lienannual2002

lienannual2002
Annual Report 2002
Annual Report 2002
Contents
Section 1: Large Industry Energy Network
page 2
1.1 Introduction
4
1.2 Message from Mr Dermot Ahern TD
6
1.3 The Large Industry Energy Network
8
1.4 Membership
12
1.5 Networking and Events
16
1.6 Awards and Recognition
Section 2: Case Studies
22
2.1 Building Management Systems - Aer Rianta, Dublin
24
2.2 Heat Recovery – Merck Sharp & Dohme
26
2.3 Plant Optimisation 1 – Baxter Healthcare S.A.
28
2.4 Plant Optimisation 2 – HJ Heinz
30
2.5 Energy Management – Boston Scientific, Galway
32
2.6 Monitoring & Targeting – Cantrell & Cochrane Ireland Ltd
34
2.7 Boiler Control & Emissions Reduction – Masonite Ireland
36
2.8 Energy Efficiency through Process Change – Novartis Ringaskiddy Ltd
38
2.9 Water Reprocessing & Recovery – Glanbia plc, Ballyragget and Janssen Pharmaceutical Ltd
40
2.10 Intelligent Lighting – Element Six and Merck Sharp & Dohme
42
2.11 Negotiated Agreement Pilot & Energy Audit – Cadbury Ireland Ltd, Dublin
44
2.12 Case study company overview
Section 3: Results and Analysis
46
3.1 Results and Targets 1995-2002
50
3.2 Analysis of Results for 2002
57
3.3 Members’ Graphs & Statements
89
3.4 The LIEN Objectives and Contact Details
91
3.5 Member Listing
92
3.6 Useful Sources of Information
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
Large Industry Energy Network
SECTION
1
Section 1: Large Industry Energy Network
page
2
1.1 Introduction
4
1.2 Message from Mr Dermot Ahern TD
6
1.3 The Large Industry Energy Network
8
1.4 Membership
10
1.5 Networking and Events
16
1.6 Awards and Recognition
Section 1 Large Industry Energy Network
1.1 Introduction
This year has seen activity on forthcoming climate-change abatement policies stepped up a
gear, but one thing remains unchanged – Large Industry Energy Network members are still
committed to reducing their specific energy use and emissions. The fact that carbon taxation
and emissions trading are on the way is well-publicised, but events over recent months – the
publication of the Department of Finance carbon tax consultation paper, the launch of the
SEI pilot programme report on negotiated energy agreements and the assignment of the EPA
to the overseeing of a National Allocation Plan for the EU emissions-trading scheme – have
kick-started a flurry of heightened interest across industry. The detailed and committed
reporting of energy use and emissions by Large Industry Energy Network (LIEN) members
will likely pay dividends over the coming months. Here in the sixth Annual Report, they
report on their 2002 results and continued commitment.
Tackling climate change remains a high priority for government. As LIEN members account
for around 40% of the country’s industrial energy spend and 9.4% of the national total primary energy requirement, the concerted efforts of these members in sharing best practice in
energy management remains vital to achieving national targets. A recent study carried out by
SEI, profiling the energy consumption and CO2 emissions in industry, revealed that 18% of
enterprises are responsible for 90% of industrial energy consumption. This highlights the
benefits that can be obtained by focusing on improving the efficiency of large and intensive
energy users, providing evidence of the validity and importance of the LIEN.
Climate-change policy measures also necessitate more accurate recording of CO2 emissions.
As CO2 cannot easily be metered like other gases, it is necessary to accurately record energy
use and understand the emissions implications. As a step towards further improving the
accuracy of energy reporting, LIEN members’ usage is now recorded in terms of primary energy usage. LIEN treatment of primary energy and emissions is explained further in Section 1.3
and is based upon information currently available on emissions data. Although this in no
way supersedes what may be decided in the future for dealing with a carbon tax regime
and/or National Allocation Plan for emissions trading, it allows members to make more
informed decisions on their energy-usage patterns. This also allows CHP and non-CHP sites
to report in an equitable and transparent manner.
In 2002 LIEN members had an energy bill of around 4290m. Consequently, energy price
increases continue to be a major considering factor when implementing energy-saving initiatives. This financial pressure will only increase with the onset of carbon taxation and emissions trading, offering a further incentive for firms to look towards a carbon-constrained
future. The voluntary-reporting approach adopted by LIEN members, along with the open
networking and promotion of best practice among members, is evidence of the dedication
and professionalism of the company energy representatives involved. The strong involvement
of LIEN members in the success of the negotiated agreement pilot project has affirmed this
view. This open working relationship harboured within the LIEN will play an essential role in
the future success of emissions abatement within industry and should be encouraged by both
government and industry representatives alike.
Fiona Murray
Project Manager, Large Industry Energy Network
Sustainable Energy Ireland
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Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
November 2003
“As LIEN members account for around 40% of the
country’s industrial energy spend and 9.4% of the national total primary energy requirement, the concerted efforts
of these members in sharing best practice in energy management remains vital to achieving national targets”
FIONA MURRAY
Project Manager, Large Industry Energy Network, Sustainable Energy Ireland
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
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Section 1 Large Industry Energy Network
1.2 Message from Mr. Dermot Ahern TD
Minister for Communications, Marine and Natural Resources
One of the most important global tasks facing us at present is the mitigation of the damaging
effects of emissions of greenhouse gases on the world’s climate. Ireland must meet tough
commitments arising from the EU’s ratification of the Kyoto Protocol, and reduction of our
energy-related emissions is crucial if we are to meet those commitments. Emissions trading
and the introduction of a carbon/energy tax present new challenges for the industrial sector.
The Large Industry Energy Network has helped significantly in preparing industry for these
challenges, and I believe that its importance will grow in the coming years.
Eight years ago, what is now the Large Industry Energy Network (LIEN) was launched. This
development, and Sustainable Energy Ireland’s continued support for the scheme, has clearly
been both appropriate and necessary, particularly given the present policy focus on measures
aimed at reducing energy use and related emissions in the industrial and other sectors. The
foresight in developing the LIEN, and that of the member companies in joining and participating in it, have been of great importance in ensuring an effective collaboration between
the State and the main energy users in the industrial sector.
It is vitally important for organisations to develop their energy-management policies, systems
and resources in identifying opportunities for economically and technically viable reductions
in energy consumption, and in measuring and reporting on progress. I believe that participation in the activities of the LIEN has contributed significantly to this.
The requirement for information provision and support to industry will grow both in magnitude and importance in the coming years. The National Climate Change Strategy lays down
a key role for Sustainable Energy Ireland in this regard. The LIEN provides an effective means
of ensuring a two-way channel of communication, and is also a model for further development of support mechanisms for the whole industrial sector.
In addition to the achievements of the LIEN in reducing energy and emissions on an annual
basis, the role played by the members in Sustainable Energy Ireland’s pilot project on negotiated energy agreements has been of great benefit in testing practical models for such an
instrument. The project is a good example of a successful collaboration with industry in
the development of policy recommendations based on the principles of action learning.
The results of the project will undoubtedly be of great assistance in informing policy decisions in this area.
I commend the members of the LIEN for their efforts in managing their energy and emissions
during the past year, in a difficult economic climate. This report reveals that these efforts
have resulted in an overall primary energy saving of 90 GWh in 2002, with a reduction in
emissions of some 23,650 tonnes of carbon dioxide.
Once again, I congratulate the members of the LIEN along with Sustainable Energy Ireland
for their efforts and achievements, and I look forward with confidence to the development of
the Network in the coming years.
Dermot Ahern
Minister for Communications, Marine and Natural Resources
4
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
DERMOT AHERN
Minister for Communications, Marine and Natural Resources
“The foresight in developing the LIEN, and that
of the member companies in joining and participating
in it, have been of great importance in ensuring an
effective collaboration between the State and the main
energy users in the industrial sector”
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
5
Section 1 Large Industry Energy Network
1.3. The Large Industry Energy Network
The Large Industry Energy Network is a voluntary networking initiative of companies who are committed to reducing their energy intensity on an individual basis,
and who recognise the benefits that can flow from collaborating with like-minded
organisations on innovations and best practices in energy management.
The structured approach to energy auditing and management, and an annual statement of
energy accounts, which is a condition of Network membership, is a valuable tool for successful energy management. The Network is an efficient mechanism for energy professionals to
access and assess valuable information on new energy technologies and improved energymanagement practices, with a view to applying them to their own plant. Member companies
have a common focus on exploring and implementing cost-effective-energy-efficient practices
and the best way of learning is in shared experience of this kind.
Benefits of the LIEN are in two categories – those contributing to national energy policy
objectives and those benefiting the individual enterprise. The LIEN, in common with other
Sustainable Energy Ireland programmes, addresses the three principal energy policy objectives. The first of these is to ensure security of supply, which a number of LIEN members contribute to through embedded generation projects. The second is to ensure environmentally
sustainable energy production and consumption, which is demonstrated through the numerous energy-management initiatives of members resulting in a progressive reduction in their
energy intensity and related emissions. Thirdly, this reduction in energy intensity leads to
improved competitiveness on an individual basis by reducing energy operating costs and
the risk of exposure to energy price fluctuations, which in turn contributes to the competitiveness of Irish industry as a whole.
So, along with contributing to national policy objectives, members themselves derive the
benefit of increased competitiveness. Additionally, the resultant emissions reduction helps
members to meet legislative regulations such as IPC licensing, while preparing for future
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Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
1.3 The Large Industry Energy Network
The Network is an efficient mechanism for energy professionals to access and assess valuable information on new
energy technologies and improved energy-management
practices, with a view to applying them to their own plant
mandatory requirements. Actively seeking to minimise environmental impact is also a positive platform for public relations, increasingly important to many companies.
As the importance of how we use energy changes, it is essential that the way we record and
report energy use develops accordingly. Carbon taxation and emissions trading place a greater
importance on accurate energy-usage figures. For this reason, all energy use recorded by LIEN
members will now be reported as primary energy use. This means that all energy use for
2002 and all previous years is converted back to the primary energy source (e.g. coal, gas, oil,
renewables) used to generate it. This gives a more comprehensive picture of energy usage.
This will mean that previously published EPI figures may change, but this is an essential step
in creating a more meaningful indication of how energy is used. It also has the advantage of
allowing the true environmental impact of a site – in terms of CO2 emissions – to be assessed.
The main change for most members is in the way electricity use is recorded. The national generating efficiency of electricity imported from the national grid supply is taken into account,
allowing electricity use to be converted back to primary energy. Currently, the national generating efficiency is taken as 40%; so metered electricity imported from the grid is multiplied
by 2.5 to represent the primary energy used to generate it (e.g. if 10 MWh is imported from
the grid, this equates to 25 MWh of primary energy).
All LIEN members have been provided with information comparing old, previously published
EPI figures with the new EPI figures calculated using primary energy-usage figures. This also
allows CHP and non-CHP sites to report in an equitable and transparent manner.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
7
Section 1 Large Industry Energy Network
1.4 Membership
Members of the Large Industry Energy Network continue to make a significant contribution towards reducing Ireland’s carbon dioxide emissions each year, in addition
to achieving energy savings worth at least j1.4 million annually. Much of this success derives from members’ firm commitment to energy conservation and management programmes, coupled with a willingness to share information and experience
with fellow LIEN members.
Eighty industrial facilities now participate in the Network. Together, they account for around
9.4% of the country’s total primary energy requirement, and an estimated 40% of energy
usage in the industrial sector.
Since its inception in 1995, the LIEN has been growing steadily, and membership now represents a wide cross-section of industrial activity in Ireland in sectors as diverse as mining and
air transport, pharmaceuticals, plastics and food and drink.
The common denominator between the 80 LIEN members is that they are all high-energy
users. Usage may be dictated by the size of their operations or by the energy-intensive nature
of their processing activities. While an industrial facility must have an annual energy bill of
at least 40.6 million in order to qualify for LIEN membership, many companies’ annual energy spend is much higher than this figure.
In addition, all members are committed to pursuing energy efficiency as a corporate objective
and to publishing their annual targets and subsequent performances.
New members
During the past 12 months, three new members have signed up to the programme:
•
Cantrell & Cochrane Ireland Ltd, Dublin
•
Tayto Limited, Coolock, Dublin
•
3Com Technologies, Dublin.
The C&C Group, building on its membership of the Cork site, now has three sites involved –
with the addition of C&C, Dublin and Tayto, Coolock – demonstrating its commitment to the
LIEN and the environmental benefits associated with membership.
While 3Com Technologies joined the Network and reports on performance for 2002, unfortunately the site is now scheduled to close at the end of 2003.
Membership losses
Due to the impending introduction of carbon/energy taxation, and the proposed introduction
of an EU-wide greenhouse gas emissions-trading scheme by 2005, greater emphasis is being
placed on the importance of recording and monitoring energy usage. Membership of the LIEN
depends on voluntary reporting of energy usage: as such, this confirms a member company’s
commitment to reducing its energy usage. Ongoing failure by a company to report on its
results leads to a review of its membership.
8
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
1.4 Membership
Becton Dickinson Insulin Syringe Ltd is the only member to leave the Network in 2002. The
company joined the Network in 1996, and during the four years that followed it improved its
EPI by 25%. However, its inability to report for 2001 and 2002, due to various operational and
resource difficulties, means that its membership has now lapsed.
Not reporting for 2002
Due to resource difficulties at its Tallaght site, Fruitfield Foods Ltd will not be reporting on its
2002 energy performance. The company’s requirement to report has been suspended for one
year only: it expects to be in a position to report its 2003 energy performance next year.
Trade name changes
Some members have undergone changes in trading names: Leo Laboratories has been
renamed LEO Pharma; Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Loughbeg is now known as Pfizer
Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Loughbeg API; Kostal Ireland is now known as Kostal Ireland
GmbH; Bausch & Lomb (Contact Lens Division) is now known as Bausch & Lomb Ireland.
As Cantrell & Cochrane Ireland Ltd now has two sites reporting – Dublin and Cork – it
will report on these sites separately.
Industrial Sectoral Representation within LIEN (2002)
During 2002, membership in the Food/Drink sector has increased from 21 to 23; and in the
Electronics sector from 6 to 7. Membership in the Non-metallic Minerals sector has decreased
from 5 to 4. Representation across the sectors is indicative of the relative importance of these
sectors to the Irish economy.
Industry Sectoral Representation within LIEN (2002)
Pharm/Chemicals
24
Food/Drink
23
Metal/Engineering
6
Non-metallic Minerals
4
Healthcare
4
Electronics
7
Print/Paper
3
Oil/Gas
2
Textiles
2
Mining
2
Air Transport
1
Plastics
1
Wood/Timber
1
TOTAL
80
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
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Section 1 Large Industry Energy Network
1.5 Networking and Events
The guiding principles of the Large Industry Energy Network (LIEN) remain
unchanged since its foundation. Conversely, the energy market in Ireland is now
facing a number of fundamental changes including deregulation, the impending
introduction of carbon/energy taxation, and the proposed introduction of an
EU-wide greenhouse gas emissions-trading scheme by 2005.
The challenge for Irish industry is to prepare for these changes and ensure that individual
firms use energy efficiently.
Against this background, auditing LIEN members’ energy use on an annual basis, setting targets for improving industries’ performance and identifying strategies to achieve those targets,
coupled with the co-ordination of forums for networking and information-sharing between
LIEN members, must now assume an even greater importance.
Workshops
The series of workshops organised by Sustainable Energy Ireland each year provides a formal
structure for LIEN members to learn from energy experts and other specialists, as well as from
other energy managers. Typically, these events are hosted by individual LIEN members. For
this reason, the content tends to focus on practical rather than theoretical aspects of implementing energy-efficiency initiatives. Case study presentations cover topics such as the range
of challenges and problems faced and how they were overcome; what new techniques, technologies and other processes were used; details of expenditure incurred as well as energy
savings and other benefits gained.
•
10
Large Industry Energy Network
In October 2002, Thermo King in Galway hosted a workshop aimed at providing large
industries with information on the substantial cost savings and other practical benefits
that can result from correct selection of lighting systems, and implementation of a
Annual Report 2002
1.5 Networking and Events
Events organised by Sustainable Energy Ireland each year
provide a formal structure for LIEN members to learn
from energy experts and other specialists, as well as
from other energy managers
high-energy-efficiency lighting programme. Participants heard and discussed presentations
on new lighting technologies as well as emerging technologies, which feature ‘intelligent’
sensors that integrate lighting systems with heating and voice-control systems. The workshop
participants were also given a brief introduction to the European GreenLight Programme,
a voluntary initiative that encourages non-residential electricity consumers to commit to
installing energy-efficient lighting technologies in their businesses and workplaces. The
event concluded with a site tour of the Thermo King plant.
•
In December 2002, Roche Ireland hosted a workshop aimed at reviewing various aspects of
waste management – in particular how it can be used to maximise energy efficiency.
Speakers demonstrated how to reap major savings by reducing, recycling and recovering heat
from waste, using novel wastewater treatment methods. Andrew Carden of Roche Ireland
described how the heat recovered from vapour and liquid waste incineration is facilitating
the optimisation of overall energy efficiency at its Clarecastle plant. Karen Kennedy of
Glanbia described how it is using the application of a unique membrane bioreactor to treat
wastewater at its Ballyragget site; she also outlined some of the operational difficulties that
the Glanbia team encountered along the way. In addition, the workshop programme featured
a presentation from the Environmental Protection Agency on the implications of the EU
Directive on Integrated Pollution Prevention Control (IPPC) and the impact that this will have
on IPC licensing, as greater emphasis is placed on energy efficiency. The final segment of the
one-day programme featured a tour of the Roche Ireland plant in Clarecastle, Co Clare.
•
In March 2003, LIEN members attended an interim briefing session on climate change and
the regulatory constraints facing Irish industry. They heard presentations on progress in
relation to the pilot project on negotiated energy agreements; they were given an update on
plans relating to the introduction of carbon taxation and emissions trading, and they were
also briefed on the current status of the Kyoto Protocol vis-à-vis EU legislation. Finally, members were commended for implementing energy-saving projects, which in 2001 accounted
for a 120,000-tonne reduction in CO2 emissions.
•
Motive power is the single largest area of electricity usage in Irish industry. In May 2003,
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
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Section 1 Large Industry Energy Network
1.5 Networking and Events
Tara Mines in Navan hosted a workshop on energy efficiency in relation to the use of motive
power and transformer applications. Participants heard from a panel of experts including
Hans De Keulenaer of the European Copper Institute in Belgium, who urged participants to
make energy saving a major focus of management policy, and to consider the use of the new
transformer technologies, which can significantly improve energy efficiency. Barry Mellerick
of Tara Mines presented a case study, which examined potential savings and compared the latest, most efficient transformers with more widely available, low-cost alternatives. The workshop concluded with an underground tour of the lead and zinc mine, giving participants a
unique opportunity to observe routine operations at close range.
•
In September 2003, Sustainable Energy Ireland held a one-day workshop in Cork aimed at
providing an update on the benefits of improving energy reporting, particularly in the light
of current developments in the energy market. As indicated above, these developments
include deregulation; the introduction of a tax on all carbon dioxide-emitting fuels after the
end of 2004; negotiated agreements on energy and related emissions; and the proposed EUwide greenhouse gas emissions-trading-scheme by 2005. Speakers gave presentations on the
implications for industry of the various forms of energy currently being used. They stressed
the importance of understanding these implications, if energy efficiencies are to be improved
and greenhouse gas emissions reduced. Lack of readiness for these instruments could lead to
significant cost penalties to industry. With the presentation of accurate energy data now assuming greater importance, companies are required to provide evidence of emissions levels,
and they must clearly demonstrate what measures they are taking in order to address the
issue of energy efficiency. Primary energy-usage reporting is the first step in meeting that
challenge.
Sustainable Energy Ireland Events
Large Industry Energy Network members are always welcome to attend events not run specifically for the LIEN, but with a relevance to energy management in industry. A number of such
events involved strong participation by members during the past year.
12
•
A Boiler Study Tour, which was organised by Sustainable Energy Ireland and took place in
November 2002, gave boiler users the opportunity to observe best practice in a range of boiler
and CHP plants while obtaining an appreciation of the technologies used and the effects of
design criteria on plant efficiency. The tour began in University College Cork. The group then
visited the three companies that won the 2001 Boiler Awards in the CHP, Hot Water and
Steam categories: Boston Scientific in Cork and the two Pfizer plants in Loughbeg and
Ringaskiddy respectively.
•
February 2003 saw the launch of the fifth Large Industry Energy Network annual report,
the publication of which is acknowledged as an important event, not least because it recognises the joint efforts of LIEN members in reducing their energy usage and related emissions.
