Body-Solid FID 46, FID46, SBL460P4 Owner's manual

Body-Solid FID 46, FID46, SBL460P4 Owner's manual
by
Body-Solid
®
FID46
Flat/Incline/Decline
Bench
of Contents
Contents
Table
Table of
Safety
Safety
SafetyInstructions
Instructions
Instructions
p.
p.
Instructions
p.
Safety
Safety
Safety
Instructions .....................................................................................p.
p.3313333
Assembly
Instructions
pp.3-10
.3-10
.3-10
Assembly
Assembly
Instructions
2-10
AssemblyInstructions
Instructions............................................................pppp.
.3-10
.3-10
Warning,
Warning,
Warning,
Safety
Safety
Maintenance
Maintenance
p.
p.
11
11
Warning,
Warning,
Warning,Safety
Safety
Safety
Safety&
&&
&&
&Maintenance
Maintenance
Maintenance
Maintenance ....................................p.
p.
p.
p.11
11
11
11
Safety
Safety
Guidelines
Guidelines
p.
p.
12
12
Safety
Guidelines
p.
12
Safety
SafetyGuidelines
Guidelines .....................................................................................p.
p.12
12
Phrases,
Phrases,
Terms,
Terms,
Tips
Tips
&&&
Guidelines
Guidelines
.p.
.p.
13-14
13-14
Phrases,
Terms,
Tips
Guidelines
.p.
13-14
Phrases,
Phrases,Terms,
Terms,Tips
Tips&
&Guidelines
Guidelines ......p.
.p.13-14
13-14
Nutrition
.p.
15
Nutrition
Nutrition
.p.
15
Nutrition .................................................................................................p.
.p.15
15
Exercise
Exercise
Exercise
Prescription
Prescription
.p.
.p.
16
16
Exercise
Exercise
ExercisePrescription
Prescription
Prescription
Prescription .....................................................................................p.
.p.
.p.
.p.16
16
16
16
Training
Training
Tips
Tips
.p.
.p.
17
17
Training
Tips
.p.
17
Training
TrainingTips
Tips .....................................................................................................p.
.p.17
17
Common
Common
Training
Training
Mistakes
Mistakes
.p.
.p.
18
18
Common
Training
Mistakes
.p.
18
Common
CommonTraining
TrainingMistakes
Mistakes ..............................................p.
.p.18
18
Setting
Up
Your
Personal
Program
.p.19
Setting
Setting
Up
Your
Personal
Program
.p.19
SettingUp
UpYour
YourPersonal
PersonalProgram
Program .................p.19
.p.19
Deterine
Deterine
Deterine
Your
Your
Training
Training
Training
Method
Method
Method
...........................................p.
.p.
.p.
20
20
Determine
Your
Training
Method
Deterine
Deterine
DeterineYour
Your
Your
Your
Training
Training
Training
Method
Method
Method
.p.
.p.
.p.20
20
20
20
Exercise
Exercise
Tips
Tips
Tips
.p.
.p.
.p.
21
21
21
Exercise
Exercise
ExerciseTips
Tips
Tips .........................................................................................................................p.
.p.
.p.21
21
21
Anatomy
Anatomy
Chart
Chart
Chart
.p.
.p.
.p.
22
22
22
Anatomy
Anatomy
AnatomyChart
Chart
Chart ...................................................................................................................p.
.p.
.p.22
22
22
Fitness
Goals
Goals
.p.
.p.
23
23
Fitness
Fitness
FitnessGoals
Goals
Goals .....................................................................................................p.
.p.
.p.23
23
23
Exercise
Exercise
Exercise
Log
Log
.p.
.p.
24-26
24-26
Logs
Exercise
Exercise
ExerciseLog
Log
Log
Log .............................................................................................................p.
.p.
.p.
.p.24-26
24-26
24-26
24-26
Stretching
Stretching
&&
&&
Flexibility
Flexibility
Flexibility
.p.
.p.
.p.
27
27
27
Stretching
Stretching
Stretching&
&Flexibility
Flexibility
Flexibility .........................................................................p.
.p.
.p.27
27
27
Stretching
Stretching
Stretching
&&
&&
Warm-Up
Warm-Up
Warm-Up
Cool-Down
Cool-Down
Cool-Down
.p.
.p.
28-37
28-37
Stretching:
.p.
28-37
Stretching
Stretching
Stretching&
&Warm-Up
Warm-Up
Warm-Up
Warm-Up/ //Cool-Down
////Cool-Down
Cool-Down
Cool-Down. .p.
.p.28-37
28-37
Build
The
Ultimate
Fitness
Center
.p.
38
Build
Build
The
Ultimate
Fitness
Center
.p.
38
BuildThe
TheUltimate
UltimateFitness
FitnessCenter
Center .................p.
.p.38
38
Notes
Notes
Notes
.p.
.p.
39-40
39-40
Notes
Notes
Notes ...........................................................................................................................................p.
.p.
.p.
.p.39-40
39-40
39-40
39-40
Reference
Reference
Drawings
Drawings
p.
p.
p.
41-42
41-42
41-42
Reference
Drawings
. 41-42
.41-42
p. 41
Reference
ReferenceDrawings
Drawings .............................................................p.
p.
p.
41-42
Hardware
Hardware
Diagrams
Diagrams
p.
p.
42-43
42-43
Hardware
Diagrams
p.
42-43
Hardware
HardwareDiagrams
Diagrams .................................................................p.
p.42-43
42-43
Mainframe
Parts
List,
Mainframe
Mainframe
Parts
List,
MainframeParts
PartsList,
List,
Hardware
Hardware
Hardware
Parts
Parts
List,
List,
Pads
Pads
List
List
Hardware
Hardware
HardwareParts
Parts
Parts
PartsList,
List,
List,
List,Pads
Pads
Pads
PadsList
List
List
List&
&&
&&
&
Labels
Labels
Decals
Decals
List
List
p.
p.
44
44
Labels
Decals
List
p.
44
Labels
Labels/////Decals
DecalsList
List ...........................................................................p.
p.44
44
Exploded
Exploded
View
View
Diagram
Diagram
p.
p.
45
45
Exploded
View
Diagram
p.
45
Exploded
ExplodedView
ViewDiagram
Diagram ............................................................p.
p.45
45
F I D 4 6
A s s e m b l y
O W N E R ’S
&
I n s t r u c t i o n s
M A N U A L
I m p o r t a n t
S a f e t y
I n s t r u c t i o n s
Before beginning any fitness program, you should obtain a complete physical examination from your physician.
Il est conseille de subir un examen medical complet avant d’entreprendre tout programme d’exercise.
Si vous avez des etourdissements ou des faiblesses, arretez les exercices immediatement.
Antes de comenzar cualquier programma de ejercicios, deberias tener un examen fisico con su doctor.
The PowerLIFT FID Bench is designed for your
enjoyment. By following these precautions and
using common sense, you will have many safe and
pleasurable hours of healthful exercise with your
Body-Solid PowerLIFT bench.
When using exercise equipment, you
should always take basic precautions,
including the following:
• Read all instructions before using the PowerLIFT
FID Bench. These instructions are written to ensure
your safety and to protect the unit.
After assembly, you should check all functions to
ensure correct operation. If you experience problems,
first recheck the assembly instructions to locate any
possible errors made during assembly. If you are unable
to correct the problem, call the dealer from whom
you purchased the bench or call 1-800-556-3113 for
the dealer nearest you.
• Do not allow children on or near the equipment.
• Use the equipment only for its intended purpose as
described in this guide. Do not use accessory
attachments that are not recommended by the
manufacturer. Such attachments might cause injuries.
• Wear proper exercise clothing and shoes for your
workout—no loose clothing.
• Use care when getting on or off the unit.
Obtaining Service
• Do not overexert yourself or work to exhaustion.
Please use this Owner’s Manual to make sure that all
parts have been included in your shipment. When
ordering parts, you must use the part number and
description from this Owner’s Manual. Use only
Body-Solid replacement parts when servicing this
bench. Failure to do so will void your warranty and
could result in personal injury.
• If you feel any pain or abnormal symptoms, stop your
workout immediately and consult your physician.
• Never operate unit when it has been dropped or
damaged. Return the equipment to a service center
for examination and repair.
• Never drop or insert objects into any opening in the
equipment.
For information about product operation or service,
check out the official Body-Solid website at
www.bodysolid.com or contact an authorized
Body-Solid dealer or a Body-Solid factory-authorized
service company or contact Body-Solid customer
service at one of the following:
• Always check the unit before each use. Make sure
that all fasteners and pop pin are secure and in
good working condition.
• Do not use the equipment outdoors or near water.
• Always use collar on weight plate post.
Toll Free:
Phone:
Fax:
E-mail:
Personal Safety During Assembly
• It is strongly recommended that a qualified dealer
assemble the equipment.
1-800-556-3113
1-708-427-3555 ext. 5
1-708-427-3598
[email protected]
• Before beginning assembly, please take the time to
read the instructions thoroughly.
Or write to: Body-Solid, Inc.
Service Department
1900 S. Des Plaines Ave.
Forest Park, IL 60130 USA
• Read each step in the assembly instructions and
follow the steps in sequence. Do not skip ahead. If
you skip ahead, you may learn later that you have to
disassemble components and that you may have
damaged the equipment.
Retain this Owner’s Manual for future
reference. Part numbers are required
when ordering parts.
Be careful to assemble all components in
the sequence presented in this guide.
• Assemble and operate the PowerLIFT FID Bench on
a solid, level surface. Locate the unit a few feet from
the walls or furniture to provide easy access.
1
A s s e m b l y
I n s t r u c t i o n s
You must review and follow the instructions in this Owner’s Manual. If you do not assemble and use the
PowerLIFT FID Bench according to these guidelines, you could void the Body-Solid warranty.
Assembly of the PowerLIFT FID Bench takes professional installers about 45 minutes to complete. If this is
the first time you have assembled this type of equipment, plan on significantly more time.
Professional installers are recommended.
However, if you acquire the appropriate tools and follow the assembly steps sequentially, the process will take
time, but is fairly easy.
Required Tools
Assembly Tips
The tools that you must obtain before assembling
the PowerLIFT FID Bench include:
• The PowerLIFT FID Bench comes in one box. Be
careful to assemble components in the sequence
presented in this guide.
6mm Hex Key (you need two)
• With so many assembled parts, proper alignment and
adjustment is critical. While tightening the nuts and
bolts, be sure to leave room for adjustments.
14mm Open-End Wrench
17mm Open-End Wrench
14mm Box Wrench
17mm Box Wrench
• Read all “Notes” on each page before beginning
each step.
