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Delta MM300 Instruction manual
Title page
GE Digital Energy
Multilin
MM300
Motor Management System
Low voltage motor protection and control
Instruction manual
MM300 revision: 1.31
Manual P/N: 1601-9023-A6
GE publication code: GEK-113022E
215 Anderson Avenue, Markham, Ontario
ISO9001:2000
EM
G
Tel: (905) 294-6222 Fax: (905) 201-2098
T
GIS ERE
D
Canada L6E 1B3
LISTED
IND.CONT. EQ.
52TL
I
N
GE Multilin
E83849
RE
Copyright © 2008 GE Multilin
U LT I L
Internet: http://www.GEmultilin.com
*1601-9023-A6*
GE Multilin's Quality
Management System is
registered to ISO9001:2000
QMI # 005094
© 2008 GE Multilin Incorporated. All rights reserved.
GE Multilin MM300 Motor Management System instruction manual for revision 1.31.
MM300 Motor Management System, EnerVista, EnerVista Launchpad, EnerVista MM300
Setup, and FlexLogic are registered trademarks of GE Multilin Inc.
The contents of this manual are the property of GE Multilin Inc. This documentation is
furnished on license and may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the permission
of GE Multilin. The content of this manual is for informational use only and is subject to
change without notice.
Part number: 1601-9023-A6 (October 2008)
Table of Contents
1. INTRODUCTION
Overview ....................................................................................................................... 1
Cautions and warnings..............................................................................................................................1
Description of the MM300 Motor Management system ............................................................2
MM300 order codes ....................................................................................................................................4
Example of an MM300 order code .......................................................................................................5
Specifications ...............................................................................................................6
Protection specifications...........................................................................................................................6
User interface specifications...................................................................................................................8
Metering and monitoring specifications............................................................................................8
Control specifications.................................................................................................................................8
Inputs specifications ...................................................................................................................................8
Outputs specifications ............................................................................................................................ 10
Power supply specifications................................................................................................................. 10
Communications specifications ......................................................................................................... 10
Testing and certification......................................................................................................................... 11
Physical specifications ............................................................................................................................ 11
Environmental specifications............................................................................................................... 12
2. INSTALLATION
Mechanical installation ..............................................................................................1
Dimensions......................................................................................................................................................1
Product identification .................................................................................................................................2
Mounting ..........................................................................................................................................................2
Module withdrawal and insertion.........................................................................................................5
Module and terminal identification......................................................................................................6
Electrical installation ..................................................................................................8
Power supply module .................................................................................................................................9
CPU module.....................................................................................................................................................9
Protection modules .................................................................................................................................. 13
Input/output modules ............................................................................................................................. 17
Dielectric strength testing ..................................................................................................................... 20
Starter types...............................................................................................................21
Full-voltage non-reversing starter .................................................................................................... 21
Full-voltage reversing starter .............................................................................................................. 22
Two-speed starter..................................................................................................................................... 23
Wye-delta open transition starter ..................................................................................................... 25
Inverter starter (VFD, VSD) ..................................................................................................................... 27
Soft starter type.......................................................................................................................................... 29
3. CONTROL PANEL
OPERATION
Graphical control panel..............................................................................................1
Introduction to the graphical control panel.....................................................................................1
MM300 graphical display pages ...........................................................................................................6
MM300 programming techniques..................................................................................................... 13
Basic control panel....................................................................................................17
4. SOFTWARE
OPERATION
EnerVista MM300 Setup Software ............................................................................1
Software requirements..............................................................................................................................2
Installing the EnerVista MM300 Setup software............................................................................2
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
toc–i
Troubleshooting the USB driver ............................................................................................................ 5
Power analysis .............................................................................................................9
Waveform capture ...................................................................................................................................... 9
Data logger ...................................................................................................................................................12
5. ACTUAL VALUES
Actual values overview...............................................................................................1
Metering ........................................................................................................................2
Current metering.......................................................................................................................................... 2
Voltage metering.......................................................................................................................................... 2
Power metering ............................................................................................................................................ 3
Sensor metering ........................................................................................................................................... 3
Status.............................................................................................................................4
Status messages .......................................................................................................................................... 4
Input and output messages.................................................................................................................... 4
System Page................................................................................................................................................... 5
Flex Page.......................................................................................................................................................... 5
6. SETPOINTS
Understanding setpoints............................................................................................1
Setting text abbreviations........................................................................................................................ 2
Configuration setpoints .............................................................................................3
Motor setpoints ............................................................................................................................................. 3
Current and voltage transformers.....................................................................................................12
Inputs ...............................................................................................................................................................14
Outputs ...........................................................................................................................................................15
Communications setpoints....................................................................................................................18
System.............................................................................................................................................................20
Events ..............................................................................................................................................................22
Waveforms....................................................................................................................................................23
Datalog ...........................................................................................................................................................23
Counters .........................................................................................................................................................24
Protection elements..................................................................................................26
Thermal protection....................................................................................................................................26
Mechanical protection.............................................................................................................................35
Electrical protection..................................................................................................................................38
Sensor protection.......................................................................................................................................43
Control elements .......................................................................................................46
Starter setpoints .........................................................................................................................................46
Starting duty inhibits ................................................................................................................................50
Process interlocks ......................................................................................................................................52
Undervoltage autorestart ......................................................................................................................54
System security..........................................................................................................57
7. DIAGNOSTICS
toc–ii
Events ............................................................................................................................1
Digital counters ...........................................................................................................3
Phasors ..........................................................................................................................5
Product information....................................................................................................6
Learned data ................................................................................................................7
Waveform .....................................................................................................................8
Datalog ..........................................................................................................................9
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
8. FLEXLOGIC™
FlexLogic™ overview...................................................................................................1
Introduction to FlexLogic™ ......................................................................................................................1
9. COMMUNICATIONS
Communications interfaces ......................................................................................1
APPENDIX
Change notes ...............................................................................................................1
Manual Revision history ............................................................................................................................1
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
toc–iii
toc–iv
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
Digital Energy
Multilin
MM300 Motor Management System
Chapter 1: Introduction
Introduction
Please read this section to help guide you through the initial setup of the MM300 Motor
Management System.
1.1 Overview
The MM300 is a modular motor protection and control system designed specifically for
low-voltage motor applications. The MM300 provides the following key benefits.
•
Flexible protection, control, and communication options to suit any low-voltage motor
application.
•
Small footprint designed specifically for IEC and NEMA MCC applications.
•
Modular design reduces the number of spare components for maintenance and
testing.
•
Integrated pushbuttons and LED indicators reduce external components and wiring.
•
DIN rail and Panel Mounting.
•
Multiple, simultaneous communication protocols allows simple integration into
monitoring and control systems.
•
Optional basic control panel or graphical control panel interface provides local control
and access to system information.
•
Automation FlexLogic™ for applications requiring more complex starter control, or
multi-starter scenarios with interlocking or programmable logic control.
1.1.1 Cautions and warnings
Before attempting to install or use this device, it is imperative that all caution and danger
indicators in this manual are reviewed to help prevent personal injury, equipment damage,
or downtime. The following icons are used to indicate notes, cautions, and dangers.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
1–1
OVERVIEW
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
Figure 1: Note icons used in the documentation
NOTE
CAUTION
DANGER
The standard note icon emphasizes a specific point or indicates minor problems that may
occur if instructions are not properly followed.
The caution icon indicates that possible damage to equipment or data may occur if
instructions are not properly followed.
The danger icon provides users with a warning about the possibility of serious or fatal
injury to themselves or others.
1.1.2 Description of the MM300 Motor Management system
The MM300 can be equipped with either of two control panels.
•
Basic control panel: includes pushbuttons for Stop, Start A, Start B, Auto, Manual, and
Reset, and 12 LED status indicators.
•
Graphical control panel: includes a 89 mm (3.5-inch) 320 by 240 pixel backlit colour
LCD screen, 14 pushbuttons and 10 LED indicators, which provide access to actual
values, trip and alarm lists, event records, and setting configuration. A USB port is
provided for laptop computer connection.
The MM300 includes the following input/output capabilities:
•
2 to 18 contact outputs
•
6 to 30 contact inputs
The following additional functions are available:
•
Ten process interlocks configurable for trip, stop, or alarm.
•
Passcode for up to three security levels.
•
Six pre-defined starter types.
•
Start inhibits.
•
Time between starts.
•
Restart block timer.
•
Starts per hour.
•
Optional undervoltage restart.
The thermal model uses a standard overload curve with multiplier, and incorporates hot/
cold biasing, unbalance biasing, RTD biasing, and exponential cooling.
A single-line diagram for the MM300 is shown below.
1–2
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
OVERVIEW
Figure 2: Single line diagram
52
BUS
Power Fuse
Control PT
Control
fuse
27X
Six inputs and two outputs (standard)
Direct voltage inputs
(690 V AC maximum)
Optional
three-phase
voltage
card
27
59
47
METERING
V, A, W, var, VA, PF, Hz
Contactor
51R
49
37
66
46
Phase CT 3
50G 51G
Ambient air
Ground CT 1
Stator RTDs
49
Bearing RTDs
Expansion module,
two cards per module,
maximum of two modules
Profibus/DeviceNet
MM300
MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
Options:
Four form-C contact outputs (max 4 cards)
Three RTDs - 100 ohm Platinum (max 2 cards)
RS485 - Modbus RTU
Ethernet - Modbus TCP/IP
?
?
Optional RTD card
LOAD
MOTOR
Options:
Three-phase voltage card (max 1 card)
Six inputs & two form-A outputs (max 5 cards)
38
Temperature
Thermistor
?
?
RTD
853739A2.CDR
Table 1: MM300 protection functions
ANSI device
Description
27X
Undervoltage, auxiliary input
27
Undervoltage, three-phase
37
Undercurrent and underpower
38
Bearing temperature RTD
46
Current unbalance
47
Voltage phase reversal
49
Thermal overload
50G
Ground instantaneous overcurrent
51G
Ground time overcurrent
51R
Locked/stalled rotor, mechanical jam
59
Overvoltage, three-phase
66
Starts per hour and time between starts
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
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OVERVIEW
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
Figure 3: MM300 feature overview
Graphical display
Ease of use
• Graphical interface
• Self-description
• Multi-language support
• Large metering values
LED indication
• Motor status
• Alarm indication
• Wide viewing angle
• System status
• Communication status
• Additional user LEDs
Mounting options
Entry Level Control Panel
• DIN Rail
• Control keys
• LED Indication
• Through door
Integrated functionality
• Protection, metering, control
• Event recorder
Soft key navigation
• Graphical module control
Front port access
• USB for laptop connection
Front panel control
• Integrated device control
• Dedicated control keys
853723A2.CDR
1.1.3 MM300 order codes
The information to specify an MM300 relay is provided in the following order code figure.
Figure 4: MM300 order codes
1–4
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
OVERVIEW
1.1.4 Example of an MM300 order code
MM300GEHS1CAXXXX: MM300 with graphical control panel and USB port, English
language display, high voltage 84 to 250 V DC and 60 to 300 V AC power supply, RS485
Modbus RTU communications, starter control, event recorder, undervoltage autorestart,
three-phase current, thermal overload, undercurrent, single phase underpower, two 10 A
form-A contact output relays, and six digital inputs.
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SPECIFICATIONS
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
1.2 Specifications
Specifications are subject to change without notice.
NOTE:
NOTE
1.2.1 Protection specifications
ACCELERATION TIMER
Pickup:...................................................................... Iav > Icutoff
Dropout: .................................................................. Iav < Ipu or timer expired
Time delay: ............................................................ 0.5 to 250.0 seconds in steps of 0.1
Timing accuracy: ................................................ ±500 ms or 1.5% of total time
Elements:................................................................ trip and alarm
AUXILIARY UNDERVOLTAGE
Pickup level:........................................................... 60 to 90% of NCV
Time delay: ............................................................ 1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1
Timing accuracy: ................................................ ± 500 ms
Elements:................................................................ trip and alarm
CURRENT UNBALANCE
Range:...................................................................... 4 to 40% in steps of 1
Accuracy:................................................................ ±2%
Time delay: ............................................................ 1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1 s
Timing accuracy: ................................................ ±500 ms
Elements:................................................................ trip and alarm
CALCULATION METHOD
If IAV ≥ IFLA: ( [IM - IAV] / IAV ) x 100%
If IAV ≤ IFLA: ( [IM - IAV] / IFLA ) x 100%
Where:
IAV = average phase current
IM = current in a phase with maximum deviation from IAV
IFLA = MOTOR FULL LOAD CURRENT setpoint
FUSE FAILURE (RUNNING STATE ONLY)
Timing:..................................................................... <500 ms
Elements:................................................................ trip and alarm
GROUND FAULT (CBCT OR RESIDUAL)
Pickup level:........................................................... 0.5 to 15.0 A in steps of 0.1 (CBCT); 10 to 100% of FLA in steps
of 1% (residual)
Trip time delay on start:................................... 0 to 10 s in steps of 0.1 s
Trip time delay on run: ..................................... 0 to 5 s in steps of 0.1 s
Alarm time delay on start/run:..................... 0 to 60 s in steps of 1 s
Timing accuracy: ................................................ ±50 ms or ±0.5% of total time
Elements:................................................................ trip and alarm
LOAD INCREASE
Pickup level:........................................................... 50 to 150% of FLA in steps of 1%
Timing accuracy: ................................................ ±500 ms
Elements:................................................................ Alarm
1–6
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
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SPECIFICATIONS
MECHANICAL JAM
Pickup level: ...........................................................1.01 to 4.50 × FLA in steps of 0.01
Time delay:.............................................................0.1 to 30.0 seconds in steps of 0.1
Timing accuracy: ................................................±500 ms
Elements: ................................................................trip
PHASE OVERVOLTAGE
Pickup level: ...........................................................101 to 120% of rated in steps of 1%
Time delay:.............................................................1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1 s
Timing accuracy: ................................................±500 ms
Elements: ................................................................trip and alarm
PHASE UNDERVOLTAGE
Pickup level: ...........................................................60 to 99% of rated in steps of 1
Time delay:.............................................................1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1 s
Timing accuracy: ................................................±500 ms
Elements: ................................................................trip and alarm
RTD PROTECTION
RTD types:...............................................................three-wire (100 ohm Platinum)
Range: ......................................................................–50 to 250°C in steps of 1
Hysteresis:..............................................................2°C
THERMAL MODEL
Standard curve time multiplier: ...................1 to 15 in steps of 1
Thermal overload pickup: ...............................1.01 to 1.25 in steps of 0.01
Motor full load current (FLA): .........................0.5 to 1000 A in steps of 0.1
Motor rated voltage:..........................................100 to 690 V AC
Curve biasing:.......................................................phase unbalance (±5%)
hot/cold ratio
stator RTD
exponential running and stopped cooling rates
Update rate: ..........................................................3 cycles
Hot/cold safe stall ratio: ..................................1 to 100% in steps of 1%
Timing accuracy: ................................................±200 ms or ±2% of total time (based on measured value)
Elements: ................................................................trip and alarm
THERMISTOR
Sensor types:.........................................................PTC (RHOT = 100 to 30 kohms); NTC (RHOT = 100 to 30 kohms)
Timing accuracy: ................................................±500 ms
Elements: ................................................................Trip and alarm
UNDERCURRENT
Pickup level: ...........................................................1 to 100% of FLA in steps of 1
Time delay:.............................................................1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1
Timing accuracy: ................................................±500 ms
Elements: ................................................................trip and alarm
UNDERPOWER
Pickup level: ...........................................................1 to 100% of kW rating in steps of 1
Time delay:.............................................................1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1
Timing accuracy: ................................................±500 ms
Elements: ................................................................trip and alarm
VOLTAGE PHASE REVERSAL
Configuration:.......................................................ABC or Rev starter
Timing accuracy: ................................................±500 ms
Elements: ................................................................trip or alarm
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SPECIFICATIONS
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
1.2.2 User interface specifications
GRAPHICAL CONTROL PANEL
Size: ........................................................................... height 102mm, width 153mm, depth 35mm
LCD: ........................................................................... 89 mm (3.5-inch) colour, 320 by 240 pixels
LED indicators: .....................................................10 LEDs
Pushbuttons:......................................................... Start A, Start B, Stop, plus 11 LCD screen display control
keys
Ports:......................................................................... USB 2.0 port for laptop computer connection
1.2.3 Metering and monitoring specifications
EVENT RECORDER
Capacity:................................................................. 256 events
Data storage:........................................................ non-volatile memory
FREQUENCY METERING
Range:...................................................................... 40.00 to 70.00 Hz in steps of 0.01
Accuracy:................................................................ ±0.05 Hz
POWER METERING
Real power range: .............................................. –2000.0 to 2000.0 kW in steps of 0.1
Apparent power range:.................................... 0.0 to 2500.0 kVA in steps of 0.1
Accuracy:................................................................ ±1% of full scale
POWER FACTOR METERING
Range:...................................................................... –0.99 to +0.99 in steps of 0.01
Accuracy:................................................................ ±0.05
1.2.4 Control specifications
UNDERVOLTAGE RESTART
Dropout/Pickup Level: ...................................... 60 to 100% NCV in steps of 1%
Short Dip Time: .................................................... 100 to 500 ms or OFF in steps of 10 ms
Medium Dip Time: .............................................. 0.1 to 10.0 s in steps of 0.1 s
Medium Dip Delay:............................................. 0.2 to 60 s in steps of 0.2 s
Long Dip Time:.....................................................0.5 to 60.0 min or OFF in steps of 0.5 min
Long Dip Delay:.................................................... 1.0 to 1200.0 s in steps of 1.0 s
Time Accuracy:.................................................... ±1 s or ±5% of total time
1.2.5 Inputs specifications
CONTROL VOLTAGE INPUT (UNDERVOLTAGE RESTART SOURCE)
External VT primary:.......................................... 110 to 690 V AC in steps of 10 (if used)
Input range:........................................................... 60 to 300 V AC
Nominal frequency: ........................................... 50 or 60 Hz
Accuracy:................................................................ ±5% of reading
DIGITAL INPUTS
Fixed pickup: ......................................................... 65 V AC
Recognition time:................................................ 2 cycles
Current draw at rated voltage: .................... 60 mA @ 120 V; 75 mA @ 240 V
Momentarily sampled every cycle
Input impedence:................................................ 1.7 kΩ
Type: ......................................................................... opto-isolated inputs
External switch: ................................................... wet contact
Maximum input voltage: ................................. 300 V AC
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MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
SPECIFICATIONS
GROUND CURRENT INPUT (50:0.025)
CT primary:.............................................................0.5 to 15.0 A
Nominal frequency: ...........................................50 or 60 Hz
Accuracy (CBCT):..................................................±0.1 A (0.5 to 3.99 A)
±0.2 A (4.0 A to 15 A)
Table 2: MM300 CBCT burden
Input Primary (A) Input Secondary (mA)
Impedance (Ohms) VA
0.5
0.25
0.004
1
0.5
5
2.5
10
5.0
1.37
15
7.5
3.09
0.01
55
0.34
PHASE CURRENT INPUTS (INCLUDING RESIDUAL GROUND CURRENT)
Range: ......................................................................0.2 to 40 A (8 × CT), direct connection up to 5 A FLA
Input type: ..............................................................combined 1 A / 5 A
Frequency:..............................................................50 or 60 Hz
Accuracy: ................................................................ExtCT: ±2% of reading or ±1% of 8× CTPrimary, whichever
is greater
Direct: ±2% of reading or ±0.1 A, whichever is greater
Withstand (at 5A nominal):.............................0.2 s at 100×
1.0 s at 50×
2.0 s at 40×
continuous at 3× rated current
Table 3: MM300 phase and ground CT burden
Secondary Input (A)
Impedance (Ohms)
1.0
5.0
VA
0.004
0.004
0.09
8.0
0.32
40.0
6.04
PHASE VOLTAGE INPUTS (THREE-PHASE VOLTAGE)
Input range: ...........................................................208 to 690 V
Nominal frequency: ...........................................50 or 60 Hz
Accuracy: ................................................................±2% of reading, or ±1 V, whichever is greater
RTD INPUTS
Sensor type:...........................................................Three-wire RTD (100 ohm Platinum)
Sensing current:...................................................5 mA
Accuracy: ................................................................±3°C
THERMISTOR INPUTS
Sensor type:...........................................................Positive temperature coefficient PTC (RHOT =
100 to 30000 ohms), negative temperature coefficient NTC
(RHOT = 100 to 30000 ohms)
Accuracy: ................................................................±6% of reading or ±100 ohms, whichever is greater
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SPECIFICATIONS
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
1.2.6 Outputs specifications
OUTPUT RELAYS
Configuration: ...................................................... electromechanical form-A (IO_C) and form-C (IO_D)
Contact material:................................................ silver-alloy
Operate time:........................................................ 10 ms
Minimum contact load:.................................... 10 mA at 5 V DC
Maximum switching rate:............................... 300 operations per minute (no load), 30 operations per
minute (load)
Mechanical life:.................................................... 10 000 000 operations
Continuous current:........................................... 10 A
Make and carry for 0.2s:.................................. 30 A per ANSI C37.90
OUTPUT RELAY BREAK CAPACITY (FORM-A RELAY)
AC resistive, 120 V AC: ...................................... 10 A
AC resistive, 240 V AC: ...................................... 10 A
AC inductive, PF = 0.4 pilot duty:.................. 2 A
DC resistive, 30 V DC: ........................................ 10 A
OUTPUT RELAY BREAK CAPACITY (FORM-C RELAY)
AC resistive, 120 V AC: ...................................... 10 A normally-open, 5 A normally-closed
AC resistive, 240 V AC: ...................................... 10 A normally-open, 8 A normally-closed
AC inductive, PF = 0.4 pilot duty:.................. 2.5 A
DC resistive, 30 V DC: ........................................ 10 A
1.2.7 Power supply specifications
POWER SUPPLY
Nominal:.................................................................. 120 to 240 V AC
125 to 250 V DC
Range:...................................................................... 60 to 300 V AC (50 and 60 Hz)
84 to 250 V DC
Ride-Through:....................................................... 35 ms
ALL RANGES
Voltage withstand:............................................. 2 × highest nominal voltage for 10 ms
Power consumption: ......................................... 16 W typical, 25 W maximum
1.2.8 Communications specifications
DEVICENET (COPPER)
Modes: ..................................................................... slave (125, 250, and 500 kbps)
Connector: ............................................................. 5-pin terminal
ETHERNET (COPPER)
Modes: ..................................................................... 10/100 MB (auto-detect)
Connector: ............................................................. RJ-45
SNTP clock synchronization error:.............. <200 ms (typical)
Protocol:.................................................................. Modbus TCP
PROFIBUS (COPPER)
Modes: ..................................................................... DP V0 slave, up to 1.5 Mbps
Connector: ............................................................. 5-pin terminal
RS485 PORT
Port:........................................................................... opto-isolated
Baud rates: ............................................................ up to 115 kbps
Protocol:.................................................................. Modbus RTU, half-duplex
Maximum distance:........................................... 1200 m
Isolation: ................................................................. 2 kV
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MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
SPECIFICATIONS
USB PORT (GRAPHIC CONTROL PANEL ONLY)
Standard specification:....................................Compliant with both USB 2.0 and USB 1.1
Data transfer rate:..............................................USB device emulating serial communications port at
115 kbps
1.2.9 Testing and certification
CERTIFICATION
ISO:.............................................................................Manufactured
under an ISO9001 registered program
CE: ..............................................................................Conforms
to EN 60255-26 (EN 50263), EN 5502/CISPR22/EN 61000-6-2
cULus:.......................................................................Conforms to UL 508 / UL 1053 and C22.2.14-05 (CSA)
TYPE TESTS
Relative Humidity Cyclic: .................................IEC 60068-2-30: 55°C at 95% RH
Composite Temperature/Humidity: ...........IEC 60068-2-38: 65°C/–10°C at 93% RH
Hot: ............................................................................IEC 60068-2-2 (Hot Start) 16 hours
Cold: ..........................................................................IEC 60068-2-1 (Cold Start) 16 hours
Dielectric Strength:.............................................IEC 60255-5: 2300 V AC
Insulation Resistance:.......................................IEC 60255-5: >100 MΩ / 500 V AC / 10 s
Impulse Voltage:..................................................IEC 60255-5: 5kV
Sinusoidal Vibration:..........................................IEC 60255-21-1: 1 g
Shock and Bump:................................................IEC 60255-21-2: 5 g / 10 g / 15 g
Damped Oscillatory Burst:..............................IEC 60255-22-1: 1 MHz 2.5 kV / 1 kV
Electrostatic Discharge Immunity - Air
and Direct:.........................................................IEC 60255-22-2: 5 kV / 8 kV
Radiated RF Immunity:.....................................IEC 60255-22-3: 10 V/m
Electrical Fast Transient / Burst
Immunity: ..........................................................IEC 60255-22-4: 4 kV
Surge Immunity: ..................................................IEC 60255-22-5: 4 kV / 2 kV
Conducted RF Immunity:.................................IEC 60255-22-6: 150 kHz to 80 MHz 10 V/m
Radiated RF Emission: ......................................IEC 60255-25: Group 1 Class A
Conducted RF Emission: ..................................IEC 60255-25: Group 1 Class A
Ingress of Solid Objects and Water:...........IEC 60529: IP54 (front), IP20 (back)
Power Frequency Magnetic Field
Immunity: ..........................................................IEC 61000-4-8: 30 A/m
Pulse Magnetic Field Immunity: ...................IEC 61000-4-9: 1000 A/m
Voltage Dip; Voltage Interruption:...............IEC 61000-4-11: 0%, 40%, 100%
Fast Transient SWC:...........................................IEEE C37.90.1: ±4 kV
Oscillatory Transient SWC: .............................IEEE C37.90.1: ±2.5 kV
Electrostatic Discharge - Air and Direct: ..IEEE C37.90.3: ±15 kV / ±8 kV
Radiated / Conducted Emissions: ...............EN5022: Class A
1.2.10 Physical specifications
DIMENSIONS
Size: ...........................................................................Base: 120 mm (W) × 90 mm (H) × 113 mm (D) [+ terminals
10mm]
Expansion: 62 mm (W) × 90 mm (H) × 113 mm (D)
GCP: 153 mm (W) × 102 mm (H) × 35 mm (D)
BCP: 75 mm (W) × 75 mm (H) × 31 mm (D)
Weight (Base):.......................................................0.75 kg
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SPECIFICATIONS
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
1.2.11 Environmental specifications
OPERATING ENVIRONMENT
Ambient operating temperature (25.4
mm (1") around base unit):........................ –20 to 70°C (base unit and basic control panel)
–20 to 50°C (graphical control panel).
Ambient (25.4 mm (1") around base unit)
storage and shipping temperature: ..... –40 to 90°C ambient
Humidity: ................................................................ up to 90% non-condensing
Pollution degree: ................................................. II
IP rating:.................................................................. 20 (base unit), 54 (control panel)
1–12
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
SPECIFICATIONS
1–13
Digital Energy
Multilin
MM300 Motor Management System
Chapter 2: Installation
Installation
2.1 Mechanical installation
This section describes the mechanical installation of the MM300 system, including
dimensions for mounting and information on module withdrawal and insertion.
2.1.1 Dimensions
The MM300 is packaged in a modular arrangement.
The dimensions of the MM300 are shown below. Additional dimensions for mounting and
panel cutouts are shown in the following sections.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
2–1
MECHANICAL INSTALLATION
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
Figure 1: MM300 dimensions
PANEL
6.071”
(154,15 mm)
3.746”
(95,15 mm)
4.059”
(103,09 mm)
0.565”
(14,35 mm)
5.228”
(132,78 mm)
5.550”
(140,97 mm)
853724A1.CDR
2.1.2 Product identification
The product identification label is located on the side panel of the MM300. This label
indicates the product model, serial number, firmware revision, and date of manufacture.
Figure 2: MM300 label
2.425”
(61.6 mm)
Model:
Serial Number:
Firmware:
0.525”
(13.3 mm)
Mfg. Date:
853748A1.CDR
2.1.3 Mounting
The MM300 can be mounted three ways: standard panel mount, DIN rail mount, and screw
mount for high vibration environments.
The standard panel mount and cutout dimensions are illustrated below.
