2015 CIP

2015 CIP
COMPREHENSIVE
INSTITUTIONAL PLAN
2015
Table of Contents
1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................... 6
2. ACCOUNTABILITY STATEMENT ........................................................................................................ 12
3. INSTITUTIONAL CONTEXT ................................................................................................................ 13
3.1
3.2
3.3
Institutional Role ........................................................................................................................... 13
Responsibilities ............................................................................................................................. 14
Mandate ........................................................................................................................................ 14
4. PLAN DEVELOPMENT ....................................................................................................................... 16
5. ENVIRONMENTAL SCAN ................................................................................................................... 17
5.1
5.2
5.3
The Growing Importance of Higher Education and Research in an Interconnected World ......... 17
The National Context: Canada 2015 ............................................................................................. 18
The Alberta and Calgary Context .................................................................................................. 19
6. ACADEMIC AND RESEARCH OUTCOMES .......................................................................................... 23
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
6.8
6.9
6.10
Introduction .................................................................................................................................. 23
The Academic Plan ........................................................................................................................ 24
The Research Plan ......................................................................................................................... 25
Key Outcomes ............................................................................................................................... 27
Enrolment Projections .................................................................................................................. 40
Student Demand ........................................................................................................................... 42
Program Expansion Proposals....................................................................................................... 43
New Programs Under Development ............................................................................................. 43
Performance Measures ................................................................................................................. 45
Summary ....................................................................................................................................... 45
7. CONNECTIVITY ................................................................................................................................. 46
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
Calgary and Surrounding Areas..................................................................................................... 46
Campus Alberta (Province-Wide).................................................................................................. 48
Multiple Provincial / National Partnerships .................................................................................. 50
International Partnerships ............................................................................................................ 52
8. INTERNATIONALIZATION.................................................................................................................. 55
9. CAPITAL PLAN................................................................................................................................... 62
9.1
9.2
9.3
9.4
9.5
9.6
Introduction / Summary ............................................................................................................... 62
Activities Supporting our Strategic Planning Priorities ................................................................. 63
Overview of Current Capital Projects ........................................................................................... 65
Highest Priority Capital Projects Seeking Government Support ................................................... 69
Priority Capital Projects Internally Funded ................................................................................... 78
Other Institutional Capital Priorities ............................................................................................. 79
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10. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ........................................................................................................ 83
10.1
10.2
10.3
10.4
Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 83
2014-15 Information Technology Plan Review ........................................................................... 83
Short-term Information Technology Requests ........................................................................... 84
Capital Information Technology Requests .................................................................................. 86
11. PLAN FOR FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY .......................................................................................... 87
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
11.5
11.6
11.7
11.8
11.9
Statement of Expected Revenues and Expenses ........................................................................ 87
Projected Revenue ...................................................................................................................... 89
Projected Expense – by Function ................................................................................................ 91
Projected Expense – by Object ................................................................................................... 92
Budgeted Cash Flow Statement .................................................................................................. 94
Capital Budget ............................................................................................................................. 95
Infrastructure Budget.................................................................................................................. 96
Budget Assumptions, Risks and Sensitivity ................................................................................. 97
Tuition and Fees .......................................................................................................................... 98
12. RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS............................................................................................................ 107
12.1
12.2
12.3
12.4
12.5
Access and Growth ................................................................................................................... 107
Facilities and Maintenance ....................................................................................................... 107
Information Technology............................................................................................................ 108
Financial Sustainability.............................................................................................................. 108
Pension Liability ........................................................................................................................ 109
13. PERFORMANCE MEASURES ......................................................................................................... 110
13.1
13.2
13.3
13.4
Teaching and Learning .............................................................................................................. 112
Research and Scholarship ......................................................................................................... 120
Community and Environment ................................................................................................... 126
Other ......................................................................................................................................... 129
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Figures and Tables
FIGURES
Figure 1 – Plan Development (Formal Governance Review and Approval Process) ................................. 16
Figure 2 – Per Cent of Labour Force in Selected Industries....................................................................... 21
Figure 3 – Academic Priorities ................................................................................................................... 25
Figure 4 – Research Priorities .................................................................................................................... 26
Figure 5 – Research Themes and Platforms Interaction............................................................................ 26
Figure 6 – Research Platforms ................................................................................................................... 27
Figure 7 – Projected Revenue .................................................................................................................... 89
Figure 8 – Projected Expense by Function................................................................................................. 91
Figure 9 – Projected Expense by Object .................................................................................................... 92
Figure 10 – Teaching ................................................................................................................................ 112
Figure 11 – Undergraduate Retention Rate ............................................................................................ 112
Figure 12 – Graduation Rate .................................................................................................................... 113
Figure 13 – Time to Completion .............................................................................................................. 113
Figure 14 – Ratio of Applicants to Student Intake ................................................................................... 114
Figure 15 – Average Entering Grade from High School ........................................................................... 114
Figure 16 – Student Mix (Graduate Proportion of Total Enrolment) ...................................................... 115
Figure 17 – Student Mix (International Enrolment) ................................................................................ 115
Figure 18 – Ratio of Students to Faculty (Total) ...................................................................................... 116
Figure 19 – Ratio of Students to Faculty (Graduate) ............................................................................... 116
Figure 20 – Undergraduate Student Engagement ................................................................................... 117
Figure 21 – Graduate Student Engagement ............................................................................................ 117
Figure 22 – Graduate Satisfaction ........................................................................................................... 118
Figure 23 – Degrees Awarded.................................................................................................................. 118
Figure 24 – Employment Rate ................................................................................................................. 119
Figure 25 – Postdoctoral Scholars ........................................................................................................... 120
Figure 26 – Postdoctoral Scholars (Per Tenure & Tenure-Track Faculty Member) ................................. 120
Figure 27 – Sponsored Research Funding (Total) .................................................................................... 121
Figure 28 – Sponsored Research Funding (Per Tenure & Tenure-Track Faculty Member) ..................... 121
Figure 29 – Tri-Council Funding (Total) ................................................................................................... 122
Figure 30 – Tri-Council Funding (Per Tenure and Tenure-Track Faculty Member) ................................. 122
Figure 31 – Publications (Total) ............................................................................................................... 123
Figure 32 – Publications (Per Tenure and Tenure-Track Faculty Member) ............................................. 123
Figure 33 – Citations (Total) .................................................................................................................... 124
Figure 34 – Citations (Per Tenure and Tenure-Track Faculty Member) .................................................. 124
Figure 35 – New Invention Disclosures ................................................................................................... 125
Figure 36 – New Licenses......................................................................................................................... 125
Figure 37 – Fundraising............................................................................................................................ 126
Figure 38 – Financial Health (Endowment Balance) ................................................................................ 126
Figure 39 – Financial Sustainability (Unrestricted Net Assets) ................................................................ 127
Figure 40 – Financial Sustainability (Facilities Condition Index – (FCI))................................................... 127
Figure 41 – Sustainability ......................................................................................................................... 128
Figure 42 – Employee Engagement ......................................................................................................... 129
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TABLES
Table 1 – Highest-Priority Capital Projects .................................................................................................. 9
Table 2 – Information Technology – Base Funding Request to Government............................................ 10
Table 3 – Consolidated Budget and Two-year Forecast for 2015-16 ........................................................ 10
Table 4 – Resource Implications – Funding Request to Government ....................................................... 11
Table 5 – Program Expansion .................................................................................................................... 40
Table 6 – International Cumulative Enrolment Growth ............................................................................ 41
Table 7 – Total Enrolment Projections ...................................................................................................... 41
Table 8 – 2015-16 Fall Enrolment Target by Faculty (Headcount [HC] and Full Load Equivalent [FLE]) ... 42
Table 9 – Enrolment Expansion Summary ................................................................................................. 43
Table 10 – Highest-priority Capital Projects .............................................................................................. 63
Table 11 – Highest-priority Capital Projects .............................................................................................. 69
Table 12 – Three-year Infrastructure Maintenance Program (Projected Plans) ....................................... 77
Table 13 – Approved 2015-16 CAR/FAR Projects ...................................................................................... 78
Table 14 – Other Capital Priority Projects List ........................................................................................... 80
Table 15 – Ten-Year Capital Forecast ........................................................................................................ 82
Table 16 – Information Technology Funding Requests ............................................................................. 84
Table 17 – IT Infrastructure Support and Renewal Focus Areas ............................................................... 84
Table 18 – Information Technology Investments to Support Research .................................................... 85
Table 19 – Consolidated Budget and Two-year Forecast for 2015-16 ...................................................... 88
Table 20 – Unrestricted Net Assets ........................................................................................................... 88
Table 21 – Expense by Object and Two-year Forecast for 2015-16 .......................................................... 89
Table 22 – Budgeted Cash Flow Statement for 2015-16 ........................................................................... 94
Table 23 – Capital Budget (2015-16) ......................................................................................................... 95
Table 24 – Infrastructure Budget (2015-16) .............................................................................................. 96
Table 25 – Budget Sensitivity..................................................................................................................... 97
Table 26 – Tuition Fees (Canadians and Permanent Residents) ............................................................... 99
Table 27 – Other Tuition Fees (Canadians and Permanent Residents) ................................................... 100
Table 28 – Tuition Fees (International Students) .................................................................................... 101
Table 29 – Non-Calendared Tuition Fees (International Students) ......................................................... 102
Table 30 – General Fees – Fall or Winter (Undergraduate Students) ..................................................... 103
Table 31 – General Fees – Spring or Summer (Undergraduate Students) .............................................. 104
Table 32 – General Fees – Yearly (Graduate Students) ........................................................................... 104
Table 33 – Residence Rates ..................................................................................................................... 105
Table 34 – Meal Plan Rates...................................................................................................................... 106
Table 35 – Priority Funding List (Facilities and Maintenance) ................................................................. 108
Table 36 – Priority Funding List (Information Technology) ..................................................................... 108
Table 37 – Priority Funding List (Pension Liability) .................................................................................. 109
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1. Executive Summary
The University of Calgary is proud to submit our 2015 Comprehensive Institutional Plan to the Ministry of
Innovation and Advanced Education. This executive summary provides in capsule format the information
requested by the Ministry. The key messages of this document are:






the University of Calgary is guided by a triad of documents – our Eyes High Strategic Vision,
Academic Plan and Research Plan – which drive decision-making in the university;
the university is led by a strong and experienced leadership team;
the university has managed difficult budget cuts, but we are less resilient – and continued
reductions in core funding will limit our ability to achieve our strategic goals;
we are a strong Campus Alberta partner and we will work with the Ministry and our partners to
advance the post-secondary system in Alberta;
we believe differential funding that recognizes strategic advancement is key to building a stronger
Alberta post-secondary system; and
universities are important drivers of economic diversification and are a good investment.
VISION
Eyes High. Our vision of becoming one of Canada’s top five research universities, grounded in innovative
learning and teaching and fully integrated with the community, is bold and ambitious. This vision belongs
to the thousands of people in our community who shared their aspirations to make our university a truly
great university.
The University of Calgary will be a global intellectual hub located in Canada’s most
enterprising city. In this spirited, high-quality learning environment, students will thrive
in programs made rich by research and hands-on experiences. By our fiftieth anniversary
in 2016, we will be one of Canada’s top five research universities, fully engaging the
communities we both serve and lead.
We have used this vision, along with the seven priorities outlined in our Academic Plan and three priorities
outlined in our Research Plan, to guide all of our actions since the 2011-12 academic year. We have been
strategic, disciplined, rigorous, and intentional in our actions. We have an exciting research direction, a
renewed focus on innovative and high quality academic program delivery and student and staff
experience, a strong financial foundation, improved service delivery, and improved world rankings.
According to the 2014 Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) Top 50 Under 50 world university ranking, the
University of Calgary is ranked first in Canada, second in North America, and ninth in the world amongst
universities under fifty years of age. We are a young academic institution on the rise, making significant
contributions to the local and provincial economies. We are a strong Campus Alberta partner, and we are
excited about our future. In this context, we are pleased to present our 2015 Comprehensive Institutional
Plan.
INSTITUTIONAL CONTEXT
The University of Calgary is located in one of the country’s most dynamic and enterprising city, the energy
capital of Canada - Calgary. We have earned a reputation for courageous thinking and for attracting
exceptional people. We have motivated and accomplished staff and students whose talent will guide the
University of Calgary to become a global intellectual hub. Our graduates are community leaders. Over
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100,000 of our 155,000 alumni have careers in Calgary. Other graduates are located in 147 different
countries, making a difference globally.
Through our Eyes High vision and the priorities articulated in our Academic Plan and Research Plan, we
have begun a transformation that will greatly enhance the impact of the institution on our city, our
province, and society at large. This transformation involves all aspects of our educational and research
enterprises as well as how we engage with our communities. These changes position the University of
Calgary to be a strategic partner with the Government of Alberta. Through this partnership and with
others in Campus Alberta, we inspire and support lifelong learning, and foster a post-secondary system
that enhances social, economic, and cultural prosperity.
We have weathered the budget storm of the past few years, but are less resilient now. Continued
reduction in funding will limit our ability to achieve our strategic goals, and will limit the capacity of the
post-secondary system to be an economic diversifier.
PLAN DEVELOPMENT
This Comprehensive Institutional Plan is a three-year, integrated planning document that satisfies
legislated requirements described within the Post-secondary Learning Act and the Fiscal Management
Act. It has been constructed as a series of chapters overseen by a senior team at the university with broad
consultation with our internal and external communities. The academic and research priorities outlined
in our Academic Plan and Research Plan drive the allocation of human, capital, and financial resources at
our institution. Our academic and research-related chapters are approved by our General Faculties
Council, and the full document is approved by our Board of Governors prior to submission to the Ministry
of Innovation and Advanced Education.
ENVIRONMENTAL SCAN
The decline in price of Alberta’s oil and gas resources has created new challenges for the province and the
2015-16 budget presented by the government brings a reduction in the Campus Alberta grant for the
University of Calgary. Despite the downturn, Alberta still benefits from significant population growth, low
unemployment, and high incomes. Alberta’s economy in the past has brought benefits to the postsecondary sector and stronger growth is projected to return to the province in the near future. Most
Albertans believe that the province should seek to build a more diversified economy and the University
of Calgary can play a critical role in this process through the production of graduates and our creativity,
research and innovation. This is not the time to cut investment in higher education and research.
ACADEMIC AND RESEARCH OUTCOMES
Our goal is to create an academy in which teaching and research interact in novel ways to promote
discovery, creativity and innovation. Our academy will produce graduates who will be global citizens and
leaders of their respective communities, with the ability to think critically and creatively to solve issues of
the day. The Academic Plan and Research Plan outline specific annual objectives that we will continue to
deliver – the intent of this section in the Comprehensive Institutional Plan is to outline major deliverables
under each of our priorities for each year of the next three years.
The University of Calgary is a young and progressive institution in a maturation phase. While we have an
excellent triad of documents that guide our strategic vision and priorities, we also have spent considerable
effort over the past five years developing and implementing foundational systems: administrative systems
and structures, policies and procedures, and processes and practices. At times, there has been tension
between our strategic imperatives and the recognition that the proper foundational systems were not in
7
place to support the strategic imperative under development. At other times, the lack of foundational
systems has allowed for a wonderful flexibility to move new ideas through a complex system relatively
quickly. As in any maturing institution, we need continued work to advance both strategic priorities and
our foundational systems. We want to develop a strong foundational system that mitigates risk, but allows
for nimbleness and entrepreneurial and opportunistic changes. Ultimately, we want to achieve symbiotic
academic and research excellence through our Eyes High strategic vision, while building a sustainable
university that emphasizes operational excellence involving the concept of continuous improvement.
Critical deliverables will include but not be limited to the completion of the Taylor Institute for Teaching
and Learning, including staffing model; implementation of the Educational Technologies Strategy;
development and implementation of the Mental Health Strategy and an Indigenous Strategy;
development and implementation of the strategic plans for our six research themes; the implementation
of the International Strategy including the establishment of all six country/regional councils and
strategies; further connection to our community through our Alumni Strategy and targeted events,
particularly those celebrating our 50th birthday in 2016, and the implementation of an integrated
Sustainability Plan. It promises to be a very exciting two years.
Current enrolment at the University of Calgary for the academic year 2014-15 is just over 30,500 students
and we project that this will increase to over 32,000 by 2017-18 as a result of the approved expansions in
a number of areas and growth in international student registrations. This represents sustainable growth
for our institution and will help to address part of the access issue prevalent in Calgary due to projected
growth. However, the university is experiencing pressure on our human and physical resources. The
Ministry of Innovation and Advanced Education has estimated that by 2022-23, the University of Calgary
will have the largest projected space shortage of all institutions – 4,607 FLEs. The University of Calgary is
ready to do more, but requires funding to meet access and space needs. We know that student demand
is only expected to increase given the rapid rate of population growth in Calgary, and as we continue to
increase our national and international reputation. This will place further emphasis on funding required
for new enrolment and the priorities outlined within our Capital Plan.
CONNECTIVITY
In today’s complex environment, success is often the result of collaboration. Collaboration requires us to
connect internally, within Calgary, across the province and country, and through international
partnerships with private industry, government, agencies, and other universities who join us in our
mission of discovery and innovation. Our vision of connectivity is one in where we have expertise to offer
and a willingness to learn from partner institutions, and we acknowledge that unexpected synergies often
arise from working together. Within this plan, we highlight examples of partnerships that are not only
essential to the achievement of the Government of Alberta’s goals for the post-secondary system, they
are key to the University of Calgary fulfilling its mandate. These examples highlight the ways in which we
collaborate with Campus Alberta partners, and provincial, national and international partners to deliver
collaborative degrees, share facilities and faculty members, and work with the private sector and
government to develop educational and research programs.
INTERNATIONALIZATION
Calgary is a global energy and business center. It is home to the second-highest concentration of head
offices in the nation. Our city demands graduates, both domestic and international, who have a global
orientation, who are competitive in a global marketplace, and who can adapt to diverse cultural,
economic, and governmental environments. The shortage of professionals and skilled labour in the city
and province is a key barrier to future economic growth. The recruitment of international students is
8
increasingly recognized as an important element in a broader strategy for attracting highly qualified
people to our country. We are building a strong infrastructure that will allow the university to attract topquality students from around the world. We present the four strategic goals of our international strategy
that will serve as a focus for our activity and resources. Through this focus, we will compete more
effectively in the global marketplace and will help to address the shortage of professionals and skilled
labour in the province. Our four international goals are:
1. increase the diversity of our campus communities;
2. improve the global and cross-cultural competencies within our campus communities;
3. enhance opportunities for international collaborations and partnerships in research and
education; and
4. leverage our areas of expertise to engage in international development.
We recognize that international projects and relationships require a significant investment. Given finite
resources, we have identified countries/regions where we have solid relationships, where there are strong
ties to our academic and research priority areas, and where there are potential connections to industry.
The countries/regions of emphasis are China, Germany, Mexico, Middle East, Eastern Africa and the
United States. We will ensure that our efforts are focused within these geographic locations.
CAPITAL PLAN
The University of Calgary has grown from a bare-land education reserve in the late 1950s to a fully
developed, urban, inner-city campus in 2015. With the first of our buildings dating back to the 1960s,
approximately half of the university’s space is over 40 years old. This aging infrastructure includes
essential classrooms, laboratories, theatres, administrative support space, and core campus service
facilities. While the campus infrastructure has undergone a modest expansion over the past few years,
our total space inventory still falls short of what is required to meet program demand, let alone the needs
of an expanding and evolving academy. As we continue to grow and evolve, so does our need to maintain,
renew, repurpose, and expand our facilities to meet the aspirations outlined within the Comprehensive
Institutional Plan and our Eyes High vision. Guided by the priorities articulated within our Academic and
Research Plans, we need $992.7 million to support our highest-priority capital projects (Table 1). Although
the current fiscal environment makes government and philanthropic investment in post-secondary
facilities difficult, the fruits of an improving economy should be invested in building capacity in the
university sector, which will be a driver of economic growth for decades to come.
Table 1 – Highest-Priority Capital Projects
($ millions)
Project Type
Expansion/ Repurposing
New Construction
Major Preservation
Minor Preservation
Other Capital Funding
Total
Project Title
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.
Science A Redevelopment Phase 2
Kinesiology Expansion and Renewal
Life and Environmental Sciences Research Centre
Haskayne School of Business Advanced Learning Centre
MacKimmie Complex and Professional Faculties Building
MacEwan Hall and Student Centre Servicing Redevelopment
Deep Utilities
Critical Building Systems Infrastructure
Matching Provincial Funding for External Grant Awards
Planning and Early Concept Studies
FLEs
Budget
625
950
44
650
500
2,769
180.0
238.0
140.0
95.0
253.0
36.0
26.0
8.0
14.2
2.5
992.7
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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Our Information Technology (IT) strategy commits the university to provide the leading-edge support
needed in research, teaching and learning, and administration. In 2015-16, a primary focus of attention
will be on renewing our IT infrastructure and will require significant investment in both wired and wireless
networks, security, management and automation tools. As we move towards our goal of becoming one
of Canada’s top five research institutions by 2016, it is clear that strategic investments must be made now
with the longer horizon in mind. A need has been identified for ongoing funding to assist the university in
the following priority areas (Table 2).
Table 2 – Information Technology – Base Funding Request to Government
Funding Request
to Government
25.0
2.5
4.0
5.5
37.0
($ millions)
Priority Areas
IT Infrastructure Support and Renewal
Support for Teaching and Learning
Support for Research
Support for Administration
Total
PLAN FOR FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY
Having undertaken significant budget work over the past 5 years, we were able to weather the budget
cuts of Budget 2013, but not without cost. Budget 2015 has brought new challenges for the University of
Calgary, including a cut of 1.4 per cent to our Campus Alberta grant. Calgary is the largest city in Alberta
and the third largest municipality in Canada 1. It is also the fastest-growing metropolitan area in Canada –
with a population expected to reach 1.5 million by 2019. As a result of this anticipated growth, the demand
for post-secondary education is on the rise in Calgary – in a city that already has the highest number of
turn-aways in the province. The Ministry of Innovation and Advanced Education has estimated that by
2022-2023, the University of Calgary will have the largest increase in projected enrolment and also the
largest projected shortage in space 2.
The University of Calgary has undergone a dramatic turnaround in the years following the recession of
2008. As a result of discipline and focus, we improved our financial situation. This strong foundation will
serve us well in 2015-16 and will allow us to submit a balanced budget of $1,266.6 million while providing
time for us to make strategic decisions going forward (Table 3). While we are presenting a significant
reduction in our unrestricted net assets over the next three years, we will undertake a rigorous process in
2015-16 to strategically plan to limit this depletion.
Table 3 – Consolidated Budget and Two-year Forecast for 2015-16
($ millions)
Total Revenue
Total Expenses
Excess (shortfall) of revenue over expenses
Shortfall funded by unrestricted net assets
Surplus (deficit)
1
2
Prior Year
2014-15
1,218.0
1,218.0
-
Budget
2015-16
1,266.6
1,266.6
-
Forecast
2016-17
1,287.3
1,321.5
(34.2)
34.2
-
Forecast
2017-18
1,320.9
1,379.1
(58.2)
23.2
(35.0)
2011 Census, Government of Canada, Statistics Canada.
2014 Campus Alberta Planning Resource, Government of Alberta, Innovation and Advanced Education.
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RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS
Through our planning process, we identified significant challenges that may slow progress toward the
achievement of our Eyes High vision. We highlight these challenges because our plan to reduce or mitigate
their impact involves the Government of Alberta as a strategic partner in the achievement of goals for the
post-secondary education system in Alberta. Guided by the priorities articulated within our Academic Plan
and Research plan, we are seeking $9.0 million in new, base (ongoing) funding and $997.7 million to
support our highest-priority capital and information technology projects. Please note that the facilities
and maintenance request is $32.0 million lower than that shown in Table 1 as we will offset costs with
philanthropic support.
Table 4 – Resource Implications – Funding Request to Government
($ millions)
Priority Areas
Facilities and Maintenance
Information Technology
Pension Liability
Total
Base
9.0
One-time
960.7
37.0
-
9.0
997.7
PERFORMANCE MEASURES
The achievement of the Eyes High vision is underpinned by a commitment to performance measurement
and benchmarking. To assess our progress, we selected a set of performance metrics that best capture
quality and productivity in education, service and community engagement. These metrics are
benchmarked against the top 5 research institutions in Canada and are compared directly to our peer
institutions within the U15 in Canada. We believe this set of metrics affords the best available proxy for
the value and impact of the University of Calgary to the province of Alberta. Our emphasis on performance
measurement relates to a broader change towards a focus on achieving results. This orientation
complements the outcomes focus of the Ministry and sets an early standard for results-based budgeting.
Our metrics relate to specific outcomes, achievement of which will drive towards the larger goals
embodied in the Eyes High vision. As we look towards achieving the goals we have set for our 50th
anniversary in 2016, it is worth noting that the data to assess our success may not become available until
after that date. We currently rank in the top 5 in 23 of 36 performance measures for which we have top
5 comparator data.
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2. Accountability Statement
This Comprehensive Institutional Plan (CIP) was prepared under the Board’s direction in accordance with
legislation and ministerial guidelines, and in consideration of all policy decisions and material, economic,
or fiscal implications of which the Board is aware.
[Original Signed by Bonnie DuPont Chair, Board of Governors]
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3. Institutional Context
3.1
INSTITUTIONAL ROLE
The University of Calgary is a Comprehensive Academic and Research Institution (CARI) as defined by the
six-sector model within the Post-secondary Learning Act (PSLA). This classification determines its role
within the Campus Alberta system. As a CARI, the University of Calgary grants diplomas and degrees,
including graduate degrees, and maintains a strong and diverse basic and applied research enterprise that
contributes to the advancement and application of knowledge for Alberta and beyond. CARI institutions
have as their primary objectives the development of the province’s capacity for research and innovation
and the education and training of a workforce that will support a rapidly evolving and increasingly
knowledge-based and globalized economy.
The university is actively driving a transformation that will greatly enhance the impact of the institution
on our city, our province and society at large. Guided by the Eyes High strategic vision, the Academic Plan
and the Research Plan, this transformation involves all aspects of our educational and research enterprises
as well as how we engage with our communities. We believe that these changes have positioned the
University of Calgary as a crucial partner for the Government of Alberta in achieving its goals for the postsecondary education system in Alberta.
At the University of Calgary, our formal responsibilities for teaching and learning are research-informed,
research-active and goal-oriented, enabled by systemic institutional structures, specialized teaching
knowledge, and sustained professional support 3. We are accountable for meeting these responsibilities
to ensure that our students have a positive and engaging experience.
We are further developing various forms of engaged scholarship in all our academic programs that enable
our students to integrate research and experiential learning into their ways of knowing and learning about
the world around them. As a result, our students are developing stronger connections to their community.
Our curricula reflects the enterprising spirit of Calgary that instills the importance of applying our students’
newfound knowledge to solving society’s most persistent and emerging problems, and teaches them how
to explore bold new approaches while managing the risks that often accompany such endeavours. At
every opportunity, we show our students how attending a research-intensive university benefits their
personal growth and career trajectory.
These goals are supported through the development of a comprehensive University of Calgary system of
research and scholarship in teaching and learning in higher education, one supported by an internal
network of teaching research professors, a research-informed teaching professional development unit,
and the soon to be developed College of Discovery, Creativity and Innovation.
Guided by the Academic Plan, we are energizing our educational enterprise in a way that integrates closely
with the transformation of our research activities. Through innovative educational programs, students
learn within a culture of inquiry and an overtly interdisciplinary context that prepare them to be creators
rather than passive consumers of knowledge in their future careers. Also guided by the Academic Plan
and the Research Plan, we have developed and begun implementation of an institutional international
strategy.
3
Integrated Framework for Teaching and Learning, June, 2011.
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Our research enterprise has been energized in the last year as we implemented our Research Plan
(published 2012). This plan sharpens our focus on priorities that will 1) match our strengths with
opportunities, 2) increase research capacity through people and platforms, and 3) create a dynamic
research environment to promote research excellence. These priorities revolve around six strategic
research themes in which the University of Calgary is positioned to assume national and international
leadership. By sharpening our focus on these six themes, we are creating synergies that energize our
researchers around issues of global relevance and of great importance to our stakeholder communities.
Ongoing implementation of this plan over the coming years is crucial to realizing our Eyes High strategic
vision of becoming a global intellectual hub.
3.2
RESPONSIBILITIES
As a publicly funded post-secondary institution accountable to the Minister of Innovation and Advanced
Education under the Post-secondary Learning Act, the University of Calgary works to support and promote
Campus Alberta and its goals of a learner-centred, accessible, affordable, high-quality, and sustainable
post-secondary system in Alberta that fosters innovation, entrepreneurship, and collaboration. In doing
so, the University of Calgary operates within its approved mandate, letter of expectation, and in
accordance with direction provided by the Minister. The University of Calgary is an important partner in
supporting and promoting Campus Alberta and its aims to lead the world in inspiring and supporting
lifelong learning, and to foster a post-secondary system that enhances social, economic, and cultural
prosperity. In addition, the University of Calgary is responsible to:




