ZEOS Meridian 400 User's Guide

ZEOS Meridian 400 User's Guide
Meridian 400
The
ROADSIDE
PORTABLE
GUIDE TO
MOBILE
COMPUTING
WITH YOUR
MERIDIAN 400
SUB-NOTEBOOK
User’s Guide
Limitation of remedies and liabilities
The vendor’s entire liability and customers’ exclusive and sole remedy for damages from any cause whatsoever
(including without limitation any nonperformance, misrepresentation, or breach of warranty) shall be limited to
returning the products pursuant to the thirty (30) day satisfaction guarantee, or to repair or replace specific
products or services that do not comply with the limited warranty given by the vendor. Any products or services
repaired or replaced pursuant to this paragraph shall be warranted as of the date of delivery in accordance with
the terms and conditions herein for the duration of the one-year term of Limited Warranty given by the vendor.
In no event will the vendor be liable for any damages caused, in whole or in part, by customer, or for any
economic loss, physical injury, lost revenues, lost profits, lost savings or other indirect, incidental, special or
consequential damages incurred by any person, even if the vendor has been advised of the possibility of such
damage for claims.
Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages for consumer
products, and some states do not allow limitations on how long an implied warranty lasts, so the above
limitations or exclusions may not apply to you.
This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state.
The vendor provides no warranties whatsoever on software.
Trademark Notices
Microsoft, MS, and MS-DOS, are registered trademarks and Windows is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
IBM, PS/2 , and OS/2 are registered trademarks and PC/AT, Color Graphics Adapter (CGA), Enhanced Graphics
Adapter (EGA), Video Graphics Array (VGA) are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation.
i486 is a trademark of the Intel Corporation.
Other brand or product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders.
This document may not, in whole or in part, be copied, photocopied, reproduced, translated or reduced to any
electronic medium or machine readable form without prior consent, in writing, from the vendor.
With this document the vendor makes no warranties or representations, either expressed, or implied, with
respect to the products described herein. The information presented herein is being supplied on an “AS IS”
basis and is expressly subject to change without notice.
© Copyright 1995
ZEOS International, Ltd.
All rights reserved
700-0187-01
Merid400
2
Customer Assurance Program
Thirty (30) Day Money-Back Guarantee on Most Products.
Any product (except for software, software disks, related
documentation and consumables) purchased from our company may
be returned within thirty days from the date it was shipped to the
customer for a full refund of the purchase price excluding original
shipping charges.
Returned products must be in as new condition, in original packing,
complete with all warranty cards, manuals, cables and other materials
as originally shipped; not modified or damaged.
Any returned product must be shipped prepaid and insured. Any
return must carry a Return Merchandise Authorization (RMA)
number, obtained from us, on the outside of each carton. Returns
without RMA numbers will not be accepted. After thirty days from
shipment, all sales are final and credit or refunds will not be given.
3
Meridian 400 One Year Limited Warranty
All new Merdian 400 computer systems come with a One Year Limited
Warranty which provides that the products we manufacture or assemble,
other than items such as software, disks and related documentation, will
remain in good working condition, free from defects in material and
workmanship under normal use and service, for a period of one year from
the date of shipment. This warranty is limited to the original purchaser
and is not transferable. During this one year period, we will repair or
replace, at its option, any defective product or parts at no additional
charge to the customer, provided that the defective product or part is
returned, shipment prepaid, to us. All replaced products and parts become
the property of the vendor. Replacement parts shall be similar new or
serviceable used parts. This Limited Warranty does not extend to any
products which have been damaged as a result of accident, misuse, abuse
(such as incorrect voltages, power surges, improper or insufficient
ventilation, failure to follow provided operating instructions, “acts of
God” or other situations beyond our control), or as the result of service or
modification by anyone other than the vendor. Non-factory installed parts
or components are not covered, nor is damage to our components covered
as a result of their installation. This warranty does not cover work
performed by others, all warranty work must be performed by us.
4
FCC Compliance Statement
For U.S. and Canadian Users
Warning!
Changes or modifications to this unit not expressly approved by the party responsible
for compliance could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class
B digital device, pursuant to Part 15, Subpart B of the FCC Rules. These limits
are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a
residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio
frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the
instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.
However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular
installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or
television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment on and
off, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the
following measures.
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
• Connect the equipment into an outlet on a different circuit.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
Connecting a non-shielded equipment interface cable to this equipment will
invalidate the FCC Certification of this device and may cause interference levels
which exceed the limits established by the FCC for this equipment.
This equipment is a Class B digital apparatus which complies with the Radio
Interference Regulations, C.R.C., c. 1374.
Cet appareil numèrique de la classe B est conformè au Règlement sur le
brouillage radioèlèctrique, C.R.C., ch. 1374.
5
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6
Contents
Contents
Welcome! .................................................................................... 10
1. Unpacking Your System ........................................................
Do I Have Everything? ............................................................
What's in the Box? ..................................................................
Let Your System Acclimate Itself .............................................
Keep the Box ..........................................................................
Where to Work ........................................................................
Beware Heat, Cold, Humidity, and Glare ................................
System Features .....................................................................
13
13
14
15
15
16
16
17
2. The Big Picture ....................................................................... 17
Top View.................................................................................. 18
Mouse buttons .................................................................................... 18
TruePoint Pointing Device ................................................................... 18
Suspend/Resume Button .................................................................... 18
Side View ................................................................................ 20
Power Button ...................................................................................... 20
Reset Switch ...................................................................................... 20
PCMCIA Card Eject Buttons ............................................................... 20
Back View ...............................................................................
Inside View ..............................................................................
Indicator Lights ........................................................................
How to Use the Keyboard .......................................................
22
24
25
26
What the Keys Do...............................................................................
How to Use the Embedded Numeric Keypad .......................................
Special Key Combinations ..................................................................
How to Set the Speaker Volume .........................................................
27
29
30
30
3. Battery and Power Management ........................................... 31
Installing the Battery for the First Time ................................... 31
How to Install the Battery Pack ........................................................... 32
How to Remove the Battery Pack ....................................................... 33
Turning On Your System ......................................................... 34
Battery Pack Life ..................................................................... 34
Low Battery Conditions ...................................................................... 35
7
Contents
How to Charge the Battery ...................................................... 37
Pre-charging a Dead Battery ...............................................................
Temperature Control ...........................................................................
Faulty Battery .....................................................................................
Don’t Unplug the AC Adapter with the Power On .................................
How to Use an External Video Monitor ................................................
37
37
38
38
38
How to Set Power Management ............................................. 39
Normal Mode ...................................................................................... 39
Power Saving Mode ............................................................................ 39
Suspend Mode ................................................................................... 39
Battery Precautions ................................................................. 40
AC Adapter Precautions .......................................................... 41
4. How to Use Your Meridian 400 ..............................................
How to Open the System ........................................................
How to use the TruePoint Pointing Device ..............................
How to Use a PS/2 Style Mouse .............................................
How to Use a Serial Mouse.....................................................
How to Use Floppy Disks ........................................................
43
43
44
45
45
46
How to Care for Floppy Disks ............................................................. 47
How to Use a PCMCIA Card Slot ............................................ 48
5. Using SETUP ..........................................................................
How to Run SETUP ................................................................
Navigating in SETUP ..............................................................
Standard System Parameters .................................................
51
52
53
54
Time ...................................................................................................
Date ...................................................................................................
Diskette Drive A ..................................................................................
Hard Disk 1.........................................................................................
Base Memory .....................................................................................
Extended Memory ..............................................................................
Video Card .........................................................................................
Maximum CPU Speed ........................................................................
Numlock on at boot .............................................................................
Quick Boot ..........................................................................................
PCMCIA Boot .....................................................................................
54
54
54
54
54
54
55
55
55
55
55
System Configuration Parameters .......................................... 56
Cache ................................................................................................. 56
Serial Port 1........................................................................................ 57
8
Contents
Parallel Port ........................................................................................
