APC | RAID Subsystem SCSI-SATA II | Product specifications | APC RAID Subsystem SCSI-SATA II Product specifications

Falcon II
SCSI-to-SATA RAID Subsystem
Installation and Hardware
Reference Manual
Version 1.3 (11, 2004)
Printed in Taiwan
Copyright 2004
This Edition First Published 2004
All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced, transmitted,
transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any language or
computer language, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical,
magnetic, optical, chemical, manual or otherwise, without the prior written
consent of RAID Inc.
Disclaimer
RAID Inc. makes no representations or warranties with respect to the
contents hereof and specifically disclaims any implied warranties of
merchantability or fitness for any particular purpose. Furthermore,
RAID Inc reserves the right to revise this publication and to make
changes from time to time in the content hereof without obligation to notify
any person of such revisions or changes. Product specifications are also
subject to change without prior notice.
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Warnings and Certifications
FCC (applies in the U.S. and Canada)
FCC Class B Radio Frequency Interference Statement
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a
Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules (47 CFR, Part
2, Part 15 and CISPR PUB. 22 Class B). These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the
equipment is operated in a residential installation. This equipment generates,
uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in
accordance with this user’s guide, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not
occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful
interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by
turning the equipment off and on, you are encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:
•
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
•
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
•
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from
that to which the receiver is connected.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
This device complies with Part 15 of FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the
following two conditions: 1) this device may not cause harmful interference,
and 2) this device must accept any interference received, including
interference that may cause undesired operation.
Warning:
A shielded power cord is required in order to meet FCC emission limits and
also to prevent interference with nearby radio and television reception.
Use only shielded cables to connect I/O devices to this equipment. You are
cautioned that changes or modifications not expressly approved by the party
responsible for compliance could void your authority to operate the
equipment.
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
CB
(Certified Worldwide)
This device meets the requirements of the CB standard for electrical
equipment with regard to establishing a satisfactory level of safety for
persons using the device and for the area surrounding the apparatus. This
standard covers only safety aspects of the above apparatus; it does not cover
other matters, such as style or performance.
Table of Contents
CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION
1.1 PRODUCT OVERVIEW ............................................................................................. 1-1
1.1.1 Product Introduction ............................................................................................. 1-1
1.1.2 Enclosure Chassis ................................................................................................. 1-2
1.2 FALCON II SUBSYSTEM COMPONENTS............................................................ 1-5
1.2.1 LCD Panel ............................................................................................................. 1-5
1.2.2 Drive Trays............................................................................................................ 1-6
1.2.3 SATA to PATA Dongle Kits ................................................................................... 1-6
1.2.4 RAID Controller Module ....................................................................................... 1-7
1.2.5 Controller Module Interfaces ................................................................................ 1-7
1.2.6 DIMM Module ....................................................................................................... 1-8
1.2.7 BBU ....................................................................................................................... 1-8
1.2.8 Power Supply Units ............................................................................................... 1-9
1.2.9 Cooling Modules ................................................................................................. 1-10
1.3 SUBSYSTEM MONITORING .................................................................................. 1-11
1.3.1 I2C bus ................................................................................................................ 1-11
1.3.2 LED Indicators .................................................................................................... 1-11
1.3.3 Firmware (FW) and RAIDWatch GUI ................................................................ 1-11
1.3.4 Audible Alarms .................................................................................................... 1-12
1.4 HOT-SWAPPABLE COMPONENTS....................................................................... 1-12
1.4.1 Hot-swap Capabilities ......................................................................................... 1-12
1.4.2 Components ......................................................................................................... 1-12
1.4.3 Normalized Airflow ............................................................................................. 1-13
CHAPTER 2 HARDWARE INSTALLATION
2.1
INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................. 2-1
2.2
INSTALLATION PREREQUISITES.................................................................... 2-1
2.3
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS: ................................................................................... 2-2
2.3.1 Precautions and Instructions................................................................................. 2-2
2.3.2 Static-free Installation ........................................................................................... 2-3
2.4
GENERAL INSTALLATION PROCEDURE....................................................... 2-3
2.4.1 Installation Procedure Flowchart ......................................................................... 2-4
2.5
UNPACKING THE SUBSYSTEM ....................................................................... 2-5
2.6
INSTALLATION OVERVIEW............................................................................. 2-6
2.6.1 Pre-installed Components ..................................................................................... 2-6
2.6.2 Uninstalled Components ....................................................................................... 2-6
2.7
BBU INSTALLATION.......................................................................................... 2-6
2.7.1 BBU Module Installation Overview ...................................................................... 2-6
2.7.2 BBU Warnings and Precautions............................................................................ 2-7
2.7.3 Installation Procedure........................................................................................... 2-7
2.8
HARD DRIVE INSTALLATION ......................................................................... 2-9
2.8.1 Hard Drive Installation Pre-requisites.................................................................. 2-9
2.8.2 Dongle Kit Installation ........................................................................................ 2-10
2.8.3 Drive Installation without a Dongle Kit .............................................................. 2-11
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
2.8.4 Drive Installation with a Dongle Kit ................................................................... 2-12
2.9
DRIVE TRAY INSTALLATION ........................................................................ 2-12
2.10 RACK/CABINET INSTALLATION............................................................................. 2-14
CHAPTER 3 SUBSYSTEM MONITORING
3.1
SUBSYSTEM MONITORING OVERVIEW........................................................ 3-1
3.2
STATUS INDICATING LEDS ............................................................................. 3-2
3.2.1 Brief Overview of the LEDs................................................................................... 3-2
3.2.2 LCD Panel ............................................................................................................. 3-3
3.2.3 Drive Tray LEDs ................................................................................................... 3-4
3.2.4 Controller Module LEDs ....................................................................................... 3-5
3.2.5 LAN Port LEDs ..................................................................................................... 3-7
3.2.6 BBU Module LED ................................................................................................. 3-7
3.2.7 PSU LEDs ............................................................................................................. 3-7
3.2.8 Cooling Module LEDs ........................................................................................... 3-8
3.3
AUDIBLE ALARM ............................................................................................... 3-9
3.3.1 Default Threshold Values ...................................................................................... 3-9
3.3.2 Failed Devices ..................................................................................................... 3-10
3.4
I2C MONITORING ............................................................................................. 3-10
CHAPTER 4 SUBSYSTEM CONNECTION AND OPERATION
4.1
SCSI CONNECTION OVERVIEW ...................................................................... 4-1
4.1.1 SCSI Cables ........................................................................................................... 4-1
4.1.2 SCSI Port on the Controller Rear Panel ............................................................... 4-1
4.1.3 SCSI Termination .................................................................................................. 4-2
4.2
HOST CONNECTION TOPOLOGY .................................................................... 4-2
4.2.1 Single Host ............................................................................................................ 4-2
4.2.2 Dual Hosts ............................................................................................................. 4-3
4.3
DAISY CHAIN ...................................................................................................... 4-3
4.3.1 Daisy Chain Topology ........................................................................................... 4-3
4.3.2 Daisy Chain Procedures........................................................................................ 4-4
4.4
POWER ON ........................................................................................................... 4-5
4.4.1 Check List .............................................................................................................. 4-5
4.4.2 Power On Procedure ............................................................................................. 4-5
4.4.3 Power On Status Check ......................................................................................... 4-6
4.4.4 LCD Screen ........................................................................................................... 4-7
4.5
POWER OFF PROCEDURE ................................................................................. 4-8
CHAPTER 5 SUBSYSTEM MAINTENANCE
5.1
OVERVIEW .......................................................................................................... 5-1
5.1.1 About Subsystem Maintenance .............................................................................. 5-1
5.1.2 General Notes on Component Replacement .......................................................... 5-1
5.2
REPLACING CONTROLLER MODULE COMPONENTS ................................ 5-2
5.2.1 Controller Module Maintenance Overview ........................................................... 5-2
5.2.2 Removing the Controller Module .......................................................................... 5-3
5.2.3 Replacing the Controller Module .......................................................................... 5-4
5.3
DIMM MODULE REPLACEMENT..................................................................... 5-5
5.3.1 DIMM Module Considerations.............................................................................. 5-5
5.3.2 DIMM Module Replacement Procedure................................................................ 5-6
5.4
REPLACING A FAULTY BBU............................................................................ 5-7
5.5
REPLACING A FAULTY PSU MODULE........................................................... 5-8
5.5.1 PSU Module Overview .......................................................................................... 5-8
5.5.2 Replacing the PSU Module ................................................................................... 5-9
5.6
COOLING MODULE MAINTENANCE............................................................ 5-11
5.6.1 Cooling Module Overview................................................................................... 5-11
5.6.2 Replacing a Cooling Module ............................................................................... 5-12
5.7
REPLACING A FAILED HARD DRIVE ........................................................... 5-13
5.7.1 Hard Drive Maintenance Overview .................................................................... 5-13
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
5.7.2 Replacing a Hard Drive ...................................................................................... 5-14
5.8
REPLACING A DONGLE KIT........................................................................... 5-16
APPENDIX A UNINTERRUPTIBLE POWER SUPPLY
A.1 UNINTERRUPTIBLE POWER SUPPLY OVERVIEW............................................A-1
A.2 COMPATIBLE UPS SUPPLIES ................................................................................A-1
A.3 SERIAL COMMUNICATIONS CABLE ...................................................................A-1
A.4 CONNECTING THE UPS TO THE SUBSYSTEM...................................................A-2
A.4.1 Connect the PSU Module Power Cords ................................................................ A-2
A.4.2 Set the Baud Rate .................................................................................................. A-2
A.4.3 Connect COM2 ..................................................................................................... A-2
A.5 POWER ON ................................................................................................................A-3
A.6 UPS STATUS MONITORING ...................................................................................A-3
A.6.1 Normal Operational Status ................................................................................... A-3
A.6.2 UPS Messages....................................................................................................... A-3
A.6.3 UPS Message Summary ........................................................................................ A-5
APPENDIX B SPECIFICATIONS
B.1
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS......................................................................... B-1
Environmental Specifications ......................................................................................... B-1
Power Requirements....................................................................................................... B-1
Dimensions ..................................................................................................................... B-1
EMI/EMC ....................................................................................................................... B-1
Safety Requirements ....................................................................................................... B-2
Shock .............................................................................................................................. B-2
Vibration......................................................................................................................... B-2
Warning Alarms ............................................................................................................. B-2
B.2
CONTROLLER SPECIFICATIONS ..................................................................... B-3
Configuration Specifications .......................................................................................... B-3
B.3
DRIVE TRAY SPECIFICATIONS ....................................................................... B-4
B.4
POWER SUPPLY SPECIFICATIONS ................................................................. B-4
B.5
COOLING MODULE SPECIFICATIONS ........................................................... B-5
B.6
RAID MANAGEMENT ........................................................................................ B-5
B.7
FAULT TOLERANCE MANAGEMENT............................................................. B-6
APPENDIX C SPARE PARTS AND ACCESSORIES
C.1
SPARE PARTS ...................................................................................................... C-1
C.2
ACCESSORIES ..................................................................................................... C-2
APPENDIX D PIN OUTS
D.1
VHDCI SCSI PORT PIN OUTS............................................................................D-1
D.2
DB9 AUDIO JACK PIN OUTS.............................................................................D-2
D.3
DB9 AUDIO JACK UPS CABLE PIN OUTS ......................................................D-3
D.4
IFT-9011 NULL MODEM.....................................................................................D-4
D.5
ETHERNET PORT PIN OUTS .............................................................................D-4
D.6
MAIN POWER ......................................................................................................D-4
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Safety Precautions
Precautions and Instructions
•
Prior to powering on the subsystem, ensure that the correct power range is being
used.
•
The Falcon II subsystem comes with 16 drive bays. Leaving any of these drive
bays empty will greatly affect the efficiency of the airflow within the enclosure,
and will consequently lead to the system overheating, which can cause
irreparable damage.
•
If a module fails, leave it in place until you have a replacement unit and you are
ready to replace it.
•
Airflow Consideration: The subsystem requires an airflow clearance, especially
at the front and rear.
