A/d/s/ | IE6.1 / IE6.2 | Introduction to Microsoft Internet Explorer 8

Microsoft®
Internet Explorer 8
University of Salford
© 2010 by CustomGuide, Inc. 1502 Nicollet Avenue South, Suite 1; Minneapolis, MN 55403
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The names of software products referred to in this manual are claimed as trademarks of their respective companies. CustomGuide is
a registered trademark of CustomGuide, Inc.
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© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Table of Contents
Web Browsing Basics ............................................................................................................................................. 7
Introduction to the Internet ..................................................................................................................................... 8
Understanding the Internet Explorer Window......................................................................................................... 9
What’s New in Internet Explorer 8 ........................................................................................................................ 10
Starting Internet Explorer ...................................................................................................................................... 11
Displaying a Specific Web Page ........................................................................................................................... 12
Browsing the Web ................................................................................................................................................ 13
Browsing with Tabs ............................................................................................................................................... 15
Searching the Web with a Search Engine ............................................................................................................ 17
Searching the Web with the Search Box .............................................................................................................. 18
Searching Within a Web Page ............................................................................................................................. 20
Web Browsing Basics Review .............................................................................................................................. 21
More Browser Features ........................................................................................................................................ 24
Changing the Home Page .................................................................................................................................... 25
Using Favorites ..................................................................................................................................................... 26
Managing Favorites .............................................................................................................................................. 28
Using RSS Feeds ................................................................................................................................................. 30
Using Browsing History ........................................................................................................................................ 32
Using Add-ons ...................................................................................................................................................... 34
Using Compatibility View ...................................................................................................................................... 36
Changing Your View ............................................................................................................................................. 37
Setup a Web Page for Printing ............................................................................................................................. 38
Previewing and Printing Web Pages .................................................................................................................... 39
Downloading Program Files ................................................................................................................................. 41
Downloading Data Files and Images .................................................................................................................... 43
More Browser Features Review ............................................................................................................................ 45
Safe Web Browsing ............................................................................................................................................... 48
Using the SmartScreen Filter ............................................................................................................................... 49
Using Domain Highlighting ................................................................................................................................... 51
Using the Information Bar and Pop-Up Blocker ................................................................................................... 52
Using InPrivate Browsing ..................................................................................................................................... 53
Using InPrivate Filtering ....................................................................................................................................... 54
Safe Web Browsing Review .................................................................................................................................. 56
University of Salford
3
Introducing
CustomGuide
Courseware
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© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
How It Works
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Streamlined design
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Exercise Notes
A new Exercise Notes section appears at the top of each lesson. Rather than practicing the
nd
topic step by step through the lesson as in 2 generation courseware, the topic can be
practiced using the exercise file and exercise described here.
Table of Contents
In addition to the Table of Contents found at the beginning of each courseware title, 3
generation courseware includes a Table of Contents at the beginning of each chapter, making
it even easier to locate the lessons you need.
Smart Quizzes
The Quiz section, located at the back of the book, automatically updates itself when the
manual is customized. For example, if you remove a lesson regarding cutting and pasting text,
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Easier customization
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Use as a reference tool
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rd
rd
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University of Salford
5
Courseware Features
Working with Objects
Positioning Pictures
Whenever you insert a graphic into a presentation, it is
inserted inline with text by default. This means that the
text in the presentation moves in order to accommodate
the graphic. This lesson will show you how to adjust text
wrapping and how to use the grid to position objects.
Tips
 Exercise

