program and also have taken and passed both Introduction to Engineering and Design and Digital Electronics.

Books/Materials: Engineering Your Future: A Project Based Introduction to Engineering, ISBN 9781881018889 or Introduction to Engineering

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE PIONEERS - Curriculum for Agricultural Science Education

(CASE)

Agriculture Research and Development Capstone

Course Code: 491053

Prerequisites: Animal and Plant Biotechnology, Environmental Studies-CASE pathway student

Credits: 1.0 Environmental Science Pioneers CASE Completer

The Maryland developed Agriculture Research and Development course will serve as the capstone and completer course for students that have completed three of the following CASE™ courses: Introduction to

Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources, Principles for Agricultural Science Plant or Animal, Animal and Plant

Biotechnology, or Food Science and Safety. Instruction and continued inquiry-based projects are designed to integrate key learning from the CASE™ sequence of courses and have students apply them to real-world career situations through student-directed research, Supervised Agriculture Experiences (SAE) projects, or other internship/work-based learning opportunities. In the capstone course students will apply the methods and knowledge learned from previous CASE™ courses to synthesize their own research project to further expand their understanding and knowledge surrounding a specific problem. Students will identify a problem, develop and implement research procedures, document the research, analyze the resulting data, and present their findings and recommendations through a written report, a visual display, and oral presentation. Students that complete the student-directed research project will be eligible to apply for and earn three transcripted credits from the Institute of Applied Agriculture at the University of Maryland.

Textbook(s): TBA

Animal and Plant Biotechnology

Course Code: 491043

Prerequisites: Principles of Agricultural Sciences - Plant; Environmental Studies - CASE pathway student

Credits: 1.0 Environmental Science Pioneers CASE Completer

Animal and Plant Biotechnology, a specialization course in the CASE program of study, provides resources to the teacher to facilitate rigorous instruction and increase the level of student understanding related to biotechnology concepts. Students will complete hands-on activities, projects, and problems designed to build content knowledge and technical skills in the field of biotechnology. Students are expected to become proficient at projects involving micropipetting, bacterial cultures and transformations, electrophoresis, and polymerase chain reaction. Research and experimental design will be highlighted as students develop and conduct industry appropriate investigations. In addition, students will understand specific connections between the Animal and

Plant Biotechnology lessons and Supervised Agricultural Experience and FFA components that are important for the development of an informed agricultural education student. Students will investigate, experiment, and learn about documenting a project, solving problems, and communicating their solutions to their peers and members of the professional community.

Textbook(s): Biotechnology A Laboratory Skills Course

Introduction to Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

Course Code: 491003

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Environmental Science Pioneers CASE Completer

Introduction of Agriculture and Natural Resources (AFNR) is intended to serve as the introductory course within the CASE (Curriculum for Agricultural Science Education) Program of Study. The course introduces all facets of agriculture as well as emphasis on career pathways. The student gains a solid foundation in science, mathematics, reading and writing, components that are essential throughout the CASE curriculum.

Students will experience “hands on” activities that provide an overview of agricultural science and natural resources as well as investigate and experiment utilizing scientific investigation to explore various topics. As a result, students communicate information and formulate solutions to their teachers, peers and members of the professional community.

Textbook(s): TBA

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Principles of Agricultural Sciences - Animal

Course Code: 491033

Prerequisites: Introduction to Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

Credits: 1.0 Environmental Science Pioneers CASE Completer

The Principles of Agricultural Science – Animal course serves as one of two principle courses within the

Curriculum for Agricultural Science Education, CASE™, program sequence. The course is structured to enable all students to have a variety of experiences that will provide an overview of the field of agricultural science with a foundation in animal science so that students may continue through the sequence of courses in the CASE™

Program of Study. Students will participate in hands-on projects and activities to recognize the characteristics of animal science and participate in projects and problems similar to those that animal science specialists, such as veterinarians, zoologists, livestock producers, or industry personnel face in their respective careers.

The knowledge and skills students develop will be used in future courses within the CASE™ program. In addition, students will understand specific connections between the Animal Science lessons Supervised

Agricultural Experience, Future Farmers of America, and LifeKnowledge® (a curriculum for leadership and career development) components that are important for the development of an informed agricultural education student. Students will build on the skills developed in Introduction to Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources to investigate, conduct experiments, and document projects that solve real life problems. Students will communicate their solutions through reports and presentations to their peers and members of the professional community.

Textbook(s): TBA

Principles of Agricultural Sciences - Plant

Course Code: 491013

Prerequisites: Introduction to Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

Credits: 1.0 Environmental Science Pioneers CASE Completer

The Principles of Agricultural Science – Plant™ course serves one of two principle courses within the

Curriculum for Agricultural Science Education, CASE™, program sequence. The course is structured to enable all students to have a variety of experiences that will provide an overview of the field of agricultural science with a foundation in plant science so that students may continue through the sequence of courses in the CASE™ program. Students will work in teams, exploring hands-on projects and activities, to learn the characteristics of plant science and work on major projects and problems similar to those that plant science specialists, such as horticulturalists, agronomists, greenhouse and nursery managers and producers, and plant research specialists face in their respective careers. This knowledge and skills will be used in future courses within the CASE™ program. In addition, students will understand specific connections between the Plant Science lessons Supervised Agricultural Experience, Future Farmers of America, and LifeKnowledge® (a curriculum for leadership and career development) components that are important for the development of an informed agricultural education student. Students will build on the skills developed in Introduction to Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources to investigate, conduct experiments, and document projects that solve real life problems.

Students will communicate their solutions through reports and presentations to their peers and members of the professional community.

Textbook(s): TBA

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENVIRONMENTAL, AGRICULTURAL, AND NATURAL RESOURCES

Human Ecology and Environmental Problem Solving

Course Code: 976813

Prerequisites: Biology or concurrent enrollment Biology

Credits: 1.0 Completer (approval pending)

In this introductory course, students will engage in interdisciplinary study of environmental problems and dilemmas related to population growth, energy usage, pollution, commercial agriculture, and biodiversity loss in their communities, the state and the region. These problems and dilemmas will be used to explore science

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

topics such as biogeochemical cycles, hydrology, geology, ecology and climatology. They will explore related careers and investigate one or more of these careers based on individual interests..

Textbook(s): TBA

Natural Resource Management

Course Code: 976823

Prerequisites: Human Ecology and Environmental Problem Solving

Credits: 1.0 Completer (approval pending)

This course is an extension of the skills and applications students developed in Human Ecology and Environmental

Problem Solving. Students will explore existing and emerging principles of sustainable environmental management such as the precautionary principle, pollution prevention and wingspread principles. This course will strengthen students understanding of local and regional regulation and policy-making as they relate these aspects to sustainability and protection of natural resources such as air, soil, water, land, and wildlife resources.

Students will participate in field experiences to enhance learning. Students will learn relevant laboratory and field-based sampling techniques for evaluating ecological conditions and adaptive management principles for conservation.

Textbook(s): None

Environmental Technologies and Techniques

Course Code: 976833

Prerequisites: Natural Resource Management

Credits: 1.0 Completer (approval pending)

The focus of this course is emerging and renewable technologies (Design for the Environment, LEED, carbon auditing, pollution credits, resources shares, wind and solar power), techniques in watershed and landscape restoration, environmental technologies including those related to remote sensing, ecological monitoring and analytic testing. Students will explore and critically evaluate the role of technology in preventing, controlling, mitigating and remediating environmental problems and issues. Student will apply environmental technologies and techniques in practical settings and produce technical reports on the application of these technologies and techniques.

Textbook(s): None

Environmental and Natural Resource Research Ethics

Course Code: 976843

Prerequisites: Environmental Technologies and Techniques

Credits: 1.0 Completer (approval pending)

The focus of this course is to develop critical thinking, communication skills and knowledge of ethics related to

Environmental, Agricultural, and Natural Resources issues. Topics will include both plant and animal biomedical research; genetically engineered cells; and the use, distribution and availability of natural resources across populations. Students will engage in independent research on current environmental topics and communicate the findings and implications of their research to appropriate audiences. Students will explore the interplay of economic, social, political and cultural aspects of EANR problems and issues, and propose ethical, data-driven solutions.

Textbook(s): None

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

GLOBAL STUDIES

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS AND FINANCE - NAF

Business in a Global Economy

Course Code: 511100

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Elective

Business in a Global Economy provides students with an understanding of how and why businesses choose to expand their operations into other countries. This course exposes students to the unique challenges facing firms doing business internationally and to the potential opportunities available to those businesses. Building on concepts introduced in Principles of Finance, Business in a Global Economy broadens students’ understanding of how businesses operate, grow, and thrive in our ever-changing world.

Textbook(s): TBA

Capstone - Business

Course Code: 599000

Prerequisites: Academy student

Credits: .50 Elective

The capstone course is an opportunity for students to demonstrate that they have achieved the goals for learning established by their career academy program. The course culminates with students completing research on their field of study, maintaining a portfolio of work, and presenting their learning’s to a panel of experts in their career academy fields of interest.

Textbook(s): None

Ethics in Business

Course Code: 511140

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Elective

This course introduces the importance of ethics in business. Students focus on the significance of ethics to stakeholders, examine who bears responsibility for monitoring ethics, and explore ethical situations common in organizations. Students examine how ethics affects various business disciplines and consider the impact of organizational culture. Students also explore ethics as social responsibility, the evolution of ethics in international business, and how the free market and ethics can coexist.

Textbook(s): TBA

Financial Services - NAF

Course Code: 510000

Prerequisites: Academy of Finance Student

Credits: .50 Completer

This course gives students an overview of banks and other financial services companies. It introduces students to the origins of money and banking and examines the early history of banking in the United States. Students study the financial services industry and the types of companies it includes in depth. They learn about the services offered by such companies and analyze the ways these companies earn profits. Finally, students examine careers in financial services.

Textbook(s): online

Geography

Course Code: 291500

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Elective

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Geography is a course in the International Business and Finance Program of Study.

Textbook(s): TBA

Global Economics

Course Code: 540010

Prerequisites: Global Studies Academy student

Credits: .50 Elective

Global Economics introduces students to the key concepts of economics as they pertain to business. This course discusses the American economy and the factors that influence the success of businesses and products.

It describes forms of business ownership, discusses the relationship of labor and business, and provides a broad overview of the global economy. Students also examine careers in business, both as employees and as business owners.

Textbook(s): Online

Global Issues

Course Code: 275200

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Elective

This course addresses foreign policy of the United States as a world power after World War II to the present.

Students engage in content using a history day project format.

Textbook(s): None

Principles of Finance - NAF

Course Code: 511110

Prerequisites: Academy student

Credits: .50 Elective

This is the first course students take in the Academy of Finance and introduces students to the financial world.

Students develop financial literacy as they learn about the function of finance in society. They study income and wealth; examine financial institutions; learn how businesses raise capital; and study key investment-related terms and concepts. They also research how innovations have changed the financial services field. Finally, students explore careers that exist in finance today.

Textbook(s): National Academy Foundation materials

GLOBAL STUDIES

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND STUDIES

Geography

Course Code: 291500

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Elective

Geography is a course in the International Business and Finance Program of Study.

Textbook(s): TBA

Global Issues

Course Code: 275200

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Elective

This course addresses foreign policy of the United States as a world power after World War II to the present.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Students engage in content using a history day project format.

Textbook(s): None

Linguistics

Course Code: 198100

Prerequisites: Global Studies/International Relations student

Credits: .50 Elective

This course is designed for the International Relations and the Global Studies Academy. It provides an overview of the history of linguistics, how one acquires language, the nature of communication, and the anthropology of linguistics. Beginning with Historical Linguistics, students will learn how languages are related, how long a language takes to reappear, disappear, and change. The students will discuss how the language is acquired.

During this course, the students will also study the significance of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and how does one become bilingual. They will discuss the nature of and the different types of communication.

Textbook(s): A Concise Introduction to Linguistics, 9780205051816

Philosophy

Course Code: 290620

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Elective

This critical reasoning/informal logic course is designed to teach students to evaluate logical arguments in daily life and conversation. Students will learn to recognize arguments, the difference between deductive and inductive reasoning, and to recognize and identify informal fallacies. A large part of the course will be devoted to the logic of induction, including the role it plays in probability theory, statistical methods of reasoning, and marking off the difference between science and superstition. Students will also learn the role of inductive logic and analogy in legal and moral reasoning, as well as in discovering causal connections.

Textbook(s): TBA

Study Abroad

Course Code: 198203

Prerequisite: Study Abroad Seminar

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The Study Abroad experience for the Global Studies students will provide the necessary proficiency skills in the language for the students to be able to communicate in the target language. The students will be immersed in the language for six weeks living with a host family and visiting the language school. during the course the students will have the opportunity to learn, share and understand the perspectives and products of other cultures in order to enhance a global vision. The students will receive a final grade through a cumulative portfolio with activities, work samples, photos, a journal of the activities in the program, and attendance.

Textbook(s): None

Study Abroad Seminar

Course Code: 198200

Prerequisite: Linguistics

Credits: .50 Elective

This course is designed for the International Relations/Global Studies program. During this course, the students will study the code of conduct, financial literacy, health and safety information in order for the students to conduct themselves in a responsible and mature manner at all times while they are overseas. This course will prepare the students to study abroad and the students must attend every class session and complete their research work. Students will study all the cultural norms and prepare for the necessary document such as: passport, visa, immunizations, etc. in order to be ready for the study abroad experience.

Textbook(s): Global Studies Study Abroad Booklet

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

World Language Conversational

Course Code: 198210

Prerequisite: None

Credits: .50 Elective

This World Language course will provide listening and speaking opportunities for the students in the target language. This course will focus on communication skills including the three modes: interpersonal, interpretative, and presentational. The focus of this course will be for students to practice the target language through different oral activities in the World Languages lab.

Textbook(s): None

World Language Writing

Course Code: 198220

Prerequisite: None

Credits: .50 Elective

This World Language course will focus on writing in the target language. Students will write in ways that closely resemble the spoken language. During the class, students will develop the ability to write using more formal styles incorporating the Common Core Standards.

Textbook(s): None

GRAPHIC ARTS, MEDIA, AND COMMUNICATION

COMMUNICATIONS AND BROADCAST TECHNOLOGY

Foundations of Media Production

Course Code: 770003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

In this course students learn the elements of art and principles of design in the context of media and entertainment.

This foundations course is designed to show students how investing in their own artistic development can open avenues for lifelong learning and professional success. Students complete project-based assignments, portfolio development, and journal reflections, continually returning to their own vision, expanding their capacity to “see” as both creators and critical consumers of art and media. Students learn art techniques as well as 21st century skills through projects to design and create media products. Students engage in structured career research as well as career exploration by assuming the roles of creative professionals and engaging in visual problem-solving as those professionals do.

Textbook(s): None

Principles of Recording Technology

Course Code: 647713

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This year long course helps students understand the process involved in creating high quality recordings in a controlled environment and in the field. This course also provides opportunities for students to create musical compositions using current recording technologies. This course can not be taken in lieu of the Foundations of

Technology course.

Textbook(s): Audio Fundamentals

Television Production 1

Course Code: 760113 single period

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

This introductory course offers the student the opportunity to assist in the direction and production of television programs. This course is an introduction to television. It will acquaint students with the techniques and problems of television production through application of theory and methods. The course will survey all aspects of television production from camera operation to directing. The students will cover the basic elements needed for a production including script writing. Practical application of these theories is provided through the student productions in the television studio. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook. Students who entered high school before Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may take this course for Technology Education credit through school year 2012-2013. All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): Television Production Handbook, ISBN 9780495898849

Television Production 2

Course Code: 760213

Prerequisites: Television Production 1

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Students, who have successfully completed Television Production 1, may enroll in this yearlong course. In

Television Production 2, students will explore the aspects of producing, scriptwriting, directing, reporting and editing for the production of various genres of programming. Utilizing studio production and field production techniques, students will learn to work independently, as well as cooperatively to complete the production process. Students will plan the total operational and management process for actual television programs, as well as participate in and take responsibility for various aspects of the finished program, such as set design, camera, audio, video switching, lighting, graphics and editing. Students will be assigned duties throughout the production process, thus exposing them to the rigors of creating television content. Upon successful completion of this course, students will understand how a production is conceived, produced, and executed.

Textbook(s): Television Production Handbook, ISBN 9780495898849

Television Production 3

Course Code: 760513

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Elective

In this course students work projects such as the senior video yearbook. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook. Students will produce a demo DVD which is a portfolio of all of their best work.

These are shorts/videos during their three years in television production. In addition, this demo DVD should include all of the pertinent info/bio about the student (such as a featurette does in a film). This demo DVD is essential when applying to the top television and film schools in the nation.

Textbook(s): Television Production Handbook, ISBN 9780495898849

GRAPHIC ARTS, MEDIA, AND COMMUNICATION

COMPUTER GRAPHICS

Computer Graphics 1

Course Code: 619903

Prerequisites: Teacher Permission and one of the following: Graphic Design, Art 1, or Basic Design

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course is an introductory exploration of the creative potential, nature and use of the computer imaging system as an artist’s tool. It will provide an opportunity for students to develop skills needed to create computergenerated images through their interaction with the software as well as various input and output devices. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): TBA

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Computer Graphics 2

Course Code: 619303

Prerequisites: Basic Design, Art 1, Computer Graphics 1

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This course is an exploration of the creative potential, nature and use of computer imagining, typography, and layout and design programs as artists’ tools. It will provide an opportunity for students to acquire and develop the skills needed to create various types of computer generated work using software, internet and various input and output devices. Students will be expected to acquire and develop the skills associated with operating and maintaining a computer. They will be expected to develop proficiency in their use of the hardware, software and accessories available to them in this course. Art History, Art Criticism, Aesthetics, and Art Production will be addressed for computer imaging, typography, layout and design in order to assure that students acquire knowledge and understanding of the visual and graphic arts and a foundation upon which to make sound aesthetic judgments. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): TBA

Foundations of Media Production

Course Code: 770003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See description on previous page.

GRAPHIC ARTS, MEDIA, AND COMMUNICATION

INTERACTIVE MEDIA PRODUCTION

Foundations of Media Production

Course Code: 770003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See description on previous page.

Textbook(s): TBA

Interactive Media Production

Course Code: 750103

Prerequisites: Foundations of Media Production, Principles of Art, Media, and Communications,

Credits:

Interactive Media Production pathway student

1.0 Completer

This course further develops student mastery of media design and the interactive media production process.

Students will advance their knowledge and skills in media design and production through project planning and product development. Students will demonstrate the use of multiple tools and modalities in the production process. Emphasis will be placed on group project development and individual portfolio development. Students will update their IMP portfolio with an interactive Media Production Proposal, Specifications Document and

Media Product.

Textbook(s): TBA

Principles of Art, Media and Communication

Course Code: 750203

Prerequisites: Foundations of Media Production, Interactive Media Production pathway student

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course provides students an understanding of all aspects of the Arts, Media and Communication industry.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Students will examine the opportunities and requirements of the major career pathways in this industry including

Communication and Broadcast technologies, Multimedia Production, Graphic Design and Print Communication.

All students will be required to produce artifacts for inclusion in a design portfolio, including an AMC Career

Exploration Research Paper and a Media Product (concept, storyboard, and product).

Textbook(s): None

GRAPHIC ARTS, MEDIA, AND COMMUNICATION

PrintED GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS

Advertising and Design

Course Code: 944143

Prerequisites: Introduction to Graphic Communications

Credits: 1.0 Completer (approval pending)

Students demonstrate knowledge in 45 competencies in advertising and design. The competencies address copyright, ethics and intellectual property rights; creating a digital portfolio, typefaces, page layout, image capture, digital illustration and design principles, and corporate branding. Students demonstrate an understanding of additive and subtractive color, design a logo, create an illustration, and pitch an advertising concept.

Textbook(s): TBA

Digital File Output

Course Code: 944133

Prerequisites: Introduction to Graphic Communications

Credits: 1.0 Completer (approval pending)

The 40 competencies in this accreditation area require that students have an understanding of the steps needed to prepare a client file for printing, from preflighting through platemaking. Most of the competencies require students to define specific activities and identify various procedures and equipment components. Students are also expected to prove their ability to perform the following functions: repair a native digital file, repair a PDF, make a folding dummy, make a digital hard and soft proof, and output a digital file to a platesetter.

Textbook(s): None

Digital File Preparation

Course Code: 944123

Prerequisites: Introduction to Graphic Communications

Credits: 1.0 Completer (approval pending)

In this course students demonstrate 80 competencies that are procedures required in each step of file preparation. These include basic design elements and principles, file construction, fonts, page layout, image capture, illustration, and PDF creation. Many of the competencies require students to describe, identify, explain, measure and/or distinguish file-related issues. Approximately half of the competencies require students to demonstrate various skills in creating and exporting images and laying out a page in appropriate software.

Textbook(s): None

Digital Production Printing

Course Code: 944113

Prerequisites: Introduction to Graphic Communications

Credits: 1.0 Completer (approval pending)

Students master 36 competencies in digital production printing to operate any vendor’s digital press. Students will understand and apply the digital workflow concepts to print production. The competencies range from introductory skills such as describing the types of jobs that use a digital press to more advanced skills such as printing two and four color jobs, printing and finishing a perfect bound booklet and printing variable data print jobs.

Textbook(s): None

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Introduction to Graphic Communications

Course Code: 943903

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 2.0 Completer (approval pending)

This required foundation course provides an overview of the graphic communications industry. Students demonstrate 103 competencies while developing an overall understanding of the industry and its major operations. The competencies include Introduction to the Printing Industry, Environmental Health and Safety and

First Aid, Digital File Output, Image Capture, Color Therapy, Digital File Output, Press Operations (Offset and

Digital), Bindery Operations, Measurement, Math, Job Application and Interpersonal Skills..

Textbook(s): None

Publishing and Graphics

Course Code: 943913, 943923, 943933, 943943

Prerequisites: Application

Credits: 4.0 Completer

This Technical Academy offering is a one-year program and may be taken in either the eleventh or twelfth grade.

Instruction and experiences include computerized layout and design of publications; materials, equipment and processes for photography; prepress procedures of stripping and platemaking; printing press preparation and operation; and bindery operations to finish published products. Abilities/aptitudes in artistic design, manual dexterity, arithmetic, measuring and lifting are important for success in this program and career field. This is a

TECH PREP program with potential for advanced placement and three college credits when enrolling in the

Printing Management Technology program at Montgomery College. This career field has good possibilities for owning and operating your own business. Only students completing Publishing and Graphics by June 2009 may use program completion to satisfy the Technology Education credit. After June 2009 Publishing and Graphics will no longer satisfy the Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): Graphic Arts: Electronic Prepress and Publish; Graphic Arts: Orientation, and Composition;

Graphic Arts: Process, Camera, and Stripping; Graphic Arts: The Press and Finishing Process

HEALTH AND BIOSCIENCES

BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES

Biomedical Innovation

Course Code: 979903

Prerequisites: Principles of the Biomedical Sciences, Human Body Systems, Medical Interventions

Credits: 1.0 Biomedical Sciences CTE Completer

In this capstone course, student apply their knowledge and skills to answer questions to solve problems related to the biomedical sciences. Students design innovative solutions for the health challenges of the 21st century as they work through progressively challenging open-ended problems, addressing topics such as clinical medicine, physiology, biomedical engineering, and public health. They have the opportunity to work on an independent project and may work with a mentor or advisor from a university, hospital, physician’s office, or industry.

Textbook(s): Online text

Human Body Systems

Course Code: 979973

Prerequisites: Principles of the Biomedical Sciences PLTW

Credits: 1.0 Biomedical Sciences CTE Completer

Students examine the interactions of body systems as they explore the identity, communication, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Students design experiments, investigate the structure and functions of the human body, and use data aquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary actions, and respirations. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal manikin, work through interesting real world cases and often play the role of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries.

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Textbook(s): Online text

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Medical Interventions

Course Code: 979993

Prerequisites: Principles of Biomedical Sciences, Human Body Systems Biomedical Science pathway student

Credits: 1.0 Biomedical Sciences CTE Completer

Students investigate the variety of interventions involved in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease as they follow the lives of a fictitious family. The course is a “How To” manual for maintaining overall health and homeostasis in the body as students explore how to prevent and fight infection; how to screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; how to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer; and how to prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail. Through these scenarios, students are exposed to the wide range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics. Lifestyle choices and preventative measures are emphasized throughout the course as well as the important role scientific thinking and engineering design play in the development of interventions of the future.

Textbook(s): None

Principles of Biomedical Sciences PLTW

Course Code: 868103

Prerequisites: 9th Grade, Biomedical Science pathway student

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Students investigate the human body systems and various health conditions including heart diseases, sickle cell disease, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. They determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person, and investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that may have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, medicine, research processes and bioinformatics. This course is designed to provide an overview of all the courses in the Biomedical Sciences program and lay the scientific foundation for subsequent courses.

Textbook(s): Online text

HEALTH AND BIOSCIENCES

HEALTH PROFESSIONS

Allied Health Internship

Course Code: 980033

Prerequisites: Foundations of Medical and Health Science, Structure and Functions of the Human Body; and a

Medical Specialty course.

Credits: 2.0 Health Professions CTE Completer

Students who have completed the first three courses in the Academy of Health Professions pathway may enroll in this internship course. Students participating in the extended internship experience will participate in a clinical experience and/or secure an internship in a professional healthcare setting such as a hospital, physician’s office, or pharmacy. Students are required to develop a resume that reflects their interest and clinical experience to pursue a career in Health Care; have an agreement among the student, parent, teacher and worksite mentor which includes specific technical and academic outcomes for the student; participate in a school based seminar class at least once a week to share experiences; prepare a professional portfolio that aligns to the SkillsUSA portfolio requirements containing, but not limited to, an updated resume, school transcript, letters of reference, achievements and awards, community project participation and projects; complete a research paper and present it to a panel of industry representatives and be supervised by an instructor or work based learning agreement..

Textbook(s): TBA

College and Career Readiness Exploration

Course Code: 983023

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See previous description.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Foundations of Medical and Health Science

Course Code: 979963

Prerequisites: Medical Science 1

Credits: 1.0 Health Professions CTE Completer

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the therapeutic, diagnostic, environmental and information systems of the healthcare industry. Students will prepare for a medical or health science career by developing a broad understanding of the cluster and pathways in the Health and Biosciences cluster. Students will learn about ethical and legal responsibiliites, as well as the history and economics of healthcare. Students will engage in processes and procedures that are used in the delivery of essential healthcare services. As students learn to use medical terminology within a variety of medical and healthcare environments, they will develop the Skills for Success, academic, and technical skills necessary to function as health professionals. It is recommended that students have completed or be concurrently enrolled in Biology to understand the concepts of Anatomy and Physiology and Pathophysiology introduced in this course.

Textbook(s): Healthcare Science Technology ISBN 9780078780929

Medical Assistant

Course Code: 980013

Prerequisites: Foundations of Medicine and Health Sciences, Structure and Function of the Human Body

Credits: 2.0 Health Professions CTE Completer

The Medical Assistant course covers general administrative tasks including office practices, patient relations, maintaining medical records, and billing. Students learn clinical duties such as taking and recording vital signs and medical histories, preparing patients for examination, drawing blood, and administering medications as directed by the physician.

Textbook(s): TBD

Medical Science 1

Course Code: 979953

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in Biology

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This Medical Science I course will provide the beginning student with an overview of the health care field and an introduction to contemporary issues in global and domestic health. The entry level information that is covered serves as a solid foundation for all students in the Health Professions Program of Study, under the Academy of Health and Biosciences. Contents include health care industry and careers, public health, epidemiology, the human body, medical math and correlations to biotechnology.

Textbook(s): Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology, ISBN 9780133481662

Certified Nursing Assistant

Course Code: 980023

Prerequisites: Foundations of Medical and Health Science, Structure and Functions of the Human Body.

Credits: 2.0 Health Professions CTE Completer

Students are prepared for actual experience in the clinical setting with a focus on the specific knowledge, skills and abilities that relate to the specialized course. Students will accurately use medical terminology; effectively apply written, verbal and non-verbal communication skills; practice ethical and professional behavior and respect confidentiality; perform Healthcare Provider CPR and obtain certification from the American Heart Association; earn industry recognized credentials or certifications; incorporate various diagnostic and therapeutic technologies as they relate to patient care; demonstrate proficiency in clinical and medical settings; demonstrate knowledge of human growth and development in relation to patient care; and demonstrate proficiency in one or more specialty areas. Students will complete the required clinical hours as set by the Maryland Board of Nursing (MBON) at a clinical site approved by the MBON; understand the role of a certified nursing assistant; practice infection control; demonstrate how to safely assist patients with mobility and positioning; effectively demonstrate patient

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

hygiene techniques; demonstrate accurate data collection methods; demonstrate effective communication skills; understand the legal and ethical considerations of being a CNA; and demonstrate competencies in order to pass the written and practical Nursing Assistant Certification Exam..

Textbook(s): TBA

Pharmacy Technician

Course Code: 980003

Prerequisites: Foundations of Medicine and Health Sciences, Structure and Function of the Human Bodyy

Credits: 2.0 Health Professions CTE Completer

Students will study the use and side effects of the top medications used in the pharmaceutical industry within specific classifications. They will review drug trade names as well as generic names, drug classifications and routes of administration. They will be introduced to medication laws, standards, and regulations affecting pharmacy technicians. Quality assurance and quality control will be examined as well as professional behaviors needed to become a successful pharmacy technician. The in-depth role of a pharmacy technician, diversity and healthcare confidentiality will be explored in detail.

Textbook(s): TBA

Structure and Functions of the Human Body

Course Code: 979983

Prerequisites: Biology, Concurrent enrollment in Chemistry, Academy of Health Professions student

Credits: 1.0 Health Professions CTE Completer

Students in this course study the structure and functions of the human body, including cellular biology and histology. Systematic study involves homeostatic mechanisms of the integumentary, skeletal,muscular, circulatory, nervous systems and special senses. Students will investigate the body’s responses to the external environment, maintenance of homeostasis, electrical interactions, transport systems, and energy processes. Students will conduct laboratory investigations and fieldwork, use scientific methods during investigations to solve problems and make informed decisions. Students will learn the medical terminology related to body systems.

Textbook(s): Body Structure and Functions ISBN 9781133691747

HOMELAND SECURITY AND MILITARY SCIENCE

INFORMATION/COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

College and Career Readiness Exploration

Course Code: 938023

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See previous description.

Foundations of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness

Course Code: 997003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Information/Communication CTE Completer

This course will introduce students to Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness guidelines, concepts, and action plans. Emphasis will be placed on unique aspects of public safety and public health. The course will explore the various methodologies for intelligence gathering and dissemination and will introduce students to various local, state, and federal assets. Students will prepare an action plan that includes initial notification, emergency response (on and off scene), and recovery.

Textbook(s): None

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing

Course Code: 997010

Prerequisites: Foundations of Homeland Security & Emergency Preparedness Recommended

Credits: .50 Information/Communication CTE Completer

This class will introduce students to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) technology through academic study and applied instruction. Students will learn the history of mapping and the place GIS has in its future. They will also learn the operation of the Global Positioning System. Through hands-on activities, students will learn to manage a GIS project, manipulate remote sensing data to identify features and analyze data, and create and present a GIS project based on local data. This course is the foundation of the STARS

Entry-Level GIS Technician.

Textbook(s): Introduction to GIS & RS Concepts, Introduction to GIS Tools & Process, .Digital Quests, Inc., 2011

Skilled-Based Training for Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing

Course Code: 997020

Prerequisites: Foundations of Homeland Security & Emergency Preparedness Recommended,

“C” or better in the Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing

Credits: .50 Information/Communication CTE Completer

This course will help students learn the skills required to work on and/or build a Geographic Information Systems/

Remote Sensing project. Students will follow a course of hands-on instruction to learn skills ranging from introductory digital mapping to image analysis. In this second course on the path to STARS Entry-Level GIS

Technician Certification, students are introduced to each skill with a real-world application and led in a problem solving process. Specifically, students will manage a data inventory; manipulate and analyze census data using a GIS; create a building site plan using a local data inventory; collect data from a variety of sources to display in a GIS; and apply the concepts of Geocoding and Hyperlinks within a GIS.

Textbook(s): Advanced Tools in GIS, Extended Tools in Remote Sensing, .Digital Quests, Inc., 2011

HOMELAND SECURITY AND MILITARY SCIENCE

HOMELAND SECURITY SCIENCES

College and Career Readiness Exploration

Course Code: 938023

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See previous description.

Foundations of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness

Course Code: 997003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer

See description on previous page.

Homeland Security Science

Course Code: 997013

Prerequisites: Foundations of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness Recommended,

”C”” or Better in Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In this course, students will be introduced to Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness threats to public safety and health, decontamination, protection, detection and identification, and planning concepts. Emphasis will be placed on the utilization of science to protect the public against chemical and biological threats. This

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

course will explore the various methodologies for intelligence gathering and dissemination and will introduce students to various local, state, and federal assets. Students will prepare an action plan that includes initial notification, emergency response (on and off scene), and recovery.

Textbook(s): Advanced Tools in GIS, Extended Tools in Remote Sensing, .Digital Quests, Inc., 2011

HOMELAND SECURITY AND MILITARY SCIENCE

IT - CYBERSECURITY

Cyber Watch: Security+

Course Code: 886003

Prerequisites: Computer Networking I or IT Essentials I

Credits: 1.0

This course offers in-depth coverage of the current risks and threats to an organization’s data, combined with a structured way of addressing the safeguarding of these critical electronic assets. The course provides a foundation for those responsible for protecting network services, devices, traffic, and data. Additionally, the course provides the broad-based knowlege necessary to prepare students for futher study in other specialized fields.

Textbook(s): TBA

CyberWatch: Ethics & Information Age

Course Code: 886013

Prerequisites: Computer Networking I or IT Essentials I; grade 12 student

Credits: 1.0

Upon completion of this course the student will have a clearer understanding of certain ethical issues in information technology as well as an understanding of how ethical theory can be applied to a discussion and analysis of those issues. In critically examining a cluster of information technology issues within the framework of ethical theory, students can develop a rational, coherent, and systematic approach to addressing moral issues in information technology.

Textbook(s): TBA

Introduction to CISCO

Course Code: 864323

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This full year course is designed to prepare students for the 21st Century in the field of Information Technology

(IT). Students will be exposed to the technology involved with the transmission and storage of information especially the design, development, implementation, support and management of computer hardware, software and network systems to organize and communicate information electronically.

Textbook(s): TBA

IT Essentials 1

Course Code: 898813

Prerequisites: Algebra 1 and Geometry or Algebra 2; application

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Students gain knowledge and skills for entering careers in computer service and repair, consumer electronics installation and repair, commercial/industrial electronics installation and repair, security system installation, and cable TV installation and service. This knowledge and skill also provides a good foundation for a college major leading to careers in such fields as electrical and electronic engineering, telecommunications and computer science. Instruction and experiences include: the theory and application of analog and digital electronics; the architecture, functioning, and repair of computers; using test equipment to analyze and “troubleshoot” consumer and industrial electronics systems; and producing electronic circuits and systems. Abilities/aptitudes in solving

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

problems, algebra, reading diagrams, manual dexterity, communicating skills and human relations skills are important for success in this program and career field. This program prepares students for an opportunity to take the “A+” Computer Technician Certification examination. This career field has good possibilities for owning and operating your own business.

Textbook(s): CompTIA Network + Self Study Guide

IT Essentials 2

Course Code: 898823

Prerequisites: Algebra 1 and Geometry or Algebra 2; application

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Students gain knowledge and skills for entering careers in computer service and repair, consumer electronics installation and repair, commercial/industrial electronics installation and repair, security system installation, and cable TV installation and service. This knowledge and skill also provides a good foundation for a college major leading to careers in such fields as electrical and electronic engineering, telecommunications and computer science. Instruction and experiences include: the theory and application of analog and digital electronics; the architecture, functioning, and repair of computers; using test equipment to analyze and “troubleshoot” consumer and industrial electronics systems; and producing electronic circuits and systems. Abilities/aptitudes in solving problems, algebra, reading diagrams, manual dexterity, communicating skills and human relations skills are important for success in this program and career field. This program prepares students for an opportunity to take the “A+” Computer Technician Certification examination. This career field has good possibilities for owning and operating your own business.

Textbook(s): CompTIA Network + Self Study Guide

HOMELAND SECURITY AND MILITARY SCIENCE

MILITARY SCIENCE

College and Career Readiness Exploration

Course Code: 938023

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See previous description.

JROTC

Course Code: See Military Science options

JROTC are courses in the Military Science Program of Study.

Textbook(s): TBA

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

IT ESSENTIALS

IT Essentials 1

Course Code: 898853

Prerequisites: Algebra 1 and Geometry or Algebra 2; application

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course covers the fundamentals of computer hardware and software and advanced concepts such as security, networking, and the responsibilities of an IT professional. This course also prepares students for

CompTIA’s A+ certification. Students assemble a computer system, install an operating system, and troubleshoot using system tools and diagnostic software. Students will connect to the Internet and share resources in a networked environment.

Textbook(s): Online

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

IT Essentials 2

Course Code: 898863

Prerequisites: Algebra 1 and Geometry or Algebra 2; application

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course is the continuation course for IT Essentials 1. After taking and passing Part 1 of the CompTIA A+ certification, students will engage in more specialized topics in order to complete Part 2 of the A+ certification process. The skills and knowledge that students learn in IT Essentials coupled with the CompTIA A+ certification, will enable them to enter careers in computer service and repair, consumer electronics installation and repair, commercial/industrial electronics installation and repair, security system installation, and cable TV installation and service. This knowledge and skill also provides a good foundation for a college major leading to careers in such fields as electrical and electronic engineering, telecommunications, and computer science.

Textbook(s): Online

CCNA Discovery 1

Course Code: 886563

Prerequisites: IT Essentials 1 and IT Essentials 2

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course is designed for students with basic PC usage skills. It introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other computer networks. The course provides students with hands-on classroom and laboratory work in current and emerging networking technology that emphasizes practical experience. The career-oriented approach to learning networking empowers students to enter employment or further education and training in the computer networking field. Also, instruction and training are provided in the proper care, maintenance, and use of networking software, tools, and equipment. A task analysis of current industry standards and occupational analysis was used to develop the content.

Textbook(s): Online

CCNA Discovery 2

Course Code: 886573

Prerequisites: IT Essentials 1, IT Essentials 2, and CCNA Discovery 1

Credits: 2.0 Completer

This course provides students with practical classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology. It is focused on the structure of the Internet and numerous ways computer communicate.

This course emphasizes practical applications and a hands-on approach to learning networking in terms of implementation and career opportunities. Students will use networking terminology and protocols, network standards, Open System Interconnection (OSI) models, cabling, cabling tools, routers, router programming,

Ethernet, Internet Protocol (IP) addressing, and newtwork standards. Particular emphasis is given to the use of decision-making and problem-solving techniques in applying science, mathematics, communication, and social studies concepts to solve networking problems. In addition, instruction and training are provided in the proper care, maintenance, and use of networking software, tools, and equipment and all local, state and federal safety, building, and environmental codes and regulations. A task analysis of current industry standards and occupational analysis was used to develop the content..

Textbook(s): Online

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

IT SOFTWARE PROGRAMMING

Android Apps Development and Apps Project

Course Code: 864233

Prerequisites: AP Computer Science

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course will teach application development on Android platform using the Java Programming Language and the Eclipse Development Environment. Students will build on the knowledge of Java programming acquired

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

during AP Computer Science and learn basics of Android platform, application life cycle. They will learn how to build widgets and apps using phone camera, geo-location tools, and playing audio and video files. Students will work on a project to build an app using advanced Android controls including - forms, dialogs, geo location, map view, and audio–video controls.

Textbook(s): TBA

Database Design and Programming with SQL

Course Code: 864203

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The Database Design course prepares students for database programming by challenging them to analyze complex business cases, to identify patterns to make connections between disparate data, and to create a model for how a business should manage its information. This model becomes the blueprint for building the database.

Students will develop professional skills, including teamwork, presentation skills, project management, and reflective thinking.

Textbook(s): TBA

Database Programming with PL/SQL and Database Project

Course Code: 864223

Prerequisites: Database Design and Programming with SQL

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course covers PL/SQL, a procedural language extension to SQL. Through an innovative project-based approach, students learn procedural logic constructs such as variables, constants, conditional statements, and iterative controls. The Database Programming with PL/SQL course introduces students to the PL/SQL programming language. In this course, students learn how to write PL/SQL code. Students learn to develop stored procedures, functions and packages, and they extend their knowledge of PL/SQL by learning more advanced topics such as creating database triggers, manipulating large objects, and managing dependencies.

Students will work on a project to build a web-based application using Oracle APEX platform - including user login, registration, reports, form and shopping cart.

Textbook(s): TBA

Introduction to SQL

Course Code: 864213

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The Introduction to SQL course continues the work begun in Database Design by grounding the conceptual in the physical world of the database. Students learn Structure Query Language (SQL), pronounced “sequel”, an industry-standard language used by companies worldwide to build databases. This includes both relational and object-relational database concepts. Building on the professional skills in Database Programming With PL/SQL, they learn interviewing skills and tactical project management.

Textbook(s): TBA

Oracle 3: Database Fundamentals 1

Course Code: 864253

Prerequisites: Database Programming with PL/SQL and Introduction to SQL

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course provides students with an understanding of the Oracle database architecture and how its components function and interact with each other. Students will use the online setting to learn how to create an operational database and to extend their knowledge by managing the various structures in a complex database. This course is designed to prepare students for the Oracle Certified Associate (OCA) exam.

Textbook(s): TBA

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

PC Hardware and Software

Course Code: 864103

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course presents an in-depth exposure to computer hardware and operating systems, as well as “soft skills” related to customer interaction and service. Students learn the functionality of hardware and software components as well as suggested best practices in maintenance and safety issues. Through hands on activities and labs, students learn how to assemble and configure a computer, install operating systems and software, and troubleshoot hardware and software problems. This course prepares students for CompTIA’s A+ certification.

Students are encouraged to take the Generalized Knowledge portion of the A+ exam when they complete the first ten units of this course. After completing units 11-16 of the course, students can take the Specializations section of the A+ exam to complete the A+ Certification process. During the second half of the course, there is an intensive introduction to Specialization topics such as installing operating systems, configuring networks, video cards etc.

Textbook(s): TBA

Web Development and Web Project

Course Code: 864243

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This is an advanced course in web development and builds on the previously acquired knowledge. Students will learn Java 2 Platform Enterprise Edition (J2EE) framework including servlet, Java Serva Pages (JSP), database connectivity using Java Database Connectivity (JDBC), concept of session, GET and POST request,

Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) request and response, Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern. Students will work on a project to build a web-based application on J2EE platform - including user login, registration, reports, form and shopping cart.

Textbook(s): TBA

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

IT SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

CCNA Introduction to Networks

Course Code: 886533

Prerequisites: PC Hardware and Software and Systems Engineering or teacher approval

Credits: 1.0 Elective

CCNA Intro to Networks is the first of two courses leading to Cisco Certified Entry Network Technician (CCENT) certification. Students will learn comprehensive networking concepts and skills, from network applications to the protocols and services provided to those applications by the lower layers of the network. Students will progress from basic networking to more complex enterprise and theoretical networking models. Students will also learn technology concepts with the support of interactive media and apply and practice this knowledge through a series of hands-on and simulated activities that reinforce learning. By the end of the course, students will be able to build simple Local Area Networks (LANs), perform basic configurations for routers and switches, and implement IP addressing schemes.

Textbook(s): Online - CCNA: Introduction to Networks

CCNA Routing and Switching Essentials

Course Code: 886523

Prerequisites: CCNA Introduction to Networks

Credits: 1.0 Elective

CCNA Routing and Switching Essentials is the second of two courses leading to Cisco Certified Entry

Network Technician (CCENT) certification. This course covers extensive coverage of networking topics, from fundamental to advanced applications and services, with many opportunities for students to gain hands-on

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

practical experience and develop career skills. Students will learn technology concepts with the support of interactive media and apply and practice this knowledge through a series of hands-on and simulated activities that reinforce learning. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with RIPv1, RIPv2, single-area and multi-area OSPF, virtual LANS, and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks.

Textbook(s): Online - CCNA: Routing and Switching

PC Hardware and Software

Course Code: 864103

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

See description on previous page.

Textbook(s): TBA

Systems Engineering 1

Course Code: 872003

Prerequisites: Computer Repair and Operating Systems

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The ability to build and administer Windows desktop clients is a skill fundamental to the study of server and network infrastructure. For that reason, a large part of the course is built around the preparation, design, and configuration of basic computer operating systems. The course will emphasize the development of diagnostic, repair, and troubleshooting skills necessary to effectively administer Windows clients. In addition, the course will focus on deploying Windows operating systems in homes, as well as large enterprise environments. An understanding of the basic hardware and software components of computer systems and the responsible use of these systems are integral parts of the course. Finally, this course will prepare the students for Microsoft’s

70-680, 70-685, and 70-686 exams.

Textbook(s): Microsoft IT Academy

LAW, EDUCATION AND PUBLIC SERVICE

CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Child Growth and Development 1

Course Code: 686103

Prerequisites: 10 th

grade Child Growth & Development pathway student

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The course presents practical experience for teaching in a child development laboratory on the school premises.

Emphasis is placed on the developmental tasks of young children, curriculum for preschool, and skills for the transition from school to work. Students develop a portfolio that reflects the ability to plan and prepare lesson plans for preschoolers. Practical knowledge and skills for parenthood are an integral part of the course. This is the first course in the Child Growth & Development State Approved Completer Program. Students may participate in the Early Childhood Education Tech Prep Program at Prince George’s Community College and/or document hours for the 90 Clock Hour and State Senior Staff Certification.

Textbook(s): Infants, Children & Adolescence, ISBN 9780205718160

Child Growth and Development 2

Course Code: 687203

Prerequisites: Grade 11 or 12; good attendance; successful completion of Child Development 1 and

Credits: teacher approval

2.0 Completer

This yearlong double period course covers in depth the growth and development of the school age child.

Emphasis is on the practical experience of working in a local preschool or elementary school where the student

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

assists a teacher. Students continue to develop their Child Development 1 portfolio. This is the second course in the Child Growth and Development state approved completer program and may serve as an elective for the MSDE approved Teacher Academy of Maryland completer program. Students may participate in the Early

Childhood Education Tech Prep Program at Prince George’s Community college and/or document hours for the

90 Clock Hour and State Senior Staff Certification. Written parental permission is required for students who will be traveling by county school bus.

Textbook(s): Working with Young Children ISBN 9781590708132

Child Growth and Development Internship

Course Code: 688323 - 2 credits

688333 - 3 credits

688343 - 4 credits.

Prerequisites: Grade 12; good attendance; successful completion of Child Development 2 and

Credits: teacher approval

1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 Completer

This two- to four-credit course focuses on careers and cooperative work experience that prepares students for the transition from school to work. Field experience is with young children in the community. Students continue to develop their Child Development 1 and 2 portfolios. This is the final course in the Child Growth and

Development state approved completer program. Students may participate in the Early Childhood Education

Tech Prep Program at Prince George’s Community College and/or document hours for the 90 Clock Hour and State Senior Staff Certification. Students may also register for concurrent enrollment at Prince George’s

Community college as part of the Tech Prep Program. Students must obtain their own job working with children and must provide their own transportation. Students are required to work five hours per week for each credit earned.

Textbook(s): Child & Adult Care Professionals, ISBN 9780078290138

Foundations of Education

Course Code: 686003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This yearlong course is the foundational course for students in the Academy of Education. The Academy contains two education programs, Early Childhood Education and the Teacher Academy of Maryland. The purpose of this course is to introduce and provide a foundation for students interested in a career as a teacher.

Presenting both historical and current views of teaching and education, this course encourages students to think deeply, broadly, and systematically about the components of teaching, what teachers do, and whether teaching is an appropriate career choice for them. In the course students will develop research and theory-based views of educational history, teaching practices, various contexts of teaching and teachers, and contemporary issues related to teacher education.

Textbook(s): Teaching, ISBN 9781605252919

LAW, EDUCATION AND PUBLIC SERVICE

FIRE/EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES

Medical Responder

Course Code: 988113

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Major topics covered in the course are an introduction to the EMS system, legal aspects of care, equipment, tools, and supplies; general anatomy and patient assessment; respiratory system, resuscitation, and CPR; aids to resuscitation and oxygen administration; management of bleeding, shock, and soft tissue injuries; management of fractures and spinal injuries; environmental emergencies and care of burns; care of special patients including obstetric, pediatric, and elderly; and special incidents including triage, water accidents, and

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

gaining access to and moving patients. Methods of instruction include lecture; discussion; classroom exercises; audio/visual material; skills, written, and practical examinations; and graded skill evaluations.

Textbook(s): First Responder, ISBN 9780136140597

Medical Technician

Course Code: 988183

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 2.0 Completer

The objective of this course is to provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to perform emergency medical care in a pre-hospital environment at the basic life support level. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to recognize, assess, and manage medical and trauma signs and symptoms in patients of emergency situations. Students must achieve a score of at least 70% on the written examination and pass all practical examinations and meet attendance requirements in order obtain EMT certification.

Textbook(s): Emergency Care, ISBN 9780132543804

Engine Company Fire Ground Operations

Course Code: 988150

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

The objective of this course is to provide the student with the fundamental principles of engine company operations and how they can be integrated during fireground operations. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to describe the functions and responsibilities of the engine company and demonstrate the use of nozzles, a hose, hydrants, foam, and testing equipment during practical evolutions.

Textbook(s): Engine Company Firegrounds Operations, ISBN 9780763744953

Fire Fighter 1

Course Code: 988133

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The objective of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to safely and effectively perform basic firefighting operations as part of a firefighting team. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to understand and apply the principles of fire behavior; building construction; water distribution systems; fixed fire protection systems; ventilation; hose streams; fire prevention; and inspections, ladders, and rescue techniques. (National Fire Protection Association Standard 1001 for

Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications). Major topics covered in the course are the fire department organization, communications, incident command system, ropes and knots, fire behavior, safety, fire prevention, personal protective equipment, fire extinguishers, respiratory protection, ventilation, hose lines, forcible entry, search and rescue procedures, and ladder and sprinkler systems. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion classroom exercises, audio/visual material, graded practical exercises, midterm and final examinations, series of practical examinations, and skills check off and homework assignments, all evaluated by the instructor for satisfactory completion.

Textbook(s): Essentials of Firefighting, ISBN 9780879392840

Fire Fighter 2

Course Code: 988193

Prerequisites: Fire Fighter 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The objective of this course is to provide the knowledge and skills needed to become a journeyman firefighter. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to understand and apply

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

the principles of fire behavior; building construction; water distribution systems; fixed fire protection systems; ventilation; hose streams; fire prevention; inspections; ladders; and rescue techniques.

(National Fire Protection Association Standard 1001, Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications. The student must achieve a score of at least 70% on the written and practical final examination in order to obtain certification in this course.

Textbook(s): Essentials of Firefighting, ISBN 9780879392840

Hazardous Materials

Course Code: 988143

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course provides students with the necessary knowledge and skills to respond to hazardous materials incidents. Students will learn to categorize hazardous materials, their storage and transportation; recognize the presence of hazardous materials and the likely behavior of such materials; estimate likely harmful emergency outcomes related to hazardous materials; and select appropriate action related to hazardous materials situations. Students will know and be able to analyze a hazardous materials incident, plan an initial response, implement the response and evaluate the progress of the actions taken.

Textbook(s): Hazardous Materials Awareness & Operations, ISBN 9780763738723

Emergency Response Guide 2008, DOT

Incident Management

Course Code: 988123

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The objective of this course is to enable the student to develop an understanding of the Incident

Command System (ICS) and its application to both emergency and non-emergency situations.

Students will know and be able to understand the basic need, structure and flexibility of an ICS and understand and apply the skills necessary to function effectively within an ICS organization. Major topics covered in the course are the history of elements and components of the incident command system, command responsibilities, expanding the system, command staff positions, incident scene accountability, rapid intervention crews, resource determination, ICS organizations chart format, and

ICS system functions and components. Students must achieve a score of at least 70% on the written and practical final examinations in order to receive certification in the course.

Textbook(s): TBA

Rescue Technician - Site Operations

Course Code: 988210

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Completer

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to perform site operations, victim management, maintenance of equipment, and the selection and use of specific ropes and rigging rescue skills. Site operations include identification of support resources required for specific rescue incidents, size up of a rescue incident, management of rescue incident hazards, management of resources in a rescue incident, conducting searches, performance of ground support for helicopter activities, and termination of a technical rescue operation. Students must achieve at least a 70% on written and practical examinations in order to receive certification in this course.

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Textbook(s): High Angle Rescue Techniques, Mosby

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Rescue Technician Vehicle and Machinery Extrication

Course Code: 988220

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Completer

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to perform specific rescue skills applicable to common passenger vehicles and simple machines (Level I) as well as rescue skills applicable to commercial or heavy vehicles, incidents involving complex extrication processes or multiple uncommon concurrent hazards, and incidents involving heavy machinery or more than digital entrapment (Level II). Students must achieve at least a 70% on written and practical examinations in order to receive certification in this course.

Textbook(s): Principles of Vehicle Extrication, IFSTA

LAW, EDUCATION AND PUBLIC SERVICE

FORENSICS

Anatomy and Physiology

Course Code: 492100

Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, Conceptual Physics

Credits: .50 Science

This course focuses on the functions of living organisms. The primary emphasis is on human functions with extensive laboratory work. The functions of cells, tissue, and organs are studied. Individual research and reading of journals is required.

Textbook(s): Hole’s Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 9

th

Edition ISBN 9780073204819

Capstone - Science

Course Code: 499000

Prerequisites: Academy student

Credits: .50 Elective

The capstone course is an opportunity for students to demonstrate that they have achieved the goals for learning established by their career academy program. The course culminates with students completing research on their field of study, maintaining a portfolio of work, and presenting their learning’s to a panel of experts in their career academy fields of interest.

Textbook(s): None

Forensics 1

Course Code: 434403

Prerequisites: Forensics Program of Study student, Biology, Microbiology, Anatomy and Physiology

Credits: 1.0 Science

This is a one credit year long course. This course focuses on problem solving, critical thinking skills and the practices and analysis of physical evidences found at crime scenes. Students are taught the basic processes and principles of scientific thinking and techniques as applied to solving crimes.

These include fingerprinting, DNA analysis, blood typing and spattering, comparative anatomy, chemical analysis of drugs, poisons, and trace evidence, and the dynamics of the Physical Sciences.

Opportunities for making connections to STEM are interspersed throughout the course. Career connections are deeply embedded in each topic of study.

Textbook(s): TBA

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Forensics 2

Course Code: 434413

Prerequisites: Forensics 1, Forensic Law, Forensic Psychology, Biology and Concurrent

Credits: enrollment in Chemistry

1.0 Science

This year long course is offered to students in the Law, Education, and Public Service Academy’s

Forensics Program Of Study. This course focuses on applications of the skills and techniques learned in Forensics I. Students will use their knowledge, data analysis of the physical evidence and inquiry to solve crimes. Throughout the course, students will experience opportunities to make connections to NGSS, MDCCRS, STEM and real world examples of crimes under investigation. Several case studies and crime scenes will be investigated. Opportunities will also be presented on cutting edge fields such as digital forensics and cybersecurity. Students will also complete a capstone Forensics

Project at the end of this course. This will include a chosen career in Forensics.

Textbook(s): Forensic Science: Advanced Investigations, Brown/Davenport, ISBN 9780538450898

Forensic Anatomy and Physiology

Course Code: 434420

Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry

Credits: .50 Elective

This course focuses on the structure and function of living organisms, emphasizing human physiology.

This course will include intensive laboratory work exposing students to various methods of investigating biological systems. The functions of cells, tissue, and organs are studied. Students will be expected to describe how basic biological mechanisms affect normal physiology. Individual research and reading of journals are required. Projects and labs will reflect real world applications to College and Career

Readiness Standards and STEM practices.

Textbook(s): Visual Anatomy and Physiology (2011), Martini, Ober and Nath- Benjamin Cummings/

Pearson

Forensic Law

Course Code: 434300

Prerequisites: Forensic Law

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester course is recommended for 9th graders enrolled in the Forensic Sciences Program of Study in the Academy of Law, Education and Public Service. This semester course introduces students to the field of law and criminal justice through the lens of forensics. Relevant government structures, court cases, and documents will be analyzed to understand how the field of forensics has contributed local, state, and federal jurisprudence. The skills and competencies utilized in the field will be examined. Contemporary issues, such as interpreting forensic evidence and the use of expert witnesses, will be explored. This course is interdisciplinary in nature and supports developing college and career readiness skills while introducing students to relevant careers. Relevant STEM connections, guest speakers and field trips are also included.

Textbook(s): Criminal Justice In Action (2013), ISBN 9781111835576

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Forensic Psychology

Course Code: 434400

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester course is recommended for 9th graders enrolled in the Forensic Sciences Program of

Study in the Academy of Law, Education and Public Service. Through an inquiry approach, this course will introduce students to psychological research, concepts of human behavior, and their applications in forensic science. Course topics include research methodologies, biological bases of behavior, developmental psychological impact, learned behaviors, intelligence, personality development, and psychological pathologies. This course is interdisciplinary in nature and supports developing college and career readiness skills while introducing students to relevant careers. Relevant STEM connections, guest speakers and field trips are also included.

Textbook(s): Psychology: Principles in Practice, ISBN 9780554004013

Microbiology

Course Code: 440200

Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, Integrating the Sciences

Credits: .50 Science

This course is designed for those students who want to study microorganisms and their activities.

