MIDDLE SCHOOL COURSE OUTLINE

MIDDLE SCHOOL COURSE OUTLINE

Department

OFFICE OF CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION, & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Science

MIDDLE SCHOOL COURSE OUTLINE

(Revised March 2012)

Course Code

4145

Course Title

Middle School Forensic Science

Abbreviation

MS Forensic Sci Grade Level

Course Length 1 Semester

Prerequisites

8

None

IMPORTANT NOTES:

Because of the nature of some of the topics discussed in this class, parent notification and permission for student participation should be sought through a letter describing the topics that will be covered in the course.

No graphic images or gratuitous discussions of violence will be presented in this class.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Middle School Forensic Science is an elective laboratory based program. Students should spend approximately forty percent (40%) of their class time on hands-on activities. This course will explore different aspects of forensic science including, DNA and heredity and their uses in identification, tissue structure and rates of decay, skeletal identification, pattern injury recognition, chromatography, projectile trajectory, and forensic botany. It will also explore uses of technology in the field of forensics.

Constructivist methods of teaching are employed to ensure the best possible comprehension and retention of science concepts. Science activities will utilize the skills and techniques outlined in the

Investigation and Experimentation Strand of the Content Standards along with some used by professional forensic investigators.

GOALS: (Student needs this course is intended to meet)

• Students will learn practical applications, which extend and explore beyond the California Science

Standards. The use of well-designed, memorable experiences and the application of scientific knowledge and methodology are essential in helping the students achieve appropriate comprehension of the content.

• Students will improve their ability to learn independently by drawing generalizations from sciencerelated articles, books, graphs, charts, and diagrams. Regular opportunities are provided for students to clearly communicate their understanding through oral and written explanations of science concepts.

• Students will study the applications of science in everyday life to inspire them to consider pursuing advanced studies in science and explore the wide variety of related career choices available.

Middle School Forensic Science

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CONTEXT: CONTENT SCOPE AND SEQUENCE

7th

Physical Sciences

6th

Density (Qualitative) -------- (CA 8)

Energy

Temperature vs. Heat

Heat Transfer

8th

Observing and Defining Motion

Forces and their Effects

Gravity’s Larges Scale Effects

Basic Atomic Theory

Periodic Table as a Tool

Metals, Non-metals, Inert Gases

Electrons beyond the Bohr Model

Ions and Isotopes

Physical & Chemical Properties

Element vs. Compound Properties

Chemical Bonding

Atoms and Ions Forming Solids

Phases and Molecular Motion

Chemical Formulas

Chemical Equations & Conservation of Matter

Exothermic vs. Endothermic

Acids, Bases, and pH

Density & Buoyancy

Sound and Light Energy ------ (CA 7)

Earth Sciences

Earth’s Layers

Plate Tectonics

Mountain Building

Earthquakes, Faults, and Epicenters

Volcanoes

California Geology

Mechanical & Chemical Weathering

Minerals

Rock Cycle (Igneous, Metamorphic, and

Sedimentary Rocks)

Sun’s Effect on Weather

Convections

Solar Energy

Atmospheric Conditions

Natural Resources

Stratigraphy: Fossil Locations Rock -- (CA 7)

Geol. Timeline of Earth’s History ------- (CA 7)

Formation of Fossils ----------------------- (CA 7)

Methods of Dating Earth’s History ----- (CA 7)

Galaxies and Stars

Life Cycles of Stars (Nebular Theory,

Novas, etc.)

Distances in Astronomy

Light Sources and Reflectors in the

Universe

Cosmology (Universe Origin) --------- (LB)

Solar System

Life Sciences

Food Chains / Food Webs

Ecosystems

Human Impacts on Ecosystems --------- (LB)

Eight Designated Lessons from Project

ALERT Health Curriculum

Cell Similarities & Differentiation

Function of Cell Structures

Energy at the Cellular Level

Photosynthesis / Respiration

Mitosis

Genetics

DNA RNA Protein ----------------- (LB)

Sexual / Asexual Reproduction

Meiosis ----------------------------------------- (LB)

DNA, Genes, & Alleles

Dominant & Recessive Traits

Theory of Evolution

Natural Selection

Body Systems

Taxonomic Keys ----------------------------- (LB)

Kingdoms & Major Phyla ------------------ (LB)

Simple Machines

and the Human Body ------------- (CA 7)

Blood Pressure and Heart Valves --- (CA 7)

Organic Chem. / Biochem.

