HP J Class 3 - For Visualization Center Datasheet

HP J Class 3 - For Visualization Center Datasheet
Service Handbook
HP VISUALIZE J6000 Workstations
Manufacturing Part Number: HP Part No. A5990-90030
Edition E0700
Notice
The information contained in this document is subject to change without
notice.
Restricted Rights Legend
Use, duplication, or disclosure by government is subject to restrictions as
set forth in subdivision (c) (1) (ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and
Computer Software Clause at DFARS 252.227.7013.
© Copyright 2000 Hewlett-Packard Company. All Rights Reserved.
This document contains proprietary information that is protected by
copyright. All rights are reserved. No part of this document may be
photocopied, reproduced or translated to another language without the
prior written consent of Hewlett-Packard Company.
UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other
countries, licensed exclusively through X/Open Company Limited.
© Copyright 1980, 1984 AT&T, Inc.
© Copyright 1979, 1980, 1983 The Regents of the University of
California.
This software and documentation is based in part on the Fourth Berkeley
Software Distribution under license from the Regents of the University
of California.
2
Contents
1. Product Information
Chapter Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Product Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Net Dimensions and Weights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Key Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Front Panel Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Power Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Thumbscrew on the Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
System LCD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Internal Storage Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Rear Panel Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
Connectors on the Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Internal Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Monitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Site Preparation and Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
2. Configuration
Chapter Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
Workstation Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
Field Replaceable Unit (FRU) Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
Internal Storage Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
I/O Cards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
3. Troubleshooting
3
Contents
Chapter Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Introduction to Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Flowcharts for Troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Dealing with a Boot Failure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Special Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching for Bootable Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stable Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Boot Command Notations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supported Boot Paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Intermediate System Loader (ISL) Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
41
42
42
42
43
43
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selftest Failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chassis Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
44
44
45
46
Running System Verification Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Running ODE-Based Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Using the System Board LEDs for Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Interpreting the LED Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Troubleshooting with System Board LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
4. Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
Chapter Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Tools Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Exploded View Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Exchange and Nonexchange Part Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
FRU Removal and Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
4
Contents
Prerequisite Steps for All Removal and Replacement Procedures . . .85
Front Bezel and Top Cover. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86
Internal CD ROM Drive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
PCI Cage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94
Speaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95
Removing the System Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
Replacing the System Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Removing and Replacing the Real-Time Clock. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
5. Boot Console Handler
Chapter Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Boot Console Handler Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Accessing the Boot Console Handler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
Boot Console Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Booting the Workstation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Searching for Bootable Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
Resetting the Workstation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Displaying and Setting Paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
The Monitor Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Displaying the Current Monitor Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Setting the Monitor Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Setting the Monitor Type at Power On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Troubleshooting Monitor Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Changing the Console to an External Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Displaying the Current Memory Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Displaying the Status of the I/O Slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
5
Contents
Setting the Auto Boot and Auto Search Flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Displaying and Setting the Security Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Displaying and Setting Fastboot Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Displaying the LAN Station Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Displaying System Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Displaying PIM Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Using Remote Power-On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Troubleshooting Hint for an Unresponsive RPC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Setting the Fan Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Rack-Mount Fan Speed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Desk-Side Fan Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Initial System Loader (ISL) Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Invoking ISL from the Boot Console Handler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
ISL User Commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
6. Block Diagram
System Board and PCI Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
A. Specifications
Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Altitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DC Magnetic Field Interference. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electrostatic Discharge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Humidity (Non-condensing) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Leakage Current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6
138
138
138
138
138
138
138
138
139
Contents
Vibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139
Electrical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
Input Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
B. SCSI Connections
Appendix Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
SCSI Bus Differences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
SCSI Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
Assigning SCSI Device IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145
Assigning External SCSI Device IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145
Assigning Internal SCSI Device IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146
C. Related Documentation
Additional Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
Site Preparation Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
Installation Poster and Getting Started Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
Parts and Replacement Guide and Technical Reference . . . . . . . . . .148
7
Contents
8
1 Product Information
This chapter provides general product information about the HP VISUALIZE J6000
workstation. This information is provided to help familiarize you with the main features
and components of the workstation.
9
Product Information
Chapter Overview
Chapter Overview
This chapter contains the following main sections:
• Product Description
• Front Panel Components
• Rear Panel Components
• Internal Components
• Monitors
• Keyboard and Mouse
Product Description
The HP VISUALIZE J6000 workstation is a high-performance system capable of handling
the most complex problems in computational analysis, advanced 3-D design, and electronic
circuit design and verification.
The J6000 has two PA-8600 microprocessors and sixteen memory slots on its system
board. It has a 715 Watt power supply with no DC/DC converter units required.
Net Dimensions and Weights
The dimensions for the deskside system are listed below.
• Depth: 25.8 inches (65.5 cm)
• Width: 10.0 inches (25.4 cm)
• Height: 19.8 inches (53.3 cm)
The dimensions for the rack system are listed below.
• Depth: 24.5 inches (62.2 cm)
• Width: 16.7 inches (42.4 cm)
• Height: 3.4 inches (8.6 cm)
10
Chapter 1
Product Information
Product Description
. Table 1-1 lists the net weights for the J6000.
Table 1-1. Net Weights for the J6000 Workstations
Weight
Deskside Configuration
Min. - 40lbs. (17 kg.)
Max. - 49 lbs (22 kg.)
Maximum Configuration (Rack
Mount)1
Min. - 36lbs. (16 kg.)
Max. - 41 ls. (18 kg.)
Maximum Configuration (Twenty
Fully Equipped Workstations and
the Rack)
1200 pounds (544 kg)
1. The rails weigh approximately 10 lbs. (4 kg.). This weight is not included in these
figures.
NOTE
Chapter 1
For environmental and electrical requirements, see Appendix B.
11
Product Information
Product Description
Key Features
The J6000 workstations have the following key features.
• CPUs:
— Two 552MHz PA-8600 microprocessors, each with 0.5 MB instruction cache and 1.0
MB data cache.
• Operating System (Native HP-UX):
— 32-bit support requires HP-UX version 10.20 plus the June 1999 Workstation ACE
(Additional Core Enhancements)
— 64-bit support requires HP-UX version 11.0 plus ACE 9911
• User Interface: HP CDE (Common Desktop Environment) graphical user interface
• Compatibility: Source- and binary-code compatible with the B-, C-, and J-Class
product families
• Main Memory: Using 512MB or 1 GB DIMMs
— Sixteen DIMM slots in pairs (from 1GB up to 16GB total)
• Power Supply:
— 500 Watt (output power), 715 Watt (input power) with two VRM modules
• Remote Power-On
— Remote power-on feature that allows you to power up and shut down your
workstation remotely through the RS232 port.
• Internal Storage Devices:
— Up to two Low-Voltage Differential (LVD) SCSI hard drives.
— One optional ATAPI Slim-line CD drive.
• Standard Networking: Ethernet IEEE 802.3 RJ45, Twisted Pair 10/100 Base T
• Standard I/O: Two GB/sec. aggregate I/O bandwidth
— Two low-voltage differential (LVD) SCSI buses. One dedicated to the two internal
disk drives and one for the external devices (multi-mode).
— Two USB (Universal Serial Bus) connectors (keyboard and mouse)
— Two serial interface connectors (RS-232C)
— Audio connectors (line input, line output, headphone, and microphone)
12
Chapter 1
Product Information
Product Description
• I/O Expansion Capabilities: 64-bit PCI (Peripheral Connect Interface) slots
— Three PCI-4X slots at 3.3V, 66MHz
• Optional Graphics Cards Currently Supported:
— HP VISUALIZE-fx10
— HP VISUALIZE-fxe
• Monitors Currently Supported:
— PC compatible monitors that support a minimum resolution of 1024×768 and a
frequency of 75Hz
• Standard Keyboard: The USB connector provides an interface for the keyboard to the
system. This keyboard provides the standard keys found on most PC keyboards.
• Mouse: The HP mouse (USB) has left, middle, and right buttons that function the same
as most mice. For general information on the various cursor shapes associated with
different areas of HP CDE while using a mouse, see the Using Your HP Workstation
document.
Chapter 1
13
Product Information
Front Panel Components
Front Panel Components
Before powering on your system, you should become familiar with the system unit
controls.
Figure 1-1 shows the front panel components with the bezel attached.
Figure 1-1. System Unit Front Panel Controls With Bezel
CD ROM Bay
System LCD
Hard Drive Bays
Power Switch
Figure 1-2. System Unit Front Panel Controls With Bezel Removed
CD Drive
Hard Disk Drive Bay Areas
CAUTION
Locking Screw
Captive Thumbscrew
System LCD
This workstation is designated for two-person lifting. It weighs
approximately 36 to 49 pounds (16 to 22 kg), depending on the configuration.
Do not attempt to lift it by yourself, or injury may result.
Power Switch
This switch turns the system on and off. When you turn your workstation off, the operating
system automatically executes the shutdown -q command. This prevents any damage to
programs and data on your system disk. Turning the power switch back on again
automatically boots up the HP-UX operating system if your system has been configured to
auto boot.
14
Chapter 1
Product Information
Front Panel Components
Thumbscrew on the Front Panel
There is one captive thumbscrew near the center of the front panel. Loosening and pulling
toward you with this screw allows the top panel to be removed. The top panel must be in
place or the system will not power up.
Between the LCD panel and the CD ROM drive, there is a threaded hole for an optional
locking screw. The locking screw is included in the bag of miscellaneous parts which comes
with the workstation. This locking screw allows the user to protect his/her workstation
form unwanted entry.
System LCD
The Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) indicator is located on the front panel. The LCD has two
16 characters lines. The LCD displays messages about the state of the system, including
chassis codes. The symbols in Figure 1-3 appear in the LCD if you have the HP-UX 10.20
or 11.0 operating system booted on your system. They represent the different system
activities.
Figure 1-3. LCD Symbols
Operating system running (Heart Beat)
Disk access in progress
Network receive in progress
Network transmit in progress
Chapter 1
15
Product Information
Front Panel Components
Internal Storage Devices
The J6000 workstations support the following internal storage devices, which are also
located on the front panel, under the bezel:
• Up to two hot-pluggable, Low-Voltage Differential (LVD) hard disk drives
• One ATAPI (IDE) Slim-Line CD drive (optional)
The following subsections describe these internal storage devices.
Hard Disk Drive(s)
The J6000 workstations can support up to two hot-pluggable, Low-Voltage Differential
(LVD) hard disk drives. These hard disk drives are 3.5-inch form factor, 10K RPM devices
which connect to Ultra2 Wide LVD (Low Voltage Differential) SCSI interfaces on the disk
bay backplane. The hard disk drive bays are located on the lower left side of the front
panel, below the CD ROM drive. See Figure 1-1.
The two hard disk drive models currently supported are:
• 18 GB LVD 10K RPM disk drive (Product Number A4998A)
• 36 GB LVD 10K RPM disk drive (Product Number A6013A)
NOTE
16
The ability to hot plug the hard disk drive(s) requires MirrorDisk/UX
(Product Number B5403BA on HP-UX 10.20, or B2491BA on HP-UX 11.0
ACE 9911).
Chapter 1
Product Information
Front Panel Components
The Hot-Plug Process
The physical aspect of inserting and removing a disk drive is discussed in the document
that comes with the drive. However, the operating system must be prepared for the
insertion or removal of a disk, or unexpected and harmful effects may occur.
There is a significant difference between the terms “hot-pluggable” and “hot-swappable”.
Hot swapping happens at the device level; that is, a hot-swappable device manages
insertion/removal on its own without assistance from HP-UX commands. The disk drive(s)
in the J6000 are not hot-swappable; they are merely hot-pluggable. Thus, a manual
software procedure must be done in order to safely remove or insert disk drives while the
system is running.
The hot-plug process allows you to replace a defective disk drive in a high-available system
while it is running.
Replacing a Failed Disk Drive
In the context of replacing a failed disk drive, the system administrator must determine
which disk has failed. Depending on how the system was set up, the identity of the failed
drive may or may not be obvious. This determination may be done in either of two ways:
• Tracking the error message written by the LVM (Logical Volume Manager) to the
system console and/or a log file. For information on LVM commands, see the man pages
for vgchange, lvreduce, vgfgrestore, lvlnboot, lvextend, lvsync, etc.
• If installed, run the diagnostic utility Support Tool Manager (xstm) to determine disk
malfunction.
The removal of a defective disk drive from an active file system is supported through LVM
commands if hot-pluggable disks have been configured into the HP-UX file system with
LVM. To provide high availability, without impact to users, the disks must also be
configured as mirrored disks. Disk-mirroring is accomplished through use of the
MirrorDisk/UX software (HP part number B5403BA); for information on classes, see
http://www.hgp.com/education/courses/h628s.html.
No graphical user interface is currently offered through the System Administrator
Manager (SAM) for doing the required LVM commands because manipulation of the LVM
requires specialized knowledge that only experienced system administrators are expected
to have (see below for details).
Chapter 1
17
Product Information
Front Panel Components
Hot-Plug Example
The following example describes a particular system problem where the solution is to
replace a hot-plug disk module.
Volume group /dev/vg00 contains the two disks, with the logical volume configuration as
shown:
Table 1-2. Example Configuration
Volume Description
Volume Description
Logical Volume 1
Logical Volume 3
Logical Volume 2
Logical Volume 4
Logical Volume 3
Logical Volume 5
hardware address
10/0/12/0.0
device file (/dev/dsk/)
c2t6d0
10/0/13/0.0
c2t5d0
The system problem for this example is that the disk at hardware address 10/0/13/0.0 has
a head crash, and as a result, is unusable. The steps described in the Hot-Plug Procedure
section below outline a method that can be used to recover from this state.
1. All of the replaced disk’s in-use extents must belong to mirrored logical volumes which
were created with the “strict” option (-s); see the documentation for MirrorDisk/UX.
2. You must have an up-to-date configuration backup file. This is done automatically each
time an LVM command changes LVM configuration.
The default backup file’s path is:
/etc/lvmconf/<base_vg_name>.conf
For example,
/etc/lvmconf/vg00.conf
3. The replacement disk must be the same product ID as the replaced one.
NOTE
HP often uses different manufacturers for disks having the same product
number. The hot-plug manual procedure will not update the disk driver’s
internal information to that of the replaced disk.
The replacement disk will have the same capacity and block size as the defective disk
because they have the same product number. The only field that could be incorrect is the
string specifying the vendor’s name. This will not affect the behavior of the LVM. If it is
desired to update the manufacturer’s name, the disk’s volume group must be deactivated
and reactivated. See the HP-UX System Administration Tasks manual for details.
18
Chapter 1
Product Information
Front Panel Components
The Hot-Plug Procedure
These are the steps required to properly hot-plug a disk drive:
Step 1
• Check if the LVM found the physical volume to be defective when the volume group was
activated.
• The “vgchange -a y” command would have printed the following message on the
console:
WARNING:
VGCHANGE:WARNING: COULDN’T ATTACH TP THE VOLUME GROUP
PHYSICAL VOLUME “/DEV/DSK/cXtXdX”
THE PATH OF THE PHYSICAL VOLUME REFERS TO A DEVICE THAT DOES NOT
EXIST, OR IS NOT CONFIGURED INTO THE KERNEL.
• If the status of the “vgchange -v vg02” is unknown, you may check if this occurred by
doing a vgdisplay command:
vgdisplay<VG name>
For our example:
vgdisplay /dev/vg00
• If the disk was defective at vgchange time, the following messages
will be printed one or more times:
WARNING:
VGDISPLAY: WARNING: COULDN’T QUERY PHYSICAL VOLUME
“/DEV/DSK/cXtXdX”
THE SPECIFIED PATH DOES NOT CORRESPOND TO PHYSICAL VOLUME
ATTACHED TO THE VOLUME GROUP.
VGDISPLAY: WARNING: COULDN’T QUERY ALL OF THE PHYSICAL
VOLUMES
• If you see these messages, the disk was defective at the time the volume group was
activated.
Otherwise, your disk became defective after the vgchange and you must continue with
step 2 of this procedure.
Chapter 1
19
Product Information
Front Panel Components
Step 2
• Reduce any logical volumes that have mirror copies on the faulty disk so that they no
longer mirror onto that disk (note the -A n option). This will take a several minutes.
lvreduce -m 0 -A n <LV name> /dev/dsk/<hard drive>
(for 1-way mirroring)
For example:
lvreduce -m 0 -A n /dev/vg00/stand /dev/dsk/c2t5d0
lvreduce -m 0 -A n /dev/vg00/swap /dev/dsk/c2t5d0
lvreduce -m 0 -A n /dev/vg00/ /dev/dsk/c2t5d0
The number of logical volumes that this step needs is variable. For instance, on a mirror
of a root disk you should have at least three logical volumes: /stand (is
lvol1), /swap (is lvol2), and / (is lvol3). Note that if your root mirror disk dies,
you need to do the following:
— Follow the procedure in the section “Initial System Loader (ISL) Environment” in
the chapter “Boot Console Handler” in this document. At the Main Menu prompt
boot from the good disk.
— Type y at the Interact with ISL prompt and press Enter.
— Type this command at the ISL prompt and press Enter: hpux -lq
The -lq option stands for loss of quorum. Once this procedure has been completed the
system will boot.
Step 3
• Replace the faulty disk.
• Do an ioscan on the replaced disk to insure that it is accessible and also as a double
check that it is a proper replacement.
For example:
ioscan /dev/dsk/c2t5d0
Step 4
• Restore the LVM configuration/headers onto the replaced disk from your backup of the
LVM configuration:
vgcfgrestore -n <volume group name> /dev/rdsk/cxtxdx
where x is the logical unit number of the disk that has been replaced.
For example:
vgcfgrestore -n /dev/vg00
20
/dev/rdsk/c2t5d0
Chapter 1
Product Information
Front Panel Components
Step 5
• Attach the new disk to the active volume group with the vgchange command.
vgchange -a y /dev/vg00
Step 6
• If the disk is not a mirror of a root disk, then skip this step.
• Run the mkboot command. For example:
mkboot /dev/rdsk/c2t5d0
• Run lvlnboot -R to relink the replaced disk into the Boot Data Reserved Area of all
the Physical volumes in the Volume group.
lvlnboot -R
Step 7
• Run the lvsync command to synchronize the physical extents of each logical volume
specified by logical volume path. Synchronization occurs only on physical extents that
are stale mirrors of the original logical extent.
lvsync /dev/<volume group name>/<LV name>
For example:
lvsync /dev/vg00/stand
lvsync /dev/vg00/swap
lvsync /dev/vg00/
At this stage, your system should be fully functioning. Use the xstm command to verify.
Chapter 1
21
Product Information
Front Panel Components
CD ROM Drive (Optional)
As an optional component, the J6000 workstations support one slim-line CD ROM drive
with an ATAPI (IDE) interface.
Figure 1-4 shows the operating features of the CD ROM drive, and Table 1-3 describes
these features.
Figure 1-4. CD ROM Drive Features
Emergency Eject
Button
Eject Button
Disk Tray
Busy Indicator
Light
Table 1-3. CD ROM Drive Features
Feature
Purpose
Busy Indicator
• Lights during a data access operation and during a data
transfer.
• Flashes at a one second rate when a disk is loaded.
• Continues to flash if a disk or hardware error is detected.
• Flashes at a three second rate while playing an audio disk.
Emergency
Eject Hole
Opens the Disk Tray when the end of a paper clip is inserted
into it. Used when the workstation does not have power and
the Disk Tray cannot be opened by pressing the Eject Button.
Eject Button
Opens the Disk Tray so that a CD ROM disk may be inserted
in it or removed from it. When the drive is in use, press the
Eject Button for more than one second to open the Disk Tray.
The Disk Tray does not open if the workstation power is off.
Disk Tray
Holds the CD ROM disk. (Note that this style of CD ROM
drive does not use a disk caddy.)
22
Chapter 1
Product Information
Rear Panel Components
Rear Panel Components
This section describes the following components on the system unit’s rear panel. Figure 1-5
shows the locations of these rear panel components.