It is concerned with the form, structure, reproduction, physiology, metabolism and identification of microbes. It includes the study of their distribution in nature, their relationship to each other and other living things, their effects on humans, and changes they make in their environment. The technical aspects of lab work are emphasized.

Textbook(s): Microbiology, a Human Perspective, ISBN 9780073305363

LAW, EDUCATION AND PUBLIC SERVICE

PRE-LAW AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

Capstone - Social Studies

Course Code: 299000

Prerequisites: Academy student

Credits: .50 Elective

The capstone course is an opportunity for students to demonstrate that they have achieved the goals for learning established by their career academy program. The course culminates with students completing research on their field of study, maintaining a portfolio of work, and presenting their learning’s to a panel of experts in their career academy fields of interest.

Textbook(s): None

Civil Rights Law

Course Code: 291200

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Elective

This course will survey the history of civil rights laws and issues with a strong focus on disenfranchised groups in society. The development of civil rights law will be explored by studying a number of legal doctrines through case studies about topics such as housing, public accommodation, education, employment, voting, and the criminal justice system. The course will examine the development

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

of constitutional doctrines such as anti-discrimination, color blindness, and anti-subordination to determine if these doctrines satisfy the evolving aspiration of the attainment of rights.

Textbook(s): TBA

Constitutional and Criminal Law

Course Code: 291100

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Elective

This course will provide an introduction to American constitutional law with an emphasis on U.S.

Supreme Court decisions. The course will explore various forms of constitutional interpretation and types of constitutional analysis. Topics will include the role of the judiciary in reviewing acts of the political branches of government; the separation of powers and relations among the three branches of the federal government; the powers of the national government and federalism-based limits on Congress and the states; and individual constitutional rights. The course will also explore the traditional and contemporary doctrines of substantive criminal law, with focus on such issues as theories of punishment, the formal elements of criminal culpability, the theory and degrees of homicide, criminal causation, accessorial and vicarious liability, conspiracy, and defenses of excuse and justification.

Textbook(s): TBA

Law Seminar

Course Code: 281910

Prerequisites: Law Writing and Research

Credits: .50 Elective

Law Seminar is designed to prepare students for the senior year internship program. Students will engage in hands on simulations and research possible areas of interest within the field of law and law related careers. The curriculum and related material address basic employment readiness competencies such as Basic Communication, Community Resources, Government and Law, Learning and Thinking Skills.

Textbook(s): TBA

Law, Writing and Research

Course Code: 281900

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Elective

Law, Writing and Research is a course in the Pre-Law and Social Justice Program of Study.

Textbook(s): TBA

LEPS Debate

Course Code: 291000

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Elective

This course is designed for students who are interested in careers in law, public service, and education.

The course will provide systematic strategies to increase critical thinking and to form arguments.

Arguers will seek to gain the acceptance of others for their point of view. The course will address the art of asking the “right” questions, deliberating reason, obtaining useful data as it relates to the

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

real issues and identifying when an arguer evades it, and offering critical opinions based on those evaluations.

Textbook(s): TBA

Practical Law

Course Code: 290700

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester course is designed to provide seniors and selected juniors an opportunity to pursue their interest in practical aspects of the law. The course will provide a framework for the county’s mock trial program and will involve participation by the Bar Association and law enforcement agencies. The course provides practical information and problem-solving opportunities necessary for survival in our society. The course includes role-playing, small group activities, opinion polls, and visual analysis experiences as well as mock trials.

Textbook(s): Street Law, 9780078799839

LAW, EDUCATION AND PUBLIC SERVICE

TEACHER ACADEMY

Education Academy Internship

Course Code: 689503

Prerequisites: Grade 12 student; Child Development 1 and Teaching as a Profession; concurrent

Credits: enrollment in Foundations of Curriculum and Instruction

1.0 Completer

The internship is the culminating course of the Education Academy Program. Students have an opportunity to integrate content and pedagogical knowledge in an educational area of interest, extend and apply their knowledge about teaching in a classroom setting under the supervision of a mentor teacher, and complete their working portfolio and present it for critique. This is the fourth course for the

Teacher Academy of Maryland (TAM) state approved completer program. Students are concurrently enrolled in Teaching Academy Internship.

Textbook(s): TBA

Foundations of Curriculum and Instruction

Course Code: 689403

Prerequisites: Grade 12 student; Child Development 1 and Teaching as a Profession; concurrent

Credits: enrollment in Teaching Academy Internship

1.0 Completer

This course explores curriculum delivery models in response to the developmental needs of all children.

Emphasis is placed on the development of varied instructional materials and activities to promote learning, classroom management strategies, and a supportive classroom environment. Students explore basic theories of motivation that increase learning; participate in guided observations and field experiences to critique classroom lessons in preparation for developing and implementing their own; and continue to develop the components of a working portfolio to be assembled upon completion of the internship. This is the third course for the Teacher Academy of Maryland (TAM) state approved completer program. Students are concurrently enrolled in Teaching Academy Internship.

Textbook(s): Effective Teaching Methods, Research and Practice, ISBN 9780131367180

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Foundations of Education

Course Code: 686003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This yearlong course is the foundational course for students in the Academy of Education. The

Academy contains two education programs, Early Childhood Education and the Teacher Academy of

Maryland. The purpose of this course is to introduce and provide a foundation for students interested in a career as a teacher. Presenting both historical and current views of teaching and education, this course encourages students to think deeply, broadly, and systematically about the components of teaching, what teachers do, and whether teaching is an appropriate career choice for them. In the course students will develop research and theory-based views of educational history, teaching practices, various contexts of teaching and teachers, and contemporary issues related to teacher education.

Textbook(s): Teaching, ISBN 9781605252919

Human Growth and Development Through Adolescence

Course Code: 686403

Prerequisites: Teacher Academy of Maryland student

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course is designed for the Child Growth and Development and Teacher Academy Programs of

Study.

Textbook(s): The Developing Child, ISBN 9780078689680

Teaching as a Profession

Course Code: 689303

Prerequisites: Grade 11 student; Human Growth and Development through Adolescence

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course focuses on the profession of teaching - its history, purposes, issues, ethics, laws and regulations, roles, and qualifications. Emphasis is placed on identifying the current, historical, philosophical and social perspectives of American education, including trends and issues. Students explore major approaches to human learning; participate in guided observations and field experiences in multiple settings to help them assess their personal interest in pursuing careers in this field and to identify effective learning environments; and continue to develop the components of a working portfolio to be assembled upon completion of the internship. This is the second course for the Teacher

Academy of Maryland (TAM) state approved completer program.

Textbook(s): Teachers, Schools and Society, ISBN 9780073331614

Career and Technical Education

Business Electives

Business Law

Course Code: 541000

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

Students will gain an understanding of the law as it relates to them currently and the implications

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

of the law in their future lives as well as the lives of their family and friends. The course will include an understanding of the court system at the local, state, and national levels. Students will gain an understanding of contract law, their rights and responsibilities as citizens, utilization of financial transactions, employment and agency relationships, and the understanding of the regulations governing different types of business organizations.

Textbook(s): Business and Personal Law: Real-World Connections, ISBN 9780078743696

Business Organization and Management

Course Code: 543000

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

The Business Organization and Management course seeks to develop sound management skills within students, as management plays a role in any future employment opportunity. Students are able to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate data from the other functional areas of business (e.g., marketing, finance, accounting, and production) as well as focus on managing one’s time and the time and talents of others. Effective management requires decision-making abilities, long-range planning knowledge, human relations expertise, and motivational skills. Students learn leadership skills and are able to select appropriate management styles. Finally, students are taught current technological applications and the effect international trade has on management style and decisions.

Textbook(s): Business Principles and Management, 12 th

Edition

Business Technology and Procedures

Course Code: 519003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Business Technology and Procedures provides students with job preparation exercises for administrative support positions. Areas of instruction include organization and functions of offices, time management, information processing concepts, thinking/problem solving skills, reference materials, employment procedures, records management, written communications skills, presentation skills, telephone systems and procedures, career development and interpersonal skills. Review of RELA, mathematics skills and keyboarding skills are integrated with instructional units. Job simulations are used extensively. Students who entered high school before Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may take this course for Technology Education credit through school year 2012-2013. All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): The Office: Procedures and Technology 5

th

Edition, ISBN 9780538443548

Capital One Work Experience

Course Code: 983003

Prerequisites: College Career Research and Development 1

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Students enrolled in this course have completed College Career Research and Development 1 and are selected to intern with the in-house branch of Capital One Bank. Students will work to earn pay, as well as credit toward graduation.

Textbook(s): None

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Entrepreneurship 1

Course Code: 574400, 574403

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 or 1.0 Elective

This course is designed to prepare students with entrepreneurship skills that reflect relevant learning experiences linked with business. Course topics include: developing a business plan and the stepby-step process of starting, organizing, and managing that business. Licensing, legal procedures, advertising, channeling, market analysis, location, financing, managerial skills, and operating procedures are covered.

Textbook(s): How to Start and Operate a Small Business 10

th

Edition, ISBN 9781890859183

Entrepreneurship 2

Course Code: 574503

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Entrepreneurship 1

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This yearlong course is designed as an extension of Entrepreneurship 1. Students will plan, organize and manage all operations of the school store or designated business. Students will also be exposed to a variety of entrepreneurial activities including computer simulations, audiovisual aids, role-playing, speakers and field trips.

Textbook(s): Entrepreneurship: Owning Your Future, ISBN 9780135128442

Financial Management Using Software Applications

Course Code: 553203

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Financial management provides students with the knowledge and practice they need to make informed financial decisions and is consistent with Maryland Council on Economic Education components.

Students will learn to successfully manage financial resources. Banking, investing, borrowing, and risk management (insurance) are core content areas of the course. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of revenue, expenses, credit and money management to enable them to make informed decisions in a highly technical and competitive society. Students will gain competencies in software using Microsoft applications. Financial Management is a skill that is essential in all business and personal environments.

Textbook(s): Business Math Using Excel, ISBN 9780538726016

First Year Accounting

Course Code: 535103

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course is a study of the methods and systems of preparing and maintaining financial records.

Emphasis is placed on the need to apply manual and computerized procedures to interpret and accurately record business transactions. Competencies include the study of the basic principles of maintaining records, the accounting cycle, and the preparation and analysis of financial reports with computer assisted instructions. Students who plan to major in business administration in college would benefit from this course.

Textbook(s): Glencoe Accounting 1

st

Year, 7 th

Edition or Century 21 Accounting, 9 th

Edition

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Insurance

Course Code: 511120

Prerequisites: Academy of Finance student

Credits: .50 Elective

This course introduces students to the insurance industry and to its critical role in the financial services sector and in society. It covers common types of insurance, including life, health, disability, property, liability, and commercial. Students examine the business model underlying the industry and how underwriting, actuarial science, and investment practices affect an insurance company’s financial success. Finally, they explore career opportunities, including broker, underwriter, actuary, and claims adjuster.

Textbook(s): TBA

Securities and Insurance

Course Code: 576500

Prerequisites: Academy of Finance Student

Credits: .50 Elective

Securities focus on the roles and functions of a modern securities organization. Through a study of the structure of brokerage firms, the trading process, credit and margin practices, automated processes, and government regulations, students gain an understanding of how a securities firm services its customers and plays an important role in our economy. Insurance introduces students to various elements of the insurance industry, including insurance needs and products for businesses and individuals. Students learn about insurance, rate-setting, financial planning, insurance regulations, and careers.

Textbook(s): Fundamentals of Insurance, 2 nd

Edition

Web Page Design

Course Code: 521000

Prerequisites: Keyboarding

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester course will provide students the opportunity to develop professional skills in developing and maintaining Web pages. Students will use web page development tools to design their own web pages. Students will obtain a marketable skill which may be utilized to obtain an entry-level position in the world of work.

Textbook(s): Textbook(s): Introduction to Web Design Using Microsoft FrontPage ISBN 9780078612329 or Introduction to Web Design using Dreamweaver ISBN 9780078729898

Career and Technical Education

Experiential Learning

College Career Research and Development I (CCRD I) (Class)

Course Code: 983913

Prerequisites: Teacher Approval

Credits: 1.0 Completer

College Career Research and Development empowers students to create a vision of their future through quality academic coursework, progressive career development, and work-based learning opportunities. CCRD I is designed to teach students the process of self-awareness, career

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

exploration, interest and aptitude assessment, and setting academic and career-related goals. Course content will integrate the development of student’s competency in business writing, basic concepts of financial literacy, and Skills for Success (learning, critical thinking, communication, technology, and interpersonal). Students taking this course begin to develop a career portfolio demonstrating workplace and academic readiness.

Textbook(s): Succeeding in the World of Work, ISBN 9780078748288

College Career Research and Development I (CCRD I) (Class) (Intensive)

Course Code: 983813

Prerequisites: Grade 11 Student; Individual Education Program (IEP) determination

Credits: 1.0 Completer

College Career Research and Development empowers students to create a vision of their future through quality academic coursework, progressive career development, and work-based learning opportunities. CCRD I Intensive is designed to teach students the process of self-awareness, career exploration, interest and aptitude assessment, and setting academic and career-related goals. Course content will integrate the development of student’s competency in business writing, basic concepts of financial literacy, and Skills for Success (learning, critical thinking, communication, technology, and interpersonal). The class also provides direct linkages to transition services, adult agencies, and supports as students move from school to careers. Each student’s needs are determined through his or her Transition Plan in the Individual Education Program.

Textbook(s): Succeeding in the World of Work, ISBN 9780078748288

College Career Research and Development II (CCRD II) (Class)

Course Code: 983923

Prerequisites: Grade 11 or 12 Student; Teacher Approval; CCRD I

Credits: 1.0 Completer

CCRD II is focused on career research and preparation, job seeking techniques, employability skills, i.e., ethics, oral and written communications, technology, and financial literacy. Students continue building and strengthening their career portfolios to demonstrate proficiencies in workplace readiness, personal financial management, personal growth and development, and employment experiences.

Students use the career portfolio as part of the interviewing process.

Textbook(s): School to Career, ISBN 9781619603042

College Career Research and Development II (CCRD II) (Class) (Intensive)

Course Code: 983823

Prerequisites: Grade 12 Student; Individual Education Program (IEP) determination

Credits: 1.0 Completer

CCRD II Intensive is focused on career research and preparation, job seeking techniques, and employability skills such as ethics, oral and written communications, technology, and financial literacy.

Students continue building and strengthening their career portfolio to demonstrate proficiencies in workplace readiness, personal financial management, personal growth and development, and employment experiences. Students use the career portfolio as part of the interviewing process. The class also provides direct linkages to transition services, adult agencies and supports as students move from school to careers. Each student’s needs are determined through his or her Transition Plan in the Individual Education Program.

Textbook(s): School to Career, ISBN 9781619603042

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

College Career Research and Development II (CCRD II) (Work)

Course Code: 983933, 983943, 983953, 983963, 983973, 983983

Prerequisites: Grade 12 Student; Teacher Approval

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Students receive up to two credits while employed at school-approved and monitored job sites in private industry and government agencies. The work component allows students to put into practice the basic employability skills and academic content they acquire in the classroom. They attend school part of the day where they are concurrently enrolled in Career Research and Development. The student’s portfolio documents proficiency in workplace readiness skills as indicated in the student’s work-based learning training plan.

Textbook(s): TBA

College Career Research and Development II (CCRD II) (Work) (Intensive)

Course Code: 983833, 983843, 983853, 983863, 983873, 983883

Prerequisites: Grade 12 Student; Individual Education Program (IEP) determination

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Students receive up to two credits while employed at school-approved and monitored job sites in private industry and government agencies. The work component allows students to put into practice the basic employability skills and academic content they acquire in the classroom in fields related to their career interests and capabilities. They attend school part of the day where they are concurrently enrolled in Career Research and Development. The student’s portfolio documents proficiency in workplace readiness skills as indicated in the student’s work-based learning training plan. The workbased learning experience is determined by each student’s Transition Plan included in his or her

Individual Education Program.

Textbook(s): TBA

Career and Technical Education

Family and Consumer Sciences

Child Development/Parenthood Education for Adolescent Parents 1

Course Code: 688401, 688402, 688403

Prerequisites: Adolescent Parents only

Credits: .50, 1.0 Elective

This semester or yearlong course covers the stages of growth and development for children from birth to five years. Students have an opportunity to acquire skills in understanding the characteristics and needs of infants and young children, in communicating with children, and in guidance and discipline techniques. The development of parenting skills is stressed by examining the demands of parenthood, the rights and responsibilities of parent and child, and the practical aspects of parenting. Prenatal care and development of the fetus are examined in addition to caring for a newborn. The special needs of exceptional children are identified. Students explore non-traditional careers and review requirements for these occupations, job application procedures, and responsibilities of these careers. This course is for adolescent pregnant and parenting students at schools identified by the supervisor.

Textbook(s): The Developing Child; Your Pregnancy & Newborn; Your Baby’s First Year; The Challenge

of Toddlers; Discipline: Birth to Three; Nurturing Your Newborn ISBN 9780078883606

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Child Development/ Parenthood Education for Adolescent Parents 2

Course Code: 688701, 688702, 688703

Prerequisites: Child Development/ Parenthood Education for Adolescent Parents 1

Credits: .50, 1.0 Elective

This semester or yearlong course covers child development and parenting issues that are pertinent to the needs of adolescent parents. This is the second course designed to assist pregnant and parenting students to remain in school and graduate. Students will continue to develop parenting skills and recognize the importance of understanding the development and needs of infants and young children.

Students will develop a career portfolio as they participate in a career assessment, explore careers, and identify job search skills. Emphasis is placed on goal setting and establishing post high school plans for further education and/or employment. This course is designed for adolescent pregnant and parenting students at schools identified by the supervisor.

Textbook(s): The Developing Child; Your Pregnancy & Newborn; Your Baby’s First Year; The

Challenge of Toddlers; Discipline: Birth to Three; Nurturing Your Newborn ISBN 9780078883606

Clinical Food and Nutrition

Course Code: 684003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The study of Clinical Food and Nutrition is a year-long course that will engage students in an intensive study of the Fundamentals of Nutrition as it relates to general and clinical health. It will cover topics on Nutrition throughout the Life Cycle, Nutrition and Metabolism, Nutrition for Integrative Systems, which includes Diseases of Cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, endocrine diseases like diabetes, and renal diseases. The course will also cover an extensive study about prevention of obesity and cancer as it relates to the study of Nutrition. Students will also research phytochemicals and antioxidants for disease prevention and will create a report.

Textbook(s): Food for Today, McGraw-Hill

Fashion I (Basic Sewing Skills)

Course Code: 682200

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

This introductory competency-based course provides an opportunity for the student to develop skills and techniques in clothing selection and construction. The student is involved with consumer decisions related to wardrobe planning, selection, purchase, care and maintenance of these clothing choices. In addition, students are encouraged to apply these principles in their personal wardrobe. Construction emphasis in this basic clothing course is placed upon seams, darts, facings, hems, pressing, zippers and other fasteners. Two projects are generally required. Purchase of fabrics, patterns, and notions is the financial responsibility of the student.

Textbook(s): Clothes and Your Appearance ISBN 9781590706855

Fashion II (Advanced Sewing Skills)

Course Code: 683200

Prerequisites: Teacher approval and successful completion of Fashion 1

Credits: .50 Elective

This competency-based semester course builds upon knowledge and skills contained in the Basic

Clothing and Textiles curriculum. The student studies characteristics of “special” fabrics and the types of articles made from them. Personal grooming, personal wardrobe planning, and personal style

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

receive emphasis in this course. Other areas of consumer study include care, repair, and recycling of ready-to-wear, new techniques and attachments for sewing machines, and an in-depth update of career opportunities in the fashion industry. Students construct suitable projects based upon new construction techniques learned. The expenditures for the class are the responsibility of the student.

Students must have successfully completed Fashion I and have teacher approval to enroll in Fashion

II.

Textbook(s): Clothes and Your Appearance ISBN 9781590706855

Fashion III (Principles of Clothing Design)

Course Code: 685410

Prerequisites: Teacher approval and successful completion of Fashion II

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester course is for students interested in creating a positive fashion image through individual analysis of personality, body type, coloring, and wardrobe planning. Students explore the elements of design and color as they relate to the appreciation of fashion and reflection on their own personal wardrobe. Students have an opportunity to develop sewing skills by creating a garment or fashion accessory. Fabrics and supplies for personal projects are the financial responsibility of the student.

Students must have successfully completed Fashion II and have teacher approval to enroll in Fashion

III.

Textbook(s): Clothing: Fashion, Fabrics & Construction ISBN 9780078767951

Fashion IV (Careers in Fashion)

Course Code: 689010

Prerequisites: Teacher approval and successful completion of Fashion III

Credits: .50 Elective

This competency-based semester course is for students having special interests in fashion. It is designed to help students appreciate opportunities within the fashion industry. This course emphasizes creativity and artistry as they relate to textiles, design and merchandising, manufacturing, media and promotion, and retailing. Innovative situations help students visualize and experience related areas more fully. Students study various fashion designers, fashion trends, and how the elements of design are effectively translated into fashion. The class creates projects to maintain a specialty shop and will coordinate a fashion production. Personal projects are the financial responsibility of the student. Students must have successfully completed Fashion III and have teacher approval to enroll in Fashion IV.

Textbook(s): Clothing: Fashion, Fabrics & Construction ISBN 9780078767951

Financial Literacy for Teens

Course Code: 682700, 682703

Prerequisites: Grade 11 or 12 student

Credits: .50, 1.0 Elective

This course presents a variety of units to assist eleventh and twelfth grade students in acquiring personal finance principles. The implementation of the ideas, concepts, knowledge, and skills contained in this course will enable students to apply decision-making skills and to become wise and knowledgeable consumers, savers, investors, users of credit, money managers, citizens, and members of a global workforce and society. Topics of study include financial responsibility and decision making, planning and money management, credit and debt, risk management and insurance, saving and investing, as well as income and careers.

Textbook(s): Learning for Earning: Your Route to Success, ISBN 9781590709467

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

International Culture and Cuisine

Course Code: 685313

Prerequisites: Foods and Nutrition 1

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This yearlong course is for students who wish to appreciate food as it relates to the customs, life styles, history, and traditions of various countries. Students visualize the unique characteristics of the cultures of other countries and special cultural groups within our own country. This course enables students to perceive how people use food customs to express themselves. Cultural celebrations and restaurant visits may be planned to enrich students’ appreciation.

Textbook(s): Guide to Good Food, ISBN 9781590706909

Lodging Management Internship

Course Code: 681303

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Lodging Management 1, Lodging Management 2, Marketing

Credits: or E-Commerce; Grade 12 student and teacher approval

Grade 12 student

1.0 Completer

Students complete a paid, industry-mentored work-based learning experience of at least 180 hours that takes place at a work-site within the lodging industry. This work-based learning experience is guided by the Lodging Management Program Competency Checklist. This is the fourth course for the

Lodging Management state approved completer program.

Textbook(s): TBA

Principles of Lodging Management 1

Course Code: 681103

Prerequisites: Grade 11 student

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course provides an introduction to the lodging industry. Students develop a broad understanding of key aspects of the lodging industry including types of lodging establishments, the guest cycle, technology used to provide services to guests, marketing and business strategies and strategies to manage the overall lodging property. Students demonstrate mastery of the concepts learned in this course by taking the American Hotel and Lodging Educational Institute’s end-of-course exam.

Students develop a portfolio with several standardized components that they build upon throughout the program. This is the first course for the Lodging Management state approved completer program.

Textbook(s): Lodging Management Year 1, ISBN 9780866122764

Principles of Lodging Management 2

Course Code: 681203

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Principles of Lodging Management 1, Marketing or

Credits:

E-Commerce, Grade 12 student, and teacher approval

1.0 Completer

Students enrolled in this course will continue to expand their knowledge of the lodging industry.

They will build upon and practice their management, leadership, team-building, and communication skills. They will learn about the role management plays in all aspects of the lodging industry. They will also be introduced to the banquet and food service aspect of lodging establishments. Students will demonstrate the concepts learned in this course and continue the develop of their portfolios. All

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

students enrolled in this course must take the American Hotel and Lodging Educational Institute’s end-of-course exam. This is the third course for the Lodging Management state approved completer program.

Textbook(s): Lodging Management Year 2, ISBN 9780866122900

Career and Technical Education

Technical Academy

Automotive Body Repair

Course Codes: 872913, 872923, 872933, 872943, 872951, 872961, 872972, 872982

Prerequisites: Algebra 1; application

Credits: 6.0 Completer

This Technical Academy offering is a two-year program that must be taken in both the 11th and 12th grades. Students gain knowledge and skills for entering careers in collision repair, auto painting/ finishing, and collision repair estimating and a good foundation for a college major leading to careers in such fields as automotive engineering, management of automotive collision repair service enterprises, and insurance sales/service. Instruction and experiences include: straightening frame damage, replacing body panels and trim, repairing dents, automobile construction, mechanical systems, preparing and applying automotive finishes, welding, and repairing rust damage. Abilities/ aptitudes in manual dexterity and mechanical functions are important for success in this program and career field. Completing this program will prepare students to take the Automotive Service Excellence

(ASE) test for automobile body and paint certification. This career field has good possibilities for owning and operating your own business. Only students completing Auto Body by June 2009 may use program completion to satisfy the Technology Education credit. After June 2009 Auto Body will no longer satisfy the Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): Motor Auto Body Repair, Delmar Learning

Automotive Technician

Course Codes: 875913, 875923, 875933, 875943, 875951, 875961, 875972, 875982

Prerequisites: Algebra 1; application

Credits: 6.0 Completer

This Technical Academy offering is a two-year program that must be taken in the 11th and 12th grades. Students gain knowledge and skills for entering careers in automotive service and repair, parts supply and after-market product installation and a good foundation for a college major leading to careers in such fields as automotive engineering and management of automotive service enterprises.

Instruction and experiences include: the functioning, servicing and repairing of suspension systems, brake systems, automotive electrical systems, fuel systems and air conditioning. Abilities/aptitudes in problem solving, manual dexterity, reading and communicating are important for success in this program and career field. Completing this program will prepare students to take the national

Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) tests in four areas: suspensions, brakes, engine performance and electrical systems. After two years of automotive technician work experience and having passed these tests, Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification can be achieved. This is a TECH

PREP program with potential for advanced placement and six college credits when enrolling in the

Automotive Technology program at Montgomery College. Only students completing Auto Technician by June 2009 may use program completion to satisfy the Technology Education credit. After June

2009 Auto Technician will no longer satisfy the Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): Automotive Excellence I and Automotive Excellence II

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Cosmetology

Course Code: 880103, 880203, 880303, 880403, 881100, 881200

Prerequisites: Students should have passed Geometry, Biology, Health and entering grade 11

Credits: 9.0 Completer

This State Approved Career and Technical Education offering is a two-year program of study resulting in nine credits (8 credits for Cosmetology, and 1 credit for Work-Based Learning). The 1500-hour

(includes 300 hours for work-based learning) program course consists of four courses; Principles and Practices of Cosmetology I, Principles and Practices of Cosmetology II, (11th grade) Advanced

Cosmetology: Theory and Application , and Mastery of Cosmetology with Work-Based Learning (12th grade) that includes classroom and practical application, clinical practice, a senior capstone project, and related monitored work-based learning experiences. Students must pass each course in order to proceed to the following course level. Careers in Cosmetology prepares students to become licensed professional cosmetologists. Students are instructed in the art and science of cosmetology as well as salon management. Services taught include basic to advanced hair care, hairstyling techniques, skin care, hand and nail care, and a variety of chemical services. Emphasis is placed on hygiene, safety, sanitation and state board of cosmetology rules and regulations. Related areas of instruction include human anatomy, physiology, mathematics, chemistry, customer relations and employability skills.

Upon successful completion and the instructor’s recommendation, the student will be required to take the Maryland Cosmetology Board examination prior to graduation. This training will provide students with the knowledge and applicable skills necessary to become employed as a licensed hairstylist.

Students must be accepted through an application process. It is mandatory that parents purchase a Student Equipment/Materials Kit from the school upon acceptance. Only students completing

Cosmetology by June 2009 may use program completion to satisfy the Technology Education credit.

After June 2009 Cosmetology will no longer satisfy the Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): Milady Standard Cosmetology

Nursing Assistant

Course Code: 979913, 979923, 979933, 979943

Prerequisites: Biology; Application

Credits: 4.0 Completer

This Maryland Board of Nursing approved course is a one-year program of four credits and must be taken in the twelfth grade. Instruction and experiences include protecting patients rights and safety, providing basic patient care skills for patients from newborn to elderly; measuring and recording patient data and vital signs; observing and recording patient condition; and practicing infection control measures. During the second semester, students leave the school four mornings a week for clinical practice in a hospital and long-term care facility. Abilities/aptitudes in manual dexterity, human relations skills, communication skills (reading, writing, speaking), basic math skills, attending to details, and biological sciences are important for success in this program and career field. Students are eligible to become Certified Nursing Assistants and sit for the Geriatric Nursing Assistant Examination pursuant to the State of Maryland regulations. This is a TECH PREP program with potential for advanced placement and three college credits when enrolling in the Licensed Practical Nursing program at

Prince George’s Community College. Documentation of immunizations, a work permit, and a background check are required. Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Anatomy and Physiology is recommended. Only students completing Nursing by June 2009 may use program completion to satisfy the Technology Education credit. After June 2009 Nursing will no longer satisfy the Technology

Education credit.

Textbook(s): Nursing Assistant

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Work-Site Learning Technical Academy

Course Code: 989001, 989002 Period 0; 989101, 989102 Period 1; 989201, 989202 Period 2;

989301, 989302 Period 3; 989401, 989402 Period 4; 989501, 989502 Period 5;

989601, 989602 Period 6; 989701, 989702 Period 7; 989801, 989802 Period 8;

989901, 989902 Period 9

Prerequisites: Enrollment in or completion of a Technical Academy program

Credits: .50 Elective

This Technical Academy offering is an opportunity for students to earn high school credit while assigned to a work site. Students will be assisted in securing paid or unpaid employment in the industry for which they are trained and leave the high school site to report to work.

Textbook(s): None

Career and Technical Education

Advanced Technology Education

Technology Education

Elective

Advanced Design Applications

Course Code: 812113

Prerequisites: Grade 11 or 12

Credits: 1.0 Advanced Technology Education

This course focuses on the three dimensions of technological literacy - knowledge, ways of thinking and acting, and capabilities - with the goal of students developing the characteristics of technologically literate citizens. It employs teaching/learning strategies that enable students to explore and deepen their understanding of “big ideas” regarding technology and makes use of a variety of assessment instruments to reveal the extent of understanding.

Textbook(s): online curriculum

Advanced Technological Applications

Course Code: 812123

Prerequisites: Foundations of Technology

Credits: 1.0 Advanced Technology Education

In Advanced Technological Applications, students study four components of the Designed World:

Information and Communication Technologies, Medical Technologies, Agriculture and Related Biotechnologies, and Entertainment and Recreation Technologies. The Agriculture and Related Biotechnologies unit explores how agricultural technologies provide increased crop yields and allow adaptation to changing and harsh environments, enabling the growth of plants and animals for various uses. It also offers an analysis of the various uses of biotechnology and the ethical considerations of those uses. The Entertainment and Recreation unit provides a study of technological entertainment and recreation systems, with an examination of the differences between these technologies, of how their use enhances human leisure-time performance, and of the social, cultural, and environmental implications of their usage. The Information and Communication Technologies unit examines how technology facilitates the gathering, manipulation, storage, and transmission of data and how this data can be used to create useful products. It also provides students with opportunities for developing communications systems that can solve technological problems. The Medical Technologies unit

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

provides an analysis of how medical technologies are used to increase the quality and length of human life and how increased use of technology carries potential consequences that require public debate. Students also examine tools and devices used to repair and replace organs, prevent disease, and rehabilitate the human body..

Textbook(s): online curriculum

Aerospace Technology 1

Course Code: 867923

Prerequisites: Aerospace Fundamentals

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Aerospace Technology 1 is an exploration into flight, space travel, and supporting technologies.

Students will use a hands-on approach to study concepts including the history of aviation, aerodynamics, aircraft components, flight conditions, airport and flight operations, space, rocketry, and the aviation and space industries. The course is competency based and utilizes Design Processes and Software,

3D Printers, Wind Tunnels and Flight Simulators.

Textbook(s): TBA

Aerospace Technology 2

Course Code: 867953

Prerequisites: Aerospace Technology 1

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Aerospace Technology 2 is an advanced exploration of flight, space travel, and supporting technologies.

Students will use a hands-on approach to study concepts including aerospace activities; aircraft design, control, safety, and maintenance; airport infrastructure; rocket technology; space systems; and living and working in the aerospace environment. The course is competency based and utilizes

Design Processes and Software, 3D Printers, Wind Tunnels and Flight Simulators.

Textbook(s): TBA

Air Traffic Control Operations 1

Course Code: 867930

Prerequisites: Air Traffic Control Systems

Credits: .50 Elective

Students complete this course in preparation for the FAA ATC exam. Lessons include fundamental terminal operations utilizing simulated radar procedures and equipment, control and separation of aircraft in the terminal area with emphasis on safe, expeditious flow of arriving and departing traffic, and use of high and low altitude en route charts and approach procedures.

Textbook(s): TBA

Air Traffic Control Operations 2

Course Code: 867960

Prerequisites: Air Traffic Control Operations 1

Credits: .50 Elective

Students complete this course in preparation for the FAA ATC exam. Lessons include non radar air traffic control rules, regulations and procedures as used by the FAA. Students will apply non radar procedures to simulated traffic situations in the ATC laboratory, ATC phraseology, aircraft recognition, tower positions, equipment, and responsibilities of controllers in the tower.

Textbook(s): TBA

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Air Traffic Control Systems

Course Code: 867943

Prerequisites: Aviation History & Meterology

Credits: 1.0 Elective

An introduction to aircraft systems, and operations. Students will learn about safety of flight, human factors, aeronautical chart interpretation, basic navigation, and introduction to air traffic control and airspace, and aviation weather factors, airplane performance, navigation, flight computers, and aeronautical decision making are covered.

Textbook(s): TBA

Designing Technology Solutions

Course Code: 842013

Prerequisites: Successful completion or concurrent enrollment in Algebra 1

Credits: 1.0 Technology Education

In this course, students are introduced to engineering design and development through software engineering and robotics technology. Students will explore and develop an understanding of technological issues and their influence on society. Through hands-on laboratory experiences, students will complete individual and collaborative projects that enable them to demonstrate understanding of design processes, identify and define problems, and realize design solutions.

Students will integrate a foundation in software engineering and robotics to develop solutions within the following technological contexts: medical, agricultural/biotech., energy and power, information and communication, transportation, manufacturing, and construction technologies. This course satisfies the Maryland technology credit for high school graduation.

Textbook(s): None

Foundations of Technology

Course Code: 842003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Technology Education

Students develop an understanding of the influence of technology on history by exploring how people of all times and places have increased their capability by using their unique skills to innovate, improvise, and invent. They gain an understanding of technology innovation and the fact that it often results when ideas, knowledge, or skills are shared within a technology, among technologies, or across other fields of study. Students develop an understanding of engineering design, the formal process that transforms ideas into products or systems of the designed world. They select and use manufacturing technologies and understand that modern manufacturing technologies produce quality goods at low prices, enhancing the quality of life for many people. Students select and use construction technologies and recognize that cultural norms, environmental conditions, and the requirements of enterprises and institutions impact the design of structures. Opportunities are provided that enable students to select and use energy and power technologies and to explore the processing and controlling of the energy resources that have been important in the development of contemporary technology. They become familiar with information and communication technologies and their role in maintaining competitive economic growth. The course concludes with the synthesizing of major ideas through an understanding of the core concepts of technology, with an emphasis on “systems thinking” and related principles.

Textbook(s): Technology, ISBN 9781590707180

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Future Business Leaders of America

Course Code: 999933

Prerequisites: FBLA Advisor approval, student paid membership, Career and Technical Education or

Business Education pathway student.

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This year long course provides students the opportunity to build a portfolio of documented accomplishments as a complement to academic experience. When applying for post secondary institutions and scholarships, students will be able to demonstrate how they served in a leadership position, received awards, or participated in projects for the largest business-based student organization in the world through the Business Achievement Awards (BAA), a self-directed resultsbased business and leadership program designed to complement academics while accelerating a student’s leadership skills. Students will have the opportunity to participate in up to 50 competitive and skills events from the areas of technology, public speaking, business, finance, and management at the regional, state and national level.

Textbook(s): TBA

Information Systems 2

Course Code: 863203

Prerequisites: Information Systems 1

Credits: 1.0 Advanced Technology Education

This one-credit course provides advanced work in the use of information systems technology.

Activities increase students’ skills and offer advanced instruction and experiences. Topics deal with communication systems, technical graphics, application of computers, computer controlled robots and machines, graphic reproduction methods, publishing, audio systems, video systems and telecommunications. The prerequisite for this course is Information Systems 1.

Textbook(s): TBA

SkillsUSA

Course Code: 999943

Prerequisites: SkillsUSA Advisor approval, Career & Technical Education academy student

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This year-long course provides students the opportunity to build a portfolio of documented accomplishments as a complement to academic experience. When applying for post secondary institutions and scholarships, students will be able to demonstrate how they developed their industry skills, received awards, or participated in projects in a self-directed program designed to complement academics while accelerating a student’s leadership and career skills. Students will have the opportunity to participate in competitions and skills events from the areas of industry, technology, public speaking, business, and management at the regional, state and national level..

Textbook(s): TBA

Technical Graphics 2

Course Code: 810503

Prerequisites: Technical Graphics 1

Credits: 1.0 Advanced Technology Education

Students in this course will develop skills and knowledge in the areas of engineering drafting and architectural drafting. Experiences and instruction will pertain to residential design considerations; architectural styling; floor plan development; drafting of floor plans, plot plans, foundations, elevations,

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

details, and rendered (shaded & colored) pictorial illustrations; machine drawing; pattern development; geometric intersections; structural drafting and design; and auxiliary views and revolutions.

Textbook(s): Basic Technical Drawing ISBN 9780078457487

Technological Design

Course Code: 812103

Prerequisites: Grade 10-12 students who have passed Foundations of Technology

Credits: 1.0 Advanced Technology Education

In Technological Design, engineering scope, content, and professional practices are presented through practical applications. Students in engineering teams apply technology, science, and mathematics concepts and skills to solve engineering design problems and innovate designs. Students research, develop, test, and analyze engineering designs using criteria such as design effectiveness, public safety, human factors, and ethics. This course is an essential experience for students who are interested in technology, innovation, design, and engineering.

Textbook(s): online curriculum

Technology Systems 2

Course Code: 867203

Prerequisites: Technology Systems 1

Credits: 1.0 Advanced Technology Education

This one-credit course provides advanced work in the engineering or other high technology careers. It is especially of value to students who are interested in how things work, and who like to be inventive and apply their ingenuity. Students will use engineering methods and apply tools and materials to solve technological problems. Advanced instruction and experiences will deal with mechanical, structural, electrical, electronic, thermal, optical and fluid (hydraulic and pneumatic) technologies materials.

Students will also have advanced experiences with robotic and computer controlled systems.

Textbook(s): Power: Mechanics of Energy Control

Transit Works 1/WMATA

Course Code: 871010

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of basic electrical concepts such as atom construction, electron transfer, and the relationship between current, voltage and resistance in an electrical circuit.

Additionally, students will practice electrical safety, use electrical mathematical formulas, and will construct circuits by building various types such as series, parallel and series parallel. Students will also begin using electrical measuring devices.

Textbook(s): TBA

Transit Works 2/WMATA

Course Code: 871020

Prerequisites: Transit Works 1/WMATA

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Students will explore the areas of magnetism, motors and current flow through guided activities and experiments. The focus of this course includes the applications of alternating current and direct current, as well as the concept of electrical energy creating mechanical energy.

Textbook(s): TBA

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Transit Works 3/WMATA

Course Code: 871030

Prerequisites: Transit Works 2/WMATA

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Students will refine their knowledge of circuit construction, wire diagrams, and circuit components.

Instruction and practice on diagnostic techniques and logical approaches to circuit malfunctions are included in this course. Students will be challenged with problems ranging from simple circuit diagnosis to more complex diagnostic scenarios.

Textbook(s): TBA

Transit Works 4/WMATA

Course Code: 871040

Prerequisites: Transit Works 3/WMATA

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course is an introduction to electronics. Students will learn electronic systems terminology, component operation and simple fault diagnosis. In a lab environment students will also learn binary theory, signal types and oscilloscope basics. Students will be able to articulate how electronic systems are planned and implemented within the transportation industry.

Textbook(s): TBA

COMMUNITY REFERENCED INSTRUCTION (CRI)

Courses are designed to facilitate learning outcomes appropriate to the instructional needs of each student as identified on the IEP. Students access the general education curricula, modified and adapted to meet IEP requirements. Core Learning Goals and Skills for Success are infused in all content areas.

All students in these courses must have a current Individualized Education Program (IEP) in compliance with Special Education mandates and procedures.

Biology Alt.

Course Code: 138513

Prerequisites: IEP, Community Referenced Instruction Program

Credits: 0.00

This course includes how living things function, develop and interact with environments. This course is designed to provide students with special needs with material regarding the basic topics in Biology.

Students in this course will participate in the Alternate Maryland School Assessment.

Textbook(s): TBA

Career Research and Development I Alt.

Course Codes: 138543

Prerequisites: Grade 9A and 9B students, IEP

Credits: 0.00

Career Research and Development empowers students to create a vision of their future through quality academic coursework, progressive career development, and job sampling through work-based learning opportunities. CRD I Alt. is designed to teach students the process of self-awareness, self advocacy, career exploration, interest and aptitude assessment, and setting academic and careerrelated goals. Course content will integrate the development of student’s competency in basic concepts

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

of personal financial literacy and skills for success i.e. learning, critical thinking, communication, basic technology, soft skills and interpersonal skills. The class also provides direct linkages to transition services, adult agencies and supports as students move from school to careers. Each student’s needs are determined through their Transition Plan and their Individual Education Program.

Textbook(s): TBA

Career Research and Development II Alt.

Course Codes: 138553

Prerequisites: Grade 11A, 11B, 12 students; IEP; completion of CRD I Alt.

Credits: 0.00

CRD II – Intensive is focused on career research and preparation, job seeking techniques, employability skills, i.e., ethics, oral and written communications, technology, and financial literacy. Students will continue building and strengthening their career portfolio to demonstrate proficiencies in workplace readiness, personal financial management, personal growth and development, and employment experiences. Students will use the career portfolio as part of the interviewing process. The class also provides direct linkages to transition services, adult agencies and supports as students move from school to careers. Each student’s needs are determined through their Transition Plan and their

Individual Education Program.

Textbook(s): TBA

Career Research and Development II Alt. Work

Course Codes: 138563

Prerequisites: Grade 11A, 11B, 12 students; IEP; completion of CRD I Alt., concurrent enrollment in

CRD II Alt.

Credits: 0.00

Students are employed at school-approved and monitored job sites in private industry and/or government agencies. The work component allows students to put into practice the basic employability skills and academic content they acquire in the classroom in fields related to their career Interests and capabilities. They attend school part of the day where they are concurrently enrolled in Career Research and Development II Alt. The student’s portfolio will document proficiency in workplace readiness skills as indicated in the student’s work-based learning training plan. The work-based learning experience is determined by their Transition Plan included in their Individual Education Program.

Textbook(s): TBA

Creative Arts Alt.

Course Codes: 138903

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 0.00

This year-long course exposes students to the State Curriculum. Students use adapted grade level materials. This course exposes students to fine arts, an understanding and appreciation of a variety of artistic responses to ideas, images, forms, sounds and experiences.

Textbook(s): TBA

English Alt.

Course Codes: 138503

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 0.00

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

This year-long course exposes students to the State Curriculum. Students use adapted grade level material in preparation for the Alternative High School Assessment. Reading and writing instruction focuses on literary and informational text as real world applications via Community Based Instruction activities.

Textbook(s): TBA

Environmental Science Alt.

Course Code: 138523

Prerequisites: IEP, Community Referenced Instruction Program

Credits: 0.00

This course is designed to provide students with special needs instruction in basic topics in

Environmental Science. Students will investigate the natural environment and the interrelationships among natural systems including biodiversity and population dynamics. The material is presented on a concrete level and instructional supports are provided as needed.

Textbook(s): TBA

Financial Literacy Alt.

Course Codes: 138533

Prerequisites: IEP, Community Referenced Instruction Program

Credits: 0.00

This course presents a variety of units to assist students in acquiring personal finance and everyday life principles. The implementation of these principles will enable students to apply decision making skills and to become wise consumers, savers, money managers, and citizens.

Textbook(s): TBA

Health/Physical Education – Alt. 1, 2, and 3

Course Codes: 138303

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 0.00

These year-long courses focus on physical, social, and personal care needs; the basic principles of physical, mental, social, and emotional health; personal safety issues; and nutrition. Students explore recreational and leisure activities as well as adapted team sports through cooperative lessons in class and in the community.

Textbook(s): TBA

Hearing Resource

Course Code: 041001, 041002, 041003; 041101, 041102, 041103 Period 1; 041201, 041202,

041203 Period 2; 041301, 041302, 041303 Period 3; 041401, 041402, 041403 Period

4; 041501, 041502, 041503 Period 5; 041601, 041602, 041603 Period 6; 041701,

041702, 041703 Period 7; 041801, 041802, 041803 Period 8

Prerequisites: See description

Credits: .50 or 1.0 Elective

In the Academic Resource room, deaf and hard of hearing students will have an opportunity to learn and develop critical academic skills (reading, writing, vocabulary, and math) which are needed in order to access the general education curriculum, prepare for the high school assessments, and learn self-advocacy skills. The students will also develop a plan that will connect them from high school

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

to post-secondary education or employment (may include transition activities, goal setting, career search, interest inventories, and designing a career portfolio).

Textbook(s): TBA

Itinerant Special Education

Course Code: 003101, 003102 Period 1; 003201, 003202 Period 2; 003301, 003302 Period 3;

003401, 003402 Period 4; 003501, 003502 Period 5; 003601, 003602 Period 6;

003701, 003702 Period 7; 003801, 003802 Period 8

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 0.00

This course is available for students with disabilities recommended to receive itinerant special education and/or related services.

Textbook(s): TBA

Journeys III

Course Codes: 572303 (9 th

grade), 572403 (10 th

grade), 572503 (11 th

grade), 572603 (12 th

grade)

Prerequisites: Students with IEP’s reading significantly below grade level

Credits: 1.00 Elective

Voyager Expanded Learning’s Passport Reading Journeys III provides explicit, systematic word study, vocabulary, comprehension, and fluency instruction that is age-and interest-appropriate both in design and implementation for adolescents. Passport Reading Journeys is designed to meet the complex and varied needs of students who struggle with reading and read significantly below grade level. The lessons specifically address the needs of struggling adolescent readers with instruction in the skills and strategies required to effectively read, understand, and learn in each of the content areas critical to reading successfully.

Textbook(s): Passport Reading Journeys 3, ISBN 9781416816126

Math Alt.

Course Codes: 138603

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 0.00

This year-long course exposes students to the State Curriculum. Students are taught on their instructional levels in preparation for the Alternate Maryland School Assessment. Courses focus on basic mathematics operations - algebra, geometry, measurement, statistics, number relationships and computation and the process of math. In addition, opportunities are provided to demonstrate real world application through community based instruction activities.

Textbook(s): TBA

Orthopedic Services

Course Code: 031003, 031101, 031102, 031103 Period 1; 031201, 031202, 031203 Period 2;

031301, 031302, 031303 Period 3; 031401, 031402, 031403 Period 4; 031501,

031502, 031503 Period 5; 031601, 031602, 031603 Period 6;

031701, 031702, 031703 Period 7; 031801, 031802, 031803 Period 8

Prerequisites: See description

Credits: .50 or 1.0 Elective

This semester course is designed for students with physical disabilities recommended to receive

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

additional instructional support and/or related services such as occupational or physical therapy.

Textbook(s): TBA

Science Alt.

Course Codes: 138203

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 0.00

This year-long course exposes students to the State Curriculum. Using adapted grade level materials, this course helps students learn how science works and understand what constitutes a good investigation. Students experience applying science skills and process in real life situations.

Textbook(s): TBA

Social Studies Alt.

Course Code: 138103

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 0.00

This year-long course exposes students to the State Curriculum. Students use adapted grade level materials. The course focuses on the development of citizenship, social and behavior skills. .

Students learn about jobs, services and resources in their community through small group instruction and community-based activities.

Textbook(s): TBA

DANCE

Depending on staffing and facilities, a school may offer dance courses. These courses are for fine arts credit only. They are not eligible for physical education credit.

Dance 1A

Course Code: 721200

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Fine Arts

This semester course focuses on the fundamentals of dance through terminology and the practice of dance technique at a beginning level. A variety of dance forms are offered ranging from Ballet,

Modern, Jazz, Tap, Folk, Social and Ethnic dance forms. Dance theory is taught through the application of vocabulary, history, beginning principles of choreography, and observation of live and filmed/ videotaped performances. Performance components beyond the regular school day are required.

Dance credit cannot be used to meet the physical education credit for graduation.

Textbook(s): Dance Anatomy, ISBN 9780736081931

Dance 1B

Course Code: 721300

Prerequisites: Dance 1A

Credits: .50 Fine Arts

This semester course focuses on the refinement of dance technique and expansion of existing dance vocabulary. More physical demands are placed on students to spur the growth of dance technique.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Dance theory is further expanded through vocabulary, history, principles of choreography, and the application of dance criticism. Performance components beyond the regular school day are required.

Dance credit cannot be used to meet the physical education credit for graduation.

Textbook(s): Dance Anatomy, ISBN 9780736081931

Dance 2A

Course Code: 721400

Prerequisites: Dance 1B

Credits: .50 Fine Arts

This course is for the student who has passed the prerequisites of Dance IA & IB or for the student who seeks higher placement because of previous dance training. Acceleration for class placement will be based on an interview, auditions and permission granted by the instructor. This class will provide continued expansion and refinement of dance vocabulary and technical skills. Dance combinations will become longer in length and more technically challenging, with emphasis on improving musicality and performance presence. The principles of dance vocabulary, history, choreography and criticism are expanded at this level. Performance components beyond the regular school day are required.

Dance credit cannot be used to meet the physical education credit for graduation.

Textbook(s): Dance Anatomy, ISBN 9780736081931

Dance 2B

Course Code: 721500

Prerequisites: Dance 2A

Credits: .50 Fine Arts

This semester course is for the student who has completed the prerequisites for class placement.

A student with previous training may be granted an advanced placement after an interview, audition and recommendation of the instructor. The student will continue to expand upon dance vocabulary and technique by experiencing combinations that are more intricate in the use of variations in space, time, and force. The students will begin to refine performance presence and continue to refine dance technique. Dance theory is increased through new vocabulary, history, choreographic principles and the criticism process. Performance components beyond the regular school day are required. Dance credit cannot be used to meet the physical education credit for graduation.

Textbook(s): Dance Anatomy, ISBN 9780736081931

Dance 3A

Course Code: 722200

Prerequisites: Dance 2B

Credits: .50 Fine Arts

This semester course is for the student who has met the prerequisite or for the student who seeks higher-class placement through an interview, audition, and recommendation of the instructor. At this level the emphasis is on the development of proficiency in the execution of dance technique, increased dance literacy, and improvement of performance. Principles of choreographic structure will be applied and the criticism process will integrate subjective and objective response to dance performance and choreographic analysis. Dance credit cannot be used to meet the physical education credit for graduation.

Textbook(s): History of Dance, Dance Anatomy; Resources: K-12 Dance Curriculum Framework;

State Fine Arts Curriculum

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Dance 3B

Course Code: 722300

Prerequisites: Dance 3A

Credits: .50 Fine Arts

This semester course is designed to provide the Low Intermediate and Intermediate student with technically challenging work that will refine proficiency in the areas of dance discipline, technique, and performance. The application of dance vocabulary, history, criticism, and choreographic process will be continuously refined. Dance credit cannot be used to meet the physical education credit for graduation.

Textbook(s): History of Dance, Dance Anatomy; Resources: K-12 Dance Curriculum Framework;

State Fine Arts Curriculum

Dance 4A

Course Code: 722400

Prerequisites: Dance 3B

Credits: .50 Fine Arts

This semester course is for the Low Intermediate to Advanced student who is committed to the study of dance, and has the self-discipline to refine dance technique, and become more aware of dance kinesthetic, and dance aesthetics. The theory of choreographic principles, history, and criticism are continued but the application of dance performance and choreographic development is strongly emphasized at this level. Dance credit cannot be used to meet the physical education credit for graduation.

Textbook(s): History of Dance, Dance Anatomy; Resources: K-12 Dance Curriculum Framework;

State Fine Arts Curriculum

Dance 4B

Course Code: 722500

Prerequisites: Dance 4A

Credits: .50 Fine Arts

This semester course will continue to sharpen the skills of dance literacy, technique, and performance and expand the accumulated knowledge of history, anatomy, choreographic performance, interpretation, and dance expression at this level. The student will have the dance knowledge to construct an ensemble dance or solo for performance. Dance credit cannot be used to meet the physical education credit for graduation.

Textbook(s): History of Dance, Dance Anatomy; Resources: K-12 Dance Curriculum Framework;

State Fine Arts Curriculum

Dance Production

Course Code: 708003

Prerequisites: Level 3 Dance

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

In this course students will focus on theatre crafts and techniques involved in dance production, including lighting, sound, set and costume design and construction, stage management, videotaping, and all financial aspects. Production components beyond the regular school day are required.

Textbook(s): History of Dance, Dance Anatomy; Resources: K-12 Dance Curriculum Framework;

State Fine Arts Curriculum

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Repertory

Course Code: 706903

Prerequisites: Level 2 Dance

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course is an introduction to group dance experiences through rehearsal, performance, dance technique training and technical theatre practice. The students will be involved in creating and reviving diverse repertory of a chosen choreographer(s). Students perform in this style in the winter and/or spring performances.

Textbook(s): History of Dance, Dance Anatomy; Resources: K-12 Dance Curriculum Framework;

State Fine Arts Curriculum

DRAMA

Drama classes are fine arts and meet the fine arts requirement for graduation. They do not meet

English requirements.

Drama 1

Course Code: 129003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

Drama 1 is the introductory course in a three-course series designed to introduce and develop skills and experiences useful to students having an interest in and/or an aptitude for drama.

Textbook(s): Stage and School, ISBN 9780026599047

Drama 2

Course Code: 129103

Prerequisites: Drama 1

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

Drama 2 is the second course in a three-course series during which the students will experience techniques of oral interpretation, the nature of technical theater, and study theatre history to

Elizabethan times.

Textbook(s): Stage and School, ISBN 9780026599047

Drama 3

Course Code: 129203; 129223 (2nd year elective)

Prerequisites: Drama 2

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art; 1.0 Elective (2nd year)

Drama 3 is the last course in a three-course series designed to provide students with both literary features of drama and hands-on experiences with practices that help drama come alive on the stage.