At this year’s launch, which was held in Dublin, Pat Noonan of GlaxoSmithKline, Dungarvan
– one of the seven new companies that joined the Network in 2002 – presented Mr Dermot
Ahern TD, Minister for Communications, Marine and Natural Resources with the first copy
of the report.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
1.5 Networking and Events
•
Energy Awareness Week, the single biggest promotional event in the Irish energy calendar,
ran from 21 to 27 September 2003. This year the campaign theme focused on the need for
action, the benefits of action and the various options available to companies that wish to get
involved in energy-conservation initiatives. As in previous years, many LIEN members conducted their own on-site awareness campaigns: Sustainable Energy Ireland supported these
companies by providing them with leaflets, electronic posters, quiz packs and other promotional materials. SEI is also happy to support members’ own Energy Awareness events, and
gave talks on ‘The Importance of Energy Awareness’ at various sites, including the Janssen
Pharmaceutical plant and the Pfizer Loughbeg plant (both in Cork), and the Hewlett-Packard
Manufacturing facility in Dublin. Speakers highlighted some of the challenges facing industry, and indeed Ireland’s economic development as a whole. Also outlined was the range of
energy-efficiency techniques that individuals can carry out in the home to play their part
in achieving reduced emissions.
Studies and Analyses
Sustainable Energy Ireland studies and analyses, either carried out in-house or by external
consultants, are often of interest to LIEN members, particularly when they focus on energy
efficiency in large industry.
The Workshop Topics Survey, which was carried out in early 2003, was designed to assist in
the development of a workshops programme that would best reflect the interests and needs of
LIEN members. Of the 80 members who were invited to participate, 43 submitted a detailed
response. The survey findings showed that 70% of respondents ranked carbon taxation and
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
13
Section 1 Large Industry Energy Network
1.5 Networking and Events
emissions trading as their first area of interest, while 67% gave equal ranking to monitoring
and targeting, and energy saving. These and other findings will be used as a basis for future
planning of LIEN workshops and events.
Negotiated Energy Agreements Pilot Project
Starting in early 2002, Sustainable Energy Ireland launched a pilot initiative aimed at developing and testing a range of negotiated energy agreements suitable for application in Ireland.
Such agreements would be an important instrument, both in increasing the effectiveness of a
carbon/energy tax in achieving early reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and in protecting the competitiveness of Irish industry.
The pilot project tested three different models of negotiated agreement: a company agreement
with an individual site whose energy consumption and emissions are exceptionally high in
Irish terms; a collective agreement with a group of sites from the same sector; and a horizontal technology agreement suitable for medium-sized sites, focusing on a specific
end-use technology.
LIEN members played a major role in this project. Aughinish Alumina Ltd volunteered and
was selected as the site participating in the individual agreement. The collective agreement,
which focused on the pharma/chem. sector, involved ten companies, of which eight are members of the LIEN: GlaxoSmithKline Cork; Janssen Pharmaceutical; Leo Pharma; Micro-Bio
Ireland Ltd; Novartis Ringaskiddy Ltd; Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Little Island and
Loughbeg; and Wyeth Medica, Newbridge. Fifteen sites were selected for participation in
the technology agreement, which focused on hot water and steam generation and distribution. Eight LIEN members participated in this strand of the project also: Aer Rianta, Dublin;
Cadbury Ireland, Coolock; Glanbia plc, Ballyragget; Hewlett-Packard Mfg Ltd, Leixlip;
Smurfit Paper Mills Ltd; Transitions Optical Ltd; Tyco Healthcare, Mulhuddart; and
Western Proteins.
The involvement of the LIEN member companies in the project was invaluable. Their knowledge of one another through the activities of the Network made it much easier to develop
the spirit of collaboration that was essential to the project’s success. Their knowledge of the
issues involved, together with their well-developed energy-management structures and systems, meant that they could contribute fully to each step of the project. Managers from the
LIEN sites served as group representatives within the negotiation process; indeed, seven of
the eight group representatives were from LIEN member companies.
The pilot project was successfully completed in mid-2003, and the subsequent project report
(Negotiated Energy Agreements Pilot Project, Final Report, SEI: Dublin, September 2003) has
been well-received. The findings of the project represent a significant contribution to the
development of energy policy in this field.
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Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
15
Section 1 Large Industry Energy Network
1.6 Awards and Recognition
During the past year, several members of the Large Industry Energy Network have
received awards from government-sponsored organisations and industry bodies for
their achievements in the promotion of sustainable energy use and environmental
protection. These awards provide further affirmation of their commitment to good
corporate citizenship and to best practice in energy management.
Food and Drinks Industry Awards
In June 2003, Glanbia Ingredients won both a Food Safety Award and an Environmental Best
Practice Award in association with Bord Bia/IBEC at the Food and Drinks Industry Awards
ceremony, which took place in Dublin. The company received the awards for the exemplary
performance of Glanbia Ingredients Division (Ballyragget, Virginia and Kilmeaden).
Glanbia’s success in the area of environmental best practice is largely attributable to its
Environmental Responsibility Care programme, which comprises five elements – water purity; recycling/reduction; energy efficiency; nutrient-management planning; and ISO 14001.
Examples of environmental best practice include the use of innovative wastewater treatment
technology at Ballyragget, which is the only known industrial application of this technology
in existence, and produces a final permeate that is cleaner than the river water into which it is
discharged. Glanbia is actively engaged in recycling cardboard, plastic, office paper, laboratory
chemicals, waste oil, fluorescent lightbulbs, scrap metal, pallets, ink cartridges and batteries.
Ballyragget’s CHP plant, (one of the largest in Ireland), converts waste heat into process heat
or steam, and has dramatically increased on-site energy efficiency. Glanbia Ingredients works
with farmers to ensure that organic waste from treatment plants is used in a responsible way
on agricultural land. Each of the Glanbia Ingredients sites is accredited to ISO 14001, which
defines the systems that must be in place in order to minimise the environmental damage
caused by a company and maximise the positive environmental impacts.
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Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
1.6 Awards and Recognition
National Irish Safety Organisation
In October 2003, Merck Sharp & Dohme (Ireland) won the National Irish Safety
Organisation’s Gold Award for its consistent achievements in applying safety standards.
The award was presented by Mr Frank Fahey TD, Minister of State at the Department of
Enterprise, Trade and Employment, at a function held in Galway.
In the past ten years, Merck Sharp & Dohme has won four Gold Awards and two Supreme
Awards for its safety performance. This is a tremendous achievement record, and it is a further reflection of the company’s commitment to the safety of the 450-strong workforce at
its Ballydine, Co Tipperary plant.
Repak Member of the Year Awards
Irish Sugar was named one of the top six industries in the “Repak Member of the Year 2002”
category at the organisation’s annual awards ceremony held in Dublin in October 2002. The
company, which was short-listed from among 1,000 Repak members, was cited for its success
in reducing packaging waste and diverting it from landfill to recycling.
In order to qualify for the award, companies had to provide evidence of substantial achievements in the area of packaging recycling; attain an ‘Excellent Result’ in the 2002 independent
packaging audit carried out by KPMG; demonstrate continuing commitment to reduction of
packaging waste; and provide evidence of further plans for reduction and recycling of packaging waste. Irish Sugar processing plants operate waste-management packaging systems. The
many good uses to which waste is put include the conversion of production-line paper and
cardboard into bedding material for greyhounds, horses and other farm animals.
Two other LIEN members, IBM and Cadbury Ireland, were among the award finalists in 2003.
IBM was short-listed in two categories – Repak Member of the Year 2003 (Large Firms) and
Repak Best Practice Member of the Year 2003 (Large Firms). IBM has been a member of Repak
since 1997. In its entry submission for both awards IBM Technology Campus highlighted its
recycling initiatives, and demonstrated its approach to managing and recycling waste.
Cadbury Ireland won a finalist award for Repak Best Practice Member of the Year 2003 (Large
Firms) for the recycling facility at its Coolock, Dublin site. The facility enables the company
to achieve 100% segregation and bailing of packaging waste. As a result, it has dramatically
reduced the amount of waste sent to landfill in the past 12 months.
ESB/CVI Community Environment Awards
In September 2003, Intel Ireland received a commendation at the ESB/CVI Community
Environment Awards ceremony, which was held in Dublin. The awards were presented by
British broadcaster and scientist, Professor David Bellamy. Intel’s submission for a series of
community and schools environmental initiatives was among the final 17 entries short-listed
for the overall award.
Large Industry Energy Network
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Section 1 Large Industry Energy Network
1.6 Awards and Recognition
The aim of the Intel programme, which is entitled ‘Waste Not, Want Not’, is to create awareness of reducing, re-using and recycling issues; to provide unique environmental solutions to
the local community; and to engage young people in ‘green thinking’. Among the activities
organised by the company since it first devised the programme in 2001 was the collection of
148,559 kg of household items, many of which were subsequently refurbished and shipped
to developing countries.
Intel’s schools programme included the organisation of a competition to recycle aluminium
cans: this resulted in 176,810 cans being recycled over a two-year period. The company actively supported the international Green Schools programme by hosting workshops, providing
guidance and sponsoring their Day of Action. It also organised an Eco-Design competition
aimed at promoting the creative use of recyclable materials.
INSPIRE (International Summit for Proliferating Innovative Ideas and
Recognising Excellence) Awards
At the Corporate Services INSPIRE Awards held in Arizona in September, Intel Ireland
received a special commendation for its presentation on the series of local community and
schools initiatives that it has spearheaded within the local community.
ISO 14001
IBM is poised for ISO 14001 accreditation following successful completion in July 2003 of
the BVQI surveillance audit.
National Boiler Awards 2002
The National Boiler Awards are presented annually by Sustainable Energy Ireland: the 2002
awards were sponsored by HDS Energy Group. The competition is intended to highlight and
reward best practice in the use and management of industrial and commercial boiler plant,
and the interaction with associated service companies. It aims to promote the maintenance of
existing high standards, and to provide an incentive to boiler users to strive for higher
performance.
Since its inception in 1996, more than 200 companies have participated in the competition,
and energy savings worth over 425 million have been achieved. During 2002, the competition
entrants achieved a reduction in carbon dioxide emissions in excess of 110,000 tonnes. As in
previous years, LIEN members featured strongly among the 2002 prize-winners.
Boilerperson of the Year Award
The Boilerperson of the Year Award went to Jim McGrath of Merck Sharp & Dohme, Ballydine,
Co Tipperary. Jim has worked as a boilerman with Merck Sharp & Dohme for over 25 years.
Working in conjunction with the plant’s existing energy-efficiency programmes, he is currently providing assistance on a number of projects, including compressor heat recovery and
the installation of a heat exchanger for condensate recovery. The plant has set ambitious targets for reducing energy costs, and an on-site energy-awareness campaign is already underway.
18
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
1.6 Awards and Recognition
The boilerhouse is extremely well-controlled and is maintained to a very high standard. It is
subject to routine inspections; written procedures are in place for all aspects of boiler house
operation; excellent logs are maintained; and the information gathered is used to optimise the
plant’s overall energy efficiency. The utilities team at Merck Sharp & Dohme has an excellent
safety record. Both daily and weekly safety checks are carried out on the site, and the team has
implemented numerous initiatives, including reduced chemical-handling, which in turn has
led to improved plant safety.
Steam Category
The top award for the Large Steam Boilerhouse of the Year went to Pfizer, Little Island, Cork.
The boilerhouse at Pfizer Little Island has an installed capacity of 27,000 kg/hr made up of
two natural-gas-fired steam boilers operating at 7 bar. The boilers operate 24 hours a day
year-round with one boiler on line and the other on hot standby. The main features of the
plant include extensive metering of steam, gas and water; Saacke burners, which are fitted
with direct digital combustion-control and oxygen-trim controls; and a reduced operating
pressure (from 10 bar to 7 bar).
Pfizer Little Island has put a lot of effort into improving overall energy efficiency at the site
in recent years. During the past 12 months alone, it has completed 34 projects – all aimed at
reducing energy costs. In the coming year, it plans to expand on the work completed to date,
and it also plans to implement a more detailed monitoring and targeting programme
throughout the plant.
Merck Sharp & Dohme, Clonmel achieved the Highly Commended Award in the overall
Steam category. The plant’s larger boiler is used as the lead boiler, with the other two boilers
alternating as backup. A number of design modifications have been made, and systems have
been put in place to ensure that the boilers operate at maximum efficiency. These systems
include the installation of an economiser, which raises the feed water temperature by 20°C;
the measurement of C, O2, CO2 and CO levels on a daily basis to monitor boiler performance;
and the tracking of gas/steam ratio on a monthly basis to determine overall efficiency.
Hot Water Category
Intel Ireland in Leixlip was awarded the Overall Winner in the Hot Water category. The
boilerhouse in FAB 14 contains three medium-pressure hot-water boilers, which can be fired
on either natural gas or light fuel oil. The boilers are fitted with Hamworthy low-NOx burners
with Alpha-Link combustion-control systems, variable-speed drives on the Forced-Draught
fans and oxygen-trim capabilities.
The boilerhouse is fully metered and monitored; weekly combustion efficiency tests are carried out on each of the boilers while they are firing natural gas, and monthly tests are carried
out on both fuels. All pipework, valves, flanges and pumps are insulated to a high standard.
The main hot-water pumps are fitted with variable-speed drives, and data charts giving the
pump characteristics are attached to the pipework associated with each pump.
Hewlett-Packard, which is also located in Leixlip, received a Highly Commended Award
in the Hot Water category. The current boilers were installed in 1998 as part of the Building 7
development, and the control system was also upgraded at the same time. In 2000,
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
19
Section 1 Large Industry Energy Network
1.6 Awards and Recognition
Hewlett-Packard achieved success in the Boiler Awards and, since then, the energy-management system has been further improved. An Energy Reduction Team is now in place, and
a programme aimed at targeting specific energy projects is also underway.
CHP Category
The CHP plant at Waterford Crystal received a Commended Award in the Small CHP category. The CHP plant, which has an installed capacity of 2MW, is used to provide process water
and space heating for the nearby factory building. The production of hot water and space
heating in this way is estimated to cost 40% less than using a conventional boiler system.
Additional savings are generated as a result of reduced electricity usage on site.
The exhaust cooling is used to dry gypsum waste that is generated by the neutralisation of
a mixture of acids with lime during the manufacturing process. Each year, the site produces
approximately 10,000 tonnes of wet gypsum. In order to reduce the water content, it is
passed through a filter press: this reduces the overall weight by 4,000 tonnes.
Prior to the installation of the CHP, the waste was disposed of in the city dump at a considerable cost to the company. Now, however, the thorough drying process that it undergoes renders it suitable for sale to the construction industry. The use of the CHP in this manner is
thus creating a positive environmental impact as well as a positive economic impact.
Ballyragget Power received a Highly Commended Award in the Overall CHP category. The
company owns and manages the CHP system on the Glanbia Ballyragget site in Co Kilkenny.
The system, commissioned in March 2000, comprises two 5.1 MW Solar/ Turbomach Taurus
T60 gas turbines. These turbines feed two 26-tonne/hr waste heat boilers, which generate
steam at 13.8 bar. In addition, the boilers are fitted with economisers, and also have supplementary firing facilities. The CHP plant is operated in conjunction with the steam boilers in
order to meet the site’s energy requirements with minimised emissions from the site.
Co-Gen Ltd, Mitchelstown received the Commended Award also in the Overall category.
The company is a joint venture between Dairygold Co-operative Society, Mitchelstown and
Fingleton, White & Associates. Milk processing is an energy intensive business and the successful application of CHP can make considerable savings.
The plant at Mitchelstown has two 5 MW Centrax turbines that were installed in 1996
and 1999. The turbines are coupled to Wellman Robey waste heat boilers, which can, with
supplementary firing from Saacke burners, produce up to 50 tonnes of steam per hour.
The boilers are fitted with economisers and the system has a high level of metering installed
with extensive logs kept on site.
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Annual Report 2002
Case Studies
SECTION
2
Section 2: Case Studies
page 22
2.1 Building Management Systems - Aer Rianta, Dublin
24
2.2 Heat Recovery – Merck Sharp & Dohme
26
2.3 Plant Optimisation 1 – Baxter Healthcare S.A.
28
2.4 Plant Optimisation 2 – HJ Heinz
30
2.5 Energy Management – Boston Scientific, Galway
32
2.6 Monitoring & Targeting – Cantrell & Cochrane Ireland Ltd
34
2.7 Boiler Control & Emissions Reduction – Masonite Ireland
36
2.8 Energy Efficiency through Process Change – Novartis Ringaskiddy Ltd
38
2.9 Water Reprocessing & Recovery – Glanbia plc, Ballyragget
and Janssen Pharmaceutical Ltd
40
2.10 Intelligent Lighting – Element Six and Merck Sharp & Dohme
42
2.11 Negotiated Agreement Pilot & Energy Audit – Cadbury Ireland Ltd, Dublin
44
2.12 Case study company overview
Section 2 Case Studies
A E R R I A N TA , D U B L I N
Building
Management
Systems
2.1
Aer Rianta, Dublin
Increasing passenger comfort while lowering
energy costs: Aer Rianta, Dublin
Against a background where passenger numbers at Dublin Airport have been increasing by
an average of 8.5% each year since the early 1990s, Aer Rianta embarked on a 4100 million
expansion of the main terminal building in 1998.
This major expansion project presented the company with a unique opportunity to upgrade
the existing heating, ventilation and air-conditioning equipment, much of which dated
from the 1970s: it involved the replacement of ten old air-handling-units (AHUs) with nine
new AHUs and all associated equipment.
Remarkably, however, significant savings were achieved within a few months of the completion of the project in 2002. Not only is this an energy-saving measure, it also has the added
benefit of improving the comfort of the 15 million passengers who pass through the airport’s
doors each year.
Irrespective of external weather conditions, the interior is now maintained at a constant 21°C.
The improvements in air quality and temperature consistency are partly due to the installation of the nine new AHUs, all fitted with the most up-to-date energy-efficient motors and
variable-speed drives. These features combine to increase the units’ operating efficiency by
at least 20%.
Further energy efficiency improvements have followed on foot of the installation of a third
2.7 MW combined heat and power unit (CHP) and the reduction of boiler water temperature
from 150°C to 110°C – designed to reduce heat losses and make it more compatible with
all three CHP units. As a result of installing the third CHP unit, usage of the main passenger
terminal boiler will be cut dramatically – probably running for as little as two months a
year. This is likely to yield savings of approximately 4130,000 a year in heating costs alone.
Other spin-off benefits of the overall upgrading programme include reduced maintenance
costs on new equipment.
According to Aer Rianta Energy Manager Martin O’Connor, two key factors which are responsible for maximising energy efficiency are better monitoring of the Building Management
System, and the appointment of an Energy Officer, who has sole charge of areas such as
setting time schedules and controlling set points. He is also responsible for liaising with the
building’s maintenance team. As a consequence, all equipment is now running at optimal
levels.
“Setting up a better monitoring system didn’t cost us anything extra. It was more a question
of utilising existing staff more efficiently. It is difficult to quantify the precise BMS savings,
but they are likely to be in the region of 430,000 to 440,000 a year.”
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
23
Section 2 Case Studies
Heat
Recovery
MERCK SHARP & DOHME (IRELAND)
2.2
Merck Sharp & Dohme
(Ireland)
Energy savings through heat recovery
At the Merck Sharp & Dohme pharmaceutical manufacturing plant in South Tipperary,
significant energy savings have been realised through optimising the recovery of heat from
condensate. The plant is equipped with three natural-gas-fired boilers – the main boiler
having a capacity of 60,000 lbs/hour @ 150psig and two back-up boilers of 36,000 lbs/hour
@ 150psig. Steam is used for process heating and space heating. Depending on the production mix and the time of year, steam loads vary from 20,000 to 50,000 lbs/hour.
An efficient condensate return system is an essential part of any modern boiler and steam
distribution plant. At MSD, condensate is returned directly to the boiler from the Factory 03
production facility and the waste sludge drier. However, where there are concerns with
contamination from glycol used as a jacket service fluid, heat is recovered indirectly and
used to pre-heat boiler feed water.
In 2002, a site energy audit indicated that the condensate recovery heat exchanger was
undersized for present steam loads and that more than 50% of the condensate was being
lost directly to drain. A project was therefore initiated to replace the heat exchanger. It was
decided to relocate the heat exchanger from the roof of the boiler house to ground level as
this would allow easier access for monitoring condensate return flows, temperatures and
the performance of the new heat exchanger.
To calculate the value of condensate recovery from the heat exchanger, the gas/steam ratio
before and after the heat exchanger installation was compared. No heat recovery took place
for a month as a result of the project work and 80.4scm of gas was required to generate each
Mkg of steam. Bringing the new heat exchanger on-line resulted in a 10% improvement in
the gas/steam ratio. On an annual basis, the plant generates approximately 85,000Mkg of
steam so the annual value of indirect heat recovery translates into a saving in excess of
600,000scm of gas or in cost terms more than 4100,000, with a payback of one year.
Month
Steam Use (Mkg)
Gas Use (scm)
Gas/Steam Ratio
No heat recovery
6,664
535,700
80.4
H/E on line
7,042
510,543
72.5
The new heat exchanger is a plate-and-shell design consisting of a fully-welded stack of round
stainless steel plates inside a carbon steel shell. This leads to a very robust design while maintaining high heat-transfer rates.
The MSD boiler house has been audited on a number of occasions as part of the SEI National
Boiler Awards and has obtained awards in the Large Steam Boiler House category. In 2002,
MSD employee, Jim McGrath won the award in the Boiler Person of the Year category.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
25
Section 2 Case Studies
B A XT E R H EA LT H C A R E S . A .
Plant
Optimisation
2.3
Baxter Healthcare S.A.
Benchmarking: the key to plant optimisation
according to Baxter Healthcare S.A.