Exercise File: AmericanHistory7-3.pptx

Exercise: Select the header row containing
the month labels, the Income row, the Total
Exp. Row, and the Net Inc. row (use the Ctrl
key to select multiple rows). Create a 2-D
Clustered Column chart.
 If you want to use a graphic with other graphics or
objects, they must be on a drawing canvas. See the
lesson on Inserting Shapes for more information.
Adjust text wrapping
To adjust how text reacts to the objects in your documents,
change the object’s text wrapping.
1. Double-click the object whose text wrapping you
wish to adjust.
The Format contextual tab appears on the Ribbon.
Table 7-2: Text Wrapping Styles
In Line
with Text
This places the object at the insertion point in a
line of text in the document. The object remains
on the same layer as the text.
Square
Wraps text around all sides of the square
bounding box for the selected object.
Tight
Wraps text tightly around the edges of the actual
image (instead of wrapping around the object’s
bounding box).
Behind
Text
This removes text wrapping and puts the object
behind text in a document The object floats on
its own layer.
In Front
of Text
This removes text wrapping and puts the object
in front of text in a document. The object floats
on its own layer.
Top and
Bottom
Wraps text around the top and bottom of the
object, leaving the area to the right and left of
the object clear.
Through
Similar to the Tight style, this style wraps text
throughout the image.
2. Click the Text Wrapping button in the Arrange group.
A list of text wrapping styles appears. Take a look at
the Text Wrapping Styles table for a description of
each style.
3. Select a text wrapping style from the list.
The text wrapping style is applied to the image.
Other Ways to Adjust Text Wrapping:
Right-click the image, point to Text Wrapping
in the contextual menu, and select an option
from the submenu.
To display/hide the grid
Just like the graph paper you used to use in geometry
class, the grid consists of horizontal and vertical lines that
help you draw and position objects.
1. Click the View tab on the Ribbon.
2. Click the Gridlines check box in the Show/Hide group.
Horizontal and vertical gridlines appear on the page.
Other Ways to Display the Grid:
Press <Shift> + <F9>, or click the Format
contextual tab on the Ribbon, click the Align
button in theArrange group, and select View
Gridlines from the list.
Figure 7-3: A slide with the grid displayed.
Tip: Gridlines do NOT appear in the printed
document.
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© 2007 CustomGuide, Inc.
Lessons are presented on one or two pages, so
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something, the most common method is presented
in the numbered step, while the alternate methods
appear beneath.
Tables provide summaries of the terms, toolbar
buttons, and options covered in the lesson.
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changes you make to the courseware.
Icons and pictures show you what to look for as you
follow the instructions.
© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Web Browsing
Basics
Introduction to the Internet................................. 8
Understanding the Internet Explorer Window .. 9
What’s New in Internet Explorer 8 ................... 10
Starting Internet Explorer ................................. 11
Windows XP ............................................ 11
Windows Vista ......................................... 11
Windows 7 ............................................... 11
Displaying a Specific Web Page ...................... 12
Browsing the Web ............................................. 13
Use hyperlinks ......................................... 13
Return to visited pages ............................ 13
Refresh a page ........................................ 14
Stop a page transfer ................................ 14
Browsing with Tabs ........................................... 15
Open a tab ............................................... 15
Use Quick Tabs ........................................ 15
Use Tab Groups ....................................... 16
Close a tab ............................................... 16
3
The Internet has changed personal
computing forever and continues to affect
the way countless tasks are done. The
Internet has introduced new ways of
sharing recipes, buying music, playing
games, paying bills, meeting new people,
and staying in touch with old friends.
Fortunately, the Internet is incredibly easy
to use. Even the most computer-phobic
users tend to feel right at home on the
Internet.
This chapter gives an overview of how to
use Internet Explorer to navigate the
World Wide Web. Lessons include simple
Web browsing, using tabs, and searching
for information on the Web. There’s a lot
to explore on the Internet, with more
pages being added every day, so let’s get
started!
Searching the Web with a Search Engine ....... 17
Searching the Web with the Search Box ......... 18
Use the search box .................................. 18
Add a Search Box provider ...................... 19
Searching Within a Web Page .......................... 20
University of Salford
7
Web Browsing Basics
Introduction to the Internet
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
The Internet is the largest computer network in the world.
It consists of millions of computers all over the planet, all
connected to each other. It evolved from the ARPANET,
which was created in the 1960s by the U.S. government to
protect computer systems in case of a nuclear attack.
• Exercise: Understand the difference between the Internet
and the World Wide Web.
Although the Internet has been around since the 1960s, it
wasn’t until the 1990s that the World Wide Web was born.
The World Wide Web (or Web) is what you probably
think of when you think of the Internet, although it’s
really just a part of the Internet. The Web consists of
millions of documents called Web pages, and you can find
Web pages on every subject imaginable—from your local
newspaper to online catalogs and airline schedules.
Web pages are stored on Web servers. A Web server is a
computer, not unlike your own computer, only bigger and
faster. Web servers are always connected to the Internet so
that people can view Web pages stored on them 24 hours
a day.
So what can you do once you’re connected to the
Internet? Plenty. Table 1-1: Internet Activities lists just
some of the things you can do once you’re online.
Figure 1-1: MSN is the default home page in Internet
Explorer.
Table 1-1: Internet Activities
Send and receive
E-mail
Send and receive messages between people anywhere in the world, as long as you both have access to the
Internet. E-mail is nearly instantaneous and sending messages is free, so it’s easier than ever to keep in touch with
faraway friends and family.
Browse the World
Wide Web
Peruse the wealth of information that is available through the Internet. There are all kinds of documents to read on
the World Wide Web, with information on every subject imaginable.
Join online
discussions with
newsgroups
Join a newsgroup and read and post messages to share your thoughts with people with similar interests. There are
thousands of newsgroups that focus on topics including politics, religion, hobbies, computers, and more.
Chat with other
online users
Chatting lets you communicate with people on the Internet instantly, no matter how far away they are. Although
most chats are conducted by typing and sending responses, a growing number of chats have voice and even video
capabilities, all without having to pay long distance charges.
Download software
You can download pictures, demo programs, software enhancements, and even full programs for your computer.
Listen to music
Many radio stations broadcast online, and you can also download and listen to music by your favorite artists.
Shop at online
retail outlets
Not only do most retailers have an online presence that lets you shop without leaving the comfort of your
computer desk, but there are innumerable specialty shopping Web sites with selections you can only find online.
Manage your
accounts
You can pay bills, check your bank account balances, and set schedules (and synchronize them with coworkers)
online.
Keep a diary
Web-logs, called blogs, are a popular way for people to document events in their lives and share them, either with
select friends and family or with the whole world.
Watch videos
Entire episodes of television shows can be viewed online, and you can purchase TV series and movies to
download. Plus, the Internet is the only place to see thousands of homemade videos covering every topic.
Check schedules
You can plan a trip by checking airline schedules and train schedules, check movie showtimes, or keep up with
your favorite sports teams online.
Play games
There are a wide variety of games you can play including card games, puzzle games, video games, and more.
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© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Web Browsing Basics
Understanding the Internet
Explorer Window
Before you jump into the world of Web browsing,
familiarize yourself with the items, controls, and
commands in the Internet Explorer window.
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
• Exercise: Understand the parts of an Internet Explorer
window.
Title bar: Displays the name of the active Web page
and program.
Favorites Bar: Gives you one-click access to your favorite
Web pages.
Address bar: Displays the Uniform Resource Locator
(URL), better known a Web address. Type an address to
visit a Web site.
Command Bar: Quick access to tools to customize Internet
Explorer.
Minimize, Maximize, and Close buttons: Use these
buttons to minimize, resize, or close and exit Internet
Explorer.
Tabbed browsing: Open up Web pages in separate tabs for
faster, more convenient browsing.
Navigation buttons: Move back/forward among Web
pages you have browsed.
Status bar: Tells you if you’re connected to the Internet and
displays the progress the Web site is making in loading. Also
displays the security level of the Web site.
Search box: Type a word or phrase and use a search
engine to look for related Web sites.
Zoom: Zoom in to increase the size of the Web page being
viewed, or zoom out to display more items in the window.
University of Salford
9
Web Browsing Basics
What’s New in Internet
Explorer 8
There are lots of exciting new features in Internet
Explorer 8 that are designed to deliver seamless, safe, and
personal experiences on the Web.
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
• Exercise: Understand the new features that are available in
Internet Explorer 8.
Review Table 1-2: New Features in Internet Explorer 8
for a description of some of these new features. Many will
be described in greater detail in later lessons.
Table 1-2: New Features in Internet Explorer 8
Web Slices
A Web Slice is a lot like a bookmark, but instead of subscribing to the entire page, you only subscribe to
a specific portion of a Web page.
Compatibility View
Some Web pages were designed for older versions of Internet Explorer. As a result, they may render
oddly in your browser view. Compatibility View allows you to view the Web page as if you were using
an earlier version of Internet Explorer.
Accelerators
Accelerators allow you to perform browsing tasks without having to leave your current Web page. For
example, if you want to map an address, you can highlight the text, click the Accelerator button, and a
map will appear in the same screen.
Favorites Bar
Now you have one-click access to your favorite Web pages by adding them to the Favorites Bar, which
appears across the top of your browser window.
New Tab Groups
When you open up a new tab from a Web page, both the original tab and the new tab will be color coded
so you know which tabs are related. You can even save tab groups as Favorites.
Improved Find On Page
The improved Find On Page toolbar appears at the top of your browser. The toolbar searches characterby-character as you type and highlights each match so that they’re easy to find within the page.
Improved Zoom
Pages with small font sizes can be hard to read. Internet Explorer now has Adaptive Page Zoom, which
allows you to increase the font size of Web pages and read it without having to scroll from left to right.
Smarter Address Bar
Sometimes it can be difficult to remember Web pages you have visited. The new address bar now
searches across your browsing history, Favorites, and RSS feeds. When you type a few characters into
the address bar, it recalls sites for you.
The address bar also makes surfing the Internet safer. It highlights the Web domain of the site you’re
visiting so you know if it’s the real thing or a malicious look-alike.
Improved Instant Search
Box
New search capabilities make it easier to find the information you’re looking for. As you type, the search
box will suggest Web sites for you. The search box will also provide visual search results. For example,
if you type in the name ―George Washington,‖ you may see a picture of him next to your results.
InPrivate Browsing and
InPrivate Filtering
InPrivate Browsing allows you to navigate the Web without leaving any evidence behind. Meanwhile,
InPrivate Filtering prevents third-parties from collecting information about your browsing history.
Better Performance
Microsoft’s developers worked hard to increase the speed and functionality of Internet Explorer, making
it a strong contender against competitors like Mozilla’s Firefox and Google Chrome.
Safer Browsing
By default, Internet Explorer 8 has features that protect you from malware and phishing threats.
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© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Web Browsing Basics
Starting Internet Explorer
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
In order to use Internet Explorer, you must start—or
launch—it first.
• Exercise: Launch Internet Explorer.
Windows XP
1. Click the Start button.
The Start menu appears.
2. Click Internet Explorer.
The browser window appears.
Other Ways to Open Internet Explorer:
Click the Internet Explorer icon in the Quick
Launch bar.
Windows Vista
1. Click the Start button.
The Start menu appears.
2. Click Internet Explorer.
The browser window appears.
Other Ways to Open Internet Explorer:
Click the Internet Explorer icon in the Quick
Launch bar.
Windows 7
1. Click the Internet Explorer icon on the taskbar.
The browser window appears.
Other Ways to Open Internet Explorer:
Click the Start button and select All Programs
Internet Explorer from the menu.
Figure 1-2: Starting Internet Explorer in Windows 7.
University of Salford
11
Web Browsing Basics
Displaying a Specific Web
Page
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
• Exercise: Visit www.ebay.com through Internet Explorer.
Every page on the Internet has its own Web address called
a Uniform Resource Locator (URL). Whenever you hear
www.something.com, people are referring to a specific
Web page’s URL. Once you know the URL, getting to the
Web page is a piece of cake!
Enter a URL in the address bar
When you know a Web site’s URL, enter it in the address
bar and the browser will open to that page.
Table 1-3: Reasons a Page Cannot Be Displayed
You’ve lost your
connection to the
Internet.
Check your Internet connection (or
wireless signal) and try again.
The Web page does
not exist.
Check the address you typed or use
a search engine to find a new
address.
If the Web page does not appear or you get a warning
message, take a look at Table 1-3: Reasons a Page
Cannot Be Displayed for possible solutions.
Too many users are
viewing the Web page
at once.
Wait for a while (sometimes a few
minutes or sometimes a few hours)
and try again.
Other Ways to Enter a URL:
Press <Ctrl> + <L> or <Ctrl> + <O>, type the
Web address, and press < Enter>.
The server where the
Web page is stored
is down.
Wait for a while and try again.
1. Click the address bar. Type the URL in the address
bar and press <Enter>.
The Web page appears in the browser window.
Tip: URLs begin with a http:// prefix. In Internet
Explorer (and other Web browsers), this prefix
does not need to be entered.
Use AutoComplete in the address bar
If you can’t quite remember a URL, you can start typing it
in the address bar and AutoComplete will automatically
recall sites you’ve visited based on your entry. It searches
History, Favorites, and RSS Feeds for matches in the Web
site address or any part of the URL to what you type.
1. Click the address bar and begin typing.
Internet Explorer begins searching through your
History, Favorites, and RSS Feeds for matches based
on what you’ve typed.
2. Click the result that you want to view.
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© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Figure 1-3: AutoComplete results in the address bar.
Web Browsing Basics
Browsing the Web
The World Wide Web is remarkably easy to navigate. It’s
so easy that most users can browse Web pages without
any training, even if they have difficulty with other
computer programs.
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
• Exercise: Browse to www.yahoo.com and click the Autos
hyperlink. Return to the previous page. Go to
www.customguide.com and stop the transfer of information.
Refresh www.customguide.com.
This lesson explains how to find your way through the
millions of Web sites that are on the Internet.
Use hyperlinks
A journey of a million Web sites starts with a single page.
You could browse the Internet just through hyperlinks.
Clicking a hyperlink will:
Take you to a page within the same Web site.
Take you to a page in a different Web site.
Take you to a part of the same Web page.
Allow you to download a file.
Send an e-mail to a specific e-mail address.
Play a video, animation, or sound.
Whenever the cursor changes from an arrow to a pointing
hand, it is on a hyperlink.
1. Point to a hyperlink and click.
The browser displays the destination of the link.
Tip: Press <Ctrl> and click to open the link in a
new tab. Press <Shift> and click to open the link
in a new window.
Figure 1-4: The cursor changes shape when hovering
over a hyperlink.
Return to visited pages
Internet Explorer has several navigation controls that
make it easy to browse among pages you have visited.
1. Click the Back button.
The page you previously viewed appears.
Back button
Forward button
2. Click the Forward button.
Address bar
Show
Address bar
Stop
AutoComplete button
The page you viewed before clicking the Back button
appears.
Recent Pages
3. Click the Recent Pages button to see the last ten
pages you have viewed on a particular tab. Select a
page to view it.
Compatibility View
Refresh
button
Figure 1-5: Controls you can use for browsing in Internet
Explorer.
4. Click the Show Address bar AutoComplete list
arrow to see a list of URLs recently typed into the
address bar.
University of Salford
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Web Browsing Basics
Refresh a page
Sometimes a page is slow to load. This usually happens
when the computer that stores the Web page is handling a
lot of data (for example, when many people are trying to
view the page at once). Other times, changes are made to
a page that don’t take effect right away. In either of these
cases, refreshing the page may solve the problem.
Click the Refresh button.
The data for the Web page is automatically reset, and
the page loads again.
Other Ways to Refresh a Page:
Press the <F5> key.
Trap: In some cases, a Web page may load slowly
because it is sending information. If you are in the
middle of sending information, as in an online
purchase, do not refresh the Web page. You may
create a duplicate transaction or cancel the
transaction.
Stop a page transfer
If the Web page refuses to load, you may have to throw in
the towel and try it again later. The Stop button stops data
from transferring so you can navigate somewhere else.
Click the Stop button.
The data stops transferring and you can continue
browsing the Internet.
Other Ways to Stop a Page Transfer:
Press the <Esc> key.
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© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Web Browsing Basics
Browsing with Tabs
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
Tabs allow you to open multiple Web pages in a single
browser window. This makes it easy to switch between
Web pages and leaves more room on your taskbar.
Open a tab
• Exercise: Open tabs for www.customguide.com,
www.microsoft.com, and www.msn.com. Display all of the
open tabs in Quick Tabs. Close Quick Tabs and close the
www.microsoft.com tab.
New Tab
button
Internet Explorer starts with one tab open. You can open
additional tabs for pages you want to view.
Quick Tabs button
Close Tab
button
1. Click the New Tab button.
A new tab opens to the New Tab page.
Other Ways to Open a New Tab:
Press <Ctrl> + <T>. Or, press <Ctrl> as you
click a link to open it in a new tab.
The New Tab page is a convenient stepping off point
for browsing. You can use an accelerator, browse
with InPrivate, reopen a tab that was previously
closed in your browsing session, or reopen your last
browsing section.
2. Type a new URL into the address bar and press
<Enter>. Or, use one of the browsing links on the
New Tab page.
The new tab displays the Web page.
Tips