Parallel Port Mode ..............................................................................
Internal Mouse ....................................................................................
LCD Brightness ..................................................................................
Password ...........................................................................................
57
57
57
57
57
Power Management Parameters ............................................ 58
Power Management ............................................................................
Idle, Standby, and Suspend Options ...................................................
System Idle After ................................................................................
System Standby After .........................................................................
System Suspend After ........................................................................
Ring on Resume .................................................................................
Low Battery Suspend ..........................................................................
HDD Timeout Value ............................................................................
Remaining Battery Level .....................................................................
59
60
60
60
61
62
62
62
62
System Security ...................................................................... 63
System Password ............................................................................... 63
Removing and Changing a System Password ..................................... 66
Key Lock Password ............................................................................ 66
6. How to Install Options ........................................................... 67
How to Install More RAM Memory .......................................... 68
How to Attach an External Floppy Drive .................................. 70
7. How to Maintain Your System ...............................................
Traveling with the System .......................................................
Caring for the System Hardware .............................................
Caring for the AC Adapter .......................................................
Caring for the Battery Power Pack ..........................................
73
73
74
75
75
System Specifications ...............................................................
Environmental Specifications ..................................................
Dimensions .............................................................................
Battery Pack Specifications .....................................................
AC Adapter Specifications .......................................................
77
77
78
78
78
Handy Cheat Sheet .................................................................... 79
Glossary ...................................................................................... 81
Index ............................................................................................ 83
9
Welcome!
Welcome!
Welcome to the Meridian User’s Guide! This guide is designed to help you
get the most out of your system and keep it running trouble free, year after
year.
The User’s Guide is divided into seven chapters.
Chapter 1, Unpacking Your System, explains how to safely open and set
up your new system.
Chapter 2, The Big Picture, gives an overview of a typical system
including information about buttons, connectors and LED indicators.
Chapter 3, Battery and Power management, gives information about
using your system for the first time and instructions for charging the
battery pack and connecting the AC adapter.
Chapter 4, How to Use Your Meridian 400, shows how to turn on the
system and begin working.
Chapter 5, Using SETUP, explains how to use the built-in SETUP
features to configure your system.
Chapter 6, How to Install Options, shows how to add system RAM, or
an external floppy drive.
Chapter 7, How to Maintain Your System, explains how to care for
your hardware.
10
Welcome!
System Specifications lists technical details about your system.
The Handy Cheat Sheet gives a short summary of some of the most
needed or most forgotten commands.
The Glossary gives definitions of common computer terms.
11
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12
Chapter 1 - Unpacking Your System
1. Unpacking Your System
Obviously, the first step towards using your new Meridian is getting it
safely to your door and unpacked.
Do I Have Everything?
The packing slip is one of the last items sealed into your system
unit box. It lists everything we shipped you. As you unpack the
box, check the contents against the packing slip. If an item is
listed on your packing slip, but isn't in the box, it may be
installed in your system, or shipped inside one of the manuals
or accessory bags. If you're sure something is missing, call
Customer Service right away. The Customer Service phone
number is listed on the inside back cover of this book.
13
Chapter 1 - Unpacking Your System
What's in the Box?
Your box contains the packing slip, this manual, a plastic bag
full of cables and other manuals, a battery pack and AC adapter,
and your Windows & DOS manual.
This book shows you how to set up your system and keep it
running. Your Windows for Workgroups & MS-DOS User's
Guide has introductory chapters to help you install and
configure DOS and Windows. Since we have already loaded
and tested DOS and Windows on your hard drive, you can
probably skip those parts for now. Those chapters will be useful
if you ever have to start over on your own and reinstall DOS or
Windows onto your computer. For now, this book should get
you up and running.
14
Chapter 1 - Unpacking Your System
Let Your System Acclimate Itself
Although your computer system can easily stand temperature
extremes, it doesn’t much like rapid changes in temperature,
especially going from a cold front stoop to a warm and comfy
office, or from a steamy jungle mail drop to an air-conditioned
villa. Rapid changes in temperature can cause condensation
inside your case. If it is hot or cold outside when you
receive your system, let the computer gradually
adjust to room temperature before you plug it in.
When you first receive your computer you will
certainly be eager to get it going and start putting it to work, but
be patient. Take the time to let it grow accustomed to its new
environment.
Keep the Box
It's a good idea to keep your Meridian’s box and packing
materials. That way, if you ever have to store the system or
return it, your components will be well-protected.
15
Chapter 1 - Unpacking Your System
Where to Work
Your Meridian 400 is a tough, rugged machine. Generally
speaking it will be comfortable and run well wherever you are
comfortable. Extremes of heat, cold, and humidity can be
challenging to your system's parts, but usually if you can take it,
so can the computer. There are, however, some things you take
very easily that the computer does not like at all. Static
electricity is one. Dust, water, steam, and oil are others.
Wherever you decide to pull over for roadside computing,
choose a clean, comfortable work area for your system.
Note: It’s best to place your Meridian near a wall socket for easier access.
Beware Heat, Cold, Humidity, and Glare
Pick a spot for your computer that’s not too - not too hot and
not too cold, not too dark and not too bright - glare can make it
hard to read the screen. Overheating can destroy computer
components. Allow plenty of room for air to circulate around
the system.
16
Chapter 2 - The Big Picture
2. The Big Picture
Your Meridian 400 is designed to give you the speed and power of a
desktop system in a lightweight, portable package.
System Features
Every Meridian 400 includes:
• Intel 486SX-33, 486DX2-50 or DX4-100 microprocessor
• 8KB internal system cache (486SX & 486DX2),
• 16KB internal system cache (DX4)
• RAM expandable to 20MB
• IDE hard drive upgradable to 350MB
• 2 Type II PCMCIA slots
• High-speed local bus video with 1MB video RAM
• Full 640 x 480 display
• 84-key keyboard with embedded numeric keypad and 12
dedicated function keys, inverted “T”
• Eraser-shaped integrated TruePoint™ pointing device
• Replaceable, rechargeable NiMH battery
• Serial port, enhanced parallel port, external VGA video port,
external keyboard or PS/2 mouse port
• Port for optional external floppy drive
• Full power management features include Low Power mode,
programmable Standby features, and Suspend to memory for
fast suspends and resumes
• AC-DC adapter
• EPA Energy Star compliant
17
Chapter 2 - The Big Picture
Top View
Mouse buttons
The two rectangular buttons on the front of the unit work like
the two buttons of a mouse. Your right thumb can push the
mouse button while another finger moves the cursor with the
TruePoint pointing device.
TruePoint Pointing Device
The TruePoint™ pointing device works much like a joystick. The
pointer moves the on-screen cursor whichever direction you tilt
the red button. The harder you push, the faster the cursor
moves.
Suspend/Resume Button
The Suspend/Resume button sets the system to the power
saving mode when you are not using your system. To use the
Suspend/Resume button, you must enable Power Management
in SETUP. See Chapter 5, Using SETUP, for more details.
18
Chapter 2 - The Big Picture
Display latch
LED Indicators
Power
Reset Switch
TruePoint pointing device
Mouse buttons
Suspend/Resume button
19
Chapter 2 - The Big Picture
Side View
Power Button
To turn the system on or off, press the power button for 1-2
seconds. When you turn the power on, the speaker beeps once
(unless you have disabled the speaker by setting the volume 0).
The Power Button will not work when the system is in suspend
mode or when the computer is being powered by battery only
and the display panel is closed. See Chapter 3, Battery and
Power Management.
Reset Switch
The reset switch reboots the system. Insert the tip of a ballpoint pen into the opening to press the switch. When the system
is rebooted all information in random access memory (RAM) is
lost.
PCMCIA Card Eject Buttons
These buttons let you insert or remove PCMCIA cards in the
PCMCIA slots.
