Samsung | VP-D310 | Specifications | Samsung VP-D310 Specifications

Dewetron USA
Owner’s Guide
Energy test
Flight test
Vehicle test
Industrial
D3PC, D310,
DEWE-3210
DEWE-3040-RM
DEWE-3050
data acquisition
instruments
Important notices
Contents © 2007-2013 Dewetron, Inc.
The contents of this manual are protected by copyright law, and may be reproduced only with the express written
permission of Dewetron, Inc. All rights are reserved.
Contact the company at our address here:
Dewetron, Inc.
10 High Street, Ste K, Wakefield, RI 02879 USA
Telephone: +1 401-284-3750
Fax: +1 401-284-3755
email: support@dewamerica.com
web: www.dewamerica.com
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Dewetron is a trademark of Dewetron GesmbH
Microsoft, Microsoft Windows XP and Microsoft Windows 7 are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation
Matlab® is a trademark of The Mathworks, Inc.
Flexpro® is a trademark of Weisang GMBH
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Dewesoft is a trademark of Dewesoft d.o.o.
Met/CAL® is a trademark of Fluke Corporation
Vector and DBC are the properties of Vector Informatik GmbH
All copyrights and trademarks acknowledged to be the properties of their owners.
Printed in USA
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3210 series | iii
Contents
1
Introduction1-11
Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11
Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11
Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-12
Certificate included. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-12
Models Covered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-12
What’s in this Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-12
And what is not in this guide: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-12
2
Safety precautions
2-13
BIOS notification:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
Windows updates and antivirus/security software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
Problematic network stacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
System and Components Recycling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
Restriction of Hazardous Substances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
3
D310 Series
3-17
System Dimensions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-18
Top-level call-outs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19
Top-level call-outs (continued). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-20
D310 Left Side Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-20
Accessing the Batteries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-21
Signal conditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-22
A/D card(s). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-22
Interface(s). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23
Video Cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23
Installing the 310-UPS option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-24
Configuration guide, D310 with MDAQ panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-26
iv | Table of Contents
Configuration guide, D310 model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-27
Connecting EPAD2 modules to your D310 (DAQ or MDAQ version). . . . . . . 3-27
System Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-28
System/PC connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-28
Computer Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-30
Signal Input Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-36
Channel Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-40
Connecting the MOB-DISP-17 to your D310. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43
Operation Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-44
System Startup Protocol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-44
HDD Usage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-46
Basic Specifcations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-47
Additional Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-48
Digital and clock line specs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-48
Standard Counter/Encoders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-49
Advanced Counter/Encoders (UP-ORION-CTR8 option). . . . . . . . . . . . 3-49
CAN BUS specs (UP-ORION-CAN2 option). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-49
4
D3PC-8 Model
4-51
System Dimensions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-52
Top-level call-outs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-53
Signal conditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-54
A/D card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-54
Interface(s). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-55
Video Cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-55
Connecting EPAD2 modules to your D3PC-8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-56
Connecting a Standard VGA/XGA Monitor to your D3PC-8. . . . . . . . . . . 4-57
Connecting the MOB-DISP-17 to your D3PC-8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-58
Using the New iPAD as a Wireless Display with your D3PC-8. . . . . . . . . . 4-59
System Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-60
Computer Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-61
Signal Input Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-68
Synchronizing Multiple D3PC-8 Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-71
| v
Operation Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-72
System Startup Protocol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-72
Hardware Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-73
Basic Specifcations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-74
Digital and clock line specs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-75
Standard Counter/Encoders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-75
Advanced Counter/Encoders (UP-ORION-CTR8 option). . . . . . . . . . . . 4-76
CAN BUS specs (UP-ORION-CAN2 option). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-76
5
DEWE-3210 Series
5-77
System Dimensions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-78
Top-level call-outs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-79
Signal conditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-80
A/D card(s). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-80
Interface(s). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-81
Video Cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-81
Configuration guide, DEWE-3211 model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-82
Configuration guide, DEWE-3210 model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-82
System Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-83
System/PC connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-83
Computer Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-85
Signal Input Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-91
Expansion connector (DEWE-3210 model). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-93
Operation Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-95
System Startup Protocol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-95
Hardware Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-97
Analog Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-99
Counter/Encoder Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-100
CAN BUS Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-100
Interfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-101
Accessories Included. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-101
Computer System Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-102
Data Acquisition Software Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-103
vi| 6
DEWE-3050 Series
6-105
System Dimensions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-106
Top-level call-outs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-107
Top-level call-outs (continued). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-108
DEWE-3050, rear view, TWO 2.5U-PANEL-16s installed (32 slots). . . . . . . 6-108
DEWE-3050 Rear Panel Configurations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-109
DEWE-3050, front view, display removed - keyboard revealed. . . . . . . . 6-110
Additional Function Panels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-110
Signal conditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-112
A/D card(s). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-112
Interface(s). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-113
Video Cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-113
System Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-114
System/PC connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-114
PC Connector Call-Outs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-115
Signal Input Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-119
Operation Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-122
System Startup Protocol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-122
Hardware Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-124
Additional Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-127
7
DEWE-3040-RM Series
7-129
System Dimensions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-130
Top Level Call-outs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-131
Top-level call-outs (continued). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-132
DEWE-3040-RM, front view, Control Panel Close-up. . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-132
DEWE-3040-RM Rear Panel Configurations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-133
DEWE-3050, front view, display removed - keyboard revealed. . . . . . . . 7-134
Signal conditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-136
A/D card(s). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-136
Interface(s). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-137
Video Cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-137
System Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-138
|vii
System/PC connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-138
Top Rear Panel Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-139
Right Side Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-139
Signal Input Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-143
Operation Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-145
System Startup Protocol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-145
Hardware Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-145
Additional Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-147
8
Signal Connections / Counters
8-149
Analog input connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-149
Counter/Encoder input connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-150
Counter Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-151
9
Software Overview
9-167
LabVIEW Drivers for ORION and DAQ Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-168
DEWESoft Turn-key Application (DS-7). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-171
DS-7 Software Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-172
DS-7 Operation Part 1: Acquisition and Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-175
Projects and Global settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-211
Matlab - Exporting Data from DS-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-237
10
Important Accessories
10-243
DPS-2410 external AC/DC power supply. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-243
Neutrino-4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-247
BAT-CHARGER-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-251
DEWE-DCDC-24-300-ISO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-255
MOB-DISP-17 Mobile Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-256
11
Signal/Sensor Adapters
11-261
MSI series interfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-261
Adapters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-263
viii| 12
HSI Series Signal Conditioners
273
HSI Series Modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273
HSI-HV Isolated High Voltage module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
HSI-LV Isolated Low Voltage Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
HSI-STG Isolated Universal Input Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286
13
DAQ Series Signal Conditioners
13-293
DAQ Series Modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13-293
DAQP-HV (and -S3) Isolated High Voltage module (300/700 kHz). . . . . . 13-303
DAQP-DMM Isolated High Voltage Module (20/30 kHz). . . . . . . . . . 13-305
DAQP-LV Isolated Low Voltage Module (300 kHz) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-307
DAQP-V Isolated Low Voltage Module (50 kHz) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-311
DAQP-LA and LA-SC Isolated Current Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-313
DAQP-STG Isolated Universal Input Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-315
DAQP-BRIDGE-A Isolated Strain Gage Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-323
DAQP-BRIDGE-B Strain Gage Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-327
DAQP-CFB Carrier Frequency/LVDT module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-331
DAQP-ACC-A IEPE Accelerometer module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-335
DAQP-CHARGE-A Charge/IEPE module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-337
DAQP-CHARGE-B Isolated Static/Dynamic Charge module. . . . . . . . . 13-339
DAQP-THERM Isolated Thermocouple module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-341
DAQP-MULTI Isolated Multifunction module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-343
DAQP-FREQ-A Frequency to Voltage module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-349
DAQN-V-OUT Isolated Voltage Output module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-351
14
PAD series Signal Conditioners
14-353
PAD Series Common Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-353
Calibration information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-353
General PAD module specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-353
PAD Module Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-354
PAD Modules Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-355
Adding PAD modules to your Dewtetron system: . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-356
Typical hook-ups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-356
|ix
Addressing PAD modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-357
PAD-V8-P Isolated 8-channel Voltage module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-361
PAD-TH8-P Isolated 8-channel Temperature module. . . . . . . . . . . . 14-363
PAD-DO7 Isolated 7-channel Relay Output module. . . . . . . . . . . . 14-365
PAD-AO1 Isolated 1-channel Analog Output module. . . . . . . . . . . . 14-367
15 MDAQ Series Conditioners
15-369
MDAQ Series Common Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-369
General MDAQ module specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15-369
MDAQ-BASE-5 Mother Board. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-370
MDAQ-SUB-STG 8-channel Strain Gage/Bridge module . . . . . . . . . . 15-372
MDAQ-SUB-BRIDGE 8-channel Bridge module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-377
MDAQ-SUB-V200 Differential Voltage Input module . . . . . . . . . . . 15-381
MDAQ-SUB-ACC IEPE Accelerometer module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-385
MDAQ-SUB-ACC-A IEPE Accelerometer module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-387
MDAQ-FILT-5-Bx Filter card. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-389
MDAQ-AAF4-5-Bx Filter card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-390
16 EPAD2 and CPAD2 Series
16-391
EPAD2 and CPAD2 overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-391
General EPAD2/CPAD2 Module Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-392
xPAD2 Series Calibration Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-395
EPAD2-TH8-X and CPAD2-TH8-X. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-396
EPAD2-V8-X and CPAD2-V8-X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-398
EPAD2-RTD8 and CPAD2-RTD8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-400
EPAD2-TH8 and CPAD2-TH8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-402
EPAD2-LA8 and CPAD2-LA8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-404
17
ORION Series A/D Cards
17-407
ORION series Cross-Reference. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-407
ORION Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-408
A/D Technologies within the ORION series. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-408
Combining ORION cards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-409
x| ORION-0424-200. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-412
ORION-0824-200. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-413
ORION-1624-200. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-414
ORION-1622-100 and ORION-3222-100. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-415
18
DEWETRON Interfaces
18-417
DEWE-CLOCK time code interface card. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-417
VIDEO-FG-4 interface card. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-433
ARINC-429 and MIL-STD-1553 interfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-437
CAN BUS interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-442
19
DEWETRON Sensors
19-451
DEWE-CAMS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-452
DEWE-CAM-USB. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-452
DEWE-CAM-FW-70 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19-456
GPS Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-461
DEWE-VGPS-200C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-461
DEWE-VGPS-HS High Speed GPS Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-462
20
Using the iPad as a Wireless Display
20-463
System Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-463
1. Create a Passworded USER account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-464
2. Allow Remote Desktop in Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-466
3. Connect your USER account to RDP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20-468
4. Set the DEWE Computer’s WIFI adapter to a fixed IP Address. . . . . . . 20-468
5. Allowing Remote Desktop through the DEWE Computer’s Firewall . . . . 20-472
6. Create a Private WIFI network with your Wireless Router. . . . . . . . .20-474
7. Connect the DEWE computer to your private network . . . . . . . . . . 20-475
8. Connect the new iPad to your private network. . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-476
9. Gestures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20-480
Appendix
A-485
OWNER’s GUIDE - Section 1, Introduction | 1-11
1
Introduction
The products covered in this manual are the data
acquisition instruments within the DEWETRON line
manufactured by Dewetron, Inc in the United States
of America.
D300 and DEWE-3000 series instruments are a
unqiue combination of a state-of-the-art computer
which has been ruggedized for field applications
in industrial applications, plus a signal conditioning
front-end system for interfacing with sensors and
interfaces, an A/D card for digitizing the conditioned
signals, and powerful data acquisition software that
allows you to set up and initiate data acquisition,
as well as to analyze data that has been replayed.
There are several models, because there are so
many applications for our products, in different
industries, and with different requirements for size,
form factor, and capabilities.
Training
DEWETRON offers training at various offices around
the world several times each year. DEWETRON
headquaters in Austria have a very large and professional conference and seminar center, where training classes are conducted on a regular basis starting
with sensors and signal conditioning, A/D technology
and software operation.
Dewetron Inc. in the USA also has a dedicated training facility connected to its headquarters, located in
Rhode Island. For more information about training
services in the US, please visit:
http://www.dewamerica.com/support/training
Support
DEWETRON has a team of people ready to assist
you if you have any questions or any technical difficulties regarding the system. For any support please
contact your local distributor first or DEWETRON
directly.
For North and South America, please contact:
Dewetron, Inc.
10 High Street, Suite K Wakefield, RI 02879 U.S.A.
Tel: +1 401-284-3750 Fax: +1 401-284-3755
support@dewamerica.com
www.dewamerica.com
For Asia and Europe, please contact:
Dewetron Ges.m.b.H.
Parkring 4 A-8074 Graz-Grambach AUSTRIA
Tel.: +43 316 3070
Fax: +43 316 307090
support@dewetron.com
www.dewetron.com
1-12| OWNER’s GUIDE
Calibration
Every measuring instrument should be calibrated at
regular intervals. The norm across nearly every industry is annual calibration, although this can vary
according to the industry, environment, government regulations, and other regulations.
Models Covered
This owner’s guide covers the following model(s):
„„ D3PC
„„ D310
„„ DEWE-3210
Before your Dewetron data acquisition system is
delivered, it is calibrated at our factory in the USA.
Dewetron utilizes a NIST traceable metrology system based on the Fluke 5500 series calibrator and
other industry leading instruments. We have created
numerous Met/CAL® procedures and specialized
calibration hardware and software to allow the
automation of calibration check and adjustment of
nearly every signal conditioner and A/D card that we
manufacture. These procedures are proprietary to
Dewetron, although they are available for purchase.
Customers who have the same Fluke hardware can
use them to similarly automate their calibration of
Dewetron instruments.
„„ DEWE-3040-RM
Calibration services are available directly from
Dewetron, on whatever frequency you require. We
do not subcontract calibration services, and perform
it ourselves in house.
„„ Detailed specs for each model
Contact Dewetron for further information about
calibration services and calibration equipment that is
available for purchase.
As a top-level reference, This manual is not meant
to replace the comprehence reference manuals related to Dewetron sensors, signal conditioners, A/D
cards, interfaces, and software.
Certificate included
Each system is delivered with a certificate of compliance with our published specifications.
However, if you require a traceable calibration
certification with data, calibration reports are available for purchase with each order. We retain them
for at least one year, so calibration reports can be
purchased after your system was delivered.
„„ DEWE-3050
What’s in this Guide
This guide is intended to serve as the top level
reference document for the models listed above. As
such, it contains the following key information:
„„ Support and calibration contact info
„„ Safety precautions
„„ System overview and block diagram
„„ Overview of all models
„„ Quick start guide operation
And what is not in this guide:
Please see those manuals for complete details.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Section 2, Safety Precautions | 2-13
2
Safety precautions
Your safety is our primary concern! Please be safe at
all times.
General safety and hazard warnings for all Dewetron
systems:
Symbols used in this manual:
♦♦ Use this system under the terms of the specifications only to
avoid any possible danger. Maintenance should be performed
by qualified personnel only.
♦♦ During the use of the system, it might be possible to interact
with non-Dewetron systems. Please read and follow the safety
instructions provided in the manuals of all other components
regarding warning and security advices for using the system.
♦♦ With this product, only use the power cable delivered or defined for the host country.
♦♦ Do not connect or disconnect sensors, probes or test leads, as
these parts are connected to a voltage supply unit.
♦♦ The system is grounded via a protective conductor in the
Indicates hazardous voltages
WARNING
power supply cord. To avoid electric shocks, the protective
conductor must be connected with the ground of the power
network. Before connecting the input or output connectors
of the system, make sure that there is a proper grounding to
guarantee potential free usage. For countries, in which there is
no proper grounding, please refere to your local legally safety
regulations for safety use.
Calls attention to a procedure, practice, or condition
that could cause bodily injury or death.
♦♦ DC systems: Every DC system has a grounding connected to
CAUTION
♦♦ Please note the characteristics and indicators on the system
Calls attention to a procedure, practice, or condition
that could possibly cause damage to equipment or
permanent loss of data.
♦♦ The inputs are not, unless otherwise noted (CATx identifica-
⇒⇒ These notices are sometimes indicated in this
graphical motif.
The following general safety precautions must be
observed during all phases of operation, service,
and repair of this product. Failure to comply with
these precautions or with specific warnings elsewhere in this manual violates safety standards
of design, manufacture, and intended use of the
product. DEWETRON Elektronische Messgeraete
Ges.m.b.H. assumes no liability for the customer’s
failure to comply with these requirements.
the chassis (yellow/green safety banana plug).
to avoid fire or electric shocks. Before connecting the system,
please carefully read the corresponding specifications in the
product manual.
tion), for connecting to the main circuit of category II, III and IV.
♦♦ The power cord separates the system from the power supply.
Do not block the power cord, since it has to be accessible for
the users.
♦♦ Do not use the system if equipment covers or shields are
removed.
♦♦ If you assume the system is damaged, get it examined by
authorized personnel only.
♦♦ Any use in wet rooms, outdoors or in adverse environmental
condition is not allowed! Adverse environmental conditions are:
moisture or high humidity, dust, flammable gases, fumes or
storms. et al.
2-14| OWNER’s GUIDE
♦♦ The measurement category can be adjusted depending on
module configuration.
♦♦ Any direct voltage output is protected with a fuse against short
cut and reverse-polarity, but is not galvanically isolated (except
when explicitly marked on the system).
♦♦ The system must be connected and operated to a properly
grounded wall socket at the AC mains power supply only
(except for DC systems).
♦♦ Any other use than described above may damage your system
and is attended with dangers like shortcut, fire or electric
shocks.
♦♦ The whole system must not be changed, rebuilt or opened
(except for changing DAQP, HSI, PAD, CPAD2, and EPAD2
modules).
♦♦ If you believe for any reason that the system cannot be used
without risk, the system must be rendered inoperative and
should be protected against inadvertant operation. You should
assume that riskless operation is not possible if the system is:
visibly damaged; emits unusual noises, smoke, or flames; if it
does not function anymore; if the system has been exposed to
long storage in adverse environmental conditions; if the system
has been exposed to heavy stresses.
♦♦ Do not touch any exposed connectors or components if they
are carrying voltage and/or current. The use of non-insulated
wires with the system is never allowed. There is a risk of short
circuit and fire hazard.
please refer to the specifications.
♦♦ Make sure that your hands, shoes, clothes, the floor, the sys-
tem or measuring leads, integrated curcuits and so on, are dry.
♦♦ DO NOT use the system in rooms with flammable gases,
fumes or dust or in adverse environmental conditions.
♦♦ Avoid operation in the immediate vicinity of high magnetic or
electromagnetic fields transmitting antennas or high-frequency
generators
♦♦ For exact values please refere to enclosed specifications.
♦♦ Use measurement leads or measurement accessories aligned
to the specification of the system only. Fire hazard in case of
overload!
♦♦ Do not switch on the system after transporting it from a cold
into a warm room and vice versa. The thereby created condensation may damage your system. Acclimate the unpowered
system to room temperature.
♦♦ Do not disassemble the system! There is a high risk of getting
a perilous electric shock. Capacitors may still be charged, even
the system has been disconnected from the power supply.
♦♦ The electrical installations and equipments in industrial facilities
must be observed by the security regulations and insurance
institutions.
♦♦ The use of the measuring system in schools and other training
facilities must be observerd by skilled personnel.
♦♦ Warranty void if damages caused by disregarding this manual.
♦♦ The measuring systems are not designed for use on human
♦♦ Warranty void if damages to property or persons caused by
♦♦ Please contact a professional if you have doubts about the
♦♦ Unauthorized changing or rebuilding the system is prohibited
♦♦ Please be careful with the product. Shocks, hits and dropping
For consequential damages NO liability will be assumed!
improper use or disregarding the safety instructions.
due to safety and permission reasons (CE). Exception: changing modules like DAQ, DAQP or PAD.
♦♦ The assembly of the system is equivalent to protection class I.
For power supply, only the correct power socket of the public
power supply must be used, except the system is DC powered.
♦♦ Be careful with voltages >25 VAC or >35 VDC! These voltages
are already high enough in order to get a dangerous electric
shock by touching the wiring.
♦♦ The system heats up during operation. Make sure there is
beings or animals.
method of operation, safety or the connection of the system.
it from even low levels may damage the batteries, or the whole
system. For exact values please refere to enclosed specifications.
♦♦ Please also consider the detailed technical reference manual
as well as the security advices of the connected systems.
♦♦ This product has left the factory in safety-related proper condition. In order to maintain this condition and guarantee safety
use, the user must observe the security advice, protocols, and
warnings in this manual.
adequate ventilation. Ventilation slots must not covered!
♦♦ Only fuses of the specified type and nominal current may be
used. The use of patched fuses is prohibited.
♦♦ Prevent using metal bare wires! Risk of short cut and fire
hazard!
♦♦ DO NOT use the system before, during or shortly after a
thunderstorm (risk of lightning and high energy overvoltage).
An advanced range of application under certain conditions
is allowed with therefore designed products only. For details
BIOS notification:
The system BIOS is protected by password. Any
change in the BIOS may cause a system crash.
When the system is booting, do not press ESC-button on keyboard. This may clear the BIOS settings
OWNER’s GUIDE - Section 2, Safety Precautions | 2-15
and cause system faults.
Any change in the file structure as deleting or adding
files or directories might cause a system crash.
Before installing software updates contact Dewetron
or your local distributor. Use only software packages which are released by DEWETRON. Further
informations are also available in the internet (http://
www.dewetron.com).
After power off the system wait at least 10 seconds
before switching the system on again. Otherwise the
system may not boot correct. This prolongs also the
life of all system components.
Windows updates and antivirus/
security software
♦♦ Before installing Windows software updates consult with Dewetron for compatibility guidance. Please also keep in mind that
the use of any antivirus or other security software may slow
down your system and may cause data loss.
Problematic network stacks
♦♦ Often intrusive IT software or network processes can interfere
with the primary function of the Dewetron system: to record
data. Therefore we recommend strongly against the installation of IT/MIS software and running their processes on any
Dewetron data acquisition system, and cannot guarantee the
performance of our systems if they are so configured.
Product End-of-Life Handling
Observe the following guidelines when recycling a
Dewetron system:
System and Components Recycling
Production of these components required the
extraction and use of natural resources. The
substances contained in the system could be
harmful to your health and to the environment if
the system is improperly handled at it’s end of life!
Please recycle this product in an appropriate way
to avoid an unnecessary pollution of the environment and to keep natural resources.
tron.com
This symbol indicates that this system
complies with the European Union’s
requirements according to Directive
2002/96/EC on waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). Please find
further informations about recycling on
the DEWETRON web site www.dewe-
Restriction of Hazardous Substances
This product has been classified as Monitoring and
Control equipment, and is outside the scope of the
2002/95/EC RoHS Directive. This product is known
to contain lead.
2-16| OWNER’s GUIDE
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-17
3
D310 Series
The D310 is an economical and portable data
acquisition instrument. In this model the 15”
touchscreen display and battery capabilities are
options that must be ordered with the machine
is built. It is capable of housing any 8 Dewetron
plug-in isolation modules (DAQ/PAD/HSI series) or
16 MDAQ differential conditioner channels.
This model is manufactured at the company’s facilities in the USA. It has all of the capabilties of the
DEWE-3210, except in a more affordable package.
This section will review the hardware characteristics and specifications of the D310 series, including its
properties as a computer instrument, and all data acquisition components, including the A/D cards, signal
conditioners, and interfaces with which it is compatible.
Please refer to the SOFTWARE section of this manual to learn how to operate the turn-key data acquisition
software installed on the system.
Please refer to the separate sections for the SIGNAL CONDITIONERS, A/D CARDS, INTERFACES and
SENSORS for complete details about those components that may be installed within your system.
3-18| OWNER’s GUIDE
System Dimensions
D310 with battery and display option installed
165
(with battery option)
128
(without battery option)
381
312
(Left Side)
Dimensions in millimeters (mm)
Divide by 25.4 for inches
(Top, with screen option)
(Right Side)
Add 10 mm all around for BNC
connectors, knobs, and other
protrusions.
Allow plenty of room for cooling fans
to function properly. Never block air
exchange.
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-19
Top-level call-outs
D310, Left/Front Angle, with optional display and batteries
Optional 15” XGA display with
resistive TOUCHSCREEN
2 Counter LEMOs
Rubber side shock
absorbers
Computer connections
(see next page)
EPAD LEMO
DAQ/PAD/HSI
slots or MDAQ
conditioners
12VDC output
CHs 8-15*
Rubber side shock
absorbers
Accessory / digital
I/O connector
Chassis tie-down hard
points
Optional ORIONSYNC I/O and LEDs
Filtered air intakes
(2 fans)
Optional CAN BUS
DB9 connectors
Chassis tie-down hard
points
Battery door release
button
Optional 310-UPS
battery compartment
D310 without the
display and battery
options
3-20| OWNER’s GUIDE
Top-level call-outs (continued)
D310 Right Side Panel
Removable hard drive bay
9~29 VDC Power Input
3 x PCI slot card edges
Chassis tie-down
hard point
Power Switch
DC output from
battery option
Computer I/O
RS232, 3 x ethernet,
4 x USB 2.0, Audio I/O,
VGA output, 2 x PS/2,
1 x IEEE-1394
DC input to
battery option
Battery option
Battery compartment
release button
D310 Left Side Panel
EPAD LEMO 2 x Counter LEMOs 12VDC convenience outlet
DAQ/PAD/HSI slots (or
MDAQ positions)
Rubberized side bumpers
Not used (Reserved)
Accessory/Digital I/O
DSUB-37
Sync In/Out and
LEDs (option)
CAN BUS (2 x DB9)
(option)
Battery option
Analog chs 8~15 (when
DAQ slots are installed only)
Battery compartment
release button
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-21
Accessing the Batteries
When the battery option (310-UPS) is installed, an additional battery compartment is fixed to the underside
of the D310 chassis. This is done at the factory. The batteries are installed on the large flat surface at the
bottom of the battery compartment.
First, turn the D310 upright as shown below, so that you have access to the underside of the battery compartment.
Second, press in the two battery door release buttons, located on opposite sides of the battery compartment. These are labeled in the preceding top-level chassis call-outs, as well as in the picture below.
This will cause the battery door to open. This reveals the edges of the batteries. Grab the plastic pull tab on
any battery to remove it from the system. Similarly you may insert new or recharged batteries into this compartment, making sure that they are aligned properly and fit all the way into the slot.
Simply close the battery door when finished. Batteries can be swapped even when the system is powered
up and running from the batteries. The only caveat is that the batteries should have enough charge to continue running the system; generally 25% is sufficient. You can look at the batteries while they are installed
and see their LCD power gauges, to estimate their remaining power.
Four battery slots for
SideHAND2 batteries
Push-buttons on each side,
to release the battery door
DC output (14-24 VDC)
DC input (18-24 VDC)
(connects to the DPS-2410,
included with the 310-UPS
option)
You can pull on the plastic tab at the end of any
battery in order to remove it from the system.
3-22| OWNER’s GUIDE
Signal conditioning
The D310 can be equipped with either:
„„ 8 x DAQ / PAD / HSI series plug-in signal conditioners, or
„„ 2 x 8-channel MDAQ-SUB conditioners (16 channels total)
It is not possible to install both DAQ/PAD/HSI slots and MDAQ conditioners into the body of the D310. However, mixed systems can be created by connecting external conditioners of any kind to the system. Therefore it is common that the D310 is configured with 8 internal DAQ modules, plus connected to 16 ot more
external MDAQ conditioners. Or the other way around, with 16 built-in MDAQ conditioners, and 16 or more
DAQ/PAD/HSI modules connected externally. There are many possibilities.
Model D310 with 8 DAQ modules
Model D310 with 16 MDAQ channels
A/D card(s)
The D310 has three half length PCI slots inside. As a standard, the ORION-1616-100 A/D card is installed
when you buy the D310 data acquisition system. This card provides the following basic specifications (further details are shown in the specification tables in the next pages):
„„ 16 simultaneously sampled analog input channels
„„ 16-bit resolution, separate ADC per channels
„„ 100 kS/s/ch maximum sample rate
„„ 2 synchronous counter/encoder inputs
„„ 8 each digital input and output lines
At the time of ordering, this card can be upgraded, using any of the options available for increasing the
channel count, the bit resolution to 22 or 24-bit, or increasing the sample rate up to 1 MS/s/ch, and many
combinations of the preceding. See the UP-ORION options for all of the possibilities.
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-23
In addition, many options can be factory installed onto the ORION cards, including adding two high speed
CAN BUS interfaces, or expanding the number and capabilities of the digital counters that are installed.
Interface(s)
The D310 is compatible with ORION, PCI card, and USB connected interfaces These include the CAN BUS
interfaces added to the ORION A/D card, as well as separate PCI cards available for adding multiple ARINC
429, MIL-STD-1553 interfaces to the system. If all three PCI slots were used up, ARINC and MIL-STD-1553
interfaces can also be added as USB devices. There are numerous interfaces available for your DEWE
system.
Typical ARINC or MIL-STD-1553 interface
Typical ARINC or MIL-STD-1553 interface
PCI format
USB format
Video Cameras
The D310 is compatible with several kinds of video cameras, including:
DEWE-CAM-USB
DEWE-CAM-FW
DEWE-CAM-GIG-E
USB camera
Hard sync Firewire
camera
Gigabit ethernet camera
3-24| OWNER’s GUIDE
Installing the 310-UPS option
The standard D310 chassis has three tapped holes on the side opposite the display (the side with the large
DEWETRON logo on it). These holes are used to mount the 310-UPS option.
Tapped mounting holes for
the 310-UPS option
STEP 1
Line up the 310-UPS stanchions with the three tapped holes.
STEP 2
Insert a standard blade screw driver into each of the round holes in the back of the 310-UPS and tighten the
screw clockwise until it seats firmly. Repeat until all three screws are secure. Do not overtighten.
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-25
STEP 3
Connect the 310-CBL-UPS between the battery box and the D310 mainframe, as shown below:
310-CBL-UPS cable connects the DC power output from the battery option, to the main
DC power input on the D310
STEP 4
To charge the 310-UPS, connect the DPS-2410 to the DC input of the battery box, as shown below.
Plug into 120 VAC
mains
DC power cable: connects the
output of the DPS-2410 to the
input of the battery box
3-26| OWNER’s GUIDE
Configuration guide, D310 with MDAQ panel
The D310 has a 2U height space on its left side panel, which can accept either a 2U high MDAQ panel, such
as either the DSUB connector panel or half BNC/half DSUB9 panel ... or a 1.5U panel plus any of the 0.5U
accessory panels, as shown below:
MDAQ panels
Accessory panels
0.5U-AMPFLEX-POWER-4
0.5 U
0.5U-AMPFLEX-POWER-8
2U
0.5 U
Power supply for PNA-A100
current clamps
0.5U-AOUT-BNC-2
0.5 U
1U-AOUT-BNC-4
2U
MDAQ panel with BNC connectors is only 1.5U, leaving 0.5U above for any accessory panel
2U
2.0 U
1.5 U
When a combo MDAQ panel is used (half BNC and half DSUB), this takes 2.0U panel height.
When a BNC only MDAQ panel is used, this occupies 1.5U of height, and 0.5U remains available for any
0.5U accessory panel to be installed. If you don’t order any of the available 0.5U panels we will install a
blank panel in the space.
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-27
Configuration guide, D310 model
The D310 has a fixed configuration: there is a RACK-8 built into the side panel, so all you need to do is
choose any any of our DAQ, PAD, or HSI series plug-in modules to fill the slots.
Connecting EPAD2 modules to your D310 (DAQ or MDAQ version)
Both D310 versions accept optional EPAD2 series external PAD modules for adding many channels of
slower temperature signals, voltage, current, and RTD inputs. Simply connect the first EPAD2 module to
the standard EPAD connector. Further EPAD2 modules can be daisy-chained from one to the next. The last
EPAD2 module must have the terminator installed in the open connector (even if there is only one EPAD2
module the terminator must be installed). Up to 16 EPADs in any combination can be connected.
EPAD-TERM-L
terminator at the last
module in the chain
EPAD2 cable
xPAD-CBL-LL-??
(where ?? is the length in meters)
3-28| OWNER’s GUIDE
System Connectors
System/PC connectors
DC power input
Connector: LEMO power connector, as shown in the picture above. The connector is this LEMO model:
EGJ-2B-302-CLA. The appropriate mating connector is LEMO FGJ.302.CLLD-XX (where XX is the cable
size).
The mating cable called 310-CBL-DC is provided to connect the D310 to the included external AC/DC power
supply. This cable is 2 meters long. It has FGJ.302.CLLD-XX on the side that plugs into the D310, and
FGG.2B.302-CLAD-XX on the side that plugs into the external AD/DC power supply.
Permissable power inputs are 9-29 VDC.
⇒⇒ Important note - power input must not exceed 29 VDC! System damage may occur.
DC Power Input
KEY PIN: (+)
LOW PIN: (–)
LEMO connector
EGJ-2B-302-CLA
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-29
RS232C interface
(com1)
PS/2 mouse (green)
XGA video output
PS/2 keyboard (violet)
IEEE-1394 firewire
USB 2.0 ports (4)
Ethernet ports (3)
Audio stack
(see description for
color codes)
3-30| OWNER’s GUIDE
Computer Connectors
The door on the right side of the chassis opens to allow access to a collection of computer interface connections, as follows:
RS232C interface connector (com1)
Connector: 9-pin DSUB (male)
Mating connector: 9-pin DSUB (female)
Function: Can be used to connect devices which utilize the RS232C serial interface.
The typical interpretation of the signals in the COM ports is as fol
The connector pin-out is defined here:
PS/2 mouse (green) and PS/2 keyboard (violet)
Connectors: Standard PS/2 green (mouse) and violet (keyboard)
Mating connectors: Standard PS/2 keyboard and mouse plugs or USB-PS/2 adapters
Function: Attachment of a keyboard or PS/2 mouse adapter via the stacked PS/2 mouse and keyboard connector (MSE & KBD).
Description: Both interfaces utilize open-drain signaling with on-board pull-up. The PS/2 mouse and keyboard is supplied from 5V_STB when in standby mode in order to enable keyboard or mouse activity to bring
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-31
the system out from power saving states. The supply is provided through a 1.1A resetable fuse.
Above left: Stacked PS/2 connector pinning and call-outs
Above right: view of a typical PS/2 connector, showing the pin numbering schema.
-- Note: PS/2 devices should be connected before the system is powered on. PS/2 mice in particular will typically
not be recognized by Windows if connected after Windows has loaded.
IEEE-1394 Firewire interface
Connector: Standard 6-pin full size IEEE-1394b female connector
Mating connector: Standard 6-pin IEEE-1394b male plug
Function: Can be used to connect devices which utilize the IEEE-1394 firewire interface.
Description: This port is an IEEE Std 1394a-2000 fully compliant cable port which provides interfacing at
100M bits/s, 200M bits/s, and 400M bits/s.
-- Note: The DEWE-CAM-FW high speed video camera from Dewetron connects via firewire. However, it is highly
recommended to add a dedicated firewire card to your system to get the best performance from the DEWE-
3-32| OWNER’s GUIDE
CAM-FW sensor. The full speed may not be achievable using the on-board interface shown above.
Ethernet interfaces (3)
Connectors: RJ45 CAT5e standard jack
Mating connectors: RJ45 CAT5e or CAT6 plugs
Function: for connecting the DEWE-321x to a local area network (LAN), or for connecting ethernet peripherals (printers, cameras, etc.).
Description: Three channels of 10/100/1000Mb Ethernet RTL8111B LAN controllers. In order to achieve the
specified performance of the Ethernet port, Category 5 twisted pair cables must be used with 10/100MB and
Category 5E, 6 or 6E with 1Gb LAN networks.
The signals for the Ethernet ports are as follows:
The pinout of the RJ45 connector is as follows:
Above right: typical mating plug, showing the pin outs
On top of Ethernet connectors there is a Green LED (to the left) turning on when a 100MHz connection is
made and it is flashing when 100MHz traffic is ongoing. The Yellow LED (to the right) turns on when a 1GHz
connection is made and it is flashing when traffic is ongoing.
Please refer to the CAT5e, CAT6, and structured cabling standards for computer networks when interfacing
to the DEWE system.
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-33
CRT/VGA video output
Connector: three-row 15-pin DE-15 (female) connector
Mating connector: 15-pin DE-15 video (male) plug
Function: For connecting an additional display to the DEWE-321x, which will show an exact duplicate of the
built-in display.
Description: There are has two basic types of interfaces to a display: Analog CRT interface and a digital interface typically used with flat panels. The digital interface to flat panels is connected internally to the built-in
flatpanel display. The CRT interface is available externally to the user.
⇒⇒ Note: The 5V supply in the CRT connector is fused by a 1.1A resetable fuse.
Left: typical mating cable for connecting an external VGA/XGA monitor
-- Note: the CRT output cannot be used in a “multiple monitors” setup under Windows. To support multiple moni-
tors with different images on them requires that a separate video card be added to the system. This is possible
to do, using a PCI video card (PCIe slots are not available in this model).
-- Note: D310’s 15” display has a max resolution of 1024x768; the CRT output is set to the same resolution as the
built-in flatpanel display.
3-34| OWNER’s GUIDE
USB 2.0 interfaces (4)
Connector: USB2.0 Standard-A receptacle
Mating connector: USB2.0 Standard-A plug
Function: For the connection of peripheral devices which utilize the USB 2.0 or USB 1.1 interface. (USB 1.1
devices may work, but will be limited in speed.)
Description: The mainboard contains an Enhanced Host Controller Interface (EHCI) host controller that supports USB 2.0 allowing data transfers up to 480Mb/s. There are four user-accessible Universal Host Controller Interface (UHCI Revision 1.1) controllers that support USB full-speed and low-speed signaling. All ports
are high-speed, full-speed, and low-speed capable and USB Legacy mode is supported.
Over-current detection on all four USB ports is supported.
USB ports 0 and 2 are supplied on the combined ETHER1, USB0, USB2 connector. USB ports 4 and 5 are
supplied on the combined IEEE1394_0, USB4, USB5 connector.
Note: It is recommended to use only High-/Full-Speed USB cable, specified in USB2.0 standard:
-- Note: USB is most often used to connect webcams for recording video in sync with the data in your Dewetron
data acquisition system. It is also used to connect inertial sensors such as the XSENS MTI series of sensors.
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-35
Audio stack connectors (6)
Connectors: 3.5 mm (~1/8 in.) TRS jacks, color coded
Mating connectors: 3.5 mm (!1/8 in.) TRS plugs
Function: for outputting or inputting audio
Description: Audio Line-in, Line-out and Microphone are available in the stacked audio jack connector. Below is shown audio stack configuration when configured for 8-channel audio.
⇒⇒ Note: Always use industry standard plugs and cables when connecting to any part of the DEWE system.
3-36| OWNER’s GUIDE
Signal Input Connectors
Analog input connectors (8 or 16)
Connector: Varies according to the signal conditioning module(s) installed
See the signal conditioning tables for further details about the module(s) installed within your system.
Function: to input analog signals to the dynamic measuring inputs of the DEWE-3210 or DEWE-3211.
Above: typical DEWE-3210 showing 8 DAQ modules plugged in
Counter/encoder connectors (2)
Connector: LEMO EGG.1B.307CLAD52
Mating connector: LEMO FGG.1B.307CLAD52
Mating cable available: CTR-CABLE-05 (includes connector)
Function: used to input tachometer, TTL level pulse train, or encoder outputs for measuring and conversion.
-- Note: see the COUNTER configuration section later in this guide.
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-37
CAN BUS interface connector (installed when you order CAN BUS option)
Connectors: DSUB 9 connectors (option UP-ORION-CAN2)
Mating connector: DSUB 9
Mating cable: Standard CAN cable
Function: used to connect to vehicle CAN BUS interfaces. Also can be used to read data from sensors which
have a CAN BUS output, such as Dewetron’s own CPAD2 series signal conditioning modules.
The typical DB-9 connectors are wired the same way, as shown below:
When you connect either CAN bus interface to your vehicle or other CAN network, it is necessary to add
termination resistors (not included) at each end of the cable:
-- Note: this connector does not provide power for CPAD2 series modules.
Expansion connector (DAQ module version only)
Connector: DSUB HD-44 pin female connector
Mating cable: DSUB HD-44 pin male connector
Function: The D310 is configured with a 16 channel A/D card inside (ORION-1616-100) as a standard. The
first eight channels are wired to the DAQ modules on the left side panel. Therefore, the other eight channels
are brought to this ANALOG INPUT connector on the left side panel, whereby you may connect an expansion rack such as the DEWE-30-8, in order to address these eight channels. This is an HD44 connector,
which looks like a DSUB25, but it actually has three rows of pins (44 connections).
3-38| OWNER’s GUIDE
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
16
GND
Pin
Signal
1
AI 8
17
AI 10
31
AI 19
2
GND
18
GND
32
GND
3
AI 11
19
AI 13
33
AI 12
4
GND
20
GND
34
GND
5
AI 14
21
AI 16
35
AI 15
6
GND
22
GND
36
GND
7
AI 17
23
AI 19
37
AI 18
8
GND
24
GND
38
GND
9
AI 20
25
AI 22
39
AI 21
10
GND
26
GND
40
GND
11
AI 23
27
RS-485 B
41
AI SENSE 2
12
RS-485 A
28
--
42
RS-485 GND
13
--
29
--
43
--
14
--
30
--
44
--
15
--
HDD-44 ANALOG INPUT connector
Above are the pin-outs of the HD-44 connector for the input of the additional 8 analog channels, when the
DAQ version of the D310 is ordered. The pins colored in GREEN apply to the standard configuration, where
a 16 channel ORION card is installed. However, if you have upgraded this card to a 32-channel ORION,
then the pins in white will apply for channels 16 to 31.
The DEWE-30-8 expansion rack is connected via a cable plugged into the DSUB-25 expansion connector,
which also includes the RS485 for module control.
DEWE-30-8-EXPANSION Rack (Optional)
Signal and
power cable
A cable connects the DEWE-30-8 expansion rack to the D310 mainframe. It provides signal connection and
RS485 module control. The DEWE-30-8 should be powered separately.
-- This expansion/connector does not apply to the model that already has 16 MDAQ channels on its left side panel
Digital I/O connector (AKA “Accessory connector”)
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-39
Connector: Standard DSUB 37-pin connector, female
Mating connector: Standard DSUB 37-pin connector, female
Function: Provides access to the digital input/output lines on the installed A/D card, as well as additional
signals such as clock input, trigger input, and more (see A/D card table related to the installed card).
The exact pin-out of this connector can vary according to the system configuration, but here is the typical
pin-out diagram when an ORION-1616-100 card is installed:
3-40| OWNER’s GUIDE
Channel Expansion
As shown previously, expanding your D310 to contain a large number of slow (non-dynamic) analog inputs
is easy via the addition of external EPAD2 series modules. But what about expanding the number of fast (dynamic) channels? Of course this is possible, and this section will show the various methods that are available to achieve more fast analog channels.
Using Analog Cables to External Signal Conditioning
In this approach, the ORION series A/D cards are installed within the D310 mainframe, and the signal
conditioners to support them are connected externally. Since the D310 has three PCI slots, and there are
32-channel ORION cards available, the maximum channel count of this approach is 96.
To the ORION card
inside the D310
AN
PO
A LO
WE
ALS
G SIGN
P P LY
R SU
AC (optional DC)
power supply
DEWE-31-12
Specifications
DEWE-30-8
DEWE-30-16
DEWE-30-32
DEWE-31-16
DEWE-31-32
DAQ/PAD/HSI slots
8
16
32
--
--
MDAQ channels
--
--
--
16
32
95 ~ 260VAC
50/60 Hz
From the ORION
(10-36 VDC)
95 ~ 260VAC
50/60 Hz
Wide range DC power (11 to 32 VDC)
N/A
Wide range DC power
(11 to 32 VDC)
Power supply
Optional power supply
Dimensions W x D x H
Weight
230 x 181 x 104 mm
9.1 x 7.1 x 4.1 in.
435 x 133 x 245 mm
17.1 x 5.2 x 9.6 in.
435 x 223 x 245 mm
17.1 x 8.8 x 9.6 in.
208 x 95 x 108 mm
8.2 x 3.7 x 4.3 in.
435 x 133 x 245 mm
17.1 x 5.2 x 9.6 in.
3 kg (7 lbs)
4 kg (9 lbs)
7 kg (15 lbs)
1.6 kg (3.5 lbs)
4 kg (9 lbs)
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-41
Using PCI bridge Connection to External Signal Conditioning
In this approach, the ORION A/D cards are installed within external DEWE-5X-PCI chassis, and are connected back to the D310 via a single high-speed PCI expansion cable.
PCI expansion is an alternative especially if high channel count is needed. When using an expansion only
one PCI slot is occupied in the D310 instrument by a PCI-HOST-CARD. The DEWE-50-PCI, DEWE-51-PCI
and DEWE-52 ADC racks can be connected by a 1m PCI cable (optionally 1.5m).
-- Important notice: The D310 and the DEWE-5x must be equipped with ORION-SYNC option.
PCI H
OST
DEWE-52-PCI-3216
SY N C
D310
Specifications
DEWE-50-PCI-32
DEWE-50-PCI-64
DEWE-51-PCI-64
DEWE-51-PCI-128
DEWE-52-PCI-3216
DAQ/PAD/HSI slots
32
64
--
--
16
MDAQ channels
--
--
64
128
32
95 ~ 260VAC
50/60 Hz
Power supply
Optional power supply
Dimensions W x D x H
Weight
Wide range DC power (11 to 32 VDC)
435 x 287 x 223 mm
17.1 x 11.3 x 8.8 in.
408 x 287 x 410 mm
16.1 x 11.3 x 16.1 in
435 x 287 x 178 mm
17.1 x 11.3 x 7.0 in.
408 x 287 x 267 mm
16 x 11.3 x 10.5 in.
435 x 287 x 223mm
17.1 x 11.3 x 8.8 in.
10 kg (22 lbs)
15 kg (33 lbs)
6 kg (13 lbs)
9 kg (20 lbs)
9 kg (20 lbs)
3-42| OWNER’s GUIDE
Using External Time Sources (NETWORK Configuration)
In this approach, multiple DEWE systems are synchronized using either IRIG or GPS time code.
Each still records their own data, but the data files are perfectly synchronized for analysis in third
party software (such as Flexpro or Matlab). In addition, because the software option DS-OPT-NET is
installed on each acquistion unit, a master controller can view channels from ALL of the connected
measuring units in real time.
In the NETWORK configuration, each instrument must have the hardware option UP-ORION-SYNC and
the software option DS-OPT-NET. Synchronization of all units is required, via either
(1) a simple SYNC cable connection, for distances up to 200 m, or
(2) DEWE-CLOCK (internal or external), for long distances when a SYNC cable connection is not
possible.
The DS-OPT-NET software offers full remote setup, online data transfer up to the limit of the network
connection and offline data transfer between the instruments.
-- User tip: The NET expansion allows multiple usages of the PC power and fast storing capability. Multiple decen-
tralized hard disks offer almost no limit for fast data storing.
D310
D310
0.000 ms
SYNC
ETHERNE
T
Above - direct SYNC of two or more DEWE systems
using the ORION-SYNC option installed onto the
chassis, and DS-OPT-NET software.
One measuring unit can be set as the master controller of both, or you can use a separate Windows
computer as a master client to remotely control all
synchronized units. The master controller is connected via ethernet to each measuring unit (typically
a dedicated ethernet switch is used).
GPS-CLOCK
SYNC
D310
Right - when the systems are too far apart for the
ORION-SYNC to be connected, the DEWE-CLOCK
is used to sync the units via either IRIG or GPS time
code signals.
The rest of the system is the same, as described
above.
DEWE-CLOCK
ETHER
D310
SYNC
NET
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-43
Connecting the MOB-DISP-17 to your D310
Whether your D310 has a built-in display or not, you can still connect an external monitor to it. This could be
either a standard office type computer monitor, or the DEWETRON MOB-DISP-17.
The MOB-DISP-17 is a ruggedized mobile display that is designed to be installed inside vehicles. It has
suction cup mounting positions, as well as VESA 75 mounting holes for this purpose. The MOB-DISP-17
accepts a standard VGA or DVI interface, therefore it can be connected directly to the VGA output of the
D3PC. In addition, the MOB-DISP-17 can be POWERED by the 12VDC output on the rear panel of the
D3PC.
Finally, a USB 2.0 cable should be connected between the D310 and the MOB-DISP-17, to enable the display’s TOUCHSCREEN capabilities, and to activate the USB 2.0 convenience jacks that are located on the
mobile display.
The MOB-DISP-17 is the perfect addition to your DEWETRON system, especially when it will be used in a
mobile or challenging physical environment. For complete technical details about the MOB-DISP-17, please
refer to the section of this document, “MOB-DISP-17 Mobile Display” on page 10-266.
(To the 12VDC output on the opposite
side of the D310 chassis)
Red - 12 VDC power cable
Blue - USB 2.0 cable (A/B)
Green - VGA cable
3-44| OWNER’s GUIDE
Operation Guidelines
System Startup Protocol
DC powered systems (STANDARD)
The standard D310 runs from wide-ranging DC
power: 9-29 VDC. An AC/DC adapter is included
with your system.
To run the system from AC, connect the AC power
cord to AC mains and to the AC/DC adapter. Connect the DC output cable that has a round LEMO
connector on it to the DC power input on the right
side of the D310.
Press then release the soft power switch on the
D310, and the system will boot up.
VGA output for
connecting external
monitor
Soft power switch
DC power input
(9~29 VDC)
If your D310 does not have a display, please connect a standard VGA or XGA monitor to the VGA
connector on the right side of the system.
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-45
Installing the Smart Batteries (310-UPS option)
⇒⇒ Do not block the cooling fan of the DPS-2410! Over-
Systems are shipped with the hot-swappable batteries removed. You should install them, connect
power, and charge up the batteries. Please follow
these guidelines shown in the previous section,
Accessing the Batteries.
For faster recharging, do NOT power up the D310
mainframe, but make certain that the DPS-2410 is
powered on and all power connections are made as
shown below.
⇒⇒ Never use any battery which appears to be dam-
Using the smart batteries
aged, or which is cracked, broken, hot to the touch,
or unusual in any way. Lithium batteries can be
dangerous if mistreated or improperly charged.
Please locate your DPS-2410 external power supply. This is included with the battery option.
♦♦ Connect the included AC power cord to the DPS-
2410, and then to a 120VAC power receptable.
♦♦ Connect the included DC power cord to the DPS-
2410 and then to the D310’s DC power input
jack.
heating any electrical component is dangerous.
The SideHAND2 “smart batteries” supplied with your
Dewetron battery powered system are equipped with
an integrated circuit which stores information such
as manufacturer, serial number, production date,
etc., and monitors the current battery status in terms
of discharge rate, predicted remaining capacity,
temperature, voltage etc.
SideHAND2 “smart batteries” are capable of displaying their charge state even when not plugged into
anything.
♦♦ Turn on the DPS-2410 power switch. A power
LED will confirm that that it is receiving AC power
and operating properly.
4) Connect the short DC
cable between the 310-UPS
output and the D310 DC
power input.
1) Connect the AC
power plug to a valid
AC mains source
2) Connect the other
end of the AC cord to
the DPS-2410
3) Connect the DC power
cord between the DC output
of the DPS-2410 and the
input of the 301-UPS option
3-46| OWNER’s GUIDE
Refer to the LCD display on the end of the SideHAND2 battery near the plastic pull tab.
Turning on the System with Batteries installed
Locate the power switch on the right side panel.
This is a momentary rocker type switch, where the
white dot indicates the ON direction.
♦♦ Press ON and hold for one second to power the
system on.
♦♦ Press ON and hold for 3 seconds to power OFF.
♦♦ Green POWER LED: lit when the system is
Refer to the four segment LCD indicator on the end of the
battery near the pull-tab. It will indicate the relative charge
remaining in the battery in 25% steps.
powered on
♦♦ The removable HDD(s) have activity LEDS
inside them, which indicate that the hard disk
drive is being accessed.
You may notice that the main screen’s backlight
will come on when power is applied. After a few
moments the BIOS and Windows operating system
messages and graphics will appear.
⇒⇒ If the system does not power on, ensure that you
have batteries with at least 30% charge, or that the
DPS-2410 is properly connected and TURNED ON.
HDD Usage
Using the removable hard disk drives
The right side of the D310 has a 2.5” removable
drive bay. This bay has two separate hard drives
inside it. The drive marked (1) is the C drive, and
the drive marked (2) is the D drive.
⇒⇒ NEVER REMOVE OR INSTALL HARD DRIVES WHEN
THE SYSTEM IS POWERED ON. Interfering with the
C drive in particular when the software is trying to
access it can cause catastrophic system failures via
corrupting the file system.
To remove either hard drive, you must have access
to the keylock. Turn the key into the lock and then
press the button on either drive to eject it. To insert
another drive, reverse these steps.
The 2.5” drive carrier actually has TWO separate removable
HDDs inside! Drive 1 is the OS drive letter ‘C,’ while Drive 2
is the data drive letter ‘D.’
Using external optical read/write drives
Because the D310 does not include an optical drive,
you are free to purchase one from any computer
retailer, and connect it to your D310 via one of the
USB 2.0 ports.
-- The D310 is compatible with external optical drives
which are Windows7 compatible.
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-47
Basic Specifcations
Input specifications
Slots for DAQ or PAD modules
MDAQ-SUB positions
D310 with DAQ conditioners
D310 with MDAQ conditioners
8
--
N/A
2 (16 channels)
Main system
Total PCI slots
Hard disk
Data throughput to disk
Power supply
Battery power (option 310-UPS)
Display (option 310-DISP)
Processor
3 x half-length PCI slots
500 GB standard removable drive (optional solid state drive)
80 MB/s typical; faster rates available with the additional of an internal RAID controller and/or additional drives
9~29 VDC. Includes external AC/DC power adapter.
Adds a battery compartment with 4 SideHAND2 series hot-swappable batteries, and connecting cable.
15” XGA display, 1024 x 768 px, with resistive touchscreen
Intel Core2Duo 2.0 GHz CPU, on a standard industrial grade MiniITX mainboard
RAM
Ethernet
USB
RS232
Operating system
Dimensions (W x D x H)
4 GB standard
3 x ethernet interfaces standard (1 Gb)
Four x USB 2.0 interfaces available
One serial interface on a DB9 connector available
Microsoft Windows7 32-bit included (upgrades to 64-bit will be available Summer 2013)
14W x 10.5D x 4.25H (inches) / 355 x 267 x 108 (mm)
Weight
Free PCI slots
8 kg typical (17.6 lbs)
2 (the standard ORION-1616-100 A/D card uses one of the three PCI slots)
Environmental specifications
Operating temperature
-20 to 50C (0 to 45C with batteries installed) (storage temp -20 to 60C)
Humdity
10 to 80% non-condensing, 5 to 95% relative humidity
Vibration
MIL-STD-810F, EN 60068-2-6, EN 60721-3-2 class 2M2
Shock
MIL-STD-810F, EN 60068-2-27
Required to complete this
model
Conditioners:
A/D card(s)
Software
Any 8 DAQ series plugin modules
Any two MDAQ-SUB modules
The ORION-1616-100 is included as standard. You may upgrade this card as follows:
UP-ORION-16-22
upgrade the resolution to 22-bits, add antialiasing filters (AAF), max. SR remains at 100
kS/s/ch
UP-ORION-16-24
upgrade the resolution to 24-bits, add AAF, max. SR increases to 200 kS/s/ch
UP-ORION-16-22-32
upgrade the resolution to 22-bits, add AAF, increase from 16 to 32 analog channels
UP-ORION-100-1000
upgrade the max. SR to 1000 kS/s/ch
UP-ORION-100-200-8
upgrade the resolution to 24-bits, add AAF, max.SR increases to 200 kS/s/ch, decrease to
8 channels
UP-ORION-100-1000-8
upgrade the max. SR to 1000 kS/s/ch, decrease to 8 channels
DS-7-SE data acquisition software is included as standard*
32 analog channels, or multiple video cameras, or DEWE-CAM-FW-70, or DEWE-CLOCK use requires upgrade to
PROF edition.
64 analog channels requires upgrade to DSA edition.
LabVIEW VIs are available for Dewetron ORION series A/D cards and DAQ series signal conditioners.
Popular upgrades
Counter expansion (UP-ORION-CTR8)
Upgrades the A/D card from 8 TTL digital I/Os and 2 TTL counter / encoders to:
8 synchronous TTL digital inputs protected up to 25 VDC
8 synchronous counter / encoder or 24 digital inputs with programmable threshold levels (0-40 V), input voltage range
-35 to 60 V, AC/DC coupling
Includes DB37 pin connectors installed
Synchronization interface (UP-ORION-SYNC)
Installs the SYNC hardware input/output ports and LED indicators onto the mainframe. Allows systems with the same
base ORION card to be synced. Additionally Requires DS-OPT-NET software option for synchronization under DS-7
software.
3-48| OWNER’s GUIDE
Input specifications
D310 with DAQ conditioners
Digital Isolation (ORION-BASE-DI-ISO)
HDD upgrade to solid state disks
D310 with MDAQ conditioners
Isolation for the 16 digital inputs of ORION base cards.
Input low: 0 - 2 V, Input high: 3 - 50 V bandwidth: DC up to 1MHz
Isolation voltage between channels: 150 VDC
Isolation voltage between Input and Output: 250 VDC
Connector: DSUB-37 connector (replaces standard digital I/O connector)
HDD-UP-SSD-120
Upgrade to 120 GB flash disk (replaces standard spinning hard disk), $ no moving parts, max.
data throughput 90 MB/s
HDD-UP-SSD-240
Upgrade to 240 GB flash disk (replaces standard spinning hard disk), $ no moving parts, max.
data throughput 90 MB/s
HDD-UP-SSD-480
Upgrade to 480 GB flash disk (replaces standard spinning hard disk), $ no moving parts, max.
data throughput 100 MB/s
Time code interface
Adds an internal IRIG or GPS time code interface (does not require a PCI slot)
Popular interface add-ons
CAN expansion (UP-ORION-CAN2)
IRIG / GPS time code (DEWE-CLOCK-INT)
Adds 2 synchronous high speed CAN bus interfaces to the ORION card inside the system. Includes two DB9 factory
installed connectors for these counters on the side panel of the D310, and rear panel of the DEWE-3040 and DEWE3050. Includes DS-OPT-CAN software option supporting CAN BUS interface.
IRIG or GPS synchronized clock source for DEWETRON systems, installed inside a new DEWETRON base unit
Input: IRIG signal code A or B, AM or DC, or GPS signal
Output: TTL clock from 10 Hz to 10 MHz, PPS and ORION-DSA-SYNC, IRIG-B DC (requires DS-PROF or higher)
Please order GPS antenna GPS-ANT-1 separately (if GPS is needed)
VIDEO-FG-4
Adds a four channel VIDEO INPUT PCI card to the system. Four BNCs for analog NTSC video input on the right side
panel, allowing four video streams to be recorded in sync with the data
ARINC-429 / 1553 interfaces
Adds a multi-channel ARINC-429 or MIL-STD-1553 interface to the system. Available as a single PCI card with either
or both interfaces on it, or as separate external USB interfaces. See the INTERFACES section for a comprehensive
list.
External channel expansion
EPAD2 and CPAD2 series modules
Add one or more EPAD2 series external signal conditioners to your system. Each one provides 8 thermocouple,
RTD, low voltage, or low current inputs. EPAD2 modules can be daisy-chained up to 8 modules per system. CPAD2
modules are the same except with CAN BUS interface.
Additional Specifications
ORION-1616-100 analog input specifications
Number of analog channels
8 channels
Bit-resolution
16-bit ADC converters (one per channel)
14.7 effective number of bits
Maximum sample rate
100 kS/s/ch simultaneous
Input configuration
Single-ended (note that the DAQ, HSI,
or MDAQ conditioners are in front of the
ORION card, and serve as the differential
front-end for your signals.
ADC type
Successive approximation (SAR)
Channel separation (cross-talk)
> 90 dB @ fin 1 kHz
DC accuracy
±0.02 % of reading ±0.013 % of range
Signal to noise
89 dB
THD (fin = 1kHz) 0 dBFS input < -86 dB
THD (fin = 1kHz) -20 dBFS input < -93 dB
Interchannel gain mismatch
±0.015 %
Interchannel phase mismatch
0.02° * fin (kHz) + 0.08°
Digital and clock line specs
Digital input lines
16
Digital input characteristics
TTL/CMOS signal levels:
Low voltage level -0.7 V to 0.8 V
High voltage level 2 V to 5 V
Pull-up with 100 kΩ resistor
Input capacitance < 5pF
Input protection -1 V to 6 V
Digital output lines
8
Digital output characteristics
TTL/CMOS signal levels:
Low voltage level < 0.4 V @ 4 mA load
High voltage level > 3 V @ 4 mA load
Output current
Sink (low level) -20 mA Source (high level)
20 mA
Output impedance 50 Ω
Clock divider output line
1, same characteristics as digital output
lines
OWNER’s GUIDE - D310 | 3-49
Standard Counter/Encoders
RPM-Measurement
Encoder
Standard counter/encoders
2 x 32-bit (LEMO connectors for each)
Note - used as pair counters when advanced features are used. If you need two or
more full-featured counters, please order the
UP-ORION-CTR8
Counter timebase
80 MHz (40 MHz max. input frequency)
Time base accuracy
25 ppm
Measurement modes
Event counting, up/down counting, gated
event counting, period time, pulse width,
two-edge separation, frequency and encoder
measurements
Gearthooth, CDM
Standard counter/encoder signal
levels
TTL/CMOS, pull-up with 100 kΩ
Input low level: -0.7 V to 0.8 V
Input high level: +2 to +5V
Gearthooth, TRG, CDM and TRG
Overvoltage input protection
(DI 0 to DI 7): ±25 V continuous
(DI 8 to DI 15): -1 to 6 V
Advanced Counter/Encoders (UPORION-CTR8 option)
Advanced counter/encoders
8 advanced 32-bit counters
Counter timebase
80 MHz (40 MHz max. input frequency)
Measurement modes
Event counting, up/down counting, gated
event counting, period time, pulse width,
two-edge separation, frequency and encoder
measurements
Signal levels
Symmetrical, differential
AC/DC coupling selectable
Trigger adjustment range
0 to 40 VDC with 40 mV resolution
Trigger level accuracy
±100 mV ±1% of trigger level
Common voltage range
-35 to 50V
Overvoltage input protection
±100 V continuous
Max. DC level @ AC coupling:
±50 V continuous
CAN BUS specs (UP-ORION-CAN2
option)
High-speed CAN interfaces
2 CAN 2.0B high speed interfaces
Bus pin fault protection
±36 V
ESD protection
12kV
Physical layer
High speed
Compatibility
2.0B standard, J1939 protocol support
OBD II via software option
Tacho
Gearthooth with missing teeth
Gearthooth with double teeth
Length-measurement
Linear encoder
Linear pulse sensor
Event Counting
Basic counting
Gated counting
Up/down counting
Waveform Timing
Period frequency
Two pulse edge separation
Period, pulse width,
frequency, duty cycle
3-50| OWNER’s GUIDE
OWNER’s GUIDE - D3PC-8 | 4-51
4
D3PC-8 Model
The D3PC-8 is our most economical and portable
data acquisition instrument. This model is preconfigured with an ORION-0824-200 card inside,
which means that it has eight IEPE (ICP) analog
inputs with very high dynamic range, perfect for
accelerometers and microphones. Each channel
can also be used as a voltage input up to ±10V.
This model is manufactured at the company’s
facilities in the USA.
This section will review the hardware characteristics and specifications of the D3PC-8 model, including its
properties as a computer instrument, and all data acquisition components, including the A/D card, signal
conditioners, and interfaces with which it is compatible.
Please refer to the SOFTWARE section of this manual to learn how to operate the turn-key data acquisition
software installed on the system.
Please refer to the separate sections for the SIGNAL CONDITIONERS, A/D CARDS, INTERFACES and
SENSORS for complete details about those components that may be installed within your system.
Model D3PC-8
Standard Configuration
4-52| OWNER’s GUIDE
System Dimensions
267
212
127
113
(Left Side)
18
12
204
(Right Side)
274
Add 10 mm all around for BNC
connectors, knobs, and other
protrusions.
Dimensions in millimeters (mm)
Divide by 25.4 for inches
Allow plenty of room for cooling fans
to function properly. Never block air
exchange.
OWNER’s GUIDE - D3PC-8 | 4-53
Top-level call-outs
D3PC-8, Left/Front Angle
EPAD LEMO
Power Switch
Rubberized corner
shock absorbers
Accessory / digital
I/O connector
Filtered air intakes
2 Counter LEMOs
USB 2.0 ports (2)
Chassis ground point
8 x ANALOG input
BNC connectors
Optional CAN BUS
interfaces (DB9s)
D3PC-8, Left/Rear Angle
Removable HDD
PCI card door
Computer subsectionand door
Spring loaded captive
hardware (both doors)
Rubberized corner
shock absorbers
12VDC power
outlet LEMO
Automotive type
fuse
Master power
switch
9-29 VDC power
input LEMO
4-54| OWNER’s GUIDE
Signal conditioning
The D3PC is equipped with eight built-in analog inputs, with these signal input capabilities:
„„ Selectable voltage / IEPE mode
„„ Selectable constant current excitation (IEPE mode), 4 or 8 mA
„„ Constant current excitation compliance up to 24 VDC
„„ Differential or single-ended input mode (software selectable)
„„ Voltage input mode with ranges ±10, ±2, ±0.5 or ±0.1 V
„„ Selectable DC or AC coupling, high-pass 0.16 or 3.4 Hz
„„ High-pass filter selectable between 0.16 or 3.4 Hz (when AC coupling is engaged)
„„ 30V over-voltage input protection
„„ All channels can be set completely independently`
A/D card
The D3PC includes the ORION-0824-200 A/D card as standard. This card provides these digitization capabilities:
„„ 8 simultaneously sampled analog input channels
„„ 24-bit resolution, separate ADC per channels
„„ Sigma-delta ADC converter for each channel
„„ 204.8 kS/s/ch maximum sample rate (all channels simultaneously)
„„ Powerful anti-aliasing filtering is standard and automatically adjusts to the selected sample rate
„„ Crosstalk 114 dB
„„ 2 synchronous counter/encoder inputs
„„ 8 each digital input and output lines
The A/D card can be upgraded to have several options installed on it, including
„„ UP-ORION-CAN2
Adds two high-speed synchronous CAN BUS interfaces to the system, including
mounting the connectors on the front panel, and installing the DS-OPT-CAN software support for CAN
„„ UP-ORION-CTR8
Adds 8 additional counters, which have adjustable threshold levels, and higher
input voltage capabilities. In addition, each counter can handle any measurement type without needing a
second counter in a “pair.” Thus, 8 separate quadrature encoders could be input. Due to space limitations on the D3PC chassis, it is recommended to also purchase the external break-out box when the
counter expansion is ordered.
OWNER’s GUIDE - D3PC-8 | 4-55
Interface(s)
The D3PC is compatible with USB connected interfaces, including ARINC 419 and MIL-STD-1553 interfaces, and more. There is a wide assortment of interfaces available for your DEWE system.
MIL-STD-1553, interface, USB format
ARINC 429, interface, USB format
Video Cameras
The D3PC is compatible with several kinds of video cameras, including:
DEWE-CAM-USB
DEWE-CAM-FW
DEWE-CAM-GIG-E
USB camera
Hard sync Firewire
camera
Gigabit ethernet camera
USB cameras are the most convenient and least expensive. But they also provide the lowest performance,
and place the highest load on the CPU, therefore we recommend only one be used.
The DEWE-CAM-FW can be used to a limited extent in the D3PC because a dedicated Firewire interface
cannot be installed for it. For best results we recommend the D310, or any other DEWE platform that has a
PCI slot available to install a dedicated separate Firewire interface card.
The DEWE-CAM-GIG-E will work fine with the D3PC. Gigabit ethernet cameras place a load on the computer CPU similar to USB cameras, so we recommend not over-taxing the system.
4-56| OWNER’s GUIDE
Connecting EPAD2 modules to your D3PC-8
The D3PC-8 accepts optional EPAD2 series external PAD modules for adding many channels of slower
temperature signals, voltage, current, and RTD inputs. Simply connect the first EPAD2 module to the standard EPAD connector. Further EPAD2 modules can be daisy-chained from one to the next. The last EPAD2
module must have the terminator installed in the open connector (even if there is only one EPAD2 module
the terminator must be installed). Up to 16 EPADs in any combination can be connected.
EPAD-TERM-L
terminator at the last
module in the chain
EPAD2 cable
xPAD-CBL-LL-??
(where ?? is the length in meters)
OWNER’s GUIDE - D3PC-8 | 4-57
Connecting a Standard VGA/XGA Monitor to your D3PC-8
The D3PC-8 accepts any standard computer monitor that can be plugged into the standard VGA connector
on the rear of the system. Open the computer door by turning the captive spring-loaded thumbscrew hardware counter-clockwise, until the door opens.
The VGA connector is the ‘D’ connector with three rows of pin holes. This connector is normally located in
the bottom left corner of the computer area.
Connect your monitor and turn on the D3PC-8. The Windows operating system should recognize that a
monitor has been connected and utilize it. After the system is booted up into Windows you can use the standard commands to configure the monitor the way that you prefer. We recommend setting the resolution to
1024 x 768 pixels for best performance within the software. However, you can also set it higher, for example,
to 1280 x 1024 pixels. This should also provide excellent performance.
D3PC with a standard computer monitor connected to it. Use a standard VGA cable to make
the connection. The monitor must be powered separately from VAC mains.
4-58| OWNER’s GUIDE
Connecting the MOB-DISP-17 to your D3PC-8
The D3PC-8 has been made specifically to support the MOB-DISP-17 (Mobile Display, 17 inches) from
DEWETRON. This is a ruggedized mobile display that is designed to be installed inside vehicles. It has
suction cup mounting positions, as well as VESA 75 mounting holes for this purpose. The MOB-DISP-17
accepts a standard VGA or DVI interface, therefore it can be connected directly to the VGA output of the
D3PC. In addition, the MOB-DISP-17 can be POWERED by the 12VDC output on the rear panel of the
D3PC.
Finally, a USB 2.0 cable should be connected between the D3PC and the MOB-DISP-17, to enable the
display’s TOUCHSCREEN capabilities, and to activate the USB 2.0 convenience jacks that are located on
the mobile display.
The MOB-DISP-17 is the perfect addition to your DEWETRON system, especially when it will be used in a
mobile or challenging physical environment. For complete technical details about the MOB-DISP-17, please
refer to the section of this document, “MOB-DISP-17 Mobile Display” on page 10-266.
Red - 12 VDC power cable
Blue - USB 2.0 cable (A/B)
Green - VGA cable
OWNER’s GUIDE - D3PC-8 | 4-59
Using the New iPAD as a Wireless Display with your D3PC-8
The D3PC-8 can also be controlled wirelessly using the new iPad from Apple computer, because it has sufficient resolution to be used as a wireless display. Other tablet devices can also be used, of course. The more
resolution the device has, the more convenient and comfortable it will be to operate the software.
See Section “19 Using the iPad as a Wireless Display” on page 20-473 of this document to learn how the
new iPad is installed and operated. But it is worth pointing out that a WIFI interface must be installed on the
D3PC. If one was not factory installed, then you can add one in the form of a USB WIFI interface, which can
be installed any time.
4-60| OWNER’s GUIDE
System Connectors
Ground (earth) Connector
Connector: insulated banana jack, marked with the ground/earth symbol, yellow with green stripe
Mating connector: insulated banana plug, yellow with green stripe
Function: Depending on your electrical environment, it may be necessary to give the system an additional
ground connection. This is an international standard mini-banana jack, color coded yellow/green, located
near the DC power input.
DC Power Input
KEY PIN: (+)
LOW PIN: (–)
LEMO connector
EGJ-2B-302-CLA
DC power input
Connector: LEMO power connector, as shown in the picture above. The connector is this LEMO model:
EGJ-2B-302-CLA. The appropriate mating connector is LEMO FGJ.302.CLLD-XX (where XX is the cable
size).
The mating cable called 310-CBL-DC is provided to connect the D310 to the included external AC/DC power
supply. This cable is 2 meters long. It has FGJ.302.CLLD-XX on the side that plugs into the D310, and
FGG.2B.302-CLAD-XX on the side that plugs into the external AD/DC power supply. Note: some external
power supplies have a built-in DC output cable, and there is no separate cable needed.
Permissable power inputs are 9-29 VDC.
⇒⇒ Important note - power input must not exceed 29 VDC! System damage may occur.
Fuse
The system DC power is fused using a REGULAR ATO 15A fast-acting blade fuse. Blue is the
ATO standard color code for a15 amperes fuse rating. ISO 8820-3:2002 standard.
⇒⇒ Replace this fuse only with exactly the same type, or equipment damage, injury or even death
can result.
OWNER’s GUIDE - D3PC-8 | 4-61
Computer Connectors
The door on the right side of the chassis opens to allow access to a collection of computer interface connections, as follows:
RS232C interface
(com1)
V/XGA video output
PS/2 mouse (green)
PS/2 keyboard (violet)
IEEE-1394 firewire
USB 2.0 ports (4)
Ethernet ports (3)
Audio stack
(see description for
color codes)
4-62| OWNER’s GUIDE
RS232C interface connector (com1)
Connector: 9-pin DSUB (male)
Mating connector: 9-pin DSUB (female)
Function: Can be used to connect devices which utilize the RS232C serial interface.
The typical interpretation of the signals in the COM ports is as follows:
The connector pin-out is defined here:
PS/2 mouse (green) and PS/2 keyboard (violet)
Connectors: Standard PS/2 green (mouse) and violet (keyboard)
Mating connectors: Standard PS/2 keyboard and mouse plugs or USB-PS/2 adapters
Function: Attachment of a keyboard or PS/2 mouse adapter via the stacked PS/2 mouse and keyboard connector (MSE & KBD).
Description: Both interfaces utilize open-drain signaling with on-board pull-up. The PS/2 mouse and keyboard is supplied from 5V_STB when in standby mode in order to enable keyboard or mouse activity to bring
the system out from power saving states. The supply is provided through a 1.1A resetable fuse.
OWNER’s GUIDE - D3PC-8 | 4-63
Above left: Stacked PS/2 connector pinning and call-outs
Above right: view of a typical PS/2 connector, showing the pin numbering schema.
-- Note: PS/2 devices should be connected before the system is powered on. PS/2 mice in particular will typically
not be recognized by Windows if connected after Windows has loaded.
IEEE-1394 Firewire interface
Connector: Standard 6-pin full size IEEE-1394b female connector
Mating connector: Standard 6-pin IEEE-1394b male plug
Function: Can be used to connect devices which utilize the IEEE-1394 firewire interface.
Description: This port is an IEEE Std 1394a-2000 fully compliant cable port which provides interfacing at
100M bits/s, 200M bits/s, and 400M bits/s.
-- Note: The DEWE-CAM-FW high speed video camera from Dewetron connects via firewire. However, it is highly
recommended to add a dedicated firewire card to your system to get the best performance from the DEWECAM-FW sensor. The full speed may not be achievable using the on-board interface shown above.
4-64| Ethernet interfaces (3)
Connectors: RJ45 CAT5e standard jack
Mating connectors: RJ45 CAT5e or CAT6 plugs
Function: for connecting the DEWE-321x to a local area network (LAN), or for connecting ethernet peripherals (printers, cameras, etc.).
Description: Three channels of 10/100/1000Mb Ethernet RTL8111B LAN controllers. In order to achieve the
specified performance of the Ethernet port, Category 5 twisted pair cables must be used with 10/100MB and
Category 5E, 6 or 6E with 1Gb LAN networks.