To view a tab, click it. Or, press <Ctrl> + <Tab> to
cycle through open tabs.
Figure 1-6: Two or more Web pages can be viewed in a
single window using tabbed browsing.
Use Quick Tabs
You can take a quick look at all of your tabs at once using
Quick Tabs. This is a single page that lets you view
thumbnails (small pictures) for the pages displayed in
each tab.
1. Click the Quick Tabs button.
The Quick Tabs view opens. Each Web page that is
open as a tab is displayed as a thumbnail preview.
Other Ways to Display Quick Tabs:
Press <Ctrl> + <Q>.
2. Click a thumbnail.
The tab with the Web page you selected appears.
Tip: Click the Title bar or press <Ctrl> + <Q> to
return to the Web page you were viewing before
opening Quick Tabs view.
Figure 1-7: The Quick Tabs view.
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Web Browsing Basics
Use Tab Groups
Tab groups let you see which Web pages have related
content. When one tab is opened from another, the new
tab is placed next to the originating tab and color-coded
so that you can quickly see which tabs have related
content.
If you close a tab that's part of a group, another tab from
the same group is displayed, so you remain within the
context of the current topic rather than suddenly looking
at an unrelated site.
1. Navigate to a Web page of your choice.
2. Right-click a hyperlink and select Open in New Tab
from the contextual menu.
Internet Explorer treats both the original tab and the
new tab as related tabs and assigns them the same
color.
Tip: To close a tab group, right-click any tab in
the group you want to close and select Close This
Tab Group.
Figure 1-8: Color-coded Tab Groups.
Close a tab
Once you are done using a tab, you can close it without
affecting the other tabs in the window.
1. Click the tab.
The tab must be active in order to close it.
2. Click the Close Tab button.
The tab closes.
Other Ways to Close a Tab:
Press <Ctrl> + <W>. Or, click the Close Tab
button in Quick Tabs view. You can also rightclick the tab and select Close Tab from the
contextual menu.
Tip: To close all tabs except one, right-click the
tab that you would like to keep open and select
Close Other Tabs from the contextual menu.
Tip: To reopen a tab you just closed, right click
any tab and select Reopen Closed Tab from the
contextual menu.
Tips

16
You can disable tabbed browsing altogether. Click
Tools and select Internet Options. On the General
tab, click the Settings button under the Tabs section
and uncheck the Enable Tabbed Browsing check
box.
© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Table 1-4: Tabbed Browsing Keyboard Shortcuts
Open a New Tab
<Ctrl> + <T>
Open a Duplicate Tab
<Ctrl> + <K>
Open a Link in a New Tab
<Ctrl> + Hyperlink
Display Quick Tabs
<Ctrl> + <Q>
Close a Tab
<Ctrl> + <W>
Reopen a Closed Tab
<Ctrl> + <Shift> + <T>
Cycle through Tabs
<Ctrl> + <Tab>
Web Browsing Basics
Searching the Web with a
Search Engine
There are millions of Web pages on the Internet, and
they’re not kept in any particular order. Fortunately, Web
sites called search engines catalog and index the Web
pages on the Internet so you can find information on the
topics that interest you.
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
• Exercise: Use a search engine to find information about
Abraham Lincoln.
This lesson teaches you how to search the Web to find the
pages you are looking for.
1. Enter the URL of the search engine that you want to
use in the address bar and press <Enter>.
The search engine appears in the browser window.
For a list of search engines, see Table 1-5: Popular
Search Engines.
2. Type the word or phrase you want to search for in the
search engine’s search box and press <Enter>.
A list of search results appears in the browser
window.
3. Click the hyperlink pertaining to the search results
that you want to view.
Figure 1-9: Google search results.
Table 1-5: Popular Search Engines
www.google.com
Google is consistently ranked as having
the most relevant search results and has
become the largest name in search
engines.
www.yahoo.com
Yahoo supplies a number of other
services from its search page, including
broad topics that can be narrowed down
and browsed like a telephone directory.
www.bing.com
Bing is Microsoft’s search engine which
offers several services along with their
search engine.
search.aol.com
This is the default search engine for
America Online subscribers.
The Web page appears in the browser window.
Tips

Most search engines also provide links to images,
videos, and other resources that are relevant to your
search terms. Just click the link in the search engine
home page or the results page.
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Web Browsing Basics
Searching the Web with the
Search Box
The search box makes it easy to search the Web. It always
appears next to the address bar, so you can search from
any Web page or tab without having to go to a search
engine beforehand.
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
• Exercise: Use the search box to find information about
William Shakespeare. Add a new search provider to your
search box.
Search
box
Use the search box
The search box is a great starting point for your searches.
It is easy to access and it is flexible, allowing you to
search among different search engines and providers.
1. Click the search box and type the word or phrase for
which you want to search.
Notice that as you type, a list of relevant suggestions
appears below the search box. Visual suggestions,
which show up as small images next to a suggestion,
may also appear. You can click one of these
suggestions at any time to begin a search for that
word or phrase.
Tip: If you are looking for a specific phrase, (for
example, ―I Have a Dream‖) you can group the
words of the phrase together by putting them in
quotation marks in the text box. Then the search
engine will only search for results that match the
entire phrase.
2. Press <Enter>.
The search is executed and search results are
displayed in the browser window.
Tip: Press <Alt> + <Enter> to search in a new
tab.
Other Ways to Execute a Search:
Click the Search button at the right side of the
Search box.
3. Click the hyperlink for the search result you want
to view.
The Web page appears in the browser window.
Figure 1-10: Search suggestions, including visual
suggestions, appear below the search box.
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© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Search
button
Web Browsing Basics
Add a search box provider
The search box uses Bing as its default search provider,
but you can change the search provider and even add
search providers to the list.
1. Click the search box list arrow and select Find More
Providers from the list.
The Add-ons Gallery: Search Providers Web page
appears.
2. Click the Add to Internet Explorer button for the
search provider you would like to use.
The Add Search Provider dialog box appears. There
are two check boxes here:
Make this my default search provider: Select
this check box to make all searches run through
this provider, unless otherwise specified.
Use search suggestions from this provider: This
is selected by default. Keep it checked if you want
suggestions from this provider to appear as you
type in the search box.
3. Verify search provider and click Add.
The search provider is added to the search box list.
Tips

