Axia IP-Intercom System User guide

Axia IP-Intercom System User guide
IP-Intercom System
Installation & User’s Guide
Manual Version 1.2.1 Aug 2010
IP-Intercom Software 1.2.5 and up
IMPORTANT NOTE:
Axia Livewire devices are intended for use with an
Ethernet Switch that supports multicast and QoS
(Quality of Service). On a non-switched Ethernet
hub, or a switch that is not enabled for multicast, this
will result in network congestion that could disrupt
other network activity.
Important Safety Information
To reduce the risk of electrical shock, do not expose
this product to rain or moisture. Keep liquids away
from the ventilation openings in the top and rear of
the unit. Do not shower or bathe with the unit.
Caution
USA Class A Computing Device
Information To User. Warning:
This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy. If it is not installed and used
as directed by this manual, it may cause interference
to radio communication. This equipment complies
with the limits for a Class A computing device, as
specified by FCC Rules, Part 15, Subpart J, which
are designed to provide reasonable protection against
such interference when this type of equipment is operated in a commercial environment. Operation of
this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause
interference. If it does, the user will be required to
eliminate the interference at the user’s expense.
NOTE: Objectionable interference to TV or radio
reception can occur if other devices are connected to
this device without the use of shielded interconnect
cables. FCC rules require the use of only shielded
cables.
Canada Warning:
“This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A
limits for radio noise emissions set out in the Radio
Interference Regulations of the Canadian Department of Communications.” “Le present appareil numerique n’emet pas de bruits radioelectriques depassant les limites applicables aux appareils numeriques
(de les Class A) prescrites dans le Reglement sur le
brouillage radioelectrique edicte par le ministere des
Communications du Canada.”
The installation and servicing instructions in the
manual are for use by qualified personnel only. To
avoid Electric Shock, do not perform any servicing
other than that contained in the operating instructions
unless you are qualified to do so. Refer all servicing
to qualified personnel.
Electrical Warning
To prevent risk of electric shock: Disconnect power
cord before servicing.
This equipment is designed to be operated from a
power source that includes a third “grounding” connection in addition to the power leads. Do not defeat
this safety feature. In addition to creating a potentially hazardous situation, defeating this safety ground
will prevent the internal line noise filter from functioning.
Ventilation Warning
Axia IP-Intercom devices use convection cooling.
Do not block the ventilation openings in the side or
top of the units. Failure to allow proper ventilation
could damage the unit or create a fire hazard. Do not
place the unit on a carpet, bedding, or other materials that could interfere with the rear and top panel
ventilation openings.
Customer Service
We support you...
By Phone/Fax in the USA.
• Customer service is available from 9:30 AM to 6:00 PM USA Eastern Time, Monday through Friday at
+1 216.241.7225. Fax: +1 216.241.4103. The 24-hour Telos/Omnia/Axia support line is +1 216.622.0247.
By E-Mail.
• The address is [email protected]
Via World Wide Web.
• The Axia Web site has a variety of information which may be useful for product selection and support. The URL
is http://www.AxiaAudio.com.
Feedback
We welcome feedback on any aspect of Axia products or this manual. In the past, many good ideas from users have
made their way into software revisions or new products. Please contact us with your comments.
Updates
The operation of Axia IP-Intercom is determined largely by software. Periodic updates may become available - to
determine if this is the case check our web site. Contact us to determine if a newer release is more suitable to your
needs.
Our electronic newsletter has announcements of major software updates for existing products, as well as keeping
you up to date on the latest Axia, Telos, and Omnia product releases. You may subscribe to update notifications here:
http://www.axiaaudio.com/signup.htm
Trademarks
Axia Audio
1241 Superior Ave. Cleveland, OH 44114 USA
+1 (216) 241-7225
[email protected]
Copyright © 2010 by TLS Corporation. Published by Axia Audio. We reserve the right to make improvements or changes in the products described in this manual, which may affect the product specifications, or to revise the manual without notice. All rights reserved.
Version 1.2.1 Aug 2010
Introduction • iii
Telos Systems, Axia Audio, Livewire, the Livewire Logo, the Axia logo, SmartSurface, Element, SmartQ, Omnia,
the Omnia logo, and the Telos logo, are trademarks of TLS Corporation. All other trademarks are the property of
their respective holders.
Notice
About This Manual
All versions, claims of compatibility, trademarks, etc.
of hardware and software products not made by Axia
mentioned in this manual or accompanying material
are informational only. Axia makes no endorsement
of any particular product for any purpose, nor claims
any responsibility for operation or accuracy.
Warranty
This product is covered by a five year limited warranty, the full text of which is included in the rear
section of this manual.
Service
You must contact Axia before returning any equipment for factory service. Axia will issue a Return
Authorization number, which must be written on the
exterior of your shipping container. Please do not
include cables or accessories unless specifically requested by the Technical Support Engineer at Axia.
Be sure to adequately insure your shipment for its
replacement value. Packages without proper authorization may be refused. US customers please contact
Axia technical support at +1 (216) 241-7225. All other customers should contact their local representative
to arrange for service.
This manual covers the details of the Axia IP-Intercom products. This document assumes that you are
familiar with Livewire’s basic concepts, as outlined
in the our Introduction to Livewire: IP-Audio System Design Reference and Primer manual.
If you have not done so, please review that material first. In it we explain the ideas that motivated
Livewire and how you can use and benefit from it,
as well as nitty-gritty details about wiring, connectors, and the like. Since Livewire is built on standard
networks, we also help you to understand general
network engineering so that you have the full background for Livewire’s fundamentals. After reading
Introduction to Livewire you will know what’s up
when you are speaking with gear vendors and the
network guys that are often hanging around radio
stations these days.
As always, we welcome your suggestions for improvement. Contact Axia Audio with your comments:
Axia Audio, a Telos Company
1241 Superior Avenue
Cleveland, Ohio 44114 USA
Phone: +1.216.241.7225
Web: www.AxiaAudio.com
E-Mail: [email protected]
Introduction • iv
We strongly recommend being near the unit when
you call, so our Support Engineers can verify information about your configuration and the conditions
under which the problem occurs. If the unit must
return to Axia, we will need your serial number, located on the rear panel.
Version 1.2.1 Aug 2010
Table of Contents
Console-Mounted Intercom Stations . . . . . . . . . 10
Customer Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii
Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
Chapter Three: Advanced Programming . . . . . . . . 13
Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
Assigning an IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
About This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
IC.20 and IC.1 Intercom Web Pages . . . . . . . . . 14
A Note from the President of Axia
. . . . .
vii
Home Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Intercom Configuration Page . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Chapter One: Introducing Axia IP-Intercom . . . . . 1
External Sources Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Key Assign Page (IC.20) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
IP-Intercom Stations: Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . 2
Key Assign Page (IC.1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Front Panel Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Livewire GPIO Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Intercom Channel Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Network and Quality of Service Page . . . . . . . 20
Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
System Configuration Page . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Listen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Factory Reset (OLED panels only) . . . . . . . . . . 24
OLED Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Display Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
OLED Front Panel Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Mute Microphone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Legendable Buttons Front Panel Test . . . . . . . 24
Mute Speaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Select . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Intercom Expansion Configuration . . . . . . . . . . 25
Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
IC.20 with IC.10X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Assign/Enter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Element IP-Intercom Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
CALLSTACK Controls (20-Station Panel) . . . 3
Intercom Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Keypad (20-Station Panel) . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Channel Assignment (10 and 20 Ch) . . . . . . . 28
Filmcap Buttons (Programmable) . . . . . . . 3
Channel Assignments (10-Btn Film Cap) . . . . . 28
Livewire Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
GPIO Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
IP-Intercom Stations: Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Intercom Livewire Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Chapter Two: Setup and Operation . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Appendix A: Unbalanced Connections . . . . . . . . 31
Individual Channel Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Appendix B: Connecting GPIO . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Appendix C: Specifications and Warranty . . . . . . 41
Listen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Axia System Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Talk/Listen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Axia Limited Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
OLED Display (Individual Channels) . . . . . 7
Other Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
OLED Display (CALLSTACK) . . . . . . . . . 7
Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Mute Speaker (MUTE SPKR) . . . . . . . . . 8
Select . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Group (20-Station Panel) . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Assign (20-Station Panel) . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
CALLSTACK (20-Station Panel) . . . . . . . . 10
Keypad (IC.20 only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Film-Cap Buttons (IC.1 only) . . . . . . . . . 10
Version 1.2.1 Aug 2010
Introduction • v
Mute Microphone (MUTE MIC) . . . . . . . . 8
Microphone opens.
Speech, in tones soft and mellow.
Introduction • vi
A new broadcast day.
Version 1.2.1 Aug 2010
20 years ago, I designed my first broadcast console
for PR&E. I look back on that time with great fondness;
we were building bullet-proof boards for the world’s
most prestigious broadcasters, making each new console
design bigger and fancier to accommodate a wider variety of source equipment and programming styles. The
console was the core of the studio; all other equipment
was on the periphery.
Then things changed: the PC found its way into
broadcast audio delivery and production. At first, PC
audio applications were simple, used only by budget
stations to reduce operating expenses. But soon the applications evolved and were embraced by larger stations.
Slowly, the PC was taking center stage in the radio studio.
Like many, I was captivated by the PC. Stations retired carts, phonographs, open-reel decks,
cassettes — even more modern digital equipment such as DAT and CD players, replacing all with PC apps. Client/server systems
emerged and entire facilities began using
PCs to provide most – or all – of their recorded audio. Yet consoles continued to treat
PCs as nothing more than audio peripherals.
I knew that we console designers were going to have to
rethink our designs to deal with computer-centric studios.
During this time, traditional broadcast console companies began producing digital versions. But early digital consoles were nearly identical in form and function
to their analog predecessors. It took a fresh look from a
European company outside broadcasting to merge two
products – audio routing switchers and broadcast consoles – into a central processing engine and attached
control surface. Eventually nearly every console and
routing switcher company followed suit, and a wide variety of digital “engines” and control surfaces flooded
the market.
But, advanced as these integrated systems were, they
still handled computer-based audio sources like their
analog ancestors. Sure, the router and console engine
were now integrated, but the most important studio ele-
ment – the PC – was stuck in the past, interfaced with
100-year-old analog technology. The PC and console
couldn’t communicate in a meaningful way – strange,
considering that PCs everywhere were being networked,
fast becoming the world’s most popular and powerful
communication tool.
Then a group of Telos engineers developed a method
of using Ethernet to network real-time audio devices,
allowing computers and consoles, controllers and peripherals to interact smoothly and intelligently. Powerful, flexible networks had finally come to our studios. As
with the transition from carts to computers, the benefits
are many and impressive. A few networked components can replace routing switchers, consoles, processing peripherals, sound cards, distribution amps, selector
switches and myriad related devices.
This deceptively simple networked system costs a
fraction of other approaches, yet has capabilities surpassing anything else. The system is modular
and can be used to perform discrete functions
in a traditional environment. Concurrently, it
easily scales to serve both the humblest and
the very largest of facilities. Console, router,
and computer work in harmony.
So, equipped with this new technology
and countless ideas, we launch Axia, the newest division of Telos. Axia is all about delivering innovative networked audio products to future-minded broadcasters. On behalf of our entire team, I welcome you as a
charter client. Axia is the culmination of nearly 40 manyears of some of the most ambitious R&D ever applied
to the radio industry. And this is only the beginning. We
have more products, innovations, and partnerships in the
pipeline.