Installation Requirements
• While you may be able to assemble the PowerLIFT
bench using the illustrations only, important safety
notes and other tips are included in the text.
Follow these installation requirements when assembling
the PowerLIFT FID Bench:
• Fill out and mail warranty card.
IMPORTANT!
• Set up the PowerLIFT bench on a solid, flat surface.
A smooth, flat surface under the bench helps keep it
level. A level bench has fewer malfunctions.
• Before you begin you should fold out pages 42 and 43.
This is a quick reference guide that shows all hardware
parts (in actual size) along with the corresponding
key numbers on the assembly instructions.
• Provide ample space around the bench. Open
space around the bench allows for easier access.
• Insert all bolts in the same direction. For aesthetic
purposes, insert all bolts in the same direction
unless specified (in text or illustrations) to do otherwise.
• Leave room for adjustments. Tighten fasteners such as
bolts, nuts, and screws so the unit is stable, but leave
room for adjustments. Do not fully tighten fasteners
until instructed in the assembly steps to do so.
Do not fully tighten bolts until
instructed to do so.
CAUTION: Obtain assistance! Do not attempt to assemble
the PowerLIFT Gym by yourself. Review the Installation
Requirements before proceeding with the following steps.
Note: Due to continuing product improvements, specifications and
designs are subject to change without notice.
Even though we have prepared this manual with extreme care, neither the
publisher nor the author can accept responsibility for any errors in, or
omission from, the information given.
2
STEP
1
Be careful to assemble all components
in the sequence they are presented.
IMPORTANT! Before you begin you should
fold-out pages 42 and 43.
This is a quick reference guide that shows all hardware parts (in actual size)
along with the corresponding key numbers on the assembly instructions.
A.
Attach front leg (A) to mainframe (B) with brace plate (D) as shown using:
two 29 (square neck carriage bolt 10mm x 95mm)
two 36 (flat washer 10mm)
two 32 (nylon lock nut 10mm)
B.
Attach back leg (C) to mainframe (B) with brace plate (D) as shown using:
two 29 (square neck carriage bolt 10mm x 95mm)
two 36 (flat washer 10mm)
two 32 (nylon lock nut 10mm)
C.
Attach chrome adjustment tube (F) to the front of the mainframe (B) with the adjustment holes facing
out on the left side as shown. Use the following:
one 24 (hex bolt 10mm x 80mm partial thread)
two 36 (flat washer 10mm)
one 32 (nylon lock nut 10mm)
D.
Slide adjustment carriage (E) over chrome adjustment tube (F) as shown with the pop pin knob on the left
side of the bench. (You may have to unscrew the pop pin to slide it on to the chrome adjustment tube).
E.
Attach seat pivot (G) to mainframe (B) using:
one 23 (hex bolt 10mm x 110mm partial thread)
two 36 (flat washer 10mm)
one 32 (nylon lock nut 10mm)
mm
Inch
3
STEP
1
4
STEP
2
Be careful to assemble all components
in the sequence they are presented.
A.
See Note 1. Install 210mm (8 1/4”) long bolt (21) thru left side of seat brace (H), and then seat pivot (G), and
then thru right side seat brace (H), using the center hole on each seat brace as shown. Use the following:
one 21 (hex bolt 10mm x 210mm partial thread)
two 36 (flat washer 10mm)
one 32 (nylon lock nut 10mm)
B.
See Note 2. Install 165mm (6 1/2”) bolt (22) thru the lower hole on the left side of back brace (J),
and then thru the adjustment carriage (E), and then thru the right side of back brace (J) as shown using:
one 22 (hex bolt 10mm x 165mm partial thread)
two 36 (flat washer 10mm)
one 32 (nylon lock nut 10mm)
C.
See Note 3. Install 165mm (6 1/2") bolt (22) thru left side of back brace (J), and thru back pivot on
mainframe (B), and then thru right side of back brace (J) as shown using:
one 22 (hex bolt 10mm x 165mm partial thread)
two 36 (flat washer 10mm)
one 32 (nylon lock nut 10mm)
D.
See Note 4. Connect seat braces (H) and back braces (J). Install as shown and described using:
two 25 (hex bolt 10mm x 60mm partial thread)
four 36 (flat washer 10mm)
two 32 (nylon lock nut 10mm)
mm
Inch
5
STEP
2
6
STEP
3
Be careful to assemble all components
in the sequence they are presented.
A.
See Note 1. Install all four handles (K, L, M, and N) on to seat braces (H) and back braces (J).
Install as shown and described using:
eight 26 (hex bolt 10mm x 40mm full thread)
sixteen 36 (flat washer 10mm)
eight 32 (nylon lock nut 10mm)
B.
Install seat pad (P) on to both seat braces (H). Tighten pad bolts to a snug fit. Do not
over-tighten any pad bolts. Over-tightening pad bolts will cause T-nuts in pads to strip out. Install using:
four 30 (hex bolt 8mm x 60mm partial thread)
four 37 (spring lock washer 8mm)
four 38 (flat washer 8mm)
C.
Install back pad (Q) on to both back braces (J). Tighten pad bolts to a snug fit. Do not over-tighten any
pad bolts. Over-tightening pad bolts will cause T-nuts in pads to strip out. Install using:
four 30 (hex bolt 8mm x 60mm partial thread)
four 37 (spring lock washer 8mm)
four 38 (flat washer 8mm)
mm
Inch
7
STEP
3
8
STEP
4
Be careful to assemble all components
in the sequence they are presented.
A.
Slide main post (T) into main post receiver of mainframe (B). Lock in place with adjustment pin (13).
Note: this leg developer main post is adjustable to properly align the pivot point with your knee joint
and accommodate all size users.
B.
Align pivot arm (R) with receiver of main post (T). Install pivot shaft (S) to connect the pivot arm and
main post. Secure as shown by using:
two 28 (round allen head 10mm x 20mm full thread bolt) *
two 35 (spring lock washer 10mm)
two 34 (flat washer 10mm x 30mm)
*Note: You should wrench tighten these bolts now. You will need two 6mm allen wrenches for this step. To lock pivot shaft
in place, use both allen wrenches at the same time and turn them in opposite directions to tighten.
C.
Install Olympic adapter sleeve (8) as shown using:
one 34 (flat washer x 30mm10mm)
one 35 (spring lock washer 10mm)
one 28 (round allen head 10mm x 20mm full thread bolt) Wrench tighten this bolt now.
one 2 (plastic ball-end cap 2”)
one 12 (rubber donut)
D.
See Note 1. Install all three roller pad bars (10) as shown. Install all six foam rollers (9) as shown.
Secure each foam roller in place using round plastic end caps (6).
At this point you should wrench tighten all bolts on the bench and the leg developer.
Do Not wrench tighten any pad bolts.
Congratulations! You are done. After assembly, you should check all functions to ensure correct
operation. If you experience problems, first recheck the assembly instructions to locate any
possible errors made during assembly. If you are unable to correct the problem, call the dealer
from whom you purchased the machine or call 1-800-556-3113 for the dealer nearest you.
Note: If any bolts seem to loosen periodically, use Loctite 242 for a long-term cure.
mm
Inch
9
STEP
4
10
W a r n i n g ,
S a f e t y
&
M a i n t e n a n c e
Be sure that all users carefully read and understand all
warning, safety and maintenance labels on the bench
before each use. Failure to do so may cause serious
injury. It is imperative that you retain this Owner’s Manual
and be sure all warning labels are legible and intact.
Replacement Owner’s Manuals and labels are available
from your local Body-Solid dealer. If you have any
questions about the operation, set up or maintenance of
this bench please call our customer service department
at 1 (800) 556-3113.
!
WA R N I N G
!
Pay special attention to the plunger on this pop
pin. Always be sure that the plunger is fully
engaged into the hole you select. Be sure
to tighten the lock down knob by turning it
clockwise to lock it in place every time. Also, be
sure the spring in the pop pin operates freely.
Failure to do so may result in serious injury.
Shows pop pin
plunger is
fully engaged.
11
Shows pop pin
plunger is NOT
fully engaged.
S a f e t y
G u i d e l i n e s
Successful resistance training programs have one prominent feature in common...safety. Resistance training
has some inherent dangers, as do all physical activities. The chance of injury can be greatly reduced or
completely removed by using correct lifting techniques, proper breathing, maintaining equipment in good
working condition, and by wearing the appropriate clothing.
1. It is highly recommended that you consult your physician before beginning any exercise
program. This is especially important for individuals over the age of 35, or persons with
pre-existing health problems.
2. Always warm up before starting a workout. Try to do a total body warm up before you start. It is
especially important to warm up the specific muscle groups you are going to be using. This can
be as simple as performing a warm up set of high repetitions and light weight for each exercise.
3. Use proper form. Focus on only working the muscle groups intended for the exercise you are doing.
If there is strain elsewhere, you may need to re-evaluate the amount of weight that is involved with
the lift. Keeping proper form also includes maintaining control through an entire range of motion.
4. Breath properly. Inhale during the eccentric phase of the exercise, and exhale during the lifting, or
concentric phase. Never hold your breath during any part of an exercise.
5. Always wear the appropriate clothing and shoes when exercising. Wearing comfortable athletic shoes
with good support and loose fitting, breathable clothing will reduce the risk of injury.
6. Maintaining equipment in proper operating condition is of utmost importance for a safe resistance
training program. Pulleys and cables should be checked for wear frequently and replaced as needed.
Equipment should be lubricated as indicated by the manufacturer.
7. Read and study all warning labels on this machine. It is absolutely necessary that you familiarize
yourself and all others with the proper operation of this machine prior to use.
8. Keep hands, limbs, loose clothing and long hair well out of the way of all moving parts.
9. Do not attempt to lift more weight than you can control safely.
10.Inspect the machine daily for loose or worn parts. If a problem is found do not allow the machine to
be used until all parts are tightened or worn or defective parts are repaired or replaced.
12
PHRASES, TERMS, TIPS
& GUIDELINES
B E G I N N E R ’ S
G U I D E L I N E S
• Work out at least two times a week.
• Include six to eight exercises that train major muscle groups.
• Perform two or three sets of at least eight to 12 repetitions.
AEROBIC
EXERCISE LARGE MUSCLES FIRST
Exercise that primarily uses oxygen to burn fuel at low to moderate levels of intensity. Running
and jogging are examples of aerobic exercise.
You should work your large muscle groups first (ie. squat, bench press, lat pulldown) before
you exercise your small muscle groups (ie. bicep curls, tricep pressdowns, lateral raises).
