WHMIS study guide

WHMIS study guide
WHMIS
AT WORK
Workers’ Compensation Board of B.C.
ABOUT WORKSAFEBC
WorkSafeBC (the Workers’ Compensation Board) is an independent provincial
statutory agency governed by a Board of Directors. It is funded by insurance
premiums paid by registered employers and by investment returns. In
administering the Workers Compensation Act, WorkSafeBC remains separate and
distinct from government; however, it is accountable to the public through
government in its role of protecting and maintaining the overall well-being of the
workers’ compensation system.
WorkSafeBC was born out of a compromise between B.C.’s workers and employers
in 1917 where workers gave up the right to sue their employers or fellow workers
for injuries on the job in return for a no-fault insurance program fully paid for by
employers. WorkSafeBC is committed to a safe and healthy workplace, and to
providing return-to-work rehabilitation and legislated compensation benefits to
workers injured as a result of their employment.
WORKSAFEBC PREVENTION INFORMATION LINE
The WorkSafeBC Prevention Information Line can answer your questions about
workplace health and safety, worker and employer responsibilities, and reporting
a workplace accident or incident. The Prevention Information Line accepts
anonymous calls.
Phone 604 276-3100 in the Lower Mainland, or call 1 888 621-7233 (621-SAFE)
toll-free in British Columbia.
To report after-hours and weekend accidents and emergencies, call 604 273-7711
in the Lower Mainland, or call 1 866 922-4357 (WCB-HELP) toll-free in
British Columbia.
WHMIS
AT WORK
W O R K S A F E B C P U B L I C AT I O N S
Many publications are available on the WorkSafeBC web site. The Occupational
Health and Safety Regulation and associated policies and guidelines, as well as
excerpts and summaries of the Workers Compensation Act, are also available on the
web site: <www.worksafebc.com>
Some publications are also available for purchase in print:
Phone:
604 232-9704
Toll-free phone: 1 866 319-9704
Fax:
604 232-9703
Toll-free fax:
1 888 232-9714
Online ordering: <www.worksafebc.com> and click on Publications;
follow the links for ordering
©1999, 2004, 2005 Workers’ Compensation Board of British Columbia. All rights
reserved. The Workers’ Compensation Board of B.C. encourages the copying,
reproduction, and distribution of this document to promote health and safety in
the workplace, provided that the Workers’ Compensation Board of B.C. is
acknowledged. However, no part of this publication may be copied, reproduced,
or distributed for profit or other commercial enterprise, nor may any part be
incorporated into any other publication, without written permission of the
Workers’ Compensation Board of B.C.
2005 Edition
Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication Data
Main entry under title:
WHMIS at work. – – Began with 1999 ed.
Irregular.
Previously published as monograph under title: What’s
WHMIS? 1995.
Description based on 2002 ed.
ISSN 1703-0935 = WHMIS at work
1. Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System
(Canada). 2. Hazardous substances – Canada – Safety
measures. 3. Hazardous substances – Law and legislation –
Canada. 4. Industrial safety – Canada. 5. Industrial
hygiene – Canada. I. Workers’ Compensation Board of
British Columbia. II. Title: Workplace Hazardous
Materials Information System at work.
T55.3.H3W45
363.17'7'0971
C99-960295-0
Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION ...................................... 1
1.
WHAT IS WHMIS? .................................. 3
Overview of WHMIS .................................................... 4
How does WHMIS work? ............................................ 5
Classification of controlled products ............................ 6
Overview of responsibilities ....................................... 11
2.
WHMIS LABELS .................................... 13
Labelling controlled products .................................... 14
Supplier labels ........................................................... 14
Workplace labels ....................................................... 19
Other means of identification .................................... 20
3.
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS .......... 21
Information included on an MSDS ............................. 22
Supplier responsibilities ............................................. 27
Employer responsibilities ........................................... 28
Confidential business information (“trade secrets”) ... 29
4.
WHMIS EDUCATION AND TRAINING .... 31
WHMIS education and training for workers ............... 32
Implementing WHMIS in your workplace .................. 34
5.
TABLES AND CHECKLISTS .................... 37
Information items on a supplier label ........................ 38
Information items on an MSDS ................................. 39
WHMIS implementation plan checklist ...................... 44
WHMIS education and training checklist ................... 46
6.
RESOURCES ......................................... 47
WorkSafeBC materials .............................................. 48
Other sources of information .................................... 50
Introduction
Workers exposed to hazardous materials may be at risk for many
serious health problems, such as kidney or lung damage, sterility,
cancer, allergic reactions, or burns. Some hazardous materials can
also cause fires or explosions. The Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) provides specific health and
safety information about workplace hazardous materials called
controlled products. Employers must use this information as well
as information specific to their workplace to educate and train
workers to work safely with and near hazardous materials.
This booklet, WHMIS at Work, explains the basics of WHMIS and
answers some commonly asked questions about WHMIS.
• Part 1 describes the three main elements of WHMIS (labels,
Material Safety Data Sheets, and education and training); the
WHMIS classification system; and the responsibilities of
suppliers, employers, and workers.
• Part 2 explains the requirements for WHMIS labels.
• Part 3 describes Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs),
including the information required on an MSDS and the
responsibilities of suppliers and employers.
• Part 4 describes WHMIS education and training requirements
and the implementation of education and training programs.
• Part 5 includes tables outlining information on WHMIS
labels and MSDSs and provides checklists for implementing
WHMIS and education and training programs.
• Part 6 includes a list of resources for more WHMIS information.
After reading this booklet, employers and workers should be able
to understand how WHMIS information can help workers to
work safely with and near hazardous materials.
WHMIS AT WORK 1
What Is
WHMIS?
1
Overview of WHMIS
The Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System
(WHMIS) provides information about many hazardous materials
used in the workplace. WHMIS calls these hazardous materials
controlled products. Under WHMIS, workers have the right to
receive information about each controlled product they use—its
identity, hazards, and safety precautions. The goal of WHMIS is
to reduce injury and disease by communicating specific health and
safety information about controlled products so that the information can be used to reduce exposure to hazardous materials.
WHMIS has developed a classification system of six hazard classes.
These classes are depicted by eight hazard symbols that identify
the specific hazards of controlled products. After a controlled product has been classified, the following three WHMIS elements are
used to communicate health and safety information:
• WHMIS labels: Labels on controlled products alert workers
to the identity of the product, hazards, and precautionary
measures.
• Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs): Technical bulletins
provide detailed hazard and precautionary information.
• WHMIS education and training programs: The employer
provides education and training for workers so that they can
work safely with and near controlled products. Workers need
to know how WHMIS works, the hazards of controlled
products in their workplace, and the safe work procedures they
must follow.
Note: Not all controlled products in the workplace are sold with
WHMIS labels and Material Safety Data Sheets. Some hazardous materials are sold with labelling and hazard information meeting the requirements of other legislation. These products are either partially or
completely exempt from WHMIS requirements (see page 10).
4
WHAT IS WHMIS?
How does WHMIS work?
Employer
vid
e
pro
Ma
y
ides
WHMIS
Labels
Prov
ides
MSDSs
Prov
Pro
vid
es
Supplier
WHMIS
Education
and
Training
Informed Worker
WHAT IS WHMIS? 5
Classification of controlled products
A controlled product is a product that falls into one or more of
the hazard classes described below. Manufacturers and suppliers
classify these products and assign one or more of the appropriate
hazard symbols. Employers must educate and train workers to
recognize the eight hazard symbols and to know what they mean.
The following are only brief descriptions of each of the classes.
CLASS A:
COMPRESSED GAS
This class includes compressed gases, dissolved
gases, and gases liquefied by compression or refrigeration. If the pressure in the container is greater
than 40 psi, the gas is a Class A product. The
cylinder may explode if exposed to heat or to
physical shock (when dropped).
Examples: oxygen and acetylene in cylinders for
welding; propane
CLASS B:
F L A M M A B L E A N D C O M B U S T I B L E M AT E R I A L
This class includes solids, liquids, and gases
capable of catching fire in the presence of a spark
or open flame under normal working conditions.