• Power cord connector
• Transfer of Control (TOC) Button
• Audio connectors
• Two serial ports
• 802.3 Twisted Pair (TP) LAN connector
• Two USB connectors
• Single-Ended/Low-Voltage Differential (SE/LVD) SCSI connector
NOTE
To maintain FCC/EMI compliance, verify that all cables are fully seated and
properly fastened.
Figure 1-5. System Unit Rear Panel Connectors
Serial Port 1
LAN Connector
Power Connector
Serial Port 2
I/O Card Slots
1
IOIOI
1
2
SERIAL
USB
2
LAN TP 10/100
SCSI
SE
LVD
3
slot 1
slot 2
slot 3
COMPATIBLE CABLE REQUIRED
TOC
USB Connectors
Audio Connectors
Chapter 1
SE/LVD
SCSI
Connector
15-Pin D-Sub
Connector
(optional graphics card)
23
Product Information
Rear Panel Components
Connectors on the Rear Panel
Power Cord Connector
Plug the power cord into the power cord connector to provide AC power to the workstation.
The J6000 power cord is rated at 15A for a 100–120V source.
RS-232C Serial Connectors
You can attach a variety of pointing devices (such as a mouse or trackball) or peripheral
devices (such as printers, plotters, modems, and scanners) to the RS-232C Serial
Input/Output (SIO) ports on this workstation. Consult the documentation that
accompanies the device for specific information concerning its use.
LAN 10/100 BaseT RJ45 Connector
Your workstation has a built-in Twisted Pair (TP) connector for the 802.3 (ETHERNET) or
10 BaseT/100 BaseT network. Your workstation will automatically select the correct
network setting.
USB Connectors
The two Universal Serial Bus (USB) connectors support only the HP keyboard, mouse, or
hub (D6804A). You can connect the HP keyboard, mouse, or hub in either of the USB
connectors.
The USB mouse and keyboard were shipped with your system unit. The HP hub can be
ordered separately. Note that you should consult the documentation that accompanies
each input device for specific information concerning its use.
For more information on the Universal Serial Bus, use your browser to access the following
URL:
http://www.usb.org.
HP Hub for USB Devices
The HP USB hub provides you with the ability to connect more than two USB devices to
the workstation, as well as the ability to extend the USB device’s cable length. As an
example, you may desire to locate the workstation’s keyboard and mouse at a greater
distance from the workstation, but the keyboard and mouse cables are not long enough. To
increase the cable length, you must make use of the USB hub’s extra cable length and
connect the hub’s cable to one of the two connectors on the back of the workstation. You
then connect the keyboard and mouse into their separate connectors on the USB hub.
24
Chapter 1
Product Information
Rear Panel Components
SCSI Connectors
There is one Single-Ended/Low-voltage Differential (SE/LVD) SCSI connector on the rear
panel. This connector will support SE SCSI and LVD SCSI, but not both at the same time.
Use the SCSI connector to connect external SCSI devices such as hard disk drives, optical
disk drives, DDS-format tape drives, and CD ROM drives.
Consult the documentation that accompanies each SCSI device for specific information
concerning its use. Also see Appendix B, “SCSI Connections,” for information about
connecting SCSI devices to the J6000 workstations.
CAUTION
Do not mix SE and LVD SCSI devices on the same SCSI bus as this can cause
reduction of device performance.
Audio Connectors
Your workstation has audio input and output capability through external input and output
connectors on the rear panel and through an internal speaker. The rear panel contains the
line input jack, line output jack, headphone jack, and microphone jack connectors.
Figure 1-6. Audio Connectors
Line Input
Line Output
Headphone
Microphone
The audio connectors are standard stereo audio mini-jacks. Hewlett-Packard recommends
using gold-plated plugs available through audio retailers for best quality recording and
playback through the external connectors. Table 1-4 on the next page provides a summary
of the audio electrical specifications.
Table 1-4. Audio Electrical Specifications
Frequency Response
25 Hz to 20 kHz
Input Sensitivity/Impedance:
– Line in
– Microphone
2.0 Vpk/47 Kohm
22 mVpk/1 Kohm
Chapter 1
25
Product Information
Rear Panel Components
Table 1-4. Audio Electrical Specifications
Maximum Output
Level/Impedance:
– Line out
– Headphones
– Speaker (internal)
2.8 Vpp/47 Kohm
2.8 Vpp/50 ohm
5.9 Vpp/48 ohm
Output Impedance:
– Line out
– Headphones
619 ohm
118 ohm
26
Chapter 1
Product Information
Internal Components
Internal Components
This section describes the internal components of the J6000 workstations.
For instructions on how to remove the workstation’s top panel in order to access these
internal components, as well as instructions on how to remove and replace these internal
components to service them, see Chapter 4.
Figure 1-7. Internal Components of the J6000
16 Memory Slots
Processor 0
Processor 1
VRMs
System Board
The system board in the J6000 contains the PA-RISC microprocessors, memory slots, and
PCI cage as well as connectors to other components.
Chapter 1
27
Product Information
Internal Components
Microprocessors
The J6000 has two PA-8600 microprocessors with operating frequencies of 552 MHz. Each
processor has 0.5 MB instruction cache and a 1.0 MB data cache. Each microprocessor is
cooled by a “turbocooler” which consists of a cylindrical heat sink and an integrated fan.
Power Supply
The power system is comprised of one apparent power factor 500W output power supply.
The maximum power needed by a fully-configured SPU is 715W input power. The
temperature sensor is located in the front of the power supply. The power supply weighs
approximately 8 lbs. (4 kg.). Please note that the system speaker is located in the power
supply.
CAUTION
HP does not recommend and does not support the use of “ferro-active” or
“ferro-resonant” power correction in conjunction with the J6000 workstation.
This type of line conditioner represents an older technology that is not
compatible with the most recent designs in active Power Factor Correction
(PFC) power supplies such as those in the HP J6000 workstations.
“Ferro-active” or “ferro-resonant” line conditioners may cause an increase in
total harmonic distortion and may produce significant and unpredictable
voltage regulation anomalies.
PCI Cage
The PCI (Peripheral Connect Interface) cage is located on the left side of the system board,
behind the CD ROM and hard disk drive bays. There are three PCI-4X, 64 bit, 3.3v, 66
MHz slots which provide I/O expansion capabilities for the workstation. There are no
primary and secondary card slots.
CD ROM and Hard Disk Drive Bays
The J6000 supports two Low-Voltage Differential (LVD) SCSI hard disk drives (one
standard and one optional) and one optional ATAPI slim-line CD ROM drive. The internal
SCSI Bus is independent of the external SCSI Bus.
The hard disk drives are hot-pluggable. More information on this was provided earlier in
this chapter in the Hard Disk Drive section.
Voltage Regulator Modules (VRMs)
NOTE
28
These VRMs are designed to function ONLY with the J6000 power supply.
The output is 2VDC. The maximum current is 52A.
Chapter 1
Product Information
Monitors
Monitors
The J6000 workstations currently support the following HP monitors:
• 19-inch (18.3-inch viewable) VGA 1600×1200 color monitor (Product Number A4575A)
• 21-inch (19.9-inch viewable) VGA 1600×1200 color monitor (Product Number A4576A)
• 18.1-inch L1800 color flat panel display VGA up to 1280×1024 (Product Number
D5065W)
• 19-inch (18-inch viewable) display VGA 1600x1200 (Product Number D8910W)
• 21-inch (19.8-inch viewable) display VGA 1800x1440 (Product Number D2847A)
• 24-inch (22.5-inch viewable) display VGA 1920x1200 (Product Number A1295A)
Keyboard
The standard USB keyboard (Product Number A4983-604xx – the actual suffix number
depends on the localized version of the keyboard) with the J6000 workstations is a 104-key
input device. It is a PC-104 compatible keyboard.
Mouse
The USB mouse is either a scroll wheel type mouse (Product Number A4983-60101) where
the scroll wheel also serves as the middle button, or a true three-button type mouse
(Product Number A4983-60111).
Site Preparation and Installation
For information on:
• Preparing customers’ sites for the delivery and installation of J6000 workstations, refer
to the HP VISUALIZE J6000 Site Preparation Guide (www.docs.hp.com)
• Installing J6000 workstations, refer to the QuikInstall Poster which came with the
workstation (Part Number A5991-90000) and the Getting Started Guide - HP
VISUALIZE J6000 Workstation (Part Number A5990-90020).
For a listing of documentation for the J6000 workstations, see Appendix D.
Chapter 1
29
Product Information
Monitors
30
Chapter 1
2 Configuration
This chapter provides details about setting up and changing the system configuration for
HP VISUALIZE J6000 workstations.
31
Configuration
Chapter Overview
Chapter Overview
This chapter contains the following main sections:
• Workstation Configurations
• Field Replaceable Unit (FRU) Configurations
— Internal Storage Devices
— Memory
— I/O Cards
Workstation Configurations
Refer to the HP Workstations web site for a complete list of supported accessories,
peripherals, and operating system versions for the J6000 workstations. The URL for the
web site is:
http://www.hp.com/visualize
Field Replaceable Unit (FRU) Configurations
This section provides information for setting up or changing the configuration of the Field
Replaceable Units (FRUs) for the J6000 workstations.
Internal Storage Devices
Hard Disk Drive Configuration
The SCSI IDs for hard disk drives are hard-wired into the SCA Ultra2 Wide LVD SCSI
interfaces in the backplane of the two disk bays within the J6000 workstations. Hence,
SCSI IDs do not need to be set for the hard disk drives installed in these workstations.
From top to bottom, the pre-set SCSI IDs for hard disk drives are: 6 and 5.
Similarly, no jumpers are installed at the factory, nor is any jumper installation required
at the customer’s site, on either of the hard disk drive models that are supported with the
J6000 workstations. Both hard disk drive models may be installed as is into these
workstations.
32
Chapter 2
Configuration
Field Replaceable Unit (FRU) Configurations
Memory
There is a label on the inside cover of the workstation which shows the J6000’s memory
loading sequence.
J6000 Memory Configuration
The J6000 workstation has sixteen memory slots, labeled 0A, 0B to 7A, 7B. Memory
DIMMs must be installed in pairs in this workstation, and both DIMMs in each pair must
be of equal size. The DIMMs for this workstation currently come in 512 MB and 1 GB
sizes. This workstation comes with two 512 MB DIMMs as its standard configuration from
the factory. Thus, currently the minimum memory configuration for this workstation is
1GB, and the maximum is 16 GB.
DIMMs should be loaded in the order shown with 0A, 0B being the first pair of DIMMs
loaded, and 7A, 7B being the last pair loaded. Figure 2-1 shows the installation sequence.
NOTE
If memory is installed improperly or it is bad and fastboot is not enabled, your
workstation’s operating system will not boot-up and a DIMM error will
appear in your workstation’s LCD. For more information see the section
“Displaying and Setting Fastboot Mode” in Chapter 5.
Figure 2-1. Memory Loading Sequence in the J6000
Chapter 2
33
Configuration
Field Replaceable Unit (FRU) Configurations
I/O Cards
The three I/O slots located in the PCI cage area of the J6000 workstations are 64-bit, 4x,
3.3v, 66 MHz PCI (Peripheral Connect Interface) slots, providing I/O expansion
capabilities for the J6000 workstations.
CAUTION
34
The J6000 workstations supply about 75 Watts of power to the PCI slots. Do
not insert I/O cards that together draw more than 75 Watts, or damage to the
workstation may result. Please look at the specifications that come with your
individual I/O cards for power requirements. Note that each PCI slot can
provide up to 25 watts.
Chapter 2
3 Troubleshooting
This chapter provides information about isolating a failing component, known as a Field
Replaceable Unit (FRU), in HP VISUALIZE J6000 workstations.
35
Troubleshooting
Chapter Overview
Chapter Overview
This chapter contains the following main sections:
• Introduction to Troubleshooting
• Flowcharts for Troubleshooting
• Dealing with a Boot Failure
• Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
• Running System Verification Tests
• Running ODE-Based Diagnostics
• LED Diagnostics
Introduction to Troubleshooting
To troubleshoot HP VISUALIZE J6000 workstations, you must be familiar with the
HP-UX operating system and be able to start and stop processes. You should also be
familiar with the boot ROM diagnostics, ISL diagnostics, and the Support Tools Manager
online tests, which are described in this chapter.
First note any error or status messages, and then run the power-up boot ROM diagnostics,
known as Selftest. If the Selftest diagnostics fail, replace the FRU that is indicated. If the
tests pass but you still suspect a problem, run the ISL diagnostics and the Support Tools
Manager online tests.
For a complete description of using ISL diagnostics and using the Support Tools Manager,
see the Support Media User’s Manual (Part Number B3782-90176).
Flowcharts for Troubleshooting
The following four figures contain troubleshooting flowcharts you can follow to isolate a
failing Field Replaceable Unit (FRU). Figure 3-1 on the next page contains the main
troubleshooting flowchart. Figures 3-2 through 3-4 on the following pages contain the
flowcharts for console, bootable device, and HP-UX troubleshooting, respectively.
36
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Flowcharts for Troubleshooting
Figure 3-1. Main Flowchart for Troubleshooting
Chapter 3
37
Troubleshooting
Flowcharts for Troubleshooting
Figure 3-2. Console Troubleshooting Flowchart
38
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Flowcharts for Troubleshooting
Figure 3-3. Bootable Device Troubleshooting Flowchart
Chapter 3
39
Troubleshooting
Flowcharts for Troubleshooting
Figure 3-4. HP-UX Troubleshooting Flowchart
40
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Dealing with a Boot Failure
Dealing with a Boot Failure
This section contains information for searching for bootable media, stable storage, boot
command notations, supported boot paths and the Intermediate System Loader (ISL)
environment. Some of the examples in this section require the use of the Boot Console
Handler, which is discussed in Chapter 5 of this handbook.
Special Considerations
When dealing with boot failures, you will need to consider the scenarios in this section.
• To boot from a known device containing a bootable operating system, type the following
at the prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > boot device [Enter]
where device
Notation.
is the hardware path to the device, specified in Mnemonic Style
Example: to boot an operating system stored on an IDE CD ROM, go to the Main Menu
of the Boot Console Handler and then type the following command at the prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > boot ide [Enter]
The operating system on the specified device is used to start the workstation.
• To interact with the Initial System Loader (ISL) before booting the workstation, type
the following at the prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > boot device [Enter]
You are prompted: Interact with ISL (Y or N) > y [Enter]
Answering yes (y) causes the ISL to be loaded from the specified device. After a short
time, the following prompt appears on the screen:
ISL>
ISL is the program that actually controls the loading of the operating system. By
interacting with ISL, you can choose to load an alternate version of the HP-UX
operating system.
For example, if the usual kernel (/stand/vmunix) on the root disk has become
corrupted, boot the workstation from the backup kernel (/stand/vmunix.prev) by
typing the following at the ISL> prompt:
ISL> hpux /stand/vmunix.prev [Enter]
• To find the location of the bootable operating systems on the various media in the file
system, use the search ipl command. See the next subsection, “Searching for
Bootable Media.”
Chapter 3
41
Troubleshooting
Dealing with a Boot Failure
Searching for Bootable Media
To list all devices that contain bootable media, go to the Main Menu of the Boot Console
Handler, and then type the following at the prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > search ipl [Enter]
The search command searches all buses. The search may turn up more devices than there
are lines on the display. If you are using a text terminal, you can control the progress of the
search from the terminal’s keyboard by doing any of the following:
• To temporarily suspend the search, press [Ctrl]-[S].
• To continue the search, press [Ctrl]-[Q].
• To halt the search, press any other key.
These flow-control commands do not work with a bitmapped display, but such a display can
show more than forty lines of text, so you are unlikely to need them.
To search for devices of just one type that actually contain bootable media, go to the Main
Menu of the Boot Console Handler, and then type the following at the prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > search ipl device_type [Enter]
where device_type is one of the following:
• fwscsi is the internal, Ultra2 Wide LVD (Low Voltage Differential) SCSI bus.
• scsi is the external SE/LVD SCSI bus.
• lan is all connections to the built-in LAN.
• ide is the built-in CD ROM drive.
• pcin is an optional SCSI interface in slot number n.
Stable Storage
Stable Storage is non-volatile memory associated with the PA-RISC processor module.
Stable Storage is used by the processor (CPU) to store device path information, the state of
the boot flags, HPMC error information, and operating system initialization data.
Boot Command Notations
The boot command supports the following two notations:
• Mnemonic
• Path number
Type help scsi or help lan for more information on the boot path parameters.
Here are examples of mnemonic notation:
• boot with no parameters selects the primary boot path in stable storage.
• boot with the alternate or alt parameter selects the alternate boot path in stable
storage.
42
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Dealing with a Boot Failure
Here is an example of path number notation:
• boot p1 [Enter] attempts to boot from the second path in a list generated by a
previous search command.
Supported Boot Paths
SCSI devices are bootable when connected to any SCSI port on the system. Workstations
can only boot from the built-in LAN port. The workstation can be booted from the CD ROM
drive for software installation.
Intermediate System Loader (ISL) Environment
The ISL environment provides the means to load the operating system (HP-UX)
environment. The ISL environment also provides an offline platform to execute diagnostic
and utility programs from a boot device when HP-UX does not load.
The ISL program is the first program loaded into main memory from an external media
(LAN, disk, or tape) and launched by the initial program loader (IPL) routine during the
Boot Administration environment.
The ISL environment provides the following capabilities:
• Execute user-entered commands to modify boot device paths and boot options in stable
storage.
• Run off-line diagnostic programs and utilities.
• Provide automatic booting of the HP-UX operating system after power-on or reset.
Chapter 3
43
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
This workstation uses a 2-line LCD, with up to 16-characters per line, to display
firmware/operating system progress codes. These codes are referred to as chassis codes.
The information displayed on the LCD has the following format:
XXX YYYY: ZZZZZZ
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
(Line 1)
(Line 2)
Where:
XXX
Three-character Operating Status
YYYY
Four-digit hex code identifying the code module being executed
ZZZZZZ
Six-digit FRU descriptor
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
Diagnostic message of up to 16 characters
The 3-character operating status can be one of the following:
FLT (fault)
A hardware error has been detected
TST (test)
Hardware being tested
INI (initialize)
Hardware being initialized
SHU (shutdown)
System being shutdown
WRN (warning)
A non-optimal operating condition exists
RUN (running)
The operating system is running
Selftest Failures
Chassis codes are the key to debugging selftest errors. If a failure is found during selftest,
chassis codes are displayed in the system LCD. To debug a failure:
1. In Table 3-1 starting on the next page, find the chassis code listed on the LCD.
2. In the Boot Console Handler, use the Service Menu’s pim, pdt, and ChassisCodes
commands to get additional information about the failure.
The FRU column in Table 3-1 shows messages printed on the LCD that refer to system
FRUs. All codes are listed in numeric order.
44
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Memory Failures
The J6000 workstations require special Memory Page Deallocation to be implemented.
This feature allows the workstation to provide information to the operating system about
memory failures.
HP-UX uses this information to map out failing memory areas and continue normal
operation. You can check the Memory Page Deallocation Table (PDT) using the pdt
command in the Service menu of the Boot Console Handler (refer to Chapter 5). If a failing
DIMM is replaced, use the command pdt clear in the Service Menu to clear out the PDT.
Chapter 3
45
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Chassis Codes
Table 3-1 lists all of the chassis codes for the J6000 workstations.
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
FLT
1n01
SYS BD
HPMC occurred
CPU n detected an unexpected HPMC.
FLT
1n02
SYS BD
powerfail intrpt
CPU n detected an unexpected power fail
interrupt.
FLT
1n03
SYS BD
recvry cntr trap
CPU n detected an unexpected recovery
counter trap.
FLT
1n04
SYS BD
external intrrpt
CPU n detected an unexpected external
interrupt.