To modify or remove search providers, click the
Tools button on the Command Bar and select
Manage Add-ons. Select Search Providers from the
Add-on Types list, and select the search provider with
which you want to work.
Figure 1-11: You can select from multiple search engines
in the search box.
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Web Browsing Basics
Searching Within a Web Page
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
Internet Explorer makes finding information on a Web
page easier with its Find On Page function.
• Exercise: Go to www.microsoft.com. Search for the word
―Windows‖ on the Microsoft home page.
In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use the Find On Page
function to find a specific word or phrase on a Web page.
Highlight All
Matches
1. Press <Ctrl> + <F>.
The Find On Page toolbar appears below the tab. A
cursor also appears in the Find text box.
Close
Find textbox
Options
Other Ways to Search Within a Web Page:
Press the <Alt> key, click the Edit menu and
select Find on this Page.
2. Type the word or phrase for which you want to search
and press <Enter>.
Internet Explorer searches the entire Web page as you
type. Matches are highlighted in yellow. The number
of matches appears at the far right of the Find On
Page toolbar.
If Internet Explorer does not find a match, the Find
On Page toolbar indicates ―No Matches Found.‖
Tip: To turn off highlighting, click the Highlight
All Matches button.
Tip: To be more specific in your searches, click
the Options button on the Find On Page toolbar
and select Match Whole Word Only or Match
Case.
3. Click Next or Previous to move between your
matches.
When you’re finished finding matches on the page,
close the Find On Page toolbar.
4. Click the Close button on the Find On Page toolbar.
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© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Found text
Figure 1-12: The Find On Page toolbar appears below the
tab of the Web page you are browsing.
Web Browsing Basics Review
Quiz Questions
1.
What is ARPANET?
A. The 1960s network developed by the U.S. to back up its computer systems.
B. An insurance plan for AARP members.
C. The system for sharing documents over the Internet.
D. A computer that makes Web pages available on the Internet 24 hours a day.
2.
Computers that store Web pages are known as:
A. Standardized protocols
B. University libraries
C. Mega-puters
D. Web servers
3.
The ____________ displays the name of the active Web page.
A. Title bar
B. Favorites bar
C. Command bar
D. Tabbed browsing
4.
Which of these is NOT a reason that a Web page would not load?
A. You have misspelled the Web address.
B. There are too many people viewing the Web page at one time.
C. You have lost your connection to the Internet.
D. The Internet is temporarily closed for cleaning.
5.
If you do not type http:// before a Web address, Internet Explorer will add it for you. (True or False?)
6.
The Refresh button:
A. Shows a number of Web pages related to the one you are currently viewing.
B. Will reload a Web page.
C. Lets your computer take a five minute break between tasks.
D. Restores a Web page to the way it looked when it was first created.
7.
The Back button will bring you to the last Web page you viewed. (True or False?)
8.
You must double-click a hyperlink to activate it. (True or False?)
9.
Quick Tabs allow you to:
A. Quickly open a group of tabs that were saved to your Favorites.
B. View all of your tabs as thumbnails on one page.
C. Quickly disable tabbed browsing in Internet Explorer
D. View the current charges you owe to your Internet Service Provider.
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10.
If you close a tab:
A. Nothing happens.
B. The other tabs will remain open.
C. All of the tabs will close.
D. You get to watch an informative video on the uses of tabbed browsing.
11.
Search engines allow you to search for Web pages that contain a key word or phrase. (True or False?)
12.
Which search providers can you add to your search box?
A. Google
B. Wikipedia
C. Amazon
D. All of the above
13.
The Find On Page function:
A. Uses Bing to search the Internet for Web pages related to a specific word or phrase.
B. Finds the lowest price of a product online.
C. Allows you find each instance of a specific word or phrase on a Web page.
D. Finds the best search engine so you can find the information you are looking for.
Quiz Answers
1.
A. ARPANET is the 1960s network developed by the U.S. to back up its computer systems.
2.
D. Computers that store Web pages are known as Web servers.
3.
A. Title bar. The Title bar displays the name of the active Web page.
4.
D. If a Web page does not load, it may mean that you have lost your connection to the Internet, you have misspelled
the Web address, there are too many people viewing the Web page at once, or there is a problem with the computer the
Web page is stored on.
5.
True. You do not need to enter http:// before an address because Internet Explorer will add it for you.
6.
B. The Refresh button will reload a Web page. This is useful if the page is loading slowly or if new information has
come in since you opened it.
7.
True. The Back button brings you to the last Web page you viewed.
8.
False. Click a hyperlink once to activate it.
9.
B. Quick Tabs allow you to view all of your tabs as thumbnails on a single page.
10.
B. If you close a tab, the other tabs will remain open.
11.
True. Search engines catalog and index Web pages on the Internet so when you enter a key word or phrase, a list of
relevant Web pages will be displayed in the search results.
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© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
12.
D. You can add all of those search providers, including many more, by clicking Find More Providers in the Search
box.
13.
C. The Find On Page function allows you to search for a word or phrase on a Web page and highlights each instance in
yellow.
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More Browser
Features
Changing the Home Page ................................. 25
Using Favorites .................................................. 26
Add a Favorite to the Favorites Center .... 26
View Favorites ......................................... 27
Managing Favorites ........................................... 28
Organize favorites .................................... 28
Add a button to the Favorites bar ............ 28
Use Suggested Sites ............................... 29
Using RSS Feeds ............................................... 30
Subscribe to an RSS feed ....................... 30
View subscribed feeds ............................. 31
Change feed settings ............................... 31
Using Browsing History .................................... 32
View your browsing history ...................... 32
Delete browsing history ........................... 32
Using Add-ons ................................................... 34
Use accelerators ...................................... 34
Save Web Slices ...................................... 34
Find other Add-ons .................................. 35
Using Compatibility View .................................. 36
Changing Your View .......................................... 37
Use Zoom ................................................ 37
Change text size ...................................... 37
Setup a Web Page for Printing ......................... 38
Previewing and Printing Web Pages ............... 39
Use Print Preview .................................... 39
Quick print a Web page ........................... 40
Print a Web page ..................................... 40
Downloading Program Files ............................. 41
Downloading Data Files and Images ............... 43
Download data files ................................. 43
Download images .................................... 43
24
© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
3
Simple Web browsing and searching
brings a lot of information to your
fingertips. However, you will find after a
very short time that there are certain Web
sites that you visit more frequently than
others. You’ll also find a lot of interesting
programs that you may want to download
and use on your computer. Finally, you’ll
also want to use the Internet for
communicating via e-mail with friends
and family. Internet Explorer 8 includes
many enhancements that will help you get
the most out of your experience
navigating the World Wide Web.
In this chapter you’ll learn how to
bookmark your favorite Web sites,
subscribe to site content that is frequently
updated, and view your history so you can
get back to that Web site whose name you
may have forgotten.
More Browser Features
Changing the Home Page
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
If you find that you make a beeline to the same Web page
every time you get online, you might want to make it your
home page. The home page is the page that appears as
soon as you open your browser.
• Exercise: Set www.google.com as your home page.
1. Browse to the page you’d like to make your home
page. If you want to use additional pages as your
home page, open them in additional tabs.
2. Click the Tools button on the Command Bar and
select Internet Options.
The General tab of the Internet Options dialog box
appears. Notice that there are several options for
setting the home page:
Use current: The current Web page and any
additional pages currently open in tabs become
the new home page(s).
Use default: Revert to the default home page:
www.msn.com.
Use blank: No Web page is displayed for the
home page.
3. Click the Use current button.
Figure 2-1: Change home page settings in the Internet
Options dialog box.
The URL for the current Web page is listed in the
box. If you are using multiple home pages, each URL
is listed on its own line.
4. Click OK.
The page(s) are saved as your home page
Other Ways to Change Your Home Page:
Browse to the Web page, click the Home button
list arrow on the Command Bar, and select Add
or Change Home Page. Select an option from the
Add or Change Home Page dialog box and click
Yes.
Figure 2-2: The Add or Change Home Page dialog box.
Tips

Whenever you click the Home button on the
Command Bar, you return to your home page.

Internet Explorer’s default home page is
www.msn.com.
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More Browser Features
Using Favorites
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
When you find a Web page that you want to return to
frequently, you may want an easy way to get back to it.
Internet Explorer provides you a place to save those Web
pages: the Favorites Center. In this lesson, you’ll learn
how to save and view your favorite Web pages.
• Exercise: Open the www.customguide.com Web page and
add it to your Favorites.
Add a Favorite to the Favorites Center
Microsoft has already added a selection of Microsoft Web
pages to your Favorites. Here’s how to add some of your
own choices to the collection:
1. Open the page you want to add as a favorite.
The Web page is displayed.
Add to Favorites Bar button
Favorites button
2. Click the Favorites button on the Favorites Bar.
Get More Add-ons button
Suggested Sites button
The Favorites Center appears.
3. Click the Add to Favorites button.
Figure 2-3: The Favorites Bar.
The Add a Favorite dialog box appears.
Other Ways to Add a Favorite:
Press <Ctrl> + <D>.
Tip: You can add a number of Web sites to the
Favorites list at once. Display them all on tabs and
click the Favorites button on the Favorites Bar.
Click the Add to Favorites button list arrow and
select Add Current Tabs to Favorites.
4. (Optional) Type a nickname for the Web page in the
Name text box.
The nickname should be something that is easy to
recognize later. Many Web pages automatically have
a nickname that works well.
Now you need to specify where you want to save the
Web page within your Favorites.
5. Click the Create in list arrow and select the folder
where you want to save the Web page.
Saving Favorites in folders makes it easy to find the
favorite when you need it. If you don’t choose a
folder, it will be saved in the Favorites folder.
Tip: If an appropriate folder does not already
exist, click New Folder to create a new one.
6. Click Add.
The Web page is added to the Favorites Center.
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Figure 2-4: The Add a Favorite dialog box appears when
you add a favorite.
More Browser Features
View Favorites
Once a Favorite has been added, you can view it by
accessing it from the Favorites Center.
1. Click the Favorites button on the Favorites Bar.
The Favorites Center appears.
Other Ways to Open the Favorites Center:
Press <Ctrl> + <I>.
2. Click the Favorite you’d like to view.
The Web page is displayed.
Tip: To display all of the pages saved within a
folder as separate tabs, click the Open Tab
Group button to the right of the folder name in
the Favorites Center.
Figure 2-5: Select a Favorite from the Favorites Center to
view it in the browser.
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More Browser Features
Managing Favorites
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
Favorites is such a handy feature that it can sometimes be
overrun with saved Web sites, making it difficult to find
what you’re looking for. If this happens, you should
organize your Favorites so that you can easily find them.
This lesson shows you how to manage your Favorites to
get the most out of them.
• Exercise: Open the www.customguide.com Web page and
add it to your Favorites. Create a new folder for
CustomGuide in your Favorites, and add the
www.customguide.com favorite to that folder.
Organize Favorites
Keeping track of your Favorites may seem like a big task.
Thankfully, there’s a window dedicated solely to keeping
them organized.
1. Click the Favorites button on the Favorites Bar, click
the Add to Favorites list arrow button in the
Favorites Center, and select Organize Favorites.
The Organize Favorites dialog box appears, with a
list of folders in alphabetical order.
2. Organize your Favorites.
You can create a new folder, or move, rename, or
delete the current Web pages and folders in your
Favorites Center.
Tip: You can move an entire folder into another
folder. For example, you may want to put folders
for North American Travel, European Travel, and
South American Travel within a folder called
Travel.
3. Click Close.
Figure 2-6: Organize Favorites in the Organize Favorites
dialog box.
Button added to Favorites Bar
The Organize Favorites dialog box closes.
Add a button to the Favorites Bar
The Favorites Bar lets you quickly access your most
visited pages.
1. Open the page you want to add to your Favorites Bar.
2. Click the Add to Favorites Bar button on the
Favorites Bar.
The Web page appears as a button on the Favorites
Bar.
Other Ways to Add a Button to the Favorites
Bar:
Click the Favorites button, click the Add to
Favorites button list arrow, and select Add to
Favorites Bar.
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© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Figure 2-7: Add a Web page to the Favorites Bar.
More Browser Features
Tips

To delete a button from the Favorites Bar, right-click
the button and select Delete from the contextual
menu.
Use Suggested Sites
The Favorites Bar includes another interesting tool:
Suggested Sites. Suggested Sites recommends Web sites
you might find interesting based on your browsing
history.
1. Click the Suggested Sites button in the Favorites Bar.
A list of five suggested sites appears.
Tip: Suggested Sites uses your browsing history
to make suggestions. When you first use
Suggested Sites, there might not be enough
history for the service to offer you suggestions.
2. Select the Web site you want to visit.
The Web site appears in the active tab.
Tips