You already know your Axia system is unlike anything else. So it shouldn’t be surprising that your new
system is loaded with new thinking, new approaches,
and new ideas in virtually every conceivable area. Some
concepts will challenge your traditional ideas of studio
audio systems, but we’re certain that once you have experienced the pleasures of the networked studio, you’ll
never want to go back. And now, for something completely different...
Michael “Catfish” Dosch
Version 1.2.1 Aug 2010
Introduction • vii
A Note From The President of Axia
Who is so attuned
that he may perceive the sound
Introduction • viii
of one bit dropping?
Version 1.2.1 Aug 2010
Chapter One:
Axia’s IP-Intercom products may operate as a standalone intercom system. The IP-Intercom system also integrates seamlessly with console and routing functions
of any existing Axia Livewire network.
Broadcasters have already discovered the advantages
of using Axia networks. Less cost, less wiring and less
setup time are just a few of the benefits gained from using Ethernet for real-time audio routing.
Now, broadcast intercom systems benefit from those
same advantages. Axia IP-Intercom Networks lower installed cost by using CAT-5 and standard switched Ethernet for instant communication between multiple stations. And if you already have an Axia network in your
broadcast facilities, deployment is even easier. Axia IPIntercoms plug right into Livewire networks for tight
integration with Axia broadcast consoles and routing
systems; console operators’ existing console microphone
and preview speaker are used to provide seamless intercom communications right from the board.
IP-Intercom Overview
The family of Axia IP-Intercom products includes
several models of rack-mounted panels and consolemounted modules as well as a software intercom panel
and desktop versions (coming soon).
Rackmount Stations:
• IC.20 20-station panel with OLED displays
• IC.10X 10-station expansion panel with OLED displays
• IC.1 10-station panel with user-labeled buttons
Many of us are familiar with Axia’s Element console
and know that every Element surface fader module has
built-in talkback to/from any connected source. These
standard communication capabilities are more advanced
than those normally found on high-end many broadcast
consoles and will satisfy most intercommunication requirements found in radio.
Some more complex operations such as broadcast
news or live productions may require more extensive
features. The enhanced intercom capabilities needed in
these demanding environments is provided by Axia’s
rack-mount intercom stations as well as drop-in Element modules and a software IP-Intercom station (coming soon). Axia IP-Intercom can also be integrated into
a facility that consists of only Livewire audio and GPIO
nodes.
Axia IP-Intercom equipment introduces AEC (Advanced Echo Cancellation) technology licensed from
Germany’s Fraunhofer Institute (the inventors of MP3).
AEC is a revolutionary echo-cancellation technology
which enables full duplex operation without the use of
headphones. AEC allows simultaneous Talk and Listen
without feedback or comb-filtering. It is no longer necessary to mute or dim the Listen loudspeaker when Talking.
NOTE: Only approved and properly programmed
Ethernet switches incorporating the proper Multicast and QoS standards should be used. See
www.AxiaAudio.com/switches/ for details.
Element Console Stations:
• 20-station panel with OLED displays
• 10-station panel with OLED displays
• 10-station panel with user-labeled buttons
Desktop Intercom Stations and SoftCom Intercom Station for Windows are currently under development and
will be released in the near future.
Version 1.2 July 2010
1: Introducing IP-Intercom • 1
Introducing Axia IP-Intercom
IP-Intercom Stations: Front Panel
The rackmounted Livewire IP-Intercom stations incorporate a number of front panel connectors, controls
and indicators to allow the operator to operate the system
quickly and confidently. Front and rear panel views are
shown for the 20-station OLED display and the 10-station film-cap user-legendable stations. The Element console versions of these stations incorporate the same controls in slightly different physical layouts.
Intercom Channel Controls
This section provides only some basic information
on the device controls. Please refer to Chapter 2: Setup
and Operation for an in-depth discussion of the operation of the IP-Intercom panels.
Talk
This button may be used in momentary or latch
modes. You may press and hold the Talk button to talk.
You may also tap to latch Talk mode and tap again to
release Talk mode.
1: Introducing IP-Intercom • 2
Front Panel Connectors
Microphone Jack
This jack is used for a panel-mount microphone with
a 1/4 inch Tip-Ring-Sleeve connector. One popular intercom microphone is the Telex MCP-90-8.
Listen
Press and hold the Listen button to listen momentarily. Tap the Listen button to latch Listen mode and tap
again to release Listen mode.
Intercom Headset Connector
This is a 4-pin XLR-M connector used to connect
an industry standard intercom headset that incorporates
both a microphone and a headphone. One example is
the Production Intercom SMH210 Single Muff Headset.
There are numerous other manufacturers of these headsets that all use the following 4-pin wiring convention:
Pin 1: Mic common
Pin 2: Mic hot
Pin 3: Headphone common
Pin 4: Headphone hot (mono)
OLED Display
This 10-character display shows the Label of the
channel assigned to the adjacent Talk and Listen buttons.
Volume
The rotary Volume control is used to adjust the overall level of the loudspeaker audio.
Mute Microphone
Tapping the Mute Microphone button alternately
enables and disables the microphone ensuring privacy if
necessary.
Figure 1-1: IC.20 - Front Panel Callouts
Version 1.2 July 2010
Mute Speaker
Tapping the Mute Speaker button alternately enables and disables the audio from the local speaker.
sheet software. Create the 1/2 inch square labels for
these buttons. Use your fingers to pop off the button cap
and insert your label behind the clear button cap.
Select
The Select control is used to scroll through various
menu options and to and select from pending calls. See
the section that follows on the CALLSTACK channel.
Livewire Status Indicators
Group
The Group button enables the user to talk to multiple
users with one press.
Net
When illuminated continuously, this LED represents
the presence of a live Ethernet link to another Ethernet
100Base-T device. If no Ethernet link is present, this
LED flashes slowly.
CALLSTACK Controls (20-Station Panel)
This channel is used for monitoring and calling stations that are not assigned to a specific Talk/Listen channel on the user’s panel. See Chapter 3 for details.
Keypad (20-Station Panel)
A 12-button telephone-style dialing keypad will be
used for features to be added in the future.
Filmcap Buttons (Programmable)
The model IC.1 rackmount 10-key Intercom station,
shown in Figure 1-2, features 10 buttons that are used
in the same manner as the Talk/Listen buttons on the
20-channel unit. These functions are programmed in the
web browser configuration. Button caps are manually
labelled using your favorite word processor or spread-
Sync and Master
Only one of these two LEDs should be illuminated.
The SYNC LED indicates the receipt of clock information from another (Master) Livewire device. The MASTER LED indicates that this device is acting as the master clock source for the Livewire network.
Livewire
This LED indicates that Livewire traffic is present on
the connected Ethernet segment.
NOTE: Axia console mounted IP-Intercom stations use the Control Room Microphone and the
Preview speaker instead of the mic/line inputs
and front panel speaker of the rack-mount models discussed here.
Please refer to Chapter 2: Setup and Operation for
detailed descriptions of the IP-Intercom station controls.
Figure 1-2 IC.1 Front Panel Controls
Version 1.2 July 2010
1: Introducing IP-Intercom • 3
Assign/Enter
This button is used to assign devices to the IP-Intercom Group. It doubles as the “enter” key. See Chapter 2
for details on Group functions.
Four LEDs indicate the status of the Livewire and
Ethernet connections, as well as system synchronisation
as follows:
IP-Intercom Stations: Rear Panel
All rackmounted intercom stations have identical rear panel configurations with the exception of the
10-station intercom expander. This expansion unit has
only a Livewire jack, ID button and AC connector. The
rear panel of the 20-station panel is illustrated in Figure
1-4 and described in the following section.
Livewire (100 Base-T) Connector
This connector is for connection to an approved Ethernet switch. It has two integral LEDs. The green “Link”
LED indicates the presence of a live signal (same as the
front panel “NET” LED). The “Activity” LED indicates
that Ethernet packets are being sent or received over the
link.
IMPORTANT NOTE: Axia IP-Intercom stations
are intended for use with an Ethernet Switch
that supports multicast and QOS (Quality of
Service). If you attempt to use them with nonswitched Ethernet hubs, or a switch that is not
enabled for multicast, you will experience network congestion that could disrupt other network activity. Information on qualified Ethernet
switches is found here: http://www.axiaaudio.
com/switches/default.htm
1: Introducing IP-Intercom • 4
ID Button
This recessed switch allows you to assign an IP address to a new unit. An IP address is required so you can
use your web browser to setup the advanced features of
the IP-Intercom panel. When the ID button is pressed,
you are prompted to enter an IP address and subnet mask
from the front panel controls. Pressing this button also
triggers the IP-Intercom panel to identify itself and request an IP address from a BootP server on the Ethernet
network (more on this later).
1
8
Figure 1-3: RJ-45 Pin Locations
IMPORTANT NOTE: Axia recommends using
balanced audio for analog audio connections.
If unbalanced sources are to be connected to
these inputs, we strongly recommend using a
balun (transformer) or balanced-to-unbalanced
buffer amplifier at the source device. Such
devices are readily available, for example the
­StudioHub “Match Jack”.
RJ-45 ANALOG LINE CONNECTORS
Pin
Function:
1
Left Channel +
2
Left Channel -
3
Right Channel + (on output only)
4
Not Connected
5
Not Connected
6
Right Channel - (on output only)
7
Not Connected
8
Not Connected
Three-pin XLR connectors are also available for
mono line level analog audio connection in and out of
the IP-Intercom rear panel. Industry standard pin conventions are followed.
Pin 1: Ground (optional connection)
Pin 2: Analog Audio +
Pin 3: Analog Audio -
Audio Input and Output Connectors
Line Level Analog Audio
All RJ-45 line-level input and output connections to
IP-Intercom stations are dual channel connectors. Each
pair of audio inputs on the Analog Line shares an 8-position / 8-pin RJ-45 modular jack. The connector pin functions are shown in the table that follows. Inputs are mono
- left channel only. Outputs are dual channel mono.
Microphone Input
A 3-pin XLR-F connector is supplied for a balanced
microphone input to the system. Phantom Power is enabled from the web page configuration.
Pin 1: Ground (Mic shield)
Pin 2: Microphone +
Pin 3: Microphone -
Version 1.2 July 2010
Figure 1-4: IC.20 - Rear Panel Callouts
Analog Line Input Characteristics
• Level: +4 dBu nominal (+24 dBu clip point)
• Impedance : >/= 10 K Ohm balanced.
IP-Intercom GPIO Connector Pinouts
Pin
Function:
1
Listen Active Lamp
Analog Microphone Input Characteristics
• Level: -83 to -28 dBu nominal, adjustable in 1
dB steps
• Headroom: 20 dB above nominal
• Impedance: ≥ 4 KOhm balanced
2
Analog Output Characteristics
• Level: +4 dBu nominal (+24 dBu clip point)
• Impedance: < 50 Ohm
6
3
Ring Lamp
4
Mic Mute Lamp
5
Line Active Lamp
7
8
9
10
GPIO Port
11
The rear panel contains a 15-pin control connector
with a logic input to mute the internal speaker, a logic
output to dim/mute the console speakers when the intercom microphone is unmuted as well as a logic output
to signal when the intercom is being signaled (ringing).
A logic output is also provided, which follows the front
panel Line-Active warning LED. The GPIO pin assignment are shown in the table that follows.
12
AC (Mains) Power
These signals are available as electrical signals on the
rack mount unit (or other Livewire GPIO ports) and as
software GPIO on all intercom channels.
The AC receptacle connects mains power to the unit
with a standard IEC power cord. The power supply has
a “universal” AC input, accepting from 90 to 240 VAC,
47-63 Hz. Fuses are located inside the chassis.
