PSYC 251 (A01) - Introduction to Mind and Brain - Krawit z

PSYC 251 (A01) - Introduction to Mind and Brain - Krawit z
PSYCHOLOGY 251 (A01) – INTRODUCTION TO MIND & BRAIN – SPRING 2016
COURSE OUTLINE
TIME: Monday & Thursday, 8:30am – 9:50am
INSTRUCTOR: Prof. Adam Krawitz
EMAIL: [email protected]
ROOM: DTB A120
OFFICE: Cornett A251
TEACHING ASSISTANT: Chantel Mayo
EMAIL: [email protected]
OFFICE: Cornett A078a
OFFICE HOURS: TBA
WEBSITE: CourseSpaces
PHONE: 250-721-7551
OFFICE HOURS: TBA
COURSE INSPIRATION & GOALS
“The question for me is how can the human mind occur in the physical universe? We now know that the
world is governed by physics. We now understand the way biology nestles comfortably within that. The
issue is how will the mind do that as well?”
Allen Newell, Desires and Diversions, Dec. 4, 1991, Carnegie Mellon University
My primary goals for this course are for you to:
Gain a broad foundation of knowledge in the study of mind and brain;
Improve your understanding of how scientists investigate mental and neural systems;
Develop your ability to think scientifically about the mind and brain;
Increase your appreciation for how the cognitive and neural sciences are applicable to everyday life.
REQUIRED MATERIALS
TEXTBOOK: Purves, D., et al. (2013). Principles of Cognitive Neuroscience (Second Edition). Sunderland, MA:
Sinauer Associates, Inc.
At UVic Bookstore and as an eBook at: https://www.vitalsource.com/textbooks?term=9780878935734
Companion website: http://sites.sinauer.com/cogneuro2e/
SOFTWARE: Williams, S. M., & White, L. E. (2013). Sylvius 4 Online: An Interactive Atlas and Visual Glossary of
Human Neuroanatomy. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer Associates, Inc. Online at: http://sylvius.sinauer.com/
Included with purchase of new textbook or eBook. For sale at: http://www.sinauer.com/sylvius-4-aninteractive-atlas-and-visual-glossary-of-human-neuroanatomy.html
HARDWARE: iClicker (Generation 1 or Generation 2)
For sale at the UVic Bookstore. Register your iClicker at: http://www.uvic.ca/iclickerreg
PREREQUISITES & REGISTRATION
Prerequisites for this course are: Two of PSYC 100A, 100B, BIOL 184, 186. (Note: BIOL 184 was formerly 190B,
and BIOL 186 was formerly 190A).
Students are responsible for checking their own registration status. Students will not be added to the course after
the Add Deadline on January 20. Students may not be automatically dropped for non-attendance, so students
deciding to drop the course must do so themselves. The Drop Deadline with 100% fee reduction is January 17,
with 50% fee reduction is February 7, and without penalty of failure is February 29. Refer to the UVic Calendar
for further dates: http://web.uvic.ca/calendar/GI/2AYeID.html
COURSE EXPERIENCE SURVEY (CES)
Near the end of the term, you will receive an email inviting you to complete the CES online. Please wait and
complete the CES in class on Monday, April 4. I will set aside ~15 minutes at the beginning of class. We do the
CES in class because this increases the number of students who complete it. You will need your UVic Netlink ID
and a laptop, tablet, or mobile device. If you do not own one then please try to borrow one for that class. If you
don’t complete the CES during class, you can complete it at any time during the last week of classes.
I value your feedback on this course! The more students that complete the survey, the more meaningful and
informative the results will be. The CES provides vital information that I will use to improve this course in the
future. It will also be used by the Department of Psychology to evaluate my performance as an instructor. I will
not receive the results until after I have submitted marks for this course. Responses are anonymous unless you
choose to say things in optional open-ended comments that identify you.
