July 28, 2015

Note: Anyone wishing to speak at any Planning Commission meeting is encouraged to do so. If you wish to speak, please rise and, after you have been recognized by the Chair, give your name and complete address for the record.

You will then be allowed to speak. Please note that the public testimony may be limited by the Chair and normally is not allowed after the Public Hearing is closed.

ASHLAND PLANNING COMMISSION

SPECIAL MEETING

JULY 28, 2015

AGENDA

CALL TO ORDER:

7:00 PM, Civic Center Council Chambers, 1175 E. Main Street

I.

II. ANNOUNCEMENTS

V. TYPE III LEGISLATIVE PUBLIC HEARING

A. PLANNING ACTION: PL-2013-01858

APPLICANT: City of Ashland

LOCATION: Normal Neighborhood District Boundary

REQUEST: To amend the Comprehensive Plan, Comprehensive Plan Map, Transportation

System Plan, and Ashland Land Use Ordinance to implement the Normal Neighborhood Plan.

A. Planning Commission Attendance Report

VII. ADJOURNMENT

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the Community Development office at 541-488-5305 (TTY phone is 1-800-735-2900). Notification 48 hours prior to the meeting will enable the City to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to the meeting (28 CFR 35.102-35.104

ADA Title 1).

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ASHLAND PLANNING DIVISION

STAFF REPORT

July 28, 2015

PLANNING ACTION:

PL-2013-01858

APPLICANT:

City of Ashland

LOCATION:

Normal Neighborhood District Boundary

ZONE DESIGNATION:

Jackson County RR-5 (Rural Residential 5 acres)

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN DESIGNATION:

City of Ashland Single-Family and Suburban

Residential

Jackson County Rural Residential Lands

ORDINANCE REFERENCE:

Chapter 18.3.4 Normal Neighborhood District (proposed)

STATEWIDE PLANNING GOALS:

Goal 2 Land Use Planning

Goal 14 Urbanization

OREGON REVISED STATUTES (ORS):

Chapter 197 – Comprehensive Land Use Planning

Coordination

REQUEST:

To amend the Comprehensive Plan, Comprehensive Plan Map, Transportation

System Plan, and Ashland Land Use Ordinance to implement the Normal Neighborhood Plan

.

I. Relevant Facts

A. Background - History of Application

Oregon Statewide Planning Goal 2, Land Use Planning, as well as Chapter 197 of the

Oregon Revised Statues requires a land use planning process and policy framework as a basis for all decision and actions related to use of land. Specifically, plans and implementation measures such as ordinances controlling the use and construction are permitted as measures for carrying out Comprehensive Plans.

Oregon Statewide Planning Goal 14, Urbanization, directs communities to plan for the orderly and efficient transition from rural to urban land use, to accommodate urban population and urban employment inside urban growth boundaries, to ensure efficient use of land, and to provide for livable communities. The existing

Comprehensive Plan designation for the Normal Neighborhood Plan area was

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established in 1981. The area’s development as low density residential, changes in the City’s population demographics, land availability, housing supply and type, and water resource protection standards over the decades warrant a re-evaluation of the area’s Comprehensive Plan designations in consideration of these changed conditions.

In March of 2011 the City Council directed the Community Development Department to apply for a Transportation and Growth Management (TGM) grant to prepare a master plan for the 94 acre Normal Neighborhood area, and the City’s project was selected for award in June 2011. The TGM program is a joint program of the Oregon

Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) and the Oregon

Department of Transportation (ODOT).

The City of Ashland received the TGM grant for consultant services in May 2012 to undertake the neighborhood planning process. A number of urban design, planning, engineering, environmental services and architecture firms were selected to prepare the draft plan. Consultants included Parametrix Inc, UrbsWorks Urban Design,

Joseph Readdy Architect, Qamar Architecture and Town Planning, Leland Consulting

Group housing market analysts, and Nevue Ngan Landscape Architects. The submission of preliminary draft plan materials and a revised draft plan concluded the

TGM funded portion of the project in September 2013.

The neighborhood planning process has involved considerable public involvement including a resident survey, two neighborhood meetings, three public open houses, two Planning Commission site visits, individual stakeholder meetings with property owners and nearby residents, and numerous Planning Commission, Transportation

Commission, Housing Commission, t, and City Council study sessions. The design phase of the planning process was initiated in October 2012 with a three day public design charrette, or workshop. The charrette allowed for the identification of issues and concerns, development of goals and objectives for the master plan, and creation of a conceptual neighborhood design.

The issues and opportunities identified during the first public workshop and key participants meetings, held when the project was initiated back in October 2012, were used to create the project goals and objectives as listed below:

Maximize land use efficiency by concentrating housing in a strategically located area within the City Urban Growth Boundary.

Create a development pattern of blocks and streets that supports a balanced, multi-modal transportation system that offers a full range of choices to its occupants and that supports active transportation opportunities like walking, bicycling or using transit in those areas planned for transit service;

Provide a range of housing choices and a variety of open space, public space, and green infrastructure improvements, in a way that preserves and

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Design a local street grid for the Project Area including connections to existing and planned street, pedestrian, and bicycle facilities beyond the project area that overcome the challenges to connectivity and better integrate the area into the Ashland transportation system;

Provide for pedestrian and bicycle routes and facility improvements within the plan area that will provide safe access to local schools, activities, neighborhoods, and destinations;

Apply those principles of low impact development to minimize the extent and initial cost of new infrastructure and to promote the benefits of stormwater management;

Provide developable alternatives at planned densities that will eliminate the need for expansion of the urban growth boundary; and

Reduce greenhouse gas emissions by implementing transportation and land use plans that encourage reductions in vehicle miles traveled.

Following the October 2012 charrette, plan options were developed and presented at study sessions and public open houses to obtain public input to assist the design team, city staff, and the Planning Commission to further refine the plan concept. A draft

Normal Neighborhood Plan, and draft implementing ordinances, were presented to the Planning Commission at a public hearing on March 11, 2014 and April 8, 2014 .

Following the Planning Commission’s public hearings their formal recommendations on the neighborhood plan were forwarded to the City Council ( Planning Commission

Report dated 4/22/2014 ).

The City Council held public hearings on the draft Normal Neighborhood Plan on

May 6, 2014 , May 20 th

, 2014 , and continued public testimony and deliberations to a special meeting on May 29, 2014 . At the final May 29 th

meeting the Council directed the establishment of an ad-hoc working group to examine the fundamental assumptions that were used in developing the plan, as well as conduct a more in depth review of a number of plan elements. The appointed working group included two

Planning Commissioners (Richard Kaplan, Michael Dawkins); two City Councilors

(Pam Marsh, Mike Morris), and Mayor Stromberg.

The Council directed the working group to specifically examine the following:

Housing Concentrations and Type

Regional Problem Solving (RPS) assumptions on density

The need for NN zoning; Density (units per acre)

Building height limitations (2.5 or 3-story)

Transportation

General transportation and connectivity issues; Transportation to the schools;

East-west transportation issues; Public transportation; Traffic reduction

(elimination); Improvements to East Main St.; Railroad crossing

Open space

Wetland protection & delineations.

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25% open space

Infrastructure

• water, sewer, and electric; developer driven costs

Public Input

Incorporate public input and respond accordingly

Over the course of twelve public meetings, held between June 2014 and May 2015, the working group explored each of the specific items identified by Council. A series of meetings specifically focused on housing and land use, open space and natural resources, transportation and infrastructure, and included an exercise where working group members aimed to conceptualize an alternative neighborhood plan independent of the original draft proposal. Additionally a special round table meeting was held

(September 18, 2014) where a panel was brought together to provide feedback on what they liked and disliked about the draft plan, identified barriers to agreement, and explored how the plan could be amended to work from their perspective. Panelists included a selected neighborhood representative from within the Normal

Neighborhood Plan area (Susan DeMarinis), a representative from the adjacent development’s Home Owners Associations (Bryce Anderson), a developer who represented a number of property owners (Randy Jones), and two outside experts familiar with Land Use and housing development (Alan Harper and Tom Giordano) who each had an opportunity to present their concerns and suggestions and participate in an open discussion about the draft plan.

In consideration of public input provided, and a review of the draft plan’s elements, the working group discussed a general vision for the neighborhood and formulated a summary list of recommended plan amendments ( Working Group memo dated

December 2, 2014 ) for Council’s consideration.

In formulating their recommendations the Normal Neighborhood Plan working group reviewed each of the Planning Commission’s recommendations as presented in the

Planning Commission Report dated 4/22/2014 . The working group’s recommended amendments alter the land use classifications, allowable housing densities, internal transportation network, thus differing from the plan the Planning Commission originally reviewed and had based the Commission report upon. The working group did concur with the Planning Commission’s recommendation that the conservation/open space boundaries are a neighborhood defining characteristic and should remain as presented in the original draft plan, however changed the amendment process for potential reductions of open space areas to correlate with designated wetlands. The working group recommended that the existing maximum building height of 35ft, or two and one-half stories, should be retained and to not allow an increase to 40ft, or three-stories, through a conditional use permit process as was initially recommended by the Planning Commission.

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Background Studies

To inform the neighborhood planning process a number of studies were completed and previously presented to the Planning Commission and City Council in support of this project including:

A Buildable Lands Inventory

(approved November 15, 2011- ordinance #3055) provided a basis for evaluation of the amount of available land within the City

Limits and Urban Growth Boundary.

A Housing Needs Analysis

(approved September 3, 2013 - ordinance #3085)

, summarized the types of housing that have been developed throughout the

City in the recent decades, as well as the projected needed housing based on income and population demographics.

An Executive Summary of Existing Conditions to provide background information for the Normal plan area including the results of a resident survey conducted in June-July 2012.

An analysis of five components of the neighborhood design including infrastructure, mobility, sustainability, open space and greenways, and housing and land use. o

Infrastructure Framework o

Sustainability Framework o

Mobility Framework o

Greenway and Open space Framework o

Housing and Land Use Framework

The traffic engineering firm SCJ Alliance completed an Existing Traffic

Conditions technical memorandum (dated September 5, 2012) , and a Future

Traffic Analysis (dated November 19, 2013) to investigate current and future traffic conditions in the Normal Neighborhood Plan study area.

B. Detailed Description of the Site and Proposal

The Normal Neighborhood Plan District is situated between East Main Street to the north and the railroad tracks to the south, Clay Street to the east and the Ashland

Middle School to the west. Currently, the 94 acre area has a mix of Comprehensive

Plan designations including single family residential and suburban residential, and is presently outside the City of Ashland (City) city limits but within the City Urban

Growth Boundary (UGB).

This area constitutes the largest remaining area of residentially designated land that is suitable for medium- to high-density development which remains largely vacant or redevelopable. The plan area contains 35 properties ranging in size between 0.38 acres up to 9.96 acres. There are 26 property owners within the plan area with a number owning multiple parcels. Residential development in the plan area has

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historically been low density large lot single family homes consistent with Jackson

County’s rural residential zoning standards.

The Normal Neighborhood Plan District includes significant natural features including Cemetery Creek, Clay Creek, and three designated wetlands (W9,W12,

W4) that are included on the City of Ashland 2007 Local Wetland Inventory (LWI).

The local wetland inventory was approved by the Department of State Lands (DSL) which means the LWI is part of the Statewide Wetland Inventory. During the course of this project property owners have completed new wetland delineations for two of the three significant wetlands within the project area (W12 & W4). These new delineations for W4 and W12 were recently approved by DSL ( WD-2014-0255 &

WD-2014-0269 ) effectively reducing the areas that are regulated as wetlands at this point in time. The last remaining large wetland (W9) within the project area is located on multiple properties adjacent to Ashland Middle School. Staff understands that one of the property owners (Grace Point Church) has recently conducted a study of the W9 wetland on their property. This delineation has been submitted to DSL for review but has yet to be approved. Approved wetland delineations are only valid for five years from the date of DSL’s approval. Therefore, with any annexation proposal the City of Ashland will require demonstration that DSL has approved a formal delineation within 5 years of the application.

The

Normal Neighborhood Plan

is comprised of Normal Neighborhood Plan

Framework document, official Normal Neighborhood Plan maps, amendments to the

Transportation System Plan and street standards, and the proposed Normal

Neighborhood District land use ordinance amendments (Ch. 18-3.4). Collectively these documents provide the underlying conceptual and regulatory structure for area’s future development. Development of this area is expected to occur in an incremental way, as individual parcels propose annexation for specific housing developments. An adopted neighborhood plan allows individual development proposals to better coordinate the provision of streets, pedestrian connections, utilities, storm water management, and open space. Such an approach can ultimately help reduce development costs through appropriate sizing of needed facilities, provision of easements, and secured street access. Additionally a significant benefit of an adopted plan is a clear expectation and understanding regarding the level of development anticipated by both developers and neighboring residents. In this way the development and annexation process for all properties with the plan area is streamlined while ensuring the City can accommodate its future growth in a systematic and efficient manner.

The proposal involves Comprehensive Plan Map amendments, Transportation System

Plan amendments, as well as amendments to the proposed Ashland Unified Land Use

Ordinance (ULUO). The proposed implementation plan includes:

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Adopting the Normal Neighborhood Plan Framework document as a supporting document to the City’s Comprehensive Plan and designation of the Normal Neighborhood District within the Comprehensive Plan map.

Adoption of official Normal Neighborhood Plan maps: o

Land Use Designations Map (NN-1-5, NN-1-3.5, NN-1-3.5-C, NN-2) o

Street Network o

Pedestrian and Bicycle Network o

Street network: Green Streets o

Open Space Network

Amending the Transportation System Plan (TSP) as follows: o

Amend the Street Dedication Map (TSP Figure 10-1) to incorporate the plan area’s proposed Street Network, and reclassification of

Normal “Avenue” to be a Neighborhood Collector. o

Amend the Planned Intersection and Roadway Improvement Map

(TSP Figure 10-3) to include East Main Street as a Planned Roadway

Project. o

Amend the Planned Bikeway Network Map to incorporate the planned multiuse trails within the Normal Neighborhood Plan.

Amend the Street Standards (18.4.6) to add a new Shared Street classification.

Amending the Land Use Ordinance to include a new Chapter 18.3.4 Normal

Neighborhood District, to guide and direct both public and private improvements. Additionally, amendments to Chapter 18.2.1.020 and

18.2.1.040 are proposed to provide reference to, and consistency with, the

Normal Neighborhood District.

II. Project Impact

A. Approval Process and Noticing

The proposal involves Comprehensive Plan and Transportation System Plan amendments, as well as additions and revisions to the Ashland Land Use Ordinance necessary to implement the Normal Neighborhood Plan. The Planning Commission makes a recommendation on the package of amendments, and the City Council makes the final decision.

Approximately 200 written notices (postcards) were mailed to property owners in and surrounding the Normal Neighborhood District boundary regarding the Planning

Commission public hearing (July 28, 2015) and City Council public hearing

(September 1, 2015). A notice was published in the newspaper on July 8, 2015, and a meeting announcement was emailed to residents and interested parties on July 13,

2015. Meeting announcements and plan materials are posted on the project web page www.ashland.or.us/normalplan

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B. Proposal Impact

Planned Housing Types and Land Use Designations

The proposed Normal Neighborhood District will contain four residential zones, NN-

1-5, NN-1-3.5, NN-1-3.5-C, NN-2. The use regulations and development standards set forth in the proposed land use ordinance (Ch. 18.3.4) for these zones are intended to be largely consistent with existing zoning standards within the City, while providing a significant degree of flexibility as to the form and character of individual developments. Affordable housing with the plan area would be provided by future development as a condition of annexation consistent with current requirements. The

Normal Neighborhood Land Use Zones map establishes the proposed designations for the properties within the district.

NN-1-5:

The Land Use designation NN-1-5 is intended to provide single family dwellings, accessory residential units, and cottage housing with a base density of 4.5 units per acre. The draft ordinance includes a reserved section for the “cottage housing” type to be consistent with standards to be proposed under a separate legislative planning action for all single family zones within the city.

NN-1-3.5

The NN-1-3.5 designation provides housing opportunities for individual households through development of a mix of single-dwelling housing, apartments, townhomes, accessory residential units, and pedestrian oriented clustered housing with a base density of 7.2 units per acre. Clustered housing, commonly referred to as “pocket neighborhoods”, are a new housing type envisioned for the plan area where multiple compact detached or attached dwellings are grouped around common open space. The Normal Neighborhood Plan, and draft land use ordinance amendments, include example illustrations primarily intended to assist those involved in conceptualizing a development to better address the principle objectives outlined within the Normal Neighborhood Plan. Through the consolidation of common open space and or parking cluster housing developments can often achieve a housing density comparable to attached row houses or low-rise apartments, yet with a lower profile retaining the appearance of traditional single-family homes.

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NN-2

The NN-2 land use designation is intended to address Ashland’s housing needs through development of multi-dwelling housing with a base density of 13.5 units per acre.

NN-1-3.5-C

The NN-1-3.5-C zone is a residential designation consistent with NN-1-3.5

(above), however it would additionally allow for limited neighborhood serving commercial uses, such as a coffee shop, on the ground floor.

Upon review of the initial draft of the plan on March 27, 2014 , The Housing and

Human Services Commission expressed that they felt strongly that this area is a major source of future growth in the City. The Commission specifically noted that affordable housing is an important component of our City, and will be integral to future development of this neighborhood. This plan and code maintain the City’s existing density bonuses and annexation requirements for the provision of affordable housing units. In addition, the Neighborhood Plan, and proposed Land Use

Ordinance, encourage more diversity in housing and increased intensity of development in those areas where the context and capacity for density is most appropriate. The result should be increases in housing supply, housing options, and housing affordability. The various land use designations, and flexibility in housing types permitted, create a complete neighborhood, accessible to a full range of ages and abilities. There will be units for sale or rent; small, and large; and attached and detached units.

Greenway and Open Space

The plan’s approach to the greenway and open space framework is establish designated open space areas to include both water resource protection areas and recreational open space. As proposed these areas are to include FEMA’s 100 year floodplain, Ashland’s designated floodplain boundaries, wetlands identified in the

2007 Local Wetland Inventory (LWI), and wetland and riparian buffer areas identified in the Water Resource Protection Zone ordinance. Precluding development in these areas will reduce or prevent the detrimental effects of flood waters, support native vegetation, provide habitat and travel corridors for wildlife, and promote environmental quality by absorbing, storing, and releasing storm water. The Open

Space Network Map shows the areas intended to be preserved as natural areas or open space within the district which absent of any environmental constraints could additionally provide recreational amenities to the districts residents. In the future event that a Department of State Lands approved wetland delineation differs from the boundaries presented in the 2007 LWI, and Normal Neighborhood Plan Open Space map, an applicant could apply for a minor plan amendment to alter the boundary to reflect the then current delineation.