ANAEROBIC
EXERCISE PROGRAM DURATION
Exercise that primarily uses the body’s stored fuel for energy. Intense weightlifting is an
example of an anaerobic exercise.
A weight training routine should take anywhere from 45 minutes to one hour to complete. Add
another 20 to 60 minutes when you include stretching, warm-up, aerobics and cool-down.
ATROPHY
GIVE YOUR MUSCLES A REST
Decrease of a muscle caused by the decrease in the size of its cells because of inactivity.
You’ll get the most out of strength training if you give your muscles at least 48 hours rest to
recover and rebuild between strength training workouts.
BALLISTIC STRETCHING
HYPERTROPHY
A stretching technique that involves a bouncing or bobbing movement during the stretch. The
final position is not held. This is not a recommended stretching technique.
Enlargement of a muscle caused by an increase in the size of its cells in response to weight
training.
BREATHING
INTENSITY
Never hold your breath during any part of an exercise. Holding your breath may cause severe
intra-thoracic pressure and raise blood pressure leading to dizziness, blackout or other
complications. The rule of thumb is to exhale on exertion and inhale on the return part of the
exercise.
The degree to which the body is worked during exercise.
ISOKINETIC EXERCISE
Resistance is given at a fixed velocity of movement with accommodating intensity. A machine
that moves you through an entire range of motion at a preset speed and will not change no
matter how much pressure is put forth by the individual.
CARDIOVASCULAR
Referring to the heart, lungs, and other periphery systems involved in the transport of oxygen
throughout the body.
ISOMETRIC EXERCISE
CHALLENGE YOUR MUSCLES
Contracts the muscle statically without changing its length. Example: Attempting to lift a
weight heavier than you can handle, but cannot move.
All strength training should progress gradually, using increases in weight until your goals are
reached. Then, change your workout to include increased reps or a higher weight resistance.
Alter the order of your exercises, perform multiple sets or different exercises to maintain
results or reach new goals.
ISOTONIC EXERCISE
Shortens and lengthens the muscle through a complete range of motion. This defines weight
training with full range of motion.
CHANGE ROUTINE
MUSCLE FATIGUE
Beginner’s please note: If you want to make changes in the exercise routine that you do,
wait until about the six to eight week point. Advanced lifters may want to change routines to
avoid plateus in gaining size or strength.
Fatigue is when you can’t possibly do another rep without sacrificing form.
MUSCULAR ENDURANCE
CIRCUIT TRAINING
The ability to perform repetitive muscular contractions against some resistance.
Exercise stations that consist of various combinations of weight training, flexibility, calisthenics,
and aerobic exercise.
MUSCULAR STRENGTH
The maximum force that can be applied by a muscle during a single maximum contraction.
CONCENTRIC MUSCLE ACTION
OSTEOPOROSIS
The muscle shortens while contracting against resistance.
A decrease in bone density.
ECCENTRIC MUSCLE ACTION
PLYOMETRIC EXERCISE
The muscle lengthens while contracting against resistance.
A technique that includes specific exercises which encompass a rapid stretch of a muscle
eccentrically, followed immediately by a rapid concentric contraction of that muscle for the
purpose of facilitating and developing a forceful explosive movement over a short period of
time. Examples of these are using medicine balls for upper extremity and depth jumping for
lower extremeity.
EXERCISE FREQUENCY
Exercise each muscle group 2-3 times per week. Allow a minimum of 48 hours rest for each
muscle group worked. If you are doing a total-body workout, three training sessions per week,
performed on every second day, is adequate.
13
PHRASES, TERMS, TIPS
& GUIDELINES
S T A R T I N G
R E S I S T A N C E
L E V E L
If you begin weight training at too high a level, you risk serious injury. You will also develop poor form,
which will hinder your efforts and discourage you. Use this as a guideline: if you cannot lift the weight
eight times with proper form, the weight is too heavy. Similarly, don’t choose too light a weight; the
last two or three repetitions of your set should be difficult.
POWER
REST INTERVAL
Power is the rate of performing work. Power during a repetition is defined as the weight lifted
times the vertical distance the weight is lifted divided by the time to complete the repetition.
Power during a repetition can be increased by lifting the same weight the same vertical distance
in a shorter period of time. Power can also be increased by lifting a heavier resistance the
same vertical distance in the same period of time as a lighter resistance.
Allow a brief pause between sets to give your muscles a chance to partially recover before
working them again. For power and muscle size development allow a 3 to 4 minute rest
interval between sets. For muscular endurance and definition allow a 30 second rest interval.
For strength training allow a 60 to 90 second rest interval.
RISK SHOULD NOT EXCEED BENEFIT
PROGRESS GRADUALLY
Increase reps before increasing resistance. Reduce rest intervals between sets to increase
intensity.
If the risk of a specific exercise exceeds its potential benefit, it is best to stay on the
conservative side. There are several ways to work specific muscle groups. Choose those that
provide minimal risk. Ask a fitness professional for guidance.
PROGRESSIVE RESISTANCE
ROUTINE
The principle of continually adding more weight to a specific exercise as your muscles
become stronger to adapt to the heavier weights.
The specific exercises, sets, reps and weight for a specific body part.
SET
PROPER FORM
This is a group of repetitions performed continuously without stopping. While a set can be
made up of any number of repetitions, sets typically range from 1 to 15 repetitions.
Focus on the proper motion of the exercise and concentrate on the specific muscles being
used. Do not sacrifice proper form to lift heavier weight or to perform more repetitions. Proper
form also means lifting in a smooth, fluid motion. If you feel strain elsewhere, you should
re-evaluate the amount of weight you are lifting or have a qualified professional critique your
exercise motion.
SMALL MUSCLE GROUP EXERCISE
Single joint movement and isolation exercises (i.e. bicep curls, tricep pressdowns and leg
extensions).
PROPER POSTURE
SPEED OF MOVEMENT
Maintaining proper posture will greatly reduce chances of injury and maximize exercise
benefit. When standing always keep your feet shoulder-width apart. Do not lock your knees.
Locking your knees can put unnecessary strain on them. Keep your back flat and straight,
making sure not to twist or arch it in order to complete a repetition.
Strength training movements should be slow and controlled. Do not use momentum to complete
an exercise movement. Momentum puts unnecessary stress on tendons, ligaments and joints.
Using momentum in your exercise movements does not develop increased strength.
STATIC STRETCHING
PROPER TECHNIQUE
A stretching technique that involves holding a specific muscle or muscle group at a desired
length for a certain period of time. This type of stretching is highly recommended.
To get the most out of strength training and to reduce the chance of injury, use proper weight
training techniques. These include working your muscles through their full range of motion
(but not locking any joints), lifting at a speed at which you can control the weight and stop
easily if necessary.
STOP TRAINING IF YOU FEEL PAIN
If you feel pain during a specific exercise stop immediately. Any continuation may aggravate
an existing injury. Re-evaluate your routine to make sure that you are doing a proper warm up.
Decrease the amount of weight you are lifting. Talk to a qualified personal trainer, health
professional or your doctor.
RANGE OF MOTION
Moving through a complete range of motion (ROM) allows the muscles to stretch before
contraction and increases the number of muscle fibers being recruited. This produces
maximum contraction and force. By working the full ROM, flexibility will be maintained and
possibly increased.
STRENGTH
Strength is the maximal amount of force a muscle or muscle group can generate in a
specified movement pattern at a specified velocity of movement.
REPETITION
WARM UP
A repetition is one complete movement of an exercise. It normally consists of two phases: the
concentric muscle action, or lifting of the resistance, and the eccentric muscle action, or
lowering of the resistance.
This cannot be stressed enough. Many workout-related injuries can be avoided by a proper
warm up routine. Try to do a total body warm up before you start training. A good example of
a total body warm up is using a stationary bike, treadmill, elliptical, rowing or skiing machine.
It is especially important to warm up specific muscle groups you are going to be using. Your
muscles need a 5 to 15 minute warm up as well as a brief cool down. This can be as simple
as performing a warm up set of high repetitions and light weight (25% to 50% of your training
weight) for each exercise.
REPETITION MAXIMUM (RM)
This is the maximum number of repetitions per set that can be performed at a given
resistance with proper lifting technique. Thus, a set at a certain RM implies the set is
performed to momentary voluntary fatigue. 1RM is the heaviest resistance that can be used
for one compete repetition of an exercise. 10 RM is a lighter resistance that allows completion
of 10 (but not 11) repetitions with proper exercise technique.
WORKOUT
The routine, specific exercises, weights, sets, and reps for one or more body parts.
14
NUTRITION
Good nutrition is a diet in which foods are eaten in
proper quantities and with the needed distribution of
nutrients to maintain good health. Malnutrition, on
the other hand, is the result of a diet in which
there is an underconsumption, overconsumption, or
unbalanced consumption of nutrients that leads to
disease or an increased susceptibility to disease.
What is stated in the above definitions is the fact that
proper nutrition is essential to good health. A history of
poor nutritional choices will eventually lead to poor
health consequences.
There are many substances necessary for the proper
functioning of the body. Nutrients are the substances
that the body requires for the maintenance of health,
growth, and to repair tissues. Nutrients can be divided
into six classes: carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins,
minerals and water. Carbohydrates, or "carbs", are
nutrients that are composed of carbon, hydrogen and
oxygen, and are essential sources of energy in the
body. Grains, vegetables, and fruits are excellent
sources of carbohydrates. It is recommended that
at least 55% to 60% of the total number of calories
consumed come from carbohydrates (American
Diabetes Association, Diabetes & Exercise, 1990). It is
further recommended that 10% or less of the total
calories consumed come from simple sugars like a
candy bar.
One of the many benefits of consuming foods that are
high in complex carbohydrates, such as rice, pasta,
and whole grain breads, is that they also typically
contain dietary fiber. Dietary fiber is a term used when
referring to substances found in plants that cannot be
broken down by the human digestive system. Although
fiber cannot be digested, it is important in helping to
avoid cancers of the digestive system, hemorrhoids,
constipation, and diverticular disease because it helps
food move quickly and easily through the digestive
system. It is recommended that people consume
20 to 30 grams of fiber per day (American Diabetes
Association, Diabetes & Exercise, 1990). Excellent
sources of dietary fiber are grains, vegetables,
legumes, and fruit.
directly related to increased cardiovascular disease.
Unsaturated fats are typically liquid at room temperature.
Corn, peanut, canola, and soybean oil are sources of
unsaturated fats. It is recommended that no more than
30% of one’s diet be composed of fats. Ten percent or
less of the total calories consumed should come from
saturated fats. One way to reduce saturated fat intake
would be to substitute margarine for butter.