3.3
operate within its current government- and board-approved mandate;
implement this CIP as approved by the Ministry of Innovation and Advanced Education;
measure and monitor progress towards key goals and objectives outlined in the Eyes High strategic
vision, the Academic Plan, and the Research Plan as set out in this CIP; and
make prudent, responsible, and transparent budgetary decisions within available resources.
MANDATE
Founded in 1966, the University of Calgary is governed by a Board of Governors, and operates as a public
Comprehensive Academic and Research Institution under the authority of Alberta’s Post-secondary
Learning Act. Education and research at the University of Calgary serve the needs of local, provincial,
national and international communities. Through its inquiry-based teaching and research programs and
strategic and entrepreneurial partnerships, the university’s faculty, staff and students pursue knowledge,
contribute to the development and critique of societal goals, and engage in creativity and innovation in
many fields. The university’s goal is to be recognized internationally for the success of its students and for
excellence in research, scholarly and creative activity.
The university offers a broad selection of programs of study including baccalaureate, graduate,
professional, and research-based master’s and doctoral degrees. It also offers a wide assortment of credit
and non-credit diplomas and certificates, as well as non-credit programs of professional development,
executive development, and artistic and scholarly activities aligned with the academic expertise of the
university. Building on strengths in disciplines in the areas of fine arts, humanities, sciences and social
sciences as well as in the professions – including architecture, business, education, engineering,
environmental design, kinesiology, law, medicine, nursing, social work and veterinary medicine – the
university is committed to offering an experience that provides both disciplinary and interdisciplinary
education to its students. A number of its programs are unique within Alberta.
14
As an autonomous institution working within the Campus Alberta framework, the university collaborates
with other post-secondary institutions in the delivery of collaborative degrees, the use of transfer and
articulation agreements, the sharing of facilities and faculty members, and the offering of degreecompletion opportunities to students from both rural and urban communities. Working with the private
sector and all three levels of government, the University of Calgary takes a leadership role within Alberta
for the further development of educational and research programs in areas designated as strategic
academic priorities.
At the University of Calgary, research, teaching and scholarship are interdependent and steeped in the
principle of academic freedom. The university encourages, supports and disseminates research,
scholarship, innovation, and creative activity in many forms and integrates these activities into both the
graduate and undergraduate curriculum. Students and faculty at the University of Calgary conduct basic
and applied research at the frontiers of knowledge and transfer knowledge to society – locally, regionally,
nationally and internationally. The university stimulates and supports the commercialization of research
and innovation for the common good and for the prosperity of the province, the nation and the world.
Students and other scholars, including post-doctoral scholars, are attracted to the University of Calgary
for the opportunity to refine their research, teaching and mentoring skills.
The development of programs of study and of research partnerships across Alberta, nationally and
internationally, extends the university’s engagement with the broader community and enlarges the vision
of its students, faculty and staff. International partnerships, alliances, and development projects, together
with study-abroad initiatives, allow the university to contribute to and benefit from a network of
worldwide interactions that enrich the student experience.
The University of Calgary offers a comprehensive set of programs, facilities, and services to provide
students with an excellent experience both inside and outside the classroom. The university supports the
student experience with a range of services including academic and career advising, student-life
programming, health and wellness services, and academic success programs. Community-service learning,
cooperative and internship placements, and international exchanges all provide experiential learning
opportunities to complement students’ classroom experiences. The university supplements and enriches
its face-to-face instruction with communication and digital technologies, library and cultural resources,
and both distance education and blended-learning techniques.
The University of Calgary is responsive to the expectations of the communities it serves in the delivery of
its educational and research programs. The university contributes in diverse ways to the cultural, social
and economic life of the province, through striving for high quality in its graduates, its research, and its
service to the community. The University of Calgary is committed to environmental and financial
sustainability, and to making a positive impact on individuals and communities.
[The Mandate was approved by the Minister of Innovation and Advanced Education on August 12, 2010.]
15
4. Plan Development
This Comprehensive Institutional Plan is a three-year, integrated planning document that satisfies
legislated requirements outlined under Section 78(1) of the Post-secondary Learning Act and Section 14
(2) of the Fiscal Management Act. The Chair of the Board of Governors is required to submit this multiyear plan to the Minister of Innovation and Advanced Education (IAE) by March 15 each year. For 2015,
the submission deadline has been extended to May.
The planning process begins in July when we start to review the previous year and apply trends that will
characterize the upcoming year. In the late fall we meet with Ministry of Innovation and Advanced
Education (IAE) officials to receive feedback on our performance over the previous year and on our early
plans for the upcoming year. This feedback is informed by their knowledge of provincial trends expected
to influence planning and priority-setting. Helping to inform these discussions are regional profiles and
institutional factsheets. Our current CIP reflects the outcome of these discussions.
The CIP has been constructed as a series of chapters overseen by a senior team at the university. The
academic and research priorities outlined in Chapter 6 – Academic and Research Outcomes serve as a
foundation for planning in the capital, budget and resource allocation chapters. The CIP has gone through
an extensive, iterative consultative process appropriate to the information in the document. Those
chapters that are the purview of General Faculties Council (GFC) (i.e., chapters 6-8) have gone through
extensive consultation with committees of GFC, including the Academic Priorities and Planning Committee
(APPC) and the Research and Scholarship Committee (RSC). Those chapters that are the purview of the
Board (i.e., the more business-related chapters) have had extensive, iterative consultation through subcommittees of the Board, including the Budget Committee (BC) and the Finance and Property Committee
(FPC) along with various administrative committees (Executive Leadership Team, Executive Leadership
Team Operations Group, and the Campus Strategic Initiatives Group) (Figure 1). In addition, the CIP has
been discussed numerous times at the Provost’s team meetings and Deans’ Council.
Figure 1 – Plan Development (Formal Governance Review and Approval Process)
Academic Planning and
Priorities Committee
Chapters 6-8
Research and Scholarship
Committee
Review and approval
process
Operating and Capital
Budgets
Budget Committee
General
General Faculties Council
Faculties Council
Finance and Property
Committee
Comprehensive
Institutional Plan
Board of Governors
Undergraduate and graduate students were highly engaged in the academic and research planning
processes, and were members of many of the committees that provided iterative input into the CIP. In its
final form, the CIP was approved by the Board of Governors.
16
5. Environmental Scan
The University of Calgary has set ambitious goals in our Eyes High strategic plan, and our Academic Plan
and Research Plan together serve as the roadmap to those goals. In planning our strategy, it is important
to be attentive to the context in which we operate and the elements of our local, provincial, national and
international environment that will influence our progress towards those goals:
5.1
THE GROWING IMPORTANCE OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND RESEARCH IN AN
INTERCONNECTED WORLD
As the role of science and technology continues to grow in the international economy, countries around
the world are investing more heavily in research and higher education. Nations are increasingly aware
that promoting economic growth and creating employment requires support of advanced research that
helps to build new industries and a highly-skilled labour force that will attract investment.
Canada and Alberta are competing successfully on an international scale but increasing competition,
especially from Asia, requires a renewed commitment to strengthening our efforts in research and higher
education. Canada has seen rapid growth in the post-secondary sector; today’s younger generation is the
best educated in our history. Almost 32.0 per cent of young Canadians aged 25-34 now hold at least the
equivalent of a bachelor’s degree, 4 and 58.0 per cent have some form of tertiary education, placing
Canada third among OECD countries, trailing only South Korea and Japan 5.
Canada’s performance in research is impressive as well, though investment lags behind the international
leaders. Measured by citations of published papers, Canada is an international leader, ranking 6th in overall
citations 6. In research funding, however, Canada’s performance is not as strong. The Conference Board of
Canada ranks our nation only a “B” in terms of public investment and shows declines in both public and
business investment in research since the beginning of the century. Only increased investment in the
higher-education sector has helped to offset the declines in government and business spending 7.
Canada’s universities are continuing to compete effectively and are serving our nation well. The most
recent QS World University Rankings show ten Canadian universities are now in the top 200 with the
University of Calgary rising to number 171 in the overall rankings and number 9 in the world among
universities under 50 years of age (#2 in North America, #1 in Canada). At the same time, Canada’s leading
universities continue to face more severe competition. Many countries around the world are investing
substantial amounts of money in their universities. Institutions in China and Korea are moving up the
rankings rapidly. The United States benefits from very significant public funding for research, a different
tuition regime, and extraordinary philanthropy. U.S. universities received an astonishing USD $37.1 billion
in donations in 2014. Nevertheless, Canadian universities have created the conditions to support further
success in both research and advanced education and are prepared to partner with governments and
business to build a stronger and more competitive economy.
Statistics Canada, National Household Survey 2011.
OECD, Education at a Glance 2013: OECD Indicators. OECD Publishing, 2013, Table A1.3a.
6
archive.sciencewatch.com/dr/cou/2012/12janALLgraphs/.
7
www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/details/innovation/publicrandd.aspx.
4
5
17
5.2
THE NATIONAL CONTEXT: CANADA 2015
The progress of the University of Calgary towards its Eyes High goals is influenced by developments
occurring at the national level. Three elements are of special importance: the health of the economy, the
demographic development of Canada’s population, and the policies of the Government of Canada,
especially those touching directly on research and higher education.
The Canadian economy rebounded well from the recession in 2008-09 and has experienced healthy
growth since 2010. Throughout the recovery, the West has played the role of locomotive, with aboveaverage rates of growth in the Prairie provinces and in Alberta, in particular. 2015 is likely to see some
change in this. Declining prices for major commodities, including oil and gas, are likely to slow growth in
the West. The decline in the value of the Canadian dollar may also help to stimulate growth in
manufacturing, leading to higher rates of growth in central Canada. According to the Royal Bank of Canada
(RBC), Ontario is projected to lead the provinces in 2015 with a growth rate of 3.1 per cent. Alberta is
likely to see significantly slower growth; the province is now predicting the 2015 figure will be only 0.6 per
cent 8. The steep decline in the value of the Canadian dollar will also have important consequences. A
lower dollar may stimulate exports and offset some of the loss associated with reduced commodity
exports. It will also provide some significant challenges for post-secondary institutions as the price of
imported goods will rise. For the University of Calgary, the most immediate consequence is likely to be a
sharp increase in the cost of books and other library materials, most of which are priced in U.S. dollars.
Enrolment at Canada’s post-secondary institutions is influenced by two key factors: changes in the size of
the population groups most likely to attend higher education and changes in the participation rates of
those age groups. Canada is now coming to the end of a period of strong growth in the university-age
cohort, which was driven by the aging of the baby-boom ‘echo’ group. The number of births in the late
1980s and early 1990s grew significantly and those children helped fuel growth in both applications and
enrolments at post-secondary institutions across the country. In the years ahead, however, the numbers
in the prime university-enrolment age groups will begin to decline in most regions. For Canada as a whole,
the number of 18-24 year olds is projected to fall from 3.37 million in 2014 to 3.11 million in 2021 9. The
decline will be especially sharp in the Atlantic region. The situation is much healthier in the West; however,
the significant decline in the number of young people in other regions of Canada will likely intensify the
competition to enrol high-achieving students and promote even greater interest in expanding
international enrolment.
A decrease in the number of young people of traditional university age may limit demand for seats in
universities and colleges. It may be offset, however, by changes in the participation rate or by increases
in enrolment among older students. Such changes are possible, particularly in Alberta, which has one of
the lowest participation rates in the country. Another potential area for growth is the participation of
older students, particularly in newer programs such as professional master’s programs, which are growing
in popularity across the country. Older, more mature students also tend to return to universities during
economic downturns. Canada is also experiencing rapid growth in the enrolment of students from other
countries. According to the Canadian Bureau of International Education (CBIE), international student
enrolment grew by 84.0 per cent in Canada between 2003 and 2013, with almost 300,000 students
registered in Canadian post-secondary institutions in 2013 10. This number is almost certain to increase in
www.rbc.com/economics/economic-reports/pdf/provincial-forecasts/provfcst-dec2014.pdf;
Alberta, “2014-15 Third Quarter Fiscal Update and Economic Statement, p. 11.
9
Statistics Canada, CANSIM, Table 052-0005, Projection M1.
10
www.cbie.ca/about-ie/facts-and-figures/.
8
Government
18
of
years ahead as the proportion of international students continues to grow, especially at universities in
eastern Canada.
A third element in the national environment important to the plans of the University of Calgary is the
federal government’s commitment to research funding. The University of Calgary welcomed its first
Canada Excellence Research Chair in 2014 – Dr. Steven Bryant, who works in the field of unconventional
oil and gas – thanks to $10.0 million in support from the Government of Canada. The university currently
hosts 71 Canada Research Chairs, who contribute to ground-breaking research in the sciences, health,
engineering, the social sciences and humanities.
The 2014 federal budget increased the budgets of the three granting councils (i.e., NSERC, CIHR, and
SSHRC), though this only partly restored the cuts in real funding that followed the 2008-09 recession. The
budget also introduced the Canada First Research Excellence Fund (CFREF). Beginning with funding of
$50.0 million in 2015-16 and increasing to $200.0 million by 2018-19 and beyond, the fund will be a gamechanger in providing critical support for research in areas where Canada is already an international leader
or shows the potential for leadership 11.
5.3
THE ALBERTA AND CALGARY CONTEXT
Alberta’s post-secondary institutions have benefitted in the past from the province’s strong economy and
vibrant demography. Through most of this century, Alberta has led all other provinces in rates of
population and economic growth. Alberta’s population continues to grow as a result of a high birth rate,
a consistent inflow of migrants from other provinces, and an influx of immigrants from around the world.
The province grew by more than 3.0 per cent in each of the last two years, with the total population now
exceeding four million. The recent downturn in the energy industry, however, is likely to moderate growth
in the next few years. The province is now forecasting a growth rate of 0.6 per cent in 2015 and 1.7 per
cent in 2016 12. It is expected that the high rates of migration to Alberta from other provinces will slacken
in the next few years.
Even with a projected slowdown in growth, the province and in particular the City of Calgary are still
currently feeling pressure for available spots at the University of Calgary and other post-secondary
institutions in the city. Calgary has been the fastest-growing metropolitan area in Canada in each ten-year
census period since 1981. The Calgary region is already experiencing a shortfall in available post-secondary
places, and continued growth, even at a slower pace, will exacerbate that shortage. The single, biggest
shortfall is at the University of Calgary, which could see demand exceeding available space by more than
4,600 full-time students by 2022-23 13.
Underlying the rapid growth of population in Calgary and Alberta has been a strong economy. Alberta has
been the leader or among the leaders in economic growth within Canada for almost every year of the new
century. At just 4.5 per cent in January 2015, Alberta has the lowest unemployment rate in the country 14.
Rapid growth and a buoyant labour market have fueled increases in personal and family income. Median
after-tax family income in Calgary is 15.0 per cent higher than in Toronto and almost 20.0 per cent higher
than in Vancouver 15. Strong growth in the economy and in personal income have helped the Government
of Alberta provide excellent services to the population.
www.rc-rc.ca/blog/budget-2014-research-canadas-analysis.
Government of Alberta, Budget 2015, p. 56.
13
Innovation and Advanced Education, 2014 Campus Alberta Planning Resource, p. 50.
14
www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/150206/t150206a003-eng.htm.
15
Statistics Canada, Results of the National Household Survey, 2011.
11
12
19
It is important to underline the fundamental strength of the Alberta economy even as the province enters
a period with new challenges related to the sharp decline in the prices of oil and gas and the consequent
decline in revenues flowing to the Government of Alberta. The government itself, in Budget 2015, predicts
a return to real GDP growth of 3.0 per cent by 2017.
While the long-term outlook for Alberta continues to be bright, it is also true that the province has relied
heavily on resource revenues to support public services. The recent decline in this source of revenue has
pushed the government to rethink its approach to both spending and revenue generation. Budget 2015
articulates a number of key principles that will guide the province in the years ahead. Among the most
important for the innovation and advanced education sector are the following:
 bringing the cost of public services in-line with the national average;
 a gradual reduction in the use of resource revenue for budgeting purposes;
 a commitment to maintain a competitive tax system; and
 a shift to more of a “user pay” approach to fund public services.
The commitment of the Government of Alberta to implement a more sustainable budget model that is
less dependent on fluctuating resource revenue is a positive step for the province. It is important,
however, to sustain the strength of our post-secondary system, which will help the province to deal with
the challenges that lie ahead. A temporary economic downturn is the worst time to reduce support for
higher education and research. Research intensive universities are economic drivers, and help to diversify
the economy. There is significant evidence that economic recessions produce an increase in
unemployment for young people, which in turn generates increased demand for post-secondary
education16. This effect may be especially strong in Alberta where participation rates in post-secondary
education have been among the lowest in Canada. 17 This low rate of participation has often been
attributed to Alberta’s strong labour market and high wages, which encourage young people to forego
advanced education. A decline in the availability of employment for young people may very likely increase
demand for places in Alberta’s universities. This is the best time to prepare our young people to step into
the skilled labour force when strong growth returns to the Alberta economy.
The energy industry plays and will continue to play a central role in the Alberta economy and has produced
tremendous benefits for the province; however, the volatility in energy prices poses a challenge to the
province and underscores the need to build a strong, diversified economy that can withstand fluctuations
in commodity markets. As Figure 2 shows, Calgary’s economy is significantly more reliant on the energy
industry than is true in Canada’s other major cities. It is important to recognize as well that a significant
component of employment in industries such as finance, construction, and professional, scientific and
technical services is tied to energy.
D. Clark, “Do Recessions Keep Students in School? The Impact of Youth Unemployment on Enrolment in Postcompulsory Education in England, “Economica (July, 2011) 78:523-545.
17
Statistics Canada: Education Indicators in Canada, December 2012.
16
20
Figure 2 – Per Cent of Labour Force in Selected Industries
60
6.4
45
0.2
9.0
9.5
2.8
0.4
10.9
10.3
7.0
6.2
30
10.3
11.7
15
3.8
5.8
8.5
0
Calgary
Health and Social Assistance
7.7
7.1
8.0
9.9
5.4
Toronto
Mining/Oil and Gas
3.6
7.6
Education
Professional, Scientific & Technical
9.8
5.2
Finance and Insurance
Manufacturing
Construction
6.7
6.5
9.7
Edmonton
6.7
Vancouver
There is a growing body of evidence that shows the important role that universities can play in the
diversification and growth of urban economies 18. Much attention has focused on regions like Boston with
powerhouse institutions like Harvard and M.I.T. as well as a number of other strong post-secondary
institutions. They are a major reason that the Boston area consistently has among the lowest
unemployment rates in the United States. The San Francisco Bay area, with Stanford and the University
of California at Berkeley, is another important example of this phenomenon. But an interesting model for
Calgary is the experience of Pittsburgh. Like Calgary, Pittsburgh has been strongly identified with one
major industry, in the case of Pittsburgh, steel. In 1976, 24.0 per cent of the Pittsburgh labour force
worked in manufacturing, a majority of whom worked in steel or associated industries. But the 1980s and
1990s saw the closure of most major steel mills. Yet, the city transformed itself and its universities played
a leading role. Led by the University of Pittsburgh (public) and Carnegie-Mellon (private), a consortium of
post-secondary institutions was formed and worked with city and state officials to promote new
industries 19. By 2014, only 7.4 per cent of those employed worked in manufacturing while 21.0 per cent
worked in health and education and 15.0 per cent in professional and business services. The city is home
to head offices in a variety of industries. Some, like the H.J. Heinz Company, do much of their
manufacturing elsewhere, but the head office has remained in Pittsburgh. The city has become a draw for
highly-educated young people. Almost 20.0 per cent of those aged 25-34 have a graduate or professional
degree, placing Pittsburgh third in the United States behind only Washington, D.C. and Boston 20. The role
of the city’s leading research-intensive universities is striking. They have helped to establish new industries
and produce a steady stream of highly-qualified young workers that are a magnet for companies. More
David C. Perry and Wim Wiewel, (eds.), The University as Urban Developer, Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 2005.
www.cmu.edu/corporate/partnerships/univ_partnership.shtml.
20
www.newgeography.com/content/004493-ranking-americas-top-young-labor-forces-a-rust-belt-rising.
18
19
21
than 50 companies that developed out of university research initiatives are now operating in the city. The
University of Pittsburgh’s strength in health and Carnegie-Mellon’s excellence in engineering have been
two of the great drivers of Pittsburgh’s resurgence.
In a similar way, the University of Calgary can help to strengthen and diversify the Alberta economy not
only through our graduates, the vast majority of whom remain in Alberta, but through our successes in
research and innovation. Data from Research Infosource (Top 50 Research Universities for 2014) show the
University of Calgary is now in 6th place among Canada’s research-intensive universities with total research
funding of $328.7 million in 2013 21. The success of our faculty in attracting funding underscores the
importance of the work being done at the University of Calgary, work that fuels innovation in a wide
variety of areas and allows the university to produce a steady stream of highly-qualified personnel to
support Alberta’s development.
Researchers at the University of Calgary benefit from strong support from various branches of the
Government of Alberta, especially the funding that flows through Alberta Innovates Corporations. The
GOA invested $814.4 million in research activities in 2012-13, $251.0 million of which was provided by
Alberta Innovates. This support has produced important advances in technology, health, environmental
management and many other areas. Only 16.0 per cent of these funds flow to the higher education sector,
however 22. The University of Calgary’s researchers are ready and able to do more on the most important
issues facing Alberta. Our researchers and the province would benefit from a larger flow of provincial
research dollars to Alberta’s leading research universities, which are the source of so much of the groundbreaking research done in the province.
Universities have been criticized at times for their unwillingness to translate the fundamental research
done on their campuses into commercial ventures that can drive economic growth and create
employment. Times have changed, however, and at the University of Calgary there is a strong
commitment to translating research discoveries to the broader community. The most important element
of this is our involvement in Innovate Calgary, which is spearheading the knowledge transfer and
commercialization of university-based research. In 2014, new highs were achieved in license agreements,
disclosures, and patent filings. More than ever, the dollars invested in university-based research are
producing results that help reshape our economy.
CONCLUSION
The case for building strong universities that are leaders in research and produce the skilled work force of
tomorrow has never been clearer. Countries around the world are increasing their investment in their
research-intensive universities and competing to hire and retain top faculty and attract the brightest
students. With our economy, growing population based on an openness to immigration, and highlyeducated workforce, Canada and Alberta provide a setting that can support investment in research and
education. Such investment will result in a diversification of the economy; an economy that is more
dynamic and better able to compete for investment and create the jobs that Canadians and Albertans
need.
www.researchinfosource.com/pdf/2014Top50List.pdf.
Innovation and Advanced Education, “Government of Alberta’s Research Investments Report 2012/13,” April,
2014.
21
22
22
6. Academic and Research Outcomes
6.1
INTRODUCTION
The University of Calgary, established in 1966, is highly regarded in relation to its peer institutions of a
similar age. In the 2014 QS World University Rankings of universities established in the last 50 years, the
University of Calgary was ranked first in Canada, second in North America, and ninth in the world23, up
from 13th in the world in 2013.
In large part, this success is driven by the University of Calgary community’s commitment to the Eyes High
strategic vision:
“The University of Calgary will be a global intellectual hub located in Canada’s most
enterprising city. In this spirited high-quality learning environment, students will thrive in
programs made rich by research and hands-on experiences. By our 50th anniversary in
2016, we will be one of Canada’s top 5 research universities, fully engaging the
communities we both serve and lead.” 24
We are realizing our Eyes High vision by focusing on three foundational commitments: 1) sharpening our
focus on research and scholarship; 2) enriching the quality and breadth of learning, and 3) fully integrating
the university with the community.
The development of our institutional Academic Plan and Research Plan in 2011-12 resulted in seven
academic and three research priorities that have provided a roadmap for the achievement of our Eyes
High vision. The vision and priorities established at the University of Calgary are designed to show our
community the benefits and rewards of integrating teaching, learning and research in an environment
where discovery, creativity, and innovation are central to the mission. Our priorities have guided – and
will continue to guide – human, financial, and capital resource allocations for the foreseeable future. This
trio of documents (Eyes High strategy, Academic Plan, Research Plan), produced through broad
consultation processes on our campus, has resulted in strong strategic decision-making that has moved
the institution forward, while at the same time placing focus on prudent fiscal management.
We continue to enhance student, faculty and staff experiences and outcomes, as evidenced by data
produced in our 2014 Annual Report. This chapter summarizes our plans going forward and highlights our
major deliverables over the next three years. Since the Eyes High strategy was officially released in 2011,
a major focus over the next three years will be a renewal of this strategy, and subsequent renewal of both
the Academic Plan and the Research Plan. The focus on deliverables is in line with the Government of
Alberta’s policy focus and priority on outcomes.
STRIVING TOWARDS OUR EYES HIGH VISION
The University of Calgary aspires to enhance its role as a great university, an institution with global reach
located in a dynamic city in an innovative province. We have already achieved excellence in many key
areas of teaching and research, and we will continue to develop our culture of discovery, creativity, and
innovation. Our students will be enriched by new ideas and will become actively engaged in creating and
discovering, benefitting from leading-edge research woven into their curricula. Graduates who are critical
23
24
Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) World University Rankings 2014: Top 50 under 50.
Eyes High strategy document, 2011.
23
thinkers are the hallmark of a great university. Our faculty, who are prominent in their respective
disciplines, will facilitate engaging learning opportunities for our students. By addressing important
societal issues in their engagement with our curricula, our students will develop new solutions and
applications that will open avenues for innovation that will benefit our many communities.
Enterprise is fostered where discovery, creativity and innovation are not hampered by traditional
boundaries. As a member of the Comprehensive Academic and Research Institutions sector under the
Campus Alberta framework of the Ministry of Innovation and Advanced Education, the University of
Calgary supports a tremendous range of expertise and has a distinctive identity. We tackle problems of
high societal and global relevance for which solutions often emerge from intersecting fields of inquiry. We
also know that the best solutions emerge from strong and fundamental disciplinary contributions
combined with productive working partnerships; these often include industry, government, and
community groups most affected by the problem. The University of Calgary will become a global
intellectual hub by identifying critical problems of local, national, and international relevance, bringing
disciplinary strengths together with community and industry partners where required to create new
knowledge, and translating this knowledge into real-world solutions. The spirit of discovery and
innovation will permeate our learning spaces, where students engage and collaborate with experts who
are addressing critical issues.
6.2
THE ACADEMIC PLAN
Through our consultation process to develop the Academic Plan we identified seven major academic
priorities (Figure 3), along with key areas of foundational support that must be addressed for the
University of Calgary to achieve our Eyes High vision. These priorities are helping to guide our actions and
define the nature of our discoveries, creative endeavours, and innovations.
In the Academic Plan, each priority is described, with key goals, strategies and tactics identified for each
priority. We highlight key strategies for achieving many of these key goals over the next three years in this
chapter and identify a process for renewal of the academic plan.
As a result of a focus on these academic priorities, graduates from the University of Calgary will have
experienced high-quality, engaging academic programs. They will be thoughtful, communicative citizens
and leaders of their respective communities, with the ability to think critically and creatively to solve issues
of the day. They will understand the value of collaboration and partnerships, and will be used to working
with others who are traditionally considered ‘outside’ of their fields of expertise. They will also appreciate
different cultures and see value in diversity – of opinion, thought, gender, ethnicity, and culture. They will
appreciate the diversity of life and limited resources available on Earth, and work and live to create a
sustainable future. Importantly, they will recognize that the knowledge they have gained during their time
at the University of Calgary will change with new discoveries, and as a result they will be life-long
learners 25.
25
University of Calgary Academic Plan, 2012.
24
Figure 3 – Academic Priorities
Talent Attraction,
Development and
Retention
Teaching and
Research
Integration
Sustainability
Academic
Priorities
Connection with
Community
Interdisciplinarity
Internationalization
Leadership
FOUNDATIONAL SUPPORT
IT Infrastructure – Facilities – Research Support – Library Collections/Services
Support Staff – Shared Services – Fundraising Support – Communications/Branding/Reputation
6.3
THE RESEARCH PLAN
In developing the Research Plan, we considered the academic priorities identified in the Academic Plan,
along with provincial, national, and global demands for new discoveries.
We recognize that our talented people are our greatest resource, and that contributions from individual
scholars are paramount for our success. We will support excellence in scholarship across the academy and
champion research priorities established by faculties. However, through the Eyes High vision established
in 2011 and the lens of our Academic Plan, we have committed to increase our research impact in priority
areas where we have recognized strength and leadership, where we can highly integrate teaching and
research, where research outcomes and translation promote sustainability, where interdisciplinary
contributions can lead to major advances, and where we can have the biggest impact on the communities
we serve. Our objective is not only to compete with the best universities ‘scholar-by-scholar’ or ‘programby-program’, but also to differentiate our institution. Therefore, while putting together our institutional
Research Plan we sought the ’strategic sweet spot’ that aligns our areas of strength with areas of need
locally, provincially, nationally and internationally where the University of Calgary can make a distinctive
contribution. We did not simply look internally to make decisions regarding our priorities. We paid
attention to the needs of society and signals from governments in defining our priorities for discovery,
creativity, and innovation, which will help position us for success by “fully engaging the communities we
both serve and lead.” 26
26
University of Calgary Research Plan, 2012.
25
Based on our consultations, our Research Plan identifies three major priorities, as shown in Figure 4 below:
Figure 4 – Research Priorities
Match our
Strengths with
Opportunities
Research
Priorities
Create a Dynamic
Environment to
Promote Research
Excellence
Increase our
Research Capacity
Within the priority of “matching strengths with opportunities,” we identified six research themes – areas
where we matched our areas of strength (push) with areas of unmet need in society for new knowledge,
creative expression, and innovation (pull). Our research themes (Figure 5) are characterized by several
important features:
1. we are leaders in the area, as demonstrated by a local critical mass of expertise, and we have
attained national or international prominence, as measured by relevant output metrics;
2. we are an essential hub in provincial, national, or global research networks for the area;
3. we have built strong industrial or community (philanthropic) partnerships in the area; and
4. our advances benefit from enabling research platforms and improving these platforms. 27
These research themes also allow us to focus on our academic priority of interdisciplinarity, since our
community of scholars in each thematic area comes from across our campus, creating a rich environment
for new discovery and innovation.
Figure 5 – Research Themes and Platforms Interaction
MATCHING STRENGTHS WITH OPPORTUNITES
Brain and
Mental Health
Human
Dynamics in a
Changing World
New Earth-Space
Technologies
Engineering
Solutions for
Health
Infections,
Inflammation
and Chronic
Diseases
Energy
Innovations
Research Platforms
Over the next three years, we will continue to build and implement research strategies and plans for each
of our six research themes. The “confederation of scholars” formed for each research theme brings
27
University of Calgary Research Plan, 2012.
26
together scholars from all faculties, enabling us to consolidate our capacity in priority areas and to
compete with the best in the world for new opportunities, new faculty, and new students. We are also
beginning to evaluate new emerging strengths across our campus.
Research platforms represent organized scholarly activities, sometimes linked through infrastructure or
critical mass of expertise, that are truly crosscutting and catalysts in the creation or application of new
knowledge, thereby increasing our research capacity. We have identified seven major research platforms
(Figure 6). Please refer to our Research Plan for more descriptive information on each platform.
Figure 6 – Research Platforms
Synthesis and Visualization
Analytics and Simulation
Commercialization
Translation
Policy Creation
Research Stations
Research Enablers
Our research platforms are typically created, or supported, by highly accomplished interdisciplinary
teams, involving cutting-edge facilities or networks in which the University of Calgary is providing
provincial, national, or international leadership. They are platforms that enable great accomplishments
for many of our strategic areas of research, and also contribute to other emerging areas of strength across
our university. They also contribute strategically to and/or provide unique components of Campus Alberta
initiatives. By identifying our research platforms of international prominence, we avoid unnecessary
duplication in core facilities across the province and provide cutting-edge contributions to provincial
initiatives 28.
6.4
KEY OUTCOMES
Our goal is to create an academy in which teaching and research interact in novel ways to promote
discovery, creativity and innovation. The previous two sections outlined the key priorities for the
Academic and Research Plans. The intent of this next section is to outline major deliverables under each
of our priorities for each year, and thus is not all-inclusive of outcomes we expect in any given year.
Outcomes are not listed in priority order. The key outcomes achieved in 2014-15 will have implications
for work and outcomes in the following years and, for the sake of brevity and clarity, we do not present
every subsequent outcome in years 2015-16 and 2016-17. We will be renewing the Eyes High strategic
vision and the Academic and Research Plans in late 2016-17, and thus for the most part have not included
outcomes for 2017-18. In addition, the University of Calgary conducts regular quality assurance reviews
for units (overall unit reviews, curricular reviews, and graduate program reviews), accreditation reviews
for professional programs, and leadership reviews. Only the timing of major unit reviews is noted in the
outcomes, as we consider quality assurance reviews to be the regular business of a well-run institution.
The University of Calgary is a young and progressive institution in a maturation phase. While we have an
excellent triad of documents that guide our strategic vision and priorities, we also have spent considerable
effort over the past five years developing and implementing our foundational systems: administrative
28
University of Calgary Research Plan, 2012.
27
systems and structures, policies and procedures, and processes and practices. At times, there has been
tension between our strategic imperatives and the recognition that the proper foundational systems were
not in place to support the particular strategic imperative under development. At other times, the lack of
foundational systems has allowed for increased flexibility to move new ideas through a complex system
relatively quickly. As in any dynamic institution, we need continued work in both strategic priorities and
our foundational systems. We want to develop a strong foundational system that mitigates risk, but allows
for nimbleness and entrepreneurial and opportunistic changes. Ultimately, we want to achieve symbiotic
academic and research excellence through our Eyes High strategic vision, while building a sustainable
university that stresses operational excellence emphasizing the concept of continuous improvement.
In that spirit, the outcomes listed in the following section are strategic in nature, and when purely
administrative items are identified as outcomes, they are considered to be of key strategic importance to
the institution. We are in a position to plan and undertake many of these initiatives because of the
significant work that has been done at the University of Calgary over the past six years to create a sound
financial foundation from which to advance our vision. The provincial budget will affect progress towards
our Eyes High vision – but we will continue to pursue our strategic imperatives.
Priority: Talent Attraction, Development, and Retention
Key outcomes for 2014-15:
We have:
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recruited the University of Calgary’s first CERC Chair in Materials Engineering for Unconventional
Oil Reservoirs. This $25.0 million ‘ecosystem’ of energy research will vault our university onto the
world stage of novel in situ extraction approaches that will immediately apply to the oil sands but
will be exportable to other areas around the world (e.g., China);
recruited the first Teaching and Learning Chair and academic director for the Taylor Institute for
Teaching and Learning (TI) effective April 1, 2015;
recruited a new director for the Educational Development Unit of the Taylor Institute (TI) and
implemented new strategies for building teaching and learning capacity, including a new online
teaching community;
recruited a new director and fully implemented the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Protected
Disclosure to promote positive practices in equity and diversity;
improved the attraction and candidate experience for all faculty and staff groups through the
launch of a new University of Calgary careers website;
increased targeted and global exposure of opportunities at the University of Calgary through
utilization of multiple sourcing channels (e.g., University of Calgary LinkedIn careers page);
refreshed our preferred vendor list for recruitment search firms to ensure best-in-class and topvalue search services;
created a new Immigration Services unit to successfully navigate the hiring process for
international candidates while meeting all government compliance regulations;
launched UBegin, an enhanced orientation program for new employees;
created a more positive work environment by responding to the outcomes of the second
employee engagement survey by:
• implementing our Respect in the Workplace program across units (52.0 per cent
participation level across faculty and staff);
• developing a recognition framework for all staff;
28
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implemented a gender-equity pay strategy in three departments that were identified as having
pay equity issues;
associated with the International Strategy launched in 2013-14, enhanced resources at the Centre
for International Students & Study Abroad (CISSA) and developed new international recruitment
strategies for undergraduate students, including a new University of Calgary program to integrate
English language development (English for Academic Purposes – EAP) and transition to academic
studies in Canada;
developed a university-wide Graduate Attributes statement for internal consultation;
expanded an innovative graduate professional skills development program called MyGradSkills
and provided opportunities for graduate students from across the university to benefit from
entrepreneurship training through the Haskayne School of Business;
analyzed the results of the Canadian Graduate and Professional Student Survey (CGPSS) and
developed an action plan of strategic priorities for the next three years in graduate education;
analyzed the results of the 2014 National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) and formed NSSE
action teams in each faculty to develop strategic plans to address the issues identified in the
survey;
implemented the Registration 2015 project, which allows for earlier registration of courses for
continuing students;
revised admission processes to enable earlier offers of admission to new students; and
established a student-focused Committee on the Prevention of Sexual Harassment and Sexual
Violence to help identify strategies, processes and policies that can ensure a safe and secure
environment on campus.
Key outcomes for 2015-16:
We will:
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complete and approve an overall mental health strategy for the campus and begin
implementation of the strategy;
develop an Indigenous strategy in conjunction with our faculties, the University of Calgary Native
Centre, and the wider Indigenous community that supports teaching, learning, research and the
integration of the university in the community as it relates to Indigenous populations;
increase recruitment training and support for department heads, directors and managers with
respect to targeted recruitment campaigns and best practices in hiring and selection;
develop and launch faculty career web spaces with standardized visual identity to continue to
improve candidate experience, the size of the candidate pool and thus resulting quality of fit;
increase community outreach and partnerships with diversity associations in order to increase
diversity hiring;
complete employment equity self-service survey in order to improve our understanding of
diversity on campus;
re-instate the University Professor Program to honour and retain high-performing academic staff;
enhance support for early-career academics through the Taylor Institute and the Academic
Learning and Development program;
implement a new learning and development program called UAdvance, focused on personal
effectiveness, technology and business process training, for our support staff and other individual
contributors within the management and professional stream;
launch the pilot project of Lynda.com, a web-based learning resource for staff and faculty offering
24x7 access to more than 4,000 software and soft-skill courses;
29
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begin phased implementation of a Career Path Management program for management and
professional staff and support staff groups to enhance retention and employee engagement;
implement faculty-based support for more comprehensive integration of learning technologies
(in response to the Strategic Framework for Learning Technologies completed in 2014-15);
continue to identify and take advantage of opportunities for research chairs in our research theme
areas with a variety of organizations, including the Alberta Innovates corporations;
review and improve our policy for Chairs, including standards for funding, salaries being funded
out of Chair allocations, selection processes, etc.;
implement a university-wide Graduate Attributes statement that will provide a vision for learning
experiences at the University of Calgary and guide curriculum development and review processes;
review and revise our Aboriginal student access program and Aboriginal student policy;
review, and alter where necessary, recruitment and retention strategies at the undergraduate
and graduate levels to ensure that we are progressing towards our international targets and that
we have a diversity of international students;
develop and implement focused recruitment strategies for international, Indigenous and
sponsored graduate students;
implement the institutional and faculty-specific strategies to address the issues identified in the
2014 NSSE survey;
review our scholarship and awards program for students, including a review of amount,
adjudication processes, relative distribution of scholarships awarded for need versus those
awarded for merit, and distribution of scholarship dollars for entering versus continuing students;
implement an early-alert program to assist in the identification of students at academic risk. This
will help in the allocation of academic support services and resources to students who need
additional help to succeed in their studies; and
implement the findings of the Committee on the Prevention of Sexual Harassment and Sexual
Violence.
Key outcomes for 2016-17
We will:
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
begin implementation of the Indigenous strategy. As part of this strategy, increase First Nations,
Métis, and Inuit learner populations through a special recruitment strategy;
implement changes to scholarship and awards program for students based on findings of the
review from the previous year and begin to align selection processes and notifications of award
with early admission processes;
develop a comprehensive scholarship application platform to support submission, adjudication
and delivery of undergraduate and graduate scholarships; and
enhance support for academics’ teaching development across the career span through the Taylor
Institute for Teaching and Learning.
30
Priority: Teaching and Research Integration
Key outcomes for 2014-15
We have:
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awarded 25 grants in the first cycle of the university-wide Teaching and Learning Grants program
designed to provide resources to integrate research evidence in teaching practice, to generate
new knowledge about teaching and learning at the University of Calgary, and to support the
dissemination of the results of that work to benefit others;
approved and begun implementation of the research-informed Strategic Framework for Learning
Technologies;
implemented changes in the university’s model of academic advising on campus in response to a
comprehensive review of the academic advising practices;
implemented new curriculum review processes that integrate program development consultation
and the use of a curriculum mapping and alignment tool to enhance learning experiences at a
program level;
completed unit reviews of Nursing, Law, and University of Calgary in Qatar (UCQ), and conducted
site visits for unit reviews in the Faculty of Social Work, the Faculty of Science, and the School of
Public Policy;
made the Taylor Institute a visible focus for integrating teaching and research:
• continued construction of the new landmark building, scheduled for completion in
February 2016;
• developed a strategic plan for the Educational Development Unit of the Taylor Institute;
• implemented new programming under the restructured Educational Development Unit of
the Taylor Institute to intentionally build an integrated teaching and learning community
across the university; and
• expanded the Technology Integration Group of the Educational Development Unit;
completed a review of policies governing supervision, examination and program standards in PhD
and thesis-based master’s programs;
implemented the first year of the metrics-based quality assurance process for graduate programs;
developed additional professional development programming for graduate students as part of
MyGradSkills program, supplementing existing offerings;
developed a comprehensive mentorship program for graduate supervisors;
launched new teaching development initiatives associated with the Teaching Academy formed by
recipients of institutional teaching awards, in collaboration with the Educational Development
Unit; and
explored dual-credit opportunities with our educational partners (Alberta Education, Innovation
and Advanced Education, College of Alberta School Superintendents and Alberta High Schools).
Key outcomes for 2015-16
We will:

develop a comprehensive framework and begin implementation for assessing teaching
effectiveness across our academic community. The framework will bring a consistent approach to
documenting the teaching effectiveness of individual academic staff in annual reports, merit,
tenure and promotion processes, and will include indicators of how teaching and learning quality,
31
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as well as the integration of research and scholarship into curriculum, are supported at
departmental, faculty and institutional levels;
host our third University of Calgary Post-secondary Teaching and Learning Conference in May
2015;
use the results of a national survey on academic integrity to inform changes to teaching and
learning and academic discipline practices that foster a university-wide culture of academic
integrity;
introduce new programs to enable inquiry-designed learning to better understand and improve
learning in specific courses and programs, led by the University Chair in Teaching and Learning;
support each faculty in implementing evidence-based responses to the results of the NSSE, in
collaboration with the Educational Development Unit;
continue implementation of the research-informed Strategic Framework for Learning
Technologies;
pilot a Teaching Fellows program administered through the Educational Development Unit of the
Taylor Institute;
continue to collaborate strategically with local, national and international communities to
enhance the learning experiences of students. In particular, we will focus on creation of
internships, mentoring programs, co-operative education programs, and practicum placements
within the community that have elements of community-based scholarship, where applicable;
implement more comprehensive teaching and learning skills development opportunities for
graduate students through a partnership of the MyGradSkills program and the Taylor Institute;
complete unit reviews of the Schulich School of Engineering, Werklund School of Education,
Libraries and Cultural Resources, Continuing Education and the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine;
celebrate the opening of the Taylor Institute in spring 2016. In order for this to occur, we will:
• develop a strategic plan for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning component of the
Taylor Institute;
• ensure programming of the three groups (Scholarship of Teaching and Learning,
Educational Development, and Technology Integration) for the Taylor Institute is fully
operational and integrated;
• develop further the concept of the College of Discovery, Creativity, and Innovation of the
Taylor Institute and do further pilot testing; and
• provide new resources to support the development of diverse forms of experiential
learning across our academic programs;
ensure that candidacy requirements for all doctoral programs are consistent with the revised
requirements for doctoral candidacy;
finalize a new university policy on graduate supervision; and
launch a dual-credit pilot project with the support of our educational partners.
Key outcomes for 2016-17
We will:
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continue to develop and assess the impact of initiatives to respond to the 2014 NSSE;
participate in the next round of the NSSE in 2017;
begin analysis of data from the 2016 CGPSS and develop an action plan based on this data;
implement the strategic plan for integrating the development of the scholarship of teaching and
learning in the Taylor Institute;
32
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continue implementation and begin assessment of the impact of the research-informed Strategic
Framework for Learning Technologies;
develop a university-level framework to guide effective learning assessment practices;
complete unit reviews of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, the Faculty of Kinesiology and the
Haskayne School of Business;
ensure that the Experiential Learning Office of the Taylor Institute is fully operational by
September 2016;
begin implementation of the university policy on graduate supervision; and
evaluate and expand the dual-credit pilot project with our educational partners.
Key outcomes for 2017-18
We will:
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ensure that the College of Discovery, Creativity, and Innovation is fully functional by September
2017, with grand challenges courses available at different levels of undergraduate programming;
assess the impact of the Teaching Fellows program administered through the Educational
Development Unit of the Taylor Institute; and
complete unit reviews of the Faculty of Environmental Design and the Faculty of Arts.
Priority: Internationalization
Please refer to chapter 8 for a discussion of our overall internationalization strategy and expected
outcomes over the next 3 years.
Priority: Interdisciplinarity
Key outcomes for 2014-15
We have:
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developed strategies for two more of our research themes – Engineering Solutions for Health and
Brain and Mental Health (adding to the Energy Innovations strategy published in 2012). For each
of our research themes and platforms, we are calling together scholars from across campus to
share expertise and identify topics within the theme where the University of Calgary has the
potential to make major advances. Each confederation of scholars is self-organized through the
assistance of a thought-leader who guides the development of the research strategy for the
group;
developed the confederation of scholars from across campus for each of the remaining strategic
research themes (Infections, Inflammation, and Chronic Diseases; Human Dynamics in a Changing
World; New Earth-Space Technologies);
continued development of the College of Discovery, Creativity, and Innovation; and
ensured that the conceptual and physical design of the Taylor Institute encourages
interdisciplinary collaboration.
33
Key outcomes for 2015-16
We will:
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increase support for high-quality interdisciplinary programs and research by creating a framework
to recognize and reward work to create and sustain interdisciplinary academic programs and
research;
begin the development of an interdisciplinary Indigenous strategy (see Talent Attraction,
Development and Retention);
develop models for interdisciplinary units leading to the creation of shared intellectual and
physical spaces between faculties. We will begin with developing models for major
interdisciplinary institutes;
update the policy to guide the development and operations of centres and institutes; and
complete the development of an academic sustainability plan by April 2015. This plan will be
developed by the Academic Committee on Sustainability, be an exemplar of interdisciplinary
synergies, and, and will inform the overall Institutional Sustainability Plan.
Key outcomes for 2016-17
We will:
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finalize the model for the College of Discovery, Creativity, and Innovation in the Taylor Institute,
including the impact assessment rubrics for grand challenges programming.
Priority: Leadership
Key outcomes for 2014-15
We have:
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held a campus-wide student leadership conference to introduce any interested student to key
concepts of leadership development and inspire further participation in student leadership
initiatives on our campus and in the community;
developed, through the Leadership and Student Engagement office, a suite of non-credit
leadership certificates in personal, team, community and organizational leadership recognized on
a student’s co-curricular record;
developed, through a collaboration between the Native Centre and Career Services, an Aboriginal
Relations Leadership program. This non-credit participatory program is designed for
undergraduates, alumni or working professionals who may embark on career opportunities that
interconnect with Aboriginal communities;
developed a proposal for establishing a graduate residential college in the new graduate student
residence, which is scheduled to run as a pilot program in 2015-16;
continued to provide additional focused and distinct leadership programs for senior academic
leaders and Management and Professional Staff (MaPS) staff; and
provided targeted professional development activities that develop the leadership potential of
academic staff who are mid-career and have potential to take on leadership roles (on-going).
34
Key outcomes for 2015-16
We will:
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ensure all leadership programs for academic staff are run from the staff development office of
Human Resources in conjunction with the Provost’s Office to ensure consistency in programs;
develop a more comprehensive strategy for the Academic Leadership Academy, and expand
offerings to different groups on campus;
implement and assess a pilot of the graduate residential college in the new graduate student
residence, scheduled to open in 2015-16; and
assess the impact of focussed and distinct academic leadership programs for senior academic
leaders and MaPS staff.
Key outcomes for 2016-17
We will:
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implement an Eyes High Leaders Residency program for campus;
implement the more comprehensive strategy for the Academic Leadership Academy; and
determine next steps for the pilot of the graduate residential college, based on assessment of
results to date.
Priority: Connection with Community
Key outcomes for 2014-15
We have:
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initiated implementation of an overall alumni strategy for the University of Calgary;
created a Landscape Master Plan that included community participation;
undertaken an institutional assessment of community-engaged scholarship as part of the national
community-engaged scholarship project in order to identify strategies to strengthen this form of
scholarship at the University of Calgary;
developed a government relations strategy for the University of Calgary;
developed an institutional marketing strategy for the University of Calgary;
created the Advisory Committee on Knowledge Engagement (ACKE) as part of the Research Plan’s
Knowledge Translation platform. The committee’s mandate is to identify how academics,
students, and community stakeholders can collaborate to improve knowledge engagement; and
approved a $1.3 billion fundraising campaign for the University of Calgary with a projected close
date of June 30, 2020.
Key outcomes for 2015-16
We will:
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develop a downtown campus strategy;
review institutional policies and practices for assessing research, promotion, tenure and identify
needed changes as part of a national project to promote community-engaged scholarship in the
academy;
35
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host preview events for our 50th birthday celebration;
pilot an Alumni Weekend initiative;
engage alumni communities in select national and international locations;
host public intellectual events in advance of the opening of the Taylor Institute in 2016; and
engage prospective donors and community members philanthropically in our strategic priorities
in order to help fund and fulfill our academic and research goals.
Key outcomes for 2016-17
We will:
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publically launch our $1.3 billion campaign in conjunction with the celebration of our 50th
anniversary;
host a variety of community-based events to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the University of
Calgary, including Alumni Weekend; and
host the 2016 meeting of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, which will bring
together scholars from across Canada and around the world in conjunction with our 50th
anniversary. In conjunction with this event, host the “Big Thinking Public Lecture Series”.
Priority: Sustainability
Key outcomes for 2014-15
We have:
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engaged students, faculty, and staff in developing a co-curricular sustainability strategy;
engaged students, faculty, and staff in developing the next phase of the operational sustainability
strategy; and
drafted the Framework for Advancing Education and Research in Sustainability.
Key outcomes for 2015-16
We will:
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approve the Framework for Advancing Education and Research in Sustainability, and begin
implementation (beginning in Fall 2015);
develop and approve our 2014-2019 Institutional Sustainability Plan for release in October 2015.
This will include the integration of academic, co-curricular, and operational sustainability
strategies;
implement the new co-curricular sustainability strategy to further enhance student engagement,
leadership skill development, and experiential learning for sustainability;
develop an enhanced campus and community engagement strategy for sustainability; and
continue to expand operational sustainability strategies to infuse sustainability into the campus
experience and to serve as a community leadership model.
36
Key outcomes for 2016-17
We will:
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launch an embedded Interdisciplinary Certificate in Sustainability;
implement the identified priorities of the Institutional Sustainability Plan (including academic and
research sustainability framework, the co-curricular sustainability strategy, and the operational
strategy);
advance prospective private-sector partnerships to utilize University of Calgary campuses as
innovation hubs for the development and commercialization of sustainability-related
technologies and practices; and
complete our third Sustainability Tracking and Assessment Rating System (STARS) assessment and
publish our third biennial sustainability report.
Priority: Matching our Strengths with Opportunities
Key outcomes for 2014-15
We have:
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established a Global Research Site for Unconventional Oil and Gas in Beijing in conjunction with
the Kerui Group;
produced research strategies for two of our priority themes – Engineering Solutions for Health,
Brain and Mental Health;
launched the research strategy for Engineering Solutions for Health; and
developed the “confederation of scholars” from across campus for each of the remaining strategic
research themes (Infections, Inflammation and Chronic Diseases; Human Dynamics in a Changing
World; and New Earth-Space Technologies).
Key outcomes for 2015-16
We will:
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launch international collaborative research initiatives in Unconventional Oil and Gas, and Brain
and Mental Health;
officially launch research strategies for Engineering Solutions for Health and Brain and Mental
Health;
produce and launch research strategies for the Infections, Inflammation and Chronic Diseases,
New Earth-Space Technologies, and Human Dynamics in a Changing World research themes;
secure new national research awards on the grand challenges posed in our research strategies for
Energy, Brain and Mental Health, and Engineering Solutions for Health;
deliver a new research strategy for the Arctic Institute of North America, and increase
partnerships with circumpolar nations on arctic research;
use our Analytics and Visualization research platforms to lead Alberta in attracting industry
partners to develop big-data applications in health and energy. The approach could rely on the
creation of new applied research institutes; and
promote entrepreneurship and innovation initiatives proposed by the Commercialization
Research Platform advisory group.
37
Key outcomes for 2016-17
We will:
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secure new national awards for confronting the grand challenges identified in the Infections,
Inflammation and Chronic Diseases, Human Dynamics in a Changing World, and New Earth-Space
Technologies research strategies; and
conduct an evaluation and consultation across campus on emerging strengths that could form
new institutional level research themes.
Priority: Increase our Research Capacity
Key outcomes for 2014-15
We have:
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

completed the recruitment of a Canada Excellence Research Chair in Materials Engineering for
Unconventional Oil Reservoirs;
launched a new round of recruitment for 50 Eyes High post-doctoral scholars in strategic priority
areas;
instituted a professional development program for scholars interested in commercializing
knowledge; and
advanced our research platforms via partnership with other CARI universities to expand
complementary applications while minimizing functional overlap.
Key outcomes for 2015-16
We will:








collaborate with industries working in our priority research areas to secure crucial equipment
needed to test or license new protocols, products or techniques that would expand access to
markets;
enhance research infrastructure through our research platforms, which can be used in a
collaborative fashion. We will continue to plan and execute the re-development of animal-care
facilities for research purposes;
create training opportunities for students from Campus Alberta and provide access to specialized
research facilities for student projects;
review and improve our Intellectual Property (IP) policy and related procedures to support faculty
and graduate students engaged in commercialization efforts;
complete the recruitment of five Alberta Innovates - Health Solutions (AI-HS) Translational Health
Chairs in research areas of personalized medicine, bioinformatics, cancer prevention, brain and
mental health, and metabolomics;
evaluate and recruit post-doctoral scholars through the new Alberta Innovates post-doctoral
program;
recruit a new cohort of Eyes High post-doctoral scholars following our strategic allocation and
open priority research areas; and
recruit 10 new post-doctoral scholars through the MITACS program.
38
Key Outcomes for 2016-17
We will:

complete the recruitment of three new Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council
(NSERC) Industrial Research Chairs to expand the research program of our Canada Excellence
Research Chair in Materials Engineering for Unconventional Oil Reservoirs.
Priority: Create a Dynamic Environment to Promote Research Excellence
Key outcomes for 2014-15
We have:
 expanded the SUPPORT review mechanisms to include individual grants and nominations via peer
review by interdisciplinary teams;
 completed the national requirements concerning education and accountability for responsible
conduct of research;
 completed the University of Calgary’s contribution to the provincial harmonization of ethics
protocols and evaluation procedures; and
 continued to establish UCARE, a harmonized system for animal care at the University of Calgary;
 completed our Canadian Council for Animal Care accreditation.
Key outcomes for 2015-16
We will:



complete the electronic research portal for grant management, compliance, application, and
reporting;
complete the hiring of personnel for UCARE and ensure new harmonized facilities are completely
functional; and
review the operations of research stations and implement new funding models that support
sustainable operations.
Key outcomes for 2016-17
We will:

explore new models to sustain commercialization of inventions and knowledge mobilization.
39
6.5
ENROLMENT PROJECTIONS
Calgary is the largest city in Alberta and the third largest municipality in Canada 29. It is also the fastestgrowing metropolitan area in Canada, with a population expected to reach 1.5 million by 2019. As a result
of this anticipated growth, the demand for post-secondary education is on the rise in Calgary – a city that
already has the highest number of turn-aways in the province. The Ministry of Innovation and Advanced
Education has estimated that by 2022-23, enrolment is projected to increase by another 10.4 per cent at
the University of Calgary, which will result in the largest projected space shortage (4,607) 30 within the
Campus Alberta system.
Over the past decade the university has expanded to address this strong student demand, resulting in an
enrolment that has increased by 16.3 per cent from 24,122 in 2003-04 to 28,047 in 2013-14 – 10.7 per
cent above the existing capacity of 25,335 Full-Load Equivalent (FLE) students. Space is thus constrained
on campus. This space constraint will worsen in the coming decade due to the growth expected in Calgary.
In 2013-14, the University of Calgary enrolled 28,047 FLEs (21,745 undergraduates; 6,302 graduates). The
2013-14 enrolment reflected a planned decrease of 294 FLEs from the University of Calgary’s peak
enrolment of 28,341 in 2012-13; the largest enrolment in its history. In 2014-15, preliminary numbers
show that the University of Calgary enrolled 27,149 FLE students (21,738 undergraduates and 5,411
graduates), which reflects a continued planned decrease in FLEs to address budget cuts.
The University of Calgary’s current Capital Plan includes a number of priorities, both new and renewal
projects, to address the projected space shortage, and also to improve the quality of space in priority
areas across the university. Based on recently completed faculty space master-plans, the space shortage
is most acute in the following faculties: Science, Haskayne School of Business, Nursing, Social Work, and
academic support services. Other units will be challenged as well to accommodate projected growth.
Construction work is well underway for an expanded engineering building (which will address the welldocumented space concerns within the Schulich School of Engineering), and the Taylor Institute for
Teaching and Learning. However, to accommodate the growth expected in Calgary, expansions to physical
infrastructure are required.
The University was successful in the 2014 enrolment expansion initiative and received resources to
expand enrolment in ten high-demand programs. Given the recent 2015-16 budget announcement, these
enrolment expansion targets have been adjusted, and by 2018-19, the expansions will provide an
additional 951 seats at the University of Calgary (Table 5).
Table 5 – Program Expansion
(FLEs)
Bachelor of Education
PhD (STEM)
B.Sc. Engineering (SAIT Proposal)
B.Sc. Engineering
M.Sc. Project Management
Juris Doctor
Bachelor of Social Work
Master of Social Work
Total FLEs
2012-13 Base
806
216
3,057
580
310
381
274
5,624
Expansion
200
16
100
400
50
60
100
25
951
2018-19 Target
1,006
232
100
3,457
630
370
481
299
6,575
2011 Census, Government of Canada, Statistics Canada.
2014 Campus Alberta Planning Resource, Government of Alberta, Innovation and Advanced Education.
29
30
40
In 2015-16, the University of Calgary will begin implementation of the international undergraduate
recruitment component of the International Strategy. The International Strategy calls for an increase of
just over 1,000 international students at the undergraduate level by 2019-2020 (a total of 601 students
by 2017-18) (Table 6). These additional international students will be considered above our current
provincial enrolment target. We anticipate that these students will be spread across a number of faculties
and in different years of study, depending on how they enter the university. Diversifying the student body
at the University of Calgary will enhance the overall student experience and lead to a greater cultural and
geographic understanding that lends itself to global citizenship, in line with our Academic and Research
Plans and our International Strategy.
Table 6 – International Cumulative Enrolment Growth
(Headcount)
Current International Enrolment
New International Enrolment
Revised International Enrolment
2014-15
Actuals
3,044
3,044
2015-16
Targets
3,044
117
3,161
2016-17
Targets
3,044
359
3,403
2017-18
Targets
3,044
601
3,645
Total enrolment (headcount) is projected to grow by 1,491 students, from 30,537 in 2014-15 to 32,028 by
2017-18 (Table 7). This growth includes an increase in students from 2014-15 to 2015-16 due to lower
than anticipated enrolment in the prior year, the approved program expansions, of which we anticipate
approximately 10.0 per cent will be international, new international enrolment above our provincial
targets and an additional increase in graduate students resulting from enrolment in new programs and
Eyes High funding support. It also includes a projected decrease of 188 entering students in 2016-17
associated with the reduction in the Campus Alberta grant. We continue to work toward the objective of
increasing graduate enrolments, through investments in PhD funding, recruitment of international
graduate students and expansion of offerings in graduate professional degree and certificate/diploma
programs.
Table 7 – Total Enrolment Projections
(Headcount)*
Undergraduate
Graduate
Total Enrolment
*Including domestic and international
2014-15
Actuals
24,629
5,908
30,537
2015-16
Targets
25,061
6,190
31,251
2016-17
Targets
25,314
6,293
31,607
2017-18
Targets
25,713
6,315
32,028
41
Table 8 shows 2015-16 fall enrolment targets by faculty in both headcount and FLE totals.
Table 8 – 2015-16 Fall Enrolment Target by Faculty (Headcount [HC] and Full Load Equivalent [FLE])
Arts
Environmental Design
Interdisciplinary Grad
Haskayne Business
Kinesiology
Law
Medicine – MD
Medicine
Medicine - PGME
Nursing
Public Policy
Schulich Engineering
Science
Social Work
Veterinary Medicine
Werklund Education
Open Studies
GS Exchange/Visiting
Subtotal
Qatar
TOTAL
6.6
Undergraduate
Domestic Interntl
Total
[HC]
[HC]
[HC]
6,971
230
7,200
2,643
137
2,780
702
4
706
346
4
350
465
465
564
28
592
844
904
16
920
2,980
220
3,200
4,671
179
4,850
480
2
482
120
120
797
4
800
932
395
1,327
22,575
1,219 24,636
425
425
22,575
1,644 25,061
Master's
Total
[HC]
380
243
557
52
56
271
120
40
708
415
285
34
1,050
50
4,261
25
4,286
PhD/EdD
Total
[HC]
375
36
10
43
32
1
246
27
432
366
27
42
267
1,904
1,904
2015-16
Total
[HC]
7,955
279
10
3,380
790
407
465
1,109
844
1,067
40
4,340
5,631
794
196
2,117
1,327
50
30,801
450
31,251
2015-16
Total
[FLE]
6,735
266
9
3,086
702
413
643
980
811
1,109
38
4,089
4,878
688
202
1,991
825
46
27,511
256
27,767
2014-15
Total
[HC]
7,619
253
13
3,459
759
400
503
1,047
965
1,021
57
4,211
5,538
763
199
1,903
1,321
50
30,081
458
30,539
2014-15
Total
[FLE]
6,452
241
12
3,158
674
406
695
925
927
1,063
53
3,968
4,797
660
205
1,789
821
46
26,892
257
27,149
STUDENT DEMAND
Demand for programs at the University of Calgary has been growing significantly, as evidenced by the
ratio of applicants to registrants. For example, in 2014-2015, the application-to-registrant ratios was 11:1
in our Medical Doctor (MD) program, 10.2:1 for law, 7.7:1 for veterinary medicine, 5.7:1 for nursing, and
4:1 for engineering. Our overall applicant-to-registrant ratio for undergraduate students sits at 2.77:1 and
3.80:1 at the graduate level. This application pressure is only expected to increase given the growth in
Calgary, the current economic downturn (which has historically resulted in increased post-secondary
applications), and as we continue to improve our national and international reputation. In order to
manage growth effectively and within available resources, over the past three years we have moved to a
sustainable growth model – one that increases our accountability to the government and staff and
students of the university. A sustainable growth model for the University of Calgary includes a
commitment to maintaining enrolment unless new resources become available for expansion through
government-funded expansion initiatives or through growth in our international and cost-recovery
programing, or through technology-related pedagogical enhancements that allow us to increase student
numbers. Our ability to admit more students in the future will be constrained by funding and space.
42
6.7
PROGRAM EXPANSION PROPOSALS
In 2014, the University of Calgary proposed expansion of eleven undergraduate and graduate programs
across the disciplines of Education, Education (STEM), Engineering, Law, Social Work and an additional
master’s-level expansion for a total expansion of 1,031 FLEs and $9.6 million. As a result of Budget 2015,
the expansion funding was cut by $2.3 million for a total base funding of $7.3 million. To best leverage
these resources, the University of Calgary will continue the discipline-specific expansions and eliminate
the general master’s-level expansion. This plan reduces the provincially-approved expansion by 80 FLEs
from the 1,031 FLEs approved in 2014-15 to 951 FLEs (Table 9). Due to the delay in expansion funding
confirmation, the University of Calgary’s expansions will begin in 2015-16 and will reach steady-state in
2018-19.
Table 9 – Enrolment Expansion Summary
(FLEs)
Bachelor of Education
PhD (STEM)
B.Sc. Engineering (SAIT Proposal)
B.Sc. Chemical Engineering
B.Sc. Mechanical Engineering
B.Sc. Oil and Gas Engineering
M.Sc. Project Management
Juris Doctor
Bachelor of Social Work
Master of Social Work
Total FLEs
Incremental FLEs
6.8
2015-16
Targets
50
4
50
40
30
30
25
20
25
25
299
299
2016-17
Targets
100
8
100
80
60
60
50
40
50
25
573
274
2017-18
Targets
150
12
100
120
90
90
50
60
75
25
772
199
2018-19
Targets
200
16
100
160
120
120
50
60
100
25
951
179
NEW PROGRAMS UNDER DEVELOPMENT
FACULTY OF ARTS
Undergraduate programs (approximate time frame: 2016-17 and beyond)
 Bachelor of Arts restructuring (Linguistics, Languages and Culture)
 Bachelor of Arts in Arabic Language and Muslim Cultures
Graduate programs (approximate time frame: 2015-16)



Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy restructuring (Linguistics, Languages and Culture)
Professional/Executive degree program in Geographical Information Sciences
Master of Arts, Master of Fine Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in Inter-Arts Performance
FACULTY OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
(approximate time frame: 2015-16)
Graduate certificates and diplomas
•
•
•
Urban Design
Rural Planning
Environmental Design for Crime Prevention
43
(approximate time frame: 2016-17 and beyond)


Doctor of Design
Master of Business Administration/Master of Planning joint degree
HASKAYNE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Undergraduate programs (approximate time frame: 2016-17 and beyond)
 Bachelor of Commerce/Bachelor of Science (Engineering) joint degree
Graduate programs (approximate time frame: 2016-17 and beyond)





Doctor of Business Administration (DBA)
Master of Science
Master of Financial Management
Master of Accounting
Master of Business Administration/Master of Planning joint degree
FACULTY OF KINESIOLOGY
(approximate time frame 2015-16)

Bachelor of Kinesiology/Bachelor of Health and Physical Education (Athletic Therapy) joint degree
with Mount Royal University
CUMMING SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
(approximate time frame: 2016-17 and beyond)



Bachelor of Social Work/Bachelor of Health Sciences joint degree
Physician’s Assistant program
Master of Biomedical Technology restructuring
FACULTY OF NURSING
(approximate time frame: 2015-16)

Master of Nursing/Master of Business Administration joint degree
SCHULICH SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Undergraduate programs (approximate time frame: 2016-17 and beyond)
 Engineering Physics/Engineering Science undergraduate degree
Graduate programs (approximate time frame: 2015-16)


Professional/Executive Master of Engineering degree
Distance delivery of course-based master’s graduate programs
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Undergraduate programs (approximate time frame: 2016-17 and beyond)
 Bachelor of Science in Energy Science
 Engineering Physics/Engineering Science undergraduate degree
Graduate programs (approximate time frame: 2016-17 and beyond)
44





Master of Science in Information Security (course-based)
Master of Science in Actuarial Science (course-based)
Master of Science in a Chemistry discipline (course-based)
Master of Science in Carbon Capture and Storage (course-based)
Master of Science in Quantum Science and Technologies (course-based)
FACULTY OF SOCIAL WORK
(approximate time frame: 2016-17 and beyond)



6.9
Master of Social Work restructuring, including graduate certificates and diplomas
Post-Masters certificate in Marriage and Family Therapy
Bachelor of Social Work/Bachelor of Health Sciences joint degree
PERFORMANCE MEASURES
Excellence is a word that is widely used in strategic plans. Instead of merely talking about excellence, we
will demonstrate it through our actions. We continuously evaluate our performance using rigorous
metrics (Chapter 13). We currently benchmark ourselves against the top five research universities in
Canada. Subsequently, we will move to benchmarking against the top research universities on the world
stage to achieve our goal of becoming a global intellectual hub. We will be an innovative and excellent
university based on our merits and our performance. We are transforming our culture to one that
embraces and celebrates excellence and rises to the challenge with achievement. In doing so, we are
developing a shared sense that the University of Calgary is a community of optimism, pride and
opportunity.
6.10 SUMMARY
As a result of a focus on our priorities, graduates from the University of Calgary will be thoughtful,
communicative citizens and leaders of their respective communities, with abilities to think critically and
creatively to solve issues of the day. They will understand the value of collaboration and partnerships, and
will be used to working with others who are considered traditionally to be outside of their fields of
expertise. They will also appreciate different cultures and see value in diversity – of opinion, thought,
gender, ethnicity, and culture. They will appreciate the limited resources available on Earth, and work and
live to create a sustainable future.
Through a focus on our academic and research priorities, we will work with the City of Calgary and
surrounding communities to enhance the strategic advantage we already have in place. We will work with
community leaders, corporate partners, non-profit organizations, alumni and the public to inspire and
ensure a positive future.
45
7. Connectivity
The Alberta Government has emphasized the enhancement of system collaboration and partnerships, and
we think it is important to describe the connectivity that the University of Calgary has developed. Below,
we highlight current illustrative examples of system partnerships and partnerships with the local,
provincial, national and international communities. Our vision of collaboration and partnership is one in
which we believe we have expertise to offer and a willingness to learn from our partner institutions, and
we acknowledge that unexpected synergies often arise from working together. We also acknowledge our
Senate, a group of community representatives who help facilitate partnership development in the
community.
7.1
CALGARY AND SURROUNDING AREAS
Campus Alberta:
We have a number of connections with Calgary post-secondary institutions.



We have academic program partnerships with Calgary institutions — such as the Social Work
program with Mount Royal University (MRU). In the case of Social Work (160 students at MRU
and University of Calgary), we have a transfer agreement that allows MRU diploma holders to
enter year three of the BSW degree at the University of Calgary.
The Southern Alberta Integrated Libraries (SAIL) Consortium was formed in 2005 between the
University of Calgary and St. Mary’s University College, Bow Valley College, and Ambrose
University College. The University of Calgary hosts shared library services using its integrated
software system (Sirsi) and hardware on a cost-recovery basis. In addition, other library services
can be negotiated (e.g., the set-up and maintenance of non-Sirsi software currently licensed by
the University of Calgary).
We have developed a collaboration with SAIT, and will launch an Energy Engineering program in
May 2015. Fifty students will complete an engineering diploma at SAIT, and then move to the
University of Calgary to complete an engineering degree.
Outside of Campus Alberta:
We have strong connections with a number of key organizations:

We partner with our professional communities to lead teaching innovation and practice and to
expand educational outreach.
• The Werklund School of Education signed a partner research school agreement with eight
school authorities in Calgary and surrounding areas. This partnership includes dynamic
collaborations among schools, communities, and universities leading innovation through
research-active inquiry and practice. The Werklund School also offers a Youth Leadership
program at Central Memorial High School.
• The Rothney Astrophysical Observatory (RAO) is the university’s principal scientific
education and public outreach facility in the Calgary area, offering community experience
and learning in astronomy and astrophysics from its location south of Calgary near the
town of Priddis. Through partnerships (in the form of Board-recognized field trip lists) with
the Calgary, Calgary Separate, Foothills, and Rocky View School Boards, 3,342 students
visited the RAO from area board, charter, and private schools during 2014. Beyond school
46
groups, RAO’s outreach activities are enhanced through memberships in and partnerships
with Museums Alberta, the Society of Education Resource Groups, the Calgary Chapter of
the Royal Astronomical Society, and the Calgary Foundation. In all, the broad range of
events and activities at the RAO were attended by 9060 visitors from Calgary and across
Alberta in 2014.
 We partner with groups to preserve culture and language:
• the Werklund School of Education is partnering with Indigenous communities, students,
academic, research, education, community and government leaders to engage in
discussions on bringing Indigenous perspectives into a faculty of education; and
• the Department of Linguistics, Languages and Cultures is working with Aboriginal
communities to create teaching materials to ensure language preservation.
 We partner with Alberta Health Services (AHS) to improve health care and patient outcomes
across the province by:
• providing certificate and continuing education programs for physicians and other health
care professionals within Calgary and across Alberta including face-to-face education,
video-conference learning, and e-learning. Providing non-credit executive education for
AHS leadership in partnership with the University of Alberta;
• accessing preceptors and clinical placements, particularly for medical and nursing students
throughout Alberta; and
• sharing academic/clinical leaders in almost all of our departments in the Cumming School
of Medicine.
To improve the quality of life for Calgarians, we partner with The City of Calgary and agencies.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The University of Calgary works closely with Calgary Economic Development (CED) and is
a partner in Action Calgary’s “Be Part of the Energy” campaign to help build relationships
to stimulate employment growth and diversification in Calgary.
We support agencies like the United Way that provide individuals and families the
opportunity to reach their potential and improve their quality of life. In 2014, the
university raised $433,512 for the United Way, exceeding our target by more than
$18,000.
The faculties of medicine, environmental design, nursing, and social work worked together
on projects with the YMCA at the South Health Campus to assess the impact of programs
and services on the communities adjacent to this institution.
makeCalgary is a community-based research platform in the Faculty of Environmental
Design that engages the disciplines of architecture, planning and ecological design in an
interdisciplinary fashion to make Calgary what we all imagine.
The University of Calgary is a proud community partner of the Calgary Stampede, playing
many roles in the stampede story.
Advancing Canadian Wastewater Assets (ACWA) is a partnership between the University
of Calgary and The City of Calgary. ACWA’s main goal is development of innovative
wastewater treatment technologies to improve ecosystem and human health. ACWA
includes major installations at the City’s Pine Creek Waste Water Treatment Plant, and is
funded by the Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI), The City of Calgary, the province,
and the university.
To encourage technology transfer, we partner with The City of Calgary, the Calgary
Chamber of Commerce, and the provincial and federal governments in Innovate Calgary.
Innovate Calgary brings together researchers, entrepreneurs, and investors to create
47
•
7.2
innovations that drive economic growth, job-creation, and social well-being. Innovate
Calgary has a vision to become one of the leading innovation eco-systems in Canada.
In November 2014, the University of Calgary and Wood’s Homes have partnered to
establish an innovative, community-based research chair focused on improving the lives
of children with mental health issues. The research initiative will also benefit families and
the community through enhanced mental health treatment services. For the first time, the
chair will be based in the community — it will have a faculty appointment in the Faculty of
Social Work, and the work will be based at Wood’s Homes — bringing academic research
and education directly into the community. The chair will conduct research that focuses
on frontline children’s mental health practices — combining theory and testing with action
and intervention.
CAMPUS ALBERTA (PROVINCE-WIDE)
We work with other Campus Alberta institutions to provide programming and special initiatives
throughout the province.


Our social work program is a model for Campus Alberta, given that it is the only degree-granting
social work program in the province. We offer Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) programming to
more than 500 undergraduates annually across the province, much of it offered directly to
students in their home locations through strong educational partnerships. In Edmonton, we host
our program in a professional building and have 2 + 2 transfer agreements with Grant McEwan
University and Norquest College to directly accept Social Work diploma holders into the third year
of a BSW degree. Our Edmonton-based students also receive library and other student supports
from the University of Alberta. In Lethbridge, our program has long been hosted on the University
of Lethbridge campus, and we work closely with academics from that institution. In Calgary, we
work closely with MRU to deliver on a similar 2 + 2 transfer agreement that offers degree
completion for their social work diploma graduates. We have long-standing outreach sites where
the BSW is delivered onsite at local colleges such as Grande Prairie Regional College, Keyano
College, Red Deer College, Medicine Hat College, and Portage College. We have key transfer
agreements with all of these colleges, and other schools such as Maskwacis Cultural College, Blue
Quills First Nations College and Northern Lakes College. Finally, we also offer an online BSW
program to students in every other part of the province through our Virtual Learning Circles
program. This provincial delivery model provides connections with dozens of community
organizations throughout the province, including Southwest Child and Family Services in
Lethbridge, Canadian Mental Health Association in northern Alberta, Glenrose Rehabilitation
Hospital in Edmonton, and the Calgary Immigrant Women’s Association.
We have developed a long list of partnerships for our veterinary medicine program. We have
designed admission procedures for the DVM degree so that students from all Alberta universities
and the majority of colleges (11) can complete the prerequisites for entry to the program at their
home institutions. As another example, the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine sends DVM students
to Olds College for learning experiences, and hosts students from Olds College for learning
experiences in Calgary. Our FVM has a unique distributed veterinary learning community, and
thus we are connected to about 60 veterinary clinics throughout the province where students go
for clinical placements. These partnerships also provide clinical homes for our faculty members.
Our FVM has launched a unique collaborative graduate course with the University of Alberta in
One Health that is taught through videoconferencing and includes students from both
universities.
48








We have a long-standing partnership with Medicine Hat College to provide our Bachelor of
Nursing degree at the college (122 students). The majority of students in this program reside in
Medicine Hat or the surrounding rural area, thus the program enables nursing students to study
and subsequently seek employment within or close to their home communities, a critical factor
in ensuring we have qualified nurses working in rural Southern Alberta.
We have had a partnership with Red Deer College (RDC) since 1996, which now provides Bachelor
of Arts degrees (126 students) through a transfer program in the major fields of English,
psychology, and sociology. Students may also minor in English, history, philosophy, political
science, psychology, or sociology, and in rare circumstances we have had students complete a
minor in visual studies and art history. Students complete their program at RDC, with professors
from RDC teaching the first and second years of the program, and a mix of RDC and University of
Calgary faculty teaching the third and fourth years. Faculty from the University of Calgary travel
to the RDC campus to teach. We are discussing expanding our partnership with RDC to other
programs.
Our Faculty of Law is involved with the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Law in a joint venture
with the Solicitor General of Alberta to run the Alberta Law Reform Institute.
Our downtown campus serves as the home for academic programs from the University of Alberta
and Athabasca University, as well as our own academic programs (Continuing Education, School
of Public Policy, and Executive Education from the Haskayne School of Business).
The Native Ambassador Post-Secondary Initiative (NAPI) is an Aboriginal youth outreach and
leadership training program managed by the Native Centre at the University of Calgary. The
program is designed to provide comprehensive and culturally appropriate leadership training
certificates as well as information on post-secondary education. The program is targeted towards
Aboriginal youth enrolled in junior and senior high school and other youth programs. The primary
objective of the program is to provide youth with leadership training that focuses, in a cultural
context, on self-development, interpersonal relations, and community engagement. In addition,
the program offers motivational presentations that encourage youth to pursue post-secondary
education. Ambassadors from MRU, SAIT, Bow Valley College and the University of Calgary serve
as role models in junior and high schools, provide campus tours for visiting groups, and travel to
regional Aboriginal career fairs.
Our Faculty of Graduate Studies is developing an ongoing relationship with its counterpart at the
University of Lethbridge to partner on professional development training for graduate
students. To begin this partnership, in March of 2014, University of Lethbridge graduate students
and faculty members attended University of Calgary-sponsored workshops, presented by an
international visiting speaker.
Campus Alberta Neuroscience (Albertaneuro) is a province-wide network of approximately 250
research professionals working in neuroscience and mental health: from early brain development
to Alzheimer’s and from foundational biological research to clinical, therapeutic and system
application of new knowledge. University of Calgary, University of Alberta, and University of
Lethbridge work together to facilitate research, attract the best and the brightest and network
the neuroscience community.
The University of Calgary’s Students’ Union, which represents the undergraduate students on
campus, has strong connections through their provincial and federal advocacy groups, allowing
them to collaborate with student associations across the country in order to improve the quality
of education and student experience Canada-wide. The Council of Alberta University Students
(CAUS) represents more than 80,000 students in Alberta, including those from the University of
Calgary, University of Alberta, University of Lethbridge, MacEwan University, and Mount Royal
University. Our Students’ Union is a key player within this organization, often providing leadership
49
within the CAUS group. The Canadian Alliance of Student Associations (CASA) consists of 24
student associations from seven provinces and represents more than 300,000 post-secondary
students on a national level to advocate for accessibility, affordability, innovation, and quality in
education.
7.3
MULTIPLE PROVINCIAL / NATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS
We have partnerships that involve the Prairie Provinces to help improve health and wellness.
The Health Knowledge Network (HKN) is a collaborative venture, established in 1994, between
the University of Calgary and the University of Alberta to provide electronic information resources
and services to health and wellness organizations in the Prairie Provinces. This service currently
serves 28 member organizations in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta and is presently
headquartered in the Health Sciences Library at the University of Calgary.
 The Prairie Child Welfare Consortium is a tri-provincial and northern multi-sector network
engaging university educators and researchers from faculties of social work in Alberta,
Saskatchewan and Manitoba, government and Aboriginal administrators, policy-makers, and
service delivery agents dedicated to advancing and strengthening child welfare education and
training, research, policy development, practice, and service delivery in the prairie provinces and
the Northwest Territories. The consortium is unique in Canada with its accomplishments across
organizational, geographical, political, and cultural boundaries.
We provide employment information for Aboriginal students in Western Canada.

The University of Calgary Native Centre manages the LYNX: Aboriginal and Student Employment
Program, which provides an opportunity for Aboriginal students and recent graduates from
Canadian post-secondary institutions to connect directly with potential employers who are
seeking to recruit qualified Aboriginal employees for internships, co-op placements, summer
employment and full time positions. Since 2008, the LYNX Program has established partnerships
with 14 post-secondary institutions across western Canada (Universities of Winnipeg, Manitoba,
Regina, Saskatchewan, Calgary, Alberta, British Columbia, Northern British Columbia, Victoria, and
Lakehead, Mount Royal, and Vancouver Island Universities, as well as technical institutes such as
the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology and SAIT Polytechnic).
We play a leadership role in veterinary medical education.
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We have strengthened our partnership between the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and the
Alberta Veterinary Medical Association. This includes partnership in delivering the DVM program,
advanced clinical training (internships), graduate/clinical fellow training, and research activities.
We collaborate with the five Canadian veterinary colleges in the following specific programs: a
National Ecosystem Health Rotation (rotates between the colleges annually and is delivered by a
joint faculty from the five colleges), the Canadian Wildlife Health Co-operative
(surveillance/research; five collaborating nodes across the country based at each vet college;
funded through a variety of government sources), and the Canadian Veterinary Regulatory
Epidemiology Network (a consortium of the five colleges and supported by the Canadian Food
Inspection Agency [CFIA]). We are also working the Canadian veterinary and agriculture colleges
in a joint contract with the CFIA to produce a food-safety training program for their staff as they
upgrade and change the food safety system in Canada. We also have a specific rotation exchange
program with the Western College of Veterinary Medicine.
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We collaborate with Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development – we have an Animal Disease Risk
and Surveillance Group between the two organizations and we also collaborate on animal disease
investigation outbreaks.
We partner with multiple universities to access high-performance computing.

WestGrid is a government-funded technology infrastructure program in British Columbia, Alberta,
Saskatchewan and Manitoba that provides research faculty and students access to highperformance computing and distributed data storage. Members include 13 research-intensive
Western Canadian universities and the Banff Centre. WestGrid is also part of Compute Canada, a
national high performance computing platform.
We partner with multiple universities to provide a community rehabilitation degree.
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The Bachelor of Community Rehabilitation program, the only one of its kind in Western Canada, is
predicated on partnerships with post-secondary education and community service organizations.
The Bachelor of Community Rehabilitation program enjoys a block transfer arrangement with
more than 60 post-secondary agencies in Canada. These block transfer arrangements provide for
seamless transfer between a two-year diploma program into the remaining two years of the
Bachelor of Community Rehabilitation program at the University of Calgary. Classroom instruction
is delivered face-to-face at the University of Calgary as well as at Grant MacEwan University
and Douglas College in British Columbia and many courses are also available in online
formats. Whether students are interested in community development and advocacy, or legal and
social reform, completion of a Bachelor of Community Rehabilitation degree entails a strong
theory-to-practice connection including approximately 600 hours of community practicum
experience. The program has community partnerships with more than 200 organizations and
agencies in Calgary. We also publish an online publication: International Journal of Disability,
Community and Rehabilitation. The Department of Community Rehabilitation and Disability
Studies (CRDS) also delivers M.Sc., MDCS and PhD programs in a blended format.
We have partnerships with national organizations to preserve our heritage.

The Military Museums Library and Archives and the Founders’ Gallery in Calgary are managed by
Libraries and Cultural Resources (LCR) at the University of Calgary and provide support for both
academic and community programs, through a partnership established in 2000. This is a joint
project involving the University of Calgary, the Department of National Defence, the Military
Museums, the Regimental and Naval and Air Force museums located at the Military Museums,
the university’s Centre for Military and Strategic Studies located in the Faculty of Arts, Valour
Canada, and the Military Museums Foundation.
We participate in numerous partnerships with national and multi-national corporations to advance
innovations.
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Alberta Sulphur Research Limited, one of the longest-lived and most successful research
enterprises in Alberta, continues to serve as a contact point between industry and academia,
striving to provide expert understanding of the chemistry of sulphur and its compounds.
The Microseismic Industry Consortium, a novel, applied-research geophysical initiative dedicated
to the advancement of research, education and technological innovations in microseismic
methods and their practical applications for resource development.
The Foundation CMG/Frank and Sarah Meyer Collaboration Centre, a state-of-the-art immersive
3D visualization facility.
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7.4
Math Minds: A partnership between the Werklund School of Education, Canadian Oil Sands
Limited (COS) and other organizations takes an innovative approach to math education, making it
more accessible, interesting, and enjoyable to students from kindergarten to grade six.
We partner with all three territorial governments by placing our students and residents in
northern communities for medical education and cultural experiences.
TRIUMF, Canada's National Laboratory for Nuclear and Particle Physics, is owned and operated
by a joint venture involving 12 Canadian Universities. In 2014-15, the University of Calgary
became the 12th member of this national consortium of major Canadian Universities stretching
from British Columbia to Quebec. TRIUMF is a major international laboratory, home to nearly 500
highly-qualified staff, post-doctoral scholars, and students, and marks a major addition to the
university's suite of research stations, which are identified as a key platform in our Strategic
Research Plan. Major TRIUMF milestones in 2014-15 included construction completion and first
beam from ARIEL, TRIUMF's second major accelerator, and the successful demonstration of a nonreactor based solution to Canada's medical isotope crisis generated by the closure of the national
nuclear reactor facility leading to a shortage of Tc-99m, a key medical isotope used for cardiac
and cancer testing. The latter work also resulted in the awarding of NSERC's Brockhouse Award
to the nation-wide team that reached this milestone.
INTERNATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS
In our role as a growing global intellectual hub, we have key international partners to help solve global
problems. Here are few significant contributions.
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Our international branch campus in the Middle East was established in 2007 at the invitation of
the State of Qatar, and is the only campus offering university-level nursing studies in the country.
The University of Calgary in Qatar has become well-recognized throughout the area for delivering
excellence in nursing education, research initiative, and community engagement. Through our
partnerships with Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC), Qatar’s premier not-for-profit health care
provider, and other key agencies in the healthcare community — including Qatar Red Crescent,
Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar, Qatar Diabetes Association, Sidra Medical and Research
Centre, the Academic Health System, Qatar Supreme Council of Education, and Qatar Supreme
Council of Health, we have solidified our position as a critical organization in the developing
healthcare system of Qatar.
We partnered with the Kerui Group, a private Chinese oil and gas company, to establish a
collaborative energy research, education and training site in Beijing in October 2014. The Beijing
site is part of the university’s new Global Research Initiative for Unconventional Oil and Gas. This
initiative aims to establish at least three world-leading research and education centres focused
on unconventional hydrocarbon resources, including a Calgary centre and others in key energy
locations around the world.
The Cumming School of Medicine has partnered with African colleagues to create and deliver a
Master of Public Health degree in Mwanza, Tanzania. This work is just one component of a multifaceted partnership with the Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences (CUHAS) that
includes joint research activities, medical electives and research field training for University of
Calgary students. An innovative PhD training program to support the development of global
health leaders will see some graduates enrol in doctoral education at the University of Calgary
with research focussed on high needs areas of Tanzania. The goal is to build joint University of
Calgary and Tanzanian research teams and to strengthen global health research capacity in both
institutions.
52
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The Cumming School of Medicine has long-standing partnerships with the Government of Laos to
build medical education. We also have a 25-year partnership with colleagues from Paton Academy
of Health Sciences in Nepal to build capacity for undergraduate medical education and are now
participating in an international consortium of American, Canadian and Australian universities to
build a new School of Public Health in Nepal.
A ten-year partnership to strengthen leadership for medical training in Sudan continues through
new initiatives and partnerships. Most recently these linkages have resulted in a successful Grand
Challenges award to build a digital medical library to enable access to medical and diagnostic
information for rural practitioners in South Sudan.
We offer the International Energy Lawyers program, a unique and exciting joint degree program
with the University of Houston. This program allows law students at the University of Calgary and
the University of Houston Law Center to earn both Canadian and American law degrees in four
years. Students spend two years at each school and take courses that enable them to be eligible
to be called to the bar in every jurisdiction in the United States and Canada. The program is
supported by a series of generous scholarships and industry-sponsored summer placements. In
steady state, the plan is to have five to ten enrolled at any given time.
Our School of Public Policy connects with research partners at the University of Dundee
(Scotland), University des los Andes (Colombia), Sergio Arboleda University (Colombia), Haifa
(Israel), and the Van Horne Institute (Canada). As one particular example, all of our policy papers
produced on extractive resources/industries appear in the Source Books, a website managed at
the University of Dundee in Scotland. This website is funded by the World Bank and is set up to
provide access to low- and middle-income countries.
We offer the Global Energy Executive Master of Business Administration (GEMBA) degree
program through a partnership between the Haskayne School of Business and global energy
consulting firm IHS. The 20-month program comprises five modules, each of which consists of two
to three weeks onsite in a global energy centre. The first module takes place in Calgary, with a
field trip to Fort McMurray. Subsequent modules are in London (UK), Houston (USA), Doha (Qatar)
and Beijing (China) with blended learning between sessions through on-line connectivity,
supplementary classes, peer-to-peer meetings, reading and assignments. This program is
designed to develop high-potential executives in the global energy sector as the industry’s next
senior leaders.
The University of Calgary has more than 125 active student exchange linkages around the world.
These partnerships with many top universities provide opportunities for Calgary students to
internationalize their programs. In addition to student exchanges, there are over 180 partnership
agreements involving research, joint publication and other scholarly activities.
The University of Calgary is an active partner in a number of Alberta-wide programs that offer
internship placements for post-secondary students. Funding for these is allocated through the
Alberta Ministry of Innovation and Advanced Education.
• The Washington Centre (TWC), Washington DC: The University of Calgary has a longstanding agreement with TWC to place students in internships in the Washington DC area.
Four-month placements may be arranged with embassies (Canadian or other countries),
non-governmental organizations and international financial institutions, various nonprofit agencies, U.S. government departments and senate or congressional offices. The
Alberta government provides funding for eight University of Calgary students per year to
participate.
• Smithsonian internships: An Alberta-wide agreement with the Smithsonian Institute in the
USA provides 8-10 placements per year. Funded by the Alberta government, the University
of Calgary has routinely secured 3-4 placements a year for students in museum studies,
53
•
archaeology, anthropology or communications and business, to have a 4-6 month
internship at one of more than 20 institutions that comprise the Smithsonian.
Alberta Saxony International Internship Program (ASiiP): Each year, University of Calgary
students participate in internship placements in Saxony, Germany in institutions, research,
government, and private industry. Honoraria are funded through the provincial
government.
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8. Internationalization
We live in a highly interconnected world where technological advances allow us to share information
across borders, cultures, and linguistic barriers like never before in human history. The world’s top
universities are all international in orientation with well-developed global webs of interaction that help
them to create, disseminate, and apply knowledge.
The Eyes High strategic vision introduces the concept that the University of Calgary will become a global
intellectual hub, and one of the seven academic priorities outlined in the academic plan is
internationalization. Calgary is a global energy and business centre, and is home to the second-highest
concentration of head offices in the nation. Our city demands graduates, both domestic and international,
who have a global orientation, are competitive in a global marketplace, and who can adapt to diverse
cultural, economic, and governmental environments. Our province suffers from a shortage of
professionals and skilled labour that is a key barrier to future economic growth. The recruitment of
international students is increasingly recognized as an important element in a broader strategy for
attracting highly qualified people to our country 31.
The International Task Force, comprised of 24 individuals from across our academy, met over a period of
a year to develop an international strategy that was approved by GFC and the Board of Governors in
December 2012. The strategy was officially launched by the university in March 2013.
Support for international activities is coordinated through the Office of the Provost and Vice-President
(Academic), the Office of Vice-Provost (International) and the Office of the Vice-Provost (Student
Experience) through:
the Provost’s International Steering Committee, chaired by the Provost: comprised of central
administrators with responsibilities in the international domain, meets four times per year to
ensure coordination of all international activities;
 University of Calgary International (UCI): international relations and international development
support and study abroad;
 International Student Experience: interconnected supports for international students to enhance
academic success and quality of experience at the University of Calgary;
 International Recruitment Network: coordination of international recruitment activities through
the Office of the Registrar; and
 the Associate Deans and Directors Council, chaired by the Vice-Provost International: meets bimonthly to share information, collaborate, and discuss how best to meet our collective objectives
in support of the international strategy.
Administratively, the Deputy Provost holds key responsibility for ensuring international activities and
initiatives are coordinated and operating efficiently and effectively.
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We believe that our international strategy must contribute to the achievement of our Eyes High strategic
vision. It presents four high-level strategic goals and three targets:
31
University of Calgary International Plan, 2013.
55
1. Diversity: Increase the diversity of our campus communities in terms of students represented
from a variety of countries.
•
•
Target: 10.0 per cent of the undergraduate population will be international.
Target: 25.0 per cent of the graduate population will be international.
2. Cross-cultural competencies: Improve the global and cross-cultural competencies within our
campus communities.
•
Target: 50.0 per cent of our students will have an international experience before they
graduate.
3. Partnerships: Enhance opportunities for international collaborations and partnerships in research
and education.
4. International development: Leverage our areas of expertise to collaborate with international
partners on development needs.
In line with our sustainable development model, we used a regional/country framework to determine the
most appropriate locations of focus in the world for the University of Calgary. We recognized that
international projects and relationships maintained by the institution reflect a significant investment in
time and resources, and that new relationships require significant investment. Given finite resources
available, we assessed where the focus of international activity is currently, and given our academic and
research priorities, where the most appropriate partnership opportunities exist. The countries/regions of
emphasis and countries/regions of interest that we identified represent those areas where there is an
existence of a solid base of ongoing and strong relationships, strong ties to our academic and research
priority areas, and potential connection to industry in both Calgary and in the countries/regions of
emphasis as well as the countries/regions of interest. In addition, strong diasporic or immigrant
populations from each of these countries/regions exist in Calgary.
There have been, and will continue to be, internal structural and organizational changes taking place as
our international activities increase. We will continue to streamline our structure, processes and programs
to meet the demands of internationalization. As part of our examination of processes and programs, we
will continue to review existing English Language Proficiency (ELP) requirements for undergraduate and
graduate admission programs to align accessibility to programs and scholarships. In addition, we will
review English as an Additional Language (EAL) training programs that exist to help students achieve their
academic goals.
The countries/regions of emphasis include:
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China: The sheer scale and speed at which its economy and higher education system are
developing make China a tremendous opportunity and challenge for any Canadian university.
China is a currently a nexus for many important collaborations.
Germany: Western Europe is second only to the United States as a nexus of research
collaboration. Germany has a strong post-secondary system. The University of Calgary has strong
and diverse patterns of collaboration in Germany.
Mexico: The convergence of geographic proximity, trilateral agreements with Canada and the
United States, and the strength of ongoing collaborations in Latin America, make Mexico an
attractive partner. In particular, energy innovations will form the basis for strong collaboration in
research and education, as will health, education, urbanization, and culture.
Middle East: In addition to our nursing campus in Qatar and broader research opportunities that
exist in Qatar, there are exciting opportunities to bridge to other countries in the region,
particularly around energy, engineering and health research.
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East Africa: The University of Calgary has a diverse and strong pattern of integrated education and
research partnerships in East Africa (e.g., Tanzania, Uganda, Kenya), particularly related to
international development and health.
 United States: The highest density of our international research collaborations are with the United
States. It is the most likely nexus for international consortia that will tackle large-scale problems
of importance to society.
The countries/regions of interest where other compelling opportunities might present include Australia,
Brazil, France, Spain, U.K., India, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Vietnam and Norway.
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In order to further develop the relationships with our countries/regions of emphasis and
countries/regions of interest, we will ensure that the efforts of university leadership are focused on these
particular areas and on institutions within these geographic locations. Funds will be allocated to support
internationalization efforts in these countries/regions. A regional council for each country/region of
emphasis – led by a senior executive and composed of members of the academy who have strong ties to
the particular country/region, industry partners, and significant Calgary community leaders – has been
formed and supports the development of a strategic plan in each country/region for the University of
Calgary.
The primary outcomes over the next three years for our international strategy are listed below.
Key outcomes for 2014-15:
We have:
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Launched all regional councils and begun strategy development for each country/region of
emphasis;
Continued to identify meaningful international opportunities for student and staff exchanges to
further build intercultural competencies (ongoing);
Developed a strategy to implement a cross-cultural competencies program to ensure a welcoming
and culturally sensitive environment for international students, faculty, staff, and visitors as well
as provide opportunities to celebrate and share the rich diversity of our community;
Developed strategic and tactical plans (international relations, programs and international
development, international learning experiences) within UCI to support the international
strategy;
Developed a new international recruitment model to meet international recruitment targets of
10.0 per cent and 25.0 per cent of the undergraduate and graduate student populations,
respectively, and hired an internationally regarded consultant to make recommendations on how
we can implement an effective international recruitment model;
Coordinated with each faculty and school to develop a strategic plan for internationalization
aligning with the Academic and Research Plans and the International Strategy;
Ensured institutional frameworks/policies facilitate establishment of complex linkages. For
example, we have ensured organizational excellence in this area by making certain that policies
and procedures (e.g. international travel and security policy, international linkage policy) and risk
management procedures are in place;
Developed a framework and model to assess and prioritize partnerships with international
universities and countries;
Commenced pilot projects for articulation programs – 3+2 in Engineering and 2+2 in Science,
recruiting more than 50 students from China for fall 2015 as a stepping stone for articulation
program implementation in 2016;
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Increased recruitment activities for sponsored graduate students, including China Scholarship
Council and Science without Borders;
Joined CALDO, a consortium of Canadian research universities working to recruit sponsored
students from Latin America;
Collaborated with the Vice-President (Research) to successfully launch the Global Research
Initiative (GRI) for Energy and Global Research Site (GRS) in Beijing, China;
Developed a working model and signed an agreement with the Government of Mexico to explore
the possibility of establishing a GRI for energy and GRS in Mexico City;
Organized “Mexico Days” in collaboration with Consulate of Mexico in Calgary to highlight arts,
movies, and culture in Mexico, including a “Research and Arts” showcase;
Organized “China Days” in collaboration with the Consulate of China in Calgary to showcase
Chinese culture;
Offered customized training programs to industry practitioners from international countries;
Secured additional scholarships to recruit students or to send Calgary students to gain
international experience (e.g., Canadian Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee scholarships,
Graduate scholarships from the Energy and Mineral Resources Development Association);
Proposed an International Foundations Program (IFP) to help academically qualified students gain
ELP for undergraduate and graduate program admission. A pilot IFP program for Engineering and
Science has been developed with two streams – Pathways and Collaborative 3+2 programs;
Delivered full-time non-credit EAL training, spanning six proficiency levels to close to 5000 course
registrants from 51 countries;
Delivered courses related to foreign languages, intercultural competency and Teaching English as
a Second Language (TESL) through Continuing Education;
Created an International Academic Strategist position in the Student Success centre and a
Graduate International Student Advisor position in the Faculty of Graduate Studies;
Expanded partnerships with Science without Borders to include Brazil and Columbia including
securing internships in the Calgary area;
Developed a Welcome Centre for new-to-Calgary students to help orient them and provide
support during their cultural transition; and
Supported the training of an international student advisor to become a Registered Canadian
Immigration Consultant.
Key outcomes for 2015-16
General:
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Complete the strategic plans for each country/region of emphasis;
Move UCI to a new location in the MacKimmie Block in order to be more centrally located and to
accommodate increased international activities;
In addition to International Week, develop major international-related activities on campus to
enhance the university community. Examples: Mexico Days, China Days, Overseas Options,
Student Photo Contest and International Development Days;
Develop key relationships between UCI and student groups/clubs and academic departments;
Establish a network of young universities (1966 Club) to expand international partnerships and
goals;
Review international scholarships to align and support the student recruitment strategy; and
Partially implement the international recruitment model, beginning with the multi-modal solution
for recruitment, including review and change of international admission standards and processes,
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registration, updating of facilities, hiring of new staff in the recruitment, student services, and
admissions areas, and improving coordination of overall services for international students.
Diversity:
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Develop a comprehensive international recruitment strategy and expanded common
communications tools in different languages;
Expand articulation programs to other interested faculties;
Finalize systems, procedures, processes and human resources within UCI, faculties and
departments to facilitate the institutionalization of articulation programs;
Actively map and study new markets for scholarships and sponsorships;
Develop mechanisms to streamline placement of international graduate students with
supervisors and link suitable programs;
Identify and nurture scholarship and sponsorship opportunities for international students from
Korea, Egypt, Mexico, Europe, Middle East and China; and
Continue to grow EAL programming for international and local communities.
Cross-cultural Competencies:
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Develop and partially implement the cross-cultural competencies program for our students, staff
and faculty and extend this to businesses and communities;
Ensure that study abroad and internationalization-at-home activities meet the international
strategy as well as contribute to cross-cultural competencies;
Develop a study abroad plan to ensure the university meets established targets for our own
outgoing students;
Develop a sustainable plan for Group Study Program growth that includes language training;
Develop a grant system that supports the countries of priority. These will include travel grants for
students as well as program development grants for faculty initiatives;
Implement the new Eyes High Golden Jubilee scholarships to enable 100-125 students to gain
international experience at elite universities in China, Germany, Hong Kong, Mexico, Norway,
Singapore and UK;
Continue to grow, further develop and deliver the IFP for our international students; and
Continue to deliver non-credit language, travel-study, TESL, and intercultural studies for local
adult learners.
Partnerships:
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Formalize university procedures and processes for dual/joint graduate programs;
Strengthen the Programs and International Development unit to ensure capacity exists to support
UC’s internationalization efforts and to meet the needs put forth by foreign governments and the
private sector;
Design and develop customized short-term training programs in consultation with relevant
faculties;
Introduce an evaluation system to determine the effectiveness and use of institutional linkages
by outlining parameters, determining appropriate metrics and measurements, and interpretation
of results;
Engage IT to develop reporting and data-tracking tools for international experiences; and
Explore the promotion and expansion of articulation programs for Engineering, Science and Arts
into other international countries – Japan, South Korea, India, Mexico and Malaysia.
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International Development:
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Develop an International Development Projects portfolio in line with the university’s research and
academic priorities, strengthening capacities of developing countries, and encouraging the role
of universities and the private sector in development;
Actively pursue medium- to large-scale international development projects, through diversified
sources of funding including the Government of Canada, private foundations, diaspora groups,
multi-lateral institutions, and others;
Organize “Knowledge for Development” events in partnership with faculties, civil society
organisations and international partners to encourage knowledge sharing and discussions on
emerging development issues, solutions and the role of universities; and
Plan for offering customized short-term training programs for international development
capacity-building programs.
Key outcomes for 2016-17
General
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Implement the strategic plans for all six countries/regions of emphasis and one for
countries/regions of interest;
In additional to International Week, develop major international-related activities on campus to
enhance the university community; and
Hold events and conferences for the new 1966 Club of universities to expand international
partnerships and goals.
Diversity
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Fully implement the international recruitment strategy;
International articulation programs are implemented and are starting to meet institutionally
established targets with international partners in Asia, Latin America and Europe; and
Continue seeking additional scholarships and sponsorships for both incoming and outgoing
students.
Cross-cultural Competencies:
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Fully implement the cross-cultural competencies program for our students, staff and faculty as
well as program offerings to businesses and the community;
Ensure IFP and EAL initiatives meet student, programming, international and community needs;
and
Expand new Eyes High Golden Jubilee scholarships for students gaining international experience
at elite universities in China, Germany, Hong Kong, Mexico, Norway, Singapore and UK.
Partnerships:
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Expand joint-degree programs with key international partners and in collaboration with relevant
faculties;
Expand customized short-term training and professional master’s degree programs;
Ensure a full complement of customized short-term programs are being offered on a regular basis
in Calgary, at GRSs and at key international hubs; and
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Based on the evaluation of the countries of emphasis and countries of interest, design and
develop new program opportunities.
International Development:
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Engage with foreign governments, private sector and international multilateral institutions to
seek capacity development support;
Expand international development projects to include key faculties engaged in international
development projects and issues;
Host customized short-term training programs for capacity development (through a summer
school in Calgary and/or abroad); and
Host Calgary or Alberta chapters of international development-related associations like the
Canadian Evaluation Society.
Key outcomes for 2017-18
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To be completed following renewal of the Eyes High strategic vision.
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9. Capital Plan
9.1
INTRODUCTION / SUMMARY
The Capital Plan directs the development of the University of Calgary’s physical infrastructure in response
to the academic and research goals and objectives outlined within the Comprehensive Institutional Plan.
Focused on Eyes High strategic vision and driven by priorities articulated within the Academic and
Research Plans, the Capital Plan forms the basis for the institution’s capital funding request to the
Province. This plan outlines the principles and processes used to determine our infrastructure
requirements, strategic capital planning priorities, capital project priorities, and the associated resources
required to meet the academic and research vision. The capital program has been developed through
broad consultation within the institution, surrounding communities and ministry personnel. While
comprehensive in scope, this plan needs to be responsive to emerging learning, research and funding
opportunities.
The University of Calgary has grown from a bare-land education reserve in the late 1950s to a fully
developed, urban, inner-city campus in 2015. The owned built-environment exceeds 900,000 gross square
metres on multiple campuses. With the first of our buildings built in the 1960s, approximately half of the
university’s space is over 40 years old. This aging infrastructure includes critical and essential classrooms,
laboratories, theatres, administrative support space, and core campus service facilities. While the campus
infrastructure has undergone a modest expansion over the past few years, our total space inventory still
falls short of what is required to meet current enrolment and program demand, let alone the planned
needs of an expanding and evolving academy.
Per the Campus Alberta Planning Resource (CAPR 2014), current and future enrolment projections
illustrate the shortage of overall space (3,000 seats currently, 4,600 by 2024-25). This lack of space, as
well as functional and pedagogical needs within our existing infrastructure, is a significant barrier to the
execution of our mandate and growth plans in response to government workforce needs-projections. In
some cases this will result in reduction of capacity for learning and research. Very short-term challenges
due to the 2015 economic conditions should not preclude action on long-term demand solutions.
Redevelopment of the MacKimmie Tower will address some of the space shortfalls. However, research
operations are being hampered by the current size and condition of core life sciences research facilities.
Science A repurposing and expansion is a pressing requirement to support science and certain engineering
programs to support today’s needs.
As we continue to grow and evolve, so does our need to maintain, renew, repurpose, and expand our
facilities to meet the aspirations outlined within the CIP and our Eyes High strategic vision. The university
has taken a pragmatic and balanced approach in its determination on how best to accommodate the
infrastructure needs of our campuses, through the development of five strategic planning priorities. These
are:



Advance planning and design activities to ensure projects are effectively scoped and budgeted,
and ready for implementation as funding opportunities arise.
Leverage renewal projects with repurposing needs to address the pedagogical requirements for
today and tomorrow.
Identify critical new infrastructure that will provide additional space for activities that cannot be
accommodated through repurposing and renewal alone.
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Proactively identify and manage our deferred maintenance liability to minimize the risk of building
failures and potential closing.
 Explore alternate funding mechanisms to leverage provincial funding and advance the mission of
the institution.
In support of the academic and research outcomes outlined within the CIP, and in accordance with the
CIP guidelines, the university has identified the following highest-priority capital projects (Table 10).