Textbook(s): Stage and School, ISBN 9780026599047

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

101

PGCC Course

DUAL CREDIT

Prince George’s County Public Schools and

Prince George’s Community College

PGCPS Course

106513 English 12 DE

PGCPS High School credit

1.0 English 12 credit EGL 1010 Composition I:

Expository Writing

SPH 1010 Introduction to

Speech

FRN 1010 French for Beginners

FRN 1020

French for Advanced Beginners

FRN 2010

Intermediate French

FRN 2020

Intermediate French II

SPN 1010

Spanish for Beginners

SPN 1020

Spanish for Advanced Beginners

SPN 2010 Intermediate

Spanish

SPN 2020 Intermediate

Spanish

PSY 1010 General Psychology

POS 1010 American National

Government

POS 1020 Local and State

Government

HST 1310 Ancient and Medieval History

HST 1320 Modern History

HST 1430 History of the

United States II

PAR 1510 Introduction to

Law for the Paralegal

HST 2310 History of American Foreign Policy

SOC 1010 Introduction to

Sociology

CJT 1510 Introduction to

Criminal Justice

122303 Speech Interpersonal Communications DE

152013 French 1 DE

155013 French 2 DE

156013 French 3 DE

157013 French 4 DE

162013 Spanish 1 DE

165013 Spanish 2 DE

166013 Spanish 3 DE

167013 Spanish 4 DE

200010 Psychology DE

212210 LSN Government 1

DE

213310 LSN Government 2

DE

.50 Local State and National

Government credit

.50 Local State and National

Government credit

261110 World History 1 DE .50 World History credit

261210 World History 2 DE .50 World History credit

262020 US History DE 1.0 United States History credit

.50 elective credit 281930 Law, Writing, and

Research DE

290410 Foreign Policy Issues DE

290630 Sociology DE

.50 elective credit

.50 elective credit

291120 Constitutional Law

DE

1.0 elective credit

1.0 World Language Level 1 credit

1.0 World Language Level 2 credit

1.0 elective credit

1.0 elective credit

1.0 World Language Level 1 credit

1.0 World Language Level 2 credit

1.0 elective credit

1.0 elective credit

.50 elective credit

.50 elective credit

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

102

PGCC Course

MAT 1190 Probability

MAT 1140 Introduction to

Statistics

MAT 1350 College Algebra

PGCPS Course PGCPS High School credit

373113 Probability and Statistics DE

374000 Introduction to Statistics DE

1.0 Mathematics credit

.50 Mathematics credit

381003 College Algebra DE 1.0 Mathematics credit

MAT 1360 Trigonometry and

Analytic Geometry

PSC 1210 Exploration of

Physical/Earth Space Science

381013 Trig and Analytic

Geometry DE

MAT 1370 Precalculus 381043 PreCalculus DE

MAT 1120 Finite Mathematics 399013 Finite Math DE

418113 Integrating the Sciences DE

1.0 Mathematics credit

1.0 Mathematics credit

1.0 Mathematics credit

1.0 Science credit

BIO 1010 General Biology

BIO 1110 Environmental Biology

BIO 1100 Introduction to

Forensic Biology

PHY 1010 Introductory Physics

BIO 2010 Microbiology

BIO 2050 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

ACC 2001 Principles of Accounting I

440113 Physics DE

440210 Microbiology DE

492110 Anatomy and Physiology DE

511200 Principles of Accounting DE

1.0 Science credit

.50 Science credit

.50 Science credit

.50 Finance-NAF credit

ART 1010 Introduction to Art 603110 Art Appreciation DE .50 Fine Arts credit

ART 1570 Introduction to

Computer Graphics

619513 Computer Graphics

2 DE

2.0 Fine Arts credit

645113 Music Survey DE 1.0 Fine Arts credit MUS 1010 Music Appreciation

CUL 1100 Introduction to

Culinary Arts

420413 Biology DE

425110 Environmental Biology DE

1.0 Biology credit

.50 elective credit

425313 Forensic Biology DE 1.0 elective credit

684633 Intro Culinary DE 1.0 Completer credit

TED 2000 Foundations of

Curriculum Education

PED 1030 Lifetime Fitness and Leisure Activities

HLE 2130 First Aid-Responding to Emergencies/CPR

FPR

TRF 1330 Television Production I

INT 1010 Introduction to

Information

Technology (A+ Cert)

689413 Found of Curriculum

DE

718000 Your Personal Fitness 1 DE

744210 Health Issues DE

760123 Television Production 1 DE

886023 Introduction to Information Technology DE

1.0 Teacher Academy credit

.50 Physical Education credit

.50 Health Education credit

1.0 elective credit

1.0 IT Cisco Cyber Security

Credit

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

PGCC Course

INT 1450 CCNA 1: Network

Fundamentals

INT 1460 CCNA 2: Routing

Protocols

PGCPS Course

886543 CCNA Networking

DE

886553 CCNA Routing DE

PGCPS High School credit

1.0 IT Systems Engineering

Credit

1.0 IT Systems Engineering

Credit

ELECTIVES

Academic Internship

Course Code: 055001, 055002, 055003; 055101, 055102, 055103 Period 1; 055201, 055202,

055203 Period 2; 055301, 055302, 055303 Period 3; 055401, 055402, 055403 Period

4; 055501, 055502, 055503 Period 5; 055601, 055602, 055603 Period 6; 055701,

055702, 055703 Period 7; 055801, 055802, 055803 Period 8; 055901, 055902,

055903 Period 9

Prerequisites: Teacher Approval

Credits: .50, 1.0 Elective

The Academic Internship course provides students enrolled in an academic program of study with an opportunity to extend and apply classroom content in real-life situations through experiential learning.

Students may be placed at a variety of paid or unpaid sites at non-profit agencies, corporations, government or policy institutes. The placements should be closely related to and designed to enhance their academic and career pursuits. Under the supervision of a classroom teacher, guidance counselor or other administrative official, the student interns will observe, explore, and discuss solutions to authentic problems as well as perform routine tasks. They will also maintain journals of their work experiences, design projects or other career related activities as identified by their

Academic Internship teacher.

Textbook(s): None

Aviation - Independent Study

Course Code: 060001, 060002

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Elective

This course allows students to pursue an independent course under the supervision of a faculty advisor. The student must indicate the area to be investigated, specific problems to be investigated, and must possess the background, skills, and information necessary to do the study. Students who entered high school before Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may take this course for Technology Education credit through school year 2012-2013. All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): TBA

AVID Elective

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Course Code: 590903, 591003, 591103, 591203

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This college preparatory elective course is offered to identified Advancement Via Individual

Determination (AVID) students to reinforce organizational and study skills, critical thinking, inquiry, and collaboration. Students receive academic help from peers and college tutors, and participate in enrichment and motivational activities that make college access possible.

Textbook(s): AVID Curriculum: Strategies for Success, College and Careers, Tutorial No Text

AVID Elective Course for Tutors

Course Code: 591303

Prerequisites: Teacher placement

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) College preparatory elective course is offered to identified AVID students to reinforce organizational and study skills, critical thinking, inquiry, and collaboration. Students receive academic help from peers and academic tutors, and participate in enrichment and motivational activities that make college access possible. The AVID Academic Tutor will lead the tutorial process with emphasis on Socratic seminars and collaboration.

Textbook(s): AVID Curriculum: Strategies for Success, College and Careers, Tutorial NO TEXT

CoAcademic College Prep

Course Code: 573000

Prerequisites: Enrollment in a CoAcademic course

Credits: 0.00 Elective

The purpose of CoAcademic College Prep is to provide students with organization, time management, and study skills and strategies. Moreover, this course will assist the student in applying these strategies and skills to their dual enrollment classes. The focus of this course is to build students’ skills which will lead to active, intrinsically motivated learning in all of the classes they take.

Textbook(s): Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies, Frances Sizer and Ellie Whitney, 2013

CoAcademic Nutrition

Course Code: 681500

Prerequisites: Students must meet the requirements as mandated by Senate Bill 740

Credits: 0.50 Elective

Addresses basic information about essential nutrients and their functions in the body as well as known and hypothesized relationships between long-term diets and development of chronic diseases.

The course addresses current issues in nutrition and food safety research. Course content includes current issues in weight management, interactions between nutritional status and physical fitness, and food safety.

Textbook(s): Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies, Frances Sizer and Ellie Whitney, 2013

College Summit 9

Course Code: 135010, 135023

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 - 1.0 Elective

In this course students understand how to be successful in high school. They will focus on transcript dissection with an emphasis on credit accumulation, developing communication skills, decision-

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making, setting short term goals, identifying the different types of learning styles and test-taking strategies, and learning how an interest can be become a college major and translate into a career.

Textbook(s): Clean Slate, College Summit, Inc.

College Summit 10

Course Code: 135020, 135013

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 - 1.0 Elective

In this course students understand the connection between college and career and explore postsecondary options, setting long term and career goals, identify career paths/clusters, identify types of standardized tests and the financial connection between post-secondary training, career choice and future lifestyle.

Textbook(s): Speak Up!, College Summit, Inc.

College Summit 11

Course Code: 135033

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The purpose of the College Summit 11 class is to prepare juniors for a successful senior year and life after high school, including the college application process and employment opportunities. Students begin to identify and articulate their plans for post-secondary activity - college attendance, work, military, apprenticeship, etc. - and students begin to draft personal statements, action plans, a college list, recommendations, and resumes that will enable them to gain acceptance into the post-secondary program/activity of their choice. Students learn how to effectively advocate for themselves and how to promote their personal strengths. Students are guided to register and prepare for college admittance exams such as SAT and ACT as well as the PSAT/NMSQT.

Textbook(s): Take Action!, College Summit, Inc.

College Summit

Course Code: 135003

Prerequisites: Approval from Principal and College Summit Advisor or Coordinator

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The purpose of the College Summit class is to prepare seniors for successful life after high school, including the college application process and employment opportunities. Students identify and articulate their plans for post-secondary activity - college attendance, work, military, apprenticeship, etc. - and develop a Senior Portfolio of materials (college application, personal statement, action plan, college list, recommendations, scholarship application, job application, etc.) that will enable them to gain acceptance into the post-secondary program/activity of their choice. Students learn how to effectively advocate for themselves and how to promote their personal strengths. Students gain access to personalized technology tools and receive their own book/planner that provides direction for navigating the post-secondary planning process.

Textbook(s): College Summit Navigator

Concurrent Enrollment College and High School

Course Code: Credit: 050101, 050102 Period 1; 050201, 050202 Period 2; 050301, 050302

Period 3; 050401, 050402 Period 4; 050501, 050502 Period 5; 050601,

050602 Period 6; 050701, 050702 Period 7; 050801, 050802 Period 8

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

No Credit: 051101, 051102 Period 1; 051201, 051202 Period 2; 051301, 051302

Period 3; 051401, 051402 Period 4; 051501, 051502 Period 5; 051601,

051602 Period 6; 051701, 051702 Period 7; 051801, 051802 Period 8

Prerequisites: Approval from Principal and Director of Curriculum and Instruction

Credits: 0 - .50 Elective

A student may take courses at his/her home school as well as take additional courses at a postsecondary school. College credits for courses not offered at high school may be applied toward high school graduation requirements with prior approval from the principal and Director of Curriculum and Instruction. Students may carry more than eight courses, but must meet the college entrance requirements for concurrent enrollment and must receive approval from the principal to do so. To begin the process, the student should consult with his or her school counselor.

Textbook(s): TBA

Enrichment

Course Code: 570520

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 0.00 Elective

This is a no credit period that will be used either to build the skills of those students who have knowledge gaps based on achievement data or to provide enriching opportunities that are of unique interest to students.

Textbook(s): N/A

Fundamentals of Aerospace

Course Code: 867913

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Fundamentals of Aerospace is a project-based Engineering course, focusing on Aerospace and

Aeronautical topics. This course utilizes hands-on activities to reinforce students’ grasp of STEM concepts critical to the understanding of the principles of engineering. This course will allow students to practice critical problem-solving skills through projects and investigations. The primary objective of this course is to provide students with adequate skill framework for success in the subsequent courses in the Aerospace program. Topics will include: Engineering Principles & Problem Solving;

Engineering Design & CAD; Aerospace Engineering; and Aeronautical Engineering.

Textbook(s): TBA

Intervention

Course Code: 570510

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 0.00 Elective

This is a no credit period that will be used either to build the skills of those students who have knowledge gaps based on achievement data or to provide enriching opportunities that are of unique interest to students.

Textbook(s): N/A

Student Assistant

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Course Code: Credit: 004101, 004102 Art; 004201, 004202, 004211, 004212, 004221, 004222,

004231, 004232, 004241, 004242, 004251, 004252, Business; 004401,

004402 English; 004501, 004502 Envir Ed; 004901, 004902 Family and

Consumer Sciences; 004001, 004002 ESOL; 004601, 004602 Foreign

Language; 004701, 004702 Guidance; 004801, 004802 Health Ed;

005501, 005502 Health Serv; 005101, 005102 Math; 005201, 005202

Media; 005301, 005302 Music; 005401, 005402 Physical Education;

005801, 005802 ROTC; 005601, 005602 Science; 005701, 005702

Special Ed; 004301, 004302 Social Studies; 005001, 005002 Technology

Education; 005901, 005902 TV Prod.

No Credit: 006001, 006002 Art; 006101, 006102, 006111, 006112, 006121, 006122,

006131, 006132, 006141, 006142, 006151, 006152 Business; 006301,

006302 English; 006401, 006402 Envir Ed; 006801, 006802 Family and

Consumer Sciences; 007901, 007902 ESOL; 006501, 006502 Foreign

Language; 006601, 006602 Guidance; 006701, 006702 Health Ed;

007801, 007802 Health Serv; 007001, 007002 Math; 007101, 007102

Media; 007201, 007202 Music; 007301, 007302 Phys Ed; 007401,

007402 ROTC; 007501, 007502 Science; 006901, 006902 Technology

Education; 007701, 007702 Soc Study; 008001, 008002 Spec Educ;

007601, 007602 TV Prod

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 0 - .50 Elective

The Student Assistant Program is designed to give work experience credit to students who are enrolled in this program, provided all the criteria are met in establishing the particular program and in implementing it. It does not mean that other types of experiences of a voluntary nature cannot be provided. This program will help students develop particular skills, will provide individual and independent study and work experience for students, and will provide opportunities for them to work in a particular relationship with adults and other students. A student may earn only one credit in grades 9 through 12 in the Student Assistant Program.

Textbook(s): None

ENGLISH

English 9

Course Code: 103903, 103923, 103933, 103943

Prerequisites: Grade 8 English

Credits: 1.0 English

This required course will help students develop strategies for reading comprehension and will improve their vocabulary, language usage skills, and writing skills. Students will also use critical reading and thinking skills to analyze fiction (including novels) and non-fiction literary genres from world literature.

Students will have opportunities to respond to Selected Response questions reflective of the format and content of the required English assessment. Students will also engage in reading, writing, speaking and listening activities that are reflective on the Common Core State Standards.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159945

English 9 Honors

Course Code: 103093

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Prerequisites: Grade 8 English

Credits: 1.0 English

This course is designed for identified selected highly able students who have met the prerequisites.

The course will further develop student reading and writing skills (See English 9) by enhancing the depth and complexity of the core curriculum. Students will use critical thinking skills in analyzing advanced/above-grade level texts. Course work will include advanced novel study, a research/essay

(e.g. paper and preparation for AP English.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159945

English 9 Co-Teach

Course Code: 103973

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 1.0 English

This required course is designed to facilitate learning outcomes appropriate to the instructional needs of students who can benefit from instructional practices and strategies based on learning styles and individual needs. This course will help students develop strategies for reading comprehension and improve their vocabulary language usage and writing skills. Students will also use critical reading and thinking skills to analyze fiction (including novels) and non-fiction literary genres from world literature. Students may receive instruction in preparation for the HSA from the Grade 9 Modified

Curriculum Framework Progress Guide. Students will have extensive opportunities to respond to questions reflective of the format and content of the required English assessment. The general education teacher will teach this class in collaboration with a special educator in order to ensure that all students have access to the general education curriculum.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159945

English 9 Intensive

Course Code: 103983

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 1.0 English

This required course is designed to facilitate learning outcomes appropriate to the instructional needs of students who can benefit from instructional practices and strategies based on learning styles and individual needs. This course will help students develop strategies for reading comprehension and improve their vocabulary, language usage and writing skills. Students will also be guided to use critical reading and thinking skills to analyze fiction (including novels) and non-fiction literary genres from world literature. Students receive instruction in preparation for the HSA from the Grade 9 Modified

Curriculum Framework Progress Guide. In addition, modified course content will be delivered in flexible groups to diverse learners with disabilities.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159945

English/Language Arts 9 Pre Diploma Program

Course Code: 103193

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 English

Pre Diploma students experience emphasis on critical reading and analysis. Content includes literary analysis, through in depth study and creation of complex interpretations of the text; aspects of each author’s style of writing including narrator’s point of view, creating a sense of suspense, use of dialogue, and embedded commentary; vocabulary focused on the terminology of literary criticism; characteristics of effective responses to literature; and vocabulary in the reading selections necessary

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to build literal and interpretive understandings.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159945

English 9 Maryland College and Career Readiness (MCCR)

Course Code: 103003

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in English 9

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The focus of the course is to provide students with additional instructional opportunities aimed at mastery of the Maryland College and Career Readiness standards. Students will get more experience with complex texts, writing, academic vocabulary and close reading strategies.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159945

English 9 Maryland College and Career Readiness (MCCR) ESOL

Course Code: 103053

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in English 9

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The focus of the course is to provide students with additional instructional opportunities aimed at mastery of the Maryland College and Career Readiness standards. Students will get more experience with complex texts, writing, academic vocabulary and close reading strategies.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159945

English 9 Maryland College and Career Readiness (MCCR) Co-Teach

Course Code: 103073

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in English 9

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The focus of the course is to provide students with additional instructional opportunities aimed at mastery of the Maryland College and Career Readiness standards. Students will get more experience with complex texts, writing, academic vocabulary and close reading strategies.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159945

English 9 Maryland College and Career Readiness (MCCR) Intensive

Course Code: 103083

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in English 9

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The focus of the course is to provide students with additional instructional opportunities aimed at mastery of the Maryland College and Career Readiness standards. Students will get more experience with complex texts, writing, academic vocabulary and close reading strategies among others.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159945

English 10

Course Code: 104503, 104523, 104543, 104563

Prerequisites: English 9

Credits: 1.0 English

This required course builds on students’ abilities in reading, writing, listening and speaking through exploration of the guiding ideas or themes in a variety of fiction (including novels) and non-fiction

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

literature. Elements of literature will be studied to enhance analysis and comprehension of texts.

Students will also have reading and writing experiences, to include reading informational text. These reading, writing, speaking and listening activities are reflective of the Common Core State Standards.

Students will have extensive opportunities to respond to selected response questions reflective of the format and content of the required English assessment.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159952

English 10 Honors/Pre-IB

Course Code: 104093, 110513

Prerequisites: English 9

Credits: 1.0 English

This course is designed for identified selected highly able students who have met the prerequisites.

The course will further develop student reading and writing skills (see English 9) by enhancing the depth and complexity of the core curriculum. Students will use critical thinking skills in analyzing advanced/above-grade level texts. Course work will include extended study (e.g. advanced novel study, a research/essay paper) and preparation for AP English.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159952

English 10 Co-Teach

Course Code: 104573

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 1.0 English

This required course is designed to facilitate learning outcomes appropriate to the instructional needs of students who can benefit from instructional practices and strategies based on learning styles and individual needs. This course will help students develop strategies for reading comprehension and improve their vocabulary language usage and writing skills. Students will also use critical reading and thinking skills to analyze fiction (including novels) and non-fiction literary genres from world literature. Students may receive instruction in preparation for the HSA from the Grade 10 Modified

Curriculum Framework Progress Guide. Students will have extensive opportunities to respond to questions reflective of the format and content of the required English assessment. The general education teacher will teach this class in collaboration with a special educator in order to ensure that all students have access to the general education curriculum.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159952

English 10 Intensive

Course Code: 104583

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 1.0 English

This required course is designed to facilitate learning outcomes appropriate to the instructional needs of students who can benefit from instructional practices and strategies based on learning styles and individual needs. This course will help students develop strategies for reading comprehension and improve their vocabulary language usage and writing skills. Students will also be guided to use critical reading and thinking skills to analyze fiction (including novels) and non-fiction literary genres from world literature. Students receive instruction in preparation for the HSA from the Grade 10 Modified

Curriculum Framework Progress Guide. In addition, modified course content will be delivered in flexible groups to diverse learners with disabilities.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159952

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

English 10 Maryland College and Career Readiness (MCCR)

Course Code: 104003

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in English 10

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Students enrolled in this course should be concurrently enrolled in English 10. The focus of the course is to provide students with additional instructional opportunities aimed at mastery of the Maryland

College and Career Readiness standards. Students will get more experience with complex texts, writing, academic vocabulary and close reading strategies.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159945

English 10 Maryland College and Career Readiness (MCCR) ESOL

Course Code: 104053

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in English 10

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Students enrolled in this course should be concurrently enrolled in English 10. The focus of the course is to provide students with additional instructional opportunities aimed at mastery of the Maryland

College and Career Readiness standards. Students will get more experience with complex texts, writing, academic vocabulary and close reading strategies.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159945

English 10 Maryland College and Career Readiness (MCCR) Co-Teach

Course Code: 104073

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in English 10

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Students enrolled in this course should be concurrently enrolled in English 10. The focus of the course is to provide students with additional instructional opportunities aimed at mastery of the Maryland

College and Career Readiness standards. Students will get more experience with complex texts, writing, academic vocabulary and close reading strategies.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159945

English 10 Maryland College and Career Readiness (MCCR) Intensive

Course Code: 104083

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in English 10

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The focus of the course is to provide students with additional instructional opportunities aimed at mastery of the Maryland College and Career Readiness standards. Students will get more experience with complex texts, writing, academic vocabulary and close reading strategies.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159945

English 11

Course Code: 105503, 105563

Prerequisites: English 10

Credits: 1.0 English

This required course gives students an opportunity to explore a thematic approach to the ideas found in the range of our national writing from the Puritan Period to the Twentieth Century. The course

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

reflects the continued diversity inherent in our society as various literary genres (poetry, short story, novel and drama) are shared using all facets of language arts-listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Vocabulary and critical reading reflective of P/SAT will also be included. The study of language will be incorporated into this year-long course. These reading, writing, speaking and listening activities are reflective of the Common Core State Standards.

Textbook(s): Collections

English 11 Maryland College and Career Readiness (MCCR)

Course Code: 105003

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in English 11

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Students enrolled in this course should be concurrently enrolled in English 11. The focus of the course is to provide students with additional instructional opportunities aimed at mastery of the Maryland

College and Career Readiness standards. Students will get more experience with complex texts, writing, academic vocabulary and close reading strategies.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159945

English 11 Maryland College and Career Readiness (MCCR) ESOL

Course Code: 105053

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in English 11

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Students enrolled in this course should be concurrently enrolled in English 11. The focus of the course is to provide students with additional instructional opportunities aimed at mastery of the Maryland

College and Career Readiness standards. Students will get more experience with complex texts, writing, academic vocabulary and close reading strategies.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159945

English 11 Maryland College and Career Readiness (MCCR) Co-Teach

Course Code: 105073

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in English 11

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Students enrolled in this course should be concurrently enrolled in English 11. The focus of the course is to provide students with additional instructional opportunities aimed at mastery of the Maryland

College and Career Readiness standards. Students will get more experience with complex texts, writing, academic vocabulary and close reading strategies.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159945

Honors English 11

Course Code: 105093

Prerequisites: English 10

Credits: 1.0 English

This course is designed for identified selected highly able students who have met the prerequisites.

The units cover the Colonial period through the twentieth century. Lessons and units include activities.

The course reflects the continued diversity inherent in our society as various literary genres (poetry, short story, novel and drama) are shared using all facets of language arts - listening, speaking, reading, and writing reflective of the Common Core State Standards. Vocabulary and critical reading

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

reflective of P/SAT will also be included. The study of language will be incorporated into this yearlong course. This course will further develop student reading and writing skills (see English 10) by enhancing the depth and complexity of the core curriculum. Students will use critical thinking skills in analyzing advanced/above-grade level texts. Course work will include extended study (e.g. advanced novel study, a research/essay paper) and preparation for AP English.

Textbook(s): Collections

English 11 Intensive

Course Code: 105583

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 1.0 English

This required course uses the Modified Curriculum Framework Progress Guide and gives the students an opportunity to explore a thematic approach to the ideas found in the range of our national writing from the Puritan Period to the Twentieth Century. The course reflects the continued diversity interest in our society as various literary genres (poetry, short story, novel and drama) are shared using all facets of language arts-listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Through the use of a modified curriculum which incorporates reading strategies, various forms of technology, and the use of concept graphic organizers, vocabulary and critical reading reflective of P/SAT will be addressed.

Textbook(s): Collections

English 12

Course Code: 106503, 106543

Prerequisites: English 11

Credits: 1.0 English

This course gives the students an opportunity to explore a thematic approach to the universal ideas found in world literature, literature of the Commonwealth, and British literature. Selected fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama will be explored using all facets of language arts - listening, speaking, reading, and writing reflective of the Common Core State Standards. Vocabulary and critical reading reflective of the SAT will also be included. The course includes the study of language usage and the writing process.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159976

English 12 Intensive

Course Code: 106583

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 1.0 English

This course uses the Modified Curriculum Framework Progress Guide and gives the students an opportunity to explore a thematic approach to the universal ideas found in world literature, all facets of language arts- listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Through the use of a modified curriculum which incorporates reading strategies, various forms of technology, and the use of concept graphic organizers, vocabulary and critical reading reflective of the SAT will be addressed. The course includes the study of language usage and the writing process.

Textbook(s): Collections, ISBN 9780544159976

Academic Resource Support Class

Course Code: Grade 9: 142170, 142171, 142272, 142273

Grade 10: 142370, 142371, 142472, 142473

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Grade 11: 142570, 142571, 142672, 142673

Grade 12: 142770, 142771, 142872, 142873

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: .50, 1.0 Elective

This course provides students with special needs instructional support and skill development to implement the goals and objectives in the student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP). Individual learning strategies will include self-advocacy, organization and test taking skills that will enhance academic performance across all content areas. Students will learn to apply individual access skills to specific high school assessment course content.

Instructional materials may include: Square Pegs: Building Success in School and Life; Test Success

in the Brain Compatible Classroom; Pathways of Learning; Self-Efficacy; Raising the Bar for Students with Learning Needs

Academic Resource Support Class - Honors

Course Code: Grade 9: 142190, 142191, 142292, 142293

Grade 10: 142390, 142391, 142492, 142493

Grade 11: 142590, 142591, 142692, 142693

Grade 12: 142790, 142791, 142892, 142893

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: .50 , 1.0 Elective

This year long course provides students with special needs instructional support and skill development in order to implement the goals and objectives in the student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP). The course can be taken year long or as a semester class. Individual learning strategies will include self-advocacy, organization and test taking skills that will enhance academic performance. Students will learn to apply individual access skills to specific high school assessment course content and accelerated courses. This course is specifically designed to provide instructional support for students who are participating in honors level coursework.

Instructional materials may include: Square Pegs: Building Success in School and Life; Test Success

in the Brain Compatible Classroom; Pathways of Learning; Self-Efficacy; Raising the Bar for Students with Learning Needs

Academic Validation English

Course Code: 015100

Prerequisites: High School Assessment eligibility

Credits: 0 Elective

This course provides students with the opportunity to complete Academic Validation Projects while preparing for the High School Assessment in English for graduation.

Textbook(s): TBA

Advanced Placement Cambridge Seminar

Course Code: 010003

Prerequisites: AP/Cambridge student; concurrent enrollment in English Language and Composition

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

This year long seminar course is a requirement for all students wishing to credential in the AP/

Cambridge Program. The course is aligned with the AP anchor course (English Language and

Composition) during the Junior year with the focus on expanding critical thinking through inquiry and reflection on issues of global relevance. Students will gain the skills needed to conduct independent

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

research, critical analysis, college level writing and the final presentation of their project at the end of the course.

Textbook(s): TBA

Advanced Placement Cambridge Seminar Part II

Course Code: 010013

Prerequisites: AP Cambridge Seminar

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

This year long seminar course is a requirement for all students wishing to credential in the AP/

Cambridge Program. The course is aligned with the AP anchor course (English Language and

Composition) during the Senior year with the focus on expanding critical thinking through inquiry and reflection on issues of global relevance. Students will gain the skills needed to conduct independent research, critical analysis, college level writing and the final presentation of their project at the end of the course.

Textbook(s): TBA

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition

Course Code: 105193

Prerequisites: Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 English; Weighted

Designed to prepare students to compete successfully in Advanced Placement, this course will present challenging reading and writing experiences similar to those on advanced placement tests and will use language and writing experiences similar to those found on the AP language test. There will be extensive reading and writing opportunities with an emphasis on analysis of language. Students completing the course are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement examination.

Textbook(s): 5 Steps to a 5 AP English Language, 50 Essays, The Language of Composition, A

Portable Anthology, The AP Vertical Teaming Guide for English, The Bedford Handbook, The Bedford

Reader, Sound and Sense, Elements of Style, novels as assigned; additional materials as appropriate

Seminar in AP English Language and Composition

Course Code: 105203

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in AP English Language and Composition

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course will provide students with intensive assistance in the concepts and skills tested by the

AP English Language and Composition exam. This course prepares students who require additional practice, guidance, and experiences beyond those available in their standard AP English Language and Composition course preparing them for success on the AP English Language and Composition exam, possible exemption from freshman composition, and/or undergraduate elective credit, and for effective reading and writing in college and beyond.

Textbook(s): 5 Steps to a 5 AP English Language, 50 Essays, The Language of Composition, A

Portable Anthology, The AP Vertical Teaming Guide for English, The Bedford Handbook, The Bedford

Reader, Sound and Sense, Elements of Style, novels as assigned; additional materials as appropriate

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition

Course Code: 132193

Prerequisites: Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 English; Weighted

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Designed to prepare students to compete successfully in advanced placement, this course will present challenging reading and writing experiences similar to those on advanced placement tests and will use literature similar to that found on the test. There will be extensive reading and writing opportunities, focusing on literary analysis. It is hoped that all students taking the course will also take the Advanced Placement examination.

Textbook(s): 5 Steps to a 5 AP English Language, A Portable Anthology, The AP Vertical Teaming

Guide for English, The Bedford Handbook, The Bedford Reader, Sound and Sense, Elements of

Style, novels as assigned; additional materials as appropriate

9780312450946 The Language of Composition, Reading, Writing, Rhetoric

9780312473020 The Language of Composition, Reading, Writing, Rhetoric

Seminar in AP English Literature and Composition

Course Code: 132203

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in AP English Literature and Composition

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course will provide students with intensive assistance in the concepts and skills tested by the

AP English Literature and Composition exam. This course prepares students who require additional practice, guidance, and experiences beyond those available in their standard AP English Literature and Composition course preparing them for success on the AP English Literature and Composition exam, possible exemption from freshman composition, and/or undergraduate elective credit, and for effective reading and writing in college and beyond.

Textbook(s): 5 Steps to a 5 AP English Language, The Language of Composition, A Portable Anthology,

The AP Vertical Teaming Guide for English, The Bedford Handbook, The Bedford Reader, Sound and

Sense, Elements of Style, novels as assigned; additional materials as appropriate

Advanced Critical Reading/Critical Analysis

Course Code: 583003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course offers students an opportunity to engage in high-level reading and writing activities that develop critical analysis skills through instruction and practice. Course content includes selected readings of various genre and response to reading in writing and discussion. Instructional activities are designed to enhance academic performance in all areas and extensive vocabulary study to prepare for PSAT/SAT assessments. (May be blocked with English course)

Textbook(s): Readers’ Handbook and/or Pre-AP reading materials fro the College Board

Critical Reading

Course Code: 582000, 582003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50, 1.0 Elective

This course is designed to assist students in developing reading strategies so they may perform at high proficiency levels in the content areas. Students will explore strategies for extending vocabulary, improving comprehension and developing study techniques. Opportunities to transfer techniques to varied materials and to select leisure reading materials will also be provided. (May be blocked with

English course.)

Textbook(s): Readers’ Handbook, Be a Better Reader

Critical Reading (READ 180)

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Course Code: 584000, 584003, 584013, 584023, 584033

Prerequisites: MSA reading score of Basic or At-Risk

Credits: .50 , 1.0 Elective

READ 180 is an intensive reading intervention program designed to meet the needs of students whose reading achievement is below grade level. The program directly addresses individual needs through adaptive and instructional software, high-interest literature, and direct instruction in reading.

Recommended as a 90-minute course of study daily.

READ 180 program.

Journalism 1 Intro

Course Code: 121003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This introductory course will provide students with both knowledge about the development of journalism as a communication instrument and practical experiences in journalistic techniques. Appropriate time may also be devoted to various school publications.

Textbook(s): 9780669388121 Writer’s Inc.

Journalism 2 - Newspaper

Course Code: 121103, 121123, 121133

Prerequisites: Journalism 1

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course provides students with functional activities involved in newspaper production. Reporting, news gathering, advertising, and photography will be among the topics explored.

Textbook(s): 9780078616167 Journalism Today

Journalism 2 - Literary Magazine

Course Code: 121303, 121323, 121333

Prerequisites: Journalism 1

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Students in this course will practice those techniques necessary to publishing a literary magazine.

The class will be responsible for devising a thematic concept for each issue; soliciting, generating, and editing copy; developing a suitable publication format; meeting funding needs; and distribution.

Textbook(s): 9780395863794 Writer’s Craft

Journalism 2 - Yearbook

Course Code: 121203, 121223, 121233

Prerequisites: Journalism 1

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Problems and procedures necessary to the development, printing, and distribution of a yearbook form the basis of this course. Students will also devise a theme for the yearbook and undertake necessary funding activities to ensure its solvency.

Textbook(s): Curriculum Framework

SAT Preparation

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Course Code: 100010, 100090

Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, and concurrent enrollment in Algebra II

Credits: .50 Elective

Seniors and juniors who plan to take the SAT for college admission should enroll in this semester course. Students will become familiar with the SAT format, test taking strategies, and critical thinking skills. Students will review basic arithmetic, algebraic, and geometric concepts for the mathematics section with particular attention to the formats. In addition, students will review reading and writing strategies and vocabulary development for the verbal section of the SAT. There will be extensive work in critical and comparative reading as well as analogical reasoning. Simulated test taking and regular feedback will be an integral part of this class. Participants will be required to take the SAT in 11th grade during the spring of the school year.

Textbook(s): Preparing for the SAT in Critical Reading and Writing; Preparing for the SAT in

Mathematics

Research and Writing the Term Paper

Course Code: 134800

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester course is designed for those students who wish to gain skills in writing longer papers based on the findings of others. Tools and methods of objective research will be explored. Students will learn the logical development and substantiation of a thesis. They will also have the opportunity to discuss problems of selecting, evaluating, and interpreting facts.

Textbook(s): Writing the Research Paper

Speech 1

Course Code: 122103

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This introductory high school course is designed to give students opportunities to gain poise, develop personal interests, and share responsibilities for group projects. Students will have opportunities to acquire listening skills, to learn fundamentals of oral presentation, to increase their vocabularies through word study and oral presentations, to increase their vocabularies through word study as it relates to speech, to prepare and present various types of speeches, to participate in group discussions, to experience platform reading and speaking, to receive an introduction to debate, to meet some of the challenges of performing through the mass media, and to develop interpersonal communication skills and poise.

Textbook(s): NO TEXT

Speech 2

Course Code: 122203

Prerequisites: Speech 1

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This second-year advanced course is designed to further develop the skills introduced in Speech

1 by providing additional and enriched experiences. Students will have opportunities to speak to a variety of audiences, enter competitive speaking situations, move extensively into debating, present a readers’ theatre production, listen to and critique a variety of speeches from outside resources, and present a formal manuscript speech.

Textbook(s): None

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES

(ESOL) COURSE SEQUENCE 2014-2015

119

English

Social Studies

Science

Math

English

Social Studies

Science

Math

English

Social Studies

9 th

grade 10 th

grade 11 th

grade 12 th

grade

ESOL Newcomer and

ESOL Newcomer AL

Language.of American

History

ESOL Beginner and

ESOL Beginner AL

U.S. History ESOL

ESOL Intermediate and ESOL

Intermediate AL and

HSA/PARCC (spring)

Local, State, and National

Government ESOL

ESOL Advanced and

English 10 and

HSA/PARCC

World History ESOL

Language of Science Integrating the

Sciences ESOL

Biology ESOL

Lab Science

For students new to the U.S., use the International Student Math Placement Test to determine level.

May include: Applications in Algebra for ELLs, Algebra 1 ESOL Common Core, Geometry Common

Core, Algebra 2 Common Core or higher. Math is to be scheduled every year.

ESOL Beginner and

ESOL Beginner AL

ESOL Intermediate and

ESOL Intermediate

AL and HSA/PARCC

(spring)

ESOL Advanced and

ESOL Advanced AL and HSA/PARCC

English 10 and

HSA/PARCC

Language of American

History

U.S. History ESOL

Local, State, and National

Government

World History

Language of Science

Integrating the

Sciences ESOL

Biology ESOL

Lab Science

For students new to the U.S., use the International Student Math Placement Test to determine level.

May include: Applications in Algebra for ELLs, Algebra 1 ESOL Common Core, Geometry Common

Core, Algebra 2 Common Core or higher. Math is to be scheduled every year.

ESOL Intermediate and

ESOL Intermediate AL

ESOL Advanced and

ESOL Advanced AL and HSA/PARCC

English 10 and

HSA/PARCC

English 11

U.S. History ESOL

Local, State, and

National Government World History

-

Science

Math

English

Social Studies

Integrating the

Sciences ESOL

Biology

Lab Science -

For students new to the U.S., use the International Student Math Placement Test to determine level.

May include: Applications in Algebra for ELLs, Algebra 1 ESOL Common Core, Geometry Common

Core, Algebra 2 Common Core or higher. Math is to be scheduled every year.

ESOL Advanced and

ESOL Advanced AL

English 10 and

HSA/PARCC

English 11 English 12

U.S. History

Local, State, and

National Government World History

-

Science

Math

Integrating the

Sciences

Biology

Lab Science -

For students new to the U.S., use the International Student Math Placement Test to determine level.

May include: Applications in Algebra for ELLs, Algebra 1 ESOL Common Core, Geometry Common

Core or higher. Math is to be scheduled every year.

Students in bold courses will take the assessment (HSA/PARCC) in those content areas.

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)

English ESOL Newcomer

Course Code: 135913

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 English

English Language Learners will be enrolled in the Newcomer class, an English credit class for students who speak little to no English. This course allows students to receive intensive sheltered. Newcomer

English support before being enrolled in ESOL Beginning class. This class meets daily for 9th grade students for one whole year..

Textbook(s): Keys to Learning, ISBN 9780132339353 Student Workbook ISBN 9780132083737

English ESOL Newcomer Accelerated Learning

Course Code: 135923

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This Elective course complements the English ESOL Newcomer class and provides newcomers with additional instructional support in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Textbook(s): Keys to Learning ISBN 9780132339353 Student Workbook ISBN 9780132083737

English ESOL Beginner

Course Code: 135123

Prerequisites: WIDA ACCESS score of 1 or 2 in Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing

Credits: 1.0 English

This language acquisition course develops the beginning English language skills of English Language

Learners in listening, speaking, reading and writing. These skills require control of the sound system, grammar, vocabulary and basic sentence structure. Students will build and develop Basic

Interpersonal Communication Skills (BICS) while learning how to read, write, and think critically for use in appropriate social, cultural, and academic situations.

Textbook(s): 9780131582583 Keystone

English ESOL Beginner Accelerated Learning (AL)

Course Code: 135113

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in English ESOL Beginner

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The English ESOL Beginner course complements ENG/ESOL Beginner and provides beginning

English Language Learners with additional instructional support in the areas of Listening, Speaking,

Reading and Writing. This course is designed to enhance student’s capacity to read, write, and think critically while building language.

Textbook(s): Keystone D, ISBN 9781428434943

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

English ESOL Intermediate

Course Code: 135133

Prerequisites: Successful completion of English ESOL Beginner or WIDA ACCESS score of 3

Credits: 1.0 English

This language acquisition course is for English Language Learners whose English language skills and previous educational backgrounds are such that they require a second year of instruction. Students will continue to acquire English proficiency with emphasis on basic reading comprehension, building vocabulary and paragraph development. This course will develop the student’s Cognitive Academic

Language Proficiency (CALP).

Textbook(s): selected literary and informational texts

English ESOL Intermediate Accelerated Learning (AL)

Course Code: 135213

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in English ESOL Intermediate

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The English ESOL Intermediate AL course complements ENGIESOL Intermediate and provides intermediate English Language Learners with additional instructional support in the areas of Listening,

Speaking, Reading and Writing...

Textbook(s): selected literary and informational texts

English ESOL Advanced

Course Code: 135223

Prerequisites: Successful completion of English ESOL Intermediate or WIDA ACCESS score of 4 or above

Credits: 1.0 English

This language development course continues to develop Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency

(CALP) and increased control of English language skills. Students will develop strategies for reading comprehension, writing skills and increase their academic vocabulary. Students will also use critical reading and thinking skills to analyze fiction (including novels) and non-fiction literary genres.

Textbook(s): Language of Literature, Gr. 9-Houghton Mifflin ISBN 13/EAN: 9780544091009

ISBN 10:054409100

Novel: To Kill A Mockingbird

English ESOL Advanced Accelerated Learning (AL)

Course Code: 135233

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in English ESOL Advanced

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Concurrent Enrollment Course: English ESOL 3 AL complements ENG/ESOL 3 and provides advanced level English Language Learners with additional instructional support in the areas of Listening,

Speaking, Reading and Writing. Book: Language of Literature

Textbook(s): Language of Literature’s Interactive Reader and Writer with Strategic Support, Gr.9-

Houghton Mifflin; Grammar for Writing Workbook, Gr. 9- Houghton Mifflin, Maryland HSA Finish Line,

English 10 - Continental Press. ISBN 13/EAN: 9780544091009, ISBN 10:054409100

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Critical Reading ESOL

Course Code: 582051, 582052, 582053

Prerequisites: Selection by ESOL staff, Enrolled in ESOL Intermediate

Credits: 0.5, 1.0 Elective

This semester or year long, single period course is designed for ESOL Intermediate students who need additional support in reading comprehension and fluency.

Textbook(s): Selected readings and novel

Advanced Reading ESOL

Course Code: 583051, 583052, 583053

Prerequisites: Selection by ESOL staff, enrolled in ESOL Advanced or English 10

Credits: 0.5, 1.0 Elective

This semester or year long, single period course is designed for ESOL Advanced students or English

10 students (previous course ESOL Advanced) who need additional support in reading comprehension and fluency.

Textbook(s): Dr. Janet Allen’s Plugged Into Reading series

Application in Algebra for ELLs

Course Code: 301003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Math

In this course, students take a broader look at computational and problem-solving skills while learning the language and concepts of algebra. The focal points in this course include translating word phrases and sentences into mathematical expressions, determining whether a relation is a function and how to describe its domain and range, and developing algebraic fluency by developing the skills needed to solve equations and perform manipulations with numbers and variables. Additionally, students will learn to read and understand word problems, communicate about mathematics, build disciplinary and academic vocabulary, and develop practices in mathematics by engaging in “Language of Math”.

This course addresses all of the essential knowledge and skills for mathematics and is designed to prepare students for Common Core Algebra 1. This course addresses the required content as well as provides language support to students whose first language is not English..

Textbook(s): Longman Science, Pearson/Longman Ed

Language of Science

Course Code: 137803

Prerequisites: ESOL Newcomer or Beginner

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This year long single period course is designed to teach academic language used in the content area of Science. In addition, learning strategies, basic literacy skills, and classroom survival skills for

American classrooms are taught to the ELLs enrolled in this course.

Textbook(s): Longman Science, Pearson/Longman Ed

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

ESOL Integrating the Sciences

Course Code: 418153

Prerequisites: ESOL Level Beginner or higher

Credits: 1.0 Science

This year-long, single period course provides non-native speakers with an opportunity to study some of the basic topics in the four core disciplines of science - Physics, Earth Science, Chemistry, and

Environmental Science. This course serves as a foundation course for students enrolling in Biology the following year. Major concepts studied include motion, forces, energy, electromagnetic radiation, earth’s surface and interior, solar system, properties of matter, atomic structure, periodic table, chemical bonds, acids and bases, carbon chemistry, interactions of organisms, diversity of live and environmental issues of the world. Each quarter culminates with a thematic project. The constructivist approach is used to deliver the content. This includes inquiry based laboratory activities, making real world connections to mathematics, history, technology and society. Methods and strategies are used to make the content comprehensible for English Language Learners.

Textbook(s): 9780133628166 Physical Science: Concepts in Action

ESOL Biology

Course Code: 420103

Prerequisites: ESOL Level Advanced or higher

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course provides non-English speaking students with an opportunity to study biology by helping them with English terminology. All students will take the Maryland Biology High School Assessment at the completion of this course. Dissection of laboratory animals may be a required part of this class.

Textbook(s): Biology Everyday, Expeneru ISBN 13: 9780675026208

ESOL World History

Course Code: 261053

Prerequisites: ESOL Level Intermediate or higher

Credits: 1.0 Social Studies

This year-long, single period course for non-native speakers focuses on modern world history beginning in approximately 1400 AD. The course is based on four major themes; human interactions, hemispheric interactions, crisis, progress and change in the 20th century, and the challenges of the 21 st

century. Methods and strategies are used to make the content comprehensible for English

Language Learners.

Textbook(s): World History Connections to Today, Prentice Hall ISBN-13: 9780131817616

ESOL U.S. History

Course Code: 262953

Prerequisites: ESOL Level Beginner or higher

Credits: 1.0 Social Studies

This year-long, single period course illustrates how the American political, economic and social system developed. Topics such as nationalism, sectionalism, Civil War, Reconstruction, Industrialism and Immigration are examined to illustrate the development of these strands during the 19 th

century.

Twentieth century content includes issues related to the development of foreign policy, the role of the United States as a world leader, domestic response to a diversified population, and issues such as reform and civil rights. Methods and strategies are used to make the content comprehensible for

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

English Language Learners.

Textbook(s): The American Journey: Reconstruction to the Present, ISBN 9780078653995

Language of American History

Course Code: 137603

Prerequisites: ESOL Level Newcomer or Beginner students; Approval of ESOL staff

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This year-long, single period course is designed to teach academic language used in the content area of History. In addition, learning strategies, basic study skills, and classroom survival skills for

American classrooms are taught to the English Language Learners enrolled in this course.

Textbook(s): ACCESS American History, ISBN 9780669508949

ESOL/AIM Literacy 1

Course Code: 136703

Prerequisites: Selection by ESOL/LMP staff

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This year-long, single period course is designed for pre- and non-literate English Language Learners.

It teaches fundamental literacy skills through the content areas of Mathematics, Science and

Geography.

Textbook(s): Access Newcomer Kit, Great Source Education; ESL Literacy, Longman

ESOL/AIM Literacy 2

Course Code: 136803

Prerequisites: Selection by ESOL/LMP staff

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This year-long, single period course is designed for semi-literate English Language Learners who successfully complete the ESOL AIM Literacy 1 class or who, as new registrants in the county, are identified by their in-take tests as being semi-literate.

Textbook(s): Access Newcomer Kit, Great Source Education; ESL Literacy, Longman

Native Language 1

Course Code: 199103 NL1

Prerequisites: International School Counseling Office transcript review and approval

Credits: 1.0 Foreign Language; Completer

International students who enter Prince George’s County Public Schools having completed course work in their Native Language (grade 9 and above) may receive foreign language credit for that language. The above course code will be used. If possible, the actual language name (e.g. Gujarati,

Amharic) may replace the title Native Language 1. For the newcomer student already fluent in a language other than English, this home language may be counted towards the foreign language completer credit (when credit is awarded for two high school years), the intent of the requirement being proficiency in more than one language.

Textbook(s): None

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Native Language 2

Course Code: 199203 NL2

Prerequisites: International School Counseling Office transcript review and approval

Credits: 1.0 Foreign Language; Completer

International students who enter Prince George’s County Public Schools having completed course work in their Native Language (grade 9 and above) may receive foreign language credit for that language. The above course code will be used for the second credit earned in the native language. If possible, the actual language name (e.g. Gujarati, Amharic) may replace the title Native Language 2.

For the newcomer student already fluent in a language other than English, this home language may be counted towards the foreign language completer credit (when credit is awarded for two high school years), the intent of the requirement being proficiency in more than one language.

Textbook(s): None

Native Language 3

Course Code: 199303 NL3

Prerequisites: International School Counseling Office transcript review and approval

Credits: 1.0 Foreign Language; Completer

International students who enter Prince George’s County Public Schools having completed course work in their Native Language (grade 9 and above) may receive foreign language credit for that language. The above course code will be used for the third credit earned in the native language. If possible, the actual language name (e.g. Gujarati, Amharic) may replace the title Native Language 3.

For the newcomer student already fluent in a language other than English, this home language may be counted towards the foreign language completer credit (when credit is awarded for two high school years), the intent of the requirement being proficiency in more than one language.

Textbook(s): None

Health Education

Family Living

Course Code: 744300

Prerequisites: Health Issues; Grades 11 or 12

Credits: .50 Elective

Family Living is a half-credit, dynamic health education elective course designed to meet the needs of seniors and mature eleventh grade students. This seminar type discussion oriented course examines personal development, independent living, relationships, marriage, pregnancy, parenthood, and family crises. Through a process of introspection and self-discovery, this course facilitates the development of a greater appreciation and understanding of what it takes to create and maintain a successful and healthy marriage and family.

Textbook(s): Strengthening Family and Self, ISBN 9781590704950

Health Issues

Course Code: 744200, 744250, 744270

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Health

This semester course prepares students with the skills to access valid health information and to identify the impact of family, peers, culture, media and technology on health behaviors. Through these

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

skills, students are able to develop a functional knowledge of the core health concepts of personal and consumer health, mental and emotional health (consisting of decision-making, stress reduction, and suicide prevention), nutrition and fitness (in which dietary factors for high blood pressure, heart disease and obesity are addressed), family life and human sexuality, first aid and safety (which includes cardiopulmonary resuscitation training), substance abuse prevention with an emphasis on coping with peer pressure and abstaining from drug use, and disease prevention and control which encompasses cancer, sexually transmitted infections, and HIV/AIDS. The family life and human sexuality unit requires prior written parental permission. All students are required to complete the

Health Issues course to satisfy the half credit graduation requirement. Students cannot earn credit for this course by examination.

Textbook(s): Health, ISBN 9780131905672

Health Issues Dual Enrollment

Course Code: 744210

Prerequisites: Dual enrollment approval

Credits: .50 Health

This semester course prepares students with the skills to access valid health information and to identify the impact of family, peers, culture, media and technology on health behaviors. Through these skills, students are able to develop a functional knowledge of the core health concepts of personal and consumer health, mental and emotional health (consisting of decision-making, stress reduction, and suicide prevention), nutrition and fitness (in which dietary factors for high blood pressure, heart disease and obesity are addressed), family life and human sexuality, first aid and safety (which includes cardiopulmonary resuscitation training), substance abuse prevention with an emphasis on coping with peer pressure and abstaining from drug use, and disease prevention and control which encompasses cancer, sexually transmitted infections, and HIV/AIDS. The family life and human sexuality unit requires prior written parental permission. All students are required to complete the

Health Issues course to satisfy the half credit graduation requirement. Students cannot earn credit for this course by examination. This course is only for use at the Academy of Health Sciences at Prince

George’s Community College.

Textbook(s): Health, Pearson, Prentice Hall

Sports Medicine

Course Code: 747000

Prerequisites: Health Issues

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester long elective course introduces the student to the field of sports medicine and athletic training. It provides for the scientific examination of the physiology of exercise; and the skillful application of first aid, taping, rehabilitation, care and prevention of athletic emergency injuries, and

CPR training.

Textbook(s): Introduction to Sports Medicine and Athletic Training, ISBN 9781401811990

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

International Baccalaureate

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program is a rigorous, two-year course of study for 11 and 12 th th

grade students emphasizing an integrated global perspective. Attainment of the IB Diploma can create a course fulfillment similar to that taken during the first year of many colleges and universities. This can result in a possible savings of enrollment costs. It is suggested that students entering the IB program as rising 9th graders have completed a minimum of Level 1 Foreign Language and Algebra 1 with a grade of C or better. Those students entering the program as rising 10 th

graders have completed a minimum of

Level 2 Foreign Language and Geometry with a grade of C or better.

International Baccalaureate Ab Initio Spanish I

Course Code: 169503

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 World Language

In Ab Initio Spanish I, students learn to communicate orally through functions and topics. The sounds of language are learned through dialogues, situations and practice activities. Students learn to practice the four language modes (listening, speaking, reading and writing) in a variety of situations.

The main focus of the program this first year is communication using the three communicative modes: interpersonal, interpretive and presentational. These modes are aligned with National Standards and the Maryland state framework. For the interpretive and interpersonal modes, students focus on listening to and interacting with the teacher and classmates on selected topics that relate to self, family, friends and community but can also include other topics from the above-mentioned themes, depending on the proficiency of the students. Students will also demonstrate an understanding of the language by using verbal and non-verbal visual cues and reading to understand and convey messages by using

CDs, videocassettes, pictures, flashcards and open-ended sentences. For the presentational mode, students will focus on presenting skits and projects and using the three communicative modes. They will also explore careers in the target language and present reports on aspects of different Hispanic and Spanish cultures.

Textbook(s): IB Spanish Ab Initio by Rosa M. Iglesias

International Baccalaureate Ab Initio Spanish II

Course Code: 169603

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 World Language

The development of skills begun in the first year is continued. Great emphasis is placed on vocabulary building and on reading and writing material not practiced orally first. The primary focus of this second year course is to improve listening, speaking, reading and writing, using the three communicative modes. Knowledge of grammar is expanded beyond the present tense and includes more complex structures such as direct and indirect object pronouns. Students will develop and demonstrate their mastery through guided composition writing in which they will use new structures and vocabulary on a variety of topics. The second year program also focuses on developing deeper awareness of and appreciation for Hispanic and Spanish cultures through discussions both in English and Spanish on different cultural aspects of several countries.

Textbook(s): IB Spanish Ab Initio by Rosa M. Iglesias

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

International Baccalaureate Advanced Independent Research and Study

Skills

Course Code: 803003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

The aim of this course is designed to help IB Diploma Candidates improve their learning effectiveness, attitudes, and awareness. The following skills are included in the curriculum – time management, concentration and stamina, study skills, close reading and annotation, formal writing, note-taking skills, textbook study methods, assessment strategies, and critical thinking skills. In addition, students will be guided by their instructor/advisor to access digital resources recommended for their various

IB subjects, as well as enhance their communication and presentation skills. Students will also appropriately apply and reinforce learned research skills to complete assigned IB assessments. The outcome for this class is for students to produce a well-developed authentic essay that demonstrates their ability to formulate a research question, choose a relevant topic worthy of investigation, plan and use an appropriate range of resources, gather and organize data, demonstrate knowledge and understanding through a detailed, logical, cohesive presentation that is stated precisely with appropriate terminology. Students will be required to collaborate with their peers, maintain a portfolio for this class, and post weekly blogs on their performance expectations and learned outcomes.

Textbook(s): None

International Baccalaureate Art/Design 1

Course Code: 615103

Prerequisites: Art 1 or Art Appreciation; Grade 11 student

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art; Weighted

IB Art/Design 1 offers students opportunities to acquire techniques in the use of a variety of media and to relate art to its historical and social context. Each student develops an inquiring attitude towards visual phenomena and a comprehension of the aesthetic and technical problems encountered in studio practice. Students acquire sufficient technical skills to produce works of quality and an ability to present this work appropriately. Course topics vary by students who choose and pursue independent studies.

Textbook(s): Launching the Imagination, McGraw-Hill

International Baccalaureate Art/Design 2

Course Code: 615203

Prerequisites: IB Art/Design 1; Grade 12 student

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art; Weighted

IB Art/Design 2 offers students opportunities to acquire techniques in the use of a variety of media and to relate art to its historical and social context. Each student develops an inquiring attitude towards visual phenomena and a comprehension of the aesthetic and technical problems encountered in studio practice. Students acquire sufficient technical skills to produce works of quality and an ability to present this work appropriately. Course topics vary by students who choose and pursue independent studies.

Textbook(s): Launching the Imagination, McGraw-Hill

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International Baccalaureate Biology 1

Course Code: 421003

Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry

Credits: 1.0 Science; Weighted

IB Biology 1 offers the equivalent to a college introductory biology course. It is structured to offer a rigorous and demanding curriculum. The assessments are both internally and externally graded.

Students are expected to take the IB test in Biology. Course topics include genetics, evolution, ecology, and options as outlined in the teacher subject guide from the International Baccalaureate

Organization.

Textbook: Biology for the Diploma Study - A Guide, IB Source; AP ISBN 9781471828997

International Baccalaureate Biology 2

Course Code: 421103

Prerequisites: IB Biology 1

Credits: 1.0 Science; Weighted

IB Biology 2 offers the equivalent to a college introductory biology course. It is structured to offer a rigorous and demanding curriculum. The assessments are both internally and externally graded.

Students are expected to take the IB test in Biology. Course topics include genetics, evolution, ecology, and options as outlined in the teacher subject guide from the International Baccalaureate

Organization.

Textbook: Biology for the Diploma Study - A Guide, IB Source; AP Edition ISBN 9781471828997

International Baccalaureate Business and Management SL

Course Code: 553223

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

IB Chemistry students are introduced to the Core Topics of Chemistry and the Options. Performance criteria are demanded with greater intensity and accuracy. Practical work is in greater detail and lab reports are more elaborate. Topics include Stoichiometry, Atomic theory, Periodicity, Chemical bonding,

States of matter, Energetics, Kinetics, Equilibrium, Oxidation and reduction, Organic chemistry

Textbook(s): IB Business Management Course Book, ISBN 9780198392811

International Baccalaureate Chemistry 1

Course Code: 431003

Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry

Credits: 1.0 Science; Weighted

IB Chemistry students are introduced to the Core Topics of Chemistry and the Options. Performance criteria are demanded with greater intensity and accuracy. Practical work is in greater detail and lab reports are more elaborate. Topics include Stoichiometry, Atomic theory, Periodicity, Chemical bonding,

States of matter, Energetics, Kinetics, Equilibrium, Oxidation and reduction, Organic chemistry

Textbook(s): Chemistry Student Guide for Assessed Practical Work, IB Source; IB Diploma Program

Chemistry Course ISBN 9781471829055

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International Baccalaureate Chemistry 2

Course Code: 431203

Prerequisites: IB Chemistry 1

Credits: 1.0 Science; Weighted

IB Chemistry 2 is sequential to IB Chemistry 1. Students are also required to conduct a joint investigation with the Biology students for a Group 4 project, a mandated internal assessment. The research question of this project must incorporate the applications of chemistry and biology concepts.

The core topic of Organic Chemistry and the Options are taught at this level with applications and related ness of the other core topics.

Textbook(s): Chemistry Student Guide for Assessed Practical Work, IB Source; IB Diploma Program

Chemistry Course Companion by Geoffrey Neuss; Chemistry for the IB Diploma - 2

ISBN 9780198392811

nd

Ed., IB Source

International Baccalaureate Dance 1

Course Code: 723213

Prerequisites: Dance 1 or Dance 2

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art; Weighted

Dance is a unique medium for learning about self and the world. It is one essential component of artistic, aesthetic and cultural education, and develops creative potential through physical expression.

In dance, the integration of body, mind and spirit helps participants learn skills that are transferable to other disciplines and to their daily lives. The IB dance program aims for a holistic approach to dance and embraces a variety of dance traditions and dance cultures—past, present and looking towards the future. Performance, creative and analytical skills are mutually developed and valued whether the students are writing papers or creating/performing dances. The curriculum provides students with a liberal arts orientation to dance. This orientation facilitates the development of students who may become choreographers, dance scholars, performers or those, more broadly, who seek life enrichment through dance. In IB Dance 1, students will focus on the fundamentals of dance, develop technical ability, as well as explore the world of dance. They will begin preparation for personal and group performances.

