College Calendar 2010/2011

College Calendar 2010/2011
Coláiste an Leighis, an Altranais agus na nEolaíochtaí Sláinte
The College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Coláiste an Leighis, an Altranais
agus na nEolaíochtaí Sláinte
The College of Medicine,
Nursing and Health Sciences
Féilire 2010-11 Calendar
Féilire 2010-11 Calendar
THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, NURSING AND
HEALTH SCIENCES
Coláiste an Leighis, an Altranais
agus na nEolaíochtaí Sláinte
FÉILIRE 2010-11
CALENDAR 2010-11
The 2010-11 Calendar is valid for that Session. Whilst every effort is made to
ensure the contents of the Calendar are accurate, the Calendar is issued for the
guidance of students and staff only. The Calendar is not an offer to supply
courses of study nor is it in any way to be construed as imposing any legal
obligation on the University to supply courses either at all or in part in respect
of any subject. No guarantee is given that courses, syllabuses, fees or
regulations may not be altered, cancelled or otherwise amended at any time. The
Calendar confers no rights on any student registered for the Session 2010-11.
1
NUI GALWAY PUBLISHES THE FOLLOWING CALENDARS:

General Calendar
COLLEGE CALENDARS
 The College of Arts, Social Sciences, and Celtic Studies
 The College of Business, Public Policy and Law
 The J.E. Cairnes School of Business and Economics
 The School of Law
 The College of Engineering and Informatics
 The College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
 The College of Science
Ollscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh
(Comhollscoil d’Ollscoil na hÉireann)
Postal Address:
Main Telephone No.:
University Rd., Galway
091 – 524411 (national)
00-353-91-524411 (international)
(Every Extension Number in the University has a Direct Dial
In Number (D.D.I.). Simply prefix the extension number with the digits 49.
e.g. Extension 2311 has a Direct Dial In Number (091) 492311.
Telefax No.:
Internet Address:
091 – 525700 (national)
00 – 353 – 91 – 525700 (international)
http://www.nuigalway.ie/oegaillimh.ie
National University of Ireland, Galway
(Constituent University of the National University of Ireland)
Cover Design by SNAP Printing
Printed for Údarás na hOllscoile
by SNAP Printing
Briarhill Business Park, Ballybrit, Galway.
August 2010

All University Calendars are available online on the NUI Galway website: http://www.nuigalway.ie/
2
Contents
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES INTRODUCTION ..................... 5
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES STAFF DIRECTORY................. 7
SECTION A
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES
SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES
GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES IN HEALTH SCIENCES .. 24
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY .................................................................. 29
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PODIATRY ............................................................................................... 35
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPY.................................................. 40
BACHELOR OF ARTS- SOCIAL CARE.................................................................................................... 49
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREES OF M.B., B.CH., B.A.O................................. 52
DEGREES OF M.B.,B.Ch.,B.A.O................................................................................................................ 57
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL SUBJECTS.............................................................................. 94
B.MED.SC. .................................................................................................................................................. 94
SCHOOL OF NURSING & MIDWIFERY
GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES IN NURSING &
MIDWIFERY ................................................................................................................................... 97
BACHELOR OF NURSING SCIENCE (GENERAL) ............................................................................... 101
BACHELOR OF NURSING SCIENCE (INTERNATIONAL).................................................................. 104
BACHELOR OF NURSING SCIENCE (PSYCHIATRIC)........................................................................ 107
BACHELOR OF MIDWIFERY SCIENCE................................................................................................ 110
BACHELOR OF NURSING(INTERNATIONAL).................................................................................... 112
SECTION B
POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES
RESEARCH GRADUATE OPTIONS............................................................................................ 115
SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES
RESEARCH GRADUATE OPTIONS............................................................................................ 117
MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY - M.Phil. (HEALTH SCIENCES)............................................................... 119
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH ................................................... 120
MASTERS IN HEALTH SCIENCES (HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH) ............................................ 121
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
RESEARCH GRADUATE OPTIONS............................................................................................ 123
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN MEDICAL SCIENCE (HEALTH INFORMATICS) .......................... 127
MASTERS IN MEDICAL SCIENCE (HEALTH INFORMATICS).......................................................... 130
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN MEDICAL SCIENCE (ENDOVASCULAR SURGERY) .................. 132
M.Sc. (SPORTS & EXERCISE PHYSIOTHERAPY) ............................................................................... 135
M.Sc. (SPORTS & EXERCISE MEDICINE) ............................................................................................ 137
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN HEALTH SCIENCES (PRIMARY CARE) ........................................ 139
MASTERS IN HEALTH SCIENCES (PRIMARY CARE)........................................................................ 141
POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE & POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN HEALTH SCIENCES
(CLINICAL PRIMARY CARE) ................................................................................................................ 142
POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE & POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN HEALTH SCIENCES
(CLINICAL EDUCATION)....................................................................................................................... 144
MASTERS IN HEALTH SCIENCES (CLINCAL EDUCATION) ............................................................ 147
M.Sc (MEDICAL PHYSICS)..................................................................................................................... 149
M.Sc (REGENERATIVE MEDICINE)...................................................................................................... 151
M.Sc. (CLINICAL RESEARCH)............................................................................................................... 153
3
SCHOOL OF NURSING & MIDWIFERY
RESEARCH GRADUATE OPTIONS............................................................................................ 156
HIGHER DIPLOMA IN MIDWIFERY ..................................................................................................... 160
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (EMERGENCY CARE) ................................................... 162
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (ADVANCED PRACTICE) ............................................. 165
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (EDUCATION) ................................................................ 166
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (GERONTOLOGY) ......................................................... 168
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (INTENSIVE CARE) ....................................................... 170
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC HEALTH CONDITION
................................................................................................................................................................... 173
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (MENTAL HEALTH, COMMUNITY AND INPATIENT
ACUTE CARE) ......................................................................................................................................... 175
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (ONCOLOGY)................................................................. 178
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (ORTHOPAEDICS) ......................................................... 180
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (PALLIATIVE CARE)..................................................... 182
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (PERIOPERATIVE)......................................................... 185
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (PRACTICE NURSING /COMMUNITY NURSING) ..... 188
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING) ...................................... 190
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES ......................................................................................................... 193
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES (NURSING)-two year programme ................................................... 193
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES (NURSING)-three year programme ................................................. 194
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES (MIDWIFERY)-two year programme.............................................. 195
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES (MIDWIFERY)-three year programme............................................ 196
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES (NURSING/MIDWIFERY EDUCATION) two year programme .... 197
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES (NURSING/MIDWIFERY EDUCATION)-three year programme.. 198
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES (ADVANCED PRACTICE NURSING/MIDWIFERY)-two year
programme ................................................................................................................................................. 199
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES (ADVANCED PRACTICE NURSING/MIDWIFERY)-three year
programme ................................................................................................................................................. 200
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES (SPECIALIST NURSING)-one year programme............................. 201
STAND ALONE MODULES(OCCASIONAL MODULES)..................................................................... 202
4
COLLEGE
OF
INTRODUCTION
MEDICINE,
NURSING
&
HEALTH
SCIENCES
The College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences welcomes students
whose academic interests include Medicine, Midwifery, General Nursing,
Psychiatric Nursing, Health Promotion, Social Care Speech & Language
Therapy, Podiatry and Occupational Therapy. We also a have a range of taught
and research based postgraduate masters and diplomas. Our goal is to equip
graduates with the necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed for a
lifetime of learning and commitment to patients and society. We make full use
of traditional and modern educational methods. College members are engaged
in innovative research in many areas, with particular emphasis on cancer, gene
and stem cell therapy, health services research, biomedical engineering science
and health promotion.
Our College is currently expanding the undergraduate medical intake, and
implementing an exciting new curriculum. In 2008 we commenced a 4-year
Honours BSc programme in Podiatry, the only course of its kind in Ireland. We
are developing Regional Academies for Teaching and Research at Sligo,
Letterkenny, Mayo and Ballinasloe. Our Nursing, Speech & Language, Podiatry
and Occupational Therapy courses are accommodated in Áras Moyola, which
was opened in 2006. A new Medical Education Centre also opened in the
hospital campus in 2007. We hope to begin the construction of a €40 million
Human Biology building later this year. A €20 million clinical and translational
research facility at the main hospital campus is planned for 2011. This facility,
jointly funded by the University, the Health Research Board and the Health
Services Executive will be located on the main hospital campus.
The mission of the College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences is to
enable ‘Exemplary Learning and Leadership in Healthcare’, our programmes,
students and staff strive to deliver ad realise this mission every day. The
College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences has emerged from the recent
Academic restructuring of the University and capitalizes on existing close
harmony across the healthcare disciplines. It is constituted as follows:
College of Medicine, Nursing
&
Health Sciences
School of
Health Sciences
School of
Medicine
School of
Nursing &
Midwifery
5
College Office
(Clinical Sciences Institute, Shantalla Road, Galway)
Professor B.G. Loftus
Dean
Professor Laurence Egan
Vice Dean of Research
Dr. Adeline Cooney
Vice Dean of Education and Assessment
Dr. Diarmuid O’Donovan
Vice Dean of Internationalisation
Mr Declan Ashe
Director of Strategic Development
Ms. Natalie Walsh
College Administrator
School of Health Sciences (Aras Moyola, NUI Galway)
Professor Agnes Shiel
Head of School
Dr Caroline McIntosh
Deputy Head of School
Ms Lorraine Kent
School Administrator
School of Medicine (Clinical Sciences, Shantalla Road, Galway)
Professor Fidelma Dunne
Head of School
Professor Anthony Wheatley
Vice-Head of School
Mrs Therese Dixon
School Administrator
School of Nursing & Midwifery (Aras Moyola, NUI Galway)
Professor Kathy Murphy
Head of School
Dr Adeline Cooney
Deputy Head of School
Ms Máire Bríd Ui Mhainin
School Administrator
Full contact information is available by College, School and Discipline on the
following pages.
6
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES STAFF DIRECTORY
College of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences
(Coláiste Leighis, Altranais agus Eolaíochtaí Sláinte)
Location:Clinical Sciences Institute
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Ashe, Mr. Declan
2117
Director of Strategic Development
[email protected]
Egan, Prof Laurence
5335
Vice Dean of Research
[email protected]
Cooney, Dr Adeline
Loftus, Prof. B.G.
3580
87-4475
Vice Dean Education & Assessment
Dean
[email protected]
[email protected]
O Donovan, Dr Diarmuid
3923
Vice Dean of Internationalisation
[email protected]
Walsh, Ms. Natalie
5960
College Administrator
[email protected]
School of Health Sciences(Scoil na nEolaíochtaí Sláinte)
Health Promotion(Cothú Sláinte)
Location:Clinical Sciences Institute
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Bannon, Mr. Patrick
Barry, Prof Margaret
Batt, Dr Vivienne
Burns, Ms. Moira
Callaghan, Mary
Canavan, Reamonn Mr
Clarke, Aleisha Ms
Clarke, Ms. Natasha
Clerkin, Ms. Pauline
Connolly, Dr Claire
Costello, Ms Christina
Doyle, Priscilla
D’Eath, Ms Maureen
Dempsey, Ms. Colette
Fitzgerald, Ms. Amanda
Gavin, Aoife Ms
Glavin, Ms Denise
Forde, Ms Yvonne
Griffin, Dr. Barbara
Hodgins, Dr Margaret
Hogan, Ms Victoria
John Akinola, Yetunde
Kelly, Dr Colette
Mahmood, Samir
Manandhar, Dr. Mary
McLaughlin, Mr. Laurence
3874
3348
3108
3874
2979
3956
3642
2858
3874
3828
2722
3490
3956
3642
2858
2858
3092
3874
4038
3349
3465
5149
3186
5040
3092
3874
Social Care Tutor
Established Professor
Admin Assistant (Research)
Social Care Tutor
Researcher
Researcher
Researcher
Researcher
Social Care Tutor
University Teacher
Administrative Assistant 2
Researcher
Researcher (Part-time)
Researcher (Part-time)
Researcher
PhD student
Administrative Assistant 3
Administrative Assistant 2
University Teacher
Lecturer
Lecturer
PhD student
Senior Researcher
Researcher
Adjunct Lecturer
Social Care Tutor
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
a.gavin2nuigalway.ie
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
7
McKenna, Ms Verna
McMahon, Ms. Margaret
Molcho, Dr Michal
Murphy, Ms. Christina
NicGabhainn, Dr Saoirse
Nolan, Ms Geraldine
O’Donovan, Dr Diarmuid
O’Grady, Ms Anne
O’Higgins, Ms Siobhán
O’Sullivan, Ms. Frankie
Power, Dr. Martin
Pursell, Dr Lisa
Sixsmith, Dr Jane
Sweeney, Ms. Leigh-Ann
Van Lente, Eric
Vaughan, Ms. Deirdre
Walker, Ms. Lorraine
3604
3874
3668
5149
3093
3645
3923
3644
3956
3874
2157
2044
3466
5149
3642
3490
3641
University Teacher
Social Care Tutor
Lecturer
PhD student
Senior Lecturer
Lecturer (Part-time)
Senior Lecturer
Administrative Assistant 2
PhD student
Social Care Tutor
University Fellow
Senior Researcher
Lecturer
PhD student
Researcher
Research Nurse
Research Assistant
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
frankie.o’[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Occupational Therapy(Teiripe Shaothair)
Location: Áras Moyola
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Armstrong, Ms Dorothy
Chockalingam, Mr M.
5023
5313
Lecturer
Lecturer
[email protected]
[email protected]
Gallagher, Ms Aideen
5021
Lecturer
[email protected]
Gordon, Ms Celine
5470
Administrative Assistant 3
[email protected]
Kent, Ms Lorraine
2957
School Administrator
[email protected]
McGrath, Ms Margaret
5624
Lecturer
[email protected]
Shiel, Prof. Agnes
2941
Established Professor
[email protected]
Podiatry(Cosliacht)
Location: Áras Moyola
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Lowry, Ms Fiona
5814
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
McIntosh, Dr Caroline
5869
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Roberts, Mr Nigel
4091
Practice-Education Coordinator [email protected]
Speech & Language Therapy(Léachtóireacht dTeiripe Urlabhra agus Teanga
Location: Áras Moyola
Name
Phone
Title
E-Mail Address
(Ainm)
(Fón)
(Teideal)
(Ríomh Phost)
Lyons, Ms Rena
5918
Course Director
[email protected]
Antonijevic-Elliott, Dr S.
5623
Lecturer
[email protected]
Caroll, Ms Clare
5384
Lecturer
[email protected]
Gordon, Ms Celine
5470
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
Kent, Ms Lorraine
2957
Administrative Assistant 3
[email protected]
8
Loftus, Ms Laura
5293
Practice Education CoOrdinator
[email protected]
Logue-Kennedy, Ms Maria
5023
Lecturer
[email protected]
McMenamin, Ms Ruth
5204
Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Malley, Ms Mary-Pat
5018
Lecturer
[email protected]
Yanushevskaya, Dr Irena
5023
Lecturer
[email protected]
Location: Clinical Sciences Institute
Name
Phone
(Ainm)
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Dixon, Mrs Thérèse
Dunne, Prof. Fidelma
Joyce, Ms Máire
Mahon, Ms Pauline
School Administrator
Head of School
Administrative Assistant 2
Administrative Assistant 1
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Location: Clinical Science Institute
Name
Phone
(Ainm)
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Ansari, Dr Bilal
5662
Researcher
[email protected]
Clarkson, Dr Kevin
87-4074
Clinical Lecturer
Coughlan, Dr Michael G.
87-4074
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
[email protected]
Finnerty, Dr Olivia
5662
Postgraduate Tutor
[email protected]
Flynn, Dr Noel
87-4074
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Grady, Dr Deirdre
87-4074
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Kelly, Ms Valerie
5662
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
Kevin, Dr Leo
87-4074
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Kinirons, Dr Brian
87-4074
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Laffey, Prof. John
87-4608
Established Professor
[email protected]
McElwain, Dr Jennifer
5662
Undergraduate Tutor
[email protected]
Neligan, Dr Patrick
87-4074
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Toole, Dr David
87-4074
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Sharkey, Dr Aidan
87-4074
Clinical Lecturer
Walshe, Dr Criona
5662
Undergraduate Tutor
[email protected]
[email protected]
School of Medicine (Scoil an Leighis)
87-4475
5074
5941
87-4475
Anaesthesia (Anaestéise)
Anatomy (Anatamaíocht)
Location: Block B
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Black, Mr Alexander
2234
Lecturer
[email protected]
Canney, Mr Mark
3520
Chief Experimental Officer
[email protected]
Dockery, Prof. Peter
2784
Established Professor
[email protected]
9
Furey, Mr John
2841
Senior Experimental officer
[email protected]
Garcia, Dr Yolanda
2837
Lecturer
[email protected]
Lalor, Mr Pierce
2273
Senior Experimental Officer
[email protected]
McMahon, Dr Siobhan
2838
Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Loughlin, Mr Thomas
2255
Departmental Attendant
Owens, Mr Peter
4036
Education & Coordinator
[email protected]
Quondamatteo, Dr Fabio
2161
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Stanley, Alanna
2712
Demonstrator
[email protected]
Wilkins, Dr Brendan
2287
Lecturer
[email protected]
Bacteriology (Baictéareolaíocht)
Location: Clinical Science Institute/University College Hospital
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Boo, Dr Teck Wee
87-3783
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Buckley, Mrs, Victoria
87-4572
Senior Technician
[email protected]
Cormican, Prof. Martin
87-4146
Established Professor
[email protected]
Morris, Dr Dearbhaile
87-4652
Lecturer
[email protected]
Doherty, Ms Claudia
87-2686
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
Whelan, Mrs Mary
87-4665
Senior Technician
[email protected]
Keady, Dr Deirbhile
87-2013
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Ní Riain, Dr Una
87-4410
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
General Practice (Doctúireacht Teaghlaigh)
Location: Clinical Science Institute/1 Distillery Road
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Buckley, Mr Brian
5257
Researcher
[email protected]
Byrne, Dr Mary
5205
Lecturer
[email protected]
Cantillon, Prof. Peter
2262
Professor of Primary Care
[email protected]
Glynn, Dr Liam
5193
Lecturer
[email protected]
Kavanagh, Dr Kim
5257
Senior Registrar
[email protected]
Kelleher, Ms Breda
5306
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
Kelly, Dr Maureen
4107
Lecturer
[email protected]
MacFarlane, Dr Anne
5194
Lecturer
[email protected]
Mulqueen, Dr Joan
5193
Clinical Researcher
[email protected]
Murphy, Prof. Andrew
3525
Established Professor
[email protected]
O’Brien, Dr Niamh
5193
Research Fellow
[email protected]
O’Donovan, Dr Barry
5269*
Lecturer
[email protected]
Pieper, Dr Hans
3608
Research Fellow
St. John, Ms Una
3524
Administrative Assistant 4
[email protected]
[email protected]
Vellinga, Ms Akke
5192
Researcher
[email protected]
10
Medical Informatics & Medical Education (Faisnéisíocht Leighis agus Oideachas Leighis)
Location: Clinical Science Institute
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Avalos, Ms Gloria
2160
Lecturer
[email protected]
Kanagaratnam, Mr Benjamin
3016
Senior Technician
[email protected]
Kropmans, Dr Thomas
5478
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Newell, Mr Micheál
5940
Lecturer
[email protected]
Medicine (Leigheas)
Remedi(Institiúid um Leigheas Athginiúnach)
Location: Clinical Science Institute/NCBES/UCH/Merlin Park
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Barry, Prof. Frank
5108
Scientific Director (REMEDI)
[email protected]
Carey, Dr John
87-5511
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Ceredig, Prof. Rod
5916
Stokes Prof. of Immunology (REMEDI) [email protected]
Coughlan, Dr Robert J.
87-5577
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Counihan, Dr Timothy
87-4251
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Crowley, Dr Jim
87-2188
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Daly, Prof. Kieran
87-2187
Personal Professor & Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Dinneen, Dr Seán
5290
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Dunne, Prof. Fidelma
5074
Personal Professor
[email protected]
Finn, Dr Yvonne
5485
Lecturer (Fixed Term)
[email protected]
Fitzgerald, Dr Una
5045
Lecturer (NCBES)
[email protected]
Flaherty, Dr Gerard
5469
Fleming, Dr Catherine
87-2294
Lecturer in Medical Education & [email protected]
Skills
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Gilmartin, Prof. J.J.
87-5225
Personal Professor & Clinical Lecturer [email protected]
Godwin, Ms Sinead
87-2187
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
Griffin, Prof. Matthew
5436
Prof. of Transplant Biology
[email protected]
Hennessy, Dr Michael
87-2167
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Howard, Dr Linda
5268
Senior Researcher
[email protected]
Hynes, Dr Seán
2963
Researcher (REMEDI)
[email protected]
Joshi, Prof. Lokesh
5768
Associate Professor (NCBES)
[email protected]
Keane, Dr Maccon
87-4805
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Kearns, Ms Miriam
87-4291
Senior Technician
[email protected]
Lappin, Dr David
87-5510
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Lee, Dr John
87-4967
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Mannion, Dr Eileen
87-4990
Lecturer
[email protected]
Markham, Dr Trevor
87-4627
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
11
Marren, Dr Pauline
87-4913
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Martin, Dr Joseph
87-2569
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Moloney, Ms Geraldine
2922
Administrative Assistant 4 (NCBES)
[email protected]
Monroe, Ms Deborah
87-4275
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
Mulkerrin, Prof. Eamon
87-4680
Personal Professor & Clinical Lecturer [email protected]
Murphy, Dr Lesley
87-4627
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Murphy, Dr Mary
5206
Toxicology Manger (REMEDI)
[email protected]
Murray, Dr Margaret
87-4281
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Nash, Dr Patrick
87-2187
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Brien, Timothy
87-4267
Established Professor
[email protected]
O’Brien, Timothy
5107
Director of REMEDI
[email protected]
O’Connor, Ms Una
87-4206
Administrative Assistant 3
[email protected]
O’Donnell, Prof. Martin
4098
Professor of Translational Medicine
[email protected]
O’Dwyer, Prof. Michael
87-2349
Professor of Haematology
[email protected]
O’Keeffe, Dr Shaun
757631
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Regan, Dr Anthony
87-4568
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Quinn, Ms Triona
5165
Administrative Assistant 2 (REMEDI)
[email protected]
Reddan, Dr Donal
87-5510
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Ritter, Dr Thomas
5329
Senior Lecturer (Gene Therapy)
[email protected]
Rochev, Dr Yury
2806
Lecturer
[email protected]
Ryan, Ms Noreen
5166
Administrative Assistant (2) REMEDI
[email protected]
Sullivan, Prof. Frank
87-2616
Professor of Radiation Oncology
[email protected]
Santocanale, Prof. Corrado 5714
Professor (NCBES)
[email protected]
Waldron, Dr Dympna
87-4990
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Zwacka, Dr Ralf
5323
Lecturer (Gene Therapy)
[email protected]
Obstetrics & Gynecology (Cnáimhseachas agus Liacht Bhan)
Location: Clinical Science Institute
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Conway, Dr Una
87-4717
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Egan, Dr Declan
87-4548
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Gaffney, Dr Geraldine
87-4218
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Kelly ,Ms Valerie
3537
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
Morrison, Prof. John
3537
Established Professor
[email protected]
O’Leary, Dr Michael
87-4717
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Sarwar, Dr Fakhra
3537
Lecturer (Fixed Term)
[email protected]
12
Ophthalmology (Oftailmeolaíocht)
Location: University College Hospital
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Fahy, Mr Gerard
87-4269
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Harney, Dr Fiona
87-2710
Lecturer (Fixed Term)
[email protected]
Kinsella, Mr Frank
87-4269
Clinical Lecturer
O’Donoghue, Mr Eamonn
87-4269
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
[email protected]
Orthopaedic Surgery (Máinliacht Orthaipéideach)
Location: Merlin Park Hospital
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Curtin, Mr William
757631
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Devitt, Mr Aiden
87-4203
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Kaar, Mr Kenneth
757631
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Kearns, Mr Stephen
87-5735
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
McCabe, Mr John
757631
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Sullivan, Mr Michael
757631
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Shannon, Mr Fintan
87-5735
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Oto-Laryngology (Ota-laraingeolaíochta)
Location: University College Hospital
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Gormley, Mr P.K.
87-4347
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Keogh, Prof. Ivan
87-2015 Personal Professor
[email protected]
Lang, Mr John
87-4552
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Waheed, Mr Khurram
87-3735
Locum
[email protected]
Paediatrics (Péidiatraic)
Location: Clinical Science Institute/University College Hospital
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Flanagan, Dr Orla
87-4082
Hon. Senior Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Geoghegan, Dr Rosemary
5220
Lecturer
[email protected]
Dunne, Dr Kevin
87-4462
Hon . Senior Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Herzig, Dr Mary
87-3733
Hon. Senior Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Loftus, Prof. B.G.
87-4654
Established Professor
[email protected]
Monroe, Ms Debbie
87-4275
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
Moylett, Dr Edina
5221
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Donovan, Dr Donough
87-4533
Hon. Senior Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
13
Pathology (Paiteilaíocht)
Location: Clinical Science Institute/University College Hospital
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Bennani, Dr Fadel
Brodie, Dr Caroline
87-4420
87-2017
Clinical Lecturer
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
[email protected]
Casey, Dr Mary
87-4928
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Callagy, Prof. Grace
87-4488
Established Professor
[email protected]
Colesky, Dr Frans
87-4415
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Curran, Dr Stephanie
87-2721
Consultant Histopathologist
[email protected]
Flavin, Dr Richard
87-2796
Consultant Histopathologist
[email protected]
Griffin, Dr Damian
87-4825
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Hayat, Dr Amjad
87-2625
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Moran, Mrs Laura
87-4574
Senior Technician
laura.moran[email protected]
Murphy, Mrs Lorraine
87-4488
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
Murray, Dr Margaret
87-4281
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Dwyer, Prof. Michael 87-2349
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Sheehan, Dr Margaret
87-2894
Consultant Histopathologist
[email protected]
Tormey, Dr Vincent J
87-4498
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Webber, Mr Mark
87-4373
Senior Technician
[email protected]
Pharmacology & Therapeutics (Cógaseolaíocht agus Teiripe)
Location: Exp.Med. & CNS Buildings/Clinical Science Institute
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Beatty, Mr Brendan
Dowd, Dr Eilís
2233
2776
Senior Technician
Lecturer (Fixed Term)
[email protected]
[email protected]
Egan, Prof. Laurence J
5355
Personal Professor
[email protected]
Fearnhead, Dr Howard
5115
Lecturer
[email protected]
Finn, Dr David
5280
Lecturer
[email protected]
Grealy, Dr Maura
3012
Lecturer
[email protected]
Kelly, Dr John
3268
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Kerr, Mr Danny
3272
Senior Technician
[email protected]
McAlinden, Ms Susan
Mureau, Ms Coralie
5370
5369
Administrative Assistant 2
Technician
[email protected]
[email protected]
O’Halloran, Mr Ambrose
2778
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Ryan, Ms Una
2246
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
Welsby, Dr Philip
3826
Lecturer (Fixed Term)
[email protected]
14
Physiology (Fiseolaíocht)
Location: Quadrangle Building
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Ceredig, Prof. Rod
5916
Professor of Immunology
[email protected]
Coen, Ms Barbara
Doyle, Dr Karen
2189
3665
Senior Technician
Lecturer
[email protected]
[email protected]
Horrigan, Dr Louise
5427
Lecturer (Fixed Term)
[email protected]
Hynes, Dr Ailish
3573
Lecturer
[email protected]
Kerrigan, Ms Liz
5937
Senior Technician
[email protected]
McDonald, Mr David
2761
Teaching Assistant (part-time)
[email protected]
Quinlan, Dr Leo
3710
Lecturer
[email protected]
Roche, Dr Michelle
5427
Lecturer
[email protected]
Webster, Dr Christina
Wheatley, Prof. Tony
2761 *
Teaching Assistant (part-time)
2361*
Head of Department
[email protected]
[email protected]
Psychiatry (Síciatracht)
Location: Clinical Sciences Institute/ University College Hospital
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Ahmed, Dr Mohammed
5771
Honorary Research Fellow
[email protected]
Burke, Dr Amanda
548922
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Carney, Dr Philip A.
3555
Dean Emeritus
[email protected]
Cannon, Dr Dara
5692
Lecturer in Neuro-imaging
[email protected]
Conlon, Louise
3555
Lecturer in Communication Skills
[email protected]
Fannon, Mrs Marian
3555
Administrative Assistant 3
[email protected]
Hallahan, Brian
3555
Honorary Research Fellow
[email protected]
Lally, Dr John
5771
Lecturer
[email protected]
Langan, Camilla
3555
Honorary Research Fellow
[email protected]
McDonald, Prof. Colm
3556
Established Professor
[email protected]
Mannion, Dr Laura
87-4072
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Meehan, Dr Karena
87-2978
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Sullivan, Sheila
87-4452
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Walsh, Dr Elizabeth
87-2400
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Radiology (Raideolaíocht)
Location: Clinical Sciences Institute/ University College Hospital
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Bergin, Dr Diane
87-2626
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Bruzzi, Dr John
87-4285
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Davidson, Dr Ian Robert
87-4340
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
15
Drury, Ms Mary
87-4653
Administrative Assistant 1
[email protected]e
McCarthy, Prof. Peter
87-4653
Established Professor
[email protected]
McLoughlin, Dr Ray
87-4313
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Keeffe, Dr David
87-4341
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Sullivan, Dr Gerard
87-2356
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Murphy, Dr Joseph
87-2193
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Roche, Dr Clare
87-2191
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Surgery (Máinliacht)
Location: Clinical Sciences Institute/ University College Hospital
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Binchy, Mr James
Clarke, Ms Grace
87-2766
87-4203
Clinical Lecturer
Administrative Assistant 3
[email protected]
[email protected]
Corcoran, Mr Michael
87-4297
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Courtney, Mr Donal F.
87-4300
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Curran, Ms Catherine
87-4202
Senior Technician
[email protected]
DaCosta, Mark
87-2896
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Devitt, Dara
87-4203
Lecturer (Fixed Term)
[email protected]
Dwyer, Roisin
87-4637
Senior Research Fellow
[email protected]
Hennessy, Emer
87-4202
Senior Technical Officer
[email protected]
Hussey, Mr Alan
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Joyce, Dr Myles
87-2377
87-4203
Consultant Surgeon
[email protected]
Kelly, Mr Jack
87-2377
Honorary Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Kelly, Mr Justin
87-4203
Clinical Lecturer
Kerin, Prof. Michael
87-4203
Established Professor
[email protected]
Malone, Ms Carmel
87-5634
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Martin, Mr Anthony
87-4556
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
McAnena, Mr Oliver J.
McLaughlin, Mr Ray
87-4300
Clinical Lecturer
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
[email protected]
Miller, Nicola
87-5637
Senior Research Fellow
[email protected]
Nugent, Dr Mary
5635
Lecturer in Clinical Methods
[email protected]
O’Donnell, Mr John
87-4556
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Quill, Mr Denis
87-4207
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Regan, Mr Mark
87-2406
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Regan, Mr Padraic
87-4714
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Sultan, Mr Sherif
87-2376
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
Sweeney, Mr Karl
Tawfick, Mr Wael
580600
87-4203
Clinical Lecturer
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
[email protected]
16
Tubassam, Dr Muhammad 87-2535
Lecturer (Fixed Term)
[email protected]
Walsh, Dr Killian
87-4861
Clinical Lecturer
[email protected]
National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science (An tIonad Náisiúnta um Eolaíocht
Innealtóireachta Bithleighis
Location: Orbsen Building
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Barry, Prof. Frank
5108
Director
[email protected]
Brennan, Mr William
3808
Senior Technical Officer
[email protected]
Connolly, Mr David
5208
Senior Technical Officer
[email protected]
Fitzgerald, Dr Una
5045
Lecturer
[email protected]
Giblin, Mr Robert
5303
Logistics Manager
[email protected]
Harhen, Mr Brendan
2479
Senior Technical Officer
[email protected]
Joshi, Prof. Lokesh
5768
Associate Professor
[email protected]
Moloney, Ms Gerardine
2922
Administrative Assistant 4
[email protected]
O’Connell, Mr Enda
5073
Senior Technical Officer
[email protected]
O’Doherty, Aideen
3918
MMI Project Manager
[email protected]
Rochev, Dr Yury
2806
Lecturer
[email protected]
Santocanale, Prof. C.
5174
Professor
[email protected]
Timmins, Dr Éadaoin
3918
Senior Technical Officer
[email protected]
Zwacka, Dr Ralf
5323
Lecturer
[email protected]
School of Nursing & Midwifery Studies(An Scoil Altranais agus Chnáimhseachais)
Location: Áras Moyola
Name
(Ainm)
Phone
(Fón)
Bradley, Dr. Stephen
3818
Fixed Term Lecturer
[email protected]
Brennan, Ms Miriam
3651
Lecturer
[email protected]
Burke, Ms Eimear
5352
Applied Teacher
e.burk[email protected]
Byrne, Ms Evelyn
3686
University Teacher
[email protected]
Casey, Dr Dympna
3652
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Connolly, Ms Sheena
2507
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
Condon, Ms Helena
3432
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
Conway, Ms Yvonne
2926
Lecturer
[email protected]
Cooney, Dr Adeline
3580
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Burke, Ms Carol
3741
Administrative Assistant 3
[email protected]
Dempsey, Ms Laura
5353
Lecturer
[email protected]
Devane, Mr Declan
5828
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Dowling, Dr Maura
3833
Lecturer
[email protected]
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
17
Engel, Ms Christina
5603
Lecturer
[email protected]
Fallon, Ms Anne
5601
Lecturer
[email protected]
Farrelly, Ms Frances
2828
Lecturer
[email protected]
Gannon, Ms Mary
5843
Fixed Term Lecturer
[email protected]
Geraghty, Catherine
4047
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
Hahessy, Ms Sinead
2012
Lecturer
[email protected]
Hunter, Mr Andrew
5823
Lecturer
[email protected]
Kelly, Ms Marcella
5036
Lecturer
[email protected]
McCarthy, Mr. Bernard
3817
Lecturer
[email protected]
McGreevy, Ms Deirdre
3740
Administrative Assitant 2
[email protected]
McNicholas, Ms Miriam
2018
Allocations Officer
[email protected]
Meagher, Ms Catherine
2829
Lecturer
[email protected]
Meaney, Ms Teresa
2927
Lecturer
[email protected]
Meskell, Dr. Pauline
5824
Fixed Term Lecturer
[email protected]
Mee, Ms Lorraine
2830
Lecturer
[email protected]
Montgomery, Adrienne
2998
Lecture
[email protected]
Mooney, Ms Brona
5395
Fixed Term Lecturer
[email protected]
Murphy, Professor Kathy
3344
Noone, Ms Phil
2831
Head of School of Nursing &
[email protected]
Midwifery
Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Donnell, Della
3816
Administrative Assistant 3
[email protected]
O’Hara, Ms Mary
3684
Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Tuathail, Ms Claire
5314
Lecturer
[email protected]
Quinlivan, Mr John
5387
Administrative Assistant 3
[email protected]
Smith, Ms Rita
2013
Fixed Term Lecturer
[email protected]
Smyth, Ms Siobhan
2832
College Lecturer
[email protected]
Tully, Ms Agnes
2833
College Lecturer
[email protected]
Ui Chiardha, Ms Toni
3527
Lecturer
[email protected]
Uí Mhainín, Ms Máire Bríd
3940
School Administrator
[email protected]
Van der Putten, Ms Deirdre
5602
Lecturer
[email protected]
DISCIPLINES AFFILIATED WITH THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, NURSING & HEALTH
SCIENCES
School of Psychology(Scoil na Síceolaíochta)
Location: St Anthonys Friary
Name
Phone
(Ainm)
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Bogue, Dr John
5124
Lecturer
[email protected]
Byrne, Dr Molly
5182
Lecturer
[email protected]
Curtis, Dr Ruth
3002
Personal Professor
[email protected]
18
Donoghue, Ms Nuala
3678
School Administrator
Elliott, Dr Mark
5345
Glynn, Mrs Briege
2855
Greally, Ms Alma
3266
Senior Lecturer
First Arts Psychology Tutor [email protected]
ordinator
[email protected]
Administrative Assistant 2
Groarke, Dr AnnMarie
3098
Head of School
Healy, Dr Olive
3457
Lecturer
Heary, Dr Caroline
5059
Lecturer
[email protected]
Hogan, Dr Michael
3455
Lecturer
[email protected]
Hughes, Dr Brian
3568
Lecturer
[email protected]
James, Prof. Jack
3287
Established Professor
[email protected]
Jennings, Ms Claudia
3454
Administrative Assistant 3
[email protected]
Keane, Ms Ann Marie
3097
Lecturer
[email protected]
Leader, Dr Geraldine
3434
Lecturer
[email protected]
Mac Neela, Dr Padraig
5121
Lecturer
[email protected]
Administrative Assistant 3
[email protected]
Lohan, Ms Miriam
nuala.[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
McGuire, Dr Brian
2954
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Morrison, Dr Todd
5122
Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Hora, Dr Denis
5126
Lecturer
[email protected]
Sarma, Dr Kiran
5715
Lecturer
[email protected]
Stewart, Dr Ian
3569
Lecturer
[email protected]
Walsh, Dr Jane
3102
Lecturer
[email protected]
Biochemistry(Bithcheimic)
Location: Arts/Science Building
Name
Phone
(Ainm)
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Byrnes, Dr Lucy
Carty, Dr Michael
2416
2420
Senior Lecturer
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
[email protected]
Creighton, Dr Peter
3654
University Teacher
[email protected]
Cullinane, Ms Ann
5890
Administrative Assistant 4
ann. [email protected]
Donlon, Dr John
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Flaus, Dr Andrew James
2706
5482
College Lecturer
[email protected]
Gorman, Dr Adrienne
2417
Lecturer
[email protected]
Griffin, Dr Tadhg
2436
Lecturer (Fixed Term)
[email protected]
Lowndes, Professor Noel
2420*
Established Professor
[email protected]
Morgan, Dr Pat
2447
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Morrison, Dr Ciaran
2060
SFI Lecturer/Investigator
[email protected]
Nasheuer, Dr Heniz-Peter
2430
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Nolan, Ms Geraldine
3645
Lecturer (Fixed Term)
[email protected]
19
O’Connor, Dr Lynn
3637
Lecturer (Fixed Term)
[email protected]
O’Rourke, Ms Una
2410
Administrative Assistant 3
[email protected]
Samali, Dr Afshin
2440
Personal Professor
[email protected]
Professor of Cell Biology
[email protected]
College Lecturer
[email protected]
Sullivan, Prof. Kevin
Tuohy, Dr Maria
2439
Botany(Luibheolaíocht)
Location: Arus De Brun/Martin Ryan Institute
Name
Phone
Title
(Ainm)
(Fón)
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Govier, Dr Robin
2340
Adjunct Lecturer
[email protected]
Mhic Dhonncha, Ms Síle
2340
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
Morgan, Dr Gerry
3615
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Connell, Prof. Michael
2338
Personal Professor
[email protected]
Popper, Dr Zoe
5431
Contract Lecturer
[email protected]
Sheehy Skeffington,Dr M
2682
Lecturer
[email protected]
Stengel, Dr Dagmar
3192
Lecturer
[email protected]
Microbiology(Micribhitheolaíocht)
Location: Arts Science Building
Name
Phone
(Ainm)
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Barry, Dr Thomas
3189
Lecturer
[email protected]
Boyd, Dr Aoife
2404
Lecturer
[email protected]
Carroll, Dr Cyril
2277
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Collins, Dr Gavin
2390
Lecturer (Fixed Term)
[email protected]
Fleming, Dr Gerard
3562
Lecturer
[email protected]
Gormally, Dr Michael J.
3334
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Hogan, Dr Edward
3003
Adjunct Professor
[email protected]
Moran, Prof. Anthony
3163
Personal Professor
[email protected]
O’Connell, Caroline
2294
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
O ’Bryne, Dr Conor
3957
Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Flaherty, Prof. Vincent
3734
Established Professor
[email protected]
O’Leary, Dr Aoife
3163
Lecturer (Fixed Term)
[email protected]
Patching, Prof. John
2398
Personal Professor
[email protected]
Smith, Prof. Peter
2370
Personal Professor
[email protected]
Trayers-Lynagh, Ms Angela
2081
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
Wall, Dr Gerard
5808
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
20
School of Chemistry(Scoil na Ceimice)
Location: Arts/Science Building
Name
Phone
(Ainm)
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Aldabbagh, Dr Fawaz
3120
College Lecturer
[email protected]
Buckley, Ms Judy
2459
Administrative Assistant 2
[email protected]
Carroll, Dr William
2452
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Crowley, Dr Peter
2480
Lecturer
[email protected]
Curran, Dr Henry
2460
Lecturer
[email protected]
Erxleben, Dr Andrea
2483
Lecturer
[email protected]
Geraghty, Dr Niall W.A.
2474
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Higgins, Dr Timothy
2464
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Jones, Dr, Leigh
3462
Lecturer
[email protected]
Kelly, Ms Karen
2460
Administrative Assistant 3
[email protected]
Leech, Dr Donal
3563
Lecturer
[email protected]
Murphy, Prof. Paul
2465
Established Professor
[email protected]
O’Leary, Patrick F
2476
Lecturer
[email protected]
Power, Dr Nicholas
2765
Lecturer
[email protected]
Ryder, Dr Alan
3451
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
School of Physics(Scoil na Fisice)
Location: Arts/Science Building
Name
Phone
(Ainm)
(Fón)
Title
(Teideal)
E-Mail Address
(Ríomh Phost)
Berresheim, Dr Harald
5705
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Butler, Dr Ray
3788
Lecturer
[email protected]
Byrne, Dr Miriam
3394
College Lecturer
[email protected]
Coggins, Dr Marie
5056
Lecturer
[email protected]
Dainty, Prof. Christopher
2826
Professor of Applied Physics
[email protected]
Lecturer
[email protected]
Devaney, Dr Nicholas
Foley, Dr Mark
5383
Lecturer
[email protected]
Gillanders, Dr Gary
2529
College Lecturer
[email protected]
Glynn, Professor Thomas J.
2516
Prof. of Experimental Physics
[email protected]
Goncharov, Dr Alexander
5191
Lecturer
[email protected]
Jennings, Prof. Stephen G.
2704
Personal Professor
[email protected]
Lang, Dr Mark
3241
Head of School
[email protected]
Mahoney, Ms Tess
2490
Administrative Assistant 3
[email protected]
Morgan, Dr Gerry
2520
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Connor, Dr Gerard
2513
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
O’Dowd, Prof. Colin
2490
Personal Professor
[email protected]
Redfern, Prof. Michael
2717
Personal Professor
[email protected]
21
Redman, Dr Matthew
Lecturer
[email protected]
Shearer, Dr Andrew
3114
Senior Lecturer
[email protected]
Sherlock, Dr Richard
2811
Lecturer
[email protected]
Ward, Dr Brian
3029
Lecturer
[email protected]
22
SECTION A
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES
23
SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES
General regulations for the Undergraduate Degrees in Health Sciences (NFQ
Level 8 Ref; www.nfq.ie)
EXPLANATORY NOTE
The Undergraduate Degree Programmes of the School of Health Sciences at NUI
Galway are four-year Honours Degrees, which award the Bachelor of Science in one
of the following specialisms: Occupational Therapy, Podiatry, Speech and Language
Therapy.
Regulations may be altered periodically. The regulations applying to students are
generally those which applied to their programme at the time in which they commenced
their studies, unless otherwise specified in the General Regulations hereunder.
These Regulations form a total, individual clauses may be conditioned or varied by the
provision of other clauses and cannot be applied in isolation.
The Regulations may also be supported by, or refer to other publications such as the
University Undergraduate Prospectus (available on request or by following on-line
links
for
Future
Students
from
http://www.nuigalway.ie:84/undergrad/request_prospectus.php), and the General
Calendar of the University.
I. Entry to the Degree is limited and is based competitively on the results of the Irish
Leaving Certificate examination or its equivalent. The minimum requirement is
matriculation, as set out in the Undergraduate Prospectus. [refer Matriculation
requirements and Additional Requirements in the University Undergraduate
Prospectus]. Requirements arising where the results being presented are from any
examination other than the Irish Leaving Certificate are also set out in the Prospectus.
Note:
The competitive cut-off may be significantly higher than the Matriculation
standard.
All Applications are processed through the Central Applications Office
(www.cao.ie).
II. Candidates who do not meet the Ordinary Matriculation Requirements as set out in I
above, may matriculate on grounds of Mature Years [refer Matriculation on Mature
Years in the University Undergraduate Prospectus].
Note: All Applications are processed through the Central Applications Office
(refer to www.cao.ie)
III. Before entering the Degree programme every student must furnish Garda
Clearance. This is organised through the School Office on entering the University.
Failure to obtain clearance may result in the student being unable to access practice
education placements which are a requirement of the programme.
IV. The School of Health Sciences strongly recommends that students obtain the
appropriate vaccinations (details available in programme handbooks). Placement
providers stipulate that students must have the appropriate vaccinations before
undertaking placements at their site. If students cannot provide evidence of
vaccinations, placements may be refused.
V. Registration is carried out by the University. Students must be registered in their
Degree programme not later than fifteen days after the commencement of Programmes.
VI. To obtain the degrees of B.Sc. in the selected Specialism as set out in the
Explanatory Note (above);
(a) Students must pursue programmes of Study extending over a period of not less than
four Academic Years and must pass the various Examinations prescribed below,
meeting the requirements as set out elsewhere in these Regulations, in the Marks and
Standards of the College and in Student Handbooks where necessary.
(b) The Examinations are as follows:
(1) The First University Examination in their programme.
(2) The Second University Examinations in their programme.
(3) The Third University Examination in their programme.
(4) The Fourth University Examination, being the Final Examination in their
programme.
Note:
(i)
The duration of the programme cannot be shortened; no part of
the Final Examination may be taken before the end of 8 Semesters of
professional education.
(ii)
There is a time-limit on the completion of the degree; while a
student who fails their yearly examination in a particular year has
the right to re-sit that/those examination(s) the following year [refer
par. VII - X below], the total time allowed for the successful
completion of the four University Examinations is 6 years or 12
semesters in total.
VII. The First University Examination must be passed completely before a student can
proceed to the Second Year.
(a) To enter this Examination, the student must have satisfied the attendance
requirements on the First Year Programme as outlined in the student handbooks,
including completion of all coursework. Exceptions may only be permitted by the Head
of School where it is recommended by the programme on professionally verified
grounds of student ill-health, close family bereavement or of significant personal
difficulties.
(b) The Examination will be held during the Summer Examination session with repeat
examinations, if necessary, held in the Autumn Examination session.
(c) Failure of the Examination in full or in part at the repeat examination will require
the student to re-attend the First Year programme and re-sit the Examination in the
following year.
(d) The First Year examination must be completed within two years of entering First
25
Year, extensions may not be given as this will breach the overall time-limit for
completing the programme as set out in Par. VI above.
VIII. The Second University Examination must be passed completely before a student
can proceed to the Third Year.
(a) To enter this Examination, the student must have satisfied the attendance
requirements on the Second Year Programme, including completion of all coursework.
Exceptions may only be permitted by the Head of School where it is recommended by
the programme on professionally verified grounds of student ill-health, close family
bereavement or of significant personal difficulties.
(b) The Examination will be held during the Summer Examination session with repeat
examinations, if necessary, held in the Autumn Examination session.
(c) Failure of the Examination in full or in part at the repeat examination will require
the student to re-attend the Second Year programme and re-sit the Examination in the
following year, provided that this will not breach the overall time-limit as set out in Par
VI above. In such a case the student will be unable to continue.
(d) The Second Year examination must be completed within two years of entering
Second Year, extensions may not be given as this will breach the overall time-limit for
completing the programme as set out in Par. VI above.
IX. The Third University Examination must be passed completely before a student can
proceed to the Fourth Year.
(a) To enter this Examination, the student must have satisfied the attendance
requirements on the Third Year Programme, including completion of all coursework.
Exceptions may only be permitted by the Head of School where this is recommended
by the programme on professionally verified grounds of student ill-health, close family
bereavement or of significant personal difficulties.
(b) The Examination will be held during the Summer Examination session with repeat
examinations, if necessary, held in the Autumn Examination session.
(c) Failure of the Examination in full or in part at the repeat examination will require
the student to re-attend the Third Year programme and re-sit the Examination in the
following year, provided that this will not breach the overall time-limit as set out in Par.
VI above. In such a case the student will be unable to continue.
(d) The Third Year examination must be completed within two years of entering Third
Year, extensions may not be given as this will breach the overall time-limit for
completing the programme as set out in Par. VI above.
X. The Fourth and Final University Examination must be passed completely before a
student can be awarded the B.Sc. Degree
(a) To enter this Examination, the student must have satisfied the attendance
requirements on the Final Year Programme, including completion of all coursework.
Exceptions may only be permitted by the Head of School where this is recommended
by the programme on professionally verified grounds of student ill-health, close family
bereavement or of significant personal difficulties.
(b) The Examination will be held during the Summer examination session with repeat
26
examinations, if necessary, held in the Autumn examination session.
(c) Failure of the Examination in full or in part at the repeat examination will require
the student to re-attend the Final Year programme and re-sit the Examination in the
following year, provided that this will not breach the overall time-limit as set out in Par.
VI above. In such a case the student will be unable to complete the degree.
(d) The Final Year examination must be completed within two years of entering Final
Year, extensions may not be given as this will breach the overall time for completing
the programme as set out in Par. VI above.
XI (a) The Award of the B.Sc. Degree will require successful completion of all years of
the Undergraduate Programme as set out in Rules V to X (inclusive) above.
(b) The calculation of the overall degree results awarded, including the calculation of
Honours (if any), will be based on the proportion of the overall marks attained across
the years of the programme as set-out in the Marks and Standards and recorded in the
student handbook for each programme:
XII. Any student failing to pass the Examination indicated in Rules VI, to XI
(inclusive) above within the specified intervals will be ineligible to proceed further
with his/her studies. Exemptions to this rule will be granted by the Academic Council,
on the recommendation of the College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, only
for very serious reasons.
XIII. Re-attendance may be required from any student whose attendance is considered
to have been unsatisfactory, or who has not attained a sufficient standard of knowledge
as judged by examination or progressive assessment. Satisfactory attendance is
generally regarded as attendance and participation in not less than 75% of the taught
sessions provided. Students who have not achieved satisfactory attendance may be
refused admission to examinations.
XIV. Given that these programmes award a professional qualification and lead to
professional registration, there are specific requirements for the completion of clinical
education and training components of the programme, which include also a prescription
on the number of opportunities allowed to repeat /re-sit these components. In some
cases, these are determined by the professional bodies (refer to each programme
handbook for more specific rules which apply in each Therapy specialism). When
students have not successfully completed these clinical components of their degree
programme, in total or in part, including their practice education, clinical theory, or
other such components as are required, and have exhausted all repeat /re-sit options for
so doing, they are not eligible for the award of the B.Sc. in their designated Therapy
specialism, but may, subject to the decision of the Head of School on the
recommendation of the programme, transfer to complete the non-clinical degree, - the
B.Sc. (Health Studies) as outlined in the Paragraph XV below.
XV. Students who are rendered ineligible for the award of the B.Sc. in their designated
Therapy specialism by the provisions of Paragraph XIV above,, may be offered the
27
option of transferring to complete the non-clinical award of the B.Sc. (Health Studies).
This programme, also an Honours (NFQ level 8 award) will include all of the modules
of the BSc in their original Therapy specialism except the practice placement, and or
clinical/practice education modules. These will be substituted by independent study
module(s) in years 3 and 4 which will constitute a non-clinical degree route. In the
independent study module(s) students will be required to demonstrate independent and
critical thinking through appropriate assignment(s). Students may be transferred either
in their Third Year or their Final Year as may be deemed appropriate. The decision to
transfer must be approved by the Head of School on the recommendation of the
programme, only in the circumstances described in Paragraph XIV above.
28
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
(B.SC. IN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY)
Refer to General regulations for the Undergraduate Degree in the Clinical
Therapies (NFQ Level 8 Ref: www.nfq.ie)
Occupational Therapy is the treatment of people with physical and psychiatric illness or
disability through specifically selected occupation for the purpose of enabling
individuals to reach their maximum level of function and independence in all aspects of
life. The occupational therapist assesses the physical, psychological and social
functions of the individual, identifies areas of dysfunction and involves the individual
in a structured programme of occupation to overcome disability. The occupations
selected relate to the consumer’s personal, social, cultural and economic needs include
the environmental factors which govern his/her lifestyle.
AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME
 To prepare students to successfully meet the professional requirements of the
Association of Occupational Therapists in Ireland (AOTI) on behalf of the World
Federation of Occupational Therapists.
 To prepare students to work effectively as occupational therapists in current and
changing health care contexts and environments.
 To produce competent occupational therapists whose practice reflects a regard for
the rights, needs and expectations of individual clients.
 To produce graduate occupational therapists who are reflective evidence based
practitioners.
 To enable students to develop a scholarly approach towards the practice of
occupational therapy.
 To facilitate the education of therapists who are ethical practitioners, analytical
thinkers and effective communicators.
OBJECTIVES OF THE PROGRAMME
The student will:
 Achieve an understanding of the concept of occupational performance and its
application in the practice of occupational therapy;
 Develop clinical reasoning skills which promote the appropriate selection of
assessment methods and treatment programmes for client types commonly treated
by occupational therapists;
 Understand the central role of occupation in occupational therapy;
 Demonstrate an understanding of research principles and methods in promoting
evidence based practice;
 Read professional and scientific literature critically and use the results;
29