“Access to reliable measurement systems is the key to benchmarking the efficiency of utilities
energy usage,” says Ciaran Geraghty, Engineering Operations Manager of Baxter Healthcare
S.A., which manufactures dialysis solutions and intravenous solutions for renal patients.
The company has maintained a continuous programme of focused efforts in the area of
energy utilisation and efficiency since 1995, when it first joined the LIEN. This has included
projects in boiler house burner efficiency, boiler efficiency, auto shutdown systems and
inverter control systems, as well as investigations into methods of controlling motor speeds
at optimum levels.
In early 2002, Baxter set out to develop a measurement system for key energy cost centres,
specifically related to the production of compressed air.
In order to establish an index of energy usage, a series of meters was installed in both the
compressor room and the boiler house to measure energy input and output from these areas.
Following a detailed analysis of the measurement results, the Energy Team was able to calculate the cost of producing each litre of compressed air.
Once the index was established, the next major objective was to implement a programme
of continuous improvement – in particular the reduction of energy usage associated with
compressed air, and minimisation of air leakage.
The first part of the programme involved the optimisation of the pressure-control system.
Surveys indicated that the installation of a variable-speed-drive compressor would achieve
significantly better control and would result in savings. On foot of this finding, the implementation of a pressure-management system followed shortly afterwards.
The team also carried out a leak study to measure losses in the compressed air generation
and usage areas.
The second part of the programme involved the installation of a new heat-recovery system
to recover waste heat from the compressed air generators: this was then used to heat the
water supply to the steam plant.
As a result of these initiatives, Baxter achieved a 5% increase in its compressor efficiency,
with a pro-rata improvement in costs associated with energy usage. Total savings associated
with the compressor room and steam plant efficiency improvements equate to annual
savings of 440,000.
The project took less than six months to complete and the estimated payback period is
two-and-a-half years.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
27
Section 2 Case Studies
Plant
Optimisation
HJ HEINZ
2.4
HJ Heinz
Water and gas reduction at HJ Heinz
In 2001, the HJ Heinz manufacturing plant in Dundalk used 330,000 tonnes of water, the
majority of which was for the washing down and sanitising of equipment. During 2002, the
application of a focused approach to reducing water and gas consumption – and more specifically the introduction of a new approach to the nightly task of cleaning and sanitising the
production plant – has yielded impressive dividends for the company.
These include a cost saving of approximately 425,000 on water bills as a result of the plant’s
55,000-tonne reduction in annual water usage; an annual saving of approximately 43,000
in the energy costs associated with heating water; an annual saving of 45,000 due to lower
effluent treatment costs levied by the local council; and reduced staffing requirements
due to a reduced and simplified workload.
Annual percentage saving
Actual annual saving
Reduced energy costs for heating
10%
h3,000
Reduced effluent treatment costs
5%
h5,000
Reduced water usage
17%
h22,500
Total saving
11%
j30,500
This was achieved by a capital investment project that provided a medium-pressure (20 bar)
hot-water pumping system supplying 14 hose points with trigger-operated guns and an
improved sprayball system for the internal cleaning of the cook/cool vessels.
The site has also achieved a significant improvement in health and safety conditions for staff.
Prior to the introduction of the improved sprayball system, each of the five cook/cool vessels
was soaked with five tonnes of hot water. After soaking and draining, food residues would
have to be removed by personnel entering confined spaces with potentially fatal entrapment
risk. This requirement has now been eliminated and the new system is simple for the operators to use. It is also more flexible in that it allows discrete parts of the system to be isolated
for cleaning work during the normal working day, which previously had to be executed
outside normal hours of operation.
The 14 outlet points around the factory with trigger-operated, medium-pressure hose
reels also allow better cleaning with reduced water consumption and better control of
water temperature.
The reduced volume of hot water means 10% less natural gas is used in the hot-water
boilers and the volume of effluent discharged to the town’s effluent plant is down by
approximately 17%.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
29
Section 2 Case Studies
Energy
Management
B O STO N S C I E N T I F I C I R E L A N D LT D, G A LWAY
2.5
Boston Scientific
Ireland Ltd, Galway
Two-year payback for Boston Scientific energy
management initiative
In line with its policy of continually reviewing opportunities for driving down energy costs,
Boston Scientific has implemented a range of initiatives – all designed to reduce energy usage
at its medical devices manufacturing plant in Galway.
First, the Energy Management Team examined the issue of cleanroom air. Originally, all air
extracted from the special production processes area was expelled to the outside atmosphere
in order to prevent it contaminating cleanroom air. However, the challenge subsequently presented was two-fold: how to treat replacement air to exacting cleanroom standards, and how
to maintain room pressure whenever more than 20% of the air was expelled.
The solution was to develop a recycling process using a Hepa carbon and chemical filter in a
Purex system to remove impurities. This involves air being extracted through a high-pressure
rated fan in the Purex system, and passed through filters. The cleaned air is then routed into
the air-handling unit (AHU) and mixed with the existing air before being returned to the
cleanroom.
A related challenge for the Energy Management Team was the high level of air changes in
the cleanrooms – 20 air changes per hour. It was decided to reduce this to ten air changes
per hour, thus halving the quantity of air being treated, and reducing the sensible and latent
loads on the heating and cooling coils by 50%. Moreover, the night-mode setting is now
being operated in four of the plant’s 13 cleanrooms.
Next, the team turned its attention to the issue of variable-speed drives (VSDs). These have
now been installed on the AHUs, chilled-water the low-pressure hot-water (LPHW) systems.
In 70% of cases, fan and pump speeds have been reduced by 30%. The VSDs are now being
used in the Phase 3 chilled-water system and LPHW system to maintain a constant pressure
differential between the supply and return headers. They are also being used on
the AHUs to achieve ten air changes per hour during plant downtime.
Finally, Boston Scientific’s most recent energy-saving initiative involved the installation
of cold-spray humidification. The alternative, steam humidification, has an average energy
requirement of 90kW. Now, however, this has reduced to approximately 10kW as a result of
installing the cold-`spray humidifier. A further benefit is that the required number of major
maintenance visits will reduce from three per year to just one per year.
The expected payback period for all of these initiatives is two years.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
31
Section 2 Case Studies
Monitoring
& Targeting
C A N T R E L L & CO C H R A N E I R E L A N D LT D
2.6
Cantrell & Cochrane
Ireland Ltd
Driving the Monitoring & Targeting Programme
across the C&C Group
With energy usage at the C&C Group’s five manufacturing plants in Dublin, Cork, Clonmel
and Newcastlewest currently running at several GWh a year, the achievement of even a small
percentage annual reduction in energy usage means very significant cost savings. For this
reason, it is good to report that the Group made serious strides in 2002 in its energy conservation programme while meeting commitments under environmental standard ISO 14001.
A notable success in this regard is the company’s Cork plant, where CO2 emissions
fell by 184 tonnes last year, and energy consumption reduced by 13%.
The establishment of a completely integrated and networked Monitoring & Targeting (M&T)
Programme is key in C&C’s commitment to maximising energy efficiency and reducing carbon dioxide emissions. Gerry Diamond, Group Energy Manager, comments:
“Staff commitment is vital in this process, and the assignment of dedicated site energy
champions, along with the formation of site energy teams, is playing an essential role
in following through programme initiatives”.
An electronic sub-metering system has been installed which records and analyses consumption at energy-usage points ranging from office lighting and air compressors to refrigeration,
boilers and production lines in three production facilities. The process works by transmitting
real-time data from 60 individual sub-meters via networked computers to each energy team
member as well as to the Group Energy Manager. Because the sub-meters are linked to the
computers via ISDN lines on a 24-hour basis, this enables the team to take remedial action
immediately should they detect any unusual energy-usage patterns such as a particular piece
of equipment exceeding its targeted energy-usage for an allotted period. The major benefit of
this system is that it allows site management to identify areas of high energy-usage and take
the necessary action.
Maintaining the motivation of individual team members is essential to the overall success
of the M&T Programme. Once a month, the energy teams meet separately with the Group
Energy Manager and site energy champions, to review analyses of data for the previous
month, and to agree action plans.
Regular contact is encouraged between plant management teams from different sites for
brainstorming and problem-solving sessions. As a result, engineers and technicians are
encouraged to liaise with their counterparts in other production facilities to swap best
available technology ideas and to discuss energy-saving initiatives that have proved
successful on their sites.
In the coming months, C&C Group plans to integrate the remaining production facilities
into the M&T Programme to further replicate the M&T energy-saving potential. Future
plans include examining C&C Group’s non-manufacturing facilities and transport section,
with a view to minimising carbon dioxide emissions and saving energy.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
33
Section 2 Case Studies
MASONITE
Boiler
Control
& Emissions
Reduction
2.7
Masonite Ireland
Energy Management Team focuses on boiler
efficiency: Masonite Ireland
The minimisation of environmental impact and the reduction of energy usage are key corporate goals for Masonite Ireland. As a consequence, the company has been using the combustion of recycled wood chip and other wood wastes to provide thermal energy for a number of
production processes at its MDF manufacturing facility in Carrick-on-Shannon, Co Leitrim.
Remarkably, up to 98.3% of the 155GWh thermal energy required for Masonite’s 44MW
thermal capacity Heat Energy Plant (HEP) has been produced by the combustion of biomass
wood wastes with back-up low-NOx burners using LPG. Wood is considered to be a renewable
energy source because it is CO2 neutral, and this may be of great benefit to Masonite in a
regime of carbon taxation if, as is likely, such a tax is applied only to fossil fuels.
In January 2002, Masonite published its Energy Management Policy, and formed an Energy
Management Team, which now meets on a monthly basis. The Team’s first task was to develop a Monitoring and Targeting programme based on internal budget forecasts for various
areas of the facility. On examination of the data, it was evident that the HEP biomass fuel
budget was exceeding forecasted expenditure. Upon further investigation, it became apparent
that two areas needed addressing: the HEP fuel quality was not of optimum standard and
the HEP control system was not optimised to conserve energy.
The fuel quality issue was addressed by a number of simple procedures. This involved updating Masonite’s fuel purchasing specifications and negotiating with fuel suppliers to rectify
issues such as high moisture content, the presence of undesirable inorganic materials and
improved mixing. Internal procedures were written to ensure these criteria could be checked
before accepting delivery.
Scrutiny of the control system revealed that if several HEP flue gas dampers were modified,
the resultant improved control would result in reduced thermal energy production. This was
achieved by making one damper more active, and linking it to a pressure-bleed stack damper.
Moreover, the linking of the pressure-bleed stack damper to the HEP fuel feed system ensured
that as energy demand reduced the control system would semi-automatically reduce fuel
feed to the HEP.
Positive results immediately followed the completion of this programme of corrective actions
in April 2002. Thermal energy consumption improved by 33%, yielding annual savings of
490,000 and 12,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions. Future plans included the installation
of variable-speed drives to the HEP.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
35
Section 2 Case Studies
Improving
Energy Efficiency
N OVA RT I S R I N G A S K I D DY LT D
2.8
Novartis Ringaskiddy Ltd
How process changes improved energy efficiency at
Novartis Ringaskiddy Ltd
Novartis Ringaskiddy, an EMAS-registered site, is continually examining proposals aimed at
generating cost savings as well as reducing CO2 emissions. In 2002, its Energy Review Group
carried out detailed reviews of the plant’s production processes to see where opportunities
for such savings and reductions might exist.
The Liquid/Vapour Incinerator (LVI) was the first process chosen for detailed investigation.
An analysis of operational and energy trends revealed that although the minimum natural
gas flow design rate was 60 m3/h, the set point had been gradually increased to 105 m3/h.
The problem was resolved by reducing gas flow to the design set point and, with minimal
engineering, increasing the reliability of the flow control loop.
The effect was an annual saving in excess of 250,000 m3 of natural gas, 490 tonnes of CO2 and
460,000, giving a payback of less than six months with continued safe operation of the LVI.
Next, the Group commissioned an energy audit on the chilled-water system. This was specifically aimed at comparing the actual operating conditions with the original design intent.
A pressure profile was established, which confirmed that the capacity constraint on the system was hydraulic rather than thermal, and that the pressure drop across the chiller control
valves was excessive. By replacing the chiller control valves, it was possible to reduce the pressure drop by 0.67 bar, which resulted in almost doubling the hydraulic capacity. This achieved savings of approximately 47,000 a year, and an annual reduction of 100 tonnes of CO2.
In addition, the increased hydraulic capacity means that further investment in chilled-water
plant can be avoided in the medium term.
The final project involved investigation of the Cold Glycol system. It operates at a supply
temperature of -25°C and is the largest consumer of electricity in the utilities generation
plant. An analysis of Monitoring and Targeting metering data revealed that, from time to
time, the return temperature exceeded the permitted 5°C differential. Moreover, it was possible for an internal Hot Glycol loop to return through the Cold Glycol loop because of faulty
or leaking valves. The solution was to increase maintenance frequency on the valves, and
to have production operators use low-cost surface-temperature monitors to ensure that
mixing of the two loops did not occur. This measure achieved savings of approximately
47,000 a year and an annual reduction of 100 tonnes of CO2.
The combined annual savings of 474,000 and 690 tonnes of CO2 were achieved by interrogating and refining the process rather than by new investment in energy-efficient equipment
and technologies.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
37
Section 2 Case Studies
Water
Reprocessing
G L A N B I A P LC , B A L LY R AG G ET
& Recovery
J A N SS E N P H A R M AC E U T I C A L LT D
2.9
Glanbia Plc, Ballyragget
Janssen Pharmaceutical Ltd
Water reprocessing/recovery decreases plant
overheads while creating environmental benefits
As the Glanbia plant in Co Kilkenny and the Janssen Pharmaceutical plant in Cork have
demonstrated, making relatively straightforward adjustments to the ways in which high
volumes of water are processed can reduce overheads significantly. It may also create
environmental benefits.
At Glanbia’s Ballyragget plant, a 10% increase in production output towards end-2001
created a demand for 1,000 m3/day of water on top of the 9,100 m3/day already required
– a demand that could not be met from existing water supplies.
The solution devised by Glanbia’s Energy Management Team was to put in place a system
whereby raw treated water used for essential cooling and certain production processes would
be recovered and reused for general cleaning purposes. This involved installing a tank into
which the recovered warm water is held before being softened and distributed to various
areas around the site.
Because 25% of plant water is now reused, raw water consumption has decreased by 9% in
2002 to 2.7 million m3, thereby yielding annual savings of 412,000. Electricity for refrigeration decreased by 6.5%, giving an annual saving of 430,000, and the reduced requirement for
electricity to heat water for cleaning purposes yielded savings of 450,000. This adds up to
a total cost saving of 492,000/year.
In addition to these savings, this initiative has obviated the need to install a treatment plant
to handle increased water requirements (a potential capital expenditure saving of at least
4500,000). Excluding savings on capital expenditure and water treatment plant operational
costs, the project will have a three-year payback. Glanbia has also significantly reduced the
level of wastewater discharged into the River Nore, thereby creating positive environmental
benefits.
At the Janssen Pharmaceutical plant in Cork, the decision to install a new loop in the ‘dryer’
building was motivated by the success of previous energy efficiency initiatives on the site.
At any given time, approximately 11,000 litres per hour are circulating in the loop at temperatures ranging from 15°c to 70°c – depending on the process for which the water was required.
In the past, two heat exchangers would have dealt with cooling/reheating the water.
However, in the latest Janssen energy efficiency project, an economiser was incorporated into
the design of the new loop: it deals with the heat transfer issue by channelling cool water
through one side and warm water through the other.
As a result, requirements for coolants/steam have been reduced considerably. Prior to the
installation of the economiser, energy requirements totalled 467 kW per loop. This is now
239 kW per loop – a reduction of 228 kW – which on an annual basis provides a cost
saving of 420,700.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
39
Section 2 Case Studies
ELEMENT SIX
MERCK SHARPE & DOHME
Intelligent Lighting
2.10
Element Six
Merck Sharp & Dohme
Element Six and Merck Sharp & Dohme show
the way
Energy wastage in non production-related areas such as administration and services can
be very significant – mainly because people tend to turn on lights when they arrive at their
workplace each morning, and rarely turn them off again until they leave for home that
evening.
A focused approach to energy management in this area can reduce electricity bills enormously. Two companies that have reaped dividends in terms of reducing lighting and related costs
are industrial diamond manufacturers, Element Six, and pharmaceuticals manufacturer,
Merck Sharp & Dohme.
In 2002, Element Six invested a total of 437,000 in the purchase of new light fittings and
cablings; removal and disposal of the original fittings; repair/replacement of old ceilings
and ceiling tiles; and the installation of Passive Infra-reds (PIRs). In all, 35 rooms in the
30-year-old plant were refitted.
In each room, the original four fittings were replaced with two new fittings. As a consequence, the average electrical load per room reduced from 736W to approximately 150W.
This combination of measures led to reduced annual electricity consumption of almost 80%.
In addition, the new SLT modular lights have a lifespan of eight years – compared with a
lifespan of two years for the original fittings. As such, maintenance costs have also
reduced significantly.
At the Merck Sharp & Dohme plant in South Tipperary, lighting accounts for 5% of the total
annual electricity bill. An energy audit carried out in 2001, highlighted a number of areas
where electricity savings could be realised. The company has since completed a number of
energy efficiency projects including the installation of motion sensors in the electrical workshop, and the installation of photocells in the glycol storage areas, water treatment area,
external utilities and the waste treatment plant.
In addition, the perimeter fence lighting system, which is 25 years old, was shown to be
inefficient in terms of power consumption and light-intensity level. It also required frequent
replacement of lamps and regular maintenance of brackets. The solution was to replace the
44 lights with high-intensity light fittings and stainless steel brackets.
Work was also completed on the Merck Sharp & Dohme canteen lighting system, which
was fitted with 160 low-voltage lights, which take 8 kW of lighting load over three phases.
The new system groups the lights in configurations of six, with power to each group supplied
from single-power transformer control packs. The major benefits of the new system are that it
will be less prone to lamp failure, it will be more efficient, and it will have extended lamp-life
due to use of a special heat shield that can reduce temperatures by as much as 25%.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
41
Section 2 Case Studies
NA Pilot &
Energy Audit
C A D B U R Y I R E L A N D LT D, D U B L I N
2.11
Cadbury Ireland Ltd,
Dublin
Sweet success: Cadbury Dublin’s experience of the
Negotiated Agreement (NA) pilot project
Since the Cadbury family first founded their confectionery-manufacturing business in
Birmingham, the company has consistently placed a strong emphasis on maintaining high
environmental standards. One particular example of the Cadbury family ethos is that factories are located in well-maintained sites and gardens: a good example of this is the Coolock
factory gardens, which are enjoyed by Cadbury staff and the general public alike.
One hundred and seventy years after the original company was founded, the Cadbury
Schweppes Group Board remains committed to good environmental practice. Each year’s
environmental targets are examined by the main Board, which has also charged the management team in each site with optimising energy usage, in order to reduce emissions of carbon
dioxide and other greenhouse gases. In line with that policy, it has implemented a rigorous
programme, which is designed to improve energy performance and is aimed at positioning
the Dublin factory as a flagship for best practice throughout the Group.
In 2002, the company responded to SEI’s call for participants to take part in its Negotiated
Energy Agreements Pilot Project, in order to explore what contribution agreements could
make to CO2 abatement within industry. As a result, an independent audit was commissioned, focusing on thermal energy usage and boiler plant capacity. In the course of the audit,
potential natural gas savings of 2 million kWh were identified. It was estimated that this
would yield annual energy savings of 448,400.
In order to achieve these savings, changes were recommended in three key areas – improvements in pipework insulation, repairs to leaks, and the replacement of failed steam traps.
The cost of implementing these changes was 456,000, with a payback period of just over 14
months.
According to Environmental and Energy Manager, Tom Byrne, as well as demonstrable cost
savings, the other major benefit of the improvements programme is that CO2 emissions are
now reduced by 350 tonnes per year.
“In addition, based on figures for the fourth quarter of 2002, we are achieving savings on
water consumption totalling 28m3/day, and, as a result of fixing steam traps and leaks, wastewater condensate has virtually been eliminated – thereby creating positive environmental
benefits. We are also trying out a new steam trap model, based on the Venturi principle,
which has yielded positive results thus far.”
The changes, then, have brought about major improvements in energy efficiency, reductions
in CO2 emissions, and are making a significant positive contribution to the environment.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
43
2.12 Case study company overview
Section 2 Case Studies
Merck Sharp & Dohme (Ireland)
Aer Rianta, Dublin
HJ Heinz
Boston Scientific Ireland Ltd, Galway
Cantrell & Cochrane Ireland Ltd
Novartis Ringaskiddy Ltd
Glanbia Plc, Ballyragget
Masonite Ireland
Janssen Pharmaceutical Ltd
44
Large Industry Energy Network
Baxter Healthcare S.A.