Proteins are substances composed of carbon, hydrogen,
oxygen, and nitrogen. Proteins are made by combining
amino acids. Amino acids are nitrogen-containing
building blocks for proteins that can be used for energy.
Amino acids can combine in innumerable ways to form
proteins, and it is estimated that tens of thousands of
different types of proteins exist in the body. It is the
ordering of the amino acids that provides the unique
structure and function of proteins.
There are proteins in both meat products and plant
products. Animal sources of protein such as milk,
meat and eggs contain the eight essential amino
acids (amino acids that the body cannot synthesize
and therefore must be ingested). Plant sources of
protein such as beans, starchy vegetables, nuts, and
grains do not always contain all eight amino acids.
Because of this, vegetarians must consume a variety
of protein-containing foods. It is recommended that
proteins make up 10% to 15% of one’s daily calories.
This will ensure adequate protein for growth,
maintenance, and the repair of cells. Protein
requirements for adults are not as high as those
recommended for infants, children, and young adults.
Note: individuals who are training intensely will have
an increase in their protein requirements.
a decrease in the total amount of bone mineral in the
body and by a decrease in strength of the remaining
bone. This condition is most common in the elderly
but may also exist in younger people who have diets
inadequate in calcium or vitamin D or both.
Iron is another mineral that is often underconsumed
by Americans. This is especially true of women. The
oxygen-carrying properties of hemoglobin (blood)
depend on the presence of iron. Anemia is a condition
characterized by a decreased capacity to transport
oxygen in the blood, and is also common in those
lacking a sufficient amount of iron intake. Red meat
and eggs are excellent sources of iron. Additionally
spinach, lima and navy beans, and prune juice are
excellent vegetarian sources of iron.
Sodium, on the other hand, is a mineral that many
Americans over-consume. High sodium intake has
been linked with hypertension, as well as high blood
pressure. People can substantially reduce their
sodium intake by limiting consumption of processed
foods and decreasing the amount of salt added to
foods when cooking.
In conclusion...don’t forget hydration. Water is
considered an essential nutrient because of its vital
role in the normal functioning of the body. Water
contributes approximately 60% of the total body
weight and is essential in creating an environment
in which all metabolic processes occur. Water is
necessary to regulate temperature and to transport
substances throughout the body.
Vitamins are organic substances that are essential to
the normal functioning of the human body. Although
vitamins do not contain energy to be used by the body,
these substances are essential in the metabolism of
fats, carbohydrates and proteins. Because of the
critical role vitamins play, it is necessary that they exist
in proper quantities in the body.
1.
Fats are an essential part of a healthy diet and serve
vital functions in the human body. Among the functions
performed by fats are temperature regulation,
protection of vital organs, distribution of some vitamins,
energy production, and formation of component parts
of cell membranes. Like carbohydrates, fats are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. However,
their chemical structure is different.
Minerals are inorganic molecules that serve a variety
of functions in the human body. The minerals that
appear in the largest quantities (calcium, phosphorus,
potassium, sulfur, sodium, chloride, and magnesium)
are often called macrominerals. Other minerals are
also essential to normal functioning of the body, but
because they exist in smaller quantities (chromium,
iron, copper, fluoride, iodine, manganese, molybdenum,
selenium, and zinc) they are called microminerals.
4.
Both animals and plants provide sources of fat.
Saturated fats come primarily from animal sources
and are typically solid at room temperature. Plant
sources of saturated fats are palm oil, coconut oil,
and cocoa butter. A high intake of saturated fats is
A mineral that is often consumed in inadequate
amounts by Americans is calcium. Calcium is a
mineral important in the mineralization of bone,
muscle contraction, and the transmission of nerve
impulses. Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by
15
2.
3.
5.
6.
7.
FOLLOW THESE BASIC NUTRITIONAL GUIDELINES
FOR GAINS IN STRENGTH AND LEAN MUSCLE MASS:
Choose your foods carefully. Try getting your
carbohydrates from sources such as rice,
vegetables, beans, whole grains, pasta and fruit.
Good protein sources include fish, chicken, turkey,
lean meat and low-fat or nonfat dairy products.
Minimize your fat intake.
Drink a minimum of 10 eight-ounce glasses of
water each day.
Eat four to six small meals a day, about three
hours apart. Small meals are more easily digested
and result in greater nutrition absorption.
Avoid eating junk food and fast food.
Time your protein intake of 40-55 grams
approximately 75 minutes after your workout.
Immediately following your workout, replenish
your glycogen stores with approximately
50-75 grams of carbohydrates.
For more information on nutrition visit your local
library or book store. There are many excellent books
available.
EXERCISE
PRESCRIPTION
Sets
Sets are defined as a combination of any number of reps of one exercise. The number
of sets used in a workout is directly related to training results. Typically, two to three sets
are used by intermediate and advanced lifters to achieve optimum gains in strength.
Experts agree that multiple-set systems work best for the development of strength and
muscular endurance. Gains will be made at a faster rate by using a multiple-set
system than gains achieved through a single-set system. The use of a single set of an
exercise is recommended and very effective for individuals who are untrained or
just beginning a resistance training program. One-set programs might also be used
for simple maintenance once you are in shape. It is important to note that low-volume
set programs will increase strength in untrained individuals, but more complex
physiological adaptations, such as gains in muscle mass, tone, size, and performance
usually requires higher-volume set training for the best results. Multiple sets of an
exercise present a more intense training stimulus to the muscles during each set.
Once your desired initial fitness level has been achieved, multiple-set performances
of the exercise using the proper resistance (with specific rest periods between sets)
will take you to the next level of strength training, endurance, and muscular development.
Rest Periods Between Workouts
The amount of rest between training sessions depends on the recovery ability of the
individual. Most experts agree that three workouts per week with one day of rest between
sessions allows adequate recovery, especially for the beginner. If the resistance
training is not excessive, only moderate amounts of delayed muscular soreness should
be experienced one day after the session. As the lifter advances and his or her body
is better able to tolerate and recuperate from the resistance exercise sessions, the
frequency of training can be increased. Well-conditioned athletes may be capable of,
and need training frequencies of 4 to 5 days in a row to improve significantly and
achieve their desired goals. When consecutive-training-day sequences are used, it is
usually beneficial to do different exercises for the same muscle groups and use different
resistances for the exercises. When training is performed on consecutive days, it often
involves the use of a split routine (different body parts exercised each day), or a split
program (different exercises for the same body part performed each day). There are
many books available at the library or your local book store for the intermediate and
advanced weight training enthusiast. It is also recommended that you work with a
qualified personal trainer to achieve your ultimate goals.
Resistance Used
The amount of resistance used for a specific exercise is probably the most important
variable in resistance training. When designing a resistance training program, a weight
for each exercise must be chosen. The use of repetition maximums (RM): the exact
resistance that allows only a specific number of repetitions to be performed, is probably
the easiest method for determining a resistance. Typically, one uses a training RM target
or a RM target zone. Example: If your RM zone is 8 to 12 repetitions and you cannot lift
the weight at least 8 times using proper form, the weight is too heavy. On the other
hand, if you can easily lift the weight 12 times, the weight is too light. In either case, the
weight needs to be changed. As the strength level of the lifter changes over time, the
resistance is adjusted so a true RM target or target zone resistance is used.
Order of Exercise
Leaders in the field of strength and conditioning believe that working the larger muscle
groups first (chest, back, legs), should take priority over training the smaller muscle
groups (biceps, triceps, deltoids, calves). The reason behind this exercise order is that
the exercises performed in the beginning of the workout are the ones that are going to
require the greatest amount of muscle mass to perform. Hence, exercising the smaller
muscle groups first will deplete the body of the energy necessary to stimulate the larger
muscle groups. Arm-to-leg ordering allows for some recovery of the arm muscles while
the leg muscles are exercised. “Stacking” exercises is a common practice among
body builders as a way to attempt to bring about muscle hypertrophy. Stacking is
loading up different exercises on the same muscle group (ie. standing bicep curls,
preacher curls, one arm concentration curls). The exercise order will have a significant
impact on the training stimulus stress level in a training session.
Rest Periods Between Sets and Exercises
One frequently overlooked variable in exercise prescription is the length of the rest
period between sets and between different exercises. Your desired fitness goals will
normally determine the amount of time you allow your body to rest. Exercises
involving high repetitions (15 to 20) and a high number of sets (3 to 4) with short rest
periods (30 seconds) between sets will raise metabolic demands. This in turn will burn
excess body fat and increase muscular endurance. Short rest periods are a
characteristic of circuit weight training, and the resistances used are typically lighter.
This type of workout is best for trimming body fat and toning muscle. Exercises with
heavier resistance and fewer sets usually have a longer resting period between sets.
The results of using this method are normally increased muscular strength and mass.
If the desired outcome is to gain overall muscle mass, your exercise prescription
should lean toward a higher weight resistance doing 2 to 6 repetitions per set, with a
rest period of 3 to 4 minutes between each set.
Scheduling Training
Finding the time to do it is one of the most difficult aspects of a training program. Once
you have established a time to workout you should plan a training routine based on
what muscles to involve on which day. As previously discussed, the larger muscle
groups such as the chest, back, and legs should take priority over working the smaller
muscle groups. Give your muscles at least 48 hours (but no more than 72 hours) of
rest in between sessions.
16
TRAINING TIPS
FOR BEGINNER’S
A R E
Y O U
A
“ B E G I N N E R ” ?
A beginner can be classified as someone who has never touched a weight, may have lifted for a while,
but has taken a substantial amount of time off, or has not consistently trained over the last six months.
If you happen to fall into any of these categories, pay close attention, because the following information
will be detrimental to the start of your training program.
As a beginner, one of the most common mistakes is doing
too much. Because beginners often make good gains
quickly, many fall into the trap of thinking that more is better.
This may be true later in the training equation, but not for the
novice. Some of the most common injuries occur as a result
of taking on too much, too soon.
One of the questions most frequently asked is, “How much
weight should I use?” Determining the weight for each
exercise will vary from person to person. The weight for each
exercise will be lifted in sets and repetitions. Repetition
is defined as one execution of any exercise. A set is a
combination of any number of repetitions of one exercise.
Experimentation at each exercise station is a good technique
for determining the starting weight for an individual. Take the
chest press exercise for example. Performing this exercise
with a weight that can be pressed 30 times with ease will
not help you achieve any particular goals. Adding the
appropriate amount of weight that will allow you to perform
a maximum of 8 to 12 repetitions will help you obtain the
results you desire.