Note: PCMCIA cards can be removed and replaced while the system is on. If you
remove a PCMCIA card while the system is on, be sure the PCMCIA card eject
button returns to its original position. When the PCMICA slot is not being
used, the eject button should be flush with the system case.
20
Chapter 2 - The Big Picture
Right Side View
PCMCIA card eject button
Type II PCMCIA slot
Socket 1
Reset switch
Left Side View
Power button
PCMCIA card eject button
21
Type II PCMCIA slot
Socket 0 (SRAM boot socket)
Chapter 2 - The Big Picture
Back View
Each connector at the back of the system unit is displayed below.
You can configure the parallel or serial ports from the SETUP
menu. See Chapter 5, Using SETUP, for detailed instructions.
Caution:
Whenever you connect or disconnect cables, turn off all power switches.
Field ground
External floppy
connector
Parallel port
Serial port
22
External
video port
Keyboard or
PS/2 Mouse
port
DC power
connector
Chapter 2 - The Big Picture
Connector
Description
External floppy
26-pin connector for attaching an
external 3.5” floppy drive
Parallel port
25-pin parallel port for printers or
other devices. Configure the parallel
port from the SETUP program ,
Ctrl+Alt+S at the DOS prompt.
Serial port
9-pin connector for a mouse, modem,
or other serial devices. Configure the
serial port from the SETUP program,
Ctrl+Alt+S at the DOS prompt.
Video
15-pin connector for external VGA
monitor. The system will
automatically detect and use an
external monitor at boot. (If LCD
panel is closed, you must use the AC
adapter to power the system.)
Keyboard/ PS/2 Mouse
6-pin mini-DIN connector used for
connecting a PS/2 style mouse or a
101/102-key external keyboard.
DC Power
Connect the AC adapter cable here.
23
Chapter 2 - The Big Picture
Inside View
The indicator lights show the status of the power, battery pack
and hard disk drive, CapsLock, NumLock and ScrollLock.
Power/Suspend LOWBATT
CHARGE
HDD
24
CapsLock
NumLock ScrollLock
Chapter 2 - The Big Picture
Indicator Lights
Indicator
Color
Description
Power/Suspend Glowing
Blinking
The power is turned on.
The system is in suspend
mode.
LOWBAT
Slow blinking
The battery power level is
low. If enabled in SETUP,
the system beeps slowly
warning you to recharge or
replace the battery, or plug
in the AC adapter.
Fast blinking:
Battery power is nearly
gone. If enabled in SETUP,
the system beeps quickly
warning you to connect the
AC adapter.
Orange
The battery is charging.
Green
The battery is charged.
HDD
Green
The system is using the hard
drive.
CapsLock
Green
CapsLock is enabled.
NumLock
Green
NumLock is enabled
ScrollLock
Green
ScrollLock is enabled
CHARGE
25
Chapter 2 - The Big Picture
How to Use the Keyboard
Escape
Function keys
Backspace
Tab
Fn key
Alt
Enter
Ctrl
Shift
The keyboard is your primary means of telling the computer what to do
and giving it the numbers and words to do it. The keyboard works much
like the keys on a typewriter, but computer keyboards have several
specialty keys. Over time, most software packages have settled on some
common uses for the specialty keys. For example, in most software
packages, pressing the F1 key gets help.
The chart on the next page explains the most important keys on the
keyboard.
26
Chapter 2 - The Big Picture
What the Keys Do
Alternate (Alt) - used with other keys to perform special functions
defined by the application you are using. While holding down the Alt
key, press the other key.
Caps Lock - toggles on and off making the typewriter letter keys
appear in uppercase.
Control (Ctrl) - used with other keys to perform special functions defined by the
application you are using. While holding down the Ctrl key, press the other key.
Delete - deletes the character at the cursor.
Enter - tells the computer you’re done typing and want it to execute your command.
Some people call this the Return key. Also used as a paragraph return key when typing.
Escape (Esc) - generally allows you to escape a function without completing it.
Function Keys (F1 through F12) - the purpose of the function keys depends on the
application you are using.
Insert - toggles between insert and overtype mode. In insert mode, anything you type is
inserted at the cursor position without deleting any existing characters. In overtype
mode, new characters simply write over existing characters.
Pause - typically suspends the application you are using. Not all applications use the
Pause key.
Print Screen - typically prints out the current screen on the printer. Sometimes used
with the Ctrl key. Some applications disable this function or require special drivers to
work properly with this key.
Scroll Lock - defined by the application software you are using. Not all applications
use the Scroll Lock key.
Shift - shifts the typewriter keys from lower to upper case or from the lower symbol to
the upper symbol on the key.
27
Chapter 2 - The Big Picture
What the Keys Do
Cursor Movement Keys
Backspace (Bksp) - usually located above the Enter key. It may be
labeled as Bksp or as an arrow pointing to the left. The Backspace
key moves the cursor to the left one space erasing the characters in its
path.
Down Arrow - usually moves the cursor down one line.
End - usually moves the cursor to the end of the line or screen.
Home - usually moves the cursor to the top left side of the current page or screen.
Left Arrow - usually moves the cursor to the left one space.
Page Down - usually scrolls the screen page down to the next page.
Page Up - usually scrolls the screen page up to the previous page.
Right Arrow - usually moves the cursor to the right one space.
Tab - moves the cursor to the next tab setting or field. Typically, Shift+ Tab moves the
cursor back one tab setting or field.
Up Arrow - usually moves the cursor up one line.
Num LK (Number Lock) - toggles the numeric keypad. When the Num Lock light is
on, the keys on the right side of the keyboard work like a ten-key calculator. When the
Num Lock light is out, the keys move the cursor.
Special Combinations
Ctrl-Alt-Del - restarts the computer. Also called a “warm boot” because it clears the
memory, resets, and reboots the computer.
Ctrl-Alt-S - Run SETUP program.
Ctrl-Alt-P - Run Power management program or View remaining battery life.
Ctrl-Break or Ctrl-C - Break out of the current program.
28
Chapter 2 - The Big Picture
How to Use the Embedded Numeric Keypad
Embedded Numeric Keypad
A numeric keypad for entering numbers is embedded within the
main keyboard. To use the numeric characters, press the
NumLock button. Keys with a number in the lower right corner
will type numbers whenever NumLock is enabled. To return the
keys to normal letters, press NumLock again.
If you install an external keyboard or keypad, the keypad
function is disabled.
29
Chapter 2 - The Big Picture
Special Key Combinations
The following key combinations let you perform special
functions without exiting your application
Note: Some applications may conflict with certain special key combinations. If you
press key combination without results, exit the application and try again.
Fn+F10
Decreases LCD display contrast
Fn+F11
Increases LCD display contrast
Fn+F12
Sets beep volume
How to Set the Speaker Volume
Pushing Fn+F12 cycles through the four volume levels for the
internal speaker. When you set the volume level, the system
records and remembers the level you set for the Power On beep,
the Suspend Mode beep, and the normal system beep. This
setting is retained in memory even when you turn the system
off. Low battery alerts, however, always reset to the maximum
volume when you boot the system. To lower the volume of the
low battery alert, cycle through the volume settings by pressing
Fn+F12 after you power up.
Note: Some settings such as BIOS errors and unknown system problems will always
beep at maximum volume.
30
Chapter 3 - Battery and Power Management
3. Battery and Power
Management
Installing the Battery for the First Time
Your system operates on a rechargeable Nickel Metal Hydride
(NiMH) battery pack. To prevent possible damage during
shipment the battery pack has not been installed in your system.
Before turning on the system for the first time, remove the
battery pack from its package and install it. Once the battery is
installed, allow it to fully charge before using your system with
the battery alone.
31
Chapter 3 - Battery and Power Management
How to Install the Battery Pack
To install the battery pack:
1. Insert the battery pack into the battery compartment.
2. Push the battery into the compartment until you hear a click.
Battery pack release locks
32
Chapter 3 - Battery and Power Management
How to Remove the Battery Pack
Battery pack release locks
1. Locate the battery pack and battery pack release locks.
2. Slide the battery pack release locks. Releasing the battery pack
locks. The battery pack will be lifted upward.