Textbook(s): TBA

International Baccalaureate Dance 2

Course Code: 723223

Prerequisites: International Baccalaureate Dance 1

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art; Weighted

This course continues the foundation laid in IB Dance 1 with additional emphasis on enhancement of technical skill. The primary focus of this level of the IB Dance curriculum is accomplishing the

IB Dance course requirements. Specific focus will be on Composition and Analysis, a research investigation of dance styles around the world, and performances by the student as an individual as well as in a group..

Textbook(s): TBA

International Baccalaureate Economics SL Online

Course Code: 792613

Prerequisites: Student must be an 11th or 12th grader

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

Economics SL is the study of economic theory and its applications in the world today. Students will

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interpret economic data and statistics, apply relevant theory, and demonstrate this knowledge using written prose, diagrams and economic terminology.

Textbook(s): None

International Baccalaureate Film A Online

Course Code: 796133

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

IB Film A and B The Diploma Programme film course develops students’ skills so that they become adept in interpreting and making film texts. Through the analysis of film texts and exercises in filmmaking, the IB film course explores film history, theory and socio-economic background. It also develops students’ critical abilities, enabling them to appreciate the variety of cultural and historical perspectives in film.

Textbook(s): None

International Baccalaureate Film B Online

Course Code: 796143

Prerequisites: IB Film A

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

IB Film A and B The Diploma Programme film course develops students’ skills so that they become adept in interpreting and making film texts. Through the analysis of film texts and exercises in filmmaking, the IB film course explores film history, theory and socio-economic background. It also develops students’ critical abilities, enabling them to appreciate the variety of cultural and historical perspectives in film.

Textbook(s): None

International Baccalaureate French 1

Course Code: 159003

Prerequisites: French 1, 2, and 3; Grade 11 student

Credits: 1.0 World Language; Weighted

The students will demonstrate accuracy in their use of both the spoken and written language. They will be able to understand, respond, and enter into discussions to express their opinions. The students will demonstrate an awareness and appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures and understand how languages embody these differences. Course topics include food, leisure, education, the media, music, and relationships in a global society.

Textbook(s): TBA

International Baccalaureate French 2

Course Code: 159103

Prerequisites: Grade 12 student; Completion of IB French 1

Credits: 1.0 World Language; Weighted

IB French B students will demonstrate accuracy in their use of both the spoken and written language; be able to understand, respond, and enter into discussions and debate in order to express their opinions; demonstrate an awareness and appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures; and understand how language embodies these cultures. Course topics include young people in a global society; women in society; work; the environment; changes in technology

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Textbook: Tout Droit, Rod Hares and David Mort ISBN 0719575338; Au Point ISBN 0174491352;

Café Crème ISBN 2011551226; L’Etranager, Albert Camus in French

International Baccalaureate Geography 1

Course Code: 266203

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

IB Geography 1 includes both human and economic geography as complementary and reinforcing concepts. Topics include geology, geomorphology, atmospheric and oceanic systems, biospheres, population geography, urban geography, economic development and trade, agriculture, and industrial and transport geography. Students apply a modern scientific approach by using statistical methods in investigation. They also interpret topographic maps and conduct fieldwork.

Textbook(s): Planet Geography

International Baccalaureate Geography 2

Course Code: 266503

Prerequisites: IB Geography 1

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

IB Geography 2 includes both human and economic geography as complementary and reinforcing concepts. Topics include geology, geomorphology, atmospheric and oceanic systems, biospheres, population geography, urban geography, economic development and trade, agriculture, and industrial and transport geography. Students apply a modern scientific approach by using statistical methods in investigation. They also interpret topographic maps and conduct fieldwork.

Textbook(s): Planet Geography

International Baccalaureate History of the Americas

Course Code: 266403

Prerequisites: IB Modern World History; Grade 12 student

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

IB History of Americas is an examination of the history of the western hemisphere to include US, Latin

American and Canadian history. Course topics include Colonial America, Wars of Independence, The

New Republics, Manifest Destiny, Pre-Civil War, Reconstruction, Westward Expansion, Immigration,

The US and Latin America, and the Great Depression.

Textbook(s): The American Pageant, ISBN 9780547166629; Latin American History, McDougall

Littell, Defining Canada: History, Identify, and Culture, ISBN 9780547166629

International Baccalaureate Information Technology in a Global Society

Course Code: 864303

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

There are four assessment objectives for the SL and HL Diploma Programme ITGS course. Having followed the course at SL or HL, students will be expected to demonstrate the following.

Knowledge and understanding of specified content (Demonstrate an awareness of IT applications and developments in specified scenarios; demonstrate an awareness of the social and ethical significance of specified IT applications and developments; demonstrate technical knowledge of ITGS terminology, concepts and tools; demonstrate technical knowledge of IT systems; and demonstrate knowledge and understanding of topics related to the annually issued case study (HL paper 3 only)

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Application and analysis (Explain the impacts of IT applications and developments in specified scenarios; analyse the social and ethical significance of specified IT applications and developments; transfer IT knowledge and make connections between specific scenarios; and apply technical knowledge of IT systems acquired through independent research to provide supporting evidence in possible decisions relating to future courses of action related to the annually issued case study (HL paper 3 only)

Synthesis and evaluation (Evaluate local and global impacts of specified IT developments through individually researched studies; evaluate a solution involving IT to a specified problem using knowledge of IT systems; discuss the social and ethical implications of specified IT policies and developments; and evaluate, formulate and justify possible strategic courses of action related to the annually issued case study (HL paper 3 only)

Use of ITGS skills (Demonstrate evidence of project management in the development of a wellorganized product to resolve a specific issue; use IT tools and the product development life cycle

(PDLC) to create an original product in consultation with a client; and demonstrate evidence of the use of appropriate techniques to develop an original IT product

Textbook(s): TBA

International Baccalaureate Japanese B Ab initio (SL)

Course Code: Ab initio A-150403; Ab initio B-150503

Prerequisites: Ab initio A – grade 11 student; Japanese 3

Credits:

Ab initio B – grade 12 student; IB Japanese B Ab initio A

1.0 World Language; Weighted

IB Japanese B Ab initio is a foreign language course designed for complete beginners. Students are prepared to use the language appropriately in a variety of settings. Each course develops students’ powers of expression in a second language, provides them with a resource for the study of other subjects, and brings them into contact with ways of thought that may differ from their own. Exercises in grammar, reading and writing, and culture are presented with such topics as hobbies and leisure activities, weather and climate, everyday life, food, shopping, travel, at home, transportation, the body and health, life and careers, and communication and media.

Textbook(s): Yookoso!

International Baccalaureate Language and Literature 1

Course Code: 112203

Prerequisites: English 9 Honors and English 10 Honors

Credits: 1.0 English; Weighted

IB Language and Literature is a comprehensive and rigorous two-year curriculum for students enrolled in the IB Diploma Programme. The course is a study of both language and literature, and students question the meaning generated by language and texts and focus closely on the language of the texts they study and become aware of the role of each text’s wider context in shaping its meaning. Students develop skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can be seen as autonomous yet simultaneously related to culturally determined reading practices. Students will also develop powers of expression in oral and written communications, and a portion of their work will be externally assessed by international examiners.

Textbook(s): IB Recommended Novels and Texts

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International Baccalaureate Language and Literature 2

Course Code: 112213

Prerequisites: English 9 Honors and English 10 Honors

Credits: 1.0 English; Weighted

IB Language and Literature is a comprehensive and rigorous two-year curriculum for students enrolled in the IB Diploma Programme. The course is a study of both language and literature, and students question the meaning generated by language and texts and focus closely on the language of the texts they study and become aware of the role of each text’s wider context in shaping its meaning. Students develop skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can be seen as autonomous yet simultaneously related to culturally determined reading practices. Students will also develop powers of expression in oral and written communications, and a portion of their work will be externally assessed by international examiners.

Textbook(s): IB Recommended Novels and Texts

International Baccalaureate Latin 1

Course Code: 147303

Prerequisites: Latin 1, 2, and 3; 11 th

grade student

Credits: 1.0 World Language; Weighted

IB Latin 1 provides students with the opportunity to study a historically significant language that is embedded in many modern languages. Through the study of Roman language, literature and culture, students will explore language development and links between ancient and contemporary knowledge and culture.

Textbook(s): TBA

International Baccalaureate Latin 2

Course Code: 147403

Prerequisites: IB Latin 1; 12 th

grade student

Credits: 1.0 World Language; Weighted

Students will develop the ability to understand and translate texts in the original language; to understand texts within their historical, political and cultural contexts; to analyze the styles and techniques of original texts and to understand the implications within them.

Textbook(s): TBA

International Baccalaureate Math Studies 1 and 2

Course Code: 377103, 386003

Prerequisites: Grade 11 or 12 student; Algebra 1 and 2 and Geometry

Credits: 1.0 Mathematics; Weighted

The course concentrates on mathematics that can be applied to contexts related as far as possible to other subjects, to common real-world occurrences and to home, work, and leisure situations. The course includes project work, a feature unique within this group of courses. Students must produce a project, a piece of written work based on personal research, guided and supervised by a teacher. This process allows students to ask their own mathematics questions and to take responsibility for a part of their own course of studies in mathematics. Course topics include introduction to the graphic display calculator; number and algebra; sets, logic and probability; functions; geometry and trigonometry; statistics; introductory differential calculus; and financial mathematics.

Textbook: Mathematical Studies Standard Level, Mathematical Studies Standard Level Worked

Solutions; Mathematical Studies Standard Level Exam Prep and Practice Guide, IB Source

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International Baccalaureate Modern World History

Course Code: 266103

Prerequisites: Grade 11 student; Local, State, National Honors

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

This course studies 20 th

century events from a global perspective. Emphasis is on 20 th

century wars and the rise of single party states as well as the cold war. Course topics include World War I, the

Russian Revolution, Stalin’s Dictatorship, the Inter War years, Nazi Germany, World War II, and the

Cold War.

Textbook(s): Discovering the Twentieth Century World: A Look at the Evidence, IB Source; Modern

World History

International Baccalaureate Music

Course Code: 645203

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

Having followed the music course at SL or HL, students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge, understanding and perception of music in relation to time, place and cultures; appropriate musical terminology to describe and reflect their critical understanding of music; comparative analysis of music in relation to time, place and cultures (unlike at SL, HL students are also expected to demonstrate this in response to pieces not previously studied); creative skills through exploration, control and development of musical elements (SLC, HL); performance skills through solo music making (SLS,

HL) or group music making (SLG); and critical-thinking skills through reflective thought.

Textbook(s): TBA

International Baccalaureate Philosophy A Online

Course Code: 792203

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

IB Philosophy A is a subject that tackles questions important to humanity. For example, what is it to be a human being and how do I know what is the right thing to do? Students learn how to think systematically, analyze arguments, study philosophical themes and look at problems facing contemporary society, including those resulting from increased international interaction..

Textbook(s): None

International Baccalaureate Philosophy B Online

Course Code: 792213

Prerequisites: IB Philosophy A

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

IB Philosophy A is a subject that tackles questions important to humanity. For example, what is it to be a human being and how do I know what is the right thing to do? Students learn how to think systematically, analyze arguments, study philosophical themes and look at problems facing contemporary society, including those resulting from increased international interaction..

Textbook(s): None

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International Baccalaureate Psychology 1

Course Code: 266303

Prerequisites: Current Grade 11 or 12 student

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

Psychology is the systematic study of behavior and experience. IB Psychology 1 major areas of study include biological, cognitive, learning, humanistic, cultural psychological, social psychology, research methodology, and experimental study. Overall, higher level psychology includes four compulsory perspectives, two options, quantitative research methods, qualitative research methods and ethics, and one experimental study.

Textbook(s): TBA

International Baccalaureate Psychology 2

Course Code: 266603

Prerequisites: Current Grade 11 or 12 student

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

IB psychology examines the interaction of biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on human behaviour, thereby adopting an integrative approach. Understanding how psychological knowledge is generated, developed and applied enables students to achieve a greater understanding of themselves and appreciate the diversity of human behaviour. The ethical concerns raised by the methodology and application of psychological research are key considerations in IB psychology.

Textbook(s): TBA

Research Practicum

Course Code: 803000

Prerequisites: Diploma Program Candidate status

Credits: .50 Elective; Weighted

IB Research Practicum is intended to assist students prepare their Extended Essays, original research papers of no more than 4000 words. Students choose a topic in one of the subjects available in the IB

Diploma curriculum and become acquainted with the kind of independent research and writing skills expected at university level. A faculty supervisor provides general guidance on time management and on the overall structure and presentation of the paper.

Textbook(s): The Research Essay

International Baccalaureate Spanish 1

Course Code: 169003

Prerequisites: Grade 11; Spanish I, II, III

Credits: 1.0 World Language; Weighted

Students will demonstrate accuracy in their use of the spoken and written language; understand, respond, and enter into discussions to express their opinions; demonstrate an awareness and appreciation of the perspectives of people from other cultures; and understand how language embodies these differences. Course topics include women and their roles in society, homelessness in the world, roles of family members, the changes in technology over the years, and the environment.

Textbook(s): Panorama de la Prensa; Lecturas Periodisticas; Conversacion y Controversia

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International Baccalaureate Spanish 2

Course Code: 169103

Prerequisites: Grade 12 student; IB Spanish 1

Credits: 1.0 World Language; Weighted

Students will demonstrate accuracy in their use of the spoken and written language. They will also be able to understand, respond, and enter into discussions to express their opinions. The students will demonstrate an awareness and appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures and understand how language embodies these differences. Course topics include relationships, violence, the environment, medicine, and technology’s effect on society

Textbook(s): Panorama de la Prensa; Lecturas Periodisticas; Conversacion y Controversia

International Baccalaureate Theatre 1

Course Code: 645013

Prerequisites: Drama 1 or Drama 2

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

The IB Theatre course is designed to encourage students to examine theatre in its diversity of forms around the world. This may be achieved through a critical study of the theory, history and culture of theatre, and will find expression through workshopping, devised work or scripted performance.

Students will come to understand that the act of imagining, creating, presenting and critically reflecting on theatre in its past and present contexts embodies the individual and social need to investigate and find explanations for the world around us. The theatre course emphasizes the importance of working individually and as a member of an ensemble. Students are encouraged to develop the organizational and technical skills needed to express themselves creatively in theatre. At the core of the theatre course lies a concern with clarity of understanding, critical thinking, reflective analysis, effective involvement and imaginative synthesis—all of which should be achieved through practical engagement in theatre. The theatre course at SL consists of four interdependent components: theatre in the making (the acquisition and development of all skills required to create, present and observe theatre), theatre in Performance (the application of skills developed in theatre in the making. This involves students in various aspects of presenting theatre, where their practical skills can be applied in different roles (as performers and as part of the production team), theatre in the world (a practical and theoretical exploration of a range of theatre traditions and cultural practices around the world) and the independent project.

Textbook(s): TBA

International Baccalaureate Theatre 2

Course Code: 645023

Prerequisites: International Baccalaureate Theatre 1

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

This course carries out the foundation of the IB Theatre 1 course and helps prepare students for further theatrical practice and study. Students will continue to focus on the primary components of the IB course: theatre in the making, theatre in performance, and the independent project. Students will not only focus on completing the IB requirements for the course but also continuing to grow in their knowledge of theatre and their practice of it in a variety of roles. Particular attention is paid to the Theater Independent Project, an independent research project on an aspect of theatre that is of interest to the student. IB Theatre in its second year will still encourage students to examine theatre in various forms around the world, and ask them to use that knowledge in their IB culminating assessments. Students will continue to critically study the theory, history, and culture of theatre, and express themselves in workshops, scripted performances, and assignments designed to help them

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meet the challenges of the IB assessments they encounter this year.

Students will begin more independent projects and continue to work as an ensemble cast. Students will continue to work on productions in a variety of roles and study the impact theatre has on individuals, groups, and societies in both the past and present.

Textbook(s): TBA

International Baccalaureate World Literature I

Course Code: 112003

Prerequisites: English 9 Honors and English 10 Honors

Credits: 1.0 English; Weighted

IB World Literature is a comprehensive and rigorous two year curriculum which is required of students enrolled in the IB program. Students enrolled in this course will read selected literary works from a four part syllabus. They will also develop powers of expression in both oral and written communications.

In addition to other course work, they will also be expected to submit original projects which will be externally assessed by international examiners.

Textbook(s): TBA

International Baccalaureate World Literature II

Course Code: 112103

Prerequisites: International Baccalaureate World Literature I

Credits: 1.0 English; Weighted

IB World Literature is a comprehensive and rigorous two year curriculum which is required of students enrolled in the IB program. Students enrolled in this course will read selected literary works from a four part syllabus. They will also develop powers of expression in both oral and written communications.

In addition to other course work, they will also be expected to submit original projects which will be externally assessed by international examiners.

Textbook(s): TBA

International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge I

Course Code: 802000, 802003

Prerequisites: Current Grade 11 or 12 student

Credits: .50 - 1.0 Elective; Weighted

TOK1 is not a learning course; it is a thinking course. It challenges students to reflect critically on diverse ways of knowing and areas of knowledge, and to consider the role which knowledge plays in the global society. It encourages students to become aware of themselves as thinkers, to become aware of the complexity of knowledge, and to recognize the need to act responsibly in an increasingly interconnected world. Course topics include the nature of knowing; knowers and sources of knowledge; justification of knowledge claims; linking questions; perception; language; reason; and emotion.

Textbook(s): Theory of Knowledge for the IB Diploma, IB Source; Theory of Knowledge for the IB

Diploma Candidate, ISBN 9780199129737

International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge II

Course Code: 806000

Prerequisites: IB Theory of Knowledge I

Credits: .50 Elective; Weighted

TOK2 is not a learning course; it is a thinking course. It challenges students to reflect critically on

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diverse ways of knowing and areas of knowledge, and to consider the role which knowledge plays in the global society. It encourages students to become aware of themselves as thinkers, to become aware of the complexity of knowledge, and to recognize the need to act responsibly in an increasingly interconnected world. Course topics include the nature of knowing; knowers and sources of knowledge; justification of knowledge claims; linking questions; perception; language; reason; and emotion.

Textbook(s): Theory of Knowledge for the IB Diploma, IB Source; Theory of Knowledge for the IB

Diploma Candidate, ISBN 9780199129737

Maryland Virtual Learning Opportunities (MVLO)

High quality online courses approved by the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) for credit offer PGCPS high school students the opportunity to take courses that they might otherwise be unable to take. The Maryland Virtual Learning Opportunities Program—an educational service managed by

MSDE—offers challenging courses aligned to the Maryland Content Standards and other appropriate standards. Students participate using a computer at school during a regularly scheduled class period in a designated, supervised room. After-hours, students must have reliable access to a computer for homework assignments, either at home, at a relative’s home, or a public library.

With the approval of the relevant department chair, the student’s professional school counselor, and parent/guardian, a student may take a course online if the school does not offer the course or if a schedule conflict prevents taking the course when it is offered. Enrollment is based on course availability and approval by PGCPS.

Students considering taking an online course for the first time must complete an online survey to help them assess their likelihood of success in online learning.

Only courses approved by the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) may be taken for

PGCPS credit during the school day, summer school, evening school, and alternative programs (COMAR

13A.03.02.05). Due to changes in state law in 2006, PGPCS can not grant credit for any online course taken outside of the school day unless the course and its provider earned prior approval by MSDE.

Online teachers meet state requirements for highly qualified teachers in the content area of the course.

Physically separated from the student, they interact with students primarily through email, online discussions, and comments on their assignments. A trained mentor provides site-based support.

There is no course fee for students enrolled in school-hours courses; however, fees do apply for online courses taken during Evening High School or Summer School. Many of the online courses approved by

MSDE have online textbooks; PGCPS provides any additional required resources.

MVLO Art

Online Advanced Placement Art History

Course Code: 796110, 796120

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Fine Arts, Weighted

Art through the Ages is a 36-week course with 28 lessons, each of which takes approximately

1-1/2 weeks. Students will investigate the history of art and the intricacies of composition, color and presentation. Students begin by studying art of the ancient world and progress through the ancient Near East, Egypt, Aegean, Greek, Etruscan, Roman and Early Christian art to the art of the

Middle Ages. Students also study about art beyond Europe and investigate the native arts of Asia, the

Americas and of Oceania before returning to study the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Modern and

Post modern art. During the course they will visit as many online art displays as possible, participate

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in local field trips to museums and art galleries and demonstrate mastery of some of the techniques of color, composition and presentation by preparing art work of their own in different styles. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Textbook(s): Gardner’s Art Through the Ages, Volumes 1 and 2. ISBN 0155070851

MVLO Career and Computer Science

Online Accounting 1A and 1B

Course Code: 795010, 795020

Prerequisites: Algebra

Credits: . .50 Elective

Basic Accounting is a 36-week course with 15 lessons. Each lesson takes 6-7 hours to complete and includes an assessment. During the semester, students study the basic concepts of accounting by relating accounting to real-life situations. Students are introduced to a real-life business in every chapter where they learn about each company and the way that accounting applies to the business. Students also learn about different careers in accounting as they complete activities in each lesson. Lessons are fully integrated with technology and computer use and students utilize the Glencoe Companion

Website with software tutorial directions at the point of instruction for individual applications. Internet resources and activities are accessed through the Glencoe Accounting Website. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester, but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1. MS Excel Spreadsheet software is required. Students who entered high school before Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may take this course for Technology Education credit through school year 2012-2013. All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After

SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn Technology

Education credit.

Textbook(s): Real-World Applications & Connections, by Glencoe McGraw Hill Publishing Company.

ISBN# 0-02-815004-X

Required Software: MS Excel Spreadsheet software, part of MS Office Professional. Please note:

Students MUST have this software in order to complete the course.

Online Advanced Placement Computer Science A

Course Code: 793410, 793420

Prerequisite: Completed or Concurrent Algebra 2; computer access - Pentium II and 256 MB RAM minimum

Credits: .50 Math; Weighted

AP Computer Science A is an introductory computer course. A large part of the course involves developing the skills to write programs or parts of programs that correctly solve specific problems.

The course also emphasizes the design issues that make programs understandable, adaptable, and when appropriate, reusable. At the same time, the development of useful computer programs and classes is used as a context for introducing other important concepts in computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, and the study of standard algorithms and typical applications. In addition an understanding of the basic hardware and software components of computer systems and the responsible use of these systems are integral parts of the course.

The goals of the AP Computer Science course are comparable to those in the introductory sequence of courses for computer science majors offered in college and university computer science departments.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Students completing the AP Computer Science course will be able to design and implement computerbased solutions to problems in a variety of application areas; use and implement commonly-used algorithms and data structures; develop and select appropriate algorithms and data structures to solved problems; code fluently in an object-oriented paradigm using the programming language Java; and read and understand a large program consisting of several classes and interacting objects; identify the major hardware and software components of a computer system, their relationship to one another, and the roles of these components within the system; and recognize the ethical and social implications of computer use. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Textbook(s): Java Concepts 4th edition, Cay Horstmann, Hoboken, N.J. Wiley 2006; GridWorld, AP

Computer Science Case Study. (Available from College Board)

Required Software: Java, a free download for either a Macintosh or a Windows platform

Online Advanced Placement Computer Science AB

Course Code: 793430, 793440

Prerequisites: Algebra II or concurrent enrollment; AP Computer Science A; computer access - Pentium II and 256 MB RAM minimum

Credits: .50 Math; Weighted

Students will learn programming methodology to produce quality computer-based solutions to real problems. This is achieved by helping students learn to combine technological knowledge and programming skills with problem-solving skills. Students are challenged with hands-on lab exercises and worksheets to enable them to become experienced Java programmers. Computer Science AB includes all the topics of Computer Science A, as well as a more formal and a more in-depth study of algorithms, data structures, and data abstraction. For example, binary trees are studied in Computer

Science AB but not in Computer Science A. The use of recursive data structures and dynamically allocated structures is fundamental to Computer Science AB. After completing this course, students should be able to write code in the Java programming language and understand and use objectoriented programming with appropriate data structures to solve problems. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Resources: Institute of Computer Technology: ICT’s Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science

Java Curriculum v 2.0

Textbook(s): Java Concepts 4th edition, Cay, Horstmann, Hoboken, N.J. Wiley 2006; AND GridWorld,

AP Computer Science Case Study. (Available from College Board)

Required software: Java, which is a free download for either a Macintosh or a Windows platform.

MVLO English

Online Advanced Placement English Language and Composition

Course Code: 791130, 791140

Prerequisites: B or better in most recent English course

Credits: .50 English, Weighted

In AP English Language and Composition, students learn to understand and analyze complex styles of writing by reading works from a variety of authors. Not only do they explore the richness of language, including syntax, imitation, word choice, and tone in other writers, but they also learn to incorporate these skills into their own writing. Students learn the basics of research writing, including the use of documentation and citations. They write in a variety of different modes: expository, analytical, personal

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

narrative, research, synthesis, and so on. They also learn about their own composition style and process, starting with exploration, planning, and writing, and continuing through editing, peer review, rewriting, polishing, and applying what they learn to a breadth of academic, personal, and professional contexts. The equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, this course prepares students for the AP Exam and for further study in communications, creative writing, journalism, literature, and composition. The content aligns to the scope and sequence specified by the College Board and to widely used textbooks. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Textbook(s): online instructional material; The Norton Reader. 11 th

ed. Brereton, John C., Joan E.

Hartman, and Linda H. Peterson. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2004. ISBN: 0393978877.

(Alternate edition also acceptable: 10 th

ed., 1996, ISBN: 0393973832). AND: Writing, A College

Handbook. 5 th

ed. Heffernan, James, John E. Lincoln, and Janet Atwill. New York: W. W. Norton &

Company, 2000. ISBN: 039397426X

Online Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition

Course Code: 791150, 791160

Prerequisites: B or better in most recent English course

Credits: .50 English, Weighted

AP English Literature and Composition immerses students in novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various periods. Students read and write daily, using a variety of multimedia and interactive activities, interpretive writing assignments, and class discussions to assess and improve their skills and knowledge. The course places special emphasis on reading comprehension, structural and critical analysis of written works, literary vocabulary, and recognizing and understanding literary devices. The key foci of this course are comprehension, interpretation, and analysis. More specifically, the course focuses on close and thematic reading skills. The writing students undertake is overwhelmingly of an analytical nature; students analyze meaning and how meaning is created. The equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, this course prepares students for the AP Exam and for further study in creative writing, communications, journalism, literature, and composition. The content aligns to the scope and sequence specified by the College Board and to widely used textbooks. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Textbook(s): The Norton Anthology of Poetry, 5 th

ed. Margaret Ferguson, Mary Jo Salter, and Jon

Stallworthy, eds. W.W. Norton & Company, 2005. ISBN 0393968200 (also acceptable: 4 th

edition,

1996); AND The Story and Its Writer: An Introduction of Short Fiction. Compact 7 th ed. Bedford Books/St.Martins, 2007. (Also acceptable: compact 6 th

1999)

ed. Ann Charters,

ed., 2003, or compact 5 th

ed.,

Online English 9

Course Code: 791010, 791020

Prerequisites: None

Credits: . .50 English

This is an introductory English course. It covers six types of literature: short stories, nonfiction, poetry, drama, novels, and epics. Students will study literature and develop their skills as a writer and thinker. They will also learn new vocabulary and reading and writing concepts. Students will also write and submit journal activities including prewriting and literary analysis. After completing the course, students will be able to understand writing techniques authors use to influence readers and accomplish their purpose, such as cause and effect, figures of speech, sounds, point of view, and irony; analyze the use of complex elements of plot, such as conflict, resolution, and cause and effect relationships; understand influences on one’s response to a text, such as personal experiences,

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values, and perspectives shaped by age, gender, or class; make connections between their own lives and the characters, events, motives, and causes of conflict in texts; understand and apply the steps to clear, logical writing including prewriting, drafting, and revising; use language and perspectives of literary criticism to evaluate literary works; identify the basic rules of grammar; and recognize more vocabulary words and know how to find the meaning of new words. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Textbook(s): Elements of Literature Third Course/Grade 9, Holt, 2005.

Online English 10

Course Code: 791030, 791040

Prerequisites: English 9

Credits: .50 English

This course was developed by the Maryland State Department of Education to meet the Core Learning

Goals and High School Assessment requirements. In this course students will develop the ability to respond to a text by employing personal experiences and critical analysis. Students will use effective strategies before, during, and after reading, viewing, and listening to self-selected and assigned materials; compose in a variety of modes by developing content, employing specific forms, and selecting language appropriate for a particular audience and purpose; control language by applying the conventions of Standard English in writing and speaking; and evaluate the content, organization, and language use of texts.

Textbook(s): TBA

Online English 11

Course Code: 791050, 791060

Prerequisites: Two years of high school English

Credits: .50 English

Students explore the themes of technology and nature, language, illusion, ethnicity, gender, culture, family, and identity by reading culturally diverse selections within a variety of genres.

Students will investigate and respond to some of the major themes in American literature and see how they encompass and are influenced by diverse historical, cultural, geographic, gendered, and class perspectives; explore, interpret, analyze, and respond to diverse genres (short story, novel, poetry, drama, nonfiction, testimony, and autobiography), and verse perspectives (history, culture, geography, age, gender, sexual orientation, and class); experience writing as a form of thinking, selfexpression, and communication through reading other writers’ works and through their own writing; learn grammatical and compositional information in the context of reading and writing; gain further understanding of themselves and others, and critically examine their own beliefs and attitudes through reading and discussion; and develop multicultural awareness through reading, reflection, application, and writing. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Textbook(s): The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald, First Scribner Paperback Fiction Edition preferred, Simon and Schuster; AND: The House on Mango Street, Cisneros, any edition, Random House; AND: For

Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow is Enuf, Shange.

Online English 12

Course Code: 791070, 791080

Prerequisites: Three years of high school English

Credits: .50 English

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

English 12 is a survey of British and world literature organized both chronologically and thematically.

Beginning with the Anglo-Saxons and continuing to modern authors, students read literature from many different genres including poetry, drama, essay, novel, and short story. The course focuses on utilizing reading strategies, improving writing skills, mastering new vocabulary and honing critical thinking skills. After completing the course, students will be able to name the characteristics of each period of British literature, how they differ, and how they drew on elements from the past; use the rules of good grammar and logical writing to produce written opinions about the literature they read; recognize more vocabulary words and know where to find the meaning of words that they don’t understand; recognize some basic elements of literary types; identify the basic rules of grammar; identify the steps in clear, logical writing; and read with more skill and more confidence. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester

2 without taking semester 1.

Textbook(s): Elements of Literature Sixth Course/Grade 12. Holt, 2007; Frankenstein; The Merchant

of Venice

Online SAT Preparation

Course Code: 790010

Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, and concurrent enrollment in Algebra II

Credits: .50 Elective

The SAT is a test of critical thinking and mathematics skills which provides a measure of those skills needed for academic success in college. The SAT Prep Course reviews a wide range of skills tested on the SAT. More important the SAT Prep course provides both strategy and practice shown to improve performance on the SAT. The goals for this course are to familiarize students with the SAT format; build test-taking confidence; develop strategies to attack each type of question; increase vocabulary; refine reading, math, and thinking skills associated with critical reading, writing and math problems; practice pacing in order to complete the test in the allotted time; and practice SAT questions under timed conditions. In order to succeed in improving SAT scores, students will need to apply the course content, study the course strategies, and practice, practice, practice.

Textbook(s): TBA

MVLO Health Education

Online General Health and Wellness

Course Code: 797010

Prerequisites: Parent Permission for Family life Unit

Credits: .50 Health

General Health and Wellness has six units: Mental Health; Tobacco, Alcohol, and Other Drugs; Nutrition and Fitness; Safety and Injury prevention; Family Life and Human Sexuality; and Disease Prevention and Control. Personal and Consumer Health is interwoven into other units. During the course, students study the basics of health and wellness, learning to make informed decisions concerning their physical, mental and social health. They learn skills to build self-esteem and manage stress, cope with loss and how to prevent violence and abuse. Students study physical fitness, weight and nutrition planning, and the ramifications of using alcohol, tobacco, and other illegal drugs. Students also study how to prevent infectious diseases and how to recognize and deal with other diseases and disabilities. They study the process of going from adolescence, to adulthood, marriage, and parenthood. They also study the reproductive system, pregnancy, and development of the fetus.

Textbook(s): Lifetime Health, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

MVLO HTML and Web Design

Online Introduction to HTML

Course Code: 795030, 795040

Prerequisites: Strong Computer Skills

Credits: .50 Elective

Students learn the basics of how to create a basic web page using both a word-processing program, a web-authoring tool (such as MS Publisher or Front Page) and with basic HTML coding. They also learn how to upload their web page to the web through FTP (file transfer protocol) and to add graphics, forms, tables, links, sound, and movement to their web pages. Students learn how to make their web pages look aesthetically pleasing and to include elements that make them handicapped accessible.

Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Textbook(s): The required text is available online. Introduction to HTML, Module 1 and Module 2 published by ElementK.

Online Web Design 1

Course Code: 795103

Prerequisites: One semester of Algebra I and strong computer skills

Credits: 1.0 Technology Education*

Students develop their own “style” as they learn web design via Netscape Composer. Students learn how to optimize their email and work in a telecommuting atmosphere. This course builds upon the basic competencies learned in Business Systems Technology and can be used for a Gold Seal credit. In addition to learning web design via Netscape Composer, this course also provides a basic overview of the Internet, Intranet, and WWW. The content includes operating systems, basic HTML commands, and navigation of the Internet, intranet, and web. *Students who entered high school before Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may take this course for

Technology Education credit through school year 2012-2013. All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After

SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn Technology

Education credit.

Required software: Netscape Communicator, a free download for either a Macintosh or a Windows platform; Paint Shop Pro

MVLO Mathematics

Online Advanced Placement Calculus AB

Course Code: 793150, 793160

Prerequisite: Algebra 2, Geometry, Trig and Pre-Calculus (or Math Analysis)

Credits: .50 Math, Weighted

In AP Calculus AB, students learn to understand change geometrically and visually (by studying graphs of curves), analytically (by studying and working with mathematical formulas), numerically

(by seeing patterns in sets of numbers), and verbally. Instead of simply getting the right answer, students learn to evaluate the soundness of proposed solutions and to apply mathematical reasoning to real-world models. Calculus helps scientists, engineers, and financial analysts understand the complex relationships behind real-world phenomena. The equivalent of an introductory college-level

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

calculus course, AP Calculus AB prepares students for the AP Exam and further studies in science, engineering, and mathematics. Upon completion of this course students will be able to work with functions represented in a variety of ways: graphical, numerical, analytical, or verbal; understand the connections among these representations; understand the meaning of the derivative in terms of a rate of change and local linear approximation and be able to use derivatives to solve a variety or problems; understand the meaning of the definite integral both as a limit of Riemann sums and as the net accumulation of change and should be able to use integrals to solve a variety of problems; and understand the relationship between the derivative and the definite integral as expressed in both parts of the fundamental theorem of calculus. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Required resources: TI-83 or TI-83 Plus calculator. Read “Getting Started” and Chapter 1 in the TI

Guidebook before your course starts.

Textbook(s): Students must use one of the following textbooks: Calculus, 5 th

ed.: James Stewart.

Brooks/Cole Publishing, 2004 ISBN: 053439339X; OR: Thomas’ Calculus, 10 th

ed: Finney, Weir,

Giordano. A/W Pearson. ISBN: 0201755270; OR: Calculus, Early Transcendental Functions, 3 rd

ed:

Larson, Hostetler, Edwards. Houghton Mifflin. ISBN: 061822307X; OR: Calculus, 6

Penney. Prentice Hall. ISBN: 0130920711 th

ed: Edwards,

Online Advanced Placement Calculus BC

Course Code: 793170, 793180

Prerequisite: Calculus or AP Calculus AB

Credits: . 50 Math, Weighted

This curriculum covers all of the material outlined by the College Board as necessary to prepare students to pass the AP Calculus BC exam. This course is designed to acquaint students with calculus principles such as derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, applications and modeling, and sequences and series. Students gain experience in the use of calculus methods and learn how calculus methods may be applied to practical applications. Upon completion of this course students will be able to work with functions represented in a variety of ways: graphical, numerical, analytical, or verbal; understand the connections among these representations; understand the meaning of the derivative in terms of a rate of change and local linear approximation and be able to use derivatives to solve a variety or problems; understand the meaning of the definite integral both as a limit of Riemann sums and as the net accumulation of change and should be able to use integrals to solve a variety of problems; and understand the relationship between the derivative and the definite integral as expressed in both parts of the fundamental theorem of calculus. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester

1.

Textbook(s): Students must use one of the following textbooks: Calculus, 5 th

ed.: James Stewart. Brooks/

Cole Publishing, 2004 ISBN: 053439339X; OR: Thomas’ Calculus, 10 th

ed: Finney, Weir, Giordano.

A/W Pearson. ISBN: 0201755270; OR: Calculus, Early Transcendental Functions, 3

Hostetler, Edwards. Houghton Mifflin. ISBN: 061822307X; OR: Calculus, 6 th rd

ed: Larson,

ed: Edwards, Penney.

Prentice Hall. ISBN: 0130920711; OR: Calculus, 2 nd

ed: Smith. McGraw. ISBN: 0072937300.

Online Advanced Placement Statistics, Part A, Part B

Course Code: 793210, 793220

Prerequisites: Algebra II or Math Analysis

Credits: .50 Math, Weighted

AP Statistics is a 36-week Advanced Placement course. Statistics gives students hands-on experience collecting, analyzing, graphing, and interpreting real-world data. Students learn to design and analyze research studies by reviewing and evaluating real research examples taken from daily life. The

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

equivalent of an introductory college-level course, AP Statistics prepares students for the AP Exam and for further study in science, sociology, medicine, engineering, political science, geography, and business. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Required resources: TI-83 or TI-83 Plus calculator. Read “Getting Started” and Chapter 1 in the TI

Guidebook before your course starts.

Recommended text: Barron’s How to Prepare for the AP Statistics: Advanced Placement Test in

Statistics. 2 nd

ed. Martin Sternstein

Textbook(s): (online text provided with course, print version also available): Introduction to Probability

and Statistics. 10 th

ed. William Mendenhall, Robert J. Beaver, and Barbara M. Beaver. Brooks/Cole

Thompson Learning Inc. 1999. ISBN 0534357784

Online Algebra/Data Analysis (HSA) (Algebra 1A)

Course Code: 793010

Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra

Credits: .50 Math

This course was developed by MSDE to help students meet the Core Learning Goals and High School

Assessment requirements. Students will model and interpret real-world situations using the language of mathematics and appropriate technology; demonstrate the ability to apply probability and statistical methods for representing and interpreting data and communicating results, using technology when needed; demonstrate the ability to investigate, interpret, and communicate solutions to mathematical and real-world problems using patterns, functions, and algebra; and apply the basic concepts of statistics and probability to predict possible outcomes of real-world situations. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Required Resources: TI-83, TI-83 Plus or TI-84 calculator

Online Algebra/Data Analysis (HSA) (Algebra 1B)

Course Code: 793020

Prerequisites: Algebra 1A

Credits: .50 Math

The Algebra 1B curriculum emphasizes a multi-representational approach to algebra, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, analytically, and verbally. It develops algebraic fluency by providing students with the skills needed to solve equations and perform important manipulations with numbers, variables, equations, and inequalities. In addition, the course develops proficiency with operations involving monomial and polynomial expressions. The main unifying themes of the course include understanding, writing, solving, and graphing linear equations, systems of linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, and rational equations. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Required Resources: TI-83, TI-83 Plus or TI-84 calculator

Textbook(s): Algebra Structure and Method, Book I, Brown/Dolciani/Sorganfrey/Coe, McDougal Littell,

ISBN: 0395977223

Online Algebra 2

Course Code: 793030, 793040

Prerequisites: Algebra 1

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Credits: .50 Math

Algebra 2 is a 36-week course broken into two semesters (A and B) with 18 lessons during each semester. Each lesson takes 5-6 hours to complete and includes textbook readings, interactive chat, threaded discussion, online activities, and a quiz or assessment. Students review Algebra 1 concepts and explore further the concepts of equations, algebraic functions, exponential and trigonometric functions, analytic geometry, discrete mathematics, statistics, and probability. Each lesson includes

Internet-based activities that complement the material taught in the lesson. Students use many online resources including LOGAL interactive activities, calculator activities, and research topics. There is a midterm, a review week, and final exam during each semester. Students are encouraged to participate in group research projects and activities throughout the course, so that they may collaborate with other students and instructors. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Required resources: Graphing computer software or a graphing calculator with a computer connection that allows uploading of graphics for inclusion in printed assignments.

Textbook(s): Algebra 2, Online 2004 edition, available from Holt, Rinehart, and Winston. This textbook is available entirely online in digital format. If students choose to use the digital format, they should purchase the one-year online subscription.

Online Geometry

Course Code: 793050, 793060

Prerequisites: Algebra 1

Credits: . .50 Math

Geometry is a 36-week course with 36 lessons broken into two semesters (A and B) with 18 lessons during ech semester. Each lesson takes 5-6 hours to complete and includes a quiz or assessment.

Geometry begins by reviewing common terms and basic building blocks of Geometry. Students study all the different components of geometry including segments, rays, angles, chords, and transformations. The course is skill oriented, interactive, informative, and enjoyable. Students use a wide variety of online resources. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Required resources: Graphing calculator; Geometer’s Sketchpad (Software Program), Key

Curriculum Press

Textbook(s): Geometry I-text, ISBN 0-13-037893-3, Prentice Hall

Online Honors Calculus

Course Code: 793130, 793140

Prerequisites: Algebra II or Math Analysis

Credits: .50 Math

Calculus is a 36-week course with 36 lessons, each of which takes 5-6 hours. The text emphasizes multiple representations of concepts and an abundance of worked examples. Calculus is explored through the interpretation of graphs and tables as well as through the application of analytical methods.

Online exercises include graphical and data based problems as well as real-life applications in biology, business, chemistry, economics, engineering, finance, physics, the social sciences and statistics.

Stepped Explorations throughout the text provide guided investigations of key concepts and assist students in building problem-solving skills. A graphing calculator is required and students utilize online graphing calculators at the Texas Instruments online website, as well as LOGAL computerized simulations for visualizing concepts. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Required resources: TI-83 or TI-83 Plus calculator. Read “Getting Started” and Chapter 1 in the TI

Guidebook before your course starts.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Textbook(s): Calculus, A Complete Course, Addison, Wesley, and Longman

Online Introductory Calculus I, Part A, Part B

Course Code: 793110, 793120

Prerequisites: Algebra II or Math Analysis

Credits: .50 Math

This course is divided into two semesters and is designed to acquaint students with calculus principles such as derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, and applications and modeling. During this course students will gain experience in the use of calculus methods and learn how calculus methods may be applied to practical applications. Upon completion of this course students will be able to work with functions represented in a variety of ways: graphical, numerical, analytical, or verbal; understand the connections among these representations; understand the meaning of the derivative in terms of a rate of change and local linear approximation and be able to use derivatives to solve a variety or problems; understand the meaning of the definite integral both as a limit of Riemann sums and as the net accumulation of change and should be able to use integrals to solve a variety of problems; understand the relationship between the derivative and the definite integral as expressed in both parts of the fundamental theorem of calculus. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Textbook(s): Students must use one of the following textbooks: Calculus, 5 th

ed: Stewart. Thomson/

Brooks/Cole, 2004. ISBN: 053439339X; OR: Thomas’ Calculus, 10 th

ed: Finney, Weir, Giordano.

A/W Pearson. ISBN: 0201755270; OR: Calculus, Early Transcendental Functions, 3 rd

Hostetler, Edwards. Houghton Mifflin. ISBN: 061822307X; OR: Calculus, 6 th

ed: Larson,

ed: Edwards, Penney.

Prentice Hall. ISBN: 0130920711; OR: Calculus, 2 nd

ed: Smith. McGraw. ISBN: 0072937300.

Online Linear Algebra, Part A, Part B

Course Code: 793250, 793260

Prerequisites: Multivariate Differential Calculus

Credits: .50 Math

This introductory course in linear algebra includes matrices, linear equations, vector spaces, bases and coordinates, linear transformations, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, and diagonalization. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Textbook(s): Linear Algebra: An Introduction. Bronson. ISBN: 0121352455

Online Multivariate Differential Calculus, Part A, Part B

Course Code: 793270, 793280

Prerequisites: AP Calculus BC

Credits: .50 Math, Weighted

Multivariate Differential Calculus is the study of differential calculus for functions of two or more variables. The course includes vectors and vector-valued functions in 2- and 3-space, tangent and normal vectors, curvature, functions of two or more variables, partial derivatives and differentiability, directional derivatives and gradients, maxima and minima, and optimization using Lagrange multipliers.

Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Textbook(s): Calculus: A New Horizon, 6 th edition and 8 th

edition)

Edition, Vol. 3. ISBN: 0471243493. (also acceptable: 7 th

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

MVLO Science

Online Advanced Placement Biology, Part A, Part B

Course Code: 794110, 794120

Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry

Credits: .50 Science, Weighted

In AP Biology, students build the conceptual framework necessary to understand science as a process.

The course is divided into three sections with correlating laboratory exercises: molecules and cells; heredity and evolution; and organisms and populations. Students will also explore evolution, energy transfer, continuity and change, the relationship of structure to function, regulation, interdependence in nature, and the balance of science, technology, and nature. AP Biology is equivalent to an introductory college-level biology course and prepares students for the AP Exam and for further study in health sciences. The content aligns to the scope and sequence specified by the College Board and widely used by textbooks. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Required resources: The majority of the required instructional material for this course is available to students online.

Textbook(s): The text is located within the study activities in each lesson. In addition, the following is required: AP Biology Lab Manual For Students. The College Board, 2002.

The following is an optional purchase for this course and may be used by students as an additional learning resource: Biology. 7 th

Edition Campbell NA, Reece JR. San Francisco: Benjamin/

Cummings, 2005. ISBN 080537146X. Also acceptable: 6 th

Edition, 2002. ISBN 0201751496

Online Advanced Placement Chemistry

Course Code: 794330, 794340

Prerequisites: Chemistry and Algebra II

Credits: .50 Science, Weighted

AP Chemistry builds students’ understanding of the nature and reactivity of matter. After studying the structure of atoms, molecules, and ions, students move on to solve quantitative chemical problems and explore how molecular structure relates to chemical and physical properties. Students will examine the molecular composition of common substances and learn to predictably transform them through chemical reactions. The equivalent of an introductory college-level chemistry course, AP Chemistry prepares students for the AP Exam and for further study in science, health sciences, or engineering.

The content aligns to the scope and sequence specified by the College Board and to widely used textbooks. Students may take the first semester of the course without taking the second semester but may not take semester 2 without taking semester 1.

Required resources: The majority of the required instructional material for this course is available to students online and is equivalent to a college-level textbook. Students will need a lab supervisor and materials specified in the course. Each laboratory activity is self-contained; no manual is needed. A collection of lab reports is comparable to a lab manual or notebook.

Textbook(s): Inquiries Into Chemistry, 3 rd

Grove, IL: Waveland Press, Inc., 2003.

Edition Michael R. Abraham and Michael J. Pavelich. Long

The text is located within the study activities in each lesson. In addition, the school must provide the following: The College Board. AP Biology Lab Manual For Students. 2002.

Optional resources for this course: Peterson’s AP Chemistry. Brett Barker. Lawrenceville, NJ:

Thomson/Peterson’s, 2005. Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity, 6 th

ed., John C. Kotz and Paul Treichel,

Jr. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole Thompson Learning, 2005. Chemistry, 7 th

Edition, Steven S. Zumdahl

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

and Susan A. Zumdahl. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2006 (Alternate editions also acceptable:

6 th

Edition, 2003, and 5 th

Edition, 2000)

Online Advanced Placement Environmental Science

Course Code: 794230, 794240

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Science, Weighted

This curriculum covers all of the material outlined by the College Board as necessary to prepare students to pass the AP Environmental Science exam. This course is designed to acquaint students with the physical, ecological, social, and political principles of environmental science. The scientific method is used to analyze and understand the inter-relationships between humans and the natural environment. The course shows how ecological realities and the material desires of humans often clash, leading to environmental degradation and pollution. The course covers the following topics:

Earth’s Systems, Human Population Dynamics, Natural Resources, Environmental Quality, Global

Changes, and Environment and Society. Upon completion of this course students will know and understand the levels of the ecological hierarchy, appreciate the integration of natural processes that govern the natural world, appreciate the importance of maintaining a sustaining biosphere for the continued presence of a human population on the earth, understand the pragmatic and realistic difficulties of integrating human societal needs without further compromising ecological processes, become familiar with the ecological background to global environmental problems, and realize the consequences of our individual and joint actions upon the biosphere. Students may take the first halfcredit of the course without taking the second half-credit but may not take the second half-credit of the course without taking the first half-credit.

Textbook(s): Students must use one of the following textbooks: Principles of Environmental

Science: Inquiry & Application, 3

rd

Edition Cunningham. McGraw-Hill, 2006. ISBN 0-07-282339-9.

OR: Environmental Science: A Study of Interrelationships, 10

Hill, 2006. ISBN: 0-07-25289-X. OR: Environment, 4 th th

Edition Enger and Smith. McGraw-

ed. Raven and Berg. Wiley, 2004. ISBN:

0-471-44452-9. OR: Environmental Science, 10

th

Edition Miller. Thompson, 2004. ISBN: 0-534-

42408-2

Online Advanced Placement Physics B

Course Code: 794450, 794460

Prerequisites: Algebra II, Math Analysis or Trigonometry

Credits: .50 Science, Weighted

AP Physics B is a non-calculus survey course covering five general areas: Newtonian mechanics, thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, and atomic and nuclear physics.

Students will gain an understanding of physics’ core principles and then apply them to problemsolving exercises. The equivalent of an introductory college level course, AP Physics B prepares students for the AP Physics B Exam and for further study in science and engineering. Students are required to participate in four regionally held hands-on labs each semester. The times and locations of these labs will be scheduled to best meet the needs of the students. Students may take the first half-credit of the course without taking the second half-credit but may not take the second half-credit of the course without taking the first half-credit.

Required resources: TI-83 or TI-83 Plus calculator. Read “Getting Started” and Chapter 1 in the TI

Guidebook before your course starts.

Textbook(s): Schaum’s Outline of College Physics. 9 th

Edition Frederick J. Bueche and Eugene Hecht.

McGraw-Hill, 1997. ISBN 0070089418

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Online Advanced Placement Physics C

Course Code: 794470, 794480

Prerequisites: Algebra II, Math Analysis or Trigonometry

Credits: .50 Science, Weighted

Advanced Placement (AP) Physics C course is designed to acquaint students with topics in mechanics and classical electricity and magnetism. The course covers two semesters. The first semester is devoted to Newtonian mechanics including: kinematics, laws of motion, work and energy, systems of particles, momentum, circular motion, oscillations, and gravitation. The second semester discusses the topics of electricity and magnetism. The course emphasizes problem solving including calculus, and there are numerous interactive examples throughout. Students will also gain laboratory experience through interactive lab simulations and wet labs. Upon completion of this course students will understand the basic principles pertaining to Newtonian mechanics, classical electricity, and magnetism, and apply these principles to solve practical problems in these areas of study. Students may take the first halfcredit of the course without taking the second half-credit but may not take the second half-credit of the course without taking the first half-credit.

Textbook(s): Students must use one of the following textbooks: Physics for Scientists and Engineers,

5 th

Edition. Tipler. WH Freeman. ISBN 0716743892. OR: Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 6

th

Edition. Serway. Thomson, Brooks/Cole. ISBN 0534408427. OR: Fundamentals of Physics, 7

th

Edition. Halliday. Wiley. ISBN 0471216437. OR: Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern

Physics, 3 rd

Edition. Giancoli. Prentice Hall. ISBN 0130215171

Online Biology (HSA)

Course Code: 794103

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course was developed by MSDE to meet the Core Learning Goals and High School Assessment requirements. The student will demonstrate the ability to use scientific skills, processes, and major biological concepts to explain the uniqueness and interdependence of living organisms, their interactions with the environment, and the continuation of life on earth. The student will be able to explain the correlation between the structure and function of biologically important molecules and their relationship to cell processes; demonstrate an understanding that all organisms are composed of cells which can function independently or as part of multicellular organisms; investigate the interdependence of diverse living organisms and their interactions with the components of the biosphere; analyze how traits are inherited and passed on from one generation to another; explain the mechanism of evolutionary change; and investigate a biological issue and develop an action plan.

Textbook(s): TBA

Online Environmental Science

Course Code: 794210, 794220

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Science

This course is designed to acquaint students with the physical, ecological, social, and political principles of environmental science. The scientific method is used to analyze and understand the inter-relationships between humans and the natural environment. The course shows how ecological realities and the material desires of humans often clash, leading to environmental degradation and pollution. The course covers the earth’s systems, human population dynamics, natural resources, environmental quality, global changes, and environment and society. Students may take the first halfcredit of the course without taking the second half-credit but may not take the second half-credit of

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the course without taking the first half-credit.

Textbook(s): Students must use one of the following textbooks: Principles of Environmental Science:

Inquiry & Application, 3 rd

Edition Cunningham. McGraw-Hill, 2006. ISBN 00728823399; OR:

Environmental Science: A Study of Interrelationships, 10 th

Edition Enger. McGraw-Hill, 2006.

Online Physics

Course Code: 794410, 794420

Prerequisites: Algebra I

Credits: .50 Science

The science of physics involves the discovery of patterns and relationships in natural phenomena.

Students learn to explain, according to the laws of physics, the events that occur in the world around them. Through text, graphics, and interactive simulations, they will investigate straight-line motion, motion in two dimensions, energy, relativity, properties of matter, change of state, heat, and temperature during the first semester. During the second semester, students will investigate wave motion, sound, light, reflection and refraction, color, magnetism, electricity, and nuclear physics.

Students successfully completing this course will be able to increase their knowledge of the physical world by concentrating on major concepts of physics instead of isolated facts and formulas; explore how physics applies to everyday life; and test new ideas by making observations, collecting evidence, searching for patterns, and proposing hypotheses to explain the observed relationships. Students may take the first half-credit of the course without taking the second half-credit but may not take the second half-credit of the course without taking the first half-credit.

Textbook(s): None

Online Honors Physics

Course Code: 794430, 794440

Prerequisites: Algebra I

Credits: .50 Science

This course acquaints students with topics in classical and modern physics. The first semester discusses topics in Newtonian mechanics, oscillatory motion, waves and static electricity. The second semester discusses the topics of current electricity, magnetism, electric circuits, sound, fluids and gases, heat, and modern physics. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding of basic physics principles, with some problem solving. There are interactive conceptual and basic problem-solving examples throughout the lessons, as well as interactive lab simulations and in-school labs. Students may take the first half-credit of the course without taking the second half-credit but may not take the second half-credit of the course without taking the first half-credit.

Textbook(s): Students must use one of the following textbooks: Conceptual Physics, 9

th

Edition: P.G.

Hewitt. Addison-Wesley. ISBN: 0321052021; OR: Physics, 6 th

Edition Cutnell and Johnson. John

Wiley & Sons. ISBN: 0471151831; OR: College Physics, 6

ISBN: 0534492584; OR: Physics: Prinicples and Applications, 6

ISBN: 0130606200.

th

Edition Serway. Thomson, Brooks/Cole.

th

Edition Giancoli. Prentice Hall.

MVLO Social Studies,

Political Science, and Economics

Online Advanced Placement American History

Course Code: 792150, 792160

Prerequisites: American History; Students in grade 11 or 12 only

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Credits: .50 Elective; Weighted

The AP United States History course is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States History.

Students will learn to analyze and interpret a variety of historical resources and develop the ability to use documentary materials, maps, pictorial, and graphic evidence of historical events. Students should be able to express themselves with clarity, maturity, and precision. Students may take the first half-credit of the course without taking the second half-credit but may not take the second half-credit of the course without taking the first half-credit. This course may be offered to students in grades 11 and 12 only.

Textbook(s): Students must use one of the following textbook(s): The American Pageant, 12 th

Edition, Thomas Andrew Bailey, David M. Kennedy and Lizabeth Cohen. Houghton Mifflin, 2002.

ISBN 061810349X. OR: America: Past and Present, 7 th

Edition, Divine. Longman, 2005. ISBN

0-321-18308-8, 0-321-18309-6. OR: The Unfinished Nation: A Concise History of the American

People, 4 th

Edition, Brinkley. McGraw-Hill, 2004. ISBN 0-07-256561-6. OR: Out of Many: A History

of the American People, 4 th

Edition, Faragher. Prentice Hall.

Online Advanced Placement Human Geography

Course Code: 792310

Prerequisites: Teacher approval; Grade 11 or 12

Credits: .50 Elective; Weighted

Human Geography includes textbook readings, interactive activities, peer-to-peer learning, threaded discussion, virtual class, and a quiz or an assessment. The course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of

Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to analyze human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. Course content is aligned to the recommendation of the

College Board AP Human Geography Course and either meets or exceeds those recommendations.

Students taking Human Geography should demonstrate an above average interest in geography and should be either a junior or a senior in high school.

Textbook(s): Human Geography, Regions and Places in a Global Context, 2004 Edition by Pearson

Education. ISBN 0-13-101518-4.

Online Advanced Placement Macroeconomics

Course Code: 792410

Prerequisites: Algebra II or Math Analysis; Students in grade 11 or 12 only

Credits: .50 Elective

Macroeconomics is an 18-week Advanced Placement course and is the equivalent of an introductory, one-semester, college-level Macroeconomics course. Students learn why and how the world economy can change from month to month, how to identify trends in our economy, and how to use those trends to develop performance measures and predictors of economic growth or decline. The equivalent of a 100-level college-level class, this course prepares students for the AP Exam and for further study in business, political science, and history. This course may be offered as an elective to students in grades 11 and 12 only.