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Clay Creek and Cemetery Creek are contained within designated open spaces which include all areas within the FEMA 100 year floodplain, City of Ashland Floodplain, and regulated riparian areas. Streams and wetlands will be maintained as amenities with access to area residents due to the carefully considered transportation network that ensures that these areas are not hidden in back yards. Accommodation of the pedestrian, bicycle, and automobile circulation along the edges of the riparian zones and designated wetlands provides visual and physical access and increases the buffer zones between pockets of development enhancing the character of openness within the plan area.

Transportation

The Normal Neighborhood Plan includes a transportation framework that would be implemented by the proposed amendments to the Transportation System Plan (TSP) and Normal Neighborhood District Standards. The mobility section or the Normal

Neighborhood Plan Framework includes a street network, a pedestrian and bicycle framework, and a green street framework. The general location of future roads and paths is addressed by the Normal Neighborhood Plan Street Network Map, although design and engineering at the time of the actual development will determine their precise locations. The proposed Street Network additionally includes designations for streets within the plan area that are to be developed as “green streets” designed to capture and treat storm water in conformance with the City of Ashland Storm

Water Master Plan. The proposed street network would amend to the TSP’s Street

Dedication Map (Figure 10-1) for the Normal Neighborhood District area.

The Pedestrian and Bicycle Network map includes facilities incorporated into the streets, as well as off-road multi-use paths including the establishment of two paths crossings Cemetery Creek, paths or shared streets along the west side of Cemetery

Creek, a path connecting the terminus of the existing Normal Avenue to East main

Street, and a connection from the plan area to the eastern boundary of the Ashland

Middle School property. The proposed multi-use paths would amend to the TSP’s

Planned Bikeway Network Map (Figure 8-1) for the Normal Neighborhood District area.

The Normal Avenue neighborhood’s internal street network has largely been designed to keep travel speeds in the range of 20 mph by introducing elements such as a planted median, small traffic circles, and subtle changes in direction at block intersections. The backbone of the street network is a re-routed neighborhood collector that extends from the southern intersection at a future improved Rail Road

Crossing, to East Main Street between Clay Creek and Cemetery Creek. Given the anticipated traffic volumes on this new road being approximately 1000 average daily trips it is not necessary that it be classified as an “Avenue” but rather a

“Neighborhood Collector” designation would suffice. Neighborhood Collectors are

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expected to accommodate 1500 to 5000 vehicle trips per day and as such this lesser classification would adequately accommodate expected use.

The Normal Neighborhood plan also introduces a street type that was recently included in the Transportation System Plan: the “shared street”. A shared street is a very low speed street where all of the functions of the transportation system coexist in the same space. There are no individual sidewalks separated from the street surface by curbs and planted medians. There are no bicycle lanes separated from the street by painted lines. The low volumes, low-speeds, narrow cross-section, and traffic calming design elements make it possible for all users safely occupy the street surface by yielding to the slowest and most vulnerable present at a given moment. The proposed amendments to the Street Design Standards within the Ashland Municipal Code

(18.4.6) codify the new shared street classification.

The use of rear lane alleys helps to reduce the extent of paved areas, and will support a complete grid of finely-grained urban blocks. These alleys will provide the primary access to garages and backyards. The specific alley locations within the designated blocks is left to future development site design considerations, subject to the maximum block length and parking access standards. As such those potential alley locations most subject to adjustment are not included in the Street Network map but it is expected that future development will provide alleys to meet access management and connectivity standards.

The Future Traffic Analysis report by SCJ Alliance found that all existing intersections in vicinity of the project are expected to continue to function within operational standards in the year 2038 at full build out of the neighborhood plan area.

The report recommended that East Main Street should be improved to comply with existing City standards, including the installation of a center turn lane at designated intersections. The improved Avenue could accommodate vehicular, pedestrian and bike traffic, and that each of the proposed street intersections with East Main Street would function within applicable operational standards according to the report.

The Planning Commission, Transportation Commission, and Working Gorup have each spent considerable time discussing the needed street improvements along East

Main Street from Walker Ave. to Clay Street. The Planning Commission had previously recommended that

“The south side of East Main Street, from Walker

Avenue to Clay Street, should be fully improved to City Street Standards prior to, or coinciding with any future annexation and development within the plan area.”.

The

Transportation Commissions most recent recommendation was that a partial improvement of East Main Street (such as full improvements 250’ on either side of a proposed intersection) could be considered to address traffic impacts demonstrated in a Traffic Impact Analysis provided “

…at a minimum, a sidewalk is to be developed between Walker and Clay Street.”

to address pedestrian and bicycle demand in the

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near term. The Normal Neighborhood Working Group had also considered that a phased approach to East Main Street improvements may be an option to consider with future annexation proposals, and that the City would consider the formation of an advance financing district to assist in acquiring full street improvements at the initiation of development within the area. The Normal Neighborhood Plan

Framework document includes the a new section ,

Advance Financing and Phasing of Public Improvements

(p30), to address this approach .

Plan Amendments

A minor and major amendment process is included in proposed section 18.4.030.C of the Normal Neighborhood District Chapter. The proposed amendment process provides flexibility to address unforeseen changes in conditions such as shifts in demand for types of uses, and physical or natural constraint challenges in individual developments.

Major amendments provide for a change in a land use overlay or allowable density, modification of the street layout plan or other transportation facility that eliminates a proposed street, a change in the applicable standards, and any other changes not listed.

Minor amendments include shifting the location of streets, alleys or paths more than 50 feet, adjustments to the boundaries of designated Open Space

Areas to correspond with a delineated wetland or water resource protection zone, and changes in dimensional standard requirements not including building height and residential density.

C. Discussion Items

The attached Normal Neighborhood Plan maps, Framework Document, and draft land use ordinance (18.3.4), have each been revised to address the recommendations of the Normal Neighborhood working group and the Planning Commission recommendations put forth in April 2014. A summary of the highlights of the latest revisions as follows.

A change in the zoning designations to provide densities consistent with existing city zones

Relocation of proposed zoning areas to locate the higher density area to the south of the project area.

Designation of open space lands on the Land Use Designation Map.

Provisions allowing the transfer of housing density out of the water resource protection zones.

Establishment of a minor amendment process to allow proposed open space locations to be moved, or reduced in area, to correlate with natural features

(future wetland locations and boundaries).

Flexibility to allow shared streets to alternatively be developed as alleys or multiuse paths where appropriate adjacent to water protection zones.

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Inclusion of mandatory standards relating to storm water management.

Alignment of streets and zoning to provide direct East-west connections with a more grid-like street pattern while aiming to locate new streets along existing property lines.

The inclusion of “neighborhood module” illustrations within the plan framework to provide general examples of characteristics that would help make a neighborhood module successful including a diversity of housing types accessible to a range of ages, family sizes, and income levels, common center greens and community gardens, and alley accessed parking areas.

III. Procedural – Required Burden of Proof

18.5 Application Review Procedures and Approval Criteria

18.5.9.010 Purpose

This chapter contains the procedure for amending the Comprehensive Plan, Zoning and Land Use Control

Maps, and Land Use Ordinance.

18.5.9.020 Applicability and Review Procedure

Applications for Plan Amendments and Zone Changes are as follows:

A. Type II. The Type II procedure is used for applications involving zoning map amendments consistent with the Comprehensive Plan map, and minor map amendments or corrections. Amendments under this section may be approved if in compliance with the Comprehensive Plan and the application demonstrates that one or more of the following.

1. The change implements a public need, other than the provision of affordable housing, supported by the Comprehensive Plan.

2. A substantial change in circumstances has occurred since the existing zoning or Plan designation was proposed, necessitating the need to adjust to the changed circumstances.

3. Circumstances relating to the general public welfare exist that require such an action.

4. Proposed increases in residential zoning density resulting from a change from one zoning district to another zoning district, will provide 25 percent of the proposed base density as affordable housing consistent with the approval standards set forth in subsection 18.5.8.050.G.

5. Increases in residential zoning density of four units or greater on commercial, employment, or industrial zoned lands (i.e., Residential Overlay), will not negatively impact the City's commercial and industrial land supply as required in the Comprehensive Plan, and will provide 25 percent of the proposed base density as affordable housing consistent with the approval standards set forth in subsection 18.5.8.050.G.

6. The total number of affordable units described in 18.5.9.020.A, subsections 4 or 5, above, shall be determined by rounding down fractional answers to the nearest whole unit. A deed restriction, or similar legal instrument, shall be used to guarantee compliance with affordable criteria for a period of not less than 60 years. 18.5.9.020.A, subsections 4 and 5 do not apply to Council initiated actions.

B. Type III. It may be necessary from time to time to make legislative amendments in order to conform with the Comprehensive Plan or to meet other changes in circumstances or conditions. The Type III procedure applies to the creation, revision, or large-scale implementation of public policy requiring City Council approval and enactment of an ordinance; this includes adoption of regulations, zone changes for large areas, zone changes requiring comprehensive plan amendment, comprehensive plan map or text amendment, annexations (see chapter 18.5.8 for annexation information), and urban growth boundary amendments. The following planning actions shall be subject to the Type III procedure.

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1. Zone changes or amendments to the Zoning Map or other official maps, except where minor amendments or corrections may be processed through the Type II procedure pursuant to subsection 18.5.9.020.A, above.

2. Comprehensive Plan changes, including text and map changes or changes to other official maps.

3. Land Use Ordinance amendments.

4. Urban Growth Boundary amendments.

IV. Conclusions and Recommendations

The planning process which resulted in the Normal neighborhood Plan involved a wide variety of participants including the general public, property owners and neighboring residents. Staff believes the revisions that have been made in the development of the implementation package over the last 2 years have refined and improved the neighborhood plan, and are largely consistent with the original plan goals and objectives.

Staff recommends the Transportation System Plan be amended to incorporate the Normal

Neighborhood Street network as proposed. Upon review of the Normal Neighborhood

Plan on April 23, 2015 the Transportation Commission recommended approval of the

Street Network and Pedestrian and Bicycle Network as follows:

Accept the presented revised plan as an amendment of the TSP with the following conditions:

1 ) Should the development occur along East Main, at a minimum, a sidewalk is to be developed between Walker and Clay Street.

2 ) Should the development occur along the railroad tracks, at a minimum, the railroad crossing needs to be completed.

Staff recommends approval of the Comprehensive Plan Map amendments, adoption of the official Normal Neighborhood Plan Maps, and adoption of the Normal Neighborhood

Plan Framework as a technical supporting document of the Comprehensive Plan.

Staff recommends approval of the Land Use Ordinance amendments as presented.

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Applicant: City of Ashland

16

Ashland Planning Division – Staff Report bg

Page 14 of 16

ATTACHMENTS

Ordinance #1

– Comprehensive Plan amendments o

Exhibit A (introduction amendment) o

Exhibit B (framework document) o

Exhibit C (map)

Ordinance #2

– Transportation System Plan and Street Design Standards amendments o

Exhibit A (Street Network Map) o

Exhibit B (Pedestrian and Bicycle Network Map)

Ordinance #3

– Land Use Ordinance (Ch 18) amendments o Exhibit A (Normal Neighborhood District Land Use Ordinance)

Planning Commission Report (4/22/2014 )

Working Group memo dated (12/2/2014 )

Electronic Attachments (links)

Working Group Meeting Minutes: o

5/21/2015 o

5/7/2015 o

4/15/2015 o

11/20/2014 o

10/23/2014 o

10/09/2014 o

9/18/2014 o

9/4/2014 o

8/21/2014 o

7/24/2014 o

7/10/2014 o

6/19/2014

Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes o

4/23/2015

Housing and Human Services Commission Meeting Minutes o

3/27/2014

Existing Traffic Conditions technical memorandum (dated September 5, 2012)

Future Traffic Analysis (dated November 19, 2013)

Planning Action PL#2013-01858

Applicant: City of Ashland

Ashland Planning Division – Staff Report bg

Page 15 of 16

17

Letters

Public letters submitted relating to Planning Action PL-2013-01858 , including prior iterations of the draft plan (pre-July 2015), are not physically attached to this Staff

Report, however they remain available online at www.ashland.or.us/normalplan , which includes the following electronically linked letters:

2015 2014 2013

All 2015 letters combined - PDF

All 2014 letters combined - PDF All 2013 letters combined - PDF

Vidmar letter (7/13/2015)

Vidmar letter (3/31/2015)

Miller Letter (3/23/2015)

Jones/MaharHomes letter

(11/20/2014)

Vidmar letter (11/15/2014)

ACCESS Inc. letter (11/12/2014)

Vidmar letter (10/27/2014)

Miller letter (9/29/2014)

Mahar Homes Concept Plan

(9/18/2014)

Lutz letter (9/17/2014)

Miller letter (9/12/2014

Miller letter (9/03/2014)

Boyer letter (8/20/2014)

DeMarinis letter (8/06/2014)

Boyer Letter (8/06/2014)

Vidmar letter (7/30/2014)

Breon letter (7/22/2014)

DeMarinis letter (7/22/2014)

Vidmar letter (7/21/2014)

DeMarinis letter (7/15/2014)

DeMarinis letter (5/19/2014)

Anderson letter (4/08/2014)

Grace Point letter (5/06/2014)

Livni letter (4/29/2014)

Mandell letter (5/05/2014)

Marshall Letter (04/30/2014)

Miller Letter (4/30/2014)

Neher letter (5/02/2014)

Quiett letter (5/1/2014)

Wallace letter (5/01/2014)

Seidler letter (4/30/2014)

Sharp letter (4/29/2014)

Jacobson letter (4/27/2014)

Arsac letter (4/29/2014)

Brannan letter (5/04/2014)

Gerschler letter (5/04/2014)

Open City Hall public comments

(3/5/14)

GracePoint letter (3/11/2014)

Anderson Letter (3/11/2014)

Skuratowicz letter (3/11/2014)

Hunter letter ( 2/25/14)

DeMarinis letter and exhibits

(10/31/2013)

DeMarinis letter and exhibits (10/8/2013)

Meadowbrook Home Owners

(Anderson) letter and exhibits

(10/8/2013)

Ashland Meadows

(Skuratowicz) letter

(10/8/2013)

Koopman letter and exhibits

(10/8/2013)

Lutz letter (9/26/2013)

Vidmar letter (7/29/2013)

Carse letter (6/27/2013)

Gracepoint letter (6/12/2013)

Vidmar letter (4/26/2013)

Shore letter (4/10/2013)

Marshall letter (4/10/2013)

Horn letter (3/05/2013)

Filson letter (2/25/2013)

Vidmar letter (2/25/2013)

Planning Action PL#2013-01858

Applicant: City of Ashland

Ashland Planning Division – Staff Report bg

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18

ORDINANCE NO. _________

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CITY OF ASHLAND COMPREHENSIVE

PLAN TO ADD A NORMAL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN DESIGNATION TO

CHAPTER II [INTRODUCTION AND DEFINITIONS], ADD THE NORMAL

NEIGHBORHOOD LAND CATEGORIES TO CHAPTER IV [HOUSING

ELEMENT], CHANGE THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN MAP DESIGNATION

FOR APPROXIMATELY 94 ACRES OF LAND WITHIN THE CITY OF

ASHLAND URBAN GROWTH BOUNDARY FROM SINGLE FAMILY

RESIDENTIAL AND SUBURBAN RESIDENTIAL TO THE NORMAL

NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN DESIGNATION, AND ADOPT THE NORMAL

NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN FRAMEWORK AS A SUPPORT DOCUMENT TO THE

CITY OF ASHLAND COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

Annotated to show deletions and

additions

to the code sections being modified.

Deletions are

bold lined through

and additions are in

bold underline

.

WHEREAS

, Article 2. Section 1 of the Ashland City Charter provides:

Powers of the City The City shall have all powers which the constitutions, statutes, and common law of the United States and of this State expressly or impliedly grant or allow municipalities, as fully as though this Charter specifically enumerated each of those powers, as well as all powers not inconsistent with the foregoing; and, in addition thereto, shall possess all powers hereinafter specifically granted. All the authority thereof shall have perpetual succession.

WHEREAS,

the above referenced grant of power has been interpreted as affording all legislative powers home rule constitutional provisions reserved to Oregon Cities. City of

Beaverton v. International Ass’n of Firefighters, Local 1660, Beaverton Shop 20 Or.

App. 293; 531 P 2d 730, 734 (1975); and

WHEREAS

, the City of Ashland Planning Commission considered the above-referenced recommended amendments to the Ashland Comprehensive Plan at a duly advertised public hearing on July 28, 2015 and, following deliberations, recommended approval of the amendments by a vote of __-__; and

WHEREAS

, the City Council of the City of Ashland conducted a duly advertised public hearing on the above-referenced amendments on September 1, 2015, and on

[subsequent public hearing continuance dates]; and

WHEREAS

, the City Council of the City of Ashland, following the close of the public hearing and record, deliberated and conducted first and second readings approving adoption of the Ordinance in accordance with Article 10 of the Ashland City Charter; and

WHEREAS

, the City Council of the City of Ashland has determined that in order to protect and benefit the health, safety and welfare of existing and future residents of the

City, it is necessary to amend the Ashland Comprehensive Plan in manner proposed,

19

that an adequate factual base exists for the amendments, the amendments are consistent with the comprehensive plan and that such amendments are fully supported by the record of this proceeding.

THE PEOPLE OF THE CITY OF ASHLAND DO ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS:

SECTION 1.

The above recitations are true and correct and are incorporated herein by this reference.

SECTION 2.

The City of Ashland Comprehensive Plan, Chapter II, [INTRODUCTION

AND DEFINITIONS] is hereby amended to add the following new Section [NORMAL

NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 2.04.17] and to adopt the Normal Neighborhood Plan

Framework as a supporting document to the City’s Comprehensive Plan; former Section

2.04.17 is renumbered [PLAN REVIEW 2.04.18], to read as follows:

PLAN REVIEW (2.04.17)

NORMAL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN (2.04.17)

This is a residential area that promotes a variety of housing types including single family, attached, and multi family residential, with base housing densities ranging from 4.5 to 13.5 units per acre. This area implements the Normal Neighborhood Plan Framework (2015) to accommodate future housing, neighborhood scaled business, create a system of greenways, protect and integrate existing stream corridors and natural wetlands, and enhance overall mobility by planning for a safe and connected network of streets and walking and bicycle routes.

PLAN REVIEW (2.04.18)

SECTION 3.

The City of Ashland Comprehensive Plan Appendix entitled “Technical

Reports and Supporting Documents” is attached hereto and made a part hereof as

Exhibit A.