Annual Report 2002
Element Six
Cadbury Ireland Ltd, Dublin
Results and Analysis
SECTION
3
Section 3: Results and Analysis
page 46
3.1 Results and Targets 1995-2002
50
3.2 Analysis of Results for 2002
57
3.3 Members’ Graphs & Statements
89
3.4 The LIEN Objectives and Contact Details
91
3.5 Member Listing
92
3.6 Useful Sources of Information
Section 3 Results and Analysis
3.1 Results and Targets 1995 to 2002
The result for each company is expressed in the form of an energy performance
index (EPI). This is based on the ratio of annual primary energy consumption to
aggregate product output, measured in a format developed individually by each
company to reflect their unique mix of products and processes. For a member’s
first year of joining the Network, this index is normalised to 100, and subsequent
improvements or deteriorations in energy performance are reflected in a decrease
or increase in EPI respectively.
The results for 2002 are presented as follows:
•
The table starting on page 47 lists the members of the scheme and highlights their yearly EPI
performance since joining the LIEN. In this section, there is a particular emphasis on targets
compared with actual performance for 2002, and targets for 2003 are also highlighted.
•
In the subsequent pages, members’ EPIs and targets are again presented, this time in chart
form, along with a short statement from each of the companies summarising the key elements of their energy-management programmes, the factors that have influenced their EPIs
and their plans for the future.
•
An analysis of the factors underlying movements in EPI during 2002 is presented on page 50,
alongside a brief discussion on the aggregate performance of the scheme as a whole.
EPI figures for previous years have been re-calculated for many companies using primary
energy usage as described in Section 1.3. This way, CHP and non-CHP facilities can report in
an equitable manner and a more comprehensive picture of energy use is obtained.
46
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
3.1 Results and Targets 1995 to 2002
COMPANY
ENERGY PERFORMANCE INDEX (EPI)
1995
Abbott Ireland, Cavan
Aer Rianta, Dublin
100.00
TARGET
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
100.00
93.06
122.92
115.53
119.74
105.83
105.07
98.97
92.83
84.60
90.72
90.88
94.89
94.78
90.55
87.65
100.00
102.31
122.81
114.73
115.29
115.29
100.00
123.40
157.78
157.78
Allergan Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Analog Devices BV
Atlas Aluminium
100.00
98.01
96.72
75.84
94.42
98.98
122.24
108.34
107.25
Aughinish Alumina
100.00
97.43
96.61
96.60
96.22
94.96
95.06
93.84
93.90
Bausch & Lomb Ireland
100.00
74.59
46.17
66.19
111.02
79.97
66.35
63.83
61.92
Baxter Healthcare S.A.
100.00
100.27
96.34
94.89
95.02
83.63
81.30
92.21
89.45
100.00
83.46
86.19
86.01
94.61
Boston Scientific Ireland Ltd, Galway
105.96
120.37
102.08
82.83
58.78
54.73
56.37
Bristol-Myers Squibb, Swords
100.00
100.81
108.82
94.92
109.85
109.81
107.62
Buckeye Technologies Ireland Ltd
100.00
68.46
50.59
56.61
58.26
61.67
57.97
Cadbury Ireland Ltd, Dublin
100.00
97.08
101.63
86.65
88.68
80.45
82.06
87.07
87.60
84.88
83.51
83.50
83.28
83.28
100.00
109.02
104.60
77.06
73.27
69.61
100.00
98.00
Braun Oral-B Ireland Ltd
Cadbury Ireland Ltd, Kerry
100.00
100.00
101.29
90.67
Cantrell & Cochrane Ltd, Cork
Cantrell & Cochrane Ltd, Dublin
96.53
83.95
71.55
72.34
74.05
77.75
25.50
25.50
Cognis Ireland Ltd
100.00
94.54
99.02
78.81
97.44
106.22
97.72
100.66
ConocoPhillips, Whitegate Refinery
100.00
96.13
97.52
92.03
99.38
103.03
118.58
118.58
101.31
90.93
90.34
89.80
86.65
83.06
80.68
78.67
100.00
96.67
99.56
99.56
Carbery Milk Products Ltd
Dairygold Co-op Society
100.00
100.00
Dawn Meats, Ballyhaunis
100.00
72.21
74.78
83.60
87.73
86.04
86.04
84.51
85.65
84.97
85.22
106.85
98.46
91.56
Elan Pharma
100.00
87.41
93.39
187.26
200.26
224.24
222.44
Element Six
100.00
79.25
68.49
63.04
54.74
49.78
48.79
89.12
77.65
77.12
69.21
89.83
78.67
91.26
100.00
105.78
138.76
187.54
Diageo Ireland, St James's Gate
Dundalk Brewery
Eli Lilly S.A. - Irish Branch
Fruitfield Foods Ltd
100.00
100.00
93.42
89.21
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
47
Section 3 Results and Analysis
3.1 Results and Targets 1995 to 2002
COMPANY
ENERGY PERFORMANCE INDEX (EPI)
1995
1996
Garrett Engine Boosting Systems
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
100.00
78.74
89.36
50.29
49.15
35.64
34.92
Glanbia Ingredients, Virginia
100.00
96.16
92.87
96.03
98.94
96.99
95.75
94.76
94.67
Glanbia Meats, Roscrea
100.00
87.59
79.43
71.97
73.41
76.41
75.95
72.85
67.02
Glanbia Meats, Ruskey
100.00
101.86
102.37
126.91
100.79
113.91
124.69
114.72
111.28
Glanbia Plc, Ballyragget
100.00
94.33
93.68
93.03
83.03
79.89
70.40
72.28
72.28
Glanbia Plc, Inch
100.00
103.71
109.80
112.10
106.25
126.41
110.93
110.93
GlaxoSmithKline, Cork
100.00
64.19
67.90
62.00
56.27
53.71
57.15
55.15
100.00
90.85
95.39
GlaxoSmithKline, Dungarvan
Gypsum Industries Ltd
100.00
104.06
106.63
103.11
105.17
102.01
HJ Heinz
100.00
84.64
74.29
80.15
79.25
79.82
83.81
Hewlett-Packard (Manufacturing) Ltd
100.00
92.99
95.38
72.69
60.56
55.20
60.72
100.00
76.08
68.65
54.26
52.09
IBM Technology Campus
40.69
110.57
70.36
57.75
64.62
72.94
93.37
100.00
89.96
89.08
95.19
117.19
116.46
116.46
92.49
93.12
84.06
83.75
91.48
95.82
93.33
84.93
Janssen Pharmaceuticals Ltd
100.00
100.59
96.39
49.61
50.40
38.51
31.43
29.86
Klinge Pharma
100.00
77.99
59.35
54.33
55.48
54.86
49.01
49.01
Kostal Ireland GmbH
100.00
95.04
87.82
115.19
141.40
140.46
155.46
155.46
94.61
92.01
92.61
96.79
94.38
101.99
95.26
95.26
100.00
102.52
102.57
107.16
122.05
116.32
106.43
111.75
100.00
105.70
97.98
96.02
100.00
75.92
73.64
100.00
92.15
72.37
79.61
Intel Ireland Ltd
100.00
92.29
Irish Shell Ltd
Irish Sugar Ltd
Lakeland Dairies, Bailieboro
100.00
100.00
LEO Pharma
Lisheen Mine
Masonite Ireland
Merck Sharp & Dohme (Ireland)
Micro-Bio Ireland Ltd, Fermoy
NEC Semiconductors Ireland Ltd
100.00
Novartis Ringaskiddy Ltd
Outokumpu (Tara Mines) Limited
48
TARGET
Large Industry Energy Network
100.00
Annual Report 2002
100.00
95.46
81.03
76.33
74.84
78.85
81.40
79.93
139.63
115.46
97.98
128.87
82.97
97.10
75.82
74.30
100.00
59.08
48.16
52.61
38.95
25.40
23.20
21.90
107.86
110.23
110.87
113.12
117.53
128.85
129.42
132.66
3.1 Results and Targets 1995 to 2002
COMPANY
ENERGY PERFORMANCE INDEX (EPI)
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Little Island
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Loughbeg API
TARGET
2000
2001
2002
2003
100.00
70.05
59.86
59.86
126.41
231.57
364.70
299.94
212.34
182.82
173.68
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Ringaskiddy
100.00
100.00
87.66
83.62
76.72
87.87
125.36
117.94
117.94
Premier Periclase Ltd
100.00
109.11
92.84
93.57
98.82
93.40
97.13
103.08
103.08
Pure Fresh Dairies Ltd
100.00
93.81
93.20
94.78
93.99
99.25
92.65
97.92
97.92
Roche Ireland Ltd
100.00
97.62
101.75
234.89
252.76
211.18
183.30
174.16
174.16
Saehan Media Ireland Ltd
100.00
97.32
91.68
104.03
95.28
83.48
90.12
92.04
92.04
Schering-Plough (Avondale) Co.
100.00
88.53
80.47
82.81
127.68
124.64
180.32
167.22
200.66
Schering-Plough (Brinny) Co.
100.00
81.28
82.87
80.94
66.75
59.69
73.22
62.99
62.36
SerCom Solutions
100.00
83.33
98.46
89.22
83.03
77.60
83.70
66.19
66.19
Smurfit Paper Mills Ltd
100.00
95.54
91.75
91.80
91.45
90.78
91.58
88.06
88.06
St Francis Abbey Brewery
94.82
101.49
104.02
102.80
106.90
123.95
132.52
139.14
Takeda Ireland Ltd
100.00
100.00
79.94
56.45
40.07
44.08
100.00
92.50
Tayto Limited
Thermo King Europe
100.00
100.62
94.19
Transitions Optical Ltd
Tyco Healthcare, Athlone
77.13
76.19
85.16
75.76
55.61
52.83
100.00
110.88
129.16
153.89
118.43
112.51
100.00
101.04
92.42
102.06
98.71
100.05
163.63
163.63
Tyco Healthcare, Mulhuddart
100.00
89.53
75.42
71.63
78.14
79.61
76.72
74.90
74.52
Unifi Textured Yarns Europe Ltd
100.00
85.75
81.41
84.26
89.19
81.20
95.84
111.67
111.67
Waterford Crystal Ltd
100.00
90.48
64.27
61.74
47.05
40.67
43.40
95.85
92.02
Wellman International Ltd
100.00
100.42
100.24
102.59
103.79
101.76
101.66
95.67
93.76
Wessel Energy Cables Ltd
100.00
94.73
83.58
81.04
97.32
102.51
100.42
89.37
92.05
100.00
97.13
99.66
99.66
Western Proteins
Wyeth Medica Ireland Ltd
100.00
97.86
81.72
90.44
92.06
85.19
84.56
87.66
87.66
Yamanouchi Ireland Co. Ltd
100.00
68.31
103.44
88.77
94.75
173.38
145.30
119.07
115.50
100.00
99.00
3Com Technologies
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
49
Section 3 Results and Analysis
3.2 Analysis of Results for 2002
Annual reporting on energy performance is central to membership of the
Large Industry Energy Network. It demonstrates not only that the members are
willing to commit to energy-reduction programmes on an ongoing basis, but also
that they are prepared to share openly the results of their efforts. The LIEN Annual
Report is the main means of reporting the members’ successes and failures for
each year, and of presenting the results of the LIEN member companies on an
aggregate basis.
2002 was a year of mixed fortunes for the LIEN members, reflecting the difficult trading
positions faced by industry generally. Some of the member companies continued to enjoy
a growth in demand for their products, while others faced a decline in production volumes.
In practically all cases, member companies battled to maintain profitability, focusing their
efforts on improving overall productivity, as is usual at the stage in the economic cycle where
overall growth is slowing. Thus, while there were mixed results in terms of members’ EPIs
for 2002, there was clear evidence of increased efforts to improve their energy performance.
This may also be due to the growing awareness of the need to prepare for measures such
as emissions trading and carbon taxation.
Twenty of the member companies achieved improvements in their EPIs of greater than 10
points. Masonite Ireland, NEC Semiconductors Ireland, Pfizer (Loughbeg), Thermo King
Europe, and Yamanouchi Ireland all achieved improvements of greater than 20 points, and
Carbery Milk Products and Transitions Optical enjoyed improvements of greater than 30
points. At the same time, four member companies reported deteriorations in their EPIs of
greater than 20 points, often reflecting the difficult trading circumstances faced by them
in 2002.
It should be noted that the results reported here are based on members’ primary energy
demand; this is a change introduced in 2002 in order to provide a better reflection of members’ true use of energy. EPIs for years previous to 2002 have been re-calculated on the basis
of primary demand, so that comparisons from one year to the next are still valid.
The members of the LIEN overall achieved an improvement in aggregate EPI for 2002 of 0.48
points (see Table 3.2.1). This represents an overall improvement in their energy efficiency for
the year. The aggregate EPI of 87.17 indicates that the LIEN members together have achieved a
12.83% improvement in their energy performance since first joining the scheme.
As Table 3.2.1 shows, members’ primary energy demand increased, by 156 GWh compared
with 2001. This was mainly due to strong continuing growth in production volumes, driven
by market demand. However, due both to economy-of-scale effects and to a wide range of
energy-saving initiatives undertaken by members throughout the year, primary energy demand did not rise to the same extent as manufacturing output, thus leading to an improvement
in the aggregate EPI.
The overall improvement in EPI for 2002 indicates that the member companies have achieved
higher levels of productivity in energy use than would be expected under a ‘business-as-usual’
scenario. Were it not for this, primary energy demand would have grown by a further 90
GWh. This is equivalent to a reduction in energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide of some
23,650 tonnes during 2002.
The LIEN membership together accounts for some 40% of Total Primary Energy Requirement
(TPER) in the industrial sector. Thus, this result for 2002 represents a sizeable proportion of
overall energy usage by industry in Ireland.
50
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
3.2 Analysis of Results for 2002
Table 3.2.1 Large Industry Energy Network – Overall Performance
*from SEI Provisional Energy
Balance 2002
LIEN Total Primary Energy Requirement 2001
16,196 GWh
LIEN Total Primary Energy Requirement 2002
16,352 GWh
Aggregate EPI for LIEN in 2001
87.65
Aggregate EPI for LIEN in 2002
87.17
Improvement in EPI (2001 to 2002)
0.48
Total CO2 emissions from LIEN sites 2002
4,295,000 tonnes
Energy avoided due to energy-efficiency measures 2002
90 GWh
C02 emissions avoided due to energy-efficiency measures 2002
National Total Primary Energy Requirement (TPER) 2002
23,650 tonnes
173,560 GWh*
Industry Sector TPER 2002
41,270 GWh*
LIEN as a percentage of national TPER 2002
9.4%
LIEN as a percentage of industrial sector TPER 2002
39.6%
LIEN Energy Spend 2002
h290m
An analysis of the contribution of the various energy sources used by the LIEN members to
total CO2 emissions is also shown in Table 3.2.2. Electricity represents the largest contributor,
at 42.65% of total emissions; this reflects the generally low efficiency of fossil-fuel-based
electricity generation, as well as the high demand for electricity within manufacturing industry. Next highest is Heavy Fuel Oil (HFO) at 29.79%, followed by 22.11% for natural gas.
Taken together, electricity, HFO and natural gas account for some 94.5% of total emissions.
LIEN members use a significant proportion of natural gas for the generation of electricity as
well as heat, in on-site CHP plant, so that the percentage shown for electricity is understated
in these figures.
Table 3.2.2 Contribution to LIEN total CO2 emissions by fuel type (percentage of total emissions)
Contribution to LIEN total CO2 emissions
Electricity
42.65%
Natural Gas
22.11%
LPG
0.49%
Gas Oil
2.26%
Light Fuel Oil
0.62%
Medium Fuel Oil
0.60%
Heavy Fuel Oil
29.79%
Other
1.48%
Total
100%
Almost half of the LIEN members have thermal energy plant rated at greater than 20 MW,
which means that they will be required to join the EU emissions-trading scheme starting in
2005. The remainder will be subject to the carbon/energy tax announced by the Minister of
Finance in his Budget Speech at the end of 2002. In both situations, companies will have to
measure and report upon their energy use. The LIEN has assisted companies in developing
their data gathering and reporting processes, which is necessary to prepare for these new e
conomic instruments. Most companies will respond to the price signals introduced by emissions trading and carbon/energy taxation by increasing their efforts to improve their energy
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
51
Section 3 Results and Analysis
3.2 Analysis of Results for 2002
efficiency. As demonstrated in this and previous annual reports of the Network, LIEN members are already devoting considerable resources to this area. Most importantly, the LIEN
encourages and supports efforts on the part of the members to improve their energy-management policies, structures and systems, and this is a crucial element in preparing for the new
regime.
Given the energy price increases consequent upon emissions trading and carbon/energy tax,
improving energy efficiency will become ever more important to companies as the main
means whereby they can maintain competitiveness. Having an effective energy-management
system in place, together with a vigorous energy-reduction programme, means that the LIEN
members are well-placed to cope with the demands and consequences of new instruments.
Sectoral analysis
The analysis shown in Table 3.2.3 illustrates the mixed fortunes of the different sectors during
2002. However, reflecting the relatively small industrial base in Ireland – particularly in terms
of large energy users – it should be noted that the number of companies in each sector is generally small. Indeed, three of the sectors listed have only one LIEN member, and a further
three have two members. The Pharmachem and Food/Drink sectors represent over half of the
membership, with 24 and 23 members respectively.
The improvement in theWood sector reflects the strong performance of the single LIEN member within that sector, Masonite. As noted elsewhere, this was largely due to their efforts
in identifying and acting upon opportunities for energy-efficiency improvements. The
Food/Drink and Pharmachem sectors also showed strong performances, partly due to energyefficiency projects, and partly to opportunities arising from continued strong growth in
production output. The Pharmachem sector has achieved reductions in the aggregate EPI
for that sector of some 13 points, for 2001 and 2002 combined.
On the other hand, the Oil & Gas and Non-Metallic Minerals sectors produced significant
aggregate disimprovements in 2002. In the case of Oil & Gas, this resulted largely from an
increased heat requirement to process a different mix of crude oils. The disimprovement in
the Non-Metallic Minerals sector arises because of a major downturn in product demand in
one member company, which in turn necessitated a postponement until 2003 of a number of
capital projects aimed at improving energy efficiency. The disimprovement in aggregate EPI
for the Textiles sector is again caused by a downturn in demand; in this case, despite many
energy-saving initiatives, a high base-load requirement for steam led to a significant deterioration in their EPI. Finally, the aggregate EPI for the Electronics sector for the second year running showed a downturn. This is partly due to a drop in demand in some of the member
companies in this sector, and is also in part a measurement effect arising from a change
in product mix in one of the member companies in that sector.
Table 3.2.3 Improvements and disimprovements in aggregate EPI (2002 compared with 2001)
* Figures in brackets indicate
the number of member
companies in each sector
52
Large Industry Energy Network
Improved Aggregate EPI over 2002
Disimproved Aggregate EPI over 2002
Reduction from 2001
Increase from 2001
Air Transport
4.23 (1)*
Electronics
4.06 (7)
Food & Drink
7.88 (23)
Healthcare
3.91 (4)
Metal & Engineering
2.63 (6)
Non-Metallic Minerals
18.54 (4)
Mining
2.78 (2)
Oil & Gas
15.31 (2)
Pharmachem
5.49 (24)
Textiles
9.52 (2)
Plastics
4.05 (1)
Printing & Paper
0.09 (3)
Wood
24.08 (1)
Annual Report 2002
3.2 Analysis of Results for 2002
Underlying factors
As in 2001, a wide variety of factors were reported by member companies as positive or negative influences on their EPIs for 2002.
Energy-saving initiatives
Members reported an extremely wide range of energy-saving measures undertaken in 2002.
In all, almost 200 major projects were reported, covering every aspect of energy management.
Boiler and related projects once again were the most frequently undertaken. This is unsurprising given the great potential for savings in generating and distributing hot water and
steam. The projects reported covered every aspect of thermal energy, with some very major
projects having been undertaken. Measures included boiler replacement, the installation of
plant such as economisers, improvements in flash steam recovery, insulation and steam trap
repair or replacement. Over the past several years, Sustainable Energy Ireland has invested
heavily in promoting boilerhouse efficiencies, and in the training of boilerhouse staff.
Significant improvements can be made with no- or low-cost measures, and it is encouraging
to see the wide range of projects being undertaken in this area.
Projects linked to measuring and analysing energy consumption, and the use of data in
Monitoring and Targeting (M&T) systems represent the second-highest category of energysaving actions reported. This is particularly welcome since careful recording and monitoring
will be essential in relation to emissions trading, carbon/energy taxation and negotiated
agreements. A number of members have introduced more sophisticated M&T systems, and
others have invested heavily in metering projects – these make it more feasible to identify
areas where there are large variances in planned-to-actual consumption, and to take early
and appropriate action.
Other energy-saving projects reported cover the whole range of end uses, including compressed
air; energy-efficient motors and drives; installation of variable-speed drives (VSDs); refrigeration and
cooling; heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC); building management systems; improved
process controls, and installation of CHP plant. There was a strong emphasis on energy auditing
in 2002, in part reflecting the participation by many companies in Sustainable Energy
Ireland’s pilot project on negotiated energy agreements, which included a full energy audit
of participating companies’ plant.
There was once again an emphasis on the management of water usage. Given the strong relationship between water and energy consumption, this can have a very significant impact on
a company’s energy efficiency, as well as a direct positive impact on the environment.