Table 10 – Highest-priority Capital Projects
($ millions)
Project Type
Expansion/ Repurposing
New Construction
Major Preservation
Minor Preservation
Other Capital Funding
Considerations
Total
Project Title
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.
Science A Redevelopment Phase 2
Kinesiology Expansion and Renewal
Life and Environmental Sciences Research Centre
Haskayne School of Business Advanced Learning Centre
MacKimmie Complex and Professional Faculties Building
MacEwan Hall and Student Centre Servicing Redevelopment
Deep Utilities
Critical Building Systems Infrastructure
Matching Provincial Funding for External Grant Awards
Planning and Early Concept Studies
FLEs
Budget
625
950
44
650
500
2,769
180.0
238.0
140.0
95.0
253.0
36.0
26.0
8.0
14.2
2.5
992.7
While these represent our highest priorities, the university has identified other capital priorities that are
instrumental to achieve the desired outcomes outlined within the CIP and our Eyes High vision. A summary
table of these projects is included at the end of this chapter and will be used to inform our May 2015
Buildings and Land Infrastructure Management System (BLIMS) submission to government. Other projects
are also included to illustrate our overall capital strategy.
9.2
ACTIVITIES SUPPORTING OUR STRATEGIC PLANNING PRIORITIES
The University of Calgary continues to create a campus environment that supports and energizes teaching,
scholarship, and community. Initiatives are underway to update older infrastructure, construct new
learning and research facilities, improve landscaping, enhance way-finding, improve environmental
management techniques, and enhance the urban design quality of the campuses. Our capital plan seeks
to advance these initiatives as current and proposed capital projects are approved and implemented.
Advancing projects through strategic planning, and in some cases partial design, allows for the university
to remain responsive to funding opportunities.
Our strategic planning priorities are supported through a variety of planning and development activities:





Campus, facility, and faculty master plans;
Balanced approach to campus development and preservation;
Sustainable stewardship;
Alternate project delivery and funding models; and
Additional planning considerations.
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CAMPUS, FACILITY AND MASTER PLANS
Campus master plans were completed for our main campus in 2010, and Spy Hill and Foothills campuses
in 2014-15. The university will begin the process of developing a Long-range Development Plan for our
main campus in 2015-16, which at its conclusion will guide future planning and development decisions.
The development of the Long-range Development Plan is supported and informed by a number of
institutional planning documents and activities beyond the CIP, which include:








Institutional Sustainability Strategy;
faculty and unit space master plans;
Infrastructure Maintenance Program, rolling three-year plan;
Landscape Master Plan;
Transportation Demand Management Plan;
Residence Master Plan;
Food Services Master Plan; and
coordination with West Campus master planning.
BALANCED APPROACH TO CAMPUS DEVELOPMENT AND PRESERVATION
Accommodating the aspirations set forth in strategic plans can be achieved through a balance of renewal,
repurposing, new, and preservation projects.
Strategic, joint renewal and repurposing projects provide a fiscally responsive means to increase
utilization within existing buildings, improve functionality for the delivery of teaching and learning, and
effectively reduce our deferred maintenance liability.
While we continue to stretch existing infrastructure to meet the demands from our academic and research
activities, we have a significant shortfall of space to meet current enrolment targets. For this reason, we
have also identified the need for critical new space on campus that cannot be achieved through our
renewal and repurposing strategy. As identified in the Campus Alberta Planning Resource (CAPR, 2013
and 2014), the University of Calgary has an existing seating shortfall of 3,000, increasing to 4,600 by 202425. Given the typical duration of a capital development project (approximately 5 years), at the present
rate of growth and capital activity these shortfalls cannot be addressed within the required timeframe.
Immediate action is required if we are to expand our facilities to meet the planned demand of our
programs.
Notwithstanding the above, it is equally important for the university to continue its strong stewardship of
our existing infrastructure. With almost 50.0 per cent of our physical infrastructure over 40 years of age,
targeted and strategic reinvestment to preserve our valuable assets is required. We will continue to work
with government to identify our recognized deferred maintenance and develop strategic action plans
through the IMP and CIP processes.
SUSTAINABLE STEWARDSHIP
The University of Calgary’s sustainability policy commits the institution to “excellence and leadership in
advancing the pursuit of sustainability in teaching, research, campus operation and community service.”
The Institutional Sustainability Strategy is the institutional framework for developing and acting upon
institutional commitments. It establishes a holistic approach to campus sustainability including academic
engagement, administrative and operational sectors. The University of Calgary currently has a STARS™
(Sustainability, Tracking, Assessment & Rating System) Gold rating and is amongst the top five performing
institutions in Canada.
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ALTERNATIVE PROJECT DELIVERY AND FUNDING MODELS
As we strive to achieve the aspirations set forth in the CIP, we are committed to leverage provincial
funding in the delivery of our capital priorities. Whether through strategic borrowing, philanthropy or the
West Campus Development Trust, we will continue to seek and explore opportunities for alternative
funding and project delivery models to assist in the delivery of our capital priorities.
We will continue to work with IAE and the framework outlined by AI to explore the feasibility of delivering
our capital priorities through Private/Public Partnership (P3) models where applicable.
ADDITIONAL PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS
Embedded within our capital initiatives is a series of general planning standards to ensure the
development of the best possible learning and working environments, balanced against capital and
operating costs. These are consistent with typical standards and expectations for the majority of
comparable public sector institutions and adopt ‘highest and best-use principles’, as embraced by external
agencies such as the Council of Ontario Universities (COU), the Educational Advisory Board (EAB) and the
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP). As detailed in previous CIPs, we are also committed to
continuing with:





9.3
performance-based decision-making;
excellence and leadership in sustainability with respect to facilities;
the Utilities Reduction program (URP);
community consultation for new capital projects; and
furthering Campus Alberta partnerships.
OVERVIEW OF CURRENT CAPITAL PROJECTS
In alignment with our capital strategic priorities, the university has a balance of capital projects that
includes new, expansion, renewal/repurposing, and general preservation.
We are extremely grateful for the significant contributions from government, industry, and the
community. These capital investments include:




a record donation for a capital project came from the Taylor Family Foundation to create the
Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning;
Government of Alberta funding for the Schulich School of Engineering expansion, as well as a
philanthropic donation from Canadian Natural Resources Limited;
Werklund Foundation support to the Werklund School of Education, which has allowed critical
renewal and repurposing of our Education complex; and
government support for university borrowing for new purpose-built undergraduate and graduate
student residences adding over 650 new beds (net 423) to our existing inventory.
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MAJOR PROJECTS COMPLETED IN 2014-15
Advancing Canadian Wastewater Assets (ACWA)
Advancing Canadian Wastewater Assets (ACWA) is a partnership between the University of Calgary and
The City of Calgary to develop wastewater treatment technologies that will remove existing and emerging
contaminants to improve ecosystem and human health. It is a place where researchers, practitioners and
industry can work together to solve important problems facing cities across the globe. The main elements
of ACWA's infrastructure are embedded within The City of Calgary's Pine Creek Wastewater Treatment
facility and include advanced, large-scale wastewater treatment processes and 12 replicate, experimental
streams that can be dosed with various constituents of municipal effluents. Additional ACWA laboratories
(Microbiology, Aquatic and Stable Isotope) were created on the University of Calgary campus to
complement and support ACWA's research program. Construction of all facilities and the installation of
all major equipment are complete, and an integrated research program has been initiated.
Advanced Technical Skills Simulation Laboratory (ATSSL), Foothills campus
The ATSSL is a new state-of-the-art facility in Calgary that will provide health care professionals
opportunities for advanced training in a variety of medical and surgical procedures. This is a joint project
between Alberta Health Services (AHS), the University of Calgary’s Cumming School of Medicine, and
Calgary Health Trust. Now complete, the ATSSL will be jointly operated by the AHS eSIM Provincial
Simulation Program and the Cumming School of Medicine. It supports physicians, health care
professionals and trainees as they hone their surgical skills through practice in a risk-free environment.
Healthy Brain Aging (HBA), Foothills campus
This project renovated approximately 1,100 m2 of existing space in the Health Science Centre (HSC) to
create a Centre of Excellence focused on the study of healthy brain aging. This includes a combination of
dry lab, wet lab, office, and support spaces to house a number of neuroscience researchers and their
teams.
Live Cell Imaging Laboratory, Foothills campus
This new facility is a synthesis of people and state-of-the-art instruments. Researchers work hand-in-hand
with expert optical imaging professionals as well as phenomics, biobanking, and molecular
instrumentation. The phenomics core looks at animal models of human disease and biobanking allows
direct insight into human disease. These cores are now integrated into the live cell imaging facility and
can collaborate with one another easily and effectively while also working and training researchers from
the University of Calgary, and the external community as well. The laboratory now houses state of the art
equipment such as the new Super Resolution Confocal Hybrid system. The new facility has space for
educational and community activities, including informal meeting space as well as teaching space.
Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute (ACHRI), Child Development Centre
This project fit-out approximately 800m2 of vacant space on the third floor of the Child Development
Centre (CDC) to create a centralized facility focused on child and youth mental health and
neurodevelopmental research. This includes a combination of dry labs, offices and support spaces to
house ten faculty members and their teams – a projected total of 78 staff. The project was completed at
year-end and will see full operations begin in spring 2015.
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CAIP Research Laboratories, EEEL Building
Fit-out of space on the fifth floor of the EEEL building provides laboratory and offices for two Campus
Alberta Innovates Program (CAIP) chair positions. The research program is now fully functional. Research
conducted in these laboratories relates to energy and environment, and include biotechnological
applications of the deep biosphere metagenome and reservoir biogeoscience.
Building Envelope Renewal
A multi-year envelope renewal program concluded with the completion of the Kinesiology A Red and Gold
gymnasia. This project addressed water leakage, air infiltration and energy loss.
Varsity Courts Family Housing
A major project to renovate all 251 units of the Family Housing Complex was completed in 2014-15. This
project addressed code deficiencies, dealt with many deferred maintenance issues and provided a general
face-lift to all units.
Classroom Alteration Request (CAR) and Facilities Alteration Request (FAR) programs
2014-15 marked the third tranche of funding to permit renewal and upgrade work to proceed on a number
of central and unit-managed instructional spaces, support offices and research needs. A total of 17
approved projects were completed including classroom and study space upgrades in the MacKimmie
Complex, the Administration Building atrium, Scurfield Hall, Murray Fraser Hall, the Health Science Centre,
the Gallagher Library, support for the Linguistics, Languages & Culture consolidation and a new home for
the Scholars' Academy.
PROJECTS CONTINUING THROUGH 2015-16
Through the generous support of government, institutional partnerships, and community philanthropists,
the university has been able to leverage these dollars along with our own internal resources to develop a
number of exciting projects across our campuses. Below is a highlight of some of our more critical projects
that are currently under construction.
CERC Laboratories, EEEL Building
Total Project Budget: $3.5 Million
The final improvements to the EEEL space to house the Canada Excellence Research Chair (CERC) in New
Materials Engineering for Unconventional Oil and Gas Reservoirs will be ready for occupancy in late 2015.
This will see the entirety of this building completed and final reporting issued in FY 2015-16. The CERC
work includes approximately 450m2 of sophisticated laboratory space, with funding from internal
resources.
Schulich School of Engineering Renewal and Expansion – Phase 2
Total Project Budget: $164.8 Million
In late 2013, the university announced the single-largest corporate donation in the institution’s history,
with a $7.0 million gift from Canadian Natural Resources Limited to the Schulich School of Engineering.
The gift has enabled the school to provide exceptional learning experiences for students and create an
environment in which engineering experts thrive, leading to ground-breaking and widely recognized
research. This gift adds to provincial funding of $142.5 million and many donations from alumni and the
community for a total project budget of $164.8 million. Construction of the expansion began in the fall of
2013, with an anticipated opening of the first elements in late 2016.
67
Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning
Total Project Budget: $40.0 Million
The Taylor Institute is another example of a successful partnership between the University of Calgary and
our strong donor community. Through this partnership, the university started construction in mid-2013
to transform the former Nickle Arts Museum site into a state-of-the-art teaching and learning facility. It
will include a Simulation Centre for Teaching Research and Professional Development, multi-purpose
facilities to promote collaboration and sharing of best practices, and collaborative spaces for related
research and institute support teams. Project completion is targeted for early 2016.
Downtown Campus
Total Project Budget: $19.8 Million
By September 2015, the last vacant space in the Downtown Campus will have been completed as generalpurpose instruction, meeting and event spaces, in part to support an expanded tenancy by the University
of Alberta Rehabilitation Medicine program in Calgary. This Campus Alberta accommodation is expected
to be matched in Edmonton with space for the University of Calgary Social Work program. University
Relations has located its Alumni Relations portfolio at the Downtown Campus, focusing on the university’s
ongoing communication and partnership activities with the university’s alumni community.
New Student Residences
Total Project Budget: $87.5 Million
The Residence Master Plan proposes to increase the on-campus student population to 15.0 per cent of
undergraduate full-load enrolment by 2022. The new upper-year undergraduate residential housing
building, now named Aurora Hall, and the new facility for graduate students, Crowsnest Hall, are on
schedule for completion in summer 2015 and first occupancy in September 2015. These residences will
add 423 net new beds to our existing inventory enabling us to accommodate approximately 10.0 per cent
of our students with purpose-built living quarters.
Foothills Campus
Total Project Budget: $32.8 Million
The older portions of the facility, in particular the Health Science Centre, continue to undergo selective,
high-value redevelopment to support medical research. Much of the funding for these projects is from
external sources, including federal grant programs and philanthropic activity. Notable projects include:



Mobility Joint Health (MOJO) project, with a major CFI grant;
ACHRI developments in HSC and at CDC; and
Research Facility Code-Compliance Program.
Minor Faculty and Unit Renewal
As part of ongoing operations, university units undertake numerous small reconfigurations to better serve
evolving teaching, research, and support needs.
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9.4
HIGHEST PRIORITY CAPITAL PROJECTS SEEKING GOVERNMENT SUPPORT
In support of the academic and research outcomes outlined within the CIP, and in accordance with the
CIP guidelines, the university has identified the following highest-priority capital projects.
Table 11 – Highest-priority Capital Projects
($ millions)
Project Type
Expansion/ Repurposing
New Construction
Major Preservation
Minor Preservation
Other Capital Funding
Considerations
Total
Project Title
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.
Science A Redevelopment Phase 2
Kinesiology Expansion and Renewal
Life and Environmental Sciences Research Centre
Haskayne School of Business Advanced Learning Centre
MacKimmie Complex and Professional Faculties Building
MacEwan Hall and Student Centre Servicing Redevelopment
Deep Utilities
Critical Building Systems Infrastructure
Matching Provincial Funding for External Grant Awards
Planning and Early Concept Studies
FLEs
Budget
625
950
44
650
500
2,769
180.0
238.0
140.0
95.0
253.0
36.0
26.0
8.0
14.2
2.5
992.7
The project briefings below are intended to outline the scope and funding required to address our
identified highest-priority projects. Each of these projects support the academic and research aspirations
as outlined within the CIP. A list of our highest priority capital priorities is shown in Table 11. It will be
used to inform our BLIMS submission for 2016-17, in May 2015. There may be some variation from the
CIP and the final BLIMS submission as the university continues to develop project scopes through its
advanced planning and design efforts and initiatives. As noted, these projects were in the 2014-15 CIP and
submitted for government consideration in May 2014 for the 2015-16 funding cycle.
EXPANSION PROJECTS (RENEWAL AND REPURPOSING)
Priority 1: Science A – Phase 2
Total Project Estimate: $180.0 million
Additional FLEs: 625
The Science A project renews one of the first buildings on campus – a 55-year-old structure – providing
capacity for upper-year chemistry instruction, chemistry research and support activities (workshops) for
the entire Faculty of Science, as well as general academic spaces for the university as a whole. While some
critical renewal requirements were completed in mid-2013, a significant portion of the building remains
out of service due to code and functional issues.
Science A is an essential infrastructure asset to the undergraduate and graduate science programs as well
as supporting campus-wide instructional needs. The changes proposed would create a central interaction
zone for science, engineering and related disciplines, as well as a structured, organized, and safe internal
corridor system for the thousands of individuals who use Science A as they move about the campus.
Completed in 1960 and with only minor modifications since, Science A is reaching the end of its effective
utility for today’s pedagogical needs. The electrical, mechanical and envelope systems are all past their
anticipated lifespan and in critical need for replacement. The building’s energy consumption is very high,
due mainly to an ineffective envelope and inefficient base building systems purporting to support teaching
and research intensive activities.
69
Phase 1 work improved code related issues by providing fire separation from adjacent buildings, barrierfree access to the upper floors, barrier-free washrooms and protected exit stairs. Phase 2 provides for
both expansion and optimization through a combination of renewal and repurposing. This project will
enhance innovation and innovative pedagogies, improve safety, and improve student experience. The
expansion scope includes an additional floor, two 250-seat theatres, replacement of existing greenhouses
and new student-community spaces. The project will add approximately 9,000 m2 of needed capacity,
while renewing a majority of the building’s existing 14,600 m2 and base building systems.
Redevelopment of Science A will effectively eliminate a significant deferred maintenance backlog as well
as replace an aged utility-intensive facility with an efficient, functional design. This will provide key
learning and research resources, with operating costs remaining steady or possibly decreasing.
Failure to redevelop Science A in a timely manner will result in students, faculty and staff learning and
working in a building with minimal functionality to support academic activities in less-than-ideal
conditions and increased risk for further space closures within the building.
Priority 2: Kinesiology Expansion and Renewal
Total Project Estimate: $238.0 million
Additional FLEs: 950
This project provides much-needed growth and renewal to support instructional and research activities
of the faculty. These facilities are critical and central in supporting our varsity, student recreation, and
community outreach programs. The university’s student base has grown by 35.0 per cent since the
completion of this complex, resulting in an inability to meet the health and wellness demands of students
and staff.
The university’s Kinesiology complex facilities are a vital and engaging presence in the Calgary community,
and make Calgary a full-service destination for international sporting excellence. A significant review of
University of Calgary athletics and recreation facilities has been completed, along with a high-level review
of academic and research space requirements associated with Kinesiology and related fields. The total
funding expected to be required to execute a solution for the Kinesiology complex is $195.0 million over
a number of phases.
The redevelopment and expansion of these aging facilities will improve the teaching and research
functions of the Kinesiology complex, as well as increase the level of health and wellness of all university
and community users. In particular, the plan proposes to:
reconfigure and upgrade existing space to increase utilization; and
construct an expansion to house a new and improved fitness centre, gymnasium, and climbing
facilities.
Existing facilities face a number of issues, all of which greatly impact the student experience and student
satisfaction:






generally this is an aging recreation complex in need of critical renewal and expansion to bring it
up to current building standards and meet the needs of a 35.0 per cent increase in student
population since the expansion;
a shortage of undergraduate teaching labs and insufficient space of all types for graduate
students;
a shortage of facilities to support the university’s athletic programs and campus health and
wellness;
renew an outdated pool facility with significant infrastructure and operational issues;
70
a shortage of multi-purpose rooms for the increasing number of recreational programs serving
the university and greater community;
 insufficient space for academic and outreach programming; and
 a Fitness Centre that no longer accommodates the demands of students and staff, including
lockers, showers and washroom facilities.
In addition to supporting core Kinesiology program delivery, athletics and recreation, the complex is also
a major community resource, bringing Calgary, provincial, national and international visitors to participate
in and witness recreation and athletics. It provides critical support capacity to the Olympic Oval, a national
facility with international stature and impact.

NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS
While we continue to focus on repurposing/expanding existing buildings to ensure they remain functional
and operational, there is a Ministry-recognized space deficit of over 10.0 per cent. As such, construction
of new facilities is required to address current and future space shortfalls to effectively deliver on
approved programming as well as planned enrollment expansions over the next 10 years. New
construction will also address increasing research productivity and allow for select, targeted expansion of
high-demand/high value programs.
Priority 1: Life and Environmental Sciences Research Centre
Total Project Estimate: $140.0 million
Additional FLEs: 44
The Life and Environmental Sciences Research Centre is a critical enabler of research and teaching
essential to achieving the goals set out in our Eyes High strategic vision. Existing core support facilities on
the university’s main campus are insufficient to meet current and growing education and research needs.
The recently completed programming and master plan for this facility highlights the need for our main
campus to centralize our life sciences resource support and have it connected to our existing facilities.
This new space will provide capacity for research and teaching activities and ensure programs dependent
on this support space will maintain their accreditation.
This project will also reduce the inefficiencies of having multiple facilities distributed across the campus
and provide a more cost-effective model in the support of operation and maintenance of these labs and
associated equipment. The approval of this project will maintain the university’s research strength in the
areas of life sciences that include kinesiology, psychology, neurosciences, chronic disease, and
environmental toxicology. Research in these areas contribute to three of our six strategic research
themes.
This new, upgraded and consolidated space will accommodate increased demand for such facilities
resulting from the intensification of existing programs and faculty teaching and research activities.
Consolidation will allow supported programs to achieve efficiencies through the better use of equipment
and personnel resources. It will also allow the university to meet pending regulatory requirements for the
management of genetically modified organisms, a critical requirement to meet research and educational
mandates.
Master planning for this facility was completed in 2013-14 and the project can begin immediately upon
approval of the project. While exact scheduling would require planning around academic and research
calendars, it is anticipated that design activities would require up to approximately 12-18 months and
construction could be complete in the following 36-48 months. The Faculty of Science, the Cumming
School of Medicine, the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, the Faculty of Kinesiology and others all rely on
71
the availability of undergraduates with experience in the sciences, and this resource centre is critical to
this experience.
Priority 2: Haskayne School of Business Advanced Learning Centre
Total Project Estimate: $95.0 million (Philanthropic target: $32.0 million)
Additional FLEs: 650
The University of Calgary has advanced the concept design work for a stand-alone 10,000-12,000 m2
expansion to accommodate the instructional and research needs identified for the Haskayne School of
Business. Partial philanthropic funding is being sought, but government support is required to create a
successful funding partnership.
The Haskayne School of Business is primarily housed in Scurfield Hall, and in the 30 years since its
construction, the school has tripled enrolment with corresponding growth in academic and support staff.
Classrooms have been modified to try to keep pace with evolving pedagogies, but the school and the
university require larger and more dynamic teaching spaces to deliver a superior student experience, as
well as expanded support and student community spaces to create a positive learning environment.
The Haskayne School of Business is on a trajectory to realize its vision of becoming a leading business
school for graduate and undergraduate education, research and community engagement – emphasizing
those distinct elements that define Calgary and Alberta: entrepreneurship, ethical leadership, and energy.
Construction of the Advanced Learning Centre will allow the school’s research centres sufficient space to
further these research goals, complementing core undergraduate and graduate instruction.
Delay in constructing this space will exacerbate current research and administrative space shortages, and
restrict growth despite demand in business fields. In addition to adding a critical new footprint for
teaching and research requirements, the Advanced Learning Centre will reflect modern requirements for
technologically-rich, flexible teaching and research spaces that can adapt to changing need. The project
will also support the repurposing and renewal of key areas within Scurfield Hall, and create a complex that
will provide a dynamic hub for all aspects of business education. At the completion of this project, business
students will be supported in a contiguous learning environment, freeing up high-demand classroom
space across the campus for a multitude of programs needing additional learning space.
MAJOR PRESERVATION PROJECTS
Priority 1: MacKimmie Complex and Professional Faculties Building Redevelopment
Total Project Estimate: $253.0 million
Additional FLEs: 500
With the completion of the Taylor Family Digital Library in 2013, the lower three floors of MacKimmie
Tower were repurposed to support student space, teaching and administrative functions, while floors 36 were renovated to consolidate much of the university’s finance and services administration. The upper
floors (7-12) have been closed due to Alberta Building Code requirements, which call for revised exiting,
fire protection and fire suppression. As well, the building envelope and base building systems are in critical
need of replacement. The MacKimmie Block remains fully occupied, however it also requires significant
renewal to meet current building code requirements, and repurposing to increase capacity and maximize
functionality.
A strategic capital renewal plan has been completed for this entire complex. The programmatic vision for
a completely renewed and repurposed MacKimmie Complex calls for student-centric activity mainly on
the lower floors of the Tower, including study spaces, project rooms, offices of the Registrar and Graduate
Studies, and academic activity of Social Work; with the upper floors programmed to support central
72
services that support the business of the university. The MacKimmie Block would also directly serve
students with study spaces and instructional classrooms of varying size, as well as key academic support
offices. In addition, completion of this project will indirectly support other space pressures facing faculties
through backfill opportunities in a number of our existing facilities.
MacKimmie Complex redevelopment is an opportunity to address many challenges with one integrated
project, making best use of two existing buildings, reducing operating costs, and bringing the Facility
Condition Index of the building to near zero. Two faculties (Nursing and Social Work) will benefit directly
through backfilling opportunities to address current and expansion needs of their teaching and research
programs. This project will also serve to co-locate and centralize student and staff services in the heart of
our campus.
Given the complexity and time-frame to complete the project, we need to continue to advance planning
and pre-design activities to further refine project scope, effective phasing, and budget. The long duration
of this project (6-7 years) is not ideal for academic operations and delays accommodation solutions, but
allows for discrete phases to be executed, starting with temporary decanting of several hundred staff from
the Tower.
Priority 2: MacEwan Hall and Student Centre Servicing Redevelopment
Total Project: $36.0 million
Additional FLEs: N/A
Phase 1 of this project, funded and completed in 2011, involved an extensive pre-design review and
schematic design exercise within the MacEwan Student Centre (constructed 1987). While the full scope
of the study involved facilities that are unsupported by definition, there are core functions within the
buildings which provide critical student services including medical and counselling services,
accommodated exam support, career services, etc.
The study was comprehensive, examining issues of optimum space use, functional organization, improved
circulation and logical expansion opportunities. One key element of the supported work involves solving
a conflict issue due to the Centre’s loading docks opening into the Taylor Family Quadrangle. While some
risk has been mitigated through the careful scheduling of loading dock use, an effective long-term solution
is required. A plan has been developed and we wish to proceed through design development to prepare
the project for funding submissions. Planning has been coordinated with the new Taylor Institute project,
which is proximate to the proposed new loading dock location.
While the primary driver is improving the safe flow of pedestrians and vehicles in the heart of campus, it
will enable select reorganization of the building’s lower level, which will create opportunity to add student
services to this over-subscribed building.
Preliminary indications from the Students’ Union suggest that student financial support for the remaining
building renovations and ancillary activities could be garnered through a referendum if this core building
service phase of work is kick-started with provincial support.
73
Decant Facility Study
Total Project: N/A
Additional FLEs: N/A
With a drive to ensure we are providing fiscally responsible and sustainable, capital projects and given the
university’s limited space for decanting, an examination and cost benefit analysis of building a decant
facility to provide more cost effective construction sequencing is being reviewed. The secondary benefit
of this approach is that at the conclusion of these major preservation projects, a decant facility could be
repurposed to partially accommodate planned, new program growth.
MINOR PRESERVATION PROJECTS
Priority 1: Deep Utilities
Total Project: $26.0 million
Additional FLEs: N/A
We have completed a comprehensive review of existing main campus deep utilities (water, sanitary sewer
and storm water) to identify points of imminent failure and inform the development of a long-range deep
utility renewal and expansion plan. Recommendations developed as a part of this review will inform future
planning exercises and result in a clear identification of immediate and long-term maintenance and
expansion requirements.
Development of the management plan included several key components. A condition assessment was
undertaken to generate record drawings and score each asset based on its physical condition. A growth
assessment was undertaken to map future utility servicing requirements based on short-term and longterm redevelopment plans, and anticipated major renovations. A minor system capacity assessment was
conducted to identify storm sewer upgrades, and a green infrastructure assessment was completed to
evaluate the benefits of incorporating a variety of Low Impact Development (LID) facilities into the campus
infrastructure.



The water system analysis included both capacity and condition failure risks under both existing
and future conditions. The capacity risks are associated with the ability to meet fire flows in
accordance with the Fire Underwriter Survey. From a condition perspective, risks focus on the
deterioration of metallic pipeline components.
The sanitary sewer system has adequate capacity for both existing and future flows. However
from a condition perspective, a 20-year investment is needed to comply with the identified service
delivery goals.
Over the next 15 years, recommended improvements include storm sewer upgrades and a variety
of green infrastructure features. The identified storm sewer upgrades will eliminate surcharge to
grade during a storm event.
Priority 2: Critical Building Systems Infrastructure
Total Project: $8.0 million
Additional FLEs: N/A
In a similar fashion to the deep utilities infrastructure upgrades, a comprehensive review of critical
building systems, such as the Central Heating and Cooling Plant (CHCP) and main campus electrical
distribution system, is required. We must identify points of imminent failure and develop a renewal
strategy to inform future planning exercises. The resulting plan must clearly identify immediate and longterm maintenance and expansion requirements.
74
University engineering and maintenance staff have undertaken a preliminary review of requirements,
leading to this cost estimate. Significant elements of the Central Heating and Cooling Plant renewal involve
major repairs and upgrades to the now 50 year-old plant, and virtually all of the aging systems within it.
Known risks include failure of boilers, high-temperature heat exchangers, controls, and the Bow River
outflow system.
The second area of significant concern involves renewal of the university’s complex and aging electrical
distribution system. A program is required immediately to begin the replacement of the high-voltage ringmain cables located within the tunnel system, along with the controls needed to ensure that re-routing
of power can occur in the event of an isolated failure in one section of the campus. A safe and dependable
electrical utility is essential to the ongoing, and safe, operations of the university.
The requested funding will support a multi-year program for addressing critical renewal and capacity
upgrades, beginning with a five-year $8.0 million package to both develop a comprehensive plan and to
then deal with the first tranche of critical renewal elements.
MATCHING PROVINCIAL FUNDING FOR EXTERNAL GRANT AWARDS
At the University of Calgary, we have a strong track record in our pursuit of research grant support for
targeted research activities. Based on historical success with CFI’s major projects Innovation Fund, the
university will be seeking up to $11.0 million in matching support for Round 8 applications made in 2014.
Within a number of these proposals are capital upgrades to existing facilities, although the majority of the
grants would be used for staff salaries, research equipment and laboratory operating expenses. We hope
to continue our success with the smaller CFI JELF program, and will be seeking up to $3.2 million in
matching support for these research equipment applications.
PLANNING FUNDING REQUIRED
Advancing planning and predesign efforts facilitate our ability to provide strategic direction on our capital
priorities and finalize project scope to deliver identified teaching and research needs. This in turn creates
a solid foundation for building the business cases required for capital funding. Importantly, it provides a
stage for us to respond to funding opportunities as they arise to deliver the critical infrastructure required
for our academic and research priorities.
In response to the capital strategies and priorities identified, we are requesting envelope funding of $2.5
million per annum in support of these activities for a period of five years.
INFRASTRUCTURE MAINTENANCE PROGRAM
Ten-year Integrated IMP Plan
While the University of Calgary is a young institution, we have grown rapidly with significant infrastructure
that requires constant and ongoing stewardship through our capital renewal program. The foundation of
an effective capital renewal is a robust and credible database of facility condition information. The
University of Calgary was a pioneer in the development of a deferred maintenance information
management information system, elements of which were subsequently adopted throughout the
province.
IMP is a critical program to aid the university in managing our recognized deferred maintenance liability,
currently exceeding $481.0 million for our supported infrastructure. We are outlining a ten-year plan –
fully integrated with our top capital priorities – to most efficiently reduce the overall deferred
75
maintenance liability of all supported infrastructure. Within the ten-year plan are sequential three-year
implementation cycles, the first of which is in the following section.
We recognize there are budgetary constraints facing the Government of Alberta, however the reduced
level of IMP funding (diminished from a previous high of $16.1 million to $9.9 million and recently
increased to $10.9 million in the 2015-16 budget) is inadequate to address critical maintenance of our
supported infrastructure. Annual IMP funding levels must therefore be increased, along with one-time
grant dollars, to avoid increased incidence of building-system failures.
Three-year Rolling Implementation Plan
Funding for FY 2015-16 is expected to begin at $11.0 million. We are thus seeking an increase to our
previous funding level of $16.1 million.
IMP funding is directed into four primary streams:
1. Code and regulatory compliance work. Examples include asbestos abatement, improvements to
campus accessibility, elevator replacements and boiler upgrades necessary to meet
contemporary regulatory requirements;
2. Maintaining facilities’ operational integrity. This area of focus involves replacement of aged
heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical and mechanical systems before
catastrophic failure occurs. Predictive maintenance techniques are used to ensure the lifespan of
the equipment is optimized and replacement occurs on a timely basis;
3. Programs of similar work across multiple structures (“horizontal” approach). Where common
issues span multiple buildings, a program of replacement is organized to achieve a common
approach and economies of scale. Examples include washroom, theatre, and classroom
renovations; and
4. Comprehensive building renewal (“vertical” approach). When possible, major portions of a facility
are renewed on a comprehensive basis. Examples include the 2010-11 combined IMP and
(Federal) Knowledge Infrastructure Program-funded major renewal within the Engineering
buildings, which saw a reduction in FCI for that complex from 13.0 per cent in 2009 to 6.7 per cent
in 2011. Another example of an IMP-targeted building initiative was the renewal of Earth Sciences
building systems in 2011, resulting in an FCI reduction from 34.4 per cent in 2009 to 17.9 per cent.
Refer to Table 12 for a summary of our three-year rolling plan. This table shows expenditures planned for
the $11.0 million 2015-16 provincial IMP grant. Please note that the total for 2015-16 shown in Table 12
($11.0 million) and the total for 2015-16 in Table 24 ($13.2 million) differ because Table 24 includes $2.2
million of the prior year IMP grant carried over from 2014-15. Table 12 also shows planned expenditures
of $16.1 million in 2016-17 and $16.1 million in 2017-18 if this grant is increased as requested.
Ten-year Special Funding Plan
Given past funding levels, we would like to work with the Ministry of IAE to determine how a special
funding envelope could be established over a 10-year period to support the retirement of our current
$481.0 million deferred maintenance liability. Accounting for modest increases in the IMP envelope and
potential one-time grants for MacKimmie Complex, Science A and Foothills campus projects, additional
funding of $20.0-25.0 million would be required on an annual basis over the next 10 years to proactively
reduce this liability.
76
Table 12 – Three-year Infrastructure Maintenance Program (Projected Plans)
($ thousands)
2015-16
2016-17
2017-18
Regulatory and Code Compliance
Fire Alarm Upgrade
Campus-wide FA Upgrade
500
500
500
Asbestos Abatement Contingency
Campus-wide
500
500
500
Mechanical Rm Abatement
KN Mechanical Room Abatement
400
-
-
-
600
600
-
Campus-wide Mechanical Rm Abatement
RM/EHS
Fume Hood Replacement
Barrier Lake Water Treatment Plant
750
-
Priddis Water System Upgrade
100
-
Campus-wide RM/EHS
325
500
500
Campus-wide Fume Hood Replacement
500
500
500
1,000
1,000
1,000
300
-
-
-
500
500
Building Systems Integrity
Major Bldg. System and Equipment Contingency
HVAC
MEB Phase II HVAC Upgrade
Campus-wide HVAC
Campus-wide Energy Performance Initiatives
Building Automation
Campus-wide Building Automation
Sanitary Line Replacement
Roofing & Skylight Replacement
Elevator Modernization
500
400
400
-
600
600
-
-
PP Roof Replacement
-
600
-
MFH Roof
-
1,200
-
Campus-wide Roofing Replacement
-
-
2,000
MT Elevator Mod
250
-
Admin Elevator Mod
250
-
1,000
-
-
-
1,000
1,000
SS Primary Heat Exchanger & Valves
500
-
-
Chiller Transformers
450
-
-
-
700
-
400
2,600
-
-
-
3,000
Campus-wide Primary Electrical Upgrade
425
1,000
1,000
ENE 322/328 Classroom Renewal
350
-
SA 213/216/259 Lab Renewal
300
-
SH Study Area Electrical Upgrade
150
-
-
-
1,000
1,000
750
-
MS Washroom Renewal
-
-
1,000
HSC Washroom Renewal (designed)
-
1,000
-
EN Complex
-
1,400
-
80
-
1,500
10,980
16,100
16,100
Campus-wide Elevator Modernization
Chiller Switch Gear
Boiler #4 Replacement
Campus-wide CHCP Replacement
Primary Electrical Systems Upgrade
500
1,200
Admin Roof
HSC Elevator Mod
CHCP & Utility Tunnels Mechanical
Replacement
500
Targeted Programs
Classroom
Campus-wide Classroom Renewal
Washroom Renewal
EDT Washroom Renewal 1,5,6,7,10 Floor
Campus-wide Washroom Renewal
Program Total
-
77
9.5
PRIORITY CAPITAL PROJECTS INTERNALLY FUNDED
In 2015-16, we will be seeking Board of Governors approval to proceed on a number of internally funded
initiatives, which include but are not limited to the following:
CLASSROOM ALTERATION REQUEST AND FACILITIES ALTERATION REQUEST (CAR/FAR)
A summary of projects included in our CAR/FAR program are outlined below in Table 13. These projects
improve the functionality of our teaching and research spaces while addressing the preservation and
renewal needs located within these spaces.
Table 13 – Approved 2015-16 CAR/FAR Projects
($ thousands)
Project Name
Unit
Project Estimate
CAR/FAR Funding
Unit Funding*
Classroom upgrades and redevelopment
PFB 2160
EVDS
400
400
-
SH 111 and 116
Registrar/HSB
685
400
285
285
210
75
Instructional Theatre Upgrades 32
BI 211 and 247
Registrar
Science
2,050
2,050
-
Performance Theatres Upgrades
Arts/SCA
650
650
-
Flooring Replacements
KNA 117 Aux Gym
KNES
71
71
CHD 6F Offices
Nursing
80
80
-
EDC 373 Doucette Library Renovation
LCR
180
180
-
PFB 4270 student Lounge Upgrade
SW
110
110
-
Research Facilities Upgrades
EDT 12 Psychology Lab (new)
Arts
800
400
400
CSB Histopathology Lab (update)
Vet Med
126
126
-
Other
326
-
-
Total
5,763
4,677
760
*other funding from units, various sources
EDUCATION TOWER
Base-building and programmatic upgrades for the Werklund School of Education have progressed in the
Education Tower. Funded in part by philanthropic donation from the Werklund Foundation, five additional
floors will receive functional upgrades, continuing through 2015-16. This project also includes elevator
modernization and extension; emergency and heating systems replacements and other IMP-funded
changes. It is anticipated that by mid-2016, the full internal renewal of Education Tower will be complete.
AURORA HALL
This undergraduate residence hall will house 268 upper-year (typically 3rd year or higher) undergraduate
students in two- and three-bedroom suites, each with a full kitchen and private bathroom. The building
complex is a nine-storey triangular design with a gross area of approximately 11,300m2. Shared student
facilities include study lounges on every floor, academic lounges, multi-purpose rooms and an event
kitchen on the main floor, mail pick-up, laundry room, secure storage facilities/lockers and bike storage.
Space for building support services includes office and resource rooms for the Residence Services team,
32
Total scope under development. Some work may be left to FY 2016-17
78
public washrooms, and a recycling and garbage room on each floor. Professional residence staff will live
on-site. Living learning community, residence life programming, mentoring and academic support
programming will be available to all students living in Aurora Hall.
CROWSNEST HALL
This graduate residence hall will house 390 graduate students in efficiency suites, and one- and twobedroom apartments, each with full kitchens and private bathrooms. The complex is made up of two
towers with a one-story hallway connecting the two buildings on the main level; seven floors in the first
building and 11 floors in the second building. The total gross area will be approximately 17,930m2. Shared
student facilities include an academic project room, breakout study rooms, a music room, a multi-purpose
room and an event kitchen on the main floor, mail pick-up, laundry room, secure storage facilities/locker
and bike storage. Space for building support services includes office and resource rooms for the Residence
Services team, public washrooms, and a recycling and garbage room on each floor. The building includes
a retail space for a café/deli to be located by the main entrance of the building. Professional residence
staff will live on-site. Crowsnest Hall will include a one-bedroom Visiting Scholar apartment, as well as a
two-bedroom Faculty-in-Residence apartment.
RESEARCH CODE COMPLIANCE PROGRAM
The University of Calgary has initiated a three-year, $10.0 million program to update emergency station
equipment in research and teaching laboratories. The program will supply emergency equipment in
laboratories that will bring the university into compliance with legislation and research funding
requirements.
9.6
OTHER INSTITUTIONAL CAPITAL PRIORITIES
Notwithstanding our noted highest priority projects, we have identified a number of other priority
projects to ensure we achieve the desired outcomes outlined within the CIP and our Eyes High strategic
vision.
Advancing planning and predesign efforts facilitate our ability to provide strategic direction on our capital
priorities and finalize project scope to deliver identified teaching and research needs. This in turn creates
a solid foundation for building the required business cases and opportunity papers required for capital
funding. Lastly, it provides a stage for us to respond to funding opportunities as they arise to deliver the
critical infrastructure required for academic and research priorities outlined within.
Of note are planned expansions at the Spy Hill campus for large-animal research, instruction and
expanded library storage; a redevelopment of the Education Classroom Block building to support
international programming; and a revised plan for university research activity related to the new Calgary
Cancer Centre program. With respect to the new Calgary Cancer Centre, the phasing of two sites, one of
which will exist on the Foothills campus, drives either new construction or redevelopment of an existing
Foothills Medical Centre building to support research related to comprehensive cancer care. At present
the original functional program for the 2020 facility is being reviewed in detail, but assumes approximately
the same amount of assignable space for cancer-related research.
New-foundation projects in early stages include a multi-disciplinary clinical trials building and a transition
facility to address decanting requirements for the next decade. We will also investigate, perhaps with
other Campus Alberta partners, a new, stand-alone high-efficiency data centre.
Table 14 identifies our other major capital priority projects that will be included in our BLIMS submission
for 2015-16. As we continue to develop project scopes through our planning and design efforts, there may
79
be some variation between the information in this table and the final BLIMS submission. Project priorities
have yet to be established; all are however secondary to those in Section 9.4.
Table 14 – Other Capital Priority Projects List
($ millions)
Project Title
Estimated
Project
Budget
Targeted
Outside
Funding
Funding
Request To
Government
Expansion at Spy Hill, Phase 1: to improve the overall
functionality of the facility by adding a small expansion for
instructional activities
Redevelopment and vertical expansion to support evolving
pedagogical needs, supplying high-demand classroom sizes,
and an enhanced international student experience
Allow more effective use of main campus capacity as well as
respond to growth needs
40.0
5.0
35.0
75.0
-
75.0
TBD
-
TBD
We wish to explore a thematically-oriented new build
supporting advanced professional learning and integrated
research centred on the development and understanding of,
and application of new knowledge towards improved brain
and mental health outcomes. The vision is a multi-unit
aggregation, led by the university’s Hotchkiss Brain
Institute, with psychology, social work, medicine, education,
kinesiology and even researchers from the engineering
disciplines. A blend of experiential education, research
laboratories, advanced brain imaging and academic clinics –
this new building will provide students, faculty, practitioners
and the citizens of Calgary with a unique environment for
advancing education, knowledge and wellness in brain and
mental health.
We will investigate options to address both the capacity
limitation of current data centres and concerns with aging
infrastructure.
TBD
-
TBD
30.0
-
-
120.0
-
120.0
35.0
-
35.0
30.0
-
30.0
200.0
-
200.0
235.0
-
235.0
5.0
-
5.0
Project Description
EXPANSION/REPURPOSING
Clinical Skills Building
Expansion
Education Classroom Block
High-density Library
Expansion at Spy Hill
NEW CONSTRUCTION
Clinical Trials Building
New Data Centre
(See Section 10)
MAJOR PRESERVATION
Building Envelope Repair and
Replacement
Foothills Campus Critical
Maintenance- Phase 2
Schulich School of
Engineering Renewal - Phase
3
Infrastructure Maintenance
Program
A significant renewal program is required to provide critical
repair and/or replacement of aging building envelopes. This
work will remedy functional deficiencies and, in many cases,
decrease our operating costs as a result of improved
performance. This program is scheduled as a seven-year
program.
Significant investment in the renewal of some of the older
assets on this campus is required to update mechanical,
electrical, research support and life safety systems.
With Phase 2 completed, this represents the final phase of
renewal for this facility and will continue the renewal required
to provide purpose-built space for teaching and research.
Deferred Maintenance Fund
MINOR PRESERVATION
Lab Fume Hood and Biosafety
Cabinet replacement
program
As part of our WCB Certificate of Recognition program and
certification requirements, we are auditing laboratory fume
hoods and there is a requirement to replace older hoods
(many original to their buildings) to meet current standards.
This has been identified as a high-priority project as it is safety
related.
80
($ millions)
Project Title
Project Description
Estimated
Project
Budget
2.0
Targeted
Outside
Funding
-
Funding
Request To
Government
2.0
RB Miller Field Station
We have been working closely with government on renewal of
the RB Miller Field Station and a project is expected to be
approved for late fall 2015 execution. Other remote sites also
require future investment. These facilities are key for research
support and experiential learning activities
Research Code Compliance
We have initiated a three-year, ten million dollar program to
update emergency station equipment in research and teaching
laboratories. The program will supply emergency equipment in
laboratories that will bring the university into compliance with
legislation and research funding requirements.
10.0
-
10.0
Various campus master planning and initial project activities
12.5
-
12.5
OTHER
Planning Envelope Funding
Refer to Table 15 for the ten-year capital forecast required to aid the university in achieving its mandate
and vision. The projects listed in this table are all supported by our academic and research needs and goals
as outlined with our Comprehensive Institutional Plan.
81
Table 15 – Ten-Year Capital Forecast
($ millions)
Rank
Total
Project
Estimate
16-17
17-18
18-19
19-20
20-21
21-22
22-23
23-24
24-25
25-26
180.0
238.0
12.4
-
43.0
-
54.0
16.5
56.0
57.0
14.6
71.2
74.0
19.3
-
-
-
TBD
40.0
-
5.7
19.7
14.6
-
-
-
-
-
-
75.0
5.3
35.0
34.7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
EXPANSION/REPURPOSING
Science A - Phase 2
Kinesiology Expansion and
Renewal
High-density Library Expansion
Clinical Skills Building
Expansion
Education Classroom Block
NEW CONSTRUCTION
#1
#2
Life and Environmental
Sciences Research Centre
Haskayne School of Business
Advanced Learning Centre
Clinical Trials Building
New Data Centre
New Calgary Cancer Centre
PRESERVATION - MAJOR
(>$10M)
#1
140. 0
-
9.7
38.3
39.7
41.3
11.0
-
-
-
-
#2
95.0
6.9
44.1
44.0
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
TBD
30.0
TBD
-
-
-
-
15.0
-
15.0
-
-
-
-
-
MacKimmie Complex and
Professional Faculties Building
Redevelopment
MacEwan Hall and Student
Centre Servicing
Redevelopment
Phase 1
Foothills Campus Critical
Maintenance- Phase 2
Building Envelope Repair and
Replacement
Schulich School of Engineering
Renewal - Phase 3
Infrastructure Maintenance
Program
Deferred Maintenance Fund
PRESERVATION - MINOR
(<$10M)
Deep Utilities Upgrade
(Campus-wide Program)
Critical Building Systems
Infrastructure
Lab Fume Hood and Biosafety
Cabinet replacement program
RB Miller Field Station
Research Code Compliance
#1
253.0
17.2
59.5
37.1
38.2
39.4
40.6
21.0
-
-
-
#2
36.0
-
-
2.7
17.8
15.5
-
-
-
-
-
35.0
17.5
17.5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
120.0
24.0
24.0
24.0
24.0
24.0
-
-
-
-
-
30.0
-
-
20.0
10.0
-
-
-
-
-
-
200.0
11.0
16.5
16.5
18.0
20.0
22.0
22.5
23.5
25.0
25.0
235.0
23.5
23.5
23.5
23.5
23.5
23.5
23.5
23.5
23.5
23.5
#1
26.0
-
0.6
0.7
0.5
1.3
1.0
1.6
1.8
1.4
17.1
#2
8.0
1.0
2.0
5.0
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5.0
2.5
1.3
1.2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2.0
10.0
0.5
10.0
0.5
-
0.5
-
0.5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
82
10. Information Technology
10.1
INTRODUCTION
Information Technology (IT) is at the core of an innovative and progressive organization. The University of
Calgary continues to support technology innovation not only as it applies to the administrative
requirements of the academy, but more importantly how it enhances and continues to improve the
educational and research experience at the university. Technology must be available, reliable, ubiquitous
and innovative. This is the basis from which all projects and initiatives are considered. Additionally,
technology must also enable an environment of learning and discovery by supporting the teaching and
research communities. IT has partnered with faculty, researchers and administration to ensure that
technology is being used strategically and that technology upgrades, additions and enhancements are
prioritized based on our Eyes High strategic priorities.
Driven by priorities articulated within the Academic Plan, Research Plan, and Finance and Services
Foundational Plan, the information within this chapter begins to lay the foundation for necessary work
over the next several years that will form the basis for the institution’s IT strategic direction and related
funding request to the province.
Strategic investment in technology must be secured for the institution to truly succeed in achieving the
university’s Eyes High strategic vision. Several initiatives were successfully completed over the last few
years with a focus to remain current and sustain the infrastructure environment. As we move towards our
Eyes High goal of becoming one of Canada’s top five research institutions – where research and innovative
teaching go hand in hand, and where we fully engage the communities we both serve and lead – increasing
demands for technology and innovation will require strategic investments to be made now, with a longer
horizon in mind.
10.2
2014-15 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PLAN REVIEW
As part of our Eyes High vision, we state:
“We will provide expert instruction. The university is home to faculty members,
postdoctoral fellows, research technicians and legions of smart, ambitious graduate
students who are passionate about knowledge. Their enthusiasm and expertise in the
classroom and in the field make them excellent teachers and mentors. We are committed
to building on this base by supporting the ongoing development of our educators so they
can engage and challenge students through consistently effective and innovative
teaching methods.”
It is within the last sentence of this mission statement that IT is able to add value to the university by
ensuring that the technology, tools and infrastructure available are up-to-date, reliable and work to
enhance the learning environment so that educators can focus their time on knowledge transfer.
In 2014-15, the university finalized the implementation of a new Learning Management System (LMS) —
Desire2Learn (D2L). The D2L implementation project is an excellent example of campus-wide
collaboration. Because of the broad impact on various members of the university community, it was
essential to involve all stakeholders (students, faculty, and staff) in all aspects of the project plan (design,
change management, communications and training). D2L is more than just a technology project. This new
83
learning management system has transformed core institutional practices, making the project more about
the people than the technology itself. Understanding the processes, workflows, organizational structure
and culture of each faculty was instrumental in the success of user acceptance and the success of the
implementation.
In 2014-15, the university deployed Microsoft Office 365 for our students, providing them with mail and
online file storage. Our students now have access to install the Microsoft Office Suite on their personal
devices. The Office 365 service has provided our students with tools for their course work, file-sharing to
enhance class group work, and the ability to develop skills and experience with the wide-spread business
productivity suite.
In 2014-2015, we completed our multi-year network renewal program, allowing us to dramatically
increase network capacity and reliability through the upgrade of the network core and targeted building
network upgrades. The upgrade has positioned us for the adoption of an improved security model.
Additionally, local building network upgrades, prioritized by faculty, have upgraded many campus user
network connection speeds by as much as 100 times.
10.3
SHORT-TERM INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY REQUESTS
We continue to focus on stabilizing foundational infrastructure while supporting and enhancing teaching,
learning and research. Please see remaining sections for a rationale on each request (Table 16).
Table 16 – Information Technology Funding Requests
($ millions)
Priority Areas
IT Infrastructure Support and Renewal
Support for Teaching and Learning
Support for Research
Support for Administration
Total
Funding Request
to Government
25.0
2.5
4.0
5.5
37.0
IT INFRASTRUCTURE SUPPORT AND RENEWAL
The overall IT infrastructure of the university requires ongoing attention to provide a solid foundation to
enable and support increasingly digital modes of teaching, learning and research. A significant effort will
be made in 2015-2016 to address stabilizing IT infrastructure and to ensure there is scalable capacity for
future growth. The following table outlines the key focus areas (Table 17).
Table 17 – IT Infrastructure Support and Renewal Focus Areas
Security
Wireless
Servers and Systems
Ongoing Maintenance
and Support
Agreements
Data Centres
Significant investments are required to secure the university’s IT infrastructure and ensure the
security and privacy of sensitive information.
Generational changes in wireless technology are driving the need for significant investments in
technical upgrades as well as increasing the density of coverage to manage increased demand.
Opportunities for retiring and consolidating legacy systems and upgrading servers to take
advantage of more efficient architectures and security features will be pursued.
Evergreen funds are required to support and maintain current systems. The university expects to
invest $1.2 million in hardware maintenance and $5.4 million in software licensing and
maintenance in 2015-16. These investments address support for current systems and are
minimal in comparison with the annual demand for emerging academic requirements.
Increased demand for additional computing and storage capacity requires a comprehensive
assessment of server-hosting options.
84
SUPPORT FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING
Technology advances place increasing demands on the teaching and learning environment as educators
incorporate new digital technologies into classrooms, labs and the overall learning environments. In
addition, learners expect educators to deliver content in an increasingly digital, virtual, social and
collaborative fashion. Our ongoing classroom upgrade program is required to standardize the remaining
spaces, while keeping upgraded spaces current.
In 2014-2015, our classroom technology upgrade process continued and ran in alignment with the
institutional classroom and facilities alteration requests processes (CAR and FAR). Aligning classroom
technology upgrade requests with classroom alteration requests ensures that scarce funds are allocated
in the most efficient manner possible. An ongoing upgrade program is required to bring the remaining
learning spaces to standard and then to ensure that the technology in learning spaces remains current.
The continued investment in classroom technology upgrades combined with the core campus network
and higher-density Wi-Fi coverage for large classrooms and lecture theatres will enable access to
collaborative learning tools and support increased use of mobile devices by both faculty and students and
use of new tools, such as lecture capture, in the classroom.
SUPPORT FOR RESEARCH
Providing the appropriate technology-based tools, services and support to faculty has become as
important as giving them the appropriate office and laboratory space. Technology is an essential enabler
of scholarship, learning and research. Ongoing infrastructure upgrades will begin to provide a base
technology layer to support research activities including data intensive research, e-Research and multisite research collaboration. Specific investments in support of research are shown in Table 18.
Table 18 – Information Technology Investments to Support Research
Research support and
enablement systems
Systems such as the research portal that is currently in development and IRISS
(software developed at the University of Calgary to support ethics review
workflow) reduce the administrative burden on researchers, enabling them to
focus more time on discovery, creativity and innovation.
Secure computing, storage
and data archiving
As research data becomes increasingly digital, securing computing networks,
equipment and storage is required. Archiving data securely has also become a
critical need.
Currently there is no provincial program to renew, replace or upgrade core technology in older facilities
at the university. A funding program is essential to maintain and upgrade technology in the increasingly
digital learning and research environment.
SUPPORT FOR ADMINISTRATION
The continued implementation of IT shared services allows us to efficiently and effectively support faculty
and staff research and teaching, student learning, and university administration. By centralizing and
standardizing base-level technology and IT services, we are able to support the university in a consistent,
agile and cost-efficient manner while continuing our focus on:



optimizing administrative systems;
teaching and learning outcomes; and
individual faculty technology requirements for teaching, research and innovation.
85
ERP systems
The university has identified additional PeopleSoft modules and functionality that are required to
evolve and streamline university administrative processes in Finance, Human Resources and Student
Support that will improve efficiencies across the institution.
Faculty projects
Although a significant portion of our application landscape is managed within the PeopleSoft system,
there are other important application investments required to support the core academic functions
of the university. These include applications such as research pre-award processing, space planning,
and academic performance review. These projects have been requested by faculties and units as part
of our annual planning process, and will directly benefit research and student communities as well
as our operational business units.
Standardization and rationalization of faculty applications
Investment is required to transition and rationalize the multiple, duplicate solutions that are being
transitioned from our faculties and units into central IT as part of the shared services (integrated
services) model.
10.4
CAPITAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY REQUESTS
DATA CENTRE
Increased demands for additional computing and storage capacity require a comprehensive assessment
of server hosting options. Research demands for additional capacity and increased data analytics require
investigation of adding additional high performance computing capacity. Due to size and power
limitations, the ability to expand or grow within the existing facilities is limited. Construction of a new
facility is planned for 2020-21.
Shared services at the Campus Alberta level continue to be a strategic priority. The expansion of highperformance computing capacity at the University of Calgary would be complementary to potential
Campus Alberta shared-services opportunities.
86
11. Plan for Financial Sustainability
11.1
STATEMENT OF EXPECTED REVENUES AND EXPENSES
The University of Calgary has a strong Eyes High strategic vision, and excellent roadmaps in the Academic
and Research Plans that provide 10 strategic priorities that guide the overall allocation of financial, human
and capital resources. Over the past six years we have made significant progress with our financial
situation. Previously, the university had a negative $57.6 million in unrestricted net assets, which caused
the university to set a strategic target to build unrestricted net assets to 5.0 per cent of the consolidated
budget or approximately $65.0 million. As a result of much work on the part of many people at the
University of Calgary and our performance- and results-based budget model developed previously, we
created a sound financial foundation from which to advance our Eyes High strategic vision.
In fiscal 2013-14 the government grant for the University was reduced by $31.9 million or 7.3 per cent.
While this reduction was partially mitigated by a mid-year increase of $10.6 million or 2.3 per cent, the
cuts that were required to balance the budget in 2013-14 were deep and difficult, and would not have
been managed without our financial foundation. While the 2014-15 government grant provided a neutral
0.0 per cent, inflationary increases in the costs of goods and services resulted in continued cuts at our
institution. The negative impact of the volatility of the government funding continues to be a challenge to
achieving the academic and research priorities as the university strives to achieve financial sustainability
and stability.
We are projecting an unrestricted net assets balance of $101.0 million for the year ending March 31, 2015,
based on December 31, 2014 projections. This number is positive, and allows us to strategically invest to
advance our Eyes High vision by drawing down our unrestricted net assets balance with targeted onetime strategic initiatives. It does not, however, address the issue of the many expenses that require
continued or base funding.
We will continue to ensure maximum benefit from the funding we receive. However, we believe one key
to our financial stability is the need for stable and predictable government funding. For the university to
be financially sustainable the Campus Alberta grant should reflect growing demands for accessibility,
discovery and innovation, as well as recognize inflationary pressures. Despite significant efforts to mitigate
expenses (e.g., our Faculty Association members have been provided with a zero per cent across the board
salary increase in three out of the past five years, and our senior executives have had their pay frozen in
two of the last three years), our salary and benefits costs are rising faster than the projected revenue
growth in 2015-16 and beyond. Given the provincial emphasis on sustainability, our ability to generate
revenue will be increasingly important. We will need to work in partnership with the government to
maximize opportunities to increase and diversify revenue streams for the university.
The university is presenting a balanced budget in fiscal year 2015-16 with revenue of $1,266.6 million and
expenditures of $1,266.6 million (Table 19). The University of Calgary is presenting deficit forecasts in
2016-17 and 2017-18.
University unit budgets have a foundational component (e.g. government grant and tuition) and variable
components including research funding, development dollars, ancillary services, and other creative
entrepreneurial options that units may devise. One of our main objectives is to increase the amount of
our overall investment in our priorities through multiple sources of funding.
87
Table 19 – Consolidated Budget and Two-year Forecast for 2015-16
($ thousands)
Government of Alberta grants
Federal and other government grants
Sales of services and products
Student tuition and fees
Donations and other grants
Investment income
Investment loss in government business enterprises
Total Revenue
Expenses
Academic costs and institutional support
Research
Special purpose and trust
Facilities operation and maintenance
Ancillary services
Total Expenses
Excess (shortfall) of revenue over expenses
Shortfall funded by unrestricted net assets
Surplus (deficit)
Prior Year
2014-15
580,827
139,926
112,597
218,225
126,206
42,952
(2,720)
1,218,013
Budget
2015-16
586,548
147,618
117,391
224,480
147,057
45,933
(2,400)
1,266,627
Forecast
2016-17
581,408
155,799
119,804
228,970
155,709
47,989
(2,400)
1,287,279
Forecast
2017-18
587,876
164,510
122,270
233,549
164,934
50,142
(2,400)
1,320,881
754,411
279,097
69,159
66,035
49,311
1,218,013
-
768,530
313,808
71,064
66,623
46,602
1,266,627
-
796,231
335,775
72,879
68,689
47,879
1,321,453
(34,174)
34,174
-
825,023
359,279
74,747
70,829
49,196
1,379,074
(58,193)
23,153
(35,040)
Budget
2015-16
101,037
43,710
57,327
Forecast
2016-17
57,327
34,174
23,153
Forecast
2017-18
23,153
58,193
(35,040)
Table 20 – Unrestricted Net Assets
($ thousands)
Opening unrestricted net assets
Deficit funded by unrestricted net assets
Capital initiatives funded by unrestricted net assets
Unfunded Deficit
Closing unrestricted net assets
As suggested earlier, we are making a choice to invest a portion of our unrestricted net assets in our Eyes
High priority areas. Beginning in 2014-15, the strategic initiatives funded from unrestricted net assets
include amounts for compliance to support research activities, enhancements to the campus, and the
student experience. Additional investment in enterprise systems supporting budgeting, forecasting, and
student recruitment and management will be undertaken. While we are presenting a significant reduction
in our unrestricted net assets over the next three years, we will undertake a rigorous process in 2015-16
to strategically plan to avoid this depletion.
88
Table 21 – Expense by Object and Two-year Forecast for 2015-16
($ thousands)
Expenses
Salaries
Employee benefits
Materials, supplies, and services
Utilities
Maintenance and repairs
Scholarships and bursaries
Cost of goods sold
Amortization of capital assets
Total Expenses
11.2
Prior Year
2014-15
Budget
2015-16
Forecast
2016-17
Forecast
2017-18
588,615
114,028
264,426
29,851
20,566
78,283
16,182
106,062
1,218,013
616,460
119,150
274,196
28,730
20,194
81,461
13,820
112,616
1,266,627
646,672
124,866
284,388
29,304
20,629
85,195
14,096
116,303
1,321,453
678,438
130,868
295,113
29,890
21,074
89,150
14,378
120,163
1,379,074
PROJECTED REVENUE
Figure 7 – Projected Revenue
47.7% 46.3%
2014-15
2015-16
17.9% 17.7%
11.5% 11.7%
9.2% 9.3%
10.4% 11.6%
3.5% 3.6%
Government of
Alberta grants
Federal and
other
government
grants
Sales of services Student tuition
and products
and fees
Donations and
other grants
Investment
income
-0.2% -0.2%
Investment loss
in government
business
enterprise
GOVERNMENT OF ALBERTA GRANTS
Government of Alberta grants includes all operating, research, and other funding from the Government
of Alberta including revenues recognized from previously deferred Government of Alberta grants.
Grants from the Government of Alberta (Innovation and Advanced Education) are budgeted to account
for $586.5 million or 46.3 per cent of total revenue for 2015-16 (Figure 7). The Campus Alberta grant
portion of the total Government of Alberta grant remained flat in 2014-15, and is decreasing by 1.4 per
cent in 2015-16 with an additional decrease of 2.7 per cent in 2016-17 and we have assumed 0.0 per cent
in 2017-18. We are forecasting sponsored research revenue to increase in all categories, including
Government of Alberta research-related grants.
89
FEDERAL AND OTHER GOVERNMENT GRANTS
Federal and other government grants includes all funding and revenue recognized from the federal
government, municipalities, foreign governments, and other provincial organizations residing in provinces
outside Alberta.
Federal and other government grants will comprise $147.6 million or 11.7 per cent of our total revenue
for 2015-16. Research revenue comprise $104.6 million or 70.9 per cent of federal and other government
grants. Research revenue is forecasted to increase significantly as we strive to reach our goal of becoming
one of the top five research institutions in Canada by 2016-17.
SALES OF SERVICES AND PRODUCTS
Sales of services and products includes ancillary revenues relating to secondary services available to
students, faculty and staff, such as on-campus residence, food services, university bookstores, microstore, Hotel Alma, parking services, and conference services. In addition, sales of services and products
includes rental income, management fees, and other faculty-generated revenues. The sales of services
and products budget for 2015-16 is $117.4 million or 9.3 per cent of total revenues.
Sales of services and products continue to grow as we develop alternative revenue sources to support the
activities of the university.
STUDENT TUITION AND FEES
Student tuition and fees include all income related to credit and non-credit tuition and related fees.
Student tuition and fees for 2015-16 are budgeted to be $224.5 million or 17.7 per cent of total revenue,
with a 2.2 per cent increase in tuition rates implemented for the 2015-16 year based on guidance from
Innovation and Advanced Education (IAE).
DONATIONS AND OTHER GRANTS
Donations and other grants include all donations and grants received from individuals and businesses
during the period.
Donations and other grants are budgeted to account for $147.1 million or 11.6 per cent of total revenues
for 2015-16 as we continue to establish aggressive targets for fundraising.
INVESTMENT INCOME
Investment income includes dividends, interest income, and realized gains or losses on the sale of
investments. The investment income budget for 2015-16 is $45.9 million or 3.6 per cent of total revenues.
Investment income is comprised of income from the university’s working capital pool as well as
endowment related income. Investment income for the University of Calgary’s working capital will
continue to be influenced by interest rates, prevailing market conditions and the research
commercialization of the university’s subsidiaries. The University of Calgary’s endowment income will be
influenced by interest rates for the fixed income portion of the fund and by the volatility of the equity
markets for the equity portion. For a long-term fund to maintain real value and generate sufficient income
to support endowment programs evidence dictates that a diversified portfolio must be structured to
include asset classes that have some risk and volatility. Our portfolio takes this into account.
90
INVESTMENT LOSS IN GOVERNMENT BUSINESS ENTERPRISES
University Technologies Group (UTI) and West Campus Development Corporation (WCDC) are whollyowned subsidiaries of the University of Calgary. UTI Group operates to facilitate the transfer of intellectual
property from the university to private business, thereby commercializing the scientific innovations of
University scholars. The WCDC operates as trustee of the West Campus Development Trust (the Trust),
which will sublease land to developers for the development of residential and commercial development.
The university is the beneficiary of the Trust and will receive distributions from the Trust once leases are
in place with developers. In 2015-16 the budget for investment loss in government business enterprises
is a loss of $2.4 million or negative 0.2 per cent of revenues.
11.3
PROJECTED EXPENSE – BY FUNCTION
Figure 8 – Projected Expense by Function
61.9% 60.7%
2014-15
2015-16
22.9% 24.7%
Academic costs and
institutional support
Research
5.7% 5.6%
5.4% 5.3%
4.1% 3.7%
Special purpose and
trust
Facilities operation and
maintenance
Ancillary services
ACADEMIC COSTS AND INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT
Academic costs and institutional support is the single-largest function at the university and effectively
represents the operating activities of the university. Expenses include activities that directly and indirectly
support innovative learning, programming, and teaching, as well as university administration and
governance functions. For 2015-16, the academic costs and institutional supports budget is $768.5 million
or 60.7 per cent of total expenses.
RESEARCH
Research expenses relate primarily to activity funded by externally sponsored research funds intended for
specific research purposes as well as internal funds designated for research-related spending. For 201516, the research budget is $313.8 million or 24.7 per cent of total expenses.
91
SPECIAL PURPOSE AND TRUST
Special purpose and trust is comprised of expenses relating to externally restricted funding for nonresearch related university activities. The special purpose and trust budget for 2015-16 is $71.1 million or
5.6 per cent of total expenses.
FACILITIES OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE
The facilities operations and maintenance function includes centralized management, maintenance of the
grounds and facilities, and buildings. Examples include utilities, facilities administration, building
maintenance, custodial services, landscaping and grounds keeping, and major repairs and renovations.
The facilities operations and maintenance budget for 2015-16 is $66.6 million or 5.3 per cent of total
expenses.
ANCILLARY SERVICES
Ancillary expenses relate to secondary services available to students, faculty, and staff. Services include
on-campus residence, food services, parking services, university bookstores, micro-store, Hotel Alma, and
conference services. For 2015-16, the ancillary services budget is $46.6 million or 3.7 per cent of total
university expenses.
11.4
PROJECTED EXPENSE – BY OBJECT
Figure 9 – Projected Expense by Object
57.7% 58.1%
2014-15
2015-16
21.7% 21.6%
2.5% 2.3%
Salaries and
benefits
Materials,
supplies and
services
Utilities
8.7% 8.9%
6.4% 6.4%
1.7% 1.6%
1.3% 1.1%
Maintenance and Scholarships and Cost of goods sold Amortization of
repairs
bursaries
capital assets
SALARIES AND BENEFITS
Salaries and benefits represent the largest investment at the University of Calgary. For 2015-16, salaries
and benefits are budgeted to be $735.6 million or 58.1 per cent of total expenses. Salaries and benefits
increases are a result of inflationary costs and increases in externally funded research.
92
MATERIALS, SUPPLIES, AND SERVICES
Materials, supplies, and services is the second-largest university expense. For 2015-16, the materials
budget is $274.2 million or 21.6 per cent of total expenses. The research component of this budget is
$94.2 million or 34.3 per cent for 2015-16.
UTILITIES
The utilities budget is $28.7 million or 2.3 per cent of total expenses for 2015-16. Our hedging strategy,
combined with lower natural gas prices and recent energy savings initiatives, allows us to have greater
stability within the utilities budget.
MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS
The maintenance and repairs budget for 2015-16 is $20.2 million or 1.6 per cent of total expenses. With
the magnitude of outstanding deferred maintenance and an aging physical plant, the maintenance and
repair budget has been increasing over the past few years. The funds allocated through the existing
Infrastructure Maintenance Program are not adequate to meet the current and growing deferred
maintenance of the university’s buildings and infrastructure needs.
SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES
The scholarships and bursaries budget for 2015-16 is $81.5 million or 6.4 per cent of total expenses. The
sponsored research and other restricted component of this budget is $55.9 million or 68.6 per cent.
COST OF GOODS SOLD
The cost of goods sold budget for 2015-16 is $13.8 million or 1.1 per cent of total expenses. This
expenditure item represents the cost of sales of services and products by the university.
AMORTIZATION OF CAPITAL ASSETS
Amortization represents the gradual reduction in the useful life of our asset pools, a portion of which is
expensed each year. One noteworthy change in accounting under Public Sector Accounting Standards is
the portion of amortization expense relating to externally-restricted grants is no longer equally offset by
revenue in Amortization of Earned Capital Contributions (ECC), but is equally offset by the recognition of
revenue in the line items of the areas that provided the capital funding (e.g. Government of Alberta
Grants). Given the large number of capital grants received to fund the university's capital program, a
greater proportion of amortization expense will be offset by revenue in future years. The amortization of
capital assets budget for 2015-16 is $112.6 million or 8.9 per cent of total expenses.
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11.5
BUDGETED CASH FLOW STATEMENT
The Budgeted Cash Flow Statement records the amount of cash and cash equivalents projected to enter
and leave the University of Calgary in 2015-16 (Table 22). It provides an understanding of how the
institution is operating, where its resources are coming from, and how they will be spent in the following
four areas: 1) operating activities, 2) capital transactions, 3) investing activities, and 4) financing activities.
Table 22 – Budgeted Cash Flow Statement for 2015-16
($ thousands)
Budget
2015-16
Forecast
2016-17
Forecast
2017-18
-
(34,174)
(58,193)
112,616
(78,339)
2,400
(5,494)
31,183
116,303
(81,833)
2,400
(6,776)
30,094
120,163
(85,533)
2,400
(5,781)
31,249
88,931
120,114
89,876
85,796
119,801
92,857
(214,384)
(214,384)
(123,242)
(123,242)
(92,069)
(92,069)
INVESTING TRANSACTIONS
Purchases of investments, net of sales
Endowment investment earnings
Cash applied to investing transactions
59,702
25,306
85,008
(2,501)
25,602
23,101
(32,081)
25,901
(6,180)
FINANCING TRANSACTIONS
Endowment donations
Debt – repayment
Debt – new financing
Cash provided by financing transactions
21,850
(33,263)
(11,413)
22,354
(33,009)
(10,655)
23,401
(33,009)
(9,608)
INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, BEGINNING OF YEAR
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, END OF YEAR
(20,675)
170,675
150,000
(25,000)
150,000
125,000
(15,000)
125,000
110,000
OPERATING TRANSACTIONS
Excess of revenue over expense
Add (deduct) non-cash items:
Amortization of capital assets
Expended capital recognized as revenue
Change in investment in gov’t business enterprises
Increase in employee future benefit liabilities
Total non-cash items
Net change in non-cash working capital less expended capital
recognized as revenue
Cash provided by operating transactions
CAPITAL TRANSACTIONS
Acquisition of capital assets
Proceeds on sale of capital assets
Cash applied to capital transactions
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11.6
CAPITAL BUDGET
Our total expected investment in learning resources, systems, furnishings and equipment and
infrastructure for 2015-16 is $214.4 million (Table 23). Approximately $138.3 million or 65.0 per cent of
the funding required to support these capital projects comes from external sources.
Table 23 – Capital Budget (2015-16)
($ thousands)
Project
Learning resources
Systems (IT)
Furnishings and equipment
Infrastructure
Total
Budget
2014-15
8,633
3,844
52,063
195,909
260,449
Budget
2015-16
8,352
5,460
40,940
159,632
214,384
Forecast
2016-17
8,770
5,733
42,987
65,752
123,242
Forecast
2017-18
9,208
6,020
45,136
31,705
92,069
LEARNING RESOURCES
Learning resources refer to library assets with permanent value, museum specimens, archival materials,
and maps that are held for education and research purposes.
SYSTEMS (IT)
IT refers to applications and infrastructure necessary to enhance the student experience, support research
excellence, and ensure business continuity. IT includes network cabling and devices, telephone systems,
data centres, support for teaching, learning and research, and administrative systems.
FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Furnishings and equipment refers to movable items not attached to buildings that have estimated useful
lives of three to 10 years. Furnishings and equipment includes items such as desks, chairs, shelving,
classroom technology, lab equipment, computers, etc.
INFRASTRUCTURE
Infrastructure refers to the construction of capital assets and site improvements. It includes costs directly
attributable to architectural, engineering, and legal fees, as well as construction materials and labour.
Infrastructure typically has an estimate useful life of 20 to 40 years.
95
11.7
INFRASTRUCTURE BUDGET
Table 24 – Infrastructure Budget (2015-16)
($ thousands)
Major Capital Projects
Schulich School of Engineering Renovation
Crowsnest Hall Graduate Residence
The Taylor Institute for Teaching and
Learning
Aurora Hall Undergraduate Residence
Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radar
Network Upgrades and Information
Education Tower Restack Plan
Mobility and Joint Health (CFI Round 7)
ACHRI HSC lab refurbishment (12 labs)
Research Facility Code Compliance
Energy Performance Initiatives Program
Healthy Brain Aging Facility (HBA)
International Undergraduate Student
Recruitment Renovation
Canada Excellence Research Chair (CERC)
ACHRI CDC - 3rd floor fit out
ACWA Pine Creek Project Phase 1
Way finding
Family Housing Renewal
Campus Alberta Innovates Program (CAIP)
Advanced Technical Skills Simulation
Live Cell Imaging Facility
Classrooms & Facilities Alteration Requests
2013-14 CAR/FAR and Faculty/Unit
2014-15 CAR/FAR and Faculty/Unit
2015-16 program
Infrastructure Maintenance Program (IMP)
Minor Faculty and Unit Renewal Projects
2013-14 Projects
2014-15 Projects
2015-16 Projects
Planning
Projects in Planning
INFRASTRUCTURE BUDGET TOTAL
Budget
2014-15
Total Project
Estimate
2014-15
Budget
2015-16
Total Project
Estimate
45,600
29,880
162,095
50,400
57,088
7,557
164,775
51,900
17,118
21,995
7,169
7,169
5,860
6,913
6,111
4,200
3,382
4,426
40,000
37,100
24,470
23,500
15,675
13,447
9,425
10,000
21,000
4,800
18,797
5,859
7,025
3,749
8,863
6,205
8,190
2,333
1,481
373
40,000
35,600
24,455
24,000
15,310
14,015
9,425
6,600
5,922
4,050
2,605
1,834
2,800
3,465
821
356
906
3,183
35,047
12,000
6,800
5,867
5,630
4,232
1,759
1,680
88
-
3,500
3,500
2,780
-
490
4,050
500
9,937
4,789
5,000
15,500
81,374
5,513
13,236
5,763
45,436
887
7,435
-
8,261
10,885
-
3,129
5,207
5,497
5,307
195,909
610,480
1,500
159,632
5,125
472,960
Refer to Chapter 9 – Capital Plan for project details.
96
11.8
BUDGET ASSUMPTIONS, RISKS AND SENSITIVITY
REVENUE ASSUMPTIONS AND RISKS
The following revenue assumptions and risks have been identified:






The Campus Alberta operating grant will be decreased by 1.4 per cent in 2015-16, decreased by
2.7 per cent in 2016-17 and we have assumed 0.0 per cent in 2017-18;
All other sources of Government funding, including other agencies or business entities that are
unrelated to Innovation and Advanced Education (IAE), will increase modestly with inflation over
the remaining two years of the plan;
We expect to generate positive returns in the investment market sufficient to sustain endowment
expenditure levels;
We anticipate receiving a similar level of support from the Federal Indirect Costs of Research
program;
Our budget is based on the assumption that we will achieve the established enrolment targets;
and
Tuition increases in 2015-16, 2016-17 and 2017-18 are based on forecast changes to the Alberta
Consumer Price Index as defined in the tuition fee regulation.
EXPENSE ASSUMPTIONS AND RISKS
The following expense assumptions and risks have been identified:





The forecast contains an inflationary estimate for salary and benefit cost increases and increased
externally funded research. The results of future collective bargaining negotiations are unknown;
As salary and benefits account for 58.1 per cent of our total expenditures any variance in salary
and benefit assumptions will have a significant impact on the university’s operating budget;
With a significant deferred maintenance liability and an aging physical plant, expensive
emergency repairs will become unavoidable;
A number of faculty positions are supported through external funding. While this is beneficial,
there are risks that the funding will be discontinued and we will be required either to assume
responsibility or discontinue positions; and
We are exposed to future increases in natural gas, water, and electricity prices or unusually
high/low seasonal temperatures. The Energy Performance Initiatives and the overall hedging
strategy are designed to reduce the amount and volatility of the cost of utilities.
BUDGET SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS
Table 25 illustrates the effect of a 1.0 per cent change in our current-year budget assumptions for a few
key revenue and expenditure categories and the potential outcome. For example, a 1.0 per cent increase
in our Campus Alberta grant would increase total revenue by $4.1 million whereas a 1.0 per cent increase
in salaries would increase total expenditures by $6.2 million.
Table 25 – Budget Sensitivity
($ millions)
Campus Alberta Grant
Student tuition and fees
Salaries
Benefits
1% Change
4.1
2.2
6.2
1.2
97
11.9
TUITION AND FEES
The Government of Alberta’s Public Post-secondary Institutions’ Tuition Fees Regulation provides a
framework for setting tuition fees at the University of Calgary. Through our Tuition Fee Policy response to
the Regulation, we commit to setting fees at levels that support student access and affordability,
encourage quality in teaching, provide for learning in a scholarly environment, are justified by the financial
needs of the institution, and ensure no student is denied access for lack of institutional, governmental or
personal resources by:
1. looking to other sources of revenue first: the focus of several strategies within this plan is the
generation of revenue from sources other than tuition. These include government funding,
research revenue, and fundraising. We ensure that fees remain reasonable and predictable in a
manner that enables students and the institution to plan their finances;
2. being cost-effective: central to the success of this plan is the reallocation of internal resources
and the reduction of costs wherever possible. Through the strategies described within this plan,
we remain committed to providing quality programs and services in a cost-effective manner;
3. carefully considering the impact of tuition increases: decisions to increase tuition fees are made
only after carefully considering the impacts they will have on students, program costs, market
demand, and fee levels at peer institutions. Other factors include information about the student
assistance environment, accessibility to and participation in university education, graduate debt
loads and repayment experience, graduate employment rates, and the return on investment in
university education; and
4. positioning increases within the context of the total revenue profile: proposals to change tuition
levels are made in the context of the total operating revenue available to the University of Calgary,
the need to produce balanced budgets, and the need to maintain and enhance the quality,
accessibility, and affordability of the student experience.
Consistent with Section 3 of the Public Post-secondary Institutions’ Tuition Fees Regulation, the University
of Calgary established a process for holding consultations with students to discuss annual increases in
tuition fees. That process is led by a Tuition and Fees Consultation Committee (TFCC). TFCC is chaired by
the Provost and Vice-President (Academic), and includes representatives of student organizations and
administration to ensure that open two-way communication on matters related to tuition and general
fees is included in the annual budget process. TFCC typically meets bi-weekly between September and
December, but has continued to meet between January and April 2015 to examine other course fees at
our institution, market modifiers, etc. Thus, through TFCC in the past year, we have examined all fees for
students related to instructional and non-instructional purposes.
The Public Post-secondary Institutions’ Tuition Fees Regulation sets the maximum tuition fee increase at
the level of the year-over-year (June to June) increase in the Alberta Consumer Price Index (CPI). For June
2013 to June 2014 this increase was 2.2 per cent. The Regulation also permits the Minister to approve
adjustments to the tuition that we charge to correct market anomalies. In December 2014, the Minister
approved market modifications for the following three (3) programs of study: Bachelor of Science in
Engineering, Master of Business Administration (MBA), and Juris Doctor (JD). Tuition increases for 201516 were approved at our December 2014 Board meeting. Tuition rates in the future years at this time are
planned to increase at an estimated rate of inflation. Shown in the following tables are approved and
projected tuition fees.
98
Table 26 – Tuition Fees (Canadians and Permanent Residents)
($ dollars)
UNDERGRADUATE
5 courses (30 credits)
1 course (6 credits)
1 half course (3 credits)
1 half course (3 credits) Audit Rate
B. Comm. 200-500 with Market
Modifier (MM)
Net B. Comm (MM)
Engineering
Engineering half course with MM
Law
Total Fees (36 credits)
Per Session (18 credits)
Law - Full Course (6 credits)
Law - Half Course (3 credits)
Per Year (36 credits) with MM
Per Term (18 credits) with MM
Full Course (6 credits) with MM
Half Course (3 credits) with MM
Medicine
Maximum
Per Session
Post Graduate Medical
Max per year (12 months)
Vet Medicine
Total Tuition Fees (per 8 month year)
Vet Med Tuition Per Term
Co-op / Internship Education
4 month work term (15 credits)
Internship Max 3 Terms
4 month work term (15 credits)
GRADUATE
Full Time Graduate (except MBA)
PhD Degree
Master's Degree with Thesis
Subsequent Years Fee & Continuing
Course-Based/Part-Time (excl. MBA)
Full Course
Half Course
Half Course Audit Rate
Masters of Business Administration
Total Thesis-Based MBA Program
Half Course – (No Market Modifier)
Half Course – Total with 2010 MM
Half course – Total with 2015 MM
Master of Public Policy
Program Full-Time Annual Fee
Program Part-Time Annual Fee
Per course fee for non-MPP students
Course fee for MPP who do not pass
prep block week
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
2017-18
2018-19
5,385.90
1,077.18
538.59
269.31
777.42
5,504.10
1,100.82
550.41
275.22
794.52
5,625.19
1,125.04
562.52
281.27
812.00
5,748.94
1,149.79
574.90
287.46
829.86
5,875.42
1,175.08
587.55
293.78
848.12
238.83
244.11
249.48
254.96
260.57
-
720.41
736.26
752.46
769.02
12,314.88
6,157.44
2,052.48
1,026.24
-
12,585.60
6,292.80
2,097.60
1,048.80
15,585.60
7,792.80
2,597.60
1,298.80
12,862.48
6,431.24
2,143.74
1,071.87
15,928.44
7,964.22
2,654.74
1,327.37
13,145.46
6,572.73
2,190.90
1,095.45
16,278.85
8,139.43
2,713.14
1,356.57
13,434.66
6,717.33
2,239.10
1,119.55
16,636.99
8,318.49
2,772.83
1,386.42
15,012.18
7,506.09
485.23
970.46
15,342.44
7,671.22
495.90
991.80
15,679.97
7,839.99
506.81
1,013.62
16,024.93
8,012.47
517.96
1,035.92
16,377.48
8,188.74
529.36
1,058.71
10,864.20
5,432.10
11,103.18
5,551.59
11,347.45
5,673.72
11,597.09
5,798.54
11,852.23
5,926.11
423.00
432.30
441.81
451.53
461.46
423.00
432.30
441.81
451.53
461.46
5,593.50
5,593.50
1,627.38
5,716.56
5,716.56
1,663.14
5,842.32
5,842.32
1,699.73
5,970.85
5,970.85
1,737.12
6,102.21
6,102.21
1,775.34
1,429.56
714.78
357.39
1,461.00
730.50
365.25
1,493.14
746.57
373.29
1,525.98
762.99
381.50
1,559.56
779.78
389.89
11,463.12
1,302.33
1,623.12
-
11,715.30
1,330.98
1,658.82
1808.82
11,973.04
1,360.26
1,695.31
1995.31
12,236.45
1,390.19
1,732.61
2039.21
12,505.65
1,420.77
1,770.73
2084.08
20,492.88
10,246.44
1,615.98
20,943.72
10,471.86
1,651.50
21,404.48
10,702.24
1,687.83
21,875.38
10,937.69
1,724.96
22,356.64
11,178.32
1,762.91
1,413.99
1,445.00
1,476.79
1,509.28
1,542.48
99
Table 27 – Other Tuition Fees (Canadians and Permanent Residents)
($ dollars)
UNDERGRADUATE
1 half course
English for Academic Purposes (EAP)
3 Credits – Domestic Student
3 Credits – International Student
GRADUATE
Executive MBA (per 8 month year)
Executive MBA Global Energy Program
Graduate Division of Educational
EdD Online. HEA, HEL, LEAD, TECH WAL
Year 1 - 4 (per 12 month year)
Continuing (per 12 months, years 5+)
GDER Continuing Fees (Anniversary
Distance Certificate Annual Program
Distance Diploma Annual Program Fee
Distance M. Ed. Annual Program Fee
1 half course (3 credits)
Master of Counselling, CAAP, Applied
Annual Program Fee
3 Unit Fee CAAP Course
Post Bachelor's Diploma - Applied
One-time fee on admit term
Master of Education - Applied
Continuing Fees on 4th year onward
Environmental Design
4 month Term
Continuing Fees (year 3+) per 4 month
M.Sc. in Sustainable Energy
SEDV Domestic Calgary (per course)
Master of Landscape Architecture
Program Annual Fee
Program Fee - Fall or Winter
Foundation Year Annual Fee
Foundation Year - Fall or Winter
CORE 600 Level Course Section
Master of Pathologists’ Assistant
Program Annual Fee
1 half course (3 credits)
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
2017-18
2018-19
537.00
550.41
562.52
574.90
587.55
538.59
1,224.00
550.41
1,249.44
562.52
1,276.93
574.90
1,305.02
587.55
1333.73
28,160.00
106,050.00
32,250.00
108,383.00
33,500.00
110,767.43
34,237.00
113,204.31
34,990.21
115,694.80
11,221.00
4,041.00
11,468.00
4,130.00
11,720.30
4,220.86
11,978.15
4,313.72
12,241.67
4,408.62
1,212.00
1,212.00
1,212.00
1,212.00
1,238.00
1,238.00
1,238.00
1,238.00
1,265.24
1,265.24
1,265.24
1,265.24
1,293.08
1,293.08
1,293.08
1,293.08
1,321.53
1,321.53
1,321.53
1,321.53
1,578.00
1,212.00
1,612.00
1,238.00
1,647.46
1,265.24
1,683.70
1,293.08
1,720.74
1,321.53
488.00
499.00
509.98
521.20
532.67
1,164.00
1,189.00
1,215.16
1,241.89
1,269.21
2,797.00
814.00
2,858.00
832.00
2,920.88
850.30
2,985.14
869.01
3,050.81
888.13
1,785.00
1,824.00
1,864.13
1,905.14
1,947.05
7,218.00
3,609.00
5,386.00
2,693.00
1,212.00
7,376.00
3,688.00
5,504.10
2,752.05
1,238.00
7,538.27
3,769.14
5,625.19
2,812.60
1,265.24
7,704.11
3,852.06
5,748.94
2,874.48
1,293.08
7,873.60
3,936.81
5,875.42
2,937.72
1,321.53
-
8,500.00
730.50
8,687.00
746.57
8,878.11
762.99
9,073.43
779.78
100
Table 28 – Tuition Fees (International Students)
($ dollars)
UNDERGRADUATE
5 courses (30 credits)
1 course (6 credits)
1 half course (3 credits)
1 half course (3 credits) Audit Rate
B. Comm. 200-500 level MM
B. Comm. MM
Engineering
Engineering half course with MM
Law
Total Fees (36 credits)
Per Session (18 credits)
Law - Full Course (6 credits)
Law - Half Course (3 credits)
Per Year (36 credits) with MM
Per Term (18 credits) with MM
Full Course (6 credits) with MM
Half Course (3 credits) with MM
Medicine
Maximum
Per Session
Post Graduate Medical
Max per year (12 months)
Vet Medicine (per 8 month year)
Total Fees
Co-op Education
Co-operative Education Max 3 Terms
4 month work term (15 credits)
Internship Max 3 Terms
4 month work term (15 credits)
GRADUATE
Full Time Graduate (except MBA)
PhD Degree
Master's Degree with Thesis
Subsequent Years Fee & Continuing
Registration
Course-Based & Part-Time (excl. MBA):
Minimum Program Fee Course-based
Full Course
Half Course
Audit Course Fee
Masters of Business Administration
Thesis-Based MBA Program
Half Course
Half Course with 2015 MM
Master of Public Policy (MPP)
Program Full-Time Annual Fee
Program Part-Time Annual Fee
Per course fee for non-MPP students
Course fee for MPP who do not pass
prep block week
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
2017-18
2018-19
18,338.40
3,667.68
1,833.84
916.92
2,072.67
-
18,741.60
3,748.32
1,874.16
937.08
2,118.27
244.11
19,153.92
3,830.78
1,915.39
957.70
2,164.87
249.48
19,575.30
3,915.06
1,957.53
978.77
2,212.50
254.97
20,005.96
4,001.19
2,000.60
1,000.30
2,261.17
260.58
-
2,044.16
2,089.13
2,135.09
2,182.06
40,929.84
20,464.92
6,821.64
3,410.82
-
41,830.56
20,915.28
6,971.76
3,485.88
44,830.56
22,415.28
7,471.76
3,735.88
42,750.83
21,375.42
7,125.14
3,562.57
45,816.84
22,908.42
7,636.14
3,818.07
43,691.35
21,845.68
7,281.89
3,640.95
46,824.84
23,412.42
7,804.14
3,902.07
44,652.56
22,326.28
7,442.09
3,721.05
47,854.92
23,927.46
7,975.82
3,987.91
57,582.42
28,791.21
1,648.08
3,296.16
58,849.26
29,424.63
1,684.32
3,368.64
60,143.94
30,071.97
1,721.38
3,442.75
61,467.11
30,733.56
1,759.25
3,518.49
62,819.39
31,409.69
1,797.95
3,595.90
32,592.60
33,309.54
34,042.35
34,791.28
35,556.69
1,437.30
1,468.80
1,501.11
1,534.14
1,567.89
1,437.30
1,468.80
1,501.11
1,534.14
1,567.89
12,695.88
12,695.88
12,975.12
12,975.12
13,260.57
13,260.57
13,552.31
13,552.31
13,850.46
13,850.46
3,693.48
3,774.72
3,857.76
3,942.63
4,029.37
12,981.12
3,245.28
1,622.64
811.32
13,266.24
3,316.56
1,658.28
829.14
13,558.10
3,389.52
1,694.76
847.38
13,856.38
3,464.09
1,732.05
866.02
14,161.22
3,540.30
1,770.15
885.08
25,293.24
2,880.78
-
25,849.68
2,944.00
3,094.20
26,418.37
3,008.97
3,308.97
26,999.58
3,075.17
3,381.77
27,593.57
3,142.82
3,456.17
30,739.35
15,369.68
2,424.02
31,415.58
15,707.79
2,477.25
32,106.72
16,053.36
2,531.75
32,813.07
16,406.54
2,587.45
33,534.96
16,767.48
2,644.37
2,121.03
2,167.50
2,215.19
2,263.92
2,313.73
101
Table 29 – Non-Calendared Tuition Fees (International Students)
($ dollars)
GRADUATE
Executive MBA (per 8 month)
Graduate Division of Educational
EdD Online. HEA, HEL, LEAD, TECH WAL
Year 1 - 4 (per 12 month year)
Continuing (per 12 month year,
Years 5+)
GDER Continuing Fees (Anniversary
Distance Certificate Annual Program
Distance Diploma Annual Program
Distance M. Ed. Annual Program Fee
1 half course (3 credits)
Environmental Design
4 month Term
Continuing Fees (year 3+) per 4
M.Sc. in Sustainable Energy
International Calgary (per course)
Master of Landscape Architecture
Program Annual Fee
Program Fee - Fall or Winter
Foundation Year Annual Fee
Foundation Year - Fall or Winter
Master of Pathologists’ Assistant
Program Annual Fee
1 half course (3 units)
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
2017-18
2018-19
28,159.52
32,250.00
33,500.00
34,237.00
30,990.21
14,540.55
14,860.50
15,187.43
15,521.55
15,863.03
5,233.81
5,349.00
5,466.68
5,586.94
5,709.86
1,211.40
1,211.40
1,211.40
1,211.40
1,238.00
1,238.00
1,238.00
1,238.00
1,265.24
1,265.24
1,265.24
1,265.24
1,293.08
1,293.08
1,293.08
1,293.08
1,321.53
1,321.53
1,321.53
1,321.53
6,347.94
1,846.64
6,487.60
1,887.26
6,630.33
1,928.78
6,776.19
1,971.21
6,925.27
2,014.58
2,782.87
2,824.00
2,886.13
2,949.62
3,014.51
16,386.96
8,193.48
12,225.60
6,112.80
16,747.48
8,373.74
12,494.40
6,247.20
17,115.92
8,557.96
12,769.28
6,384.64
17,492.47
8,746.24
13,050.20
6,525.10
17,877.31
8,938.65
13,337.31
6,668.65
-
17,000.00
1,658.28
17,374
1,694.76
17,756.23
1,732.05
18146.87
1,770.15
Tuition increase assumption for 2015-16 through 2017-18 = 2.2 per cent annually.
102
Table 30 – General Fees – Fall or Winter (Undergraduate Students)
($ dollars)
Full Time
Students' Union General
U-Pass
Student Health Plan
Student Dental Plan
Campus Recreation
Athletics
Donation
Student Services
Total
Part Time
Students' Union General
Campus Recreation
Athletics
Donation
Student Services
Total
Coop / Internship
Students' Union General
Student Health Plan
Student Dental Plan
Donation
Total
Faculty Specific General Fees
Engineering Endowment Fee
Engineering Student Society Fee
Law Career Services Fee
Full Time Medical Doctor Students
Students' Union General
U-Pass
Student Health Plan
Student Dental Plan
Campus Recreation
Athletics
Donation
Student Services
Total
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
2017-18
2018-19
55.50
120.00
51.50
45.00
35.90
49.29
10.00
225.00
592.19
55.50
125.00
51.50
45.00
36.68
50.37
10.00
225.00
599.05
55.50
125.00
51.50
45.00
37.49
51.48
10.00
225.00
600.97
55.50
125.00
51.50
45.00
38.31
52.62
10.00
225.00
602.93
55.50
125.00
51.50
45.00
39.15
53.77
10.00
225.00
604.92
31.75
35.90
49.29
7.00
75.00
198.94
31.75
36.68
50.37
7.00
75.00
200.80
31.75
37.49
51.48
7.00
75.00
202.72
31.75
38.31
52.62
7.00
75.00
204.68
31.75
39.15
53.77
7.00
75.00
206.67
27.00
51.50
45.00
10.00
133.50
27.00
51.50
45.00
10.00
133.50
27.00
51.50
45.00
10.00
133.50
27.00
51.50
45.00
10.00
133.50
27.00
51.50
45.00
10.00
133.50
25.00
10.00
75.00
25.00
10.00
75.00
25.00
10.00
75.00
25.00
10.00
75.00
25.00
10.00
75.00
28.00
120.00
51.50
45.00
35.90
49.29
10.00
225.00
564.69
28.00
125.00
51.50
45.00
36.68
50.37
10.00
225.00
571.55
28.00
125.00
51.50
45.00
37.49
51.48
10.00
225.00
573.47
28.00
125.00
51.50
45.00
38.31
52.62
10.00
225.00
575.43
28.00
125.00
51.50
45.00
39.15
53.77
10.00
225.00
577.42
Campus Recreation and athletics rate increase assumption for 2016-17 and 2017-18 = 2.2 per cent.
The U-Pass Fee for fall 2015 is $125. The fee for winter 2016 and beyond has yet to be determined.
Students’ Union, Health and Dental Fees are subject to change.
103
Table 31 – General Fees – Spring or Summer (Undergraduate Students)
($ dollars)
Full Time
Students' Union General
U-Pass
Campus Recreation
Donation
Student Services
Total
Part Time
Students' Union General
Campus Recreation
Donation
Student Services
Total
Coop / Internship
Students' Union General
Donation
Total
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
2017-18
2018-19
22.75
120.00
17.95
7.00
50.00
217.70
22.75
125.00
18.34
7.00
75.00
248.09
22.75
125.00
18.71
7.00
75.00
248.46
22.75
125.00
19.08
7.00
75.00
248.83
22.75
125.00
19.46
7.00
75.00
249.21
22.25
17.95
7.00
25.00
72.20
22.25
18.34
7.00
37.05
84.64
22.25
18.71
7.00
37.05
85.01
22.25
19.08
7.00
37.05
85.38
22.25
19.46
7.00
37.50
86.21
19.25
7.00
26.25
19.25
7.00
26.25
19.25
7.00
26.25
19.25
7.00
26.25
19.25
7.00
26.25
Campus Recreation and athletics rate increase assumption for 2016-17 and 2017-18 = 2.2 per cent.
The U-Pass Fee for fall 2014 is $120. The fee for winter 2015 and beyond has yet to be determined.
Table 32 – General Fees – Yearly (Graduate Students)
($ dollars)
Full Time
Graduate Students Association (GSA)
Group Insurance
U-Pass
Health Insurance
Dental Insurance
Campus Recreation
Athletics
Donation
Student Services
Total
Part Time
Graduate Students Association (GSA)
Campus Recreation
Athletics
Donation
Student Services
Total
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
2017-18
2018-19
138.23
11.00
360.00
283.52
231.64
105.60
48.32
10.00
450.00
1,638.31
160.07
11.00
375.00
283.52
231.64
110.04
50.37
10.00
450.00
1,681.64
160.07
11.00
375.00
283.52
231.64
112.24
51.38
10.00
450.00
1,684.85
160.07
11.00
375.00
283.52
231.64
114.49
52.40
10.00
450.00
1,688.12
160.07
11.00
375.00
283.64
231.64
116.78
53.45
10.00
450.00
1,691.58
114.64
105.60
48.32
10.00
150.00
428.56
132.57
110.04
50.37
10.00
150.00
452.98
132.57
112.24
51.38
10.00
150.00
456.19
132.57
114.49
52.40
10.00
150.00
459.46
132.57
116.78
53.45
10.00
150.00
462.80
Campus recreation and athletics rate increase assumption for 2015-16 through 2017-18 = 2.0 per cent annually.
The U-Pass Fee for fall 2015 is $125. The fee for winter 2016 and beyond has yet to be determined.
104
Table 33 – Residence Rates
($ dollars)
Phase II Norquay, Brewster, & Castle
Studios
1 Bedroom
2 Bedroom
4 Bedroom
Phase III Olympus Hall, Glacier Hall*
Studios
1 Bedroom
2 Bedroom
4 Bedroom
Phase IV Cascade Hall*
Studios
2 Bedroom
4 Bedroom
Living Learning – Large Double
Living Learning – Small Single
Living Learning – Large Single
Phase V International House*
2 Bedroom
Phase VI – Yamnuska (Suite Style)
1 Bedroom
2 Bedroom
3 Bedroom
Traditional Kananaskis Hall & Rundle
Single
Double
Student Family Housing Town Home
1 Bedroom
2 Bedroom
3 Bedroom
Aurora (Suite Style)
Studio
2 Bedroom
3 Bedroom
Studio Premium
2 Bedroom Premium
3 bedroom Premium
Crowsnest (Apartments)
Studio
1 Bedroom
2 Bedroom
Studio Premium
1 Bedroom Premium
2 Bedroom Premium
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
2017-18
2018-19
6,516
7,449
5,654
5,200
-
-
-
-
7,319
7,985
6,627
6,762
7,861
7,985
6,892
7,032
8,018
8,145
7,030
7,173
8,179
8,308
7,170
7,316
8,342
8,474
7,314
7,462
7,783
6,630
6,173
6,138
6,744
7,348
7,861
6,962
6,389
6,384
7,014
7,715
8,018
7,101
6,517
6,512
7,154
7,869
8,179
7,243
6,647
6,642
7,297
8,027
8,342
7,388
6,780
6,775
7,443
8,187
7,251
7,505
7,655
7,808
7,964
6,721
7,075
6,721
6,889
7,181
6,889
7,027
7,325
7,027
7,167
7,471
7,167
7,311
7,621
7,311
5,535
3,435
5,812
3,607
5,928
3,679
6,047
3,753
6,168
3,828
1,152
1,267
1,312
1,210
1,330
1,378
1,234
1,357
1,406
1,259
1,384
1,434
1,284
1,411
1,462
-
7,795
7,210
7,000
8,595
8,010
7,800
7,951
7,354
7,140
8,767
8,170
7,956
8,110
7,501
7,283
8,942
8,334
8,115
8,272
7,651
7,428
9,121
8,500
8,277
-
7,452
7,956
7,040
8,280
8,772
7,840
7,601
8,115
7,181
8,446
8,947
7,997
7,753
8,277
7,324
8,615
9,126
8,157
7,908
8,443
7,471
8,787
9,309
8,320
*Academic-year contracts are for eight months starting at the commencement of the fall term and ending in April.
Residence rate increase assumption for 2015-16 through 2017-18 = 2.0 per cent annually.
105
Table 34 – Meal Plan Rates
($ dollars)
Sampler
Lighter Side
Standard
Standard Plus
Ultimate
2014-15
2,153
3,131
3,814
4,130
4,802
2015-16
2,228
3,241
3,947
-
2016-17
2,273
3,306
4,026
-
2017-18
2,318
3,372
4,106
-
2018-19
2,364
3,439
4,189
-
Meal plan rate increase assumption for 2015-16 through 2017-18 = 2.0 per cent annually.
106
12. Resource Implications
Through our planning process, we identified significant challenges that may slow progress toward the
achievement of our Eyes High vision. We highlight these challenges within this chapter because our plan
to reduce or mitigate their impact involves the Government of Alberta as a strategic partner in the
achievement of goals for the post-secondary education system in Alberta. These plans are guided by the
academic and research priorities we outlined in Chapter 6 – Academic and Research Outcomes.
12.1
ACCESS AND GROWTH
The metropolitan population of Calgary is projected to grow from 1.1 million to 1.5 million by 2019, and
planning for this growth is an essential element of sustainable management of the post-secondary sector.
The University of Calgary is experiencing increased demand for programs, as evidenced by our high
number of “turnaways” among qualified applicants, and we anticipate that this demand will continue to
rise given the growth projected in Calgary (see below). Two issues must be addressed for us to meet the
projected increase demand for access: funding for students, and funding for space. As a strong Campus
Alberta partner and an institution committed to the well-being of our community through our sustainable
growth model, we are prepared to grow more to meet rising demand from qualified students. Support
from the Government of Alberta will allow the university to respond to the needs of our growing
population and to meet the demands from employers for highly-qualified personnel. We look forward to
the opportunity to work with government to address this issue.
12.2
FACILITIES AND MAINTENANCE
While our campus infrastructure has undergone a modest expansion over the past few years, our total
space inventory still falls short of that required to meet the needs of an expanding and evolving academy
and the growth anticipated in Calgary. Over the past decade the university has expanded access to address
strong student demand, resulting in an enrolment that is now above our existing capacity. The Ministry of
Innovation and Advanced Education has estimated that by 2022-23, enrolment is projected to increase by
another 10.4 per cent at the University of Calgary, which will result in the largest projected space shortage
(4,607 33) within the Campus Alberta system.
Our faculty space master-planning initiative revealed space shortages in a number of Faculties and
academic support units. Additionally, with almost 50.0 per cent of our physical infrastructure over 40
years of age, strategic investment is necessary to preserve our valuable assets. The Infrastructure
Maintenance Program (IMP) grant that we receive from the province is critical to addressing our deferred
maintenance liability, which is currently just over $481.0 million. Even with the increase we received in
the 2015-16 budget, IMP funding is still 32.0 per cent below what it was in 2012-13. We are asking the
province to restore funding for IMP to the 2012-13 level, which amounted to $16.1 million for the
University of Calgary. Guided by the priorities articulated within our Academic Plan and Research Plan, we
are seeking $960.7 million (2015 Construction Dollars) to support our highest-priority capital projects
(Table 35). If approved, these projects will address 60.0 per cent (2,769 seats) of the capacity shortfall
(4,607 seats) projected by 2022-23.
2014 Campus Alberta Planning Resource, Government of Alberta, Innovation and Advanced Education
33
107
Table 35 – Priority Funding List (Facilities and Maintenance)
($ millions)
Project Category
Expansion/
Repurposing
New Construction
Major Preservation
Minor Preservation
Other Capital Funding
Considerations
Total
12.3
Project Title
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.
Science A Redevelopment Phase 2
Kinesiology Expansion and Renewal
Life and Environmental Sciences Research Centre
Haskayne School of Business Advanced Learning Centre (Total $95.0M)
MacKimmie Complex and Professional Faculties Building Redevelopment
MacEwan Hall and Student Centre Servicing Redevelopment
Deep Utilities
Critical Building Systems Infrastructure
Matching Provincial Funding for External Grant Awards
Planning and Early Concept Studies
FLEs
Budget
625
950
44
650
500
2,769
180.0
238.0
140.0
63.0
253.0
36.0
26.0
8.0
14.2
2.5
960.7
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
The university is highly dependent on IT infrastructure for day-to-day operations. Organic network growth
over the past 20 years, combined with minimal evergreen investment, has resulted in technical
infrastructure that is outdated and increasingly challenged to support current and future research and
teaching requirements. To address our aging infrastructure, investment in the core campus network is
required, including specific building wireless and wired networks, along with management and
automation tools. Currently there is no provincial program to renew, replace or upgrade core technology
in older facilities at the University of Calgary (or other provincial post-secondary institutions). A funding
program to maintain and upgrade technology is critical in the increasingly digital learning and research
environment. As we move towards our goal of becoming one of Canada’s top five research institutions
by 2016, it is clear that investments must be made now to support our teaching and research
communities. A need has been identified for ongoing funding to assist the university in the following
priority areas (Table 36).
Table 36 – Priority Funding List (Information Technology)
($ millions)
Priority Areas
IT Infrastructure Support and Renewal
Support for Teaching and Learning
Support for Research
Support for Administration
Total
12.4
Funding Request
to Government
25.0
2.5
4.0
5.5
37.0
FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY
To respond to the rising demand for university education in Calgary and in order for us to continue to
create leading-edge research and innovation, the university needs a commitment to stable and
predictable funding from the government. At the University of Calgary we have a deep understanding of
the challenges facing our institution. We respect the accountability that results from local and
institutional autonomy in decision making, and we expect the government to do the same. The
government can enable us to move towards a new financially sustainable model of post-secondary
education by doing the following:
108