FLT
1n05
SYS BD
LPMC occurred
CPU n detected an unexpected LPMC.
FLT
1n06
SYS BD
ITLB mis/Ipg flt
CPU n detected an unexpected ITLB miss
or instruction page fault.
FLT
1n07
SYS BD
I mem prot trap
CPU n detected an unexpected instruction
memory protection trap.
FLT
1n08
SYS BD
illegal inst trp
CPU n detected an unexpected illegal
instruction trap.
FLT
1n09
SYS BD
break instr trap
CPU n detected an unexpected break
instruction trap.
FLT
1n0A
SYS BD
privilgd op trap
CPU n detected an unexpected privileged
operation trap.
FLT
1n0B
SYS BD
privlgd reg trap
CPU n detected an unexpected privileged
register trap.
FLT
1n0C
SYS BD
overflow trap
CPU n detected an unexpected overflow
trap.
FLT
1n0D
SYS BD
conditional trap
CPU n detected an unexpected conditional
trap.
FLT
1n0E
SYS BD
assist exep trap
CPU n detected an unexpected assist
exception trap.
FLT
1n0F
SYS BD
DTLB mis/Dpg flt
CPU n detected an unexpected DTLB
miss or data page fault.
FLT
1n10
SYS BD
non-acc ITLB mis
CPU n detected an unexpected non-access
ITLB miss fault.
FLT
1n11
SYS BD
non-acc DTLB mis
CPU n detected an unexpected non-access
DTLB miss or data page fault.
46
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
FLT
1n12
SYS BD
data mem prot tr
CPU n detected an unexpected data
memory protection trap.
FLT
1n13
SYS BD
data mem brk trp
CPU n detected an unexpected data
memory break trap.
FLT
1n14
SYS BD
TLB dirty bit tr
CPU n detected an unexpected TLB dirty
bit trap.
FLT
1n15
SYS BD
page refrnce trp
CPU n detected an unexpected page
reference trap.
FLT
1n16
SYS BD
assist emul trap
CPU n detected an unexpected assist
emulation trap.
FLT
1n17
SYS BD
hi-priv xfer trp
CPU n detected an unexpected
higher-privilege transfer trap.
FLT
1n18
SYS BD
lo-priv xfer trp
CPU n detected an unexpected
lower-privilege transfer trap.
FLT
1n19
SYS BD
taken branch trp
CPU n detected an unexpected
taken-branch trap.
FLT
1n1A
SYS BD
data mem acc rts
CPU n detected an unexpected data
memory access rights trap.
FLT
1n1B
SYS BD
data mem prot ID
CPU n detected an unexpected data
memory protection ID trap.
FLT
1n1C
SYS BD
unalign data ref
CPU n detected an unexpected unaligned
data reference trap.
FLT
1n1D
SYS BD
perf mon intrrpt
CPU n detected an unexpected
performance monitor interrupt.
TST
1n20
SYS BD
CPUn basic test
CPU n is starting its basic operations
self-test.
TST
1n21
SYS BD
CPUn alu test
CPU n is starting its arithmetic and
logical unit self-test.
TST
1n22
SYS BD
CPUn branch test
CPU n is starting its branch instruction
self-test.
TST
1n23
SYS BD
CPUn arith cond
CPU n is starting its arithmetic condition
self-test.
TST
1n24
SYS BD
CPUn bit opers
CPU n is starting its bit operation
instruction self-test.
TST
1n25
SYS BD
CPUn cntrl regs
CPU n is starting its control register
self-test.
Chapter 3
47
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
TST
1n26
SYS BD
CPUn ext intrpt
CPU n is starting its external interrupt
self-test.
TST
1n27
SYS BD
CPUn itimer test
CPU n is starting its interval timer
self-test.
TST
1n28
SYS BD
CPUn multi-media
CPU n is starting its multi-media
instructions self-test.
TST
1n29
SYS BD
CPUn shadow reg
CPU n is starting its shadow register
self-test.
TST
1n2A
SYS BD
CPUn diagnse reg
CPU n is starting its diagnose register
self-test.
TST
1n2B
SYS BD
CPUn rdr test
CPU n is starting its remote diagnose
register self-test.
TST
1n2C
SYS BD
CPUn bypass test
CPU n is starting its integer bypass
operation self-test.
TST
1n30
SYS BD
CPUn start est
CPU n is starting its early (pre-memory)
self-tests.
WRN
1n31
SYS BD
CPUn skip est
CPU n is bypassing its early self-tests to
save time.
FLT
1n32
SYS BD
CPUn bad tst mod
CPU n detected an unsupported system
mode.
INI
1n3C
SYS BD
CPUn initialize
CPU n is initializing after self-tests.
TST
1n3E
SYS BD
CPUn exit est
CPU n finished its early self-tests.
TST
1nA0
SYS BD
CPUn fpu tests
CPU n is starting its floating-point unit
self-tests.
TST
1nA1
SYS BD
CPUn fpu reg tst
CPU n is starting its floating-point
register self-test.
TST
1nA2
SYS BD
CPUn fpu inst
CPU n is starting its floating-point
instruction self-test.
TST
1nA3
SYS BD
CPUn fpu traps
CPU n is starting its floating-point trap
self-test.
TST
1nA4
SYS BD
CPUn fpu misc
CPU n is starting its floating-point
miscellaneous operations self-test.
TST
1nA5
SYS BD
CPUn fpu bypass
CPU n is starting its floating-point
bypassing self-test.
TST
1nB1
SYS BD
CPUn TLB RAM tst
CPU n is starting its TLB register
self-test.
48
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
TST
1nB2
SYS BD
CPUn TLB trans
CPU n is starting its TLB translation
self-test.
FLT
1nBA
SYS BD
monarch CPU fail
The monarch CPU failed.
FLT
1nBB
SYS BD
bad CPUn number
The CPU identifier was out of range.
FLT
1nBF
SYS BD
CPUn halt boot
Bootstrap failure--machine halted.
INI
1nCA
SYS BD
CPUn sys bus arb
Monarch CPU is initializing the system
bus arbitration.
WRN
1nCD
SYS BD
CPUn deconfig
CPU n deconfigured itself.
WRN
1nCE
SYS BD
CPUn extinguish
PDC_PROC halted CPU n.
FLT
1nCF
SYS BD
slaven failed
Slave CPU n failed self-test.
WRN
1mDs
SYS BD
slaves deconfig
Monarch CPU m deconfigured slave CPU
s.
WRN
1nEF
SYS BD
CPUn slftst warn
CPU n detected a non-fatal error during
its self-tests.
WRN
1mFs
SYS BD
monm stop slaves
Monarch CPU m halted slave CPU s.
INI
1nFC
SYS BD
CPUn sync’ing
CPU n is synchronizing with the rest of
the system.
INI
1nFD
SYS BD
CPUn stat wd tst
CPU n is testing the system status word.
FLT
1nFF
SYS BD
monarchn selftst
Monarch CPU n failed self-test.
TST
2n20
SYS BD
CPUn icache RAM
CPU n is starting its instruction cache
RAM self-test.
FLT
2n25
SYS BD
CPUn ic ld d err
CPU n detected a data error during data
cache load.
FLT
2n26
SYS BD
CPUn ic ld t err
CPU n detected a tag error during data
cache load.
TST
2n30
SYS BD
CPUn icache tag
CPU n is starting its instruction cache tag
self-test.
TST
2n40
SYS BD
CPUn icache par
CPU n is starting its instruction cache
parity detection self-test.
TST
2n50
SYS BD
CPUn dc stor que
CPU n is starting its data cache store
queue self-test.
FLT
2n51
SYS BD
CPUn dc st q err
CPU n detected an error during its data
cache store queue self-test.
TST
2n70
SYS BD
CPUn dcache RAM
CPU n is starting its data cache RAM
self-test.
Chapter 3
49
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
TST
2n80
SYS BD
CPUn dcache tag
CPU n is starting its data cache tag
self-test.
TST
2n90
SYS BD
CPUn dcache ECC
CPU n is starting its data cache ECC
self-test.
FLT
2BAD
SYS BD
assertion fail
A firmware assertion failed.
TST
3n00
SYS BD
ROM checksum tst
Monarch CPU n is testing the boot ROM
integrity.
FLT
3n00
SYS BD
ROM checksum BAD
The boot ROM failed checksum.
INI
3n00
SYS BD
ROM checksum ok
The boot ROM passed checksum.
TST
3n01
SYS BD
PDH control test
Monarch CPU n is testing PDH control
register.
INI
3n01
SYS BD
PDH control init
Monarch CPU n is initializing the PDH
control register.
FLT
3n01
SYS BD
PDH control err
Monarch CPU n detected an error in the
PDH control register.
TST
3n02
SYS BD
scratch RAM test
Monarch CPU n is testing scratch RAM.
INI
3n02
SYS BD
scratch RAM ok
The scratch RAM test failed.
FLT
3n02
SYS BD
scratch RAM bad
The scratch RAM test passed.
WRN
3n03
SYS BD
stbl st read err
CPU n detected a non-fatal error reading
the stable store.
FLT
3n03
SYS BD
stbl st read err
CPU n detected a non-fatal error reading
the stable store.
INI
3nC4
SYS BD
clearing EEPROM
Monarch CPU n is clearing the EEPROM.
INI
3nD4
SYS BD
deflting EEPROM2
Monarch CPU n is initializing the
EEPROM to system defaults.
WRN
3n04
SYS BD
EEPROM write err
CPU n detected a non-fatal error writing
the EEPROM.
FLT
3n04
SYS BD
EEPROM write err
CPU n detected a fatal error writing the
EEPROM.
FLT
3n05
SYS BD
EEPROM wrt limit
CPU n detected a fatal error writing the
EEPROM.
WRN
3n06
SYS BD
EEPROM read err
CPU n detected a non-fatal error reading
the EEPROM.
FLT
3n06
SYS BD
EEPROM read err
CPU n detected a fatal error reading the
EEPROM.
50
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
INI
3n07
SYS BD
CPUn invoke LDB
CPU n is starting the low-level debugger.
FLT
3n09
SYS BD
bad sys mde byte
CPU n detected an unsupported system
mode.
WRN
3n1A
SYS BD
hversion mismtch
Stable store hardware version doesn’t
match system.
TST
3n1B
SYS BD
chck model strng
Check model string with version in stable
store.
WRN
3n1B
SYS BD
model str msmtch
Model string doesn’t match that in stable
store.
FLT
3n1B
SYS BD
fatal model str
Error reading model string from stable
store.
TST
3n1C
SYS BD
test software ID
Check LANIC address.
WRN
3n1C
SYS BD
update sw ID
Update LANIC address.
FLT
3n1C
SYS BD
update sw ID err
Error updating LANIC address.
INI
3n2s
SYS BD
Invoke LDB: s
CPU n is awaiting the low-level debugger
for s more seconds.
TST
3nBC
IO BD
test sys clocks
CPU n is verifying processor clocks with
the real-time clock.
INI
3nBC
SYS BD
init sys clocks
CPU n has initialized the processor clocks.
FLT
3nBC
IO BD
RTC tick timeout
The real-time clock is ticking too slowly or
not at all.
TST
3nCD
SYS BD
check defaults
CPU n is initializing stable store values to
system defaults.
INI
3nCD
SYS BD
init defaults
CPU n finished initializing stable store
values.
FLT
3nCD
SYS BD
init EEPROM err
CPU n detected an error writing to stable
store.
FLT
3nEC
SYS BD
bad sys config
CPU n detected an illegal CPU board
configuration.
FLT
3nF4
SYS BD
EEPROM boot limt
CPU n detected a fatal error writing the
EEPROM.
FLT
3nFC
SYS BD
bad sys bd id
CPU n cannot identify CPU board.
TST
4n00
SYS BD
CPUn start lst
CPU n is starting its late (with memory)
self-tests.
Chapter 3
51
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
WRN
4n01
SYS BD
CPUn skip lst
CPU n is bypassing its late self-tests to
save time.
TST
4n0E
SYS BD
CPUn exit lst
CPU n finished its late self-tests.
TST
4n20
SYS BD
CPUn lst erly st
CPU n is re-executing some of its early
self-tests from system memory.
TST
4n21
SYS BD
CPUn lst basic
CPU n is re-executing its basic operations
self-test.
TST
4n22
SYS BD
CPUn lst alu
CPU n is re-executing its arithmetic and
logic unit self-test.
TST
4n23
SYS BD
CPUn lst branch
CPU n is re-executing its branch
instruction self-test.
TST
4n24
SYS BD
CPUn lst arth cd
CPU n is re-executing its arithmetic
conditions self-test.
TST
4n25
SYS BD
CPUn lst bit ops
CPU n is re-executing its bit operations
self-test.
TST
4n26
SYS BD
CPUn lst ctl reg
CPU n is re-executing its control register
self-test.
TST
4n27
SYS BD
CPUn lst ext int
CPU n is re-executing its external
interrupt self-test.
TST
4n28
SYS BD
CPUn lst itimer
CPU n is re-executing its interval timer
self-test.
TST
4n29
SYS BD
CPUn lst mltimed
CPU n is re-executing its multi-media
instructions self-test.
TST
4n2A
SYS BD
CPUn lst shadow
CPU n is re-executing its shadow register
self-test.
TST
4n2B
SYS BD
CPUn lst dg regs
CPU n is re-executing its diagnose
register self-test.
TST
4n2C
SYS BD
CPUn lst rdrs
CPU n is re-executing its remote diagnose
register self-test.
TST
4n2D
SYS BD
CPUn lst bypass
CPU n is re-executing its integer bypass
operation self-test.
TST
4n30
SYS BD
CPUn cache byte
CPU n is starting its data cache sub-word
operations self-test.
TST
4n40
SYS BD
CPUn cache flush
CPU n is starting its cache flush self-test.
TST
4n50
SYS BD
CPUn icache miss
CPU n is starting its instruction cache
miss self-test.
52
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
TST
4n60
SYS BD
CPUn dcache miss
CPU n is starting its data cache miss
self-test.
FLT
5n00
SYS BD
unknown bus err
CPU n detected an unknown error on the
system bus (Runway).
FLT
5n02
SYS BD
path err assertd
CPU n detected a path error on the
system bus (Runway).
FLT
5n04
SYS BD
data parity err
CPU n detected a data, address, or control
parity error on the system bus (Runway).
FLT
5n07
SYS BD
Runway dir error
CPU n detected a directed error on the
system bus (Runway).
FLT
5n08
SYS BD
Runway broad err
CPU n detected a broadcast error on the
system bus (Runway).
FLT
5n0A
SYS BD
illegal response
CPU n received data that did not match
any outstanding data request.
FLT
5n0B
SYS BD
bus timeout
CPU n timed out before receiving
requested data. The responder is logged in
the system responder address.
FLT
5n0C
SYS BD
CPU sync failure
CPU n’s synchronizer detected a rule
violation on the system bus (Runway).
INI
7000
DIMM
start DIMM scan
Start looking for installed DIMMs.
INI
7002
SYS BD
init mem tables
Initialize memory data structures.
FLT
7004
SYS BD
mem plt upd fail
Error updating memory platform data.
FLT
7005
DIMM
insufficient mem
Insufficient memory detected to continue.
TST
7010
DIMM
check DIMM order
Start memory DIMM order check.
WRN
7011
DIMM
skip DIMM ord ck
Bypass memory DIMM order check.
FLT
7012
DIMM
DIMM order error
Memory DIMMs are not in the proper
order.
FLT
7013
DIMM
DIMM order error
Memory DIMMs are not in the proper
order. As a result, the system cannot
access one or more DIMMs and has
deallocated all inaccessible DIMMs.
TST
7016
DIMM
DIMM pair check
Start memory DIMM pair check (DIMMs
in a pair (e.g. 0a/0b) must match in
J7xxx).
WRN
7017
DIMM
skip mem pair ck
Bypass memory DIMM set check.
FLT
701F
DIMM
no memory found
Memory scan couldn’t find any DIMMs.
Chapter 3
53
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
TST
7020
SYS BD
search for IMM
Try to find a single memory bank to use
for the initial memory module.
TST
703s
DIMM
DIMM s IMM vrfy
DIMM s was the initial memory module
last boot. Verify it still works.
FLT
704s
DIMM
DIMM s IMM fail
DIMM s failed the initial memory module
test.
TST
705s
DIMM
DIMM s IMM test
Test DIMM in slot s as the initial memory
module.
INI
706s
DIMM
DIMM s is IMM
DIMM s chosen as initial memory module.
INI
70F0
DIMM
DIMM scan done
Memory DIMM scan complete.
TST
7100
SYS BD
mem register tst
Start testing registers in memory
controller.
WRN
7101
SYS BD
skip mem reg tst
Bypass the memory controller register
test.
FLT
7102
SYS BD
mem addr reg tst
Firmware detected an error in the
memory controller address registers.
FLT
7103
SYS BD
mem mbat reg tst
Firmware detected an error in the
memory controller bank registers.
FLT
7104
SYS BD
mem reg tst fail
Firmware detected an error in the
memory controller memory registers.
FLT
7105
SYS BD
mem err reg test
Firmware detected an error in the
memory controller error registers.
FLT
7106
SYS BD
mem err clr fail
Firmware was unable to clear the error
registers after testing.
INI
7200
DIMM
strt DIMM detect
Start the Serial Presence Detection (SPD)
to search for memory DIMMs.
INI
7201
DIMM
DIMM detect x%
SPD is x% finished.
WRN
7202
SYS BD
skip DIMM detect
Bypass Serial Presence Detection.
FLT
7203
DIMM
unsupp DIMM type
SPD found an unsupported DIMM type.
FLT
7204
DIMM
SPD fatal error
SPD detected an unexpected, fatal error.
INI
7205
DIMM
add HP DIMM type
New HP manufactured DIMM type added
to tables.
INI
7206
DIMM
non-HP DIMM type
New non-HP DIMM type added to tables
(use at own risk).
54
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
FLT
7207
DIMM
DIMM table full
The DIMM table is full--cannot add new
type.
FLT
7208
DIMM
no DIMMs found
SPD didn’t find any memory DIMMs.
INI
721s
DIMM
is DIMM s inst?
SPD is checking memory slot s.
INI
722s
DIMM
???? DIMM in s
SPD found a DIMM in slot s, but can’t
determine its size. DIMM will not be used.
INI
723s
DIMM
128M DIMM in s
SPD found a 128MB DIMM in slot s.
INI
724s
DIMM
256M DIMM in s
SPD found a 256MB DIMM in slot s.
INI
725s
DIMM
512M DIMM in s
SPD found a 512MB DIMM in slot s.
FLT
72As
DIMM
DIMM s checksum
DIMM in slot s failed SPD checksum and
will not be used.
FLT
72Cs
DIMM
DIMM s mismatch
DIMM in slot s didn’t match the other in
pair. (J7xxx only--DIMMs must be in
matched pairs.)
FLT
72Ds
DIMM
DIMM s load err
Memory DIMMs are not in the proper
order. As a result, the system cannot
access DIMM s and has deallocated it.
INI
7300
SYS BD
mem config start
Starting main memory configuration.
TST
7301
SYS BD
check mem config
Checking for memory configuration
change since last boot.
WRN
7302
SYS BD
mem confg changd
Memory physical configuration changed
since last boot.
INI
7303
SYS BD
use confg change
Memory physical configuration didn’t use
saved configuration change. Use stored
configuration data.
INI
7304
SYS BD
build mem intrlv
Building memory configuration with all
DIMMs interleaved.
INI
7305
SYS BD
save mem config
Saving memory configuration information
in non-volatile memory.
WRN
7306
SYS BD
use alt mem conf
Memory will be configured from fixed
values, instead of detected DIMMs.
INI
7307
SYS BD
interleve memory
Generating the memory interleave.
FLT
7308
SYS BD
PDT is disabled
Firmware detected bad memory pages,
but the Page Deallocation Table is
disabled.