SECTION 4.

The document entitled “The City of Ashland Normal Neighborhood Plan

Framework (2015),” attached hereto as Exhibit B, and made a part hereof by this reference is hereby added to the above-referenced Appendix to support Chapter II,

[INTRODUCTION AND DEFINITIONS] of the Comprehensive Plan.

SECTION 5.

The officially adopted City of Ashland Comprehensive Plan Map, adopted and referenced in Ashland Comprehensive Plan Chapter II [PLAN MAP 2.03.04] is hereby amended to change the Comprehensive Plan map designation of approximately

94 acres of land inside the urban growth boundary from Single Family Residential and

Suburban Residential, to the Normal Neighborhood Plan designation including designated Conservation Areas as reflected on the revised adopted Comprehensive

Plan Map, attached hereto as Exhibit C, and made a part hereof by this reference.

20

SECTION 6.

The City of Ashland Comprehensive Plan Housing Element [Chapter VI]

Estimated Land Need table [Section 6.06] is hereby amended to include the Normal

Neighborhood Land Use Categories within the table’s Land Category Key as follows:

MFR – Multi-family, High Density Residential

(R-2

, &

R-3

& NN-2

zoning)

SR - Suburban Residential

(R-1

:-

3.5

& NN-1-3.5

zoning)

SFR - Single-family Residential

(R-1

:-

5, R-1

:-

7.5, R-1

:-

10

, & NN-1-5)

LDR - Low Density Residential

(RR.5 zoning)

SECTION 7

.

Severability.

The sections, subsections, paragraphs and clauses of this ordinance are severable. The invalidity of one section, subsection, paragraph, or clause shall not affect the validity of the remaining sections, subsections, paragraphs and clauses.

SECTION 8

.

Codification.

Provisions of this Ordinance shall be incorporated in the

City Comprehensive Plan and the word “ordinance” may be changed to “code”, “article”,

“section”, or another word, and the sections of this Ordinance may be renumbered, or re-lettered, provided however that any Whereas clauses and boilerplate provisions (i.e.

Sections 1, 3-5, 7-8) need not be codified and the City Recorder is authorized to correct any cross-references and any typographical errors.

The foregoing ordinance was first read by title only in accordance with Article X,

Section 2(C) of the City Charter on the _____ day of ________________, 2015, and duly PASSED and ADOPTED this _____ day of ________________, 2015.

_______________________________

Barbara M. Christensen, City Recorder

SIGNED and APPROVED this day of , 2015.

___________________

John Stromberg, Mayor

Reviewed as to form:

_________________________

David Lohman, City Attorney

21

Exhibit A

Appendix A: Technical Reports and Supporting Documents

City of Ashland, Oregon Comprehensive Plan

Periodically, the City may choose to conduct studies and prepare technical reports to adopt by reference within the Comprehensive Plan to make available for review by the general public. These studies and reports shall not serve the purpose of creating new city policy, but rather the information, data and findings contained within the documents may constitute part of the basis on which new policies may be formulated or existing policy amended. In addition, adopted studies and reports provide a source of information that may be used to assist the community in the evaluation of local land use decisions.

Chapter II, Introduction and Definitions

The following reports are adopted by reference as a supporting document to the Ashland Comprehensive Plan,

Chapter II, Introduction and Definitions.

1. Croman Mill Site Redevelopment Plan (2008) by Ordinance 3030 on August 17, 2010

2. Normal Neighborhood Plan Framework (2015) by Ordinance____ on ______, 2015.

Chapter IV, Environmental Resources

The following reports are adopted by reference as a support document to the Ashland Comprehensive Plan,

Chapter IV, Environmental Resources.

1. City of Ashland Local Wetland Inventory and Assessment and Riparian Corridor Inventory (2005/2007) by

Ordinance 2999 on December 15, 2009.

Chapter VI, Housing Element

The following reports are adopted by reference as a support document to the Ashland Comprehensive Plan,

Chapter VI, Housing Element.

1) City of Ashland: Housing Needs Analysis (2012) by Ordinance 3085 on September 3, 2013

Chapter VII, Economy

The following reports are adopted by reference as a support document to the Ashland Comprehensive Plan,

Chapter VII, The Economy.

1. City of Ashland: Economic Opportunities Analysis (April 2007) by Ordinance 3030 on August 17, 2010

Chapter XII, Urbanization

The following reports are adopted by reference as a support document to the Ashland Comprehensive Plan,

Chapter XII, Urbanization.

1. City of Ashland: Buildable Lands Inventory (2011) by Ordinance 3055 on November 16, 2011.

22

Planning Commission Public Hearing 7/28/2015

Exhibit B

Normal Neighborhood Plan

Framework Document

July 2015

23

ii

]

Project Team

City of Ashland

Brandon Goldman, Bill Molnar

Oregon Department of Transportation

John McDonald

Parametrix

Jason Franklin, Derek Chisholm

SCJ Alliance

Anne Sylvester PTE

Urbsworks, Inc

Marcy McInelly

Joseph Readdy Architect, Inc

Joseph Readdy

Qamar Architecture & Town Planning

Laurence Qamar

Leland Consulting Group

Brian Vanneman

Nevue Ngan

Ben Ngan, Olena Turula, Jason Hirst

Giordano Architecture

Tom Giordano

Transportation and Growth Management

This project is funded by the Transportation and

Growth Management (TGM) Program, a joint program of the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development and the Oregon Department of

Transportation. This project is funded in part, by federal

Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation

Equity Act: A Legacy for Users ( ), local government, and State of Oregon funds.

The contents of this document do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the State of Oregon.

Acknowledgements

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

Adopted by Ordinance 2015-XXXX and Ordinance 2015-XXXX

[Date] 2015

Ashland City Council and Mayor

Mayor John Stromberg

Pam Marsh

Michael Morris

Greg Lemhouse

Carol Voisin

Rich Rosenthal

Stefani Seffinger

Normal Neighborhood Working Group

Mayor John Stromberg

Pam Marsh

Michael Morris

Richard Kaplan

Michael Dawkins

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N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

Table of Contents

1. INTrOduCTION

Project objectiveS exiSting conDitionS 2 concePt Plan backgrounD anD charrette 3

Five FrameWorkS 4

1

1

2. hOusINg ANd lANd use

lanD uSeS houSing tyPeS

DeveloPment StanDarDS aFForDability

3. greeNwAy ANd OPeN sPACe

natural areaS

4. MObIlITy

Street netWork active tranSPortation

Street alignment oPPortunitieS to maximize Solar orientation 17 main anD clay Street acceSS PointS tranSit Service anD tranSit StoPS

17

18

15

15

16

12

12

5

5

6

9

9

5. INfrAsTruCTure

Water

29

29

Sanitary SeWer 29

StormWater 29 i i i

6. susTAINAbIlITy 30

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list of figures

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k iv

]

fIgures

Project Study area

Wetlands and Streams charrette illustrative Plan land use zones creek Drive before and after view east main Street before and after view cluster Dwelling around a center green example multiple-Dwelling Development (nn-03) uses allowed Within nn-01 uses allowed Within nn-02 uses allowed Within nn-03 use table charrette open Space Diagram open Space network charrette mobility Sketches

Street map

Street type: normal avenue with one-Sided Parking at Wetland 19

Streettype: normal avenue with two-Sided Parking 20

Streettype Streambed crossing 21

Street type: neighborhood Queuing Street with one-Sided Parking 22

Street type: neighborhood Street with two-Sided Parking 23

12

14

16

17

10

10

11

11

8

9

6

7

4

5

2

3

Street type: neighborhood Street with Diagonal Parking

Street type: neighborhood Street with median

Street type: Shared Street

‘Street type: rear lane

Street type: multi-use Path charrette infrastructure / Stormwater Diagram

24

25

26

27

28

29

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N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

Neighborhood Vision

Neighborhood planning is the process by which the City works with Ashland’s residents to envision the future of the neighborhood. The eventual incorporation of the Normal Neighborhood Plan area into the City depends on careful consideration of the neighborhood’s unique identity and character and a holistic planning approach. The City envisions a neighborhood that is notable for the natural beauty of the area’s wetlands and creeks, mountain views, diversity of households, and as an area which accommodates bicycling and walking as a reliable and convenient way to move throughout the area.

Local streams, wetlands, and scenic vistas contribute significantly to define the character of the

Normal Neighborhood. The quality of the place is enhanced by these features and the wildlife that they attract. Connected and contiguous open spaces will remain as central features of the area’s future development as they help reflect the community of Ashland’s commitment to promote environmental quality, provide recreational opportunities, and function to incorporate nature into the daily lives of the area’s residents.

The neighborhood will provide for a range of housing choices available a diversity of Ashland’s population. The neighborhood can accommodate a blend of housing types including individual residences, townhomes, apartments, moderately sized cottages, pedestrian oriented cluster housing, and mixed-use neighborhood serving businesses. Future developments should be designed to relate to, and complement, adjacent properties. Incorporating unifying elements between adjacent developments will serve to promote neighborhood cohesiveness, provide open space in a coordinated manner, and secure an efficient circulation system. Given the immediate proximity to existing schools, parks, and local business areas the neighborhood is recognized as place where children can readily walk and bike to schools through a safe, desirable family-based neighborhood.

This neighborhood plan addresses long-term community goals, unifies expectations, and integrates the project area into the fabric of the City. The implementation standards for the neighborhood plan are intended to be strong enough to maintain the vision for the area, yet flexible enough to respond to changing conditions and adapt over time.

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Introduction

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

INTRODUCTION

Thanks to the active participation of the community and significant support from City staff, this Plan will guide future development for the Normal Neighborhood . The plan emphasizes compact urban form to better accommodate an extensive range of housing types for families of all sizes and incomes. Compact urban form also makes it possible to build upon the abundance of natural features

–streams, wetlands, and trees– that support the character of this unique place. By creating a system of greenways and protecting and enhancing existing natural features the plan anticipates a place that welcomes nature in. Despite the challenges to connectivity posed by existing conditions like the Central Oregon & Pacific Railroad tracks, the plan enhances access and mobility while reducing dependance on the automobile: walking and biking will be the attractive first choice for residents of all ages.

Project Objectives

The following project objectives were developed by the City and project partners and have been used to guide the development of this plan.

· Maximize land use efficiency by concentrating housing in a strategically located area within the City Urban Growth Boundary.

· Create a development pattern of blocks and streets that supports a balanced, multi-modal transportation system that offers a full range of choices to its occupants and that supports active transportation opportunities like walking, bicycling or using transit in those areas planned for transit service;

· Provide a range of housing choices and a variety of open space, public space, and green infrastructure improvements, in a way that preserves and enhances the area’s creeks and wetlands;

· Design a local street grid for the Project Area including connections to existing and planned street, pedestrian, and bicycle facilities beyond the project area that overcome the challenges to connectivity and better integrate the area into the Ashland transportation system;

· Provide for pedestrian and bicycle routes and facility improvements within the plan area that will provide safe access to local schools, activities, neighborhoods, and destinations;

· Apply those principles of low impact development to minimize the extent and initial cost of new infrastructure and to promote the benefits of stormwater management;

· Provide developable alternatives at planned densities that will eliminate the need for expansion of the urban growth boundary; and

· Reduce greenhouse gas emissions by implementing transportation and land use plans that encourage reductions in vehicle miles traveled.

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1

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]

existing Conditions

Located within the urban growth boundary, but not within the city limits, the site is characterized by its relative isolation from the rest of the City of Ashland. The north boundary of the project study area is East Main Street and there is currently no street within the project study area that connects to East Main Street. The west boundary of the project study area is Ashland Middle School. Informal paths that cut through private property provide connection for pedestrians from the study area to the middle school, the ScienceWorks Museum, and other neighborhoods.

The south boundary of the project is clearly delineated by the Siskiyou rail line operated by the Central Oregon & Pacific Railroad. An unprotected rail crossing connects Normal Avenue south to to an established residential neighborhood. The character of the Normal Avenue changes dramatically from a neighborhood street to a narrow lane with slow speeds that is shared by pedestrians, bicyclists, and cars.

The east boundary of the project study area abuts the Wingspread Mobile Home

Park, Creek Drive, and Clay Street.

The neighborhood’s relative isolation is widely considered an asset by most residents – most of the time. The inaccessibility provides a high degree of quiet privacy, but emergency responders have had to be occasionally inventive when trains occupy the rail line and access to Normal Avenue is interrupted: residents described an incident where emergency responders had to drive their vehicle over the informal, unpaved trail from Ashland Middle School to Normal Avenue in order to reach a resident in need. The Normal Neighborhood has a mix of

Comprehensive Plan designations including single-family residential and suburban residential, but is currently outside the City of Ashland city limits. Development in the plan area has historically been low density, single-dwelling rural residences on large lots – consistent with Jackson County zoning standards.

The Normal Neighborhood currently represents a modest level of development with a diverse range of uses from agriculture to single-dwelling residential on large lots to religious institutions. The plan area contains 35 properties with sizes between 0.38 acres up to 9.96 acres. There are currently two existing land comprehensive plan designations that overlay the 93.3 acre site: Single-Family

29

Introduction

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Introduction

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

Wetlands & Streams

0 100 300 500 north

East Main Street

Creek Drive

Stream

Wetland

Wetland Protection Zone

Low Density and Suburban Residential. The base density of Single-Family

Low Density is 4.5 units per acre; the base density of Suburban Residential is 7.2 units per acre. The gross potential for the entire neighborhood under the current comprehensive plan is 560 dwellings.

The plan area includes two creeks and three significant wetland areas.

Over time, each of the streams and all of the wetlands have been subject to negative impact from development. None represents a pristine natural condition, but each are considered significant and, once restored or enhanced, capable of making a unique and significant contribution to the quality of the place. The wetlands and riparian areas were investigated in detail and have informed the design of the new Normal Neighborhood

Plan, especially the greenway and open space framework.

The project area constitutes the largest remaining readily-developable area of residentially designated land that is suitable for medium- to high-density development.

[

3

Concept Plan background and Charrette

A central part of the development of the Normal Neighborhood Plan was a multi-day community design charrette that took place in Ashland in October 2012. Prior to the design charrette, however, the project team developed an initial Concept Plan grounded in data provided by the City of Ashland, surveys, and initial interviews with stakeholders. Researching and developing the concept plan gave the project team the opportunity critically consider the existing conditions of the site within the existing context of the city. In preparation for the Charrette, the project team investigated patterns for possible development and market conditions necessary to support development. This initial concept plan was not intended to be the preferred pattern for development but, as just one of many possible development schemes, it was used as the starting place for community discussion at an intensive multi-day planning process in

Ashland. During the four-day design charrette the design team collaborated

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N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

4

] with City staff, local property owners, their designers, and nearby residents. The

Charrette concluded with a public presentation of a new draft illustrative plan for future refinement, discussion, development, and implementation. While the initial draft concept plan informed the ultimate Normal Neighborhood

Plan, community input significantly guided the charrette draft plan which incorporated numerous new and specific elements to better address many local issues.

Both the initial discussion plan and this final draft plan were organized by five separate conceptual frameworks intended to guide analysis and investigation of existing conditions, support research and best practices, offer City staff and the public a concrete path for engaging with the plan, and guide the development of the plan.

five frameworks

· Housing and Land Use

· Greenway and Open Space

· Mobility

· Infrastructure

· Sustainability

Introduction

charrette illustrative Plan

31

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A s l a n d N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n

housing and land use

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

HOUSING AND LAND USe

The district is designed to provide an environment suitable for traditional neighborhood living, working, and recreation. The Normal

Neighborhood Plan is a blueprint for promoting a variety of housing types while preserving open spaces, stream corridors, wetlands, and other significant natural features. The neighborhood will be characterized by a connected network of streets and lanes, paths and trails, with nodes of access and connection to the natural areas, wetlands, and streams that characterize this place. This network will also connect to the larger network of regional trails, paths, and streets beyond the boundaries of the neighborhood.

[

5

Land Uses

Housing

Housing makes sense for the Normal Neighborhood because both the population and the number of households in the city are expected to continue to grow in the decades ahead. Ashland remains a very popular choice for families and retirees. The project area is connected to other residential neighborhoods with schools, retail and commercial enterprises, and parks and recreation areas. The site is close to all of

Ashland’s centers of employment including downtown. Housing is supported by the site’s comprehensive plan designations and base zoning.

While housing as a land use makes sense from both policy and market perspectives, it should be planned for and developed with an intent to create community. There is a market demand for a wide range of housing including single-family, attached housing such as townhomes, multidwelling residential, apartments, pedestrian-oriented cluster housing, senior, student, and affordable housing.

Commercial | Retail

A market analysis of the plan area shows that it is a weak location for retail. Traffic volumes in the area are currently low and the projections based upon the plan indicate that traffic volumes will continue to be low – even when the neighborhood is fully developed.

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N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

housing and land use

6

]

The plan shows the potential for approximately 450 dwelling units and around nine hundred residents, so small scale retail and commercial space, such as a coffee shop, café, restaurant, or corner store, is possible. Such neighborhood serving businesses would be located within the limited commercial overlay area zoned

NN-1-3.5-C as a component of mixed-use residential development.

Office

Office space is an unlikely choice for the Normal Neighborhood .

Demand for new office space is low in Ashland and that demand is more likely to be met in more central locations and near existing employment hubs such as the downtown, Southern Oregon University, and the Croman Mill District.

housing Types

There are four distinct residential zones within the Normal Neighborhood Plan:

NN-1-5, NN-1-3.5, NN-1-3.5-C, and NN-2, . The development standards for the Normal Neighborhood Development Plan will preserve neighborhood character by providing three different zones with different residential densities and development standards. The NN-1-5,NN-1-3.5, zones are intended to preserve land and open space and provide housing opportunities for individual households through development of single-dwelling housing. The use regulations and development standards are intended to create, maintain and promote singledwelling neighborhood character. The NN-1-3.5-C zone is also intended to primarily provide housing opportunities while allowing for limited neighborhood serving commercial uses that do not sacrifice the overall image and character of the single-dwelling neighborhood. Zone NN-2 is intended to preserve land and open space and provide housing opportunities for individual households through development of multi-dwelling housing. The use regulations and development standards are intended to create and maintain higher density residential neighborhoods. The designated openspace and conservation areas are intended to protect environmentally sensitive water resource lands and provide open space recreational opportunities for individual households throughout the Normal

Neighborhood Development Plan area.

Normal Plan Visualizations

Creek Drive illustration by tom giordano

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Normal Plan Visualizations

housing and land use

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

East Main Street

The Normal Neighborhood District Plan includes a distinct building type,

Pedestrian-Oriented Clustered Residential Units where multiple compact dwellings are grouped around common open space and promote a scale and character that is compatible with single-family homes.