Three Designated Lessons from Project

ALERT Health Curriculum

Notes regarding non-aligned content:

(LB) => Long Beach specific content; not found in CA Science

Content Standards

(CA 7) => 7 th

grade content which has been moved to 6 th

or 8 th

grade to accommodate reduced science instruction in 7 th

grade

(CA 8) => 8 th

grade content which should be presented qualitatively in 6 th

grade to help explain convections and other Earth science related content

Middle School Forensic Science

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CONTEXT: SKILLS SCOPE AND SEQUENCE

Investigation and Experimentation:

Scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations. As a basis for understanding this concept and addressing the content in the other three strands, students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. Students will:

6th

7a. Develop a hypothesis.

b. Select and use appropriate tools and technology (including calculators, computers, balances, spring scales, microscopes, and binoculars) to perform tests, collect data, and display data.

c. Construct appropriate graphs from data and develop qualitative statements about the relationships between variables.

d. Communicate the steps and results from an investigation in written reports and oral presentations.

e. Recognize whether evidence is consistent with a proposed explanation.

f. Read a topographic map and a geologic map for evidence provided on the maps and construct and interpret a simple scale map.

g. Interpret events by sequence and time from natural phenomena (e.g., the relative ages of rocks and intrusions).

h. Identify changes in natural phenomena over time without manipulating the phenomena (e.g., a tree limb, a grove of trees, a stream, a hillslope).

7th

7a. Select and use appropriate tools and technology (including calculators, computers, balances, spring scales, microscopes, and binoculars) to perform tests, collect data, and display data.

b. Utilize a variety of print and electronic resources (including the World Wide Web) to collect information as evidence as part of a research project.

c. Communicate the logical connection among hypothesis, science concepts, tests conducted, data collected, and conclusions drawn from the scientific evidence.

d. Construct scale models, maps and appropriately labeled diagrams to communicate scientific knowledge (e.g., motion of Earth’s plates and cell structure).

e. Communicate the steps and results from an investigation in written reports and verbal presentations.

8th

9a. Plan and conduct a scientific investigation to test a hypothesis.

b. Evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of data.

c. Distinguish between variable and controlled parameters in a test.

d. Recognize the slope of the linear graph as the constant in the relationship y=kx and apply this to interpret graphs constructed from data.

e. Construct appropriate graphs from data and develop quantitative statements about the relationships between variables.

f. Apply simple mathematical relationships to determine one quantity given the other two

(including speed = distance/time, density = mass/volume, force = pressure x area, volume=area x height).

g. Distinguish between linear and non-linear relationships on a graph of data.

Middle School Forensic Science

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Relevant CA CONTENT STANDARDS

Grade 7 Focus On Life Science:

Cell Biology

1. All living organisms are composed of cells, from just one to many trillions, whose details usually are visible only through a microscope. As a basis for understanding this concept, students know … c. the nucleus is the repository for genetic information in plant and animal cells. [LS10]

Genetics

2. A typical cell of any organism contains genetic instructions that specify its traits. Those traits may be modified by environmental influences. As a basis for understanding this concept, students know… b. sexual reproduction produces offspring that inherit half their genes from each parent.

c. DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is the genetic material of living organisms and is located in the chromosomes of each

cell. [LS10]

Structure and Function in Living Systems

3. The anatomy and physiology of plants and animals illustrate the complementary nature of structure and function. As a basis for understanding this concept, students know … b. organ systems function because of the contributions of individual organs, tissues, and cells. The failure of any part can affect the entire system. c. how bones and muscles work together to provide a structural framework for movement. [LS10]

Investigation & Experimentation

4. Scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations. As a basis for understanding this concept and addressing the content in the other three strands, students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. Students will … a. select and use appropriate tools and technology (including calculators, computers, balances, spring scales, microscopes, and binoculars) to perform tests, collect data, and display data. b. use a variety of print and electronic resources (including the World Wide Web) to collect information and evidence as part of a research project. c. communicate the logical connection among hypothesis, science concepts, tests conducted, data collected, and conclusions drawn from the scientific evidence. [LS10] d. construct scale models, maps and appropriately labeled diagrams to communicate scientific knowledge (e.g., motion of Earth’s plates and cell structure). e. communicate the steps and results from an investigation in written reports and verbal presentations.