The signals for the Ethernet ports are as follows:
The pinout of the RJ45 connector is as follows:
Above right: typical mating plug, showing the pin outs
On top of Ethernet connectors there is a Green LED (to the left) turning on when a 100MHz connection is
made and it is flashing when 100MHz traffic is ongoing. The Yellow LED (to the right) turns on when a 1GHz
connection is made and it is flashing when traffic is ongoing.
Please refer to the CAT5e, CAT6, and structured cabling standards for computer networks when interfacing
to the DEWE system.
|
4-65
CRT/VGA video output
Connector: three-row 15-pin DE-15 (female) connector
Mating connector: 15-pin DE-15 video (male) plug
Function: For connecting a display to the system.
Description: There are has two basic types of interfaces to a display: Analog CRT interface and a digital interface typically used with flat panels. The digital interface to flat panels is connected internally to the built-in
flatpanel display. The CRT interface is available externally to the user.
⇒⇒ Note: The 5V supply in the CRT connector is fused by a 1.1A resetable fuse.
Left: typical mating cable for connecting an external VGA/XGA monitor
-- Note: the CRT output cannot be used in a “multiple monitors” setup under Windows. To support multiple moni-
tors with different images on them requires that a separate video card be added to the system. This is possible
to do, using a PCI video card (PCIe slots are not available in this model).
-- Note: D310’s 15” display has a max resolution of 1024x768; the CRT output is set to the same resolution as the
built-in flatpanel display.
4-66| USB 2.0 interfaces (4)
Connector: USB2.0 Standard-A receptacle
Mating connector: USB2.0 Standard-A plug
Function: For the connection of peripheral devices which utilize the USB 2.0 or USB 1.1 interface. (USB 1.1
devices may work, but will be limited in speed.)
Description: The mainboard contains an Enhanced Host Controller Interface (EHCI) host controller that supports USB 2.0 allowing data transfers up to 480Mb/s. There are four user-accessible Universal Host Controller Interface (UHCI Revision 1.1) controllers that support USB full-speed and low-speed signaling. All ports
are high-speed, full-speed, and low-speed capable and USB Legacy mode is supported.
Over-current detection on all four USB ports is supported.
USB ports 0 and 2 are supplied on the combined ETHER1, USB0, USB2 connector. USB ports 4 and 5 are
supplied on the combined IEEE1394_0, USB4, USB5 connector.
Note: It is recommended to use only High-/Full-Speed USB cable, specified in USB2.0 standard:
-- Note: USB is most often used to connect webcams for recording video in sync with the data in your Dewetron
data acquisition system. It is also used to connect inertial sensors such as the XSENS MTI series of sensors.
OWNER’s GUIDE - D3PC-8 | 4-67
Audio stack connectors (6)
Connectors: 3.5 mm (~1/8 in.) TRS jacks, color coded
Mating connectors: 3.5 mm (!1/8 in.) TRS plugs
Function: for outputting or inputting audio
Description: Audio Line-in, Line-out and Microphone are available in the stacked audio jack connector. Below is shown audio stack configuration when configured for 8-channel audio.
4-68| OWNER’s GUIDE
⇒⇒ Note: Always use industry standard plugs and cables when connecting to any part of the DEWE system.
Signal Input Connectors
Analog input connectors (8 or 16)
Connector: Varies according to the signal conditioning module(s) installed
See the signal conditioning tables for further details about the module(s) installed within your system.
Function: to input analog signals to the dynamic measuring inputs of the DEWE-3210 or DEWE-3211.
Above: typical D3PC with BNC input connectors for the ANALOG INPUTS
OWNER’s GUIDE - D3PC-8 | 4-69
Counter/encoder connectors (2)
Connector: LEMO EGG.1B.307CLAD52
Mating connector: LEMO FGG.1B.307CLAD52
Mating cable available: CTR-CABLE-05 (includes connector)
Function: used to input tachometer, TTL level pulse train, or encoder outputs for measuring and conversion.
-- Note: see the COUNTER configuration section later in this guide.
CAN BUS interface connector (installed when you order CAN BUS option)
Connectors: DSUB 9 connectors (option UP-ORION-CAN2)
Mating connector: DSUB 9
Mating cable: Standard CAN cable
Function: used to connect to vehicle CAN BUS interfaces. Also can be used to read data from sensors which
have a CAN BUS output, such as Dewetron’s own CPAD2 series signal conditioning modules.
The typical DB-9 connectors are wired the same way, as shown below:
When you connect either CAN bus interface to your vehicle or other CAN network, it is necessary to add
termination resistors (not included) at each end of the cable:
4-70| OWNER’s GUIDE
-- Note: this connector does not provide power for CPAD2 series modules.
Digital I/O connector (AKA “Accessory connector”)
Connector: Standard DSUB 37-pin connector, female
Mating connector: Standard DSUB 37-pin connector, female
Function: Provides access to the digital input/output lines on the installed A/D card, as well as additional
signals such as clock input, trigger input, and more (see A/D card table related to the installed card).
The exact pin-out of this connector can vary according to the system configuration, but here is the typical
pin-out diagram when an ORION-0824-200 card is installed:
OWNER’s GUIDE - D3PC-8 | 4-71
Synchronizing Multiple D3PC-8 Systems
Using Direct SYNC or External Time Sources (NETWORK Configuration)
In this approach, multiple DEWE systems are synchronized using either IRIG or GPS time code.
Each still records their own data, but the data files are perfectly synchronized for analysis in third
party software (such as Flexpro or Matlab). In addition, because the software option DS-OPT-NET is
installed on each acquistion unit, a master controller can view channels from ALL of the connected
measuring units in real time.
In the NETWORK configuration, each instrument must have the hardware option UP-ORION-SYNC and
the software option DS-OPT-NET. Synchronization of all units is required, via either
(1) a simple SYNC cable connection, for distances up to 200 m, or
(2) DEWE-CLOCK (internal or external), for long distances when a SYNC cable connection is not
possible.
The DS-OPT-NET software offers full remote setup, online data transfer up to the limit of the network
connection and offline data transfer between the instruments.
-- User tip: The NET expansion allows multiple usages of the PC power and fast storing capability. Multiple decen-
tralized hard disks offer almost no limit for fast data storing.
D3PC
D3PC
0.000 ms
SYNC
ETHER
NET
Above - direct SYNC of two or more DEWE systems
using the ORION-SYNC option installed onto the
chassis, and DS-OPT-NET software.
One measuring unit can be set as the master controller of both, or you can use a separate Windows
computer as a master client to remotely control all
synchronized units. The master controller is connected via ethernet to each measuring unit (typically
a dedicated ethernet switch is used).
GPS-CLOCK
SYNC
D3PC
Right - when the systems are too far apart for the
ORION-SYNC to be connected, the DEWE-CLOCK
is used to sync the units via either IRIG or GPS time
code signals.
The rest of the system is the same, as described
above.
DEWE-CLOCK
ETHER
D3PC
SYNC
NET
4-72| OWNER’s GUIDE
Operation Guidelines
System Startup Protocol
DC powered systems (STANDARD)
The standard D3PC runs from wide-ranging DC
power: 9-29 VDC. An AC/DC adapter is included
with your system.
To run the system from AC, connect the AC power
cord to AC mains and to the AC/DC adapter. Connect the DC output cable that has a round LEMO
connector on it to the DC power input on the rear
panel of the D3PC.
Connect a display
Please connect a standard VGA or XGA monitor to
the VGA connector on the rear of the system, behind
the computer protection door.
The D3PC MASTER power switch is located on the REAR
panel, directly above the 9-29 VDC power input connector.
Turning on the System
Ensure that the master power switch on the REAR
panel is in the ON position, then press and quickly
release the soft power switch on the FRONT of the
D3PC, and the system will boot up.
♦♦ Press ON and hold for one second to power the
system on.
♦♦ Press ON and hold for 3 seconds to power OFF.
Front Panel LED indicators
♦♦ Green POWER LED: Indicates that power is on,
when lit
♦♦ Red HDD LED: indicates hard disk activity, when
lit / flashing
The D3PC SOFT power switch is located on the FRONT
panel. Adjacent are LEDs for system power (green) and HDD
activity (red).
OWNER’s GUIDE - D3PC-8 | 4-73
Hardware Protocols
Using the removable hard disk drive
The rear panel of the D3PC has a 2.5” removable
drive bay. This single bay has at least one hard
drives inside it. Some systems are configured with
two separate drives inside this single carrier (a C
drive for Windows and applications, and a D drive
for data.)
⇒⇒ If this is the only hard drive in the system, do NOT
remove it when the system is powered on! This will
cause Windows to crash very badly. If you have an
internal hard drive which has the Windows operating system, then removing the external drive is
permitted when power is on, because you are not
writing to it at that time.
To remove the hard drive, you must have access
to the keylock. Turn the key into the lock and then
press the large button beside the lock to eject the
drive. To insert another drive, reverse these steps.
Using external optical read/write drives
Because the D3PC does not include an optical drive,
you are free to purchase one from any computer
retailer, and connect it to your D3PC via one of the
USB 2.0 ports.
-- The D3PC is compatible with external optical drives
which are Windows7 compatible.
The removable HDD is located on the rear panel. Two keys
are provided with your system, so that you may remove the
HDD and replace it with a different one.
4-74| OWNER’s GUIDE
Basic Specifcations
Input specifications
Analog inputs
Optional slow analog input channels (EPAD2)
Digital I/O lines and Counters
Number of analog channels
Bit-resolution
Maximum sample rate
Input configuration
ADC type
Input ranges
D3PC-8 model
8 IEPE / Voltage input channels
Up to 128 channels (16 EPAD2 series modules, each with 8 channels)
8 x DIO, 2 counters
8 channels
24-bit ADC converters (one per channel)
204.8 kS/s/ch simultaneous
Differential or single-ended (software selectable)
Sigma-delta
±10, ±2, ±0.5 or ±0.1 V
Voltage mode coupling
DC or AC, high-pass 0.16 or 3.4 Hz
IEPE mode and coupling
4 or 8 mA, high-pass 0.16 or 3.4 Hz
Over-voltage protection
Bandwidth
Signal to noise ratio
Crosstalk
Analog input connectors
±30 V
Sample rates up to 102.4 kS/s: 49 kHz -3dB
Sample rates up to 204.8 kS/s: 76 kHz -3dB
1 kS/s ≤ fS ≤ 51.2 kS/s: 108 dB
51.2 kS/s < fS ≤ 102.4 kS/s: 105 dB
102.4 kS/s < fS ≤ 204.8 kS/s: 80 dB
114 dB
Insulated BNC (female) (8)
Main system
Total PCI slots
Hard disk
Data throughput to disk
Power supply
Processor
RAM
Ethernet
USB
RS232
Operating system
Dimensions (W x D x H)
Weight
1 half length PCI slot, occupied by the ORION-0824-200 card (standard)
500 GB standard removable drive (optional solid state drive)
80 MB/s typical; faster rates available by changing to SSD drives
9~29 VDC. Includes external AC/DC power adapter.
Intel Core2Duo 2.0 GHz CPU, on a standard industrial grade MiniITX mainboard
4 GB standard
3 x ethernet interfaces standard (1 Gb)
Four x USB 2.0 interfaces available
One serial interface on a DB9 connector available
Microsoft Windows7 32-bit included (upgrades to 64-bit will be available Summer 2013)
8W x 10.5D x 4.25H (inches) / 203 x 267 x 108 (mm)
3 kg typical (7 lbs)
Environmental specifications
Operating temperature
-20 to 50C (0 to 45C with batteries installed) (storage temp -20 to 60C)
Humdity
10 to 80% non-condensing, 5 to 95% relative humidity
Vibration
MIL-STD-810F, EN 60068-2-6, EN 60721-3-2 class 2M2
Shock
Software
LabVIEW drivers
MIL-STD-810F, EN 60068-2-27
DS-7-SE data acquisition software is included as standard*
Multiple video cameras, or DEWE-CAM-FW-70, or DEWE-CLOCK use requires upgrade to PROF edition.
LabVIEW VIs are available for Dewetron ORION series A/D cards and DAQ series signal conditioners.
Popular upgrades
Counter expansion (UP-ORION-CTR8)
Upgrades the A/D card from 8 TTL digital I/Os and 2 TTL counter / encoders to:
8 synchronous TTL digital inputs protected up to 25 VDC
8 synchronous counter / encoder or 24 digital inputs with programmable threshold levels (0-40 V), input voltage range
-35 to 60 V, AC/DC coupling
Includes DB37 pin connectors installed
OWNER’s GUIDE - D3PC-8 | 4-75
Input specifications
D3PC-8 model
Synchronization interface (UP-ORION-SYNC)
Installs the SYNC hardware input/output ports and LED indicators onto the mainframe. Allows systems with the same
base ORION card to be synced. Additionally Requires DS-OPT-NET software option for synchronization under DS-7
software.
Digital Isolation (ORION-BASE-DI-ISO)
HDD upgrade to solid state disks
Isolation for the 16 digital inputs of ORION base cards.
Input low: 0 - 2 V, Input high: 3 - 50 V bandwidth: DC up to 1MHz
Isolation voltage between channels: 150 VDC
Isolation voltage between Input and Output: 250 VDC
Connector: DSUB-37 connector (replaces standard digital I/O connector)
HDD-UP-SSD-120
Upgrade to 120 GB flash disk (replaces standard spinning hard disk), no moving parts, max.
data throughput 90 MB/s
HDD-UP-SSD-240
Upgrade to 240 GB flash disk (replaces standard spinning hard disk), no moving parts, max.
data throughput 90 MB/s
HDD-UP-SSD-480
Upgrade to 480 GB flash disk (replaces standard spinning hard disk), no moving parts, max.
data throughput 100 MB/s
Time code interface
DEWE-CLOCK (internal or external) Adds an internal IRIG or GPS time code interface (does not require a PCI slot)
Popular interface add-ons
CAN expansion (UP-ORION-CAN2)
IRIG / GPS time code (DEWE-CLOCK-INT)
Adds 2 synchronous high speed CAN bus interfaces to the ORION card inside the system. Includes two DB9 factory
installed connectors for these counters on the side panel of the D310, and rear panel of the DEWE-3040 and DEWE3050. Includes DS-OPT-CAN software option supporting CAN BUS interface.
IRIG or GPS synchronized clock source for DEWETRON systems, installed inside a new DEWETRON base unit
Input: IRIG signal code A or B, AM or DC, or GPS signal
Output: TTL clock from 10 Hz to 10 MHz, PPS and ORION-DSA-SYNC, IRIG-B DC (requires DS-PROF or higher)
Please order GPS antenna GPS-ANT-1 separately (if GPS is needed)
VIDEO-FG-4
Adds a four channel VIDEO INPUT PCI card to the system. Four BNCs for analog NTSC video input on the right side
panel, allowing four video streams to be recorded in sync with the data
ARINC-429 / 1553 interfaces
Adds a multi-channel ARINC-429 or MIL-STD-1553 interface to the system. Available as a single PCI card with either
or both interfaces on it, or as separate external USB interfaces. See the INTERFACES section for a comprehensive
list.
External channel expansion
EPAD2 and CPAD2 series modules
Add one or more EPAD2 series external signal conditioners to your system. Each one provides 8 thermocouple,
RTD, low voltage, or low current inputs. EPAD2 modules can be daisy-chained up to 8 modules per system. CPAD2
modules are the same except with CAN BUS interface.
Digital and clock line specs
Digital input lines
8
Digital input characteristics
TTL/CMOS signal levels:
Low voltage level -0.7 V to 0.8 V
High voltage level 2 V to 5 V
Pull-up with 100 kΩ resistor
Input capacitance < 5pF
Input protection -1 V to 6 V
Digital output lines
8
Digital output characteristics
TTL/CMOS signal levels:
Low voltage level < 0.4 V @ 4 mA load
High voltage level > 3 V @ 4 mA load
Output current
Sink (low level) -20 mA Source (high level)
20 mA
Output impedance 50 Ω
Clock divider output line
1, same characteristics as digital output
lines
Standard Counter/Encoders
Standard counter/encoders
2 x 32-bit (LEMO connectors for each)
Note - used as pair counters when advanced features are used. If you need two or
more full-featured counters, please order the
UP-ORION-CTR8
Counter timebase
80 MHz (40 MHz max. input frequency)
Time base accuracy
25 ppm
Measurement modes
Event counting, up/down counting, gated
event counting, period time, pulse width,
two-edge separation, frequency and encoder
measurements
Standard counter/encoder signal
levels
TTL/CMOS, pull-up with 100 kΩ
Input low level: -0.7 V to 0.8 V
Input high level: +2 to +5V
Overvoltage input protection
(DI 0 to DI 7): ±25 V continuous
(DI 8 to DI 15): -1 to 6 V
4-76| OWNER’s GUIDE
Advanced Counter/Encoders (UPORION-CTR8 option)
Advanced counter/encoders
8 advanced 32-bit counters
Counter timebase
80 MHz (40 MHz max. input frequency)
Measurement modes
Event counting, up/down counting, gated
event counting, period time, pulse width,
two-edge separation, frequency and encoder
measurements
Signal levels
Symmetrical, differential
AC/DC coupling selectable
Trigger adjustment range
0 to 40 VDC with 40 mV resolution
Trigger level accuracy
±100 mV ±1% of trigger level
Common voltage range
-35 to 50V
Overvoltage input protection
±100 V continuous
Max. DC level @ AC coupling:
±50 V continuous
CAN BUS specs (UP-ORION-CAN2
option)
High-speed CAN interfaces
2 CAN 2.0B high speed interfaces
Bus pin fault protection
±36 V
ESD protection
12kV
Physical layer
High speed
Compatibility
2.0B standard, J1939 protocol support
OBD II via software option
RPM-Measurement
Encoder
Tacho
Gearthooth, CDM
Gearthooth, TRG, CDM and TRG
Gearthooth with missing teeth
Gearthooth with double teeth
Length-measurement
Linear encoder
Linear pulse sensor
Event Counting
Basic counting
Gated counting
Up/down counting
Waveform Timing
Period frequency
Two pulse edge separation
Period, pulse width,
frequency, duty cycle
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3210 | 5-77
5
DEWE-3210 Series
The DEWE-3210 is a powerful and portable “all in
one” data acquisition instrument. It features a flipup screen that resembles a notebook computer’s.
And like a notebook computer, it has lithium ion
batteries that keep the system running for hours
when external power is not available.
This model is designed and manufactured at the
company’s facilities in the USA. This is where the
SideHAND battery power system was invented,
hence why this model is made at that factory.
This section will review the hardware characteristics and specifications of the DEWE-3210 series, including
its properties as a computer instrument, and all data acquisition components, including the A/D cards, signal
conditioners, and interfaces with which it is compatible.
Please refer to the SOFTWARE section of this manual to learn how to operate the turn-key data acquisition
software installed on the system.
Please refer to the separate sections for the SIGNAL CONDITIONERS, A/D CARDS, INTERFACES and
SENSORS for complete details about those components that may be installed within your DEWE-3210.
Model DEWE-3210
Rear view, screen closed
5-78| OWNER’s GUIDE
System Dimensions
334
340
6
6
164
408
8
350
Add 10 mm all around for BNC
connectors, knobs, and other
protrusions.
Allow room for the display to be
opened - approximately 350mm H.
420
Dimensions in millimeters (mm)
Divide by 25.4 for inches
Allow plenty of room for cooling fans
to function properly. Never block air
exchange.
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3210 | 5-79
Top-level call-outs
DEWE-321x, head on view, with the screen open
17” XGA display and
resistive TOUCHSCREEN
Right speaker grille
Left speaker grille
Power and
STORE/STOP buttons
Touchpad and
mouse buttons
QWERTY keyboard
Screen release
buttons (slide
inward to release)
Screen release
buttons (slide
inward to release)
Filtered air intakes
(2 fans)
Rubber corners
on all sides
Carrying handle
POWER switch and LED
HDD busy LED
Battery status LCD
Storing indicator LED
STORE / STOP buttons *
QWERTY keyboard
* STORE/STOP buttons may not be
present in all models
5-80| OWNER’s GUIDE
Signal conditioning
The DEWE-3210 can be equipped with either:
„„ 8 x DAQ / PAD / HSI series plug-in signal conditioners, or
„„ 2 x 8-channel MDAQ-SUB conditioners (16 channels total)
It is not possible to install both DAQ/PAD/HSI slots and MDAQ conditioners into the body of the DEWE3210. However, mixed systems can be created by connecting external conditioners of any kind to the system. Therefore it is common that the DEWE-3210 is configured with 8 internal DAQ modules, plus connected to 16 ot more external MDAQ conditioners. Or the other way around, with 16 built-in MDAQ conditioners,
and 16 or more DAQ/PAD/HSI modules connected externally. There are many possibilities.
Model DEWE-3210 with 8 DAQ modules
Model DEWE-3211 with 16 MDAQ channels
Left side, screen open
Left side, screen open
A/D card(s)
The DEWE-3210 has three half length PCI slots inside. As a standard, the ORION-1616-100 A/D card is
installed when you buy the DEWE-3210 data acquisition system. This card provides the following basic
specifications (further details are shown in the specification tables in the next pages):
„„ 16 simultaneously sampled analog input channels
„„ 16-bit resolution, separate ADC per channels
„„ 100 kS/s/ch maximum sample rate
„„ 2 synchronous counter/encoder inputs
„„ 8 each digital input and output lines
At the time of ordering, this card can be upgraded, using any of the options available for increasing the
channel count, the bit resolution to 22 or 24-bit, or increasing the sample rate up to 1 MS/s/ch, and many
combinations of the preceding. See the UP-ORION options for all of the possibilities.
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3210 | 5-81
In addition, many options can be factory installed onto the ORION cards, including adding two high speed
CAN BUS interfaces, or expanding the number and capabilities of the digital counters that are installed.
Interface(s)
The DEWE-3210 is compatible with ORION, PCI card, and USB connected interfaces These include the
CAN BUS interfaces added to the ORION A/D card, as well as separate PCI cards available for adding
multiple ARINC 429, MIL-STD-1553 interfaces to the system. If all three PCI slots were used up, ARINC and
MIL-STD-1553 interfaces can also be added as USB devices. There are numerous interfaces available for
your DEWE system.
Typical ARINC or MIL-STD-1553 interface
Typical ARINC or MIL-STD-1553 interface
PCI format
USB format
Video Cameras
The DEWE-3210 is compatible with several kinds of video cameras, including:
DEWE-CAM-USB
DEWE-CAM-FW
DEWE-CAM-GIG-E
USB camera
Hard sync Firewire
camera
Gigabit ethernet camera
5-82| OWNER’s GUIDE
Configuration guide, DEWE-3211 model
The DEWE-3211 has a 2U height space on its left side panel, which can accept either a 2U high MDAQ
panel, such as either the DSUB connector panel or half BNC/half DSUB9 panel ... or a 1.5U panel plus any
of the 0.5U accessory panels, as shown below:
MDAQ panels
Accessory panels
0.5U-AMPFLEX-POWER-4
0.5 U
0.5U-AMPFLEX-POWER-8
2U
0.5 U
Power supply for PNA-A100
current clamps
0.5U-AOUT-BNC-2
0.5 U
1U-AOUT-BNC-4
2U
MDAQ panel with BNC connectors is only 1.5U, leaving 0.5U above for any accessory panel
2U
1.5 U
Note - if your system is ordered with any 1.5U MDAQ panel (MDAQ-SUB-V200-BNC or MDAQ-SUB-ACCBNC are perfect examples), and you do not order a 0.5U accessory panel, we will install a blank panel in the
0.5U space.
Configuration guide, DEWE-3210 model
The DEWE-3210 has a fixed configuration: there is a RACK-8 built into the side panel, so all you need to do
is choose any any of our DAQ, PAD, or HSI series plug-in modules to fill the slots.
Both models accept optional EPAD2 series external PAD modules for adding many channels of slower temperature signals, voltage, current, and RTD inputs.
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3210 | 5-83
System Connectors
System/PC connectors
Ground (earth) Connector
Connector: insulated banana jack, marked with the ground/earth symbol, yellow with green stripe
Mating connector: insulated banana plug, yellow with green stripe
Function: Depending on your electrical environment, it may be necessary to give the system an additional
ground connection. This is an international standard mini-banana jack, color coded yellow/green, located
near the DC power input.
DC Power Input
KEY PIN: (+)
LOW PIN: (–)
LEMO connector
EGJ-2B-302-CLA
DC power input
Connector: LEMO power connector, as shown in the picture above. The connector is this LEMO model:
EGJ-2B-302-CLA. The appropriate mating connector is LEMO FGJ.302.CLLD-XX (where XX is the cable
size).
The mating cable called CBL-DPS-2410 is provided to connect the DEWE-3210 to the DPS-2410 power
supply. This cable is 2 meters long. It has FGJ.302.CLLD-XX on the side that plugs into the DEWE-3210,
and FGG.2B.302-CLAD-XX on the side that plugs into the DPS-2410 AD/DC power supply.
Permissable power inputs are 18-24VDC.
⇒⇒ Important note - power input must not exceed 24VDC! System damage will occur.
Fuse
The system DC power is fused using a REGULAR ATO 15A fast-acting blade fuse. Blue is the ATO standard
color code for a15 amperes fuse rating. ISO 8820-3:2002 standard.
⇒⇒ Replace this fuse only with exactly the same type, or equipment damage, injury or even death can result.
5-84| OWNER’s GUIDE
RS232C interface
(com1)
PS/2 mouse (green)
XGA video output
PS/2 keyboard (violet)
IEEE-1394 firewire
USB 2.0 ports (4)
Ethernet ports (3)
Audio stack
(see description for
color codes)
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3210 | 5-85
Computer Connectors
The door on the right side of the chassis opens to allow access to a collection of computer
interface connections, as follows:
RS232C interface connector (com1)
Connector: 9-pin DSUB (male)
Mating connector: 9-pin DSUB (female)
Function: Can be used to connect devices which utilize the RS232C serial interface.
The typical interpretation of the signals in the COM ports is as follows:
The connector pin-out is defined here:
PS/2 mouse (green) and PS/2 keyboard (violet)
Connectors: Standard PS/2 green (mouse) and violet (keyboard)
Mating connectors: Standard PS/2 keyboard and mouse plugs or USB-PS/2 adapters
Function: Attachment of a keyboard or PS/2 mouse adapter via the stacked PS/2 mouse and keyboard connector (MSE & KBD).
Description: Both interfaces utilize open-drain signaling with on-board pull-up. The PS/2 mouse and keyboard is supplied from 5V_STB when in standby mode in order to enable keyboard or mouse activity to bring
the system out from power saving states. The supply is provided through a 1.1A resetable fuse.
5-86| OWNER’s GUIDE
Above left: Stacked PS/2 connector pinning and call-outs
Above right: view of a typical PS/2 connector, showing the pin numbering schema
-- Note: PS/2 devices should be connected before the system is powered on. PS/2 mice in particular will typically
not be recognized by Windows if connected after Windows has loaded.
IEEE-1394 Firewire interface
Connector: Standard 6-pin full size IEEE-1394b female connector
Mating connector: Standard 6-pin IEEE-1394b male plug
Function: Can be used to connect devices which utilize the IEEE-1394 firewire interface.
Description: This port is an IEEE Std 1394a-2000 fully compliant cable port which provides interfacing at
100M bits/s, 200M bits/s, and 400M bits/s.
-- Note: The DEWE-CAM-01 high speed video camera from Dewetron connects via firewire. However, it is highly
recommended to add a dedicated firewire card to your system to get the best performance from the DEWECAM-01 sensor. The full speed may not be achievable using the on-board interface shown above.
Ethernet interfaces (3)
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5-87
Connectors: RJ45 CAT5e standard jack
Mating connectors: RJ45 CAT5e or CAT6 plugs
Function: for connecting the DEWE-321x to a local area network (LAN), or for connecting ethernet peripherals (printers, cameras, etc.).
Description: The DEWE-321x provides three channels of 10/100/1000Mb Ethernet RTL8111B LAN controllers. In order to achieve the specified performance of the Ethernet port, Category 5 twisted pair cables must
be used with 10/100MB and Category 5E, 6 or 6E with 1Gb LAN networks.
The signals for the Ethernet ports are as follows:
The pinout of the RJ45 connector is as follows:
Above right: typical mating plug, showing the pin outs
On top of Ethernet connectors there is a Green LED (to the left) turning on when a 100MHz connection is
made and it is flashing when 100MHz traffic is ongoing. The Yellow LED (to the right) turns on when a 1GHz
connection is made and it is flashing when traffic is ongoing.
Please refer to the CAT5e, CAT6, and structured cabling standards for computer networks when interfacing
to the DEWE-321x.
CRT/VGA video output
5-88| Connector: three-row 15-pin DE-15 (female) connector
Mating connector: 15-pin DE-15 video (male) plug
Function: For connecting an additional display to the DEWE-321x, which will show an exact duplicate of the
built-in display.
Description: The DEWE-321x has two basic types of interfaces to a display: Analog CRT interface and a
digital interface typically used with flat panels. The digital interface to flat panels is connected internally to
the built-in flatpanel display. The CRT interface is available externally to the user.
⇒⇒ Note: The 5V supply in the CRT connector is fused by a 1.1A resetable fuse.
Left: typical mating cable for connecting an external VGA/XGA monitor
-- Note: the CRT output cannot be used in a “multiple monitors” setup under Windows. To support multiple moni-
tors with different images on them requires that a separate video card be added to the system.
-- Note: DEWE-321x’s with 15” displays (made in 2010) have a max resolution of 1024x768; DEWE-321x (made in
2011 or later) with 17” displays have a max resolution of 1280x1024 . The CRT output is set to the same resolution as the built-in flatpanel display.
USB 2.0 interfaces (4)
Connector: USB2.0 Standard-A receptacle
Mating connector: USB2.0 Standard-A plug
Function: For the connection of peripheral devices which utilize the USB 2.0 or USB 1.1 interface.
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5-89
Description: The DEWE-321x’s mainboard contains an Enhanced Host Controller Interface (EHCI) host controller that supports USB 2.0 allowing data transfers up to 480Mb/s. There are four user-accessible Universal
Host Controller Interface (UHCI Revision 1.1) controllers that support USB full-speed and low-speed signaling. All ports are high-speed, full-speed, and low-speed capable and USB Legacy mode is supported.
Over-current detection on all four USB ports is supported.
USB ports 0 and 2 are supplied on the combined ETHER1, USB0, USB2 connector. USB ports 4 and 5 are
supplied on the combined IEEE1394_0, USB4, USB5 connector.
Note: It is recommended to use only High-/Full-Speed USB cable, specified in USB2.0 standard:
-- Note: USB is most often used to connect webcams for recording video in sync with the data in your Dewetron
data acquisition system. It is also used to connect inertial sensors such as the XSENS MTI series of sensors.
Audio stack connectors (6)
Connectors: 3.5 mm (~1/8 in.) TRS jacks, color coded
Mating connectors: 3.5 mm (!1/8 in.) TRS plugs
Function: for outputting or inputting audio
Description: Audio Line-in, Line-out and Microphone are available in the stacked audio jack connector. Below is shown audio stack configuration when configured for 8-channel audio.
5-90| OWNER’s GUIDE
⇒⇒ Note: Always use industry standard plugs and cables when connecting to any part of the DEWE-321x
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3210 | 5-91
Signal Input Connectors
Analog input connectors (8 or 16)
Connector: Varies according to the signal conditioning module(s) installed
See the signal conditioning tables for further details about the module(s) installed within your system.
Function: to input analog signals to the dynamic measuring inputs of the DEWE-3210 or DEWE-3211.
Above: typical DEWE-3210 showing 8 DAQ modules plugged in
Counter/encoder connectors (2)
Connector: LEMO EGG.1B.307CLAD52
Mating connector: LEMO FGG.1B.307CLAD52
Mating cable available: CTR-CABLE-05 (includes connector)
Function: used to input tachometer, TTL level pulse train, or encoder outputs for measuring and conversion.
-- Note: see the COUNTER configuration section later in this guide.
5-92| OWNER’s GUIDE
CAN BUS interface connector (installed when you order CAN BUS option)
Connectors: LEMO EGG.1B.306.CLL
Mating connector: LEMO FGG.1B.306.CLL
Mating cable: CAN-CBL-Y
PIN
Function
Comment
1
CAN0 Lo
First CAN port
2
CAN0 Hi
First CAN port
3
D GND
4
CAN1 Lo
Second CAN port
5
CAN1 Hi
Second CAN port
6
GND
Function: used to connect to vehicle CAN BUS interfaces. Also can be used to read data from sensors which
have a CAN BUS output, such as Dewetron’s own CPAD2 series signal conditioning modules.
When the CAN option is installed, this single LEMO connector will contain two CAN BUS interfaces. The
CAN-CBL-Y mating cable is optionally available to split the single LEMO connector to two standard CAN
DB-9 (female) connectors. Both DB-9 connectors are wired the same way, as shown below:
When you connect either CAN bus interface to your vehicle or other CAN network, it is necessary to add
termination resistors (not included) at each end of the cable:
-- Note: this connector does not provide power for CPAD2 series modules.
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3210 | 5-93
Expansion connector (DEWE-3210 model)
ANALOG INPUT connector
Connector: LEMO 19-pin LEMO EGG.2B.319.CLL, marked ANALOG INPUT
Mating cable: 3210-EXP8-L
Function: The DEWE-3210 can be configured with a 16 channel A/D card inside. The first eight channels
are wired to the DAQ modules on the left side panel. Therefore, the other eight channels are brought to this
ANALOG INPUT connector on the left side panel, whereby you may connect an expansion rack such as the
DEWE-30-8, in order to address these eight channels.
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
AI 8+
2
AI 8 GND
3
AI 9+
4
AI 9 GND
5
AI 10+
6
AI 10 GND
7
AI 11+
8
AI 11 GND
9
AI 12+
10
AI 12 GND
11
AI 13+
12
AI 13 GND
13
AI 14+
14
AI 14 GND
15
AI 15+
16
AI 15 GND
17
N.C.
18
N.C.
19
N.C.
The DEWE-30-8 expansion rack needs two connections to the DEWE-3210 mainframe:
1. The analog connection as shown above via the 3210-EXP8-L cable as shown above, and
2. POWER and MODULE CONTROL are carried to the DEWE-30-8 expansion rack via the EPAD connector. Therefore, the additional modules in the expansion rack will be controllable within the software just as if
the inputs were physically installed within the DEWE-3210 mainframe.
DEWE-30-8-EXPANSION Rack (Optional)
5-94| OWNER’s GUIDE
DC Power &
control cable
3210-EXP8-L
analog cable
The 3210-EXP8-L cable connects the DEWE-30-8-EXP expansion rack to the DEWE-3210 model. It provides signal connection. Power and RS485 module control are via a separate cable.
-- This expansion/connector does not apply to the DEWE-3211 model, which already has 16 MDAQ channels on its
left side panel
Digital I/O connector (AKA “Accessory connector”)
Connector: Standard DSUB 37-pin connector, female
Mating connector: Standard DSUB 37-pin connector, female
Function: Provides access to the digital input/output lines on the installed A/D card, as well as additional
signals such as clock input, trigger input, and more (see A/D card table related to the installed card).
The exact pin-out of this connector can vary according to the system configuration, but here is the typical
pin-out diagram when an ORION-1616-100 card is installed:
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3210 | 5-95
Operation Guidelines
System Startup Protocol
Installing the Smart Batteries
Systems are shipped with the hot-swappable batteries removed. You should install them, connect
power, and charge up the batteries. Please follow
these guidelines:
♦♦ Open the battery door on side of DEWE-321x
and insert one battery into the top slot, and the
other into the bottom slot. Leave the center slot
open unless you have a third battery!
♦♦ When inserting the first battery you may notice
that the system LEDs and fans will turn on for a
second, this is normal when the battery module
“wakes up.”
The battery door on the side of the DEWE-321x is hinged,
allowing you to access the battery compartment. Batteries can
be removed by pulling on their flexible tabs.
⇒⇒ Never use any battery which appears to be dam-
aged, or which is cracked, broken, hot to the touch,
or unusual in any way. Lithium batteries can be
dangerous if mistreated or improperly charged.
Please locate the BATTERY STATUS LCD, located on
the panel just above the keyboard.
♦♦ With batteries in place, the LCD screen will
display the charge level, charge/discharge state,
power consumption and total current.
The battery status LCD keeps you informed of how many
batteries are installed (2 above), the charge level (100%
above), and whether the system is charging or discharging.
♦♦ The LCD (and battery module circuit) will always
be ON, unless the batteries are removed
Please locate your DPS-2410 external power supply. This is included with each DEWE-321x system.
♦♦ Connect the included AC power cord to the DPS-
2410, and then to a 120VAC power receptable.
♦♦ Connect the included DC power cord to the DPS-
2410 and then to the DEWE-3031’s DC power
input jack.
♦♦ Turn on the DPS-2410 power switch. A power
LED will confirm that that it is receiving AC power
and operating properly.
The DPS-2410 AC/DC converter/power supply is fused with
an automotive type power fuse. Please replace only with the
same type and rating of fuse.
5-96| OWNER’s GUIDE
⇒⇒ Do not block the cooling fan of the DPS-2410! Over-
heating any electrical component is dangerous.
-- NOTE: The DEWE-321x can be operated without bat-
teries simply by connecting the DPS-2410.
-- This can also help you refresh batteries which have
become 100% discharged, which can happen over
time. If the mainframe will not start up, simply
remove all of your batteries, then power up the system using the DPS-2410. When the system is up and
running, insert only one battery into the top slot.
Wait 30 minutes and then insert a second battery
into the second slot.
For faster recharging, do NOT power up the DEWE3xxx mainframe, but make certain that the DPS2410 is powered on.
-- There are also one, two, and four slot external bat-
The DPS-2410 has a POWER SWITCH - be sure to turn it on,
otherwise, DC power will not flow from it.
Optional BAT-CHARGER-1 is
ideal for desktop usage.
tery chargers optionally available. For an easy to use
desktop charger for a single battery, please order
the BAT-CHARGER-1. For a more robust four battery
charger which can also be used as a DC power
source, choose the Neutrino-4.
Using the smart batteries
The “smart batteries” supplied with your Dewetron battery powered system are equipped with an
integrated circuit which stores information such as
manufacturer, serial number, production date, etc.,
and monitors the current battery status in terms of
discharge rate, predicted remaining capacity, temperature, voltage etc.
Optional NEUTRINO-4 is
a ruggedized four battery
charger that also serves as a
DC power supply
BATT-95WH “smart batteries” are capable of displaying their charge state even when not plugged
into anything.
With the push of a button, an LED display on the
battery pack shows the current charge state in 25%
steps. An intelligent battery controller, integrated
in our DEWETRON systems, takes care of the
charging and discharging process in order to ensure
maximum battery performance and lifetime.
Press the white dot on the battery and the charge percentage
indicator will show the approximate remaining charge, in
25% steps.
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3210 | 5-97
Turning on the System
Locate the power switch on the front panel above
the main screen. This is a momentary rocker type
switch, where the white dot indicates the ON direction.
♦♦ Press ON and hold for one second to power the
system on.
♦♦ Press ON and hold for 3 seconds to power OFF.
♦♦ Green POWER LED: lit when the system is
powered on
-- The LCD battery display is ALWAYS on when any bat-
teries are installed. This does not indicate that the
system is powered on! Only the green POWER LED
indicates system power on/off status.
♦♦ Red HDD LED: lit when there is hard disk activ-
The DEWE-321x power switch is a momentary type, located
on the front panel near the LED battery status display. To its
right are LEDs for system power (green) and HDD activity
(red).
ity.
You will notice that the main screen’s backlight will
come on when power is applied. After a few moments the BIOS and Windows operating system
messages and graphics will appear.
⇒⇒ If the system does not power on, ensure that you
have batteries with at least 30% charge, or that the
DPS-2410 is properly connected and TURNED ON.
Hardware Protocols
Using the removable hard disk drive
The right side of the DEWE-321x has a 2.5” removable drive bay. This single bay has two separate
hard drives inside it: a C drive for Windows and applications, and a D drive for data.
⇒⇒ If this is the only hard drive in the system, do NOT
remove it when the system is powered on! This will
cause Windows to crash very badly. If you have an
internal hard drive which has the Windows operating system, then removing the external drive is
permitted when power is on, because you are not
writing to it at that time.
To remove the hard drive, you must have access
to the keylock. Turn the key into the lock and then
The DEWE-321x right side panel contains the removable
HDD and the optical media drive as standard.
5-98| OWNER’s GUIDE
press the large button beside the lock to eject the
drive. To insert another drive, reverse these steps.
Using the Optical read/write drive
-- Note - systems built after August 2012 do NOT have
an optical drive. This option was removed. Therefore
this section applies only to those models which
have the optical drive installed.
Directly above the removable HDD is an optical
drive which can read and write many formats of DVD
and CD media. Note that DVD and CD authoring
tools which are standard within the installed Windows operating system are available. No additional
authorizing tools are included as standard.
A standard slimline optical drive, you open it by
pressing the single button on the drive door beside
the LED. Gently press-fit a compatible disk onto the
spindle and then close the door.
If your system has Windows 7 operating system
installed, authoring capability for both CD and DVD
media are included with the operating system (Windows XP did not have authoring software for DVD
media included as standard).
Of course, in all cases, you are free to install whatever authoring software you prefer. There are some
very nice third party utilities which are superior to the
ones built into Windows.
-- Windows 7 Professional, 32-bit mode, was installed
on these models starting in December 2010.
The optical drive is located above the computer access door.
Press the EJECT button to open the optical drive. This optical
drive is no longer included with the DEWE-3210. Please
purchase an external USB optical drive if you require one.
Any Windows7 compatible optical drive with a USB 2.0
interface will work.
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3210 | 5-99
Analog Specifications
DEWE-3210 (DAQ)
DEWE-3211 (MDAQ)
8
--
On-board DAQ /PAD/HSI module slots
On-board MDAQ channels
-16
Compatible modules
All DAQ, PAD, and HSI series plug-in signal conditioning
modules
All MDAQ-SUB series conditioners
Module configuration
Any combination of 8 DAQ, PAD, and HSI modules can be
plugged in at any time. (See DAQ, PAD, and HSI tables)
One MDAQ-BASE-5 holds any two MDAQ-SUB modules
(See MDAQ table)
Modularity
Plug-in modules can be removed with 2 screws, even when
power is applied to the system.
MDAQ conditioners are factory installed and are not fieldmodular.
Input configuration
Differential, isolated (See DAQ, PAD, and HSI section for
complete details)
Differential, non-isolated (See MDAQ section for complete
details)
Signal/sensor compatibility
Voltages, currents, strain, pressure, acceleration, sound
pressure, temperature, force, displacement, and more. DAQ,
PAD and HSI modules are available which are compatible
with virtually all sensors in common use today.
Voltages, currents, strain, pressure, acceleration, sound
pressure, temperature, force, displacement, and more.
MDAQ modules (when combined with MSI adapters) are
available which are compatible with virtually all sensors in
common use today.
Detailed input specifications
According to the installed signal conditioners and installed A/D cards
(see tables for DAQ, MDAQ, PAD, HSI, EPAD2, CPAD2 conditioners, and ORION and AD series A/D cards)
3 (using all three PCI slots for A/D cards)
Max A/D card quantity
Channel expansion - DYNAMIC input channels
Max channel expansion with analog
connection
96 dynamic channels (3 x 32 channel A/D cards inside, plus one or more expansion signal conditioning chassis (external)
Max channel expansion with PCI-bridge
connection
200 dynamic channels (8 internal plus external DEWE-51-PCI-192 chassis with PCI bridge interface to the mainframe)
Channel expansion - SLOW input Channels
Max EPAD2 series conditioners
16 (128 channels). EPAD2 modules provide 8 channels each. They are plugged into the standard EPAD connector, and
one is daisy-chained to the next one. The last EPAD2 module in the chain must have the small terminator plugged into it to
ensure that the communication bus works properly.
5-100| OWNER’s GUIDE
Counter/Encoder Specifications
Parameter
DEWE-3210 series
DEWE-3211 series
DEWE-3213 series
Number of counter channels
According to the A/D card installed (see tables)
Counter modes
ORION cards: Event counting, waveform timing, encoder, tacho, geartooth sensor
AD series cards: Event counting, waveform timing, tacho
Counter input signal level
Standard: TTL level
Optional: user adjustable trigger level (when ORION
cards whose model names end in 4 or 5 are ordered.
See A/D card tables)
Standard: TTL level
Counter input connectors
Standard: Two LEMO connectors on the left side panel,
one for each counter input
Optional: More LEMO connectors, or alternative
connectors, for the counters
Standard: Eight LEMO
connectors
Number of Digital input/outputs
According to the A/D card installed (see tables)
24 digital inputs
Digital input signal level
Standard: TTL, non-isolated
Optional: Wider range, isolated digital input
According to the A/D card installed (see tables)
TTL level, non-isolated
Digital input connector
DSUB37 connector on the left side panel, which has the
digital I/O lines, counter, and trigger line from the first
installed A/D card.
Each of the 8 LEMOs has
three digital inputs
8
CAN BUS Specifications
Parameter
DEWE-3210 series
Number of CAN bus interfaces
According to the A/D card installed (see tables below)
DEWE-3211 series
DEWE-3213 series
Interface type
CAN 2.0B, up to 1 MBit/sec
Special protocols supported
J1939 (standard)
OBDII PLUGIN-OBDII option)
CAN output (DEWESoft-OPT-CAN option)
Isolation
not isolated, however, CAN-OPT-ISO adapters are available optionally, which will
isolated the CAN BUS interfaces.
2 x high speed CAN ports
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3210 | 5-101
Interfaces
Parameter
DEWE-3210 series
DEWE-3211 series
EPAD2 interface
Standard, via LEMO connector. See signal conditioner tables below for EPAD2
details.
Video camera interfaces
USB 2.0, Firewire (IEEE-1394), and ethernet may be used for optional DEWE-CAM
VIDEO cameras. The optional FG-VIDEO-4 can be installed to provide four NTSC
video inputs in addition (requires one PCI slot).
GPS interfaces
RS232C and USB 2.0 may be used for optional GPS interfaces/sensors
ARINC 429 / MIL-STD-1553
Optional ARINC 429 and MIL-STD-1553 interfaces may be added either as PCI
cards or as external USB 2.0 or ethernet-connected boxes.
PCM data
PCM bit sync/decom interface optionally available. This is a full length card and thus
cannot fit within the DEWE-3210 or DEWE-3211. However, it can be connected via
a PCI bridge expansion chassis. Or it can be installed into the DEWE-3218 computer
version of the DEWE-3210, which does not have analog signal conditioning.
CAN BUS
Two high speed CAN bus interfaces can be installed on each ORION card as an option.
(factory installed). Up to 6 CAN BUS interfaces therefore can be installed within the
DEWE-3210 mainframe.
Accessories Included
Carrying bag
3200-BAG, soft sided carrying bag made from ballistic nylon, black.
Pouches for accessories, cords, DPS-2410, straps and adjustable shoulder strap
System restore DVD
DVD allows the system to be reloaded to factory conditions, including Windows
configuration and Dewetron software configuration
Printed manuals
DEWE-3210/3211 Owner’s Guide
Documentation
Certificate of conformance with manufacturer’s specifications
Calibration report
(optional) Complete NIST traceable calibration report from Met/CAL®
5-102| OWNER’s GUIDE
Computer System Specifications
Parameter
DEWE-3210 series
DEWE-3211 series
CPU
Intel® Core2Duo® 2 GHz CPU
RAM
2 GB RAM standard (up to 4 GB optionally)
Hard disk drive
500 GB removable S-ATA spinning drive standard, plus internal 160 GB fixed drive
for Windows OS and applications
Optional drives:
32, 64, or 128 GB removable flash drive (no moving parts)
Internal spinning or flash drive added in addition to the removable drive
Larger removable drive (up to 1 TB)
Optical drive
None (this was removed in 2012). External optical drives can be purchased at any
computer retailer and connected via USB 2.0 interface.
Operating System
Microsoft® Windows 7 Professional® (32-bit)
Keyboard and pointing device
Built-in Cherry brand QWERTY keyboard with touchpad
Display
Built-in 17” XGA display 1280x1024 pixels, with resistive touchscreen as stanard
Interfaces
2 x Ethernet interfaces (1 Gb/s max. transfer speed)
4 x USB 2.0 interfaces
1 x IEEE-1394 Firewire interface
1 x RS232C serial interface
1 x VGA interface
Audio and video I/O connectors
PCI slots
Three half-length 32-bit PCI slots. The first slot always used by an A/D card. The other
slots may be used for additional A/D cards, or additional interfaces.
Power system
SideHAND® battery power system installed
2 x Lithium Ion smart batteries are included
Three battery slots are built into the left side panel
DPS-2410 external AC/DC adapter/charger is included
Built-in 2 line LCD display shows the battery status at all times
Battery running time
Approximately 2 hours of battery operation (depends on workload of the system)
AC running time
Unlimited. With the DPS-2410 connected, the system will run indefinitely. Batteries
are recharged automatically when power is connected.
Dimensions:
425 x 340 x 191 mm (16.7 x 13.4 x 7.5 in.) (with screen closed)
Weight:
Without batteries: 10 kg (22 lb.)
Battery weight: approx. 1.5 lbs each
Temperature & humidity
0 to +50 °C (-20 when pre-warmed) (10 to 80 % non cond., 5 to 95 % rel. humidity)
Shock and vibration
Shock: EN 60068-2-27, MIL-STD-810F
Vibration: EN 60068-2-6, EN 60721-3-2 class 2M2
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3210 | 5-103
Data Acquisition Software Specifications
DEWESoft software specifications
General
Compatibility
Microsoft® Windows XP® and Windows 7® (32-bit operating systems)
Computer requirements
Recommended: Intel® Core2Duo® 2 GHz CPU with 2 GB RAM and S-ATA HDD
with 100 GB of free space
Minimum: Intel® Atom® 1.2 GHz CPU with 1 GB RAM and IDE HDD with 50 GB of
free space
Licensing requirements
A valid license is required for data acquisition operation
No license is required to use the software in analysis mode
Software name and edition
DEWESoft 7 SE (standard edition) is included with the DEWE-321x system.
Upgrades from SE to PROF or DSA or EE editions are available for purchase at any
time.
Hardware compatibility
Controls all programmable aspects of the integrated DEWE-43 acquisition module
TEDS
Supports TEDS sensors, and includes TEDS compatible sensor database
Input scaling
Channel setup screen: supports linear scaling of analog channels via 2-point method
and funtional method (y=mx+b)
Math formula and sensor database: support both linear and non-linear (polynomial)
scaling, via multi-sectional coefficients or look-up table scaling
Counter setup
Counter/encoder channel setup screen supports graphical configuration of all counter
and encoder decoding modes.
Recording setup
Recording modes
Always fast (continuous recording to disk at the dynamic sample rate)
Fast on trigger (dynamic sample rate recording when one or more trigger conditions
are true)
Always slow (reduced rate storage of min/max/ave/rms values at a user-selectable
decimation of the dynamic sample rate
Fast on trigger, slow otherwise (combination of fast triggering and slow recording in
between triggers)
Pre-trigger time
Pre-trigger time can be entered when using any triggered recording mode. Pretrigger
time limited to the amount of physical RAM available divided by the number of
samples per second being streamed across the PCI bus
Post-trigger time
Post-trigger time may be selected without limit
When one or more channels are being used to stop recording, any selected posttrigger time will be added to the end of the acquisition
File naming
Data files may be named freely within Windows file naming constraints
File protection
Files canno be over-written accidentally due to a warning screen, which provides a
way to cancel recording, continue and overwrite the existing file, or rename the new
file (preserving the existing file)
Multi-file naming
Selectable automatic numbering of files. Software will append an underscore and four
digits to the end of the user-entered filename. Subsequent recordings are increased
one digit at a time. Alternatively the date and/or time (hh:mm:ss) can be added to the
filename.
5-104| OWNER’s GUIDE
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3050 | 6-105
6
DEWE-3050 Series
The DEWE-3050 is a powerful yet portable data
acquisition instrument. It features a removable
touchscreen display that can be placed on facing
when for protection when the system is not being
used. In addition, the keyboard and cables are
stored in a compartment behind the display when
not in use.
The rear panel of this model is the most capable
and flexible that we have ever made, capable of
holding up to 32 plugin-modules, or up to 128
MDAQ channels, and many combinations.
The DEWE-3050 runs from AC power, but has a
built-in battery UPS system that will keep it running for hours in the event that the power is lost.
This model is designed and built at our Wakefield,
RI manufacturing facility in the USA.
Model DEWE-3050
Front view, display installed facing
outward for normal use
This section will review the hardware characteristics and specifications of the DEWE-3050 series, including
its properties as a PC-based instrument, and all data acquisition components, including the A/D cards, signal
conditioners, and interfaces with which it is compatible.
Please refer to the SOFTWARE section of this manual to learn how to operate the turn-key data acquisition
software installed on the system.
Please refer to the separate sections for the SIGNAL CONDITIONERS, A/D CARDS, INTERFACES and
SENSORS for complete details about those components that may be installed within your DEWE-3050.
6-106| OWNER’s GUIDE
System Dimensions
419
5
384
10
394
340
343
Dimensions in millimeters (mm)
Divide by 25.4 for inches
Add 10 mm all around for BNC
connectors, knobs, and other
protrusions.
Allow plenty of room for cooling fans
to function properly. Never block air
exchange.
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3050 | 6-107
Top-level call-outs
DEWE-3050, front view, display facing out and mounted
High-impact rubberized
side / corner protectors
PCI card edge access (for ARINC,
1553, PCM, D/A cards)
(INSIDE) ORION-1616-100 A/D
card included as standard
Computer interfaces
(ethernet, USB, RS232,
audio, and more)
Two removable 2.5” HDDs (C and D)
Video cameras like:
DEWE-CAM-FW-70
DEWE-CAM-GIG-E-120
DEWE-CAM-USB, etc.
Convenient large handle
LCD battery status display
17” removable TOUCHSCREEN display
Air cooling (filtered intakes)
120 / 240 VAC mains power input
Door for 4 x SideHAND2 series
hot-swappable batteries
6-108| OWNER’s GUIDE
Top-level call-outs (continued)
DEWE-3050, rear view, 2.5U-PANEL-16 installed
Accessory / DIO connector (DSUB 37)
ORION-SYNC (option)
EPAD connector (LEMO)
12 VDC output (LEMO
Counters (2) (LEMO)
16 slots for DAQ / PAD / HSI modules
Modular spaces for the installation
of additional function panels
Rubberized corner protectors
DEWE-3050, rear view, TWO 2.5U-PANEL-16s
installed (32 slots)
5 x PCI slots (full length)
Filtered air intakes for colling
Two removable HDDs (C and D)
Computer interfaces
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3050 | 6-109
DEWE-3050 Rear Panel Configurations
With DAQ / PAD / HSI and MDAQ
conditioners
The rear panel can be configured with one 16 slot
racks for DAQ / PAD / HSI modules
2.5U-PANEL-DAQ-16 - compatible with all DAQ and
PAD modules, and HSI modules (up to 300 kHz
bandwidth) - or 2.5U-PANEL-DAQ-16-HSI - compatible with all HSI
modules up to 2 MHz bandwidth, all PAD modules,
and most DAQ modules
When one 16-slot rack is installed, two 2.5U and two
2.0U panel spaces remain available for additional
panel options to be added. For example: 32 channels
of MDAQ conditioners with DSUB connectors could
be added, plus 32 channels of MDAQ with BNC
connectors. Or 64 channels of MDAQ with BNC
connectors.
There are many possibilities.
With MDAQ conditioners only
The rear panel can be configured with up to:
SIX 2.0U MDAQ conditioner panels with DSUB
connectors could be added (96 channels) - or EIGHT 1.5U MDAQ conditioner panels with BNC
connectors would be added (128 channels) - or Many other comibinations of MDAQ panels and other
function panels
(ALL MODELS)
EPAD2 signal conditioners
for adding slow thermocouple
inputs, RTDs, voltages, and
currents (daisy-chain)
6-110| OWNER’s GUIDE
DEWE-3050, front view, display removed - keyboard revealed
Inside compartment for cable storage
(remove the display to access it)
Removable kayboard with touchpad
located behind the display. Held in by
spring-loaded clips. You can stow the
keyboard and your cables inside here
when the system is not being used.
Additional Function Panels
Note that the screen can be put
on backwards to protect it when
the system is not in use.
0.5U-DA2-BNC
0.5 U panel with 2 BNC connectors connected to the 2 analog
outputs of an AD16-1000-16-OUT2 card
0.5U-DA4-BNC
0.5 U panel with 4 BNC connectors connected to the 4 analog
outputs of a DA4-1000-16 card
0.5U-DA8-BNC
0.5 U panel with 4 BNC connectors connected to the 8 analog
outputs of a DA8-1000-16 card
0.5U-AMFLEX-POWER-4
0.5U panel with BINDER 712 connectors, 9VDC power supply
for up to four PNA-100 current sensors.
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3050 | 6-111
0.5U-AMFLEX-POWER-8
0.5U panel with BINDER 712 connectors, 9VDC power supply
for up to four PNA-100 current sensors.
0.5U-CLAMP-DC-POWER-4
0.5U panel with LEMO connectors, 15VDC power supply and
digital status lines for up to four PNA-CLAMP-150-DC current
sensors.
0.5U-CLAMP-DC-POWER-8
0.5U panel with LEMO connectors, 15VDC power supply and
digital status lines for up to eight PNA-CLAMP-150-DC current
sensors.
1U-DA8-BNC
1U panel with 8 BNC connectors supporting up to 8 analog
outputs
1U-DA16-BNC
1U panel with 8 BNC connectors supporting up to 16 analog
outputs
1.5U-ORION-DIO-PANEL-1
1.5U panel with 8 LEMO connectors (EGG.1B.307) for up to 8
counters, plus one DSUB37 connector for up to 16 digital input
lines, including mating connectors (included with UP-ORIONCTR8 upgrade)
1.5U-TC-PANEL-32
1.5U panel prepared for up to 32 thermocouple input channels.
Up to four MPAD-TH8-X modules can be factory installed into
this panel. Each MPAD block provides 8 channels.
6-112| OWNER’s GUIDE
Signal conditioning
The DEWE-3050 can be equipped in countless ways. Here are the most popular configurations:
„„ 16 x DAQ / PAD / HSI series plug-in signal conditioners, or
„„ 32 x DAQ / PAD / HSI series plug-in signal conditioners, or
„„ 16 x 8-channel MDAQ-SUB-BNC conditioners (128 channels total), or
„„ 12 x 8-channel MDAQ-SUB-DSUB conditioners (96 channels total), or
„„ 16 x DAQ / PAD / HSI modules PLUS up to 64 channels of MDAQ conditioners
When every possible panel space is not filled, other function panels can additionally be added. Please see
the previous page for a listing of these panels.
A/D card(s)
The DEWE-3050 has five full length PCI slots inside. As a standard, the ORION-1616-100 A/D card is
installed when you buy the data acquisition system. This card provides the following basic specifications (further details are shown in the specification tables in the next pages):
„„ 16 simultaneously sampled analog input channels
„„ 16-bit resolution, separate ADC per channels
„„ 100 kS/s/ch maximum sample rate
„„ 2 synchronous counter/encoder inputs
„„ 8 each digital input and output lines
At the time of ordering, this card can be upgraded, using any of the options available for increasing the
channel count, the bit resolution to 22 or 24-bit, or increasing the sample rate up to 1 MS/s/ch, and many
combinations of the preceding. See the UP-ORION options for all of the possibilities.
In addition, many options can be factory installed onto the ORION cards, including adding two high speed
CAN BUS interfaces, or expanding the number and capabilities of the digital counters that are installed.
Furthermore, multiple ORION series cards may be installed. A few examples:
„„ 5 x ORION-1624-200 cards for a 40 channel noise and vibration analyzer
„„ 3 x ORION-3216-100 cards for a 96 channel general purpose system
„„ 4 x ORION-1616-1000 cards for a 64 channel HIGH SPEED acquisition system (1 MS/s/ch)
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3050 | 6-113
Interface(s)
The DEWE-3050 is compatible with ORION, PCI card, and USB connected interfaces These include the
CAN BUS interfaces added to the ORION A/D card, as well as separate PCI cards available for adding
multiple ARINC 429, MIL-STD-1553 interfaces to the system. If all three PCI slots were used up, ARINC and
MIL-STD-1553 interfaces can also be added as USB devices. There are numerous interfaces available for
your DEWE system.
Typical ARINC or MIL-STD-1553 interface
Typical ARINC or MIL-STD-1553 interface
PCI format
USB format
Video Cameras
The DEWE-3050 is compatible with several kinds of video cameras, including:
DEWE-CAM-USB
DEWE-CAM-FW
DEWE-CAM-GIG-E
USB camera
Hard sync Firewire
camera
Gigabit ethernet camera
6-114| OWNER’s GUIDE
System Connectors
System/PC connectors
Ground (earth) Connector
Connector: insulated banana jack, marked with the ground/earth symbol, yellow with green stripe
Mating connector: insulated banana plug, yellow with green stripe
Function: Depending on your electrical environment, it may be necessary to give the system an additional
ground connection. This is an international standard mini-banana jack, color coded yellow/green, located
near the DC power input.
AC power input
Connector: Standard AC receptacle, compatible with 120/240 VAC (the receptacle has to be reversed to
switch it between 120 VAC/60 Hz and 240 VAC/50 Hz.
⇒⇒ Important note - applied power must fall within the posted ranges.
Fuse
The AC power is fused within the AC receptacle, using a REGULAR ATO 15A fast-acting blade fuse. Blue is
the ATO standard color code for a15 amperes fuse rating. ISO 8820-3:2002 standard.
⇒⇒ Replace this fuse only with exactly the same type, or equipment damage, injury or even death can result.
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3050 | 6-115
PC Connector Call-Outs
Audio I/O stack
DVI video output
USB 2.0 ports
DisplayPorts (2)
Ethernet (3)
6-116| OWNER’s GUIDE
Ethernet interfaces (3)
Connectors: RJ45 CAT5e standard jack
Mating connectors: RJ45 CAT5e or CAT6 plugs
Function: for connecting the DEWE-321x to a local area network (LAN), or for connecting ethernet peripherals (printers, cameras, etc.).
Description: The DEWE-321x provides three channels of 10/100/1000Mb Ethernet RTL8111B LAN controllers. In order to achieve the specified performance of the Ethernet port, Category 5 twisted pair cables must
be used with 10/100MB and Category 5E, 6 or 6E with 1Gb LAN networks.
The signals for the Ethernet ports are as follows:
The pinout of the RJ45 connector is as follows:
Above right: typical mating plug, showing the pin outs
On top of Ethernet connectors there is a Green LED (to the left) turning on when a 100MHz connection is
made and it is flashing when 100MHz traffic is ongoing. The Yellow LED (to the right) turns on when a 1GHz
connection is made and it is flashing when traffic is ongoing.
Please refer to the CAT5e, CAT6, and structured cabling standards for computer networks when interfacing
to the DEWE-321x.
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3050 | 6-117
DVI Video Output
Connector: Standard DVI connector
Mating connector: Standard DVI-to-DVI or DVI-to-VGA cable
Function: For connecting the standard display.
-- Note: the CRT output cannot be used in a “multiple monitors” setup under Windows. To support multiple moni-
tors with different images on them requires that a separate video card be added to the system.
-- Note: DEWE-321x’s with 15” displays (made in 2010) have a max resolution of 1024x768; DEWE-321x (made in
2011 or later) with 17” displays have a max resolution of 1280x1024 . The CRT output is set to the same resolution as the built-in flatpanel display.
USB 2.0 interfaces (6)
Connector: USB2.0 Standard-A receptacle
Mating connector: USB2.0 Standard-A plug
Function: For the connection of peripheral devices which utilize the USB 2.0 or USB 1.1 interface.
Description: The DEWE-3050 mainboard contains an Enhanced Host Controller Interface (EHCI) host
controller that supports USB 2.0 allowing data transfers up to 480Mb/s. There are typically six user-accessible Universal Host Controller Interface (UHCI Revision 1.1) controllers that support USB full-speed and
low-speed signaling. All ports are high-speed, full-speed, and low-speed capable and USB Legacy mode is
supported.
Over-current detection on all USB ports is supported.
Note: It is recommended to use only High-/Full-Speed USB cable, specified in USB2.0 standard:
6-118| -- Note: USB is most often used to connect webcams for recording video in sync with the data in your Dewetron
data acquisition system. It is also used to connect inertial sensors such as the XSENS MTI series of sensors.
Audio stack connectors (3)
Connectors: 3.5 mm (~1/8 in.) TRS jacks, color coded BLUE, GREEN and PINK
Mating connectors: 3.5 mm (!1/8 in.) TRS plugs
Function: for outputting or inputting audio
Description: Audio Line-in, Line-out and Microphone are available in the stacked audio jack connector. Below is shown audio stack configuration when configured for 8-channel audio.
⇒⇒ Note: Always use industry standard plugs and cables when connecting to any part of the system.
|
6-119
Signal Input Connectors
Analog input connectors (up to 128)
Connector: Varies according to the signal conditioning module(s) installed.
See the signal conditioning tables for further details about the module(s) installed within your system.
Function: to input analog signals to the dynamic measuring inputs of the DEWE-3050.
Counter/encoder connectors (2)
Connector: LEMO EGG.1B.307CLAD52
Mating connector: LEMO FGG.1B.307CLAD52
Mating cable available: CTR-CABLE-05 (includes connector)
Function: used to input tachometer, TTL level pulse train, or encoder outputs for measuring and conversion.
-- Note: see the COUNTER configuration section later in this guide.
CAN BUS interface connector (UP-ORION-CAN2 option)
Connectors: DSUB-9 standard CAN wiring
Mating connector: DSUB-9 male mate
PIN
Function
Comment
1
CAN0 Lo
First CAN port
2
CAN0 Hi
First CAN port
3
D GND
4
CAN1 Lo
Second CAN port
5
CAN1 Hi
Second CAN port
6
GND
Function: used to connect to vehicle CAN BUS interfaces. Also can be used to read data from sensors which
have a CAN BUS output, such as Dewetron’s own CPAD2 series signal conditioning modules.
6-120| When the CAN option is installed, this single LEMO connector will contain two CAN BUS interfaces. The
CAN-CBL-Y mating cable is optionally available to split the single LEMO connector to two standard CAN
DB-9 (female) connectors. Both DB-9 connectors are wired the same way, as shown below:
When you connect either CAN bus interface to your vehicle or other CAN network, it is necessary to add
termination resistors (not included) at each end of the cable:
-- Note: this connector does not provide power for CPAD2 series modules.
Digital I/O connector (AKA “Accessory connector”)
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3050 | 6-121
Connector: Standard DSUB 37-pin connector, female
Mating connector: Standard DSUB 37-pin connector, female
Function: Provides access to the digital input/output lines on the installed A/D card, as well as additional
signals such as clock input, trigger input, and more (see A/D card table related to the installed card).
The exact pin-out of this connector can vary according to the system configuration, but here is the typical
pin-out diagram when an ORION-1616-100 card is installed:
6-122| OWNER’s GUIDE
Operation Guidelines
System Startup Protocol
Installing the Smart Batteries
Systems are shipped with the hot-swappable batteries removed. You should install them, connect
power, and charge up the batteries. Please follow
these guidelines:
♦♦ Open the battery door on the side of the DEWE-
3050 and insert four SideHAND2 series smart
batteries into the four slots.
♦♦ When inserting the first battery you may notice
that the system LEDs and fans will turn on for a
second, this is normal when the battery module
“wakes up.”
The battery door on the side of the DEWE-3050 is hinged,
allowing you to access the battery compartment. Batteries can
be removed by pulling on their flexible tabs.
⇒⇒ Never use any battery which appears to be dam-
aged, or which is cracked, broken, hot to the touch,
or unusual in any way. Lithium batteries can be
dangerous if mistreated or improperly charged.
Please locate the BATTERY STATUS LCD, located on
the left side panel.
♦♦ With batteries in place, the LCD screen will
display the charge level, charge/discharge state,
power consumption and total current.
♦♦ The LCD (and battery module circuit) will always
be ON, unless the batteries are removed
Plug the standard AC power cord into a valid
mains power source.
„„ Turn on the master power switch on the left side
panel.
„„ Press and release the smaller soft power switch
adjacent to the larger master power switch. The
system, will boot up.
⇒⇒ Do not block the cooling fan of the DEWE-3050.
The battery status LCD keeps you informed of how many
batteries are installed (2 above), the charge level (100%
above), and whether the system is charging or discharging.
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3050 | 6-123
Overheating any electrical component is dangerous.
-- NOTE: The DEWE-3050 can be operated without bat-
teries simply by connecting the DPS-2410.
-- This can also help you refresh batteries which have
become 100% discharged, which can happen over
time. If the mainframe will not start up, simply
remove all of your batteries, then power up the
system using external AC power. When the system
is up and running, insert only one battery. Wait 30
minutes and then insert a second battery into the
second slot, and so on.
For faster recharging, do NOT power up the DEWE3050 mainframe, but make certain that the AC
power is connected.
Optional BAT-CHARGER-1 is
ideal for desktop usage.
-- There is a one-slot desktop style battery charger
available (BAT-CHARGER-1).
Using the smart batteries
The “smart batteries” supplied with your Dewetron battery powered system are equipped with an
integrated circuit which stores information such as
manufacturer, serial number, production date, etc.,
and monitors the current battery status in terms of
discharge rate, predicted remaining capacity, temperature, voltage etc.
SideHAND2 series “smart batteries” are capable of
displaying their charge state even when not plugged
into anything.
A small LCD display on the battery pack shows the
current charge state in 25% steps. An intelligent
battery controller, integrated in our DEWETRON
systems, takes care of the charging and discharging
process in order to ensure maximum battery performance and lifetime.
SideHAND2 series batteries have a small LCD display on
their end near the plastic pull tab. This LCD will indicate the
approximate level of charge in 25% steps.
6-124| OWNER’s GUIDE
Turning on the System
The MASTER power switch must be set to the on
position. Now locate the smaller soft power switch
nearby on the left side panel. This is a momentary
rocker type switch, where the white dot indicates the
ON direction.
♦♦ Press ON and hold for one second to power the
system on.
♦♦ Press ON and hold for 3 seconds to power OFF.
♦♦ Green POWER LED: lit when the system is
powered on
-- The LCD battery display is ALWAYS on when any bat-
teries are installed. This does not indicate that the
system is powered on! Only the green POWER LED
indicates system power on/off status.
The larger power switch is the MASTER. The smaller one is
a “soft,” or momentary type, located nearby, on the left side
panel. In between is a green LED which lights up to indicate
that system power is on.
You may notice that the main screen’s backlight will
come on when power is applied. After a few moments the BIOS and Windows operating system
messages and graphics will appear.
⇒⇒ If the system does not power on, ensure that you
have batteries with at least 30% charge, or that the
DPS-2410 is properly connected and TURNED ON.
Hardware Protocols
Using the removable hard disk drives
The left side of the DEWE-3050 has two 2.5” removable drive bays. One is marked as the C drive for
Windows and applications, and the other as the D
drive for data.
⇒⇒ Never remove the C drive when the system is
powered on or plugged in! The operating system
can become corrupted and the system will fail if
you do this. Also take care with the D drive, that no
application is trying to access it. It’s always safer to
completely turn off the system before removing or
installing any hard drive.
To remove the hard drive, you must have access
to the keylock. Turn the key into the lock and then
press the large button beside the lock to eject the
drive. To insert another drive, reverse these steps.
The DEWE-3050 right side panel contains two removable
HDD s (hard disk drives).
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3050 | 6-125
Using external optical read/write drives
Because the DEWE-3050 does not include an optical drive, you are free to purchase one from any computer
retailer, and connect it to your system via one of the available USB 2.0 ports.
-- The DEWE-3050 is compatible with external optical drives which are Windows7 compatible.
6-126| OWNER’s GUIDE
DEWE-3050 SPECIFICATIONS
Input specifications
Slots for DAQ or PAD modules
MDAQ-SUB positions
DEWE-3050 - DAQ version
DEWE-3050 - MDAQ version
16 or 32
--
When 16 DAQ slots are installed, up to 64 more channels
of MDAQ can be added to the system, for 80 channels
total.
Consult Dewetron for configuration assistance.
Up to 6 x 2.0U MDAQ-DSUB (96 channels) or 8 x 1.5U
MDAQ-BNC (128 channels) can be installed. Also many
combinations of MDAQ and other panels are possible.
Consult Dewetron for configuration.
Main system
Total PCI slots
Hard disk
Data throughput to disk
5 x full-length PCI slots (one is used by the standard A/D card)
C: 100 GB removable C drive / 500 GB removable D drive (optional solid state drive)
80 MB/s typical; faster rates available with the additional of an internal RAID controller and/or additional drives
Power supply
120/240 VAC, 50/60 Hz AC mains power.
Battery power
Includes standard UPS with four hot-swappable SideHAND2 series batteries. Batteries are charged automatically
when AC power is connected.
Display
Processor
17” SXGA display, 1280 x 1024 px, with resistive touchscreen. Display is removable, and can be mounted backwards
when not in use.
Intel 8-core i7 2.0 GHz CPU, on a standard ATX mainboard
RAM
Ethernet
USB
RS232
Operating system
Dimensions (W x D x H)
Weight
Free PCI slots
4 GB standard
3 x ethernet interfaces standard (1 Gb)
Four x USB 2.0 interfaces available
One serial interface on a DB9 connector available
Microsoft Windows7 32-bit included (upgrades to 64-bit will be available Summer 2013)
425 x 340 x 191 mm (16.7 x 13.4 x 7.5 in.)
12 kg typical (26.4 lbs)
4 (the standard ORION-1616-100 A/D card uses one of the PCI slots)
Environmental specifications
Operating temperature
-20 to 50C (0 to 45C with batteries installed) (storage temp -20 to 60C)
Humdity
10 to 80% non-condensing, 5 to 95% relative humidity
Vibration
MIL-STD-810F, EN 60068-2-6, EN 60721-3-2 class 2M2
Shock
MIL-STD-810F, EN 60068-2-27
Required to complete this model
Conditioners:
A/D card(s)
Software
Any 16 or 32 DAQ series plugin modules
Up to 128 MDAQ series channels
The ORION-1616-100 is included as standard. You may upgrade this card as follows:
UP-ORION-16-22
upgrade the resolution to 22-bits, add antialiasing filters (AAF), max. SR remains at 100
kS/s/ch
UP-ORION-16-24
upgrade the resolution to 24-bits, add AAF, max. SR increases to 200 kS/s/ch
UP-ORION-16-22-32
upgrade the resolution to 22-bits, add AAF, increase from 16 to 32 analog channels
UP-ORION-100-1000
upgrade the max. SR to 1000 kS/s/ch
UP-ORION-100-200-8
upgrade the resolution to 24-bits, add AAF, max.SR increases to 200 kS/s/ch, decrease to
8 channels
UP-ORION-100-1000-8
upgrade the max. SR to 1000 kS/s/ch, decrease to 8 channels
DS-7-SE data acquisition software is included as standard*
32 analog channels, or multiple video cameras, or DEWE-CAM-FW-70, or DEWE-CLOCK use requires upgrade to
PROF edition.
64+ analog channels requires upgrade to DSA edition.
LabVIEW VIs are available for Dewetron ORION series A/D cards and DAQ series signal conditioners.
Popular upgrades
Counter expansion (UP-ORION-CTR8)
Upgrades the A/D card from 8 TTL digital I/Os and 2 TTL counter / encoders to:
8 synchronous TTL digital inputs protected up to 25 VDC
8 synchronous counter / encoder or 24 digital inputs with programmable threshold levels (0-40 V), input voltage range
-35 to 60 V, AC/DC coupling
Includes DB37 pin connectors installed
Synchronization interface (UP-ORION-SYNC)
Installs the SYNC hardware input/output ports and LED indicators onto the mainframe. Allows systems with the same
base ORION card to be synced. Additionally Requires DS-OPT-NET software option for synchronization under DS-7
software.