•
Handle subsystem modules using the retention screws, eject levers, and the metal
frames/face plates. Avoid touching PCB boards and connector pins.
•
To comply with safety, emission, or thermal requirements, none of the covers or
replaceable modules should be removed. Make sure that all enclosure modules
and covers are securely in place during operation.
•
Be sure that the rack cabinet into which the subsystem chassis will be installed
provides sufficient ventilation channels and airflow circulation around the
subsystem.
•
Provide a soft, clean surface to place your subsystem on before working on it.
Servicing on a rough surface may damage the exterior of the chassis.
•
If it is necessary to transport the subsystem, repackage all drives and replaceable
modules separately.
•
Dual redundant controller models come with two controller modules that must
be installed into the subsystem. Single controller modules come with a single
controller module and a metal sheet is placed over the lower controller bay at the
rear of the subsystem. Since single controller modules cannot be upgraded, this
metal sheet should NEVER be removed.
ESD Precautions
Observe all conventional anti-ESD methods while handling system
modules. The use of a grounded wrist strap and an anti-static work pad are
recommended. Avoid dust and debris in your work area.
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
About This Manual
This manual:
•
Introduces the Falcon II RAID Subsystem series.
•
Describes all the active components in the system.
•
Provides recommendations and details about the hardware installation
process of the subsystem.
•
Briefly describes how to monitor the subsystem.
•
Describes how to maintain the subsystem.
This manual does not:
•
Describe components that are not user-serviceable.
•
Describe the configuration options of firmware, using terminal
emulation programs, or the RAIDWatch GUI that came with your
subsystem.
•
Give a detailed description of the RAID processing units or the RAID
controllers embedded within the subsystem.
Revision History
Initial release
Who should read this manual?
This manual assumes that its readers are experienced with computer
hardware installation and are familiar with storage enclosures.
Related Documentation
•
Generic Operation Manual
•
RAIDWatch User’s Manual
These two (2) documents are located in the CD included with your
subsystem package.
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Conventions
Naming
From this point on and throughout the rest of this manual, the Falcon II series
is referred to as simply the “subsystem” or the “system” and Falcon II is
frequently abbreviated as “FII.”
Warnings
Warnings appear where overlooked details may cause damage to the
equipment or result in personal injury. Warnings should be taken seriously.
Warnings are easy to recognize. The word “warning” is written as
“WARNING,” both capitalized and bold and is followed by text in italics.
The italicized text is the warning message.
Cautions
Cautionary messages should also be heeded to help you reduce the chance
of losing data or damaging the system. Cautions are easy to recognize. The
word “caution” is written as “CAUTION,” both capitalized and bold and is
followed by text in italics. The italicized text is the cautionary message.
Notes
These messages inform the reader of essential but non-critical information.
These messages should be read carefully as any directions or instructions
contained therein can help you avoid making mistakes. Notes are easy to
recognize. The word “note” is written as “NOTE,” both capitalized and bold
and is followed by text in italics. The italicized text is the cautionary
message.
Lists
Bulleted Lists: Bulleted lists are statements of non-sequential facts. They
can be read in any order. Each statement is preceded by a round black dot
“•.”
Numbered Lists: Numbered lists are used to describe sequential steps you
should follow in order.
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Software and Firmware Updates
Please visit RAID Inc’s support site for the latest software or firmware
updates. NOTE that the firmware version installed on your system should
provide the complete functionality listed in the specification sheet/user’s
manual. We provide special revisions for various application purposes.
Therefore, DO NOT upgrade your firmware unless you fully understand what a
firmware revision will do.
Problems that occur during the updating process may cause unrecoverable
errors and system down time. Always consult technical personnel before
proceeding with any firmware upgrade.
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
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left blank
xii
Chapter 1: Introduction
Chapter 1
Introduction
1.1 Product Overview
1.1.1
Product Introduction
This hardware manual briefly introduces the Falcon II SCSI-320 to SATA-II
storage subsystem shown in Figure 1-1. The Falcon II subsystem comes with two
(2) 320MB/second SCSI (SCSI-320) host channels. This high-density subsystem
supports up to sixteen (16) hot swappable, SATA-II hard drives in a 3U
profile. The core of the subsystem is the RAID
controller board with the ASIC266 and a preinstalled 256MB DDR RAM DIMM module
with support for capacities up to 1GB. The new
SCSI-320 host channel features
packet protocol, and its
Figure 1-1: FALCON II Subsystem
reduction in command overhead provide increased speed without bandwidth
issues.
The metal container in which the controller board is pre-installed is referred
to as the “controller module.” The controller module is comprised of a PCB
board, a rear faceplate, and a metal canister. The controller module is
accessed through the rear of the FALCON II. An optional battery backup
unit (BBU) can be installed in the upper left side of the controller module
when viewed from the rear of the subsystem. The BBU is also accessible
and hot swappable through the rear panel of FALCON II.
Two (2) dual-stacked VHDCI SCSI connectors connect the RAID controller
to single or dual hosts and cascade external devices. Two (2) hot-swappable
cooling modules protect the subsystem from overheating, and two (2) hotswappable power supply unit (PSU) modules provide constant power to the
subsystem. The modular nature of the subsystem and the easy accessibility
to all major components ensure the ease of the subsystem maintenance.
NOTE:
On receiving and unpacking your subsystem, please check the package
contents against the included Unpacking Checklist. If any modules are
missing, please contact your subsystem vendor immediately.
Product Overview
1-1
Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
1.1.2
Enclosure Chassis
1.1.2.1 Chassis Overview
The FALCON II RAID storage subsystem chassis is an enhanced 3U metal
chassis divided into front and rear sections, which are respectively accessed
through front (see Figure 1-3) and rear (see Figure 1-5) panels. Pre-drilled
mounting holes in the sides of the 3U RAID subsystem enclosure allow you
to attach separately purchased slide rails so that you can install the enclosure
into a rack or cabinet.
NOTE:
Components accessed through the front panel are referred to as Front
Panel Components and components accessed through the rear panel are
referred to as Rear Panel Components
Figure 1-2: FALCON II Subsystem Overview
1.1.2.2 Physical Dimensions
The FALCON II comes in an enhanced 3U chassis with the following
dimensions:
1-2
•
With handles: 482.6mm x 131mm x 504.3mm (width x height x
depth)
•
Without handles: 445mm x 130mm x 488.2mm (width x height x
depth)
Product Overview
Chapter 1: Introduction
1.1.2.3
Front Panel Overview
The front section of the subsystem features a 4 x 4 layout for sixteen (16)
3.5-inch drives. The two (2) handles on the front of the subsystem enable
you to easily insert/extract the chassis into/from a rack or cabinet. The LCD
panel on the left handle provides an easy way for you to monitor and
configure your subsystem.
The front panel of the FALCON II RAID subsystem described in this
manual is shown in Figure 1-3. A description of each front panel
component is given below:
Figure 1-3: FALCON II Front View
The front panel shown in Figure 1-3 accommodates the following
components:
•
Drive bays with drive tray canisters: The drive bays house the
FALCON II hard drives.
•
Right handle and left handle with LCD panel: The subsystem has
right and left handles for easier rackmounting and handling. The
LCD panel shows system information and can be used to configure
and monitor the FALCON II. (Please refer to Section 1.2.1)
1.1.2.4 Hard Drive Numbering
The front panel of the FALCON II enclosure houses sixteen (16) hard
drives in a 4x4 configuration as shown in Figure 1-4. When viewed from
the front, the drive bays (slots) are numbered 1 to 16 from top to bottom,
from left to right.
Product Overview
1-3
Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 1-4: Hard Drive Numbering
1.1.2.5 Rear Panel Overview
The rear section of FALCON II subsystem is accessed through the rear
panel and is reserved for a single RAID controller module, one (1) optional
BBU, two (2) power supply units (PSUs) and two (2) cooling modules.
The rear panel of the RAID subsystem described in this manual is shown in
Figure 1-5. A description of each rear panel component is given below:
Figure 1-5: FALCON II Rear View
The rear panel shown in Figure 1-5 accommodates the following
components:
•
RAID controller module: A controller board and a DDR RAM
DIMM module are housed in the controller module to provide the
system RAID functionalities. (See Section 1.2.4)
•
BBU: An optional BBU sustains cache memory during a power
shortage to prevent data loss. (See Section 1.2.7)
•
PSUs: The hot-swappable PSUs provide power to the subsystem.
A power switch is located on the right of each PSU to turn the
system on and off. (See Section 1.2.8)
•
Cooling modules: The redundant cooling modules ventilate the
subsystem to reduce the temperature within the subsystem. (See
Section 1.2.9)
•
1-4
Dummy plate: The FALCON II is a single controller subsystem.
The only controller module is installed in the upper controller bay.
Product Overview
Chapter 1: Introduction
A dummy plate covers the lower controller bay at the rear of the
subsystem.
1.1.2.6 Back-plane Board
Internal backplane boards separate the front and rear sections of the
FALCON II. The PCB board provide logic level signals and low voltage
power paths. They contain no user-serviceable components.
1.2
FALCON II Subsystem Components
The FALCON II houses many active components and most of them can be
accessed through either the front or rear panel. The modular design of the
active components facilitates their easy installation and removal. Hot-swap
mechanisms are incorporated to eliminate power surges and signal glitches
that might occur while removing or installing these modules.
1.2.1
LCD Panel
Figure 1-6: LCD Panel
PN: IFT-9273CHandLLCD
The LCD panel shown in Figure 1-6 consists of a 16x2-character LCD
screen with push buttons and LED status indicators. The LCD front panel
provides full access to all RAID configuration settings and monitoring
functions. After powering up the subsystem, the initial screen will show the
subsystem model name. A different name may be assigned for the system or
different arrays. This will enable easier identification in a topology with
numerous arrays.
FALCON II Subsystem Components
1-5
Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
1.2.2
Drive Trays
Figure 1-7: Drive Tray Front View
PN: IFT-9273CDTray or IFT-9273ADT1S1P (with dongle kit preinstalled)
The FALCON II subsystem comes with sixteen (16) drive trays (See
Figure 1-7) designed to accommodate separately purchased standard 1-inch
pitch, 3.5-inch disk drives. The drive bays are easily accessible from the
front of the enclosure. Two (2) LEDs on the front of the tray indicate the
drive status. A key-lock on each drive tray secures the hard drive in place,
while an easily accessible button ensures fast and efficient drive hotswapping.
WARNING!
Be careful not to warp, twist, or contort the drive tray in any way (e.g., by
dropping it or resting heavy objects on it). The drive tray has been
customized to fit into the drive bays in the FALCON II subsystem. If the
drive bay superstructure is deformed or altered, the drive trays may not fit
into the drive bay.
1.2.3
SATA to PATA Dongle Kits
Figure 1-8: Dongle Kit
PN: IFT-9270AN1S1P
FALCON II is designed to operate with SATA or SATA-II drives. Prior to
purchasing the subsystem, you should have determined whether to use
SATA, SATA-II, or parallel ATA (PATA) hard drives. If you wish to use
PATA hard drives in your subsystem, the sixteen (16) SATA-to-PATA
dongle kits must be purchased separately and installed independently. (See
Figure 1-8)
1-6
FALCON II Subsystem
Components
Chapter 1: Introduction
WARNING!
The dongle kits are small, delicate components that must be handled with
care.
1.2.4
The RAID Controller Module
PN: IFT-83AU24GD16-M2 or IFT-83AU24GD16 (without DDR RAM)
The RAID controller module contains a main circuit board, a preinstalled
256MB capacity or above DDR RAM DIMM module and the controller
module interfaces. The controller module contains no user-serviceable
components. Except when installing/upgrading the cache memory inside,
the controller module should never be removed or opened.
WARNING!
Although the RAID controller can be removed, the only time you should
touch the controller itself is to install the memory modules. The RAID
controller is built of sensitive components and unnecessary tampering can
damage the controller.
The heart of the FALCON II RAID controller subsystem is the 320MB per
second SCSI-to-SATA controller board. The controller comes with two (2)
pre-set SCSI-320 host channels, CH0 and CH1. The subsystem connects to
the host through a VHDCI SCSI input connector, while the output connector
is ready to connect external devices. (See Figure 1-9)
The docking connector at the rear of the controller board is used to connect
the controller module to the backplane board. A DDR RAM DIMM socket
is strategically placed in an easily accessible location on the controller board
for easy insertion of the DDR RAM DIMM module.