Mute Preview/Speaker Command
13
14
15
Version 1.2 July 2010
1: Introducing IP-Intercom • 5
Note: All microphone and line inputs are internally summed. All outputs are dual-channel
mono.
Featureless paper
this page would have been empty
1: Introducing IP-Intercom • 6
save for this haiku.
Version 1.2 July 2010
Setup and Operation
Chapter 1: Introducing Axia IP-Intercom described
the physical connections to the IP-Intercom stations. This
chapter will discuss the operation of the IP-Intercom stations when used as a standalone system or in conjunction
with your Element console and Livewire audio nodes.
Please be sure to read Chapter 3: Advanced Programming so you will understand how you assign the IP
address and Livewire channel numbers to your IP-Intercom station. Chapter 3 also describes the web page interface and the advanced features and capability of your
IP-Intercom system.
Individual Channel Controls
Talk
This key may be used in momentary or latching
modes. To use it as a momentary PTT (push-to-talk)
switch, you may press and hold the Talk key to talk. If
you want to us it as a latching control, you can tap to
latch Talk mode and tap again to release Talk mode.
The red Talk LED illuminates during Talk Mode, or
when the remote station associated with that key is listening. The Talk LED may flash to indicate a fault (attempt to communicate with faulty or disconnected panel,
route is locked out by studio IFB, function is overridden
by another station, system failure prohibits completing
route, etc.)
PRIVACY NOTE: If a remote user is assigned
to one of your intercom channels and that user
presses his Listen key (corresponding to your
station), the Microphone LED will indicate solid
RED. This means that the remote user is listening to you. This is desirable if you want fast,
hands-free operation. If you want to ensure your
privacy - be sure to press your Mute Mic key.
The yellow Listen LED illuminates during Listen
Mode when an assigned remote station is calling the local station. The Listen LED will continue to flash for 5
seconds (by default) after the remote user has disconnected to indicate who has recently called. This is useful in a busy operation where there are many short calls
making it difficult to keep track of who has spoken to
you while you are concentrating on other tasks.
Talk/Listen
If you want to initiate a full-duplex hands-free conversation with a remote station, simply press both Talk
and Listen keys. As long as the remote microphone is not
muted, the two-way communication can proceed without any action on the part of the remote user. Remember
communication among IP-Intercom stations is always
full-duplex. Hands-free operation may not be available
when communicating with third-party equipment that
does not support full-duplex operation.
OLED Display (Individual Channels)
This 10-character display will show the Label of the
Source that is assigned to the adjacent Talk and Listen
buttons. The upper part of the display refers to the buttons above the display and the lower part of the display
refers to the buttons below the display.
If you have configured the channel with an Alternate Label, that alternate name will be displayed.
Other Controls
OLED Display (CALLSTACK)
This high contrast OLED (Organic Light Emitting
Diode) display is context dependent and is used to display many different parameters in conjunction with the
Version 1.2 July 2010
2: Basic Setup and Operation • 7
Chapter Two:
Listen
In a manner identical to the Talk button, this key may
also be used in two different ways. You may press and
hold the Listen key to listen momentarily. You may also
tap the Listen key to latch Listen mode and tap again to
release Listen mode. You may also press multiple keys
and listen on more than one channel if desired.
Figure 2-1: IC.20 Front Panel Controls
2: Basic Setup and Operation • 8
Select control and Assign/Enter key. Those controls are
fully described in subsequent sections.
Volume
The rotary Volume control performs three functions.
•
It is used to adjust the overall level of the loudspeaker audio by simply rotating the control.
• When the Volume Control is rotated while pushing a Listen button, it adjusts the audio level of
only that source on the panel loudspeaker without affecting the levels presented for that source
elsewhere in the system. When a channel is
removed from listen mode, the default level is
restored.
• The headphone level can be controlled by pushing the Volume control encoder and adjusting
the volume while pushed. When released, normal operation will resume.
Mute Microphone (MUTE MIC)
Tapping the Mute Microphone key alternately enables and disables the microphone. The red LED illuminates when the microphone is muted and extinguishes
when the microphone is active.
Whenever the intercom station is powered up, the
analog output and Livewire source may be active. If you
want the freedom of hands-free communication with
other stations, make sure the Mute Mic LED is not illuminated. Alternately, to ensure your privacy, you should
use the Mute Microphone function.
Mute Speaker (MUTE SPKR)
Tapping the Mute Speaker button alternately enables and disables the audio from the local speaker. The
red LED illuminates when the speaker is muted and extinguishes when the local speaker is active. Note that the
speaker may also be muted by a contact closure to the
GPIO port input 2 (pin 12).
Select
The Select control is used for several functions:
• The Select control is used in injunction with the
Assign/Enter key to scroll and select from options in the Assign, Shift and Status menus. See
the section on the Assign key for the details of
Figure 2-2: IC.10X - Expander Chassis
Version 1.2 July 2010
•
•
these menus.
The Select control can also scroll and select incoming calls from stations not assigned to a local channel. See the section that follows on the
CALLSTACK channel.
Pressing the Select control will toggle between
the main and alternate Channel Labels. This
switches all labels on keys and menus. If an alternate label is not available, the main label will
remain on the display
The Select control is used in combination with the
Assign/Enter key to navigate menus. Pressing the Assign key performs the “enter” function thus choosing the
highlighted option.
Assign (20-Station Panel)
The Assign key is used in conjunction with the Select control for several functions. The Assign key works
like an “enter” key to:
• Assign channels to the Talk/Listen buttons.
•
Program the channels that are assigned to the
Group button (described previously).
Figure 2-3: IC.20 Memu Tree
•
•
Choose pre-programmed Shift pages.
Choose other parameters in IC.20 menus in conjunction with the Select control.
The IC.20 Menu Tree is illustrated in Figure 2-3. The
Select control is used to scroll through the menu options
and the Assign/Enter key is used to choose the highlighted option. Menu Tree descriptions follow:
•
Home Page - lists the CALLSTACK (incoming call requests) plus the ASSIGN, SHIFT and
STATUS options.
• ASSIGN - takes you to a list of available intercom users that can be assigned to dedicated intercom channels. Scroll with the Select control
and press the Assign key to make a selection.
Then press the Microphone key on the channel
to which you wish to assign the new user.
•
SHIFT - takes you to a list of presets, referred
to as Shift Pages. These preset Shifts are used
to load up entire 20-channel key configurations.
The Select control is used to scroll the list and
the Assign key is used to make your choice.
•
STATUS - takes you to a page that will list various status parameters. The current version of the
software displays the IC.20 Intercom Label and
the temperature (degrees C) of the unit.
Version 1.2 July 2010
2: Basic Setup and Operation • 9
Group (20-Station Panel)
The Group button enables the user to talk to multiple
sources with one press. It is used in two different ways:
• The Group button is used as a Group Talk key
to talk to your station group (discussed below)
in momentary or latching modes. To use Group
as a momentary PTT (push-to-talk) key, simply
press and hold the Group button. If you want
to us this as a latching control, you can tap to
latch Group Talk mode and tap again to release
Group Talk mode.
•
Pressing the Assign button and then the Group
button will enter Group Assignment mode, at
which point the Group LED will flash. Tap any
number of channel Listen keys that you wish to
join into the group. Tap any number of previously selected Listen buttons that you wish to
remove from the group. Talk and Listen LED
indicators illuminate to show group assignment
state. Tap the Group button to leave assignment
mode and its LED extinguishes.
Figure 2-4: IC.1 Front Panel Controls
2: Basic Setup and Operation • 10
•
In all menus, selecting Back will take you back
to the Home Page.
CALLSTACK (20-Station Panel)
This CALLSTACK channel (found only on the
20-station rackmount panel and the 20-station Element
console module) is used for monitoring and calling stations that are not assigned to a specific Talk/Listen channel on the user’s panel. The OLED lists up to four ringing, active and last completed calls. Press Talk to talk
to the present source displayed. You can use the Select
control to scroll through the call list.
• The Listen LED flashes yellow when the local
user is being called by a station not assigned to
one of the Talk/Listen channels on the called station panel, and continues to flash for approximately 40 seconds or until call is answered.
• The Talk LED flashes red when a remote user
is attempting to Listen to you. The Talk LED
is solid red when you have selected Talk Mode.
It may flash red to indicate a fault (attempt to
communicate with faulty or disconnected panel,
route is locked out by studio IFB, system failure
prohibits completing route, etc.)
Keypad (IC.20 only)
The keypad will be used for enhancements that will
be added in the future. In a networked studio environment, there are many possibilities. Stay tuned - we
wouldn’t put it there if we didn’t have a plan for it!
Film-Cap Buttons (IC.1 only)
The 10-button Intercom panel shown in Figure 2-4
features 10 film-cap buttons that are programmed in the
web page setup of the IC.1. These buttons may be con-
figured as Talk or Listen buttons. They may also be configured as combination Talk/Listen buttons that provide
the equivalent of pressing both the Talk and Listen buttons on an IC.20 station. This allows an IC.1 user to open
up full two-way communication with a user by pressing
a single button.
Note that the Film-Cap buttons cannot be programmed from the front panel of the IC.1. The web
page setup must be used to configure these buttons. See
Chapter 3: Advanced Programming for details.
Console-Mounted Intercom Stations
Connecting console-mounted IP-Intercom stations
couldn’t be easier. Each of these modules is equipped
with a CANBus RJ-45 connector. All data communication and power is provided by the CANBus connection.
The console-mounted modules are highly integrated
with the Element console and do not have dedicated
GPIO or audio connectors.
To get started, simply connect the IP-Intercom console module to the CANBus distribution hub in your
Element console using a CAT5-E patch cable. Note
that more than one IP-Intercom module in an Element
console is unsupported so any setting of the ID selector
switch on the circuit board will be acceptable.
Once you have connected the Intercom module, it
may be necessary to ensure that the Element knows
about it. To do this, enter the Element capture mode by
pressing both * and 2 keys on the Element keypad for 5
seconds. When you see “Capture” displayed above each
Version 1.2 July 2010
fader, press the Enter key.
The Intercom module will
now be available.
Figure 2-5: 10-Station
Film-Cap Element
Intercom Module
Operation is nearly
identical to rackmounted
units with the difference
being Element integration
details. The audio source
for the console modules is
the Talkback audio of the
Element (generated by the
CR Microphone). The CR
Headphone and Preview
speaker are used instead of
the headphone and speaker
that is built into the rackmount panels. The Element’s External Preview
source must be specified as
the Intercom’s Preview Mix
Livewire channel. Chapter
3 provides details on this
topic.
GPIO ports can be assigned to the Intercom module or external sources if
desired. IP-Intercom logic signals include an input to
mute the audio feeding the preview system, a logic output to activate whenever the microphone path is muted
as well as a logic output to signal when the intercom
is being signaled (ringing). A logic output is also provided which follows the front panel Line-Active warning
LED. Please refer to Appendix B: Connecting GPIO
for more information on GPIO.
The web page configuration for the Element inter-
Figure 2-6: 10 and 20-Station OLED Element
Intercom Modules
com modules is contained within the StudioEngine or
PowerStation Mix Engine configuration since it is the
Engine that creates and manipulates the intercom audio
streams. Advanced setup of the IP-Intercom modules for
the Element console is covered in Chapter 3.
What’s Next
Now you know the essentials of wiring and using
your IP-Intercom, In Chapter 3, we’ll learn about the
advanced configuration of your IP-Intercom system. q
Version 1.2 July 2010
2: Basic Setup and Operation • 11
The 10-station and
20-station modules as well
as the 10-station film-cap
module are shown here.