On the other hand, if you put too much weight on the press
bar and press it 4 or 5 times, then common sense will tell
you to reduce the weight, wait a few minutes, then try again.
Remember, never sacrifice perfect form just for the sake of
lifting heavier weight. This is a sure-fire, one-way trip down
the road to injury. Making muscles work hard, with proper
form is the name of the game.
Now that you understand how to test each station for your
starting amount of resistance, you should know which muscles
to train first. Training the large muscles groups first, such as your
chest, legs, and back, should be done before training your
small muscle groups like the arms, shoulders, and calves.
You need to give your body plenty of rest, especially if you’re
still sore from the last workout. This will keep you fresh and
growing stronger. NEVER TRAIN A BODY PART THAT
IS STILL SORE FROM THE PREVIOUS WORKOUT.
Performing some flexibility exercises is a good way to keep
the blood flowing through the sore area, but do not train
these muscles again until you are feeling recovered.
Speaking of soreness, there is something else that you, as a
beginner, should be aware of: If you work out - your muscles
will get sore. The majority of muscle soreness comes from
microtears and a build up of lactic acid in the muscle fibers.
This is the result of intense exercise. Muscle soreness can
become a problem when the body is pushed too fast and
too quickly. As a beginner, tendons, ligaments, joints and
tissues have not yet developed the ability necessary to
recover from high intensity exercise. A general warm up of
stretching and light calisthenics prior to exercise can
possibly reduce the amount of post-exercise muscle
soreness. A good cool down of stretching and cardio work
may also decrease muscle soreness.
Now that we have laid a good foundation of the “do’s and
don’ts”, let’s get into something a little more specific.
The Beginner’s Strength Training Program. One of the best
beginner’s programs is the three-days-a-week routine. For
example, do a whole-body workout on Monday, Wednesday
and Friday. Use the other days for rest and recuperation. As
previously discussed, you want to start with the large
muscle groups first, then move on to the small muscle
groups. Perform one exercise per muscle group that
consists of 2 or 3 sets of 8 to 12 repetitions. Follow this
routine for at least six to eight weeks in order for your body
to establish the proper stimulation for growth.
Starting with the large muscle groups will help you achieve
and maintain quicker gains. The large muscles groups will
require more stimulation and a higher intensity level than the
smaller muscle groups. Training your arms with all-out
intensity and training your chest immediately afterwards will
not leave you with enough energy necessary to properly
stimulate the muscle fibers in your chest. Moreover,
because the triceps are required in chest press movements,
your arm muscles will fail much more quickly than your
chest muscles, which will also hold back your chest training.
As a beginner, you will find that your gains will come quickly.
The excitement and enthusiasm that comes with these gains
may cause you to spend even more time on your gym. Take
it easy! Remember, just as too little exercise won’t stimulate
muscle growth...too much exercise won’t either.
One or two exercises per muscle group may not sound like
enough to produce any results, but if you’re a beginer - it
most definitelty will. As you conitinue to train and your body
adapts to your exercise routine and recuperative demands
you place upon it, you’ll be able to add more sets and
exercises to your routine.
Another point that is highly recommended is the assistance
of a personal trainer. Through the use of a personal trainer
you can learn the mechanics and techniques of exercise, how
to use proper form to avoid injury and details on proper
nutrition. A good trainer will also provide MOTIVATION.
When choosing a personal trainer, here are some tips:
Choose an individual that is certified through an accredited
association. This is a good way to ensure that he or she is
qualified to give you what you need. Also, take a look
at what kind of shape they are in. If you want to be in
great shape, look for a trainer who is in great shape.
They will know what it takes to get results. Here are a few
recommended organizations:
• National Strength & Conditioning
(719) 632-6722
• American College of Sports Medicine (317) 637-9200
• National Academy of Sports Medicine (312) 929-5101
SAMPLE WORKOUT ROUTINE WHEN
TRAINING FOR STRENGTH
Exercises
Reps
Sets
Leg Press / Squat
Leg Extension
Leg Curl
Calf Raise
Bench / Chest Press
Incline Press
Incline Pec Fly
Lat Pulldown
Seated Row
Military Press
Upright Row
Bicep Curl
Tricep Pressdown
Tricep Extension
Resistance Ab Crunch
Resistance Oblique Crunch
8 to 12
8 to 12
8 to 12
8 to 12
8 to 12
8 to 12
8 to 12
8 to 12
8 to 12
8 to 12
8 to 12
8 to 12
8 to 12
8 to 12
20 to 30
20 to 30
2 or 3
2 or 3
2 or 3
2 or 3
2 or 3
2 or 3
2 or 3
2 or 3
2 or 3
2 or 3
2 or 3
2 or 3
2 or 3
2 or 3
2 or 3
2 or 3
Rest period between sets should be about 60 to 90 seconds.
17
COMMON TRAINING
MISTAKES
1. Lack of Adequate Warm-Up and Inadequate Flexibility
A warmed muscle is a more flexible muscle that’s better able to lift heavier weights and work in a full range of motion.
Those warmed muscles also greatly reduce your chance of training injuries.
2. Improper Form
The use of improper form is a good way to keep you out of the gym. Not only does improper form cause injuries,
it also doesn’t allow for adequate muscle-fiber stimulation.
3. Too Much Weight
Overloading the muscles is a good way to promote muscular growth, but packing on too much weight can cause a
snowball effect of improper form, injuries, and down time from your routine.
4. Not Enough Weight
Not lifting enough weight will prohibit the stimulation necessary for muscular growth. Keep challenging yourself to lift
heavier weights on a progressive basis always maintaining proper form.
5. Not Enough Rest Between Workouts
If you’re still sore from your previous workout, you don’t have to go back at it just because it’s your scheduled day.
Give your body an extra day off to fully recover so when you return you will be able to give 100%.
6. Overtraining
It’s not how much time you spend working out, but what you accomplish that really matters. Try to keep your
resistance workouts within 45 to 60 minutes per session.
7. Poor Diet and Supplementation
Eating the right combination of foods, along with good supplementation, will greatly promote your success. Make your
diet 50 percent carbohydrate, 35 percent protein, 15 percent fat, and take a good multivitamin and protein/carbohydrate
supplement. Don’t forget the water- at least 80 ounces a day! Hydration is critical.
8. Stale Routines
Your body adapts very quickly to the demands placed upon it. That’s why you should have a variety of exercises and
routines that you can do. To keep your body growing, you’ve got to keep it off-guard. Changing your exercises and
routines is a sure way to do it.
18
S ETTING UP YOUR
PERSONAL PROGRAM
It is important to first establish specific
and realistic goals. You should determine
your long term goal and then set a
series of short term goals that will
help you attain your long term goal.
The most common goals are:
Muscular Endruance & Definition
Increase Strength
Once you have determined your personal goals, you will need to set up a schedule
that helps you attain them. Set up a schedule that includes the number of workouts
per week, the type of workout activity, the time of day for each workout, and the actual
workout program. Don’t forget to factor in the warm up and cool down periods. You
may have to modify your current lifestyle to accommodate your new schedule. It’s very
important to include the following basic components to achieve successful results:
If your personal goals
involve losing a
considerable amount
of body fat you will
need to focus more
on aerobic exercise
and weight training
for muscular
endurance and
definition. If your
goals involve a large
increase in muscle
size you will need to
focus on power and
muscle mass weight
training. Depending
on your goals, you
will have different
nutritional
requirements.
Increase Power & Muscle Mass
19
Stretching
Aerobic Exercise
Weight Training
Nutrition
DETERMINE YOUR
TRAINING METHOD
There are three basic types of weight
training methods:
Which training method is right for you?
1. Training for muscular
endurance and definition
2. Training for strength
3. Training for power and
muscle mass
FOR MUSCULAR
ENDURANCE & DEFINITION
FOR STRENGTH
FOR POWER
AND MUSCLE MASS
This training method incorporates
achieving and maintaining a high
cardiovascular (heart) rate and helps
burn away excess fatty tissue. It also
adds muscle definition and muscular
endurance to your entire body.
Exercises are most commonly
performed for 15 to 20 repetitions and
3 to 4 sets using a light to moderate
weight. The rest period between sets
should be about 30 seconds. These
short rest intervals will help maintain an
elevated heart rate and prevent the
muscles from cooling down.
This type of training is the most
popular of the three and is designed
specifically for increasing strength
throughout the muscle and the
muscle-tendon junction. This type of
training is especially important for
athletes. Normally, exercises are
performed using moderate to heavy
weight for 8 to 12 repetitions and 2 to 3
sets. The rest period between sets
should be from 60 to 90 seconds. This
allows a degree of muscle recovery
before you hit them again.
This is the method most often used by
bodybuilders and is recommended
only for the intermediate and
advanced lifter. The weights used are
heavy — this shocks the muscles and
stimulates a more rapid increase in
muscle size. Usually exercises are
performed for 2 to 6 repetitions and
3 to 4 sets using very heavy weight.
The rest period between sets should
be from 3 to 4 minutes. The prolonged
rest periods allow ample time for
recovery between sets.
You should select a training method
that reflects both your present fitness
level and your long term goals. You
should begin carefully and with proper
professional guidance. You can always
move from one training method to
another as you progress.
If you are beginner, you should start
slowly and carefully, gradually increasing
the frequency and intensity of your
training. Always play it safe – be realistic
about your goals and your schedule.
Realistic goals are safer and easier to
follow.
Which is the right training method
for you? First, take a look at your
present physique and determine your
objectives. Do you want a trim, toned,
well-defined body? Are you involved in
a sport where speed, strength and
power are most important? Maybe you
want bulging muscles and a terrific
V-shape torso so you look great on the
beach. Once you make a decision on
what the final results should be, you
can set up your personal program
using the proper training method to
achieve your goals.
DESIGNING YOUR PERSONAL ROUTINE
FIRST:
FOURTH:
You need to decide which of the above training methods is best
suited to accomplish your personal goals.
Order the exercises in your routine so you are working the
large muscle groups first and the small muscle groups last.
SECOND:
FIFTH:
Study the exercise poster that came with your Body-Solid
machine and select one or two exercises per body part (body
parts are listed to the left of the exercise pictures). Be sure to
include exercises for all body parts. If you leave out certain
body parts your exercise routine and your body will not be
balanced. If you are trying to increase muscle mass or
increase strength to a muscle group it is alright to add extra
exercises to the area you are particularly concerned about.
Keep a record! Write down the exercises, number of sets,
number of reps and the amount of resistance (weight).
THIRD:
Coordinate your body part exercise program and your
personal schedule. If you select one exercise per body part
you can normally do your entire routine in the same workout.