Class B has six divisions:
DIVISION 1: FLAMMABLE GASES
These are compressed gases (Class A) that form
flammable mixtures in air.
Examples: butane, propane, hydrogen gas
DIVISION 2: FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
These are liquids that have flash points below
37.8°C. A flash point is the lowest temperature at
which the vapours from these liquids will catch fire
from nearby sparks or open flames.
Examples: acetone, gasoline, isopropyl alcohol
6
WHAT IS WHMIS?
DIVISION 3: COMBUSTIBLE LIQUIDS
These are liquids that have flash points of 37.8°C
or more but less than 93.3°C.
Examples: kerosene, mineral spirits, butyl cellosolve
DIVISION 4: FLAMMABLE SOLIDS
This is a special group of solids (usually metals)
that meet very specific technical criteria such as the
ability to cause fire through friction or to ignite
and burn so vigorously and persistently that they
create a hazard.
Examples: various magnesium alloys, beryllium
powder
DIVISION 5: FLAMMABLE AEROSOLS
These products are packaged in aerosol containers.
Either the aerosolized product itself or the
propellant may catch fire.
Examples of flammable propellants: propane,
butane, isobutane
DIVISION 6: REACTIVE FLAMMABLE MATERIALS
These products react dangerously in one of two
ways: either (1) they spontaneously create heat or
catch fire under normal conditions of use or they
create heat when in contact with air to the point
where they begin to burn, or (2) they emit a
flammable gas or spontaneously catch fire when
in contact with water or water vapour.
Examples: aluminum alkyl compounds, metallic
sodium, white phosphorous
CLASS C:
O X I D I Z I N G M AT E R I A L
These materials increase the risk of fire if they
come in contact with flammable or combustible
materials.
Examples: perchloric acid, hydrogen peroxide,
permanganates, compressed oxygen
WHAT IS WHMIS? 7
CLASS D:
P O I S O N O U S A N D I N F E C T I O U S M AT E R I A L
Class D has three divisions:
DIVISION 1: MATERIALS CAUSING IMMEDIATE AND SERIOUS TOXIC EFFECTS
These materials can cause death or immediate
injury when a person is exposed to small amounts.
Examples: sodium cyanide, hydrogen sulphide
DIVISION 2: MATERIALS CAUSING OTHER TOXIC EFFECTS
These materials can cause life-threatening and
serious long-term health problems as well as less
severe but immediate reactions in a person who is
repeatedly exposed to small amounts. Health
problems include immediate skin or eye irritation,
allergic sensitization, cancer, serious impairment of
specific body organs and systems, and reproductive problems.
Examples: xylene, asbestos, isocyanates
DIVISION 3: BIOHAZARDOUS INFECTIOUS MATERIAL
These materials contain harmful micro-organisms
that have been classified into Risk Groups 2, 3,
and 4 as determined by the World Health
Organization (WHO) or the Medical Research
Council of Canada.
Examples: cultures or diagnostic specimens containing salmonella bacteria or the hepatitis B virus
8
WHAT IS WHMIS?
CLASS E:
C O R R O S I V E M AT E R I A L
This class includes caustic and acid materials that
can destroy the skin or eat through metals.
Examples: sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid,
nitric acid
CLASS F:
D A N G E R O U S LY R E A C T I V E M AT E R I A L
These products may self-react dangerously (for
example, they may explode) upon standing or
when exposed to physical shock or to increased
pressure or temperature, or they emit toxic gases
when exposed to water.
Examples: plastic monomers such as butadiene;
some cyanides
WHAT IS WHMIS? 9
Products exempt from WHMIS
Some controlled products are either partially exempt or completely
exempt from WHMIS.
Partially exempt products
Products covered by other federal legislation are exempt from federal
WHMIS requirements for supplier labels and MSDSs. However,
provincial WHMIS legislation still applies and employers must:
• Provide workers with hazard information about the product
• Educate workers about the hazards of the product
• Educate and train workers in the safe use, handling, storage, and
disposal of the product
These partially exempt products are:
• Some consumer products, such as chemicals and pressurized
containers
• Cosmetics, medical devices, drugs, and foods (Food and Drugs Act)
• Explosives (Explosives Act)
• Pesticides (Pest Control Products Act)
• Radioactive substances (Atomic Energy Control Act)
Completely exempt products
Products that are completely exempt (sometimes called “excluded”)
from both federal and provincial WHMIS legislation are still covered
by general provincial occupational health and safety regulations.
Workers must still be trained and supervised in the safe handling of
of these products.
These completely exempt products are:
• Wood and products made of wood
• Manufactured articles (such as appliances and car batteries)
• Tobacco and products made of tobacco
• Goods handled, offered for transport, or transported under the
Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act
• Hazardous wastes (they must be identified at workplaces where
they are produced)
For more information on exempt products, see the WorkSafeBC
manual WHMIS Core Material.
The rest of this booklet deals with controlled products that require
WHMIS supplier labels and MSDSs (products that are not exempt).
10 WHAT IS WHMIS?
Overview of responsibilities
The purpose of WHMIS is to reduce the likelihood of disease or
injury in the workplace. WHMIS was developed through the
collective efforts of labour and industry, along with federal,
provincial, and territorial regulatory agencies.
WHMIS legislation exists at both the federal and provincial
levels. Federal legislation establishes which products are controlled under WHMIS and deals with either the importation or sale
of these materials. Under WHMIS, those who manufacture,
import, sell, or distribute controlled products are referred to as
suppliers.
Provincial legislation covers the use of hazardous materials in the
workplace and identifies employers’ responsibilities. Workers who
work with or near controlled products must know how to handle
them safely.
When an employer becomes a supplier
If employers import or produce a controlled product, even if it is
for their own use, they are considered to be the supplier of the
controlled product. This means they must provide an up-to-date
MSDS and attach a supplier label.
WHAT IS WHMIS?
11
The following table summarizes the responsibilities of the various
groups identified by WHMIS legislation. Note that supplier
labels and workplace labels are explained starting on page 13 and
MSDSs on page 21.
Group
Responsibilities
Suppliers
Provide up-to-date MSDSs (not more than three years old) for all
controlled products they sell or produce.
Provide supplier labels on all containers of controlled products they sell
or produce.
Employers
Ensure that workers understand information on MSDSs, supplier labels,
and workplace labels by providing effective worker education.
Provide training in specific safe work procedures to workers who work
with or near controlled products.
Ensure that all containers of controlled products in their workplace have
MSDSs and WHMIS labels (supplier labels, workplace labels, or other
acceptable means of identification as appropriate).
Ensure that MSDSs are readily accessible to workers.
Workers
Know and understand the information on labels and MSDSs.
Use the information they receive through education and training to
handle controlled products safely.
Inform employers if labels are illegible or missing.
WorkSafeBC staff
Administer WHMIS legislation.
Provide general information about WHMIS to employers and workers.
Ensure compliance with both federal and provincial WHMIS legislation.
12
WHAT IS WHMIS?
WHMIS
Labels
2
Labelling controlled products
Two types of labels are required by WHMIS: supplier labels and
workplace labels. In general, suppliers are responsible for providing supplier labels and employers are responsible for providing
workplace labels or other means of identification. Employers must
also ensure that all labels at their workplace are legible and that
they are replaced if damaged.
The purpose of WHMIS labels is to alert workers to the hazards
of a controlled product and the safe procedures necessary to work
with or near that product. For this to happen, workers must be
educated to recognize and understand the information provided
on supplier labels, workplace labels, and other means of identification (such as warning signs, colour codes, and placards).
Employers are responsible for developing this education and training in consultation with worker representatives or the occupational
health and safety committee.
Supplier labels
WHMIS requires that supplier labels be placed on containers of
all controlled products sold for use in the workplace. A supplier
who produces or imports a product for distribution and sale in
Canada must prepare a supplier label for that product. Supplier
labels can be easily recognized by the distinctive WHMIS hatched
borders. The label on page 16 is one example of an acceptable
supplier label.