The controls are identical
to their rackmounted counterparts.
In our youth we
never dreamed that, one day, streams
2: Basic Setup and Operation • 12
might not have water.
Version 1.2 July 2010
Chapter Three:
Advanced Programming
This chapter will walk you through the use of the
IP-Intercom panel’s built in web pages to configure
advanced features quickly, easily — and remotely!
Assigning an IP Address
When you first press the ID button, you will see the
existing IP address of the unit. If it is “factory fresh”,
you will see the display as shown in Figure 3-2. These
four OLEDs display the four octets of the unit’s IP address. The factory default is 0.0.0.0.
•
Use the Mic or Spkr key above the display to
increment or decrement the IP address.
•
Use the Mic and Spkr keys below the first display to select whether you are setting the IP Address or the Subnet Mask.
•
Press the Mic key below OK on the fourth display to save your settings.
There are a few different ways to assign an IP address to your Axia IP-Intercom station.
Figure 3-2: IC.20 Front Panel IP Address Displays
BootP Server
Since the IC.1 does not have a front panel display,
you may need a different way to assign its IP address.
We use a standard utility program called BootP that’s
available in the Support section of the Axia Audio web
site. To assign the IP address, follow these steps:
• Download and save the BootPS program. Temporarily disable your Windows Firewall. Doubleclick the bootps.exe program. A command prompt
window will open.
• Press the <ID> button on the IP-Intercom rear
panel and bootps.exe will recognize the button
press, display the existing IP address and prompt
you for new IP address entry.
• Enter the desired new IP address and press <ENTER> on your keyboard.
• Make note of the IP address you have entered.
Figure 3-1: iProbe - BootP
Pop-up Window
IC.20 Front Panel Controls
If you do not have iProbe and you are working with
an IC.20, you may program the IP address by pressing the ID button on the rear panel and following the
prompts on the front panel OLED displays.
Version 1.2 July 2010
Figure 3-3: IC.1 BootP Server Window
3: Advanced Programming • 13
iProbe
The quickest and easiest way to assign an IP address
to an IP-Intercom station is to use our system management utility, iProbe. Axia’s iProbe software contains a
BootP server. If iProbe is running when the IP-Intercom
station’s ID button is pressed, you will see a pop-up that
prompts you for IP address and subnet mask parameters.
IC.20 and IC.1 Intercom Web Pages
All of the intercom panel’s parameters may be configured using the IP-Intercom Panel’s Web configuration pages. To access the Web pages from a computer,
the computer and IP-Intercom Panel must be connected
to the same LAN (or, the computer and Node can be
connected using a “crossover 10/100 Base-T” Ethernet
cable). To connect, open your web browser and enter the
IP address of the device to be configured. Your browser
should now display the device’s home page, with links to
the various functions available.
A few things to remember: We assume you
know the basics of network architecture, but we
must mention that the first three numbers of the
IP address of the computer you are using will normally match those of the Node you are attempting to configure; i.e., 192.168.15.xxx. If they
don’t, the gear won’t be able to communicate
and you’ll just get frustrated. Microsoft Internet Explorer 5 and later, and Mozilla Firefox 1.0 and later
have been tested with Axia devices. Your browser must have the Java runtime library installed and enabled, and must allow “pop up” windows and display our meters. To obtain the Java runtime, visit
www.java.com .
3: Advanced Programming • 14
Note that the rackmount panels will each have a
unique IP address while the Element intercom modules
share the IP address of their associated Element console
or PowerStation. The implementation of an Element IPIntercom module is slightly different than a standalone
Intercom panel. We will begin by looking at the web
pages for the standalone IP-Intercom panels.
The web pages for the various IP-Intercom models
are very similar. The home page of each panel gives
you access to the panel’s configuration pages. Let’s go
through these pages now starting with the Home Page.
Home Page
The home page shown in Figure 3-4 includes only
links to other configuration pages. As soon as you select one of these links, you will be prompted for a user
name and password. By default, the user name is user
and there is no password.
Intercom Configuration Page
The page labelled Intercom Configuration is
where you configure the local input to this panel,
and assign a Livewire channel and parameters to
that source. Once configuration is complete (or at any
time in the configuration process) click on Apply to save
your changes to the device.
Intercom Main and Alternate Labels
Each channel label can be up to 10 characters maximum. An alternate label can also be entered for each
channel. The user will see the alternate label (if any) by default. A typical example
might be to use locations for the default labels and user names for the alternate labels.
The example in Figure 3-5 shows ProdStudio as the Main Label and Maciej (our buddy who works there) as the Alternate label.
If an alternate label is assigned to a port, the
channel label only appears during assignment and configuration functions.
Figure 3-4: IP-Intercom IC.20 - Home Page
Version 1.2 July 2010
Livewire Channel
This is the channel number of the Intercom station’s audio sources (mixed mic and
line inputs). This number is used to identify
the audio stream in the network so must be
a unique number. As described in the Introduction to Livewire: IP-Audio System Design Reference and Primer, each Livewire stream must
be assigned a unique channel number.
You will want to develop a logical naming
plan for your facility. For example you may
wish to include the studio or rack name as
part of your names to make life simpler
when identifying sources in the future. We
give some examples in the Introduction
to Livewire manual.
Stream Mode
IP-Intercom sources are Stereo and either
Standard or Live. They can also be Enabled, or
Disabled
•
Standard Stereo – Generates a stereo
source. Use this for sources where latency is not critical. Standard streams
are usually OK for Intercom since other
users are in different locations and latency is not observable.
•
Live Stereo – Generates a low latency
stereo source. This is usually used for
microphones, phones, air monitors and
other monitored “live” sources.
Set all Node “Sharable” fields to “No” if you are
using Element consoles running v2.0 or later software
since the Element console now handles source sharing.
Call Drop Flash
This feature helps to inform you who has recently
called. In a fast-paced environment, you will receive
a quick messages from other Intercom users. The corresponding Listen indicator will continue to flash even
after the caller has dropped the call. The default drop
flash time of 5 seconds will give you a chance to glance
Figure 3-5: IC.20 - Intercom Configuration Page
at the IP Intercom panel and easily determine who has
recently called you.
Trigger Level
This setting is communicated to all other IP-Intercom stations. It controls the priority of this IP-Intercom
station when it is calling another IP-Intercom station.
When any IP-Intercom station listens to multiple sources
simultaneously, those with lower “trigger level” will be
muted or dimmed by another IP-Intercom user with a
higher priority.
The possible settings for Trigger Level are:
1. IFB
2. Low Priority (Mute IFB)
3. Low Priority (Dim lower priority sources, Mute
IFB)
Version 1.2 July 2010
3: Advanced Programming • 15
Shareable
This is a standard feature provided for backward compatibility with SmartSurface consoles. This interlock prevents multiple consoles from sending simultaneous backfeeds or logic commands to a single source. A
red lock indicates a console has locked the source and it
is available to other consoles in listen-only mode.
4. Default (Dim lower priority sources; Mute IFB)
5. Above Normal (Dim lower priority, Mute Low
Priority and IFB)
6. Above Normal (Dim low priority, Mute Low Priority and IFB)
7. High (Mute lower priority sources)
8. Highest (Mute lower priority sources)
Dimming and muting of external sources is configured on the Ext Sources page (described in the next section).
Dim Level
This setting specifies the degree of dimming. It is
variable from 0 (no dimming) to full mute. Any Dim
Level greater than 99 dB is considered to be equivalent
to MUTE and the * symbol will be displayed.
Audio I/O Configuration
There are three microphone connectors on the IC.20
and IC.1 intercom stations.
•
Front panel 1/4 in TRS connector
•
Front panel 4-pin XLR headset connector
•
Rear panel 3-pin XLR connector
3: Advanced Programming • 16
Each input can be configured with an independent
gain setting ranging from +18 to +77 dB.
Phantom power can be disabled or enabled for each
of the three microphone inputs. Phantom power voltages
are:
•
Rear panel XLR microphone input: 48V
•
Front panel microphone: 9V-15V
• 4-pin headset microphone: 3.3V
The rear-panel line input may be disabled or enabled
as desired.
You will note that the IP-Intercom station actually has
several inputs. All of the analog inputs (unless disabled)
are internally mixed so you can use any of them (or even
more than one) without any special configuration.
Temperature
This is a display of the temperature on the main cir-
cuit board. Under normal conditions, the temperature
will be approximately 50 degrees Celsius. Potentially
damaging high temperatures may create an alarm condition which will cause the IP-Intercom station to shut
down.
External Sources Page
IP-Intercom sources use an automatic source advertising scheme so no setup or external software is required for them.
In most real-word installations, you will want to interface your IP-Intercom system to other non-Livewire
equipment. You can accomplish this easily by using
Axia audio nodes and GPIO nodes and configuring those
External Sources here. These sources might be talkback
from existing analog consoles or interconnections to
wireless intercom systems. External sources could also
be sources that you might occasionally wish to monitor
such as TV audio.
Label
The label may be customized to help you easily identify these external sources. Keep your label short so it
will fit in the 10-character OLED display.
Livewire Channel
The Livewire Channel is automatically populated
when you select a Source by using the pop-up control
that is located to the right of the Livewire Channel box.
Clicking on this selector button will open a new window
that will list all Livewire sources in your entire network.
Simply select the one that you want to make it available
to your intercom station.
Once a label has been specified and a Livewire channel selected, clicking Apply will add a new source to
the station.
GPIO Port
This source GPIO Port refers to the port number as
listed on the Livewire GPIO page of the intercom station
configuration. This drop-down control allows you to associate these channels with AUX GPIO ports 1 through
8. These AUX ports are defined on the Livewire GPIO
Version 1.2 July 2010
the Talk pin for Marc.
Listen Pin
A contact closure to this pin will replicate pressing the front panel Listen key associated with this
source. In Figure 3-6, Milos has pin 2 defined as his
Listen pin and Marc has pin 5.
NEW
Additional Livewire sources can be added to the
list of external sources by entering the relevant information in this row and then clicking the Apply
button.
Delete
Checking the Delete box and clicking Apply
will delete all checked sources from this intercom
station. As expected, any keys with labels that may
correspond to deleted stations will no longer function.
configuration page that is discussed later.
Talk and Listen pins are selected by the associated
drop-down selector. Pins 1 through 5 are available.
Each port is assigned separate Talk and Listen pins
that will allow you to interface these sources to the real
world. These GPIO ports may be connected to 2-way radios, wireless intercom equipment, audio console logic,
electric door locks ... use your imagination!
Since each port has five pins, you can double-up two
sources on a single GPIO port as shown in Figure 3-6.
Let’s use a real-world example to illustrate the concepts.
In this example, Milos is assigned pins 1 and 2 on AUX
2 while Marc has been assigned pins 4 and 5; both on the
same GPIO port AUX 2.
Talk Pin
A contact closure to this pin will replicate pressing
the front panel Talk key associated with this source. In
our example, pin 1 is the Talk pin for Milos and pin 4 is
Key Assign Page (IC.20)
The Key Assign configuration is used to assign
intercom sources to front panel channels and to create
Shift Pages that may be loaded to the intercom station
(IC.20 only). Each Shift page contains the key assignment and mode for each of the front panel keys. This
concept is similar to Show Profiles or scenes. You may
store numerous Shift Pages that are easily loaded from
the front-panel controls.