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3050 | 6-127
Input specifications
DEWE-3050 - DAQ version
Digital Isolation (ORION-BASE-DI-ISO)
HDD upgrade to solid state disks
DEWE-3050 - MDAQ version
Isolation for the 16 digital inputs of ORION base cards.
Input low: 0 - 2 V, Input high: 3 - 50 V bandwidth: DC up to 1MHz
Isolation voltage between channels: 150 VDC
Isolation voltage between Input and Output: 250 VDC
Connector: DSUB-37 connector (replaces standard digital I/O connector)
HDD-UP-SSD-120
Upgrade to 120 GB flash disk (replaces standard spinning hard disk), $ no moving parts, max.
data throughput 90 MB/s
HDD-UP-SSD-240
Upgrade to 240 GB flash disk (replaces standard spinning hard disk), $ no moving parts, max.
data throughput 90 MB/s
HDD-UP-SSD-480
Upgrade to 480 GB flash disk (replaces standard spinning hard disk), $ no moving parts, max.
data throughput 100 MB/s
Time code interface
Adds an internal IRIG or GPS time code interface (does not require a PCI slot)
Popular interface add-ons
CAN expansion (UP-ORION-CAN2)
IRIG / GPS time code (DEWE-CLOCK-INT)
Adds 2 synchronous high speed CAN bus interfaces to the ORION card inside the system. Includes two DB9 factory
installed connectors for these counters on the side panel of the DEWE-3050, and rear panel of the DEWE-3040 and
DEWE-3050. Includes DS-OPT-CAN software option supporting CAN BUS interface.
IRIG or GPS synchronized clock source for DEWETRON systems, installed inside a new DEWETRON base unit
Input: IRIG signal code A or B, AM or DC, or GPS signal
Output: TTL clock from 10 Hz to 10 MHz, PPS and ORION-DSA-SYNC, IRIG-B DC
Uses one USB interface (requires DS-PROF or higher)
Please order GPS antenna GPS-ANT-1 separately (if GPS is needed)
VIDEO-FG-4
Adds a four channel VIDEO INPUT PCI card to the system. Four BNCs for analog NTSC video input on the right side
panel, allowing four video streams to be recorded in sync with the data
ARINC-429 / 1553 interfaces
Adds a multi-channel ARINC-429 or MIL-STD-1553 interface to the system. Available as a single PCI card with either
or both interfaces on it, or as separate external USB interfaces. See the INTERFACES section for a comprehensive
list.
External channel expansion
EPAD2 and CPAD2 series modules
Add one or more EPAD2 series external signal conditioners to your system. Each one provides 8 thermocouple,
RTD, low voltage, or low current inputs. EPAD2 modules can be daisy-chained up to 8 modules per system. CPAD2
modules are the same except with CAN BUS interface.
Additional Specifications
ORION-1616-100 A/D specifications
Number of analog channels
8 channels
Bit-resolution
16-bit ADC converters (one per channel)
14.7 effective number of bits
Maximum sample rate
100 kS/s/ch simultaneous
Input configuration
Single-ended (note that the DAQ, HSI, or MDAQ conditioners are in front of the ORION card, and serve as the differential front-end for your signals.
ADC type
Successive approximation (SAR)
Channel separation (cross-talk)
> 90 dB @ fin 1 kHz
DC accuracy
±0.02 % of reading ±0.013 % of range
Signal to noise
89 dB
THD (fin = 1kHz) 0 dBFS input < -86 dB
THD (fin = 1kHz) -20 dBFS input < -93 dB
Interchannel gain mismatch
±0.015 %
Interchannel phase mismatch
0.02° * fin (kHz) + 0.08°
6-128| OWNER’s GUIDE
Digital I/O and Clock line specs
Digital input lines
16
Digital input characteristics
TTL/CMOS signal levels:
Low voltage level -0.7 V to 0.8 V
High voltage level 2 V to 5 V
Pull-up with 100 kΩ resistor
Input capacitance < 5pF
Input protection -1 V to 6 V
Digital output lines
8
Digital output characteristics
TTL/CMOS signal levels:
Low voltage level < 0.4 V @ 4 mA load
High voltage level > 3 V @ 4 mA load
Output current
Sink (low level) -20 mA Source (high level) 20 mA
Output impedance 50 Ω
Clock divider output line
1, same characteristics as digital output lines
Standard counter/encoder specs
Standard counter/encoders
2 x 32-bit (LEMO connectors for each)
Note - used as pair counters when advanced features are used. If you need two or more full-featured counters, please
order the UP-ORION-CTR8
Counter timebase
80 MHz (40 MHz max. input frequency)
Time base accuracy
25 ppm
Measurement modes
Event counting, up/down counting, gated event counting, period time, pulse width, two-edge separation, frequency
and encoder measurements
Standard counter/encoder signal levels
TTL/CMOS, pull-up with 100 kΩ
Input low level: -0.7 V to 0.8 V
Input high level: +2 to +5V
Overvoltage input protection
(DI 0 to DI 7): ±25 V continuous
(DI 8 to DI 15): -1 to 6 V
Advanced counter/encoders (UP-ORION-CTR8 option)
Advanced counter/encoders
8 advanced 32-bit counters
Counter timebase
80 MHz (40 MHz max. input frequency)
Measurement modes
Event counting, up/down counting, gated event counting, period time, pulse width, two-edge separation, frequency
and encoder measurements
Signal levels
Symmetrical, differential
AC/DC coupling selectable
Trigger adjustment range
0 to 40 VDC with 40 mV resolution
Trigger level accuracy
±100 mV ±1% of trigger level
Common voltage range
-35 to 50V
Overvoltage input protection
±100 V continuous
Max. DC level @ AC coupling:
±50 V continuous
CAN BUS specs (UP-ORION-CAN2 option)
High-speed CAN interfaces
2 CAN 2.0B high speed interfaces
Bus pin fault protection
±36 V
ESD protection
12kV
Physical layer
High speed
Compatibility
2.0B standard, J1939 protocol support
OBD II via software option
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3040-RM | 7-129
7
DEWE-3040-RM Series
The DEWE-3040-RM is our best “all in one” rack
mounting data acquisition instrument. It features
a huge 19” display, and a keyboard (with touchpad) that pulls out for easy access any time you
need it, then hides away again when you don’t
The rear panel of this model is very flexible, capable of holding up to 16 plugin-modules, or up
to 64 MDAQ channels, and many combinations.
The DEWE-3040-RM runs from AC power, and
comes with slide rack hardware for easy installation in your standard 19” rack enclosure.
This model is designed and built at our Wakefield,
RI manufacturing facility in the USA.
Model DEWE-3040-RM
Front view, keyboard not deployed
This section will review the hardware characteristics and specifications of the DEWE-3040-RM series,
including its properties as a PC-based instrument, and all data acquisition components, including the A/D
cards, signal conditioners, and interfaces with which it is compatible.
Please refer to the SOFTWARE section of this manual to learn how to operate the turn-key data acquisition
software installed on the system.
Please refer to the separate sections for the SIGNAL CONDITIONERS, A/D CARDS, INTERFACES and
SENSORS for complete details about those components that may be installed within your DEWE-3040-RM.
7-130| OWNER’s GUIDE
System Dimensions
436
352
483 (19”)
276
317
Add 10 mm all around for BNC
connectors, knobs, and other
protrusions.
When the keyboard is pulled out, it
protrudes ~140 mm (~5.5”)
Dimensions in millimeters (mm)
Divide by 25.4 for inches
Allow plenty of room for cooling fans
to function properly. Never block air
exchange.
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3040-RM | 7-131
Top Level Call-outs
DEWE-3040-RM, front view, keyboard open
Standard 19” rack-mounting
(slides also included)
(INSIDE) ORION-1616-100 A/D
card included as standard
Convenient pull-out handles
Big wide aspect display
Front-panel pushbuttons for start/
stop and REC indicator
Front-panel USB connectors
Removable 2.5” HDD
Pull-out keyboard drawer built-in
NOTE;
Computer interfaces (ethernet, USB,
RS232, are automatically brought out
to the rear panel, space permitting.
DEWE-3040-RM, front view, keyboard open
Soft power switch
Pull-out keyboard drawer built-in
Captive spring-loaded thumbscrews keep
it closed when you don’t need it
Video cameras like:
DEWE-CAM-FW-70
DEWE-CAM-GIG-E-120
DEWE-CAM-USB, etc.
7-132| OWNER’s GUIDE
Top-level call-outs (continued)
DEWE-3040-RM, right side/rear oblique view
PCI and PCIe card edge access door
Air cooling (filtered intakes)
Computer subsystem access door (all needed
ports are brought to the rear panel already)
120 / 240 VAC mains power input
DEWE-3040-RM, front view, Control Panel Close-up
Soft Power Switch
Store / Stop Pushbuttons
Power LED / HDD busy LED
USB 2.0 interfaces
Pull-out Keyboard drawer Removable HDD
Optical Drive
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3040-RM | 7-133
DEWE-3040-RM Rear Panel Configurations
2.5U
With DAQ / PAD / HSI modules only
The rear panel can be configured with one 16 slot
racks for DAQ / PAD / HSI modules
2.5U-PANEL-DAQ-16 - compatible with all DAQ and
PAD modules, and HSI modules (up to 300 kHz
bandwidth)
2.0U
1.5U
2.5U-PANEL-DAQ-16-HSI - compatible with all HSI
modules up to 2 MHz bandwidth, all PAD modules,
and most DAQ modules
When a 16-slot rack is installed, two 2U and two
1.5U panel spaces remain available for additional
panel options to be added.
With DAQ / PAD / HSI and MDAQ
conditioners
2.5U
The rear panel can be configured with one 16 slot
racks for DAQ / PAD / HSI modules - and still leave
room for MDAQ conditioners!
2.5U-PANEL-DAQ-16 - compatible with all DAQ and
PAD modules, and HSI modules (up to 300 kHz
bandwidth) - or -
2.0U
1.5U
2.5U-PANEL-DAQ-16-HSI - compatible with all HSI
modules up to 2 MHz bandwidth, all PAD modules,
and most DAQ modules
Thus, you could still add 32 more channels of
MDAQ signal conditioning, and a 1.5U panel for 32
channels of thermocouples, as one example.
Or you could add three blocks of 16 channels of
MDAQ signal conditioning, as long as one of them
was using the 1.5U high BNC panel type. This
means 48 MDAQ channels PLUS 16 isolated DAQ /
PAD / HSI conditioner channels.
7-134| OWNER’s GUIDE
DEWE-3050, front view, display removed - keyboard revealed
With MDAQ conditioners only
2.0U
The rear panel can be configured with up to:
FIVE 2.0U MDAQ conditioner panels with DSUB
connectors can be added (80 channels) - or FIVE 1.5U MDAQ conditioner panels with BNC
connectors can be added (80 channels) - or -
0.5U
Many other combinations of MDAQ panels and other
function panels
1.5U
(ALL MODELS)
EPAD2 signal conditioners
for adding slow thermocouple
inputs, RTDs, voltages, and
currents (daisy-chain)
0.5U-DA2-BNC
0.5 U panel with 2 BNC connectors connected to the 2 analog
outputs of an AD16-1000-16-OUT2 card
0.5U-DA4-BNC
0.5 U panel with 4 BNC connectors connected to the 4 analog
outputs of a DA4-1000-16 card
0.5U-DA8-BNC
0.5 U panel with 4 BNC connectors connected to the 8 analog
outputs of a DA8-1000-16 card
0.5U-AMFLEX-POWER-4
0.5U panel with BINDER 712 connectors, 9VDC power supply
for up to four PNA-100 current sensors.
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3040-RM | 7-135
0.5U-AMFLEX-POWER-8
0.5U panel with BINDER 712 connectors, 9VDC power supply
for up to four PNA-100 current sensors.
0.5U-CLAMP-DC-POWER-4
0.5U panel with LEMO connectors, 15VDC power supply and
digital status lines for up to four PNA-CLAMP-150-DC current
sensors.
0.5U-CLAMP-DC-POWER-8
0.5U panel with LEMO connectors, 15VDC power supply and
digital status lines for up to eight PNA-CLAMP-150-DC current
sensors.
1U-DA8-BNC
1U panel with 8 BNC connectors supporting up to 8 analog
outputs
1U-DA16-BNC
1U panel with 8 BNC connectors supporting up to 16 analog
outputs
1.5U-ORION-DIO-PANEL-1
1.5U panel with 8 LEMO connectors (EGG.1B.307) for up to 8
counters, plus one DSUB37 connector for up to 16 digital input
lines, including mating connectors (included with UP-ORIONCTR8 upgrade)
1.5U-TC-PANEL-32
1.5U panel prepared for up to 32 thermocouple input channels.
Up to four MPAD-TH8-X modules can be factory installed into
this panel. Each MPAD block provides 8 channels.
7-136| OWNER’s GUIDE
Signal conditioning
The DEWE-3040-RM can be equipped in countless ways. Here are the most popular configurations:
„„ 16 x DAQ / PAD / HSI series plug-in signal conditioners, or
„„ 10 x 8-channel MDAQ-SUB (any connector) conditioners (80 channels total), or
„„ 16 x DAQ / PAD / HSI modules PLUS up to 48 channels of MDAQ conditioners
When every possible panel space is not filled, other function panels can additionally be added. Please see
the previous page for a listing of these panels.
A/D card(s)
The DEWE-3040-RM has two full length PCI slots and two full length PCIe slots inside. As a standard, the
ORION-1616-100 A/D card is installed when you buy the data acquisition system. This card provides the following basic specifications (further details are shown in the specification tables in the next pages):
„„ 16 simultaneously sampled analog input channels
„„ 16-bit resolution, separate ADC per channels
„„ 100 kS/s/ch maximum sample rate
„„ 2 synchronous counter/encoder inputs
„„ 8 each digital input and output lines
At the time of ordering, this card can be upgraded, using any of the options available for increasing the
channel count, the bit resolution to 22 or 24-bit, or increasing the sample rate up to 1 MS/s/ch, and many
combinations of the preceding. See the UP-ORION options for all of the possibilities.
In addition, many options can be factory installed onto the ORION cards, including adding two high speed
CAN BUS interfaces, or expanding the number and capabilities of the digital counters that are installed.
Furthermore, multiple ORION series cards may be installed. A few examples:
„„ 2 x ORION-1624-200 cards for a 32 channel noise and vibration analyzer
„„ 2 x ORION-3216-100 cards for a 64 channel general purpose system
„„ 2 x ORION-1616-1000 cards for a 64 channel HIGH SPEED acquisition system (1 MS/s/ch)
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3040-RM | 7-137
Interface(s)
The DEWE-3040-RM is compatible with ORION, PCI / PCIe card, and USB connected interfaces These
include the CAN BUS interfaces added to the ORION A/D card, as well as separate PCI and PCIe cards
available for adding multiple ARINC 429, MIL-STD-1553 interfaces to the system. If all three PCI slots were
used up, ARINC and MIL-STD-1553 interfaces can also be added as USB devices. There are numerous
interfaces available for your DEWE system.
Typical ARINC or MIL-STD-1553 interface
Typical ARINC or MIL-STD-1553 interface
PCI or PCIe format
USB format
Video Cameras
The DEWE-3040-RM is compatible with several kinds of video cameras, including:
DEWE-CAM-USB
DEWE-CAM-FW
DEWE-CAM-GIG-E
USB camera
Hard sync Firewire
camera
Gigabit ethernet camera
7-138| OWNER’s GUIDE
System Connectors
System/PC connectors
Ground (earth) Connector
Connector: insulated banana jack, marked with the ground/earth symbol, yellow with green stripe
Mating connector: insulated banana plug, yellow with green stripe
Function: Depending on your electrical environment, it may be necessary to give the system an additional
ground connection. This is an international standard mini-banana jack, color coded yellow/green, located
near the DC power input.
AC power input
Connector: Standard AC receptacle, compatible with 120/240 VAC @ 50/60 Hz.
⇒⇒ Important note - applied power must fall within the posted ranges.
Fuse
The AC power is fused.
⇒⇒ Replace this fuse only with exactly the same type, or equipment damage, injury or even death can result.
Ethernet interfaces (2 or 3)
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3040-RM | 7-139
Top Rear Panel Connectors
EPAD LEMO
Accessory / Digital I/O (DSUB-37)
ORION-SYNC (option)
12VDC output
Counters (2) LEMO
Reserved
Right Side Panel
Both of the panels can be accessed by
removing the four philips head screws.
UPPER PANEL
Remove this panel to access the
PCI and PCIe card edges.
LOWER PANEL
Remove this panel to access the
computer inside the system.
7-140| OWNER’s GUIDE
Connectors: RJ45 CAT5e standard jack
Mating connectors: RJ45 CAT5e or CAT6 plugs
Function: for connecting the DEWE-3040-RM to a local area network (LAN), or for connecting ethernet
peripherals (printers, cameras, etc.).
Description: The DEWE-321x provides three channels of 10/100/1000Mb Ethernet RTL8111B LAN controllers. In order to achieve the specified performance of the Ethernet port, Category 5 twisted pair cables must
be used with 10/100MB and Category 5E, 6 or 6E with 1Gb LAN networks.
The signals for the Ethernet ports are as follows:
The pinout of the RJ45 connector is as follows:
Above right: typical mating plug, showing the pin outs
On top of Ethernet connectors there is a Green LED (to the left) turning on when a 100MHz connection is
made and it is flashing when 100MHz traffic is ongoing. The Yellow LED (to the right) turns on when a 1GHz
connection is made and it is flashing when traffic is ongoing.
Please refer to the CAT5e, CAT6, and structured cabling standards for computer networks when interfacing
to the DEWE-321x.
DVI Video Output
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3040-RM | 7-141
Connector: Standard DVI connector
Mating connector: Standard DVI-to-DVI or DVI-to-VGA cable
Function: For connecting the standard display.
-- Note: the CRT output cannot be used in a “multiple monitors” setup under Windows. To support multiple moni-
tors with different images on them requires that a separate video card be added to the system.
-- Note: DEWE-321x’s with 15” displays (made in 2010) have a max resolution of 1024x768; DEWE-321x (made in
2011 or later) with 17” displays have a max resolution of 1280x1024 . The CRT output is set to the same resolution as the built-in flatpanel display.
USB 2.0 interfaces (6)
Connector: USB2.0 Standard-A receptacle
Mating connector: USB2.0 Standard-A plug
Function: For the connection of peripheral devices which utilize the USB 2.0 or USB 1.1 interface.
Description: The DEWE-3050 mainboard contains an Enhanced Host Controller Interface (EHCI) host
controller that supports USB 2.0 allowing data transfers up to 480Mb/s. There are typically six user-accessible Universal Host Controller Interface (UHCI Revision 1.1) controllers that support USB full-speed and
low-speed signaling. All ports are high-speed, full-speed, and low-speed capable and USB Legacy mode is
supported.
Over-current detection on all USB ports is supported.
Note: It is recommended to use only High-/Full-Speed USB cable, specified in USB2.0 standard:
7-142| -- Note: USB is most often used to connect webcams for recording video in sync with the data in your Dewetron
data acquisition system. It is also used to connect inertial sensors such as the XSENS MTI series of sensors.
Audio stack connectors (3 or 6)
Connectors: 3.5 mm (~1/8 in.) TRS jacks, color coded BLUE, GREEN and PINK
Mating connectors: 3.5 mm (!1/8 in.) TRS plugs
Function: for outputting or inputting audio
Description: Audio Line-in, Line-out and Microphone are available in the stacked audio jack connector. Below is shown audio stack configuration when configured for 8-channel audio.
⇒⇒ Note: Always use industry standard plugs and cables when connecting to any part of the system.
|
7-143
Signal Input Connectors
Analog input connectors (up to 128)
Connector: Varies according to the signal conditioning module(s) installed.
See the signal conditioning tables for further details about the module(s) installed within your system.
Function: to input analog signals to the dynamic measuring inputs of the DEWE-3050.
Counter/encoder connectors (2)
Connector: LEMO EGG.1B.307CLAD52
Mating connector: LEMO FGG.1B.307CLAD52
Mating cable available: CTR-CABLE-05 (includes connector)
Function: used to input tachometer, TTL level pulse train, or encoder outputs for measuring and conversion.
-- Note: see the COUNTER configuration section later in this guide.
CAN BUS interface connector (UP-ORION-CAN2 option)
Connectors: DSUB-9 standard CAN wiring
Mating connector: DSUB-9 male mate
PIN
Function
Comment
1
CAN0 Lo
First CAN port
2
CAN0 Hi
First CAN port
3
D GND
4
CAN1 Lo
Second CAN port
5
CAN1 Hi
Second CAN port
6
GND
Function: used to connect to vehicle CAN BUS interfaces. Also can be used to read data from sensors which
have a CAN BUS output, such as Dewetron’s own CPAD2 series signal conditioning modules.
7-144| When the CAN option is installed, this single LEMO connector will contain two CAN BUS interfaces. The
CAN-CBL-Y mating cable is optionally available to split the single LEMO connector to two standard CAN
DB-9 (female) connectors. Both DB-9 connectors are wired the same way, as shown below:
When you connect either CAN bus interface to your vehicle or other CAN network, it is necessary to add
termination resistors (not included) at each end of the cable:
-- Note: this connector does not provide power for CPAD2 series modules.
Digital I/O connector (AKA “Accessory connector”)
Connector: Standard DSUB 37-pin connector, female
Mating connector: Standard DSUB 37-pin connector, female
Function: Provides access to the digital input/output lines on the installed A/D card, as well as additional
signals such as clock input, trigger input, and more (see A/D card table related to the installed card).
The exact pin-out of this connector can vary according to the system configuration, but here is the typical
pin-out diagram when an ORION-1616-100 card is installed:
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3040-RM | 7-145
Operation Guidelines
System Startup Protocol
Plug the standard AC power cord into a valid
mains power source.
⇒⇒ Do not block the cooling fans of the DEWE-3040-RM.
Overheating any electrical component is dangerous.
Turning on the System
The MASTER power switch must be set to the on
position. Now locate the smaller soft power switch
nearby on the front panel. This is a momentary
rocker type switch, where the white dot indicates the
ON direction.
♦♦ Press ON and hold for one second to power the
The rear panel of the DEWE-3040-RM is where the
MASTER power switch is located.
system on.
♦♦ Press ON and hold for 3 seconds to power OFF.
♦♦ Green POWER LED: lit when the system is
powered on
Hardware Protocols
Using the removable hard disk drives
The front panel of the DEWE-3040-RM has a 2.5”
removable drive bay.
The front panel of the DEWE-3040-RM is where the soft
power switch is located.
⇒⇒ Never remove the C drive when the system is
powered on or plugged in! The operating system
can become corrupted and the system will fail if you
do this. It’s always safer to completely turn off the
system before removing or installing any hard drive.
To remove the hard drive, you must have access
to the keylock. Turn the key into the lock and then
press the large button beside the lock to eject the
drive. To insert another drive, reverse these steps.
The front panel of the DEWE-3040-RM is where the
removable hard disk drive is located.
7-146| OWNER’s GUIDE
DEWE-3040-RM Specifications
Input specifications
Slots for DAQ or PAD modules
MDAQ-SUB positions
DEWE-3040-RM - DAQ version
DEWE-3040-RM - MDAQ version
16
48 possible channels
When 16 DAQ slots are installed, up to 48 more channels
of MDAQ can be added to the system, for 64 channels
total. Consult Dewetron for configuration assistance.
Up to 8 x 2.0U MDAQ-DSUB (64 channels) plus two
1.5U MDAQ-SUB-BNC (16 channels) can be installed (80
channels maximum).
Main system
Total PCI slots
Hard disk
Data throughput to disk
Power supply
Display
Processor
2 x full-length PCI slots (one is used by the standard A/D card) plus 2 x full-length PCIe slots are available
C: 100 GB removable C drive / 500 GB removable D drive (optional solid state drive)
80 MB/s typical; faster rates available with the additional of an internal RAID controller and/or additional drives
120/240 VAC, 50/60 Hz AC mains power.
19” SXGA display, 1280 x 1024 px, with resistive touchscreen. Display is removable, and can be mounted backwards
when not in use.
Intel 8-core i7 2.0 GHz CPU, on a standard ATX mainboard
RAM
Ethernet
USB
RS232
Operating system
Dimensions (W x D x H)
4 GB standard
3 x ethernet interfaces standard (1 Gb)
Four x USB 2.0 interfaces available
One serial interface on a DB9 connector available
Microsoft Windows7 32-bit included (upgrades to 64-bit will be available Summer 2013)
425 x 340 x 191 mm (16.7 x 13.4 x 7.5 in.)
Weight
Free PCI slots
10 kg typical (22 lbs)
One (the standard ORION-1616-100 A/D card uses one of the PCI slots)
Free PCIe slots
Two
Environmental specifications
Operating temperature
-20 to 50C (0 to 45C with batteries installed) (storage temp -20 to 60C)
Humdity
10 to 80% non-condensing, 5 to 95% relative humidity
Vibration
MIL-STD-810F, EN 60068-2-6, EN 60721-3-2 class 2M2
Shock
MIL-STD-810F, EN 60068-2-27
Required to complete this model
Conditioners:
A/D card(s)
Software
Any 16 DAQ series plugin modules
Up to 80 MDAQ series channels
The ORION-1616-100 is included as standard. You may upgrade this card as follows:
UP-ORION-16-22
upgrade the resolution to 22-bits, add antialiasing filters (AAF), max. SR remains at 100
kS/s/ch
UP-ORION-16-24
upgrade the resolution to 24-bits, add AAF, max. SR increases to 200 kS/s/ch
UP-ORION-16-22-32
upgrade the resolution to 22-bits, add AAF, increase from 16 to 32 analog channels
UP-ORION-100-1000
upgrade the max. SR to 1000 kS/s/ch
UP-ORION-100-200-8
upgrade the resolution to 24-bits, add AAF, max.SR increases to 200 kS/s/ch, decrease to
8 channels
UP-ORION-100-1000-8
upgrade the max. SR to 1000 kS/s/ch, decrease to 8 channels
DS-7-SE data acquisition software is included as standard*
32 analog channels, or multiple video cameras, or DEWE-CAM-FW-70, or DEWE-CLOCK use requires upgrade to
PROF edition.
64+ analog channels requires upgrade to DSA edition.
LabVIEW VIs are available for Dewetron ORION series A/D cards and DAQ series signal conditioners.
Popular upgrades
Counter expansion (UP-ORION-CTR8)
Upgrades the A/D card from 8 TTL digital I/Os and 2 TTL counter / encoders to:
8 synchronous TTL digital inputs protected up to 25 VDC
8 synchronous counter / encoder or 24 digital inputs with programmable threshold levels (0-40 V), input voltage range
-35 to 60 V, AC/DC coupling
Includes DB37 pin connectors installed
Synchronization interface (UP-ORION-SYNC)
Installs the SYNC hardware input/output ports and LED indicators onto the mainframe. Allows systems with the same
base ORION card to be synced. Additionally Requires DS-OPT-NET software option for synchronization under DS-7
software.
OWNER’s GUIDE - DEWE-3040-RM | 7-147
Input specifications
DEWE-3040-RM - DAQ version
Digital Isolation (ORION-BASE-DI-ISO)
HDD upgrade to solid state disks
DEWE-3040-RM - MDAQ version
Isolation for the 16 digital inputs of ORION base cards.
Input low: 0 - 2 V, Input high: 3 - 50 V bandwidth: DC up to 1MHz
Isolation voltage between channels: 150 VDC
Isolation voltage between Input and Output: 250 VDC
Connector: DSUB-37 connector (replaces standard digital I/O connector)
HDD-UP-SSD-120
Upgrade to 120 GB flash disk (replaces standard spinning hard disk), $ no moving parts, max.
data throughput 90 MB/s
HDD-UP-SSD-240
Upgrade to 240 GB flash disk (replaces standard spinning hard disk), $ no moving parts, max.
data throughput 90 MB/s
HDD-UP-SSD-480
Upgrade to 480 GB flash disk (replaces standard spinning hard disk), $ no moving parts, max.
data throughput 100 MB/s
Time code interface
Adds an internal IRIG or GPS time code interface (does not require a PCI slot)
Popular interface add-ons
CAN expansion (UP-ORION-CAN2)
IRIG / GPS time code (DEWE-CLOCK-INT)
Adds 2 synchronous high speed CAN bus interfaces to the ORION card inside the system. Includes two DB9 factory
installed connectors for these counters on the side panel of the DEWE-3050, and rear panel of the DEWE-3040 and
DEWE-3050. Includes DS-OPT-CAN software option supporting CAN BUS interface.
IRIG or GPS synchronized clock source for DEWETRON systems, installed inside a new DEWETRON base unit
Input: IRIG signal code A or B, AM or DC, or GPS signal
Output: TTL clock from 10 Hz to 10 MHz, PPS and ORION-DSA-SYNC, IRIG-B DC
Uses one USB interface (requires DS-PROF or higher)
Please order GPS antenna GPS-ANT-1 separately (if GPS is needed)
VIDEO-FG-4
Adds a four channel VIDEO INPUT PCI/e card to the system. Four BNCs for analog NTSC video input on the right
side panel, allowing four video streams to be recorded in sync with the data
ARINC-429 / 1553 interfaces
Adds a multi-channel ARINC-429 or MIL-STD-1553 interface to the system. Available as a single PCI/e card with
either or both interfaces on it, or as separate external USB interfaces. See the INTERFACES section for a comprehensive list.
External channel expansion
EPAD2 and CPAD2 series modules
Add one or more EPAD2 series external signal conditioners to your system. Each one provides 8 thermocouple,
RTD, low voltage, or low current inputs. EPAD2 modules can be daisy-chained up to 8 modules per system. CPAD2
modules are the same except with CAN BUS interface.
Additional Specifications
ORION-1616-100 A/D specifications
Number of analog channels
8 channels
Bit-resolution
16-bit ADC converters (one per channel)
14.7 effective number of bits
Maximum sample rate
100 kS/s/ch simultaneous
Input configuration
Single-ended (note that the DAQ, HSI, or MDAQ conditioners are in front of the ORION card, and serve as the differential front-end for your signals.
ADC type
Successive approximation (SAR)
Channel separation (cross-talk)
> 90 dB @ fin 1 kHz
DC accuracy
±0.02 % of reading ±0.013 % of range
Signal to noise
89 dB
THD (fin = 1kHz) 0 dBFS input < -86 dB
THD (fin = 1kHz) -20 dBFS input < -93 dB
Interchannel gain mismatch
±0.015 %
Interchannel phase mismatch
0.02° * fin (kHz) + 0.08°
7-148| OWNER’s GUIDE
Digital I/O and Clock line specs
Digital input lines
16
Digital input characteristics
TTL/CMOS signal levels:
Low voltage level -0.7 V to 0.8 V
High voltage level 2 V to 5 V
Pull-up with 100 kΩ resistor
Input capacitance < 5pF
Input protection -1 V to 6 V
Digital output lines
8
Digital output characteristics
TTL/CMOS signal levels:
Low voltage level < 0.4 V @ 4 mA load
High voltage level > 3 V @ 4 mA load
Output current
Sink (low level) -20 mA Source (high level) 20 mA
Output impedance 50 Ω
Clock divider output line
1, same characteristics as digital output lines
Standard counter/encoder specs
Standard counter/encoders
2 x 32-bit (LEMO connectors for each)
Note - used as pair counters when advanced features are used. If you need two or more full-featured counters, please
order the UP-ORION-CTR8
Counter timebase
80 MHz (40 MHz max. input frequency)
Time base accuracy
25 ppm
Measurement modes
Event counting, up/down counting, gated event counting, period time, pulse width, two-edge separation, frequency
and encoder measurements
Standard counter/encoder signal levels
TTL/CMOS, pull-up with 100 kΩ
Input low level: -0.7 V to 0.8 V
Input high level: +2 to +5V
Overvoltage input protection
(DI 0 to DI 7): ±25 V continuous
(DI 8 to DI 15): -1 to 6 V
Advanced counter/encoders (UP-ORION-CTR8 option)
Advanced counter/encoders
8 advanced 32-bit counters
Counter timebase
80 MHz (40 MHz max. input frequency)
Measurement modes
Event counting, up/down counting, gated event counting, period time, pulse width, two-edge separation, frequency
and encoder measurements
Signal levels
Symmetrical, differential
AC/DC coupling selectable
Trigger adjustment range
0 to 40 VDC with 40 mV resolution
Trigger level accuracy
±100 mV ±1% of trigger level
Common voltage range
-35 to 50V
Overvoltage input protection
±100 V continuous
Max. DC level @ AC coupling:
±50 V continuous
CAN BUS specs (UP-ORION-CAN2 option)
High-speed CAN interfaces
2 CAN 2.0B high speed interfaces
Bus pin fault protection
±36 V
ESD protection
12kV
Physical layer
High speed
Compatibility
2.0B standard, J1939 protocol support
OBD II via software option
OWNER’s GUIDE - Signal Connections | 8-149
8
Signal Connections / Counters
Analog input connections
Because DEWETRON systems are compatible with so
many different DAQ, MDAQ, PAD, EPAD, CPAD, and other
Dewetron modules, please refer to those signal conditioners in
the Appendix for complete details about how to connect your
signals to them.
Choice of Cables
Voltage cables should be instrumentation grade 50 Ω cables
with a braided shield. Using good quality cables can make
the difference between making a good measurement and not.
Why spend thousands of dollars on a powerful data acquisition
system, and then apply low quality cables?
Long cable runs should use twisted pairs, where each pair
is individually shielded. Then the entire cable should have a
shield around all of the pairs, and a high quality insulation.
Thermocouple cables should be instrumentation grade
thermocouple wires with a high quality insulation. It is not
necessary to shield thermocouple cables.
Shielding Best Practices
Normally a cable’s main shield will drain into the ground pin
on the Dewetron side. It is a best practice NOT to connect the
cable drain shield on both sides. This will help you to avoid
ground loops (voltage potential differences which can adversly
influence the measurements.
8-150| OWNER’s GUIDE
Counter/Encoder input connections
The DEWE-321x is suited with synchronous 32-bit advanced counter and digital inputs. In addition to the
basic counter function like simple event counting, up/down counting and gated event counting also period
time, pulse width, two-edge separation, frequency and all encoder measurements are supported.
All counter inputs can also be used as digital inputs. In addition to the basic counter input selections, the
ADC clock can also be used as counter source. The figure below shows the block diagram of the counter
and input overvoltage protection.
1) Pull-up resistors 2) Over-voltage protection 3) Buffers
OWNER’s GUIDE - Signal Connections | 8-151
Counter Applications
each counter block is equipped with three inputs. With this three inputs the following applications can be
done:
„„ Event Counting
„„ Gated Event Counting
„„ Up/Down Counter
„„ Frequency Measurement
„„ Period Time Measurement / Pulse Width Measurement
„„ Two Pulse Edge Separation
„„ Quadrature Encoder (X1, X2, X4, A-Up/B-Down)
Event Counting
In Event Counting the counter counts the number of pulses that occur on counter source. At each sample
clock the counter value is read without disturbing the counting process. The figure below shows an example
of event counting where the counter counts eight events on Counter Source. The synchronized value is the
value read at the sample clock (see the encircled numbers in the figure, e.g. (1), (2), (3)... ).
Event counting figure :
8-152| OWNER’s GUIDE
Software setup:
-- If counting the falling edges is necessary, the input signal can be inverted.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Signal Connections | 8-153
Gated Event Counting
Gated Event Counting is similar to Event Counting except that the counting process is gated. When the
counter gate is active, the counter counts pulses which occur at the counter source. When the counter gate
is inactive the counter retains the current count value. At each sample clock interval the current value is
read.
The figure below shows an example of gated event counting where the counter counts three events on the
counter source. At (1) and (2) the counter value is zero, because the gate signal is inactive. At sample clock
(3), (4) and (5) the actual counter value is read out. At (6) the same value as at (5) is output.
Gated event counting figure:
Software setup:
-- If counting the falling edges is necessary, the input signal can be inverted.
8-154| OWNER’s GUIDE
Up/Down Counter
The Up/Down Counter counts the rising edges on the counter source. The direction of the counting depends
on the signal state on the counter aux pin. If counter aux is active (high level), the counter value increases; if
counter aux is inactive (low level), the counter value decreases.
Up/Down counting figure:
Software setup:
OWNER’s GUIDE - Signal Connections | 8-155
Period Time Measurement
In Period Time Measurement the counter uses the internal time base to measure the period time of the
signal present on Counter Source. The counter counts the rising edges of the internal time base which occurs between two rising edges on Counter Source. At the completion of the period interval the counter value
is stored in a register and the counter starts counting from zero. At every Sample Clock ((1), (2), ... (6)) the
register value is read out.
Period time measurement figure:
Software setup:
8-156| OWNER’s GUIDE
Pulse Width Measurement
In Pulse Width Measurement the counter uses the internal time base to measure the pulse width of the signal present on Counter Source. The counter counts the rising edges of the internal time base after a rising
edge occurs on counter source. At the falling edge on Counter Source the counter value is stored in a register and the counter is set to zero. With the next rising edge on Counter Source the counter starts counting
again. At every Sample Clock ((1), (2), ... (6) ) the register value is read out.
Pulse width measurement figure:
Software setup:
-- Note: to measure the LOW time of the signal, invert the input.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Signal Connections | 8-157
Two Pulse Edge Separation Measurement
The two pulse edge separation measurement is similar to the pulse width measurement, except that there
are two input signals: Counter Start and Counter Stop. After a rising edge has occurred on Counter Start the
counter counts rising edges of the internal time base. Additional edges on signal start are ignored. After a
rising edge has occurred on Counter Stop the counter stops counting and the value is stored in a register.
At the next rising edge on Counter Start the counter starts counting from zero again. At every Sample Clock
((1), (2), ... (6)) the register value is read out.
Two Pulse Edge Separation Measurement figure:
Software setup:
-- If the input signals are inverted, the falling edges will be used for counting.
8-158| OWNER’s GUIDE
Motion Encoders
Motion encoders have usually three channels: channel A, B and Z. Channel A and channel B provide the
square signals for the counter, and have a phase shift of 90°. From this phase shift the decoder is able to
recognize the rotation direction of the motion encoder. The third channel outputs one pulse at a certain
position at each revolution. This pulse is used to set the counter to zero. The number of counts per cycle at
a given motion encoder depends on the type of decoding: X1, X2, or X4. Some motion encoders have two
outputs, which work in a different way. Either channel A or channel B provides the square signal, depending
on the direction of the rotation.
The next sections illustrate the basic encoder modes that are supported:
Quadrature Encoder
In the first case, X1 decoding is explained. When Input A leads Input B in a quadrature cycle, the counter
increments on rising edges of Input A. When Input B leads Input A in a quadrature cycle, the counter decrements on the falling edges of Input A. At every Sample Clock ((1), (2), ... (9)) the counter value is read out.
Quadrature Encoder X1 Mode figure:
OWNER’s GUIDE - Signal Connections | 8-159
For X2 encoding the rising edges and the falling edges of Input A are used to increment or decrement. The
counter increments if Input A leads Input B and decrements if Input B leads Input A.
Quadrature Encoder X2 Mode figure:
Similarly, the counter increments or decrements on each edge of Input A and Input B for X4 decoding. The
condition for increment and decrement is the same as for X1 and X2.
Quadrature encoder X4 figure:
8-160| OWNER’s GUIDE
The third channel Input Z, which is also referred as the index channel, causes the counter to be reloaded
with zero in a specific phase of the quadrature cycle. The figure below shows the results for X1 encoding
with input Z.
Quadrature Encoder with channel Z figure:
Software setup:
OWNER’s GUIDE - Signal Connections | 8-161
A-Up/B-Down Encoder
The A-Up/B-Down Encoder supports two inputs, A and B. A pulse on Input A increments the counter on its
rising edges. A pulse on Input B decrements the counter on its rising edges. At every Sample Clock ((1), (2),
... (9)) the counter value is read out.
A-up/B-down Encoder figure:
Software setup:
8-162| OWNER’s GUIDE
Frequency Measurement
In general it is possible to take the inverse of a period measurement to get the frequency of the input signal.
If the period time measurement is done an inaccuracy of counted internal time base cycles of ±1 cycle appears, because the counted cycles of the internal time base depends on the phase of the input signal with
re- spect to the internal time base. For long period times, and therewith low frequencies, the measurement
error is negligible. At high frequencies, and therewith short period times, few cycles are counted. In this case
the error of ±1 cycle becomes significant.
Accuracy at period time measurement figure:
For higher precision result the frequency measurement is done with two counters. In each case two counters are paired, i.e. it have to be used counter 0 and counter 1 or counter 2 and counter 3 or counter 4 and
counter 5 or counter 6 and 7 for the frequency measurement. The first coun- ter counts the rising edges on
Counter Source. The second counter counts the rising edges of the internal time base. At every rising edge
on Counter Source the counter value of the second counter is stored in a register. At every Sample Clock
((1), (2), ... (6)) the values of both counters are read out.
Frequency measurement figure:
With these both measurement results not only the frequency can be calculated in a precise way. Also the
event counter result can be show in fractions because the exact time when the event occurs at the input is
known. The event counting result is recalculated with interpolation to the exact sample point like shown in
the diagram above.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Signal Connections | 8-163
In the next figure, the difference of the measurement result is shown. While a standard counter input shows
the value up to one sample delayed, the counter input of the counter calculates the counter result at the
exact sample point:
-- For low frequency input signals the frequency also can be obtained by measure the period time and take its
inverse without more inaccuracy.
Period, pulsewidth, and duty cycle
Software setup:
8-164| OWNER’s GUIDE
Miscellaneous counter functions
Filters
Each counter input has a digital filter, which can be set to various gate times. If the gate time is set to “Off”,
no filter is on the input signal. The purpose of filtering is to eliminate unstable states, e.g. glitches, chatter,et
al, which may appear on the input signal. Noise can be mis-counted, and should therefore be eliminated.
The filter circuit samples the input signal on each rising edge of the internal time base. If the input signal
maintains his state for at least the gate time, the new state is propagated. As an effect the signal transition is
shifted by the gate time.
The figure demonstrates the function of the filter:
Below, input signal with chatter, before and after filtering:
The filter can be chosen between eight filter settings:
Off, 100 ns, 200 ns, 500 ns, 1 μs, 2 μs, 4 μs and 5 μs.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Signal Connections | 8-165
Two examples of filter settings:
The 100 ns filter will pass all pulse widths (high and low) that are 100 ns or longer. It will block all pulse
widths that are 75 ns or shorter. The 5 μs filter will pass all pulse widths (high and low) that are 5 μs or longer and will block all pulse widths that are 4.975 μs or shorter.
The internal sampling clock (time base) is 80 MHz, so the period time amounts 12.5 ns. Pulse widths between gate time minus two internal time base period times may or may not pass, depending on the phase of
the input signal with respect to the internal time base.
Properties of all filter settings:
Reset on start measure
Usually all counters are reset at the start of data acquisition, i.e., the counter value is set to zero at the start
of data acquisition. In some applications this is not required. For example, an angle encoder is adjusted
to the physical zero position at the beginning of a test procedure. By resetting the counter at every start of
the measurement this adjustment will be lost. Without this reset the counter is also active if the acquisition
is interrupted between the test cycles. As a result the counter types out the absolute angle position at the
measurement output all the time.
Count Direction
As default setting the count direction is in up-counting mode. Every rising edge at the input will increase the
counter value. The DEWE-ORION-1616-10x supports also down counting without the need of an additional
input like in the up/down counting mode.
No new value available
Especially in every kind of input period time measurement mode (also pulse width or two pulse edge separation measurement) there may be new information between two samples. Also measuring the line frequency
of about 50 Hz with a sample rate of 10 kSamples/sec means, that only after every 200th measurement
new input frequency information is available. Another example is the measurement on rotating machines if
the sensor output frequency is lower than the sample rate. Depending on the application you can choose
between two different output data settings:
„„ Repeat last value: last measured cycle time is taken until a new measured cycle time is available
„„ Make zero value: as soon as no input information is available the output is set to zero
8-166| OWNER’s GUIDE
OWNER’s GUIDE - Software | 9-167
9
Software Overview
Your DEWETRON system is compatible with several software applications. For turn-key data acquisition, we offer DEWESoft 7, aka DS-7 for short. This
is a very powerful yet fairly easy to use application
that has reached wide acceptance among nearly
all DEWETRON customers worldwide. It is the ideal
application for R&D applications, since it can be
so quickly configured to handle quickly changing
requirements.
If your application is more industrial in nature, especially involving closed-loop testing, ATP testing,
process control and automation, the software of
choice is normally LabVIEW from National Instruments. LabVIEW is a powerful development environment used by many thousands of engineers
and technicians worldwide.
DEWETRON offers robust LabVIEW drivers, socalled VI;s (virtual instruments), that you can drop
onto your worksheet and integrate our ORION
cards and DAQ series signal conditioners very
easily.
This section will provide the basic specifications of both
DS-7 turn-key software application, as well as the LabVIEW
drivers now available from DEWETRON for ORION series
A/D cards and DAQ series isolation signal conditioners.
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LabVIEW Drivers for ORION and DAQ Modules
Dewetron customers creating automated test systems, manufacturing test, or any special function system, rely on LabVIEW
from National Instruments as their development environment.
LabVIEW is perhaps the best known application of its type, all
around the world. It’s no surprise therefore that DEWETRON
has developed robust VIs (virtual instruments) that you can
drop directly onto your LabVIEW application, integrating our
hardware easier than ever before.
You might be aware that it is possible to program on top of
Dewesoft as well, but you need to run Dewesoft at least hidden, and have a paid license for it. But using DEWETRON’s
LabVIEW VIs you get native LabVIEW support for our hardware, and eliminate the need for Dewesoft.
Hardware Supported by DEWETRON’s LabVIEW VI’s
DEWETRON ORION series A/D cards are supported, including:
„„ ORION 16-bit A/D cards
„„ ORION 22-bit A/D cards
„„ ORION 24-bit A/D cards
In addition, we’ve been adding our DAQ series plug-in ISOLATION modules, starting with these most popular models:
„„ DAQP-STG - universal / strain / bridge module
„„ DAQP-HV - high voltage module
„„ DAQP-LV - low voltage module
Additional DAQ series modules are being added all the time,
according to our customer requests.
DwDAQ Library for LabVIEW
There are 15 VI’s as of this writing:
Using these functions you can setup the
A/D card, read its current settings, and
more importantly, configure it the way
that you want, including which channels
to acquire, the acquisition rate, and how
many samples to get from the card. Error
checking is built in, so that you can verify
at every step that the hardware is doing
what you expect.
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DAQP Signal Conditioner Implementation
A great assortment of functions are provided so that you can
control your DAQP signal conditioners. In particular we have
implemented the three most popular ones as shown at left, but
more modules will be added to the mix over time.
DAQP modules are controlled by way of the RS485 interface
that is built into the ORION card (complete functionality is
built in for module control). But for those applications where
only DEWETRON DAQP series modules are used without
DEWETRON ORION A/D cards, you can still control the DAQP
modules using a traditional serial interface that connects your
computer to the DEWE-30 “rack” that holds your DAQP modules.
No matter what the application, with or without ORION cards,
we have created a great library of LabVIEW VIs that will allow
you to create your project more easily than you ever imagined.
Top level COUNTER related functions,
from the DEWETRON LabVIEW manual
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Counter Inputs and Counter Expansion
ORION cards also have synchronous counter/encoder inputs
on them, as well as digital I/O lines. These are also implemented in the VIs, using their own functions. The top level
nine functions are shown in the figure at right. Below these
are an array of subfunctions that allow you to read and control
every function of the counters. Certain ORION cards have a
“counter expansion” option installed, which means that not only
that there are additional counters (and digital input) lines are
installed, but also that the counters have adjustable threshold
levels. These advanced capabilities can be controlled from
within the VI, too, if they are installed.
Digital I/O Lines
Every ORION card also provides at least 8 digital input
and 8 digital output lines. These are TTL level lines as a
standard, but can be expanded in quantity and voltage input
capability via various hardware options. Once again, these
lines are accessible via a group of related functions in the VI.
You can query the card to find out how many analog inputs,
counters, and digital I/O lines that are installed, so that you
know exactly what the hardware capabilities are in order to
implement them perfectly in your application.
CAN BUS Input Channel Functions
Finally, ORION cards feature optional CAN BUS interfaces,
and there is a group of nine functions related to controlling
these ports, setting up the messages and channels within
them, scaling them, and more. You can both read from and
write to the CAN BUS, creating a complete implementation
of CAN BUS data in sync with your analog and other digital
channels.
Sample LabVIEW Application
We have written a sample LabVIEW application that works
with our hardware. Installing it will also install the LabVIEW
drivers that you would need to start your own developments.
This is a great time saver and will start you off in the right
direction.
Top level COUNTER related functions,
from the DEWETRON LabVIEW manual
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DEWESoft Turn-key Application (DS-7)
DEWETRON customers in the R&D world don’t want to write software, or run on LINUX - they just want a
turn-key software application that can be used within minutes. DEWESoft (DS-7 for short) is a great package
that perfectly supports most DEWETRON hardware.
Key DS-7 Capabilities and Features
Runs under Windows
DS-7 was written specifically for Windows, and does not run on any other operating system. But that’s perfectly fine for test and measurement specialists in the research sector. Data acquisition systems used in this
sector are typically used for something different all the time, and flexibility is more important than long-term
stability.
The feature set provided by DS-7 is truly impressive. You can acquire high speed (dynamic) data from
DEWETRON ORION and TRION series hardware (plus all of our signal conditioners), as well as hundreds
of channels of asynchronous data from CAN, ARINC, 1553, SERIAL, and more.
Easy visualization
One of the most popular aspects of DS-7 is how easy it makes it for you to arrange the screens just the way
that you like them. It provides recorder graphs, scopes, analog and digital meters, 2D and 3D graphs, tabular displays, text objects, X-Y graphs, and more. Place them in any arrangement and assign the channels
into them that you want. DS-7 makes that very fast and easy. The entire setup is saved, so you can create
countless configurations and recall them in a matter of seconds.
MATH functions
DS-7 includes a rich set of pre-made MATH functions that you can apply to your data DURING recording, or
AFTER recording. These include programmable filters, integration, FFT analysis, and so much more. When
the computer is not powerful enough to handle what you want to do in real-time, you can set any or all of
the MATH functions to be processed after recording. DS-7 is not as powerful as a real analysis tool such as
Flexpro or Matlab, but it’s pretty darn good for the money.
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DS-7 Software Specifications
DEWESoft software specifications
Data file size
No restrictions, however we suggest to keep files to within 8 GB for your convenience
Setup files
A setup file contains all hardware settings and all display settings that can be
configured within the software. An unlimited number of setup files may be saved for
easy loading and re-use any time in the future
Setup file format
XML data format is used with D7s extension or XML extension
Data file format
Binary file with XML header portion containing the entire setup file, with D7d
extension. A library DLL is available for adding Dewesoft 7 data file importation into
any software program under your control. Several commercially available analysis
programs have added direct reading of Dewesoft 7 data files in this way, including
Matlab®, Flexpro®, and nCode®.
Data display
Built-in screens
Scope, Overview, Recorder, FFT, Video, Power
Screen design
Every display screen can be modified by the user
Screens can be deleted, and new screens added
Subscreens may be added below main screens
Screens may be renamed and moved on the toolbar
Data display widgets (standard)
Recorder (y/t strip chart) graph, horizontal, up to 16 channels/graph
Recorder (strip chart) graph, vertical, 1 channels/graph
Scope y/t graph, up to 32 channels/graph
Digital meter with color coded alert levels, user programmable
Analog meter with color coded alert levels, user programmable
Bar graph, horizontal or vertical, with color coded alert levels, user programmable
X-Y graph, X-YYY or 4 x X-Y, linear or angle based X-Y modes supported
FFT graph, up to 4 channels/graph
2D array graph
3D array graph
Background image container
Video display container
GPS track display container, compatible with map background images
Discrete display, LED with color change, user programmable
Discrete display, Alphanumeric, user programmable messages based on discrete levels
Text container, user programmable
Line tool, for drawing connections from meters/graphs to other widgets
Data display widgets (optional)
Vectorscope, harmonic FFT for voltage and current (included with DEWESoft-OPTPOWER)
Third-octave display (included with DEWESoft-OPT-SNDLVL)
On-line and Off-line MATH
Function blocks included
Formula editor: user-programmable arithmetic, algebra, trigonometry, boolean logic, measuring functions (time distance and ampltitude delta), and
more.
Filtering: IIR, FIR, FFT, and Envelope
Integration, Double integration, Derivation and Double derivation (IIR filter
module)
Polynomial / coefficient scaling (IIR filter module)
Basic statistics, array statistics, Latch math, counting functions, classification
Reference curves: Y/T, X/Y, and FFT
Constant function
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DEWESoft software specifications
Function blocks (continued)
Exact frequency calculation
CA noise (included with DEWESoft-OPT-CA combustion analyzer)
Angle sensor (user definable angle-based sensor toolkit)
FFT, SFFT, CPB
Scope trigger math function
Strain gage rosette calculator
Math channel operation modes
Math channels can be created before or after recording
Math channels created before recording may be set to not process until after
recording, or may be set to process during recording
Math functions created after recording can be processed on a subset of the data, or all
of the data
New channels resulting from math channels are saved to the data file, both before and
after recording
On-screen analysis capabilities
Cursor measurements
Recorder graphs have selectable cursors which can be used to take precise
measurements anywhere within the data, or any channels
Delta ampltidue and delta time are calculated, displayed, and printable
Cursors can be locked individually
Graph may still be zoomed/unzoomed when cursors are locked
Cursors and their readings appear on the paper when screen is printed
Data zoom in/out
Any recorder graph can be used to zoom the data in or out, as many times as
necessary
Data replay
Data can be replayed to make it look like it did when recording
Replay speed and direction
Replay can be increased or decreased in speed up to 8000x
Replay can be forward or reverse
Data export capabilities
Export file formats available
Matlab®, Flexpro, Excel®, delimited ASCII text
Diadem®, Universal 58, FAMOS®, nsoft time series, Sony log, RPC III, Comtrade®,
ATI®, Technical Data Management TDM, Impression Diadem®, Standard Data File,
WFT, Replay RPL, Wave (audio wav), Google Earth® KML
Export selection
The area zoomed using the cursors will be exported.
If no zooming has been done, the entire data file will be exported
Export channel selection
Any combination of channels may be exported, from 1 to all
Export mode
Data may be exported at the full acquisition rate, or at the reduced storage rate.
When reduced is chosen, user may select to export up to four columns per channel:
min, max, ave, rms
Export timebase
User selectable absolute time, relative time, or trigger (zero) time
Software licensing and distribution
Acquisition mode
A valid DEWESoft license is required to RECORD (acquire) data
Analysis mode
No license is required to use DEWESoft to analyze data
DEWESoft may be given to third parties for installation and use to analyze data files
Off line math, zooming, printing, and data export are all supported
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DEWESoft software specifications
Input sensor types supported
Analog sensors
Virtually all analog type sensors are supported (see Conditioners section for
compatibility details), abbreviated list:
Strain gages, accelerometers, microphones, RTDs, thermocouples, load cells, force
sensors, voltages, currents, string potentiometers, LVDTs, resistive sensors
Digital inputs
Digital I/O “discrete” lines, position encoders, tachometers, frequency meters
Video sensors
USB and Firewire webcams which support DirectShow/DirectX under Windows7®
Gig-E ethernet video camera (DEWE-CAM-GIG-E-50 option)
Synchronized Firewire camera (DEWE-CAM-01 option)
NSTC and PAL video streams (VIDEO-FG-4 option)
Sound sensors
IEPE and charge type microphones (see analog sensors)
GPS sensors
Compatible with:
DEWE-VGPS-200C, NMEA compatible GPS stream, Leane V-SAT®, Racelogic
VBOX II® GPS, Javad® GPS, Microsat® GPS
Inertial sensors
Compatible with:
XSENS MTI® and MTI-G® series MEMS based sensors (requires PLUGIN-XSENS
software option)
Genesys ADMA® series gyro / GPS platforms (requires PLUGIN-ADMA software
option)
BUS interfaces supported
CAN BUS
CAN 2.0B, with several additional protocols, including J1939 and OBD II (optional
interface and software option DEWESoft-OPT-CAN)
Importation of Vector DBC files is included with this option
Note: CAN output is available via option DEWESoft-OPT-CAN-OUT)
This option also includes a Vector license for the export of Vector DBC files
Hardware supported:
All Dewetron CAN hardware, Softing® CAN PCI and USB, Vector® CAN, National
Instruments® PCI-CAN/2 card
ARINC 429
Internal half-length PCI card and external USB ARINC 429 interfaces optionally
available.
Requires also DEWESoft-OPT-ARINC/1553
MIL-STD-1553
Internal half-length PCI card and external USB ARINC 429 interfaces optionally
available.
Requires also DEWESoft-OPT-ARINC/1553
PCM data
Internal full-length PCI format bit-sync/decom interface optionally available
Requires also DEWESoft-OPT-PCM
Requires a model with a full length PCI slot available, or external expansion chassis
with PCI slot(s).
OWNER’s GUIDE - Software | 9-175
DS-7 Operation Part 1: Acquisition and Analysis
Where to Start?
Turn on your Dewetron system. When Windows is loaded, find the DS-7 icon on the desktop. It looks like
this:
Double-click it. When DS-7 loads, it will be in the ACQUISITION mode by default, showing any existing
SETUP FILES that you have created. It should look like this:

The files might also look like icons. This is selectable near the top right corner of the window using these
buttons:
You can load any setup file by simply double-clicking it from this page. But don’t do that yet: let’s make a
new setup file. Before doing anything, we need to cover some questions that you might have already:
What kind of files are these?
These are SETUP files. In the ACQUISITION mode you create a system setup, which is used to record a
DATA file.
Are these my data files?
No, these are not data files. You cannot see or load your data files in the ACQUISITION mode!
Why can’t I see my data files?
You can if you change to the ANALYSIS mode. But DEWESoft starts up in the ACQUISITION mode by
default.
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What is the difference between ACQUISITION and ANALYSIS modes? Why do I need them?
ACQUISITION - in this mode you set up the system and store (record) your data
ANALYSIS - in this mode you can see your stored data, print it out, export it, and analyze it further
Where is my data stored? How do I get to it?
It’s stored on the hard drive. And don’t worry, we will be loading and replaying captured data files in a few
minutes!
Start with a Blank Setup
Click [Ch. Setup] in the ribbon:

When you do this, you will be on the ANALOG setup screen first. This is where you set up the analog inputs
of your system. You might have other setup screens for DIGITAL, COUNTER, CAN, VIDEO and more
inputs… but let’s focus on the analog inputs in this QuickStart. Notice that the Analog screen is highlighted in
yellow when selected.
Below it you will see your channels. How this looks will vary according to which kinds of signal conditioners
your system has, and how many channels. Here is a system with eight DAQ modules:
OWNER’s GUIDE - Software | 9-177

otice that DEWESoft automatically activates the first channel for you. You need to activate the ones that
N
you want to store when you record data.
Each channel is shown on one row which has these fields: Slot, On/Off, (Color), Name, Amplifier, Physical
Values, CAL, and SETUP:
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Activate the Channels
All channels that are set to USED will be stored when you press STORE. It does not matter whether the
channel is shown on the display screen or not! If it is activated here as USED, it will be stored. It is possible
to activate a channel but not store it - this is an advanced feature not covered here.
To turn on more channels, simply press their [Unused] buttons, and they will change to [Used].
-- HINT: to turn on (or off ) all channels at once, click the top of the column and select from the menu that will ap-
pear:

“Select all” will turn ON all channels, while “Deselect all” will turn them all OFF.
Set Up Your Channels
The easiest and most direct way to configure a channel is to click the “Set ch. #” button all the way to the
right:
To configure channel 0, for example, click the [Set ch. 0] button.
The channel setup dialog will appear. This is a critical screen to learn about, so let’s take a close look at
what it does and how to use it.
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Channel Setup Dialog
This dialog seems complex at first, but it’s really quite simple once you understand what it contains and how
to use it. There are four sections:
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PART 1: signal conditioner hardware control (top-right quadrant)
It is best to configure this section first, because this actually conthe signal conditioning HARDWARE. In the example above, we
a DAQP-LV low voltage module, which has two basic input types:
age and current.
trols
have
volt-
Assuming we want to measure voltage, simply set the RANGE
the selector:
using
Now set the filter (if you have an MDAQ system, you may or may not have the filter option). Different signal
conditioners have different settings, so please refer to the details about them. In this quick start we will just
use voltage modules and keep it simple.
In our example we set the range to 50V. Have a look at the reference section and you will see this on the
LEFT SIDE of the bar graph. Note that if you change the range, this will change directly below on the bar
graph:
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PART 2: channel name, units, color… (top-left quadrant)
Now enter a short name for this input channel, any additional info you want into the next
field, and then the UNIT OF MEASURE. This is important to do before moving to the next
section.
In the example above, we are configuring a channel which will be used to measure air pressure in PSI.
You can also set the color here. The “Min value” and “Max value” and “Sample rate divider” fields will be
explained later. These are more advanced, so please ignore them for now.
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PART 3: Scale/CAL your channel (bottom-left quadrant)
In this section you enter whatever scaling your input needs.
-- NOTE : If you are simply measuring voltage from a voltage module, you don’t
need to do any scaling (unless the voltage has been stepped down before being
input to the Dewetron system).
Let’s say that your transducer outputs 1V for 500 PSI. All you need to do is
enter these values into the “by two points” fields, as shown here:
In other words, when your sensor outputs 0V, this represents 0 PSI. But when it outputs 1V, that represents
500 PSI.
This simply establishes the slope of the scaling. In this case it is a linear function which multiplies the input
by 500 and changes the UM from V to PSI. You can click the [by function] button and see this algebraically:
This slope is the famous y = mx + b equation from high school. The scaling is created by a multiplier and
an offset. In our example, the offset is zero (none). But there are times when the offset is not zero. For
example, if you are scaling from Celcius to Fahrenheit. These two temperature measurement systems have
placed ZERO at different places: 0° C = 32° F. So to scale from C to F you would set it up like this:
or…
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It doesn’t matter whether you use the 2-point scaling method or the function scaling method to scale your
channel! Use whichever one is more comfortable to you and the scaling factor that you prefer. Both of the
methods above are the same. They both express the equation C x 1.8 + 32 = F
Reference Check (bottom-right quadrant)
This fourth quadrant of the channel setup screen provides a handy reference,
where the ACTUAL input scale is shown on the left side of the bar graph, and
the result of your scaling is shown on the right side of the bar graph:
or …
-- NOTE : DEWESoft will show the data in your scaled units of measurement from this point forward! Of course, the
data are really stored unscaled, to preserve all of their resolution, but they are always shown scaled according to
what you do here, during and after recording. They are also exported in scaled engineering units.
Look at the channel above on the right, our PSI channel. It shows ±25,000 PSI. But this is too much: your
sensor will output only 8 volts max, so the 50V range is too much. No problem! Change the ACTUAL measuring range from 50 to 10V, and look what happens:
>> results in >>

Now the measurement range of 10V yields a scaled measurement range of ±5000 PSI, which is what you
were looking for. In this way you can see the relationship between the ACTUAL hardware measuring range
and the SCALED measuring range.
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If everything looks good, then you are ready to move on to the next channel. You can either click [OK] at the
bottom of the setup dialog, or click the [ > > ] button to move to the next channel:

Change the Display Scale
One very important thing to note is that the scaled range shown on the right side of the bar graph on the
setup screen sets the DEFAULT DISPLAY RANGE for this channel. Therefore, if you were to put this channel into a strip chart, scope, or analog meter gauge on the display screens, the scale will be taken from this
bar graph.
Let’s take the example of the thermocouple channel, which is scaled like this:
So, if we put this channel into a strip chart, DEWESoft will set the scale to match the right side of the bar
graph, like this:
Note that DEWESoft set the channel’s display scale from -4.5e2 (-454°F) to 2.5e3 (+2498°F).
But what if this range is too much? Let’s say that you expect to only really measure from -100°F to +400°F?
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You can change it right here on the graph, which we will cover later. But even better would be to PRE-set the
display scale of this channel, so that when you put it into a graph or meter which has a scale, it will automatically be set to the desired span. How to preset this default display scale? It is back on the channel’s setup
screen, in section 2:
Setting the Default Display Range
If you refer back to PART 2: channel name, units, color..., you will find two fields that we skipped over before.
They are labeled “Min value” and “Max value”. By default they say “Auto” in them, which means that the
display range of this channel will be set to the same min and max values of the reference bar graph. But you
can override that by entering numbers into either or both of these fields!
So in our example, we want the temperature channel’s default range to be -100°F to ±400°F, therefore we
would enter that like this:
Note that making this change will not CHANGE the range of any existing graph, but you can coax them to
defer to these settings by right-clicking on the channel name within the graph:
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after right-clicking on the channel name inside the graph:

And when you add this channel into graphs for the first time, they will be scaled at -100°F to ±400°F automatically!
Above, the same temperature channel shown in several different kinds of graphs and meters, they all have
the default -100°F to +400°F display scale, because you have preset the display scale back on the setup
screen for that channel.
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Copying Channel Settings
You just learned a lot in setting up that channel. You set the actual hardware range/filter, then moved left to
the channel name, description, units, and possibly set the display range, then moved down to do the scaling… all the while keeping an eye on the reference bar graph to ensure that this channel was set correctly.
At this point you might be worrying that this is a lot of work to do on every single analog channel. Is there a
shortcut you can take to speed up the process?
Yes! Normally you will have several channels whose configurations are very similar. Here is our set up
screen:
OK, you just set the first channel up … and the next three channels are going to be very similar. Their hardware settings will be the same, and possibly even their scaling, display scale settings, etc. How do you copy
those settings from channel 0 to the next three channels?
Easy. Click the first box in the SLOT column of the channel that you want to copy:
When you click the SLOT box of any channel, it pops up the Copy/Paste menu. Only Copy is active, since
there is nothing to paste yet. Click Copy.
Now click on the SLOT box of channel 1, the next channel down. Suddenly the Paste menu item is active, so
click it to paste the settings from Channel 0 to Channel 1:
Now you get some very nice choices, which make the copy/paste process very flexible. Here is what each of
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the three sub choices under Paste source (<module type> : <channel>) means:
„„ Paste - it will simply paste the settings from the channel you copied to this channel, EXCEPT that it will
not paste the channel name, channel color, or the Used/Unused status to this channel.
„„ Paste to all - it will paste the settings from the channel you copied to ALL channels, EXCEPT that it will
not paste the channel name, channel color, or the Used/Unused status to the other channels.
„„ Paste special… - here you can choose exactly which parameters it will paste from the channel you cop-
ied to this channel, or even a range of channels. So if you wanted to really make them all the same color,
or paste to a range of channels (example: copy channel 14 and then paste it to channels 23 to 31).
If you select the Paste special... option, you get this screen where you can control what gets pasted, and to
which range of channels:
You can click the boxes in the PASTE column to toggle whether this parameter gets pasted or not. As
mentioned, the Used/Unused status is not normally pasted from one channel to another, but here we can
override that and paste that, too, as well as the channel name, etc. At the top we told it to paste from Slot 1
to Slot 3, so that channels 1, 2, and 3 will receive this paste simultaneously. Click OK to execute the paste,
and see what happens:
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The Paste Special function turned those three channels on and pasted every parameter except the channel
names and colors from channel 0 to channels 1, 2, and 3. Now you can just modify the channel names right
here, and you’re ready to go.
Just double-click in the white field under the Name column to directly edit any channels’ name. You don’t
need to open up the [Set ch. #] dialog box to enter a name or pick a color.
OK, our analog channels are all set up - let’s make the final adjustments and then record some data.
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Set the Data File Name
You need to tell DEWESoft what to NAME your captured data file. In other words, you need to set the file
name. For this function, please click the File details button in the toolbar:
By default, DEWESoft will put a name like Data into this field. Type in whatever you want, avoiding characters that are illegal to use in Windows filenames, such as $ <> {} [] / \ | ; : , -- you know the list! If you stick
with numbers, letters, underscores and hyphens you will be OK.
Automatic Recording STOP function
Let’s say that you want to start storing, and then have DEWESoft record for one hour automatically. Or stop
after a certain file size is reached. These functions are easy to control using the Stop storing after checkbox
that you can see here. Check it, and some settings controls will appear automatically for you:
With Stop storing after checked, you can set DEWESoft to stop storing automatically based on time (hours,
minutes, or seconds), or file size (in MB), or number of triggers within the file.
Automatic File Numbering
Notice the checkbox called Create a Multifile. This means that DEWESoft will automatically name your files
for you, so you don’t have to keep entering a new name each time you want to record data.
If you don’t use multifile, and you stored data right now, it would be stored to the filename Data.d7d.
If you come back here, this screen would look different. Do you notice the difference?
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If you saw that the filename “Data” is now written in RED, then you were correct. DEWESoft shows a
filename in RED here if this file already exists! So if you were to try and store again, DEWESoft would stop
and tell you that this file exists, and give you the chance to either overwrite it with new data, or enter a new
name.
To avoid this, check the Multifile box, and then use the setup button that will appear to pre-configure how
DEWESoft will automatically name your files, like so:
The way it is set above, the base part of the filename will be Data, and each time you store data, DEWESoft
will add an underscore and then four digits, starting at zero. So you will get a series of data files called:
Data_0000.d7d
Data_0001.d7d
Data_0002.d7d
Data_0003.d7d
Data_0004.d7d
…
and so on.
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Notice also that you could elect to start numbering the files at something higher than 0000. Simply select or
enter a starting file number.
Of course, you can change the base part of the filename to anything supported by the Windows OS. In the
example below we entered Gear_check as the base part of our filename.
You may also turn on the DATE to be added to the filename. You could also turn on the TIME, which will disable the number at the end (you cannot have both).
In the gray example area, you will see a preview of how your files will be named (as shown above).
Automatic file SWITCHING function
When multifile is not checked, the box below it is called Stop storing after, and as we saw, it allows you to
set DEWESoft to stop storing according to how big the file is, or when a certain amount of time has elapsed.
But when multifile is checked, the Stop storing after function changes slightly to be called Make new file
after. In this case, DEWESoft will not stop recording per se, but it will close the current data file and immediately open a new one, which will be named according to the active multifile settings. In other words, instead
of STOPPING storage outright, DEWESoft will switch to the next file in the series automatically.
Check the box and you will get similar configuration controls as before:
As before, DEWESoft can switch files automatically based on time (absolute or relative), file size, or trigger
count. If you want one triggered event per data file, this is the way to do it, for example. Set it to triggers and
set the quantity to 1.
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Set the Sample Rate
You need to select a sample rate. This is the number of samples per second that DEWESoft will store for
each of your active analog channels. If you have four channels active, and you select a sample rate of 10
kS/s for example, DEWESoft will stored 10 thousand samples per second for each of the four channels. This
means that 40,000 samples will be stored each second. In a 16-bit system that means 80,000 bytes of data
per second. In a 22 or 24-bit system, it is 160,000 bytes of data per second.
-- Note : Typically you should select a sample rate which is at least twice as high as the highest frequency that you
want to measure. The higher the rate, the more time axis resolution you will get, but the bigger the file will get!
You set the rate right here on the ANALOG setup screen, just above the channel list:
Use the Dynamic acquisition rate to set the sample rate. Using the small triangle at the bottom of the
field you can change the units of the sample rate, as shown here. So if you think in kiloHertz, for example
(kSamples per second per channel), you can select that instead of Hz/ch). You can work in Hz, kHz, or even
MHz if you have a really fast system. When you change sample rate units, the value shown in the box will
also change accordingly.
To select a rate, either choose one from the list that drops down from the little triangle, or simply type one
into the field and press ENTER on the keyboard. If DEWESoft cannot do this range, it will correct it and
show you what it can do:
There are several storing modes in DEWESoft, but in this first example we are simply going to store manually, by pressing STORE then STOP. Later in this QuickStart guide we will come back and learn how to use
reduced storage mode and the triggered modes.
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Save Your Setup
Everything that you can set up in DEWESoft is saved to a setup file that you can name freely (according to
Windows file naming restrictions of course). It is ALWAYS a good idea to save your setup before moving on
from here.
You need to be in the SETUP mode (as we have been for many pages now). On the left side of the toolbar
are large buttons for [Save] and [Save as]. If you have not yet named this setup file and you click [Save],
DEWESoft treat this the same as if you had clicked [Save as].
Use [Save as] to save the current setup configuration to a new name. So you can open an existing setup
that you like, use [Save as] to make a copy of it under a new name, then change it freely! No need to start
from the beginning each time.
WHAT’S NEXT?
Yes, there are many other kinds of channels that Dewetron systems typically have, such as digital inputs,
counter/encoders, video cameras, CAN BUS interfaces, and more… but this is a quickstart guide and we will
focus on making simple analog input recordings.
There are also several storing methods, such as triggering and reduced data. But for the quickstart we will
focus on the ALWAYS FAST mode, which is like a tape recorder: you manually press STORE and DEWESoft
records your active input channels at the selected dynamic acquisition rate, until you press STOP.
Are you ready to record some data?
It is better if you have some real signals connected to your channels. Even a simple 9VDC transistor battery,
or a function generator that can output a sine wave, is a great way to input signals. If you have nothing but
straight lines on the screen, it is impossible to learn how to zoom in, for example.
So please take a moment and connect at least one real signal to your dewetron system, and then let’s move
forward to the MEASURE screen, where we will use the default displays and STORE some data.
After that we will learn how to replay it.
Using the Acquisition Screens
When you click ACQUISITION from the ribbon at the top of the DEWESoft window, the default displays will
appear: Overview, Scope, Recorder, and FFT:
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If this is your first visit to Overview, there will be a digital meter group containing any channels that are set to
USED back on the analog setup screen.
In the example above, just one channel is active.
-- Note : going back and activating more channels will not automatically add them to this screen - you have to do
that manually.
Elements of the Acquisition screen
What exactly do the Acquisition screens contain? It might seem complex at first, but there are really just four
main functional groups of objects, as shown here:
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Notice that four screens are created for you by default. click on the Scope, Recorder, and FFT screens and
see how they are set up by default. You can change everything about these screens as mentioned earlier,
but for now let’s use them as they are, and then come back to the design functions later.
1. RIBBON AND TOOLBAR - contains the DEWESoft ribbon, where you can navigate among the setup
screens, display screens, and design mode. Also contains the toolbar, which has buttons to start and stop
storing data, and select which screen to display.
2. PROPERTIES BAR - where you can set the properties of any display widget in the Data display area, as
well as the properties of each display screen
3. DATA DISPLAY AREA - where your signals are shown, according to which display screen has been selected from the toolbar
4. CHANNEL LIST - shows your channels, and allows you to assign them into graphs and widgets.

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Please click on the Recorder button in the toolbar to activate that display:
The recorder shows you one big graph by default. Or perhaps more graphs depending on how many channels were set to USED when you first come here after leaving the setup screen. We had only one channel
USED, so DEWESoft gave us one graph with our one channel on it. Common questions at this point:
Is my data being stored already? I see it moving on the screen!
No. It is being monitored but not yet stored, because we did not click the STORE button yet.
I see some data that just went by, but I want to save it to disk. Is this possible?
No, data being monitored is not stored. It is not possible to capture it now.
Can I freeze this display right now? What about when I am storing data?
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To freeze the display when just monitoring data (not storing), press the STOP button. It will change to say
START when you do that, so that you can re-start it moving on the screen.
If you are STORING data, and you press STOP, the recording will STOP and the screen will stop moving.
If you want to freeze the display while DEWESoft continues to store data in the background, use the
FREEZE button instead! This is limited by a RAM buffer, so you cannot freeze the display and look back in
time beyond the amount of RAM that is available for this function.