1.2.5
Controller Module Interfaces
All external interfaces that connect to external devices are located on the
controller module rear panel shown in Figure 1-9. The interfaces are listed
below.
FALCON II Subsystem Components
1-7
Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 1-9: Controller Module Interfaces
1.2.6
•
Host Ports: Two (2) SCSI-320 host channels (CH0 and CH1 in
Figure 1-9) connect the Falcon II subsystem to the host through two
(2) dual-stacked VHDCI SCSI connectors.
•
Ethernet Ports: A single 10/100BaseT Ethernet port (located next
to COM2) is used for remote management through the network.
•
COM ports: The controller module comes with two (2) COM
ports. One port is used to access the controller-embedded
configuration utility through the network, and the other connects to
a UPS connection. Please refer to Appendix A for the instructions
on connecting a UPS.
•
Levers: Two (2) levers located in the sides of the controller board
rear panel provide easy controller module installation and secure
the controller module in place.
DIMM Module
The controller module comes with a pre-installed 256MB capacity or above
DDR RAM DIMM module and can support capacities up to 1GB. The
DIMM module is placed in an easily accessed location on the controller
board. However, when the DIMM module is being changed, the controller
module must be removed from the subsystem chassis.
1.2.7
BBU
PN: IFT-9273CBT-C
An optional, separately purchased Li-ION battery backup unit (BBU) (see
Figure 1-11) can sustain cache memory after a power failure. If you
purchased a BBU, it will be installed on the upper left side of the controller
module in the rear subsystem chassis. Please refer to Section 2.6 for
installation instructions.
1-8
FALCON II Subsystem
Components
Chapter 1: Introduction
Figure 1-10: BBU Module
In accordance with international transportation regulations, the BBU is only
charged to between 35% and 45% of its total capacity when shipped.
Therefore, after powering on the subsystem (see Section 4.4) the BBU must
be charged to its full capacity. It normally requires approximately twelve
(12) hours for the battery to be fully charged. If the battery is not fully
charged after twelve (12) hours, there is a problem with the BBU and you
should contact your subsystem vendor immediately. While the battery is
being charged, the LED on the BBU rear panel and the fifth LED on the rear
panel of the controller module will flash slowly. (See Chapter 3.2.6 for
details on the LED indicators.) You can check the status of the battery’s
charge via RAIDWatch or the firmware.
1.2.8
Power Supply Units
PN: IFT-9273CPSU
The FALCON II is equipped with two (2) redundant, hot-swappable,
460W PSUs, which are located at the rear of the enclosure. (See Figure 1-5)
The PSU is permanently mounted into a 2U (dual-level) bracket especially
designed to house both the PSU and a cooling module, which is mounted in
the lower part of the 2U bracket. Hot-swapping the PSU requires the
removal of the cooling module.
As shown in Figure 1-11, each PSU comes with a single power socket for
power cord plug-in, and a power switch on the right to turn the subsystem
on and off. Two (2) embedded cooling fans provide sufficient airflow to
keep the PSU cool. A single LED indicates the PSU status. When any power
supply failure occurs, such as over-voltage or fan failure, the LED shines
red. A handle at the back of the PSU has been especially designed to enable
you to remove the PSU from the subsystem while the subsystem is online.
This should only be done if the PSU has failed and needs to be replaced.
A retention screw at the top of the PSU module secures the PSU to the
enclosure. To remove the PSU, the retention screw must be removed first.
When installing a new PSU module, make sure that the retention screw has
been firmly secured.
FALCON II Subsystem Components
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 1-11: PSU Module
For the PSU specifications, please refer to Appendix B.
1.2.9
Cooling Modules
PN: IFT-9273CFanMod
The FALCON II is equipped with two (2) 1U, dual-fan, redundant, hotswappable cooling modules (IFT-9273CFanMod). They are installed in the
cooling module slots located in the lower section of the PSU modules (see
Figure 1-12.) The two (2) 9.7cm fans housed in each cooling module
provide two (2) fan speeds. When the subsystem is running in normal
ambient temperature, the fans operate at the lower speed. When the
temperature reaches the temperature threshold, the fans automatically
change to high speed to generate more cooling air from the front to the rear
of the subsystem to extract the heat generated by the hard drives.
Cooling module specifications are listed in Appendix B.
Figure 1-12: Cooling Module
1-10
FALCON II Subsystem
Components
Chapter 1: Introduction
1.3 Subsystem Monitoring
FALCON II subsystem comes with a number of different monitoring
methods that provide you with continual updates on the status of the system
and individual components. The following monitoring features are included
in the subsystem.
1.3.1
I2C bus
The following FALCON II elements are interfaced to the RAID controller
over a non-user-serviceable I2C bus:
•
PSU modules
•
Cooling modules
•
Temperature sensors (for the temperature of the backplane board
and controller board)
1.3.2
LED Indicators
The following active components come with LEDs to indicate the status of
the individual component:
•
RAID controller (5 LEDs)
•
LCD panel (3 LEDs)
•
BBU (2 LEDs)
•
Cooling modules (2 LEDs)
•
PSU modules (1 LED)
•
Drive trays (2 LEDs)
1.3.3
Firmware (FW) and RAIDWatch GUI
Firmware: The firmware is pre-installed software used to configure the
subsystem. The latest firmware functionalities include Task Scheduler,
Intelligent Drive Handling, and Media Scan. Media Scan handles low
quality drives in both the degraded mode and during the rebuild process.
Maintenance tasks will then be performed on an entire array or specific hard
drives. Various options are user-configurable such as priority, start time, and
execution internals. For more information, please refer to the Generic
Manual in the product CD.
Subsystem Monitoring
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RAIDWatch: RAIDWatch is a premier web-based graphics user interface
(GUI) that can be installed on a remote computer and accessed via the web.
The manager communicates with the array via the connection of the existing
host interface or Ethernet link to the array’s LAN port. For more
information, please refer to the RAIDWatch User’s Manual in the product
CD.
1.3.4
Audible Alarms
The FALCON II subsystem comes with audible alarms that are triggered
when certain active components fail or when certain (controller or
subsystem) thresholds are exceeded. Whenever you hear an audible alarm
from the FALCON II, it is imperative that you determine the cause and
rectify the problem immediately.
Event notification messages indicate the completion or status of array
configuration tasks and are always accompanied by two (2) or three (3)
successive and prolonged beeps.
WARNING:
Failing to respond when an audible alarm is heard can lead to permanent
damage of the FALCON II. When an audible alarm is heard, rectify the
problem as soon as possible.
1.4 Hot-swappable Components
1.4.1
Hot-swap Capabilities
The FALCON II subsystem comes with a number of hot-swappable
components. A hot-swap component is one that can be exchanged while the
subsystem is still online without affecting the operational integrity of the
subsystem. These components should only be removed from the subsystem
when they are being replaced. At no other time should these components be
removed from the subsystem.
1.4.2
Components
The following components are hot-swappable:
1-12
•
Power supply units (PSUs)
•
Cooling modules
•
BBU
•
Hard drives
Hot-swappable Components
Chapter 1: Introduction
1.4.3
Normalized Airflow
Proper subsystem cooling is referred to as “normalized” airflow.
Normalized airflow ensures the sufficient cooling of the subsystem and is
only attained when all components are properly installed. Therefore, a failed
component should only be hot-swapped when a replacement is available. If
a failed component is removed but not replaced, permanent damage to the
subsystem can result.
Hot-swappable Components
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left blank
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Hot-swappable Components
Chapter 2: Hardware Installation
Chapter 2
Hardware Installation
2.1 Introduction
This chapter gives detailed instructions on how to install the subsystem.
When installing the subsystem, it is necessary to install the controller
module, hard drives, and drive trays. Depending on the type of drives being
used, it may also be necessary to install dongle kits. Installation into a rack
or cabinet should occur before the hard drives or drive trays are installed
into the subsystem. Please confirm that you received all of the components
listed on the Unpacking List that came with the subsystem before
proceeding with the installation process.
CAUTION!
Please note that the installation instructions described in this manual
should be carefully followed to prevent any difficulties and damages to
your system.
2.2 Installation Prerequisites
1. Static-free installation environment: The FALCON II subsystem
must be installed in a static-free environment to minimize the
possibility of electrostatic discharge (ESD) damage. (See Section 2.3.2)
2. Component check: Before installing the FALCON II subsystem, you
should first check to see that you have received all the required
components. (See Section 2.5) If any items appear damaged, contact
your vendor for a replacement.
3. Dongle kits: If you wish to use PATA drives in the FALCON II
controller subsystem, a SATA-to-PATA dongle kit needs to be installed
in each drive tray. (See Section 2.8.2)
4. Hard drives: Up to sixteen (16) SATA-I, SATA-II or PATA hard
drives must be purchased separately prior to the FALCON II
subsystem installation. (See Section 2.8)
Introduction
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
5. Cabling: The FALCON II comes with an external VHDCI to VHDCI
SCSI round cable to connect the subsystem to a host computer. All
other SCSI cables used to connect to a second host computer or external
devices must be purchased separately. Please see Chapter 4 for sample
topologies and configuration options.
6. Memory module: If you wish to change the pre-installed memory
module, a separately purchased module must be installed. (See Section
5.3)
7. BBU: If you wish to use a BBU on the controller, the module must be
purchased separately. For installation instructions, please see Section
2.7.
8. Rack installation: The enclosure chassis can be installed into rack
cabinet using separately purchased mounting rails, rear-attached
brackets, or RAID’s slide rails. (See Section 2.10)
2.3 Safety Precautions
2.3.1 Precautions and Instructions
1. Be sure the correct power range (100-120 or 200-230VAC) is supplied
by your rack cabinet or power outlet.
2. Thermal notice: All drive trays (even if they do not contain a hard
drive) must be installed into the enclosure. Leaving a drive bay or
module slot open will greatly affect the airflow efficiency within the
enclosure, and will consequently lead to system overheating. Keep a
faulty module in place until you have a replacement unit and you are
ready to replace it.
3. An enclosure without disk drives can weigh over 24 kilograms. Two
(2) people are required to install or relocate the subsystem. Drives
should be removed from the enclosure before moving the subsystem.
4. Airflow considerations: The subsystem requires an airflow clearance
especially on the front and rear. For proper ventilation, a minimum of
2.5cm is required between the front of the enclosure and rack cover; a
minimum of 5cm is required between the enclosure and end of the rack.
5. Handle the system modules by the retention screws, eject levers, or the
module’s metal frame/face plate only. Avoid touching the PCB boards
and connector pins.
6. None of the covers or replaceable modules should be removed in order
to maintain compliance with safety, emission, or thermal requirements.
2-2
Safety Precautions
Chapter 2: Hardware Installation
7. Always secure every enclosure module by its retaining screws or make
sure it is held in place by its latches.
8. Always make sure the subsystem has a safe electrical earth connection
via power cords or chassis ground by the rack cabinet.
9.
Be sure that the rack cabinet in which the subsystem chassis is to be
installed provides sufficient ventilation channels and airflow circulation
around the subsystem.
10. Provide a soft, clean surface to place your enclosure on before working
on it. Servicing the enclosure on a rough surface may damage the finish
of the chassis.
11. If it is necessary to transport the subsystem, repackage all drives and
replaceable modules separately.
2.3.2 Static-free Installation
Static electricity can damage the system’s electronic components. To
prevent ESD damage to any of the components, follow these precautions
before touching or handling them:
•
Discharge the static electricity accumulated in your body by
wearing an anti-static wristband.
•
Avoid carpets, plastic, vinyl, and Styrofoam in your work area.
•
Handle all components by holding their edges or metal frames.
Avoid touching the exposed circuitry on PCB boards and connector
pins.
2.4 General Installation Procedure
Following all the instructions provided below can save subsystem
installation time. Detailed, illustrated instructions for each component are
given in the following sections.
CAUTION!