Chapter 3
55
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
FLT
7309
DIMM
insufficient mem
Insufficient error-free memory to
continue.
FLT
730C
SYS BD
mem intrlv fail
Memory interleave generation failed.
INI
730F
SYS BD
mem config done
Main memory configuration complete.
TST
7400
DIMM
non-dest mem tst
Starting non-destructive memory test.
TST
740F
DIMM
non-dst tst done
Non-destructive memory test complete.
INI
7500
SYS BD
memory reset
Resetting memory system.
WRN
7501
SYS BD
mem log clr warn
Memory error logs didn’t clear on first try.
FLT
7502
SYS BD
mem err log fail
Firmware could not clear memory error
logs.
TST
7600
DIMM
dest mem test
Starting the destructive memory test.
WRN
7601
DIMM
mem init only
Skip the test, just initialize memory to
save time.
TST
7602
DIMM
tst 1st mem page
Starting 3-pass test of first memory page.
TST
7603
DIMM
tst rest of mem
Starting 3-pass test of the rest of memory.
TST
7604
DIMM
start 1st pass
Starting 1st pass of memory test (write
pseudorandom sequence).
TST
7605
DIMM
1st pass x%
First pass is x% complete.
TST
7606
DIMM
start 2nd pass
Starting 2nd pass of memory test (verify
pseudorandom sequence, write inverse).
TST
7607
DIMM
2nd pass x%
Second pass is x% complete.
TST
7608
DIMM
start 3rd pass
Starting 3rd pass of memory test (verify
inverse sequence).
TST
7609
DIMM
3rd pass x%
Third pass is x% complete.
TST
760A
DIMM
start mem init
Starting memory initialization. (Initialize
to zero to set ECC.)
TST
760B
DIMM
mem init x%
Memory initialization is x% complete.
WRN
760C
DIMM
repeat dest test
Re-execute destructive test for hardware
troubleshooting.
FLT
760D
DIMM
mem code cpy err
Firmware tried to copy code from ROM to
memory, but the copy didn’t match the
original.
FLT
7610
DIMM
ECC wrt/read err
Writing and reading back good data
caused memory ECC error.
56
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
FLT
7611
DIMM
ECC single data
Memory ECC test failed to detect
single-bit data error.
FLT
7612
DIMM
ECC single ECC
Memory ECC test failed to detect
single-bit ECC error.
FLT
7613
DIMM
ECC multipl data
Memory ECC test failed to detect
multiple-bit data error.
FLT
7614
DIMM
ECC multpl signl
Memory ECC test failed to signal
multiple-bit error.
FLT
7800
SYS BD
mem err summary
Printing memory error summary word to
RS-232.
FLT
7801
SYS BD
bus ctrl par err
System bus (Runway) control parity error
detected.
FLT
7802
SYS BD
bus addr par err
System bus (Runway) address parity error
detected.
FLT
7803
SYS BD
bus data par err
System bus (Runway) data parity error
detected.
FLT
7804
SYS BD
mem out of range
Memory access outside configured
memory space.
FLT
7805
SYS BD
bus broadcst err
System bus (Runway) broadcast error
detected.
FLT
7806
SYS BD
mem addr par err
Memory bus address parity error
detected.
FLT
7807
SYS BD
mem ctlr stat wd
Printing memory controller status word to
RS-232.
FLT
781s
DIMM
DIMM s uncor err
Uncorrectable ECC error detected in
DIMM s.
FLT
782s
DIMM
DIMM s corr err
DIMM s is bad and needs replacing.
FLT
783s
DIMM
Replace DIMM s
Correctable ECC error detected in DIMM
s.
FLT
7840
SYS BD
unexpected HPMC
Unexpected HPMC detected.
FLT
7841
SYS BD
mem status invld
Memory error status word is invalid.
FLT
7842
SYS BD
mem summ invalid
Memory summary word is invalid.
FLT
7843
SYS BD
fwd prog invalid
Memory forward progress word is invalid.
FLT
7844
SYS BD
mem HPMC summ wd
Printing memory error summary word to
RS-232.
Chapter 3
57
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
FLT
7845
SYS BD
mem ctlr stat wd
Printing memory controller status word to
RS-232.
FLT
7846
SYS BD
mem err overflow
Multiple memory errors detected.
FLT
7848
SYS BD
addr not mapped
Memory address outside configured
memory space.
FLT
785s
DIMM
MBE in DIMM s
Destructive memory test detected an
uncorrectable memory error in DIMM s.
FLT
786s
DIMM
SBE&MBE DIMM s
Destructive memory test detected both an
uncorrectable and a correctable memory
error in DIMM s.
FLT
787s
DIMM
mem err DIMM s
Destructive memory test detected a
pattern compare error in DIMM s.
FLT
788s
DIMM
SBE in DIMM s
Destructive memory test detected a
correctable memory error in DIMM s.
FLT
7890
DIMM
MBE overwrt SBE
Firmware replaced a correctable memory
error entry in the PDT with an
uncorrectable memory error entry at the
same address.
FLT
7891
DIMM
dup entry in PDT
The PDT already contains an entry at
that address.
FLT
7892
SYS BD
PDT write error
Error adding the entry to the PDT.
FLT
7893
SYS BD
PDT is full
The PDT is full--cannot add new entry.
FLT
7900
SYS BD
no DMT entry
Internal error--cannot find DIMM entry.
FLT
7901
SYS BD
no rank entry
Internal error--cannot find rank entry.
FLT
7902
SYS BD
bad refrsh intvl
Computed refresh interval is invalid.
FLT
7903
SYS BD
mem intrlv fail
Cannot generate memory interleave.
FLT
7904
SYS BD
mem reloc failed
Cannot interleave with relocated range
(3.75GB - 4.0GB).
FLT
7905
SYS BD
mem intrlv error
Undefined memory interleave failure.
FLT
79FF
SYS BD
mem firmware err
Internal error--never expected this to
happen.
WRN
80F3
SYS BD
err rd IODC byte
Cannot read IODC from ROM or card.
WRN
80F4
EXT IO
boot read error
Cannot load IODC entry_init for boot
device.
WRN
80F5
EXT IO
boot exec error
Error initializing boot device.
58
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
WRN
80F6
EXT IO
boot read error
Cannot load IODC entry_io for boot
device.
WRN
80F7
EXT IO
boot IO error
Error detected during boot device I/O.
WRN
80F8
EXT IO
invalid boot dev
Invalid boot device class; bad IODC?
WRN
80FC
EXT IO
invalid boot dev
Unexpected error; bad IODC?
INI
8800
IOCARD
PCI BusWlk start
Starting PCI bus and device discovery.
INI
88r1
IOCARD
PCI Rope r walk
Starting PCI bus and device discovery on
Rope r.
INI
8802
IOCARD
PCI BusWalk done
PCI bus and device discovery complete.
INI
8803
SYS BD
PCI alloc done
Done allocating address space for PCI
devices.
INI
8804
SYS BD
PCI config done
Done configuring PCI devices.
FLT
881r
IO BD
R2PCIr not found
Rope-to-PCI bridge r not found.
WRN
882r
IO BD
R2PCIr not found
Rope-to-PCI bridge r initialization failed.
FLT
883r
IO BD
Roper config err
Rope r configuration failed.
INI
884r
EXT IO
Roper debug tggl
Rope r debug register toggled.
FLT
884r
EXT IO
Roper tgl fail
Rope r debug register toggle failed.
INI
8850
SYS BD
early rope0 init
Initializing rope 0 for early RS-232
output.
FLT
8850
SYS BD
rope0 init fail
Couldn’t initialize rope 0.
INI
8860
SYS BD
rope0 init done
Rope 0 initialization complete.
INI
8870
IO BD
early R2PCI init
Initializing Rope-to-PCI bridge 0 for early
RS-232 output.
FLT
8870
IO BD
R2PCI init fail
Couldn’t initialize Rope-to-PCI bridge 0.
INI
8880
IO BD
R2PCI init done
Rope-to-PCI bridge 0 initialization
complete.
INI
8890
IO BD
early Super init
Initializing Super-I/O for early RS-232
output.
FLT
8890
IO BD
Super init fail
Couldn’t initialize Super-I/O.
INI
88A0
IO BD
Super init done
Super-I/O initialization complete.
WRN
8A03
EXT IO
No graph console
Cannot re-establish communications with
the graphics console.
Chapter 3
59
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
WRN
8A04
EXT IO
No USB keyboard
Cannot re-establish communications with
the USB keyboard.
TST
8C06
EXT IO
PCI BIST test
Running PCI Built-In Self-Test
WRN
8C07
EXT IO
PCI BIST error
PCI Built-In Self-Test failed.
WRN
8C08
SYS BD
PCI alloc error
PCI address space allocation failed.
WRN
8C09
IO BD
PCI mem mngr err
Memory allocation for PCI device failed.
WRN
8C0A
EXT IO
PCI mem type err
PCI device requested invalid memory
type.
WRN
8C0B
IO BD
PCI max bus dpth
PCI bus depth exceeded maximum
supported depth.
WRN
8C0C
EXT IO
PCI dev not cnfg
Unable to configure PCI device.
WRN
8C0F
IO BD
dev tree ovrflow
Data space for PCI devices is full.
WRN
8DEC
IO BD
init LAN SROM
Initializing the core LAN serial EPROM.
SHU
8DEC
IO BD
resetting system
Restarting system after core LAN
initialization.
FLT
8E10
IO BD
PARALEL port cfg
Parallel port configuration failed.
FLT
8E11
IO BD
SERIAL1 port cfg
Serial 1 port configuration failed.
FLT
8E12
IO BD
SERIAL2 port cfg
Serial 2 port configuration failed.
FLT
8E13
IO BD
FLOPPY drive cfg
Floppy drive configuration failed.
FLT
8E20
IO BD
bad USB port cfg
USB port configuration failed.
WRN
9001
EXT IO
no console found
Search for console display device failed.
INI
9151
IO BD
init SERIAL_1
Initializing serial 1 port as console
display.
INI
9152
IO BD
init SERIAL_2
Initializing serial 2 port as console
display.
INI
915F
IO BD
init unknown dev
Initializing unknown device as console
display.
INI
916s
EXT IO
init PCI slot s
Initializing PCI device in slot s as console
display.
INI
91DB
IO BD
init SERIAL_LDB
Initializing serial LDB port as console
display.
INI
9C51
IO BD
consol is SER_1
Console display is on serial port 1.
60
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
WRN
9C51
IO BD
bad init SERIAL1
Serial port 1 failed to initialize as a
console device.
INI
9C52
IO BD
consol is SER_2
Console display is on serial port 2.
INI
9160
EXT IO
builtin GRAPHICS
Initializing built-in graphics as console
display.
INI
9C52
IO BRD
consol is SER_2
Console display is on serial port 2.
WRN
9C52
IO BD
bad init SERIAL2
Serial port 2 failed to initialize as a
console device.
INI
9C6s
EXT IO
consol is GRAPHs
Console display is on graphics card in PCI
slot s.
WRN
9C6s
EXT IO
bad PCI slot s
Graphics in PCI slot s failed to initialize
as a console device.
INI
9C8t
EXT IO
cnfg mon type t
Set graphics console to monitor type t.
(Seen when cycling through types.)
WRN
9C8t
EXT IO
mon type t fail
Failed to configure console to monitor type
t.
INI
9CDB
IO BD
consl is SER_LDB
Console display is on serial LDB port.
WRN
9CDB
IO BD
bad init SER_LDB
Serial LDB port failed to initialize as a
console device.
FLT
A088
IO BD
consl path fault
Unable to boot--no console device found.
WRN
A008
EXT IO
no boot device
Unable to boot--no bootable device found.
WRN
A0BD
EXT IO
device not ready
Boot device not ready--operation may be
retried.
FLT
A0FF
EXT IO
unknown launch
Unable to boot. Explanation may appear
on console.
WRN
A50F
EXT IO
init pri pth err
Unable to boot from primary boot device.
WRN
A70F
EXT IO
init otr pth err
Unable to boot from non-primary boot
device.
INI
C10m
SYS BD
CPUm is monarch
CPU m was chosen as the monarch
processor. (All other CPUs are slaves.)
INI
C30m
SYS BD
monarchm test
CPU m finished the monarch-only tests
and system initialization.
INI
C30C
SYS BD
mnrch slv chck
The monarch CPU is checking whether
the slaves are in the correct rendezvous.
Chapter 3
61
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
INI
C3FF
SYS/IO
late monarch tst
The monarch CPU is starting the late
(post-memory) monarch-only tests.
FLT
C3FF
SYS/IO
late monarch flt
The late (post-memory) monarch-only
tests failed.
INI
C4CC
SYS BD
initialize ccp
Searching for (lab-only) debugger card.
INI
C4CD
SYS BD
no ccp found
Debugger card not found.
INI
C4CE
SYS BD
ccp disabled
Debugger card disabled.
INI
C4CF
SYS BD
ccp found
Debugger card found.
INI
C500
SYS BD
get primary path
Autoboot is reading primary boot path
from stable store.
INI
C540
EXT IO
init pri path
Autoboot is trying to boot from primary
boot device.
INI
C580
EXT IO
load IPL pri pth
Loading IPL from primary boot device.
WRN
C5F0
EXT IO
err read pri IPL
Error loading IPL from primary boot
device.
FLT
C5F0
EXT IO
pri IPL fault
Error loading IPL from primary boot
device.
WRN
C5F1
EXT IO
err read pri IPL
Cannot load IPL from primary boot
device--load address invalid.
WRN
C5F2
EXT IO
err read pri IPL
Cannot load IPL from primary boot
device--file is not IPL image.
WRN
C5F3
EXT IO
err read pri IPL
Cannot load IPL from primary boot
device--IPL image size invalid.
WRN
C5F4
EXT IO
err read pri IPL
Cannot load IPL from primary boot
device--IPL entry point address invalid.
WRN
C5F8
EXT IO
err read pri IPL
Cannot load IPL from primary boot
device--IPL image checksum failed.
INI
C5FF
<blank>
launch pri IPL
Booting from primary boot path.
INI
C642
EXT IO
init kybrd consl
Try to initialize USB keyboard.
FLT
C642
EXT IO
keyboard error
An error was detected trying to access the
keyboard.
WRN
C643
EXT IO
keyboard reinit
Keyboard was re-initialized.
WRN
C64F
EXT IO
reset montr type
The console device failed to initialize with
the given monitor type. Try again with
type 1.
62
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
TST
C680
SYS BD
builtin graphics
Look for built-in graphics card.
TST
C68s
SYS BD
test graph in s
Look for graphics card in PCI slot s.
INI
C68s
SYS BD
init graph in s
Successfully initialized graphics card in
PCI slot s.
INI
C680
SYS BD
bultin graphics
Successfully initialized built-in graphics
card.
WRN
C680
SYS BD
bultin graphics
built-in graphics initialization failed.
WRN
C68s
SYS BD
fail graph in s
Card in PCI slot s failed graphics
initialization or is not a graphics card.
INI
C740
EXT IO
init other path
Autoboot is trying to boot from
non-primary boot device.
INI
C780
EXT IO
ld IPL othr path
Loading IPL from non-primary boot
device.
WRN
C7F0
EXT IO
other IPL fault
Error loading IPL from non-primary boot
device.
WRN
C7F1
EXT IO
bad alt IPL read
Cannot load IPL from non-primary boot
device--load address invalid.
WRN
C7F2
EXT IO
bad alt IPL read
Cannot load IPL from non-primary boot
device--file is not IPL image.
WRN
C7F3
EXT IO
bad alt IPL read
Cannot load IPL from non-primary boot
device--IPL image size invalid.
WRN
C7F4
EXT IO
bad alt IPL read
Cannot load IPL from non-primary boot
device--IPL entry point address invalid.
WRN
C7F8
EXT IO
bad alt IPL read
Cannot load IPL from non-primary boot
device--IPL image checksum failed.
WRN
C7FF
<blank>
launch IPL other
Booting from a device other than the
primary boot path.
INI
CB00
SYS BD
TOC initiated
A Transfer of Control entered the
firmware TOC handler.
WRN
CB01
SYS BD
no OS TOC vector
There is no TOC vector for the operating
system. Firmware will soft boot the
system.
WRN
CB02
SYS BD
bad OS TOC addr
The operating system TOC handler vector
is invalid. Firmware will soft boot the
system.
Chapter 3
63
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
WRN
CB03
SYS BD
bad OS TOC code
The operating system TOC handler is
invalid. Firmware will soft boot the
system.
WRN
CB04
SYS BD
bad OS TOC len
The size of the operating system TOC
handler is invalid. Firmware will soft boot
the system.
WRN
CB05
SYS BD
bad OS TOC chksm
The operating system TOC handler failed
the checksum test. Firmware will soft boot
the system.
WRN
CB0A
SYS BD
prev TOC logged
Firmware detected unread PIM data from
a previous TOC and will not overwrite it.
(PIM for this TOC is lost.)
INI
CB0B
SYS BD
branch to OS TOC
Branching to the operating system TOC
handler.
WRN
CB0C
SYS BD
br OS TOC failed
Branch to the operating system TOC
handler failed. Firmware will soft boot the
system.
WRN
CB10
SYS BD
LPMC initiated
A Low-Priority Machine Check entered
the firmware LPMC handler. The handler
should log the error and return to normal
operation.
WRN
CB11
SYS BD
icache LPMC err
An instruction cache parity error caused
the LPMC.
WRN
CB12
SYS BD
dcache LPMC err
A data cache parity/ECC error caused the
LPMC.
WRN
CB13
SYS BD
dcache tag error
The parity error is in the tag portion of
the data cache.
WRN
CB14
SYS BD
dcache data err
The parity error is in the data portion of
the data cache.
FLT
CB1F
SYS BD
OS LPMC failed
Firmware couldn’t branch to the operating
system LPMC handler. It will halt the
CPU, requiring a power cycle to recover.
WRN
CB71
SYS BD
HPMC occurred
A High-Priority Machine Check caused
entry to PDCE_CHECK (the firmware
trap handler).
WRN
CB72
SYS BD
LPMC occurred
A Low-Priority Machine Check caused
entry to PDCE_CHECK (the firmware
trap handler).
64
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
WRN
CB73
SYS BD
TOC occurred
A Transfer of Control caused entry to
PDCE_CHECK (the firmware trap
handler).
FLT
CB9r
IO BD
Error on roper
An error was detected on rope r.
FLT
CB99
SYS BD
seed IVA handler
PDC_SEED_ERROR triggered an HPMC.
FLT
CB9A
SYS BD
HPMC overwrite
Firmware is overwriting PIM data from a
previous HPMC.
OFF
CBA1
SYS BD
AIOC int dat err
I/O controller internal error.
OFF
CBA2
IO BD
EtoA rope perr
Parity error between I/O controller and
Rope-to-PCI bridge.
OFF
CBA3
SYS BD
access invld TLB
An invalid I/O TLB entry was accessed.
OFF
CBA4
IO BD
EtoA rp cmd perr
Command parity error between I/O
controller and Rope-to-PCI bridge.
OFF
CBA5
IO BD
CDF timeout
Rope Command/Data FIFO is backed up.
OFF
CBA6
IO BD
R2PCI resp tmout
Rope-to-PCI bridge timed out. Could be a
failure of the PCI card, rope, or R2PCI
bridge.
OFF
CBA7
IO BD
Unknown AIOC err
Unknown I/O controller error.
OFF
CBB1
IO BD
PCI timeout
A PCI card requested the bus but failed to
use it.
OFF
CBB2
IO BD
PCI timeout; OV
More than once aPCI card requested the
bus but failed to use it.
OFF
CBB3
IO BD
R2PCI intrnl err
Rope-to-PCI bridge internal error.
OFF
CBB4
IO BD
R2PCI int err;OV
Multiple Rope-to-PCI bridge internal
errors.
OFF
CBB6
IO BD
PCI data req err
PCI bus data requestor error: R2PCI
detected PERR# assertion.