Speed up/Slow down the recorder graph
If the data are scrolling past too slowly or too fast, use the blue [+] and [-]
 STORE SOME DATA
Let’s get down to business and record some data. Press the STORE button and the screen will be cleared. A
red vertical line appears and your data is now storing to disk. This is also indicated in the LOG in the toolbar
area:
Close-up view of the recording log:
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Marking your recordings with EVENTS
During recording, you can mark your data in three ways:
„„ Notice event - just hit the spacebar on the keyboard, and a gray line will be time-stamped and added to
the recorder graph. This is like the simple event marker of an old fashioned chart recorder.
„„ Text event - press the N key on the keyboard. Click on the log area if necessary to open the log for typ-
ing. Just type in whatever you like. The text event will be time-stamped according to when you pressed
N, not when you finish typing, so there is no rush!
„„ Voice event - (requires that sound events be activated in the project configuration, and that your Dewetron system has a usable sound card installed) press and hold V on the keyboard, and talk into your PC
mic (not included by Dewetron). A short voice message will be added to the data file.
You will see all of these events later when you reload this captured data to the screen. More about that later.
Each event type is indicated on the screen with a vertical line of a different color. You can also activate them
using the little icons near the log area instead of the keyboard shortcuts, as shown here.
Stop storing...
Press the STOP button and the recording will be closed. The screen will freeze.
Reloading your Data Files
This is as simple as pressing the ANALYSIS button near the top-left of the screen! If you have not gone to
any other screen since stopping the recording, DEWESoft will automatically load the last data file that you
recorded. Here it is!
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Replay reference strip
Across the top of the DISPLAY AREA is something new: the display reference bar. By default, DEWESoft
puts the first channel into this reference strip. When you load a data file, the entire file is displayed.
The beginning of the data is on the left, and the end is on the right.
This reference strip will become very useful when you ZOOM IN on the data. Let’s learn how to do that now
Zooming in and zooming out
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It is important to know how to zoom in and out on various parts of your data, to look closer and make measurements. Notice that when you are in the Analysis mode, there are two grey cursors and one yellow cursor
on the screen. The yellow cursor is also shown in the reference strip at the top.
But let’s use the gray cursors to zoom. Simply drag them into position around the area that you want to
zoom. Or, you can simply click and drag to the right, then release, to set the cursors.
Now move the pointer between them, and you will notice that it changes to a pointer with a small PLUS
symbol below it:
To zoom this area, simply CLICK with your mouse (or touch with your finger, if you have a touchscreen)
between these cursors!
Notice what the screen looks like now:

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See how the area that you zoomed has been highlighted into a little box? This is done to show you WHERE
in the data file you are looking on the recorder, and roughly how much of the data is being shown. This is a
great reference, and is needed once you start zooming in.
Zoom in again and again!
You can zoom in as many times as you like.
How to unzoom?
There are two ways:
1. Simply RIGHT-CLICK onto the recorder graph, and each zoom that you have done will be un-zoomed in
reverse order. So you can step backward through your zooms perfectly.
2. Use the blue MINUS button at the bottom right corner of the recorder graph to reduce the amount of time
shown on the graph.
Move the zoom box
The small zoom box shown in the reference strip can be directly moved. Use the mouse and drag it left or
right. Or, use the PAGE+UP and PAGE+DOWN buttons on your keyboard to move it in whole steps. You can
also move it in half steps by using the left and right arrow keys on your keyboard.
Make direct measurements on any channel
Simply by moving the pointer along any waveform, DEWESoft will show you a color-coded X and Y values
in engineering units in the top-left corner of the recorder graph. The pointer turns into a crosshairs when you
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move it along a waveform. Notice the values shown at the top of the graph:
Using the Cursors
DEWESoft uses these cursors in two ways: to zoom as shown above, and to make measurements on the
signals. To make full use of them, activate the cursor checkbox in the properties panel on the left, when your
recorder graph is active:
Before you check the box Show cursor values, the delta-T is already shown here. In the screen shot above,
notice the label:
dt = 6.7 ms f = 149 Hz
Therefore, the delta time between the cursors is less than 7 ms (<0.007 s), and the reciprocal of that time
interval is 149 Hz.
Now check the Show cursor values box, and notice that the recorder graph will get a new panel on its right
side, which shows the cursor I and cursor II values in a table:
So we see the value of the channel called Master Cylinder at cursor I, cursor II, and then the calculated delta
amplitude value.
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If a recorder graph has more than one channel in it, cursor readings for the other channels will also be
shown here, like in this example:
You can also move the cursors and take readings at exact locations. Simply drag each cursor into position.
To prevent accidentally zooming because you clicked in between them, you can LOCK each cursor using
the little padlock icons on the properties panel.
Print Out Your Data
You might want to make a print out on paper after recording data. To do this, make the screen look how you
want it to appear on the paper by zooming and using the cursor controls. Next, click the PRINT item from the
ribbon along the top of the DEWESoft window.
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You can turn the page to portrait or landscape orientation using the buttons in the toolbar.
Want to add some text to the page? Simply type it into the text field in the toolbar, and it will appear on the
header of the printed page.
Add your company logo to printouts
You can associate a BMP image to DEWESoft, so that it will be printed in the header when you print your
data.
Click the Settings menu near the top right corner of the DEWESoft screen. Click on Global setup... to open
the dialog box.
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When the dialog opens, click on the Print tab to see those settings:
Click on the ellipsis […] button and then choose the bitmap (*.bmp) image that you want to appear on your
printed output.
Next time you print something, it will have your logo at the top-left.
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Export Your Data
You might need to convert the DEWESoft data file to another format, so that you can open it in a different
analysis program. You can do this from the Analysis mode. Open a data file, and then zoom in if you want to
export only a certain portion of the data file. If you want to export it all, do not zoom in.
After opening a data file, click the EXPORT item from the ribbon near the top of the DEWESoft screen:
Now click the File export button from the toolbar. When you do, you will see a list of file formats that you can
convert this data file to. Select any one of them. DEWESoft will put the name of this data file into the Export
file name field automatically - however, you can change it to whatever you like. But please do not add the file
extension, because DEWESoft will add it automatically.
-- NOTE : to export to either Excel or Flexpro formats, you need to have these applications on this computer! Oth-
erwise, exporting will not work! This is because DS-7 needs to communicate with these programs.
Modify the Screens
It is not possible to do this subject justice in such a short manual. But you should know that you can enter
the Design mode by clicking the Design button in the ribbon near the top of the DEWESoft screen, and then
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change virtually every aspect of each screen. This is one of the most powerful and popular features of DEWESoft. Have a look at just a few of the screens that you can make in a matter of moments:


Use the hardware STORE and STOP buttons
Some Dewetron instruments include hardware buttons for starting and stopping recording. You may use
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them just like you use the on-screen buttons labeled the same: STORE and STOP. These hardware buttons
are active at the same time that the software buttons are active.
The built-in LED will illuminate when data is storing. When you press STOP, the LED will go dark, and the
storing will stop.
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Projects and Global settings
This is part 2 of our QuickStart Guide to DEWESoft 7! It was written at the time of DEWESoft version 7.0.1,
however it will remain largely compatible with higher versions of the software. It is meant to help you reach
the next level of knowledge with DEWESoft. Part 1 focused 100% on the analog inputs, and using the
measure screens as they are. In Part 2, you will see how to configure DEWESoft the way that you like it both
at the highest possible level (Global level) as well as at the Project level -- and explain the difference. The
Project level is especially important to learn about, since it never existed before DEWESoft7.
NOTE : In this manual we will often refer to DEWESoft as “DS-7” as shorthand. There is no difference.
What is a Dewesoft Project?
You can consider a Project to be like a “hardware profile,” in that it defines the hardware that you will be
using with DEWESoft. It also contains flexible settings that control how the system behaves. Let’s say that
you have a computer that you sometimes use a DEWE-43-V (USB connection), and other times you connect
a DEWESoft-NET ethernet based system, or other times yet, you use an ORION A/D card and rack of DAQ
modules outside your computer.
In DEWESoft6, there was only one global hardware setup, which you would have to change each time you
wanted to connect these different pieces of hardware to. But now with “Projects,” you can make and name
a hardware profile for each possibility. But a project defines more than just the hardware setup, as we will
learn in this QuickStart Guide.
To see your Projects, click the [Settings] button near the top-right corner of the DEWESoft window:
The first item is called Project >
Click it to open the submenu, where you can see your existing Projects, and then some controls below them
for adding a new Project, renaming the active Project, removing a Project, etc.
If you have not visited here before, you probably have a single Project called Default (you always need to
have at least one Project, otherwise you would have no hardware setup!).
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In our case, we have a Project called “DEMO,” in which there is no data acquisition hardware defined, and
DEWESoft creates waveforms for demo and training purposes. The checkbox tells us that this is the currently active Project. There is also another project called “DEWE43,” which is used when we connect our
DEWE-43-V unit, and a third Project called “Sound card,” in which we use the computer’s sound card as a
two channel sound recorder.
Hardware setup screen
Let’s check the hardware settings of the active Project. Simply click the Hardware setup… menu item. This
menu will close and the hardware setup dialog will open.
Hardware setup is where you control all of the hardware connected to your system, as well as the options
that you might have purchased for DEWESoft. Your license info is also stored here. There are several
screens, starting with ANALOG.
You can see that we have selected No A/D Hardware, since we want this project to be purely for demo and
training purposes, even when there is no hardware connected. But we have selected the Amplifiers to be
COM port or offline, so that we can use them in the setup mode for training.
In our other Project where we connect the DEWE-43-V and DAQ modules to make real measurements, the
hardware setup screen looks different, of course:
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There are other tabs for setting up other input types, such as CAN, GPS, VIDEO...and more. The Plugins
tab is where you activate software plugins that you have purchased for DEWESoft (some plugins are free).
Registration is where you enter your license information.
One source of potential confusion is the Math tab, so it is worth mentioning here:
MATH Options
It is important to note that the Basic functions (Filter, Formula, Statistics…) box can be checked. These
functions are included with all versions of DEWESoft. It should be checked for you already, but if it isn’t, go
ahead and check it.
However, the additional features below that are OPTIONAL - i.e., they have to be paid for. If you check their
boxes, and you do not have a license, you will not be able to click OK and use DEWESoft!
-- Note : The DEWESoft-DEWESoftA version includes most of these options. However, Power requires the addi-
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tional option called DEWESoft-OPT-POWER.
BUT if you want to try them before buying them, the solution is simple: create a new project called DEMO
and then set it up with NO A/D HARDWARE like we did, and then you can turn on every option in the world!
No license is needed for the demo mode! In demo mode, DEWESoft will generate sinusoidal waveforms that
you can use to test any function that you want, without any license.
And now with the ability to have different projects, you don’t have to take a risk by changing your “real” hardware setup -- just make a project called DEMO and then set up the hardware for this demo/testing mode,
where every option is turned on. The only thing you cannot do is try these functions with real data coming in
(unless you purchase the option of course).
These options are called “built-ins” because they are included already in the DEWESoft source code - they
simply require a valid license to be used for real.
DEWESoft Plugins
Then there are options which can be added in to DEWESoft as little snippets of code, or quick large chunks,
called PLUGINS. These plugins are easy to install - you simply copy them into the \addons directory under
the DEWESoft program file location on the hard disk. Then restart DEWESoft, and all installed plugins will
be shown in the Plugins tab here on hardware setup. For example:
Above you can see that we have a variety of plugins installed. Some of them are free of charge, while others
are included with the hardware option that you have purchased from us, or are an extra cost option.
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To activate a plugin you need to toggle it to Used, as you can see we have done above with the DEWESoftNET plugin. When you click some plugins, they may have some additional features or configuration selections that will appear in the Plugin properties area at the bottom of the dialog box. Not all plugins have this.
Please consult with your Dewetron sales person to learn more about which plugins are available for DEWESoft.
More Project Properties
In addition to the hardware and licensing configuration that you set up on the Hardware setup dialog, each
project also contains several other properties that you can configure according to your needs. Click again on
the [Settings] button near the top-right corner of the DEWESoft window:
Notice now the item called “Project setup…”. Please click it to open the dialog box:
This dialog has several subsections, including:
„„ Project folders - where you can set your default folders for setup files, data files, and exported data files
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„„ Starting setup - where you can force DEWESoft to load a particular setup and screen when it loads
„„ Security - where you can establish password protection of the setup mode
„„ Internal variables - where you can define project level variables which can be used in Math channels,
displayed on the screen, etc. These can be text or numeric variables.
„„ Data header - where you can set up a data entry box that will appear automatically before or after data
storage, to force the operator to enter whichever test parameters you want added to the data file
„„ Memory - top level control of DEWESoft’s use of physical RAM
The settings that you make here will apply to only the active Project! This is a lot of flexibility.
Most of the project subsections are obvious how to use, so we won’t get into them here in the QuickStart.
But there are two subsections worth a closer look: Internal Variables and Data Header, so we will do that
now!
Internal Variables
Here you can define variables which will exist at the Project level. That means that they will be available to
all setups which are created when this project is active. Variables can be in the form of TEXT or NUMERIC
values.
To create a variable, click the [+] symbol, and a default channel will be added, which you can directly edit.
You can rename the variable’s ID, channel name, and even give it a unit of measurement and color, if it will
be used as a channel. Next you can set the TYPE of data that it should contain: whether a floating, integer,
or text value.
If it is a numeric type, you can set the channel type to single or async. This does not apply to text data types.
„„ A “single” value means that it is treated like a static number in DEWESoft.
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„„ An “Async” value is treated more like a channel in DEWESoft. This means that it could be processed in a
series of calculations, like a filter. But there is no way to filter a static value. As a result of this distinction,
both async and single value numeric variables can be used within the FORMULA kind of math channel.
However, only an async value could be processed by a FILTER math channel. Do you see the difference?
Finally, you can set the default value. This field is quite wide, which is useful when this variable will hold
some text.
Above we have created four variables - one of each basic type: text, floating number, and integer number. In
addition, there are two versions of floating numbers: one which is async and another which is a single value.
So now what can we do with these variables? Well basically, we can use them in MATH channels, and we
can also simply put them on the screen in any setup that is active when this Project is active! These values
will be stored with any data files that are created when this project is active.
Using variables in Math channels
Numeric variables can be used within your MATH channels, which is their primary purpose after all. You can
use these variables to hold constants, for example, which are needed in your calculations.
If you create a new FORMULA math channel, you will see how you can use them:
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Above you can see that in the formula math setup, there is a tab called Variables, which will appear as soon
as there is at least one variable created for the current Project! So you can use these values within your
MATH formulas, as shown above… we are dividing the real analog signal called ‘Oil’ by the variable called
‘Oil_Temp.”
This formula creates a new virtual channel called ‘Oil_calc’ with the units ‘C’ (notice how we entered those
parameters near the top-left corner of the screen above).
So now this new math channel is available to be placed on the screen. Let’s take a look at that by clicking
the Measure button near the top of the DEWESoft window:
Click Measure from the ribbon...
After clicking Measure you will see the first display screen, called Overview. If this is the first time you have
visited the Overview screen with this setup, DEWESoft will automatically put your USED channels onto the
screen in the form of digital meters, like this:
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Looking at the right side of the display, you can see a list of channels shown in the grey, vertical task bar. By
default these channels are GROUPED according to type.
In this setup we have analog channels, then the one Math channel, then our Variables.
Each channel is shown within its group. Each group is collapsible.
In the first DEWESoft QuickStart Guide we showed you the channel list, but we did not show you how to get
the most from it. We will do that in a future QuickStart Guide.
For now just have a look at the screen -- and notice how your channels appear within the digital meters:
Even your text variable can be shown in a digital meter! Basically every kind of channel can be displayed in
this meter (there are very few exceptions, and not worth mentioning at this point).
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Data header
In this subsection of the Project setup, you can define a form that will appear when you record data, in order
to collect some additional information from the operator about the test.
When you first come to this subsection, it will look like the screen shot above. The main part of the dialog
box will be completely empty, as shown here. This is your workspace, where you can create data input fields
that the test operator will use later. There are three things that you can add to this workspace:
„„ Info - This is basically just a section header, which you can freely name.
„„ Input - A field which will collect alphanumeric input from the user
„„ Selection - A control that allows the user to pick from a list that you have predefined
OK, let’s see how all these work. It is normally a good idea to start by writing down on paper what you want
to collect from the user. Just use a piece of paper, and then refer to it as you duplicate it in the software.
Let’s say that you want to collect this information, arranged in these groups:
Test operator info:
name
ID number
Test article info:
model name (could be model A, model B, or model C)
serial number
lot number
Test procedure info:
ATP number (could be 1-1, 1-2, 1-3, or 22a)
ATP step (could be any number from 1 to 100)
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How would you create this? It’s quite simple. Let’s start with the first group of info:
Test operator info:
name
ID number
First we create the group, by clicking the
icon, then editing its label below, like this:
Now we have a section, and we can add the fields below it. The first field we want to collect is the operator’s
name. If you have a lot of operators and it is not practical to predefine them all, just use an Input field, so
that the user can type his or her name freely.
Click the
icon, then edit the label, as shown here:
Now we want to add the ID number field. Repeat the same step: click the
label:
icon, then edit the
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Great! Section 1 is done. We have created a category, and then defined two input fields that the operator
can type into when data is recorded. Let’s move on and create the next section, and learn how to create a
selection field. As a reminder, here is what we need to create:
Test article info:
model name (could be model A, model B, or model C)
serial number
lot number
So first we create the category header by clicking the
icon, then editing its label below:
Easy enough. But now we need to create a selector so that the operator can simply choose from model A,
model B, or model C (and nothing else). To do that, you click the
icon, and then edit its label:
But this field looks different than the simpler Input fields that we created before. A selector control requires
that you define the selections right now. To do that, click the
(ellipsis) button:
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The selection list dialog opens, where you can add new items to the list. Above we have typed “model A” into
the new item field, then clicked the Add item button below, to move it into the list. Do the same for “model B”
and “model C,” then click OK.
At this point you have the idea, right? Please continue along and add the rest of the items from our checklist,
until it looks like this:
If you change your mind and want to delete a field, or rearrange the order of them, there are controls exactly
for those functions:
To move a field up or down, use the icons shown here. Also, you can use the Delete icon to remove a field
completely. To select WHICH FIELD to move or delete, simply click on the field, and it will get a darker color
field behind it, like the one called “Rabbits” here:
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With this field selected, click the
icon and it will go away. There is no UNDO, so be careful.
If your form is ready, there is still one very important step left: you must tell DEWESoft WHEN to show this
form to the operator! There are checkboxes near the bottom, where you can tell DEWESoft to pop up this
form at the start of acquisition, or at the end, or both.

It is critical to check at least ONE of these boxes, otherwise the form will never appear! Remember that this
data header exists at the PROJECT LEVEL. Therefore, it does not matter which setup you use when storing
data: when this project is active, the data header and internal variable settings that you establish here will be
applied during recording.
Let’s see how this works.
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OK, we have our system set up and ready to record. Using the info in DEWESoft QuickStart-1 you learned
how to set up and scale your channels, and in QuickStart-2 you have learned how to create internal variables and a data header. You have combined variables and real data in the MATH section to create virtual
channels, which will be displayed and recorded, too. The sample rate is set up and you have a nice screen
to look at.
Press STORE and watch what happens:
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Congratulations! When you press STORE, the Data Header dialog will instantly appear, and your operator
can fill in the fields and then click OK to continue.
Selectors that you have predefined will show their first value by default, so if you want to force the operator
to make a choice, you can create a first selection like “--” or “choose” when you define the selection.
If you think that your operators will be annoyed by this data header and will skip over it, you could also check
the box to have it appear at the end of storing, when they have more time to fill it out.
Data headers can be as long as you like. If you create many fields, the screen will automatically create
NEXT and PREV buttons to navigate through multiple pages of fields. But take care: few people want to fill
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out so many fields, and will quickly grow tired of it.
If you store data, stop, and then store again, the data header will appear again -- with the fields already
filled in from the first run. So the operator just needs to change any fields which might have a different value
now… the other fields can be left alone.
Looking at the data header information later
Data header values, and all variables from the project that was active when a given data file was created,
are stored within the header of the data file. This is crucial for documentation purposes! How can you see
this info?
In the Analyze mode, click ONCE on any data file. In our case, we just captured some data called Test.d7d,
so let’s have a look:
When you click on the name of a data file here, you will see the header information from this file below, in
several tabbed areas:
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Settings
shows the basic settings of the data file (sample rate, date and time of storing, duration, and
many more elements about each of the captured channels)
Events
there are always at least two events in any data file: the date and time storing started, and the
date and time when it stopped.
Data header what we just created! The fields are captured here
File locking whether this file is protected against post-processing or not
Preview
a simple look at one of the display screens
We cover all of this in more detail in the manual, but for now click the Data header tab and see what is captured here:
Yes, your inputs are safely stored within the data file, for documentation purposes! What else can you do
with these values? Can you print them out or show them on the screens?
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To print out the data header info:
First, load the data file by double-clicking its name from the list. Then click the SETUP button in the ribbon:
At this point you can review the various elements contained within the header by clicking their icons: Channels, Events, Data header, File locking, etc. But if you just want to make a print-out, click the PRINT button in
the ribbon, and you will get a preview of what the paper will look like:
When you do a print preview from captured data, with the SETUP clicked in the ribbon, you will see a preview of the entire header section of the data file.
To get a preview of the DATA itself, i.e., any of your display screens, simply click REVIEW from the ribbon,
then click PRINT in the ribbon:
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Variables within the data header
You might have noticed that DEWESoft creates a variable from each of the fields that you create in your
data header. These variables can be displayed and used in processes, just like the internal variables that
you created earlier!
For example, let’s say that each time you run a test you need to input a variable that will be used in a math
channel. Like doing repetitive valve tests, where different valve diameters are used all the time, as one
example. You could ask the operator to simply enter the valve diameter using the Data header pop-up, and
then this value will be processed mathematically in whatever way you want!
Imagine a situation where a tolerance is calculated by multiplying a constant value by another value which
might change from test to test? This is not a problem: you can use the Internal Variables that we learned
about earlier to hold a constant value, and use the Data header field to collect a second value at run time
from the operator…. then put them together in a math channel.
Above - we add an internal variable to hold the valve circumference, which will not change from test to test...
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Above - then we create a data header question that the operator needs to respond to at the beginning of
each recording, called Valve diameter. DEWESoft automatically assigns it a unique ID - but let’s change it to
“ValveDiam” to make it easier to identify this parameter later. Now you should also define the TYPE of data
that can be entered: text, integer, or floating number. Since a number is absolutely required here, you should
not allow the operator to enter text, for example! You may also define the units and color of this channel.
Above - we create a MATH channel that we named ‘Valve_calc’ which will combine these two values and
give you the output that you need to test against!
This particular math channel doesn’t really make any sense: it is just one hypothetical example of how you
can use these variables in DEWESoft.
Displaying variables on the screen
So now you can see that project variables - whether they are predefined or collected from the operator at
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run time, can be quite powerful. Importantly, they are captured within the header of the data file, and are thus
a permanent part of the documentation.
You can use them mathematically, or simply show them on the screen. How to do that? Let’s see:
Did you notice that in the channel list, ALL VARIABLES are shown? If your variables are not showing, then
perhaps you are clicked on a display object which cannot hold them, like a scope or FFT graph. To reveal
all of them, click on a digital meter … then look at the channel list. You can see in the example above that
there is a group of variables, and within it, there are now two sub-groups, labeled ‘Data Header’ and ‘Internal
Variables’, and they contain exactly the variable names that we defined above.
In the screen above we have simply put these variables, as well as the real and math channels into meters.
Note that the data header variable is unknown until you press STORE and then the operator enters a number! Then that value will be known to DEWESoft, and also will be used in the MATH channel that calls for it.
This is what has happened above.
Projects Summary
You can make as many Projects as you require. This is a handy way to quickly configure the system for
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different test scenarios, and different hardware configurations. A great example is when you have a channel
expansion box: sometimes you need it, and sometimes you don’t You can therefore make a different Project
for each configuration.
But that’s only the beginning: you might have only one hardware configuration, but you can use Projects for
different test scenarios, since the data header and internal variables exist at the project level, and they are a
great source of automation and documentation, as you have seen above.
We suggest that you make a Project called DEMO that you can use for training, as well as to try all of the
options that are available as built-ins and plug-ins.
Global Setup
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In the previous section you learned how to create Projects, which will set up the system in a certain configuration. But then there are some configuration parameters that you can at the highest level, i.e., above the
level of any particular Project. This is the Global setup, and by definition there can be only one.
Referring again to the [Settings] button, click it and then select the “Global setup…” item.
When you select this item you will get the Global setup dialog box:
There are several tabs on this dialog, which allow you to configure these parameters:
General
where you can set the language, character set, default sample rate, and similar
Displays
where you can control which screens are active by default, and set the display background
color
Sound
where you can active VOICE EVENTS for data storing, and trigger sounds from the PC sound
card
Print
where you can define several aspects of printing, and link to your company’s logo to print on
reports
Folders
where you can set up the default folders for top level settings and the sensor database
Amplifier
(Infrequently used) top level Amplifier setting. Please leave this alone unless instructed otherwise
The most often-used features at this top level are: Changing the DEWESoft background color
The default background color is dark blue. However, if you plan on printing reports frequently directly from
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DEWESoft, you might want to change the background to WHITE, because then the screen and paper output
will match. Also, this will prevent you from using really light colors like yellow (or white), which look great
against dark blue, but which are impossible to see when printed on white paper.
To change the background color to white, click the [Displays] button on the Global settings dialog box:
Here you can simply set the color to white using the selector.
Here is the difference:
Adding a logo to your printouts
To add a logo, click the [Print] button on the Global settings dialog box:
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Now click the […] button and then choose a BMP logo file that will be printed when you print stored data
onto paper.
Summary
This concludes Part 2 of the DEWESoft QuickStart Guide. We have still only scratched the surface of this
amazing data acquisition software program. There are more input types, more math functions, and … well,
it’s a long list.
Please refer to the DEWESoft 7 Manual and DEWESoft 7 Tutorials for further information about how to use
these advanced capabilities, or make arrangements to attend a Dewetron training class, where you can really learn a lot.
Finally, please experiment with DEWESoft and try everything. The software is quite intuitive once you get
started.
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DS-7 Plugins
DEWEsoft software can be expanded with the installation of software PLUGINS. There are several kinds
available:
„„
„„
„„
„„
„„
Drivers for different hardware (A/D card, serial or other port connected devices, wireless devices, etc.)
Graphical display widgets for the measurement displays
Export filters to convert captured data to additional file formats
Extensions of the functionality of DS-7
New MATH functions for custom processes
This section will focus on a few of the key PLUGINs that are used with our systems. It is not meant to replace all of the documentation that is available separately related to DS-7, but as a convenience within this
manual.
PLUGIN Installation and Configuration
How to Install a PLUGIN
All plugins need to be copied to the ADDONS folder within your Dewesoft installation. Normally this will be at
this path, but your system might be different:
D:\DEWESoft7\Bin\V7_0\Addons\
In addition, all PLUGINS must be registered. Starting with Windows7, Microsoft does not allow an application to directly register a plugin, so you must manually start the process with a mouse-click.
This is easily accomplished by clicking on the SETTINGS button near the top right corner of the DS-7
window (while in the setup mode). Then click HARDWARE SETTINGS from the menu. When the dialog box
opens up, click on the ADDONS tab. Then click the REGISTER PLUGINS at the bottom of the screen. When
this process completes after a few moments, you must click OK on this dialog. Then quit the DS-7 application and restart it in order that the newly registered plugins (of any kind) are registered.
The PLUGINS tab of the HARDWARE SETUP screen
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Configuring Certain PLUGINS
Some plugins have a setup interface that must be configured. From the ADDONS tab of the hardware setup
screen, click once on the designed PLUGIN and you will see any user-configurable settings below. In the
example we click on the TARSUS plugin, and below within the gray area several selectors appear, where
you can configure this software.
Plugins tab, showing the configuration of a certain plugin
Make the appropriate changes and then click OK to register them and close this box. Your settings will be
saved under this hardware project.
The OK button at the bottom of the HARDWARE SETUP dialog box
We learned about PROJECTS in an earlier section of this chapter - so you know that you can create multiple
projects, which are essentially hardware profiles, that allow you to have different hardware configurations.
So if sometimes you use a certain piece of hardware, but other times you don’t, you can make different
PROJECTS, and load the one that you prefer.
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Testing plugins without a license
Nearly all plugins require a license specific to them, in order to make them work. So how can you try out a
plugin without first buying it? Answer: get a 30 day eval code. Even if your system is 100% licensed, you can
still add a 30-day code to your license, and it will unlock all features, including any installed and registered
plugins. Contact DEWETRON to get a 30 day evaluation code. In the screen shot above notice that a TRIAL
license was installed when the screen shot was made.
-- Note - some plugins require HARDWARE in order to function - you must also have that hardware!
PLUGIN-ETHERNET-REC
This plugin allows you to display and record data parsed from an ethernet stream, including UDP packets.
No special hardware is needed, because basically every DEWETRON system has at least one ethernet
interface already. Assuming you have an available ethernet interface on your DEWETRON system and you
want to capture data from it, you can use this PLUGIN.
First, install it according to the process mentioned at the beginning of this section. Make sure it is enabled,
and licensed (even using a 30 day TRIAL / EVALATION license is fine for testing purposes).
WinpCAP installation
In addition to the plugin itself, we require that a third-party ethernet sniffer package be installed onto the
DEWETRON computer. WINpCAP enables the access to the network interface (driver and DLL libraries).
Please visit this page in order to download the software:
http://www.winpcap.org/
Download WinPcap_4_1_3.exe
There might be a newer version by the time you visit this page - no worries, simply get the latest version and
use this name as a reference only.
After installation you should restart your DEWETRON computer to make sure that all of the new libraries are
instantiated.
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Setting up your Ethernet streams, filters and channels
Once the plugin has been installed and enabled, and WinPcap has been installed, you should be able to see
a new icon on your DS-7 SETUP toolbar, which looks like this:
The first thing we need to do is to add a STREAM. Click the button in the toolbar below the ETHERNET icon
to do that:
Click the “+” button to add an ethernet STREAM
Some controls will appear below:
Datastream dialog, ethernet data source selected
Data Source Choose ETHERNET, or UDP, or DEWESOFT (with Dewetron hardware this will always be
either ethernet or UDP). We will cover ETHERNET and UDP setups below.
Select Interface Choose the appropriate network card (the one that you will be reading the data from).
Max Packet Size 1520 is the default, and is also the maximum length of the ethernet frame.
-- Hint: If you have a fast stream with shorter frames, you can improve the performance and reduce data file size
by reducing this value.
Selecting ETHERNET is the simplest to setup. Simply choose the interface and maximum packet size as
mentioned above. Then click OK at the bottom of this dialog box to register these settings.
However, if you have chosen UDP, the dialog box will change slightly, and provide some alternate setup
parameters to configure:
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Datastream dialog, UDP data source selected
Input Type
This can be set to either UDP PORT or REPLAY FILE. If you select a port, you need to give
the port number and max packet size. The default values of 2999 and 2048 are entered for
you. However if you select REPLAY FILE, you need to point to a file that contains the data you
want to read, as well as the max packet size.
UDP source, replay file input type
Forward UDP packets
This can be set to one of three selections:
Disabled
UDP packets will not be forwarded
UDP Port
UDP packets will be forwarded to the selected port and destination IP address (boxes will appear where you can enter these values)
Replay file
UDP packets will be written into the named file (a text box will appear where you can enter the
filename)
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Regardless of whether you have selected ETHERNET or UDP as your data source, as soon as you can set
one up, this will appear on the large open area of the software:
Ethernet Stream ready to be further defined
So far this section has column headings, but is emtpy. Therefore now we must add a filter chain, and then
some CHANNELS to be displayed and recorded.
Defining the Filter Chain
Since each stream can have one or more filter chains, we need to define the one(s) that we need.
Click the [ + ] button under the capture “Filter chains.”
When you do, a single filter will be created for this stream, and it will appear like this:
Ethernet filter within the first stream
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Defining the Filter Chain
We need to define this filter chain. Let’s start by clicking the SETUP button on it the right side of it. When you
click this SETUP button it will open up the Filter Settings dialog box:
The Filter Settings dialog box
The Filter chain is used to filter out ethernet frames by MAC address, IP address, packet type, etc. This is
a very flexible setup, because you have the ability to include or exclude specific fields. You can also write
multiple strings in each field.
-- Note - if you write multiple strings in each field, they must be separated by a space character
Here is an example:
IP Address: 192.168.10.1 192.168.10.2
This will include both addresses. This also works with all other fields.
If you click in the fields, e.g. “Destination IP”, the according part in the protocol will be highlighted. Here
for instance we search for all messages going to 192.168.1.255; switch the view to “DEC” to see the plain
numbers:
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Example of a filter chain setup
Notice that we are already seeing the data stream at the bottom of the dialog box. This is a great convenience when setting up these filter chains.
If you happen to know the exact position of the string, you can search for specific bytes or characters, by using the Data filter. Switch the preview to ASCII to see plain text. You can clear the previous values from the
screen, to make sure that you are seeing the latest real data, or to discover if data is really moving or not.
Using the DATA FILTER
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In the example below we will define a filter chain under the UDP protocol. We will search for messages with
a destination port of 5001. We will see short test messages coming in, and the we can decode/extract our
channel from it.
Sample filter chain setup using UDP protocol
And what do we get from this? Depending on the protocol, the packets can vary. For example, IPv6 addresses are longer than IPv4 addresses.
Configuring your channels
Well, now that we have configured the stream and the filter chain, we can finally define the actual CHAN-
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NELS that we want to measure, display, and store.
Channels are always defined as a “child” of the selected Filter Chain. So first select the Filter Chain, and
then click the [ + ] CHANNEL button to create one or more channels:
The ADD CHANNEL button [+]
Notice that you can add multiple channels below a given filter chain, simply by pressing the [+] key again.
Click the channel to turn it to a darker gray color, if you want to remove it. Once it’s selected in this fashion,
simply press the [-] key and any selected channel will be deleted.
⇒⇒ Take care - there is no UNDO function here, so if you accidentally delete a filter chain or channel, you will need
to add it back again manually.
Several channels added below a Filter Chain
Of course, each channel needs to be set up. This is done by clicking the SETUP button on the far right of
any channel. When you do that, the Channel Setup dialog will appear:
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Notice that the selected bytes have been highlighted to make it easier for you to see them:
Just like with analog channels, this dialog box is where you can enter your slope (a scaling FACTOR and
OFFSET). For example, to convert from Celcius to Fahrenheit you would enter a factor of 1.8 and and offset
of 32.
You can also define the default DISPLAY SCALE here using the Min Value and Max Value fields. This will
not affect recording at all, but simply predefines the display scale of this channel when shown on a graph or
meter that has a scale. For example, if this channel might have a max possible range of -1500 to +2000°C,
but you just want to display it from -300 to +600°C, you would enter those two numbers into the min and max
fields.
-- Note - just as with analog channels, please do not enter the + sign. It is understood that numbers that do not
have a minus sign are positive numbers.
Our sample channel starts at byte 42 and is 16 bits long:
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Set your channels to USED
It is an absolute MUST that channels be set to USED. Only channels which are USED can be shown on the
displays, recorded, or processed within MATH functions. Be sure to press this button for all channels that
you want to record / display / process in math!
Filter chains and channels MUST be set to USED here in order to be displayed/recorded/processed
You’re Ready Record Data
Now that your ethernet data has been defined, you can use these channels just as if they were analog channels.
Display
Move to your display screens and you will see these channels in the channel LIST on the right
side of the display. You can put them into digital and analog meters, Recorder Graphs, and
Tabular displays.
-- Note - because ethernet data is essentially asynchonous channels, they cannot be put into the SCOPE graph or
FFT graph directly.
Recording
Just like any other channel(s) within the software, these channels will be STORED when you
record data. And of course, replayed later when you analyze the data file.
Process
Just like any other channel(s) within the software, these channels can be used within your
MATH functions, and even combined with other synchronous and asynchronous channels to
create unlimited derived parameters.
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Matlab - Exporting Data from DS-7
Data exchange is an important matter for our customers, so there are several options how the proprietary
DS-7 data and file format can be transferred and read by other software.
Exporting MAT files from the DS-7 (DEWESoft 7) Export menu
There are basically two methods of exporting data from DS-7:
DirectX export into Flexpro or Matlab - including templates to automatically process data into reports.
Then there is ...
File export, which either writes other vendors’ proprietary data formats (e.g. MAT file) or commonly used
interchange formats like CSV.
This section is concerned with using File export from DS-7 to Matlab analysis software. Matlab is a very
powerful tool made by The Mathworks, a company separate from and not affiliated with DEWETRON. The
Mathworks owns the product Matlab, its intellectual property, including any and all Matlab related patents,
trademarks and copyrights.
The 2 GB Export Limitation, and How to Overcome
DS-7 uses standard MATLAB™ libraries to write this specific file format as version 5 files with a 2 GB size
limit.
The DS-7 export function has an inherent 2 GB limit
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However, starting with DS-7 version 7.1 this limit can be overcome if newer MATLAB™ libraries are installed
on the system. These libraries must be the 32-bit ones, because DS-7 is a 32-bit application. It is possible to
install MATLAB™ 64-bit and 32-bit in parallel on the same machine with the same installer medium, but the
latter one has to be started manually (e.g.: bin\win32\setup.exe). By installing this version, also 32-bit libraries are installed and registered and DEWESoft shows a new MATLAB™ export file type, MAT file version 7.3
removing the 2GB barrier.
The export screen under DS-7.1 has additional choices regarding the data export
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Using DWDataReader Library inside MATLAB™
The DWDataReader library (including many examples) is available for download free of charge. It can be
found on the www.dewamerica.com homepage on the DS-7 pages.
Because our library is a native DLL, depending on the programming language in use and its included interop
support, data types have to be converted and memory allocated.
To make this easier for the end-user a number of examples are available for Win32 & Win64-bit MATLAB™
or C language, Win32 VBA and Linux C.
The MATLAB™ example includes 3 files, the MATLAB™ script, the library and the header file.
„„ dw_data_reader.m
„„ DWDataReaderLib.dll
„„ DWDataReaderLib.h
The basic steps to access D7D data files are explained in the library’s documentation:
1.Call DWInit to initialize the dynamic link library
2.Call DWOpenDataFile to open DEWESoft data file (*.d7d)
3.Call DWGetChannelListCount to get the number of channels
4.Allocate the DWChannel structure then call DWGetChannelList to get channel list properties
5.Call DWGetScaledSamplesCount to get the number of all samples
6.Allocate memory (data and time_stamp) then call DWGetScaledSamples
7.Call DWCloseDataFile to close data file
8.Call DWDeInit to clear and close dynamic link library
Short walk-through of the example:
-- Hint: The steps inside the demo are documented, so just look at the comments for more information.
„„ 64-bit operation mode is checked at first.
„„ Then the DLL is loaded into MATLAB™.
„„ The steps above have to be followed for correct operation, so the next step is to init the library.
„„ Get version is an optional step.
„„ Structures and referring pointers are created to be used as return types later on.
„„ The data file being opened is defined in line 41, default path is c:\Test.d7d.
[stat, file_name, info_data] = calllib(DWDataLibFile, ‘DWOpenDataFile’, ‘c:\Test.
d7d’, sptr.Value);
„„ DWGetChannelListCount returns the number of channels inside the data file.
„„ Events, such as start storing, are checked with DWGetEventListCount and DWGetEventListItem
„„ All data channels are then looped through and parameters such as name and color are read with
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DWGetChannelListItem
„„ Data itself is opened by reserving data and time_stamp variables and then using the DWGetScaledSam-
ples function
„„ Color representation varies from different software, so the appropriate conversion is shown next by doing
an example plot.
„„ As final steps the data file is closed by using DWCloseDataFile and the library de-initialized by calling
DWDeInit.
„„ If the DLL is no longer used inside MATLAB™, the unloadlibrary function frees up memory.
This demo shows basic operation and can be modified according to your own programming needs.
Using DCOM to access DEWESoft data online with MATLAB™
After installation, DS-7 is a registered DCOM component on your Windows system, giving you access to a
large number of functions, among them remote control and optionally hiding the software or loading a measurement setup and accessing data online or offline.
This same DCOM standard is used when programming your own plugins, math modules, import or export
filters or additional hardware drivers – independent from the used programming language.
Again, there are programming examples on the www.dewamerica.com webpage on the DS-7 product pages.
Example ListChannels:
„„ Start DEWESoft from inside MATLAB:
global h;
h = actxserver(‘Dewesoft.App’);
h.Init();
h.Visible = true;
„„ Build ChannelList
h.Data.BuildChannelList;
„„ Count all available channels
h.Data.AllChannels.Count
„„ Count used ones only
h.Data.UsedChannels
„„ Access channel with index and get Name property:
h.Data.UsedChannels.Item(0).Name
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Example ReadDataFile (offline data):
„„ Start ActiveX server
„„ Go to Setup screen
„„ Start storing a data file
„„ Load the file in analysis mode
„„ Get global parameters, such as sampling rate, number of channels
„„ Loop through all the channels and get specific parameters, such as channel names
„„ Read data and time_stamp from channel
„„ Plot data
„„ Clear handle
Example DewesoftEvents (online data):
This example shows how to access data online via DCOM interface, and display this data in a MATLAB™
plot directly.
Matlab screen showing data import from DS-7 software
9-254| OWNER’s GUIDE
The main file here is actx_dewe_events, while the eventhandler is called from DEWESoft to transmit data
online.
actx_dewe_events:
„„ Start ActiveX server
„„ Init DEWESoft
„„ Load measurement setup
„„ Register events
„„ Start measure mode
„„ Pause main thread to be able to get data-events
„„ Stop and clear ActiveX components
eventhandler:
„„ Listen for OngetData event
„„ Calculate data position from block size, no. of blocks, previous samples,…
„„ Loop through all channels and read data
„„ Plot data block
„„ Remember data position for next iteration
OWNER’s GUIDE - Important Accessories | 10-255
10
Important Accessories
DPS-2410 external AC/DC power supply
Certain models include a Dewetron Power Supply (DPS) which outputs 24VDC at 10 amps (2410). Thus, the
model name is DPS-2410. The DPS-2410 is used to power your system from 120/240VAC. When connected
and powered on, it will also recharge any batteries which are installed within the system at the same time.
Here are the relevant specifications for this power supply:
Parameter
DSP-2410
Power input:
100~250 VAC, 50/60 Hz standard worldwide power from AC mains
Power output:
24 VDC nominal level, up to 10.5A absolute max (10A nominal and fused)
Ground:
yellow/green stripe color coded mini banana jack referenced to ground.
Switch:
AC mains power switch, turns off the DPS-2410 completely (there is no hot
standby mode)
Indicator
Green LED indicates that the DPS-2410 is connected to power and turned
ON.
Fuse
10A fast blow automotive type fuse
Fan:
Built into the top cover. Series 1 models: black plastic fan bezel. Series 2
models: flush metal fan grille.
Construction:
Aluminum with rubber shock protection corners
DPS-2410 Compatibility
The DPS-2410 is included as standard with the DEWE-3210 series, and is included with the 310-UPS battery option for the D310 series. It is not required by nor compatible with the DEWE-3040-RM or DEWE-3050
series.
10-256| OWNER’s GUIDE
DPS-2410 Dimensions
OWNER’s GUIDE - Important Accessories | 10-257
DPS-2410 Call-outs
LED power on
indicator
Rubberized shock
absorbing corners
AC Mains input
receptacle
24 VDC power
output
20A fuse
Power on/off
Chassis ground point
Important safety notices:
⇒⇒ Never block the vetilation holes on any side of the DSP-2410
⇒⇒ Always locate the DPS-2410 in an open, well ventilated area
⇒⇒ Never apply power to the DPS-2410 when it is enclosed within the carry bag, shipping case, or any other loca-
tion where air flow is restricted.
⇒⇒ Always replace the external fuse with the same value and type. Never substitute a larger A value.
⇒⇒ Use the chassis ground point if needed to reference the voltage to the UUT or test stand
⇒⇒ Do not open the DPS-2410. Service must be performed by qualified DEWETRON service personnel.
⇒⇒ If the chassis appears damaged, or any connector is loose or damaged in any way, do not apply power to the
DPS-2410.
⇒⇒ Never use the DPS-2410 for any purpose other than for which it was supplied by DEWETRON.
⇒⇒ Failure to observe these safety protocols, as well as other best practices related to electronic equipment and
power conversion equipment, can lead to equipment damage, or bodily harm or even death to you and others.
10-258| OWNER’s GUIDE
Neutrino-4
The Neutrino-4 is an optional external battery charger and additional DC power supply unit. It can recharge
four Dewetron standard batteries (model BATT-95WH) simultaneously when powered from 120/240 VAC.
The Neutrino-4 has a built-in LCD display exactly like the one which is on the DEWE-321x mainframe, so it
will show you the number of batteries inside and their aggregate charge status.
Using a special power cable, the Neutrino-4 can also be unplugged from AC and plugged into the DC
input of many DEWETRON systems to provide an additional power source. With a full loaded and charged
Neutrino-4 plus the batteries already within models like the D310 (with 310-UPS option), DEWE-3050, and
DEWE-3210, you then have the power of six Dewetron BATT-95WH batteries. Since a rule of thumb is that
you typically get one hour of data acquisition time per battery, this means your system can run practically an
entire work day without being connected to external power.
Above left: with the door open and batteries partially or completely removed
Above right: with the door closed
The Neutrino also supports hot-swapping of its batteries, so you can feed in fresh batteries at regular intervals, to keep it supplying DC power indefinitely.
What’s included with the Neutrino-4:
„„ The Neutrino-4 mainframe
„„ AC mains input power cord
„„ One (1) BATT-95WH smart battery (please order additional batteries separately if you require them)
Note - the Neutrino-4 is not compatible with the SideHAND2 series batteries used within the D310 with the
310-UPS option, or the DEWE-3050. We offer a desktop charger called the BAT-CHARGER-1, which supports both the original BAT-95W and newer SideHAND2 series batteries
OWNER’s GUIDE - Important Accessories | 10-259
Neutrino-4 Outline and Dimensions
10-260| OWNER’s GUIDE
Important safety notices:
⇒⇒ Never block the vetilation holes on any side of the Neutrino-4
⇒⇒ Always locate the Neutrino-4 in an open, well ventilated area
⇒⇒ Never apply power to the Neutrino-4 when it is enclosed within the carry bag, shipping case, or any other loca-
tion where air flow is restricted.
⇒⇒ Always replace the external fuse with the same value and type. Never substitute a larger A value.
⇒⇒ Use the chassis ground point if needed to reference the voltage to the UUT or test stand
⇒⇒ Do not open the Neutrino-4. Service must be performed by qualified DEWETRON service personnel.
⇒⇒ If the chassis appears damaged, or any connector is loose or damaged in any way, do not apply power to the
Neutrino-4.
⇒⇒ Never use the Neutrino-4 for any purpose other than for which it was supplied by DEWETRON.
⇒⇒ Failure to observe these safety protocols, as well as other best practices related to electronic equipment and
power conversion equipment, can lead to equipment damage, or bodily harm or even death to you and others.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Important Accessories | 10-261
BAT-CHARGER-1
This is a desktop (non-ruggedized) style battery charger, capable of recharging one battery at a time. The
charger will also recalibrate our smart batteries automatically, whenever needed. The BAT-CHARGER-1 is
compatible with both the classic BAT-95W batteries used in DEWETRON DEWE-3210, DA120, DA-121,
DA124, DEWE-3020, DEWE-5000, DEWE-571, DEWE-2600 and DEWE-3040 instruments, as well as the
smaller “SideHAND2” series smart batteries used in the DEWE-3050 and D310 series.
What’s included with the BAT-CHARGER-1:
„„ The single battery charger, plastic office use type construction
„„ AC/DC power adapter and power cord.
„„ Owner’s manual
Above: the BAT-CHARGER-1 shown with a SideHAND2
series battery plugged in, and a BAT-95W battery lying
nearby.
Right: The DEWE-3050 includes four
SideHAND2 series batteries. They can be hotswapped on the left side panel.
Above: the BAT-CHARGER-1 shown with the included AC/
DC adapter. Not shown but also included is a standard AC
power cable.
10-262| OWNER’s GUIDE
BAT-CHARGER-1 Specifications
Specification
Weight:
235 g (8 oz.)
Dimensions: (W x L x H)
92 x 180 x 58 mm (3.5 x 7 x 2.25 in.)
Mating Connector:
5-pin standard battery connector
LED Status Display
Green flashing: Charging
Green solid: Charge complete
Blue flashing: Calibrating
Blue solid: Calibration complete
Red flashing: battery fuel gauge recalibration recommended
Red solid: Error
AC/DC power supply
(External) 90~260VAC, 24V, 2.5A DC, 119 x 38 x 60 mm, 500 g (18 oz)
AC Cord
Standard: 110V N. American 3-pin connector
Optional: 220V European 2-pin connector with ground recess
Optional: CH5000U: 240V UK 3-pin connector
Compliances
System Management Bus Rev 1.0, Smart Battery Data Specification rev 1.0 and Smart
Battery Charger specification Rev 1.0 compliant
Certifications
UL listed, CE Compliant
Outline Dimensions
Dimensions in inches (in.)
Multiply by 25.4 for mm
OWNER’s GUIDE - Important Accessories | 10-263
Safety
⇒⇒ Do not expose the charger or power supply to water or liquids; this is not a sealed case. 2. Do not open the
charger or power supply case, no user serviceable parts are inside.
⇒⇒ Do not cover the fan exhaust or obstruct the airflow, this will cause overheating.
⇒⇒ Use only the manufacturer’s power supply and observe terminal polarity.
⇒⇒ Place the charger in a cool spot, away from external heat sources
⇒⇒ Caution - during recalibration the charger may become warm.
Operation Guidelines
Place the charger on a flat, level surface away from sources of heat and moisture. Plug the DC connector
from the power supply into the back of the charger and connect the power supply to the mains AC supply
using the cable supplied.
Charging Batteries
Place the battery into the battery bay ensuring that the 5-way connector is fully seated. The LEDs in the
status window will provide status information and the charger will automatically begin charging.
The BAT-CHARGER-1 charger is capable of sensing and delivering an appropriate charge to all Inspired
Energy NiMH and Li Ion standard battery packs, including the BAT-95WH and SIdeHAND2 batteries used inDEWETRON systems. Upon inserting the battery into the charger, the battery communicates to the charger
over the SMBus telling the charger what type of cell chemistry it is and what type of charge regime it needs.
The charger then configures its output to provide the charge regime requested by the battery. If no SMBus
communications are issued from the battery, the charger interrogates the thermistor/resistor I.D. pin on the
battery terminal and delivers an appropriate charge.
LED Indication:
The status of the battery is indicated by the LEDs visible in the status window:
Green flashing:
Battery charging
Green solid:
Battery fully charged
Blue flashing:
Battery in calibration mode
Blue solid:
Battery fuel gauge calibrated
Red flashing:
Battery fuel gauge in need of recalibration
Red solid:
Error
10-264| OWNER’s GUIDE
Recharging and Calibration Times
Different battery packs will require differing recharge times. The times given below are for a full charge from
0% to 100% state of charge. They are valid for all variants and custom hybrids of each battery model. (For
example the NJ1020HP has the same recharge time as the NJ1020.
DEWETRON model
Mfr. Model Name
Recharge Time
Recalibration Time
BAT-95WH
NL2404
3 hours
7 - 10 hours
SideHAND2
NH2054
5 hours
18 - 24 hours
Recalibration Time
Recalibration consists of a calibration charge, followed by a calibration discharge. Finally the battery is given
a regular charge. A calibration cycle will be faster if the battery is fully charged to begin with. Recalibration
time is governed by the battery voltage and capacity. Larger batteries, and lower voltage batteries will take
longer to recalibrate. Calibration is initiated each time the button is pressed, so it is not recommended to
press the recalibration button part way through the recalibration cycle.
What are the SMBus and the SBS?
The Smart Battery System defines the parameters that are stored by an SBS-compliant battery. These
parameters include full battery status and fuel gauging information. The System Management Bus is the language by which these parameters are communicated between the battery, the charger and the host device.
How does the charger know what to deliver?
The charger is capable of sensing and delivering an appropriate charge to all Inspired Energy NiMH and
Li Ion standard battery packs. Upon inserting the battery into the charger, the battery communicates to the
charger over the SMBus telling the charger what type of cell chemistry it is and what type of charge regime
it needs. The then configures its output to provide the charge regime requested by the battery. If no SMBus
communications are issued from the battery, the charger interrogates the thermistor/resistor I.D. pin on the
battery terminal and delivers an appropriate charge.
Above: the BAT-CHARGER-1 includes an AC/DC
adapter and AC power cable that connects to USA
power receptacles. Customers in Europe / UK can
order compatible power cables with their BATCHARGER-1. Please consult DEWETRON about
your requirements.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Important Accessories | 10-265
DEWE-DCDC-24-300-ISO
This is an isolated DC-DC converter that will power your Dewetron battery powered instrument from a wide
ranging DC input power source, and also isolate it from that source.
This option is very popular in automotive applications, due to its isolation. And of course, it runs from such a
wide range of DC input power: 10 VDC to 36 VDC, that it is very convenient for use in cars, trucks, busses,
and even aircraft.
You can order the DEWE-DCDC-24-300-ISO as an accessory for any Dewetron instrument which runs from
DC power, as long as that instrument accepts 24 VDC.
Parameter
DEWE-DCDC-24-300-ISO
Input:
Input voltage:
Max. input current:
Input connector:
10 to 36 VDC (the input is protected against wrong polarity)
36 A @ 10 VDC input voltage (15 A @ 24 VDC)
2-pin LEMO connector male, type: EGJ.3B.302
Output: Output voltages: Output power: Output
current: Output connector:
24 V 300 W 12.5 A 2-pin LEMO connector female, type: EGG.2B.302
Operating temperature: Derating above 45 °C:
-20 °C to 60 °C 8 Watt/°C
Isolation voltage:
500 VDC
Status LED:
Green LED indicates an output voltage > 21 VDC
Dimensions: (W x D x H):
~219 x 122 x 50 mm (8.6 x 4.8 x 2 in.)
Weight:
1.3 kg (2.9 lbs)
Power on sequence:
First: Connect the system and the DCDC! Followed by the DCDC and the power supply connection.
The DEWE-DCDC-24-300-ISO has the CE Mark
10-266| OWNER’s GUIDE
MOB-DISP-17 Mobile Display
For mobile applications, particularly in car and train testing, our MOBILE displays are highly useful. The
MOB-DISP-17 is our largest display, featuring a high brightness 17” TFT panel, which is also a touchscreen
that connects to your DEWE system via a USB 2.0 interface.
The MOB-DISP-17 can be mounted using suction cups, or
more permanently using the VESA 75 mounts, or the other
#1/4-20 tapped holes on most sides, to fasten it to an AUTOPOLE or other fixture within your vehicle.
The MOB-DISP-17 has three important connections:
„„ POWER - it runs from a wide ranging 9-29 VDC power
source
„„ VIDEO - it connects to your computer via a standard
cable with either VGA or DVI video output
„„ USB 2.0 - the touchscreen interface is connected via a
standard A/B USB 2.0 cable
A set of standard length cables is included with the MOBDISP-17, which is suitable for short distance hookups. The
display does include an AC/DC adapter so that you can
operate it from regular AC mains power.
MOB-DISP-17, front view
You can purchase an accessory kit for the MOB-DISP-17 called the
DISP-17-OPT, which includes:
„„ Suction cups (2)
„„ 3 meter USB cable
„„ 3 meter VGA cable
„„ 1 m power cable with cigarette lighter plug on the input side
The MOB-DISP-17 installed on a car
dashboard. In the foreground is the
DEWE-214 data acquisition system.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Important Accessories | 10-267
MOB-DISP-17 Outline and Dimensions
10-268| OWNER’s GUIDE
MOB-DISP-17 Call-outs
Two USB 2.0 (type A)
convenience jacks
Status LED
Screen set-up MENU
buttons
B, A, SELECT, MENU,
POWER
One USB 2.0 (type A)
convenience jack
VGA video input
DVI video input
USB 2.0 (type B) input from
host computer
Power input jack (LEMO
FGG.1B.302.CLA)
Hook-up Example: Connecting to the D3PC
Red - 12 VDC power cable
Blue - USB 2.0 cable (A/B)
Green - VGA cable
OWNER’s GUIDE - Important Accessories | 10-269
MOB-DISP-17 Specifications
Parameter
MOB-DISP-17
Description
17” Ruggedized video display, suitable for mobile applications
Power requirements
12VDC, 5A peak. External AC/DC adapter included
Power input connector
LEMO FGG.1B.302.CLA
Screen resolution
SXGA (1280 x 1024 pixels) resolution, Low power consumption
Backlight
90 LEDs
TFT details
Pixel pitch: 0.264(H) x 0.264(W) mm
Active display area: 337.92(H) x 270.336(V) mm
Surface treatment: Haze 25%, Hard-coating (3H)
Display colors: 16.7M (Hi-FRC)
Pixel arrangement: RGB vertical stripe
White luminance: 360(Typ.) cd/m2
DIsplay OEM
Based on the Samsung LTM170ET01 TFT display with LED backlight unit
Touchscreen
Capacitive touchscreen included, with USB 2.0 interface and drivers for Windows 7
Mounting positions
VESA 100 tapped holes on the side opposite the display, and
#1/4-20 tapped holes on top and bottom for suction cup mounting
Standard accessories
1m VGA cable with DVI adapter
2.5 m USB cable
1 m power cable, FGG.1B.302.CLA LEMO to banana plugs
AC/DC adapter for lab usage
Optional accessories (DISP-17-OPT)
2 high-grade suction cups
3 m VGA cable
3 m USB cable
1 m power cable (LEMO to cigarette lighter plug)
USB convenience jacks
Three (3) USB 2.0 (type A) convenience jacks. Requires that the USB 2.0 (type B) input jack be
connected to the DEWE system’s USB 2.0 interface via a standard USB 2.0 A to B type cable (one is
included)
Environmental
Operating temperature: 0 °C to 50 °C, 95% RH
Center of glass surface temperature absolute max: -10 °C to +60 °C
Storage temperature: -25 °C to 70 °C, 70% RH (do not store in direct sunlight)
Dimensions: (W x D x H):
384 x 39 x 337 mm (15.1 x 1.53 x 13.27 in.)
Weight:
4.5 kg (10 lbs), not including cables
MOB-DISP-17 Safety Notices
Storage
⇒⇒ (a) Do not leave the MOB-DISP-17 in high temperature, and high humidity for a long time. It is highly recom-
mended to store the Module with temperature from 0 to 35°C and relative humidity of less than 70%.
⇒⇒ (b) Do not store the MOB-DISP-17 Module in direct sunlight.
⇒⇒ (c) The MOB-DISP-17 should be stored in a dark place. It is prohibited to apply sunlight or fluorescent light in
storing.
Operation
⇒⇒ (a) Do not connect or disconnect the Module in the “Power On” condition.
⇒⇒ (b) Power supply should always be turned on/off by the item 6.3 “Power on/off sequence”
10-270| OWNER’s GUIDE
⇒⇒ (c) The TFT module within the MOB-DISP-17 has high frequency circuits. Sufficient suppression to the electro-
magnetic interference should be done by system manufacturers. Grounding and shielding methods may be
important to minimize the interference.
Operation Condition Guide
The MOB-DISP-17 should be operated under normal conditions. Normal condition is defined as below;
„„ Temperature : 20±15°C
„„ Humidity : 65±20%
„„ Display pattern : continually changing pattern (Not stationary)
⇒⇒ (b) If the MOB-DISP-17 will be used in extreme conditions such as high temperature, humidity, display patterns
or operation time etc.., It is strongly recommended to contact SEC for Application engineering advice. Otherwise, its reliability and function may not be guaranteed.
Others
⇒⇒ (a) Avoid condensation of water. It may result in improper operation or disconnection of electrode.
⇒⇒ (b) Do not exceed the absolute maximum rating value. (supply voltage variation, input voltage variation, varia-
tion in part contents and environmental temperature, and so on). Otherwise the MOB-DISP-17 may be damaged.
Connecting the MOB-DISP-17
There are two essential connections, and one non-essential connection, to be made on the MOB-DISP-17.
Essential connections:
„„ The VGA cable
„„ The power
Non-essential connection:
„„ USB 2.0
The VGA and power connections absolutely must be made in order for the MOB-DISP-17 to function at all.
However, you do not connect the USB 2.0 cable between your DEWETRON system and the MOB-DISP-17,
the touchscreen will not function, and the USB jacks on the MOB will not function.
In order to activate the touchscreen, the driver must be installed onto the computer / DEWETRON system. If
you have purchased the MOB-DISP-17 and the DEWETRON system together, we will have already installed
the driver for you. Otherwise, you may have to download the display driver from our website and install it
yourself onto the DEWETRON system. Please visit the MOB-DISP-17 product page on www.dewamerica.
com and locate the downloader for the driver. If you cannot find it, please contact Dewetron in Wakefield, RI
for a copy of it.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Signal/Sensor Adapters | 11-271
11
Signal/Sensor Adapters
MSI series interfaces
Most DEWETRON instruments are compatible with MSI series intelligent sensor interfaces. Exactly which
MSI interfaces can be used depends entirely on which signal conditioners are installed within your system.
The table on the next page cross references the compatibility of each MSI with various Dewetron DAQ and
MDAQ series signal conditioners, so please refer to that table when choosing MSIs for your system.
Several MSIs are available for both bridge series modules and voltage input modules, namely the ACC,
V200, and charge adapters.
When you plug in an MSI interface to any of the analog inputs, it should show up automatically on the
SETUP screen within DS-7, within the AMPLIFIER column.
-- Note - if your MSI interfaces are NOT showing up on the screen as shown above, then there are two possible
explanations:
1. You have not upgraded your software to DS 7.0 or higher
2. Perhaps MSIs are not activated at the hardware setup level. To remedy this, please click the SETTINGS
menu then select HARDWARE SETUP. On the analog page, ensure that the checkbox for MSIs is
checked, then click OK to save this setting.
-- Note - please make sure that any conditioners that you have are checkmarked on this screen.
If you are using DS-7 and have activated MSI interface as described above, and MSI interfaces are still not
showing up when plugged into your analog inputs, please contact us for technical support. Be sure to try
more than one MSI interface, to rule out a defective MSI interface being the cause of this problem.
11-272| OWNER’s GUIDE
MSI Compatibility Reference
MSI Modular Smart Interfaces for MDAQ and DAQ series modules
MSI-BR-ACC
MDAQ-SUBSTG-D
MDAQ-SUBBRIDGE-D
MDAQ-SUBV200-D
DAQP-STG
DAQPBRIDGE-A*
DAQPBRIDGE-B
DAQP-LV-D
√
√
--
√
--
--
--
Isotron (constant current powered) adapter for MDAQ-SUB-BRIDGE / -STG modules with DB9 connector Excitation current 4 mA at 21
V, High pass filter 1.5 Hz, BNC connector
Bandwidth and ranges are defined by connected amplifier
Automatic identification via TEDS
MSI-BR-V-200
√
√
--
√
--
--
--
200 V input adapter for MDAQ-SUB-BRIDGE / -STG modules with DB9 connector Differential input configuration, BNC connector
Bandwidth and ranges are defined by connected amplifier
Automatic identification via TEDS
MSI-BR-RTD
√
√
--
not needed
--
--
--
Pt100, Pt200, Pt500, Pt1000 and Pt2000 adapter for MDAQ-SUB-BRIDGE / -STG modules with DB9 connector
2, 3 and 4 wire connection methods, 5-pin Binder 710 series connector
Automatic identification via TEDS
MSI-BR-CH-50
√
√
--
√
--
--
--
Charge input interface for DAQP-STG and MDAQ-SUB-BRIDGE / -STG with DB9 connector Range up to 50000 pC, AC coupled with
0.07 Hz, BNC signal connection
Max. 100 kHz bandwidth (dependent on the max. bandwidth of the amplifier)
Automatic identification via TEDS
MSI-BR-TH-X
√
√
--
√
√
√
--
Thermocouple type K / J / T adapter for DAQP-BRIDGE-x and MDAQ-SUB-BRIDGE / -STG modules
For use with isolated thermocouple sensors only ! (except in combination with DAQP-STG-D or DAQP-BRIDGE-A*, which are isolated)
High accuracy cold junction reference measurement, 1 m thermo cable with Mini TC connector
Automatic identification via TEDS*
MSI-V-ACC
--
--
√
--
--
--
√
Isotron (constant current powered) adapter for DAQP-V-D and MDAQ-SUB-V200-D
Excitation current 4 mA at 21 V, High pass filter 1.5 Hz, BNC connector
Bandwidth and ranges are defined by connected amplifier
Automatic identification via TEDS
MSI-V-RTD
--
--
√
--
--
--
√
Pt100, Pt200, Pt500 and Pt1000 adapter for DAQP-V-D and MDAQ-SUB-V200-D
2, 3 and 4 wire connection methods, 5-pin Binder 710 series connector
Automatic identification via TEDS
MSI-V-CH-50
--
--
√
--
--
--
Charge input interface for DAQP-LV-D and MDAQ-SUB-V200-D
Range up to 50000 pC, AC coupled with 0.07 Hz, BNC signal connection
Max. 100 kHz bandwidth (dependent on the max. bandwidth of the amplifier)
Automatic identification via TEDS
* DAQP-BRIDGE-A does not have TEDS, therefore it cannot recognize MSI interfaces
√
OWNER’s GUIDE - Signal/Sensor Adapters | 11-273
MSI Operation within DS-7
When you plug any one of them into the analog inputs, the software will detect it and show its name and serial number on the main channel setup screen, as shown here:
⇒⇒ The only exception to automatic identification within DS-7 is the DAQP-BRIDGE-A module, which does not have
TEDS interface. Therefore, although they will literally work, it is not convenient to use MSI adapters with that
signal conditioner. The DAQP-STG-D is a much better choice.
Adapters
ADAP series interfaces are passive adapters, available for various types of signal inputs. Unlike MSI interfaces, they are not controlled under the software, nor do they have a TEDS interface inside. They are strictly
passive adapters. A popular one, for example, has a precision 50Ω resistor inside it, wired across the inputs,
which serves as a current shunt for 0-20 mA applications.
Following these single function adapters is a table with the most popular adapters for wider applications.
ADAP-BNC-MICRODOT
The DAQP-CHARGE-A module comes with an adapter from microdot connector to BNC,
allowing you to connect charge sensors with the small 10-32 microdot connectors to the
BNC input. This adapter is also available for purchase for the DAQP-CHARGE-A, or to be used in conjunction with the MSI-BR-CH-50 and MSI-V-CH-50 charge interfaces.
ADAP-CAN-OPT-ISO
Isolation adapter for one CAN BUS interface. This small interface plugs into a
standard DSUB9 CAN BUS interface connector, and provides real isolation between the vehicle CAN bus and the Dewetron CAN interface. This is very often
needed in electrically noisy environments, and on military vehicles.
-- Being passive, ADAP series adapters do not show up on the DS-7 setup screen.
However, you can select them manually in many cases, as we will show below.
11-274| OWNER’s GUIDE
Adapters for various MDAQ and DAQ series modules
DAQ-SHUNT-1
MDAQ-SUBSTG-D
MDAQ-SUBBRIDGE-D
MDAQ-SUBV200-D
MDAQ-SUBV200-BNC
DAQP-LV-B
DAQP-LVBNC
DAQP-LV-D
DAQP-STG-D
--
--
--
--
√
--
--
--
Shunt adapter for 0-20 mA or 4-20 mA measurements, internal precision 50Ω shunt resistor
100 mA input range, 1 W maximum, 1% accuracy
banana plug to Dewetron module / banana jacks on sensor side
DAQ-SHUNT-1-BNC
√
√
√
--
--
--
√
√
Shunt adapter for 0-20 mA or 4-20 mA measurements, internal precision 50Ω shunt resistor
100 mA input range, 1 W maximum, 1% accuracy
9-pin DSUB to Dewetron module / BNC jack on sensor side
DAQ-SHUNT-3
--
--
--
--
√
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
√
√
--
--
Shunt box for measurements up to 5A (0.1 Ω, ±0.1%, 3W)
Current input via 2 x 0.3 meter cables with banana plugs
Voltage output via 2 x 0.3 meter cable with banana plugs
DAQ-SHUNT-4
--
--
--
√
--
Shunt box for measurements up to 5A (0.1 Ω, ±0.1%, 3W)
Current input via 2 x safety banana jacks
Voltage output via 2 x 0.3 meter cable with banana plugs
DAQ-SHUNT-5
--
--
--
√
--
Shunt box for measurements up to 5A (0.1 Ω, ±0.1%, 3W)
Current input via 2 x safety banana jacks
Voltage output via 2 x safety banana jacks
CONN-DSUB-9
√
√
√
--
--
--
Mating connector for 9-pin DSUB connectors with convenient screw terminals inside
Eliminates soldering/desoldering
ADAP-MDAQ-BNC
√
√
√
--
--
--
Converter from 9-pin DSUB to BNC input connector, for MDAQ series modules
(pin-outs are the same as ADAP-DAQ-BNC, but there is an additional isolation resistor in this adapter to improve noise performance of
differential MDAQ series modules)
ADAP-DAQ-BNC
--
--
--
--
--
--
√
√
--
--
Converter from 9-pin DSUB to BNC input connector, for DAQ series modules
ADAP-BAN-BNC
--
--
--
√
not needed
√
OWNER’s GUIDE - Signal/Sensor Adapters | 11-275
Adapters for various MDAQ and DAQ series modules
MDAQ-SUBSTG-D
MDAQ-SUBBRIDGE-D
MDAQ-SUBV200-D
MDAQ-SUBV200-BNC
DAQP-LV-B
DAQP-LVBNC
DAQP-LV-D
DAQP-STG-D
Adapter from banana jack to BNC.
Allows you to connect your cables with banana plugs into Dewetron modules which have BNC input connectors.
ADAP-MIC-BNC-CBL
--
--
--
√
--
√
--
--
Microphone adapter and 6 ft BNC cable. Allows the use of standard unpowered mics with your Dewetron system.
Adapter: 3 Pin XLR Male to BNC Female Audio Adapter
Contacts (XLR) : 3 Genders: BNC (Female) / XLR (Male) Wired: Pin 1 & 3 = Ground / Pin 2 = Hot
Includes 6 ft BNC-BNC cable (not shown in picture here)
ADAP-BR-1/4-120
not needed
√
--
--
--
--
--
not needed
--
--
not needed
Bridge completion terminal, 1/4 bridge @ 120 Ω
DSUB9 input and output connectors
ADAP-BR-1/4-350
not needed
√
--
--
--
Bridge completion terminal, 1/4 bridge @ 350 Ω
DSUB9 input and output connectors
Using Adapters in DS-7
Since ADAP adapters do not have any kind of electronic interface, they do not show up in the software
automatically - you have to set them up yourself. But DEWESoft makes this easy. Simply access the SETUP
screen for any channel that you have an adapter plugged into, and enter the appropriate settings and scaling information there.
In the next section we will look at setting up a few popular adapters in the most commonly requested scenarios.
11-276| OWNER’s GUIDE
Using the DAQ-SHUNT-1 adapter
Let’s take the case of the DAQ-SHUNT-1, which is a 50Ω shunt adapter for making 4-20 mA current measurements. Let’s see how to set it up within a DAQP-LV-B module. When you first open the SETUP dialog
for this channel, by default it will be set to the VOLTAGE measurement mode, like this:
Therefore, it is necessary to change the mode from voltage to current, as shown here:
When you do this, the software changes the unit of measure from V to mA, and also presents you with the
ability to select Shunt 1, Shunt 2 (Shunt 2 applies to Shunt 3, Shunt4, and Shunt 5, which are the same electrically, but which only have different I/O connector configurations), as well as a variety of Dewetron specialized shunts for automotive applications:
OWNER’s GUIDE - Signal/Sensor Adapters | 11-277
Simply select the shunt that is appropriate. In this case, when you choose Shunt 1, DEWESoft will automatically scale the input. And notice that the measuring ranges are now given directly in mA instead of voltage
units.
Have a look at the range selector:
Therefore you can simply select the 20 mA range, and there is no need to do any other scaling unless you
need to convert the 20 mA signal to something else.
11-278| OWNER’s GUIDE
For instance, if your 4 - 20 mA signal really represents -100 to 5000 PSI, you could enter these scaling values quite easily on this same screen. First change the Units from mA to PSI, then below in the Scaling area,
enter these values:
That’s all you would have to do! Any scaling parameters which are linear can be entered in this way.
-- Note: the ranges shown above apply to the DAQP-LV module. When you use the DAQ-SHUNT-1 with other mod-
ules, the ranges will be different according to which module is being used.
Using custom Shunt resistors
After selecting CURRENT input type you can also select CUSTOM instead of one of the preset current
adapters, at the end of the list:
OWNER’s GUIDE - Signal/Sensor Adapters | 11-279
When you do this, the software allows you to enter the value of the shunt resistor that you are using, as well
as the maximum wattage. The software will do the appropriate Ω’s law calculations to amperage for you
automatically.
-- Note - Dewetron conditioners such as the MDAQ-SUB-BRIDGE and MDAQ-SUB-STG also support the direct
selection of CURRENT as a measuring type. Therefore you can use them with shunts as shown above. You simply
need to adapt the input connector to handle a shunt resistor. An idea choice is the CONN-DSUB-9 mating connector, which makes it easy to insert your own shunt resistor into the mating connector and plug it into the
DSUB 9-pin input connector of the module.
…Using Current sensors
11-280| OWNER’s GUIDE
In this case we recommend that you leave the Measurement type to Voltage, and simply enter the appropriate engineering units and scaling factor. For example, if you were using a current clamp that could measure
250 Amps, but which output 0.1 V/A, you would simply set up this channel like this:
After you set the Units to A, then enter the scaling factors as shown above so that 0.1 V = 1 A, simply use
the Range selector to choose the appropriate current measuring range. Keep an eye on the right side of the
scaling BAR in the bottom left corner of the screen. Notice that when you select the 25V measuring range,
you will get a full scale 250 A measuring range. This is perfect. You can select smaller ranges if you expect
that the current input will not really reach 250 A. Choose the range that best fits to your current sensor AND
the desired measuring range.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Signal/Sensor Adapters | 11-281
Using the ADAP-BR-1/4-120 or 350 bridge completion adapters
These adapters are only needed for Dewetron bridge conditioners which do not have internal completion for
1/4 bridge sensors. Therefore they are not needed by the DAQP-STG, DAQP-BRIDGE-A, DAQP-BRIDGEA, or MDAQ-SUB-STG-D, because these all support full bridge, half bridge and quarter bridge with internal
completion for many bride wiring scenarios.
However, these adapters to apply to Dewetron conditioners that lack 1/4 bridge completion, including the
MDAQ-SUB-BRIDGE-D (which supports full and half bridge inputs only), as well as the inputs of the DEWE43, DEWE-101, and DEWE-3213 (those models support full bridge inputs only). Select the full bridge mode
of the MDAQ-SUB-BRIDGE, and then plug in the completion adapter.
This is less convenient than using a more capable signal conditioner, not only because of the external adapter, but because you cannot use the balance buttons in this mode. But it serves to adapt this less capable
conditioner to handle 1/4 bridge sensors.
11-282| OWNER’s GUIDE
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, HSI | 283
12
HSI Series Signal Conditioners
There are several series of Dewetron signal conditioners that may be installed in your system in many possible combinations. This section covers the HSI series plugin modules. These are user-exchangeable modules, all of which have the highest bandwidth that we offer in a plug-in module, and robust signal isolation,
protecting you and your measurements against ground loops and other typical measurement problems.