It is also encouraging to see some growth in interest in developing company-wide energy policies
aimed at focusing attention on reducing energy use and related emissions. In some cases, very
strong emphasis has been placed on a comprehensive energy policy, with commitment to this
from the very top; this augurs well for the future, since it is exactly that commitment that is
needed in order to achieve significant and ongoing reductions in energy and emissions.
Changes in production output
Changing production output was again the dominant influencing factor on members’ performance. Despite the general slowdown in the economy, 27 members saw an increase in
demand for their products. In 24 of these cases, this increase led to an improvement in EPI,
mainly because this meant that a high base-load was spread over a larger volume of output.
The remaining three cases identified growth in demand as a restraining factor, due to the fact
that larger than anticipated production volume led to inefficient practices in order to meet
the demand. It is of interest that, in previous years, a larger number of members saw increased
demand leading to inefficiencies, which is to be expected at the peak of the economic cycle.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
53
Section 3 Results and Analysis
3.2 Analysis of Results for 2002
Reduced production demand was the most commonly reported negative factor for 2002, with
15 members having seen a production downturn. Disturbingly, a number of these foresee further decreases in production volumes in 2003, which may lead to further deteriorations in
energy performance.
Changes in production output have a significant secondary effect also on efforts to improve
energy efficiency. Increased volumes generally lead to improved cash flows, whereas decreased volumes may constrain a company’s investment plans, whether for energy efficiency
or other projects. A restriction on capital expenditure budgets often affects projects not directly connected with new product development, strategic change, or investments in production
plant; energy-efficiency projects suffer disproportionate cuts under such circumstances.
However, with further decline in economic growth, it may be expected that firms will increase their investment in projects aimed specifically at improving competitiveness, and this
may be reflected in an even greater interest in energy-efficiency projects.
Process changes
In 2002, 15 members undertook process changes that led to improvements in their energy
performance. Indeed, some of the changes to process were made specifically in order to
reduce energy consumption. Sustainable Energy Ireland believes that significant improvements in energy use can be achieved through process changes that either do not impact on
product quality or actually improve yield or quality. It is encouraging to see member companies being willing to change their processes with the aim of reducing energy use. Some of
the case studies in this report describe specific process changes made by the members.
Changes in product mix
Product mix changes can lead to improvements or disimprovements in EPI, depending
on their impact on overall energy demand. Seven member companies enjoyed product mix
changes leading to improved energy performance, while five others saw deteriorations in
their EPIs arising from product mix changes, changes in raw materials used, or changes to
product specifications. Changes often involve a shift to higher- added-value products, or
products of a higher specification or quality; in these cases, the impact on a company’s
EPI is usually negative, although of course higher added-value or quality is a desirable goal
from a broader strategic perspective.
Plant expansion and upgrade projects
2002 once again saw a number of member companies expanding their facilities – in some
cases, expansion of production capacity, and in others, development of non-productive facilities such as administration, sales or R&D facilities. While such expansion is clearly most
welcome, the short-term effects are usually to disimprove energy performance. Construction
and commissioning invariably lead to increased energy consumption without any corresponding increase in output, and non-production facilities can also lead to an ongoing increase
in energy demand, with no growth in manufacturing output.
Combined Heat and Power (CHP)
Two members installed and commissioned new CHP plant in 2002, adding to the very
significant number of member companies that use CHP.
This continued growth in CHP capacity is welcome, since CHP represents perhaps the single
greatest possible contribution to emissions abatement on a site. It is particularly welcome
given the unfavourable economic context within which CHP operates at present.
54
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
3.2 Analysis of Results for 2002
Table 3.2.4 Positive and negative influences on energy performance
* Figures in brackets indicate
the frequency of reporting for
each of the underlying factors.
Positive influences
Negative influences
Increased production output (24)*
Reduced production output (15)
Boiler and related projects (18)
Plant expansion and upgrade projects
and commissioning and start-up (8)
Metering, monitoring, M&T (17)
Process changes (5)
Compressed air projects (17)
Other changes in production (5)
Process changes (15)
Changes in the product specification,
mix or raw materials (5)
Energy-efficient motors/VSDs (12)
Increased production output (3)
HVAC projects (10)
Environmental projects (2)
Energy audits (10)
Low ambient temperatures (1)
Energy teams (9)
High summer temperatures (1)
Heat recovery projects (8)
Lighting projects (8)
Refrigeration/cooling projects (7)
Product mix changes (7)
Staff awareness programmes (7)
Water treatment/reduction programmes (7)
Improved maintenance (7)
Improved energy management (6)
Building Management Systems/upgrades (6)
Improved controls on processes (6)
Low-cost measures (4)
Energy policies (3)
Fuel switching (3)
Purchasing policies (2)
New combined heat and power plant (2)
Outsourcing of energy-intensive operations (2)
Higher ambient temperatures (1)
Training (1)
Motor sizing (1)
Cleanroom projects (1)
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
55
Section 3 Results and Analysis
3.2 Analysis of Results for 2002
Prospects for 2003
Of the companies that set EPI targets for 2003, 32 expect to achieve improvements in their
EPIs, 17 expect slight disimprovements, and the remainder currently expect to achieve the
same as in 2002.
Where disimprovements are expected, these are usually due to known negative influences
that will impact in 2003: falls in expected production output, continued plant expansion, or
anticipated changes in product mix or specifications. In most of these cases, firms still plan
energy-efficiency projects, but these can sometimes merely maintain current levels of EPI.
On the other hand, were these companies to take no action, it is probable that their EPIs
would worsen in 2003.
It is encouraging that some 40% of the members expect to improve the productivity of their
energy use, even though many of these also expect a deterioration in trading conditions.
2003 will see the allocation of free emissions permits to those firms included in the emissions-trading scheme. It may also see greater certainty regarding the imposition of a carbon/
energy tax, together with the introduction of binding negotiated agreements. These developments will undoubtedly focus the attention of many firms on further improvement of energy
efficiency, and on greater attention to energy management.
Sustainable Energy Ireland looks forward to another successful year for the members of
the LIEN, and to further significant improvements in energy efficiency for the members as
a whole.
56
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
3.3 Members’ Graphs & Statements
Key to Member EPI bar graphs
+
EPI
88.51
93.51
100.02
100
80
70
TARGET EPI
OVERSHOOT
90
1
TARGET EPI 2001–02
2
ACTUAL EPI LEVELS
3
TARGET EPI 2003
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1996–2003
4
1 Target EPI 2001–02
The white outline surrounding each bar indicates the Target EPI level for that year.
2 Actual EPI levels
The coloured bar indicates the Actual EPI level achieved. If the Target EPI level is achieved,
the company is within target and is shown solely as a green bar whereas if the target is
exceeded, the overshoot amount is shown in red. For the current year, a company which
is within its Target EPI is indicated with a ‘-’ symbol; conversely, a company which overshoots its Target EPI is indicated with a ‘+’ symbol. In the bar graph shown above, the
company was within target in 2001 but has exceeded its EPI target in 2002.
3 Target EPI 2003
The grey bar indicates the Target EPI level for the coming year.
4 EPI trend
The EPI trend in the bottom left shows the trend in EPI achieved by a company since
it commenced reporting.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
57
3.3 Members‘ Graphs & Statements
EPI
105.83
105.07
Key to graphs: page 57
98.97
+
Abbott Ireland, Cavan
Abbott Ireland is committed to energy management. As part
of our Class A Programme and our continuous improvement initiative, we are constantly carrying out cost improvement programmes and seeking to devise new ways to reduce energy usage.
120
110
100
In 2002, we implemented a number of these programmes. We
installed Connoisseur, a computerised control system designed
to maximise the efficiency of equipment such as the evaporator
(by running the evaporator to its maximum total solids, we anticipate energy savings of 6% because, in terms of moisture removal
functionality, the evaporator is a more efficient technology than
the dryer). We replaced fixed-speed fans with variable-speed fans:
in doing so, we reduced our electricity consumption further.
Finally, we plan to install monitoring equipment to detect leakages of compressed air, which is an extremely costly utility.
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
94.78
90.55
87.65
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1996–2002
EPI
–
100
90
80
70
60
Aer Rianta, Dublin
Aer Rianta Dublin is fully committed to active energy management, as evidenced by initiatives such as the upgrading of the
heating, ventilation and air-conditioning systems in all passenger
areas; further investment in CHP including the installation of a
2.7 MWhe CHP unit at Dublin Airport; better monitoring of all
energy usage by means of using equipment controlled by our
Building Management System.
When compared with 2001, our EPI for 2002 is 90.55.
This is 4% below the 2001 figure.
50
40
With our third combined heat and power (CHP) unit reducing
electricity consumption dramatically, and with passenger numbers of 15.8 million anticipated for 2003, we are aiming for an
EPI of 87.65, or 3.2% below the 2002 figure.
30
20
10
Finally, Aer Rianta is participating in Sustainable Energy Ireland’s
Negotiated Energy Agreements Pilot Programme.
0
01
02
03
114.73
115.29
115.29
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
+
During 2002, Allergan experienced a slight increase in primary
energy usage as a result of the completion of expansion work in
the classified and support areas. This work was carried out in
order to meet ergonomic requirements as well as the demands
of technologically improved systems.
140
120
100
We are now positioned to increase our production volumes without significantly increasing our energy usage.
80
Despite the expansion work undertaken, our EPI remained fairly
constant with a slight increase recorded. This is largely attributable to the energy savings made following the installation in 2001
of energy-efficient motors and energy-efficient lighting in a number of areas of the plant, together with increased automation
across the site.
60
40
20
0
01
02
EPI TREND 1998–2002
58
Allergan Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Large Industry Energy Network
03
Y EA R
A major plant expansion is scheduled for 2005, when we plan to
install energy-efficient motors and fans throughout the new production area. The savings yielded as a result of this initiative will
be in the region of 1 million kWh per year.
Annual Report 2002
EPI
123.40
157.78
157.78
+
Analog Devices BV
The recession in the semiconductor industry over the past
number of years has meant reduced demand for products, as evidenced by the financial results of semiconductor manufacturers
worldwide. This has resulted in the less-than-optimal utilisation
of resources.
160
140
120
Analog continues to restructure its manufacturing operations in
line with this new business environment and technology requirements.
100
80
While this restructuring will result in an increase in our EPI figure, in the long term these changes should have a positive
impact.
60
40
20
0
01
02
03
122.24
108.34
107.25
Y EA R
EPI TREND 2000–2002
EPI
–
140
120
Atlas Aluminium
Significant improvements were made on our EPI between 2001
and 2002 as a result of ongoing energy reduction and awareness
programmes, and increased production efficiency during the
year.
The most significant improvements were made in furnace usage
(both operating and standby), as well as furnace insulation. Our
air leak reduction programme also proved to be very successful:
the introduction of a preventive maintenance programme on
pipework in high-risk leak areas was a major contributor to that
success.
100
80
60
Atlas Aluminium is committed to energy reduction. In the coming year, we hope to improve the monitoring of all high-energy
usage equipment to evaluate its efficiency. We also plan to focus
on compressed air usage.
40
20
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
Aughinish Alumina
EPI
95.06
93.84
93.90
–
100
90
Against a background where production output and energy
usage at our plant have been rising year-on-year, we have a policy
of monitoring overall energy consumption on a daily basis, and
maintaining tight control of specific energy consumption
throughout the plant on a continuous basis.
Moreover, in line with our policy of reducing greenhouse gas
emissions, we are actively pursuing the development of a viable
combined heat and power (CHP) scheme on site. We are also
actively involved with Sustainable Energy Ireland in programmes such as the LIEN and the pilot programme on negotiated energy agreements.
80
70
60
50
40
During 2002, we reduced electricity consumption by 0.78% due
to a combination of high productivity rates and optimisation of
equipment. We also reduced heavy fuel oil (HFO) consumption
by 3.15% following the full commissioning of the main heat
recovery/heat exchange system, which was completed during
2001-2002.
30
20
10
0
01
02
EPI TREND 1995–2002
Large Industry Energy Network
03
Y EA R
As a result of the initiatives outlined above, we improved our
EPI from 95.06 in 2001 to 93.84 in 2002.
Annual Report 2002
59
3.3 Members‘ Graphs & Statements
EPI
66.35
63.83
Key to graphs: page 57
61.92
+
Bausch & Lomb Ireland
During 2002, we completed construction work on a 20,000 sq. ft.
pharmaceutical facility to manufacture a slow-release drug for
the treatment of back-of-the-eye diseases, and we also commissioned and validated a new production facility for the manufacture of extended-wear contact lenses.
100
90
80
70
While overall energy usage increased significantly as a result of
this expansion work, we managed to achieve a 3% improvement
on our EPI for 2002.
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
Our success in achieving this result is largely due to our programme of continuous energy improvements across the site.
Recent initiatives included the implementation of a plant-wide
programme to detect leakages of compressed air, nitrogen and
steam; the upgrade of our Building Management System, which
involved the installation of a new Desigo software package and
the full reconditioning/replacement of all hardware; and the
reduction of non-critical room air changes from 20 air changes
per hour (ACPH) to 15 ACPH in 15% of production areas.
Factors such as the installation of a combined heat and power
(CHP) unit have also played an important role. Since we first
installed this unit several years ago, our EPI has improved by
more than 45%.
EPI
81.30
92.21
89.45
+
Baxter Healthcare S.A.
Continued plant expansion in terms of an increase in square
footage and storage areas, together with an accelerated drive to
change our process from a manual to an automated operation
system, impacted on energy performance in 2002. These developments were reflected in our EPI, which disimproved from 81.30
in 2001 to 92.21 in 2002. The 2002 figure is also significantly at
variance with the longer-term downward trend in the EPI for
Baxter Healthcare.
100
90
80
70
60
50
During the year, a number of significant energy-saving projects
were implemented in the compressor house and process areas,
and energy management continues to be an area of particular
focus for Baxter Healthcare S.A.
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
60
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
EPI
86.19
86.01
94.61
–
Boston Scientific Ireland Ltd, Galway
Our energy usage increased by 15% in 2002 due to expanded production output and the introduction of new product lines, processes and mix changes. These changes meant that we took on a
number of energy-intensive processes such as moulding, extrusion and braiding, along with a new coating process. However,
this percentage increase would have been even greater had it not
been for the range of electricity and fuel-conservation measures
that we have had in place for some time. The overall result was
that our EPI was almost unchanged compared with 2001.
100
90
80
70
60
50
Boston Scientific continues to invest heavily in energy-reduction
projects. To date, each of these projects has reached its target in
terms of achieving substantial savings within a period of less
than two years.
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1999–2002
In line with our policy of fuel conservation, we ensure that the
full range of energy-saving systems which have been installed
throughout the plant are also incorporated into the design of
all new plant utility projects.
On foot of the undertakings required to comply with our ISO
14000 membership, we must continually demonstrate energy
savings through audits on initiatives implemented to date. We
plan to implement a number of additional energy- saving initiatives in 2003, although we expect our EPI to disimprove due to
the changes mentioned above.
EPI
58.78
54.73
56.37
–
100
90
Braun Oral-B Ireland Ltd
Continuing the strong performance of previous years, Braun
Oral-B Ireland improved its EPI by 6.9% in 2002 (i.e. from 58.78
in 2001 to 54.73 in 2002).
Key among the factors responsible for achieving this positive
result were the investment in previous years in a range of energysaving projects, and close monitoring of energy usage on a
monthly basis, coupled with the fact that all new installations
have been planned with best practice energy-saving and energyconservation measures being used wherever possible.
80
70
60
50
40
Other influencing factors included a change in product mix, and
a substantial move away from labour-intensive production methods to highly automated processes. The latter resulted in a substantial increase in our energy-to-output ratio.
30
20
10
We are examining the feasibility of introducing free cooling for
our chilled-water plant in 2003.
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
61
3.3 Members‘ Graphs & Statements
EPI
109.85
109.81
Key to graphs: page 57
107.62
+
Bristol-Myers Squibb, Swords
While on-site manufacturing activity levels remained constant
during the year, energy consumption was 5% lower than the previous year. This reduction is not reflected in our EPI due to a difference in the product mix during the two periods measured;
nonetheless, Bristol-Myers Squibb continues to invest in energyreduction projects.
110
100
90
80
70
We recorded a 10% decrease in natural gas consumption, which
is now at its lowest level since the major expansion of the plant
in 1999. Our positive energy consumption figures are attributable to improved emphasis on Monitoring and Targeting; routine
auditing of systems; upgrade of the steam boiler plant including
sequence controller, economisers, heat recovery and variablespeed-drive fans; optimisation of the condensate recovery system;
replacement of compressed air equipment and distribution headers.
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
58.26
61.67
57.97
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1997–2002
EPI
+
100
Factors such as improved maintenance of steam traps and regular
cleaning of cooling-tower suction strainers have also played a
role in yielding positive returns. As a result of ongoing initiatives,
we expect to see further improvements in our EPI in future years.
Buckeye Technologies Ireland Ltd
During 2002, the number of operating hours at the plant reduced
by 20% in order to bring manufacturing output into line with a
reduction in customer requirements. As output decreased, energy
usage per tonne increased.
90
80
70
The disimprovement in our EPI was largely due to the volume of
energy consumed while the plant was in standby mode for
extended periods.
60
50
In 2003, we intend to continue improving operating efficiencies
in order to deliver a greater production output/energy consumption ratio. We also intend to focus on minimising energy consumption during plant downtime.
40
30
20
10
Cadbury Ireland Ltd, Dublin
0
01
02
03
88.68
80.45
82.06
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1997–2002
EPI
–
100
90
80
70
A comprehensive energy audit commenced in 2002, in association with the Sustainable Energy Ireland negotiated agreements
pilot, and some of the recommendations made on foot of that
audit were implemented during the year.
Further energy savings were achieved as a result of improved
heat control, coupled with reduced space-heating requirements
during the mild winter of 2001/2002. Along with an increase
in throughput, these factors led to an improvement in our EPI
of 9.3%.
Power consumption is set to increase by 400 kWh in 2003 following the installation of new plant.
60
In addition, we will be installing a 100 kWhe compressor, storage
tanks, mixers and pumping equipment. We expect output to be
reduced, and the overall effect should be an EPI for 2003 about
2% higher than achieved in 2002.
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1997–2002
62
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
EPI
83.50
83.28
83.28
+
Cadbury Ireland Ltd, Kerry
We recorded a fractional improvement in our EPI for 2002. While
the scale of this improvement is disappointing, it must be viewed
against the backdrop of the overall scale of changes and improvements made on the site since 1995, when we first got involved
in the LIEN. During this period, we reduced our electricity usage
by 21% and our oil usage by 18% based on energy per tonne of
product produced.
100
90
80
70
60
Energy usage was higher during 2002 due to increased production volumes as well as temporary alterations across a range of
production practices and processes. The increase in demand
meant it was necessary to reduce the use of some of our more
energy-efficient plant. Also, it was necessary to keep our second
boiler on line to meet the extra steam requirements.
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
We will be entering a recovery stage shortly, and we will be on
track to make further strides in improving our EPI for 2004. Our
flash steam recovery system was upgraded in late 2002, and we
will see positive results from this in 2003.
Moreover, in line with our overall environmental controls programme, we have defined a series of energy-reduction targets up
to 2006. We have placed specific emphasis on reducing our electricity and oil usage, as well as our wastewater and solid waste
volumes. We also plan to increase recycling at the plant.
EPI
77.06
73.27
69.61
–
110
100
90
80
70
Cantrell & Cochrane Ltd, Cork
2002 was a significant year for energy management on the
Cantrell & Cochrane Cork site. Despite increasing our production output by 3%, we reduced energy consumption by 13%.
This success is largely attributable to the strong commitment
shown by our management team and, in particular, by our
Energy Saving Team.
Other factors that contributed to our EPI improvement included
engineering changes in our boiler house, which in turn led to
a reduction of over 1MWh in natural gas usage. In addition, the
Energy Saving Team implemented a fully computerised energymonitoring programme across the site, and identified no-cost
measures such as weekend ‘switch outs’ to reduce energy consumption.
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
EPI TREND 1998–2002
Large Industry Energy Network
03
Y EA R
The reductions achieved are particularly important in the context of a competitive business environment. Against a background where electricity costs for the Cantrell & Cochrane
Group increased by 18% and natural gas increased by 54% in
2002 alone, energy reduction assumes a greater significance. Its
importance is now reflected in the Group’s policy statement on
energy, which is supported at the highest level.
Annual Report 2002
63
3.3 Members‘ Graphs & Statements
100.00
EPI
Key to graphs: page 57
Cantrell & Cochrane Ltd, Dublin
98.00
In a drive to better understand and control energy usage across
the business ranging from production processes to building services, CCIR Dublin has adopted a comprehensive energy policy,
which has been endorsed by Group CEO, Maurice Pratt.
100
90
80
One of the key measures of the policy is a continual energy conservation and improvement programme, and its main aim is to
reduce the level of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere
per unit of production output.
70
60
50
Projects completed in 2002 include the appointment of an on-site
Energy Team to drive energy-saving initiatives, and the installation of a computerised energy-monitoring system.
40
30
20
Looking to the future, we plan to achieve reductions in energy
consumption of between 2% and 5%, through energy monitoring and an energy awareness ‘switch off’ programme. These and
other initiatives will be actively supported by the Energy Team.