If you want to turn Suggested Sites on or off, click
the Tools button on the Command Bar and select
Suggested Sites. If a check mark appears next to the
Suggested Sites option, Suggested Sites is turned on.
Figure 2-8: Suggested Sites recommends Web pages
based on your browsing history.
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More Browser Features
Using RSS Feeds
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
Many Web sites, such as blogs or news sites, frequently
update content for their readers. While you could add the
Web site as a favorite in Internet Explorer’s Favorite
Center, you may find it easier to subscribe to the site’s
RSS feed.
• Exercise: Go to http://news.bbc.co.uk and subscribe to the
RSS feed. View the feed from the Favorites Center. Change
the feed settings so it checks for updates every 4 hours.
RSS Feeds button
RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication. It provides a
simple way for Web publishers to automatically distribute
the content on their Web site. That content may include:
Articles
Pictures
Video, or
Audio, such as podcasts.
When you subscribe to an RSS feed, Internet Explorer
downloads new content as it is posted. So, if you
subscribe to several feeds, you can check them all and
view only the content that you want to view.
In this lesson, you’ll learn how to subscribe to RSS feeds
and how to check the feeds for new content.
Subscribe to an RSS feed
1. Open the Web site that offers the feed to which you
want to subscribe.
Figure 2-9: The Feeds button appears in the Command
Bar on Web sites that offer RSS feeds.
If the Web site offers feeds, the orange RSS feeds
button appears on the Command Bar.
2. Click the Feeds button in the Command Bar.
A list of the site’s available feeds appears.
Other Ways to View Available Feeds:
Press <Alt> + <J>.
3. Click the Subscribe to this feed link for each of the
feeds to which you want to subscribe.
The Subscribe to this Feed dialog box appears. Here,
you have the option of changing the name of the feed
and assigning the feed to a folder.
4. Click Subscribe.
Internet Explorer confirms that you’ve successfully
subscribed to the feed.
Tip: You can add the feed to your Favorites Bar
by clicking the Add to Favorites Bar check box.
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© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Figure 2-10: The window showing the site’s available
feeds.
More Browser Features
View subscribed feeds
Once you subscribe to a feed, you can view it in much the
same way you would a Favorite.
1. Click the Favorites button on the Favorites Bar and
click the Feeds tab in the Favorites Center.
A list of feeds you are subscribed to appears.
Tip: Feeds with new content appear in bold text
in the Feeds tab.
2. Click a feed to view new content.
A list of headlines and/or full articles appears.
3. Click a headline to view the to the Web site’s RSS
feed page.
Figure 2-11: The Subscribe to this Feed dialog box.
Change feed settings
1. Click the Tools button on the Command Bar and
select Internet Options.
The Internet Options dialog box appears.
2. Click the Content tab, then click the Settings button
in the Feeds and Web Slices section of the dialog box.
The Feed and Web Slice Settings dialog box appears.
Here, you can change how often Internet Explorer
checks the feeds for new content and choose
advanced settings.
Advanced feed settings include:
Automatically mark feed as read when reading a
feed.
Play a sound when a feed is found for a Web site.
Figure 2-12: The Feeds tab in the Favorites Center.
Play a sound when a monitored feed is updated.
3. Select the settings you wish to use and click OK
Internet Explorer applies your changes and closes the
dialog box.
Table 2-1: Popular RSS Feeds
BBC World News
The latest international news from the
BBC.
CNN.com
Top stories from around the world
from the cable news network.
Wired Top Stories
The latest science and technology
news.
Dictionary.com
Word of the Day
Learn a new word every day!
The New York
Times Home Page
Breaking news, world news, and
multimedia.
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More Browser Features
Using Browsing History
Let’s say you found a great Web site yesterday on custombuilt ice sculptures. It would make a wonderful
anniversary gift, but you can’t remember the Web address.
Internet Explorer saves the history of your Web browsing
for just such an occasion.
View your browsing history
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
• Exercise: View your browsing history, and then delete it.
History tab
Pin the Favorites Center button
You can find a history of every Web page you’ve visited
for the last several weeks in the Favorites Center.
1. Click the Favorites button on the toolbar.
View By list
arrow
The Favorites Center appears.
2. Click the History tab.
Your browsing history appears, grouped by date.
Other Ways to Open Your Browsing History:
Press <Ctrl> + <H>.
3. Click the View By list arrow.
A list of ways to view your history appears. See Table
2-2: Viewing Browser History for the list of options
you have for browsing your history.
4. Click a folder.
The pages saved in the fold are listed.
5. Click a specific Web page.
Figure 2-13: The History tab in the Favorites Center.
The page appears in the browser window.
Delete browsing history
Of course, if you know how the browsing history works,
your spouse might know too. To keep the ice sculpture
gift a secret, you’ll have to remove the Web page from
your browsing history or delete the history entirely.
1. Click the Safety button on the Command Bar and
select Delete Browsing History.
The Delete Browsing History dialog box appears.
You can delete the following:
Temporary Internet Files: Copies of Web sites
you have viewed that are saved so they load faster
when you return.
Cookies: Files stored that save data such as login
information.
History: A list of Web pages you have visited.
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Table 2-2: Viewing Browser History
View by Date
Sorts your history by date, showing the
oldest first.
View by Site
Alphabetically sorts folders for the sites
you visited in ascending order.
View by Most
Visited
Shows a list of your most frequently
visited Web sites in order of most visited.
View by Order
Visited Today
Shows a list of all of the Web sites you
visited today, showing the most recently
visited sites first.
Search History
Searches your history.
More Browser Features
Form Data: Information that has been typed into
forms.
Passwords: Some sites automatically fill in
passwords on your return visit.
InPrivate Filtering Data: Collects information
and uses it to determine if Web sites are sharing
information about your visit with a third party.
2. Select the check boxes for the items you want to
delete.
3. Click Delete.
The browsing history is deleted.
Other Ways to Delete Your Browsing History:
You can also delete one item at a time from your
history. Open the History tab, right-click the item
and select Delete from the contextual menu.
Figure 2-14: The Delete Browsing History dialog box.
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More Browser Features
Using Add-ons
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
Add-ons let you personalize your browser by adding Web
sites, toolbars, and other features to Internet Explorer.
Two add-ons that are included with IE 8 are accelerators
and Web Slices.
• Exercise: Go to www.customguide.com and use the Map
with Live Search accelerator to find CustomGuide’s
location. Explore the Add-ons Gallery.
Accelerator
icon
Use accelerators
While looking at a museum’s Web site you want to see
how close it is to your house. Instead of navigating to
another Web site to find that information, you can use an
accelerator. New in IE 8, an accelerator allows you to
highlight a word or phrase on one page and jump to
another page with that word or phrase.
1. Navigate to a Web page in the browser window.
2. Highlight the word or phrase that you want to use.
The Accelerator icon appears.
3. Click the Accelerator icon.
A contextual menu appears. Default options include
blogging, e-mailing, mapping, and searching for the
word or phrase.
Highlighted text
4. Select the action you would like to take.
A new Web page opens in a new tab.
Tips

To get additional accelerators and disable and remove
default accelerators, click the Tools button on the
Command Bar and select Manage Add-ons. Select
Accelerators to manage your accelerators.
Contextual menu
Figure 2-15: Use an accelerator to get more information
on a word or phrase.
Web Slice
Web Slice icon
Save Web Slices
There are some Web pages you may check many times a
day for updates. You can add these pages as Web Slices.
Internet Explorer alerts you when a Web Slice is updated.
1. Navigate to a Web page in the browser window.
Not all Web sites have Web Slices available. If the
green Web Slice icon appears in the Command Bar,
then the Web site is Web Slice enabled.
2. Click the Web Slice icon in the Command Bar.
The Internet Explorer dialog box appears.
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© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Figure 2-16: Click the Web Slice icon to add this page as
a Web Slice.
More Browser Features
3. Click the Add to Favorites Bar button in the Internet
Explorer dialog box.
A new button appears in your Favorites Bar. When
the Web Slice is updated, the button will appear in
bold on the Favorites Bar.
See Table 2-3: Helpful Web Slices for some
commonly-used Web Slices.
Tips

If you want to delete a Web Slice from your Favorites
Bar, right-click the Web Slice and select Delete from
the contextual menu.
Table 2-3: Helpful Web Slices
Weather from Bing
Provides weather updates
MSN Headlines
Provides the latest headlines from
MSN.
Finance from Bing
Provides recent stock quotes
Traffic from Bing
Get traffic updates from Bing
New York Times
Latest News
Provides headlines from the New
York Times
Find other Add-ons
There are other add-ons that can change the appearance of
your browser or provide you with additional tools. Follow
these steps to find more add-ons:
1. Click the Get More Add-ons button on the Favorites
Bar.
A list of add-ons appears.
2. Click the Find more in the Internet Explorer Addons Gallery link.
The Add-ons Gallery appears. You can search the
gallery, browse through categories for helpful addons, or search for specific Internet Explorer 8 Addons.
Other Ways to Find Other Add-ons:
Type www.ieaddons.com in the address bar
and press <Enter>.
The Find more in the Internet Explorer Add-ons Gallery link
Figure 2-17: The Get More Add-ons button suggests
various add-ons and provides a link to the Add-ons
Gallery.
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More Browser Features
Using Compatibility View
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
Not all Web sites were designed with the newest version
of Internet Explorer, IE 8, in mind. As a result, you might
run into a few compatibility problems. Some Web sites
that were designed for older browsers may not display
properly: the menus might not be in the right place, the
images might be blurry, or the text may not be sized
correctly. To view these Web sites, IE 8 provides
Compatibility View.
• Exercise: Turn on Compatibility View for
www.yahoo.com.
Compatibility View button
Click the Tools button on the Command Bar and
select Compatibility View.
The page appears correctly in the browser.
Other Ways to Turn on Compatibility View:
Click the Compatibility View button in the
address bar.
Tips

Microsoft provides automatic updates for Web sites
with known issues. These updates are downloaded if
you have automatic updates enabled.

You can see a list of all the Web sites you have
viewed in Compatibility View. Click the Tools button
on the Command Bar and select Compatibility View
Settings. Once you’ve turned on Compatibility View
for a Web site, Internet Explorer will remember that
you’ve turned it on.
Compatibility View
options and settings
Figure 2-18: If a Web site does not display correctly, use
Compatibility View.
Figure 2-19: The Compatibility View Settings dialog box
displays sites you’ve viewed in Compatibility View.
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More Browser Features
Changing Your View
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
Web pages with small text and images can be very
difficult to read. Internet Explorer has two features that
allow you to manually adjust the appearance of Web
pages so that they are easier on your eyes: Zoom and Text
Size.
• Exercise: Go to www.lifehacker.com. Zoom to 200% and
then back to 100%. Change the text size to Largest. Return
the text size to Medium.
In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use Zoom to zoom in or
out on a Web page. You will also learn how to change the
size of the text.
Use Zoom
All Web pages appear at 100 percent of their size by
default. When you zoom in, you increase the size of all
content on the Web page. By contrast, when you zoom
out, you decrease the size of all content on the Web page.
1. Click the Page button on the Command Bar, point to
Zoom, and select a zoom level from the menu.
The Web page zooms in or out depending on your
selection.
Figure 2-20: Standard view of a Web page: 100% Zoom,
Medium Text Size.
Other Ways to Zoom:
Press <Ctrl> + <+> to Zoom In or press <Ctrl> +
<-> to Zoom Out. Or, you can click the Change
zoom level list arrow in the lower right corner of
the browser window and make a selection from
the contextual menu.
Tip: You can customize the Zoom magnitude by
clicking the Custom option and entering your
own zoom percentage.
Change text size
Contrary to zooming, when you change the size of text in
your browser window, you are not changing the size of
any other elements, such as images, on the Web page.
1. Click the Page button on the Command Bar, point to
Text Size, and select a text size from the menu.
Figure 2-21: Zoom: The Web page with 200% Zoom and
Medium Text Size.
The text size increases or decreases in size depending
on your selection.
Tip: The text size may not change on some Web
Sites. Try zooming in or out instead.
Tips

Whenever you use one of these features, they will
apply to all Web sites that you visit. To return to your
default view, change the Zoom percentage to 100%
and the text size to Medium.
Figure 2-22: Text Size: The Web page with 100% Zoom
and Largest Text Size.
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More Browser Features
Setup a Web Page for Printing
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
Web sites are not designed to be printed; they are
designed to look good on your display. There will come a
time, however, when you’ll want to print out a Web page,
whether it is a receipt for an item that you purchased or an
article that you are using for research. In this lesson,
you’ll learn how adjust the setup of a Web page and
include additional information in the headers and footers.
• Exercise: Go to www.msn.com and click on any news
article. Add Time to the middle of the Footer. Change the
margins to one inch on all sides.
1. Go to the Web page that you would like to print.
2. Click the Print button list arrow on the Command
Bar and select Page Setup.
The Page Setup dialog box appears. Here, you can
specify setup options. See Table 2-4: Sections in the
Page Setup Dialog Box for a list of changes you can
make to the printed appearance of Web pages.
3. Specify setup options, then click OK.
The Page Setup dialog box closes and the Web page
is ready to print.
Tip: Many Web sites provide an option for
printing a page, like a receipt, that is more printerfriendly that the regular Web page. You don’t have
to change page setup settings with this option.
Figure 2-23: The Page Setup dialog box.
Table 2-4: Sections in the Page Setup Dialog Box
Paper Options
Page Size: Change the size of the paper on which you are going to print the Web page.
Portrait: Orients the page vertically.
Landscape: Orients the page horizontally.
Print Background Colors and Images: Off by default, this option allows you to print the colors or images
underlying the text on the Web page. Keeping this option unchecked allows you to save ink or toner in your
printer.
Enable Shrink to Fit: Automatically shrinks the Web page so that it fits the selected paper size.
Margins (inches)
Adjust the size of the margins (in inches) on the left, right, top, and bottom of the page.
Headers and Footers
Header: Change the information that appears in the header of the printed Web page.
Footer: Change the information that appears in the footer of the printed Web page.
Change Font: Change the text’s font on the printout.
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More Browser Features
Previewing and Printing Web
Pages
Before you print out a Web page, it’s a good idea to see
how it will look before you hit the Print button.
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
• Exercise: Go to www.msn.com. Click on a news article.
Print Preview the article and then print the article.
Use Print Preview
1. Navigate to the Web page that you would like to
print.
2. Click the Print button list arrow on the Command
Bar and select Print Preview.
The Print Preview window appears and the Web page
is shown in Preview mode.
Tip: Use the commands on the Print Preview
toolbar to adjust the page setup settings.
3. Click the Print Preview window’s Close button to
return to the Web site.
Tip: You can print directly from the Print Preview
window by clicking the Print button on the
Command Bar.
Table 2-5: Print Preview Commands
Print
Prints the Web page.
Portrait
Orients the page vertically.
Landscape
Orients the page horizontally.
Page Setup
Opens the Page Setup dialog box.
Turn headers and footers
on and off
Display additional information about the Web page at the top and bottom of the
page.
View Full Width
Zoom the Web page to the full width of the print preview screen.
View Full Page
Zoom out to show the full page in the print preview screen.
Show Multiple Pages
View multiple pages on the preview screen.
Change Print Size
Stretch or shrink the Web page to fit the printed page.
First Page / Last Page
Go to the first page/last page.
Previous Page / Next
Page
Go to the previous page/next page.
Adjust margin
Change the page margins by dragging the horizontal and vertical markers.
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More Browser Features
Quick print a Web page
Quick printing a Web page bypasses the Print dialog box
and sends the document directly to the printer.
1. Click the Print button on the Command Bar.
Print a Web page
1. Click the Print button list arrow on the Command
Bar and select Print.
The Print dialog box appears. Here you can specify
print options. See Table 2-6: Settings in the Print
Dialog Box for options that you can change.
Other Ways to Print:
Press <Ctrl> + <P>.
2. Specify printing options, then click Print.
The Web page is sent to your printer.
Figure 2-24: The Print dialog box.
Table 2-6: Settings in the Print Dialog Box
Select Printer
Used to select what printer to send your document to when it prints. If you are connected to more than one printer,
the currently selected printer is displayed.
Preferences button: Displays a dialog box with options available to your specific printer. The Properties dialog
box will change according to the type of printer you use, but here are some common print properties:
Paper Size: Change the size of the paper you’re printing to.
Orientation: Change the paper orientation (portrait or landscape) or print on both sides of the sheet.
Color/Mono: Print in black and white or choose how you want to print colors in your document.
Page range
Allows you to specify what pages you want to print. There are several options here:
All: Prints the entire document.
Current page: Prints only the page you’re currently on.
Selection: Prints only selected document content.
Pages: Prints only the pages you specify. Select a range of pages with a hyphen (5-8) and separate single pages
with a comma (3,7).
Number of copies
40
Specifies the number of copies you want to print.
© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
More Browser Features
Downloading Program Files
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
There are countless Web sites that offer program files that
you can download for installation on your computer. Each
site makes programs available in a different way. In fact,
most Web sites provide instructions for the best way to
download a program, but for most files there are only a
few basic steps to follow.
• Exercise: Go to http://download.cnet.com. Find and
download any program.
You can identify program files by looking for the .exe and
.msi file extensions. Larger program files may be
compressed in a zip folder that ends with the .zip file
extension.
Trap: There are some dangers to downloading
content, so make sure your computer has an antivirus program installed before you download
anything. The most common file types to carry a
virus end with the following file extensions: .exe,
.scr, .bat, .com, or .pif.
1. Click the download link for the program.
The File Download dialog box appears asking if you
would like to Run or Save the file. The difference
between the Run and Save commands is small but
significant:
Run: Internet Explorer automatically downloads
the program and begins the program installation
process.
Save: The Save As dialog box appears. Select the
location on your local hard drive where you
would like to save the file. To begin the program
installation, open the location where you saved
the file and double-click the downloaded file.
Figure 2-25: A warning will appear when you try to
download an executable (.exe) file.
Tip: The Information Bar may appear and block
the download before the File Download dialog
box appears. If this happens, click the
Information Bar and select Download File from
the menu.
Tip: Saving is a better option for large files that
take a long time to download.
2. Click the Run or Save button.
The file downloads to your computer.
Once the download is completed, follow the
instructions provided or begin the installation
process.
Other Ways to Download a Program:
Right-click the link to the program you want to
download. From the contextual menu, select Save
Target As. Select the folder in which you would
Figure 2-26: Windows displays the progress of a
download.
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More Browser Features
like to save the file. Rename the file, if desired,
and click Save.
Tips

Downloading large files from the Internet can take a
long time—especially if you use a dial-up
connection.

Not all downloads are free, especially software
upgrades and programs. Be sure to check if there is a
cost associated with downloading a program.

Downloading and installing new program files may
require administrator privileges. If you find that you
cannot download and/or install a program, contact
your system administrator.
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More Browser Features
Downloading Data Files and
Images
As you browse the Web, you will encounter data files to
download, or transfer, to your computer for use by your
programs. These data files include images, music,
documents, and more. Each site makes files available in a
different way, but for most data files there are a few basic
steps to follow to download a file.
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
• Exercise: Go to www.google.com and look for a picture
of your favorite animal using Google images. Download the
picture.
In this lesson you will learn how to transfer files and
images to your computer.
Trap: There are some dangers to downloading
content, so make sure your computer has an antivirus program installed before you download
anything. The most common file types to carry a
virus end with the following file extensions: .exe,
.scr, .bat, .com, or .pif.
Download data files
Downloading files is very simple process: just click the
link to begin the download.
1. Click the download link for the file.
The File Download dialog box appears. You have the
option of opening the file or saving the file.
Open: Opens the file in the default program
assigned to handle the file’s type. For example, if
the file is a Word document, the Microsoft Office
Word program will open and display the
document.
Save: Downloads the file and saves the file to the
location that you specify. To open or use the file,
open the location where you saved the file and
double-click on the downloaded file.
Figure 2-27: The File Download dialog box.
2. Click the Open or Save button.
The data file downloads to your computer.
Other Ways to Download a Program:
Right-click the link to the data file you want to
download. From the contextual menu, select Save
Target As. Select the folder in which you would
like to save the file. Rename the file, if desired,
and click Save.
Download images
Downloading images is a little trickier than downloading
other data files, but just as simple.
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More Browser Features
1. Right-click the picture or image and select Save
Picture As from the contextual menu.
The Save Picture dialog box appears.
2. Select the location to which you want to save the
image and click Save.
The image downloads and is saved to your computer.
Trap: Be careful when using downloaded images
elsewhere. The image may be copyrighted. If you
are unsure, it is best to ask the Webmaster from
whom you downloaded the image for permission
to use it.
Other Ways to Download a Program:
Right-click the link to the image you want to
download. From the contextual menu, select Save
Target As. Select the folder in which you would
like to save the file. Rename the file, if desired,
and click Save.
Tips

Downloading large files from the Internet can take a
long time—especially if you use a dial-up
connection.

Not all downloads are free, especially software
upgrades and programs. Be sure to check if there is a
cost associated with downloading a file.

Data files require special programs in order to be
used. Make sure you have the required programs
before you download.

Some document files open directly in your browser
window instead of downloading to your computer.
This is common with text (.txt) files and portable
document format (.pdf) files.
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More Browser Features Review
Quiz Questions
14.
The home page will appear when:
A. You restart your computer.
B. You click the Home button on the Command bar.
C. Your Internet connection is lost.
D. You type www.homepage.com in the address bar.
15.
You can save more than one page as a home page. (True or False?)
16.
When you add a Favorite, you must add it to one of the existing folders. (True or False?)
17.
You can display the Favorites Center by pressing <Ctrl> + <F>. (True or False?)
18.
Once you add a Favorite to the Favorites Center, you can never delete that Favorite. (True or False?)
19.
Suggested Sites recommends Web sites based on:
A. Your browsing history
B. Google ranking
C.Web sites in your Favorites Center
D. Programs you’ve downloaded from the Internet
20.
What does RSS stand for?
A. Really Small Slices
B. Really Simple Syndication
C. Really Sleazy Syndication
D. Really Simple Subscription
21.
How do you access RSS feeds to which you’ve subscribed?
A. By going to the Favorites Center and clicking on the Feeds tab.
B. By searching for My RSS feeds in the search box.
C. By clicking the Page button on the Command bar and selecting Feeds from the menu.
D. By going to the Internet Explorer Home Page.
22.
How far back does Internet Explorer keep track of your browsing history?
A. A few months.
B. A few hours.
C. A few weeks.
D. Several years.
23.
How do you access your browsing history?
A. Click the History button.
B. Click the Favorites Center button on the Command bar and select the History tab
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C. Select Tools > Histories > Browsing History from the Command bar.
D. Visit www.history.com
24.
What is the purpose of an accelerator?
A. It makes your Internet connection faster.
B. It helps you search for a word or a phrase using maps, search engines, and translators.
C. It speeds up your e-mail delivery.
D. It tells you what search terms to use.
25.
Compatibility View displays Web pages designed for Windows Vista in Windows 7. (True or False?)
26.
Which feature of Internet Explorer allows you to increase or decrease the size of ALL content in your browser
window?
A. Changing text size
B. Compatibility View
C. The SmartScreen Filter
D. Zoom
27.
When you setup a page for printing, it is a good idea to print the background colors and images. (True or False?)
28.
Which of the following is NOT a way you can adjust the a Web page in the Print Preview window?
A. Turn headers and footers on and off
B. Adjust margins
C. Choose between printing in black and white or color
D. Change print size
29.
Which command button in the File Download dialog box should you click if you want to download and automatically
install a program file?
A. Save
B. Cancel
C. Open
D. Run
30.
Before you download any files or software, make sure you have an anti-virus program installed on your computer.
(True or False?)
Quiz Answers
14.
B. The home page will appear when you click the Home Page button on the Command bar. It also appears whenever
you open a new browser window.
15.
True. You can save more than one page as a home page. Each page will appear in a separate tab.
16.
False. You can create new folders and sub folders to store Favorites. However, you aren't required to use folders when
adding a Favorite.
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© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
17.
False. You can display the Favorites Center by pressing <Ctrl> + <I>.
18.
False. You can move, rename, or delete your folders and Favorites in Organize Favorites.
19.
A. Your browsing history
20.
B. Really Simple Syndication provides a simple way for web publishers to syndicate the content on their Web site.
21.
A. You can access the feeds to which you’ve subscribed by going to the Favorites Center.
22.
C. Internet Explorer will keep track of the last 3 weeks of your browsing history.
23.
B. You can access your browsing history by clicking the Favorites Center button and selecting the History tab.
24.
B. It helps you search for a word or a phrase using maps, search engines, and translators.
25.
False. Compatibility View displays Web pages designed for older browsers in IE 8.
26.
D. Zoom allows you to zoom in to a page to magnify everything or zoom out to minimize the appearance of
everything. Changing the text size will only increase or decrease the size of the text, not other elements like pictures.
27.
False. The background colors and images generally do not contain any content you would need to print and is a waste
of ink or toner.
28.
C. You cannot choose between color and black and white printing from the Print Preview window. You can, however,
change that setting in the Print dialog box.
29.
D. When you click Run Internet Explorer will automatically download the program file and begin the installation
process.
30.
True. You should install a virus protection program, also called an anti-virus program, on your computer if you intend
to download files.
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Safe Web
Browsing
Using the SmartScreen Filter ........................... 49
Check a Web site manually ..................... 49
Report an unsafe Web site ...................... 49
Disable the SmartScreen Filter ................ 50
Using Domain Highlighting .............................. 51
Using the Information Bar & Pop-Up Blocker. 52
Use the Information Bar ........................... 52
Change Pop-up Blocker settings ............. 52
Using InPrivate Browsing ................................. 53
Using InPrivate Filtering ................................... 54
Turn on InPrivate Filtering ....................... 54
3
The Internet, for all of its wonders, can be
a treacherous place. For as many people
out there who are trying to provide you
with helpful information and a positive
online shopping experience, there are also
those people who would trick you into
downloading harmful software onto your
computer and steal your personal
information. The Internet is a jungle, and
you need to be armed with tools that can
help protect you.
Fortunately, Internet Explorer 8 was
designed to help keep you safe. It comes
packed with several tools that steer you
away from dangerous Web site, block
annoying pop-ups, and keep your Web
browsing safe from the prying eyes of
others.
This chapter shows you how to increase
your awareness when browsing the Web
and how to use Internet Explorer’s tools
to keep you safe.
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© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Safe Web Browsing
Using the SmartScreen Filter
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
One of the most common ways to steal personal
information on the Web comes in the form of phishing
Web sites. Phishing schemes trick users into giving up
personal information like credit card numbers, Social
Security Numbers, user IDs and passwords.
• Exercise: Understand how the SmartScreen Filter protects
you while you’re browsing online. Go to any Web site and
manually check it.
While there are methods for visually determining which
Web sites are safe and which are not, even the experts can
be fooled sometimes. Fortunately, Internet Explorer helps
protect you with the SmartScreen Filter.
The SmartScreen Filter works in the background as you
browse. It detects phishing Web sites and protects you
from downloading malicious software, or malware, like
viruses. The SmartScreen Filter functions in three ways:
It blocks Web sites that have any characteristics in
common with phishing sites.
It blocks Web sites that Microsoft has flagged as
unsafe.
Figure 3-1: A SmartScreen Filter file download warning.
It blocks the download of known malware.
Check a Web site manually
Over the course of browsing the World Wide Web, you
may come across a Web site that you find suspicious, but
was not blocked by the SmartScreen Filter. In this case,
you may want to manually check the Web site against
Microsoft’s list of malicious Web sites.
1. Go to the Web site that you want to check.
2. Click Safety on the Command Bar, and select
SmartScreen Filter
Check This Web site from
the menu.
Internet Explorer checks the Web site against a list of
reported Web sites. If the site was reported as a
threat, you will receive a warning. If the site has not
been reported, follow the instructions in the dialog
box that appears.
Figure 3-2: The SmartScreen Filter dialog box reporting
the results of a manual Web site check.
Report an unsafe Web site
Microsoft’s list of unsafe Web sites is by no means
complete. If you come across a Web site that you believe
to be unsafe, you may report it yourself.
1. Go to the Web site that you want to report.
2. Click Safety on the Command Bar and select
SmartScreen Filter Report Unsafe Website
from the menu.
The Web site is reported to Microsoft as unsafe.
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Safe Web Browsing
Disable the SmartScreen Filter
The SmartScreen Filter is automatically turned on by
default in Internet Explorer. However, you can disable the
SmartScreen Filter. You may want to do this if you
frequently visit a site that is reported as unsafe, though
you know it to be perfectly safe.
1. Click Safety on the Command Bar and select
SmartScreen Filter Turn Off SmartScreen
Filter from the menu.
A dialog box appears to confirm the changes you are
about to make to the SmartScreen Filter.
2. Select the Turn off SmartScreen Filter option and
click OK.
The SmartScreen Filter is disabled.
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© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Figure 3-3: Disabling the SmartScreen Filter.
Safe Web Browsing
Using Domain Highlighting
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
Web site forgery is one of the most common ways to trick
people on the World Wide Web. Web site forgers create a
copy of a legitimate Web site, fooling people into giving
up personal information. For example, you may receive
an e-mail from what appears to be your bank asking you
to verify your User ID and password. When you click the
link to get to the Web site, it looks exactly like the real
thing. However, when you attempt to login, you are
actually sending the information to an identity thief.
• Exercise: Go to Microsoft’s Web site. Notice how domain
highlighting appears in the address bar.
Domain highlighting helps to protect you from Web site
forgery by making it easier to distinguish between real
and misleading Web addresses. For example, let’s say you
want to visit the Microsoft home page.
The actual URL looks like this:
A fake version of the URL, however, might look like this:
It looks like you’re on the Microsoft.com Web domain,
but in fact you are on the Fake.com Web domain. Notice
that the domain name in the address bar is displayed in
black, while the rest of the Web address is in gray.
1. Navigate to a Web page in the browser window and
look at the address bar.
Notice that only the domain name is in black, while
the rest is in gray.
Tips

Check the highlighted domain whenever you’re
doing online banking, online shopping, or inputting
other sensitive information, like usernames and
passwords. That way, you can be more confident that
you are on the correct Web site.