HSI modules have the advantage of being “hot swappable,” meaning that they can be exchanged by the
user any time, even with the system is powered on.
This modularily also means that the DEWETRON system can be converted very quickly to handle different
measuring requirements and applications - simply plug in the modules that you need, make sure their addresses are correct, and then you’re up and running in a matter of moments.
DEWETRON HSI modules are small, multi-range ISOLATED signal conditioners, and hundreds of thousands of them are in use all around the world right now.
HSI Series Modules
HSI Module Connectors
Front Panel Connector
Accessible to the user. The connector type and pin assignment varies
from module to module. Detailed pin assignment of each module is shown
in the appropriate module description.
Rear Connector
Not user accessible. 9-pin male SUB-D, interface to the Dewetron System.
HSI, DAQ, and PAD
module rear panel
284| OWNER’s GUIDE
General module specifications
Module dimensions:
20 x 65 x 105 mm (0.79 x 2.56 x 4.13 in.)
(W x H x D without front cover and connectors)
Front cover: Environmental:
Temp. range storage: Temp. range operating:
Rel. humidity (MIL202): RFI susceptibility:
20 x 87 x 2 mm (0.79 x 3.43 x 0.08 in.)
(W x H x D without connector)
-30 °C to +85 °C (-22 °F to 185 °F)
-5 °C to +60 °C (23 °F to 140 °F)
0 to 95 % at 60 °C, non-condensing
±0.5 % span error at 400 MHz, 5 W, 3 m
All specifications within this manual are valid at 25 °C.
All modules are produced according to ISO9001 and ISO14001.
Common Information
Calibration information
All DEWETRON modules are calibrated at 25°C after a warmup time of 30 minutes and meet their specifications when leaving the factory. The time interval for recalibration depends on environmental conditions.
Typically, the calibration should be checked once a year.
Calibration certificates are available from DEWETRON as an option. DEWETRON offers several types:
„„ NIST traceable DEWETRON calibration certificate (USA CAL LAB only)
„„ ISO traceable DEWETRON certificate (European CAL LAB only)
„„ Calibration certificate according to ÖKD (equivalent to DKD)
RS-232/485 interface
HSI modules can be configured via RS-485 interface. DEWETRON instruments include an internal RS232/485 converter and interface. This converter allows communication with all DEWETRON signal conditioning modules. To communicate with the modules, the RS-232 interface must be set to the following parameters:
baud rate: 9600
data bits: 8
parity: no parity
stop bits: 1
handshake: not required
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, HSI | 285
Adding HSI modules to your Dewtetron system:
HSI modules can be plugged directly into DEWETRON models which have slots for DAQ/PAD/HSI series
plug-in modules. Additional modules can be connected to most models by adding an external DEWE-30 or
DEWE-50 series expansion chassis to the system.
Typical HSI module configurations:
„„ Installing 8 modules directly into the DEWE-3210: „„ Adding a DEWE-30-8 expansion rack, for accessing 16
total channels:
Analog/
Power/
RS485
„„ Adding a DEWE-30-8 expansion rack, plus another 16
slot DEWE-30-16 rack, for a total of 32 HSI modules:
Analog/
RS485
Analog/
Power/
RS485
The DEWE-30-16 requires that an
additional 16-ch A/D card be added
into the DEWE-3210 mainframe!
286| OWNER’s GUIDE
Addressing HSI modules
Each HSI module must have a unique address (just like DAQP, PAD, and other modules). The address
is stored inside the HSI module in non-volatile memory. Therefore, if you remove a HSI module from one
system, where it was set to address 31, and plug it into a different Dewetron chassis, it will still report itself
on the bus at address 31.
This can cause a conflict if you already have a module at this address. In addition, it will be confusing to you
when you hook up your signals to what you believe is HSI module at address 16, but the channels show up
on address 31. Therefore, it is vitally important that you set the addresses of any DAQ, PAD, or HSI modules
that you plug into your Dewetron system.
-- There is no need to set the addresses of MDAQ modules, except when initially installed at the factory.
„„ There are essentially two ways to address your modules:
„„ FILL RACK PROCEDURE - this addresses all of your modules in sequence. This is what you should do
if you have been changing more than one module around, to ensure that every module is at the appropriate and unique address.
„„ FILL ONE MODULE PROCEDURE - easier and faster, when you simply want to exchange one module.
Let’s look at how to do each one of the above procedures:
Fill Rack (all Modules) Procedure
Within DS-7, go to the ACQUISITION MODE and select the SETUP screen, where you can see your list of
modules. Now click on the top of the AMPLIFIER COLUMN and you will see this menu:
Select the FILL RACK option, and the software will prompt you like this:
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, HSI | 287
Follow the instruction to press the TOP black button on the module in the first slot, which is always SLOT 0
in the case of doing a FILL RACK, since you are starting at 0 and going all the way up, filling all modules.
When you press this button on the module, the system will beep and prompt you to press the next module’s
button, and so on. Continue all the way through until you have done the last module, then press CANCEL to
complete and save your changes.
If you get to the position where there is an empty module slot, or a non-programmable module from the old
days in that slot, press the SKIP button to move past it to the next module. You can do this as many times as
needed.
When you’re done, the rack should be filled with all of the modules that are physically installed within this
system, like this:
FILL (or CLEAR) One Module Procedure
FILL RACK is a great way to ensure that your modules are all addressed correctly, and we highly recommend it if you make several module exchanges at once. But there are times when you simply want to
exchange one module with a different one, or perhaps to just remove a module. This is also quite easy once
you know how.
Within DEWESoft, go to the ACQUISITION MODE and select the SETUP screen, where you can see your
list of modules. This time, instead of clicking on the top of the AMPLIFIER COLUMN, double-click the amplifier column for the one module that you want to add, delete, or exchange. When you do this, the software
will give you a similar choice as before:
And your choices are:
288| OWNER’s GUIDE
„„ If you have plugged a new module into this slot, choose FILL, then follow the prompts.
„„ If you change you mind and want to do a FILL RACK anyway, starting at slot 0, choose FILL FROM #0,
then follow the prompts.
„„ If there is a module in this slot that you have removed, but it continues to show up in RED (because the
software cannot really find it), choose CLEAR to remove it from the list.
„„ If you have clicked this by accident and want to cancel without making any changes, choose CANCEL
Module Installation Trouble-shooting
There may be times when you have trouble addressing your modules, for a variety of reasons. Here are
some good tips for solving these issues:
⇒⇒ Problem: some or all modules are showing up in RED letters.
Analysis: a module shown in RED letters on the setup screen tells you that the software cannot find this
module. Or, it can mean that there is a conflict with another module, like when you plug two modules with
the same address into the system at the same time and don’t do a FILL RACK or FILL (or CLEAR) one of
them. A very rare condition might be that a module is defective and cannot communicate properly.
-- Solution: the trusty FILL RACK is always a great and easy way to solve nearly all these issues.
If the FILL RACK does not solve them, remove any modules shown in RED and add them back in one at
a time, using the FILL ONE MODULE procedure. Fill one module at a time until the offending modules’ addresses have been resolved.
⇒⇒ Problem: you plug in a new module into a previously unused slot, but it does not show up.
Analysis: more than likely it was already set to an address that you were using, and it has either taken another module’s address, or is conflicting with it.
-- Solution: the trusty FILL RACK is always a great and easy way to solve nearly all these issues.
If the FILL RACK does not solve them, remove any modules shown in RED and add them back in one at
a time, using the FILL ONE MODULE procedure. Fill one module at a time until the offending modules’ addresses have been resolved.
⇒⇒ Problem: you want to use a very old PAD module which does not have the upper black button on it, so you don’t
know how to address it
Analysis: These modules have been out of production for a long time, but there are still some around, and
they are still perfectly good modules.
-- Solution: Start with the old PAD module in the slot, but NOT PRESSED IN!! Make sure the connector on
the inside is not mated or making contact in any way. Now double click on the amplifier slot where you want to
install this module. Select FILL when prompted. Then when the next prompt appears to press the black button
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, HSI | 289
or push in the module... PUSH IN THE MODULE. The green LED on its front panel should light up, and it should
show up on the list on your SETUP screen.
⇒⇒ Problem: some modules show up with the SERIAL NUMBERS in the amplifier column, and some do not.
Analysis: There is nothing wrong here. With each Dewetron module there is a certain revision before which the serial number
was not available for external query, so these modules will not show this information on the setup screen.
Solution: N/A
290| OWNER’s GUIDE
HSI-HV Isolated High Voltage module
„„
„„
„„
„„
„„
„„
Input ranges:
Bandwidth: Isolation:
Input impedance:
Protection:
Signal connection:
7 ranges (±20 V to ±1400 V)
2 MHz
1.8 kVRMS line to line 1.4 kVRMS line to ground
10 MΩ
4 kV burst, surge
Insulated banana jacks
V
HSI-HV Specifications
Parameter
HSI-HV
Input ranges unipolar and bipolar:
20 V(1), 50 V(1), 100 V, 200 V, 400 V, 800 V, 1400 V
Range
Signal frequency
Accuracy
20 V; 50 V
DC
±0.05 % of reading ±60 mV
100 V to 1400 V
DC
0.1Hz to 1kHz
>1kHz to 10kHz
>10kHz to 50kHz
>50kHz to 100kHz
>100kHz to 1MHz
>1MHz to 2MHz
±0.05 % of reading ±0.05 % of range
±0.05 % of reading ±0.01 % of range
±0.1 % of reading ±0.05 % of range
±0.4 % of reading ±0.05 % of range
±(0.016*f) % of reading ±0.1 % of range
±(0.010*f) % of reading ±1 % of range
±(0.014*f) % of reading ±3 % of range
f = signal frequency in kHz
1 year accuracy (2)
Gain linearity:
0.05%
Gain drift range:
Typically 20 ppm/°C (max. 50 ppm/°C)
Offset drift:
20 V to 100 V
200 V to 1400 V
typical 0.5mV/°C
typical 5ppm/°C
max. 4mV/°C
max. 20 ppm of Range/°C
Long term stability:
100 ppm/sqrt (1000 hrs)
Input resistance:
10 MΩ || 2.2 pF
-3dB Bandwidth:
2 MHz
Signal delay @ full bandwidth
~ 290 ns
Filter selection:
Push button or software
Filter (low-pass):
100, 300, 1k, 3k, 10k, 30k, 100k, 300 kHz, 1 MHz, 2 MHz (3)
Filter type:
Bessel or Butterworth, 40 dB/decade
Typical SFDR and SNR:
10 kHz bandwidth
SFDR SNR
110 dB
91 dB
110 dB
95 dB
110 dB
95 dB
100 kHz bandwidth
SFDRSNR
110 dB
82 dB
110 dB
92 dB
110 dB
95 dB
Typical CMRR:
>80 dB @ 50 Hz 70 dB @ 400 Hz 60 dB @ 1 kHz
48 dB @ 10 kHz
Isolation voltage
Line to Ground 1.4kVrms
Line to Line 1.8kVrms
50 V:
200 V:
1400 V:
1 MHz bandwidth
SFDR SNR
94 dB
76 dB
94 dB
82 dB
94 dB
82 dB
2 MHz bandwidth
SFDR SNR
84 dB
73 dB
84 dB
77 dB
84 dB
77 dB
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, HSI | 291
Parameter
HSI-HV
Protection:
Surge (1.2 / 50)
Burst (5 kHz)
CAT III 600
CAT IV 300
±4000 V
±4000 V
Output voltage:
±5 V
Output resistance:
10 Ω
Output current maximum
35 mA CAUTION: do not exceed maximum output current!
Output protection
Short to ground for 10 sec.
Power supply
±9 VDC ± 1%
Power consumption
1.2 W
Power On default settings
Software programable
RS485 interface for module control
Yes
Power supply
Integrated temperature sensor
TEDS support:
N/A
MSI support:
N/A
(1) 20 V and 50 V are auxiliary ranges and have a limited bandwidth.
20 V range typically 0.9 Mhz
50 V range typically 1.9 Mhz
(2) Conditions for accuracy: Module temperature is calibration temperature ±5 °C; humidity is 30 to 90 RH;
AC accuracy: the highest filter (2 Mhz) has to be activated. f = signal frequency in kHz.
for the 2 year accuarcy multiply all % of range and % of reading values by 1.5.
(3) 2 MHz filter: exclusively Butterworth 60 dB/decade. Please consider possible bandwidth limitation of further components in the measuring chain, e.g. A/D
cards or signal conditioning mainframe
Signal hook-up
HSI-HV: The insulated banana jacks are the signal connection point. Use only mating cables which have
molded insulated/safety type plugs. These plugs should be the kind which prevent you from coming into
contact with high voltages or currents.
⇒⇒ Use only insulated cables and the appropriate mating plugs or connectors when using this module!
⇒⇒ Never handle cables when high voltage is applied! Connect your signal points before applying high voltage!
⇒⇒ Failure to observe safety protocols can result in equipment damage, and personal injury or even death!
⇒⇒ Always check that positive and negative lines are connected with the correct polarity on the DAQP-HV and
DAQP-HV-S3 module, and at the signal source side.
⇒⇒ Use of red (+) and black (-) color coded cables is highly recommended.
⇒⇒ High voltages can be lethal! Observe all safety protocols at all times.
292| OWNER’s GUIDE
HSI-LV Isolated Low Voltage Module
„„ Voltage input:
12 ranges (10 mV to 50 V)
„„ Current input:
±20 mA using DAQ-SHUNT-1 (option)
±5 A using DAQ-SHUNT-4
or DAQ-SHUNT-5
„„ Bandwidth: 2 MHz
„„ Isolation:
1 kV RMS with banana jacks
„„ Additional signal input types using MSI interfaces:
IEPE
Constant current sensors
12 ranges (10 mV to 5 V)
RTD
Resistance Temperature Detector (Pt100
to Pt2000)
9 resistance ranges (8 to 4000 Ω); requires MSI-V-RTD
CHARGE
Charge up to 50000 pC requires MSI-V-CHA-50
V
HSI-LV Specifications
Parameter
HSI-LV
Input ranges
±10, ±20, ±50, ±100, ±200, ±500 mV and ±1, ±2.5, ±5, ±10, ±25, ±50 V
Push button selectable ranges
±10 mV, ±50 mV, ±200 mV, ±1 V, ±5 V, ±10 V, ±50 V
One year accuracy (1)
Range
Signal Frequency
Accuracy
10 mV to 100 mV
DC
±0.02 % of reading ±60 μV
2.5 V
DC
±0.02 % of reading ±0.1 % of range
200 mV to 50 V
DC
±0.02 % of reading ±0.05 % of range
10 mV to 100 mV
0.1 Hz to 10 kHz
>10 kHz to 50 kHz
>50 kHz to 100 kHz
>100 kHz to 1 MHz
>1 MHz to 2 MHz
±0.1 % of reading ±30 μV
±0.4 % of reading ±30 μV
±(0.016*f) % of reading ±0.1 % of range ±(0.010*f)
% of reading ±1 % of range ±(0.014*f) % of reading
±3 % of range
200 mV to 50 V
0.1 Hz to 1 kHz
>1 kHz to 10 kHz
>10 kHz to 50 kHz
>50 kHz to 100 kHz
>100 kHz to 1 MHz
>1 MHz to 2 MHz
±0.05 % of reading ±0.01 % of range ±0.1 % of
reading ±0.05 % of range ±0.4 % of reading ±0.05
% of range ±(0.016*f) % of reading ±0.1 % of range
±(0.010*f) % of reading ±1 % of range ±(0.014*f)
% of reading ±3 % of range
10 mV to 100 mV
200 mV to 50 V
DC
DC
±0.02 % of reading ±60 μV
±0.02 % of reading ±0.08 % of range
Bipolar
Unipolar
Input coupling
DC or AC software selectable (1.5 Hz standard, custom filters upon request, down to 0.01 Hz)
Gain linearity
Typically 0.01 %; max. 0.04 % of full scale
Gain drift range
Typically 10 ppm/°C (max. 30 ppm/°C)
Offset drift:
10 mV to 200 mV:
500 mV to 50 V:
Typically 3 μV/°C
Typically 10 ppm of range/°C
Long term stability:
100 ppm/sqrt (1000 hrs)
Input resistance:
1 MΩ
-3dB Bandwidth:
2 MHz
Filter selection:
Push button or software
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, HSI | 293
Filter
100 Hz, 300 Hz, 1 kHz, 3 kHz, 10 kHz, 30 kHz, 100 kHz, 300 kHz, 1 MHz, 2 MHz (2)
Filter type
Bessel or Butterworth; 40 dB/decade
Typical SFDR and SNR
20 mV
1V
50 V
Typical CMRR
50 Hz
1 kHz
10 kHz
100 kHz
10 kHz bandwidth
SFDRSNR
88 dB 78 dB
110 dB 98 dB
110 dB
98 dB
10 mV to 1 V range
130 dB
120 dB
95 dB
75 dB
10 kHz bandwidth
SFDRSNR
88 dB 71 dB
110 dB 95 dB
110 dB
95 dB
1 MHz bandwidth
SFDRSNR
77 dB 60 dB
93 dB 82 dB
94 dB
82 dB
2 MHz bandwidth
SFDRSNR
76 dB 56 dB
84 dB 75 dB
85 dB
75 dB
2.5 V to 50 V range:
100 dB
75 dB
55 dB
25 dB
Input overvoltage protection
350 VDC
Isolation voltage
350 VDC (1 kVRMS with banana connectors)
Sensor supply
±9 V (±1 %), 12 V (±5 %), 200 mA resettable fuse protected (3)
Output voltage
±5 V
Output resistance
10 Ω
Maximum Output current
5 mA
Output protection
Short to ground for 10 sec.
Power On default settings
Software programable
Power supply
±9 VDC ± 1%
Power consumption
0.8 W without sensor supply
RS-485 interface for module control
Yes
TEDS support
Yes, compatible with TEDS chips DS2406, DS2430A, DS2432, DS2433, DS24313)
MSI support
MSI-V-ACC; MSI-V-RTD; MSI-V-CHA-50
(1) Conditions for accuracy: Module temperature is calibration temperature ±5 °C; humidity is 30 to 90 RH.
AC accuracy: the highest filter (2 MHz) has to be activated. f = signal frequency in kHz.
For the 2 year accuracy multiply all % of range and % of reading values by 1.5.
(2) 2 MHz filter: exclusively for Butterworth 60 dB/decade - refer to filter specifications. Please consider possible bandwidth limitation of further
components in the measuring chain, e.g. A/D card or signal conditioning mainframe.
(3) Overall current should not exceed DEWE-30-xx maximum power.
HSI-LV Signal Hook-up
HSI-LV pin-outs
With 9-pin DSUB (DB9) or LEMO (EGG.1B.307)
HSI-V-B model with banana jacks
DB9
Hot: IN+
Shield: IN-
HSI-V-BNC model with BNC connector
LEMO
Description
1
7
TEDS
2
1
IN +
3
N/A
4
5
Reserved for custom sensor supplies
GND (not isolated)
5
3
+9 V (200 mA max.)
6
6
+12 V (200 mA max.)
IN -
7
2
Hot: IN+
8
N/A
Shield: IN-
9
4
Reserved for custom sensor supplies
-9 V (200 mA max.)
294| OWNER’s GUIDE
HSI-LV: Typical sensor connections
Sensor with differential output, module powered
Current measurement using external shunt
Current loop-powered measurement with
external shunt
Sensor with common ground
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, HSI | 295
HSI-LV Shunt Options
There are several current shunts that are available for this module, which can handle currents up to 5A. For
higher currents, please use a rated CLAMP or FLEX COIL or other current transformer which has a voltage
output.
Model
Input Range
Accuracy
Description
100 mA
0.1%
50 Ω shunt adapter (1 W)
Compatible with all Dewetron voltage modules
and break-out boxes with banana jacks
100 mA
0.1%
50 Ω shunt adapter (1 W)
(This is the resistor from the DAQ-SHUNT-1
option above - for user mounting/integration)
5A
±0.1% < 10 ppm
100 mΩ Shunt box
Current input via 2x safety banana jacks
Voltage output via 2x 0.3 meter cable with
banana plugs
5A
±0.1% < 10 ppm
100 mΩ Shunt box
Current input via 2x safety banana jacks
Voltage output via 2x safety banana jacks
DAQ-SHUNT-1
DAQ-SHUNT-1R
DAQ-SHUNT-4
DAQ-SHUNT-5
296| OWNER’s GUIDE
HSI-STG Isolated Universal Input Module
Strain gauge, bridge sensors:
Piezoresistive bridge: Voltage input: RTD:
Resistance: Isolation: Signal input connection:
±0.1 to ±1000 mV/V (@ 5 VDC excitation)
±0.5 to ±10000 mV/mA (@ 1 mA excitation)
±500 μV to ±10 V
Resistance Temperature Detector (Pt100 to Pt2000)
9 resistance ranges (8 to 4000 Ω)
25 mΩ to 100 kΩ
350 VDC
9-pin SUB-D connector (standard) or LEMO (optional)
Additional signal input using MSI interfaces:
IEPE Constant current powered sensors (accelerometers, mics);
12 ranges (±2.5 mV to 10 V); requires MSI-V-ACC
THERMOCOUPLE
Popular T/C types; requires MSI-BR-TH-J, -K, or -T
CHARGE
Charge sensors up to 50000 pC requires MSI-V-CH-50
VOLTAGE
up to ±200 V requires MSI-BR-V-200
V
HSI-STG specifications
Parameter
HSI-STG
Gain:
0.5 to 10 000
Voltage Input ranges: Sensitivity @ 5 VDC
excitation:
±0.5 , ±1, ±2.5, ±5, ±10, ±25, ±50, ±100, ±250, ±500 mV, ±1 V, ±2V, ±5 V,±10 V ±0.1 , ±0.2, ±0.5, ±1,
±2, ±5, ±10, ±20, ±50, ±100, ±200, ±400, ±1000 mV/V
Resistance:
25 mΩ to 100 kΩ
Input impedance:
>100 MΩ (power off: 50 kΩ)
Input noise:
3.5 nV * √Hz
Voltage Input Accuracy:
Excitation voltage:
Excitation current:
Gain drift
Offset drift
Linearity
Accuracy
Drift
Current limit
Protection
Accuracy
Drift
Compliance voltage
Output impedance
±0.05 % of reading ± 0.02 % of range ±10 μV
typical 10 ppm/°K max. 20 ppm/°K
typical 0.3 μV/°K + 10 ppm of range, max 2 μV/°K + 20 ppm of range
typical 0.02 %
0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5,10 and 12 VDC software programmable (16 Bit DAC)
±0.03 % ±1 mV
±10 ppm/K ±50 μV/K
100 mA
Continuous short to ground
0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20mA software programmable (16 Bit DAC)
0.05% ±2μA
15ppm/°K
12V
>1 MΩ
Supported Sensors:
4- or 6-wire full bridge 3- or 5-wire 1⁄2 bridge with internal completion (software programmable) 3- or
4-wire 1⁄4 bridge with internal resistor for 120 and 350 Ω (software programmable)1) 4-wire full bridge
with constant current excitation (piezoresistive bridge sensors) Potentiometric Resistance Resistance
Temperature Detection: PT100 PT200 PT500 PT1000
Bridge resistance:
80 Ω to 10 kΩ @ ≤ 5 VDC excitation
Shunt calibration:
Two internal shunt resistors 59.88 kΩ and 175 kΩ
Shunt and completion resistor accuracy:
0.05% ±15ppm/°K
Automatic bridge balance:
Input range 500μV to 1V:
2.5V to 5V:
Bandwidth (-3dB):
2 MHz
Filters (low pass):
10 Hz, 30 Hz, 100 Hz, 300 Hz, 1 kHz, 3 kHz, 10 kHz, 30 kHz, 100 kHz (±1.5 dB @ f0)
Filter characteristics:
10Hz to 100Hz:
300kHz:
±200 % of Range
±40% of Range
Butterworth or Bessel 40 dB/dec ( 2nd order)
Bessel 60 dB/dec (3rd order)
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, HSI | 297
Parameter
HSI-STG
Typical SNR @ 100 kHz [1 kHz]
and 5 VDC excitation:
66 dB [84 dB] @ 1 mV/V
82 dB [100 dB] @ 50 mV/V
Typical CMRR @ 0.1 mV/V [1 mV/V]
and 5 VDC excitation:
160 dB [160 dB] @ DC
115 dB [110 dB] @ 400 Hz
110 dB [105 dB] @ 1 kHz
Isolation
±350 VDC continuous (for input, excitation and TEDS interface)
Common mode Voltage
±350 VDC input to housing
Over voltage protection:
±50 VDC input (+) to input (-)
Output voltage:
±5 V
Output resistance:
<1Ω
Output current:
Max. 5 mA; short to ground protected for 10 seconds
RS-485 interface:
Yes
TEDS support:
Yes, compatible with TEDS chips DS2406, DS2430A, DS2431, DS2432, DS2433
MSI support:
MSI-BR-TH-x, MSI-BR-ACC, MSI-BR-V-200 ,MSI-BR-CH-50
Power supply voltage:
±9 VDC (±1 %)
Power consumption:
Typ. 1.7 W @ 350 Ω, 2.15 W @ 120 Ω (both full bridge @ 5 VDC excitation)
Absolute max.: 3 W (maximum excitation @ maximum current)
HSI-STG Pin-outs
⇒⇒ CAUTION: The sensor shield can be connected to either pin 4 (SUB-D version only) or the housing of the 9-pin
SUB-D / 8-pin LEMO connector, depending on your application.
298| OWNER’s GUIDE
HSI-STG-D Cables and Shielding
To reduce the influence of electromagnetic disturbances, shielded twisted pair cables are recommended. Connect the shield to
the isolated GND (Pin4) to get the best result.
The twisted pairs for full bridge, half bridge, voltage and resistance mode are:
Twisted pair 1
EXC+
PIN1
EXC-
PIN8
Twisted pair 2
Sense+
PIN6
Sense-
PIN3
Twisted pair 3
IN+
PIN2
IN-
PIN7
Twisted pair 4
R+
PIN5
GND(isolated)
PIN4
If TEDS is used also the shield could be used as GNDisolated
For quarter bridge mode:
Twisted pair 1
IN+
PIN2
Sense1
PIN3
Twisted pair 2
R+
PIN5
EXC-
PIN8
HSI-STG Operation Notes
Free variable gain and excitation
The gain, excitation and offset values of this module are free programmable. So it is possible to normalize any physical sensor
input signal to the ±5V output of the module. By using these settings as power on default, standalone solutions could be easily
realized.
Gain: from 0.5 to 10000. The module input ranges are based on predefined gain values. The module automatically chose the
best gain combination of the internal amplifiers to keep the overall noise and drift as low as possible.
Output offset: Could be programmed from the positive to the negative full scale range except on the input ranges above 1V.
Due to internal structure here the offset could be set from +20 % to – 20 %.
Excitation Voltage: The excitation voltage is programmable from 0 to 12 V in 185 μV steps. Setting the excitation to 0 V for
example allows you to determine the noise of the sensor cabling. The sense terminals have to be connected to the excitation
terminals all the time. Even if the remote sensing is not required.
Excitation current: The current could be programmed from 0.1 mA to 20 mA in 0.3 μA steps. The maximum compliance voltage is 12 V. The compliance voltage is automatically balanced around the internal GND. This minimizes the common mode error.
Power On Default function
You can store the latest settings of the module in the internal EE-Prom memory. Once the module restarts, it comes up automatically with these setting. This is important for stand alone applications and for fail-safe reasons.
Filter
The Module has nine selectable low-pass filters from 10 Hz to 100 kHz. The filter characteristic can be set to Butterworth
2nd order or Bessel 2nd order. An additional fixed filter inside this module is a 3rd order Bessel filter with a guaranteed -3 dB
bandwidth of 300 kHz.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, HSI | 299
HSI-STG Amplifier balance
The amplifier balance allows eliminating automatically all internal amplifier offsets. It switches the differential amplifier inputs
IN+ and IN- to the internal isolated GND reference point. Then the output offset of the module is automatically adjusted to zero
for all ranges. This function takes up to 8 seconds. Automatically previous stored sensor offset values are cleared.
Sensor Balance
Typically every strain gage sensor has a certain offset. That comes from manufacturing tolerances or because of sensor mounting. By performing a bridge balance this sensor offset could be completely removed on the analog side up to 200 % of the actual
range. This allows using the full dynamic of the AD-board instead of losing resolution because of digital offset shifting. Output
offset and sensor balance may not exceed 200 % of range (20 % for ranges above 1 V).
Internal Completion Resistors
The DAQP-STG has an internal half bridge completion and two internal quarter bridge completions for 120 Ω and 350 Ω strain
gages. The used high precision resistors with low temperature drift allow a long- time stable measurement of almost every strain
gage type without using an external completion network.
Internal Shunt
With two internal shunt resistors (59.88 kΩ and 175 kΩ) and one spare socket for a customised shunt, the DAQP-STG has wide
flexibility in case of shunt calibration. A jumper network gives the possibility to connect the internal shunts to either Sense+
Sense – IN+ or IN- to be compatible to existing sensor types and correction calculation methods. This technology is used to correct the complete measurement chain gain error from the sensor input to the digital signal output. It is based on the known ratio
between the shunt resistor and the strain gage resistance.
Short
It switches the differential amplifier inputs IN+ and IN- from the input terminals to the internal isolated GND reference point.
With this function the absolute sensor offset could be determined.
CAL
It applies a high precision internal reference signal with 80% of the full scale value to the module. For ranges above 1V the
reference signal level is 20 % of range.
Self Test
The self test function is a software controlled procedure that checks in the first step the amplifier itself. In the second step a
basic sensor check will be performed. This test is only available in DeweSoft if an AD-Card is installed.
Part 1: Amplifier Test
The amplifier offset is checked by using the Short function The 80% Cal signal is applied to the amplifier. The complete isolation
amplifier including the AD-Card is checked by using this test signal. The self test circuit switches the amplifier input to the positive excitation voltage, so also the input amplifier is checked. Warning: if there is a short circuit on the excitation this test will
fail.
Part 2: Basic Sensor Test
Bridge Sensor: It is checked if the supply current doesn’t exceed the maximum value, and if the excitation voltage is within the
predefined value.
300| OWNER’s GUIDE
HSI-STG Full bridge signal connection
6-wire and 4-wire sensor connection
Voltage or Current excitation are allowed.
Sense lines MUST be connected to the excitation also when 4-wire connection is used.
6-wire sensor connection: Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the sensor
4-wire sensor connection: Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the connector
HSI-STG Half bridge signal connection
5-wire and 3-wire sensor connection, and potentiometric sensors
5-wire sensor connection: Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the sensor
3-wire sensor connection: Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the connector
Voltage or Current excitation are allowed.
Sense lines MUST be connected to the excitation also when 4-wire connection is used. A potentiometer can
be seen similar to a half bridge sensor with ±500 mV/V sensitivity. Therefore potentiometric sensors can be
measured with bridge amplifiers. The advantages of using the DAQP-STG for potentiometric measurements
is by adjusting the offset and range, you can focus on a certain potentiometer position with higher resolution.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, HSI | 301
The scaling is ±500 mV/V equals ±50 % of potentiometer position.
1) ‘R+’ has to be connected only if shunt calibration is required, otherwise it can be left unconnected.
HSI-STG Quarter bridge signal connection
3-wire sensor connection (Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the sensor)
⇒⇒ Sense leads (SUB-D: pin 3 and 6 must be connected!
-- The 3-wire quarter bridge is only able to compensate symmetrical wire resistance
4-wire sensor connection (Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the sensor)
In the quarter bridge 4-wire mode the HSI-STG internally adjusts its excitation so that on the gage the resistor terminates exactly on the half of the excitation voltage. All wire resistances are compensated.
302| OWNER’s GUIDE
Resistance, RTD 2-wire and 4-wire
For resistance and RTD mode, 4-wire connection is recommended (2-wire connection will not compensate
wire resistance).
Other measurement modes and hook-ups
Voltage and microvolt measurement signal connection
⇒⇒ CAUTION: If the excitation is not used for sensor supply it has to be deactivated by setting it to 0 V. This will
internally connect the IN- to the GNDisolated to improve the common mode rejection.
Sensor with supply, and voltage output
In the quarter bridge 4-wire mode the DAQP-STG internally adjusts its excitation so that on the gage the
resistor terminates exactly on the half of the excitation voltage. All wire resistances are compensated.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-303
13
DAQ Series Signal Conditioners
There are several series of Dewetron signal conditioners that may be installed in your system in many possible combinations. This section covers the DAQ series plugin modules. These are user-exchangeable modules, nearly all of which have robust signal isolation, protecting you and your measurements against ground
loops and other typical measurement problems.
DAQ modules have the advantage of being “hot swappable,” meaning that they can be exchanged by the
user any time, even with the system is powered on.
This modularily also means that the DEWETRON system can be converted very quickly to handle different
measuring requirements and applications - simply plug in the modules that you need, make sure their addresses are correct, and then you’re up and running in a matter of moments.
DEWETRON DAQ modules are small, multi-range ISOLATED signal conditioners, and hundreds of thousands of them are in use all around the world right now.
DAQ Series Modules
DAQ Module Connectors
Front Panel Connector
Accessible to the user. The connector type and pin assignment varies
from module to module. Detailed pin assignment of each module is shown
in the appropriate module description.
Rear Connector
Not user accessible. 9-pin male SUB-D, interface to the Dewetron System.
HSI, DAQ, and PAD
module rear panel
13-304| OWNER’s GUIDE
Module
Input type
Ranges
TEDS
Bandwidth (BW)
Filters (LP / HP)
ISOLATION (ISO)
Over-voltage
Protection (OP)
High Voltage Measurement
DAQP-HV
V
High voltage
±20, ±50, ±100, ±200, ±400,
±800, ±1400 V
N/A
BW: 300 kHz
LP: 10, 30, 100, 300 Hz
1, 3, 10, 30, 100, 300 kHz
ISO: 1.8 kVrms
(line-to-line)
High voltage
±20, ±50, ±100, ±200, ±400,
±800, ±1400 V
N/A
BW: 700 kHz
ISO: 1.8 kVrms
(line-to-line)
High voltage
±10, ±40, ±100, ±200, ±400,
±1000 V
N/A
BW: 20/30 kHz
LP: 10, 100, Hz
1, 2, 20/30 kHz
ISO: 1.5 kVrms
N/A
BW: 300 kHz
LP: 10, 30, 100, 300 Hz
1, 3, 10, 30, 100, 300 kHz
ISO: up to 1 kVrms
(with banana jacks)
OP: 350 VDC
DAQP-HV-S3
V
DAQP-DMM
V
Low/Medium Voltage & Current Measurement
DAQP-LV
V
DAQP-V
V
Voltage, current
with external shunt
or current sensor
±10, ±20, ±50, ±100, ±200,
±500 mV
±1, ±2.5, ±5, ±10, ±25, ±50 V
IEPE via MSIV-ACC
±10, ±20, ±50, ±100, ±200,
±500 mV
±1, ±2.5, ±5, ±10 V
PT100, Pt200,
Pt500, Pt1000,
Pt2000 and
resistance via MSIV-RTD
-200 to 1000 C and 0 to
6.5 kΩ
Voltage, current
with external shunt
or current sensor
±10, ±100 mV
±1, ±5, ±10, ±50 V
N/A
BW: 50 kHz
LP: 10, 100 Hz
1, 10, 50 kHz
ISO: up to 1 kVrms
OP: ±500 VDC or
350 Vrms
Current
Note: 5Arms
continuous
±0.1, ±0.3, ±1, ±3 A
±10 A peak, ±30 A peak
max 5Arms continuous current
N/A
BW: 300 kHz
LP: 10, 30, 100, 300 Hz
1, 3, 10, 30, 100, 300 kHz
ISO: 1.4 kVrms
Current
Note: intended
for 4-20 mA
applications
±2, ±6, ±20 mA
±60 mA, ±200 mA, ±0.6A
max 0.6 A
N/A
BW: 300 kHz
LP: 10, 30, 100, 300 Hz
1, 3, 10, 30, 100, 300 kHz
ISO: 1.4 kVrms
DAQP-LA-SC
DAQP-LA-B
Bridge / Strain Gage Measurement
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-305
Module
DAQP-STG
DAQP-BRIDGE-A
DAQP-BRIDGE-B
DAQP-CFB
Input type
Ranges
Strain gages, bridge
sensors, voltages
Bridge:
Voltage:
Pot/Ωic sensors
Resistance/Ωs
Thermocouple via
MSR-BR-TH series
Full range of thermocouple
type
Strain gages, bridge
sensors
±1, ±2, ±5, ±10, ±20, ±50
mV/V
(@ 5 Vdc excitation)
Pot/Ωic sensors
200 Ω to 10 kΩ
Thermocouple via
MSR-BR-TH series
Full range of thermocouple
type
Strain gages, bridge
sensors
±0.1, ±0.2, ±0.5, ±1, ±2, ±5,
±10, ±20, ±50, ±100 mV/V
(@ 5 Vdc excitation)
Pot/Ωic sensors
200 Ω to 10 kΩ
Thermocouple via
MSR-BR-TH series
Full range of thermocouple
type
AC bridge, strain
gage, carrier
sensors
Bridge: 0.1 to 1000 mV/V
Inductive: 5 to 1000 mV/V
TEDS
Bandwidth (BW)
Filters (LP / HP)
ISOLATION (ISO)
Over-voltage
Protection (OP)
BW: 300 kHz
LP: 10, 30, 100, 300 Hz
1, 3, 10, 30, 100, 300 kHz
ISO: 350 VDC
OP: ±10 VDC
N/A
BW: 20 kHz
LP: 10, 100 Hz
1, 5, 20 kHz
ISO: 350 VDC
OP: ±50 VDC
Yes
BW: 200 kHz
LP: 10, 30, 100, 300 Hz
1, 3, 10, 30, 100, 200 kHz
ISO: N/A
OP: ±10 VDC
N/A
BW: dc to 2.3 kHz
LP: 10, 30, 100, 300 Hz
1 kHz
ISO: N/A
OP: ±10 VDC
Inductive/ LVDT
sensors
Voltage: 0.2 to 1000 mV/vrms
IEPE sensors
±50, ±166, ±500 mV; ±1.66,
±5 V (Gain: 1, 3, 10, 30, 100)
Yes
BW: 0.5 Hz to 300 kHz
LP: 1, 10, 100, 300 kHz
HP: 0.5 Hz, 5 Hz
N/A
IEPE and charge
sensors
Note: selectable
integration and
double integration
Charge: 5, 50, 500, 5000,
50000 pC
IEPE: ±5, ±50, ±500 mV,
±5 V
(0, 20, 40, 60 dB)
N/A
BW: 0.1 Hz to 50 kHz
LP: 100 Hz; 1, 3, 10, 50
kHz
HP: 0.1 Hz, 1 Hz, 10 Hz
N/A
Charge sensors
Note: selectable
time constant
for static charge
sensors
±100, ±500, ±2 000, ±10 000,
±40 000, ±200 000, ±1 000
000 pC
N/A
BW: 0.5 Hz to 100 kHz
LP: 10, 30, 100, 300 Hz;
1, 3, 10, 30, 100 kHz
HP: DC, 0.0001 Hz to
0.5 Hz
ISO: 350 VDC
Charge / IEPE Measurement
DAQP-ACC-A
DAQP-CHARGE-A
DAQP-CHARGE-B
Temperature and Universal Measurement
13-306| OWNER’s GUIDE
Module
Input type
DAQP-THERM
Thermocouple
(universal)
K, J, T, R, S, N, E, B, L, C, U
freely programmable within
the maximum range of the
selected thermocouple type,
internal linearization, internal
CJC
Thermocouple
(universal)
K, J, T, R, S, N, E, B, L, C, U
type, internal linearization,
freely programmable range,
internal CJC
RTD
Pt100, Pt200, Pt500,
Pt1000 and Pt2000 sensors,
programmable range (2-wire
and 4-wire only)
TEDS
Bandwidth (BW)
Filters (LP / HP)
ISOLATION (ISO)
Over-voltage
Protection (OP)
N/A
BW: 3 kHz
LP: 3Hz, 10 Hz, 30 Hz, 100
Hz, 300 Hz, 1 kHz
Butterworth or Bessel;
2nd, 4th, 6th, or 8th order
(programmable)
ISO: ±1000 Vrms
continuous
Yes
BW: 3 kHz
LP: 3Hz, 10 Hz, 30 Hz, 100
Hz, 300 Hz, 1 kHz
Butterworth or Bessel;
2nd, 4th, 6th, or 8th order
programmable
ISO: 1000 Vrms
continuous (for
input, excitation and
TEDS interface)
Frequency to
voltage
100, 1k, 5k, 20k, 100k and
200 kHz ranges;
Trigger level range 0 to 130 V,
Additional TTL output
(isolated pulse output of input
signal)
N/A
BW: 200 kHz
Selectable input and output
filters (range-dependent)
ISO: 350 Vrms
Analog output
1:1 output module, from 0 to
±10 V; Accuracy ±0.05 %
Connector choices: banana,
BNC, or 9-pin DSUB
connector
N/A
BW: 400 Hz
ISO: CMV output to
input, continuous:
1500 VRMS max
DAQP-MULTI
V
Ranges
Voltage
10 ranges from ±5 mV to
± 5V
Resistance
freely programmable range
from 1 Ω to 1 MΩ
Bridge (constant
current)
4-wire full bridge sensors,
13 ranges from ±0.5 to 5000
mV/mA
Frequency to Voltage Measurement
DAQP-FREQ-A
Output modules
DAQN-V-OUT
OUT
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-307
General module specifications
Module dimensions:
20 x 65 x 105 mm (0.79 x 2.56 x 4.13 in.)
(W x H x D without front cover and connectors)
Front cover: Environmental:
Temp. range storage: Temp. range operating:
Rel. humidity (MIL202): RFI susceptibility:
20 x 87 x 2 mm (0.79 x 3.43 x 0.08 in.)
(W x H x D without connector)
-30 °C to +85 °C (-22 °F to 185 °F)
-5 °C to +60 °C (23 °F to 140 °F)
0 to 95 % at 60 °C, non-condensing
±0.5 % span error at 400 MHz, 5 W, 3 m
All specifications within this manual are valid at 25 °C.
All modules are produced according to ISO9001 and ISO14001.
Common Information
Calibration information
All DEWETRON modules are calibrated at 25°C after a warmup time of 30 minutes and meet their specifications when leaving the factory. The time interval for recalibration depends on environmental conditions.
Typically, the calibration should be checked once a year.
Calibration certificates are available from DEWETRON as an option. DEWETRON offers several types:
„„ NIST traceable DEWETRON calibration certificate (USA CAL LAB only)
„„ ISO traceable DEWETRON certificate (European CAL LAB only)
„„ Calibration certificate according to ÖKD (equivalent to DKD)
RS-232/485 interface
DAQP modules can be configured via RS-485 interface. DEWETRON instruments include an internal RS232/485 converter and interface. This converter allows communication with all DEWETRON signal conditioning modules. To communicate with the modules, the RS-232 interface must be set to the following parameters:
baud rate: 9600
data bits: 8
parity: no parity
stop bits: 1
handshake: not required
13-308| OWNER’s GUIDE
Adding DAQ modules to your Dewtetron system:
DAQ modules can be plugged directly into DEWETRON models which have slots for DAQ/PAD/HSI series
plug-in modules. Additional modules can be connected to most models by adding an external DEWE-30 or
DEWE-50 series expansion chassis to the system.
Typical DAQ module configurations:
„„ Installing 8 modules directly into the DEWE-3210: „„ Adding a DEWE-30-8 expansion rack, for accessing 16
total channels:
Analog/
Power/
RS485
„„ Adding a DEWE-30-8 expansion rack, plus another 16
slot DEWE-30-16 rack, for a total of 32 DAQ modules:
Analog/
RS485
Analog/
Power/
RS485
The DEWE-30-16 requires that an
additional 16-ch A/D card be added
into the DEWE-3210 mainframe!
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-309
Addressing DAQ modules
Each DAQ module must have a unique address (just like HSI, PAD, and other modules). The address is
stored inside the DAQ module in non-volatile memory. Therefore, if you remove a DAQ module from one
system, where it was set to address 31, and plug it into a different Dewetron chassis, it will still report itself
on the bus at address 31.
This can cause a conflict if you already have a module at this address. In addition, it will be confusing to you
when you hook up your signals to what you believe is DAQ module at address 16, but the channels show up
on address 31. Therefore, it is vitally important that you set the addresses of any DAQ, PAD, or HSI modules
that you plug into your Dewetron system.
-- There is no need to set the addresses of MDAQ modules, except when initially installed at the factory.
„„ There are essentially two ways to address your modules:
„„ FILL RACK PROCEDURE - this addresses all of your modules in sequence. This is what you should do
if you have been changing more than one module around, to ensure that every module is at the appropriate and unique address.
„„ FILL ONE MODULE PROCEDURE - easier and faster, when you simply want to exchange one module.
Let’s look at how to do each one of the above procedures:
Fill Rack (all Modules) Procedure
Within DS-7, go to the ACQUISITION MODE and select the SETUP screen, where you can see your list of
modules. Now click on the top of the AMPLIFIER COLUMN and you will see this menu:
Select the FILL RACK option, and the software will prompt you like this:
13-310| OWNER’s GUIDE
Follow the instruction to press the TOP black button on the module in the first slot, which is always SLOT 0
in the case of doing a FILL RACK, since you are starting at 0 and going all the way up, filling all modules.
When you press this button on the module, the system will beep and prompt you to press the next module’s
button, and so on. Continue all the way through until you have done the last module, then press CANCEL to
complete and save your changes.
If you get to the position where there is an empty module slot, or a non-programmable module from the old
days in that slot, press the SKIP button to move past it to the next module. You can do this as many times as
needed.
When you’re done, the rack should be filled with all of the modules that are physically installed within this
system, like this:
FILL (or CLEAR) One Module Procedure
FILL RACK is a great way to ensure that your modules are all addressed correctly, and we highly recommend it if you make several module exchanges at once. But there are times when you simply want to
exchange one module with a different one, or perhaps to just remove a module. This is also quite easy once
you know how.
Within DEWESoft, go to the ACQUISITION MODE and select the SETUP screen, where you can see your
list of modules. This time, instead of clicking on the top of the AMPLIFIER COLUMN, double-click the amplifier column for the one module that you want to add, delete, or exchange. When you do this, the software
will give you a similar choice as before:
And your choices are:
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-311
„„ If you have plugged a new module into this slot, choose FILL, then follow the prompts.
„„ If you change you mind and want to do a FILL RACK anyway, starting at slot 0, choose FILL FROM #0,
then follow the prompts.
„„ If there is a module in this slot that you have removed, but it continues to show up in RED (because the
software cannot really find it), choose CLEAR to remove it from the list.
„„ If you have clicked this by accident and want to cancel without making any changes, choose CANCEL
Module Installation Trouble-shooting
There may be times when you have trouble addressing your modules, for a variety of reasons. Here are
some good tips for solving these issues:
⇒⇒ Problem: some or all modules are showing up in RED letters.
Analysis: a module shown in RED letters on the setup screen tells you that the software cannot find this
module. Or, it can mean that there is a conflict with another module, like when you plug two modules with
the same address into the system at the same time and don’t do a FILL RACK or FILL (or CLEAR) one of
them. A very rare condition might be that a module is defective and cannot communicate properly.
-- Solution: the trusty FILL RACK is always a great and easy way to solve nearly all these issues.
If the FILL RACK does not solve them, remove any modules shown in RED and add them back in one at
a time, using the FILL ONE MODULE procedure. Fill one module at a time until the offending modules’ addresses have been resolved.
⇒⇒ Problem: you plug in a new module into a previously unused slot, but it does not show up.
Analysis: more than likely it was already set to an address that you were using, and it has either taken another module’s address, or is conflicting with it.
-- Solution: the trusty FILL RACK is always a great and easy way to solve nearly all these issues.
If the FILL RACK does not solve them, remove any modules shown in RED and add them back in one at
a time, using the FILL ONE MODULE procedure. Fill one module at a time until the offending modules’ addresses have been resolved.
⇒⇒ Problem: you want to use a very old PAD module which does not have the upper black button on it, so you don’t
know how to address it
Analysis: These modules have been out of production for a long time, but there are still some around, and
they are still perfectly good modules.
-- Solution: Start with the old PAD module in the slot, but NOT PRESSED IN!! Make sure the connector on
the inside is not mated or making contact in any way. Now double click on the amplifier slot where you want to
install this module. Select FILL when prompted. Then when the next prompt appears to press the black button
13-312| OWNER’s GUIDE
or push in the module... PUSH IN THE MODULE. The green LED on its front panel should light up, and it should
show up on the list on your SETUP screen.
⇒⇒ Problem: some modules show up with the SERIAL NUMBERS in the amplifier column, and some do not.
Analysis: There is nothing wrong here. With each Dewetron module there is a certain revision before which the serial number
was not available for external query, so these modules will not show this information on the setup screen.
Solution: N/A
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-313
DAQP-HV (and -S3) Isolated High Voltage module (300/700 kHz)
Input ranges: Bandwidth: Isolation:
Signal connection:
7 ranges (±20 V to ±1400 V)
300 kHz (version DAQP-HV-S3: 700 kHz)
1.8 kVRMS line to line 1.4 kVRMS line to ground
Banana sockets (S3 = Screw terminals)
V
DAQP-HV Specifications
Parameter
DAQP-HV
Input ranges unipolar and bipolar:
20 V, 50 V, 100 V, 200 V, 400 V, 800 V, 1400 V
DC accuracy:
20 V and 50 V
100 V to 1400 V
±0.05 % of reading ±40mV
±0.05 % of reading ±0.05 % of range
Gain linearity:
0.03%
Gain drift range:
Typically 20 ppm/°K (max. 50 ppm/°K)
Offset drift:
20 V to 100 V
200 V to 1400 V
typical 0.5mV/°K
typical 5ppm/°K
max. 4mV/°K
max. 20 ppm of Range/°K
Long term stability:
100 ppm/sqrt (1000 hrs)
Input resistance:
10 MΩ
-3dB Bandwidth:
300 kHz
Filter selection:
Push button or software
Filter (lowpass):
10, 30, 100, 300, 1k, 3k, 10k, 30k, 100k, 300 kHz
Filter type:
Bessel or Butterworth 40 dB/decade
Typical SFDR and SNR:
300 kHz
SFDR
SNR
98 76 dB
98
84 dB
98
86 dB
50 V:
200 V:
1400 V:
Typical CMRR:
>80 dB @ 50 Hz
70 dB @ 400 Hz
60 dB @ 1 kHz
48 dB @ 10 kHz
Isolation voltage
Line to Ground 1.4kVrms
Line to Line 1.8kVrms
Protection:
Surge (1.2/50)
Burst(5kHz)
CAT III 600
CAT IV 300
±4000V
±4000V
Output voltage:
±5 V
Output resistance:
<10 Ω
Output current:
5 mA
Output protection:
Short to ground for 10 sec.
Power supply:
±9 VDC ± 1%
Power consumption:
0.7 W
100 kHz
SFDR
SNR
101
81 dB
101
89 dB
102
91 dB
1)
10 kHz
SFDR
108
108
107
SNR
90 dB
91 dB
92 dB
13-314| OWNER’s GUIDE
Parameter
DAQP-HV
Power On default settings:
Software programable
RS485 interface for module control:
Yes
TEDS support:
N/A
MSI support:
N/A
1) The 300 kHz filter setting applies only to the Bessell filter type
Signal hook-up
DAQP-HV: The insulated banana jacks are the signal connection point. Use only mating cables which have
molded insulated/safety type plugs. These plugs should be the kind which prevent you from coming into
contact with high voltages or currents.
DAQP-HV-S3: The insulated screw terminal panels are the signal connection point. Always make your connections before applying voltage to them.
⇒⇒ Use only insulated cables and the appropriate mating plugs or connectors when using this module!
⇒⇒ Never handle cables when high voltage is applied! Connect your signal points before applying high voltage!
⇒⇒ Failure to observe safety protocols can result in equipment damage, and personal injury or even death!
⇒⇒ Always check that positive and negative lines are connected with the correct polarity on the DAQP-HV and
DAQP-HV-S3 module, and at the signal source side.
⇒⇒ Use of red (+) and black (-) color coded cables is highly recommended.
⇒⇒ High voltages can be lethal! Observe all safety protocols at all times.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-315
DAQP-DMM Isolated High Voltage Module (20/30 kHz)
Voltage input: Bandwidth: Isolation:
Signal input:
6 ranges (±10 V to ±1000 V)
30 kHz maximum
1500 VRMS
Insulated banana jacks
V
DAQP-DMM Specifications
Parameter
DAQP-DMM
Input ranges:
±10, ±40, ±100, ±200, ±400, ±1000 V
Range selection:
Pushbutton or software command
DC accuracy:
0.1 % of reading ±0.1 % of range
Gain linearity:
Better than ±0.03 %
Gain drift range:
Typ. 20 ppm/°K, max. 40 ppm/°K
Input resistance:
10 MΩ (±0.1 %)
Bandwidth (-3 dB ±1.5 dB @ f0)
10 V to 40 V range
100 V to 200 V range
400 V to 1000 V range
Typical 20 kHz
Typical 25 kHz
30 kHz
Filter selection:
Pushbutton or software command
Filter:
10 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, 3 kHz (±1.5 dB @ f0)
Filter characteristics
@ 0.01, 0.1, 1, 3 kHz
@ 30 kHz
Butterworth 40 dB / decade (12 dB / octave)
100 dB / decade (30 dB / octave)
Typ. SNR @ max. bandwidth
10 V range
100 V range
1000 V range
60 dB
76 dB
81 dB
Typical CMRR:
73 dB @ 0 Hz
70 dB @ 50 Hz
57 dB @ 400 Hz
Isolation voltage:
1.5 kVRMS
Output voltage:
±5 V
Output resistance:
<10 Ω
Output current:
5 mA max.
Output protection:
Continuous short to ground
Power supply voltage:
±9 VDC ± 1%
Power consumption:
0.65 W typical
RS-485 interface for module control:
Yes
TEDS support:
N/A
MSI support:
N/A
13-316| OWNER’s GUIDE
Signal hook-up
DAQP-DMM: The insulated banana jacks are the signal connection point. Use only mating cables which
have molded insulated/safety type plugs. These plugs should be the kind which prevent you from coming
into contact with high voltages or currents.
⇒⇒ Use only insulated cables and the appropriate mating plugs or connectors when using this module!
⇒⇒ Never handle cables when high voltage is applied! Connect your signal points before applying high voltage!
⇒⇒ Failure to observe safety protocols can result in equipment damage, and personal injury or even death!
⇒⇒ Always check that positive and negative lines are connected with the correct polarity on the DAQP-DMM mod-
ule, and at the signal source side.
⇒⇒ Use of red (+) and black (-) color coded cables is highly recommended.
⇒⇒ High voltages can be lethal! Observe all safety protocols at all times.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-317
DAQP-LV Isolated Low Voltage Module (300 kHz)
Voltage input: 12 ranges (10 mV to 50 V)
Current input:
±20 mA using DAQ-SHUNT-1 (option)
±5 A using DAQ-SHUNT-4 or DAQ-SHUNT-5
Bandwidth: 300 kHz
Isolation:
350 VDC (1 kVRMS with banana connector)
Additional signal input types using MSI interfaces:
IEPE Constant current powered sensors (accels,mics);
12 ranges (10 mV to 5 V); requires MSI-V-ACC
RTD
Resistance Temperature Detector (Pt100 to Pt2000)
9 resistance ranges (8 to 4000 Ω); requires MSI-V-RTD
CHARGE
Charge up to 50000 pC requires MSI-V-CHA-50
V
DAQP-LV Specifications
Parameter
DAQP-LV
Input ranges unipolar and bipolar:
10 mV, 20 mV, 50 mV, 100 mV, 200 mV, 500 mV, 1 V, 2.5 V, 5 V, 10 V, 25 V, 50 V
Push button selectable ranges:
10 mV, 50 mV, 200 mV, 1 V, 5 V, 10 V, 50 V
DC accuracy:
Bipolar:
Unipolar:
Range
10 mV to 50 mV
100 mV to 50 V
10 mV to 50 mV
100 mV to 50 V
Accuracy
±0.02 % of reading ±40 μV
±0.02 % of reading ±0.05 % of range
±0.04 % of reading ±40 μV
±0.04 % of reading ±0.05 % of range
Input coupling:
DC or AC software selectable (1.5 Hz standard, cust.on request down to 0.01 Hz)
Gain linearity:
0.01 % of full scale
Gain drift range:
Typically 10 ppm/°K (max. 20 ppm/°K)
Offset drift:
10 mV to 200 mV:
500 mV to 50 V:
Uni- and bipolar
3 μV/°K
10 ppm of Range/°K
Long term stability:
100 ppm/sqrt (1000 hrs)
Input resistance:
1 MΩ
-3dB Bandwidth:
300 kHz
Filter selection:
Push button or software
Filter:
10, 30, 100, 300, 1k, 3k, 10k, 30k, 100k, 300 kHz 1)
Filter type:
Bessel or Butterworth 40 dB/decade
Typical SFDR and SNR:
300kHz bandwidth
SFDR
SNR
100 dB
72 dB
102 dB
82 dB
102 dB
82 dB
100 kHz bandwidth
SFDR
SNR
98 dB
76 dB
99 dB
93 dB
99 dB
93 dB
Typical CMRR:
10 mV to 1 V range:
>100 dB @ 50 Hz
>100 dB @ 1 kHz
83 dB @ 10 kHz
2.5 V to 50 V range:
90 dB @ 50 Hz
65 dB @ 1 kHz
55 dB @ 10 kHz
Input overvoltage protection:
350 VDC
Isolation voltage:
350 VDC (1 kVRMS with banana connector)
Sensor supply:
±9 V (±1 %), 12 V (±5 %), 200mA resettable fuse protected 2)
Output voltage:
±5 V
Output resistance:
<10 Ω
20 mV
1V
50 V
10 kHz bandwidth
SFDR
SNR
97 dB
84 dB
97 dB
96 dB
97 dB
96 dB
13-318| OWNER’s GUIDE
Maximum Output current:
5 mA
Output protection:
Short to ground for 10 sec.
Power On default settings
Software programable
Power supply:
±9 VDC ± 1%
Power consumption:
0.8 W without sensor supply
RS-485 interface for module control:
Yes
TEDS support:
Yes, compatible with TEDS chips DS2406, DS2430A, DS2432, DS2433, DS24313)
MSI support:
MSI-V-ACC; MSI-V-RTD; MSI-V-CHA-50
(1) 300 kHz exclusively for Bessel filter characteristic (2) Overall current should not exceed Dewetron mainframe’s maximum power.
(3) TEDS is only available on the -D and -L versions
DAQP-LV-D pin-outs
Standard 9-pin DSUB connector
DAQP-LV Signal Hook-up
DAQP-V-B model with banana jacks
Hot: IN+
Shield: INDAQP-V-BNC model with BNC connector
Hot: IN+
Pin
Description
1
TEDS
2
IN +
3
Reserved for custom sensor supplies
4
GND (not isolated)
5
+9 V (200 mA max.)
6
+12 V (200 mA max.)
7
IN -
8
Reserved for custom sensor supplies
9
-9 V (200 mA max.)
Shield: IN-
DAQP-LV-L pin-outs
LEMO EGG.1B.307
DAQP-V-D model with DSUB connector
See table >
DAQP-V-L model with LEMO connector
Pin
Description
1
IN +
2
IN -
3
+9 V (200 mA max.)
4
-9 V (200 mA max.)
5
GND
6
+12 V (200 mA max.)
7
TEDS
⇒⇒ IMPORTANT: Always observe all safety protocols when handling live voltages!
⇒⇒ Use pins 4, 5 and 9 only as NON-ISOLATED sensor supply voltages
⇒⇒ If signals above 60 V may appear, don’t use the metal housing of SUBD connector
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-319
DAQP-LV: Typical sensor connections
Sensor with differential output, module powered
Current measurement using external shunt
Current loop-powered measurement with
external shunt
Sensor with common ground
13-320| OWNER’s GUIDE
DAQP-LV: Shunt Options
There are several current shunts that are available for this module, which can handle currents up to 5A. For
higher currents, please use a rated CLAMP or FLEX COIL or other current transformer which has a voltage
output.
Model
Input Range
Accuracy
Description
100 mA
0.1%
50 Ω shunt adapter (1 W)
Compatible with all Dewetron voltage modules
and break-out boxes with banana jacks
100 mA
0.1%
50 Ω shunt adapter (1 W)
(This is the resistor from the DAQ-SHUNT-1
option above - for user mounting/integration)
5A
±0.1% < 10 ppm
100 mΩ Shunt box
Current input via 2x safety banana jacks
Voltage output via 2x 0.3 meter cable with
banana plugs
5A
±0.1% < 10 ppm
100 mΩ Shunt box
Current input via 2x safety banana jacks
Voltage output via 2x safety banana jacks
DAQ-SHUNT-1
DAQ-SHUNT-1R
DAQ-SHUNT-4
DAQ-SHUNT-5
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-321
DAQP-V Isolated Low Voltage Module (50 kHz)
Input ranges: Bandwidth: Isolation: Signal connectors:
6 ranges from ±10 mV to ±50 V
50 kHz
350 VDC (1 kVRMS with banana connector)
-B:
Safety banana sockets
-BNC: BNC connector
-D:
9-pin SUB-D connector
-L:
8-pin LEMO connector (option)
V
DAQP-V Specifications
Parameter
DAQP-V
Input ranges:
±10, ±100 mV, ±1, ±5, ±10, ±50 V
Range Selection:
Push button or software
DC accuracy:
10 mV range
100 mV range
1 V to 50 V ranges
0.05 % of reading ±40 μV
0.05 % of reading ±100 μV
0.05 % of reading ±0.05 % of range
Input coupling:
DC fixed
Gain linearity:
Better than ±0.03%
Gain drift range:
Typically 20 ppm/°K (max. 40 ppm/°K)
Input resistance:
1 MΩ (±0.1 %)
Bandwidth (-3 dB):
50 kHz (±1.5 dB @ f0)
Filters (low-pass):
10 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, 10 kHz (±1.5 dB @ f0)
Filter selection:
Pushbutton or software command
Filter characteristics:
@ 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 kHz
@ 50 kHz
Typ. SNR @ max. bandwidth
10 mV range
10 V range
50 V range
Butterworth
40 dB / decade (12 dB / octave)
100 dB / decade (30 dB / octave)
61 dB
78 dB
78 dB
Typical CMRR:
90 dB @ 0 Hz
78 dB @ 50 Hz
60 dB @ 400 Hz
Isolation voltage:
350 VDC (1 kVRMS with banana connector)
Sensor supply:
±9 V (±1 %), 12 V (±5 %)
Output voltage:
±5 V
Output resistance:
<10 Ω
maximum Output current:
5 mA
Output protection:
Continuous short to ground
Power supply:
±9 VDC ± 1%
Power consumption:
0.85 W typical without sensor supply
RS-485 interface:
Yes
TEDS:
N/A
Supported TEDS chips:
N/A
Supported MSI
N/A
13-322| OWNER’s GUIDE
DAQP-V Signal Hook-up
DAQP-V-B model with banana jacks
DAQP-V-D pin-outs
Standard 9-pin DSUB connector
DAQP-V-BNC model with BNC connector
Hot: IN+
Shield: IN-
Pin
Description
1
Not connected
2
IN +
3
Not connected
4
GND (not isolated)
5
reserved for +9 V sensor supply
6
+12 V sensor supply (200 mA max.)
7
IN -
8
Not connected
9
reserved for -9 V sensor supply
DAQP-V-D model with DSUB connector
DAQP-V-L pin-outs
LEMO EGG.1B.307
DAQP-V-L model with LEMO connector
Pin
Description
1
IN +
2
IN -
3
+9 V sensor supply
4
-9 V sensor supply
5
GND
6
+12 V sensor supply
7
not connected
⇒⇒ IMPORTANT: Always observe all safety protocols when handling live voltages!
⇒⇒ Use pins 4, 5 and 9 only as NON-ISOLATED sensor supply voltages
⇒⇒ If signals above 60 V may appear, don’t use the metal housing of SUBD connector
-- For sensor hook-up guidance and shunt resistor information, please refer to the DAQP-LV module
(except that TEDS is not available on the DAQP-V module)
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-323
DAQP-LA and LA-SC Isolated Current Module
Input ranges:
Bandwidth: Isolation: Signal connection:
DAQP-LA-SC: 0.1 A, 0.3 A, 1 A, 3 A, 10 A peak, 30 A peak
DAQP-LA-B-S1: 2 mA, 6 mA, 20 mA, 60 mA, 200 mA, 0.6 A
300 kHz
1.4 kVRMS Input to ground
-SC: screw terminals
-B-S1: insultated banana jacks
DAQP-LA Specifications
Parameter
DAQP-LA-SC
DAQP-LA-B-S1
Input resistance (Shunt):
0.1 Ω
5Ω
Shunt inductance:
<10 nH
<10 nH
Input ranges:
0.1 A, 0.3 A, 1 A, 3 A, 10 A peak, 30 A peak
2 mA, 6 mA, 20 mA, 60 mA, 200 mA, 0.6 A
Continuous current:
max. 5 Arms
max. 0.6 A
Peak current:
30 A max. 10 ms; 10 A max. 100 ms
DC accuracy:
100 mA and 300 mA
1 A to 30 A
2 mA and 6 mA
20 mA and 600 mA
Offset drift
100 mA and 300 mA
1 A to 30 A
2 mA and 6 mA
20 mA to 600 mA
±0.05 % of reading ±200 μA ±0.05 % of reading
±0.05 % of range
±0.05 % of reading ±4 μA ±0.05 % of reading
±0.05 % of range
typ. max.
1220μA/°K
20
40
ppm of Range/°K
typ .
0.24
20
Gain linearity:
0.03 %
Gain drift range:
Typically 20 ppm/°K (max. 50 ppm/°K)
Long term stability:
100 ppm/sqrt (1000 hrs)
-3dB Bandwidth:
300 kHz
Filter selection:
Push button or software
Filter:
10, 30, 100, 300, 1k, 3k, 10k, 30k, 100k, 300 kHz 1)
Filter type:
Bessel or Butterworth 40 dB/decade
Typical SFDR and SNR:
300kHz bandwidth
SFDR
SNR
95 dB
64 dB
102 dB
82 dB
104 dB
89 dB
100 mA
1A
30 A
100 kHz bandwidth
SFDR
SNR
95 dB
67dB
103 dB
85 dB
103 dB
89 dB
Protection:
CAT III 150 V
CAT IV 100 V
Isolation voltage:
Input to Ground 1.4 kVRMS
Output voltage:
±5 V
Output resistance:
<10 Ω
Output current:
5 mA
Output protection:
Short to ground for 10 sec.
max.
0.4
40
10 kHz bandwidth
SFDR
SNR
95 dB
77 dB
113 dB
90 dB
117 dB
91 dB
μA/°K
ppm of Range/°K
13-324| OWNER’s GUIDE
Power On default settings
Software programable
Power supply:
±9 VDC ± 1%
Power consumption:
0.7 W
RS-485 interface:
Yes
TEDS:
N/A
Supported TEDS chips:
N/A
Supported MSI
N/A
(1) 300 kHz exclusively for Bessel filter
DAQP-LA Signal Hook-up
DAQP-LA-B-xx model with banana jacks
DAQP-LA-SC model with screw terminal connectors
Hot: IN+
Shield: IN-
⇒⇒ IMPORTANT: Always observe all safety
protocols when handling live voltages!
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-325
DAQP-STG Isolated Universal Input Module
Strain gauge, bridge sensors:
Piezoresistive bridge: Voltage input: RTD:
Resistance: Isolation: Signal input connection:
±0.1 to ±1000 mV/V (@ 5 VDC excitation)
±0.5 to ±10000 mV/mA (@ 1 mA excitation)
±500 μV to ±10 V
Resistance Temperature Detector (Pt100 to Pt2000)
9 resistance ranges (8 to 4000 Ω)
25 mΩ to 100 kΩ
350 VDC
9-pin SUB-D connector (standard) or LEMO (optional)
Additional signal input using MSI interfaces:
IEPE Constant current powered sensors (accelerometers, mics);
12 ranges (±2.5 mV to 10 V); requires MSI-V-ACC
THERMOCOUPLE
Popular T/C types; requires MSI-BR-TH-J, -K, or -T
CHARGE
Charge sensors up to 50000 pC requires MSI-V-CH-50
VOLTAGE
up to ±200 V requires MSI-BR-V-200
V
DAQP-STG specifications
Parameter
DAQP-STG
Gain:
0.5 to 10 000
Voltage Input ranges: Sensitivity @ 5 VDC
excitation:
±0.5 , ±1, ±2.5, ±5, ±10, ±25, ±50, ±100, ±250, ±500 mV, ±1 V, ±2V, ±5 V,±10 V ±0.1 , ±0.2, ±0.5, ±1,
±2, ±5, ±10, ±20, ±50, ±100, ±200, ±400, ±1000 mV/V
Resistance:
25 mΩ to 100 kΩ
Input impedance:
>100 MΩ (power off: 50 kΩ)
Input noise:
3.5 nV * √Hz
Voltage Input Accuracy:
Excitation voltage:
Excitation current:
Gain drift
Offset drift
Linearity
Accuracy
Drift
Current limit
Protection
Accuracy
Drift
Compliance voltage
Output impedance
±0.05 % of reading ± 0.02 % of range ±10 μV
typical 10 ppm/°K max. 20 ppm/°K
typical 0.3 μV/°K + 10 ppm of range, max 2 μV/°K + 20 ppm of range
typical 0.02 %
0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5,10 and 12 VDC software programmable (16 Bit DAC)
±0.03 % ±1 mV
±10 ppm/K ±50 μV/K
100 mA
Continuous short to ground
0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20mA software programmable (16 Bit DAC)
0.05% ±2μA
15ppm/°K
12V
>1 MΩ
Supported Sensors:
4- or 6-wire full bridge 3- or 5-wire 1⁄2 bridge with internal completion (software programmable) 3- or
4-wire 1⁄4 bridge with internal resistor for 120 and 350 Ω (software programmable)1) 4-wire full bridge
with constant current excitation (piezoresistive bridge sensors) Potentiometric Resistance Resistance
Temperature Detection: PT100 PT200 PT500 PT1000
Bridge resistance:
80 Ω to 10 kΩ @ ≤ 5 VDC excitation
Shunt calibration:
Two internal shunt resistors 59.88 kΩ and 175 kΩ
Shunt and completion resistor accuracy:
0.05% ±15ppm/°K
Automatic bridge balance:
Input range 500μV to 1V:
2.5V to 5V:
Bandwidth (-3dB):
300 kHz
Filters (low pass):
10 Hz, 30 Hz, 100 Hz, 300 Hz, 1 kHz, 3 kHz, 10 kHz, 30 kHz, 100 kHz (±1.5 dB @ f0)
Filter characteristics:
10Hz to 100Hz:
300kHz:
±200 % of Range
±40% of Range
Butterworth or Bessel 40 dB/dec ( 2nd order)
Bessel 60 dB/dec (3rd order)
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Parameter
DAQP-STG
Typical SNR @ 100 kHz [1 kHz]
and 5 VDC excitation:
66 dB [84 dB] @ 1 mV/V
82 dB [100 dB] @ 50 mV/V
Typical CMRR @ 0.1 mV/V [1 mV/V]
and 5 VDC excitation:
160 dB [160 dB] @ DC
115 dB [110 dB] @ 400 Hz
110 dB [105 dB] @ 1 kHz
Isolation
±350 VDC continuous (for input, excitation and TEDS interface)
Common mode Voltage
±350 VDC input to housing
Over voltage protection:
±50 VDC input (+) to input (-)
Output voltage:
±5 V
Output resistance:
<1Ω
Output current:
Max. 5 mA; short to ground protected for 10 seconds
RS-485 interface:
Yes
TEDS support:
Yes, compatible with TEDS chips DS2406, DS2430A, DS2431, DS2432, DS2433
MSI support:
MSI-BR-TH-x, MSI-BR-ACC, MSI-BR-V-200 ,MSI-BR-CH-50
Power supply voltage:
±9 VDC (±1 %)
Power consumption:
Typ. 1.7 W @ 350 Ω, 2.15 W @ 120 Ω (both full bridge @ 5 VDC excitation)
Absolute max.: 3 W (maximum excitation @ maximum current)
Module Pin-outs
⇒⇒ CAUTION: The sensor shield can be connected to either pin 4 (SUB-D version only) or the housing of the 9-pin
SUB-D / 8-pin LEMO connector, depending on your application.
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DAQP-STG-D Cables and Shielding
To reduce the influence of electromagnetic disturbances, shielded twisted pair cables are recommended. Connect the shield to
the isolated GND (Pin4) to get the best result.
The twisted pairs for full bridge, half bridge, voltage and resistance mode are:
Twisted pair 1
EXC+
PIN1
EXC-
PIN8
Twisted pair 2
Sense+
PIN6
Sense-
PIN3
Twisted pair 3
IN+
PIN2
IN-
PIN7
Twisted pair 4
R+
PIN5
GND(isolated)
PIN4
If TEDS is used also the shield could be used as GNDisolated
For quarter bridge mode:
Twisted pair 1
IN+
PIN2
Sense1
PIN3
Twisted pair 2
R+
PIN5
EXC-
PIN8
DAQP-STG Operation Notes
Free variable gain and excitation
The gain, excitation and offset values of this module are free programmable. So it is possible to normalize any physical sensor input signal to the ±5V output of the module. By using these settings as power on
default, standalone solutions could be easily realized.
Gain: from 0.5 to 10000. The module input ranges are based on predefined gain values. The module automatically chose the best gain combination of the internal amplifiers to keep the overall noise and drift as low
as possible.
Output offset: Could be programmed from the positive to the negative full scale range except on the input
ranges above 1V. Due to internal structure here the offset could be set from +20 % to – 20 %.
Excitation Voltage: The excitation voltage is programmable from 0 to 12 V in 185 μV steps. Setting the excitation to 0 V for example allows you to determine the noise of the sensor cabling. The sense terminals have
to be connected to the excitation terminals all the time. Even if the remote sensing is not required.
Excitation current: The current could be programmed from 0.1 mA to 20 mA in 0.3 μA steps. The maximum
compliance voltage is 12 V. The compliance voltage is automatically balanced around the internal GND. This
minimizes the common mode error.
Power On Default function
You can store the latest settings of the module in the internal EE-Prom memory. Once the module restarts,
it comes up automatically with these setting. This is important for stand alone applications and for fail-safe
reasons.
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Filter
The Module has nine selectable low-pass filters from 10 Hz to 100 kHz. The filter characteristic can be set to
Butterworth 2nd order or Bessel 2nd order. An additional fixed filter inside this module is a 3rd order Bessel
filter with a guaranteed -3 dB bandwidth of 300 kHz.
DAQP-STG Amplifier balance
The amplifier balance allows eliminating automatically all internal amplifier offsets. It switches the differential amplifier inputs
IN+ and IN- to the internal isolated GND reference point. Then the output offset of the module is automatically adjusted to zero
for all ranges. This function takes up to 8 seconds. Automatically previous stored sensor offset values are cleared.
Sensor Balance
Typically every strain gage sensor has a certain offset. That comes from manufacturing tolerances or because of sensor mounting. By performing a bridge balance this sensor offset could be completely removed on the analog side up to 200 % of the actual
range. This allows using the full dynamic of the AD-board instead of losing resolution because of digital offset shifting. Output
offset and sensor balance may not exceed 200 % of range (20 % for ranges above 1 V).
Internal Completion Resistors
The DAQP-STG has an internal half bridge completion and two internal quarter bridge completions for 120 Ω and 350 Ω strain
gages. The used high precision resistors with low temperature drift allow a long- time stable measurement of almost every strain
gage type without using an external completion network.