LS10 = Standards assessed on the 10 th

grade No Child Left Behind Biology/Life Science Test

Grade 8 Focus On Physical Science:

Motion

1. The velocity of an object is the rate of change of its position. As a basis for understanding this concept, students know: a. position is defined in relation to some choice of standard reference point and a set of reference directions. [CST] b. average speed is the total distance traveled divided by the total time elapsed and that the speed of an object along the path traveled can vary. [CST]

c. changes in velocity may be due to changes in speed, direction, or both. [CST]

Forces

2. Unbalanced forces cause changes in velocity. As a basis for understanding this concept, students know: a. a force has both direction and magnitude. [CST] e. the greater the mass of an object, the more force is needed to achieve the same rate of change in motion. [CST]

Reactions

5. Chemical reactions are processes in which atoms are rearranged into different combinations of molecules.

As a basis for understanding this concept, students know: a. reactant atoms and molecules interact to form products with different chemical properties. [CST]

Middle School Forensic Science

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Grade 8 Focus On Physical Science: (cont’d)

Investigation & Experimentation

9. Scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations. As a basis for understanding this concept and addressing the content in the other three strands, students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. Students will … a. plan and conduct a scientific investigation to test a hypothesis. [CST] e. construct appropriate graphs from data and develop quantitative statements about the relationships between

variables. [CST] f. apply simple mathematic relationships to determine a missing quantity in a mathematic expression, given the two

remaining terms (including speed = distance/time, density = mass/volume, force = pressure x area, volume = area x

height). [CST]

CST = Standards assessed on the California Standards Test

LS10 = Standards assessed on the 10 th

grade No Child Left Behind Biology/Life Science Test

DISTRICT PERFORMANCE STANDARDS:

The Performance Standard Criteria are shown in the table below. The objective is to have all students achieve at or above the Proficient Level and receive a C or better in this course. Performance level is determined by the average of the assessments or assignments.

Science Performance Standard Criteria

Graded Student Work

Not Proficient

Average is a 1 or less than 60%

Partial

Proficient

Average is a 2 or 60% - 69%

Proficient

Average is a 3 or 70% - 84%

Advanced

Proficient

Average is a 4 or 85% - 100%

Less than 60% 60% - 69% 70% - 84% 85% - 100% Classroom Assessments

Written Response / Lab Report

(6 point scale)

Written Response / Lab Report

(4 point scale)

End-Of-Course Exam

1-2

1

Less than 45%

3

2

45% - 59%

4

3

60% - 84%

5-6

4

85% - 100%

Middle School Forensic Science

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OUTLINE OF CONTENT AND RECOMMENDED TIME ALLOTMENT:

Content sequencing and time allocations are only suggestions and may be adjusted to suit school site curriculum plans and student needs.

MIDDLE SCHOOL FORENSIC SCIENCE

Skeletal System

Topics

Task Analysis

“Students know and are able to …”

Adopted Textbook

Correlation(s) Connections

Appx

Time

(per 90 days)

Osteology:

Identification of bones

* These two tasks are very large. You may want to embed some of this as you move to other topics to keep students from getting overwhelmed .

Students know bones and muscles work together to provide a structural framework for movement.

(CA-7 3c)

• Identify all bones of the human body.*

• Identify the location of the bones in the human body.*

• Distinguish between human and animal bones.

• Explain why proper bone identification is important.

Forensic Odontology

• Recall the correct number of teeth for people at various ages.

• Identify the specific patterns found in human teeth (i.e.,

Y-5 pattern of human molars).

• Explain how dental records are used to identify human remains.

Human Osteology: A Lab and Field Manual No. 2,

William Bass

Anatomy Coloring Book, 3 rd

ed., Wynn Kapit

Anatomy Coloring Book, 3 rd ed., Wynn Kapit

Human Osteology: A Lab and Field Manual No. 2,

William Bass

KEY VOCABULARY:

bone process sinus superior inferior anterior posterior

SKILLS FOCUS:

articulate foramen distal proximal

compare and contrast, classify

Construct scale models, maps and appropriately labeled diagrams to communicate scientific knowledge.

(I&E-7 4d)

LABS / DEMOS:

Skeletal Identification

Use anatomy coloring book to identify the bones of the skeleton.

Use numbered skeleton model for an identification practicum

KEY VOCABULARY:

odentology wisdom teeth molars incisors maxilla canine mandible labial primary teeth secondary teeth enamel crowns / caps bridges fillings lingual arcade bite mark

SKILLS FOCUS:

observe, identify, infer, compare and contrast, classify

Use a variety of print and electronic resources (including the World Wide

Web) to collect information and evidence as part of a research project.

(I&E-7 4b)

LABS / DEMOS:

Odentology Research

Research actual cases of the use of forensic odentology to identify the remains of missing people.

Right Bite

Students make impressions of their teeth and trace them onto a transparency. Students then switch and identify which bite marks belong to whom.

Middle School Forensic Science

Page 7

Skeletal System

Topics

Analysis of Age, Sex,

Ancestry, and Stature

Task Analysis

“Students know and are able to …”

Adopted Textbook

Correlation(s) Connections

AGE

• Estimate the age of skeletal remains based on number of teeth, tooth wear, and types of dental work.

• Estimate the age of skeletal remains based on the size, length, amount and pattern of wear, and density of bones.