Select, develop and present ideas in an acceptable academic manner;
Be able to select appropriate models of practice for therapeutic intervention in a
variety of practice settings;
Recognise the right of clients to participate in decision making about their therapy;
Know the structure and functions of major government departments and other
organisations relevant to the work of occupational therapists.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
This is a full-time undergraduate programme extending over four years or eight
academic semesters. The course explores how difficulties in relation to physical or
mental health can affect occupation (i.e. daily activities in relation to areas such as self
care, work, leisure, play etc.) in all groups of people - children, adolescents, adults and
older adults. The modules studied in the four years are described briefly below.
YEAR 1
ANATOMY
This module introduces students to the fundamental principles of biological science and
to the basic organisation, form and structure of the human body. Students develop
knowledge and understanding of the structure and functional aspects of the
musculoskeletal system of the body and support knowledge in Physiology. An
understanding of the musculoskeletal system forms part of the knowledge required to
understand the performance components (motor/sensory, cognitive and affective) of
occupation.
HUMAN BODY FUNCTION
This course covers the physiology of the major body systems with the exception of the
central nervous system which will be addressed in Year 2. Students develop
knowledge and understanding of the physiological processes in the body associated
with a normal, healthy, functional state. It is designed to underpin subsequent
development of modules related to Occupational Therapy practice.
PSYCHOLOGY
This module introduces students to areas of psychology relevant to their professional
activities. The main areas covered are Social Psychology, Clinical Abnormal and
Forensic Psychology, Developmental Psychology and Cognitive Psychology. The
module helps to underpin some of the material encountered in Occupational Therapy
modules.
EXPLORATION OF OCCUPATION
This module is aimed at enabling the students to develop an understanding of
themselves as occupational beings. Students will be introduced to the way in which
occupation is conceptualised within occupational therapy and will learn how to conduct
an occupational analysis. Students will also learn about roles, habit and routines and
explore the nature of occupation and form.
30
ENABLING OCCUPATION - MENTAL HEALTH
This module will provide the students with some of the knowledge, understanding and
skills needed to work as an occupational therapist in a mental health setting. The
lectures focus on the aetiology, course, prognosis and management of various mental
health conditions. The seminars and workshops will introduce and expand on the
occupational therapy role, with emphasis on enabling people with mental health
problems to engage in occupation.
ENABLING OCCUPATION - PHYSICAL DISABILITY
Students will be introduced to a variety of clinical conditions commonly encountered
by occupational therapists in practice. Case studies used in seminars and workshops
will be organised using the format of an occupational therapy model. Case studies will
also reflect culture and gender diversity. Students will have the opportunity to develop
skills, knowledge and understanding with regard to treatment approaches used in
practice.
FUNDAMENTALS OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY I
This module is the first in a series of modules which will run throughout the four years
and underpin the study of occupational therapy. In this module students will begin to
develop a thorough understanding of occupational therapy identity. They will learn the
history of the profession both nationally and internationally and will understand the
occupational therapy process. They will reflect on client-centered practice and on
outcomes for intervention and will also study the code of ethics via the discussion of
ethical dilemmas and will discuss the various intervention methods of occupational
therapists.
GROUPWORK AND PROFESSIONAL SKILLS
This module prepares students to engage patients/clients through a range of seminars
and workshops designed to develop professional skills in dyadic and group situations.
Students learn the principles of effective communication and effective teamwork and in
addition to this, this module aims to encourage students reflection on their personal and
professional development.
YEAR 2
NEUROANATOMY
This module runs concurrently with the module in neurophysiology and includes the
fundamentals of neuroanatomy and functional neuroanatomy. It will underpin several
applied occupational therapy modules. An understanding of neuroanatomy forms part
of the knowledge required to understand the performance components (motor/sensory,
cognitive and affective) of occupation.
NEUROPHYSIOLOGY
This module runs concurrently with the module in neuroanatomy and includes the
fundamentals of neurophysiology. It will underpin several applied occupational
31
therapy modules. An understanding of neurophysiology forms part of the knowledge
required to understand the performance components (motor/sensory, cognitive and
affective) of occupation.
HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
This module provides students with an introduction to health psychology. Students are
introduced to the main areas of sickness and health and application of psychological
theories to the prevention of ill health and the promotion of health across the lifespan.
ENABLING OCCUPATION – PAEDIATRICS
This module introduces students to the knowledge and skills necessary to work
effectively with children and adolescents with physical or intellectual disability or
mental health problems.
ENABLING OCCUPATION - ADULTS AND CHILDREN WITH
INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY
In this module, students become familiar with the specific issues and needs of adults
with intellectual disability. This is a growing population and in this module issues such
as advocacy, ageing, personal relationships and culture will be explored.
FUNDAMENTALS OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY II
This module is the second in the series. Here, students explore client narratives and
professional behaviour and reasoning, the therapeutic relationship, interdisciplinary
teams and managing conflict. There are also sessions aimed at preparing students for
practice education placement.
PRACTICE EDUCATION
These two eight week placements provide students with an opportunity to experience
the delivery of occupational therapy services in the field. Students will be supervised
by a named qualified occupational therapist. An individual learning contract will be
negotiated and agreed between the student and supervisor and will guide students
learning on placement. Tutorials may be provided by practice educators and a
minimum of one hour per week of formal supervision will be provided. Informal
feedback will be given regularly.
YEAR 3
SOCIAL POLICY
This module examines the legislation and policy which underpins practice including the
knowledge of employment and equality of opportunity.
EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE
In this module, students learn to explore and appraise critically the best available
clinical evidence from systematic research and to apply and integrate this into clinical
practice. Students are required to make use of evidence to guide professional
32
judgement about the effectiveness of specific interventions for individual clients.
STANDARDISED TESTING
With increasing need for evidence, audit and clinical effectiveness, quantifiable
measures of effectiveness are essential. In order to engage in and develop evidence
based practice, occupational therapists need to be familiar with and competent in
administering, scoring and interpreting the results of standardised tests. This module
introduces the students to a range of standardised assessments used in Occupational
Therapy and links with the module of evidence based practice.
ENABLING OCCUPATION – COMMUNITY
In this module, students explore the policies and trends for care in the community and
implications for Occupational Therapy practice. The diversity of service users within
the community is a key theme and will include all ages, cultures and conditions e.g.
primary care, health promotion, equipment provision, community mental health etc.
This module enables students to develop the knowledge and skills to work with
individuals and groups in the community.
ENABLING OCCUPATION - OLDER ADULTS
This module prepares the student to work with older adults (>65 years) and considers
the complexity of the interrelationships between normal aging, role change and
pathology and the subsequent effect on occupational functioning.
RESEARCH METHODS
This module introduces the student to methods of scientific enquiry focusing on
research and design. Both quantitative and qualitative methodologies will be
introduced and the module includes both theoretical aspects and practical skills such as
data analysis and statistics.
EMERGING AREAS OF PRACTICE
Using Service Learning, this module provides students with the opportunity to work in
collaboration with community organisations to develop and implement occupational
therapy programs which meet identified occupational therapy need(s) of the
organisation. Students engage in a minimum of 120 hours of community based
learning, during which they design, implement and evaluate an occupational therapy
program under supervision from academic staff.
FUNDAMENTALS OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY III
This module is the third in a series of modules. The students have an opportunity to
debrief and discuss their second year practice education experience and apply the casestudies carried out on placement to the modules of practice presented. Students will be
given an opportunity to develop knowledge, understanding and skills regarding models
of practice and occupational therapy.
33
FUNDAMENTALS OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY IV
This module is the fourth in a series. In this module, students are introduced to the
concepts and theory of occupational science. They examine the relationship between
occupation and issues such as health and quality of life. They also explore the effects
of occupational imbalance, deprivation and alienation and will develop knowledge and
understanding and skills in the promotion of social justice.
YEAR 4
PRACTICE EDUCATION
These are the third and fourth year practice education modules each eight weeks long
and provide further opportunity for students to experience the delivery of occupational
therapy services in the field. This module may be taken abroad if a student wishes and
if an appropriate venue with an accredited supervisor can be identified. Students will
be supervised by a named qualified occupational therapist. An individual learning
contract will be negotiated and agreed between the student and supervisor and will
guide students learning on placement. In this placement it is expected that students will
continue to work as effective team members but that they will also learn to manage a
small caseload and communicate effectively with other team members, with
parents/clients and carers/relatives in this context.
RESEARCH PROJECT
This module gives the student the opportunity to plan and conduct an original piece of
research in a scientific and organised manner under supervision. Project guidelines are
given to students. Supervision will be given by an academic supervisor. Students will
write a 10-15,000 word dissertation and give a conference presentation.
MANAGEMENT
In this module students are introduced to basic management and leadership styles. The
skills are relevant to their practice as staff grade occupational therapists. Current health
and social service policies and proposed developments are also addressed and the
importance of being aware of and acting upon changes in policy where appropriate
stressed.
PREPARATION FOR PRACTICE
This module provides a synthesis and an update of the learning acquired to date.
Students will review current health care strategies and policies and will learn about
continuing professional development and draw up curriculum vitae and practice
interview skills.
34
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PODIATRY
B.SC. IN PODIATRY
Refer to General regulations for the Undergraduate Degree in the Clinical
Therapies (NFQ Level 8 Ref: www.nfq.ie)
Podiatry is a healthcare profession that specialises in the management of disease and
disorder of the lower limb and foot. The foot is a highly complex structure, which can
develop problems affecting the overall health and quality of life of the patient. Podiatry
can significantly improve peoples’ quality of life by promoting and maintaining
mobility. Podiatrists are educated in diagnosis and in planning and implementing
interventions for all age groups.
Podiatrists work as autonomous practitioners
demonstrating expertise in assessing, diagnosing and managing lower limb and foot
related problems. As such, the Podiatrist works in a variety of health-care settings
including public sector services such as the HSE in primary and hospital settings, the
commercial and private sectors, in education, research and in industry. Podiatrists are
an integral part of the health care team augmenting the physician and surgeon in
treating foot disease and preventing, where possible, the onset of foot disease.
Podiatrists may work in single-handed practice or as a member of the wider multidisciplinary team working in collaboration with other health professionals including
nurses, physiotherapists, orthotists and occupational therapists.
PHILOSOPHY AND AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME
The BSc Podiatry programme is designed to educate and train those who wish to
pursue a professional career in podiatry, as a health care professional, who specialises
in the management of disease and disorder of the lower limb and foot. The Discipline is
committed to providing a comprehensive education for podiatrists and the curriculum is
based on best available evidence in relation to both theory and practice. The course
aims to ensure that students achieve the academic and practitioner standards as laid out
regulatory and professional bodies in Ireland.
The BSc Podiatry (equivalent to BSc (Hons) at UK institutions) extends over four years
or eight academic semesters. The structure of the degree programme introduces, in a
defined manner, inter-professional learning in both academic and clinical modules. It
has, as its central focus, the integration of theory with clinical practice with
opportunities for inter-professional learning with other health care professionals. The
overall goal of this programme is to prepare competent, flexible, accountable
practitioners, who are capable of lifelong learning. Preparing students to be flexible
and self-directed in learning is considered to be a key outcome of the degree
programme as it is recognised that the current rapid pace of change in the health
services means the skills of tomorrow will be different from those of today. It is
therefore fundamental that graduates “learn how to learn”. Lifelong learning is a
continually supportive process, which stimulates and empowers individuals to acquire
35
the knowledge, values, skills and understanding they will require throughout their
lifetime and develop the capacity to apply these with confidence.
The aims of the programme are:
 To produce graduates that have an ability to apply knowledge and understanding
of core podiatric theory to underpin podiatric practice and, using this knowledge,
effectively plan, negotiate and deliver podiatric care
 To produce graduates, and skilled podiatrists, who possess excellent podiatric
psychomotor skills for clinical practice
 To produce graduates who are able to analyse and evaluate the effectiveness of
their treatment and management strategies
 To produce graduates of a high calibre who meet the specifications and standards
of proficiency of professional and regulatory bodies
 To enable students to develop a range of personal and transferable skills
commensurate with working effectively in dynamic healthcare environments in
preparedness for clinical practice
 To enable students to develop a professional identity and ethos, with awareness of
the scope and limits of the role of the podiatrist, working with and/or referring
onto other agencies where appropriate
 To produce graduates who are able to acknowledge their commitments as a
professional within clinical governance frameworks and take responsibility for
their own learning and continuing professional development
 To ensure graduates appreciate the nature and complexity of organisations and
policies within which podiatry is delivered
 To ensure graduates can demonstrate an understanding of evidence based practice,
and research, and how this may underpin practice and effective service delivery
 To produce graduates who can demonstrate an understanding of ethical, legal
issues and socio-economic factors that impact on healthcare delivery.
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
The programme is outlined below:
Year 1






Introduction to Clinical Studies
Podiatry Theory 1
Human Anatomy
Human Body Function
Professional Development
Redefining Health and Wellbeing
36
Year 2






Clinical Studies 2
Podiatry Theory 2
Introduction to Pharmacology
Functional Anatomy and Biomechanics
Research Methods 1
Pathophysiology
Year 3






Clinical Studies 3
Medicine and Surgery
Pharmacology in Health and Disease
Research Methods 2
Podiatry Theory 3
Health Promotion in Podiatry
Year 4






Clinical Studies 4
Scope of Practice
Working with Older People
Footwear and Orthoses
Dissertation
Elective Modules
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Central to the curriculum are the clinical studies modules. These modules extend
throughout the programme building from year one to integrate and articulate with the
theoretical learning. Theoretical components of the programme have a direct
relationship to clinical practice and as such are podiatry specific modules; podiatric
medicine and surgery, theory of therapeutics, pharmacology, general medicine and
surgery. In the first year the students are introduced to clinical protocols, then develop
and acquire the essential psychomotor and communication skills required for podiatric
practice. Various aspects of management planning skills are introduced at each stage.
Ultimately the students acquire assessment and diagnostic skills and increasing
competence leads to a comprehensive podiatric patient management which requires
increasing cognitive and psychomotor skills to affect safe and efficient patient care.
The theoretic components of the programme underpin the clinical podiatric
management of patients. The framework provides vertical and horizontal integration
for the subject areas that impact on the practice of podiatry. These include physiology,
anatomy, pathophysiology, pharmacology, medicine, surgery, health promotion and
core podiatry. The modules build sequentially with the 1st year modules dealing
37
mainly with normal structure and function. This allows time to absorb and reflect on
normal function and structure prior to progressing to abnormal structure and disease
states.
Evidence-Based Practice informs the student of the importance of audit, research and
evidence based care. Therefore the importance of evidence-based practice will be
integrated throughout all modules within the curriculum. Students are encouraged to
develop the necessary skills to understand, critique and apply research based evidence
in practice. Research approaches and methodologies are covered within years 2 and 3
of the programme ensuring students receive grounding in research methods before they
apply this knowledge through their dissertation in year 4.
A variety of approaches to learning and teaching are integrated throughout the
curriculum including lectures, tutorials, work-shops, seminars and problem-based
learning.
PRACTICE EDUCATION
Practice education is a process of work based learning which involves a partnership
between the practice educator and the student in the practice setting. All students are
required to complete 1,000 hours of practice education successfully under the
supervision of qualified Podiatrists. Practice education will be undertaken each year.
The majority of practice education will take place in a purpose built clinic at Merlin
Park University Hospital, Galway. This facility will provide a service to patients with a
wide variety of medical and surgical conditions, children, sports injuries and patients
requiring soft tissue surgery.
Practice education aims to introduce the students to the culture of the profession. It
facilitates the development and application of the knowledge, attitudes, values and
skills needed for the execution of appropriate professional behaviours. It also gives the
opportunity to practice under supervision, and be assessed on professional standards
and behaviour, ethical practice and inter professional partnership.
The main aims of practice education are:
 to integrate theory, practice, ethics and values of podiatry
 to apply knowledge, professional reasoning and professional behaviour within
practice
 to promote professional competence
 to work as an effective team member
 to promote professional confidence
 to provide opportunities for students to integrate theoretical and practical learning
 to facilitate consolidation of student’s previous learning
38
ASSESSMENT
A wide variety of assessment strategies are employed at stages throughout the
programme in order to cater for a diversity of learning needs. The range and diversity
of assessments allows the varying strengths of individual students to be demonstrated.
All assessments throughout the programme are designed to assess students’ theoretical
knowledge and clinical practical skills to ensure students meet the necessary
competencies for professional practice. Assessment strategies that are employed
include clinical practical examinations, continuous assessment and end of year
examinations.
Pass Standard
The pass mark is 50% based on the aggregate mark of coursework and examination.
Unless the Board of Examiners recommends otherwise the maximum mark obtainable
on a repeat examination is a pass (50%).
Compensation
Students may compensate up to 12 ECTS in Biological Sciences I (Human Anatomy or
Human Body Function) and in Biological Sciences II (Functional Anatomy &
Biomechanics and Pathophysiology). Compensation shall be effective from a mark of
45%. To compensate the candidate must obtain excess marks in the other biological
science subject. The marks need to be at least double the deficiency. Compensation is
NOT allowed between different Podiatry modules. Compensation is NOT allowed
within clinical modules as students must demonstrate competency in all aspects of
clinical practice. Therefore students must pass all elements of clinical modules in order
to pass the module overall.For instance, if a student fails any part of the clinical module
in Semesters 1 & 2, compensation is not allowed and they will fail the overall module.
This is because students must demonstrate competency in all aspects of clinical
practice.
39
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPY
B.SC. IN SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPY
Refer to General regulations for the Undergraduate Degree in the Clinical
Therapies (NFQ Level 8 Ref: www.nfq.ie)
Speech and Language Therapy is the health care profession specifically concerned with
the assessment, diagnosis and management of communication and swallowing
disorders. Speech and language therapists enable people with communication disorders
to achieve their maximum potential to communicate. Having assessed the individual
and established a diagnosis, the speech and language therapist plans and implements an
intervention programme with the client. This may involve direct work with the client
or work with the family or significant others in the individual’s environment to break
down the barriers to communication and enable the individual to function as
independently as possible in his/her environment. Speech and language therapists also
have an important role in the prevention of communication difficulties through health
promotion and education programmes.
Speech and language therapists work closely with other health care professionals e.g.
doctors, psychologists, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, public health nurses,
paediatricians, ear nose and throat consultants etc. They also work in collaboration
with teachers, educational psychologists and resource and learning support teachers.
Speech and language therapists work in a range of settings including:
 community clinics/health centres
 hospitals
 rehabilitation centres
 child development centres
 mainstream and special schools
 language classes
 day centres
 people’s homes
 private practice
STRUCTURE OF PROGRAMME
In 2003 the National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI Galway) commenced a four
year full time undergraduate programme leading to a Bachelor of Science and a
professional qualification in speech and language therapy. The mission statement of
Speech and Language Therapy is:
“To prepare speech and language therapists in training to become competent clinicians
and independent lifelong learners, by providing a supportive learning environment to
explore relevant theory and apply it to clinical practice, with an emphasis on lived
experiences.”
40
This course currently offers an average of twenty five places for students. This
programme is firmly centred on the core area of disorders of communication, therefore
all years contain substantial proportions of time devoted to disorders of
communication, with the major ancillary disciplines of anatomy, physiology,
audiology, linguistics and psychology integrated as far as possible at appropriate
locations. The overall goal of this programme is to prepare competent, flexible,
accountable practitioners, who are capable of lifelong learning.
The aims of the programme are:
 To produce graduates of a high calibre who meet the specifications of the Irish
Association of Speech and Language Therapists (IASLT).
 To enable students to gain the knowledge and core theoretical understanding of
communication and related disorders and their management.
 To enable students to develop effective interpersonal and clinical skills.
 To enable students to develop a professional identity and ethos, with awareness of
the scope and limits of the role of the speech and language therapist.
 To encourage students to be flexible and responsive practitioners, prepared for the
workplace and changing patterns of service delivery.
 To provide opportunities for self-monitoring and personal development for the
formation of reflective practitioners, capable of effective, critical evaluation and
analysis thereby promoting continuing professional development and lifelong
learning.
 To develop practitioners who appreciate their role in contributing to the knowledge
and understanding of communication, its disorders and their management through
the application of research to practice.
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
Year 1
Psychology 1
Human Body Structure 1
Human Body Function
Practice Education 1
Professional Studies 1
Linguistics 1
Phonetics & Phonology
Communication Impairments 1
Year 2
Psychology 2
Neuroanatomy
Neurophysiology
41
Practice Education 2
Professional Studies 2
Research Methodology 2
Linguistics 2
Communication Impairments 2
Year 3
Psychology 3
Practice Education 3
Professional Studies 3
Research Methodology 3
Linguistics 3
Communication & Swallowing Impairments
Year 4
Practice Education 4
Professional Studies 4
Research Methodology 4
42
THE OVERALL STRUCTURE AND ECTS IN THE NEW CURRICULUM
STRAND 31 Communication & Swallowing
STRAND 1 The Developing Clinician STRAND 2 Human Sciences STRAND
Y
E
A
R
Practice Education 4
Professional Stu dies 4
Research Methodology 4
18
24
18
4
Y
E
A
R
3
Y
E
A
R
2
Y
E
A
R
1
Psychology 3
Practice Education 3
Pro fessional Studies 3
Research
Meth odology 3
Linguistics 3
Communication &
Swallowing Impairmen ts
6
12
18
6
6
12
Ling uistics 2
Communication
Impairments 2
Psychology 2
Neuro anatomy
Neurophysio logy
Practice
Education 2
Professional Studies 2
Research
Methodology 2
6
6
6
6
12
6
Psychology 1
Anato my
Human Body
Fun ction
Practice
Ed ucation 1
Professional
Studies 1
Linguistics 1
Phonetics & Phonology
Communication
Impairments 1
12
6
6
6
6
6
12
6
6
12
43
&
Overview of the Strands, Modules and Aims for each year of the Programme
1.
Developing
Clinician
2. Human Sciences
Total Hours
Modules within
the Strand
12
Professional Studies
1
SLTs in training will have the opportunity to begin to develop key knowledge, skills, and
attitudes for speech and language therapy practice. They will also integrate knowledge, skills
and experiences from Strands 2 and 3 through provided cases. Students will be introduced to
the concept of research and evidence based practice in SLT and the focus will be on finding,
critically appraising and properly citing literature and understanding ethical issues underpinning
clinical and research practice. They will be introduced to the potential impact of communication
impairments on quality of life across the lifespan. The service model that will be emphasized is
universal services.
6
30
120
150
Practice Education 1
To introduce students to observation and reflection as learning and assessment tools. It will
provide students with opportunities to study infant and child development and to interact with
children in preschools and with people with disabilities at an appropriate level through
placements and university-based workshops.
To introduce students to the fundamental principles of human body function which underpin
speech and language
6
12
138
150
6
32
118
150
To introduce students to the fundamental principles of biological science and basic
organization, form and structure of human body. It will develop concepts which have particular
relevance in the understanding of the anatomical basis of speech production.
In Psychology 1: Developmental psychology students are introduced to the main theoretical
perspectives in developmental psychology with a focus on the lifespan perspective on
development.
6
32
118
150
6
30
120
150
In Psychology 1: Cognitive psychology SLTs in training are introduced to the theory and
practice of cognitive psychology, which is an area of psychology that is particularly concerned
with explaining how we think and how that thinking affects our behaviour.
3
12
63
75
In Psychology 1: The Psychology of Learning, theoretical developments in the psychology of
learning from a behaviour analytic perspective are examined.
3
24
51
75
To introduce SLTs in training to key concepts in linguistics and to the development of
communication across the lifespan.
6
30
120
150
To equip SLTs in training with an understanding of how speech is produced and to provide
grounding in the descriptive and transcriptional conventions for transcribing speech sounds. To
provide an overview of the procedures in carrying out a basic phonological analysis and to
develop listening and transcription skills.
12
60
240
300
To introduce SLTs in training to the classifications, types, nature and causes of developmental
and acquired communication and swallowing impairments.
6
30
120
150
24
Human
Function
Aims of the Module
Body
Psychology
1
(Developmental,
Cognitive and the
Psychology
of
Learning)
24
Linguistics 1
Phonetics
Phonology
Communication
Impairments 1
Totals
Self-directed
Assessment
Hours
Credits
for Strand
Anatomy
3. Communication
&
Swallowing
Sciences
Credits
Modules
Strands in
Year 1
Contact Hours
for
PROGRAMME OVERVIEW- An
60
and
60
1500
44
Total
Hours
Selfdirected
&
Assessme
nt Hours
Contact
Hours
Credits
for
Modules
Strands in
Year 2
Credits for
Strand
Modules
Strand
1. Developing Clinician
24
Professional Studies 2
To build on the learning of key knowledge, skills and attitudes underpinning speech and
language therapy practice from year one. The aim of this module is that students will
learn about personal and professional practice and key knowledge and skills for the
identification and management of clients with relatively straight forward communication
impairments. Students will integrate knowledge, skills and experiences from Strands 2
and 3 ‘off-line’ through provided cases with guidance and discuss potential impact of
communication impairments on quality of life across the lifespan. The service model that
will be emphasized is targeted services.
12
60
240
300
Practice Education 2
To orientate students to the professional role of a speech and language therapist. This
module will introduce SLTs in training to clinical settings and facilitate their active
participation in the speech and language therapy process. SLTs in training will be
facilitated to link theory to practice in clinical setting and will begin to work with clients
with relatively straight forward communication impairments.
To build on the learning about research methodology from year one. The aim of this
module is to develop the student’s knowledge of research to enable them to design their
own research project by posing feasible research questions and setting hypotheses. The
module introduces students to research methods as a set of multiple systematic strategies
derived from both the quantitative and qualitative paradigms. SLTs in training will also
begin to critically appraise published research.
To facilitate understanding of the neuroanatomical functions of the body and how
components of the central nervous system work together. Through neuroscience tutorials
and cases, SLTs in training will learn about the role of neuroanatomical functions in
communication and swallowing impairments.
6
12
138
150
6
16
134
150
6
24
126
150
To facilitate understanding of the neurophysiological functions of the body and how
components of the central nervous system work together. Through neuroscience tutorials,
SLTs in training will learn about the relevance of neurophysiological functions in
communication and swallowing impairments.
To introduce students to health psychology, including its theoretical models, evidence
base and applications to SLT.
To introduce SLTs in training to social psychology by conceptualizing and examining
important social phenomena related to SLT practice.
To build on knowledge and skills gained from Linguistics 1 and to focus specifically on
the morphological, syntactic, semantic and pragmatic analyses of clinical data. This
module aims to develop SLT’s in training linguistic analytical skills which they will use
in clinical practice.
6
24
126
150
6
30
120
150
6
30
120
150
To introduce SLTs in training to the core clinical information such as specific aspects of
assessment diagnostic features, assessment and treatment of relatively straight-forward
cases, with emphasis on the child and family and targeted service provision.
12
60
240
300
60
256
1244
1500
within
the
Aims of the Module
Research Methodology 2
2. Human Sciences
18
Neuroanatomy
Neurophysiology
Psychology 2
(Health
and
Psychology)
3.
Communication &
Swallowing Sciences
18
Linguistics 2
Communication
Impairments 2
Totals
60
Social
45
1.
Developing
Clinician
Practice Education 3
Research Methodology 3
Total
Hours
Aims of the Module
To build on the learning of key knowledge, skills and attitudes underpinning speech
and language therapy practice from years 1, and 2. SLTs in training will learn about
personal and professional practice and key knowledge and skills for the identification
and management of clients with complex communication and swallowing
impairments. SLTs in training will integrate knowledge, skills and experiences from
Strands 2 and 3. Students will discuss the impact of communication impairments on
quality of life across the lifespan. The service model that will be emphasized is
specialist services.
To prepare the SLT in training for increasingly independent work in clinical
contexts. SLTs in training will have clinical placements where they will apply theory
to practice in the management of complex cases.
To broaden knowledge about research methodology by enabling SLTs in training to
understand and critically appraise existing research.
To introduce students to cognitive neuropsychology and build on their knowledge
from previous modules in cognitive psychology and neuroscience. This module
reviews the ways in which neuropsychological data has been used in models and
ideas about the nature of brain processes and systems involved in core cognitive (and
related) processes including: perception, memory, language and attention.
Selfdirected &
Assessmen
t Hours
Modules within the
Strand
Professional Studies 3
Contact
Hours
Credits for
Strand
36
Credits for
Modules
Strands in
Year 3
18
75
300
375
12
12
288
300
6
16
134
150
6
22
203
225
2. Human Sciences
6
Psychology 3 (Cognitive
Neuropsychology)
3. Communication &
Swallowing Sciences
18
Linguistics 3
To equip SLTs in training with core knowledge and skills in the areas of theories of
bilingualism, narrative analysis and discourse analysis underpinning speech and
language therapy practice. This module will also introduce SLTs in training to a
variety of instrumental techniques applied in experimental phonetics and speech and
language therapy clinical practice with an emphasis on basic skills in use of
instrumentation in speech and voice analysis.
6
30
120
150
Communication
&
Swallowing Impairments
3
To develop knowledge of the specific aspects of assessment, diagnostic features,
assessment and treatment of complex cases, with emphasis on the wider sociocultural context and specialist service provision. SLTs in training will be introduced
to eating, drinking and swallowing impairments.
12
60
240
300
60
215
1285
1500
Totals
46
Aims of the Module
To further develop personal and professional practice and key knowledge and skills for
the identification and management of all clients with communication and swallowing
impairments. There will also be an emphasis on organizational structures, service
planning and quality systems.
Practice Education 4
To facilitate SLTs in training to consolidate their clinical skills, integrate theory and
practice, and apply knowledge and resources to new clinical situations. It will prepare
them to enter the workforce and smooth the transition from SLTs in training to
professionals in practice.
To conduct a semi-independent piece of research under the supervision of a member of
staff. To demonstrate ability to disseminate the research findings.
Research Methodology 4
Totals
60
Total Hours
Modules within the Strand
Professional Studies 4
Contact Hours
for
Self-directed
&
Assessment Hours
for
1.
Developing
Clinician
Credits
Strand
60
Credits
Modules
Strands in
Year 4
24
70
530
600
18
12
438
450
18
20
430
450
60
102
1398
1500
47
48
BACHELOR OF ARTS- SOCIAL CARE(NFQ LEVEL 8 REF WWW.NFQ.IE )
This programme leads to the award of Bachelor of Arts – Social Care.
PROGRAMME STRUCUTRE.
The Bachelor of Arts (Social Care) provides teaching of theoretical concepts applied to social
care practice. It was developed in response to the continuing educational needs of social care
workers in the context of the professionalisation of social care work.
Year 1 of the programme is offered in various centres around the country supported by local
tutors. The centres are Galway, Portarlington and Carlow. The first year provides a general
introduction to the field of health studies through three course components: course modules, a
seminar and work placement. Students receive interactive materials for home study and attend
a workshop for each module. Students also attend one weekend seminar in NUI Galway and
complete a supervised work placement in a social care setting in which they do not have
experience. Students who successfully complete these course components may leave the
programme at the end of this first year and be awarded the Certificate in Social Care.
Entry to the second year of the BA is open to those who have completed the first year,
obtaining an average mark of or in excess of 60%. As with the first year the course is provided
through interactive distance education materials for home study with local workshops, a
seminar and work placement. The second year is offered through various centres with local
tutor support. This second year provides students with further skills as well as introducing the
theoretical ideas that underpin social care work and service provision. Students may leave the
programme on the successful completion of year 2 and graduate with a Diploma in Arts (Social
Care).
Students who successfully complete year 2 of the programme can continue to year 3 of the BA
in Social Care. This year builds on years 1 and 2 with further theoretical exploration of social
care work and service provision through interactive distance education materials and
workshops. The core competencies required for working in the social care field will be
examined and linked to their application in a workplace setting. This year is offered at NUI
Galway only with full day workshops on 1 in 2 to 1 in 3 Saturdays from September to May.
Similarly the final year is offered at NUI Galway only with full day workshops on 1 in 2 to 1
in 3 Saturdays through the year. This final year of the BA in Social Care provides a selection
of optional modules focused on working with specific population groups; children and youth,
people with disabilities and older people. In addition a dissertation on a particular area of
social care work will be undertaken supported by a named individual supervisor.
49
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Y ear One: Certificate in Social Care
Module
Redefining Health and Well Being
Seminar 1
Basic Care Skills
Health Services and Policy Context
Workplacement 1
Introduction to Information Technology for Social Care Practice
Introduction to the Legal and Ethical Context of Social Care
ECTS
5
5
5
5
10
5
10
Year Two: Diploma in Arts (Social Care)
Module
Skills in Practice for Social Care
Seminar 2
Psychology for Social Care Workers
Sociology for Social Care Workers
Work placement 2
Introduction to Social Research Skills
Independent Research Project 1
ECTS
5
5
5
5
10
5
10
Year 3: Bachelor of Arts Social Care
Module
Health and Social Care Services
Equality and Diversity
Social Care Theory and Practice 1
Research Methodology in the Social Sciences
Work placement 3
ECTS
5
10
10
10
10
50
Year 4: Bachelor of Arts Social Care
Module
Social Care Theory and Practice 2
Promoting Health in Social Care
*Working with Older People
*Working with People with Disabilities
*Working with Children/Young People
Research Project 2
ECTS
10
10
10
10
10
15
* Optional Modules
ASSESSMENT AND REGULATIONS
Assessment of course modules, seminars and work placements is based on a combination of
written assignments, practical work, project work and examinations in each year of the
programme.
ENTRY CRITERIA
No formal academic qualifications are required, but social care work experience is essential
and candidates will be expected to have good reading and writing skills as independent home
study is key element of the programme. Candidates under 21 years should meet the
University’s minimum matriculation entry requirements.
51
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
General regulations for the Degrees of M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O.(NFQ Level 8 Ref;
www.nfq.ie)
EXPLANATORY NOTE
The Programme of the Medical School at NUI Galway is now replacing a traditional six
year programme with an integrated five year programme, although with a
requirement for a Foundation Year for some students.
Entry to the Medical School is limited and is at present based competitively on the
results of School-Leaving Examinations and HPAT. In general students for
admission to the First Medical Year must have successfully completed the
Foundation Year for Medical School. Subject to attainments at Biology, Physics
and Chemistry in Leaving Certificate some students may be offered admission
directly to the First Medical Year.
Note: In the Session 2010-11 the University will consider applications for up to four
places on the ACCESS programme.
All Applications are processed through the Central Applications Office. (CAO)
I.
Before Registration as a medical student every applicant must furnish evidence
(a) that he/she has passed a recognised Examination in General Education (the
Examination in General Education required by the National University of Ireland is
Matriculation according to the requirements of the College of Medicine, Nursing and
Health Sciences, or an Examination accepted by the University in lieu thereof, normally the
Irish Leaving Certificate or its recognised equivalent);
(b) that he/she has passed the Foundation Year for Medical School. (To fulfil this
requirement programmes in Physics, Chemistry and Human Biology are given in the
National University of Ireland, Galway, in the Foundation Year for Medical School) or
has satisfied the requirements for direct admission to the First Medical Year.
II.
Registration is carried out by the University. Students must be registered as Medical
Students not later than fifteen days after the commencement of those Programmes for
which Certificates of attendance will be required of them (First Medical Programmes).
III.
(a) To obtain the degrees of M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O., Medical Students must pursue
programmes of Study extending over a period of not less than five Academic Years and
must pass the various Examinations prescribed in the Regulations.
(b) The Examinations (New Course) are as follows:
(1) The Foundation Year in Medicine
(2) The First University Examination in Medicine.
(3) The Second University Examinations in Medicine.
(4) The Third University Examination in Medicine.
52
(5) The Fourth University Examination in Medicine.
(6) The M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O. Degree Examinations.
(c) The M.B.,B.Ch.,B.A.O. Degree Examinations of the old curriculum
Note:
(i) A period of not less than two Academic Years must intervene between
the passing of the Second Medical Examination and admission to the
Final Examination in the subjects Medicine, Surgery and Obstetrics/
Gynaecology.
(ii) No part of the Final Examination may be taken before the end of 8
Semesters, and the Examination may not be completed before the end of 10
Semesters of professional education.
(iii) Students have an overall timelimit of 6 years in which to complete the 5
year programme; a student who fails to progress from one year to the
next on more than one occasion will not be permitted to continue.
IV.
The Foundation Year for Medical School Examination must be passed within one year
from the date of entering the Foundation Year for Medical School Programme. The
Foundation year examination will be held during the Summer Examination Period with
repeats, if necessary, held in the Autumn Examination Period.
V.
(a) The First University Examination in Medicine must be passed before a student can
proceed to the Second Year Medical Programme.
(b) The First University Examination in Medicine must be passed within two years from
the date of entry or of passing the Foundation Year for Medical School.
(c) The First Medical University Examination will consist of the examination of the
learning from each of the Introductory modules, systems-based and Medical
professionalisation modules in the programme.
(d) The First University Examination, will comprise examinations on Semester 1
modules in the Winter Examination Session and examinations on the Semester 2
modules in the Summer Examination Session. Repeat examinations, for both Semester
1 and Semester 2 modules, if necessary will be held, during the Autumn Examination
Sessions.
VI.
(a) The Second University Examination in Medicine must be passed before a student can
proceed to the Third Year Medical Programme.
(b) The Second University Examination in Medicine must be passed within three years
from the date of entry or of passing the Foundation Year Medical Programme.
(c) The Second Medical University Examination will consist of the examination of the
learning from each of the systems-based and Medical professionalisation modules in
the programme.
(d) The Second University Examination will comprise examinations on Semester 1 modules
in the Winter Examination Session and examinations on the Semester 2 modules in the
Summer Examination Session. Repeat examinations, for both Semester 1 and Semester
2 modules, if necessary will be held, during the Autumn Examination Sessions.
53
VII.
(a) The Third Medical University Examinations must be passed before a student can
proceed to the Fourth Medical Year.
(b) The Third Medical University Examinations must be passed within four years of
entry or of passing the Foundation Medical Examination.
VIII.
(a) The Fourth Medical University Examinations must be passed before a student
can proceed to the Final Medical Year.
(b) The Fourth Medical University Examinations must be passed within Five years of
entry or of passing the Foundation Medical Examination.
IX.
The Final Medical University Examinations must be passed within six years of entry or of
passing the Foundation Medical Examination.
X.
(a) The Award of the M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O. Degree will require successful completion
of all years of the Medical Undergraduate Programme as set out in Rules III, to IX
(inclusive) above.
(b) The calculation of the overall degree results awarded, including the calculation of
Honours (if any), will be based on the proportion of the overall marks attained across
the years of the programme as follows:
i. For candidates who entered the First year of the Medical programme in the
Sessions 2006-07 and 2007-08, whether directly or having passed the Foundation
examination:
The degree result is calculated on the final three (3) years; based on 20% of the
result attained in the Third Medical Examination, 40% of the result attained in the
Fourth Medical Examination and 40% of the result attained in the Final Medical
Examination.
ii. For candidates who enter the Medical Programme in the Session 2009-10 and
following, whether directly or having passed the Foundation examination:
The degree result is calculated on the full five (5) years; based on 10% of the
result attained in the First Medical Examination, 10% of the result attained in
the Second Medical Examination 20% of the result attained in the Third
Medical Examination, 30% of the result attained in the Fourth Medical
Examination and 30% of the result attained in the Final Medical Examination.
XI.
Repeating the year-of-programme is required of any student whose attendance is
considered to have been unsatisfactory, or who failed individual modules of the
programme at the second (Autumn repeat) sitting.
Satisfactory attendance is generally regarded as attendance and participation in not less
than 70% of the Compulsory components of the programme. All such components are
appropriately notified in the course information material provided to students.
54
Attendance at not less than 70% of these components is a pre-requisite for taking the
assessments and examinations of the relevant semester and /or year-of-programme.
Students deemed to have unsatisfactory attendance will be excluded from the
examinations of that programme component, or of the module(s) in which these
components occur, and in the event that examinations are taken, any results will be
rendered null. The provisions of this requirement may only be varied by the approval of
the School Executive Board where exceptional circumstances beyond the control of the
student are clearly demonstrated to its satisfaction.
XII.
A student who is repeating any year of the Medical programme within the provisions set
out in these rules, is required to register for the repeat year and, to re-attend as set out
above, and complete all continuous assessments, other coursework and examinations
in each failed module. This requirement may be varied in exceptional circumstances on
the recommendation of the Student Affairs Committee, and agreed by the Head of the
Medical School.
XIII.
Exemptions from specific modules can be granted in first and second year on the basis
of previous academic achievement and at the discretion of the Student Affairs
Committee. In the case of exemptions, the mark of the corresponding module will be
50% (i.e. a bare pass , this will impact on the calculation of the overall year result).
XIV.
Medical Graduates, in addition to holding the Degrees of M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O. must be
registered as Medical Practitioners in the appropriate Medical Register. All graduates who
wish to practice must register provisionally with the Medical Council. Graduates
who wish to practice in Ireland (excluding Northern Ireland) must, after completing one
year’s internship in an approved hospital, be fully registered with the Medical Council.
Those who wish to practice in Great Britain and Northern Ireland must be fully
registered with the General Medical Council. Graduates may, if they so wish, be fully
registered in both Registers. The attention of Medical Graduates is directed to the
following Extract from Medical Practitioners’ Act, 1978: “A Certificate of Experience
shall not be granted to any person unless, after he had been awarded a primary
qualification, that person had been engaged in employment in a residential medical
capacity in one or more hospitals approved by the Council for this purpose and had been
so engaged for such period or periods as may be determined by the Council.” In
accordance with Regulation of Medical Council the period for which a person shall
have been engaged as an Intern shall be a period of 12 months.
Sources from which information may be obtained:
 Registrar, Medical Council, Portobello Court, Lower Rathmines Road, Dublin 6.
Registrar, General Medical Council, 44, Hallam St., London WIN 6AE.
 Royal College of Physicians of Ireland and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
(L.R.C.P. and S.I.)
 The Secretary, Royal College of Surgeons, St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2.
 Royal College of Physicians of London, 11 St. Andrew’s Place, Regent’s Park,
London.
55


Royal College of Surgeons of England, 35-43 Lincoln’s Inn Field, London.
Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Edinburgh, and Royal Faculty of
Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow.
56
DEGREES OF M.B.,B.Ch.,B.A.O.
Refer to General regulations for the Degrees of M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O.(NFQ Level 8
Ref; www.nfq.ie)
FOUNDATION MEDICAL YEAR
The Programmes of instruction to be attended are:
1. Experimental Physics - Lectures and Practicals over two Semesters
(15 Credits).
2. Chemistry - Lectures over two Semesters and practicals over one Semester
(15 Credits)
3. Biology – Lectures and Practicals over two Semesters (15 Credits).
4. Introduction to Medicine – Lectures and practicals over two Semesters. (15
Credits)
Candidates for admission to the Foundation Year Examination must have attended the
prescribed programmes of instruction as set forth in the Syllabus of Programmes.
The subjects for Examination are:
Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Introduction to Medicine
The Examinations will be held during the Summer Examination Session, with the exception
of the Early Patient Contact component which will be examined at the end of Semester
I. The result of the Examination will be determined by the standard in each subject
and compensation between courses is not permitted. There will be a repeat examination if
necessary, during the Autumn Examination Session. Honours will not be awarded unless
the Examination is passed as a whole.
Students required to take the Foundation Year cannot be registered for the five years
Integrated Medical Programme until they have passed the Foundation Year Medical
Examination.
FIRST MEDICAL YEAR
In the first Semester of the First Medical Year programme 80% of the programme will be
devoted to 4 modules (6 credits per module) providing discipline specific introductory
material relating to Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry and Pharmacology. In the
second Semester of the First Medical Programme 80% of the programmes will be
devoted to 5 integrated modules that are systems-based. These are the Cardiovascular
system (6 credits), the Respiratory System (6 credits), the Gastrointestinal System (6
credits) the Renal system (3 credits) and Nutrition (3 credits). In both semesters 1 and
2, 20% of the programme will be devoted to modules related to professionalism (6
credits in each semester).
Exemptions can be granted in (Year 1 and 2) on the basis of previous academic
achievements at the discretion of corresponding module coordinators. In cases where
exemption has been granted, no overall honours will be awarded for the corresponding
academic year.
The Examinations of the First Medical Year:
For all modules 40% of the marks will be awarded on the basis of continuous
assessments performed during the Semester. Where a student has a failing mark in one or
more modules not exceeding a maximum of 6 credits in combination but has attained 45%
or more, this component may be deemed to be passed by compensation where the
57
student has a surplus of marks across the remaining modules of not less than double
the deficit in the module(s) which have been failed.
Detailed information on compulsory attendance of practical sessions and objects of
assessments for each module will be given at the beginning of each course.
There will be an examination on the content of each module taught in the first Semester
in the Winter Examination Session. Where appropriate examinations of two or more
modules may be examined in a single examination sitting. There will be an examination
of the content of each module taught in the second Semester in the Summer
Examination Session. If necessary repeat examinations for Semester 1 and 2 will be
taken in the Autumn.
Candidates for admission to the First Medical University Examination must have
attended at least 70% of the teaching sessions in the prescribed Programmes of
Instruction as set forth in the Syllabus of Programmes.
A student who fails to complete the Examination in Autumn will be required to repeat
the year.
SECOND MEDICAL YEAR
In the first Semester of the Second Medical Year programme 80% of the programme
will be devoted to 6 integrated modules that are systems based. These are the Endocrine
System, Growth Factors and Signalling Molecules (6 credits), Central Nervous System
(9 credits), Reproduction and Development (3 credits) Genetics (3 credits) Molecular
Medicine (3 credits). In the second Semester of the Second Medical Programme 80% of
the programme will be devoted to 3 integrated modules that are systems based. These
are Health and Disease (12 credits), Drugs and Disease (6 credits) and Organ Failure
(6 credits). In both semesters 1 and 2, 20% of the programme will be devoted to
modules related professionalism (6 credits in each semester).
Exemptions can be granted in (Year 1 and 2) on the basis of previous academic
achievements at the discretion of corresponding module coordinators. In cases where
exemption has been granted, no overall honours will be awarded for the corresponding
academic year.
Detailed information on compulsory attendance of practical sessions and objects of
assessments for each module will be given at the beginning of each course. Candidates
for admission to the Second Medical University Examination must have attended at
least 70% of the teaching sessions in the prescribed Programmes of Instruction as set
forth in the Syllabus of Programmes.
The Examinations of the Second Medical Year:
For all modules 40% of the marks will be awarded on the basis of continuous
assessments performed during the Semester. Where a student has a failing mark in one or
more modules not exceeding a maximum of 6 credits in combination but has attained 45%
or more, this component may be deemed to be passed by compensation where the
student has a surplus of marks across the remaining modules of not less than double
the deficit in the module(s) which have been failed.
There will be an examination on the content of each module taught in the first Semester
58
in the Winter Examination Session. Where appropriate examinations of two or more
modules may be examined in a single examination sitting. There will be an
examination of the content of each module taught in the second Semester in the
Summer Examination Session. If necessary repeat examinations for Semester 1 and 2
will be taken in the Autumn.
A student who fails to complete the Examination in Autumn will be required to repeat
the year.
THIRD MEDICAL YEAR
In the first Semester of the Third Medical Year programme the student will take
modules in Health and Disease (15 credits), Global Health and Disease (3 Credits) Forensic
Medicine (3 Credits) and Clinical Skills and Professionalism (9 Credits). These modules
will be assessed at the end of the first semester. In the second semester the student will
take a single 30 credit module Foundations of Clinical Practice. This module will be
assessed at the end of Semester 2. Within this module there are 5 distinct strands,
comprising: Cardiovascular Studies (6 credits); Gastrointestinal Studies (6 credits);
Respiratory Perioperative and Critical care medicine (6 credits); Care of the elderly (6
Credits); and Acute Hospital Care (6 credits). Each strand is delivered in 4 week
rotating blocks over the course of Semester 3.2, at both the Galway University
Hospitals and the Affiliated Hospitals (Sligo and Letterkenny). The teaching of
Professionalism is incorporated into each strand. This module will be assessed at the
end of Semester 2. Repeat examinations for both Semesters will if necessary be taken
in August.
Candidates for admission to the Third Medical University Examination must have
attended at least 70% of the teaching sessions in the prescribed Programmes of
Instruction as set forth in the Syllabus of Programmes and must have completed at least
70% of the stipulated course work as laid down in the module logbooks..
The Examinations of the Third Medical Year:
For all modules up to 20% of the marks will be awarded on the basis of continuous
assessments performed during the Semester.
There will be an examination on the content of each module taught in the first Semester
in the Winter Examination Session. Where appropriate examinations of two or more
modules may be examined in a single examination sitting. There will be an
examination of the content of the entire module taught in the second Semester in
the Summer Examination Session. Where appropriate examinations of two or more
individual strands within this module may be examined in a single examination sitting.
If necessary repeat examinations for Semester 1 and 2 will be taken in the Autumn. A
student who fails to complete the Examination in Autumn will be required to repeat
the year.
FOURTH MEDICAL YEAR
Programme Structure and Delivery Approach
The year 4 programme will consist of modules in Obstetrics and Gynaecology,
Paediatrics, Psychiatry, General Practice, Otorhinolaryngology and a special study
59
option (SSM). The latter of these is a core component of professionalism training and
will take place in a 4 week block at the end of semester 2. Other aspects of
professionalism training including clinical methods, ethics, understanding health and
illness will be threaded throughout the specialist modules and delivered by the
respective specialist disciplines. The other modules will be divided into 2 parts, one of
which will be delivered in semester 1 and one of which will be delivered in semester 2.
Teaching methods in each discipline will include lectures, small groups teaching, case
studies and clinical attachments at UCHG and at regional affiliated clinical services. A
proportion of the students will complete all of semester 1 in the Sligo Medical Academy
and another proportion of the class will complete all of semester 2 in the Sligo Medical
Academy. Continuous assessment is included in each discipline with an end of
year examination in May. Repeat examinations, where necessary, are held in autumn
of the Final Medical Year.
OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY (14 credits)
This course will encompass the theory and clinical practice of the subject. Thus it will
include the physiology and clinical feature of normal pregnancy and the clinical
problems that may arise during pregnancy. It will also include the epidemiology of
disease during pregnancy and statistics pertaining to birth. The study of normal
physiological reproductive function and disease of the reproductive tract will be
covered by gynaecology. Assessment will be partly by continuous assessment (40%)
with a final assessment that will account for 60%. Teaching will be delivered through
lectures, video teaching, small group learning, tutorials, case presentations and self
directed learning.
PAEDIATRICS (14 credits)
This module will be delivered in two four week blocks, the first delivered in semester
one, the second in semester 2. In block 1 students will be introduced to the principles of
paediatrics, essential paediatric skills and a child-centred approach to the assessment of
the sick child.
Semester 2 will build on students’ prior paediatric knowledge, skills and attitudes
acquired in semester1. Additional focus will be placed on diagnosis and management of
paediatric presentations. For the Paediatric Module 30% of marks will be based on
Continuous Assessment and 70% on Summative Assessment.
PSYCHIATRY (14 credits)
Students will attain knowledge of and learn the skills required to assess a range of
mental illnesses presenting to adult and child and adolescent mental health services.
They will learn about the biopsychosocial risk factors for these illnesses and their
multidisciplinary management using physical, pharmacological, psychological and
social interventions.
Students will develop skills in risk assessment and will be assisted in developing the
communication skills necessary to interact with patients suffering from mental illness
and their relatives. They will be made aware of the varying presentation of mental
disorders in learning disabled patients, later life patients, children, patients in a general
medical setting and be able to adapt their communication skills accordingly. Students
will develop an awareness of the impact of family dynamics and of psychological
defence mechanisms on the development of mental illness and an understanding of the
60
roles and functioning of multidisciplinary teams in assessing and managing mental
illness. For the Psychiatry Module 30% of marks will be based on Continuous
Assessment and 70% on Summative Assessment.
GENERAL PRACTICE (11 credits)
This module introduces students to the principles and practice of medicine in the
community. The module will run concurrently at NUI Galway and the Sligo Academy
ON completion of this module, the student will be able to:
 list the range of problems seen in General Practice.
 describe the organisation of General Practice in Ireland
 demonstrate an understanding of the importance of physical, psychological and
social factors in making a diagnosis
 explain the importance of health promotion and disease prevention and how it can
be incorporated into General Practice
 effectively communicate with a patient in order to discover the reason for
attendance, explain the diagnosis and discuss a management plan
 formulate a patient management plan
 perform the following clinical skills : venepuncture, glucometer, urinalysis, breast
and rectal examination
 make and explain the diagnosis and basic management of asthma, hypertension and
diabetes
 reflect on his/her own attitudes to different groups of patients
OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (3 credits)
Students will receive teaching on diseases of the Ear, Nose, Throat Head & Neck and be
competent in:
 Oto Rhino Laryngology (ORL) oriented history taking.
 Safe / Competent clinical examination of the ear nose throat head and neck.
 Interpretation and use of basic clinical tests associated with ORL.
 Clinical assessment of hearing.
 Differential diagnosis of ORL conditions.
 Appropriate investigations to establish a definite diagnosis. Interpreting results.
 Management of common ENT emergencies.
 Understanding the relevance of ORL to other specialities, especially General
Practice & Paediatrics.
 Head and Neck Cancer awareness.
 Knowledge of Complications of ORL diseases.
SSM PROGRAMME (4 credits)
The SSM programme is aimed to assist medical students to develop a special
appreciation of various disciplines by studying in depth areas that provide them with
insights into scientific method and the discipline of research and that engenders an
approach to medicine that is constantly questioning and self-critical. An SSM typically
requires small-group learning and a small element of expert input by teachers to meet
the stated aims of the programme. Students will have the opportunity and support to
explore ideas that they find of particular personal interest, or relevance, to a level that is
both demanding and intellectually satisfying. This component of the course gives the
61
student freedom to explore a subject and encourages students to respond to a major
intellectual challenge. SSMs lend themselves well to the promotion of interdisciplinary
linkages and collaboration with the wider community. There are also valuable
opportunities to integrate material across the curriculum and to amplify components of
the core curriculum. Year 4 SSMs will be of 4 weeks duration and will involve a
substantial portion of student directed self study time. SSMs will accrue 4 European
Credits equivalent to 100-120 hours of student effort. All SSMs include an assessment
strategy that measures group and individual performances. Group presentations and/or
project reports will provide evidence of group productivity. Individual learning will be
assessed using activity logs and reflective submissions. All SSMs will be assessed at the
end of the 4 week SSM block, the results calculate may however form a proportionate
part of the fifth/final medical year.
62
FIFTH MEDICAL YEAR / FINAL YEAR (5MB)
In the first Semester of the Final Medical Year programme (Semester 5.1) the student
will take a single 30 credit module Foundations of Advanced Clinical Practice, it builds
on the module ‘Foundations of Clinical Practice’ of the Third Medical Year (3MB).
This module will be assessed at the end of Semester 1. Within this module there are 4
distinct strands, comprising: Cardiovascular Studies (6 credits); Gastrointestinal Studies (6
credits); Respiratory, Perioperative and Critical Care Medicine (6 credits); and General
Medicine/General Surgery (6 Credits). Each strand is delivered in 4 week rotating
blocks over the course of Semester 5.1, at both the Galway University Hospitals and the
Affiliated Hospitals. The teaching of Professionalism is incorporated into each strand.
This module will be assessed at the end of Semester 1. Repeat examinations if
necessary will be taken in August.
In the second Semester of the Final Medical Year (Semester 5.2) programme the student
will take a further single 30 credit module Specialist in Clinical Practice which aims to
enhance their knowledge of clinical practice in specialist areas and builds on the
Foundations of Clinical Practice 3MB, (Semester 3.2) and Advanced Clinical Practice
(5MB /Semester 5.1). This module will be assessed at the end of Semester 2. Within
this module there are 5 strands, comprising Musculosketal Studies (5 Credits),
Renal/Urology Studies (5 Credits), Neurology/Ophthalmology Studies (5 Credits),
Dermatology/Plastics (5 Credits) and Cancer Studies (5 Credits).
This is followed by the final element of the 5MB year; a four week module Shadowing
for Clinical Practice which focuses on skills and procedures necessary to function as a
junior doctor. This module is a Course Requirement; - it is assessed on a Pass /Fail
basis only, carries no grade and will not contribute marks or ECTS credits towards the
overall grade of Honours if any to be awarded, However any candidate who fails this
module will be remain incomplete in their medical degree and will be unable to pursue
Internship.
Candidates for admission to the Final Medical University Examination must have
attended at least 70% of the teaching sessions in the prescribed Programmes of
Instruction as set forth in the Syllabus of Programmes and completed 70% of the course
work as stipulated by the module logbooks.. The Medical School has a rigorous policy
in applying this attendance provision.
The Examinations of the Final Medical Year:
Written Exam at the end of Semester 1 will examine the four strands within the Foundations
of Advanced Clinical Practice module. This exam will represent 20% of the total year
mark. Written Exam (MCQ x 2) at the end of Specialist in Clinical Practice module in
Semester 2 will represent 20% of the total year mark. Clinical Exams at the end of Semester
2 will represent 60% of the total year mark.
There will be an examination on the content of each strand taught in the first Semester
in the Winter Examination Session. Where appropriate examinations of two or more
modules may be examined in a single examination sitting. There will be an
63
examination of the content of the entire module taught in the second Semester in
the Summer Examination Session. Where appropriate examinations of two or more
individual strands within this module may be examined in a single examination sitting.
If necessary repeat examinations for Semester 1 and 2 will be taken in the Autumn. A
student who fails to complete the Examination in Autumn will be required to repeat
the year.
64
SYLLABUS OF PROGRAMMES OF INSTRUCTION FOR THE DEGREES
OF M.B., B.CH., B.A.O.
FOUNDATION YEAR IN MEDICINE
CHEMISTRY
The Foundation Year Chemistry programme is a dedicated medical programme
designed for students with long-term interests in medicine and biology.
Examples of topics used for teaching basic chemistry principles are:
Solution and dialysis; Buffers, acidosis and alkalosis; Pharmaceuticals; Magnetic
Resonance Imaging, CAT and PET; Metallic complexation, haemoglobin;
Radioactivity; Biological macromolecules; Biochemical thermodynamics. Some of
these will be discussed. The programme provides a fundamental basis for higher
programmes in Biochemistry, Physiology and Pharmacology.
Programme consists of 60 lectures, 20 tutorials and 30 hours Laboratory work per
annum.
PHYSICS
The programme is designed to provide a good understanding of basic concepts in
Physics and supported by numerous examples and applications related to the
medical and health service.
Introduction — Mathematical review, Units and Conversion factors.
General Physics—Motion, gravity and falling bodies, Force, Newton’s Laws,
Vectors (Resolution/addition; not in book) Statics Work, Energy and Power. Heat—
Temperature and Heat, Fluids and Pressure, Archimedes’ Principle, Poiseuille’ s
Law, Medical applications of Pressure and Fluids.
Sound—Elasticity and Waves, Sounds, Loudness and Hearing.
Magnetism and Electricity—Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism, Simple
Electrical Circuits, Electrical Safety.
Optics – Geometric Optics, Vision, [ Electromagnetic Radiation, Introduction to
Modern Physics, Atomic Physics (Spectra, Lasers, X-rays).] Radioactivity—
Radioactivity and Nuclear Physics, Medical Imaging SysteMs
BIOLOGY
The Biology course is designed to introduce students to biological concepts in the areas
of Biochemistry, Botany, Microbiology and Zoology.
INTRODUCTION TO MEDICINE
The Introduction to Medicine course will comprise 2 elements Early Patient
Contact and Contemporary Topics in Medicine.
The Early Patient Contact module is an opportunity for students begin to meet patients,
and learn appropriate skills to deal effectively with both patients and colleagues.
The Contemporary Topics in Medicine module will provide students with an
opportunity to study key concepts of modern cell biology, evolution and population biology
and their importance in medicine. In addition there will be updates on recent
developments at the leading edge of medicine and practical classes in which students can
develop their skills in laboratory practice and analytical thinking.
65
CLINICAL SKILLS TEACHING
Clinical skills teaching commences in the Foundation Year with a 10-week Early Patient
Contact programme delivered in semester 1 by the School of Medicine with contributions
from other clinical departments. This will comprise the following components:
1. Foundations of Clinical Practice – A series of 10 lectures on fundamental
aspects of clinical care will provide the knowledge necessary to orientate
students to the clinical environment and to enhance their understanding of the
healthcare system.
2. Understanding Patients – Students are assigned in small groups to acute hospital
wards and primary care practices where they will observe doctor-patient
interactions and interview patients. They should develop an understanding of
the biopsychosocial factors that influence a patient’s clinical presentation and
their recovery.
3. Practical Clinical Skills – Students will attend sessions on hand-washing, vital
signs measurement and basic life support in the clinical skills laboratory.
Assessment will take place in December of semester 1 and will involve a Multiple Choice
Examination (25%), a mini-OSCE examination (30%), submission of case notes (20%), a
group project (20%), and an attendance record (5%). The marks available will contribute
to the Human Biology component of the Foundation Year examination.
FIRST MEDICAL YEAR
First Semester:
Introduction to Human Anatomy and Musculoskeletal System 6ECTS
Introduction to Biochemistry
6 ECTS
Introduction to Pharmacology
6 ECTS
Introduction to Physiology
6 ECTS
Medical Professionalism 1.1
6 ECTS
Second Semester:
Cardiovascular System
6 ECTS
Respiratory System
6 ECTS
Gastrointestinal System
6 ECTS
Renal System
3 ECTS
Nutrition
3 ECTS
Medical Professionalism 1.2
6 ECTS
INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN ANATOMY AND THE
MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM
This module introduces students to the gross anatomy of the human and to the
microscopic anatomy of the tissues. The module describes the muscles of the upper and
lower limb and the distribution of blood vessels and nerves to those limbs. The anatomy of
the vertebral column and the skull is also described. The medical and surgical
importance of this knowledge is indicated. Students are also introduced to the principles
of medical imaging.
66
At the end of the course the student should know:
The basic tissue organization of the body including anatomical terminology
General organization of bones and joints
General aspects of tissue organisation
Trunk: bones, spino-appendicular musculature with their innervation and
action, course of the major vessels, general organizational plan of the spinal
cord and spinal nerves
Upper & lower limbs: bones, joints and their movements, muscles and their
action and innervation, course of the most relevant arteries, veins and nerves
Clinical relevance of the anatomical knowledge of the musculoskeletal system,
e.g.:
Aspects relative to the position of major veins (venepuncture); the position
of the radial artery (pulse) and brachial artery (blood pressure) Why the
shoulder dislocates easily; the sites of common fractures and the complications
that might follow them
The principles of nerve testing
The axillary lymph nodes and their relevance to the lymphatic drainage of the
breast and metastasis
Complications of femoral neck fractures
Which ligaments give stability to the hip, knee and ankle and how to test their
integrity
The vulnerability of the common peroneal and sciatic nerves
How blood is lifted out of the legs and the consequences of the failure of this
mechanism.
INTRODUCTION TO BIOCHEMISTRY
This module introduces students to the molecular events that correspond to the
phenomenon of life, in health and disease. It is particularly concerned with the
relationships between the structure and function of the various macromolecules of the
body: the proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and the carbohydrates, their building blocks and
their importance to human body function. DNA structure and function is also described,
and the use of recombinant techniques in Medicine is introduced. The basic principles of
intermediary metabolism, its regulation and relationship to disease are explored.
At the end of this module the student should know:
 All life is based on a number of common molecular themes
 Cells are the basic units of all living systems
 The basic features of protein structure and function
 The basic characteristics of enzymes and the nature of catalysis and especially
the active site
 The basic structures of nucleic acids including replication and repair How
information stored in DNA is transcribed into RNA and translated into proteins
 How gene expression is controlled and an introduction to the use of recombinant
DNA techniques in medicine
 The fluid mosaic model of membrane structure and the basic functions of cellular
membranes
 Importance of carbohydrates in the cell
 The production and utilization of energy and the roles of ATP
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
How to assess the metabolic significance of glycolysis, TCA cycle, oxidative
phosphorylation, electron transport, pentose phosphate pathway, gluconeogenesis and
glycogen breakdown
Lipid synthesis and oxidation of fatty acids and ketone bodies Strategies for
metabolic control as applied to carbohydrate and fat metabolism
INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY
This module provides an introduction to the Principles of Pharmacology, and serves
as a foundation to aid the understanding of the drug treatment of disease.
At the end of this module the student should be familiar with:
 The general mechanisms of action of drugs at a molecular, cellular, tissue and organ
level.
 The ways in which these actions produce therapeutic and adverse effects. The
receptor as a target of drug action and related concepts such as agonism,
antagonism, partial agonism and selectivity.
 The mechanisms of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion,
and the concepts of volume of distribution, clearance and half-life and their clinical
relevance.
 How pharmacokinetic factors determine the optimal route, dose and frequency
of drug administration.
 The factors that determine inter-individual variation in drug response, e.g.
pharmacokinetic handling of drugs, pharmacogenetic and pharmaceutical variation.
 The effects of drugs on the gastrointestinal and respiratory systems The
problems associated with drugs such as the development of dependence and
tolerance to drugs, adverse drug reactions, poisoning and the principles of
counteracting the effects of toxic substances after ingestion.
 The drug development process including clinical trials (Phase I to IV). The drug
approval process and major regulatory authorities
 The requirements of good clinical trial design and consent, ethics, bias, statistics,
dissemination of information
INTRODUCTION TO PHYSIOLOGY
This module functions as an introduction to physiology and human body function. It
provides a brief overall introduction to the various body systems such as the
cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, etc. It also provides an elementary
account of body fluids, nerve and muscle function, the autonomic nervous system,
blood cells and immunity.
At the end of this module the student should have a knowledge and understanding of:





the basic design of the organ systems of the body
the fluid compartments of the body, the composition of the different fluids and
their properties including osmolarity and pH and their clinical significance
the mechanisms whereby substances are transported in and out of cells and its
relevance to absorption in the gut and the kidney.
the fundamentals of body pH regulation and it clinical significance
nerve function including conduction, and synaptic and neuromuscular junction
transmission
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



the mechanism and control of skeletal and smooth muscle contraction
blood composition and function including both cells and plasma; this should
include formation of blood cells, hemoglobin, blood groups, blood clotting, blood
indices and blood disorders
the fundamentals of immunity, including structure and function of the white blood
cells and both cellular and humoral immunity
the fundamentals of the autonomic nervous system and its importance.
PROFESSIONALISM 1.1
Medical education is not only a technical training; it is also a process of gradual
induction to professional medical practice. The new NUI Galway curriculum takes a
very deliberate approach to the development of future doctors. The 12 learning
outcomes of the new curriculum include 5 learning outcomes that relate directly to the
development of the new medical professional. The new curriculum therefore
includes a new “professionalism” course that will occupy 20% of curricular time in all
of the Semesters of all 5 years. It will constitute a vertical theme in the new
systems based course incorporating several different knowledge skills and attitude
sets. The teaching and learning experiences for students will integrate the expertise and
interest of several disciplines, Law, Ethics, Health & Illness and Medical
Informatics/Statistics. In particular the strand aims to support the achievement of
the following curricular outcomes:
The NUI Galway Medical Graduate:
 Should be able to demonstrate communication skills in all areas and in all relevant
media because good communication underpins all aspects of the practice of
medicine.
 Should demonstrate an awareness of how medical knowledge is created shaped
shared and applied. As well as having the relevant technical skills to find appraise
and synthesise information it is important that graduates understand the role of
health informatics in the day-to-day care of patients.
 Should have an awareness of conventional professional attitudes and demonstrate
professional behaviours, commensurate with the standards set out by the medical
council for professional practice in medicine.
 Should be familiar with the role of a doctor within the Irish Health Service as well
as being aware of the structure of different health services.
 Should be familiar with the importance of personal development and be aware that
this is a life long process. It is influenced by the personality of the individual and
his/her life experiences, in addition to experiences related to their training.
From the learning outcomes outlined above the following educational strands have been
developed:
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Communication and interview skills. This strand will develop the students ability
to communicate effectively with patients whilst also learning how to carry out an
accurate medical interview.
Ethics, medical law, jurisprudence and human rights. This strand will introduce
students to important concepts in medical ethics law and human rights. The
purpose of the strand is to support informed and ethical practice after
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qualification
Understanding health and illness. This strand has been designed to introduce
students to organisational, psychological and social aspects of health, well-being
and illness and to help them to understand the concept of professional roles
Health informatics. This strand is designed to build students IT and information
management skills. In particular students will become capable of evidence
based medicine/ practice.
At the end of this module the student should be able to:
 to work in groups and contribute to various roles set out for effective group work
 to use all e-resources of information provided through the James Hardiman Library
 to use Cite While You Write in Endnote and appropriate text editing software
 to discuss content and objectives of all contributing partners in Professionalism as
outlined in the course booklet provided through the Electronic Learning
Environment Blackboard
 to produce a scientific report interpreting the latest evidence and statistics
published
SEMESTER II
CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM
This module covers the anatomy, physiology and biochemistry of the cardiovascular
system with clinical applications in an integrated fashion. The anatomy of the heart and
blood vessel distribution is covered, as is the microscopic anatomy of the blood vessels.
The genesis of the electrical activity of the heart and the formation of the
electrocardiogram is described as is the function of the heart as a pump. The control of
arterial blood pressure is described as is the control of the various regional
circulations. This module will incorporate a clinical seminar session at the end of
the module (one day’s duration). It is also envisaged that some clinical lectures will be
interspersed throughout the module.
At the end of this module the student should know:
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and be able to demonstrate the position and function of the heart valves. the
positions for auscultation of the valves and the positions for placing the chest
leads for the ECG.
the Anatomy of the heart and of anatomically and functionally related
structures, including why the coronary arteries are important to the
functional microanatomy of the heart
General plan of distribution of arteries, veins, lymphatics
about cardiac cell action potentials and how they give rise to the rhythmical
excitation of the heart.
how the spread of cardiac action potentials throughout the heart gives rise to the
electrocardiogram (ECG).
the clinical significance of the ECG
the cardiac cycle and the working of the heart as pump
the function and roles of the different parts of the systemic circulation (arteries,
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arterioles, capillaries and veins).
arterial blood pressure, its clinical significance, how to measure it and its mechanisms
of control and the targets for drug intervention.
the control of the various regional circulations
be able to discuss the anatomy and pathophysiology related to
cardiovascular disease.
THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM
This module covers the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system with clinical
applications in an integrated fashion. The anatomy of the respiratory system and
associated structures is covered. The ventilation of the lungs with air, diffusion of gases
in the lungs, the perfusion of the lungs with blood, and gas exchange in the lungs are
then described. Gas transport in the blood and gas exchange in the tissues are
covered. The regulation of respiratory ventilation is described. Students are introduced
to medical imaging of the respiratory system. This module will incorporate a clinical
seminar session at the end of the module (one day’s duration). It is also envisaged that
some clinical lectures will be interspersed throughout the module
At the end of this module the student should:
 Know the general plan of the functional Anatomy of the respiratory system
 Know and be able to demonstrate the positions of the pleurae and lungs and of
structures anatomically and functionally related to them.
 Know the anatomy of the intercostals spaces and the diaphragm and the functional
anatomy of ventilation.
 Have sufficient anatomical knowledge to undertake an examination of the lungs
including the interpretation of routine radiographs and MRI scans. Have an
understanding of the role of the respiratory system in the control of blood gases
and pH, including how normal levels are maintained and the causes and
consequences of disturbances.
 Know the factors that govern alveolar ventilation in health and disease. Understand
the peripheral and central mechanisms involved in controlling respiration.
 Be able to discuss the anatomy and pathophysiology related to respiratory disease.
THE GASTROINTESTINAL SYSTEM
This module covers the structure and function of the gastrointestinal system with
clinical applications in an integrated fashion. The embryological development of the
gut is described. The general organisation of the GIT is covered as is the gross anatomy
and histology of its various parts including oesophagus, stomach and small and large
intestines. GIT motility and its control, digestion and absorption of nutrients and its control,
and enzymes and secretions are considered as are their medical implications. The role of
the accessory organs of digestion is described. GIT reflexes such as vomiting and
defecation are covered. This module will incorporate a clinical seminar session at
the end of the module (one day’s duration). It is also envisaged that some clinical
lectures will be interspersed throughout the module.
At the end of this module the student should:
 know the positions and functions of the liver and gall bladder, the stomach,
small and large intestines including the appendix, pancreas and spleen and their
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layout within the peritoneum;
understand why the portal circulation may be involved in pathology; have
some knowledge of the abdominal wall in relation to incisions, hernias and
referred pain.
have a knowledge of modern medical Imaging of the GIT.
should understand how food is mixed and moved along the course of the GIT and
the role played in this by the enteric nervous system. know how food is
digested in the mouth, stomach and small intestine so that it is broken down into
constituents which can be readily absorbed. know how the digested constituents of
food are absorbed in the stomach and the small and large intestine.
know the mechanisms of the GIT reflexes of vomiting and defecation.
THE RENAL SYSTEM
This module covers the structure and function of the renal system with clinical
applications in an integrated fashion. The development, anatomy and histology of the
kidney is described as is the anatomy of the pelvic floor. The formation of urine is
covered in terms of the underlying processes of glomerular filtration and tubular absorption
and secretion and their control. The control of salt and water, pH balance and the
medical importance of these processes is indicated. The anatomy and mechanism of the
micturition reflex is described. Students are also introduced to medical imaging of the
kidney. It is also envisaged that some clinical lectures may be interspersed throughout
the module
At the end of this module the student should:
 Know and be able to demonstrate the positions of the bladder, urethra, rectum
and anal canal.
 Know the macro and micro structure of the kidney, ureter, urinary bladder and
urethra.
 Know the neuroanatomical basis of urinary incontinence.
 Have an understanding of the role of the respiratory system in the control of blood
gases and pH, including how normal levels are maintained and the causes and
consequences of disturbances.
 Be familiar with the medical imaging of the urinary system.
 Understand the special features of the renal blood supply which adapt the
 organ for filtration and reabsorption and how blood flow and GFR can be
 measured
 Be able to describe the transport properties of the nephron and how these relate to
the excretory function of the kidney
 Understand the role of the kidneys in regulating body fluid osmolarity, volume and
aid base balance and the methods of investigation used to examine these
mechanisms
 Be able to discuss the anatomy and pathophysiology of processes related to renal
disease.
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NUTRITION
This module describes the fundamentals of human nutrition. It provides a basic
knowledge of nutrient biochemistry and function to underpin an understanding of human
nutrition. It discusses essential dietary requirements, energy meatabolism in the fed and
fasting states and the role of nutrition in heart disease with particular emphasis on the
role of cholesterol and lipids. It also covers the dietary role of lipids and trace
elements. It is envisaged that there will be inputs to this module from clinical
nutritionists.
At the end of this module the student should know:
 The link between metabolism and nutrition
 Main sources of metabolic fuels and energy requirements The role
of organic and inorganic essential nutrients
 Digestion and transport of nutrients and significance of transport
mechanisms on health and disease
 The metabolic flexibility associated with different life stages The
metabolic link between nutrition and disease
 The role of nutrition in athletic performance
PROFESSIONALISM 1.2
Professionalism 1.2 (Year 1, semester 2) focuses on all core clinical methods and skills
according to international standards. See also clinical skills teaching. Clinical skills will
be assessed in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations.
An important part of medical professionalism 1.2 is achieved through Special Study
Modules in semester 2. Students make a choice out of various special study
modules, (SSM). The purpose of the SSM is to encourage students to develop areas of
special interest and to learn how to examine topics in more depth.
CLINICAL SKILLS TEACHING
A 12-week course in Communication and Clinical Skills delivered jointly by the
Disciplines of Medicine, General Practice and Psychiatry will take place in semester
2 of Year One. This course will be systems-based and will run parallel with teaching in
anatomy, physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology. The communication skills
teaching will run throughout the second semester and will involve lectures and role play.
Clinical skills relevant to the following systems will be taught in three half-day
sessions in the clinical skills laboratories at Aras Moyola and the Comerford
Medical Education Centre.
1. Cardiovascular
2. Respiratory
3. Gastrointestinal/Renal
Full-day integrated communication and clinical skills workshops involving multiple
supervised stations with simulated patients will attempt to underscore the importance of
effective doctor-patient communication.
An OSCE examination will be held at the end of semester 2.
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SECOND MEDICAL YEAR
First Semester
Endocrine System Growth Factors and Signalling
Central Nervous System
Reproduction and Development
Genetics
Molecular Medicine
Medical Professionalism 2.1
Second Semester
Health and Disease
Drugs and Disease
Organ Failure
Medical Professionalism 2.2
6ECTS
9ECTS
6ECTS
3ECTS
3ECTS
6ECTS
12 ECTS
6 ECTS
6 ECTS
6 ECTS
ENDOCRINE SYSTEM, GROWTH FACTORS AND SIGNALLING
This module describes the structure and function of the endocrine system both in health
and disease. It also provides an introduction to growth factor and signal transduction
systems in health and disease. It includes an introduction to chemical messengers of the
nervous, endocrine and immune systems, as well as eicosanoids and growth factors. The
biochemical basis of hormonal classification will be explained. The student will be
provided with an overview of the general anatomy of the endocrine system. The
structure and function of classical endocrine glands will also be discussed. The clinical
importance of the endocrine secretions will also be described throughout the module.
At the end of this module the student should:
 Know the endocrine system provides communication between cells, tissues and
organs
 Understand the structure and function of the hypothalamic pituitary axis and the
roles of the various hormones secreted by these areas Be able to
discuss the effects of hypo and hyper secretion of the these hormones
 Understand the structure and function of the thyroid, parathyroid and adrenal
glands, and the Islets of Langerhans and the roles of the various hormones secreted
by these glands
 Be able to discuss the effects of hypo and hyper function of these glands
 Be able to discuss the hormonal control of carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism
and its clinical significance
 Be able to discuss the hormonal control of calcium and phosphate metabolism, and
salt and water metabolism and their clinical significance Understand the
methodology of hormone measurement and its relevance to clinical diagnosis
 Be aware of the general features and types of signaling molecules Know the
most important and common growth factors and have some understanding of
their functional and clinical importance
 Know the biochemical properties and mode of action of steroid hormones Have an
understanding of plasma membrane receptors, G-proteins, the cAMP, cGMP and
phosphatidylinositol signaling systems and their role in normal function and disease
 Know the formation and role of eicosanoids
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CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM
The module focuses on the anatomy, physiology and biochemistry of the human central
nervous system.
At the end of this module the student should
 Have a comprehensive understanding of the structure and organisation of the
nervous system; brain, spinal cord and meninges
 Be aware of the structure and function of neurons and glial cells Understand
the role of cerebrospinal fluid
 Be able to discuss the process of CNS neurotransmission
 Know the structure and function of the somatosensory system
 Understand the structure and function of the motor system
 Understand the organization and function of vision, hearing, speech, and balance
 Have an understanding of role of the hypothalamus, and its role in appetite,
thirst and thermoregulation
 Know the role of limbic system in emotions
 Understand the processes of Sleep, learning and memory
 Be aware of the concept of reward circuitry
REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT
This module describes the process involved in reproduction and will provide an
introduction to embryology. The osteology, blood supply and innervation of the pelvic
region will be described. Pelvic imaging methodology will also be introduced. The
anatomy of the male and female reproductive systems will be explained. The function
and hormonal regulation of reproduction will be described. The events involved in
fertilisation and embryonic development including sexual differentiation and fetal
physiology will be covered. Students will be instructed in various specific reproductive
topics including lactation, parturition. The normal process of embryology will be
discussed. ). It is also envisaged that some clinical lectures will be interspersed
throughout the module.
At the end of this module the student should:
 Know the anatomy of the male reproductive system as well as the Hormonal
and nervous control of male
 Understand the major features of the anatomy of the female reproductive system
including the relevant osteology and variations in the shape of the pelvis
 Know the positions of the bladder, urethra, rectum and anal canal Understand
and the structure of the pelvic floor; the anatomy of continence; the anatomy
of the female and male internal and external genitalia (ovaries, uterine tubes, uterus,
vagina, labia, clitoris; testis, vas deferens, prostate, scrotum, penis).
 Have sufficient anatomical knowledge to understand the anatomy of urinary and
faecal continence, of taking cervical smears and of pelvic examination (the structures
palpable on an examination via the rectum or vagina) and the anatomical basis of
passing a urinary catheter in the male. Understand the anatomical consequences of
prostatic enlargement, and the basis of common medical conditions affecting the
female genital tract. Understand the principles and types of abdominal hernia,
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common medical conditions affecting the scrotum and testis.
Have an appreciation of anatomical changes that occur during pregnancy and the
anatomy underlying anaesthesia during childbirth.
Embryology
Understand the hormonal and nervous control of male reproduction Understand the
hormonal control of the menstrual cycle and of pregnancy Know the basis of sexual
determination of sex, the control of parturition and lactation
Understand both foetal and neonatal physiology
GENETICS
This course introduces Medical students to the principles of modern genetics and its
application to the understanding and treatment of inherited disease. The roles of DNA
technology and genetic counselling are explained.
At the end of this module the student should:
 Have a comprehensive understanding of the main principles of modern medical
genetics and cytogenetics and its relevance to modern medicine.
 Have a critical awareness of the applications of DNA technology .
 Have a basic understanding of chromosome analysis and the causes and
consequences of cytogenetic disorder and its relevance to modern medicine.
 Have a basic understanding of the role of chromosome rearrangement in human
leukaemia and cancer
 Have an appreciation of the practical, moral and ethical issues associated with
genetic testing, prenatal diagnosis and genetic counselling in modern medicine.
MOLECULAR MEDICINE
This module describes the contributions of advances in molecular biology to research,
diagnosis and treatment of disease. The molecular basis of cancer is emphasised as an
example and topic of special relevance.
At the end of this module the student should know:
 What constitutes molecular medicine
 Principles which underlie contemporary research, diagnosis and treatment
 methods in molecular medicine.
 Application of recombinant DNA technology to treatment of disease Molecular
basis of cell cycle control
 the nature of DNA damaged and how it is repaired
 Cell biological hallmarks of cancer
 Role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes
 Principles underlying current and proposed molecular cancer therapies
Pharmaceutical development pipeline for molecular medicines
PROFESSIONALISM 2.1
Clinical Skills Teaching
Professionalism 2.1 (year 2, semester 2) focuses on all core clinical methods and skills
according to international standards. See also clinical skills teaching. Clinical skills will
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be assessed in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations.
Students are introduced through a series of systems-based lectures and practical
workshops to history taking and physical examination in semester 1. Four week days
are spent on the wards and in general practices applying these skills. Case reports and
a multiple choice examination in December of Semester 1.
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SEMESTER II
DRUGS AND DISEASE
The module focuses on the pharmacology of drugs affecting various body systems and
disease categories. Students learning is based upon prior knowledge from Introduction
to Pharmacology and all of the other systems-based modules that have run in the
preceding 3 semesters. Areas covered include the pharmacology of drugs used in the
treatment of cardiovascular diseases, nervous system diseases, pain, endocrine diseases,
immune system-related conditions and cancer. The module is designed to run parallel to
the Health and Disease module also in semester 2.2.
At the end of this module, the student should know:
 The basic pharmacology of drugs used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases,
nervous system diseases, pain, endocrine diseases, immune system-related
conditions and cancer.
 Mechanisms of action, important side effects and routes of administration of those
drugs.
 How those drugs abrogate or interfere with mechanisms of disease. Important
drugs interactions.
HEALTH AND DISEASE I
Students will be introduced to the idea that mechanistic knowledge underpins the
analysis and solving of clinical problems The module will demonstrate that molecular,
cellular, microbiological and environmental mechanisms underpin the development and
progression of disease and will highlight the interplay between these factors. Students
will be introduced to the principles of health promotion and of disease prevention and
treatment for both individuals and populations.
On completion of this module students will have a foundation in:
 The various causes of disease and the interplay of molecular, cellular,
microbiological and environmental factors in the causation of different diseases;
 Principles of public health and health promotion;
 Mechanisms of cell injury and cell death; organisms that cause cell injury; response to
cell injury and death; and healing and repair
 Disorders of cell growth and neoplasia
 Control of infection
 Basic alterations of the haemodynamics including thrombosis, ischaemia, infarction
and shock
 Pathobiology, microbiology, surveillance and prevention of cardiovascular
disorders including atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, valvular disorders,
cardiomyopathy, cardiac failure, aneurysms and hypertension;
 Pathobiology, microbiology and surveillance and prevention of respiratory disorders
including asthma and allergic disorders, infections, inflammatory disorders,
COAD, cystic fibrosis and neoplasia.
 The clinical relevance of the mechanisms that underlie disease and begin to see
how such information can be used in clinical scenarios.
ORGAN FAILURE
These modules will integrate preclinical subjects into clinical setting and
demonstrate relevance of basic sciences to clinical practice
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At the end of this module the student should:
 Know the underlying causes/disease processes leading to loss of organ function
 Have an understanding of the clinical consequences of loss of organ function
 Be able to discuss the basic management principles and issues arising have an
understanding of organ supportive/replacement therapies
This module focuses on Group and Self Directed Learning
 Use of relevant clinical scenarios involving failure of a major organ system.
 Group presentation of knowledge gained during self-directed learning session.
 Grouped assessment of submissions
Key Knowledge Areas
 Acute Hepatic Failure
 Acute Brain Injury
 Acute Renal Failure
 Hypovolaemic Shock
 The Failing Heart
 Acute Respiratory Failure
PROFESSIONALISM 2.2
Medical professionals focus on the integrated professional approach in problem solving
and decision making. Student learning is based upon enquiry based learning skills
achieved in the previous professionalism courses. New medical technologies are
critically appraised using clinical case stories and discussed in self-directed group
processes. Prior knowledge of medical law, medical ethics, health & illness and
medical informatics is used to upgrade the professional learner. The results of selfdirected learning will be reported in a scientific group essay and a statistics report at the
end of the course. Knowledge achieved in Professionalism 2.2 will be assessed in an
integrated MCQ and SAQ.
Medical ethics is concerned with contemporary moral issues facing medics. It
introduced a variety of normative ethical theories to provide a foundation for the
critical analysis of a range of issues arising from the biological and medical
sciences. These are likely to include abortion, euthanasia / physician assisted
suicide, disability, genetic modification, new medical technologies and resource
allocation.
It is intended that students will gain knowledge of moral theory that equips them to evaluate
some of the most pressing dilemmas facing biomedical practice.
Medical law shows students the importance of law in their every day practice as a doctor.
This will be done by discussing major legal issues such as, consent to treatment,
medical negligence, confidentiality and mental health law. Students will be shown how
the law has dealt with situations that are rarely black and white. This will be done
through various cases of direct interest to medical practice. At the end of the module
students will be expected to identify situations where legal responsibilities arise and to
discern the various legal elements and find the best possible course of action
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CLINICAL SKILLS TEACHING
In semester 2 students build on the procedural skills learned in their first medical year
with workshops covering skills relevant to the neurological, endocrine and
musculoskeletal systems. Skills will be assessed in an Objective Structured Clinical
Examination by the end of semester 2.
Special Study Modules
Another important part of professionalism 2.2 is achieved through a new set of Special
Study Modules. Students make a choice out of a variety special study modules,
(SSM). The purpose of the SSM is to encourage students to develop areas of special
interest and to learn how to examine topics in more depth. The majority of these Special
Study Modules are based upon service learning and project/enquiry based learning.
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THIRD MEDICAL YEAR
SEMESTER I
HEALTH AND DISEASE II
Students will build on the knowledge of biomedical science and Health and Disease
module I in semester 2 year 2 to understand the common disease processes affecting
different organ systems and their clinical implications. They will learn to apply these
principles to common clinical problems Students will also build on their knowledge
of the biopsychosocial model of health and disease and its application in the
prevention and treatment of common clinical conditions. Students will acquire an
understanding of the relevance of epidemiology to the clinical practice of medicine and
the functions of public health medicine and health promotion in practice. They will
develop an appreciation of the role of the laboratory in clinical practice.
On completion of this module students will have a foundation in:
 Pathobiology and microbiology of diseases affecting central nervous system
including the causes and effects of raised intracranial pressure, stroke, head
trauma, infection and neurodegenerative diseases; Patholobiology and
microbiology of diseases of the gastrointestinal system including
infections, inflammatory conditions, common malabsorptive disorders,
benign and malignant diseases;
 Diseases of hepatobiliary system and pancreas including infections,
inflammatory disorders, inherited diseases, neoplasms and organ failure; Disease of
genitourinary system including infections, immune disorders, vasculitis, stones,
neoplasia and organ failure;
 Haematological disorders including anaemias, haematological malignancy and
pathology of the lymph node;
 Pathobiology of the breast and endocrine system; screening services; Pathobiology
and microbiology of the skin and musculoskeletal system The clinical aspects of
diseases affecting different systems;
 Functions of public health medicine, including topics of epidemiology, needs
assessment, occupational health related both to individual and population health
services.
 The principles and practical aspects of infection control in the health care setting
 The principles and practical aspects of the use of antimicrobial agents
 The principle of prevention, control and management and aetiology of major
infectious diseases
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FORENSIC MEDICINE
Students will build on the knowledge of biomedical science achieved in modules H&D
I and H&D II to develop a basic understanding of the principles of forensic medicine in
relation to common causes and signs of injury, disease and death. They will be familiar
with the role of the coroner, the circumstances in which death should be reported to
the coroner, the role of the autopsy and the inquest. They will learn the importance of
accurate certification of death. They will be familiar with the signs of violence and
injury/trauma. They will acquire some insight into establishing the manner of death in a
given case, i.e. whether it is natural, accidental, homicidal or suicidal and they will be
familiar with the causes of unnatural death, including the effects of various drugs and
toxins.
GLOBAL HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT
This module provides a brief introduction to key concepts in understanding the
challenges of human health and development from a global perspective. The
content will focus on social and economic development as it relates to global
health.
Global health can be defined as 'health problems, issues and concerns that
transcend national boundaries; that may be influenced by circumstances or experiences
in other countries; and that are best addressed by cooperative actions and solutions'.
The module is delivered by staff from the Disciplines of Bacteriology and Public Health &
Health Promotion with input from a range of people from different disciplines.
Learning outcomes
By the end of this course students should:
 recognise the impacts of globalisation, poverty and widening socio-economic
inequalities as determinants of health;
 understand the concepts of development, poverty, economic and social
development, and the right to health;
 be able to discuss the main causes of morbidity and mortality globally; the
global burden of disease including major infectious, non-communicable and chronic
diseases and injuries;
 be aware of the difficulties faced by health services in resource poor settings and
the challenges of strengthening health systems, ensuring adequate human resources
for health and equitable access;
 know about some of the major global health initiatives, including the roles of
international agencies such as WHO and other UN agencies, civil society
organisations and new partnerships for health;
 recognise issues related to global health security and addressing public health risks
from epidemic prone diseases and climate change;
 consider some of the health issues faced by migrants including refugees and
asylum seekers;
 know where to identify sources of information for medical advice for
international travelers
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PROFESSIONALISM 3.1
CORE CLINICAL SKILLS
The Core Clinical Skills module is a 12 week (9ECTS) module delivered in
semester 1 of year 3. Students receive lectures on evidence-based physical diagnosis,
tutorials on clinical problem solving and practical procedural skills teaching. More
advanced physical examination skills are taught in the clinical skills laboratory.
Students are required to clerk patients throughout their hospital stay and keep reflective
account in their portfolio. Bedside tutorials help students to develop their diagnostic
and clinical reasoning skills. Assessment involves an OSCE, MCQ Exam, Structured
answer question paper and satisfactory completion of their logbook.
SEMESTER II
FOUNDATIONS OF CLINICAL MEDICINE
The teaching in year 3 semester 2 will comprise one module entitled ‘Foundations of
Clinical Medicine’. Within this module there are 5 distinct strands. Each strand is
delivered in 4 week rotating blocks over the course of Semester 3.2. Each strand will
therefore be delivered five times to five separate groups, at both the Galway University
Hospitals and the Affiliated Hospitals. The teaching of Professionalism is incorporated
into each strand.
1. Cardiovascular Studies: The aim of this strand is to provide structured
integrated teaching in the diagnosis, investigation, and management of patients with
common diseases of the cardiovascular system. The module builds on the systems based
approach to the CVS system in Year 1 (1.2) and to the pathology of the CVS system in
the modules on the process of Health and Disease (2.2; 3.1). In addition it provides a
foundation to a more advanced level of CVS disease in Cardiovascular Studies 111 in
semester 5.1. At the end of the strand the student will be competent to deliver
appropriate care to a patient presenting with a common cardiovascular problem. The
strand addresses the each of the 12 learning outcomes of the overall curriculum. The
professionalism component of the strand includes a ‘Clinical Methods’ component,
focussing on communication and examination skills on both simulated and real patients.
2. Gastrointestinal Studies: This strand will build on the systems based approach to
the gastrointestinal system, and clinical methods (communication and examination
skills) and will vertically integrate with the anatomy, physiology and pathology courses.
Common gastrointestinal problems are introduced in this strand. For each clinical
condition the student will be exposed to the pathology and clinical presentation followed by
the appropriate investigation and management of the condition. The student will learn to
formulate a working diagnosis and appropriate differential diagnosis from which a plan of
investigation and management can be delivered.
3. Respiratory, Perioperative and Critical Care Medicine: This strand will build
on the basic concepts acquired in the respiratory I module in Semester 1.2. The strand
will introduce students to core knowledge, skills and attitudes required to develop a
critical understanding of the pathophysiology and management of the common respiratory
diseases (Respiratory Medicine), basic non-surgical aspects of care of the patient
presenting for major surgery (Perioperative Medicine), and introduce concepts regarding
the severely ill patient and the pathophysiology of organ failure (Critical Care
83
Medicine). These basic skills and concepts will be developed further in semester 5.1.
4. Care of the Elderly: This strand will provide students with the requisite
knowledge, skills and professional attitudes related to management of the elderly
patient. The multidisciplinary approach will be emphasised throughout the strand and
students will be encouraged to gain an appreciation of the role of allied health professionals
in elderly care. Students will be introduced to investigation and management of the
following conditions, with particular reference to their presentation in elderly patients:
acute confusional state and dementia,
cerebrovascular disease, sensory impairment, movement disorders, recurrent falls,
cardiorespiratory disease, bowel and bladder disturbance, metabolic bone disease,
electrolyte disorders, malignant disease and haematological disorders.
5. Acute Hospital Care (GUH) / Elective Module (Affiliated Hospitals): This strand
aims to guide the student in the development of the appropriate clinical skills to
appropriately investigate and participate in the management of acutely unwell medical
and surgical patients. Students will acquire a comprehensive range of clinical skills that
are needed to properly evaluate the diversity of situations common to an emergency
department. The student will also gain an appreciation of the core concepts related to
skin and soft tissue injuries and how these commonly present through the emergency
department. Horizontal integration with other strands is emphasised, as well as vertical
integration with the basic sciences especially anatomy, physiology and pathology.
84
FOURTH MEDICAL YEAR
PSYCHIATRY
This 8 week program is divided into two four week blocks, one in semester 1 and one in
semester 2. Students will attain knowledge of and learn the skills required to assess a
range of mental illnesses. They will learn about the biopsychosocial risk factors for
these illnesses and their multidisciplinary management using physical, pharmacological,
psychological and social interventions. Mental illnesses addressed in this way will
include depressive disorders; bipolar disorder; schizophrenia and psychotic disorders;
alcohol and substance misuse; dementia and delirium; suicide and deliberate self harm;
autism, pervasive and specific developmental disorders; attention deficit disorders;
posttraumatic stress disorder; anxiety disorders, eating disorders; personality disorders;
dissociative and somatoform disorders; psychosexual disorders; learning disability;
obsessive compulsive disorder; psychiatric disorders of the puerperium; childhood
conduct and emotional disorders.
Students will develop skills in how to assess and manage deliberate self harm. Students
will be assisted in developing the empathic attitudes and communication skills necessary
to interact with patients suffering from mental illness and their relatives. They will be
made aware of the varying presentation of mental disorders in learning disabled patients,
later life patients, children, patients in a general medical setting and be able to adapt
their communication skills accordingly. Students will be assisted in developing an
awareness of the importance of counteracting stigma. They will develop an awareness of
the impact of family dynamics and of psychological defence mechanisms on the
development of mental illness. They will be introduced to the principles of involuntary
treatment and an understanding of the roles and functioning of multidisciplinary teams
in assessing and managing mental illness.
Structure and delivery:
The curricular structure will include circa 20 didactic lectures, small group teaching,
video-based teaching of clinical cases, problem based learning tutorials, communication
skills training in mental health setting, self directed learning, case presentation to peers,
case studies, clinical placements with shadowing of doctors and clinical nurse
specialists, clerking patients, attendance at ward rounds and multidisciplinary team
meetings.
On satusfactory completion of this module students will:
 Be able to describe the prevalence and presentations of common psychiatric
conditions, discuss their aetiology and understand the principles of their
management, including biological, psychological, and socio-cultural approaches.
 Be able to outline the conditions under which it is legitimate to detain and treat
patients against their will.
 Be able to describe the principal mechanisms of action of, indications for, side
effects of, and appropriate use of common psychotropic medication and ECT.
 Be able to describe the principles of different forms of psychotherapy and their
appropriateness for different patients.
85






Be able to describe the range of services and roles of the professionals involved in
the care of people with a mental illness and appreciate the importance of
multidisciplinary working.
Communicate effectively with mentally ill patients and be able to take a full
psychiatric history from, and carry out a mental state examination of patients of all
ages and developmental levels.
Summarise the findings of a psychiatric history and mental state examination by
producing a biopsychosocial formulation.
Assess family relationships and their impact on the functioning of other family
members, and speak to families about an ill or disabled member.
Assess a patient’s potential suicidal risk and risk to others.
Demonstrate an empathic understanding of the emotional problems of patients of
all ages and developmental levels, the psychological and sociocultural dimension of
illness.
PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH
Each student completes an 8 week paediatric clerkship, delivered in two discrete four
week modules over two semesters. Each four week learning block will run concurrently
at NUI, Galway and The Sligo Academy. It is anticipated that at any one time 24
paediatric students will be based at NUI, Galway and 5 students at the Sligo Academy
with uniform delivery on both sites.
During this time the student’s major clinical commitments are in Paediatrics and take
precedence over all other activities. This Clerkship is during the Fourth Medical Year, and
includes two weeks attachment in Paediatrics at Castlebar, Derry, Ballinasloe or Letterkenny
for students based at NUI, Galway. Students who spend one module at the Sligo Academy
spend the second at NUI, Galway.
Semester 1 introduces the student to common paediatric presentations and topics as well
as building on the students’ clinical skills in the paediatric setting.
Semester 2 focuses on students acquiring knowledge and skills in management of
paediatric conditions. This includes evidence based critical analysis of case
management.
Theoretical learning is provided through small group problem based learning seminars,
student case presentations and computer aided learning. In addition lectures are given
on the principles of growth and development, child health, common paediatric
problems, perinatal problems, and the management of newborn and premature
infants.
Clinical learning opportunity is provided through clinical skills tutorials, core bed-side
tutorials, clinical placement – (mentor and role modelling, ward rounds and clinic
exposure) and nurse shadowing on clinical placement. Tutorials are given in the Special
Care Newborn infant unit in addition to those in general paediatrics; visits are arranged to
Child Development centres and to schools for children with learning disability.
86
Assessment is both formative and summative. Focused feedback is the main formative
assessment method used. Summative assessment methods include: Continuous
assessment (4 case report submissions), written examination (MCQ, MEQs and SAQs)
and OSCE (Objective structured clinical examination).
OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY
The course will be divided into 2 semesters in year 4, each for the duration of 4 weeks.
The first semester will address basic obstetrics & gynaecology; the second will address
advanced aspects of care. The course will take place in UHG and in the Sligo Academy
with a two week attachment in one of the affiliated hospitals for those based at UHG.
Semester 1 will address basic aspects of care in Obstetrics and Gynaecology and will
include normal antenatal care, the impact of pre-existing disease on pregnancy on the
mother and fetus, common gynaecological disease, the performance of intimate
gynaecological examinations in accordance with recommended professional standards
and participation in labour ward activities. This will involve performing normal
deliveries, observing operative deliveries and close interaction with the midwifery staff
in the care of the woman during labour. It will also address the contribution of changing
demographics and disease profiles in the population on adverse obstetric outcome.
Specifically, this will involve learning about the collation of maternal and perinatal
morbidity and mortality statistics at a local, national and international level. It will also
involve learning how the published reports (CEMM, CEMACH, CEDSI and the Annual
Clinical Reports) identify areas that lead to changes in obstetric practice.
In Semester 2 the student will learn about the management of more complicated
obstetric problems, and the effect of pregnancy on their management. This will include
the interaction of the multidisciplinary teams involved in high risk obstetric care. It will
address the use of the Cochrane and RCOG databases in daily practice to employ
evidence based management of obstetric and gynaecological problems. It will explain
the principles of screening for disease – the principles of prenatal screening for fetal and
maternal disease during pregnancy and the associated aspects; ethical, legal, health
economics and the clinical and laboratory aspects of prenatal tests such as CVS,
amniocentesis and ultrasound. The principles and practice of screening for
gynaecological malignancy will be addressed. The management of patients who undergo
early and late pregnancy loss will be taught. Finally the management of obstetric
emergencies will be explained.
The course will consist of didactic lectures, small group teaching, tutorials, student case
presentations, clinical attachment, videos and self directed learning. The course will be
delivered by the academic staff, the consultants and specialist registrars in Obstetrics
and Gynaecology. In the second semester the clinical attachment will include attendance
at the subspecialist clinics – feto-maternal medicine, infertility, urogynaecology and
gynaecological oncology.
The assessment will be both formative and summative. Semester 1 will carry 10% based
on the student’s attendance and performance of clinical tasks. Semester 2 will account
for 30% based on an OSCE / MCQ. The end of year assessment will account for 60%.
87
GENERAL PRACTICE
The General Practice component involves, in semesters, two weeks of small group
teaching and two weeks on placement with a GP practice. The majority of students will
be placed with the same practice, but this is not guaranteed. Placement with a General
Practitioner occurs in weeks three and four in semester one and weeks two and three in
semester two. The small group activity covers topics such as communication skills,
chronic disease management, case based learning, etc.
What do we hope students will learn in general practice?
We have listed below the learning objectives for our year 4 course.
Semester #1 will introduce the principles and organisation of general practice as well as
build on the students’ clinical and procedural skills.
Semester #2 will focus on developing patient management skills including a general
practice approach to history taking and physical examination; therapeutic skills and an
awareness of the features of case management.
Table of proposed year 4 learning objectives categorized by
Semester and assessment method.
OBJECTIVES
The student will…….
Semester 1 Objectives
Be able to describe the range of problems seen
in General Practice.
Demonstrate awareness of the importance of
physical, psychological and social factors in
illness
Demonstrate that s/he has a good working
knowledge of the GP management of the
following chronic diseases: asthma, diabetes
and hypertension
Demonstrate that s/he has a good working
knowledge of the GP management of the
following acute conditions respiratory tract
infections, urinary tract infections, acute
confusion in the elderly, contraception
Be able to effectively communicate with a
patient in order to discover the reason for
attendance, explain the diagnosis and discuss a
management plan
Personal objective
Semester 2 Objectives
Be able to explain the organisation of General
Practice in Ireland
Be able to reflect on his/her own attitudes to
different patients and demonstrate appropriate
professional behaviour in the consultation
Be able to suggest how/ demonstrate how
health promotion and disease prevention can
be incorporated into General Practice
Be able to formulate a patient management
plan with the patient
Be able to perform the
Clinical,
Examination,
Administration,
Communication and Clinical Reasoning skills
listed in the GP SKILLS LOG
Personal objective
DOMAIN
TEACHING/
ACTIVITY
LEARNING
ASSESSMENT
Knowledge
Lecture, GP attachment
MCQ
Attitude
Skill
Lecture, communication skills
video session, GP attachment
Case study, OSCE
Skill
Knowledge
&
Small
group
placement
sessions,
GP
MCQ/OSCE
Skill
Knowledge
&
Small
group
placement
sessions,
GP
MCQ/OSCE
Attitude
Skill
Communication
skills
session, GP attachment.
Knowledge
Lecture, GP attachment
MCQ
Attitude
Small group session
OSCE
Knowledge
Lecture, GP attachment, OSCL,
Small group session
MCQ, OSCE
Skill
OSCL,
GP
attachment
,
Communication
skills
video
session,
Small group clinical skills
sessions, GP placement, self
directed learning
OSCE
Skill
video
OSCE
OSCE
88
OTOLARYNGOLOGY
Oto-Rhino-Laryngology (ORL) is the speciality that deals with the diagnosis and
management of diseases of the ear, nose and throat. The speciality also includes all
aspects of congenital and acquired diseases of the Head and Neck.
It involves dealing with patients of all ages and as a speciality ORL is responsible for
the surgical management of more paediatric patients than any other surgical discipline.
Adenotonsillectomy and the insertion of ventilation tubes (Grommets) are two of the
most frequently performed operations world wide.
Teaching at the department of ORL will be delivered over two semesters. Each semester
will be of four weeks duration. GP and ORL will share this time. We intend to create an
element of integration between GP and ORL as both specialities share a common core
of patients and disease processes. This integration will be seen particularly in semester 1
week 1 and semester 2 week 4. Students will spend 2 full weeks in ORL.
VISION:
Clinically competent student in ORL: Ability to diagnose and manage common
acute and chronic ORL conditions including their complications.
Learning Objectives Semester 1:
An introduction to the basic principles of ORL. History taking, safe clinical examination
of the ear nose throat head and neck. Basic clinical tests associated with ORL, clinical
assessment of hearing. Differential diagnosis, appropriate investigations.
Learning Objectives Semester 2:
Building on clinical skills learnt in semester 1. Disease processes, paediatric ORL,
surgical anatomy, surgical management, complications. Introduction to safe surgery,
Red Flags – conditions not to miss!!
FIFTH MEDICAL YEAR / FINAL YEAR
COMPRISES 2 SEMESTERS
SEMESTER 1:
ADVANCED CLINICAL PRACTICE (30 ECTS Credits)
This module aims to enhance the students knowledge of clinical practice and builds on
the module ‘Foundations of Clinical Practice’ (3MB). The module will integrate
vertically with the systems based approach of the earlier years of the curriculum (1MB,
2MB) and the Foundations of Clinical Practice in 3MB and will incorporate the teaching
of Professionalism seamlessly within the following strands:
1. CARDIOVASCULAR STUDIES
Students will increase their understanding of the diseases of the cardiovascular system
and build on the basic knowledge acquired in 3MB. They will focus on diagnosis
89
investigation and management learning to integrate and interpret large amounts of
patient information. At the end of the module the student will have acquired an
advanced level of competence to deliver care to a patient presenting with a
cardiovascular problem.
2. GASTROINTESTINAL STUDIES
Students will increase their understanding of the diseases of the gastrointestinal system
and build on the basic knowledge acquired in 3MB. They will focus on diagnosis
investigation and management learning to integrate and interpret large amounts of
patient information. At the end of the module the student will have acquired an
advanced level of competence to deliver care to a patient presenting with a
gastrointestinal problem.
3. RESPIRATORY CRITICAL AND PERIOPERATIVE CARE MEDICINE 11
Students will increase their understanding of the respiratory system and further develop
their clinical knowledge and skills relating to Perioperative and Critical Care Medicine,
building on the basic knowledge acquired in 3MB. They will focus on diagnosis
investigation and management learning to integrate and interpret large amounts of
patient information. At the end of the module the student will have acquired an
advanced level of competence to deliver care to a patient presenting with a respiratory
problem, the non surgical aspects of care of the patient presenting for major surgery and
the recognition and initial management of the severely ill patient.
4.GENERAL MEDICAL /SURGICAL CARE
Students will increase their understanding of the 10 most common medical and 10 most
common surgical reasons for admission to an acute hospital. These 20 conditions have
been chosen based on HSE HIPE data of coding admissions. They will focus on
diagnosis investigation and management learning to integrate and interpret large
amounts of patient information. At the end of the module the student will have acquired
an advanced level of competence to deliver care to a patient presenting with a common
acute medical or surgical problem.
STRUCTURE:
4 x 4 week strands repeated 4 times each across the Autumn Semester
DELIVERY OF DIDACTIC CONTENT
8 hours of contact time per week (32 hours per module)
3 hours didactic lectures (Full class)
3 hours small group teaching
2 hours clinic/ward based activity
40 hours student effort required per week
8 hours didactic time
32 hours divided between (a)Completion of tasks in Log Book (b) Directed Reading
90
SEMESTER 2:
SPECIALIST CLINICAL PRACTICE
This module aims to enhance the students knowledge of clinical practice in specialist
areas and builds on the Foundations of Clinical Practice (3MB, Semester 2) and
Advanced Clinical Practice (5 MB Semester 1). The module will integrate vertically
with the Foundations and Advanced Clinical Practice Modules (3.2 and 5.1) and will
incorporate the teaching of Professionalism seamlessly within the following strands:
1. MUSCULOSKETAL STUDIES
Students will increase their understanding of the diseases of the musculoskeletl system
and build on the basic system based knowledge acquired in 1MB and 2MB. They will
focus on diagnosis investigation and management of common musculoskeletal problems
learning to integrate and interpret large amounts of patient information. At the end of the
module the student will have acquired an advanced level of competence to deliver care
to a patient presenting with a musculoskeletal problem.
2. RENAL/UROLOGY STUDIES
Students will increase their understanding of the diseases of the renal and urological
system and build on the basic systems based knowledge acquired in 1MB and 2MB.
They will focus on diagnosis investigation and management of common renal and
urological problems learning to integrate and interpret large amounts of patient
information. At the end of the module the student will have acquired an advanced level
of competence to deliver care to a patient presenting with a renal/urological problem.
3. NEUROLOGY/OPHTHALMOLOGY STUDIES
Students will increase their understanding of the diseases of the nervous system and eye
and build on the systems based knowledge acquired in 1MB and 2MB. They will focus
on diagnosis investigation and management of common neurological and eye problems
learning to integrate and interpret large amounts of patient information. At the end of the
module the student will have acquired an advanced level of competence to deliver care
to a patient presenting with a neurological/ophthalmology problem respiratory problem.
4. DERMATOLOGY/PLASTICS
Students will increase their understanding of diseases of the skin including cancers and
burns and the interventions and treatments available to mange both. They will focus on
the diagnosis investigation and management of common skin problems learning to
integrate and interpret large amounts of patient information. At the end of the module
the student will have acquired an advanced level of competence to deliver care to a
patient presenting with a common skin problem, skin cancer and burn injury.
5. CANCER STUDIES
Students will increase their understanding of common cancers and build on knowledge
acquired in Foundations for Clinical Practice (3.2) and Advanced Clinical Practice (5.1).
They will focus on the general principles of a cancer diagnosis and the decision making
and strategies for curative and palliative treatments. Teaching will occur around
multidisciplinary meetings (MDM). At the end of the module the student will have
91
acquired a basic level of competence to deliver care to a patient presenting with cancer.
SHADOWING FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE
This four week module is completed in addition to the five strands of Specialist Clinical
Practice. It is a Course Requirement; - it is assessed on a Pass /Fail basis only, carries
no grade and will not contribute marks or ECTS credits towards the overall grade of
Honours if any to be awarded, However any candidate who fails this module will be
remain incomplete in their medical degree and will be unable to pursue Internship. The
module focuses on perfecting a directory of skills and proceedures necessary to function
as a junior doctor. The student will build on the knowledge acquired in the clinical
settings of 3.2, 5.1 and 5.2. At the end of the module the student will have acquired an
advanced competency in a list of common skills and procedures necessary to deliver
care to a patient in any clinical setting
STRUCTURE:
5 x 3 week strands repeated 5 times each across the Spring Semester
1 x 4 week module in Shadowing for Clinical Practice
DELIVERY OF DIDACTIC CONTENT
8 hours of contact time per week (24 hours per module)
2 hours didactic lectures (Full class)
3 hours small group teaching
3 hours clinic/ward based activity
40 hours student effort required per week
8 hours idactic time
32 hours divided between (a) Completion of tasks in Log Book
(b) Directed Reading
92
ASSESSMENT OF YEAR 5
Assessment of Year 5 will comprise 40% for Knowledge and 60% for Clinical
Skills and Professionalism as follows:
KNOWLEDGE (40% of total marks)
1. Written exam at end of Semester 1 to examine the four strands in this semester.
This examination is to assess knowledge. This examine will represent 20% of total
Year mark.
2.
2 x MCQ exams at the end of 15 weeks of the 5 strands Specialist Modules.
These MCQ examinations assess knowledge. These combined MCQ exams will
represent 20% of total Year Mark.
CLINICAL EXAMINATION (60% of total marks)
Integrated Clinical Examination following 15 weeks of Special Study Modules in
semester 2. This will assess clinical examination, management and decision making
skills and will take the form of.
i. A LONG CASE
Medical or surgical observed long case. Examined by 1/2 examiners. This will
represent 20% of total marks.
ii. A number of SHORT CASES
The cases included in this examination will a representation from all of the
disciplines represented in modules from Semester 1 and 2. There will be 2
examiners at each case. This part of the exam will represent 40% of the total mark.
iii. CLINICAL PROCEEDURES/PROFESSIONALISM OSCE This will occur at
the end of the 4 week module of shadowing for clinical practice. This is to assess
practical/procedural skills necessary to function as an Intern. The OSCE will not
have marks given but must be passed and a certificate of competence will be issued.
SHADOWING FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE
The module is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis, carries no grade and will not contribute
marks or ECTS credits towards the overall grade of Honours if any to be awarded.
Failure to complete however represents a barrier to completing the Medical Degree and
commencing internship.
93
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL SUBJECTS
Refer to General regulations for the Degrees of M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O. (NFQ Level 8
Ref; www.nfq.ie)
Students can if they wish undertake a B.Sc. Degree in Anatomy, Physiology,
Biochemistry, or Pharmacology.
A period of additional study outside of the Medical degree is required, in general
conformity with the regulations for the award of the B.Sc. Degree, as may be prescribed.
Admission to the B.Sc. degree programme is subject to the approval of the relevant head
of discipline.
B.MED.SC.
Refer to General regulations for the Degrees of M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O. (NFQ Level 8
Ref; www.nfq.ie)
The B.Med.Sc. may be awarded to students who have completed the programmes and
examinations in the following subjects: Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Pathology,
Bacteriology, Pharmacology and Medical Informatics & Medical Education.
To be eligible for award of the degree candidates must present a minor thesis of not
more than 2,000 words embodying a review of the literature or a research project in one of
the above subjects.
Students in the Fourth and subsequent years who do not intend proceeding to the MB,
BCh, BAO and who wish to be considered for the B.Med.Sc. may be accepted subject to
undertaking a period of three months under the Head of one of the specified subjects
and submission of a thesis as described above.
94
SCHOOL OF NURSING & MIDWIFERY
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES:
The School of Nursing and Midwifery is situated on-campus in a purpose built building.
The philosophy underpinning programme design and delivery is student-focused and aims to
inculcate values of caring, dignity and respect. The School has a reputation for being vibrant
and dynamic and its purpose is to develop innovative, practice focused programmes and to
undertake quality research of local, national and international relevance. There are two broad
goals: to prepare graduates who are analytical, knowledgeable, responsive and highly skilled
and to undertake quality research that effects change and makes a difference to client care
and service delivery.
Undergraduate Programmes (NFQ Level 8 awards; ref. www.nfq.ie)
provided include
Bachelor of Nursing Science (General), Bachelor of Nursing Science (International)
Bachelor of Nursing Science (Psychiatric), Bachelor of Midwifery Science, Bachelor of
Nursing (International).
Postgraduate Programmes provided include Full & Part-Time Options
Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Emergency Care)
Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Advanced Practice)
Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Child & Adolescen t
Men tal Health
Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Education)
Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Gerontology)
Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Intensive Care)
Po s t g r a d u a te D ip lo m a in N u rs i n g ( On c o lo g y )
Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Orthopaedics)
Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Mental Health, Community & In-Patient Acute Care)
Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Palliative Care)
Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Perioperative)
Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Practice & Community Nursing)
Master of Health Sciences (Nursing)
Master of Health Sciences (Midwifery)
Master of Health Sciences (Nursing/Midwifery Education)
Master of Health Sciences (Advanced Practice Nursing/Midwifery)
Master of Health Sciences (Specialist Nursing)
Stand Alone Modules
95
Full Time Options
Postgraduate Diploma In Nursing (Management Of Chronic Health Conditions)
Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Public Health Nursing)
Higher Diploma in Midwifery
PhD Degree (Nursing)
PhD Degree (Midwifery)
MPhil in Nursing
MPhil in Midwifery
96
General regulations for Undergraduate Degrees in Nursing & Midwifery (NFQ
Level 8 Ref; www.nfq.ie)
EXPLANATORY NOTE
The Undergraduate Degree Programmes of the School of Nursing and Midwifery at
National University of Ireland, Galway are four-year Honours Degrees, which award
the: Bachelor of Nursing Science (General), Bachelor of Nursing Science (Psychiartry)
and Bachelor of Midwifery Science.
Regulations may be altered periodically. The regulations applying to students are
generally those which applied to their programme at the time in which they commenced
their studies, unless otherwise specified in the General Regulations hereunder.
These Regulations form a total, individual clauses may be conditioned or varied by the
provision of other clauses and cannot be applied in isolation.
The Regulations may also be supported by, or refer to other publications such as the
University Undergraduate Prospectus (available on request or by following on-line
links for Future Students from www.nuigalway.ie), and the General Calendar of the
University http://www.nuigalway.ie/calendar/
I.
Entry to the Degree is limited and is based competitively on the results of the
Irish Leaving Certificate examination or its equivalent.
The minimum
requirement is matriculation, as set out in the Undergraduate Prospectus. [refer
Matriculation Requirements and Additional Requirements in the University
Undergraduate Prospectus]. Requirements arising where the results being
presented are from any examination other than the Irish Leaving Certificate are
also set out in the Prospectus.
Note: The competitive cut-off may be significantly higher than the Matriculation
standard.
All Applications are processed through the Central Applications Office.
(www.cao.ie)
II.
Candidates who do not meet the Ordinary Matriculation Requirements as set out
in II above, may matriculate on grounds of Mature Years [refer Matriculation on
Mature Years in the University Undergraduate Prospectus].
Note: All Applications are processed through the Central Applications Office. (refer to
www.cao.ie)
All applications must be successful at the Nursing Careers Centre (NCC) written
assessment and interview before being considered for an offer as a mature
applicant (refer to www.nursingcareers.ie). However, success at the NCC
written assessment and interview does not guarantee an offer of a place.
III.
Every student must furnish Garda Vetting. This is organised through the School
of Nursing and Midwifery in conjunction with HSE West. Failure to meet the
97
Garda Vetting requirements results in the student being removed from the Degree
programme.
IV.
Registration is carried out by the University. Students must be registered in their
Degree programme not later than fifteen days after the commencement of
Programmes.
V.
To obtain the degrees of B.NSc./ B.MSc. as set out in the Explanatory Note
(above);
(a) Students must pursue programmes of Study extending over a period of not
less than four Academic Years and must pass the various Examinations
prescribed below, meeting the requirements as set out elsewhere in these
Regulations, in the Marks and Standards of the School
http://www.nuigalway.ie/academic_records/syllabus/marks_standards.html)
and in Student Handbooks where necessary.
(b) The Examinations are as follows:
(1) The First University Examination in their programme.
(2) The Second University Examinations in their programme.
(3) The Third University Examination in their programme.
(4) The Fourth University Examination, being the Final Examination in
their programme.
Note: The duration of the programme cannot be shortened; no part of the Final
Examination may be taken before the end of 8 Semesters of professional
education
There is a time-limit on the completion of the degree; while a student who fails
their yearly examination in a particular year has the right to re-sit that/those
examination(s) the following year [refer par. VI to X below], the total time
allowed for the successful completion of the four University Examinations is 8
years or 16 semesters in total.
VI.
The First University Examination must be passed completely before a student
can proceed to the Second Year.
(a) To enter this Examination, the student must have satisfied the attendance
requirements on the First Year Programme, including completion of all
coursework and required clinical placement(s). Exceptions may only be
permitted by the Head of School where this is recommended by the
programme on professionally verified grounds of student ill-health, close
family bereavement or of significant personal difficulties.
(b) The Examination will be held during the Summer examination session with
repeat examinations, if necessary, held in the Autumn Examination session.
(c) Failure of the Examination in full or in part at the repeat examination will
require the student to re-sit the Examination in the following year.
(d) The First Year examination must be completed within two years of entering
First Year.
98
VII.
The Second University Examination must be passed completely before a student
can proceed to the Third Year.
(a) To enter this Examination, the student must have satisfied the attendance
requirements on the Second Year Programme, including completion of all
coursework and required clinical placements(s). Exceptions may only be
permitted by the Head of School where this is recommended by the
programme on professionally verified grounds of student ill-health, close
family bereavement or of significant personal difficulties.
(b) The Examination will be held during the Summer examination session with
repeat examinations, if necessary, held in the Autumn examination session.
(c) Failure of the Examination in full or in part at the repeat examination will
require the student to re-sit the Examination in the following year.
(d) The Second Year examination must be completed within two years of
entering Second Year.
VIII. The Third University Examination must be passed completely before a student
can proceed to the Fourth Year.
(a) To enter this Examination, the student must have satisfied the attendance
requirements on the Third Year Programme, including completion of all
coursework and required clinical placements(s). Exceptions may only be
permitted by the Head of School where this is recommended by the
programme on professionally verified grounds of student ill-health, close
family bereavement or of significant personal difficulties.
(b) The Examination will be held during the Summer examination session with
repeat examinations, if necessary, held in the Autumn examination session.
(c) Failure of the Examination in full or in part at the repeat examination will
require the student to re-sit the Examination in the following year.
(d) The Third Year examination must be completed within two years of entering
Third Year.
IX.
The Fourth and Final University Examination must be passed completely before
a student can be awarded the B.NSc / B.MSc.
(a) To enter this Examination, the student must have satisfied the attendance
requirements on the Final Year Programme, including completion of all
coursework, required clinical placement(s) and clinical hours. Exceptions
may only be permitted by the Head of School where this is recommended by
the programme on professionally verified grounds of student ill-health, close
family bereavement or of significant personal difficulties.
(b) The Examination will be held during the Summer examination session with
repeat examinations, if necessary, held in the Autumn examination session.
(c) Failure of the Examination in full or in part at the repeat examination will
require the student to re-sit the Examination in the following year.
(d) The Final Year examination must be completed within two years of entering
Final Year.
(e) To be awarded the Degree students must meet the requirements of An Bord
Altranais in full.
99
X
(a) The Award of the B.NSc / B.MSc. Degree will require successful
completion of all years of the Undergraduate Programme as set out in Rules
V to IX (inclusive) above.
(b) The calculation of the overall degree results awarded, including the
calculation of Honours (if any), will be based on 50% of the penultimate
year and 50% of the final year or the final year alone, whichever benefits the
student.
XI.
Any student failing to pass the Examination indicated in Rules VI, to IX
(inclusive) above within the specified intervals will be ineligible to proceed
further with his/her nursing / midwifery studies. Exemptions to this rule will be
granted by the Academic Council, on the recommendation of the College of
Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, only for very serious reasons.
XII.
Re-attendance may be required from any student whose attendance is considered
to have been unsatisfactory, or who has not attained a sufficient standard of
knowledge as judged by examination, competency or progressive assessment.
Satisfactory attendance is generally regarded as attendance and participation in
not less than 70% of the taught sessions provided. Students who have not
achieved satisfactory attendance may not be admitted to examinations.
100
BACHELOR OF NURSING SCIENCE (GENERAL)
Refer to General regulations for the Undergraduate Degrees in Nursing &
Midwifery (NFQ Level 8 Ref; www.nfq.ie) Paragraphs to I to XII above, pp. 96 to
99.
This programme leads to the award of Bachelor of Nursing Science (General) and
registration in the General division of the Nurse Register maintained by An Bord
Altranais. The programme is offered in partnership with the Health Service Executive,
West.
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
The Bachelor of Nursing Science Programme is a four-year academic programme,
which is delivered over two semesters for the first three years. Year four of the
programme comprises of clinical/theory instruction in semester one and a clinical
internship which occurs in year four, semester two, to run over 36 weeks. The
theoretical component comprises of lectures, seminars, workshops, experiential
learning, skills’ training and reading time. The clinical practice placements are linked to
the theoretical input. Clinical practice modules require students to complete clinical
placements throughout the Health Service Executive region. While on clinical
placements students will be supervised by a named preceptor. In accordance with An
Bord Altranais the total requirements of the programme are 144 weeks. During clinical
internship students will be paid a salary.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
A. Theoretical content aims to provide students with the knowledge necessary to
underpin their professional practice. The following key themes will be addressed:
B. Biological Sciences, providing students with a basis for understanding the structure
and function of the human body in health and ill-health.
C. Social Sciences, introducing students to the disciplines of sociology, psychology,
philosophy and law as applied to nursing practice. The overall aim is to provide
students with an understanding of what influences behaviour in both personal and
professional contexts
D. Nursing practice, including an exploration of the nature and goals of nursing, the
nursing management of the ill adult and specialist client groups and preparation for
practice. Later in the programme the focus is on enabling students to make the
transition from student nurse to registered practitioner.
E. Research / Informatics, introducing students to the concepts and principles of
research and its use in clinical practice. Students will also have an opportunity to
develop competency in basic information technology skills.
F. Health promotion, introducing students to the principles and skills of promoting
health.
G. Leadership in nursing practice, students will examine factors that affect the
management of care and develop an understanding of theories of leadership and
management of change.
Clinical modules provide students with the opportunity to develop their nursing skills in
the reality of practice.
101
ASSESSMENT AND REGULATIONS
Each year both the theoretical and clinical components of the programme will be
assessed. Modules are assessed by means of a combination of written examinations and
coursework; this includes both theoretical and clinical modules. Students’ clinical
performance/progress is assessed on an on-going basis while on placements to
determine competency. To be deemed competent students must attain the level
specified in the Assessment of Competency Tool, based on the Domains of Competency
identified by An Bord Altranais. Students must pass both theoretical, clinical and
competency assessments to be deemed to have passed the year. Students will not be
permitted to proceed to the next year of the programme until they have met all the
requirements specified in the Marks and Standards. Students who fail to proceed must
pass within one further year or they will be required to withdraw from the programme.
To pass the programme overall students must pass the required theoretical, practice and
competency assessments. In addition, to be awarded the degree and to register as a
general nurse, students must meet the requirements for registration identified by An
Bord Altranais. . The final calculation of marks will be derived either from years 3 & 4
or from year 4 only, to the benefit of the student. A full account of programme
regulations, compensation and credits is provided in the Marks and Standards.
ENTRY CRITERIA
Applicants must meet the following criteria to be eligible for admission to the Bachelor
of Nursing Science (General) programme.
 Applicants must be at least 17 years of age on 15 January of the year of entry onto
the programme.
 The minimum educational requirements for admission to the programme is a pass
in the Leaving Certificate examination, having obtained a minimum of grade C3 in
higher level papers in any two of the subjects listed below and a minimum of grade
D3 in ordinary or higher level papers in the other four subjects.

Irish (not Foundation Level)

English

Mathematics (not Foundation Level)

A laboratory science subject (Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Physics
and Chemistry (joint), Agricultural Science)

Any other two subjects acceptable for matriculation registration
purposes.
Or

Have second level education qualifications equivalent to the above
An applicant who does not meet the education requirements and who is 23 years of
age or over on 15 January in the year of application may apply as a mature student.
A separate pathway is available for mature students.
 Successful applicants must be of good mental and physical health and free from any
defect or abnormality which would interfere with the efficient performance of their
role as nurse. All applicants must undertake a medical and be deemed fit to
undertake this role.
102
SELECTION CRITERIA
Selection of applicants meeting the minimal educational requirements is on the basis of
points obtained in the Leaving Certificate (or equivalent). Applicants apply through the
CAO. A separate pathway applies to mature applicants, that is, those who are applying
on the grounds of mature years only and not on the basis of educational achievement.
Further details are available from the Nursing Careers Centre, An Bord Altranais.
103
BACHELOR OF NURSING SCIENCE (INTERNATIONAL)
Refer to General regulations for the Undergraduate Degrees in Nursing &
Midwifery (NFQ Level 8 Ref; www.nfq.ie) Paragraphs to I to XII above, pp. 96 to
99.
This programme leads to the award of Bachelor of Nursing Science (International) and
registration in the General division of the Nurse Register maintained by An Bord
Altranais. The programme is offered in partnership with the Health Service Executive,
West and Danbury Hospital, Connecticut, United States.
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
The Bachelor of Nursing Science (International) programme is a four-year academic
programme, which is delivered over two semesters for the first three years. Year four of
the programme comprises of clinical/theory instruction in semester one and an extended
clinical placement which occurs in year four, semester two, to run over 40 weeks. The
theoretical component comprises of lectures, seminars, workshops, experiential
learning, skills’ training and reading time. The clinical practice placements are linked to
the theoretical input. Clinical practice modules require students to complete clinical
placements throughout the Health Service Executive (West) region and Danbury
Hospital, Connecticut. While on clinical placements students will be supervised by a
named preceptor. In accordance with An Bord Altranais the total requirements of the
programme are 157 weeks.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
H. Theoretical content aims to provide students with the knowledge necessary to
underpin their professional practice. The following key themes will be addressed:
I. Biological Sciences, providing students with a basis for understanding the structure
and function of the human body in health and ill-health.
J. Social Sciences, introducing students to the disciplines of sociology, psychology,
philosophy and law as applied to nursing practice. The overall aim is to provide
students with an understanding of what influences behaviour in both personal and
professional contexts
K. Nursing practice, including an exploration of the nature and goals of nursing, the
nursing management of the ill adult and specialist client groups and preparation for
practice. Later in the programme the focus is on enabling students to make the
transition from student nurse to registered practitioner capable of working in Irish
and US healthcare settings.
L. Research / Informatics, introducing students to the concepts and principles of
research and its use in clinical practice. Students will also have an opportunity to
develop competency in basic information technology skills.
M. Health assessment skills, focused on preparing students to carry out client physical
and mental health assessments.
N. Health promotion, introducing students to the principles and skills of promoting
health.
O. Leadership in nursing practice, students will examine factors that affect the
management of care and develop an understanding of theories of leadership and
management of change.
104
Clinical modules provide students with the opportunity to develop their nursing skills in
the reality of practice.
ASSESSMENT AND REGULATIONS
Each year both the theoretical and clinical components of the programme will be
assessed. Modules are assessed by means of a combination of written examinations and
coursework; this includes both theoretical and clinical modules. Students’ clinical
performance/progress is assessed on an on-going basis while on placements to
determine competency. To be deemed competent students must attain the level
specified in the Assessment of Competency Tool, based on the Domains of Competency
identified by An Bord Altranais. Students must pass both theoretical, clinical and
competency assessments to be deemed to have passed the year. Students will not be
permitted to proceed to the next year of the programme until they have met all the
requirements specified in the Marks and Standards. Students who fail to proceed must
pass within one further year or they will be required to withdraw from the programme.
To pass the programme overall students must pass the required theoretical, practice and
competency assessments. In addition, to be awarded the degree and to register as a
general nurse, students must meet the requirements for registration identified by An
Bord Altranais. . The final calculation of marks will be derived either from years 3 & 4
or from year 4 only, to the benefit of the student. A full account of programme
regulations, compensation and credits is provided in the programme Marks and
Standards.
ENTRY CRITERIA
Applicants must meet the following criteria to be eligible for admission to the Bachelor
of Nursing Science (General) programme.
 Applicants must be at least 17 years of age on 15 January of the year of entry onto
the programme.
 US Applicants are assessed based on their High School transcripts and their
performance in standardised tests (SAT or ACT). To be considered for entry,
applicants must present six academic subjects, to include Mathematics, English and
a laboratory science subject, with an overall minimum GPA of 3.0. In addition,
students must present a composite SAT(I) score of 1700, or a composite ACT score
of 25. Preference is also given to applicants presenting AP or SAT (II) test scores.
The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma is also recognised for the purposes of
admission. Applicants must also meet the entry requirements stipulated by An
Bord Altranais including: medical clearance (students must be deemed fit through a
medical screening) and have police clearance Or
 Successful applicants must be of good mental and physical health and free from any
defect or abnormality which would interfere with the efficient performance of their
role as nurse. All applicants must undertake a medical and be deemed fit to
undertake this role.
105
SELECTION CRITERIA
To be considered applicants must meet the minimal requirements outlined above
outlined above. Selection will be made, by the programme team, on the basis of
applicants’ written application. Applications will be evaluated on the:
 Applicant’s academic record.
 Applicant’s level of motivation and suitability based on his/her Personal Statement.
106
BACHELOR OF NURSING SCIENCE (PSYCHIATRIC)
Refer toGeneral regulations for the Undergraduate Degrees in Nursing &
Midwifery(NFQ Level 8 Ref; www.nfq.ie)
This programme leads to the award of Bachelor of Nursing Science (Psychiatric) and
registration in the Psychiatric division of the Nurses Register maintained by An Bord
Altranais.
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
The Bachelor of Nursing Science Programme is a four-year academic programme,
which is delivered over two semesters for the first three years. Year four of the
programme comprises of clinical/theory instruction in semester one and a clinical
internship which occurs in year four, semester two, to run over 36 weeks.
Students are required to be in clinical practice for 39 hours per week over the internship
period. Students are paid a salary during their clinical internship. In total, students will
complete 24 theoretical modules and 6 clinical modules. Clinical modules will require
students to complete clinical placement throughout the Health Service Executive West.
While on clinical internship students will be supervised by a named preceptor, who is a
Registered Nurse. Clinical modules require students to be in clinical practice for 35
hours per week. Students are supernumerary while on placement, that is, when not on
clinical internship. Theory modules are of 100 hours duration, of which a maximum of
50 hours is direct contact.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Theoretical content aims to provide students with the knowledge necessary to underpin
their professional practice. The following key themes will be addressed:
 Biological Sciences, providing students with a basis for understanding the structure
and function of the human body in health and ill-health.
 Social Sciences, introducing students to the disciplines of sociology, psychology,
philosophy and law as applied to nursing practice. The overall aim is to provide
students with an understanding of what influences behaviour in both personal and
professional contexts
 Nursing practice, including an exploration of the nature and goals of psychiatric
nursing, the nursing management of the mentally ill person and preparation for
practice. Later in the programme the focus is on enabling students to make the
transition from student nurse to registered practitioner.
 Research / Informatics, introducing students to the concepts and principles of
research and its use in clinical practice. Students will also have an opportunity to
develop competency in basic I.T. skills.
 Mental health promotion, introducing students to the principles and skills of
promoting mental health.
 Leadership in psychiatric nursing practice, students will examine factors that affect
the management of care and develop an understanding of theories of leadership and
management of change.
107
Clinical modules provide students with the opportunity to develop their nursing skills in
the reality of practice.
ASSESSMENT AND REGULATIONS
Each year both the theoretical and clinical components of the programme will be
assessed. Modules are assessed through a combination of written examinations and
coursework; this includes both theoretical and clinical modules. Students’ clinical
performance/progress is assessed on an on-going basis while on placements to
determine competency. To be deemed competent students must attain the level
specified in the Assessment of Competency Tool, based on the Domains of Competency
identified by An Bord Altranais. Students must pass both theoretical, clinical and
competency assessments to be deemed to have passed the year. Students will not be
permitted to proceed to the next year of the programme until they have met all the
requirements specified in the Marks and Standards. Students who fail to proceed must
pass within one further year or they will be required to withdraw from the programme.
To pass the programme overall students must pass the required theoretical, practice and
competency assessments. In addition, to be awarded the degree and to register as a
psychiatric nurse, students must meet the requirements for registration identified by An
Bord Altranais. The final calculation of marks will be derived from years 3 & 4 only.
A full account of programme regulations, compensation and credits is provided in the
Marks and Standards.
ENTRY CRITERIA
Applicants must meet the following criteria to be eligible for admission to the Bachelor
of Nursing Science (Psychiatric) programme.


Or
Applicants must be at least 17 years of age on 15 January of the year of entry onto
the programme
The minimum educational requirements for admission to the programme is a pass
in the Leaving Certificate examination, having obtained a minimum of grade C3 in
higher level papers in any two of the subjects listed below and a minimum of grade
D3 in ordinary or higher level papers in the other four subjects.

Irish (not Foundation Level)

English

Mathematics (not Foundation Level)

A laboratory science subject (Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Physics
and Chemistry (joint), Agricultural Science)

Any other two subjects acceptable for matriculation registration
purposes.

Have second level education qualifications equivalent to the above
An applicant who does not meet the education requirements and who is 23 years of
age or over on 15 January in the year of application may apply as a mature student.
A separate pathway is available for mature students.
Successful applicants must be of good mental and physical health and free from any
defect or abnormality which would interfere with the efficient performance of their
role as nurse. All applicants must undertake a medical and be deemed fit to
undertake this role.
108
SELECTION CRITERIA
Selection of applicants meeting the minimal educational requirements is on the basis of
points obtained in the Leaving Certificate (or equivalent). Applicants apply through the
CAO. A separate pathway applies to mature applicants, that is, those who are applying
on the grounds of mature years only and not on the basis of educational achievement.
Further details are available from the Nursing Careers Centre, An Bord Altranais.
109
BACHELOR OF MIDWIFERY SCIENCE
Refer toGeneral regulations for the Undergraduate Degrees in Nursing &
Midwifery (NFQ Level 8 Ref; www.nfq.ie)
On completion of this programme students are awarded the Bachelor of Midwifery
Science and are eligible to apply to register as a midwife with An Bord Altranais. The
programme is offered in partnership with the Health Service Executive West.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Theoretical content aims to provide students with the knowledge necessary to underpin
their professional practice. The following key themes are addressed:

Biological Sciences: Provides students with a basis to understand the structure and
functioning of the human body, with a specific emphasis on the knowledge
necessary to underpin midwifery practice.

Social Sciences: Introduces students to psychology, sociology, and philosophy and
its application to midwifery practice. The overall aim is to give students an
understanding of what influences behaviour in both personal and professional
contexts.

Midwifery Skills: Focuses on the different skills required to practice as a midwife.

Midwifery Studies: Provides students with the knowledge of how to care for a
woman and her baby experiencing a normal pregnancy, childbirth and puerperium
and the woman and her baby experiencing complications during pregnancy,
childbirth and the puerperium.

Health Promotion: Introduces students to the principles of health and health
promotion in relation to midwifery practice.

Research: Gives students an in-depth understanding of research methods and its
application to midwifery practice. Students will also become competent in basic IT
skills with an emphasis on electronic information retrieval.

Leadership in Midwifery Practice: Focuses on theories of leadership, management
and change management and their application to midwifery practice.
Clinical modules provide students with the opportunity to develop their midwifery skills
in the reality of practice.
ASSESSMENT AND REGULATIONS
Each year both the theoretical and clinical components of the programme are assessed.
Modules are assessed by means of a combination of written examinations and
coursework; this includes both theoretical and clinical modules. Students’ clinical
performance/progress is assessed on an on-going basis while on placements to
determine competency. To be deemed competent students must attain the level
specified in the Competency Assessment Tool, based on the Domains of Competence
identified by An Bord Altranais. Students must pass both the theoretical, clinical and
110
competency assessments to be deemed to have passed the year. Students will not be
permitted to proceed to the next year of the programme until they have met all the
requirements specified in the Marks and Standards for the programme. Students who
fail to proceed must pass within one further year or they will be required to withdraw
from the programme.
To pass the programme overall, students must pass the required theoretical, practice and
competency assessments. In addition, to be awarded the degree and to apply to register
as a midwife, students must complete the minimum clinical practice experience
requirements and minimum number of clinical hours required by An Bord Altranais.
The final calculation of marks will be derived either from years 3 and 4 or from year 4
only, to the benefit of the student. A full account of programme regulations,
compensation and credits is provided in the Marks and Standards.
ENTRY CRITERIA
Applicants must meet the following criteria to be eligible for admission to the Bachelor
of Midwifery Science programme.
 Applicants must be at least 17 years of age on 15 January of the year of entry onto
the programme.
 The minimum educational requirements for admission to the programme is a pass
in the Leaving Certificate examination, having obtained a minimum of grade C3 in
higher level papers in any two of the subjects listed below and a minimum of grade
D3 in ordinary or higher level papers in the other four subjects.

Irish (not Foundation Level)

English

Mathematics (not Foundation Level)

A laboratory science subject (Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Physics
and Chemistry (joint), Agricultural Science)

Any other two subjects acceptable for matriculation registration
purposes.
Or

Have second level education qualifications equivalent to the above
An applicant who does not meet the education requirements and who is 23 years of age
or over on the 1st January in the year of application may apply as a mature student. A
separate pathway is available for mature students.

Successful applicants must be of good mental and physical health and free from any
defect or abnormality which would interfere with the efficient performance of their
role as midwife. All applicants must undertake a medical and be deemed fit to
undertake this role. In addition each student must undergo Garda Vetting.
SELECTION CRITERIA
Selection of applicants meeting the minimal educational requirements is on the basis of
points obtained in the Leaving Certificate (or equivalent). Applicants apply through the
CAO. A separate pathway applies to mature applicants, that is, those who are applying
on the grounds of mature years only and not on the basis of educational achievement.
Further details are available from the Nursing Careers Centre, An Bord Altranais.
111
BACHELOR OF NURSING(INTERNATIONAL)
Refer to General regulations for the Undergraduate Degrees in Nursing &
Midwifery (NFQ Level 8 Ref; www.nfq.ie) Paragraphs to I to XII above, pp. 96 to
99.
This programme leads to the award of the Bachelor of Nursing (International) and is
offered in partnership with Alliance College of Medical Sciences (ACMS), Malaysia.
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
The Bachelor of Nursing (International) programme is a two-year academic programme
aimed at Malaysian registered nurses. The degree programme is comprised of six taught
modules and a research project (a focused review of the literature or a service
improvement project). The programme will be delivered in a blended learning format
combining on-line learning with face-to-face teaching on site in Malaysia.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Programme content focuses on two major themes - developments in nursing or
midwifery practice and research applied to nursing or midwifery. Students will also
take an option module from a menu of choices.
Developments in Nursing or Midwifery Practice (4 modules)
These modules are research-based and focus on clinical practice. They aim to provide
students with the opportunity to explore current issues and advances in nursing practice
in context of their practice.
 Conceptualising Nursing Practice
 Contemporary Issues in Nursing Practice
 Promoting Quality Care or Promoting Health and Well-Being
 Option (see below)
Research Applied to Nursing of Midwifery (3 modules)
These modules aim to further develop students understanding of research and its
contribution to the development of nursing practice.

Evidence Based Practice

Research Methods

Focused Literature Review or Service Improvement
Options
Students will be able to choose from a range of theoretical and practice focused
modules. These will vary year on year depending on local needs. Modules will run
subject to sufficient numbers selecting that module. Examples include:

Advanced Wound Care Management.

Empowering Clients to Self-Manage Chronic Diseases.

Managing the Physical Health Needs of People with a Serious Mental Illness.

Experiencing Cancer.

End of Life Care: Psychological and Social Perspectives
112



The Context of Managing Health Care.
Health Assessment Skills.
Continence Care
ASSESSMENT AND REGULATIONS
The modules are assessed by means of continuous assessment. In order to be eligible
for the award of the Bachelor of Nursing (Internationanl) students must pass each
module at 50%. Compensation is not permitted between modules. The standards for
the award of an ‘Honours’ degree shall be: First Class honours overall 70% and Second
Class honours overall 60%. Unless the Board of Examiners recommends otherwise the
maximum mark obtainable on a repeat examination is 50%. A full outline of
programme assessment and regulations is provided in the programme Marks and
Standards.
ENTRY CRITERIA
All applicants must meet the following entry requirements:



Be registered nurse and recognised as such by the Malaysian Nursing and
Midwifery Board.
Have completed a Diploma in Nursing (or equivalent)
Demonstrate proficiency in the English language.
SELECTION CRITERIA
Selection will be made, by the Programme Director, in consultation with the Head of
School, on the basis of applicants’ written application. To be considered for admission
to the programme applicants must meet the admission criteria outlined above.
Applications will be evaluated on the:
 Applicant’s academic record and relevant professional experience.
 Applicant’s level of motivation and suitability based on his/her Personal Statement
(submitted as part of the application)
113
SECTION B
POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES
114
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES
RESEARCH GRADUATE OPTIONS
Full Time Structured PhD
The core component of doctoral training is the advancement of knowledge through
original research. The full-time PhD programme is now a ‘structured’ 4 year
programme, but it may be completed in a shorter period where there is approval by the
supervisor and the relevant School. The qualification is designed to enhance, improve
and directly engage the student in relative research skills. In addition, it will offer the
student disciplinary or dissertation-specific modules, as well as generic and transferable
skills. The programme is student-centred and insists on the overriding and primary
importance of scholarly research as reflected in the writing of a dissertation or in work
directed towards a comparable practice-based project. The programme offers a broad
template designed to provide the maximum flexibility of choice for the student while
respecting the wide range of disciplines and scholarly methodologies encompassed by
the various disciplinary units within the College.
The central role of the structured PhD is to nurture a distinctive, original and publishable
contribution to knowledge and the provision of a structure for the acquisition of highlevel skills in research methods, analysis and communication. Successful completion
and examination of the research thesis is the fundamental basis for the award of the PhD
degree.
At the core of this programme is the allocation of a large portion ECTS to the research
element of the PhD, the balancing ECTs for a given year (90 ECTs=1 Year PhD) are
divided between discipline and transferable skills modules. Discipline-or dissertationspecific modules are courses that have a direct and immediate bearing on the topic of the
student’s dissertation; transferable skills modules are courses that offer the student a
skill expertise in a subject or area that may be ‘transferred’ to employment other than
academia. Students will choose modules in consultation with her/his supervisor or
supervisory committee.
Entry Requirements
The entry requirements for doctoral students are set out in the University’s General
Calendar and also listed under the appropriate School headings in this calendar. Entrants
will be expected to have no less than an upper second class honours degree in the
discipline to which they are applying.
Course Entry and Registration
Application to the structured PhD will be made according to standard University
admission procedures. Students will be selected on the basis of a detailed proposal
submitted in the normal way and assessed by the Graduate Research Committee of the
relevant discipline. The structured PhD programme will commence in Semester 1 of
each academic year.
115
Programme Content
All students must take the mandatory Induction Module in the first year of their
registration on the Structured PhD Programme. Students then in consultation with their
Graduate Research Committee agree a structured approach to their research, transferable
skills and discipline specific skills requirements bringing them to a total of 90 ECTs per
annum for the first three years. These 90 ECTs must include some elements of
transferable and discipline specific modules. In the final year of the PhD it is expected
that the full ECT weighting be allocated to research. No student may register for a
module without the consent of the Supervisor/Supervisory Committee.
For full details of the modules available in 2010/11, please go to:
http://www.nuigalway.ie/colleges/mnhs/research.html.
Assessment
Each module has specific methods of assessment, which are detailed on the web address
given above. Where students elect to take a module that already exists as part of an
undergraduate or MA programme, they will be required to complete the standard
assessment for that module and in addition write a reflective report detailing the
contribution that participation in the module has made to the furtherance of their
research.
All candidates for doctoral study will enter the programme as PhD track with a strict
procedure in place for confirming their status as PhD students at the end of the first year.
Students will receive an oral examination at the end of the first year so as to ‘confirm’
her/his status as a doctoral student. This examination will be conducted by the student’s
supervisory committee during the period April to June. Those students whose PhD
status remains ‘unconfirmed’ will repeat the oral examination before September. The
committee responsible for the student’s supervision will either confirm continuation on
PhD track or make a recommendation to the College for change of status to MPhil. In
normal circumstances the principal supervisor will remain in place for the duration of
the MPhil.
For general information regarding the submission and examination of the thesis, please
refer to the University’s General Calendar.
Part Time: The traditional research only PhD remains available for those wishing to
complete on a part time basis. Please refer to the University General calendar and the
appropriate School section in this calendar for further information on these programmes.
116
SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES
RESEARCH GRADUATE OPTIONS
PH.D DEGREE
The School of Health Sciences is committed to creating an active, dynamic research
culture and aspires to be a centre of excellence in its targeted areas of research. Through
its research the School aims to support the provision of high quality nursing care and to
contribute to the improvement of people’s health and well-being.
Duration:
Full-time (Structured)-See College Structured PhD Entry
Part-time (18 terms)
Assessment:
Research Thesis
Entry requirements
To pursue a PhD potential candidates should discuss the matter with the Head of School
or relevant academic staff member. Candidates should have an honours degree in a
relevant academic discipline.
Application Procedures
Interested applicants should in the first instance consult the list of key research areas of
the School of Health Sciences as outlined below and make contact with the Head of
School or with the academic staff member concerned directly. In the event that the Head
of School is willing to recommend that the candidate be accepted, a supervisory
committee will be assigned to supervise the candidate’s research. Following informal
consultation, a formal application from the candidate will be considered by the College
of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences and Academic Council and a decision
regarding the application will be formally communicated to the candidate.
Application
Applications to research programmes are made online via The Postgraduate
Applications Centre (PAC).
The School’s key research interests are as follows:
Health Promotion
 Adolescent health
 Community health
 Environmental health
 Evidence-based practice and evaluation research in health promotion
 Global health.
 Health and human rights
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













Health and the media
Health Behaviour in School Children (HBSC).
Health impact assessment methodologies and evaluation
Health inequalities
Health policy
Health promotion competencies.
Health promotion in the travelling community
Health services research.
Immigrant health
Mental health promotion
Qualitative methodologies
Sexual and reproductive health
Substance use and risk taking and women’s health
Violence and injury prevention
Workplace bullying and Workplace Health Promotion
Occupational Therapy
 Aquired and Traumatic Brain Injury
 Evidence Based Practice
 Cognitive & Neuro-rehabilitation
Podiatry
 Tissue viability/ lower extremity wounds
 Management of the at risk limb
 Diabetic foot disease
 Tissue stress
 Foot and ankle biomechanics
 Joint instability
 Gait analysis
 Orthoses therapy
 Footwear
 Evidence based practice
 Interprofessional working in clinical practice
Speech & Language Therapy
 Psycholinguistics
 Language and Cognition
 Language Structure
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MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY - M.Phil. (HEALTH SCIENCES)
This one-year full-time or two-year part-time programme is aimed to prepare graduates
to develop, improve and enhance knowledge and understanding in their chosen area of
research. The
PROGRAMME CONTENT
The dissertation will normally involve the design of an empirical study and the
collection and analysis of data under the supervision of an academic member of the
discipline. The dissertation will be a piece of original research conducted by the student
in the area of Health Promotion, Occupational Therapy, Podiatry or Speech and
Language Therapy.
Students undertaking the M.Phil. will acquire skills and knowledge in the following
areas:
 Theoretical background to the concepts and principles underlying the research
topic
 Understand different research designs and be able to apply appropriate and
feasible approaches to study
 Use research literature critically to identify and assess evidence for decisions
in the module area
 Understand the relationship between research evidence and policy
 Communicate research evidence competently
 Demonstrate ability in key research and presentation skills, including
competence to carry out a literature search, to critically review published
literature, to evaluate research findings and to draw relevant policy and
practice conclusions.
ASSESSMENT
The dissertation will initially be graded by two assessors who will then agree a grade
and mark that is reviewed by the External Examiner. The student may undertake an oral
examination after submission of thesis.
ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
To purse with M.Phil, potential candidates should discuss the matter first with the Head
of Discipline or relevant academic staff member / potential supervisor. Candidates
should have a postgraduate honours degree award (at least second class honours), or
equivalent in a relevant academic discipline.
If candidates do not meet the above requirements, they may be permitted to take the
qualifying examination for the M.Phil. programme, but only on the recommendation of
the Head of Discipline or Programme Board, duly approved by College. A short-listing
procedure will be applied based on the applicant’s application details, a discretionary
interview may take place.
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POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH
ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
Candidates for admission to the programme should hold an appropriate primary
degree or appropriate professional qualifications and work experience.
PROGRAMME DURATION
The Postgraduate Diploma programme is taught over two years part-time attending one
full day per week.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
The Postgraduate Diploma is a taught modular programme comprising eight core
modules.
Module
Code
HP 856
HP 858
HP 861
HP 844
HP848
HP 805
HP862
HP 837
Module Title
ECTS
Introduction to Health Services Research methods
10
Health Services
5
Epidemiology and Statistical Methods in Health Services 10
Research
Health Informatics
5
Determinants of Health
10
Health and Public Policy
5
Evaluation,
Quality and Economics
in Health
Services 10
Research
Research Protocol
5
Where there is no examination indicated it may be assumed that the examination is by
continuous assessment = CA
ASSESSMENT:
Assessment shall be by means of written papers, continuous assessment and an oral
examination. Marks are returned for eight modules. A maximum of 2 attempts is
allowed in each written examination.
STANDARD:
Pass: 50%
Second class honours: 60%
First class honours: 70%
PROGRESSION ROUTES
Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Diploma to second class honours
standard (i.e. 60% on the aggregate) can apply to take a top-up Masters by means of a
minor dissertation provided they fulfill the normal entry requirements for the Masters
programme.
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MASTERS IN HEALTH SCIENCES (HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH)
The Masters programme incorporates the taught component of the Postgraduate Diploma
in Health Services Research programme with a minor dissertation based on original
research.
ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
A Second-class Honours primary degree in science, social science, or a related subject,
or a degree in medicine.
PROGRAMME DURATION
Both the Postgraduate Diploma and the Masters programmes are taught over two years
part-time attending one full day per week.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Masters students must complete the taught modular programme of the Postgraduate
Diploma programme.
Module
Code
HP 856
HP 858
HP 861
HP 844
HP848
HP 805
HP862
HP 837
HP841
Module Title
ECTS
Introduction to Health Services Research methods
10
Health Services
5
Epidemiology and Statistical Methods in Health Services 10
Research
Health Informatics
5
Determinants of Health
10
Health and Public Policy
5
Evaluation, Quality and Economics
in Health
Services 10
Research
Research Protocol
5
Dissertation
30
Masters students must submit a dissertation of not more than 20,000 words based on
original research in the field of Health Services Research not less than four moths
after completion of the taught Diploma programme.
121
ASSESSMENT
Standard:
Pass: 50%
Second class honours: 60%
First class honours: 70%
Assessment shall be by means of written papers, continuous assessment and a
discretionary oral examination. A maximum of two attempts is allowed in each written
examination. Masters students must complete the taught programme second class
honours standard (60%) and must submit a dissertation not less than four months from
completion of the taught programme.
The Masters degree shall not be awarded to any candidate who does not achieve a pass
mark (50%) in the dissertation. In this event students will have the facility to exit the
Masters programme with the Diploma in Health Services Research.
Marks are returned for eight modules as per the Postgraduate Diploma in Health
Services Research, plus a mark for the dissertation plus an overall aggregate for both.
122
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES (NFQ level 9 awards; ref. www.nfq.ie)
RESEARCH GRADUATE OPTIONS
Note regarding applications to present for the Degrees of M.D., M. Ch., or M.A. O. Only
candidates who have obtained his/her primary medical degrees in the National
University of Ireland or possess qualifications deemed by the Senate of the University
to be equivalent to the appropriate primary degree of the University are eligible to apply.
A candidate applying for permission to present for any one of these degrees who is not a
medical graduate of the University must in addition to satisfying the relevant conditions set
out in the sections following, also satisfy the following further conditions:
1
the applicant’s medical qualifications must be such as to qualify for
admission to the Medical Council Register;
2
the applicant must submit satisfactory evidence as to (1) when applying for
the permission; and
3
the applicant must be in a position to carry out the work for the degree in an
Irish medical facility.
M.D. DEGREE EXAMINATION
Subject to the provisions of the University Statute, a candidate shall be eligible to obtain
the Degree of Doctor of Medicine, three years after obtaining the Degree of Bachelor of
Medicine.
A candidate shall be eligible to obtain the Degree of Doctor of Medicine
(a)
(b)
by Thesis; or
on Published Work.
No candidate is eligible to obtain the Degree of M.D. under the provisions of the Statute
unless such candidate shall have obtained his Primary Degree in Medicine in the
University, or possess qualifications deemed by the Senate of the University to be
equivalent to the Primary Degree in Medicine of the University.
REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF M.D. BY THESIS
The candidate shall apply to the School for permission to present for the M.D.
Degree by Thesis at least twelve months before the date of the examination for which
he intends to enter. In his application he will state the nature of his proposed
123
thesis, his experience in the subject chosen, and will give the name of at least one referee
who will verify his statement regarding experience. The School, if satisfied that a prima
facie case has been made, shall appoint one or more of its members to advise on the work
and preparation of the thesis, if the candidate so desires.
The following further conditions must be fulfilled:
1.
2.
3.
The thesis shall embody original observations on the subject chosen and shall
contain in part, at least, material which in the opinion of the examiners is suitable for
publication, or which has already been published.
The candidate shall give the name(s) of referee(s) to prove that the material in his
thesis was the result of his personal effort. Where conjoint work is being considered
the candidate should have been the principal author of at least some part of the
work.
The candidate may be required to satisfy the examiners in an oral
examination in the subject matter of his thesis. Four copies of the thesis must be
submitted on or before February 2nd or July 1st to the Examinations Office, National
University of Ireland, Galway. Conferring Ceremonies are held in June and
December.
REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF M.D. ON PUBLISHED WORK
The Published Work must embody the results of personal observation or of original research
in subjects such as one or more of the following:–
Human Anatomy;
Pathology;
Pharmacology;
Gynaecology;
Psychiatry;
Physiology;
Obstetrics;
Medicine;
Embryology;
Microbiology;
Therapeutics;
Surgery;
Medical Informatics & Medical Education
Biochemistry;
Social Medicine;
Forensic Medicine;
Paediatrics;
General Practice;
or any other associated subject(s).
It is to be noted that publications on Surgical Diseases and their Pathology, which may be
presented, must not be works devoted solely to operative technique or methods.
(Application under this heading must be made to the Registrar, National University of
Ireland, 49 Merrion Square, Dublin 2.)
124
THE M.Ch. AND M.A.O. DEGREES
Candidates for Higher Medical Degrees will not be examined in the Clinical or Practical
Part of the Examination in hospitals in which they, at the time, hold appointments.
(1)
A candidate who has obtained the degree of M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O. from the National
University of Ireland, or who possesses qualifications deemed by the Senate of the
University to be equivalent to the appropriate primary degree of the University, shall be
eligible to obtain the Degree of M.Ch., under the following conditions:
1. A period of not less than five years shall have elapsed from the time the
candidate obtained the degrees of M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O., or the accepted equivalent
qualifications, not less than four years of which shall have been spent in the practice
of surgery and surgical science at a level approved by the College of Medicine,
Nursing and Health Sciences.
2. The candidate must pass a preliminary clinical examination in general
surgery. Exemption from this examination may be granted if the College considers
that the candidate holds a suitable senior surgical qualification acquired by
examination.
3. The candidate must present a thesis, the work for which has been carried out
over a period of not less than one year in Surgery in the College under the direction
of the Professor of Surgery. The School may approve of the work being carried out
elsewhere.
4. Permission to enter for the degree must be obtained from the School at least twelve
months before presentation of the thesis for examination.
5. The examination of the thesis is held in Summer and Winter. Four copies must be
presented on or before February 2nd or July 1st to the Examinations
Office, National University of Ireland, Galway.
(2)
A Candidate who has obtained the Degrees of M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O. from the National
University of Ireland, or who possesses qualifications deemed by the Senate of the
University to be equivalent to the appropriate primary degree of the University, shall be
eligible to obtain the Degree of M.A.O. under the following conditions.
1.
A period of not less than five years shall have elapsed from the time the
candidate obtained the equivalent qualification, not less than four years of which
shall have been spent in the practice of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at a level
approved by the College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences.
2.
The candidate must pass a preliminary clinical examination in Obstetrics
and Gynaecology. Exemption from this examination may be granted if the School
considers that the candidate holds a suitable obstetrical and gynaecological
qualification acquired by examination.
The candidate must present a thesis, the work for which has been carried out
3.
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over a period of not less than one year in Obstetrics and Gynaecology in the
College under the direction of the Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. The
School may approve of the work being carried out elsewhere.
4.
Permission to enter for the degree must be obtained from the School at
least twelve months before presentation of the thesis for examination.
5.
The examination of the thesis is held in Summer and in Winter. Four
copies must be presented on or before February 2nd or July 1st to the Examinations
Office, National University of Ireland, Galway.
Ph.D DEGREE
The College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences offers active research
programmes in most disciplines leading to a Ph.D Degree based on full-time research
projects.
Duration:
Refer to Structured PhD on pages 114-115
Timetable:
Full-Time
Assessment:
Thesis based on research carried out over a period of nine terms
Entry Requirements:
Candidates must hold an appropriate honours primary degree from the NUI or a
qualification deemed by the Senate of the NUI to be equivalent to the appropriate
primary degree of the University.
Please note that applicants should refer to the general NUI Galway Calendar of the
University in addition reading the above information (www.nuigalway.ie/calendar)
126
POSTGRADUATE
INFORMATICS)
DIPLOMA
IN
MEDICAL
SCIENCE
(HEALTH
PROGRAMME DESCRIPTION
The Postgraduate Certificate (30 ECTS) will be completed in the first semester and the
postgraduate diploma (60 ECTS) in the second semester. This is a revised 2 steps
approach to be enrolled in the Master degree programme in Medical Science (Health
Informatics) (90 ECTS). The postgraduate diploma is designed for all health professionals
to achieve knowledge and skills in how to search the Internet, retrieve and critically
appraise scientific literature regarding researchable clinical questions related to a topic of
your own special scientific interest.
The programme will be of value to health professionals and doctors, implementing scientific
knowledge in daily practice (Evidence Based Medicine). The course is delivered via
face-to-face teaching (block weeks) and distance learning. Beginners in EBM are
brought to an advanced level through enquiry based learning.
MINIMUM ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
Successful applicants will normally hold a primary degree in health care, medicine or
equivalent qualification, at second class honours grade one level or above, in a relevant
subject. Competence in English language equivalent to IELTS 6.5.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates of our Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Science have gone on to pursue
careers in a diverse range of fields including the completion of a Masters degree in Medical
Science, Medical Research and improved professional attitude in daily practice
(Evidence Based Practice/Medicine).
TIMETABLE
The mode of study is full-time due to your professional commitments; a blend of 3 blockweeks per semester and distance learning (Blackboard). The duration is 2 semesters from
September 2009 – January 2010 and from February 2010 – August 2010
25 places available
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Time table details: modules completed over two semesters—six months
Informatics modules are offered in block released courses of one week duration,
delivered via a blend of face-to-face teaching and enquiry based learning. Distance
learning is encouraged through online course materials available via the University’s
Blackboard website.
Modules, Year 1, Semester 1
ECTS
Finding the Needle in the I-stack (E-resources)
10
Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics
10
From Popper to Proposal (research methods)
10
Modules, Year 1, Semester 2
Searching the Internet (Advanced Level)
10
Research Methods (Advanced Level)
10
Advanced Statistics
10
Deadline for Final Research Proposal
To be confirmed
PROGRAMME AIMS
The broad aim of this programme is to strengthen junior doctor’s knowledge and skills in
subjects particular to medical research and clinical teaching. In particular the programme
aims to:











Using a blend of enquiry based learning and a self-directed interactive approach, by
the end of this programme you should be able to:
To search, retrieve, and store scientific information related to a specific topic of
interest.
Demonstrate critical appraisal skills regarding specified scientific literature.
Demonstrate an ability to ask researchable questions related to a specified field of
interest.
To detect the validity and reliability of published evidence and measurement
devices aimed to be used in a future research project.
To write a scientific essay in Word and referencing according to Vancouver formats
( Word plus Endnote)
To know how to use advanced descriptive and inferential statistics and critical
appraisal of published statistics.
Demonstrate competence in designing your own research design and to produce an
appropriate research proposal.
To organise a research meeting(s) with fellow researchers/heads of departments
aiming the launch of your own research strand.
To submit an approved research proposal.
To be enrolled in the second year of the Master of Medical Science (Health
Informatics)
128
DURATION OF THE PROGRAMME
The programme may be taken on a full time basis over at least 1 year.
129
MASTERS IN MEDICAL SCIENCE (HEALTH INFORMATICS)
Designed for health care providers, doctors and general practitioners, consultants,
nurses, physiotherapists, speech and language therapists with an interest in Evidence
Based Medicine, Health and Medical Research.
The course is delivered through a blend of teaching & learning methodologies
(block weeks and enquiry based learning).
MINIMUM ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
Successful applicants will normally hold a primary degree in health care, medicine or
equivalent qualification, at second class honours grade one level or above, in a relevant
subject AND have successfully completed the Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Science
(Health Informatics) or a comparable award deemed by the School of Medicine to
satisfy these requirements. Competence in English language equivalent to IELTS 6.5.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates of our previous Masters in Medical Science have gone on to pursue careers
in a diverse range of fields of medical research including MDs and PhDs and
improved professional knowledge, skills and attitudes in daily (para)-medical practice
(Evidence Based Medicine/Practice).
PROGRAMME AIMS
 Using a blend of enquiry based learning and a self-directed interactive approach, by
the end of this programme you should be able to:
 To search, retrieve, and store scientific information related to a specific topic of
interest.
 Demonstrate critical appraisal skills regarding specified scientific literature.
 Demonstrate an ability to ask researchable questions related to a specified field of
interest.
 To detect the validity and reliability of published evidence and measurement
devices aimed to be used in a future research project.
 To write a scientific essay in Word and referencing according to Vancouver formats
( Word plus Endnote)
 To know how to use advanced descriptive and inferential statistics and critical
appraisal of published statistics.
 Demonstrate competence in designing your own research design and to produce an
appropriate research proposal.
 To organise a research meeting(s) with fellow researchers/heads of departments
aiming the launch of your own research strand.
 To submit an approved research proposal.
130


To complete a research thesis.
To publish the content of the thesis in scientific output styles ( Endnote).
DURATION OF THE PROGRAMME
The programme may be taken on a full-time basis over at least two years (including the
PG Diploma in Medical Science (Health Informatics).
Programme content (subject to change)
8 modules completed over 4 semesters—2 years
Informatics modules are offered in block released courses of one week
duration, delivered via a blend of face-to-face teaching and enquiry based
learning. Distance learning is encouraged through online course materials
available via the University’s Blackboard website.
Modules, Year 1, Semester 1 (PG Dip)
ECTS
Finding the Needle in the I-stack (E-resources)
10
Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics
10
From Popper to Proposal (research methods)
10
Modules, Year 1, Semester 2 (PG Dip)
Searching the Internet (Advanced Level)
10
Research Methods (Advanced Level)
10
Advanced Statistics
10
Deadline for Final Research Proposal
Modules, Year 2, Semester 1 & 2
Scientific Writing and Publication
10
Research Thesis
50
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POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN MEDICAL SCIENCE (ENDOVASCULAR
SURGERY)
PROGRAMME DESCRIPTION
A new study programme combining practical endovascular surgical training with
evidence based medical research skills.
GENERAL
The Endovascular Training content is provided under the guidance of vascular surgeons
from the Western Vascular Institute. The curriculum is taught through hands-on,
supervised training, and supervised sessions in the Endovascular surgery teaching lab,
and weekly scheduled educational meetings.
Candidates will apply knowledge and skills to search for and critically appraise
scientific evidence to answer researchable clinical questions, to submit a research
proposal and to complete this proposal through a research thesis in endovascular
surgery.
PROGRAMME AIMS AND OBJECTIVES
The aim of the study programme is to combine practical endovascular surgical training
with evidence based medical research skills.
By the end of this programme you should be able to:
 To search, retrieve, and store scientific information related to a specific topic of
interest within endovascular surgery.
 Demonstrate critical appraisal skills regarding specified scientific literature.
 Demonstrate an ability to ask researchable questions related to endovascular
surgery.
 To detect the validity and reliability of published evidence and measurement
devices aimed to be used in a future research project.
 To write a scientific essay in Word and referencing according to Vancouver formats
(Word plus Endnote).
 To know how to use advanced descriptive and inferential statistics and critical
appraisal of published statistics.
 Demonstrate competence in designing your own research design and to produce an
appropriate research proposal.
 To organise a research meeting(s) with fellow researchers/heads of departments
aiming the launch of your own research strand.
 To submit an approved research proposal.
 Understand the basic concepts of all endovascular surgery procedures, including:
Imaging equipment, radiation physics, and safety
Diagnostic arteriography and venography
Guide wire and catheter skills
Percutaneous vascular access
Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA)
Subintimal Angioplasty
Intravascular stents
Pharmacologic and mechanical thrombolytic therapy
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Stent-grafts for endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms
Coil embolization (to facilitate endovascular AAA repair)
Closure of percutaneous access sites
Accepted intra-arterial and intracaval filtering devices
ECTS WEIGHTING
60 ECTS.
MINIMUM ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
Applicants must be a qualified and registered medical physician/surgeon, and enrolled
on the Western Vascular Institute’s Endovascular Training Programme as well as other
suitably qualified medical persons.
Competence in English language equivalent to IELTS 6.5.
EXAMINATION ARRANGEMENTS
Candidates will be required to complete individual assignments and presentations for
each module. Assessment will be by two combined MCQs and assignments for modules
1–3, and 4– 6 respectively. A detailed research proposal including a scientific review of
the literature (introduction section), and a full-fledged research proposal (method
section) together with regular attendance will be part of the final exam.
Candidates must complete a logbook and there will be ongoing evaluation of the
knowledge, competency, attitudes, and performance of the Endovascular surgery
trainees. The assessment will include cognitive, motor, and interpersonal skills as well as
Endovascular surgery judgment, to verify the individual has demonstrated sufficient
professional ability to practice Endovascular surgery therapy completely and
independently. This evaluation will be performed at three-monthly intervals, as well as
upon completion of the training programme.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates of our previous programmes have gone on to pursue careers in a diverse range
of fields of health and medical research including MDs and PhDs and improved
professional knowledge, skills and attitudes in daily practice (Evidence Based Medicine
– Endovascular Surgery).
PROGRAMME CONTENT (SUBJECT TO CHANGE)
Specialist surgical training combined with six research modules—one year.
Informatics modules are offered in block released courses of one week
duration, delivered via a blend of face-to-face teaching and enquiry based
learning. Distance learning is encouraged through online course materials
available via the University’s Blackboard website.
Optional modules for endovascular surgery techniques will be offered due
course!
Modules, Year 1, Semester 1
ECTS
Finding the Needle in the I-stack (E-resources)
10
133
Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics
10
From Popper to Proposal (research methods)
10
Modules, Year 1, Semester 2
Searching the Internet (Advanced Level)
10
Research Methods (Advanced Level)
10
Advanced Statistics
10
Deadline for Final Research Proposal
To
confirmed
134
be
M.Sc. (SPORTS & EXERCISE PHYSIOTHERAPY)
Part-time Masters two years - Places limited to 10
PROGRAMME DESCRIPTION
The overall intention of the Masters programme is to produce a successful student with a
wide breadth of knowledge across Sports & Exercise Physiotherapy and the necessary
skills to put the theory into practice
PROGRAMME AIMS & OBJECTIVES
The programme will provide physiotherapists with:

The necessary scientific background knowledge to appreciate the issues arising in
the field of Sports & Exercise Physiotherapy.

The necessary skills and knowledge to provide advice on the prevention of sports
injuries.

Up to date training in modern methods of assessing, diagnosing and treating sports
injuries including emergency care.

Opportunities to learn about the theory and application of Sports Psychology,
Podiatry, Biomechanics, Sports Nutrition, Sports Pharmacology, Exercise
Physiology, Fitness Assessment and ethical issues within sport.

Opportunity to learn about the medical applications of exercise in maintaining
health and in disease

An introduction to research appropriate to the field of Sports & Exercise
Physiotherapy
ECTS WEIGHTING
90 ECTS
MINIMUM ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
Applicants must be chartered physiotherapy graduates (BSc Physiotherapy NUI) of
National University of Ireland or another university deemed acceptable, and have a
minimum of two year’s experience post qualification.
SELECTION CRITERIA
Short listed applicants may be called to interview and the final selection made at that
point. Preference will be given to applicants with a strong sporting background, either
personal involvement or recognized service provision.
135
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Sports & Exercise Physiotherapy
Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy 1
Sports Injuries 1
Exercise Physiology
Research 1 & 2 Biostatistics
Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy 2
Sports Injuries 2
Medical Applications of Exercise
Sports Psychology /
Sports Medicine & Administration
Thesis
136
ECTS
7.5
7.5
7.5
7.5
7.5
7.5
7.5
7.5
Examined
Semesters 1
Semester 1
Semesters 2
Semesters 2
Semester 1
Semester 1
Semesters 2
Semesters 2
30
Both Summers
M.Sc. (SPORTS & EXERCISE MEDICINE)
Part-time Masters two years - Places limited to 10
PROGRAMME DESCRIPTION
The overall intention of the Masters programme is to produce a successful student with a
wide breadth of knowledge across Sports & Exercise Medicine and the necessary skills
to put the theory into practice
PROGRAMME AIMS AND OBJECTIVES
The programme will provide doctors with:
The necessary scientific background knowledge to appreciate the issues arising in the
field of Sports & Exercise Medicine.
The necessary skills and knowledge to provide advice on the prevention of sports
injuries.
Up to date training in modern methods of assessing, diagnosing and treating sports
injuries including emergency care.
Opportunities to learn about the theory and application of Sports Psychology, Podiatry,
Biomechanics, Sports Nutrition, Sports Pharmacology, Exercise Physiology, Fitness
Assessment and ethical issues within sport.
Opportunity to learn about the medical applications of exercise in maintaining health
and in disease
An introduction to research appropriate to the field of Sports & Exercise Medicine
ECTS WEIGHTING
90 ECTS
MINIMUM ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
Applicants must be medical graduates of National University of Ireland or another
university deemed acceptable, and have a minimum of one year’s experience after
registration with the Irish Medical Council.
SELECTION CRITERIA
Applicants wishing to enter for the Pfizer Bursary must complete a 200 word statement
on why they feel they should be accepted into the programme. Short listed applicants
may be called to interview and the final selection made at that point. Preference will be
given to applicants with a strong sporting background, either personal involvement or
recognized service provision.
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PROGRAMME CONTENT
Sports & Exercise Medicine
Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy 1
Sports Injuries 1
Exercise Physiology
Research 1 & 2 Biostatistics
Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy 2
Sports Injuries 2
Medical Applications of Exercise
Sports Psychology /
Sports Medicine & Administration
Thesis
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ECTS
7.5
7.5
7.5
7.5
7.5
7.5
7.5
7.5
Examined
Semesters 1
Semester 1
Semesters 2
Semesters 2
Semester 1
Semester 1
Semesters 2
Semesters 2
30
Both Summers
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN HEALTH SCIENCES (PRIMARY CARE)
OVERVIEW
This is an exciting time for professionals working in the rapidly changing healthcare
policy context. The opportunities presented by the HSE Transformation process pose
challenges to traditional ways of working, while advancing research brings new
approaches to healthcare management. We aim to meet the evolving educational needs
of health and social care professionals working at the forefront of this ever-changing
environment. The programme aims are:
 To allow primary care practitioners to learn with and from each other in a structured
educational environment to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes for effective
multidisciplinary working in primary care.
 To develop effective leaders, managers and members of primary health care teams.
 To explore the role of primary care in the health service.
 To increase knowledge and skills for evidence-based practice and information
management within a changing health care environment.
 To foster a critical approach to practice by a)developing an analytical approach to
published work, b)learning about the work of others and c)examining own work
using the technique of reflective practice writing.
 To increase understanding of human behaviour in relation to health, illness and
health care in order to improve effectiveness of interaction with patients and other
health care professionals.
 To develop knowledge and skills to plan, implement and evaluate new developments
in health care delivery.
COURSE STRUCTURE
This is an inter-disciplinary course delivered over eight months using a mix of elearning and face to face teaching. E-learning is supported by comprehensive distance
learning packs. Face to face teaching uses a collaborative learning model and requires
attendance in Galway for two consecutive weekdays each month (four days in
September and February).
ENTRY
The Postgraduate Diploma in Primary Care is directed at the wide range of specialists
who provide primary care. Candidates for the course should have an appropriate primary
degree, professional qualification or equivalent experience and work in a health care
setting. Selection is based on relevant professional experience, ability/opportunity to
apply learning to daily work, and academic record. Computer literacy is an essential
requirement for this course.
COURSE CONTENT
The course syllabus and assessment are designed to meet the aims of the course with an
emphasis being placed on knowledge and skills required for effective teamwork. A
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group project is compulsory part of the course. This allows students to work together in
a multidisciplinary group to use the knowledge gained in the taught modules. These are
outlined below:
 Concepts and Principles of Primary Care
 Evidence Based Primary Care
 Health Research Methods
 Teambuilding and Communication Skills
 Health Promotion
 Health Economics
 Healthcare Ethics
 Psychology for Primary Care
 Sociology of Health and Illness
ASSESSMENT
This is a 60 ECTS course. Assessment is based on course assignments, participation in
online discussions, a group project and a reflective practice journal.
A 70% minimum attendance rate is required for satisfactory completion of the course.
Non-attendance must be accompanied by relevant medical certification.
Students must submit three essays, each worth 5 ECTS – they have a choice of writing
on psychology, sociology, health economics or ethics.
Students must submit an assignment in health promotion, also worth 5 ECTS, and a
Reflective Practice Journal, worth 10 ECTS.
Primary care, research methods and evidence based health care are assessed by means of
one group project worth 18 ECTS. In addition, students are graded on their participation
in distance learning exercises. These are worth 12 ECTS collectively. Marks for the
group project and distance learning exercises are returned to the Examinations Office as
a single result worth 30 ECTS.
COMPENSATION
Students who achieve 40-49% in an assessment may compensate between modules.
Students who compensate between modules cannot be awarded an overall Honours
result. There is no limit to the ECT’s they can compensate in.
140
MASTERS IN HEALTH SCIENCES (PRIMARY CARE)
OVERVIEW
The Master of Health Sciences (Primary Care) will equip students to successfully
develop and carry out a piece of research within the primary care setting, and in doing
so develop relevant expertise in research methodology. Students are drawn from a wide
range of health and social care professions.
ENTRY
Entry to the Masters year usually follows successful completion of the Postgraduate
Diploma in either Primary Care or Clinical Primary Care, with a result of at least 60%.
Applications may be considered from others whose educational background and relevant
experience suit them to the requirements of the course.
Selection of individual candidates will be based on congruence of the applicant’s thesis
proposal with the expertise and capacity for supervision within the Discipline of General
Practice. All applicants should contact the Course Director for further details in relation
to this.
COURSE STRUCTURE
The programme runs for one calendar year from September to August. Each student is
assigned a dedicated thesis supervisor with whom they will work closely throughout the
year. Individual research is supported by ten days of workshops in Galway (two
consecutive weekdays in each of September, October, November, February and April).
COURSE CONTENT
The topics covered during workshops include:
 Advanced qualitative research methods
 Statistics and epidemiology
 Computer packages: SPSS, Nvivo and Endnote
 Evidence Based Primary Care (advanced)
 Research ethics
 How to write a research paper
ASSESSMENT
The course is assessed by submission of a 20,000 word dissertation on a piece of
independent research carried out by the student under supervision.
An external examiner and one other examiner will assess the dissertation.
First Class Honours will be awarded to those receiving a mark of 70% or greater,
Second Class Honours to 60-69% and a pass to 50-59%.
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POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE & POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN HEALTH
SCIENCES (CLINICAL PRIMARY CARE)
OVERVIEW
There is an increasing expectation for community based health professionals to demonstrate
their continuing competence in primary care. Inter-disciplinary learning provides new and
interesting challenges for primary care professionals that reflect many of the issues that
occur in the context of primary care teams.
This course aims to meet the learning needs of general practitioners and community based
nurses in the management of disease in the community. It aims to give practitioners up-todate, relevant, in-depth understanding and knowledge of common conditions to assist in the
management of disease in practice.
ENTRY
Applicants must be clinically qualified healthcare professionals working in a primary care
setting. Applicants from secondary care may also be considered. Parts of the programme are
delivered in distance learning format and general computer literacy is essential for this.
COURSE STRUCTURE
The Clinical Primary Care collection is a suite of modules on clinical and related nonclinical topics. It has been designed with maximum flexibility in mind to meet the needs of
busy health professionals. You can take a single module in a subject of your choice or you
can construct your own course at Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma levels
by choosing a selection of modules that suit your needs. Modules can be accumulated over
up to five years (or one year) as you wish.
The modules are delivered using an e-learning platform supported by dedicated skills
training sessions at NUI Galway (usually two non-consecutive days per module). The
distance education format allows you to engage in learning at a time and place that suit your
lifestyle.
Postgraduate Certificate (36 ECTS) = any 3 modules, at least 2 clinical.
Postgraduate Diploma (90 ECTS) = any 6 modules, at least 3 clinical, plus a Service
Development Module.
COURSE CONTENT
The modules are listed below with their ECTS credit ratings. In all modules there is an
emphasis on practical application of the module in practice. Thus, where appropriate,
theoretical classes are supported by workshops and assessments involving application of
theory in the workplace.
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Clinical Modules
Diabetes in Primary care
Cardiovascular Disease in Primary care
Infectious Disease in Primary Care
Women’s Health in Primary Care
Respiratory Disease in Primary Care
Minor Surgery and Related Dermatology in General Practice
ECTS
12
12
12
12
12
12
Non-Clinical Modules
Concepts and Principles of Primary Care
Health Research Methods
Evidence Based Primary Care
Clinical Teaching Methodologies
ECTS
12
12
12
12
Service Development Module (18 ECTS)
This is a core module for students completing the Postgraduate Diploma. The content of the
module will be largely student-directed and will focus on an issue of relevance to service
improvement within the student’s workplace. It allows students to contribute to the
development of their own primary care service by critically examining a practice issue and
developing a resolution to the issue in collaboration with colleagues and/or clients as
appropriate. It is an opportunity to integrate and apply learning from other modules, making
explicit links between theory and practice to bring tangible and documented improvements
to primary care services on the ground.
ASSESSMENT
Each module is assessed via a combination of submitting a practice-based assignment,
participating in online activities, and attending skills workshops.
The pass standard for each module and for the course is 50%. The standard for the award of
a second class honours is the attainment of 60% or greater on the aggregate of the modular
scores. A first class honours is awarded on an aggregate result of 70% or greater. Normally,
honours may be awarded only when the examination is passed at the first attempt.
COMPENSATION
Compensation between modules will not be permitted.
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POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE & POSTGRADUATE
HEALTH SCIENCES (CLINICAL EDUCATION)
DIPLOMA
IN
RATIONALE
In the health professions, much of the undergraduate teaching and most postgraduate
education takes place in clinical settings. Most clinical teachers have little background
knowledge of adult learning and have received no formal training in clinical teaching
techniques. The purpose of this programme is to provide health professionals with the
knowledge and skills required for effective clinical teaching and to become successful
clinical supervisors and motivators of student learning.
PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES
The Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma in clinical education are aimed
at qualified health professionals for whom clinical teaching forms part of their role or
work plan. The aims of the programmes are to provide a theoretical and experiential
platform for the participants to develop expertise in all of the key components of clinical
teaching.
By the end of the Postgraduate Certificate Programme the learners will be able to:
1. Demonstrate an awareness of the key relevant theories of learning and how they
relate to clinical teaching
2. Construct learning events or programmes based on an understanding of the
principles of adult learning and programme design
3. Implement and evaluate effective clinical teaching using appropriate theory based
techniques
4. Demonstrate an understanding of the purposes and effects of assessment
5. Participate in the design and implementation of objective and reflective methods of
assessment
6. Demonstrate proficiency in key teaching skills such as small, large group teaching,
giving feedback, using questions appropriately and learner appraisal.
In addition, by the end of the Postgraduate Diploma Programme the learners will be able
to:
 Design and implement assessments of clinical competence and performance
 Demonstrate an understanding of individual and group supervision techniques
 Demonstrate an understanding of how to design and oversee effective continuing
professional development
 Design, implement and evaluate a clinical teaching project
144
ELIGIBILITY AND SELECTION:
The programme will be offered to health professionals who have completed their
undergraduate degrees and have achieved full registration status, or equivalent.
Applicants must be currently registered with their relevant professional body and
actively involved in clinical practice. The programme will also be open to registered
health professionals (who qualified prior to the modern degree route) and who have a
minimum of 2 years post registration experience in their clinical profession. Applicants
will be selected on the basis of the quality of their application measured against
established criteria.
PROGRAMME CAPACITY
Applicants can register for the Postgraduate Certificate or the Postgraduate Diploma.
Progression to the Postgraduate Diploma requires successful completion of the
Postgraduate Certificate programme. The capacity for the combined programmes is 30
students.
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
The Postgraduate Certificate programme will be delivered over two semesters and the
Postgraduate Diploma programme over 3 semesters. The Postgraduate Certificate will
comprise 3 modules and the Postgraduate Diploma 6 modules plus a clinical teaching
project.
Most programme material will be delivered using distance learning techniques.
Programme materials will be made available sequentially on the Blackboard virtual
learning environment. Communication and discussion will be electronic and assessments
will be submitted online. The distance learning components will be supported by faceto-face teaching skills workshops.
Each module will require approximately 50 hours of effort of which 25 hours will be
contact time. The contact hours include reading formal programme materials,
participation in practical workshops, participation in discussion board activities, carrying
out assignments and mini projects (e-tivities), and the practical application of new
knowledge in the workplace. The Postgraduate Diploma clinical teaching project will
include a further 50 contact hours including work based project design, implementation,
evaluation and online supervision.
PROGRAMME OUTLINE
The majority of teaching is by distance learning. The skills of clinical teaching are
taught in 5 one day residential workshops. The first of these will take place in October
(programme introduction, e-learning skills and clinical teaching skills). The latter two
workshops will be held Jan-March in semester 2. In addition, there is a two-day face-toface introductory workshop in September.
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Module
Trimester
1
Learning Theory in Clinical Settings
2
Clinical Teaching Course Design
3
Clinical Teaching Methodologies
4
Assessment and Evaluation of Clinical Teaching
5
Measurement of Competence and Performance
6
Professional Development
Clinical Teaching Project
1
1
2
2
3
3
3
Sep-Dec
Sep-Dec
Jan-Mar
Jan-Mar
Apr-Jul
Apr-Jul
Apr-Jul
ASSESSMENT
Modules are assessed by problem based assignment and e-tivity. The assignment should
be not less than 1,000 words and not more than 1,500 words long. Students will be asked
to solve a generic clinical teaching problem using knowledge and skills gained during
the module in question. They will also have to justify their choice of solution using
evidence from the programme and other resources. The assignment is assessed
according to criteria which are published in the programme handbook. Each problem
based assignment is worth 55% of the marks for the module in question.
E-tivities (or electronic activities) are short assessments designed to test candidates
ability to link the theoretical constructs offered by the modular programme materials to
the work that they do as teachers. Each e-tivity will require students to submit between
300 and 500 words in response to an e-tivity exercise. Each e-tivity will account for 15%
of the total marks for the module.
The major assessment for the Postgraduate Diploma is a clinical teaching project. The
clinical teaching project involves students completing a proposal for a real or planned
clinical teaching programme including a rationale for the programme, an indication of
the proposed content, a set of learning objectives, an indication of the proposed teaching
methodologies, an assessment strategy, and an evaluation plan. The clinical teaching
project should include a justification for the teaching methods, the assessments and the
evaluation tools used using evidence derived from the programme and from other
resources.
146
MASTERS IN HEALTH SCIENCES (CLINCAL EDUCATION)
The Master of Health Sciences (Clinical Education) has been designed to address the
higher educational needs of health care professionals involved in the delivery of teaching
and training in the health care environment. It builds on the Postgraduate Diploma in
Health Sciences (Clinical Education), successful completion of which is a requirement
for entry into the Masters programme.
AIMS
The programme aims to:
1. Develop the teaching and educational planning skills of experienced clinical
professionals who have significant educational responsibilities.
2. Provide students with relevant knowledge to both manage and lead effective
educational innovations within their profession.
3. Provide students with the relevant knowledge and skills to plan and teach clinical
and communication skills at an advanced level.
4. Enable students to develop the knowledge and skills required to practice evidence
based education.
5. Enable students to develop and implement a sound educational research protocol.
Enable students to complete an educational research project and to submit in the
form of a research paper.
ENTRY
The programme will be offered to health professionals who have completed the
Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Education and who have achieved at least a second
class honours final mark. Applicants must be currently registered with their relevant
professional body and actively involved in clinical teaching. Applicants will be selected
on the basis of the quality of their C.V., and an application essay (personal statement) in
which each candidate must outline their rationale for doing the programme.
STRUCTURE
The programme will be delivered using online and paper-based distance learning
techniques, supported by face to face teaching skills workshops. Students will each have
an academic mentor/supervisor for the duration of the Masters. The content of the course
is as follows:
MODULE ECTS
Evidence Based Education
Educational Leadership
Educational Research Design
Clinical Teaching Research Dissertation
5
5
10
40
147
ASSESSMENT
The taught modules will be assessed using:
 A problem-based assignment for the modules on leadership and evidence based
education.
 An educational research proposal for the educational research module.
 Students are also required to submit a 4,000 word clinical teaching research
dissertation at the end of the academic year, in the form of a 4,000 word ready for
publication research paper.
148
M.Sc (MEDICAL PHYSICS)
Medical Physics involves the application of physics and physical methods to problems
in medicine. Although often associated with the use of ionizing radiation (X-Rays and
Nuclear medicine) it finds application in almost every clinical discipline present in
modern hospitals. There is considerable demand for qualified Medical Physicists in
Ireland and this demand is expected to grow in the future.
It is a one year full-time programme for which a minimum of five and a maximum of ten
students will be accepted.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
The programme consists of an intensive programme of lectures, workshops, laboratory
sessions, tutorials, and self-directed learning, followed by a short (three-month) project
and dissertation. The syllabus contains modules covering the traditional topics
associated with medical physics (Radiation Fundamentals, Hospital & Radiation Safety)
and those more associated with clinical engineering (Clinical Instrumentation). The
emphasis is on radio-therapy, radiation protection and diagnostic imaging. Programmes
in anatomy, physiology, hospital safety and risk management are also provided. The
course is accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) and
is therefore recognised as a component of IPEM professional training.
PROGRAMME AIMS AND OBJECTIVES
The programme is designed to meet the demand for qualified medical physicists in
Ireland. It is primarily geared towards training for physicists in the application of
radiation physics in medicine but maintains a reasonable exposure to key aspects of
clinical engineering so that students receive a comprehensive knowledge of the
application of physical sciences and engineering to medicine.
ECTS
90 ECTS
ASSESSMENT
Assessment will be through a combination of written and oral examinations, continuous
assessments, project work, and the writing of a small dissertation.
Graduates must hold at least a second class honours degree in Physics or Experimental
Physics, Electronic Engineering, or another relevant discipline as determined by the
College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences. A candidate with a primary degree
without honours, and having practical experience in a relevant subject area over a
number of years at a level deemed to be appropriate by the College of Medicine,
Nursing and Health Sciences, may be registered for the M.Sc.Degree. Candidates may
be interviewed to determine suitability.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The healthcare industry is one of the largest commercial sectors both nationally and
internationally. There will be a considerable demand for qualified medical physicists in
149
Ireland in the future. There will be a significant increase in the number of radiotherapy
facilities in the country, both public and private. New regulations regarding protection
against the hazards of radiation will also require additional medical physicists. In the
past, vacancies have often been filled from abroad. However, the shortage of medical
physicists in the U.S. and U.K. will mean that this supply can no longer be relied upon.
Opportunities also exist in specialist medical device industries and in academic research.
150
M.Sc (REGENERATIVE MEDICINE)
Regenerative Medicine is a discipline which generates novel therapeutics to mediate
repair and generation of damaged and diseased organs. These therapeutics are based on
stem cells, gene therapy, biomaterials, engineering tissue and other biologically active
compounds. This 12 month taught programme aims to provide graduates in life sciences,
biomedical engineering, nursing or medicine with an understanding of Regenerative
Medicine and to equip them with the skills necessary for a career in this emerging
discipline.
PROGRAMME AIMS AND OBJECTIVES
This programme aims to provide graduates with an understanding of Regenerative
Medicine integrating information, technologies and skills from biological sciences,
engineering, legal and ethical disciplines. These modules will address the science behind
Regenerative medicine, its application to human disease and its importance to modern
society.
ECTS
90 ECTS
COURSE MODULES
Compulsory modules
Basic Pharmacology
Translational Medicine
Introduction to Biomedical Research
Immunology
Tissue Engineering
Advanced Research Techniques
Regenerative Medicine
Research Project
Total
PM55 1
REM502
REM507
REM508
ME422
REM503
REM504
REM505
Optional modules
Students will select options worth 10 ECTS
Anatomy
AN230
Physiology Human Body Function Module
Introduction to Business
Optics and Cell Biology
Economic Evaluation in Healthcare
Introduction to Biomedical Systems
151
SI3 17
MG529
BES504
EC581
CT560
5 ECTS
5 ECTS
5 ECTS
5 ECTS
10 ECTS
10 ECTS
10 ECTS
30 ECTS
80ECTS
5 ECTS
10 ECTS
10 ECTS
5 ECTS
5 ECTS
5 ECTS
This programme is open to students who have obtained at least a Second Class Honours
degree in an appropriate biological science, biomedical engineering, medicine or
nursing. Students who have a degree without Honours in a related area and have 3 or
more years of practical experience in the subject area will also be eligible to apply for
this programme.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
This programme will equip students for careers in biomedical research and development
in an academic or industrial setting. Graduates will also receive training relevant to
clinical research, translational research and clinical trial management.
152
M.Sc. (CLINICAL RESEARCH)
PROGRAMME DESCRIPTION
The objective of this course is to provide training for the next generation of healthcare
workers in the clinical research arena, providing a platform for more enhanced
efficiencies in the translation of medical discoveries into clinical practice. Course
contributors include senior academics and medical professionals from NUI Galway,
Galway University Hospitals and McMaster University, Canada, who are actively
engaged in clinical research. This programme is closely linked with the HRB Clinical
Research Facility, Galway. Aimed at individuals employed in the healthcare sector, this
course has been developed to meet the needs of working graduates who wish to up-skill,
specialise or change career direction. For further details of the course, see www.crfg.ie
The MSc in Clinical Research is intended to be a part-time two-year program of
academic study in Clinical Research Methodology. Year 1 will be spent at NUIG and
Year 2 is completed by a combination of distance learning through modules delivered by
McMaster University and NUI Galway, and on-site modules delivered by NUI Galway.
A full-time 1-year option is available to students who wish to complete the MSc in a
full-time capacity
This course is delivered through blended learning, to include lectures, tutorials, problem
based learning (PBL) and distance learning.
NUI GALWAY CODE:
GYM56 (Full Time); GYM57 (PART TIME)
PROGRAMME AIMS AND OBJECTIVES
 To understand quantitative and qualitative research approaches, understand their
strengths and limitations and to learn how to apply research approaches and
methods by completing weekly assignments and preparing a research protocol in
own area of interest
 To examine data analysis, statistical concepts and thinking on a practical level, to
apply simple statistical techniques to design, analyse and interpret studies in a wide
range of disciplines and to utilise a computer statistical package to illustrate the
power of statistical techniques.
 An in-depth understanding of sampling, causation, survey research, cohort study
(retrospective and prospective), case-control, bias in observational research,
multivariable analysis and propensity analysis
 An appreciation and understanding of the main elements of clinical trial design,
execution, and analysis. At the end of the course, students should have a firm grasp
of clinical trial methodology at a level that would allow them to prepare successful
grant applications.
 An understanding of systematic review methods and the execution of a rigorous
systematic review. Students will be introduced to the review methodology outlined
in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews and will explore concepts and
controversies in review methods.
153


An in-depth understanding of the translational process to enable development of
therapeutic strategies, GLP, the clinical trial process and GMP manufacturing and
validation, regulatory and legislation requirements for the design and translation of
medical therapies and ethical issues underpinning the practice of translational
medicine.
To examine the various elements involved in the establishment and operation of
clinical research facilities and clinical trials, procedures for successful completion
and reporting of clinical trials and financial management issues.
ECTS WEIGHTING
90 ECTS.
MINIMUM ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
Students must have completed either; 1) Undergraduate degree in medicine or; 2) Other
healthcare-related undergraduate degree with a minimum of 2nd Class honours degree,
Grade 1 (including Nursing, Occupational therapy, Physiotherapy, Speech and Language
Therapy and Pharmacy) or; 3) Biomedical sciences with a minimum of 2nd Class
honours degree, Grade 1. Application from graduates of non-healthcare related degrees
are also considered (minimum requirement of 2nd Class honours, Grade 1) on a case-bycase basis, at the discretion of the admissions committee. Students who have a degree
without Honours in a related area and have 3 or more years of practical experience in the
subject area will also be considered for this programme. Potential students should be
seeking a career in clinical research as a principal investigator, research coordinator or
research administration.
COURSE OUTLINE:
FULL TIME M.SC. (CLINICAL RESEARCH): Students are required to complete
three compulsory modules at NUI Galway. A further 3 modules are selected from
additional courses available at NUI Galway and/or by distance learning by McMaster
University.
PART TIME MSC. (CLINICAL RESEARCH): Students are required to complete
three compulsory modules at NUI Galway. A further 3* or 5** modules are selected
from additional courses available at NUI Galway and/or by distance learning by
McMaster University.
Compulsory Modules (Core):
1. Fundamentals of Health Research and Evaluation Methods; 10ECTS
2. Introduction to Biostatistics I; 10ECTS
3. Ethics of Health Research; 10ECTS
Additional Modules (Optional):
SELECT 3 FROM THE FOLLOWING:
4. Introduction to Biostatistics II; 10 ECTS
5. Introduction to Research Methods for Randomized Controlled Trials; 10ECTS
6. Systematic Review Methods; 10ECTS
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7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Translational Medicine; 10ECTS
Clinical Research Administration; 10ECTS
Health Systems and Policy Analysis; 10ECTS
Health Technology Assessment; 10ECTS
Observational and Analytical Research Methods; 10ECTS
Independent Study; 10ECTS
PLUS
Full Time: Thesis (30 ECTS), completed over the 1 year period. Thesis defence will be
completed at NUI Galway.
Part Time: *Thesis (30 ECTS), completed over the 2 year period. Thesis defence will
be completed at NUI Galway OR **Independent Study Module (10 ECTS), completed
and assessed by NUI Galway.
TOTAL: 90 ECTS over 1 year (FT) or 2 years (PT).
Module assessment: 40% examination, 50% end of module project, 10% lecture /
tutorial input.
Subject to change; minimum threshold of students per module will apply
155
SCHOOL OF NURSING & MIDWIFERY
RESEARCH GRADUATE OPTIONS
PhD Degree (Nursing)
PhD Degree (Midwifery)
Please refer to pages 114-115 for further information on the full time structured
PhD options.
Aim
A PhD in Nursing or PhD in Midwifery is the highest academic award a nurse or
midwife can achieve. The aim of the PhD in Nursing and PhD in Midwifery
programmes offered in the School of Nursing and Midwifery, is to rigoursly prepare
graduates to develop, improve and enhance knowledge and understanding in their
chosen area of research.
The PhD programmes we offer will provide nurses and midwives with the research
training necessary to conduct research relevant to the needs of the health service and
grounded in the experience of those accessing these services. Through its research, the
School aims to support the provision of high quality nursing and midwifery care and to
contribute to the improvement of people’s health and well-being.
The School of Nursing and Midwifery is committed to creating an active e and dynamic
research culture. This is achieved through supporting and promoting research and other
scholarly activity. The School’s key research interests and activities are centred around
cognate research clusters. Each cluster is composed of a group of academic staff and
research students with a shared research interest who offer each other support within a
resourced research environment. The School is currently admitting research students in
the following clusters:




Care of older people
o with a specific focus on quality of life, person-centred care, factors
impacting on older peoples’ lives and life stories/biographical data.
Maternity care and women’s health
Chronic illness
o for example issues relating to Diabetes and COPD
Teaching and learning
o with a specific focus on innovative approaches to teaching/learning,
students’ experiences of learning, ways of supporting learning.
o Community and Population Health
The School has specific methodological expertise in case study, grounded theory,
phenomenology, randomised trials including cluster trials and systematic reviews and
meta analyses.
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o
o
o
Duration: Full-time (9 terms)
Part-time (18 terms)
Assessment: Research Thesis
Entry requirements
To pursue a PhD, potential candidates should, in the first instance, consult the list of key
research areas of the School of Nursing and Midwifery and make contact with the Head
of School or with the relevant academic staff member/potential supervisor.
Application procedures
Following informal consultation, the candidate will submit a research proposal for
consideration by the Board of the School of Nursing and Midwifery for entry to the PhD
programme. The Board’s recommendation will subsequently be considered by the
College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences and Academic Council. The outcome
of the Board’s decision regarding the application will be communicated formally to the
candidate.
Application
Applications to research programmes are made online via The Postgraduate Applications
Centre (PAC) (see http://www.pac.ie/pgrad.php?inst=gy) .
Research Interests
Professor Kathy Murphy
Quality of care and quality of life of older people, person-centred care, cultural issues in
nursing and chronic illness
Dr. Dympna Casey
Health promotion and nursing, care of older people, cultural issues in nursing, service
learning and chronic illness
Dr. Maura Dowling
Nurse-patient relationships, caring and nursing, oncology nursing practice, advanced
practice roles in nursing
Dr. Adeline Cooney
Quality of life of older people, relationship-centred care, nursing/client care in long-stay
care settings and grounded theory.
Declan Devane
Maternity care and women’s health, models of maternity care, assessment of fetal
wellbeing, randomised trials, systematic reviews and meta analyses.
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MPhil Degree (Nursing)
MPhil Degree (Midwifery)
Aim
The aim of the MPhil in Nursing and MPhil in Midwifery programmes offered in the
School of Nursing and Midwifery, is to rigoursly prepare graduates to develop, improve
and enhance knowledge and understanding in their chosen area of research.
The MPhil programmes we offer will provide nurses and midwives with the research
training necessary to conduct research relevant to the needs of the health service and
grounded in the experience of those accessing these services. Through its research, the
School aims to support the provision of high quality nursing and midwifery care and to
contribute to the improvement of people’s health and well-being.
The School of Nursing and Midwifery is committed to creating an active and dynamic
research culture. This is achieved through supporting and promoting research and other
scholarly activity. The School’s key research interests and activities are centered around
cognate research clusters. Each cluster is composed of a group of academic staff and
research students with a shared research interest who offer each other support within a
resourced research environment. The School are currently admitting research students in
the following clusters:




Care of older people
o with a specific focus on quality of life, person-centred care, factors
impacting on older peoples’ lives and life stories/biographical data.
Maternity care and women’s health
o with a specific focus on models of maternity care, methods of
assessment of fetal wellbeing and women’s experiences of maternity
care.
Chronic illness
o for example issues relating to Diabetes and COPD
Teaching and learning
o with a specific focus on innovative approaches to teaching/learning,
students’ experiences of learning, ways of supporting learning.
o Community and Population Health
The School has specific methodological expertise in case study, grounded theory,
phenomenology, in evaluating complex interventions through randomised trials
including cluster trials and in systematic reviews and meta analyses.
Students can choose to transfer to the PhD register from the MPhil (Nursing) or MPhil
(Midwifery) at the end of year 1 if (i) the research project is appropriate to PhD study (ii)
the candidates work demonstrates potential for PhD scholarship and (iii) with the
support of the research supervisor(s).
Duration:
Full-time over 12 months
Part-time over 24 months
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Assessment:
Research Thesis of 40,000 word count
Entry requirements
To pursue a MPhil potential candidates should discuss the matter with the Head of
School or relevant academic staff member/potential supervisor. Candidates should have
a higher honours Bachelors degree award (at least second class honours), or equivalent,
in Nursing or Midiwfery or in a relevant academic discipline.
Application procedures
Interested applicants should in the first instance consult the list of key research areas of
the School of Nursing and Midwifery as outlined below and make contact with the Head
of School or with the relevant academic staff member/potential supervisor. In the event
that the Head of School is willing to recommend that the candidate be accepted, a
supervisor will be assigned to supervise the candidate’s research. Following informal
consultation, the candidate will submit a research proposal for consideration by the
Board of the School of Nursing and Midwifery for entry to the MPhil programme. The
Board’s recommendation will subsequently be considered by the College of Medicine,
Nursing and Health Sciences and Academic Council.
Application
Applications to research programmes are made online via The Postgraduate Applications
Centre (PAC) (see http://www.pac.ie/nuig)
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HIGHER DIPLOMA IN MIDWIFERY
The Higher Diploma in Midwifery has been designed for registered nurses, who wish to
undertake midwifery education and training. This programme enables the student to
develop the knowledge and skills necessary to care for women and their babies during
the antenatal, intra-natal and postnatal periods. The Higher Diploma in Midwifery is
offered in partnership with the Health Service Executive West. The aims of this
programme are:
1. To prepare the student to practise the activities of a registered midwife (The
Council Directive 2005/36/EC) in order to contribute meaningfully to the physical,
social, and psychological care of women and their babies.
2. To facilitate the student to develop both personally and professionally. Inherent in
this, is the development of an analytical and reflective midwife who has the
knowledge and skills to meet the demands of professional practice with competence
and skill.
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND DURATION
The Higher Diploma in Midwifery is an 18 month full time programme consisting of a
theoretical and clinical component. Theoretical instruction is of twenty-six weeks
duration and is delivered in planned study blocks. Students undertake 10 theory
modules over the course of the programme. The modules focus on: the application of
the biological sciences to midwifery, normal midwifery care, social sciences (Sociology
and Psychology), evidence based practice, caring for the woman experiencing
complications during pregnancy and childbirth, caring for the neonate requiring special
care, and issues in midwifery practice and women’s health. Clinical placements are
undertaken throughout the 18 months in the different clinical areas under the supervision
of a preceptor.
The next intake of students is in March 2012 and students are salaried employees of the
Health Service Executive West for the duration of the Programme.
ASSESSMENT
Theory and clinical practice modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and
written examinations. In addition students’ clinical performance/progress is assessed on
an on-going basis while on placements, to determine competency. To be deemed
competent students must attain the level specified in the Competency Assessment Tool,
based on the Domains of Competence identified by An Bord Altranais. Students must
pass both the theoretical, clinical and competency assessments to be deemed to have
passed the programme.
In addition, in order for a student to apply to register as a Midwife with An Bord
Altranais, he/she must complete the minimum clinical practice experience and minimum
number of clinical hours required by An Bord Altranais.
160
ENTRY CRITERIA
Applicants must satisfy the matriculation requirements of the National University of
Ireland and be Registered General Nurses as specified by An Bord Altranais.
Candidates who are at least 23 years of age on January 1st of the year of registering for
the Higher Diploma in Midwifery programme, and do not reach these requirements may
be admitted on the grounds of mature years. All candidates must have twelve months
relevant post-registration experience.
SELECTION CRITERIA
The programme is advertised by the National Recruitment Services for the Health
Service Executive. Selection involves a formal written application, a personal interview,
verification of medical fitness and satisfactory character references.
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POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (EMERGENCY CARE)
The Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Emergency) has been designed for registered
nurses, who wish to pursue a specialist course in emergency care nursing. The
Postgraduate Diploma is offered in partnership with the Health Service Executive.
PROGRAMME DURATION AND STRUCTURE
The aim of the programme is to develop knowledgeable sensitive practitioners who have
a high level of specialist skills.
The programme is offered full-time over one calendar year and part-time over two
calendar years. Taught components of the programme are delivered in a blended
learning format and classroom teaching. Blended learning is an innovative teaching
strategy which involves a combination of face-to-face and on-line learning. This means
that learning/teaching will be delivered on-line through Blackboard, an interactive
learning system which connects directly to the University from your own home
computer. Students are required to attend face to face workshops for a total of 12 days
across the programme (in blocks of 2 days at a time). The programme is comprised of
seven theory/practice modules. In all modules there is an emphasis on exploring the
relevance of module content to practice, similarly, practice placements allow students to
explore "new" knowledge in practice, enabling them an opportunity to integrate theory
and practice. Students are required to undertake their clinical practice in an approved
clinical practice setting within Ireland normally within the students’ own work setting.
Students are required to complete a minimum of 1,000 clinical hours within the
specialist area before completing this programme.
ENTRY CRITERIA
All applicants must meet the following entry requirements:
1. Be a registered nurse on the General Nurse division of the Register maintained by
an Bord Altranais.
2. Hold an active nursing registration.
3. Have a minimum of two years post-registration experience (exclusive of postregistration courses).
4. Be currently working in the required specialist area, i.e., emergency department,
and have as a minimum six months clinical experience in this specialist area.
5. Hold an honours degree or equivalent.
Determining Equivalence: This is a level 9 programme. Applicants who do not
hold an honours degree or higher diploma (Level 8) may apply but must clearly
demonstrate their capacity to complete a programme at this level. In addition to the
other requirements outlined above, these applicants are required to submit a 1000word literature-based essay. To be considered for admission, this essay must be at
the level expected of an honours degree candidate (Level 8).
Click here for more information on this essay.
SELECTION CRITERIA
To be considered an applicant must:
 Meet the entry criteria
162

Obtain a letter from the candidate’s Director of Nursing guaranteeing practice
placements within Ireland, in the appropriate specialism for the duration of the
programme, within the candidate’s current place of work. Or, where necessary,
additional appropriate clinical placements in order to meet clinical learning
requirements.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
The programme comprises of seven modules of which two are generic/core and four are
specialist exclusive to Emergency Nursing. Core modules and some aspects of specialist
modules are taken in conjunction with students undertaking other Postgraduate
Diplomas. Students will also undertake three practice assessments and a service
improvement project.
The seven programme modules are listed below:
Core Modules:
Professional Issues in Nursing
Evidence Based Practice Specialist Nursing Module 1
Specialist Modules:
Specialist Nursing Module 1 (Medical Emergencies)
Specialist Nursing Module 2 (Major Trauma and Medical Emergencies)
Specialist Nursing Module 3 (Specialist Patient Groups)
Clinical Skills development in Emergency Nursing
Service Improvement Project
ASSESSMENT
The modules are assessed by means of continuous assessment and examinations. In
order to be eligible for the award of the Post Graduate Diploma in Nursing Studies
students must pass each of the modules of the programme with a minimum of 50%.
Compensation is not permitted between modules.
A Maximum of 50% can only be obtained in a module on repeat
Clinical competence must be demonstrated by:
 Students passing all performance criteria within each of the five domain of the
clinical assessment and
 Students reaching the specified level of competence in the assessment overall.
 Three clinical assessments must be completed and passed to successfully complete
the course
Students must have completed a minimum of 1000 clinical practice hours over the
duration of the course.
163
Additional Issues:
Students must complete the programme within two years of commencement for the full
time option, and within four years of commencement for the part time programme.
Students who achieve an aggregate mark of 65% will be awarded the Post Graduate
Diploma with distinction.
164
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (ADVANCED PRACTICE)
This is a full-time programme running over one calendar year. Taught programme
content is delivered over two trimesters and is offered in blended mode, workshops and
on-line.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Specialist practice modules address the context of advanced practice, physical
assessment skills, pathophysiology, pharmacology and clinical decision making.
Substantive hours of clinical practice at an advanced practice level and supervised by
appropriate healthcare professionals is integral to the programme.
ASSESSMENT
Each module is assessed independently. Strategies for assessment include essays,
reflective practice assignments, presentations, clinical competency assessments and
dissertation.
MINIMUM ENTRY CRITERIA:
 Master of Health Sciences (Nursing/Midwifery) or equivalent
 Be on the active Register as a nurse/midwife
 Have practiced as a nurse/midwife for a minimum of five (5) years post registration
three (3) of which are in the specialist area
 Letters from the Director of Nursing and the appropriate health care professional
Clinical Supervisor in support of the application.
165
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (EDUCATION)
This programme is aimed at masters prepared graduates who wish to gain a teaching
qualification. Broadly the programme aims to develop nurses/midwives expertise and
understanding of teaching in higher education and clinical settings.
PROGRAMME DURATION AND STRUCTURE
This is a full-time programme running over one calendar year and is offered in blended
mode, which is a combination of workshops and on-line. Taught programme content is
delivered over two trimesters. Over the duration of the programme students are required
to complete 100 hours of teaching/facilitation. Students are expected to gain experience
of teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate level and of using a wide range of
teaching methods including, lecturing, clinical teaching in both laboratory and clinical
settings and working with small groups using experiential approaches. Students are
required to provide evidence of having completed:




30 hours experience of formal classroom based lecturing
30 hours of clinical focused teaching which should comprise of both classroom
based skills teaching and teaching in the clinical setting
30 hours of small group work with a focus on experiential approaches, for example,
seminars, workshops
10 hours at the discretion of the student.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
The programme is comprised of four taught modules, and three teaching assessments.
Taught modules are as follows:
 Facilitating Learning and Approaches to Teaching
 Principles of Teaching and Assessing
 Assessing Learning
 Curriculum Development
ASSESSMENT
The programme is assessed by means of continuous assessment. In order to be eligible
for the award of the Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Education) students must pass
each module at 50% to be deemed to have passed the theoretical component and three
teaching assessments to be deemed to have passed the practice component. Students
must complete the required 100 hours of teaching practice in the areas specified.
Compensation is not permitted. The standard for the award of a distinction is the
attainment of 65% on the aggregate. Normally, a Distinction may be awarded only
when the assessment is passed at the first attempt.
MINIMUM ENTRY CRITERIA:
Candidates must have successfully completed a Master in Nursing/Midwifery or its
equivalent; be a registered nurse/midwife on the Register maintained by An Bord
166
Altranais; have practised as a nurse/midwife for a minimum of three years post
registration (exclusive of post-registration/educational programmes); have negotiated a
placement in a Centre of Nurse/Midwifery Education which will provide them with the
opportunity to meet the practice requirements of this programme.
SELECTION CRITERIA
Selection is based on applicants academic and professional qualifications (as above). In
order to register as a nurse tutor students must meet any requirements for registration
identified by An Bord Altranais.
167
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (GERONTOLOGY)
The Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Gerontology) offered in partnership with the
Health Service Executive West, has been designed for registered nurses who wish to
pursue a specialist programme in caring for older people and their families. The overall
goal of the programme is to further enhance nurses’ ability to provide effective,
appropriate, high quality nursing care for older people.
PROGRAMME DURATION AND STRUCTURE
The programme is offered full time over one calendar year and part time over two
calendar years. It is comprised of theoretical and clinical components, commencing in
September of each year. Taught programme content is delivered over two trimesters.
Students also undertake practice placements in their own clinical setting.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
The programme is comprised of seven theory modules (three specialist, two core, one
option, and a Service Improvement module) and three practice assessments. In all
modules there is an emphasis on exploring the relevance of module content to practice.
A blended learning approach is adopted in the delivery of this programme. Students
continue to work in their own practice setting while undertaking the programme.
Modules
The Nature and Experience of Ageing
The Nursing Care of Older People
Evidence Based Practice
Professional Issues in Nursing
Promoting Health and Well-being
Service Improvement
Practice Assessment 1
Practice Assessment 2
Practice Assessment 3
Option Modules
Empowering Clients to Self Manage Chronic Disease or End of Life Care; Psychological
and Social Perspectives or
Advanced Wound Care Management or
Continence Care
ENTRY CRITERIA
All applicants must meet the following entry criteria:
A. be currently working in a setting in Ireland which requires him/her to care for older
people and have as a minimum six months clinical experience in caring for older
people within the previous two years
B. Hold an honours degree or equivalent. Applicants who do not hold an honours
degree are required to submit a literature based essay (1000 words) on a chosen
topic with their application. It is important that the topic chosen is relevant to the
programme being applied for. This will be judged to determine its equivalence to an
168
honours degree (or Level 8) programme
C. Satisfy the selection panel that they have the ability to complete the programme
SELECTION CRITERIA
To be considered an applicant must:
A. Meet the entry criteria
B. Demonstrate an understanding of the demands of the programme and the motivation
to complete the programme
C. Demonstrate in his/her essay the potential to cope with the academic standards
required
D. Obtain a letter from the candidate’s Director of Nursing guaranteeing practice
placements in the appropriate specialism, for the duration of the programme, within
the candidate’s current place of work
ASSESSMENT
Modules are assessed by means of continuous assessment only.
Clinical competence must be demonstrated by:
Students passing all the competencies at the specified level of competence for each
clinical assessment
Three clinical assessments must be completed and passed to successfully complete the
programme.
In order to be eligible for the award of the Post Graduate Diploma in Nursing
(Gerontology) students must
 pass each theoretical component at 50%
 pass three clinical assessments
Students must have completed a minimum of 1000 clinical practice hours over the
duration of the programme.
Compensation is not permitted. A maximum of 50% can only be obtained in a module
on repeat. The standard for the award of a distinction is the attainment of 65% on the
aggregate.
169
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (INTENSIVE CARE)
The Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Intensive Care) has been designed for registered
nurses, who wish to pursue a specialist course in Intensive Care. The Postgraduate
Diploma is offered in partnership with the Health Service Executive, West.
PROGRAMME DURATION AND STRUCTURE
The aim of the programme is to develop knowledgeable sensitive practitioners who have
a high level of specialist skills.
The programme is offered full-time over one calendar year and part-time over two
calendar years. Taught components of the programme are delivered in a blended
learning format and classroom teaching. Blended learning is an innovative teaching
strategy which involves a combination of face-to-face and on-line learning. This means
that learning/teaching will be delivered on-line through Blackboard, an interactive
learning system which connects directly to the University from your own home
computer. Students are required to attend face to face workshops for a total of 12 days
across the programme (in blocks of 2 days at a time). The programme is comprised of
seven theory/practice modules. In all modules there is an emphasis on exploring the
relevance of module content to practice, similarly, practice placements allow students to
explore "new" knowledge in practice, enabling them an opportunity to integrate theory
and practice. Students are required to undertake their clinical practice in an approved
clinical practice setting within Ireland normally within the students’ own work setting.
Students are required to complete a minimum of 1,000 clinical hours within the
specialist area before completing this programme.
ENTRY CRITERIA
All applicants must meet the following entry requirements:
6. Be a registered nurse on the General Nurse division of the Register maintained by
an Bord Altranais.
7. Hold an active nursing registration.
8. Have a minimum of two years post-registration experience (exclusive of postregistration courses).
9. Be currently working in the required specialist area, i.e., Intensive Care, and have as
a minimum six months clinical experience in this specialist area.
10. Hold an honours degree or equivalent.
Determining Equivalence: This is a level 9 programme. Applicants who do not
hold an honours degree or higher diploma (Level 8) may apply but must clearly
demonstrate their capacity to complete a programme at this level. In addition to the
other requirements outlined above, these applicants are required to submit a 1000word literature-based essay. To be considered for admission, this essay must be at
the level expected of an honours degree candidate (Level 8).Click here for more
information on this essay.
170
SELECTION CRITERIA
To be considered an applicant must:
 Meet the entry criteria
 Obtain a letter from the candidate’s Director of Nursing guaranteeing practice
placements within Ireland, in the appropriate specialism for the duration of the
programme, within the candidate’s current place of work. Or, where necessary,
additional appropriate clinical placements in order to meet clinical learning
requirements.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
The programme comprises of seven modules of which two are generic/core and four are
specialist exclusive to Intensive Care Nursing. Core modules and some aspects of
specialist modules are taken in conjunction with students undertaking other Postgraduate
Diplomas. Students will also undertake three practice assessments and a service
improvement project.
The seven programme modules are listed below:
Core Modules:
Professional Issues in Nursing
Evidence Based Practice Specialist Nursing Module 1
Specialist Modules:
Specialist Nursing Module 1
Specialist Nursing Module 2
Specialist Nursing Module 3
Specialist Nursing Module 4
Service Improvement Project
ASSESSMENT
The modules are assessed by means of continuous assessment and examinations. In
order to be eligible for the award of the Post Graduate Diploma in Nursing Studies
students must pass each of the modules of the programme with a minimum of 50%.
Compensation is not permitted between modules.
A Maximum of 50% can only be obtained in a module on repeat
Clinical competence must be demonstrated by:
 Students passing all performance criteria within each of the five domain of the
clinical assessment and
 Students reaching the specified level of competence in the assessment overall.
 Three clinical assessments must be completed and passed to successfully complete
the course
Students must have completed a minimum of 1000 clinical practice hours over the
171
duration of the course.
Additional Issues:
Students must complete the programme within two years of commencement for the full
time option, and within four years of commencement for the part time programme.
Students who achieve an aggregate mark of 65% will be awarded the Post Graduate
Diploma with distinction.
172
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC
HEALTH CONDITIONS
The Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Management of Chronic Health Conditions) is
offered in collaboration with the Department of General Practice. The programme is
aimed at registered nurses working in a service (public, private or voluntary) where they
have an opportunity to care for clients with a chronic disease. The overall goal of the
programme is to further enhance nurses’ ability to provide effective, appropriate, high
quality nursing care for people with chronic health conditions.
ENTRY CRITERIA
All applicants must meet the following entry requirements:
 Be registered general nurse or registered psychiatric nurse or registered sick
children’s nurse or registered nurse intellectual disability or registered midwife on
the register maintained by An Bord Altranais.
 Hold an active nursing registration.
 Be currently working in a setting which provides opportunities for him/her to care
for clients with a chronic health condition.
 Satisfy the selection panel that they have the ability to complete the programme.
 Hold an honours degree or equivalent*
*This is a Level 9 programme. Applicants who do not hold an honours degree or
higher diploma may apply but must demonstrate clearly their capacity to undertake
a programme at this level. In addition to the requirements outlined above these
applicants are expected to submit a 1000 word literature based essay. To be
considered for admission this essay must be judged equivalent to an honours
degree (Level 8).
SELECTION CRITERIA
To be considered applicants must meet the entry criteria. Selection will be made, by the
programme team, on the basis of applicants’ written application. Applications will be
evaluated on the:
 Applicant’s academic record and relevant professional experience.
 Applicant’s level of motivation and suitability based on his/her Personal Statement,
which is submitted as part of the online application process.
 Applicants must supply a letter from his/her Director of Nursing guaranteeing
practice placement in a setting where he/she has an opportunity to care for clients
with a chronic disease for the duration of the programme, or where necessary,
agreement that the applicant will be freed to undertake additional practice in a
suitable placement setting.
PROGRAMME DURATION AND STRUCTURE
The programme is offered full time over one calendar year and comprises of six
modules: five core plus one option module (see below). Module content is viewed as
interconnected and interdependent. Taught programme content is delivered over two
trimesters, students complete supervised self directed work in trimester three.
The programme is offered via a blend of e-learning and face-to-face experiential
173
workshops and is delivered on-line through BlackBoard, an interactive learning
environment. Workshops total 12 days and will focus primarily on application of skills.
Students are required to complete a minimum of 500 hours in the clinical setting i.e.
engaged in the care and management of clients with a chronic health condition.
Modules:
 Critical Issues in Chronic Disease Management
 Inside the Experience of Chronic Illness
 Health Assessment Skills
 Collaboration and Interagency Working
 Promoting Health and Well-Being
Students may select one of the following optional modules:
 Cardiovascular Disease in Primary Care
 Respiratory Disease in Primary Care
 Diabetes in Primary Care
 Advanced Wound Care Management
 Managing the Physical Health Needs of People with a Serious Mental Illness
 Work Based Learning
Student application of learning in and from practice will be assessed on the basis of the
submission of two Personal Professional Development Plans.
ASSESSMENT
The modules are assessed using coursework. In order to be eligible for the award of the
Post Graduate Diploma in Nursing (Management of Chronic Health Conditions)
students must pass each of the modules with a minimum of 50%.



Compensation is not permitted between modules.
The Maximum mark attainable in a repeat module is 50%
Students must have completed a minimum of 500 clinical practice hours over the
duration of the programme.
Additional Issues:
 Students must complete programme within two years of commencement.
Students who achieve an aggregate mark of 65% will be awarded the Post Graduate
Diploma with distinction.
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POSTGRADUATE
DIPLOMA
IN
NURSING
COMMUNITY AND INPATIENT ACUTE CARE)
(MENTAL
HEALTH,
The Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Mental Health, Community & Inpatient Acute
Care) is designed for registered nurses who wish to pursue a specialism in Mental
Health, Community and Inpatient Acute Care. It will prepare students to be flexible,
competent and who can practice with confidence, and collaboratively within a variety of
multidisciplinary care contexts. The aim of the programme is to develop knowledgeable,
caring practitioners who have a high level of specialist skills in mental health nursing.
This programme is offered in partnership with the Health Service Executive, West and
Experts with Experience.
PROGRAMME DURATION AND STRUCTURE
The programme is offered full-time over one calendar year and part-time over two
calendar years. It consists of both theoretical and clinical components. A blended
learning approach is adopted in the delivery of this programme.
Students are required to attend face to face workshops for a total of 12 days across the
programme (in blocks of 2 days at a time). The programme is comprised of seven
theory/practice modules. In all modules there is an emphasis on exploring the relevance
of module content to practice, similarly, practice placements allow students to explore
"new" knowledge in practice, enabling them an opportunity to integrate theory and
practice. Students are required to undertake their clinical practice in an approved clinical
practice setting within Ireland normally within the students’ own work setting. Students
will need to demonstrate hours in both ‘community’ and ‘in-patient acute’ settings. This
will be supported by a review of their current role to meet the requirements to work
across the ‘community’ and ‘in-patient acute’ interface. Students are required to
complete a minimum of 1,000 clinical hours before completing this programme.
ENTRY CRITERIA
All applicants must meet the following entry criteria
A. be a registered nurse on the Psychiatric Nurse division of the Register maintained
by an Bord Altranais
B. hold an active nursing registration
C. have a minimum of one years post-registration experience (exclusive of postregistration courses)
D. be currently working in a setting which requires him/her to care for the mentally ill
clients and have as a minimum six months clinical experience in this specialist area.
E. Satisfy the selection panel that they have the ability to complete the programme
Meet the following educational requirements:
 Hold an honours degree or equivalent

Applicants who do not hold an honours degree or equivalent will need to
demonstrate the capacity to perform at this level. This requires writing a 1000 word
literature based essay which will be judged to determine its equivalence to an
honours degree (or Level 8) programme.
175
SELECTION CRITERIA
To be considered an applicant must:
F. Meet the entry criteria
G. Demonstrate an understanding of the demands of the programme and the motivation
to complete the programme
H. Demonstrate in the potential to cope with the academic standards required
I. Obtain a letter from the candidate’s Director of Nursing guaranteeing practice
placements within Ireland, in the appropriate specialism for the duration of the
programme, within the candidate’s current place of work. Or, where necessary,
additional appropriate clinical placements in order to meet clinical learning
requirements.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
The programme comprises of seven modules of which three are generic/core and three
are specialist exclusive to Mental Health Nursing. Core modules and some aspects of
specialist modules are taken in conjunction with students undertaking other Postgraduate
Diplomas. Students will also undertake practice competencies and assignments.
The programme’s theory/practice modules are listed below:
Collaboration and Interagency working (Specialist)
Professional Issues in Nursing (Core)
Evidence Based Practice (Core)
Partnerships in Mental Health Care (Service User/Carer/Service Provider) (Specialist)
Psychosocial interventions in Health Care (Specialist)
Service Improvement (Shared)
*Optional Module
Clinical Competency Competency 1, 2, and 3
*Students may select one (1) of the following optional modules:
Managing the Physical Health Needs of People with a Severe Mental Illness
Empowering Clients to Self-Manage Chronic Diseases
ASSESSMENT
The modules are assessed by means of continuous assessment. In order to be eligible for
the award of the Post Graduate Diploma in Nursing, students must pass all the above
modules of the programme with a minimum of 50%.
Compensation is not permitted between modules.
A Maximum of 50% can only be obtained in a module on repeat
Clinical competence must be demonstrated by:
 Students passing all performance criteria within each of the five domains of the
clinical competency assessment and
 Students reaching the specified level of competence in the assessment overall.
Three clinical competencies must be completed and passed to successfully
complete the programme.
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
Students must have completed a minimum of 1000 clinical practice hours over the
duration of the programme.
Additional Issues:
Compensation is not permitted. The standard for the award of a distinction is the
attainment of 65% on the aggregate. Normally a distinction may be awarded only when
the examination is passed at the first attempt and when all subjects are presented
together.
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POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (ONCOLOGY)
The Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing Studies (Oncology) offered in partnership with
the Health Service Executive West, is designed for registered nurses who wish to pursue
a specialist programme in Oncology. Module content is viewed as interconnected and
interdependent. In all modules there is an emphasis on exploring the relevance of
module content to practice; similarly, practice placements allow students to explore
“new” knowledge in practice, thus providing students with an opportunity to integrate
theory and practice. This programme aims:
1. To expand the knowledge, skills and attitudes of nurses engaged in caring for
people with cancer.
2. To develop interpersonal skills in order to provide comprehensive physical,
psychosocial, emotional and spiritual support to people with cancer and their
families.
PROGRAMME DURATION AND STRUCTURE
The aim of the programme is to develop knowledgeable, sensitive practitioners who
have a high level of specialist skills in oncology nursing. The programme is offered fulltime over a twelve-month period or part-time over a twenty four-month period and
consists of both theoretical and clinical components. The programme is delivered by
blended learning using Blackboard. The majority of clinical practice will take place in
the students’ own work setting. Students must meet the minimum 1000 clinical hours in
order to pass the programme.
ENTRY CRITERIA
All applicants must meet the following entry requirements:
A. be a registered nurse on the General Nurse division of the Register maintained by an
Bord Altranais
B. hold an active nursing registration
C. have a minimum of two years post-registration experience (exclusive of postregistration courses)
D. be currently working in the required specialist area i.e. Oncology care setting and
have as a minimum six months clinical experience in this specialist area
E. Satisfy the selection panel that they have the ability to complete the programme
Meet the following educational requirements:
 Hold an honours degree or equivalent
Applicants who do not hold an honours degree or equivalent will need to demonstrate
the capacity to perform at this level. This requires writing a 1000 word literature based
essay which will be judged to determine its equivalence to an honours degree (or Level
8) programme.
SELECTION CRITERIA
To be considered an applicant must:
A. Meet the entry criteria
B. Demonstrate an understanding of the demands of the programme and the motivation
to complete the programme
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C. Obtain a letter from the candidate’s Director of Nursing guaranteeing practice
placements in the appropriate specialism, for the duration of the programme, within
the candidate’s current place of work
PROGRAMME CONTENT
The programme comprises of seven modules of which three are generic/core and three
are specialist exclusive to Oncology nursing and one is optional. Students will also
undertake practice assessments and assignments.
 Professional Issues in Nursing (Core)
 Service improvement (Core)
 Evidence Based Practice(Core)
 Experiencing cancer (Specialist)
 The cancer trajectory (Specialist)
 Cancer management: the nursing perspective on a treatment journey (Specialist)
ASSESSMENT
The modules are assessed by means of continuous assessment. In order to be eligible for
the award of the Post Graduate Diploma in Nursing students must pass each of the
following modules of the programme with a minimum of 50%
All three specialist modules
The student’s chosen optional module
Evidence Based Practice
Professional issues in Nursing
Service improvement
Compensation is not permitted between modules.
A Maximum of 50% can only be obtained in a module on Repeat
Clinical competence must be demonstrated by:
 Students passing all the competencies at the specified level of competence for each
clinical assessment
 Three clinical assessments must be completed and passed to successfully complete
the programme.
 Students must have completed a minimum of 1000 clinical practice hours over the
duration of the programme.
Additional Issues:
Students on the one year option must complete programme within two years of
commencement.
Students who achieve an aggregate mark of 65% will be awarded the Post Graduate
Diploma with distinction.
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POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (ORTHOPAEDICS)
The Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Orthopaedic Nursing) has been designed for
registered nurses, who wish to pursue a specialist course in Orthopaedic Nursing. The
Post Graduate Diploma is offered in partnership with Health Service Executive, West.
PROGRAMME DURATION AND STRUCTURE
The aim of the programme is to develop knowledgeable, sensitive practitioners who
have a high level of specialist skills. The programme is offered full-time over one
calendar year and part-time over two calendar years. It consists of both theoretical and
clinical components. The majority of clinical practice will take place in the students’
own work setting. Students must meet the minimum 1000 clinical hours in order to pass
the programme.
ENTRY CRITERIA
All applicants must meet the following entry requirements:
A. be a registered nurse on the General Nurse division of the Register maintained by an
Bord Altranais
B. hold an active nursing registration
C. have a minimum of two years post-registration experience (exclusive of postregistration courses) and obtain a letter from the candidate’s Director of Nursing
guaranteeing practice placements in the appropriate specialism, for the duration of
the programme, within the candidate’s current place of work
D. be currently working in the required specialist area i.e. Orthopaedics, and have
E. as a minimum six months clinical experience in this specialist area E. Satisfy the
selection panel that they have the ability to complete the programme
Meet the following educational requirements:
Hold an honours degree or equivalent
Applicants who do not hold an honours degree or equivalent will need to demonstrate
the capacity to perform at this level. This requires writing a 1000 word literature based
essay which will be judged to determine its equivalence to an honours degree (or Level
8) programme.
SELECTION CRITERIA
To be considered an applicant must:
A. Meet the entry criteria
B. Demonstrate an understanding of the demands of the programme and the motivation
to complete the programme
C. Demonstrate in his/her essay the potential to cope with the academic standards
required
D. Obtain a letter from the candidate’s Director of Nursing guaranteeing practice
placements in the appropriate specialism, for the duration of the programme, within
the candidate’s current place of work.
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PROGRAMME CONTENT
The programme comprises of seven modules of which three are generic/core, three are
specialist exclusive to Oncology nursing, and one is an optional module. Students will
also undertake practice assessments and assignments.
 Professional Issues in Nursing (Core)
 Service Improvement (Core)
 Evidence Based Practice (Core)
Choice of one Optional Module from following list:
 Collaboration and Interagency Working
 Advanced Wound Care Management
 Nursing Perspectives on End of Life Care
 The Context of Managing Health Care
 Principles of Orthopeadic Nursing (Specialist Module)
 Orthopaedic Trauma ( Specialist Module )
 Orthopaedic Specialities and Rehabilitation ( Specilaist Module )
ASSESSMENT
The modules are assessed by means of continuous assessments. In order to be eligible
for the award of the Post Graduate Diploma in Nursing (Orthopaedics) students must
pass each of the following modules of the programme with a minimum of 50%  Specialist modules 1, 2, 3
 Service Improvement Module
Optional Module
 Evidence Based Practice
 Professional Issues in Nursing
Compensation is not permitted between modules.
A Maximum of 50% can only be obtained in a module on Repeat
Clinical competence must be demonstrated by:
 Students passing all performance criteria within each of the five domains of the
clinical assessment.
 Students reaching the specified level of competence in the assessment overall.
 Three clinical assessments must be completed and passed to successfully complete
the course.
Students must have completed a minimum of 1000 clinical practice hours over the
duration of the course.
Additional Issues:
Students must complete programme within two years of commencement.
Students who achieve an aggregate mark of 65% will be awarded the Post Graduate
Diploma with distinction.
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POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (PALLIATIVE CARE)
The Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing Studies (Palliative Care) is designed for registered
General, Mental Health or Intellectual Disability nurses who wish to pursue a specialist
programme in Palliative Care. Each module is designed to provide students with a
theoretical framework from which they can explore and integrate theory & practice. This
programme aims to:
1. Provide students with knowledge and skills to enhance palliative nursing practice.
2. Prepare nurse practitioners for entry to specialist nursing practice
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE & DESIGN
The programme is comprised of seven theory/practice modules. Core modules and some
aspects of specialist modules are taken in conjunction with students undertaking other
Postgraduate Diplomas. Modules are listed below:
 Professional Issues in Nursing (Core)
 Collaboration & Interagency Working (Core)
 Evidenced Based Practice (Core)
 End of Life Care: Psychological & Social Perspectives (Specialist)
 Palliative Approaches to Symptom Management (Specialist)
 Care of the Child and Family with a Life Limiting Illness (Specialist)
 Service Improvement (Core)
THEORETICAL INSTRUCTION
The content of this programme is delivered over three trimesters, comprising of lectures,
workshops, seminars, the reading and preparation of assignments and clinical practice in
the specialist area. The programme is offered full-time over one calendar year and parttime over two calendar years. Taught components of the programme are delivered in a
blended learning format and classroom teaching. Blended learning is an innovative
teaching strategy which involves a combination of face-to-face and on-line learning.
This means that learning/teaching will be delivered on-line through Blackboard, an
interactive learning system which connects directly to the University from your own
home computer. Students are required to attend face to face workshops for a total of 12
days across the programme. In addition to clinical experience gained in the students’
own work setting, all students undertake two alternative clinical placements as part of
the programme
DURATION
The programme is delivered on a full-time/part-time basis commencing in September of
each year.
INTAKE
There is one intake per year.
ENTRY CRITERIA
All applicants must meet the following entry requirements:
11. Be a registered nurse on the General, Mental Health or Intellectual Disability Nurse
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12.
13.
14.
15.
division of the Register maintained by an Bord Altranais.
Hold an active nursing registration.
Have a minimum of two years post-registration experience (exclusive of postregistration courses).
Be currently working in the required specialist area and have as a minimum six
months clinical experience in this specialist area.
Hold an honours degree or equivalent.
Determining Equivalence: This is a level 9 programme. Applicants who do not
hold an honours degree or higher diploma (Level 8) may apply but must clearly
demonstrate their capacity to complete a programme at this level. In addition to the
other requirements outlined above, these applicants are required to submit a 1000word literature-based essay. To be considered for admission, this essay must be at
the level expected of an honours degree candidate (Level 8).Click here for more
information on this essay.
SELECTION CRITERIA
To be considered an applicant must:
 Meet the entry criteria
 Obtain a letter from the candidate’s Director of Nursing guaranteeing practice
placements within Ireland, in the appropriate specialism for the duration of the
programme, within the candidate’s current place of work. Or, where necessary,
additional appropriate clinical placements in order to meet clinical learning
requirements.
ASSESSMENT
All modules are assessed through continuous assessment, written coursework and
examination. In order to be eligible for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing
(Palliative Care) students must:
pass each theoretical component at 50%
pass three clinical assessments
Core Modules:
 Professional Issues in Nursing
 Evidence Based Practice
 Collaboration and Interagency Working
Specialist Modules:
 Palliative approaches to symptom management
 End of life care: psychological and social perspectives
 Care of the child and family with a life-limiting illness
Service Improvement Project
ASSESSMENT
The modules are assessed by means of continuous assessment. In order to be eligible for
the award of the Post Graduate Diploma in Nursing Studies students must pass each of
the modules of the programme with a minimum of 50%.
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Compensation is not permitted between modules.
A Maximum of 50% can only be obtained in a module on repeat
Clinical competence must be demonstrated by:
 Students passing all performance criteria within each of the five domain of the
clinical assessment and
 Students reaching the specified level of competence in the assessment overall.
 Three clinical assessments must be completed and passed to successfully complete
the course
 Students must have completed a minimum of 1000 clinical practice hours over the
duration of the course.
Additional Issues:
 Students must complete the programme within two years of commencement for the
full time option, and within four years of commencement for the part time
programme.
 Students who achieve an aggregate mark of 65% will be awarded the Post Graduate
Diploma with distinction.
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POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (PERIOPERATIVE)
The Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Perioperative) has been designed for registered
nurses, who wish to pursue a specialist course in Perioperative Nursing. The
Postgraduate Diploma is offered in partnership with the Health Service Executive.
PROGRAMME DURATION AND STRUCTURE
The aim of the programme is to develop knowledgeable sensitive practitioners who have
a high level of specialist skills. The programme is offered full-time over one calendar
year and part-time over two calendar years. Taught components of the programme are
delivered in a blended learning format and classroom teaching. Blended learning is an
innovative teaching strategy which involves a combination of face-to-face and on-line
learning. This means that learning/teaching will be delivered on-line through
Blackboard, an interactive learning system which connects directly to the University
from your own home computer. Students are required to attend face to face workshops
for a total of 12 day across the programme (in blocks of 2 days at a time). The
programme is comprised of seven theory/practice modules. In all modules there is an
emphasis on exploring the relevance of module content to practice, similarly, practice
placements allow students to explore "new" knowledge in practice, enabling them an
opportunity to integrate theory and practice. Students are required to undertake their
clinical practice in an approved clinical practice setting within Ireland normally within
the students’ own work setting. Students are required to complete a minimum of 1,000
clinical hours before completing this programme.
ENTRY CRITERIA
All applicants must meet the following entry requirements:
1. Be a registered nurse on the General Nurse division of the Register maintained by
an Bord Altranais.
2. Hold an active nursing registration.
3. Have a minimum of two years post-registration experience (exclusive of postregistration courses).
4. Be currently working in the required specialist area, i.e., perioperative department,
and have as a minimum six months clinical experience in this specialist area.
5. Satisfy the selection panel that they have the ability to complete the programme.
Hold an honours degree or equivalent.
Determining Equivalence: This is a level 9 programme. Applicants who do not
hold an honours degree or higher diploma (Level 8) may apply but must clearly
demonstrate their capacity to complete a programme at this level. In addition to the
other requirements outlined above, these applicants are required to submit a 1000word literature-based essay. To be considered for admission, this essay must be at
the level expected of an honours degree candidate (Level 8).Click here for more
information on this essay (online Calendar only).
SELECTION CRITERIA
To be considered an applicant must:
 Meet the entry criteria
 Obtain a letter from the candidate’s Director of Nursing guaranteeing practice
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placements within Ireland, in the appropriate specialism for the duration of the
programme, within the candidate’s current place of work. Or, where necessary,
additional appropriate clinical placements in order to meet clinical learning
requirements.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
The programme comprises of seven modules of which two are generic/core and three are
specialist exclusive to Perioperative Nursing. Core modules and some aspects of
specialist modules are taken in conjunction with students undertaking other Postgraduate
Diplomas. Students have one elective module which they can choose from a selection of
options. Students will also undertake three practice assessments and a service
improvement project.
The seven programme modules are listed below:
Core Modules:
 Professional Issues in Nursing
 Evidence Based Practice Specialist Nursing Module 1
Specialist Modules:
 Specialist Nursing Module 1
 Specialist Nursing Module 2
 Specialist Nursing Module 3
Optional Module (one of the following)
 The Context of Managing Health Care
 Advanced Wound Care Management
Service Improvement Project
ASSESSMENT
The modules are assessed by means of continuous assessment and examinations. In
order to be eligible for the award of the Post Graduate Diploma in Nursing Studies
students must pass each of the modules of the programme with a minimum of 50%.
Compensation is not permitted between modules.
A Maximum of 50% can only be obtained in a module on repeat
Clinical competence must be demonstrated by:
 Students passing all performance criteria within each of the five domain of the
clinical assessment and
 Students reaching the specified level of competence in the assessment overall.
 Three clinical assessments must be completed and passed to successfully complete
the course
 Students must have completed a minimum of 1000 clinical practice hours over the
duration of the course.
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Additional Issues:
 Students must complete the programme within two years of commencement for the
full time option, and within four years of commencement for the part time
programme.
 Students who achieve an aggregate mark of 65% will be awarded the Post Graduate
Diploma with distinction.
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POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (PRACTICE NURSING
/COMMUNITY NURSING)
PROGRAMME DURATION AND STRUCTURE
Programme may be undertaken either full time over one calendar year or part time over
two calendar years. This programme is designed for nurses (General, Psychiatric or
Intellectual Disability) who are working in a General Practice or Community setting. It
aims to develop nurses’ expertise and understanding of primary care, family centred
care, chronic disease management, and clinical nursing skills related to chronic illness
management. It also aims to promote interdisciplinary learning, specifically providing an
opportunity for nurses to learn with and from other health care professionals who work
in a community setting. This programme is offered either full time over one calendar
year, or part time over two calendar years. On successful completion of the programme,
students will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Practice
Nursing/Community Nursing). Taught components of the programme are delivered in a
blended learning format. This includes opportunities for mutual learning via web-based
discussion using a virtual learning environment called Blackboard. The programme
offers a number of elective module options. Students continue to work in their own
practice setting while undertaking the programme and are required to complete a
minimum of 1,000 hours clinical practice over the duration of the programme.
ENTRY CRITERIA
All applicants must meet the following entry requirements:
A. be a registered nurse (General, Psychiatric or Intellectual Disability) on the live
register held by An Bord Altranais.
B. hold a current nursing registration.
C. have a minimum of two years post-registration experience.
D. be currently working in the required specialist area and have as a minimum six
months clinical experience in this specialist area
E. submit a Letter of Support from line manager.
F. satisfy the selection panel that they have the ability to complete the programme
G. hold an honours degree or equivalent
H. Determining Equivalence: This is a level 9 programme. Applicants who do not
hold an honours degree or higher diploma (Level 8) may apply but must clearly
demonstrate their capacity to complete a programme at this level. In addition to the
other requirements outlined above, these applicants are required to submit a 1000word literature-based essay. To be considered for admission, this essay must be at
the level expected of an honours degree candidate (Level 8).Click here for more
information on this essay (online Calendar only).
I. This requires writing a 1000 word literature based essay which will be judged to
determine its equivalence to an honours degree (or Level 8) programme.
SELECTION PROCESS
To be considered an applicant must:
A. Meet the entry criteria
B. Obtain a Letter of Support from the candidate’s Line Manager
188
PROGRAMME CONTENT
This programme aims to provide nurses with the necessary specialized knowledge and
technical skills to respond appropriately to the needs of patients/clients/families in the
context of Primary Care and gain academic qualification. It also aims to promote
interdisciplinary learning, specifically providing an opportunity for nurses to learn with
and from other health care professionals who work in a community setting. There are a
number of core modules which all students undertake and a choice of elective module
options available on this programme.
Core Modules
Concepts and Principles of Primary
Care
Clinical Competence 1
Evidence Based Practice
Clinical Competence 2
Professional Issues in Nursing
Service Improvement
Select Any 3 Module Options
Diabetes in Primary Care
Women’s Health
Cardiovascular Disease in Primary
Care
Empowering Clients to Self-Manage their
Chronic Diseases
Advanced Wound Care Management
Psychosocial Interventions in Health Care
Respiratory Disease in Primary Care
End of Life Care: Psychological and Social
Perspectives
Best Practice in Cervical Smear
Taking
Collaboration and Interagency Working
All modules are assessed through a combination of examinations and coursework. This
will include: projects, poster presentations and portfolio.
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POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NURSING (PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING)
The Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Public Health Nursing) programme is aimed at
nurses who wish to work in the community setting as a public health nurse. The
experience of health is both socially and culturally determined with the achievement of
maximum health potential influenced by the wider determinants of health. The Public
Health Nurse has a unique role in recognizing the wider realms of what impacts and
determines community health and in facilitating maximum health potential. Nursing in
the community involves the consideration and enablement of health care needs which
demands both a clinical and public health focus of care. In considering this multifaceted
function and the fact that primary health care and targeting population health is integral
to community nursing practice, this programme aims to prepare students to competently
meet the complex health care needs of the community as client.
In partnership with the relevant third level institutions the Health Services Executive
Areas run a centralised funding application process for candidates. Sponsorship is
offered by the Health Areas of the Health Service Executive to nurses who undertake the
Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing (Public Health Nursing). Sponsorship must be secured
by the candidate prior to commencement on the programme.
PROGRAMME DURATION AND STRUCTURE
The programme is offered full time over one calendar year. The taught programme
content is delivered over three trimesters, Practice placements will take place over the
three trimesters enabling students to build the required competencies to work in the
community setting.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
The programme is modular and is comprised of eight theory and six practice modules.
Theory modules comprise of:
 Collaboration and Interagency Working
 Health across the Lifespan
 Promoting Public Health and Well Being
 Promoting Population Health
 Evidence Based Practice
 Public Health Nursing Praxis
 Service Improvement
 Child and Maternal Health (mandatory for non midwives, theory content optional
for midwives and is recommended if greater than five years since midwifery
practice)
Students will complete a number of community placements throughout the programme.
An experienced Public Health Nurse will supervise students on community placement.
For students undertaking the child and maternal health module experienced midwives
will supervise practice placements in the maternity unit. Students’ competency will be
assessed on an on-going basis throughout the programme.
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Professional practice assessments comprise of:
 Professional Assessment 1
 Professional Assessment 11
 Professional Assessment 111
 Professional Assessment 1V
 Professional Assessment V
 Professional Assessment 1 (Child and Maternal Health) (mandatory for non
midwives)
ENTRY CRITERIA
All candidates must meet the following entry requirements:
 Be a registered nurse on the general division of the register maintained by An Bord
Altranais entitled to be so registered
 Unless the candidate's name is registered in the midwives division of the register
maintained by An Bord Altranais, the candidate must complete an An Bord
Altranais (2005) approved module of study on Child and Maternal Health as part of
the programme.
 Have a minimum of two years post-registration general experience in nursing , of
which twelve months must be consecutive experience within the last 5 years.
(exclusive of post-registration/educational courses)
 Hold an NQAI level 8 qualification (honours degree or higher diploma) or proof of
equivalency.
 Fluency in English or evidence of level 7.0 proficiency.
Meet the following educational requirements:

Applicants must satisfy the selection/admission committee that they have the ability
to complete the programme

Applicants who do not hold an honours degree or equivalent will need to
demonstrate the capacity to perform at this level. This requires submission of APEL
essay on application which will be judged to determine its equivalence to an
honours degree (or Level 8) programme.

Applicants must satisfy the selection/admission committee that they have a
minimum of two years post registration experience in general nursing within the last
5 years (exclusive of post registration courses)
Successful candidates must have secured Health Service Executive sponsorship prior to
commencement on the programme
SELECTION CRITERIA
To be considered an applicant must:
A. Meet the entry criteria
B. Demonstrate his/her potential to cope with the academic standards required
C. Confirmation of placement on the programme is subject to the candidate confirming
191
clinical placement for the duration of the programme from their relevant Director of
Public Health Nursing.
ASSESSMENT
This programme is assessed by means of a combination of coursework, examination and
competency assessment. In order to be eligible for the award of the Postgraduate
Diploma in Nursing (Public Health Nursing) students must pass each component at 50%.
The Professional Practice component requires students to attain identified competencies;
to pass overall the student must pass all of the practice assessments. Professional
assessment 111 must be completed in order to progress to professional assessment IV
and V in the programme Compensation between modules is not permitted. The standard
for the award of distinction is 65% on the aggregate. In order to register as a Public
Health Nurse, students must meet any requirements for registration identified by An
Bord Altranais.
PLEASE NOTE THIS INFORMATION IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE AND
CANDIDATES ARE ADVISED TO VISIT THE POST GRADUATE APPLICATION
WEBSITE AT THE TIME OF APPLICATION
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MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES
The School of Nursing & Midwifery offers (9) programmes, eight taught and 1 research
at the Masters level, Master of Health Sciences (Nursing) two or three years, Master of
Health Sciences (Nursing/Midwifery Education) two or three years, Master of Health
Sciences (Advanced Practice Nursing/Midwifery) two or three years, Master of Health
Sciences (Midwifery) two or three years and Master of Health Sciences (Specialist
Nursing). These programmes have been designed to meet the needs of practising nurses
allowing the candidates to focus on their area of practice. The programmes are offered
in blended mode, workshops and on-line.
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES (NURSING)-two year programme
The programme comprises three (3) core modules, four (4) option modules, three (3)
reflective practice modules and a research dissertation. Option modules are available in
education, management, advanced practice, clinical practice and womens’ health.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of nursing practice; research methodology
and evidence based practice; practice development and conduct of research form the
framework for reflection on practice and exploration of aspects of practice.
ASSESSMENT
Each module is assessed independently. Strategies for assessment include essays,
reflective practice assignments, presentations and dissertation.
ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
Upper 2nd class honours degree in nursing or Nursing Studies at H2.1 or at H2.2 with
appropriate experience; or Higher Diploma in Nursing/Midwifery Studies with
appropriate experience; or meet the required standard in the Master in Health Sciences
Qualifying Examination.
Be on the active Register as a nurse.
Have practiced as a nurse for a minimum of two (2) years post registration.
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MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES (NURSING)-three year programme
The programme comprises three (3) core modules, four (4) option modules, three (3)
reflective practice modules and a research dissertation. Option modules are available in
education, management, advanced practice, clinical practice and womens’ health.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of nursing practice; research methodology
and evidence based practice; practice development and conduct of research form the
framework for reflection on practice and exploration of aspects of practice.
ASSESSMENT
Each module is assessed independently. Strategies for assessment include essays,
reflective practice assignments, presentations and dissertation.
ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
 Upper 2nd class honours degree in nursing or Nursing Studies at H2.1 or at H2.2
with appropriate experience; or Higher Diploma in Nursing/Midwifery Studies with
appropriate experience; or meet the required standard in the Master in Health
Sciences Qualifying Examination.
 Be on the active Register as a nurse.
 Have practiced as a nurse for a minimum of two (2) years post registration.
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MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES (MIDWIFERY)-two year programme
The programme comprises three (3) core modules, four (4) option modules, three (3)
reflective practice modules and a research dissertation. Option modules are available in
education, management, advanced practice, clinical practice and womens’ health.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of nursing practice; research methodology
and evidence based practice; practice development and conduct of research form the
framework for reflection on practice and exploration of aspects of practice.
ASSESSMENT
Each module is assessed independently. Strategies for assessment include essays,
reflective practice assignments, presentations and dissertation.
ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
 Upper 2nd class honours degree in nursing or Nursing Studies at H2.1 or at H2.2
with appropriate experience; or Higher Diploma in Nursing/Midwifery Studies with
appropriate experience; or meet the required standard in the Master in Health
Sciences Qualifying Examination.
 Be on the active Register as a midwife.
 Have practiced as a midwife for a minimum of two (2) years post registration.
195
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES (MIDWIFERY)-three year programme
The programme comprises three (3) core modules, four (4) option modules, three (3)
reflective practice modules and a research dissertation. Option modules are available in
education, management, advanced practice, clinical practice and womens’ health.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of nursing practice; research methodology
and evidence based practice; practice development and conduct of research form the
framework for reflection on practice and exploration of aspects of practice.
ASSESSMENT
Each module is assessed independently. Strategies for assessment include essays,
reflective practice assignments, presentations and dissertation.
ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
 Upper 2nd class honours degree in nursing or Nursing Studies at H2.1 or at H2.2
with appropriate experience; or Higher Diploma in Nursing/Midwifery Studies with
appropriate experience; or meet the required standard in the Master in Health
Sciences Qualifying Examination.
 Be on the active Register as a midwife.
 Have practiced as a midwife for a minimum of two (2) years post registration.
196
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES (NURSING/MIDWIFERY EDUCATION)
two year programme
The programme comprises three (3) core modules, four (4) specialist modules, three (3)
reflective practice modules, teaching practice and a research dissertation.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of nursing practice; research methodology
and evidence based practice; practice development and conduct of research form the
framework for reflection on practice and exploration of aspects of practice. Specialist
modules address teaching methods, facilitating learning, assessment strategies and
curriculum development.
100 hours of teaching practice is completed over the two years and is an integral part of
the programme.
ASSESSMENT
Each module is assessed independently. Strategies for assessment include essays,
reflective practice assignments, presentations, competency assessment of teaching
practice and dissertation.
ENTRY CRITERIA
 Upper 2nd class degree in nursing or Nursing Studies at H2.1 or at H2.2 with
appropriate experience; or Higher Diploma in Nursing Studies with appropriate
experience; or meet the required standard in the MHSc Qualifying examination
 Be on the active Register as a nurse/midwife
 Have practiced as a nurse/midwife for a minimum of three (3) years post
registration
 A letter indicating that teaching practice has been negotiated in an educational
establishment
197
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES (NURSING/MIDWIFERY EDUCATION)three year programme
The programme comprises three (3) core modules, four (4) specialist modules, three (3)
reflective practice modules, teaching practice and a research dissertation.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of nursing practice; research methodology
and evidence based practice; practice development and conduct of research form the
framework for reflection on practice and exploration of aspects of practice. Specialist
modules address teaching methods, facilitating learning, assessment strategies and
curriculum development.
100 hours of teaching practice is completed over the two years and is an integral part of
the programme.
ASSESSMENT
Each module is assessed independently. Strategies for assessment include essays,
reflective practice assignments, presentations, competency assessment of teaching
practice and dissertation.
ENTRY CRITERIA
 Upper 2nd class degree in nursing or Nursing Studies at H2.1 or at H2.2 with
appropriate experience; or Higher Diploma in Nursing Studies with appropriate
experience; or meet the required standard in the MHSc Qualifying examination
 Be on the active Register as a nurse/midwife
 Have practiced as a nurse/midwife for a minimum of three (3) years post
registration
 A letter indicating that teaching practice has been negotiated in an educational
establishment
198
MASTER
OF
HEALTH
SCIENCES
NURSING/MIDWIFERY)-two year programme
(ADVANCED
PRACTICE
The programme comprises three (3) core modules, four (4) specialist modules, three (3)
reflective practice modules, clinical practice and a research dissertation.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of nursing practice; research methodology
and evidence based practice; practice development and conduct of research form the
framework for reflection on practice and exploration of aspects of practice. Specialist
practice modules address the context of advanced practice, physical assessment skills,
pathophysiology, pharmacology and clinical decision making. Substantive hours of
clinical practice at an advanced practice level and supervised by appropriate healthcare
professionals over the 2 years is integral to the programme.
ASSESSMENT
Each module is assessed independently. Strategies for assessment include essays,
reflective practice assignments, presentations, clinical competency assessments and
dissertation.
ENTRY CRITERIA
 Upper 2nd class degree in nursing or Nursing Studies at H2.1 or at H2.2 with
appropriate experience; or Higher Diploma in Nursing Studies with appropriate
experience; or meet the required standard in the MHSc Qualifying examination.
 Be on the active Register as a nurse/midwife
 Have practiced as a nurse/midwife for a minimum of five (5) years post registration
three (3) of which are in the specialist area
 Letters from the Director of Nursing and the appropriate health care professional
Clinical Supervisor in support of the application.
199
MASTER
OF
HEALTH
SCIENCES
NURSING/MIDWIFERY)-three year programme
(ADVANCED
PRACTICE
The programme comprises three (3) core modules, four (4) specialist modules, three (3)
reflective practice modules, clinical practice and a research dissertation.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of nursing practice; research methodology
and evidence based practice; practice development and conduct of research form the
framework for reflection on practice and exploration of aspects of practice. Specialist
practice modules address the context of advanced practice, physical assessment skills,
pathophysiology, pharmacology and clinical decision making. Substantive hours of
clinical practice at an advanced practice level and supervised by appropriate healthcare
professionals over the 2 years is integral to the programme.
ASSESSMENT
Each module is assessed independently. Strategies for assessment include essays,
reflective practice assignments, presentations, clinical competency assessments and
dissertation.
ENTRY CRITERIA
 Upper 2nd class degree in nursing or Nursing Studies at H2.1 or at H2.2 with
appropriate experience; or Higher Diploma in Nursing Studies with appropriate
experience; or meet the required standard in the MHSc Qualifying examination.
 Be on the active Register as a nurse/midwife
 Have practiced as a nurse/midwife for a minimum of five (5) years post registration
three (3) of which are in the specialist area
 Letters from the Director of Nursing and the appropriate health care professional
Clinical Supervisor in support of the application.
200
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES (SPECIALIST NURSING)-one year
programme
The one (1) year research programme comprises one (1) taught module and a research
dissertation.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
Research methodology as evidenced by the ability to design and implement a research
study; evaluation and application of research findings to practice.
ASSESSMENT
Each module is assessed independently.
ENTRY CRITERIA
 Have achieved an aggregate of 60% and successfully completed a Postgraduate
Diploma in Nursing Studies at level 9
 Be on the active Register as a nurse
 Have practiced as a nurse for a minimum of two (2) years post registration
201
STAND ALONE MODULES(OCCASIONAL MODULES)
These modules provide the opportunity for nurses and midwives to fulfill and support
learning needs identified during their clinical practice and therefore allows for their
ongoing education and professional development.These modules are components of a
recognised full-time programme- Post Graduate Diploma in Nursing offered by the
School of Nursing and Midwifery, NUI Galway. Each module is worth 12 ECTS which
may be credited towards further academic study. A Student taking a stand alone module
is classed as an Occasional Student. These students however, are not on a programme
leading to a Degree, Diploma or any other award of this University. These modules are
delivered via blended learning which involves a combination of face to face and online
learning. Modules are delivered over one semester.
Stand alone Modules
 Advanced Wound Care Management
 Best Practice in Cervical Smear Taking
 Cardiovascular Disease in Primary Care
 Care of the Child and Family with Life-Limiting Illness *
*(Only open to previous graduands of the Higher/Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing
(Palliative Care) or equivalent)
 Collaboration and Interagency Working
 Continence Care
 Diabetes in Primary Care
 Empowering Clients to Self-Manage Chronic Diseases
 End of Life Care: Psychological and Social Perspectives
 Evidence Based Practice
 Experiencing Cancer
 High Dependency Maternity Care
 Living with Cancer of the Lower Urinary Tract
 Managing the Physical Health Needs of People with a Serious Mental Illness
 Principles of Orthopaedic Nursing
 Psychosocial Interventions in Healthcare
 Respiratory Disease in Primary Care
 The Context of Managing Health Care
 Work Based Learning
ENTRY CRITERIA
All applicants for Stand Alone Modules must meet the following criteria:
(a) Be a Registered Nurse/Midwife on the Live Register held by An Bord Altranais
(b) Working in a clinical area where they are able to develop skills relevant to their
chosen module.
202
SELECTION CRITERIA
Occasional students are considered for admission on the basis of their application, and
considering the following points:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Meet the entry criteria
Their previous academic and current clinical practice
A personal statement outlining their current clinical role and their need for the stand
alone module
Recommendation by the Programme Director concerned with module, in favour of
the application.
Obtain a letter from the candidate’s Director of Nursing guaranteeing clinical
practice commensurate with the module content in the applicant’s current place of
work.
203
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