Shift Page
This drop-down selects from all existing Shift Pages
or allows you to edit an existing page or create a new
Shift Page. Remember that your Shift Page names are
limited to the 10 characters available in the display.
Key Settings
Each key has a drop-down to select the source assigned to that key. You may select only from valid IPIntercom sources or External sources that have been created on the previous configuration page.
Each key is also assigned a mode to determine the
functions of the front panel keys. The four mode selec-
Version 1.2 July 2010
3: Advanced Programming • 17
Figure 3-6: IC.20 - Livewire External Source Configuration
Figure 3-8: IC.1 - Key Assign
specify front panel film-cap button functions.
Key Settings
Each key has a drop-down to select the source assigned to that key. You may select only from valid IPIntercom sources or External sources that have been created on the previous configuration page.
Figure 3-7: IC.20 - Key Assign Configuration
3: Advanced Programming • 18
tions are:
•
•
•
•
Each key is also assigned a mode to determine the
functions of the front panel switches. The four mode selections are:
• Talk and Listen
•
Listen
• Talk
•
Disabled
Talk and Listen
Listen
Talk
Disabled
Shift Page Name
Each Shift Page is assigned a unique name. When
listed, the Shift Pages are always listed alphabetically. If
you wish to have your list presented in a specific order,
precede each name with a number to force the list to appear in that order.
This page also contains controls to “save as a copy”
and to “delete this page”. Use the “save as a copy” to
save time in creating and editing a new Shift page that
shares much in common with your original page.
For the IC.1, these settings have a slightly different
meaning when compared to the IC.20. With the IC.1,
you may specify that a key performs either a Talk or Listen function as you might expect. With 10 buttons, you
could have 5 Talk keys and 5 Listen keys. A unique feature of the IC.1 is that a single button may actually be a
combination Talk/Listen button whereby simply pressing that single button will establish a full-duplex Talk
and Listen communication path.
Livewire GPIO Page
Key Assign Page (IC.1)
The Key Assign configuration of the IC.1 is used to
assign intercom sources to front panel channels and to
In a system that consists of only IP-Intercom stations,
and Element IP-Intercom modules, you really don’t have
to worry much about GPIO since all of the logic func-
Version 1.2 July 2010
tions are built into your IP-Intercom system. When
you have interconnections to other equipment, you
may need to extend the IP-Intercom logic functions to and from these non-Livewire devices.
GPIO (General Purpose Input Output) can be
a complicated topic. In an IP-Intercom system,
GPIO is primarily used for the logic functions associated with Talk and Listen when we are communicating with other systems.
Intercom channel logic can be assigned to virtual GPIO ports used for interfacing to intercom
sources that are external to your IP-Intercom system. We saw on the External Sources configuration page how we can name these external sources
and associate them with virtual GPIO channels
such as AUX 2. The Livewire GPIO configuration
page provides the logic link between these virtual
GPIO channels and physical connections to those
external sources so they will have Talk and Listen
capability.
When Milos wants to LISTEN, the IC.20 must be in
TALK mode (closure to input pin 1). When Milos wants
to TALK, the IC.20 must be in LISTEN mode (closure
to input pin 2).
Figure 3-8: IC.1 - Livewire GPIO
Whenever we want to Talk to our friend Milos, output pin 1 on this same port is activated. When we want
to Listen to Milos, output pin 2 is active on Port 1 of the
GPIO node at 192.168.0.110.
It is very important to understand the logic of Talk
and Listen as they apply to local and remote users. A local IC.20 user will press Talk when he wants to talk. A
remote user will place the IC.20 channel into Talk mode
when he wants to Listen to the IC.20 local user. This
seems a bit strange but it is the same way a conversation
takes place. At any given point in time, one user is talking while the other is listening. When the IC.20 channel
is in Talk mode, the IC.20 user is talking and the remote
user is listening to him. The same logic follows through
to the Listen function. When the IC.20 local user must
Listen when the remote user Talks - so in order for this
exchange to take place, the IC.20 must be in Listen
Version 1.2 July 2010
3: Advanced Programming • 19
To continue with the example we started earlier, you will recall we had determined that Milos
and Marc would both be assigned to GPIO Port
AUX 2. Here is where we will map that virtual GPIO
port to a real, physical GPIO connector by specifying
the IP address and physical port of the GPIO node that
is used for the remote contact closures to/from these two
users. In our example, Marc and Milos are both connected to Port 1 of the GPIO node at 192.168.0.110. We must
also map that GPIO port back to our virtual GPIO AUX
2 so the communication will be bidirectional. The channel specified for that remote GPIO port would look like
this: 192.168.0.140/4 which is port AUX 2 of our IC.20
IP-Intercom station. As we determined on the External
Sources page, the Talk and Listen input pins for Milos
are input pins 1 and 2 (respectively) of this port and the
Talk/Listen input pins for Marc are input pins 4 and 5.
mode. Of course, since our communication path is fullduplex, we can Talk and Listen simultaneously so there
is no limitation imposed.
This web page can be used to monitor GPIO activity
in real time so it is extremely useful for troubleshooting
GPIO logic. You must have Java installed before your
web browser can display the GPIO status boxes. They
will illuminate green when active.
GPIO Ports 1 and 2 are special. Port 1 is a hardware
port and can be assigned to any Livewire GPIO function.
It can be used to communicate with other Livewire devices or IP-Intercom virtual ports. Port 2 is a virtual port
used to provide “main” status of the IP-Intercom MAIN
unit itself. The pin assignments are as follows:
1 Listen mode active
2 not used
3 Ring Active (CALLSTACK)
4 Mic Muted
5 not used
3: Advanced Programming • 20
In the example shown in Figure 3-8, we have shown
you a case where we have created a GPIO “snake” between two GPIO ports. In this case we have used the
loop-back IP address 127.0.0.1 and “connected” the virtual MAIN port with the Hardware Port (the rear panel
15-pin GPIO connector). You can create such a relationship between any Livewire GPIO ports, real or virtual.
In addition to the special functions of ports 1 and 2
we have just discussed, any of the GPIO ports may be
used to map external source logic to a physical port as
we have shown for Port 4.
The parameters for GPIO Configuration follow.
Port #:
Displays the GPIO port number (fixed): 1 through
10. Port 1 is the only physical port. Ports 2 through 10
are virtual ports.
Name:
Provides a box where you can label this port for your
own reference.
Channel:
This is the Livewire channel number associated a
Livewire source that has associated logic (such as a microphone in an existing Element console) or the GPIO
address and port associated with an external intercom
source. The channel number is entered manually.
Network and Quality of Service Page
The settings on this tab are advanced settings, and
generally the default settings should be used.
Livewire Clock Master
Livewire’s clocking system is automatic and largely
transparent to end users. By default, the Axia hardware
node with the lowest Ethernet IP address will be the
clock “master”. The system will automatically and transparently switch to a new unit as clock master if needed.
We do however, permit you to force clock mastership
to a particular node or set certain nodes as “preferred”
for clock master while maintaining automatic operation. For example you may prefer to have nodes that are
on UPS power be preferred clock masters. Note that in
the automatic modes, the clock master is changed only
when the current master becomes unavailable (adding a
new node will not change clock master regardless of the
new node’s setting). The only exception is the 7 (Always
Master) setting.
You have the following choices for this setting:
•
0 (always slave) “STL” – Unit will never be
master and is only used with Ethernet radios.
•
0 (always slave) – This unit will never be used
as clock master.
• 3 (default) – The usual setting.
• 4 (Secondary Master) – Nodes with this setting
will be used as clock masters before those set
to 3.
• 5 (Primary Master) – Nodes set to this setting
will be used as master before those set to 4.
• 7 (Always Master) – This forces a particular
node to be clock master, even if another node
is currently clock master. If this mode becomes
available then the usual prioritization is used.
• 7 (Always Master) “STL Snake” – This forces
a particular device to be clock master. Use only
Version 1.2 July 2010
one system to another; some computers can provide very low timing irregularities and allow the
receive buffer to be reduced to achieve lower audio delay. Default setting is 100 ms.
801.1p Tagging, 802.1p VLAN ID, 802.1q
Priority, & DSCP Class of Service
802.1p tagging is necessary within the
Livewire network to mark high-priority audio
packets. This information is used by the Ethernet switches in the packet scheduling and queuing mechanism. It provides low-jitter packet
forwarding of Livewire clock and low-latency
audio streams.
On the other hand, Standard streams don’t
need tagging, because they are not low-latency.
By default, standard streams are marked with
Type of Service (DSCP code points) information in the IP header which can be used by L3
switches to provide better service to our audio
streams than to best effort IP traffic.
when two nodes are connected back to back
without an Ethernet Switch.
IMPORTANT! Only a single device on a Livewire
network should ever be set to 7 (Always Master).
For this reason we do not recommend using that
selection.
Livewire Clock Mode
Provided for compatibility with older revisions:
•
IP low rate (default) – recommended setting
•
Ethernet – compatible with 1.x firmware
•
IP High rate – compatible with 2.1.x master
Receive Buffer Size
Determines the amount of buffering in the receiver.
Buffering is needed to compensate for jitter in network
packet delivery. Usually the biggest source of the jitter is
a source PC. Real-time performance varies widely from
You should not need to change these default settings
unless you are building a system that is not based on our
recommendations.
In Axia devices, the VLAN ID setting is read-only. It
is always 0 and cannot be changed. As a result Livewire
audio always uses the native VLAN assigned to the port
of the switch.
“DSCP Class of Service” is a standard describing the
tagging of IP frames with service information. Network
equipment can be set up to provide different forwarding delay and drop precedence depending on the service
Version 1.2 July 2010
3: Advanced Programming • 21
Figure 3-9: IC.20 - Livewire QoS Configuration
There is an option to enable L2 802.1p tagging on standard streams, and this may be used
with switches that do not use the DSCP information included in the TOS field of the IP header.
We do not enable this tagging by default, because it
wouldn’t work in cross-over Ethernet connection to PCs.
Most network cards do not accept 802.1p frames by default.
information. Our defaults are compatible with
most Ethernet equipment defaults for the Class
of Service that Livewire requires; you should
not need to change them unless instructed by
Axia Support.
System Configuration Page
The System Configuration page, shown in
Figure 3-10, allows configuring the device’s
IP address and related settings. It also permits
choosing between a primary and secondary
bank of software and to download new software
into the secondary bank. The currently running
software version is displayed here as well. You
must click the Apply button for changes to take
place.
3: Advanced Programming • 22
IP Settings
These are the usual IP-related settings (see
Introduction to Livewire: Systems Primer for
an overview and some good references to additional information). Your network administrator should be able to provide the needed values.
Each unit must have a unique IP address.
Host name
The name is a 12-character, alphanumeric
name for this device that may include hyphens
but NOT spaces; those will be converted to hyphens.
This name is used to identify the panel on the network.
You may wish to include the location of the intercom
panel (studio or rack) in the name for ease of reference.
Network Address (IP Address)
NOTE: If you change the IP address you will lose
your browser connection when you click Apply,
and will need to reconnect using the new IP address.
The IP address of the IP-Intercom station. Each
Livewire device must have a unique IP address. Normally this address would be set using the front panel or using
the BootP program, but it can be checked or changed
from this web page, if needed.
Figure 3-10: IC.20 - System Configuration
Netmask (Subnet mask)
This is the IP subnet mask of the local unit. The typical setting that is suitable for most cases is 255.255.255.0 .
Gateway (Router)
This may be the IP address of the IP Router connecting the local IP network with some other IP network.
This is not used or required in basic configurations.