Create Favorites for places like online banks so you
can be confident that you’re always going to the
correct Web address, rather than a fake Web address
that exploits common misspellings.

Don’t follow hyperlinks in e-mails to Web sites
where you may have to input your username and
password, even if it appears to come from your bank.
Type the URL yourself or use your Favorites. By
doing so you can be more certain that you’re not
falling for a scam or well-crafted forgery.
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Safe Web Browsing
Using the Information Bar and
Pop-Up Blocker
Not all Web pages are safe. Some contain malicious code
that could be downloaded onto your computer, and some
pummel you with a bevy of annoying pop-up ads. Internet
Explorer uses the Information Bar to give you a warning
before either of these attacks can take place.
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
• Exercise: Add www.customguide.com to the Allowed
Sites list in Pop-up Blocker settings.
Use the Information Bar
The Information Bar notifies you when a security action
has taken place in order to protect you from harmful files.
It may appear if you try to download a program, if a Web
site tries to install an ActiveX control, if active content
tries to run on your computer automatically, or if a pop-up
is blocked. Here’s what to do when the Information Bar
appears:
Figure 3-4: The Information Bar appears when a Web site
tries to download a file onto your computer.
1. Click the Information Bar.
A menu appears, giving you options if you want to
allow the action.
2. Select a command from the contextual menu.
The command occurs: for example, the file is
downloaded to your computer.
Change Pop-up Blocker settings
The Pop-up Blocker prevents annoying advertisement
windows from disrupting your Web browsing. You can
adjust the settings from heavy filtering to light filtering or
even turn it off altogether. Here’s how:
1. Click the Tools button on the Command Bar and
select Pop-up Blocker
Pop-up Blocker Settings
from the menu.
The Pop-up Blocker Settings dialog box appears.
Figure 3-5: The Pop-up Blocker Settings dialog box.
Here, you can control exceptions, notifications and
filter level for the Pop-up Blocker.
2. Configure the Pop-up Blocker settings.
See Table 3-1: Pop-up Blocker Settings for more
information on these settings.
3. Click Close.
Tip: You can turn off the Pop-up Blocker
completely, although you’ll probably find you
prefer at least a little bit of filtering.
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Table 3-1: Pop-up Blocker Settings
Exceptions
Add sites that you always want to view popups from by adding them to the Allowed
Sites list.
Notifications
and blocking
level
Play a sound or have the Information Bar
appear when a pop-up is blocked.
Blocking
level
Choose High, Medium, or Low filtering for
pop-up ads.
Safe Web Browsing
Using InPrivate Browsing
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
Whenever you browse the Internet, you leave traces of
your activity behind on your computer. Anyone with even
a small amount of computer savvy can figure out where
you’ve been online and what you’ve been doing. See
Table 3-2: Evidence of Your Browsing and Searching for
some of the signs that other users on your computer can
find.
A new Internet Explorer 8 feature allows you to browse
and search the Internet with complete privacy, preventing
Internet Explorer from storing any information about your
browsing session. In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use
InPrivate Browsing.
• Exercise: Open an InPrivate Browsing window.
Table 3-2: Evidence of Your Browsing and Searching
History
A list all of the sites that you
visited.
Temporary Internet
files
A cache of files downloaded and
saved to your computer when you
visit Web pages.
Form data
Information you input into online
forms and may include names,
addresses, phone numbers and
other personal data.
Cookies
Small pieces of text stored by
your Web browser that is used to
store shopping cart contents, track
activity, or store user preferences.
Usernames and
passwords
Information you use to login to
Web sites.
1. Click the New Tab button.
The New Tab screen appears.
2. Click the Open an InPrivate Browsing window
link.
Internet Explorer opens a new browser window
indicating that InPrivate is turned on. The address bar
also changes to show that you are now browsing in
InPrivate mode.
Other Ways to Open InPrivate Browsing:
Click the Safety button in the Command Bar and
select InPrivate Browsing from the menu. Or,
press <Ctrl> + <Shift> + <P>.
Tip: Third-party toolbars (such as those you can
install from Google and Yahoo!) are disabled by
default when you are InPrivate Browsing mode. If
you have installed any extensions, they are
disabled as well.
3. Begin browsing.
Internet Explorer will not save your browsing history
during your InPrivate session.
Trap: InPrivate browsing may prevent other users
of your computer from seeing your browsing
activity, but your employer can still monitor your
online behavior if you’re at work!
Tips

To stop InPrivate Browsing, close the browser
window.
Figure 3-6: The InPrivate Browser window with the
address bar indicator.
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Safe Web Browsing
Using InPrivate Filtering
 Exercise
• Exercise File: None required.
Many Web pages use content providers, or third-party
Web sites, to collect information about your browsing
habits. As content providers learn more about you, they
can use that information to send you targeted
advertisements or to personalize the products they display
on the Web page.
• Exercise: Turn on InPrivate Filtering. Visit several Web
sites. Open the InPrivate Filtering settings to see if any
content providers are attempting to track your browsing
habits.
Some consider these practices an invasion of privacy. To
give users a choice in what content is delivered to thirdparties, Microsoft developed InPrivate Filtering. InPrivate
Filtering analyzes the Web sites that you visit. If it finds
the same third-party Web sites providing content across
the sites that you visit, it will block information sent to
those third-parties.
In this lesson, you will learn how to turn on InPrivate
Filtering and change its settings.
Turn on InPrivate Filtering
By default, InPrivate Filtering is turned off. To turn it on,
follow these steps.
1. Click the Safety button in the Command Bar and
select InPrivate Filtering.
The InPrivate Filtering dialog box appears. There are
two options here:
Block for me: Internet Explorer 8 blocks all
content providers from receiving information
about the Web sites you visit.
Let me choose which providers receive my
information: Takes you to InPrivate Filtering
settings where you choose which content
providers to block and which to allow.
Trap: The InPrivate Filtering dialog box only
appears the first time that InPrivate Filtering is
activated.
Other Ways to Turn on InPrivate Filtering:
Press <Ctrl> + <Shift> + <F>.
2. Choose an InPrivate Filtering option.
InPrivate Filtering is enabled. A checkmark appears
next to InPrivate Filtering in the Safety menu to show
that it is turned on.
Trap: Turning on InPrivate Filtering may disable
some or all content from certain Web sites. If you
find that you cannot use a Web page after
enabling the filtering mechanism, disable
InPrivate Filtering and try again.
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© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Figure 3-7: The InPrivate Filtering dialog box.
Safe Web Browsing
Tip: To disable InPrivate Filtering, click the
Safety button on the Command Bar and select
InPrivate Filtering.
Change InPrivate Filtering settings
InPrivate Filtering may interfere with some of your Webbased activity. In this case, you may have to change the
settings.
1. Click the Safety button in the Command Bar and
select InPrivate Filtering Settings.
The InPrivate Filtering settings dialog box appears.
You have three options:
Automatically block: Blocks all information that
might be shared with content providers.
Choose content to block or allow: Blocks only
the content providers that you choose. When you
select this option, you have to click each of the
content providers listed and the window and
indicate whether you want to allow or block their
content.
Off: Disables InPrivate Filtering.
Figure 3-8: The InPrivate Filtering settings dialog box.
2. Select an option and click OK.
The InPrivate Filtering settings you chose are
enabled.
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Safe Web Browsing Review
Quiz Questions
31.
What is the purpose of the SmartScreen Filter?
A. It helps protect you from threats like phishing and downloading malicious software.
B. It makes Web pages more printer friendly.
C. It helps protect you from mediocre and idiotic Web sites whose contents would severely insult your intelligence.
D. It blocks advertisements from appearing in Internet Explorer.
32.
Which feature of Internet Explorer is designed to help you identify forged Web sites?
A. Print preview
B. The Pop-up Blocker
C. The Information Bar
D. Domain highlighting
33.
If a pop-up window or download is blocked, you can override the action and continue the download from the
Information Bar. (True or False?)
34.
The Pop-Up Blocker cannot be turned off. (True or False?)
35.
You can allow pop-ups to appear from a Web site by adding it to the Allowed Sites list. (True or False?)
36.
In which of the following ways can you open an InPrivate Browsing session?
A. By using the key combination <Ctrl> + <Shift> + <P>
B. By clicking the Safety button on the Command bar and selecting InPrivate Browsing from the menu.
C. By opening a new tab and clicking Open an InPrivate Browsing window.
D. All of the above
37.
InPrivate Filtering is designed to prevent content providers from collecting information about your browsing habits.
(True or False?)
Quiz Answers
31.
A. The SmartScreen Filter helps prevent you from going to Web sites that might be a threat to you or your computer.
32.
D. Domain highlighting works by highlighting the domain name of the Web site that you are visiting, so you know if
you’re on www.microsoft.com or www.microsoft.fake.com.
33.
True. You can overrule a blocked pop-up window or download and proceed with the action.
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34.
False. The Pop-Up Blocker can be turned off, but you'll probably want at least a low level of filtering instead of
turning it off altogether.
35.
True. Pop-ups will always appear for Web sites on the Allowed Sites list, regardless of the filter level.
36.
D. All of the methods listed will open an InPrivate Browsing session.
37.
True. InPrivate Filtering blocks information about your browsing habits from being sent to third-parties.
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