OFF
CBB8
IO BD
PCI D req err;OV
Rope-to-PCI bridge detected multiple
PERR# assertions.
OFF
CBBA
IO BD
PCI data par err
PCI bus data parity error.
OFF
CBBC
IO BD
PCI Dpar err;OV
Multiple PCI bus data parity errors.
OFF
CBBE
IO BD
R2PCI intrnl err
Error in R2PCI internal data to PCI bus.
OFF
CBC0
IO BD
R2PCI int err;OV
Multiple R2PCI internal data to PCI bus
errors.
Chapter 3
65
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
OFF
CBC2
IO BD
PCI data parity
PCI data parity error. I/O error log word 3
contains the error address.
OFF
CBC4
IO BD
PCI data par; OV
Multiple PCI data parity errors. I/O error
log word 3 contains the error address.
OFF
CBC6
IO BD
R2PCI intrnl err
Rope-to-PCI bridge internal data error:
R2PCI detected PERR# assertion.
OFF
CBC8
IO BD
R2PCI int err;OV
Multiple R2PCI internal data errors:
R2PCI detected multiple PERR#
assertions.
OFF
CBCA
IO BD
PCI data rs err
PCI bus data responder error: R2PCI
detected PERR# assertion.
OFF
CBCC
IO BD
PCI D rs err; OV
Multiple PCI bus data responder errors:
R2PCI detected multiple PERR#
assertions.
OFF
CBCE
IO BD
R2PCI T-Abort
Rope-to-PCI bridge signalled Target
Abort.
OFF
CBD0
IO BD
R2PCI T-Abort;OV
Rope-to-PCI bridge signalled multiple
Target Aborts.
OFF
CBD2
IO BD
PCI parity err
PCI address/command parity error.
OFF
CBD4
IO BD
PCI par err; OV
Multiple PCI address/command parity
errors.
OFF
CBD6
IO BD
PCI no DEVSEL#
No PCI device selected (DEVSEL#
assertion). I/O error log word 3 contains
the error address.
OFF
CBD8
IO BD
PCI no DEVSEL;OV
Multiple DEVSEL# assertions. I/O error
log word 3 contains the error address.
OFF
CBDA
IO BD
PCI target abort
A PCI device signalled Target Abort. I/O
error log word 3 contains the error
address.
OFF
CBDC
IO BD
PCI T-Abort; OV
A PCI device signalled multiple Target
Aborts. I/O error log word 3 contains the
error address.
OFF
CBDD
IO BD
PCI assrts LOCK#
A PCI device asserted LOCK#.
OFF
CBDE
IO BD
PCI LOCK#; OV
A PCI device asserted LOCK# multiple
times.
OFF
CBE0
IO BD
PCI assrts SERR#
A PCI device asserted SERR#: address
parity error or other system error.
66
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
OFF
CBE2
IO BD
PCI SERR#; OV
A PCI device asserted SERR# multiple
times.
OFF
CBE3
IO BD
Unknown PCI err
Unknown PCI error detected.
OFF
CBE6
SYS BD
AtoE rope perr
Parity error between system I/O controller
and Rope-to-PCI bridge.
OFF
CBE7
IO BD
R2PCI intrnl err
Rope-to-PCI bridge internal data error.
OFF
CBE8
SYS BD
AtoE rope perr
Command parity error between system
I/O controller and Rope-to-PCI bridge.
OFF
CBE9
IO BD
Unknown Rope err
Unknown rope error occurred.
FLT
CBF0
SYS BD
HPMC initiated
A High-Priority Machine Check entered
the firmware HPMC handler.
FLT
CBF1
SYS BD
no OS HPMC IVA
There is no HPMC vector for the
operating system. Firmware will halt the
CPU, requiring a power cycle to recover.
FLT
CBF2
SYS BD
bad OS HPMC len
The size of the operating system HPMC
handler is invalid. Firmware will halt the
CPU, requiring a power cycle to recover.
FLT
CBF3
SYS BD
bad OS HPMC addr
The operating system HPMC handler
vector is invalid. Firmware will halt the
CPU, requiring a power cycle to recover.
FLT
CBF4
SYS BD
bad OS HPMC cksm
The operating system HPMC handler
failed the checksum test. Firmware will
halt the CPU, requiring a power cycle to
recover.
FLT
CBF5
SYS BD
OS HPMC vector 0
The size of the operating system HPMC
handler is zero. Firmware will halt the
CPU, requiring a power cycle to recover.
WRN
CBFA
SYS BD
prev HPMC logged
Firmware detected unread PIM data from
a previous HPMC and will overwrite it.
FLT
CBFB
SYS BD
brnch to OS HPMC
Branching to the operating system HPMC
handler.
FLT
CBFC
SYS BD
OS HPMC br err
Branch to the operating system HPMC
handler failed. Firmware will halt the
CPU, requiring a power cycle to recover.
FLT
CBFD
SYS BD
unknown check
The firmware trap handler didn’t detect
an HPMC, LPMC, or TOC.
FLT
CBFE
SYS BD
HPMC during TOC
A High-Priority Machine Check occurred
during Transfer of Control processing.
Chapter 3
67
Troubleshooting
Identifying LCD-Indicated Conditions
Table 3-1. Chassis Codes for J6000 Workstations
Ostat
Code
FRU
Message
Description
FLT
CBFF
SYS BD
multiple HPMCs
A High-Priority Machine Check occurred
while processing another HPMC.
INI
CC0n
SYS BD
CPUn OS rendezvs
Slave CPU n entering the final
rendezvous, waiting for the operating
system to awaken it.
INI
CC1n
SYS BD
CPUn early rend
Slave CPU n entering the early
rendezvous, waiting for the monarch CPU
to initialize scratch RAM and other
system state.
INI
CC2n
SYS BD
CPUn rendezvous
Slave CPU n entering rendezvous. Slave
CPUs enter this rendezvous numerous
times during boot.
INI
CC3n
SYS BD
CPUn cache rend
Slave CPU n entering cached rendezvous,
waiting for the monarch CPU to configure
the system bus.
INI
CC4n
SYS BD
CPUn mem rendez
Slave CPU n entering memory
rendezvous, waiting for the monarch CPU
to select a boot device.
TST
D000
SYS BD
micro controller
Firmware is initializing communications
with the system controller.
WRN
D004
SYS BD
micro not resp
Firmware detected a communications
error with the system controller.
INI
D005
SYS BD
set dom1 fan spd
Firmware is initializing communications
with the system controller.
INI
D006
SYS BD
set dom2 fan spd
Firmware is initializing communications
with the system controller.
WRN
D007
SYS BD
bad microctl cmd
Firmware detected a communications
error with the system controller.
FLT
D01n
SYS/IO
fan n: failure!
Firmware detected system fan n stopped.
WRN
D02n
SYS/IO
fan n: too slow!
Firmware detected system fan n is
running too slowly.
68
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Running System Verification Tests
Running System Verification Tests
HP-UX uses an online diagnostics product called the Support Tools Manager that allows
system operation verification.
Three interfaces are available with the Support Tools Manager: a command line interface
(accessed through the cstm command), a menu-driven interface (accessed through the
mstm command), and the graphical user interface (accessed through the xstm command).
For more information on these user interfaces, see the online man pages by entering the
following at a command line prompt:
man cstm [Enter]
man mstm [Enter]
man xstm [Enter]
For information on the enhanced online diagnostics, see the Support Media User’s Manual
(HP Part Number B3782-90176).
To access the Support Tools Manager, perform the following steps:
1. In a terminal window, type the following at the # prompt to invoke the command line
interface:
# cstm [Enter]
2. The following message appears:
Support Tool Manager
Version A.01.00
Type ‘help’ for a list of available commands.
CSTM>
3. To verify the system operation, type the following at the CSTM> prompt:
CSTM> verify all [Enter]
Messages similar to the following appear:
Verification has started on device (CPU).
Verification has started on device (FPU).
CSTM> Verification of (FPU) has completed.
CSTM> Verification of (CPU) has completed.
4. Press [Enter] to return to the CSTM> prompt after all test results are reported.
5. To exit the Support Tools Manager, enter the following:
CSTM> exit [Enter]
If any tests failed, run Selftest and ISL diagnostics to isolate the problem.
Chapter 3
69
Troubleshooting
Running ODE-Based Diagnostics
Running ODE-Based Diagnostics
The Offline Diagnostic Environment (ODE) consists of diagnostic modules for testing and
verifying system operation. ODE provides all the necessary functions for the user to load
specified tests and interact with those tests.
ODE is an ISL utility. To boot ODE:
1. Invoke the ISL environment from the system disk or a CD ROM.
2. Type ode [Enter] after the ISL> prompt to invoke ODE from the LIF directory on
the system disk. The prompt changes to ODE>.
Not all of the test modules are available on all systems. To see what test modules are
available to run on this system, type ls at the ODE> prompt. The available modules include
the following:
• astrodiag – tests and verifies the basic functionality of the Astro memory
controller/I/O chip.
• siodiag – tests and verifies the basic functionality of the SuperI/O multifunction I/O
chip, including serial, parallel, USB, and so forth.
• wdiag – tests and verifies the functionality of the PA-RISC chip.
• memtest – tests and verifies the memory arrays. If an error is detected, the diagnostic
reports the memory card and its slot number that needs replacement. It also provides a
map of the memory configuration so that the user can identify the type of memory and
its slot location.
• fupdate – updates the system’s Processor Dependent Code (PDC) firmware in the
EEPROM.
• mapper – identifies the configuration of HPPA systems. It displays path, identification,
and revision information of I/O components, configuration of memory controllers,
processors, co-processors, cache, and TLB, as well as processor board component
revisions and values of various HPPA system identifiers, revisions, and capabilities.
For further information on the various ODE commands and a complete listing of the
command set, type help [Enter] at the ODE> prompt or at the prompt of one of the test
modules.
70
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Using the System Board LEDs for Troubleshooting
Using the System Board LEDs for Troubleshooting
This section provides a description of the system board’s Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)
and how to use them for troubleshooting. These LEDs are located inside of the workstation
on the system board’s left-back edge. See Figure 3-5.. Note that you will have to view these
LEDs through the airflow holes on the back of your workstation.
Figure 3-5. System Board LEDs
For those system problems that this section is not able to solve, you will have to call your
local HP Support Representative. Before you call, record the state (on, off or blinking) of
your LEDs and give this information to your local HP support representative. The
representative will use this information to determine the course of action to take.
Interpreting the LED Information
Table 3-2. explains how to interpret the information the system board LEDs provide. Note
that the SUPPLY LED is reserved for future functionality.
Table 3-2. Interpreting the System Board LEDs
LED Name
LED’s Color
When On
Description
VRM1
Green
This light, when on, indicates that the
voltage regulator module is working
correctly for processor one. The default
state for this light is on.
Chapter 3
71
Troubleshooting
Using the System Board LEDs for Troubleshooting
Table 3-2. Interpreting the System Board LEDs
LED Name
LED’s Color
When On
Description
VRM0
Green
This light, when on, indicates that the
voltage regulator module is working
correctly for processor zero. The
default state for this light is on.
FETCH
Green
This light, when on, indicates that one
or both processors is fetching code. The
default state for this light is on.
FANS
Yellow
(blinking)
Note that the yellow light blinks a
heart beat when the system is working
correctly. See Table 3-3. for more
details for interpreting the blinks of
this light.
Over Current
Red
This light, when on, indicates there is
a short somewhere in the system. The
default state for this light is off.
There are six LED blink sequences supported by the System Controller. The LED blink
sequences are shown in Table 3-3. Note that each blink of the LED represents a tenth of a
second (0.1 sec.).
If the FANS LED is ever stuck either ON or OFF, a system problem has occurred. This
system problem is most likely an I2C bus hang. A potential fix may be to check that the
power supply cables are correctly plugged in. If this does not work, call you local HP
Support Representative.
Table 3-3. Blink Sequences for the FANS LED
Blink
Sequence
Number
LED Blink Sequence
(black dot represents 0.1 second LED on; white dot
is 0.1 second LED is off)
Description
System Controller Non-error Blink Sequences
1
●❍●❍❍❍❍❍❍❍
System controllers
normal heart beat.
2
●●●●●❍❍❍❍❍
This is a transient
state shown by the
system controller at
power up.
3
●●●●●●●●●●❍❍❍❍❍❍❍❍❍❍
System controller’s
transient state.
There is no system
problem.
72
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Using the System Board LEDs for Troubleshooting
Table 3-3. Blink Sequences for the FANS LED
Blink
Sequence
Number
LED Blink Sequence
(black dot represents 0.1 second LED on; white dot
is 0.1 second LED is off)
Description
System Controller Error Blink Sequences
4
●❍❍❍❍❍❍❍❍❍
System controller
shut off power to
the system because
the ambient
temperature
exceeded 60˚C or
140˚F.
5
●●●●●●●●●❍
System controller
detects a fan
failure. If this
happens you need
to read the message
in the LCD on the
front of the
workstation.
6
●❍●❍●❍❍❍❍❍
System controller is
reporting an error.
Troubleshooting with System Board LEDs
This section explains what to do when you see the LEDs on your system board in a
non-default state, and when the yellow FANS LED displays certain blink sequences. For
the default states, see Table 3-2. Note that the non-default state is a state that should not
exist, and it is a state that requires a solution.
Table 3-4. Solutions for the Non-Default LED States
LED Name1
Non-Default
State
Solution
VRM1
OFF
If the following solutions do not bring this LED back
on, replace VRM1 board.
• Swap VRM cards to determine if VRM1 is bad
• Determine that the power cable to the system is
plugged in
• Check that the power button has been pressed on
• Re-seat the VRM1 board in its connector
• Check that the VRM1 connector cable is properly
plugged in
Chapter 3
73
Troubleshooting
Using the System Board LEDs for Troubleshooting
Table 3-4. Solutions for the Non-Default LED States
LED Name1
Non-Default
State
Solution
VRM0
OFF
If the following solutions do not bring this LED back
on, replace VRM0 board.
• Swap VRM cards to determine if VRM0 is bad
• Determine that the power cable to the system is
plugged in
• Check that the power button has been pressed on
• Re-seat the VRM0 board in its connector
• Check that the VRM0 connector cable is properly
plugged in
FETCH
OFF
If the following solutions do not bring this LED back
on, replace the system board.
• Look at the system’s LCD to determine if the
firmware update process has been interrupted
• Determine that the power cable to the system is
plugged in
• Check that the power button has been pressed on
• Determine that all external peripheral devices are
turned on and that their cables are properly
connected
• Check that all internal devices are powered on and
that their cables are properly connected
74
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting
Using the System Board LEDs for Troubleshooting
Table 3-4. Solutions for the Non-Default LED States
LED Name1
Non-Default
State
Solution
FANS
OFF or
blink
sequence 4,
5 or 6
If the following solutions do not bring the LED back on
or cause it to properly blink, replace the system board.
OFF
Unplug the system and replace the
system board
Blink Sequence 4 Unplug the system and operate the
unit when its environment gets
cooler
Blink Sequence 5 Replace the fan associated with the
message in your system LCD. If
power supply fans are bad, you have
to replace the power supply. If the
PCI fan is bad, replace it. If either
one of the processor fans are bad, you
must replace the system board. Note,
fans may still be spinning, but their
control signal may have failed.
Blink Sequence 6 Check that the 24-pin power supply
signal cable is properly connected
Press the power button off and
unplug the system and wait for two
minutes before turning the system
back on
SHORT
ON
If the following solutions do not turn this LED off,
replace the system board.
• Check that no pieces of metal are shorting
connections anywhere in the system
• Check that no pins on system connectors are bent
and touching each other
1. The LEDs are in the OFF state, or in the case of the FANS LED, the LED is
blinking sequence 1, 2, or 6 or it is not blinking.
Chapter 3
75
Troubleshooting
Using the System Board LEDs for Troubleshooting
76
Chapter 3
4 Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
This chapter lists the Field Replaceable Units (FRUs) for the HP VISUALIZE J6000
workstations. This chapter then provides procedures for removing and replacing the FRUs
in the workstations.
77
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
Chapter Overview
Chapter Overview
This chapter contains the following main sections:
• Tools Required
• Exchange and Nonexchange Part Numbers
• FRU Removal and Replacement
— Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Precautions
— Prerequisite Steps for All Removal and Replacement Procedures
— Exploded View Diagram
— Front Bezel and Top Panel
— LCD Panel
— Hard Disk Drives
— Hard disk Drive Backplane
— CD ROM Drive
— Memory DIMMs
— Power Supply
— PCI Cage
— PCI Backplane
— Speaker
— System Board
— Real-Time Clock
WARNING
For most of the removal and replacement procedures in this chapter,
you must power off the workstation and unplug the workstation
power cord from the AC power outlet. The exceptions to this are the
removal and replacement of DIMMs and the PCI cage. For these you
only need to power off the workstation.
NOTE
To maintain FCC/EMI compliance, verify that all covers are replaced and
that all screws are properly seated.
78
Chapter 4
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
Tools Required
Tools Required
Use the following tools to remove or replace FRUs:
• Light-duty flat blade screwdriver with 6-inch (150 mm) blade
• T-15 Torx and T-20 (for rack mounting) Torx drivers
• ESD equipment (see the “Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Precautions” section later in
this chapter for detailed information)
Chapter 4
79
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
Exploded View Diagram
Exploded View Diagram
Figure 4-1 shows an exploded view of the internal components (FRUs) in the J6000
workstations.
Refer to this figure to identify the various workstation FRUs while performing the FRU
removal and replacement procedures in this chapter.
Figure 4-1. Exploded View of the J6000 Workstation
Desk side only
15
16
8
3
1
9
6
2
10
12
7
14
4
Plastic cover
desk side only
13
5
11
80
Chapter 4
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
Exchange and Nonexchange Part Numbers
Exchange and Nonexchange Part Numbers
In this chapter we refer to exchange and nonexchange part numbers. You must return
FRUs with exchange part numbers in exchange for replacement FRUs. Do not return
FRUs with nonexchange part numbers – you may discard them.
The following Tables 4-1 lists the exchange part numbers for the J6000 workstation.
Table 4-1. J6000 Exchange Part Numbers
Numbers in Figure 4-1
Part Number
Description
1
A5990-69010
J6000 System Board Assembly
2
A5990-69001
Power supply 500W includes system speaker,
power supply fans, and LCD display cable
3
A3863-69001
512 MB SDRAM DIMM
3
A3864-69001
1 GB SDRAM DIMM
4
A1658-69031
LVD Ultra SCSI hard disk 18 GB 10K RPM
4
A1658-69032
LVD Ultra SCSI hard disk 36 GB 10K RPM
Chapter 4
81
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
Exchange and Nonexchange Part Numbers
The following Tables 4-2 lists the nonexchange part numbers for the J6000 workstation.
