Detroit Diesel MBE4000 User manual

Detroit Diesel MBE4000 User manual
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
To the Operator
This guide contains instructions on
the safe operation and preventive
maintenance of your Detroit
Diesel EPA07 MBE 4000 engine.
Maintenance instructions cover
routine engine services such as lube
oil and filter changes in enough detail
to permit self-servicing if desired.
The operator should become familiar
with the contents of this guide before
operating the engine or carrying out
maintenance procedures.
Power-driven equipment is only
as safe as the person operating the
controls. You are urged, as the
operator of this diesel engine, to keep
fingers and clothing away from the
revolving belts, drive shafts, etc. on
engine installation.
Throughout this guide CAUTIONS
regarding personal safety and
NOTICES regarding engine
performance or service life will
appear. To avoid personal injury and
ensure long engine service life, always
heed these instructions.
experienced, trained personnel
to provide prompt preventive
maintenance and skilled engine
repairs.
The information and specifications
in this publication are based on the
information in effect at the time of
approval for printing. Contact an
authorized Detroit Diesel service
outlet for information on the latest
revision. The right is reserved to
make changes at any time without
obligation.
The MBE 4000 engine is built in
accordance with sound technological
principles and based on state-of-the-art
technology.
Despite this, the engine may constitute
a risk of damage to property or injury
to persons if it is not used for its
intended purpose.
The engine should not be modified or
converted in an incorrect manner or
the safety instructions included in this
manual disregarded.
Whenever possible, it will benefit
you to rely on an authorized Detroit
Diesel® service outlet for all your
service needs from maintenance to
major parts replacement. Authorized
service outlets worldwide stock
factory original parts and have
the specialized equipment and
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
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NOTICE:
Coolant must be inhibited with the
recommended SCAs (supplemental
coolant additives) listed in the
How To section of this engine
operator's guide. In addition, the
engine can be equipped with a
coolant filter/inhibitor system as an
installed option or as an after-sale
item. Failure to check and
maintain SCA levels at required
concentrations will result in
severe damage (corrosion) to
the engine cooling system and
related components.
WARRANTY
are registered trademarks of Detroit
Diesel Corporation. Delco Remy®
is a registered trademark of Delco
Remy America, Inc. Bosch® is
a registered trademark of Robert
Bosch Company N.A. Fuel Pro®is
a registered trademarks of Davco
Manufacturing, L.L.C. Nexiq™ is
a trademark of Nexiq Technologies,
Inc. PowerBand® is a registered
trademark of Gates Rubber Company.
Tectyl® is a registered trademark of
Daubert Chemical Company, Inc.
Biobor® is a registered trademark of
United States Borax and Chemical
Corporation. DuPont® is a registered
trademark of E.I. DuPont de Nemours
and Company, Inc. All other
trademarks used are the property of
their respective owners.
The applicable engine warranty is
contained in the booklet “Warranty
Information for MBE 4000 Engines,”
available from authorized Detroit
Diesel service outlets.
Keep this Operator's Guide
with the engine installation at
all times. It contains important
operating, maintenance, and safety
instructions.
Trademark Information
DDC®, Detroit Diesel®, DDEC®,
Optimized Idle®, Diagnostic Link®,
reliabilt®, POWER Trac®, POWER
COOL®, and POWER GUARD®
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................
NON-GENUINE AND REBUILT COMPONENT QUALITY ALERT ..
PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS .....................................................
ENGINE CONVERSIONS AND MODIFICATIONS ..........................
1
1
2
2
CAUTION SUMMARY ..........................................................................
ENGINE OPERATION .....................................................................
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE .......................................................
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM ...................................................................
COOLING SYSTEM .........................................................................
AIR INTAKE SYSTEM ......................................................................
FUEL SYSTEM ................................................................................
STARTING AIDS ..............................................................................
COMPRESSED AIR .........................................................................
LUBRICATING OIL AND FILTERS ..................................................
AFTERTREATMENT SYSTEM ........................................................
3
3
4
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
9
ENGINE IDENTIFICATION ..................................................................
ENGINE COMPONENTS .................................................................
ENGINE MODEL AND SERIAL NUMBER DESIGNATION .............
DETAILS ON THE PLATE ..........................................................
CERTIFICATION LABELS ...............................................................
11
11
16
16
17
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR STARTING THE ENGINE ..........
FIRST TIME START PREPARATION ..............................................
SYSTEM CHECKS ..........................................................................
COOLING SYSTEM CHECKS ....................................................
LUBRICATION SYSTEM CHECKS .............................................
CHECKING THE OIL LEVEL ..................................................
EXTENDED STORAGE ..........................................................
FUEL SYSTEM CHECKS ............................................................
ADDING FUEL ........................................................................
PRIMING THE FUEL SYSTEM ...............................................
OTHER CHECKS ........................................................................
STARTING THE ENGINE-FOR THE FIRST TIME ......................
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18
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18
19
19
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20
22
22
22
24
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
ELECTRIC STARTER .............................................................
RUNNING THE ENGINE .................................................................
OIL PRESSURE ..........................................................................
WARM-UP ...................................................................................
INSPECTION ...............................................................................
TRANSMISSION .....................................................................
FLUID LEAKS .........................................................................
CRANKCASE ..........................................................................
TURBOCHARGER ..................................................................
AVOID UNNECESSARY IDLING .................................................
STOPPING THE ENGINE ................................................................
EMERGENCY JUMP STARTING ....................................................
ROUTINE ENGINE START ..............................................................
STARTING THE ENGINE-ROUTINE ...........................................
CHECKING THE COOLANT LEVEL (COLD CHECK) ................
CHECKING THE COOLANT LEVEL (HOT CHECK) ..................
MONITORING ENGINE OPERATION .............................................
BATTERY CHARGE ....................................................................
OIL PRESSURE ..........................................................................
EXCESSIVE IDLING ...................................................................
CHANGING THE IDLE SPEED .......................................................
SHUTTING DOWN THE ENGINE ...................................................
SHUTTING DOWN AFTER HIGH LOAD OPERATION ...............
EMERGENCY RUNNING MODE ....................................................
STOP ENGINE OVERRIDE OPTION ..............................................
COLD WEATHER OPERATION ......................................................
WINTER FRONTS .......................................................................
25
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
27
27
27
28
29
30
30
31
31
32
32
32
32
33
34
34
35
35
DDEC VI SYSTEM ...............................................................................
MOTOR CONTROL MODULE .........................................................
COMMON POWERTRAIN CONTROLLER .....................................
DDEC FEATURES ...........................................................................
CRUISE CONTROL .....................................................................
DATA RECORDING CAPABILITY ...............................................
ENGINE BRAKES .......................................................................
ENGINE PROTECTION ..............................................................
CALIFORNIA ENGINE IDLE LIMITING .......................................
IDLE SHUTDOWN TIMER ..........................................................
DDEC VI OPERATION .....................................................................
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37
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40
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All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
STOP ENGINE OVERRIDE SWITCH .........................................
IMMEDIATE SPEED REDUCTION .............................................
RED STOP LAMP ........................................................................
DIAGNOSTIC TOOL ....................................................................
FLASHING MALFUNCTION CODES ......................................
43
44
44
44
44
DDEC VI ENGINE DRIVING TIPS .......................................................
ACCELERATING THE VEHICLE .....................................................
CRUISE CONTROL .........................................................................
ENGINE BRAKES AND CRUISE CONTROL ..................................
SHIFTING ........................................................................................
IDLING .............................................................................................
47
47
47
49
49
50
ENGINE BRAKE SYSTEM ..................................................................
EXHAUST BRAKE/CONSTANT-THROTTLE VALVES ....................
ANTI-LOCK BRAKING SYSTEMS ...................................................
DRIVING ON FLAT, DRY PAVEMENT .............................................
DESCENDING A LONG, STEEP GRADE .......................................
DRIVING ON WET OR SLIPPERY PAVEMENT ..............................
51
51
53
53
54
55
ENGINE SYSTEMS .............................................................................
FUEL SYSTEM ................................................................................
LUBRICATION SYSTEM .................................................................
AIR SYSTEM ...................................................................................
COOLING SYSTEM .........................................................................
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM ...................................................................
EXHAUST SYSTEM ........................................................................
EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION SYSTEM ..................................
57
57
57
57
57
58
58
58
AFTERTREATMENT SYSTEM ............................................................
OPERATING REQUIREMENTS ......................................................
PARKED REGENERATION PROCEDURE .....................................
HAZARDOUS APPLICATIONS ...................................................
DPF STATIONARY REGEN ONLY = 0-DISABLED ................
DPF STATIONARY REGEN ONLY = 1-ENABLED .................
SERVICE RECORD .........................................................................
MAINTENANCE ...............................................................................
59
60
60
61
62
62
62
62
DRIVER ACTIONS ............................................................................... 63
INSTRUMENT PANEL LAMPS ........................................................... 65
All information subject to change without notice.
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Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
MAINTENANCE ...................................................................................
SCHEDULED INTERVALS ..............................................................
MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE TYPES .........................................
SEVERE SERVICE .................................................................
SHORT-HAUL .........................................................................
LONG-HAUL ...........................................................................
MAINTENANCE INTERVALS ..................................................
SCHEDULE USE .........................................................................
MAINTENANCE TABLES ................................................................
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE INTERVALS ..................................
ITEM 1 – LUBRICATING OIL FILTER .........................................
ITEM 2 – COOLING SYSTEM .....................................................
ITEM 3 – VALVE LASH CHECKING AND ADJUSTMENT ..........
ITEM 4 – DRIVE BELTS ..............................................................
ITEM 5 – FUEL/WATER SEPARATOR ........................................
ITEM 6 – FUEL FILTERS ............................................................
ITEM 7– AIR SYSTEM ................................................................
ITEM 8– EXHAUST SYSTEM .....................................................
ITEM 9 – AIR COMPRESSOR ....................................................
ITEM 10 – AFTERTREATMENT SYSTEM (ATS) ........................
ITEM 11 – VIBRATION DAMPER ................................................
ITEM 12 – REPTO TORSIONAL DAMPER CHECKING .............
REPTO TORSIONAL DAMPER INSPECTION .......................
REPTO TORSIONAL DAMPER CLEANING ...........................
REQUIRED MAINTENANCE OPERATIONS ...................................
ENGINE INSPECTING ................................................................
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67
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75
76
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HOW-TO SECTION ..............................................................................
HOW TO SELECT LUBRICATING OIL ............................................
LUBRICANT REQUIREMENTS ..................................................
COLD WEATHER STARTING .....................................................
SYNTHETIC OILS .......................................................................
THE USE OF SUPPLEMENTAL ADDITIVES ..............................
WHEN TO CHANGE OIL .............................................................
DISPOSING OF WASTE OIL ..................................................
HOW TO REPLACE THE LUBE OIL AND FILTER .........................
REPLACE LUBRICATING OIL AND FILTER ...............................
HOW TO SELECT DIESEL FUEL ...................................................
QUALITY .....................................................................................
81
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81
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84
84
84
87
87
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All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
FUEL CONTAMINATION ............................................................. 87
BIODIESEL ............................................................................. 88
PROHIBITED ADDITIVES ........................................................... 88
USED LUBRICATING OIL ....................................................... 88
FUEL ADDITIVES WITH SULFUR OR SULFATED ASH ........ 88
GASOLINE .............................................................................. 89
HOW TO REPLACE THE FUEL FILTERS ....................................... 89
REPLACE MAIN FUEL FILTER ELEMENT ................................. 89
FUEL/WATER SEPARATOR PREFILTER ELEMENT
CLEANING .................................................................................. 91
REPLACE DAVCO 382 FUEL PRO®FUEL/WATER SEPARATOR
ELEMENT .................................................................................... 92
REPLACE DAVCO 382/382E FUEL PRO® FUEL FILTER
ELEMENT .................................................................................... 93
ENGINE OUT OF FUEL — HOW TO RESTART ............................. 96
ENGINES WITH FUEL PRO FILTERS ........................................ 96
ENGINE MOUNTED FUEL FILTER ............................................ 96
HOW TO CLEAN THE ENGINE ...................................................... 97
HIGH-PRESSURE CLEANING EQUIPMENT ............................. 97
HOW TO CLEAN THE COOLING SYSTEM .................................... 97
DEGREASING ............................................................................. 98
HOW TO SELECT COOLANT ......................................................... 99
DEFINITIONS .............................................................................. 99
APPROVED COOLANTS ............................................................ 100
ETHYLENE GLYCOL / WATER + CONVENTIONAL
CORROSION INHIBITOR, PROPYLENE GLYCOL / WATER
+ CONVENTIONAL CORROSION INHIBITOR ....................... 101
MIXING EG OR PG ANTIFREEZE AND WATER ................... 102
RECYCLED ANTIFREEZE .................................................... 103
ETHYLENE GLYCOL / WATER + OAT INHIBITOR,
PROPYLENE GLYCOL / WATER + OAT INHIBITOR ............. 103
WATER ONLY + SCA, WATER ONLY + OAT INHIBITOR ..... 104
WATER REQUIREMENTS ...................................................... 105
COOLANTS NOT RECOMMENDED .......................................... 105
ALL ANTIFREEZES AND COOLANTS CONTAINING
PHOSPHATE ........................................................................... 105
AUTOMOTIVE TYPE COOLANTS .......................................... 106
METHYL ALCOHOL-BASED ANTIFREEZE ........................... 106
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
GLYCOL-BASED COOLANTS FORMULATED FOR HVAC ...
ADDITIVES NOT RECOMMENDED ...........................................
SOLUBLE OILS .......................................................................
CHROMATES ..........................................................................
COOLANT INHIBITOR TEST INTERVALS .................................
SUPPLEMENTAL COOLANT ADDITIVES FOR FULLY
FORMULATED COOLANT ......................................................
MAINTENANCE INTERVALS ..................................................
SCA TEST PROCEDURES .........................................................
NEED RELEASE COOLANT FILTERS (NON-OAT SYSTEMS) .
DROPOUT ...................................................................................
COOLANT EXTENDER INHIBITOR ADDITIVE FOR “OAT”
COOLANT ...................................................................................
OAT COOLANT DRAIN INTERVAL ........................................
CHRONIC COOLANT SYSTEM PROBLEMS .............................
DETROIT DIESEL COOLING SYSTEM MAINTENANCE
PRODUCTS .................................................................................
POWER COOL SCAS .............................................................
POWER COOL COOLANT FILTER ELEMENTS ....................
POWER COOL CLEANERS ...................................................
SUMMARY OF COOLANT RECOMMENDATIONS ....................
COOLANT LIFE OF GLYCOL COOLANT ...............................
COOLANT LIFE OF OAT COOLANT ......................................
COOLANT LIFE OF OTHER COOLANTS ..............................
COOLANT FLUSHING AND CHANGING ...................................
COOLING SYSTEM INSPECTING .............................................
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113
114
115
115
115
116
117
TROUBLESHOOTING ......................................................................... 118
ENGINE STORAGE .............................................................................
PREPARING ENGINE FOR STORAGE ..........................................
TEMPORARY STORAGE (30 DAYS OR LESS) .........................
EXTENDED STORAGE (MORE THAN 30 DAYS) ......................
PROCEDURE FOR RESTORING TO SERVICE AN ENGINE
THAT HAS BEEN IN EXTENDED STORAGE .............................
131
131
131
132
135
CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE ................................................................. 137
ROAD SERVICE IN THE U.S. OR CANADA ................................... 139
WORKING WITH DETROIT DIESEL SERVICE OUTLETS ............ 139
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Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
STEP ONE ................................................................................... 140
STEP TWO .................................................................................. 140
STEP THREE .............................................................................. 140
SPECIFICATIONS ................................................................................
FUEL AND LUBRICATING OIL FILTERS ........................................
OIL PAN CAPACITY ....................................................................
POWER COOL ENGINE PRODUCTS ............................................
POWER COOL FULLY FORMULATED IEG COOLANT .............
POWER COOL 2000 AND 3000 SUPPLEMENTAL COOLANT
ADDITIVE ....................................................................................
POWER COOL 3000 SUPPLEMENTAL ADDITIVE COOLANT
FILTERS ......................................................................................
POWER COOL SUPPLEMENTAL ADDITIVE NEED RELEASE
COOLANT FILTERS ....................................................................
POWER COOL PLUS EXTENDED LIFE OAT COOLANT ..........
POWER COOL PLUS EXTENDER FOR USE WITH POWER
COOL PLUS OAT COOLANT ......................................................
POWER COOL COOLING SYSTEM CLEANERS ......................
POWER TRAC COOLANT TESTING AND ANALYSIS
PRODUCTS .................................................................................
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
INTRODUCTION
This guide is intended for use
by the operator of an MBE 4000
diesel engine used in the following
applications:
□ On-Highway Vehicles
□ Fire Truck or Crash/Rescue
Vehicles
Non-Genuine and Rebuilt
Component Quality Alert
Electronic engine controls have
been instrumental in aiding engine
manufacturers in meeting the stringent
emission requirements of the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency
(U.S. EPA) and the California Air
Resources Board (CARB) and
also in meeting the ever-increasing
performance demands of the customer.
Maintenance procedures must
be followed in order to continue
satisfactory performance and
durability and to ensure coverage of
the engine under the manufacturer's
warranty. Many of these maintenance
procedures also ensure that the
engine continues to comply with
applicable emissions standards.
Proper maintenance procedures, using
specific components engineered to
comply with emissions regulations,
may be performed by an authorized
Detroit Diesel distributor or dealer,
an independent outlet or the operator
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
or owner. The owner is responsible
for determining the suitability of
components to maintain emissions
compliance during the engine's useful
emission life.
Detroit Diesel cautions that the
indiscriminate rebuilding of precision
components, without the benefit of
specifications, specialized equipment,
and knowledge of the electronic
operating system, will jeopardize
performance or lead to more serious
problems, and can take the engine
outside of compliance with U.S. EPA
or CARB emissions standards.
There are other components in
an engine, such as turbocharger,
camshaft, piston, etc., which
are specifically designed and
manufactured to exacting standards
for emissions compliance. It is
important that these components, if
replaced, modified or substituted, can
be verified to ensure that the engine
remains in compliance with emissions
standards. The use of inadequately
engineered, manufactured or tested
components in repair or rebuild of
the engine may be in violation of the
federal Clean Air Act and applicable
U.S. EPA or CARB regulations.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
1
INTRODUCTION
Furthermore, modern engines exhibit
operating parameters which require
the use of proper fluids, such as
fuel, coolant and lubricating oil, to
maintain long engine life. The use of
fluids that do not meet Detroit Diesel
specifications may result in early wear
out or engine failure.
Personnel Requirements
Work on the engine should be carried
out only by skilled technicians who
have been instructed in the specific
skills necessary for the type of work
being performed.
Engine Conversions and
Modifications
The function and safety of the engine
could be affected if unauthorized
modifications are made to it. Detroit
Diesel will not accept responsibility
for any resulting damage.
Tampering with the fuel injection
system and engine electronics could
also affect the engine's power output or
exhaust emission levels. Compliance
with the manufacturer's settings
and with statutory environmental
protection regulations cannot then be
guaranteed.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
CAUTION SUMMARY
The following cautions must be
observed by the operator of the
vehicle or equipment in which this
engine is installed and/or by those
performing basic engine preventive
maintenance. Failure to read and
heed these cautions and exercise
reasonable care for personal safety
and the safety of others when
operating the vehicle/equipment
or performing basic engine
preventive maintenance may result
in personal injury and engine
and/or vehicle/equipment damage..
Engine Operation
Observe the following cautions when
operating the engine.
FIRE
To avoid injury from fire, keep all
potential ignition sources away
from diesel fuel, including open
flames, sparks, and electrical
resistance heating elements. Do
not smoke when refueling.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
HOT EXHAUST
During parked regeneration the
exhaust gases will be extremely
HOT and could cause a fire
if directed at combustible
materials. The vehicle must be
parked outside.
PERSONAL INJURY
Diesel engine exhaust and some
of its constituents are known to
the State of California to cause
cancer, birth defects, and other
reproductive harm.
□ Always start and operate an
engine in a well ventilated
area.
□ If operating an engine in
an enclosed area, vent the
exhaust to the outside.
□ Do not modify or tamper
with the exhaust system or
emission control system.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
3
CAUTION SUMMARY
Preventive Maintenance
Observe the following cautions when
performing preventative maintenance.
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury when working
near or on an operating engine
equipped with an hydraulic
clutch fan, remove loose items
of clothing and jewelry. Tie back
or contain long hair that could
be caught in any moving part
causing injury. The hydraulic fan
may start without warning.
HOT OIL
To avoid injury from hot oil, do
not operate the engine with the
rocker cover(s) removed.
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from slipping and
falling, immediately clean up any
spilled liquids.
USED ENGINE OIL
HOT COOLANT
To avoid scalding from the
expulsion of hot coolant, never
remove the cooling system
pressure cap while the engine is
at operating temperature. Wear
adequate protective clothing
(face shield, rubber gloves,
apron, and boots). Remove the
cap slowly to relieve pressure.
To avoid injury to skin from
contact with the contaminants in
used engine oil, wear protective
gloves and apron.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
PERSONAL INJURY
FIRE
To avoid injury from the
projection of tools or other
objects that may fall on or behind
the vibration damper of an
engine, always check and remove
these items before starting the
engine.
To avoid injury from combustion
of heated lubricating-oil vapors,
stop the engine immediately if an
oil leak is detected.
FIRE
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from contact
with rotating parts when an
engine is operating with the air
inlet piping removed, install an
air inlet screen shield over the
turbocharger air inlet. The shield
prevents contact with rotating
parts.
To avoid injury from fire, do not
smoke or allow open flames when
working on an operating engine.
FIRE
To avoid injury from fire from a
buildup of volatile vapors, keep
the engine area well ventilated
during operation.
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury when using
caustic cleaning agents, follow
the chemical manufacturers
usage, disposal, and safety
instructions.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
5
CAUTION SUMMARY
Electrical System
Observe the following cautions when
jump starting an engine, charging a
battery, or working with the vehicle
electrical system.
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from accidental
engine startup while servicing
the engine, disconnect/disable
the starting system.
Battery Explosion and Acid Burn
To avoid injury from battery
explosion or contact with battery
acid, work in a well ventilated
area, wear protective clothing,
and avoid sparks or flames near
the battery. If you come in contact
with battery acid:
□ Flush your skin with water.
□ Apply baking soda or lime to
help neutralize the acid.
□ Flush your eyes with water.
□ Get medical attention
immediately.
Electrical Shock
To avoid injury from electrical
shock, use care when connecting
battery cables. The magnetic
switch studs are at battery
voltage.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
ELECTRICAL SHOCK
To avoid injury from electrical
shock, do not touch battery
terminals, alternator terminals, or
wiring cables while the engine is
operating.
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Cooling System
Air Intake System
Observe the following cautions when
servicing the cooling system.
Observe the following cautions when
working on the air intake system.
HOT COOLANT
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid scalding from the
expulsion of hot coolant, never
remove the cooling system
pressure cap while the engine is
at operating temperature. Wear
adequate protective clothing
(face shield, rubber gloves,
apron, and boots). Remove the
cap slowly to relieve pressure.
To avoid injury from hot surfaces,
wear protective gloves, or allow
engine to cool before removing
any component.
PERSONAL INJURY
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from slipping and
falling, immediately clean up any
spilled liquids.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
To avoid injury from contact
with rotating parts when an
engine is operating with the air
inlet piping removed, install an
air inlet screen shield over the
turbocharger air inlet. The shield
prevents contact with rotating
parts.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
7
CAUTION SUMMARY
Fuel System
Observe the following cautions when
fueling the vehicle or working with
the fuel system.
FIRE
To avoid injury from fire caused
by heated diesel-fuel vapors:
□ Keep those people who are not
directly involved in servicing
away from the engine.
PERSONAL INJURY
□ Stop the engine immediately if
a fuel leak is detected.
To avoid injury from fuel spills,
do not overfill the fuel tank.
□ Do not smoke or allow open
flames when working on an
operating engine.
FIRE
To avoid injury from fire, contain
and eliminate leaks of flammable
fluids as they occur. Failure to
eliminate leaks could result in
fire.
□ Wear adequate protective
clothing (face shield,
insulated gloves and apron,
etc.).
□ To prevent a buildup of
potentially volatile vapors,
keep the engine area well
ventilated during operation.
Starting Aids
FIRE
To avoid injury from fire, keep all
potential ignition sources away
from diesel fuel, including open
flames, sparks, and electrical
resistance heating elements. Do
not smoke when refueling.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Compressed Air
Observe the following cautions when
using compressed air.
FIRE
To avoid injury from fire, do not
smoke or allow open flames when
working on an operating engine.