2–2
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
MECHANICAL INSTALLATION
Figure 3: Panel mounting and cutout dimensions
#4 - 40x3/8in SELF-TAP PAN HD PHILIPS
QTY: 6 (SUPPLIED); GE PART NO. 1402-0017
TIGHTENING TORQUE: 8 lb-in
INSTALL RELAY
FROM FRONT
OF THE PANEL
REAR OF PANEL
CUTOUT AND
MOUNTING HOLES
5.580”
(141,73 mm)
0.105”
(2,67 mm)
0.138”
(3,49 mm)
1.750”
(44,45 mm)
3.775”
(95,89 mm)
3.500”
(88,90 mm)
5.790”
(147,07 mm)
0.130”
(QTY: 6)
(3,30 mm)
853725A1.CDR
The DIN rail mounting is illustrated below. The DIN rail conforms to EN 50022.
To avoid the potential for personal injury due to fire hazards, ensure the unit is
mounted in a safe location and/or within an appropriate enclosure.
CAUTION:
CAUTION
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
2–3
MECHANICAL INSTALLATION
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
Figure 4: Basic Control Panel mounting and cutout dimensions
#4-40X3/8in SELF TAP PAN HD PHILIPS
QTY: 8; (SUPPLIED); GE PART# 1402-0017
TIGHTENING TORQUE: 7 lb-in
2.635"
[66,93mm]
2.515"
[63,88mm]
1.500"
[38,10mm]
.
2.635"
[66,93mm]
2.515"
1.500"
[63,88mm] [38,10mm]
Ø.130"
[3,30mm]
TypX8
853825A1.cdr
Figure 5: DIN rail mounting
SNAP-IN THE DIN CLIPS (QTY: 4)
FOR DIN RAIL MOUNTING
0.30”
(7,6 mm)
1.38”
(35,1 mm)
DIN 3 RAIL
853726A1.CDR
2–4
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
MECHANICAL INSTALLATION
The screw mount for high vibration environments is illustrated below.
Figure 6: Screw mounting
MEETS VIBRATION REQUIREMENT OF
IEC 60255 SEC 21.1, 21.2, & 21.3
2.250”
(57,15 mm)
#6 -32 THREADED HOLE
QTY: 2
4.100”
(104,14 mm)
853727A1.CDR
2.1.4 Module withdrawal and insertion
DANGER:
DANGER
Module withdrawal and insertion may only be performed when control power has been
removed from the unit. Inserting an incorrect module type into a slot may result in
personal injury, damage to the unit or connected equipment, or undesired operation!
Proper electrostatic discharge protection (for example, a static strap) must be used
when coming into contact with modules while they are removed from the MM300.
CAUTION:
CAUTION
The MM300 is a modular protection system. This allows for easy withdrawal and insertion
of modules for fast replacement. Modules must only be replaced in their original factory
configured slots.
Use the following procedure to withdraw a module.
1.
Ensure that control power has been removed from the MM300.
2.
Record the slot location of the module to ensure that the same or replacement
module is inserted into the correct slot.
3.
Remove the two captive screws at the top and bottom of the module.
4.
Slide a flat-blade screwdriver into the opening above the module marked by the two
arrows on top of the MM300 case.
5.
Press down on the screwdriver and pivot towards the unit to unlatch the module from
the MM300 case.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
2–5
MECHANICAL INSTALLATION
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
Figure 7: Removing a module from the MM300
853733A1.CDR
Use the following procedure to insert a module.
1.
Ensure that control power has been removed from the MM300.
2.
Ensure that the module is being inserted into the correct slot.
3.
Align the module card edges with the slot track as shown in the diagram below.
4.
Gently slide the modules into the slot until the modules latch into the opening marked
by the two arrows on top of the MM300 case.
5.
Attach the two captive screws to anchor the module to the case (use a tightening
torque of 3.5 lb.-in.).
Figure 8: Inserting modules into the MM300
853734A1.CDR
2.1.5 Module and terminal identification
The MM300 input/output and protection modules are labeled with the “IO_” prefix followed
by a one-character identifier as follows.
Table 1: Input/output module nomenclature
2–6
Module
Description
IO_A
CT module
IO_B
VT module
IO_C
Two 10 A form-A relays, six 60 to 300 V AC digital inputs, and Aux VT input module.
IO_D
Four 10 A form-C relays module.
IO_G
3 RTD module.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
MECHANICAL INSTALLATION
The MM300 terminals are labeled with a three-character identifier. The first character
identifies the module slot position and the second character identifies the terminals within
the module. For example, the first terminal in a module in slot C is identified as “C1”.
NOTE:
NOTE
Do not confuse the slot designation with the module ordering designation. That is, terminal
“C1” does not imply an IO_C module. Rather, it indicates the first terminal of whatever
module is in slot C.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
2–7
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
2.2 Electrical installation
This section describes the electrical installation of the MM300 system. An overview of the
MM300 terminal connections is shown below.
MM300 is not to be used in any way other than described in this manual.
CAUTION:
CAUTION
Figure 9: MM300 terminal connection overview
Profibus or DeviceNet
Optional fieldbus protocols
RS485 communications
and thermistor input
Three-phase and
residual ground CT
inputs
Expansion module
to base unit with a single connector
Optional three-phase
voltage module
RTD Module
with three RTD inputs
Switched power supply
allows AC or DC control
voltage
Optional TCP/IP
Ethernet
I/O card includes:
Core-balance ground CT input • two contactor outputs (form-A)
• six programmable inputs
• single-phase VT input (60 to 300 V AC)
Expansion module
allows additional digital
inputs/outputs, RTDs, or
voltage inputs
853740A2.CDR
The MM300 can contain up to eight modules. The first four modules (slots A through D)
comprise the base unit, and the next four modules (slots E through H) comprise the
optional expanded unit.
Table 2: Module slot position
Slot
Module types
A
Power supply module
B
CPU module with communications
C
IO_C module
D
IO_A module
E
IO_B, IO_C, IO_D, IO_G modules
F
IO_C, IO_D, IO_G modules
G
IO_C, IO_D, IO_G modules
H
IO_C, IO_D, IO_G modules
The following figure shows a typical module arrangement for an expanded unit.
Use gauge size appropriate for the voltage and current draw of the device.
CAUTION:
CAUTION
2–8
Table 3: Gauge Sizes
CPU Card: Themistor, RS485 and Fieldbus
16 AWG (3.50mm pitch terminals)
PSU / CBCT /IO_C / IO_D / IO_G
12 AWG (5.00mm pitch terminals)1
IO_A / IO_B
12 AWG (7.62mm pitch terminals)1
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
1. Wire gauge size remains constant; increased pitch distance reflects higher voltage
rating.
It is recommended that you install a circuit disconnection system for control power, near
the device, which should be easily accessible after installation of the unit. This is in case an
emergency power shut-down of the unit is required.
NOTE:
NOTE
Figure 10: Typical module arrangement
B
L V-
L
PSU
60-300 VAC
84-250 VDC
N C
H
V+
MS
NS
g
Technical Support:
Tel: (905) 294-6222
(North America) 1-800-547-8629
Fax: (905) 201-2098
www.GEMultilin.com
13
F
E
8
8
12
+
–
C
+
–
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
5
3
3
4
2
1
11
10
8
7
R
6
I
10/100
ETHERNET
1
IND.CONT.EQ.
52TL
Base unit
H
14
14
13
13
14
13
12
12
12
11
11
11
10
10
9
9
9
8
8
8
7
7
7
6
6
6
5
5
5
2
4
4
4
3
3
3
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
3
2
G
10
9
SG
E200434
LISTED
D
14
GROUND
CT I/P
MULTILIN
C
THERM RS485 FIELD BUS
A
Slot position
Expansion modules
853749A1.CDR
2.2.1 Power supply module
The power supply module in slot A supplies control power to the MM300 system. A supply
voltage between 60 to 300 V AC or 84 to 250 V DC is required to power the MM300.
Check the voltage rating of the unit before applying control power! Control power
outside of the operating range of the power supply will damage the MM300.
CAUTION:
CAUTION
2.2.2 CPU module
The main CPU module and optional communications board is contained in slot B. This
module provides a Modbus RTU RS485 port, a thermistor input, and a 50:0.025 CBCT input.
The optional communications board provides Fieldbus and Ethernet ports.
2.2.2.1 Ground current input
The MM300 CPU module has a sensitive ground input suitable for a 50:0.025 CT. There is
also a residual ground input on the CT module (IO_A) with the same rating as the phase
current inputs. Only one ground CT input can be used at any time.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
2–9
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
Figure 11: CBCT connection
Contactor
A
B
C
To switchgear
ground bus
–
+
N
L
Control power
+
–
RS485
C
+
–
Thermistor
R
I
SG
CBCT
CPU module
SG = Surge Ground = Functional Ground
MM300
Motor Management System
853711A1.CDR
CAUTION:
CAUTION
Only one ground input should be wired; the other input should be unconnected.
NOTE:
NOTE
2–10
The zero-sequence connection is recommended. Unequal saturation of CTs, size and
location of motor, resistance of power system, motor core saturation density, and
other factors, may cause false readings in the residually connected ground fault
circuit.
The exact placement of a zero-sequence CT to detect only ground fault current is shown
below. If the core balance CT is placed over shielded cable, capacitive coupling of phase
current into the cable shield during motor starts may be detected as ground current unless
the shield wire is also passed through the CT window. Twisted-pair cabling on the zerosequence CT is recommended.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
Figure 12: Core balance ground CT installation, shielded cable
CABLE LUGS
TO SOURCE
TERMINATION
STRESS CONE
SHIELD GROUND
CONNECTION
SPLIT-BOLT CONNECTOR
IMPORTANT: FOR SHIELDED
CABLE, THE GROUND WIRE
MUST PASS THROUGH THE
CT WINDOW.
50:0.025 CORE BALANCE CT
FOR GROUND SENSING
CORE BALANCE CT
SECONDARY CONNECTION
TO MM300 IED
(TWISTED PAIR)
POWER CABLE
TO MOTOR
BOTTOM OF
MOTOR STARTER
COMPARTMENT
TO STARTER
GROUND BUS
853712A1.CDR
Figure 13: Core balance ground CT installation, unshielded cable
50:0.025 CORE BALANCE CT
FOR GROUND CT SENSING
CORE BALANCE CT
SECONDARY CONNECTION
TO MM300 IED
GROUND CONDUCTOR DOES
NOT PASS THROUGH CT, AS THE
CT IS NOT MOUNTED OVER
GROUND WITHIN THE CABLE
JACKET.
(TWISTED-PAIR)
TO STARTER
GROUND BUS
POWER CABLE
TO MOTOR
BOTTOM OF
MOTOR STARTER
COMPARTMENT
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
853713A1.CDR
2–11
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
2.2.2.2 Thermistor connections
Either a positive temperature coefficient (PTC) or negative temperature coefficient (NTC)
thermistor may be directly connected to the + and - terminals on the CPU module. By
specifying the hot and cold thermistor resistance, the MM300 automatically determines
the thermistor type as NTC or PTC. Use thermistors with hot and cold resistance values in
the range 100 to 30000 ohms. If no thermistor is connected, the Thermistor Alarm and
Thermistor Trip settings must be set to “Disabled”.
Figure 14: Typical thermistor connection
MOTOR
Stator thermistor
To switchgear
ground bus
–
+
N
L
+
Control power
–
C
+
RS485
–
R
Thermistor
I
SG
CBCT
CPU module
SG = Surge Ground = Functional Ground
MM300
Motor Management System
853743A1.CDR
2.2.2.3 RS485 connections
Figure 15: Typical RS485 connection
Z T (*)
SHIELD
MM300 IED
TWISTED PAIR
B1
RS485 +
B2
RS485 -
OPTOCOUPLER
OPTOCOUPLER
DATA
DATA
COM
SCADA, PLC, OR
PERSONAL COMPUTER
B3
COMMON
GROUND THE SHIELD AT THE
SCADA/PLC/COMPUTER ONLY
OR THE MM300 ONLY
IED
RS485 +
(*) TERMINATING IMPEDANCE AT EACH END
(typically 120 ohms and 1 nF)
RS485 -
COMMON
UP TO 32 MM300
OR OTHER IEDs,
MAXIMUM CABLE
LENGTH OF
1200 m (4000 ft.)
IED
Z T (*)
RS485 +
RS485 -
COMMON
LAST
DEVICE
853745A1.CDR
2–12
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
One two-wire RS485 port is provided. Up to 32 MM300 IEDs can be daisy-chained together
on a communication channel without exceeding the driver capability. For larger systems,
additional serial channels must be added. Commercially available repeaters can also be
used to add more than 32 relays on a single channel. Suitable cable should have a
characteristic impedance of 120 ohms (for example, Belden #9841) and total wire length
should not exceed 1200 meters (4000 ft.). Commercially available repeaters will allow for
transmission distances greater than 1200 meters.
Voltage differences between remote ends of the communication link are not uncommon.
For this reason, surge protection devices are internally installed across all RS485 terminals.
Internally, an isolated power supply with an optocoupled data interface is used to prevent
noise coupling.
CAUTION:
CAUTION
To ensure that all devices in a daisy-chain are at the same potential, it is imperative
that the common terminals of each RS485 port are tied together and grounded only
once, at the master or at the MM300. Failure to do so may result in intermittent or
failed communications.
The source computer/PLC/SCADA system should have similar transient protection devices
installed, either internally or externally. Ground the shield at one point only, as shown in the
figure above, to avoid ground loops.
Correct polarity is also essential. The MM300 IEDs must be wired with all the positive (+)
terminals connected together and all the negative (–) terminals connected together. Each
relay must be daisy-chained to the next one. Avoid star or stub connected configurations.
The last device at each end of the daisy-chain should be terminated with a 120 ohm
¼ watt resistor in series with a 1 nF capacitor across the positive and negative terminals.
Observing these guidelines will ensure a reliable communication system immune to
system transients.
2.2.3 Protection modules
The following protection modules are available for the MM300.
Table 4: MM300 protection modules
Module
Slots
Description
IO_A
D
Three-phase current metering and thermal overload, undercurrent, and singlephase underpower protection.
IO_B
E
Three-phase voltage metering and three-phase underpower, undervoltage,
overvoltage, and phase reversal protection.
IO_G
E, F, G
Bank of three RTDs (100 ohm Platinum).
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
2–13
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
2.2.3.1 Phase current inputs (IO_A module)
Figure 16: Typical phase current input connections
D1
D2
CT1
D3
D4
D5
CT2
Power flow
Power flow
Power flow
D6
D7
CT3
D1
D8
D2
D3
CT1
G/F
D4
D5
CT2
D6
D7
D1
D8
Direct Connection
Residual Ground Connection
D3
D4
CT2
D5
D6
CT3
D7
D8
G/F
Phase current inputs
Phase current inputs
Phase current inputs
D2
CT1
G/F
CT3
Two CT Connection
853753A1.cdr
Core Balance (Zero Sequence)
Power flow
Contactor
A
B
C
To switchgear
ground bus
–
+
N
L
D1
D2 D3
D4
CT2
D5
D6
CT3
Phase current inputs
D7 D8
G/F
R
CT1
I
CBCT /
50 : 0.025
Control power
MM300
Motor Management System
853744A2.CDR
The MM300 has three channels for phase current inputs, each with an isolating
transformer. The phase CTs should be chosen so the FLA is not less than 50% of the rated
phase CT primary. Ideally, the phase CT primary should be chosen such that the FLA is
100% of the phase CT primary or slightly less, never more. This will ensure maximum
accuracy for the current measurements. The maximum phase CT primary current is
1000 A.
Polarity of the phase CTs is critical for negative-sequence unbalance calculation,
power measurement, and residual ground current detection (if used).
CAUTION:
CAUTION
2–14
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
2.2.3.2 Two CT configuration
Each of the two CTs acts as a current source. The current that comes out of the CT on
phase A flows into the interposing CT on the relay marked CT1. From there, the current
sums with the current that is flowing from the CT on phase C which has just passed
through the interposing CT on the relay marked CT3. This summed current flows through
the interposing CT marked CT2 and from there, the current splits up to return to its
respective source (CT).
Polarity is very important since the value of phase B must be the negative equivalent of
A + C in order for the sum of all the vectors to equate to zero.
Only one ground connection should be made as shown. If two ground connections are
made, a parallel path for current has been created.
In the two CT configuration, the currents will sum vectorially at the common point of the
two CTs. The diagram illustrates the two possible configurations. If one phase is reading
high by a factor of 1.73 on a system that is known to be balanced, simply reverse the
polarity of the leads at one of the two phase CTs (taking care that the CTs are still tied to
ground at some point). Polarity is important.
Change CT wiring only if the system is de-energized!
NOTE:
NOTE
Figure 17: Two CT connection vector diagram
60°
1.73
1
1
60°
1
60°
1
853715A1.CDR
To illustrate the point further, the following diagram shows how the current in phases A
and C sum up to create phase "B".
Figure 18: Two CT connection currents
1.73
1
C
Two-phase CT currents
1
B
A
A
B
C
Two-phase CT currents,
180° out-of-phase
808701A1.CDR
Once again, if the polarity of one of the phases is out by 180°, the magnitude of the
resulting vector on a balanced system will be out by a factor of 1.73.
On a three-wire supply, this configuration will always work and unbalance will be detected
properly. In the event of a single phase, there will always be a large unbalance present at
the interposing CTs of the relay. If for example phase A was lost, phase A would read zero
while phase B and C would both read the magnitude of phase C. If on the other hand,
phase B was lost, at the supply, phase A would be 180° out-of-phase with phase C and the
vector addition would equal zero at phase B.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
2–15
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
2.2.3.3 Phase voltage inputs (IO_B module)
The MM300 has three channels for AC voltage inputs. There are no internal fuses or ground
connections on the voltage inputs. Polarity is critical for correct power measurement and
voltage phase reversal operation.
Figure 19: Wye voltage connection
Contactor
A
B
C
–
+
N
L
FUSES - 100 ma typical
To switchgear
ground bus
E2
E1
Control power
E3
VT1
E4
E6
E5
VT2
VT3
E7
E8
N/C
Phase voltage inputs
MM300
Motor Management System
853735A2.CDR
Figure 20: Delta voltage connection
Contactor
A
B
C
FUSES
To switchgear
ground bus
–
+
N
L
Control power
E1
E2
E3
VT1
E4
VT2
E5
E6
VT3
E7
E8
N/C
Phase voltage inputs
MM300
Motor Management System
853736A2.CDR
2–16
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
2.2.3.4 RTD sensor connections (I0_G module)
The type IO_G module contains three PT100 RTDs and associated protection functionality.
The MM300 monitors up to six RTD inputs for stator, bearing, ambient, or other
temperature monitoring types. The type of each RTD is 100 ohm platinum (DIN 43760).
RTDs must be three-wire type.
The RTD circuitry compensates for lead resistance, provided that each of the three leads is
the same length. Lead resistance should not exceed 25 ohms per lead. Shielded cable
should be used to prevent noise pickup in industrial environments. RTD cables should be
kept close to grounded metal casings and away from areas of high electromagnetic or
radio interference. RTD leads should not be run adjacent to or in the same conduit as high
current carrying wires.
Figure 21: RTD wiring
MM300 IED
Route cable in separate conduit from
current carrying conductors
RTD terminals
at motor
~13
RTD Module shield
~4
Compensation
~3
Return
~2
Hot
~1
RTD 1
RTD MODULE
Surge ground
Three-wire shielded cable
Motor
starter
Motor
RTD in motor
stator or
bearing
RTD
terminals in
motor starter
Maximum total lead resistance:
25 ohms (Platinum and Nickel RTDs)
853737A2.CDR
2.2.4 Input/output modules
The following input and output modules are available for the MM300.
Table 5: MM300 input and output modules
Module
Slots
Description
IO_C
C, E, F, G, H
Two 10 A form-A relays and six 60 to 300 V AC digital inputs.
IO_D
E, F, G, H
Four 10 A form-C relays
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
2–17
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
2.2.4.1 Type IO_C module connections
Figure 22: Typical wiring for type IO_C module
MM300
Motor Management System
SURGE
~14
L
~12
Six contact
(digital) inputs
+
~13
VT INPUT
–
AC
Control power
N
COMMON
~11
CONTACT INPUT 6 +
~10
CONTACT INPUT 5 +
~9
CONTACT INPUT 4 +
~8
CONTACT INPUT 3 +
~7
CONTACT INPUT 2 +
~6
B
CONTACT INPUT 1 +
~5
A
~4
CONTACT OUTPUT 2
~3
Two form-A
contact outputs
B
~2
CONTACT OUTPUT 1
~1
A
Contactors
853741A3.CDR
The IO_C module contains two form-A contact output relays, six digital inputs and control
voltage input.
Contact inputs can be programmed to any of the input functions, such as field stop or
process interlock. The exception is that contactor A status is fixed as the first contact
input, and contactor B status (where used) is fixed as the second contact input.
An AC auxiliary supply must be connected to terminals 12 and 13. This auxiliary voltage
(from slot C only) is also used for actual value indication, for auxiliary undervoltage, and for
undervoltage restart. When three-phase voltages are not available, it is also used to
calculate power quantities and is used as a phase angle reference.
When the I0_C module senses an interruption to its auxiliary supply, it raises an AC Low
Aux Voltage Inhibit, and freezes the last valid state of the contact inputs, as the
interruption prevents sensing the actual states.
The two contact outputs can be programmed to follow any one of the digital signals
developed by the MM300, such as alarms and status signals. The exception is that the
contactor A relay is fixed as the first contact output, and contactor B relay is fixed as the
second contact output (where used).
Connect AUX VT to the Control Supply for correct operation of the UV Restart feature and
readings of inputs.
NOTE:
NOTE
All IO_C cards must have the auxiliary input VT wired for proper input sensing.
NOTE:
NOTE
Substitute the slot position of the input/output module (C E, F, G, H) wherever the tilde
symbol “~” appears in the diagrams above.
NOTE:
NOTE
2–18
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
2.2.4.2 Type IO_D module connections
The IO_D module contains four form-C contact output relays.
In general, contact outputs can be programmed to follow any one of the digital signals
developed by the MM300, such as alarms and status signals.
Figure 23: Typical wiring for type IO_D contact output module
MM300
Motor Management System
NOT USED
~14
NOT USED
~13
~12
CONTACT OUTPUT 4
~11
~10
~9
CONTACT OUTPUT 3
~8
~7
Four form-C
contact outputs
~6
CONTACT OUTPUT 2
CLOSE
COIL
~5
START
~4
52b
~3
CONTACT OUTPUT 1
~2
N
TRIP
COIL
~1
STOP
52a
–
Control
power
L
+
853742A1.CDR
Substitute the slot position of the input/output module (E, F, G, or H) wherever the tilde
symbol “~” appears in the diagrams above.
NOTE:
NOTE
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
2–19
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
2.2.5 Dielectric strength testing
Figure 24: Testing for dielectric strength
CPU module
Surge Ground
Core
balance
BLACK RED
ON
Thermistor
FAULT RESET
POWER
~14
Aux VT
DIELECTRIC STRENGTH TESTER
LINE FAULT
RS485
kV
* * *
VT1
+ – C + – R I SG
HV ON
E1
E2
E3
VT2
E4
E5
VT3
E6
E7
Surge Ground E8
* *
VOLTAGE ADJUST
COM
VT module (optional)
~13
~12
~11
~10
MM300
Motor Management System
Do not HI-POT test
HI-POT test at 1.9 kV AC for 1 second, or
1.6 kV AC for 1 minute (per UL 508)
Remove surge ground during test
~8
~7
~6
~5
CT1
CT2
CT3
CT4
~4
CT Module
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
~3
Power
supply
~2
L
N
G
*
~9
IO_C module
Consumer & Industrial
Multilin
~1
853738A3.CDR
It may be required to test a complete motor starter for dielectric strength (“flash” or “HIPOT”) with the MM300 installed. The MM300 is rated for 1.9 kV AC for 1 second, or 1.6 kV AC
for 1 minute (per UL 508) isolation between relay contacts, CT inputs, VT inputs and the
surge ground terminal SG. Some precautions are required to prevent damage to the
MM300 during these tests.
Filter networks and transient protection clamps are used between VT input and the surge
ground terminal. This is intended to filter out high voltage transients, radio frequency
interference (RFI), and electromagnetic interference (EMI). The filter capacitors and
transient suppressors may be damaged by continuous high voltage. Disconnect the surge
ground terminal (E8) during testing of VT inputs. The CT inputs, control power, and output
relays do not require any special precautions. Low voltage inputs (less than 30 volts), RTDs,
and RS485 communication ports are not to be tested for dielectric strength under any
circumstance (see above).
Substitute the slot position of the input/output module (D, E, F, G, or H) wherever the tilde
symbol “~” appears in the diagram above.
NOTE:
NOTE
2–20
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
STARTER TYPES
2.3 Starter types
2.3.1 Full-voltage non-reversing starter
Figure 25: Full-voltage non-reversing starter wiring
L
N
A
B
C
C14
Aux VT
N
L
C13
Com
C11
IN 6
C10
IN 5
C9
IN 4
C8
IN 3
C7
IN 2
PSU
C6
Order Code : MM300-XEHSSCA
Consumer & Industrial
M
M
Multilin
Contactor
I/O Module- Type C
M
MM300
CT2
CT1
RS485
Surge Grd
Thermistor
-
+
-
Com
+
I
R
MOTOR
IN 1
CPU
Core
Balance
Core Balance CT
Relay 2
IA
CT3
Low Voltage
Motor
Manager
Relay 1
IB
G/F
CT Module
IC
D8
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
C12
Reset
Field Start
Field Stop
M
C5
C4
C3
C2
C1
M
RS485 Serial Link
Ground at one point
Stator Thermistor
The full-voltage non-reversing starter type is a full voltage or across-the-line non-reversing
starter.
When a start control is received, the pre-contactor relay (if any) is picked up for the set precontactor time. When the pre-contactor timer times out, relay1 picks up and seals-in,
picking up contactor M, which starts the motor. When a stop control is received, relay1
drops out, contactor M drops out, and the motor stops. The pre-contactor is omitted on
forced starts (for example, UVR Immediate, External Start).
Connect AUX VT to the Control Supply for correct operation of the UV Restart feature and
readings of inputs
NOTE:
NOTE
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
2–21
STARTER TYPES
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
2.3.2 Full-voltage reversing starter
Figure 26: Full-voltage reversing starter wiring
L
N
A
B
C
C14
Aux VT
N
L
C13
Com
C11
IN 6
C10
C9
Rev Limit
Fwd Limit
Field Stop
R
R
R
F
F
F
Dual
Contactor
CPU
RS485
Thermistor
Core
Balance
+
-
-
Com
+
I
R
MOTOR
Surge Grd
Core Balance CT
IN 4
CT1
MM300
Low Voltage
Motor
Manager
C8
IN 3
CT2
Relay 2
IA
CT3
Relay 1
IB
G/F
CT Module
IC
D8
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
I/O Module- Type C
Multilin
C7
IN 2
Consumer & Industrial
C12
C6
IN 1
Order Code : MM300-XEHSSCA
IN 5
PSU
C5
R
F
C4
C3
R
C2
C1
Interlock
F
NOTE: Mechanical
Interlock required
RS485 Serial Link
Ground at one point
Stator Thermistor
The full-voltage reversing starter type is a full voltage or across-the-line reversing starter.
When a start A (forward) control is received, the pre-contactor relay (if any) is picked up for
the set pre-contactor time. When the pre-contactor timer times out, relay1 picks up and
seals-in, picking up contactor F, which starts the motor in the forward direction. When a
start B (reverse) control is received, relay1drops out, and contactor F drops out. When the
contactor F Off status is received, the starter waits for the set transfer time to allow the
motor to slow or stop. When the transfer time timer times out, relay2 picks up and seals-in,
picking up contactor R, which starts the motor in the reverse direction. When a stop
control is received, relays 1 and 2 drop out, contactor F and R drop out, and the motor
stops. The starter logic is fully symmetrical between forward and reverse.
When a contact input has its function set to forward limit, and that contact closes, relay1
will drop out, stopping any forward rotation. When a contact input has its function set to
reverse limit, and that contact closes, relay2 will drop out, stopping any reverse rotation.
The pre-contactor is omitted on forced starts (for example, UVR Immediate, External Start).
Forced starts are not supervised by this starter transfer timer – any external starting circuit
must itself respect fast direction change restrictions.
Connect AUX VT to the Control Supply for correct operation of the UV Restart feature and
readings of inputs.
NOTE:
NOTE
2–22
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
STARTER TYPES
2.3.3 Two-speed starter
Figure 27: Two-speed starter typical wiring
L
N
Grd
A
B
C
C14
Aux VT
N
L
C13
Com
C11
IN 6
C10
IN 5
C9
IN 4
C8
IN 3
C7
IN 2
PSU
C6
Order Code : MM300-XEHSSCA
Consumer & Industrial
L
Dual
Contactor
IC
IB
IA
Core
Balance
CT
D8
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
Multilin
G/F
CT3
CT2
CT1
MM300
Low Voltage
Motor
Manager
CPU
RS485
+
+
Com
R
I
Grd
MOTOR
Thermistor
Core
Balance
H
Surge Grd
H
IN 1
L
I/O Module- Type C
L
Relay 2
H
Relay 1
H
CT Module
H
C12
L
H
C5
C4
C3
H
C2
C1
Interlock
L
RS485 Serial Link
Ground at one point
Stator Thermistor
This starter type is a full voltage or across-the-line two speed starter.