Table 4-2. J6000 Nonexchange Part Numbers
Numbers in Figure 4-1
82
Part Number
Description
5
A5990-62023
CD ROM slim-line, ATAPI Assembly
6
A5990-66530
PCA, SCA backplane (disk drive)
7
A5990-62015
LCD/power switch assembly
8
0950-3812
VRM assembly
9
A5990-66520
PCA-PCI backplane board
Not Shown
A1658-86004
Real Time Clock/Battery Module
10
A5990-62006
PCI cage assembly includes PCI tray fan
11
A5990-62003
Disk drive bracket assembly
Not Shown
1390-1266
Locking Thumbscrew
Not Shown
0515-2721
T15 Screw - M3x6 (Mounts CD ROM drive to
chassis, system board mounting, PCI backplane
mounting, and power supply mounting)
Not Shown
0380-2018
Jackscrew - 4 - 40Mx4F
Not Shown
0515-2332
M3 screws for mounting SCA board
12
A5990-62002
Main chassis assembly1
14
A5990-63003
Internal SCSI cable
13
A5990-62004
Disk EMI cover assembly
Not Shown
A5990-62005
Top cover assembly
14
A5990-62007
Front bezel assembly
Not Shown
A5990-63004
CD ROM IDE cable
Not Shown
A5990-40021
Trim - bezel bottom (with J6000 branding)
Not Shown
A5990-40002
Trim - bezel bottom (blank - no branding)
Not Shown
A5990-62002
J6000 Rack Mount Kit2
Not Shown
A5990-62020
Rack mounting hardware kit2
Not Shown
A5990-62021
Cable management assembly
Not Shown
A5990-40006
Front bezel end caps
Not Shown
A5990-40019
Right side cover (with logo)3
Not Shown
A5990-40020
Left side cover (with logo)3
Chapter 4
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
Exchange and Nonexchange Part Numbers
Table 4-2. J6000 Nonexchange Part Numbers
Numbers in Figure 4-1
Part Number
Description
15
A5990-40010
Cosmetic cover (without logo)3
16
A5990-40009
Deskside pedestal3
Not Shown
A5990-00044
Drip pan3
Not Shown
A4983-60111
USB mouse, 3 buttons
Not Shown
A4983-60401
USB keyboard, U.S. English
Not Shown
A4983-60403
USB keyboard, German, Euro
Not Shown
A4983-60404
USB keyboard, Spanish, Euro
Not Shown
A4983-60405
USB keyboard, French, Euro
Not Shown
A4983-60406
USB keyboard, Kanji, JIS-109
Not Shown
A4983-60409
USB keyboard, Norwegian, Euro
Not Shown
A4983-60411
USB keyboard, Swiss-German, Euro
Not Shown
A4983-60412
USB keyboard, Swedish, Euro
Not Shown
A4983-60413
USB keyboard, U.K. English, Euro
Not Shown
A4983-60414
USB keyboard, Belgian/Flemish, Euro
Not Shown
A4983-60416
USB keyboard, Danish, Euro
Not Shown
A4983-60421
USB keyboard, Korean
Not Shown
A4983-60423
USB keyboard, Chinese/Trad
1. Order this for all sheet metal parts unless otherwise listed.
2. Used on rack mounted systems only.
3. Used on desk side mounted systems only.
Chapter 4
83
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
FRU Removal and Replacement
The procedures in this section describe how to remove and replace J6000 workstation
FRUs. Observe the electrostatic discharge (ESD) precautions and the prerequisites for
removing and replacing FRUs in the next two subsections, as well as any NOTEs,
CAUTIONs, and WARNINGs in each FRU removal and replacement procedure.
NOTE
If you need to install a new FRU, simply follow the procedures for replacing
the FRU in this chapter. (That is, replacement procedures are the same as
those for installing new FRUs.)
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Precautions
To prevent damage to the J6000 workstation, observe all of the following ESD precautions
while performing FRU removal and replacement procedures:
1. Remove all ESD-generating materials from the work area in which you will remove and
replace a workstation’s FRU(s).
2. Stand on an ESD (static-free) mat.
3. Wear a grounding wrist strap to ensure that any accumulated electrostatic charge
discharges from your body to ground.
4. Connect all equipment together, including the ESD mat, grounding wrist strap,
workstation, and peripherals.
5. Keep uninstalled printed circuit boards in their protective antistatic bags.
6. Once you have removed printed circuit boards from their protective antistatic bags,
handle the printed circuit boards by their edges only.
84
Chapter 4
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
Prerequisite Steps for All Removal and Replacement Procedures
You must complete the following steps before performing any of the FRU removal and
replacement procedures in this chapter:
1. Power off the workstation (either by executing shutdown -h as root, or by simply
pressing the power switch on the front panel of the workstation, which accomplishes
the same thing), as well as the monitor and any attached peripheral devices.
2. Unplug the workstation power cord and all peripheral devices from AC power outlets.
3. Attach the static-grounding wrist strap by following the instructions on the package.
Attach the sticky end of the wrist strap to bare metal on the rear panel of the
workstation.
NOTE
To make access to the internal FRUs easier, you may want to place the
workstation on a table or workbench instead of leaving it on the floor.
CAUTION
This workstation is designated for two-person lifting; it weighs approximately
36 to 49 pounds (12 to 22 kg), depending on the configuration. Do not attempt
to lift it by yourself, or injury may result.
Chapter 4
85
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
Front Bezel and Top Cover
This section describes how to remove and replace the J6000 workstation’s front bezel and
top cover.
Note that you can perform certain operations, like removing and replacing hard disk
drives, simply removing the front bezel of the workstation. Other operations require more
access to the interior of the workstation, so you will need to remove the front bezel or top
panel to perform those procedures.
CAUTION
86
The system will not operate with the top panel removed.
Chapter 4
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
Removing the Top Cover
Figure 4-2. Removing the Top Cover
1 - Remove all connectors from
back of workstation
- Remove workstation from
pedestal.
2 - Place workstation on a padded
surface
- Remove bezel
- Press in on both sides of bezel
and pull forward as shown.
1
2
Hold down pedestal when
removing workstation
3
- Remove top cover
1. Unscrew captive screw
2. Pull cover forward
3. Lift cover up.
3
4
- Attach anti-static strap
2
1
To replace the top cover or front bezel, perform the above steps in reverse.
NOTE
Chapter 4
The graphics in these steps depict a desk side unit. If this is a rack mount
unit, the skins and pedestal will not be present. Rack mounted systems will
not have air louvres mounted in the front bezel. When replacing the bezel,
remove and discard the louvres from the new bezel unit.
87
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
Removing the LCD Panel
To remove the LCD panel, do the following:
Figure 4-3. Removing the LCD Panel
1. Push LCD tab from one side to remove
2. Remove LCD
3. Remove connector
1
2
3
To replace the LCD panel, perform the above steps in reverse.
88
Chapter 4
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
Removing the Hard Disk Drives
To remove a hard disk drive do the following:
Figure 4-4. Removing the Hard Disk Drives
1
1. Remove optional locking thumbscrew
2. Press HDD cover release tab to remove cover
Locking
Thumbscrew
2
1
2
Removing a HDD
- Pull out bracket
- Remove bracket and HDD
Adding a HDD
- Remove bracket and screws
3
Removing a HDD
- Install hard drive in bracket
- Insert in HDD cage till firmly seated
Adding a HDD
- Carefully remove bar
- Install HDD
Carefully
remove and
discard
To replace the hard disk drives, perform the above steps in reverse. You should make sure
that the disks are firmly seated. Reinstall the hard disk drive cover and optional locking
thumbscrew, if applicable.
Chapter 4
89
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
Removing the Hard Disk Drive Backplane
To replace the hard disk drive backplane, do the following:
Figure 4-5. Removing the Hard Disk Drives Backplane
1
3
Remove PCI Cage
- Lift PCI handle to remove PCI cage
from workstation
2
- Remove disk drives BEFORE removing
board.
- Unplug four connectors
4
- Remove four screws
- Lift board out
Press sides
of connector
to remove
CD cable
1
Back
view
4
2
3
To replace the hard disk drive backplane, perform the above steps in reverse.
90
Chapter 4
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
Internal CD ROM Drive
To remove the CD ROM drive, do the following:
Figure 4-6. Removing the CD ROM Drive
1. Press sides of connector in back of CD to remove cable
2. Remove two screws
3. Slide CD to front
1
3
2
To replace the CD ROM drive, perform the above steps in reverse.
Removing and Replacing Memory DIMMs
To remove and replace memory DIMMs in the J6000, refer to the memory sequence label
inside the system. Be sure to press the tabs at both ends of the DIMM slots to release the
DIMM, then lift the DIMM out of the slot.
When replacing the DIMMs, press the DIMM into the slot until the tabs on each end snap
into place.
Removing and Replacing the Voltage Regulator Modules (VRMs)
To remove and replace the VRMs, see the section on removing and replacing the system
board.
Chapter 4
91
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
Power Supply
To remove the power supply, do the following:
Figure 4-7. Removing the Power Supply
1
- Remove two VRM connectors
- Remove VRM 1 board as shown
VR
M
VR
M
2
VRM
connector
1
VRM
connector
0
- Remove screw from back of workstation to remove power plug
- Disconnect five connectors (2-6)
power plug
3
1
Back
2
1
screw
5
ply
6
Sup
Power
4
92
Chapter 4
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
Figure 4-8. Removing the Power Supply (cont’d)
4
- Remove two screws from front of workstation
- Push power supply to back of workstation to lift out.
To replace the power supply, do the above steps in reverse.
Chapter 4
93
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
PCI Cage
To remove the PCI Cage, do the following:
Figure 4-9. Removing the PCI Cage
1
2
- Lift PCI handle to remove cage from workstation
1. Slide PCI retainer back
2. Lift off cage
RD
CA ER
I
PC AIN
T
RE
2
1
3 - Remove screw to remove card
- Slide I/O card out as shown
Bulkhead
screw
94
Chapter 4
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
Figure 4-10. Removing the PCI Backplane
1
1. Disconnect fan power plug
2. Remove mounting screw
1
Fan power plug
2 PCI
mounting
screw
2 - Slide board to back of cage and lift out
To replace the PCI Backplane and Cage, do the above steps in reverse.
Speaker
The speaker is integrated into the power supply. If the speaker fails, replace the power
supply.
Chapter 4
95
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
Removing the System Board
To remove the system board, do the following:
Figure 4-11. Removing the System Board
1
1. Lift PCI handle to remove PCI cage from workstation
2
2. Remove memory cards from system board
1
3. Remove VRM connectors and
VR
VRM 0 and VRM 1 cards
M
VR
M
2
1
0
- Remove screw from back of workstation to remove power plug
- Disconnect five connectors from system board (2-6)
power plug
1
1
2
3
power plug
screw
6
5
4
96
Chapter 4
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
Figure 4-12. Removing the System Board
3 - Remove two mounting screws from
system board.
4 - Remove four serial port screws
from back of workstation.
Back
Mounting
Screws
serial port screws
5 - Pull system board toward front of workstation to remove from slots
- Lift system board up
Slots
Front
Chapter 4
97
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
Replacing the System Board
To replace the system board, perform the above steps in reverse. Pay close attention to
installing the PCI cage.
Figure 4-13. Replacing the System Board
- Reverse steps
- Install PCI cage in workstation, with handle up, then press down.
NOTE
If you are replacing the system board on a desk side unit, go into the Boot
Console Handler (BCH) and set the fan choice to desk side.
NOTE
Be sure to install the four serial port screws BEFORE installing the two
system board mounting screws.
98
Chapter 4
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
Removing and Replacing the Real-Time Clock
To remove the real-time clock, you first need to follow the procedure in the section “Front
Bezel and Top Cover” of this chapter. After this procedure has been completed, you can
remove the real-time clock as shown in Figure 4-14. You may need to rock the real-time
clock back and forth to loosen it in its socket.
Figure 4-14. Removing the Real-Time Clock
Locator Dot
Real-time Clock
To replace the real-time clock, reverse the above procedure. Note that you should be
careful to not bend any of the real-time clock’s pins, and you must position the locator dot
as shown in Figure 4-14. Once the real-time clock is in place, reverse the procedure in the
section “Front Bezel and Top Cover” to replace the top cover.
Chapter 4
99
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
FRU Removal and Replacement
100
Chapter 4
5 Boot Console Handler
This chapter explains how to use the Boot Console Handler, which provides an interactive
environment after the power-on sequence in HP VISUALIZE J6000 workstations.
101
Boot Console Handler
Chapter Overview
Chapter Overview
This chapter contains the following main sections:
• Boot Console Handler Features
• Accessing the Boot Console Handler
• Boot Console Menus
• Booting the Workstation
• Searching for Bootable Media
• Resetting the Workstation
• Displaying and Setting Paths
• Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type
• Displaying the Current Memory Configuration
• Displaying the Status of the I/O Slots
• Setting the Auto Boot and Auto Search Flags
• Displaying and Setting the Security Mode
• Displaying and Setting Fastboot Mode
• Displaying the LAN Station Address
• Displaying System Information
• Displaying PIM Information
• Using Remote Power-On
• Setting the Fan Speed
• Stable Storage
• ISL Environment
102
Chapter 5
Boot Console Handler
Boot Console Handler Features
Boot Console Handler Features
There are times when you want to interact directly with the J6000 workstation before it
boots the operating system. These workstations provide a menu-driven Boot Console
Handler that allows you to perform special tasks, display information, and set certain
system parameters, even if the operating system is unavailable.
Here are some of the things you can do:
• Boot the workstation
• Search for bootable media
• Reset the workstation
• Display and set boot paths
• Display and set the monitor type
• Display memory configuration information
• Display the status of the I/O slots
• Set Auto Boot, Auto Search, and Auto Start
• Display and set Security mode
• Set Fastboot
• Display LAN information
• Display system information
• Display PIM information
• Using Remote Power-On
• Setting the Fan Speed
NOTE
Chapter 5
All of the tasks in the Boot Console Handler should be performed by a system
administrator with superuser (root) login permissions.
103
Boot Console Handler
Accessing the Boot Console Handler
Accessing the Boot Console Handler
To access the Boot Console Handler, follow these steps:
1. Close any files and applications on the workstation.
2. Press the power switch on the front panel of the workstation to power it off.
NOTE
There is no need to manually shut down the HP-UX operating system on the
workstation before powering it off. When you press the power switch, the
workstation automatically shuts down the operating system before
terminating the power.
Make sure you do not unplug the workstation’s power cord or otherwise interrupt power
to the workstation at this time.
3. Power on the workstation after the system has completely shut down.
If auto boot is turned off, the boot sequence automatically stops at the boot console
Main Menu.
If auto boot is turned on, you will see the following message:
Processor is starting auto boot process. To discontinue, press any key
within 10 seconds.
If auto boot and auto search are both turned on, you will see the following message:
Processor is booting from first available device. To discontinue, press
any key within 10 seconds.
NOTE
If you are using a power-saving monitor, you will have less than 10 seconds
from the time this message appears to press a key.
4. Press a key. You will then see the following message:
Boot terminated
The Main Menu of the Boot Console Handler appears.
104
Chapter 5
Boot Console Handler
Boot Console Menus
Boot Console Menus
The boot console menus follow, showing the various tasks you can perform and the
available information.
The shortened version of each command is indicated by the uppercase letters.
Help is available for all the menus and commands by using either help, he, or? and the
menu or command for which you want help.
------ Main Menu -------------------------------------Command
Description
-------
-----------
BOot [PRI|ALT|<path>]
Boot from specified path
PAth [PRI|ALT|CON|KEY [<path>]]
Display or modify a path
SEArch [DIsplay|[[IPL] [<path>]]] Search for boot devices
COnfiguration [<command>]
INformation [<command>]
SERvice [<command>]
Access Configuration menu/commands
Access Information menu/commands
Access Service menu/commands
DIsplay
HElp [<menu>|<commands>]
RESET
Redisplay the current menu
Display help for menu or command
Restart the system
Main Menu: Enter command >
Chapter 5
105
Boot Console Handler
Boot Console Menus
------ Configuration Menu ----------------------------Command
-------
Description
-----------
AUto [BOot|SEArch] [ON|OFF]
BootID [<proc> [<boot ID>]]
BootINfo
CPUconfig [<proc>[ON|OFF]]
DEfault
FanChoice [DeskSide|RackMount]
Display or set specified flag
Display or modify processor boot ID
Display boot-related information
Config/deconfig processor
Set the system to predefined values
Display or set the fan preference
FastBoot [ON|OFF]
LanConfig [<config_type>]
MOnitor [LIST|[<path> <type>]]
PAth [PRI|ALT|CON|KEY [<path>]]
PreviousPower [ON|OFF]
SEArch [DIsplay|[[IPL][<path>]]
SECure [ON|OFF]
TIme [c:y:m:d:h:m:s]
Display or set boot tests execution
Display or set LAN configuration
Change the current monitor type
Display or modify a path
Set previous power state
Search for boot devices
Set/show security mode
Read or set real time clock in GMT
BOot [PRI|ALT|<path>]
Boot from specified path
DIsplay
Redisplay the current menu
HElp [<menu>|<command>]
Display help for menu or command
RESET
Restart the system
MAin
Return to Main Menu
----Configuration Menu: Enter command >
106
Chapter 5
Boot Console Handler
Boot Console Menus
------ Information Menu ------------------------------Command
-------
Description
-----------
ALL
BootINfo
CAche
ChipRevisions
COprocessor
FwrVersion
IO
LanAddress
MEmory
PRocessor
SysConfig
WArnings
Display
Display
Display
Display
Display
Display
Display
Display
Display
Display
Display
Display
BOot [PRI|ALT|<path>]
DIsplay
HElp [<menu>|<command>]
RESET
MAin
-----Information Menu: Enter
Boot from specified path
Redisplay the current menu
Display help for menu or command
Restart the system
Return to Main Menu
Chapter 5
all system information
boot-related information
cache information
revisions of VLSI and firmware
coprocessor information
firmware version
I/O interface information
built-in system LAN address
memory information
processor information
the system configuration
selftest warning messages
command >
107
Boot Console Handler
Boot Console Menus
------ Service Menu ----------------------------------Command
-------
Description
-----------
ChassisCodes [<proc>|ON|OFF]
CLEARPIM
EepromRead [<addr> [<len>]]
MemRead <addr>[<len>] [<type>]
PciDelay [<value>]
PDT [CLEAR]
PIM [<proc>] [HPMC|LPMC|TOC]
Display/enable/disable chassis codes
Clear (zero) the contents of PIM
Read EEPROM locations
Read memory locations
Display or set PCI delay value
Display or clear the Page
Deallocation Table
Display PIM information
RemotePower [ON|OFF]
ScRoll [ON|OFF]
Display/enable/disable remote power
Display or change scrolling ability
BOot [PRI|ALT|<path>]
DIsplay
HElp [<menu>|<command>]
RESET
MAin
----Service Menu: Enter command >
Boot from specified path
Redisplay the current menu
Display help for menu or command
Restart the system
Return to Main Menu
108
Chapter 5
Boot Console Handler
Booting the Workstation
Booting the Workstation
You usually start a workstation by turning it on and waiting for HP-UX to boot
automatically. However, you may not always want the usual boot sequence to occur.
For example, you may want to start the workstation from an operating system that is
stored on a device that is different from the usual boot device. If the normal operating
system kernel or the disk on which it resides becomes damaged or unusable, you may wish
to boot from a different disk or perhaps from another type of device, such as a CD ROM
drive.
Here are some possible booting scenarios you may encounter:
• If you know which device you want to boot from, and you know that it contains a
bootable operating system, follow the directions in “Accessing the Boot Console
Handler” on, and then type the following at the prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > boot device [Enter]
where device is the hardware path to the device, specified in Mnemonic Style
Notation. For example, if you wish to boot an operating system that is stored on an IDE
CD ROM drive, you would type the following command at the prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > boot IDE [Enter]
• If you do not know which device you want to boot from, then type the following at the
prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > search [Enter]
A message similar to the following will be displayed:
Path Number
Device Path
Device Type
-------------
-------------
------------
P0
P1
IDE
FWSCSI.6.0
TEAC CD-532E-B
SEAGATE ST39102LC
At the prompt, you might type the following:
Main Menu: Enter command > boot P1 [Enter]
Note that the operating system on the specified device (P1) is used to boot the system
(also see the next section, “Searching for Bootable Media”).
Chapter 5
109
Boot Console Handler
Booting the Workstation
• If you wish to interact with the Initial System Loader (ISL) before booting the
workstation, follow the directions in the section “Accessing the Boot Console Interface”
found in this chapter, and type the following at the prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > boot device [Enter]
The following prompt will appear:
Interact with ISL (Y,N,Q)>
Answering yes (Y) causes the ISL to be loaded from the specified device. After a short
time, the following prompt appears on the screen:
ISL>
ISL is the program that actually controls the loading of the operating system. By
interacting with ISL, you can choose to load an alternate version of the HP-UX
operating system. If you do not want to interact with ISL, you must enter no (N).