10
0
01
02
03
77.75
25.50
25.50
Y EA R
BASE YEAR 2002
EPI
–
100
90
80
As anticipated, the dramatic decrease in our EPI for 2002 may be
attributed to the installation of a 4.7 MW CHP unit, which has in
turn led to a significant reduction in on-site carbon dioxide and
sulphur dioxide emissions.
Plans for 2003 include the upgrade of our Building Management
System (BMS), coupled with the installation of a number of submetering points in the plant’s production area, which will supply
detailed information on steam and electricity usage to the Energy
Management Team. These measures will enhance our energy
monitoring and targeting system and will help us to control energy consumption throughout the site.
70
60
50
40
30
Plans under consideration for future years include the implementation of a number of heat recovery projects as well as an extensive programme of pipework insulation.
20
10
0
01
02
03
106.22
97.72
100.06
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
Carbery Milk Products Ltd
–
110
100
90
80
The Carbery management team is fully committed to reducing
energy consumption, and will continue to invest in a range of
energy-saving projects across all areas of the plant’s operations.
Cognis Ireland Ltd
We are pleased to have achieved our EPI target for 2002. The key
factor in attaining this result was a high level of production output, which in turn yielded a good plant utilisation figure.
This led to an improvement in our EPI of some 8% compared
with 2001.
We are currently examining a proposal to separate performance
indices for the two companies now operating on the site, Cognis
Ireland Ltd and Henkel Ireland Detergents Ltd. We believe
that such a move would produce more realistic EPIs for both
operations.
70
60
50
40
We are hopeful that our new Monitoring and Targeting (M&T)
system will help us identify further savings on an ongoing basis.
We intend to start by examining our electrical systems usage,
before taking on the other energy streams on site. However, 2003
will see a reduction in plant output and, as a result, we do not
expect further significant EPI improvements in the short term.
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1996–2002
64
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
EPI
100.03
118.58
118.58
+
Following a major upgrade of our process plant, which is now
operated by a digital control system, we processed a wide variety
of crude oils in order to take advantage of market price variations, and achieve the maximum net margin on crude processed.
However, the processing and refining of some of these crude oils
required a higher heat input to maximise these improved yields,
and so we did not achieve the overall level of savings we had targeted for 2002.
120
110
100
90
80
70
60
A 10% lower production output than in 2001, with a corresponding drop in energy usage of only 2%, had a negative effect on
our EPI.
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
83.06
80.68
78.67
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1996–2002
EPI
ConocoPhillips, Whitegate Refinery
–
We have installed new burners in one of our fired heaters, and
these are expected to save approximately 800 tonnes of refinery
gas in 2003. In early 2004, we hope to install new burners in
a large percentage of our older furnaces. The new burners will
be far more efficient and, as a result, fuel consumption will
decrease by 8,000 tonnes per year. As well as generating considerable direct cost savings, this reduction in fuel usage will lead
to a corresponding reduction in CO2 emissions.
Dairygold Co-op Society
100
Maximising energy efficiency and minimising energy bills at our
Castlefarm plant has been a key management focus since we first
joined the LIEN in 1995. The continuous improvement in our EPI
each year since then has been largely due to the efforts of a crossfunctional team which has implemented a range of energy-efficient, cost-saving initiatives as part of our internal Profit
Improvement Programme.
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
96.67
99.56
99.56
Y EA R
Among the factors that contributed to the improvement of 2.9%
in our EPI for 2002 was the upgrade of the combined heat and
power turbine: this was aimed at increasing both energy output
and efficiency. In addition, we reduced the use of standby steam
boilers; we continued our programme of installing energy-efficient motors and variable-speed drives; we maintained a programme of continuous fine-tuning of refrigeration, water and air
production processes coupled with continuous fine-tuning of the
planned maintenance schedule for the plant.
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
+
Dawn Meats, Ballyhaunis
During the year, we saw a four-fold increase in the quantity of
meat processed at our Ballyhaunis plant coupled with a substantial increase in our chilling capacity: the slight disimprovement
in our EPI for 2002 is largely due to these major changes in our
operating environment.
100
90
80
70
Despite the substantially higher energy requirements generated
by increased production output, we managed to maintain our
energy-to-output ratio more or less at 2001 levels. We achieved
this by implementing a number of energy-saving initiatives
including the replacement of the main boiler with a more efficient model: this enabled us to virtually eliminate LPG usage.
We installed new compressors, which enable us to meet changes
in demand more efficiently, and we implemented an insulation
programme, which has led to a reduced requirement for steam
heating.
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
EPI TREND 2000–2002
Large Industry Energy Network
Y EA R
In the coming year, we will continue to pursue improvements
through existing and new technologies. We have therefore set
ourselves a challenging target for our 2003 EPI.
Annual Report 2002
65
3.3 Members‘ Graphs & Statements
EPI
87.73
86.04
Key to graphs: page 57
86.04
–
Diageo Ireland, St James’s Gate
Our target for the St James’s Gate site for 2002 was to not exceed
2001 energy usage figures. Our success in meeting this target in
addition to recording an improvement in our EPI is largely attributable to our continued focus on energy efficiency.
100
90
80
Production output levels at the site are now fairly stable, and we
expect to sustain this improved EPI figure in 2003.
70
60
We plan to outsource all on-site utility activities during 2003. We
will select a service provider that has demonstrated leading-edge
capability and has set world-class standards and benchmarks for
the provision of industrial utilities.
50
40
30
We have identified a number of energy-saving initiatives for
implementation in 2004. As a result, we should be in a position
to deliver further improved EPI figures that year.
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1997–2002
EPI
106.85
98.46
91.56
–
110
100
Dundalk Brewery
When compared with 2001, our EPI for 2002 is 98.46. This is a
decrease of 7.8% from the 2001 figure.
Our target for 2002 was to maintain energy-to-output ratios at
2001 levels.
90
As highlighted in last year’s report, some time ago we identified
the contracting-out of our utilities supply operation as an opportunity to reduce costs. While this plan was originally scheduled
for implementation in July 2002, it was subsequently put on hold
due to developments in the energy and utilities-supply business
environment generally.
80
70
60
50
40
The contract for utilities supply was finally signed in December
2002, with full implementation scheduled for January 2003. The
utilities supplier has guaranteed to reduce our energy consumption by 7% in the first year of operation.
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
200.26
224.24
222.44
–
300
270
240
Elan Pharma Ltd
As expected, energy usage rose sharply last year due to continuing expansion work at the plant and the construction and validation of new manufacturing facilities. As a result, our EPI for 2002
was 224.24 compared with 200.26 for 2001.
As we approach the completion of the current phase of this expansion work, we are focusing on measures to optimise energy utilisation across a range of operations including manufacturing, utilities and services.
210
180
150
We recognise the importance of responsible corporate citizenship and the need to create a cleaner environment. We remain
committed to energy efficiency, as evidenced by the implementation of the current programme, which is designed to reduce energy consumption and optimise equipment utilisation.
120
90
60
30
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
Planned energy-saving initiatives include the optimisation
of chilling equipment, compressors and boilers, and a review
of air-conditioning requirements.
EPI TREND 1995–2002
66
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
EPI
54.74
49.78
48.79
–
We achieved a reduction in our EPI from 54.74 in 2001 to 49.78
in 2002 – a 9% improvement. This was due to a major change in
our product mix and improved production techniques, coupled
with an ongoing drive to reduce costs and the completion of the
shutdown of a section of the plant.
100
90
80
70
During 2002, we upgraded lighting systems in the Administration
Building and in the relocated PCBN processing plant. The new
system includes energy-efficient fittings, Passive Infra-red controls, and daylight monitoring.
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1997–2002
EPI
Element Six
89.83
78.67
91.26
–
100
We are continuing to progress our restructuring plan, including
the relocation of some production areas. We are also continuing
to upgrade the production bays, and, while doing so, we are placing particular emphasis on energy-efficient installations and
practices. This upgrading programme, together with streamlining the electrical distribution system within the plant, will be
ongoing for a number of years.
Among the planned projects for 2003 are the replacement of
the administration building heating system; the modernisation
of bays to permit relocation of the Syndite plant; and the development of methods to improve product batching in order to increase throughput and reduce production costs.
90
Eli Lilly S.A. – Irish Branch
80
We have continued to pursue a policy of energy efficiency and
optimisation in all aspects of our site operations. During 2002,
our EPI improved by 12.5%, despite a significant level of on-site
construction activity, and a greater than expected usage of LPG
due to variations in production activity. The installation of highly efficient equipment was one of the factors responsible for
creating improved overall performance.
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
187.54
Completed projects include an external energy audit; installation
of variable-speed drives to improve HVAC control in different
administration areas; and installation of high-efficiency lighting.
High-efficiency motors are now specified as standard for all new
projects. Finally, we have begun a combined heat and power
(CHP) feasibility study for the site.
We expect our EPI to deteriorate in 2003, as a result of increasing
our energy consumption and ceasing production of one high-volume product. Higher energy demand will be generated as a consequence of a new phase of construction activity on site. In addition, the completion of new administration/laboratory facilities
will result in higher energy consumption without generating
any additional production output.
187.54
200
180
160
140
120
Fruitfield Foods Ltd
100
Requirement to report suspended for one year only due to
resource difficulties.
80
60
40
20
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1998–2001
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
67
3.3 Members‘ Graphs & Statements
EPI
49.15
35.64
Key to graphs: page 57
34.92
–
Garrett Engine Boosting Systems
Energy consumption at the plant rose significantly during 2002
due to two main factors – the installation of afterburners in our
conveyorised ovens, which use approximately 25-33% more gas
during each production cycle, and the introduction of annualised
hours, which necessitated changing the production shift cycle
from a six-and-a-half-day week to a five-day week.
100
90
80
70
Energy usage has increased as a direct result of more machinery
being operated concurrently in order to meet output targets.
60
50
Energy saving remains a key corporate objective, as evidenced by
the company’s purchase of energy-efficient equipment such as an
180 kW variable-speed-drive compressor; the installation of highefficiency lamps for factory lighting; and additional measures
such as ensuring more vigilant monitoring of our on-site facilities and greater use of our existing energy-management module.
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
Glanbia Ingredients, Virginia
EPI TREND 1997–2002
EPI
95.75
94.76
94.67
–
100
90
Continuous improvement in energy conservation and management is a key objective of Glanbia Ingredients, Virginia. It is also
an integral part of each year’s business plan – not least because of
the need for prudent resource management in an environment
where the company’s energy costs have increased substantially.
The 1% improvement in our EPI for 2002 is largely due to a number of energy-saving initiatives including the installation of a
heater plant, which has reduced steam demand by utilising existing condensate. The other key factor was a change in certain production methods – in particular, reduced operation of one of the
evaporation plants.
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
During 2002, we built on progress made in previous years by
ensuring that energy-saving systems are incorporated into the
design of all new plant installations. We also continued our work
on developing energy-measurement techniques, by using existing tools such as the plant monitoring system. Finally, the use
of manufacturing by-product condensate helped to lower plant
steam demand, thereby reducing the quantity of natural gas
consumed.
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
75.95
72.85
67.02
–
100
90
80
Glanbia Meats, Roscrea
Our EPI for 2002 improved by 4.1% from 2001. This was mainly
due to increased production output at the plant. This spreads
high-energy operations such as wash-down over a larger production volume, which improves our ratio of energy to output.
Completed projects included a changeover from LPG to light fuel
oil for water heating throughout the plant. We also completed
installation of an M&T system, which is now beginning to impact favourably on water and energy levels.
70
60
50
In the year ahead, we intend to examine our plant efficiency and
upgrade where necessary. We will focus on heat recovery from
our stack and from our refrigeration condenser, for use in producing hot water.
40
30
20
Overall, we plan to reduce energy consumption at the plant by
10% in 2003.
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
68
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
EPI
124.69
114.72
111.28
–
Glanbia Meats, Ruskey
The impact of the fire that destroyed the pig-processing facility in
May 2002 continues to be felt at our Ruskey plant, where we have
seen a significant drop in energy usage due to the cessation of
pig-slaughtering activities.
140
120
However, despite the extensive damage caused by the fire, the
production of canned meats continues as before.
100
In line with our policy of continuous monitoring of energy consumption, we have put in place plans to increase water-usage
efficiencies and to promote greater awareness of the need for
resource conservation among on-site staff. Future plans include
an upgrade of the energy-monitoring system, which will feature
additional meters and more extensive energy-usage reporting.
In addition, we plan to reduce water wastage through improved
water recycling.
80
60
40
20
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
Glanbia Plc, Ballyragget
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
70.40
72.28
+
72.28
An increase in the output of high-added-value powder products,
(which require a higher energy input during the manufacturing
process), was the major factor responsible for causing our EPI to
disimprove from 70.40 in 2001 to 72.28 in 2002.
100
Despite this slight deterioration in performance, energy management continues to be an area of particular focus for Glanbia, and
at Ballyragget we remain committed to a programme of continuous energy monitoring and ongoing energy-saving initiatives.
We have participated actively in Sustainable Energy Ireland’s
pilot negotiated agreement programme, which included a major
energy audit of our thermal systems.
90
80
70
60
50
Recently completed projects include the installation of a water
recovery/recycling system, and the optimisation of whey-cooling.
Both initiatives resulted in decreasing on-site electricity consumption.
40
30
20
10
Glanbia Plc, Inch
0
01
02
03
126.41
110.93
110.93
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
–
140
Our EPI improved by 12.2% in 2002 due a 14.7% increase in production volume following a new product launch, but only a 6.5%
increase in energy usage. In line with our plans to drive down
energy usage, we targeted non-value-added on-site activities, with
a view to either outsourcing or eliminating these activities altogether. We began this process in 2002 and already it is yielding
dividends.
We commissioned a survey of the plant’s water sources to assess
their long-term viability. Based on those survey findings, we are
now improving our management of water resources. Also in
2002, we commissioned a report on the potential for alternative
sources of energy with a view to assessing the potential to reduce
our liabilities for the proposed new carbon-energy taxation.
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
Among planned projects for 2003 are an upgrade of the quality
of the water feed to the boiler and replacement of the boiler’s
blow-down facility; replacement or repair of all access points in
the cold storage area; and replacement of one air compressor and
the installation of a sequencer on the bank of compressors.
Finally, we plan to improve on our current condensate recovery
rate. Total capital expenditure on these energy-saving initiatives
is expected to be in the region of 4200,000.
EPI TREND 1996–2002
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
69
3.3 Members‘ Graphs & Statements
EPI
53.71
57.15
Key to graphs: page 57
55.15
+
GlaxoSmithKline, Cork
Our ongoing campaign to improve energy management continued in 2002, incorporating continuous energy monitoring, training and awareness programmes, and regular internal energy
audits to help identify savings and opportunities.
100
90
80
The site emphasis has been focused more on improving the operational efficiency of existing plant and equipment – choosing to
invest in areas such as our main refrigeration system – than on
large-scale capital investment projects.
70
60
50
During 2002, our new on-site incineration heat recovery unit
delivered better-than-expected performance results. The segregation of waste streams by calorific value resulted in a significant
reduction in incinerator gas consumption and more efficient
operation of the thermal incineration plant. Virtually all plant
steam requirements were met by this unit, thereby creating a
greater-than-expected reduction in boiler gas consumption.
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
100.00
90.85
95.39
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1996–2002
EPI
+
However, despite these energy-efficiency and optimisation measures, and initiatives such as the condensate recovery project and
the electricity-metering project, our EPI deteriorated by 6.5% in
2002. This was due to a significant drop in production output
towards the end of the year.
GlaxoSmithKline, Dungarvan
The continuing improvement in our EPI since 2001 is a reflection
of GlaxoSmithKline’s strong commitment to energy management, and in particular to initiatives such as its Energy
Management Programme, Project Helios.
100
90
80
Against a background where the plant had expanded significantly both in size and in production activity to meet an 11% increase
in demand in 2002, we achieved a decrease of 4.4% on the previous year’s energy consumption figures. This led to an improvement in our EPI of more than 9%.
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
BASE YEAR 2001
70
03
Y EA R
Among the energy-saving initiatives carried out during the year
were steam generation and distribution system upgrades; compressed air generation and distribution upgrades; lighting efficiency improvements including the fitting of Passive Infra-red
controls, electronic ballasts/starters and long-life fluorescent
tubes; and manipulation of the Building Management System
for on/off control of AHUs.
Finally, we used measures such as the publication of an Energy
Wasters database and the Energy Matters publication to promote
staff awareness.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
EPI
103.11
105.17
102.01
+
We recorded a deterioration of 2% in our EPI for 2002. This was
due to a number of factors. Key among these was the increased
demand for our products, which led to equipment being run at
historically high levels, and generated significant increases in our
overall energy consumption. Another site-specific factor responsible for increasing energy consumption was the high precipitation recorded during the year (60% higher than in the previous
year), which resulted in rock from the mine being wetter than
usual. This in turn placed greater-than-normal demands on our
mining/drying equipment.
120
110
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
79.25
79.82
83.81
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1998–2002
EPI
Gypsum Industries Ltd
+
Because of the deterioration in our EPI, we now have plans in
place to implement a number of initiatives aimed at improving
process and operational controls in the longterm. We have
recently appointed additional personnel to our energy management team and we expect that they will identify a number of
potential electricity and gas savings at the plant. One of the
team’s early successes has been to reduce energy usage on our
electrostatic precipitator by 10%.
HJ Heinz
Our EPI deteriorated fractionally in 2002 as the combined result
of a 7.5% increase in energy usage, an 11% increase in production volume, and a significant shift in our product mix from
frozen crust and bagels to ready meals – a more complex production process requiring greater energy usage.
100
90
80
70
However, the percentage EPI deterioration was minimised as a
consequence of continuous improvement activity in a number of
areas, combined with corporate management’s determination to
implement a programme of capital investment in projects that
will improve energy efficiency and minimise the site’s environmental footprint.
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
EPI TREND 1997–2002
03
Y EA R
Despite slightly disappointing 2002 results, the underlying
trends are still good, with improved process efficiencies for steam
cycle, air and water usage. Effective tracking is in place via our
Building Management System. Line efficiencies are the best ever
and improving, while routine maintenance on – and efficiency
of – our utilities plant also continue to improve.
Planned projects for 2003 include a reconfiguration of our site
chill provision, in order to reduce electricity consumption.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
71
3.3 Members‘ Graphs & Statements
EPI
60.56
55.20
Key to graphs: page 57
60.72
–
Hewlett-Packard (Manufacturing) Ltd
Our EPI improved in 2002, with an improvement compared to
2001 of almost 9%. This was due to an increase in manufacturing
output, combined with sustained energy-conservation activity
by the plant’s Energy Reduction Team. This included continuous
monitoring of the plant, aimed at identifying times when
energy usage in areas such as general services, compressed air
and air-handling could be reduced, or energy supply closed off.
100
90
80
70
60
We plan to implement a number of additional energy-saving initiatives in 2003, notably in relation to compressed air generation
and distribution, and in relation to areas such as lighting and
boiler equipment. The latter was identified as an area requiring
special attention during our participation in the Sustainable
Energy Ireland pilot programme on negotiated energy agreements.
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
68.65
54.26
52.09
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1997–2002
EPI
–
Against a background where production volumes are expected to
decrease slightly, and non-production-related activities such as
office-based work and output from our new media division are
set to increase, we anticipate a deterioration in our EPI for 2003.
IBM Technology Campus
IBM is fully committed to active energy management and energy
conservation programmes, as evidenced by our EPI for 2002,
which fell from 68.65 in 2001 to 54.26 in 2002 – a 21% improvement.
100
90
80
Among the factors that have contributed to this success are
optimisation of air-handling units and boilers; reduced lighting
in process areas; the implementation of a complete review of all
AHU set times and set points. Adjusting these parameters to
match area occupation has resulted in a significant drop in both
electricity consumption and gas consumption.
70
60
50
40
30
In line with IBM’s corporate target of improving energy efficiency by 4% each year, our energy management programme and
Energy Team continue to focus on energy management practice
– highlighting and implementing energy conservation programmes as well as ‘avoidance’ projects at the design stage.
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1999–2002
Intel Ireland Ltd
EPI
64.62
72.94
93.37
+
100
90
80
70
60
50
During 2002, we implemented a significant range of energyreduction initiatives including the modernisation of equipment
as part of the manufacturing conversion to flash memory products. However, during the same period we saw a decrease in production output levels plus recommencement of construction
work on our new state-of-the art wafer fabrication facility, Fab 24.
The effect of the energy-saving initiatives was insufficient to
counteract the increased demand and, coupled with lower-thanexpected outputs, we unavoidably missed our target and recorded
a disimprovement in our EPI from 64.62 in 2001 to 72.94 in 2002.
Target EPI will be met and improvements made when the new
facility is on line and production output optimally loaded in the
early 2005 timeframe.
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
72
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
EPI
117.19
116.46
116.46
–
Irish Shell Ltd
We are fully committed to improving energy efficiency across
our operations.
120
110
Our EPI improved slightly in 2002. This was partly due to the
implementation of a number of energy-saving initiatives including the installation of variable-speed drives (VSDs) on product
pumps, and the removal of one of our bitumen-holding tanks for
routine maintenance repairs: the removal of this tank resulted in
savings on product heating.