Building types in the Normal Neighborhood will include:

Single Dwelling Residential Units

A Single Dwelling Residential Unit is a detached residential building that contains a single dwelling with self-contained living facilities on one lot. It is separated from adjacent dwellings by private open space in the form of side yards and backyards, and set back from the public street or common green by a front yard. Auto parking is provided in either a garage or on surface area on the same lot, accessible from the lane. The garage may be detached or attached to the dwelling structure. Single Dwelling Residential Units will be permitted in the NN-1-5, NN-1-3.5 and NN-1-3.5-C zoning districts.

Double Dwelling Residential Units

A Double Dwelling Residential Unit is a residential building that contains two dwellings, each with self-contained living facilities. In appearance, height, massing and lot placement the Double Dwelling

Residential Unit is similar or identical to a Single Dwelling Residential Unit. The

Double Dwelling Residential Unit is subject to all of the same setbacks, height and parking requirements as single dwellings in the surrounding base zone.

Residential units may be arranged side-by-side, like rowhouses, each with its own entrance, or stacked flats with one or more shared entrances. Dwelling units may be sold as condominiums or rented as apartments. Double Dwelling Residential

Units will be permitted in the NN-1-3.5, NN-1-3.5-C , and NN-2 zoning districts.

Accessory Residential Units

An Accessory Residential Unit is a small living unit located on the same lot as a single dwelling residential unit. The Accessory

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housing and land use

Normal Plan Visualizations

Residential Units may be located within the single-family residential structure or in a separate structure. Accessory Residential Units will be permitted in the NN-1-

5, NN-1-3.5 and NN-1-3.5-C zoning districts.

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Pedestrian-Oriented Clustered Residential Units

Pedestrian-Oriented

Residential Clusters are multiple dwellings grouped around common open space that promote a scale and character that is very compatible with single-family homes. Clustered Residential Units may be separated from one another by side yards that provide private open space or be attached to one or more units with shared walls. Dwelling units may be sold as condominiums, sold as dwellings on individual lots, or rented as apartments. Auto parking is typically provided in a shared surface lot, or lots, and is accessible from an alley or common driveway.

Pedestrian-Oriented Residential Clusters will be permitted in the NN-1-3.5, NN-

1-3.5-C and NN-2 zoning districts.

Attached Residential Units

Attached Residential Units, or rowhouses, are single dwellings with self-contained living facilities on one lot, attached along one or both sidewalls to an adjacent dwelling unit. Private open space may take the form of front yards, backyards, or upper level terraces. The dwelling unit may be

Cluster housing around a center green.

set back from the public street or common green by a front yard. Auto parking may be provided in a garage on the same lot, either detached or attached to the dwelling structure, and accessible from an alley. Attached Residential Units will be permitted in the NN-1-3.5, NN-1-3.5-C and

NN-2 zoning districts.

Multiple Dwelling Residential Units

Multiple Dwelling Residential Units are multiple dwellings that occupy a single building or multiple buildings on a single lot. Dwellings may take the form of attached residential units (like rowhouses) or stacked flats (like apartments) or a combination of attached and stacked units. Dwelling units may be sold as condominiums or rented as apartments. Auto parking is provided in a shared surface area or areas internal to the lot. Multiple Dwelling Residential Units will be permitted in the NN-1-3.5, NN-1-3.5-C and NN-2 zoning districts zoning districts.

Illustration by Tom Giordano

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housing and land use

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

development standards

The development standards will promote desirable residential areas by addressing aesthetically pleasing environments, safety, privacy, energy conservation, and recreational opportunities. The site development standards allow for flexibility of development while maintaining compatibility with the City’s various neighborhoods. In addition, the regulations provide certainty to property owners, developers, and neighbors about the limits of what is allowed. The development standards are generally written for houses on flat, regularly shaped lots. Other situations are addressed through special regulations or exceptions.

The plan envisions a variety of housing options through the formation of a complete neighborhood comprised of smaller interconnected neighborhood modules that fosters a strong sense of community among nearby neighbors, while preserving their need for privacy.. Although specific subdivision design issues are better addressed during a proposed development’s review process, the conceptual illustrations presented (pg 11) identify general characteristics that would make a neighborhood module successful including a diversity of housing types accessible to a range of ages, family sizes, and income levels, common center greens and community gardens, and alley accessed parking areas.

Future developments within the plan area should reflect the Ashland City Coucil goals and Comprehensive Plan priorities in providing, a variety of dwelling types, street and alley designes that promote walking and bicycling, resource conservation with reduced energy and water consumption., designed in a manner to complement and conserve the aestetic character of the neighborhood.

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housing and land use

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Development in the Normal Neighborhood should be:

1. Family-friendly, exhibiting qualities that support children and families. Family-friendly development might include these elements:

• A variety of housing sizes and types of a varying square footage

• Development in neighborhood modules built around common open space with direct links to neighborhood natural areas

• Common areas that include play equipment, sun shelter and community gardens

• Design that allows smaller homes to add a bedroom or accessory residential unit

• Front and rear porches that orient to both street frontages and common open space areas

• Aging in place design features

2. Energy efficient, exhibiting qualities that recognize conservation and new energy sources. Energy efficient units might include these elements:

• East-West orientation with pitched roofs

• Homes pre-wired for photovoltaic electric systems

• Homes pre-wired and pre-plumbed for solar water heating

• Homes built to Earth Advantage energy standards or comparable industry equivalent

• Use of overhanging eaves and front/rear porches for shade

3. Water efficient, exhibiting qualities that recognize the benefits of long term conservation practices. Water efficient units might include these elements:

• Homes pre-plumbed for grey water systems

• Homes pre-plumbed for water retention and storage

• Residences designed with low water-use landscaping

• Inclusion of drought-tolerant trees and watering systems that promote appropriate root development

• Inclusion of sun shelters to provide shade

4. Inclusive of micro-agriculture. Developments supportive of micro-agriculture might include these elements:

• Placement of a food or flower garden at each home

• Gardens pre-plumbed for drip irrigation

• Gardens designed for irrigation and shade cloth systems

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alley local street local street or alley

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k natural area preservation

The City recognizes that future innovations in building technologies, water conservation practices, and creative approaches to site design and layout will help shape the neighborhood module concept in consideration of the unique characteristics of the properties being developed. As such these example illustrations presented are primarily intended to assist those involved in conceptualizing a development to better address the principle objectives outlined within the Normal Neighborhood Plan.

Personal and community garden space alley a variety of housing types and sizes

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Solar oriented buildings common center greens visibile from adjacent consolidated parking areas

Parking accessed by alleys alley

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N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

uses Allowed in NN-1-5

baSe DenSity: 4.5 DWelling unitS Per acre

housing and land use

uses Allowed in NN-1-3.5

baSe DenSity: 7.2 DWelling unitS Per acre

uses Allowed in NN-2

baSe DenSity: 13.5 DWelling unitS Per acre

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Zone Zone

Single Dwelling

Residential Unit

NA-01 NA-01

NA-02 NA-02

NA-03 NA-03

NA-OS NA-OS

Legend Legend

use Table

For detailed use table see land use code

(chapter 18-3.13)

Permitted Permitted

Accessory Dwelling

Residential Unit

Double Dwelling

Residential Unit

Clustered Residential

Units Units

Attached Residential

Unit Unit

Multiple Dwelling

Residential Unit

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greenway and Open space

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

Affordability

Housing in Ashland is not affordable to many of its residents. This plan and code maintain the City’s existing density bonuses and annexation requirements for the provision of affordable housing units. In addition, the land will be zoned to encourage more diversity in housing and increased intensity of development in those areas where the context and capacity for density is most appropriate. The result should be increases in housing supply, housing options, and housing affordability. The plan creates a complete neighborhood, accessible to a full range of ages and abilities. There will be units for sale or rent; small, and large; and attached and detached units.

Certain elements of affordability are better addressed later in the development process. The City could later use the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and Housing Trust Fund programs to incentivize affordable housing development in the study area. These funds can help build sidewalks, trails, and other features directly associated with eligible affordable housing projects. Developers and the City can also partner with local affordable homebuilders and Community Development Corporations (CDCs) to build affordable housing.

These organizations should be very knowledgeable about developing and managing affordable housing that takes advantage of public and private funding sources such as CDBG, HOME Investment Partnership, Low Income

Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC), funding from state agencies such as the Department of Human Services (DHS),

HUD sources, and others.

GReeNWAy AND OPeN SPACe

open Space Diagram Produced at charrette

The Normal Neighborhood’s distinctive character is shaped by the presence of prominent open spaces and natural areas. The preservation of these neighborhood defining features is central to the success of the neighborhood plan as they ensure the protection of fragile ecosystems, provide passive recreational opportunities where people can connect with nature, protect scenic views considered important to the community, protect future development from flood hazards, and preserve community character and quality of life by buffering areas of development from one another. The permanent establishment of interconnected open spaces and contiguous conservation areas as proposed in the Open Space Framework is essential to promote and maintain high quality residential development which is appropriate to the distinct character of the neighborhood.

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greenway and Open space

The quality of the place is enhanced by the neighborhood’s streams, wetlands, and other environmentally sensitive features and the wildlife that they attract. In addition to protection of these existing natural resource areas, the Plan provides usable, connected open space for neighbors and residents of Ashland. In the context of the greenway and open space system, streams and wetlands are maintained as amenities for all area residents. The open space network will support the neighborhood’s distinctive character, promotes environmental quality, and provides opportunities for many forms of recreation including bird-watching, hiking, biking, and exploring.

Protected and restored, these riparian corridors and wetlands will support native vegetation, provide habitat for wildlife, and promote environmental quality by absorbing, storing, and releasing stormwater.

In order to offer all residents and visitors an opportunity to engage directly with nature, pedestrian, bicycle, and automobile circulation are accommodated beyond the edges of the stream beds and wetlands to provide visual and physical access and to increase the buffer zones between pockets of development.

Natural Areas

Water Resource Protection Areas (WRPA) are established by the City’s Land Use Ordinance. For locally significant wetlands, WRPAs include the wetland plus a 50 foot buffer, and for locally significant streams includes all lands 40’ from centerline of stream. Four areas on the site have significant natural resources including three wetlands, and two creeks. These WRPAs are:

· Wetland W9, the large wetland east of Ashland Middle School;

· Wetland W12, an isolated, linear wetland;

· Cemetery Creek and its associated wetland W4, and

· Clay Creek

The Middle School wetland (W9) is the largest wetland in Ashland urban growth boundary. It is an isolated wetland with no surface water connection to other water bodies. This wetland is significant to neighborhood development due to its size and proximity to the school. It provides an opportunity for a large open space area, and potential for outdoor education associated with the school and science learning center west of Walker Ave. It also provides an opportunity to create a distinct destination open space that will anchor the neighborhood at its west end.

Wetland (W4) is bisected by Cemetery Creek. Cemetery Creek and this associated wetland will serve as one part of the environmental north-south framework used to guide the pattern of development in the neighborhood.

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greenway and Open space

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

This stream corridor will provide valuable habitat and habitat connectivity as well as a framework for bike and pedestrian connections within the site and beyond the neighborhood.

Although the extent of Clay Creek within the project area is less than that of Cemetery Creek, it still holds the potential to be an amenity for the plan area and the city by providing connectivity.

Opportunities for restoration along Clay Creek in the plan area will provide habitat, support habitat connectivity to the north and south, provide recreation opportunities and connect pedestrians and bicyclists to the regional trail system.

The W12 wetland near the center of the project area is not associated with streams or ponds and may have been created –or intensively modified– by human activity.

Based upon community input and guidance from City staff, the project emphasizes protection of streams and wetlands first and mitigation with restoration for those degraded areas within the

WRPA protection zones to improve their utility for managing stormwater, maximize their value as habitat, and enhance their purpose as a recreational amenity for the community.

Stormwater management is critical to maintaining the health and function of the existing streams and wetlands. When stormwater is not managed it flows into streams too quickly and too hot – degrading the stream as habitat for native species and causing erosion. When stormwater is slowed and cooled by re-infiltration, stream health is restored. While streams and wetlands can function to absorb stormwater, every effort should be made to ensure that stormwater runoff is filtered and slowed before discharging into streams and wetlands. The most effective way to treat stormwater is by managing it as close to its source as possible with small, shallow

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Mobility

facilities. Impervious surfaces should be minimized; and green streets, swales and residential surface stormwater management should be maximized. The plan proposes that the required landscape strips between sidewalk and street are designed and managed as stormwater facilities wherever practicable and curb-less street sections be encouraged for those streets that abut a wetland, stream, or natural area. In addition, the Normal Neighborhood

Plan proposes that permeable paving be installed in the parking zones.

Street crossings of wetlands and streams in the east-west direction have been minimized to the extent possible.

Where stream crossings are necessary for street network connectivity, we recommend that the bridging of each stream bed be as “light” and narrow as practicable.

In addition to the greenways associated with water resource protection, the plan includes other open space features. A number of pocket parks may be proposed which help to frame scenic vistas and provide small gateways into different portions of the plan area. These small parks may include public art or small-scale active recreational opportunities for all ages. The Normal Neighborhood Plan design for open space orients new improvements in the open space framework east-west for the purpose of creating new connections across the site that support the natural north-south grain of the existing open space. The goal is to provide habitat connectivity between all wetlands and stream corridors.

MObILITy street Network

The site has been considered as an integrated system where each framework element is intended to support every other. The placement of streets was very directly influenced by the natural function of wetlands and creeks and was designed to support the full range of intended housing choices.

The vehicular circulation system proposed by the plan for the Normal Neighborhood will connect to the existing street network. The existing street network includes two functionally-classified city boulevards – Ashland Street and East Main Street. Ashland Street provides two travel lanes in each direction with signals and left turn lanes at key intersections. The Ashland Street cross-section appears to be fully built-out in most locations. East Main

Street provides a single through lane in each direction and exhibits a rural character with limited access and curbless shoulders. The eastbound lane of East Main Street should be improved as the adjacent properties along its south side increase in land use intensity. The westbound side of this street is the current Urban Growth Boundary, so no development is anticipated until such time as the lands to the north are incorporated into the UGB.

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Mobility

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

The Normal Neighborhood street network was designed with the following principles in mind:

· Street connectivity through the Normal Neighborhood Plan area will reduce travel demand on the adjacent east-west boulevards: East Main Street and Ashland Street. Connections from the Normal Neighborhood will extend to the east to Clay Street by way of Creek Drive and other future street connections.

· Walkability is supported by small blocks. The City’s street standards recommend that, where possible, block lengths be a maximum of 300 to 400 feet with a maximum perimeter of 1,200 to 1,600 feet to provide good connectivity for all modes of travel. The fabric of blocks in the Normal Neighborhood Plan were designed to these standards. Although walkability is a major focus of the plan, some variations from these standards may ultimately be required in order to fully protect natural resources.

All streets have been designed to keep travel speeds in the range of 20 mph by introducing elements such as planted medians, traffic circles, and subtle changes in direction at block intersections. Slow speeds and meandering street alignments will contribute to safety for everyone. The Normal Neighborhood Plan introduces a new street type into the range of Ashland streets: the “Shared Street.” A Shared Street is a very low speed street where all modes of transportation coexist in the same space. There are no individual sidewalks separated from the street surface by curbs and planted medians. There are no bicycle lanes separated from the street by painted lines.

The low traffic volumes, low-speeds, and narrow cross-section make it possible for all to safely occupy the street surface by yielding to the slowest and most vulnerable present at a given moment.

The use of rear lanes helps to upport a complete grid of finely-grained urban blocks. and provide access to garages and backyards. Where cottage clusters occur, alleys are critically important to their function. Elsewhere, as in those areas zoned NN-2, specific alley locations within the designated blocks is left to future development for definition, subject to the maximum block length and access management standards.

There is a synergy between the design of the street network, the stormwater management system, and the design of parks and open space. Holistic thinking and a multi-disciplinary approach to street network, stormwater, infrastructure, and parks and open space will support a more attractive and desirable neighborhood, reduce infrastructure costs, and maximize land development potential.

Active Transportation

Active transportation is fundamental to the Normal Neighborhood urban design plan. Active transportation means using human-powered transportation as a convenient choice for many of the activities of daily living.

It can also define the critical infrastructure, bike lanes and sidewalks, that communities need to promote safe mobility sketches produced at charrette

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Mobility

connections to work, school, businesses, playgrounds and green spaces. The natural act of walking and the urban form that results from making the human scale the fundamental of design are keys to the planning and development pattern. Despite the inherent boundary conditions that limit connectivity, such as Ashland

Middle School and the Central Oregon & Pacific rail line, building the transportation network on a foundation of walkability makes all modes of travel more efficient, effective, and safe.

The bicycle and pedestrian circulation systems for the Normal

Neighborhood will build upon the existing network consistent with adopted City plans and code. Existing facilities in the study area include:

· Sidewalks exist along the extent of Ashland Street and Tolman

Creek Road, and along portions of Walker Avenue and Clay

Street. East Main Street has shoulders which place pedestrians at risk as speeds are posted as 40 mph. East Main Street cannot be considered part of the pedestrian circulation network until improvements to this street include the sidewalks normally associated with urban development.

· Bicycle facilities exist along all of Ashland Street, Tolman

Creek Road and Walker Avenue. The shoulders along East

Main Street place bicyclists at risk as speeds are posted as 40 mph. East Main Street cannot be considered part of the bicycle circulation network until improvements to the street include the lower speeds and bicycle lanes normally associated with urban development.

· Existing multi-use trails in the vicinity include the Central Bike

Path along the railroad corridor that runs immediately south of the study area. The Bear Creek Greenway runs between Ashland and Central Point, currently terminating at the Ashland Dog

Park near the Helman Street/Nevada Street intersection. Trail

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Mobility

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k development and improvements are proposed for the Clay Creek corridor along the eastern boundary of the Normal Neighborhood Plan area, and the Hamilton Creek

Corridor paralleling Tolman Creek Road. Both of these proposed corridors would connect to a future proposed extension of the Bear Creek Greenway that would be located north of the Normal Neighborhood Plan area.

street Alignment Opportunities to Maximize solar exposure

The street alignment maximizes solar orientation and shading opportunities for buildings, consistent with the City’s Land Use Code. In particular, the code speaks to incorporating both passive and active solar strategies in the design and orientation of buildings and public spaces. Where the site configuration and locational constraints permit, buildings should be oriented to maximize the solar heat gain in the winter on the south side and, with the combined use of shading, minimizing solar heat gain in the summer.

east Main and Clay street Access Points

The Normal Neighborhood urban design plan identifies three vehicular points of access to East Main Street. One of these occurs at the existing driveway connection serving Ashland Middle School and Ashland Gracepoint Nazarene. The two other new connections to East Main Street occur between Cemetery Creek and Clay Creek.