EYE INJURY
To avoid injury from flying debris
when using compressed air, wear
adequate eye protection (face
shield or safety goggles) and do
not exceed 276 kPa (40 psi) air
pressure.
Lubricating Oil and Filters
Observe the following cautions when
replacing the engine lubricating oil
and filters.
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from slipping and
falling, immediately clean up any
spilled liquids.
FIRE
To avoid injury from fire from a
buildup of volatile vapors, keep
the engine area well ventilated
during operation.
Aftertreatment System
Observe the following cautions when
servicing the A·ertreatment System
(ATS). Be advised that these two labels
are attached to the Aftertreatment
Device (ATD).
FIRE
To avoid injury from combustion
of heated lubricating-oil vapors,
stop the engine immediately if an
oil leak is detected.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
9
CAUTION SUMMARY
Figure 1
Hot Surfaces External and Internal Caution
Figure 2
Heavy Aftertreatment Device Caution
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
ENGINE IDENTIFICATION
The MBE 4000 engine has a
certification label, engine model and
serial number for identification.
Engine Components
For a general view of the MBE 4000
engine, showing major components,
see Figure 3 for the left-hand side,
and Figure 4 for the right-hand side.
See Figure 5 for left side sensor
locations and see Figure 6 for right
side sensor locations.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
11
ENGINE IDENTIFICATION
1. Fuel Pump
9. Air Intake Manifold
2. Intake Throttle Valve
10. Fuel Filter Bracket
3. Air Intake Elbow
11. Fuel Filter and Lines
4. Alternator & A/C Mounting Bracket
12. Doser Block Assembly
5. Gas Mixer Housing
13. Engine Harness
6. Smart Injector Adaptor Frame
(Internal)
14. MCM
7. Constant Throttle Valve (Internal)
15. Dipstick and Oil Fill
8. Electrostatic Crankcase Breather
Figure 3
12
Major Engine Components, Left Side
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
1. Air Intake Elbow
8. EGR Cooler Bracket
2. Turbocharger
9. Grid Heater
3. Fuel Doser Valve
10. EGR Valve
4. Flywheel Housing
11. EGR Coolant Return
5. Hot EGR Cooler Pipe
12. Coolant Outlet
6. Exhaust Manifold
13. Coolant Inlet
7. EGR Cooler
14. Front Mount
Figure 4
Major Engine Components, Right Side
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
13
ENGINE IDENTIFICATION
1. Fuel Temperature Sensor
5. Fuel Compensation Pressure
Sensor
2. Intake Throttle Valve
6. Fuel Cut-off
3. Intake Manifold Pressure/Temperature Sensor
7. Fuel Line Pressure Sensor
4. Doser Block Asembly
Figure 5
14
Left Side Sensor Locations
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
1. EPV-1
4. EGR Delta-P Sensorr
2. Wastegate Actuator
5. Oil Pressure/Temperature Sensor
3. Turbocharger Pressure/Temperature Sensor
Figure 6
Right Side Sensor Locations
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
15
ENGINE IDENTIFICATION
Engine Model And Serial
Number Designation
The fourteen-digit engine model and
serial number is located on the left
front of the engine cylinder block, on
the DDEC-MCM label and on the oil
filter housing on the right-hand side of
the engine. See Figure 7.
and serial number contains the type
reference followed by a sequential
manufacturing number. The last six
digits of the engine model and serial
number is the serial number for the
engine. See Figure 8.
Figure 8
Figure 7
Engine Type Plate
Location of Engine Type
Plate
Details on the Plate
The engine type reference, OM 460
LA, is the production code. The first
three numbers of the engine serial
number are the engine series number,
the next three number are the engine
model number. See Figure 8.
The engine type reference and the
complete engine model and serial
number appears beside the name
of the manufacturer. The engine
type reference, OM 460 LA is the
production code. The engine model
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Certification Labels
The MBE 4000 engine complies
with all United States Environmental
Protection Agency (USEPA) and
California Air Resources Board
Figure 9
(CARB) emission standards. An
emission label is attached to the
cylinder head cover, as required by
law. See Figure 9.
Emission Label, MBE 4000
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
17
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR STARTING THE ENGINE
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR STARTING THE
ENGINE
Following are instructions for starting
the engine.
First Time Start
Preparation
When preparing to start a new or
newly overhauled engine which has
been in storage, perform all of the
operations listed below. Also refer to
the “ENGINE STORAGE” section
of this guide. Failure to follow these
instructions may result in serious
engine damage.
Be sure you are familiar with all of
the instruments, gauges and controls
which are needed to operate the
engine.
the engine overheats, uses excessive
fuel or lubricating oil, vibrates,
misfires, makes unusual noises, or
shows an unusual loss of power, turn
the engine off as soon as possible and
determine the cause of the problem.
Engine damage may be avoided by a
quick response to early indications of
problems.
When starting the engine in
cold weather, refer to “How to
Select Coolant” in the “HOW-TO
SECTION” of this guide.
System Checks
Perform the following system checks
before starting for the first time.
Note especially the location and
function of the following:
Cooling System Checks
□ Oil pressure gauge
Check the cooling system as follows:
□ Low oil pressure warning light
□ Coolant temperature gauge
□ High coolant temperature warning
light
□ Water in fuel warning light
□ Tachometer
□ Air restriction indicator
Watch for any signs of engine
problems when starting or driving. If
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
1. Make sure all drain cocks in
the cooling system are installed
(drain cocks are often removed
for shipping) and are closed
tightly.
2. Remove the radiator pressure
control cap and fill with genuine
Detroit Diesel POWER COOL®
antifreeze or an equivalent
quality ethylene glycol (EG)
or propylene glycol (PG) base
antifreeze solution in the required
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
concentration. In extremely
hot environments, properly
inhibited water may be used in
the summer. Keep the coolant
level at the bottom of the filler
neck to allow for expansion of
the coolant. For more detailed
recommendations, Refer to
“How to Select Coolant” in the
“HOW-TO SECTION” of this
guide.
3. Entrapped air must be purged
after filling the cooling system.
To do this, allow the engine to
warm up with the pressure cap
removed. With the transmission
in neutral, increase engine speed
above 1,000 rpm and add coolant
to the radiator as required.
4. Check to make sure the front
of the radiator and air-to-air
charge cooler (if equipped) are
unblocked and free of debris.
NOTICE:
Insufficient lubrication at startup can
cause serious damage to engine
components.
To insure an immediate flow of
oil to all bearing surfaces at initial
engine startup, the engine lubrication
system should be charged with a
commercially available pressure
pre-lubricator. If this is impractical,
rocker covers should be removed and
clean lubricating oil should be poured
over the rocker arms. The oil should
be the same weight and viscosity
as that used in the crankcase. After
pre-lubricating, add additional oil to
bring the level to the proper mark on
the dipstick.
For lubricant recommendation,
Refer to “How to Select Lubricating
Oil” in the “HOW-TO SECTION” of
this guide.
Lubrication System Checks
The lubricating oil film on the rotating
parts and bearings of a new or newly
overhauled engine, or one which has
been in storage for six months or
more, may be insufficient when the
engine is started for the first time.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Checking the Oil Level — Check
the oil level as follows:
1. Check the oil level using the oil
dipstick (See Figure 10).
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
19
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR STARTING THE ENGINE
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from slipping and
falling, immediately clean up any
spilled liquids.
Extended Storage — An engine
in storage for an extended period
of time (over winter, for example)
may accumulate water in the oil
pan through normal condensation of
moisture (always present in the air)
on the cold, internal surfaces of the
engine.
NOTICE:
Failure to eliminate water-diluted
lubricating oil may lead to serious
engine damage at startup.
Figure 10
Oil Dipstick
2. If necessary, top off by filling
engine oil through the oil fill tube
(See Figure 11) to the maximum
fill level on the oil dipstick. Do
not overfill.
Figure 11
20
Oil Fill Tube
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Lube oil diluted by water cannot
provide adequate bearing protection
at engine startup. For this reason,
Detroit Diesel recommends replacing
the engine lubricating oil and filters
after extended storage.
Fuel System Checks
Fill the tanks with the recommended
fuel. Keeping tanks full reduces water
condensation and helps keep fuel
cool, which is important to engine
performance. Full tanks also reduce
the chance for microbe (black slime)
growth. For fuel recommendations,
Refer to “How to Select Diesel Fuel”
in the “HOW-TO SECTION” of this
guide. Make sure the fuel shutoff
valve (if used) is open.
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
NOTICE:
NOTICE:
Prolonged use of the starting motor
and engine fuel pump to prime the
fuel system can result in damage to
the starter, fuel pump and injectors.
Engines equipped with starting
devices dependent on compressed
air or gas reservoirs should always
be primed before initial startup.
Otherwise, reserve pressure can
be exhausted and injectors may be
damaged from lack of lubrication
and cooling.
This may cause erratic engine
operation due to the amount of air
in the lines and filters from the fuel
supply tank to the cylinder head
NOTICE:
Under no circumstances should
a starting aid such as ether be
used to run the engine until the
fuel system is primed. Injector
damage will result if this method
is used.
To insure prompt starting and even
running, the fuel system must
be primed if air has entered the fuel
system. Priming is done by connecting
a manual or electric priming pump to
the secondary fuel filter adaptor.
If an external starting aid is used, the
heat generated by the external fuel
source will cause the injector tips to
be damaged when the fuel cools them.
The injector plunger and bushing
can be scored from running without
lubrication.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
21
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR STARTING THE ENGINE
Authorized Detroit Diesel service
outlets are properly equipped and have
the trained technicians to perform this
service.
Priming is not normally required if
the filter elements are filled with clean
fuel when installed and the lines are
not drained of fuel.
If the engine is equipped with a
fuel/water separator, drain off any
water that has accumulated. Water
in fuel can seriously affect engine
performance and may cause engine
damage. Detroit Diesel recommends
installation of a fuel/water separator
wherever water contamination is a
concern.
Adding Fuel — When adding fuel,
pay attention to the following:
separator, work the hand pump
until resistance is felt.
NOTE:
There should be a strong resistance
in the hand pump, caused by the
pressure buildup within the fuel
system.
2. Crank the engine for 30 seconds
at a time, but no longer. Wait at
least two minutes. The engine
should start within four 30-second
attempts.
Other Checks
Make sure the transmission is
filled to the proper level with the
fluid recommended by the gear
manufacturer. Do not overfill.
□ Add winter or summer grade fuel
according to the season of the
year.
□ Work in the cleanest conditions
possible.
□ Prevent water from entering the
fuel tank.
For further information, Refer to the
“HOW-TO SECTION” of this guide.
Priming the Fuel System —
Prime the fuel system as follows:
1. If equipped with a hand pump
on the fuel filter or fuel/water
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Battery Explosion and Acid Burn
To avoid injury from battery
explosion or contact with battery
acid, work in a well ventilated
area, wear protective clothing,
and avoid sparks or flames near
the battery. If you come in contact
with battery acid:
Manufacturer
Lubricant or
Part Number
Shell Oil Co.
No. 71032; No.
71306
Texaco, Inc.
No. 955
Quaker State
No. NYK-77
Table 1
Approved Electrical
Lubricants
Figure 12
Maintenance-Free
Battery “Eye”
□ Flush your skin with water.
□ Apply baking soda or lime to
help neutralize the acid.
□ Flush your eyes with water.
□ Get medical attention
immediately.
Make sure cable connections to
the storage batteries are clean and
tight. Check the hydrometer “eye” of
maintenance-free batteries for charge.
See Figure 12.
If lead-acid or low-maintenance
batteries are used, make sure battery
electrolyte level is normal.
Use only batteries that have been
correctly filled and serviced. To
provide corrosion protection, apply
dielectric grease liberally to the
terminal pads. Approved suppliers are
Listed in Table 1.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Check the turbocharger for signs of
oil or exhaust leaks. Leaks should be
corrected before starting the engine.
Check engine mounting bolts for
tightness. Bolts should be retightened,
if necessary.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
23
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR STARTING THE ENGINE
Starting the Engine-For The
First Time
Before starting the engine the first
time, perform the operations listed in
the System Checks section.
NOTICE:
To start an MBE 4000 engine, make
sure the transmission is in neutral and
turn the ignition key on.
ENGINE EXHAUST
The turbocharger may be seriously
damaged if the engine is cranked
with the air shutdown in the closed
position.
To avoid injury from inhaling
engine exhaust, always operate
the engine in a well-ventilated
area. Engine exhaust is toxic.
The engine may require the use of a
cold weather starting aid if the ambient
temperature is below 4°C (40°F).
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury when working
near or on an operating engine,
remove loose items of clothing
and jewelry. Tie back or contain
long hair that could be caught in
any moving part causing injury.
FLAMES, EXPLOSION AND
TOXICITY
To avoid injury from flames,
explosion, and toxicants when
using ether, the following
precautions must be taken:
□ Do not smoke when servicing
ether system.
□ Work in well ventilated area.
□ Do not work near open flames,
pilot flames (gas or oil
heaters), or sparks.
□ Do not weld or carry an open
flame near the ether system if
you smell ether or otherwise
suspect a leak.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
You will notice that both the Amber
Warning Lamp (AWL)/Check Engine
and the Red Stop Lamp (RSL)/Stop
Engine will come on. This is the
result of the Detroit Diesel Electronic
Controls (DDEC®) diagnosing
the system to ensure everything is
functional, including the light bulbs
for the warning lights. If everything
is OK, both lights will go out in
approximately five seconds.
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Start the engine after the lights go
out. If starting a vehicle, start the
engine with foot off the foot pedal.
NOTICE:
If the warning lights stay on, or
do not come on momentarily after
turning on the ignition, contact
the Detroit Diesel Customer
Support Center at 313–592–5800.
Operating the engine under these
circumstances may result in engine
damage.
Electric Starter — Start an engine
equipped with an electric starting
motor as follows:
NOTICE:
To prevent serious starting motor
damage, do not press the starter
switch again after the engine has
started.
3. If the engine doesn't start after
30 seconds, stop. Try again after
waiting two minutes. The engine
should start within four 30-second
attempts.
NOTICE:
Do not rev the engine if the oil
pressure gauge indicates no
oil pressure. To avoid engine
damage, shut down the engine
within approximately ten seconds.
Check to determine the cause of the
problem.
4. Monitor the oil pressure gauge
immediately after starting the
engine.
NOTE:
Do not place the engine under full load
until it reaches operating temperature.
Important: At outside temperatures
below –25°C (–13°F), a coolant
preheater is recommended.
1. Chock the tires, place the
transmission in neutral, and set
the parking brake.
2. With foot OFF the foot pedal,
turn on the ignition switch and
start the engine
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
25
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR STARTING THE ENGINE
Running the Engine
Inspection
While the engine is operating, monitor
the battery charge indicator light,
the oil pressure and avoid excessive
idling.
While the engine is idling, inspect the
transmission, check for fluid leaks,
check the crankcase and turbocharger.
Oil Pressure
Observe the oil pressure gage
immediately after starting the engine.
A good indicator that all moving parts
are getting lubrication is when the
oil pressure gage registers pressure
(7 psi or 50 kPa at idle speed). If
no pressure is indicated within 10
to 15 seconds, stop the engine and
check the lubrication system. The
pressure should not drop below 36 psi
or 250 kPa at 1800 rpm, and normal
operating pressure should be higher. If
oil pressure does not fall within these
guidelines, it should be checked with
a manual gage.
HOT OIL
To avoid injury from hot oil, do
not operate the engine with the
rocker cover(s) removed.
Warm-up
Run the engine at part throttle for
about five minutes to allow it to warm
up before applying a load.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Transmission — While the
engine is idling, check the automatic
transmission (if equipped) for proper
oil level and add oil as required.
Fluid Leaks — Look for coolant,
fuel or lubricating oil leaks. If any
are found, shut down the engine
immediately and have the leaks
repaired after the engine has cooled.
Crankcase — If the engine oil
was replaced, stop the engine after
normal operating temperature has
been reached. Allow the oil to drain
back into the crankcase for about
twenty minutes, then check the oil
level. If necessary, add oil to bring
the level to the proper mark on the
dipstick. Use only the heavy-duty
oils recommended. Refer to ”How to
Select Lubricating Oil” in this guide.
Turbocharger — Make a visual
inspection of the turbocharger for
oil leaks, exhaust leaks, excessive
noise or vibration. Stop the engine
immediately if a leak or unusual noise
or vibration is noted. Do not restart
the engine until the cause of the
concern has been investigated and
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
corrected. Authorized Detroit Diesel
service outlets are properly equipped
to perform this service.
Avoid Unnecessary Idling
Whenever possible, avoid unnecessary
idling.
Never allow the engine to idle for
more than 30 minutes. Excessive
idling can cause oil to leak from the
turbocharger.
During long engine idling periods
with the transmission in neutral, the
engine coolant temperature may fall
below the normal operating range.
The incomplete combustion of fuel
in a cold engine will cause crankcase
oil dilution, formation of lacquer or
gummy deposits on the valves, pistons,
and rings, and rapid accumulation of
sludge in the engine. When prolonged
idling is necessary, maintain at least
850 rpm spring/summer and 1200 rpm
fall/winter.
NOTICE:
Stopping a turbocharged engine
immediately after high-speed
operation without allowing a
sufficient cool-down period may
cause damage to the turbocharger,
as it will continue to turn without an
oil supply to the bearings.
2. Allow the engine to run between
idle and 1000 rpm with no load
for four or five minutes. This
allows the engine to cool and
permits the turbocharger to slow
down. After four or five minutes,
shut down the engine.
Emergency Jump Starting
The DDEC VI system operates on 12
volts DC. If a DDEC VI engine with
an electric starting motor requires
emergency jump starting, do not
exceed 16 volts DC.
Stopping the Engine
Stop an engine under normal operating
conditions as follows:
1. Reduce engine speed to idle and
put all shift levers in the neutral
position.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
27
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR STARTING THE ENGINE
BATTERY EXPLOSION
To avoid injury from battery
explosion when jump starting the
engine, do not attach the cable
end to the negative terminal of
the disabled battery.
Before attempting to jump start the
engine, make sure the jumper cables
are connected properly (positive to
positive, negative to negative ground)
and in the proper sequence (negative
to negative ground last).
Battery Explosion and Acid Burn
NOTICE:
Jump starting with voltages greater
than those indicated or reversing
battery polarity may damage the
MCM.
To avoid injury from battery
explosion or contact with battery
acid, work in a well ventilated
area, wear protective clothing,
and avoid sparks or flames near
the battery. If you come in contact
with battery acid:
□ Flush your skin with water.
NOTICE:
Failure to connect jumper cables
in the proper sequence can result
in alternator and/or equipment
damage.
□ Apply baking soda or lime to
help neutralize the acid.
□ Flush your eyes with water.
□ Get medical attention
immediately.
Routine Engine Start
Following are procedures for a routine
everyday engine start.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
ENGINE EXHAUST
To avoid injury from inhaling
engine exhaust, always operate
the engine in a well-ventilated
area. Engine exhaust is toxic.
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury when working
near or on an operating engine,
remove loose items of clothing
and jewelry. Tie back or contain
long hair that could be caught in
any moving part causing injury.
Starting the Engine-Routine
Before a routine start, Refer tothe
“Maintenance” section and see the
daily checks for your engine.
Important: Before starting the
engine, carefully read all operating
instructions in this manual and do all
the recommended pretrip inspections
and daily maintenance. Check the
engine oil and fuel levels, and drain
contaminants from the fuel/water
separator (optional).
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
NOTE:
If you drain the fuel/water separator
completely, you may have to prime the
fuel system.
NOTE:
As a safety function, the electronic
engine control system may be wired to
start the engine only If the transmission
is in neutral. This is vehicle application
specific.
NOTICE:
Never attempt to start the MBE
4000 electronic engine using ether
or any other starting fluid. Serious
engine damage could result.
1. Turn on the ignition switch.
2. With the accelerator pedal in the
idle position, start the engine. If
the engine doesn't start after 30
seconds, stop. Try again after
waiting two minutes. The engine
should start within four 30-second
attempts.
3. Check the engine for leaks.
[a] Check all hoses, hose clamps,
and pipe unions on the engine
for tightness. Shut down the
engine and tighten them if
necessary.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
29
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR STARTING THE ENGINE
[b] Check the oil feed and return
lines at the turbocharger for
tightness. Shut down the
engine and tighten them if
necessary.
4. Shut down the engine.
5. Approximately five minutes after
shutdown, check the engine oil
level. If necessary, add oil up to
the maximum fill level on the oil
dipstick.(See Figure 13). Do not
overfill.
the radiator outlet pipe are secure
and tight.
2. Check the coolant level. The
cooling system is correctly filled
when the coolant is between the
maximum and minimum marks
on the surge tank.
NOTE:
For more information, Refer to the
“Maintenance” section.
Checking the Coolant Level (Hot
Check)
Check the coolant levels as follows:
1. Allow the engine to run for
approximately five minutes at a
moderate speed.
Figure 13
Oil Dipstick
6. Check all the mounting fasteners
on the engine for tightness.
Checking the Coolant Level
(Cold Check)
Check coolant level as follows:
1. Ensure that all coolant plugs in
the bottom of the radiator and on
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Battery Charge
HOT COOLANT
To avoid scalding from the
expulsion of hot coolant, never
remove the cooling system
pressure cap while the engine is
at operating temperature. Wear
adequate protective clothing
(face shield, rubber gloves,
apron, and boots). Remove the
cap slowly to relieve pressure.
2. Then, with the coolant
temperature above 50°C (122°F),
recheck the coolant level.
3. Add more coolant if necessary.
Open the heater valves (if
equipped) before adding coolant.
4. Do not close the heater valves
until the engine has been run
briefly and the coolant level
again checked and corrected as
necessary.
Monitoring Engine
Operation
While the engine is operating, monitor
the battery charge indicator light,
the oil pressure and avoid excessive
idling.
The battery charge indicator light
(See Figure 14) must go out once the
engine starts.
Figure 14
Battery Charge Indicator
Light
If the indicator light comes on
while the engine is running, do the
following:
FIRE
To avoid injury from fire, keep all
potential ignition sources away
from diesel fuel, including open
flames, sparks, and electrical
resistance heating elements. Do
not smoke when refueling.
1. Shut down the engine.
2. Check the poly-V belt for
tightness.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
31
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR STARTING THE ENGINE
3. Do a load test on the batteries.
Charge or replace the batteries as
needed.
4. If necessary, visit the nearest
authorized dealer to have the
alternator voltage and output
checked.
1. Turn the cruise control switch to
the OFF position.
2. To increase the idle speed, push
the "Resume" switch until the idle
is fast enough.
3. To decrease the idle speed, push
the "Decel" switch until the idle
is slow enough.
Oil Pressure
Shutting Down the Engine
When the engine has reached its
normal operating temperature, the
engine oil pressure must not drop
below the following values:
If the engine has been running at full
output or the coolant temperature has
been high, allow the engine to idle
for one or two minutes without load.
Then turn off the ignition key switch.
□ 250 kPa (36 psi) at rated speed
□ 50 kPa (7 psi) at idling speed
If oil pressure drops below these
values, stop the engine and determine
the cause.
Excessive Idling
Never allow the engine to idle for
more than 30 minutes. Excessive
idling can cause oil to leak from the
turbocharger.
If any of the following occur, shut
down the engine immediately.
□ The oil pressure swings back and
forth or falls sharply.
□ Engine power and rpm fall, even
though the accelerator pedal
remains steady.
□ The exhaust pipe gives off heavy
smoke.
□ The coolant and/or oil temperature
climb abnormally.
Changing the Idle Speed
The rpm range of the MBE 4000
engine is 600 to 850 rpm if the
parameters in the Common Powertrain
Controller (CPC) are set to the default
range.
□ Abnormal sounds suddenly occur
in the engine or turbocharger.
Change the idle speed as follows:
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Shutting Down After High Load
Operation
After high load operation, do the
following:
NOTICE:
After high load operation, if the
engine has been running at full
output or the coolant temperature
has been high, allow the engine to
idle for one or two minutes without
load. Shutting down the engine
without idling may cause damage to
the turbocharger.
Turn off the ignition switch and shut
down the engine.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
33
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR STARTING THE ENGINE
Emergency Running Mode
The engine is equipped with the
electronic engine control system,
which monitors the engine as it is
running.
For fault codes and their meanings,
see the DDEC VI MBE 4000
Troubleshooting Guide (6SE568).
Stop Engine Override
Option
As soon as a fault is detected, it is
evaluated and one of the following
measures is initiated.
NOTICE:
To prevent possible serious engine
damage, have any faults corrected
without delay by an authorized
dealer.
□ In conjunction with any dashboard
or instrument panel display, the
code for the electronic control
unit reporting the fault can be read
immediately on the display.
The Stop Engine Override Option
is used for a momentary override.