100
90
80
70
60
Another factor that contributed to the EPI improvement was that
2002 marked the first full year of operation of the vapour recovery unit. The installation of this unit on our white oils site was
carried out in order to comply with EU and Irish environmental
legislation regulations.
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1997–2002
During 2002, we investigated a range of measures designed to
increase the efficiency of heating facilities on our bitumen site.
As a result of those investigations, we plan to replace the boilers
on the bitumen site and the existing thermal oil heating boilers
in 2003/2004.
At our white oils terminal, we installed two 75kW pumps with
VSDs (duty/standby) to allow for more DERV loading arms on
our bottom-loading gantries. This will facilitate more efficient
turnaround of trucks, but not necessarily an increase in terminal
throughput (product).
EPI
95.82
93.33
84.93
+
Irish Sugar Ltd
Difficult harvesting conditions, caused by poor weather, led to
slower-than-normal delivery of raw materials, creating a series of
interruptions in process operations and throughput in 2002.
Although, as a result, we used more energy than we had expected, our EPI improved by 2.5% on 2001.
100
90
80
70
Among the energy efficiency projects completed in 2002 was the
replacement of a number of batch crystallisation pans with continuous pans. The replacement of old slicers with modern
machines is planned for 2003.
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
We are aiming to improve our EPI next year by 9% compared
with the 2002 out-turn. This target is based on known plant capability coupled with good energy management practices, with an
emphasis on using timely key performance data/indicators and a
proactive approach to improving operations and energy efficiency. This is challenging, and assumes optimum processing conditions unhindered by negative external factors.
EPI TREND 1995–2002
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
73
3.3 Members‘ Graphs & Statements
EPI
38.51
31.43
Key to graphs: page 57
29.86
–
Janssen Pharmaceutical Ltd
Effective energy management delivers a range of economic and
environmental benefits and is thus regarded as a critical element
of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Health, Safety and Environment
process and plant operational plan.
100
90
80
Our success in achieving a major improvement of 18.4% in our
EPI for 2002 was due to the implementation of several initiatives,
including the installation of an economiser on our third boiler;
optimisation of the carbon adsorption plant operation; implementation of Lean Manufacturing Principles; replacement of both
the deduster and the vacuum pump; and installation of an energy-efficient process water distribution system. The work of our
multi-function energy team in raising awareness and identifying
areas for improvement has been central to our achievements.
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
54.86
49.01
49.01
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1996–2002
EPI
–
100
90
Klinge Pharma
Reduced thermal energy consumption combined with increased
manufacturing production output underlay our improved EPI for
2002.
In line with our policy of constantly seeking to improve energy
efficiency, we have recently installed a water consumption monitoring system as well as a boiler monitoring system. We also installed new burners. In addition, the Building Management
System (BMS) time zones have been expanded to include additional plant items such as water circulation pumps, and air leak
survey/elimination is now a continuous process.
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
EPI TREND 1996–2002
74
We are aiming for a 5% improvement in energy efficiency for
2003. This is based on current forecasts for production output
and energy usage, coupled with the knowledge that our lean
manufacturing principles will enable us to achieve the requisite
reduction in energy consumption.
Large Industry Energy Network
03
Y EA R
During 2003, we plan to install a sophisticated Energy
Management System, which will incorporate performance review mechanisms that will allow for comparison with best available practice. The system will provide full documentation for
audit purposes and will be used as a tool to identify and prioritise
energy-management enhancement processes and procedures, and
deliver precise measurements of their impact on energy consumption.
Annual Report 2002
EPI
140.46
155.46
155.46
+
Although we have consistently implemented a programme of
energy-saving initiatives since we first joined the LIEN in 1996,
our EPI disimproved from 140.46 in 2001 to 155.46 in 2002. This
is in line with the negative trend in our EPI over a period of four
years.
160
140
120
As highlighted in last year’s report, we are looking at changing
the method used for measuring our energy-to-output ratio to one
that takes into account the varying levels of complexity of our
products. However, as yet, we have not succeeded in finding a
suitable alternative to the existing measurement system.
100
80
60
40
20
0
01
02
03
101.99
95.26
95.26
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
Kostal Ireland GmbH
–
110
100
90
80
As committed members of the LIEN, we continue to maintain
a proactive approach to energy management, as evidenced by initiatives such as our SMD equipment replacement programme.
We began this programme in 2002, and we expect that it will
make a significant positive contribution to our energy-to-output
ratio in 2003 and beyond. We also envisage a significant downward trend in our overall energy consumption in future years,
as the number of products using wave-soldering technology
decreases.
Lakeland Dairies, Bailieboro
During 2002, we set out to identify opportunities for product
specialisation at our Bailieboro plant. As a result of that move, we
succeeded in maximising production output for a range of milk
powders. The energy efficiency of the site is closely related to
volume and product mix.
In line with our policy of continually reviewing opportunities for
increasing energy efficiency, we invested heavily in technologies
designed to enhance process control, decrease cleaning time, and
reduce downtime for both plant and equipment. We also installed T5 high-efficiency fluorescent lighting in one office block,
with a payback of roughly 10,000 hours.
70
60
50
40
30
These initiatives directly benefited overall plant energy efficiency and, together with the product volume and mix changes, were
the key drivers of the improvement of 6.6% in our EPI for 2002.
20
10
0
01
02
EPI TREND 1995–2002
Large Industry Energy Network
03
Y EA R
2003 will see a major expansion in butter production on the site,
and a corresponding increase in energy consumption. In order to
counteract any potential deterioration in our EPI, we plan to
make further investments in process control; build a new cold
store; upgrade both the compressed air system and the plant data
acquisition/information storage system; install additional variable-speed drives, and improve the use of cooling water to reduce
refrigeration in product cooling.
Annual Report 2002
75
3.3 Members‘ Graphs & Statements
EPI
116.32
106.43
Key to graphs: page 57
111.75
–
LEO Pharma
We are delighted to report an 8.5% improvement in our EPI for
2002. This is largely attributable to our corporate policy of continuous investment in programmes that are specifically designed
to reduce on-site energy costs, as well as reducing the impact of
our operations on the environment.
140
120
100
Our energy team implemented a wide range of conservation and
management programmes during the year, and a programme
focusing on gas usage contributed to a reduction of more than
7% in on-site consumption.
80
60
40
20
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1996–2002
Among recently completed energy-saving projects was the fitting
of equipment designed to slow down the GPP pilot plant air-handling unit to a minimum when not in use. In addition, the grease
collection system temperature was reduced from 75°C to 40°C;
compressed air system leaks were checked/repaired; a new compressor was commissioned; and the penicillin plant condensate
return system was overhauled and repaired. Finally, we improved
the quality of water supplied to the boilers, which resulted in
fewer blow-downs.
We anticipate some disimprovement in our EPI for 2003, arising
from increased energy demand due to the construction of a large
pharmaceutical grade D clean store.
EPI
105.70
97.98
96.02
–
110
100
90
Lisheen Mine
Against a background where the quantity of zinc and lead produced at the mine rose by almost 24% last year, and as a consequence the electricity consumption rose by 14%, we improved
our EPI from 105.7 in 2001 to 97.98 in 2002.
This improvement in our EPI was mainly due to the implementation of a number of energy-saving initiatives and an energy awareness programme – all of which were overseen by our Energy
Management Team.
80
70
60
Among the energy-saving initiatives carried out were the insulation of the drying rooms, and more regulated use of the on-site
boilers. As a result, we achieved a reduction of 34% in our LPG
usage.
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
EPI TREND 2000–2002
03
Y EA R
Production output is expected to rise again next year. Moreover,
as the underground mine area expands, this will create greater
demand for electricity to deal with additional ventilation and
pumping loads, lighting and other services. Diesel consumption
will rise as our underground ore transportation vehicles are
obliged to travel greater distances, and as more water is encountered underground, the volumes of wastewater required to be
treated will also increase.
Despite these demands on our resources, we hope to maintain
or further improve our EPI for 2003 by implementing a number
of new energy management initiatives.
76
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
EPI
100.00
75.92
73.64
–
Masonite Ireland is fully committed to reducing energy usage
at its Carrick-on-Shannon facility, as evidenced by its policy of
implementing industry best practice.
100
90
Following the establishment of an energy management team
during 2002, coupled with the implementation of a Monitoring
and Targeting programme, areas of potential improvement were
quickly highlighted. This has resulted in substantial reductions
in both electrical and thermal-specific energy consumption,
which will be sustainable into the foreseeable future.
80
70
60
50
40
Whereas we originally targeted a reduction of 5% for our EPI for
2002, with cumulative reductions in electrical and thermal energy use, we have actually managed to achieve a reduction of 24%.
30
20
By implementing a range of energy-saving practices, we have
become a better corporate citizen and environmental neighbour.
10
0
01
02
03
92.15
72.37
79.61
Y EA R
BASE YEAR 2001
EPI
Masonite Ireland
–
100
90
For 2003, we have appointed a full-time Energy Manager to guide
the process further, but we are not expecting the same rate of
gain as achieved in 2002. Further improvement in EPI will be
achieved either through the use of technologically advanced control systems and equipment, or improvements in productivity
and output.
Merck Sharp & Dohme (Ireland)
Our involvement in both the LIEN and the Sustainable Energy
Ireland (SEI) Boiler Awards Scheme underscores the company’s
commitment to energy conservation and management.
When measured against 2000 baseline figures, our EPI improved
in 2001, and again in 2002, with a cumulative improvement of
over 27% since 2000. This success was due to process optimisation (yield/cycle time) and the implementation of a number of
energy-saving initiatives.
80
70
60
50
Our energy management team has implemented energy efficiency projects in areas such as boiler efficiency, steam distribution,
compressed air generation, wastewater treatment plant operations and lighting. The team is currently reviewing site practice
versus best practice, as outlined in the audit template for the
chemical and pharmaceutical sector developed within SEI’s pilot
programme on negotiated energy agreements. The result of that
review will determine the parameters of future initiatives.
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
Due to a reduction in volumes and a change in product mix, the
EPI target for 2003 is set at 79.6, an increase of 10% from the 2002
figure.
EPI TREND 2000–2002
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
77
3.3 Members‘ Graphs & Statements
EPI
78.85
81.40
Key to graphs: page 57
79.93
+
Given that electricity usage represents 28.7% of our direct costs,
we are satisfied with a deterioration in our EPI for 2002 of 2.55 in
a manufacturing environment where energy usage increased by
6.4%, and where manufacturing output was expected to decrease
by 3.7%, but actually increased by 2.95%.
100
90
80
70
Among the measures that helped us to limit the increase in our
energy-to-output ratio was the replacement of a cooling tower
with a new unit fitted with energy-efficient motors. In addition,
Production Building 2 was upgraded, and the reactors were fitted
with energy-efficient motors.
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1996–2002
EPI
Micro-Bio Ireland Ltd, Fermoy
97.10
75.82
74.30
–
The recommendations made in the energy audit that we commissioned in late 2002 as part of Sustainable Energy Ireland’s pilot
programme on negotiated energy agreements have been incorporated into our capital expenditure programme for 2003-2004.
In addition, we have developed an energy policy, which we are
now actively promoting through our Energy Team.
Planned projects for 2003 include installation of a new boiler, operating with a dual burner using a combination of light fuel oil and
natural gas. The primary fuel for this boiler will be natural gas.
NEC Semiconductors Ireland Ltd
100
During 2002, manufacturing output at the NEC Semiconductors
plant rose steadily, reaching our production target of 4.2 million
units per month.
90
80
70
Overall, electricity consumption grew due to increased demand
and the need for additional testing on new products. The increase
in demand necessitated the installation of new energy-intensive
equipment such as ovens and mould presses.
60
50
40
However, despite a 16% increase in manufacturing output for
the year as a whole, our electricity consumption increased by
only 10%, and we managed to attain a striking 21.9% improvement in our EPI for 2002.
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
Production output is expected to increase to 5.2 million units per
month in the second half of 2003. Planned energy-saving initiatives include the installation of an ice bank.
EPI TREND 1995–2002
Novartis Ringaskiddy Ltd
EPI
25.40
23.20
21.90
–
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
EPI TREND 1996–2002
78
Large Industry Energy Network
03
Y EA R
Since we first joined the Large Industry Energy Network in 1996,
we have been working on a rolling list of energy-saving initiatives each year. As a result, we managed to further reduce energy
consumption in 2002, recording an 8.6% improvement on our
2001 figure. This was achieved by making many small changes
to process and equipment, involving an investment of over
4100,000. Areas addressed included chilled water, and natural
gas flow-metering.
In the spring of 2002, we were invited to participate in
Sustainable Energy Ireland’s pilot programme on negotiated
energy agreements and, as part of our involvement in that project, our plant was audited by external consultants. Once we have
reviewed the findings of the audit, we will include in our list of
energy-saving initiatives those that offer continued savings. In
the meantime, we will proceed with the projects already planned
for 2003, when energy consumption is expected to increase by
7.5% due to increased manufacturing output. Despite this, we
have set a target for EPI in 2003 of 21.90, an improvement over
the 2002 actual EPI of 5.6%.
Annual Report 2002
EPI
128.85
129.42
132.66
+
Outokumpu (Tara Mines Limited)
Outokumpu’s (Tara Mines) EPI figure for 2002 was very much
distorted by the unavoidable suspension of operations for a total
of eight months due to the depressed state of the international
zinc market. As a result, the figures used come from annualising
the four-month operating period from September to December.
140
120
100
Completed energy-saving projects in 2002 included conversion
of the production hoist control system to solid-state operation;
commissioning of additional variable-speed-fan controls; and
modifying a number of sump pump controls to a more efficient
operating mode.
80
60
Fluctuations in energy requirements are common throughout
the mining industry. They may be caused by operating factors
such as increases in production output, or by increasing distances
between working faces and the hoisting centre, as the mine is
worked.
40
20
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
Tara Mines frequently faces such challenges, and it prides itself
in minimising the potential adverse energy impacts that can be
created as a result of fluctuating energy demands. We achieve
this by ensuring that every possible energy-efficient measure is
applied at every stage of a project’s design, specification and
implementation.
In the year ahead, we will be bringing the SWEX project, a worldclass mining operation, into production. This project epitomises
our corporate philosophy of judicious energy management.
EPI
70.05
59.86
59.86
–
100
90
80
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Little Island
Our approach to energy management is in line with our corporate commitment to environmental responsibility. It combines a
number of measures ranging from integration of all engineering
projects and running staff awareness programmes to carrying out
continuous improvements in our site operations.
2002 also marked the first full year of operation for our new thermal oxidiser. Additional energy-saving initiatives included the
fitting of variable-speed drives to a significant number of utility
system motors, and improvements to the cooling system and
HVAC controls.
70
60
50
40
The overall effect of our energy management actions has been
a reduction in energy consumption of 13.5% in 2002. Combined
with a significant increase in production output, the impact on
our EPI was dramatic: an improvement from 70.05 in 2001 to
59.86 in 2002.
30
20
10
0
01
02
EPI TREND 2000–2002
Large Industry Energy Network
03
Y EA R
For 2003, we are targeting a further reduction in energy consumption of some 5%. However, we are unsure of the overall effect of
this on EPI, and so our target for 2003 is to maintain our EPI at
2002 levels.
Annual Report 2002
79
3.3 Members‘ Graphs & Statements
EPI
212.34
182.82
Key to graphs: page 57
173.68
–
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Loughbeg API
During 2002, we invested further in energy management technology at our Loughbeg site. We improved HVAC control and maintenance in key areas such as high-energy intensity refrigeration
systems, and we installed additional energy-monitoring equipment such as compressed gas flow-metering systems. The above
initiatives resulted in a decrease in gross energy consumption
and, combined with an increase in manufacturing output, our
EPI fell significantly compared with 2001.
220
200
180
160
140
120
From 2003 onwards, we will face a number of significant challenges. Among the factors that will conspire against future EPI
improvements will be the further expansion of the plant and the
construction of new processing facilities. Additional expansion of
non-production-related services such as on-site security and new
office buildings will also have a negative impact on our EPI.
100
80
60
40
20
0
01
02
03
125.36
117.94
117.94
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1996–2002
EPI
–
A key focus of future energy conservation and management plans
will be on specific systems energy auditing, as well as additional
demand side awareness schemes and operational improvements.
Moreover, the selection of high-efficiency equipment, with frontend installed metering systems, will continue to be a vital component of all significant future energy efficiency projects.
180
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Ringaskiddy
160
We are firmly committed to energy and resource conservation.
Even though our energy consumption increased significantly in
2002, following the commissioning of a new production facility,
we still managed to come in well under our EPI target for the
year. This was largely due to the company’s commitment to
invest in energy-efficient technologies and practices, and to the
new facility being brought gradually up to full production and
efficiency.
140
120
100
80
60
We have a series of initiatives planned for 2003, which will help
to reduce our electrical and thermal inputs to the site relative to
production. In addition, we plan to put in place an improved
energy tracking and reporting system.
40
20
0
01
02
03
97.13
103.08
103.08
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
+
Until production output at the new facility is fully stabilised,
it will be difficult to estimate our EPI target for 2003. For the
moment, therefore, we are aiming to maintain it at the 2002
level.
110
Premier Periclase Ltd
100
Energy optimisation has been a key management focus since we
first joined the LIEN in 1995. Despite this, our EPI deteriorated
quite significantly last year from 97.13 in 2001 to 103.08 in 2002.
Maintenance start/stops were higher than previously, resulting
in additional heat-ups in our furnaces and kilns.
90
80
70
60
The challenge for 2003 and beyond will be to improve energy
efficiency and return to the high levels achieved in previous
years.
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
80
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
EPI
92.65
97.92
+
97.92
Pure Fresh Dairies Ltd
The company is committed to active energy management, as
evidenced by its policy of continuous monitoring of energy usage
and ongoing investigation into different methods of energy conservation.
100
90
80
Planned projects for 2003 include the installation of ice bank
refrigeration.
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
183.30
174.16
174.16
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
–
200
180
160
Roche Ireland Ltd
Against a background where production output increased slightly last year and energy usage decreased slightly, we achieved a
significant reduction in our EPI from 183.3 in 2001 to 174.16 in
2002. This success is largely attributable to increased production
efficiency and improved energy-to-output ratios.
During 2002, we commissioned a comprehensive energy audit of
the site. Based on the findings of that audit, we have now identified a range of energy-saving projects, which we intend to implement over a three-year period.
140
120
100
80
Plans for 2003 include the conversion of one boiler to natural gas
– a move that is expected to deliver substantial energy savings.
60
40
20
0
01
02
03
90.12
92.04
92.04
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
+
Saehan Media Ireland Ltd
Against a background where our energy usage increased by 6.4%,
our EPI deteriorated from 90.12 in 2001 to 92.04 in 2002.
100
90
However, a number of energy-saving initiatives have been implemented. They include the replacement of a cooling tower with a
new unit fitted with energy-efficient motors; the upgrade of
Production Building Two, with the reactors being fitted with
energy-efficient motors; and the installation of more efficient
lighting – also in Production Building Two.
80
70
60
50
The recommendations made on foot of the audit carried out as
part of the Sustainable Energy Ireland negotiated agreements
pilot programme have now been incorporated into our capital
expenditure programme for 2003/2004. Among immediate
improvements planned are the installation of a new boiler that
will operate with both light fuel oil and natural gas.
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
Finally, we have now developed an energy policy for the site,
which is actively promoted by our Energy Team.
EPI TREND 1995–2002
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
81
3.3 Members‘ Graphs & Statements
EPI
180.32
167.22
Key to graphs: page 57
200.66
–
Schering-Plough (Avondale) Co.
We are fully committed to a programme of active energy management and energy conservation, as evidenced by our EPI for
2002, which fell from 180.32 in 2001 to 167.22 in 2002.
220
200
180
The 7.3% improvement in our performance was achieved against
a background where energy consumption increased significantly
during the year. Despite this, we were able to maintain our energy-to-output ratios: although energy usage increased, production
output increased pro rata.
160
140
120
100
During 2003, we plan to commission an independent audit of our
Co Wicklow production facility, focusing particularly on waste
minimisation and energy consumption. We also plan to convert
our boiler to natural gas and to upgrade our boiler plant – including installation of a new economiser and variable-speed drives.
80
60
40
20
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
Plans for future years include the installation of a new cooling
tower and distribution system to provide capacity for process
equipment. We are also considering the possible replacement of
our chiller with a more energy-efficient unit.
The boiler upgrade will not yield benefits until early 2004. We
forecast a drop in production in 2003 of about 20%, and we have
significant construction projects in progress on the site. For these
reasons, we have set a target EPI for 2003 about 20% above the
2002 level.
EPI
73.22
62.99
62.36
–
100
90
80
Schering-Plough (Brinny) Co.
During 2002, overall manufacturing output grew by 29.7%. As a
consequence, on-site energy usage rose significantly. Nonetheless,
we still managed to achieve an improvement of over 10 points on
our EPI – a percentage improvement over 2001 of 14%.
The most significant energy-related project completed in 2002
was the replacement of the plant’s last remaining boiler, which
utilised heavy fuel oil. In its place is a gas boiler, which has been
fitted with an economiser.