Syslog Server (IP address)
Various services generate syslog (RFC 3164) messages, which can be forwarded to a remote syslog daemon. The remote syslog daemon IP address can be entered on the System page.
Syslog Severity Level Filter
You can customize syslog logging by choosing log
Version 1.2 July 2010
User Password
This is the password required to connect to the unit.
It must be at least 5 characters long and may be as long
as 8 characters. Only alphanumeric characters are permitted. To change the password you must enter and
verify the new password and then click Apply. NOTE:
If you have changed the Firmware version the unit will
reboot. If you have entered a new IP address or password
the unit will not reboot. Of course, if you have changed
the IP address, it will be necessary to re-connect to the
unit at its new address.
IMPORTANT! Changing device passwords can
have serious implications on the operation of
your PathfinderPC software. Consult the PathfinderPC manual before making any password
changes.
When logging into the unit any of the following “user
names” may be used: user, USER, axia, Axia, AXIA.
The default password is blank for any of the above users.
Firmware version
An Axia device has two internal memory “banks”.
Each bank contains room for a complete version of operating software. This approach allows a software update
to be completed and checked without danger of making
the unit inoperable if the download were to be incomplete or corrupted. It also provides and easy way to try a
new software version and still return to the old version.
the desired bank and then click on Apply.
Saving Bank 1 Software
Software is always downloaded to Bank 1 (the secondary bank). Downloading new software to your unit
(see below) will overwrite any software currently in this
bank. If you wish to save the software currently in Bank
1, you can save it by moving it to Bank 0 as follows:
•
Click on Commit this version to Bank 0 box
(see Figure 3-10).
• Click on Apply.
Downloading new software
A new version of software can be downloaded into
Bank 1 as follows:
1. Go to the Axia web site www.axiaaudio.com/
downloads/ and download the desired software update for your unit to your computer (this should be
the computer that you will use to access the unit’s
web page). Your local computer operating system
should display a prompt to permit you to choose
where you wish to locate the downloaded file. You
can choose any convenient location, just be sure
to note the drive and location where the file is to
be saved.
2. Open a web browser and connect to the device to
be updated. Enter the complete path and file name
for the software file (e.g. the file downloaded from
the Axia site), or click on the Browse button to locate the file. Once the proper path and filename are
displayed, click on Apply to download the file.
3. A successful download will be indicated by the
new version being displayed in the Bank 1 field. If
the download is unsuccessful the field for Bank 1
will be blank.
4. To run the new software click on Bank 1 radio button and then click on Apply to reboot the node. It
will take approximately one minute for the unit to
reboot.
IMPORTANT! The unit will reboot after you click
Apply when changing between software versions. This will result in loss of audio locally, and
at any unit using the local sources.
The software version in each bank is displayed here.
To change banks simply click in the “radio button” for
Version 1.2 July 2010
3: Advanced Programming • 23
detail level:
• Emergency: system is unusable
• Alert: action must be taken immediately
• Critical: critical condition
• Error: error conditions
• Warning: warning conditions
• Notice: normal but significant condition
• Informational: informational messages
• Debug: debug-level message
• Only messages with a severity higher than that
specified by the filter will be forwarded to the remote logger.
Factory Reset (OLED panels only)
If it is necessary to reset the unit to factory defaults
for any reason, this can be accomplished by powering
up the unit while the rear-panel ID button is depressed.
Once the unit boots up, you will be prompted “Reset in
10 seconds” and if you continue to press the ID switch,
the unit will reset to factory defaults and reboot.
After the reboot, you will then be prompted to enter
the IP address and subnet mask. The first four OLED
displays are used to display the four octets of the IP address or subnet mask, depending on which you have currently selected. Once you have assigned an IP address
and subnet mask, you may connect to the unit with your
web browser and continue with other aspects of the configuration.
Pressing the ID button at any time will bring up the
IP setup screens. Press the Mic or Spkr key below the
fourth display to Save or Cancel your settings.
Display Tests
3: Advanced Programming • 24
This section describes tests that may be used to troubleshoot controls, displays and indicators on your intercom panels. Press and hold ID button for 10 seconds to
activate the front panel OLED test. Press the ID button
again when you wish to exit test mode.
OLED Front Panel Test
•
Net, Sync, Livewire, Master LEDS should turn
on and off, one after another and repeat this pattern as long as the test mode is active.
•
Press every button on the front panel. A Talk
button press lights up the red LED and turns
on all pixels on the adjacent OLED display. A
Listen button press turns on the adjacent yellow
•
•
•
LED.
When a numeric keypad key is pressed, that
character is displayed on the auto-answer section OLED display.
The rotary knob values are displayed on the
auto-answer section OLED display as they are
turned. Pressing the knobs lights up the “LINK
ACTIVE” LED. Other buttons of the auto answer section light up the adjacent LED.
Pressing MUTE SPKR and MUTE MIC, lights
up adjacent LED.
Legendable Buttons Front Panel Test
• The Net, Sync, Livewire, and Master LEDs
should turn on and off one after another and repeat this pattern as long as the test mode is active.
• As you press a film cap button on the front panel,
the color of the button will cycle through off,
green, red and yellow with every press.
• The rotary encoder controls the brightness of the
LEDs. As the control is turned, 16 different levels of brightness should be observed.
•
Pressing the rotary encoder will toggle the color
of all buttons between green and red.
•
Pressing MUTE SPKR and MUTE MIC, lights
up the adjacent LED.
IC.10X Expander Chassis
The IC.20 IP-Intercom station may be equipped with
a 10-channel expander unit known as the IC.10X. This is
a rack-mount chassis with only an AC receptacle, an ID
button and a Livewire jack on the rear panel. There are
no audio connections or logic ports on the IC.10X.
Figure 3-11: IC.10X - Expander Chassis
Version 1.2 July 2010
The configuration and operation of the IC.10X is
quite straight-forward and if you have understood our
previous section on the IC.20, you will have no problem
extending that knowledge to the IC.10X.
IP Address
The IC.10X has an ID button on the rear panel. This
switch is used in conjunction with Axia iProbe software
or the BootP utility as described in detail at the beginning of this chapter.
The IP address may also be changed from the System page of the configuration as shown in Figure 3-14.
Remember that if you change the IP address, you will
lose the connection to your web browser and it will be
necessary to “point” your browser at the new IP address
to restore the connection.
Web Page Configuration
Figure 3-13: IC.10X Expansion Configuration
password and Firmware Version sections that are fully
described earlier in this chapter. The IP address, other
network settings, syslog server, password, firmware updates are all handled in a manner identical to that described previously for the System Page of the IC.20 main
station.
It is highly recommended that any IC.10X expander
chassis should run the same version of software as its
associated main chassis.
The web pages of the IC.10X will look familiar since
it is simply an extension of the IC.20 channel capacity.
Figure 3-12: IC.10X Home Page
Intercom Expansion Configuration
This page simply allows you to specify the Label of
the IC.20 master to which you are associating the expansion and which bank of 10 stations you are assigning to
this module. You may have more than one IC.10X associated with an IC.20 master - just be sure to specify
different channel ranges for each expansion chassis.
System Page
The configuration contains the familiar IP settings,
Figure 3-14: IC.10X - System Configuration Page
IC.20 with IC.10X
When you are using an IC.20 chassis with an IC.10X
expander, you will notice a change to the Key Assign
Version 1.2 July 2010
3: Advanced Programming • 25
Home Page
The IC.10X has only two options on the home page
as shown in Figure 3-12.
•
Intercom Expansion Configuration
•
System Parameters
dress since they are CANBus accessory panels that are
associated with a specific Element console. The configuration of Element Intercom modules is very similar to
the standalone intercom stations.
The example shown in Figure 3-16 is for the 20-station Element module when used with a PowerStation.
There is a lot of information on that page - we will discuss the four sections independently
Note: Element IP-Intercom Module configuration web pages are actually associated with
the StudioEngine or PowerStation Mix Engine,
not the Element. Use the Intercom tab on the
StudioEngine or PowerStation to locate the IPIntercom module configuration.
Intercom Configuration
Figure 3-15: IC.20 - Key Assign with IC.10X
Expander Chassis
page of the IC.20. The Key Assign page will now contain the additional keys that belong to the expansion
chassis. An example of the IC.20 Key Assign when used
with a single IC.10X expander is shown in Figure 3-15.
3: Advanced Programming • 26
It is possible to use more than one expansion chassis
however each chassis must be assigned to a unique range
of keys as specified in the Intercom Expansion Configuration page.
Remember that an IC.10X is an expander and cannot
be used as a standalone unit since it has no audio connections. It shares the audio connections with its associated
IC.20 station.
Element IP-Intercom Modules
The IP-Intercom modules for the Element come in
three formats:
• 20-station OLED Element intercom module
• 10-station OLED Element intercom module
• 10-station Film-Cap Element intercom module
IP-Intercom modules do not have a separate IP ad-
Intercom Main and Alternate Labels
Each channel label can be up to 10 characters maximum. An alternate label can also be entered for each
channel. The user will see the alternate label (if any) by
default. A typical example might be to use locations for
the default labels and user names for the alternate labels.
If an alternate label is assigned to a port, the channel
label only appears during assignment and configuration
functions.
Livewire Channel Number
This is the channel number of the Intercom station’s
audio source. This number is used to identify the audio
stream in the Livewire network so it must be a unique
number.
Preview Mix Channel Number
This is a second Livewire channel that must be specified. It is a new Livewire source created by the IP-Intercom station and this source must be delivered to your
Element as it’s External Preview source channel. The
channel number that you specify here must be used to
create an Element Source Profile that will be specified as
the Source ID for External Preview in the Show Profile
General Monitor Settings.
It is not necessary to use a GPIO input to enable the
External Preview since this logic is handled automati-
Version 1.2 July 2010
cally. Also note that muting of the Preview speaker is
handled automatically whenever any CR microphone is
ON.
Call Drop Flash
This feature helps to inform you who has recently
called. In a fast-paced environment, you will receive
a quick messages from other Intercom users. The corresponding Listen indicator will continue to flash even
after the caller has dropped the call. The default drop
flash time of 5 seconds will give you a chance to glance
at the IP Intercom panel and easily determine who has
recently called.
Trigger Level
This setting is communicated to all other IP-Inter-
com stations. It controls the priority of this IP-Intercom
station when it is calling another IP-Intercom station.
When any IP-Intercom station listens to multiple sources
simultaneously, those with lower “trigger level” will be
muted or dimmed by another IP-Intercom user with a
higher priority.
The possible settings for Trigger Level are:
1. IFB
2. Low Priority (Mute IFB)
3. Low Priority (Dim lower priority sources, Mute
IFB)
4. Default (Dim lower priority sources; Mute IFB)
5. Above Normal (Dim lower priority, Mute Low
Priority and IFB)
6. Above Normal (Dim low priority, Mute Low Priority and IFB)
7. High (Mute lower
priority sources)
8. Highest (Mute lower priority sources)
Dim Level
This setting specifies the degree of dimming. It is variable
from 0 (no dimming)
to full mute. Any Dim
Level greater than 99
dB is considered to be
equivalent to MUTE
and the * symbol will
be displayed.
Channel
Assignment
Figure 3-16: 20-Station Element IP-Intercom Module
Version 1.2 July 2010
Each channel has
two parameters that
3: Advanced Programming • 27
Dimming and muting of external sources
is configured on the
Ext Sources page (described in the next section).
you will configure:
• The Intercom Source is selected from the dropdown menu. You may select from any connected
IP-Intercom source or any external Livewire
Sources that have been configured in the Intercom Livewire Sources section.