Textbook(s): Optional: Macroeconomics for Today, 2 nd

Thompson Learning, 2000. ISBN 0324006225

edition, ed. Irvin B. Tucker. South-Western/

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Online Advanced Placement Microeconomics

Course Code: 792510

Prerequisites: Algebra I; Students in grade 11 or 12 only

Credits: .50 Elective

Microeconomics is an 18-week Advanced Placement course and is the equivalent of an introductory, one-semester, college-level Microeconomics course. Students investigate the behavior of individuals and businesses as they exchange goods and services in the marketplace. Students will learn why the same product costs different amounts at different stores, in different cities, and at different times.

They’ll also learn to spot patterns in economic behavior and how to use those patterns to explain buyer and seller behavior under different economic conditions. The equivalent of an introductory college level course, AP Microeconomics prepares students for the AP Exam and for further study in business, history, and political science. This course may be offered as an elective to students in grades 11 and 12 only.

Textbook(s): Optional: Microeconomics for Today, 2 nd

Thompson Learning, 2000.

ISBN 0324006233

Edition, Irvin B.Tucker. South-Western/

Online Advanced Placement U.S. Government and Politics

Course Code: 792250, 792260

Prerequisites: U.S. History

Credits: .50 Elective or 1.0 Local, State, National Government; Weighted

U.S. Government and Politics is the equivalent to an introductory college-level U.S. Government course. Students explore the structure and operations of the U.S. government and the behavior of the electorate and politicians. Students will gain the analytic perspective necessary to critically evaluate political data, hypotheses, concepts, opinions, and processes. They also learn to gather data about political behavior and develop their own theoretical analysis of American politics. The equivalent of an introductory college-level course, AP U.S. Government and Politics prepares students for the AP

Exam and for further study in political science, law, education, business, and history. This course may be offered to students in grade 10 as a full year course for 1.0 Local, State, National Government

(LSN) credit. In addition to taking the AP Government and Politics exam, such students MUST take the Government HSA exam. The course may also be offered for .50 credit as an elective to students in grades 11 and 12 who have passed the LSN course.

Textbook(s): Lanahan Readings in the American Polity. 2 nd

Edition Ann G. Serow and Everett C.

Ladd. Lanahan Publishing, 2000. ISBN 0965268772; AND: Online text American Government. 6

Edition Theodore J. Lowi and Benjamin Ginsberg. W.W. Norton & Co., 2000. ISBN 0393974715 th

Online American Government (HSA)

Course Code: 792210, 792220

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Local, State, National Government

Introduction to the American Government prepares students to identify, understand, and work to resolve problems that confront them, their communities, the nation, and the world. To accomplish these tasks and work effectively as citizens, students need to learn about the role that economics, geography, history and sociopolitical concepts have played in the development of their own society and societies around the world. As students progress through public schools in Maryland, they should develop the knowledge and skills to understand and cope with change, resolve conflict, analyze issues and appreciate diversity in a representative democracy. In this course, students study the purpose, forms, and types of political and economic structures, the three branches of government, the development and implementation of domestic and foreign policy, the role of economic and geography on national,

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

state and local government, and the responsibilities of being an effective citizen. Students engage in analysis and interpretation of documents, events, and issues that affect individuals and groups and the functioning of government. Imbedded activities and resources help low literacy learners. Students analyze primary source documents, policy evaluation, problem-solving decision making, and data use. Students may take the first half-credit of the course without taking the second half-credit but may not take the second half-credit of the course without taking the first half-credit.

Textbook(s): None

Online International Baccalaureate Psychology SL

Course Code: 792143

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Psychology is the systematic study of behavior and mental processes. Psychology has a variety of research designs and applications, and provides a unique approach to understanding modern society.

The core of Online IB Psychology SL is the study of the biological level of analysis, the cognitive level of analysis, and the sociocultural level of analysis. There is also an investigation of methodology.

Textbook(s): TBA

Online U.S. History I

Course Code: 792110, 792120

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 U.S. History

Upon completion of this course students will demonstrate comprehension of a broad body of historical knowledge; express ideas clearly in writing; work with classmates to research an historical issue; interpret and apply data from original documents; identify underrepresented historical viewpoints; write to persuade with evidence; compare and contrast alternate interpretations of an historical figure, event, or trend. They will also explain how an historical event connects to or causes a larger trend or theme; develop essay responses that include a clear, defensible thesis statement and supporting evidence; effectively argue a position on an historical issue; evaluate primary materials, such as historical documents, political cartoons, and first-person narratives; raise and explore questions about policies, institutions, beliefs, and actions in an historical context; critique and respond to arguments made by others; and evaluate secondary materials, such as scholarly works or statistical analyses.

Students may take the first half-credit of the course without taking the second half-credit but may not take the second half-credit of the course without taking the first half-credit.

Textbook(s): Students must use one of the following textbooks: The American Pageant, 12 th

Edition Bailey, Kennedy, Cohen. Houghton Mifflin, 2003. ISBN: 161810349X; OR: America:

Past and Present, 7 th

Edition Divine. Longman, 2005. ISBN: 1321183096; OR: The Unfinished

Nation: A Concise History of the American People, 4 th

Edition, Brinkley. McGraw-Hill, 2004. ISBN

0072565616; OR: Out of Many: A History of the American People, 4 th

Edition, Faragher. Prentice

Hall; OR: America: A Narrative History, 6 th

Edition Tindall. W.W. Norton & Company, 1999. ISBN:

0393973395.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

MVLO World Languages

Online Advanced Placement French Language and Culture

Course Code: 791393

Prerequisites: French 4

Credits: 1.0 Foreign Language

In this full-year course, students will master the concepts of the language needed to succeed on the

AP exam and be able to use the language to translate text, as well as use the language both verbally and in writing. Students will use the French language to present information and personal opinions and feelings; understand and interpret written and spoken language on diverse topics from diverse media; understand that different languages use different patterns to communicate and apply this knowledge to the use of the French language; demonstrate, in writing and in speaking, an abilityappropriate understanding of the structures and uses of French verb forms; demonstrate, in writing and in speaking, an ability-appropriate understanding of parts of speech and their use in the French sentence. The course includes AP exam practice items.

Textbook(s): TBA

Online Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Culture

Course Code: 791493

Prerequisites: Spanish 4

Credits: 1.0 Foreign Language

In this full-year course, students will master the concepts of the language needed to succeed on the

AP exam and be able to use the language to translate text, as well as use the language both verbally and in writing. Students will use the Spanish language to present information and personal opinions and feelings; understand and interpret written and spoken language on diverse topics from diverse media; understand that different languages use different patterns to communicate and apply this knowledge to the use of the Spanish language; demonstrate, in writing and in speaking, an abilityappropriate understanding of the structures and uses of Spanish verb forms; demonstrate, in writing and in speaking, an ability-appropriate understanding of parts of speech and their use in the Spanish sentence. The course includes AP exam practice items.

Textbook(s): TBA

Online Chinese, French, Latin, or Spanish 1

Course Code: 791210, 791220 Chinese 1

791310, 791320 French 1

791510, 791520 Latin 1

791410, 791420 Spanish 1

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Foreign Language

Students will master the beginning concepts of the language and be able to use the language to translate text, as well as use the language both verbally and in writing. This course will give students a solid grounding in the structure of the language. Students will engage in short conversations about personal interests, including what they do, are doing, and plan to do; understand spoken and written language on familiar topics that incorporates basic structures and strong visual support; make short presentations and write simple sentences on familiar topics regarding what they do, are doing, or plan to do; and identify and describe cultural practices in the target countries and discuss their importance.

They also will identify and describe the products within the target culture and discuss their importance; access and apply information and skills from other content areas to extend knowledge and skills in the

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

target language; demonstrate a greater understanding of various topics by examining them from the perspectives of other cultures where the language is spoken; gain insight into the nature of their own language by comparing how a different language system expresses meaning and reflects culture; compare the perspectives, practices, and products of people in different cultures; and use and extend their language proficiency and cultural knowledge through face-to-face encounters and/or the use of technology both within and beyond the school setting. Students may take the first half-credit of the course without taking the second half-credit but may not take the second half-credit of the course without taking the first half-credit.

Textbook(s): TBA

Online French, Latin, and Spanish 2

Course Code: 791330, 791340 French 2

791530, 791540 Latin 2

791430, 791440 Spanish 2

Prerequisites: Same Language Level 1

Credits: .50 Foreign Language

Students will master the emerging (intermediate) concepts of the language and be able to use the language to translate text, as well as use the language both verbally and in writing. This course will give students a solid grounding in the structure of the language. Students will engage in short conversations about personal interests, including what they do, are doing, and plan to do; understand spoken and written language on familiar topics that incorporates basic structures and strong visual support; make short presentations and write simple sentences on familiar topics regarding what they do, are doing, or plan to do; demonstrate knowledge and understanding of another people’s way of life, and the relationship between their patterns of behavior, and the underlying beliefs and values that guide and shape their lives; identify and describe the products within the target culture and discuss their importance; access and apply information and skills from other content areas to extend knowledge and skills in the target language; demonstrate a greater understanding of various topics by examining them from the perspectives of other cultures where the language is spoken; compare the perspectives, practices, and products of people in different cultures; use and extend their language proficiency and cultural knowledge through face-to-face encounters and/or the use of technology both within and beyond the school setting; and explore opportunities both at home and abroad and have access to a wider variety of resources where they can pursue topics of personal interest. Students may take the first half-credit of the course without taking the second half-credit but may not take the second half-credit of the course without taking the first half-credit.

Textbook(s): TBA

Online French, Latin, and Spanish 3

Course Code: 791350, 791360 French 3

791550, 791560 Latin 3

791450, 791460 Spanish 3

Prerequisites: Same Language Level 2

Credits: .50 Foreign Language

Students will master the concepts of the language at the developing level and be able to use the language to translate text, as well as use the language both verbally and in writing. Students will engage in short conversations about personal interests, including what they do, are doing, and plan to do; understand spoken and written language on familiar topics that incorporates basic structures and strong visual support; make short presentations and write simple sentences on familiar topics regarding what they do, are doing, or plan to do; demonstrate knowledge and understanding of another people’s way of life, and the relationship between their patterns of behavior, and the underlying beliefs

158

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

and values that guide and shape their lives; identify and describe the products within the target culture and discuss their importance; access and apply information and skills from other content areas to extend knowledge and skills in the target language; demonstrate a greater understanding of various topics by examining them from the perspectives of other cultures where the language is spoken; gain insight into the nature of their own language by comparing how a different language system expresses meaning and reflects culture; compare the perspectives, practices, and products of people in different cultures; use and extend their language proficiency and cultural knowledge through face-to-face encounters and/or the use of technology both within and beyond the school setting; and explore opportunities both at home and abroad and have access to a wider variety of resources where they can pursue topics of personal interest. Students may take the first half-credit of the course without taking the second half-credit but may not take the second half-credit of the course without taking the first half-credit.

Textbook(s): TBA

Mathematics

Academic Validation Algebra

Course Code: 015300

Prerequisites: High School Assessment eligibility

Credits: 0.00 Elective

This course provides students with the opportunity to complete Academic Validation Projects while preparing for the High School Assessment in Algebra for graduation.

Textbook(s): TBA

Advanced Algebra 1 Common Core

Course Code: 331203

Prerequisites: Acceptance in the Science and Technology Program.

Credits: 1.00 Math

Advanced Algebra I formalizes and extends the mathematics students learned in the middle grades.

Five critical areas comprise Algebra I: Relationships Between Quantities and Reasoning with

Equations, Linear and Exponential Relationships, Descriptive Statistics, Expressions and Equations and Quadratic Functions and Modeling. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. This course is designed for students in the Science and Technology program, therefore technology and projects are an integral part of the curriculum.

Textbook(s): Algebra 1, Glencoe ISBN 9780078951138

Advanced Placement Calculus (AB)

Course Code: 380003

Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus; Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 Math, Weighted

This is a college-level course in differential and integral calculus, equivalent to one semester of calculus at most universities. Topics include a review of functions, an introduction to limits and

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

continuity, derivatives and their applications, integrals and their applications, anti-derivatives and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and an introduction to differential equations using slope fields. There is an emphasis on conceptual understanding and working with functions represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The TI-83 graphing calculator is used extensively.

The Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam is expected of all students in this course.

Textbook(s): Calculus: Graphing, Numerical, Algebraic, ISBN 9780132074083

Advanced Placement Calculus (BC)

Course Code: 380103

Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus; Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 Math, Weighted

Students who study AP Calculus (BC) will learn all of the topics covered in AP Calculus (AB) as well as the analysis of planar curves given in parametric form, polar form, and vector form; geometric interpretation of differential equations via slope fields; advanced techniques for antidifferentiation; working with polynomial approximations and series including harmonic.

Textbook(s): Calculus: Graphing, Numerical, Algebraic, ISBN 9780132074083

Advanced Placement Computer Science

Course Code: 345003

Prerequisites: Introduction to Computer Science; Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 Math, Weighted

This full year course provides programming experiences, which include features of programming languages, data types and structures, algorithms, applications of computing, games, and computer systems. The programming language taught in this course is JAVA. This course prepares a student to take the AP Computer Science Exam.

Textbook(s): Fundamentals of JAVA, ISBN 9780619243784

Advanced Placement Statistics

Course Code: 398003

Prerequisites: Algebra 2/Trig or Trig/Analysis; Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 Math, Weighted

The AP Statistics course is an excellent option for any student who has successfully completed

Algebra II/Trig or Trig/Analysis. This course is designed to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Students are expected to take the AP Exam at the end of the course.

Textbook(s): The Practice of Statistics, ISBN 9781429262583

Algebra 1 Common Core

Course Code: 311403, 311413, 311423, 311433, 311443, 311453, 311463, 311493, 311703,

311603, 311643, 311653

Prerequisites: Math 8 Common Core or Algebra Data Analysis

Credits: 1.0 Math (satisfies the graduation requirement for Algebra 1)

Algebra I formalizes and extends the mathematics students learned in the middle grades. Five critical areas comprise Algebra I: Relationships Between Quantities and Reasoning with Equations, Linear and Exponential Relationships, Descriptive Statistics, Expressions and Equations and Quadratic

Functions and Modeling. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions.

The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

Textbook(s): Algebra 1, ISBN 9780078951138

Algebra 1 Common Core Co-Teach

Course Code: 311473, 311673

Prerequisites: Math 8 Common Core or Algebra Data Analysis

Credits: 1.0 Math (satisfies the graduation requirement for Algebra 1)

Algebra I formalizes and extends the mathematics students learned in the middle grades. Five critical areas comprise Algebra I: Relationships Between Quantities and Reasoning with Equations,

Linear and Exponential Relationships, Descriptive Statistics, Expressions and Equations and

Quadratic Functions and Modeling. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. This course is designed to facilitate learning outcomes to meet the needs of diverse learners through curriculum modifications and accommodations as appropriate.

Textbook(s): Algebra 1, ISBN 9780078951138

Algebra 1 Common Core Honors

Course Code: 311493,

Prerequisites: Math 8 Common Core or Algebra Data Analysis

Credits: 1.0 Math (satisfies the graduation requirement for Algebra 1)

Algebra I formalizes and extends the mathematics students learned in the middle grades. Five critical areas comprise Algebra I: Relationships Between Quantities and Reasoning with Equations, Linear and Exponential Relationships, Descriptive Statistics, Expressions and Equations and Quadratic

Functions and Modeling. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions.

The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Honors course includes extended projects and additional topics.

Textbook(s): Algebra 1, ISBN 9780078951138

Algebra 1 Common Core Intensive

Course Code: 311483, 311683

Prerequisites: IEP; Math 8 Common Core or Algebra Data Analysis

Credits: 1.0 Math (satisfies the graduation requirement for Algebra 1)

Algebra I formalizes and extends the mathematics students learned in the middle grades. Five critical areas comprise Algebra I: Relationships Between Quantities and Reasoning with Equations, Linear and Exponential Relationships, Descriptive Statistics, Expressions and Equations and Quadratic

Functions and Modeling. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. This course is designed to facilitate learning outcomes appropriate to the instructional needs of the student, as identified on the

Individualized Education Plan (IEP).

Textbook(s): Algebra 1, ISBN 9780078951138

Algebra 2 Common Core

Course Code: 361113, 361123, 361133, 361143, 361153, 361163, 361173, 361183, 361193

Prerequisites: Geometry or Geometry Common Core

Credits: 1.0 Math

Algebra 2 continues to work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions. Students extend their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, radical, and trigonometric functions. In this course rational functions are limited to those whose numerators are of degree at most one and denominators of degree at most 2; radical functions are limited to square roots or cube roots of at most quadratic polynomials. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions, and continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations..

Textbook(s): Algebra 2, ISBN 9780076641017

Applications in Algebra

Course Code: 301003

Prerequisites: Year 1 ESOL students

Credits: 1.0 Math

In this course, students take a broader look at computational and problem-solving skills while learning the language and concepts of algebra. The focal points in this course include translating word phrases and sentences into mathematical expressions, determining whether a relation is a function and how to describe its domain and range, and developing algebraic fluency by learning the skills needed to solve equations and perform manipulations with numbers and variables. Additionally, students will learn to read and understand word problems, communicate about mathematics, build disciplinary and academic vocabulary, and develop practices in mathematics by engaging in “Language of Math”.

This course addresses all of the essential knowledge and skills for mathematics and is designed to prepare students for Common Core Algebra 1.

Textbook(s): Algebra 1, ISBN 9780078951138

Calculus 2/Differential Equations

Course Code: 395100, 396000

Prerequisites: AP Calculus (AB) or (BC)

Credits: .50 Math, Weighted

This full year course provides students with hands-on experiences with the applications of concepts related to limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, problem solving applications, advanced integration techniques, sequences and series and multi variable calculus.

Textbook(s): Calculus: Graphing, Numerical, Algebraic, Scott Foresman Addison Wesley

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Finite Mathematics

Course Code: TBA

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits:

TBA

This course is a one year program in advanced mathematics. It is comparable to the Finite Mathematics courses taught at the college level. The course is designed for students as a senior level mathematics course. It is recommended for students who plan to pursue a college major that does not require calculus and the higher levels of mathematics. Topics include Linear Algebra, Matrices, Linear

Programming, Finance, Counting Techniques, Probability and Statistics. The course is designed for students as a senior level mathematics course.

Textbook(s): TBA

Geometry Common Core

Course Code: 311503, 311513, 311523, 311543, 311553, 311563, 353103, 343123

Prerequisites: Algebra 1 or Algebra 1 Common Core

Credits: 1.0 Math (satisfies the graduation requirement for Geometry)

Geometry formalizes and extends students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Six critical areas comprise the Geometry course:

Congruence, Proof and Constructions, Similarity, Proof and Trigonometry, Extending to Three

Dimensions, Circles With and Without Coordinates, and Applications of Probability. The Mathematical

Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

Textbook(s): Geometry, ISBN 9780547647098

Geometry Common Core Co-Teach

Course Code: 311573

Prerequisites: Algebra 1 or Algebra 1 Common Core

Credits: 1.0 Math (satisfies the graduation requirement for Geometry)

Geometry formalizes and extends students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Six critical areas comprise the Geometry course:

Congruence, Proof and Constructions, Similarity, Proof and Trigonometry, Extending to Three

Dimensions, Circles With and Without Coordinates, and Applications of Probability. The Mathematical

Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. This course is designed to facilitate learning outcomes to meet the needs of diverse learners through curriculum modifications and accommodations as appropriate.

Textbook(s): Geometry, ISBN 9780547647098

Geometry Common Core Honors

Course Code: 311593

Prerequisites: Algebra 1 or Algebra 1 Common Core

Credits: 1.0 Math (satisfies the graduation requirement for Geometry)

Geometry formalizes and extends students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students

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explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Six critical areas comprise the Geometry course:

Congruence, Proof and Constructions, Similarity, Proof and Trigonometry, Extending to Three

Dimensions, Circles With and Without Coordinates, and Applications of Probability. The Mathematical

Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Honors course includes extended projects and additional topics.

Textbook(s): Geometry, ISBN 9780547647098

Geometry Common Core Intensive

Course Code: 311583

Prerequisites: IEP; Algebra 1 or Algebra 1 Common Core

Credits: 1.0 Math (satisfies the graduation requirement for Geometry)

Geometry formalizes and extends students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Six critical areas comprise the Geometry course:

Congruence, Proof and Constructions, Similarity, Proof and Trigonometry, Extending to Three

Dimensions, Circles With and Without Coordinates, and Applications of Probability. The Mathematical

Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. This course is designed to facilitate learning outcomes appropriate to the instructional needs of the student, as identified on the Individualized

Education Plan (IEP).

Textbook(s): Geometry, ISBN 9780547647098

Integrated Mathematics

Course Code: 335003, 335053, 335073, 335083

Prerequisites: Algebra 1 and Geometry

Credits: 1.0 Math

Integrated Math I topics include recognizing and developing patterns using tables, graphs and equations. Mathematical modeling is stressed as a methodology for approaching the solution to problems. Students will explore operations on algebraic expressions, and apply mathematical properties to algebraic equations. Students will problem solve using equations, graphs and tables and investigate linear relationships, including comparing and contrasting options and decision-making using algebraic models. Reinforcement of topics from two-dimensional Geometry is integrated into this curriculum. This includes applications from the areas of area and perimeter, the Pythagorean theorem and its applications, as well as geometric proportion. Finally, introductory instruction in the area of mathematical probability is provided to reinforce use of fractions and numerical modeling.

Technology will be used to introduce and expand upon the areas of study listed above.

Textbook(s): Math Matters: An Integrated Program, ISBN 9780078681769

Introduction to Computer Science

Course Code: 390003

Prerequisites: Algebra 2

Credits: 1.0 Math

This course is designed to be an introductory course to the field of computer science. It emphasizes programming methodology and procedural abstractions. It also includes the study of algorithms, data

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structures, and data abstractions in the C ++ programming language. It is a prerequisite course for

AP Computer Science. Students taking this course should have completed Algebra 2 or completed a programming course.

Textbook(s): Fundamentals of C++ 2

nd

edition, ISBN 9780538695589

Introduction to Statistics

Course Code: TBA

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits:

TBA

This course emphasizes concepts rather than in-depth coverage of traditional statistical methods.

Topics include sampling and experimentation, descriptive statistics, probability, binomial and normal distributions, estimation, single sample and two sample hypothesis tests for means and proportions.

Additional topics will be selected from descriptive methods in regression and correlation, or contingency table analysis.

Textbook(s): TBA

Linear Algebra

Course Code: 372000

Prerequisites: Algebra 2 or Algebra 2/Trig

Credits: .50 Math

This semester course includes topics related to the real number system, matrices and determinants, and vector spaces. This course may be paired with Probability/Statistics, Discrete Math, Trigonometry, or SAT Prep Math.

Textbook(s): TBA

Math 1 ISCO Semester

Course Code: 320400

Prerequisites: International Student

Credits: .50 Math

A half credit of Mathematics instruction received in a school outside the United States. Credit may only be granted by the International Student Counseling Office upon evaluation of a foreign transcript.

Textbook(s): Not applicable

Math 1 ISCO

Course Code: 320103

Prerequisites: International student

Credits: 1.0 Math - see testing requirement below

International students entering Prince George’s County Public Schools with a course title of

Mathematics on their school records will be assigned this transfer credit for the first mathematics course completed and passed in their home country in the equivalent of grade 9 and above. This course code may be changed as a result of the administration of the Mathematics Placement Test for ESOL and International Students (see Bulletin PS -05-97, Mathematics Credits for International

Students). If a student passes the locally administered test for Algebra 1 or above, the credits will be changed to reflect a passing score for the course at which the student was tested and successfully passed. *ISCO - International School Counseling Office

Textbook(s): Not applicable

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Math 2 ISCO

Course Code: 320203

Prerequisites: International Student

Credits: 1.0 Math - see testing requirement below

International students entering Prince George’s County Public Schools with a course title of

Mathematics on their school records will be assigned this transfer credit for the second mathematics course completed and passed in their home country in the equivalent of grade 10 and above. This course code may be changed as a result of the administration of the Mathematics Placement Test for ESOL and International Students (see Bulletin PS -05-97, Mathematics Credits for International

Students). If a student passes the locally administered test for Algebra 1 or above, the credits will be changed to reflect a passing score for the course at which the student was tested and successfully passed. *ISCO - International School Counseling Office

Textbook(s): Not applicable

Math 3 ISCO

Course Code: 320303

Prerequisites: International Student

Credits: 1.0 Math - see testing requirement below

International students entering Prince George’s County Public Schools with a course title of

Mathematics on their school records will be assigned this transfer credit for the third mathematics course completed and passed in their home country in the equivalent of grade 10 and above. This course code may be changed as a result of the administration of the Mathematics Placement Test for ESOL and International Students (see Bulletin PS -05-97, Mathematics Credits for International

Students). If a student passes the locally administered test for Algebra 1 or above, the credits will be changed to reflect a passing score for the course at which the student was tested and successfully passed. *ISCO - International School Counseling Office

Textbook(s): Not applicable

Pre-Calculus

Course Code: 375203

Prerequisites: Algebra 2 Common Core, Trigonometry or Trig/Analysis

Credits: 1.0 Math

Pre-Calculus focuses on standards to prepare students for a more intense study of mathematics.

The critical areas, organized in five units, delve deeper into content from previous courses. The study of circles and parabolas is extended to include other conics such as ellipses and hyperbolas.

Trigonometric functions are further developed to include inverses, general triangles and identities.

Matrices provide an organizational structure in which to represent and solve complex problems.

Students expand the concepts of complex numbers and the coordinate plane to represent and operate upon vectors. Probability rounds out the course using counting methods, including their use in making and evaluating decisions. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

Textbook(s): Advanced Mathematics Concepts, Glencoe McGraw-Hill; or Pre-calculus With Limits,

McDougall-Littell; or Pre-calculus: Graphing and Data Analysis, Prentice Hall

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Probability/Statistics

Course Code: 373000

Prerequisites: Algebra 2 or Algebra 2/Trigonometry

Credits: .50 Math

This is a semester course that includes combinations and permutations, and descriptive and inferential statistics. This course may be paired with Linear Algebra, Discrete Math, Trigonometry, or SAT Prep

Math.

Textbook(s): Practice of Statistics 3rd Edition, ISBN 9780716773092

Probability/Statistics

Course Code: 373103

Prerequisites: Algebra 2 or Algebra 2/Trigonometry

Credits: 1.0 Math

This course provides an elementary introduction to probability and statistics with applications.

Topics include: basic probability models; combinatorics; random variables; discrete and continuous probability distributions; statistical estimation and testing; confidence intervals; and an introduction to linear regression.

Textbook(s): Practice of Statistics 3rd Edition, ISBN 9780716773092

Seminar for Advanced Placement (Calculus, Statistics or Computer Science)

Course Code: 380013 Calculus; 398013 Statistics

Prerequisites: Concurrently enrolled in an AP course

Credits: .50 Elective

This seminar course will cover topics of current interest and provide in-depth coverage of selected topics from the concurrent AP course. Students will receive intensive assistance in the concepts and skills tested by the AP exams. This course prepares students who require additional practice, guidance, and experiences beyond those available in their standard AP courses preparing them for success on the AP exams, possible exemption from freshman mathematics, and/or undergraduate elective credit.

Textbook(s): TBA

Trigonometry/Analysis

Course Code: 370003

Prerequisites: Algebra 2 Common Core

Credits: 1.0 Math

Trig/Analysis will expand students’ knowledge of critical areas, in trigonometry, explored in Geometry and Algebra 2 Common Core. This course provides a thorough treatment of trigonometry through the study of trigonometric definitions, applications, evaluating, graphing, and solving trigonometric equations and identities. Emphasis is placed on using connection between right triangle ratios, trigonometric functions and circular functions. Numerical, graphical and algebraic solutions are considered for all problems as applicable. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

Textbook(s): Trigonometry, Scott Foresman Addison Wesley

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Trigonometry

Course Code: 371000

Prerequisites: Geometry and Algebra 2

Credits: .50 Math

Trigonometry is a half year one half credit course. A scientific or graphing calculator is required for this course. In some cases students who have completed Algebra 2/Trigonometry may elect, upon consultation with their Algebra 2/Trigonometry teacher to enroll in Trigonometry. Students who complete the course Trigonometry may not earn another credit for Trig/Analysis. The course(s) following (or “linked to”) Trigonometry are SAT Math Preparation, Discrete Math, Linear Algebra,

Probability Statistics, or in some cases Pre-Calculus.

Textbook(s): TBA

Visual BASIC

Course Code: 534103

Prerequisites: Algebra 1

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course, using the programming language BASIC, is for the student who has an interest in the computer-programming field. It provides the student with an understanding of the data processing cycle, computer hardware and software, and career opportunities in data processing. The student will write and execute programs in the Visual BASIC language. Students who entered high school before Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may take this course for

Technology Education credit through school year 2012-2013. All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After

SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn Technology

Education credit.

Textbook(s): Programming BASICS Using Microsoft Visual Basic, C++, HTML, and JAVA

Military Science:

Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC)

The goal of the Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) is to provide secondary school students the opportunity to become informed, responsible citizens prepared for high school graduation. The curriculums focus on academics including United States military history; exploration of national security issues; the study of meteorology and astronomy; communications and advanced technologies employed by the

Armed Services; navigation and survival skills; healthy lifestyles and physical fitness; organizational skills and financial management; career exploration in a wide variety of fields (both military and nonmilitary); and the foundations of responsible leadership. Cadets learn and continue to develop leadership skills and application of military courtesies and customs as they complete each year of their JROTC programs.

Each of the four branches structures its curriculum for success in high school and beyond. Through the demonstration of discipline, honor, self-respect, and commitment cadets gain increasing responsibilities within their programs. JROTC cadets and units must complete civic action projects and community service. The program also provides field trips to historical military sites and institutions; visits to colleges/ universities and military academies to increase awareness and opportunities; and participation on one of the various Drill Teams could include travels to neighboring counties, states, and possibly to competitions held nationwide. The programs provide college scholarships and Military Academy appointment opportunities for qualified cadets. With the completion of specific requirements several courses within the JROTC curriculum can earn cadets college credits through the University of Colorado at Colorado

Springs and other two-four year colleges/universities in the U.S. Students who successfully complete a minimum of three years of the JROTC program and qualify to enter the active duty military service receive pay/rank increases of two grades above non-JROTC recruits.

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Life Skills, College and Career Opportunities

Course Code: 999923

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

College Summit curriculum is designed to expose and influence students to strengthen the collegegoing mind set and generate a population of students to participate in a college going culture in their schools. Students throughout the year will complete lessons ranging from choosing a career/ profession and the educational requirements to achieve their goals; financial planning for college; college admissions; adjusting to college life; and developing the life-skills to cope with planning for life beyond high school. Students will have opportunities to attend workshops and college fairs to gain confidence in their skills, learn to advocate for themselves and leave high school prepared to enroll in college. Once these students return to school the following year, they return empowered as

“Peer Leaders” and are ready to support their classmates in transitioning from high school to higher education.

Textbook(s): Life Skills and Career Opportunities Air University Pearson Publishing, 2006; Navigator,

College Summit

Military Science:

Aerospace Science Program

The mission of the Aerospace Science program is to provide the climate, opportunity, and motivation for cadets to experience success in academic studies and their development as leaders. Cadets learn about the aerospace environment and how the technology of aerospace science affects them individually, our society, our nation, and our way of life. Cadets learn and master effective followership and leadership qualities and skills. The program promotes community service and instills responsibility, character, selfdiscipline, and a sense of accomplishment.

Aerospace Science 1

Course Code: 999100, 999103

Prerequisites: Agreement to meet grooming and discipline standards

Credits: 0.5 - 1.0 Elective

The introductory year and first year course taken by students entering AFJROTC is designed to acquaint students with the heritage of flight, development of air power, and evolution of air power from

WW II to the present. Leadership education concentrates on learning basic and intermediate military drill and ceremonies, as well as military customs and courtesies.

Textbook(s): All instructional materials provided by the Air Force Center for Officer Accessions and

Citizens Development

Aerospace Science 2

Course Code: 999203

Prerequisites: Aerospace Science 1; Agreement to meet grooming and discipline standards;

Instructor approval

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The second year is a science course designed to acquaint the student with the aerospace environment, the human requirements of flight, principles of aircraft flight, and principles of navigation. The course begins with a discussion of the atmosphere and weather. After developing an understanding of the environment, how that environment affects flight is introduced. Discussions include the forces of lift, drag, thrust, and weight. Students also learn basic navigation including map reading, course plotting,

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and the effects of wind. The portion on the Human Requirements of Flight is a survey course on human physiology. Discussed here are the human circulatory systems, the effects of acceleration and deceleration, and protective equipment. Leadership Education stresses communication skills and cadet corps activities. Written reports and speeches complement academic materials. Cadet corps activities include holding positions of greater responsibility in the planning and execution of corps projects. Students who entered high school before Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may take this course for Technology Education credit through school year

2012-2013. All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take

FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): All instructional materials provided by the Air Force Center for Officer Accessions and

Citizens Development

Aerospace Science 3

Course Code: 999303

Prerequisites: Aerospace Science 2; Agreement to meet grooming and discipline standards;

Instructor approval

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The third year is a science course which examines our Earth, the Moon and the planets, the latest advances in space technology, and continuing challenges of space and manned spaceflight. Issues critical to travel in the upper atmosphere such as orbits and trajectories, unmanned satellites, space probes, guidance and control systems are explained. The manned spaceflight sections cover major milestones in the endeavor to land on the Moon, and to safely orbit humans and crafts in space for temporary and prolonged periods. It also covers the development of space stations, the Space Shuttle and its future, and international laws for the use of and travel in space. Leadership education emphasis is Management Theories, Stress, Financial Management, Introduction to Ethics, and Citizenship.

Textbook(s): All instructional materials provided by the Air Force Center for Officer Accessions and

Citizens Development

Aerospace Science 4

Course Code: 999403

Prerequisites: Aerospace Science 3; Agreement to meet grooming and discipline standards;

Instructor approval

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Aerospace Science 4/Leadership Education: (AFJROTC) consists of three options:

Option 1: Management of the Cadet Corps: The cadets manage the entire Corps during the fourth year. This hands-on experience affords the cadets the opportunity to put the theories of previous leadership courses into practice. The cadets manage all the planning, organizing, coordinating, directing, controlling, decision-making, personal interaction, managerial, and organizational skills.

Option 2: Aerospace Careers, Laboratory Manual, Geography, Survival, and Air Force Policy and

Organization: The third option includes aerospace careers, which has four books from NASA and FAA.

The laboratory manual contains experiments that supplement the information in Aerospace Science:

The Science of Flight, and Aerospace Science: The Exploration of Space. It is designed to help students apply scientific concepts and principles discussed in the texts. The geography portion of the course adds to the basic knowledge of the Earth’s surface and the processes that shape it; of places and their connections to other places; and of the relationship between people and environments. The survival section presents “good to know” information that would be useful in any situation. Survival instruction will provide training in skills, knowledge, and attitudes necessary to successfully perform

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fundamental tasks needed for survival. The information is just as useful to an individual lost hunting or stranded in a snowstorm. The section on policy and organization describes the functions of the four branches of service and it also discusses the presidential administrations from the 1970s to present.

Leadership Education emphasis is placed on Career Choices and opportunities in the aerospace industry, Leadership Principles, Planning Your Future, and Managing Your Life.

Option 3: Global and Cultural Studies is a multidisciplinary course that introduces students to various regions of the world from a geographic, historical and cultural perspective. The course provides increased international awareness and insight into foreign affairs that permits a more educated understanding of other cultures and enhanced knowledge of America’s interests and role in the world.

Geopolitical issues such as terrorism, economics, politics, military issues, migration of peoples and other cultural issues will be examined. The regional areas included in this course are Europe, the

Middle East, South Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The lessons include excellent videos to provide a window into life and issues within the regions, followed by a variety of hands-on activities created to engage the student. Readings are also available to set the stage for each lesson, along with workbook exercises suitable for in-class or homework assignments.

Textbook(s): All instructional materials provided by the Air Force Center for Officer Accessions and

Citizens Development

Aerospace Science 5

Course Code: 999903

Prerequisites: Aerospace Science 4; Agreement to meet grooming and discipline standards;

Instructor approval; Students entering their Junior year request Honors Ground School course and complete AS 5/ 6 as a JROTC four-year completer

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Aerospace Science V, Aviation Honors Ground School is a course designed for a foundation for cadets/students interested in receiving a private pilot’s license. When the course is completed the cadets/students should be prepared to take and pass the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written examination. Cadets/students will indicate, through oral/written assessments proficiency in all requirements for successful completion of the FAA written exam. Cadets/students will show familiarity with pilot training programs, opportunities in aviation and human elements associated with the license of a private pilot. In addition, the instructor will ensure the cadet has a basic understanding of policies and procedures applicable to the corps’ pilot training program and association with private pilot training institutions. Course overall objectives will enable the cadets to comprehend: Fundamentals of Flight,

Aircraft Operation, Aircraft Systems, Aircraft Performance, Flight operations/Aircraft Maneuvering,

Atmosphere and its effect on aircraft operations, Basics of navigation, GPS, and using charts and radio aids, Application of principles of aeronautical decision-making and flight-related physiological factors. Prerequisites for this course: Satisfactory completion of AS I - Frontiers of Aviation History and AS II - Science of Flight; Cadets must be recommended to attend the course by the SASI/ASI.

Textbook(s): Aviation Fundamentals (Jeppesen & Sanderson), Private Pilot Manual (Jeppesen),

Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) / Airman Information Manual (AIM), Approved FAA written test question bank, Airman Knowledge Study Guide, Aeronautical Charts, SP-4 Flight Plotter, CPU-26A/P,

Flight Navigation Computer, Supplemental Video Series: Private Pilot Lessons.

Aerospace Science 6

Course Code: 999913

Prerequisites: Aerospace Science 5; Agreement to meet grooming and discipline standards;

Instructor approval; Satisfactory completion of AS –V, Honors Ground School and recommendation to attend flight course by the SASI/ASI.

Credits: 1.0 Elective

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Aerospace Science VI, Flight School is a course designed for completion of the FAA private/recreational pilot license for cadets/students interested in receiving a private pilot’s license through concentrated flying lessons. When the course is completed the cadets/students should be prepared to take and pass the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Flight Examination. Cadets/students will indicate, through oral/written assessments proficiency in all requirements for successful completion of the FAA

Flight Evaluation. Cadets/students will partner with local pilot training programs for individual flying lessons. In addition, the instructor will ensure the cadet has continuity in association with private pilot training instructions. The course overall objectives will enable the cadets to demonstrate proficiency in flight and knowledge in order to successfully complete the FAA requirements for obtaining the

Private/Recreational Pilot License. (3) Computer flight evaluations, (2) Solo computer flight, (1)

Cross-country simulator flight (student planned). *The Flight Instruction will be contracted between the individual cadets and JROTC instructor approved Flight Instruction Facilities within the local area.

Limited funds available for school sponsored flight lessons; however, flight scholarships are available with local flight Institutions. The Civil Air Patrol provides one orientation flight at no cost to the students to determine flight lesson feasibility.

Text: Aviation Fundamentals (Jeppesen & Sanderson), Private Pilot Manual (Jeppesen), Federal

Aviation Regulations (FAR) / Airman Information Manual (AIM), Airman Knowledge Study Guide,

Supplemental Video Series: Private Pilot Lessons*

Interactive Computer Practice tests. Flight Simulator: Simulator flight lessons, (6) eight individual computer graded simulator lessons

Military Science:

The Army JROTC Program

Army JROTC (AJROTC) focuses on the development of better citizens through the instruction of skills in leadership, citizenship, life success, geography, and wellness in a structured interactive environment.

AJROTC is one of the Army’s contributions to assisting America’s youth to become better citizens.

The program produces successful cadets and productive adults while fostering in each cadet a more constructive and disciplined learning environment. This program makes substantial contributions to many communities and ultimately to the nation’s future. It is the centerpiece of the Department of Defense’s commitment to America’s Promise for Youth through its emphasis on community service and teen antidrug efforts.

Army JROTC (Leadership, Education and Training 1)

Course Code: 998000, 998003

Prerequisites: Agreement to meet grooming and discipline standards

Credits: .50 , 1.0 Elective

The Army JROTC program includes instruction in the history, organization, and functions of the Army.

Leadership Laboratory I is an introduction to leadership development; students learn the principals, positive traits, values, and attributes of leadership; communication - both oral and written; map reading and navigation; drill and ceremonies; first aid; personal hygiene; and living a healthy life. Students learn critical thinking strategies and complete lessons focused on high school graduation.

Textbook(s): All instructional materials provided by U.S. Army Cadet Command

Army JROTC (Leadership, Education and Training 2)

Course Code: 998103

Prerequisites: ARJROTC 1 ; Agreement to meet grooming and discipline standards;

Instructor approval

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Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course continues the core instruction and laboratory lessons in LET I. The course introduces equal opportunity, sexual harassment, wellness, fitness, first aid, drug awareness, advance map skill, identification of geographic features and environmental awareness. Behavioral traits and leadership styles are identified in students through the use of practical exercises, self assessments and evaluations. Students further their lessons in leadership theory instruction. Students who entered high school before Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may take this course for Technology Education credit through school year 2012-2013. All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn

Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): All instructional materials provided by U.S. Army Cadet Command

Army JROTC (Leadership, Education and Training 3)

Course Code: 998203

Prerequisites: ARJROTC2; Agreement to meet grooming and discipline standards;

Instructor approval

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course continues and expands the instruction and skills taught in LET I and LET II. Students investigate the functions US Government, civic actions and political responsibility, explore U.S. Army’s role in American history. The course continues to develop leadership skills focusing on decisionmaking, problem-solving skills, management skills including goal setting, identification of performance indicators, enhancement of negotiations skills, implementation of processes, span of control and proper staff procedures, mediation of conflict, project development and execution. Students are given ample opportunities to serve in leadership positions in the battalion Students complete the financial planner program through National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE) which teaches life skills in developing budgets, use of banking institutions and planning your financial future. Focus is placed on research and development of career portfolios and college preparation.

Textbook(s): All instructional materials provided by U.S. Army Cadet Command

Army JROTC (Leadership, Education and Training 4)

Course Code: 998303

Prerequisites: ARJROTC 3; Agreement to meet grooming and discipline standards

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course continues the instruction and expands the skills taught in LET I- III. Cadets assume responsibility for the planning, execution, and operations of the AJROTC unit by filling key leadership and staff positions. Focused on positive leadership experiences, cadets develop staffs, conduct meetings, and use project management skills to lead and supervise subordinates in the execution the battalion’s missions. Cadets participate in military events to demonstrate their understanding of military protocol, etiquette, formal dining and decorum. Career exploration and college preparation are the main focus of the curriculum. Students complete career portfolios and use various resources to investigate college admission requirements, financial preparedness, and success strategies after high school graduation.

Textbook(s): All instructional materials provided by U.S. Army Cadet Command

rooming and discipline standards

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Military Science:

The Navy JROTC Program

The purpose of Navy JROTC is to instill in students the value of citizenship, service to the United States, personal responsibility and a sense of accomplishment. Specific goals for the NJROTC program and course work include patriotism, developing informed citizens and responsible citizens; promoting habits of orderliness and precision; developing a high degree of self-discipline and leadership; promoting an understanding of the basic elements and requirements for national security; developing respect for and an understanding of the need for constituted authority in a democratic society; providing incentives to live healthy and drug-free lives; developing leadership potential; promoting high school completion; providing information on the military services as a possible career.

Naval Science 1

Course Code: 999500, 999503

Prerequisites: Agreement to meet grooming and discipline standards

Credits: .50, 1.0 Elective

Naval Science 1 is the first of a three or four year Naval Science program. The NJROTC program emphasizes each person’s responsibilities in democratic society. The program includes classroom instruction, physical fitness, and military drill, wearing the correct uniform, practicing military customs and courtesies, and basic leadership training. Students will be introduced to leadership theories on ethics and values. Instructional topics also include naval ships and aircraft, citizenship and U.S. government and other forms of government, wellness and fitness, geography and survival skills. The program is designed to motivate students to use the skills learned in NJROTC to be successful in high school, in advance education and in other education and training.

Textbook(s): All instructional materials provided by the Naval Service Training Command

Naval Science 2

Course Code: 999603

Prerequisites: NJROTC 1; Agreement to meet grooming and discipline standards; Instructor approval

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course continues the instruction offered in Naval Science 1 at an advanced level. The second level course is intended to meet the needs of cadets who desire further training in Naval subjects and to gain additional leadership experiences. Topics include: Maritime History, Leadership, Maritime

Geography, Meteorology, Astronomy, Physical Science, and Oceanography. Naval Science 2 and

3 topics may be alternated annually if approved by the senior instructor and the school principal.

Students who entered high school before Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may take this course for Technology Education credit through school year 2012-2013.

All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course

(to be determined) to earn Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): All instructional materials provided by the Naval Service Training Command

Naval Science 3

Course Code: 999703

Prerequisites: NJROTC 2; Agreement to meet grooming and discipline standards; Instructor approval

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course continues the instruction offered in Naval Science 1 and 2 at an advanced level. The third level course is designed to meet the needs of cadets who desire advanced training in Naval subjects

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and to gain additional leadership experiences while holding cadet officer positions. NJROTC-3 cadets may also be selected to staff positions. Topics include: National Security, Naval Operations and Support Functions, Military Law, International Law, Ship Construction, Shipboard Organization,

Seamanship, Navigation, Naval Weapons and Aircraft.

* Naval Science 2 and 3 topics may be alternated annually if approved by the senior instructor and the school principal.

Textbook(s): All instructional materials provided by the Naval Service Training Command

Naval Science 4

Course Code: 999803

Prerequisites: NJROTC 3; Agreement to meet grooming and discipline standards; Instructor approval

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course continues the instruction offered in Naval Science 1, 2, and 3 at an advanced level.

The fourth level course is designed to meet the needs of senior cadets participating in the full fouryear NJROTC program. Fourth year NJROTC cadets comprise the majority of the command staff responsible for planning, organizing, and administering unit activities. NJROTC-4 cadets also receive course work in advance leadership and organizational theory; ethics and complete workshops on college preparation; and career exploration.

Textbook(s): All instructional materials provided by the Naval Service Training Command

Music: Instrumental

All instrumental music courses will enable students to gain an appreciation and sensitivity to various musical styles representing differing cultures and histories and develop skills and techniques necessary to perform music of the selected ensemble. These skills include:

0 1. Read music;

0 2. Hold instrument/bow correctly;

0 3. Develop correct embouchure (winds);

0 4. Develop correct hand position;

0 5. Play in tune with good tone quality;

0 6. Understand the musical terminology included in the materials used in class;

0 7. Tune instruments correctly;

0 8. Sight read compositions of a basic level;

0 9. Listen to recordings to develop an awareness of the components of various musical periods, styles, and cultures;

10. Utilize technology appropriate for the class; and

11. Develop critical listening skills.

Attendance at outside school performances/rehearsals is a requirement for these courses.

Advanced Placement Music Theory

Course Code: 647613

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Theory IV and/or Advanced Piano courses or equivalent; teacher recommendation

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art, Weighted

This full-year course for 11 th

or 12 th

grade students is designed to offer experienced advanced music

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

students abilities to develop greater technical ability, good independent practice skills, and written theory. Additionally sight singing, aural dictation, and computer application will enhance instruction.

Topics may include seventh chords, modulation, secondary dominate, and classical music form and style. Students that will be attending college as Music majors are encouraged to take this course.

Textbook(s): Textbooks may include: Anthology of Music Forms, Leon Stein; Master Theory, Peres and Yoder Melodia, Cole and Lewis; Harvard Dictionary of Music; Musicianship for Older Beginners,

Artis & Schukman, Carl Fisher; Hannon Studies Vol. 1. Hanon, Schirmer; Introduction to Sight Singing,

Artis & Schukman, Carl Fiasher; Teaching Choral Sight Reading, Boyd, Parker, Willis Keyboard and

Reference Chart, Willis Music Co. Rhythm Drills; Favorite Classical Melodies, Bastien/Kjos; First Piano

Repertoire. Barron’s, AP Music Theory by Nancy Scoggin- (Teacher Edition includes 4 audio CD’s.)

-Practice Test Simulations; The Musician’s Guide to Theory and Analysis by Jane Piper Clendinning and Elizabeth West Marvin; Music in Theory and Practice

Basic Band

Course Code: 636003, 636013, 636023

Prerequisites: Teacher approval

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This class has a performance based curriculum which requires participation in performances which occur outside of school hours. Designed for students who have not developed the necessary skills for placement in the intermediate or advanced bands, enrollment in this class is subject to the approval of the instrumental teacher in order to insure appropriate placement.

Textbook(s): Accent on Achievement Book 1; Standard of Excellence Book 1; Essential Elements,

2000 Book 1

Intermediate Band

Course Code: 636113, 636133, 636143, 636183, 636193

Prerequisites: Teacher approval

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This class has a performance based curriculum which requires participation in performances which occur outside of school hours. Designed for wind and percussion students who have able to perform intermediate level band music. Sectional or ensemble instruction should be scheduled. Enrollment in this class is subject to the approval of the instrumental teacher in order to insure appropriate placement.

Textbook(s): Accent on Achievement Bk 2, Standard of Excellence Bk. 2, Essential Elements 2000

Bk.2, Foundations for a Superior Performance, Belwin Intermediate, Sixteen Weeks to a Better Band and intermediate band literature; MBDA III or IV

Advanced Band

Course Code: 636213, 636233, 636243, 636283, 636293

Prerequisites: Teacher approval

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This class has a performance based curriculum which requires participation in performances which occur outside of school hours. Emphasizing a high standard of musical excellence in the preparation and performance of band literature, the band provides an opportunity for instrumentalist to continue their instruction and to gain performing experience on a daily basis. Small group and ensemble instruction should be scheduled. This class is subject to the approval of the instrumental teacher in

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

order to insure appropriate placement.

Textbook(s): Foundations for a Superior Performance, Belwin Intermediate, Sixteen Weeks to a Better

Band, Symphonic Warm ups; MBDA IV, V, or VI

Basic Orchestra

Course Code: 641003, 641013, 641023

Prerequisites: Teacher approval

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This class has a performance based curriculum which requires participation in performances which occur outside of school hours. Designed for students playing an orchestral string instrument who have not yet developed the skills necessary to be placed in intermediate or advanced orchestra, the emphasis is on the development and remediation of musical skills rather than public performance. This class is subject to the approval of the instrumental teacher in order to insure appropriate placement.

Textbook(s): Essential Elements 2000 Bk. 1, Artistry in Strings Bk. 2, String Explorer Bk. 1, and beginning ensemble literature

Intermediate Orchestra

Course Code: 641113, 641133, 641143

Prerequisites: Teacher approval

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This class has a performance based curriculum which requires participation in performances which occur outside of school hours. Instruction is aimed primarily at the fundamentals of string playing and performance of intermediate orchestral literature in an acceptable manner. The wind and percussion players should be added periodically to perform the orchestral literature. This class is subject to the approval of the instrumental teacher in order to insure appropriate placement.

Textbook(s): Essential Technique for Strings, Essentials for Strings, Strictly Strings Bk. 2, Daily Warm-

ups for String Orchestra, and intermediate ensemble literature; MODA III or IV

Advanced Orchestra

Course Code: 641213, 641233, 641243, 641283, 641293

Prerequisites: Teacher Approval

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This class has a performance based curriculum which requires participation in performances which occur outside of school hours. Emphasizing a high standard of musical excellence in the preparation and performance of orchestral literature, the orchestra provides an opportunity for string instrumentalists to continue their instruction and to gain performing experience on a daily basis.

Small group or ensemble instruction should be scheduled. This class is subject to the approval of the instrumental teacher in order to insure appropriate placement.

Textbook(s): Advanced Technique for Strings, Essentials for Strings, Essential Elements Bk. IV, Daily

Warm ups for Strings, High Tech for Strings and advanced ensemble literature; MODA IV, V, or VI

Jazz Ensemble

Course Code: 647203, 647213, 647223, 647233

Prerequisites: concurrent enrollment in Advanced, Intermediate, or Basic Band or Orchestra; teacher

approval

Credits: 1.0 Elective

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

This performance based course will focus on a variety of jazz styles such as blues, swing, bebop, Latin jazz, and New Orleans jazz. Enrollment in the course is limited to traditional jazz band instruments

(sax, trumpet, trombone, keyboard, rhythm section, guitar) and competent music reading is required.

This course does not fulfill the MSDE fine arts graduation requirement. Students are required to participate in after school rehearsals and concerts.

Textbook(s): TBA

Special Instrumental Ensemble

Course Code: 641303, 641343, 641353

Prerequisites: Teacher approval, concurrent enrollment in Intermediate /Advanced Band/Orchestra

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This class has a performance based curriculum which requires participation in performances which occur outside of school hours. This course is designed for instrumental music students desiring to enhance their musical experience through the study and performance of literature for the smaller instrumental ensemble. Possible offerings are string or wind chamber music, jazz ensemble, instrumental choirs, and percussion ensemble. This course does not fulfill Fine Arts Graduation requirement. Instructional materials will be provided as appropriate and dictated by the type of ensemble (string/chamber music/jazz ensemble, percussion ensemble, etc.). This class is subject to the approval of the instrumental teacher in order to insure appropriate placement.

Textbook(s): TBA

Music: Vocal and General

General/Vocal Performance Courses

Schools must offer a minimum of two levels of chorus. Student ability will determine the levels of courses to be offered. In accordance with Title IX regulations, if Intermediate Chorus-Soprano and

Alto are offered, Intermediate Chorus-Tenor and Bass must also be offered. Attendance at outside school performances/rehearsals is a requirement for these courses.

Musicianship Courses

Schools must offer one musicianship course or combination each semester according to the ability of the students. A school must decide which Musicianship courses it should offer. Two or more levels might be taught simultaneously, according to instructional needs of students.

Special Interest-General Music Courses

Schools must offer a minimum of two different special interest-general music courses each semester selected from those listed. Student interest will determine the courses to be offered. (Additional

General/Vocal Performance Courses, i.e., Handbell Choir, Vocal Ensemble and Music Theatre, may be substituted for General Music Courses if student interests warrant.)

Intermediate Chorus - Mixed

Course Code: 630003, 630043, 630053, 631143, 631153

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This full-year course offers instruction in intermediate vocal techniques, score reading and includes study and performance of mixed chorus literature. The teacher selects students through prior audition.

This group has out-of-school performances, which may require after-school rehearsals. Three & four part medium level chorus literature. Students are required to participate in the choral assessment festivals.

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Textbook(s): TBA

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Intermediate Chorus - Men’s Ensemble

Course Code: 630243, 630253, 630263, 630273

Prerequisites: Audition and/or teacher approval

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This full year course offers instruction in intermediate (two and three parts medium level choral literature) vocal techniques, score reading and includes study and performance of men’s choral literature. The teacher selects students through prior audition. This group has out-of-school performances, which may require after-school rehearsals. Students are encourages to participate in the county Solo and

Ensemble festival and are required to participate in the Choral Performance Assessments.

Intermediate Chorus - Women’s Ensemble

Course Code: 630203, 630213, 630223, 630233

Prerequisites: Audition and/or teacher approval

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This full year course offers instruction in intermediate (two and three part medium level choral literature) vocal techniques, score reading and includes study and performance of women’s choral literature.

The teacher selects students through prior audition. This group has out-of-school performances, which may require after-school rehearsals. Students are encouraged to participate in the county

Vocal Solo and Ensemble assessments and are required to participate in the Choral Performance

Assessments.

Textbook(s): TBA

Advanced Chorus - Concert/Chamber Choir

Course Code: 631103, 631143, 631153, 632103, 643823, 646813, 646823, 646833

Prerequisites: Previous experience preferred

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This full-year course offers instruction in, and study and performance of, advanced vocal techniques, score reading and large ensemble or chamber chorus literature. The teacher selects students through prior audition. This group may perform extensively in out-of-school performances, which may require after-school rehearsals. Four part medium to advanced chorus literature.

Textbook(s): TBA

Applied Music Voice

Course Code: 646403, 646413, 646423, 646433

Prerequisites: Previous experience preferred

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This course is intended to enhance students’ vocal ability. Students receive individual vocal instruction reflecting appropriate vocal technique, tone production, and voice-part specific literature and repertoire in the classical and sacred genres appropriate for college auditions. Students will be required to participate in recitals and juries throughout the year. Juniors and seniors will be required to participate in the county Solo and Ensemble Festival.

Textbook(s): TBA

Choral Ensemble

Course Code: 643503, 643523, 643533, 643543, 647103

Prerequisites: None

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This full-year course includes performance and study of historical development of one or more current styles of music, such as popular, folk, rock, and gospel. This group has out-of-school performances, which may require after-school rehearsals. Three and four part medium to advanced chorus literature.

Textbook(s): TBA

Handbell Choir

Course Code: 643603, 643623, 643633, 643643

Prerequisites: Audition

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This special interest performance group studies for a full-year the basics of handbell ringing and is exposed to handbell literature covering all styles and periods of music history. This group performs extensively in out-of-school performances, which may require after-school rehearsals. Handbell choir music.

Textbook(s): TBA

Music Theatre

Course Code: 645003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This full-year course includes study of the history and development of the American musical theatre, and performance of theatrical productions. This group has out-of-school performances, which may require after-school rehearsals.

Textbook(s): Music history, appreciation and theater literature

Music Survey

Course Code: 645100, 645103

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50, 1.0 Fine Art

This course is a full-year or semester course for the student who wishes to become a knowledgeable consumer of music. Experiences will include: choosing and caring for sound systems and recordings; learning about performing artists and composers of today; studying about and attending musical theatre.