Seven items of information must be included within the distinctive hatched border:
1. Product identifier: Often the chemical name of a product or
the trade name, common name, code name, or code number.
14 WHMIS LABELS
2. Hazard symbol(s): One or more of the eight WHMIS
symbols indicating the hazard classes of the controlled
product.
3. Risk phrases: Phrases that alert workers to the specific
hazard(s) of the product. There should be at least one risk
phrase for each hazard symbol.
4. Precautionary statements: Statements that describe essential
precautions workers should take and specific personal protective clothing and equipment (PPE) they should wear when
handling (using, storing, and disposing of ) the product.
5. First aid measures: Statements that describe immediate first
aid measures required.
6. Supplier identification: The name of the supplier (manufacturer or distributor), preferably with the address and telephone
number.
7. Reference to MSDS: A statement indicating that an MSDS is
available.
Additional requirements for supplier labels:
• Only the above seven information items can be printed within
the WHMIS hatched borders. Other information, such as
directions for use, must be placed outside the WHMIS
hatched borders.
• The written information must be shown in both English and
French.
• The information must be correct and current.
• Colours that conflict with Transportation of Dangerous Goods
(TDG) labelling cannot be used. For example, the colour
orange cannot be used because it is used by TDG to identify
explosives.
• The label must stand out from the container itself and
other markings on the container (for example, the size of
the label should be appropriate for the size of the container).
See the WorkSafeBC manual WHMIS Core Material for
more information.
WHMIS LABELS 15
Hazard
symbols
ACETONE ACÉTONE
Product
Identifier
S E E M AT E R I A L S A F E T Y DATA S H E E T F O R T H I S P RO D U C T
VOIR LA FICHE SIGNALÉTIQUE POUR CE PRODUIT
Reference
to MSDS
Risk
phrases
Precautionary
statements
First aid
measures
DANGER! EXTREMELY
FLAMMABLE. IRRITATES EYES.
PRECAUTIONS: Keep
away from heat, sparks,
and flames. Ground
containers when pouring.
Avoid breathing vapours or
mists. Avoid eye contact. Avoid prolonged
or repeated contact with skin. Wear
splash-proof safety goggles or faceshield
and butyl rubber gloves. If acetone is
present in concentrations greater than
250 ppm, wear a NIOSH-approved
respirator with an organic vapour
cartridge. Use with adequate ventilation,
especially in enclosed areas. Store in a
cool, well-ventilated area, away from
incompatibles.
FIRST AID: In case of contact with eyes,
immediately flush eyes with lots of running
water for 15 minutes, lifting the upper and
lower eyelids occasionally. Get medical
attention immediately. In case of contact
with skin, immediately wash skin with lots
of soap and water. Remove contaminated
clothing and shoes. Get medical attention
if irritation persists after washing. Wash
clothing before reuse. If inhaled, remove
subject to fresh air. Give artificial
respiration if not breathing. Get medical
attention immediately. If swallowed,
contact the Poison Control Centre. Get
medical attention immediately. Do not give
anything by mouth to an unconscious or
convulsing person.
ATTENTION! THIS CONTAINER IS
HAZARDOUS WHEN EMPTY. ALL
LABELLED HAZARD PRECAUTIONS
MUST BE OBSERVED.
BIG
DANGER! EXTRÈMEMENT
INFLAMMABLE. IRRITE LES YEUX.
MESURES DE PRÉVENTION:
Tenir à l’écart de la chaleur, des
étincelles et des flammes.
Relier les récipients à la terre
lors du transvasement. Éviter de
respirer les vapeurs ou les
brumes. Éviter le contact avec les yeux. Éviter le
contact prolongé ou répété avec la peau. Porter
des lunettes contre les éclaboussures de
produit chimique ou une visière de protection, et
des gants en caoutchouc butyle. Si l’acétone est
présent en concentration de plus de 250 pour
un million, porter un respirateur muni d’une
cartouche à vapeur organique approuvé par
NIOSH. Utiliser avec suffisamment de ventilation
surtout dans les endroits clos. Entreposer dans
un endroit frais, bien aéré, à l’écart des produits
incompatibles.
PREMIERS SOINS: En cas de contact avec les
yeux, rincer immédiatement et copieusement
avec de l’eau courante pendant 15 minutes en
soulevant les paupières inférieures et
supérieures de temps en temps. Obtenir des
soins médicaux immédiatement. En cas de
contact avec la peau, laver immédiatement la
region affectée avec beaucoup d’eau et de
savon. Retirer les vêtements et les chaussures
contaminées. Si l’irritation persiste après le
lavage, obtenir des soins médicaux. Laver les
vêtements avant de les réutiliser. En cas
d’inhalation, transporter la victime à l’air frais. En
cas d’arrét respiratoire, pratiquer la respiration
artificielle. Obtenir des soins médicaux
immédiatement. En cas d’ingestion, contacter le
Centre de Contrôle des Empoisonnements.
Obtenir des soins médicaux immédiatement. Ne
rien faire avaler à une victime inconsciente ou en
convulsions.
ATTENTION! CE RECIPIENT EST
DANGEREUX LORSQU’IL EST VIDE.
CHAQUE INDICATION DE DANGER
SUR LES ÉTIQUETTES DOIVENT
ÊTRE OBSERVÉES.
BIG Chemical Company / 123 Nitro Avenue, Vapour Town, BC / 123-4567
An example of a supplier label.
Supplier identification
French
version
WHMIS
hatched
border
Other supplier labels
Some supplier labels may look different from the example on
page 16 because less information is required for controlled products
that are:
• In small containers (less than 100 mL)
• Chemicals from laboratory chemical suppliers
• Laboratory samples
Information item
1
Product identifier
2
Hazard symbol(s)
3
Risk phrases
4
Precautionary
statements
5
First aid measures
6
Supplier
identification
7
Reference to
MSDS
Small
container
Laboratory
chemical
Laboratory
sample*
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
*Laboratory samples must also include chemical identity and an
emergency phone number.
For more information about these supplier labels, see the
WorkSafeBC manual WHMIS Core Material.
When a supplier ships a product, it will generally be transported
in a single container, in a multi-container, or in bulk. If the product is in a single container, the supplier must apply the supplier
label. If a number of inner containers are packaged into a
multi-container shipment (such as a box or wrapped pallet), the
supplier must apply labels on both the inner and outer containers
unless there is a written agreement that the purchaser will apply
the supplier labels to the inner containers. For bulk shipments,
the supplier must send to the purchaser either a supplier label or
the information required on a supplier label.
WHMIS LABELS 17
The Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act may require additional
labels during transport. For multi-container shipments, a supplier
label is not required on the outer container if a TDG label is
present. Only the inner containers require supplier labels.
Employers are responsible for checking that supplier labels have
been applied to the controlled products received at their
workplace. With multi-container shipments, the employer must
apply supplier labels to inner containers if the employer has agreed
in writing to do so. With bulk shipments, the employer must
apply the supplier labels provided. If the supplier sends labelling
information instead of labels, the employer must develop and
apply, at a minimum, a workplace label (see page 19).
If a supplier label is missing when the product is received, or if the
employer believes the label contains inaccurate information, the
employer must temporarily store that product while he or she is
actively seeking the information from the supplier or the manufacturer. The temporarily stored product cannot be handled or
used until a proper label has been obtained.
If a supplier label later becomes illegible or is accidentally removed,
the employer must replace the label with either a supplier label or a
workplace label (see page 19).
Multi-container shipment with
supplier label.
18
WHMIS LABELS
Workplace labels
Workplace labels are required on containers for each controlled
product produced and used on-site, on secondary containers after
a product has been transferred from the original container, and on
containers where the supplier label is missing or not readable.