• Explain how the sutures on the skull and growth plates develop over time.

SEX

• Identify differences in pelvic bones in males and females.

• Explain how bone size and shape can help identify gender.

• Distinguish between male and female bone processes

(i.e., occipital and mandibular).

OTHER CONCLUSIONS

• Describe other evidence from skeletal analysis can lead to conclusions about the lifestyle and history an individual.

(Note: While is possible to identify details of skull structure that can help identify ancestry, it is not recommended to go into this with students at this level.)

Human Osteology: A Lab and Field Manual No. 2,

William Bass

Anatomy Coloring Book, 3 rd ed., Wynn Kapit

KEY VOCABULARY:

analysis sutures pelvis pubic symphasis growth plates sex occipital protuberance sciatic notch ilium sacrum mastoid process epiphysis calipers supraorbital tori (torus)

SKILLS FOCUS:

observe, identify, infer, measure, analyze, compare and contrast, classify,

Select and use appropriate tools and technology (including calculators, computers, balances, spring scales, microscopes, and binoculars) to perform tests, collect data, and display data.

(I&E-7 4a)

LABS / DEMOS:

• Using skeletal models (and X-rays if available), practice determining age, sex, and ancestry.

Soft Tissue

Topics

Taphonomy

(Organ Systems)

Task Analysis

“Students know and are able to …”

Adopted Textbook

Correlation(s) Connections

Students know organ systems function because of the contributions of individual organs, tissues, and cells. The failure of any part can affect the entire system.

(CA-7 3b)

• Identify and locate major body organs.

• Describe the general function and major components the following body systems:

 musculo-skeletal system

 circulatory system

 nervous system

 lymphatic system

 digestive system

 reproductive system

Physiology Coloring Book,

Wynn Kapit

Anatomy Coloring Book, 3 rd ed., Wynn Kapit

Focus on LS, Prentice Hall

KEY VOCABULARY:

organs synapses lymph decomposition

SKILLS FOCUS:

observe, identify, recall

Construct scale models, maps and appropriately labeled diagrams to communicate scientific knowledge.

(I&E-7 4d)

LABS / DEMOS:

• Using anatomy and physiology coloring books to identigy organ systems

Appx

Time

(per 90 days)

Appx

Time

(per 90 days)

Middle School Forensic Science

Page 8

Soft Tissue

Topics

Toxicology

Pattern Injury

Recognition

Task Analysis

“Students know and are able to …”

• Identify common toxins, infectious agents, and metabolic byproducts forensic scientists look for.

• Recall tissue samples commonly extracted for toxic analysis.

• Explain why certain tissues are chosen for analysis.

• Describe the common tests performed determine amounts of toxins in the body.

• Recognize puncture, cut, and blunt trauma wounds.

• Determine possible weapons/objects that match observed injuries.

• Identify how the direction of impacts can be determined from internal tissue damage.

Adopted Textbook

Correlation(s)

Detective Science: 40

Crime Solving, Case

Breaking, Crook Catching

Activities for Kids, Jim

Wiese

GEMS: Crime Lab

Chemistry

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

toxin infectious metabolic byproduct

SKILLS FOCUS:

experimentation, analyze, application, infer

Communicate the logical connection among hypothesis, science concepts, tests conducted, data collected, and conclusions drawn from the scientific evidence.

(I&E-7 4c)

KEY VOCABULARY:

puncture blunt trauma wound

SKILLS FOCUS:

experimentation, analyze, application, infer

Plan and conduct a scientific investigation to test a hypothesis.

(I&E-8 9a)

LABS / DEMOS:

Pattern Injury Recognition

Using various objects that could be used for weapons, match them to injury patterns on an object (i.e. animal remains obtained from a butcher)

Forensic Anthropology & Autopsy

Topics

Body Removal /

Excavation

Task Analysis

“Students know and are able to …”

• Identify the people and roles involved in body removal.

• Describe the tools and methods used in body removal.

• Discuss the ethics related to respectful treatment of human remains.

Adopted Textbook

Correlation(s)

Human Osteology: A Lab and Field Manual No. 2,

William Bass

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

excavation ethics

SKILLS FOCUS:

selecting appropriate tools, organizing, evaluating

Select and use appropriate tools and technology (including calculators, computers, balances, spring scales, microscopes, and binoculars) to perform tests, collect data, and display data.

(I&E-7 4a)

LABS / DEMOS:

Excavation lab

Students will use various excavation tools to uncover animal bones and remove them from various burial materials

Guest Speaker:

Forensic Anthropologist, L.A. County

Appx

Time

(per 90 days)

Appx

Time

(per 90 days)

Middle School Forensic Science

Page 9

Forensic Anthropology & Autopsy

Topics

Autopsy

Task Analysis

“Students know and are able to …”

Adopted Textbook

Correlation(s)

• Identify the legal reasons for performing autopsies.