When a start A (low speed) control is received, the pre-contactor relay (if any) is picked up
for the set pre-contactor time. When the pre-contactor timer times out, relay1 picks up
and seals-in, picking up contactor L, which starts the motor in low speed. When a start B
(high speed) control is received, the relay1drops out, and contactor L drops out. When
contactor L Off status is received, the relay2 picks up and seals-in, picking up contactor H,
which starts the motor in high speed. Should a start A (low speed) control be received when
relay2 is picked up, relay2 is drops out, and contactor H drops out. When contactor H Off
status is received, the starter waits for the set transfer time to allow the motor to slow.
When the transfer time timer times out, the relay1 picks up and seals-in, picking up
contactor L, which starts the motor in low speed. When a stop control is received, the
relays 1 and 2 drop out, contactors L and H drop out, and the motor stops. If the HIGH
SPEED START BLOCK setting is “Enabled”, this starter will not allow a start B (high speed)
control unless already running at low speed.
The pre-contactor is omitted on forced starts (for example, UVR Immediate, External Start).
Forced starts are not supervised by the starter transfer timer – any external starting circuit
must itself respect high to low speed transition restrictions and starting in high speed
restrictions.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
2–23
STARTER TYPES
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
Connect AUX VT to the Control Supply for correct operation of the UV Restart feature and
readings of inputs.
NOTE:
NOTE
2–24
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
STARTER TYPES
2.3.4 Wye-delta open transition starter
Figure 28: Wye-delta open transition starter wiring
A
B
C
1S
L
N
1M
C14
Aux VT
N
L
C13
Com
C11
IN 6
C10
IN 5
C9
IN 4
C8
IN 3
C7
IN 2
Order Code : MM300-XEHSSCA
C6
IN 1
PSU
C5
Consumer & Industrial
2M
1M
Dual
Contactor
IC
IB
IA
MM300
G/F
CT3
CT2
Low Voltage
Motor
Manager
CPU
RS485
-
+
-
+
Com
I
R
1S
Thermistor
Core
Balance
1S
C12
2M
1S
CT1
Surge Grd
Core
Balance
CT
D8
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
Relay 2
1M
Relay 1
2M
CT Module
1M
I/O Module- Type C
Multilin
2M
2M
C4
C3
2M
C2
C1
Interlock
1S
1S
RS485 Serial Link
Ground at one point
Stator Thermistor
The wye-delta open transition starter is a reduced voltage starter.
When a start A control is received, the pre-contactor relay (if any) is picked up for the set
pre-contactor time. When the pre-contactor timer times out, relay1 picks up and seals-in,
picking up the 1S contactor, which connects the motor in wye configuration. The 1S
contactor in turn picks up the 1M contactor, which connects the motor to the supply. The
motor is now starting at 58% voltage. When the transfer time timer expires, the relay1 is
de-energized, contactor 1S drops out, opening the wye and disconnecting the motor from
the supply. When the contactor 1S Off status is received, relay2 picks up and seals-in,
picking up the 2M contactor, which connects the motor in delta configuration. The 2M
contactor in turn picks up the 1M contactor, which connects the motor to the supply. The
motor is now running at full voltage. When a stop control is received, relays 1 and 2 drop
out, contactor 1S and 2M drop out, contactor 1M drops out, and the motor stops.
Pre-contactor is omitted on forced starts (for example, UVR Immediate, External Start).
Otherwise, type A forced starts operate in the same fashion as other type A starts, with the
transfer to full voltage occurring when the transfer time expires. Type B forced starts are
not supervised by this starter transfer timer – any external type B starting circuit must itself
respect full voltage starting restrictions.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
2–25
STARTER TYPES
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
Connect AUX VT to the Control Supply for correct operation of the UV Restart feature and
readings of inputs.
NOTE:
NOTE
2–26
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
STARTER TYPES
2.3.5 Inverter starter (VFD, VSD)
Figure 29: Inverter starter typical wiring
A
B
C
1M
1M
Contactor
L
N
1M
Aux VT
N
L
C13
Com
C11
IN 6
C10
IN 5
Order Code : MM300-XEHSSCA
C9
Reset
IN 4
INVERTER
C8
Field Start
IN 3
Ramp
Up
Input
C14
PSU
C7
Consumer & Industrial
MM300
Relay 2
RS485
-
+
Com
+
-
I
R
MOTOR
Thermistor
CT1
CPU
Core
Balance
Core Balance CT
CT2
Surge Grd
IA
CT3
Relay 1
IB
G/F
CT Module
IC
D8
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
Low Voltage
Motor
Manager
I/O Module- Type C
Multilin
C12
Field Stop
MR
IN 2
2M
Motor
Running
Output
C6
IN 1
MR
C5
1M
C4
C3
2M
C2
C1
1M
RS485 Serial Link
Ground at one point
Stator Thermistor
The inverter starter is used with an external inverter that ramps the motor speed up on
start and ramps it down on stop.
The B Open Contactor Control Circuit and B Welded Contactor alarms are defeated when
the inverter starter is selected.
When a start A control is received, the pre-contactor relay (if any) is picked up for the set
delay, then relay1 picks up and seals-in, picking up contactor 1M. This provides power for
the inverter to start up. Relay 2 closes after a 1 second delay, and seals-in, which signals
the inverter to ramp the motor up. When a stop control is received, the relay2 drops out,
and the inverter ramps down. When the ramp down time timer has expired, relay1 is
opened, contactor 1M drops out, cutting power to the inverter and motor.
The inverter signals the relay that it is up to speed by closing auxiliary relay MR. If the
auxiliary relay MR unexpectedly opens while running, signalling a possible inverter
problem, relay2 drops out, and the inverter ramps down if it has not done so already. An
Inverter alarm is issued, but relay1 remains closed, so contactor 1M stays picked up, and
the supply to the inverter is maintained. This is done so that the inverter has power to
retain its event records for subsequent diagnosis of the problem. Relay1 is opened
removing power to the inverter when a stop control is received, and the alarm is reset on
the next start.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
2–27
STARTER TYPES
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
Forced starts (for example, External Start) operate in the same fashion as other starts, with
relay1 not picking up until the pre-contactor timer times out. Then, after 1 second, relay 2
picks up. If up-to-speed feedback is not received from auxiliary relay MR within the Ramp
Up Time setting during a start, a Drive Start Failed alarm is generated. If up-to-speed
feedback is not seen before a stop control, an Inverter Fail alarm is generated, and relay2
opens as described above. If inverter speed feedback remains when the ramp down time
expires during a stop, a Drive Stop Fail alarm is generated. Neither results in a trip or a stop.
The Drive Start Failed alarm is latched till reset or cleared by a stop control. The Inverter
Fail alarm is cleared at next start.
The Undervoltage Autorestart feature is disabled for the Inverter Starter.
Connect AUX VT to the Control Supply for correct operation of the UV Restart feature and
readings of inputs.
NOTE:
NOTE
Ensure inverter is located before contactor.
NOTE:
NOTE
2–28
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
STARTER TYPES
2.3.6 Soft starter type
Figure 30: Soft starter typical wiring
A
B
C
UTS 2M
BP
1M
1M
Contactor
L
N
1M
C14
Aux VT
N
L
Com
C9
C8
C7
C6
UTS
C5
1M
Multilin
I/O Module- Type C
Com
Run
MM300
Relay 2
RS485
CT1
CPU
Thermistor
CT2
-
+
-
+
I
R
Com
Relay 1
CT3
Core
Balance
IA
G/F
Surge Grd
IB
D8
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
Low Voltage
Motor
Manager
CT Module
IC
MOTOR
C10
Consumer & Industrial
SOFT STARTER
2M
Core Balance CT
C11
IN 6
Stop
IN 5
BP
C13
IN 4
BP
Order Code : MM300-XEHSSCA
IN 3
BP
Up To
Speed
Output
IN 2
UTS
IN 1
PSU
C12
Reset
Field Start
Field Stop
C4
C3
2M
C2
C1
1M
RS485 Serial Link
Ground at one point
Stator Thermistor
The soft starter type is used with an external soft starter that ramps the motor speed up on
start and down on stop. Once the motor is ramped up, the soft starter can be bypassed.
When a start A control is received, the relay1 picks up and seals-in, picking up contactor
1M. This provides power for the soft starter to start up and to drive the motor. The precontactor relay (if any) is picked up for the set delay, then relay 2M signals the soft starter
to ramp the motor up. When the soft starter signals up to speed by picking up auxiliary
relay UTS, the starter generates the soft starter bypass signal. When a stop control is
received, relay2 drops out, signalling the soft starter to ramp down. When the ramp down
time timer has expired, relay1 is opened, M1 drops out, cutting power to the soft starter
and motor.
Forced starts (for example, External Start) operate in the same fashion as other starts,
relay2 closes after a 1 second delay. If up-to-speed feedback is not received from auxiliary
relay UTS within the RAMP UP TIME setting during a start, a Drive Start Failed alarm is
generated. If soft starter speed feedback remains when the ramp down time expires
during a stop, a Drive Stop Fail alarm is generated. Neither results in a trip or a stop. The
Drive Start Failed alarm is cleared by a stop control.
The B Open Contactor Control Circuit and B Welded Contactor alarms implemented in the
start/stop control element are defeated when the soft starter is selected.
The Undervoltage Autorestart feature is disabled for the Soft Starter.
Connect AUX VT to the Control Supply for correct operation of the UV Restart feature and
readings of inputs.
NOTE:
NOTE
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
2–29
STARTER TYPES
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION
Ensure soft starter is located before contactor.
NOTE:
NOTE
2–30
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
Digital Energy
Multilin
MM300 Motor Management System
Chapter 3: Control panel operation
Control panel operation
There are three methods of interfacing with the MM300 Motor Management System.
•
Interfacing via the graphical control panel.
•
Interfacing via the basic control panel.
•
Interfacing via the EnerVista MM300 Setup software.
This section provides an overview of the interfacing methods available with the MM300
using the Graphical and Basic control panels. For additional details on interface
parameters (for example, settings, actual values, etc.), refer to the individual chapters.
3.1 Graphical control panel
The MM300 graphical control panel provides the operator with rapid access to relevant
information and controls using intuitive sequences. It also provides all available
information and setting control, again with intuitive sequences.
3.1.1 Introduction to the graphical control panel
The central feature of the graphical control panel is an 89 mm (3.5-inch) 320 by 240 pixel
backlit color LCD screen. The panel also contains keys (pushbuttons) that control the
display and perform commands. In addition, the interface contains START A, START B, and
STOP direct acting control pushbuttons.
The display also contains several LED indicators that provide a summary of the machine
status. Details are displayed on the screen when the user navigates to the appropriate
page.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
3–1
GRAPHICAL CONTROL PANEL
CHAPTER 3: CONTROL PANEL OPERATION
Figure 1: MM300 front panel with example default display
3.1.1.1 Graphical display
Each display page consists of the three components shown below.
Figure 2: Graphical display overview
The header bar (white text on a blue background) displays the hierarchical path name, the
date and time in 24-hour format, and the current password access level. The hierarchical
path is always displayed on the left top side of the graphical display. The present time is
displayed on the right top side. If the test switch is on, the time is replaced with the text
TEST MODE in red.
The soft-key labels are indicated on the bottom line. The soft-keys are used for navigation,
performing functions, and for acknowledgement.
•
Navigation: soft-keys can be used to traverse across and down the hierarchy of
pages.
•
Functional: soft-keys can be used to perform page-specific functions.
•
Acknowledgement: soft keys can be used to acknowledge popup windows.
Soft-keys labels change to show relevant selections for the displayed screen. The color of
each soft-key label indicates its functionality. Soft-keys are highlighted for the displayed
page, unauthorized keys are “greyed-out”, and unused keys are not displayed.
3–2
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 3: CONTROL PANEL OPERATION
GRAPHICAL CONTROL PANEL
The remainder of the screen shows the selected page. Pages are organized in a
hierarchical or tree-based menu structure. To improve readability, some pages are labeled
with rectangular outlines or colored backgrounds. Some pages contain too many fields to
display at once. These pages display arrows bars at the right edge to indicate that the
page continues below the screen. When recalled, scrolled pages are re-positioned at the
top of the page.
Fields display actual value or setting information, and have behaviours that allow help
display, editing, and control.
Each Actual Value analog field displayed on the home page has an associated alarm limit
and changes color to orange when that limit is exceeded. Fields with an associated trip
limit change their color to red when that limit has tripped. Fields that are disabled or
unavailable are greyed-out.
3.1.1.2 Keypad
The function keys perform the labeled functionality. The summary of function key
operation is shown below.
Table 1: Summary of function key operations
Key
Operation
HOME
Single press recalls the home page; double press recalls the default display
UP
Scroll up page, select field, tab to next field, increment value
DOWN
Scroll down page, select field, tab to previous field, decrement value
ESC
Single press closes pop-up, cancels editing, deselects field, moves to previous page;
sustained press logs out (cancels security passcode entry)
ENTER
Single press freezes scrolling and selects field, edits selected field, saves edited value;
double press sets the selected field/page as default; sustained press logs in (enter
security passcode)
HELP
Displays context sensitive help and Modbus address
The HOME key always recalls the root or home page. The home page allows access to all
sub-pages and also contains a status and process values summary. Double pressing the
HOME key recalls the default display. Like a screen-saver, the default display appears after
a period of inactivity and displays user-selected information. A typical default display is
shown below, indicating a running motor in the forward direction.
Figure 3: Typical default display (actual size)
The UP and DOWN keys function in different ways depending on their context.
•
Where a scroll bar is displayed, the UP and DOWN keys scroll the page up and down.
•
Where there is no scroll bar or it is greyed-out, the first press of the UP and DOWN
keys selects the first field. Subsequent presses tab up and down through the fields,
scrolling as required.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
3–3
GRAPHICAL CONTROL PANEL
CHAPTER 3: CONTROL PANEL OPERATION
•
When a field is open for editing, the UP and DOWN keys increment/decrement the
value of that field.
The ENTER key functions in different ways depending on its context.
•
If there are no selected fields, the ENTER key will freeze any scroll bars and select the
first field on the display.
•
If a field is selected, pressing ENTER will attempt to open it for editing.
•
If a field is opened for editing, pressing enter will exit the edit sequence.
•
Double pressing the ENTER key at any time selects the displayed page as the default
display.
•
A sustained press on ENTER prompts the security passcode and displays a dialog box
that allows passcode entry.
For example, pressing and holding the ENTER key, or attempting a control where a
password is required, displays the following page.
Figure 4: Passcode entry dialog box
The ESC key functions in different ways depending on its context.
•
If a pop-up dialog box is displayed, the ESC key closes it.
•
If an edit sequence is in progress, the ESC key cancels the edit.
•
If a field is selected, the ESC key de-selects it.
•
In all other instances, the ESC key moves back one page in the menu structure.
•
A sustained press on the ESC key clears the security passcode and prompts for
confirmation.
The HELP key functions in different ways depending on its context.
•
If a field is selected, the HELP key displays a help window for the field.
•
If a help window is displayed, the HELP key closes it.
Help windows are also closed when any other key is pressed. A typical help window is
shown below.
Figure 5: Typical MM300 help window
3–4
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 3: CONTROL PANEL OPERATION
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Pressing an invalid key displays a message explaining the problem and recommending a
solution. Where the keypress is invalid because a security passcode is required, the dialog
window will be a passcode entry window.
When a lockout occurs that clears when a count-down timer expires or when the thermal
capacity recovers for a restart, the Status > Message page is displayed indicating timer
value or thermal capacity.
3.1.1.3 Control keys
The MM300 has three large direct control keys: START A, START B, and STOP.
•
STOP: The STOP key allows the user to stop the motor directly from the MM300
faceplate interface. Pressing this key causes the contactor A and contactor B output
relays to de-energize, therefore dropping out the motor contactor.
•
START A and START B: Pressing these keys initiates the programmed start sequence.
The START A and START B keys are used to start the motor from the MM300 faceplate
(if MCC control is enabled). The start A and start B sequences can also be initiated via
communications, field control, or hardwired input.
3.1.1.4 LED indicators
The control panel LEDs summarize the status of the device and up to three userprogrammable parameters. The LED colors can be independently configured by the user
to display either red, orange, or green, as required by local operating conventions. The
following LEDs are available for the MM300.
•
Running LED: Indicates that the motor is running. It will be on whenever the contactor
A or B relays are closed and the contactor status inputs acknowledge the correct
state. Current flow does not affect the indicator.
•
Stopped LED: Indicates that the motor is stopped based on both contactors A and B
being de-energized.
•
Tripped LED: Indicates that the A and B contactor relays are de-energized. The motor
cannot be restarted as long as this indicator remains on.
•
Alarm LED: Indicates that an alarm condition is present.
•
Auto LED: Indicates if the MM300 is in auto control mode.
•
Manual LED: Indicates if the MM300 is in manual control mode.
•
Comms OK LED: Indicates the status of selected communication interface activity.
User can select an individual or a combination of communications interfaces by
configuring the "Comms OK Evaluation" (Modbus address 40517, 0204H) setpoint,
under \\home\setpoints\configure\Comms. If all interfaces are communicating, then
the LED is green. If all interfaces are failed, then the LED is red. If one or more, but not
all, interfaces are failed, then this LED is orange.
•
User 1 to User 3 LEDs: These LEDs can be programmed by the user to indicate any
digital condition.
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3.1.2 MM300 graphical display pages
A summary of the MM300 page hierarchy is shown below.
Figure 6: MM300 display page hierarchy
Values
Summary
Motor
Amps
CT-VT
Volts
Power
Sensor
Status
Message
Inputs
Trips
Outputs
Alarms
Comms
Control
System
Virtual
Reset
Inputs
Events
Outputs
Counters
System
Summary
Flex
V Inputs
Setpoints
Config
V Outputs
Protection
Thermal
Control
Mech
Security
Elec
Sensor
Diag
Events
Clear
Counters
Clear
Starter
Inhibits
Phasors
Interlock
Info
UV Restart
Learned
Control
Auto
Manual
Main menu
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
853701A3.CDR
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3.1.2.1 Home display page
The home page represents the root of the entire menu structure. An overview of the
system status is displayed which includes the following items.
•
Locked out, tripped, blocked, stopped, pre-contactor, starting, running status, and
inhibit.
•
Motor load, thermal capacity used, and power.
•
Estimated time to trip (if motor is loaded above its service factor).
•
The longest current timeout from any of the pre-contactor time, time to overload, time
to reset, starts/hour block, time between starts, transfer time, undervoltage restart
time, and restart block timers.
•
Temperature of the hottest stator RTD (if there is an RTD and the two previous items
are not applicable).
•
Average line-to-line voltage (if there is no RTD).
Figure 7: Typical MM300 home display
The Values, Status, Setpoints, Diag, and Control soft-keys are displayed on the home
page. The Status soft-key will be highlighted red if any trip conditions are active, orange if
relay is not tripped and any alarm conditions are present. Otherwise it will be grey. If the
’tripped LED flasher’ setpoint is set to ’ON’, the softkey will flash red if there is a trip or
lockout.
Pressing any of the soft-keys displays the first sub-page in the hierarchy. Pressing the ESC
key within any of these sub-pages returns directly to the home page.
3.1.2.2 Default display
The default display is automatically shown when no control key has been pressed for five
minutes. It can also be recalled at any time by double-clicking the HOME key.
The default display can be set to the home page, any actual values page, or any status
page. A page can be set to be the default display by navigating to that page and doublepressing the ENTER key. The default display setting is saved in non-volatile memory.
If a page is set as the default display, the soft-keys will be those of the selected page.
3.1.2.3 Actual values pages
The actual values pages are divided into five sections.
•
Summary (overview of primary actual values)
•
Amps (metered current values)
•
Volts (metered voltage values)
•
Power (metered power values)
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•
Sensor (metered temperature and thermistor values)
The actual values summary page displays a summary of the analog actual values. The
current, voltage, power, and sensor actual values pages are accessible from the summary
page through the corresponding soft-keys at the bottom of the screen.
Some typical actual values screens are shown below.
Figure 8: Typical actual values summary page
Figure 9: Typical actual values current page
Figure 10: Typical actual values voltage page
3.1.2.4 Status pages
The status pages provide the user with up-to-date information on the current status of the
MM300.
Status pages are divided into five sections.
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•
Message (displays all locked out conditions plus conditions such as alarms, internal
faults, control status, etc.).
•
Inputs (displays the present state of assigned contact inputs).
•
Outputs (displays the present state of assigned contact outputs).
•
System (displays the present state of the communications interface).
•
Flex (displays the present state of the FlexLogic™ engine and number of lines used.)
A typical display is shown below:
Figure 11: Typical status message page
Message types are classified by color and associated icon type, as follows::
•
Red Triangle = Trip
•
Orange Square = Alarm
•
Blue Circle = Inhibit
•
Black Text = Information Message
Message can have an associated countdown timer.
When the relay is first powered up, the status page lists why the relay is not available for
service. This is not an exhaustive list of setpoints to be configured, but is a list of key items
such as FLA, CT Type, starter type and control Source, that must be configured before the
unit will be available for use. Protection values must still be configured for the motor to be
protected correctly.
Inhibits
These include Process Interlock Stop, and Field Stop.
Trips / Alarms
These trigger depending on the protection setpoints. A typical example would be;
“Overload Trip”.
Information Messages
Information pages are split into two groups
–
With navigation (shown above, as an Enter symbol on the right side of the
display)
–
Without navigation
When a line showing a message (with navigation) is highlighted, pressing Enter will take
the GCP directly to the page in question, so that the situation can be quickly resolved. A
typical example would be “FLA not set”. Selecting this entry on the page will take you to the
\setpoints\config\motor page.
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3.1.2.5 Setpoints pages
The setpoints pages are divided into five sections.
•
Config (contains basic configuration setpoints)
•
Protection (contains the protection setpoints)
•
Control (contains the control setpoints)
•
Security (contains the password security setpoints)
•
Factory (contains settings used by GE Multilin personnel for testing and calibration
purposes.)
The Home > Setpoints page displays a warning message concerning unexpected
performance if setpoints are improperly changed. It is recommended that all relay outputs
capable of causing damage or harm be blocked before a setpoints change is made and it
is clear the relay is performing as intended with the new setpoints.
Figure 12: setpoints home page
To streamline the setpoint entry process, the graphical control panel will not display
setpoints that are not relevant at the specific instance. For instance, if a process interlock
function is disabled, the six setpoints associated with that interlock function will not be
displayed. If all ten process interlock functions are disabled, the MM300 will display only 10
successive “Disabled” list items. If one of the interlock functions were then enabled, then
room is made on the display for the six setpoints which are now functional.
The setpoint pages are in a common format of twelve rows and two columns displaying
setpoint name, value, and units.
The Home > Setpoints > Config > Motor page is shown below.
Figure 13: Typical setpoints page, motor setpoints
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3.1.2.6 Diagnostics pages
The diagnostic pages are divided into five sections.
•
Events (event recorder data for up to 256 events)
•
Counters (accumulated system counter data)
•
Phasors (metered phasor data)
•
Info (product information)
•
Learned (learned values based upon metered data)
Typical diagnostic pages for phasors and product information are shown below.
Figure 14: Typical phasors page
Figure 15: Typical events page
Pressing Enter on the highlighted line (line 9 above) will take you directly into the detailed
event analysis screen:
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Figure 16: Typical event diagnosis page
3.1.2.7 Control page
This page is used to view the active control mode and switch between Auto/Manual if the
softkeys are enabled.
Figure 17: Typical control page display
Refer to the Control section for details on control page functionality.
3.1.2.8 Popup windows
There are three types of popup windows:
•
Setpoint editor popup windows.
•
Help popup windows.
•
Invalid operation popup windows.
Refer to the Setpoints chapter for details on setpoint editor popup windows.
Help popup windows are initiated by pressing the HELP key. This will display help text for
the active setpoint field.
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Figure 18: Typical help popup window
Invalid operation popups explain the problem and provide direction on how to rectify it.
This may also include invalid features or uninstalled options (for example, accessing the
undervoltage restart page when undervoltage restart option is not ordered). Where a
keypress is illegal because a security passcode is required, the popup is a passcode entry
dialog box.
Figure 19: Typical invalid operation popup window
Help and illegal action popup windows remain open until they are acknowledged by
clicking any soft or hard key, or until a pre-determined period of inactivity has passed.
3.1.3 MM300 programming techniques
To streamline the setting entry process, the graphical control panel omits non-functional
settings from the display.
CAUTION:
CAUTION
Settings may be changed while the motor is running. However, appropriate measures
must be taken to limit the consequences of entering unintended or misunderstood
setting values. Consequences of inappropriate settings to the specific application at
hand include loss of protection, loss of control, and undesired starting or stopping.
3.1.3.1 Enumeration setpoints
Enumeration settings select from a limited set of values (for example, enabled or disabled).
The following procedure describes how to edit an enumeration setting.
1.
Use the soft-keys to select the relevant setting page.
2.
Use the UP and DOWN keys to select the relevant setting field.
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3.
Press the ENTER key. A popup window will appear with a list of available values.
4.
Use the UP and DOWN keys to select from the available values. If there are more than
seven available values, then an arrow indicator will appear on the lower right of the
popup to indicate additional selections.
5.
Press the ENTER key when complete to exit the edit sequence. The selection will be
automatically saved.
6.
Press Esc to cancel the edit and leave the setpoint unchanged.
Figure 20: Enumeration setpoint editing
Label of
setpoint being
edited
Indication of additional
setpoint values
3.1.3.2 Numeric setpoints
Numeric setpoints accept a numerical value within a specific range. The numeric setpoint
editor is a numeric input panel, with the current value shown on the number display. The
minimum, maximum, step, and default values are shown on the left of the keypad, and the
label of the setpoint being edited is displayed on the menu bar of the setpoint editor.
Figure 21: Numeric setpoint editor window
The navigational soft keys change the numeric key in focus, which is highlighted in orange.
There are also five functional soft-buttons in the popup window.
•
BkSpc: This key performs the backspace function, clearing the last digit or decimal
from the display.
•
CLR: This key clears the field’s value from the display
•
Default: This key returns the setpoint value to its default value.
•
OFF: This key disables the setpoint and is visible only for setpoints that can be
disabled.
In order to activate the functions offered by these buttons, the user has to highlight the
appropriate button and press "Select".
The UP and DOWN front panel keys can also be used to increment and decrement the
setpoint by its step value. Clicking the ENTER key verifies the displayed value. If the
setpoint value is valid, it is stored as the new setpoint value and the editor is closed.
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Otherwise, an error statement is displayed and the Default soft-button is brought to focus.
Clicking HOME before the value is stored cancels the edit sequence and recalls the home
page.
The following procedure describes how to edit a numeric setting.
1.
Use the navigation keys to select the relevant setting page.
2.
Use the navigation keys to select the relevant setting field.
3.
Press the ENTER key to open the numeric setpoint editor.
4.
Use the navigational soft-keys to highlight the first digit of the new setpoint value.
5.
Press the "Select" soft-key to select the highlighted digit.
6.
Use the navigational soft-keys to highlight the next digit, then press "Select."
7.
When the new value has been fully entered, press the "Enter" key to store the value
and close the window.
3.1.3.3 Alphanumeric setpoints
Alphanumeric setpoints accept any alphanumeric value of a specified size and are
generally used for labeling and identification purposes. When an alphanumeric setpoint is
selected, the MM300 displays an alphanumeric setpoint editor window.
Figure 22: Alphanumeric setpoint editor
A flashing underline marks the current character. The “<” and “>” soft-keys shift the cursor
left and right. When the cursor is at the extreme right hand side of the field and the field
has not reached its maximum length of string input, the “>” key shifts the cursor to the
right and sets the selected character to the space character. Up to 20 characters can be
stored for alphanumeric setpoints. A long click of the “<” and “>” soft keys move the cursor
to the first or last character in the string.
The up and down soft-keys increment and decrement the selected character through the
character set. A long click of the up or down soft-keys sets the selected character to “a”
and “Z”, respectively. The shift soft-key toggles the case of the character set. Pressing
ENTER stores the selected value, while pressing ESC cancels the editing sequence and
closes the popup editor.
The following procedure describes how to edit an alphanumeric setting.