To ensure that your system is correctly installed, please follow the steps
outlined below. If you follow these steps, installation will be fast and
efficient. If you do not follow these steps, you may accidentally install the
hardware incorrectly.
1. Unpack: Unpack the subsystem and confirm that all the components on
the packing list have been included. (See Section 2.5)
General Installation Procedure
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
2. Install an optional BBU: If an optional BBU has been separately
purchased, it should be installed prior to operating the subsystem. (See
Section 2.7)
3. Rack/Cabinet installation: If the subsystem is going to be installed in a
rack or cabinet, it should be installed prior to installing the hard drives.
Installing the subsystem into a rack or cabinet requires at least two (2)
people. (See Section 2.10)
4. Install dongle kits: If you wish to use PATA hard drives in your
subsystem, you must purchase the SATA-to-PATA dongle kits and
install them separately. (See Section 2.8.2)
5. Install hard drives: Separately purchased SATA-I, SATA-II, or PATA
hard drives must be individually installed into the drive trays. (See
Section 2.8)
6. Install drive trays: After the hard drives have been installed into the
drive trays, the drive trays must be installed into the enclosure itself.
(See Section 2.9)
7. Cable connection: Use the power cables that came with the subsystem
to connect the subsystem to the main power source. Use the provided
SCSI cable to connect a host port to the host computer or an external
device.
8. Power up: Once the components have been properly installed and all
cables are properly connected, you can power up the subsystem and
configure the RAID array. (See Section 4.4)
2.4.1 Installation Procedure Flowchart
Figure 2-1 shows a flowchart of the installation procedure. As you complete
each step, check off the “Done” box on the right. Please use this flowchart
in conjunction with the instructions that follow.
2-4
General Installation Procedure
Chapter 2: Hardware Installation
Figure 2-1: Upgrade Procedure Flowchart
2.5 Unpacking the Subsystem
Use the Unpacking Checklist in your package to verify package contents.
Carefully check the items contained in each box before proceeding with
installation.
NOTE:
A detailed packing list can be found in your product shipping package or
product CD.
Each packed box is separated into upper and lower levels.
Upper level: The box on the upper level contains:
•
Sixteen (16) drive trays
Lower level: Three (3) boxes are placed in the lower level. One (1) box
contains the enclosure chassis with all the pre-installed components. The
other two (2) boxes contain the power cords and accessory items.
Unpacking the Subsystem
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Accessory items include an RS-232C audio jack cable, VHDCI to VHDCI
external SCSI cable, null modem, Quick Installation Guide, screws, and a
CD containing the Installation and Hardware Reference Manual (this
document), the Generic Operation Manual (Firmware), and the
RAIDWatch User’s Manual.
2.6 Installation Overview
2.6.1 Pre-installed Components
The following components have been pre-installed in the FALCON II and
therefore do not need to be installed:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1 - LCD module
2 - Subsystem handles (right and left)
1 - Backplane board
1 - Controller module
1 - DDR RAM DIMM module (installed in the controller module)
2 - PSU modules
2 - Cooling modules
2.6.2 Uninstalled Components
You must install the following components:
•
•
•
•
Hard drives (separately purchased SATA-I, SATA-II or PATA
drives)
Drive trays
Dongle kits (if PATA drives are being used)
BBU (if ordered)
2.7 BBU Installation
2.7.1 BBU Module Installation Overview
The BBU is an optional item that can sustain cache memory in the event of
a power failure or in the extremely unlikely event of both PSUs failing.
Purchasing and installing a BBU is highly recommended. The optional BBU
provides additional data security and helps minimize the loss of data during
power shutdowns.
The BBU is inserted into the subsystem in the top, left corner of the
controller module. The BBU is secured to the subsystem with two (2)
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Installation Overview
Chapter 2: Hardware Installation
retention screws. When shipped, the BBU slot in the subsystem rear panel is
covered with a metal dummy plate that must first be removed.
2.7.2 BBU Warnings and Precautions
•
Install or replace the BBU supplied by your Falcon II subsystem
vendors only.
Use of battery cells provided otherwise will
void our warranty.
•
Always dispose of discharged or used batteries in an ecologically
responsible manner. Dispose used BBU at authorized battery
disposal sites only.
•
Do not use nor leave the BBU near a heat source. Heat can melt the
insulation and damage other safety features of battery cells,
possibly leading it to acid leak, and result in flames or explosion.
•
Do not immerse the BBU in water nor allow it to get wet. Its
protective features can be damaged. Abnormal chemical reactions
may occur, possibly causing functional defects, acid leak, and other
hazardous results.
•
Do not disassemble or modify the BBU. If disassembled, the BBU
could leak acid, overheat, emit smoke, burst and/or ignite.
•
Do not pierce the BBU with a sharp object, strike it with a hammer,
step on it, or throw it. These actions could damage or deform it,
internal short-circuiting can occur, possibly causing functional
defects, acid leak, and other hazardous results.
•
If the BBU leaks, gives off a bad odor, generates heat, becomes
discolored or deformed, or in any way appears abnormal during
use, recharging or storage, immediately remove it from the
subsystem and stop using it. If this is discovered when you first use
the BBU, return it to RAID or your system vendor.
2.7.3 Installation Procedure
To install a BBU into the controller module, please follow these steps:
1. Prior to installing the BBU, power off the subsystem or restart the
subsystem after the installation. For power off subsystem procedures,
please refer to Section 4.5.
NOTE:
A new or replaced BBU takes at least 6 hours to charge to its full
capacity. Reset the subsystem whenever a BBU is replaced or added for
the new BBU to take effect.
BBU Installation
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
2.
Using a screwdriver, loosen the two (2) retention screws located on
both sides of the dummy plate. (See Figure 2-2)
Figure 2-2: Loosening the BBU Retention Screws
3. Once the retention screws are loosened, remove the dummy plate from
the chassis. (See Figure 2-3)
Figure 2-3: Removing the BBU Slot Dummy Plate
NOTE:
It may be difficult to remove the dummy plate as it is embedded in the
subsystem chassis. If you are unable to dislodge the sheet, wedge the
head of a flat-head screwdriver between the metal sheet and the chassis
and then gently nudge the metal sheet out of the chassis.
4. Install the BBU. Align the BBU with the BBU slot. Gently insert the
BBU until the back of the BBU reaches the end of the slot.
5. Secure the BBU to the chassis. Fasten the two (2) retention screws on
the BBU rear panel to secure the BBU to the chassis. (See Figure 2-4)
Figure 2-4: Installing the BBU Module
2-8
BBU Installation
Chapter 2: Hardware Installation
2.8 Hard Drive Installation
2.8.1 Hard Drive Installation Prerequisites
Hard drives for the Falcon II subsystem must be purchased separately. When
purchasing the hard drives, the following factors should be considered:
Capacity (MB/GB): Use drives with the same capacity. RAID arrays use a
“least-common-denominator” approach. The maximum capacity of each
drive used in the array is the maximum capacity of the smallest drive.
Choose big drives with the same storage capacity.
Profile: The drive trays and bays of the system are designed for 3.5-inch
wide x 1-inch-high hard drives. It is highly recommended that you do not try
to use drives of any other size.
Drive type: The FALCON II described in this manual can use SATA-I,
SATA-II or PATA hard drives. Please ensure that you purchase the correct
hard drives.
CAUTION!
The hard drives and drive trays should only be installed into the
subsystem after the subsystem has been mounted into a rack cabinet. If
the hard drives are installed first, the subsystem will be too heavy to lift
and the possible impact during installation may damage your drives.
WARNING!
1.
Handle hard drives with extreme care. Hard drives are very
delicate. Dropping a drive onto a hard surface (even from a short
distance) and hitting or touching the circuits on the drives with your
tools may cause damage to the drives.
2.
Observe all ESD prevention methods when installing drives.
3.
Only use screws supplied with the drive canisters. Longer screws
may damage the drive.
2.8.2 Dongle Kit Installation
If you wish to use PATA drives in the subsystem, SATA-to-PATA dongle
kits are available for purchase separately and must be installed into each
drive tray prior to installing the PATA drives.
Hard Drive Installation
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
WARNING!
The dongle kits are small, delicate components that must be handled with
care.
1. Installation: The dongle kit (IFT-9270AN1S1P-0010) shown in Figure
2-5 is mounted onto a metal base plate that has three (3) pre-drilled
holes reserved for retention screws.
Figure 2-5: SATA-to-PATA Dongle Kit
2. Three (3) corresponding pre-drilled screw holes are located at the back
of the drive tray shown in Figure 2-6.
Figure 2-6: Screw Locations on an Empty Drive Tray
3. Place the dongle kit at the back of the drive tray. Hold the dongle kit in
place and turn the drive tray over. Align the holes in the base of the
drive tray with the holes in the dongle kit base tray.
4. Insert the three (3) retention screws from the bottom of the drive tray.
These screws will firmly secure the dongle kit to the drive tray and
facilitate the installation of the appropriate drive. (See Figure 2-7)
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Hard Drive Installation
Chapter 2: Hardware Installation
Figure 2-7: Installing a Dongle Kit
NOTE:
Only use the screws provided in the dongle kit package. The screws size
should be 6#32*4mm. Using an unmatched screw could result hard drive
malfunction.
2.8.3 Drive Installation without a Dongle Kit
1. Place the SATA hard drive into the drive tray as shown in Figure 2-8,
making sure that the hard drive is oriented in such a way that the SATA
connector is facing the back of the drive tray.
Figure 2-8: Installing a SATA Hard Drive
2. Adjust the drive’s location until the mounting holes in the drive
canister are aligned with those on the hard drive. Secure the drive with
four (4) of the supplied 6/32 flat-head screws. (See Figure 2-8)
Hard Drive Installation
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
2.8.4 Drive Installation with a Dongle Kit
1. For PATA drives, connect the drive to the dongle kit and make sure
that the dongle kit connector is firmly attached to the hard drive
connector. Connect the ATA and power cables from the dongle kit to
the hard drive. (See Figure 2-9) Make sure that these connections are
secure and will not come loose.
Figure 2-9: PATA Hard Drive Connectors
2. Once the connectors from the dongle board have been firmly attached
to the hard drive, place the hard drive into the drive tray as shown in
Figure 2-10.
Figure 2-10: Inserting the PATA Hard Drive
3. Adjust the drive’s location until the mounting holes in the drive
canister align with those on the hard drive. Secure the drive with four
(4) of the supplied 6/32 flat-head screws.
2.9 Drive Tray Installation
Once the hard drives have been installed in the drive trays, the drive trays
can be installed into the FALCON II.
WARNING!
All drive trays must be installed into the enclosure even if they do not
contain a hard drive. If the trays are not installed into the enclosure, the
ventilation required for cooling will not be normalized and the subsystem
will overheat.
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Drive Tray Installation
Chapter 2: Hardware Installation
1.
Make sure the key-lock is in the unlocked position, i.e., the groove on
its face is in a horizontal orientation. If the groove is in a vertical
position, as shown in Figure 2-11, then the key-lock is locked and the
front flap on the drive tray cannot be opened.
Figure 2-11: Front View of an Individual Drive Tray
2. Open the front flap on the drive tray. (See Figure 2-12) Push the
button on the front of the drive tray. The front flap will open in an
upward direction.
Figure 2-12: Drive Tray Front Flap
3. Align the drive tray with the slot in which you wish to insert it. Make
sure that it is resting on the rails inside the enclosure. Once the drive
tray is lined up with the slot, gently slide it in. This should be done
smoothly and gently. (See Figure 2-13)
Figure 2-13: Installing a Drive Tray
4. Close the front flap on the drive tray. Make sure the front flap is closed
properly to ensure that the SATA connector at the back of the drive tray
is firmly connected to the corresponding connector on the mid-plane
board. If the front flap is not closed properly, the connection between
the hard drive and the subsystem will not be secure.
Drive Tray Installation
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
5. Lock the flap into place by turning the key-lock until the groove on its
face is pointing down (vertical orientation). (See Figure 2-14)
Figure 2-14: Drive Tray Key-lock Rotation
6.
Once the drive tray is inserted, the RAID controller will recognize the
drive and scan it in automatically.