3. Pull the battery pack out of the compartment.
33
Chapter 3 - Battery and Power Management
Turning On Your System
After installing the battery pack, be sure to let the battery fully
charge before using your system for the first time. The battery
LED will be green when the battery is fully charged. Once the
battery is fully charged, go ahead and open your system and
push the power button. Hold the button down for one second
to turn on the system.
Note: Be sure to wait one to two seconds before pressing the power button again. If
you don’t, the power button may not respond.
Battery Pack Life
Battery life greatly depends on how you use and configure your
system. Battery life can be extended, however, by:
• Operating the system at a slower speed
• Operating the system on external power whenever possible
• Setting the LCD brightness to “Half” level at the SETUP program
• Setting Power Management features to a lower time interval
• Operate your Meridian in cooler temperatures
See Chapter 5, Using SETUP, to learn how to set the power
management features.
34
Chapter 3 - Battery and Power Management
Low Battery Conditions
There are two warnings when the battery in your system is low
and needs charging. At the first warning, the orange battery
indicator light blinks slowly, and the system speaker will beep
(if enabled). The first battery warning occurs about eight
minutes before the second warning. At the first warning, you
should quit working and save your data, or connect the AC
adapter to the system immediately. Otherwise, your data may be
lost.
At the second warning the orange battery indicator light blinks
rapidly and the system speaker beeps again. After the second
warning, the system could shut down at any moment, erasing all
your unsaved work.
Warning!
Systems containing more than the base amount of system memory might have a slightly
shorter initial low-battery warning.
Note: Even if your low battery warning volumes are set to OFF, the system speaker will
still beep to alert you to a low battery problem.
If you receive a low battery warning, we recommend that you do
one of the following:
AC adapter and power outlet available
1. Set in suspend mode by pushing the suspend/resume button.
2. Connect the AC adapter to the system.
3. Resume the system from suspend mode by pushing the suspend/
resume button.
35
Chapter 3 - Battery and Power Management
Extra fully charged battery available
1. Save all necessary files.
2. Exit the application.
3. Turn off the system.
4. Remove the battery pack and replace it with the fully charged battery pack.
No AC adapter, power outlet or extra charged battery available
1. Save all necessary files.
2. Exit the application.
3. Turn off the system.
36
Chapter 3 - Battery and Power Management
How to Charge the Battery
To charge the battery, plug the AC adapter into the system and
an electrical outlet. The AC adapter converts alternating current
(AC) into direct current (DC). When the power switch is turned
on, the AC adapter supplies power to the system and recharges
the battery pack only when the system in the suspend mode.
When the power switch is turned off, all the power from the AC
adapter is dedicated to recharging the battery pack.
When the computer is off or in suspend mode, recharging an
empty battery pack takes about 1 hour.
While the battery charges, the CHARGE LED is orange. Once
the battery is fully charged, the CHARGE LED is green.
Pre-charging a Dead Battery
If the battery has been completely discharged or placed in
prolonged storage, it may need a pre-charge in addition to a
normal charge. A pre-charge can take as little as a few seconds
or as much as an hour in some extreme cases. While the battery
pre-charges, the CHARGE LED slowly flashes orange.
Temperature Control
The AC adapter will not charge a battery that is too hot or too
cold. If the battery is outside the normal operating temperatures,
the system unit will wait for the battery to warm up or cool
down before charging. While the system unit waits for the
battery to return to the normal operating temperature, the
CHARGE LED will slowly flash green.
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Chapter 3 - Battery and Power Management
Faulty Battery
The orange charge light indicator may flash when a faulty battery
pack is installed. If the CHARGE LED flashes orange rapidly,
remove the faulty battery pack immediately.
Warning!
Powering the system with the AC adapter and a faulty battery pack installed can
damage both the AC adapter and your system.
Don’t Unplug the AC Adapter with the Power On
You can operate your system with external power at any time by
plugging the AC adapter into the system and a power outlet. It is
not necessary to turn off the system power before connecting the
AC adapter. However, do not unplug the AC adapter when the
system power is turned on. The system may operate in an
unexpected manner. When the AC adapter is connected, it
powers the system and recharges the battery.
How to Use an External Video Monitor
You may wish to use an external keyboard, mouse, or monitor
with the LCD panel on the Meridian closed. If you wish to use
the Meridian with the LCD panel closed, you must run the
system with the AC adapter plugged in.
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Chapter 3 - Battery and Power Management
How to Set Power Management
Your system can operate in normal mode, power saving mode or
suspend mode.
Normal Mode
The system runs at the speed specified in SETUP (Full, Slow).
Power Saving Mode
Power saving mode reduces power to the hard drive after
several minutes of inactivity. You can set the amount of time the
system should wait before powering down the hard drive. If no
activity is detected during the period of time specified in
SETUP, the system switches to the power saving mode. See
Chapter 5, Using SETUP, for more information about setting
the power saving configuration.
Suspend Mode
In suspend mode the system clock speed is lowered to 0 MHz,
and the green power/suspend light blinks continuously. Push
and hold the suspend/resume button for about one second to
enter or cancel suspend mode.
Warning!
While in Suspend Mode, the system still draws a small amount of power. If you leave
your system in Suspend Mode for long periods of time, the battery will eventually drain.
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Chapter 3 - Battery and Power Management
Battery Precautions
1. Do not expose the battery to fire, which can cause explosion, or allow it to
become dented or deformed.
2. Do not run your system on battery power for a long time at temperatures over
95°F (35°C). Also, do not store the battery at high temperatures. This can
significantly reduce the life of the battery.
3. Temperature extremes can greatly affect the life of the battery. It should be
kept in a low-humidity area and temperature range of between 14 and 104° F (10 and 40° C) when being stored for less than one month and between 14 and
86° F (-10 and 30° C) when being stored for over one month.
4. The battery may be damaged if it is used in any other device than your
computer. Also, do not attempt to use with any other make of adapter or
battery charger.
5. Do not force the battery into the system unit. Do not drop it.
6. Do not short-circuit the electrode of the battery.
7. Do not be alarmed if the battery feels warm to the touch when installed in your
system. This is normal.
8. If the CHARGE LED on the computer blinks green while charging, remove the
battery pack and allow it to return to normal operating temperatures before
recharging.
9. After recharging, if the battery power quickly becomes weak, or if the charge
LED on the computer blinks rapidly during recharging, the battery power
pack’s service life has probably come to an end. Promptly replace it with a
new battery pack, or remove the battery pack and use the AC adapter for a
power source. Do not leave a dead battery pack in the computer.
10. Do not to open the pack. It which contains harmful materials that can catch
fire when exposed to the air or chemically burn your skin. Dispose of batteries
according to local regulations.
11. The battery may not charge if the contacts become dirty. You can clean the
contacts with a cloth.
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Chapter 3 - Battery and Power Management
AC Adapter Precautions
1. Do not subject the adapter to strong vibration or shocks. Be careful not to drop
it.
2. Do not expose the adapter to direct sunlight for prolonged periods.
3. Do not use or store the adapter near chemicals or in an environment containing
corrosive gases.
4. Do not use or store the adapter in places subject to extreme temperatures or
near a heat-producing source. Avoid using it where it is extremely humid or
dusty.
5. Using the adapter while wet is extremely dangerous. If it should become wet or
damaged, immediately unplug the adapter from the power socket and the
computer.
6. Do not unplug the AC power cord or DC connector by pulling on the cord.
Instead, grasp the plug firmly and pull it out. Also, do not hold the adapter by
its AC cord or DC input connector.
7. After unplugging the DC input connector from the computer or AC power cord
from the adapter, wait at least 5 seconds before attempting to reconnect it,
otherwise the CHARGE LED indicator may flash at random. If this happens,
turn the system power off, remove the battery and AC adapter and reinstall.