• The channel Mode may be selected from the
drop-down. This determines the actions of the
film-cap buttons or Talk/Listen keys associated
with the channel.
Channel Assignment (10 and 20 Ch)
The Channel Assignment configuration is used to
assign intercom sources to panel channels as described
above and to create Shift Pages that may be loaded to
the intercom station. Each Shift Page contains the key
assignment and mode for each of the front panel keys.
This concept is similar to Show Profiles or scenes. You
may store numerous Shift Pages that are easily loaded
from the front-panel controls.
3: Advanced Programming • 28
Shift Page (20 Channel Only)
This drop-down selects from all existing Shift pages
or allows you to edit an existing page or create a new
Shift page. Remember that your Shift pages names are
limited to the 10 characters available in the display.
Key Settings
Each key has a drop-down to select the source assigned to that key. You may select only from valid IPIntercom sources or External sources that have been created on the previous configuration page.
Each key is also assigned a mode to determine the
functions of the front panel keys. The four mode selections are:
• Talk and Listen
•
Listen
• Talk
•
Disabled
Shift Page Name (20-Channel Only)
Each Shift page is assigned a unique name. When
listed, the Shift pages are always listed alphabetically. If
you wish to have your list presented in a specific order,
precede each name with a number to force the list to appear in that order.
This page also contains controls to “save as a copy”
and to “delete this page”. Use the “save as a copy” to
save time in creating and editing a new Shift page that
shares much in common with your original page
Channel Assignments (10-Btn Film Cap)
The Channel Assignment configuration of the module is used to assign intercom sources to panel keys and
to specify front panel film-cap key functions.
Key Settings
Each key has a drop-down to select the source assigned to that key. You may select only from valid IPIntercom sources or External sources that have been created on the previous configuration page.
Each key is also assigned a mode to determine the
functions of the front panel switches. The four mode selections are:
• Talk and Listen
•
Listen
• Talk
•
Disabled
For the 10-Station Film Cap module, these settings
have a slightly different meaning when compared to the
other 10 or 20 Station modules. With the Film Cap module, you may specify that a key performs either a Talk
or Listen function as you might expect. With 10 buttons,
you could have 5 Talk keys and 5 Listen keys. A unique
feature is that each of the Film Cap buttons may actually
be a combination Talk/Listen button whereby simply
pressing a single button will establish a full-duplex Talk
and Listen communication path.
GPIO Configuration
Element Intercom modules utilize the physical GPIO
ports of their associated Element or PowerStation. The
Element IP-Intercom modules have the same virtual
GPIO ports as their rack-mounted cousins and they work
in exactly the same manner.
Version 1.2 July 2010
Please refer to Appendix B: Connecting GPIO for
more details and a real world example.
Intercom Livewire Sources
IP-Intercom sources use an automatic source advertising scheme so no setup or external software is required.
You may also wish to interface your IP-Intercom system to other non-Livewire equipment. You can accomplish this easily by using Axia audio nodes and GPIO
nodes and configuring those sources in this section.
These external sources might be talkback from existing analog consoles or interconnections to wireless intercom systems. External sources could also be sources
that you might occasionally wish to monitor such as TV
audio.
Label
The label may be customized to help you easily identify these external sources. Keep your label short so it
will fit in the 10-character OLED display.
Livewire Channel
The Livewire Channel is automatically populated
when you select a Source by using the pop-up control
that is located to the right of the Livewire Channel box.
Clicking on this selector button will open a new window
that will list all Livewire sources in your entire network.
Simply select the one that you want to make it available
to your intercom station.
Once a label has been specified and a Livewire channel selected, clicking Apply will add a new source to
the station.
GPIO Port
This source GPIO Port refers to the port number as
listed on the GPIO Configuration area of the intercom
station configuration. This drop-down control allows
you to associate these channels with AUX GPIO ports 1
through 8. These AUX ports are defined on the Livewire
GPIO configuration page that was discussed above.
Talk and Listen pins are selected by the associated
drop-down selector. Pins 1 through 5 are available.
Each external source GPIO port is assigned separate
Talk and Listen pins that will allow you to interface these
sources to the real world. Since each port has five pins,
you can double-up two sources on a single GPIO port (2
talk pins and 2 listen pins.
Talk Pin
A contact closure to this pin will replicate pressing
the front panel Talk key associated with this source.
Listen Pin
A contact closure to this pin will replicate pressing
the front panel Listen key associated with this source.
It is very important to understand the logic of Talk
and Listen as they apply to local and remote users. A
local Element user will press Talk when he wants to
talk. A remote user will place the Element’s IP-Intercom
channel into Talk mode when he wants to Listen to the
Element operator. This seems a bit strange but it is the
same way a conversation takes place. At any given point
in time, one user is talking while the other is listening.
When the Element channel is in Talk mode, the Element’s Operator is talking and the remote user is listening to him. The same logic follows through to the Listen
function. When the CR Operator must Listen when the
remote user Talks - so in order for this exchange to take
place, the Element’s IP-Intercom station must be in Listen mode. Of course, since our communication path is
full-duplex, we can Talk and Listen simultaneously so
there is no limitation imposed.
NEW
Additional Livewire sources can be added to the list
of external sources by entering the relevant information
in this row and then clicking the Apply button.
Version 1.2 July 2010
3: Advanced Programming • 29
Each virtual GPIO port has a Name box where you
may enter any name to describe the port. It also has a
Channel box where you will enter the IP Address and
port of a GPIO node. For example, you would enter
192.168.0.120/5 in the Channel box if you anted to associate a Virtual GPIO port with port 5 of a GPIO node
(or Element) with an IP address of 192.168.0.120.
3: Advanced Programming • 30
Delete
Checking the Delete box and clicking Apply will delete all checked sources from this intercom station. As
expected, any keys with labels that may correspond to
deleted stations will no longer function.
Version 1.2 July 2010
Unbalanced Connections
We’ve told you, both earlier in this manual, and in
Introduction to Livewire; System Design Reference
& Primer, that Axia recommends balanced audio connections when connecting analog source and destination gear to the inputs and outputs, respectively, of Axia
nodes. Not only do we recommend this for the usual
reasons, but because inter-channel crosstalk between the
left and right channels of unbalanced signals sharing the
same Cat. 5 cable is a possibility. As we’ve mentioned
before, we recommend converting between balanced
and unbalanced at the unbalanced device and then using
the standard Cat. 5 connection from there to the Axia
node.
There are a number of active balanced-to-unbalanced
and unbalanced-to-balanced adaptors commercially
available at a reasonable cost (see www.studiohub.com
for a pair of units that will easily plug and play with our
gear). We’ll suggest one more time that this approach
is the way to go, and that using unbalanced cable runs
will compromise the performance of your state of the
art Axia audio network. However, if you are in a bind, or
otherwise determined to do so, here is how we recommend connecting Axia nodes to unbalanced equipment:
Unbalanced Destinations
To feed audio to an unbalanced destination from the
8x8 Analog node you must use a separate cable for the
left and right signals, and you will need a shielded RJ-45
plug so you can terminate the shield of the audio cables.
RJ-45 Pin 1 will feed the Left signal with the signal common (e.g. cable shield) connected to the RJ-45 shield.
Pin 3 will feed the Right signal with the signal common
(e.g. cable shield) connected to the RJ-45 shield.
the shield. Doing so will not harm the node, however doing so will activate a feature that will increase the output
level by 6 dB, which is generally not desirable.
+
R
+
L
8
Feeding unbalanced device inputs from Axia 8x8
analog node outputs.
Unbalanced Sources
To feed an unbalanced signal from a source into the
inputs of the analog 8x8 node you must use a separate
cable for the left and right signals. We generally prefer
the method where the unbalanced signal is presented
across the differential balanced inputs of the node. The
handling of the shield will depend on the equipment and
grounding practices used.
If both pieces of equipment are grounded to a facility
grounding system then the shield may be left open at one
end (or both ends), as follows.
+
+
8
An external pad may be required if the destination
equipment’s inputs cannot accept signals with peak levels of +24 dBu.
1
1
Axia node’s analog inputs fed from an unbalanced
source where both pieces of equipment are tied to a
facility ground.
Generally the unused output pin should not be tied to
Version 1.2 July 2010
R
L
Unbalanced Connections • 31
Appendix A:
Alternatively, if both pieces of equipment are not
both tied to a common facility ground, both sides of the
shield must be connected. In this case the “-“ side of the
nodes inputs are tied to the shield of the RJ-45 plug as
follows:
Axia node’s inputs fed from a floating source, with no
+
R
+
L
8
1
Unbalanced Connections • 32
facility ground in common with the Axia node.
Version 1.2 July 2010
Connecting GPIO
This Appendix will give you some basic information on GPIO (General Purpose Input Output) ports.
Please refer to the manuals supplied with your Element
or GPIO node for more details on integration with other
non-intercom GPIO.
GPIO Port Definitions
Axia GPIO devices utilize DB-15 connectors on
their back panels. Each connector (also known as a
GPIO port) can be associated with the logic functions
of a device in your studio. Each GPIO port and provides
five opto-isolated inputs and five opto-isolated outputs
per device for machine control, lamp drives and remote
channel controls. GPIO ports can also be monitored and
controlled by our PathfinderPC software.
1. Microphone (Operator, Guest, Producer, Talent
or External)
2. Line Input
3. Codec
4. Telephone Hybrid
5. Computer Playback Device
6. Control Room Monitor
7. Studio Monitor
8. Profanity Delay Device
9. Recording Device
10.Accessory Button Panel Device
11.IP-Intercom Station
The pin definitions for the IP-Intercom hardware
port are provided below.
IP-Intercom GPIO Connector Pinouts
GPIO ports are programmed to support several different types of devices. How does a GPIO port “know”
which type of device is assigned to it?
Pin
Function:
1
Listen Active Lamp
When you construct a console Source Profile for a
telephone hybrid, for example, you defined the source
type. This is important, because when that source is
assigned to a console fader, Element console uses this
Source Profile definition to tell the GPIO Node what sort
of command to send to the attached device. IP-Intercom
stations are also a special type of source that have predefined GPIO properties.
3
Ring Lamp
4
Mic Mute Lamp
5
Line Active Lamp
If Element “sees” in the Source Profile that the assigned device is a microphone, it tells the GPIO Node
to send logic for On, Off, Remote Mute and Remote
Talk commands on the appropriate pins as defined for
a microphone source. If it “sees” a line input, it tells the
GPIO Node to send Start, Stop and Reset commands,
plus closures for Ready lights, etc.
10
Axia GPIO ports can deliver unique command sets
for the following types of devices:
2
6
7
8
9
11
12
Mute Preview/Speaker Command
13
14
15
The functions of the pins vary a bit for different device types. This automatically customizes the port to the
Version 1.2 July 2010
Connecting GPIO • 33
Appendix B:
type of source associated with it.
Assigning GPIO
A lot of the work of assigning logic to a source is
already done for you; once a GPIO port is linked with a
Source, all that remains to do is to connect the GPIO’s
DB-15 connectors to the device’s control interface.
A physical GPIO port may be associated with:
• a Livewire audio source
• another physical GPIO port (also known as a
GPIO snake)
• a virtual GPIO port (as in the case of the IP
Audio driver or IP-Intercom)
Figure B-1: GPIO definitions page
clicking on it; the window will close and the source’s
name and channel number will appear in the Channel box.
GPIO and Livewire Audio Sources
In the case if the IP-Intercom systems, you will not
typically use this method but it will be described here in
order to be complete.