• Recall that pathologists are ultimately looking for cause(s) of death.

• Identify religious and cultural objections that people may have to performing an autopsy.

Video: “Death Detectives:

LA County Coroner” www.

Pathguy.com/autopsy.htm www.autopsy-md.com

“History of Forensics”

DNA

Topics

Task Analysis

“Students know and are able to …”

Adopted Textbook

Correlation(s)

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

autopsy medicolegal tissue sample

SKILLS FOCUS:

observe, communicate

Connections

Appx

Time

(per 90 days)

Appx

Time

(per 90 days)

Heredity

Note: Be sure to assess prior knowledge. It will likely save you instructional time.

DNA Fingerprinting

Students know sexual reproduction produces offspring that inherit half their genes from each parent.

• Illustrate how sexual

(CA-7 2b) reproduction combines genetic material from two distinct cells to form a new and unique combination.

Students know the nucleus is the repository for genetic information in plant and animal cells.

(CA-7 1c)

• Explain that DNA molecules contain a unique code, or

“blueprint”, for every organism, which allows DNA fingerprinting.

• Explain how family relationships can be identified from patterns found in DNA.

Illustrate that fingerprints are not only formed by genetics but also from environmental factors.

Students know DNA

(deoxyribonucleic acid) is the genetic material of living organisms and is located in the chromosomes of each cell.

(CA-7 2c)

• Explain that cells are used to collect DNA samples.

• Identify the various tissues used to collect cells (i.e. blood, hair, saliva, etc.).

• Identify different test scientists use to create a DNA fingerprint.

Discuss the history of DNA fingerprinting, it’s acceptability in court cases, the impact it has on modern court cases, and its implications in reopening cold cases.

Focus on LS, Prentice Hall

LHS GEMS: Fingerprinting

Court TV.com- “Renters

Beware”

Detective Science: 40

Crime Solving, Case

Breaking, Crook Catching

Activities for Kids, Jim

Wiese

Court TV.com- “The

Cafeteria Caper”

LHS GEMS: Mystery

Festival, p.169- 185

KEY VOCABULARY:

heredity deoxyribonucleic acid

SKILLS FOCUS:

experimentation, analyze, application, infer

Select and use appropriate tools and technology (including calculators, computers, balances, spring scales, microscopes, and binoculars) to perform tests, collect data, and display data.

(I&E-7 4a)

LABS / DEMOS:

• LHS GEMS: Fingerprinting

• Court TV- “Renters Beware”

KEY VOCABULARY:

genetic markers enzyme electrophoresis

SKILLS FOCUS:

experimentation, analyze, application, infer

Select and use appropriate tools and technology (including calculators, computers, balances, spring scales, microscopes, and binoculars) to perform tests, collect data, and display data.

(I&E-7 4a)

.

LABS / DEMOS:

• Using DNA electroforesis to create a fingerprint.

• CourtTV- “The Cafeteria Caper”

Trajectory

Topics

Ballistics

Middle School Forensic Science

Page 10

Task Analysis

“Students know and are able to …”

Adopted Textbook

Correlation(s)

Students know position is defined in relation to some choice of a standard reference point and a set of reference directions.

(CA-8 1a)

• Measure positions, distances and directions of projectiles in relation to a standard reference point using meter sticks or rulers.

• Track the motion of projectiles in a twodimensional (x,y) coordinate system.

Students know that average speed is the total distance traveled divided by the total time elapsed and that the speed of an object along the path traveled can vary.

(CA-8 1b)

• Recall that the International

System of Units is used in calculations.

• Calculate speed of projectiles using distance traveled and elapsed time.

• Calculate average speeds of projectiles using total distance and length of entire trip.

Students know changes in velocity may be due to changes in speed, direction, or both.

(CA-8 1c)

• Observe changes in speed of projectiles due to gravity, friction, and other forces.

• Change conditions of the traveling projectile to see the affects on speed.

Detective Science: 40

Crime Solving, Case

Breaking, Crook Catching

Activities for Kids, Jim

Wiese

CourtTV.com- “The

Celebration”

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

projectile ballistics caliber gauge

SKILLS FOCUS:

Construct appropriate graphs from data and develop quantitative statements about the relationships between variables. (I&E-8 9e)

Apply simple mathematic relationships to determine a missing quantity in a mathematic expression, given the two remaining terms.

(I&E-

8 9f)

LABS / DEMOS:

Trajectory

Using a model (i.e. very thick foam rubber) with bullet holes from different angles, have students calculate the angles at which the bullets hit the object

CourtTV.com- “The Celebration”

Guest Speaker:

LBPD Crime Lab

LBPD Homicide Detective

Appx

Time

(per 90 days)

Trajectory

Topics

Ballistics – cont.