8. Do not attempt to open the adapter, which has no user-serviceable parts.
Failure to comply can result in electrical shock or adapter malfunction.
9. When the adapter is not being used, unplug its AC power cord. While attached
to a wall outlet, the adapter continues to supply DC voltage to the plug
connector even when it is unplugged from the computer. If the loose plug
comes into contact with metal, a short circuit could occur, causing damage to
the adapter.
10. Do not use the adapter with any other devices other than this computer. Also,
do not attach any other make of AC adapter other than the one supplied with
the computer. Even momentarily attempting to use a different adapter can
cause serious or fatal damage to your computer.
11. Always set the AC adapter so its top vents are upward. Also, do not cover the
adapter with cloth, paper or other materials that can interfere with heat release.
An overheated AC adapter may become damaged.
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Chapter 4 - How to Use Your Meridian 400
4. How to Use Your Meridian
400
How to Open the System
To open the display, push the latch at the front of the system
backward to release the lock and lift the display carefully.
Display latch
LED Indicators
TruePoint pointing device
Mouse buttons
Suspend/Resume button
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Chapter 4 - How to Use Your Meridian 400
How to use the TruePoint Pointing Device
The red button, called the True Point embedded pointing
device, works like a joystick. Simply put a finger on it and tilt it
the direction you want the cursor on the screen to go. The
harder you tilt, the faster it moves.
When you need to click on something, use the rectangular
mouse buttons on the front of the unit exactly as you would use
the two buttons on a mouse.
Note: If the cursor moves too quickly for you, change its sensitivity. In Windows, select
the mouse icon from the Control Panel and click on Sensitivity. In DOS, run
the MOUSE program with the /S flag. See your Windows & MS-DOS User’s
Guide for more details.
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Chapter 4 - How to Use Your Meridian 400
How to Use a PS/2 Style Mouse
Before you can use an external mouse, you must first install its
device driver. This software enables your mouse to
communicate with the system. See your mouse documentation
for instructions how to install the mouse and mouse driver.
Your system automatically switches to a PS/2 mouse if one is
connected to the Keyboard/PS/2 Mouse port. You cannot use
both the embedded pointing device and the external mouse at
the same time.
Note: A PS/2 style mouse may not work correctly if you connect it after bootup. Always
turn the power off before connecting a PS/2 style mouse.
How to Use a Serial Mouse
To use a serial mouse, you must first disable the TruePoint
pointing device in SETUP. On the SETUP menu (Ctrl-Alt-S at
boot) Set Pointing Device to “Disabled”.
Once the TruePoint device is disabled, you can connect a serial
mouse to the serial port at the back of the system unit.
Do not try to connect a PS/2 style mouse to the serial port.
Remember also that before you can use any external mouse,
you must first install its device driver. This software enables
your mouse to communicate with the system. See your mouse
documentation for instructions how to install the mouse and
mouse driver.
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Chapter 4 - How to Use Your Meridian 400
How to Use Floppy Disks
Floppy disks are used to:
• transfer information from one computer to another
• install software on your system’s hard drive
• make back-up copies of your software and data
When you insert a floppy disk into the system’s floppy disk
drive, you can read the information stored on the disk and write
information to the disk.
Your can attach a 3.5-inch 1.44MB an external floppy drive.
You can use either high-density (1.44 MB storage capacity) or
double-sided/double-density (720 KB storage capacity) floppy
disks in this drive. The 1.44 MB disk has the advantage of
storing more data than a 720 KB disk.
You can tell the disks apart by looking at the edge of the disk
opposite the sliding metal panel.
• 1.44 MB disks have a write-protected tab on one side and a sensing hole on the
other side
• 720 KB disks have only a write-protect tab.
To write-protect either kind of disk, slide the plastic writeprotect tab to uncover the hole.
As you push the disk into the drive you will hear a faint click as
the disk slides into place. To release the disk, slide the disk
release button on the right side of the disk opening.
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Chapter 4 - How to Use Your Meridian 400
How to Care for Floppy Disks
• Handle disks carefully.
• Don’t remove a disk from a drive while the drive is in use.
• Don’t touch or scratch any exposed portion of the disk’s shiny surface, or allow
dust or moisture to collect on the disk.
• Store disks at a temperature range between 10°C (50°F) and 49°C
(120°F).
• Keep disks away from magnetic fields.
• Format a new disk before you use it for storing data. Before you begin the
format, make sure the disk doesn’t contain anything you want to save.
Formatting a disk will erase all data stored on it.
Write protect notch
Sensing hole
3.5” 1.44MB High Density Floppy Disk
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Chapter 4 - How to Use Your Meridian 400
How to Use a PCMCIA Card Slot
Caution:
Don’t install another vendor’s card and socket services over the preinstalled Phoenix services. Your Card & Socket Services will
accomodate SRAM cards and a modem on COM2.
Your system comes with dual PCMCIA Type-II expansion slots.
One slot on each side of the computer. To insert a PCMCIA
card, align the card so the label is up and the connector is
toward the computer. Carefully slide the card into the slot. To
remove a card, pull the PC card eject button out and then push
in. Your system comes with software that allows most PCMCIA
cards to be recognized. Some third-party cards may require
their own software. See your PCM+ user’s guide for detailed
instructions.
Note: Your system is installed and configured with Phoenix Card & Socket Services.
For more information, double-click on the Readme icon in Windows or on the
Readme file in the C:\UTILS directory.
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Chapter 4 - How to Use Your Meridian 400
PCMCIA cards (Type II) can provide your computer with:
• Flash Memory
• LAN
• Fax/Modem
• SRAM Memory
• SCSI
• Sound system
Before you can use certain PCMCIA cards, you need to install a
client driver first. See your card’s user manual for more details.
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Chapter 5 - Using SETUP
5. Using SETUP
Your system includes a SETUP utility program that allows you
to change the system configuration as needed:
System time and date
Floppy disk drive type
Hard disk drive type
Base memory
Extended memory
Video system
Maximum CPU speed
Number lock on or off
Quick boot on or off
PCMCIA Boot
Cache
Serial and parallel port status
Internal Mouse
LCD Brightness
System Password
Power saving features
Note: SETUP configuration information reside in the battery powered CMOS RAM. The
battery usually lasts for five years. If the battery is low, you may repeatedly get
a SETUP error during system startup. If this occurs, call Customer Service
immediately. Do not open the system yourself.
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Chapter 5 - Using SETUP
How to Run SETUP
Before entering SETUP save all your files and exit your
application. Once you enter SETUP, you lose all unsaved data
because the system reboots when you exit SETUP.
To run SETUP press Ctrl+Alt+S at the DOS prompt.
Note: Do not run SETUP during system initialization.
There are three SETUP screens. The first screen, “Standard
System Parameters” is the first screen that appears. You should
see a screen similar to the one above.
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Chapter 5 - Using SETUP
Navigating in SETUP
You navigate through the SETUP program using cursor keys,
function keys, and a few other special keys. Use the keys listed
below on the SETUP screen.
From the Standard System Parameters Menu
F1
Display Help screen
F2
Display system information
Up and Down arrow
Select a SETUP option
+ and - or Space Bar
Change a SETUP nonnumeric value
From the Exit Menu
Esc
Display the Exit menu and return to
the SETUP screen
F4
Save values, and exit SETUP
F5
Load default values
F6
Exit SETUP without rebooting the
system
0
Press to delete a numeric value
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Chapter 5 - Using SETUP
Standard System Parameters
Standard System Parameters contains the following options:
Time
The current time, in hours, minutes, and seconds. The system
uses a 24-hour clock format; for example, 5:50 pm displays as
17:50:00.
Date
The current date in month/day/year format.
Diskette Drive A
Set to a 1.44 MB 3.5-inch floppy disk drive when it is installed
in your system.
Hard Disk 1
Set to the fixed (hard) disk drive type installed in your system.
When set to Auto, the system automatically determines your
hard drive type. (Default: Auto 1)
Base Memory
The amount of base memory in the system set to 640 KB
(Default).