Developing a new provincial funding model that differentiates among institutions on the basis of
activity, particularly related to student enrolment, research and innovation;
Conducting a province-wide discussion on first principles that should be used in assessing tuition,
and then using those principles to develop a new tuition regulation for the province; and
Enabling us to innovate and collaborate with the private sector on key research platform ideas
and infrastructure projects.
As an important contributor to the economy of our region and a member of Campus Alberta, we take this
challenge as an opportunity to play a leadership role in the responsible restructuring of post-secondary
education in this province. We will help to produce a system that is more entrepreneurial - one that will
contribute to economic prosperity and social innovation in Alberta. The University of Calgary will leverage
support from the province to produce a more highly educated workforce and a more diverse and
sustainable economy.
12.5
PENSION LIABILITY
The university participates with other Alberta post-secondary institutions in the Universities Academic
Pension Plan (UAPP) to provide pensions for participating faculty and staff. The extrapolated actuarial
deficiency for the pension plan at March 31, 2014 was $1,056.9 million (2013 - $1,149.2 million) with the
pre-1992 portion of the deficiency making up 80.0 per cent ($845.1 million). The unfunded liability for
service prior to January 1, 1992 was accrued while the pension plan was managed by the Government of
Alberta prior to the UAPP becoming a multi-sponsored plan. This pre-1992 unfunded liability is financed
by an additional contribution of 1.25 per cent of salaries by the Government of Alberta, and the employees
and employers equally share the balance of the contributions of 2.87 per cent in order to eliminate the
unfunded liability by 2043. We are requesting that the Government of Alberta provide $9.0 million
annually to contribute to the elimination of this liability.
Other employees at the university participate in the Public Sector Pension Plan (PSPP). Given the large
number of employers participating in PSPP and the resulting complexities in calculating accurate
information relating to each participant’s share of any unfunded liability, employers were unable to isolate
their portion of the total unfunded deficiency at December 31, 2013 of $1,254.7 million (2012 - $1,645.1
million). This unfunded liability represents a risk that both employer and employee contribution rates
could increase in the near future (Table 37).
Table 37 – Priority Funding List (Pension Liability)
($ millions)
Priority Areas
Pre-1992 Pension Liability
Base
$9.0
One-time
-
109
13. Performance Measures
The purpose of this chapter is to identify the measures that we will use to monitor our progress across
the domains of teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and community and environment. The
challenge we encounter in doing so is common among large, comprehensive research institutions −
selecting measures that assess the breadth of our programs, the impact of our scholarship, the extent of
our mandate, and the complexity of our organization.
To be successful, a valid and adequate set of performance measures would need to balance measurement
along quantitative and qualitative dimensions and reflect different facets of our organization. Given the
absence of data in some areas of the academy, the tendency would be to select measures most readily
available and easily manipulated. The tendency to count things that can be counted and to discount those
that cannot is at the center of much of the scrutiny about university performance measurement.
Our approach addresses this challenge through the selection of measures that we believe have horizontal
and vertical validity and that are associated with our key thematic areas). By horizontal validity we mean
applicability across the institution so that these measures are just as meaningful in the characterization
of achievement for physicists as for mathematicians, political scientists, art historians, and musicians. By
vertical validity we mean measures applicable at all levels of the academy. By thematic areas we mean
measures clustered around our priorities. Selecting measures in this way is intended to ensure that they
apply equally well to the individual faculty member as to departments, faculties, and to the university.
It is important to note that the measures we have chosen are not simply internal comparisons of progress
over time. Rather, they include comparisons across universities in a manner that compares like with like.
We selected the Canadian U15 group of research universities and, in particular, the top 5 to align with our
vision to be a top 5 research institution by 2016. In most of our measures we include three targets –the
score for the 5th ranked institution in the U15, the average score of the top 5 U15 institutions, and our
stretch target for 2017-18. In the case of teaching, we have chosen to delay the selection of a measure.
As we look towards achieving the goals we have set for our 50th anniversary in 2016, it is worth noting
that the data to assess our success may not become available until after that date. We currently rank in
the top 5 in 23 of 36 performance measures for which we have top 5 comparator data.
•
University of Calgary performance within the top five
Teaching and Learning
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Teaching (under development)
Retention rate
Graduation rate (undergraduate)
Graduation rate (master’s)
Graduation rate (PhD)
Time to completion (undergraduate)
Time to completion (master’s)
Time to completion (PhD)
Ratio of applicants to student intake (undergraduate)
Ratio of applicants to student intake (graduate)
Average entering grade
Graduate proportion of total enrolment
110
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
International proportion of total enrolment (undergraduate)
International proportion of total enrolment (graduate)
Ratio of students to faculty (total)
Ratio of students to faculty (graduate)
Undergraduate student engagement (NSSE) (first year)
Undergraduate student engagement (NSSE) (fourth year)
Graduate student engagement (CGPSS)
Graduate satisfaction
Degrees awarded
Employment rate (total)
Employment rate (employed in related jobs)
Research and Scholarship
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Postdoctoral scholars (total)
Postdoctoral scholars (per tenure and tenure-track faculty)
Sponsored research funding (total)
Sponsored research funding (per tenure and tenure-track faculty)
Tri-council research funding (total)
Tri-council research funding (per tenure and tenure-track faculty)
Publications (total)
Publications (per tenure and tenure-track faculty)
Citations (total)
Citations (per tenure and tenure-track faculty)
New invention disclosures
New licenses
Community and Environment
•
•
•
•
•
Fundraising
Endowment
Unrestricted net assets
Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STARS)
Facilities condition index
Other
•
Employee engagement (not ranked against peers)
111
13.1
TEACHING AND LEARNING
Teaching
We are developing programs to promote the professional development of professors, instructors,
graduate students, and teaching assistants to create and nurture a culture of expert instruction and
learning. Measuring the results of these initiatives will ensure that our students will benefit from the
support, education, mentoring, and continuous improvement that we provide inside and outside the
classroom.
Figure 10 – Teaching
8.0%
4.0%
Under Development
0.0%
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2017-18 Target
Undergraduate Retention Rate
This measure helps us understand the key factors that compel students to complete their degree
programs or cause them to consider an alternative path after their first year of study. Our retention rate
of students transitioning from year one to year two has improved markedly since 2009-10 and surpasses
the average of our top five peer institutions. We have already met and exceeded the target we established
for 2016.
Figure 11 – Undergraduate Retention Rate
96%
91.2%
88%
90.8%
90.4%
89.1%
88.6%
89.1%
88.0%
85.7%
Top 5
80%
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
(p)
Top 5 Min
(p)
Top 5 Avg
(p)
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange (CSRDE)
Source: Top 5 CSRDE Final 2012-13. Subject to change pending 2013-14 data availability
112
Graduation Rate
This measure tracks the percentage of students who ultimately graduate from a group, or cohort, who
began their studies at the same time. We are currently in the range of our top five peers.
Figure 12 – Graduation Rate
85.0%
85.0%
70.0%
83.5%
69.6%
75.3%
71.4%
60.4%
71.2%
81.0%
71.7%
72.8%
85.0%
73.7%
71.3%
77.4%
69.3%
67.3%
81.1%
70.0%
68.0%
81.1%
66.4%
50%
79.2%
100%
Undergraduate
Master's
PhD
Top 5
0%
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
(p)
Top 5 Min
(p)
Top 5 Avg
(p)
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary Retention and Time to Completion Reports (Tracking Period = Undergraduate 6-Year; Master's 5-Year; PhD 9-Year)
Master's completion rate includes students promoted to PhD.
Source: Top 5 Retention and Time to Completion reports Final 2012-13. Subject to change pending 2013-14 data availability
Time to Completion
This measure tracks the average number of years it takes students to complete their degree programs at
the University of Calgary. Understanding this dynamic helps us refine our support services for students as
they progress. While undergraduate and PhD rates have remained stable, time-to-completion rates for
master’s students have shown an improvement over the past five years. The undergraduate rate has
maintained its Top 5 position for another consecutive year.
Figure 13 – Time to Completion
6.0
5.0
4.5
4.6
4.4
4.8
4.4
4.9
4.8
4.5
4.5
4.4
4.5
4.3
4.3
4.1
3.0
2.7
2.8
2.8
2.7
Undergraduate
2.6
2.1
2.1
1.7
Masters
PhD
Top 5
0.0
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
(p)
Top 5 Min
(p)
Top 5 Avg
(p)
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary Retention and Time to Completion reports (Years)(Tracking Period = Undergraduate 6-Year; Master's 5-Year; PhD 9-Year)
Source: Top 5 Retention and Time to Completion reports. Final 2012-13. Subject to change pending 2013-14 data availability
113
Ratio of Applicants to Student Intake
This metric is calculated as the number of applicants we attract relative to the number of available student
spaces. It is one indicator of program demand. Demand for spaces at the University of Calgary has
increased steadily over the past several years.
Figure 14 – Ratio of Applicants to Student Intake
4.00
3.57 : 1
3.47 : 1
3.04 : 1
2.97 : 1
3.50 : 1
3.18 : 1
2.71 : 1
2.00
2.10 : 1
2.38 : 1
2.19 : 1
2.07 : 1
2.30 : 1
Undergraduate
Graduate
0.00
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2017-18 Target
Source: AET Application Submission Initiative (ASI)
Note: The number of graduate applicants is understated by ASI
Average Entering Grade from High School
We promote high levels of student achievement by emphasizing the importance of academic admission
standards. The average entering grade is one of a number of leading indicators of graduation rates. We
currently rank among our top five peers.
Figure 15 – Average Entering Grade from High School
90%
86.5%
87.6%
85.5%
85.5%
84.1%
80%
82.0%
82.3%
82.7%
Top 5
70%
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
(p)
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange (CSRDE)
Source: Top 5 2013-14 data; Maclean's University Rankings; one institution reported 2012-13 data
114
Student Mix (Graduate Proportion of Total Enrolment)
We monitor the graduate proportion of our total student population to ensure that we grow to the level
of leading research universities. The proportion of graduate students at leading international research
universities is approximately 25.0 per cent, and our intent is to move towards that target by 2017-18. The
University of Calgary is currently within the range of the top five Canadian institutions.
Figure 16 – Student Mix (Graduate Proportion of Total Enrolment)
30%
25.0%
19.6%
19.3%
19.3%
21.1%
18.9%
15%
18.6%
18.6%
Top 5
0%
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: U15 Factbook 2013 (Headcount)
Student Mix (International Enrolment)
We monitor the number of international students that we attract to ensure that we grow to the level of
the top five universities. The proportion of international students at leading Canadian research
universities is close to 10.0 per cent at the undergraduate level and 25.0 per cent at the graduate level.
We have exceeded our goal at the graduate level and continue to grow diversity in our undergraduate
student population.
Figure 17 – Student Mix (International Enrolment)
30%
24.3%
24.0%
26.5%
24.6%
24.1%
26.0%
15%
16.0%
Top 5
25.0%
15.3%
Graduate
12.4%
10.0%
5.4%
0%
2009-10
5.2%
2010-11
5.5%
2011-12
6.4%
2012-13
Undergraduate
6.8%
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: U15 Enrolments 2013 (Headcount)
115
Ratio of Students to Faculty (Total)
This measure tracks the ratio of students to academic staff. University of Calgary students have better
access to their instructors than their counterparts at many other institutions across Canada. We currently
rank among our top five peers.
Figure 18 – Ratio of Students to Faculty (Total)
40.0 : 1
36.2 : 1
24.7 : 1
20.0 : 1
18.9 : 1
20.2 : 1
21.6 : 1
22.0 : 1
21.1 : 1
20.0 : 1
Top5
0.0 : 1
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: U15 2013-14 Factbook; Full-time Equivalent (FTE) students and Full-time Tenure & Tenure-track academic staff
Ratio of Students to Faculty (Graduate)
This ratio is an indicator of the vibrancy of our graduate programs, measuring the total number of
graduate students divided by the total number of academic staff. Graduate students at the University of
Calgary enjoy greater access to their academic mentors than their peers at other Canadian universities.
We currently rank among our top five peers.
Figure 19 – Ratio of Students to Faculty (Graduate)
7.0 : 1
7.4 : 1
5.4 : 1
3.5 : 1
3.7 : 1
3.9 : 1
4.2 : 1
4.3 : 1
5.0 : 1
4.1 : 1
Top 5
0.0 : 1
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: U15 2013-14 Factbook; Full-time Equivalent (FTE) graduate students and Full-time Tenure & Tenure-track academic staff
116
Undergraduate Student Engagement
We monitor the quality of our learning environment, and the overall level of satisfaction reported by firstyear and senior-level undergraduate students, through their responses to the National Survey of Student
Engagement (NSSE) question, ‘How would you evaluate your entire educational experience at this
institution?’ Percentages shown are ratings of ‘good’ or ‘excellent’. We currently rank among our top five
peers.
Figure 20 – Undergraduate Student Engagement
100%
85%
81%
76%
67%
73%
74% 73%
78% 77%
75%
50%
First Year
Senior Year
Administered
every three years
0%
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
Top 5
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary NSSE 2014
Source: Top 5 Maclean's 2014
Graduate Student Engagement
We monitor the quality of the learning environment and the overall level of satisfaction reported by our
graduate students in regular programs through their responses to a Canadian Graduate and Professional
Student Survey (CGPSS) question that assesses the percentage of students (master’s and PhD) rating the
quality of their graduate program as ‘good’ to ‘excellent’. We currently rank among our top five peers.
Figure 21 – Graduate Student Engagement
100%
82.0%
81.5%
81.2%
85.4%
85.0%
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
50%
Administered
every three years
0%
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
Top 5
2012-13
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Source: U15 CGPSS 2009-10 & 2012-13
117
Graduate Satisfaction
We monitor the quality of our learning environment through student responses to the question, ‘rate the
quality of your education experience’ on a Government of Alberta survey completed two years after
graduation. Percentages shown are ratings of ‘satisfied’ and ‘very satisfied’. This has been a focus of
concentration in the past few years and the effort has been worthwhile, as evidenced by the 1.4 per cent
increase in satisfaction.
Figure 22 – Graduate Satisfaction
95.0%
90.0%
87.6%
85.0%
86.2%
85.0%
Administered
every two years
Administered
every two years
75.0%
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary Graduate Outcomes Survey (IAE Survey)
Degrees Awarded
This measure provides an indication of how many students graduate each year and go on to be thoughtful,
communicative citizens and leaders of their respective communities with abilities to think critically and
creatively to solve issues of the day. We have determined that we will be using a sustainable growth model
to determine overall enrolment, so it is likely that our graduate numbers will be relatively stable unless
further funding is provided to increase enrolment. The top five institutions are also all larger than the
University of Calgary, and so, in absolute numbers, would be expected to produce more.
Figure 23 – Degrees Awarded
12,000
3,054
6,000
0
1,799
1,285
1,409
1,535
1,634
4,588
4,719
4,857
4,755
4,917
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2,085
8,215
Graduate
1,700
5,394
Top 5 Min
4,800
Top 5 Avg
Undergraduate
2017-18 Target
Source: U15 Degrees Awarded (excludes certificates and diplomas)
118
Employment Rate (Government of Alberta Graduate Outcomes Survey)
We monitor how well we respond to the needs of individual learners and to the social, economic and
cultural needs of the province through the percentage of graduate survey respondents who are employed,
and employed in a related field, within a specified period following graduation.
Figure 24 – Employment Rate
100%
96.1%
95.0%
95.0%
94.7%
85.1%
75%
79.5%
85.0%
79.5%
Employment Rate
Employed in Related Jobs
Top 5
50%
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary Graduate Outcomes Survey (IAE Survey)
119
13.2
RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP
Postdoctoral Scholars
Through our postdoctoral scholars measure, we monitor the number of scholars that we attract.
Postdoctoral scholars contribute to our overall research quality and productivity. We continue to grow in
this important area. However, the top five institutions are all larger than the University of Calgary, and so,
in absolute numbers, would be expected to attract and engage more postdoctoral scholars overall.
Figure 25 – Postdoctoral Scholars
1,500
1,267
750
579
451
-
2009-10
394
2010-11
427
2011-12
388
2012-13
550
462
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary U15 Factbook 2013-14
Source: Top 5 U15 2013-14 & 2014-15 Factbook; Top 5 Avg 2013 data used for four instituions; Fall 2014 data for one institution
Postdoctoral Scholars (Per Tenure & Tenure-Track Faculty Member)
Postdoctoral scholars per tenure and tenure-track faculty member is another indicator of research quality
and productivity. It accounts for size differences among top five institutions by dividing the total number
of postdoctoral scholars by the total number of tenure and tenure-track faculty members. We currently
rank among our top five peers.
Figure 26 – Postdoctoral Scholars (Per Tenure & Tenure-Track Faculty Member)
0.80 : 1
0.64 : 1
0.40 : 1
0.44 : 1
0.33 : 1
0.30 : 1
0.33 : 1
0.30 : 1
0.35 : 1
0.34 : 1
Top 5
0.00 : 1
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary U15 Factbook 2013-14
Source: Top 5 U15 2013-14 & 2014-15 Factbook; Top 5 Avg 2013 data used for four instituions; Fall 2014 data for one institution
120
Sponsored Research Funding (Total) ($ millions)
Our sponsored research income measure is one indicator of our research quality and productivity. It
includes funding from federal, provincial and foreign governments, corporations, foundations and nonprofit organizations, as well as donations and investment income. The top five institutions are all larger
than the University of Calgary, and so, in absolute numbers, would be expected to produce more. We
anticipate our scores will improve in the coming years.
Figure 27 – Sponsored Research Funding (Total)
$700
$613.0
$462.9
$400.0
$350
$0
$282.8
$286.4
$282.8
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
$328.7
$324.2
2012-13
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary U15 2013-14 Factbook
Source: Top 5 U15 2013-14 and 2012-13 Factbook; Top 5 Avg includes four institutions with 2013-14 data and one with 2012-13 data
Sponsored Research Funding (Per Tenure & Tenure-Track Faculty Member) ($ thousands)
This is another indicator of research quality and productivity. We currently rank amongst our top five
peers and anticipate that this number will increase as a result of the strategies that have been put in place.
Figure 28 – Sponsored Research Funding (Per Tenure & Tenure-Track Faculty Member)
$330
$316.7
$253.5
$230
$205.0
$215.2
$311.0
$244.0
$219.9
$212.0
Top 5
$130
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary U15 Factbook (2013-14 CAUBO reported data)
Source: Top 5 U15 Factbook (2013-14 CAUBO); one institution U15 Factbook (2012-13 CAUBO)
121
Tri-Council Funding (Total) ($ millions)
This measure is an indicator of our research income, intensity and quality. It includes grant funding from
the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council
(NSERC) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). We anticipate this number will
increase as a result of the strategies that have been put in place. The top five institutions are all larger
than the University of Calgary, and so, in absolute numbers, would be expected to produce more.
Figure 29 – Tri-Council Funding (Total)
$200
$182.0
$135.0
$100
$106.0
$76.8
$0
2009-10
$72.0
2010-11
$67.7
$66.9
2011-12
2012-13
$58.9
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary CAUBO
Source: Top 5 U15 Tri-Council Report Tables 2013-14
Tri-Council Funding (Per Tenure and Tenure-Track Faculty Member) ($ thousands)
This is another indicator of research income, intensity and quality. Tri-Council research income includes
grant funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Natural Sciences and Engineering
Research Council (NSERC) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). We
anticipate this number will increase as a result of the strategies that have been put in place.
Figure 30 – Tri-Council Funding (Per Tenure and Tenure-Track Faculty Member)
$120
$105.0
$92.0
$60
$64.0
$55.7
$54.1
$52.6
$51.6
$44.3
$0
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary CAUBO
Source: Top 5 U15 Tri-Council Report Tables 2013-14
122
Publications (Total)
One measure of a university’s scholarly output is the number of academic and research publications that
it produces each year. This measure monitors the number of publications produced by the University of
Calgary in all subject areas compared to peer institutions. We continue to improve year over year in
publication quantity. The top five institutions are all larger than the University of Calgary, and so, in
absolute numbers, would be expected to produce more.
Figure 31 – Publications (Total)
7,000
6,372
5,451
4,149
3,500
2,668
0
2009-10
2,837
2,896
3,044
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
3,280
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: Thompson Reuters – indivdual year total
Publications (Per Tenure and Tenure-Track Faculty Member)
Another measure of a university’s research productivity is the number of papers produced on average by
each faculty member. This measure monitors the number of publications produced by the University of
Calgary by tenure and tenure-track faculty member in all subject areas compared to peer institutions.
Productivity, as measured by publication, has risen significantly since 2009-10 and is within range of the
top five benchmark.
Figure 32 – Publications (Per Tenure and Tenure-Track Faculty Member)
4.0
3.27
2.80
2.0
1.96
2.15
2.28
2.38
2.47
2.10
Top 5
0.0
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: Thompson Reuters – individual year totals; faculty counts from University of Calgary Human Resources
123
Citations (Total)
One measure of the impact of the research that is performed is the number of times its publications are
cited. Frequently cited publications are viewed as having more relevance or impact. This measure
monitors the number of citations produced by the University of Calgary in all subject areas compared to
peer institutions. Our history over the past five years shows a clear pattern of year-over-year increases in
overall citations rates and, as a result, in overall research impact. The top five institutions are all larger
than the University of Calgary, and so, in absolute numbers, would be expected to produce more.
Figure 33 – Citations (Total)
300,000
264,195
150,000
0
159,343
77,620
83,983
2009-10
2010-11
94,876
2011-12
103,194
2012-13
150,000
114,605
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: Thompson Reuters – 5-year totals
Citations (Per Tenure and Tenure-Track Faculty Member)
This measure monitors the number of citations per faculty member produced by the University of Calgary
in all subject areas compared to peer institutions. The number of citations per faculty member has risen
significantly in the past four years, reflecting an increase in the relevance and impact of the research
conducted at the University of Calgary. We have already exceeded our target and are within range of the
top five U15 institutions in this measure.
Figure 34 – Citations (Per Tenure and Tenure-Track Faculty Member)
150
134.3
75
74.8
56.9
80.7
86.2
80.8
77.0
63.7
Top 5
0
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: Thompson Reuters – 5-year totals; faculty counts from University of Calgary Human Resources
124
New Invention Disclosures
This measure monitors the number of new or novel inventions that our researchers disclose each year
while patent protection is being obtained. New invention disclosures are granted for ideas that produce
products, processes, machines, or compositions of matter, or any new and useful improvements of these.
We anticipate these numbers will increase as we develop our strategy with Innovate Calgary. The top five
institutions are all larger than the University of Calgary, and so, in absolute numbers, would be expected
to produce a greater volume of new inventions.
Figure 35 – New Invention Disclosures
400
339
300
274
200
210
172
143
0
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
186
165
2012-13
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary Innovate Calgary (Three-year running total 2011-2013)
Source: Top 5 AUTM Survey (Three-year running total 2011-2013)
New Licenses
New licenses provide one measure of a university’s scholarly output that will be translated into useful
products that help to shape society. It refers to the number of new discoveries licensed each year. We
have determined that we are not accurately capturing discoveries made on our campus, and will aim to
improve reporting over the next year. We anticipate these numbers will increase as we continue to
develop our strategy with Innovate Calgary.
Figure 36 – New Licenses
100
88
73
68
68
50
44
42
27
0
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
24
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary Innovate Calgary
Source: Top 5 AUTM Survey (Three-year running total 2011-2013)
125
13.3
COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENT
Fundraising ($ millions)
We monitor the extent to which we engage the community in our educational programs and our research,
scholarship and creative activity through a measure that tracks the level of funds we raise within the
community to support these activities. The University of Calgary is currently within the range of top five
Canadian institutions. As anticipated we have exceeded our stated target.
Figure 37 – Fundraising
$200
$163.1
$123.7
$100
$83.7
$76.5
$129.3
$120.0
$116.4
$88.6
Top 5
$0
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary Development Office
Source: Top 5 data available for three institutions; 2013-14 data from institutional websites.
Financial Health (Endowment Balance) ($ millions)
Growth in our endowment balance is an important indicator of the cumulative support we have received
from our community. It is an indication of our capacity to support our academic priorities in future years.
While we are in the range of the top five U15 universities, this will be an area of focus in the coming years.
Figure 38 – Financial Health (Endowment Balance)
$1,200
$1,123.2
$750.0
$600
$661.8
$441.7
$496.8
$517.2
$568.3
$310.0
Top 5
$0
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Top 5 Min
Top 5 Avg
2017-18 Target
Source: University of Calgary Financial Statements (2013-2014)
Source: Top 5 CAUBO University Investment Survey (For the year ending Dec 31, 2013)
126
Financial Sustainability (Unrestricted Net Assets) ($ millions)
One index of our leadership in the area of economic sustainability is the level of our Unrestricted Net
Assets (UNA). As a general guideline, leading universities establish positive UNA balances of 5.0 per cent
of their budgets to ensure that they have the resources needed to address challenges and leverage
opportunities. We are currently slightly over the 5.0 per cent target of overall budget. With the change in
budget announced in March 2013, we decreased our UNA pool, but we remain financially healthy.
Figure 39 – Financial Sustainability (Unrestricted Net Assets)
100
2009-10
-10.6
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
24.3
64.0
72.8
-11.8
Top 5 (min)
Top 5 (avg)
2017-18 Target
65.0
Top 5
-225.9
-200
-453.5
-500
Source: University of Calgary (Finance and Services)
Source: Top 5 (2012-13 CAUBO)
Financial Sustainability (Facilities Condition Index – (FCI))
FCI provides one measure of the quality of our learning environment. It is calculated as a percentage of
the total value of our supported asset pool requiring upgrades to various base building elements.
Improvements in our FCI can result from investments in maintenance, changes in the replacement value
of campus facilities, and the addition of new facilities. This is a measure we anticipate will be negatively
impacted by reductions in government funding, particularly the loss of Infrastructure Maintenance
Program (IMP) allocations.
Figure 40 – Financial Sustainability (Facilities Condition Index – (FCI))
40%
33.3%
20%
20.9%
10.7%
9.8%
10.4%
12.2%
11.2%
10.0%
Top 5
0%
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Top 5 (min)
Top 5 (avg)
2015-16 Target
Source: University of Calgary Facilities Management (APPA Leadership in Educational Facilities)
Source: Top 5 Facilities Management (APPA Leadership in Educational Facilities); one FCI pulled from institutional website
127
Sustainability
Our performance is aligned with the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STARS)
developed by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE). This
measure monitors our performance in the areas of environmental sustainability in education and
research, operations, planning, administration and engagement. We have made significant progress and
are now number two in the country.
Figure 41 – Sustainability
70%
73.1%
52.1%
35%
57.7%
56.0%
58.9%
61.6%
65.1%
67.5%
37.1%
Top 5
Saskatchewan
Gold
Silver
Bronze
0%
Western
McGill
Dalhousie
Ottawa
Alberta
UBC
Calgary
Laval
Source: Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) (Canadian Institution Total Scores as of May 2014)
128
13.4
OTHER
Employee Engagement
Employee engagement levels — though not measured against our peers as comparative data is
unavailable — provide us with an important assessment of how well we work together to build
commitment and trust in leadership, ensure a culture of respect and recognition, and create a 'one
university family' environment. Results from our 2011 survey provide an important baseline from which
to measure progress. Recent results from 2013 demonstrate that while we have made significant
improvements, there is still work to be done, and we have plans in place to drive progress on key
indicators.
Figure 42 – Employee Engagement
85%
Learning and Research Focus
82%
Clear and Promising Direction
83%
Authority and Empowerment
79%
Engagement
Image and Reputation
78%
Development Opportunities
78%
78%
Supervision
75%
Faculty/Institute/Admin Unit
Enablement
75%
Performance/Work Demands
75%
70%
Collaboration
83%
83%
Confidence in Leadership
62%
University Issues
62%
50%
82%
81%
78%
80%
2010-11
2012-13
78%
77%
68%
Respect and Recognition
85%
81%
78%
Pay and Benefits
86%
83%
77%
Resources
88%
75%
74%
67%
70%
90%
Percent Neutral/Favourable
129
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