If you choose to do more than 12 exercises you may decide
to divide your workout routine into upper and lower body
exercises. You can split your schedule to work upper body
one day and lower body the next day. Remember to rest each
particular muscle group 48 hours before working it again.
BEGINNER’S SAMPLE WORKOUT ROUTINE
WHEN TRAINING FOR DEFINITION
Exercise
Bench / Chest Press
Lat Pulldown
Shoulder Press
Tricep Pressdown
Bicep Curl
Leg Press/Squat
Leg Extension
Leg Curl
Calf Raise
Ab Crunch
Reps
15 to 20
15 to 20
15 to 20
15 to 20
15 to 20
15 to 20
15 to 20
15 to 20
15 to 20
20 to 30
Sets
3 or 4
3 or 4
3 or 4
3 or 4
3 or 4
3 or 4
3 or 4
3 or 4
3 or 4
3 or 4
Rest period between sets should be about 30 seconds.
20
EXERCISETIP S
Listed below are Body-Solid’s picks of the best exercises you can do for each body part. These exercises can be
done using free weights, machines and multi-station gyms. Learn to do each exercise in proper form. You can
make substitutions in your training and try variations of each using different Body-Solid grips, cable attachments and
accessories to slightly change the emphasis of a particular exercise. Note: Many movements, especially multijoint
exercises, work more than one muscle group. For example, your front deltoids and triceps are stimulated during
bench / chest pressing movements.
CHEST
TRAPS
BICEPS / FOREARMS
THIGHS / GLUTES
This powerful muscle group is the
cornerstone of a well-developed upper
body. To most thoroughly work your
pecs, include both pressing and fly
movements and vary the angle of the
bench from decline to flat to incline.
A signature muscle of a strong upper
back, well-developed traps help prevent
neck injury. Shrug movements should
be done with heavy weights in a straight
up-and-down motion.
A two-headed muscle, the biceps’
primary focus is to flex your elbow and
supinate your wrist. The ability to build
your biceps peak is largely genetic,
but exercises that maximally stress the
short head will help.
BENCH / CHEST PRESS
INCLINE PRESS
DECLINE PRESS
PEC FLY
INCLINE FLY
DECLINE FLY
CABLE CROSSOVER
DIPS
DUMBBELL SHRUG
BEHIND THE BACK SHRUG
UPRIGHT ROW
The main muscles of the thighs are the
quadriceps which are composed of four
muscles. You have several others near
the hip joint, including the body’s largest
muscle group, the gluteals. Multijoint
movements (in which action occurs at
both the hip and knee joints) are your
best choice to work these muscles.
SHOULDERS
The shoulder joint, which has the
greatest range of motion of all joints in
the body, is best worked by training all
three deltoid heads. Include a pressing
movement followed by a raise for each
of the three heads.
SHOULDER PRESS
BEHIND THE NECK PRESS
FRONT DELTOID RAISE
LATERAL (SIDE) DELTOID RAISE
BENT-OVER LATERAL DELTOID RAISE
REVERSE PEC-FLY
UPPER BACK
A powerful upper back is marked by
both middle-back thickness and width
(the sought-after V-taper). This is
best achieved by combining various
rows with pull-downs and pull-ups.
Remember to vary your grip to slightly
change the stimulus.
PULL UP
UPRIGHT ROW
LAT PULLDOWN
SEATED ROW
BENT OVER ROW
HIGH ROW
REVERSE GRIP PULLDOWN
STRAIGHT BAR SHRUG
LOWER BACK
Important not only for spinal protection
but also because it’s the seat of power
for many exercises. If you spend a great
deal of time crunching for abs, you need
to balance your training for complete
development and muscular balance.
BICEPS
STANDING BICEP CURL
SEATED BICEP CURL
INCLINE CURL
PREACHER CURL
CONCENTRATION CURL
ONE-ARM CABLE CURL
FOREARMS
WRIST CURL
REVERSE WRIST CURL
HAMSTRINGS
ABDOMINALS
PULL UP
UPRIGHT ROW
LAT PULLDOWN
SEATED ROW
BENT OVER ROW
HIGH ROW
REVERSE GRIP PULLDOWN
The rectus abdominus has upper and
lower regions, but you can’t isolate one
area over the other. Still, include both
upper and lower ab movement to more
strongly emphasize those areas, and
do twisting movements to work the
obliques for complete development.
TRICEPS
This three-headed muscle on the back
of your arm is involved in extension of
the elbow. Like the biceps, the triceps
cross the elbow and shoulder joints.
Because of this, you can and should work
the triceps through a variety of angles
to ensure complete development.
LYING TRICEPS EXTENSION
CABLE TRICEPS EXTENSION
CABLE TRICEPS PRESSDOWN
CLOSE-GRIP BENCH PRESS
REVERSE-GRIP PRESSDOWN
TRICEPS PRESS
DIPS
BACK SQUAT
FRONT SQUAT
LEG PRESS
LUNGE
REVERSE LUNGE
STEP-UP
LEG EXTENSION (does not work glutes)
UPPER AB REGION
CABLE AB CRUNCH
DECLINE BENCH CRUNCH
LOWER AB REGION
REVERSE CRUNCH
HANGING KNEE RAISE
HIP THRUST
OBLIQUES
CABLE SIDE BEND
OBLIQUE CRUNCH
On the back of the thighs, the
hamstrings balance the quads and
allow for a wide range of movement.
Good exercise choices include those
that work the hamstrings and both the
hip and knee joints.
DEADLIFT
STIFF-LEGGED DEADLIFT
GOOD MORNING
LYING LEG CURL
SEATED LEG CURL
ONE-LEGGED STANDING LEG CURL
CALVES
Calves consist of two major muscles,
the gastrocnemius and soleus. The
latter is best worked when the knee is
flexed, as in the seated calf raise.
STANDING CALF RAISE
SEATED CALF RAISE
DONKEY CALF RAISE
LEG PRESS CALF RAISE
HACK SQUAT CALF RAISE
21
ANATOMY
CHART
FRONT VIEW
Note: These illustrations depicting exaggerated musculature are
not in the textbook anatomical position. As such, they are inexact
for medical purposes but are useful for a general understanding.
Chest
Neck
Omohyoid
Sternohyoid
Sternocleidomastoid
Trapezius
Pectoralis Major
Pectoralis Minor
(beneath major)
•
•
• •
Shoulders
• •
•
•
Biceps
•
•
•
•
• •
•
Serratus Anterior
External Oblique
Rectus Abdominis
Tendinous Inscriptions
Pollicis
Brevis
•
•
•
• •
Tensor Fasciae Latae
Rhomboid Major
medial head
• •
•
•
•
Erector Spinae
(deep)
Thoracolumbar
Fascia
Vastus Lateralis
Rectus Femoris
Patella (kneecap)
Hamstrings
Iliotibial Band
Biceps Femoris
Adductor Magnus
Semitendinosus
Gracilis
Semimembranosus
Peroneus Longus
Extensor Digitorum Longus
Tibialis Anterior
22
•
•
•
•
Latissimus
Dorsi
Calves
Gastrocnemius
Soleus
Triceps Brachii
lateral head
longhead
Flexor Carpi Radialis
•
Tibia (bone)
Triceps
Infraspinatus
Trapezius
Flexor
Carpi
Ulnaris
•
BACK VIEW
Teres Minor
Teres Major
Abductor
Pollicis
Longus
Brachioradialis
•
Vastus
Medialis
Sartorius
Pectineus
Adductor Longus
Gracilis
Extensor
Pollicis Longus
•
•
Thighs
Back
• • • Brachialis
Biceps Brachii
Pronator •
long head
•
Teres
• • short head
Palmaris
• • Forearms
• Longus
•• Extensor
Carpi Ulnaris
Extensor
•
Abs
Deltoid
anterior head
middle head
posterior head
•
• •
•
•
Abs
External
Oblique
•
•
•
Glutes
• •
• •
Gluteus Medius
Gluteas Maximus
•
•
•
•
Calves
Gastrocnemius
Soleus
Peroneus Brevis
Flexor Hallucis Longus
FITNESS GOALS
*
SHORT-TERM GOALS
Date Set
Date Accomplished
Goal
Reward**
Date Set
Date Accomplished
Goal
Reward**
Date Set
Date Accomplished
Goal
Reward**
LONG-TERM GOALS
Goal
Reward!
*
Make several copies of this page to keep track of your goals and accomplishments.
Yo u c a n p r i n t m o r e c o p i e s o f t h i s p a g e b y g o i n g t o h t t p : / / w w w. b o d y s o l i d . c o m / s u p p o r t / d o c s . h t m l
** Don’t forget to reward yourself for a job well-done!
23
24
TOTALS
AB CRUNCH
CALF RAISE
LEG CURL
LEG EXTENSION
LEG PRESS / SQUAT
BICEP CURL
TRICEP PRESSDOWN
SHOULDER PRESS
LAT PULLDOWN
BENCH / CHEST PRESS
Exercise
Date
S
R
W
S
R
W
S
R
W
BEGINNER’S SAMPLE WORKOUT ROUTINE
Keep track of your changes and improvements. It’s a great motivational tool!*
R
W
S
R
W
S
R
W
* Make several copies of this page to keep track of your progress.
You can print more copies of this page by going to http://www.bodysolid.com/support/docs.html
S
S = Sets
R = Repetitions per set
W = Weight used
WEIGHT TRAINING EXERCISE LO G
25
TOTALS
RESISTANCE OBLIQUE CRUNCH
RESISTANCE AB CRUNCH
TRICEP EXTENSION
TRICEP PRESSDOWN
BICEP CURL
UPRIGHT ROW
MILITARY PRESS
SEATED ROW
LAT PULLDOWN
INCLINE PEC FLY
INCLINE PRESS
BENCH / CHEST PRESS
CALF RAISE
LEG CURL
LEG EXTENSION
LEG PRESS / SQUAT
Exercise
Date
S
R
W
S
R
W
S
R
W
SAMPLE WORKOUT ROUTINE WHEN TRAINING FOR STRENGTH
Keep track of your changes and improvements. It’s a great motivational tool!*
R
W
S
R
W
S
R
W
* Make several copies of this page to keep track of your progress.
You can print more copies of this page by going to http://www.bodysolid.com/support/docs.html
S
S = Sets
R = Repetitions per set
W = Weight used
WEIGHT TRAINING EXERCISE LO G
TOTALS
Exercise
Date
S
R
W
S
R
W
S
R
W
R
W
S
R
W
S
R
S = Sets
R = Repetitions per set
W = Weight used
W
* Make several copies of this page to keep track of your progress.