Extended Memory
The amount of extended memory in the system (depending on
the amount of memory installed). For example:
4MB RAM = 3072 KB extended memory + 640KB base.
8MB RAM = 7168 KB extended memory + 640KB base.
20MB RAM = 19456 KB extended memory + 640KB base.
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Chapter 5 - Using SETUP
Video Card
Always set to “VGA/EGA”.
Maximum CPU Speed
Use the Maximum CPU Speed feature to select between Full
Speed, and Slow Speed. Slow Speed reduces the speed of the
CPU to be compatible with some software which cannot be used
at the faster operating speed. Slow Speed also extends battery
life. Normally this setting should be left at “Full Speed”.
Numlock on at boot
Use the Numlock on at boot feature to activate the numeric
keypad on the computer’s keyboard at bootup. The keys that
make up the 10-key numeric keypad will produce the assigned
numerals when typed.
Quick Boot
Use the Quick Boot feature to skip the detailed memory and
self-diagnostics tests during system bootup. This reduces the
amount of time required for powering up the system.
PCMCIA Boot
Set to “Enabled” only when booting from an SRAM PCMCIA
card in PCMCIA Slot 0. (Default: Disabled)
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Chapter 5 - Using SETUP
System Configuration Parameters
To display the System Configuration menu, press PageUP or
PageDown from the main SETUP screen.
Cache
Use of 8KB or 16KB of cache memory can improve your
computer’s processing speed. Some applications and diagnostic
utilities do not run properly with the cache on. (Default;
Enabled)
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Chapter 5 - Using SETUP
Serial Port 1
Sets the COM port used for the RS-232C serial port.
Defaults: Name: COM1. I/O address: 03F8h. IRQ: 4.
Parallel Port
Sets the Name, I/O address, and IRQ for LPT1, LPT2 and LPT3
parallel ports.
Defaults: Name: LPT1. I/O address: 0378h. IRQ: 7.
Parallel Port Mode
Sets the parallel port for unidirectional or bidirectional data flow.
(Default: Bidirectional)
Note: Should you use the port as Enhanced Parallel Port (EPP), set to “Bidirectional.”
Internal Mouse
Set to “Disabled” if you use an external serial mouse.
Default: Enabled.
LCD Brightness
Adjusts the LCD brightness to be comfortable.
Default: Normal.
Note: To extend battery life, set to “Half.”
Password
Sets the password for computer security. See “System
Passwords,” for details.
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Chapter 5 - Using SETUP
Power Management Parameters
The Power Management Feature Control menu customizes the
system’s battery conservation programs, allowing for the most
efficient operation. To view the Power Management Setup
menu from the DOS prompt, press Ctrl+Alt+P simultaneously.
Note: Windows NT version 3.1 does not support power management. If you are running
Windows NT version 3.1 with this system, disable all power management.
Running Windows NT with power management enabled can lead to
unpredictable results.
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Chapter 5 - Using SETUP
Power Management
This option enables or disables all power management functions.
You can choose between Enable, Disable, or Battery only.
When Enabled, the setup items listed under Power
Management Parameters will take effect.
When Disabled, the setup items listed under Power
Management Parameters will not take effect.
When set to Battery Only and the system is being powered by
battery only, Power Management will be on.
When set to Battery Only and the system is being powered by
the AC adapter, Power Management will be off.
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Chapter 5 - Using SETUP
Idle, Standby, and Suspend Options
The Setup items listed under Power Management Feature
Control let you minimize power consumption and maximize
battery life. Use these Setup options to get the maximum use
out of every battery charge.
System Idle After
System Idle is the first level of power management. When
System Idle is enabled, the system slows down only the CPU
after the allotted time has passed. Slowing down only the CPU
saves battery power, but allows for quick “wakeups” when you
press a key or move the mouse cursor. You can set this option
anywhere between 1 and 16 seconds.
Note: If you set this option below 8 seconds, applications that take a long time to load
(like Windows) may not run properly.
System Standby After
System Standby is the second level of power conservation.
When System Standby is enabled, the system turns off the LCD
backlight and the CPU after the allotted time has passed. The
Meridian immediately wakes up the next time any key is hit or
mouse movement is detected.
The System Standby state timeout interval can be disabled or
set to preset values between 1 minute and 16 minutes.
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Chapter 5 - Using SETUP
System Suspend After
System Suspend After is the third level of power conservation,
providing the maximum power conservation. When System
Suspend is enabled, the system turns off the LCD backlight as
well as the diskette and hard disk drives and also turns off the
CPU after the allotted time has passed. Data currently in RAM
is safe until normal operation is resumed.
The suspend state timeout interval can be disabled or set to
preset values between 5 minutes and 60 minutes.
Note: If your system has an external PS/2 style mouse, keyboard, modem (when turned
on), etc., power is supplied to them in the Suspend state. Therefore, these
peripheral devices will shorten the possible suspend duration time when
powered by the battery pack.
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Chapter 5 - Using SETUP
Ring on Resume
Use the Ring on Resume feature to determine whether the
system automatically wakes up from Suspend mode upon
receiving an incoming modem ring from a serial or PCMCIA
modem.
Low Battery Suspend
Use this feature to automatically enter the suspend mode when
the battery charge is critically low. If you disable this feature,
normal battery low alarms will occur, but the system will not
enter suspend mode unless you push the suspend/resume button.
You can choose Enabled or Disabled.
Note: If you disable this feature and ignore low battery alarms, the system will shut
down when the battery is drained. Also remember, Suspend mode is intended
for short breaks only. For longer breaks, always turn your system completely
off so the battery can recharge.
HDD Timeout Value
Specifies how much time should elapse before the hard drive
automatically shuts off. The next application to access the hard
disk reactivates the motor.
The hard disk timeout interval can be disabled or set to preset
values between 1 minute and 15 minutes.
Remaining Battery Level
Displays the level of usable battery with the horizontal bar when
the battery pack is installed in your system.
Note: If you don’t fully recharge the battery before putting it in, the Remaining Battery
Level may not read accurately.
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Chapter 5 - Using SETUP
System Security
You can set both a system password and a key lock password to
prevent unauthorized use of your system.
System Password
Warning!
If you forget the password, your system will not operate. You will have to contact
Customer Service to completely clear the CMOS password. Write down your password
and store it in a safe place.
To set the system password, run the SETUP program and select
Password: on the menu screen. To set the system password for
the first time, follow these steps:
1. Select the password option. Press +, - or Space to enable.
The following message appears.
more steps next page
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Chapter 5 - Using SETUP
2. Type the password you want use and press Enter. It can be up to
seven characters in length.
The following verification prompt appears.
more steps next page
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Chapter 5 - Using SETUP
3. Type your password and press Enter again.
The following alert message appears.
4. Press any key to return to main menu.
5. Press ESC, then F4 to save the password.
For security's sake, the password characters don't appear on the screen as
you type them.
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Chapter 5 - Using SETUP
Removing and Changing a System Password
To remove or change the system password:
1. Start your system, then wait for the password prompt.
2. Enter your current password at the prompt followed by a forward
slash (/). At this point, if you wish to remove the password, just
press the Enter key. To set a new password, type it in, then press
the Enter key.
Example: OLDPASSWORD/NEWPASSWORD <Enter>
Key Lock Password
Note: The Key Lock Password feature is unavailable when using an external keyboard.
The key lock password feature prevents your computer from
being used by an unauthorized person when you temporarily
leave your computer. The key lock password is the same as the
power-on password.
To activate the key lock password, press the Fn + CapsLock
keys. The ScrollLock, NumLock, and CapsLock indicator lights
will be turned on and off repeatedly on the computer.
To unlock the key lock password, type in the password at any
time, then press the Enter key. The system will beep when the
keyboard unlocks.