Blood Spatter

Middle School Forensic Science

Page 11

Task Analysis

“Students know and are able to …”

Adopted Textbook

Correlation(s)

Students know a force has both direction and magnitude.

(CA-8 2a)

Calculate the forces acting on an object in the same line.

Calculate the forces acting on an object at different angles using the x,y,z axes.

Students know the greater the mass of an object, the more force is needed to achieve the same rate of change in motion.

(CA-8 2e)

Explain that different projectiles using various force can inflict different injury patterns.

Discuss terms used with bullet sizes and amount of force and speed associated with each.

Detective Science: 40

Crime Solving, Case

Breaking, Crook Catching

Activities for Kids, Jim

Wiese

CourtTV.com- “The

Celebration”

• Explain that the trajectory of a projectile can be determined by blood spatter patterns

• Describe methods used by crime scene investigators to determine origin and directionality of blood spatter

• Identify chemicals and tools used to locate blood spatter where an attempt to clean has been made.

Detective Science: 40

Crime Solving, Case

Breaking, Crook Catching

Activities for Kids, Jim

Wiese

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

projectile ballistics caliber gauge

SKILLS FOCUS:

Construct appropriate graphs from data and develop quantitative statements about the relationships between variables.

(I&E-8 9e)

Apply simple mathematic relationships to determine a missing quantity in a mathematic expression, given the two remaining terms

(including speed = distance/time, density = mass/volume, force = pressure x area, volume = area x height).

(I&E-8 9f)

LABS / DEMOS:

Trajectory

Using a model (i.e. very thick foam rubber) with bullet holes from different angles, have students calculate the angles at which the bullets hit the object

CourtTV.com- “The Celebration”

Guest Speaker:

LBPD Crime Lab

LBPD Homicide Detective

KEY VOCABULARY:

blood spatter trajectory

SKILLS FOCUS:

Construct appropriate graphs from data and develop quantitative statements about the relationships between variables.

(I&E-8 9e)

Apply simple mathematic relationships to determine a missing quantity in a mathematic expression, given the two remaining terms

(including speed = distance/time, density = mass/volume, force = pressure x area, volume = area x height).

(I&E-8 9f)

LABS / DEMOS:

Blood Spatter

Using paint to mimic blood, have students create spatter patterns and measure angles at which the paint hit the background object

Appx

Time

(per 90 days)

Middle School Forensic Science

Page 12

Court Testimony

Topics

Presentation of

Evidence

Task Analysis

“Students know and are able to …”

Adopted Textbook

Correlation(s)

• Discuss how evidence is presented in court to support a case.

• Identify the difference between circumstantial and

“hard” evidence.

• Discuss the term, “beyond a reasonable doubt” and what it should imply to jury verdicts.

• Demonstrate correct methods of giving testimony during hearings.

Detective Science: 40

Crime Solving, Case

Breaking, Crook Catching

Activities for Kids, Jim

Wiese

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

circumstantial physical evidence hearsay verdict testimony

SKILLS FOCUS:

infer, communicate, analyze data

Communicate the steps and results from an investigation in written reports and verbal presentations.

(I&E-7 4e)

LABS / DEMOS:

Court Testimony

Have students present evidence and give testimony for a fabricated court hearing.

Chemical Reactions

Topics

Crime Scene

Chemistry

Task Analysis

“Students know and are able to …”

Adopted Textbook

Correlation(s) Connections

Reactant atoms and molecules interact to form products with different chemical properties.

(CA-8 5,a)

• Demonstrate the use of chromatography to separate substances in mixtures.

• Explain methods used to identify chemicals and substances found at crime scenes.

• Demonstrate methods of collecting substances found at crime scenes.

Focus on Physical Science,

Prentice Hall

GEMS: Crime Lab

Chemistry

Court TV.com: “It’s Magic” and “Renters Beware”

KEY VOCABULARY:

acid base salt pH chemical property physical property flame test mixture solution chromatography solubility pigments

SKILLS FOCUS:

experimentation, analyzing data making inferences

Plan and conduct a scientific investigation to test a hypothesis.