1.
Use the soft-keys to select the relevant setting page.
2.
Use the arrow soft-keys to select the relevant alphanumeric setpoint field.
3.
Press the ENTER key to open the alphanumeric setpoint editor.
4.
The first character of the alphanumeric setting value will be marked with a flashing
cursor (underline).
5.
Use the up, down, left, right, shift, and space soft-keys to change the indicated
character.
6.
Use the left and right arrow soft-keys to select and change more characters.
7.
Press the ENTER key when complete to exit the edit sequence. The changes are
automatically saved.
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3.1.3.4 Date, time, and IP entry
The entry process for date, time, and IP setpoints follows the same convention as numeric
setpoints, where the day, month, year, hour, minute, second, and each octet of the IP
address are entered as separate fields. Input verification is performed for all fields of the
setpoint when the ENTER key is pressed. As these are standard formats, the minimum,
maximum and step value displays are removed. For date and time setpoints, a format
string of DD/MM/YYYY or HH:MM:SS is included as a part of the setpoint label for reference
when entering a new value.
Figure 23: IP address setpoint editor
3.1.3.5 Security access
There are three levels of security access allowing write access to setpoints, lockout reset,
and firmware download. When there are no pop-ups present, a sustained press on the ESC
key clears the security passcode. When operations are performed that require a higher
level of security, a passcode entry dialog box automatically opens (for example, in entering
factory page at read only security access).
Figure 24: Password entry dialog box
The encrypted key information appears only when the current security access level is 0.
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BASIC CONTROL PANEL
3.2 Basic control panel
The MM300 basic control panel provides the basic start and stop panel functionality, as
well as a series of LED indications. The basic control panel is illustrated below.
Figure 25: Basic control panel
853750A1.CDR
The following LEDs are provided:
•
Two USER LEDs (USER 1 and USER 2). the user can select parameters from a list
•
50%/80%/100% - showing motor load
•
RUNNING, STOPPED, TRIPPED, and ALARM
•
COMMS OK
•
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MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
Digital Energy
Multilin
MM300 Motor Management System
Chapter 4: Software operation
Software operation
There are three methods of interfacing with the MM300 Motor Management System.
•
Interfacing via the graphical control panel.
•
Interfacing via the basic control panel.
•
Interfacing via the EnerVista MM300 Setup software.
This section provides an overview of the interfacing methods available with the MM300
using the Graphical and Basic control panels. For additional details on interface
parameters (for example, settings, actual values, etc.), refer to the individual chapters.
4.1 EnerVista MM300 Setup Software
Although settings can be entered manually using the control panel keys, a PC can be used
to download values through the communications port. The EnerVista MM300 Setup
software is available from GE Multilin to make this as convenient as possible. With
EnerVista MM300 Setup running, it is possible to:
•
Program and modify settings
•
Load and save setting files to and from a disk
•
Read actual values
•
Monitor status
•
Read pre-trip data and event records
•
Get help on any topic
•
Upgrade the MM300 firmware
The EnerVista MM300 Setup software allows immediate access to all MM300 features with
easy to use pull down menus in the familiar Windows environment. This section provides
the necessary information to install EnerVista MM300 Setup, upgrade the relay firmware,
and write and edit setting files.
The EnerVista MM300 Setup software can run without a MM300 connected to the
computer. In this case, settings may be saved to a file for future use. If an MM300 is
connected to a PC and communications are enabled, the MM300 can be programmed
from the setting screens. In addition, measured values, status and trip messages can be
displayed with the actual value screens.
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CHAPTER 4: SOFTWARE OPERATION
4.1.1 Software requirements
The following requirements must be met for the EnerVista MM300 Setup software.
•
Microsoft Windows™ XP / 2000 is installed and running properly.
•
At least 20 MB of hard disk space is available.
•
At least 128 MB of RAM is installed.
The EnerVista MM300 Setup software can be installed from either the GE EnerVista CD or
the GE Multilin website at http://www.GEmultilin.com.
4.1.2 Installing the EnerVista MM300 Setup software
After ensuring the minimum requirements indicated earlier, use the following procedure to
install the EnerVista MM300 Setup software from the enclosed GE EnerVista CD.
4–2
1.
Insert the GE EnerVista CD into your CD-ROM drive.
2.
Click the Install Now button and follow the installation instructions to install the nocharge EnerVista software on the local PC.
3.
When installation is complete, start the EnerVista Launchpad application.
4.
Click the IED Setup section of the Launch Pad toolbar.
5.
In the EnerVista Launchpad window, click the Add Product button and select the
MM300 Motor Management System as shown below. Select the Web option to ensure
the most recent software release, or select CD if you do not have a web connection,
then click the Add Now button to list software items for the MM300.
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ENERVISTA MM300 SETUP SOFTWARE
6.
EnerVista Launchpad will obtain the latest installation software from the Web or CD
and automatically start the installation process. A status window with a progress bar
will be shown during the downloading process.
7.
Select the complete path, including the new directory name, where the EnerVista
MM300 Setup software will be installed.
8.
Click on Next to begin the installation. The files will be installed in the directory
indicated, the USB driver will be loaded into the computer, and the installation
program will automatically create icons and add EnerVista MM300 Setup software to
the Windows start menu. The following screen will appear:
9.
Press the Continue Anyway button, then click Finish to end the installation. The
MM300 device will be added to the list of installed IEDs in the EnerVista Launchpad
window, as shown below.
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If you are going to communicated from your computer to the MM300 Relay using the
USB port:
10. Plug the USB cable into the USB port on the MM300 Relay then into the USB port on
your computer. The following screen will appear:
11. Select Install... Automatically
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12. Select No, not this time.The above Hardware Installation warning screen will
reappear. Press the Continue Anyway button.
13. In EnerVista > Device Setup:
14. Select Serial as the Interface type.
15. Select port 7 as the COM Port.
4.1.3 Troubleshooting the USB driver
When the Setup Software is installed on the Windows 2000 or XP operating system, and
the device is power recycled while the native USB port is still connected to the PC, the USB
driver in the PC Program may get lost and the setup software may fail to recognize the USB
device. If this happens, the ‘MM300 USB Serial Emulation (COM #)’ will be missing in the
Setup Software’s Device Setup window. To overcome the problem:
1.
Remove the USB cable from the native port of the device.
2.
Wait for 20 Seconds and connect the cable back to the native port of the device.
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3.
Check the Setup Software for the availability of the USB Device on the Device setup
Window. It will automatically reappear on the ‘USB Device’ list as ‘MM300 USB Serial
Emulation (COM #)’ as shown in the image below.
4.
If the USB Device is not recognized automatically in the Setup Software, repeat the
same procedure 2 or 3 times until the PC Program recognizes the USB device (and
‘MM300 USB Serial Emulation (COM #)’ reappears in dropdown of ‘USB Device’ list).
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5.
If problem still persists, uninstall the USB driver from Computer’s ‘Device Manager’
under tree-branch modems from the Installation folder. To uninstall it, right click on
MM300 USB Serial Emulation and select Uninstall.
6.
After the uninstall, remove the USB cable from the Device’s native USB port, wait for at
least 10 Seconds and reconnect it.
7.
Now the ‘Found New Hardware Wizard’ will open, select No, not this time and press
the Next button.
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8.
Select Install the software automatically (Recommended) and press the Next
button.
9.
Press Continue Anyway.
10. At the end press Finish.
11. Check in the Setup Software for the availability of the USB Device on the Device setup
Window. Now the device will reappear on the ‘USB Device’ list.
For the current version, the USB driver can not be installed on Windows Vista Operating
System and communication to the Device via the Native USB port is not supported.
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POWER ANALYSIS
4.2 Power analysis
4.2.1 Waveform capture
The EnerVista MM300 Setup software can be used to capture waveforms (or view trace
memory) from the MM300 relay at the instance of a trip, activation of a virtual output, or
other conditions. A maximum of 64 cycles (32 samples per cycle) can be captured and the
trigger point can be adjusted to anywhere within the set cycles.
If the trigger mode is set to "ONE-SHOT," then the trace memory is triggered once; if it is set
to "RETRIGGER," then it automatically retriggers and overwrites the previous data.
The following waveforms can be captured:
•
Phase A, B, and C currents (Ia, Ib, and Ic)
•
Ground current (Ig)
•
Phase A-N, B-N, and C-N voltages (Van, Vbn, and Vcn) if wye-connected. Phase A-B, BC, and C-A voltages (Vab, Vbc, and Vca) if delta-connected.
•
Digital data for output relays and contact input states.
1.
With EnerVista MM300 Setup running and communications established, select the
Diagnostics > Waveform menu item to open the Waveform Capture setup window.
2.
Click on Trigger Waveform to trigger a waveform capture. Waveform file numbering
starts with the number zero in the MM300, so that the maximum trigger number will
always be one less than the total number of triggers available.
3.
Click on the Save to File button to save the selected waveform to the local PC. A new
window will appear, requesting the file name and path. One file is saved as a
COMTRADE file, with the extension "CFG." The other file is a "DAT" file, required by the
COMTRADE file for proper display of waveforms
4.
To view a previously-saved COMTRADE file, click the Open button and select the
corresponding COMTRADE file.
5.
To view the captured waveforms, click on the Launch Viewer button. A detailed
Waveform Capture window will appear as shown below.
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TRIGGER TIME & DATE
Display the time & date of the
Trigger
Display graph values
at the corresponding
cursor line. Cursor
lines are identified by
their colors.
4–10
VECTOR DISPLAY SELECT
Click here to open a new graph
to display vectors
FILE NAME
Indicates the
file name and
complete path
(if saved)
CURSOR LINE POSITION
Indicate the cursor line position
in time with respect to the
trigger time
DELTA
Indicates time difference
between the two cursor lines
CURSOR
LINES
To move lines locate the mouse pointer
over the cursor line then click and drag
the cursor to the new location.
TRIGGER LINE
Indicates the
point in time for
the trigger
6.
The red vertical line indicates the trigger point.
7.
The date and time of the trigger is displayed at the top left corner of the window. To
match the captured waveform with the event that triggered it, make note of the time
and date shown in the graph. Then find the event that matches the same time and
date in the event recorder. The event record will provide additional information on the
cause and the system conditions at the time and date of the event.
8.
From the window main menu bar, press the Preference button to open the COMTRADE
Setup page, in order to change the graph attributes.
9.
The following window will appear:
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 4: SOFTWARE OPERATION
POWER ANALYSIS
10. Change the color of each graph as desired, and select other options as required, by
checking the appropriate boxes. Click OK to store these graph attributes , and to close
the window. The Waveform Capture window will reappear with the selected graph
attributes available for use.
11. To view a vector graph of the quantities contained in the waveform capture, press the
Vector Display button to display the following window:
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POWER ANALYSIS
CHAPTER 4: SOFTWARE OPERATION
12. Use the graph attribute utility described in step 9, to change the vector colors.
4.2.2 Data logger
The data logger feature is used to sample and record up to ten actual values at a
selectable interval. The datalogger can be run with Continuous mode Enabled, which will
continuously record samples until stopped by the user; or with Continuous mode Disabled,
which will trigger the datalog once without overwriting previous data.
Setting
Parameter
Sample Rate
1 Second
Continuous Mode
Disabled
Data Log Trigger Position
25%
Data Log Trigger Source
None
Channel 1 Source
Phase A Current
Channel 2 Source
Phase B Current
Channel 3 Source
Phase C Current
Channel 4 Source
Disabled
Channel 5 Source
Disabled
Channel 6 Source
Disabled
Channel 7 Source
Disabled
Channel 8 Source
Disabled
Channel 9 Source
Disabled
Channel 10 Source
Disabled
Viewing and saving of the Datalogger is performed as follows:
4–12
1.
With EnerVista MM300 Setup running and communications established, select the
Diagnostics > Datalog menu item to open the datalog setup window:
2.
If Continuous mode is enabled, click on Stop to stop the datalog
3.
Click on the Save to File button to save the datalog to the local PC. A new window will
appear requesting for file name and path.
4.
One file is saved as a COMTRADE file, with the extension ‘CFG’. The other file is a DAT
file, required by the COMTRADE file for proper display of data.
5.
To view a previously saved COMTRADE file, click the Open button and select the
corresponding COMTRADE file.
6.
To view the datalog, click the Launch Viewer button. A detailed Datalog window will
appear as shown below.
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CHAPTER 4: SOFTWARE OPERATION
POWER ANALYSIS
TRIGGER TIME & DATE
Display the time & date of the
Trigger
Display graph values
at the corresponding
cursor line. Cursor
lines are identified by
their colors.
VECTOR DISPLAY SELECT
Click here to open a new graph
to display vectors
FILE NAME
Indicates the
file name and
complete path
(if saved)
CURSOR LINE POSITION
Indicate the cursor line position
in time with respect to the
trigger time
DELTA
Indicates time difference
between the two cursor lines
CURSOR
LINES
To move lines locate the mouse pointer
over the cursor line then click and drag
the cursor to the new location.
TRIGGER LINE
Indicates the
point in time for
the trigger
7.
The method of customizing the datalog view is the same as the Waveform Capture
described above.
8.
The datalog can be set to capture another buffer by clicking on Run (when Continuous
mode is enabled), or by clicking on Release (when Continuous mode is disabled).
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
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POWER ANALYSIS
4–14
CHAPTER 4: SOFTWARE OPERATION
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
Digital Energy
Multilin
MM300 Motor Management System
Chapter 5: Actual values
Actual values
5.1 Actual values overview
Measured values, maintenance and fault analysis information are accessed in the actual
values screens. Actual values may be accessed via one of the following methods.
•
Through the graphical control panel, using the keys and display.
•
With the EnerVista MM300 Setup software supplied with the relay.
•
Through the RS485 or Ethernet ports and a PLC/SCADA system running user-written
software.
Actual value messages are organized into logical groups, or pages, for easy reference.
Pressing the Values soft-key displays the actual values summary window. A summary of
metered current, voltage, and power values are shown for all three phases.
Figure 1: Actual values summary window
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
5–1
METERING
CHAPTER 5: ACTUAL VALUES
5.2 Metering
5.2.1 Current metering
Select the Values > Amps page to display the metered current for all three phases and
ground.
Figure 2: Current metering page
5.2.2 Voltage metering
Select the Values > Volts page to display the metered voltage for all three phases and
auxiliary. The system frequency is also displayed.
Figure 3: Voltage metering page
5–2
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CHAPTER 5: ACTUAL VALUES
METERING
5.2.3 Power metering
Select the Values > Power page to display the power and energy metering values.
Figure 4: Power metering display
An induction motor by convention consumes watts and vars (+watts and +vars).
NOTE:
NOTE
5.2.4 Sensor metering
Select the Values > Sensor page to display the metered temperature sensor values. The
values for each RTD and thermistor (if installed) are displayed.
Figure 5: Temperature metering page
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
5–3
STATUS
CHAPTER 5: ACTUAL VALUES
5.3 Status
The MM300 status messages are categorized as trip, alarm, and stop messages. The
following trip, alarm, and stop messages are displayed.
5.3.1 Status messages
Figure 6: Typical status message display
Color indicates message type:
•
Red Triangle = Trip
•
Orange Square = Alarm
•
Blue Circle = Inhibit
•
Black Text = msg
Msg can have an associated countdown timer.
? shows that a link is available. Use ?? to highlight the line, then press Enter to zoom to the
setpoint page that contains this setpoint.
Select the Status > Msg page to display a list of status messages. Trips, alarms, and
control messages are displayed as status messages. The up and down keys can be used to
scroll through large lists of status messages.
5.3.2 Input and output messages
Select the Status > Inputs and Status > Outputs pages to display a list of input and output
status messages.
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CHAPTER 5: ACTUAL VALUES
STATUS
Figure 7: Typical input status message page
5.3.3 System Page
Shows the communication status of all configuration interfaces (serial, Ethernet,
DeviceNet, and Profibus).
5.3.4 Flex Page
Shows the status of Flex engine and the number of 512 lines in use.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
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STATUS
5–6
CHAPTER 5: ACTUAL VALUES
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
Digital Energy
Multilin
MM300 Motor Management System
Chapter 6: Setpoints
Setpoints
6.1 Understanding setpoints
Any of the motor trip and alarm setpoints may be viewed or altered by pressing the
Setpoints soft-key. Setpoints data is divided into four pages.
•
Configuration page: Information about the motor configuration as well as system
setup, inputs, outputs, communications, CTs, and VTs.
•
Protection page: Information about the protection features.
•
Control page: Information about the process control features.
•
Security page: Information about the security and password features.
Press the Setpoint soft-key to scroll through the setpoints pages. When pressed for the
first time, the following screen is displayed.
Figure 1: Setpoints home page
The soft-keys on the Home > Setpoints page open pages two levels down, since the pages
immediately below this page are blank. For example, the Config soft-key opens the Home
> Setpoints > Config > Motor page.
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UNDERSTANDING SETPOINTS
CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
The pages containing setpoint fields, except for the inputs and outputs pages, are in a
common format. This is a simple tabular format with two columns: setpoint name and
units, and setpoint value. Setpoints for features that are not enabled are omitted from the
page.
Setpoints may be changed while the motor is running; however it is not recommended
to change important protection parameters without first stopping the motor.
CAUTION:
CAUTION
Setpoints will remain stored indefinitely in the internal non-volatile memory even when
control power to the unit is removed. Protection parameters are based on the entered
data. This data must be complete and accurate for the given system for reliable protection
and operation of the motor.
6.1.1 Setting text abbreviations
The following abbreviations are used in the setpoints pages.
•
6–2
A, Amps: amperes
•
AUX: auxiliary
•
CBCT: core balance current transformer
•
COM, Comms: communications
•
CT: current transformer
•
FLA: full load amps
•
FV: full voltage
•
G/F: ground fault
•
GND: ground
•
Hz: Hertz
•
kohms: kilo-ohms
•
MAX: maximum
•
MIN: minimum
•
SEC, s: seconds
•
UV & U/V: undervoltage
•
VT: voltage transformer
•
%MNV: percent of motor voltage
•
%UB: percent unbalance
•
%NCV: percent of nominal control voltage
•
%MNR: percent of motor nominal rating
•
Ctrl: control
•
Hr & hr: hour
•
O/L: overload
•
UTC: co-ordinated universal time
•
ops: operations
•
mcc: motor control center
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
CONFIGURATION SETPOINTS
6.2 Configuration setpoints
The configuration setpoints contains data on motor configuration as well as system setup,
inputs, outputs, communications, CTs, and VTs. The following sub-pages are available.
•
Motor (setpoints related to motor configuration).
•
CT-VT (setpoints related to CT and VT configuration).
•
Inputs (setpoints related to digital input configuration)
•
Outputs (setpoints related to digital output configuration)
•
Comms (setpoints related to communications configuration)
•
System (setpoints related to MM300 system configuration, such as the faceplate LEDs)
•
Events (setpoints related to the event recorder)
•
Counters (setpoints related to the digital counters)
6.2.1 Motor setpoints
The MM300 starter function is responsible for executing the motor startup sequence,
including the pre-contactor start warning. The MM300 provides six pre-defined starters.
•
Full-voltage non-reversing
•
Full-voltage reversing
•
Two-speed
•
Wye-delta open transition
•
Inverter
•
Soft start
By selecting a pre-defined starter, inputs and outputs are automatically assigned.
NOTE:
NOTE
Select the Home > Setpoints > Config > Motor page to edit the motor data settings.
Figure 2: Motor data settings page
6.2.1.1 Common motor setpoints
Several motor setpoints are dependent on the chosen starter type. The setpoints shown
below are common to all starter types.
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CONFIGURATION SETPOINTS
CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
Motor Name
Range: up to 20 alphanumeric characters
Default: Motor Name
This setpoint specifies a name for the motor. This name will appear in the actual values,
sequence of events record, and other reports.
Starter Type (Mandatory Setpoint)
Range: None, FV Non-Reversing, FV Reversing, Two Speed, Wye-Delta, Inverter, Soft
Starter, Custom Starter
Default: FV Non-Reversing
This setpoint selects the starter type. The relay is essentially disabled when the value is
set to “None”. The following figure illustrates typical starter timing beginning from the
stopped state for all starter types.
Motor FLA (Mandatory Setpoint)
Range: 0.5 to 1000.0 amps in steps of 0.1
Default: OFF
This setpoint must be specified for motor protection. The value may be taken from the
motor nameplate data sheets.
Motor Nameplate Voltage (Mandatory Setpoint)
Range: 100 to 690 volts in steps of 1
Default: 690 volts
This setpoint specifies the rated motor nameplate voltage. This value represents the
base phase-to-phase voltage, and is used by the undervoltage and overvoltage
protection elements.
Supply Frequency (Mandatory Setpoint)
Range: 50 Hz, 60 Hz
Default: 60 Hz
This setpoint specifies the nominal system frequency.
Motor Rating (Mandatory Setpoint)
Range: 0.3 to 1100.0 kW in steps of 0.1 or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the motor rating (or low speed motor rating for two-speed
starters) in kWs.
6–4
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CONFIGURATION SETPOINTS
Full Voltage Non-reversing
Stop
Start A
Start B
Start A
Figure 3: Typical starter timing
Motor Current
Contactor A Relay
Contactor B Relay
Pre-contactor
P
Starting
Running
Full Voltage Reversing
Motor Current
Contactor A Relay
T
T
Contactor B Relay
Pre-contactor
P
Starting
Running
Two Speed Starter
Motor Current
Contactor A Relay
T
Contactor B Relay
Pre-contactor
P
Starting
Running
P - Pre-contactor Time setting
T - Transfer Time setting
R - Ramp Down Time setting
Wye-Delta Starter
Motor Current
Contactor A Relay
T
Contactor B Relay
Pre-contactor
P
Starting
Inverter Starter and Soft Starter
Running
Motor Current
Contactor A Relay
Contactor B Relay
Pre-contactor
P
Starting
Running
Stopping
R
853710A1.CDR
The following sections provide additional information for each starter type.
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CONFIGURATION SETPOINTS
CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
6.2.1.2 Full-voltage non-reversing starter
If the Starter Type setpoint is programmed to “FV Non-Reversing”, the pre-contactor relay
(if any) is picked up for the set Pre-Contactor Time when a start control is received. When
the pre-contactor timer times out, the contactor A relay picks up and seals-in, starting the
motor. When a stop control is received, the contactor A relay is dropped out and the motor
stops.
The following figure illustrates typical starter timing beginning from the stopped state.
Stop
Start A
Start B
Start A
Figure 4: Typical starter timing for full-voltage non-reversing starter
Motor current
Contactor A relay
Contactor B relay
Pre-contactor
P
Starting
Running
P = Pre-contactor time setting
853717A1.CDR
The following additional setpoint is available for the full-voltage non-reversing starter.
Pre-Contactor Time
Range: 0 to 60 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 0 seconds
This setpoint represents the time after a start command before the motor is started.
Most starters do not use this delay for forced starts such as undervoltage restart
immediate and external start. This setpoint is also used by the inverter starter and the
soft start starter to set the amount of time between powering up an inverter or soft
starter and sending the ramp-up command. An audible or other warning signal can be
activated in this interval by connecting the signal to a contact output set to the precontactor function.
6.2.1.3 Full-voltage reversing starter
The full-voltage reversing starter type is a full-voltage or across-the-line reversing starter.
When a start A (forward) control is received, the pre-contactor relay (if any) is picked up for
the set Pre-Contactor Time. When the pre-contactor timer times out, the contactor A relay
picks up and seals-in, starting the motor in the forward direction. When a start B (reverse)
control is received, the A contactor is dropped out. When contactor A status off is received,
the starter waits for the set Transfer Time to allow the motor to slow or stop. When the
transfer time timer times out, the contactor B relay picks up and seals-in, starting the
motor in the reverse direction. When a stop control is received, the contactor A and B
relays are dropped out and the motor stops. The starter logic is fully symmetrical between
forward and reverse.
When a contact input has its function set to “Forward Limit”, and that contact closes, the
contactor A relay will drop out. When a contact input has its function set to “Reverse Limit”,
and that contact closes, the contactor B relay will drop out.
The pre-contactor is omitted on forced starts (for example, undervoltage restart
immediate or external start). Forced starts are not supervised by this starter transfer timer
– any external starting circuit must itself respect fast direction change restrictions.
The following figure illustrates typical starter timing beginning from the stopped state.
6–6
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CONFIGURATION SETPOINTS
Stop
Start A
Start B
Start A
Figure 5: Typical starter timing for full-voltage reversing starter
Motor current
Contactor A relay
T
T
Contactor B relay
Pre-contactor
P
Starting
Running
P = Pre-contactor time setting
T = Transfer time setting
853718A1.CDR
The following additional setpoints are available for the full-voltage reversing starter.
Pre-Contactor Time
Range: 0 to 60 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 0 seconds
This setpoint represents the time after a start command before the motor is started.
Most starters do not use this delay for forced starts such as undervoltage restart
immediate and external start. This setpoint is also used by the inverter starter and the
soft start starter to set the amount of time between powering up an inverter or soft
starter and sending the ramp-up command. An audible or other warning signal can be
activated in this interval by connecting the signal to a contact output set to the precontactor function.
Transfer Time
Range: 0 to 125 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 1 second
This setpoint represents the time between stopping and starting in a new direction for
the reversing starter.
6.2.1.4 Two-speed starter
The “Two Speed” starter type is a full-voltage or across-the-line two speed starter.
When a start A (low speed) control is received, the pre-contactor relay (if any) is picked up
for the set Pre-Contactor Time. When the pre-contactor timer times out, the contactor A
relay picks up and seals-in, starting the motor in low speed. When a start B (high speed)
control is received, the A contactor is dropped out. When contactor A status Off is received,
the contactor B relay picks up and seals-in, starting the motor in high speed. Should a start
A (low speed) control be received when the high speed contactor B is picked up, contactor
B is dropped out. When contactor B status Off is received, the starter waits for the set
Transfer Time to allow the motor to slow. When the transfer time timer times out, the
contactor A relay picks up and seals-in, starting the motor in low speed. When a stop
control is received, the contactor A and B relays are dropped out and the motor stops.
If the High Speed Start Block setpoint is “Enabled”, this starter will not allow a start B (high
speed) control unless already running on contactor A (low speed).
The pre-contactor is omitted on forced starts (for example, undervoltage restart
immediate or external start). Forced starts are not supervised by this starter transfer timer
– any external starting circuit must itself respect high to low speed transition restrictions
and starting in high speed restrictions.
The following figure illustrates typical starter timing beginning from the stopped state.
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CONFIGURATION SETPOINTS
CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
Stop
Start A
Start B
Start A
Figure 6: Typical starter timing for two-speed starter
Motor current
Contactor A relay
T
Contactor B relay
Pre-contactor
P
Starting
Running
P - Pre-contactor time setting
T - Transfer time setting
853719A1.CDR
The following additional setpoints are available for the two-speed starter.
High Speed FLA
Range: 0.5 to 1000.0 amps in steps of 0.1
Default: OFF
This setpoints specifies the maximum continuous phase current when running in high
speed.
High Speed Motor Rating
Range: 0.3 to 1100.0 kW in steps of 0.1 or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the high-speed motor rating for two-speed starters in kWs on the
line. This setpoint is for reference only and does not affect operation of the MM300.
High Speed Start Block
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Enabled
When this setpoint is programmed as “Disabled”, the relay allows the motor to be
started directly to high speed. When programmed as “Enabled”, the motor must be
running in low-speed before switching to high-speed.
Transfer Time
Range: 0 to 125 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 1 second
This setpoint represents the time between running at high speed and starting at low
speed for the two speed starter.
6.2.1.5 Wye-delta open transition starter
The wye-delta open transition starter is a reduced voltage starter.
When a start A control is received, the pre-contactor relay (if any) is picked up for the set
Pre-Contactor Time. When the pre-contactor timer times out, the contactor A relay picks
up and seals-in, picking up the 1S contactor, which connects the motor in wye
configuration. The 1S contactor in turn picks up the 1M contactor, which connects the
motor to the supply. The motor is now starting at 58% voltage. When the transfer time
timer expires, the contactor A relay is de-energized, contactor 1S drops out, opening the
wye and disconnecting the motor from the supply. When the contactor 1S status off is
received, the contactor B relay picks up and seals-in, picking up the 2M contactor, which
connects the motor in delta configuration. The 2M contactor in turn picks up the 1M
contactor, which connects the motor to the supply. The motor is now running at full
voltage. When a stop control is received, the contactor A and B relays are dropped out,
contactor 1S and 2M drop out, contactor 1M drops out, and the motor stops.