You can print more copies of this page by going to http://www.bodysolid.com/support/docs.html
S
INTERMEDIATE AND ADVANCED LIFTERS... Design your personal strength training program.
Keep track of your changes and improvements. It’s a great motivational tool!*
WEIGHT TRAINING EXERCISE LO G
26
STRETCHING
& FLEXIBILITY
Flexibility is an important component of physical fitness and needs to be addressed
in a resistance training program. The two main purposes for stretching are injury
prevention and a faster rate of recovery from exercise. Stretching should be
performed in both the warm up and cool down phases of a training session. A good
general guideline is that each workout session should be preceded by 5 to 15 minutes
of general warm up, followed by 8 to 12 minutes of stretching, and concluded with 4 to 5
minutes of post-exercise stretching.
The following
pages show
illustrations with
descriptions of
static stretching
for warm up and
post-exercise
cool down.
Remember...
stretch your
large muscle
groups first and
do all stretches
in a smooth,
slow, controlled
manner.
A regular stretching program will loosen muscle tissue, allowing an increased range
of motion. This helps prevent microtears at the muscle-tendon junction. Almost 90%
of all injuries from muscle strain occur at the muscle-tendon junction. Repeated
injury at this junction can lead to a build-up of scar tissue, which impedes range of
motion and adds stress to the joints.
Begin by stretching the major muscle groups first. Move in and out of your stretches
with smooth, slow, controlled motion. Hold the stretch for at least 10 seconds when
you feel you have reached your muscle’s maximum distance. Do not use fast,
hurried or reckless motions when stretching. Fast and bouncy motions will increase
the risk of injury.
The most common and most popular type of stretching is the static stretching
technique. This form of stretching involves voluntary, complete relaxation of the muscles while they are elongated. A static stretch is a constant, steady stretch in which
the end position is held for 10 to 30 seconds. This technique is popular because it
is easy to learn, effective, and accompanied by minimal soreness with the least risk
of injury.
Ballistic stretching involves a bouncing or bobbing movement during the stretch.
The final position in the movement is not held. Ballistic stretching is unpopular
because of the increased amount of delayed muscle soreness and the possibility of
injury during the stretching exercise. Ballistic stretching is not recommended.
A dynamic stretch involves flexibility during sport specific movements. Dynamic
stretching is similar to ballistic stretching in that it utilizes movement, but dynamic
stretching includes movements that may be specific to a sport or movement
pattern. Dynamic stretching is most common among track and field athletes, but is
also used in other sports, such as basketball and volleyball. An example of dynamic
stretching would be a track sprinter performing high knees with an emphasis on
knee height and arm action, not on horizontal speed.
27
STRETCHING
WARM-UP/COOL-DOWN
UPPER BACK
Cross Arm in Front of Chest
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: latissimus dorsi and teres major
1. Stand or sit with the right arm slightly flexed (15° to 30°) and
adducted across the chest.
2. Grasp the upper arm just above the elbow, placing the left hand
on the posterior side of the upper arm.
3. Pull the right arm across the chest (toward the left) with the left
hand.
4. Hold for 10 seconds.
5. Repeat with the left arm.
Stretching the
upper back
UPPER BACK
Arms Straight Up Above Head (Pillar)
Stretching the
shoulders, chest
and upper back
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: latissimus dorsi and wrist flexors
1. Stand with arms in front of torso, fingers interlocked with palms
facing each other.
2. Slowly straighten the arms above the head with palms up.
3. Continue to reach upward with hands and arms.
4. While continuing to reach upward, slowly reach slightly backward.
5. Hold for 10 seconds.
LOWER BACK
Spinal Twist (Pretzel)
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: internal oblique, external oblique and spinal erectors
1. Sitting with legs straight and upper body nearly vertical, place
right foot on left side of left knee.
2. Place back of left elbow on right side of right knee, which is now
bent.
3. Place right palm on floor 12 to 16 inches behind hips.
4. Push right knee to the left with left elbow while turning shoulders
and head to the right as far as possible. Try to look behind the
back.
5. Hold for 10 seconds.
6. Repeat with left leg.
28
Stretching
the low back
and sides
STRETCHING
WARM-UP/COOL-DOWN
LOWER BACK
Semi-Leg Straddle
Stretching the
low back from
seated position
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: spinal erectors
1. Sitting, knees flexed 30 to 50 degrees, let the legs totally relax.
2. Point the knees outward; the lateral side of the knees may or may
not touch the floor.
3. Lean forward from waist and reach forward with extended arms.
Hold position for 10 to 15 seconds.
4. Bending and relaxing legs decreases hamstring involvement and
increases lower back stretch.
HIPS
Forward Lunge (Fencer)
Stretching the
hip flexors
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: iliopsoas, rectus femoris
1. Standing, take a long step forward (as with the lunge) with the
right leg and flex the right knee until it is directly over the right foot.
2. Keep right foot flat on floor.
3. Keep back leg straight.
4. Keep back foot pointed in same direction as front foot; it is not
necessary to have heel on floor.
5. Keep torso upright and rest hands on hips or front leg.
6. Slowly lower hips forward and downward.
7. Hold for 10 to 15 seconds.
8. Repeat with the left leg.
HIPS
Supine Knee Flex
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: hip extensors (gluteus maximus and hamstrings)
1. Lie on back with legs straight.
2. Flex right leg and lift knee toward chest.
3. Place both hands below knee and continue to
pull knee toward chest.
4. Hold for 10 to 15 seconds.
5. Repeat with left leg.
29
Stretching
the gluteals
and hamstrings
STRETCHING
WARM-UP/COOL-DOWN
SHOULDER
Seated Lean-Back
Stretching shoulder
joints—sitting
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: deltoids and pectoralis major
1. Sitting with legs straight and arms extended, place palms on floor
about 12 inches behind hips.
2. Point fingers away (backward) from body.
3. Slide hands backward and lean backward.
4. Hold for 10 seconds.
CHEST
Straight Arms Behind Back
Stretching the chest
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: deltoids and pectoralis major
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Standing, place both arms behind back.
Interlock fingers with palms facing each other.
Straighten arms fully.
Slowly raise the straight arms.
Hold for 10 to 15 seconds.
Keep head upright and neck relaxed.
POSTERIOR OF UPPER ARM
Behind-Neck Stretch (Chicken Wing)
Stretching
the triceps
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: triceps and latissimus dorsi
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Standing or sitting, flex right arm and raise elbow above head.
Reach the right hand down toward the left scapula.
Grasp right elbow with left hand.
Pull elbow behind head with left hand.
Hold for 10 seconds.
Repeat with left arm.
30
STRETCHING
WARM-UP/COOL-DOWN
NECK
Look Right and Left
Rotational flexion
of the neck
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: sternocleidomastoid
1. Stand or sit with head and neck upright.
2. Turn head to the right using a submaximal concentric contraction.
Hold for 10 seconds.
3. Turn head to the left using a submaximal concentric contraction.
Hold for 10 seconds.
NECK
Neck extension
Neck flexion
Flexion and Extension
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: sternocleidomastoid, suboccipitals and splenii
1. Standing or sitting with head and neck upright, flex neck anteriorly
(forward) by tucking chin in toward the chest; hold for 10 seconds.
2. If the chin touches the chest, try to touch lower on the chest with
the chin.
3. Extend neck posteriorly (backward) by trying to touch the head to
the trapezius; hold for 10 seconds.
SHOULDER
Straight Arms Behind Back
Stretching shoulder
joints—standing
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: deltoids and pectoralis major
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Standing, place both arms behind back.
Interlock fingers with palms facing each other.
Straighten arms fully.
Slowly raise the straight arms.
Hold for 10 to 15 seconds.
Keep head upright and neck relaxed.
31
STRETCHING
WARM-UP/COOL-DOWN
SIDES
Side Bend with Straight Arms
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: external oblique, latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior
1.
2.
3.
4.
Stand with feet 14 to 16 inches apart.
Interlace the fingers with palms facing each other.
Reach upward with straight arms.
Keeping arms straight, lean from waist to left side.
Do not bend knees.
5. After moving as far as possible, hold for 10 seconds.
6. Repeat to the left side.
Stretching
the sides, upper
back and shoulders
SIDES
Side Bend with Bent Arm
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: external oblique, latissimus dorsi, serratus anterior and triceps
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Stand with feet 14 to 16 inches apart.
Flex right arm and raise elbow above head.
Reach the right hand down toward the left shoulder.
Grasp the right elbow (just above the elbow) with the left hand.
Pull the elbow behind head.
Keeping arm bent, lean from waist to left side.
Do not bend knees.
After moving as far as possible, hold for 10 to 15 seconds.
Repeat with the left arm.
ANTERIOR OF THIGH AND HIP FLEXOR
Side Quadricep Stretch
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: quadriceps and iliopsoas
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Lie on left side with both legs straight.
Place left forearm flat on floor and upper arm perpendicular to floor.
Place left forearm at 45° angle with torso.
Flex right leg with heel of right foot moving toward buttocks.
Grasp front of ankle with right hand and pull toward buttocks.
WARNING: Do not pull on ankle so hard that pain or discomfort is felt in knee.
6. Move knee backward and slightly upward. The stretch occurs not so
much from the excessive flexion of the knee but from moving the knee
back and slightly up.
7. Hold for 10 to 15 seconds.
8. Repeat with the left leg.
32
Stretching
the sides, triceps
and upper back
Stretching the
quadriceps
on side
STRETCHING
WARM-UP/COOL-DOWN
ANTERIOR OF THIGH AND HIP FLEXOR
Kneeling Quadriceps Stretch
Stretching the
quadriceps
kneeling
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: quadriceps
1.
2.
3.
4.
Kneel with the balls of the feet on the ground.
Keep hips straight (upper leg and torso should be in a straight line).
Place palms of hands on buttocks and push slightly forward.
With a straight body, lean slightly backward until developmental
stretch is felt in quadriceps.
5. Hold for 10 to 15 seconds.
Stretching the hamstrings with
emphasis on insertion of the
hamstrings and calves.
POSTERIOR OF THIGH
Sitting Toe Touch
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: hamstrings, spinal erectors and gastrocnemius
1. Sit with the upper body nearly vertical and legs straight.
2. Lean forward from waist and grasp toes with each hand, slightly
pull toes towards the upper body, and pull chest towards leg.
(If you are very stiff, try to grasp the ankles.) Hold for 10 seconds.
3. Release toes and relax foot.
4. Grasp ankles and continue to pull chest towards legs. Hold for 10
seconds.