The western-most of these is the neighborhood collector extending from the railroad crossing at Normal Avenue to East Main Street. Any additional street access points onto East Main Street or Clay Street, not shown in the Street Framework Map, would require further study and a major amendment to the plan. The Street Network Map provides for two dedicated multi-use path connections to East Main Street to further biking and walking connectivity. As East Main Street is a designated city boulevard, its access spacing for streets and driveways is 300 feet. Access spacing along Clay Street is 100 feet. However it’s appropriate that block length and perimeter standards provide the necessary guidance to the spacing of additional connections to Clay Street.

Transit service and Transit stops

Transit service is currently provided along Tolman Creek Road to the east of the Normal Neighborhood Plan area, and along Ashland Street to the south. In both instances, the walking distance between the site and existing transit route alignment is greater than the reasonable transit access walking distance of ¼ mile to a bus stop. At some point in the future, if there is sufficient density along East Main Street and/or in the general vicinity of the Normal Neighborhood Plan area, the City should engage the Rogue Valley Transit District (RVTD) in conversations about providing additional transit service. Potentially, this service could be oriented toward development of the north Southern Oregon University campus and other school facilities along Walker Avenue and include more intensely developed portions of East Main Street. At a minimum bus stops, in the area should be spaced no more than 1,000 feet apart. Shelters, seating, trash receptacles and waiting areas should conform to City and RVTD standards. Vehicular circulation through the Normal Neighborhood Plan area should not preclude the provision of direct transit service.

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Mobility

Normal Neighborhood Collector with

One-Sided Parking at Wetland

Normal Neighborhood Collector is the spine of the neighborhood and connects from the south edge of the project area north to East Main

Street. It is designed to discourage cut-through traffic and encourage slow speeds that will enhance safety for all modes: cars, bikes, and pedestrians. Speeds will be slow and bicycles will share the travel lanes with cars.

Intersections may be necked-down with bulbouts to improve safety for pedestrians.

The design of the street network was also influenced by the natural functions of the wetlands and streams. In the center of the plan, the neighborhood collector street skirts

Wetland W12. The street edge abutting this restored wetland may have street edge alternatives to allow stormwater flow to recharge this wetland.

Permeable paving in the parking lanes and flow-through planters in the parkrows reduces the extent of impervious surfaces in the Normal

Neighborhood and supports wetland and stream health.

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Normal Neighborhood Collector with

Two-Sided Parking

In some areas of the plan, Normal

Neighborhood Collector will have parking on two-sides of the street. Speeds will be slow and bicycles will share the travel lanes with cars.

Intersections may be necked-down with bulbouts to improve safety for pedestrians.

Permeable paving in the parking lanes and flow-through planters in the parkrows reduces the extent of impervious surfaces in the Normal

Neighborhood and supports wetland and stream health.

Mobility

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

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Streambed Crossing

Where a neighborhood collector or street crosses one of the streambeds, the street section narrows to reduce initial and life-cycle costs and minimize the impact of bridge construction on the creeks. Speeds will be slow and bicycles will share the travel lanes with cars.

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Neighborhood Queuing Street with

One Sided Parking

Neighborhood streets are designed to enhance safety for all modes: cars, bikes, and pedestrians.

Speeds will be slow and cars meeting each other from opposite directions will slow and yield to one another. Bicycles will share the travel lanes with cars.

Intersections may be necked-down with bulbouts to improve safety for pedestrians.

Permeable paving in the parking lanes and flow-through planters in the parkrows reduces the extent of impervious surfaces in the Normal

Neighborhood and supports wetland and stream health.

Mobility

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

5 to 6 ft.

7 to 8 ft.

7 ft.

15 ft.

7 to 8 ft.

8 ft.

7 to 8 ft.

5 ft.

C i t y o f A s h l a n d

| P a r a m e t r i x | U r b s w o r k s | Q a m a r A r c h i t e c t u r e & To w n P l a n n i n g | L e l a n d C o n s u l t i n g | N e v u e N g a n

50

[

23

24

]

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

Mobility

Neighborhood Street with Two-

Sided Parking

Neighborhood streets are designed to enhance safety for all modes: cars, bikes, and pedestrians. Speeds will be slow and cars meeting each other from opposite directions will slow and yield to oneanother. Bicycles will share the travel lanes with cars.

Intersections may be necked-down with bulb-outs to improve safety for pedestrians.

Permeable paving in the parking lanes and flow-through planters in the parkrows reduces the extent of impervious surfaces in the Normal Neighborhood and supports wetland and stream health.

5 ft.

7 to 8 ft.

8 ft.

10 ft.

10 ft.

51

8 ft.

7 to 8 ft.

5 ft.

J u l y 2 0 1 5 | Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n G r o w t h M a n a g e m e n t

Neighborhood Street with Diagonal Parking

Streets that abut Clay Creek may be locations for an alternative to the typical Neighborhood Street where diagonal parking is accommodated and encourages residents and citizens to park nearby and visit these natural areas. Traffic volumes will be low and slow speeds will enhance safety for all modes: cars, bikes, and pedestrians.

Bicycles will share the travel lanes with cars.

Intersections may be necked-down with bulb-outs to improve safety for pedestrians.

Permeable paving in the parking lanes and flow-through planters in the parkrows reduces the extent of impervious surfaces in the Normal Neighborhood and supports wetland and stream health.

Mobility

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

[

25

C i t y o f A s h l a n d

| P a r a m e t r i x | U r b s w o r k s | Q a m a r A r c h i t e c t u r e & To w n P l a n n i n g | L e l a n d C o n s u l t i n g | N e v u e N g a n

52

26

]

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

Mobility

Neighborhood Street with Median

One locations at the southern entrance to the

Normal Neighborhood has been designed with a central median that separates the travel lanes. This median could be improved with a pedestrian walk , park row, and Bioswales to capture and treat storm water run-off.

Slow speeds will enhance safety for all modes: cars, bikes, and pedestrians. Bicycles will share the travel lanes with cars.

Intersections may be necked-down with bulbouts to improve safety for pedestrians.

Permeable paving in the parking lanes and flow-through planters in the parkrows reduces the extent of impervious surfaces in the

Normal Neighborhood and supports wetland and stream health.

53

J u l y 2 0 1 5 | Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n G r o w t h M a n a g e m e n t

Shared Street

Shared Streets are designed to support a parklike atmosphere where all modes of traffic share a narrow paved surface. Shared Streets are places for people and the automobile is a guest in this street where space is shared among all modes. The pace of walking dictates the speed of all traffic in a shared street.

The narrow street section reduces the extent of impervious surfaces in the Normal

Neighborhood and supports wetland and stream health. The proposed locations for the primary Shared Street in the Normal

Neighborhood is adjacent to wetlands and stream corridors. Street edge alternatives may permit stormwater flow to re-infiltrate into the ground.

Mobility

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

8 ft.

18 ft.

C i t y o f A s h l a n d

| P a r a m e t r i x | U r b s w o r k s | Q a m a r A r c h i t e c t u r e & To w n P l a n n i n g | L e l a n d C o n s u l t i n g | N e v u e N g a n

54

[

27

28

]

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

Mobility

Alleys

Alleys provide off-street access to homes, parking pads, and garages. Alleys, also known as rear lanes, are very narrow and the street section is 12-feet wide with a 2-foot green edge on either side.

Speeds are very low.

The narrow street section of rear lanes reduces the extent of impervious surfaces in the Normal

Neighborhood and supports wetland and stream health. Alleys are curbless and permit stormwater flow from paved areas to re-infiltrate into the ground. Although the Normal Neighborhood

Plan Street Framework does not indicate alley locations, it anticipated alley connections it is anticipated that alleys will provide mid-block internal access within proposed developments.

2 ft.

12 ft.

2 ft.

55

J u l y 2 0 1 5 | Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n G r o w t h M a n a g e m e n t

Multi-Use Path

Multi-use Paths are car-free and support connectivity for pedestrians and bicycles across the Normal Neighborhood . Street sections are narrow and may vary to accommodate unique demands of local conditions.

Mobility

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

[

29

2 to 4 ft.

6 to 10 ft.

2 to 4 ft.

C i t y o f A s h l a n d

| P a r a m e t r i x | U r b s w o r k s | Q a m a r A r c h i t e c t u r e & To w n P l a n n i n g | L e l a n d C o n s u l t i n g | N e v u e N g a n

56

30

]

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k infrastructure/ Stormwater Diagram

Produced at charrette

Infrastructure

Advance financing and Phasing of Public Improvements

The City will consider establishing an Advance Financing District for off-site public facility improvements, as long as the City and the developer enter into a Development Agreement. The City’s participation in a Normal

Neighborhood advance financing district would be intended to achieve a positive impact for the whole of the

City.

The construction of a new public street connection to East Main St. will trigger public street improvements along

East Main St. The City recognizes that infrastructure and transportation improvements to East Main Street could potentially be completed in phases, dependent upon the impacts of proposed developments within the plan area and supporting Traffic Impact Analysis.

Consideration of a phased improvement plan for new intersections along East Main Street will include an evaluation of adequate pedestrian and bicycle connectivity from Walker Avenue to Clay Street. A full sidewalk along the south side of East Main Street, or an alternative bicycle and pedestrian path system within the project area connecting a propsed development to the middle school should be provided in the initial phase of development. Additionally full improvements to the public railroad crossing must be completed concurrently with the annexation and development of properties adjacent to the railroad tracks.

In the event full improvements to East Main Street, or the Railroad crossing, are not required to be completed as part of an application for development and annexation, the applicant shall agree to participate in future improvements of these facilities as a condition of annexation.

INfRASTRUCTURe water

No City of Ashland water services extend to the project area and all existing homes in the project study area get their potable and domestic water from wells. The closest municipal water sources are the Lithia main that runs in the East Main Street alignment and an 8-inch main that runs along the full extent of Creek Drive and part of

Clay Street.

J u l y 2 0 1 5 | Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n G r o w t h M a n a g e m e n t

57

Infrastructure sanitary sewer

No City of Ashland sanitary sewers extend to the project area; all existing homes in the project study rely on septic systems for disposing of their waste. A single 8-inch service stub connects the Temple Emek Shalom at 1800 East

Main Street to the 12-inch sanitary sewer that runs in the Bear Creek Alignment. Other proximate sewer lines include 8-inch sewer lines that run in the Walker Street, Creek Drive, and Clay Street alignments.

stormwater

Implementation of stormwater management in the Normal Neighborhood should emphasize low-impact development (LID) techniques focused on controlling stormwater at its source rather than moving stormwater offsite though expensive, engineered conveyance systems. The goals of low-impact development are to lower initial construction and reduce life-cycle costs while maintaining natural ecosystem functions: stormwater retention, infiltration, and release that supports stream health and ecological function. Some of the approaches that should be considered for implementation in the Normal Neighborhood Plan area include:

· Bio-swales alongside streets slow stormwater runoff, filter it, and allow it to soak into the ground. Swales improve water quality and reduce in-stream erosion by slowing the velocity of stormwater runoff before it enters the stream.

They also cost less to install than curbs, storm drain inlets, and piping systems.

· Bio-retention cells, commonly known as rain gardens, are relatively small-scale, landscaped depressions with a soil mixture that absorbs and filters runoff. Bio-retention cells work well in places like the project area with poorly draining soils.

· Stormwater planters, more engineered than rain gardens, stormwater planters are designed to accept stormwater from adjacent surfaces, and infiltrate stormwater through the ground to a pipe connected to a storm sewer or, where practicable, to natural features such as the wetlands, Clay Creek or Cemetery Creek.

· Flow-through planters, within developments with higher floor area ratios, flow-through planters are a sound solution. Flow-through planters do not infiltrate into the ground; they are filled with an engineered mixture of gravel and soil and planted. Flow-though planters store stormwater runoff temporarily, filter sediment and pollutants, and slow the flow of rainfall to storm sewers which can be smaller in size and less costly to engineer and build.

· Cisterns and rain barrels collect rainwater from roofs. They can provide water for garden or lawn irrigation, reducing water bills and conserving municipal water supplies. The City currently provides a rain barrel guide for homeowners and contractors.

· Green roofs are partially or completely covered with plants. Green roofs help mitigate the tendency for urban areas to have higher summer temperatures, and reduce peak stormwater flows. The vegetated cover also protects and insulates the roof, extending its life and reducing energy costs.

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

[

31

C i t y o f A s h l a n d

| P a r a m e t r i x | U r b s w o r k s | Q a m a r A r c h i t e c t u r e & To w n P l a n n i n g | L e l a n d C o n s u l t i n g | N e v u e N g a n

58

N o r m a l N e i g h b o r h o o d P l a n F r a m e w o r k

Understanding infiltration capacity and rates for stormwater re-infiltration in the study area will be critically important to the design and engineering of future stormwater systems –conventional and low-impact alike.

Preliminary data from the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and a Custom Soil Resource Report for Jackson County show that the soils in the area generally drain very poorly. A detailed assessment of soils must be a part of pre-development geotechnical investigations.

SUSTAINAbILITy

Sustainability is not a discrete element, independent of the preceding framework elements. The most successful strategies for sustainability will be to build them into each framework element of the plan. The wide range of housing types and the mix of permitted land uses is fundamentally sustainable because compact urban form encourages active transportation as a convenient first choice; a range of housing choices means that there is a home in the neighborhood for every stage of life; and protection of wetlands and restoration of the creek habitat brings nature in while it also provides lower impact –and less costly– solutions to infrastructure. The

City of Ashland is committed to the development of a vibrant livable community. The design of the Normal

Neighborhood Plan is consistent with the framework of the US Green Building Council LEED Neighborhood

Development and the Sustainable Sites Initiative (SITES). Both the LEED ND rating system established

USGBC and SITES establish sets of performance standards for certifying the planning and development of neighborhoods. Their intent is to promote healthful, durable, affordable, and environmentally sound practices in building design and construction. Because no rating system for sustainable design and construction will be a prerequisite for development, it is all the more essential that the elements of sustainability are built into each of the frameworks for the Normal Neighborhood : Housing and Land Use; Greenway and Open Space; Mobility; and Infrastructure.

59

J u l y 2 0 1 5 | Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n G r o w t h M a n a g e m e n t

60

Exhibit C

E MAIN

ST

East Main

Street

E MAIN ST r A ke ve

KER

Ashland

Middle

School

CREEK DR

ABBOTT AV

DOLLARHIDE WY

MEADOW DR

Walker

Elementary

School

HOMES AV

PARKER ST

RAY

SHAMROCK LN

ASHLAND ST

Normal Neighborhood Plan

Comprehensive Plan Map Amendment

0 200 400

Normal Neighborhood Plan

EN

VILLARD ST

AY

BIRCHWOOD

800

McCALL DR

CLAY ST

1,200 Feet

[

7/28/2015

61

62

ORDINANCE NO. _________

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE STREET DEDICATION MAP, PLANNED

INTERSECTION AND ROADWAY IMPROVEMENT MAP, AND PLANNED

BIKEWAY NETWORK MAP OF THE ASHLAND TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM

PLAN FOR THE NORMAL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN AREA, AND AMENDING

STREET DESIGN STANDARDS WITHIN THE ASHLAND MUNICIPAL CODE

CHAPTER 18.4.6 TO ADD A NEW SHARED STREET CLASSIFICATION.

Annotated to show deletions and

additions

to the code sections being modified.

Deletions are

bold lined through

and additions are in

bold underline

.

WHEREAS

, Article 2. Section 1 of the Ashland City Charter provides:

Powers of the City The City shall have all powers which the constitutions, statutes, and common law of the United States and of this State expressly or impliedly grant or allow municipalities, as fully as though this Charter specifically enumerated each of those powers, as well as all powers not inconsistent with the foregoing; and, in addition thereto, shall possess all powers hereinafter specifically granted. All the authority thereof shall have perpetual succession.

WHEREAS,

the above referenced grant of power has been interpreted as affording all legislative powers home rule constitutional provisions reserved to Oregon Cities. City of

Beaverton v. International Ass’n of Firefighters, Local 1660, Beaverton Shop 20 Or.

App. 293; 531 P 2d 730, 734 (1975); and

WHEREAS,

the City of Transportation Commission considered the above-referenced amendments to the Transportation System Plan at a duly advertised public hearing on

_________, 2015 and following deliberations recommended approval of the amendments by a vote of __-__; and

WHEREAS

, the City of Ashland Planning Commission considered the above-referenced amendments to the Transportation System Plan at a duly advertised public hearing on

July 28, 2015 and following deliberations recommended approval of the amendments by a vote of __-__; and

WHEREAS

, the City Council of the City of Ashland conducted a duly advertised public hearing on the above-referenced amendments on September 1, 2015, and on

[subsequent public hearing continuance dates]; and

WHEREAS

, the City Council of the City of Ashland, following the close of the public hearing and record, deliberated and conducted first and second readings approving adoption of the Ordinance in accordance with Article 10 of the Ashland City Charter; and

WHEREAS,

the Ashland Comprehensive Plan includes goals and policies intended to work towards creating an integrated land use and transportation system to address the

Transportation Planning Rule (TPR) Oregon Administrative Rule 660-012-0000 directive

63

for “… coordinated land use and transportation plans should ensure that the planned transportation system supports a pattern of travel and land use in urban areas that will avoid the air pollution, traffic and livability problems faced by other large urban areas of the country through measures designed to increase transportation choices and make more efficient use of the existing transportation system.”; and

WHEREAS,

the Street Dedication Map, Planned Intersection and Roadway

Improvement Map and Planned Bikeway Network Map are adopted official maps for long range planning purposes, and are periodically amended to identify streets and pedestrian and bicycle pats that will be needed in the future to connect the street network and provide access to undeveloped areas within the Urban Growth Boundary

(UGB); and

WHEREAS,

the Ashland Comprehensive Plan includes the following policies addressing street dedications: 1) Development of a modified grid street pattern shall be encouraged for connecting new and existing neighborhoods during subdivisions, partitions, and through the use of the Street Dedication map. (10.09.02.32); and 2)

Street dedications shall be required as a condition of land development. A future street dedication map shall be adopted and implemented as part of the Land Use Ordinance.

(10.09.02.34).; and

WHEREAS,

the City Council of the City of Ashland has determined that in order protect and benefit the health, safety and welfare of existing and future residents, and to address changes in existing conditions and projected needs related to land use and transportation patterns, it is necessary to amend the Ashland Comprehensive Plan in the manner proposed, that an adequate factual base exists for the amendments, the amendments are consistent with the comprehensive plan and that such amendments are fully supported by the record of this proceeding.