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PSYCHOLOGY 251 (A01) – INTRODUCTION TO MIND & BRAIN – SPRING 2016
COURSE OUTLINE
EVALUATION
Your grade will be based on the following items:
ITEM
DATE
% OF GRADE
iClicker Participation
throughout
5
Lab Activities
throughout
15
Exam 1
Mon., Feb. 1
25
= 100%
Exam 2
Mon., Mar. 7
25
Exam 3
(Exam Period)
30
Extra Credit
by Mon., Apr. 4
(up to 2)
ICLICKER PARTICIPATION (5%): The use of iClickers in the classroom will give you opportunities to participate in
class, compare your thoughts with those of other students, and provide me with feedback on the level of
understanding in the classroom. You will not be evaluated on the answers you give, just on participation.
iClicker participation credit for a class is earned by making at least one iClicker response that day. Credit
will be given for each class, except for the first class and exam days, thus there are 21 available classes.
You can miss iClicker participation in up to 4 classes and still receive full credit. If you miss participation in
more than 4 classes, your grade will be based on the number of days you participated divided by 17.
LAB ACTIVITIES (15%): Each week, a lab activity will give you hands-on experience and active engagement with
the material, supported by online resources. The labs will be accessed through CourseSpaces and will be
completed online. Credit will be divided evenly over the 9 lab activities. Detailed instructions on how to
access and complete the activities will be provided on CourseSpaces. Each lab will be due at 6pm, usually
on a Friday. If you experience technical difficulty with a lab that will prevent you from completing it on
time, you must contact the instructor before the relevant deadline in order to receive credit.
EXAMS (80%): Exams will evaluate your understanding of the material presented in the textbook, the lectures,
and the lab activities. Exams may include multiple choice and short answer questions on the following topics:
Exam 1: Foundation: Neurons, Foundation: Brains, and Perception
Exam 2: Action, Attention, and Long-Term Memory
Exam 3: Language, Decision Making, Executive Function
The first 2 exams will be in class, while Exam 3 will be during the examination period. You are responsible
for attending examinations as scheduled. This responsibility includes Exam 3, so DO NOT plan your travel
until the exam schedule is finalized. If you miss Exam 1 or 2 for a valid, documented reason (e.g. illness or
accident) you may be permitted to write a make-up test at the instructor’s discretion. Unexcused missed
examinations will be assigned a score of zero. If you miss Exam 3, you must apply to Records Services to
request a deferred examination (see the UVic Calendar for guidelines).
EXTRA CREDIT (UP TO 2%):
RESEARCH PARTICIPATION: Experience research being carried out here at UVic, while simultaneously helping out
our scientific community with data collection. Earn up to 2% toward your final grade by participating in
research studies in the Department of Psychology. Each 15 minutes of participation will earn 0.5 credits and
up to 4 credits may be counted toward this course. Each credit increases your final grade by 0.5%, thus 2
hours (i.e. 4 credits) of participation will earn the full 2%. For details, go to the Psychology Research
Participation System web page (http://www.uvic.ca/socialsciences/psychology/research/participants) and
follow the instructions for students. You are encouraged, but not required, to participate in studies pertaining
to this class. The last day for earning and assigning credits towards this course is Monday, April 4.
ALTERNATIVE ACTIVITY (ARTICLE REVIEWS): If you want to earn extra credit, but do not wish to be a research
participant, article reviews are an alternative. You will gain research experience by writing reviews of recent
journal articles that report original research relevant to the course. Each review will be worth 1% extra credit
and a maximum of 2 reviews will be accepted (i.e. you can earn a total of 2% extra credit). You must send
an email to the TA no later than the start of class on Monday, March 24, indicating you wish to use this
option, and submitting the chosen journal article(s) for approval. Completed reviews must be submitted in
printed form no later than Monday, April 4. Details and requirements are on CourseSpaces.
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PSYCHOLOGY 251 (A01) – INTRODUCTION TO MIND & BRAIN – SPRING 2016
COURSE OUTLINE
GRADES
Your final letter grade in the course will be determined by your total percent score according to the standard
UVic grading scale (see the UVic Calendar for details). Final grades ending with a decimal point of 0.5 or
above will be rounded to the next higher whole number, and grades ending with a decimal point below 0.5 will
be rounded to the next lower whole number. The minimum percentage necessary for each grade is as follows:
LETTER GRADE:
A+
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
D
MINIMUM %:
90
85
80
77
73
70
65
60
50
TIPS FOR SUCCESS
Please consider the following suggestions for maximizing success:
Attend, participate, and engage in class.