LABS / DEMOS:

(I&E-8 9a)

• LHS GEMS: Crime Lab Chemistry

• Court TV: “It’s Magic” and “Renters

Beware”

Guest Speaker:

LBPD Crime Lab

Appx

Time

(per 90 days)

Appx

Time

(per 90 days)

Middle School Forensic Science

Page 13

APPLICATION OF COURSE CONTENT:

Career Connection:

Related Major Skills & Characteristics – objective observation, careful measurement, curiosity, problem

solving, organizational skills, numerical reasoning, ability to analyze & interpret data, critical thinking, reading comprehension, concise and accurate communication skills, computer literacy, logical thinking, team skills, testing skills, practical safety, awareness, evidence evaluating

Related Careers – Students who continue in the forensic sciences can prepare for the following careers:

Analytical Chemist

Autopsy Technician

Ballistics Technician

Biochemist

Biologist

Biotechnologist

Botanist

Cell Biologist

Crime Scene Investigator

Criminalist

Cytogeneticist

Fire Fighter

Forensic Anthropologist

Geologist

Geneticist

Lawyer

Materials Scientist

Medical Researcher

Microbiologist

Mortician

Nurse

Paleontologist

Pathologist

Physician

Physicist

Physiologist

Police Officer

Professor

Radiologist

Science Fiction Writer

Security Guard

Teacher

METHODS:

Lesson Design & Delivery: Teachers will incorporate these components of lesson design during direct

instruction and inquiry activities. The order of components is flexible, depending on the teacher’s vision for the individual lesson. For instance, the objective and purpose, while present in the teacher’s lesson plan, are not made known to the students at the beginning of an inquiry lesson.

Essential

Elements of

Effective

Instruction

Model for Lesson Design Using

Task Analysis

Anticipatory Set

Objective

Standard Reference

Purpose

Input

Modeling

Check for Understanding

Guided Practice

Closure

Independent Practice

Some components may occur once in a lesson, but others will recur many times. Checking for understanding occurs continually; input, modeling, guided practice and closure may occur several times.

There may even be more than one anticipatory set when more than one content piece is introduced.

Active Participation: Teachers will incorporate the principles of active participation and specific

strategies to ensure consistent, simultaneous involvement of the minds of all learners in the classroom.

Teachers should include both covert and overt active participation strategies, incorporating cooperative learning structures and brain research. Some of the possible active participation strategies include:

COVERT

• Recall

• Imagine

• Observe

• Consider

OVERT

(Oral)

• Pair/Share

• Idea Wave

• Choral Response

• Give One, Get One

• “Foggiest” point

• Socratic Seminar

• Cooperative Discussion

Groups (i.e.Talking Chips,

Gambit Chips)

OVERT

(Written)

• Restate in Journals / Notes

• Response Boards

• Graphic Organizers

• Folded Paper

• Ticket Out of Class

OVERT

(Gestures)

• Hand Signals

• Model with Manipulatives

• Stand up/ Sit down

• Point to Examples

Middle School Forensic Science

Page 14

Baldrige Quality Tools

:

Students can become more positively involved in their education through goal setting, self-assessment, and data tracking and analysis by making use of the following strategies:

BALDRIGE TOOL PURPOSES

Affinity Diagram

Flowchart

Force Field Diagram

Issues / Ideas Bin

– finding consensus, organizing complex information

– describing a process, planning a project, identifying problem steps in a process

– identifying obstacles, finding causes and solutions to problems

– handling individual questions/requests without stopping a group activity, providing anonymous input, obtaining diverse input in specific areas.

Data Folder – tracking goals and actual results

Plus / Delta – tracking improvement efforts, identifying opportunities for change, finding out what’s working and what’s not working in a process, procedure, activity, etc.

Class Data Graphs – displaying trends for goal setting

Learning styles and learning challenges of your students may be addressed by implementing combinations of the following:

Reading Strategies in Science

 Learning Logs

 Pre-teaching

 Vocabulary

 Pre-reading

 Text Structures

 Trail Markers

 Reciprocal Teaching

 Functional Text

SDAIE Strategies for English

Learners

 Tapping/Building Prior

Knowledge (Graphic

Organizers, Schema)

 Grouping Strategies

 Multiple Intelligences

 Adapt the Text

 Interactive Learning

(Manipulatives, Visuals)

 Acquisition Levels

 Language Sensitivity

 Lower the Affective Filter

(including Processing Time)

Significant, Proven Science Strategies for ALL Science Students

 Hands-On Labs

 Inquiry Activities

 Short/Long-term projects

 Essential Questions

 Written/Oral Presentations  Summarization

 Home/School Connection

(including Cultural Aspects)

Differentiation for Advanced

Learners

 Curriculum Compacting

 Tiered Assignments

 Flexible Grouping

 Acceleration

 Depth and Complexity

 Independent Study

 Current Events

 Peer Teaching

 Guest Speakers

Please note that these strategies often overlap and should not be limited to specifically defined courses or student populations.