THE PEOPLE OF THE CITY OF ASHLAND DO ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS:

SECTION 1.

The above recitations are true and correct and are incorporated herein by this reference.

SECTION 2.

The officially adopted City of Ashland Street Dedication Map, referenced in Ashland as Figure 10-1 in the Ashland Transportation System Plan is hereby amended to include the Normal Neighborhood Plan Street Network attached hereto as

Exhibit A.

SECTION 4.

The City of Ashland Planned Bikeway Network Map, referenced in the

Ashland Transportation System Plan as Figure 8-1. is hereby amended to include the

Normal Neighborhood Plan Pedestrian and Bicycle Network attached hereto as Exhibit

B.

SECTION 5.

The City of Ashland Planned Intersection and Roadway Improvement

Map, referenced in the Ashland Transportation System Plan as Figure 10-3. is hereby

64

2-Lane

Boulevard

3-Lane

Boulevard

5-Lane

Boulevard

2-Lane

Avenue

3-Lane

Avenue

Neighborhood

Collector,

Residential

No Parking

Parking One

Side

Parking Both

Sides

Neighborhood

Collector,

Commercial

Parallel

Parking One

Side

Parallel

amended to include East Main Street as a Planned Avenue from Walker Avenue to

Ashland St.

SECTION 6.

The Ashland Municipal Code Chapter 18.4.6.040, Street Design

Standards, street classification table is hereby amended to include a new classification of “Shared Street” as follows

18.4.6.040 F. Design Standards. A description of street design standards for each street classification follows in Table 18.4.6.040.F and subsection 18.4.6.040.G. All elements listed are required unless specifically noted, and dimensions and ranges represent minimum standard or ranges for the improvements shown. The approval authority may require a dimension within a specified range based upon intensity of land use, existing and projected traffic and pedestrian volumes, or when supported through other applicable approval standards. The approval authority may approve dimensions and ranges greater than those proposed by an applicant.

Table 18.4.6.040.F: City of Ashland Street Design Standards

TYPE OF

STREET

AVERAGE

DAILY

TRIPS

(ADT)

8,000 to

RIGHT-

OF-

WAY

WIDTH

61'-87'

CURB-TO-

CURB

PAVEMENT

WIDTH

34'

WITHIN CURB-TO-CURB AREA

MOTOR

VEHICLE

TRAVEL

LANES

MEDIAN

AND/OR

CENTER

TURN

LANE

BIKE

LANES on both sides

11' none 6'

PARK

-ING

8'-9’

CURB on both sides

6"

PARK-

ROW on both sides

5'-8'

1

30,000

3,000 to

10,000

1,500 to

5,000

73'-99'

95'-121'

59'-86'

70.5'-

97.5'

49'-51' 22'

50'-56' 25'-27'

57'-63' 32'-34'

55’-65’ 28’

63'-73'

46'

68'

32'-33'

43.5'-44.5'

36'

11'

11'

10'-10.5'

10'-10.5'

11'

9'-10'

9'-10'

10’

10'

12'

12' none

11.5'

NA

6'

6'

6'

6'

NA

3

8'-9’

8'-9’

8'-9’

8'-9’ none

7'

7'

8’

8'

6"

6"

6"

6"

6"

6"

6"

6”

6"

5'-8'

1

5'-8'

1

5'-8'

1

5'-8'

1

8'

7'-8'

7'-8'

5'-8'

1

5'-8'

1

SIDE-

WALKS on both sides

6'-10'

2

6'-10'

2

6'-10'

2

6'-10'

2

6'-10'

2

5'-6'

5'-6'

5'-6'

8'-10'

2

8'-10'

2

65

Table 18.4.6.040.F: City of Ashland Street Design Standards

TYPE OF

STREET

AVERAGE

DAILY

TRIPS

(ADT)

RIGHT-

OF-

WAY

WIDTH

CURB-TO-

CURB

PAVEMENT

WIDTH

WITHIN CURB-TO-CURB AREA

MOTOR

VEHICLE

TRAVEL

LANES

MEDIAN

AND/OR

CENTER

TURN

LANE

BIKE

LANES on both sides

PARK

-ING

CURB on both sides

PARK-

ROW on both sides

SIDE-

WALKS on both sides

Parking Both

Sides

Diagonal

Parking One

Side

Diagonal

Parking Both

Sides

Neighborhood

Street

Parking One

Side

Neighborhood

Street

Parking Both

Sides

Private Drive

4 less than

1,500

65'-74' 37'

81'-91' 54'

47'-51' 22'

50'-57' 25'-28'

10'

10'

15'

Queuing

11'-14'

Queuing

NA NA

3

17'

17'

7'

7'

6"

6"

6"

6"

5'-8'

1

5'-8'

1

5’-8

’1

5’-8

’1

8'-10'

2

8'-10'

2

5'-6'

5'-6'

Shared

Street

Less than

100

Less than

1500

15’-20’ 12’-15’

25’ 18' paved

Queuing

12’

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Alley

Multi-Use

Path

NA

NA

16'

12'-18'

12' paved width, 2' strips on both sides

6'-10' paved width, 2'-4' strips on both sides

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

1) 7’ – 8’ landscape parkrow shall be installed in residential areas; 5’ hardscape parkrow with tree wells shall be installed in commercial areas on streets with on-street parking lanes, or 7’ landscape parkrow may be used in commercial areas on streets without on-street parking lanes or where the street corridor includes landscaped parkrow. Street Trees shall be planted in parkrows pursuant to 18.4.4.030.

2) 6' sidewalk shall be installed in residential areas; 8'-10' sidewalk shall be installed in commercial areas; 10’ sidewalk shall be required on boulevards in the Downtown Design Standards Zone.

3) Bike lanes are generally not needed on streets with low volumes (less than 3,000 ADT) or low motor vehicle travel speeds (less than

25mph). For over 3,000 ADT or actual travel speeds exceeding 25 mph, 6’ bike lanes; one on each side of the street moving in the same direction as motor vehicle traffic

4) A private drive is a street in private ownership, not dedicated to the public, which serves three or less units. Private drives are permitted in the Performance Standards Options overlay.

SECTION 7.

The Ashland Municipal Code Chapter subsection 18.4.6.040 G, Street

Design Standards, is hereby amended to add a new classification of “Shared Street” as follows:

66

18.4.6.040.G.8

Shared Street

Provides access to residential in an area in which right-of-way is constrained by natural features, topography or historically significant structures. The constrained right-of-way prevents typical bicycle and pedestrian facilities such as sidewalks and bicycle lanes. Therefore, the entire width of the street is collectively shared by pedestrians, bicycles, and autos. The design of the street should emphasize a slower speed environment and provide clear physical and visual indications the space is shared across modes. See Figure 18.4.6.040.G.8.

Prototypical Section: Shared Street

Figure 18.4.6.040.G.8

Shared Street

Street Function: Provide vehicular, pedestrian, and bicycle neighborhood circulation and access to individual residential and commercial properties designed to encourage socializing with neighbors, outdoor play for children, and creating comfortable spaces for walking and biking.

Connectivity: Connects to all types of streets.

Average Daily Traffic: 1,500 or less motor vehicle trips per day

Managed Speed: Motor vehicle travel speeds should be below 15 mph

Right-of-Way Width: 25'

Pavement width: 18' minimum, maintaining full fire truck access and minimum turning paths at all changes in alignment and intersections.

67

Motor Vehicle Travel Lanes: Minimum 12' clear width.

Bike Lanes: Not applicable, bicyclists can share the travel lane and easily negotiate these low use areas

Parking: Parking and loading areas may be provided within the right of way with careful consideration to ensure parked vehicles do not obstruct pedestrian, bicycles, or emergency vehicle access.

Parkrow: Not applicable

Sidewalks: Not applicable, pedestrians can share the travel lane and easily negotiate these low use areas. Refuge areas are to be provided within the right of way to allow pedestrians to step out of the travel lane when necessary.

SECTION 8

.

Severability.

The sections, subsections, paragraphs and clauses of this ordinance are severable. The invalidity of one section, subsection, paragraph, or clause shall not affect the validity of the remaining sections, subsections, paragraphs and clauses.

SECTION 9

.

Codification.

Provisions of this Ordinance shall be incorporated in the

City Comprehensive Plan and the word “ordinance” may be changed to “code”, “article”,

“section”, or another word, and the sections of this Ordinance may be renumbered, or re-lettered, provided however that any Whereas clauses and boilerplate provisions (i.e.

Sections 1, 3-5 need not be codified and the City Recorder is authorized to correct any cross-references and any typographical errors.

The foregoing ordinance was first read by title only in accordance with Article X,

Section 2(C) of the City Charter on the _____ day of ________________, 2015, and duly PASSED and ADOPTED this _____ day of ________________, 2015.

_______________________________

Barbara M. Christensen, City Recorder

SIGNED and APPROVED this day of , 2015.

___________________

John Stromberg, Mayor

Reviewed as to form:

68

_________________________

David Lohman, City Attorney

69

70

Exhibit A

Normal Neighborhood Plan

Street Network Map

0

71

200 400

Road

Classifications

neigborhood collector local street shared street multi-use path

Shared Streets within the Normal

Neighborhood Plan areamay be alternatively developed as alleys or multi-use paths.

Improvement of the rail road crossing requires approval of an application for an at grade railroad crossing.

800 Feet

[

Exhibit B

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ââ

ââ

ââ

ââ

ââ

â â

â âââ

â â

â âââ

â âââ â âââ â âââ

â âââ â âââ â âââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

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ââ ââ

ââ ââ

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ââââ ââ

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Normal Neighborhood Plan

Pedestrian and Bicycle Network

ââ ââ ââ ââââ

ââ

ââ

ââ

ââ

ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

0 200 400 800 Feet

ââ ââ ââ ââ

72

ââ ââ

Shared Street

Multi-use path

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ

ââ ââ ââ ââ

ââ

[

7/28/2015

ORDINANCE NO. __________

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE ASHLAND MUNICIPAL CODE

CREATING A NEW CHAPTER 18.3.4 NORMAL NEIGHBORHOOD DISTRICT,

AMENDING CHAPTER 18.2.1.020 TO ADD A NORMAL NEIGHBORHOOD ZONING

CLASSIFICATION, AND AMENDING CHAPTER 18.2.1.040 TO ADD A NORMAL

NEIGHBORHOOD SPECIAL DISTRICT.

Annotated to show deletions and

additions

to the code sections being modified.

Deletions are

bold lined through

and additions are in

bold underline

.

WHEREAS

, Article 2. Section 1 of the Ashland City Charter provides:

Powers of the City The City shall have all powers which the constitutions, statutes, and common law of the United States and of this State expressly or impliedly grant or allow municipalities, as fully as though this Charter specifically enumerated each of those powers, as well as all powers not inconsistent with the foregoing; and, in addition thereto, shall possess all powers hereinafter specifically granted. All the authority thereof shall have perpetual succession.

WHEREAS,

the above referenced grant of power has been interpreted as affording all legislative powers home rule constitutional provisions reserved to Oregon Cities. City of

Beaverton v. International Ass’n of Firefighters, Local 1660, Beaverton Shop 20 Or.

App. 293; 531 P 2d 730, 734 (1975); and

WHEREAS

, the City of Ashland is projected to grow by approximately 3,250 residents by 2030 and 2,000 employees by 2027, and the City Council reaffirmed the longstanding policy of accommodating growth within the Ashland Urban Growth Boundary rather than growing outward into surrounding farm and forest lands in the Greater Bear

Creek Valley Regional Problem Solving (RPS) planning process; and

WHEREAS

, the City of Ashland seeks to balance projected population and employment growth with the community goal of retaining a district boundary and preventing sprawling development, and to this end examines opportunities to use land more efficiently for housing and businesses; and

WHEREAS

, the City of Ashland continues the community’s tradition of integrating land use and transportation planning, and using sustainable development measures such as encouraging a mix and intensity of uses on main travel corridors to support transit service and use, integrating affordable housing opportunities, and reducing carbon emissions by providing a variety of transportation options; and

WHEREAS

, the City conducted a planning process involving a series of public workshops, on-line forum, key participant meetings and study sessions from October

2011 through July 2015 involving a three-step process in which participants identified the qualities that make a successful neighborhood,, developed vision statements for the

An Ordinance Amending Chapters 18.2.1.020 and 18.2.1.040, and Adding a New Chapter 18.3.4 to the

Ashland Municipal Code

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study area, and reviewed and revised plans illustrating an example of what development might look when the 94 acre is incorporated into the City of Ashland; and

WHEREAS

, the final report for the Normal Neighborhood Plan included recommended amendments to the zoning map and land use ordinance which would support the development of the neighborhood as envisioned in the planning process being small walkable neighborhood modules that provide concentrations of housing grouped in a way to encourage more walking, cycling and transit use; and

WHEREAS

, the City of Ashland Planning Commission considered the above-referenced recommended amendments to the Ashland Municipal Code and Land Use Ordinances at a duly advertised public hearing on July 28, 2015, and following deliberations, recommended approval of the amendments by a vote of ____; and

WHEREAS

, the City Council of the City of Ashland conducted a duly advertised public hearing on the above-referenced amendments on __________, 2015; and following the close of the public hearing and record, deliberated and conducted first and second readings approving adoption of the Ordinance in accordance with Article 10 of the

Ashland City Charter; and

WHEREAS

, the City Council of the City of Ashland has determined that in order to protect and benefit the health, safety and welfare of existing and future residents of the

City, it is necessary to amend the Ashland Municipal Code and Land Use Ordinance in manner proposed, that an adequate factual base exists for the amendments, the amendments are consistent with the comprehensive plan and that such amendments are fully supported by the record of this proceeding.

THE PEOPLE OF THE CITY OF ASHLAND DO ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS:

SECTION 1.

The above recitations are true and correct and are incorporated herein by this reference.

SECTION 2.

A new Chapter 18.3.4 of the Ashland Municipal Code creating a new overlay district [Normal Neighborhood District ] set forth in full codified form on the attached Exhibit A and made a part hereof by this reference, is hereby added to the

Ashland Municipal Code.

SECTION 3.

Chapter 18.2.1.020, of the Zoning Regulations and General Provisions section of the Ashland Municipal Code, is hereby amended to read as follows:

18.2.1.020 Zoning Map and Classification of Zones

For the purpose of this ordinance, the City is divided into zones designated and depicted on the

Zoning Map, pursuant to the Comprehensive Plan Map, and summarized in Table 18.2.1.020.

Table 18.2.1.020

Base Zones

Residential - Woodland (WR)

Overlay Zones

Airport Overlay

Residential - Rural (RR) Detail Site Review Overlay

An Ordinance Amending Chapters 18.2.1.020 and 18.2.1.040, and Adding a New Chapter 18.3.4 to the

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Table 18.2.1.020

Base Zones

Residential - Single-Family (R-1-10, R-1-7.5, and R-1-5)

Overlay Zones

Downtown Design Standards

Overlay

Residential - Suburban (R-1-3.5) Freeway Sign Overlay

Residential - Low Density Multiple Family (R-2) Historic District Overlay

Residential - High Density Multiple Family (R-3) Pedestrian Place Overlay

Commercial (C-1) Performance Standards Options

Commercial – Downtown (C-1-D)

Overlay

Physical and Environmental

Constraints Overlay

-Hillside Lands Employment (E-1)

Industrial (M-1)

Special Districts

-Floodplain Corridor Lands

-Severe Constraints Lands

-Water Resources

Croman Mill District (CM)

Health Care Services District (HC)

Normal Neighborhood (NN)

North Mountain Neighborhood District (NM)

Southern Oregon University District (SOU)

-Wildfire Lands

Residential Overlay

SECTION 4.

Chapter 18.2.1.040, of the Zoning Regulations and General Provisions section of the Ashland Municipal Code, is hereby amended to read as follows:

18.2.1.040 Applicability of Zoning Regulations

Part 18.2 applies to properties with base zone, special district, and overlay zone designations, as follows:

Table 18.2.1.040: Applicability of Standards to Zones, Plan Districts and Overlays

Designation

Base Zones

Residential - Woodland (WR)

Residential - Rural (RR)

Residential - Single-family (R-1-10, R-1-

7.5, R-1-5)

Residential - Suburban (R-1-3.5)

Residential - Low Density Multiple Family

(R-2)

Residential - High Density Multiple Family

(R-3)

Commercial (C-1)

Commercial - Downtown (C-1-D)

Employment (E-1)

Industrial (M-1)

Applicability

Chapter 18.2 Applies Directly

Chapter 18.2 Applies Directly

Chapter 18.2 Applies Directly

Chapter 18.2 Applies Directly

Chapter 18.2 Applies Directly

Chapter 18.2 Applies Directly

Chapter 18.2 Applies Directly

Chapter 18.2 Applies Directly

Chapter 18.2 Applies Directly

Special Districts

Croman Mill District Zone (CM)

Health Care Services Zone (HC)

Normal Neighborhood District (NN)

CM District Replaces chapter 18.2

NN District Replaces chapter 18.2

NM District Replaces chapter 18.2

North Mountain Neighborhood (NM)

Southern Oregon University (SOU)

An Ordinance Amending Chapters 18.2.1.020 and 18.2.1.040, and Adding a New Chapter 18.3.4 to the

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Table 18.2.1.040: Applicability of Standards to Zones, Plan Districts and Overlays

Designation

Overlay Zones

Airport

Detail Site Review

Downtown Design Standards

Freeway Sign

Historic

Pedestrian Place

Performance Standards Options

Physical and Environmental Constraints

Residential

Applicability

Overlay Modifies chapter 18.2

Overlay Modifies chapter 18.2

Overlay Modifies chapter 18.2

Overlay Modifies chapter 18.2

Overlay Modifies chapter 18.2

Overlay Modifies chapter 18.2

Overlay Modifies chapter 18.2

Overlay Modifies chapter 18.2

Overlay Modifies chapter 18.2

SECTION 5.

Severability.

The sections, subsections, paragraphs and clauses of this ordinance are severable. The invalidity of one section, subsection, paragraph, or clause shall not affect the validity of the remaining sections, subsections, paragraphs and clauses.

SECTION 6.

Codification.

Provisions of this Ordinance shall be incorporated in the

City Code and the word “ordinance” may be changed to “code”, “article”, “section”, or another word, and the sections of this Ordinance may be renumbered, or re-lettered, provided however that any Whereas clauses and boilerplate provisions, and text descriptions of amendments (i.e. Sections 1-2, 5-6) need not be codified and the City

Recorder is authorized to correct any cross-references and any typographical errors.