Use the posted lecture slides for note-taking, reference, and studying.
Take the lab activities seriously, and make sure you understand how to arrive at the correct answers.
Read the book chapters to augment the lecture material.
When you are studying, don’t just reread, actively self-test.
Focus not just on facts, but also on concepts, methods, and logical arguments.
Don’t cram, rather, spread out you study time over days and weeks.
Organize a study group using the Student Discussion Forum on CourseSpaces.
If you struggle in the course, seek help sooner rather than later – we want you to succeed!
SOURCES OF ASSISTANCE
Please make use of the following resources as needed:
COURSE MATERIAL: Do you have questions about course material? Or do you just want to chat about the course?
Please feel free to contact Prof. Krawitz or the TA during office hours or by email.
COURSE MARKS: Do you have questions about the marking of an exam or lab activity? First, review the course
material, including the answer key (if applicable), to determine the explanation yourself. Second, if you still
have questions, visit the TA during office hours. Third, if talking to the TA does not resolve the issue, visit Prof.
Krawitz during office hours.
ICLICKER: If you have not received any iClicker participation points, and you believe you should have, first make
sure that you have registered your iClicker at UVic: http://www.uvic.ca/iclickerreg
For general iClicker technical support, refer here:
http://www.uvic.ca/systems/support/learningteaching/iclicker/
COURSESPACES, EMAIL, NETLINK ID, LAB COMPUTERS: For technical matters, please contact the Computer Help Desk:
[email protected], (250) 721-7687, Clearihue A004, or visit the University Systems Help Centre:
http://www.uvic.ca/systems/support/
PSYCHOLOGY RESEARCH PARTICIPATION SYSTEM: Email the coordinator: [email protected], or refer to the
documentation at: http://www.uvic.ca/socialsciences/psychology/research/participants/
ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATION: Students with diverse learning styles and needs are welcome in this course. In
particular, if you have a disability/health consideration that may require accommodation, please feel free to
approach me and/or the Resource Centre for Students with a Disability (RCSD) as soon as possible. The
RCSD staff members are available by appointment to assess specific needs, provide referrals and arrange
appropriate accommodations: http://rcsd.uvic.ca/
ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE: If English is not your first language and you are having trouble because of
that, please contact the English Language Centre: http://www.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/
MENTAL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING: Most students at one time or another struggle with mental health issues (anxiety,
depression, insomnia, substance abuse, etc.). UVic has a wealth of resources to help students through those
tough times: http://www.uvic.ca/mentalhealth/students/
Students are expected to familiarize themselves with the Important Course Policy Information (attached).
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PSYCHOLOGY 251 (A01) – INTRODUCTION TO MIND & BRAIN – SPRING 2016
COURSE CONTENT
This course consists of a series of approximately weeklong topics. Each topic will include a textbook reading,
lectures, and an online lab activity. After the introductory topics on neurons and brains, each topic will focus on a
key cognitive process. As we learn about these cognitive processes, we will also encounter key brain areas,
research methods, and overarching concepts. We will grapple with the interrelationships between these ideas
(and others) throughout the term:
OVERARCHING CONCEPTS:
Neural computation
Neural representation
Cognition as construction
Interactive processes
Hierarchical organization
Converging methods
Levels of analysis
BRAIN AREAS:
Sensory cortex
Motor cortex
Association cortex
Pre-frontal cortex
Hippocampus
Basal ganglia
Thalamus
Cerebellum
COGNITIVE PROCESSES:
Perception
Action
Attention
Long-Term Memory
Language
Decision Making
Executive Function
RESEARCH METHODS:
Single-unit recording
ERPs
fMRI
Lesions
Electrodermal activity
Reaction time
Cognitive modelling
COGNITIVE PROCESSES: Constituent parts of our mind. While they are often studied as distinct entities, we should
not assume they are separable in terms of theoretical conception, mental realization, or neural implementation.