Textbook(s): Music history and appreciation literature

Musicianship 1A

Course Code: 623000

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Fine Art

A beginning semester course in music that includes theory, ear training, dictation, sight singing and analysis of simple form and structure.

Textbook(s): Music theory text and simple keyboard literature

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Musicianship 1B

Course Code: 624000

Prerequisites: Musicianship 1A or equivalent knowledge

Credits: .50 Fine Art

Continuation of semester course that includes theory, ear training, dictation, sight singing and analysis of simple form and structure.

Textbook(s): Music theory text and simple keyboard literature

Musicianship 2A

Course Code: 625000

Prerequisites: Musicianship 1B or equivalent knowledge

Credits: .50 Fine Art

An intermediate semester course in music theory, ear training, dictation, sight singing, analysis of musical forms, and arranging for voice and instruments.

Textbook(s): Music theory text and simple keyboard literature.

Musicianship 2B

Course Code: 626000

Prerequisites: Musicianship 2A or equivalent knowledge

Credits: .50 Fine Art

Continuation of semester course in music theory, ear training, dictation, sight singing, analysis of musical forms, and arranging for voice and instruments.

Textbook(s): Music theory text and simple keyboard literature

Musicianship 3A

Course Code: 627000

Prerequisites: Musicianship 2B or equivalent knowledge

Credits: .50 Fine Art

An advanced semester course designed and offered to students who are gifted in music and plan careers in music composition. Instruction includes composition, aural analysis, and orchestration.

Textbook(s): Music theory text and simple keyboard literature

Musicianship 3B

Course Code: 628000

Prerequisites: Musicianship 3A or equivalent knowledge

Credits: .50 Fine Art

Continuation of semester course designed and offered to students who are gifted in music and plan careers in music composition. Instruction includes composition, aural analysis, and orchestration.

Textbook(s): Music theory text and simple keyboard literature

Piano Lab

Course Code: 639000

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Fine Art

This semester course is designed for any senior high student who wishes to learn the fundamentals

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

of keyboard performance. The course, available only where there is a lab in place, is designed to accommodate students of varying abilities to play a variety of music for self-enjoyment.

Textbook(s): TBA

Principles of Recording Technology

Course Code: 647700

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Fine Art

This semester course helps students understand the process involved in creating high quality recordings, and provides opportunities for students to create musical compositions using current recording technologies. Students who entered high school before Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may take this course for Technology Education credit through school year 2012-2013. All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): Recording techniques text

Basic Guitar

Course Code: 643000, 643010, 643020, 643030, 643040

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Fine Art

In this semester course students will begin to learn the skills necessary for playing the guitar. Students will explore units in basic notation, parts of a guitar, how to read a chord chart, and strumming techniques. Some performance is required.

Textbook(s): Basic guitar instruction book and literature

Intermediate Guitar

Course Code: 643100, 643110, 643120, 643130, 643140

Prerequisites: Basic guitar or equivalent skill

Credits: .50 Fine Art

This semester course includes an opportunity to learn intermediate techniques for playing the guitar.

The emphasis will be on folk and classical styles of guitar playing. Performance is recommended.

Students are eligible to participate in the county Solo and Ensemble festival.

Textbook(s): Intermediate guitar instruction book and literature

Advanced Guitar

Course Code: 643800, 643810, 643820, 643830, 643840

Prerequisites: Intermediate guitar or equivalent knowledge

Credits: .50 Fine Art

This course includes opportunities to perform using folk, rock, blues, and classical techniques. Music theory and original composition appropriate to the student’s level is required. Students are encouraged to participate in the Solo and Ensemble festival. Open to 10 th

, 11 th

and 12 th

Grade students.

Textbook(s): TBA

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Basic Piano

Course Code: 643200, 643210, 643220

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Fine Art

This semester course is designed for students who wish to learn the fundamentals of keyboard performance. Students with no previous piano background will explore; basic notation, pitch and its notation, manuscript writing and music symbols specific to reading and playing keyboard music with artistry and appropriate technique.

Textbook(s): TBA

Intermediate Piano

Course Code: 643300, 643310, 643320, 643330, 643340

Prerequisites: Piano 1 or equivalent skill

Credits: .50 Fine Art

This semester course is designed to increase keyboard skills to a degree which will permit the students to play a variety of music for self-enjoyment. Students are eligible to participate in the county Solo and

Ensemble festival

Textbook(s): Intermediate piano instruction book and literature

Advanced Piano

Course Code: 643400, 643410, 643420, 643430

Prerequisites: Piano 2 or equivalent skill

Credits: .50 Fine Art

This semester course is designed for the experienced student who wishes to develop a greater technical ability, and develop good independent practice skills. Students are also introduced to standard piano repertoire in preparation for college auditions. Students are eligible to participate in the county Solo and Ensemble festival.

Textbook(s): Advanced piano instruction book and literature

Physical Education

A student in Prince George’s County is required to complete one-half (.50) credit in physical education in order to graduate. Your Personal Fitness 1 is the course to fulfill the Physical Education graduation requirement.

A student will be expected to enroll in the one-half (.50) credit physical education course in the ninth grade. With the principal’s permission, enrollment may be delayed until grade 10, 11, or 12.

Health education courses may not be substituted for physical education courses. Dance courses do not count as physical education courses. However, dance courses do count toward the completion of the fine arts credit requirement.

Students may not be exempt or waivered from physical education for any reason. Accommodations will be made as necessary, to meet IEP goals.

Your Personal Fitness 1

Course Code: 718010, 718020, 718050, 718060, 718070, 718080

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 P.E.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

The course will provide students with the opportunity to explore their personal fitness levels, engage in lifetime physical activities, analyze their personal well-being, nutritional choices and attitudes observed during social physical activities which can be measured by the Healthy Fitness Zone component of Fitnessgram. The students will use the knowledge they gain to develop a well-rounded personal fitness plan that will support living an active healthy lifestyle.

Textbook(s): Fitness For Life, ISBN 9780736066754

Your Personal Fitness 1 Dual Enrollment

Course Code: 718000

Prerequisites: Dual enrollment approval

Credits: .50 P.E.

The course will provide students with the opportunity to explore their personal fitness levels, engage in lifetime physical activities, analyze their personal well-being, nutritional choices and attitudes observed during social physical activities which can be measured by the Healthy Fitness Zone component of Fitnessgram. The students will use the knowledge they gain to develop a well-rounded personal fitness plan that will support living an active healthy lifestyle.

Textbook(s): TBA

Your Personal Fitness 2

Course Codes: 718100

Prerequisites: Your Personal Fitness 1

Credits: .50 Elective

This course is designed to extend the knowledge acquired in Your Personal Fitness 1 in regard to personal fitness and lifetime activities. This course must be offered co-educationally (mandated Title

IX).

Textbook(s): Fitness For Life, ISBN 9780736066754

Lifetime Sports 1

Course Code: 717010, 717020, 717050, 717060, 717070, 717080

Prerequisites: Your Personal Fitness 1

Credits: .50 Elective

Students will experience a variety of activities which will provide them with the skills and knowledge necessary to successfully participate in leisure time activities throughout life. Activities in this course must be offered as co-educationally. (Mandated Title IX).

Textbook(s): None

Lifetime Sports 1 Dual Enrollment

Course Code: 717000

Prerequisites: Your Personal Fitness 1

Credits: .50 Elective

Students will experience a variety of activities which will provide them with the skills and knowledge necessary to successfully participate in leisure time activities throughout life. Activities in this course must be offered as co-educationally. (Mandated Title IX).

Textbook(s): None

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Lifetime Sports 2

Course Code: 717100

Prerequisites: Your Personal Fitness 1 and Lifetime Sports 1

Credits: .50 Elective

Students extend their experiences in activities for leisure time enjoyment throughout life. Activities in this course must be offered as co-educationally (mandated Title IX).

Textbook(s): None

Team Sports 1

Course Code: 719010, 719020, 719050, 719060, 719070, 719080

Prerequisites: Your Personal Fitness 1

Credits: .50 Elective

The student will learn rules, terms, historical background and basic skills for a variety of sports. The student will be able to understand team strategy in a competitive situation. Activities in this course must be offered co-educationally (mandated Title IX).

Textbook(s): None

Team Sports 2

Course Code: 719110, 719120, 719150, 719160

Prerequisites: Your Personal Fitness 1 and Team Sports 1

Credits: .50 Elective

The students will improve their knowledge of game rules and basic skills. The student will experience the concept of teamwork in competition situations. Activities in this course must be offered coeducationally (mandated Title IX).

Textbook(s): None

Physical Training

Course Codes: 719470, 719480

Prerequisites: Your Personal Fitness 1

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester course is designed as a conditioning course for students who wish to improve Strength and endurance. Areas that may be explored are physical fitness, circuit training, isometrics, weight training, body mechanics, jogging and/or running and fundamental theories of body conditioning.

Activities must be offered co-educationally (mandated Title IX).

Textbook(s): None

Gymnastics and Tumbling

Course Codes: 719550, 719560, 719570

Prerequisites: Your Personal Fitness 1

Credits: .50 Elective

Emphasis in this semester course is placed on refinement of beginning gymnastic and tumbling skills.

These activities must be offered coeducationally (mandated Title IX).

Textbook(s): None

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Science

Academic Validation Biology

Course Code: 015400

Prerequisites: High School Assessment eligibility

Credits: 0.00

This course provides students with the opportunity to complete Academic Validation Projects while preparing for the High School Assessment in Biology for graduation.

Textbook(s): TBA

Advanced Placement Biology

Course Code: 422003

Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, Algebra I, Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 Science, Weighted

AP Biology is designed to offer a rigorous and challenging curriculum that covers the biology and biological principles typical of college and university general biology courses. Dissection of laboratory animals may be a required part of this class. This course is designed for college bound students who wish to enrich their knowledge of biology and develop more advanced skills and techniques. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Test in Biology.

Textbook(s): Biology, ISBN 9780131375048

Advanced Placement Biology Lab

Course Code: 498023

Prerequisites: Enrollment in AP Biology

Credits: 1.0 Elective, Weighted

This year-long course is offered to fulfill College Board’s Advanced Placement Laboratory requirements for AP Biology. This laboratory section of the course addresses objectives of laboratories that are recommended by the College Board. They exemplify inquiry, experimental and quantitative, rather than descriptive, laboratory exercises. They are intended to challenge students’ abilities to understand problems, develop and implement appropriate experimental designs, manipulate data, draw conclusions, think analytically, and develop hypotheses.

Textbook(s): Biology, ISBN 9780131375048

Advanced Placement Chemistry

Course Code: 431103

Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, Algebra I and II, Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 Science, Weighted

AP Chemistry is designed to offer a rigorous and challenging curriculum that covers the chemistry and chemical principles typical of college and university general chemistry courses. Students learn the usefulness and relevance of chemistry in both their intended areas of study and in the everyday world. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Test in Chemistry.

Textbook(s): Chemistry 7

th

Edition, ISBN 9780618528448

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Advanced Placement Chemistry Lab

Course Code: 498123

Prerequisites: Enrollment in AP Chemistry

Credits: 1.0 Elective, Weighted

This year-long course is offered to fulfill College Board’s Advanced Placement Laboratory requirements for AP Chemistry. This laboratory section of the course addresses objectives of laboratories that are recommended by the College Board. They exemplify inquiry, experimental and quantitative, rather than descriptive, laboratory exercises. They are intended to challenge students’ abilities to understand problems, develop and implement appropriate experimental designs, manipulate data, draw conclusions, think analytically, and develop hypotheses.

Textbook(s): Chemistry 7

th

Edition, ISBN 9780618528448

Advanced Placement Environmental Science

Course Code: 491303

Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry, Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 Science, Weighted

AP Environmental Science provides students with a more advanced study of topics related to the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world. Content includes identifying and analyzing natural and human-made environmental problems, evaluating the relative risks associated with these problems, and examining alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing the problems. Students are expected to take the Advanced

Placement Test in Environmental Science.

Textbook(s): Living in the Environment 15

th

Edition, ISBN 9780495015987

Advanced Placement Environmental Science Lab

Course Code: 498323

Prerequisites: Enrollment in AP Environmental Science

Credits: 1.0 Elective, Weighted

This year-long course is offered to fulfill College Board’s Advanced Placement Laboratory requirements for AP Environmental Science. This laboratory section of the course addresses objectives of twelve laboratories that are recommended by the College Board. They exemplify experimental and quantitative, rather than descriptive, laboratory exercises. They are intended to challenge students’ abilities to understand problems, develop and implement appropriate experimental designs, manipulate data, draw conclusions, think analytically, and develop hypotheses.

Textbook(s): Living in the Environment 15

th

Edition, ISBN 9780495015987

Advanced Placement Physics 1

Course Code: 441113

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Science, Weighted

This algebra-based AP physics course promotes focused, hands-on learning. It enables students to develop deep understanding of the content and to focus on applying their knowledge through inquiry labs. This course also allows time for teachers to include physics contents that are normally covered in the Physics Course for Science and Technology Program students. This course covers

Newtonian mechanics; work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound, electric circuits, static electricity, magnetic field, optics and a little bit of modern physics. This course also emphasizes the understanding of physics concepts and the development of problem solving and critical thinking skills.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Demonstrations are used to illustrate physical concepts and phenomena; and applications to real-life are highlighted throughout the course. Labs, demonstrations, and real-life applications are used to foster student-centered guided inquiry and open inquiry into the world around them.

Textbook(s): Physics Principles with Applications (AP), ISBN 0131142860, Prentice Hall, 2005

Advanced Placement Physics 1 Lab

Course Code: 441123

Prerequisites: Algebra, Concurrent Enrollment in AP Physics 1

Credits: 1.0 Elective, Weighted

AP Physics 1 Lab is the laboratory companion for AP Physics 1. AP Physics 1: Algebra-Based is the equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits.

Textbook(s): Physics Principles with Applications (AP), ISBN 0131142860, Prentice Hall, 2005

Advanced Placement Physics 2

Course Code: 441133

Prerequisites: AP Physics 1

Credits: 1.0 Science, Weighted

AP Physics 2: Algebra-Based is the equivalent to a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers fluid mechanics; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; optics; and atomic and nuclear physics.

Textbook(s): Physics Principles with Applications (AP), ISBN 0131142860

Advanced Placement Physics C

Course Code: 441003

Prerequisites: Physics, Algebra II/Trig or Concurrent Enrollment in Pre-Calculus or Trig/Analysis,

Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 Science, Weighted

AP Physics C is based on the national curriculum for Advanced Placement Physics C and is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Physics C exam. Approximately one semester is devoted to the study of mechanics, including rotational motion, oscillations and gravitation. In the second semester, the primary emphasis is on classical electricity and magnetism. Use of calculus is expected to increase as the course progresses to the point where it is used freely in formulating principles and in solving problems. Laboratory work is included to help students understand the topics, as they exist in nature rather than in idealized form.

Textbook(s): Physics: Principles with Applications (2005), ISBN 9780131846616

Advanced Placement Physics C Lab

Course Code: 498243

Prerequisites: Enrollment in an AP Physics C

Credits: 1.0 Elective, Weighted

This year-long course is offered to fulfill College Board’s Advanced Placement Laboratory requirements for AP Physics C. This laboratory section of the course addresses objectives of laboratories that are recommended by the College Board. They exemplify inquiry, experimental and quantitative, rather than descriptive, laboratory exercises. They are intended to challenge students’ abilities to understand problems, develop and implement appropriate experimental designs, manipulate data, draw conclusions, think analytically, and develop hypotheses.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Textbook(s): Physics: Principles with Applications (2005), ISBN 9780131846616

Anatomy and Physiology

Course Code: 492100

Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, Conceptual Physics

Credits: .50 Science

This course focuses on the functions of living organisms. The primary emphasis is on human functions with extensive laboratory work. The functions of cells, tissue, and organs are studied. Individual research and reading of journals is required.

Textbook(s): Hole’s Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology 9

th

Edition, ISBN 9780073204819

Astronomy

Course Code: 497000

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Science

This course, designed to meet the needs of students interested in astronomy, who have not taken a course in the Earth Sciences, is an activity oriented, hands-on, investigative program, which will train students in the skills necessary to study the sky. Large numbers of “daytime” astronomy activities are woven into the program. Regular laboratory and student research projects are included in this course.

Textbook(s): TBA

Biology

Course Code: 420003, 420063

Prerequisites: Integrating the Sciences recommended

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course includes how living things function, develop, and interact with their environments.

Instruction is designed to promote student inquiry through conducting investigations. Dissection of laboratory animals may be a required part of this class. At the end of this course students must take the Maryland Biology High School Assessment. It is recommended that students have successfully completed Conceptual Physics.

Textbook(s): Biology, ISBN 9780131662551

Biology Co-Teach

Course Code: 420073

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course fulfills the Biology requirement for graduation and is designed to facilitate learning outcomes appropriate to the instructional needs of students who can benefit from strategies based on individual learning styles and needs. The general education teacher will teach this class in collaboration with a special educator in order to ensure that all students have access to the Biology curriculum (see Biology). At the end of this course, students must take the Maryland Biology High

School Assessment.

Textbook(s): Biology, ISBN 9780131662551

Biology Intensive

Course Code: 420083

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course fulfills the Biology requirement for graduation and is designed to provide students with special needs with material regarding the basic topics in Biology (see Biology). At the end of this course, students must take the Maryland Biology High School Assessment.

Textbook(s): Biology, ISBN 9780131662551

Biology Honors

Course Code: 419093

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1 in the 8th grade.

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course is designed to endow students with the necessary knowledge and skills that will enable them to apply scientific skills and processes on major biological science concepts. Honors Biology is delivered using various instrucitonal techniques including a heavy independent study component as well as laboratory orientation to support concept development. Students are expected to complete quarter and semester projects and dissection of laboratory animals is a required part of this class. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to identify and explain characteristics of organisms, natural phenomena and their interrelationships with other science, technology and social issues as they relate to the study of living things. Ownership of knowledge acquired in the high school

Biology course will be demonstrated by success on the Maryland Biology High School Assessment which is administered at the end of the course. Passing the Maryland High School Assessment for

Biology is a requirement for graduation. To facilitate the development of student science literacy, quarter projects, semester projects, and the bio-lit bingo project have been integrated into the curriculum.

Projects are designed to develop advanced skills like critical thinking and reasoning, informed decision making, and systematic problem solving. In addition, students will complete a lab practicum at the end of each quarter to evaluate their science skills and processes as they relate to biology. All of these activities serve as opportunities for creative expression, meaningful connections, and academic growth through reflection. As a result students will share in the excitement and personal fulfillment that come from understanding and learning about the natural world.

Textbook(s): Biology, ISBN 9780131662551

Biology Summit

Course Code: 420013

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1 in the 8th grade

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course is designed for ninth grade students who have successfully completed Algebra 1 in the

8th grade. It maintains the major concepts of a rigorous biology program and integrates chemistry and physics aspects in many of these biology topics. Several research topics and additional students’ projects add to the rigor. There is a heavy laboratory orientation to support concept development. All students will take the Maryland Biology High School Assessment at the completion of this course.

Dissection of laboratory animals may be a required part of this class.

Textbook(s): Biology, ISBN 9780131662551

Biotechnology Applications 1

Course Code: 420800

Prerequisites: Biology, Biotech Chemistry, and Microbiology

Credits: .50 Science

This course has been developed to provide an organized and realistic approach for a one-semester

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

course. This course emphasizes laboratory activities and will cover the following topics: DNA, the molecule of life and the messenger of life, chromatography, mutations, isolating and manipulating

DNA, and cloning a gene.

Textbook(s): Daugherty, E. Biotechnology Science for the New Millennium, ISBN 9780763842840

Biotechnology Applications 2

Course Code: 420900

Prerequisites: Biotechnology Applications 1

Credits: .50 Science

Biotechnology Applications 2 is a semester course for juniors and seniors and will focus on the development of a research project. Projects are expected to address one or more of the techniques that have been emphasized in the previous biotechnology course such as recombinant DNA, fermentation, microbiology, and scanning electron microscopy. Students will be taught research methodologies, proposal-writing skills, and various statistical tests as they pursue a project of their own choosing under the guidance of the teacher. Each project will include the preparation of data and analysis in a scientific report. The research presentation will include a written report, a laboratory report, a display, and an oral presentation of their findings.

Textbook(s): Daugherty, E., Biotechnology Science for the New Millennium, ISBN 9780763842840

Biotechnology Chemistry

Course Code: 430703

Prerequisites: Molecular Biology

Credits: 1.0 Science (10th grade)

This introductory chemistry course fulfills the requirements of a basic chemistry curriculum while emphasizing biochemistry, i.e., biomolecules, enzymology, and DNA technology. Laboratory skills will include gel electrophoresis techniques, scanning visible/ultraviolet spectrophotometry, and computerassisted data acquisition. Scanning electron microscopy will be used for examining elements, compounds and complex materials. The course will prepare students for Advanced Placement

Chemistry, Advanced Placement Biology, and Biotechnology Applications 1.

Textbook(s): TBA

Chemistry

Course Code: 430003, 430013, 430063, 430083

Prerequisites: Integrating the Sciences, Biology, Algebra

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course is designed to give the student a basic understanding of chemical theory and principles. The subject matter also includes descriptive chemistry and practical applications. Laboratory experiences are designed to familiarize students with chemical reactions and to develop skills in using equipment and instruments associated with the chemistry laboratory.

Textbook(s): Chemistry, ISBN 9780131152625

Chemistry Honors

Course Code: 430093

Prerequisites: Honors Biology

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course is designed to endow students with the necessary knowledge and skills that will enable them to apply scientific skills and processes on major chemical science concepts. Upon successful

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

completion of this course, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to use language and instruments of science to communicate information collected, explain the composition and properties of matter, utilize scientific skills and processes, and use mathematics to demonstrate the relationship between various aspects of the physical world. It is expected that students who have taken this course will be prepared for enrollment in Advanced Placement Chemistry and/or Advanced Placement

Biology.

Textbook(s): Chemistry, ISBN 9780131152625

Co-Academic Environmental Biology Lecture

Course Code: 425100

Prerequisites: Students must be rising 11 th

and 12 th

graders and have passed all HSA’s

Credits: .50 Science

This course involves a survey of basic scientific principles needed to understand cur¬rent environmental problems and evaluate alternatives for solving those problems. Students who satisfy all conditions are eligible to earn three college credits.

Textbook(s): The Science Behind The Stories (2008), ISBN 9780131357051

Co-Academic Environmental Biology Lab

Course Code: 425200

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in Science 525100

Credits: .50 Science

This course supplements Science 425200. It provides laboratory and field experiences relevant to environmental issues. Students who satisfy all conditions are eligible to earn three college credits.

Textbook(s): The Science Behind The Stories (2008), ISBN 9780131357051

Co-Academic Forensic Biology

Course Code: 425303

Prerequisites: Students must be rising 11 th

and 12 th

graders and have passed all HSA’s

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course is an introduction to the principles and concepts of the biological aspects of forensic science and an examination of the role of the laboratory in criminal investigation and human identification using forensic pathology, serology, anthropology, molecular biology and other specializations. Students who satisfy all conditions are eligible to earn four college credits.

Textbook(s): TBA

Coop Satellite Research App. 1

Course Code: 451003

Prerequisites: Integrating the Sciences

Credits: 1.0 Science

This year - long course gives students an opportunity to work with space scientists and engineers on satellites before and after launch. The experience has included building a model satellite and presenting information to various groups on the subsystems of the satellite as well as opportunities for visits to launch and tracking facilities for selected students. Students who entered high school before Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may take this course for

Technology Education credit through school year 2012-2013. All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After

SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn Technology

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Education credit.

Textbook(s): TBA

Coop Satellite Research App. 2

Course Code: 452003

Prerequisites: Coop Satellite Research 1

Credits: 1.0 Science

This year - long course gives students an opportunity to work with space scientists and engineers on satellites before and after launch. The experience has included building a model satellite and presenting information to various groups on the subsystems of the satellite as well as opportunities for visits to launch and tracking facilities for selected students.

Textbook(s): TBA

Coop Satellite Research App. 3

Course Code: 453003

Prerequisites: Coop Satellite Research 2

Credits: 1.0 Science

This year - long course gives students an opportunity to work with space scientists and engineers on satellites before and after launch. The experience has included building a model satellite and presenting information to various groups on the subsystems of the satellite as well as opportunities for visits to launch and tracking facilities for selected students.

Textbook(s): TBA

Earth and Space Systems Science

Course Code: 493003

Prerequisites: Integrating the Sciences and/or Biology, and Chemistry

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course deals with our knowledge of the earth and space systems. It is an integrated, interdisciplinary course, which stresses inquiry, discovery, and interpretation of data obtained through remote sensing, web sites, and student laboratory investigations. (This course will replace Earth science course

#417903 which will no longer be offered.)

Textbook(s): Earth Science, ISBN 9780131258525

Environmental Science

Course Code: 491103

Prerequisites: Integrating the Sciences and/or Biology

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course is designed as a comprehensive, contemporary environmental science course with emphasis on fieldwork and data collection and analysis. Students will investigate the natural environment and the interrelationships among natural systems including biodiversity and population dynamics.

Textbook(s): Arms, K.A. (2008). Environmental Science. ISBN 97800300781360

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Environmental Science Intensive

Course Code: 491183

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course is designed to provide students with special needs instruction in basic topics in

Environmental Science. This material is presented on a concrete level and instructional supports are provided as needed.

Textbook(s): Arms, K.A. (2008). Environmental Science. ISBN 9780030781360

Forensic Lab Science 1 and 2

Course Code: 433090, 433190

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Science

This course is an integrated science involving the disciplines of biology, chemistry, earth science, archeology, anthropology, law, medicine, and professional/technical writing. Focus will center on the following; crime scene investigations; evaluation of evidence, glass and soil sampling and analysis techniques; organic analysis; microscopic evaluation of evidence; and analysis of hair, fiber, paint, and drugs. It is recommended that students have completed Biology, Chemistry and Conceptual

Physics or Earth Science.

Textbook(s): Saferstein, R. (2008). Forensic Science, an Introduction. Pearson Prentice Hall

Genetics

Course Code: 420503

Prerequisites: Biology

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course, designed to meet the needs of students who have already taken a course in biology, is an activity oriented, hands-on, investigative program, which will train students in the skills necessary to study the cellular mechanisms of inheritance and extend their study of genetics. Laboratory and student research projects are included in the program. Topics include cellular reproduction, complex traits, DNA structure and replication, the human genome project, population genetics, and human origins.

Textbook(s): Human Genetics: Concepts and Applications ISBN 9780076701650

Integrating the Sciences

Course Code: 418103, 418163, 418153, 418173, 418193

Prerequisites: Enrollment in Algebra 1 or Algebraic Concepts

Credits: 1.0 Science

This yearlong class integrates and makes connections to the four core disciplines of science - Physics,

Earth Science, Chemistry, and Environmental Science. This course serves as a foundation course for students enrolling in Biology the following year. Major concepts studied include motion, forces, energy, electromagnetic radiation, earth’s surface and interior, solar system, properties of matter, atomic structure, periodic table, chemical bonds, acids and bases, carbon chemistry, interactions of organisms, diversity of live and environmental issues of the world. Each quarter culminates with a thematic project. The constructivist approach is used to deliver the content. This includes inquiry based laboratory activities, making real world connections to mathematics, history, technology and society.

Textbook(s): Physical Science, Concepts in Action, ISBN 9780133628166

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Integrating the Sciences Intensive

Course Code: 418183

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course is designed to provide students with special needs with science content that includes connections to the four core disciplines of science - Physics, Earth Science, Chemistry, and

Environmental Science. This course serves as a foundation course for students enrolling in Biology the following year. Major concepts studied include motion, forces, energy, electromagnetic radiation, earth’s surface and interior, solar system, properties of matter, atomic structure, periodic table, chemical bonds, acids and bases, carbon chemistry, interactions of organisms, diversity of live and environmental issues of the world. The content is presented on a concrete leel and instructional supports are provided as needed. Students will make real world connections to mathematics, history, technology and society.

Textbook(s): Physical Science, Concepts in Action, ISBN 9780133628166

Introduction to Environmental Relationships & Problems

Course Codes: 490100, 490170, 490180

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Science

This course is designed for the student who is concerned about problems of the environment and possible solutions. It will deal with problems such as overpopulation, food resources, natural resources, and pollutants. Food additives, pesticides, radiation, air, water, solid waste, and noise will also be studied.

Textbook(s): TBA

Medical Science

Course Codes: 490600, 490680

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Science

This course is designed to allow students to explore the science content and careers related to the fields of medicine. This content is inclusive of the exploration of health issues, medical research, ethical issues, cultural diversity awareness and much more.

Textbook(s): Introduction to Health Science Technology, ISBN 9781401811280

Microbiology

Course Code: 440200

Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, Integrating the Sciences

Credits: .50 Science

This course is designed for those students who want to study microorganisms and their activities.

It is concerned with the form, structure, reproduction, physiology, metabolism and identification of microbes. It includes the study of their distribution in nature, their relationship to each other and other living things, their effects on humans, and changes they make in their environment. The technical aspects of lab work are emphasized.

Textbook(s): Microbiology, a Human Perspective 5

th

Edition, ISBN 9780073305363

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Molecular Biology (Biology - Biotechnology)

Course Code: 420403

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Science (9th grade)

This course is for 9 th

grade Biotechnology students. It follows the PGCPS Biology Curriculum Framework to prepare students to pass the Biology HSA. The additions to this course include exposure to the use of the scanning electron microscope, gel electrophoresis, and lab experiences with DNA extractions,

DNA Fingerprinting, and restrictive enzymes.

Textbook(s): TBA

Physics

Course Code: 440103

Prerequisites: Chemistry and Concurrent Enrollment in Algebra 2

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course is a study of the physical properties and interrelationships of matter and energy. Topics such as astronomy, optics, motion, force, electricity, magnetism, and nucleonics will be studied through experimentation, discussion, and reasoning.

Textbook(s): Physics, Principles and Problems, ISBN 9780078458132

Physics Honors

Course Code: 440193

Prerequisites: Honors Biology, Honors Chemistry, and Completion of or Concurrent Enrollment in Algebra 2

Credits: 1.0 Science

This course maintains the major concepts of a rigorous physics program and integrates biology and chemistry aspects into many of the physics topics. There is a heavy emphasis on laboratory investigation and concept development.

Textbook(s): Physics, Principles and Problems, ISBN 9780078458132

Plants and People

Course Codes: 490000, 490070, 490080

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Science

This course deals with classification, structure, and function in plants; their growth and development; and their relationship to humans. The course relies heavily on horticultural practices and scientific experimentation.

Textbook(s): Introductory Plant Biology, ISBN 9780073314211

Science 1 ISCO Semester

Course Code: 418500

Prerequisites: International Student

Credits: .50 Science

A semester (1/2) credit of Science taken in a school outside the United States. Requires evaluation of foreign transcript by the International Student Counseling Office.

Textbook(s): Not applicable

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Science 1 ISCO

Course Code: 418203

Prerequisites: International Student

Credits: 1.0 Science

International Students entering Prince George’s County Public Schools with a course title of Science on their school records will be assigned this transfer credit for the first science course completed and passed in their home country in the equivalent of grade levels 9 and above. *ISCO - International

School Counseling Office

Textbook(s): Not applicable

Science 2 ISCO

Course Code: 418303

Prerequisites: International Student

Credits: 1.0 Science

International Students entering Prince George’s County Public Schools, having completed a second science course in their home country, will be assigned this transfer credit for the science completed and passed in their home country in the equivalent of grade levels 9 and above. *ISCO - International

School Counseling Office

Textbook(s): Not applicable

Science 3 ISCO

Course Code: 418403

Prerequisites: International Student

Credits: 1.0 Science

International Students entering Prince George’s County Public Schools, having completed a third science course in their home country, will be assigned this transfer credit for the science completed and passed in their home country in the equivalent of grade levels 9 and above. *ISCO - International

School Counseling Office

Textbook(s): Not applicable

Science, Technology, and Society

Course Codes: 480000

Prerequisites: Bioapplications I and II and Microbiology

Credits: .50 Science

This is the concluding course in the biotech sequence. Science, Technology, and Society explores the ethical questions related to biotechnology. Students learn the basic principles of ethics, and then they discuss the controversial topics which are part of biotechnology. They write essays and case studies and examine topics such as animal rights, environmental issues, Human Genome Project, genetic engineering, genetic screening, stem cell research, cloning, and health care.

Textbook(s): TBA

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Science and Technology Program S/T

Architectural Drafting and Design S/T

Course Code: 811103

Prerequisites: Engineering Foundations S/T 1 and 2

Credits: 1.0 Advanced Technology Education

Students in this level two course will use drafting equipment and tools to produce plans for a residential building and a model of their plans. Course topics include Residential House Design, Plot Planning,

Reading a Contour, House Construction Techniques, Foundations, Insulation, Exterior Siding Materials,

City Planning Issues, Land Use Controls, and Eco Friendly Design. Experiences and instruction will pertain to residential design considerations; architectural styling; floor plan development; drafting of floor plans, plot plans, foundations, elevations, details, and rendered (shaded and colored) pictorial illustrations: and model building procedures, materials, and techniques.

Textbook(s): Architecture

Materials: Building homes of our Own Design Software, ProDesktop Design Software

Architectural Graphics S/T

Course Code: 811200

Prerequisites: Engineering Foundations S/T 1

Credits: .50 Advanced Technology Education

This course requires students to use drafting equipment and computers (CAD) to produce plans for a residential building. Course topics include residential design considerations, architectural styling, floor plan developments, drafting of floor plans, plot plans, foundations, elevations, details, internet design projects, and rendered (shaded and colored) pictorial illustrations.

Textbook(s): Architectural Drafting and Design 4 th

Edition, Jefferies and Madsen

Organic Chemistry/Biochemistry S/T

Course Code: 431303

Prerequisites: Biology S/T, Chemistry S/T, Biology and Chemistry teacher recommendation

Credit: 1.0 Elective

Bio-Organic Chemistry is an advanced level course in which students study the organic chemistry that occurs in biological systems. This course deals with the characteristics, molecular bonding, synthesis and reaction of most classes of organic compounds. The synthesis and metabolism of biochemical compounds are also included. There is a major concentration in the laboratory on the syntheses, purification, and verification of structure of organic compounds using classical and instrumental means. The course culminates with a major individualized student-directed laboratory analysis of an unknown compound.

Textbook(s): Essential Organic Chemistry, ISBN 9780131498587

Biology S/T

Course Code: 420203

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Science

This class is part of the normal sequence of science and technology courses for graduation and college preparation. Course topics include: The Science of Biology, Biologically Important Molecules,

Energy and the Cell, Cell Structures and Functions, Genetics, Evolution, Biological Diversity, Ecology,

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Body Systems, and Biological Issues. Dissection may be included. Biology ST is a distinct course in that it stresses independent research and open-ended experimentation. Career study in biology will also be incorporated.

Textbook(s): Miller, R.R., Levine, J. (2006). Biology. Pearson Prentice Hall

Chemistry S/T

Course Code: 430303

Prerequisites: Algebra I S/T, Biology S/T

Credits: 1.0 Science

This class is part of the normal sequence of science courses for science and technology (STP) students for graduation and college preparation. The course combines theory, mathematical applications, and experimentation to explore concepts relating to matter and the world around us.

Topics include measurement in chemistry, matter and its changes, chemical composition, equations and mass relationships, atomic structure, periodicity, bonding and organic chemistry, gases, liquids and solids, solutions, reaction Energy and Kinetics, equilibrium, and acids and bases. Chemistry S/T stresses independent research and open-ended experimentation, maintains the major concepts of a rigorous chemistry program, and integrates biology and physics aspects in many of these chemistry topics. There is a heavy emphasis on lab orientation and concept development. Career study in chemistry will also be incorporated.

Textbook(s): Chemistry, ISBN 9780131152625

Electronics Systems S/T

Course Code: 836103, 836200

Prerequisites: Engineering Foundations 1 and 2 S/T

Credits: .50, 1.0 Advanced Technology Education

Students will use tools, equipment, and apparatus to work on and produce electronic circuits and systems. Experiences and instruction will pertain to characteristics of alternating current, metering devices, controlling and sensing devices, elementary digital mechanical systems, electronic components, circuit design and fabrication. Course topics include Electronic Theory, Careers in Electronics, Direct Circuit Design, Series and Parallel Circuitry, Radio Technology, Fiber Optic

Technology, Alternating Circuit Design, Low Voltage Circuitry, Sensors, and Electronic Meter Reading and Operation. Sensors and entry level programming in Basic form the center of computer use in this course.

Textbook(s): TBA

Energy Systems S/T

Course Code: 870103, 870200, 870300

Prerequisites: Engineering Foundations 1 and 2 S/T

Credits: .50, 1.0 Advanced Technology Education

Students will use tools and equipment in working on, analyzing, and building devices that convert energy into work, transmit energy from one location to another, and store energy. Course topics include Forms of Energy, Methods of Transforming Power, Energy in Transportation, Energy Sources,

Renewable Energy Sources, Environmental Considerations with Energy Use, and Energy Technical and Professional Careers. Experiences and instruction will pertain to gasoline reciprocating engines; diesel engines; conventional electric generators and motors; boilers and furnaces; turbines; external heat engines; solar energy systems; refrigeration systems; mechanical, electrical, fluid, and thermal energy transmitters; and careers in the energy field at the technician and professional levels.

Textbook(s): Power, Energy Technology

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Engineering Drafting and Design S/T

Course Code: 811303

Prerequisites: Engineering Foundations 1 and 2 S/T

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Students in this level two course use drafting equipment to produce technical drawings and to solve geometric drafting problems. Course topics include Conventional Drafting Techniques, Computer

Aided Design (CAD) Methods, ProDesktop Usage, LandSat Images, schematic drawings, use of scale to produce high quality products, and rapid prototyping. Advanced experiences and instruction will pertain to machine drawing; pattern development; geometric intersections; structural drafting and design; auxiliary views and revolutions; rendered (shaded and colored) pictorial illustrations, schematic diagramming in the areas of electricity, electronics, plumbing, ventilation, and welding; statistical information diagramming; and land feature description (cartography). Computer Aided

Design (CAD) programs are introduced and students learn how to project, extrude, revolve, chamfer, render, and export drawing files in other formats.

Textbook(s): Technical Drawing ISBN 9780078457487

Engineering Foundations 2 S/T

Course Code: 870913

Prerequisites: Engineering Foundations 1 S/T

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course is a requirement for tenth grade Science and Technology program students. It consists of the following 9-week modules: 1) Dynamics of Mechanical, Fluid and Thermal Systems – Students are introduced to the functioning, common components and control of these systems; 2) Dynamics of Electrical, Electronic and Optical Systems – Students are introduced to the functioning, common components and control of these systems; 3) Materials and Processes – Students are introduced to the properties and characteristics of common engineering materials and the processes by which they are cut, formed, shaped, conditioned and assembled for engineering applications; and 4) Engineering

Design and Development – Students apply their knowledge and skills developed in Science, Math and other Engineering Foundations modules in solving design and development problems through engineering team efforts. Students enrolled in Engineering Foundations 2 S/T (870903) through

2006-2007 may be awarded fine arts credit. Beginning in 2007-2008 Engineering Foundations 2

S/T is no longer eligible for fine arts credit. Students who entered high school before Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may have taken this course for Technology

Education credit through school year 2012-2013. All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): Design and Problem Solving in Technology, ISBN 9780827352445

Engineering Graphics S/T

Course Code: 811400

Prerequisites: Engineering Foundations S/T 1

Credits: .50 Advanced Technology Education

This course requires students to use drafting equipment and computers (CAD) to produce technical drawings and to solve geometric drafting problems. Experiences and instruction will pertain to procedures and techniques for communicating information about the size and shape of objects; pattern development; schematic diagramming; statistical charting, and land feature description

(cartography).

200

Textbook(s): Engineering Drafting and Design 3 rd

Edition, Madsen

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Foundations of Technology S/T

Course Code: 842093

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Technology Education

Students will develop an understanding of the influence of technology on history by exploring how people of all times and places have increased their capability by using their unique skills to innovate, improvise, and invent. They will gain an understanding of technology innovation and the fact that it often results when ideas, knowledge, or skills are shared within a technology, among technologies, or across other fields of study. Students will develop an understanding of engineering design, the formal process that transforms ideas into products or systems of the designed world. They will select and use manufacturing technologies and understand that modern manufacturing technologies produce quality goods at low prices, enhancing the quality of life for many people. Students will select and use construction technologies and recognize that cultural norms, environmental conditions, and the requirements of enterprises and institutions impact the design of structures. Opportunities will be provided that enable students to select and use energy and power technologies and to explore the processing and controlling of the energy resources that have been important in the development of contemporary technology. They will become familiar with information and communication technologies and their role in maintaining competitive economic growth. The course will conclude with the synthesizing of major ideas through an understanding of the core concepts of technology, with an emphasis on “systems thinking” and related principles.

Textbook(s): Technology, 2008 ISBN 9781590707180

Geometry S/T

Course Code: 353003

Prerequisites: Algebra I

Credits: 1.0 Math

This is an intensive, problem solving geometry course that incorporates and goes beyond the typical geometry curriculum. Topics include using logic to develop arguments; working with postulates and theorems of Euclidian geometry; applying rules for parallel and perpendicular lines; identifying congruent and similar figures; classifying polygons and studying relationships within triangles and quadrilaterals; measuring angles and segments; finding area of polygons; finding volume of

3-dimensional figures; writing proofs of triangle congruence; drawing, constructing, and performing plane transformations; and solving problems with right triangle trigonometry. The course also includes the study of circles – angle measures and segment lengths. Additionally, there is a strong algebra content woven throughout the course. PSAT problems are also stressed.

Textbook(s): Geometry, ISBN 9780547647098

Internship S/T

Course Codes: 806103, 806203

Prerequisites: Assigned by S/T Coordinator and/or selected by Research Practicum Internship Panel

Credits: 1.0, 2.0 Elective

This course is designed to allow students time within the school day to conduct out-of-school research for Research Practicum (RP) project under the guidance of an engineer, scientist or computer scientist at a research facility or approved work site. Students are at the research site 4 days a week and a minimum of 2 ¾ hours each day. One day each week, the student is on campus the entire day, assigned to the RP teacher and/or Internship Coordinator for at least one class period. Each Internship S/T student will be required to maintain daily records of research activity(s) using a prescribed “log book” methodology and develop and maintain electronic and printed copies of a portfolio which includes:

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description of his/her internship, academic resume/vitae, all components of the 5-chapter RP paper, school report cards, letters of recommendation, and college acceptance letters.

Textbook(s): None

Physics S/T

Course Code: 440303

Prerequisites: Biology S/T, Chemistry S/T, 11 th

grade S/T students are required to take either

Physics S/T or AP Physics B

Credits: 1.0 Science

The Physics S/T course uses the same college textbook used in the AP Physics B course. However, the S/T course is taught at a slower pace than AP Physics B and therefore does not cover as many topics as the AP Physics B. Course topics include kinematics, forces, work & energy, simple harmonic motion, momentum, rotation, static electricity, electric circuits, magnetism, waves & sound, geometric optics, the wave nature of light, and modern physics.

Textbook(s): Physics, Principles and Problems, ISBN 9780078458132

Production Systems S/T

Course Codes: 870403, 870500, 870600

Prerequisite: Engineering Foundations S/T 1 and 2

Credits: .50,1.0 Advanced Technology Education

Students will use tools, machines, and materials in developing products, and in experimenting with materials and manufacturing processes. Experiences and instruction will pertain to hot and cold forming of materials; mechanical machining; casting; materials testing; production tooling; such assembling processes as welding, chemical bonding, and mechanical fastening; processes for material conditioning and finishing; characteristics and uses of industrial materials; computer control in industrial production; and careers in manufacturing at the technician and professional levels.

Students will work with a varied of robotic devices to learn control and programming while developing an understanding of modern robotic theory. Students will model engineering design and management methods in various challenges while working as individuals and teams.

Textbook(s): Basic Manufacturing Processes, Manufacturing Technology: Today and Tomorrow

ISBN 9781590707807

Research Practicum S/T

Course Codes: 800023 Engineering, 800033 Physical Science, 800043 Biology, 800053 Watershed,

800063 Botany

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Science/Tech Requirements through grade 11, proficiency in Microsoft Office software applications

Credits: 1.0 Elective, Weighted

This course is the support for Science and Technology seniors to complete a research or design & development senior project. Areas of research include biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, and computer science. Requirements include Science Fair Participation, writing of a 5-chapter thesis-type paper, and participation in the Research Practicum (RP) Symposium. Steps of the RP process include topic selection, research design, implementation of research, statistical data analysis, interpretation of research findings, and presentation of research findings. Course topics are Project development,

Proposal construction, Technical Writing, Statistics, Ethics, Use of Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Word,

Microsoft PowerPoint, information processing, and scientific display of both backboard and poster.

Textbook(s): None

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Structural Systems S/T

Course Code: 870703, 869800, 869900

Prerequisites: Engineering Foundations S/T 1 and 2

Credits: .50 Advanced Technology Education

Students will use equipment and materials in constructing a wood-frame structure. Experiences and instruction will pertain to light construction structural design; advanced wood-frame construction; brick masonry; surveying and site plotting; electrical wiring; plumbing systems and piping; insulating; building enclosing; interior finishing; testing of materials and structural components; design and installation of heating, cooling, and ventilating systems; current trends in structural design and engineering such as Code: specification in earthquake and storm surge prone areas; and design of trusses used in bridges, towers and steel structures.

Textbook(s): Static and Structures - Architecture

Social Studies

Academic Validation Government

Course Code: 015200

Prerequisites: High School Assessment eligibility

Credits: 0.00 Elective

This course provides students with the opportunity to complete Academic Validation Projects while preparing for the High School Assessment in Government for graduation.

Textbook(s): TBA

Advanced Placement American Government and Politics

Course Code: 250503

Prerequisites: Teacher approval; Strong reading, writing, and analytical thinking skills;

Application and orientation session; U.S. History

Credits: 1.0 Social Studies; Weighted

The Advanced Placement course in American Government and Politics is designed to give students a critical perspective on politics and government in the United States. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret American politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that make up the American political reality. Course topics to be included are: constitutional underpinnings of

American government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties and interest groups, institutions and policy processes of national government, civil rights and civil liberties. This course will prepare students for the AP exam and the Government HSA.

Textbook(s): American Government Roots and Reform, ISBN 9780132582445

Advanced Placement Comparative Government and Politics

Course Code: 250600

Prerequisites: Application and orientation session

Credits: .50 Elective; Weighted

The Advanced Placement course in Comparative Government and Politics is designed to help students gain knowledge of the world’s diverse political structures and practices. The course encompasses the study of both specific countries and of general concepts used to interpret the key political relationships found in virtually all-national politics. Five countries form the core of the AP examination. Four of these

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nations are Great Britain, France, the former Soviet Union/Russia, and China. These nations are included because they are commonly covered in college comparative systems. For the fifth nation, the AP examination will permit candidates to choose from among India, Mexico, and Nigeria.

Textbook(s): TBA

Advanced Placement Economics

Course Code: 290903

Prerequisites: Application and orientation session; Preferably 11th or 12th grade

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

The AP Economics course offers two separate examinations in economics: one in microeconomics and the other in macroeconomics. The content for this course is considered appropriate for the measurement of skills and knowledge in the fields of introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. Each examination is intended for qualified students who wish to complete studies in secondary school equivalent to a one-semester college introductory course. Students can elect to take one or both examinations in a given year. A separate grade will be reported for each examination.

Textbook(s): TBA

Advanced Placement European History

Course Code: 242003

Prerequisites: Application and orientation session; Preferably 11 th

or 12 th

grade

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

This course provides an in-depth survey of European history since the Sixteenth Century. Although high school credit is provided, the course is equal to an introductory college course. It emphasizes document interpretations, the analysis of major historical interpretations, and the skills of historical research and writing. Successful completion of a College Board examination qualifies students for college credit if the college approves.

Textbook(s): A History of Western Society ISBN 9780312640583

Advanced Placement Human Geography

Course Code: 280503

Prerequisites: Application and orientation session; Preferably 11th or 12th grade

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

The purpose of the Advanced Placement course in Human Geography is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis human social organization and its environmental consequences and learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice.

Textbook(s): Introduction to Human Geography ISBN 9780131732896

Advanced Placement Macroeconomics

Course Code: 290933

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

The AP Macroeconomics course provides students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics and how economists use those principles to examine aggregate economic behavior.

Students learn how the measures of economic performance, such as gross domestic product (GDP),

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

inflation, and unemployment are constructed and how to apply them to evaluate the macroeconomic conditions of an economy.The course recognizes the global nature of economics and provides ample opportunities to examine the impact of international trade and finance on national economies. Various economic schools of thought are introduced as students consider solutions to economic problems.

Textbook(s): College Board approved text

Advanced Placement Microeconomics

Course Code: 290923

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective; Weighted

The purpose of the Advanced Placement course in Human Geography is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis human social organization and its environmental consequences and learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice.

Textbook(s): Microeconomics, ISBN 9780716771593

Advanced Placement Psychology

Course Code: 220103

Prerequisites: Application and orientation session; Preferably 11 th

or 12 th grade student

Credits: 1.0 Elective, Weighted

This year-long course is designed to give the students a fundamental body of knowledge and skills in the area of psychology. The course will involve an investigation of the major approaches to this study of psychology. It also will involve the use of research methods and statistical measurement to include inferential as well as descriptive statistics. Advanced Placement Psychology builds upon the foundation of the General Psychology course (or the psychology section of Introduction to Social/

Behavioral Sciences), which is a prerequisite for this course. It also requires the student use methods and skills acquired in math and science courses as well as computer application. Advanced placement courses are designed for qualified students who wish to complete studies in secondary school that are equivalent to a one-semester college course in psychology. It is expected that upon completion of the course students will take and pass the college Board Advanced Placement test.

Textbook(s): Psychology 8

th

Edition, ISBN 9780716728306

Advanced Placement United States History

Course Code: 216593

Prerequisites: Application and orientation session; Strong reading, writing, and analytical thinking skills.

Credits: 1.0 U.S. History, Weighted

This year long course is designed for identified Honors and other recommended students. It focuses on American history from the Revolutionary War time period through the late twentieth century. The main goal is to provide students with college level experiences giving them a thorough background in relevant facts, and the skills to examine their significance and context.

Textbook(s): The American Pageant, ISBN 9780547166629

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Advanced Placement World History

Course Code: 261503

Prerequisites: Application and orientation session; Strong reading, writing, and analytical thinking skills.

Credits: 1.0 World History, Weighted

The purpose of the Advanced Placement World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contact, in interaction with different types of human societies.

The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences.

Textbook(s): Traditions & Encounters, ISBN 9780076594382

African American Studies

Course Code: 234000

Prerequisites: Preferably 11 th

or 12 th

grade

Credits: .50 Elective

Beginning with a brief study of cultural roots in Africa, this semester course focuses on the African

American experience in the United States. Emphasis is placed on understanding the contemporary life of African Americans in light of historical experience. African American involvement and impact on politics, economics and the arts are emphasized.

Textbook(s): African American Experience; African American History; African Americans; Voices of

Triumph series;

Textbook(s): African American History, ISBN 9780131947252

African American Studies II

Course Code: 234010

Prerequisites: African American Studies

Credits: .50 Elective

African American Studies II will provide a study of the cultural contributions of African Americans to the global society. Emphasis is placed on understanding the contemporary life of African Americans in light of historical experience as well as the impact of African American involvement on politics, economics and the arts. This semester course focuses on the African American experience in the

United States and abroad.

Textbook(s): African American History, ISBN 9780131947252; African American Experience; African

Americans; Voices of Triumph series

Anthropology

Course Code: 290600

Prerequisites: Preferably 11 th

or 12 th

grade student

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester course recommended for juniors and seniors, focuses on the study of humans and their cultures. Students learn some of the research tools and techniques used by professional anthropologists and identify the sub fields of anthropology. The course examines questions such as what factors influence human behavior; why do all societies have the same basic institutions; and how can we apply anthropological procedures to the study of present cultures.

Textbook(s): Anthropology, Ember, Ember and Peregrine, Pearson 2007

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Comparative Religions

Course Code: 235100

Prerequisites: Preferably 11 th

or 12 th

grade

Credits: .50 Elective

This course is designed to introduce students to the history and traditions of the major religions of the world. While the primary focus will be on Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, other religions will also be examined. Students will be expected to understand the basic philosophy and practices of each religion as well as to recognize and appreciate the contribution each has made to mankind.

Textbook(s): Religions of the World; Many Peoples, Many Faiths: Women and Men in the World

Religions

Economic Issues

Course Code: 290300

Prerequisites: Preferably 11 th

or 12 th

grade

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester course acquaints students with some major economic problems facing Americans.

Students will become aware of the decision-making processes in today’s mixed economy. Attention will be focused on such goals as wise use of resources, price stability, unemployment, and protection of the consumer. As much as possible, the course involves students in practical experiences with local economic institutions.

Textbook(s): Economics: Today and Tomorrow; Current Issues by Close-Up Foundation

ISBN 9780078606960

Foreign Policy Issues

Course Code: 290400

Prerequisites: Preferably 11 th

or 12 th

grade

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester course id designed to help students think clearly about America’s role in the community of nations. Emphasis is placed on national goals or interests and the means to achieve them. International conflict is shown to be a result of conflicting national interests, as well as misunderstandings and incomplete information on the part of national decision makers. Students should develop insight into foreign policy issues and the role of American foreign policy in different parts of the world.

Textbook(s): Current Issues by Close-up Foundation

Global Issues

Course Code: 275203

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course addresses foreign policy of the United States as a world power after World War II to the present. Students engage in content using a history day project format.

Textbook(s): None

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

High School Assessment Government Enrichment

Course Code: 215600, 215700

Prerequisites: High School Assessment eligibility

Credits: 0.00 Elective

This course provides students with the opportunity to prepare for the High School Assessment in

Government for graduation, including test taking strategies for success.

Textbook(s): A Democracy in Action ISBN 9780078909085

Latin American Area Studies

Course Code: 234300

Prerequisites: Preferably 11 th

or 12 th

grade

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester course extends student understanding of the Spanish and Portuguese speaking nations of North and South America. Emphasis is placed on the geographic, historical, and economic factors influencing these nations. Special attention is given to the contributions of the Indian, European, and African peoples in shaping the traditions and present day characteristics of Latin American societies.

Textbook(s): Latin Studies; The Latino Experience

Leadership Skills

Course Code: 251003

Prerequisites: Preferably for students holding an office or position in Student Government

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This year-long elective will develop the leadership skills needed for success in school, business, community, and governmental organizations. Students will have the opportunity to interact with and learn from leaders in these fields. In this study of different leadership processes, students will have opportunities to model the behavior of successful leaders. The course is particularly appropriate in providing background for school leadership training.

Textbook(s): TBA

Local, State, and National Government

Course Codes: 213103, 213143, 213153, 213163, 213193

Prerequisites: United States History

Credits: .50 - 1.0 LSN Government

This year-long course provides students with a comprehensive examination of the basic concepts and principles of our federal system of government. Course study includes a focus on the foundations of government; an overview of the United States political system; study of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government; explanation of citizenship rights and responsibilities; examination of structure and functions of state and local governments; and study of global perspective on governmental relationships. Students will take the High School Assessment in Government at the end of this course.

Textbook(s): United States Government Democracy in Action, ISBN 9780078747625

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Local, State, and National Government Co-Teach

Course Codes: 213173

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 1.0 LSN Government

This course fulfills the Government requirement for graduation and is designed to facilitate learning outcomes appropriate to the instructional needs of students who can benefit from strategies based on individual learning styles and needs. The general education teacher will teach this class in collaboration with a special educator in order to ensure that all students have access to the Local,

State and National Government curriculum (see LSN). At the end of this course, students must take the High School Assessment in Government.

Textbook(s): United States Government Democracy in Action, ISBN 9780078747625

Local, State, and National Government Intensive

Course Codes: 213183

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 1.0 LSN Government

This course is designed to provide students with special needs with material regarding the basic topics in Local, State and National Government. The class examines the basic concepts and principles of our federal system of government. Instructional supports are provided as needed. At the end of this course, students must take the High School Assessment in Government.

Textbook(s): United States Government Democracy in Action, ISBN 9780078747625

Philosophy

Course Code: 290620

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Elective

This course is a critical reasoning/informal logic course designed to teach students to evaluate logical arguments in daily life and conversation. Students will learn to recognize arguments, the difference between deductive and inductive reasoning, and to recognize and identify informal fallacies. A large part of the course will be devoted to the logic of induction, including the role it plays in probability theory, statistical methods of reasoning, and marking off the difference between science and superstition.

Students will also learn the role of inductive logic and analogy in legal and moral reasoning, as well as in discovering causal connections.

Textbook(s): Philosophy: A Text with Readings, ISBN 9781133612100

Political Issues

Course Code: 290200

Prerequisites: Preferably 11 th

or 12 th

grade

Credits: .50 Elective

The emphasis in this semester course is on the processes and problems of the American political system. Questions of political power, authority, leadership, and individual rights are basic to the course. Students are encouraged to be actively involved in political organizations and government agencies.

Textbook(s): Current Issues by Close-Up Foundation

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Practical Law

Course Code: 290700

Prerequisites: Grade 11 or 12

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester course is designed to provide students an opportunity to pursue their interest in practical aspects of the law. The course will provide a framework for the county’s mock trial program and will involve participation by the Bar Association and law enforcement agencies. The course provides practical information and problem-solving opportunities necessary for survival in our society. The course includes role-playing, small group activities, opinion polls, and visual analysis experiences as well as mock trials.

Textbook(s): Street Law, ISBN 9780078799839

Psychology

Course Code: 220000

Prerequisites: Grade 11 or 12

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester course recommended for juniors and seniors introduces students to the psychological research and concepts of human behavior. Course topics include research methodologies, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, principles of learning and memory, intelligence, personality development, and psychological pathologies.

Textbook(s): Understanding Psychology, ISBN 9780078745171

Public Policy Issues

Course Code: 281400

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: .50 Elective

This elective course is designed to examine Public Policy in the United States. the course approaches the concept for how public policy is determined and how it affects citizens.

Textbook(s): None

Revolutionaries and Reformers in U.S. History

Course Code: 275103

Prerequisites: Grade 9 American History Scholars student

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This year-long course is required for ninth grade participants in the Gilder-Lehrman American History

Scholars Program. It provides in-depth instruction in historical research methods. Students use primary and secondary sources to complete a major project suitable for the National History Day competition.

Using a chronological approach to nineteenth century U.S. History, this course complements and supports the required U. S. History course since 1877. Students’ interest in U.S. History is engaged by focusing on individuals who made a difference in the evolution of our nation’s story and through use of resources, especially documents, from the Gilder-Lehrman collection. This course is for the

American Scholar Program only.

Textbook(s): The American Republic to 1877, Glencoe

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Social Issues

Course Code: 290100

Prerequisites: Grades 11 or 12

Credits: .50 Elective

The semester course recommended for juniors and seniors focuses on the issues facing people living in groups in contemporary American and global society. It is concerned with fostering the development of critical thinking. Current social issues are examined using the techniques developed by social scientists. Students will be given opportunities to investigate some of the many complex issues facing American and global society. The course makes it possible for the student to examine openly and critically their own beliefs in relation to those of other members of our society and the world community.

Textbook(s): Social Problems, Prentice Hall; Taking Sides: Bioethical Issues, Glencoe-McGraw-Hill;

Taking Sides: Social Issues, Glencoe-McGraw-Hill

Social Studies Seminar for AP American Government & Politics

Course Code: 250513

Prerequisites: Current AP American Govt & Politics student

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Advanced Placement Social Studies Seminar is designed to provide additional skill based instruction for the rigors of an Advanced Placement course. The seminar component of each course focuses on the strategies that will build the skills necessary for success in Advanced Placement. Students will be afforded the opportunity to practice the learned skills for success in taking an AP exam that is content specific.

Textbook(s): American Government Roots and Reform, ISBN 9780132582445

Social Studies Seminar for AP Comparative Government & Politics

Course Code: 250610

Prerequisites: Current AP Comparative Govt & Politics student

Credits: .50 Elective

Advanced Placement Social Studies Seminar is designed to provide additional skill based instruction for the rigors of an Advanced Placement course. The seminar component of each course focuses on the strategies that will build the skills necessary for success in Advanced Placement. Students will be afforded the opportunity to practice the learned skills for success in taking an AP exam that is content specific.

Textbook(s): TBA

Social Studies Seminar for AP Economics

Course Code: 290993

Prerequisites: Current AP Economics student

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Advanced Placement Social Studies Seminar is designed to provide additional skill based instruction for the rigors of an Advanced Placement course. The seminar component of each course focuses on the strategies that will build the skills necessary for success in Advanced Placement. Students will be afforded the opportunity to practice the learned skills for success in taking an AP exam that is content specific.

Textbook(s): TBA

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Social Studies Seminar for AP European History

Course Code: 242013

Prerequisites: Current AP European History student

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Advanced Placement Social Studies Seminar is designed to provide additional skill based instruction for the rigors of an Advanced Placement course. The seminar component of each course focuses on the strategies that will build the skills necessary for success in Advanced Placement. Students will be afforded the opportunity to practice the learned skills for success in taking an AP exam that is content specific.

Textbook(s): A History of Western Society ISBN 9780312640583

Social Studies Seminar for AP Human Geography

Course Code: 280513

Prerequisites: Current AP Human Geography student

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Advanced Placement Social Studies Seminar is designed to provide additional skill based instruction for the rigors of an Advanced Placement course. The seminar component of each course focuses on the strategies that will build the skills necessary for success in Advanced Placement. Students will be afforded the opportunity to practice the learned skills for success in taking an AP exam that is content specific.

Textbook(s): Introduction to Human Geography ISBN 9780716728306

Social Studies Seminar for AP Psychology

Course Code: 220113

Prerequisites: Current AP Psychology student

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Advanced Placement Social Studies Seminar is designed to provide additional skill based instruction for the rigors of an Advanced Placement course. The seminar component of each course focuses on the strategies that will build the skills necessary for success in Advanced Placement. Students will be afforded the opportunity to practice the learned skills for success in taking an AP exam that is content specific. ISBN 9780131732896

Textbook(s): Psychology 8

th

Edition, ISBN 9781429244367

Social Studies Seminar for AP US History

Course Code: 216603

Prerequisites: Current AP US History student

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Advanced Placement Social Studies Seminar is designed to provide additional skill based instruction for the rigors of an Advanced Placement course. The seminar component of each course focuses on the strategies that will build the skills necessary for success in Advanced Placement. Students will be afforded the opportunity to practice the learned skills for success in taking an AP exam that is content specific.

Textbook(s): The American Pageant, ISBN 9780547166629

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Social Studies Seminar for AP World History

Course Code: 261513

Prerequisites: Current AP World History student

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Advanced Placement Social Studies Seminar is designed to provide additional skill based instruction for the rigors of an Advanced Placement course. The seminar component of each course focuses on the strategies that will build the skills necessary for success in Advanced Placement. Students will be afforded the opportunity to practice the learned skills for success in taking an AP exam that is content specific.

Textbook(s): Traditions & Encounters, Glencoe- McGraw/Hill ISBN 9780076594382

Sociology

Course Code: 290610

Prerequisites: Grades 11 or 12

Credits: .50 Elective

This semester course recommended for juniors and seniors focuses on defining the science of sociology; examines the question of issues involved in the study of humans and their cultures, family and socialization, factors influencing human behavior, and solutions of the individual; institutions; social problems; and the effects of rapid technological changes and urbanization.

Textbook(s): Sociology and You

Student Board Member

Course Code: 253003

Prerequisites: Elected by peers to the office

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course is intended for the student elected by PGCRASG to serve as the student board member for the Prince George’s County Public Schools Board of Education for the school year.

Textbook(s): None

Student Government Association 101 (Year One High School)

Course Code: 250613

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course provides a study of the legislative, educational and philosophical basis of student government. The course may include travel to other campuses, local, regional and state conferences and provide the opportunity to participate on faculty and administrative committees. Topics are designed to teach leadership skills and give practical experience in the social and civic responsibilities of student government. An emphasis will be placed on fostering a school-wide environment for all students to express and exchange opinions and ideas, develop leadership skills and promote student representation and involvement in all groups and organizations impacting the lives of students. .

Textbook(s): None

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Student Government Association 102 (Year Two High School)

Course Code: 250623

Prerequisites: Year One Student Government Association

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental elements of leadership as it pertains to student governmental processes, team and community building. Students will examine contemporary leadership models as well as their own values and beliefs to develop a personal philosophy of leadership. Through activities and projects facilitated by student government, students will learn how to apply theory and experience leadership in the high school and community settings.

Students interested in broadening their understanding of diverse topics related to self-knowledge, group dynamics and leadership are encouraged to enroll. .

Textbook(s): None

Student Government Association 103 (Year Three High School)

Course Code: 250633

Prerequisites: Year Two Student Government Association

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course provides opportunities to study, practice and develop group and individual leadership and organizational skills. These skills include decision-making, problem-solving, effective communication, leadership roles and understanding the need for civic responsibility. Students enrolled in this course will apply these skills in the relationships with peers, administration and community stakeholders.

The course is a hands-on and interactive learning approach to leadership. This course is customized to meet the needs of a student government association but can also be adapted to a broader student population. .

Textbook(s): None

Student Government Association 104 (Year Four High School)

Course Code: 250643

Prerequisites: Year Three Student Government Association

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course is a compilation and continuation of the themes and activities of the SGA 101, 102, 103 courses. The course focuses on actual participation in the local political arena and will include a school-wide service learning project and independent study. .

Textbook(s): None

Student Government

Course Code: 250103, 250113, 250123, 250133,

Prerequisites: Appointed or elected to the position

Credits: 1.0 Elective

Student Government is designed for students who have been elected or appointed to their Student

Government Association. In the course, students will learn the fundamentals of political behavior.

Students apply these principles to their own school by analyzing student needs and making recommendations to the appropriate administrators.

Textbook(s): None

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Student Government

Course Code: 250403

Prerequisites: Appointed or elected to the position

Credits: 0.0 Elective

Student Government is designed for students who have been elected or appointed to their Student

Government Association. In the course, students will learn the fundamentals of political behavior.

Students apply these principles to their own school by analyzing student needs and making recommendations to the appropriate administrators.

Textbook(s): None

Student Government President (PGC Regional)

Course Code: 254003

Prerequisites: Elected by peers to the office

Credits: 1.0 Elective

The President will preside over all meetings, serve as the organization’s official spokesperson, supervise enactment of all meeting approved legislation, be an ex-officio member of all committees created, serve as the official representative of the organization to the Maryland Association of Student

Councils, make an address on the state of the organization to the General Assembly at the end of his/her term, present written quarterly reports of the organization’s activities to every member school president, and perform all duties developing from the office.

Textbook(s): None

United States History II Reconstruction to Present

Course Codes: 262093, 262903, 262963, 262973

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 U.S. History

This course examines how the American political, economic, and social systems developed. Twentieth century content includes issues related to the development of foreign policy, the role of the United

States as a world leader, and the domestic response to a diversified population and issues such as reform and civil rights.

Textbook(s): The American Anthem: Reconstruction to the Present, Glencoe

United States History Intensive

Course Code: 262983

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 1.0 U.S. History

This course is designed to provide students with special needs with material regarding the basic topics in United States History. The class examines how the American political, economic and social systems developed. Instructional supports are provided as needed.

Textbook(s): TBA

United States History through the Arts

Course Code: 275303

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course is designed in collaboration with the Gilder Lerhman program whereby students engage

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in a study of United States history through the analysis of the arts.

Textbook(s): None

Women’s Studies

Course Code: 219900

Prerequisites: Preferably 11 th

or 12 th

grade

Credits: .50 Elective

This course in women’s studies focuses on the experience of women in the United States. It highlights the role(s) of women within society, past and present; the contributions of women; the struggle for equality; and the changing roles of women. This course is concerned with fostering the development of critical thinking, analysis, and research skills. Learning experiences include varied individual and cooperative learning projects, discussion, and hands-on activities.

Textbook(s): Women, Politics and American Society, ISBN 9780321202314

World History

Course Code: 261003, 261093

Prerequisites: Local, State, and National Government

Credits: 1.0 World History

This course focuses on modern world history beginning approximately 1400 AD. The course is based on four major themes: human interactions; hemispheric interactions; crisis, progress and change in the 20th century; and the challenges of the 21 st

century.

Textbook(s): Modern World History: Patterns of Interaction, McDougal Littell

World History Intensive

Course Code: 261083

Prerequisites: IEP

Credits: 1.0 World History

This course is designed to provide students with special needs with material regarding the basic topics in World History. The class examines modern world history beginning in approximately 1400

AD. Instructional supports are provided as needed.

Textbook(s): Modern World History: Patterns of Interaction, McDougal Littell, and supplemental materials to be announced

Visual Arts

Advanced Placement Studio Art 2D Design

Course Code: 613503

Prerequisites: Art 1, Art 2 or Departmental waiver

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art; Weighted

The Advanced Placement Studio Art Program enables highly motivated students to do college level work in studio art while still in high school. AP Studio Art students submit a portfolio of work for evaluation at the end of the school year. This rigorous program is intended for students seriously committed to studying art. Portfolios are evaluated on quality, concentration and breadth. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): The Visual Experience and Launching the Imagination

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Advanced Placement Studio Art 3D

Course Code: 613603

Prerequisites: Art 1; Ceramics or Sculpture

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art; Weighted

The Advanced Placement Studio Art Program enables highly motivated students to do college level work in studio art while still in high school. AP Studio Art students submit a portfolio of work for evaluation at the end of the school year. This rigorous program is intended for students seriously committed to studying art. Portfolios are evaluated on quality, concentration and breadth. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): The Visual Experience and Launching the Imagination

Advanced Placement Art History

Course Code: 616903

Prerequisites: Application and orientation session; 11 th

or 12

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art; Weighted th

grade student

The Advanced Placement Program in the History of Art is designed to provide the same benefits to secondary school students as are provided by an introductory college course in art history: an understanding and enjoyment of architecture, sculpture, painting, and other art forms within a historical and cultural context. In the course students learn to look at works of art with intelligence and sensitivity, examining the major forms of artistic expression of past cultures, as well as those of our own time and environment. Production experiences will be part of this course. Students who achieve this goal may receive advanced placement and/or credit at many colleges and universities.

All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Tansey, R., Kleiner, F., & Dela Croix, H., 10 th

Edition, Gardner’s art through the ages

Art 1

Course Code: 602103

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

Art 1 is designed as an entry-level course for the high school student. The curriculum provides a broad base of art experiences including: design, drawing, printmaking, painting, sculpting, lettering and crafts. Each art unit includes both a sequentially structured, hands-on experience, art vocabularies and a theoretical section that relates the cultural, historical, aesthetic significance, and critical analysis of the art form. The emphasis in each unit is on the development of fundamental concepts, technical and problem-solving skills. The course concludes with an introduction to careers in art. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): ArtTalk. ISBN 9780078305993

Art 2

Course Code: 602203

Prerequisites: Art 1

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Art 1. The curriculum is designed with a broad base of art experiences; however the emphasis is on increasing development of the students’ art concepts and artistic skills. The art student is introduced to cultural, historical and aesthetic material that relates to the studio assignments. Further development of art vocabulary with increasing emphasis placed on a portfolio of work in design, drawing, print making, painting,

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sculpture, graphic design and crafts. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Katz, Lankford, Plank. Themes and foundations in art. McGraw Hill Glencoe.

Art 3

Course Code: 602303

Prerequisites: Art 2

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This course is designed for the student who has successfully completed Art 2. The hands-on experience includes all the traditional areas of art such as design, drawing, painting, print making, sculpture, graphic design and crafts. The emphasis of the course is the development of a personal style of expression in the student’s work. In addition, the student will examine more closely the work of individual artists that were instrumental in developing the art of his/her own culture as well as indepth studies of the art of other cultures. As the art experience proceeds in each unit, the student will have the opportunity to learn about careers in art. Educational opportunities are explored in close cooperation with the guidance department. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/ sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Hobbs, J., Salome, R., & Vieth, K. (2005). The visual experience, 3 rd

Edition. Davis

Publications. and Brommer, G., & Gatto, J. (1999). Careers in art, 2 nd

Edition. Davis Publications.

Art 4

Course Code: 602403

Prerequisites: Art 3

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Art 3 and who have a special interest in art. The students are expected to have a greater participation in determining their direction and/or area of concentration. The course closely coordinates the students’ personal art style and their developing appreciation of broad cultural and historical influences in art. The emergence of personal expression through increased conceptual and skill development is stressed. Preparation for scholarships and college acceptance is provided in the preparation of a portfolio. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Hobbs, J., Salome, R., & Vieth, K. (2005). The visual experience, 3 rd

Edition. Davis

Publications. and Brommer, G., & Gatto, J. (1999). Careers in art, 2 nd

Edition. Davis Publications.

Art Appreciation 1

Course Code: 603100

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Fine Art

This semester course consists of studying the major approaches to understanding visual art: subject matter, materials, techniques, vocabulary and critical analysis. How the artists use these approaches to communicate will be emphasized. Works of art will be studied through the use of textbook, slide lectures, the Internet, and discussion. Students are expected to write about art, prepare oral presentations, critically discuss visual art products as well as create original work in the studio. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Mitler, G., & Ragans, R., (1999). Understanding art. McGraw Hill. or Mitler, G., (2006).

Art in focus, 5 th

Edition. McGraw Hill

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Art Appreciation 2

Course Code: 604100

Prerequisites: Art Appreciation 1

Credits: .50 Fine Art

This second semester course traces the history of visual arts in America from the Colonial period to the present. Painting, sculpture, graphics and architecture will be studied through a textbook, slide lectures, and the Internet. The students will be expected to write and discuss art, and major art movements. The students will also prepare oral presentations and critically analyze art. Students in the studio will create original work. Emphasis will be placed on the contribution of the artists in the growth and development of the United States. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/ sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Mitler, G., & Ragans, R., (1999). Understanding art. McGraw Hill. or Mitler, G., (2006).

Art in focus, 5 th

Edition. McGraw Hill

Basic Design

Course Code: 612200

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Fine Art

This semester course is intended for students who have had little art background. Most work in class will be flat work. This unit will stress such areas of concentration as design elements and principles in drawing, painting, and printing. Students will study the history of design. They will learn the fundamentals of critiquing artwork. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Gatto, J., & Porter, A. (2000). Visual design, 3 rd

Edition.

Basic Drawing and Painting

Course Code: 611600

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Fine Art

This semester course is intended for students with little art background who would like to have some experiences with drawing, sketching, and painting. Master works of two-dimensional artists will be studied. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Rose, T., & Mahan-Cox, S. (2007). Discovering drawing. Davis Publication and Brommer,

G., & Kinue, N. (2003). Exploring painting, 3rd edition. Davis Publication

Basic Printmaking

Course Code: 613400

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Fine Art

This semester course will allow the student to explore printing and stenciling as vehicles for creative self-expression. The course will incorporate lettering and layout and various commercial aspects of advertising art. The history of print making will be studied. Students will critique the work of master print makers. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Basic Printing Techniques

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Basic Sculpture

Course Code: 611700

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Fine Art

This semester course will emphasize the importance of craftsmanship in working with threedimensional media. Clay, metal, wood, wax, stone, yarns, and fabrics may be molded, carved, woven, and constructed into many satisfying and useful articles. Emphasis will be placed on the utilitarian as well as the aesthetic qualities of three-dimensional art. The history of sculpture and vocabulary will be studied. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Williams, A. (2005). Beginning sculpture. Davis Publication.

Ceramics 1

Course Code: 611503

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

In this year-long course, students will learn to make pottery and other clay forms using traditional and exploratory methods. Decorating techniques will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on developing proficiency in techniques, developing art vocabulary and handling of equipment. Students will be expected to produce original clay products. The influences of other cultures will be examined. Students will critique their own work and the work of significant traditional and contemporary ceramic artists. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Mackey, M. (2003). Experience clay. Davis Publication.

Ceramics 2

Course Code: 611803

Prerequisites: Ceramics 1

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

In the year-long course, students will produce clay products using advanced skills and techniques used in Ceramics 1. Emphasis will be placed on ceramic design and skill in handling materials, tools, and equipment. Advanced skills and techniques will include mold formation and pouring. Emphasis will be on the creation of clay pieces with lids, handles, openings and other utilitarian and decorative devices. The influences of other cultures will be examined. Students will critique their own work and the work of significant traditional and contemporary ceramic artists. The emphasis on this course will be on ceramics as sculptural form. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Mackey, M. (2003). Experience clay. Davis Publication.

Computer Graphics/Graphic Design

Course Code: 619203

Prerequisites: Art 1 and teacher recommendation

Credits: 2.0 Fine Art

This course consists of traditional studio and computer laboratory experience. As an introduction to the basic components of graphic design, the course emphasizes visual communication and creative problem solving along with the integration of other disciplines. The student is given a structured introduction to a variety of graphic materials, instruments, vocabulary and method and presentation techniques. Development of skills in lettering, composition and layout is integrated into the assignments.

The student develops primary skills associated with computer operation and explores the computer imaging systems as an artist’s tool. Career and cultural influences will be emphasized. Computer

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

typography, desktop publication, animation, sound integration and digitized imagery will be covered in the course. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): TBA

Computer Graphics 1

Course Code: 619903

Prerequisites: Teacher Permission and one of the following: Graphic Design, Art 1, or Basic Design

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course is an introductory exploration of the creative potential, nature and use of the computer imaging system as an artist’s tool. It will provide an opportunity for students to develop skills needed to create computer-generated images through their interaction with the software as well as various input and output devices. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): TBA

Computer Graphics 2

Course Code: 619913

Prerequisites: Art 1, Computer Graphics 1

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course is an exploration of the creative potential, nature and use of computer imagining, typography, and layout and design programs as artists’ tools. It will provide an opportunity for students to acquire and develop the skills needed to create various types of computer generated work using software, internet and various input and output devices. Students will be expected to acquire and develop the skills associated with operating and maintaining a computer. They will be expected to develop proficiency in their use of the hardware, software and accessories available to them in this course.

Art History, Art Criticism, Aesthetics, and Art Production will be addressed for computer imaging, typography, layout and design in order to assure that students acquire knowledge and understanding of the visual and graphic arts and a foundation upon which to make sound aesthetic judgments. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): TBA

Computer Graphics 2

Course Code: 619303

Prerequisites: Basic Design, Art 1, Computer Graphics 1

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This course is an exploration of the creative potential, nature and use of computer imagining, typography, and layout and design programs as artists’ tools. It will provide an opportunity for students to acquire and develop the skills needed to create various types of computer generated work using software, internet and various input and output devices. Students will be expected to acquire and develop the skills associated with operating and maintaining a computer. They will be expected to develop proficiency in their use of the hardware, software and accessories available to them in this course.

Art History, Art Criticism, Aesthetics, and Art Production will be addressed for computer imaging, typography, layout and design in order to assure that students acquire knowledge and understanding of the visual and graphic arts and a foundation upon which to make sound aesthetic judgments. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): TBA

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Computer Graphics 2 Dual Enrollment

Course Code: 619513

Prerequisites: Basic Design, Art 1, Computer Graphics 1

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This Dual Enrollment course is an exploration of the creative potential, nature and use of computer imaging, typography, and layout and design programs as artists’ tools. It will provide an opportunity for students to acquire and develop the skills needed to create various types of computer generated work using software, internet and various input and output devices. Students will be expected to acquire and develop the skills associated with operating and maintaining a computer. They will be expected to develop proficiency in their use of the hardware, software and accessories available to them in this course. Art History, Art Criticism, Aesthetics, and Art Production will be addressed for computer imaging, typography, layout and design in order to assure that students acquire knowledge and understanding of the visual and graphic arts and a foundation upon which to make sound aesthetic judgments. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Communicating through Graphic Design by Kevin Gatta & Claire Mowbray Golding

Davis Publications

Crafts 1

Course Code: 601100

Prerequisites: None

Credits: .50 Fine Art

This introductory semester course deals with the aesthetics of craft design. It stresses the development of fundamental skills and the knowledge necessary to work intelligently and creatively with craft media.

Students will be expected to learn appropriate art vocabulary. The area of study will be American crafts. Study of the historical heritage of the crafts produced is a part of the course. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Sprintzen, A. Crafts. Davis Publications

Crafts 2

Course Code: 601200

Prerequisites: Crafts 1

Credits: .50 Fine Art

The second semester of Crafts will continue with American crafts. The aesthetics of design and craftsmanship will be stressed in the development of the products produced. Some techniques and processes from Craft 1 will be repeated to enhance the crafts produced in this course. Study of the historical heritage of the American crafts will be an integral part of this course. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Sprintzen, A. Crafts. Davis Publications

Drawing and Painting 1

Course Code: 611103

Prerequisites: Art 1 and teacher permission

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This year-long course will provide opportunities for students to develop drawing and painting skills. A variety of materials and techniques will be used to produce compositions. Organization of compositions will be based on the Elements and Principles of Design. Students will be expected to produce original drawings and paintings and critique those works. Students will be expected to develop art vocabulary.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

The work of master artists will be discussed. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/ sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Bromer, G., Kinue, N. (2003). Exploring painting, 3rd edition. Davis Publication; Mitler.

G., Howze, J. (2006). Understanding drawing. McGraw Hill Glencoe

Drawing and Painting 2

Course Code: 611203

Prerequisites: Drawing and Painting 1 and/or Teacher Permission

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This year-long course is for students who have completed Drawing and Painting 1. Students will continue to develop skills and vocabulary in drawing and painting techniques. All students will learn more advanced application of techniques. Emphasis will be placed on producing original artwork suitable for exhibits and portfolios. Organization of compositions will be based on the Elements and

Principles of Design. Students will critique their work as well as the works of master artists. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Bromer, G., Kinue, N. (2003). Exploring painting, 3 rd

Edition. Davis Publication; Mitler.

G., Howze, J. (2006). Understanding drawing. McGraw Hill Glencoe

Honors Art Studio 1

Course Code: 610003

Prerequisites: Art 1; Teacher Approval

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This year-long course is designed for the advanced junior and senior student who has matured artistically and aesthetically. The art teacher and the student will develop an outline and plans for a portfolio of artwork to be executed. The use of a variety of techniques, skills, and media will be part of the student portfolio. Standards for organizing portfolios and entering work in national and local art shows will be a primary concern. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): Hobbs, J., Salome, R., Vieth, K. (2005). The visual experience, 3 rd

Edition. Davis

Publications; Brommer, G., Gatto, J. (1999). Careers in art, 2nd edition. Davis Publications

Honors Art Studio 2

Course Code: 610103

Prerequisites: Honors Art Studio 1; teacher approval

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This year-long course is designed for the advanced senior student who has matured artistically and aesthetically. The student will explore new media and techniques. Standards for organizing portfolios and entering work in national and local art shows will be a primary concern. Students will be expected to work independently in preparing and presenting a portfolio of work.

Textbook(s): Hobbs, J., Salome, R., Vieth, K. (2005). The visual experience, 3 rd

Edition. Davis

Publications; Brommer, G., Gatto, J. (1999). Careers in art, 2nd edition. Davis Publications

Introduction to Photography

Course Code: 616403

Prerequisites: Art 1 or Basic Design; teacher approval

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This course will introduce students to basic photography. The content will include the history and mechanics of photography as well as the aesthetics and cultural influences of photography. Teacher

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

and student evaluation of work is an integral part of this course. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): London, B., Upton, J. (2005). Photography, 8 th

Edition. Prentice Hall.

Photography 1

Course Code: 618203

Prerequisites: Intro to Photo; teacher approval

Credits: 2.0 Fine Art

This two-credit course is for those students interested in photography as an area of concentration in the visual arts. It is designed to provide students with advanced levels of knowledge of the photographic processes and techniques. In addition to developing their own style, students will develop advanced technical skills, understanding and application of photographic equipment and materials. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): London, B., Upton, J. (2005). Photography, 8 th

Edition. Prentice Hall.

Photography 2

Course Code: 618303

Prerequisites: Photography 1

Credits: 2.0 Fine Art

This two-credit course is for those students interested in photography as an area of concentration in the visual arts. It is designed as an extension and refinement of the ideas, techniques and theories covered in the Introduction to Photography course. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): London, B., Upton, J. (2005). Photography, 8 th

Edition. Prentice Hall.

Sculpture 1

Course Code: 611303

Prerequisites: Art 1 or Basic Design; teacher approval

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This year-long course will emphasize sculpture processes. Students will be expected to produce original sculpture forms using a variety of materials and techniques as well as develop art vocabulary.

The importance of craftsmanship will be stressed. The works of master sculptors will be examined.

Students will discuss and critique their work and the work of master sculptors. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): O’Brien, M., Sibley, N. Sculpture. Davis Publications

Sculpture 2

Course Code: 611403

Prerequisites: Sculpture 1 and Teacher Permission

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This year-long course is for students who have mastered the objectives and skills covered in Sculpture

1. Students will be encouraged to work individually on more advanced projects and to strengthen their ability to use the various sculpture methods. Emphasis will be placed on design and form. Students will be expected to produce original sculpture pieces. Self-evaluation will be stressed. Discussion and critiques of student work and sculptures of master artists is an integral part of this course. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook.

Textbook(s): O’Brien, M., Sibley, N. Sculpture. Davis Publications

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Television Production 1

Course Code: 760113 single period

760313 double period

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 or 2.0 Elective

This introductory course offers the student the opportunity to assist in the direction and production of television programs. This course is an introduction to television. It will acquaint students with the techniques and problems of television production through application of theory and methods.

The course will survey all aspects of television production from camera operation to directing. The students will cover the basic elements needed for a production including script writing. Practical application of these theories is provided through the student productions in the television studio. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook. Students who entered high school before

Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may take this course for Technology

Education credit through school year 2012-2013. All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn Technology Education credit.

Textbook(s): Television Production Handbook, ISBN 9780495898849

Television Production 2

Course Code: 760213 single period

760413 double period

Prerequisites: Television Production 1

Credits: 1.0 or 2.0 Elective

Students, who have successfully completed Television Production 1, may enroll in this yearlong course.

In Television Production 2, students will explore the aspects of producing, script writing, directing, reporting and editing for the production of various genres of programming. Utilizing studio production and field production techniques, students will learn to work independently, as well as cooperatively to complete the production process. Students will plan the total operational and management process for actual television programs, as well as participate in and take responsibility for various aspects of the finished program, such as set design, camera, audio, video switching, lighting, graphics and editing. Students will be assigned duties throughout the production process, thus exposing them to the rigors of creating television content. Upon successful completion of this course, students will understand how a production is conceived, produced, and executed.

Textbook(s): Television Production Handbook, Herbert Zettl

Television Production 3

Course Code: 760513

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Elective

In this course students work projects such as the senior video yearbook. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook. Students will produce a demo DVD which is a portfolio of all of their best work. These are shorts/videos during their three years in television production. In addition, this demo DVD should include all of the pertinent info/bio about the student (such as a featurette does in a film). This demo DVD is essential when applying to the top television and film schools in the nation.

Textbook(s): TBA

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

World Art: Pre Diploma Program

Course Code: 614213

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

AP Art History is a rigorous, year-long course designed to prepare students for the Art History

Advanced Placement Exam. The course covers art history in chronological order from Paleolithic through Post-Modernism. Students will study art within its historical, cultural context in order to learn how art encodes social ideologies. Students will learn to understand works of art through visual analysis in order to evaluate the artistic merit of the work while developing critical thinking skills.

Students will learn canons of western and non-western images and the basic problems and flux of the canons in order to develop a better appreciation of the art. Students will learn to appreciate the aesthetics of all art forms within global societies in order to make contextual connections to all types of human experiences.

Textbook(s): TBA

Visual and Performing Arts (VPA):

Dance

Ballet 1

Course Code: 707003

Prerequisites: VPA Application and Audition

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course focuses on the elementary classical ballet technique (Vaganova, Checetti, RAD, or

Bournville): classical form, static, and dynamic alignment, rotation, weight, shift, body positions, port de bras, breath support, level change with application of classical ballet vocabulary. Topics include pointe, barre, and center floor work including adage movements, petit allegro, pirouettes, grand allegro and traveling turns. Materials include videos, costumes, and CDs. Video cameras are used to conduct classes and to record student practical exams and performances. Students perform in this style in the winter and spring performances.

Textbook(s): TBA

Ballet 2

Course Code: 707103

Prerequisites: VPA Application and Audition

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course is a continuation of the study of classical ballet technique (Vaganova, Checetti, RAD, or

Bournville): emphasis on exploring and embodying a particular world view, including intermediate level enchanments, shifting weight physically and musically connecting movement sequences; and sequencing combinations designed to develop both strength and flexibility. Topics include pointe, barre, and center floor work including adage movements, petit allegro, pirouettes, grand allegro and traveling turns. Materials include videos, costumes, and CDs. Video cameras are used to conduct classes and to record student practical exams and performances. Students perform in this style in the winter and spring performances.

Textbook(s): TBA

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Ballet 3

Course Code: 707203

Prerequisite: Ballet 2

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course is a continuation of the study of classical ballet technique (Vaganova, Checetti, RAD, or

Bournville): advanced level enchanments, standard classical divertissement and style distinctions including progression of technical complexities and approaches to contemporary ballet. At this level students will develop greater control and strength. The level is more advanced in all facets of the class. More vocabulary is required. Topics include barre, center, adage, petit allegro, grand allegro, pirouettes and turns traveling. Materials include videos, costumes, and CDs. Video cameras are used to conduct classes and to record student practical exams and performances. Students perform in this style in the winter and spring performances.

Textbook(s): TBA

Ballet 4

Course Code: 707303

Prerequisite: Ballet 3

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

Building on the techniques learned in Level 3, this course emphasizes extension, strength of balloon, and phrasing artistry. Classes are conducted on pointe. Topics include barre, center, adage, petit allegro, grand allegro and turns. Vocabulary work continues. Students perform in this style in the winter and spring performances.

Textbook(s): TBA

Choreography

Course Code: 707803

Prerequisite: Level 2 Dance

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

Students experiment with movement in groups and alone, produce studies from which to choreograph a dance for college auditions, and choreograph a piece to present in the Choreography Concert. Topics include analysis of dance in choreographic terms - space, time and force, examination and evaluation of major components of any dance, and choreography for self and others. Students perform in this style in the winter and spring performances.

Textbook(s): TBA

Dance Production

Course Code: 708003

Prerequisites: Level 3 Dance

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

In this course students will focus on theatre crafts and techniques involved in dance production, including lighting, sound, set and costume design and construction, stage management, videotaping, and all financial aspects. Production components beyond the regular school day are required.

Textbook(s): None

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Ethnic Dance

Course Code: 707603

Prerequisites: Level 2 Dance

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

In this course students will develop an understanding of world cultures through studying traditional dances and music of a selected culture. Students perform in this style in the winter and spring performances.

Textbook(s): None

Improvisational Dance

Course Code: 707903

Prerequisites: Level 2 Dance

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course provides an introduction to the process of spontaneous movement and discovery involving solo and group movement experiences. Students perform in this style in the winter and spring performances.

Textbook(s): None

Jazz or Tap 1

Course Code: 706503

Prerequisites: VPA Application and Audition

Credit : 1.0 Fine Arts

This 9 th

or 10 th

grade course is an introduction to basic jazz or tap techniques stressing body alignment, physical toning and strengthening. Emphasis is placed on the use of various styles and movement patterns. Course topics include jazz and tap techniques and styles, Luigi, Fosse, rhythm tap, jazz tap, and others. Students perform in this style in the winter and/or spring performances.

Textbook(s): TBA

Jazz or Tap 2

Course Code: 706603

Prerequisite: Passing Level 1 Dance courses

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This grade 10 or 11 course is a continuation of Jazz or Tap 1 using more complicated floor patterns and combinations. Course topics include jazz or tap techniques developing more strength and accuracy and more advanced combinations. Students perform in this style in the winter and/or spring performances.

Textbook(s): TBA

Modern Dance 1

Course Code: 706003

Prerequisites: VPA Application and Audition

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course provides an introduction to the elementary aspects of modern dance techniques: level change, weight shift, dynamic alignment, breath support and expression, and application of modern dance. Students perform in this style in the winter and/or spring performances.

Textbook(s): TBA

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Modern Dance 2

Course Code: 706103

Prerequisites: Passing Level 1 dance classes

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course continues to build on the techniques of Level 1 Modern: emphasis on exploring and embodying a particular world view, including expanded movement vocabulary involving sequences in greater complexity - kinesthetically, spatially, and musically. Students perform in this style in the winter and/or spring performances.

Textbook(s): TBA

Modern Dance 3

Course Code: 706203

Prerequisites: Passing Level 2 dance classes

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

In this grade 11 or 12 course, students continue the development and progression of dance technique and participate in at least three concerts. Graham, Horton, or Dunham technique will be used as the basis for this year’s study. Students perform in this style in the winter and/or spring performances.

Textbook(s): The Dancer Prepares, James Penrod; Basic Concepts in Modern Dance, Gay Cheney

Modern Dance 4

Course Code: 706303

Prerequisites: Level 3 Dance

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This grade 12 course places emphasis on refining technical skills and developing individual expression.

Students continue the study of Graham, Horton, or Dunham techniques. Students perform in this style in the winter and/or spring performances.

Textbook(s): TBA

Pointe Ballet 3

Course Code: 707403

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

In this course students will focus on basic pointe (toe) work essential to students whose interest is in total comprehensivion of the elements necessary to the performance of classical ballet. This course will include work to strengthen the ankles and insteps and acclimation of body weight and placement.

Students perform in this style in the winter and/or spring performances.

Textbook(s): TBA

Pointe Ballet 4

Course Code: 707503

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course is a continuation of Pointe Ballet with emphasis on tempi, allegro combinations, enchainment au milieu and barre supported adage. Students perform in this style in the winter and/ or spring performances.

Textbook(s): TBA

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Repertory

Course Code: 706903

Prerequisites: Level 2 Dance

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course is an introduction to group dance experiences through rehearsal, performance, dance technique training and technical theatre practice. The students will be involved in creating and reviving diverse repertory of a chosen choreographer(s). Students perform in this style in the winter and/or spring performances.

Textbook(s): None

Visual and Performing Arts (VPA):

Music

Advanced Band

Course Code: 636233, 636243

Prerequisites: Basic Band, Teacher approval; 636003

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course emphasizes a high standard of musical excellence in the preparation and performance of band literature. The band provides an opportunity for instrumentalists to continue their instruction and to gain performing experiences on a daily basis. Small group and ensemble instruction are scheduled.

Topics include medieval, renaissance, baroque, classical, romantic, and twentieth century.

Textbook(s): Foundations for a Superior Performance, Belwin Intermediate

Advanced Orchestra

Course Code: 641233, 641243

Prerequisites: VPA Application and Audition

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course emphasizes a high standard of musical excellence in the preparation and performance of orchestral literature. The orchestra provides an opportunity for string instrumentalists to continue their instruction and to gain performing experiences on a daily basis. Small groups or ensemble instruction is scheduled. Topics include medieval, renaissance, baroque, classical, romantic, and twentieth century.

Textbook(s): Advanced Techniques for strings; Essentials for Strings; Essential Elements Book IV

Advanced Chorus - Chamber

Course Code: 632143, 632153

Prerequisites: VPA Application and Audition, Concert Chorus, Applied Music

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This full-year course offers instruction in advanced vocal techniques, score reading, study and performance of mixed chorus literature, and four-part advanced and college-level choral literature.

Students have out-of-school performances, which may require after-school rehearsals. Topics include medieval, renaissance, baroque, classical, romantic, and twentieth century.

Textbook(s): TBA

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Applied Music Band

Course Code: 646103, 646113, 646123, 646133, 626133

Prerequisites: VPA Application and Audition

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

Students are given private lesson instruction in orchestra or band instruments. They receive weekly one on one instruction. This course will assist students to develop, through personal attention, proper tone production techniques such as embouchure, posture, playing position, breath control, bow control, and left hand control. Students develop, through personal attention, proper performing techniques such as articulation, scales, arpeggios, sight reading, vibrato, and fingering/positions.

Students develop, through personal attention, musicianship techniques such as practice habits, phrasing, style and period, and solo and ensemble playing. Students will demonstrate performance proficiency for their applied teacher on a weekly basis. Performance at the Prince George’s County

Solo and Ensemble is mandatory. A jury evaluation will be required at the end of each semester.

Textbook(s): TBA

Applied Music Piano

Course Code: 646203, 646213, 646223, 646233

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This full-year course offers each student individualized one-on-one instruction in the music instrument of their major. Through this course students create a solo repertoire that increases in quantity and rigor each year. No specific text is issue for this course. Instead students work from individual music books suitable to their instruments and playing ability

Textbook(s): TBA

Applied Music Strings

Course Code: 646303, 646313, 646323, 646333

Prerequisites: VPA Application and Audition

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

Students are given private lesson instruction in orchestra or band instruments. They receive weekly one on one instruction. toThis course will assist students to develop, through personal attention, proper tone production techniques such as embouchure, posture, playing position, breath control, bow control, and left hand control. Students develop, through personal attention, proper performing techniques such as articulation, scales, arpeggios, sight reading, vibrato, and fingering/positions.

Students develop, through personal attention, musicianship techniques such as practice habits, phrasing, style and period, and solo and ensemble playing. Students will demonstrate performance proficiency for their applied teacher on a weekly basis. Performance at the Prince George’s County

Solo and Ensemble is mandatory. A jury evaluation will be required at the end of each semester.

Textbook(s): TBA

Special Instrumental Ensemble

Course Code: 641303, 641313

Prerequisites: Instrumental Teacher Recommendation

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This Chamber Orchestra is designed for instrumental music students desiring to enhance their musical experience through the study and performance of literature for the smaller instrumental ensemble.

Topics include medieval, renaissance, baroque, classical, romantic, and twentieth century.

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Textbook(s): TBA

Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Concert Chorus

Course Code: 646803

Prerequisites: VPA Application and Audition

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This full-year course offers instruction in intermediate vocal techniques, score reading, study and performance of mixed chorus literature and four-part medium and advanced choral literature. This group has out-of-school performances, which may require after-school rehearsals. Topics include medieval, renaissance, baroque, Classical, romantic, and twentieth century.

Textbook(s): TBA

Jazz Ensemble

Course Code: 647203

Prerequisites: Band director recommendation

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This full-year course offers instruction on advanced instrumental jazz technique, score reading, and study and performance of classic and modern jazz. This group has out of school performances, which may require after school rehearsals.

Textbook(s): TBA

Piano Theory I

Course Code: 646003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This full-year course offers students instruction in the fundamentals of music theory including basic skills in notation, keyboard, aural dictation, sight singing, simple melodic construction, harmony and computer aided composition. Topics include basic notation, key signatures, tetra chords, scales, intervals, acoustics and expression marks, triads, and melodic writing.

Textbook(s): Music Theory, G. Thaddeus Jones; Anthology of Musical Forms, Leon Stein; Master

Theory, Peters and Yoder; Melodia, Cole & Lewis; Harvard Dictionary of Music; Musicianship for older

beginners, Arlis&Schukman, Carl Fischer; Hannon Studies Vol. 1, Hanon/Schirmer; Introduction to

sight singing, Arlis & Schukman, Carl Fischer; Teaching Choral Sight Reading, Boyd/Parker; Willis

Keyboard and Reference Chart, Willis Music Co.; Rhythm Drills; Favorite Classical Melodies, Bastien/

Kjos; First Piano Repertoire, Bastien/Kjos; From Purcell to Mozart, T. Presser; Intermediate Theory

Vol. 1,2,&3, James Bastien/Kjos; The Music Arts, David Schanke, Music Arts Publishing Co.; The

Independent Singer, Richard Edstrom, Curtis Press; Introduction to Musical Notation, EVA; Elements

of Music, EVA

Piano Theory II

Course Code: 647303

Prerequisites: Piano Theory I

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This full-year course offers continuing instruction in the areas of written theory, keyboard, sight singing, aural dictation and computer assisted composition as well as continued development in scales, intervals triads melody writing, and four-part harmony. Course topics include majors scales, minor scales, intervals, transposition, triads, melodic cadences, harmonic cadences, and four-part harmony.

Textbook(s): Music Theory, G. Thaddeus Jones; Anthology of Musical Forms, Leon Stein; Master

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Theory, Peters and Yoder; Melodia, Cole & Lewis; Harvard Dictionary of Music; Musicianship for Older

Beginners, Arlis&Schukman, Carl Fischer; Hannon Studies Vol. 1, Hanon/Schirmer; Introduction to

sight singing, Arlis&Schukman, Carl Fischer; Teaching Choral Sight Reading, Boyd/Parker; Willis

Keyboard and Reference Chart, Willis Music Co.; Rhythm Drills; Favorite Classical Melodies, Bastien/

Kjos; First Piano Repertoire, Bastien/Kjos; From Purcell to Mozart, T. Presser; Intermediate Theory

Vol. 1,2,&3, James Bastien/Kjos; The Music Arts, David Schanke, Music Arts Publishing Co.; The

Independent Singer, Richard Edstrom, Curtis Press; Introduction to Musical Notation, EVA; Elements

of Music, EVA

Piano Theory III

Course Code: 647403

Prerequisites: Theory I, Theory II or equivalent knowledge

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This full-year course offers continuing instruction in the areas of written theory, Keyboard, sight singing, aural dictation, and computer, including work in tonality, forms of melody writing, principles of four-part writing, non-harmonic tones, harmonic cadences and composition. Topics include Melodia Parts 1 and 2, tonality and key feeling, melody writing with modes, part writing, harmonization, composition, and dictation.

Textbook(s): Music Theory, G. Thaddeus Jones; Anthology of Musical Forms, Leon Stein; Master

Theory, Peters and Yoder; Melodia, Cole & Lewis; Harvard Dictionary of Music; Musicianship for

older beginners, Arlis&Schukman, Carl Fischer; Hannon Studies Vol. 1, Hanon/Schirmer; Introduction

to sight singing, Arlis&Schukman, Carl Fischer; Teaching Choral Sight Reading, Boyd/Parker; Willis

Keyboard and Reference Chart, Willis Music Co.; Rhythm Drills; Favorite Classical Melodies, Bastien/

Kjos; First Piano Repertoire, Bastien/Kjos; From Purcell to Mozart, T. Presser; Intermediate Theory

Vol. 1,2,&3, James Bastien/Kjos; The Music Arts, David Schanke, Music Arts Publishing Co.; The

Independent Singer, Richard Edstrom, Curtis Press; Introduction to Musical Notation, EVA; Elements

of Music, EVA; Music for Sight Singing, 2

Exercises, Watson Crescendo

nd

Edition, Robert W. Ottman; Fifty Two Part Sight Reading

Piano Theory IV

Course Code: 647503

Prerequisites: Theory III

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This full-year grade 11 or 12 course offers continuation instruction in the areas of written theory, piano keyboard, sight singing, aural dictation and computer applications. Topics include seventh chords, modulation, secondary dominate, and classical musical form and style.

Textbook(s): Anthology of Musical Forms, Leon Stein; Master Theory, Peters and Yoder

Melodia, Cole & Lewis; Harvard Dictionary of Music; Musicianship for Older Beginners, Arlis&Schukman;

Carl Fischer; Hannon Studies Vol. 1, Hanon, Schirmer; Introduction to Sight Singing, Arlis&Schukman;

Carl Fischer; Teaching Choral Sight Reading, Boyd: Parker; Willis Keyboard and Reference Chart,

Willis Music.Co; Rhythm Drills; Favorite Classical Melodies, Bastien/Kjos; First Piano Repertoire,

Bastien/Kjos; From Purcell to Mozart, T. Presser; Intermediate Theory Vol. 1, 2,& 3, James Bastien/

Kjos; The Music Arts, David Schanke, Music Arts Publishing Co.; The Independent Singer, Richard

Edstrom, Curtis Press; Introduction to Musical Notation, EVA; Elements of Music, EVA; Music Theory,

Thaddeus Jones; Fifty Two Part Sight Reading Exercises, Watson Crescendo; Music for Sight Singing,

2 nd

Edition, Robert W. Ottman; The Independent Singer, Richard Edstrom, Curtis Press

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Advanced Placement Music Theory

Course Code: 647603

Prerequisites: Application and orientation session; Piano Theory IV or equivalent knowledge

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

This full year course is designed for the experienced piano student who wishes to develop greater technical ability, good independent practice skills and written theory. Additionally, sight singing, aural dictation and computer applications will enhance instruction. Topics may include seventh chords, modulation, secondary dominate, and classical musical form and style. Students that will be attending college as Music majors are encouraged to take this course.

Textbook(s): May include Anthology of Musical Forms, Leon Stein; Master Theory, Peters and Yoder

Melodia, Cole & Lewis; Harvard Dictionary of Music; Musicianship for Older Beginners,Arlis&Schukman;

Carl Fischer; Hannon Studies Vol. 1, Hanon, Schirmer; Introduction to Sight Singing, Arlis&Schukman;

Carl Fischer; Teaching Choral Sight Reading, Boyd: Parker; Willis Keyboard and Reference Chart,

Willis Music.Co; Rhythm Drills; Favorite Classical Melodies, Bastien/Kjos; First Piano Repertoire,

Bastien/Kjos; From Purcell to Mozart, T. Presser; Intermediate Theory Vol. 1, 2,& 3, James Bastien/

Kjos; The Music Arts, David Schanke, Music Arts Publishing Co.; The Independent Singer, Richard

Edstrom, Curtis Press; Introduction to Musical Notation, EVA; Elements of Music, EVA; Music Theory,

Thaddeus Jones; Fifty Two Part Sight Reading Exercises, Watson Crescendo; Music for Sight Singing,

2 nd

edition, Robert W. Ottman; The Independent Singer, Richard Edstrom, Curtis Press and others as determined by student ability.

Visual and Performing Arts (VPA):

Television Production

Depending on staff and facilities other high schools may offer these courses for 1 or 2 elective credits.

Television Production 1

Course Code: 760113 single period

760313 double period

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 or 2.0 Elective

This introductory course offers the student the opportunity to assist in the direction and production of television programs. This course is an introduction to television. It will acquaint students with the techniques and problems of television production through application of theory and methods.

The course will survey all aspects of television production from camera operation to directing. The students will cover the basic elements needed for a production including script writing. Practical application of these theories is provided through the student productions in the television studio. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook. Students who entered high school before

Foundations of Technology (FOT) became available at that school may have taken this course for

Technology Education credit through school year 2012-2013. All students who entered high school after FOT became available at that school must take FOT, preferably in their freshman year. After

SY 2013, all students must take FOT or a designated course (to be determined) to earn Technology

Education credit.

Textbook(s): Television Production Handbook, ISBN 9780495898849

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Television Production 2

Course Code: 760213 single period

760413 double period

Prerequisites: Television Production 1

Credits: 1.0 or 2.0 Elective

Students, who have successfully completed Television Production 1, may enroll in this yearlong course.

In Television Production 2, students will explore the aspects of producing, scriptwriting, directing, reporting and editing for the production of various genres of programming. Utilizing studio production and field production techniques, students will learn to work independently, as well as cooperatively to complete the production process. Students will plan the total operational and management process for actual television programs, as well as participate in and take responsibility for various aspects of the finished program, such as set design, camera, audio, video switching, lighting, graphics and editing. Students will be assigned duties throughout the production process, thus exposing them to the rigors of creating television content. Upon successful completion of this course, students will understand how a production is conceived, produced, and executed.

Textbook(s): Television Production Handbook, Herbert Zettl

Television Production 3

Course Code: 760513

Prerequisites: TBA

Credits: 1.0 Elective

In this course students work projects such as the senior video yearbook. All students will be expected to maintain a journal/sketchbook. Students will produce a demo DVD which is a portfolio of all of their best work. These are shorts/videos during their three years in television production. In addition, this demo DVD should include all of the pertinent info/bio about the student (such as a featurette does in a film). This demo DVD is essential when applying to the top television and film schools in the nation.

Textbook(s): TBA

Visual and Performing Arts (VPA):

Theatre

Acting Studio 1

Course Code: 116003

Prerequisites: VPA Application and Audition

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This level 1 course is designed as a synthesis of information learned through reading, lecture, exploration, writing, oral presentation, and practical application of acting concepts and techniques.

Course topics include concentration, pantomime, mime, improvisation, stage movement, vocal development, character development, studio rehearsal and performance, and dramatic/comic acting.

Textbook(s): The Dynamics of Acting, Joan Snyder/Michael P. Drumsta; Playing an Introduction

to Acting, Paul Kuritz, Prentice-Hall, Inc; Acting is Believing, Charles McGraw, Holt, Tinehart, and

Winston; Theatre Preparation and Performance, Charlotte Lee and David Grote, Scott, Foresman, and Company; The Stage and the School, Ommanney and Schanker, McGraw-Hill Books

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Acting Studio 2

Course Code: 116703

Prerequisites: Acting Studio 1

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This level 2 course continues the development of the acting skills introduced in Acting Studio 1.

Students continue their development by exploring new concepts and ideas. Multicultural aspects will be emphasized through the performance and study of the works of international playwrights. Topics include advanced oral interpretation, auditioning techniques, children’s theatre, musical theatre, and twentieth century styles of acting.

Textbook(s): The Dynamics of Acting, Joan Snyder/Michael P. Drumsta; Playing an Introduction

to Acting, Paul Kuritz, Prentice-Hall, Inc.; Acting is Believing, Charles McGraw, Holt, Tinehart, and

Winston; Theatre Preparation and Performance, Charlotte Lee and David Grote, Scott, Foresman, and Company; The Stage and the School, Ommanney and Schanker, McGraw-Hill Books

Introduction to Theatre Production

Course Code: 116103

Prerequisites: VPA Application and Audition

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This Theatre for the Visual and Performing Arts course for 9 th

graders or Level 1 is designed as a synthesis of information learned through reading, lecture, writing, oral presentation, and practical application of stage principles. Course topics include technical development, scenic construction, introduction to scenic design, stage practicum, lighting, costuming, and stage management. Students use drawing boards, t-squares, and architecture scales.

Textbook(s): The Stage and the School, Ommanney and Schanker, McGraw-Hill; Theatre Preparation

and Performance, Charlotte Lee and David Grote, Scott-Foresman

Performance Styles

Course Code: 115203

Prerequisites: Acting Studio 1, Acting Studio 2

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

The purpose of this grade 11 course is to expose students to skills needed to perform those styles of theatre most often encountered by the developing actor. Course topics include ensemble acting, soliloquy acting, classical acting in the Greek tradition, physical comedic timing, restoration comedy in performance, and acting Shakespeare.

Textbook(s): The Dynamics of Acting, Joan Snyder/Michael P. Drumsta, National Textbook Company;

The Stage and the School, Ommanney and Schanker, McGraw-Hill

Play Writing/Directing

Course Code: 117003

Prerequisites: Special Topics in Theatre

Credits: 2.0 Elective

This course is designed to enable fourth-year theatre students to examine closely the principles and practices of play writing and directing. Practical application of learned techniques will be an outcome of the course through the utilization of underclassmen in student directed projects. Topics include review of play writing principles, the successful one-act, scripting one-act plays, the director’s function, director’s organization, and production of student scripted plays.

Textbook(s): Fundamentals of Play Directing, Dean/Cara, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston; Play Directing:

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Analysis, Communication, and Style, Francis Hodge, Prentice-Hall

Repertory Acting

Course Code: 116403

Prerequisites: Performance Styles or approval of Theatre Department Chairperson

Credits: 2.0 Elective

This course is designed to allow fourth year theatre majors to apply all learned techniques and skills garnered in their previous years of instruction. The course consists of concentrations each nine week period on the production of a different style of theatre intended for public performance in a studio setting. Topics include one acts, musical theatre performance, performing the classics, performing the avant-garde, and oral reading of teacher-selected scripts.

Textbook(s): None

Special Theatre Topics

Course Code: 115103

Prerequisites: VPA student

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

The purpose of Special Theatre Topics is to examine and explore in depth specific units of study supplemental to theatre. Topics include play writing, stage dialects, stage combat, musical theatre, acting for the camera, and dramatic criticism. Supplementary materials include gymnastic mats, practice swords/dowels, and stage dialect recordings (Japanese, New York, American Southern,

Standard English, Cockney, Irish, Scottish, French, Italian, German, Russian)

Textbook(s): The Stage and the School by Ommanney and Schanker, McGraw-Hill Books

Theatre Design

Course Code: 115003

Prerequisites: Introduction to Theatre Production

Credits: 1.0 Elective

This course exposes students to the materials and design methods used by professional theatre designers. Students gain experience working with drafting materials and apply these techniques to design concepts of their own development. Topics include major design styles, mechanical equipment and materials, mechanical drawing conventions and drafting views, color theory, scale model building, advanced stage lighting, and costume design and rendering. Materials include drawing boards, t-squares, and architectural scales.

Textbook(s): Graphic for the Performing Arts, Harvey Sweet, Allyn and Bacon, Inc.

Theatre Survey

Course Code: 116603

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This level 2 course is designed to explore the structural developments of the literature of theatre in play manuscripts from Greek to modern times. Topics include early theatre (Greek, Medieval, Renaissance,

Shakespearean and Neo-Classic), restoration to early realism (Scandinavian, European, American), and modern drama.

Textbook(s): Types of Drama: Plays and Contexts, Barnet, Berman, Burto, Draya, Longman

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Visual and Performing Arts (VPA):

Visual Arts

Advanced Placement Studio Art - Drawing Portfolio

Course Code: 613203

Prerequisite: Art 1, Art 2 or Departmental waiver

Credits: 1.0 Fine Art

AP Drawing is designed to address a very broad interpretation of drawing issues and media. Light and shade, line quality, rendering of form, composition, surface manipulation, and illusion of depth are drawing issues that can be addressed through a variety of means, which could include painting, print making, or mixed media. Abstract and observational works may demonstrate drawing competence.

The range of marks used to make drawings, the arrangement of those marks, and the materials used to make the marks are endless. In this course students are required to strike a balance between creative interpretations of teacher-guided drawing assignments and personal imagery while simultaneously developing a strong body of work that communicates a cohesive vision.

Textbook(s): The Visual Experience and Launching the Imagination

Art History

Course Code: 616803

Prerequisite: Completion of Level Year 1

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course chronologically surveys the history of Western art, including the influences of other cultures. The first semester includes the study of visual arts from the Stone Age to the Renaissance.

In the second semester, students study the period from the Renaissance to the present. Course topics include 1) an introduction to the elements and principles of art, including presentation and practice of appropriate vocabulary; 2) introduction to the nature of art; 3) a survey of materials and techniques used in the production of art, relating particular styles to time, place and space; 4) identification of extraordinary elements in art over time which have digressed from, confronted, and transcended traditional artistic norms; 5) an assessment of how the artist transforms actual and imaginative elements into a unique representation; 6) identification and analysis of transcendent themes in art; and 7) discussion of what art implies about reality. The content of this course is presented through slide presentations and museum visits. Emphasis will be placed on critique and the development of critical thinking skills and verbal expression of concepts.