The Motor Control Module (MCM)
will record the number of times the
override is activated after a fault
occurs.
Momentary Override – A Stop
Engine Override (SEO) switch is used
to override the shutdown sequence
(see Figure 15). This override resets
the 60 second (30 seconds for oil
pressure) shutdown timer, restoring
power to the level when the RSL (Stop
Engine) was illuminated. The switch
must be recycled after five seconds to
obtain a subsequent override.
□ Complete fault codes are
transmitted and can be read
using DDDL 7.0 or latest version.
□ If the fault is serious enough to
impair normal operation, the
electronic engine system switches
over to emergency running mode.
When in emergency running
mode, the engine operates at a
constant 1300 rpm. This allows
you to move the vehicle to a
service location.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
cooling across each tube and reduces
header to tube stress and possible
failure. Winter fronts should only be
used when the ambient temperature
remains below -12.2°C (10°F).
Figure 15
Typical SEO Switch and
Warning Lamps
NOTE:
The operator has the responsibility to
take action to avoid engine damage.
Cold Weather Operation
Special precautions must be taken
during cold weather. To protect your
engine, special cold weather handling
is required for fuel, engine oil, coolant,
and batteries.
The engine will not require starting
aids down to –15°C (5°F). Between
–15°C (5°F) and –25°C (-13°F), a
grid heater is required. Temperatures
below –25°C (-13°F), will require a
grid heater, block heater, and oil pan
heater.
Winter Fronts
A winter front may be used to improve
cab heating while idling. At least 25%
of the grill opening should remain
open in sectioned stripes that run
perpendicular to the charge air cooler
tube flow direction. This assures even
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
35
DDEC VI SYSTEM
DDEC VI SYSTEM
The engine is equipped with a fully
electronic control system, which
regulates the fuel injection quantity
and timing using solenoid valves,
allowing extremely low-emission
operation. Besides the engine and
its related sensors, the system is
composed of the following:
Motor Control Module
The MCM (See Figure 16) is located
on the left-hand side of the engine.
The MCM processes the data received
from the CPC, for example the
position of the accelerator pedal,
engine brake, etc.
□ The Motor Control Module
(MCM)
□ The Common Powertrain
Controller (CPC) located under
the right-hand dash panel
The two control units are connected by
a proprietary datalink through which
all necessary data and information can
be exchanged.
The CPC then broadcasts all
information on the J1587 and J1939
datalinks, where it can be read by the
diagnostic tool.
The engine control system monitors
both the engine and the datalink.
When a malfunction or other problem
is detected, the system selects an
appropriate response; for example,
the emergency running mode may be
activated.
Figure 16
MCM
These data are evaluated together
with the data from the sensors on
the engine, such as coolant and
fuel temperature and oil and charge
pressure.
The Accelerator Pedal Assembly
(AP) eliminates the need for any
throttle linkage.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
The data is then compared to the
characteristic maps or lines stored in
the MCM. From these data, quantity
and timing of injection are calculated
and the unit pumps are actuated
accordingly through the solenoid
valves.
NOTE:
To obtain a replacement MCM, all
the data given on the MCM label are
required.
The MCM data label has the 10 digit
engine serial number.
Common Powertrain
Controller
The CPC communicates with the
other MCM units installed on the
vehicle over the J1587 and J1939 data
link.See Figure 17.
Data for specific applications is stored
in the CPC. These include idle speed,
maximum running speed, and speed
limitation.
Figure 17
CPC
The CPC receives data from the
following sources:
□ The operator (accelerator pedal
position, engine brake switch)
□ Other electronic control units
(for example, the anti-lock brake
system)
□ The MCM (oil pressure and
coolant temperature)
From these data, instructions are
computed for controlling the engine
and transmitted to the CPC via the
proprietary datalink.
The CPC controls various systems,
for example, communications with
the datalink, the engine brake, and the
constant-throttle valves.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
37
DDEC VI SYSTEM
DDEC Features
DDEC offers a variety of features and
options designed to warn the operator
of an engine malfunction.
Options can range from warning panel
lights to automatic reduction in engine
power followed by automatic engine
shutdown.
DDEC has the ability to perform
diagnostics for self-checks and
continuous monitoring of other
system components.
Figure 18
Depending on the application,
DDEC can monitor oil temperature,
coolant temperature, oil pressure, fuel
pressure, coolant level and remote
sensors (if used).
DDEC connects to the AWL (Check
Engine) and the RSL (Stop Engine) to
provide a visual warning of a system
malfunction.
Cruise Control
Cruise Control is available with any
DDEC engine. Cruise Control will
operate in either Engine or Vehicle
Speed Mode and maintain a targeted
speed (MPH or RPM) by increasing or
decreasing fueling. The targeted speed
can be selected and adjusted with
dash-mounted switches. See Figure
18.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Typical Cruise Control
Switches
Cruise Control may also be
programmed to permit fast idle
using the Cruise Control switches.
With the engine at normal idle,
transmission in neutral and service
brakes on, depress the SPD CNTL
Switch, and use the RSM/ACC
Switch. The engine rpm should
increase to a pre-defined speed. The
engine rpm can be raised or lowered
from this point using the SET/CST
and RSM/ACC switches.
Cruise Control will maintain the set
speed under normal road and load
conditions.
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
LOSS OF VEHICLE CONTROL
To avoid injury from the loss of
vehicle control, do not use cruise
control under these conditions:
□ When it is not possible to
keep the vehicle at a constant
speed (on winding roads, in
heavy traffic, in traffic that
varies in speed, etc.).
□ On slippery roads
(wet pavement, ice-or
snow-covered roads, loose
gravel, etc.).
NOTICE:
When descending a hill with
Cruise Control OFF, do not allow
the engine to exceed 2500 rpm
under any conditions. Failure to
observe this precaution can result
in overspeeding and serious engine
damage.
It cannot limit vehicle speeds on
down grades if available engine
braking effort is exceeded, nor can it
maintain speed on upgrades if power
requirements exceed engine power
capability.
set vehicle speed. The vehicle speed
must be above Min. Cruise Set Speed
and below Max. Cruise Set Speed. It
is recommended that Max Cruise Set
Speed be set to the default to allow
proper operation of other features
such as Fuel Economy Incentive and
PasSmart. The Vehicle Speed Limit
should be used to limit vehicle throttle
speed.
When the SPD CNTL is in the ON
position, Cruise Control is engaged by
momentarily contacting the SET/CST
Switch. As a check after each engine
start, DDEC looks for a one time
activation of the clutch (if equipped)
and service brake before DDEC
allows Cruise Control to be enabled.
The MCM must also recognize that
the Cruise Enable Switch has changed.
If the Cruise Enable Switch is off, it
needs to be turned on. If the Cruise
Enable Switch is on, it must be turned
off then on for cruise to operate.
Holding the switch in the SET/CST
position allows the vehicle to slow to a
lower speed. Toggling the switch will
result in a one mile-per-hour (1.6 kph)
decrease in vehicle speed. If Cruise
Control has been disabled, toggling
the RSM/ACC Switch restores the
vehicle to the previously set cruise
speed.
Engine speed and power are varied
under Cruise Control to maintain the
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
39
DDEC VI SYSTEM
Cruise Control can be overridden at
any time with the throttle pedal if
the vehicle is operating at less than
the programmed Max Road Speed.
Additionally, using either the brake or
the clutch will disable Cruise Control.
Data Recording Capability
The DDEC VI contains the ability to
extract detailed data on the engine’s
use and performance using DDEC
Reports software. This data, known
as DDEC Data, is stored in the CPC
and contains information on engine
performance (such as fuel economy,
idle time, time in top gear) and critical
incidents (such as detailed diagnostic
data records and hard braking events).
DDEC Data can be downloaded using
DDEC Reports software to produce
reports.
DDEC Reports software is part of
the Detroit Diesel Diagnostic Link®
7.0 (DDDL 7.0) software package.
DDDL 7.0 requires at least a Pentium
II computer with at least 256 MB of
RAM.
Engine Brakes
Engine brakes are enabled by a
dash-mounted On/Off switch with a
separate intensity switch to select low,
medium or high braking power.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
LOSS OF VEHICLE CONTROL
To avoid injury from loss of
vehicle control, do not activate
the Engine Brake system under
the following conditions:
□ On wet or slippery pavement,
unless the vehicle is equipped
with ABS (anti-lock braking
system) and you have had
prior experience driving
under these conditions.
□ When driving without a trailer
(bobtailing) or pulling an
empty trailer.
□ If the tractor drive wheels
begin to lock or there is
fishtail motion after the
Engine Brake is activated,
deactivate the brake system
immediately if this occurs.
The engine brakes will only operate
when the Accelerator Pedal is fully
released. Disengaging the clutch
will prevent the engine brakes from
operating.
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Engine brakes will supply braking
power even when in Cruise Control.
MCM will control the amount of
engine braking with respect to the
Cruise Control set speed. The
maximum amount of braking (low,
medium, high) is selected with the
dash switches.
Engine Protection
The DDEC engine protection
system monitors all engine sensors
and electronic components, and
recognizes system malfunctions. If
a critical fault is detected, the AWL
(Check Engine) and RSL (Stop
Engine) illuminate. The malfunction
codes are logged into the MCM's
memory.
The standard parameters which are
monitored for engine protection
are: low coolant level, high coolant
temperature, low oil pressure, and
high oil temperature.
This system features a 30-second,
stepped-power shutdown sequence
or an immediate speed reduction
without shutdown in the event a major
engine malfunction occurs, such as
low oil pressure, high oil or coolant
temperature, or low coolant level.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from engine
shutdown in an unsafe situation,
ensure the operator knows how
to override the stop engine
condition on a DDEC-equipped
unit.
NOTICE:
Engines equipped with the
power-down/shutdown option have
a system override button or switch
to allow engine operation for a
short period of time. Using the
override button so the engine does
not shutdown in 30 seconds but
operates for an extended period
may result in engine damage.
California Engine Idle Limiting
In order to meet the California Engine
Idle Limiting Standard, an engine
idle shutdown feature has been built
into the DDEC VI Engine Control
Strategy. When the California Engine
Idle Limiting feature is enabled, the
engine will generally shut down after
five minutes of continuous idling
when the transmission is in neutral
or park and the parking brake is set
or after fifteen minutes when the
transmission is in neutral or park and
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
41
DDEC VI SYSTEM
the parking brake is not set. Activating
or momentarily changing the position
of the service brake pedal, the clutch
pedal, Stop Engine Override, the
accelerator pedal, or park brake status
during the final 30 seconds before
a shutdown would otherwise occur
will prevent the engine from shutting
down and will reset the shutdown
timer. After an automatic shutdown,
the engine may be restarted and
operated normally. The automatic
shutdown feature is generally disabled
on engines certified by the US EPA for
use outside California but is required
to be enabled for all California
certified engines with the exception
of engines used in specific vehicle
types which the state of California
has determined to be exempt from
the idle shutdown requirement.
These include buses, school buses,
recreational vehicles, medium duty
vehicles, military tactical vehicles,
and authorized emergency vehicles
as they are defined by the state of
California. Owners of these vehicle
types that wish to have the shutdown
feature disabled should consult with
California authorities to determine
if their vehicles qualify for the
exemption.
eliminating excessive idling and
allowing a turbocharger cool-down
period. To activate the shutdown, the
transmission must be in neutral with
the vehicle parking brakes set and the
engine in idle or fast-idle mode.
DDEC VI Operation
NOTE:
This engine is equipped with DDEC
software. This software generally
assures optimal engine performance.
The installation of software upgrades
may cause minor changes in features
and engine performance.
Since the DDEC system is electronic,
a battery is required to operate the
computer. The system operates at
12 volts. However, in the event of
a power supply malfunction, the
system will continue to operate at
reduced voltage. When this occurs,
the AWL (Check Engine) will come
on. See Figure 19
Idle Shutdown Timer
This feature is an optional 1 –
100 minute idle shutdown system.
Its purpose is to conserve fuel by
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Figure 19
Warning Lamps and
SEO Switch
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
The engine will only operate at
reduced rpm until the battery voltage
reaches a point where the MCM will
no longer function and the engine
shuts down.
Should the AWL (Check Engine)
come on for any reason, the vehicle
can still be operated and the driver can
proceed to the required destination.
This condition should be reported
to an authorized Detroit Diesel
distributor or dealer.
Stop Engine Override Switch
This feature allows the operator to
override the automatic stop engine
sequence.
This is done by pressing the Stop
Engine Override Switch every 15 to 20
seconds to prevent engine shutdown
from occurring.
NOTE:
The Stop Engine Override Switch and
the Diagnostic Request Switch are the
same.
NOTICE:
When the RSL (Stop Engine) comes
on, the computer has detected a
major malfunction in the engine that
requires immediate attention. It is
the operator's responsibility to
shut down the engine to avoid
serious damage.
The engine can be configured to
give a warning only, to ramp down
(reduce power) or to shut down.
Ramp down will reduce engine rpm
to a pre-determined speed, but will
not shut down the engine. With
the 30-second shutdown option, the
engine will begin a 30-second, stepped
power-down sequence until it shuts
down completely.
NOTE:
Holding down the Stop Engine
Override Switch will not prevent the
engine shutdown sequence. You
must continue to reset the automatic
shutdown system by pressing the Stop
Engine Override Switch at intervals of
approximately 15 to 20 seconds.
It takes 30 seconds from the time the
automatic shutdown sequence begins
until engine shutdown. Therefore,
the operator must press the override
switch just prior to engine shutdown
and continue to do so until the vehicle
can be brought to a stop in a safe
location.
A “Stop Engine Override” can be
procured in case the vehicle is to
operate in a critical location.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
43
DDEC VI SYSTEM
Immediate Speed Reduction
The immediate speed reduction option
will bring engine rpm back to a
predetermined speed, but will not shut
down the engine.
The engine should not be restarted
after it has been shut down by the
engine protection system, unless
the problem has been located and
corrected.
Red Stop Lamp
The conditions that will cause the RSL
(Stop Engine) to come on are:
□ High coolant temperature
□ Loss of coolant
□ High oil temperature
□ Low oil pressure
□ Auxiliary shutdown
Whenever the AWL (Check Engine)
or the RSL (Stop Engine) come on,
the DDEC computer will determine
where the problem is and will then
store this information in its memory.
If the malfunction is intermittent, the
lights will come on and go off as the
computer senses the changing engine
condition.
Diagnostic Tool
The diagnostic tool for DDEC VI is
DDDL 7.0. which requires at least a
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Pentium II computer with at least 256
MB of RAM.
Once the malfunction has been
corrected, the DDEC system will
return the engine to normal operation.
The temperature of air in the intake
system is increased with the addition
of an EGR. DDEC is programmed
to reduce fueling (power) for a
short time to reduce air and coolant
temperatures when necessary. DDEC
will store an information code that
this event occurred, but no corrective
action is required as this action
is designed to maintain operation
without a noticeable affect on vehicle
performance.
Flashing Malfunction Codes —
All malfunction codes are four digits.
The malfunction code recorded in the
computer memory will remain until it
is erased by a technician.
The flashing malfunction code can
also be obtained by the operator.
To support flashing codes, a Stop
Engine Override/Diagnostic Request
Switch must be configured and the
AWL (Check Engine) and RSL (Stop
Engine) must be hard-wired. The CPC
cannot flash these lamps if they are
not hard-wired.
The flashing code feature may be
activated by satisfying one of the
following conditions:
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
□ Engine speed is <100 rpm and
the SEO switch is put in the ON
position.
□ Vehicle speed is <3 mph and Park
Brake is activated and the SEO
switch is put in the ON position.
□ Idle Governor is activated and
the SEO switch is put in the ON
position.
The flashing code feature is
deactivated to the OFF position or
the listed conditions are no longer
satisfied. See Figure 20.
Figure 20
RSL (Stop Engine) Flashing Code Example
Only one light will be flashing codes
at any time. All codes will be flashed
twice. The inter-digit pause is 1.5
seconds. The pause between codes
is 3.5 seconds. The same 3.5 second
pause occurs as the switch is made
from RSL (Stop Engine) to AWL
(Check Engine).
When code flashing is initiated,
the active codes will be flashed on
the RSL (Stop Engine). Then the
inactive codes will be flashed on the
AWL (Check Engine). When all the
inactive codes have been flashed, the
process of flashing all the active codes
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
followed by all the inactive codes will
repeat until the conditions for code
flashing are no longer satisfied.
If there are no active or inactive faults
the number 3 is flashed once followed
by an inter-code gap of 3 seconds.
To Read Codes: Press and hold the
SEO/Diagnostic Request Switch.
Active codes will be flashed on the
RSL (Stop Engine) first, followed by
inactive codes being flashed on the
AWL (Check Engine).
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
45
DDEC VI SYSTEM
The codes will continue to flash
and repeat as long as the Diagnostic
Request Switch is held in the ON
position. Both CPC and MCM faults
are included.
Active Codes – The active codes will
be flashed on the RSL (Stop Engine)
in the order of most recent to least
recent occurrence based on engine
hours.
Inactive Codes – The inactive codes
will be flashed on the AWL (Check
Engine) in the order of most recent
to least recent occurrence based on
engine hours.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
DDEC VI ENGINE DRIVING TIPS
Driving with an electronically
controlled engine feels different from
driving with a mechanically governed
engine.
Accelerating the Vehicle
Engine response versus pedal
movement may feel different from
the mechanical-governed engine you
were driving. The Accelerator Pedal
(AP) was designed to communicate
“percentage” foot pedal travel to
the engine's Motor Control Module
(MCM). The engine will respond
accordingly to the driver's demand.
Cruise Control
For added driver convenience and
comfort, DDEC VI also features a
Cruise Control option that works just
like the system in your car. It can
be operated in any gear above 1000
rpm or road speed faster than 32
kph (20 mph), up to the rated engine
speed. And it can be programmed to
hold your road speed at or below the
maximum vehicle speed. The switch
to energize Cruise Control is usually
mounted on the instrument panel.
See Figure 21.
Another throttle or governor
characteristic you may need time to
get used to is the DDEC Limiting
Speed Governor. This allows the
driver to command total engine
response between idle and rated speed,
such as accelerating at half throttle
– an advantage when driving under
slippery conditions.
If you require wide-open throttle
engine response, either accelerating or
just plain pulling hard, the throttle AP
will have to be held to the floor. To
obtain 100% fueling at any speed, the
AP will have to be maintained at the
fully pressed position.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Figure 21
Typical Cruise Control
Switches
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
47
DDEC VI ENGINE DRIVING TIPS
speed in one mile-per-hour (1.6
kilometer-per-hour) increments, press
the RSM/ACL Switch. To reduce road
speed, press and hold the SET/CST
Switch until the lower speed is
reached.
Turn the switch ON to energize the
system. Remember as a check after
each engine start, DDEC VI looks for
a one time activation of the clutch (if
equipped) and service brake before
DDEC VI allows Cruise Control to be
enabled.
Cruise Control is deactivated by
slightly pressing the service brakes,
clutch pedal, or trailer brake. The
On/Off Switch will also deactivate
Cruise Control.
DDEC VI must also see or recognize
that the Cruise Enable Switch has
changed. If the Cruise Enable Switch
is OFF it needs to be turned ON. If the
Cruise Enable Switch is left in the ON
position at key OFF, the switch must
be cycled OFF then ON for DDEC
VI to see a status change to allow
Cruise Control activation. The status
of DDEC VI inputs to activate Cruise
Control at key ON is Listed in Table
2 below.
Cruise Control will maintain vehicle
speed even on up grades, unless power
requirements demand a downshift.
And, of course, Cruise Control does
not limit your speed on down grades.
Most likely, Cruise Control will feel
stronger than driving with the foot
pedal because of the instantaneous
and wide-open throttle response.
That's why Cruise Control use is not
suggested during slippery driving
conditions.
Once Cruise Control is enabled
and you reach your road speed,
press the Set Switch to activate
Cruise Control. The cruise light
will come on. To increase road
Input
Status of Input at
Key ON
Status of Input
Before Cruise
Control Activates
Service Brake Switch
ON
OFF
Clutch Release Switch
(Manual Trans only)
ON
OFF
Cruise Control Enable
Switch
OFF
ON
Table 2
48
Input Status to Activate Cruise Control
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Use Cruise Control after down shifting
on a hill to pull the hill. Hitting the
RSM/ACL Switch (not the Set Switch)
will keep the truck accelerating in the
lower gears up to the rated engine
speed.
Cruise Control will disengage below
1000 rpm or 20 mph (32 kph) road
speed. When using Cruise Control,
if you want to pull the engine below
1000 rpm, remember to hold the
throttle pedal to the floor to keep the
engine pulling at wide-open throttle.
Realistically, the engine will pull to
about 1050 rpm.
Remember: The electronic data
programmed into the DDEC VI
system will not allow you to hurt or
overfuel the engine at low or “lug”
engine speeds. There is enough oil
pressure to withstand hard pulls at low
engine speeds.
Engine Brakes and Cruise
Control
If your engine is equipped with both
Cruise Control and engine brake
retarders, the engine retarders can
operate automatically while you
are in Cruise Control. If the Cruise
Control/Engine Brake function is
turned ON in the MCM programming,
the engine retarders will come on
“low” when your set road speed
increases a few miles-per-hour
(kilometers per hour) above your
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
cruise set speed. If your speed
continues to increase, the MCM will
increase the engine retarders' braking
power progressively. When the
vehicle returns to the set cruise speed,
the engine retarders will turn off until
you need them.
For safety reasons, don't use Cruise
Control when it is not possible to keep
the vehicle at constant speed due to:
□ Winding roads
□ Heavy traffic
□ Slippery pavement
□ Descending grades that call for
engine brake assistance.
For an explanation of the engine brake
retarder system and recommendations
for proper operation, refer to
“ENGINE BRAKE SYSTEM”.
Shifting
Depending on your transmission
model, the gear split may vary from
500 to 300 rpm. The electronic
governor provides almost no overrun
capability; and, if the transmission
is downshifted too early, you will
experience a temporary loss of pulling
power until the engine speed falls
below rated speed.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
49
DDEC VI ENGINE DRIVING TIPS
In general, when using a 7 or 9-speed
transmission, you should always
downshift between 1250 and 1300
rpm. This is true even on steep grades
with heavy loads. When using an
18-, 15- or 13-speed transmission,
you will need to downshift at an rpm
that allows “less than rated” rpm
before throttle application in the next
gear down. You may want to limit
engine speed to 1900 rpm in all gears.
The Series 60 provides horsepower
through 2100 rpm, but fuel economy
is not as efficient above 1800 rpm.
Low rpm operation should feel greatly
enhanced due to the characteristics
of the variable nozzle turbocharger.
Engine response should be almost
instantaneous below peak torque
engine speeds. This should encourage
progressive shifting especially during
slow vehicle speed operation.
If you decide to drive at lower rpm's
for improved fuel economy, don't let
different engine noises throw you
off guard. The Series 60 sounds
quiet at 1400 rpm, almost as if it
had quit pulling. Don't believe it!
If you had a boost gage to look at
while driving, you would notice
the turbocharger maintaining steady
intake manifold pressure, even as
rpm's fall. Depending on the air
intake arrangement, you may also
experience a “chuffing” sound as the
engine starts to pull hard at lower
rpm's. This is caused by the velocity
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
changes of the air flow within the air
intake plumbing. Electronic engines
can actually deliver more fuel at lower
engine speeds than at rated speed.
One difference you may notice with
the EGR equipped engine is under
hood noise. The gear train has been
redesigned for quieter operation,
and the EGR gas flow may be
noticeable to the tuned attentive ear.
The turbocharger operates at higher
boost pressure forcing EGR gas flow
through the EGR plumbing. In some
situations the driver may believe
he/she has experienced a charge air
cooler system leak. Even connecting
trailer light and air hoses, the driver
may hear a different tone (exhaust and
under hood with the engine idling.) If
equipped with a turbo boost gage, the
driver may occasionally note intake
manifold pressure exceeds 35 psi.
Idling
The common belief that idling a diesel
engine causes no engine damage is
wrong. Idling produces sulfuric acid,
which breaks down the oil and eats
into bearings, rings, valve stems and
engine surfaces. If you must idle
the engine for cab heat or cooling,
the high idle function of the Cruise
Control switches should be used. An
idle speed of 1100 rpm should be
enough to provide cab heat in above
0° C (32° F) ambients.
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
ENGINE BRAKE SYSTEM
Certain MBE 4000 vehicle engines
are equipped with engine brakes,
commonly referred to as retarders.
Before operating the vehicle, you
must familiarize yourself with the
retarder system to obtain optimum
benefit from it. Engine brake control
systems may vary slightly, depending
on the engine brake configuration and
cab design. However, basic operator
controls are similar for all models.