For example, if the usual kernel (/stand/vmunix) on the root disk (fwscsi.6.0) has
become corrupted, and you wish to boot the workstation from the backup kernel
(/stand/vmunix.prev), type the following at the ISL> prompt:
ISL> hpux /stand/vmunix.prev [Enter]
• If you do not know which media in the file systems have bootable operating systems,
you can find them with the search ipl command. See the next section, “Searching for
Bootable Media.”
110
Chapter 5
Boot Console Handler
Searching for Bootable Media
Searching for Bootable Media
To list all devices that contain bootable media, follow the directions in the section
“Accessing the Boot Console Handler” found in this chapter, and type the following at the
prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > search ipl [Enter]
The search command searches all buses. The search may turn up more devices than there
are lines on the display. If you are using a text terminal, you can control the progress of the
search from the terminal’s keyboard by doing any of the following:
• To temporarily suspend the search, press [Ctrl]-[S].
• To continue the search, press [Ctrl]-[Q].
• To halt the search, press any other key.
These flow-control commands do not work with a bit-mapped display, but such a display
can show more than forty lines of text, so you are unlikely to need them.
To search for devices of just one type that actually contain bootable media, follow the
directions in the section “Accessing the Boot Console Handler” found in this chapter, and
then type the following at the prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > search ipl device_type [Enter]
where device_type is one of the following:
• fwscsi is the internal, Wide LVD (Low Voltage Differential) SCSI bus.
• scsi is the external, SE/LVD ( Single-Ended/Low-Voltage Differential) SCSI bus.
• lan is all connections to the built-in LAN.
• ide is the built-in CD ROM drive.
• pcin is an optional SCSI interface in slot number n.
For more information about the search command, type the following at the prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > help search [Enter]
Chapter 5
111
Boot Console Handler
Resetting the Workstation
Resetting the Workstation
To reset the workstation to its predefined values, follow the directions in the section
“Accessing the Boot Console Handler” found in this chapter, and type the following at the
prompt to access the Configuration Menu:
Main Menu: Enter command > co [Enter]
When the Configuration Menu appears, type the following at the prompt:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > default [Enter]
Then type the following at the prompt:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > reset [Enter]
112
Chapter 5
Boot Console Handler
Displaying and Setting Paths
Displaying and Setting Paths
A path is the hardware address of a device that is attached to the I/O system of a
workstation. The path command sets the system paths shown in Table 5-1.
The path command sets and displays the hardware address of a specified device attached
to the I/O bus of the workstation.
Table 5-1. System Paths
Path Type
Device
primary or pri
The workstation’s default boot device (usually the root disk)
alternate or alt
The workstation’s alternate boot device (usually a DDS-format tape device)
console or con
The workstation’s primary display device
keyboard or key
The workstation’s primary ASCII input device
To display the current settings for the system paths, type the following at the prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > path [Enter]
The paths are displayed in Mnemonic Style Notation, as shown in Table 5-2.
Table 5-2. Mnemonic Style Notation
I/O Type
Specification Format
Internal LVD SCSI
fwscsi.scsi_address.logical_unit_number
External SE/LVD
SCSI
scsi.scsi_address.logical_unit_number
Built-in LAN
lan.server_address.init_timeout.io_timeout
Optional SCSI
pcin.scsi_address.logical_unit_number
Built-in IDE
IDE
To display the current setting for a particular system path, follow the directions in the
section “Accessing the Boot Console Handler” found in this chapter, and type the following
at the prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > path path_type [Enter]
where path_type is one of the path types listed in Table 5-1.
For example, to get the path to the primary boot device, follow the directions in the section
“Accessing the Boot Console Handler” found in this chapter, and type the following at the
prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > path primary [Enter]
Chapter 5
113
Boot Console Handler
Displaying and Setting Paths
To set a system path to a new value, follow the directions in the section “Accessing the Boot
Console Handler” found in this chapter, and type the following at the prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > path path_type path [Enter]
where path_type is one of the path types listed in Table 5-1 and path is the specification of
the path in Mnemonic Style Notation (as described in Table 5-2). For example, to set the
primary boot path to a SCSI disk with an ID of 6.0, follow the directions in “Accessing the
Boot Console Handler” on, and then type the following at the prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > path pri scsi.6.0 [Enter]
114
Chapter 5
Boot Console Handler
Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type
Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type
The workstation ships from the factory preset to use a monitor with a specific resolution
and frequency. If the workstation’s monitor is replaced with a different type of monitor, you
may have to reconfigure the workstation to support the new monitor.
The Monitor Command
The monitor command lets you change the workstation’s graphics configuration. This
command is available in the Configuration Menu of the Boot Console Handler.
NOTE
The monitor command lets you change a workstation’s graphics
configuration before you replace the monitor. For information about changing
the configuration after you replace the monitor, go to the section “Setting the
Monitor Type at Power On” found in this chapter.
To display the current graphics and console information, type the following set of
commands:
Main Menu: Enter command > configuration [Enter]
Configuration Menu: Enter command > monitor [Enter]
The correct usage for setting the graphics configuration is:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > monitor graphics_path type [Enter]
where valid graphics_path parameters are:
• graphics(1) - Graphics adapter installed in slot 1
• graphics(2) - Graphics adapter installed in slot 2
• graphics(3) - Graphics adapter installed in slot 3
NOTE
No blanks or spaces may be used in the graphics_path.
type is the numerical monitor type as shown with the monitor list command. See the
section “Setting the Monitor Type” found in this chapter for a list of types. For example, a
graphics card installed in option slot 1 would be graphics(1).
Chapter 5
115
Boot Console Handler
Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type
Displaying the Current Monitor Configuration
To display the current monitor configuration for the workstation from the Configuration
Menu of the Boot Console Handler, follow the directions in the section “Accessing the Boot
Console Handler” found in this chapter. Once you are in the Boot Console Handler’s Main
Menu, type:
Main Menu: Enter command > configuration [Enter]
This places you in the Configuration Menu. From here, type:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > monitor [Enter]
This displays a list of the current graphics adapters and their monitor types configured for
the workstation. For example:
MONITOR INFORMATION
Path
Slot
-------------
--------- --------
GRAPHICS(1) 1
Head
1
HPA
-------------
fffa000000
Resolution
Freq Type
------------------ ------1600x1200
75Hz
8
Class
-------
-------
PCI
Configuration Menu: Enter command >
In this example, only the graphics adapter (located in slot 1) GRAPHICS(1) is configured.
The monitor type for GRAPHICS(1) is set to type 8, which (for this graphics adapter) is a
1600x1200 monitor that uses a frequency of 75 Hz.
Setting the Monitor Type
You can set the monitor type for a graphics adapter by typing the following:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > monitor graphics(n) tt [Enter]
where n is the number of the graphics adapter and tt is the monitor type.
To display a list of supported monitors that are used by a graphics card, type the following:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > monitor list [Enter]
A list of valid monitor types similar to the following is displayed.
NOTE
116
Each graphics adapter will have a different list of valid monitor types. The
meaning of any monitor type will therefore differ for each graphics adapter.
Chapter 5
Boot Console Handler
Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type
MONITOR INFORMATION
Path
Slot Head Type
------- ---- ---GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
1
GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
2
GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
3
GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
4
GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
5
GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
6
GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
7
GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
8
GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
9
GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
10
GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
11
GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
12
GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
13
GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
14
GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
15
Size
Freq Class
--------- ---- ----1280x1024 75Hz PCI
1280x1024 75Hz PCI, Double buffered
1280x1024 75Hz PCI, Greyscale
1280x1024 75Hz PCI, Double buffered, Greyscale
1280x768 75Hz PCI
800x600 75Hz PCI
640x480 75Hz PCI
1600x1200 75Hz PCI
1600x1200 75Hz PCI, Greyscale
1200x1600 75Hz PCI
1200x1600 75Hz PCI, Greyscale
1280x1024 72Hz
1280x1024 72Hz Double buffered
640x480 60Hz
---------- user defined -----------
Configuration Menu: Enter command >
To set the monitor type for GRAPHICS(1) to monitor type 8, type the following:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > monitor graphics(1) 8 [Enter]
This will take effect on the next reboot or reset of the workstation.
MONITOR INFORMATION
Path
-------------
Slot
Head
HPA
--------- -------- -------------
GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
fffa000000
Resolution Freq Type Class
------------------ ------- ------1600x1200
75Hz
8
-------
PCI
The new monitor selection will either take effect the next time you reboot the workstation
if this is a non-console monitor, or immediately if this is a console monitor. The boot console
also displays the new monitor information.
Trying to change the monitor type to a number not listed for that graphics device fails and
gives you the following warning message:
Value of monitor type n out of range (n - nn)
NOTE
Chapter 5
Changing the monitor type on an empty slot works; the monitor type will be
saved for a future graphics card.
117
Boot Console Handler
Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type
Setting the Monitor Type at Power On
If you replace a workstation’s monitor with a different monitor type, and do not set the
workstation’s graphics parameters by using the monitor command before doing so, you
may need to perform the following if your screen is blank.
Cycle the power to the workstation. Wait 2 seconds after the Num Lock light flashes near
the end of the boot sequence, and then press [Tab] to initiate the automatic monitor
selection process. If the screen remains blank after two minutes, however, see the
“Troubleshooting Monitor Problems” subsection on the next page.
NOTE
It takes approximately one minute after powering on the workstation before
the Num Lock light flashes.
The system cycles through the available monitor types one at a time. When you see a
message similar to the following, and it is the correct monitor type, select the monitor type
by pressing [Enter]:
MONITOR INFORMATION
Path
-------------
Slot
Head
Type
Size
Freq Type
--------- -------- ------------- ------------------
GRAPHICS(1) 1
1
n
nnnnxnnnn
nnHz
Class
-------
-------
8
PCI
-------
Press [RETURN] to select this monitor type (type n of n types)
The system queries you to confirm your selection. Press Y (yes) to save this monitor type.
If you press any key other than Y, the following message is displayed:
Monitor type not saved.
At this point, the new monitor type is active, but not saved. Because you did not save the
monitor type, the next time you reboot the workstation the original monitor type will be
used.
Next, the following message is displayed:
To select a new Graphics Monitor Type press the <TAB> key now, otherwise
EXIT by entering any other key (or will time out in 15 seconds)...
To restart the monitor selection process, press [Tab].
118
Chapter 5
Boot Console Handler
Displaying and Setting the Monitor Type
Troubleshooting Monitor Problems
In the event that the console stops displaying to the graphics device, use the following
procedure to set the console for displaying to an external terminal:
1. Turn off the workstation’s power.
2. Disconnect the USB keyboard connector from the rear panel.
3. Connect a serial terminal emulator to the Serial 1 connector (the left serial connector)
on the rear panel. Configure the terminal for: 9600 baud, No Stop Bits, No Parity, and
8 Bits.
4. Power on the workstation. The system will now display the console to the terminal
connected to Serial 1 port. Note that you can use a 9-pin to 9-pin serial cable (HP Part
Number F1044-80002) to connect an HP OmniBook serial port to the workstation.
5. Set the monitor type and path using the Boot Console Handler.
Changing the Console to an External Terminal
In the event that the console stops displaying to the graphics device, use the following
procedure to display the console to an external Serial terminal so that you can configure
the graphics console:
1. Turn off the workstation’s power.
2. Disconnect the USB keyboard connector from the rear panel.
3. Connect a Serial terminal to the Serial 1 connector (the left serial connector) on the rear
panel. Configure the terminal for: 9600 baud, No Stop Bits, No Parity, and 8 Bits.
4. Power on the workstation.
The workstation will now display the console to the terminal connected to the Serial 1 port.
Chapter 5
119
Boot Console Handler
Displaying the Current Memory Configuration
Displaying the Current Memory Configuration
The following sample screen output uses the memory command to show a memory
configuration table with properly-installed and configured memory.
To display the current memory configuration for a workstation, first follow the directions
in the section “Accessing the Boot Console Handler” found in this chapter. Once you are in
the Boot Console Handler’s Main Menu, type the following:
Main Menu: Enter command > information [Enter]
This places you in the Information Menu. From here, type the following:
Information Menu: Enter command > memory [Enter]
The screen displays status and configuration information for the memory DIMMs installed
in the workstation. The following sample shows the memory information when memory
DIMMs are properly installed and configured.
MEMORY INFORMATION
MEMORY STATUS TABLE
Slot
Size (A)
--------0a/0b
512MB
1a/1b
512MB
2a/2b
512MB
3a/3b
512MB
4a/4b
512MB
5a/5b
512MB
6a/6b
512MB
7a/7b
512MB
Status (A)
------------Active
Active
Active
Active
Active
Active
Active
Active
Size (B)
-------512MB
512MB
512MB
512MB
512MB
512MB
512MB
512MB
Status (B)
---------Active
Active
Active
Active
Active
Active
Active
Active
TOTAL MEMORY = 8192MB
MEMORY FAULT TABLE
Slot
Size
----
------
120
Status
-------------
Chapter 5
Boot Console Handler
Displaying the Current Memory Configuration
Memory Installation Guidelines
For best performance, load DIMMs in ascending slot order: 0, 1, 2,...
• For DIMMs to work, both DIMMs in a slot pair (a/b) must be the same type.
(Same part number = same type)
Active, Installed Memory
Deallocated Pages
: 768MB of SDRAM
: 0 Pages
-----------
Available Memory
: 768MB
Good Memory Required by OS
:
0 (Not Initialized)
Memory
HVERSION
SVERSION
-------- ---------0x0860
Chapter 5
0x0900
121
Boot Console Handler
Displaying the Status of the I/O Slots
Displaying the Status of the I/O Slots
The IO command lets you identify all built-in I/O devices and optional I/O devices installed
in the option slots. It is available in the Information Menu.
To use the IO command from the Information Menu of the Boot Console Handler, type the
following:
Information Menu: Enter command > io [Enter]
Information about the built-in and optional I/O devices is displayed. For example:
I/O MODULE INFORMATION
Path
---LAN
AUDIO
IDE
SUPERIO MISC
SERIAL_1
SERIAL_2
USB
SCSI
FWSCSI
GRAPHICS(2)
Decimal
------10/0/12/0
10/0/13/0
10/0/14/0
10/0/14/0
10/0/14/1/1
10/0/14/1/2
10/0/14/2
10/0/15/0
10/0/15/1
10/4/2/0
Type
---Ethernet
Audio
IDE
Bridge Device
RS232 port
RS232 port
USB
SCSI
SCSI
Display
Location
-------built-in
built-in
built-in
built-in
built-in
built-in
built-in
built-in
built-in
slot 2
IODC IODC
Vers Dep
---- --0x02 0x00
HVER
---0060
SVER
---a200
0060
a300
0x00
0x00
0060
0060
0060
0060
0060
0070
8c00
8c00
a900
a300
a300
8500
0x01
0x01
0x95
0x00
0x00
0x01
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
Main Menu: Enter command >
122
Chapter 5
Boot Console Handler
Setting the Auto Boot and Auto Search Flags
Setting the Auto Boot and Auto Search Flags
The auto boot and auto search flags are variables stored in the system’s non-volatile
memory. (Non-volatile memory retains its contents even after power is turned off.) If you
reset these flags to new values, the change takes effect the next time you reboot the
workstation.
To examine the state of the auto boot and auto search flags, type the following:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > auto [Enter]
If auto boot is set to on, the workstation automatically attempts to boot the operating
system when powered on. If auto boot is set to off, the workstation enters the boot
administration mode of the Boot Console Handler.
The state of the auto search flag determines how the workstation seeks a boot device
during autoboot. If auto search is set to on, the workstation will search for other boot
devices if the primary boot device is not available. If auto search is off, the workstation
will default to the boot administration mode if it can’t see the primary boot device.
To change the state of the auto boot or auto search flags, type either:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > auto boot state [Enter]
OR:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > auto search state [Enter]
where state is on or off.
Chapter 5
123
Boot Console Handler
Displaying and Setting the Security Mode
Displaying and Setting the Security Mode
The secure flag is a variable stored in non-volatile memory. (Non-volatile memory retains
its contents even after power is turned off.) If you reset this flag to a new value, the change
takes effect the next time you reboot the workstation.
When the secure flag is set to on, auto boot and auto search are enabled and cannot be
stopped. The workstation boots from the default boot paths regardless of user intervention.
To display the current setting for the secure flag, type the following:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > secure [Enter]
To set the secure flag on, type the following:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > secure on [Enter]
To set the secure flag off, you need to disconnect all possible boot devices to interrupt the
boot sequence and force the prompt to the Boot Console Handler. Next, type the following:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > secure off [Enter]
124
Chapter 5
Boot Console Handler
Displaying and Setting Fastboot Mode
Displaying and Setting Fastboot Mode
When fastboot is enabled (set to on), the workstation does a quick check of the memory
and skips some processor self tests during its power-on self tests. This enables the
workstation to complete its boot process quicker. The default factory setting is for
fastboot to be enabled (set to on).
When fastboot is disabled (set to off), more extensive memory and processor testing is
performed during the selftests, causing the boot process to take longer.
If you are experiencing difficulty in booting the workstation, set fastboot to off and
reboot the system. The more extensive testing may reveal the error condition.
To display the status of fastboot, type the following:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > fastboot [Enter]
To disable fastboot, type the following:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > fastboot off [Enter]
To enable fastboot, type the following:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > fastboot on [Enter]
Chapter 5
125
Boot Console Handler
Displaying the LAN Station Address
Displaying the LAN Station Address
It is sometimes necessary to supply the LAN station address of the workstation to other
users. For example, if the workstation is to become a member of a cluster, the cluster
administrator needs to know the LAN station address in order to add the workstation to
the cluster.
A LAN station address is the label that uniquely identifies the LAN connection for the
workstation at the link level (the hardware level).
To display the workstation’s LAN station address, type the following:
Information Menu: Enter command > lanaddress [Enter]
The LAN station address is displayed as a twelve-digit number in hexadecimal notation,
similar to the following:
LAN Station Addresses:
001083-000429
The address is for the workstation’s built-in LAN interface.
126
Chapter 5
Boot Console Handler
Displaying System Information
Displaying System Information
The all command allows you to display the system’s processor revision and speed, cache
size, memory size, flag settings, and the boot and console paths. To display system
information, from the Information Menu type the following:
Information Menu: Enter command > all [Enter]
This information is paged to allow you to view it as necessary, unless the ScRoll command
has been used to disable scrolling.
Displaying PIM Information
The pim command allows you to display the most recent PIM information for the specified
fault type. To display PIM information for a specific fault, from the Service Menu, type the
following:
Service Menu: Enter command > pim processor_number fault_type [Enter]
Chapter 5
127
Boot Console Handler
Using Remote Power-On
Using Remote Power-On
The J6000 workstation has a remote power-on feature that allows you to power up and
shut down your workstation remotely through the RS232 port. The RS232 receive line is
monitored by the system board Remote Power Controller (RPC). This controller responds
to the following commands:
Press:
Type:
Description
Esc
rsys^on
Turns the system on
Esc
rsys^off
Turns the system off
Esc
rsys^ton
Turns the system off without soft-power down
Esc
pic^sleep
Causes RPC to stop responding to commands
If the remote-power jumper is set to the enable position (factory default), the Remote
Power Controller will always be able to turn on a system the first time AC power is
applied. Once the system is powered up, further command processing will depend on the
state of the firmware’s “remote power” bit, which is set using the Boot Console Handler
(see the “Boot Console Handler” chapter in this document). If the remote power bit is set to
ON, the Remote Power Controller will continue to process commands only if the Remote
Power Controller has not been put into the sleep mode. If the remote power bit is set to
OFF, the Remote Power Controller will not respond to commands.