6–8
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CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
CONFIGURATION SETPOINTS
Pre-contactor is omitted on forced starts (for example, undervoltage restart immediate or
external start). Otherwise, contactor A forced starts operate in the same fashion as other
contactor A starts, with the transfer to full voltage occurring when the transfer time
expires. Contactor B forced starts are not supervised by this starter transfer timer – any
external contactor B starting circuit must itself respect full voltage starting restrictions.
The following figure illustrates typical starter timing beginning from the stopped state.
Stop
Start A
Start B
Start A
Figure 7: Typical starter timing for wye-delta open transition starter
Motor current
Contactor A relay
T
Contactor B relay
Pre-contactor
P
Starting
Running
P = Pre-contactor time setting
T =- Transfer time setting
853720A1.CDR
The following additional setpoints are available for the wye-delta open transition starter.
Pre-Contactor Time
Range: 0 to 60 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 0 seconds
This setpoint represents the time after a start command before the motor is started.
Most starters do not use this delay for forced starts such as undervoltage restart
immediate and external start. This setpoint is also used by the inverter starter and the
soft start starter to set the amount of time between powering up an inverter or soft
starter and sending the ramp-up command. An audible or other warning signal can be
activated in this interval by connecting the signal to a contact output set to the precontactor function.
Transfer Time
Range: 0 to 125 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 1 second
If the value specified by this setpoint has expired, the transition from wye (contactor A) to
delta (contactor B) will occur.
6.2.1.6 Inverter starter
The “Inverter” starter type is used with an external inverter that ramps the motor speed up
on start and ramps it down on stop.
When a start A control is received, the contactor A relay picks up and seals-in. This
provides power for the inverter to start up and to drive the motor. The pre-contactor relay
(if any) is also picked up for the set Pre-Contactor Time. When the pre-contactor timer
times out, the contactor B relay is picked up signalling the inverter to ramp the motor up.
When a stop control is received, the contactor A and B relays drop out immediately,
signalling the inverter to ramp down.
If the contactor B status unexpectedly opens while running, signalling a possible inverter
trouble, the contactor B relay is dropped out and an Inverter Trip Alarm is issued, but no
trip is issued and the contactor A relay remains closed. This is done so that the inverter has
power to retain its event records for subsequent diagnosis of the problem. The contactor A
relay is opened and the alarm is reset when a stop control is received.
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CONFIGURATION SETPOINTS
CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
Forced starts (for example, external start) operate in the same fashion as other starts, with
the B contactor not calling for the inverter to ramp until the pre-contactor timer times out.
If up-to-speed feedback is not received from the inverter via the contactor B status within
the setpoint during a start, a Drive Start Failed alarm is generated. If up to speed feedback
resets before a stop control, an Inverter Fail alarm is generated, and the contactor B relay
opened. If inverter speed feedback remains when the Ramp Down Time expires during a
stop, a Drive Stop Fail alarm is generated. Neither results in a trip or a stop. The Drive Start
Failed alarm is latched until reset. The Inverter Fail alarm is also cleared by a stop control.
The B Open Contactor Control Circuit and B Welded Contactor alarms implemented in the
start/stop control element are defeated when the inverter starter is selected.
If the inverter does not provide an up to speed feedback signal, the contactor B relay
contact or an auxiliary contact of the B contactor should be connected to the contactor B
status contact input to suppress spurious Drive Failed To Start alarms.
The Undervoltage Autorestart feature is disabled for the Inverter Starter.
The following figure illustrates typical starter timing beginning from the stopped state.
Stop
Start A
Start B
Start A
Figure 8: Typical starter timing for the inverter starter
Motor current
Contactor A relay
Contactor B relay
Pre-contactor
P
Starting
Running
Stopping
R
P = Pre-contactor time setting
R = Ramp Down time setting
853721A1.CDR
The following additional setpoints are available for the inverter starter.
Pre-Contactor Time
Range: 0 to 60 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 0 seconds
This setpoint specifies the time after a start command before the motor is started. Most
starters do not use this delay for forced starts such as external start. This setpoint is also
used by the inverter starter and the soft start starter to set the amount of time between
powering up an inverter or soft starter and sending the ramp-up command. An audible
or other warning signal can be activated in this interval by connecting the signal to a
contact output set to the pre-contactor function.
Ramp Up Time
Range: 0 to 125 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 1second
This setpoint specifies the time after signalling the inverter starter to ramp up that the
up-to-speed feedback can be delayed without issuing a Drive Start Fail alarm.
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CONFIGURATION SETPOINTS
Ramp Down Time
Range: 0 to 125 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 1second
This setpoint specifies the time after signalling the inverter starter to ramp down before
the main contactor is opened, cutting power to the starter. If speed feed back is still on
when this time expires, a Drive Stop Fail alarm is issued.
6.2.1.7 Soft starter
The “Soft Starter” type is used with an external soft starter that ramps the motor speed up
on start and down on stop. Once the motor is ramped up, the soft starter can be bypassed.
When a start A control is received, the contactor A relay picks up and seals-in. This
provides power for the soft starter to start up and to drive the motor. The pre-contactor
relay (if any) is also picked up for the set Pre-Contactor Time. When the pre-contactor timer
times out, the contactor B relay is picked up signalling the soft starter to ramp the motor
up. When a stop control is received, the contactors A and B relays drop out, signalling the
soft starter to ramp down.
Forced starts (for example, external start) operate in the same fashion as other starts, with
the B contactor not calling for the soft starter to ramp until the pre-contactor timer times
out.
If up to speed feedback is not received from the soft starter via the contactor B status
within the Ramp Up Time setpoint during a start, a Drive Start Failed alarm is generated. If
soft starter speed feedback remains when the Ramp Down Time expires during a stop, a
Drive Stop Fail alarm is generated. Neither results in a trip or a stop. The Drive Start Failed
alarm is latched until reset.
The B Open Contactor Control Circuit and B Welded Contactor alarms implemented in the
start/stop control element are defeated when the soft starter is selected.
If the soft starter does not provide an up to speed feedback signal, the contactor B relay
contact or an auxiliary contact of the B contactor should be connected to the up to speed
feedback contact input to suppress spurious Drive Failed To Start alarms.
The Undervoltage Autorestart feature is disabled for the Soft Starter.
The following figure illustrates typical starter timing beginning from the stopped state.
Stop
Start A
Start B
Start A
Figure 9: Typical starter timing for the soft starter
Motor current
Contactor A relay
Contactor B relay
Pre-contactor
P
Starting
Running
Stopping
R
P = Pre-contactor time setting
R = Ramp Down time setting
853721A1.CDR
The following additional setpoints are available for the soft starter.
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Pre-Contactor Time
Range: 0 to 60 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 0 seconds
This setpoint specifies the time after a start command before the motor is started. Most
starters do not use this delay for forced starts such as external start. This setpoint is also
used by the inverter starter and the soft start starter to set the amount of time between
powering up an inverter or soft starter and sending the ramp-up command. An audible
or other warning signal can be activated in this interval by connecting the signal to a
contact output set to the pre-contactor function.
Ramp Up Time
Range: 0 to 125 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 1 second
This setpoint specifies the time after signalling the soft starter to ramp up that the up-tospeed feedback can be delayed without issuing a Drive Start Fail alarm.
Ramp Down Time
Range: 0 to 125 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 1 second
This setpoint specifies the time after signalling the soft starter to ramp down before the
main contactor is opened, cutting power to the starter. If speed feedback is still on when
this time expires, a Drive Stop Fail alarm is issued.
6.2.2 Current and voltage transformers
Select the Home > Setpoints > Config > CT-VT page to edit the current and voltage
transformer setpoints.
Figure 10: Typical current and voltage transformer setpoints window
The following setpoints are available to configure the current and voltage transformers.
Phase CT Type (Mandatory Setpoint)
Range: None, 1 A Secondary, 5 A Secondary, Direct Connect
Default: Direct Connect
This setpoint specifies the phase CT connection type. The “Direct Connect” value
indicates that no phase CTs are used; instead, motor phase current passes directly
through the relay. The “Direct Connect” selection should never be used where full load
current is greater than 5.0 amps.
If Direct Connect is selected and the FLA is set >5 A, a "FLA too high" message will be
displayed on the Status page.
NOTE:
NOTE
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CT Primary (Mandatory Setpoint)
Range: 5 to 1000 amps in steps of 1
Default: 5 amps
This setpoint specifies the phase CT primary current. It should never be less than the full
load current, and preferably no greater than twice than the full load current.
This setpoint is displayed only if the phase CT is selected to 1 A secondary or 5 A
secondary.
NOTE:
NOTE
High Speed CT Primary
Range: 5 to 1000 amps in steps of 1
Default: 5 amps
This setpoint specifies the phase CT primary current when the motor is running at high
speed. It should never be less than the high speed full load current, and preferably no
greater than twice than the high speed full load current.
This setpoint is displayed only if the phase CT is selected as 1 A secondary or 5 A
secondary and the motor starter type is two-speed.
NOTE:
NOTE
Ground CT Type
Range: None, Residual, CBCT 2000:1
Default: CBCT 2000:1
This setpoint specifies the type of ground CT. Select "Residual" if the fourth CT Input on
the IO_A is connected to the residual of the Phase CT. Select 2000:1 if a zero sequence CT
(CBCT) is connected to the ground input on the CPU card.
CT Primary Turns
Range: 1 to 10
Default: 1
For smaller motors where the drawn current is very low, the motor leads may be
wrapped through the CT Primary with several turns thereby increasing the current seen
by the MM300 and as a result increasing the accuracy of the measurement. The value
of this setting should equal the number of turns on the CT Primary to display the correct
current value. Internally the current measurement will be divided by this setting..
Three Phase Voltage Connection
Range: Wye, Delta
Default: Wye
The method in which the IO_B voltage inputs are connected must be entered here. Note
that phase reversal is disabled for single VT operation. All voltages are assumed
balanced.
Auxiliary Voltage Connection (Mandatory Setpoint)
Range: VabVT, VbcVT, VcaVT, VanVT, VbnVT, VcnVT, VanDirect, VbnDirect, VcnDirect
Default: Vab VT
This setpoint specifies the control transformer connection to the motor supply voltage.
Auxiliary VT Primary
Range: 110 to 690 volts in steps of 1
Default: 415 volts
This setpoint specifies the primary voltage rating of the control transformer.
Auxiliary VT Secondary
Range: 110 to 300 volts in steps of 1
Default: 110 volts
This setpoint specifies the secondary voltage rating of the control transformer.
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6.2.3 Inputs
The MM300 digital (contact) inputs are programmed in this menu. A typical input
configuration page is shown below.
Figure 11: Input configuration setpoint page
Inputs are automatically assigned based on typical wiring diagrams, shown in chapter 2,
when a pre-defined starter is selected.
NOTE:
NOTE
The following setpoints are available for each contact input:
Function
Range: Access Switch, Comms Permissive, Contactor A Status, Contactor B Status, Field
Permissive, Field Start A, Field Start B, Field Stop, Forward Limit, Hard Wired Permissive,
Hard Wired Start A, Hard Wired Start B, Hard Wired Stop, Interlock A, Interlock B, Interlock
C, Interlock D, Interlock E, Interlock F, Interlock G, Interlock H, Interlock I, Interlock J,
Lockout Reset, MCC Permissive, Remote Reset, Reverse Limit, Test Switch, U/V Restart
Inhibit, Auto/Manual Switch.
Default: None
6–14
–
“Access Switch”: This value represents an open contact that disables security
access of selected levels.
–
“Auto/Manual”: "Close" sets the auto mode. "Open" sets the manual mode.
–
“Comms Permissive”: This value represents an open contact that disables
communications control. Used by the auto/manual control element.
–
“Contactor A Status”: This value represents the normally open auxiliary contact of
contactor A. Used by the starters, the stop/start control element, and the system
trouble function. Automatically assigned to the first input when a starter type is
selected. Not otherwise user-programmable.
–
“Contactor B Status”: This value represents the normally open auxiliary contact of
contactor B. Used by the starters, the stop/start control element, and the system
trouble function. Automatically assigned to the second input when a reversing or
two-speed starter type is selected, and when the custom starter which uses this
input is selected. Not otherwise user assignable.
–
“Field Permissive”: This value represents an open contact which disables field
control. Used by the auto/manual control element.
–
“Field Start A”: This value represents a field-located manual switch requesting
contactor A pickup. Used by the auto/manual control element.
–
“Field Start B”: This value represents a field-located manual switch requesting
contactor B pickup. Used by the auto/manual control element.
–
“Field Stop”: This value represents a field-located manual switch where an open
position requests stop. Used by the auto/manual control element.
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–
“Forward Limit”: This value represents a contact which opens at the forward
travel limit. Used by the reversing starter type.
–
“Hard Wired Permissive”: This value represents an open contact that disables
hard-wired control. Used by the auto/manual control element.
–
“Hard Wired Start A”: This value represents an auto contact (typically from a PLC)
requesting contactor A pickup. Used by the auto/manual control element.
–
“Hard Wired Start B”: This value represents an auto contact (typically from a PLC)
requesting contactor B pickup. Used by the auto/manual control element.
–
“Hard Wired Stop”: This value represents an auto contact (typically from a PLC)
where the open position requests stop. Used by the auto/manual control element.
–
“Interlock A” to “Interlock J”: These value represent the contact inputs used by
process interlocks A through J, respectively.
–
“Lockout Reset”: This value represents a contact input used to reset lockout trips:
mechanical jam, ground fault and thermal overload.
–
“NA”: This value indicates the contact Input has no assigned function, though it
may still be used by the custom starter (FlexLogic™) if that starter type is selected.
–
“MCC Permissive”: This value represents an open contact that disables MCC
control. Used by the auto/manual control element.
–
“Remote Reset”: This value represents a contact input used to resets non-lockout
trips and alarms.
–
“Reverse Limit”: This value represents a contact which opens at the reverse travel
limit. Used by the reversing starter type.
–
“Test Switch”: This value represents a contact input used to suspend collection of
selected data items, override auto/manual modes, and cause interlocks to be
ignored.
–
“UV Restart Inhibit”: This value repesents a contact that disables undervoltage
restart feature when closed, and allows undervoltage restarts to take place when
open.
When Lockout Reset is used to reset a Thermal Overload, the Thermal Capacity % will be
reset to zero.
NOTE:
NOTE
6.2.4 Outputs
Contact inputs are designated by their card slot letter appended with their card terminal
number. Contact outputs, which have two or three terminals, use the first of their terminal
numbers. This is the same scheme as is used to form the relay terminal designation. A
typical contact output setpoint page is shown below.
Figure 12: Output configuration setpoint page
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The terminal designation is indicated under the “Terminal” column. The values in the first
column are determined from the installed option cards and cannot be edited.
When a starter type is selected, the first equipped contact output and the first equipped
contact input are forced to the contactor A relay function and the contactor A status
function, respectively. When the two-speed or reversing starter type is selected, the
second equipped contact output and the second equipped contact input are forced to the
contactor B relay function and the contactor B status function, respectively. Any prior
values for these setpoints are erased, and the setpoint becomes non-editable.
For contact outputs the Function setpoint determines which internal signal turns the
output on and off. A list of the setpoints options with descriptions is shown below. For
more information on a particular option, see the appropriate section in this manual.
•
"Contactor A Relay": This value represents an output contact that energizes contactor
A. It is used by the starters, the stop/start control element, and the system trouble
function, and automatically assigned to the first output when a starter type is
selected. Not otherwise user assignable.
•
"Contactor B Relay": This value represents an output contact that energizes contactor
B. It is used by the starters, the stop/start control element, and the system trouble
function, and automatically assigned to the second output when a reversing, twospeed, inverter, or soft starter type is selected, and when the custom starter is
selected and uses this output. Not otherwise user assignable.
•
FlexLogic™ operands: Any FlexLogic™ operand can be assigned to a contact output.
Select Home > Setpnts > CFG > Outputs > Trips to edit the Trips setpoints:
Figure 13: Output configuration setpoints trips page
Comm Trip
Range: N/A, C2, D1... D4 (order code dependent)
Default: N/A
This setting assigns the Comm Trip Available element to the desired contact output.
Select Home > Setpnts > CFG > Outputs > Ctrl to edit the Control setpoints:
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Figure 14: Output configuration setpoints control page
Drive Available
Range: N/A, C2, D1... D4 (order code dependent)
Default: N/A
This setting assigns the Drive Available element to the desired contact output.
Drive Available Manual
Range: N/A, C2, D1... D4 (order code dependent)
Default: N/A
This setting assigns the Drive Available Manual element to the desired contact output.
Drive Available Auto
Range: N/A, C2, D1... D4 (order code dependent)
Default: N/A
This setting assigns the Drive Available Auto element to the desired contact output.
Figure 15: Output configuration setpoints control page ctd.
Stop A
Range: N/A, C2, D1... D4 (order code dependent)
Default: N/A
This setting assigns the Stop A element to the desired contact output.
Stop B
Range: N/A, C2, D1... D4 (order code dependent)
Default: N/A
This setting assigns the Stop B element to the desired contact output.
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NOTE:
NOTE
CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
Stop A and Stop B are not included in the evaluation of the “Any Stop” element because
they are selective (direction/speed ). Flexlogic can be used to OR the condition for
waveform capture triggering if desired.
6.2.5 Communications setpoints
The MM300 has one RS485 serial communications port supporting a subset of the Modbus
protocol. An additional DeviceNet, Profibus, or Ethernet port is also available as an option.
Select the Home > Setpnts > Cfg > Comms page to edit the communications setpoints.
Figure 16: Communications setpoints page
The following setpoints are available.
Slave Address
Range: 1 to 254 in steps of 1
Default: 254
For RS485 communications, each MM300 IED must have a unique address from 1 to 254.
Address 0 is the broadcast address detected by all IEDs in the serial link. Addresses do
not have to be sequential, but no two units can have the same address or errors will
occur. Generally, each unit added to the link uses the next higher address starting at 1.
RS485 Baud Rate
Range: 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, or 115200 baud
Default: 115200 baud
This setpoint selects the baud rate for the RS485 port. The data frame is fixed at 1 start,
8 data, and 1 stop bits, while parity is optional.
DeviceNet MAC ID
Range: 0 to 63 in steps of 1
Default: 63
This setpoint specifies the dedicated MAC ID as per the DeviceNet design.
DeviceNet Baud Rate
Range: 125, 250, or 500 kbps
Default: 125 kbps
This setpoint selects the DeviceNet baud rate.
Ethernet IP Address
Range: standard IP address format
Default: 0.0.0.0
This setpoint specifies the dedicated IP address provided by the network administrator.
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When changing the IP address, power to the relay must be cycled in order for the new IP
address to become active.
NOTE:
NOTE
Ethernet Subnet Mask
Range: standard IP address format
Default: 255.255.252.0
This setpoint specifies the subnet IP mask provided by the network administrator.
Ethernet Gateway Address
Range: standard IP address format
Default: 0.0.0.0
This setpoint specifies the gateway IP address provided by the network administrator.
NTP Address
This setpoint is set to the IP address of the external clock source.
Profibus Address
Range: 1 to 125
Default: 125
Specifies the Profibus Slave address for this node.
Profibus Baud Rate
Range: 9600, 19200, 31250, 45450, 93750, 187500, 500K, 1.5M, Autodetect
Default: Autodetect*
Specifies the speed of communication for the Profibus inteface.
* Profibus communications will operate only in 1.5Mbps or auto-detect with the
presentimplementation. Auto-detect includes all listed baud rates.
Comms OK Evaluation
Range: Serial, Serial + Ethernet, Serial + Fieldbus, Ethernet, Fieldbus, Ethernet + Fieldbus,
All
Default: Serial
Specifies the operands for the Comms OK flag.
Comm Failure Trip
Range: Off, 5 to 25 step 5s
Default: Off
Specifies the time without comms before a trip will be generated.
Comm Failure Alarm
Range: Off, 5 to 25 step 5s
Default: Off
Specifies the time without comms before an alarm will be generated.
Timing delay commences after failure is detected.
NOTE:
NOTE
Change Mode on Comm Alarm
Range: Disabled, Enabled
Default: Disabled
If enabled, forces control mode to manual if comms are lost.
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6.2.6 System
Figure 17: System setpoint page
The following setpoints are available.
LED Colour Invert
Range: Red/Green, Green/Red
Default: Green/Red
When set Red/Green, the colour of Running LED is red, and the colour of the Stopped LED
is green. When set Green/Red the colour of the Running LED is green, and the colour of
the Stopped LED is red.
Tripped LED Flasher
Range: ON/YES, OFF/NO
Default: OFF/NO
This setpoint determines whether the Tripped LED flashes or is steadily illuminated when
there is a trip or lockout condition.
Self-Test Action
Range: Trip, Alarm
Default: Trip
This setpoint defines whether a self-test failure will cause a trip or an alarm.
For relay self-test, the MM300 runs a series of self-tests, including data and program
memory integrity and program execution watchdogs. If any of these tests fail, a self-test
trip or alarm is generated depending on the value of the setpoint.
Reset Lockout Using Reset Key
Range: Disabled/Enabled
Default: Disabled
If set to "enabled," the GCP/BCP reset key will perform a non-lockout and lockout reset.
When a Lockout Reset is used to reset a Thermal Overload, the Thermal Capacity % will
be reset to zero.
NOTE:
NOTE
Change Mode When Running
Range: Disabled/Enabled
Default: Enabled
If set to "enabled," the Auto/Manual mode can be changed while the motor is running.
Set Date
Set to program today’s date.
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Set Time
Set to program current time.
Time Offset from UTC
Range: -24 to +24 step 0.25
Default: 0.00
Enter the time in hours that your zone is off from Universal Time.
Daylight Savings
Range: Disabled/Enabled
Default: Disabled
Set to enable automatic time change based on the DS time setpoints.
Orange LED Intensity
Range: 1 to 6
Default: 1
Selects brightness level (1 to 6) for Control Panel LEDs.
Green LED Intensity
Range: 1 to 6
Default: 1
Selects brightness level (1 to 6) for Control Panel LEDs.
Red LED Intensity
Range: 1 to 6
Default: 1
Selects brightness level (1 to 6) for Control Panel LEDs.
User 1 LED Assignment, User 2 LED Assignment, User 3 LED Assignment
Range: any FlexLogic™ operand
Default: Not Set
Set to program the GCP/BCP user LEDs to follow an internal element.
USER 1 LED Color
Range: None, Red, Green, Orange
Default: Red
Selects the color of the USER 1 LED.
USER 2 LED Color
Range: None, Red, Green, Orange
Default: Red
Selects the color of the USER 2 LED.
USER 3 LED Color
Range: None, Red, Green, Orange
Default: Red
Selects the color of the USER 3 LED.
Screen Saver Feature
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Enabled
Screen saver will become active after five (5) minutes of LCD inactivity. The LCD will
switch off after this time interval. Timing is fixed.
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Phasor Display
Range: Leading, Lagging
Default: Lagging
The customer has the choice to display either lagging or leading phasor quantities.
6.2.7 Events
Figure 18: Events setpoint page
The following setpoints are available.
Event Recorder Function
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Enabled
Enables or disables the Event Recorder feature.
Recording of Trip Events
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Enabled
Enables or disables the recording of Trip events.
Recording of Alarm Events
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Enabled
Enables or disables the recording of Alarm events.
Recording of Control Events
Range: Disabled, Enabled
Default: Enabled
Enables or disables the recording of Control events.
Recording of Set Time/Date Events
Range: Disabled, Enabled
Default: Disabled
Enables or disables the recording of Time and Date storage events.
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6.2.8 Waveforms
Figure 19: Waveform setpoint page
The following setpoints are available:
Trigger Source
Range: Command, VO1 to VO32, Any Trip Pickup, Any Trip, Any Trip Dropout, Any Alarm
Pickup, Any Alarm, Any Alarm Dropout, Any Stop, Start A, Start B
Default: Command
Selects a trigger source. Command is always active. Flexlogic can be used to create
combinations of trigger sources.
Trigger Position
Range: 0 to 100% step 1%
Default: 0
Percentage of the sample buffer used for pretrigger samples.
Trigger Mode
Range: Retrigger, One-shot
Default: Retrigger
Determines whether or not the trigger data is overwritten with new trigger data.
Retrigger will overwrite the previous trigger data with the new trigger data. One-shot
mode will keep the current trigger data until a manual Clear command is sent.
6.2.9 Datalog
Figure 20: Datalog setpoint page
The following setpoints are available:
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Sample Rate
Range: 1 cycle, 1 second, 1 minute, 1 hour
Default: 1 second
Determines how often data is stored in the data log.
Continuous Mode
Range: Disabled, Enabled
Default: Disabled
Determines whether or not the trigger data is overwritten with new data. Enabled will
overwrite the previous trigger data with new trigger data. When Disabled, the data log
will run until filled with 256 samples. Continuous Mode should be used when the data is
stored externally by a polling system. The sample rate should be chosen to match the
poll rate of the external program.
Trigger Position
Range: 0 to 100% steps of 1%
Default: 25%
Percentage of the sample buffer used for pretrigger samples.
Trigger Source
Range: Command, VO1 to VO32, Any Trip Pickup, Any Trip, Any Trip Dropout, Any Alarm
Pickup, Any Alarm, Any Alarm Dropout, Any Stop, Start A, Start B
Default: Command
Selects a trigger source. Command is always active. Flexlogic can be used to create
combinations of trigger sources.
Channel 1 Source
Range: Disabled, Phase A Current, Phase B Current, Phase C Current, Average Phase
Current, Motor Load, Current Unbalance, Ground Current, System Frequency, Vab, Vbc,
Vca, Van, Vbn, Vcn, Power Factor, Real Power (kW), Reactive Power (kvar), Apparent Power
(kVA), Positive Watthours, Positive Varhours, Hottest Stator RTD, Thermal Capacity Used,
RTD #1, RTD #2, RTD #3, RTD #4, RTD #5, RTD #6
Default: Disabled
Selects the data to be stored for each sample of the data log channel.
Sources and Defaults for Channels 2 to 10 are the same as those for Channel 1.
NOTE:
NOTE
6.2.10 Counters
Figure 21: Counters setpoint page
The following setpoints are available:
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Drive Greasing Inteval
Range: 100 to 50000 hours in steps of 100 hours, or OFF
Default: OFF
Enter the interval at which the motor bearings must be lubricated. When the motor
running time exceeds this setpoint, a motor greasing interval alarm is generated. To
clear the "Motor Running Hours," use the "Clear Maintenance Timers" command and
start the motor. If this feature is not required, set this setpoint to OFF.
Contactor Inspection Interval
Range: 100 to 64900 operations in steps of 100 operations, or OFF
Default: OFF
Enter the interval after which the contactor contacts must be inspected for wear. When
the Number of Starts counter exceeds this setpoint, a contactor inspection interval
alarm is generated. To clear the "Number of Motor Starts," use the "Clear Counters"
command. If this feature is not required, set this setpoint to OFF.
Max Motor Stopped Time
Range: 10 to 10000 hours in steps of 10 hours, or OFF
Default: OFF
Enter the maximum interval during which the motor can be left not running. When the
Motor Stopped Time exceeeds this setpoint, a maximum motor stopped time alarm is
generated. To clear the "Motor Stopped Hours," use the "Clear Maintenance Timers"
command, and stop the motor. If this feature is not required, set this setpoint to OFF.
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6.3 Protection elements
6.3.1 Thermal protection
The primary protective function of the MM300 is the thermal model. The MM300 integrates
stator and rotor heating into a single model. The rate of motor heating is gauged by
measuring the terminal currents. The present value of the accumulated motor heating is
maintained in the Thermal Capacity Used actual value register. When the motor is in
overload, the motor temperature and thermal capacity used will rise. A trip occurs when
the thermal capacity used reaches 100%. When the motor is stopped and is cooling to
ambient, the thermal capacity used decays to zero. If the motor is running normally, the
motor temperature will eventually stabilize at some steady state temperature, and the
thermal capacity used increases or decreases to some corresponding intermediate value,
which accounts for the reduced amount of thermal capacity left to accommodate
transient overloads.
The thermal model consists of six key elements.
•
Unbalance current biasing that accounts for negative-sequence heating.
•
Hot/cold biasing that accounts for normal temperature rise.
•
RTD biasing that accounts for ambient variation and cooling problems
•
An overload curve that accounts for the rapid heating that occurs during stall,
acceleration, and overload.
•
Cooling rate that accounts for heat dissipation.
•
Thermal protection reset that controls recovery from thermal trips and lockouts.
Each of these categories are described in the following sub-sections.