Figure 22
Exhaust
Brake/Constant-Throttle
Valves
When the driver activates the engine
brake, the MCM energizes the brake
gate solenoid. The solenoid valve
supplies air pressure to the brake
gate actuator, closing the brake gate,
which closes off the large entry to
the turbocharger and the combined
exhaust stream flows through the
small entry to the exhaust turbine.
Brake Gate Open
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
51
ENGINE BRAKE SYSTEM
The smaller cross-sectional area, of
the small entry, increases the flow and
speed of the exhaust stream to the
exhaust turbine, which increases the
exhaust turbine speed and increases
the boost pressure. The small
cross-sectional flow of the small
entry will increase the total exhaust
manifold pressure. This increased
boost pressure will increase the airflow
forced into the cylinders, which results
in increased resistance to the pistons
during a compression stroke and
increases the engine braking power.
Figure 23
Increased exhaust effort is required
for the next exhaust stroke, all the
exhaust flows across the small entry,
which causes a deceleration of the
engine speed.
Brake Gate Closed
Controlling the exhaust to the turbine
through the small entry, the EGR
valve now controls the brake effect
52
At the same time, the Constant
Throttle Valve (CTV) solenoid is
energizes allowing the CTV to be
open. The CTV partially releases
the increased compression pressure
allowing less compression on the
piston during the end of the stroke.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
by removing the necessary exhaust
through the EGR system.
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
The engine brake is activated by
the Common Powertrain Controller
(CPC). In engine braking mode, an
engine rpm range of up to 2500 rpm
can be used by the operator. 2500 rpm,
however, may never be exceeded.
The engine is turned off automatically
when the engine rpm is:
□ Below 900 rpm for Allison
Automatic Transmissions
□ Below 1100 rpm for all other
transmissions
Also, the engine brake is automatically
turned off when the accelerator pedal
is pressed.
NOTE:
When in emergency running mode
(constant rpm), the engine brake can
be activated only when the engine is
in overrun. When constant rpm has
been attained, the engine brake is
automatically turned off.
Anti-Lock Braking
Systems
Vehicles equipped with ABS
(anti-lock braking systems) have
the ability to turn the engine brake
retarder OFF if a wheel-slip condition
is detected. The engine brake will
automatically turn itself ON once
the wheel slip is no longer detected.
The DDEC system will deactivate
the engine brake system when the
engine speed falls below 1000 rpm
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
or when the vehicle slows down to a
pre-set speed, depending on DDEC
programming. This prevents stalling
the engine. Engine brakes can also
be used with vehicle Cruise Control
TURNED ON.
Driving on Flat, Dry
Pavement
Use the following guidelines when
driving on flat, dry pavement:
1. If driving on flat, dry, open
stretches with a light load and
greater slowing power is not
required, place the progressive
braking switch in the LOW
position.
2. If you find you are still using the
service brakes, move the switch
to a higher position until you do
not need to use the service brakes
to slow the vehicle down.
3. If you are carrying a heavier load
and road traction is good, move
the progressive braking switch to
the “High” position.
4. Check your progressive braking
switch often for proper position,
since road conditions can change
quickly. Never skip a step when
operating the progressive braking
switch. Always go from OFF
to LOW, and then to a higher
position.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
53
ENGINE BRAKE SYSTEM
Descending a Long, Steep
Grade
An explanation of “control speed”
may be helpful in understanding how
to use the engine brake system while
descending a grade. Control Speed
is the constant speed at which the
forces pushing the vehicle forward on
a grade are equal to the forces holding
it back, without using the vehicle
service brakes. In other words, this
is the speed the vehicle will maintain
without using the service brakes or
fueling.
BRAKE FADE
To avoid injury, do not over
apply the vehicle service brakes
when descending a long, steep
grade. Excessive use of the
vehicle brakes will cause them
to heat up, reducing their
stopping ability. This condition,
referred to as “brake fade”, may
result in loss of braking, which
could lead to personal injury or
vehicle/property damage or both.
Use the following guidelines when
descending a long, steep grade:
1. Before beginning the descent,
determine if your engine brake
system is operating properly by
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
lifting your foot briefly off the
throttle. You should feel the
system activate.
2. Ensure the progressive braking
switch is in the appropriate power
position.
PERSONAL INJURY
Failure to keep the vehicle within
safe control speed limits while
descending a grade may result
in loss of vehicle control, which
could cause personal injury.
NOTICE:
Failure to keep the vehicle within
safe control speed limits while
descending a grade may result in
vehicle or property damage or both.
3. Do not exceed the safe control
speedof your vehicle. Example:
You could descend a 6% grade,
under control only at 16 kph (10
mph) without an engine brake, but
at 40 kph (25 mph) with an engine
brake. You could not descend
that same hill at 80 kph (50 mph)
and still expect to remain under
control. Get to know how much
slowing power your engine brake
can provide. So get to know
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
your engine brake system before
climbing hills and do not exceed
a safe control speed.
4. Check your progressive braking
switch often for proper position,
since road conditions can change
quickly. Never skip a step when
operating the progressive braking
switch. Always go from OFF
to LOW and then to a higher
position when on slippery roads.
Driving on Wet or Slippery
Pavement
Do not attempt to use the engine brake
system on wet or slippery roads until
you have some experience with it on
dry pavement.
LOSS OF VEHICLE CONTROL
To avoid injury from loss of
vehicle control, do not activate
the Engine Brake system under
the following conditions:
□ On wet or slippery pavement,
unless the vehicle is equipped
with ABS (anti-lock braking
system) and you have had
prior experience driving
under these conditions.
□ When driving without a trailer
(bobtailing) or pulling an
empty trailer.
□ If the tractor drive wheels
begin to lock or there is
fishtail motion after the
Engine Brake is activated,
deactivate the brake system
immediately if this occurs.
NOTE:
On single trailers or combinations,
a light air application of the trailer
brakes may be desirable to help
keep the trailer stretched out. Follow
the manufacturer's recommended
operating procedure when using your
trailer brakes.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
55
ENGINE BRAKE SYSTEM
On wet or slippery pavement, start
with the master switch in the OFF
position and use the gear you would
normally use under these conditions.
If the vehicle is maintaining traction,
place the selective braking switch in
the LOW position and turn ON the
engine brake system. If the drive
wheels are maintaining traction and
you desire greater slowing power,
move the braking switch to the next
highest position.
However, if the tractor drive wheels
begin to lock or there is a fishtail
motion, turn the engine brake system
OFF immediately and do not activate
it until road conditions improve.
Check your progressive braking
switch often for proper position, since
road conditions can change quickly.
Never skip a step when operating the
progressive braking system. Always
go from OFF to LOW and then to a
higher position.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
ENGINE SYSTEMS
The engine systems are the following:
Fuel System
The fuel system consists of DDEC,
fuel injectors, fuel manifolds (integral
with the cylinder head), Electronic
Unit Pumps (EUP), fuel pump, a
cooling plate for the Motor Control
Module (MCM) on non-automotive
engines, primary and secondary fuel
filters, and the necessary connecting
fuel lines.
The gear-type fuel pump is located
near the front of the crankcase on the
left hand side. The pump is driven
from the forward end of the camshaft.
Lubrication System
The lubricating oil system consists of
an oil pump, oil cooler, full-flow oil
filter, bypass at the oil filter housing
stand pipe, oil level dipstick and an oil
pressure regulator at the oil pump.
There is a force-feed lubricating oil
circuit supplied by a gear-type oil
pump. This pump is positioned at the
rear of the oil pan and driven by gears
from the crankshaft. The oil cooler is
integrated with the oil filter housing
on the right-hand side.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Air System
The outside air drawn into the
engine passes through the air filter
and is pulled into the turbocharger
and compressed. It then moves to
the air-to-air charge cooler (heat
exchanger) and is cooled. Next it
flows to the intake manifold and into
the cylinders, where it mixes with
atomized fuel from the injectors.
For optimum protection of the
engine from dust and other airborne
contaminants, service the dry type
air cleaners used when the maximum
allowable air restriction has been
reached, or annually, whichever
occurs first.
Cooling System
A radiator/thermo-modulated fan
cooling system is used on MBE 4000
engines. This system has a centrifugal
type fresh water pump to circulate
coolant within the engine. Two
full-blocking type thermostats located
in a housing attached to the right side
of the cylinder head control the flow
of coolant.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
57
ENGINE SYSTEMS
Electrical System
The addition of cooled exhaust
gasses back into the combustion
airflow reduces the peak in cylinder
combustion temperature. Less oxides
of nitrogen (NOx) are produced at
lower combustion temperatures.
The electrical system consists of
a starting motor, starting switch,
battery-charging alternator, storage
batteries, and the necessary wiring.
Exhaust System
Exhaust gases exit the cylinders
through exhaust ports and the exhaust
manifold. These exhaust gases expand
through the exhaust turbine and drive
the turbocharger compressor impeller.
The gases are then released through
the exhaust pipes and the muffler to
the atmosphere.
The recycled exhaust gases are cooled
before engine consumption in a tube
and shell engine water cooler.
Exhaust Gas Recirculation
System
The purpose of the Exhaust Gas
Recirculation System (EGR) is to
reduce engine exhaust gas emissions
in accordance with EPA regulations.
The MBE 4000 engines for
on-highway EPA 2007 regulation
applications use a cooled EGR system
consisting of an EGR cooler, EGR
control valve, and an EGR mixer.
In the cooled EGR system, part of the
exhaust gasses from the front three
cylinders are routed from the exhaust
manifold through the EGR cooler, past
control, and are mixed with the intake
manifold charge air.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
AFTERTREATMENT SYSTEM
In order to meet current emissions
regulations, the traditional muffler has
been replaced by a new Aftertreatment
Device (ATD). This device consists
of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC)
and a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF).
Together these two components burn
off collected particulate matter in a
process called “regeneration.” The
Figure 24
key to successful regeneration is high
exhaust temperature for an extended
period of time. Without adequate
temperatures for regeneration, the
filter will continue to trap particulates
and eventually plug. In order to avoid
plugging, Detroit Diesel has designed
an actively regenerated Aftertreatment
System (ATS). See Figure 24.
Aftertreatment System Schematic
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
59
AFTERTREATMENT SYSTEM
Operating Requirements
Oxidation of the particulate matter
is the key to filter performance.
This requires that the catalyzing
agent (platinum coated passages)
are providing optimum enhancement
to the oxidation process. The
following requirements must be met,
otherwise the ATD warranty may be
compromised:
NOTICE:
Do not use kerosene or fuel blended
with used lube oil.
□ Use Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel
(ULSD) fuel with (15 ppm sulfur
content maximum), based on
ASTM D2622 test procedure
□ Lube oil must have a sulfated ash
level less than 1.0 wt %; currently
referred to as CJ-4 oil
NOTICE:
Not following the operating
requirements may result in damage
to the ATD or accelerated ash
plugging of the diesel particulate
filter.
soot. This process happens during
the normal operation cycle of the
vehicle; it can occur both passively
and actively. Regardless of this,
the operator will see no difference
in vehicle performance or vehicle
control. If the ATS is not capable
of completing an over-the-road
regeneration due to duty cycle
constraints or other restrictions, a
parked regeneration may need to
occur.
The driver will be notified of the
need for a DPF regeneration by
illumination of the DPF Regeneration
Lamp. Refer to section DRIVER
ACTIONS .
NOTE:
If the DDEC VI electronics have not
requested the initiation of a parked
regeneration (the DPF Regeneration
Lamp is not illuminated), the Regen
request switch is disabled.
NOTE:
The driver MUST stay with the vehicle
throughout the regeneration process.
NOTE:
Not all vehicles may be equipped
with a Regen request switch due to
application or user specification.
Parked Regeneration
Procedure
Regeneration of the ATS is
fundamental for the oxidation of
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
NOTE:
The procedure will take up to
40 minutes (depends on engine type
and the amount of soot accumulated
in the filter).
To initiate a parked regeneration,
perform the following:
1. Keep engine at slow idle (cannot
be in PTO mode).
2. Transmission is in neutral with
parking brake ON.
3. Cycle the parking brake from
OFF to ON.
NOTE:
Air tank pressure must be high enough
for the parking brake switch to hold in
the OFF position.
4. Press and release clutch pedal (if
equipped with clutch pedal).
5. Cycle transmission to DRIVE
and back to NEUTRAL (if not
equipped with clutch pedal).
6. Hold DPF Switch in the ON
position for five seconds and
then release (engine speed will
increase and DPF Lamp will go
out).
The regeneration will take up to 40
minutes.
The regeneration is completed when
the engine returns to low idle and the
DPF Lamp remains off. The High
Exhaust System Temperature (HEST)
Lamp will remain on but the vehicle
can be driven.
If the Parked Regeneration exits and
the DPF Lamp remains on, repeat the
procedure. If the second try also fails,
contact the Detroit Diesel Customer
Support Center at (313) 592-5800.
NOTE:
A Parked Regeneration will stop if the
key is turned to the OFF position, the
vehicle is put into gear, or the parking
brake is released.
Hazardous Applications
The MCM should be configured to
not allow automatically triggered
over-the-road regenerations (DPF
Manual Regen Only Enable =
Enabled).
NOTE:
This is for hazardous applications only.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
61
AFTERTREATMENT SYSTEM
□ Particulate filter part number and
serial number
There are two CPC options:
□ DPF Stationary Regen Only =
0-Disabled
Maintenance
□ DPF Stationary Regen Only =
1-Enabled
DPF Stationary Regen Only =
0-Disabled — This option allows
the DPF Regen Switch to request
a parked regeneration if the parked
regeneration entry conditions are met.
This option also allows MCM-initiated
over-the-road regenerations to occur.
DPF Stationary Regen Only =
1-Enabled — This option only
allows a parked regeneration to
occur by using the DPF Regeneration
Switch. The MCM will be unable
to initiate an active over-the-road
regeneration when this option is
enabled.
Service Record
It is mandatory that customers or
distributors maintain a proper record
of the particulate filter servicing and
cleaning. This record is an agent to
warranty considerations. The record
must include information such as:
□ Date of cleaning or replacement
A high amount of black smoke
emitting from the vehicle or
illumination of an AWL (Check
Engine) or RSL (Stop Engine) are
indications of a system problem.
Should this occur, refer to the
Aftertreatment System Technician's
Guide (7SE63), or contact the Detroit
Diesel Customer Support Center at
313–592–5800.
Illumination of the Diesel Particulate
Filter (DPF) lamp indicates that a
parked regeneration is required.
There is a need to periodically
remove accumulated ash, derived
from engine lube oil, from the filter.
This ash does not oxidize in the
filter during the regeneration process
and must be removed through a
cleaning procedure. All Detroit Diesel
ATD device equipped engines will
illuminate a dashboard warning lamp
indicating the need for ash cleaning.
For information on this cleaning
procedure, refer to the Aftertreatment
System Technician's Guide (7SE63),
or contact the Detroit Diesel Customer
Support Center at 313–592–5800.
□ Vehicle mileage at the time of
cleaning or replacement
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
DRIVER ACTIONS
Name
Indicator
Lamp
SOLID: Exhaust is at
high temperature and
vehicle is at low speed
or parked.
High Exhaust
System
Temperature
(HEST) Lamp
FLASHING: A Parked
Regeneration is in
process and the system
is not up to temperature.
Indicates a failure of
an Emission Control
Device. The MIL may
illuminate at the same
time as the Check
Engine Lamp.
Malfunction
Indicator
Lamp (MIL)
SOLID: Indicates that
a Regeneration may be
needed.
DPF
Regeneration
Lamp
DPF
Regeneration
Lamp
+
Check
Engine Lamp
Description
FLASHING: Indicates
that a Regeneration is
required as soon as
possible.
FLASHING
+
No change in driving
style is required.
Vehicle can be
driven to end of
the shift. If the MIL
remains on after
three drive cycles,
call for service.
Perform a Parked
Regeneration OR
bring vehicle to
highway speeds
to allow for
an Automatic
Regeneration.
A Parked
Regeneration must
be performed.
ENGINE DERATE
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Indicates that a Parked
Regeneration MUST be
performed.
Driver Action
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
63
DRIVER ACTIONS
Indicator
Lamp
Name
DPF
Regeneration
Lamp
+
Check
Engine Lamp
+
Red Stop
Lamp (RSL)
Table 3
64
FLASHING
+
+
Description
Indicates that a Parked
Regeneration MUST be
performed.
Driver Action
A Parked
Regeneration must
be performed.
ENGINE DERATE
Driver Actions
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
INSTRUMENT PANEL LAMPS
Lamp
Table 4
Indicator
Description
Results
Amber
Warning
Lamp (AWL)
Indicates a fault with the
engine controls.
Vehicle can be
driven to end of
shift. Call for
service.
Red Stop
Lamp (RSL)
Indicates a major engine
fault that may result in
engine damage
Engine derate and/or
shutdown sequence will
be initiated.
Move the vehicle
to the nearest
safe location and
shutdown the
engine. Call for
service
DPF
Regeneration
Lamp
Solid yellow indicates a
parked regeneration is
required.
Blinking yellow, derate,
and/or shutdown are
possible as soot load
continues to increase.
Lamp will shut off during
regeneration.
Lamp Solid - parked
regeneration
required.
Lamp Flashing
- parked
regeneration
required
immediately.
High Exhaust
System
Temperature
(HEST) Lamp
This is an information
indicator. Indicates
exhaust temperature is
above a preset limit and
the unit is operating at
low vehicle speed. Lamp
flashes once every ten
seconds during a parked
regen. Lamp is yellow.
Vehicle can be
driven.
Malfunction
Indicator
Lamp (MIL)
Yellow lamp Indicates a
failure of an Emission
Control device. May
illuminate at the same
time as the Amber
Warning Lamp
Vehicle can be
driven to end of
shift. Call for
service.
Instrument Panel Lamps
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
65
INSTRUMENT PANEL LAMPS
The activation conditions are
listed in Table 5.
Lamp
Lamp Solid
Lamp Flashing
□ Diagnostic Request Switch
□ At the start of every ignition
cycle (a bulb check).
□ When an electronic system
fault occurs (problem
should be diagnosed as
soon as possible).
□ At the start of every ignition
cycle (a bulb check).
□ A potential engine
damaging fault is
detected.
□ Parked regeneration is
required.
□ At the start of every ignition
cycle (a bulb check).
is used to activate the AWL
to flash inactive codes.
□ Last 90 seconds before idle
shutdown if programmed
for override.
□ Idle shutdown or the
Optimized Idle shutdown
occurs.
□ When Engine Protection
Shutdown occurs.
□ Diagnostic Request Switch
is used to activate the RSL
to flash active codes.
When a parked regeneration
is required immediately (If
the lamp flashing is ignored,
derate and/or shutdown could
occur.
□ At the start of every ignition
cycle (a bulb check).
□ Vehicle speed is less than
5 mph and the DPF outlet
temperature is greater
than 525°C (977°F).
Flashes every 10 seconds
during a parked regen
□ At the start of every ignition
cycle (a bulb check).
□ For any emission related
Never flashes
fault (light out when the
fault is inactive)
Table 5
66
Lamp Activation Conditions
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
MAINTENANCE
When performed on a regular basis,
changing the engine oil and filters is
the least costly way of obtaining safe
and reliable vehicle operation. Added
benefits and savings occur when you
check that the valves, fuel injectors,
and oil and cooling circuits are in good
working order during oil changes.
Important: If the engine is stored for
more than 18 months, the oil must be
changed and the lubrication system
must be primed before the engine can
be brought into service. See MBE
4000 Service Manual (6SE420).
The maintenance section of this
manual explains when you should
change your oil and what to look for
when checking for wear or damage.
There are three types of maintenance
schedule:
For additional information, please
contact the Detroit Diesel Customer
Support Center at 313–592–5800.
□ Short Haul
Scheduled Intervals
All service intervals and maintenance
operations are based on the parts and
accessories expressly approved for
your engine.
The scope and frequency of
maintenance work are determined
by the engine's operating conditions:
severe duty, short haul, or long haul.
Evidence of regular maintenance is
essential if a warranty claim has to be
submitted.
If optional equipment is installed, be
sure to comply with the maintenance
requirements for these extra items.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Maintenance Schedule Types
□ Severe Service
□ Long Haul
To determine which schedule to use,
find the distance traveled by the
vehicle in a year, regardless of vehicle
type.
Severe Service — Applies to
vehicles that annually travel up to
10,000 miles (16,000 kilometers) or
that operate under severe conditions.
Examples of Severe Service usage
include: operation on extremely poor
roads or where there is heavy dust
accumulation; constant exposure
to extreme hot, cold, salt-air, or
other extreme climates; frequent
short-distance travel; construction-site
operation; city operation (fire truck,
garbage truck), or farm operation.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
67
MAINTENANCE
Short-Haul — Applies to vehicles
that annually travel up to 15,000
miles (24,000 kilometers) and operate
under normal conditions. Examples
of Short-Haul usage are: operation
primarily in cities and densely
populated areas; local transport with
infrequent freeway travel; or high
percentage of stop-and-go travel.
Long-Haul — Long Haul
(over-the-road transport) is for
vehicles that annually travel more than
30,000 miles (48,000 kilometers),
with minimal city or stop-and-go
operation. Examples of Long-Haul
usage are: regional delivery that
is mostly freeway miles; interstate
transport; or any road operation with
high annual mileage.
Maintenance Intervals — The
three tables show which maintenance
operation must be performed at
the actual distances (in miles or
kilometers) for each maintenance
operation. The schedule of actual
distances is based on the intervals
given in the Maintenance Tables
The three maintenance tables
are: referred to in section
“Maintenance Tables.”
□ Maintenance Interval Table,
Severe Service (listed in Table 7)
□ Maintenance Interval Table, Short
Haul (listed in Table 8)
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
□ Maintenance Interval Table, Long
Haul (listed in Table 9)
Schedule Use
Before placing your new vehicle
in service, determine the correct
maintenance intervals that apply to
your intended use of the vehicle.
Refer to section “Maintenance Tables”
to determine the distance interval at
which each maintenance operation
must be performed to comply with
your vehicle's schedule.
When the vehicle reaches the actual
distance given for an interval,
refer to section “Maintenance Tables”.
When maintenance is required
for hours of engine operation
for severe applications
refer to section “Maintenance
Tables”. Listed in Table 6 provides
an engine hours conversion for
applications that may require service
intervals based on hours and not
mileage. The intervals are based on
a collaboration of field and fleet data.
For a more accurate analyst of when
fluids should be changed, such as
engine oil, refer to publication Engine
Requirements – Lubricating Oil, Fuel
and Filters, (7SE270), available from
authorized Detroit Diesel distributors.
Complete each maintenance operation
at the required interval.
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Maintenance Tables
Procedure
Engine Oil and Filter
Severe (hrs)
Short-Haul
(hrs)
Long-Haul
(hrs)
300 - or 3
Months
500 - or 6
months
—
600
—
—
600 then every
1200
—
—
Fuel Filter
Valve Lash Adjustment
Table 6
Maintenance Intervals by Engine Hours
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
69
MAINTENANCE
Miles (X 1000)
10 12 20 24 30 36 40 48
50 60
Km (X 1000)
17 19 32 38 50 57 68 77
84 100 113 116
Item
1. Lubricating Oil/Filter
70
72
Procedure
R
2. Cooling System
R
R
R
R
R
R
Intervals are based on type of coolant used
as listed in Table 17 in the How to Select
Coolant section of this guide.
3. Valve Lash Checking
and Adjustment
First adjustment at 20,000 mi. (32,000 Km) and
then every 40,000 mi. (68,000 Km)
4. Drive Belts
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
5. Fuel/Water
Separator
Inspect at every fuel fill. Replace when fuel
level is at top of filter.
6. Fuel Filters
R
R
R
R
R
R
7. Air System
I
I
I
I
I
I
8. Exhaust System
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
9
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Air Compressor
10. Aftertreatment
Device
Inspect same as exhaust system interval, ash
removal at 300,000 Miles (480,000 Km)
11. Vibration Damper
Replace at major overhaul or earlier if dented or
leaking.
12. REPTO torsional
damper checking
10,000 mi. (16,000 Km) or 300 hours or 1 year,
whichever comes first.
All items are described in refer to section “Preventive Maintenance
Intervals”
I – Inspect, service, test, correct or replace as necessary.
R – Replace.
Table 7
70
Maintenance Intervals (Severe Service)
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
15 30 45 60
Miles (X 1000)
75 90
105 120 135 150 165 180
25 50 75 100 125 150 169 193 217 241 266 290
Km (X 1000)
Item
1. Lubricating
Oil/Filter
Procedure
R R
2. Cooling System
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
Intervals are based on type of coolant used
as listed in Table 17 in the How to Select
Coolant section of this guide.
3. Valve Lash
Checking and
Adjustment
First adjustment at 30,000 mi. (50,000 Km) and then
every 60,000 mi. (100,000 Km)
4. Drive Belts
I
I
5. Fuel/Water
Separator
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Inspect at every fuel fill. Replace when fuel
level is at top of filter.
6. Fuel Filters
R
R
R
R
R
R
7. Air System
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
8. Exhaust System
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
9. Air Compressor
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
10. Aftertreatment
Device
Inspect same as exhaust system interval, ash
removal at 300,000 miles (480,000 Km)
11. Vibration
Damper
Replace at major overhaul or earlier if dented or leaking.
12. REPTO torsional
damper checking
First inspection at 60,000 mi. (100,000 Km) or 3000
hours and then every 30,000 mi (50,000 Km) or 1500
hours.
All items are described in refer to section “Preventive Maintenance
Intervals.”
I – Inspect, service, test, correct or replace as necessary.
R – Replace.
Table 8
Maintenance Intervals (Short Haul)
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
71
MAINTENANCE
Miles (X 1000)
30 60
90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360
Km (X 1000)
50 100 150 198 241 290 338 386 435 483 531 579
Item
Procedure
1. Lubricating
Oil/Filter
R
2. Cooling System
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
Intervals are based on type of coolant used
as listed in Table 17 in the How to Select
Coolant section of this guide.
3. Valve Lash Check
and Adjustment
First adjustment at 60,000 mi. (100,000 Km) and then
every 120,000 mi. (198,000 Km)
4. Drive Belts
I
5. Fuel/Water
Separator
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Inspect at every fuel fill. Replace when fuel
level is at top of filter.
6. Fuel Filters
R
R
R
R
R
R
7. Air System
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
8. Exhaust System
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
9. Air Compressor
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
10 Aftertreatment
Device
Inspect same as exhaust system interval, ash
removal at 300,000 Miles (480,000 Km)
11. Vibration Damper
Inspect at oil changes. Replace at major overhaul or
earlier if dented or leaking.
12. REPTO Torsional
Damper Checking
First inspection at 60,000 mi. (100,000 Km) or 3000
hours and then every 30,000 mi (50,000 Km) or 1500
hours.
All items are described in refer to section “Preventive Maintenance
Intervals.”
I – Inspect, service test, correct or replace as necessary.
R – Replace.
Table 9
72
Maintenance Intervals (Long Haul)
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Preventive Maintenance
Intervals
This section describes the items listed
in the tables.
As the operator of a vehicle, routine
“Daily” inspections of the engine and
chassis should be performed. This
will provide the best opportunity to
identify major concerns or concerns
that could stretch a longer time span
like slow coolant loss.
For new or stored engines,
refer to section “OPERATING
INSTRUCTIONS FOR STARTING
THE ENGINE” in this guide.
Item 1 – Lubricating Oil Filter
Lubricating Oil: – Check the oil
level daily with the engine stopped.
If the engine has just been stopped
and is warm, wait approximately 20
minutes to allow the oil to drain back
into the oil pan before checking. Add
the proper grade of oil to maintain
the correct level on the dipstick.
See Figure 25.
Figure 25
Oil Dipstick
NOTICE:
When adding lubricating oil, do
not overfill. Oil may be blown out
through the crankcase breather
and/or aeration of the oil can occur.
All diesel engines are designed to use
some oil, so the periodic addition of
oil is normal.
NOTICE:
If the oil level is constantly above
normal and excess oil has not been
added to the crankcase, consult
with an authorized Detroit Diesel
service outlet for the cause. Fuel or
coolant dilution of lubricating oil can
result in serious engine damage.
Before adding lubricating oil,
refer to section “How to Select
Lubricating Oil” in this guide.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
73
MAINTENANCE
Lubricating Oil Filter: – The oil
filter is a cartridge style element and
is located on the front right side of the
engine. See Figure 26. If followed
correctly, an oil filter change can be
performed quickly with minimal oil
cleanup. Refer to section “How to
Replace the Lube Oil and Filter” in
this guide.
Item 2 – Cooling System
Coolant Flush and Fill – Proper
maintenance of the cooling system is
vital to its performance and longevity.
The cooling system must, on a
constant basis, deal with cavitation,
temperature/pressure variations, and
continuous threats on the additive
package. Once the additives have been
depleted from the coolant, it will only
be a matter of time until the engine
components suffer. Refer to section
“How to Select Coolant“ in this guide.
Cooling System Inspection – Inspect
the cooling system as follows:
Figure 26
HOT COOLANT
Lubricating Oil Filter
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from slipping and
falling, immediately clean up any
spilled liquids.
To avoid scalding from the
expulsion of hot coolant, never
remove the cooling system
pressure cap while the engine is
at operating temperature. Wear
adequate protective clothing
(face shield, rubber gloves,
apron, and boots). Remove the
cap slowly to relieve pressure.
Make a visual check of all lubricating
oil lines for wear and/or chafing. If
any indication of wear is evident,
replace the oil lines and correct the
cause.
1. Inspect the radiator, condenser,
coolant pump, engine oil cooler,
freeze plugs, and heat exchanger
for damage and leaks.
Check for oil leaks after starting the
engine.
2. Check all cooling system pipes
and hoses for damage and leaks;
74
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
ensure they are positioned to
avoid chafing, and are securely
fastened.
3. Check the outside of the radiator
and condenser for blockage.
Check fins for damage; straighten
them if necessary.
Proper maintenance of the cooling
system is vital to its performance
and longevity. The cooling system
must, on a constant basis, deal with
cavitation, temperature/pressure
swings, and continuous threats
on additive package. Once the
additives have been depleted from
the coolant, it is only be a matter of
time until the engine components
suffer. Refer to section “How to Select
Coolant” in this guide.
Coolant Inhibitor Test Intervals
– Coolant inhibitor level should
be checked at the intervals as
listed in Table 17 in the How to Select
Coolant section of this guide.
If topping off is needed, add coolant
which is identical to the initial fill
coolant.
service categories (Severe, Short Haul,
and Long Haul) require a “first time”
valve lash adjustment at a shorter
interval. After the initial adjustment,
all others are based on the same
mileage intervals. Refer to section
“Maintenance Tables” in this guide.
Proper valve lash clearance allows
the engine to produce the best
possible performance with the lowest
emissions. Valve lash adjustments
should be performed by an authorized
Detroit Diesel maintenance or repair
facility.
Item 4 – Drive Belts
Belts should be neither too tight nor
too loose. Belts that are too tight
impose extra loads on the crankshaft,
fan and/or alternator bearings,
shortening both belt and bearing life.
Excessively overtightened belts can
result in crankshaft breakage. A loose
belt will slip and generate excessive
heat that may cause damage to the belt
and accessory drive components.
Item 3 – Valve Lash Checking
and Adjustment
Valve lash checking and adjustment
should be performed per the prescribed
under the proper service category for
the engine, refer to section “Scheduled
Intervals” in this guide. All three
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
75
MAINTENANCE
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from rotating belts
and fans, do not remove and
discard safety guards.
Uneven belt wear can indicate a loose,
wore out, or bad bearing on the auto
tensioner. A build up of dirt or grime
around the front bearing surface of the
wheel can indicate a future bearing
failure due to inadequate lubrication.
Item 5 – Fuel/Water Separator
Belt Replacement – Drive belts (V
and poly-V) should be replaced every
2,000 hours or 100,000 miles (160,000
km).
After an extended time in service,
minor rib cracks may appear, usually
one or two cracks per inch is
considered normal. See Figure 27.
A concern occurs when the belt ribs
exhibit severe multiple cracking or
“chunking”. At this point, the belt
should be replaced.
If the vehicle is equipped with a
fuel/water separator located on the
frame rail, follow the manufactures
recommendation on draining the
trapped water and priming the fuel
system. Refer to section “Fuel/Water
Separator Prefilter Element Cleaning”
or refer to section “Replace Davco
382 Fuel Pro®Fuel/Water Separator
Element” in this guide.
Item 6 – Fuel Filters
The engine uses a cartridge style fuel
filter. If followed correctly, a fuel filter
change can be performed quickly with
minimal cleanup. Refer to section
“How to Replace the Fuel Filters” in
this guide.
Figure 27
Minor Rib Cracking
Auto Tensioner – Auto tensioners
are usually maintenance free for the
life of the engine. However, routine
inspections should be performed.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
One method of determining when
filters are plugged to the extent that
they need replacing is based on the
fuel pressure at the fuel filter housing.
See an authorized Detroit Diesel repair
facility to determine a clogged filter.
The maximum pressure difference
between the inlet and outlet of the fuel
filter housing is 0.3 bar (4.0 psi).
NOTE:
Filter change intervals may be
shortened to conform to established
preventive maintenance schedules,
but should never be extended.
Item 7– Air System
Air Cleaner – The air cleaner element
should be inspected per the scheduled
maintenance or more often if the
engine is operated under severe dust
conditions.
Replace the element, if necessary.
Check the gaskets for deterioration
and replace, if necessary. If the dry
type air cleaner is equipped with an
aspirator, check for aspirator damage
or clogging. Clean, repair or replace,
as necessary.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
NOTICE:
Do not allow the air inlet restriction
to exceed 5.0 kPa (20 in. H2
O) under any engine operating
conditions. A clogged air cleaner
element will cause excessive intake
restriction and reduced air supply
to the engine resulting in increased
fuel consumption, inefficient engine
operation and reduced engine life.
Inspect the entire air system for leaks
daily. Look especially for torn air inlet
piping or boots and loose or damaged
clamps. Have worn or damaged parts
repaired or replaced, as required.
Retighten loose connections.
Air Cleaner Replacement – Dry
type air cleaner elements should be
replaced after one year of service or
when the maximum allowable air
intake restriction has been reached,
whichever comes first.
Air-to-Air Charge Cooler –
Periodically inspect the air-to-air
charge cooler for buildup of dirt, mud,
etc. and wash off using a mild soap
solution. Check the charge cooler,
ductwork, and flexible connections for
leaks and have repaired or replaced,
as required.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
77
MAINTENANCE
Item 8– Exhaust System
Item 11 – Vibration Damper
The exhaust manifold retaining bolts
and other connections should be
inspected for leaks. The exhaust pipe
rain cap should be checked for proper
operation, if so equipped. With the
introduction of an Aftertreatment
system, the sealing of the exhaust
system is critical and should be
inspected regularly.
The viscous vibration damper should
be inspected periodically and replaced
if dented or leaking.See Figure 28 for
“Viscous Vibration Damper"
Item 9 – Air Compressor
The air compressor incorporates
three of the major systems of a diesel
engine (air, lubrication, and coolant).
Proper inspection of air compressor
would include inspecting for air, oil,
and coolant leaks. Due to inadequate
internal sealing air compressors,
when failed, can produce excessive
crankcase pressure or allow an engine
to ingest oil.
1. Viscous Vibration Damper
Item 10 – Aftertreatment System
(ATS)
Figure 28
There is a need to periodically remove
accumulated ash, derived from engine
lube oil, from the filter. The ash
does not oxidize in the filter during
the regeneration process and must
be removed through a cleaning
procedure. All Detroit Diesel ATD
equipped engines will illuminate a
dashboard warning lamp indicating
the need for ash cleaning.
Heat from normal engine operation
may, over a period of time, cause the
fluid within the damper to break down
and lose its dampening properties.
For this reason, the viscous vibration
damper must be replaced at time
of normal major engine overhaul,
regardless of apparent condition.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Viscous Vibration
Damper
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Item 12 – REPTO Torsional
Damper Checking
The REPTO accessory drive is an
option on the MBE4000 engine. The
drive provides continuous live power
anytime the engine is operating. The
REPTO is driven by the camshaft gear
and is an integral part of a unique
SAE#1 flywheel housing. All REPTO
installations require a torsional
coupling installed at the flange of
the drive unit (i.e. hydraulic pump).
The torsional coupling incorporates a
rubber element designed to reduce the
unwanted stresses from reaching the
engine. See Figure 29.
Figure 29
MBE4000 REPTO
Connection Illustration
REPTO Torsional Damper
Inspection — Inspect the REPTO
torsional damper as follows:
1. Inspect the outer casing of the
torsional damper for dents or
bulges. If damage is found
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
replace the damper. Regardless
of the condition, the torsional
coupling must be replaced at
normal engine overhaul.
2. Inspect the torsional damper
rubber element as follows:
[a] Check the rubber element for
bulges or cracks. If damage is
found replace the damper.
[b] Inspect the rubber element
teeth for wear. If the teeth
are worn to less than one-half
of the new part length (11.0
mm [0.433 in.]), replace the
torsional damper. See Figure
30.
Figure 30
REPTO Torsional
Damper
REPTO Torsional Damper
Cleaning — Clean the REPTO
torsional damper as follows:
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
79
MAINTENANCE
The torsional damper coupling
will withstand normal exposure to
hydraulic oil, diesel fuel, anti-freeze
solutions, and muriatic acid. The
coupling should be washed with a
mild soap solution and rinsed with
water after contact with the above
items. The coupling can be power
washed without damage as long as it is
installed in the vehicle. If the coupling
is power washed when not connected
to a cardan shaft, debris may be forced
internally at the bolt flanges damaging
the coupling.
positioned to avoid chafing, and
properly secured.
Required Maintenance
Operations
The following sections describe the
required maintenance operations .
Engine Inspecting
Inspect engine as follows:
1. Visually check the engine for
signs of leakage. A slight
dampness at the sealing points is
no cause for concern.
NOTE:
More severe leaks, combined with a
continual loss of oil, must be corrected
without delay.
2. Visually inspect all lines and
hoses. Listen for any sound of
leaking. Make sure all pipes and
hoses are undamaged, correctly
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
HOW-TO SECTION
This section covers Detroit Diesel's
recommendations on how to select
lubricating oil, diesel fuel, and coolant
and includes basic engine maintenance
procedures which can be performed
by the operator.
NOTICE:
Lubricating oil must have a sulfated
ash level less than 1.0% mass;
currently referred to as CJ–4 oil
NOTICE:
The manufacturer's warranty
applicable to MBE 4000 engines
provides in part that the provisions
of such warranty shall not apply
to any engine unit that has been
subject to misuse, negligence or
accident. Accordingly, malfunctions
attributable to neglect or failure to
follow the manufacturer's fuel or
lubricating recommendations may
not be within the coverage of the
warranty.
How to Select Lubricating
Oil
The selection of the proper lubricating
oil is important to achieve the long
and trouble-free service which Detroit
Diesel engines are designed to
provide. The proper lubricating oil for
model year 2007 MBE 4000 engines
is selected based on SAE viscosity
grade and API (American Petroleum
Institute) service designation. Only
oils licensed to display the API symbol
should be used. See Figure 31.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Figure 31
API Lubricant Symbol
Lubricant Requirements
API CJ-4 oils must be used in
engines meeting January 2007,
and later build, exhaust emission
regulations.
Cold Weather Starting
At ambient temperatures below
–20°C (–4°F) when sufficient starter
speed cannot be achieved with SAE
15W-40 oils, the use of 5W-XX oils
and 10W-XX oils (XX =30 or 40) is
allowed to improve starting.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
81
HOW-TO SECTION
NOTICE:
Monograde oils should not be
used in MBE 4000 engines,
regardless of API service
classification. Monograde oils
gel at lower ambient temperatures,
reducing lubricant flow, and
they do not provide adequate
lubricity at higher engine operating
temperatures. These factors can
result in severe engine damage.
Figure 32
Engine Oil Temperature
Ranges
Synthetic Oils
The oils must be API CJ-4
that have demonstrated field
performance in Detroit Diesel engines.
These oils must possess a High
Temperature/High Shear (HT/HS)
viscosity of 3.7 minimum. For further
information, refer to publication
Engine Requirements – Lubricating
Oil, Fuel and Filters, (7SE270),
available from authorized Detroit
Diesel distributors.
Synthetic oils may be used in Detroit
Diesel engines, provided they are API
licensed and meet the performance
and chemical requirements of
non-synthetic oils outlined in this
publication. Synthetic oils offer
improved low-temperature flow
properties and high-temperature
oxidation resistance. However,
they are generally more costly than
non-synthetic oils.
Select the SAE class (viscosity) on the
basis of the average air temperature
for the season. See Figure 32.
Product information about synthetic
oils should be reviewed carefully.
Performance additive systems often
respond differently in synthetic oils.
NOTE:
Continued use of a single SAE class
will result in frequent oil changes. For
this reason, view the temperature
ranges for the various SAE classes.
Their use does not permit extension of
recommended oil drain intervals.
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All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
The Use of Supplemental
Additives
Lubricants meeting the Detroit
Diesel specifications outlined in this
publication already contain a balanced
additive treatment. Supplemental
additives are generally not necessary
and can even be harmful. These
additives may be marketed as either
oil treatments or engine treatments and
are discouraged from use in Detroit
Diesel engines.
Engine damage resulting from the
use of such materials is not covered
by your Detroit Diesel Corporation
warranty. Detroit Diesel will not
provide statements beyond this
publication relative to their use.
Engine Application
Long Haul — Highway Truck & Motor
Coach — operates more than 60,000
miles (100,000 kilometers) per year
Sort Haul — City Transit — operates
up to 60,000 miles (100,000
kilometers) per year
Severe Service — Fire Truck or
Crash/Rescue Vehicle — operates up
to 6000 miles (9,600 kilometers) or
under severe conditions
Table 10
When to Change Oil
The length of time an engine may
operate before an oil change depends
upon the lubricant and fuel used,
engine oil consumption, and the
operating cycle.
USED ENGINE OIL
To avoid injury to skin from
contact with the contaminants in
used engine oil, wear protective
gloves and apron.
The maximum interval at which
the engine may operate before the
oil and filters must be changed is
listed in Table 10.
Drain Interval
30,000 Miles (50,000 km)
15,000 Miles (25,000 km)
10,000 Miles (16,000 km), 300 hours
or 1 year, whichever comes first
Oil Drain and Filter Change Interval
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
83
HOW-TO SECTION
Oil analysis may be used to determine
whether this interval should be
shortened, but it should not be used
to lengthen the interval. For detailed
information refer to publication
Engine Requirements – Lubricating
Oil, Fuel and Filters (7SE270),
available from authorized Detroit
Diesel distributors.
Disposing of Waste Oil — Dispose
of used lubricating oil and filters in an
environmentally responsible manner,
according to federal (EPA) and/or state
recommendations. The disposal of
waste oil may be best addressed by the
engine oil supplier, who may accept
responsibility for proper disposal of
this material as part of the business of
providing lubricant.
How to Replace the Lube
Oil and Filter
1. Chock the tires, place the
transmission in neutral, and set
the parking brake.
NOTE:
Change the engine oil only when
the engine is at a temperature of
approximately 60°C (140°F).
2. Clean the outside of the oil filter
housing, then unscrew the oil
filter cap from the housing.
NOTE:
Use care to prevent foreign objects
from entering the filter housing.
3. Using a 36-mm socket, unscrew
the cap and filter and allow the oil
to drain into the housing. After
draining, remove the assembly
from the housing. (see Figure 33).
Filters are an integral part of the
lubricating oil system. Proper
filter selection and maintenance
are important to satisfactory engine
performance and service life.
Filters should be used to maintain
a clean system, not to clean up a
contaminated system.
Replace Lubricating Oil and
Filter
Drain oil as follows:
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
7. Insert a new filter element into
the cap.
8. Insert the element and cap
assembly into the housing.
Torque the cap to 25 N·m (18
lb·ft).
9. Drain the oil from the oil pan.
1. Oil Filter
Cap
3. Oil Filter
Housing
2. O-ring
Figure 33
Oil Filter Element
[a] Place a suitable receptacle
beneath the oil drain plug on
the underside of the oil pan.
[b] Carefully unscrew the oil
drain plug on the oil pan and
allow the oil to drain out
(See Figure 34).
FIRE
To avoid injury from fire, keep
open flames, sparks, electrical
resistance heating elements, or
other potential ignition sources
away when draining lubrication
oil. Do not smoke when draining
lubricating oil.
4. Remove the element by pressing
and twisting the side and
detaching it from the cap.
5. Remove the oil filter O-ring and
discard it. Lightly grease a new
O-ring with engine oil and install
it on the filter cap.
6. Check the filter housing for any
debris.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Figure 34
Engine Oil Drain Plug,
Oil Pan
[c] Discard the O-ring on the oil
drain plug.
10. Install the oil drain plug, using a
new O-ring. Tighten the plug to
65 N·m (48 lb·ft).
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
85
HOW-TO SECTION
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from slipping and
falling, immediately clean up any
spilled liquids.
11. Add new engine oil through
the oil fill tube (See Figure
35) until the maximum fill level
on the oil dipstick has been
reached.Listed in Table 11 are the
engine fill capacities.
Table 11
Figure 35
Oil Fill Tube
Oil Pan Capacity
Engine Oil System Fill Capacity
(Includes oil filter)
36 L (38 qts)
39.5 L (41.7 qts)
Engine Lubricating Oil Capacity
NOTICE:
Keep the engine running at idling
speed until an oil pressure reading is
obtained. If no oil pressure is shown
after approximately 10 seconds,
stop the engine and determine the
cause. Failure to do so could result
in engine damage.
To avoid injury when working
near or on an operating engine,
remove loose items of clothing,
jewelry, tie back or contain long
hair that could be caught in any
moving part causing injury.
12. Start the engine with the
accelerator pedal in the idle
position. Monitor the oil pressure
gauge.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
13. Check the filter and oil drain plug
for signs of leakage.
14. Stop the engine. Check the oil
level again after approximately
five minutes. If necessary, add oil
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
up to the maximum fill level on
the oil dipstick.
Requirements – Lubricating Oil, Fuel
and Filters (7SE270), available from
authorized Detroit Diesel distributors.
How to Select Diesel Fuel
Detroit Diesel engines in 2007
are designed to operate ONLY on
Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) fuel,
see Figure 36.
NOTICE:
Use only Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel
(ULSD) fuel (15 ppm sulfur content
maximum), based on ASTM
D2622 test procedure. Using fuel
other than ULSD will damage the
Aftertreatment Device.
Fuel Contamination
Figure 36
Quality
Fuel quality is an important factor
in obtaining satisfactory engine
performance, long engine life, and
acceptable exhaust emission levels.
In general, fuels meeting the
properties of ASTM designation
D 975 (grades 1-D and 2-D) have
provided satisfactory performance.
The fuels used must be clean,
completely distilled, stable, and
non-corrosive. For more information
regarding the significance of these
properties and selection of the proper
fuel, refer to publication, Engine
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Generally, fuel contamination
occurs as the result of improper fuel
handling. The most common types
of contamination are water, dirt, and
microbial growth (“black slime”).
The formation of varnishes and
gums resulting from poor stability or
extended storage (“stale fuel”) also
affects fuel quality. The best treatment
for contamination is prevention by
maintaining a clean storage system
and choosing a reputable fuel supplier.
Supplemental additives are not
recommended due to potential
injector system or engine damage.
Our experience has been that such
additives increase operating costs
without providing benefit.
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HOW-TO SECTION
The use of supplemental fuel additives
does not necessarily void the engine
warranty. However, repair expenses
which result from fuel system or
engine component malfunctions or
damage attributed to their use will
not be covered.
These products should be
accompanied by performance
data supporting their merit. It is
not the policy of Detroit Diesel
Corporation to test, evaluate, approve
or endorse such products.
Biodiesel — Biodiesel fuels meeting
ASTM D 6751 specification, prior
to blending can be mixed up to 5%
maximum by volume in petroleum
diesel fuel. Detroit Diesel highly
recommends biodiesel fuels made
from soybean or rapeseed oil through
the proper transesterification reaction
process. Other feedstock source
of biodiesel fuels such as animal
fat and used cooking oils are not
recommended by Detroit Diesel. The
resulting mixture must meet ASTM D
975 specification. More information
is available in the Detroit Diesel
publication Lubricating Oil, Fuel, and
Filters (7SE270).
Failures attributed to the use of
biodiesel fuel will not be covered
by Detroit Diesel product warranty.
Also, any engine performance
problem related to the use of biodiesel
fuel would not be recognized
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
nor considered Detroit Diesel's
responsibility.
Prohibited Additives
The following fuel additives are not
allowed and MUST NOT be mixed
with diesel fuel:
Used Lubricating Oil — Do not use
fuel blended with used lubricating oil.
Detroit Diesel specifically prohibits
the use of used lubricating oil in diesel
fuel.
NOTICE:
Burning used lubricating oil in
fuel cannot be tolerated as it will
cause the diesel particulate filter to
prematurely plug with ash.
Used lubricating oil contains
combustion acids and particulate
materials which can severely erode
fuel injector components, resulting in
loss of power and increased exhaust
emissions. In addition, the use of
drained lubricating oil will increase
maintenance requirements due to filter
plugging and combustion deposits.
Fuel Additives with Sulfur
or Sulfated Ash — Do not
use non-approved fuel additives
containing sulfur or sulfated ash.
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Gasoline — The addition of
gasoline to diesel fuel will create a
serious fire hazard. The presence
of gasoline in diesel fuel will reduce
fuel cetane number and increase
combustion temperatures.
FIRE
To avoid increased risk of a fuel
fire, do not mix gasoline and
diesel fuel.
An optional fuel/water separator may
be installed in place of the standard
primary filter.
Replace Main Fuel Filter Element
Change the main fuel filter element as
follows:
1. Open the fuel tank fill cap to
release pressure in the fuel
system. Replace and tighten the
cap.
2. Clean the outside of the fuel filter
housing (See Figure 37).
Tanks which contain a mixture of
gasoline and diesel fuel should be
drained and cleaned as soon as
possible.
Detroit Diesel Corporation will not be
responsible for any detrimental effects
it determines resulted from adding
drained lubricating oil or gasoline to
the diesel fuel.
How to Replace the Fuel
Filters
Filters are an integral part of the
fuel system. Proper filter selection
and maintenance are important to
satisfactory engine operation and
service life. Filters should be used to
maintain a clean system, not to clean
up a contaminated system.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
1. Filter Housing Cap
2. O-ring
3. Filter Element
Figure 37
Main Fuel Filter
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89
HOW-TO SECTION
3. Using a 36-mm socket, unscrew
the cap on the main fuel filter
housing. Remove the cap and lift
the filter element a short distance
within the filter housing allowing
the fuel to drain off the filter.
4. Remove the filter element from
the cap and clean the filter cap.
Discard the filter element and the
O-ring from the cap.
NOTICE:
To prevent damage to the filter
housing, do not allow dirt to get into
the filter housing.
5. Clean the filter housing cap.
6. Replace the O-ring.
7. Lubricate the rubber seal, on the
bottom of the filter element with
a light coat of fuel oil and insert
it into the filter housing. Push
down and rotate the filter element
while installing to ensure it is
seated properly at the base of the
housing.
8. Fill fuel filter housing with clean
fuel oil.
9. Install a new O-ring on the filter
cap and screw the cap onto the
filter housing. Tighten the cap to
25 N·m (18 lb·ft).
10. Prime the fuel system by working
the hand pump until resistance is
felt.
NOTE:
There should be a strong resistance
in the hand pump, caused by the
pressure build-up within the fuel
system.
11. Crank the engine for 30 seconds
at a time, but no longer. Before
cranking again, wait at least two
minutes, then crank again. The
engine should start within four
30-second attempts.
12. Once the engine starts allow it to
idle for at least one minute or until
idle is smooth before applying
the throttle. Check the fuel filter
housing for leaks.
NOTE:
A properly seated filter element will
hold the fuel in the filter housing and
prevent it from draining back to the
tank. If the fuel does not stay in the
housing the element is not seated
properly, repeat steps 1 and 2.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Fuel/Water Separator Prefilter
Element Cleaning
tighten firmly, using hands
only.
Clean the prefilter element as follows:
1. Loosen the bleed screw.
See Figure 38.
2. Unscrew the drain plug and drain
the fuel in the prefilter.
3. Twist off the sight bowl and
remove the filter element from the
separator head.
4. Separate the sight bowl from
the filter element. Clean the
sight bowl. Discard the old filter
element and both O-rings.
5. Replace the filter element and
O-rings.
6. Assemble the sight bowl and the
prefilter element.
[a] Lubricate one O-ring with a
light coating of engine oil and
insert it into the sight bowl.
[b] Screw the prefilter element
and sight bowl together.
7. Assemble the prefilter element
and the separator head.
[a] Lubricate the other O-ring
with a light coating of engine
oil and insert it into the open
end of the prefilter element.
[b] Screw the prefilter element
onto the separator head and
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Figure 38
Fuel/Water Separator
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91
HOW-TO SECTION
NOTE:
Do not use tools to tighten the prefilter
element.
8. Tighten the drain plug.
9. Prime the fuel system.
[a] If equipped with a hand pump
on the fuel/water separator,
work the hand pump until
resistance is felt.
NOTE:
There should be a strong resistance
in the hand pump, caused by the
pressure build-up within the fuel
system.
[b] Crank the engine for 30
seconds at a time, but no
longer. Before cranking the
engine again, wait at least two
minutes. The engine should
start within four 30 second
attempts.
Replace Davco 382 Fuel
Pro®Fuel/Water Separator
Element
Replace the fuel/water separator
element as follows:
Figure 39
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Davco 382 Fuel
Pro®Fuel/Water
Separator
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
1. Remove the vent cap, open the
drain valve and drain fuel into
approved container, until level is
below the collar. See Figure 39.
2. Using a collar wrench remove
collar and cover.
3. Remove the filter element from
the separator head and discard
filter cover seal and vent seal.
Dispose of filter properly.
4. Clean the cover and the mounting
surface on the body.
5. Install the filter element with
bottom grommet and new cover
seal. Install the cover and collar.
Hand tighten only.
10. Start the engine and raise the rpm
for one minute to purge the air.
After the air is purged stop the
engine, loosen the vent cap until
the fuel level lowers to just above
the collar. Tighten the vent cap
by hand. Check for leaks.
Replace Davco 382/382E Fuel
Pro® Fuel Filter Element
The Davco 382/323E Fuel Pro
diesel fuel filter system consists of a
permanently mounted fuel processor,
a replaceable filter element and sealing
grommet assembly, a filter spring, a
see-thru cover and seal, a cover collar,
and a vent cap and seal. See Figure 40.
6. Fill cover completely with clean
fuel through the vent cap opening.
7. Replace seal on the vent cap and
install in cover. Hand tighten
only.
NOTE:
Do not use tools to tighten the collar
or vent cap.
8. Tighten the drain plug.
9. Crank the engine for 30 seconds
at a time, but no longer. Before
cranking the engine again, wait
at least two minutes. The engine
should start within four, 30
second attempts.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
93
HOW-TO SECTION
3. A fuel shutoff valve may be
installed on the discharge side of
the fuel filter. If installed, turn the
handle on the shutoff valve to the
closed position (perpendicular to
the valve).
4. Open the drain valve at the base
of the fuel processor and drain the
fuel until it is below the bottom
of the filter in the see-thru cover.
Close the drain valve. The fuel
may be returned to the tank.
5. Using filter collar/vent cap wrench
Davco part number 382002 or
equivalent, remove the collar
by turning counterclockwise.
Remove the cover, filter spring
and cover seal ring by lifting
straight up and over the filter
element.
Figure 40
6. Remove the element from the
center stud (fuel outlet pipe)
by pulling upward and twisting
slightly.
Davco 382E Fuel
Pro Fuel Processor
Assembly
The system also includes a fuel heater
element, thermostatic switch and
wiring harness.
Replace the element as follows:
1. Shut down the engine and allow
it to cool.
2. With the engine at ambient
temperature and cool to the touch,
place a suitable container under
the filter.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
NOTE:
Current filter elements include an
integral sealing grommet. If a former
element is replaced, make sure the
separate sealing grommet is removed
from the center stud before installing
the new element.
7. Dispose of the used element and
grommet in an environmentally
responsible manner, according
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
to federal (EPA) and/or state
recommendations.
8. Check to make sure the sealing
grommet is included in the base
of the replacement filter element,
then install the element onto the
center stud by pushing down and
twisting slightly.
9. Check to make sure the spring is
installed at the top of the cover.
If missing, this spring must be
replaced to insure proper filter
operation. Wipe the cover lip and
cover seal clean.
NOTICE:
Do not use a wrench of any kind
to tighten the collar, since this may
lead to overtightening, which can
damage the collar and/or the cover.
10. After making sure the seal is
properly positioned at the base of
the cover, install the cover and
collar onto the fuel processor.
Tighten the collar by hand until
secure.
11. Using filter collar/vent cap
wrench 382002 or equivalent,
remove the vent cap from the top
of the cover by turning the cap
counterclockwise. Fill the cover
full of clean fuel. After making
sure the O-ring seal is installed on
the vent cap, reinstall the cap and
tighten by hand.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
NOTICE:
To avoid cover or vent cap damage,
do not use tools to tighten the vent
cap.
12. Open the fuel shutoff valve (if
installed) and start the engine.
When the lubrication system
reaches its normal operating
pressure, increase engine speed to
high idle for 2 to 3 minutes.
NOTICE:
Do not allow the fuel level in the
see-thru cover to fall below the top
of the collar, since this may lead
to interruption of the fuel flow and
engine stalling.
13. After the air is purged and with
the engine still running, loosen
the vent cap. The fuel level in
the cover will start falling. When
the fuel level falls to the top of
the collar, tighten the vent cap
quickly by hand.
14. Shut down the engine and tighten
the collar again by hand . Restart
the engine and check for leaks.
NOTE:
The filter cover will not fill completely
during engine operation. It will
gradually fill over time, and the fuel
level will rise as the filter medium
becomes clogged. The filter element
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
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HOW-TO SECTION
does nor require changing until
the fuel level has risen to the top
of the element, or after one year of
service, whichever comes first.
NOTICE:
To avoid cover or vent dap damage,
do not use tools to tighten the vent
cap.
Engine Out of Fuel — How
to Restart
When an engine has run out of fuel,
there is a definite procedure to follow
when restarting it.
NOTICE:
The starting motor and fuel pump
should never be used to prime the
fuel filters. Prolonged used of the
starting motor and fuel pump to
prime the fuel system can result in
damage to the starter, fuel pump
and injectors and cause erratic
running of the engine due to the
amount of air in the fuel lines and
filters.
Engines with Fuel Pro Filters
Use the following procedure for an
engine with Fuel Pro filters.
1. Remove the vent cap from
the top of the filter by turning
counterclockwise. Fill the cover
full of clean fuel. After making
sure the O-ring seal is installed on
the vent plug, reinstall the plug
and tighten by hand only.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
NOTICE:
Do not allow the fuel level in the
see-thru cover to fall below the top
of the collar, since this may lead
to interruption of the fuel flow and
engine stalling.
2. Start the engine and allow the
lubrication system to reach its
normal operating pressure, then
increase engine speed to high idle
for 2 to 3 minutes.
3. After the air is purged and with
the engine still running, loosen
the vent cap on the filter cover.
The fuel level in the cover will
start falling. When the fuel level
falls to the top of the collar on the
Fuel Pro cover, tighten the vent
cap quickly by hand.
Engine Mounted Fuel Filter
Use the following procedure for an
engine mounted fuel filter.
1. If the engine is equipped with a
hand priming pump located on
the fuel filter module, operate the
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
priming pump for two to three
minutes or until resistance is felt.
2. If the engine is equipped with
only a priming port located on
the fuel filter module, have an
authorized repair facility prime
the fuel system.
NOTICE:
To prevent damage to engine
components, keep the water
moving at all times while cleaning.
Never direct water onto electrical
components, plug connectors, seals
or flexible hoses.
3. Crank the engine for 30 seconds
at a time, but no longer. Before
cranking the engine again, wait
at least two minutes. The engine
should start within four 30 second
attempts.
4. If the engine fails to start, ensure
the vehicle has adequate fuel and
the fuel system is not leaking
externally.
5. If problem persists, call an
authorized repair facility.
How to Clean the Engine
Important: Observe all environmental
protection regulations.
High-Pressure Cleaning
Equipment
Information on suitable cleaning
and protective products is available
from any authorized dealer. Note the
equipment manufacturer's operating
instructions.
To avoid injury, wear a face shield
or goggles.
Comply with the minimum working
distance between the high-pressure
nozzle and the surface being cleaned:
□ Approximately 700 mm (28
inches) for circular pattern jets
□ Approximately 300 mm (12
inches) for 25-degree flat jets and
dirt cutters
How to Clean the Cooling
System
Important: Collect the used coolant,
cleaning solutions, and washing
liquids and dispose of them in an
environmentally responsible manner.
Clean as follows:
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
97
HOW-TO SECTION
Degreasing
NOTICE:
Clean at moderate pressures only;
otherwise the fins of the radiator
grille could be damaged.
1. First remove debris (dust, insects,
etc.) from the fins of the radiator
grille.
EYE INJURY
To avoid injury from flying debris
when using compressed air, wear
adequate eye protection (face
shield or safety goggles) and do
not exceed 276 kPa (40 psi) air
pressure.
Degrease as follows:
1. Fill the cooling system with a 5%
solution (1.6 ounces per quart of
water — 50 grams per liter) of a
mildly alkaline cleaning agent,
such as sodium carbonate.
2. Run the engine at moderate speed
until the thermostat starts to open,
at an operating temperature of
approximately 80°C (176°F).
Then run it for about five minutes
longer. Shut down the engine and
allow it to cool to approximately
50°C (112°F).
2. Remove the debris by blowing
them through with compressed air
or spraying them out with water.
Work from the rear of the radiator
(in the opposite direction of the
normal cooling air flow).
3. Drain the coolant when
the engine is cold. For
detailed procedures, see the
vehicle/chassis maintenance
manual. For types of coolant,
Refer to the”How to Select
Coolant" section.
4. If the HVAC unit is connected
to the cooling system, open the
regulating valves all the way.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
“How to Select Coolant” section
in this guide.
HOT COOLANT
To avoid scalding from the
expulsion of hot coolant, never
remove the cooling system
pressure cap while the engine is
at operating temperature. Wear
adequate protective clothing
(face shield, rubber gloves,
apron, and boots). Remove the
cap slowly to relieve pressure.
3. Drain all the cleaning solution.
4. Flush the cleaning solution from
the cooling system.
[a] Immediately after draining
the cleaning solution, flush
the system with clean water.
[b] Once the clean water has
drained, fill the system again
with clean water.
[c] Run the engine. Allow
the engine to warm up to
approximately 80°C (176°F),
and then run it about five
minutes longer.
[d] Drain the hot water.
5. Fill the cooling system with new
coolant. For detailed procedures,
see the vehicle/chassis
maintenance manual. For
types of coolant, refer to the
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
How to Select Coolant
This section covers selection of
the required coolant for MBE 4000
engines.
Definitions
To help ensure complete
understanding of the information, the
definitions of the following terms are
provided:
Antifreeze — Ethylene Glycol (EG)
or Propylene Glycol (PG) containing
a corrosion inhibitor package and
meeting an appropriate heavy-duty
specification, i.e., TMC RP-329 “Type
A” EG, TMC RP 330 “Type A” PG or
TMC RP organic acid ethylene glycol.
NOTE:
TMC RP-329 and TMC RP-330 “Type
A” formulations are phosphate free.
Coolant — The fluid mixture
circulating in the engine cooling
system, typically a mixture of 50%
water and 50% antifreeze.
Drop–Out — Precipitated sludge or
deposit formation in or on cooling
system components.
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HOW-TO SECTION
Fully Formulated Antifreeze —
Contains all the necessary inhibitors
to protect a diesel engine and does
not, therefore, require a pre-charge of
SCA before its first use.
Initial–Fill Coolant — The coolant
that is used in a new or rebuilt engine,
or any time the cooling system is
emptied and then refilled with new
coolant.
NOTICE:
Required specifications for water,
ethylene glycol, propylene glycol,
inhibitor packages and inhibitor
concentration are included in this
publication. To avoid possible
engine damage from inadequate
or over-concentrated coolant,
this publication should be read
thoroughly before replacing coolant.
OAT — Organic Acid Technology:
An inhibitor system based on organic
acid inhibitors.
SCA — Supplemental Coolant
Additive – SCAs are used in a
preventive maintenance program to
prevent corrosion, cavitation and the
formation of deposits.
Approved Coolants
The approved and preferred coolants
for MBE 4000 are .Listed in Table 12.
Once installed, these coolants
should be maintained according
to the procedures discussed under
Maintenance in this section.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Product
Coolant Fill Option
Ethylene Glycol and Water +
Conventional Corrosion Inhibitors 1
Commercial Equivalent of DDC Power
Cool
Propylene Glycol and Water +
Conventional Corrosion Inhibitors 1
Ethylene Glycol & Water + OAT
Inhibitors
Water Only + Conventional Corrosion
Inhibitors 2
Water Only + OAT Inhibitors 2
1
2
DDC Power Cool
Fully Formulated TMC RP-329 Type A
Antifreeze and Water
Fully formulated TMC RP-330 "Type
A" Antifreeze and Water
DDC Power Cool Plus
Water + DDC Power Cool 3000
Water + DDC Power Cool Plus 6000
Preferred Coolant
Water-only coolant systems offer no freeze protection and should not
be used where ambient temperatures can fall to 32° F (0° C).
Table 12
Initial Fill Coolant Options
Ethylene Glycol / Water
+ CONVENTIONAL
CORROSION Inhibitor,
propylene Glycol / Water +
CONVENTIONAL CORROSION
Inhibitor — These products are
available as Fully Formulated,
Phosphate-Free, Extended Service
Interval (ESI) coolants. They are
commercially available from Detroit
Diesel (recommended) and other
manufacturers as either a concentrated
antifreeze or as a pre-mixed antifreeze.
The pre-mixed antifreeze is ready to
use, while the concentrated coolant
must be mixed with water prior to use.
Detroit Diesel Power Cool® Engine
Coolant (P/N 23512138) is the
preferred ethylene glycol coolant
as Listed in Table 12. If other
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
commercial brands of ethylene glycol
are used, they must be equivalent to
Power Cool. Detroit Diesel does not
market a propylene glycol coolant.
If a propylene glycol coolant is
used, it must also meet the following
requirements:
□ Fully formulated ethylene
glycol-based, low silicate
antifreeze or coolant must
meet TMC RP-329 “Type A”
requirements.
□ Fully formulated propylene
glycol-based, low silicate
antifreeze or coolant must
meet TMC RP-330 “Type A”
requirements.
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HOW-TO SECTION
NOTE:
Fully formulated antifreeze does not
require a dosage of SCA prior to initial
use.
Mixing EG or PG Antifreeze and
Water — If a concentrated Ethylene
Glycol (EG) or Propylene Glycol
(PG) antifreeze is purchased, mix
the antifreeze with water meeting
the required quality standards and
fill the cooling system. For water
requirements, If a concentrated EG
or PG antifreeze is purchased, mix
the antifreeze with water meeting
the required quality standards and
fill the cooling system. For water
requirements, refer to section Water
Requirements. If a pre-diluted, fully
formulated coolant is purchased,
simply fill the cooling system.
For best overall performance, a coolant
consisting of 50% concentration of
antifreeze (50% antifreeze, 50%
water) is recommended. An antifreeze
concentration of over 67% (67%
antifreeze, 33% water) is not
recommended due to poor heat
transfer, reduced freeze protection
(IEG only), and possible silicate
dropout. An antifreeze concentration
below 33% (33% antifreeze, 67%
water) offers too little freeze and/or
corrosion protection and is not
recommended.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Always verify that the freeze point
and nitrite concentration of the
antifreeze/water mix are correct by
using a POWER Trac® 3-Way Test
Strip. If chemical analysis is used,
elements in the coolant must fall
within the limits as listed in Table 13
Fully Formulated Glycol Coolant Concentration Limits
Table 13
Boron
125 – 500 PPM
Nitrite
900 – 3200 PPM
Nitrate
200 – 3200 PPM
Silicon
50 – 250 PPM
Phosphorous
0 PPM
pH
8.0 – 11.0
Fully Formulated Glycol Coolant Limits with TMC RP-329,
TMC RP-330 Chemistry Type A (50/50 Coolant/Water
Mixture)
Recycled Antifreeze — Antifreeze
or coolant recycled by reverse
osmosis, distillation, and ion
exchange, properly re-inhibited to
meet TMC RP-329 “Type A” or
RP-330 “Type A” requirements
has been demonstrated to provide
service equivalent to virgin antifreeze.
Recycled antifreeze or coolants of
these types are preferred. Other
recycled coolants, especially coolants
recycled through filtration processes,
are not recommended.
Technology (OAT) corrosion inhibitor
package. These coolants require less
maintenance over the useful life of the
engine. The cooling system should
either be equipped with a “blank”
coolant filter or the coolant filter
and piping may be omitted from the
system.
ETHYLENE GLYCOL /
WATER + OAT INHIBITOR,
PROPYLENE GLYCOL / WATER
+ OAT INHIBITOR — Ethylene
glycol and propylene glycol are
also available with an Organic Acid
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
103
HOW-TO SECTION
OAT fully formulated antifreezes
are available as concentrated and
pre-mixed. Concentrated antifreezes
should be mixed at 50% (50%
antifreeze 50% water). OAT coolants
should not be mixed with conventional
coolants. If OAT and conventional
coolants are mixed, no damage will
result, but the long-life advantages
of the OAT coolant will be lost. In
this event, the coolant should be
maintained as a fully formulated ESI
(Extended Service Interval) coolant,
not as an OAT coolant.
Detroit Diesel markets OAT-inhibited
ethylene glycol coolants – DDC
POWER COOL Plus and POWER
COOL Plus Marine (30% glycol, 70%
water). POWER COOL Plus coolants
contain all of the required inhibitors.
If a non-DDC OAT antifreeze is used,
it must conform to TMC RP-338
specification. Do not add extender to
new OAT antifreeze or coolant.
cavitation erosion protection. Initial
fill options are listed in Table 1. OAT
inhibitors such as POWER COOL
Plus 6000 are available for water-only
systems. OAT inhibitor should be
mixed at 7.5% – 10% by volume
with water. Refer to section POWER
COOL ENGINE PRODUCTS for a
listing of POWER COOL products.
Conventional SCA (POWER COOL
3000) can also be used to protect
the engine. Listed in Table 14
are POWER COOL 3000 coolant
concentration limits.
NOTE:
Do not use Power Trac 3–Way Test
Strips to test OAT coolant.
WATER ONLY + SCA,
WATER ONLY + OAT
INHIBITOR — In warm climates
where freeze protection is not
required, water only with corrosion
inhibitors is approved for use.
Water-only systems need to be treated
with the proper dosage of corrosion
inhibitors. Detroit Diesel-approved
conventional SCA or OAT corrosion
inhibitors must be added to the water
to provide required corrosion and
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Power Cool 3000 Coolant Concentration Limits
Table 14
Boron
125 – 500 PPM
Nitrite
900 – 3200 PPM
Nitrate
0 – 1000 PPM
Silicon
50 – 250 PPM
Phosphorous
0 PPM
pH
8.0 – 11.0
Power Cool 3000 Concentration Limits (5% Power Cool
3000/ 95% Water)
POWER COOL 3000 SCA inhibitors
should be mixed at 5% by volume
with water (1 quart per 5 gallons of
water). These additions can be made
by adding liquid SCAs available in a
variety of sizes. Coolant filters are
also available for different cooling
system capacities. These filters release
the proper amount of SCA at initial
fill.
below the maximum allowable limits
listed in Table 15.
Water Requirements —
Distilled or de-ionized water, which
eliminates the adverse effects of
minerals in tap water, is preferred.
High levels of dissolved chlorides,
sulfates, magnesium, and calcium in
some tap water causes scale deposits,
sludge deposits and/or corrosion.
These deposits have been shown
to result in water pump failures
and poor heat transfer, resulting in
overheating. If tap water is used, the
mineral content in the water must be
Coolants Not Recommended
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
NOTICE:
Do not add additional SCA to
new, fully formulated antifreeze or
coolant. This can result in dropout
and/or the formation of deposits.
The following coolants are not
recommended for use in Detroit Diesel
engines.
All Antifreezes And Coolants
Containing Phosphate — These
coolants are not recommended. Drop
out, overheating and water pump seal
failures can result from the use of
coolant or inhibitor packages based on
phosphate.
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HOW-TO SECTION
Methyl Alcohol-Based
Antifreeze — This must not be
used because of its effect on the
non-metallic components of the
cooling system and its low boiling
point.
Automotive Type Coolants —
These coolants generally contain high
levels of phosphate and silicate, offer
no liner pitting protection, and are
not suitable for use in Detroit Diesel
engines.
Maximum Allowable
Parts per Million
Grains per Gallon
Chlorides
40
2.5
Sulfates
100
5.8
Total Dissolved Solids
340
20
Total Hardness –
Magnesium and Calcium
170
10
Table 15
Satisfactory Water Limits – Make-Up Water Only
Glycol-based Coolants
Formulated For HVAC —
These coolants formulated for
Heating/Ventilation/Air Conditioning
(HVAC) should not be used. These
coolants generally contain high levels
of phosphates, which can deposit
on hot internal engine surfaces and
reduce heat transfer.
Additives Not Recommended
The following additives are not
recommended for use in MBE 4000
engines.
Soluble Oils — Soluble oil additives
are not approved for use in Detroit
Diesel engine cooling systems. A
small amount of oil adversely affects
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
heat transfer. For example, a 1.25%
concentration of soluble oil increases
fire deck temperature 6%. A 2.50%
concentration increases fire deck
temperature 15%. The use of soluble
oil additives may result in engine
overheating and/or failure.
Chromates — Chromate additives
are not approved for use in Detroit
Diesel engine cooling systems.
Chromate additives can form
chromium hydroxide, commonly
called “green slime.” This, in turn,
can result in engine damage due to
poor heat transfer. Cooling systems
operated with chromate-inhibited
coolant must be chemically cleaned
with POWER COOL Twin Pack
cooling system cleaner/conditioner
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
(or equivalent sulfamic acid/sodium
carbonate cleaner) and flushed.
POWER COOL cleaners are
listed in Table POWER COOL
Cooling System Cleaners
Service Application
Long Haul — Highway Truck & Motor
Coach — operates more than 60,000
miles (100,000 kilometers) per year
Sort Haul — City Transit — operates
up to 60,000 miles (100,000
kilometers) per year
Severe Service — Fire Truck or
Crash/Rescue Vehicle — operates up
to 6000 miles (9,600 kilometers) or
under severe conditions
Table 16
Coolant Inhibitor Test Intervals
The coolant inhibitor level should be
checked at the intervals listed in Table
16.
Inhibitor Test Interval
20,000 Miles (32,000 km)
6,000 Miles (9,600 km) or three
months, whichever comes first
6,000 Miles (9,600 km) or three
months, whichever comes first
Required Coolant Inhibitor Test Intervals
HOT COOLANT
To avoid scalding from the
expulsion of hot coolant, never
remove the cooling system
pressure cap while the engine is
at operating temperature. Wear
adequate protective clothing
(face shield, rubber gloves,
apron, and boots). Remove the
cap slowly to relieve pressure.
If topping off is needed, add coolant
which is identical to the initial fill
coolant.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Supplemental Coolant Additives
for Fully Formulated Coolant —
The concentrations of some inhibitors
will gradually deplete during normal
engine operation. SCAs replenish
the protection for cooling system
components. The coolant must
be maintained with the proper
concentration of SCA. Detroit Diesel
Power Cool maintenance SCAs are
recommended.
The proper application of SCA will
provide:
□ pH control.
□ Restored inhibitor levels to prevent
corrosion.
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HOW-TO SECTION
□ Water softening to deter formation
of mineral deposits.
□ Cavitation protection to protect
wet sleeve cylinder liners.
Maintenance Intervals — Check
the nitrite concentration at the regular
intervalslisted in Table 17 with a
Power Trac 3–Way Test Strip.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Interval 1
Coolant
Antifreeze / Water +
SCA Inhibitor (DDC
Power Cool)
Ethylene Glycol
/ Water + SCA
Inhibitor
or
Propylene Glycol
/ Water + SCA
Inhibitor
Ethylene Glycol
/ Water + OAT
Inhibitor
or
Propylene Glycol
/ Water + OAT
Inhibitor
20,000 Miles (32,000 km)
or 3 Months*
300,000 Miles
(480,000 km)
20,000 Miles (32,000 km)
or 3 Months*
Action
Test nitrite concentration
with test strip. Add SCA or
dilute coolant as needed.
Drain and clean system.
Refill with new coolant.
Test nitrite concentration
with test strip. Add SCA or
dilute coolant as needed.
300,000 Miles
(480,000 km)
Drain and clean system.
Refill with new coolant.
Test at 1 Year.
300,000 Miles
(480,000 km) or 2 Years*
—
Add Power Cool Plus
Extender
600,000 Miles
(960,000 km)
Drain and clean system.
Replace with new coolant.
Test nitrite concentration
with test strip. Add SCA or
Water Only + SCA
dilute coolant as needed.
Inhibitor
300,000 Miles
Drain and clean system.
(480,000 km)
Replace with new coolant.
300,000 Miles
Add Power Cool Plus
(480,000 km) or 2 Years*
Water Only + OAT
Extender
600,000 Miles
Clean and drain. Replace
Coolant
(960,000 km)
with new coolant.
1
based on application. Drain interval dependent on proper maintenance.
20,000 Miles (32,000 km)
or 3 Months*
Table 17
Coolant Maintenance Intervals
Nitrite levels must be within the
ranges listed in Table 13.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
109
HOW-TO SECTION
NOTICE:
Failure to properly maintain coolant
with SCA can result in damage
to the cooling system and its
related components. Conversely,
over-concentration of SCA inhibitor
can result in poor heat transfer,
leading to engine damage.
Always maintain concentrations at
recommended levels. Do not use
traditional SCAs with OAT coolant.
Additional SCA must be added to the
coolant when it becomes depleted, as
indicated by a nitrite concentration
of 900 PPM or less. If the nitrite
concentration is greater than 900
PPM, do not add additional SCA. If
the nitrite concentration is above 3200
PPM, the system is over-inhibited and
should be partially drained and filled
with a 50/50 mix of water and EG or
PG.
In this case the EG or PG should
contain no inhibitors and should
conform to ASTM D4985. This
will dilute the over-concentrated
inhibitors.
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NOTE:
In non-OAT systems, nitrite
concentration of 5000 PPM or
higher on a MBE 4000 engine
suggests problematic additive
over-concentration. This condition
must be corrected by immediate
draining and flushing of the cooling
system. Refill the system with new fully
formulated or pre-charged coolant.
Check the nitrite concentration level
at the next with a Power Trac 3–Way
Test Strip.
SCA Test Procedures
Detroit Diesel Power Trac 3–Way
Coolant Test Strips should be
used to measure nitrite and glycol
concentrations. Part numbers
are in refer to section POWER
COOL ENGINE PRODUCTS and
refer to section POWER TRAC
Coolant Testing And Analysis
Products. Cavitation/corrosion is
indicated on the strip by the level of
nitrite concentration. Freeze/boil over
protection is determined by glycol
concentration.
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Discard unused strips if they have
turned light pink or tan.
HOT COOLANT
To avoid scalding from the
expulsion of hot coolant, never
remove the cooling system
pressure cap while the engine is
at operating temperature. Wear
adequate protective clothing
(face shield, rubber gloves,
apron, and boots). Remove the
cap slowly to relieve pressure.
For best results make the test while
the coolant is between 50° – 140° F
(10° – 60° C). Wait at least 60, but
not longer than 75, seconds before
reading the nitrite level. Use the test
strips as follows:
1. Dip the strip into coolant for
one second. Remove and shake
briskly to eliminate excess fluid.
2. Immediately compare the pad end
(% glycol) to the color chart on
the container.
3. Sixty seconds (one minute) after
dipping, compare the nitrite pad
to the color chart.
A factory coolant analysis program is
available through authorized Detroit
Diesel service outlets. Part numbers
are in refer to section POWER
TRAC Coolant Testing And Analysis
Products in the Specifications section.
To verify coolant acceptability, submit
a sample for coolant analysis every
two (2) years, 300,000 miles (480,000
km), or 10,000 operating hours,
whichever comes first.
Need Release Coolant Filters
(Non-OAT Systems)
Spin-on coolant filters are available for
Detroit Diesel engines. Membranes
in the filters release SCAs before
the coolant approaches a corrosive
condition, protecting the engine from
corrosion. The elements release the
SCA charge as needed, as opposed to
the maintenance SCA elements, which
instantaneously release the SCA
charge. Coolant filter elements should
be replaced after one (1) year, 120,000
miles (192,000 km) or 2,000 operating
hours, whichever comes first.
4. Color change of the additive
indicator (middle pad) indicates
the presence of inhibitor that is
not approved by Detroit Diesel.
Promptly replace and tighten the test
strip container cap after each use.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
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HOW-TO SECTION
Dropout
Excessive amounts of some inhibitors
in the coolant can cause a gel or
crystalline deposit that reduces heat
transfer and coolant flow. The deposit,
called “dropout,” takes the color of
the coolant when wet, but appears as a
white or gray powder when dry. It can
pick up solid particles in the coolant
and become gritty, causing excessive
wear of water pump seals and other
cooling system components.
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury when using
caustic cleaning agents, follow
the chemical manufacturers
usage, disposal, and safety
instructions.
Coolant Extender Inhibitor
Additive for “OAT” Coolant
The inhibitors in OAT coolant must
also be maintained, but less often
than traditional SCA-type coolants.
A portable test is available to test the
levels of OAT inhibitors in coolant.
Where this is not used, fleet testing
has determined that a OAT coolant
extender package should be added to
the coolant at 300,000 miles (480,000
km), two (2) years, or 5,000 hours,
whichever comes first. The proper
maintenance dosages for all OAT
coolants are listed in Table 17 ,
reflecting 0.6% by volume extender.
This dosage should be added to the
water-only and the glycol systems at
the same interval.
The proper application of extender to
OAT coolant will provide:
□ pH Control
The wet gel can be removed by using
a non-acid (alkali) type heavy-duty
cleaner, such as Detroit Diesel Power
Cool On-Line Cleaner (sodium
nitrite/sodium tetraborate). Part
numbers are inrefer to section POWER
COOL ENGINE PRODUCTS.
NOTE:
If the gel is allowed to dry, it is
necessary to disassemble the
engine and clean it with a caustic
solution or physically clean individual
components.
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
□ Restored inhibitor levels to prevent
corrosion
□ Cavitation protection to protect
wet sleeve cylinder liners
NOTE:
Do not use traditional SCAs in
OAT coolant, and do not use
OAT extender in traditional coolant.
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
OAT Coolant Drain Interval —
A properly maintained OAT-inhibited
coolant will last 600,000 miles
(960,000 km), four (4) years, or
10,000 operating hours, whichever
comes first. At this time the coolant
should be drained, and the cooling
system should be thoroughly cleaned,
flushed, and filled with new, properly
inhibited OAT coolant.
Chronic Coolant System
Problems
The most commonly seen coolant
system problems result from
maintenance and formulation factors
such as:
□ Hard water
□ Dilution of the coolant by the
addition of untreated water
□ Over dosage or under dosage of
corrosion inhibitors
□ Improper corrosion inhibitor (most
often phosphated)
□ Mixing SCAs
□ Improper testing
Detroit Diesel Cooling System
Maintenance Products
The following products are available
to do maintenance on the cooling
system.
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Power Cool SCAs — Power Cool
SCAs are water-soluble chemical
compounds. These products are
available in coolant filter elements,
liquid packages, and in fully
formulated Power Cool antifreeze.
NOTE:
Power Cool 3000 liquid SCA is more
compatible with hard water than
Power Cool 2000 SCA.
Power Cool Coolant Filter
Elements — Power Cool coolant
filter elements (spin-on canisters) are
available in various sizes suitable for
cooling systems of varying capacities.
Selection of the proper element size
is vital when pre-charging non-fully
formulated coolant at initial fill and
at s. A fully formulated antifreeze
must not have SCA added at initial
fill. Do not use SCA-containing
filters with OAT antifreeze or
coolant. The need for maintenance
elements is determined by the results
of the nitrite concentration test
performed at each cooling system
interval. Do not automatically
install maintenance elements at
maintenance intervals, unless the
nitrite concentration falls below 900
parts per million.
Power Cool Cleaners — Power
Cool Liquid On-Line Cleaner is used
for light deposits. Power Cool Dry
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HOW-TO SECTION
Chemical Cleaner/Conditioner is used
for heavy deposits or scale.
Summary of Coolant
Recommendations
HOT COOLANT
To avoid scalding from the
expulsion of hot coolant, never
remove the cooling system
pressure cap while the engine is
at operating temperature. Wear
adequate protective clothing
(face shield, rubber gloves,
apron, and boots). Remove the
cap slowly to relieve pressure.
1. Always maintain the engine
coolant to meet Detroit Diesel
specifications.
2. Only use water that meets the
specifications listed in Table 15.
Distilled, de-mineralized (reverse
osmosis) or de-ionized water is
preferred.
3. The proper dosage of inhibitors
must be included in the coolant
at initial fill for all Detroit Diesel
engines. This dosage is usually
included in the fully formulated
antifreeze used, or it may need to
be added if water alone or if less
than 50% antifreeze is used. The
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
user is urged to refer to the full
text of this section to determine
the proper dosage. Mixing
of different manufacturers'
technologies (brands) could cause
cooling system problems.
4. Maintain the inhibitor at the
prescribed concentration. Test
the nitrite concentration by using
a titration kit or Detroit Diesel
Power Trac 3-Way Coolant Test
Strips. Add SCA only if the nitrite
concentration is below 900 PPM.
Do not use SCA in OAT coolant,
and do not use Power Trac 3-Way
Coolant Test Strips to test OAT
coolant.
NOTE:
If the nitrite concentration exceeds
3200 PPM, the coolant must be
drained and replaced with new
coolant. A thorough cleaning of the
cooling system may be required.
5. Do not use another manufacturer's
test kit to measure the SCA
concentration of Detroit Diesel
maintenance products.
6. Pre-mix coolant makeup solutions
to the proper concentration before
adding to the cooling system.
7. Do not mix OAT and other
coolants in the same engine.
8. Do not use automotive coolants.
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
9. Where antifreeze/boil over
protection is required, use only
antifreeze that meets TMC
RP-329 “Type A” EG or
TMC RP-330 “Type A” PG
specifications. Always maintain
coolant at the proper level.
10. Do not use the following in
Detroit Diesel engine cooling
systems:
□ Soluble oil
□ High silicate, automotive-type
antifreeze
□ Chromate SCAs
□ Methoxy propanol-base
coolant
□ Methyl alcohol-base coolant
□ Sealer additives or coolant
containing sealer additives.
□ HVAC coolant
SCA as needed, indicated by the strip
test. To verify coolant acceptability,
submit a sample for coolant analysis
every 300,000 miles (480,000 km),
three (3) years, or 5,000 operating
hours, whichever comes first. Submit
the sample in a DDC Power Trac
Coolant Test Bottle. Required part
numbers are inrefer to section POWER
COOL ENGINE PRODUCTS.
Coolant Life of OAT Coolant — A
properly maintained OAT coolant may
be operated 600,000 miles (960,000
km), four (4) years, or until overhaul,
whichever comes first. At this time the
system must be completely drained,
thoroughly cleaned, and refilled. OAT
Coolants require the addition of an
extender at 300,000 miles (480,000
km), two (2) years, or 5,000 hours,
whichever comes first. Use 1 pint
of extender for every 20 gallons of
coolant.
□ Phosphated coolants
Coolant life of Glycol Coolant —
A properly maintained cooling
system, filled with phosphate-free
coolant consisting of a 50/50 mix of
antifreeze and water per TMC RP-329
“Type A” EG or TMC RP-330 “Type
A” PG specifications can be operated
to the limits recommended. The
proper maintenance involves periodic
evaluation using Power Trac 3-Way
Coolant Test Strips and the addition of
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Coolant Life of Other Coolants —
Other properly maintained coolants
may be operated up to 250,000 miles
(480,000 km), two (2) years, or 4,000
operating hours, whichever comes
first. At this time the system must
be completely drained, thoroughly
cleaned, and refilled.
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Coolant Flushing and Changing
Flush and change the coolant as
follows:
Do not apply more than 140 kPa (20
psi) air pressure for a radiator flush;
more pressure could damage the
radiator or heater core.
HOT COOLANT
To avoid scalding from the
expulsion of hot coolant, never
remove the cooling system
pressure cap while the engine is
at operating temperature. Wear
adequate protective clothing
(face shield, rubber gloves,
apron, and boots). Remove the
cap slowly to relieve pressure.
1. Open the cap on the surge tank
slowly, to allow excess pressure
to escape. Set the cap aside.
2. Open the water regulating valve
for the heating system.
3. Place a large receptacle
underneath the coolant drain
plug and open the coolant drain
plug on the bottom of the radiator.
NOTE:
Make sure the coolant can flow
unobstructed into the receptacle.
NOTICE:
4. Start radiator flushing by
attaching a flushing gun nozzle to
the radiator outlet and run water
in until the radiator is full.
EYE INJURY
To avoid injury from flying debris
when using compressed air, wear
adequate eye protection (face
shield or safety goggles) and do
not exceed 276 kPa (40 psi) air
pressure.
5. Apply no more than 140 kPa (20
psi) air pressure intermittently to
help dislodge sediment buildup in
the core.
6. Drain the radiator, and flush the
radiator until clean water flows
from the radiator. Remove the
flushing gun.
7. When the coolant has drained,
install the coolant drain plug on
the radiator.
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8. Add coolant in the specified
concentration until the maximum
mark on the surge tank is reached.
9. Start the engine and run it for
about one minute at varying
speeds to release air pockets in
the cooling system. Ensure the
heater valve is still open. Check
the coolant level and add more
coolant if necessary.
10. Shut down the engine, close and
tighten the cap on the surge tank.
1. Inspect the radiator, condenser,
water pump, engine oil cooler,
freeze plugs, and heat exchanger
for damage and leaks.
2. Check all cooling system pipes
and hoses for damage and leaks;
ensure they are positioned to
avoid chafing, and are securely
fastened.
3. Check the outside of the radiator
and condenser for blockage.
Check fins for damage; straighten
them if necessary.
Cooling System Inspecting
NOTE:
Before doing this inspection, do either
"Coolant Concentration Checking," or
"Coolant Flushing and Changing."
Inspect the cooling system as follows:
HOT COOLANT
To avoid scalding from the
expulsion of hot coolant, never
remove the cooling system
pressure cap while the engine is
at operating temperature. Wear
adequate protective clothing
(face shield, rubber gloves,
apron, and boots). Remove the
cap slowly to relieve pressure.
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TROUBLESHOOTING
TROUBLESHOOTING
In addition to operating the engine
carefully and maintaining it properly,
make sure to correct any malfunction
promptly.
When the electronic engine control
system detects a fault, it broadcasts
a message on the datalink. The
dash display will show the code
"Motor Control Module (MCM) 128,"
indicating there is an engine fault.
Important: To read the complete
fault code, bring the vehicle to an
authorized dealer. Complete fault
codes can be read using the Nexiq
DDR or DDDL 7.0 version or later.
For fault codes and their meanings,
see the next section in this guide.
The tables that follow are designed
to identify the causes of common
problems, suggest further checks and
appropriate remedies. When dealer
service is necessary, this is mentioned
in the table.
NOTE:
Remember to follow all cautions when
troubleshooting the engine.
Problem - The Engine Will Not Crank
Remedy
Cause
The batteries are damaged or weak.
Test the batteries. Replace them, if
needed.
The ignition switch is damaged.
Replace the ignition switch.
The battery cables are damaged
and/or corroded.
Replace the battery cables.
The starter is damaged and/or worn.
Have an authorized repair facility
replace the starter.
The clutch or transmission is
damaged.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
There is internal damage to the
engine.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
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Problem—The Engine Turns Over Slowly
Cause
Remedy
The batteries are damaged or weak.
Test the batteries. Replace them, if
needed.
The ignition switch is damaged.
Replace the ignition switch.
The battery cables are damaged
and/or corroded
Replace the battery cables.
The starter is damaged and/or worn.
Have an authorized repair facility
replace the starter.
The engine oil does not meet the
correct specifications.
Change the engine oil, using the
correct type of oil.
The transmission fluid does not meet
the correct specifications.
Change the transmission fluid, using
the correct type of fluid.
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TROUBLESHOOTING
Problem—The Engine Cranks, But Won't Start
Remedy
Cause
The batteries are damaged or weak.
Test the batteries. Replace them, if
needed.
The cranking speed is not set correctly.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
No intake air preheater is installed,
and it is too cold to start without one.
Install an intake air preheater.
The intake air preheater is
malfunctioning.
Check the intake air preheater, and
replace it, if necessary.
The camshaft position (CMP) sensor
and/or the crankshaft position (CKP )
sensor are out of adjustment.
Push both sensors into their holes as
far as they will go. If this does not
solve the problem, bring the vehicle to
an authorized repair facility for service.
The camshaft position (CMP) sensor
and/or the crankshaft position (CKP )
sensor are damaged.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
There is air in the fuel system.
Check the fuel lines for air pockets.
Prime the fuel system and start the
engine.
The air filter is clogged.
Clean or replace the air filter.
The fuel filter is clogged.
Replace the filter element.
The exhaust brake valve is
malfunctioning.
Have an authorized repair facility
check the operation of the valve.
The valves are not adjusted properly.
Check the valve lash.
There are other problems in the fuel
system.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
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Problem—The Engine Starts Only After Cranking for a Long Time
Cause
Remedy
The fuel tank is low or empty.
Add fuel and prime the fuel system, if
necessary.
There are leaks in the fuel lines.
Check the fuel lines for leaks and
repair them, if necessary.
The fuel filter is clogged.
Replace the filter element.
The fuel line, the fuel prefilter, or the
screen in the fuel tank is blocked.
Clean and prime the system. Have
the fuel lines and filters checked by an
authorized repair facility.
The camshaft position (CMP) sensor
and/or the crankshaft position (CKP )
sensor are out of adjustment.
Push both sensors into their holes as
far as they will go. If this does not
solve the problem, bring the vehicle to
an authorized repair facility for service.
The camshaft position (CMP) sensor
and/or the crankshaft position (CKP )
sensor are damaged.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
There are other problems in the fuel
system.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
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TROUBLESHOOTING
Problem—The Engine Starts, But Dies
Remedy
Cause
The fuel tank is low or empty.
Add fuel and prime the fuel system, if
necessary.
The fuel filter is clogged.
Replace the filter element.
The fuel line, the fuel prefilter, or the
screen in the fuel tank is blocked.
Clean and prime the system. Have
the fuel lines and filters checked by an
authorized repair facility.
The camshaft position (CMP) sensor
and/or the crankshaft position (CKP )
sensor are out of adjustment.
Push both sensors into their holes as
far as they will go. If this does not
solve the problem, bring the vehicle to
an authorized repair facility for service.
The camshaft position (CMP) sensor
and/or the crankshaft position (CKP )
sensor are damaged.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
The constant-throttle valves are
malfunctioning.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
There are other problems in the fuel
system.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
Problem—The Engine Fan Doesn't Work
Remedy
Cause
The fan hub is damaged.
Replace the fan hub.
The fan wiring is damaged.
Repair the fan wiring.
The parameter settings in the MCM or
Common Powertrain Controller (CPC)
are incorrect.
Have an authorized repair facility
reprogram the control unit.
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EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Problem—The Engine Fan Is Constantly On
Cause
Remedy
The fan override switch is on.
Check the operation of the fan override
switch.
The fan hub is damaged.
Replace the fan hub
The parameter settings in the MCM or
CPC are incorrect.
Have an authorized repair facility
reprogram the control unit.
AC switch is damaged
Check AC switch.
Problem—Fuel Consumption Is Too High
Cause
Remedy
The tires are not properly inflated.
Check all tires for correct pressure.
The air filter and/or intake air system
is clogged.
Check the air restriction indicator.
Clean the intake air system and
replace the air filter if necessary.
The exhaust brake valve is
malfunctioning.
Have an authorized repair facility
check the operation of the valve.
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TROUBLESHOOTING
Problem—The Engine Performs Poorly, Does Not
Develop Full Power
Remedy
Cause
The air filter and/or intake air system
is clogged.
Check the air restriction indicator.
Clean the intake air system and
replace the air filter if necessary.
The exhaust brake valve is
malfunctioning.
Have an authorized repair facility
check the operation of the valve.
The fuel filter is clogged.
Replace the filter element.
There are other problems with the fuel
system.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
The valves are not adjusted properly
Check the valve lash.
The coolant temperature sensor is
damaged or reading incorrectly.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
The fuel temperature sensor is
damaged or reading incorrectly.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
The engine oil temperature sensor is
damaged or reading incorrectly.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
The charge-air temperature sensor is
damaged or reading incorrectly.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
There are problems with the MCM or
CPC.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
There is internal damage to the
engine.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
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EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Problem—The Engine Is in Emergency Running Mode
(constant speed 1,300 rpm)
Cause
Remedy
The MCM or CPC is damaged.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
An incorrect parameter is in the MCM
or CPC.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility and have the parameter
settings reprogrammed in the MCM
or CPC.
Problem—The Coolant Temperature Is Above Normal
Cause
Remedy
The coolant level is too low.
Check for coolant leaks, and repair as
needed.
The poly-V belt is loose.
Tighten or replace the poly-V belt.
The coolant temperature gauge and/or
sensor is not reading correctly.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
The radiator is damaged or dirty.
Clean the radiator. Repair or replace
the radiator if necessary.
The water pump is damaged.
Have an authorized repair facility
replace the water pump.
The thermostat is damaged.
Have an authorized repair facility
replace the water pump.
The fan is not operating properly.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility and have the fan hub
checked or have the parameter
settings reprogrammed in the MCM
or CPC.
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TROUBLESHOOTING
Problem—The Coolant Temperature Is Below Normal
Remedy
Cause
The coolant temperature gauge and/or
sensor is not reading correctly.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
The thermostat is not operating
properly.
Have an authorized repair facility
replace the thermostat.
The fan is not operating properly.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility and have the fan hub
checked.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility and have the parameter
settings reprogrammed in the MCM
or CPC.
Problem—The Cooling System Is Losing Coolant
Cause
Remedy
There is an external coolant leak.
Repair the leaking component.
The radiator cap is leaking.
Replace the radiator cap.
The air compressor head is damaged.
Have an authorized repair facility
replace the air compressor.
The cylinder head gasket is leaking.
Have an authorized repair facility
replace the head gasket.
Problem—There Is Coolant in the Engine Oil
Cause
Remedy
The cylinder head gasket is damaged.
Have an authorized repair facility
replace the head gasket.
The oil/water heat exchanger is
leaking.
Have an authorized repair facility
replace the heat exchanger.
There is an internal coolant leak.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
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EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Problem—There Is Foam in the Engine Oil
Cause
Remedy
The oil level is too low or too high.
Correct the oil level.
The oil has not been changed within
the recommended interval.
Change the oil.
The oil is not of the recommended
quality.
Change the oil.
Problem—The Engine Oil Pressure Is Low
Cause
Remedy
The oil pressure gauge and/or sensor
is not reading correctly.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
There is fuel in the oil.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
The oil filter is clogged.
Replace the filter element.
The oil filter bypass valve is damaged.
Replace the bypass valve.
The oil pump and/or relief valve is
damaged.
Have an authorized repair facility
replace the oil pump.
Problem—The Engine Exhaust Is White
Cause
Remedy
The fuel is of poor quality.
Add fuel of the right quality.
The intake air preheater is
malfunctioning.
Check the intake air preheater, and
replace it, if necessary.
The valves are not adjusted properly.
Check the valve lash.
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TROUBLESHOOTING
Problem—The Engine Exhaust Is Black
Cause
Remedy
The air filter and/or intake air system
is clogged.
Check the air restriction indicator.
Clean the intake air system and
replace the air filter if necessary.
The exhaust brake valve is
malfunctioning.
Have an authorized repair facility
check the operation of the valve.
The intake air preheater is
malfunctioning.
Check that the heater is not staying on
all of the time.
The valves are not adjusted properly.
Check the valve lash.
There is damage to the fuel system:
the fuel pump, one or more fuel
injectors, or one or more unit pumps
are damaged.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
The charge-air temperature sensor is
damaged.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
There is internal damage to the
engine.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
Problem—The Engine Exhaust Is Blue
Cause
Remedy
The engine oil level is too high
(engine oil is reaching the combustion
chamber).
Adjust the oil level, and then have the
oil level checked by an authorized
repair facility.
The turbocharger is leaking oil.
Have an authorized repair facility
replace the turbocharger
The valve stem seals are loose or
damaged.
Have an authorized repair facility
replace the seals.
The piston rings are worn.
Have an authorized repair facility
replace the piston rings.
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EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Problem—Engine Brake Performance Is Poor
Cause
Remedy
The engine brake control switch is
damaged.
Replace the switch
The exhaust brake is not operating
properly.
Have an authorized repair facility
check the operation of the valve.
The constant-throttle valves are
malfunctioning.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
Components of the MCM and/or CPC
are damaged.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
Problem—Cruise Control Is Not Working
Cause
Remedy
One or more of the cruise control
switches are damaged.
Replace the damaged switch.
Components of the MCM and/or CPC
are damaged or not working properly.
Bring the vehicle to an authorized
repair facility for service.
Problem—The Battery Charge Indicator Light Does Not
Come On When the Engine Is Not Running
Cause
Remedy
The bulb is bad.
Replace the bulb.
The circuit is broken.
Repair the break in the circuit.
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TROUBLESHOOTING
Problem—The Battery Charge Indicator Light Comes
On When the Engine is Running
Remedy
Cause
The poly-V belt is too loose.
Check the belt tension; if necessary,
Have an authorized repair facility
replace the belt tensioner.
The belt tensioner is damaged.
Have an authorized repair facility
replace the belt tensioner.
The poly-V belt is worn or damaged.
Replace the belt.
The alternator is damaged (has a
damaged rectifier or voltage regulator).
Have an authorized repair facility
replace the alternator.
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EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
ENGINE STORAGE
When an engine is to be stored or
removed from operation for a period
of time, special precautions should
be taken to protect the interior and
exterior of the engine, transmission
and other parts from rust accumulation
and corrosion. The parts requiring
attention and the recommended
preparations are given below.
Preparing Engine for
Storage
It will be necessary to remove all
rust or corrosion completely from
any exposed part before applying rust
preventive compound. Therefore,
it is recommended that the engine
be processed for storage as soon as
possible after removal from operation.
The engine should be stored in
a building that is dry and can be
heated during the winter months.
Moisture-absorbing chemicals are
available commercially for use when
excessive dampness prevails in the
storage area.
Temporary Storage (30 Days or
Less)
To protect the engine for a temporary
period of time (30 days or less), follow
this procedure:
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
1. With the engine at ambient
temperature and cool to the touch,
drain engine crankcase oil into a
suitable container. Dispose of the
oil in an environmentally friendly
manner, according to state and/or
federal (EPA) recommendations.
2. Fill the crankcase to the proper
level with the recommended
viscosity and grade of oil.
3. Fill the fuel tank with the
recommended grade of fuel oil.
Operate the engine for two (2)
minutes at 1200 rpm and no load.
Do not drain the fuel system or
the crankcase after this run.
4. Check the air cleaner and service
it, if necessary.
5. If freezing weather is expected
during the storage period, check
the antifreeze/coolant for required
freeze and inhibitor protection.
Add antifreeze solution to the
cooling system in accordance with
Detroit Diesels recommendations.
Refer to “How to Select Coolant”
in this guide.
NOTE:
If an antifreeze solution is not required
during storage, flush the cooling
system with a good soluble oil (3% –
5% by volume) rust inhibitor to prevent
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ENGINE STORAGE
rusting of the outside diameter of the
cylinder liners.
EYE INJURY
To avoid injury from flying debris
when using compressed air, wear
adequate eye protection (face
shield or safety goggles) and do
not exceed 276 kPa (40 psi) air
pressure.
6. Clean the exterior of the engine
(except electrical parts) with fuel
oil and dry with compressed air.
7. Seal all engine openings. The
material used must be waterproof,
vapor proof and possess sufficient
physical strength to resist
puncture and damage from the
expansion of entrapped air.
An engine prepared in this manner can
be returned to service in a short time
by removing the seals at the engine
openings and by checking the engine
coolant, fuel oil, lubricating oil and
transmission oil levels.
Extended Storage (More than 30
Days)
To prepare an engine for extended
storage (more than 30 days), follow
this procedure:
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1. Drain the cooling system and
flush with clean, soft water. Refill
with clean, soft water and add
a rust inhibitor to the cooling
system.
2. Circulate the coolant by operating
the engine until normal operating
temperature is reached.
3. Stop the engine.
4. With the engine at ambient
temperature and cool to the touch,
drain the engine crankcase oil
into a suitable container. Remove
the oil filters. Dispose of the oil
and filters in an environmentally
friendly manner, according
to state and/or federal (EPA)
recommendations. Replace the
drain plug and tighten to 80 N·m
(59 lb·ft) torque.
5. Install new lubricating oil
filters. Fill the crankcase to
the proper level with Tectyl®
930A preservative lubricating
oil or an equivalent 30–weight
preservative lubricating oil
meeting Mil-L-21260C, Grade 2
Specification.
6. Drain the fuel tank. Refill with
enough clean No. 1 diesel fuel
or pure kerosene to permit the
engine to operate for about ten
(10) minutes. If draining the
fuel tank is not convenient, use
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EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
a separate, portable supply of
recommended fuel.
NOTE:
If engines are stored where
condensation of water in the fuel
tank may be a problem, additives
containing methyl carbitol or butyl
cellusolve may be added to the fuel.
Follow manufacturer's instructions
for treatment. Where biological
contamination of fuel may be a
problem, add a biocide such as
Biobor® JF (or equivalent) to the
fuel. When using a biocide, follow
the manufacturer's concentration
recommendations and observe all
cautions and warnings.
7. Drain the fuel system and remove
the fuel filters. Dispose of used
filters in an environmentally
responsible manner, according
to state and/or federal (EPA)
recommendations. Fill the new
filters with No. 1 diesel fuel or
pure kerosene and install on the
engine.
8. Operate the engine for five (5)
minutes to circulate the clean fuel
throughout the engine. Be sure
the engine fuel system is full.
9. Stop the engine and allow to
cool. Then disconnect the fuel
return line and the inlet line at
the primary filter and securely
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DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
plug both to retain the fuel in the
engine.
10. Transmission: Follow the
manufacturer's recommendations
for prolonged storage.
11. Power Take-Off: If equipped,
follow manufacturer's
recommendations for prolonged
storage.
NOTICE:
Failure to properly seal off the
turbocharger air inlet and exhaust
outlet openings before engine
storage may permit air drafts to
circulate through the turbocharger
and rotate the turbine/compressor
shaft without an adequate flow of
lubricating oil to the center housing
bearings. This can result in severe
bearing damage.
12. Turbocharger: Since
turbocharger bearings are
pressure lubricated through the
external oil line leading from
the oil filter adaptor while the
engine is operating, no further
attention is required. However,
the turbocharger air inlet and
turbine exhaust outlet connection
should be sealed off with
moisture-resistant tape.
13. Apply a non-friction rust
preventive compound to all
exposed engine parts. If
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ENGINE STORAGE
convenient, apply the rust
preventive compound to the
engine flywheel. If not, disengage
the clutch mechanism to prevent
the clutch disc from sticking to
the flywheel.
NOTE:
Do not apply oil, grease or any
wax-base compound to the flywheel.
The cast iron will absorb these
substances, which can “sweat” out
during operation and cause the clutch
to slip.
14. Drain the engine cooling system.
15. Drain the preservative oil from
the engine crankcase. Reinstall
and torque the oil drain plug to
80 N·m (59 lb·ft).
16. Remove and clean the battery
and battery cables with a baking
soda-water solution and rinse
with fresh water. Do not allow
the soda solution to enter the
battery. Add distilled water to
the electrolyte (if necessary) and
fully charge the battery. Store the
battery in a cool (never below 0°
C or 32° F) dry place. Keep the
battery fully charged and check
the level and specific gravity of
the electrolyte regularly.
18. Seal all engine openings,
including the exhaust outlet,
with moisture-resistant tape. Use
cardboard, plywood or metal
covers where practical.
19. Clean and dry the exterior painted
surfaces of the engine and spray
with a suitable liquid automobile
body wax, a synthetic resin
varnish, or a rust preventive
compound.
20. Protect the engine with a good
weather-resistant tarpaulin and
store it under cover, preferably
in a dry building which can be
heated during the winter months.
Outdoor storage of the engine is not
recommended. If units must be kept
out of doors, follow the preparation
and storage instructions already
given. Protect units with quality,
weather-resistant tarpaulins (or other
suitable covers) arranged to provide
for air circulation.
17. Insert heavy paper strips between
the pulleys and drive belts to
prevent sticking.
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EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
NOTICE:
Do not use plastic sheeting for
outdoor storage. Plastic is fine
for indoor storage. When used
outdoors, however, enough moisture
can condense on the inside of the
plastic to rust ferrous metal surfaces
and pit aluminum surfaces. If a unit
is stored outside for any extended
period of time, severe corrosion
damage can result.
The stored engine should be inspected
periodically. If there are any
indications of rust or corrosion,
corrective steps must be taken to
prevent damage to the engine parts.
Perform a complete inspection at the
end of one year and apply additional
treatment as required.
3. Wash the exterior of the engine
with fuel oil to remove the
rust preventive. Do not wash
electrical components.
4. Remove the rust preventive from
the flywheel. Flush any soluble
oil rust inhibitor (if used) in the
cooling system.
5. Remove the paper strips from
between the pulleys and drive
belts.
6. Fill the crankcase to the proper
level with the required grade of
lubricating oil. Use a pressure
lubricator to insure all bearings
and rocker shafts are lubricated.
7. Fill the fuel tank with the required
fuel.
1. Remove the covers and tape from
all the openings of the engine, fuel
tank and electrical equipment. Do
not overlook the exhaust outlet.
8. Close all drain cocks and fill the
engine cooling system with clean,
soft water and required inhibitors.
If the engine is to be exposed
to freezing temperatures, install
genuine Detroit Diesel Power
Cool antifreeze or an equivalent
ethylene glycol-base or propylene
glycol-base antifreeze solution
which provides required freeze,
boil over, and inhibitor protection.
Refer to section “How to Select
Coolant.”
2. Remove the plugs from the inlet
and outlet fuel lines and reconnect
the lines to their proper positions.
9. Install and connect the battery.
Make sure the average specific
gravity of the battery is 1.260
Procedure for Restoring to
Service an Engine that Has Been
in Extended Storage
If an engine has been in extended
storage, prepare it for service as
follows:
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
135
ENGINE STORAGE
or higher. Charge the battery, if
necessary.
10. Service the air cleaner, if required.
11. Transmission: Follow the
manufacturer's recommendations
covering the return of the
transmission to service.
12. Power Take-Off: If equipped,
follow the manufacturer's
recommendations covering the
return of the power take-off to
service.
NOTE:
The small amount of rust preventive
which remains in the fuel system
will cause smoky exhaust for a few
minutes.
NOTE:
Before subjecting the engine to a load
or high speed, allow it to reach normal
operating temperature. Then check for
trouble codes.
13. Turbocharger: Remove the
covers from the turbocharger
air inlet and turbine outlet
connections. Reconnect
piping as required. Prelube
the turbocharger center bearing
housing. Refer to “Lubrication
System Checks” in the
“OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
FOR STARTING THE ENGINE”
section of this guide.
ENGINE EXHAUST
To avoid injury from inhaling
engine exhaust, always operate
the engine in a well-ventilated
area. Engine exhaust is toxic.
14. After all preparations are
completed, start the engine.
136
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE
The satisfaction and good will of
the owners of Detroit Diesel engines
are of primary concern to Detroit
Diesel and its distributor/dealer
organizations.See Figure 41 for
Detroit Diesel NAFTA On-Highway
service regions.
Figure 41
Detroit Diesel NAFTA
On-Highway Service
Regions
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
137
CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE
NAFTA ON-HIGHWAY SERVICE REGIONS
DETROIT DIESEL REGIONAL
SALES OFFICES
DETROIT DIESEL REGIONAL
SERVICE OFFICES
NORTHEAST REGION
Detroit Diesel
Powder Miss Plaza, Suite 3A
51 Gibralter Drive
Morris Plains, NJ 07950-1274
Phone: 973-492-6555
Fax: 973-267-5922
NORTH EASTERN REGION
Detroit Diesel
13400 Outer Drive West
Detroit, MI 48239-4001
Telephone: 313-592-5420
Fax: 311-592-5887
CENTRAL REGION
Detroit Diesel
9255 Indian Creek Parkway, Suite 850
Overland Park, KS 66210
Phone: 678-570-2389
NORTH CENTRAL & WESTERN
REGIONS
Detroit Diesel
7700 Irvine Center, Suite 275
Irvine CA 92618
Phone: 949-753-7710
Fax: 949-753-7711
SOUTHERN REGION
Detroit Diesel
3325 Paddocks Parkway, Suite 230
Suwanne, GA 30024
Phone: 678-341-6100
Fax: 678-341-6150
SOUTHERN REGION
Detroit Diesel
3325 Paddocks Parkway, Suite 230
Suwanne, GA 30024
Phone: 678-341-6100
Fax: 678-341-6150
WESTERN REGION
Detroit Diesel
7700 Irvine Center, Suite 275
Irvine CA 92618
Phone: 949-753-7710
Fax: 949-753-7711
CANADA REGION
Detroit Diesel of Canada, Ltd.
150 Dufferin Ave., Suite 701
London ON N5A 5N6
Phone: 519-661-0149
Fax: 519-661-0171
CANADA REGION
Detroit Diesel of Canada, Ltd.
150 Dufferin Ave., Suite 701
London ON N5A 5N6
Phone: 519-661-0149
Fax: 519-661-0171
MEXICO REGION
Detroit Diesel Allison de Mexico, S.A.
Av. Santa Rosa 58
Col. Ampliacion Norte
San Juan Ixtacala, Tlanepantla
C.P. 54160, Edo de Mexico
Phone: 525-333-1802
Fax: 525-333-1870
138
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
Road Service in the U.S. or
Canada
If you require road service for any
reason in the U.S. or Canada, you may
call the 1–800–445–1980 customer
assistance phone number. An operator
will assist you in determining what
type of service is required. Not all
problems are engine related and not
all problems are covered by engine
or vehicle warranties. YOU MAY
BE RESPONSIBLE FOR REPAIR
EXPENSES.
Before calling Customer Assistance,
please do the following:
□ Check coolant level
□ Check fuel level
□ Check DDEC fuses
□ Check for fuel leaks
□ Make sure manual shutoff valve (if
installed) on the fuel filter adaptor,
fuel processor body or fuel supply
line is open.
□ Check the oil level on the dipstick.
□ Check diagnostic codes.
If you call, have the following
information available:
□ Engine serial number
□ Vehicle owner/company name
Working with Detroit Diesel
Service Outlets
As the owner of a Detroit Diesel
product you have a complete network
of Detroit Diesel service outlets in the
U.S. and Canada, plus many outlets
worldwide that are prepared to meet
your parts and service needs:
□ Service by trained personnel
□ Sales teams to help determine your
specific power requirements
□ In many areas, emergency service
24 hours a day
□ Complete parts support including
reliabilt® remanufactured parts
□ Product information and literature
We recognize however, that despite
the best intentions of everyone
concerned, misunderstandings may
occur. Normally, any situation
that arises in connection with the
sale, operation, or service of your
product will be handled by the
authorized service outlet in your area
(in the U.S. and Canada check the
Yellow Pages or service locator at
www.detroitdiesel.com for the Detroit
Diesel service outlet nearest you).
□ Vehicle make and model
□ Odometer mileage (kilometers) or
hourmeter hours
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
139
CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE
Detroit Diesel has established a
three-step procedure that customers
should follow when experiencing
a problem with any Detroit Diesel
Product or Part. Detroit Diesel fully
realizes that ultimately the customer's
concerns will be resolved at the
Distributor/Dealer level and therefore
encourages customers to follow the
procedure outlined below:
Step One
Customers should discuss the problem
with a member of management
from the authorized service outlet.
Frequently, complaints are the result
of a breakdown in communication
and can quickly be resolved by a
member of management. If they have
already discussed the problem with
the Distributor or Dealer Sales or
Service Manager, they should contact
the General Manager.
When it appears that the problem
cannot readily be resolved at the
Distributor/Dealer level without
additional assistance, the Detroit
Diesel Customer Support Center
(CSC) should be contacted at
313–592–5800.
The information provided to the CSC
will be forwarded to the appropriate
Regional Product Support Manager.
The customer will then be assisted
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Prior to this contacting the CSC, the
customer should have the following
information available:
□ Name and location of authorized
service outlet
□ Type, make and vehicle
identification number of
equipment
□ Engine model and serial number
□ Engine delivery date and
accumulated miles/kilometers or
hours of operation
□ Nature of problem
□ Chronological summary of
engine's repair history
Step Three
If the customer is still not satisfied,
he/she should present the entire matter
in writing or by phone to:
Step Two
140
be a member of the Regional Product
Support Managers staff, depending on
the nature of his/her problem.
Director of Technical Service or
Manager, Service Operations BX5
Detroit Diesel
13400 Outer Drive, West
Detroit, Michigan 48239–4001
Phone: 313–592–5000
Fax: 313–592–5888
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
SPECIFICATIONS
This section lists the various POWER
COOL engine products.
Center (313 592–5800) if you need
this specific information.
Fuel and Lubricating Oil
Filters
POWER COOL ENGINE
PRODUCTS
Consult with a Detroit Diesel
Distributor to obtain the proper fuel
filters and lubricating oil filters.
Maintenance of the cooling system
requires the chemical make-up of the
system to be balanced.
OIL PAN CAPACITY
POWER COOL Fully Formulated
IEG Coolant
Engine oil capacity can vary,
depending on the oil pan used and
the engine application. Contact the
Detroit Diesel Customer Support
Coolant Type
The part numbers and sizes of
concentrated POWER COOL and
pre-blended 50:50 POWER COOL are
Listed in Table 18
Part Number
Concentrated
23512138
1 Gallon Jug – 6
Per Case
23512139
55 Gallon Drum
23529295
330 Gallon Tote
23512140
23528203
23518918
Pre-Blended 50:50
Table 18
Description
Bulk Delivery – 1,000
Gallon Min.
1 Gallon Jug – 6
Per Case
55 Gallon Drum
23528544
330 Gallon Tote
23513503
Bulk Delivery – 1,000
Gallon Min.
POWER COOL Fully Formulated IEG Coolant
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
141
SPECIFICATIONS
POWER COOL 2000 and 3000
Supplemental Coolant Additive
Coolant Type
Part Number
Description
23507858
Pint Bottle – 12 Per case
23507859
Half Gallon Jug – 6
Per Case
23507860
5 Gallon Pail
23507861
55 Gallon Drum
For Power Cool IEG
Coolant
Table 19
POWER COOL 2000 Supplemental Coolant Additive
Coolant Type
Part Number
For POWER COOL IEG
Coolant
Table 20
142
Description
23507854
Pint Bottle – 12 Per Case
23507855
Half Gallon Jug – 6
Per Case
23507856
5 Gallon Pail
23507857
55 Gallon Drum
POWER COOL 3000 Supplemental Coolant Additive
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
POWER COOL 3000
Supplemental Additive Coolant
Filters
Part Number
Coolant Type
23507545
23508425
23508426
For POWER COOL IEG
Coolant
23507189
23508427
23508428
Table 21
Description
4 Ounce (1 Pint
Equivalent)
8 Ounce (2 Pint
Equivalent)
12 Ounce (3 Pint
Equivalent)
16 Ounce (4 Pint
Equivalent)
32 Ounce (8 Pint
Equivalent)
53 Ounce (13 Pint
Equivalent)
POWER COOL 3000 Supplemental Additive Coolant Filters
POWER COOL Supplemental
Additive Need Release Coolant
Filters
Part Number
Coolant Type
For POWER COOL IEG
Coolant
Table 22
Description
NF2091
For 0 – 8 Gallon Systems
23516489
For 8 – 20 Gallon
Systems
POWER COOL Supplemental Additive Need Release
Coolant Filters
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
143
SPECIFICATIONS
POWER COOL Plus Extended
Life OAT Coolant
Coolant Type
Part Number
23519397
Concentrated
23519394
23519395
23519396
Pre-Blended 50:50
23519398
23519399
Table 23
Description
1 Gallon Jug – 6
Per Case
55 Gallon Drum
Bulk Delivery – 1,000
Gallon Min.
One Gallon Jug – 6
Per Case
55 Gallon Drum
Bulk Delivery – 1,000
Gallon Min.
POWER COOL Plus Extended Life OAT Coolant
POWER COOL Plus Extender
For Use With POWER COOL
Plus OAT Coolant
Coolant Type
Part Number
Description
23519400
Quart Bottle – 6 Per
Case
For Power Cool Plus
Table 24
POWER COOL Plus Extender for Use with POWER COOL
Plus OAT Coolant
POWER COOL Cooling System
Cleaners
Coolant Type
Part Number
200164
On-Line Cleaner
Twin Pack
Table 25
144
Description
On-Half Gallon Jug –
6 Per Case
200105
5 Gallon Pail
200155
55 Gallon Drum
201549
Twin Pack – 2 Per Case
POWER COOL Cooling System Cleaners
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
All information subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
EPA07 MBE 4000 OPERATOR'S MANUAL
POWER TRAC Coolant Testing
And Analysis Products
Application
Part Number
Indicates Nitrite,
Molybdate & Glycol
Levels
Indicates Nitrite,
Molybdate & Glycol
Levels
Indicates Nitrite,
Molybdate & Glycol
Levels
Complete IEG/IPG
Coolant Analysis
Organic Coolant
Analysis
Table 26
23519401
23519402
23522774
23516921
23523398
Description
3-Way Coolant Test
Strips
(Single Foil Packs)
3-Way Coolant Test
Strips
(Bottle of 50)
3-Way Coolant Test
Strips
(Bottle of 10)
Coolant Analysis Bottle
(Carton of 6)
Laboratory Coolant
Analysis Bottle
(Carton of 6)
Power Trac Coolant Testing and Analysis Products
All information subject to change without notice.
DDC-SVC-MAN-0041
Copyright © 2009 DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION
145
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