Sargent and Greenleaf 6120 Operating instructions

Sargent and Greenleaf 6120 Operating instructions
Sargent and Greenleaf
Electronic Safe Lock Guide
Sargent and Greenleaf is a company dedicated to providing security. Not just a sense of
security, but real security designed to meet real-world needs. We offer mechanical locks that
deliver an unbeatable combination of quality and value. Electronic locks that take control to a
level never before possible. And exit devices that achieve the highest standard of safety. Since
1857, Sargent and Greenleaf has provided innovative security solutions to financial institutions,
businesses and governments across the globe. Today, we are a subsidiary of Stanley Security
Solutions, a growing division of Stanley Black & Decker.
Contents
Product Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
6120 / 6123 Installation Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
6120 Operating Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
6123 Operating Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
6123 Quick Reference Programming Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
6120 / 6123 Battery Changing Instructions—Two-Battery Keypad . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
6120 / 6123 Battery Changing Instructions—One-Battery Keypad . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
6120 / 6123 Troubleshooting Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
6120 / 6123 Troubleshooting Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
6120 / 6123 Management Reset Code Technical Bulletin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
6120 / 6123 Commonly Asked Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
A Brief History of Sargent & Greenleaf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Product Overview
Models 6120 and 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Locks
Added control and flexibility for greater security
• The 6120 gives you one master code and up to eight
independent user codes
Sargent & Greenleaf safe locks have been protecting the assets
of banks, businesses, and governments for more than a century
and a half.
• The 6123 gives you programmable time delay of up to ninetynine minutes with a variable opening window of two to nine
minutes.
• The 6123 gives you one master code, one supervisor code,
five independent user codes, and one time delay override
code.
• The 6123 lets you choose from three different modes of
operation: single user, dual control, and supervisor/user.
• T he 6123 lets you choose between single code time delay
override, dual code override, or no time delay override.
Features and Benefits:
• One-step operation—just enter the code and the lock
unlocks.
• T he 6123 lets individual users change their own codes
without supervisory assistance.
• Requires no turning of a dial to lock or unlock.
• Puts an end to the dangerous practice of “day locking” or
leaving the safe open.
• Automatically re-locks when you close the safe.
• Lets you change codes at any time with just a few touches of
the keypad.
• Protects from being opened or manipulated by repeated,
random code entry.
• Offers secure and reliable motor-driven lock bolt operation.
• F lexible interface capability — works with security systems,
time locks, alarm systems and CCTV.
• A llows for multiple users, while at the same time giving you
greater control over access.
• The 6120 has a built in programmable time delay of up to
nine minutes.
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
1
Product Overview
Models 6120 and 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Locks
The secure, smart way to protect your assets.
Protects against random dialing. With a million possible codes,
it’s unlikely a thief would ever have time to randomly enter
the right code, but why take a chance? Anytime four incorrect
codes are entered into the Comptronic 6120 or 6123, they
automatically shut down for five minutes.
Easy to use. Just enter your personal six-digit code and the
Comptronic lock automatically unlocks your safe door in one easy
step. It’s as simple as punching in a telephone number. There’s no
dial to turn.
Fits new and existing safes. You can request a Comptronic
6120 or 6123 for a new safe, or you can replace the lock on
your existing safe. And because it’s available in a variety of
attractive keypad finishes (including 24 karat gold), your
Comptronic lock will look as good on your safe as it works.
Relocks automatically. There’s nothing to turn, and it re-locks
itself after 6 seconds. That’s because the bolt mechanism on
Comptronic locks is driven by an extremely reliable DC motor.
Easy to program. Every
Comptronic lock gives
you a choice of one
million six-digit codes.
Change them yourself
anytime. Programming is
easy and done through
the keypad. There is no
need for additional tools,
programming boxes, or
disassembly of your lock or safe.
Over 8,000 openings between battery changes. Two
9-volt alkaline batteries are housed in the standard keypad
(S&G recommends Duracell®). When batteries get low, the
Comptronic’s audio signal changes pitch to let you know it’s
time for fresh ones. Your access codes remain unchanged while
you install new batteries.
The support of the industry leader. S&G is a leading global
manufacturer of high security safe combination locks, with the
broadest array of locks available. Our electronic locks have more
applications than all others. We provide excellence in all areas,
from our ISO 9001, U.L., and other worldwide certifications to
our experienced customer service staff. And, as with all our
products, we stand behind the 6120 and 6123 with one of the
best warranties in the industry.
Control access. The 6120 conveniently lets you assign up
to eight individual employee access codes. Perhaps more
importantly, you can delete and reprogram these codes at any
time with your Master Code, even if the code being deleted is
not known.
The 6123 lets you assign a Supervisor Code, a time delay
override code, and up to five individual employee access codes.
Either the Master Code holder or Supervisor Code holder can
delete and reprogram these codes at any time, even if the
employee access code is unknown.
Time delay opening and control. No robber can afford to wait
for a safe to be opened. The Comptronic 6120 lets you program
an opening delay of up to nine minutes. The 6123 time delay
can be set up to ninety-nine minutes. Employees enter their
access code, wait the delay period, and re-enter their code to
open the safe.
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© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
Installation Instructions
Models 6120 and 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Locks
• Modifications to the lock (including lock bolt attachments)
are not recommended, and will void the manufacturer’s
warranty.
Sargent & Greenleaf 6120 series electronic locks combine ease
of operation with security. Advanced electronic circuit design
makes them easy to install, easy to open, and easy to change
codes. Follow these instructions carefully to get the best
possible performance from your lock.
Mounting Considerations
• A minimum distance of .150” (3,8 mm) is required between
the end of the lock case containing the bolt and the safe’s
blocking bar or cam plate which is normally blocked by the
extended lock bolt. This is because the lock bolt may not be
retracted quite as far by older batteries as by fresh ones.
• Sargent & Greenleaf 6120 series Motorized Electronic
Combination Locks have been designed to use the same
mounting screw locations and occupy the same space as a
standard S&G 6730 mechanical lock. The 6120 series uses
standard mounting dimensions to simplify retrofit in safes
originally equipped with mechanical locks.
• You should install fresh alkaline batteries in the keypad and
connect the lock wiring cable to check the functions of the
lock prior to installation. Follow the procedures given in the
Operating Instructions. Avoid pressure to the end of the
lock bolt during these checks.
• The keypad base diameter is 4” (101,6 mm). This is slightly
greater than the diameter of standard S&G dial rings for
mechanical locks. The 6120 series keypad will cover any
scratches or paint blemishes left by the old lock.
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
• Do not allow the safe’s blocking bar or cam plate
to depress the electronic lock’s bolt farther than it
retracts during normal motor operation. This can lead to
inconsistent lock operation.
3
Installation Instructions
Models 6120 and 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Locks
Installation Notes
Although the 6120 series is easy to install, we recommend
the following procedures be performed only by an experienced
locksmith or safe technician. Your safe may incorporate
relocking devices that are attached to the combination lock.
Misalignment or detachment of these devices can result in a
lockout—a condition that makes it unlikely that the safe can be
opened without damage.
Additional Items You Will Need
The 6120 series requires two 9-volt alkaline batteries (not
included). We recommend fresh Duracell® batteries. Do not use
old or partially drained batteries in your lock. New batteries will
power your lock for approximately 8,000 openings when used
without the time delay feature.
Step 2
Many installations can be performed with nothing more that
a medium Phillips screwdriver. If the manufacturer of your
safe has made external relock device attachments to the lock,
specialized tools and knowledge may be required.
Run the connector through the wire channel. Gently pull the
connector and all excess cable to the outside of the safe. Make
sure the cable is not crimped or stressed at any point.
Use a reamer or round file to remove any sharp edges from the
wire channel (spindle hole) that might damage the wire cable.
Installation
Step 3
Once you’ve made sure the wire cable is not crimped or in
contact with any sharp surface, attach the lock to the safe’s
mounting plate. Use the four 1⁄4-20 (or metric M6) screws
provided. Tighten securely, attaching the lock firmly to the plate.
Step 1
Remove the existing lock (if present). The mounting plate should
be smooth and flat, with 1⁄4-20 mounting screw holes. The wire
channel (spindle hole) must have a diameter of at least 5⁄16”.
The lock incorporates a bolt-through cover that allows mounting
with the cover in place. Removing the cover voids the warranty.
The 6120 series can be mounted right-hand, left-hand, verticalup, or vertical-down without any modifications or adjustments.
4
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
Installation Instructions
CLEARANCE
Models 6120 and 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Locks
Step 4 (FOR SAFES WITH RELOCK DEVICES)
Step 6
This is an installation that requires attachment of the safe
manufacturer’s relock device plate to the lock cover using the
cover screws. If your situation is similar, be sure the thickness
of the relock device plate(s) is not great enough to prevent the
screws from engaging the lock case by at least four threads. If
necessary, use longer 8-32 machine screws to insure proper fit.
The boltwork bind has been relieved by removing a small
amount of material from the right side of the boltwork opening.
When the safe’s boltwork is fully thrown to the locked position,
there is air space on all sides of the electronic lock’s bolt.
BIND
The photo also illustrates a required space of at least .150” (3,8
mm) between the end of the lock body and the blocking bar of
the safe’s boltwork.
Step 7
Run the connector and wire cable through the center hole of the
mounting base. Then use the included 8-32 machine screws
to attach the base to the safe door. The attaching screw holes
will line up with those used for any standard S&G dial ring
(excluding R132 key locking dial rings).
Step 5
Make sure that the lock bolt does not bind against the safe’s
boltwork. 6120 series locks are sensitive to bolt end and side
pressure. The safe’s blocking bar or cam must not depress the
lock’s bolt farther than it retracts under normal motor operation.
Check to make sure this doesn’t happen when the safe handle
is moved to retract the door bolts (unlock the safe).
This photograph shows boltwork in the locked position which
places pressure on the side of the lock bolt. This could prevent
the lock from opening properly.
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
5
Installation Instructions
Models 6120 and 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Locks
Step 8
Step 10
Install a new 9-volt alkaline battery in each of the keypad’s
battery holders (Duracell® is recommended). Support the top of
each holder as the battery is inserted. This will prevent bending
or breaking the holder.
Make a loose coil of the excess wire cable. Hold the coil
away from the spring clips that will secure the keypad to the
mounting base.
Step 9
The wire cable connector is shaped so that it will fit into the
circuit board receptacle only when aligned correctly. Insert the
connector into its receptacle in the keypad housing. If it does
not slide easily into place, do not force it. This means you need
to turn it 180º before attempting to insert it again.
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© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
Installation Instructions
Models 6120 and 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Locks
Step 11
Step 12
Place the keypad over the base. Make sure the wire cable is still
clear of the spring clips, then push the keypad firmly onto the
base. It should snap into place.
The installation is complete. Refer to your lock’s Operating
Instructions for opening, code changing, time delay, and battery
changing instructions.
Make sure your lock is fully operational before closing the safe
door for the first time.
2.400" (61,0 mm)
1.000" (25,4 mm)
1.624" (41,2 mm)
Important Dimensions
.312"
7,9 mm
2.624" (66,6 mm)
.281"
7,1 mm
3.320" (84,3 mm)
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
1.165" (29,6 mm)
7
Operating Instructions
Model 6120­—Motorized Electronic Combination Lock
The Sargent & Greenleaf Model 6120 combines ease of
operation with security. Its advanced electronic circuit
design makes it easy to open and easy to change codes.
Follow these instructions carefully to get the best
possible use from your lock.
• All codes must contain six digits or six letters. Any digit or
letter can be used as many times as you wish. For instance,
the following codes (while not recommended) will operate the
lock: 5 5 5 5 5 5 # OR J J J J J J #
• All codes end with #. This signals the lock that you have
finished entering all digits of the code.
Introduction
• The Sargent & Greenleaf Model 6120 Motorized Electronic
Combination Lock is shipped from the factory with a factory
master code only. It is 1 2 3 4 5 6 #. This code is used to
open the lock and set or change all of its codes. If the safe
maker or your dealer sets a new master code, he will advise
you of the change. You should set the lock to your own,
unique master code immediately.
• If you pause more than ten seconds between button presses
when entering a code, the lock will assume you do not want
to continue, and it will reset itself. To open the lock, begin
the code entry sequence again from the first step.
• If you realize you have pressed an incorrect button when
entering a code, press or simply pause ten seconds or
more, then begin entering your code again.
*
• The Model 6120 will always open on the master code. At your
discretion, it can also be set to accept up to eight different
user codes. The master code holder is responsible for
maintaining the number of active users programmed into
each lock. The master code is designated as code #1, and
the user codes (if set) are designated by user I.D. number 2,
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9. The user codes do not exist until they
are programmed into the lock.
• If four incorrect codes are entered in a row, the Model 6120
will shut down for a period of as long as fifteen minutes.*
This is a security feature. Pressing any button anytime during
the lockout period will reset the timer to its maximum penalty
time. Do not touch any keypad buttons for a period of fifteen
minutes, then enter any valid code to open the lock.
* Locks produced before mid 1997 shut down for fifteen minutes. Locks
produced after this shut down for five minutes.
• Each time a button is pressed and the lock accepts the
input, it emits a “chirp,” and the LED on the keypad lights
momentarily.
8
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
Operating Instructions
Model 6120­—Motorized Electronic Combination Lock
To Open the Lock
this occurs, the lock will not operate properly. To relieve side
pressure on the lock bolt, move the safe’s handle to the fully
locked position, then re-enter a working code. The lock should
open after the pressure is removed.
Press the code digits or letters in order, followed by #. The lock
bolt will retract for six seconds, allowing you time to operate the
safe handle and open the door. Do not put any pressure on the
safe handle until after the code has been entered. The Model
6120 will lock automatically when the safe door is closed and
the handle is turned to the locked position.
2. If the lock “chirps” when keys are pressed, but it will not
open, the batteries may be drained to the point that they will
not operate the lock’s motor. Follow the battery replacement
procedure in this manual.
3. If the lock makes no sound when any of the keys are pressed,
dead batteries are likely to be the cause. Follow the battery
replacement procedure in this manual.
Note: The Master Code Holder is responsible for maintaining
the number of active users programmed into each lock.
4. This item applies to the two-battery keypad only:
If the lock makes no sound when any of the keys are pressed,
but the batteries have been checked and found to be good,
a loose keypad connector may be the cause. Pull the keypad
away from the base as described in the battery changing
procedure. Check to make sure the wire connector is firmly
seated into its receptacle on the keypad circuit board. The
connector is designed so that it will only slide into the
receptacle when aligned correctly.
In Case of Trouble
If your lock should fail to open when a valid code is entered,
check for the following:
1. The boltwork of a safe can, under certain conditions, place
pressure on the side of the lock’s bolt. This is often caused
by something inside the safe pressing against the door or by
something caught between the safe door and its frame. When
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© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
If all of the preceding remedies have been exhausted
and the lock still does not open, contact a qualified safe
technician in your area for professional service.
T
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Operating Instructions
Model 6120­—Motorized Electronic Combination Lock
MRC—Management Reset Code
Whenever # is pressed, the lock chirps to acknowledge the entry.
Wait for the chirps before proceeding. If a long series of closely
spaced chirps (almost a continuous tone) sounds when # is
pressed, the new code will not be accepted. Any existing user
code remains.
If a management reset code is used, it must be programmed into the
lock before the master code is changed for the first time. Once the
master code is changed, the lock cannot accept an MRC. Conversely,
once an MRC is programmed into a lock, it is always present. It
cannot be deleted or changed.
For instance, if you want to enable the #3 user code to open
the lock with a code of 4 4 6 6 3 3, you will use the following
procedure.
Some 6120 locks have factory installed management reset codes,
You cannot install a new MRC to replace an existing one.
Press SG (____) #  3
*
The management reset code is used to regain control of a lock when
its master code is lost. When the MRC is employed, it deletes all
codes and changes the master code back to 1 2 3 4 5 6 #. See the
technical bulletin on page 32 for detailed information on how to set
and use a management reset code.
(7 4) existing master code
You may find that a particular user code which you have enabled
is no longer needed. It is a good security policy to remove any
unneeded codes. To do so, follow this procedure.
*
Press SG (___) #  (user I.D. 2 through 9)
*
All code changing procedures begin by pressing SG (the same
as 74 ), followed by the existing six-digit master code and #.
The lock immediately chirps five times ( ). If the lock emits
a series of closely spaced chirps (nearly a continuous tone)
you’ve made a mistake and must start again.
(7 4) existing master code
*
(___) #  1
* (___) # 
new master code
(___) # 
In this procedure, the Model 6120 lock will not allow you to
inadvertently remove the master code.
new master code
Security Advisory
Whenever # is pressed, the lock chirps to acknowledge the entry.
Wait for the chirps before proceeding. If a long series of closely
spaced chirps (almost a continuous tone) sounds when # is
pressed, the new master code will not be accepted—the old
code is retained.
If your lock is used many times a day (50 or more openings
daily), it is advisable to use as many different keys as possible
in your code number. Avoid using a key more than once whenever
possible. Check the keypad frequently for visible wear which
indicates which keys are being pressed for code entry. Change
the code to use different keys when wear is evident. If necessary,
have a qualified service technician replace the keypad.
To Enter or Change a User Code (codes #2-#9)
Press SG (___) #  (user I.D.)
*
(7 4) existing master code
* (___) #  (___) # 
new user code
* #  # 
Whenever # is pressed, the lock chirps to acknowledge the entry.
Wait for the chirps before proceeding. If a long series of closely
spaced chirps (almost a continuous tone) sounds when # is
pressed, the user code will not be deleted.
To Change the Master Code (code #1)
(7 4) existing master code
446633 # 
new user code
To Delete a User Code
Always keep the safe door open when changing codes and
making other programming changes.
Press SG
new user code
This same procedure would change any existing #3 user code to
4-4-6-6-3-3.
About Changing Codes
*
* 446633 # 
new user code
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© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
Operating Instructions
Model 6120­—Motorized Electronic Combination Lock
To Use the Time Delay
Whenever a safe is secured with a time delay device, a sign
should be posted on the door of the container to indicate the
presence of the device. Suggested wording is:
The Sargent & Greenleaf Model 6120 Electronic Combination
Lock has a built in time delay feature that you can turn on and
off by following the programming steps on this page. The time
delay can be set anywhere from one to nine minutes. When the
time delay feature is enabled, your lock will function like this:
“THIS EQUIPMENT IS PROTECTED AGAINST HOLD UP
AND ROBBERY BY TIME DELAY LOCK.”
After you enter a valid opening code, the lock will “chirp”
three times. It will not open.
This information should be clearly posted in every language
which is prevalent in the area where the safe is located.
The lock will “chirp” once every ten seconds during the
delay period, and it will not accept any keypad input during
the delay period.
A self-adhesive label is available from Sargent & Greenleaf
distributors or your local safe and lock retailer. The S&G
part number for the label is 0000-636-152000. This label is
available only in English.
The lock will “chirp” ten times at the end of the delay
period. Then it will “double-chirp” every six seconds for
the next two minutes. This two-minute period is called the
“opening window.”
To Set a Time Delay
The time delay value can be 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, or 9 minutes.
To deactivate the time delay, set its value to zero minutes.
You must enter a valid code during the opening window
to open the lock. Instead of entering a valid code to open
the lock, you can use the procedure below to turn the time
delay off or set it to a different length. The two-minute
period immediately following the time delay is the only time
during which you can change or delete the time delay.
Press SG (___) #  0 (___) #  (___) # 
*
(7 4)
*
delay time
delay time
Whenever # is pressed, the lock chirps to acknowledge the entry.
Wait for the chirps before proceeding. If a long series of closely
spaced chirps (almost a continuous tone) sounds when # is
pressed, the new time delay value is not accepted—the old time
delay value is retained.
Use of the time delay feature will decrease your battery life
by approximately 50%. Battery life will vary depending on the
length of the time delay. For instance, batteries will last longer
with the time delay set to one minute than with the delay set to
nine minutes.
For instance, if you want to set the time delay to five minutes,
use the following procedure.
A time delay is typically used in situations where there is threat
of armed robbery. Statistically, an armed robber will not linger
more than a minute or two at a crime scene. The longer he
stays, the greater his risk of being caught. A time delay lock
enforces a waiting period which is beyond the control of either
robber or victim.
Press SG
* (___) #  0 * 5 #  5 # 
(7 4)
master code
To turn the time delay off, use the following procedure during
the two-minute opening window.
Press SG
(7 4)
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
master code
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* (___) #  0 * 0 #  0 # 
master code
Operating Instructions
Model 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Lock
The Sargent & Greenleaf Model 6123 combines ease of
operation with security and flexibility. Its advanced electronic
circuit design makes it easy to open and easy to change codes.
Follow these instructions carefully to get the best
possible use from your lock.
• If you pause more than 10 seconds between button presses
when entering a code, the lock will assume you do not want
to continue, and it will reset itself to the original code. To
open the lock, begin the code entry sequence again from the
first step.
Introduction
• If you realize you have pressed an incorrect button when
entering a code, press or simply pause ten seconds or
more, then begin entering your code again.
*
• The Sargent & Greenleaf Model 6123 Motorized Electronic
Combination Lock is shipped from the factory in single user
mode with a factory master code only. It is 1 2 3 4 5 6 #.
This code is used to open the lock and set or change all of
its codes. If the safe maker or your dealer sets a new master
code, he will advise you of the change. You should set the
lock to your own, unique master code immediately.
• If four incorrect codes are entered in a row, the Model 6123
will shut down for a period of as long as fifteen minutes.*
This is a security feature. Pressing any button anytime during
the lockout period will reset the timer to its maximum penalty
time. Do not touch any keypad buttons for a period of fifteen
minutes, then enter any valid code(s) to open the lock.
• The Model 6123 will always open on the master code. At your
discretion, it can also be set to accept a supervisor code,
up to five different user codes, and a time delay override
code. The master code holder is responsible for maintaining
the number of active users programmed into each lock. The
supervisor code holder can also create, change, and delete
user codes. The master code is designated as code #1. The
supervisor code (if set) is designated as code #2. The user
codes (if set) are designated by user I.D. number 3, 4, 5, 6,
and 7. The time delay override code (if set) is designated as
code #9.
The lock can also go into the lockout period during
programming if it interprets an incorrect programming
sequence as four or more incorrect code entries. If the lock
emits a long error tone (brap) during repeated programming
attempts, it may be in lockout mode. Do not press any
buttons for fifteen minutes, then try again.
The 6123 is extremely versatile, and therefore somewhat
complex to program. These detailed programming
instructions are followed by a condensed, two-page quick
programming reference that is designed for anyone who is
already familiar with the lock’s various features.
• Each time a button is pressed, the lock acknowledges it by
sounding a “chirp,” and the LED on the keypad will light
momentarily as the “chirp” sounds.
* 6120 and 6123 locks produced before mid 1997 shut down for fifteen
minutes. 6120 and 6123 locks produced after this shut down
for five minutes.
• All codes must contain six digits or six letters. Any digit or
letter can be used as many times as you wish. For instance,
the following codes (while not recommended) will operate the
lock: 5 5 5 5 5 5 # OR J J J J J J #
• All codes end with #. This signals the lock that you have
finished entering all digits of the code.
12
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
Operating Instructions
Model 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Lock
To Open the Lock
this occurs, the lock will not operate properly. To relieve side
pressure on the lock bolt, move the safe’s handle to the fully
locked position, then re-enter a working code. The lock should
open.
Press the code digits or letters in order, followed by #. The lock
bolt will retract for six seconds, allowing you time to operate the
safe handle and open the door. Do not put any pressure on the
safe handle until after the code has been entered. The Model
6123 will lock automatically when the safe door is closed and
the handle is turned to the locked position.
2. If the lock “chirps” when keys are pressed, but it will not
open, the batteries may be drained to the point that they will
not operate the lock’s motor. Follow the battery replacement
procedure in this manual.
3. If the lock makes no sound when any of the keys are pressed,
dead batteries are likely to be the cause. Follow the battery
replacement procedure in this manual.
Note: The Master Code Holder is responsible for maintaining
the number of active users programmed into each lock.
4. This item applies to the two-battery keypad only:
If the lock makes no sound when any of the keys are pressed,
but the batteries have been checked and found to be good,
a loose keypad connector may be the cause. Pull the keypad
away from the base as described in the battery changing
procedure. Check to make sure the wire connector is firmly
seated into its receptacle on the keypad circuit board. The
connector is designed so that it will only slide into the
receptacle when aligned correctly.
In Case of Trouble
If your lock should fail to open when a valid code is entered,
check for the following:
1. The boltwork of a safe can, under certain conditions, place
pressure on the side of the lock’s bolt. This is often caused
by something inside the safe pressing against the door or by
something caught between the safe door and its frame. When
ALI
GN
RI
DGE WITH
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
If all of the preceding remedies have been exhausted
and the lock still does not open, contact a qualified safe
technician in your area for professional service.
T
SLO
13
Operating Instructions
Model 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Lock
Decisions —MRC and TDO
The [01] or [03] pair of digits in your management reset code must
be pressed at the same time. The lock will emit three rapid beeps
after the final # is pressed to acknowledge successful programming
of the MRC. If you don’t hear those three beeps, the MRC has not
been programmed. If you hear a long tone (called a “brap”) while
trying to program the MRC, either you’ve made an error in the entry
sequence, the lock already has an MRC, or the master code has
been changed. Even if the master code is changed, then set back to
1 2 3 4 5 6 #, the management reset code cannot be set.
MRC—Management Reset Code
Before any buttons are pressed, you need to make some decisions.
The first is whether or not your lock is to have a management reset
code, also known as the MRC. This code must be programmed into
the lock before the master code is changed for the first time. After
the master code is changed, the lock can never be programmed with
an MRC. Conversely, when an MRC is programmed into a lock, it is
always present. It cannot be deleted or changed.
The procedure for using the management reset code to reset a lock
with a lost master code is found later in the manual.
Some 6123 locks have factory installed management reset codes,
depending on how they were ordered by the safe maker or dealer. You
cannot install a new MRC to replace an existing one.
TDO—Time Delay Override
Note: Time delay override is not available if the lock is used in
supervisor/user mode.
The management reset code is used to regain control of a lock when
its master code is lost. When the MRC is employed, it deletes the
supervisor and all user codes present in the lock and changes the
master code to the factory default of 1 2 3 4 5 6 #. While this can
be a real time and money saving feature if a master code is lost,
the presence of a management reset code in a lock could also be
viewed as a security weakness under some circumstances. Carefully
consider whether or not you want to program an MRC into you lock. If
you decide to use this feature, here’s what you need to know.
If your 6123 will be using a time delay, you may also want to program
a time delay override capability. Like the MRC, you’ve got to make
this decision and do the programming before the master code is
changed for the first time.
A time delay is used to deter armed robbery. Statistics show
that the longer an armed robber has to wait for a safe to open,
the less likely he is to initiate the crime. The 6123‘s time delay
feature enforces a waiting time between the entry of the lock
code and the opening of the safe.
Important: All programming and code changing should be
done with the safe door open. Do not close the safe door until
all programming and/or code changes are completed and triple
checked to make sure everything is working correctly.
Often a safe that requires a time delay lock is involved in a cash
carrier or armored car pickup process. Excess cash receipts
are picked up at various intervals by armored car services.
In the interest of security and efficiency, it is important that
these couriers do not spend any more time than is absolutely
necessary to access the safe, remove the excess valuables, and
be on their way. This is where the time delay override code
comes into play. It allows one code to override the lock’s time
delay and open the safe immediately.
An MRC consists of seven digits, including one [01] or [03] pair
that can appear once anywhere in the code. When entering the
MRC, these two digits are pressed simultaneously. An example of an
acceptable management reset code is:
7 4 8 1 [1 0] 5
Before programming the MRC into the lock, enter the master code
(123456#) to make sure the lock is functioning correctly on the
factory default master code. When the bolt extends, press:
Before the lock’s master code is changed for the first time,
you should determine whether or not you will need a time delay
override code or not. If you will need a TDO, you must decide
if it will be a single user time delay override or a dual control
time delay override.
* * # 1 2 3 4 5 6 # (______) # (______) # 
management
reset code
management
reset code
14
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
Operating Instructions
Model 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Lock
If you do not want your 6123 to have time delay override capability,
use the following programming sequence to permanently remove it:
8 3
The lock will emit three rapid beeps after the final # is pressed to
acknowledge that the dual control time delay override capability
has been set. If you don’t hear those three beeps, or if you hear a
long tone (called a “brap”) while following this procedure, either
you’ve made an error in the entry sequence, or the master code has
already been changed.
* 1 2 3 4 5 6 # 1 # 1 # 
The lock will emit three rapid beeps after the final # is pressed to
acknowledge that the time delay override capability has been
irrevocably removed. If you don’t hear those three beeps, or
if you hear a long tone (called a “brap”) while following this
procedure, either you’ve made an error in the entry sequence, or
the master code has already been changed.
Once you’ve successfully set a management reset code (if
desired) and a time delay override method (or deleted the
capability permanently), you can perform any of the lock’s other
programming functions, including changing the master code.
Any programming you do from this point on can be changed.
A single user time delay override code allows the holder of
the code to enter it into the lock and immediately gain access to the
safe. He does not have to wait for the time delay, and there are no
other actions required.
Either type of time delay override still requires you to select and
set the actual six-digit TDO code number that will be used to open
the safe. Even if the capability for TDO has been programmed, it is
useless until a code is programmed. The code can be set, changed,
or deleted at any time by the holder of the lock’s master code. It
is easiest to set the time delay override code before a time delay
period is programmed. To do so, press:
To program the lock for single user time delay override, use the
following procedure:
4 6
* 1 2 3 4 5 6 # 2 # 2 # 
The lock will emit three rapid beeps after the final # is pressed to
acknowledge that the single user time delay override capability has
been set. If you don’t hear those three beeps, or if you hear a long
tone (called a “brap”) while following this procedure, either you’ve
made an error in the entry sequence, or the master code has already
been changed.
Press SG (_____) #  9
*
(7 4) existing master code
Single User Mode
One person with a single, valid, six-digit code can open the lock. Lock
features can include time delay and time delay override code, if
desired. The holder of the master code can perform all programming
functions. The holder of the supervisor code (if it’s set) can set,
change, and delete user codes. He can also change and delete his
own code. User code holders can change their own codes. Your lock
left S&G’s factory in single user mode (the default mode). If it’s in
another mode and you want to change it to single user mode, follow
this programming sequence:
3 2
1 2 3 4 5 6 # 1 # 1 # 
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
(____) # 
new TDO code
Access Methods — modes of operation
The dual control time delay override is often preferred, because it
imposes a supervisory restriction on the only person who has a code
that will circumvent the time delay. To set the lock for dual control
time delay capability, press:
*
new TDO code
If a time delay period is already programmed into the lock, the time
delay override code can only be set, changed, or deleted during the
opening window, which is explained later in the manual.
A dual control time delay override is somewhat similar, with
one restriction placed on it. The override code will only open the
safe when it is entered within one minute of another code holder
entering his or her code to start the time delay. For example, when
the armored car shows up at the safe, a store employee would enter
the master code, the supervisor code, or any user code to start
the lock’s time delay. Within one minute, the armored car person
would enter his code. The safe would immediately open, rather than
enforcing the entire time delay period.
4 6
* (____) # 
* (_____) #  0 #  0 # 
existing master code
15
Operating Instructions
Model 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Lock
Dual Control Mode
codes. He can also change and delete his own code. User code
holders can change their own codes and open the lock when it is
enabled by the master code or supervisor code.
This is also referred to as dual user mode. It requires two different
valid lock codes to be entered within one minute of each other for
the lock to open. The idea is that no one person has the ability to
open the safe alone. Lock features can include time delay and time
delay override code, if desired. The holder of the master code can
perform all programming functions. The holder of the supervisor
code cannot perform any programming or code changes. He cannot
even change or delete his own code. User code holders can change
their own codes. You should also be aware that a single user time
delay override code can open the lock immediately without entry
of a second code. The dual control time delay override will require
another code to start the time delay before it can be used to open the
safe. A time delay period of at least one minute must be programmed
into the lock for a time delay override code of either variety to work.
It cannot open a lock that is not using the time delay feature.
To place your 6123 lock in supervisor/user mode, press:
3 2
existing master code
Setting / Changing / Deleting Codes
The Master Code
As mentioned previously, the master code can perform all
programming functions for the 6123 lock. The master code can
be changed, but the lock will not allow you to delete it. The factory
default master code is 1 2 3 4 5 6 #. We strongly suggest you
change it to a six-digit code of your own choosing before storing
anything of value in your safe. Only the holder of the master code
can change the master code. The sequence is:
If your lock is in another mode and you want to change it to dual
control mode, follow this programming sequence:
3 2
*
* (_____) #  2 #  2 # 
Press SG (___) #  1
*
(_____) #  1 #  1 # 
(7 4) existing master code
existing master code
* (___) # 
(___) # 
new master code
new master code
If the long error tone (brap) sounds at any time during the master
code changing procedure, you have made an error. The old master
code is retained.
Supervisor/User Mode
This is sometimes referred to as supervisor/subordinate mode. In
this mode, the master code and the supervisor code cannot open
the lock. Instead, they are used to enable and disable the lock for
opening by the user codes. When either the master code or the
supervisor code (if set) is entered, the lock will emit four short beeps
or two long beeps. If it gives the four short beeps, any user code
can subsequently be used to open the lock. The next time the master
code or supervisor code is entered, the lock will emit the two long
beeps. Now the user codes cannot open the lock. When the lock is
disabled and a user code is entered, it does not open, but emits
two long beeps instead. The master code and supervisor code are
effectively used to toggle the lock back and forth between usable
and non-usable states. Lock features can include time delay, but the
time delay override is not available in this mode. The holder of the
master code can perform all programming functions. The holder of
the supervisor code (if it’s set) can set, change, and delete user
The Supervisor Code
The supervisor code can change and delete itself (once set). It can
be set, changed, and deleted by the holder of the master code. The
process for using the master code to set or change the supervisor
code is:
Press SG (___) #  2
*
(7 4) existing master code
* (___) # 
new supervisor code
(___) # 
new supervisor code
If the long error tone (brap) sounds at any time during the supervisor
code changing procedure, you have made an error. The old
supervisor code is retained.
To delete the supervisor code, the master code holder enters:
Press SG (___) #  2
*
(7 4) existing master code
16
* #  # 
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
Operating Instructions
Model 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Lock
If the long error tone (brap) sounds at any time during the supervisor
code deletion procedure, you have made an error. The old supervisor
code is retained.
If the long error tone (brap) sounds at any time during the user code
setting or changing procedure, you have made an error. If a user
code already existed in this position, it will be retained.
Here is the sequence the supervisor code holder uses to change his
own six-digit code:
The holder of the master code or supervisor code can delete a user
code as follows:
Press SG (___) #  2
*
(7 4)
existing
supervisor code
* (___) # 
new supervisor code
(___) # 
user code position number
new supervisor code
Press SG (___) #  3
*
(7 4) existing master code
or supervisor code
If the long error tone (brap) sounds at any time during the supervisor
code changing procedure, you have made an error. The old
supervisor code is retained.
If the long error tone (brap) sounds at any time during the user code
deletion procedure, you’ve made an error. The user code is retained.
The supervisor code holder can delete his code completely from the
lock. This is the procedure he would use:
Press SG (___) #  2
(7 4)
*
existing
supervisor code
To set, change, or delete any user code, follow the two previous
programming sequences, changing the position number to point to
the particular user code you want to affect.
* #  # 
The holder of a user code can change his own six-digit code to a
new number. He cannot delete his own code, leaving his user position
empty. To make the change:
If the long error tone (brap) sounds at any time during the supervisor
code deletion procedure, you have made an error. The old supervisor
code is retained.
Press 3 3
* (___) # 
existing user code
The User Codes
The Time Delay Override Code
This is a code we learned about earlier in the manual. It circumvents
any time delay period programmed into the lock. A time delay period
of at least one minute must be used for the time delay override
code to be valid. If there is no time delay in the lock, the override
code will not work.
Only the holder of the lock’s master code can set, change, or delete
the time delay override code. To set or change it:
Press SG (___) #  9
*
user code position number
(7 4) existing master code
*
* (___) # 
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
new user code
new user code
If the long error tone (brap) sounds at any time during the changing
procedure, you’ve made an error. The old user code is retained.
There are provisions for five different user codes in the 6123. Each
one is associated with a storage position number. The first user
code is stored in position #3, the second in position #4, the third
in position #5, the fourth in position #6, and the fifth user code
is stored in position #7. When we program a user code, we have
to identify the particular code by its position number. For instance,
here’s how the holder of the master code or supervisor code (except
in dual control mode) sets or changes the user code found in the
#3 position.
(7 4) existing master code
or supervisor code
(___) #  (___) # 
new user code
Notice that you don’t have to put in a position number to identify
which user code position you’re changing. That’s because the lock
figures it out from the existing code that you enter.
Holders of user codes can do two things—open the safe within the
restrictions of the lock mode, and change their code numbers. User
codes do not exist until set by the holder of the master code or the
supervisor code. As we discovered earlier, however, the supervisor
code holder cannot set, change, or delete any codes when the lock is
in dual control mode.
Press SG (___) #  3
* #  # 
(___) # 
new user code
17
* (___) # 
new TDO code
(___) # 
new TDO code
Operating Instructions
Model 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Lock
Important Note: If a time delay is already present in your 6123 when
you want to set, change, or delete a time delay override code, the
programming must be done during the time delay opening window.
This is the period of time that the lock is normally able to be opened
following the countdown of the time delay period. For instance, if
your lock is in single user mode, enabled for a time delay override
code, and using a two-minute time delay, this is how you would
program the TDO: Enter any valid operating code for the lock
(master, supervisor, or any user code) to start the time delay. The
lock will beep once every ten seconds during the two minute time
delay period. At the end of two minutes, the lock will beep ten times
rapidly to signal the beginning of the opening window period. Instead
of entering a valid operating code to open the lock, you initiate the
programming sequence to create a time delay override code.
Press SG (___) #  9
*
(7 4) existing master code
* (___) # 
new TDO code
Changing or deleting an existing time delay period requires
programming to be done during the opening window period. This
is the period of time that the lock is normally able to be opened
following the countdown of the time delay period. For instance, if your
lock is in single user mode and using a two-minute time delay, this
is how you would change the length of the time delay. Enter any valid
operating code for the lock (master, supervisor, or any user code) to
start the time delay. The lock will beep once every ten seconds during
the two minute time delay period. At the end of two minutes, the lock
will beep ten times rapidly to signal the beginning of the opening
window period. Instead of entering a valid operating code to open the
lock, you initiate the programming sequence to change the length of
the time delay period.
Press SG (___) #  0
*
(___) # 
(7 4) existing master code
*
(7 4) existing master code
*
Using the 6123 with a Time Delay Period
#  # 
Time delay can be used with any of the 6123’s operating modes. It
automatically enforces a waiting period between the time a valid lock
code is first entered and when the safe can be opened.
In single user mode, a 6123 with time delay is opened by first
entering any valid operating code (master, supervisor, or user) to
begin the time delay. At the end of the time delay period, the lock
beeps ten times rapidly. Now you have a period of time (the opening
window) during which you enter any valid code for the lock. It can be
the same code used to start the time delay, or it can be another code.
The lock will open.
Time Delay Features
Setting / Changing / Deleting the Time Delay Period
Time delay can be used with any of the 6123’s operating modes. It
can only be programmed by the holder of the lock’s master code,
and it can be set for any time between one and ninety-nine minutes,
in single minute increments.
In dual control mode, a 6123 with time delay is opened by first
entering any valid operating code (master, supervisor, or user) to
begin the time delay. At the end of the time delay period, the lock
beeps ten times rapidly. During the opening window you must enter
any two valid operating codes within sixty seconds of each other to
open the lock. One of these codes may be the same one used to begin
the time delay, but it may be two different codes for the lock.
To set a time delay when none exists:
*
(7 4) existing master code
* (___) # 
time delay period
in minutes (1 - 99)
(___) # 
new time delay period
in minutes (1 - 99)
To delete the time delay altogether, you follow the same programming
sequence to set the time delay period to zero.
If there is no time delay period programmed when you want to set,
change, or delete a time delay override code, you obviously don’t
need to be concerned about performing the programming during the
opening window.
Press SG (___) #  0
new time delay period
in minutes (1 - 99)
new TDO code
If you wished to delete an existing time delay override code, the
sequence would be:
Press SG (___) #  9
* (___) # 
(___) # 
time delay period
in minutes (1 - 99)
18
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
Operating Instructions
Model 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Lock
In supervisor/user mode, only user codes can open the lock, and
only when the lock has been enabled by the holder of the master
code or supervisor code. Once the lock is enabled, any valid user
code is entered to begin the time delay. At the end of the time delay
period, the lock beeps ten times rapidly. During the opening window,
any valid user code is entered to open the lock. It can be the same
user code that initiated the time delay, or it can be any other valid
user code for the lock. The time delay override feature does not
work when the lock is used in supervisor/user mode. If a TDO code
is programmed into the lock when it is placed in supervisor/user
mode, the TDO code simply ceases to function.
Only the lock’s master code can be used to alter the opening window
period. If the lock is using a time delay, the opening window can only
be altered during the opening window. If you are programming a lock
from scratch and you know you will be changing the opening window
value, it’s easiest to do it before you program the time delay period.
The Opening Window
This information should be clearly posted in every language
which is prevalent in the area where the safe is located.
Whenever a safe is secured with a time delay device, a sign
should be posted on the door of the container to indicate the
presence of the device. Suggested wording is:
“THIS EQUIPMENT IS PROTECTED AGAINST HOLD UP
AND ROBBERY BY TIME DELAY LOCK.”
An important part of the time delay feature is the opening window.
This is the limited period of time immediately following the time
delay period during which a valid code (or codes) can be entered
to open the lock. If the opening window is allowed to expire after a
time delay has elapsed, the lock cannot be opened without initiating
the time delay (by entering a valid lock code) all over again. In other
words, if you don’t take advantage of the opportunity the opening
window provides for you to open the lock, you must start all over
again.
A self-adhesive label is available from Sargent & Greenleaf
distributors or your local safe and lock retailer. The S&G
part number for the label is 0000-636-152000. This label is
available in English only.
6123 Quick Reference Guide
The following two pages comprise the 6123 Quick Reference Guide.
It contains the programming sequences we’ve already covered, and
presents them in a form that makes it easy to find and use the
particular feature you need to implement.
The factory default setting for the opening window is two minutes.
You can easily change this to expand the window up to nine minutes,
in single minute increments. The process is:
Press SG (___) #  8
*
(7 4)
existing master code
* (___) # 
new opening
window period in
minutes (1 - 9)
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
(___) # 
new opening
window period in
minutes (1 - 9)
19
6123 and Z02 Quick Reference
Set the Management Reset Code (before the Master Code is changed for the first time):
Press
**#
(123456)
factory master code
#
#
(_______)
MRC
(_______)
MRC
# 
Use the Management Reset Code
Press
*6 #
(_______)
MRC
#
(lock beeps once  for each time the MRC has been used)
Note: clears all codes except the Time Delay Override Code
Disabling Time Delay Override Capability (before the Master Code is changed for the first time):
Press 8 3
*
(123456)
factory master code
# 1 # 1 # 
Set a Time Delay Override Mode (before the Master Code is changed for the first time):
Press 4 6
*
(123456)
factory master code
#
(
☞ ) # ( ☞ ) # 
☞ = 1 for dual control TDO
☞ = 2 for single control TDO
Set or Change the Time Delay Override Code:
Press 7 4
*
(______)
master code
#  9
*
(______)
TDO code
# 
# 
(______)
TDO code
Note: must be set or changed in the “opening window” if the time delay length is more than zero
Set or Change the Time Delay Length:
Press 7 4
*
(______)
master code
#  0
*
(delay length)
# 
(delay length)
# 
Note: must be set or changed in the “opening window” if the time delay length is more than zero
Set or Change the Opening Window Length:
Press 7 4
*
(______)
master code
#  8
*
(window length)
#  1
*
(______)
# 
(window length)
# 
Note: must be set or changed in the “opening window” if the time delay length is more than zero
Change the Master Code:
Press 7 4
*
(______)
master code
new master code
# 
(______)
new master code
Note: to delete a code, simply do not enter a new code number—just push the # key
# 
Set, Change, Delete Supervisor and User Codes:
Press 7 4
*
(______)
master or
supervisor code
# 
(
☞) * ( _ _ _ _ _ _ )
new code
# 
(______)
new code
# 
Note: to delete a code, simply do not enter a new code number—just push the # key
= 2 for Supervisor Code
☞
☞ = 3 through 7 for User Codes
20
Revision 1/5/06
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
6123 and Z02 Quick Reference
User Changes His Own Code:
Press 3 3
*
(______)
current user
code
# 
# 
(______)
new user code
(______)
new user code
# 
Note: users cannot delete their own codes
Setting the Access Mode:
Press 3 2
*
(______)
master code
# 
(
☞)
# 
(
☞)
# 
☞ = 0 for Single User access
☞ = 1 for Dual User access
☞ = 2 for Supervisor/Subordinate access
Notes:
time delay override does not work in S/S mode
a supervisor code must be set before changing to S/S mode
1
2
Notes:
•
The Supervisor code cannot set, change, or delete any codes in Dual Control mode.
•
Time Delay Override (TDO) is not available in Supervisor/Subordinate mode.
Recovering a 6123 with Unknown Programming:
You will need the Management Reset Code (MRC) for the lock.
1. Make sure there are good batteries in the keypad.
2. The lock cable must be plugged into the keypad.
3. DO NOT PRESS ANY BUTTONS FOR AT LEAST 15 MINUTES!
*6 #
Press 3 2
*1
4. Press
5.
(_______)
MRC
2
3
#
4
(lock beeps once  for each time the MRC has been used)
5
6 #  0 #  0 # 
The lock should now be in Single User Mode, and the Master Code is 1 2 3 4 5 6 .
Repeat steps 1 through 5 if necessary.
To make sure a Time Delay Override Code is not retained in the lock:
Press 7 4
*1
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
2
3
4
5
6 #  9
21
* # 
# 
Battery Changing Instructions
Models 6120 and 6123 Using a Two-Battery Keypad
Step 2—Turn the keypad over and remove both batteries. This
is best done by grasping the bottom of a battery and pulling it
gently away from the keypad circuit board. Do not use any type
of tool to pry a battery from its holder.
Low Battery Condition
These locks use two 9-volt alkaline batteries when equipped
with the standard keypad. We recommend Duracell® brand.
If the batteries in your lock need to be replaced, twenty
consecutive beeps will be heard after the last number of the
code and # have been pressed. The batteries must be replaced
before the lock can open.
Step 3—Install new batteries by pushing them directly into
the battery connectors attached to the keypad circuit board. It’s
important to support the connectors so they will not become bent
during battery insertion. The connectors are designed to make it
very difficult to install a battery incorrectly. Pay close attention
to battery polarity so as not to damage a connector by forcing a
battery into it backwards.
Note: A low battery simulator is built into the 6120 and 6123
so that you can familiarize yourself with how the lock sounds
under a low battery condition. To activate the low battery
simulator, depress the key for approximately three seconds,
until the lock emits three chirps. Immediately enter your code.
Each time you press a key, the chirp will sound distinctly
different than it does during normal operation. Approximately
two seconds after you enter the code and open the lock, it will
revert to normal operation.
*
Battery Replacement Procedure
The lock will NOT forget your code(s) during battery change.
Codes are stored in non-volatile memory, which will retain data
for extended periods of time (about ten years) without power.
Step 1­­—Remove the keypad from its mounting base by pulling
the bottom of the keypad housing away from the base. Grip the
keypad housing as shown in the photograph for best results.
Support the keypad housing so that the wires which are
attached to its circuit board are not pulled or stressed. Do not
let the keypad hang from its wires.
Step 4—Hold the keypad housing close to the mounting base
while you coil excess wire inside the housing. Position the wire
away from the spring clips that hold the keypad housing to the
mounting base.
22
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
Battery Changing Instructions
Models 6120 and 6123 Using a Two-Battery Keypad
Step 5—Align the spring clips with the receptacles in the base.
Using steady pressure, push the keypad housing back onto
its mounting base. Don’t allow any wire(s) to be damaged by
contact with the spring clips. The keypad housing will snap into
place on the base.
Step 6—Check the master code and all user codes at least
three times with the safe door open. Close the safe door only
after the lock has been thoroughly checked to make sure it’s
operating properly.
Note: The 6120 and 6123 will operate with just one 9-volt
alkaline battery attached to either connector of the standard,
two-battery keypad. This is only recommended under
emergency conditions when a second replacement battery is
not available. Using a single battery will not harm the lock in
any way.
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
23
Battery Changing Instructions
Models 6120 and 6123 Using a One-Battery Keypad
Remove Changing the battery in this keypad is a simple
process. Always handle components and connectors with
care to avoid damage. Battery changing should be performed
with the safe door open.
Step 1­­— Keypad disassembly is neither required nor advised.
The removable battery holder is accessed from the bottom of the
keypad base. Pull it slightly toward the front of the keypad, then
downward to remove it.
Step 2— As you remove the old battery, you will notice there is
a spring at the bottom of the holder. The new battery will rest on
top of this spring to maintain good electrical contact.
Step 3— Note that the battery is oriented so that the larger
contact is in line with the larger opening in the top of the
battery holder. It’s important to orient the new battery this way.
24
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
Battery Changing Instructions
Models 6120 and 6123 Using a One-Battery Keypad
Step 4­­—With the new battery in the holder, slide the holder into
the base of the keypad until it clicks into place. If your lock does
not operate properly, don’t press any buttons for five minutes,
then try it again.
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
25
Troubleshooting Guide
Models 6120 and 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Locks
Basic Operation
This troubleshooting guide is designed to help you identify and
solve problems you may encounter with a Sargent & Greenleaf
electronic lock. It is not designed as a substitute for the
instructions that were shipped with your lock. If the instructions
are missing, you can obtain a replacement instantly on the S&G
website (www.sargentandgreenleaf.com). The direct address
of this booklet is http://www.sargentandgreenleaf.com/pdf/
book_elec_locks.pdf . Online versions of instruction documents
are always the most up to date.
The Sargent & Greenleaf line of electronic locks is powered by
either one or two 9-volt alkaline batteries, depending on the
style of keypad used. As the name implies, two-battery keypads
use two alkaline batteries which are located under the keypad
housing. The single battery keypad houses one alkaline battery
in a compartment that is accessible from the bottom of the
keypad. In either case, batteries can be easily replaced by
following the instructions that originally came with your lock
and keypad. The battery changing instructions are also included
in this manual.
Some of the following troubleshooting procedures are intended
for the consumer, and others require the skills of a qualified
safe technician. The Sargent & Greenleaf line of electronic
combination locks is not designed to be user serviceable. We
specifically do not recommend any repairs beyond replacing
either the keypad or the lock body as a unit.
The lock can be ordered in two basic lock bolt configurations—a
traditional square bolt for use with most safe designs, and a
beveled spring bolt for direct locking applications on light safe
doors and inner compartments of burglary safes.
All applicable troubleshooting procedures should be tried before
a safe is forcibly opened. Whenever a safe must be opened by
drilling, S&G recommends you contact the safe manufacturer
first. The safe maker will supply appropriate procedures for
dealing with his product.
When the correct code is entered and followed by the # sign,
a motor retracts the lock bolt. This allows the container to be
opened. The bolt remains retracted for six seconds, then the
motor extends the bolt again. S&G electronic locks are equipped
with a spring mechanism to automatically extend the bolt after
any obstruction, such as safe boltwork, is moved out of its path.
If you find it necessary to locate a competent safe technician in
your area, S&G suggests you call the Safe & Vault Technicians
Association, at 800-532-2562. Any work which you think may be
submitted to S&G as a warranty claim must be cleared by our
Technical Services Department (phone 800-826-7652).
Some safe manufacturers ship safes with the lock bolt
retracted. With the door open and the safe handle turned fully
to the locked position, enter the code (followed by the # sign).
Wait fifteen seconds, then repeat the procedure. The lock should
now cycle normally. Close your safe door only after checking for
proper lock operation at least three times.
26
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
Troubleshooting Guide
Models 6120 and 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Locks
PROBLEMS
POSSIBLE CAUSE
POSSIBLE SOLUTION(S)
• # sign is not being pushed after code is
entered
• Press # sign after entering code
• Wrong code is being used
• V erify that you have the correct code for
the lock
• Batteries need replacement
• S ee Battery Check and Replacement
Procedure (#6)
• Lock is in security lockout mode
• P erform Lockout Test Procedure (#1) and
Override Procedure (#2) if Master Code
is available
• Keypad is defective
• Replace with a keypad known to be good
• Feedback wire is broken
• S ee Wire Check and Repair Procedure
(#5)
• Sounder or LED is defective
• Replace keypad
3) L ock will not enter programming
mode when programming sequence is
entered
• Incorrect Master Code is being used
• Perform Lockout Test Procedure (#1)
4) L ock can be heard starting, but not
running far enough to open the safe
• Bolt is stalled due to side pressure
1) M
odel 6120 or 6123 beeps and LED
flashes on key press, but does not
open with a six digit code
2) L ock opens but doesn’t beep or light
when a key is pressed
• P erform Master Code Check Procedure
(#3)
• M
ove safe handle to fully locked position
and enter code again
• M
ove safe handle to fully locked position
and perform Walk Back Procedure (#4)
• Batteries are weak
• S ee Battery Check and Replacement
Procedure (#6) and Low Battery Warning
Check Procedure (#10)
5) L ock emits “click-click” sound but
motor cannot be heard running
• Drive nut is cross-threaded
• C ontainer must be forcibly opened by a
qualified safe technician
6) M
otor can be heard running free, but
safe does not open
• Stop pin has dislodged
• P erform Stop Pin Check and Opening
Procedure (#7)
• Insufficient bolt retraction
• Perform Walk Back Procedure (#4)
• Weak batteries
• S ee Battery Check and Replacement
Procedure (#6) and Low Battery Warning
Check Procedure (#10)
• Safe’s relock device is engaged
• P erform Relock Device Check Procedure
(#11)
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
27
Troubleshooting Guide
Models 6120 and 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Locks
PROBLEMS
POSSIBLE CAUSE
POSSIBLE SOLUTION(S)
• C onnection of wires to back
of keypad is loose
• Perform Keypad Connector Check (#8)
• Keypad is bad
• Replace with new keypad
8) L ock beeps three times when code is
entered, but doesn’t open
• Lock is in time delay mode
• W
ait for time delay to expire, then
delete time delay—see lock operating
instructions or consult toll free help line
9) Unable to delete time delay
• T ime delay can only be
deleted during the opening window
• W
ait for opening window before
attempting to delete time delay—see
lock operating instructions or consult toll
free help line
• Y ou are using a code other than the
Master Code
• T he Master Code must be used to
delete the time delay. Perform Master
Code Check Procedure (#3)—see lock
operating instructions or consult toll free
help line
• B olt of the lock is binding against the
door frame or door strike
• P ush in on the door while entering the
code; remove the source of the binding
after the door is open
7) L ock opens intermittently when using
valid codes
11) After entering the code for a spring
bolt lock, the motor starts, but the
safe door cannot be opened
• Perform Walk Back Procedure (#4)
12) Lock motor runs continuously after
a battery change, and the lock stays
locked
• T he logic circuit did not reset properly
when power was restored to the logic
circuits
• U nplug the wire connector from the back
of the keypad, leave it unplugged for at
least 30 seconds, then plug it back into
the receptacle on the back of the keypad.
The processor should reset properly
13) Lock opens okay, but bolt will not
re-extend far enough to lock safe
• Batteries are weak
• See
Battery Check and Replacement
Procedure (#6)
Test Procedures
1. Lockout Mode Test Procedure:
The S&G 6120 lock has a wrong code lockout feature that prevents the lock from operating for a period of time after four
consecutive incorrect code entries. Locks produced before mid 1997 have a fifteen minute lockout period which can be overridden
by entering the master code twice. Locks made after mid 1997 have a five minute lockout period which cannot be overridden. The
purpose of the lockout period is to prevent tampering. During this period, the lock will beep and the LED will flash each time a key is
pressed, but the lock will emit an error tone (long “brap”) whenever the # key is pressed.
28
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
Troubleshooting Guide
Models 6120 and 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Locks
Test Procedures (cont.)
brand batteries. Fresh batteries will often supply the extra
power necessary to open a lock which is experiencing bolt side
pressure. If neither one of the above tips works, perform the
following steps:
2. Lockout Reset Procedure:
Make sure the batteries are good and installed correctly in the
keypad. Make sure the lock cable is properly inserted into the
keypad receptacle. Don’t press any buttons for at least fifteen
minutes, then enter a code, followed by the # sign. If the code
is valid, the lock should open. This procedure will work for any
vintage of 6120 or 6123 lock.
A) If your lock uses the standard, two-battery keypad, remove
the keypad from the door, but keep it plugged into the lock.
Don’t attempt to remove a single-battery keypad.
B) Enter a valid code, making sure the safe handle is in the
fully locked position.
3. Master Code Check Procedure:
C) After you hear the motor finish its initial run (but before
it extends the bolt again), unplug the wire connector from
the underside of the keypad. If you have a single-battery
keypad, simply remove the battery compartment.
When the lock is not in lockout mode (see Procedure 1), the
correct Master Code can be verified by attempting to enter the
programming mode. Enter 74 followed by the Master Code and
# 1 * 1 2 3 4 5 6 #. Don’t press any more buttons. The lock will
do one of the following:
*
D) See if the safe handle can be turned to the unlocked
position. If not, move the handle back to the fully lock
position and wait ten seconds before proceeding.
A) Emit five short beeps after the first # and 3 short beeps
after the second #, indicating that the code entered is the
correct Master Code.
E) Plug the wire connector back into the keypad receptacle or
re-install the battery holder of a single-battery keypad, and
repeat the process starting at Step B.
—OR—
B) Emit a long, continuous tone (sometimes referred to as
the “raspberry” sound or a “brap”) at some point in the
process, indicating that the entered code is not the correct
Master Code.
If the safe does not open after ten tries, refer to the next step
in the chart. For spring bolt locks (used on inner compartments
and lightweight safes without boltwork), pushing in on the door
when entering the code and # key may be sufficient to allow the
door to open.
4. Walk Back Procedure:
This procedure is used to retract the bolt when there is too
much side pressure on the lock bolt or when other factors may
prevent full bolt retraction. It involves repetitive retractions of
the bolt without allowing it to extend again. The first step is to
make sure the safe bolt work is not binding on the lock bolt.
This is accomplished by ensuring that the handle is in the fully
locked position. If there is any travel in the handle, place the
handle in the middle of the travel and enter a valid code into
the lock. This action alone may be enough to allow the lock to
open. The second step is to replace the batteries with a fresh
set of 9-volt alkaline batteries (“Extra Heavy Duty” batteries are
NOT alkaline and will not work). S&G recommends Duracell®
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
5. Wire Check and Repair Procedure:
The 6120 lock requires four wires from the connector on the
underside of the keypad to the lock for normal operation. One
of the wires provides the signal back from the lock to the LED
and sounder. The lock will operate with this wire broken, but it
will not beep or light the LED. If any other wire is broken, the
lock will not operate until it is repaired. If a break is detected,
or if a tear in the insulation is found, the wire should be
spliced and/or insulated before proceeding. S&G recommends
24-gauge stranded copper wire for these repairs. After the safe
is successfully opened, the lock should be replaced.
29
Troubleshooting Guide
Models 6120 and 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Locks
6. Battery Check Procedure:
(voltmeter that can measure 9 v.d.c is required)
connection. Inspect each wire while pushing it and attempting
to gently rotate the wire where it enters the connector. If any
motion is noted, try pushing in on the wire to attempt to tighten
it. Operate the lock with a valid code. If the looseness is still
present, S&G recommends replacing the lock.
Make sure the batteries being used with the lock are marked as
alkaline. “Extra Heavy Duty” batteries are NOT alkaline. Use a
voltmeter to check the voltage level of each battery. Each one
should indicate at least 7.75 volts. If either battery is below this
voltage, replace both with fresh batteries. Fresh batteries will
indicate voltage levels of 9.2 volts or greater.
10. Low Battery Warning Check Procedure:
Your lock is equipped with a low battery warning feature that changes
the pitch of the sounder when the batteries need to be replaced. It
also incorporates a low battery tester and warning demonstrator that
simulates the low battery warning signal for one lock cycle. To operate
the demonstrator, press and hold the * key until three beeps are heard.
Now enter a valid code while listening to the sounder. If the sounder
has changed pitch, the batteries are okay (although it is always a good
idea to check them with a voltmeter). If the sounder does not change
pitch, the lock was already in low battery mode when the demonstrator
was engaged, and the batteries should be changed before any further
troubleshooting is attempted.
7. Stop Pin Check and Opening Procedure:
Check: The stop pin is the pin which holds the lock bolt in
the lock. On a few early models it could dislodge and
prevent the drive mechanism from engaging. The
motor can be heard running, but the lock bolt does
not retract. To verify this problem, make sure the
safe boltwork is not binding the lock bolt (see the
information in Step 4). Enter a valid code and listen
to the sound the motor makes. If it makes no sound
at all, the problem is not a dislodged stop pin. If
the motor seems to run normally, wait until it goes
through its retraction and extension cycle (about 6
seconds). Then enter a valid code while pulling the
safe handle toward the unlocked position. If the motor
sounds the same as it did during the previous cycle
(free running), a dislodged stop pin is the most likely
problem.
11. Safe Relock Device Engaged Check Procedure:
It is possible for the safe’s relock device(s) to activate during shipment. If
the safe has recently been serviced or handled roughly during shipment,
the relock device could be engaged. Use the following procedure to verify
this.
A) With the lock in the locked condition, note the amount of
motion in the safe handle
B) Locate the safe handle in the middle of its travel range, and
operate the lock with a valid code
Opening: If the safe can be moved, the most successful method
is to orient the safe so the lock is in a vertical-up
position (with the lock bolt pointing up). Gravity may
help the drive mechanism engage long enough to
unlock the safe. The lock may need to be operated
two or three times with the safe in this position.
The handle should be tried after each attempt.
If this technique is unsuccessful, drilling is the
remaining option. Contact the safe manufacturer for
recommendations.
C) As soon as the lock bolt retracts, again note the range of
motion in the safe handle
If the handle moves farther when the lock bolt is retracted, but the safe
does not open, a relock device is probably the cause. The service of a
trained and experienced safe technician should be employed. Contact the
safe manufacturer for recommendations.
8. Keypad Connector Check:
The Safe & Vault Technicians Association, based in Dallas,
Texas, can refer you to a safe technician in your area. The
association’s number is (214) 827-7233.
Note: This technique is for standard, two-battery
keypads only.
If the lock works intermittently, check for loose wires at the
keypad connector (underside of the keypad). It is a four-wire
30
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
6120/6123 Troubleshooting Checklist
Models 6120 and 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Locks
Use this checklist to ensure you have covered all aspects
of 6120 troubleshooting before resorting to forced entry of a
container. This checklist should be used in conjunction with
S&G’s 6120 Troubleshooting Guide (document no. 630-325).
Can you hear the motor relay click after an operating
code is entered?
Have batteries been replaced with fresh, 9-volt, alkaline
(preferably Duracell®) batteries?
Is the lock using a time delay?
Have you waited at least 15 minutes (without pressing any
buttons) to time out a lockout ?
Can you remove the time delay by waiting until the start
of the opening window, then entering 7 4 * (master code)
(wait for 5 chirps) 0 * 0 # (wait for 3 chirps) 0 #
(3 chirps)?
Is # being pressed after the code is entered?
Do you get a beep and a light whenever a key is pressed?
Have you checked to make sure the wire connector that
is attached to the back of the keypad is making a good
connection with its receptacle?
Has the Master Code been verified by attempting to change
the Master Code?
Have you inspected the lock cable for breaks, kinks, or
scraped insulation?
Have you been able to successfully use the Management
Reset Code?
Have you replaced the keypad with one known to be good
and then entered an operating code?
Have you checked for free play in the safe door and handle
to relieve any possible side pressure on the lock bolt?
Have you checked to ensure the safe’s relock device is
not activated?
Can you hear the motor run after an operating code is
entered?
Have you disconnected the batteries for one minute, then
reconnected and checked the lock?
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
31
Technical Bulletin—MRC
Management Reset Code Information for Models 6120 and 6123
Subject: Management Reset Code (MRC)
6123 Lock—If a time delay was being used, it is still
present. The lock will also retain its mode of operation (single,
dual user, or supervisor/subordinate mode), and the time delay
override code if one was set. After using the MRC, it may be
necessary to use the master code (123456) to create user
codes in order to operate the lock if it was set to dual user or
supervisor/user mode.
Models 6120 and 6123 can incorporate a Management
Reset Code if one is programmed before the Factory Master
Code is changed or reset. Once the Master Code changing
procedure is completed for the first time, a Management
Reset Code cannot be installed. Once programmed, the
Management Reset Code cannot be deleted or changed.
Sargent & Greenleaf strongly recommends that a different
Management Reset Code be used for each lock.
To Program the Management Reset Code (MRC):
(note that the Management Reset Code must be entered twice)
The Management Reset Code consists of seven digits.
For added security, two of the digits must be pressed
simultaneously. These digits must be either 0 and 1, or 0 and
3. They may be used anywhere in the code. For instance, a
Management Reset Code could be 1 4 7 [01] 8 9 (0 and 1 are
pressed simultaneously). To use the Management Reset Code
in this example, press: 6 # 1 4 7 [0/1] 8 9 #. The lock’s
Master Code will revert to 1 2 3 4 5 6 #.
Press
#123456#
**
factory master code
(_______)
#
management reset code
(_______)
management reset code
# 
To Use the Management Reset Code:
*
Press
6# (_______) # (Master Code is now 123456#)
*
Immediately after the Management Reset Code is entered,
the lock will beep once for each time the MRC has been used,
including the current usage. This simple device is provided to
let the safe operator know how many times the Management
Reset Code has been used to reset the lock. The Master Code
is now reset automatically to the original Factory Master Code
(1 2 3 4 5 6 #). Any User Codes which were present in the lock
when the Management Reset Code was entered will be erased.
management reset code
(REMEMBER THAT ONE OF THE ENTRIES MUST BE EITHER 0 AND 1, OR 0
AND 3 PRESSED SIMULTANEOUSLY)
Note: The lock will not accept a Management Reset Code
when it is in lockout mode. To be certain your lock is not
in lockout, leave the keypad connected (with batteries
installed), and do not press any buttons for a minimum
of 15 minutes. Then enter your Management Reset Code.
6120 Lock—If a time delay was being used, it is eliminated.
32
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
Commonly Asked Questions & Answers
Models 6120 and 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Locks
What happens if the batteries go dead? Are the codes lost?
How long will the electronics remember the codes?
Has the 6120 been tested for electromagnetic interference
(EMI), and static electricity?
Codes will be retained in the lock’s electronic processor for
up to 10 years, even if batteries are removed or go dead.
Batteries are easily replaced by removing the keypad housing.
Yes— under stun gun attacks, the 6120 fails secure. Locks
produced after March, 1995 provide ground paths that allow
static electricity to dissipate into the safe body, preventing
circuit damage. In the first quarter of 1996, a ground circuit
was also added to the keypad.
What is the battery life in S&G’s 6120 and 6123?
During S&G accelerated laboratory testing, which is more
demanding on batteries than daily normal use, we routinely
exceeded 8,000 opening and closing cycles using Duracell®
9-volt alkaline batteries.
What is the effect of magnetism on the product?
None —magnetic fields cannot be used to compromise
6120 or 6123 locks as they can with some locks that rely on
solenoid locking devices.
What happens if carbon batteries are used rather than the
recommended alkaline batteries?
What happens when the 6120 or 6123 lock is electronically
attacked?
Carbon batteries do not allow as much current draw as
alkaline batteries, and even new carbon batteries will not
retract the bolt sufficiently for frequent openings. So, be sure
to use alkaline batteries, preferably Duracell® brand.
If attacked with low voltage, the lock is not affected. If high
voltage is applied, the lock is designed to fail secure (the lock
remains closed). Therefore, attempts to defeat the lock will
be unsuccessful. After an attack with high voltages, some
electrical components could be damaged and may require lock
replacement.
Is there a recommended procedure for installing batteries in
standard, two-battery keypads?
Yes – install new batteries by pushing them directly into the
battery connectors attached to the keypad circuit board. It is
important to support the connectors so they are not bent due
to excessive force.
What is the maximum distance the lock can be located from
the keypad?
The 6120 and 6123 can be supplied with wire lengths up
to 10 feet, at an additional cost. Greater lengths are not
recommended.
Does the lock function properly in high humidity conditions?
Yes – S&G’s 6120 design protects the electronic boards with a
coating that shields the lock’s electronic components from the
effects of humidity. Locks have been tested in uncured fire
safes for a 90-day period and shipped cross-country without
incident, and they continued to function properly.
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
How can the 6120 or 6123 be used to retrofit a mechanical
lock that incorporates a wingback cover?
Using longer cover screws, the mechanical lock’s wingback
cover can be fastened directly on top of the 6120 or 6123 lock
cover. Before doing this, use a file or grinder to remove any
projections from the underside of the wingback cover.
33
Commonly Asked Questions & Answers
Models 6120 and 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Locks
What resistance will the keypad have to wear or puncture?
Can the keypad be punctured with a ballpoint pen or
fingernail?
What happens to the lock when there is a bolt side pressure
from the safe’s boltwork?
The boltwork of a safe, under certain conditions, can place
excessive pressure on the side of any lock’s bolt. When this
occurs, the lock’s bolt cannot retract properly. To relieve side
pressure on the lock bolt, jiggle the safe’s handle. This action
will remove the pressure on the lock’s bolt. Then re-enter a
valid code to open the safe. No damage occurs to the lock
under these circumstances.
Special care should always be used when entering your code.
The keypad is protected with a tough polypropylene material
that makes a puncture unlikely, and impossible for dust and
debris to interfere with the operation of the push-button keys.
The new plastic dome design is superior to metal domes and
will continue to function even if the dome is damaged and
collapsed. Our laboratory testing has surpassed 500,000
code input cycles with no failures using a pointed input tool,
similar to a ballpoint pen. Although wear was noticeable
after this extensive testing, the lock remained operational.
In actual operation, changing codes periodically will prevent
noticeable keypad wear.
Does the lock have a duress mode?
For duress, use one of the following lock models: 6124, 6125,
6126, 6127, 6128, 6129, or 6150.
Can the lock replace a standard mechanical lock?
The 6120 and 6123 mounting holes, bolt placement and
throw are identical to a 6730 combination lock. The case
dimensions are equal except for the thickness of the lock
body, which is .044” greater than the 6730.
Can the audible beep, which confirms code input, be adjusted
or mounted remotely to an external sounding device?
Yes—a remote indicator became available in 1996 with a
count-up or countdown display, LED, and a remote sounder.
Are the 6120 and 6123 manipulation-resistant?
What is the warranty period and what does it cover?
Yes— traditionally manipulation techniques are ineffective
on the 6120 and 6123 locks. They are also designed to resist
random code input by locking out for up to 15 minutes after
incorrect codes are entered. Both the 6120 and 6123 are UL
Type 1 Listed.
S&G warrants all Comptronic locks for two years from the
date of shipment from S&G’s factory. The locks shall be free
from defects in materials and workmanship, provided they are
normally and properly used according to Sargent & Greenleaf’s
written instructions.
®
34
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
Commonly Asked Questions & Answers
Models 6120 and 6123—Motorized Electronic Combination Locks
What are the service or maintenance requirements
for the 6120 and 6123?
How do I change the Master Code?
*
Press 74 . Press the six digits of your code, followed by #.
Wait for the lock to beep 5 times. Press 1 . Press the six
digits of your new code, followed by #. Wait for the lock to
beep 3 times. Again press the six digits of your new code,
followed by #. The lock will again beep 3 times.
Due to the design, substantiated by S&G testing, no service
is needed, even in harsh environments. S&G laboratory
testing consistently exceeded 500,000 opening cycles without
problems. Changing the batteries is the only service required.
How should the lock be mounted?
How do I know that the code changed?
Either lock can be mounted in any position, including the
standard positions of right-hand, left-hand, vertical-up, and
vertical-down.
If your lock emits a continuous tone for about one second
anytime during the code changing procedure, you have made
an error. When this happens, the lock ignores your new
code and reverts to the old one. For more detailed changing
instructions, see the complete version of the operating
instructions found earlier in this manual.
Is the 6120/6123 a unique S&G design?
Yes—the electronics, motor, and all other component parts
are unique S&G designs. S&G has a license arrangement
with another company to assure there are no infringements on
existing patents.
What if the master code and user codes are forgotten?
S&G recommends ordering locks with the management reset
code (MRC) option. This allows the lock to be reset to the
factory master code setting (1,2,3,4,5,6 #).
How long does the bolt stay retracted after code entry?
The bolt retracts for 6 seconds, allowing sufficient time to
turn the safe’s handle.
What happens if someone takes my keypad. Can they
determine my code(s):
How far does the lock bolt retract?
T he keypad is a “dumb” input terminal. Your codes and
security information are stored in the lock body, inside the
safe. No one can steal your codes by taking the keypad. To
operate your lock, simply plug in a new keypad.
Under normal operation, the bolt retracts at least .375”,
leaving no more than .109” extended (our installation
requirements are .150”, case to boltwork). These are
the same dimensions as the standard bolt of the 6730
mechanical combination lock. Lock bolt retraction is
dependent on battery condition.
If my keypad is taken and the lock cable cut, how can
I get in my safe?
A qualified safe technician can temporarily attach a new
keypad and cable section and use your code to open the safe.
Once the safe is open, the lock body (and attached cable)
should be replaced.
If user codes and time delay are entered through a Master
Code, what happens to the user codes and time delay if the
Master Code is changed?
Nothing, because a Master Code is only a means to implement
the change procedure for user codes or time delays. For the
6123, it can also set the mode of lock operation, time delay
window duration, and set the time delay override code.
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
*
35
A Brief History of S&G
The Sargent & Greenleaf Story—Over a Century of Security
S
argent & Greenleaf prides itself on a tradition of quality and innovation which stretches back to 1857. It was then
that James Sargent, a bright and inventive young sales agent for Yale & Greenleaf Lock Manufacturers, made the
decision to build a lock that would offer security far surpassing that of any device available of the time. The result
of his resolve and genius was Sargent’s Magnetic Bank Lock, the first successful key changeable combination lock. The lock gained
almost immediate acceptance from safe manufacturers and the United States Treasury Department, bringing financial stability and
paving the way for James Sargent to continue bringing new ideas and products to the security industry.
In 1865, one of Mr. Sargent’s former employers, Halbert Greenleaf, became his equal partner in the firm of Sargent &
Greenleaf. A manufacturing facility was built in Rochester, New York, and the company remained in that city until 1975. James Sargent
was never one to rest on the success of past achievements. In 1868, he invented Sargent’s Automatic Lock, bringing refinements to the
original Sargent’s Magnetic Bank Lock.
Then, in 1873, using parts from locks and a pair of eight-day kitchen clocks, Mr. Sargent created the first time lock to be
installed on a bank vault door. He personally connected the time lock to the vault door of the First National Bank in Morrison, Illinois,
on May 26, 1874. This lock continued to secure the vault for nearly forty years until the bank was remodeled and a larger vault was built.
In 1880, Mr. Sargent connected one of his combination locks to a delay timer, creating the first Time Combination Lock, a
lock that would remain locked for a predetermined amount of time after the combination was dialed. This was the forerunner of today’s
Sargent & Greenleaf Timebination.
These inventions are just a sampling of the numerous advancements and innovations in security hardware that can be
attributed directly to James Sargent. His tireless efforts and clear vision of what comprises good security were responsible for the
success of his young company. These same qualities continue to drive Sargent & Greenleaf today.
Times have changed since the early days in Rochester, New York. Sargent & Greenleaf now occupies 100,000 square feet
of manufacturing space and 22,000 square feet of offices in Nicholasville, Kentucky. The company also serves European and other
international customers from a facility in Switzerland. Safe manufacturers, independent safe technicians, and locksmiths throughout the
United States and the world rely on the quality and value of S&G products.
Today’s Sargent & Greenleaf offers a full line of mechanical and electronic locks for safes, vaults, and safe deposit boxes,
as well as other specialty security devices. S&G makes locks that secure safes designed to store sensitive information. In addition,
doors that secure special areas where classified information is developed and stored are protected by Sargent & Greenleaf combinationlocked deadbolts. Special designs even combine a high degree of security for these rooms while providing easy, one motion exit for the
room’s occupants in case of a life threatening emergency.
From combination locks in commercial and government service—from time locks to safe deposit locks—from high security
exit devices to special purpose padlocks—Sargent & Greenleaf remains committed to the ideals of its founder, James Sargent. That is
to provide security, quality, and value by leading the security industry with innovative products and a thorough understanding of the
security needs of our customers.
36
© Copyright 2011, Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc.
Corporate Headquarters
One Security Drive
Nicholasville, KY 40356
Phone 859.885.9411
FAX 859.885.3063
European Headquarters
9, chemin du Croset
1024 Ecublens
Switzerland
Phone 41 21 694 34 00
FAX 41 21 694 34 09
www.sargentandgreenleaf.com
rev. 3/2/2011
Document 630-673
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