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Chapter 6 - How to Install Options
6. How to Install Options
Right out of the box, your Meridian helps you do your work faster and
easier. And as your needs change, it's easy to add new components to
improve the performance, power, and flexibility of your system.
This section explains how to install some of the most popular computer
accessories. Usually, beefing up your system is as easy as opening the case
and sliding in a new feature.
Caution:
Whenever you work inside the computer, electrostatic discharge can permanently
damage your equipment. Always ground yourself before beginning these procedures. We
strongly recommend using an antistatic wrist strap attached to cabinet ground.
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Chapter 6 - How to Install Options
How to Install More RAM Memory
System memory is often called RAM or Random Access
Memory. RAM is the thinking space available to your
applications. Usually, the more system RAM you have, the
faster your system will run. Many software applications simply
run much faster and more efficiently when more RAM is
available.
Your system comes with 4 MB of RAM installed, upgradable to
8 MB or 20 MB. Additional memory is installed with a 4 MB or
16 MB RAM module.
Before You Begin
Select a clean, well lighted work space. Place your system unit
on a stable work surface large enough to accommodate the
components of the system unit you remove and replace.
Caution:
Whenever you work inside the computer, electrostatic discharge can
permanently damage your equipment. Always ground yourself before
beginning these procedures. We strongly recommend using an antistatic wrist strap attached to cabinet ground.
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Chapter 6 - How to Install Options
Installing the RAM Board
RAM Board
The RAM board slot is located under the memory board cover,
as illustrated in the figure.
1. Turn off the power and remove all connecting cables.
2. As you face the computer, turn the system over so the bottom of
the system is facing up.
3. Use a small, thin screw driver or other tool to free the cover. Be
careful not to break the cover or the system unit case. Take the
cover off and set it aside.
4. Hold the RAM board gently by its edges.
5. Insert the RAM board into the slots as shown in the figure. Press
down gently.
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Chapter 6 - How to Install Options
How to Attach an External Floppy Drive
You can use an optional external 3.5-inch floppy disk drive by
connecting it to the external floppy drive port on the back of
your system.
Caution:
Always locate the drive at the place with good ventilation. Keep the
drive away from strong magnetic fields. Do not insert liquids or
corrosive chemicals into the drive.
To connect the drive:
1. Turn off your computer and peripherals.
2. Connect the cable between the external floppy disk drive and the
floppy disk drive connector on the computer. Make sure the
connector near the ferrite is attached to the system unit.
See the instruction manuals of the external floppy disk drive for
more details.
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Chapter 6 - How to Install Options
Floppy disk slot
Disk release button
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Chapter 7 - How to Maintain Your System
7. How to Maintain Your
System
Your system is designed for years of rugged, portable use. You’ll get even
more service out of your Meridian by taking good care of your equipment.
Traveling with the System
Follow these steps to prepare the system for travel:
1. Back up important data onto floppy disks.
2. Turn off the power to the system and all peripherals.
3. Make sure that the display is properly closed. The latch on the
system must be secured.
4. Disconnect the AC adapter and all peripherals.
5. Make sure the PCMCIA eject buttons are flush with the edge of
the system unit.
6. Hand carry the system. Do not check it as luggage.
7. Check with the airline if you plan to use the system in-flight.
8. When traveling in another country, check that the local AC voltage
and the AC adapter power cord specifications are compatible. If
not, purchase a power cord that is compatible with the local
voltage. Do not use converter kits sold for appliances to power the
system.
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Chapter 7 - How to Maintain Your System
Caring for the System Hardware
• Do not expose the system to rain, liquid, or moisture.
• Do not clean the system with liquid or aerosol cleaners. Wipe the
system with a damp, soft cloth.
• Do not place the system near sources of heat.
• Do not expose the system to extreme temperatures.
• Do not place objects on top of the system. This can damage the
screen.
• Do not expose the system to direct sunlight.
• Do not subject the system to strong vibration or shocks. Be sure not
to drop it.
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Chapter 7 - How to Maintain Your System
Caring for the AC Adapter
• Do not connect to any other device.
• Connect the adapter power cord into a grounded power outlet only.
• Contact an electrician if the adapter power cord does not fit into
your outlet.
• Do not set anything on the power cord. Carefully route the power
cord and cables.
Caring for the Battery Power Pack
• Turn the power off before removing or replacing the battery pack.
• Do not remove a battery while charging. Unplug the AC adapter
before removing a battery.
• Do not tamper with the battery pack. Never attempt to open the
case. The pack can ignite if opened. Corrosive chemicals in the
battery can cause chemical burns.
• Dispose of a used battery case promptly and properly according to
local regulations.
75
System Specifications
System Specifications
CPU
Intel i486SX/33MHz, i486DX2/50MHz or
i486DX4/100MHz (all SL enhanced)
CPU Internal Cache
8KB; 16KB for i486DX4/100
Memory
ROM: 128KB for system/video
RAM: 4MB standard expandable to 8MB or 20MB
Video: 1MB
Hard drive
2.5 inch low power consumption IDE hard drive with
175MB, 262MB, or 350MB capacity
Display dimensions
STN mono - 8.2 inch diagonal
STN color - 7.8 inch diagonal
TFT color - 7.8 inch diagonal
Color Video mode
640 X 480, 256 colors (color only) , VGA compatible
Keyboard
84 keys plus cursor control keys,
embedded numeric pad, 12 function keys
Environmental Specifications
Operating Temperature
10°C to 35°C
Storage Temperature
-10°C to 50°C
Operating Humidity
40%RH to 80%RH (no condensation)
Storage Humidity
40% RH to 80% RH (no condensation)
76
System Specifications
Dimensions
Weight
STN Monochrome:
STNColor:
TFT Color:
3.6 lbs with battery
3.9 lbs with battery
4.1 lbs with battery
Case
STN/TFT color: 10.2(w) X 7.8(d) X 1.7(h) inch
259(w) X 198(d) X 42(h) mm
Case
STN mono:
10.2(w) X 7.8(d) X 1.5(h) inch
259(w) X 198(d) X 37(h) mm
Battery Pack Specifications
Type
6-cell rechargeable nickel-metal hydride
Voltage
7.2V DC
Capacity
2600 mAh
Storage temperature
-10° to 40° C short term
-10° to 30° C long term
Dimensions
5.5(w) X 2.3 (d) X 0.8 (h) inch
139.6(w) X 58.6(d) X 20.5(h) mm
Weight
.76 lbs (345g)
AC Adapter Specifications
Input
100 to 240V AC, 50/60Hz, 0.6A maximum
Output
11.5V DC, 2.4 amps
Dimensions
2.6(w) X 5.4(d) X 1.5(h) inch
66(w) X 137(d) X 38(h) mm
Weight
.79 lbs (360g)
DC Cable length
70.9 inch (1,800mm)
77
Handy Cheat Sheet
Handy Cheat Sheet
Here are some of the most often needed or forgotten notes.
CTRL-ALT-DEL .......................................................... Warm Reboot
Reset button, or
Power button ................................................................... Cold Reboot
F2 during power up ..................................................... Access SETUP
CTRL-BREAK, or
CTRL-C............................ Pause or Break an application or batch file
DOS Commands
COPY [filename] [drive:][path][newfilename].................. copies a file
FORMAT [drive:] ......................................... erases and formats a disk
DIR [drive:][path] ............ lists the files in a certain drive and directory
DEL [filename] ................................................................ deletes a file
MD[newdirectory] ............................................ makes a new directory
RD[directoryname] ........... removes and erases an empty, old directory
RENAME [oldfilename][newfilename] ......................... renames a file
CHKDSK [drive:] ............................. displays a status report for a disk
CD[path] .............................................. changes to a different directory
CLS ........................................................................... clears the screen
Common DOS file extensions
.BAK .................................................................................. backup file
.BAT ..................................................................................... batch file
.COM............................................................... command program file
.EXE ............................................................... executable program file
.SYS ................................................................................... system file
.INI ............................................................. Windows initialization file
.PIF ................................................ Windows program information file
README files ................................ text files with special instructions
78
Handy Cheat Sheet
Handy Cheat Sheet
Windows Shortcuts
Ctrl-C ....................................................................... copy to clipboard
Ctrl-V ................................................paste or copy from the clipboard
Ctrl-X ...................................................... delete and copy to clipboard
Alt-Tab ............................................ toggle between open applications
Alt-Esc .................................................. jump to next open application
Wildcards - wildcards are special characters that can represent any other
valid numbers, letters, or symbols in a file name.