Workplace labels provide three types of information:
• Product identifier
• Specific safe handling information and personal protective
clothing and equipment required
• Reference to the MSDS, if an MSDS has been produced by
the supplier
The format for workplace labels is fairly flexible. For example:
• The information can be written directly onto the container
using a permanent marker.
• The language(s) used can be chosen to fit the specific
workplace.
• Hazard symbols and hatched borders are optional.
Acetone
Keep away from heat, sparks, and flames.
Wear safety goggles and butyl rubber gloves.
Use with local exhaust ventilation.
MSDS available
An example of a workplace label.
WHMIS LABELS 19
Other means of identification
In some circumstances where workplace labels are impractical,
employers may use other means of identification such as warning
signs, symbols, placards, and coding systems (for example, using
colours, numbers, or letters). These can be used as long as the
identification system is communicated effectively and understood
by workers. These other means of identification can be used when
the product is:
• Used in a laboratory (for example, in transfer containers such
as beakers and flasks)
• Transferred by a worker into a container for use during the
same shift if that worker maintains control of the new
container and finishes use in that shift
• Contained in a transfer or reaction system such as a pipe,
reaction vessel, tank car, or conveyor belt
• Identified as a hazardous waste produced in the workplace
Controlled products in pipes identified by colour and letters.
20
WHMIS LABELS
Material
Safety Data
Sheets
3
Information included on an MSDS
A Material Safety Data Sheet is a technical bulletin that provides
specific hazard information, safe handling information, and
emergency procedures for a controlled product. Since the MSDS
contains detailed health and safety information specific to each
controlled product, it should be used as a key source of information for developing training programs and safe work procedures.
It is also a valuable reference source of health and safety information for workers, health and safety committees, and emergency
service personnel.
WHMIS legislation lists general guidelines and the minimum content requirements for an MSDS. WHMIS requires 54 items of
information in nine sections. If information for any of the 54 items
is either not available or not applicable, then the MSDS must clearly
indicate that fact. No section of the MSDS can be left blank. See
pages 39–43 for a list of the 54 items and an explanation of each
one.
The following are the nine recommended section headings and
the types of information to be provided in each section.
1.
P R O D U C T I N F O R M AT I O N
This section identifies the product, the manufacturer, and the
supplier, and it describes the intended product use. It also
provides information about where to contact the manufacturer
and supplier for information and/or in case of emergency.
2.
HAZARDOUS INGREDIENTS
This section lists the specific chemical names, percentages, and
acute toxicity data for the individual components.
3.
P H Y S I C A L D ATA
This section contains general information on physical and
chemical properties such as the specific gravity, boiling point,
and evaporation rate.
22
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS
4.
FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD
This section lists the conditions under which the product may
catch fire or explode, as well as information for developing
strategies and procedures to deal with fire and explosion
hazards.
5.
R E A C T I V I T Y D ATA
This section lists conditions and other substances that should
be avoided to prevent dangerous reactions.
6.
TOXICOLOGICAL PROPERTIES
This section identifies how the substance enters the body and
the possible health effects from single or repeated exposures.
It also identifies if the product has known long-term health
effects such as liver or kidney damage, sensitization, cancer, or
reproductive effects.
7.
PREVENTIVE MEASURES
This section includes information on required protective
equipment, as well as on how to safely clean up spills and how
to safely use, handle, store, dispose of, and transport the product.
8.
FIRST AID MEASURES
This section lists specific instructions for the immediate treatment of a worker who has inhaled or swallowed the product
or who has had skin or eye contact with the product.
9.
P R E PA R AT I O N I N F O R M AT I O N
This section lists the date the MSDS was prepared and who
prepared it.
MSDSs are complex and technical. Many workers may find some
of the information on an MSDS difficult to understand. The
employer must be able to explain the content of the MSDS to the
workers in order for them to work safely with or near controlled
products.
The following sample MSDS shows information items for acetone.
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS 23
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET — 9 Sections
SECTION 1 — PRODUCT INFORMATION
Product Identifier
WHMIS Classification (optional)
Acetone
B2, D2B
Product Use
Solvent, general-purpose cleaning of adhesives, contact cements, printing inks, gums, waxes, resins, greases, and oils
Manufacturer’s Name
Street Address
City
Province
City
BC
Emergency Telephone
X0X 0X0
Big Chemical Company
Street Address
5556 Helium Lane
Gaseous Bay
Postal Code
Supplier’s Name
Happy Chemical Company
Province
Vapour Town
Postal Code
(604) 234-5678
123 Nitro Avenue
BC
Emergency Telephone
X5X 5X5
(604) 345-6789
SECTION 2 — HAZARDOUS INGREDIENTS
Hazardous Ingredients (specific)
%
CAS Number
Acetone
99-100
LD50 of Ingredient
(specify species and route)
67-64-1
LC50 of Ingredient
(specify species)
5,800 mg/kg (oral, rat) 30,000 ppm (inhal.,4 hrs.)
SECTION 3 — PHYSICAL DATA
Physical State
Specific Gravity
Odour and Appearance
Liquid
0.791 at 20° C
Boiling Point (°C)
Vapour Density (air = 1)
Clear, colourless liquid with mildly
pungent, sweet and fruity odour
Vapour Pressure (mmHg)
2.0
24-24.7 1 kPa
Freezing Point (°C)
56.2
pH
Odour Threshold (ppm)
62 (average)
5.6 (n-butyl acetate=1)
Evaporation Rate
Coefficient of Water/Oil Distribution
-94.6
n/ap
0.58
SECTION 4 — FIRE AND EXPLOSION DATA
Flammability
If yes, under which conditions?
❐ Yes
❐ No
X
Flammable liquid
Carbon dioxide, dry chemical powder, “alcohol” foam, polymer foam. Water may be ineffective because
it will not cool acetone below its flashpoint.
Means of Extinction
Flashpoint (°C) and Method
Upper Flammable Limit (% by volume)
-18°C (cc)
Autoignition Temperature (°C)
Explosion Data — Sensitivity to Impact
465°C
Hazardous Combustion Products
Lower Flammable Limit (% by volume)
12.8% at 25°C
2.5% at 25°C
No
Explosion Data — Sensitivity to Static Discharge
Yes
Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide
SECTION 5 — REACTIVITY DATA
Chemical Stability
❐ Yes
X
Incompatibility with Other Substances
If no, under which conditions?
❐ No
X❐ Yes
❐ No
If yes, which ones?
Acids (for example, nitric acid);
Strong oxidizing agents (for example, hydrogen peroxide);
Bases (for example, sodium hydroxide)
Reactivity, and under what conditions?
Hazardous Decomposition Products
57M2 (R6/99)
Attacks many forms of plastics and rubber, including rayon
Carbon monoxide from prolonged exposure to sunlight
SAMPLE FORMAT PROVIDED BY THE WORKERS’ COMPENSATION BOARD OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
24 MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS
Please continue on reverse side
Acetone
Product Identifier
SECTION 6 — TOXICOLOGICAL PROPERTIES
Route of Entry
❐
X
Skin Contact
Effects of Acute Exposure to Product
❐
Skin Absorption
❐
X
❐
X
Eye Contact
❐
X
Inhalation
Ingestion
Irritation; possible effects on central nervous system (CNS); at air concentrations above
8,000 ppm may cause drowsiness, incoordination, loss of reflexes, unconsciousness, and respiratory failure
Effects of Chronic Exposure to Product
Dermatitis. No significant harmful effects from oral or inhalation exposures.
Exposure Limits (value, source, date)
250 ppm, 8-hour exposure limit (WCB)
Irritancy (if yes, explain)
❐ No
❐ Yes
X
Severe eye irritant, skin and respiratory irritant
Sensitization (if yes, explain)
❐ Yes
❐ No
Carcinogenicity (if yes, explain)
❐ Yes
❐ No
Reproductive Toxicity (if yes, explain)
❐ No
❐ Yes
Mutagenicity (if yes, explain)
Synergistic Products (if yes, explain)
X
❐ Yes
❐ Yes
X
Teratogenicity (if yes, explain)
❐ No
X
X
❐ No
XYes
❐
X
❐ No
Chlorinated solvents, ethyl alcohol
SECTION 7 — PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Personal Protective Equipment
If checked, specify type
❐ Gloves
X
❐ Respirator
X
❐
X Eye
❐
Footwear
❐
❐
Clothing
Other
Butyl rubber gloves. NIOSH-approved respirator with organic vapour cartridge for air concentrations
up to 2,500 ppm. Splash-proof chemical safety goggles or face shield.