2.10 Rack/Cabinet Installation
PN: IFT-9273CSlider36
PN: IFT-9273CSlider32
The FALCON II subsystem has been designed to fit into a standard cabinet or
rack. Two (2) slide rails are available for installing the subsystem into a
rack or cabinet. Please contact your system vendor for further details. The
subsystem should be installed in the rack or cabinet before the hard drives
and the drive trays are installed. If the drive trays with the associated hard
drives are installed, the subsystem will be too heavy to mount into a rack or
cabinet. When installing the subsystem into a rack or cabinet it is advisable
that three people assist in the mounting process.
To install the subsystem into a rack or cabinet please refer to the installation
instructions that came with the slide rails.
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Rack/Cabinet Installation
Chapter 3: Subsystem Monitoring
Chapter 3
Subsystem Monitoring
3.1 Subsystem Monitoring Overview
The FALCON II subsystem is equipped with a variety of self-monitoring
features that help to keep subsystem managers informed of the subsystem
operational status. These monitoring features provide vital feedback to help
you maintain the operational integrity of the subsystem. Prompt response to
warnings and subsystem component failure notifications will improve the
overall operation of the subsystem and help ensure the longevity of the
FALCON II.
Self-monitoring features include:
•
Firmware (FW): The controllers in the FALCON II come with
pre-installed FW, which can be accessed using either the LCD
panel or a PC hyper-terminal. The FALCON II can be connected
to a PC hyper-terminal through the COM ports. Device status
information can be obtained from the FW. The FW is fully
described in the Generic Operation Manual that came with your
system. Please refer to this manual for further information.
•
RAIDWatch: RAIDWatch is a fully integrated, Java-based,
Graphics User Interface (GUI) that came with the subsystem and
can be used to monitor and maintain the subsystem and the RAID
controllers using your web browsers. The LAN port at the back of
each controller module enables you to use an Ethernet cable to
connect to the subsystem.
The RAIDWatch Panel View can be customized to show a direct
representation of the FALCON II in the content panel of the
RAIDWatch screen. Panel View allows you to quickly determine
the operational status of critical FALCON II components. Please
refer to the RAIDWatch User’s Manual for further details.
NOTE:
Detailed installation instructions for RAIDWatch Manager are given in
the RAIDWatch User’s Manual, which is located on the product CD
that came with the Falcon II system.
Subsystem Monitoring Overview
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
•
Configuration Client: The Configuration Client is a powerful
module that runs as a background Disk and Executive Monitor
(DAEMON) independent from RAIDWatch that can be installed
redundantly on different hosts. It is used for event notification via
email, fax, LAN broadcast, SNMP traps, MSN Messenger, ICQ,
SMS short messages, and the configuration utility screen. The
Configuration Client helps prevent blind time and keeps you
constantly informed as to the status of the storage management
subsystem. Instructions on how to activate the Configuration
Client functionality are given in the RAIDWatch User’s Manual.
•
LEDs: Device-status-indicating LEDs are located on all
FALCON II active components. These LEDs inform you of the
integrity of a given component or a given link. You should become
familiar with the different LEDs that are present on the subsystem
and be aware of their functions. (See Section 3.2)
•
Audible alarm: An audible alarm is present on the subsystem
controller board and will be triggered if any of a number of
threatening events occur. These events usually jeopardize the
functional and operational integrity of the controller board and
must be heeded at all times. Events such as a breaching of the
temperature threshold will trigger the alarm. If a subsystem
manager is present, the manager should use either the LCD panel
or the PC hyper-terminal to determine the cause of the alarm and
take the appropriate corrective measures. (See Section 3.3)
•
I2C: The I2C bus monitors the operational integrity of the PSUs,
cooling modules, and RAID controller board temperature. (See
Section 3.4)
Subsystem monitoring is a necessary part of subsystem management. If
failure events or other disruptive events are detected and reported, the
subsystem managers must take the appropriate action to rectify the problem.
Failure to act in a properly specified manner to a system event (like
overheating) can cause severe and permanent damage to the subsystem.
3.2 Status Indicating LEDs
3.2.1 Brief Overview of the LEDs
The following devices all come with LEDs that inform subsystem managers
about the operational status of the component on which they are mounted.
The FALCON II has a total of 49 status-indicating LEDs distributed over
the active components in the following ways:
3-2
Status Indicating LEDs
Chapter 3: Subsystem Monitoring
Component
LEDs per module
Total LEDs
Definition
LCD Panel
3
3
See Section 3.2.2
Drive Trays
2
32
See Section 3.2.3
Controller
Modules
5
5
See Section 3.2.4
LAN port
2
2
See Section 3.2.5
BBU Module
1
1
See Section 3.2.6
PSU Module
1
2
See Section 3.2.7
Cooling
Module
2
4
See Section 3.2.8
(if BBU is
applied)
Table 3-1: LED Distribution
LED definitions are given in the following sections.
3.2.2 LCD Panel
The LCD panel shown in Figure 3-1 consists of five (5) buttons, three (3)
LEDs, and a 16x2-character LCD screen that indicates subsystem status.
Press “ENT” button for two (2) seconds on the initial screen to enter the
main menu. Press the “ESC” button to clear current event.
Press the ENT button for two (2) seconds on the initial screen to enter the
Main Menu. Press the ESC button to clear the current event.
Press the UP and DOWN arrow keys to select viewing items. In the last
item, “View and Edit Event Logs,” the most recent event is displayed first.
For dual RAID controllers, the LCD shows the status of the primary
controller. Press the UP and DOWN arrow keys for more than one (1)
second to display the status of the secondary controller.
The MUTE button can be used to stop the alarm until the next controller
event occurs.
Three (3) LEDs monitor the status of the system. The definitions of these
LEDs are given in Table 3-2 below.
Status Indicating LEDs
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 3-1: LCD Panel
Name
Color
Status
ON indicates that power is being supplied to
the subsystem.
PWR
Blue
(Power)
OFF indicates that no power is being
supplied to the subsystem.
FLASHING indicates that there is activity
on the host/drive channels.
BUSY
White
OFF indicates that there is no actively on the
host/drive channels.
ON indicates that a component failure/status
event has occurred.
ATTEN
(Attention)
Red
OFF indicates that the subsystem and all its
components are operating correctly.
Table 3-2: LCD Panel LED Definitions
NOTE:
During the power up process, the LCD panel ATTEN LED will be turned
on. If the subsystem boots up correctly, then the ATTEN LED will be
turned off after the boot-up procedure is complete.
3.2.3 Drive Tray LEDs
Two (2) LED indicators are located on the right side of each drive tray. (See
Figure 3-2) Refer to Table 3-3 for the LED definitions. When notified by a
drive failure message, you should check the drive tray indicators to find the
correct location of the failed drive. Replacing the wrong drive can fatally
fail a logical array.
3-4
Status Indicating LEDs
Chapter 3: Subsystem Monitoring
Figure 3-2: Drive Tray LEDs
Name
Color
Status
FLASHING indicates data is being written
to or read from the drive. The drive is busy.
Drive Busy
Blue
OFF indicates that there is no activity on the
drive.
Power Status
Green/
Red
GREEN indicates that a drive is installed in
the drive tray
RED indicates that there is a drive failure.
Table 3-3: Drive Tray LED Definitions
3.2.4 Controller Module LEDs
The rear panel of the controller module is shown in Figure 3-3. The LEDs
on the controller’s faceplate that can be accessed from the rear of the
enclosure are numbered from 1 to 5. The definitions are shown in Table 3-4.
Figure 3-3: LEDs on the FALCON II Controller Module
Status Indicating LEDs
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
LED
Name
Color
Status
FLASHING indicates controller
initialization is taking place.
1
Ready
Green
ON indicates the controller is active
and operating properly.
OFF indicates the controller is not
ready for operation.
2
Hst Bsy
(Host Busy)
3
Drv Bsy
(Drive Busy)
4
C_Dirty
(Cache Dirty)
FLASHING indicates
activity on the host ports.
Green
there
OFF indicates there is no activity on
the host ports.
FLASHING indicates there
activity on the drive ports.
Green
Amber
is
is
OFF indicates there is no activity on
the drive ports.
ON indicates that the cache memory
is dirty or is being held up via the
BBU during a system power loss.
ON indicates the BBU is functioning
normally and is able to sustain the
cache memory.
OFF indicates the BBU cannot
sustain the cache memory.
5
BBU Fail
Amber
SLOW FLASH indicates the BBU is
charging.
NOTE: This LED is only functional
when a BBU is installed in the
subsystem.
Table 3-4: Controller Module LED Definitions
3-6
Status Indicating LEDs
Chapter 3: Subsystem Monitoring
3.2.5 LAN Port LEDs
A shielded Ethernet cable must be used to connect the RJ-45 Ethernet port
to a hub on a network after you assign a permanent IP to the FALCON II.
This enables you to manage your subsystem via the web. Two (2) LEDs
located on the Ethernet port indicate the Ethernet connection status. See
Figure 3-4 for the locations of the two (2) LED indicators. Refer to Table 35 for the LED definitions.
Online Status
LAN Activity
Figure 3-4: LAN Indicators
Name
Color
Status
Online Status
Green
ON indicates currently connected to a LAN
LAN Activity
Green
BLINKING indicates active transmission
Table 3-5: LAN Port LEDs Definitions
3.2.6 BBU Module LED
The BBU has an LED on the right side of the rear panel. (See Figure 3-5)
The function is the same as the fifth LED on the controller module. The
LED is off when the BBU is functioning normally and is able to sustain the
cache memory. The LED flashes to indicate the BBU is charging. If the
LED is illuminating amber, please re-charge the BBU or contact your
system vendor to verify the problem.
Figure 3-5: BBU Module LED
3.2.7 PSU LEDs
Each PSU comes with a single LED at the back (see Figure 3-6), located
just above the power switch that turns on the subsystem. This LED indicates
the operational status of the PSU module. Please refer to the PSU LED
definitions shown in Table 3-6.
Status Indicating LEDs
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 3-6: PSU Module LED
Color
Status
FLASHING
Green
The power supply has not been turned on. The PSU
module LED will blink when the subsystem is
connected to a power source but not yet turned on.
Static Green
The PSU is operating normally and experiencing no
problem.
Static Red
The PSU has failed and is unable to provide power to
the subsystem.
OFF
The PSU is not turned on. The PSU module LED will
remain off even if the power cable has been plugged in
but the power switch is not turned on.
Table 3-6: PSU Module LED Definitions
3.2.8 Cooling Module LEDs
Each cooling module has two (2) red LEDs on the back. Each LED
corresponds to a single fan in the cooling module. (See Figure 3-7) When
the LED is on, it indicates the fan has failed. When the LED is off, it
indicates the fan is functioning properly.
Figure 3-7: Cooling Module LEDs and Cooling Fan Locations
3-8
Status Indicating LEDs
Chapter 3: Subsystem Monitoring
The FALCON II has a novel approach to stabilizing the temperature within
the subsystem: When the intelligent sensors on the backplane detect higher
temperature, such as high ambient temperature or the failure of any cooling
or PSU module, the system will turn the cooling fans to high speed to
extract more heat. Once the ambient temperature cools down to normal or
the cooling or PSU modules have been replaced, the cooling fans will return
to low speed.
3.3 Audible Alarm
Different controller environmental and operational parameters (like
temperature, etc.) have been assigned a range of values between which they
can fluctuate. If either the upper or lower thresholds are exceeded, an
audible alarm will automatically be triggered. The alarm will also be
triggered when an active component on the FALCON II fails. If the E
FALCON II manager is onsite and hears an alarm, the manager must read
the error message on the LCD screen or PC terminal to determine what has
triggered the alarm. After determining what has occurred, the FALCON II
manager must take appropriate actions to rectify the problem. WARNING!
If an alarm is triggered it is necessary for you to determine the problem.
If the audible alarm is ignored and the problem is not rectified,
unexpected damages may occur.