6.3.1.1 Unbalance biasing
Unbalanced phase currents (that is, negative-sequence currents) cause rotor heating in
addition to the normal heating caused by positive-sequence currents. When the motor is
running, the rotor rotates in the direction of the positive-sequence MMF wave at near
synchronous speed. The induced rotor currents are at a frequency determined by the
difference between synchronous speed and rotor speed, typically 2 to 4 Hz. At these low
frequencies the current flows equally in all parts of the rotor bars, right down to the inside
portion of the bars at the bottom of the slots. On the other hand, negative-sequence stator
current causes an MMF wave with a rotation opposite to rotor rotation, which induces
rotor current with a frequency approximately two times the line frequency (100 Hz for a
50 Hz system or 120 Hz for a 60 Hz system.) The skin effect at this frequency restricts the
rotor current to the outside portion of the bars at the top of the slots, causing a significant
increase in rotor resistance and therefore significant additional rotor heating. This extra
heating is not accounted for in the thermal limit curves supplied by the motor
manufacturer, as these curves assume only positive-sequence currents from a perfectly
balanced supply and balanced motor construction.
To account for this additional heating, the MM300 allows for the thermal model to be
biased with negative-sequence current. This biasing is accomplished by using an
equivalent motor heating current rather than the simple motor terminal current (Iavg). This
equivalent current is calculated as shown in the following equation.
æI ö
Ieq = Iavg ´ 1 + k ´ çç 2 ÷÷
è I1 ø
2
Eq. 1
In the above equation:
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PROTECTION ELEMENTS
•
Ieq represents the equivalent motor heating current in per-unit values on an FLA base.
•
Iavg represents the average RMS current at each motor terminals in per-unit values on
an FLA base.
•
I2 / I1 represents the negative-sequence to positive-sequence current ratio.
•
k represents the value of the Unbalance K Factor setpoint, used to adjust the degree of
unbalance biasing.
The value for k may be estimated as follows.
k=
175
230
(typical estimate); k = 2 (conservative estimate)
2
ILR
ILR
Eq. 2
In the above equation, ILR represents the locked rotor current in per-unit values on an FLA
base.
If a k value of 0 is entered, the unbalance biasing is defeated and the overload curve will
time out against the average per-unit motor current.
The following figure shows recommended motor derating as a function of voltage
unbalance recommended by NEMA (the National Electrical Manufacturers Association). To
illustrate the MM300 unbalance biasing, assume a typical induction motor with an inrush
of 6 × FLA and a negative-sequence impedance of 0.167. With this impedance, voltage
unbalances of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5% on the motor terminals will result in current unbalances of
6, 12, 18, 24, and 30%, respectively. Based on these assumptions, the derating resulting
from the MM300 unbalance biasing for different values of k is as illustrated in the GE
Multilin curve below. Note that the curve for k = 8 is almost identical to the NEMA derating
curve.
Figure 22: Motor derating factor due to unbalanced voltage
GE Multilin
NEMA
1.0
Derating factor
Derating factor
1.0
0.9
0.8
k=2
0.9
k=4
k=6
0.8
k=8
k=10
0.7
0.7
0
1
2
3
4
5
Voltage unbalance (%)
0
1
2
3
4
5
Voltage unbalance (%)
853729A1.CDR
6.3.1.2 Hot/cold biasing
When the motor is running with a constant load below the overload level, the motor will
eventually reach a steady state temperature, which corresponds to a particular steadystate thermal capacity used. As some thermal capacity is used, there is less thermal
capacity left in the motor to cover transient overloads than is available when the motor is
cold. Typically, the extent of this effect is calculated by taking the ratio of the motor's rated
hot safe stall time to its rated cold safe stall time. The safe stall time (also known as locked
rotor time) is the time taken with the rotor not turning for the motor to heat to a
temperature beyond which motor damage occurs at an unacceptable rate. The term 'cold'
refers to starting off with the motor at ambient temperature, while 'hot' refers to starting
off with the motor at the temperature reached when running at rated load. The method
the thermal model uses to account for the pre-overload state is thus known as hot/cold
biasing.
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The MM300 calculates the steady-state thermal capacity used according to the following
equation.
TCUSS = Ieq ´ (100% - HCR )
Eq. 3
In the above equation:
•
TCUSS represents the steady-state thermal capacity used expressed as a percentage.
•
Ieq represents the equivalent motor heating current in per-unit values on an FLA base.
Refer to unbalance biasing for additional details.
•
HCR represents the value of the Hot/Cold Safe Stall Ratio setpoint expressed as a
percentage.
If a Hot/Cold Safe Stall Ratio value of 100% is entered, the hot/cold biasing is defeated, and
unless RTD biasing is deployed, the thermal model will operate as if the motor was cold
prior to overload.
6.3.1.3 RTD biasing
The thermal model can operate based solely on measured current and the assumption of
rated ambient and normal motor cooling, as described earlier. However, if the ambient
temperature is unusually high, or motor cooling is blocked, the motor will have a nonmodeled temperature increase. The RTD biasing feature can correct for this by forcing the
Thermal Capacity Used register up to the value appropriate to the temperature of the
hottest stator RTD. Since RTDs are relatively slow, the rest of the thermal model is still
required during starting and heavy overload conditions when motor heating is relatively
fast. Thus the RTD bias feature does not prevent the thermal capacity used value from
rising above the value appropriate to the RTD temperature.
The value of the Thermal Capacity Used register appropriate to the RTD temperature is
determined by the straight line segmented curve shown in the following figure. This curve
is characterized by minimum, center, and maximum temperature values, and by the hot/
cold ratio value.
The RTD bias feature alone cannot create a trip. If the RTD bias forces thermal capacity
used to 100%, the motor current must be above FLA before an overload trip can occur.
NOTE:
NOTE
Figure 23: RTD bias curve
40%
RTD Bias - Center T
60%
RTD Bias - Maximum T
80%
RTD Bias - Minimum T
Appropriate thermal capacity used
100%
20%
100% - Hot/Cold Ratio
0%
0
50
100
150
200
Hottest stator RTD temperature (°C)
853730A1.CDR
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MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
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PROTECTION ELEMENTS
6.3.1.4 Overload curve
The overload curve accounts for the rapid motor heating that occurs during stall,
acceleration, and overload. Specifically, the overload curve controls the rate of increase of
Thermal Capacity Used whenever the equivalent motor heating current is greater than
1.01 times the full load current setpoint. The curve is defined by the following equation and
reflects that overload heating largely swamps the cooling, and this heating is primarily due
to resistive losses in the stator and the rotor windings (said losses being proportional to the
square of the current).
Trip time =
Curve Multiplier ´ 2.2116623
2
0.02530337 x (Pickup - 1) + 0.05054758 x (Pickup -1)
Eq. 4
In the above equation,
•
The trip time represents the time (in seconds) for the MM300 to trip, given the motor
starts cold and the current is constant.
•
The multiplier represents the value of the Curve Multiplier setpoint. This setpoint can
be used to adjust the curve to match the thermal characteristics of the motor.
•
Ieq represents the equivalent motor heating current in per-unit values on a full load
current base. The value of Ieq is limited in this equation to 8.0 to prevent the overload
from acting as an instantaneous element and responding to short circuits. Equivalent
motor heating current is discussed in the Unbalance biasing section.
For example, a motor with a stall current (also known as locked rotor current) of 8 times its
FLA, with a curve multiplier of 7, if stalled from a cold state, trips in the following amount of
time.
Trip time =
=
Curve Multiplier ´ 2.2116623
2
0.02530337 x (Pickup - 1) + 0.05054758 x (Pickup -1)
7 ´ 2.2116623
2
0.02530337 x (8 - 1) + 0.05054758 x (8 -1)
= 9.714 seconds
Eq. 5
This would respect a safe stall cold time of 10 seconds.
The standard overload curves are displayed below.
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PROTECTION ELEMENTS
CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
Figure 24: Standard overload curves
100000
TIME IN SECONDS
10000
1000
100
x15
10
x1
1.00
0.10
1.00
10
100
MULTIPLE OF FULL LOAD AMPS
1000
806804A5.CDR
The trip times for the standard overload curves are tabulated below.
6–30
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
PROTECTION ELEMENTS
Table 1: Standard overload curve trip times (in seconds)
PICKUP STANDARD CURVE MULTIPLIERS
(× FLA)
×1
×2
×3
×4
×5
×6
×7
×8
×9
× 10
× 11
× 12
× 13
× 14
× 15
1.01
4353.6
8707.2
13061
17414
21768
26122
30475
34829
39183
43536
47890
52243
56597
60951
65304
1.05
853.71
1707.4
2561.1
3414.9
4268.6
5122.3
5976.0
6829.7
7683.4
8537.1
9390.8
10245
11098
11952
12806
1.10
416.68
833.36
1250.0
1666.7
2083.4
2500.1
2916.8
3333.5
3750.1
4166.8
4583.5
5000.2
5416.9
5833.6
6250.2
1.20
198.86
397.72
596.58
795.44
994.30
1193.2
1392.0
1590.9
1789.7
1988.6
2187.5
2386.3
2585.2
2784.1
2982.9
1.30
126.80
253.61
380.41
507.22
634.02
760.82
887.63
1014.4
1141.2
1268.0
1394.8
1521.6
1648.5
1775.3
1902.1
1.40
91.14
182.27
273.41
364.55
455.68
546.82
637.96
729.09
820.23
911.37
1002.5
1093.6
1184.8
1275.9
1367.0
1.50
69.99
139.98
209.97
279.96
349.95
419.94
489.93
559.92
629.91
699.90
769.89
839.88
909.87
979.86
1049.9
1.75
42.41
84.83
127.24
169.66
212.07
254.49
296.90
339.32
381.73
424.15
466.56
508.98
551.39
593.81
636.22
2.00
29.16
58.32
87.47
116.63
145.79
174.95
204.11
233.26
262.42
291.58
320.74
349.90
379.05
408.21
437.37
2.25
21.53
43.06
64.59
86.12
107.65
129.18
150.72
172.25
193.78
215.31
236.84
258.37
279.90
301.43
322.96
2.50
16.66
33.32
49.98
66.64
83.30
99.96
116.62
133.28
149.94
166.60
183.26
199.92
216.58
233.24
249.90
2.75
13.33
26.65
39.98
53.31
66.64
79.96
93.29
106.62
119.95
133.27
146.60
159.93
173.25
186.58
199.91
3.00
10.93
21.86
32.80
43.73
54.66
65.59
76.52
87.46
98.39
109.32
120.25
131.19
142.12
153.05
163.98
3.25
9.15
18.29
27.44
36.58
45.73
54.87
64.02
73.16
82.31
91.46
100.60
109.75
118.89
128.04
137.18
3.50
7.77
15.55
23.32
31.09
38.87
46.64
54.41
62.19
69.96
77.73
85.51
93.28
101.05
108.83
116.60
3.75
6.69
13.39
20.08
26.78
33.47
40.17
46.86
53.56
60.25
66.95
73.64
80.34
87.03
93.73
100.42
4.00
5.83
11.66
17.49
23.32
29.15
34.98
40.81
46.64
52.47
58.30
64.13
69.96
75.79
81.62
87.45
4.25
5.12
10.25
15.37
20.50
25.62
30.75
35.87
41.00
46.12
51.25
56.37
61.50
66.62
71.75
76.87
4.50
4.54
9.08
13.63
18.17
22.71
27.25
31.80
36.34
40.88
45.42
49.97
54.51
59.05
63.59
68.14
4.75
4.06
8.11
12.17
16.22
20.28
24.33
28.39
32.44
36.50
40.55
44.61
48.66
52.72
56.77
60.83
5.00
3.64
7.29
10.93
14.57
18.22
21.86
25.50
29.15
32.79
36.43
40.08
43.72
47.36
51.01
54.65
5.50
2.99
5.98
8.97
11.96
14.95
17.94
20.93
23.91
26.90
29.89
32.88
35.87
38.86
41.85
44.84
6.00
2.50
5.00
7.49
9.99
12.49
14.99
17.49
19.99
22.48
24.98
27.48
29.98
32.48
34.97
37.47
6.50
2.12
4.24
6.36
8.48
10.60
12.72
14.84
16.96
19.08
21.20
23.32
25.44
27.55
29.67
31.79
7.00
1.82
3.64
5.46
7.29
9.11
10.93
12.75
14.57
16.39
18.21
20.04
21.86
23.68
25.50
27.32
7.50
1.58
3.16
4.75
6.33
7.91
9.49
11.08
12.66
14.24
15.82
17.41
18.99
20.57
22.15
23.74
8.00
1.39
2.78
4.16
5.55
6.94
8.33
9.71
11.10
12.49
13.88
15.27
16.65
18.04
19.43
20.82
The following tables illustrate the relation between GE Multilin MM2 and MM3 curve
numbers, NEMA curves, and the MM300 curve multipliers.
Table 2: MM2 and MM3 curve numbers and MM300 curve multipliers
MM2 and MM3 curve number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
MM300 curve multiplier
1
2
3
4
7
9
12
15
Table 3: NEMA curves and MM300 curve multipliers
NEMA curve
Class 10
Class 15
Class 20
Class 30
MM300 curve multiplier
4
6
8
12
6.3.1.5 Cooling rate
The model causes the thermal capacity used to decrease exponentially when the steadystate thermal capacity used value is less than the actual thermal capacity used. This
simulates motor cooling. As a stopped motor normally cools significantly slower than a
running motor, the relay has two cooling time constant setpoints, one used when the
motor is off (stopped, tripped, locked out, pre-contactor, etc.), the other used when the
motor is on (starting, running, stopping). In each case, the time constant is time in minutes
for the motor temperature to cool by 63% of the difference between the initial
temperature and ambient temperature.
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Figure 25: Thermal model cooling following a trip at t = 0
100%
63%
Thermal capacity used
75%
50%
Cool time constant = 30 minutes
25%
0%
0
30
60
90
120
150
180
Time (minutes)
853732A1.CDR
6.3.1.6 Thermal protection reset
Operating at the thermal model protection limit is a serious event, and results in a lockout
that can not be reset until the motor has cooled, except with a level 2 or level 3 security
login. A setpoint is available (Minimize Reset Time - see section 6.3.1) that controls whether
lockout persists until the motor has cooled until the thermal capacity used reaches 15%
(approximately twice the cool time stopped setpoint), or until the relay estimates based on
learned thermal capacity used on start that the motor has cooled sufficiently for a
successful restart. For the latter, a 2% safety margin is included. While in lockout, the
motor can not be started via the MM300. Refer to section 6.4.2 - Thermal Start Inhibit, for
details.
If the motor is re-started it may re-trip quickly. Should process interruption concerns
outweigh the probable damage to the motor that early starting would incur, an external
circuit should be added that bypasses the relay to directly close the motor contactor.
A second setpoint controls whether once the motor has cooled as described above, the
lockout is replaced with a trip that can be manually reset without security login, or
alternatively the condition is fully reset allowing immediate restart.
NOTE:
NOTE
When the "Reset Lockout Using Reset Key" setpoint is set to "Enabled," pressing the Reset
key will reset all Lockout and Non-Lockout trips. When a Lockout Reset is used to reset a
Thermal Overload, the Thermal Capacity % will be reset to zero.
6.3.1.7 Thermal protection setpoints
Select the Home > Setpoints > Protection > Thermal page to edit the thermal protection
setpoints.
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MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
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PROTECTION ELEMENTS
Figure 26: Thermal protection configuration setpoints
The following setpoints are available for thermal protection.
Standard Overload Curve
Range: 1 to 15 in steps of 1
Default: 4
This setpoint specifies the standard overload curve to the thermal characteristics of the
protected motor.
Unbalance K Factor
Range: 0 to 19 in steps of 1
Default: 0
This setpoint specifies the degree of unbalance biasing used by the thermal model. A
value of “0” disables the unbalance bias feature.
Hot/Cold Safe Stall Ratio
Range: 1 to 100% in steps of 1
Default: 75%
This setpoint is used to control the hot/cold bias and RTD bias features. It specifies the
ratio of the rated hot safe stall time to the rated cold safe stall time as a percentage. A
value of “100%” disables the hot/cold bias feature.
Cool Time Constant Stopped
Range: 1 to 1000 minutes in steps of 1
Default: 30 minutes
This setpoint specifies the cooling time constant used by the thermal model when the
motor is stopped. Enter the time in minutes for the temperature to cool by 63% of the
difference between the initial value and ambient when the motor is stationary.
Cool Time Constant Running
Range: 1 to 1000 minutes in steps of 1
Default: 15 minutes
This setpoint specifies the cooling time constant used by the thermal model when the
motor is running. Enter the time in minutes for the temperature to cool by 63% of the
difference between the initial value and ambient when the motor is at speed.
RTD Bias - Minimum T
Range: 0 to 250°C in steps of 1 or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the stator RTD temperature appropriate for a thermal capacity
used value of zero. If RTD bias is to be deployed, enter the rated ambient temperature. A
value of “0” or a value greater than the RTD Bias – Center T setpoint disables the RTD bias
feature.
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RTD Bias - Center T
Range: 0 to 250°C in steps of 1 or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the stator RTD temperature appropriate for a thermal capacity
used value of 100% – Hot/Cold Ratio. If RTD bias is to be deployed, enter the rated full
load motor running temperature. A value of “0” or a value greater than the RTD Bias –
Maximum T setpoint disables the RTD bias feature.
RTD Bias - Maximum T
Range: 0 to 250°C in steps of 1 or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the stator RTD temperature appropriate for a thermal capacity
used value of 100%. If RTD bias is to be deployed, enter the stator insulation
temperature rating. A value of “0” or a value greater than the RTD Bias – Center T
setpoint disables the RTD bias feature.
Minimize Reset Time
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Disabled
When set to “Disabled”, the lockout condition following a thermal protection operation
will persist until the thermal capacity used has dropped to 15%. When set to “Enabled”,
the lockout persists until the thermal capacity used has dropped to 2% below the
learned thermal capacity used at start (refer to the Thermal Start Inhibit for details).
Overload Reset Mode
Range: Manual, Auto
Default: Manual
If this setpoint value is “Auto”, an automatic reset of overload lockouts occurs after the
motor has cooled as described above. When set to “Manual”, the lockouts are replaced
with trips when the motor cools, the trips must be reset by the control panel, by remote
contact or by communications before the motor can be restarted.
Thermal Capacity Alarm Level
Range: 10 to 100% in steps of 1 or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the amount of thermal capacity used, equal to or above that at
which the thermal level alarm is issued.
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PROTECTION ELEMENTS
6.3.2 Mechanical protection
Select the Home > Setpoints > Protection > Mech page to edit the mechanical protection
setpoints.
Figure 27: Mechanical protection configuration setpoints
The mechanical protection setpoints are divided into the following categories.
•
Mechanical jam
•
Undercurrent protection
•
Underpower protection
•
Acceleration protection
•
Open control circuit trip.
The setpoints applicable to each of these categories are described in the following
sections.
6.3.2.1 Mechanical jam
After the motor has started and reached a running state, the mechanical jam element (if
enabled) produces a trip when the magnitude of Ia, Ib, or Ic reaches or exceeds the pickup
level for the time specified by the Mechanical Jam Delay setpoint. This feature may be used
to indicate a stall condition when running. Not only does it protect the motor by taking it
off-line faster than the thermal model (overload curve), it may also prevent or limit damage
to the driven equipment if motor starting torque persists on jammed or broken equipment.
The Mechanical Jam Level should be set higher than motor loading during normal
operation, but lower than the motor stall level. Normally the delay is set to the minimum
time delay or to avoid nuisance trips due to momentary load fluctuations.
The following setpoints are available for the mechanical jam element.
Mechanical Jam Level
Range: 1.01 to 4.50 × FLA in steps of 0.01 or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the current pickup level. Set this value to “OFF” to disable
mechanical jam protection.
Mechanical Jam Delay
Range: 0.1 to 30.0 seconds in steps of 0.1
Default: 0.1 seconds
This setpoint specifies the time that the motor current must reach or exceed pickup to
generate a mechanical jam trip.
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6.3.2.2 Undercurrent protection
When the motor is in the running state, a trip or alarm will occur should the magnitude Ia,
Ib, or Ic fall below the pickup level for the time specified by the Undercurrent Alarm Delay.
The pickup levels should be set lower than the lowest motor loading during normal
operations.
The following setpoints are available for the undercurrent protection element.
Undercurrent Trip Level
Range: 1 to 100% of FLA or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the undercurrent trip pickup level. A value of “OFF” disables the
undercurrent trip function.
Undercurrent Trip Delay
Range: 1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 1 second
This setpoint specifies the time that the motor current must exceed pickup to generate a
trip.
Undercurrent Alarm Level
Range: 1 to 100% of FLA or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the undercurrent alarm pickup level. A value of “OFF” disables the
undercurrent alarm function.
Undercurrent Alarm Delay
Range: 1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 1 seconds
This setpoint represents the time that the motor current must exceed pickup to generate
an alarm.
For example, if a pump is cooled by the liquid it pumps, loss-of-load may mean that the
pump overheats. In this case, the undercurrent feature is enabled. To prevent motor
loading from falling below 0.75 × FLA, even for short durations, the Undercurrent Trip Level
could be set to “70%” and the Undercurrent Alarm Level to “75%”. The Undercurrent Trip
Delay and Undercurrent Alarm Delay setpoints are typically set as quick as possible (that is,
1 second).
6.3.2.3 Underpower protection
Underpower protection is available whether or not a type I0_B module (3 x VT) is included
in the order code. When this option is included, the power is calculated using the voltages
connected to this card. When this option is not included, the power is calculated using the
auxiliary voltage and assumes that the missing voltages are balanced.
When the motor is in the running state, a trip or alarm will occur if the magnitude of the
real power falls below the pickup level for the time specified by the Underpower Alarm
Delay setpoint. The pickup levels should be less than the lowest motor loading during
normal operations.
Setpoint levels are a percentage of MNR, where MNR is the "Motor Rating Setpoint."
The following setpoints are available for the underpower protection feature.
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PROTECTION ELEMENTS
Underpower Trip Level
Range: 1 to 100% MNR in steps of 1 or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the underpower trip pickup level. A value of “OFF” disables the
underpower trip function.
Underpower Trip Delay
Range: 1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 1 second
The setpoint specifies the amount of time the motor power must meet or exceed the trip
pickup level to generate a trip.
Underpower Alarm Level
Range: 1 to 100% MNR in steps of 1 or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the underpower alarm pickup level. A value of “OFF” disables the
underpower alarm function.
Underpower Alarm Delay
Range: 1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 1 second
The setpoint specifies the amount of time the motor current must exceed the alarm
pickup level to generate an alarm.
For example, underpower may be used to detect loss-of-load conditions. A loss-of-load
condition will not always cause a significant loss of current. Power is a more accurate
representation of loading and may be used for more sensitive detection of load loss or
pump cavitation. This may be especially useful for detecting process related problems.
6.3.2.4 Acceleration protection
The thermal model protects the motor under both starting and overload conditions. The
acceleration timer trip may be used to complement this protection. For example, if the
motor always starts in 2 seconds, but the safe stall time is 8 seconds, there is no point
letting the motor remain in a stall condition for the 7 or 8 seconds it would take for the
thermal model to operate. Furthermore, the starting torque applied to the driven
equipment for that period of time could cause severe damage.
If enabled, the acceleration protection will trip if the motor stays in the starting state and
does not reach the running state by the set acceleration time.
The acceleration protection setpoints and logic are described below.
Acceleration Alarm Timer(s)
Range: 0.5 to 250.0 seconds in steps of 0.1 or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the maximum acceleration time before alarming. A value of “OFF”
disables the acceleration protection alarm.
Acceleration Trip Timer(s)
Range: 0.5 to 250.0 seconds in steps of 0.1 or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the maximum acceleration time before tripping. A value of “OFF”
disables acceleration protection tripping.
Open Control Circuit Trip
Range: Enable, Disable
Set to Enable if the MM300 should trip when an open control circuit is detected.
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CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
6.3.3 Electrical protection
6.3.3.1 Current unbalance protection
When an unbalance or phase current exceeds the setpoints, an alarm or trip condition is
generated.
The calculation method is as follows:
If IAV ≥ IFLA : UB% =
|IM - IAV|
× 100%
IAV
If IAV ≤ IFLA : UB% =
|IM - IAV|
× 100%
IFLA
Where:
IAV = average phase current
IM = current in a phase with maximum deviation from IAV
IFLA = MOTOR FULL LOAD CURRENT setpoint
Current Unbalance Trip Level
Range: 4 to 40%, in steps of 1, or OFF
Default: 30%
This setpoint specifies the current unbalance trip pickup level. A value of “OFF” disables
the current unbalance trip function.
Current Unbalance Trip Delay
Range: 1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 1 second
This setpoint specifies the time the motor unbalance current must meet or exceed
pickup to generate a trip.
Current Unbalance Alarm Level
Range: 4 to 40%, in steps of 1, or OFF
Default: 15%
This setpoint specifies the current unbalance alarm pickup level. A value of “OFF”
disables the current unbalance alarm function.
Current Unbalance Alarm Delay
Range: 1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 1 second
This setpoint specifies the time the motor unbalance current must meet or exceed
pickup to generate an alarm.
6.3.3.2 Ground fault protection
When motor stator windings become wet or otherwise suffer insulation deterioration, low
magnitude leakage currents often precede complete failure and resultant destructive fault
currents. Ground fault protection provides early detection of such leakage current,
allowing the motor to be taken offline in time to limit motor damage. However, if a high
magnitude ground fault occurs that is beyond the capability of the contactor to interrupt,
it is desirable to wait for the fuses or an upstream device to provide the interruption.
The ground fault protection will alarm or trip when the ground current magnitude meets or
exceeds the pickup for the specified time, provided that the maximum phase current is less
than 8 × FLA. When used with a core-balance CT, this protection becomes a sensitive
ground fault protection.
A ground fault trip is a serious event, and therefore results in a lockout that can not be
reset until the motor has cooled except with a level 2 or level 3 security login.
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NOTE:
NOTE
The ground fault protection pickup setpoints are entered in %FLA if the Ground CT setpoint
is selected as "Residual," or in units of primary amps if a 50:0.025 core balance CT is used
and the ground CT is selected as “CBCT 2000:1”.
Various situations (for example, contactor bounce) may cause transient ground currents
during motor starting that exceed the ground fault pickup levels for a very short period of
time. The delay can be fine-tuned to an application so it still responds very quickly, but
rides through normal operational disturbances. Normally, the ground fault time delays are
set as short as possible, that is, 0 ms. Time may have to be increased if nuisance tripping
occurs.
Special care must be taken when the ground input is wired to the phase CTs in a residual
connection. When a motor starts, the starting current (typically 6 × FLA for an induction
motor) has an asymmetrical or DC component. This momentary DC component will cause
each of the phase CTs to react differently, and cause a net current into the ground input of
the relay.
The following setpoints are available for the ground fault protection element.
[Path: Home > Setpoints > Protection > Electrical]
Ground Trip Level
Range: 10 to 100% FLA in steps of 1%, or OFF, when Ground CT type is set to "Residual"
Range: 0.5 to 15.0 A in steps of 0.1 A, when Ground CT type is set to "CBCT 2000:1"
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the ground fault trip pickup level. A value of “OFF” disables the
ground fault trip function.
Ground Trip Delay on Start
Range: 0.0 to 10.0 s in steps of 0.1 s
Default: 0.0 s
This setpoint specifies the time that the motor ground fault current must meet or exceed
pickup to generate a ground fault trip when the motor is in a starting condition.
Ground Trip Delay on Run
Range: 0.0 to 5.0 s in steps of 0.1 s
Default: 0.0 s
This setpoint specifies the time that the motor ground fault current must meet or exceed
pickup to generate a ground fault trip when the motor is in a running condition.
Ground Alarm Level
Range: 10 to 100% FLA in steps of 1%, or OFF, when Ground CT type is set to "Residual"
Range: 0.5 to 15.0 A in steps of 0.1 A, when Ground CT type is set to "CBCT 2000:1"
Default: OFF
The setpoint specifies the ground fault alarm pickup level. A value of “OFF” disables the
ground fault alarm function.
Ground Alarm Delay on Start
Range: 0 to 60 s in steps of 1 s
Default: 10 s
This setpoint specifies the time that the motor ground fault current must meet or exceed
pickup to generate a ground fault alarm.
Ground Alarm Delay on Run
Range: 0 to 60 s in steps of 1 s
Default: 10 s
This setpoint specifies the time that the motor ground fault current must meet or exceed
pickup to generate a ground fault alarm.
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6.3.3.3 Load increase alarm
The load increase alarm is used to alarm abnormal load increases that may indicate
problems with the process. An alarm is enabled only after the acceleration phase is
complete and the motor has entered the running phase, and then only if the current has
fallen below the set pickup or one minute has elapsed. Once enabled, the alarm is
generated when the current exceeds the set pickup, and automatically resets when the
current has subsided.