Internal Shunt
With two internal shunt resistors (59.88 kΩ and 175 kΩ) and one spare socket for a customised shunt, the DAQP-STG has wide
flexibility in case of shunt calibration. A jumper network gives the possibility to connect the internal shunts to either Sense+
Sense – IN+ or IN- to be compatible to existing sensor types and correction calculation methods. This technology is used to correct the complete measurement chain gain error from the sensor input to the digital signal output. It is based on the known ratio
between the shunt resistor and the strain gage resistance.
Short
It switches the differential amplifier inputs IN+ and IN- from the input terminals to the internal isolated GND reference point.
With this function the absolute sensor offset could be determined.
CAL
It applies a high precision internal reference signal with 80% of the full scale value to the module. For ranges above 1V the
reference signal level is 20 % of range.
Self Test
The self test function is a software controlled procedure that checks in the first step the amplifier itself. In the second step a
basic sensor check will be performed. This test is only available in DeweSoft if an AD-Card is installed.
Part 1: Amplifier Test
The amplifier offset is checked by using the Short function The 80% Cal signal is applied to the amplifier. The complete isolation
amplifier including the AD-Card is checked by using this test signal. The self test circuit switches the amplifier input to the positive excitation voltage, so also the input amplifier is checked. Warning: if there is a short circuit on the excitation this test will
fail.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-329
Part 2: Basic Sensor Test
Bridge Sensor: It is checked if the supply current doesn’t exceed the maximum value, and if the excitation voltage is within the
predefined value.
DAQP-STG Full bridge signal connection
6-wire and 4-wire sensor connection
Voltage or Current excitation are allowed.
Sense lines MUST be connected to the excitation also when 4-wire connection is used.
6-wire sensor connection: Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the sensor
4-wire sensor connection: Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the connector
DAQP-STG Half bridge signal connection
5-wire and 3-wire sensor connection, and potentiometric sensors
5-wire sensor connection: Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the sensor
3-wire sensor connection: Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the connector
Voltage or Current excitation are allowed.
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Sense lines MUST be connected to the excitation also when 4-wire connection is used. A potentiometer can
be seen similar to a half bridge sensor with ±500 mV/V sensitivity. Therefore potentiometric sensors can be
measured with bridge amplifiers. The advantages of using the DAQP-STG for potentiometric measurements
is by adjusting the offset and range, you can focus on a certain potentiometer position with higher resolution.
The scaling is ±500 mV/V equals ±50 % of potentiometer position.
1) ‘R+’ has to be connected only if shunt calibration is required, otherwise it can be left unconnected.
DAQP-STG Quarter bridge signal connection
3-wire sensor connection (Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the sensor)
⇒⇒ Sense leads (SUB-D: pin 3 and 6 must be connected!
-- The 3-wire quarter bridge is only able to compensate symmetrical wire resistance
4-wire sensor connection (Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the sensor)
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-331
In the quarter bridge 4-wire mode the DAQP-STG internally adjusts its excitation so that on the gage the
resistor terminates exactly on the half of the excitation voltage. All wire resistances are compensated.
DAQP-STG Resistance, RTD 2-wire and 4-wire
For resistance and RTD mode, 4-wire connection is recommended (2-wire connection will not compensate
wire resistance).
DAQP-STG - Other measurement modes and hook-ups
Voltage and microvolt measurement signal connection
⇒⇒ CAUTION: If the excitation is not used for sensor supply it has to be deactivated by setting it to 0 V. This will
internally connect the IN- to the GNDisolated to improve the common mode rejection.
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Sensor with supply, and voltage output
In the quarter bridge 4-wire mode the DAQP-STG internally adjusts its excitation so that on the gage the
resistor terminates exactly on the half of the excitation voltage. All wire resistances are compensated.
Why More Wires are Better...
Sensitivity: For sensor wiring typically copper cables are used. For example a 120 Ω full bridge connected
with four 0.14 mm2 cables will have an sensitivity error of 2.1 % due to the 1.27 Ω wire resistance. But with
6-wire technology this can be completely compensated!
Temperature drift:
Intial error
Drift after 10°C warm up
Offset
Sensitivity
Offset
Sensitivity
2-wire
25183 μm/m
-4.97 %
956 μm/m
-0.18 %
3-wire
0 μm/m
-2.6 %
0 μm/m
-0.01 %
4-wire
0 μm/m
0.0 %
0 μm/m
0.00 %
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-333
DAQP-BRIDGE-A Isolated Strain Gage Module
Protection: Input sensitivity: Ranges and filter: Bridge offset:
Bridge completion: Shunt calibration: Custom range: Signal connection:
Fully isolated (input and excitation)
0.5 mV/V to 1000 mV/V
Button or software selection
Automatic bridge offset adjustment (approx. ±200 % of range)
Internal completion for 1⁄2 and 1⁄4 bridge (120 and 350 Ω)
Two internal shunts or external shunt calibration possible
Programmable range for sensitivity, excitation and offset
9-pin SUB-D or 8-pin LEMO connector (optional)
DAQP-BRIDGE-A specifications
Parameter
DAQP-BRIDGE-A
Gain:
20 to 1000
Input ranges: @ 5 VDC excitation:
±5, ±10, ±25, ±50, ±100, ±250 mV ±1, ±2, ±5, ±10, ±20, ±50 mV/V
Range selection:
Push button or software
Input impedance:
> 100 MΩ
DC accuracy:
±0.1 %
Gain linearity:
±0.05 %
Excitation voltage: Accuracy: Drift: Protection:
0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 VDC software programmable (5 VDC = default setting) 0.05 % ±1 mV typ. 20
ppm (max. 40 ppm) Continuous short to ground
Bridge types:
Full bridge 1⁄2 bridge with internal completion (software programmable) 1⁄4 bridge with internal resistor
for 120 and 350 Ω (software programmable)
Bridge resistance:
120 Ω to 10 kΩ (down to 87 Ω on request)
Shunt calibration:
Two internal shunt resistors or external resistor for shunt calibration (175k & 59k88)
Zero adjust:
Full automatic, ±200 % of F.S. (via push button or software)
Bandwidth (-3dB):
20 kHz (±1.5 dB @ f0)
Filters (lowpass):
10 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, 5 kHz, 20 kHz (±1.5 dB @ f0)
Filter selection:
Push button or software
Filter characteristics:
Bessel or Butterworth (software programmable) 40 dB / decade (12 dB / octave)
Typ. SNR @ max. bandwidth:
71 dB @ Gain 1000 79 dB @ Gain 20
Typical CMRR:
73 dB @ 0 Hz 71 dB @ 400 Hz 70 dB @ 1 kHz
Overvoltage protection:
±10 VDC
Isolation:
350 VDC (for input and excitation)
Output voltage:
±5 V
Output resistance:
< 10 Ω
Output current:
Max. 5 mA
Output protection:
Continuous short to ground
RS-485 interface:
Yes
TEDS support:
No
MSI support:
Manually support of MSI-BR-TH-x adapter
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Parameter
DAQP-BRIDGE-A
Power supply voltage:
±9 VDC (±1 %)
Power consumption:
Typ. 1.44 W @ 350 Ω, 1.83 W @ 120 Ω (both full bridge @ 5 VDC excitation) Max: 3 W (depending on
sensor) *
Module Pin-outs
⇒⇒ CAUTION: The sensor shield can be connected to either pin 4 (SUB-D version only) or the housing of the 9-pin
SUB-D / 8-pin LEMO connector, depending on your application.
Full bridge signal connection
6-wire sensor connection
4-wire sensor connection
⇒⇒ Sense leads (SUB-D: pin 3 and 6; LEMO: pin 5 and 6) MUST be connected!
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-335
Half bridge signal connection
3-wire sensor connection
⇒⇒ Sense leads (SUB-D: pin 3 and 6; LEMO: pin 5 and 6) MUST be connected!
Quarter bridge signal connection
3-wire sensor connection
⇒⇒ Sense leads (SUB-D: pin 3 and 6; LEMO: pin 5 and 6) MUST be connected!
⇒⇒ 1) ‘Shunt’ has to be connected only if shunt calibration is required, otherwise it can be left unconnected.
Potentiometric and µV measurements
The differential amplifier of the DAQP-BRIDGE-B module is designed to measure small voltages (with very
low offset drift and high amplification). These are exactly the same requirements than for μV amplifiers.
By setting the bridge input type to Voltage you can select input ranges from ±0.5 mV to ±500 mV. The
advantages of using bridge amplifiers for μV measurements: only one multifunctional module with high
bandwidth, a lot of input and filter ranges and a programmable offset (Auto Zero).
The correct hook-up is simply connecting your µV signal to the IN+ and IN- pins of the this module, and be
sure to use a shielded cable and connect the drain to the ground pin of the DSUB connector on the DAQ
module.
13-336| OWNER’s GUIDE
A potentiometer can be seen similar to a half bridge sensor with ±500 mV/V sensitivity. Therefore potentiometric sensors can be measured with bridge amplifiers.
The advantages of using bridge amplifiers for potentiometric measurements: only one multifunctional module with high bandwidth and a programmable offset (by adjusting the offset and range, you can focus on a
certain potentiometer position with higher resolution).
Module configuration
DAQP-BRIDGE-A:
Excitation: 0.5 V
Range:
500 mV/V
The following table shows how the mV/V ranges are calculated. The ranges depend on the gain and the
excitation voltage (note that commas indicate decimal points in this table):
⇒⇒ Always change the excitation voltage before changing the input range, otherwise you will not get the required
500 mV/V range.
Potentiometer sensor connection
The left side shows the connections on the signal conditioner, while the right side represents your potentiometric sensor:
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-337
DAQP-BRIDGE-B Strain Gage Module
Input sensitivity: Bandwidth, filter: Bridge offset: Bridge completion:
Shunt calibration: Custom range: TEDS: Signal connection:
0.05 mV/V to 1000 mV/V
200 kHz, 9 selectable lowpass filters (10 Hz to 100 kHz)
Automatic offset adjustment (approx. ±200 % of range)
Internal completion for 1⁄2 and 1⁄4 bridge (120 and 350 Ω)
Supports 3- and 4-wire 1⁄4 bridge connection
Two internal shunts or external shunt calibration possible
Programmable range for sensitivity, excitation and offset
Support for TEDS sensors
9-pin SUB-D or 8-pin LEMO connector (optional)
DAQP-BRIDGE-B specifications
Parameter
DAQP-BRIDGE-B (revision 2)
Gain:
10 to 10 000
Input ranges: @ 5 VDC excitation:
±0.5 1), ±1, ±2.5, ±5, ±10, ±25, ±50, ±100, ±250, ±500 mV ±0.1 1), ±0.2, ±0.5, ±1, ±2, ±5, ±10, ±20,
±50, ±100 mV/V
Range selection:
Push button or software
Input impedance:
> 100 MΩ
Input noise:
3.5 nV * √Hz
Accuracy @ 5 VDC excitation:
±0.05 % F.S.
Gain drift @ 5 VDC excitation:
10 ppm/K of range ±0.02 μV/V/K
Excitation voltage: Accuracy: Drift: Protection:
0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 VDC software programmable (5 VDC = default setting) ±0.05 % ±0.7 mV ±10
ppm/K ±50 μV/K Continuous short to ground
Bridge types:
4- or 6-wire full bridge 3- or 5-wire 1⁄2 bridge with internal completion (software programmable) 3- or
4-wire 1⁄4 bridge with internal resistor for 120 and 350 Ω (software programmable) 1)
Bridge resistance:
87 Ω to 10 kΩ @ ≤ 5 VDC excitation (120 Ω to 10 kΩ @ 10 VDC excitation)
Shunt calibration:
Two internal shunt resistors
Zero adjust:
Full automatic, ±200 % of F.S. (via push button or software)
Bandwidth (-3dB):
200 kHz (±1.5 dB @ f0) 1)
Filters (lowpass):
10 Hz, 30 Hz, 100 Hz, 300 Hz, 1 kHz, 3 kHz, 10 kHz, 30 kHz, 100 kHz (±1.5 dB @ f0)
Filter selection:
Push button or software
Filter characteristics:
Bessel or Butterworth (software programmable) 40 dB / decade (12 dB / octave)
Typ. SNR @ 100 kHz [1 kHz] and 5 VDC
excitation:
66 dB [84 dB] @ 1 mV/V 82 dB [100 dB] @ 50 mV/V
Typ. CMRR @ 0.1 mV/V [1 mV/V] and 5 VDC
excitation:
125 dB [120 dB] @ DC 115 dB [110 dB] @ 400 Hz 110 dB [105 dB] @ 1 kHz
Max. common mode voltage:
±6 V
Overvoltage protection:
±10 VDC
Output voltage:
±5 V
Output resistance:
< 10 Ω
Output current:
Max. 5 mA
Output protection:
Continuous short to ground
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Parameter
DAQP-BRIDGE-B (revision 2)
RS-485 interface:
Yes
TEDS: Supported TEDS chips
Hardware support for TEDS (Transducer Electronic Data Sheet) DS2406, DS2430A, DS2432, DS2433
MSI support:
Automatic MSI-BR-TH-x support
Power supply voltage:
±9 VDC (±1 %)
Power consumption:
Typ. 1 W @ 350 Ω, 1.3 W @ 120 Ω (both full bridge @ 5 VDC excitation) Max: 2 W (depending on sensor)
1) 4-wire 1⁄4 bridge or ±0.5 mV input range will limit the bandwidth to 30 kHz
Module Pin-outs
⇒⇒ CAUTION: The sensor shield can be connected to either pin 4 (SUB-D version only) or the housing of the 9-pin
SUB-D / 8-pin LEMO connector, depending on your application.
Full bridge signal connection
6-wire sensor connection
4-wire sensor connection
⇒⇒ Sense leads (SUB-D: pin 3 and 6; LEMO: pin 5 and 6) MUST be connected!
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-339
Half bridge signal connection
5-wire sensor (sense wired at the sensor) 3-wire sensor (sense wired at the connector)
⇒⇒ Sense leads (SUB-D: pin 3 and 6; LEMO: pin 5 and 6) MUST be connected!
Quarter bridge signal connection
4-wire sensor (sense wired at the sensor)
3-wire sensor (sense wired at the connector)
⇒⇒ Sense leads (SUB-D: pin 3 and 6; LEMO: pin 5 and 6) MUST be connected!
⇒⇒ 1) ‘R+’ has to be connected only if shunt calibration is required, otherwise it can be left unconnected.
Potentiometric and µV measurements
The differential amplifier of the DAQP-BRIDGE-B module is designed to measure small voltages (with very
low offset drift and high amplification). These are exactly the same requirements than for μV amplifiers.
By setting the bridge input type to Voltage you can select input ranges from ±0.5 mV to ±500 mV. The
advantages of using bridge amplifiers for μV measurements: only one multifunctional module with high
bandwidth, a lot of input and filter ranges and a programmable offset (Auto Zero).
The correct hook-up is simply connecting your µV signal to the IN+ and IN- pins of the this module, and be
sure to use a shielded cable and connect the drain to the ground pin of the DSUB connector on the DAQ
module.
13-340| OWNER’s GUIDE
A potentiometer can be seen similar to a half bridge sensor with ±500 mV/V sensitivity. Therefore potentiometric sensors can be measured with bridge amplifiers.
The advantages of using bridge amplifiers for potentiometric measurements: only one multifunctional module with high bandwidth and a programmable offset (by adjusting the offset and range, you can focus on a
certain potentiometer position with higher resolution).
Module configuration
DAQP-BRIDGE-B:
Excitation: 1V
Range:
500 mV/V
The following table shows how the mV/V ranges are calculated. The ranges depend on the gain and the
excitation voltage (note that commas indicate decimal points in this table):
⇒⇒ Always change the excitation voltage before changing the input range, otherwise you will not
get the required 500 mV/V range.
Potentiometer sensor connection
The left side shows the connections on the signal conditioner, while the right side represents your potiometric sensor:
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-341
DAQP-CFB Carrier Frequency/LVDT module
Ideal for these kinds of sensors:
Special features:
Input ranges: Bandwidth: Isolation: Signal connection:
full bridge; half bridge; quarter bridge 120 Ω;
quarter bridge 350 Ω inductive full bridge;
inductive half bridge (such as most LVTD Sensors)
Automatic balancing up to 400% of range
Internal completion for 1⁄2 and 1⁄4 bridge
Two internal shunts for completion
0.1 mV/V to 1000 mV/V
2.3 kHz
N/A
9-pin SUB-D
DAQP-CFB specifications
Parameter
DAQP-CFB
Input ranges:
0.1 mV/V to 1000 mV/V
Inductive input ranges:
5 mV/V to 1000 mV/V (inductive range is limited from 20 mVRMS to 1000 mVRMS input voltage)
Input voltage ranges:
0.2 mVRMS to 1000 mVRMS
Bridge resistance:
60 - 1,000 Ω depending on excitation voltage
Excitation voltage level:
1, 2, 5 VRMS
Excitation voltage frequency:
5 kHz sine wave ±20 Hz
Maximum excitation current:
30 mARMS short circuit protected
Excitation voltage synchronization:
Internal or external
Excitation voltage accuracy:
5 VRMS ±5 mVRMS; 2 VRMS ±2.5 mVRMS; 1 VRMS ±2.5 mVRMS
Excitation voltage drift:
typically 50 ppm/°K
Excitation frequency drift:
typically 20 ppm/°K
Nonlinearity:
±0.02 % FS
Accuracy:
±0.2 % of reading ±0.1 % of range
Offset drift:
±0.003 μV/V/K ±40 ppm of Range/°K
Gain drift:
within ±30 ppm/°K
Balance adjusting range:
±400 % of Range (±200 % at 1 V excitation)
Capacitive imbalance compensation:
Approx. 1000 pF
Phase adjustment range:
±40° (inductive mode only)
Balance adjusment accuracy:
within ±0.1 % FS
Supported sensors:
full bridge; half bridge; quarter bridge 120 Ω; quarter bridge 350 Ω
inductive full bridge; inductive half bridge (typically LVTD Sensors)
Shunt calibration:
internal 50 kΩ and 100 kΩ Shunt
Completion and shunt resistor accuracy:
±0.05 %
-3 dB Bandwidth:
DC - 2.3 kHz
Filters (lowpass):
10, 30, 100, 300, 1 kHz
Filter characteristics:
2nd order Bessel, 2nd order Butterworth (40 dB/ decade)
Typ. SNR @ 1000 Hz [100 Hz]
and 2 VRMS excitation:
78 dB [85 dB] @ 1 mV/V
80 dB [87 dB] @ 100 mV/V
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Parameter
DAQP-CFB
Over voltage protection
±10 V
Output voltage:
±5V
Output current:
±5 mA
Output protection:
Continuous short to ground
Power consumption:
max. 1.5 W
Supported TEDS chips:
DS2406, DS2430, DS2432, DS2433, DS2431 1)
Weight:
within 250 (±30) g
1) TEDS only supported by revision 2 of this module (or higher)
Module Pin-outs
-- Pins 6 and 8 can be left unconnected
Software controlled functions
Amplifier balance
Amplifier balance allows elimination of the amplifier offset. The input is shorted and all ranges are balanced
by within the module. Any previously stored sensor offset values are cleared.
Sensor balance
Sensor balance is similar to the amplifier balance. Because the input is not shorted, the sensor offset is
automatically adjusted to zero.
Short
When measuring the absolute strain it is possible to disconnect the sensor via software and short the input.
Shunt
Two different internal shunts resistors (50 kΩ and 100 kΩ) can be connected for easy function or calibration
check. With this technique the whole measurement chain (sensor, amplifier and analog to digital conversa-
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-343
tion) are checked. The table below shows the shunt calibration result for typical strain gage resistor values.
Strain gage resistor
Shunt resistor
Result
120 Ω
50 kΩ
0.6 mV/V
120 Ω
100 kΩ
0.3 mV/V
350 Ω
50 kΩ
1.74 mV/V
350 Ω
100 kΩ
0.87 mV/V
The shunt resistor check is not possible in inductive bridge operation mode.
Cal
Independent of the value of the input signal, the CAL function sets the output to 80% of the actual range.
The base of this calibration signal is the excitation voltage. Therefore this is an easy check of the excitation
voltage. The typical reasons why the excitation is not working are short curcuit of the excitation at the cabling
or sensor defects, too high a load for the excitation amplifier (please decrease the excitation level), or wrong
settings of the synchronization mode (no master assigned).
Synchronizing multiple amplifiers
Due the high amplification of strain gage amplifiers it is needed to synchronize the excitation voltage if multiple channels are used. This is done with Pin 8 of the back plane connector. See the detailed DAQ modules
manual for details about how to set up the synchronization of multiple DAQP-CFB modules.
Sensor connections
Inductive half bridge sensors
LVDT sensors
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Full bridge signal connection
4-wire sensor for standard bridge & inductive bridge (Sense wired at the connector)
-- Sense leads (SUB-D: pin 3 and 6) could be connected to be compatible to other modules.
Half bridge signal connection
3-wire sensor for standard bridge (Sense wired at the sensor)
Quarter bridge signal connection
3-wire sensor for standard bridge (Sense wired at the connector)
-- Sense leads (SUB-D: pin 3 and 6) could be connected to be compatible to other DEWE-BRIDGE amplifier.
-- 1) ‘R+’ has to be connected only if shunt calibration is required, otherwise it can be left unconnected.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-345
DAQP-ACC-A IEPE Accelerometer module
Ideal for these kinds of sensors:
Input ranges: Bandwidth: Isolation: Signal connection:
Constant current type accelerometers, aka
IEPE, ICP, I.C.P.®, or Piezotronic
±5 V, ±1.66 V, ±500 mV, ±166 mV, ±50 mV
300 kHz
N/A
BNC connector
DAQP-ACC-A specifications
Parameter
DAQP-ACC-A
Input ranges:
±5 V, ±1.66 V, ±500 mV, ±166 mV, ±50 mV
Gain:
1, 3, 10, 30, 100
Range/gain selection:
Pushbutton or software selection
Gain error:
0.5 %
Sensor types:
IEPE (constant current) only
Sensor excitation:
4 or 8 mA (software selection), 10 %, up to 28 VDC
Input impedance:
5 or 7 MΩ (depending on time constant), in parallel with 1.2 nF
Input voltage range:
Voltage < 4 V
Voltage > 19 V
-3 dB Bandwidth:
Filters (high-pass)
4 to 19 V
”Shortcut” detection
“No sensor” detection
From selected highpass filter to 300 kHz (+2 to -5 dB @ fg)
0.5 Hz filter
5 Hz filter
0.5 Hz and 5 Hz (software selection)
0.32 s time constant
0.032 s time constant
Filters (low-pass):
1 kHz, 10 kHz, 100 kHz, 300 kHz
other filter steps available as an option upon request
Filter selection:
Pushbutton or software selection
Filter characteristics
Typ. SNR @ max. bandwidth
up to 100 kHz
300 kHz
Gain 1 and 3
Gain 10
Gain 30
Gain 100
Butterworth
100 dB / decade (30 dB / octave)
80 dB / decade (24 dB / octave)
94 dB
91 dB
80 dB
73 dB
Output voltage:
±5 V
Output resistance:
<10 Ω
Output current:
5 mA maximum
Output protection:
Continuous short to ground
Power supply voltage:
±9 VDC (±10 %)
RS-485 interface for module control:
Yes
TEDS support:
N/A
Power consumption:
Typical 0.8 to 1.0 W (depending on sensor)
13-346| OWNER’s GUIDE
Sensor connection
Standard IEPE accelerometer or microphone connector and cable. Use a standard BNC plug on the Dewetron module side. The sensor side may be molded into the sensor, or a modular connector with BNC, 10-32,
etc.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-347
DAQP-CHARGE-A Charge/IEPE module
Handles both of these sensors:
Special features:
IEPE sensitivity:
Charge sensitivity:
Bandwidth: Isolation: Signal connection:
Charge type accelerometers and microphones, plus
IEPE (Piezotron) accelerometers and mics
Directly outputs acceleration, velocity or displacement
0, 20, 40 and 60 dB (±5 V, ±500 mV, ±50 mV, ±5 mV)
5, 50, 500, 5000 and 50000 pC
0.1 Hz to 50 kHz
N/A
BNC (10-32 microdot adapter included)
DAQP-CHARGE-A specifications
Parameter
DAQP-CHARGE-A
Input sensitivity:
IEPE mode:
CHARGE mode:
0, 20, 40, 60 dB (±5 V, ±500 mV, ±50 mV, ±5 mV)
5, 50, 500, 5000, 50000 pC
Supported sensor types:
Dynamic CHARGE and IEPE (constant current)
Sensor type selection:
Pushbutton or software selection
Gain accuracy:
1% full scale
Input range fine tuning:
Software selectable
Range selection:
Pushbutton: fixed ranges
Software: every range
Integration on-board:
Single (velocity) or double (displacement), 0 dB at 15.9 H
LED indicators:
Range and filter:
ICP LED:
OVL LED:
A, V and D LED:
5 LEDs
Active with connected ICP® sensor, inactive for charge input
Overload control (output voltage > 5 V)
Indicator for acceleration, velocity and displacement output
Constant current source:
3.2 to 5.6 mA, > 24 V
Filters (high-pass):
0.1 Hz, 1 Hz, 10 Hz (±2 dB @ f0)
Filters (low-pass):
100 Hz, 1, 3, 10, 50 kHz (±2 dB @ f0)
Filter selection:
Push button or software selection
Filter characteristics:
Butterworth
80 dB / decade (24 dB / octave)
-3 dB Bandwidth:
0.1 Hz to 50 kHz (±2 dB @ f0)
Typ. SNR @ max. bandwidth
5000 pC
500 pC
50 PC
5 pC
5 pC
90 dB
87 dB
73 dB
54 dB
60 dB @ 10 kHz
Output voltage:
±5V
Output noise:
< 8 mV (all ranges with 50 kHz filter)
Power consumption:
0.6 W to 1.2 W (depending on sensor)
Power supply voltage:
±9 VDC (±10 %)
TEDS support:
N/A
RS-485 interface for module control
Yes
13-348| OWNER’s GUIDE
Sensor connection
Standard charge or IEPE accelerometer or microphone connector and cable. Use a standard BNC plug on
the Dewetron module side. The sensor side may be molded into the sensor, or a modular connector with
BNC, 10-32, etc.
BNC to Microdot adapter
This adapter is included for no additional cost with the DAQP-CHARGE-A module.
-- Using an IEPE® sensor with charge input selected (or a Charge sensor with IEPE® input selected) will not destroy
the module or the sensor, but the measured values will be incorrect.
-- When using the fine tuning option of the input range (3686 steps per decade), the module is no longer in a
calibrated state. In this case the input range LED’s are not active!
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-349
DAQP-CHARGE-B Isolated Static/Dynamic Charge module
Charge sensors, dynamic or static
Special capability:
Selectable time bases for long settling time sensors
Charge drift < 0.03 pC/sec
Ideal for these kinds of sensors:
Input ranges: Bandwidth: Isolation: Signal connection:
±100 to ±1 000 000 pC
100 kHz
350 VDC
BNC connector
DAQP-CHARGE-B specifications
Parameter
DAQP-CHARGE-B
Input ranges:
±100, ±500, ±2 000, ±10 000, ±40 000, ±200 000, ±1 000 000 pC
Supported sensor types:
Dynamic and static CHARGE accelerometers and microphones
Gain accuracy:
0.5 % of range (1 % of range for 100 and 500 pC)
Gain linearity:
±0.5 %
-3 dB Bandwidth:
100 kHz (±1.5 dB @ f0)
Range selection:
Pushbutton or software selection
Filters (low-pass):
10 Hz, 30 Hz, 100 Hz, 300 Hz, 1 kHz, 3 kHz, 10 kHz, 30 kHz, 100 kHz (±2 dB @ f0)
Filter selection:
Push button or software selection
Filter characteristics:
Bessel or Butterworth (software selectable)
40 dB / decade (12 dB / octave)
Time constant:
Long
Highpass filter on
DC mode
2 to 1000 sec.
Drift input current @ 25 °C:
< ±0.03 pC/s
Offset drift:
50 ppm of Range/°K
Amplifier reset:
Push button or software
Offset after reset:
±2 mV or ±1 pC (greater value is valid)
Typ. SNR @ max. bandwidth:
Ouput noise:
Range 100 pC
Range > 2000 pC
@ 100 kHz
@ 30 kHz
76 dB (82 dB @ 30 kHz / 85 dB @ 10 kHz )
81 dB (89 dB @ 30 kHz / 93 dB @ 10 kHz )
0.3 mVRMS + 0.01 pCRMS
0.12 mVRMS + 0.008 pCRMS
Output voltage:
±5V
Output noise:
< 8 mV (all ranges with 50 kHz filter)
Cable noise:
< 10-5 pCRMS/pF
CMR:
< 0.02 pC/V (difference between input and output ground)
Input overvoltage protection:
1 kV ESD
Isolation:
350 VDC
Power consumption:
1.5 W to 3.5 W (depending on signal range and frequency)
Power supply voltage:
±9 VDC (±1 %)
TEDS support:
N/A
RS-485 interface for module control
Yes
13-350| OWNER’s GUIDE
Sensor connection
Standard charge accelerometer or microphone connector and cable. Use a standard BNC plug on the
Dewetron module side. The sensor side may be molded into the sensor, or a modular connector with BNC,
10-32, etc.
BNC to Microdot adapter
This adapter is available as an option with the DAQP-CHARGE-B module.
High pass filter
The time constant of the internal highpass filter depends on the used input range. For range 1 (100 pC, 500
pC and 2,000 pC) the time constant is 2 seconds (or 0.07 Hz), for range 2 (10,000 pC and 40,000 pC) the
time constant is 40 seconds (or 3.9 mHz). For the highest both ranges (200,000 pC and 1,000,000 pC) the
time constant is 1,000 seconds or 0.16 mHz).
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-351
DAQP-THERM Isolated Thermocouple module
Ideal for these kinds of sensors:
Special feature:
Cold junction compensation: Linearization:
Bandwidth: Isolation: Signal connection:
Thermocouple types K, J, T, R, S, N, E, B, L, C, U
Freely programmable measuring range!
On-board and automatic
On-board and automatic
3 kHz
350 VDC
Standard mini T/C connector, universal white
DAQP-THERM specifications
Parameter
DAQP-THERM
Thermocouple types:
K, J, T, R, S, N, E, B, L, C, U
Range selection:
Min. to max. of the input range is freely programmable within the full thermocouple input span
CJC absolute accuracy:
±0.2 °C
CJC stability:
0.01 °C/°C ambient temperature change
Linearization:
DSP based linearization
Accuracy:
Typical 0.3° for type K including CJC error; details see table below
Nonlinearity:
> 0.01°C
Input resistance:
> 1 MΩ
-3 dB Bandwidth:
3 kHz
Filters:
3 Hz, 10 Hz, 30 Hz, 100 Hz, 300 Hz, 1 kHz
Filter characteristics:
Butterworth or Bessel, 2nd, 4th, 8th order programmable
Isolation:
±1000 VRMS continuous (for input excitation and TEDS interface)
Typ. CMRR @ 3kHz:
> 160 dB
Open thermocouple detection:
100 MΩ pull up; software selectable
Output voltage:
±5 V; 0 to 5 V; (±10 V and 0 to 10 V possible only with special DEWE-30)
Output resistance:
100 Ω
Output protection:
Continuous short to ground
Power supply voltage:
±9 VDC (±1 %)
Power consumption:
1 W typical
TEDS support:
N/A
Connector:
Universal mini termocouple connector, white color code
Standard MINI thermocouple connector
13-352| OWNER’s GUIDE
DAQP-THERM Input ranges and detailed specifications
Thermocouple
Input range
Accuracy
Type
Standard
min
[°C]
max
[°C]
-270 to
-200 °C
[°C]
-200 to
-100 °C
[°C]
-100 to 0 °C
[°C]
0 to 100 °C
[°C]
100 °C to fullscale [%
of reading + °C]
J
DIN EN 60584-1
-270
1372
6.70
0.70
0.35
0.26
0.027
0.26
K
DIN EN 60584-1
-210
1200
0.68
0.60
0.32
0.25
0.019
0.25
T
DIN EN 60584-1
-270
400
4.37
0.69
0.37
0.26
R
DIN EN 60584-1
-50
1760
0.85
0.59
0.009
0.44
S
DIN EN 60584-1
-50
1760
0.77
0.58
0.012
0.45
N
DIN EN 60584-1
-270
1300
9.14
0.77
0.37
0.28
0.017
0.27
E
DIN EN 60584-1
-270
1000
4.25
0.60
0.33
0.24
0.018
0.23
L
DIN 43710
0
900
0.25
C
ASTM E988-96
0
2310
0.36
U
DIN 43710
-200
600
0.64
0.37
DIN EN 60584-1
0
1820
0.33
0.045
0.26
0 to 500°C
B
0.23
0.26
0.33
0.24
> 500°C
0.44
All values given in Celcius on these pages.
Software programmable module range
Regardless which input mode is selected, the module measurement range is completely free programmable.
Simply by entering the lower and upper limit the amplifier adjusts its gain and offset factors automatically.
The amplifier output is scaled to either ±5 V or 0 to 5 V. Converting a nonlinear temperature signal from a
thermocouple to a linear analog output is one of the key features of this amplifier.
Open thermocouple detection
The open thermocouple detection of the DAQP-THERM consists of an 100 MΩ pull-up resistor. That typically drives a 50 nA current through the sensor which normally does not take effect on the measurement, but
is enough to generate an input overflow if the sensor breaks. Despite of this small current, there are sensors
available where this current generates a big error. These sensors are typically non-contact infrared thermocouples and fast response thermocouples. In that case the open thermocouple detection can simply be
deactivated in the software. Sensors with up to 50 kΩ output impedance can be measured in this way.
CJC
The DAQP-THERM comes with an integrated cold junction compensation sensor with an absolute accuracy
of ±0.2 °C. In order to archieve this accuracy the sensor has to be connected for at least 5 minutes to the
thermocouple connector (CJC equilibrium time).
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-353
DAQP-MULTI Isolated Multifunction module
Thermocouple:
Bridge: Voltage input: RTD:
Resistance: Bandwidth: Isolation: Signal connection:
Freely programmable ranges within full thermocouple input span
±0.5 to ±1000 mV/mA
±5 mV to ±5 V (free programmable within ±5 V)
Resistance Temperature Detector (Pt100 to Pt2000),
freely programmable ranges within full RTD input span
1 Ω to 1 MΩ (free programmable between 1 Ω and 1 MΩ)
3 kHz
1000 VRMS continuous
Standard miniature thermocouple connector, and
9-pin SUB-D connector
V
DAQP-MULTI Specifications
Parameter
DAQP-MULTI
Input types:
Thermocouple (TC); Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD); Voltage; Resistance; Bridge with constant
current excitation
Thermocouples
Sensor types:
K, J, T, R, S, N, E, B, L, C, U, others on request
Range:
Min. to max. of the input range is free programmable within the full thermocouple input span
CJC absolute accuracy:
±0.2 °C
CJC stability:
0.01 °C/°C ambient temperature change
Accuracy:
Typical 0.3° for type K including CJC error; details see table below.
Linearization:
DSP based linearization on-board
Non-linearity:
> 0.01°C
Open thermocouple detection:
100 MΩ pull up; software selectable
Connector:
Mini thermocouple connector with integrated cold junction compensation sensor
RTD
Sensor types:
Pt100, Pt200, Pt500, Pt1000, Pt2000, others on request
Range:
Min. and max. of the input range is free programmable within the full RTD input span
Constant current:
Pt100: 1 mA; Pt200, Pt500: 0.5 mA; Pt1000, Pt2000: 0.2 mA
Accuracy:
Typical accuracy 0.15 °C for Pt100, details see table below
Linearization:
DSP based linearization on-board
Non-linearity:
> 0.01 °C
Voltage
Input ranges:
±5 mV, ±10 mV, ±20 mV, ±50 mV, ±100 mV, ±200 mV, ±500 mV, ±1 V, ±2 V, ±5 V, free programmable
within ±5V
Accuracy:
0 to ±100 mV Range:
0.02 % of reading ±0.01 % of Range ±5 μV
>±100mV to ±5V Range: 0.02 % of reading ±0.01 % of Range ±100 μV
Offset drift:
Typical ±0.3 μV/°K ±10 ppm of range/°K
Gain drift:
Typical 15 ppm/°K
Input impedance:
> 100 MΩ (power off: 50 kΩ)
Input noise:
8 nV * √Hz
13-354| OWNER’s GUIDE
Parameter
DAQP-MULTI
Resistance
Ranges:
1, 3, 10, 30, 100, 300, 1k, 3k, 10k, 30k, 100k, 1M, free programmable between 1 Ω and 1 MΩ
Accuracy:
See table below
Drift:
Typical 15 ppm/°K
Constant current:
From 5 μA to 5 mA depending on range
Bridge
Ranges:
0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, 1000 mV/mA
Accuracy:
0.02 % of reading ±0.01 % of Range ±5 μV
Offset drift:
typical ±0.3 μV/°K ±10 ppm of range/°K
Gain drift:
typical 15ppm/°K
Input impedance:
> 100 MΩ (power off: 50 kΩ)
Input noise:
8 nV * √Hz
Automatic bridge balance:
±200 % of range
Supported sensors:
4 wire full bridges
Connector:
DSUB 9, standard Dewetron bridge pin-outs
Excitation current:
1, 2, 4 mA; software programmable
Accuracy:
0 to 200 μA
200 μA to 5 mA
0.02 % ±50 nA
0.02 % ±1 μA
Drift:
15 ppm/°K
Compliance voltage:
15 V
Source resistance:
> 150 kΩ
General Specifications
-3dB Bandwidth:
3 kHz
Filters:
3 Hz, 10 Hz, 30 Hz, 100 Hz, 300 Hz, 1 kHz
Group delay:
300 μs with highest filter
Filter characteristics:
Butterworth or Bessel, 2nd, 4th, 8th order programmable
Typ. CMRR @ 3kHz
>160 dB
Isolation:
±1000 VRMS continuous (for input excitation and TEDS interface)
Over-voltage protection:
±100 V between inputs (clamping voltage: 5 V @ TC input; 11 V @ Voltage input)
Output voltage:
±5 V; 0 to 5V; (±10 V and 0 to 10 V with special DEWE-30)
Output resistance:
22 Ω
Output current:
Max. 5 mA
Output protection:
Continuous short to ground
RS485 interface for module control:
Yes
Supported TEDS chips:
DS2406, DS2430A, DS2431, DS2432, DS2433,DS28EC20
MSI support:
No
Power supply voltage:
±9 VDC (±1 %)
Power consumption:
1 W typical
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-355
DAQP-MULTI Input ranges and detailed specifications for THERMOCOUPLES
Thermocouple
Input range
Accuracy
min
[°C]
-270 to
-200 °C
[°C]
Type
Standard
J
DIN EN 60584-1
-270
1372
6.70
K
DIN EN 60584-1
-210
1200
0.68
T
DIN EN 60584-1
-270
400
4.37
R
DIN EN 60584-1
-50
S
DIN EN 60584-1
N
max
[°C]
-200 to
-100 °C
[°C]
-100 to 0 °C
[°C]
0 to 100 °C
[°C]
0.70
0.35
0.26
0.027
0.26
0.60
0.32
0.25
0.019
0.25
0.69
0.37
0.26
1760
0.85
0.59
0.009
0.44
-50
1760
0.77
0.58
0.012
0.45
DIN EN 60584-1
-270
1300
9.14
0.77
0.37
0.28
0.017
0.27
E
DIN EN 60584-1
-270
1000
4.25
0.60
0.33
0.24
0.018
0.23
L
DIN 43710
0
900
0.25
C
ASTM E988-96
0
2310
0.36
U
DIN 43710
-200
600
0.64
0.37
DIN EN 60584-1
0
1820
0.23
0.33
0.045
0.26
0 to 500°C
B
100 °C to fullscale [%
of reading + °C]
0.33
0.24
> 500°C
0.26
0.44
DAQP-MULTI Input ranges and detailed specifications for RTDs
RTDs
Type
Standard
Input range
Current
Accuracy
min
[°C]
[mA]
-200 to -100
°C [°C]
max
[°C]
-100 to 0 °C
[°C]
100 °C to full-scale [%
of reading + °C]
Pt100 (385)
DIN EN 60751
-200
850
0.2
0.14
0.21
0.07
0.21
Pt200 (385)
DIN EN 60751
-200
850
0.1
0.18
0.27
0.10
0.27
Pt500 (385)
DIN EN 60751
-200
850
0.2
0.34
0.42
0.09
0.42
Pt1000 (385)
DIN EN 60751
-200
850
0.2
0.22
0.29
0.09
0.29
Pt2000 (385)
DIN EN 60751
-200
850
0.2
0.25
0.35
0.12
0.36
-200
850
0.2
0.14
0.21
0.07
0.21
Pt100 (3926)
DAQP-MULTI Input ranges and detailed
DAQP-MULTI detailed specifications
13-356| OWNER’s GUIDE
specifications for RESISTANCE
for EXCITATION CURRENT
Resistance
Range
Current
Accuracy
[Ω]
[mA]
% of reading
Excitation
% of range
1,000,000
0.005
0.04
1.02
0 to 200 μA
300,000
0.015
0.04
0.35
>0.2 to 5 mA
100,000
0.05
0.04
0.11
30,000
0.1
0.04
0.07
10,000
0.1
0.04
0.08
3,000
0.2
0.04
0.07
1,000
0.5
0.04
0.25
300
1
0.04
0.18
100
1
0.04
0.12
30
2
0.04
0.08
10
4
0.04
0.06
3
5
0.04
0.10
1
5
0.04
0.23
% of reading
[µA]
0.02
0.05
0.02
1
Sensor connections
9-pin DSUB connector
Mini thermocouple connector
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-357
Resistance, RTD 2-wire and 4-wire
-- For resistance and RDT mode the 4-wire connection is recommended. The 2-wire connection will not compensate the wire
resistance.
Voltage Measurement
Bridge sensor
13-358| OWNER’s GUIDE
Thermocouple sensor
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-359
DAQP-FREQ-A Frequency to Voltage module
Ideal for these kinds of sensors:
Frequency ranges:
Special feature:
Input ranges: Isolation: Signal connection:
Frequency and tachometer sensors, hall effect F/V, optical speed
sensors, and more
100 Hz, 1 kHz, 5 kHz, 20 kHz, 100 kHz, 200 kHz
Second output from module: TTL clock mirror of input frequency
100 Hz, 1 kHz, 5 kHz, 20 kHz, 100 kHz, 200 kHz
350 VDC
9-pin SUB-D connector
DAQP-FREQ-A specifications
Parameter
DAQP-FREQ-A
Input ranges:
100 Hz, 1 kHz, 5 kHz, 20 kHz, 100 kHz, 200 kHz
Minimum input frequency:
2 % of selected range
Range selection:
Pushbutton or software selection
Accuracy:
±0.05 % (from 4 % to 100 % of range)
Input signal:
10 mV to 300 V
Note: the DSUB connector is only specified up to 250 V
For signals above 60 V do not use the metal housing of the provided DSUB connector
Input resistance:
1 MΩ
Input filters:
100 Hz, 1 kHz, 5 kHz, 20 kHz, 100 kHz, 200 kHz
Filter selection:
Pushbutton or software selection
Input coupling:
DC or AC (software selectable)
Trigger level:
10 mV to 130 V (software programmable)
Sensor supply:
+12 VDC, ±9 VDC (not isolated)
Input isolation:
350 VDC
Over-voltage protection:
Output filter:
Output signals:
±500 V peak / 350 VRMS
Filter characteristics
Selection
Main output
Secondary output
3 ranges with 1.5, 30 and 500 ms (10 - 90 %)
Butterworth, 60 dB / decade (18 dB / octave)
Automatically according to input range
Slow (default) or fast output filter selectable within the input range
±5 V according to input frequency
Secondary: TTL level trigger output signal
Output resistance:
< 10 mΩ
Output current:
5 mA max.
Output protection:
Continuous short to ground
Power consumption:
1 W max.
TEDS support:
N/A
Power supply voltage:
±9 VDC (±5 %)
13-360| OWNER’s GUIDE
Sensor connection
⇒⇒ Sensor supply voltages are not isolated - only the input (pin 2 and 7)!
⇒⇒ For signals above 60 V don’t use the metal housing of SUBD connector!
Sensors without power supply
Sensors with power supply
Open collector sensors (NPN)
Open collector sensors (PNP)
-- The value of the resistor depends on the sensor supply voltage and the open collector sensor.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, DAQ | 13-361
DAQN-V-OUT Isolated Voltage Output module
Module purpose:
1:1 (unity gain) isolation module, compatible
with AD series cards which have analog outputs
Input/Output range: ±10 V
Bandwidth: 400 Hz
Isolation: 1500 VRMS
Signal connection:
-B: Banana plugs
-BNC: BNC connector
-D: 9-pin SUB-D connector
OUT
DAQN-V-OUT specifications
Parameter
DAQN-V-OUT
Input range:
±10 V
Input range maximum:
±36 V maximum (damage will occur above ±36 V)
Input resistance:
50 MΩ
Output voltage range:
±10 V
Over range capability:
5 % @ 10 V output
Output drive:
50 mA max.
Output resistance:
0.5 Ω
Output current during fault, maximum:
75 mA
Output protection, transient:
ANSI/IEEE C37.90.1-1989
CMV, output to input, continuous:
1500 VRMS max.
ANSI/IEEE C37.90.1-1989
110 dB
Accuracy:
±0.05 % span (0 to 5 mA load)
NMR (-3 dB @ 400 Hz):
100 dB per decade above 400 Hz
Non-linearity:
0.02 % span
Transient
CMRR (50 / 60 Hz)
Stability:
Noise:
Offset
Span
Output ripple, 1 kHz bandwidth
±25 ppm/°C
±20 ppm/°C
2 mVpp
-3 dB Bandwidth:
400 Hz
Power supply voltage:
9 VDC ±5 %
Over voltage protection
±10 V
Power supply current:
350 mA full load, 135 mA no load
Power supply sensitivity:
±12.5 ppm/%
13-362| OWNER’s GUIDE
Output signal connections
DAQN-V-OUT-B module
Voltage output via banana plug cables
DAQN-V-OUT-BNC module
Voltage output via BNC cable
DAQN-V-OUT-B module
Voltage output via DSUB 9-pin cable
Pin
9-pin DSUB connector
1
Not connected
2
Not connected
3
Not connected
4
GND (not isolated)
5
+9 V (not isolated)
6
Not connected
7
OUT + (-10 to +10 V, isolated)
8
OUT - (-10 to +10 V, isolated)
9
-9V (not isolated)
⇒⇒ Use pin 4, 5 and 9 only as sensor supply (not isolated)!
⇒⇒ For signals above 60 V don’t use the metal housing of SUB-D connector!
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, PAD | 14-363
14
PAD series Signal Conditioners
PAD Series Common Information
Calibration information
All DEWETRON modules are calibrated at 25°C after a warmup time of 30 minutes and meet their specifications when leaving the factory. The time interval for recalibration depends on environmental conditions.
Typically, the calibration should be checked once a year.
Calibration certificates are available from DEWETRON as an option. DEWETRON offers several types:
„„ NIST traceable DEWETRON calibration certificate (USA CAL LAB only)
„„ ISO traceable DEWETRON certificate (European CAL LAB only)
„„ Calibration certificate according to ÖKD (equivalent to DKD)
This manual contains no calibration information. There is a separate calibration kit available for DAQ series
modules manual calibration. The CAL-KIT contains the required cables, software and instructions that you
need to add to your own calibration lab. It does not include a calibrator or volt meter.
General PAD module specifications
Module dimensions:
20 x 65 x 105 mm (0.79 x 2.56 x 4.13 in.)
(W x H x D without front cover and connectors)
Frontcover: 20 x 87 x 2 mm (0.79 x 3.43 x 0.08 in.)
(W x H x D without connector)
Environmental:
Temp. range storage: Temp. range operating:
Rel. humidity (MIL202): RFI susceptibility:
-30 °C to +85 °C (-22 °F to 185 °F)
-5 °C to +60 °C (23 °F to 140 °F)
0 to 95 % at 60 °C, non-condensing
±0.5 % span error at 400 MHz, 5 W, 3 m
All specifications within this manual are valid at 25 °C.
All modules are produced according to ISO9001 and ISO14001.
14-364| OWNER’s GUIDE
PAD Module Connectors
Front Panel Connector
Accessible to the user. The connector type and pin assignment varies
from module to module. Detailed pin assignment of each module is shown
in the appropriate module description.
Rear Connector
Not user accessible. 9-pin male SUB-D, interface to the Dewetron System.
HSI, DAQ, and PAD
module rear panel
RS-232/485 interface
PAD modules can be configured via RS-485 interface, and they require this interface for all data transfers.
The DEWE-3210 and DEWE-3211 include an internal RS-232/485 converter and interface. This converter
allows communication with all Dewetron signal conditioning modules.
To communicate with the modules, the RS-232 interface must be set to the following parameters:
baud rate:
9600
data bits: 8
parity: no parity
stop bits: 1
handshake: not required
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, PAD | 14-365
PAD Modules Table
Module
Chs
Input
type
Ranges
Voltage
±100 mV to ±50 V
Bandwidth
(BW)
Filters
(FILT)
Isolation
(ISO)
Overvoltage
protection
(OP)
Special
functions
BW: 6 Hz
FILT: 1 / 4 / 8
values
ISO: 350 VDC
OP: 150 VDC
Separate 24-bit
ADC per channel
BW: 6 Hz
FILT: 1 / 4 / 8
values
ISO: 350 VDC
OP: 15 VDC
Separate 24-bit
ADC per channel
ISO: 350 VDC
OP: 15 VDC
Separate 24-bit
ADC per channel
Voltage measurement
PAD-V8-P
V
8
Current
±20 mA
Voltage
±15, ±50, ±100, ±150 mV
-150 mV to +1.5V
Thermocouple
Types J, K, T with PAD-CB8
breakout box
RTDs
Pt100, Pt200, Pt500,
Pt1000, Pt2000, Ni120
Temperature and Ωic measurement
PAD-TH8-P + PAD-CB8-J/K/T
8
PAD-TH8-P + PAD-CB8-RTD
Resistors
up to 2 MΩ
BW: 6 Hz
FILT: 1 / 4 / 8
values
Digital output
Relay outputs (dry contacts)
--
ISO: 300 VDC
Max load:
0.5 A @ 60 VAC,
1 A @ 24 VDC
Voltage output
0 to 10V
Current output
0 to 20 mA, 4 to 20 mA
--
ISO: 300 VDC
--
8
Analog and digital outputs
PAD-DO7
7
PAD-AO1
1
OUT
Please see the following pages for details about each of the available PAD series modules and accessories.
-- Note: if you want to also use DAQ or HSI series modules in this expansion rack, then you must also have an
analog cable connecting it to the DEWE-3210 or DEWE-3211. In addition, there must be an A/D card inside the
DEWE-321x chassis with the appropriate number of ADCs available.
Hook-up Notes:
-- If using RS232 com port, you must configure the port used for additional PAD modules in the DS-7 settings >
hardware setup > analog tab.
-- Make sure “PAD modules” are checked
14-366| OWNER’s GUIDE
Adding PAD modules to your Dewtetron system:
PAD modules can be plugged directly into the DEWE-3210, because it has 8 slots for DAQ/PAD/HSI series
plug-in modules. But if you don’t want to give up one of these eight dynamic input slots, you can simply add
a DEWE-30 series chassis.
This method also allows the DEWE-3211 to utilze PAD series modules, since this model does not have any
slots on its chassis. When only PAD modules are installed into it, the DEWE-30 series expansion box connects easily via either RS485 connected to the Dewetron chassis’ EPAD interface, or via RS232C using the
Dewetron chassis’ COM port. DEWE-30 chassis are available with 4, 8, 16, 32, 48, or 64 slots.
-- Note: if you want to also use DAQ or HSI series modules in this expansion rack, then you must also have an
analog cable connecting it to the DEWE-3210 or DEWE-3211. In addition, there must be an A/D card inside the
DEWE-321x chassis with the appropriate number of ADCs available.
Typical hook-ups
PAD modules can plug directly into any DEWE system that has DAQ/PAD/HSI slots, or...
PAD modules can plug into a DEWE-30 chassis, and connect to a DEWE system via RS485 (always available on the EPAD connector in any DEWE mainframe)
When using PAD modules simply with a computer (not a DEWE computer), you can use the RS232 serial interface on the back of the DEWE-30 chassis to connect to your computer. If your computer does not
have RS232, you can obtain and use an RS232 to USB converter that will create a virtual com port on your
computer.
Do not connect both RS232 (USB) and RS485 interfaces at the same time.
If using RS232 com port, you must configure the port used for additional PAD modules in the DS-7 hardware
setup, analog tab.
Make sure that PAD modules are check-marked in the HARDWARE SETUP SCREEN when using DS-7
software
When adding external PAD modules, enter the number of them under “Additional PAD modules”
If adding a DEWE-30 via RS232, select the appropriate com port here for the additional PAD modules.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, PAD | 14-367
Addressing PAD modules
Each PAD module must have a unique address (just like DAQ modules). The address is stored inside the
PAD module in non-volatile memory. Therefore, if you remove a PAD module from one system, where it was
set to address 31, and plug it into a different Dewetron chassis, it will still report itself on the bus at address
31.
This can cause a conflict if you already have a module at this address. In addition, it will be confusing to you
when you hook up your signals to what you believe is PAD module at address 16, but the channels show up
on address 31. Therefore, it is vitally important that you set the addresses of any DAQ, PAD, or HSI modules
that you plug into your Dewetron system.
-- There is no need to set the addresses of MDAQ modules, except when initially installed at the factory.
There are essentially two ways to address your modules:
„„ FILL RACK PROCEDURE - this addresses all of your modules in sequence. This is what you should do
if you have been changing more than one module around, to ensure that every module is at the appropriate and unique address.
„„ FILL ONE MODULE PROCEDURE - easier and faster, when you simply want to exchange one module.
Let’s look at how to do each one of the above procedures:
Fill Rack (all Modules) Procedure
Within DEWESoft, go to the ACQUISITION MODE and select the SETUP screen, where you can see your
list of modules. Now click on the top of the AMPLIFIER COLUMN and you will see this menu:
Select the FILL RACK option, and the software will prompt you like this:
14-368| OWNER’s GUIDE
Follow the instruction to press the TOP black button on the module in the first slot, which is always SLOT 0
in the case of doing a FILL RACK, since you are starting at 0 and going all the way up, filling all modules.
When you press this button on the module, the system will beep and prompt you to press the next module’s
button, and so on. Continue all the way through until you have done the last module, then press CANCEL to
complete and save your changes.
If you get to the position where there is an empty module slot, or a non-programmable module from the old
days in that slot, press the SKIP button to move past it to the next module. You can do this as many times as
needed.
When you’re done, the rack should be filled with all of the modules that are physically installed within this
system, like this:
FILL (or CLEAR) One Module Procedure
FILL RACK is a great way to ensure that your modules are all addressed correctly, and we highly recommend it if you make several module exchanges at once. But there are times when you simply want to
exchange one module with a different one, or perhaps to just remove a module. This is also quite easy once
you know how.
Within DEWESoft, go to the ACQUISITION MODE and select the SETUP screen, where you can see your
list of modules. This time, instead of clicking on the top of the AMPLIFIER COLUMN, double-click the amplifier column for the one module that you want to add, delete, or exchange. When you do this, the software
will give you a similar choice as before:
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, PAD | 14-369
And your choices are:
„„ If you have plugged a new module into this slot, choose FILL, then follow the prompts.
„„ If you change you mind and want to do a FILL RACK anyway, starting at slot 0, choose FILL FROM #0,
then follow the prompts.
„„ If there is a module in this slot that you have removed, but it continues to show up in RED (because the
software cannot really find it), choose CLEAR to remove it from the list.
„„ If you have clicked this by accident and want to cancel without making any changes, choose CANCEL
Module Installation Trouble-shooting
There may be times when you have trouble addressing your modules, for a variety of reasons. Here are
some good tips for solving these issues:
⇒⇒ Problem: Some or all modules are showing up in RED letters.
Analysis: a module shown in RED letters on the setup screen tells you that the software cannot find this
module. Or, it can mean that there is a conflict with another module, like when you plug two modules with
the same address into the system at the same time and don’t do a FILL RACK or FILL (or CLEAR) one of
them. A very rare condition might be that a module is defective and cannot communicate properly.
-- Solution: the FILL RACK procedure is always a great and easy way to solve nearly all these issues. If the FILL RACK
does not solve them, remove any modules shown in RED and add them back in one at a time, using the FILL
ONE MODULE procedure. Fill one module at a time until the offending modules’ addresses have been resolved.
⇒⇒ Problem: you plug in a new module into a previously unused slot, but it does not show up.
Analysis: more than likely it was already set to an address that you were using, and it has either taken another module’s address, or is conflicting with it.
-- Solution: the FILL RACK is always a great and easy way to solve nearly all these issues. If the FILL RACK does not
solve them, remove any modules shown in RED and add them back in one at a time, using the FILL ONE MODULE procedure. Fill one module at a time until the offending modules’ addresses have been resolved.
⇒⇒ Problem: you want to use a very old PAD module which does not have the upper black button on it, so you don’t
14-370| OWNER’s GUIDE
know how to address it
Analysis: These modules have been out of production for a long time, but there are still some around, and
they are still perfectly good modules.
-- Solution: Start with the old PAD module in the slot, but NOT PRESSED IN!! Make sure the connector on
the inside is not mated or making contact in any way. Now double click on the amplifier slot where you want to
install this module. Select FILL when prompted. Then when the next prompt appears to press the black button
or push in the module... PUSH IN THE MODULE. The green LED on its front panel should light up, and it should
show up on the list on your SETUP screen.
⇒⇒ Problem: some modules show up with the SERIAL NUMBERS in the amplifier column, and some do not.
Analysis: There is nothing wrong here. With each Dewetron module there is a certain revision before which the serial number
was not available for external query, so these modules will not show this information on the setup screen.
-- Solution: There is no solution for this. But at the same time there is not really a proble, either. If you must have modules
with serial numbers showing in the software, then the only remedy is to replace older hardware with newer hardware. That
will eliminate the problem. PAD modules can also be replaced via newer EPAD2 modules if you don’t want to use DAQ slots
for them any more. Using EPAD2 modules will free up slots in your DEWETRON chassis for more dynamic channels, via
DAQ and HSI series signal conditioners.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, PAD | 14-371
PAD-V8-P Isolated 8-channel Voltage module
Module purpose:
Input ranges: Bandwidth: Isolation: Signal connection:
Interface boxes:
Voltage input module for DC/quasi-static signals
Selectable from ±100 mV to ±50V full-scale
6 Hz
350 VDC
25-pin D connector
PAD-CB8-BNC: 8 channel connector block, BNC
PAD-CB8-B:
8 channel connector block, banana jacks
V
PAD-V8-P specifications
Parameter
PAD-V8-P
Input channels:
8 differential input channels
Input ranges:
Voltage
Current
±100 mV, ±150 mV, ±500 mV, ±1 V, ±2.5 V, ±5 V, ±10 V, ±50 V, -0.15 to +1.5 V
With external shunt resistor
Resolution:
10 µV for all ranges
Sample rate:
12 Hz for all channels, maximum
Read-out speed:
Typical 80 channels/s
DC accuracy:
±0.02 % of reading ±900 μV
-3 dB Bandwidth:
6 Hz (±1.5 dB @ f0)
Input isolation:
350 VDC (channel to channel, and input to output)
Over-voltage protection
150 VDC
Common mode voltage:
350 VDC / 250 VAC @ 50 Hz
NMR:
120 dB @ 50/60 Hz
CMRR:
140 dB @ DC, 120 dB @ 50 Hz
RS485 interface for module control/data:
Yes
Power supply voltage:
9 VDC ±10 %
Power consumption:
0.6 W typical
1)
1) Depending on system and number of channels
PAD-CB8-B and PAD-CB8-BNC break-out boxes
High quality break-out boxes are available for the PAD-V8-P module.
The PAD-CB8-B provides eight banana jacks, while the PAD-CB8-BNC
provides eight BNC onnectors. Each one features a 2 meter long cable
and connector that plugs into the face of the PAD-V8-P module. There
are no electronics inside these break-out boxes.
14-372| OWNER’s GUIDE
Connector pin-outs
Mating connector
Pin
Function
Pin
Function
1
Channel 0 (+)
13
Channel 6 (+)
2
Channel 0 (-)
14
Channel 6 (-)
3
Channel 1 (+)
15
Channel 7 (+)
4
Channel 1 (-)
16
Channel 7(-)
5
Channel 2 (+)
17
Digital input 1*
6
Channel 2 (-)
18
Digital input 2*
7
Channel 3 (+)
19
Digital input 3*
8
Channel 3 (-)
20
+12 VDC
9
Channel 4 (+)
21
Reset / Digital input 4*
10
Channel 4 (-)
22
GND
11
Channel 5 (+)
23
Reserved
12
Channel 5 (-)
24
Reserved
25
Reserved
* not supported in Dewesoft software
PAD-OPT2
25-pin SUB-D connector with screw terminals
(optional)
Low cost alternative to the PAD-CB8-B and -BNC
breakout boxes, or as a building block to making
your own cable without soldering. Metal shell covers
are included.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, PAD | 14-373
PAD-TH8-P Isolated 8-channel Temperature module
Module purpose:
Bandwidth: Isolation: Signal connection:
Interface boxes:
Thermocouples and RTD input module for DC/quasi-static
signals
6 Hz
350 VDC
25-pin D connector
PAD-CB8-TH8-K-M: T/C K mini connectors, 2 meter cable
PAD-CB8-TH8-K-P2: T/C J mini connectors, 2 meter cable
PAD-CB8-TH8-J-P2: T/C J mini connectors, 2 meter cable
PAD-CB8-TH8-T-P2: T/C J mini connectors, 2 meter cable
PAD-CB8-RTD: RTD, 9-pin DSUB, 2 meter cable
PAD-TH8-P specifications
Parameter
PAD-TH8-P
Input channels:
8 differential input channels
Input voltage:
±1.5 V
Input resistance:
1.4 MΩ
Gain linearity:
0.001%
Temperature drift:
30 ppm/°K
Typical noise:
2 µV
Resolution:
10 µV for all ranges
Sample rate:
12 Hz for all channels, maximum
Read-out speed:
Typical 80 channels/s
DC accuracy:
Better than ±0.05 % ±200 μV (typ. ±0.03 % F.S. ±20 μV)
-3 dB Bandwidth:
6 Hz (±1.5 dB @ f0)
Input isolation:
350 VDC (channel to channel, and input to output)
Over-voltage protection
15 VDC
Common mode voltage:
130 VDC / 250 VAC @ 50 Hz
NMR (50/60 Hz):
120 dB
CMRR (50/60 Hz):
130 dB
RS485 interface for module control/data:
Yes
Power supply voltage:
9 VDC ±10 %
Power consumption:
0.6 W typical
1)
1) Depending on system and number of channels
14-374| OWNER’s GUIDE
PAD-CB8-K-xx series break-out boxes
Above left: standard size PAD-CB8-K-P2 break-out box | Above center: miniature size PAD-CB8-K-M
Above: PAD-CB8-RTD break-out box
Parameter
PAD-CB8-J (or K or T)-P2 and PAD-CB8-J (or K or T)-M
Input channels:
8 thermocouple sensors (J, K, or T) with built-in CJC (cold junction compensation)
Accuracy:
Thermocouple type J:
±1.0 °C @ -200 to -100 °C ±0.3 °C @
-100 to 150 °C ±0.4 °C @ 150 to 400
°C ±1 °C @ 400 to 1200 °C
Typical noise:
±0.1 °C @ 6 Hz sampling; no average
Operating temperature:
-25 to +80 °C
Cable length:
2m (up to 12 m on request)
Dimensions:
approx. 196 x 57 x 32.2 mm (7.7 x 2.2 x 1.3 in.)
Thermocouple type K:
±1.0 °C @ -200 to -25 °C ±0.4 °C @
-25 to 120 °C ±0.6 °C @ 120 to 400
°C ±1 °C @ 400 to 1372 °C
Thermocouple type T:
±1.0 °C @ -200 to -150 °C ±0.4 °C @
-150 to 400 °C
PAD-CB8-RTD break-out box
Parameter
PAD-CB8-RTD
Input channels:
8 RTD sensors
Constant current:
1250 μA (CB8-RTD-S3: 250 μA)
Constant current drift:
5 ppm/°K
Connection types:
2-, 3-, and 4-wire
Standard input ranges:
Resistor 0 to 999,99 Ω, Pt100 a = 0.00385; Pt100 a = 0.003916; Pt200; Pt500; Ni120
CB8-RTD-S3:
Resistor 0 to 999,99 Ω, Pt100 a = 0.00385; Pt100 a = 0.003916; Pt200; Pt500; Pt1000; Pt2000
Accuracy:
Pt100 a = 0.00385
±0.25 °C @ -200 to 100 °C
±0.4 °C @ 100 to 400 °C
±0.8 °C @ 400 to 800 °C
Pt100
a = 0.003916
±0.25 °C @ -200 to 100 °C
±0.4 °C @ 100 to 400 °C
±0.8 °C @ 400 to 800 °C
Pt200
a = 0.00385
±0.25 °C @ -200 to 100 °C
±0.4 °C @ 100 to 400 °C
±0.5 °C @ 400 to 630 °C
Pt500 a = 0.00385
±0.25 °C @ -200 to 100 °C
±0.4 °C @ 100 to 400 °C
Pt1000
a = 0.00385
±0.25 °C @ -200 to 100 °C
±0.4 °C @ 100 to 400 °C
±0.8 °C @ 400 to 600 °C
Pt2000
a = 0.00385
±0.25 °C @ -200 to 100 °C
±0.4 °C @ 100 to 400 °C
±0.8 °C @ 400 to 600 °C
Pt1000
a = 0.00385
±0.25 °C @ -200 to 100 °C
±0.4 °C @ 100 to 400 °C
±0.8 °C @ 400 to 600 °C
Ni120
±0.3 °C @ -80 to 100 °C
±0.6 °C @ 100 to 260 °C
Typical noise:
0.01 °C
Operating temperature:
-25 to +80 °C
Cable length:
2m (up to 12 m on request)
Dimensions:
approx. 196 x 57 x 32.2 mm (7.7 x 2.2 x 1.3 in.)
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, PAD | 14-375
PAD-DO7 Isolated 7-channel Relay Output module
Module purpose:
Isolation: Signal connection:
Important note:
Driving dry contact relays
300 VDC
25-pin D connector
This module is not supported by DEWESoft
data acquisition software
PAD-DO7 specifications
Parameter
PAD-DO7
Output channels:
7 relay output channels
Relay type:
Form “A” relay SPST N.O. with dry contacts
Max load:
0.5 A (60 VAC) 1 A (24 VDC)
Gain linearity:
0.001%
Input isolation:
300 VRMS
Relay on-time:
5 mS typical
Common mode voltage:
130 VDC / 250 VAC @ 50 Hz
RS485 interface for module control/data:
Yes
Power supply voltage:
+12 VDC (±10%)
Power consumption:
1.0 W typical
14-376| OWNER’s GUIDE
Connector pin-outs
Mating connector
Pin
Function
Pin
Function
PAD-OPT2
1
R1 NO
13
R7 NO
2
R1 COM
14
R7 COM
25-pin SUB-D connector with screw terminals
(optional)
3
R2 NO
15
Not connected
4
R2 COM
16
Not connected
5
R3 NO
17
Not connected
6
R3 COM
18
Not connected
7
R4 NO
19
Not connected
8
R4 COM
20
+12 VDC
9
R5 NO
21
Init
10
R5 COM
22
GND
11
R6 NO
23
Not connected
12
R6 COM
24
Not connected
25
Not connected
* not supported in Dewesoft software
Convenient building block to making your own cable
without soldering. Metal shell covers included.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, PAD | 14-377
PAD-AO1 Isolated 1-channel Analog Output module
Module purpose:
Isolation: Signal connection:
Important note:
Driving a DC analog output
300 VDC
25-pin D connector
This module is not supported by DEWESoft
data acquisition software
PAD-AO1 specifications
Parameter
PAD-AO1
Output channel:
1 analog VDC output channel
Output signals:
Voltage
Current
0 to 10 V
0 to 20 mA or 4 to 20 mA
Resolution:
12-bits
Accuracy:
±0.1 % of FSR
Read-back accuracy:
±1 % of FSR
Rad-back resolution:
±0.02 % of FSR
Zero drift:
Voltage output
Current output
±30 μV/°C
±0.2 μA/°C
Span temp. coefficient:
±25 ppm/°C
Programmable output slope:
0.125 to 1024 mA/sec or 0.0625 to 512 V/sec
Current load resistor:
500 Ω
Isolation:
300 VDC
RS485 interface for module control/data:
Yes
Power supply voltage:
+12 VDC (±10%)
Power consumption:
1.2 W typical
OUT
14-378| OWNER’s GUIDE
Connector pin-outs
Mating connector
Pin
Function
Pin
Function
PAD-OPT2
1
Not connected
13
Not connected
2
Not connected
14
Not connected
25-pin SUB-D connector with screw terminals
(optional)
3
Not connected
15
Reserved
4
Not connected
16
Reserved
5
Not connected
17
IOUT (+)
6
Not connected
18
IOUT (-)
7
Not connected
19
VOUT (+)
8
Not connected
20
VOUT (-)
9
Not connected
21
Not used
10
Not connected
22
GND
11
Not connected
23
Not connected
12
Not connected
24
Not connected
25
Not connected
* not supported in Dewesoft software
Convenient building block to making your own cable
without soldering. Metal shell covers included.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, MDAQ | 15-379
15 MDAQ Series Conditioners
MDAQ Series Common Information
Calibration information
All DEWETRON modules are calibrated at 25°C after a warmup time of 30 minutes and meet their specifications when leaving the factory. The time interval for recalibration depends on environmental conditions.
Typically, the calibration should be checked once a year.
Calibration certificates are available from DEWETRON as an option. DEWETRON offers several types:
„„ NIST traceable DEWETRON calibration certificate (USA CAL LAB only)
„„ ISO traceable DEWETRON certificate (European CAL LAB only)
„„ Calibration certificate according to ÖKD (equivalent to DKD)
This manual contains no calibration information. There are separate resources optionally available for
MDAQ series modules for automated calibration under Met/CAL®. The CAL-KIT contains the required
cables, software and instructions that you need to add to your own calibration lab. It does not include a
calibrator or volt meter.
General MDAQ module specifications
MDAQ modules are factory installed within your Dewetron system. From the outside you see only the input
connectors. But inside, there is a BASE card which can hold any two 8-channel MDAQ-SUB modules on
one side, and any MDAQ-FILT filter card on the other side. The result is a system which can be configured
to suit a wide variety of applications.
All specifications within this manual are valid at 25 °C.
All modules are produced according to ISO9001 and ISO14001.
15-380| OWNER’s GUIDE
MDAQ-BASE-5 Mother Board
Every MDAQ assembly consists of a 16-channel MDAQ-BASE mother board and at least one MDAQ-SUB series 8-channel
daughter card. Each MDAQ-BASE card can accept any two MDAQ-SUB cards, which are mounted next to each other on one
side of the MDAQ-BASE. The other side of the MDAQ-BASE can accept any single Dewetron MDAQ-FILT series 16-channel
filter card.
MDAQ-BASE-5 Details
The MDAQ assembly is factory installed according to your purchase order. Unlike DAQ modules, which can be freely plugged/
unplugged by the system user, MDAQ assemblies are not user-exchangeable. When your system is constructed at Dewetron, the
MDAQ assembly will be completely installed and tested.
TOP: MDAQ-SUB DAUGHTER cards (2)
MIDDLE: MDAQ-BASE mother board
BOTTOM: MDAQ-FILT card (optional)
MDAQ-SUB module dimensions:
Modules with BNC connectors: 175 x 61 x 30 mm (6.9 x 2.4 x 1.2 in.)
Modules with DSUB connectors: 175 x 82 x 22 (6.9 x 3.2 x 0.9)
MDAQ-SUB output connector (for MDAQ-BASE mother board)
68-pin amplimite series (AMP Nr. 174339-6)
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, MDAQ | 15-381
Module
Input type
Ranges
Strain gage (full, half, and
1/4 bridge, incl. shunt cal
and balance) for strain gage
applications
14 ranges from ±0.5 to 1000 mV/V
(@ 5V excitation)
Voltage up to ±10V
15 ranges from ±2.5 V to ±10 V
IEPE via MSI-BR-ACC
7 ranges from ±0.25 mV to ±10V
Voltage via MSI-BR-V200
6 ranges from ±10 to ±200 V
Thermocouples via MSI-BRTH-J, -K, -T
Full range of thermocouple type
RTD via MSI-BR-RTD
-200° to 1000°C, and 0 to 6.5 kΩ
Strain gage (full and half
bridge) for strain gage
sensors
14 ranges from ±0.5 to 1000 mV/V
(@ 5V excitation)
Voltage up to ±10V
15 ranges from ±2.5 V to ±10 V
IEPE via MSI-BR-ACC
7 ranges from ±0.25 mV to ±10V
Voltage via MSI-BR-V200
6 ranges from ±10 to ±200 V
Thermocouples via MSI-BRTH series
Full range of thermocouple type
RTD via MSI-BR-RTD
-200° to 1000°C, and 0 to 6.5 kΩ
Voltage up to ±200V
13 ranges from ±0.125 to ±200 V 2)
IEPE via MSI-BR-ACC
7 ranges from ±0.25 mV to ±10V
RTD via MSI-BR-RTD
-200° to 1000°C, and 0 to 6.5 kΩ
8
Voltage up to ±200V
8
8
Chs
MDAQ-SUB-STG-D
Connector: DB9
MSI
V
8
MSI
MSI
MDAQ-SUB-BRIDGE-D
Connector: DB9
MSI
8
V
MSI
MSI
MDAQ-SUB-V200-D
Connector: DB9
8
V
MSI
TEDS
Bandwidth
High-pass
Filter
Excitation
√
BW: 30 kHz
HF: -EX: 0 to 12 VDC
√
BW: 30 kHz
HF: 0.16 Hz
EX: 0 to 12 VDC
EX: ±15 VDC
√
BW: 300 kHz
EX: 0 to 12 VDC
EX: ±15 VDC
13 ranges from ±0.125 to ±200 V
--
BW: 300 kHz
HF: -EX: --
IEPE or voltage up to ±10V
8 ranges from ±125 mV to ±10 V
√
BW: 300 kHz
HF: 0.16 Hz
EX: 4/8 mA
IEPE or voltage up to ±10V
8 ranges from ±125 mV to ±10 V
√
BW: 300 kHz
HP: 0.16 and
3.4 Hz
EX: 4/8 mA
MDAQ-SUB-V200-BNC
MSI
Connector:
BNC
V
MDAQ-SUB-ACC-BNC
Connector: BNC
MDAQ-SUB-ACC-A-BNC
Connector: BNC
(same image as above)
-- 1) When excitation is chosen on any channel of an MDAQ-SUB module, it is the same for all 8 channels of that module.