Engineering Controls (specify, such as ventilation, enclosed process)
Use mechanical ventilation to reduce exposure. Use non-sparking and
grounded ventilation system.
Leak and Spill Procedure
Eliminate all ignition sources. Wear adequate protective equipment. Contain spill with absorbent
material and place in a suitable covered and labelled container for disposal.
Waste Disposal
Check with federal, provincial, and local government requirements for disposal.
Handling Procedures and Equipment
Use in a well-ventilated area, away from heat and all ignition sources (including sparks, open
flames, and hot surfaces). Do not use with incompatible substances. Use grounded and non-sparking equipment.
Storage Requirements
Store in cool, well-ventilated area out of direct sunlight, away from heat and ignition sources. Storage
facilities should be made from fire-resistant materials.
Special Shipping Information
PIN
TDG shipping name: Acetone, Classification 3, Flammable liquid, Packing Group II
1090
SECTION 8 — FIRST AID MEASURES
Inhalation
Remove source of contamination or move victim to fresh air.
If conscious, have victim rinse mouth thoroughly with water; do not induce vomiting; have victim drink
240-300 mL of water. Obtain medical attention immediately.
Skin Contact
Flush with water for 15 minutes.
Eye Contact Immediately flush contaminated eye(s) with lukewarm, gently flowing water for 20 minutes, while holding
eyelids(s) open. Obtain medical attention immediately.
Ingestion
SECTION 9 — PREPARATION INFORMATION
Prepared by (Group, Department, etc.)
Sally Safemeister
Telephone Number
(604) 123-2222
Preparation Date
January 4, 2005
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS 25
WHMIS legislation does not require a standard format for the layout of MSDSs. MSDSs may look very different and information
items may be located in different sections.
Alternative MSDSs
In certain circumstances, the employer may need to obtain an MSDS
from a source other than the manufacturer or supplier.
MSDS databases
Employers can use an up-to-date MSDS from a database if the
MSDS was prepared by the supplier or manufacturer of the product
they have purchased.
If an employer chooses to use an MSDS prepared by someone other
than the supplier or manufacturer of the purchased product, then
the employer becomes responsible for all of the information on that
MSDS. This includes ensuring that the information is accurate,
complete, and current and is reviewed at least every 3 years.
Generic MSDSs
One generic MSDS can be used for a group of controlled products
when those products have similar chemical compositions — for
example, different coloured paints from the same product line. In
some cases, additional information that is specific to a particular
product in the group may need to be included on the MSDS. See the
WorkSafeBC manual WHMIS Core Material for more information.
Blank MSDSs
If employers need to create an MSDS or revise* an existing MSDS,
they may use any format to present the nine section headings and
54 information items. There is no standard format for an MSDS.
However, blank MSDS forms are available on WorkSafeBC.com
under “Forms.” Please note that these forms may not provide
enough space for some of the information items. For example,
“Effects of Acute Exposure to Product,” “Effects of Chronic
Exposure to Product,” and “Leak and Spill Procedure” often require
several lines of information.
*Be aware that if an employer changes or adds information to an
MSDS provided by the supplier of a product, the employer becomes
legally responsible for all the information on the revised MSDS.
26
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS
Supplier responsibilities
Suppliers of controlled products must do the following:
• Provide an accurate and complete MSDS for each controlled
product they import or sell in Canada.
• Provide an MSDS in either or both the official languages
(English and French) at the purchaser’s request.
• Provide an MSDS that is current (not more than three years
old) to purchasers on or before the day of purchase.
• Use language and words easy for workers and employers to
read and understand.
• Ensure that information is not ambiguous and does not
conflict with information on the supplier label or in other parts
of the MSDS. If abbreviations are used, they must be explained
in the text.
• Provide an updated MSDS as soon as significant new information becomes available or every three years, whichever
comes first.
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS 27
Employer
responsibilities
Employers who use controlled products are responsible for the
following:
• Ensure that current MSDSs are received and maintained for
all controlled products in the workplace before allowing
workers to handle these products. If a current MSDS is not
available, the employer must temporarily store that product
while he or she is actively seeking a proper MSDS from the
supplier or the manufacturer.
• Educate and train workers to ensure they understand the
information on MSDSs and are able to use the information to
work safely with and near controlled products.
• Ensure MSDSs are “readily available” at the worksite in a file,
binder, or computer database that is accessible at all times by
all workers. (It is not acceptable for an MSDS to be read to a
worker over a telephone or radio.)
• Ensure that no MSDS is more than three years old. Chemicals are constantly being studied and new information can
affect the health and safety information on an MSDS. Even if
the ingredients of a product have not changed, other important information may have changed.
• Obtain or prepare accurate and complete MSDSs for any
controlled products imported for use in the workplace.
• Prepare or provide MSDSs for any controlled products mixed
or made for use at the workplace (these MSDSs can be in the
language or languages used at the workplace).
28
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS
Confidential business information
(“trade secrets”)
Confidential business information (CBI) refers to specific
product information that suppliers or employers who are manufacturers are permitted to withhold from an MSDS or label for a
period of three years. In the United States, CBI may be called trade
secrets or proprietary information. Under WHMIS, a supplier can
make a request to the Hazardous Materials Information Review
Commission (HMIRC) to protect certain information that gives
a company an economic advantage over competitors. Crucial
information such as health hazards may never be withheld. Types
of information that may be granted this exemption are:
• Chemical identity
• Concentration of ingredients
• Information that can be used to identify an ingredient, such
as a toxicological study
• Information that can be used to identify the controlled
product
• Information that can be used to identify the supplier of the
controlled product
If the term “trade secret” or “proprietary information” appears on an
MSDS, it must have a registration number and date. The following are examples of valid statements you may see:
• While a CBI claim is being processed:
HMIRC #1938, filed on April 20, 2005
•
After a CBI claim has been granted:
CBI claim #1938, granted on May 5, 2005
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS 29
When information is needed for emergency or first aid treatment,
a supplier or employer must immediately disclose — in confidence
— to a treating physician or nurse, the specific chemical identity
and other necessary information about a hazardous material
protected by a trade secret claim. In addition, an officer of the
HMIRC may disclose — in confidence — withheld information
to agencies responsible for occupational health and safety.
For more information on trade secrets and WHMIS, consult the
WorkSafeBC manual WHMIS Core Material or the Hazardous
Materials Information Review Regulations, or contact the
HMIRC. Full reference information is listed on pages 48–51.
American and European MSDSs
American and European MSDSs that have 16 sections instead of 9
are acceptable under WHMIS as long as they include all 54 information items. The 16 section headings must be similar to the headings
recommended by ANSI (American) and European standards.
Some WHMIS information items are not required in OSHA legislation
or the ANSI standard. As a result, an American or European MSDS
may not be acceptable in Canada.
• Irritants may not be listed as hazardous ingredients. Some other
examples of information items that are commonly missing on an
American or European MSDS are odour threshold, evaporation
rate, and freezing point.
• An MSDS in Canada requires the hazardous combustion products
and hazardous decomposition products to be listed separately.
On an American or European MSDS, they may be combined.
• American and European MSDSs usually do not have a separate
section heading for First Aid Measures. This information is often
combined with Health Hazards.
• American and European MSDSs usually do not have a section for
Preparation Information. This information is often missing.
• American and European MSDSs may not have separate subsections for WHMIS information items (for example, carcinogenicity,
teratogenicity, reproductive toxicity, mutagenicity, allergic
sensitization, and synergistic effects).