The following setpoints are available.
[Path: Home > Setpoints > Protection > Electrical]
Load Increase Alarm Level
Range: 50 to 150% of FLA in steps of 1, or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the load increase alarm pickup level. A value of “OFF” disables the
load increase alarm.
6.3.3.4 Phase undervoltage
An undervoltage on a running motor with a constant load results in increased current. The
relay thermal model typically picks up this condition and provides adequate protection.
However, the phase undervoltage element may be used to provide for an advance warning
alarm and/or for tripping before the motor has heated.
In some motor manager relays, the undervoltage feature is used for additional conditions.
Instead, the MM300 uses the undervoltage restart element to handle loss of supply, and
the fuse fail element to cover main and VT fuse failure.
The element generates alarms or trips when any of the three phase-to-phase voltages
meets or falls below the pickup level.
Phase undervoltage protection is available only when a type B option card (3 × VT) is
included in the order code.
NOTE:
NOTE
The following setpoints are available.
[Path: Home > Setpoints > Protection > Electrical]
Undervoltage Alarm Level
Range: 60 to 99% of MNV in steps of 1, or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the phase undervoltage alarm pickup level as a percentage of the
rated voltage.
Undervoltage Alarm Delay
Range: 1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1second
Default: 30 seconds
This setpoint specifies the time that the voltage must be less than or equal to, the
undervoltage alarm pickup level to generate an alarm.
Undervoltage Trip Level
Range: 60 to 99% of MNV in steps of 1, or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the phase undervoltage trip pickup level as a percentage of the
rated voltage.
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Undervoltage Trip Delay
Range: 1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1 second
Default: 30 seconds
This setpoint specifies the time that the voltage must be less than or equal to, the
undervoltage trip level to generate a trip.
6.3.3.5 Auxiliary undervoltage
Undervoltage on the motor supply can present problems for both starting and running the
motor. The phase undervoltage element may be used to protect against these problems,
however it requires the 3 × VT input option B card to be installed. The auxiliary
undervoltage element may be used if there is no installed option B card, the relay auxiliary
VT input is derived from the motor supply, and where errors introduced by the control
power transformer can be tolerated.
The following setpoints are available for the auxiliary undervoltage protection element.
[Path: Home > Setpoints > Protection > Electrical]
Aux Undervoltage Alarm
Range: 60 to 90% of NCV in steps of 1, or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the auxiliary undervoltage alarm level.
Aux Undervoltage Alarm Delay
Range: 1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 5 seconds
This setpoint specifies the auxiliary undervoltage alarm delay.
Aux Undervoltage Trip
Range: 60 to 90% of NCV in steps of 1, or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the auxiliary undervoltage trip level.
Aux Undervoltage Trip Delay
Range: 1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 5 seconds
This setpoint specifies the auxiliary undervoltage trip delay.
If Aux VT is set for Direct: NCV = MNV / root3
NOTE: NCV - Nominal Control Voltage - is calculated depending on Aux VT connection:
NOTE
If Aux VT is set for VabVT, VbcVT, VcaVT, VanVT, VbnVT, VcnVT: NCV = Aux VT secondary
For additional information, refer to:
Phase undervoltage
6.3.3.6 Phase overvoltage
An overvoltage on a running motor with a constant load results in decreased current.
However, iron losses increase, causing an increase in motor temperature. The current
overload element will not pickup this condition and provide adequate protection.
Therefore, the overvoltage element may be useful for protecting the motor in the event of
a sustained overvoltage condition.
If this element is enabled, a trip or alarm will occur once the magnitude of either Vab, Vbc, or
Vca meets or rises above the pickup level for a user-specified period of time.
Phase overvoltage protection is available only when a type IO_B option card (3 × VT) is
specified in the order code.
NOTE:
NOTE
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The following setpoints are available for the phase overvoltage element.
[Path: Home > Setpoints > Protection > Electrical]
Overvoltage Alarm Level
Range: 101 to 120% of MNV in steps of 1, or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the overvoltage alarm pickup level as a percentage of the rated
voltage.
Overvoltage Alarm Delay
Range: 1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1 s
Default: 30 seconds
This setpoint specifies the time that the voltage must meet or exceed the overvoltage
alarm pickup level to generate an alarm.
Overvoltage Trip Level
Range: 101 to 120% of MNV in steps of 1, or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the overvoltage trip pickup level as a percentage of the rated
voltage.
Overvoltage Trip Delay
Range: 1 to 60 seconds in steps of 1 s
Default: 30 seconds
This setpoint specifies the time that the voltage must meet or exceed the overvoltage
trip pickup level to generate a trip.
6.3.3.7 Phase reversal
The MM300 can detect the phase rotation of the three phase voltages.
Phase reversal protection is available only when a type IO_B option card (3 × VT) is
specified in the order code. This element assumes A-B-C connection.
NOTE:
NOTE
The following setpoints are available.
[Path: Home > Setpoints > Protection > Electrical]
Voltage Phase Reversal
Range: Disabled, Alarm, Trip
Default: Trip
This setpoint selects the phase reversal action.
6.3.3.8 Fuse failure
If one or two of the three phase voltages drops to less than 70% of nominal, and at the
same time any of the three voltages is greater than 85%, either an alarm or a trip and
block start will occur after a one second delay. The 70% threshold allows for the possibility
that the voltage downstream from a blown fuse is pulled up above zero by devices
connected between the open fuse and another phase.
Fuse failure protection is available only when a type IO_B option card (3 × VT) is specified in
the order code.
NOTE:
NOTE
The following setpoints are available.
[Path: Home > Setpoints > Protection > Electrical]
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VT Fuse Fail
Range: Disabled, Alarm, Trip
Default: Trip
This setpoint selects the fuse failure action.
6.3.4 Sensor protection
6.3.4.1 RTD protection
The MM300 can support up to six 100-R RTDs, each of which may be configured to have a
trip temperature and an alarm temperature. The alarm temperature is normally set slightly
greater than normal running temperature, and the trip temperature is normally set at the
insulation rating. Trip voting has been added for extra security in the event of RTD
malfunction. If enabled, a second RTD must also exceed the trip temperature of the RTD
being checked before a trip will be issued. If the RTD is chosen to vote with itself, or OFF, the
voting feature is disabled.
The following table shows the RTD resistance versus temperature. RTDs configured as
stator types are also used by the thermal model for determining the RTD bias.
Table 4: RTD temperature vs. resistance
Temperature
Resistance (in ohms)
°C
°F
100 Pt
–50
–58
80.31
–40
–40
84.27
–30
–22
88.22
–20
–4
92.16
–10
14
96.09
0
32
100.00
10
50
103.90
20
68
107.79
30
86
111.67
40
104
115.54
50
122
119.39
60
140
123.24
70
158
127.07
80
176
130.89
90
194
134.70
100
212
138.50
110
230
142.29
120
248
146.06
130
266
149.82
140
284
153.58
150
302
157.32
160
320
161.04
170
338
164.76
180
356
168.47
190
374
172.46
200
392
175.84
210
410
179.51
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Temperature
Resistance (in ohms)
°C
°F
100 Pt
220
428
183.17
230
446
186.82
240
464
190.45
250
482
194.08
All RTDs programmed with an alarm or a trip are monitored for sensor failure. When the
measured temperature is greater than 250°C, the RTD is declared failed and a common
RTD open circuit alarm is issued. When the measured temperature is less than -50°C, a
common RTD short circuit/low temperature alarm is issued.
The following setpoints are available for RTD protection.
[Path: Home > Setpoints > Protection > Sensor]
RTD Open Circuit Alarm
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Disabled
Enable to generate an alarm if RTD is open circuit.
RTD Open/Short Circuit Alarm
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Disabled
Enable to generate an alarm if RTD is shorted/opened.
RTD #1 Application to RTD #3 Application
Range: None, Stator, Bearing, Ambient, Other
Default: None
These setpoints select the application type for RTDs #1 through 6, respectively.
RTD #1 Alarm Temp to RTD #6 Alarm Temp
Range: 1 to 250°C in steps of 1 or OFF
Default: OFF
These setpoints specify the alarm temperature for RTDs #1 through 6, respectively.
RTD #1 Trip Temp to RTD #6 Trip Temp
Range: 1 to 250°C in steps of 1 or OFF
Default: OFF
These setpoints specify the trip temperature for RTDs #1 through 6, respectively.
RTD #1 Trip Voting to RTD #6 Trip Voting
Range: RTD #1, RTD #2, RTD #3, RTD #4, RTD #5, RTD #6, OFF
Default: OFF
These setpoints select the redundant RTD that must also exceed the trip temperature for
RTDs #1 through 6, respectively, for a trip to occur.
6.3.4.2 Thermistor protection
Either a Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC) or Negative Temperature Coefficient (NTC)
thermistor may be directly connected to the MM300. By specifying the hot and cold
thermistor resistance, the MM300 automatically determines the thermistor type as NTC or
PTC. Use thermistors with hot and cold resistance values in the range 100 to 30000 OHMS.
If no thermistor is connected, the thermistor alarm and trip detection must be set to
DISABLE.
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Cold Resistance
Range: 0.1 to 30.0 kOHMS in steps of 0.1
Default: 0.1 kOHMS
For a PTC thermistor, enter the resistance that the thermistor must drop below before a
Thermistor Trip or Alarm can be cleared. For an NTC thermistor, enter the resistance
that the thermistor must rise above before a Thermistor Trip or Alarm can be cleared.
Hot Resistance
Range: 0.1 to 30.0 kOHMS in steps of 0.1
Default: 5.0 kOHMS
For a PTC thermistor, enter the resistance that the thermistor must rise above before a
Thermistor Trip or Alarm can be cleared. For an NTC thermistor, enter the resistance
that the thermistor must drop below before a Thermistor Trip or Alarm can be cleared.
Thermistor Trip
Range: ENABLE, DISABLE
Default: DISABLE
When a thermistor is used, it can be selected for an Alarm or Trip or both. Choose
ENABLE to allow Thermistor Trips to occur.
Thermistor Alarm
Range: ENABLE, DISABLE
Default: DISABLE
When a thermistor is used, it can be selected for an Alarm or Trip or both. Choose
ENABLE to allow Thermistor Alarms to occur.
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6.4 Control elements
6.4.1 Starter setpoints
Select the Home > Setpoints > Control > Starter page to edit the starter setpoints.
Figure 28: Starter configuration setpoints
6.4.1.1 Auto/manual control
The auto/manual control element manages the auto/manual control mode, consolidates
the start A, start B and stop controls from their various sources, and applies auto/manual,
test switch and permissive supervision.
The MM300 has four possible sources of start A, start B and stop controls:
•
Communications: Controls received over a serial data link - Modbus, DeviceNet,
Profibus and/or Modbus TCP. Communications controls are not differentiated based
on port or protocol.
•
Hard-wired: Controls received typically via contact inputs from a PLC or DCS.
•
Field: Controls received typically via contact inputs from pushbuttons or switches
located adjacent to the controlled equipment.
•
MCC: controls received from the control panel of the MM300.
Communications and hard-wired controls are considered to be auto controls, and are
inhibited unless auto mode is on. Likewise, field and MCC controls are considered to be
manual controls, and are inhibited unless manual mode is on. Each source may also have
a contact input assigned to permissive supervision, which enables that source when on.
Table 5: Auto/manual control sources
Control source
Supervision
Communications
Auto
Comms permissive
Hard-wired
Auto
Hard-wired permissive
Field
Manual
Field permissive
MCC
Manual
MCC permissive
The MM300 may also be set to always honor stop controls, regardless of auto/manual
mode and permissive supervision (default).
The auto/manual control element also drives a control source active indicator for each
source on the front panel display (if equipped) that shows the user exactly which control
sources have both the correct auto/manual mode on and have their permissive configured
and on.
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The auto/manual control element includes non-volatile latches that hold the auto and
manual mode states. Besides supervising controls from the sources, the latches drive auto
and manual indicators on the MM300 control panel. The latches can be controlled either by
an external auto switch contact or by the control panel.
•
When configured for Auto/Man switch contact, auto is on when the contact is closed
energizing the input, and manual is on when the contact is open.
•
When a switch contact is configured for auto/manual, the front panel auto/manual
pushbuttons are inoperative. When no switch contacts are configured, but the MCC
Auto/Manual Key setpoint is “Enabled”, the control panel auto and manual keys will
switch the mode between auto and manual.
•
When no input is configured for auto or manual, and the MCC Auto/Manual Key
setpoint is “Disabled”, both auto and manual modes are set off.
The Auto and Manual modes are temporarily forced to settable states when the test switch
is on.
The following setpoints are available for the auto/manual control element.
[Path: Home > Setpoints > Control > Starter]
Comms Start Ctrl
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Disabled
Sets whether start commands are accepted via communications.
Comms Stop Mode
Range: Always Enabled, Follow Ctrl Mode
Default: Always Enabled
If set to “Always Enabled”, communication stops will always be honoured, irrespective of
the Comms Start Ctrl setpoint and auto/manual mode. If set to “Follow Ctrl Mode”,
communication stops will be supervised by auto/manual and by communication
permissive in the same manner as the starts.
Comms Stop Action
Range: Stop, Trip
Default: Stop
Defines whether field control trips (reset required to clear) or stops (no reset required).
Hard Wired Start Ctrl
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Disabled
Sets whether start commands are accepted from hard wired start contact inputs.
Hard Wired Stop Mode
Range: Always Enabled, Follow Ctrl Mode
Default: Always Enabled
If set to “Always Enabled”, hard-wired stops will always be honoured, irrespective of the
Hard Wired Start Ctrl setpoint, auto/manual mode and permissive. If set to “Follow Ctrl
Mode”, hard-wired stops will be supervised by auto/manual and by hard-wired
permissive in the same manner as the starts.
Hard Wired Stop Actn
Range: Stop, Trip
Default: Stop
Defines whether hard wired stop control trips (reset required to clear) or stops (no reset
required).
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Hard Wired 2W/3W
Range: 2W, 3W
Default: 3W
The setpoint is for two-wire or three-wire control selection. If in the two-wire mode, all
hard-wired start contact inputs being open will be treated as a hard-wired stop control.
For reversing and two-speed starter configurations, both start inputs open is treated as
a hard-wired stop control.
Field Start Ctrl
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Disabled
Sets whether start commands are accepted from field start contact inputs.
Field Stop Mode
Range: Always Enabled, Follow Ctrl Mode
Default: Always Enabled
If set to “Always Enabled”, field stops will always be honoured, irrespective of the Field
Start Ctrl setpoint, auto/manual mode, and permissive. If set to “Follow Ctrl Mode”, field
stops will be supervised by auto/manual and by field permissive in the same manner as
the starts.
Field Stop Action
Range: Stop, Trip
Default: Stop
Defines whether field control trips (reset required to clear) or stops (no reset required).
Field 2W/3W
Range: 2W, 3W
Default: 3W
Two-wire or three-wire controls selection. If in the two-wire mode, all field start contact
inputs being open will be treated as a field stop control. For reversing and two-speed
starter configurations, both start inputs open is treated as a field stop control.
MCC Start Ctrl
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Enabled
Sets whether start commands are accepted from the control panel.
MCC Stop Mode
Range: Always Enabled, Follow Ctrl Mode
Default: Always Enabled
If set to “Always Enabled”, control panel stops will always be honoured, irrespective of
the MCC Start Ctrl setpoint, auto/manual mode, and permissive. If set to “Follow Ctrl
Mode”, control panel stops will be supervised by auto/manual and by MCC permissive in
the same manner as the starts.
MCC Stop Action
Range: Stop, Trip
Default: Stop
Defines whether MCC control trips (reset required to clear) or stops (no reset required).
Test Auto Mode
Range: On, Off, Unaffected
Default: Off
Sets whether, when the test switch is on, the auto mode is forced on, forced off, or is
unaffected.
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Test Manual Mode
Range: On, Off, Unaffected
Default: On
When the test switch is on, this setpoint determines if the manual mode is forced on,
forced off, or is unaffected.
6.4.1.2 Stop/start control element
An external stop sequence has occurred if the relay detects that either contactor A or
contactor B has dropped out without receiving a stop command. If the External Stop Action
setpoint is programmed as “Stop”, the relay will accept this as a stop control and display
the External Stop message. If this setpoint is set to “Trip”, the relay will treat this as an
emergency stop trip. This trip condition must be reset before the motor can be restarted.
Most protection and control elements in this relay are sensitive to whether the motor is
stopped, starting, or running. These include the jam, acceleration, undercurrent,
underpower, overvoltage, and undervoltage protection, the process interlocks, and the
thermal start inhibit and undervoltage restart elements.
Traditionally, the motor is deemed to have entered the starting state when the motor
current changes from zero to some measurable value, and to have entered the running
state when the current having increased above FLA then subsides below FLA. This
algorithm is satisfactory for most applications. The current profile of full voltage acrossthe-line starters for instance typically goes from zero to 6 × FLA within a cycle of the
contactor closing, and then decays exponentially until it reaches 1 × FLA just before
reaching normal operating speed.
However, some starter types implemented in the MM300 have significantly different
current profiles. For instance, with an inverter starter, the inverter may ramp the motor
speed up so slowly that the current never exceeds FLA. Alternatively, the current may
initially exceed 1 × FLA, but subside well before reaching normal operating speed. The
traditional algorithm could either not declare the motor reaching the running state, or
declare it much too soon.
Another problem can develop when there is a brief supply interruption for which the
immediate undervoltage restart feature recloses the contactor so quickly that there is little
or no inrush current.
The traditional algorithm would detect the start (if it is fast enough), but may or may not
detect the running state that follows. Even if it does detect the running state, as it is an
atypical start, the learned values such as learned acceleration time would be corrupted.
The MM300 employs an improved starting and running state detection algorithm.
Normally, it declares starting when either contactor A or contactor B closes. Running is
declared when either contactor has been closed for one second, and then current is found
to be below 1 × FLA. This provides equivalent functionality to the traditional algorithm.
However, the advanced algorithm also accepts Starting Status Block and Running Status
Block signals. Most starter types leave these signals in their default off state, where they
have no effect on the starting and running declarations. Where required however, the
starters can manipulate these signals to correct the above described problems with the
traditional algorithm. The inverter starter for instance asserts the Starting Status Block
signal when it powers up the inverter, and then allows the starting state to be declared by
turning it off only when the ramp up command is issued. The inverter starter also asserts
the Running Status Block signal and then allows the running state to be declared by
turning it off only when the inverter signals up-to-speed.
In addition, the advanced algorithm accepts a UVR Short Dip signal from the
undervoltage restart element. This signal will carry the running status through short dips
followed by immediate reclose.
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If an A or B motor contactor is externally energized, the relay will treat this as a start A or B
control, and display an External Start A Alarm or an External Start B Alarm message.
The stop/start control element also consolidates the various start and stop signals for the
convenience of other elements.
The following setpoint is available:
[Path: Home > Setpoints > Control > Starter]
External Stop Action
Range: Stop, Trip
Default: Stop
This setpoints selects whether an external stop is considered to be an emergency stop
(reset required to clear) or a stop control (no reset required).
6.4.2 Starting duty inhibits
The MM300 provides four elements that guard against excessive starting duty:
•
Thermal start inhibit
•
Starts per hour inhibit
•
Time between starts inhibit
•
Restart inhibit
The thermal start inhibit function inhibits starting of a motor if there is insufficient thermal
capacity available for a successful start. The motor start inhibit logic algorithm is defined
by the Start Inhibit Margin setpoint. If this value is “0”, starts are inhibited until thermal
capacity used decays to a level of 15%. If this setpoint is greater than zero, starts are
inhibited while the available thermal capacity is greater than the learned thermal capacity
used at start.
The margin should be set to zero if the load varies for different starts.
NOTE:
NOTE
The learned thermal capacity used at start is the largest value of thermal capacity used
calculated by the thermal model from the last five successful starts, plus a user-defined
margin. The margin is a percentage of this largest of five. A successful motor start is one in
which the motor reaches the running state. See the Start/Stop section of this manual for a
description of running state logic. If the relay does not contain records of five successful
starts, a value of 85% is used for the learned thermal capacity used, which requires the
thermal capacity used to decay to the same 15% level required when the margin setpoint
is zero.
In addition, since a 2% safety margin is included for the relay to determine if Thermal
Capacity Used has decreased enough (ie - the motor has cooled enough) to allow another
restart, in the case where the Start Inhibit margin is set to 0%, Thermal Capacity must
actually reduce to 15% - 2% = 13%.
For example, if the thermal capacity used for the last five starts is 24, 23, 30, 22, and 21%
respectively, and the set margin is 10%, the learned starting capacity used at start is:
Maximum[24%, 23%, 30%, 22%, 21%] /5 x (1 + 10%/100%) = 33%.
If the motor stops with a thermal capacity used of 90%, a start inhibit will be issued until
the motor cools to 100% – 33% - 2% = 65%. If the stopped cool time constant is set to 30
minutes, the inhibit time will be:
30 x ln (90% / 65%) = 9.8 minutes
If the margin is set to zero instead, the inhibit time will be:
30 x ln (90% / (15% - 2%)) = 58 minutes
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The starts per hour element defines the number of start attempts allowed in any 60
minute interval. Once the set number of starts has occurred in the last 60 minutes, start
controls are inhibited until the oldest start contributing to the inhibit is more than 60
minutes old.
The starts per hour element assumes a motor start is occurring when the relay measures
the transition of no motor current to some value of motor current.
NOTE:
NOTE
The time between starts element enforces a programmable minimum time duration
between two successive starts attempts. A time delay is initiated with every start and a
restart is not allowed until the specified interval has elapsed. This timer feature may be
useful in enforcing the duty limits of starting resistors or starting autotransformers. It may
also be used to restrict jogging.
This time between starts element assumes a motor start is occurring when the relay
measures the transition of no motor current to some value of motor current.
NOTE:
NOTE
The restart inhibit element may be used to ensure that a certain amount of time passes
between the time a motor is stopped and the restarting of that motor. This timer is useful
for many process applications and motor considerations. If a motor is on a down-hole
pump, the liquid may fall back down the pipe and spin the rotor backwards after the motor
stops. It would be very undesirable to start the motor at this time. This feature is bypassed
by undervoltage immediate restart and by external start.
This element assumes a motor stop is occurring when the relay measures the transition of
some value of motor current to no motor current
NOTE:
NOTE
For each of these features, non-volatile memory is used to make them behave as if they
continue to operate while control power is lost.
Figure 29: Starting duty inhibit setpoints
The following setpoints are available.
[Path: Home > Setpoints > Control > Inhibits]
Start Inhibit Margin
Range: 0 to 10% in steps of 1 or Off
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the start inhibit margin. A value of “OFF” disables start inhibits. A
value of 0% causes starts to be inhibited until the thermal capacity used value
calculated by the thermal model drops to 15% or less. Setpoint values in the range of 1
to 10% specify the margin to be included in the calculation of the learned thermal
capacity used at start value, and cause starts to be inhibited until the present thermal
capacity used value drops to the learned thermal capacity used at start value or less.
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CONTROL ELEMENTS
CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
Starts/Hour Limit
Range: 1 to 5 in steps of 1 or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the number of starts in the last 60 minutes at which count start
control is inhibited. A value of “OFF” defeats this feature.
Time Between Starts
Range: 1 to 3600 seconds in steps of 1 second, or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the time following a start before a start control is permitted to
prevent restart attempts in quick succession (jogging). A value of “OFF” defeats this
feature.
Restart Block Time
Range: 1 to 50000 seconds in steps of 1 second, or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint specifies the time following stop before a start control is permitted. A value
of “OFF” defeats this feature.
This timer should not be used with starters that inherently use Transition timers (Rev, TwoSpeed, and Wye-Delta).
NOTE:
NOTE
6.4.3 Process interlocks
Ten independent process interlocks A through J (abbreviated as IL A…J on the display) are
used to provide trip, stop or alarm actions based on a contact input.
The contact input for utilized process interlocks is assigned in the contact inputs setpoints
page. The healthy state of the contact driving the input, the state wherein there is no trip,
stop or alarm action taken by the interlock, may be set to either open or closed.
Each process interlock has a startup override timer that sets the time given for the process
interlock switch to reach the healthy state (measured from the moment a start control is
received). If the input is unhealthy at the moment this timer expires, the interlock function
performs its configured action. If the startup override delay setpoint is set to zero, the
switch must be healthy for the motor to start.
Each process interlock also has a running override timer that sets the time the switch can
remain unhealthy during normal running. If the startup override timer has expired and the
switch then goes unhealthy for longer than the IL A(J) Running Override delay setpoint, the
interlock performs its configured action. If the IL A(J) Running Override is “OFF” and the
switch goes unhealthy after the startup override has expired, no action will occur.
The process interlocks may also be set such that no action is performed when the test
switch is closed. This allows the control circuit to be tested.
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MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
CONTROL ELEMENTS
Figure 30: Process interlock timing
Not Started:
i.e.: Stopped, Stopping, Tripped, Locked
Out, Blocked, Starts Inhibited or Restart
In Progress
Started
i.e.: Pre-contactor, Starting or Running
Startup Override == 0, Running Override == OFF
Healthy
state irrelevant once started
Unhealthy
starts inhibited
Startup Override == 0, Running Override == 0...3600 s
Healthy
Unhealthy
starts inhibited
running
override
set time
running
override
set time
Action
Startup Override > 0, Running Override == OFF
Healthy
state irrelevant before startup timeout
state irrelevant after startup timeout
Unhealthy
startup override
set time
Action
Startup Override > 0, Running Override == 0...3600 s
Healthy
state irrelevant before startup timeout
Unhealthy
startup override
set time
running
override
running
override
set time
Action
853703A1.CDR
The following setpoints are available. The setpoints and logic for interlock A shown below
applies to all interlocks A through J.
[Path: Home > Setpoints > Control > Interlock]
IL A Function
Range: Disabled, Trip, Stop, Alarm
Default: Disabled
This setpoint selects whether the process interlock causes a trip (reset required to restart
the motor), a stop (no reset required), or alarms only. The “Disabled” selection disables all
interlock functions, including the instantaneous alarm.
IL A Healthy State
Range: Open, Closed
Default: Closed
This setpoint allows the user to configure the process interlock contact input as either
healthy open or healthy closed. The switch state is healthy when no action is taken by
this interlock.
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CONTROL ELEMENTS
CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
IL A Startup Override
Range: 0 to 3600 seconds in steps of 1
Default: 0 seconds
This setpoint specifies the time provided for the process interlock switch to reach the
healthy state, measured from the moment a start control is received. This includes any
pre-contactor time. A value of “0” inhibits starts if the switch state is unhealthy.
IL A Running Override
Range: 0 to 3600 seconds in steps of 1 or OFF
Default: 0 seconds
This setpoint specifies the time the switch can remain unhealthy during normal running.
A value of “OFF” indicates the interlock is inoperative during normal running.
IL A Inst Alarm
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Disabled
When this setpoint is “Enabled”, a process interlock alarm is issued without delay. This is
in addition to the trip, stop, or alarm selected by the IL Function A setpoint.
IL Ignore in Test
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Disabled
When this setpoint is “Enabled”, all process interlocks are ignored when the test switch is
on.
IL A Name
Range: 20 alphanumeric characters
Default: Process Interlock A
This setpoint represents the interlock description that appears in the event record and
on the status message page.
6.4.4 Undervoltage autorestart
The undervoltage restart element (UVR) provides for relay initiated undervoltage motor
restart after a momentary power loss (dip). In addition, this element provides for controlling
the timing of both controlled starts and undervoltage restarts following interruptions.
When the auxiliary voltage supply drops below the dropout voltage level, the motor
contactor(s) are de-energized until the dip is over as indicated by supply recovery to the
pickup level. The duration of the dip is classified as short, medium, or long, based on
settable time thresholds.
•
Short dips are intended to cover situations where it is appropriate to immediately
close the contactors back in on voltage recovery.
•
Medium dips are for where it is appropriate to restart the motor with any staged
startup sequence the starter type might provide.
•
Long dips (interruptions actually) are intended to cover cases where restoration is
from backup power, and there must be substantial intervals between starting different
motors to maintain stability, and/or only critical motors can be started.
If the motor was running at the time a short dip occurred, a forced restart will occur as
soon as the relay detects healthy auxiliary voltage. An immediate restart bypasses any
pre-contactor and staged startup sequence the starter type might otherwise provide.
If the motor was running at the time a medium or long dip occurred, after a settable
medium or long delay, a normal start will be performed.
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CONTROL ELEMENTS
If the motor was not running at the start of the dip, no restart sequence will be initiated.