An Ordinance Amending Chapters 18.2.1.020 and 18.2.1.040, and Adding a New Chapter 18.3.4 to the

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The foregoing ordinance was first read by title only in accordance with Article X,

Section 2(C) of the City Charter on the _____ day of ________________, 2015, and duly PASSED and ADOPTED this _____ day of ________________, 2015.

_______________________________

Barbara M. Christensen, City Recorder

SIGNED and APPROVED this day of , 2015.

___________________

John Stromberg, Mayor

Reviewed as to form:

_________________________

David Lohman, City Attorney

An Ordinance Amending Chapters 18.2.1.020 and 18.2.1.040, and Adding a New Chapter 18.3.4 to the

Ashland Municipal Code

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78

Exhibit A

Normal Neighborhood District

DRAFT - July, 2015

Chapter 18 Code Amendments

18.3.4.010 Purpose

18.3.4.020 Applicability

18.3.4.030 General Requirements

18.3.4.040 Use Regulations

18.3.4.050 Dimensional Regulations

18.3.4.060 Site Development and Design Standards

18.3.4.070 Conservation Area overlay

18.3.4.075 Advanced Financing District [Placeholder]

18.3.4.080 Review and Approval Procedure

18.3.4.010 Purpose

The neighborhood is designed to provide an environment for traditional neighborhood living. The

Normal Neighborhood Plan is a blueprint for promoting a variety of housing types while preserving open spaces, stream corridors, wetlands, and other significant natural features. The neighborhood commercial area is designated to promote neighborhood serving businesses with building designs that reflect the character of the neighborhood and where parking is managed through efficient on-street and off-street parking resources. The neighborhood will be characterized by a connected network of streets and alleys, paths and trails, with connection to the natural areas, wetlands, and streams. This network will also connect to the larger network of regional trails, paths, and streets beyond the boundaries of the neighborhood. The development of the neighborhood will apply principles of low impact development to minimize the extent and initial cost of new infrastructure and to promote the benefits of storm water management.

18.3.4.020 Applicability

This chapter applies to properties designated as Normal Neighborhood District on the Ashland Zoning

Map, and pursuant to the Normal Neighborhood Plan adopted by Ordinance

[#number (date)]

.

Development located within the Normal Neighborhood District is required to meet all applicable sections of this ordinance, except as otherwise provided in this chapter; where the provisions of this chapter conflict with comparable standards described in any other ordinance, resolution or regulation, the provisions of the Normal Neighborhood District shall govern.

18.3.4.030 General Regulations

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A. Conformance with the Normal Neighborhood Plan

. Land uses and development, including construction of buildings, streets, multi-use paths, and open space shall be located in accordance with those shown on the Normal Neighborhood Plan maps adopted by Ordinance [#number (date)].

B. Performance Standards Overlay

.

All applications involving the creation of three or more lots shall be processed under chapter 18.3.9 Performance Standards Option.

C. Amendments.

Major and minor amendments to the Normal Neighborhood Plan shall comply with the following procedures:

1. Major and Minor Amendments

a. Major amendments are those that result in any of the following: i. A change in the land use overlay designation. ii. A change in the maximum building height dimensional standards in section 18.3.4.050 iii. A change in the allowable base density, dwelling units per acre, in section 18.3.4.050. iv. A change in the Plan layout that eliminates a street, access way, multi-use path or other transportation facility. v. A change in the Plan layout that provides an additional vehicular access point onto

East Main Street or Clay Street. vi. A change not specifically listed under the major and minor amendment definitions. b. Minor amendments are those that result in any of the following: i. A change in the Plan layout that requires a street, access way, multi-use path or other transportation facility to be shifted fifty (50) feet or more in any direction as long as the change maintains the connectivity established by Normal Avenue

Neighborhood Plan. ii. A change in a dimensional standard requirement in section 18.3.4.050, but not including height and residential density. iii. A change in the Plan layout that changes the boundaries or location of a conservation area to correspond with a delineated wetland and water resource protection zone, or relocation of a designated open space area.

2. Major Amendment – Type II Procedure

. A major amendment to the Normal Neighborhood Plan is subject to a public hearing and decision under a Type II Procedure. A major amendment may be approved upon finding that the proposed modification will not adversely affect the purpose of the Normal Neighborhood Plan. A major amendment requires a determination by the City that: a. The proposed amendment maintains the transportation connectivity established by the

Normal Neighborhood Plan; b. The proposed amendment furthers the street design and access management concepts of the Normal Neighborhood Plan.

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c. The proposed amendment furthers the protection and enhancement of the natural systems and features of the Normal Neighborhood Plan, including wetlands, stream beds, and water resource protection zones by improving the quality and function of existing natural resources. d. The proposed amendment will not reduce the concentration or variety of housing types permitted in the Normal Neighborhood Plan. e. The proposed amendment is necessary to accommodate physical constraints evident on the property, or to protect significant natural features such as trees, rock outcroppings, streams, wetlands, water resource protection zones, or similar natural features, or to adjust to existing property lines between project boundaries.

3. Minor Amendment – Type 1 Procedure.

A minor amendment to the Normal Neighborhood

Development Plan which is subject to an administrative decision under the Type I

Procedure. Minor amendments are subject to the Exception to the Site Design and Use

Development Standards of chapter 18.5.2.050.E.

18.3.4.040 Use Regulations

A. Plan overlay zones

. There are four Land Use Designation Overlays zones within the Normal

Neighborhood Plan are intended to accommodate a variety of housing opportunities, preserve natural areas and provide open space.

1. Plan NN-1-5 zone

The use regulations and development standards are intended to create, maintain and promote single-dwelling neighborhood character. A variety of housing types are allowed, in addition to the detached single dwelling. Development standards that are largely the same as those for single dwellings ensure that the overall image and character of the single-dwelling neighborhood is maintained.

2. Plan NN-1-3.5 zone

. The use regulations and development standards are intended to create, maintain and promote single-dwelling neighborhood character. A variety of housing types are allowed including multiple compact attached and/or detached dwellings. Dwellings may be grouped around common open space promoting a scale and character compatible with single family homes.

Development standards that are largely the same as those for single dwellings ensure that the overall image and character of the single-dwelling neighborhood is maintained.

3. Plan NN-1-3.5-C zone.

The use regulations and development standards are intended to provide housing opportunities for individual households through development of multiple compact attached and/or detached dwellings with the added allowance for neighborhood-serving commercial mixeduses so that many of the activities of daily living can occur within the Normal Neighborhood. The public streets within the vicinity of the NN-1-3.5-C overlay are to provide sufficient on-street parking to accommodate ground floor neighborhood business uses.

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4. Plan NN-2 zone

. The use regulations and development standards are intended to create and maintain a range of housing choices, including multi-family housing within the context of the residential character of the Normal Neighborhood Plan.

B. Normal Neighborhood Plan Residential Building Types.

The development standards for the

Normal Neighborhood Plan will preserve neighborhood character by incorporating four distinct land use overlay areas with different concentrations of varying housing types.

1. Single Dwelling Residential Unit.

A Single Dwelling Residential Unit is a detached residential building that contains a single dwelling with self-contained living facilities on one lot. It is separated from adjacent dwellings by private open space in the form of side yards and backyards, and set back from the public street or common green by a front yard. Auto parking is generally on the same lot in a garage, carport, or uncovered area.

The garage may be detached or attached to the dwelling structure.

2. Accessory Residential Unit.

An Accessory Residential Unit is a secondary dwelling unit on a lot, either attached to the singlefamily dwelling or in a detached building located on the same lot with a single-family dwelling, and having an independent means of entry.

3. Double Dwelling Residential Unit

(Duplex)

.

A Double Dwelling Residential Unit is a residential building that contains two dwellings located on a single lot, each with self-contained living facilities. Double Dwelling Residential Units must share a common wall or a common floor/ ceiling and are similar to a Single Dwelling Unit in appearance, height, massing and lot placement.

4. Attached Residential Unit

. (Townhome, Row house)

An Attached Residential Unit is single dwelling located on an individual lot which is attached along one or both sidewalls to an adjacent dwelling unit. Private open space may take the form of front yards, backyards, or upper level terraces. The dwelling unit may be set back from the public street or common green by a front yard.

5. Clustered Residential Units - Pedestrian-Oriented.

Pedestrian-Oriented Clustered Residential Units are multiple dwellings grouped around common open space that promote a scale and character compatible with single family homes. Units are typically arranged around a central common green under communal ownership. Auto parking is generally grouped in a shared surface area or areas.

6. Multiple Dwelling Residential Unit.

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Multiple Dwelling Residential Units are multiple dwellings that occupy a single building or multiple buildings on a single lot. Dwellings may take the form of condominiums or apartments.

Auto parking is generally provided in a shared parking area or structured parking facility.

7. Cottage Housing.

[Reserved]

C. General Use Regulations

. Uses and their accessory uses are permitted, special permitted or conditional uses in the Normal Neighborhood Plan area as listed in the Land Use Table.

Table 18.3.4.040 Land Use

Descriptions

NN-1-5

Single family

Residential

NN-1-3.5

Suburban

Residential

NN-1-3.5-C

Suburban

Residential with commercial

NN-2

Multi-family

Low Density

Residential

Residential Uses

Single Dwelling Residential Unit

(Single-Family Dwelling)

Accessory Residential Unit

Double Dwelling Residential Unit

(Duplex Dwelling)

Cottage Housing [Placeholder]

Clustered Residential Units

Attached Residential Unit

Multiple Dwelling Residential Unit

(Multi family Dwelling)

Manufactured Home on Individual Lot

Manufactured Housing Development

Neighborhood Business and Service Uses

Home Occupation

Retail Sales and Services, with each building limited to

3,500 square feet of gross floor area

Professional and Medical Offices, with each building limited to 3,500 square feet of gross floor area

P

P

N

P

N

N

N

P

N

P

N

N

P

P

P

N

P

P

P

P

P

P

N

N

N

P

P

N

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

N

N

P

N

P

P

P

P

P

P

N

N

Light manufacturing or assembly of items occupying six hundred (600) square feet or less, and contiguous to the permitted retail use.

Restaurants

Day Care Center

Assisted Living Facilities

Public and Institutional Uses

Religious Institutions and Houses of Worship

Public Buildings

N

N

N

N

C

P

N

N

N

C

C

P

P

P

P

C

C

P

N

N

N

C

C

P

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Community Gardens P P P P

Open space and Recreational Facilities P P P

P = Permitted Use; CU = Conditional Use Permit Required; N = Not Allowed

P

1. Permitted Uses.

Uses listed as “Permitted (P)” are allowed. All uses are subject to the development standards of zone in which they are located, any applicable overlay zone(s), and the review procedures of Part 18.5. See section 18.5.1.020 Determination of Review Procedure.

2.Conditional Uses.

Uses listed as “Conditional Use Permit Required (C)” are allowed subject to the requirements of chapter 18.5.4 Conditional Use Permits.

3. Prohibited Uses.

Uses not listed in the Land Use Table, and not found to be similar to an allowed use following the procedures of section 18.1.5.040 Similar Uses, are prohibited.

18.3.4.050 Dimensional Regulations

A.

The lot and building dimensions shall conform to the standards in Table 18.3.4.050 below.

Table 18.3.4.050 Dimensional Standards

Base density, dwelling units per acre

Minimum Lot Area

1

, square feet

(applies to lots created by partitions only)

Minimum Lot Depth

1

, feet

(applies to lots created by partitions only)

Minimum Lot Width

1

, feet

(applies to lots created by partitions only)

Setbacks and yards (feet)

NN-1-5

4.5

5,000

80

50

NN-1-3.5

NN-1-3.5C

7.2

3500

80

35

NN-2

13.5

3000

80

25

Minimum Front Yard abutting a street 15

Minimum Front Yard to a garage facing a public street, feet

20

Minimum Front Yard to unenclosed front porch, feet 8

2

Minimum Side Yard

Minimum Side Yard abutting a public street

Minimum Rear Yard

Solar Access

Maximum Building Height, feet / stories

15

20

8

2

15

20

8

2

6

10

6

0

3

10

6

0

3

10

10 ft per Bldg Story, 5 feet per Half Story

Setback and yard requirements shall conform to the

Solar Access standards of chapter 18.4.8

35 / 2.5 35 / 2.5 35 / 2.5

Maximum Lot Coverage, percentage of lot 50% 55% 65%

Minimum Required Landscaping, percentage of lot

Parking

50% 45% 35%

See section 18.4.3.080 Vehicle Area Design

Requirements

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Minimum Outdoor Recreation Space, percentage of lot na na 8%

1 Minimum Lot Area , Depth, and Width requirements do not apply in performance standards subdivisions.

2 Minimum Front Yard to an unenclosed front porch (Feet), or the width of any existing public utility easement, whichever is greater; an unenclosed porch must be no less than 6 feet in depth and 8 feet in width, see section 18.6.1.030 for definition of porch.

3 Minimum Side Yard for Attached Residential Units (Feet)

B.

Density Standards

Development density in the Normal Neighborhood shall not exceed the densities established by Table 18.3.4.050, except where granted a density bonus under chapter 18.3.9.

Performance Standards Options and consistent with the following:

1 General Density Provisions.

a. The density in NN-1-5, NN-1-3.5, NN-1-3.5-C and NN-2 zones is to be computed by dividing the total number of dwelling units by the acreage of the project, including land dedicated to the public. b. Conservation Areas including wetlands, floodplain corridor lands, and water resource protection zones may be excluded from the acreage of the project for the purposes of calculating minimum density for residential annexations as described in section 18.5.8.050.F. c. Units less than 500 square feet of gross habitable area shall count as 0.75 units for the purposes of density calculations. d. Accessory residential units consistent with standards described in section 18.2.3.040 are not required to meet density or minimum lot area requirements. e. Accessory residential units shall be included for the purposes of meeting minimum density calculation requirements for residential annexations as described in 18.5.8.050.F.

2. Residential Density Bonuses

.

a. The maximum residential density bonuses permitted shall be as described in section

18.2.5.080.F. b. Cottage Housing.

[Reserved]

18.3.4.060 Site Development and Design Standards.

The Normal Neighborhood District Design

Standards provide specific requirements for the physical orientation, uses and arrangement of buildings; the management of parking; and access to development parcels. Development located in the Normal

Neighborhood District must be designed and constructed consistent with the Site Design and Use Standards chapter 18.5.2 and the following:

A. Street Design and Access Standards.

Design and construct streets and public improvements in accordance with the Ashland Street Standards. A change in the design of a street in a manner inconsistent with the Normal Neighborhood Plan requires a minor amendment in accordance with section 18.3.4.030.B.

1. Conformance with Street Network Plan:

New developments must provide avenues, neighborhood collectors, streets, alleys, multi-use paths, and pedestrian and bicycle improvements consistent with the design concepts within the mobility chapter of the Normal

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Neighborhood Plan Framework and in conformance with the Normal Neighborhood Plan

Street Network Map. a. Streets designated as Shared Streets on the Normal Neighborhood Plan Street

Network Map may be alternatively developed as alleys, or multiuse paths provided the following: i. Impacts to the water protection zones are minimized to the greatest extent feasible. ii. Pedestrian and bicyclist connectivity, as indicated on the Normal Avenue

Neighborhood Plan Pedestrian and Bicycle Network Map, is maintained or enhanced.

2 Storm water management.

The Normal Neighborhood Plan uses street trees, green streets, and other green infrastructure to manage storm water, protect water quality and improve watershed health. Discharge of storm water runoff must be directed into a designated green street and neighborhood storm water treatment facilities. a.. Design Green Streets. Streets designated as Green Streets within the Street Network, and as approved by the Public Works Department, shall conform to the following standards: i. New streets must be developed so as to capture and treat storm water in conformance with the City of Ashland Storm Water Master Plan.

3. Access Management Standards:

To manage access to land uses and on-site circulation, and maintain transportation safety and operations, vehicular access must conform to the standards set forth in section 18.4.3.080, and as follows: a. Automobile access to development is intended to be provided by alleys where possible consistent with the street connectivity approval standards. b. Curb cuts along a Neighborhood Collector or shared street are to be limited to one per block, or one per 200 feet where established block lengths exceed 400 feet.

4. Required On-Street Parking

: On-street parking is a key strategy to traffic calming and is required along the Neighborhood Collector and Local Streets.

B. Site and Building Design Standards.

1. Lot and Building Orientation:

a. Lot Frontage Requirements: Lots in the Normal Neighborhood are required to have their Front

Lot Line on a street or a Common Green. b. Common Green. The Common Green provides access for pedestrians and bicycles to abutting properties. Common greens are also intended to serve as a common open space amenity for residents. The following approval criteria and standards apply to common greens:

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i. Common Greens must include at least 400 square feet of grassy area, play area, or dedicated gardening space, which must be at least 15 feet wide at its narrowest dimension.

2. Cottage Housing

:

[Reserved]

.

3. Conservation of Natural Areas.

Development plans must preserve water quality, natural hydrology and habitat, and preserve biodiversity through protection of streams and wetlands.

In addition to the requirements of 18.3.11 Water Resources Protection Zones (Overlays), conserving natural water systems must be considered in the site design through the application of the following guidelines: a.Designated stream and wetland protection areas are to be considered positive design elements and incorporated in the overall design of a given project. b.Native riparian plant materials must be planted in and adjacent to the creek to enhance habitat. c. Create a long-term management plan for on-site wetlands, streams, associated habitats and their buffers.

4. Storm Water Management.

Storm water run-off, from building roofs, driveways, parking areas, sidewalks, and other hard surfaces must be managed through implementation of the following storm water management practices: a. When required by the City Engineer, the applicant must submit hydrology and hydraulic calculations, and drainage area maps to the City, to determine the quantity of predevelopment, and estimated post-development, storm water runoff and evaluate the effectiveness of storm water management strategies. Computations must be site specific and must account for conditions such as soil type, vegetative cover, impervious areas, existing drainage patterns, flood plain areas and wetlands. b. Future Peak Storm water flows and volumes shall not exceed the pre-development peak flow.

The default value for pre-development peak flow is .25 CFS per acre. c. Detention volume must be sized for the 25 year, 24 hour peak flow and volume. d. Development must comply with one or more of following guidelines.

i. Implement storm water management techniques that endeavor to treat the water as close as possible to the spot where it hits the ground through infiltration, evapotranspiration or through capture and reuse techniques. ii. Use on-site landscape-based water treatment methods to treat rainwater runoff from all surfaces, including parking lots, roofs, and sidewalks. iii. Use pervious or semi-pervious surfaces that allow water to infiltrate soil. iv. Design grading and site plans that create a system that slows the stormwater, maximizing time for cleansing and infiltration.

v. Maximizing the length of overland flow of storm water through bioswales and rain gardens, vi. Use structural soils in those environments that support pavements and trees yet are free draining.