*
The asterisk represents any number of other characters.
For example:
*.BAK would represent any file with the extension BAK.
GONOW.* would represent all files named GONOW
with any extension.
?
The question mark represents one single character.
For example:
GONOW.?XE would represent any file named GONOW
with an extension ending in XE.
?ONOW.EX? would represent any five character
filename ending in ONOW with EX as the first two
characters of its extension.
79
Glossary
Glossary
This glossary provides general definitions of key terms. For an expanded list look in
standard reference books on computers.
Address (Physical) - A specific location in
memory where a unit record, or sector, of data is
stored.
Application Program - Computer program that
actually performs a useful task. Word processors,
spreadsheets, and desktop publishing programs are
application programs.
AUTOEXEC.BAT File - An MS-DOS batch file
containing commands which execute
automatically when you turn on your computer.
Batch File - A file containing several commands
that execute in sequence as a group, or batch. MSDOS batch files must have a filename extension of
.BAT.
Boot - Short for Bootstrap. Transfer of a disk
operating system program from storage on floppy
disk or hard disk drive to computer’s working
memory.
Boot Disk - A disk with an operating system
installed which loads the system on power up.
Character - Anything that can print in a single
space on the page or the screen. Includes numbers,
letters, punctuation marks, and graphic symbols.
Command Processor - The part of an operating
system that processes commands entered by you.
The command processor in MS-DOS is contained
in the COMMAND.COM file.
CPU - Central Processing Unit. The piece of
hardware which interprets instructions, performs
the tasks you indicate, keeps track of stored data,
and controls all input and output operations.
Crash - A malfunction in the computer hardware
or software, usually causing loss of data.
Cursor - The highlighted marker which shows
your position on the screen and moves as you
enter words or numbers.
Diagnostics - The tests and procedures the
computer performs to check its internal circuitry
and set up its configuration.
DIP Switches - Small switches on a piece of
hardware such as a CPU, a printer, or an option
card. DIP switch settings control various functions
and provide a system with information about itself.
DIP stands for Dual In-Line Package.
Directory - A list of the files stored on a disk or a
part of a disk.
Disk Drive - The physical device which allows
the computer to read from and write to a disk. A
floppy disk drive has a disk slot into which you
insert floppy disks. A hard disk drive is
permanently fixed inside the system unit.
DOS - Disk Operating System. A computer
program which continuously runs and mediates
between the computer user and the Application
Program, and allows access to disk data by disk
filenames. The Disk Operating System controls
the computer’s input and output functions. See
Operating System.
File - A group of related pieces of information
called records, or entries, stored together on disk.
Text files consist of words and sentences.
Program files consist of codes and are used by
computers to interpret and carry out instructions.
Floppy disk - a flat piece of flexible plastic
coated with magnetic material and used to store
data permanently.
Format - To prepare a new disk (or erase an old
one) so it can receive information. Formatting a
disk divides it into tracks and sectors which
create addressable locations on it.
Hard Disk Drive - Commonly called rigid disk
drives, or fixed disk drives. Unlike floppy disks,
hard disks are fixed in place inside the system
unit. They can process data faster and store many
more files than floppy disks.
Hardware - Any physical component of a
computer system, such as a monitor, printer,
keyboard, or CPU.
IDE - Integral Device Equipment. Also, IDE is an
acronym for Integrated, Intelligent or Imbedded
Drive Electronics. An IDE drive has the
controller electronics built into the drive itself
and is connected directly to the mainboard or to
an adapter card.
Jumper - A small electrical connector that alters
some of the computer’s functions. Short (makes a
connection) or Non-Short (no connection).
80
Glossary
Glossary
Kilobyte (KB) - A unit used to measure storage
space (in a computer’s memory or on a disk).
One kilobyte equals 1024 bytes.
LED - Light Emitting Diode. A substance that
illuminates when electricity passes through it,
like the indicator lights on the front panel of the
computer.
Local Bus - A set of addresses, data, and control
signals that interface directly with the host CPU.
Mainboard - A printed circuit board into which
other circuit boards can be plugged. Usually, it
contains the CPU, connectors for memory
(SIMMs), secondary cache, SCSI host adapter
socket and expansion slots for add-on boards.
Also known as a motherboard.
Memory - The area where your computer stores
data. Memory contents can be permanent and
unalterable (ROM) or temporary (RAM).
MHz - This stands for Megahertz, or cycles per
second.
Operating System - A collection of programs
that allow a computer to control its operations.
The Operating System determines how programs
run on the computer and supervises all input and
output - for example, MS-DOS.
Parallel - The type of interface which transmits
data in groups of bits. Printers usually use
Parallel ports.
Peripheral - A device (such as, a printer or a
modem) connected to a computer that depends
on the computer for its operation.
Port - A physical input/output socket on a
computer where you can connect a peripheral.
RAM - Random Access Memory. The part of
memory that a computer can both read and write
to. The programs you use are temporarily stored
in RAM. All data stored in RAM is erased when
you turn off the power.
Read - To copy data from one area to another.
For example, when you open a text file stored on
disk, the computer reads the data from the disk
and displays it on the screen.
Reset - To reload a computer’s operating system
so you can retry a task or begin using a different
operating system. Resetting clears RAM.
ROM - Read Only Memory. A portion of memory that
can only be read and cannot be used for temporary
storage. ROM retains its contents even when you turn
off the power.
Self Test - The initial diagnostics procedures a system
performs to check its hardware.
Setup - This refers (usually) to the program that is
used to load the CMOS data base with input from the
user. SETUP sets the date, time, and configuration of
disk drives installed on the system.
Software - The programs that enable your computer
to perform the tasks and functions you indicate.
Application programs are software.
Subdirectory - A directory that originates from
another directory (the root directory or some other
directory). Subdirectories branch out from other
directories.
System Disk - A disk that contains the operating
system. A Boot Disk.
Write - To store data on a disk.
Write-Protect - To prevent a floppy disk from being
overwritten by placing a write-protect tab over the
notch on the side of the floppy disk (5.25") or setting
the write-protect switch (3.5"). When a floppy disk is
write-protected, you cannot erase, change, or record
over its contents.
ZEOS - Greek God of computers.
81
Index
Index
A
M
AC Adapter
Memory
precautions 41
how to install 68
Mouse
B
how to use 45
Battery
how to charge 37
how to install 32
how to remove 33
life 34
precautions 40
C
Mouse Buttons 18
N
Numeric Keypad 29
O
Options
Charging the battery 37
Condensation 15
Connectors 23
how to install 67
P
D
Packing Slip 13
PCMCIA Slot 48
DOS Commands 79
DOS File Extensions 79
Power Button 20
Power Management
F
Power Saving 39
eject buttons 20
parameters 58
Features, system 17
Floppy Disks 46
Floppy Drive
R
RAM
external 70
I
Indicator Lights 25
K
Key Combinations 30
Keyboard 26
Keypad, numeric 29
L
how to install 68
Reset Switch 20
S
SETUP 51
how to navigate 53
how to run 52
Power Management Parameters 58
Standard System Parameters 54
System Configuration Parameters 56
System Security 63
Speaker Volume 30
Low Battery Warnings 35
82
Index
Index
Suspend Mode 39
Suspend/Resume Button 18
System
features 17
how to maintain 73
how to open 43
specifications 77
System Security 63
T
TruePoint device 18, 44
U
Unpacking 13
W
Where to set up 16
700-0187-01
Merid400
83
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