• The name and telephone number of the person or group who
prepared the MSDS may be omitted.
• As American and European legislation does not require MSDSs to
be updated every three years, the preparation or last revision date
may be missing or more than three years old.
30
WHMIS
Education
and Training
4
31
WHMIS education and training for workers
Employers must establish an education program for their workers
to ensure that workers understand WHMIS and the hazards of
the controlled products they work with or near. Education
programs about WHMIS must be followed up with job-specific
training in safe work procedures for handling, storing, and disposing of these controlled products. Workers must also be trained in
emergency procedures in the event of an accident or spill.
What’s the difference between education and training?
WHMIS education explains how WHMIS works, what an MSDS is,
what information is on a WHMIS label, and other information about
WHMIS. Workers can be educated through classroom instruction or
using videos or computer programs. WHMIS training refers to
hands-on, job-specific training. Training shows individuals how to
work safely with the controlled products in a particular workplace.
Workers need to be educated and trained if they:
• Store, handle, use, or dispose of a controlled product
• Supervise or manage workers who store, handle, use, or
dispose of a controlled product
• Serve as emergency personnel
• Work near the controlled product, where their health and
safety could be at risk during normal storage, handling, use,
or disposal of the product; during maintenance operations; or
in emergencies (for example, even a receptionist at a dental
office may be exposed to mercury if it is spilled)
The WHMIS education and training program must be reviewed
at least once a year to determine if it is still effective or if it needs to
be revised. The program may need to be revised and workers may
need to be retrained when:
• Conditions at the workplace change
• New products are being used
• Reformulated products pose different hazards
• New hazard information becomes available
32
WHMIS EDUCATION AND TRAINING
Workers who are successfully educated and trained in WHMIS
should be able to answer these four key questions:
1.
2.
3.
4.
What are the hazards of the product you are using?
How do you protect yourself ?
What should you do in case of an emergency or spill?
Where do you get more information on this product?
When the education and training program is reviewed, it is
important to find out if workers still understand the hazards of
controlled products and follow safe work procedures. These four
key questions can also be used to evaluate whether workers need
to be retrained because they have forgotten some information.
Worker representatives or the health and safety committee must
be consulted in developing, implementing, and reviewing education and training programs.
Does WorkSafeBC validate education or training programs?
WorkSafeBC does not validate education or training programs.
Private WHMIS consultants can help you with education or training.
WorkSafeBC prevention officers will conduct performance-based
audits as part of their workplace inspections — for example, they
may evaluate workers’ knowledge of health and safety information
specific to the products they work with or near.
Some industries, such as construction, offer WHMIS “cards” or
“certificates” to participants who complete their WHMIS education
program. Such cards and certificates are useful for workers who
move regularly from site to site, enabling them to prove to new
employers that they have attended WHMIS sessions. However,
job-specific training at each worksite is still required for all
workers who work with or near controlled products.
WHMIS EDUCATION AND TRAINING 33
Implementing WHMIS in your workplace
To implement the WHMIS program, employers should make use
of supplier labels and MSDSs, as well as their own knowledge of
the hazards of products and their use in the workplace. Their
workplace knowledge should take into account factors such as
quantity, work processes, control measures, and work location. For
example, the hazards of spray painting with a controlled product
inside a confined space are far different from the hazards of hand
brushing the same product outdoors.
Based on all this information, employers must develop written safe
work procedures that ensure the health and safety of workers. They
must also educate their workers about the hazards and train them
in safe work procedures.
How employers implement WHMIS in their own workplaces will
vary, but the major elements of their programs will be similar. The
WHMIS Implementation Plan Checklist on pages 44–45 can be
used to verify that a workplace WHMIS implementation plan
meets WorkSafeBC guidelines. In developing a program to instruct
workers, an employer might use the WHMIS Education and
Training Checklist on page 46.
34 WHMIS EDUCATION AND TRAINING
What are safe work procedures?
Employers must develop effective procedures to prevent exposing
their workers to excessive levels of hazardous materials. These
include safe work procedures for handling, using, storing, and
disposing of controlled products. As well, safe work procedures
must be established for emergency situations and spill clean-ups.
Safe work procedures should be written and they should address the
specific hazards of the controlled product and how it is used in the
workplace. They must contain enough detail to provide direction to
workers. Workers must be trained by the employer and must follow
these procedures at the worksite.
Sample safe work procedure
The following is an example of a written safe work procedure to be
used by authorized workers for clean-up of small spills of acetone
(about one litre) for a particular worksite:
1. Extinguish and control all ignition sources including electrical
services, open flames, and electrostatic discharge.
2. Evacuate workers to the designated safe location.
3. Report the spill to your supervisor.
4. Get the waste containers and spill cart.
5. Put on the respirator, butyl rubber gloves, and safety goggles.
6. Clean up the acetone using chemical absorbent pillows from the
spill cart according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
7. Do not flush or rinse the spilled acetone into the sewer system.
8. Place used absorbent pillows (containing acetone) in designated
waste containers.
9. Dispose of used chemical absorbent pillows according to local
waste disposal procedures.
WHMIS EDUCATION AND TRAINING 35
Tables and
Checklists
5
Information items on a supplier label
Information item
38
Description
1
Product identifier
Often the chemical name of a product or the trade name,
common name, code name, or code number.
2
Hazard symbol(s)
One or more of the eight WHMIS symbols indicating the
hazard class(es) of the controlled product.
3
Risk phrases
Phrases that alert workers to the specific hazard(s) of the
product. There should be at least one risk phrase for each
hazard symbol.
4
Precautionary statements
Statements that describe essential precautions workers
should take when handling (using, storing, and disposing of)
the product.
5
First aid measures
Statements that describe immediate first aid measures
required.
6
Supplier identification
The name of the supplier (preferably with the address and
telephone number).
7
Reference to MSDS
A statement indicating that an MSDS is available.
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TABLES AND CHECKLISTS
Information items on an MSDS
Information item
Description
Section 1: Product Information
1
Product identifier
The name of the product as it appears on the label. This is
often the chemical name of a product but can also be the
trade name, common name, code name, or code number.
2
Product use
The product use(s) intended by the manufacturer or supplier.
3
Manufacturer's name, address,
and emergency phone number
The manufacturer of the product. Emergency phone number
must be listed if one is available.
4
Supplier's name, address, and
emergency phone number
The seller or distributor (which may be the same as the
manufacturer).
Section 2: Hazardous Ingredients
5
Hazardous ingredients
Each hazardous ingredient must be listed by its specific
chemical name (not its generic name).
6
Percentages
The percentages, or range of percentages, for each
hazardous ingredient.
7
CAS Registry Number
The unique number assigned to each hazardous ingredient by
the Chemical Abstract Service Registry.
8
Current LD50 for each
hazardous ingredient
A measure of the short-term poisoning potential of a
hazardous ingredient. LD50 is the lethal single dose at which
50% of a specified test population dies. Note: LD50 can be
determined for many routes of entry, but oral (given by
mouth) and dermal (applied to skin) LD50s are used for
WHMIS classification.
9
Current LC50 for each
hazardous ingredient
A measure of the short-term poisoning potential of a
hazardous ingredient. LC50 is the lethal concentration (by
inhalation) at which 50% of a specified test population dies.
Note: 4-hour exposures are used for WHMIS classification.
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Section 3: Physical Data
10
Physical state
The physical state of the product (gas, liquid, solid, paste,
powder, or gel) at room temperature.
11
Odour and appearance
Odour describes the quality of the odour of the product (for
example, fruity, sharp, almond-like). Appearance describes
colour and texture for most products and includes particle
size for solids.
TABLES AND CHECKLISTS 39
Information item
Description
12
Odour threshold
The lowest airborne concentration that can be detected by
the human sense of smell.
13
Specific gravity
The ratio of the weight of a substance compared with water.
14
Vapour density
A ratio of the molecular weight of a gas or vapour compared
with the equivalent weight of air.