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vii. Plant deep rooted native plants. viii, Replace metabolically active minerals, trace elements and microorganism rich compost in all soils disturbed through construction activities.

5. Off-Street Parking.

Automobile parking, loading and circulation areas must comply with the requirements of chapter 18.4.3 Parking, Access, and Circulation Standards, and as follows: a. Neighborhood serving commercial uses within the NN-1-3.5-C zone must have parking primarily accommodated by the provision of public parking areas and onstreet parking spaces, and are not required to provide private off-street parking or loading areas, except for residential uses where one space shall be provided per residential unit.

6. Neighborhood Module Concept plans.

The Neighborhood Module Concept plans (i.e. development scenarios) are for the purpose of providing an example of developments that conform to the standards, and do not constitute independent approval criteria. Concept plans are attached to the end of this chapter.

18.3.4.65 Exception to the Site Development and Design Standards

An exception to the requirements Site Development and Design Standards must follow the procedures and approval criteria adopted under section 18.4.1.030, unless authorized under the procedures for a major amendment to plan.

18.3.4.070. Open Space Area Overlay

All projects containing land identified as Open Space Areas on the Normal Neighborhood Plan Open Space

Network Map, unless otherwise amended per section 18.3.030.C

,

must dedicate those areas as: common areas, public open space, or private open space protected by restrictive covenant. It is recognized that the master planning of the properties as part of the Normal Neighborhood Plan imparted significant value to the land, and the reservation of lands for recreational open space and conservation purposes is proportional to the value bestowed upon the property through the change in zoning designation and future annexation.

18.3.4.075. Advance Financing District [Reserved]

18.3.4.080. Review and Approval Procedure.

All land use applications are to be reviewed and processed in accordance with the applicable procedures of Part 18.5.

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Neighborhood Module Concept plans

The City recognizes that future innovations in building technologies, water conservation practices, and creative approaches to site design and layout will help shape the neighborhood module concept in consideration of the unique characteristics of the properties being developed. As such these example illustrations presented are primarily intended to assist those involved in conceptualizing a development to better address the principle objectives outlined within the Normal Neighborhood Plan.

Page 11 of 11

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Planning Commission Report

DATE: April 22, 2014

TO:

FROM:

Ashland City Council

Ashland Planning Commission

RE: PA#20130-1858 Normal Neighborhood Plan

Planning Commission Recommendations

Summary

The Ashland Planning Commission held a public hearing on March 11, 2014 related to the

Comprehensive Plan, Comprehensive Plan Map, Transportation System Plan, and Ashland Land Use

Ordinance amendments proposed to implement the Normal Neighborhood Plan (Planning Action 2013-

01858). The Commission concluded their review on April 8 th

and following discussion and deliberation unanimously recommended the City Council approve of the Normal Neighborhood Plan with a number of specific recommendations as outlined in this report.

The Normal Neighborhood Plan area is one of the last sizeable tracts of largely undeveloped land designated for residential purposes in Ashland’s Urban Growth Boundary (UGB). The future development of this area is expected to contribute toward accommodating long range population growth consistent with the City’s Comprehensive Plan, and Ashland’s position in the Greater Bear Creek Valley

Regional Problem Solving Plan (RPS). The Planning Commission recognizes in order to

maintain a compact urban form

and to

ensure the orderly and sequential development of land

(Comprehensive Plan

Goal 12.09) that neighborhood planning is an appropriate tool for this area. The creation of a neighborhood plan in this area is particularly valuable as over three decades of development has occurred in the area, under county standards, since the original Comprehensive Plan land use designations were assigned to the area. Consideration of the area’s existing pattern of development, presence of water resource protection areas, existing and projected traffic volumes, and public testimony has allowed the Planning Commission to better understand the development constraints within the plan area, and carefully address the coordinated provision of open space, transportation, infrastructure, and housing.

Recommendations

The Planning Commission identified two categories of recommended amendments, those changes that are minor editorial corrections, and those changes that have broader policy implications. Amendments that are editorial in nature and necessary to clarify terminology and provide inter-document consistency are to be included in the final documents presented to the City Council. A list of these editorial changes is attached to this report (Appendix A). The Commission’s recommendations pertaining to allowable land use standards, the stated purpose of open space, and the extent and timing of transportation system improvements are addressed in this report as specific recommendations for Council’s consideration.

Comprehensive Plan Change and Land Use Designations

The Planning Commission supports the proposed Comprehensive Plan amendments and Land Use

Designation Overlay Zones as proposed, and recommends the following:

90

o

Approval of the proposed amendment to the Ashland Comprehensive Plan Map to create a designation for the Normal Neighborhood Plan District, including revised boundaries for

-

2-

Conservation Areas within the plan area. o

Adoption of the Normal Neighborhood Plan Land Use Designations Overlay Zone Map. o

Adoption of the Normal Neighborhood Plan Framework document as a supporting document to the City’s Comprehensive Plan, with recommended changes to the mobility and open space chapters as described below.

Mobility (Transportation) Framework

The Planning Commission supports the Street Network, Pedestrian and Bicycle Network, Green Street

Network, Shared Street Standard, and Street Classifications as proposed, and recommends approval of amendments to the the City Transportation System Plan (TSP) and City Street Standards to incorporate these elements of the Normal Neighborhood Plan as follows: o

Amend to the Street Dedication Map (TSP Figure 10-1) to incorporate the plan area’s proposed Street Network, and reclassification of Normal “Avenue” to be a Neighborhood

Collector. o

Amend the Planned Intersection and Roadway Improvement Map (TSP Figure 10-3) to include East Main Street as a Planned Roadway Project. o

Amend the Planned Bikeway Network Map (TSP Figure 8-1) to incorporate the planned multi-use trails within the Normal Neighborhood Plan. o

Amend the Street Design Standards within the Street Standards Handbook to incorporate the

Shared Street classification.

The Planning Commission has specific recommendations relating to the timing of transportation improvements associated with the future development of the plan area. In order to address current and future transportation along to East Main Street, the Commission recommends the mobility chapter of the

Normal Neighborhood Plan Framework Document be amended to reflect the following:

The south side of East Main Street, from Walker Avenue to Clay Street, should be fully improved to City Street Standards prior to, or coinciding with any future annexation and development within the plan area.

A future transit stop coordinated with the Rogue Valley Transportation District, in the immediate vicinity of the NN-03 Land Use Zone, should be incorporated into the East Main

Street roadway design and development.

That prior to annexation and development within the plan area the following items relating to the future Railroad crossing at Normal Avenue be addressed: o

That the proposed public Rail Road crossing can be installed without necessitating the closure of any existing public crossing within the City. o

A financing plan be developed and approved by the City for the future improvement of the rail road crossing.

Open Space Framework

The Planning Commission supports the Comprehensive Plan map amendment to establish designated

Conservation Ares as proposed, which include the Cemetery Creek and Clay Creek 100 year

Floodplains, Wetlands identified in the 2007 Local Wetland Inventory, and wetland and riparian buffer

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20 E. Main Street

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-

3areas consistent with the Water Resource Protection Zones. The Planning Commission further supports the Open Space Network map as presented and recommends approval of these plan elements.

The Planning Commission has determined that the provision of open space within the plan area has environmental, recreational, and aesthetic value to the neighborhood. The contiguous open space corridors are a neighborhood defining characteristic and as such the Planning Commission recommends the Normal Neighborhood Plan Framework Document’s Greenway and Open Space chapter be amended to further emphasize the community value of open space retention with a concluding statement on page

14 as follows:

The Normal Neighborhood’s distinctive character is shaped by the presence of prominent open spaces and natural areas. The preservation of these neighborhood defining features is central to the success of the neighborhood plan as they ensure the protection of fragile ecosystems, provide passive recreational opportunities where people can connect with nature, protect scenic views considered important to the community, protect future development from flood hazards, and preserve community character and quality of life by buffering areas of development from one another. The permanent establishment of interconnected open spaces and contiguous conservation areas as proposed in the Open Space Framework is essential to promote and maintain high quality residential development which is appropriate to the distinct character of the neighborhood.

Land Use Ordinance

The proposed Normal Neighborhood District Land Use Ordinance will be reviewed as part of a separate legislative process as it is to be incorporated into the Unified Land Use Ordinance (ULUO) process presently underway. However, given the interrelated nature of the Normal Neighborhood Plan elements the Planning Commission took testimony regarding the draft Normal Neighborhood District Land Use

Ordinance at March 11 th

public hearing in order to evaluate the draft ordinance and formulate recommendations for the Council’s consideration. The Planning Commission supports the draft land use ordinance’s mix of land uses, housing types and proposed densities, Site Development and Design

Standards, and flexibility afforded by the proposed major and minor amendment provisions, with following recommended policy change:

The Commission recommends the dimensional regulations in the proposed land use ordinance

(18-3.13.050) and the review procedures be amended to include a Conditional Use Permit to increase building height from the proposed 35ft and 2½ story maximum up to 40ft and 3stories exclusively within the NN-03 and NN-03C zones. The Commission finds that such a change would provide applicants greater site and building design flexibility in achieving the stated densities (15 units per acre) within the NN-03 and NN-03-C zones, while retaining a publically noticed review process to evaluate the bulk and scale of proposed buildings to ensure neighborhood compatibility is preserved.

Conclusion

Through the two year public neighborhood planning process the Planning Commission has evaluated the impacts of future development in consideration the of goal to ensure a variety of dwelling types and provide housing opportunities for the total cross section of Ashland’s population, consistent with preserving the character and appearance of the City (Comprehensive Plan goal 6.10). The resulting

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neighborhood plan strives to preserve the character of the neighborhood, accommodate a variety of housing types, connect a system of greenways, protect and integrate existing creek corridors and wetlands, and enhance mobility for area residents through establishing safe and direct walking and bicycle routes. The Planning Commission finds the Normal Neighborhood Plan, with the additional recommendations included in this report, achieves these objectives and will be a valuable guide for future annexation and development of properties within the 94 acre area.

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5-

Appendix A

Editorial Changes incorporated into the final plan documents

The editorial changes recommended by the Planning Commission and Staff were needed to clarify terminology and provide inter-document consistency. These changes have already been incorporated into the draft documents presented to the City Council for consideration. The following lists the specific changes that were made to the plan documents presented at the first public hearing on March 11, 2014:

Amend the framework document (page 7) under Double Dwellings to strike NN-01 as a zone where they are permitted.

Amend the Framework Document to alter references to Pedestrian Oriented Cluster Housing

(e.g top of page 7) to be consistent with the description of the Housing Type as written on page 8.

Amend the Framework Document to eliminate statements that stipulate that rear alleys “help to eliminate pavement” as although true in some site configurations it is not universally true in all circumstances (pg 16).

Amend the Framework Document’s “Use Table” on page 10 to include Pedestrian Oriented

Cluster Housing as permitted in NN-02 and NN-03 consistent with the draft Land Use

Ordinance.

Amend the draft Land Use Code 18-3.13.040 as follows: o

A2: The use regulations and development standards are intended to create, maintain and promote single-dwelling neighborhood character. A variety of housing types are allowed including multiple compact attached and/or detached dwellings. Dwellings may be grouped around common open space promoting a scale and character compatible with single family homes. Development standards that are largely the same as those for single dwellings ensure that the overall image and character of the single-dwelling neighborhood is maintained. o

B5: Pedestrian Oriented Cluster residential Units are multiple dwellings grouped around common open space that promote a scale and character compatible with single family homes. Units are typically arranged around a central common green under communal ownership. Auto Parking is generally grouped in a shared surface area or areas. o

B7: Add a place holder for a Cottage Housing description consistent with the Unified

Land Use Ordinance.

Amend the draft Land Use Code 18-3.13.050 to read as follows: o

B1(e). Accessory residential units shall be included for the purposes of meeting minimum density calculation requirements for residential annexations as described in 18-

5.7.050F. o

B2(b): Cottage Housing. In the NN-01 zone, developments meeting the standards of section 18-2.3.090 Cottage housing shall receive a density bonus consistent with 18x.xx.xxx .

(to reference the density bonus put forth in the ULUO)

Amend the draft Land Use Code 18-3-13.060 to read as follows:

A3(a): Automobile Access to development is intended to be provided by alleys where possible consistent with the street connectivity approval standards.

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Ashland, Oregon 97520 www.ashland.or.us

94

Memo

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TO: Ashland City Council

FROM: Normal Neighborhood Plan Working Group

DATE: December 2, 2014

RE: Normal Neighborhood Plan Recommendations

____________________________________________________________________________________

Vision Statement

Neighborhood planning is the process by which the City works with Ashland’s residents to envision the future of the neighborhood. The eventual incorporation of the Normal Neighborhood Plan area into the City depends on careful consideration of the neighborhood’s unique identity and character and a holistic planning approach. The Normal Neighborhood Working Group envisions a neighborhood that is notable for the natural beauty of the area’s wetlands and creeks, mountain views, diversity of households, and as an area which accommodates bicycling and walking as a reliable and convenient way to move throughout the area.

Local streams, wetlands, and scenic vistas contribute significantly to define the character of the

Normal Neighborhood. The quality of the place is enhanced by these features and the wildlife that they attract. Connected and contiguous open spaces should remain as central features of the area’s future development as they help reflect the community of Ashland’s commitment to promote environmental quality, provide recreational opportunities, and function to incorporate nature into the daily lives of the area’s residents.

The neighborhood should provide for a range of housing choices available a diversity of

Ashland’s population. The neighborhood can accommodate a blend of housing types including individual residences, townhomes, apartments, moderately sized cottages, pedestrian oriented cluster housing, and mixed-use neighborhood serving businesses. Future developments should be designed to relate to, and complement, adjacent properties. Incorporating unifying elements between adjacent developments will serve to promote neighborhood cohesiveness, provide open space in a coordinated manner, and secure an efficient circulation system. Given the immediate proximity to existing schools, parks, and local business areas the neighborhood is recognized as place where children can readily walk and bike to schools through a safe, desirable family-based neighborhood.

The Normal Neighborhood Plan Working Group believes a neighborhood plan is necessary to address long-term community goals, unify expectations, and integrate the project area into the fabric of the City. The implementation standards for the neighborhood plan should be strong enough to maintain the vision for the area, yet flexible enough to respond to changing conditions and adapt over time.

Normal Neighborhood Working Group

95

Memo

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Recommendations

Land Use and Housing Density

:

1.

Housing Density gradation should move from south to north. This would place higher density development near the railroad tracks and within a relatively short distance to transit lines, parks and community facilities. This approach will also protect the existing viewshed.

2.

Zoning designations applied within the Normal neighborhood area should be consistent with the zoning of adjacent land within the City Limits, and use zoning labels that are comparable to those used in the rest of the city while recognizing the Normal Neighborhood (NN) district.

3.

Maintain option for neighborhood serving businesses and services close to East Main St near the northeast corner of the plan area.

Open Space :

1.

Maintain the approach toward designation of open space and conservation areas proposed in the draft plan. Amend the plan to allow non-conservation open space to be relocated requiring a minor amendment application.

2.

Obtain a review of the final plan by the Parks Department prior to adoption.

Design issues

:

1.

Maintain a maximum building height of 35 feet.

2.

Encourage the development of clustered housing that integrates with open space and respects the viewshed.

3.

Provide for a smooth transition between adjacent developments to promote neighborhood cohesiveness, provide open space in a coordinated manner, and secure an efficient circulation system.

Transportation

:

1.

The internal transportation system’s local street network should incorporate multiple connections with East Main St as shown, and maintain the Normal Collector as designated in the draft plan.

Additional connections to East Main Street or Clay Street, which are not shown in the proposed

Street Framework, should require a major amendment to the Plan.

2.

Internal local streets should be aligned to provide a grid pattern, including clear east-west connections.

3.

Pedestrian and bicycle pathways are critical, especially as a means to connect residents with the middle school and the existing bike path.

4.

External transportation improvements, including the railroad crossing and improvements to East

Main St., are integral and should proceed in concert with development. However, we believe the city may need to play a role in the financing/implementation of these projects. Accordingly, as a next step we recommend that the council direct city staff and/or an outside consultant to identify and quantify: a.

the need and possible means for public investment in the project, and b.

the overall costs and benefits that these facilities present to the entire city.

Normal Neighborhood Working Group

96

Memo

DATE:

RE:

July 28, 2015

Planning Commission Attendance Report

Pursuant to AMC 2.10.025, below is the Planning Commission’s attendance record for January through

June, 2015. This report is for information only; No action by the Planning Commission is needed.

Meeting Date Meeting Type Absences

January 13, 2015

February 10, 2015

February 24, 2015

March 10, 2015

March 31, 2015

April 14, 2015

April 28, 2015

May 12, 2015

June 9, 2015

June 23, 2015

Regular Meeting

Regular Meeting

Study Session

Regular Meeting

Study Session

Regular Meeting

Special Meeting

Regular Meeting

Regular Meeting

Special Meeting

0

0

0

0

1 – Commissioner Miller

2 – Commissioners Miller, Peddicord

2 – Commissioners Miller, Brown

0

1 – Commissioner Pearce

2 – Commissioners Pearce, Thompson

Section 2.10.025 Meetings and Attendance

A. Unless otherwise provided by law, the number of meetings related to business needs of an advisory commission, or boards may be set by the advisory body.

B. The Planning Commission and Budget Committee shall set their own meeting attendance requirements. All members of other Regular or ad hoc advisory bodies must attend at least seventy-five percent (75%) of the full advisory body’s noticed meetings, study sessions and special meetings in each full year of their tenure. A person removed from the advisory body for non-compliance with attendance requirements subsequently may be appointed to fill the vacancy on the advisory body by means of the normal appointment process of that advisory body.

C. A member should provide at least 48-hour notice to both the chair of the advisory body and the staff liaison regarding any planned absence from a scheduled meeting of the advisory body. In the event an unexpected emergency will cause a member to be absent from the meeting, the member must, if possible, notify the chair or the staff liaison within a reasonable time in advance of the meeting.

D. Generally, advisory bodies may not allow alternates to represent or stand in for a member at a meeting. Notwithstanding the foregoing preclusion of alternates, on Regular and ad hoc advisory bodies with some members who are appointed by an entity other than the Mayor and City Council and who serve as a representative of the appointing entity, an alternate may participate and vote for the named member by proxy at any meeting of the advisory body. Such participation by the alternate will be deemed to be attendance by the named member. Individuals directly appointed by the Mayor and approved by the Council may not be represented by alternates.

E. Each advisory body should review member attendance and report to the City Recorder approximately every six months.

City Recorder will advise the Mayor on the need for appointments or re-appointments, if necessary.

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