⇒⇒ 2) We recommend not exceeding 50Vrms on the DSUB input connector for safety reasons
15-382| OWNER’s GUIDE
MDAQ-SUB-STG 8-channel Strain Gage/Bridge module
Sensor compatibilty:
Special functions:
Ranges: Bandwidth: Input configuration: Compatibility:
Signal connection:
Full bridge sensors, 1/2 bridge sensors, 1/4 bridge sensors,
Voltages up to ±10V, Potentiometric/Ωic sensors
Built-in bridge completion, built-in shunt resistors,
Software selectable auto-balance
Excitation programmable in 1 mV steps from 0 to 12VDC
Sense lines for the most accurate measurements
15 input ranges from ±2.5mV to ±10V
30 kHz
Differential (not isolated)
Plugs into any MDAQ-BASE card
-D: Banana plugs (standard)
-L: 8-pin LEMO connector (optional)
V
MDAQ-SUB-STG specifications
Parameter
MDAQ-SUB-STG
Gain:
0.5 to 2000
Input ranges @ 5VDC excitation:
±2.5, 5, 10, 20, 25, 50, 100, 200, 250, 500, 1000, 1250, 2500, 5000, 10 000 mV ±0.5, 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 20,
40, 50, 100, 200, 250, 500, 1000 mV/V
Input impedance:
>100 MΩ
Input noise:
3.5 nV * √Hz
Typ. input offset drift:
0.5 μV/K (for ranges < 200 mV)
DC Accuracy
(High Gain)
±2.5mV;5mV/V;10mV/V;±25mV
20mV
50mV
±100mV to ±200mV
(with correction table applied)
±0.03% of reading ±15μV [±3μV/V @5 Vexc] ±0.03% of reading ±0.12% of range ±0.03% of reading ±0.06% of range ±0.03% of reading ±0.03% of range
(no correction table applied)
±0.15% of reading ±15μV [±3μV/V @5 Vexc]
±0.03% of reading ±0.12% of range
±0.03% of reading ±0.06% of range
±0.03% of reading ±0.03% of range
DC Accuracy
±0.250 to ±1V
±1.25V; ±2.5V
±5; 10V
(with correction table applied) ±0.03% of reading 400μV [±80μV/V @5 Vexc]
±0.03% of reading ±1mV
±0.03% of reading ±0.03% of range
(no correction table applied)
±0.15% of reading 400μV [±80μV/V @5 Vexc]
±0.15% of reading ±1mV
±0.15% of reading ±0.03% of range
(Low Gain)
Gain drift @ 5VDC excitation:
10 ppm/K of range ±0.02 μV/V/K
Excitation voltage:
0 to 12 VDC, programable in 1 mV steps. (5 VDC default)
Excitation accuracy:
±0.05 % ±0.7 mV
Excitation drift:
±10 ppm/K ±50 μV/K
Excitation protection:
Continuous short to ground
Excitation current limit:
50 mA/channel
Bridge types:
4- or 6-wire full bridge
3- or 5-wire 1⁄2 bridge with internal completion (software selectable)
3- wire Quarter bridge with internal 120 Ω and 350 Ω completion (software selectable)
Shunt resistor:
Internal 100 k and 50 k Resistor (software selectable)
Completion and Shunt resistor accuracy:
0.05% 5ppm/°K
Bridge resistance:
120 Ω to 10 k Ω
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, MDAQ | 15-383
Parameter
MDAQ-SUB-STG
Automatic bridge balance:
2.5mV to 20mV
25mV to 200mV
250mV to 1V
2V to 10V
Absolute Voltage
mV/V @ 5V EXC
±10mV
±100mV
±0.5V
±5V
±2mV/V
±20mV/V
±100mV/V
±1000mV/V
μm/m @ 5VEXC
(k=2 quarter bridge)
±4,000μm/m
±40,000μm/m
±200,000μm/m
±2,000,000μm/m
-3 dB Bandwidth:
30 kHz
Filters (low-pass):
See MDAQ-FILT specification (option)
Typ. SNR @ 30 kHz [1 kHz] and
@ 5 VDC excitation
64 dB [82 dB] @ 1 mV/V
82 dB [96 dB] @ 50 mV/V
Typ. CMR @ 0.1 mV/V [1 mV/V] and
@ 5 VDC excitation
125 dB [120 dB] @ DC
115 dB [110 dB] @ 400 Hz
110 dB [105 dB] @ 1 kHz
Input isolation:
N/A (input is differential but not isolated)
Common Mode Voltage:
12V maximum
Input over-voltage protection:
±25 VDC
Output voltage:
±5 V
Output resistance:
< 10 Ω
Output current:
5 mA max.
Output protection:
Continuous short to ground
TEDS compatible 1)
Yes, compatible with TEDS chips DS2406, DS2430A, DS2432, DS2433
Power consumption:
@ 5 VDC excitation
@ 5 VDC excitation
@ 10 VDC excitation
Standard operating temperature:
350 Ω 16 Channels typ. 8 W
120 Ω 16 Channels typ. 15 W
350 Ω 16 Channels typ. 15 W
0 °C to 70 °C (32 °F to 158 °F)
1) When MSI modules are used, the TEDS interface is used by the MSI, and is not available to any sensor that you may connect
Module Pin-outs (all 8 inputs are the same)
⇒⇒ CAUTION: The sensor shield can be connected to ei-
ther pin 4 (SUB-D version only) or the housing of the
9-pin SUB-D / 8-pin LEMO connector, depending
on your application.
⇒⇒ If signals above 60 V may appear, don’t use the
metal housing of SUBD connector.
PIN
Function
1
EXC+
2
IN+
3
Sense -
4
GND
5
+15VDC (50 mA)
6
Sense +
7
IN-
8
EXC-
9
TEDS
15-384| OWNER’s GUIDE
Full bridge signal connection
6-wire and 4-wire sensor connection
Voltage or Current excitation are allowed.
Sense lines MUST be connected to the excitation also when 4-wire connection is used.
6-wire sensor connection: Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the sensor
4-wire sensor connection: Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the connector
Half bridge signal connection
5-wire and 3-wire sensor connection, and potentiometric sensors
5-wire sensor connection: Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the sensor
3-wire sensor connection: Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the connector
Voltage or Current excitation are allowed.
A potentiometer can be seen similar to a half bridge sensor with ±500 mV/V sensitivity. Therefore potentiometric sensors can be measured with bridge amplifiers. The advantages of using the MDAQ-STG for
potentiometric measurements is by adjusting the offset and range, you can focus on a certain potentiometer
position with higher resolution. The scaling is ±500 mV/V equals ±50 % of potentiometer position.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, MDAQ | 15-385
-- 1) ‘R+’ has to be connected only if shunt calibration is required, otherwise it can be left unconnected.
Quarter bridge signal connection
3-wire sensor connection (Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the sensor)
⇒⇒ Sense leads (SUB-D: pin 3 and 6 must be connected!
-- ‘R+’ has to be connected only if shunt calibration is required, otherwise it can be left unconnected.
-- The 3-wire quarter bridge is only able to compensate symmetrical wire resistance
Other measurement modes and hook-ups
Voltage and microvolt measurement signal connection
15-386| OWNER’s GUIDE
⇒⇒ CAUTION: If the excitation is not used for sensor supply it has to be deactivated by setting it to 0 V.
Sensor with 15VDC supply, and voltage output
Why More Wires are Better...
Sensitivity: For sensor wiring typically copper cables are used. For example a 120 Ω full bridge connected
with four 0.14 mm2 cables will have an sensitivity error of 2.1 % due to the 1.27 Ω wire resistance. But with
6-wire technology this can be completely compensated!
Temperature drift:
Intial error
Drift after 10°C warm up
Offset
Sensitivity
Offset
Sensitivity
2-wire
25183 μm/m
-4.97 %
956 μm/m
-0.18 %
3-wire
0 μm/m
-2.6 %
0 μm/m
-0.01 %
4-wire
0 μm/m
0.0 %
0 μm/m
0.00 %
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, MDAQ | 15-387
MDAQ-SUB-BRIDGE 8-channel Bridge module
Sensor compatibilty:
Special functions:
Ranges: Bandwidth: Input configuration: Compatibility:
Signal connection:
Full bridge sensors, 1/2 bridge sensors
Voltages up to ±10V, Potentiometric/Ωic sensors
Built-in bridge completion for half bridge
AC/DC coupling software selectable
Software selectable auto-balance
Several selectable excitation voltages
Sense lines for the most accurate measurements
15 input ranges from ±2.5mV to ±10V
30 kHz
Differential (not isolated)
Plugs into any MDAQ-BASE card
-D: Banana plugs (standard)
-L: 8-pin LEMO connector (optional)
V
MDAQ-SUB-BRIDGE specifications
Parameter
MDAQ-SUB-BRIDGE
Gain:
0.5 to 2000
Input ranges @ 5VDC excitation:
±2.5, 5, 10, 20, 25, 50, 100, 200, 250, 500, 1000, 1250, 2500, 5000, 10 000 mV ±0.5, 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 20,
40, 50, 100, 200, 250, 500, 1000 mV/V
Input impedance:
1 MΩ
Input noise:
3.5 nV * √Hz
Typ. input offset drift:
0.5 μV/K (for ranges < 200 mV)
DC Accuracy
(High Gain)
±2.5mV;5mV/V;10mV/V;±25mV
20mV
50mV
±100mV to ±200mV
(with correction table applied)
±0.03% of reading ±15μV [±3μV/V @5 Vexc] ±0.03% of reading ±0.12% of range ±0.03% of reading ±0.06% of range ±0.03% of reading ±0.03% of range
(no correction table applied)
±0.15% of reading ±15μV [±3μV/V @5 Vexc]
±0.03% of reading ±0.12% of range
±0.03% of reading ±0.06% of range
±0.03% of reading ±0.03% of range
DC Accuracy
±0.250 to ±1V
±1.25V; ±2.5V
±5; 10V
(with correction table applied) ±0.03% of reading 400μV [±80μV/V @5 Vexc]
±0.03% of reading ±1mV
±0.03% of reading ±0.03% of range
(no correction table applied)
±0.15% of reading 400μV [±80μV/V @5 Vexc]
±0.15% of reading ±1mV
±0.15% of reading ±0.03% of range
(Low Gain)
Gain drift @ 5VDC excitation:
10 ppm/K of range ±0.02 μV/V/K
Excitation voltage:
0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5V (default) and 10 VDC (software selectable)
Excitation accuracy:
±0.05 % ±0.7 mV
Excitation drift:
±10 ppm/K ±50 μV/K
Excitation protection:
Continuous short to ground
Excitation current limit:
50 mA/channel
Bridge types:
4- or 6-wire full bridge
3- or 5-wire 1⁄2 bridge with internal completion (software selectable)
Completion and Shunt resistor accuracy:
0.05% 5ppm/°K
Bridge resistance:
120 Ω to 10 k Ω
Automatic bridge balance:
Absolute Voltage
mV/V @ 5V EXC
±10mV
±100mV
±0.5V
±5V
±2mV/V
±20mV/V
±100mV/V
±1000mV/V
2.5mV to 20mV
25mV to 200mV
250mV to 1V
2V to 10V
μm/m @ 5VEXC
(k=2 quarter bridge)
±4,000μm/m
±40,000μm/m
±200,000μm/m
±2,000,000μm/m
15-388| OWNER’s GUIDE
Parameter
MDAQ-SUB-BRIDGE
-3 dB Bandwidth:
30 kHz
Filters (low-pass):
See MDAQ-FILT specification (option)
Typ. SNR @ 30 kHz [1 kHz] and
@ 5 VDC excitation
64 dB [82 dB] @ 1 mV/V
82 dB [96 dB] @ 50 mV/V
Typ. CMR @ 0.1 mV/V [1 mV/V] and
@ 5 VDC excitation
125 dB [120 dB] @ DC
115 dB [110 dB] @ 400 Hz
110 dB [105 dB] @ 1 kHz
Input isolation:
N/A (input is differential but not isolated)
Common Mode Voltage:
12V maximum
Input over-voltage protection:
±25 VDC
Output voltage:
±5 V
Output resistance:
< 10 Ω
Output current:
5 mA max.
Output protection:
Continuous short to ground
TEDS compatible 1)
Yes, compatible with TEDS chips DS2406, DS2430A, DS2432, DS2433
Power consumption for 16 channels:
@ 5 VDC excitation
@ 5 VDC excitation
@ 10 VDC excitation
@ 10 VDC excitation
350 Ω @ 10V Exc. typ. 15 W
120 Ω @ 5V typ. 15 W
350 Ω max. @ 15 W max.
120 Ω @ 15 W
Standard operating temperature:
0 °C to 70 °C (32 °F to 158 °F)
1) When MSI modules are used, the TEDS interface is used by the MSI, and is not available to any sensor that you may connect
Module Pin-outs (all 8 inputs are the same)
PIN
Function
1
EXC+
2
IN+
3
Sense -
4
GND
5
+15VDC (50 mA)
6
Sense +
or the housing of the 9-pin SUB-D / 8-pin LEMO connector, depending on your
application.
7
IN-
8
EXC-
⇒⇒ If signals above 60 V may appear, don’t use the metal housing of SUBD connector.
9
TEDS
⇒⇒ CAUTION: The sensor shield can be connected to either pin 4 (SUB-D version only)
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, MDAQ | 15-389
Full bridge signal connection
6-wire and 4-wire sensor connection
Voltage or Current excitation are allowed.
Sense lines MUST be connected to the excitation also when 4-wire connection is used.
6-wire sensor connection: Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the sensor
4-wire sensor connection: Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the connector
Half bridge signal connection
5-wire and 3-wire sensor connection, and potentiometric sensors
5-wire sensor connection: Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the sensor
3-wire sensor connection: Sense+ is connected to EXC+ at the connector
Voltage or Current excitation are allowed.
A potentiometer can be seen similar to a half bridge sensor with ±500 mV/V sensitivity. Therefore potentiometric sensors can be measured with bridge amplifiers. The advantages of using the MDAQ-STG for
potentiometric measurements is by adjusting the offset and range, you can focus on a certain potentiometer
position with higher resolution. The scaling is ±500 mV/V equals ±50 % of potentiometer position.
-- 1) ‘R+’ has to be connected only if shunt calibration is required, otherwise it can be left unconnected.
15-390| OWNER’s GUIDE
Other measurement modes and hook-ups
Voltage and microvolt measurement signal connection
⇒⇒ CAUTION: If the excitation is not used for sensor supply it has to be deactivated by setting it to 0 V.
Sensor with 15VDC supply, and voltage output
Why More Wires are Better...
Sensitivity: For sensor wiring typically copper cables are used. For example a 120 Ω full bridge connected
with four 0.14 mm2 cables will have an sensitivity error of 2.1 % due to the 1.27 Ω wire resistance. But with
6-wire technology this can be completely compensated!
Temperature drift:
Intial error
Drift after 10°C warm up
Offset
Sensitivity
Offset
Sensitivity
2-wire
25183 μm/m
-4.97 %
956 μm/m
-0.18 %
3-wire
0 μm/m
-2.6 %
0 μm/m
-0.01 %
4-wire
0 μm/m
0.0 %
0 μm/m
0.00 %
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, MDAQ | 15-391
MDAQ-SUB-V200 Differential Voltage Input module
Sensor compatibilty:
Special features:
Measuring ranges: Bandwidth: Input configuration: Compatibility:
Signal connection:
Voltages, and low currents with appropriate shunt
The DSUB version has sensor power on board,
and is TEDS compatible
Low and high ranges from ±0.125 V to ±200 V
300 kHz
Differential (not isolated)
Plugs into any MDAQ-BASE card
-BNC: BNC jacks (standard)
-D: 9-pin DSUB connector
V
MDAQ-SUB-V200 Specifications
Parameter
MDAQ-SUB-V200
Input ranges:
Divider OFF (higher voltage ranges)
Divider ON lower voltage ranges)
±0.125 V, 0.25 V, 0.5 V, 1 V, 1.25 V, 2.5 V, 5 V, 10 V (12 V max CMV)
±2.5 V, 5 V, 10 V, 20 V, 25 V, 50 V, 100 V, 200 V (250 V max CMV)
Input impedance:
1 MΩ to GND, 2 MΩ differential
DC accuracy:
±0.125 to ±1V
±1.25V; ±2.5V
±5; ±10V
(Divider OFF)
(with correction table applied)
±0.03% of reading
±400 μV ±0.03% of reading
±1 mV ±0.02% of reading ±0.03% of range
(without correction table applied)
±0.15% of reading
400 µV
±0.15% of reading
1 mV
±0.15% of reading
±0.03% of range
DC accuracy:
±2.5 to ±20V
±25V; ±50V
±100; ±200V
(Divider ON)
(with correction table applied)
±0.06% of reading
±8 mV ±0.03% of reading
±20 mV ±0.02% of reading ±0.03% of range
(without correction table applied)
±0.25% of reading
8 mV
±0.25% of reading
20 mV
±0.25% of reading
±0.03% of range
Gain drift:
Input offset drift:
125 mV to 10 V
2.5 V to 200 V
typ. 15 ppm/K (max. 40 ppm/K)
(Divider OFF)
(Divider ON)
Over voltage protection:
-3 dB Bandwidth:
typ. 10 μV/K (max. 20 μV/K)
typ. 100 μV/K (max. 200 μV/K)
±250 VDC
(Divider OFF)
(Divider ON)
Channel separation @ 10 kHz:
300 kHz (200 kHz at range 0.125 V and 1.25 V)
300 kHz (200 kHz at range 2.5 V and 25 V)
> 80 dB
CMRR @ 50 Hz (@ 1 kHz)
(Divider OFF)
(Divider ON)
Typ. SNR @ 50 kHz BW
±0.125 V and ±0.25 V
±0.5 V to ±10 V
(Divider OFF)
±2.5 V and ±10 V
±10 V to ±25 V
±25 V to ±200 V
(Divider ON)
> 94 dB (> 80 dB)
> 70 dB (> 56 dB)
> 87 dB
> 96 dB
> 84 dB
> 88 dB
< 93 dB
Programmable sensor supply (1)
Sensor supply accuracy(1)
Fixed sensor supply (1)
0 to 12 V short circuit protected;
50mA current limmitation ±0.05 % ±2 mV
±15 V (50 mA)
Output voltage:
±5 V
Output impedance:
5Ω
Output current:
±20 mA
RS485 interface for module control:
Yes
15-392| OWNER’s GUIDE
Parameter
MDAQ-SUB-V200
Power supply:
±15 VDC
Power consumption:
typ. 4.5 W / 10 W
Sensor connection:
-BNC: -D:
TEDS support:
Yes (-D model only!), compatible with chips DS2406, DS2430A, DS2432, DS2433
Standard operating temperature:
0 °C to 70 °C (32 °F to 158 °F)
BNC connector, female
9-pin DSUB connector, female
1) Applies to the MDAQ-SUB-V-200-D model only (DSUB connector)
Module Pin-outs (all 8 inputs are the same)
MDAQ-SUB-V-200-BNC version
Hot: IN+
Shield: IN-
MDAQ-SUB-V-200-D version
See table >
⇒⇒ If signals above 60 V may appear, don’t use the
metal housing of SUBD connector.
⇒⇒ Note - for safety reasons, refer to your
local/government regulations about the
maximum voltage that may be applied to
BNC or DSUB connectors!
PIN
DSUB-9 connector
MDAQ-SUB-V-200-D module (typ x 8)
1
TEDS
2
IN+
3
Reserved
4
GND
5
+15V sensor supply
6
0 - 12VDC sensor supply (software programmable)
7
IN-
8
Reserved
9
-15V sensor supply
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, MDAQ | 15-393
MDAQ-SUB-V200 sensor connections
Sensor with differential output, module powered
Sensor with common ground
Loop-powered sensor, ext. shunt
Single-ended connection
Current measurement, external shunt
Potentiometric connection
15-394| OWNER’s GUIDE
Avoiding Common Mode Issues
In contrast to isolated amplifiers the input common voltage range is limited at differential amplifiers. The
measurement configuration below shows the possibilities to measure the current of a 24 V supplied system.
The optimum input range in that case is 500 mV. That will work fine for CH1 in the picture, but not for the
CH0. This channel will exceed the maximum common mode voltage and go into overflow.
With the MDAQ-SUB-V-200 module, there are several ranges which overlap between the 12V and 250V
max CMV ranges. This is intentionally done to provide you with more options when it comes to choosing the
best possible fit of range/resolution/common mode.
The max. CMV is shown here within the software (analog channel setup dialog):
Notice that in the screen shot above left, the CMV is shown to be 12V max, whereas it is 250V max in the screen shot above
right.
⇒⇒ Always pay attention to the max CMV which is listed on the channel setup screen, when you
select a given range within the software.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, MDAQ | 15-395
MDAQ-SUB-ACC IEPE Accelerometer module
Sensor compatibilty:
Special features:
Modes:
Bandwidth: Isolation: Compatibility:
Signal connection:
IEPE constant current accelerometers
and microphones, and ±10V max. signals
Single ended or differential input mode
AC/DC coupling
300 kHz
N/A
Plugs into any MDAQ-BASE card
BNC connector
V
MDAQ-SUB-ACC specifications
Parameter
MDAQ-SUB-ACC
Input voltage ranges:
±0.125 V, 0.25 V, 0.5 V, 1 V, 1.25 V, 2.5 V, 5 V, 10 V
Gain:
0.5, 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 20, 40
Input modes:
Voltage modes
Input impedance:
DC Accuracy:
IEPE or low voltage
Single-ended or differential
AC or DC coupling
1 MΩ
±0.125 to ±1V
±1.25V; ±2.5V
±5;10V
(with correction table applied)
±0.03% of reading
±400 μV ±0.03% of reading
±1 mV ±0.02% of reading ±0.03% of range
(without correction table applied)
±0.15% of reading
400 µV
±0.15% of reading
1 mV
±0.15% of reading
±0.03% of range
Gain drift:
typ. 10 ppm/K (max. 20 ppm/K)
Input offset drift:
typ. 3 μV/K (max. 12 μV/K)
Over voltage protection:
IN+ differential ±40 V
IN- differential: max ±40 V
IN- Single ended: max 300 mA
Max common mode voltage:
12 V (differential mode)
-3 dB Bandwidth:
300 kHz (200 kHz at range 1.25 V and 0.125 V)
Channel separation @ 10 kHz:
> 96 dB
CMR @ 50 Hz (@ 1 kHz):
> 94 dB (> 80 dB)
Typ. SNR @ 50 kHz bandwidth:
Range ±0.125 V
Range ±0.25 V
Range ±0.5 V to ±1.25 V
Range ±2.5 V to ±10 V
> 87 dB
> 93 dB
> 96 dB
> 100 dB
Sensor excitation:
4 or 8 mA, 5 % up to 24 VDC
Current noise:
150 nA * sqrt (Hz)
RS485 interface for module control:
Yes
Power supply voltage:
±15 VDC
Output voltage:
±5 V
Output impedance:
5Ω
Power consumption:
typ. 10 W (max 12 W @ 8 mA sensor excitation)
TEDS support:
Yes, compatible with TEDS chips DS 2406, DS 2430A, DS 2432, DS2433
Standard operating temperature:
0 °C to 70 °C (32 °F to 158 °F)
15-396| OWNER’s GUIDE
Module Pin-outs (all 8 inputs are the same)
MDAQ-SUB-ACC-BNC version
Typical Sensor Hook-ups
HOT: SHIELD: Above left: IEPE sensor mode
IN+
IN-
Above right: Voltage input mode
For constant current powered sensors (IEPE) the current source is switched on and the minus input of the
BNC is connected to GND. The input coupling is switched to AC. In this mode the TEDS interface circuit is
activated so that it can read the sensor information from IEEE 1451.4 compliant sensors (the TEDS interface
is disabled in the voltage mode).
In all voltage measurement modes the current source is disconnected from the input signal.
The position of the GND switch defines if the amplifier is used for differential or singled-ended input configuration. The allowed input voltage range (common mode voltage) is limited to 12 V.
-- NOTE: If floating input sources (like batteries) are connected to the MDAQ-SUB-ACC the amplifier has to be used
in single ended configuration (GND-switch ON)! Otherwise the input may be out of the maximum input voltage
range!
-- In differential mode as well as in single ended mode AC or DC coupling is possible. The standard high pass filter
frequency is 3 Hz in AC-mode. Please contact DEWETRON for other frequencies.
⇒⇒ The constant current supply (4 or 8 mA) that you set on one channel, will apply to all 8 channels of this MDAQ-
SUB module. However, other MDAQ-SUB modules may be set to different constant current levels.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, MDAQ | 15-397
MDAQ-SUB-ACC-A IEPE Accelerometer module
Sensor compatibilty:
Special features:
Modes:
Bandwidth: Isolation: Compatibility:
Signal connection:
IEPE constant current accelerometers and
microphones, and ±10V max voltages
Two selectable high-pass filters
Single ended, AC/DC coupling
300 kHz
N/A
Plugs into any MDAQ-BASE card
-BNC:
BNC connector
V
MDAQ-SUB-ACC-A specifications
Parameter
MDAQ-SUB-ACC-A
Input voltage ranges:
±0.125 V, 0.25 V, 0.5 V, 1 V, 1.25 V, 2.5 V, 5 V, 10 V
Gain:
0.5, 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 20, 40
Input modes:
Voltage modes
Input impedance:
DC Accuracy:
IEPE or low voltage
Single-ended only
AC or DC coupling
1 MΩ
±0.125 to ±1V
±1.25V; ±2.5V
±5;10V
(with correction table applied)
±0.03% of reading
±400 μV ±0.03% of reading
±1 mV ±0.02% of reading ±0.03% of range
(without correction table applied)
±0.15% of reading
400 µV
±0.15% of reading
1 mV
±0.15% of reading
±0.03% of range
Gain drift:
typ. 10 ppm/K (max. 20 ppm/K)
Input offset drift:
typ. 3 μV/K (max. 12 μV/K)
Over voltage protection:
IN+ ±40 V
IN- Single ended: max 300 mA
Max common mode voltage:
±12 V (differential mode)
-3 dB Bandwidth:
300 kHz (200 kHz at range 1.25 V and 0.125 V)
Channel separation @ 10 kHz:
> 96 dB
CMR @ 50 Hz (@ 1 kHz):
> 94 dB (> 80 dB)
Typ. SNR @ 50 kHz bandwidth:
Range ±0.125 V
Range ±0.25 V
Range ±0.5 V to ±1.25 V
Range ±2.5 V to ±10 V
> 87 dB
> 93 dB
> 96 dB
> 100 dB
Sensor excitation:
4 or 8 mA, 5 % up to 24 VDC
Current noise:
150 nA * sqrt (Hz)
RS485 interface for module control:
Yes
Power supply voltage:
±15 VDC
Output voltage:
±5 V
Output impedance:
5Ω
Power consumption:
typ. 10 W (max 12 W @ 8 mA sensor excitation)
TEDS support:
Yes, compatible with TEDS chips DS 2406, DS 2430A, DS 2432, DS2433
Standard operating temperature:
0 °C to 70 °C (32 °F to 158 °F)
15-398| OWNER’s GUIDE
Module Pin-outs (all 8 inputs are the same)
MDAQ-SUB-ACC-A-BNC version
Typical Sensor Hook-ups
Above left: IEPE sensor mode
Above right: Voltage input mode
For constant current powered sensors (IEPE) the current source is switched on and the minus input of the
BNC is connected to GND. In this mode the TEDS interface circuit is activated so that it can read the sensor
information from IEEE 1451.4 compliant sensors (the TEDS interface is disabled in the voltage mode).
In all voltage measurement modes the current source is disconnected from the input signal.
The position of the GND switch defines if the amplifier is used for differential or singled-ended input configuration. The allowed input voltage range (common mode voltage) is limited to 12 V.
⇒⇒ The constant current supply (4 or 8 mA) that you set on one channel, will apply to all 8 channels of this MDAQ-
SUB module. However, other MDAQ-SUB modules may be set to different constant current levels.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, MDAQ | 15-399
MDAQ-FILT-5-Bx Filter card
MDAQ-FILT-5-BE: Bessel characteristics
MDAQ-FILT-5-BU: Butterworth characteristics
16 Channel 2nd order low pass filter
5 selectable filters including bypass function
5 different cut off frequencies
Discrete low noise filter design
Independent filter settings for each channel
Direct control from MDAQ-xx Amplifier series
MDAQ-FILT-5-Bx specifications
Parameter
MDAQ-FILT-5-Bx
Filter range (-3 dB):
Version MDAQ-FILT-5-BU
Version MDAQ-FILT-5-BE
Version MDAQ-FILT-5-BU-S1
Bypass bandwidth:
Filter characteristics:
30 Hz, 100 Hz, 300 Hz, 1 kHz, 10 kHz, bypass
30 Hz, 100 Hz, 300 Hz, 1 kHz, 10 kHz, bypass
100 Hz, 1 kHz, 10 kHz, 30 kHz, 100 kHz, bypass
other frequencies optionally available
> 700 kHz
-BE model
-BU model
2-Pole Bessel
2-Pole Butterworth
Attenuation slope:
40 dB/decade (12 dB/octave)
Filter Accuracy:
±1.5 dB @ fc
DC gain:
1 (0 dB)
Offset error:
Max. 1 mV (typ <0.2 mV)
Max. 0.02% of range with MDAQ-BASE-5
Input voltage range:
±10 VPP
Channel separation @ 50 kHz:
> 96 dB
CMR @ 50 Hz (@ 1 kHz):
> 94 dB (> 80 dB)
Input configuration:
Designed to work with MDAQ-BASE-5 mother board
Output configuration:
Single-ended
S/NR @ bandwidth:
> 100 dB
Output impedance:
5Ω
Output current:
20 mA max.
Output connector:
68-pin Amplimite series (AMP Nr. 174339-6), SCSI II Type
Power supply:
±7.5 V to ±15 V direct via MDAQ-BASE
Power consumption:
typ. 3 W
Dimensions:
175 x 61 x 14 mm (6.9 x 2.4 x 0.9 in.)
15-400| OWNER’s GUIDE
MDAQ-AAF4-5-Bx Filter card
MDAQ-AAF4-5-BE: Bessel characteristics
MDAQ-AAF4-5-BU: Butterworth characteristics
16 Channel 4th order low pass filter
5 selectable filters including bypass function
5 different cut off frequencies
Discrete low noise filter design
Independent filter settings for each channel
Direct control from MDAQ-xx Amplifier series
MDAQ-AAF4-5-Bx specifications
Parameter
MDAQ-AAF4-5-Bx
Filter range (-3 dB):
version MDAQ-AAF4-5-BU
version MDAQ-AAF4-5-BU-S1
version MDAQ-AAF4-5-BU-S2
version MDAQ-AAF4-5-BE-S1
Bypass bandwidth:
Filter characteristics:
100 Hz, 1 kHz, 10 kHz, 30 kHz, 100 kHz, bypass
163 Hz, 500 Hz, 2.5 kHz, 10 kHz, bypass, bypass
10 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, 10 kHz, 20 kHz, bypass
100 Hz, 1 kHz, 10 kHz, 20 kHz, 30 kHz, bypass
other frequencies optionally available
> 700 kHz
-BE model
-BU model
4-Pole Bessel
4-Pole Butterworth
Attenuation slope:
80 dB/decade (24 dB/octave)
Filter Accuracy:
±1.5 dB @ fc
DC gain:
1 (0 dB)
Offset error:
Max. 1 mV (typ <0.2 mV)
Max. 0.02% of range with MDAQ-BASE-5
Input voltage range:
±10 VPP
Channel separation @ 50 kHz:
> 96 dB
CMR @ 50 Hz (@ 1 kHz):
> 94 dB (> 80 dB)
Input configuration:
Designed to work with MDAQ-BASE-5 mother board
Output configuration:
Single-ended
S/NR @ bandwidth:
> 100 dB
Output impedance:
5Ω
Output current:
20 mA max.
Output connector:
68-pin Amplimite series (AMP Nr. 174339-6), SCSI II Type
Power supply:
±7.5 V to ±15 V direct via MDAQ-BASE
Power consumption:
typ. 3 W
Dimensions:
175 x 61 x 14 mm (6.9 x 2.4 x 0.9 in.)
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, EPAD2/CPAD2 | 16-401
16 EPAD2 and CPAD2 Series
EPAD2 and CPAD2 overview
EPAD2 modules are external signal conditioning modules which connect to virtually any Dewetron system
via the RS485 interface, normally marked EPAD on your Dewetron system. It is marked this way on both
the DEWE-3210 and DEWE-3211 mainframes. However, EPAD2 series modules may also be connected to
any computer using a small interface box called the EPAD-BASE2, which allows you to connect one or more
EPAD2 modules to your computer’s RS232 or USB 2.0 interface.
CPAD2 modules are external modules which connect to any Dewetron system which has at least one CAN
BUS interface. Unlike EPAD2 series modules which employ the RS485 bus for communication and data
transfer, CPAD2 modules employ the CAN BUS for these functions.
Both EPAD2 and CPAD2 modules are 100% compatible with Dewetron software. The following pages will
show you how to connect and control these modules from within your system, as well as provide detailed
specifications about these modules.
EPAD2 and CPAD2 modules are available for measuring voltage, current, and temperature. Each module
provides 8 inputs. They have a separate 24-bit ADC for each input channels, and provide galvanic isolation to avoid ground loops and common mode problems. They can be daisy-chained to add more and more
channels to a single interface (CPAD2 and EPAD2 modules cannot be chained together).
EPAD2 and CPAD2 modules are not meant for dynamic/AC signals, but are intended for slowly changing
(quasi-static) and DC signals. They are the ideal way to add a moderate or even large number of slow channels to your Dewetron system in an affordable and convenient way.
Further technical details can be found within the xPAD technical reference manual, a separate document.
All specifications within this manual are valid at 25 °C.
All modules are produced according to ISO9001 and ISO14001.
16-402| OWNER’s GUIDE
General EPAD2/CPAD2 Module Specifications
Environmental:
Temp. range storage: Temp. range operating:
Enhanced temperature range:
Rel. humidity (MIL202): RFI susceptibility:
-30 °C to +85 °C (-22 °F to 185 °F)
-5 °C to +60 °C
(23 °F to 140 °F)
Upon request and special order
0 to 95 % at 60 °C, non-condensing
±0.5 % span error at 400 MHz, 5 W, 3 m
All specifications within this manual are valid at 25 °C.
All modules are produced according to ISO9001 and ISO14001.
EPAD2/CPAD2 Series Common Information
Calibration information
All DEWETRON modules are calibrated at 25°C after a warmup
time of 30 minutes and meet their specifications when leaving the
factory. The time interval for recalibration depends on environmental conditions. Typically, the calibration should be checked once a year.
Calibration certificates are available from DEWETRON as an option. DEWETRON offers several types:
„„ NIST traceable DEWETRON calibration certificate (USA CAL LAB only)
„„ ISO traceable DEWETRON certificate (European CAL LAB only)
„„ Calibration certificate according to ÖKD (equivalent to DKD)
EPAD2 RS-232/485 interface
EPAD2 series modules are controlled via RS-485 interface, and they require this interface for all data
transfers The DEWE-3210 and DEWE-3211 include an internal RS-232/485 converter and interface. This
converter allows communication with all Dewetron signal conditioning modules. To communicate with the
modules, the RS-232 interface must be set to the following parameters:
baud rate: 9600
data bits: 8
parity: no parity
stop bits: 1
handshake: not required
CPAD2 CAN BUS interface
CPAD2 series modules are controlled via the industry standard CAN BUS over CAN 2.0b protocol, and they
require this interface for all data transfers. CAN BUS is an option for both the DEWE-3210 and DEWE-3211
instruments, and must be installed at the factory in order for this interface to be available for CPAD2 connection.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, EPAD2/CPAD2 | 16-403
Cross-reference of EPAD2 / CPAD2 modules
Module
Input type
Input ranges
Isolation
8 thermocouple connectors
Type J: xPAD2-TH8-P-J
Type K: xPAD2-TH8-P-K
Type T: xPAD2-TH8-P-T
Type U: UNIVERSAL
Type J: -210 to 1200 °C
Type K: -270 to 1372 °C
Type T: -270 to 400 °C
Type U: includes types K, J, T, E,
R, S, B, N, C, and U
EPAD2-V8
CPAD2-V8
8 isolated voltage input
channels
Physical input range: ±50 V
Software selectable: ±100 mV,
±500 mV, ±1 V, ±2.5 V, ±5 V,
±10 V
350 VDC (channel to channel
and channel to BUS, power
and chassis)
EPAD2-RTD8
CPAD2-RTD8
8 isolated Resistance
Temperature Detector (RTD)
channels
Resistor: 0 to 999.99 Ω
RTD:
PT100(385), PT200 (385),
PT500(385), PT1000 (385),
PT2000(385), PT100 (3961)
350 VDC (channel to channel
and channel to BUS, power
and chassis)
EPAD2-TH8-P
CPAD2-TH8-P
8 isolated voltage inputs
Supported breakout boxes:
PAD-CB8-x-P2 PAD-CB8x-M PAD-CB8-RTD
±1.5 V fixed
350 VDC (channel to channel
and channel to BUS, power
and chassis)
EPAD2-LA8
CPAD2-LA8
8 isolated current inputs
0 to 20 mA, ±20 mA, ±30 mA
350 VDC (channel to channel
and channel to BUS, power
and chassis)
EPAD2-TH8-x
CPAD2-TH8-x
(where x = J, K, T, U)
350 VDC (channel to channel
and channel to BUS, power
and chassis)
COMMENTS
Overvoltage protection: 15
VDC
Types J, K, T have typical
accuracy of ±0.4°C
Type U (universal) has
typical accuracy of ±1.4°C
Overvoltage protection:
350 VDC
DSUB25 connector - please
order PAD-CB8-B or -BNC
breakout boxes to complete
this module
Overvoltage protection: 15
VDC
LEMO connectors
Overvoltage protection: 15
VDC
DSUB25 connector - please
order PAD-CB8-J, K, T or
-RTD breakout boxes to
complete this module
Overcurrent protection:
70 mA cont.
LEMO connectors
Installing CPAD2 modules
After connecting a CPAD2 module to an unused CAN BUS
interface on your Dewetron system, run DEWESoft and go
to the HARDWARE SETTINGS screen, accessed under the
SETTINGS button. Then click on the CAN button.
Select the CAN interface that you connected the CPAD2 module to on that screen and set it to work with CPAD2 modules,
as shown in the screen shot here.
If your software does not have this selection on the CAN
screen, please obtain the CPAD2 plugin from Dewetron. This is
a software addon that is free of charge with your CPAD modules. It was included on a DVD/CD disk when you purchased
your CPAD2 module(s). Or it can be downloaded from our FTP
site.
Additional CPAD2 series modules can be daisy-chained to the
first module. The last CPAD2 module must have the terminator plugged into the last open connector to ensure stable bus
communications.
Terminator
16-404| OWNER’s GUIDE
Installing EPAD2 modules
When you purchase an EPAD2 module for an existing
Dewetron system, you need to make a small change to the
hardware setup of your system so that the EPAD2 is recognized by the software.
First, connect the EPAD2 to the EPAD connector on your
system. If you plan to connect multiple EPAD2 modules,
start with one first and then add the others one at a time.
When connected properly, the EPAD2 LED should light up,
indicating that it is powered. If this does not happen, check
your cabling and verify it with Dewetron if necessary.
Now run DS-7. Click the SETTINGS button near the top right of the screen and then click HARDWARE
SETUP. Make sure you are looking at the ANALOG page of this dialog box. It looks like this:
Notice the area that we have drawn a red rectangle around in the screen shot above: this is where you need
to input the number of EPAD2 modules that you want to add. Enter that number here. Then click OK to close
this dialog box.
Click Ch Setup to see the list of ANALOG channels in DS-7. Scroll to the very bottom of this list and you will
see that four empty channels have been added. Assuming that one EPAD2 module is connected already to
the bus, double-click the first empty EPAD2 channel in the list within the AMPLIFIER column:
Double-click here
The new empty channels are outlined in red above. Now DOUBLE-CLICK on the first amplifier button, that
we have outlined in blue above. That will cause DS-7 to pop up the question “what should be done with the
module?”, at which point you should click the FILL button.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, EPAD2/CPAD2 | 16-405
When you click FILL, DS-7 will prompt you to press the black button on the EPAD2 module. Use a paperclip
or thin pencil lead to do that, and the module will be addressed to this slot number, and it will show up here
on the Setup screen. Use the SET CH. button on the far right to configure the eight channels of this module.
Now connect the next EPAD2 module and repeat these steps, moving down to the next empty amplifier button, and so on, until all EPAD2 modules have been installed.
Be sure to plug the terminator into the last EPAD2 module (even if there is only one EPAD2 module).
xPAD2 Series Calibration Information
All DEWETRON modules are calibrated at 25°C after a warmup time of 30 minutes and meet their specifications when leaving the factory. The time interval for recalibration depends on environmental conditions.
Typically, the calibration should be checked once a year.
Calibration certificates are available from DEWETRON as an option. DEWETRON offers several types:
„„ NIST traceable DEWETRON calibration certificate (USA CAL LAB only)
„„ ISO traceable DEWETRON certificate (European CAL LAB only)
„„ Calibration certificate according to ÖKD (equivalent to DKD)
This manual contains no calibration information. There are separate resources optionally available for
MDAQ series modules for automated calibration under Met/CAL®. The CAL-KIT contains the required
cables, software and instructions that you need to add to your own calibration lab. It does not include a
calibrator or volt meter.
16-406| OWNER’s GUIDE
EPAD2-TH8-X and CPAD2-TH8-X
Intelligent amplifier with integrated 24-bit A/D conversion
8 input channels for thermocouple types J, K, T, and U (universal)
Inputs isolated to 350 VDC
Modules daisy-chain together to add more and more channels
EPAD2 series uses RS485 interface
CPAD2 series uses CAN 2.0B interface
Specifications
Parameter
EPAD2-TH8-x and CPAD2-TH8-x
Input channels:
8 isolated thermocouple channels
Input signals:
thermocouple types depending on module
J: -210 °C to 1200 °C
K: -270 °C to 1372 °C
T: -270 °C to 400 °C
U: Supports types K, J, T, E, R, S, B, N, C, and U
Sample rate:
12.5 S/s/ch maximum
-3 dB bandwidth:
6 Hz
ADC type:
Sigma delta ADC per channel, 24-bit
(Note: CPAD2 outputs CAN data at 16-bits)
Input connector:
Standard “mini” thermocouple connector, polarized, color coded
Type K: yellow
Type J: black
Type T: blue
Type U: white
Resolution:
0.01 °C for all types
Input impedance:
typically 1.4 MΩ
Bias current:
typically 10 nA
Open thermocouple detection:
module indicates fullscale if input is open
Accuracy:
Thermocouple type J
Thermocouple type K
Thermocouple type T
Thermocouple type U
±1.0 °C @ -210 to -100 °C
±0.3 °C @ -100 to 760 °C
±0.4 °C @ 760 to 1200 °C
±1.0 °C @ -200 to -25 °C
±0.4 °C @ -25 to 1000 °C
±0.5 °C @ 1000 to 1372 °C
±1.0 °C @ -250 to -150 °C
±0.4 °C @ -150 to 400 °C
Varies according to the T/C type and range, but accuracy ±1.4 °C, typ. ±0.7 °C
Temperature drift:
typically 20 ppm/°C
Isolation voltage:
350 VDC (channel to channel and channel to Bus, Power and Chassis)
Over-voltage protection:
15 VDC
CMRR @ 50/60 Hz:
130 dB
Interface:
EPAD2 series: RS485
CPAD2 series: CAN BUS 2.0B protocol
Read-out speed:
EPAD2 series: typ. 80 ch/sec.
CPAD2 series: 12.5Hz, 10Hz, 5Hz, 2Hz, 1Hz, 0.5Hz, 0.2Hz or 0.1 Hz programmable
Bus power connector:
LEMO EGG.1B.304
Power supply voltage:
7 to 40V
Power consumption:
0.5 W maximum
Dimensions:
Weight:
Base module (W x D x H)
Mounting holes distance:
129 x 72 x 34.2 mm (5.1 x 2.8 x 1.3 in.) incl. mounting holes
119 x 7 mm (4.7 x 0.3 in.), 4.2 mm (0.165 in.) diameter
360 g typical
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, EPAD2/CPAD2 | 16-407
xPAD2 interface connector
Use the correct type
There are two identical interface connectors for power and control. One is used to interface with either
the Dewetron system, or another xPAD2 module in a
series. The other can be used to extend the daisychain another xPAD2 module from this one. The two
connectors are interchangeable.
Thermocouples are color coded according to international conventions.
PIN
EPAD2
CPAD2
1
RS485 (A)
CAN high
2
RS485 (B)
CAN low
3
+15V supply
+15V supply
4
GND
GND
-- Note: Our “universal” thermocouple input is cow-
white, to indicate that it is compatible with multiple
thermocouple types.
Connecting sensors
Use thermocouple sensors with standardized “mini”
thermocouple connectors. This is a polarized connector with two flat blades, and one blade is wider
than the other. Insert the plug correctly, and do not
force the plug in the wrong way.
-- Connecting the thermocouple backwards will result
in wrong readings.
Above: typical thermocouple mini connectors,
image courtesy of Omega.com
LEMO EGG.1B.304
xPAD2-TH8-X Dimensions
16-408| OWNER’s GUIDE
EPAD2-V8-X and CPAD2-V8-X
Intelligent amplifier with integrated 24-bit A/D conversion
8 input channels for voltages
Inputs isolated to 350 VDC
Modules daisy-chain together to add more and more channels
EPAD2 series uses RS485 interface
CPAD2 series uses CAN 2.0B interface
Specifications
Parameter
EPAD2-V8-x and CPAD2-V8-x
Input channels:
8 isolated voltage channels
Input ranges:
Physical input range: ±50 V Software selectable: ±100 mV, ±500 mV, ±1 V, ±2.5 V, ±5 V, ±10 V
Sample rate:
12.5 S/s/ch maximum
-3 dB bandwidth:
6 Hz
ADC type:
Sigma delta ADC per channel, 24-bit
(Note: CPAD2 outputs CAN data at 16-bits)
Input connector:
Standard “mini” thermocouple connector, polarized, color coded
Type K: yellow
Type J: black
Type T: blue
Type U: white
Resolution:
1µV for all ranges
Input impedance:
typically 1.4 MΩ
Bias current:
typically 10 nA
Linearity:
0.001 %
DC accuracy:
±0.02 % of reading ±900 μV
Temperature drift:
typically 25 ppm/°C
Isolation voltage:
350 VDC (channel to channel and channel to Bus, Power and Chassis)
Over-voltage protection:
15 VDC
CMRR @ 50/60 Hz:
130 dB
Interface:
EPAD2 series: RS485
CPAD2 series: CAN BUS 2.0B protocol
Read-out speed:
EPAD2 series: typ. 80 ch/sec.
CPAD2 series: 12.5Hz, 10Hz, 5Hz, 2Hz, 1Hz, 0.5Hz, 0.2Hz or 0.1 Hz programmable
Bus power connector:
LEMO EGG.1B.304
Power supply voltage:
7 to 40V
Power consumption:
0.5 W maximum
Dimensions:
Weight:
Base module (W x D x H)
Mounting holes distance:
129 x 72 x 34.2 mm (5.1 x 2.8 x 1.3 in.) incl. mounting holes
119 x 7 mm (4.7 x 0.3 in.), 4.2 mm (0.165 in.) diameter
310 g typical
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, EPAD2/CPAD2 | 16-409
xPAD2-V8-X Dimensions
Connector pin-outs
Pin
Function
Pin
Function
1
Channel 0 (+)
13
Channel 6 (+)
2
Channel 0 (-)
14
Channel 6 (-)
3
Channel 1 (+)
15
Channel 7 (+)
4
Channel 1 (-)
16
Channel 7(-)
5
Channel 2 (+)
17
Digital input 1*
6
Channel 2 (-)
18
Digital input 2*
7
Channel 3 (+)
19
Digital input 3*
8
Channel 3 (-)
20
+12 VDC
9
Channel 4 (+)
21
Reset / Digital input 4*
10
Channel 4 (-)
22
GND
11
Channel 5 (+)
23
Reserved
12
Channel 5 (-)
24
Reserved
25
Reserved
* not supported in Dewesoft software
xPAD2 interface connector
There are two identical interface connectors for power and control. One is used to interface with either
the Dewetron system, or another xPAD2 module in a
series. The other can be used to extend the daisychain another xPAD2 module from this one. The two
connectors are interchangeable.
PIN
EPAD2
CPAD2
1
RS485 (A)
CAN high
2
RS485 (B)
CAN low
3
+15V supply
+15V supply
4
GND
GND
Mating connector
PAD-OPT2
25-pin SUB-D connector with screw terminals
(optional)
LEMO EGG.1B.304
xPAD2-V8 signal interface connector
Normally this is where you plug in a break-out box,
such as the PAD-CB8-B (banana jacks) or PADCB8-BNC (BNC connectors). But in the event that
you want to make your own cable, the pin-outs are
here, and there is a convenient mating connector
with screw terminals available for purchase.
Low cost alternative to the PAD-CB8-B and -BNC
breakout boxes, or as a building block to making
your own cable without soldering. Metal shell covers
included.
16-410| OWNER’s GUIDE
EPAD2-RTD8 and CPAD2-RTD8
Intelligent amplifier with integrated 24-bit A/D conversion
8 input channels for RTD sensors
Supports 2-wire and 4-wire hook-ups
Inputs isolated to 350 VDC
Modules daisy-chain together to add more and more channels
EPAD2 series uses RS485 interface
CPAD2 series uses CAN 2.0B interface
Specifications
Parameter
EPAD2-RTD8 and CPAD2-RTD8
Input channels:
8 isolated RTD channels
Input ranges:
Resistor: 0 to 999.99 Ω
RTD: PT100(385); PT200(385); PT500(385); PT1000(385); PT2000(385); PT100(3961)
Sample rate:
12.5 S/s/ch maximum
-3 dB bandwidth:
6 Hz
ADC type:
Sigma delta ADC per channel, 24-bit
(Note: CPAD2 outputs CAN data at 16-bits)
Input connector:
ERA.1S.304
Resolution:
0.01 °C for all types
Input impedance:
typically >100 MΩ
Bias current:
typically 10 nA
Connection type:
2-wire, 4-wire (see diagrams on opposite page)
Accuracy:
Pt100 a = 0.00385 ±0.25 °C @ -200 to 100 °C ±0.4 °C @ 100 to 400 °C ±0.8 °C @ 400 to 800 °C
Pt100 a = 0.003916
±0.25 °C @ -200 to 100 °C
±0.4 °C @ 100 to 400 °C
±0.8 °C @ 400 to 800 °C
Pt200 a = 0.00385
±0.25 °C @ -200 to 100 °C
±0.4 °C @ 100 to 400 °C
±0.8 °C @ 400 to 800 °C
Pt500 a = 0.00385 ±0.25 °C @ -200 to 100 °C ±0.4 °C @ 100 to 250 °C
Pt1000 a = 0.00385
±0.25 °C @ -200 to 100 °C
±0.4 °C @ 100 to 400 °C
±0.8 °C @ 400 to 600 °C
Pt2000 a = 0.00385
±0.25 °C @ -200 to 100 °C
±0.4 °C @ 100 to 400 °C
±0.8 °C @ 400 to 600 °C
Temperature drift:
typically 25 ppm/°C
Isolation voltage:
350 VDC (channel to channel and channel to Bus, Power and Chassis)
Over-voltage protection:
15 VDC
CMRR @ 50/60 Hz:
130 dB
Interface:
EPAD2 series: RS485
CPAD2 series: CAN BUS 2.0B protocol
Read-out speed:
EPAD2 series: typ. 80 ch/sec.
CPAD2 series: 12.5Hz, 10Hz, 5Hz, 2Hz, 1Hz, 0.5Hz, 0.2Hz or 0.1 Hz programmable
Bus power connector:
LEMO EGG.1B.304
Power supply voltage:
7 to 40V
Power consumption:
0.5 W maximum
Dimensions:
Weight:
Base module (W x D x H)
Mounting holes distance:
129 x 72 x 34.2 mm (5.1 x 2.8 x 1.3 in.) incl. mounting holes
119 x 7 mm (4.7 x 0.3 in.), 4.2 mm (0.165 in.) diameter
310 g typical
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, EPAD2/CPAD2 | 16-411
xPAD2-RTD8 Dimensions
* Shield is on the housing
RTD connections
2-wire hook-up
ERA.1S.304.CLL
xPAD2 interface connector
There are two identical interface connectors for power and control. One is used to interface with either
the Dewetron system, or another xPAD2 module in a
series. The other can be used to extend the daisychain another xPAD2 module from this one. The two
connectors are interchangeable.
PIN
EPAD2
CPAD2
1
RS485 (A)
CAN high
2
RS485 (B)
CAN low
3
+15V supply
+15V supply
4
GND
GND
LEMO EGG.1B.304
xPAD2-RTD8 signal interface connector
Pin
Function
1
Excitation +
2
Sense +
3
Sense -
4
Excitation -
4-wire hook-up
16-412| OWNER’s GUIDE
EPAD2-TH8 and CPAD2-TH8
Intelligent amplifier with integrated 24-bit A/D conversion
8 input channels for thermocouples or RTDs via
PAD-CB8 series break-out boxes
Inputs isolated to 350 VDC
Modules daisy-chain together to add more and more channels
EPAD2 series uses RS485 interface
CPAD2 series uses CAN 2.0B interface
Specifications
Parameter
EPAD2-TH8 and CPAD2-TH8
Input channels:
8 isolated voltage channels (prepared for thermocouple or RTD interface boxes)
Input range:
±1.5 V (fixed)
Sample rate:
12.5 S/s/ch maximum
-3 dB bandwidth:
6 Hz
ADC type:
Sigma delta ADC per channel, 24-bit
(Note: CPAD2 outputs CAN data at 16-bits)
Input connector:
SUBD 25-pin connector - please order your choice of PAD-CB8-TH or RTD series break-out boxes
Resolution:
1µV
Input impedance:
typically 1.4 MΩ
Supported break-out boxes:
PAD-CB8-x-P2 standard thermocouple breakout box (where x = J, K, or T)
PAD-CB8-x-M miniature size thermocouple breakout box (where x = J, K, or T)
PAD-CB8-RTD RTD breakout box
Temperature drift:
typically 20 ppm/°C
Isolation voltage:
350 VDC (channel to channel and channel to Bus, Power and Chassis)
Over-voltage protection:
15 VDC
CMRR @ 50/60 Hz:
130 dB
Interface:
EPAD2 series: RS485
CPAD2 series: CAN BUS 2.0B protocol
Read-out speed:
EPAD2 series: typ. 80 ch/sec.
CPAD2 series: 12.5Hz, 10Hz, 5Hz, 2Hz, 1Hz, 0.5Hz, 0.2Hz or 0.1 Hz programmable
Bus power connector:
LEMO EGG.1B.304
Power supply voltage:
7 to 40V
Power consumption:
0.5 W maximum
Dimensions:
Weight:
Base module (W x D x H)
Mounting holes distance:
129 x 72 x 34.2 mm (5.1 x 2.8 x 1.3 in.) incl. mounting holes
119 x 7 mm (4.7 x 0.3 in.), 4.2 mm (0.165 in.) diameter
310 g typical
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, EPAD2/CPAD2 | 16-413
xPAD2-TH8 Dimensions
Connector pin-outs
Pin
xPAD2 interface connector
PIN
EPAD2
CPAD2
RS485 (A)
CAN high
2
RS485 (B)
CAN low
3
+15V supply
+15V supply
4
GND
GND
Pin
Function
1
Channel 0 (+)
13
Channel 6 (+)
2
Channel 0 (-)
14
Channel 6 (-)
3
Channel 1 (+)
15
Channel 7 (+)
4
Channel 1 (-)
16
Channel 7(-)
5
Channel 2 (+)
17
Reserved
6
Channel 2 (-)
18
Reserved
7
Channel 3 (+)
19
Reserved
8
Channel 3 (-)
20
+12 VDC
9
Channel 4 (+)
21
Reserved
10
Channel 4 (-)
22
GND
11
Channel 5 (+)
23
Reserved / CJC
12
Channel 5 (-)
24
Reserved / CJC
25
Reserved / CJC
Mating connector
There are two identical interface connectors for power and control. One is used to interface with either
the Dewetron system, or another xPAD2 module in a
series. The other can be used to extend the daisychain another xPAD2 module from this one. The two
connectors are interchangeable.
1
Function
PAD-OPT1
25-pin SUB-D connector with screw terminals
(optional)
LEMO EGG.1B.304
xPAD2-V8 signal interface connector
Normally this is where you plug in a break-out box,
such as the PAD-CB8-B (banana jacks) or PADCB8-BNC (BNC connectors). But in the event that
you want to make your own cable, the pin-outs are
here, and there is a convenient mating connector
with screw terminals available for purchase.
Low cost alternative to the PAD-CB8-B and -BNC
breakout boxes, or as a building block to making
your own cable without soldering. CJC chip and
metal shell covers included. CJC chip will be preinstalled for you on pins 23-24-25 (not shown in image
above).
16-414| OWNER’s GUIDE
EPAD2-LA8 and CPAD2-LA8
Intelligent amplifier with integrated 24-bit A/D conversion
8 input channels for current measurements
Supports 0 to 20 mA, ±20 mA, and ±30 mA
Inputs isolated to 350 VDC
Modules daisy-chain together to add more and more channels
EPAD2 series uses RS485 interface
CPAD2 series uses CAN 2.0B interface
Specifications
Parameter
EPAD2-LA8 and CPAD2-LA8
Input channels:
8 isolated current input channels
Input ranges:
0 to 20 mA, ±20 mA; and ±30 mA
Sample rate:
12.5 S/s/ch maximum
-3 dB bandwidth:
6 Hz
ADC type:
Sigma delta ADC per channel, 24-bit
(Note: CPAD2 outputs CAN data at 16-bits)
Input connector:
LEMO EGB.1B.304
Resolution:
0.3 μA
Input impedance:
50 Ω 0.1 %
Connection type:
2-wire, 4-wire (see diagrams on opposite page)
Temperature drift:
typically 20 ppm/°C
Isolation voltage:
350 VDC (channel to channel and channel to Bus, Power and Chassis)
Over-current protection:
70 mA continuous
CMRR @ 50/60 Hz:
130 dB
Interface:
EPAD2 series: RS485
CPAD2 series: CAN BUS 2.0B protocol
Read-out speed:
EPAD2 series: typ. 80 ch/sec.
CPAD2 series: 12.5Hz, 10Hz, 5Hz, 2Hz, 1Hz, 0.5Hz, 0.2Hz or 0.1 Hz programmable
Bus power connector:
LEMO EGG.1B.304
Power supply voltage:
7 to 40V
Power consumption:
0.5 W maximum
Dimensions:
Weight:
Base module (W x D x H)
Mounting holes distance:
129 x 72 x 34.2 mm (5.1 x 2.8 x 1.3 in.) incl. mounting holes
119 x 7 mm (4.7 x 0.3 in.), 4.2 mm (0.165 in.) diameter
360 g typical
OWNER’s GUIDE - Conditioners, EPAD2/CPAD2 | 16-415
xPAD2-LA8 Dimensions
xPAD2-LA8 signal interface connector
Pin
Function
1
Power supply +
2
Current +
3
Current -
4
Power supply -
EGB.1B.304
* Shield is on the housing
xPAD2 interface connector
There are two identical interface connectors for power and control. One is used to interface with either
the Dewetron system, or another xPAD2 module in a
series. The other can be used to extend the daisychain another xPAD2 module from this one. The two
connectors are interchangeable.
PIN
EPAD2
CPAD2
1
RS485 (A)
CAN high
2
RS485 (B)
CAN low
3
+15V supply
+15V supply
4
GND
GND
LEMO EGG.1B.304
16-416| OWNER’s GUIDE
OWNER’s GUIDE - ORION A/D Cards | 17-417
17
ORION Series A/D Cards
There are several A/D cards which may be installed into your Dewetron system, depending on how it was
ordered from the factory. In the models covered by this manual, the ORION-1616-100 is installed as a
standard. However, as mentioned, your card might have been upgraded in terms of its options (the last digit
might be changed), or upgraded to a completely different card, with a different model name.
The ORION series are simultaneous sampling, high-end performance, including synchronous counter/encoder inputs on board, and offering options such as CAN BUS interfaces, isolated counters and digital input
lines, and more. ORION series cards represent the state of the art within the Dewetron family. They were
designed from the ground up to allow 100% synchronization, not just within one system but across multiple
systems, whether they are physically connected, or separated by thousands of miles.
This section will present the basic specifications for all commonly installed ORION series A/D cards. Additional information is available in Dewetron manuals specific to these cards, available as separate documents.
ORION series Cross-Reference
Series
Voltage ranges
Bits
Max
SR
ADC
type
Dig.
Ins
Dig. I/
Os
Ctr/Enc
CAN
ORION-0824-200
8
±0.1 V, ±0.5 V, ±2 V, ±10 V
IEPE®: 4 mA / 8 mA
excitation
24-bit
204.8
D/Sigma
8 to 40
8
2 to 10 (ADV)
0 or 2
ORION-1624-200
16
±10 V
24-bit
204.8
D/Sigma
8 to 40
8
2 to 10 (ADV)
0 or 2
ORION-1622-100
16
±10 V
22-bit
100
D/Sigma
8 to 40
8
2 to 10 (ADV)
0 or 2
ORION-3222-100
32
±10 V
22-bit
100
D/Sigma
8 to 24
8
2 to 10 (ADV)
0 or 2
ORION-0816-1000
8
±1.25 V, ±2.5 V, ±5 V, ±10 V
16-bit
1000
SAR
8 to 40
8
2 to 10
0 or 2
ORION-1616-100
16
±1.25 V, ±2.5 V, ±5 V, ±10 V
16-bit
100
SAR
8 to 40
8
2 to 10
0 or 2
ORION-3216-100
32
±1.25 V, ±2.5 V, ±5 V, ±10 V
16-bit
100
SAR
8 to 24
8
2 to 10
0 or 2
Key Features
„„ Simultaneous sampling
„„ Separate A/D converter channel
„„ Dozens of different models
„„ Synchronized analog, digital, counter and CAN inputs
„„ Clock output for synchronizing external devices, e.g. video cameras
„„ Sync option for synchronizing multiple systems or synchronize to IRIG or GPS
17-418| OWNER’s GUIDE
ORION Overview
To create instruments with dozens or even hundreds of dynamic channels, multiple ORION cards can be
installed within a single unit. All cards are synchronized via the internal sync-bus to ensure absolute simultaneous sampling of all channels.
Key Features
„„ Simultaneous sampling
„„ Separate A/D converter channel
„„ Dozens of different models
„„ Synchronized analog, digital, counter and CAN inputs
„„ Clock output for synchronizing external devices, e.g. video cameras
„„ Sync option for synchronizing multiple systems or synchronize to IRIG or GPS
Multiple Dewetron instruments can be hardwaresynchronized using the ORION-SYNC option. Depending on distance and local preconditions there
are several choices how to use this option.
You can connect your instruments via standard
CAT6 cables, over short distances. The maximum
length depends on the sampling rate and the A/D technology, and
ranges between 30 m to 200 m. This requires that the ORION-SYNC
option was factory installed when each system was made.
For large distances which do not allow physical
connection
be This
-- One
card must of
bethe
set instruments,
as the master,synchronization
and the others ascan
slaves.
achieved using GPS or IRIG time codes. Thisisrequires
the Dewetron
systems have either the IRIGdone at that
the driver
level.
CLOCK or GPS-CLOCK option installed internally, or connected externally (order IRIG-CLOCK-INT or
GPS-CLOCK-INT for factory-installed internal interfaces, or the IRIG-CLOCK-EXT or GPS-CLOCK-EXT for
field-installed external interfaces).
The driver design enables total continuous gap-free disk storing rates of more than 100 MB/s. Today standard computers with a single hard disk reach continuous gap-free storing rates between 50 MB/s and 80
MB/s.
A/D Technologies within the ORION series
Delta-Sigma Converter
This technique is used in the ORION cards with 22 and 24-bit A/D converters. Of course, 24-bit converters
offer highest dynamic range (up to 120 dB).
Whenever you choose a sampling rate, the used internal sampling rate is up to 512 times higher. Using
this over-sampling technique full anti-aliasing protection is guaranteed. These boards can not be external
clocked, but synchronized from board to board and also synchronized to GPS clock using the DEWE-GPSCLOCK or to IRIG time using DEWE- IRIG-CLOCK.
OWNER’s GUIDE - ORION A/D Cards | 17-419
Flash Converter
This technique is used in all ORION cards with 16-bit A/D converters, as well as MI and AD series boards.
Flash converters offer the fastest sampling rates (up to 1 MS/s/ch) as well as the possibility for external
clocking. This is required for external clocked applications like distance related A/D conversion, combustion
analysis as well as order tracking applications (using hardware order tracking clocked by an encoder).
Combining ORION cards
ORION cards with different bit resolutions, or different max sample rates, cannot be mixed within the same
system. In other words, you cannot install an ORION-0816-1000 and an ORION-1616-100 in the same system,
because they have different max sample rates. Nor can you mix ORION-1616-100 with ORION-1622-100.
However, there is no problem to mix the ORION-3216-100 with ORION-1616-100 cards, because they have the
same bit resolution and the same max sample rate. (The ORION-3216-100 is an ORION-1616-100 card with an
add-on of 16 more channels, so they are essentially the same card anyway).
Also there is no problem to mix multiples of the same card, but which have different last digits. Therefore you
may install an ORION-1624-200, ORION-1624-202, and ORION-1624-205 in the same system.
Synching ORION cards
If multiple compatible ORION cards are installed in the same system, they must be interconnected with a
sync cable. A standard 10-pin connector with 1.27 mm flat ribbon cable is available for easy connection
between the boards.
Synching Multiple systems
If multiple systems or PCI expansion systems are used, a sync bus option must be installed. This option decouples the internal sync bus with
the external sync I/O connector. By changing the internal TTL sync bus
levels from TTL to RS-422 level, the distance between two systems
can be increased by up to 50 meters using by using standard CAT5/
CAT6 Ethernet cables (greater distances are possible - please contact
Dewetron to discuss).
17-420| OWNER’s GUIDE
„„ The ORION-DAQ-SYNC option is required for Dewetron 16-bit ORION cards.
„„ The ORION-DSA-SYNC option is required for Dewetron 22- and 24-bit ORION cards.
The SYNC option also includes the security circuit if two master systems have to be connected together
over the sync bus connection. As soon as the system is configured to a master system the external sync is
ignored by disabling the SYNC-IN amplifier. The LED labeled MI (master internal) indicates if the system is
configured to a master system. ME (master external) will light up if a valid sync signal is being received on
the SYNC-IN connector.
Above: schematic of ORION-XXX-SYNC option
-- Note - if you plan on adding more compatible Dewetrons and hardware synchronizing them like this, it is highly
recommended to have the sync option installed at the factory. It is difficult to add later.
Opto-coupler emitter
Opto-collector
System on
Power +5V
Power GND
SYNC IN
ME/MI LEDs (2)
To ORION card sync
bus interface
SYNC OUT
In addition to the synchronization function the ORION-xxx-SYNC allows also the remote power-on of any
connected slave system. When the master is powered on, an opto coupler output (PC817) is activated
to switch on the power supply of the slave system. The remote power on also can be controlled with an
external control voltage (+5 V@Sys-On). Systems with this option typically have a three way power switch
labeled ON, OFF, and SLAVE ON. In this third mode, the system can be powered on remotely if connected
to a master. This is very convenient for powering on everything at once, and in the correct order.
On-board RS-485 interface
ORION cards are equipped with an RS-485 interfaced as standard. The baud-rate is fixed to 9600, 8 data,
1 stop bit and no parity. This interface is used for configuration of DAQ, MDAQ, and HSI signal conditioning
modules. In addition, PAD and EPAD2 series modulescan also be handled. Therefore there is no need for
an additional serial interface for module control when ORION cards are used within your system.
OWNER’s GUIDE - ORION A/D Cards | 17-421
In DS-7 you need to access the HARDWARE SETUP screen, and make sure that “ORION onboard” is selected as the module control interface, as shown in the screen shot at right.
ORION card Windows driver
Every PCI card requires a driver so that Windows knows how to implement it. 99% of the time, ORION cards
are factory installed, and thus we install the drivers for you. If you are adding a second compatible ORION
card to your system, then the drivers are already installed. However, if you are installing one or more ORION
cards into a new computer, please contact Dewetron for the latest Windows driver.
Installing ORION cards
Please see the manual provided with your new ORION card for complete installation instructions. It is beyond the scope of this manual to describe that for all of the different ORION cards that we offer.
17-422| OWNER’s GUIDE
ORION-0424-200
„„
„„
„„
„„
„„
„„
„„
4 simultaneous sampled channels, BNC connection
Voltage or IEPE® mode (4 mA or 8 mA source)
4 input ranges (from ±0.1 V to ±10 V)
Input coupling DC or AC (0.15 Hz or 3.4 Hz)
204.8 kS/s per channel
24 bit resolution, anti-aliasing filter
TEDS (IEEE 1451) sensor support
Model Overview
Model
Analog
chs
Max kS/s/
ch
Digital
input
chs
Digital
I/O
Ext clock
Ext.
trigger
Counter/
encoder
TTL
Counter/
Encoder
ADJ
CAN
BUS
ORION-0424-200
4
204.8
--
--
--
1
--
1
--
Top Level Specifications
Parameter
Specification
Number of analog input channels:
4, simultaneously sampled
Input configuration:
Symmetric, differential or single ended
Resolution:
24 bit, nominal
Type of ADC:
Delta-sigma
Sample rate:
204.8 kS/s/ch maximum
Input signal range:
±10V, ±2V, ±0.5V, ±0.1V peak
Input impedance (ground ref.):
Positive to negative input 1 MΩ each with 60 pF to GND
Over-voltage protection:
±30V on both positive and negative inputs
Alias-free bandwidth (passband):
1 kS/s ≤ fs ≤ 51.2 kS/s DC (0 Hz) to 0.42 fs
51.2 kS/s < fs ≤ 102.4 kS/s DC (0 Hz) to 0.32 fs
102.4 kS/s < fs ≤ 200 kS/s DC (0 Hz) to 0.22 fs
Dimensions:
17.5 x 10.7 cm (6.9 x 4.2 in.) (not including connectors)
Form factor:
Half length PCI card
Analog input connector:
BNC
Counter input connector:
DSUB 9-pin connector, male
Environmental:
T.OP: 0 to 50°C, T.STORE: -20 to 70°C; RH: 10 to 90 %, non-condensing
For complete details, please see the detailed manual for this card, available as a separate document.
OWNER’s GUIDE - ORION A/D Cards | 17-423
ORION-0824-200
„„
„„
„„
„„
„„
„„
8 simultaneous sampled channels
Voltage or IEPE® mode (4 mA or 8 mA source)
Synchronous digital inputs
204.8 kS/s per channel
24 bit resolution, anti-aliasing filter
6 models available with many options
Model Overview
Model
Analog
chs
Max
kS/s/ch
Digital
input
chs
Digital
I/O
Ext clock
Ext.
trigger
Counter/
encoder
TTL
Counter/
Encoder
ADJ
CAN
BUS
ORION-0824-200
8
204.8
2 (8*)
8
--
1
--
2
--
ORION-0824-201
8
204.8
2 (8*)
8
--
1
--
2
2
ORION-0824-202
8
204.8
10 (40*)
8
--
1
8
2
--
ORION-0824-203
8
204.8
10 (40*)
8
--
1
8
2
2
ORION-0824-204
8
204.8
10 (40*)
8
--
1
--
2+8
--
ORION-0824-205
8
204.8
10 (40*)
8
--
1
--
2+8
2
Top Level Specifications
Parameter
Specification
Number of analog input channels:
8, simultaneously sampled
Input / Resolution / ADC type:
Symmetric, differential or single ended / 24 bit, nominal / Sigma-delta
Sample rate:
204.8 kS/s/ch maximum
Input signal range:
±10V, ±2V, ±0.5V, ±0.1V peak
Input impedance (ground ref.):
1 MΩ each with 60 pF to GND (Positive to negative input)
Over-voltage protection:
±30V on both positive and negative inputs
Alias-free bandwidth (passband):
1 kS/s ≤ fs ≤ 51.2 kS/s DC (0 Hz) to 0.42 fs
51.2 kS/s < fs ≤ 102.4 kS/s DC (0 Hz) to 0.32 fs
102.4 kS/s < fs ≤ 200 kS/s DC (0 Hz) to 0.22 fs
Form factor:
Half length PCI card
Analog input connector:
68-pin SCSI male (AMP 174341-5)
Environmental:
T.OP: 0 to 50°C, T.STORE: -20 to 70°C; RH: 10 to 90 %, non-condensing
For complete details, please see the detailed manual for this card, available as a separate document.
17-424| OWNER’s GUIDE
ORION-1624-200
„„
„„
„„
„„
„„
„„
16 simultaneous sampled channels
±10V input range
Synchronous digital inputs
204.8 kS/s per channel
24 bit resolution, anti-aliasing filter
6 models available with many options
Model Overview
Model
Analog
chs
Max
kS/s/ch
Digital
input
chs
Digital
I/O
Ext clock
Ext.
trigger
Counter/
encoder
TTL
Counter/
Encoder
ADJ
CAN
BUS
ORION-1624-200
16
204.8
2 (8*)
8
--
1
2
--
--
ORION-1624-201
16
204.8
2 (8*)
8
--
1
2
--
2
ORION-1624-202
16
204.8
10 (40*)
8
--
1
2+8
--
--
ORION-1624-203
16
204.8
10 (40*)
8
--
1
2+8
--
2
ORION-1624-204
16
204.8
10 (40*)
8
--
1
2
8
--
ORION-1624-205
16
204.8
10 (40*)
8
--
1
2
8
2
Top Level Specifications
Parameter
Specification
Number of analog input channels:
16, simultaneously sampled
Input / Resolution / ADC type:
Symmetric, differential / 24 bit, nominal / Sigma-delta
Sample rate:
204.8 kS/s/ch maximum
Input signal range:
±10 V
Input impedance:
10 MΩ in parallel with 60 pF (both positive and negative inputs)
Over-voltage protection:
±30V on both positive and negative inputs
Alias-free bandwidth (passband):
1 kS/s ≤ fs ≤ 51.2 kS/s DC (0 Hz) to 0.42 fs
51.2 kS/s < fs ≤ 102.4 kS/s DC (0 Hz) to 0.32 fs
102.4 kS/s < fs ≤ 200 kS/s DC (0 Hz) to 0.22 fs
Form factor:
Half length PCI card
Analog input connector:
68-pin SCSI male (AMP 174341-5)
Environmental:
T.OP: 0 to 50°C, T.STORE: -20 to 70°C; RH: 10 to 90 %, non-condensing
For complete details, please see the detailed manual for this card, available as a separate document.
OWNER’s GUIDE - ORION A/D Cards | 17-425
ORION-1622-100 and ORION-3222-100
„„
„„
„„
„„
„„
„„
16 or 32 simultaneous sampled channels
±10 V inputs
Synchronous digital inputs
100 kS/s per channel
22 bit resolution, anti-aliasing filter
8 models available with many options
Model Overview
Model
Analog
chs
Max
kS/s/ch
Digital
input
chs
Digital
I/O
Ext clock
Ext.
trigger
Counter/
encoder
TTL
Counter/
Encoder
ADJ
CAN
BUS
ORION-1622-100
16
102.4
2 (8*)
8
--
1
2
--
--
ORION-1622-101
16
102.4
2 (8*)
8
--
1
2
--
2
ORION-1622-102
16
102.4
10 (40*)
8
--
1
2+8
--
--
ORION-1622-103
16
102.4
10 (40*)
8
--
1
2+8
--
2
ORION-1622-104
16
102.4
10 (40*)
8
--
1
2
8
--
ORION-1622-105
16
102.4
10 (40*)
8
--
1
2
8
2
ORION-3222-100
32
102.4
18 (24*)
8
1
1
2
--
--
ORION-3222-101
32
102.4
18 (24*)
8
1
1
2
--
2
Top Level Specifications
Parameter
Specification
Number of analog input channels:
16 or 32, simultaneously sampled
Input / Resolution / ADC type:
Symmetric, single ended w/remote sense / 22 bit nominal / Sigma-delta
Sample rate:
102.4 kS/s/ch maximum
Input signal range:
±10 V
Input impedance (ground ref.):
1 MΩ each with 60 pF to GND
Over-voltage protection:
±30V
Alias-free bandwidth (passband):
1 kS/s ≤ fs ≤ 51.2 kS/s DC (0 Hz) to 0.42 fs
51.2 kS/s < fs ≤ 102.4 kS/s DC (0 Hz) to 0.32 fs
Form factor:
Half length PCI card
Analog input connector:
68-pin SCSI male (AMP 174341-5)
Environmental:
T.OP: 0 to 50°C, T.STORE: -20 to 70°C; RH: 10 to 90 %, non-condensing
For complete details, please see the detailed manual for this card, available as a separate document.