If the Remote Power Controller has been placed in the sleep mode, you can re-enable the
Remote Power Controller by following this procedure:
1. Reboot your workstation. If auto boot is turned off, the boot sequence automatically
stops at the boot console Main Menu. If auto boot is turned on, you will see the
following message:
Processor is starting auto boot process. To
discontinue, press any key within 10 seconds.
If auto boot and auto search are both turned on, you will see the following message:
Processor is booting from first available device. To discontinue, press any key within 10
seconds.
NOTE
128
If you are using a power-saving monitor, you will have less than 10 seconds
from the time this message appears to press a key.
Chapter 5
Boot Console Handler
Using Remote Power-On
2. Press any key. You will then see the message:
Boot terminated
The Main Menu of the boot console appears.
3. At the Main Menu prompt, type the following and press Enter:
Main Menu: Enter command > service
4. Turn remote power off by typing the following at the prompt and press Enter:
Service Menu: Enter command > RemotePower OFF
Next, turn remote power on by typing the following at the prompt and press Enter:
Service Menu: Enter command > RemotePower ON
The Remote Power Controller is now enabled.
5. Return to the Main Menu by typing the following at the prompt and press Enter:
Service Menu: Enter command > main
6. Continue booting the system by typing the following at the prompt and press Enter:
Main Menu: Enter command > boot
7. Answer “N” to the question, INTERACT WITH IPL (Y,N,Q)?
Troubleshooting Hint for an Unresponsive RPC
If the Remote Power Controller (RPC) is enabled and it seems to be unresponsive, press
the Enter key several (approximately 15 times) times. You need to do this because the
Remote Power Controller auto senses the baud rate at the beginning of each command
(that is, when you press Enter). It does this by measuring the width of the start bit of the
first character it sees. Because the Remote Power Controller does not know the difference
between the beginning of a command or any other data that may occur on the receive line,
the Remote Power Controller can set the baud rate to an incorrect value if the first
character it sees has the lowest order bit or bits set. The Remote Power Controller has an
input buffer of a fixed size; therefore, pressing the Enter key 15 or more times causes the
buffer to overflow, resetting the Remote Power Controller. If the baud rate was set to some
real extreme value, you may have to try this process several times.
Chapter 5
129
Boot Console Handler
Setting the Fan Speed
Setting the Fan Speed
There are two fan speed settings available on the J6000 workstation. The RackMount fan
speed is used for J6000s that are installed in a rack. The DeskSide fan speed is used for
J6000s that are used as desk-side systems. These fan speeds are set using the Boot
Console Handler (bch). To set the fan speeds, follow the procedures discussed in this
section.
Rack-Mount Fan Speed
If you currently have a desk-side workstation that you want to convert to a rack-mount
workstation, you need to change the workstation’s fan speed. To do this, follow this
procedure:
1. Turn on the workstation and press the Tab key until a select display message appears.
Select the display frequency and resolution that are best for your workstation.
2. Stop the boot process by pressing any key before the ten-second limit. This gets you to
the Boot Console Handler’s (bch) Main Menu. You will only need to do this if you have
autoboot turned on; otherwise, the system stops at the bch Main Menu. When the
Main Menu prompt appears, type:
Main Menu: Enter command > configuration
3. Enter the following command at the Configuration Menu prompt:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > FanChoice RackMount
4. Return to the Main Menu and enter this command at the prompt to continue booting:
Main Menu: Enter command > boot
Desk-Side Fan Speed
If you currently have a rack-mount workstation that you want to convert to a desk-side
workstation, you need to change the workstation’s fan speed. To do this, follow this
procedure:
1. Turn on the workstation and press the Tab key until a select display message appears.
Select the display frequency and resolution that are best for your workstation.
2. Stop the boot process by pressing any key before the ten-second limit. This gets you to
the Boot Console Handler’s (bch) Main Menu. You will only need to do this if you have
autoboot turned on; otherwise, the system stops at the bch Main Menu. When the
Main Menu prompt appears, type:
Main Menu: Enter command > configuration
130
Chapter 5
Boot Console Handler
Setting the Fan Speed
3. Enter the following command at the Configuration Menu prompt:
Configuration Menu: Enter command > FanChoice DeskSide
4. Return to the Main Menu and enter this command at the prompt to continue booting:
Main Menu: Enter command > boot
Chapter 5
131
Boot Console Handler
Initial System Loader (ISL) Environment
Initial System Loader (ISL) Environment
The ISL environment provides the means to load the operating system (HP-UX)
environment. The ISL environment also provides an offline platform to execute optional
diagnostic and utility programs from a boot device when HP-UX does not load.
The ISL program is the first program loaded into main memory from an external medium
(LAN, disk, or tape) and launched by the initial program loader (IPL) routine from the
Boot Administration environment.
The ISL environment provides the following capabilities:
• Execute user-entered commands to modify boot device paths and boot options in stable
storage.
• Run offline diagnostic programs and utilities.
• Provide automatic booting of the HP-UX operating system after power-on or reset.
Invoking ISL from the Boot Console Handler
Perform the following steps to invoke ISL from the Boot Console Handler:
1. Follow the directions in the section “Accessing the Boot Console Handler” found in this
chapter, and type the following at the prompt:
Main Menu: Enter command > boot device [Enter]
You are prompted:
Interact with ISL (Y or N) > y [Enter]
2. Answering yes (y) causes the ISL to be loaded from the specified device. After a short
time, the following prompt appears on the screen:
ISL>
ISL is the program that actually controls the loading of the operating system. By
interacting with ISL, you can choose to load an alternate version of the HP-UX
operating system.
For example, if the usual kernel (/stand/vmunix) on the root disk has become
corrupted, and you wish to boot the workstation from the backup kernel
(/stand/vmunix.prev), type the following at the ISL> prompt:
ISL> hpux /stand/vmunix.prev [Enter]
132
Chapter 5
Boot Console Handler
Initial System Loader (ISL) Environment
ISL User Commands
The following commands that are available in the ISL environment allow you to display
and modify the boot characteristics of the system.
• help - lists ISL command menu and available utilities.
• display - displays the boot and console paths in Stable Storage and the current setting
of the ISL Boot Flags.
• primpath - modifies the primary boot path entry in Stable Storage. The entry in Stable
Storage for the primary boot device begins at byte address 0 and ends at 31.
• altpath - modifies the alternate boot path entry in Stable Storage. The entry for the
alternate boot device begins at byte address 128 and ends at 159.
• conspath - modifies the console path entry in Stable Storage. The entry in Stable
Storage for the console device begins at byte address 96 and ends at byte address 127.
The entry for the keyboard and mouse devices begins at byte address 160 and ends at
191.
• listautofl or lsautofl - lists the contents of the (HP-UX) autoboot file.
• support - boots the Support Tape from the boot device.
• readss - displays 4 bytes (one word) from Stable Storage. The readss command
requires a decimal number between 0 and 255 to address four bytes in Stable Storage.
Chapter 5
133
Boot Console Handler
Initial System Loader (ISL) Environment
134
Chapter 5
6 Block Diagram
This chapter contains the block diagram for the J6000 workstation’s system board and PCI
board.
135
Block Diagram
System Board and PCI Board
System Board and PCI Board
Figure 6-1. Block Diagram of the J6000’s System Board and PCI Board
136
Chapter 6
A Specifications
This appendix lists the environmental and electrical specifications for the HP VISUALIZE
J6000 workstations.
137
Specifications
Environmental Specifications
Environmental Specifications
Altitude
Operating:
0–10,000 ft (0–3,000 m) @ 0 to +45˚ C
Non-operating:
15,000 ft (0–4,500 m) @ –40 to +70˚ C
DC Magnetic Field Interference
Operating:
<1 Gauss at surface of product
Non-operating:
<2 milli Gauss @ 7 feet
Electromagnetic Interference (EMI)
Emissions:
FCC Class A CISPR A
Electrostatic Discharge
Air discharge:
8kV
Contact discharge:
4kV
Temperature
Operating:
0 to +45˚ C
Non-operating:
–40 to +70˚ C
Humidity (Non-condensing)
Operating:
15 to 80%, 26˚ C max wet bulb for removable media
Non-operating:
0 to 90%
Leakage Current
Less than 3.5 mA
138
Appendix A
Specifications
Environmental Specifications
Shock
Operating:
20g at 3ms, 1/2 sine in normal axis with no hard errors
Non-operating:
80g at 3ms, 1/2 sine, normal axis
Vibration
Operating random:
0.21 Grms, 5–500 Hz
Swept sine survival:
0.5 g peak, 5–500 Hz
Random survival:
2.09 Grms, 5–500 Hz
Appendix A
139
Specifications
Electrical Specifications
Electrical Specifications
Input Power
J6000
AC Frequency:
47–63 Hz
Maximum Power Input:
715 Watts
Maximum Current:
7.4–6.2 Amps AC at 100–120VAC
3.7–3.2 Amps AC at 200–230VAC
140
Appendix A
B SCSI Connections
This appendix provides information about connecting SCSI (Small Computer System
Interface) devices to an HP VISUALIZE J6000 workstation
141
SCSI Connections
Appendix Overview
Appendix Overview
This appendix contains the following main sections:
• SCSI Bus Differences
• SCSI Restrictions
• SCSI Bus Length Constraints
• Assigning SCSI Device IDs
• Connecting to the SCSI Ports
NOTE
When attaching external SCSI devices, be sure to terminate the last device on
the external SCSI bus. The J6000 does note require external SCSI
termination if no external SCSI devices are connected.
SCSI Bus Differences
A SCSI (Small Computer Systems Interface) bus is an IEEE standard bus for connecting a
workstation to internal and external SCSI devices running at different speeds. There may
be one device connected to the external SCSI port, or several SCSI devices may be
daisy-chained together and connected to the external SCSI port. Examples of these SCSI
devices are 4 mm DDS-format tape drives, CD ROM drives, and hard disk drives.
The J6000 has a single dedicated external SCSI bus which supports both low voltage
differential SCSI (LVD) and single-ended SCSI. The J6000 will also support wide (68 pin)
or narrow (50 pin via a 68-50 pin adapter cable) SCSI. The following table shows the
specification differences between these SCSI buses.
NOTE
Do not mix SE and LVD SCSI devices on the same SCSI bus as this can cause
reduction in device performance.
Table B-1. SCSI Bus Differences
Maximum
Addresses1
Maximum
Cable
Length
8 bits
0 through 6
3.0 meters
(9.84 feet)
Up to 40 MB/sec.
16 bits
0 through 6;
8 through 15
3.0 meters
(9.84 feet)
Up to 80 MB/sec
16 bits
0 through 6;
8 through 15
12 meters
(39.37 feet)
SCSI Type
Transfer Rate
Data Bus
Width
SE/LVD
Up to 20 MB/sec
VWSE
LVD
1. Address 7 is reserved for host controller use on all SCSI buses.
142
Appendix B
SCSI Connections
Appendix Overview
CAUTION
A narrow SCSI device can not be placed between two wide devices.
SCSI Restrictions
This section describes the SCSI restrictions that apply to the J6000 workstations in the
following areas:
• Cables
• Terminators
• SCSI configuration constraint
NOTE
The J6000 SCSI bus supports only 7 narrow SCSI devices because address 7
is reserved by the system. Similarly, the SCSI bus supports only 15 wide
SCSI devices because address 7 is reserved by the system.
Cables
Only SCSI cables approved by HP can be used to connect a J6000 workstation to SCSI
devices. HP offers the following SCSI cables for SE SCSI devices:
• 1.0 meter (3.281 feet) cable (HP Product Number C2908A)
• 1.5 meter (4.922 feet) cable (HP Product Number C2956A)
HP offers the following SCSI cables for LVD SCSI devices:
• 0.5 meter (1.64 feet) cable (HP Product Number C2978A)
• 1.5 meter (4.922 feet) cable (HP Product Number C2979A)
CAUTION
SCSI cables approved by HP are designed to function within the SCSI
tolerances for HP devices. Use of other cables can result in significant
problems with system operation.
Always use the shortest possible cable(s) for a configuration.
NOTE
See “SCSI Bus Length Constraints” to determine the total length of SCSI
cables.
Terminators
The J6000 workstation has auto termination and does not require external termination.
NOTE
Appendix B
The last external device connected to the SCSI bus must be terminated with a
SCSI terminator.
143
SCSI Connections
Appendix Overview
SCSI Configuration Constraints
The number of SCSI devices per bus is limited (see Table B-1 earlier in this appendix).
Before adding another SCSI device, determine if the system can support the additional
device.
SCSI Bus Length Constraints
This section discusses SCSI bus lengths constraints for the SE and LVD SCSI devices.
SE SCSI Bus Length
When the J6000 external SCSI bus is used in single-ended (SE) mode, the maximum cable
length for a SE SCSI bus is 3 meters.
NOTE
When calculating the total SE SCSI cable/bus/trace length used externally,
remember to account for cables connecting external devices together as well
as the bus length internal to those devices.
There are two total cable length specifications you need to consider when dealing with an
SE SCSI bus on a workstation. Note that these specifications are based on the requirement
that the SCSI device being connected to the SE SCSI bus does not exceed the maximum
capacitance of 25 picofarads (pF). Please check with the vendor of the SCSI device if you
are not sure of the device’s maximum capacitance.
The total cable length specifications are as follows:
• For a total of one to four devices being connected to the SE SCSI bus, the total length of
cable used should not exceed 3.0 meters.
• For a total of five to eight devices being connected to the SE SCSI bus, the total length
of cable used should not exceed 1.5 meters.
NOTE
The computer is counted as one of the devices, and the internal length of its
cabling is 0.15 meters. This length needs to be considered in determining the
total cable length.
LVD SCSI Bus Length
When the J6000 external SCSI bus is used in low voltage differential (LVD) mode, the
maximum cable length for an LVD SCSI bus is 12 meters.
NOTE
144
When calculating the total LVD SCSI cable/bus/trace length used externally,
remember to account for cables connecting external devices together as well
as the bus length internal to those devices.
Appendix B
SCSI Connections
Assigning SCSI Device IDs
Assigning SCSI Device IDs
Before assigning a SCSI device ID to a new SCSI device, you need to determine which
SCSI device IDs are available. To view the SCSI IDs already in use, type the following
command at the prompt and press [Enter]:
/usr/sbin/ioscan -f
After a few moments, the ioscan utility lists all of the I/O devices it could find. The list
appears similar to the following:
Class
I H/W Path
Driver
S/W State
H/W Type
Description
============================================================================
bc
0
root
CLAIMED
BUS_NEXUS
bc
1 10
ccio2
CLAIMED
BUS_NEXUS
I/O Adapter
ba
0 10/0
ROPEtoPCI
CLAIMED
BUS_NEXUS
PCI Bus Bridge - ROPEtoPCI
graphics
0 10/0/1/0
graph3
CLAIMED
INTERFACE
PCI(103c1005)
lan
0 10/0/12/0
btlan3
CLAIMED
INTERFACE
PCI(10110019)
audio
0 10/0/13/0
audio
CLAIMED
INTERFACE
Built-in Audio
ext_bus
0 10/0/14/0
side
CLAIMED
INTERFACE
PCI(100b0002)
target
0 10/0/14/0.0
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
0 10/0/14/0.0.0 sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HITACHI CDR-8435 CDROM
target
0 10/0/14/0.7
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
ctl
0 10/0/14/0.7.0 sctl
CLAIMED
DEVICE
Initiator
ba
1 10/0/14/1
superio
CLAIMED
BUS_NEXUS
PCI Core I/O Adapter
tty
0 10/0/14/1/1
asio0
CLAIMED
INTERFACE
Built-in RS-232C
tty
1 10/0/14/1/2
asio0
CLAIMED
INTERFACE
Built-in RS-232C
ext_bus
1 10/0/14/1/3
SCentIf
CLAIMED
INTERFACE
Built-in Parallel Interface
pc
0 10/0/14/1/4
siofdc
CLAIMED
INTERFACE
Built-in Floppy Drive
floppy
0 10/0/14/1/4.1 sioflop
CLAIMED
DEVICE
HP_PC_FDC_FLOPPY
usb
0 10/0/14/2
hcd
CLAIMED
INTERFACE
Built-in USB Interface
usbhub
0 10/0/14/2.1
hub
CLAIMED
DEVICE
USB Root Hub
ext_bus
2 10/0/15/0
c720
CLAIMED
INTERFACE
Ultra2 Wide SCSI Dual Port
target
1 10/0/15/0.7
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
ctl
1 10/0/15/0.7.0 sctl
CLAIMED
DEVICE
Initiator
ext_bus
3 10/0/15/1
c720
CLAIMED
INTERFACE
Ultra2 Wide SCSI Dual Port
target
2 10/0/15/1.6
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
disk
0 10/0/15/1.6.0 sdisk
CLAIMED
DEVICE
SEAGATE ST39102LC
target
3 10/0/15/1.7
tgt
CLAIMED
DEVICE
ctl
2 10/0/15/1.7.0 sctl
CLAIMED
DEVICE
Initiator
ba
2 10/1
ROPEtoPCI CLAIMED
BUS_NEXUS
PCI Bus Bridge - ROPEtoPCI
ba
3 10/2
ROPEtoPCI CLAIMED
BUS_NEXUS
PCI Bus Bridge - ROPEtoPCI
ba
4 10/4
ROPEtoPCI CLAIMED
BUS_NEXUS
PCI Bus Bridge - ROPEtoPCI
ba
5 10/6
ROPEtoPCI CLAIMED
BUS_NEXUS
PCI Bus Bridge - ROPEtoPCI
processor
0 32
processor CLAIMED
PROCESSOR
Processor
processor
1
34
processor CLAIMED
PROCESSOR
Processor
Assigning External SCSI Device IDs
You can determine which SCSI devices are currently in use by looking under the H/W Path
heading in the output from the ioscan command. The entry 10/0/15/0 is the built-in SCSI
bus. For devices connected to the built-in SCSI bus, such as disks, the number between the
two decimals and after the third “/” in the hardware path specifies the SCSI ID for that
device. For example, a hardware path of 10/0/15/0.2.0 specifies an SCSI device at SCSI ID
Appendix B
145
SCSI Connections
Assigning SCSI Device IDs
2. Here is the breakdown of the hardware path:
SCSI device 10/0/15/0.2.0
SCSI 10/0/15/0.2.0
SCSI ID 2 10/0/15/0.2.0
NOTE
Do not use SCSI device ID 7 for any device. It is reserved for the built-in SCSI
bus controller.
Assigning Internal SCSI Device IDs
You can determine which LVD SCSI devices are currently in use by looking under the H/W
Path heading in the output from the ioscan command discussed previously. The entry
10/0/15/1 is the built-in LVD SCSI bus. For devices connected to the built-in LVD SCSI bus,
such as disks, the number between the two decimals and after the third “/” in the hardware
path specifies the SCSI ID for that device. For example, a hardware path of 10/0/15/1.5.0
specifies a LVD SCSI device at SCSI ID 5. Here is the breakdown of the hardware path:
SCSI device10/0/15/1.5.0
LVD SCSI10/0/15/1.5.0
SCSI ID 510/0/15/1.5.0
CAUTION
146
Do not use SCSI device ID 7 for any device. It is reserved for the built-in SCSI
bus controller.
Appendix B
C Related Documentation
This appendix lists the part numbers and titles of documents related to the HP
VISUALIZE J6000 workstations.
147
Related Documentation
Additional Documentation
Additional Documentation
Site Preparation Guide
• A5990-90005 – Site Preparation Guide HP VISUALIZE J6000 Workstations and
Multiple System Configurations
Installation Poster and Getting Started Guide
• A5990-90000 - QuikInstall Poster HP VISUALIZE J6000 Workstation
• A5990-90020 - Getting Started Guide HP VISUALIZE J6000 Workstation
Parts and Replacement Guide and Technical Reference
• A5990-90010 - Technical Reference HP VISUALIZE J6000 Workstation
• A5990-90060 - Parts and Replacement Guide HP VISUALIZE J6000 Workstation
148
Appendix C
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement