Download version 0.1 of ER 750-1-1 Materiel Maintenance Policies.pdf

Download version 0.1 of ER 750-1-1 Materiel Maintenance Policies.pdf
CELD-MS
Department of the Army
ER 750-1-1
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Engineer
Regulation
750-1-1
Washington, DC 20314-1000
Maintenance of Supplies and Equipment
MATERIEL MAINTENANCE POLICIES
Distribution Restriction Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is
unlimited.
30 January 1997
CELD-MS
26 February 1999
Errata Sheet
No. 3
MATERIEL MAINTENANCE POLICIES
ER 750-1-1
30 January 1997
Chapter 4, page 4-6, paragraph 4-5: Change "Maintenance of Federal Information Processing
(FIP) Equipment" to read " Maintenance of Information Technology (IT) Equipment."
Chapter 4, page 4-6, paragraph 4-5: First sentence; Change "The maintenance of FIP equipment
(formally ADPE) " to read "The maintenance of IT equipment." Strike-out "Federal Information
Resources management Regulation (FIRMR) "
20 October 1998
CELD-MS
Errata Sheet
No.
2
MATERIEL MAINTENANCE POLICIES
ER 750-1-1
30 January 1997
Table of Contents, page iii: Add Appendix E, Management Control
Evaluation Checklist for the Materiel Maintenance Program
(beginning on Page E-l).
After page D-l, Add Appendix E, i n i t ' s e n t i r e t y ( p a g e s E - l
through E-xx) as follows:
CELD-MS
24 March 1997
rata Sheet
No. 1
MATERIEL MAINTENANCE POLICIES
ER 750-1-1
30 January 1997
Chapter 1, page l-4, paragraph l-Se(4): Change to read “Appointed in writing as the Oil
Analysis Program (OAP) monitor, who will:”
Chapter 3, page 3-3, paragraph 3-9c(2): Change to read “An automatic transmission or
gearbox when attached to above engine in paragraph 3-9c.”
Chapter 3, page 3-4, paragraph 3-9c(S)(a): Change to read “Auxiliary engines are those on
a watercraft that are not used. for propulsion.”
Chapter 5, page 5-1, paragraph 5-2: Change to read “Equipment Usage Standards. This
section explains how personal property usage standards can be used as part of an overall
personal property management program. Table 5-l (herein) and Appendix B, Table B-2,
EP 750-1-1, are lists of USACE equipment that requires usage reporting and Table B-3
shows usage standards for selected equipment. Equipment that is exempt from usage
reporting in USACE is shown in Table B-4 of the cited EP and Table 5-2 (herein).”
Chapter 5: Add page 5-9, Table 5-2, in it’s entirety as follows:
ER 750-l-l
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
U. S. Army Corps of Engineers
Washington, D.C. 20314-1000
CELD-MS
Regulation
No. 750-l-l
30 January 1997
Maintenance of Supplies and Equipment
MATERIEL MAINTENANCE POLICIES
Issuance of supplements to this regulation is prohibited except
upon approval of HQUSACE (CELD-MS) WASH, D. C. 20314-1000
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
PARAGRAPH
Chapter 1
Introduction
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l-l
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l-2
l-2
l-2
2-1. General Maintenance Policies . . . . . . . . . .
2-2. The Maintenance System . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3. Equipment Training and Licensing . . . . . . . . .
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2-4. Maintenance Assistance and Instruction Team (MAIT)
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2-5. Materiel Maintenance Management Business Process .
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2-l
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l-l. Purpose . . .
l-2. Applicability .
l-3. References . .
l-4. Exceptions . .
l-5. Responsibilities .
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Chapter 2
Maintenance Policies and Structure
This regulation supersedes ER 750-l-1, 30 March 1996.
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ER 750-l-l
30 Jan 97
Chapter 3
Maintenance Operations
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3-1
3-1
3-1
3-2
3-2
3-2
3-3
3-3
3-3
3-5
3-7
3-7
3-7
3-9
Maintenance of Watercraft and Amphibians . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance of Aircraft and Aviation Electronics . . . . . . . .
Maintenance of Communication Systems . . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance of Communication Security Materiel and CCI . . . . .
Maintenance of Federal Information Processing Equipment . . . . .
Maintenance of Commercial Design Vehicles . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance of Engineer, Special Purpose and Materiel Handling Equipment
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4-1
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4-7
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4-7
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5-1
5-1
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5-2
3-l. General . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2. Personal Property Evaluations . . . . . .
3-3. Controlled Exchange . . . . . . . .
3-4. Materiel Records and Reports . . . . . .
3-5. Contract Maintenance . . . . . . . .
3-6. Inter-service and Intra service Maintenance Support
3-7. Materiel Warranty Program . .
3-8. Duplicate Facilities . . . . .
3-9. Oil Analysis Program . . . .
3-10. Administrative Storage of Materiel
3-11. Calibrations Programs . . . .
3-12. Cannibalization of Materiel . .
3-13. Maintenance of Pneumatic Tires .
3-14. Maintenance Expenditure Limits .
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Chapter 4
Commodity-Oriented Maintenance Policies
4-1.
4-2.
4-3.
4-4.
4-5.
4-6.
4-7.
Chapter 5
Equipment Management
5-1. Maintenance Management Indicators . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2. Equipment Usage Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-3. Maintenance Cost (Parts & Labor) . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-4. Equipment Availability Operational Rates . . . . . . . . . .
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ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
Chapter 6
Maintenance Program
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6-1
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6-1
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6-2
6-2
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6-2
6-2
6-2
Appendix A - References . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix B - Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix C - Materiel Maintenance Management Business Process
Appendix D - Oil Analysis Requirements List . . . . . .
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A-l
B-l
C-l
D-l
6-1. Maintenance Operations . .
6-2. Maintenance Plan . . . .
6-3. Scheduled Maintenance Services
6-4. Evaluations . . . . .
6-5. Reviews . . . . .
6-6. Inspections . . . . .
6-7. Repair Parts Management .
6-8. Safety . . . . . .
6-9. Environmental Compliance
6-10. Security . . . . .
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APPENDICES
iii
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION
1- 1. Purpose. This regulation defines the policies and responsibilities of the United States Army
Corps of Engineers (USACE), as they apply to personal property maintenance, and incorporates
Department of the Army (DA) policies for general maintenance operations, commodity oriented
maintenance, maintenance management, and contract maintenance support for personal property.
This regulation sets policy and establishes responsibilities for the maintenance of military and civil
personal property.
l-2. Applicability This regulation applies to all HQUSACE elements, major subordinate
commands (MSC), districts, laboratories, and field operating activities (FOA) except active duty
units. Note: This regulation does not apply to “real property or dredges.”
a. This regulation also applies to all self propelled, towed, or stationary self-powered personal
property, excluding equipment specified in ER 56-2-1. At the minimum, all personal property with
an acquisition value criteria of $5,000.00 or more, including items used together to form a system
with total acquisitionvalue of $5,000.00 or more, are subject to the full requirements and methods
contained in this regulation.
b. This regulation also applies to all government furnished property, including that used at
government owned, contractor operated (GOCO) projects. In accordance with the Federal
Acquisition Regulation (FAR), section 45.102, contractors are required to furnish all property
necessary to perform government contracts. However, there are times when it is in the best interest
of the government to provide property to a contractor in performance of their contract. When this
is the case, the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation
Supplement (DFARS), and Army Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (AFARS) Subpart
45 (Government Property ) become the governing regulatory system for that property.
c. The requiring activity must contact the appropriate Contracting Officer and discuss the
appropriate method and conditions required for providing government property in accordance with
FAR, DFARS and AFARS Subpart 45. At this time the Statement of Work (SOW) should be
discussed so the appropriate requirements will be included therein.
d. Some examples to consider are:
(1) If automated systems are provided, the SOW needs to state the requirements of the
contractor. It should explain what is expected from the contractor, but not how to accomplish the
requirement.
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ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
(2) If documenting and reporting is required, the SOW needs to state the requirements of the
contractor. It should explain what is expected from the contractor, but not how to accomplish the
requirement.
(3) If there is a different requirement for maintaining the property, than as listed in FAR,
DFARS, or AFARS Subpart 45, then the specific requirement should be stated.
(4) If there are regulations that the contractor must have in order to comply with some
requirements, those regulations must be provided and listed in an appendix of the contract. The
SOW must indicate what the requirements are. When the contractor is furnished GOCO equipment
that requires maintenance actions, this regulation and EP 750-1-1 will be provided and cited in a
contract appendix.
(5) The contracting officer will control government property IAW the FAR, DFARS and
AFARS Subpart 45.
1-3. References. References are listed in Appendix A.
1-4. Exceptions. Requests to waive applications to any provisions of this regulation will be
submitted through command channels to HQUSACE (CELD-MS), Washington, D.C. 20314-1000.
The request for waiver will include:
a. A recommended alternative course of action.
b. An analysis that shows that the alternative course of action is the best solution under the
circumstances.
1-5. Responsibilities.
a. Commander, USACE:
(1) Provide command-wide emphasis to the materiel maintenance management program.
(2) Emphasize the importance of maintenance and ensure that commanders at all levels are
accountable for the execution of the maintenance program and operations.
b. Director, Logistics Management, HQUSACE:
(1) Develop concepts, policies, doctrine, and plans for the maintenance of personal property.
1-2
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
(2) Develop and distribute implementing instructions to assist commanders in complying with
this regulation.
(3) Conduct periodic inspections and staff visits, as appropriate, to determine the adequacy of
command maintenance operations, document deficiencies, and recommend corrective action.
c. Commanders:
(1) Provide local command emphasis to the Materiel Maintenance Management Program.
(2) Ensure sufficient resources are dedicated to the Materiel Maintenance Management
Program.
(3) Ensure the maintenance operations at all levels within their command are properly staffed
and supervised.
(4) Appoints a qualified maintenance officer in writing, to manage the materiel maintenance
program, as his or her primary duty.
d. Chief, Logistics Management Office:
(1) Implement HQUSACE guidance and standards and advise HQUSACE of major changes
necessary to improve the maintenance policies of the Corps.
(2) Assure compliance with the materiel maintenance standards and maintenance related
logistic performance standards.
(3) Develop policies and procedures as necessary to implement the District Materiel
Maintenance Program.
(4) Assist supervisors in implementing policies and procedures for the Materiel Maintenance
Program.
(5) Ensures that equipment disposal inspection are completed.
e. Maintenance Officers: (Refer to Table 1 - 1, EP 750- 1 - 1).
(1) Monitor the maintenance programs and advises the Chief of Logistics Management of
changes necessary to improve local maintenance policies and procedures.
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ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
(2) Assure that materiel maintenance standards are being complied with.
(3) Assist local supervisors in implementing the policies and procedures for the materiel
maintenance program.
(4) Appointed in writing as the Oil Analysis Program (AOP) monitor, who will:
(a) Provide management guidance, technical supervision and assistance activities affiliated
with your division, district, etc.
(b) Assure that all activities participate in an OAP program.
(c) Recommend systems for inclusion in the OAP and sampling intervals for systems.
(5) Appointed in writing as the Test, Measurement, and Diagnostic Equipment (TMDE)
Coordinator, responsible to develop a TMDE program which will ensure compliance with the
maintenance plan, regulations, manuals, and bulletins in order to reinforce maintenance discipline.
(6) Manage the activity’s warranty program to include all matters related to warranty claim
actions (WCA).
(7) Conduct annual site visits and prepare written evaluations, and reviews the Materiel
Maintenance Program within the district. Annual evaluation will be sent through the Chief, LMO,
to the activity commander.
(8) Develop and implement the maintenance plan with annual reviews and changes posted as
needed.
f. Maintenance Managers:
(1) Assure that scheduled and unscheduled maintenance of all personal property is performed
expeditiously and by the most economical means.
(2) Oversee Maintenance Coordinators functions within their activity.
(3) Identifies maintenance requirements.
(4) Prepare and implement the activity’s maintenance sub-plans.
(5) Determine resources and personal property specific requirements.
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ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
(6) Monitor personal property performance and evaluates maintenance program.
(7) Assure all maintenance programs are executed.
g. Maintenance Coordinators: (Refer to Table 1-1, EP 750- 1-1).
(1) Assure that maintenance data are maintained and transferred to permanent records.
(2) Are responsible for tracking and complying with warranty requirement.
(3) Are responsible for dispatching functions.
(4) Assure that scheduled and unscheduled maintenance is performed.
(5) Are responsible for upward reporting requirements through maintenance channels.
(6) Are responsible for the maintenance of specific item(s) of personal property or for groups
of personal property.
(7) Receive Preventive Maintenance Checks and Services (PMCS) and determines if personal
property is operational and safe for use.
(8) Maintain operator/utilization records.
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ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
CHAPTER 2
MAINTENANCE POLICIES AND STRUCTURE
2-1. General Maintenance Policy
a. Proper use, care, handling, and conservation of materiel (personal property) in accordance
with public law is mandatory. The USACE Maintenance Program will be overseen in the Logistics
Management Office and executed by assigned functional area. The following descending order of
precedence will apply to all maintenance policies: Federal, Department of Defense, Department of
the Army, and Engineer Regulations. When there is a conflict between any two regulations, the
higher precedence will apply. If the conflict is between two regulations on the same level of
precedence, HQUSACE will determine which has precedence.
b. The commander will appoint an individual in Logistics, in writing, as the maintenance
officer to oversee the command’s Materiel Maintenance Program. This appointment will be made
at all division, district, laboratory and field operating activities.
c. Functional managers at all USACE activities are encouraged to cease spending for
acquisition of development of nonstandard automated equipment management system when one
exists else- where in the Corps, Army, or Government that meets the needs. Before starting major
development efforts, field commanders will coordinate with the appropriate headquarters functional
manager.
d. Maintenancemanagers will be appointed in writing (with the concurrence of the appropriate
function division chief) at all activities requiring maintenance. The maintenance manager will
maintain a consolidated list of all equipment and the maintenance coordinator assigned to support
it.
(1) All USACE activities will established a maintenance “History Jacket” file for each item of
equipment assigned or attached.
(2) Maintenance managers assure the collection and recording of cost of parts, labor and
contracts for each piece of personal property.
(3) Methods listed in EP 750-1-1 will be used to document maintenance actions.
e. Maintenance coordinators will be designated in the maintenance plan at all activities
requiring maintenance.
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ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
2-2. The Maintenance System. Maintenance of personal property will be sustained at a level to
assure responsiveness to mission requirements and readiness, as described in EP 750-1-1 and as
specified in maintenance manuals and the local maintenance plan.
2-3. Equipment Training and Licensing. Equipment training and licensing in all USACE activities
is mandatory. Commanders and/or directors are responsible for ensuring a comprehensive training
and licensing program is established, maintained and executed in accordance with AR 600-55 and
EM 385-1-1.
2-4. Maintenance Assistance and Instruction Team (MAIT). Department of the Army has
developed a maintenance and instruction program at the decentralized level. Corps activities may
request assistance from the MAIT by contacting the Directorate of Logistics (DOL) of the nearest
Army installation and request the support needed (reimbursement may be required). Usually, a
MAIT is in place at most Army installations to support the active Army.
2-5. Materiel Maintenance Management Business Process. Appendix C is an outline of the
maintenance management business processes required for Corps of Engineers activities, with
suggested forms and media, plus related references in parenthesis.
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ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
CHAPTER 3
MAINTENANCE OPERATIONS
3-1. General. To ensure the most cost-effective use of maintenance resources, the economic
repairability of unserviceable personal property will be determined prior to the initiation of any
action to restore the personal property to a serviceable condition.
3-2. Personal Property Evaluations.
a. Unserviceable personal property, or personal property needing expensive repairs will be
evaluated using equipment maintenance and serviceability standards. This evaluation may be used
to determine if the unserviceable condition is the result of other than fair wear and tear. When the
determination is made to repair or replace this item, a DA Form 3953 (Purchase Request and
Commitment) will be submitted to include a justification statement supporting the decision.
b. When the evaluation is in conjunction with a Report of Survey and the actual cost cannot
be determined, an itemized listing of the Estimated Cost of Damages (ECOD) will be included.
Instructions for preparing an ECOD are found in DA PAM 738-750.
c. Equipment evaluations should become part of the history jacket.
3-3.
and is approved in writing (including electronic mail or similar means), by the commander or
designated representative of the organization performing the controlled exchange action.
a. Required serviceable parts, components and assemblies cannot be obtained through
repairable exchange, maintenance (repair and return), or supply channels in time to meet mission
requirements. The maintenance officer must ensure that a valid request has been submitted to
replace the unserviceable item prior to using controlled exchange procedures.
b. All the unserviceable,repairable materiel involved is owned or under control of the activity
performing the controlled exchange action.
c. The maintenance effort required to restore all the unserviceable,repairable personal property
to a full mission capable condition is within the capability of the activity performing the controlled
exchange.
d. The action will immediately restore the unserviceable, repairable materiel involved to a fully
operable condition.
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ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
e. Such action will not degrade any of the materiel involved to an uneconomically repairable
condition.
f. Actions are immediately taken to prevent further degrading of materiel from weather or other
adverse conditions. The activity performing the controlled exchange will take prompt action to
restore the unserviceable materiel to a fully capable condition.
g. Approved in writing (including electronic mail or similar means) by the commander or
designated representative of the organization performing the controlled exchange action.
h. Controlled exchange is only authorized to be performed by internal maintenance personnel.
Materiel from controlled exchange will not be provided when the equipment is at contract
maintenance or other outside activities.
3-4. Materiel Records and Reports. Materiel records and reports for maintenance management will
be prepared and maintained as prescribed in EP 750- 1-1. These maintenance forms should be phased
in over a 6-month period of time beginning on the effective publish date of this regulation. See your
activity publications officer for ordering information.
3-5. Contract Maintenance. USACE activities may use competitive private enterprise for
maintenance support consistent with effective and efficient accomplishment of USACE programs
and missions. Contract maintenance will not be used when:
a. Contract maintenance support will result in higher cost than the support provided by the
Army, DOD and other Federal agencies within a reasonable vicinity and time constraints. The
commander is responsible for determining the distance (“reasonable vicinity”) and time constraints
based on mission needs and a location survey of available resources.
b. The use of contract maintenance transfers the management responsibility outside the activity
requesting support.
3-6. Interservice and Intraservice Maintenance Support.
a. Interservice and intraservice support agreements will be used to provide maintenance
support services when:
(1) This means is the least costly to the government.
(2) Materiel to be supported is common to another service.
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ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
(3) The supporting agency or component has the available capability to render timely support.
b. Interservice and intraservice support agreements will not be used to document transfer of
responsibility for the maintenance function from one DOD activity to another.
3-7. Materiel Warrantv Program. Materiel under warranty will be identified and maintained in
accordance with terms of the warranty, and records will be maintained by the maintenance officer
or designated representative.
a. As a minimum, maintenance procedures recommended by the equipment manufacturer will
be scheduled, and performed throughout the equipment’s warranty program.
b. Military standard equipment under warranty will follow the procedures outlined in
EP 750-1-1 and DA PAM 738-750.
3-8. Duplicate Facilities. When additional facilities are needed to support maintenance operations,
with the exception of personnel, local DOD activities and Federal agency will be surveyed to verify
whether they have additional capability prior to referring this issue to HQUSACE (CELD-MS).
3-9. Oil Analysis Program (OAP). The objectives of an OAP are to improve readiness rates,
promote safety, detect impending component failure and conserve lubricating and hydraulic fluids
by applying on-condition oil changes (OCOC). An OAP that uses OCOC is mandatory for all
USACE activities.
a. On-condition oil change. An oil change directed by the Army Oil Analysis Program
laboratory as a result of finding relative to the condition of the oil and its lubricating capability.
b. Army Oil Analysis Program (AOAP) Participation. Participation in the AOAP is mandatory
for equipment listed in Tables 4-2 thru 4-7 of DA PAM 738-750.
c. Equipment meeting the following criteria must be enrolled in a commercial OAP or the
AOAP:
( 1) A diesel engine with an oil capacity of five gallons and over.
(2) Automatic transmission/gearbox, meeting criteria in paragraph 3-9a, above.
(3) Hydraulic system over five gallons, excluding brakes, meeting criteria in 3-9a, above.
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ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
(4) All watercraft engines, main and auxiliary, meeting criteria in 3-9a, above.
(5) NOTE:
(a) Auxiliary engines are those engines on a watercraft which are used for propulsion.
(b) No gasoline engines or manual transmissions may be enrolled.
(c) Automatic transmissions and hydraulics cannot be enrolled in the AOAP unless the
equipment engine is enrolled.
d. Real property that meets the criteria of Phase II above, may be enrolled in the OAP.
e. HQUSACE (CELD-MS) will:
(1) Develop policy pertaining to the OAP.
(2) Exercise program management over the OAP.
(3) Ensure the AOAP is coordinated with the U.S. Army Logistics Support Activity.
(4) Established a requirements lost for items to be enrolled in the OAP.
f. MSC commander will:
(1) Recommend items for inclusion in the AOAP.
(2) Provide management guidance, technical supervision and assistance to all activities within
their command.
(3) Ensure all activities within their command participate in an OAP.
(4) Have an OAP monitor appointed in writing.
g. The following policies apply to the AOAP:
(1) The AOAP is mandatory at all levels of maintenance operations for specified personal
property, including overhaul for quality assurance purposes.
(2) The AOAP will be executed between the laboratory and the user activity.
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ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
(3) The lubricating-and hydraulic oils from all components enrolled in the program will be
evaluated by the servicing AOAP laboratories. Intervals are specified in DA PAM 738-750, chapter
4, or upon notification by the servicing AOAP laboratory.
(4) Upon receipt of a DA Form 3254-R (Oil Analysis, Recommendation, and Feedback) issued
by the AOAP laboratory, the activity commander will place the equipment in a nonmission capable
maintenance status until the maintenance action is completed.
(5) All activities and levels of command will have an AOAP monitor who is adequately trained
by the supporting lab or installation AOAP monitor.
(6) Each AOAP laboratory will provide oil analysis support per applicable publications and
supplemental guidance provided by the program director.
h. Detailed operating procedure for the AOAP are contained in DA PAM 738-750, chapter 4.
3-10. Administrative Storage of Materiel. Administrative storage is the placement of materiel in a
limited care and preservation status for short periods of time.
a. Administrative storage will be considered when:
(1) An activity lacks operating funds, people and other resources, or normal usage of its
equipment is not adequate to sustain materiel readiness.
(2) Lack of maintenance resources causes an activity to be incapable of performing the
required routine maintenance of its personal property.
(3) Equipment that exceeds the activity’s capability to operate or maintain but is required to
be retained for contingency or other valid reasons as determined by the commander.
(4) Completion of current mission does not require the use of authorized personal property on
a routine basis (seasonal).
(5) Before the decision to use administrative storage, the commander will consider all
workable options for maintaining personal property readiness.
b. Commanders/directors may authorize the administrative storage of their personal property
within guidance furnished by this regulation. To maximum extent practical, administrative storage
of personal property will be controlled and supervised at district/laboratory level or above.
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c. Commanders/directors will:
(1) Furnish assistance as required in carrying out an administrative storage program.
(2) Monitor the condition of materiel in administrative storage in their commands.
(3) Conduct a command level review of administrative storage at least every 6 months to
determine the need and effectiveness of the program.
d. When more than 15 percent of an organization’s on-hand equipment must be placed in
administrative storage, the commander/director will consider initiating action to reorganize the
activity at a level of equipment authorization that can be operated and maintained.
e. Equipment in administrative storage will have all major subsystems exercised as directed
by applicable owners’ manual. Any faults detected will be corrected. The personal property will
then be completely reprocessed if it is to be returned to administrative storage.
f. All regularly scheduled preventive maintenance services are suspended while materiel is in
administrative storage. Before personal property is placed in administrative storage, all operator
maintenance must be completed.
g. Special scheduled services, inspections, maintenance standards and procedures, or other
evaluations prescribed in applicable materiel operators’ manuals will be followed. Performance of
the services is the responsibility of the activity storing the materiel. Faults noted during these
required services, inspections and evaluations are corrected as quickly as practicable.
h. Equipment will be rotated per a rotational plan that will keep it exercised and reduce
maintenance effort.
i. Equipment will be stored to provide maximum protection from the elements, to provide
access for inspection, maintenance, and exercising, and to provide physical separation from active
personal property.
j. The access to materiel in administrative storage will be strictly controlled to prevent
cannibalization of pilferage.
3-11. Calibrations Programs. The use and care of test, measurement and diagnostic equipment
within USACE is extremely important. Commanders at all levels will ensure a calibrations program
is used to the maximum extent possible. AR 750-43 and TB 43-180 outline the policies and
procedures to be followed if the Army’s program is used. The equipment that is covered by this
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ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
program are items used to troubleshoot and repair other items, i.e., multimeters, torque wrenches,
gauges, etc. It can be used for, but is not solely intended for, laboratory equipment. The program
is item-specific and the use of other calibration sources is allowed for Corps equipment.
3-12. Cannibalization of Materiel.
a. Cannibalization is the authorized removal of components from materiel designated
for disposal. Cannibalization supplements supply operations providing assets not immediately
available through the supply system. Degradation of resale value should be considered prior to the
determination to use cannibalization.
b. Materiel awaiting disposition will not be cannibalized. Parts will only be removed after the
end item is accepted into a cannibalization point and with the approval of the accountable officer.
c. Policies and procedures for the establishment and operation of cannibalization points are
contained in AR 710-2, DA PAM 710-2-2 and ER 700-1-1.
3- 13. Maintenance of Pneumatic Tires.
a. Public Law 99-272 requires all government agencies to use and procure retread tires to the
maximum extent possible. The following paragraphs address the basic policy pertaining to retread
tires.
(1) Command emphasis is required at all levels to obtain maximum safety, savings and
environmental benefits from the use of retread tires.
(2) Surveillance procedures will be established to ensure that all repairable vehicle and
equipment tires are recovered prior to the end of their useful life.
(3) Repairable tires will be retreaded, not discarded or processed through Defense
Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO), unless classified not repairable/not economically
repairable by qualified technical inspectors. Repairable tires will not be given or sold to commercial
vendors for disposal.
(4) Except for the restrictions listed below, or as approved by waiver from HQUSACE
(CELD-MS), all activities will use retread tires in accordance with Public Law 99-272.
(a) Two-ply tires, without breaker strips or belts will not be retreaded.
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(b) All buses and passenger vans with an occupancy capacity of 15 personnel or more will not
be operated with retread tires on the steering axles.
(c) M520 truck series and M747 (or equivalent) semitrailers will not be operated with retread
tires.
(d) All IO-ton and above, truck tractors will not be operated with retread tires on the steering
axles.
(e) All emergency vehicles (i.e., fire trucks, police/ranger vehicle, etc.) will not be operated
with retread tires on the steering axles.
(f) All activities will comply with Federal, state or local codes that prohibit the use of retreads.
(5) Regrooving of tires is not permitted because it is not structurally viable or cost-effective.
b. Responsibilities of all commanders/directors are:
(1) Obtain the most cost-efficient use of the retread tire program and maximize safety during
pneumatic tire maintenance.
(2) Maximize the use of training courses dealing with pneumatic tires.
(3) Ensure thorough inspections of pneumatic tires mounted on vehicles and equipment during
PMCS and their removal when tread depth reaches the dimension for retreading.
(4) Ensure all maintenance personnel are in compliance with TM 9-2610-200-24, TM
9-2610-201-14, and applicable OSHA regulations.
(5) Assuring that qualified personnel are available to inspect and classify tires prior to turn-in
for retreading or for disposal and to perform acceptance inspections upon receipt of retread tires.
c. Quality of retread tires. Retreading can be performed several times as long as the casing is
removed from the vehicle/equipment before damage occurs. Activities and stock record accounts
will ensure retread tires are inspected for quality of workmanship upon receipt. If deficiencies in
quality or workmanship are noted, the inspector will initiate a Quality Deficiency Report/ Equipment
Improvement Recommendation (QDR/EIR) to the applicable command.
d. Training. All commanders will ensure that training is provided to personnel who service
single-piece or multi-piece rims and wheels. Records will be maintained documenting this training.
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e. Warranties. Tires repaired or retreaded by General Services Administration contractor or
local commercial sources are guaranteed against defects for the tread life of the tire. Defective tires
will be returned to the contractor for repair or adjustment. Defective tires rebuilt by government
facilities will be retained as exhibits and reported for disposition.
f. Mixing of radial and bias ply tires is not permitted. Mixing of radial and bias ply tires can
result in the loss of steering control, inadequate vehicle handling and/or mechanical damage. Radial
tires should always be used in sets. The term “sets” means all tires on the vehicle including the
spare.
3-14. Maintenance Expenditure Limits (MEL).
a. The MEL is a total allowable one-time cost to restore an end item, major component or
repairable component to a fully serviceable condition.
b. MELs will be used to ensure economic and operational effectiveness of USACE
maintenance. Required repairs will not be broken into separate job estimates to bypass prescribed
MELs.
c. MELs for Revolving Fund and Project Fund owned equipment are contained in ER
1125-2-301. MELs for Administrative Use Vehicles are contained in ER 56-2-l. Department of
the Army has published MELs for military standard equipment in the Technical Bulletin (TB) series
43-0002. MELs for office machines, furniture and materiels handling equipment is contained in
CFR Title 41. Equipment not covered by any of the above publications will have a MEL assigned
locally. This process will take place within 30 days of item being posted to the property book. Life
expectancy, depreciation, uniqueness, repair parts and labor costs are some of the items to consider
when establishing the MEL. The MEL can be expressed by either a dollar amount or by percentage
and will be reviewed and updated annually. Document the MEL in the equipment maintenance
records.
d. Request for permission to exceed the MEL cited in publications above should be made to
authorities cited in the publication. Permission approvals should be in writing. Permission to exceed
locally assigned MEL (only for items not covered in publications) must be in writing and signed by
the District Commander or equivalent, for separate operating activities.
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CHAPTER 4
COMMODITY - ORIENTED MAINTENANCE POLICIES
4- 1. Maintenance of Watercraft and Amphibians.
a. Purpose. To establish policies which are specific to the maintenance of Corps watercraft.
b. Objective. The objective of watercraft maintenance is to ensure safe, seaworthy, reliable,
and fully capable watercraft.
c. Scope. This section applies to all Corps watercraft and amphibians worldwide.
(1) Watercraft and amphibians are defined in EP 750-1-1, para. 7-1a., and DA PAM 738-750.
(2) To accomplish the objectives of watercraft maintenance, tasks are distinctly organized into
wholesale and retail maintenance. Each is responsible for the performance and management of its
materiel maintenance functions. This responsibility is established in regulatory and maintenance
publications.
(3) Wholesale maintenance is that maintenance which is beyond the capability of the operating
activity and is commonly referred to as depot level maintenance. Specifically, wholesale
maintenance is defined as that level of maintenance requiring the necessary personnel, skills,
facilities and equipment to perform industrial type maintenance functions.
(4) Retail maintenance is that maintenance which is within the capability of and is the
responsibility of the operating activity. The responsibility to perform retail maintenance operations
within a given level is assigned based on mission, degree of complexity, availability of personnel,
skills and materiel resources. Actual maintenance tasks to be performed are listed in applicable
maintenance manuals.
d. General Maintenance Policies.
( 1) Emergency repairs. A thorough marine condition survey/technical inspection will
be performed by qualified personnel to ascertain the scope of work necessary to return a watercraft
to a serviceable condition. When emergency repairs dictate that a watercraft be dry docked to
accomplish the necessary repairs, it will be considered wholesale maintenance. When this condition
exists, suitable repairs may be accomplished to correct the emergency. However, personal property
so repaired must be removed from operation as soon as possible and properly repaired before being
returned to an operational condition.
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(2) Watercraft awaiting disposition instructions will be maintained in administrative storage.
(3) When engaged in operations (underway/deployed) and maintenance problems occur where
normal corrective action can not be completed, a vessel master is authorized to perform any level
of maintenance required to maintain the watercraft in, a seaworthy, safe and operable condition. This
decision shall be made while considering the availability of resources, the skill of the crew, and the
impact the repairs will or will not have on the basic seaworthiness and operability of the watercraft.
(4) This policy also applies to electronic equipment installed on-board watercraft.
e. On-Condition Cycle Maintenance (OCCM). All watercraft will undergo OCCM in
accordance with the intervals established in Table 4-1. The intervals in Table 4-1 are the maximum
time intervals. If more than 3 months deviation is anticipated, a request for waiver with justification
will be sent to the district commander. OCCM consists of a series of inspections and maintenance
actions which are designed to assure that a watercraft’s structure (internal and external), piping, main
and auxiliary engines, electrical installations, life-saving appliances, fire detecting and extinguishing
equipment, pollution prevention equipment, and other equipment/systems are maintained in a
suitable, seaworthy and safe condition.
f. Inspections. Marine condition surveys incident to the performance of OCCM will be
accomplished in accordance with the following paragraph.
(1) One hundred eighty days prior to the scheduled OCCM, a marine condition survey will be
performed. This survey will provide the basis for written specifications by which OCCM will be
accomplished. This will be a dock side inspection. When possible, the services of qualified divers
will be utilized to ascertain the condition of the watercraft’s hull and appendages below the deep load
waterline.
(2) At the time of dry-docking, if required, a dry-dock inspection will be performed to identify
additional repair/maintenance requirements not observable at the time of the 180-day inspection
(dockside).
(3) Periodic surveys required by the United States Coast Guard (USCG) and the American
Bureau of Shipping (ABS) for retention of loadline certification will be accomplished in accordance
with 46 CFR subchapter E and TB 55-1900-201-45/1. When such inspections are required, the
service of ABS will be employed.
(4) In addition to the marine condition survey, an interim survey after 50% of the OCCM/drydocking time has elapsed will be conducted. Whenever possible, this survey will also include an
underwater hull survey as defined by TB 55-1900-201-45/1.
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g. Maintenance. The scope of work to be accomplished during OCCM will vary dependent
on watercraft conditions, resource limitations, class of vessel and other factors. As a minimum, the
following maintenance and repair actions will be accomplished during OCCM if the inspection so
indicates:
(1) Bottom cleaning and painting up to the deep load waterline.
(2) All repairs below the deep load waterline as identified during the dry-dock
inspection/underwater hull survey.
(3) Overhaul/replacement/renewal of all major components identified for overhaul at the depot
level. The requirements will be determined through diagnostic testing, hours of operation, and
inspection of internal parts.
(4) All other maintenance and/or repairs identified by the marine/ship surveyor required to
effect a permanent change in the watercraft’s condition so as to assure the following:
(a) Capability of operating in an unrestricted manner for the purpose intended.
(b) Capability of being maintained and operated in accordance with all applicable regulations,
rules, laws, and policies.
(c) The sustainment of the inherent reliability and maintainability designed and manufactured
into the equipment between repair cycles (OCCM).
(d) The sustainment of acceptable rates of readiness between OCCM cycles.
(e) Application of all outstanding Modification Work Orders (MWO), minor alterations,
modernization and/or special inspections will, to the maximum extent feasible, be accomplished
concurrently with OCCM.
h. Marine Condition Surveys. Marine condition surveys are technical inspections and written
evaluations performed by qualified marine surveyors in accordance with TB 55-1900-201-45/1 and
other applicable publications.
(1) Marine condition surveys on watercraft shall only be performed by experienced and
qualified technical experts. This requires the surveyor to be thoroughly familiar and capable of
interpreting written standards, Federal laws. rules and regulations affecting watercraft inspections,
common watercraft construction, and maintenance and repair procedures. The marine surveyor must
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also be capable of preparing written repair specifications and estimating repair costs (man-hour and
personal property costs).
(2) When qualified marine surveyors are not available, assistance may be requested through
command channels to HQUSACE, ATTN: CECW-OD.
i. Maintenance Reporting. Forms and records on watercraft and amphibians will be completed
according to DA PAM 738-750, TB 43-0002-26, TB 55-1900-205-24 and TB 55-1900-201-45/l.
j. On-Condition Cycle Maintenance. Table 4-1 is a list of the proposed Corps dry dock
intervals, compared to the required Coast Guard intervals. Based on periodic marine surveys, dry
docking intervals may be extended for freshwater vessels, and the extended intervals must be fully
documented and justified in accordance with paragraph 7-3c of EP 750-1-1.
k. In some cases, the Corps would be required to dry-dock more often than the proposed
intervals if the Coast Guard standards are adapted. However, in other cases, particularly with double
hull vessels, the dry-docking intervals can be greatly extended. The Corps has been designing and
building newer double hull tank barges, so using the Coast Guard intervals would be an opportunity
to take advantage of the increased savings available to these types of vessels. Other advantages for
adopting the Coast Guard dry-docking schedules are the general acceptance of the American Bureau
of Shipping to the Coast Guard intervals, and the decreased liability of adopting the industry
schedule of maintenance in the event of a mishap or oil spill.
4-2. Maintenance of Aircraft and Aviation Electronics AVIONICS). The object of USACE
aviation maintenance is to ensure safe and reliable aviation systems. Aviation systems maintenance
will be accomplished in accordance with Army regulations and applicable Federal Aviation
Administration (FAA) requirements. Contracted maintenance agreements will be reviewed by the
aviation manager.
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Table 4-1
Dry-docking Intervals (In Months)
Corps Recommendations
Salt Water
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
Vessel Class
Coast Guard Requirement
Salt Water
Fresh Water
Fresh Water
36
60
Class A(I)
30
60
36
60
Class B(T)
18
36 (1)
60
36
60
Class Cl(I)
38
60
Class C 1 (H)
48
60
Class C2(I)
s/h(2) 30
d/h(3) 60
udcb(5) 60
s/h(2)
60
d/h(3) 120
udcb(5) 120
36-48
60
Class C3(D)
s/h(2) 30
d/h(3) 60
s/h(2)
d/h(3)
s/h(2) 30
d/h(3) 60
s/h(2)
d/h(3)
30
18(4)
60
120
60
20
120
time interval extended if vessel spends more than 6 months but less than twelve months during the year in fresh water.
s/h = single hull vessel.
d/h = double hull vessel.
time interval is lessened if vessel is greater than 20 years old.
udcb = unmanned deck cargo barge.
Note: The letter in parenthesis next to the vessel classification is the letter of the subchapter in 46 CFR for that particular
vessel.
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The maintenance of fixed and other
4-3. Maintenance of Communication Systems.
communication systems is covered in AR 25- 1, AR 25- 11, and DA PAM 25- 1-1. Assistance with
maintenance policies and procedures can be obtained by contacting HQUSACE (CEIM-P).
aintenance of Communication Securitv (COMSEC) Materiel and Controlled Cryptographic
The maintenance of COMSEC and CC1 materiel is covered in AR 25-12, DA PAM
25- 16, and TM 11- 5810-310-23&P. Assistance with policies and procedures can be obtained by
contacting HQUSACE (CEIM-P).
4-5. Maintenance of Federal Information Processing_(FIP) Equipment. The maintenance of FIP
equipment (formally ADPE) is covered by the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR), Federal
Information Resources Management Regulations (FIRMR), AR 25-1, AR 25-3, DA PAM 25-4, DA
PAM 25-6, and DA PAM 25-6-l. Assistance with policies and procedures can be obtained by
contacting HQUSACE (CEIM-L).
4-6. Maintenance of Commercial Design Vehicles. The maintenance policies in DOD 4500.36R,
ER 56-2-1and the maintenance procedures in TM 38-600 apply to commercial design nontactical
vehicles. In general, these policies limit maintenance operations performed on these type vehicles
to inspections, services, and replacement of minor components and assemblies. Rebuild maintenance
of end items or major components is not authorized.
4-7. Maintenance of Engineer, Special Purpose (SP) Materiel Handling Equipment (MHE).
Maintenance will be accomplished on Engineer, SP and MHE as prescribed in this regulation, DA
PAM 738-750, applicable TMs and equipment manuals. As much maintenance as possible will be
conducted during the service interval. Standard maintenance management policies set forth in the
above cited regulations will be followed at all times. Waivers to any part of the regulations must be
approved in writing by the division commander prior to implementation. Examples of each type are
provided below:
a. Engineer Equipment
(1) Cranes
(2) Rollers/Compactors
(3) Loaders
(4) Scrapers
(5) Graders
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30 Jan 97
(6) Bulldozers
b. Special Purpose Equipment (SPE)
(1) Generators
(2) Pumps
(3) Low Bed Trailers
(4) Refuse Trucks
(5) Drill Rigs
(6) Dump Trucks
c. Materiel Handling Equipment (MHE)
( 1) Forklifts
(2) Warehouse Tractors
4-7
Paragraph 5-2 was superseded by ER 700-1-1, 2 October, 2000.
The balance of the document remains current.
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
CHAPTER 5
EQUIPMENT MANAGEMENT
5-1. Maintenance Management Indicators. To effectively measure the performance of maintenance
management, each USACE activity will use maintenance indicators. Three of the most common and
effective indicators are the tracking of equipment usage, equipment maintenance costs, and
equipment operational rates. The importance of accurate data documentation cannot be over
stressed. Commanders and managers rely on this type data to measure and improve the effectiveness
of the materiel maintenance program in the Corps. Taken collectively, these indicators provide
materiel maintenance managers the required tools to perform effective, efficient, and comprehensive
life cycle materiel maintenance management activities. The goal of our efforts is to field, operate,
maintain, and sustain the range and depth of equipment adequate to perform our missions at the
lowest life cycle cost of ownership.
5-2. Equipment Usage Standards. This section explains how personal property usage standards can
be used as part of an overall personal property management program. Appendix B, Table B-2, in
EP 750-1-1, is the list that shows personal property requiring usage reporting in USACE and Table
B-3 contains usage standards for selected categories of equipment. Equipment categories that are
exempt from usage reporting in USACE, are shown in Table B-4 of the cited EP.
a. General. Please note that objective and minimum usage standards are listed in the EP.
Minimum standards were established as ones that should be attainable for general purpose
assignment and normal use of equipment. When individual equipment items within a category are
not attaining the minimum usage, the whole category should be reviewed by the using activity, with
a view toward equalizing use through rotation, asset pooling, or other management actions. Assets
and/or authorizations should be reduced when indicated by the review.
b. Basis for Computation. Army usage standards are generally expressed in terms of hours,
days, or times used. Chapter 9 of EP 750-1-1, shows how usage standards are computed.
c. General Use Equipment. ER 700-1-1, Chapter 3, Section IV, Equipment Usage
Management, provides general USACE policy that governs personal property usage management
and explains why documenting historical usage data is important. EP 750-1-1, also gives details on
how this data should be collected and reported.
5-3. Maintenance Costs (Parts & Labor)
a. This section explains how life cycle costing techniques can serve to indicate how effective
an equipment management program is. A goal of a good program would be to provide historical
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ER 750-1-1
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records of maintenance costs, parts and labor, associated with personal property usage. Access to
this information can help us improve future equipment acquisitions and management decisions.
b. Life cycle costing attempts to identify projected personal property related expenditures,
using the acquisition to retirement approach. Its focus considers maintenance costs from the time of
initial equipment acquisition, until equipment is retired and disposed of. Command emphasis on the
importance of keeping accurate cost documentation is necessary for success in using life cycle cost
projections and historical cost data to efficiently manage our materiel maintenance program.
c. All personal property reaches a time in its service life when it becomes more of a liability
than an asset. When the cost to maintain personal property reaches a pre-established level or when
the property has mission crippling inoperative patterns, it is probably time to replace it.
d. USACE activities should document maintenance costs using the methods described in EP
750-1-1 for scheduled and corrective maintenance. In each case the costs for labor, parts, and those
associated with maintenance contracts will be recorded.
5-4. Equipment Operational Rates. Operational rates can be a helpful indicator for maintenance
management. The rates are mathematical expressions of equipment up time versus down time.
Chapter 9, EP 750-1-1, lists equipment categories suggested for operational rates tracking and gives
the formula for computing rates.
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TABLE 5-1
EQUIPMENT REQUIRING UTILIZATION REPORTING
Equipment Category
Code
Nomenclature
Federal Supply Class
1
LE
Boat, Tow
1925
2
LE
Boat, Tug
1925
3
LG
Propelling Unit,
(Outboard), 100 HP
and Larger
2010
4
LH
Crane, Barge
Mounted
3950
5
LH
Derrick, Crane Barge
3950
6
NB
Distributor, Water,
1000 Gal and Above,
Trk Mtd, Engine
Driven
3825
7
NB
Mixer, Concrete,
Trailer Mounted
3895
8
NB
Mixer, Concrete,
Truck Mounted
3895
9
NC
Scraper,
Earthmoving, Self
Propelled
3805
10
NC
Scraper,
Earthmoving, self
Propelled
3805
11
ND
Tractor, Full
Tracked, with
Backhoe/Loader
2430
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12
ND
Tractor, Full
Tracked, with
Bulldozer, (High
Speed)
2430
13
ND
Tractor, Full
Tracked, with
Bulldozer, (Low
Seed)
2410
14
ND
Tractor, Wheeled,
Industrial, with
Bulldozer
2420
15
ND
Tractor, Wheeled,
Industrial, with
Backhoe/Loader
2420
16
ND
Tractor, Wheeled,
Industrial, with
Bulldozer
2420
17
NE
Grader, Road
Motorized (All)
3805
18
NF
Crane, Crawler Mtd
3810
19
NF
Crane, Truck Mtd
3810
20
NF
Crane, Wheel Mtd
3810
21
NF
Crane Shovel,
Crawler Mounted
3810
22
NF
Crane Shovel, Truck
Mounted
3810
23
NF
Excavator, MultiPurpose, Crawler
Mounted
3805
24
NF
Excavator, MultiPurpose, Truck
Mounted
3805
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25
NG
Loader, Scoop,
Engine Driven, Full
Tracked
3805
26
NG
Loader, Scoop,
Engine Driven,
Wheel Mounted
3805
27
NH
Roller, Motorized,
Engine Driven
3895
28
NH
Roller, Vibratory,
Self Propelled
3895
29
NJ
Drill, Machine,
Truck Mounted
3820
30
NJ
Drill, Machine Truck
Mounted
3820
31
NJ
Truck, Well Drill
support
3820
32
NN
Truck, Concrete
Mixer, CCE
3895
33
NN
Truck, Dump, CCE,
20T
3805
34
NV
Auger, Earth, Skid
Mounted, Engine
Driven
3820
Auger, Earth, Truck
Mounted, Engine
Driven
3820
35
36
NV
Compactor,
Motorized (HS)
3805
37
NV
Ditching Machine,
Engine Driven
3805
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38
NV
Hammer, Pile Driven
Self Powered, (All)
3895
39
NV
Sweeper, Rotary,
Self Propelled
3825
40
PA
Crane Truck,
Warehouse, Electric
3810
41
PA
Crane Truck,
Warehouse, Engine
Driven
3950
42
PB
Truck, Forklift,
Electric, Lbs., and
Above
3930
43
PC
Truck, Forklift,
Gasoline Engine
Driven, 4000 Lbs.,
and Above
3930
44
PE
Tractor, Wheeled,
Warehouse, Electric
3930
45
PE
Tractor, Wheeled,
Warehouse, Engine
Driven
3930
46
PG
Truck, ForkliftRough Terrain
3930
47
PI
Truck, Forklift,
Diesel Engine Driven
3930
48
QB
Generator Set, Skid
Mounted, 15 kw and
Above
6115
49
QB
Generator Set, Trailer
Mounted, 15 kw and
Above
6 115
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50
QB
Generator Set, Truck
Mounted, 15 kw and
Above
6 115
51
QB
Generator Set, Wheel
Mounted, 15 kw and
Above
6115
52
QC
Compressor, Skid
Mounted, 125 CFM,
100 psi and Above
4310
53
QC
Compressor, Trailer
Mounted, 125 CFM,
100 psi and Above
4310
54
QC
Compressor, Truck
Mounted, 125 CFM,
100 psi and Above
4310
55
QC
Compressor, Wheel
Mounted, 125 CFM,
100 psi and Above
4310
56
QD
Pump, Centrifugal,
Water, Engine
Driven, Skid
Mounted
4320
57
QD
Pump, Reciprocating,
Water, Engine
Driven, Skid
Mounted
4320
58
QG
Welding Machine,
Skid Mounted
3431
59
QG
Welding Machine,
Trailer Mounted
3431
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60
QU
Truck, Fire Fighting
Equipment Engine
Driven (All)
4210
61
QU
Pump, Fire Fighting
Equipment Trailer
Mounted
4210
62
SY
Snowblower, Self
Propelled
3825
63
SY
Snowblower, Truck
Mounted
3825
5-8
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
Table 5-2
USACE Equipment Exempt From Usage Reporting
The following equipment categories are usually exempt from meeting usage tracking standards:
a. Information Management Area Equipment. This is covered by the AR 25-series.
b. Government furnished equipment (GFE). Contracts will include the requirement for the
collection and recording of utilitization data.
c. Defense Industrial Plant Equipment Center (DIPEC) controlled equipment. Although
DIPEC controlled, equipment is exempt from usage collection and reporting, walk-through
procedures will be used to evaluate the need for it.
d. Equipment used in direct support of a research, development, test, and evaluation mission
(RDTE). This equipment is exempt from usage collection and reporting. Walk-through
Procedures will be used to evaluate the need for it.
e. One of a kind equipment. The requirement for utilization data collection for one of a kind
equipment is not required. “One of a kind,” is defined as that “one and only specific type of
equipment located at a project site. This does mean equipment that is a site specific.
f. Common Tables of Allowance (CTA) equipment. Equipment authorized by CTA does not
require collecting of utilization data. This means that low dollar valued items (e.g., typewriters,
calculators, desks, fans, etc.) are exempt from collection of utilization data
g. Installed equipment (see glossary). Usage data collection for installed equipment such as
generators, and compressors, which are part of a real property facility, is not required.
h. Emergency equipment. Equipment required to be on hand for emergencies, such as
generators, compressors, wreckers, ambulances, fire trucks, etc., does not require utilization data
collection. Retention for such equipment will be based on documented justification.
NOTE: ACTIVITIES ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR DOCUMENTING EQUIPMENT
WHICH IS EXEMPTED FROM USAGE REPORTING. A MEMORANDUM FOR
RECORD WILL BE KEPT ON FILE FOR THIS PURPOSE.
5-9
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
CHAPTER 6
MAINTENANCE PROGRAM
6- 1. Maintenance Operations. Maintenance operations are those actions that ensure personal
property is inspected regularly, dispatched properly, operated correctly, serviced as required, and
ensures that faults are diagnosed and repaired as required.
6-2. Maintenance Plan. A maintenance plan will be developed by all divisions, districts,
laboratories and field operating activities. This plan will enable commanders to achieve
maximum efficiency through maintenance training and maintenance operations. In developing
the maintenance plan, factors for considerations are listed in EP 750-1-1, chapter 2.
6-3. Scheduled Maintenance Services. Scheduled maintenance services are the cornerstones of
the preventive maintenance (PM) program. They must be scheduled and performed within the
allowed time frame. These services permit the maintenance supervisors to assure the correct
accomplishment of all required maintenance. Therefore, all supervisors must place emphasis on
the planning and executing of scheduled services. (The single most important factor for success
of the maintenance program is the active participation of the functional area supervisor.) Other
factors to consider while planning maintenance services are:
a. Commanders, chiefs of logistics, maintenance officers and all supervisors are responsible
for the effectiveness of the maintenance program.
b. Tool sets, special tools and test equipment must be on hand, cared for, controlled,
accounted for and used properly.
c. Publications are vital for the execution of the maintenance program. They must be
accessible to all personnel who perform supervise maintenance actions.
d. Time management is essential to a good maintenance program. Supervisors must ensure
that maintenance time is scheduled for all required maintenance actions.
6-4. Evaluations. Evaluations of the overall maintenance program are vital to the success of the
maintenance mission and will be accomplished at each activity. Only detailed evaluations can
identify the changes needed to maximize maintenance efficiency. As a minimum, written annual
evaluations will be conducted and maintained by the logistics office.
6-1
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
6-5. Reviews. Maintenance management reviews should be established by division/district
logistics chiefs to evaluate, assist, and correct the maintenance programs within their activity.
Such reviews identify both good and bad maintenance practices.
6-6. Inspections. Maintenance inspections provide. essential information to supervisors on their
maintenance program. Inspections provide immediate feedback to supervisors at every level, and
identify action at the lowest possible level. Inspections can range from informal spot-checks by
the first line supervisor to formal inspections conducted by maintenance inspection teams. No
matter what type of inspection is conducted, supervisors must monitor the results and take
corrective action as necessary.
6-7. Repair Parts Management. Repair parts are essential to the success of any maintenance
operation. Commanders will establish accurate accountability for all parts and show an audit trail
from the time of requisition until they are used. Excess parts will be identified and turned in as
soon as possible. GSA, DOD and other Federal agencies will be utilized to the maximum extent
possible in the acquisition of parts and supplies. Only after these sources have been
exhausted/determined unfeasible will local procurement be used. Requesting, receiving,
stocking, issuing and the security of repair parts will be accomplished in accordance with AR
710- 2, DA PAM 710-2-1, and ER 700-1-1.
6-8. Safety. All personnel are responsible for safe operations. Anyone seeing an unsafe act will
take the required actions to stop it. All work will be performed in accordance with the USACE
Safety and Health Requirements Manual, EM 385-1-1.
6-9. Environmental Compliance. Public law 94-580 (Solid Waste Disposal Act), as amended,
mandates compliance with environmental procedures and explains why they are essential. Every
effort will be made to maximize compliance in USACE.
6-10. Security. Tools, repair parts, lubricants and maintenance facilities will be secured
appropriately. Supervisors will ensure strict security procedures are followed in accordance with
the AR 190 series publications.
6-2
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
APPENDIX A
REFERENCES
(required)
AR 25-1
AR 25-3
AR 25-11
AR 25-12
AR 25-13
AR 25-400-2
AR 58-1
AR 190-13
AR 380-5
AR 385-10
AR 385-40
AR 385-55
AR 420-83
AR 600-55
AR 700-68
AR 700-138
AR 710-2
AR 735-5
AR 750-43
AR 570-7
AR 700-9
AR 700-131
AR 740-3
AR 750-2
AR 750-10
ER 25-1-2
The Army Master Data File (AMDF)
The Master Cross Reference List (MCRL)
The Army Information Resources Management Program
Life Cycle Management of Information Systems
Record Communications and Privacy Communications Systems
Communications Security Equipment
The Department of the Army Equipment Authorization and Usage
Program
The Modem Army Record Keeping System
Management, Acquisition and Use of Administrative Use Motor
Vehicles
The Army Physical Security Program
Department of the Army Information Security Program
Army Safety Program
Accident Reporting and Records
Prevention of Motor Vehicle Accidents
Maintenance and Services (M&S), Equipment and Facilities
Engineering Shops
Motor Vehicle Driver and Equipment Operator Selection, Training,
Testing and Licensing
Storage and Handling of Compressed Gases and Gas Cylinders
Army Logistics Readiness and Sustainability
Supply Policy Below the Wholesale Level
Policies and Procedures for Property Accountability
Army Test, Measurement and Diagnostic Equipment Program
Equipment Management: Equipment Survey Program
Policies of the Army Logistics System
Loan of Army Materiel
Care of Supplies in Storage
Army Materiel Maintenance, Wholesale Operations
Modification of Materiel and Issuing Safety-of-Use Messages
and Commercial Vehicle Safety
Life Cycle Management of Automated Information System (AIS)
A-l
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
REFERENCES
(related)
Public Law 99-272
CFR Title 41
CFR Title 44
CFR Title 46
CTA 50-900
CTA 50-909
CTA 50-970
DOD 4500.36
DA PAM 25-1-1
DA PAM 25-4
DA PAM 25-6
DA PAM 25-6-1
DA PAM 25-16
DA PAM 710-2-1
DA PAM 710-2-2
DA PAM 738-750
DA PAM 750-l
EM 385-1-1
EP 750-1-1
ER 56-2-l
ER 700-1-1
ER 1125-2-301
ER 1130-2-500
TB 43-0002(series)
TB 43-0142
TB 43-0144
TB 43-0151
TB 43-180
TB 55-1900-201-45/l
TB 55-1900-205-24
TM 38-600
Code of Federal Regulations
Code of Federal Regulations
Code of Federal Regulations
Clothing and Individual Equipment
Field and Garrison Furnishings and Equipment
Expendables/Durable Items (Except: Medical, Class V, Repair Parts
and Heraldic Items)
Management, Acquisition and Use of Motor Vehicles
Installation Information Services
Information Systems Technical Documentation
Configuration Management for Automated Information Systems
Army Acquisition Planning for Information Systems
Security Procedures for Secure Telephone Unit, Third Generation
Using Unit Supply System
Supply Support Activity System Manual System
Functional Users Manual for the Army Maintenance Management
System
Leader’s Unit Level Maintenance Handbook
Safety and Health Requirements Manual
Procedural Pamphlet for Materiel Maintenance Policies
Administrative Vehicle Management
USACE Supply Policies and procedures
Plant Replacement and Improvement Program
Partners and Support (Work Management Policies)
Maintenance Expenditure Limits
Safety Inspection and Testing of Lifting Devices
Painting of Watercraft
Inspection and Test of Air and Other Gas Compressors
Calibrations and Repair Requirements for the Maintenance of Army
Materiel
Guide to Army Watercraft Survey Inspections, Repair Procedures
and Repair Specifications
Watercraft Information and Reporting System (WIRS), Data
Collection for Configuration Control
Administrative Use Vehicle Management
A-2
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
TM 11-5810-310-23&P
TM 9-243
TM 9-2610-200-24
TM 9-2610-201-14
Unit and Direct Support Maintenance Manual (including repair parts
and special tools) for STU 3/LCT
Use and Care of Hand Tools
Repair of Pneumatic Tires and Inner Tubes
Standards, Inspection and Classification of Tires
A-3
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
APPENDIX B
GLOSSARY
Section 1: Abbreviations
ABS
AFAR
AOAP
BITE
CC1
CFR
COMSEC
DA PAM
DFAR
DOL
ECOD
EIR
FAR
FIRMR
FIPR
FWT
GSA
GOCO
IAW
MEL
MHE
MSC
MWO
OAP
OCCM
OCOC
OSHA
PM
QDR
PMCS
SP
TAMMS
TB
TI
American Bureau of Shipping
Army Federal Acquisition Regulation
Army Oil Analysis Program
Built-In Test Equipment
Controlled Cryptographic Items
Codes of Federal Regulations
Communication Security
Department of the Army Pamphlet
Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation
Directorate Of Logistics
Estimated Cost Of Damages
Equipment Improvement Recommendation
Federal Acquisition Regulation
Federal Information Resources Management Regulation
Federal Information Processing Resources
Fair Wear and Tear
General Services Administration
Government Owned-Contractor Operated
In Accordance With
Maintenance Expenditure Limit
Materiel Handling Equipment
Major Subordinate Command
Modification Work Order
Oil Analysis Program
On-Condition Cyclic Maintenance
On-Condition Oil Change
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Preventive Maintenance
Quality Deficiency Report
Preventive Maintenance Checks and Services
Special Purpose
The Army Maintenance Management System
Technical Bulletin
Technical Inspection
B-l
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
CONSOLIDATED GLOSSARY
Section 2: Terms
Assembly. A combination of components/modules and parts used as a portion of, and intended
for, further installation in an equipment end item (for example, engine, transmission, electronic
component).
Available Days. The days equipment is on hand in an organization and fully able to do its
assigned mission.
Built in Test Equipment. Any identifiable, removable device which is part of equipment or
components under test that is used for the express purpose of testing.
Calibration. Comparison of an instrument (measurement standard or item of test, measurement,
and diagnostic equipment) of unverified accuracy with an instrument of known or greater
accuracy to detect and correct any discrepancy in the accuracy of the unverified instrument.
Component/Module. A combination of parts mounted together in manufacture, which may be
tested, replaced as a unit, or repaired (for example, starter, generator, fuel pump, and printed
circuit boards). The term module is normally associated with equipment.
Contract Maintenance. Any material maintenance operation performed under contract by
commercial organizations (including the original manufacture of material).
Controlled Exchange. Removal of serviceable parts, components and assemblies from
unserviceable, but economically repairable equipment and their immediate reuse in restoring a
like item of equipment to a mission capable condition.
Deferred Maintenance. Authorized delay of maintenance/repair of uncorrected faults.
Deficiency. A fault/shorting or problem that causes equipment to malfunction. A defect is a
deficiency when it:
a. Makes an item inoperable.
b. Makes the equipment unsafe or endangers the operator or crew.
c. Will damage the equipment if operation is continued.
d. Makes equipment so inaccurate, it cannot do its mission.
B-2
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
Fully Mission Capable. Systems and equipment that are safe and have all mission-essential
subsystems installed and operating as designed by applicable regulations. The terms
ready/available and full mission capable refer to the same status: equipment is on hand and able
to perform its missions.
Interservice Maintenance Support. Maintenance operations performed on a recurring or
nonrecurring basis by the organic maintenance capability of one military service or element
thereof in support of another military service or element thereof.
Maintainability. A characteristic of design and installation which inherently provides for the
time to be retained in or restored to a specified condition within a given period of time, when
maintenance is performed by prescribed procedures and resources.
Maintenance Canability. Availability of those resources, facilities, tools, TMDE, drawings,
technical publications, trained maintenance personnel, engineering and management support, and
repair parts required to perform maintenance operations.
Maintenance Coordinator. An individual responsible for the maintenance of specific items of
equipment, and also may be responsible for issuing equipment for utilization purposes.
Maintenance Manager. An individual responsible for the conduct of maintenance at a particular
location. Responsible for scheduled and unscheduled maintenance actions. Supervises
maintenance coordinators in the execution of their duties.
Maintenance Officer. An individual responsible for the maintenance management program
within a specified activity (i.e., division, district, laboratory, etc.).
Maintenance Operations. That function of material maintenance which encompasses the
management and physical performance of those actions and tasks involved in servicing,
repairing, inspecting, testing, overhauling, modifying, calibrating, etc., and the provision of
technical assistance to equipment users.
Material Maintenance. The function of sustaining material in an operational status, restoring it to
a serviceable condition, or updating and upgrading its functional usefulness through modification
or other modification.
Non-Operational. An item of equipment having faults that affect operation or may cause further
damage to the equipment or endanger the safety of the operator or passengers.
B-3
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
Oil Analysis. A test or series of tests that provide an indication of equipment component and
oil condition by applying methods of quantitative measurement of wear metals and detection of
contaminants in an oil sample.
On-Condition Oil Chance. An oil change directed by an oil analysis laboratory as a result of
findings relative to the condition of the oil and its lubricating capability.
Part. An item which can not normally be disassembled or repaired or is of such design that
disassembly is impractical.
Personal Propertv. Property of any kind except real property and records of the Federal
Government.
Preventive Maintenance. All actions performed in an attempt to retain an item in a specified
condition by providing systematic inspections, detection, and prevention of incipient failures.
Rebuild. To restore an item to a standard as nearly as possible to original or new condition in
appearance, performance, and life expectancy.
Scheduled Maintenance. Any type of maintenance that is performed as the result of a planning
action.
Shortcoming A fault that requires maintenance or supply action on a piece of equipment but
does not render it not mission capable.
Unscheduled Maintenance. Unexpected maintenance which is required because of either
equipment or component failure.
B-4
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
Watercraft. Coastal, harbor, and inland waterway craft; landing craft; amphibians; lighters;
barges; ocean going vessels (self- propelled or towed, tugged, or pushed).
Work Day. Normal duty shift as defined by local commander.
B-5
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
APPENDIX C
MATERIEL MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT BUSINESS PROCESS
1. Determine Equipment Requirement.
a. New
(1) Require justification
(2) Obtain authorization
(3) Obtain funding
b. Replacement
(1) Verify replacement criteria
(2) Obtain funding
2. Determine Acquisition Alternatives
a. Defense Reutilization and Marketing Offices (DRMO)
b. Borrow
c. Rent
d. Lease
e. Purchase
3. Acquisition of Equipment
a. Lateral transfer from another USACE activity
b. Government first source of supply (utilize Defense Supply Center Columbus as a prime
source of construction, material handling equipment and repair parts support when it is
advantageous)
c. Commercial vendor
d. Prepare requisition document
4. Maintenance Management Program in Place
a. Maintenance Officer appointed to lead maintenance effort giving focus and direction to
the Materiel Maintenance program.
b. Policy and procedures in place
c. Appoint maintenance managers
d. Appoint maintenance coordinators
C-1
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
e. Develop comprehensive maintenance plan
f. Equipment management procedures in place
(1) Maintain equipment utilization data
(2) Document maintenance cost (parts & labor)
(3) Maintain equipment availability data (operational rates)
g. Safe use of cranes, crane shovels, draglines and similar equipment near electric power
lines.
h. Safety inspection and testing of lifting devices, (TB 43-0142)
i. Inspection and test of air and other gas compressors (TB 43-0 151)
j. Equipment enrolled in Army Test Measurement and Diagnostic Equipment (TMDE) (AR
750-43, TB 750-25, TB 43-180) (FREE)
k. Equipment components enrolled in Army Oil Analysis Program (AOAP), DA PAM 738750, ER 750-1-1, EP 750-1-1) (FREE)
l. Government Owned Contractor Operated (GOCO) equipment requiring maintenance
actions will be maintained in accordance with ER 750-1-1 & EP 750-1-1.
5. Receive Equipment
a. In process equipment (service)
b. Assign equipment to maintenance coordinator
c. Add publications to library
6. Determine Maintenance Requirements
a. Preventive Maintenance Checks and Services (PMCS) Daily
b. Preventive Maintenance (PM) schedule services
c. Predictive maintenance schedule service
d. Test required
7. Schedule Preventive Maintenance Services
a. Schedule services on DD Form 314
b. Army Oil Analysis Program DD Form 314
c. Schedule other test as required on DD Form 314
8. Place Equipment in Service
a. Prepare equipment record folder
b. Prepare operational records
c. Prepare maintenance records
C-2
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
d. Prepare equipment record jacket, for historical records
9. Dispatch and Record Equipment Utilization
a. Maintain organizational control record for equipment (DA Form 2401)
b. Monthly submission of ENG Form 3662 to record utilization
c. Document fuel and oil consumption
d. Provide equipment utilization report (for management use)
10. Perform Schedule Maintenance Services
a. Document scheduled maintenance service (PM) on DD Form 314
b. Schedule next service on DD Form 314
c. Document test results on DD Form 314
d. Schedule next test
11. Repair Management
a. Determine from previous utilization if repair, overhaul, or replacement is justified
b. One time repair in excess of 30% of acquisition cost requires approval from the chief of
logistics
c. Consider overhaul or rebuild if in the best interest of USACE
d. Document equipment repair cost, parts and labor (ENG Form 2409)
e. Document equipment non-operational days on DD Form 314
f. Place all historical records in record jacket
12. Disposal
a. Identify equipment eligible for disposal
b. Determine if equipment is to be replaced or is excess to district needs
c. Circulate serviceable equipment excess to district needs
d. Prepare documentation for disposal
e. Remove equipment from property book
C-3
ER 750-1-1
30 Jan 97
APPENDIX D
OIL ANALYSIS REQUIREMENTS LIST
1. All items listed in DA PAM 738-750/EP 750-1-1 for the Army Oil Analysis Program
(AOAP).
2. Wheeled Vehicles, All wheeled vehicles powered by a diesel engine having an engine oil
capacity of five gallons or greater. All automatic transmission of that vehicle. Hydraulic systems
of the vehicle with a capacity of five gallons or greater, excluding brakes (i.e., dump truck
hydraulics, lift ramps, etc.).
3. Watercraft All watercraft that the main engine(s) is diesel and has an engine oil capacity of
five gallons or greater. All additional diesel engines with oil capacities of five gallons or
greater (i.e., cranes, winches, generators, etc.). All hydraulic systems with a capacity of five
gallons or greater. Other items determined necessary by local policy.
4. Construction All equipment with diesel engines having an engine oil capacity of
five gallons or greater. All automatic transmissions of the end item. All additional engines with
engine oil capacities of five gallons or greater. All hydraulic systems with a capacity of five
gallons or greater, excluding brakes.
5. Special Purpose Equipment. All items with diesel engines having an engine oil capacity of
five gallons or greater. All automatic transmissions. All hydraulic systems with a capacity of
five gallons or greater, excluding brakes.
6. Materiel Handling Equipment. All equipment with diesel engines having an engine oil
capacity of five gallons or greater. All automatic transmissions. All hydraulic systems with a
capacity of five gallons or greater, excluding brakes.
D-l
Appendix E
Management Control Evaluation Checklist for the Materiel
Maintenance Program
E-1. Function. The function of this checklist is to provide
guidelines for assessing key management controls of personal
property maintenance activities within the USACE.
E-2. Purpose. The purpose of this checklist is to assist USACE
management with evaluating and helping their Districts/
Activities/ Projects to comply with and adhere to the key
management controls listed below. The checklist is not intended
to cover all controls, but merely serve as a guide that points
toward proper equipment maintenance and management procedures.
E-3. Instructions. Answers must be based on the actual
testing of key management controls (i.e., document analysis,
direct observation, sampling, simulation, and [or] others).
Answers that indicate deficiencies must be explained and the
corrective action indicated in the supporting documentation.
These management controls must be evaluated at least once every
five years and then certified on DA Form 11-2-R (Management
Control Evaluation Certification Statement [see AR 11-2]). Note:
All negative answers to test questions indicate a weakness
Assessable Division/District/Activity/Laboratory: The
Chief of the Logistics Office that provides support to the USACE
Districts/Projects will designate the specific manager
responsible for using this checklist. The responsible principal
and mandatory schedule for using this checklist will be reviewed
and approved by the Division/Activity/Laboratory/District
Commander.
E-4. Management Control Evaluation Questions.
E-4-A. Maintenance Plan
EVENT CYCLE 1: Determine if all applicable Maintenance
plans are on hand and current.
Risk: Consistency in accomplishment of assigned missions will
be in jeopardy if a comprehensive maintenance plan is not
developed and followed.
Control Objective: To ensure that an effective maintenance
plan is written, kept current, and is always on hand and
followed.
Control technique: Review and analyze maintenance plans for
adequacy.
TEST QUESTION:
1. Does the activity have a maintenance plan on hand?
Response: YES_
Remarks:
NO _ N/A
2. Is the maintenance plan current?
Response: YES_ NO_ N/A
Remarks:
3. Are all personnel familiar with the contents of the
maintenance plan?
Response: YES_ NO_ N/A Remarks:
4. Are there established procedures for reviewing and
updating the maintenance plan?
Response: YES_ NO_ N/A
Remarks:
EVENT CYCLE 2: Determine if all applicable maintenance
polices and procedures are in place for efficiency and
proper use of resources.
RISK: Consistency in accomplishment of mission will be
degraded if questionable activity policies and procedures are
not develop and practiced.
CONTROL OBJECTIVE: To ensure that office and activity
standing operating procedures are effective.
CONTROL TECHNIQUE: Review and analyze office and activity
maintenance policy and Procedures for adequacy and provide
periodic inspections for the review of records
by supervisory personnel.
TEST QUESTION:
1. Has the appropriate Division Chief appointed
Maintenance Managers and Coordinators?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
2. Is an appointed and qualified Maintenance Officer
performing the equipment maintenance management
mission?
Response: YES_ NO_ NA
Remarks:
3. Does the Maintenance Officer report directly to
the Chief of Logistics?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
4. Are the Maintenance Officer's functions clearly
stated in the local mission statement?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
5. Does the Maintenance Manager maintain a
consolidated list of equipment he/she is responsible
for supporting?
Response: YES_ NO_ _NA
Remarks:
6. Is the equipment listed accounted for on the
current Property Book?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
7. Has comprehensive equipment training and a
licensing program been established, maintained and
executed in accordance with AR 600-55 and EM 385-1-1?
Response: YES_ NO_
Remarks:
NA
EVENT CYCLE 3: Determine if the maintenance management
Business Process guidelines are being followed IAW ER
750-1-1.
RISK: Scheduled maintenance and services may not
be performed or documented properly.
CONTROL OBJECTIVE: To ensure all maintenance for
personal property is scheduled (manual or automated)
and performed to prevent degradation of equipment and
mission accomplishment.
CONTROL TECHNIQUE: Review and analyze the
maintenance operation business process to find out
if equipment maintenance and services are
performed.
TEST QUESTION:
1. Are maintenance services scheduled in accordance
with the manufacture recommendations?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
2. Are services annotated and scheduled at least one
month or one service in advance?
3. Are scheduled services preformed on time or within
the prescribed variance?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
Remarks:~>mm~ rkc
4. Is there a scheduled Maintenance Form (manual
or automated) kept on all applicable equipment?
Response: YES _ NO_ NA
Remarks:
5. Are deferred maintenance actions corrected
during scheduled services?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
6. Are Inter-service support agreements current and
on hand for required activities?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
7. Has equipment under warranty been identified
and maintained in accordance with the warranty
terms?
Response: YES_ NO _ NA
Remarks:
8. Does the activity participate in the oil analysis
program for selected equipment and equipment listed
in Table 4-2 thur 4-7 of DA PAM 738-750 and EP
750-1-1?
Response: YES_ NO _ NA
Remarks:
9. Does the activity participate in the Test
Measurement and Diagnostic Program (TMDE) for special
tools and test equipment?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
R~mi~rk.c
10. Is re-refined oil being used in accordance with
Executive Order 12873 dated 20 Oct 93 and the
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
R=m~ rkc
11. Are retread tires used to the maximum extent
possible as required by Public Law 99-272 and applicable
OSHA regulations?
Response: YES _ NO_
Remarks:
NA
12. Is the economic reparability of unserviceable
personal property determined before actions are taken to
restore the property to a serviceable condition?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
13. Are "History Jackets" files maintained for equipment
on-hand, assigned or attached?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
14. Has Controlled Exchange Authority been approved in
writing when criteria in ER 750-1-1 have been met?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
15. Are controls adequate enough to ensure that maintenance can
be completed on equipment prior to mission requirements? (I.e.,
major services during peak work season)
Response: YES_ NO_ NA
Remarks:
16. Is there a quality assurance program in effect for
"completed or in-process maintenance?" (Including
contracted and GSA services)? YES_NO_ NA_ Remarks:
E-4-B.
Watercraft-Oriented Maintenance Policies.
EVENT CYCLE 4: Determine if watercraft equipment is
systematically scheduled for services and cycle
maintenance.
RISK: Consistency in comprehensive maintenance for floating
equipment, boats/vessels may be performed and over looked by
maintenance managers/supervisor
CONTROL OBJECTIVE: To ensure that authorized maintenance is
performed, and official maintenance forms are used (manual or
automated) for documentation in accordance with ER/EP 750-1-1.
CONTROL TECHNIQUE: Review and analyze maintenance policy and
procedures for adequacy and provide periodic inspection for
review of records by supervisory personnel.
TEST QUESTION:
1. Does the vessel master maintain required maintenance
records for watercraft?
Response: YES_ NO_ NA
Remarks:
2. Does required watercraft undergo On-Condition Cycle
maintenance in accordance with the intervals established
in Table 4-1 in ER 750-1-1?
Response: YES_ NO_ NA
Remarks:
E-4-C.
Equipment Management.
1. Are usage reports maintained on personal property
that is listed in Table 1-4, in EP 750-1-1?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
2. Is documentation on file for personal properties
that are usually exempt from meeting minimum usage
tracking standards?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
3. Is DA Form
Form 3662, or
maintained by
750-1-1)
Response: YES
Remarks:
2401 (Control Record for Equipment), ENG
an automated form filled out and
the activity IAW current guidance? (EP
_ NO _ NA
4. Is the Equipment Record Folder complete and
properly maintained when equipment is used?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
5. Does equipment on extended utilization (dispatch)
cycle have a valid requirement for the extension?
Response: YES NO _ NA
Remarks:
6. Does the utilization (dispatch) cycle terminate
when the equipment becomes none operational?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
7. Is equipment continually operated when services are
overdue?
E-4-D. Maintenance
Program
EVENT CYCLE 5: Determine if the Maintenance Officer has
established a maintenance program to include operators
who follow the maintenance business process.
RISK: Consistency in a maintenance program business
process is not developed nor followed.
CONTROL OBJECTIVE: To ensure that deficiencies and
work requests for maintenance is documented, and
processed through the maintenance
manager/coordinator/supervisor
CONTROL TECHNIQUE: Inspect, review, analyzes and
interview equipment operators and maintenance personnel
to determine if proper equipment maintenance is being
performed.
TEST QUESTION:
1. Is Equipment Maintenance Checks and Services
performed prior to use?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks
2. Does the operator report equipment shortcomings and
deficiencies to the Maintenance Coordinator that cannot
be corrected immediately?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks
3. Are operators/users knowledgeable on maintenance
and operating characteristics of their assigned
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks
4. Are controls in place to ensure that work order
request numbers are recorded/tracked when received?
Response: YES_ NO_ NA
Remarks:
5. Have work orders been prepared in accordance with
the maintenance plan?
Response: YES _ NO_ NA
Remarks:
6 Are controls adequate to ensure that sufficient repair
parts are on hand, or on order for each official work
request?
Response: YES_ NO _ NA
Remarks:
7. Are controls adequate to ensure that appropriate
tools and test equipment are on hand?
Response: YES_ NO_
Remarks:
NA
8. Are procedures in place to ensure that the standard
man-hour rates for the task to be performed are used
for determining labor costs?
Response: YES_ NO_ NA
Remarks:
9. Are both direct and indirect labor costs included
in the total for labor?
Response: YES_ NO__NA
Remarks:
10. Are procedures in place to ensure that all parts,
labor and materials are capture and charged to the
appropriate work order?
Response: YES_ NO__NA
Remarks:
11. Are quality control procedures in place to ensure
that all repairs are properly completed and deferred work
promptly annotated?
Response: YES_ NO _ NA
Remarks:
12. Are procedures in place to ensure that repair parts
consumption data are reported to the appropriate Maintenance
Coordinator?
Response: YES_ NO_
Remarks:
NA
13. Are required publications on-hand or on order within the
activity?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
14. Are repair parts located in a single area readily
accessible to maintenance personnel and properly secured? (AR
190-13)
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
15. Is repair part history reviewed periodically for
identification of equipment maintenance trends and the
adjustment of stocked quantities? (DA PAM 710-2-1, AR 7102)
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
16. Is an Equipment Repair Cost Record (Manual or Automated)
maintained on each specific item of equipment for its life
or until the equipment is disposed of, or transferred? (EP
750-1-1)
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
17. Are historical records maintained for each item of
equipment?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
18. Does the Maintenance Officer conduct annual
written reviews IAW EP 750-1-1, and follow up to
ensure proper corrective action is taken? (EP 750-1-1)
E-4-E. Safety
EVENT CYCLE 6: Determine if safety requirements
for personnel property are enforced.
RISK: Consistency in comprehensive maintenance plan is
not developed and unchecked safety violations will cause
injury to personnel or damage property.
CONTROL OBJECTIVE: To ensure that management
identifies safety violations, direct corrective
action and record results.
CONTROL TECHNIQUE: Review and analyze safety and health
programs, documents, signs, and communicate the result
to employees.
TEST QUESTION:
1. Are all low and high-pressure air compressors
inspected and tested both mechanically and hyrostatically
IAW TB 430151 and EM 385-1-1 as required?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
2. Are air compressors marked and the results of
all inspections recorded IAW EP 750-1-1 and TB
43-0151?
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
3. Is battery handling, storage and charging
accomplished IAW EM 385-1-1?
Response: YES_ NO _ NA
Remarks:
4. Have the requirements for safety inspections and
testing of lifting devices been performed, to include,
marking lifting devices, documenting the results, and
scheduling the next periodic inspection? (TB 43-0142,
ER 385-1-1)
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
5. Is hazardous material/waste stored and disposed of
IAW applicable regulations? (AR 200-1, AR 420-27)
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
6. Are compressed gas cylinders marked and stored IAW
applicable regulations and guidelines? (AR 700-68 and
EM 385-1-1)
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
7. Are equipment operators retested or retrained
periodically for proficiency on special equipment IAW
AR 600-55, EM 385-1-1, TB 600-1/TB 600
Response: YES _ NO _ NA
Remarks:
8. Is personnel protection equipment being issued and
utilized? I.e., safety shoes, hard hats, safety
glasses, respirators, etc, (ER 750-1-1, EM 385-1-1)
Response: YES_ NO_
Remarks:
NA
I attest that the above listed internal controls provide
reasonable assurance that USACE maintenance program and
equipment are adequately safeguarded. I am satisfied that
if the above controls are fully operational, the internal
controls for maintenance of personal property throughout
USACE are adequate.
Assistant Chief of Staff for Logistics, HQUSACE
I have reviewed the maintenance controls of personal
property within my organization and have supplemented the
prescribed internal control checklist as listed below.
The controls prescribed in this checklist, as amended,
are in place and operational for my organization (except
for the
weaknesses described in the attached plan, which
includes schedules for correcting the weaknesses).
Operating Manager (Signature)
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