MATERIALS:

Basic Textbook:

Focus on Physical Science,

Glencoe Science © 2007

Supplemental Texts:

Physiology Coloring Book, Wynn Kapit

Anatomy Coloring Book, 3 rd

ed., Wynn Kapit

Focus on Life Science,

Glencoe Science © 2007

Detective Science: 40 Crime Solving,

Case Breaking, Crook Catching

Activities for Kids, Jim Wiese

LHS GEMS: Mystery Festival, LHS GEMS © 1994

Fingerprinting, LHS GEMS © 1993

Crime Lab Chemistry, LHS GEMS © 1993

Human Osteology: A Lab and Field Manual, William

Bass

Middle School Forensic Science

Page 15

Supplementary Materials:

eguidance.com web site for exploring careers safety equipment: goggles, latex gloves, fire extinguisher glassware: flasks, beakers, test tubes, etc. measuring devices: triple beam balance, rulers, volumetric containers chemical reagents microscopes, microviewers, hand lenses, dissection equipment appropriate technology

 Many items are available through Science/Math Resource Center (SMRC).

Resources:

Documents

Science Framework: ................................ http://www.cde.ca.gov/re/pn/fd/sci-frame-dwnld.asp

CST / NCLB Test Blueprints: ............................ http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sr/blueprints.asp

CST Reference Sheets: ...................................... http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sr/cstsciref.asp

National Science Standards: .................... http://www.nap.edu/readingroom/books/nses/html/

Science Safety Handbook for CA Public Schools (1999) can be ordered from the CDE at .................................... http://www.cde.ca.gov/re/pn/rc/

LBUSD Approved Chemicals List

,

Chemical Hygiene Plan

, and

Science Fair

Resources: http://www.lbusd.k12.ca.us/curriculum/Curriculum%20Services/Science/science.htm

District Offices

Science Curriculum Office

(562) 997-8000 (ext. 2963) o

K-12 science standards, curriculum, professional development, science fair

Science / Math Resource Center (SMRC)

(562) 997-8000 (ext. 2964) o hands-on materials, consumable material orders, alternative standards-based curriculum packets

Instructional Materials Workshop (IMW) o standards-based instructional materials o content integrated instructional materials o monthly theme-based literacy supplements for science

(562) 997-8000 (ext. 2965) o wood shop / lumber room o copying, enlarging, and laminating

Office of Multimedia Services (OMS)

(562) 997-8000 (ext. 7145) o videos for check out to fit the curriculum (see your librarian for current catalogs) o district TV channels programming

PALMS Office

Program Assistance for

Language Minority Students

(562) 997-8000 (ext. 8031) o technical assistance and professional development for English Language Development (ELD) and Specially

Designed Academic Instruction In English (SDAIE) o assistance in the implementation and maintenance of programs addressing the needs of English Language

Learners (ELLs)

Health Curriculum Office o curriculum and training for mandated health content

(562) 997-8000 (ext. 2967)

Middle School Forensic Science

Page 16

EVALUATION: Student achievement in this course will be measured using multiple assessment tools.

Assessments will be used for diagnosing student understanding before instruction, monitoring student learning during instruction, and evaluating student understanding after instruction.

Suggested Evaluation Tools:

Source

District Developed

Assessments

Science Explorer:

Focus on Life Science

Teacher Developed

Assessments

Diagnose

Discover Activities

Engage/Explore

Pre-quiz

Pre-Test

Vocab. Knowledge Rating

Monitor

Open-Ended Science

Performance Task

Checkpoint Questions

Skills Labs

Real-World Labs

Caption Questions

Section Review

Unit Resource Worksheets

Guided Reading & Study

Workbook

Warm-Up

Quiz

Proving Behavior

Lab

Evaluate

Chapter Assessment

Chapter Projects

Chapter & Unit Tests

Rubric Scored Projects, Labs, and

Writings

Chapter / Unit Test

Practicum

Semester Final Exam

Suggested Grade Weighting:

(with some possible examples)

1. Assessment o objective tests including comprehensive finals o performance tasks (rubric scored) o open-ended questions (rubric scored) o portfolios o student self-evaluations

~30%

2. Homework o discovery assignments o assignments reinforcing class lesson o essays o organization o research

3. Labs o lab reports o active participation

4. Projects o science fair projects o research-based reports and projects not more than 10%

5. Classwork o note taking skills o organization skills o oral presentations o individual and group projects and assessments

~20%

~20%

~20%

Standard Grading Scale:

Advanced Proficient

Proficient

...........................................................................................................................................

Not Proficient

A 90 – 100%

...........................................................................................................................................

B 80 – 89%

C 70 – 79%

....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Partial Proficient D 60 – 69%

F 0 – 59%

Submitted by: Rachel Murillo

School:

Date:

Hill Middle School

9/13/04 mscourse/science/msforensicscience

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