3.3.1 Default Threshold Values
Table 3-7 shows the default threshold values for the FALCON II
subsystem. If any of these values are surpassed, the alarm will sound:
Upper Threshold
Lower Threshold
+3.3V
+3.6V
+2.9V
+5V
+5.5V
+4.5V
+12V
+13.2V
+10.8V
CPU Temperature
90ºC
5ºC
Board Temperature
80ºC
5ºC
Enclosure Ambient
Temperature
40ºC
0ºC
Table 3-7: Default Threshold Values
Audible Alarm
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
The thresholds in Table 3-7 are default threshold values and may be
changed. To see how to change these values, please refer to the Generic
Operation Manual on the CD that came with your system.
3.3.2 Failed Devices
If any of the following devices fail, the audible alarm will be triggered:
•
RAID controller module
•
Cooling modules
•
PSU modules
•
BBU
•
Hard drives
NOTE:
When the temperature exceeds a preset threshold, the controller s
charger circuits will stop charging. You will then receive a message that
says Thermal Shutdown/Enter Sleep Mode. When the temperature falls
back within normal range, the battery will resume charging.
3.4 I2C Monitoring
Presence detection and the general working status of the cooling fan and
other modules are monitored through an I2C serial bus. If any of these
modules fail, you will be notified via the various methods described above.
3-10
IP2PC Monitoring
Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
Chapter 4
Subsystem Connection and Operation
This chapter introduces sample topologies, daisy-chaining, and external
device connections for the FALCON II and discusses both the power on
and power off procedures.
4.1 SCSI Connection Overview
The FALCON II subsystem supports two (2) SCSI channels and two (2)
dual-stacked SCSI connectors using SCSI-320 (also known as Ultra-320
SCSI), the latest iteration of the SCSI bus standard. SCSI-320 enables
maximum data transfer rates of up to 320MB/second per channel between
the host computers and FALCON II. This is twice as fast as the Ultra-160
standard, allowing users to store data at the fastest SCSI speeds available.
4.1.1 SCSI Cables
One (1) SCSI cable (IFT-9270UJBODCab) is provided with each
FALCON II for host connection. If you wish to use a second SCSI
cable to connect the second host channel, a second cable must be
purchased separately. Purchase only high quality SCSI-320 cables from a
reputable manufacturer.
To
ensure
optimum
FALCON II
performance, it is necessary to use proper, high quality, durable SCSI-320
cables. Failure to do so will result in downgraded performance.
4.1.2 SCSI Port on the Controller Rear Panel
The FALCON II is equipped with two (2) dual-stacked VHDCI SCSI
connectors on the back of the enclosure for connecting the subsystem to a
host computer and/or to daisy-chain other FALCON II’s. (See Figure 4-1)
The connectors on the bottom of the controller rear panel are for data input
and the connectors on the top are for data output.
SCSI Connection Overview
4-1
Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 4-1: SCSI Connectors on the Controller Rear Panel
4.1.3 SCSI Termination
Correct SCSI termination procedures require that the last device on the
SCSI bus is terminated. If the last device is not terminated or if devices
other than the last are terminated, erratic SCSI bus performance may occur.
The on-board terminator is built into the controller in the FALCON II. You
do not need to install an external terminator when a subsystem acts as the
last device in the daisychain configuration. The on-board terminator default
is enabled. However, if the subsystem is not the last device in the daisy
chain configuration, you can disable the terminator through the LCD panel
on the subsystem, firmware, or RAIDWatch management software.
Typically, the host computer or host adapter (SCSI card inside the PC) is the
first device and is already terminated. When installing the FALCON II on a
SCSI bus with other devices, be sure to observe the above rules regarding
all devices on the SCSI bus. Consult your host computer and/or host adapter
manual for additional information on correct termination procedures.
4.2 Host Connection Topology
4.2.1 Single Host
Figure 4-2: Single Host Connection
4-2
Host Connection Topology
Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
In the example shown in Figure 4-2, one of the SCSI port is connected to a
single host computer.
4.2.2 Dual Hosts
Figure 4-3: Dual Host Connection
In the example shown in Figure 4-3, the two (2) SCSI ports on the
FALCON II are connected to two (2) different host computers and an
Ethernet cable connects both computers to each other. This configuration
provides both path and host computer redundancy. If one of the host
channels becomes disconnected for some reason, or the cable connecting
one of the host ports to the host computer is damaged, the second path
can transmit data from the subsystem to the host computer. Similarly, in
the clustered hosts configuration, the same array can be accessed through
different data paths and downtime will be minimized.
NOTE:
To create dual redundant data paths on the host side, it is necessary to
install third-party failover software on the host computer.
4.3 Daisy Chain
4.3.1 Daisy Chain Topology
The FALCON II offers the flexibility to daisy chain additional
FALCON II subsystems to meet increasing storage needs. In a daisy
chain topology, the FALCON II can be connected to each other. The IN
ports on the first subsystem are both connected to separate SCSI-320 host
computers. The OUT ports on the first subsystem are connected to the IN
ports on the second subsystem. This process is repeated for the third
subsystem.
Daisy Chain
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 4-4: Daisy Chain FALCON II Subsystems
4.3.2 Daisy Chain Procedures
1.
Connect the RAID subsystem to the host computer. Use the VHDCI to
VHDCI SCSI cable that was provided in the packaging box. Attach one
end to the host computer and the other end to the SCSI IN port on the
back of the RAID subsystem.
2.
Daisy chain subsystems. If you wish to connect more than one
subsystem, the extra VHDCI to VHDCI SCSI cable must be separately
purchased and installed. Attach one end of the cable to the SCSI OUT
port and the other end to the SCSI IN port in the next subsystem.
3.
Assign chassis IDs. Each chassis must be assigned a unique chassis ID
before being powered on. The chassis ID for the first RAID subsystem
is 0. The chassis IDs for the subsystems connected to the first RAID
subsystem are from 1 to 16. You can assign chassis IDs through the
LCD panel on the subsystem, firmware, or RAIDWatch management
software. (See Figure 4-4)
4. Create redundant host paths. If access to data is a critical requirement,
redundant data paths to different LDs (logical drives) or logical
volumes (LVs) can be created. To do this, logical units (LDs or LVs)
are mapped to both host channels (CH0 and CH1 in Figure 4-4.) This
will ensure that if one host computer fails, the second host computer
will be able to access the logical units on that host computer.
4-4
Daisy Chain
Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
NOTE:
•
The subsystem is shipped with one (1) SCSI-to-SCSI daisy chain
cable (IFT-9270UJBODCAB). If you are going to cascade your
subsystems, extra cables must be purchased separately.
•
To create dual redundant data paths on the host side, it is necessary
to install third-party failover software on the host computer.
4.4 Power On
Once all of the components have been installed in the FALCON II and the
host channels have been connected to the host, the subsystem can be
powered on.
4.4.1 Check List
BEFORE powering on the FALCON II, please check the following:
‰
Memory module: Memory modules have been correctly installed
on the controller boards.
‰
BBU: If used, the BBU has been installed correctly.
‰
Hard drives: Hard drives have been correctly installed in the drive
trays.
‰
Drive trays: ALL the drive trays, whether or not they have a hard
drive, have been installed into the subsystem.
‰
Cable connections: The host ports on the subsystem have been
correctly connected to a host computer.
‰
Power cables: The power cables have been connected to the PSU
modules on the subsystem and plugged into the main power source.
‰
Ambient temperature: All the subsystem components have been
acclimated to the surrounding temperature.
4.4.2 Power On Procedure
When powering on the FALCON II, please follow these steps:
1. Power on the subsystems that are not connected directly to the host
computer, if applied.
If you have daisy chained any FALCON II, power on those
subsystems before powering on the first subsystem that is connected to
your host computer(s).
Power On
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
2. Power on the FALCON II.
The first FALCON II should be powered on before the host
computers. To power on the FALCON II please follow the description
below.
Using the power cords provided in the package, connect both power
sockets on the subsystem rear panel to the main power source.
Turn the two (2) power switches on. (See Figure 4-5) Each switch
controls a single PSU, therefore make sure that both switches are turned
on.
Figure 4-5: Power Sockets and Power Switches
CAUTION!
Although the PSUs are redundant and a single PSU can provide
sufficient power to the system, it is advisable to turn both the power
switches on. If only one (1) PSU is operating and that PSU fails, the
whole system will crash.
3. Power on the host computers.
The host computers should be the last devices that are turned on. Please
refer to the manual that came with your host computers to see their own
power on procedures.
4.4.3 Power On Status Check
Once the FALCON II has been powered on, the status of the entire
subsystem should be checked to ensure that everything is running smoothly
and that there are no complications or malfunctions.
1. Controller module LEDs: The Controller Ready, Host Busy, and Drive
Busy LEDs should all flash green.
2. Drive tray LEDs: The green LEDs for all the drive trays that contain
hard drive should light up showing that there is power.
3. LCD panel LEDs: The blue LED on the LCD panel should illuminate,
indicating that power is being supplied to the system.
4-6
Power On
Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
4. Firmware and RAIDWatch: The overall status of the system may be
checked using the pre-installed firmware or the RAIDWatch GUI.
5. Audible alarm: If any errors occur during the initialization process, the
onboard alarm will sound in a hastily repeated manner.
6. Drive tray LEDs should start flashing, indicating that the RAID control
units are attempting to access the hard drives.
System firmware can be configured to support a delayed sequence for
starting drives. Please consult your Generic Operation Manual for more
details.
NOTE:
The subsystem has been designed to run continuously. If a component
fails, the fault can be corrected online.
4.4.4 LCD Screen
When powering on the subsystem, wait for the front panel LCD screen to
show “READY” or “No Host LUN” before the host boots up. Refer to
Figure 4-6 on how to read the screens.
Model Name
FALCON II
Ready
Status/Data Transfer Indicator
Figure 4-6: The LCD Startup Screen
The LCD screen startup sequence is shown and described in the sequence
below:
Initializing .
Please Wait...
FALCON II
Modem Not Config
Power On
This screen appears when the PSUs are
turned on.
This screen appears after the initialization
process. It clearly shows the model name.
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
FALCON II
256MB RAM, Wait
Verifying installed cache memory.
FALCON II
No Host LUN
System is ready. You can now start to
configure the subsystem.
4.5 Power Off Procedure
If you wish to power down the FALCON II, please follow these steps:
NOTE:
If you wish to power down the FALCON II, please ensure that no timeconsuming processes, like a logical drive parity check or a
background scrub, are running.
1. Stop I/O access to the system.
Use the software provided on the host computer to stop all IO accesses
to the FALCON II. Please refer to the user’s manual that came with
your host computer.
2. Flush the cache.
Use the “Shutdown Controller” function to flush all cached data. This
prepares the RAID subsystem to be powered down.
3. Turn off the power.
Turn off the power switches at the top of the rear panel of the
FALCON II. Once the subsystem has been powered down, other devices
that are connected to the subsystem may be powered down.
4-8
Chapter 5: Subsystem Maintenance
Chapter 5
Subsystem Maintenance
5.1 Overview
5.1.1 About Subsystem Maintenance
Constant monitoring and maintenance of your FALCON II minimizes
subsystem downtime and preserves the working integrity of the system for a
longer period of time. If any of the subsystem components fail, they must be
replaced as soon as possible.
WARNING!
Do not remove a failed component from the subsystem until you have a
replacement on hand. If you remove a failed component without
replacing it, the internal airflow will be disrupted and the system will
overheat, causing damage to the subsystem.
All of the following components can be replaced in case of failure:
1.
Controller modules – Section 5.2
2.
Memory module – Section 5.3
3.
BBU – Section 5.4
4.
PSU modules – Section 5.5
5. Cooling modules – Section 5.6
6. Hard drives – Section 5.7
7. Hard drive trays – Section 5.7
8.
Dongle kits – Section 5.8
5.1.2 General Notes on Component Replacement
•
Overview
With the exception of the RAID controller module, all of the
components on the FALCON II, including the PSU modules, cooling
modules, and drive trays, are hot-swappable and can be changed while
the subsystem is still in operation.
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
•
Qualified engineers who are familiar with the FALCON II should be
the only ones who make component replacements. If you are not
familiar with the FALCON II or with RAID subsystem maintenance in
general, it is strongly advised that you refer FALCON II
maintenance to a suitably qualified maintenance engineer.