BRAIN AREAS: Anatomical components of our brain. These areas are highly interconnected and function as an
interactive, dynamical system. The implementation of each cognitive process depends on many brain areas.
OVERARCHING CONCEPTS: These high-level principles describe concepts that hold true across multiple cognitive
processes and brain areas, and provide organizing principles for understanding mind and brain.
RESEARCH METHODS: Types of data, including behavioral, computational, and physiological measures, collected to
study the relationships between cognitive processes and brain areas informed by overarching concepts.
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PSYCHOLOGY 251 (A01) – INTRODUCTION TO MIND & BRAIN – SPRING 2016
COURSE SCHEDULE
DATE
Mon., Jan. 4
TOPIC
0. COURSE INTRODUCTION
READING
Chpt. 1
LAB
Thu., Jan. 7
Mon., Jan. 11
1. FOUNDATION: NEURONS
“
Appx. A (pp. 539 – 546)
LAB 1. Due 6pm, Fri., Jan. 8
Thu., Jan. 14
Mon., Jan. 18
2. FOUNDATION: BRAINS
“
Appx. A (pp. 547 – 563)
LAB 2. Due 6pm, Fri., Jan. 15
Thu., Jan. 21
Mon., Jan. 25
Thu., Jan. 28
3. PERCEPTION
“
“
Chpt. 3 & 4
LAB 3. Due 6pm, Fri., Jan. 22
Mon., Feb. 1
EXAM 1 (Foundation: Neurons, Foundation: Brains, and Perception)
Thu., Feb. 4
(Mon., Feb. 8
(Thu., Feb. 11
Mon., Feb. 15
4. ACTION
READING BREAK – NO CLASS)
READING BREAK – NO CLASS)
“
Chpt. 5
LAB 4. Due 6pm, Fri., Feb. 5
Thu., Feb. 18
Mon., Feb. 22
5. ATTENTION
“
Chpt. 6 & 7
LAB 5. Due 6pm, Fri., Feb. 19
Thu., Feb. 25
Mon., Feb. 29
Thu., Mar. 3
6. LONG-TERM MEMORY
“
“
Chpt. 8 & 9
LAB 6. Due 6pm, Fri., Feb. 26
Mon., Mar. 7
EXAM 2 (Action, Attention, Long-Term Memory)
Thu., Mar. 10
Mon., Mar. 14
7. LANGUAGE
“
Chpt. 12
LAB 7. Due 6pm, Fri., Mar. 11
Thu., Mar. 17
Mon., Mar. 21
8. DECISION MAKING
“
Chpt. 14
LAB 8. Due 6pm, Fri., Mar. 18
Thu., Mar. 24
(Mon., Mar.28
Thu., Mar. 31
Mon., Apr. 4
9. EXECUTIVE FUNCTION
EASTER MONDAY – NO CLASS)
“
“
Chpt. 13
LAB 9. Due 6pm, Tue., Mar. 29
Exam Period
EXAM 3 (Language, Decision Making, Executive Function)
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UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA
Department of Psychology
Important Course Policy Information
Winter 2015-2016
Prerequisites
Students who remain in courses for which they do not have the prerequisites do so at their own
risk. Students who complete courses without prerequisites ARE NOT exempt from having to
complete the prerequisite course(s) if such courses are required for the degree program.
Program Requirements
For more information see pages 220-222 of the UVic Calendar 2015-16.
Registration Status
Students are responsible for verifying their registration status. Registration status may be
verified using My Page, View Schedule. Course adds and drops will not be processed after the
deadlines set out in the current UVic Calendar.
Commitment to Inclusivity and Diversity
The University of Victoria is committed to promoting, providing and protecting a positive and
supportive and safe learning and working environment for all its members.
In the Event of Illness, Accident or Family Affliction (See UVic Calendar, 2015-16, p. 36)

What to do if you miss an exam other than one scheduled during the formal examination period
Do not apply at Records Services for a “Request for Academic Concession”. Instead submit
documentation of the illness, accident or family affliction directly to your course instructor (or
designated teaching assistant).