So, how do you link a GPIO port with a Livewire
Source? It’s very easy; let’s do it step-by-step. We will
illustrate using the Element console’s web GUI.
1. Open your Web browser and enter the IP address
of your Element console or, if so equipped, your
­PowerStation. Choose GPIO Configuration from
menu. Enter your password if prompted (default login is “user”, leave the password field blank).
Figure B-2: GPIO Select Source popup list
Connecting GPIO • 34
Note: If your systems includes a PowerStation,
you will have four GPIO ports. If your system
uses an Element Power Supply/GPIO unit, you
have eight GPIO ports as shown in Figure 4-1.
2. If you haven’t previously assigned any GPIO ports,
the GPIO definitions screen will be blank. Notice the
status indicators at the top of the page, showing the
state of the input and output pins of each port. Click
on the list icon to the right of an unused line. When
you click on any list icon, a small popup window will
open, enumerating all of the audio sources available
on the Livewire network (Figure B-2). Choose the
source you wish to associate with a GPIO port by
3. Type a descriptive name in the Name field, and click
on the Save button at the bottom of the page.
4. Look at the output status indicator for Port 1.
You’ll see that one of the pin status indicators is
lit in green; this means that the port is now sending a GPIO logic state of “true” through this
pin. Assign the source for which you just created a GPIO link to a Element channel; operate the
On and Off keys for the channel and watch the
pin status indicators change as you do so.
The source we’ve been using for this demonstration
is a telephone hybrid; we can now observe the pin
Version 1.2 July 2010
status indicators change as we turn the channel on
and off, as shown in Figure B-3.
The Engineering Room GPIO port 2 would look
something like this:
Figure B-3: Pin status indicators showing
GPIO port activity
GPIO Snake
When you “connect” two GPIO ports together via
their port configuration, we call that a GPIO snake. This
may be useful to make GPIO logic travel over the network from one room to another. You might have a Newsroom with some 2-way radio PTT switches but the radios
are in your engineering rack room. GPI of a node in the
Newsroom could be translated to GPO of a node at the
location of the radios. The GPI of each port is translated
to GPO of the other corresponding port. To accomplish
this GPIO mapping (or snake), you will simply specify
the IP Address and Port of the two GPIO’s that you wish
to “connect”.
To illustrate the example above, let’s say we have:
• Newsroom GPIO node with IP address
192.168.10.101 and we wish to use port 3 on this
node.
• Engineering Room GPIO node with IP address
192.168.10.102 using port 2 on that node.
Newsroom GPIO port 3 would be configured as
shown below:
Virtual GPIO Connections
Virtual GPIO is used extensively with IP-Intercom
stations. This flexibility allows you to easily associate an
external intercom source with a GPIO port that may be
in a different studio.
This configuration is very similar to that described
above however one of the ports is not a physical port. In
the case of an IC.20 IP-Intercom unit, there is one physical GPIO port that may be used in the same manner as a
GPIO port on any other GPIO node. The IC.20 also has
several virtual ports that exist in the software. If we wish
to “connect: these virtual ports to physical port, we must
specify a connection in the same manner as we did when
we created a GPIO snake in the previous example.
The diagram on the following two pages gives you a
real world example of how you will configure and connect IP-Intercom GPIO to non-Livewire external equipment. The example we have used is the interconnection
of a couple of external analog intercom sources to an
Axia IC.20 IP-Intercom unit. These external sources
might be existing analog studios or other workstations
that have only analog audio sources and physical switches for Talk/Listen control.
Version 1.2 July 2010
Connecting GPIO • 35
See how easy that was? Simply assigning an existing
audio source to a GPIO port automagically configures the port for the type of device supplying the audio, and send the appropriate logic commands to that
port when the source is assigned to a Element channel.
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Connecting GPIO • 36
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Version 1.2 July 2010
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Version 1.2 July 2010
Connecting GPIO • 37

Input Connections
Connecting GPIO • 38
Current on these inputs must be limited to 20 mA
or less, through the use of a current-limiting resistor. An
external power source (24 volts DC maximum) is recommended for all inputs and outputs, to prevent ground
loops between equipment.
However, if customer equipment is completely isolated, using power from the GPIO port connectors is
acceptable. Figure B-4 shows details for both types of
connections:
Figure B-4 GPIO input connections
Version 1.2 July 2010
Output Connections
The GPIO port’s outputs are opto-isolated. Current
should be limited 100 mA through each output, with the
total current draw from the +5 Volt supply not to exceed
3 amps. Figure B-5 shows the recommended connections for outputs:
Please note that this section is provided as a “jumpstart” introduction to Axia GPIO nodes. For a fuller
understanding of the GPIO node’s options and requirements, you may wish to read the GPIO Node User’s
Manual that is available for download at www.AxiaAudio.com/downloads/ .
Figure B-5: GPIO output connections
Version 1.2 July 2010
Connecting GPIO • 39
Note: Some external devices will allow a logic
control input “sink to ground” to activate. Thus,
some devices may not work with an Axia GPO
control, because they may not fully achieve
ground through the output transistor. The voltage drop between the collector and emitter may
not be low enough to activate the device, so an
external relay controlled by the GPO may need
to be used to provide a “dry” contact closure to
the external device.
Connecting GPIO • 40
Version 1.2 July 2010
Appendix C:
Specifications and Warranty
Axia System Specifications
Microphone Preamplifiers
•
•
•
•
•
Source Impedance: 150 ohms
Input Impedance: 4 k ohms minimum, balanced
Nominal Level Range: Adjustable, -75 dBu to -20 dBu
Input Headroom: >20 dB above nominal input
Output Level: +4 dBu, nominal
Analog Line Inputs
• Input Impedance: >40 k ohms, balanced
• Nominal Level Range: Selectable, +4 dBu or -10dBv
• Input Headroom: 20 dB above nominal input
Analog Line Outputs
•
•
•
•
Output Source Impedance: <50 ohms balanced
Output Load Impedance: 600 ohms, minimum
Nominal Output Level: +4 dBu
Maximum Output Level: +24 dBu
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Reference Level: +4 dBu (-20 dB FSD)
Impedance: 110 Ohm, balanced (XLR)
Signal Format: AES-3 (AES/EBU)
AES-3 Input Compliance: 24-bit with selectable sample rate conversion, 32 kHz to 96kHz input sample rate
capable.
AES-3 Output Compliance: 24-bit
Digital Reference: Internal (network timebase) or external reference 48 kHz, +/- 2 ppm
Internal Sampling Rate: 48 kHz
Output Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz or 48 kHz
A/D Conversions: 24-bit, Delta-Sigma, 256x oversampling
D/A Conversions: 24-bit, Delta-Sigma, 256x oversampling
Latency <3 ms, mic in to monitor out, including network and processor loop
Frequency Response
• Any input to any output: +0.5 / -0.5 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
Dynamic Range
• Analog Input to Analog Output: 102 dB referenced to 0 dBFS, 105 dB “A” weighted to 0 dBFS
• Analog Input to Digital Output: 105 dB referenced to 0 dBFS
• Digital Input to Analog Output: 103 dB referenced to 0 dBFS, 106 dB “A” weighted
Version 1.2 July 2010
Specifications & Warranty • 41
Digital Audio Inputs and Outputs
• Digital Input to Digital Output: 138 dB
Equivalent Input Noise
• Microphone Preamp: -128 dBu, 150 ohm source, reference -50 dBu input level
Total Harmonic Distortion + Noise
•
•
•
•
Mic Pre Input to Analog Line Output: <0.005%, 1 kHz, -38 dBu input, +18 dBu output
Analog Input to Analog Output: <0.008%, 1 kHz, +18 dBu input, +18 dBu output
Digital Input to Digital Output: <0.0003%, 1 kHz, -20 dBFS
Digital Input to Analog Output: <0.005%, 1 kHz, -6 dBFS input, +18 dBu output
Crosstalk Isolation and Stereo Separation and CMRR
•
•
•
•
•
Analog Line channel to channel isolation: 90 dB isolation minimum, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
Microphone channel to channel isolation: 80 dB isolation minimum, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
Analog Line Stereo separation: 85 dB isolation minimum, 20Hz to 20 kHz
Analog Line Input CMRR: >60 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
Microphone Input CMRR: >55 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
Power Supply AC Input
• Auto-sensing supply, 90VAC to 240VAC, 50 Hz to 60 Hz, IEC receptacle, internal fuse
• Power consumption: 35 Watts or less.
Operating Temperatures
• -10 degree C to +40 degree C, <90% humidity, no condensation
Specifications & Warranty • 42
Dimensions and Weight
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Microphone node: 1.75 inches x 19 inches x 10 inches, 6 pounds
Analog Line node: 1.75 inches x 19 inches x 10 inches, 6 pounds
AES/EBU node: 1.75 inches x 19 inches x 10 inches, 6 pounds
Router Selector node: 1.75 inches x 19 inches x 10 inches, 6 pounds
GPIO node: 1.75 inches x 19 inches x 13 inches, 8 pounds
Studio Mix Engine: 3.5 inches x 19 inches x 15 inches, 10 pounds
IC.20: 3.5 inches x 19 inches x 8.5 inches, 5 pounds
IC.10X: 1.75 inches x 19 inches x 8.5 inches, 4 pounds
IC.1: 1.75 inches x 19 inches x 8.5 inches, 4 pounds
Version 1.2 July 2010
Axia Limited Warranty
This Warranty covers “the Products,” which are defined as the various audio equipment, parts, software and accessories manufactured, sold and/or distributed by TLS Corp., d/b/a Axia Audio (hereinafter “Axia Audio”).
With the exception of software-only items, the Products are warranted to be free from defects in material and
workmanship for a period of five (5) years from the date of receipt by the end-user. Software-only items are warranted
to be free from defects in material and workmanship for a period of 90 days from the date of receipt by the end-user.
This warranty is void if the Product is subject to Acts of God, including (without limitation) lightning; improper
installation or misuse, including (without limitation) the failure to use telephone and power line surge protection devices; accident; neglect or damage.
EXCEPT FOR THE ABOVE-STATED WARRANTY, AXIA AUDIO MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS
OR IMPLIED (INCLUDING IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE).
In no event will Axia Audio, its employees, agents or authorized dealers be liable for incidental or consequential
damages, or for loss, damage, or expense directly or indirectly arising from the use of any Product or the inability to
use any Product either separately or in combination with other equipment or materials, or from any other cause.
In order to invoke this Warranty, notice of a warranty claim must be received by Axia Audio within the above-stated
warranty period and warranty coverage must be authorized by Axia Audio. If Axia Audio authorizes the performance
of warranty service, the defective Product must be delivered, shipping prepaid, to: Axia Audio, 1241 Superior Avenue,
Cleveland, Ohio 44114.
Axia Audio at its option will either repair or replace the Product and such action shall be the full extent of Axia
Audio’s obligation under this Warranty. After the Product is repaired or replaced, Axia Audio will return it to the party
that sent the Product and Axia Audio will pay for the cost of shipping.
Axia Audio’s products are to be used with registered protective interface devices which satisfy regulatory requirements in their country of use.
Version 1.2 July 2010
Specifications & Warranty • 43
Axia Audio’s authorized dealers are not authorized to assume for Axia Audio any additional obligations or liabilities in connection with the dealers’ sale of the Products.
Axia Audio, a Telos Company • 1241 Superior Ave. • Cleveland, Ohio, 44114, USA • +1.216.241.7225 • www.AxiaAudio.com
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