•
Normalized airflow depends upon the presence of all subsystem
components. A subsystem component, even if it has failed, should not
be removed from the subsystem until a replacement is readily at hand
and can be quickly installed. Removing subsystem components without
a replacement can lead to permanent subsystem damage.
•
When replacing any hot-swappable component, caution should be taken
to ensure that the components are handled in an appropriate manner.
Rough or improper handling of components can lead to irreparable
damage.
•
When removing a controller module from the subsystem, ensure that
the power has been turned off and that all precautionary measures,
without exception, are adhered to. The controller board and the I/O
board on which it is mounted are very sensitive components and can be
easily damaged.
5.2 Replacing Controller Module Components
The controller module in the FALCON II consists of the following
replaceable components:
•
•
DDR RAM DIMM module
Controller module
If any of these components fail, it need to be replaced. To replace any of
these components, the system power must first be turned off, and the
controller module must be removed from the FALCON II.
5.2.1 Controller Module Maintenance Overview
5-2
•
The controller module contains a DDR RAM DIMM module. When
replacing the controller module, the DIMM module must be removed
from the old controller module and reinstalled onto the new controller
module.
•
When replacing the controller module, always remember that the
controller board is one of the most sensitive components in the
FALCON II. All previously stipulated safety precautions (see Section
2.3) must be strictly adhered to. Failure to adhere to these precautions
can result in permanent damage to the controller board, resulting in
lengthy delays for the end user.
Replacing Controller Module Components
Chapter 5: Subsystem Maintenance
•
Prior to replacing the controller module, it is imperative for your own
safety to be sure that no power is being supplied to the system.
5.2.2 Removing the Controller Module
To remove the controller module:
1. Make sure there is no data access to the subsystem to avoid losing any
data. Use the software provided on the host computer to stop all I/O
accesses to the FALCON II.
2. Power off the subsystem. Be sure to flush all cache data before
powering off the subsystem. Turn off both power switches on the rear
of the subsystem.
3. Disconnect all cables from the controller module. These include the
SCSI cables connecting to input/output SCSI connectors, Ethernet cable
connected to the LAN port, and any cables connected to the COM ports.
4. Remove the screws on the levers at the back of the controller module.
(See Figure 5-1)
Figure 5-1: Removing the Controller Module Screws
5. Remove the controller module. Once all the cables have been
disconnected, press down the two (2) levers at the back of the controller
module. The controller module will automatically be eased out of the
controller module bay. Gently pull the controller module out of the
subsystem. (See Figure 5-2)
Levers
Figure 5-2: Removing the Controller Module
Replacing Controller Module Components
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
5.2.3 Replacing the Controller Module
If the controller module itself has failed, it must be replaced. To replace a
failed controller module:
1. Remove the controller module from the subsystem (see Section 5.2.2.)
If the DIMM module is undamaged it can be removed and reinstalled
on the new controller module. For instructions on removing and
installing a DIMM module, please see Section 5.3.
2.
Install the DIMM module onto the new controller module, making sure
that the memory module is securely in place. (See Section 5.3)
3. Install the controller module. Make sure the levers at the back of the
controller module are down. Align the controller module with the
controller module bay at the rear of the subsystem. Gently slide the
controller module in. (See Figure 5-3)
Levers
Figure 5-3: Installing the Controller Module
4. Reposition the controller module. Once fully inserted, lift up the levers
at the back of the controller module. This will set the controller module
in the correct position. (See Figure 5-4)
Levers
Figure 5-4: Lifting the Controller Module Latches Upward
5. Secure the controller module to the subsystem. Install the two (2)
screws on the levers to secure the controller module in place. (See
Figure 5-5)
5-4
Replacing Controller Module Components
Chapter 5: Subsystem Maintenance
Figure 5-5: Installing the Controller Module Screws
6. Re-attach all the cables that were removed. These include the cables
that connect to the host and the expansion chassis, any Ethernet cable
that was previously attached to the LAN port, and any cables that were
attached to the COM ports.
7.
The system is now ready to power up.
5.3 DIMM Module Replacement
The subsystem comes with a pre-installed 256MB capacity or above DDR
RAM DIMM module on the controller. The controller supports memory up
to 1GB. If a DDR RAM DIMM module has been failed or a different size of
DIMM module needs to be used, the pre-installed module must be removed
and the new one installed. Replacement and installation instructions are
described fully below.
5.3.1 DIMM Module Considerations
If the memory module on the controller module is going to be replaced, the
following issues must be considered when purchasing a replacement DIMM
module:
•
Pre-installed DDR RAM DIMM module: The FALCON II RAID
subsystem comes with a 256MB capacity or above DDR RAM DIMM
pre-installed on the controller board and can support up to 1GB
capacity. If you wish to change the size of the DDR DIMM, then a new
DIMM must be installed.
•
Purchasing considerations: When purchasing a DDR RAM DIMM
module to install on the FALCON II controller board, contact your
subsystem vendor for an updated list of compatible DIMM modules.
•
DDR RAM DIMM module supported: The FALCON II supports
DDR RAM DIMM modules with memory capacities between 256MB
and 1GB.
•
Installation considerations: When installing the DDR RAM DIMM
module, it is necessary to remove the controller module. The controller
DIMM Module Replacement
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
board is more susceptible to damage than the other components and
must be handled with extreme care.
•
Secure installation: When replacing the DIMM module, make sure that
the new DIMM module is firmly in place prior to re-installing the
controller module. If the DIMM module is not firmly in place, the
subsystem will not run and the whole procedure must be repeated.
5.3.2 DIMM Module Replacement Procedure
NOTE:
If you are going to replace or upgrade a DIMM module, please follow
the instructions below. If you do not want to replace or upgrade a DIMM
module and would like to install a controller module, please go to
Section 5.2.3.
If a DIMM module fails of if a DIMM module with a higher memory
capacity is required, the onboard DIMM module must be replaced. To
replace the DIMM module:
1. Remove the controller module. (See Section 5.2.2)
2. Remove the previously installed DIMM module from the DIMM
socket. Pull down the white clips on either side of the DIMM module to
a 45-degree angle to dislodge the DIMM module. (See Figure 5-6)
White Clip
White Clip
Figure 5-6: Removing the DIMM Module
3. Re-insert the new DIMM module. Align the new DDR RAM DIMM
module with the slot and gently (but firmly) push it in. The white clips
on either side of the slot should automatically close and lock the new
DIMM module into place. (See Figure 5-7)
5-6
DIMM Module Replacement
Chapter 5: Subsystem Maintenance
Figure 5-7: Installing the DIMM Module
4. Install the controller module. Once the new DIMM module has been
installed, place the controller module back in its original location. (See
Section 5.2.3)
5.4 Replacing a Faulty BBU Module
The BBU is an optional item for the FALCON II. It consists of a bracket, a
battery pack, and a PCB board that connects to the backplane board. If a
BBU was installed and has failed, it should be replaced. To install or replace
a BBU, please follow these steps:
CAUTION!
Please read and follow the warning and precautions listed in Section
2.7.2 when replacing a BBU.
1. Remove the faulty BBU from the chassis. Loosen the two (2) retention
screws located on both sides of the BBU, then pull out the BBU. (See
Figure 5-8)
Figure 5-8: Removing the BBU Module
2. Install the new BBU. Align the BBU with the slot, and then gently
push the BBU into the slot.
Replacing a Faulty BBU Module
5-7
Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
3.
Secure the BBU to the subsystem by fastening the two (2) retention
screws on the back of the BBU (See Figure 5-9)
Figure 5-9: Installing the BBU Module
4. Once the new BBU is correctly installed into the subsystem, the LED
should start flashing to indicate that BBU is being charged. When the
BBU is fully charged, the LED will light amber constantly.
NOTE:
The life expectancy of a BBU is approximately 500 cycles. Follow the
procedures above to replace an old BBU with a new BBU in order to
maintain fault-tolerant subsystem functionalities.
5.5 Replacing a Faulty PSU Module
5.5.1 PSU Module Overview
5-8
•
Two (2) redundant PSU modules: The FALCON II is preinstalled
with two (2) 460W, fully redundant, hot-swappable PSU modules.
These modules are located at the rear of the subsystem.
•
PSU bracket: Each PSU module is permanently mounted in a two-level
steel bracket, creating a single unit. The PSU is located in the upper
level and a removable cooling module is mounted in the lower level.
When removing the PSU from the subsystem, the cooling module is
also being removed.
•
PSU printing mark: Before you insert a new PSU, be sure that it has
the same printing mark on its handle as that shown on the handle of a
remaining PSU. Double-check to avoid mixing a PSU of previous
Falcon II series. (See Figure 5-10)
Replacing a Faulty PSU Module
Chapter 5: Subsystem Maintenance
Figure 5-10: Label on the PSU Handle
•
Immediate replacement: When a PSU fails, it should be replaced
immediately. However, do not remove the PSU module unless a
replacement is readily available. Removing a PSU without a
replacement will cause severe disruptions to the internal airflow and the
subsystem will overheat, possibly causing irreparable damage to some
of the subsystem components.
5.5.2 Replacing the PSU Module
WARNING!
Although the PSU modules are fully redundant, it is not advisable to run
the FALCON II with a single PSU module for an extended period of
time. If the second PSU module fails, the subsystem will be shut down.
To replace a PSU, please follow these steps:
1. Turn off the PSU. Using the power switch located at the top of the rear
panel, directly above the PSU module. (See Figure 5-11)
2. Remove the power cable that connects the FALCON II to the main
power source. The power socket is found on the left side of each power
supply module. (See Figure 5-11)
Figure 5-11: Power Sockets and Power Switches
Replacing a Faulty PSU Module
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
3.
Remove the PSU retention screw at the top right-hand side of the PSU.
(See Figure 5-12)
Figure 5-12: Removing the PSU Retention Screw
4. Remove the PSU module by pressing down the PSU handle found on
the top of the PSU. (See Figure 5-13) This will dislodge the PSU
module from the subsystem.
PSU Handle
Figure 5-13: Pressing Down the PSU Handle
5. After the PSU module has been dislodged from the enclosure, use the
handle to gently pull the PSU module out of the enclosure. (See
Figure 5-14)
Figure 5-14: Dislodging the PSU
6. Remove the cooling module from the lower level of the PSU module.
Please refer to Section 5.6.
WARNING!
When a PSU is pulled out of the chassis, the cooling module beneath the
PSU is removed from the chassis at the same time.
It is recommended that the replacement procedure is completed in less
than five (5) minutes to prevent the subsystem from overheating.
5-10
Replacing a Faulty PSU Module
Chapter 5: Subsystem Maintenance
7. Insert the previously removed cooling module into the new PSU
module. (See Section 5.6.)
8. Insert the new PSU module into the subsystem. Make sure the ejection
handle is in its down position so that the saddle notches on the lower
edges of the handle can lock on to the edge metal brackets along the
chassis inner walls. Push the PSU into the slot and pull the handle
upward to secure the module. (See Figure 5-16)
Figure 5-15: Installing the new PSU Module
9. Secure the PSU to the subsystem by inserting the retention screw to the
PSU. (See Figure 5-16)
Figure 5-16: Fastening the PSU Retention Screw
10. Replace the power cable that connects the PSU module to the main
power source.
11. Turn the PSU module on.
5.6 Cooling Module Maintenance
5.6.1 Cooling Module Overview
•
Redundant cooling modules: The FALCON II is equipped with two
(2) redundant, hot-swappable, dual-blower cooling modules located on
the lower level of the subsystem rear panel. These cooling modules
control the internal operational temperature of the subsystem and
therefore their working integrity should be maintained at all times.
Cooling Module Maintenance
5-11
Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
•
Detecting a failed cooling module: If a cooling module fails, the LED
located at the back of the module, an audible alarm, the firmware, the
RAIDWatch panel view, or the Configuration Client can notify you.
•
Replacing a cooling module: Once you are notified that a cooling
module has failed, it should be replaced as soon as possible. A failed
cooling module should only be removed from the subsystem when you
have a replacement module immediately available that can be installed
as soon as the failed cooling module has been removed.
WARNING!
The latches at the back of the cooling module secure the cooling module
into the enclosure. If these latches are broken, the warranty on the
cooling module will be void.