Textbook(s): Discovering Art History, Art in Focus, Janson’s History of Art, Stokstad’s Art History,

Gardner’s Art Through the Ages

Commercial Illustration 1

Course Code: 619003

Prerequisite: Introduction to Drawing

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This course will involve the development of drawing and painting skills with emphasis on commercial application, pictorial and graphic illustration, and cartooning. Students will examine historical and contemporary approaches to illustration. Course topics include 1) a survey of materials and techniques used in commercial illustration; 2) an exploration of traditional subject matter (figure, portrait, still life and landscape) as it applies to commercial illustration; 3) a broad examination of illustration, application and client relationship; 4) an in-depth study of various media that may be used for specific communications results; 5) a working study of composition as it applies to the relationship between

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

image and typography (the pictures and the words) in achieving effective communications; and 6) a conscious development of a personal style in communicating ideas through visual images. Originality and mastery of media will be stressed as students work toward the development of a personal style.

Textbook(s): Janson’s History of Art, Stokstad’s Art History, Gardner’s Art Through the Ages

Commercial Illustration 2

Course Code: 619103

Prerequisite: Commercial Illustration 1

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This advanced course concentrates on the development of a highly articulated personal style in commercial drawing and painting. The student will be encouraged to fine-tune personal perception and refine skills in using materials and techniques. The finished product will be emphasized. Course topics include 1) a survey of materials and techniques used in commercial illustration; 2) an exploration of traditional subject matter (figure, portrait, still life and landscape) as it applies to commercial illustration; 3) a broad examination of illustration, application and client relationship; 4) an in-depth study of various media that may be used for specific communications results; 5) a working study of composition as it applies to the relationship between image and typography (the pictures and the words) in achieving effective communications; and 6) a conscious development of a personal style in communicating ideas through visual images. The production of a high quality professional portfolio will be required of each student.

Textbook(s): Janson’s History of Art, Stokstad’s Art History, Gardner’s Art Through the Ages

Computer Graphics 1

Course Code: 619403

Prerequisite: Introduction to Art

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This course consists of traditional studio and computer laboratory experience. As an introduction to the basic components of graphic design, the course emphasizes visual communication and creative problem solving. The student is given a structured introduction to a variety of graphic materials, instruments, and presentation techniques. Development of skills in composition and layout is integrated into the assignments. The student develops primary skills associated with computer operation and explores the computer imaging systems as an artist’s tool. The student learns to generate computer images through the use of software (Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash, Dreamweaver) and various input (scanners, cameras, Internet) and output (printers, web pages, LCD projectors). Course topics include 1) an introduction to the historic development of graphic design and mass communication technology; 2) an exploration of the basic concepts of graphic design and computer graphics; 3) an introduction to the hardware and software used for creating computer graphic images; 4) a survey of the materials used for traditional methods of graphic design production; 5) an exploration of peripheral devices (zero-dimensional, one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional peripherals);

6) comparison of the production of graphic designs by traditional and computerized methods; 7) comparison of color and black computer systems; 8) exploration of two-dimensional processes including image enhancement and computer vision and image analysis; 9) an introduction to threedimensional modeling including perspective, surface attributes and rendering on the computer; 10) a study of typography and its use in visual communication; 11) the use of desktop publishing as a graphic art tool; 12) a study of two-dimensional media applications (digital typography, illustration systems, pagination, animation; and 13) a career exploration in the graphic design/computer graphic fields.

Textbook(s): Janson’s History of Art, Stokstad’s Art History, Gardner’s Art Through the Ages, The

Visual Experience, On-line Tutorials

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Advanced Computer Graphics VPA

Course Code: 619703

Prerequisites: Computer Graphics 1

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This advanced course is designed for the student who intends to major in computer graphics and digital imagery. The emphasis is placed on advanced design work as well as working with advanced software. Course topics include 1) an introduction to the historic development of graphic design and mass communication technology; 2) an exploration of the basic concepts of graphic design and computer graphics; 3) an introduction to the hardware and software used for creating computer graphic images; 4) a survey of the materials used for traditional methods of graphic design production;

5) an exploration of peripheral devices (zero-dimensional, one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional peripherals); 6) comparison of the production of graphic designs by traditional and computerized methods; 7) comparison of color and black computer systems.; 8) exploration of twodimensional processes including image enhancement and computer vision and image analysis; 9) an introduction to three-dimensional modeling including perspective, surface attributes and rendering on the computer; 10) a study of typography and its use in visual communication; 11) the use of desktop publishing as a graphic art tool; 12) a study of two-dimensional media applications (digital typography, illustration systems, pagination, animation; and 13) a career exploration in the graphic design/computer graphic fields. The student will develop a personal direction in their work and develop digital portfolio presentations for college portfolios, exhibitions and competitions.

Textbook(s): Janson’s History of Art, Stokstad’s Art History, Gardner’s Art Through the Ages, The

Visual Experience, On-line Tutorials

Drawing and Painting 1

Course Code: 617003

Prerequisites: Introduction to Painting

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This course provides students with opportunities to use a variety of drawing and painting materials.

Color theory is studied and utilized by students in developing their compositions. Course topics include 1) a survey of materials and techniques, both historical and contemporary, used in various painting styles and approaches; 2) an exploration of both wet and dry media used in the drawing and painting experience; 3) working through a series of drawings or paintings and solving specific problems related to composition, light source, color theory, and media limitations; and 4) learning to develop a personal style by expressing self through an honest representation of visual data. Students learn how to present and exhibit their work. Evaluation of work is an integral part of this course.

Textbook(s): Janson’s History of Art, Stokstad’s Art History, Gardner’s Art Through the Ages

Drawing and Painting 2

Course Code: 617103

Prerequisites: Drawing and Painting 1

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This course provides a concentrated focus in painting and drawing. Students develop personal style through study, skill development, experimentation and evaluation, study and utilize color theory and perceptional theory in their work, apply painting and drawing techniques in solving complex pictorial problems, and evaluate the historical significance of painting and drawing. A comprehensive portfolio of selected work is used for exhibits, competitions, college admissions and career opportunities.

Critiques assist students in developing both written and verbal judgment. Course topics include 1) a survey of materials and techniques, both historical and contemporary, used in various painting

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styles and approaches; 2) an exploration of both wet and dry media used in the drawing and painting experience; 3) working through a series of drawings or paintings and solving specific problems related to composition, light source, color theory, and media limitations; and 4) learning to develop a personal style by expressing self through an honest representation of visual data.

Textbook(s): Janson’s History of Art, Stokstad’s Art History, Gardner’s Art Through the Ages

Introduction to Art

Course Code: 616703

Prerequisites: VPA Application and Audition

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course introduces students to the theory of the elements and principles of design. Course topics include 1) an introduction to the logical division of the arts; 2) a survey of history, materials and techniques used in each major form; 3) an exploration of a variety of materials and techniques will accompany the study of each major form; 4) an introduction to the language of the visual arts, elements and principles; 5) historical forms of criticism; 6) a concise overview of the historical evolution of the major art forms through selected principles of elements and principles of design; 7) an introduction to computer graphics to create two-dimensional art forms. Traditional and contemporary visual art forms are studied in this course. Multimedia presentations, museum visits and student-teacher evaluation of work are important aspects of this course.

Textbook(s): The Visual Experience

Introduction to Drawing

Course Code: 616203

Prerequisites: VPA Application and Audition

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This basic course provides a foundation in traditional and experimental drawing. Emphasis is placed on the development of perception through the use of the fundamentals of design. Analysis of historical examples, demonstrations, and critiques assists student development. The course culminates with matting, mounting, and exhibition techniques. Course topics include 1) an introduction to the historic development of drawing and its relationship to painting, sculpture and architecture; 2) drawing as a unique art form and as a planning phase for other art processes; 3) a survey of materials and techniques; 4) a working study of the relationship between the conceptual object and the visual elements (i.e., line, shape, value); 5) how the artist gives up the “known” object in order to “see and record” the elements that make it visible; 6) an introduction to the picture plane (the 2-D format); and

7) a working study of composition.

Textbook(s): The Visual Experience

Introduction to Painting

Course Code: 616603

Prerequisite: Completion of Level Year 1

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course introduces students to a variety of materials, methods and the techniques of painting. The content examines and analyzes the development of traditional and contemporary painting movements.

Color, perception and theory are emphasized. The concepts of personal style are explored. Course topics include 1) an introduction to the development of the art of painting in human culture; 2) a survey of materials and techniques used in painting: historical, cultural and geographic influences;

3) an exploration of traditional subject matter (i.e., the figure, portraiture, still life, landscapes) as well as experimental subject matter; 4) extensive exploration in recording visual data in a variety of

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paint media; 4) a working study of composition as it applies to the relationship between the three dimensional reality and the two dimensional illusion of the picture plane; 5) an in-depth study of the elements of line, shape, texture and color as they pertain to the illusion of form and space into the picture plane; and 6) a broad examination of the devices painters use to compensate for those qualities of the three dimensional world which are lost in the transition to the two dimensional picture plane. Teacher-student evaluation of work is an integral part of this course.

Textbook(s): None

Introduction to Photography

Course Code: 616403

Prerequisites: Application and Audition

Credits: 1.0 Fine Arts

This course gives the student an introduction to the camera and darkroom. A wide variety of photographic theory, techniques and aesthetics will be covered, as well as the history of photography.

Hands-on experience will provide knowledge in the use of cameras, studio lighting, film processing, printing and photographic presentation. The student will be encouraged to develop an individual vision and approach to the medium. Course topics include 1) history of photography, 2) the camera,

3) the lens, 4) film, 5) exposure, 6) processing black and white film, 7) the darkroom, 8) the print,

9) composition, 10) finishing and mounting, 11) lighting, 12) special techniques, and 13) careers in photography.

Textbook(s): Photography

Introduction to Print Making

Course Code: 616401

Prerequisites: Completion of Level Year 1

Credits: .50 Fine Arts

In this introductory course, students are taught planographic and intaglio methods. Topics include

1) an introduction to various methods of creating prints; 2) etching and monotype processes; and 3) visual presentations, hands-on demonstrations and field trips. The historical and theoretical aspects of print making are emphasized. Students are required to produce a small edition of etchings. Teacherstudent evaluation of work is an integral part of this course.

Textbook(s): None

Introduction to Sculpture

Course Code: 616502

Prerequisites: Completion of Level Year 1

Credits: .50 Fine Arts

This course introduces students to a variety of materials, methods and the techniques of sculpture.

The content examines and analyzes the development of traditional and contemporary sculpture movements. Color, perception, hands-on production of forms, contemporary forms, and theory are emphasized. Course topics include 1) the elements and principles of design and their application to sculpture; 2) the generalities of organic and geometric form; 3) the concept of an architectural framework; 4) the history of sculpture in western civilization; 5) multicultural influences on contemporary concept of sculpture; 6) sculpture’s historical relationship to architecture; 7) truth to materials and artful deception; 8) the relationship of form to meaning and feeling; 9) the interaction of sight and touch; 10) how sculptors get started; 11) traditional and experimental materials and how they work;

12) sources of sculptural inspiration (historical, contemporary and personal); 12) emphasis on papier mache, plaster and clay; and 13) additive methods. Teacher-student evaluation of work is an integral

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part of this course.

Textbook(s): None

Photography 1

Course Code: 618203

Prerequisites: Introduction to Photography

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This course is for students interested in photography as an area of concentration in the visual arts.

Student will acquire a better understanding of photography as a fine art through field trips to local galleries, museums and studios. Course topics include 1) a review of the principles and theories explaining the operation of the camera, its parts, functions, and exposure controls; 2) a review of safety in the darkroom and the proper handling of photographic chemicals; 3) a study of traditional photographic processes, techniques, and subject matter; 4) an exploration and experimentation of non-traditional approaches to producing photographically derived images, with an emphasis on experimentation with black & white materials using hand and chemically applied color; 5) a working study in the making and practical use of early processes such as Van Dyke Brown and Cyanotypes;

6) an investigation into the similarities and differences between invented photographic images and found images; 7) an in-depth study of the elements of line, shape, texture, and lighting techniques as they pertain to the illusion of form and space; 8) the appropriate presentation of photographs for exhibition and preservation of the photographic print; 9) research into the possible application of acquired photographic skills in today’s job market; and 10) special techniques: hand tinted prints, chemically toned prints, perspective control, special lighting techniques, photomontage, the Sabattier effect. Critiques and examinations of the student’s own work, as well as professional and historical work, will be an integral part of this exploration of the medium.

Textbook(s): Photography

Photography 2

Course Code: 618303

Prerequisite: Photography 1

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This advanced course is designed for the student who intends to major in photography. Students will continue to develop their mastery of photographic processes as well as concentrate on developing their own personal voices through the development of their imagery. Course topics include 1) a review of the principles and theories explaining the operation of the camera, its parts, functions, and exposure controls; 2) a review of safety in the darkroom and the proper handling of photographic chemicals; 3) a study of traditional photographic processes, techniques, and subject matter; 4) an exploration and experimentation of non-traditional approaches to producing photographically derived images, with an emphasis on experimentation with black & white materials using hand and chemically applied color;

5) a working study in the making and practical use of early processes such as Van Dyke Brown and

Cyanotypes; 6) an investigation into the similarities and differences between invented photographic images and found images; 7) an in-depth study of the elements of line, shape, texture, and lighting techniques as they pertain to the illusion of form and space; 8) the appropriate presentation of photographs for exhibition and preservation of the photographic print; 9) research into the possible application of acquired photographic skills in today’s job market; and 10) special techniques: hand tinted prints, chemically toned prints, perspective control, special lighting techniques, photomontage, the Sabattier effect. Thematic work, critical and critique is an integral part of this course.

Textbook(s): Photography

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Printmaking 1

Course Code: 617503

Prerequisite: Introduction to Printmaking

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This intermediate level course expands students’ knowledge of the printmaking process initiated in their second year. The four major methods of intaglio, relief, stencil and Planographic are included.

Students are encouraged to discover creative and technical possibilities within each media. Historical and contemporary examples of prints are drawn upon for critical analysis and inspiration. Course topics include 1) an exploration of intaglio techniques which includes engraving, drypoint, mezzotint, etching, aquatint and softground; 2) an exploration of monotype and monoprint techniques; and 3) further exploration of linocut techniques. Critiques are an on-going part of the course.

Textbook(s): Janson’s History of Art, Stokstad’s Art History, Gardner’s Art Through the Ages

Printmaking 2

Course Code: 617603

Prerequisite: Printmaking 1

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This advanced course is designed for the student who intends to major in printmaking. The emphasis of this course is to enable the student to develop a personal style in one or more of the printmaking areas. Development of an interview-ready portfolio and participation in local and national competitions are given special focus. Critiques are an integral part of this course.

Textbook(s): Janson’s History of Art, Stokstad’s Art History, Gardner’s Art Through the Ages

Sculpture 1

Course Code: 618003

Prerequisite: Introduction to Sculpture

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This intermediate level course builds on Introduction to Sculpture. Additive and subtractive methods are developed. The unique properties of a variety of materials are studied. Craftsmanship and the proper use of tools are stressed. Historical and cultural examples enhance and inspire compositional ideas. Course topics include 1) the elements and principles of design as they apply to sculpture; 2) historical and cultural styles of sculpture; 3) an exploration of clay, plaster and wood as sculpture materials; 4) further exploration of truth to materials and artful deception; 4) the relationship of form to meaning and feeling; 5) use of the human body as form source for sculpture; 6) the difference between organic and geometric form; 7) sculpture as nexus between the sense of sight and touch;

8) how a sculptor finds source material; 9) developing sequences strategies; 10) further implications of additive and subtractive approaches; and 11) safe use and care of tools. Periodic critiques are an ongoing part of this course.

Textbook(s): Janson’s History of Art, Stokstad’s Art History, Gardner’s Art Through the Ages

Sculpture 2

Course Code: 618103

Prerequisite: Sculpture 1

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

This course is designed for the advanced student ready to form a personal style in sculpture. The personal styles of master sculptors are studied. The relationship of the artist’s personal style and historical happenings are explored. Technical proficiency in selected media is encouraged. The

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emphasis of this course is on the production of an interview-ready portfolio and/or body of work ready for exhibition. Course topics include 1) the elements and principles of design as they apply to sculpture; 2) historical and cultural styles of sculpture; 3) an exploration of clay, plaster and wood as sculpture materials; 4) further exploration of truth to materials and artful deception; 4) the relationship of form to meaning and feeling; 5) use of the human body as form source for sculpture; 6) the difference between organic and geometric form; 7) sculpture as nexus between the sense of sight and touch; 8) how sculptor finds source material; 9) developing sequences strategies; 10) further implications of additive and subtractive approaches; and 11) safe use and care of tools.

Textbook(s): Janson’s History of Art, Stokstad’s Art History, Gardner’s Art Through the Ages

World Architecture

Course Code: 619803

Prerequisites: Introduction to Sculpture, Art History

Credits: 2.0 Fine Arts

In this course students explore a broad spectrum of creative possibilities offered by the development of architectural forms, styles, and functions from pre-classical times to the present. Students will engage in a number of concrete and abstract experiences designed to promote a greater understanding of architecture and provoke critical analysis of the sociological, cultural, and political factors that have affected architecture. The thematic approach encompasses five major themes: climate, economics, available materials, technology, and people. The themes serve as a framework and point of reference for the survey. Course topics include 1) an introduction to the elements and principles of architecture including presentation and practice of appropriate vocabulary; 2) an introduction to the nature of architecture (how it developed historically, motivation for production, variety of form, and prescription for use); 3) a survey of materials and techniques used in architecture, relating particular styles to time, place, and space; 4) an exploration of function focusing on cultural comparisons; 5) an assessment of how the architectural process transforms actual and imaginative elements into a unique representation; 6) the significance of architecture in national and ethnic culture and the ways in which this significance changes over time and place; 7) a discussion of what architecture implies about reality; 8) an identification of five architectural themes in terms of each work studied;

9) an evaluation of the motivations for and consequences of restoration and renovation; and 10) an analysis of specific works in terms of their emotional, rational, and aesthetic impact on surrounding environment and the viewer. Finally, students will be asked to make and defend evaluative judgments concerning the nature and worth of historical structures as they relate to current issues of renovation, restoration, public housing, and city planning.

Textbook(s): Janson’s History of Art, Stokstad’s Art History, Gardner’s Art Through the Ages, and online resources

World Languages

American Sign Language 1

Course Code: 194103

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The first year introduces students to American Sign Language and Deaf culture. Grammatical principles of the language are introduced. Visual-gestural communication techniques are used to develop basic signing skills. The course emphasis will be on receptive skills and developing expressive skills. The student will be able to communicate basic language functions such as introducing oneself, asking for and giving information, asking for directions, making requests, and talking about activities. Videotapes

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support observation and practice.

Textbook(s): Master ASL, Sign Media Inc.

American Sign Language 2

Course Code: 194203

Prerequisites: American Sign Language 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The continuation of ASL1 skill developed focusing with greater emphasis on expressive signing proficiency and comprehension of signed narratives. Students participate in various language functions such as talking about life events, nationalities and family history and describing objects.

The activities take place in small group discussion, role-play, short stories and dialogues. Videotaped activities of a variety of signers are practiced for improved receptive skills. Cultural and language behaviors are studied. Sign language expressions are developed.

Textbook(s): Master ASL, Sign Media Inc.

American Sign Language 3

Course Code: 194303

Prerequisites: American Sign Language 2

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course is a continuation of ASL2, expanding the emphasis on more complex ASL grammar and sentence structure, vocabulary development, and Deaf culture. The student will develop greater conversation fluency with Deaf people. Precision in self-expression will be emphasized. Understanding the role of interpreters and other career opportunities in the area of deafness are discussed.

Textbook(s): Master ASL, Sign Media Inc.

American Sign Language 4

Course Code: 194403

Prerequisites: American Sign Language 3

Credits: 1.0 Completer

At ASL 4, students are expected to master fluency of complex expressive and receptive skills. The course includes class discussions, advanced grammatical concepts and expressions, research projects, viewing videotape of various signers. Student will give signed presentations based on their research to sign language classes. The aim is greater precision of self-expression and to be able to understand the deaf signer the first time. Increased understanding of the role of the interpreter with the use of hands-on experience of actual interpreting during school hours and in the community.

Various interactions with the Deaf Community will be encouraged.

Textbook(s): Master ASL, Sign Media Inc.

American Sign Language 5

Course Code: 194413

Prerequisites: American Sign Language 4

Credits: 1.0 Completer

With the continuation of ASL to level 5, students are expected to master fluency of complex expressive and receptive skills for a successful communication in the sign language. The course includes advanced grammatical concepts and expressions, research projects, creating quotes for the language, and viewing videotape of various signers. Students ail give signed presentations to sign language classes based on their research. The aim is greater precision of self-expression,

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understanding the deaf signer the first time, and increasing understanding of the role of the interpreter with the use of hands-on-experience of actual interpreting during school hours and in the community.

Various interactions with the deaf community and professors from universities will be encouraged..

Textbook(s): Master ASL, Sign Media Inc.

Arabic 1

Course Code: 192103

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In the first year of Arabic, communication and the sounds of the language are learned through dialogues, learning scenarios, repetition, practice exercises, and simulated real life situations. The students learn to understand, speak, read, and write a limited amount of material. Students will learn the principles of Arabic script. Cultural information related to various related countries is taught as part of the content.

Textbook(s): Alif Baa, ISBN 9781589011021

Arabic 2

Course Code: 192203

Prerequisites: Arabic 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The communication skills begun in the first year are continued. Greater emphasis is placed on oral proficiency, listening, reading, and writing using Arabic script. Students must learn the grammatical principles of the language to write a limited amount of material.

Textbook(s): Al-Kitaab, ISBN 9781589011045

Arabic 3

Course Code: 192303

Prerequisites: Arabic 2

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The communication skills continue during the third year of study. Greater emphasis is placed on oral proficiency, listening, and reading and writing using Arabic script. The teacher follows the ACTFL descriptors in order to assist the student with the oral communication tasks. Students need to apply the grammatical principles of the language to write short paragraphs.

Textbook(s): Al-Kitaab, ISBN 9781589011045

Arabic 4

Course Code: 192113

Prerequisites: Arabic 3

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In this course students will strengthen and use their writing skills and write short compositions with a more complex vocabulary. Arabic Culture will continue to be a major point of emphasis through real life scenarios. The class will discuss current topics and compare and contrast other cultures.

Textbook(s): Al-Kitaab, ISBN 9781589011045

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

International Baccalaureate Chinese Ab Initio 1

Course Code: 188313

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 World Language Level 1 Completer

IB Chinese Ab Initio is a foreign language course designed for complete beginners. Students are prepared to use the language appropriately in a variety of settings. Each course develops students’ powers of expression in a second language, provides them with a resource for the study of other subjects, and brings them into contact with ways of thought that may differ from their own. Exercises in grammar, reading and writing, and culture are presented with such topics as hobbies and leisure activities, weather and climate, everyday life, food, shopping, travel, at home, transportation, the body and health, life and careers, and communication and media.

Textbook(s): TBA

Chinese 1

Course Code: 188103

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In the first year of Chinese, communication and the sounds of the language are learned through dialogues, learning scenarios, repetition, practice exercises, and real-life situations (student performances). The students learn to understand, speak, read and write a limited amount of material.

Students will learn the principles of Chinese writing and cultural information about Chinese-speaking countries.

Textbook(s): Learn Chinese with Me, People’s Education Press

Chinese 2

Course Code: 188203

Prerequisites: Chinese 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The communication skills begun in the first year are continued. Greater emphasis is placed on oral proficiency, listening, reading and writing Chinese using the characters. Students must learn the grammatical principles of the language to write a limited amount of material.

Textbook(s): Learn Chinese with Me, ISBN 9787107174223

Chinese 3

Course Code: 188303

Prerequisites: Chinese 2

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In this course students will continue to strengthen and utilize their writing skills. Writing and reading skills as well as short compositions will be emphasized. Listening, reading, and speaking skill activities will be increased. Chinese culture will continue to be a major point of emphasis through practical scenarios that one would encounter while living in or visiting China.

Textbook(s): Learn Chinese with Me, People’s Education Press

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Chinese 4

Course Code: 188403

Prerequisites: Chinese 3

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In the level 4 Chinese course, students continue to develop communicative skills at a more advanced level through selected functions and topics. Students will learn the three modes of communications:

Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational. Application of grammatical principles of the language to form new sentences in meaningful exchanges and real world situations will be emphasized. Students will also begin using cognitive-academic language. The ability to distinguish between the modern vernacular and classical literary language (which often appears in poetry) will also be developed.

Cultural information relevant to China is integrated through the languages and various activities that focus on the perspective, practices, and products of the target language.

Textbook(s): TBA

French 1

Course Code: 152003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In the first year of French communication and the sounds of the language are learned through dialogues, learning scenarios, practice exercises, and real-life situations. The students learn to understand, speak, read, and write a limited amount of material and to apply grammatical principles of the language to form new ideas and to communicate them. Cultural information about the countries is taught as a part of the content. To advance to the next level in the language, students need to pass the end of the year assessment.

Textbook(s): D’Accord Level 1, ISBN 9781618578754

French 2

Course Code: 155003

Prerequisites: French 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The development of skills begun in the first year of French is continued. Greater emphasis is placed on oral proficiency, listening, reading and writing in French. Knowledge of grammar is expanded, including object pronouns and most of the verb tenses beyond the present. Cultural information is taught through basic content readings and supplementary materials.

Textbook(s): D’Accord Level 2, ISBN 9781618578878

French 2 Honors

Course Code: 155093

Prerequisites: French 1; MSA Reading score at the advanced level

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course is designed for identified selected highly able students who have met the prerequisites.

Lessons and units include activities and a writing component that will challenge students’ skills.

Textbook(s): D’Accord Level 2, ISBN 9781618578878

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

French 2 Pre Diploma Program

Course Code: 155113

Prerequisites: French 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Through International Baccalaureate pedagogy and assessment strategies, French 2 PDP builds upon existing vocabulary and grammar structures that students have learned in the prerequisite French

1. They continue to learn to communicate through three modes of communication: Interpersonal

(Conversation); Interpretive (Listening and Reading); and Presentational (Speaking and Writing).

They learn to apply grammatical principles to form new sentences in meaningful exchanges and real world situations. Cultural information is integrated through the language and various activities that focus on the perspective, practices and products of the target language.

Textbook(s): D’Accord Level 2, ISBN 9781618578878

French 3

Course Code: 156003

Prerequisites: French 2

Credits: 1.0 Completer

By the third level of French students are required to use the language in class conversations, and read both fiction and nonfiction, including magazines and newspapers. Learning of vocabulary is greatly expanded. Some supplementary reading is required. Basic grammar is reviewed and more complex structure is taught. Cultural projects are to be carried out in the foreign language. Students are expected to write coherent paragraphs, short summaries, and outlines in foreign language.

Frequent testing of listening and reading comprehension is expected in this course.

Textbook(s): D’Accord Level 3, ISBN 9781618578792

French 3: Pre Diploma Program

Course Code: 156113

Prerequisites: French 2

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Through International Baccalaureate pedagogy and assessment strategies, French 3 PDP students are expected to demonstrate a more profound knowledge of language as they move towards communicative proficiency. They will also be able to demonstrate competence in ach of the five domains of performance: comprehensibility, comprehension, language control, vocabulary usage, communication strategies and cultural awareness. Students continue to be exposed to cultural information.

Textbook(s): D’Accord Level 3, ISBN 9781618578792

French 4

Course Code: 157003

Prerequisites: French 3

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In the level 4 French course, students are expected to use the language in conversation, class discussions, in oral and written reports and research projects. Reading includes literary works, social and cultural material, magazines, and newspapers from the foreign country. Grammar is reviewed, and the finer points are analyzed through work with original compositions, summaries, reports, advanced exercises, and some translation activities. The aim is greater precision in self-expression. Students are expected to understand and write from dictation material heard for the first time. The use of the

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foreign language in school-wide and community projects is encouraged.

Textbook(s): Themes, ISBN 9781680040357

Advanced Placement French Language and Culture

Course Code: 158803

Prerequisites: French 4; Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 Completer, Weighted

The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program for French 5 will provide course work, written assessments, and practical experiences culminating in the AP French exam.

Textbook(s): Tresors du Temps, Glencoe

French 6

Course Code: 158913

Prerequisites: Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 Completer

French 6 will provide course work, written assessments, and practical experiences.

Textbook(s): TBA

French 7

Course Code: 158123

Prerequisites: French 6

Credits: 1.0 Completer, Weighted

French 7 is a content-based course rather than a skills-acquisition course. The knowledge of grammatical concepts in French and the language skills acquired in levels 1-5 are to be used to fulfill creative tasks. The main purpose of this course is the application of French language skills for communication and more advanced levels of literature discussions. Essay writing and research are components of this level.

Textbook(s): Littérature francophone; Anthologie, Oxford University Press; Communication Plus,

Centre Educatifet Culturel Inc.

French for Native Speakers Level 2

Course Code: 152203

Prerequisites: Intermediate-Low to Mid French Reading Level

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course is designed for students who are totally bilingual in French and English. It is conducted entirely in French for students who speak and read French at the intermediate-low to -mid level. The course will emphasize reading and writing, critical thinking, culture, literary exposure, and improving speaking skills.

Textbook(s): Grammaire Progressive Du Francais, Ado 2-(CLE International), Images Trois (McDougal

Littell) Level 2, 3, & 4.

French for Native Speakers Level 3

Course Code: 152303

Prerequisites: Intermediate-Mid to Advanced French Reading Level

Credits: 1.0 Completer

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This course is designed for students who are totally bilingual in French and English. It is conducted entirely in French for students who speak and read French at the intermediate-mid to advanced level. The course will emphasize reading and writing, critical thinking, culture, literary exposure, and improving speaking skills.

Textbook(s): Grammaire Progressive Du Francais; Ado 2-(CLE International); Images Trois McDougal

Littell) Level 2, 3, & 4

French for Native Speakers Level 4

Course Code: 152403

Prerequisites: Advanced Reading Level in French

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course is designed for students who are totally bilingual in French and English. It is conducted entirely in French for students who speak and read French at the advanced level. The course will emphasize reading and writing, critical thinking, culture, literary exposure, and improving speaking skills.

Textbook(s): Grammaire Progressive Du Francais; Ado 2-(CLE International); Images Trois (McDougal

Littell) Level 2, 3, & 4

French 5 Immersion Literature

Course Code: 158203

Prerequisites: Grade 9 French Immersion student

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Students explore both classical and non-traditional literature from France and the francophone world.

Two new literary units from amongst the diverse world of francophone cultures are presented each quarter for students to analyze, discuss critically with appreciation of similarities and differences. A gamut of current reading strategies is used for group and individual presentations and projects. A wide range of grammatical structures is studied.

Textbook(s): Autour de la litterature

French 5 Immersion Life and Civilization

Course Code: 158303

Prerequisites: Grade 9 French Immersion student

Credits: 1.0 Completer

A thematic approach characterizes this course based on the francophone world, teenagers and social issues, human relations, study of the environment and the new world order. Authentic material, both written and electronic, is explored by students as they learn to research and deliver presentations detailing understanding of the various issues related to the themes studied. The study of correct grammar is reinforced throughout the course.

Textbook(s): Réactions et Connaissances

French 6 Immersion Francophone Societies

Course Code: 158403

Prerequisites: French 5 Immersion Life and Civilization and French 5 Immersion Literature

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Linguistic skills are developed through the study of thought and cultural practices from amongst the French speaking world. Each unit studied comprises an oral component (speaking, debating), a writing component as well as a special interest segment demonstrating the requisite French language

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skills needed to interpret, analyze and recognize the literary, sociological and cultural identities of francophone societies.

Textbook(s): Réactions et Connaissances

French 7 Immersion Comparative Literature and Cultures in Francophone Societies 1

Course Code: 158503

Prerequisites: French 5 Immersion Life and Civilization and French 5 Immersion Literature

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Students read and analyze works by various authors so as to examine connections which exist within the diversity of the French speaking world. The study of correct grammatical functions is reinforced through oral and written work, group discussion. Students learn to revise written communications for clarity and coherence, improve research techniques, state reasoned opinions on subjects of fairly complex social and cultural issues.

Textbook(s): Autour de la literature

French 7 Immersion Comparative Literature and Cultures in Francophone Societies 2

Course Code: 158513

Prerequisites: French 5 Immersion Life and Civilization and French 5 Immersion Literature

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Students read and analyze works by various authors so as to examine connections which exist within the diversity of the French speaking world. The study of correct grammatical functions is reinforced through oral and written work, group discussion. Students learn to revise written communications for clarity and coherence, improve research techniques, state reasoned opinions on subjects of fairly complex social and cultural issues.

Textbook(s): Autour de la literature

French 8 Immersion Perspectives on Francophone Issues 1

Course Code: 158603

Prerequisites: French 7 Immersion Comparative Literature and Cultures in Francophone Societies 2

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course presents an integrated approach to the study of French language and literature based the human aspects of culture. The material used, both in printed and the electronic forms, is organized around a number of themes of permanent relevance such as Education, the Family, Politics, the Arts,

Communications and the concept of Globalization in the contemporary world scene. Selections are made for their intrinsic cultural value and may include newspaper and magazine articles, essays, literary works, cartoons, interviews etc.

Textbook(s): En Bonne Forme

French 9 Immersion Perspectives on Francophone issues 2

Course Code: 158613

Prerequisites: French 7 Immersion Comparative Literature and Cultures in Francophone Societies 2

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Students perfect their analytical skills in communicating in the French language. They are taught to use French appropriately based on a various cultural and social contexts, understand ideas and how

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they are organized in order to communicate them appropriately. Students develop an understanding of and sensitivity to the subtleties of the French language through material that is challenging both linguistically and in its context.

Textbook(s): Personnages

German 1

Course Code: 173003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In the first year of German study, communication and the sounds of the language are learned through dialogues, practice exercises and situations. The students learn to understand, speak, read, and write a limited amount of material. Students must learn to apply grammatical principles of the language to form new ideas and to communicate them. Cultural information is taught about countries where the target language is spoken.

Textbook(s): KOMM MIT! 1, Holt Rinehart & Winston

German 2

Course Code: 174003

Prerequisites: German 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The development of skills begun in the first year of German is continued. Greater emphasis is placed on oral proficiency, reading and writing in German. Knowledge of grammar is expanded, including object pronouns and most of the verb tenses beyond the present. Cultural information about the people is taught through readings in the basic text and supplementary materials.

Textbook(s): KOMM MIT! 2, Holt Rinehart & Winston

German 3

Course Code: 175003

Prerequisites: German 2

Credits: 1.0 Completer

By the third level of German students are required to use the language to a greater extent in class conversations, and for reading both fiction and nonfiction, including magazines and newspapers.

Learning of vocabulary is greatly expanded. Some supplementary reading is required. Basic grammar is reviewed and more complex structure is taught. Cultural projects are to be carried out in the foreign language. Students are expected to write coherent paragraphs, short summaries, and outlines in the foreign language. Frequent testing of listening and reading comprehension is expected in this course.

Textbook(s): KOMM MIT! 3, Holt Rinehart & Winston

German 4

Course Code: 176003

Prerequisites: German 3

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In the level 4 German course, students are expected to use the language in conversation, class discussions, in oral and written reports and research projects. Reading includes literary works, social and cultural material, magazines, and newspapers from the foreign country. Grammar is reviewed, and the finer points are analyzed through work with original compositions, summaries, reports, advanced

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exercises, and some translation activities. The aim is greater precision in self-expression. Students are expected to understand and write from dictation material heard for the first time. The use of the foreign language in school-wide and community projects is encouraged.

Textbook(s): KOMM MIT! 3, Holt Rinehart & Winston

Advanced Placement German 5

Course Code: 177103

Prerequisites: German 4; Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 Completer, Weighted

The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program for German 5 will provide course work, written assessments, and practical experiences culminating in the AP German exam.

Textbook(s): College Board materials

Italian 1

Course Code: 190103

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This introductory course offers students the opportunity to communicate in Italian and to develop foreign language skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. The program focuses on functional language in selected situations. Appropriate pacing is a key element of the course that allows students to understand linguistic, cultural and grammatical concepts in second language study. Lessons incorporate visual resources from various materials to provide a basis for comprehending cultural content. Writing and reading are limited to topics that are introduced.

Textbook(s): Super [email protected] 1A, ISBN 9788835018810

Italian 2

Course Code: 190203

Prerequisites: Italian 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Communication and the sounds of the language are learned through dialogues, learning scenarios, practice exercises, and real-life situations. The students learn to understand, speak, read, and write a limited amount of material. Students will learn to apply grammatical principles of the language to form new ideas and to communicate them. Cultural information about the countries is taught as a part of the content.

Textbook(s): Super [email protected] 1B, ISBN 9788835018896

Italian 3

Course Code: 190303

Prerequisites: Italian 2

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The development of skills begun in previous years of the language is continued. Greater emphasis is placed on oral proficiency, listening, reading and writing in Italian. Knowledge of grammar is expanded, including object pronouns and most of the verb tenses beyond the present. Cultural information is taught through basic content readings and supplementary materials.

Textbook(s): Parliamo Italiano, ISBN 9780470426159

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Italian 4

Course Code: 190403

Prerequisites: Italian 3

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In the level 4 Italian course, students are expected to use the language in conversation, class discussion, oral and written reports, and research projects.

Textbook(s): Parliamo Italiano, ISBN 9780470426159

Advanced Placement Italian Language and Culture

Course Code: 190603

Prerequisites: Italian 4, Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 Foreign Language, Weighted

The AP Italian Culture and Language course is designed to be comparable to college/university

Italian courses that serve as a transition between language courses and linguistics or content-based courses. The aim is to develop student’s reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills within a cultural frame of reference reflective of the richness of Italian language and culture. Students will benefit from learning about structural aspects of the language while being exposed to interwoven cultural content throughout the course.

Textbook(s): College Board materials

Japanese 1

Course Code: 150003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Students will be taught to speak the language contextually in terms of greetings, school activities, limited social situations, counting and sports. They will be introduced to reading and writing through the phonetically based symbols called Hiragana and Katakana, eventually learning a pre-determined number of Japanese Kanji. Grammar will be taught through the structure of the Japanese language, especially the cultural context of the verb forms, as well as vocabulary expansion. Culture of the

Japanese people will be an integral part of the course. It will be necessary for students to apply study skills consistently in order to succeed in both the oral and written aspects of this course.

Textbook(s): Speak Japanese, Kenkyusha

Japanese 2

Course Code: 150103

Prerequisites: Japanese 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Japanese 2 continues in the same vein as level 1. After acquiring skill in writing the Hiragana and

Katakana syllabaries (mainly in level 1), students concentrate on the Kanji in level 2. The listening and speaking skills are developed at a higher level. Grammatically, in addition to continuation of the grammar of level 1, there is an introduction to phrases characteristic of hierarchical levels of social relationships. Students will learn to express degrees of polite speech. Compound verbs are included.

Cultural emphasis in the course will be on modern post-World War II in Japan.

Textbook(s): Speak Japanese

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Japanese 3

Course Code: 150203

Prerequisites: Japanese 2

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Japanese 3 will utilize writing skills in Hiragana and Katakana, while further expanding students’ knowledge of Kanji. Writing and reading skills as well as short compositions will be emphasized.

Listening, reading and speaking skill activities will be increased. Students will be introduced to the grammatical aspects of “Keigo” (polite speech form), particularly as related to verb usage. Other grammar will be presented such as causative verbs, particles used for sentence clauses, conjunctions, and various counters used in the Japanese language. Culture will continue to be emphasized using practical scenarios that one would encounter while living in or visiting Japan.

Textbook(s): Speak Japanese

Japanese 4

Course Code: 150303

Prerequisites: Japanese 3

Credits: 1.0 Completer

Level 4 Japanese will have extensive use of informal speech forms, while expanding vocabulary for daily life, such as managing a budget and travel. Extensive use of honorific verbal forms (keigo) will be further developed, as well as the increase of formal speech. Reading comprehension will be heightened through the use of contextualized paragraphs and short stories. Students will be working with authentic materials, such as newspaper articles and selected sections of popular and historical novels. Authentic video and radio shows will be shown or listened to in order to further develop student familiarity with native speech patterns and intonation. Culture bonding concepts and practices, such as “reserve,” “obligation/indebtedness,” and “outside/inside,” will be explored in depth. The Japanese economy is a theme presented in relationship to the workplace. Students should have a working knowledge of at least four hundred Kanji (ideographs) beyond the Hiragana and Katakana syllabaries.

Textbook(s): Speak Japanese

Advanced Placement Japanese Language and Culture

Course Code: 150803

Prerequisites: Japanese 4; Application and orientation session, Japanese 3 assessment, teacher

recommendation

Credits: 1.0 Completer, Weighted

Students will study the language as a whole through content-based themes such as Japanese history, tradition, contemporary culture, and social issues. The course curriculum is built based on the National Standards for Japanese Language Learning. Students will deepen their understanding of the language and Japanese perspectives towards social issues and values. Through various speaking, listening, reading, and writing activities, students will acquire a more solid knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, and kanji. They will also learn how to manipulate the Japanese language for better comprehension.

Textbook(s): College Board Materials

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Latin 1

Course Code: 143003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In this beginning Latin course students learn to pronounce and read orally by imitating the teacher.

The classical pronunciation is used. The main tasks in the first level are learning the word order of the Latin sentence, the case endings of Latin nouns and adjectives according to use in the sentence.

Verb forms of all six tenses of the indicative mood, active and passive, are learned. Students are introduced to techniques of translation. Myths and legends of ancient Rome and Greece are read and translated. Study of the ancient Mediterranean world and of Roman life is included. A large part of the course is devoted to the study of English words derived from Latin. The main skill developed is reading of Latin.

Textbook(s): Cambridge Latin Course Units 1 and 2, ISBN 9780521782289

Latin 2

Course Code: 144003

Prerequisites: Latin 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In this level more complex grammatical forms are taught with the aim of developing the skill of reading

Latin with comprehension. Students continue to prepare translations. Students are expected to translate a few selected passages at sight, and to analyze a Latin sentence explaining the grammatical function of each part. Derivative work is greatly expanded to include Latin phrases used in English and modern applications of Latin in the terminology of various professions. Readings include mythology, history, government, and social customs in Ancient Rome. The culture of the ancient world is related to modern conditions.

Textbook(s): Cambridge Latin Course Units 2 and 3, Cambridge University Press

Latin 3

Course Code: 145003

Prerequisites: Latin 2

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In this course the first two years of Latin are reviewed with the addition of the finer points of grammar.

Excerpts from the works of such authors as Cicero, Pliny, Ovid, and Seneca are read and translated with emphasis on precise meanings. Some techniques in reading Latin poetry are introduced. The

Latin/English relationship is studied in greater depth with consideration of Greek influences. Students become aware of Roman life across the centuries and their contribution to western civilization.

Textbook(s): Cambridge Latin Course Unit 4, Cambridge University Press

Latin 4

Course Code: 146003

Prerequisites: Latin 3

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course provides an opportunity for advancing, refining, and enjoying the skills learned during the first three years. The principle literary work to be read consists of the first three books of Virgil’s

Aeneid. The aim is to appreciate and enjoy the poetry. Other activities include the study of advanced grammar, figures of speech, mythological and historical background, and reading aloud and analyzing epic poetry. Some selections of other poets such as Horace, Juvenal, Ovid, and Martial are also

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read.

Textbook(s): Vergil’s Aeneid Books I-VI

Advanced Placement Latin Vergil

Course Code: 147103

Prerequisites: Latin 4; Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 Completer; Weighted

The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program for Latin 5 will provide course work, written assessments, and practical experiences culminating in the AP Latin exam.

Textbook(s): College Board Materials

Linguistics

Course Code: 198100

Prerequisites: Global Studies/International Relations student

Credits: .50 Elective

This course is designed for the International Relations and the Global Studies Academy. It provides an overview of the history of linguistics, how one acquires language, the nature of communication, and the anthropology of linguistics. Beginning with Historical Linguistics, students will learn how languages are related, how long a language takes to reappear, disappear, and change. The students will discuss how the language is acquired. During this course, the students will also study the significance of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and how does one become bilingual.

They will discuss the nature of and the different types of communication.

Textbook(s): A Concise Introduction to Linguistics, 3rd Edition, Pearson, 9780205051816

Portuguese 1

Course Code: 170003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In the first year of Portuguese, communication and the sounds of the language are learned through dialogues, learning scenarios, practice exercises, and real-life situations. The students learn to understand, speak, read, and write a limited amount of material and to apply grammatical principles of the language to form new ideas and to communicate them. Cultural information is an important part of the subject.

Textbook(s): Ponto de Encontro

Portuguese 2

Course Code: 170013

Prerequisites: Portugese 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In the first year of Portuguese, communication and the sounds of the language are learned through dialogues, learning scenarios, practice exercises, and real-life situations. The students learn to understand, speak, read, and write a limited amount of material and to apply grammatical principles of the language to form new ideas and to communicate them. Cultural information is an important part of the subject.

Textbook(s): Ponto de Encontro, Portuguese as a World Language, Second Edition, Pearson

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Portuguese 3

Course Code: 170023

Prerequisites: Portugese 2

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course is a continuation of Portuguese level 2. Students will practice more complex sentences and develop communication skills to sustain a conversation with a native speaker.

Textbook(s): Ponto de Encontro, Portuguese as a World Language, Second Edition, Pearson

International Baccalaureate Russian Ab Initio 1

Course Code: 186203

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer, Weighted

IB Russian Ab Initio is a foreign language course designed for complete beginners. Students are prepared to use the language appropriately in a variety of settings. Each course develops students’ powers of expression in a second language, provides them with a resource for the study of other subjects, and brings them into contact with ways of thought that may differ from their own. Exercises in grammar, reading and writing, and culture are presented with such topics as hobbies and leisure activities, weather and climate, everyday life, food, shopping, travel, at home, transportation, the body and health, life and careers, and communication and media.

Textbook(s): Golosa, ISBN 9780131986282

International Baccalaureate Russian Ab Initio 2

Course Code: 186303

Prerequisites: IB Russian Ab Initio 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer, Weighted

IB Russian Ab Initio is a foreign language course designed for complete beginners. Students are prepared to use the language appropriately in a variety of settings. Each course develops students’ powers of expression in a second language, provides them with a resource for the study of other subjects, and brings them into contact with ways of thought that may differ from their own. Exercises in grammar, reading and writing, and culture are presented with such topics as hobbies and leisure activities, weather and climate, everyday life, food, shopping, travel, at home, transportation, the body and health, life and careers, and communication and media.

Textbook(s): Golosa, ISBN 9780131986282

Russian 1

Course Code: 183003

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In the first year of Russian study, communication and the sounds of the language are learned through dialogues, exercises and situations. The students learn to understand, speak, read, and write a limited amount of material. Students must learn to apply grammatical principles of the language to form new ideas and to communicate them. Cultural information is taught about countries where the target language is spoken. Letters of the Russian alphabet are gradually introduced and practiced in the Russian 1 course.

Textbook(s): Golosa, ISBN 9780131986282

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Russian 2

Course Code: 184003

Prerequisites: Russian 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The development of skills begun in the first year of Russian is continued. Greater emphasis is placed on oral proficiency, reading and writing in Russian. Knowledge of grammar is expanded, including object pronouns and most of the verb tenses beyond the present. Cultural information about the people is taught through readings in the basic text and supplementary materials.

Textbook(s): Golosa, Prentice Hall

Russian 3

Course Code: 185003

Prerequisites: Russian 2

Credits: 1.0 Completer

By the third level of Russian students are required to use the language to a greater extent in class conversations, and for reading both fiction and nonfiction, including magazines and newspapers.

Learning of vocabulary is greatly expanded. Some supplementary reading is required. Basic grammar is reviewed and more complex structure is taught. Cultural projects are to be carried out in the foreign language. Students are expected to write coherent paragraphs, short summaries, and outlines in the foreign language. Frequent testing of listening and reading comprehension is expected in this course.

Textbook(s): Golosa, Prentice Hall

Russian 4

Course Code: 186003

Prerequisites: Russian 3

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In the level 4 Russian course, students are expected to use the language in conversation, class discussions, in oral and written reports and research projects. Reading includes literary works, social and cultural material, magazines, and newspapers from the foreign country. Grammar is reviewed, and the finer points are analyzed through work with original compositions, summaries, reports, advanced exercises, and some translation activities. The aim is greater precision in self-expression. Students are expected to understand and write from dictation material heard for the first time. The use of the foreign language in school-wide and community projects is encouraged.

Textbook(s): Russian Stage One

Russian 5

Course Code: 186103

Prerequisites: Russian 4; Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 Completer; Weighted

Level 5 is the most advanced foreign language course; therefore, students are expected to speak solely in the second language. Students engage in reading for information in order to prepare oral and written reports, as well as for literary appreciation. Grammar is reviewed and discussed in the foreign language as the students’ composition and oral work reveal their weaknesses. The students work on broad units dealing with literary, cultural or social themes. Students are to use a variety of foreign language sources of information, including films, recordings, native speakers, as well as printed matter in preparing their assignments. Contemporary problems of the foreign country as

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well as national problems are discussed in the foreign language. Long-range individual projects on special student-selected topics are expected. Creative writing is encouraged through such activities as producing a newspaper, poetry magazine, and storybooks for children, or term papers.

Textbook(s): College Board Materials

Spanish 1

Course Code: 162003, 162023

Prerequisites: None

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In the first year of Spanish communication and the sounds of the language are learned through dialogues, learning scenarios, practice exercises, and real-life situations. The students learn to understand, speak, read, and write a limited amount of material. Students will learn to apply grammatical principles of the language to form new ideas and to communicate them. Cultural information about the countries is taught as a part of the content.

Textbook(s): Espanol Santillana, ISBN 9781622639458

Spanish 2

Course Code: 165003, 165023

Prerequisites: Spanish 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer

The development of skills begun in the first year of Spanish is continued. Greater emphasis is placed on oral proficiency, listening, reading and writing in Spanish. Knowledge of grammar is expanded, including object pronouns and most of the verb tenses beyond the present. Cultural information is taught through basic content readings and supplementary materials.

Textbook(s): Espanol Santillana, ISBN 9781622639496

Spanish 2 Honors

Course Code: 165093

Prerequisites: Spanish 1

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course is designed for identified selected highly able students who have met the prerequisites.

Lessons and units include activities and a writing component that will enhance students’ skills.

Textbook(s): Espanol Santillana, ISBN 9781622639496

Spanish 3

Course Code: 166003

Prerequisites: Spanish 2

Credits: 1.0 Completer

By the third level of Spanish students are required to use the language in class conversations and read both fiction and nonfiction, including magazines and newspapers. Learning of vocabulary is greatly expanded. Some supplementary reading is required. Basic grammar is reviewed and more complex structure is taught. Cultural projects are to be carried out in the foreign language. Students are expected to write coherent paragraphs, short summaries, and outlines in foreign language.

Frequent testing of listening and reading comprehension is expected in this course.

Textbook(s): Espanol Santillana, ISBN 9781622639533

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Spanish 4

Course Code: 167003

Prerequisites: Spanish 3

Credits: 1.0 Completer

In the level 4 Spanish course, students are expected to use the language in conversation, class discussions, in oral and written reports and research projects. Reading includes literary works, social and cultural material, magazines, and newspapers from the foreign country. Grammar is reviewed, and the finer points are analyzed through work with original compositions, summaries, reports, advanced exercises, and some translation activities. The aim is greater precision in self-expression. Students are expected to understand and write from dictation material heard for the first time. The use of the foreign language in school-wide and community projects is encouraged.

Textbook(s): Espanol Santillana, ISBN 9781622639571

Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Culture

Course Code: 168203

Prerequisites: Spanish 4; Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 Completer, Weighted

The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program for Spanish 5 will provide course work, written assessments, and practical experiences culminating in the AP Spanish exam.

Textbook(s): Abriendo Puertas: Ampliando Perspectivas, McDougal Littell, 9780547946566

Advanced Placement Spanish 6 Literature

Course Code: 168303

Prerequisites: Spanish 5; Application and orientation session

Credits: 1.0 Completer, Weighted

The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program for Spanish 6 will provide course work, written assessments, and practical experiences culminating in the AP Spanish exam.

Textbook(s): College Board Materials

Spanish 7

Course Code: 168113

Prerequisites: Spanish 6

Credits: 1.0 Completer, Weighted

Spanish 7 is a content-based course rather than a skill acquisition course. The skills and grammatical knowledge acquired in levels 1-6 are to be used to fulfill creative, cultural, and research projects. The main thrust of the course is to extend the study of literature and to develop stronger proficiency in speaking, writing, and reading Spanish.

Textbook(s): Antologia de la novella realista; Antologia de la generación del 98; Escritos modernistas;

Los mejores relatos fantásticos de habla hispaña; Nuestra señora de la soledad

Spanish for Native Speakers Level 2

Course Code: 165203

Prerequisite: Native Spanish speaker

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course is designed for students who are totally bilingual in Spanish and English. It is conducted

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

entirely in Spanish for students who speak and read Spanish at the intermediate-low to mid level. The course will emphasize reading and writing, critical thinking, culture, literary exposure, and improving speaking skills.

Textbook(s): El Español Para Nosotros Level 1, ISBN 9780078271502

Spanish for Native Speakers Level 3

Course Code: 166203

Prerequisite: Spanish proficiency test

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course is designed for students who are totally bilingual in Spanish and English. It is conducted entirely in Spanish for students who speak and read Spanish at the intermediate to advanced level.

The course will emphasize reading and writing, critical thinking, culture, and literary exposure, and improving speaking skills.

Textbook(s): El Español Para Nosotros Level 2, McGraw-Hill/Glencoe

Spanish for Native Speakers Level 4

Course Code: 167203

Prerequisite: Spanish proficiency test

Credits: 1.0 Completer

This course is designed for students who are totally bilingual in Spanish and English. It is conducted entirely in Spanish for students who speak and read Spanish at the advanced level. The course will emphasize reading and writing, critical thinking, culture, and literary exposure and improving speaking skills.

Textbook(s): Galería de Arte y vida, Glencoe McGraw Hill

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Prince George’s County Public Schools High School Course Offerings • Fall 2015

Prince George’s County Public Schools

HIGH SCHOOLS

Academy of Health Sciences at PGCC................................... . .........................................301-583-1593

Annapolis Road Academy Alternative ............................................................................... 301-209-3580

Bladensburg High ............................................................................................................. 301-887-6700

Bowie High ....................................................................................................................... 301-805-2600

Central High ...................................................................................................................... 301-499-7080

Charles Herbert Flowers High .......................................................................................... 301-636-8000

Community Bsed Classroom .............................................................................................301-985-5149

Croom Vocational .............................................................................................................. 301-372-8846

Crossland Evening High.....................................................................................................301-449-4994

Crossland High .................................................................................................................. 301-449-4800

DuVal High ......................................................................................................................... 301-918-8600

Eleanor Roosevelt High ..................................................................................................... 301-513-5400

Fairmont Heights High ....................................................................................................... 301-925-1360

Forestville Military .............................................................................................................. 301-817-0400

Frederick Douglass High ................................................................................................... 301-952-2400

Friendly High ..................................................................................................................... 301-449-4900

Gwynn Park High............................................................................................................... 301-372-0140

Dr. Henry A. Wise, Jr. High ................................................................................................ 301-780-2100

High Point High.................................................................................................................. 301-572-6400

International High School at Langley Park.........................................................................301-702-3910

International High School at Largo .................................................................................... 301-702-3810

Largo High ......................................................................................................................... 301-808-8880

Laurel High ........................................................................................................................ 301-497-2050

Northwestern Evening High................................................................................................301-985-1460

Northwestern High ............................................................................................................. 301-985-1820

Oxon Hill High.................................................................................................................... 301-749-4300

Parkdale High .................................................................................................................... 301-513-5700

Potomac High .................................................................................................................... 301-702-3900

Suitland High ..................................................................................................................... 301-817-0500

Surrattsville High ............................................................................................................... 301-599-2453

Tall Oaks Vocational .......................................................................................................... 301-390-0230

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PHONE DIRECTORY

Contact appropriate program personnel for further information. For updates to phone information, see the PGCPS phone directory online at www1.pgcps.org.

Advanced Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-808-8274

Advanced Technology Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-669-6012

Area 1 Office. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-669-6010

Area 2 Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-669-6060

Area 3 Office. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-669-6000

Alternative Educational Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-209-3570

Business Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-669-6012

Code of Maryland Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.dsd.state.md.us; 800-633-9657

College Career Reserach Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-669-6012

Creative Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-808-8317

Curriculum and Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-808-8240

Dance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-808-8317

Department of Test Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-702-3860

Distance Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-386-1624

Drama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-808-8317

Family and Consumer Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-669-6012

Fine Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-808-8317

Foreign Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-808-8265

Health Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-808-4080

High School Performance Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-669-6000

Maryland State Department of Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.marylandpublicschools.org; 888-246-0016

Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-749-5610

Media Arts/Television Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-808-8317

Military Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-669-6012

Music (Vocal/General) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-333-0961

Music (Instrumental) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-333-0963

Physical Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-333-0970

Prince George’s Community College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.pgcc.md.us; 301-322-0866

Prince George’s County Public Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www1.pgcps.org; 301-952-6000

Reading/English Language Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-808-8284

SAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-669-6012

School Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-567-8669

Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-808-8256

Service Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-808-5956

Social Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-808-8246

Special Area Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-808-2594

Special Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-618-8300

Talented and Gifted (TAG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-803-3790

Tech Prep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-669-6012

Technical Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-669-6012

Technology Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301-669-6012

University System of Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.usmd.edu; 301-445-2740

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C&I-120 (8/15)

Prince George’s County Public Schools

14201 School Lane • Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772 www.pgcps.org

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