5. Still grasping the ankles, point away from body and continue to
pull chest towards legs. Hold for 10 seconds.
Stretching the hamstrings with
emphasis on the middle portion.
Stretching the hamstrings
with emphasis on the
upper portion.
33
STRETCHING
WARM-UP/COOL-DOWN
Stretching the hamstrings with
emphasis on insertion of the
hamstrings and calves
POSTERIOR OF THIGH
Semistraddle (Figure Four)
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: gastrocnemius, hamstrings and spinal erectors
1. Sit with the upper body nearly vertical and legs straight.
2. Place sole of left foot on left side of right knee. The lateral side of
left leg should be resting on the floor.
3. Lean forward from the waist and grasp toes with right hand and
slightly pull toes toward the upper body as the chest is also pulled
toward right leg. Hold for 10 seconds.
4. Release toes and relax foot.
5. Grasp ankle and continue to pull chest toward right leg. Hold for
10 seconds.
6. Point toes away from body and continue to pull chest toward right
leg. Hold for 10 seconds.
7. Repeat with the left leg.
Stretching the hamstrings
with emphasis on the
middle portion
Stretching the hamstrings
with emphasis on the
upper portion
Remember... do all stretches in a
smooth, slow controlled manner.
34
STRETCHING
WARM-UP/COOL-DOWN
GROIN
Stretching the hamstrings and groin
with emphasis on insertion of
the hamstrings and calves
Straddle (Spread Eagle)
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: gastrocnemius, hamstrings, spinal erectors,
adductors and sartorius
1. Sit with the upper body nearly vertical and legs straight, and
spread legs as far as possible.
2. With right hand, grasp toes of right foot and pull on toes slightly,
while pulling chest toward right leg. Hold for 10 seconds.
3. Release toes and relax foot.
4. Grasp ankle and continue to pull chest toward right leg. Hold for
10 seconds.
5. Point toes away from body and continue to pull chest toward right
leg. Hold for 10 seconds.
6. Repeat process with the left leg.
7. Repeat process by grasping right toes with right hand and left
toes with left hand. Move the torso forward and toward the ground.
Stretching the hamstrings and groin
with emphasis on the middle portion
Stretching the hamstrings and groin
with emphasis on the upper portion
Stretching the groin, low
back and hamstrings
35
STRETCHING
WARM-UP/COOL-DOWN
GROIN
Butterfly
Stretching the groin
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: adductors and sartorius
1. Sitting with the upper body nearly vertical and legs straight, flex
both knees as the soles of the feet come together.
2. Pull feet toward body.
3. Place hands on feet and elbows on legs.
4. Pull torso slightly forward as elbows push legs down.
5. Hold for 10 to 15 seconds.
POSTERIOR OF LOWER LEG
Bent-Over Toe Raise
Stretching calves
without a step
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: gastrocnemius and soleus
1. Stand with heel of right foot 6 to 8 inches in front of left foot.
2. Flex right foot toward shin (dorsi-flexion) with heel in contact with
floor.
3. Lean forward and try to touch right leg with chest while both legs
are straight.
4. Continue to lean downward with upper body as the foot is
dorsi-flexed near maximal toward the shin.
5. Hold for 10 to 15 seconds.
6. Repeat with the left leg.
36
STRETCHING
WARM-UP/COOL-DOWN
POSTERIOR OF LOWER LEG
Step Stretch
MUSCLE(S) AFFECTED: gastrocnemius and soleus; also, achilles tendon
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Have ready a step or board 3 to 4 inches high.
Place balls of both feet on the step or board, 1 inch from its edge.
With straight legs, lower heels as far as posible.
Hold for 10 to 15 seconds.
To stretch achilles tendon, raise heels slightly. Slightly flex the
knees and then lower the heels. This stretch will be felt in the
achilles tendon.
6. Hold for 10 to 15 seconds.
7. For a more intense and individualized stretch, perform this stretch
with one leg at a time.
Stretching the calves
standing on a step
Preparing to stretch
the achilles tendon by
slightly bending the knee
37
Stretching the
achilles tendon by
lowering the heel
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38
N O T E S
39
N O T E S
40
FID46 Flat/Incline/Decline Bench
R e f e r e n c e
41
D r a w i n g s
F I D 4 6
H a r d w a r e
( s h o w n
i n
( c o n t i n u e d )
a c t u a l
s i z e )
Key # 33 nylon lock nut 8mm QTY. 2
Key # 35 spring lock washer 10mm QTY. 3
Key # 37 spring lock washer 8mm QTY. 8
Key # 36 flat washer 10mm QTY. 34
Key # 38 flat washer 8mm QTY. 12
Key # 34 flat washer 10mm x 30mm QTY. 3
Key # 32 nylon lock nut 10mm QTY. 19
Key # 31 spring lock washer 12mm QTY. 2
Key # 30 hex bolt 8mm x 60mm partial thread QTY. 8
Key # 22 flat washer 12mm QTY. 10
Key # 31 hex bolt 8mm x 45mm partial thread QTY. 2
mm
Inch
42
43
Inch
mm
Key # 13 hex bolt 12mm x 80mm partial thread QTY. 2
a c t u a l
Key # 21 hex bolt 10mm x 210mm partial thread QTY. 1
i n
Key # 22 hex bolt 10mm x 165mm partial thread QTY. 2
Key # 29 square neck carriage bolt 10mm x 95mm QTY. 4
Key # 28 round allen head 10mm x 20mm full thread bolt QTY. 3
( s h o w n
Key # 23 hex bolt 10mm x 110mm partial thread QTY. 1
Key # 24 hex bolt 10mm x 80mm partial thread QTY. 2
Key # 25 hex bolt 10mm x 60mm partial thread QTY. 2
Key # 26 hex bolt 10mm x 40mm full thread QTY. 8
F I D 4 6
H a r d w a r e
s i z e )
F I D 4 6
KEY# QTY
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
J
K
L
M
N
R
S
T
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
M a i n f r a m e
PART#
DESCRIPTION
FID46FL-A
FID46MF-B
FID46BL-C
FID46BP-D
FID46AC-E
FID46CAT-F
FID46SP-G
FID46SB-H
FID46BB-J
FID46LSPH-K
FID46RSPH-K
FID46LBKH-M
FID46RBKH-N
FID46PA-R
FID46PS-S
FID46MP-T
FRONT LEG
MAINFRAME
BACK LEG
BRACE PLATE
ADJUSTMENT CARRIAGE
CHROME ADJUSTMENT TUBE
SEAT PIVOT
SEAT BRACE
BACK BRACE
LEFT SEAT PAD HANDLE
RIGHT SEAT PAD HANDLE
LEFT BACK PAD HANDLE
RIGHT BACK PAD HANDLE
PIVOT ARM
PIVOT SHAFT
MAIN POST
F I D 4 6
KEY# QTY
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
10
1
2
1
4
6
4
1
6
3
4
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
22
1
2
1
2
2
8
3
4
8
2
19
2
3
3
34
8
12
2
1
H a r d w a r e
P
Q
1
1
1
1
L i s t
PART#
DESCRIPTION
PLASTIC END CAP 1"X2"
PLASTIC BALL-END CAP 2"
PLASTIC BALL-END CAP 2.5"
PLASTIC BALL-END CAP 3"
3" ROUND FOOT CAP
PLASTIC ROLLER END CAP
ID. 1 1/4" ROUND HANDLE END CAP
OLY ADAPTER SLEEVE
FOAM ROLLER 4"X8" / UPHOLESTERED
FOAM ROLLER BAR 18 1/2"
FOAM GRIP 1.6" OD (VARIOUS LENGTHS)
RUBBER DONUT (FOR OLY. WEIGHT POST)
ADJUSTMENT PIN
ROLLER WHEEL 3"
LARGE LOCKING POP PIN HANDLE
RUBBER STOPPER
OILITE BUSHING 32mm OD X 20mm ID
PLASTIC BUSHING 65mm X 65mm
HIGH-LOW PLASTIC BUSHING 45mm X 45mm
OILITE BUSHING 20mm OD X 10mm ID
HEX BOLT 10mmX210mm PARTIAL THREAD
HEX BOLT 10mmX165mm PARTIAL THREAD
HEX BOLT 10mmX110mm PARTIAL THREAD
HEX BOLT 10mmX80mm PARTIAL THREAD
HEX BOLT 10mmX60mm PARTIAL THREAD
HEX BOLT 10mmX40mm FULL THREAD
ROUND ALLEN HEAD 10mmX20mm FULL THREAD BOLT
SQUARE NECK CARRIAGE BOLT 10mm X 95mm
HEX BOLT 8mmX60mm PARTIAL THREAD
HEX BOLT 8mmX45mm PARTIAL THREAD
NYLON LOCK NUT 10mm
NYLON LOCK NUT 8mm
FLAT WASHER 10mm X 30mm
SPRING LOCK WASHER 10mm
FLAT WASHER 10mm
SPRING LOCK WASHER 8mm
FLAT WASHER 8mm
PLASTIC SQUARE END CAP 1.75"X1.75"
OLYMPIC SPRING COLLAR 1 7/8"
P a d s
PART#
DESCRIPTION
FID46SP-P
FID46BP-Q
SEAT PAD
BACK PAD
F I D 4 6
KEY# QTY
L i s t
PEC12
BC2
BEC250
BC3
RFC3
PFREC2.5
REC1.25
OASC2
FOAM48
FRB18.5
FG1.6
RDOP2
PIN4
ROLWH3
LLPPH
RS1
BB3220
PB6565
PB4545
BB2010
HEX10210PTB
HEX10165PTB
HEX10110PTB
HEX1080PTB
HEX1060PTB
HEX1040FTB
RAH1020FTB
SNCS1095
HEX860FTB
HEX845FTB
NLN10
NLN8
WFLT1030
WSW10
WFLT10
WSW8
WFLT8
PSEC175175
OLYCLR1.84
F I D 4 6
KEY# QTY
P a r t s
L i s t
L a b e l s / D e c a l s
PART#
DESCRIPTION
DWRULE-4
DWSM-5
WARNING LABEL FOR RULES
WARNING LABEL FOR MAINTENANCE
Part numbers are required when ordering parts.
44
L i s t
EXPLODED VIEW
DIAGRAM
B o d y - S o l i d
F I D 4 6
F l a t / I n c l i n e / D e c l i n e
B e n c h
© Copyright 2003. Body-Solid. All rights reserved. Body-Solid reserves the right to change design and specifications when we feel it will improve the product.
Body-Solid machines maintain several patented and patent pending features and designs. All rights reserved on all design patents and utility patents.
45
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