70
60
50
During 2003, we will be striving to further improve our energy
utilisation by installing a new compressor with an associated distribution system incorporating the most up-to-date energy-efficient technology. We also plan to install Passive Infra-red lighting
systems to improve lighting efficiency across the site. Finally, we
plan to involve more staff in performing comprehensive monthly energy audits in order to raise energy awareness across the site.
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
82
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
EPI
83.70
66.19
–
66.19
2002 was a remarkable year for SerCom Solutions. Among a
number of successes, we reduced our overall energy usage by
14%, more than doubling our original target. We also improved
our EPI very significantly, by 20.9% compared with 2001. The
main drivers of this improvement were our long-term energy
awareness programme, our on-site energy-saving team, and the
vast number of energy-saving initiatives that have been implemented on foot of the energy audit that was carried out on the site.
100
90
80
70
60
50
Among these initiatives are Passive Infra-red lighting installations; dropped ceilings, which reduce space-heating requirements; fitting of timers on all heaters on the production floor;
assessment of plant equipment motors to ensure that the most
energy-efficient models are in place; and training of staff in a
wide range of energy-efficiency techniques and practices.
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
91.58
88.06
88.06
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
–
100
SerCom Solutions, a DCC plc company, is very proud of its
progress in 2002, and will continue to implement more energysaving projects in 2003 in line with the ongoing energy strategy
to which the company’s senior management team is committed.
Smurfit Paper Mills Ltd
Against a background where production volumes increased
during 2002, we managed to lower our overall energy usage by
1.2%, while simultaneously making significant improvements
in reducing energy consumption per unit of output.
90
80
70
This improvement was achieved through a range of factors ranging from obtaining greater efficiency in the calorifier, which is
used in the steam condensate system, to upgrading steam traps in
the plant. We also improved the paper machine wet-end vacuum
foil system, which reduced drag and motor load. Perhaps the
most crucial of all factors, however, is the strong commitment
demonstrated by our mill staff to improving energy efficiency
throughout the plant.
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
123.95
132.52
139.14
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
SerCom Solutions
+
Going forward, we are faced with more difficult market conditions in 2003 due to greater variation in the quality of the waste
paper that we are permitted to recycle. This variability in the
quality of our raw materials may lead to a substantial increase in
our energy consumption. Nevertheless, we are strengthening our
commitment to energy conservation. Current projects include
improvements in the mill’s heat exchangers, and upgrading the
lagging on steam pipework.
140
120
St Francis Abbey Brewery
100
Our EPI disimproved by 6.9% in 2002. Reduced sales volume led
to a significant change in our key energy usage ratios, since base
loads remain high when demand drops.
80
As our sales growth looks set to remain static for 2003, we will be
actively examining a range of opportunities to reduce energy
usage throughout the plant. Our capital expenditure plan features several projects that are justified on the basis of their energy reduction potential.
60
40
20
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
We are also looking at other ways to optimise on-site utilities
such as effluent treatment, and we are currently planning to
install a site treatment plant, in co-operation with our local
authority.
EPI TREND 1996–2002
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
83
3.3 Members‘ Graphs & Statements
EPI
56.45
40.07
Key to graphs: page 57
44.08
–
Takeda Ireland Ltd
Our production output increased during 2002, thereby enabling
us to exceed our targeted EPI. Indeed our EPI for 2002 represents
an improvement over 2001 of 29%.
100
90
Unfortunately, energy projects planned for implementation in
2002 were not completed due to continuing expansion work at
the plant. However, these projects, including the installation
and commissioning of a utilities metering system linked to our
Building Management System (BMS), are now scheduled for
completion by November 2003.
80
70
60
50
40
During 2003, we will undertake a comprehensive energy review
in order to identify further opportunities for making savings in
the areas of water, electricity usage and effluent production.
However, plant expansion work in 2003/2004 will lead to a deterioration in our EPI until the new plant is fully operational.
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
100.00
92.50
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1999–2002
EPI
Tayto Limited
Tayto is fully committed to a programme of energy conservation
and energy management, as evidenced by its Corporate Social
Responsibility Programme, which is integrated into all aspects of
the company’s business activities.
100
90
80
One example of a recently implemented on-site energy conservation measure was the installation of a network of sub-metering
points in the plant’s production area, which supply detailed
information on gas and electricity usage to the Energy
Management Team.
70
60
50
40
In the year ahead, we have an ambitious target to cut energy consumption by 7.5%. By achieving this reduction, we will also be
reducing CO2 emissions per unit of production output.
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
75.76
55.61
52.83
Y EA R
BASE YEAR 2002
EPI
–
100
90
80
70
60
Thermo King Europe
Our EPI improved in 2002 as a result of reducing our usage of
electricity, gas oil and LPG, and increasing our manufacturing
production output. Among the factors responsible for delivering
considerable energy savings were lower electricity consumption
following the outsourcing of sheet metal fabrication, and the
replacement of our main air compressor with a machine equipped with variable-speed drive. Our EPI for 2002 was 55.61, compared with 75.76 for 2001.
A pilot project to install intelligent lighting has yielded promising returns. Due to the energy savings achieved, plans are now in
place to convert the rest of the factory to this system in early
2003. We are predicting reductions of 67% in the energy used for
lighting, which will be achieved by maximising space occupancy
and using both ambient light level sensors and automatic dimming. Another energy-saving initiative for 2003 will involve
installing automatic steam valves in the plant heating system.
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
84
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
EPI
153.89
118.43
112.51
–
Transitions Optical Ltd
Our production volumes increased significantly in 2002. This factor, combined with a range of energy-saving initiatives, resulted
in a decrease of more than 20% in electricity consumption per
unit of production output. Our EPI improved from 153.89 in 2001
to 118.43 in 2002.
160
140
120
Despite our success in achieving this decrease, we believe that
opportunities exist for making even greater progress. The installation of a plant-wide energy-monitoring system during 2002
has ensured that we will be in a strong position to generate even
bigger energy reductions in the future, thereby further improving our EPI.
100
80
60
40
20
0
01
02
03
100.05
163.63
163.63
Y EA R
Planned projects for 2003 include a further increase in temperature
and humidity specifications in process areas; introducing reduced
air changes in cleanroom areas; carrying out a compressed air leaks
study; and fitting variable-speed drives on AHUs. The combined
effect of these should be an EPI for 2003 of around 112.
EPI TREND 1998–2002
EPI
+
Tyco Healthcare, Athlone
Our EPI profile changed in 2002 following the transfer of a high
unit-volume, low-cost medical product range to a sister plant
within the Tyco group in Ireland. Production output at our
Athlone plant was also artificially suppressed during the year
by inventory reductions in our global supply chain.
180
160
140
Working off this new baseline, we are aiming to maintain our EPI
at the 2002 level, as sales volumes are unlikely to rise in 2003.
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1996–2002
EPI
76.72
74.90
74.52
–
Tyco Healthcare, Mulhuddart
2002 was another very successful year for the company. While
production volumes increased, overall energy usage on a per unit
output basis decreased significantly and we achieved a 2-point
reduction in our EPI.
100
During the year, a number of conservation measures were adopted to optimise energy utilisation across a range of operations
including manufacturing, utilities and services. These measures
included the completion of a major Six Sigma project, which
resulted in significant reduction in water usage on site. This has
contributed indirectly to energy savings on pumping and wastewater treatment.
90
80
70
60
50
Utilisation of electricity improved by approximately 3.5%, while
utilisation of boiler fuel improved by 1.7%, thereby giving a combined energy utilisation improvement of approximately 2% for
the year.
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
EPI TREND 1995–2002
Large Industry Energy Network
03
Y EA R
As part of our participation in the Sustainable Energy Ireland
pilot programme on negotiated energy agreements, a full thermal
audit was carried out by external consultants during the year.
The recommendations made on foot of that audit will form the
basis for further energy-saving investments in 2003 and beyond.
Annual Report 2002
85
3.3 Members‘ Graphs & Statements
EPI
95.84
111.67
Key to graphs: page 57
111.67
+
Unifi Textured Yarns Europe Ltd
Despite the range of energy-saving initiatives that we have had in
place for several years, our EPI disimproved from 95.84 in 2001 to
111.67 in 2002. This was caused by the continuing downward
trend in the plant’s annual production output, which dropped by
13.4% between 2001 and 2002. As production output decreased,
energy usage per tonne increased.
120
110
100
90
80
While a 3.3% reduction in heavy fuel oil consumption in 2002
did have a positive impact, it was insufficient to counteract the
negative effect of the drop in production output, due to our high
base load requirement for steam. The plant will be undergoing
a restructuring programme during 2003, and this will lead to
a further reduction in production output.
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
43.40
95.85
92.02
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
+
On a more positive note, we will be proceeding with a number
of additional energy-saving projects in 2003 and beyond. These
will include the installation of variable- speed drives on selected
air-conditioning units, which will have a potential payback period of less than 12 months. We will also be using ‘off-gas’ from
an anaerobic digester unit to reduce heavy fuel oil consumption
in steam boilers, and we will be carrying out a review of plant
lighting levels. Finally, we plan to commission a site-wide
energy audit by independent specialists.
100
90
Waterford Crystal Ltd
80
Due to events of September 11, 2001, and the more general slowdown in the US economy, 2002 was a tough year for Waterford
Crystal. As a result of a significant reduction in business, a number of cost-cutting measures were introduced throughout the
plant. We had three unplanned weeks of closure for both plants,
and capital expenditure was curtailed.
70
60
50
40
Those capital projects with the shortest payback periods took
priority, and therefore most of the planned energy efficiency projects were postponed. Although business remains slow, a number
of these projects were given the green light for 2003 and we
expect to complete them.
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
Wellman International Ltd
EPI
101.66
93.67
93.76
+
110
100
90
80
We achieved an improvement of 7.9% on our EPI for 2002 due
to the introduction of a number of energy-saving initiatives. For
example, with the aid of ultrasonic equipment, we are now able
to identify and repair steam trap faults and compressed air leaks,
on an ongoing basis. In addition, flash steam from condensate
return is now being used to heat process water; a polymer dryer
has been insulated with 150 mm of non-combustible material;
and extruder barrels have been lagged to reduce heat loss.
These measures along with projects planned for 2003 such as
adding compressed air meters and incorporating them into a
Building Energy Management System (BEMS); installing a second
110 kW (810 CFM) screw compressor, and improving steam line
and dryer insulation are a clear indication of the company’s continuing commitment to saving energy and the resulting environmental impact.
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
86
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
EPI
100.42
89.37
92.05
–
Wessel Energy Cables Ltd
Manufacturing output from the factory increased by 19% in
2002. This led to a greatly enhanced EPI, due to improved energyto-output ratios. Our EPI was further improved as a result of the
introduction on one production line of a new plastic compound
that requires significantly less processing energy.
100
90
80
70
We are anticipating a slight decrease in production output in
2003 due to a reduction in customer requirements; this will in
turn create a negative impact on our EPI. However, this impact
will be offset somewhat by introducing the previously mentioned new plastic compound on a second production line. This
will eliminate the need for our natural-gas-powered steam boiler.
60
50
40
30
Among a number of future energy-saving initiatives, we are considering replacing the existing fixed-speed compressors on the
factory floor with a variable-speed model.
20
10
0
01
02
03
97.13
99.66
99.66
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
+
100
90
80
70
Western Proteins
Despite our close attention to energy efficiency through the year,
we recorded a disimprovement in our EPI from 97.13 in 2001 to
99.66 in 2002. The context for this deterioration was a fall in
overall throughput and increased investments in necessary environmental controls.
However, we did achieve efficiencies as a result of commissioning the Condensate Recovery System; the implementation of
tight operational controls at both start-up and shutdown periods;
fewer stoppages for maintenance purposes, and the installation
of automated controls on aeration equipment during the last
quarter of 2002.
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
EPI TREND 2000–2002
03
Y EA R
The Condensate Recovery System, along with the use of electricity conservation devices, and improvements to operational logistics – including the introduction of a controlled programme to
reduce the moisture content of raw materials processed – will
lead to efficiency improvements in 2003. We also participated
in Sustainable Energy Ireland’s negotiated agreement pilot programme, which included a comprehensive energy audit of our
site.
Planned projects include the installation of a ‘cleaning-in-place’
unit for tallow sterilisation, which should provide heat transfer
efficiencies as a spin-off benefit; and the installation of additional
inverters and oxygen meters, which are designed to improve the
operational efficiency of the wastewater treatment plant.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
87
3.3 Members‘ Graphs & Statements
EPI
84.56
87.66
Key to graphs: page 57
87.66
+
Wyeth Medica Ireland Ltd
While our electricity consumption rose by 2.3% during 2002,
overall energy usage actually decreased by 8.7%. This was attributable to a 13.25% reduction in natural gas consumption, following our decision to shut down the CHP unit for a nine-hour period during each nightshift, due to a 62.5% increase in gas prices in
January 2002. The overall result in 2002 was a slight increase in
our EPI, from a 2001 figure of 84.56 to 87.66 in 2002.
100
90
80
70
60
We expect energy consumption to rise next year, as several major
expansion projects are nearing completion. However, had it not
been for the range of energy-efficient equipment such as variablespeed drives, motors and lighting now installed throughout the
newly constructed areas of the plant, it is likely that energy consumption would be even higher in 2003 and future years.
50
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
145.30
119.07
115.50
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
–
We have started to implement further energy-saving projects, as
recommended by the energy survey carried out in conjunction
with Sustainable Energy Ireland’s negotiated energy agreements
pilot programme. We expect that the completion of these projects will result in future reductions in our EPI.
Yamanouchi Ireland Co. Ltd
Continuing the strong performance of previous years,
Yamanouchi Ireland’s EPI again improved dramatically in 2002,
from 145.30 in 2001 to 119.07.
180
160
140
The 20% decrease in energy consumption was primarily due to
non-operation of the waste disposal facility for a three-month
period during the year.
120
100
Energy usage continues to be an important element of
Yamanouchi’s environmental management policy for the
Mulhuddart site, and it is reported as part of our EcoManagement and Audit Scheme (EMAS) statement.
80
60
40
20
0
01
02
03
100
99.00
Y EA R
EPI TREND 1995–2002
EPI
3Com Technologies
Although we are newcomers to the Large Industry Energy
Network, we have had a programme of energy-saving initiatives
in place for several years.
100
90
In 2000, we set out to achieve a 5% energy cost saving for the
period November 2000 to November 2001. However, we actually
achieved a 31% saving, mainly through optimising the running
times of air-handling units, boiler plant pumps, equipment and
lighting.
80
70
60
50
Further initiatives introduced in 2002 were aimed at maintaining energy usage at the levels achieved by the 2000/2001 energysaving programme. Also during 2002, we focused on increasing
energy awareness; monitoring our energy-to-output ratio; and
communicating our energy management programmes to local
SME suppliers.
40
30
20
10
0
01
02
03
Y EA R
An independent energy audit carried out by the ESB during the
year verified the efficient use of energy at 3Com.
BASE YEAR 2002
Unfortunately, the site is now planned to close at the end of 2003.
88
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
3.4 The LIEN Objectives and Contact Details
For the members of the Large Industry Energy Network, the primary objectives are to
adopt a responsible approach to managing energy use, and to minimise their energy bills.
For Sustainable Energy Ireland, the objectives are somewhat broader than that; the principal
current objectives of the LIEN include the following:
1 To develop a core of major players within Irish industry
who are publicly and proactively committed to an ongoing
voluntary programme of energy and emissions reduction.
2 To create a network of companies which are willing to share
knowledge and experience with one another in order to
maximise the energy savings that are possible.
3 To contribute to the competitiveness of Irish industry by
assisting in reducing energy costs to a minimum, using the
most effective means available.
4 To engage not less than 33 per cent of the overall Irish
industry spend on energy in active energy management.
5 To achieve overall energy cost savings, within the members
of the Network, and to reduce emissions to the environment.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
89
The LIEN contact details:
Orla Thornton
Fiona Murray
Membership Support Assistant
Project Manager
t +353 1 808 2087
t +353 1 808 2098
e [email protected]
e [email protected]
w www.sei.ie/lien
Section 3 Results and Analysis
3.5 Member Listing
Abbott Ireland, Cavan
Irish Shell Ltd
Aer Rianta, Dublin
Irish Sugar Ltd
Allergan Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Janssen Pharmaceutical Ltd
Analog Devices BV
Klinge Pharma
Atlas Aluminium
Kostal Ireland GmbH
Aughinish Alumina
Lakeland Dairies, Bailieboro
Bausch & Lomb Ireland
LEO Pharma
Baxter Healthcare S.A.
Lisheen Mine
Boston Scientific Ireland Ltd, Galway
Masonite Ireland
Braun Oral-B Ireland Ltd
Merck Sharp & Dohme (Ireland)
Bristol-Myers Squibb, Swords
Micro-Bio Ireland Ltd, Fermoy
Buckeye Technologies Ireland Ltd
NEC Semiconductors Ireland Ltd
Cadbury Ireland Ltd, Dublin
Novartis Ringaskiddy Ltd
Cadbury Ireland Ltd, Kerry
Outokumpu (Tara Mines) Limited
Cantrell & Cochrane Ltd, Cork
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Little Island
Cantrell & Cochrane Ltd, Dublin
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Loughbeg API
Carbery Milk Products Ltd
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Ringaskiddy
Cognis Ireland Ltd
Premier Periclase Ltd
ConocoPhillips, Whitegate Refinery
Pure Fresh Dairies Ltd
Dairygold Co-op Society
Roche Ireland Ltd
Dawn Meats, Ballyhaunis
Saehan Media Ireland Ltd
Diageo Ireland, St James's Gate
Schering-Plough (Avondale) Co.
Dundalk Brewery
Schering-Plough (Brinny) Co.
Elan Pharma
SerCom Solutions
Element Six Ltd
Smurfit Paper Mills Ltd
Eli Lilly S.A. - Irish Branch
St Francis Abbey Brewery
Fruitfield Foods Ltd
Takeda Ireland Ltd
Garrett Engine Boosting Systems
Tayto Limited
Glanbia Ingredients, Virginia
Thermo King Europe
Glanbia Meats, Roscrea
Transitions Optical Ltd
Glanbia Meats, Ruskey
Tyco Healthcare, Athlone
Glanbia Plc, Ballyragget
Tyco Healthcare, Mulhuddart
Glanbia Plc, Inch
Unifi Textured Yarns Europe Ltd
GlaxoSmithKline, Cork
Waterford Crystal Ltd
GlaxoSmithKline, Dungarvan
Wellman International Ltd
Gypsum Industries Ltd
Wessel Energy Cables Ltd
HJ Heinz
Western Proteins
Hewlett-Packard (Manufacturing) Ltd
Wyeth Medica Ireland Ltd
IBM Technology Campus
Yamanouchi Ireland Co. Ltd
Intel Ireland Ltd
3Com Technologies
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
91
Section 3 Results and Analysis
3.6 Useful Sources of Information
Irish Websites:
Board Gáis Eireann
www.bge.ie
Commission for Energy Regulation
www.cer.ie
Department of Communications, Marine & Natural Resources
www.marine.gov.ie
Department of the Environment and Local Government
www.environ.ie
Eirgrid
www.eirgrid.com
Energy Ireland 2003
www.energyireland.net
Environmental Protection Agency
www.epa.ie
ESB Energy Efficiency Information
www.esb.ie/main/energy_business/energy_intro.jsp
European Commission Representation in Ireland
www.euireland.ie/news/trans
IBEC
www.ibec.ie
Index Ireland
www.indexireland.com/business_and_finance/energy
Irish Combined Heat and Power Association
www.ichpa.ie
Northern Ireland Centre for Energy, Research & Technology
www.ulst.ac.uk/faculty/science/nicert
Sustainable Energy Ireland
www.sei.ie
European Websites:
Action Energy UK
www.actionenergy.co.uk
Cogen Europe
www.cogen.org
Combined Heat and Power Association, UK
www.chpa.co.uk
EC Cordis database
www.cordis.lu
EC Directorate General for Energy
www.europa.eu.int/comm/dgs/energy_transport/index_en.html
Energy Institute
www.energyinst.org.uk
European Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
www.eceee.org
European Energy Network
www.enr-network.org
Point Carbon
www.pointcarbon.com
International Websites:
92
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
www.aceee.org/altsites/index.htm
Business & Sustainable Development: A Global Guide
www.bsdglobal.com
Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET)
www.caddet-ee.org
Energy Star United States Environmental Protection Agency
www.energystar.gov
Environmental News Network
www.enn.com
Institute for Global Communications Energy Links
www.igc.org/econet
International Energy Agency (IEA)
www.iea.org
Sustainable Energy Development Authority, NSW
www.seda.nsw.gov.au
USA Office of Industrial Technologies
www.oit.doe.gov
World Business Council for Sustainable Development
www.wbcsd.org
World Energy Efficiency Association
www.weea.org
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2002
Designed by: Design Factory (Alan Fitzpatrick), Dublin, Ireland
Printed by: Veenman Print, Ede, The Netherlands
This report is printed on
environmentally friendly paper
Facilitated by
t +353 1 836 9080
Glasnevin
f +353 1 837 2848
Dublin 9
e [email protected]
Ireland
w www.sei.ie
Sustainable Energy Ireland is funded by the
Irish Governement under the National
Development Plan 2000-2006 with programmes
part financed by the European Union
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