15
Vapour pressure
One measure of the ability of a substance to form vapours.
The higher the vapour pressure, the more quickly a
substance evaporates.
16
Evaporation rate
The ratio of how fast a substance evaporates relative to a
known reference standard (usually n-butyl acetate = 1).
17
Boiling point
The temperature at which a liquid changes to a gas
(at normal room pressure).
18
Freezing point (melting point)
The temperature at which a liquid changes to a solid or a
solid to a liquid (at normal room pressure).
19
pH
A value that indicates the acidity or alkalinity of a product
(usually liquid)––pH values between 0 and 7 are considered
acidic and pH values between 7 and 14 are considered
alkaline (7 is neutral).
20
Coefficient of
water/oil distribution
A number that indicates how easily a product may be
absorbed into the body. A value greater than 1 means a
substance may enter the body through the mucous
membranes of the eyes, nose, and lungs. A value less than 1
means that the substance may be absorbed by the fatty
tissue below the skin.
21
Flammability
Whether a product is classified as flammable or combustible
under WHMIS.
22
Means of extinction
Fire extinguishers or the extinguishing material suitable for
use on the burning product or fire.
23
Flash point and
test method used
The lowest temperature at which the product will catch fire
(or explode) when there is a nearby source of ignition such as
a spark or open flame. A flash point is determined either by a
“cc” (closed cup) or “oc” (open cup) method.
24
Upper flammable limit
25
Lower flammable limit
The highest and lowest concentration of a gas or vapour in
air (expressed as a percentage) at which the product will
catch fire or explode if near an ignition source such as a
spark or open flame. These are also referred to as explosive
limits. These concentrations, and all concentrations in
between, form the flammable range.
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Information item
Description
26
Autoignition temperature
The temperature above which the substance (usually the
vapour) may self-ignite without an external flame or spark.
Autoignition temperatures are available only for flammable
liquids and gases.
27
Hazardous combustion
products
The hazardous products produced when the substance burns
or is exposed to extreme heat.
28
Sensitivity to
mechanical impact
Whether the product may explode due to physical impact
(for example, being dropped, bumped, or knocked over).
29
Sensitivity to static discharge
Whether the product may explode or catch fire if there is a
nearby spark from static electricity.
Section 5: Reactivity Data
30
Chemical stability
Whether the product is chemically stable when exposed to
normal intended use or when placed in extended storage.
31
Incompatible substances
Other chemicals or chemical groups (for example, acids and
caustics) that will cause violent reactions when the two
products contact each other.
32
Conditions of reactivity
When hazardous reactions (for example, vigorous
polymerization) may occur.
33
Hazardous decomposition
products
Hazardous substances produced or released due to aging or
reaction with air or moisture. These do not include thermal
decomposition products from burning or excess heating.
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Section 6: Toxicological Properties
34
Routes of entry
How the product enters the body during normal use:
skin contact, skin absorption, eye contact, inhalation,
and/or ingestion.
35
Effects of acute exposure
Adverse health effects resulting from short-term exposure
to the substance, either as a single exposure or as multiple
exposures occurring within a short time, usually 24 hours
or less.
36
Effects of chronic exposure
Adverse health effects resulting from repeated exposure over
a relatively long period of time, anywhere from several days
to years.
37
Exposure limits
The exposure limit for the product, usually the 8-hour
time-weighted-average, and the name of the regulatory
agency. The legal exposure limits (for example, in B.C. the
exposure limits accepted by WorkSafeBC) may be different
from the ones listed on the MSDS.
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41
Information item
Description
38
Irritancy of product
Whether the product may irritate the skin, eyes, nose, throat,
or any other part of the body that it contacts to produce
tearing, reddening, swelling, itching, and/or pain. Irritancy is
often described as mild, moderate, or severe.
39
Sensitization
Whether the product may cause sensitization. A sensitizer
may cause severe allergic reactions with repeated exposure.
40
Carcinogenicity
Whether the product is classified as a human carcinogen by
the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) or by
the American Conference of Governmental Industrial
Hygienists (ACGIH).
41
Reproductive toxicity
Whether the product may cause reproductive problems.
42
Teratogenicity
Whether the product may cause birth defects in the fetus at
exposures that do not cause damage or injury to the mother.
43
Mutagenicity
Whether the product may cause changes to the genetic
material (DNA) of living cells.
44
Synergistic products
Other products that, when combined with exposure to the
controlled product, may cause a toxic effect greater than the
sum of the effects of the individual materials. For example,
product A increases the chance for getting cancer by 2 times
and product B increases the chance for cancer by 2 times, but
when product A and B are used together, the chance for
cancer is increased by 50 times.
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Personal protective equipment
Specific personal protective equipment, and specific type of
equipment, required to prevent exposure to the product.
46
Specific engineering controls
Recommended engineering controls, such as ventilation and
process equipment design, to be used with the product.
47
Leak and spill procedures
Safe procedures to clean up spills, leaks, and other accidental
releases of the product.
48
Waste disposal
Information such as proper waste container design, safe
procedures for handling waste, and agencies to contact
regarding disposal requirements.
49
Handling procedures
and equipment
Particular procedures and equipment required to handle the
product safely.
50
Storage requirements
Specific safe storage information such as separation from
other incompatibles, shelf life, testing for peroxide formation,
and sensitivity to light, temperature, or moisture.
42 TABLES AND CHECKLISTS
Information item
51
Special shipping information
Description
Safe shipping information such as:
• Sensitivity to shock and temperature
• Product identification number (PIN) or United Nations
• number (UN number)
Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) information
(for example, classification, proper shipping name, and
packaging group) may also be included.
Section 8: First Aid Measures
52
Specific first aid measures
Specific first aid measures in the event of:
• Inhalation
• Ingestion
• Skin contact
• Eye contact
Section 9: Preparation Information
53
Date of original preparation
and date of last review
54
Name and phone number
of preparer
Gives the date that the MSDS was first prepared and when it
was last reviewed (which should be within three years of the
current date). Providing the date that the MSDS was printed
is not acceptable.
Frutiger Condensed
Frutiger Bold Condensed
FC-Frutiger-Blk75
FC-Frutiger-Itl56
Gives the name and phone number of the person or group
who prepared the MSDS.
TABLES AND CHECKLISTS
43
WHMIS implementation plan checklist
Activity
Time
needed
Assigned
to
Assign responsibility for WHMIS implementation
1.
2.
3.
Establish an inventory of controlled products
Determine which products used or produced are
classified as controlled products under WHMIS.
WHMIS labels and MSDSs
Obtain MSDSs for controlled products already in the
workplace.
Develop a process for requesting and receiving MSDSs
for new purchases.
Develop methods to store MSDSs so that they are readily
available to workers.
Frutiger
Frutiger Condensed
Condensed
Frutiger
Frutiger Bold
Bold Condensed
Condensed
DetermineFC-Frutiger-Blk75
hazards
FC-Frutiger-Blk75
FC-Frutiger-Itl56
FC-Frutiger-Itl56
Develop a process to ensure that supplier labels are on
or available for all new controlled products received.
Develop a process to create and provide workplace
labels and other means of identification.
Identify and evaluate the hazards of controlled products
in the workplace (for example, consider the quantities to
be used and stored, and the work processes where these
products are used).
44 TABLES AND CHECKLISTS
Date
completed
Activity
Time
needed
Assigned
to
Date
completed
Workplace controls
Based on the hazard evaluation, determine where the
following workplace controls may need to be established
or upgraded:
• Substitution of a less hazardous product
• Engineering controls such as local exhaust ventilation
• and process modification
• Administrative controls such as work procedures and
• work scheduling
• Personal protective equipment and clothing
Integrate these controls into the overall health and
safety program.
Emergency procedures
Review first aid procedures and upgrade them if
required.
Review spill control procedures and upgrade them if
required.
Frutiger Condensed
Frutiger Bold Condensed
FC-Frutiger-Blk75
Worker education and training
FC-Frutiger-Itl56
Review firefighting procedures and upgrade them if
required.
Notify the local fire department of the location, types,
and quantities of controlled products used and stored.
Complete “WHMIS Education and Training Checklist”
(page 46).
Evaluate WHMIS program
Establish periodic review process for the following:
• Check to ensure that no MSDS is more than
• three years old.
• Check that all items on the MSDS have been
• completed.
• Check the condition and presence of labels for all
• controlled products.
• Monitor workplace controls to ensure they are
• effective.
• Review the WHMIS education and training program.
TABLES AND CHECKLISTS
45
WHMIS education and training checklist
Activity
Development
Consult the occupational health and safety committee or worker
representative on the development, implementation, and review of
the program.
Identify all controlled products used in the workplace.
Evaluate the hazards of each controlled product.
Identify WHMIS instructors, from either internal or external sources.
Train instructors (if internal), or evaluate their qualifications (if
external).
Identify employees to be instructed––those who work with or near
controlled products.
Establish a process to identify new employees and contractors who
require instruction.
Evaluate labels and MSDSs to be used in the education program
(check for clarity, accuracy, and completeness).
Evaluate safe work and emergency procedures to be used in the
WHMIS education and training program.
Instruction
Provide a general introduction to WHMIS (for example, discuss
responsibilities, labels, and MSDSs).
Provide instruction on how to identify controlled products.
Provide instruction on control measures and safe work procedures.
Provide instruction on emergency procedures.
Provide instruction on accessing information on controlled products.
Evaluate the need for additional or specialized instruction to workers
(for example, to those with language or learning difficulties) and
provide this instruction where required.
Provide instruction to workers whenever new products are received
or new hazard information becomes available.
Follow-up activities
Evaluate workers' understanding of WHMIS, and provide further
education and training as required.
Review the effectiveness of the education and training program at
least once a year. (Reviews must be done in consultation with the
occupational health and safety committee or worker representative.)
Assigned
to
Date
completed
Resources
6
WorkSafeBC materials
To help you implement a complete WHMIS program at your
workplace, you can obtain the following items produced by
WorkSafeBC:
Phone:
604 232-9704
Toll-free phone: 1 866 319-9704
Fax:
604 232-9703
Toll-free fax:
1 888 232-9714
Online ordering: WorkSafeBC.com and click on
Publications; follow the links for ordering
Web site: WorkSafeBC.com for online publications
Video loans from the WorkSafeBC library:
Phone: 604 231-8450
Toll free: 1 888 621-7233, ext. 8450
E-mail: [email protected]
WHMIS Core Material: A Resource Manual for the Application
and Implementation of WHMIS (RR20)
A comprehensive resource manual that provides information
on the history and legislation of WHMIS and on topics such
as regulations for classification, WHMIS labels, the MSDS,
worker education and training, and confidential business
information.
Suppliers’ Guide to WHMIS (RR22)
A self-study guide for suppliers and employers to learn how to
classify controlled products and review/prepare supplier labels
and MSDSs to meet all applicable WHMIS legislation.
48 RESOURCES
Making WHMIS Work (Video 39)
A video to educate workers in the agricultural industry about
WHMIS. Other videos on WHMIS are also available from
the WorkSafeBC library.
Occupational Health and Safety Regulation
Available online at WorkSafeBC.com.
WorkSafeBC Web Site
For more WHMIS information, visit
<http://whmis.healthandsafetycentre.org/s/Home.asp>.
WorkSafeBC Prevention Information Line
Information on industrial chemicals and other safety topics is
available through the WorkSafeBC Prevention Information Line.
Phone 604 276-3100 in the Lower Mainland or toll-free within
British Columbia 1 888 621-7233 (621-SAFE).
RESOURCES
49
Other sources of information
Contact the following organizations for publications mentioned
in this booklet or for other relevant WHMIS publications:
The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
135 Hunter Street East
Hamilton ON L8N 1M5
Phone: 1 800 668-4284
Web site: http://www.ccohs.ca
The CCOHS provides a wide range of health and safety
information for both workers and employers.
WHMIS Division, Product Safety Programme, Health Canada
MacDonald Building
4th floor, 123 Slater Street
Postal Locator 3504D
Ottawa ON K1A 0K9
Phone: 613 957-2342
Fax: 613 948-2626
Web site: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hecs-sesc/whmis/
This federal government department can provide reference
information on hazardous products legislation.
Commission de la Santé et de la Securité du Travail du Québec
Service du répertoire toxicologique
1199, rue de Bleury, 4e étage
CP 6056, SUCC Centre-Ville
Montréal QC H3C 4E1
Phone: 514 906-3080
Web site: http://www.reptox.csst.qc.ca
The CSST provides information on the classification of
chemicals.
50
RESOURCES
Hazardous Materials Information Review Commission
427 Laurier Avenue West, 7th Floor
Ottawa ON K1A 1M3
Phone: 613 993-4331
Fax: 613 993-4686
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://www.hmirc-ccrmd.gc.ca
Contact the HMIRC for more information on confidential
business information exemptions or to obtain a copy of the
Hazardous Materials Information Review Act and Regulations.
Canadian Government Publishing Centre
Phone: 613 957-4222
Fax: 613 954-0811
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en
Contact the centre to obtain government legislation such as
the Controlled Products Regulations, the Hazardous Products
Act, or the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act.
A variety of organizations may be able to help you establish your
WHMIS program. These include:
• Your suppliers or manufacturers
• Trade and industry associations
• Labour organizations
• Protective equipment and clothing firms
• WHMIS consulting firms
• Occupational safety and health media organizations
• Libraries, trade schools, and colleges
RESOURCES 51
WorkSafeBC Offices
Visit our web site at <www.worksafebc.com>.
Abbotsford
North Vancouver
2774 Trethewey Street V2T 3R1
Phone 604 276-3100
1 800 292-2219
Fax 604 556-2077
400 – 224 Esplanade Ave. W. V7M 1A4
Phone 604 276-3100
1 888 875-6999
Fax 604 232-1558
Burnaby
Prince George
450 – 6450 Roberts Street V5G 4E1
Phone 604 276-3100
1 888 621-7233
Fax 604 232-5950
1066 Vancouver Street V2L 5M4
Phone 250 561-3700
1 800 663-6623
Fax 250 561-3710
Coquitlam
Surrey
104 – 3020 Lincoln Avenue V3B 6B4
Phone 604 276-3100
1 888 967-5377
Fax 604 232-1946
100 – 5500 152 Street V3S 5J9
Phone 604 276-3100
1 888 621-7233
Fax 604 232-7077
Courtenay
Terrace
801 30th Street V9N 8G6
Phone 250 334-8765
1 800 663-7921
Fax 250 334-8757
4450 Lakelse Avenue V8G 1P2
Phone 250 615-6605
1 800 663-3871
Fax 250 615-6633
Kamloops
Victoria
321 Battle Street V2C 6P1
Phone 250 371-6003
1 800 663-3935
Fax 250 371-6031
4514 Chatterton Way V8X 5H2
Phone 250 881-3418
1 800 663-7593
Fax 250 881-3482
Kelowna
Head Office / Richmond
110 – 2045 Enterprise Way V1Y 9T5
Phone 250 717-4313
1 888 922-4466
Fax 250 717-4380
Prevention Information Line:
Phone 604 276-3100
1 888 621-7233 (621-SAFE)
Administration:
6951 Westminster Highway
Phone 604 273-2266
Mailing Address:
PO Box 5350 Stn Terminal
Vancouver BC V6B 5L5
Nanaimo
4980 Wills Road V9T 6C6
Phone 250 751-8040
1 800 663-7382
Fax 250 751-8046
Nelson
524 Kootenay Street V1L 6B4
Phone 250 352-2824
1 800 663-4962
Fax 250 352-1816
After Hours
Health & Safety Emergency
604 273-7711
1 866 922-4357 (WCB-HELP)
R06/05
R11/05
PRINTED IN CANADA
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