17-426| OWNER’s GUIDE
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-427
18
DEWETRON Interfaces
There are several key interface cards that are available for your Dewetron instrument. These include time
code interfaces based on IRIG or GPS, as well as BUS interface cards for popular data busses such as
ARINC 429, MIL-STD-1553, NTSC/PAL video input, and more.
Please see the next pages for basic information about these interface cards. Additional details can be found
in the manuals specific to each card, as provided with your system.
DEWE-CLOCK time code interface card
Device Overview
The DEWE-CLOCK is a synchronized time base generator capable of using either GPS or IRIG as time
source. This allows completely synchronized data acquisition of multiple systems whether they are mobile or
stationary. Additionally the DEWE-CLOCK can also be used as an IRIG time code generator (output IRIG B/
DC) synchronized to the GPS time.
The time synchronization is supported for the whole DEWE-ORION series as well as for many 3rd party A/Dboards.
The diagram below outlines the basic functionality of the DEWE-CLOCK:
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GPS Measurement Mode
The base of any GPS receiver is precise time measurement. In addition to the position information a precise
PPS (pulse per second) is generated by the GPS engine. This pulse is used to synchronize a 40 MHz
oscillator with software PLL (phase locked loop). The result is an ultra-stable 40 MHz clock source which is
completely free of drift over time.
Out of this 40 MHz base clock, the programmable clock divider generates the clock frequency for the standard data acquisition system which is being output on the 9-pin DSUB connector.
For A/D-boards with over-clocked delta sigma converters (e.g. DEWE-ORION-DSA series), a special output
clock is required for synchronized sampling. This is available on a RJ45 connector.
The communication to the host is provided over USB interface.
IRIG Based Operation
The IRIG signal contains the binary-coded time (year, day of year, hours, minutes, seconds, fractions of
a second) modulated on a sine wave carrier. This signal is decoded to the PPS and the drift-free 40 MHz
clock.
The following IRIG time codes are supported:
„„ IRIG-A (10 Hz)
„„ IRIG-B (1 Hz)
Functionality of the LEDs
Power Green
The power LED is solid green when the DEWE-CLOCK is in normal operation.
Status (red)
Indicates current status of device. At normal operation - when DEWE-CLOCK is locked to
the selected time source - it shortly blinks once a second.
When the time source signal is missing (neither GPS or IRIG time code signal), the device
automatically goes to flying-wheel operation. This is indicated by inverted blinking.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-429
Mounting the Aerial
The aerial supplied with the DEWE-CLOCK is designed to be
mounted with the included mounting kit. The positioning of the
aerial is critical to the correct operation of the DEWE-CLOCK.
The aerial picks up the signals from up to 12 satellites which are
all in different places in the sky. These satellites are not necessarily directly overhead, and can often be close to the horizon. Therefore it is best to mount the aerial in a way, that the least amount
of metal obscures the view of the sky. On a domed roof, place the
aerial on the top of the dome. On an open car with a roll-over bar,
place the aerial horizontally on the highest point of the roll-over
hoop and tape the wire securely to the frame.
Although the DEWE-CLOCK can work with at least three satellites,
it’s precision increases the more satellites it finds. If one satellite
disappears over the horizon, or behind an object, there are other satellites still in view.
In order to fix your antenna on a tube, use the provided universal mounting adaptor. The image here shows
you how to affix the tube with the screws - see call-outs (1) (2).
-- Important note: The maximum diameter is limited to 43 mm (1.7 Inch). Otherwise the universal mounting
adapter will not fit on the tube.
The DEWE-CLOCK is shipped with a 6 m antenna cable (standard). 15 m or 25 m antenna cables are available optionally.
„„ PC-GPS-CBL15 - 15 m
„„ PC-GPS-CBL15 - 25 m
This is an industry standard BNC connector, female. A mating BNC cable
is not included with the IRIG-CLOCK option.
Warm-Up time
When the DEWE-CLOCK is used as GPS based time code generator
for the first time, has been moved more than 200 km or not used for 10
hours (since last usage), it is recommended to perform a ‘cold start’. To
get the best performance from your GPS in the future, perform this cold
start in an open place with a good all round view to the sky. Allow the
GPS to map the satellites for at least 20 to 30 minutes. The GPS builds
up the ‘Ephemeris’ data on each satellite which is stored in a non-volatile
18-430| OWNER’s GUIDE
memory, and means future satellite tracking is swift and stable. Once the GPS has carried out a successful
cold start, future satellite lock from power up will take between 15 seconds and 1 minute. Before going to
test in a shady environment with tall objects or near to trees, allow the GPS to settle in an open space for 5
to 10 minutes.
Scope of Supply
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-431
Connection
Connector overview:
Aerial connector
Connect the GPS antenna to the SMA connector.
IRIG connector
Connect the IRIG signal to the BNC connector.
Multi I/O connector
The 9-pin DSUB 9 (male) connector is configured as output connector for following signals:
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Mini USB connector
The mini-USB interface connectors meets standard USB pin assignment.
ORION-DSA-SYNC connector
This connector is used for synchronizing any ORION-DSA data acquisition card to the DEWE-CLOCK. For
this purpose the DEWE-CLOCK is equipped with a RJ45 connector for connection to the DEWETRON data
acquisition system. A standard CAT5e or CAT6 Ethernet cable with up to 30 m can be used for connection.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-433
Multi I/O connector cable
Type of cable: 2x2x0.25 shielded
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Connecting the DEWE-CLOCK hardware to the DAQ-System
Synchronization to DEWE-ORION-DAQ series or 3rd party A/D boards
To synchronize standard data acquisition systems a start trigger and the possibility of external clocking is
required. Usually DEWETRON data acquisition systems are equipped with a 37-pin DSUB connector. This
digital multifunction connector contains the required clock and trigger input for easy connection to the clocking unit.
DEWE-CLOCK with GPS source
DEWE-CLOCK with IRIG source
Synchronization to DEWE-ORION-DSA series
One of the unique features of the DEWE-CLOCK is the possibility to synchronize also data acquisition
systems using delta sigma ADC technology like DEWE-ORION-DSA. The main challenge is to produce the
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-435
up to 256 times over sample clock used for these types of analog to digital converters. For this purpose the
DEWE-CLOCK is equipped with a RJ45 connector for connection to the DEWETRON data acquisition system. A standard CAT5e or CAT6 Ethernet cable with up to 30 m can be used for connection.
⇒⇒ Please note: also the data acquisition has to be provided ORION-DSA-SYNC option for having access to the
synch bus of the board.
Configure of DS-7 Software
To unlock the GPS functionality in DS-7 software, the GPS has to be configured in the Hardware Setup
screen (Settings > Hardware Settings > GPS):
Select “DEWESoft USB” from the GPS device dropdown menu.
DS-7 will automatically start searching for a connected device.
There are only a few settings on this screen, as follows:
Update rate
The update rate is fixed at 1 Hz.
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Maps directories
Select the directories, where you stored your maps. You can copy your maps into this directory, add individual directories or remove unused directories from the box. Convert the maps to .jpg or .bmp format before
selecting them.
Timing settings
When you want to use the DEWE-CLOCK as high precision timing device for synchronized data acquisition,
you need to enable this in the Timing section (Settings > Hardware Settings > Timing).
Select “DEWESoft USB” from the Timing device dropdown menu.
DS-7 will automatically start searching for a connected device.
Input settings
Time source
Here you can select which input signal (GPS or IRIG) is used for the time source.
Code type
If IRIG mode is selected as time source, this dropdown menu defines the used code type (IRIG-A, IRIG-B or
IRIG-G).
Modulation
This selects the modulation type (AC or DC) of the IRIG input signal
Output settings
The checkbox “IRIG Out” enables the output of the internally generated IRIG signal on the BNC connector of
the DEWE-CLOCK.
Please note that only IRIG-B with DC modulation is supported as output signal.
Set to default
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-437
This button defines the current input and output settings as power on default settings. This way the DEWECLOCK will always start up with the predefined settings.
What Happens If the Timinig Source is Lost?
For synchronizing the internal oscillator with the PPS signal at least 4 satellites are required. If the GPS or
IRIG signal is lost during acquisition the DEWE-CLOCK continues sourcing the data acquisition system with
a precision clock source. Without synchronising to the GPS or IRIG signal, the oscillator may drift. Therefore
the absolute time synchronisation cannot be guaranteed anymore. However, as soon the GPS or IRIG signal
is available again, the DEWE-CLOCK recognizes a possible drift and tries to correct this inaccuracy. If the
drift during the free-run time is higher than 200 ms, a new data file is automatically generated with exact time
stamping.
The graph below gives an idea how the DEWE-CLOCK behaves when the GPS or IRIG signal is lost during
data acquisition. In this example the drift of the oscillator is smaller than the allowed 2 ms (fixed).
A) This state shows the normal operation. The internal clock is synchronized to the GPS/IRIG
once per second.
B) At this point the time source signal is lost.
C) In the free-run operation the oscillator drift is obvious.
D) After the time source signal is received again, the error during the free run cycle is calculated.
E1) Because the oscillator drift is smaller than 200 ms, the DEWE-CLOCK automatically corrects
the drift for getting again time synchronized data. So the data acquisition is not interrupted
although the time source signal was lost. The correction is done with the maximum rate of 5
μs/sec.
However if the time source signal is lost for too long, the oscillator drift may be higher than 200 ms. In this
case automatically the existing data file is closed and a new file is generated with adding “Lost” of the current filename: “DataFilennameLostX” where X is a running number for each time source signal loss.
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As soon the timing device is selected, DS-7 automatically sets the data acquisition hardware to external
clocking for receiving the sample frequency out of the DEWE-CLOCK. In addition, each measurement starts
synchronized with the PPS signal. The time information of the data file is taken out of the GPS-time or IRIGtime and not from the local PC time anymore.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-439
Channel setup
The DS-7 screenshot below shows the channel setup screen of the DEWE-CLOCK when it was selected as
GPS device. In the column ON/OFF you can select the channels for storing during the measurement. The
default channel names are displayed in the column NAME. You can change them with a double click on it.
Beside the channel names the actual value is displayed.
„„ X absolute: Longitude component of position in degrees, minutes and fraction of minutes Y absolute:
„„
„„
„„
„„
Latitude component of position in degrees, minutes and fraction of minutes Z: Altitude in meters above
sea level
Velocity: Speed over ground (vector of all 3 dimensions)
Direction: True track over ground
Used sat.: Numbers of satellites used for calculation of position and speed Current sec: Seconds since
midnight (UTC + 15 seconds)
NMEA log: The raw NMEA string from the GPS receiver
The circle on the right side of the screen image (above) gives an overview of the satellites in view of the
GPS receiver and which of them are used from the receiver. The color of the shown satellites indicates the
signal strength of them. From grey to dark green which is the strongest signal. Satellites shown in the centre
of the circle are directly above the GPS aerial. Satellites shown at the border of the circle are near the horizon.
The field <PPS sync> and <Not fixed> change their color from grey to green depending if the appropriate
feature is available at the moment (green means available).
The PPS sync is used for hardware synchronization to analog channels. This will eliminate the time shift
caused due the calculation time of the GPS receiver and of the data transfer time of the USB interface.
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The button “NMEA log” shows/hides the raw NMEA data stream from the GPS receiver.
Measurement setup
When the DEWE-CLOCK is used as timing device and you switch to the measurement screen you will see
the actual time from the DEWE-CLOCK shown in the top right corner of the screen. A green dot next to this
time indicates that the DEWE-CLOCK is locked to the GPS or IRIG time whereas a red dot indicates that the
DEWE-CLOCK is in free-run mode.
As default the local time is stored inside the data file. But if the measurement results from multiple systems
located in different time zones should be analyzed it is recommended to set to UTC or GPS time. This can
be done in the Global settings of DEWESoft (Settings Global settings Displays). Doing so, the data from all
data acquisition systems are containing the same absolute time stamp.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-441
DEWE-CLOCK Specifications
DEWE-CLOCK
Specification
IRIG Input Specifications
Supported codes
IRIG code A or B;; AM or DC
Compatibility (AM code)
0.5 Vp-p to 10 Vp-p
Ratio (AM)
3:1 ±10 %
Compatibility (DC code)
DC Level Shift TTL / CMOS compatible
Impedance
20 kΩ
Isolation
150 VDC
Trigger accuracy
1 µs
IRIG Input Specifications
Supported codes
IRIG code B, DC
Isolation
None
Accuracy
< 1 µs latency from GPS PPS signal
GPS Specifications
General
12 channel, L1 frequency receiver
PPS accuracy
100 ns
Refresh rate
1 Hz
Position accuracy
Trigger accuracy
Autonomous
Differential
Horizontal CEP 3.0 m
1.0 m
1 µs
System Specifications
Clock accuracy locked
Without drift
Clock accuracy unlocked
< 10 ppm
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DEWE-CLOCK
Specification
Input
SMA for GPS antenna, BNC for IRIG I/O
Output:
Clock and Trigger for DAQ-systems on DB9 connector
Trigger:
PPS (pulse per second), rising edge on time, 75 msec high time, TTL level compatible
Scan clock:
10 Hz to 10 MHz, rising edge synchronized,
50 % duty cycle, TTL level compatible
ORION-DSA-SYNC:
LVDS compatible on RJ45
Power supply
USB powered, max. current 500 mA
Temperature
Operating: -5 °C to +70 °C
Humidity
10 % to 80 %; non condensing
Dimensions
133 x 104 x 43 mm (5.23 x 4.1 x 1.7 in.)
Weight
Approximately 330 g (0.72 lbs.)
Vibration test
Shape
Frequency
Power spectral density
Duration:
EN 600068-2-6
Sine
10 Hz to 150 Hz
1 m/s2 / Hz from 10 – 200 Hz
30 Minutes per axis
Vibration test
Shape
Frequency range
Power spectral density
Duration
EN 60721-3-2 Class 2M2
Random
10 - 200 Hz
1 m/s2 / Hz from 10 – 200 Hz
30 Minutes per axis
Shock
Shape
Acceleration amplitude
Duration
EN 60068-2-27
Half-sine
15 g
11 ms
Shock test type
Test in 3 axis, 3 shocks in each axis and direction
Non-operating (storage): -20 °C to +85 °C
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-443
VIDEO-FG-4 interface card
This is a PCI card with four NTSC/PAL video inputs on it, presented on standard BNC connectors on the
side of your Dewetron system. With this option and DEWESoft-PROF level software, you can acquire and
display up to four video streams simultaneously in sync with your data.
It accepts standard composite colors (PAL, NTSC) or monochrome video formats (CCIR, EIA).
The supported resolution is programmable and includes square-pixel (640 x 480 or 768 x 576) and broadcast resolution. Before captured images are transferred to the PC’s memory, images can be scaled down
using available selectable ratios.
Image Acquisition
„„ Frame Rate: 30 full-frame images acquired per second for each channel.
„„ Color Image: Color video format is compatible with the following composite video input formats:
„„ NTSC-M, NTSC-Japan, PCL-B, PALD, PAL-G, PAL-H, PAL-I, PAM-M, PAL-N and SECAM
„„ Monochrome Image: The monochrome video acquisition is compatible with CCIR and EIA (RS-170).
„„ Optional Scaling: The acquire images or portions of images can be optionally scaled:
„„ Acquisition of a programmable area of interest
„„ Scaling of the image (down to 1:16)
„„ Adjustment of hue (for NTSC signals), contrast (0 to 200%), brightness and saturation (0 to 200%
„„ for U and V signals)
„„ Automatic chrominance gain control
It is necessary to install the driver for this card under Windows before it can be used within DEWESoft. Additionally, each of the inputs must be configured as a DirectShow video channel. This must be done for each
of the four video inputs by following the instructions in the manual for this product.
The OEM source for this card is Adlink, part number PCI-RTV24. Please refer to that technical information
for details.
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Video interface setup
Once the card is installed and configured for DirectShow under Windows, run DEWESoft and then go to
hardware setup under the SETTINGS button. Click the VIDEO button to see the setup for your cameras and
video inputs:
You need to enable DIRECTX video via the checkbox. When you do, the VIDEO-FG4 card should show up
automatucally, and four video channels should appear in the list. If this does not happen, then the card is not
set up properly under Windows, because DEWESoft will always see any properly configured DirectX video
sources that are available under Windows.
Be sure that the ENABLED column is set to YES for each of the video streams that you want to be able to
display and record.
In the bottom section you can choose the type of video files that will be created, and the compression format.
Once this is done, and you return to the SETUP screens, you will have a new button called VIDEO in the
toolbar. Click it to access the video streams, preview them, and activate them for display and recording.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-445
As always, be sure to press in as USED any of the video streams or cameras that you want to be able to
display and record with your data files.
Displaying video channels
Video streams are displayed almost like any other channel, except that there is a special video display widget that is used. Enter the design mode and find the icon that looks like a roll of film, and click it to add one
video display widget to your screen:
The video widget is shown highlighted in yellow, above. After you click it to add a video window, you can
select any USED video streams from the channel list to put them onto your screen. The video widget can be
scaled and moved freely into an attractive arrangement on your display:
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-- Note: video streams also create a channel which contains the frame count. You can display this count in a digital
meter as a convenience.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-447
ARINC-429 and MIL-STD-1553 interfaces
ARINC 429 and 1553 bus interfaces are available for your Dewetron system, in both PCI card and external
USB box format. The OEM supplier of these interfaces is Ballard Technologies. Dewetron systems support
the Omnibus line of cards and rack-mounting boxes, as well as the so-called “fifth generation” of lower cost
Ballard PCI cards. The software interface into DEWESoft is in the form of a software plugin, which is an option called DEWESoft-OPT-ARINC/1553.
-- With the Omnibus series you can have a single card with both ARINC 429 and 1553 interfaces on it. In the USB
and 5th generation PCI series, there is one bus type maximum per interface.
The plugin will be installed and configured at the factory, however, if you need to reinstall the plugin, please
copy Ballard.dll to the Addons folder of DEWESoft. If you are running Windows 7, plugins need to be registered, and there is a button for that on the plugins page of the DEWESoft hardware setup screen.
When this is done, the Ballard plugin will appear in Hardware setup plugin list.
Refer to Ballard manual for installation of Ballard drivers and connecting Ballard devices.
First checkmark the Ballard plugin to enable it. If any devices will be found they will be shown at Devices
panel. If hardware configuration changes, just press the Search button and system will be rescanned.
If you want to use previous recorded data or/and don’t have hardware, you can use a replay mode. Checkmark it and select any csv file with device definition and bus data.
At the top you have save messages check box for saving replay files. Just check it and one csv file for each
device (core) will be created along with DEWESoft data file when recording (on the same folder with the
same name).
Under it is one button for each bus. Short name on the button is composed of device number, channel num-
18-448| OWNER’s GUIDE
ber and channel type. MIL-STD-1553 buses have two tabs, one for receive and one for transmit.
ARINC 429 receive setup
In addition to standard buttons for adding and deleting messages or channels and display options there is a
scan check box. If it is checked every unhandled message coming through the bus will be added automatically to the list. On start every message already had standard channels (SDI, SSM and Parity). They can be
deleted if you do not need them. Bus speed and Parity check are there for ARINC 429 bus control. Messages that do not have proper parity will be ignored.
In the table you can see all messages and channels and live data. Labels are always in octal notation, and
for the message value you can choose between hex and binary (right click on the VALUES column). Messages are always ordered by their labels. Some properties like color and name can be changed directly on
the table and for others you must open SETUP. In the SETUP dialog you can add channels and manage
their properties.
There is no problem to have more messages with the same label (and SDI filter) and/or more channels using
same bits. When the message will come through the bus all that messages and channels will catch its data.
ARINC 429 transmit setup
Here you have buttons for adding and deleting messages and for sorting them. Bus speed is for ARINC 429
bus setup.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-449
Two types of messages can be created. Button and Schedule.
Schedule messages will be send automatically in intervals which are defined with MIN INT and MAX INT values. The schedule is created and scheduled messages start to transmit after you leave the tab by entering
some other tab or entering the measure mode.
Button messages are never sent automatically. You get a button to send them manually. In setup mode the
button for each Button message is on the table, and in Measure mode you get the special window with buttons for all that messages.
MIL-STD-1553 receive setup
As in the ARINC 429 setup there are standard buttons for adding and deleting messages or channels and
display options. There is also a scan check box. If SCAN is checkmarked, every unhandled message coming through the bus will be added automatically to the list.
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In the table you can see all messages, channels and live data. Messages are always ordered by their addresses. Some properties like color and name can be change directly on the table and for others you must
open SETUP. In the SETUP dialog you can add channels and manage their properties.
There is no problem to have more messages with the same address and/or more channels using same
word/bits. When the message will come through the bus all that messages and channels will catch its data.
MIL-STD-1553 transmit setup
Here you have buttons for adding and deleting messages and for sorting them.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-451
Every message has the Edit button which opens Transmit message setup form where all message properties and data can be set.
Two types of messages can be created. Button and Schedule.
Schedule messages will be send automatically in the same order they have in the list. After each message
there can be wait time which can be defined in Wait time column. After last message is sent the schedule
starts will the first message again. The schedule is created and scheduled messages start to transmit after
you leave the tab by entering some other tab or entering the measure mode.
Button messages are never sent automatically. You get a button to send them manually. In setup mode the
button for each Button message is on the table, and in Measure mode you get the special window with buttons for all that messages.
Storing ARINC/1553 data
ARINC and 1553 channels pressed in as USED on the setup screen will be stored into the data file when
you store data. It does not matter if the channels are shown on a display screen or not.
Processing ARINC/1553 data in MATH
ARINC and 1553 channels can be used within your MATH channels just like any other channel.
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CAN BUS interfaces
In terms of hardware, Dewetron systems are available with several different CAN BUS interfaces. However,
90% of the systems delivered have the 2 CAN BUS interfaces that are provided as options from a Dewetron
ORION series A/D card. If you look at the model numbering of our ORION cards, you will see that the last
digit changes according to which options are installed on the card, like this:
model name
last digit
description
ORION-1616-100
0 (even)
the standard card
ORION-1616-101
1 (odd)
Adds 2 x CAN BUS interfaces
ORION-1616-102
2 (even)
The standard card plus more counters + digital inputs
ORION-1616-103
3 (odd)
The standard card plus more counters + digital inputs + 2 x CAN BUS interfaces
ORION-1616-104
4 (even)
The standard card plus ADVANCED counters + digital inputs
ORION-1616-105
5 (odd)
The standard card plus ADVANCED counters + digital inputs + 2 x CAN BUS interfaces
You can see from the table above that basically any ORION card whose model name ends in an odd
number has the CAN interfaces on it. In addition to the hardware option, you must have the software option
called DEWESoft-OPT-CAN installed.
The actual CAN bus interface connectors installed on your unit are shown in SECTION 4, SIGNAL INPUT
CONNECTORS in this document. That page also shows you how to connect to the CAN BUS, including using termination resistors if needed.
If you want to use either one of the CAN bus interfaces to connect a Dewetron CPAD2 series module,
please see SECTION 10, CONDITIONERS, CPAD2 within this document.
Your CAN interfaces should be set up already at the factory, however, if you need to check or reconfigure
the settings, please check the HARDWARE SETUP under the SETTINGS menu. Then click the CAN button
to see the CAN hardware interface setup:
Use the selector to choose the CAN device that is installed within your system. Here is a basic description of
what each entry refers to:
„„ Test CAN (replay mode) - for demonstration and training purposes, you may select this even if you do not
have the CAN software option, and point the software to a CAN bus data file (CSV), which it will replay
through the system for you.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-453
„„ National Instruments - select this if your system has a National Instruments brand PCI-CAN/2 interface
card.
„„ Softing - select this if you are using a compatible Softing brand CAN BUS interface card
„„ Vector - select this if you are using a compatible Vector brand CAN BUS interface card
„„ Dewetron DAQ - select this option if your system has any 16-bit ORION card with the CAN option
„„ Dewetron DSA - select this option if your system has any 22- or 24-bit ORION card with the CAN option
⇒⇒ Note - if your DEWESoft license does not include the CAN option, you will not be able to proceed with hardware
setup after selecting a real CAN interface card. Please contact Dewetron for a license upgrade.
After doing the hardware setup, please visit the CH SETUP screens and click on the CAN icon, which will
appear there in the toolbar.
At first you will have no channels or messages being shown. This is normal.
Notice that there are buttons for CAN0 and CAN1. That is because there are two CAN interfaces in nearly
every system. Your system could even have more -- in which case you will have additional buttons for CAN2,
CAN3, etc. The maximum is 8 interfaces in one Dewetron system.
It is essential to select the correct SPEED of the bus, in kBaud. Dewetron CAN hardware supports speeds
up to 1 Mb (1,000,000 bits per second). 500 kb is the default.
⇒⇒ Selecting a wrong SPEED of the CAN bus can actually interfere with certain systems, so please take care to select
the correct one.
Setting up your channels
It is important to know that the CAN data stream does not contain any information about the channels that
are being conveyed within the 64-bit messages. Therefore you need to know the configuration. Most car
companies are very secretive about the CAN message layout, and do not release this information. Dewetron
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does not have any information about the CAN message layout from any car maker. However, there are third
party programs such as CANALYZER which you could use to help in this area. This product is not affiliated
with Dewetron in any way.
A great invention of Vector corporation is the DBC file. This is essentially a standardized flat file which contains the information about a given CAN messaging layout. If you have a DBC file, you may import it right
here and set up all of your channels instantly. Click the IMPORT button under the label DBC library, and then
select the DBC file that you would like to apply.
Scan for messages
Another approach is to checkmark the SCAN button. When you do this, DEWESoft will “listen” on this bus
and identify all of the CAN messages that are coming across, and create messages for them here. DEWESoft will show you how many messages it has found above the SCAN button.
-- SCAN can only find messages that appear during the time the system is scanning. Not all CAN messages are
coming across the bus all the time! Some messages only report errors, for example, so you might have to scan
for days or weeks to see them all this way. Yet other messages will only appear based on a specific query, and
will thus never appear unless you cause them to report on the bus.
-- SCAN can only find messages; it cannot identify the channels within the messages
Of course, since each message might contain any number of channels, starting at various bits and running
any bit length, and with any scaling factors, it is still impossible to know just from the messages, what the
bits represent, but it gives you a starting point. As mentioned, the easiest way is by importing a DBC file,
which contains everything already.
But if you need to configure channels manually, the procedure is quite simple.
Configuring message and channels manually
You can add messages manually by clicking the Message + button (or using SCAN as mentioned above).
To configure the channels contained within a message, click the SETUP button for a message, and the CAN
CHANNEL SETUP box will open:
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-455
In the top half of this dialog you set up the message itself, where in the bottom half you can configure the
channels contained within this message.
Message setup
Looking at the top half, message configuration, here are the key things to know about:
Name
The name of the message
Arb ID#
ID number of your message on the CAN bus
Type
Select between CAN standard and CAN extended from drop down list. Those two differs in
identifier length. The standard length is 11 bits, and extended is 29 bits.
DLC
DLC is the length of the message. It ranges from 1 to 8. As a standard, the DLC is set to 8.
Delay
We can also enter the message delay in millisecond which shifts the time stamp of the message back in time. This can be used to perfectly synchronize the analog data with CAN data
with compensating the delays in digital data transmission.
Channel setup
Now we need to add the channel(s) contained within this message. Click the ADD button and DEWESoft will
create a default channel and color code the first 16 bits of the CAN message. Please enter the name and
units of this channel, and the scale factor (multiplier and offset). Also, make sure that the start bit and length
(in bits) are correct. Then click OK. You can see that in the screen shot below, four channels have been set
up within this one message. Two of the channels are just one bit long, whereas the other ones are
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Or, if this message contains multiple channels, repeat the procedure starting with the ADD button mentioned
above, and create more channels. Within a message, there can be numerous channels, and each one can
be absolutely unique in terms of its bit length, scaling, name, units... CAN is really quite flexible.
Arbitration IDs and CAN message rates
CAN messages are identified via hex IDs known as “Arbitration IDs.” This is what DEWESoft shows on the
message list, in the ARB column:
Below the Arbitration ID, the rate at which this message is coming across the bus is also shown in Hz. You
will notice that each message can come across at a different rate.
J1939 support
J1939 is used to enable special decoding of arbitration ID which includes the sender, receiver and the message ID itself. Arb ID is always extended in this case. This is most widely used on trucks, busses and certain
military vehicles. Please make sure that the bus type is really J1939 before enabling this option.
OBD II support
DEWESoft additionally supports the protocol for reading in data from the OBD II port, required on all US
cars. In this case, the messages are standardized, and a DBC file is not needed. This feature requires that
an optional plugin be purchased and installed into DEWESoft.
Select messages / channels for storage
Notice the buttons near the top of the CAN setup window labeled VIEW:
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-457
It is important to go to the CHANNELS view, and then press USED for the channels that you want to really
record and display next time you store data.
⇒⇒ If you press USED only on the MESSAGES view, the actual message ID itself will be stored, but not the channel(s)
that it contains!!! Always go to CHANNELS view and press in USED for all channels that you want to display and
store.
After clicking CHANNELS, you will see a list of all of the channels contained within the various CAN messages that you have set up:
Make sure to press USED in on the channels that you want to store and display. We cannot emphasize that
enough.
OK, your CAN interface is set up.
When you save this Dewesoft SETUP, all of the CAN parameters are saved into the setup file, of course. But
sometimes it is useful to be able to save this CAN setup as a DBC file. This is possible, as described in the
next section.
Saving DBC files
Saving your CAN setup to a stand-alone DBC file requires a software option called DEWESoft-OPT-CANOUT. This option is needed because the DBC file format is proprietary to Vector, a company not affiliated
with Dewetron. With this software option, we include a license from Vector, which we purchase from them
and transfer to you, so that you gain the ability to export your CAN setup to a standard Vector DBC file. This
DEWEsoft-CAN-OUT option also includes the ability to transmit CAN messages onto the bus. Please see
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the separate documentation about these capabilities for further details.
Displaying CAN channels
Whichever CAN channels are pressed in as USED on the CAN setup screen, will be displayed on the
measure screens, as shown below. We made a simple screen which populates the CAN channels into digital
meters. Below that, each of the four wheel speed channels are shown in a recorder graph.
Notice that the CAN channels are shown on the right side of the screen in the CHANNEL LIST. A nice feature is that the channels contained within each message are collapsed into a group whose name is the same
as the message name:
OWNER’s GUIDE - Interface cards | 18-459
So you can see that the message called SteeingWheel has four channels within it.
The CAN messages and channels will disappear from this list if you click on a display type which is incompatible. For example, CAN is too slow to show in a SCOPE or FFT graph. So if you click on a SCOPE or
FFT graph, the CAN channels will disappear from the channel list. This is the same with other very slow
data, like from PAD, EPAD2 or CPAD2 modules, for example.
Storing CAN data
Any CAN channels pressed in as USED on the CAN setup screen will be stored into the data file when you
store data. It does not matter if the channels are shown on a display screen or not.
Processing CAN data in MATH
CAN channels can be used within your MATH channels just like any other channel.
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OWNER’s GUIDE - Dewetron Sensors | 19-461
19
DEWETRON Sensors
Dewetron offers a handful of specialty sensors for
our systems, primarily DEWE-CAM series CAMERAS that are made to work with our hardware
and software. This section will show the sensors
that we make and provide the details that you
require about their specifications, capabilities, and
applications.
We also offer GPS speed / distance and position
sensors, with extremely high performance.
We also offer intertial sensors for movement applications.
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DEWE-CAMS
DEWE-CAM-USB
This camera is a USB 2.0 compatible DirectX camera that is compatible with all DEWETRON systems.
For use within the software, the Windows driver
must be installed. In addition, the camera must be
attached to the DEWETRON system before the software is started. Further operational guidelines are
presented at the end of this section.
The DEWE-CAM-USB has an integral USB 2.0
cable which connects to your DEWETRON system. The camera is also powered via the 500 mA
available on the USB port, and there is no separate
power input possible on the camera. As a result, you
should always connect the camera to a USB port
on the DEWETRON system - and never via a USB
hub or other in between device (such as the MOBDISP-17, as one example).
Outline Drawing
Operating System Drivers
„„ Windows 32-bit: SFT-04040, driver and stand-alone video viewer
„„ Windows 64-bit SFT-10028, driver only (please download SFT-04040 for a viewer)
Please see the DEWE-CAM-USB web page at www.dewamerica.com to download the latest drivers.
OWNER’s GUIDE - Dewetron Sensors | 19-463
DEWE-CAM-USB Specifications
DEWE-CAM-USB
Specs
Image sensor
1/4” IL CCD
Active pixels
768 x 494 (NTSC) / 752 x 582 (PAL)
Viewer display
(USB 2.0, 30fps) / 720 x 480 pixels max (NTSC / 720 x 576 pixels max (PAL)
Sensitivity
< 0.5 Lux
Signal To Noise Ratio
> 48 dB (AGC off)
Gamma
0.45 default (1.0 via Software)
Gain control
Automatic 36 dB (AGC default) or Fixed options via software
Scan mode
Interlaced / Non Interlaced (selectable via Software)
Synchronization
Internal
Back Light Compensation
On by default
White Balance Mode
AWB auto white mode, Fixed modes selectable via software
Contour enhancement
On by default
Iris control
CCD Iris default
Shutter speed
Automatic
Video output
USB 2.0
Power supply
5 VDC via USB bus
Power consumption
< 1.3 W
Environmental
Operating temperature
-15°C to + 55°C (5°F to + 131°F)
Storage temperature
-25°C to + 70°C (-13°F to + 158°F)
Operating humidity
20% up to 93% RH
Storage humidity
Up to 98% RH
Lifetime
MTBF > 150000
Mechanical
Dimensions
50mm x 50mm x 49.6mm (without lens mount) (1.97” x 1.97” x 1.95”)
Weight
154g (0.34 lb)
Cable
Integrated 8.2 ft. USB cable
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Using the DEWE-CAM-USB within DS-7 software
As mentioned earlier, the drivers must be installed within the Windows operating system.
Step 1
Connect the camera to your DEWE system.
Step 2
Start the DS-7 software.
First Time Setup Steps
You need to turn on DirectX VIDEO support within DS-7. To do this, select SETTINGS then HARDWARE
SETUP. This will open the hardware settings dialog box. Click on the VIDEO tab and then place a checkmark on the DirectX box. If the WIndows driver has been properly installed, the camera will show up in the
list.
The name in the screen capture shown above is figurative - yours will be different. Make sure that your
camera is enabled.
Adjusting for Camera Delay
Since USB camera video frames have to be processed by the CPU, there is always a small latency or delay,
between when the camera “sees” the image and when the frame is processed. This latency can be offset
automatically at the time of recording. But in order to know how many milliseconds the delay is, we need to
measure it first. Here are the steps:
First, connect a sensor by which you can create a sharp spike which can be
seen within the camera image. A perfect example would be tapping on an
accelerometer, or microphone. In the same way that film crews use a “slate”
clapper in order to later align the video with the audio: the precise moment
that the clapper comes together creates an audio spike which makes it easy
to align the two media. Do a short recording using your video camera and
sensor. Click ANALYSIS to replay the data. Use the cursors on the recorder
graph to measure the number of ms that the video lags behind the data.
Now go back to the Hardware Settings screen, video tab, and enter that number into the DELAY field. In future recordings, the video will be aligned better
with the data.
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Recording with your DEWE-CAM-USB
In the previous steps we turned on the camera in general within the software. This is analogous to turning on
your A/D card at the hardware setup level. But in order to record video from the camera we need to configure it on the Channel Setup screen (just like we do analog and digital channels).
On the Channel Setup screen, click the VIDEO icon.
-- Note - if you don’t see a VIDEO icon here, then either DirectX video is not enabled or your camera is not enabled
on the HARDWARE SETTINGS screen, or the camera was not plugged in when the software was launched. Check
those settings and then come back to this point when you have gotten a VIDEO icon here.
In the CAMERA OPTIONS area you will see your camera. Enable the USED button. This will activate the
camera and allow it to be viewed and recorded. You can click the SETUP button to configure the detailed
settings of the camera. Now go to the MEASURE screens and add your camera to any screen of your
choosing. When you STORE data, video will be recorded automatically.
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DEWE-CAM-FW-70
This camera has a HARD SYNC to the ORION
A/D card within your DEWETRON system,
allowing the video frames to be precisely time
synchronized with the analog and digital data
(and CAN data, if this option is installed).
The data and control interface is Firewire. It
is required that a PCI or PCIe Firewire (IEEE1394) interface be added to your DEWETRON
system, otherwise the specified maximum
frame rates cannot be guaranteed. (The
Firewire interfaces built into the mainboards on
certain DEWETRON models are not as fast as
a separate PCI / PCIe card.)
In addition, the SYNC cable must be connected
to the Digital I/O (Accessory) connector on your
DEWETRON system, and properly configured to be controlled by the ORION card within your system.
Main Features
„„ VGA 640 x 480 progressive CCD
„„ Up to 70 fps @ full resolution
„„ Super compact size
„„ Ready for C-Mount lenses
„„ Wide-range manual / auto gain
„„ Manual / auto exposure (shutter)
„„ Gamma on / off
„„ Real time shading correction
„„ External trigger input for synchronization including frame index
„„ Lockable IEEE1394 connector
OWNER’s GUIDE - Dewetron Sensors | 19-467
Specifications
DEWE-CAM-FW-70
Specifications
Image device
type 1/2” (diag. 8 mm) progressive scan, SONY
Picture size
640 x 480 px
Cell size
9.9 μm x 9.9 μm
Resolution depth
12 bit (ADC)
Lens mount
C-Mount
Digital interface
IEEE 1394 IIDC v. 1.3
Transfer rates
100 Mbit/s, 200 Mbit/s and 400 Mbit/s
Frame rates
Up to 74 Hz in full resolution, higher rates with AOI
Gain control
Manual: 0 to 24 dB (0.035 dB/step); Auto gain (selectable
AOI)
Shutter speed
20 to 67.108.864 μs (67 s); auto shutter (selectable AOI)
External trigger
Yes
Shutter trigger
Yes
Smart features
Real time shading correction; built-in FIFO memory up to 17
frames
Power requirements
8 to 36 VDC via IEEE 1394 cable or 12-pin HIROSE
Power consumption
Less than 3 W (@ 12 VDC)
Dimensions (L x W
x H)
72 x 44 x 29 mm (2.8 x 1.7x 1.1 in.) w/o tripod and lense
Weight
<120 g (without lens)
Temperature
Operating: +5 to +45 °C; Storage: -10 to +60 °C
Regulations
EN 55022, EN 61000, EN 55024, FCC Class B; DIN ISO
9022
Package information
Each DEWE-CAM-FW-70 package consists of
1 x DEWE-CAM-FW-70 camera
1 x IEEE 1394 cable (4.5 m)
1 x Trigger calbe (4.5 m)
1 x Mounting plate (for tripod or suction cup mounting)
1 x Suction cup
1 x Protection bag
Options
C-MOUNT lens 6 mm, F 1.2, Iris 1.2 to 16, screw fixing for focus and iris, 42 x 46 mm / 125 g
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DEWE-CAM-GIG-E-120
OWNER’s GUIDE - Dewetron Sensors | 19-469
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OWNER’s GUIDE - Dewetron Sensors | 19-471
GPS Sensors
DEWE-VGPS-200C
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DEWE-VGPS-HS High Speed GPS Sensor
OWNER’s GUIDE - iPAD Wireless Display | 20-473
20
Using the iPad as a Wireless Display
There are a few important things that you need to do in order to use remote desktop applications, such as
the iTap RDP on the new iPad, to control your Dewetron system. In a nutshell, you must have these things
set properly:
„„ Create a passworded USER account on the DEWE computer
„„ Allow Remote Desktop in Windows
„„ Connect your USER account(s) to remote desktop
„„ Set the DEWE Computer’s WIFI adapter to a fixed IP address
„„ Allow Remote Desktop through the DEWE Computer firewall
„„ Create a private WIFI network with your Wirless Router
„„ Connect the computer to your private WIFI network
„„ Connect the new iPad to your private WIFI network
The new iPad should be running iTap RDP app, and pointed to the fixed IP of the Dewetron, and to the passworded login that you created on the computer.
System Requirements
„„ A Dewetron computer system with a wireless adapter installed and working
„„ A wireless router compatible with your Dewetron adapter and the new iPad WIFI
„„ The new iPad from Apple Computer
„„ The RDP app from the company called iTap (downloadable on the app store; moderately priced)
Now, please follow these steps...
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1. Create a Passworded USER account
To be able to connect to your Computer using Remote Desktop you have to have a password set for your
User account. If you do not have a password set you have to create one. This also applies for any user who
should be able to connect to your computer via Remote Desktop.
Open Control Panel
„„ Click on the Windows start button.
„„ Select “Control Panel”.
Open User Accounts
„„ Click on the User Accounts and Family Safety.
Select Change password
„„ Click on the Change your Windows password.
OWNER’s GUIDE - iPAD Wireless Display | 20-475
Create a password for your account.
„„ Select Create a password for your account.
Enter your password and confirm.
„„ Type in your password.
„„ Type a password hint to recall if you forgot it.
„„ Click on Create password.
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2. Allow Remote Desktop in Windows
Navigate to system settings
„„ Click on the Windows start button.
„„ Click with the right mouse button on the “Computer” button.
„„ Select “Properties”.
Select Remote settings
„„ On the left pane click on Remote settings.
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Allow Remote Desktop connections
„„ From the top five tabs select the Remote tab.
„„ In the lower “Remote Desktop” section select the middle one. (“Allow connections from computers run-
ning any version of Remote Desktop [..]”).
„„ Click on Select Users.
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3. Connect your USER account to RDP
Continuing from the previous step, please select Users
„„ Add any User you want to be able to access your Computer.
„„ Click OK to finalize this step.
-- Note - the USER ACCOUNT that you created in STEP 1 must be showing in the screen above! Make sure that this
user account is listed or granted access to remote desktop.
4. Set the DEWE Computer’s WIFI adapter to a fixed IP Address
We set the computer’s WIFI interface to a fixed, non-routable IP address of:
192.168.1.100
subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
This is done here:
OWNER’s GUIDE - iPAD Wireless Display | 20-479
Then click on CHANGE ADAPTER SETTINGS in the left toolbar:
Then RIGHT CLICK on the wireless network connection that you want to use to connect to the private WIFI
network we will create in the next step, then select PROPERTIES from the context menu that will appear:
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„„ Uncheck Internet Protocol Version 6 (TCP/IPv6)
„„ Make sure that Internet Protocol Version 4 is checked, and selected, as shown above.
„„ Click PROPERTIES to configure your fixed IP address:
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Click the radio button called “Use the following IP address:”
Then enter the fixed IP and subnet mask as shown above.
-- Note - if you are configuring MULTIPLE Dewetron instruments, please change the last IP number set of each one
to something unique. For example, if you want to control four different Dewetrons from one iPad, you would set
these Dewetron IPs to something like this:
Dewetron instrument #1: 192.168.1.101
Dewetron instrument #2: 192.168.1.102
Dewetron instrument #3: 192.168.1.103
Dewetron instrument #4: 192.168.1.104
…
Dewetron instrument #10: 192.168.1.110
Now click OK on any open dialogs to set these changes and put them into effect. If your Dewetron computer
asks to you restart, please do so. Shut down the instrument (computer), and then restart it in the normal
way.
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5. Allowing Remote Desktop through the DEWE Computer’s Firewall
In certain circumstances you might need to manually create the exception in the firewall to allow Remote
Desktop to be used.
Please be aware that a 3rd party firewall (e.g., Symantec, Kaspersky) might also affect Remote Desktop.
Check those settings to be sure that Remote Desktop is allowed!
Open Control Panel
„„ Click on the Windows start button.
„„ Select “Control Panel”.
Go to System and Security
„„ Click on System and Security.
OWNER’s GUIDE - iPAD Wireless Display | 20-483
Open Firewall settings
„„ Click on “Allow a program through Windows Firewall”.
Allow Remote Desktop exception
„„ Click on the Change settings button.
„„ Scroll down to “Remote Desktop”.
„„ Check Remote Desktop, Home/Work and Public.
„„ Click OK.
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6. Create a Private WIFI network with your Wireless Router
Most of our customers purchase a simple wireless router and simply connect it to power. They do NOT connect it to the internet or to their company network.
Run the configuration program that comes with the wireless router (most of them have a web browser based
interface) and set up the name (SSID) of the wireless LAN, and set the security method that you prefer to
use (WEP, WPA...) and the password.
„„ These settings are completely up to you, according to your company’s requirements.
„„ In our example, we will set the SSID to DEWE-INSTRUMENTS and set up WEP security and a
password. We set the base IP address of the wireless router to 192.168.1.1 with a subnet mask of
255.255.255.0.
„„ By not connecting the router to the company network or the internet, only a local computer with WIFI can
access it. This is what we want in our example: to create a local private network.
„„ Notice that the IP address is routable from our DEWE computer, which was set to 192.168.1.100 (the last
three digits might be different according to your configuration).
„„ Just be sure NOT to use the same last three digits on your router that you have used on the DEWE
computers! It must be unique.
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7. Connect the DEWE computer to your private network
Make sure that the DEWE computer is within range of your WIFI network and that the wireless router is
turned on and working.
„„ In the tray, find your WIRELESS CONNECTION icon and click it to pop up the list of available networks.
Select the DEWE-INSTRUMENTS network and CONNECT to it.
„„ Click CONNECT to join this network
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8. Connect the new iPad to your private network
Make sure that the DEWE computer is within range of your WIFI network and that the wireless router is
turned on and working.
„„ Click the SETUP icon on the iPad and then make sure that WIFI is turned on.
„„ When the network that you created appears in the list, CLICK IT to select it.
„„ If you have set up a password, you will need to enter it on the iPad.
„„ Follow the normal iPad procedures to put your iPad onto this network.
You can check the settings by clicking the blue forward arrow on this connection. It should look something
like this:
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Notice how the IP address is set to 100, and the Router has the “1” as the last three digits.
Everything looks correct.
Now we can run the iTap RDP application and configure it to remotely control any DEWE instrument that is
on this network.
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Open the iTap app and then create a configuration that points to your DEWE computer instrument. Here is
what the screen looks like:
Use the (>) control within the list of bookmarks to edit the settings. Input the user name and password as
well as the IP address of the DEWE instrument that you want to remotely control.
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Then touch once on the name from the bookmarks, then click CONNECT in the middle of the screen to start.
If you have a local screen plugged into the DEWE computer, it will go back to the login screen as long as
the iPad RDP is logged in and operating the computer. At this moment, the iPad will serve as the screen and
virtual keyboard of the system.
The iTap app has numerous controls and gestures for operating the computer, opening the on-screen keyboard, pinching and zooming, and more. Please see the iTap documentation for a complete list. There is an
index presented at the end of this document with the main gestures, as a convenience to you.
Note - if you possess a bluetooth keyboard for your iPad, you can use it as a real keyboard with your DEWE
computer, as long as the iTap RDP application is serving as the display of this system. Sometimes a real
keyboard is more convenient than the on-screen version. You have the option of using it or not - it makes no
difference to the iTap application that we have seen.
Note also that you can create multiple bookmarks for various DEWE computer instruments, and log into any
of them from a single iPad.
You can also store your login credentials within the app, and link them to each DEWE computer, so that you
don’t need to enter the password each time.
-- Important note - you need to configure the DEWE computer so that the WIFI adapter is ON and set to automati-
cally connect to the DEWE-INSTRUMENTS wireless router. If you don’t do that, then you will need to connect a
monitor to the DEWE computer and make those settings manually before you will be able to connect wirelessly.
These are standard Windows settings that are easily made within the configuration of your wireless adapter.
20-490| OWNER’s GUIDE
9. Gestures
iTap mobile RDP uses gestures to control all input actions except keyboard input. This frees up your screen,
because it doesn’t need to display any buttons.
This is a quick reference - please see the HELP built into the iTap app itself for more details, or visit the company on the internet from your computer.
-- Note: 3 finger gestures will not work if you have Apple’s “Zoom” accessibility feature enabled! In that case you
might use the corresponding buttons within the iTap Utility Bar instead. Make sure that the “Utility Bar” is set to
“Initally On” in your bookmark’s advanced settings.
You can use the following gestures:
Basic Gestures
Tap three fingers to show or hide the utility bar.
Swipe three fingers from left to right to disconnect and return to the main menu.
Swipe three fingers from top to bottom to show/hide the keyboard.
Scope Mode and Pointer Mode Gestures
A single tap will produce a mouse click on the location where you tapped.
Zoom in if you need very precise control over the click location.
OWNER’s GUIDE - iPAD Wireless Display | 20-491
A simple drag will pan the display. This is a clientside operation, no mouse
movement is generated on the server.
Perform a pinch gesture with two fingers to zoom in or out. Like panning this
does not produce any mouse input on the server.
Drag two fingers up or down the display to emulate a mousewheel.
Tap with two fingers to produce a right click.
Tapping with one finger two times in quick succession will produce a doubleclick. Tap three times for a tripple click, and so on.
The same can be done with two fingers to do a right mouse button doubleclick.
Tap with a single finger and then quickly touch the screen again but do not release the finger to initiate a mouse drag. the mouse will be released once you
remove the finger from the display.
The same can be done with two fingers for a right mouse button drag.
20-492| OWNER’s GUIDE
Scope Mode Gestures
Touch the screen and hold the finger for a short while to begin scope mode.
Scope mode is in effect as long as the scope is visible.
Move the finger to move the scope. As you approach the screen borders the
screen will scroll in that direction. The closer you are to the border, the faster is
scrolls.
Touch the screen with a single additional finger to press the left mouse button, release the additional finger to release the left mouse button. Repeat for
double- or multi-clicks.
Touch the screen with two additional finger simultaneously to press the right
mouse button, release the additional fingers to release the left mouse button.
Repeat for double- or multi-clicks.
You can move the original finger to perform mouse drags while holding down
an additional finger to drag the left mouse button. The additional finger does
not have to move.
You can move the original finger to perform mouse drags while holding down
two additional fingers to drag the right mouse button. The additional fingers do
not have to move.
Draw Mode Gestures
A single tap will produce a mouse click on the location where you tapped.
Zoom in if you need very precise control over the click location.
OWNER’s GUIDE - iPAD Wireless Display | 20-493
Drag a single finger to drag the left mouse button (paint).
A drag with two fingers will pan the display. This is a clientside operation, no
mouse movement is generated on the server.
Perform a pinch gesture with two fingers to zoom in or out. Like panning this
does not produce any mouse input on the server.
20-494| OWNER’s GUIDE
OWNER’s GUIDE - Appendix | A-495
Appendix
Index
Symbols
0.5U-AMFLEX-POWER-4 6-110,
7-134
0.5U-AMFLEX-POWER-8 6-111,
7-135
0.5U-CLAMP-DC-POWER-4
6-111, 7-135
0.5U-CLAMP-DC-POWER-8
6-111, 7-135
0.5U-DA2-BNC 6-110, 7-134
0.5U-DA4-BNC 6-110, 7-134
0.5U-DA8-BNC 6-110, 7-134
1.5U-ORION-DIO-PANEL-1
6-111, 7-135
1.5U-TC-PANEL-32 6-111, 7-135
1U-DA8-BNC 6-111, 7-135
1U-DA16-BNC 6-111, 7-135
2D array 9-172
2-point scaling method 9-183
3D array 9-172
22-bit A/D converter 5-102, 9-193,
274, 13-297, 13-344, 13-345,
14-353, 14-362, 14-366, 14368, 15-370, 16-392, 16-399,
16-403, 17-407, 17-408, 17412, 17-413, 17-414, 17-415
310-UPS 3-19, 3-21, 3-24, 3-25,
3-45, 3-47, 10-243, 10-247
1553 5-101, 9-174, 18-417, 18-437,
18-438, 18-439, 18-440
A
Accessory connector 3-38, 4-70,
5-94, 6-120, 7-144
Accuracy 8-162
AC power cord 3-45, 5-95
Acquisition Mode 5-103, 9-173
Acquisition Screens 9-194
Activate the Channels 9-178
ADAP-BAN-BNC 11-264
ADAP-BNC-MICRODOT 11263
ADAP-BR-1/4-120, using it 11265, 11-271
ADAP-BR-1/4-350 11-265
ADAP-CAN-OPT-ISO 11-263
ADAP-DAQ-BNC 11-264
ADAP-MDAQ-BNC 11-264
ADAP-MIC-BNC-CBL 11-265
ADC 8-150
address, Dewetron Inc. ii, 3-37, 5-93,
276, 278, 13-299, 13-301,
14-357, 14-359, 14-360
addressing module 278, 13-301
Adlink 18-433
AD series 5-99, 5-100, 13-351,
17-409
amplifier column 277, 279, 13-300,
13-302, 14-358, 14-360
ANALOG INPUT connector 3-37,
5-93
Analog input connectors 3-36, 4-68,
5-91, 6-119, 7-143
Analog output 13-296
Analog Output module 14-367
ANALOG setup screen 9-176,
9-193
Analysis Mode 9-173, 9-175, 9-201,
9-207
anti-aliasing 17-408, 17-412, 17413, 17-414, 17-415
antivirus/security software 2-15
Arbitration ID 18-446
ARINC 3-23, 3-48, 4-55, 4-75,
5-81, 5-101, 6-107, 6-113,
6-127, 7-137, 7-147, 9-171,
9-174, 18-417, 18-437, 18438, 18-439, 18-441
ARINC 429 9-174
ARINC 429 receive setup 18-438
ARINC 429 transmit setup 18-438
Audio 3-29, 3-35, 4-61, 4-67, 5-84,
5-89, 5-102, 6-118, 7-142,
11-265
Automatic File Numbering 9-190
Automatic file SWITCHING function 9-192
Automatic Recording STOP function 9-190
B
Background image 9-172
Ballard 18-437
BAT-CHARGER-1 5-96, 6-123,
10-247, 10-251, 10-252, 10-
A-496| Appendix
253, 10-254
BATT-95WH 3-45, 5-96, 10-247
Battery appears damaged 3-45, 5-95,
6-122
battery door 5-95, 6-122
Battery handling 3-45, 5-95, 6-122
BATTERY STATUS LCD 5-95,
6-122
BIOS 2-14, 3-46, 5-97, 6-124
break-out box 14-364
BUS interfaces 3-37, 4-69, 5-92,
6-119, 7-143, 9-174, 9-194
C
calibration 1-12, 5-101
Calibration 1-12
CANALYZER 18-444
CAN bus interfaces 5-100
CAN channels, displaying 18-448
CAN data, performing MATH
18-449
CAN data, storing 18-449
CAN message rates 18-446
CAN output 5-100, 9-174
Carrying bag 5-101
CAT5e 3-32, 4-64, 5-87, 6-116,
7-140
CAT6 3-32, 4-64, 5-87, 6-116,
7-140, 17-408
CD 5-98
certificate of compliance 1-12
channel name, units, color 9-181,
9-185
Channel Setup 9-179
channel setup dialog 9-178
coefficients 5-103
CONN-DSUB-9 11-264
Connectors 3-30, 3-32, 3-35, 3-36,
3-37, 4-61, 4-62, 4-64, 4-67,
4-68, 4-69, 5-85, 5-87, 5-89,
5-91, 5-92, 6-116, 6-118,
6-119, 7-140, 7-142, 7-143
Copying Channel Settings 9-187
Copy/Paste menu 9-187
Core2Duo® 5-102, 5-103
Counter 3-36, 4-69, 5-91, 5-100,
5-103, 6-119, 6-126, 7-143,
7-146, 8-151, 8-154, 8-155,
8-156, 8-157, 8-162
Counter/Encoder 6-126, 7-146
Counter Filters 8-164
CPAD2 5-99, 16-391
CPAD2 modules, adding new modules 16-393
CPAD2-RTD8 16-393, 16-396
CPAD2-TH8 16-393, 16-396
CPAD2-TH8-x 16-393, 16-396
CPAD2-V8 16-393, 16-396
CPU 5-102, 5-103
Current sensors, using 11-269
Cursor 9-173
cursors 9-173, 9-201, 9-203, 9-204
D
D3PC-8 4-51, 4-53, 4-56, 4-57,
4-58, 4-59, 4-71, 4-74
D310 i, 1-12, 3-17, 3-18, 3-19, 3-20,
3-21, 3-22, 3-23, 3-24, 3-25,
3-26, 3-27, 3-28, 3-33, 3-37,
3-38, 3-40, 3-41, 3-42, 3-43,
3-44, 3-45, 3-46, 3-47, 3-48,
4-55, 4-60, 4-65, 4-75, 10243, 10-247, 10-251
DAQ Module Connectors 13-293
DAQ modules, Addressing 276,
13-299
DAQN-V-OUT 13-296
DAQP-ACC-A 13-295
DAQP-BRIDGE-A 13-295, 13323
DAQP-BRIDGE-B 13-331, 13335, 13-337, 13-339, 13-341,
13-343, 13-349, 13-351,
14-361, 14-363, 14-364, 14365, 14-367, 15-372, 15-377,
15-381, 15-385, 15-387, 15389, 15-390, 16-396, 16-398,
16-400, 16-402, 16-404
DAQP-CFB 13-295
DAQP-CHARGE-A 13-295
DAQP-CHARGE-B 13-295
DAQP-DMM 13-294, 13-305
DAQP-FREQ-A 13-296
DAQP-HV 13-294, 13-303
DAQP-HV-S3 13-294, 13-303
DAQP-LA-B 13-294, 13-313
DAQP-LA-SC 13-294, 13-313
DAQP-LV 9-180, 13-294, 13-307
DAQP-MULTI 13-296
DAQP-STG 13-295, 13-315
DAQP-THERM 13-296
DAQP-V 13-294, 13-311
DAQ-SHUNT-1 11-264, 282, 285,
13-307, 13-310
DAQ-SHUNT-1 adapter, using it
11-266
DAQ-SHUNT-1-BNC 11-264
DAQ-SHUNT-3 11-264, 282, 285,
13-307, 13-310
DAQ-SHUNT-4 11-264, 282, 285,
13-307, 13-310
DAQ-SHUNT-5 11-264, 282, 285,
13-307, 13-310
Data export 9-173
Data file format 9-172
Data replay 9-173
Data throughput 3-47, 4-74, 6-126,
7-146
DBC file 18-444, 18-447
DBC files, saving 18-447
DC power cord 3-45, 5-95
DC power input 3-45, 4-60, 5-83,
5-95, 6-114, 7-138
Default Display Range 9-185
Delay 18-445
Design mode 9-207
DEWE-30-8 expansion rack 275,
13-298
DEWE-30-16 rack 275, 13-298
DEWE-3040-RM i, 1-12, 7-129,
7-131, 7-132, 7-133, 7-136,
7-137, 7-140, 7-145, 7-146,
10-243
DEWE-3050 i, 1-12, 3-48, 4-75,
6-105, 6-107, 6-108, 6-109,
6-110, 6-112, 6-113, 6-117,
6-119, 6-122, 6-123, 6-124,
OWNER’s GUIDE - APPENDIX |
A-497
6-125, 6-126, 6-127, 7-134,
7-141, 7-143, 7-147, 10-243,
10-247, 10-251
DEWE-3210 3-36, 3-37, 4-68,
5-77, 5-91, 5-93, 5-101,
6-105, 6-119, 7-129, 7-143,
14-354, 16-392
DEWE-3211 1-12, 3-22, 3-36,
4-51, 4-68, 5-77, 5-80, 5-91,
5-101, 6-105, 7-129, 14-354,
16-392
DEWE-CAM-FW 3-23, 3-31,
3-47, 4-55, 4-63, 4-74, 5-81,
6-107, 6-113, 6-126, 7-131,
7-137, 7-146, 19-456
DEWE-CAM-GIG-E 3-23, 4-55,
5-81, 6-107, 6-113, 7-131,
7-137, 9-174, 19-458
DEWE-CAM-USB 3-23, 4-55,
5-81, 6-107, 6-113, 7-131,
7-137, 19-452, 19-453, 19454, 19-455
DEWE-DCDC-24-300-ISO 10255, 11-271
DEWESoft 7 5-103, 9-167, 9-211,
9-236
DEWESoft-OPT-ARINC/1553
18-437
Dewetron ii, 1-11, 1-12, 2-13, 2-15,
3-31, 3-34, 3-45, 4-63, 4-66,
5-86, 5-89, 5-96, 5-101,
6-118, 6-123, 7-142, 8-149,
9-174, 9-175, 9-182, 9-194,
9-199, 10-243, 10-247,
11-265, 273, 276, 279, 285,
13-293, 13-299, 13-302, 13308, 13-310, 13-336, 13-338,
13-340, 13-344, 14-354,
14-356, 14-357, 14-360, 15369, 15-370, 16-391, 16-392,
16-393, 16-397, 16-399, 16401, 16-403, 16-405, 17-407,
A-493
DEWE-VGPS-200C 9-174
digital filter 8-164
Digital inputs 9-174
Digital I/O connector 3-38, 5-94,
6-120, 7-144
DirectShow 9-174, 18-433, 18-434
DIRECTX 18-434
Display Range 9-185
Display Range, Setting the Default
9-185
Display Scale 9-184
DLC 18-445
DPS-2410 3-45, 3-46, 5-83, 5-95,
5-96, 5-97, 5-101, 5-102,
6-122, 6-123, 6-124, 7-145,
10-243
DS-7 3-47, 4-74, 4-75, 6-126,
7-146, 9-167, 9-171, 9-172,
9-175, 11-261, 11-263, 11265, 276, 13-299, 14-356, 16394, 16-395, 17-411, 19-454
DSUB 37-pin connector, 3-39, 4-70,
5-94, 6-121, 7-144
DVD 5-98, 5-101
DVD / CD drive 5-98
Dynamic acquisition rate 9-193
E
Encoder 8-150, 8-151, 8-158, 8-159,
8-160, 8-161
encoders 8-158, 9-174, 9-194
End-of-Life Handling 2-15
EPAD2 5-99, 5-101, 16-391
EPAD2 modules, installing new ones
16-394
EPAD2-RTD8 16-393, 16-396
EPAD2-TH8 16-393, 16-396
EPAD2-TH8-x 16-393, 16-396
EPAD2-V8 16-393, 16-396
Ethernet 3-29, 3-32, 4-61, 4-64,
5-84, 5-86, 5-87, 6-116,
7-138, 7-140
Event Counting 8-151, 8-153
EVENTS 9-199
Export file formats 9-173
Export Your Data 9-207
F
FFT 9-172, 9-173, 9-194, 9-196
FFT graph, 9-172
file conversion 9-207
File export button 9-207
File Name 9-190
File Numbering, automatic 9-190
FILL ONE MODULE PROCEDURE 276, 13-299, 14-357
FILL (or CLEAR) One Module
Procedure 277, 13-300,
14-358
Fill Rack (all Modules) Procedure
276, 13-299, 14-357
FILL RACK PROCEDURE 276,
13-299, 14-357
firewire 3-29, 3-31, 4-61, 4-63, 5-84,
5-86
Flexpro 9-173, 9-207
Fluke 1-12
Frequency Measurement 8-151,
8-162
Frequency to voltage 13-296
function scaling method 9-183
Fuse 4-60, 5-83, 6-114, 7-138
G
Gated Event Counting 8-151, 8-153
GPS 9-172, 9-174
GPS-CLOCK 17-408
GPS track 9-172
graph 9-172, 9-173, 9-180, 9-183,
9-184, 9-185, 9-186, 9-187,
9-197, 9-198, 9-199, 9-202,
9-203, 9-204
Ground (earth) Connector 4-60,
5-83, 6-114, 7-138
H
hard drive 3-46, 4-73, 5-97, 6-124,
7-145, 9-176
Hazardous Substances 2-15
HDD 4-72, 5-97, 5-98, 5-103,
6-124
hot-swappable batteries 3-45, 5-95,
6-122
A-498| Appendix
HSI 5-99
HSI-HV Isolated High Voltage
module 280
HSI-HV Specifications 280
HSI-LV Isolated Low Voltage Module 282
HSI-LV Shunt Options 285
HSI-LV Specifications 282
HSI Series Signal Conditioners 273
HSI-STG Isolated Universal Input
Module 286
HSI-STG Pin-outs 287
HSI-STG specifications 286
humidity 2-13, 5-102
I
i7 6-126, 7-146
IEEE-1394 3-29, 3-31, 4-61, 4-63,
5-84, 5-86, 5-102
IEPE 9-174, 282, 286, 13-294, 13295, 13-307, 13-315, 13-335,
13-337, 13-339
Inductive 13-295
Inertial sensors 9-174
Input scaling 5-103
Installing the Smart Batteries 3-44,
4-72, 5-95, 6-122
Intel 3-47, 4-74, 6-126, 7-146
iPad 20-476
IRIG-CLOCK 17-408, 18-419
Isolation 5-100
J
J1939 5-100, 9-174, 18-446
K
Keyboard 5-102
L
LabVIEW 3-47, 4-74, 6-126, 7-146,
9-167, 9-168, 9-169, 9-170
LCD 5-95, 5-97, 5-102, 6-122,
6-124, 10-247
LCD screen, battery indicator 5-95,
6-122
LEMO 3-28, 3-36, 4-60, 4-69, 5-83,
5-91, 6-119, 7-143
LVDT 13-295
M
Math channel 9-173
Matlab ii, 9-172, 9-173
Max value 9-181, 9-185
MDAQ 5-99, 9-180
MDAQ-AAF4-5-BE-S1 15-390
MDAQ-AAF4-5-BU 15-390
MDAQ-AAF4-5-BU-S1 15-390
MDAQ-AAF4-5-BU-S2 15-390
MDAQ-BASE-5 5-99, 15-370
MDAQ-FILT-5-BE 15-389, 16396, 16-398, 16-400, 16-402,
16-404
MDAQ-FILT-5-BU 15-389
MDAQ-FILT-5-BU-S1 15-389
MDAQ-SUB-ACC 15-385, 15387, 15-389, 15-390, 16-396,
16-398, 16-400, 16-402,
16-404
MDAQ-SUB-BRIDGE 15-377
MDAQ-SUB-STG 15-372, 15-377
MDAQ-SUB-V200 15-381
Met/CAL® 1-12, 5-101
MIL-STD-1553 5-101, 9-174, 18417, 18-437, 18-438, 18-439,
18-440
MIL-STD-1553 receive setup 18439
MIL-STD-1553 transmit setup
18-440
Min value 9-181, 9-185
MOB-DISP-17 3-43, 4-58, 10-256,
10-257, 10-259, 10-260,
19-452
Module Installation Trouble-shooting 278, 13-301, 14-359
modules are showing up in RED letters 278, 13-301, 14-359
MSI-V-ACC 11-262, 283, 286, 13294, 13-307, 13-308, 13-315
MSI-V-CH-50 11-262, 283, 286,
13-294, 13-307, 13-308,
13-315
MSI-V-RTD 11-262, 283, 286, 13294, 13-307, 13-308, 13-315
Multifile 9-190, 9-191
N
National Instruments 18-443
nCode ii
network stacks 2-15
Neutrino-4 5-96, 10-247, 10-255
NIST ii
NIST traceable 1-12, 5-101
Notice event 9-199
NTSC/PAL video inputs 18-433
O
OBDII 5-100
OBD II support 18-446
On-board RS-485 interface 17-410
operating system 3-46, 4-73, 5-97,
5-98, 6-124
optical drive 5-98
Optical read/write drive 5-98
ORION 3-39, 4-70, 5-94, 5-99,
5-100, 6-121, 7-144, 8-165,
17-407
ORION-0424-200 17-412
ORION-0816-1000 17-407, 17-413
ORION-0816-1001 17-407, 17-413
ORION-0816-1002 17-407, 17-413
ORION-0816-1003 17-407, 17-413
ORION-0816-1004 17-407, 17-413
ORION-0816-1005 17-407, 17-413
ORION-0824-200 17-407, 17-413
ORION-0824-201 17-407, 17-413
ORION-0824-202 17-407, 17-413
ORION-0824-203 17-407, 17-413
ORION-0824-204 17-407, 17-413
ORION-0824-205 17-407, 17-413
ORION-1616-100 17-407, 17-413
ORION-1616-101 17-407, 17-413
ORION-1616-102 17-407, 17-413
ORION-1616-103 17-407, 17-413
ORION-1616-104 17-407, 17-413
OWNER’s GUIDE - APPENDIX |
A-499
ORION-1616-105 17-407, 17-413
ORION-1622-100 17-407, 17-413
ORION-1622-101 17-407, 17-413
ORION-1622-102 17-407, 17-413
ORION-1622-103 17-407, 17-413
ORION-1622-104 17-407, 17-413
ORION-1622-105 17-407, 17-413
ORION-3216-100 17-407, 17-413
ORION-3216-101 17-407, 17-413
ORION-3222-100 17-407, 17-413
ORION-3222-101 17-407, 17-413
ORION cards, Combining various
17-409
ORION cards installation 17-411
ORION cards, synchronizing them
17-409
ORION card Windows driver 17411
ORION-DAQ-SYNC 17-410
ORION-DSA-SYNC 17-410
ORION series 17-407
ORION-SYNC 17-408
Outline Drawings 3-18, 4-52, 5-78,
6-106, 7-130
Overview 1-12, 9-172, 9-194, 9-195
P
PAD-AO1 14-355, 14-367
PAD-CB8-B 14-361, 16-399,
16-403
PAD-CB8-BNC 14-361
PAD-CB8-RTD 14-355, 14-363,
14-364
PAD-DO7 14-355, 14-365
PAD module, old type without buttons 278, 13-301, 14-359,
14-360
PAD modules, adding new ones
14-356
PAD Modules Table 14-355
PAD-TH8-P 14-355, 14-363
PAD-V8-P 14-355, 14-361
Paste special 9-188
Paste special… 9-188
Paste to all 9-188
PCM data 9-174
Period Time Measurement 8-151,
8-155
polynomial 5-103
Pot/Ohmic sensors 13-295
Power 5-102, 9-172, 10-243
power cord 2-13, 3-45, 5-95
Project 9-211, 9-212, 9-215, 9-216,
9-217, 9-218, 9-220, 9-233,
9-234
PROPERTIES BAR 9-196
PS/2 3-29, 3-30, 3-31, 4-61, 4-62,
4-63, 5-84, 5-85, 5-86
Pulse Width Measurement 8-151,
8-156
Q
Quadrature Encoder 8-151, 8-158,
8-159, 8-160
Quick start guide 1-12, 9-167
R
RAM 5-102, 5-103, 9-198
Recorder 9-172, 9-173, 9-194,
9-196, 9-197
recorder graph 9-173, 9-198, 9-199,
9-202, 9-203, 9-204
Recording modes 5-103
Recording setup 5-103
Recycling 2-15
Reference Check 9-183
Relay Output module 14-365
Reloading your Data Files 9-199
remote power-on 17-410
removable 3-46, 3-47, 4-73, 4-74,
5-97, 5-98, 5-102, 6-105,
6-107, 6-108, 6-124, 6-126,
7-145, 7-146
removable hard disk drive 3-46,
4-73, 5-97, 6-124, 7-145
Replay speed 9-173
Resistance 282, 286, 13-295, 13-296,
13-307, 13-315
RIBBON 9-196
RS-232/485 interface 14-354
RS232C 3-29, 3-30, 4-61, 4-62,
5-84, 5-85, 5-102, 6-116,
7-138
S
safety 2-13, 2-14
Safety precautions 1-12, 2-13
Sample rate 9-181
Sample Rate 9-193
Sample rate divider 9-181
Sample Rate, setting it 9-193
Save Your Setup 9-194
SBS 10-254
Scale/CAL 9-182
Scope 9-172, 9-173, 9-194, 9-196
Screen design 9-172
sensors 1-12, 2-13, 3-34, 3-37, 4-66,
4-69, 5-89, 5-92, 5-103,
6-118, 6-119, 7-142, 7-143,
9-174
Setup files 9-172
Setup file, saving 9-194
Set Up Your Channels 9-178
Shock and vibration 5-102
Shunt resistors, using custom 11-268
SideHAND ii
Sigma-delta 17-413, 17-414, 17-415
signal conditioner hardware control
9-180
Signal Input Connectors 3-35, 4-68,
5-91, 6-119, 7-143
Simultaneous sampling 17-407,
17-408
slope 9-182, 14-367, 15-389, 15-390
smart batteries 3-45, 5-96, 5-102,
6-123
SMBus 10-253, 10-254
Softing 18-443
Software 3-47, 4-74, 5-103, 6-126,
7-146, 8-152, 8-153, 8-154,
8-155, 8-156, 8-157, 8-160,
8-161, 8-163, 9-167, 9-172,
9-173, 281, 283, 13-304,
13-308, 13-314, 13-332, 13337, 13-342, 15-372, 15-377,
16-393, 16-398, 19-453
Software licensing 9-173
A-500| Appendix
Sound sensors 9-174
Specifications 5-103
Specifications, Analog Input 3-18,
3-28, 4-52, 5-78, 5-83, 6-106,
6-114, 7-130, 7-138
STOP, Automatically 9-190
Stop storing. 9-199
Stop storing after 9-190, 9-192
STORE and STOP buttons 9-208
STORING data 9-198
Strain gage 9-173
Support 1-11, 1-12
SYNC 5-93
Synching Multiple systems 17-409
synchronizing external devices 17407, 17-408
synchronizing multiple systems 17407, 17-408
System restore DVD 5-101
System Startup 3-44, 4-72, 5-95,
6-122, 7-145
T
TEDS 5-103
Temperature 5-102, 282, 286, 13295, 13-307, 13-315, 13-343,
14-355, 14-363
Text event 9-199
Thermocouple 13-295, 13-296
time constant 13-295
TOOLBAR 9-196
touchpad 5-102
training 1-11, 2-14
turn on (or off ) all channels at once
9-178
Two Pulse Edge Separation 8-151,
8-157
U
Unused (channels) 9-178
unzoom, how to 9-202
Up/Down Counter 8-151, 8-154
USB 3-29, 3-30, 3-34, 4-61, 4-62,
4-66, 5-84, 5-85, 5-88, 5-89,
5-102, 6-117, 6-118, 7-141,
7-142, 9-174
Used (channels) 9-178
V
Vector 18-443
VGA 3-33, 4-65, 5-87, 5-88, 5-102
video 3-29, 3-31, 3-33, 3-34, 4-61,
4-63, 4-65, 4-66, 5-84, 5-86,
5-87, 5-88, 5-89, 5-102,
6-117, 6-118, 7-141, 7-142,
9-174, 9-194
video channels, displaying 18-435
VIDEO-FG-4 9-174
Voice event 9-199
Voltage/current input configurations
8-149
W
Weight 5-102
Windows 7 ii, 5-98, 5-102
Windows updates 2-15
Windows XP ii
Wireless Display 4-59, 20-463
X
XLR 11-265
X-Y graph 9-172
X-YYY 9-172
Y
y = mx + b 9-182
y/t 9-172
Z
zoom 9-173, 9-194, 9-201, 9-202,
9-203, 9-207
Zooming in 9-200
zooming out 9-200
zoom in/out 9-173
OWNER’s GUIDE - APPENDIX |
A-501
Dewetron, Inc. 10 High Street, Ste K, Wakefield, RI 02879 USA ¤ Tel: +1 401-284-3750 ¤ Fax: +1 401-284-3755 ¤ www.dewamerica.com
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