Start controls are ignored while the UVR delay is timing out. While the UVR timer is
counting down, the status will change to "UVR Pending". During UVR Pending, any stop or
trip will immediately cancel the restart sequence.
With control voltage derived from the incoming motor supply, the MM300 will experience
the same interruption as the motor. The MM300 is designed to ride through power outages
of up to 500 ms, so that the undervoltage restart function is accurate. For longer outages
the relay saves critical data to non-volatile memory just before shutting down. While the
relay is shut down, a backup timer continues to keep time without external power by using
stored energy.
Figure 31: Undervoltage autorestart screen
The following setpoints are available:
[Path: Home > Setpoints > Control > UV restart]
Under Voltage Restart
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Disabled
This setpoint enables the undervoltage autorestart function.
UVR Dropout Level
Range: 60 to 100% of NCV in steps of 1
Default: 65%
When the magnitude of the control voltage drops below the UVR Dropout Level, the
motor contactor(s) are de-energized. The UVR Dropout Level is set as a percentage of the
nominal control voltage. This value programmed must be set lower than the UVR Pickup
Level setpoint.
UVR Pickup Level
Range: 60 to 100% of NCV in steps of 1
Default: 90%
When the magnitude of the control voltage recovers to the UVR Pickup Level, the
undervoltage restart element is triggered. The UVR Pickup Level is set as a percentage of
the nominal control voltage. This value programmed must be set higher than the UVR
Dropout Level setpoint.
UVR Short Dip Time
Range: 100 to 500 ms in steps of 10 ms, or OFF
Default: 200 ms
This setpoint represents the maximum duration of short dips, which result in immediate
restarts. A value of Off disables immediate restarts.
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CONTROL ELEMENTS
CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
UVR Med Dip Time
Range: 0.1 to 10.0 s in steps of 0.1 seconds
Default: 2.0 s
This setpoint represents the maximum duration of medium dips.
UVR Long Dip Time
Range: 0.5 to 60 min. in steps of 0.5 min., or OFF
Default: OFF
This setpoint represents the maximum duration of long dips. A value of Off disables
restarts after long dips.
UVR Med Dip Delay
Range: 0.2 to 60.0 seconds in steps of 0.2 seconds
Default: 2.0 s
This setpoint represents the UV restart medium delay.
UVR Long Dip Delay
Range: 1.0 to 1200.0 s in steps of 1.0 seconds
Default: 10.0 s
This setpoint represents the UV restart long delay.
If Aux VT is set for Direct: NCV = MNV / root3
NOTE: NCV - Nominal Control Voltage - is calculated depending on Aux VT connection:
NOTE
If Aux VT is set for VabVT, VbcVT, VcaVT, VanVT, VbnVT, VcnVT: NCV = Aux VT secondary
When the UV Restart feature is used, ensure that the IO_C VT and MM300 PSU are
connected to the same AC source.
NOTE: NCV - Nominal Control Voltage - is calculated depending on Aux VT connection:
NOTE
When using medium and long dip, ensure that the delay setting is greater than the
Restart Inhibit time (if used).
NOTE: NCV - Nominal Control Voltage - is calculated depending on Aux VT connection:
NOTE
The UV Autorestart feature requires a minimum of 2.5 s between successive dips, to
ensure correct operation.
NOTE: NCV - Nominal Control Voltage - is calculated depending on Aux VT connection:
NOTE
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MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
SYSTEM SECURITY
6.5 System security
Hardware and passcode security features are designed to restrict user access. This can
deter inappropriate employee action and curtail errors. Security against hackers or others
with malicious intent should be provided by other means. Security for the external hardwired and field controls should also be externally provided as required.
Three security levels above the default level are recognized. Each security level can also be
set for passcode access. The passcode is programmed as a five-digit number, using only
digits 1 through 5. The security access levels are:
•
Default - start/stop control, auto/manual selection, and reset trips
•
Level 1 - default privileges plus setpoint access
•
Level 2 - level 1 privileges plus lockout reset and reset counters
•
Level 3 - level 2 privileges plus factory page.
The MCC passcode can be entered at any time by a sustained press on the ENTER key.
displays a dialog box prompting for a new passcode. Alternatively, the MCC passcode can
be entered by pressing a currently unauthorized (grayed-out) control/selection key. This
will display an error message detailing the required security levels and whether access
switch or passcode entry is required. If only a passcode is required to complete the control/
selection, the error message displays a passcode entry dialog box.
Figure 32: Passcode entry dialog box
Passcodes are automatically canceled after five minutes of inactivity. The MCC passcode
access can also be canceled by a sustained press on the ESC key, which clears any
previously entered passcode. Communications passcode access can be cancelled by
writing zero to the passcode register.
Figure 33: Security page
The following system security setpoints are programmed in the security page.
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SYSTEM SECURITY
CHAPTER 6: SETPOINTS
Passcode Level 1, Passcode Level 2, Passcode Level 3
Range: any five-digit number using digits 1 through 5 only or Disabled
Default value: 11111 (level 1), 22222 (level 2)
Access is granted if a passcode has been correctly entered matching the value of this
setpoint.
Access Switch Level
Range: 1, 2, 3
Default value: 1
Sets the access level provided by the access switch being closed. The contact input for
the access switch is configured on the contact inputs page.
Comms security
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Disabled
Sets whether the security feature applies to the communications ports.
MCC setpoint access
Range: Enabled, Disabled
Default: Enabled
Sets whether the setpoint access is allowed from the control panel display.
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Digital Energy
Multilin
MM300 Motor Management System
Chapter 7: Diagnostics
Diagnostics
The diagnostics pages display typical diagnostic information, including the event recorder,
learned data, phasors, system counters, and system information. In the event of a trip or
alarm, the diagnostic pages are often very helpful in diagnosing the cause of the condition.
7.1 Events
The Home > Diag > Events page displays up to 256 events.
When this page is selected, the MM300 will load and format an event list from the event
recorder. After a short length of time (depending on the number of recorded events), the
green Loading...Complete indicator will become active, and the most recent event placed
at the top of the list, with the oldest event at the bottom. The MM300 loads the event list
with the most recent event automatically selected.
If a new event occurs while viewing the event page, the event list will automatically
reorganize itself and place the newest event first. The addition of new events while the
event list is being viewed will not reset the event screen to the top of the page unless the
newest event is being viewed. If there are no events in the event recorder, then this page
will be empty.
Figure 1: Typical event recorder view
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
7–1
EVENTS
CHAPTER 7: DIAGNOSTICS
Individual events are selected by using the UP and DOWN keys to highlight the event then
pressing the ENTER key. This will display a pop-up window with the event details.
Figure 2: Typical event details view
7–2
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 7: DIAGNOSTICS
DIGITAL COUNTERS
7.2 Digital counters
The Home > Diag > Counters page displays the values of the various MM300 digital
counters.
Figure 3: Counters page
The total number of trips by type are displayed in this screen. Trip counters are typically
used for scheduling inspections on equipment, for performing qualitative analysis of
system problems, and for spotting trends. Several general counters are also available.
Total Number of Trips, Incomplete Sequence Trips, Overload Trips, Mechanical Jam
Trips, Undercurrent Trips, Current Unbalance Trips, Ground Fault Trips, Motor
Acceleration Trips, Underpower Trips
Range: 0 to 65535 trips in steps of 1
These values display a breakdown of number of trips by type. When the total number of
trips for any counter exceeds 65535, that counter is reset to 0. To clear this value, use
the Clear Counters command.
Number of Motor Starts
Range: 0 to 65535 starts in steps of 1
This value displays the number of accumulated motor starts or start attempts. This value
may be useful information when troubleshooting a motor failure. When this counter
exceeds 65535 starts, it will reset to 0. To clear this value, use the Clear Maintenance
Timers command.
Number of UV Restarts
Range: 0 to 65535 restarts in steps of 1
This value displays the number of accumulated undervoltage restarts. This value may be
useful information when troubleshooting a motor failure. When this counter exceeds
65535 restarts, it will reset to 0. To clear this value, use the Clear Counters command.
Motor Running Hours
Range: 0 to 100000 hours in steps of 1
The motor running hours timer accumulates the total running time for the motor. This
value may be useful for scheduling routine maintenance. Counter will roll over to zero
after range is exceeded. To clear this value, use the Clear Maintenance Timers
command and stop the motor.
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DIGITAL COUNTERS
CHAPTER 7: DIAGNOSTICS
Motor Stopped Hours
Range: 0 to 100000 hours in steps of 1
The motor stopped hours timer accumulates the total stopped time for the motor. This
value may be useful for scheduling routine maintenance. To clear this value, use the
Clear Maintenance Timers command and stop the motor.
The above clear commands can also be sent directly from the Graphical Control Panel, by
highlighting the value then pressing "clear." Setpoint access level 2 is required.
NOTE:
NOTE
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MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 7: DIAGNOSTICS
PHASORS
7.3 Phasors
The Home > Diag > Phasors page displays phase voltage and angle, and auxiliary voltage.
A typical phasor display page is shown below.
Figure 4: Typical phasors display
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PRODUCT INFORMATION
CHAPTER 7: DIAGNOSTICS
7.4 Product information
The Home > Diag > Info page displays fixed system information, including the order code,
serial number, hardware revision, software revision, modification number, boot revision,
boot modification, original calibration date, and last calibration date.
Figure 5: Product information page
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CHAPTER 7: DIAGNOSTICS
LEARNED DATA
7.5 Learned data
The Home > Diag > Learned page displays the MM300 learned data parameters. A typical
learned data page is shown below.
Figure 6: Learned data values
The MM300 learns the acceleration time, the starting current, the starting capacity, and
the average motor load during motor starts. This data is accumulated based on the last
five successful starts.
Learned Acceleration Time
Range: 0.0 to 200.0 ms in steps of 0.1 s
If motor load during starting is relatively consistent, the learned acceleration time may
be used to fine tune the acceleration protection. Learned acceleration time will be the
greatest time of the last five successful starts. The time is measured from the transition
of motor current from zero to greater than overload pickup, until line current falls below
the overload pickup level.
Learned Starting Current
Range: 0.0 to 10000.0 A in steps of 0.1 A
The learned starting current is measured 200 ms after the transition of motor current
from zero to greater than overload pickup. This should ensure that the measured current
is symmetrical. The value displayed is the average of the last five successful starts. If
there are less than five starts, a value of 0 seconds will be averaged in for the full five
starts.
Learned Starting Capacity
Range: 0 to 100% in steps of 1
The learned starting capacity is used to determine if there is enough thermal capacity to
permit a start. If there is not enough thermal capacity available for a start, a start inhibit
will be issued. Starting will be blocked until there is sufficient thermal capacity available.
Average Motor Load Learned
Range: 0.00 to 20.00 × FLA in steps of 0.01
The MM300 can learn the average motor load over a period of time (fixed at 15 minutes).
The calculation is a sliding window and is ignored during motor starting.
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WAVEFORM
CHAPTER 7: DIAGNOSTICS
7.6 Waveform
The Home > Diag > Waveform page displays the MM300 waveform parameters. A typical
waveform page is shown below.
Figure 7: Waveform values
Trigger Date
Date of the current trigger.
Trigger Time
Time of the current trigger.
Trigger Cause
Range: None, Command, VO1 to VO32, Any Trip Pickup, Any Trip, Any Trip Dropout, Any
Alarm Pickup, Any Alarm, Any Alarm Dropout, Any Stop, Start A, Start B
Indicates the cause of the waveform trigger.
Trigger Frequency (Hz)
Measured system frequency at the time of the trigger event.
Total Triggers
Range: 0 to 65535
A count of waveform triggers since the Clear Waveform command was sent.
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CHAPTER 7: DIAGNOSTICS
DATALOG
7.7 Datalog
The Home > Diag > Datalog page displays the MM300 datalog parameters. A typical
datalog page is shown below.
Figure 8: Datalog values
# of Triggers Since Clear
Range: 0 to 65535
Count of data log triggers since the Clear Data Logger command was sent.
# of Datalog Samples Stored
Range: 0 to 256
Count of the number of samples stored in the data log for the current trigger cause.
Trigger Cause
Range: None, Command, VO1 to VO32, Any Trip Pickup, Any Trip, Any Trip Dropout, Any
Alarm Pickup, Any Alarm, Any Alarm Dropout, Any Stop, Start A, Start B
Indicates the cause of the datalog trigger.
Trigger Date
Date of the current trigger.
Trigger Time
Time of the current trigger.
Datalog Status
Range: Stopped, Started, Triggered, Pretrigger, Posttrigger
Indicates the present status of the data log feature. Stopped and Started are used only
in Continuous mode. Triggered, Pretrigger, and Posttrigger are used only in Trigger
Mode.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
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DATALOG
7–10
CHAPTER 7: DIAGNOSTICS
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
Digital Energy
Multilin
MM300 Motor Management System
Chapter 8: FlexLogic™
FlexLogic™
8.1 FlexLogic™ overview
8.1.1 Introduction to FlexLogic™
This topic describes the MM300 FlexLogic™ system, defines its operators, and lists its
operands. In essence, all the information necessary to implement a custom starter.
All MM300 digital signal states are represented by FlexLogic™ operands. Each operand is
in one of two states: on (asserted, logic 1, or set), or off (de-asserted, logic 0, or reset). There
is a FlexLogic™ operand for each contact input, contact output, communications
command, control panel command, element trip, and element alarm, as well as many
others.
A list of FlexLogic™ operands and operators are sequentially processed once every 50 ms.
When list processing encounters an operand, the value of that operand is placed in a firstin-first out stack. When list processing encounters a calculation operator, the number of
values required for the calculation are removed from the stack, and the result of the
operation is placed back on the stack. The operators are logic gates (for example, AND, OR,
NOT), timers, latches, one-shots, and assignments. Assignment operators assign the value
calculated by the preceding operators to a special class of operands called virtual outputs.
Like any other operand, a virtual output can be used as an input to any operator –
feedback to achieve seal-in is allowed. When list processing encounters an end operator,
processing is stopped until the next processing cycle, at which time it restarts at the top of
the list.
Each contact output has a setpoint to specify the operand that drives the output. Any
operand may be selected – selection of a virtual output is the means by which FlexLogic™
directly controls external equipment such as the motor contactors.
The operators used in FlexLogic™ conform to the following rules.
•
A virtual output may only be assigned once within any given starter. An unassigned
virtual output will have a value of off.
•
A maximum of thirty (30) general purpose timers (timers 1 through 30) are allowed, in
addition to the special purpose timers (pre-contactor timer, transfer timer, ramp up
timer, and ramp down timer).
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FLEXLOGIC™ OVERVIEW
CHAPTER 8: FLEXLOGIC™
•
Each timer may only be used once within any given starter.
•
A maximum of thirty (30) one-shots are allowed.
•
512 lines are executed during every 50 ms.
The operators available in FlexLogic™ are shown below.
Table 1: FlexLogic™ operators
Operator
Inputs
Description
<operand>
none
The output value is the value of the named <operand>.
NOT
1
The output value is “on” if and only if the intput value is “off”.
OR
2 to 16
The output value is “on” if and only if any of the input values are
“on”.
AND
2 to 16
The output value is “on” if and only if all of the input values are
“on”.
NOR
2 to 16
The output value is “on” if and only if all of the input values are
“off”.
NAND
2 to 16
The output value is “on” if and only if any of the inputs values are
“off”.
XOR
2
The output value is “on” if and only if one input value is “on” and
the other input value is “off”.
TIMER
1
The output value is “on” if the input value has been “on” for the set
pickup time. Once the output value is “on”, it remains “on” until the
input value has been “off” for the set dropout time.
LATCH
2
The output value is the state of a reset-dominant volatile bi-stable
latch, where the first input value is the set input, and the second
input value is the reset input.
Positive one-shot
1
The output value is “on” for one processing cycle following an offto-on transition of the input value.
Negative one-shot
1
The output value is “on” for one processing cycle following an onto-off transition of the input value.
Dual one-shot
1
The output value is “on” for one processing cycle following either
an on-to-off or off-to-on transition of the input value.
ASSIGN <operand>
1
The input value is assigned to the named operand. There is
otherwise no output value.
END
none
The first END encountered terminates the current processing
cycle.
The FlexLogic™ operands available in the MM300 are listed below.
Control operands: auto/manual
Auto...............................................Asserted when auto mode is enabled.
Comms Ctrl Actv .....................Asserted when the communication start controls have all
required supervision enabled.
Field Ctrl Actv............................Asserted when the field start controls have all required
supervision enabled.
Field Trip......................................Asserted when a trip resulting from a field control contact input
has yet to be reset.
Hard Wired Ctrl Actv..............Asserted when the hard-wired start controls have all required
supervision enabled.
Hard Wired Trip .......................Asserted when a trip resulting from a hard-wired control
contact input has yet to be reset.
Manual.........................................Asserted when manual mode is enabled.
MCC Ctrl Actv ............................Asserted when motor control center (MCC) start controls have
all required supervision enabled.
MCC Trip......................................Asserted when a trip resulting from a motor control center
(MCC) stop has yet to be reset.
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CHAPTER 8: FLEXLOGIC™
FLEXLOGIC™ OVERVIEW
Comm Trip................................. Asserted when a Comm Trip command is received.
Drive Available Element ...... Asserted when the motor is available to start regardless of the
control mode (auto or manual).
Drive Available
Auto Element............................ Asserted when the motor is available to start and the control
mode is Auto.
Drive Available
Manual Element...................... Asserted when the motor is available to start and the control
mode is Manual.
Control operands: restart inhibit timer
Restart Inhibit .......................... Asserted when the minimum restart time has not expired since
the last motor start.
Control operands: process interlocks
IL A Alarm................................... Asserted upon a process interlock A alarm command.
IL A Stop...................................... Asserted upon a process interlock A stop command.
IL A Trip ....................................... Asserted upon a process interlock A trip command.
IL B... to IL J................................ The operands shown above are identical for interlocks B
through J.
Control operands: starts per hour
Starts/Hour Inhibit................. Asserted when the number of starts in the last 60 minutes has
reached the set maximum.
Control operands: stop/start control
Start A.......................................... Asserted when any start A is present.
Start B.......................................... Asserted when any start B is present.
Stop A .......................................... Asserted when either the Field Start A or Hardwired Start A is
open in two-wire control mode.
Stop B .......................................... Asserted when either the Field Start B or Hardwired Start B is
open in two-wire control mode.
Stop .................................... Asserted when any lockout, trip, or stop is on.
Comms Start A ........................ Asserted when a start A control is received via
communications.
Comms Start B ........................ Asserted when a start B control is received via communications
Comms Stop ............................. Asserted when a stop control is received via communications.
Emergency Stop ..................... Asserted when an external stop set to trip is detected.
External Start A ....................... Pulsed on when external start A is detected.
External Start B ....................... Pulsed on when external start B is detected.
External Stop............................ Pulsed on when external stop set to stop only is detected.
HW Stop...................................... Asserted when a hard-wired control contact input is holding
the motor stopped.
Field Stop ................................... Asserted when a field control contact input is holding the
motor stopped.
Start A Ctrl ................................. Asserted when a start A command is received from any control
source with all required supervision enabled.
Start B Ctrl ................................. Asserted when a start B command is received from any control
source with all required supervision enabled.
MCC Start A............................... Asserted when the control panel START A button has been
pressed.
MCC Start B............................... Asserted when the control panel START B button has been
pressed.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
8–3
FLEXLOGIC™ OVERVIEW
CHAPTER 8: FLEXLOGIC™
MCC Stop ....................................Asserted when the control panel STOP button has been
pressed.
Control operands: undervoltage restart
UVR................................................Asserted when a UV Restart active condition exists.
Fixed operands
Off ..................................................The operand is always off (not asserted). This may be used as a
placeholder or test value.
On...................................................The operand is always on (asserted). This may be used as a
placeholder or test value.
Input/output operands: virtual outputs
Contactor A Relay...................Expected by several control elements to be asserted to close
contactor A.
Contactor B Relay...................Expected by several control elements to be asserted to close
contactor B.
Starter
Forward.......................................Asserted when "Forward" is appended to the displayed basic
status.
Pre-Contactor...........................Asserted during a pre-contactor warning.
Reverse........................................Asserted when “Reverse” is appended to the displayed basic
status.
Input/Output Operands
VO1................................................Asserted when virtual output 1 is on.
VO2 to VO32..............................As above; asserted when virtual outputs 2 through 20 are on,
respectively.
Protection operands: acceleration protection
Acceleration Alarm ................Asserted when an acceleration alarm condition exists.
Acceleration Trip .....................Asserted when an acceleration trip condition exists.
Protection operands: auxiliary undervoltage
Aux U/V Alarm..........................Asserted when an auxiliary undervoltage alarm condition
exists.
Low Aux Voltage Inhibit .......Asserted when an auxiliary undervoltage condition inhibits
starting.
Aux U/V Trip...............................Asserted when an auxiliary undervoltage trip condition exists.
Protection operands: current unbalance
Unbalance Alarm....................Asserted when a current unbalance alarm condition exists.
Unbalance Trip.........................Asserted when a current unbalance trip condition exists.
Protection operands: fuse failure
Fuse Fail ......................................Asserted when a fuse fail condition inhibits starting.
Fuse Fail Alarm ........................Asserted when a fuse failure alarm condition exists.
Fuse Fail Trip .............................Asserted when a fuse failure trip condition exists.
Protection operands: ground fault
Ground Fault Alarm ...............Asserted when a ground fault alarm condition exists.
Ground Fault Trip....................Asserted when a ground fault trip condition exists.
Protection operands: load increase
Load Increase Alarm .............Asserted when a load increase alarm condition exists.
Protection operands: mechanical jam
Mechanical Jam Trip.............Asserted when a mechanical jam trip condition exists.
8–4
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CHAPTER 8: FLEXLOGIC™
FLEXLOGIC™ OVERVIEW
Protection operands: overvoltage
Overvoltage Alarm ................ Asserted when an overvoltage alarm condition exists.
Overvoltage Trip ..................... Asserted when an overvoltage trip condition exists.
Protection operands: phase reversal
Phase Reversal Alarm .......... Asserted when a phase reversal alarm condition exists.
Phase Reversal Inhibit.......... Asserted when a phase reversal condition inhibits starting.
Phase Reversal Trip............... Asserted when a phase reversal trip condition exists.
Protection operands: RTD protection
RTD #1 Alarm ........................... Asserted when an RTD #1 alarm condition exists.
RTD #1 Trip................................ Asserted when an RTD #1 trip condition exists.
RTD #2 to RTD #6 ................... The same set of operands shown above are available for RTDs
2 through 6.
RTD Open/Short Alarm ........ Asserted when any configured RTD channel is found to be an
open circuit when any configured RTD channel is found to be
shorted or showing less than –50°C..
Protection operands: starting duty inhibits
Thermal Inhibit ........................ Asserted when the motor is too hot to be started.
Time Between Inhibit ........... Asserted when the minimum time between starts has not
expired since the last motor start.
Protection operands: thermal model
Thermal Level Alarm............. Asserted when the thermal capacity used alarm condition
exists.
Thermal O/L Trip..................... Asserted when the thermal model has operated and the motor
has cooled, but the trip has not yet been reset.
Protection operands: thermistor protection
Thermistor Alarm ................... Asserted when a thermistor alarm condition exists.
Thermistor Trip ........................ Asserted when a thermistor trip condition exists.
Protection operands: undercurrent
Undercurrent Alarm.............. Asserted when an undercurrent alarm condition exists.
Undercurrent Trip................... Asserted when an undercurrent trip condition exists.
Protection operands: underpower
Underpower Alarm................ Asserted when an underpower alarm condition exists.
Underpower Trip..................... Asserted when an underpower trip condition exists.
Protection operands: undervoltage
Undervoltage Alarm ............. Asserted when an undervoltage alarm condition exists.
Undervoltage Trip .................. Asserted when an undervoltage trip condition exists.
System trouble operands
Open Control Circuit ............. Asserted when an open control circuit is detected.
Self-Test Alarm ........................ Asserted when the self-test has failed and is set for alarm.
Self-Test Trip............................. Asserted when the self-test has failed and is set for trip.
Welded Contactor Alarm.... Asserted when a welded contactor is detected.
Communication trouble operands
Comm Fail Trip ........................ Asserted when a loss of communication is detected.
Comm Fail Alarm.................... Asserted when a loss of communication is detected.
Maintenance
Drive Greasing Alarm ........... Asserted when the running hours exceed the alarm level.
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
8–5
FLEXLOGIC™ OVERVIEW
CHAPTER 8: FLEXLOGIC™
Contactor Inspect Alarm.....Asserted when the number of starts exceeds the alarm level.
Max Stopped Alarm ...............Asserted when the stopped hours exceed the alarm level.
Configuration
Relay Not Configured ...........Asserted when critical settings are not stored.
Reset
Remote Reset Closed............Asserted when the Remote Reset input is closed.
Lockout Reset Closed ...........Asserted when the Lockout Reset input is closed.
Test Switch
Test Switch Closed .................Asserted when the Test Switch is closed.
8–6
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
Digital Energy
Multilin
MM300 Motor Management System
Chapter 9: Communications
Communications
9.1 Communications interfaces
The MM300 has three communications interfaces. These can be used simultaneously:
•
RS485
•
10/100Base-T Ethernet
•
Fieldbus
Setpoint changes related to DeviceNet, Profibus, and Ethernet, require a power cycle to be
activated.
NOTE:
NOTE
External power must be present on the Fieldbus port at power-up, in order to correctly
initialize and operate.
NOTE:
NOTE
For full details, please refer to the MM300 Communications Guide, to be found on the GE
Multilin web site.
NOTE:
NOTE
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
9–1
COMMUNICATIONS INTERFACES
9–2
CHAPTER 9: COMMUNICATIONS
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
GE Digital Energy
Multilin
MM300 Motor Management System
Appendix
Appendix
A.1 Change notes
A.1.1 Manual Revision history
Table A–1: Revision History
MANUAL P/N
RELEASE DATE
ECO
1601-9023-A1
21 June 2007
300-002
1601-9023-A2
8 November 2007
300-005
1601-9023-A3
6 February 2008
1601-9023-A4
13 May 2008
1601-9023-A5
10 September 2008
1601-9023-A6
17 October 2008
Table A–2: Major Updates for MM300-A6
Section Number
CHANGES
Manual revision number from A5 to A6
No content changes
Firmware version to 1.31 to align with Comm Guide changes
Table A–3: Major Updates for MM300-A5
Section Number
CHANGES
Manual revision number from A4 to A5
4.1.2
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
Added new section - Troubleshooting the USB Driver
a–1
APPENDIX
Table A–3: Major Updates for MM300-A5
Section Number
CHANGES
6.2.4
Drive Available setpoint added
6.3.3.5
Note added re Aux Undervoltage
8.1.1
Flexlogic: added operands to control operands: auto/
manual, and control operands: stop/start control
General
Minor Corrections
Table A–4: Major Updates for MM300-A4
Section Number
CHANGES
Manual revision number from A3 to A4
Chapter 9
Removed Communications details ---> Comm Guide
General
Minor Corrections
Table A–5: Major Updates for MM300-A3
Section Number
CHANGES
Manual revision number from A2 to A3
Ch6 - Setpoints - System
Screen Saver Feature added
Ch6 - Setpoints - System
Phasor Display added
Ch6 - Setpoints - Current
and Voltage Transformers
CT Primary Turns added
Ch6 - Setpoints - Soft
Starter
Bypass information deleted
Ch6 - Setpoints
Waveform section added to Config section
Ch6 - Setpoints
Datalog section added to Config section
Ch6 - Setpoints
Events section added
Ch6 - Setpoints
Counters section added
Ch7 - Diagnostics
Waveform section added
Ch7 - Diagnostics
Datalog section added
Table A–6: Major Updates for MM300-A2
Section Number
CHANGES
Manual revision number from A1 to A2
Ch1 - MM300 Order Codes Change to Protection section of Order Table
a–2
Ch2 - Mounting
Control Panel mounting drawing added
Ch4 - Status
Description of use of <enter> symbol added
Ch5 - Comm Setpoints
Profibus Address details added
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
APPENDIX
Table A–6: Major Updates for MM300-A2
Section Number
CHANGES
Ch5 - Status
Misc. Setpoints added
Ch5 - UV Autorestart
Two NOTES added - end of setpoint section
Ch5 - Wye-Delta Open...
Section updated
Ch5 - Soft Starter
Section updated
Ch5 - System Security
Section relocated after Control Elements section
Ch5 - System
Section updated
General
Miscellaneous text updates and revisions
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
a–3
APPENDIX
a–4
MM300 MOTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – INSTRUCTION MANUAL
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