What to do if you miss an exam scheduled during the formal exam period
Apply at Records Services for a “Request for Academic Concession”, normally within 10 working days
of the end of the formal examination period. Records Services will forward the form to the
instructor. If the concession is granted the instructor will determine how to deal with the situation
(for example, a deferred exam). Where a concession is not applied for or where such application is
denied, an N grade will be entered on the student’s academic record.
OR, you can download the Request for Academic Concession form here:
http://www.uvic.ca/registrar/assets/docs/record-forms/rac.pdf

What to do if you require additional time to complete course requirements
Apply at Records Services for a “Request for Academic Concession”, normally within 10 working days
of the end of the formal examination period. Records Services will forward the form to the
instructor. If the concession is granted the instructor will determine how to deal with the situation.
Where a concession is not applied for or where such application is denied, an N grade will be
entered on the student’s academic record.
OR, you can download the Request for Academic Concession form here:
http://www.uvic.ca/registrar/assets/docs/record-forms/rac.pdf
Policy on Academic Integrity including Plagiarism and Cheating
The Department of Psychology fully endorses and intends to enforce rigorously the Senate Policy on
Academic integrity (http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2015-09/FACS/UnIn/UARe/PoAcI.html , p. 33-35, UVic
Calendar 2015-16). It is of utmost importance that students who do their work honestly be protected
from those who do not. Because this policy is in place to ensure that students carry out and benefit
from the learning activities assigned in each course, it is expected that students will cooperate in its
implementation.
The offences defined by the policy can be summarized briefly as follows:
1. Plagiarism. You must make sure that the work you submit is your work and not someone
else’s. There are proper procedures for citing the works of others. The student is responsible
for being aware of and using these procedures.
2. Multiple Submission. Only under exceptional circumstances may a work submitted to fulfill an
academic requirement be used to satisfy another similar requirement. The student is responsible
for clarifying this with the instructor(s) involved.
3. Falsifying Materials Subject to Academic Evaluation. This includes falsification of data,
use of commercially prepared essays, using information from the Internet without proper
citation, citing sources from which material is not actually obtained, etc.
4. Cheating on Assignments, Tests, and Examinations. You may not copy the work of others
in or out of class; you may not give your work to others for the purpose of copying; you may not
use unauthorized material or equipment during examinations or tests; and you may not
impersonate or allow yourself to be impersonated by another at an examination. The
Department of Psychology has a policy of not making old examinations available for study
purposes. Therefore, use of old exams without the express written permission of the instructor
constitutes cheating by the user, and abetting of cheating by the person who provided the exam.
5. Being an Accessory to Offences. This means that helping another student to cheat (for
instance, by showing or communicating to them answers to an assignment, or by allowing them
to view answers on an exam) is an academic offence.
Instructors are expected to make every effort to prevent cheating and plagiarism. This may include the
assignment of seating for examinations, asking students to move during examinations, requests to see
student identification cards, and other measures as appropriate. Instructors also have available to them
a variety of tools and procedures to check for Internet and electronic media-based cheating. In
instances of suspected or actual plagiarism or cheating, instructors, following prescribed procedures, are
authorized to take steps consistent with the degree of the offence. These measures will range from a
zero on the test or assignment or a failing grade for the course, probation within a program to
temporary or even permanent suspension from the University.
Rights of Appeal are described in the Policy on Academic Integrity in the University calendar (on p. 3335 in 2015-16).
The definitive source for information on Academic Integrity is the University Calendar (p. 33-35 in
2015-16) (http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2015-09/FACS/UnIn/UARe/PoAcI.html)
Other useful resources on Plagiarism and Cheating include:
1. The Learning Skills program: http://www.coun.uvic.ca/learning/index.html
2. The Ombudsperson’s office: http://www.uvss.uvic.ca/ombudsperson/pubsguides/plagiarism.pdf
3. The English Department: http://web.uvic.ca/wguide/Pages/CitPlagiarism.html
Dept Syllabus info Winter 2015.rtf
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