5.6.2 Replacing a Cooling Module
If one of the cooling modules fails, it must be replaced as soon as possible.
The cooling modules are secured to the chassis with the two (2) black
latches located on the rear surface of the module itself. To replace the
cooling module, please follow these steps:
WARNING!
•
Although the cooling modules are fully redundant, it is not
advisable to run the FALCON II with a single cooling module for
an extended period of time. If the remaining cooling module fails,
the system is at risk of sustaining irreparable damage.
•
Keep a failed module in its enclosure bay until a replacement unit is
in hand.
1. To remove the cooling module, pull both side latches toward the center
of the cooling module. Withdraw the cooling module from the
subsystem by gently pulling on the silver handle at the bottom of the
module. (See Figure 5-17)
Side latches
Silver Handle
Figure 5-17: Removing the Cooling Module
5-12
Cooling Module Maintenance
Chapter 5: Subsystem Maintenance
2. Install the new cooling module by aligning the module with the
cooling module slot on the lower section of the PSU module and gently
sliding it in. The latches will hold the module in place. (See Figure 518)
Figure 5-18: Installing the new Cooling Module
5.7 Replacing a Failed Hard Drive
5.7.1 Hard Drive Maintenance Overview
•
Hot-swappable drive trays: The drive trays are all hot-swappable. If a
hard drive fails, it can be replaced while the subsystem is still running.
•
Handles: If the failed hard drive is behind either the left or right front
handle, unfold the handles to open the front access to the drive trays.
(See Figure 5-19)
Figure 5-19: Open the Front Handles
•
Open flap: Once the flap on the drive tray has been opened, the drive
tray must be removed from the subsystem. Failure to remove the drive
tray from the subsystem after the flap has been opened may cause data
errors.
•
Remove drives slowly: When removing a drive tray from the
FALCON II, pull the drive tray out only about one inch and then wait
for at least 30 seconds for the hard drive motor to spin down before
taking it out completely. Any impact to the hard drive while the drive
motor is spinning can damage the drive.
•
Keep a replacement on hand: If a hard drive has failed, make sure you
have a replacement hard drive readily available before removing the
Replacing a Failed Hard Drive
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
failed drive from the subsystem. Do not leave the drive tray slot open
for an extended period of time or the normalized airflow will be
disrupted and subsystem components will overheat and may become
permanently damaged.
5.7.2 Replacing a Hard Drive
When a hard drives fails, it needs to be replaced. To replace a hard drive,
please follow these steps:
WARNING!
The hard drive is fragile always handle with extreme care. Do not drop
the hard drive; always be slow, gentle, and careful when setting down a
hard drive. Only handle the hard drive by the edges, and avoid touching
any components or connectors.
1. Identify the drive tray that contains the hard drive that needs to be
replaced.
2. Open the key-lock. To remove the drive tray from the enclosure, the
key-lock must be unlocked. (See Figure 5-20) To do this, turn the keylock on the front of the drive tray until the groove on its face is in a
horizontal orientation.
Figure 5-20: Drive Tray Key-lock Rotation
3. Open the front flap by pushing the button at the front of the drive tray.
(See Figure 5-21) The drive tray front flap will automatically be lifted
and the drive tray will be dislodged from the chassis.
5-14
Replacing a Failed Hard Drive
Chapter 5: Subsystem Maintenance
Figure 5-21: Front View of an Individual Drive Tray
4. Remove the drive tray with the hard drive, gently and carefully
withdrawing the drive tray with hard drive from the chassis.
5. Remove the four (4) retention screws located on the sides of the drive
tray (two on each side.) (See Figure 5-22)
Figure 5-22: Removing the SATA Hard Drive
6. For PATA drives, once the hard drive has been removed from the drive
tray, disconnect the drive from the dongle board. (See Figure 5-23)
Figure 5-23: Removing the PATA Hard Drive
7. Install the new hard drive. Please refer to the complete hard drive
installation procedures in Section 2.8.
Replacing a Failed Hard Drive
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Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
5.8 Replacing a Dongle Kit
If a dongle kit is damaged or broken, it needs to be replaced. To replace the
dongle kit, please follow these instructions:
1. Remove the drive tray from the subsystem.
2. Remove the hard drive from the drive tray. (See Section 5.7)
3.
Remove the three (3) dongle kit retention screws. Turn the drive tray
over and remove these screws.
Figure 5-24: Removing the Retention Screws
4. Install the new dongle kit using the instructions given in Section 2.8.2.
5. Install the hard drive to the drive tray. See Section 2.8.4.
6. Install the drive tray with the hard drive to the chassis. See Section
2.9.
5-16
Replacing a Dongle Kit
Appendix A: Uninterruptible Power Supply
Appendix A
Uninterruptible Power Supply
A.1 Uninterruptible Power Supply Overview
An uninterruptible power supply (UPS) is a separately purchased battery
backup unit that is connected to an RAID subsystem. If the UPS is
sufficiently large, it can be used to power the whole subsystem in the event
of an AC power failure.
A.2 Compatible UPS Supplies
The APC SMART-UPS 700VA is compatible with the Falcon II subsystem.
A.3 Serial Communication Cable
Part Number: IFT-9270CUPSCab-0030
The FALCON II is shipped with a customized audio jack-to-DB9 serial
communication cable. The cable is used to connect the controller module on a
subsystem to a PC hyperterminal for subsystem management. If you wish to
use a UPS with your subsystem, an additional audio jack-to-DB9 serial
communication cable (see Figure A-1) must be purchased.
Figure A-1: Audio Jack-to-DB9 Serial Communication Cable
CAUTION:
The pin outs on the audio jack-to-DB9 serial cable used to connect to the
UPS are different from the pin outs on the serial cable that was shipped
with the subsystem. When connecting the UPS device, please be sure to
use the correct cable. The cable pin outs are listed in Appendix E.
Uninterruptible Power Supply Overview
A-1
Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
A.4 Connecting the UPS to the Subsystem
A.4.1 Connect the PSU Module Power Cords
The two (2) power cables shipped with the subsystem must be plugged into
the power cord sockets in the rear of the PSU modules. The plug at the other
end of the power cable must be inserted into a socket on the UPS. (See
Figure A-2) Please refer to the UPS manual to determine the location of
these sockets. The UPS must then be connected to main power.
A.4.2 Set the Baud Rate
The default baud rate for the COM 2 serial port is 38400 and must be
changed to 2400. For instructions on changing the baud rate, please refer to
the Generic Operation Manual that came with the subsystem.
A.4.3 Connect COM2
The separately purchased audio jack-to-DB9 serial cable connects the
COM2 port on the controller module to the UPS directly. (See Figure A-2)
The cable transmits UPS status updates to the controller module and will in
turn determine the write policy of the controller module. To connect the
serial communication cable to the subsystem controller, insert the audio jack
connector on one end of the cable into the COM2 port on the controller
module. To see how to connect the DB9 connector to the UPS, please refer
to the documentation that came with your UPS.
Figure A-2: Connecting the UPS to the Subsystem
A-2
Connecting the UPS to the Subsystem
Appendix A: Uninterruptible Power Supply
A.5 Power On
When powering on the subsystem, the UPS must be powered on before the
subsystem. For instruction on how to power on the UPS, please refer to the
documentation that came with your UPS. Note that the power on sequence
described in Chapter 4 will be altered. The power on sequence when a UPS
is connected is shown below:
Step 1. Power on SCSI channel connection devices (including hubs and
switches).
Step 2. Power on the UPS.
Step 3. Power on the FALCON II subsystem.
Step 4. Power on the host computers.
Step 5. Trigger the firmware to allow the subsystem to detect the UPS.
To see how to do this please, refer to the Generic Operation
Manual that came with the subsystem.
NOTE:
A UPS can be connected to the subsystem after the subsystem has been
powered on, but you will have to trigger the firmware to allow the
subsystem to detect the UPS.
A.6 UPS Status Monitoring
If a UPS has been correctly connected to the subsystem, the status of the
UPS will be constantly monitored by the controller through the COM2
(audio jack) serial port. The status of the UPS will determine the controller’s
write policy, and messages that appear on the LCD panel and other
monitoring devices will keep you informed of the UPS status.
A.6.1 Normal Operational Status
If the UPS has been connected to main power and the UPS battery power
level is above 50%, then no status messages will appear and the default
“Write Back” write policy will be implemented by the controller.
A.6.2 UPS Messages
The following messages may appear on the LCD screen:
Message 1: “UPS connection is absent”
This message appears when COM2 has not been connected to the UPS.
Power On
A-3
Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Message 2: “UPS connection detected”
This message appears when the COM2 ports on the subsystem have been
connected to the UPS.
Message 3: “Warning: UPS AC Power-Loss detected”
This message appears when the UPS battery power level remains above
50% but its connection to the AC power supply has been disrupted in some
way. The write policy changes from write back to write through.
Message 4: “Warning: UPS Battery Low 50%. Please shut down to protect
data loss”
This message appears when the UPS battery power level has dipped below
50% of its capacity and the UPS has either been disconnected from the AC
power supply or the AC power supply has been disrupted. The write policy
will be changed from the default write back to write through. If this message
appears, the subsystem should be properly shut down to avoid data loss.
Message 5: “Warning: UPS Battery Low 50%”
This message appears when the UPS battery power level has dipped below
50% of its capacity. The default write policy will be changed from the
default write back to write through.
Message 6: “UPS Battery restored to safe level”
This message appears when the UPS battery power level has been restored
to above 50% of its capacity. The write policy will be changed from write
through to write back.
Message 7: “UPS AC Power Restored”
This message appears when the AC power supply to the UPS has been
reconnected. If the UPS battery power level is below 50%, the write policy
will remain as write through. If the battery power level is above 50%, the
write policy will change from write through to write back.
A-4
UPS Status Monitoring
Appendix A: Uninterruptible Power Supply
A.6.3 UPS Message Summary
Table A-1 below summarizes the UPS messages described above. It is
important that you become familiar with these messages and their meanings
to help maintain the integrity of the data running through your subsystem.
Message
AC Power
Battery
Power
Level (BPL)
Write
Policy
Status
UPS connection is absent
N/A
N/A
Write back
UPS connection detected
N/A
N/A
Write back
Warning: UPS AC PowerLoss detected
Disconnected
BPL > 50%
Write through
Warning:
UPS
Battery Disconnected
Low 50%. Please shut
down to protect data loss
BPL < 50%
Write through
Connected
BPL < 50%
Write through
UPS AC Power Restored
Reconnected
BPL > 50%
Write back
UPS AC Power Restored
Reconnected
BPL < 50%
Write through
UPS Battery restored to
safe level
Reconnected
BPL > 50%
Write back
Warning: UPS
Low 50%.
Battery
Table A-1: UPS Status Messages
UPS Status Monitoring
A-5
Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
This page is intentionally
left blank
A-6
UPS Status Monitoring
Appendix B: Specifications
Appendix B
Specifications
B.1 Technical Specifications
Environmental Specifications
Humidity
Temperature
Altitude
5 to 95% (non condensing)
Operating: 0º to 40ºC
Non-operating: -20º to 60ºC
Operating: 0 - 12,000 ft
Packaging: 0 - 20,000 ft
Power Requirements
Input Voltage
100VAC @ 10A
240VAC @ 5A with PFC (auto-switching)
Frequency
47 – 63Hz
Power Consumption
460W
Dimensions
Height
Width
Length
Weight
With handle: 131mm
Without handle: 130mm
With handle: 482.6mm
Without handle: 445mm
With handle: 504.3mm
Without handle: 488.2mm
Net weight: 28.5 Kg
Gross weight: 30.5 Kg
EMI/EMC
•
•
FCC Class B
CE
Technical Specifications
B-1
Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Safety Requirements
•
•
UL60950
CB
Shock
Half-sine
Operating: 10G peak, 11ms duration
Non-operating: 100G, 180 in/sec 240G, 2ms, halfsine
Square
240G, 2ms, half-sine
Vibration
Operating
5 - 500Hz, 0.2G, X/Y/Z
Non-operating
5 - 500Hz, 1.0G, X/Y/Z
Warning Alarms
•
•
•
B-2
Audible alarms
System LEDs
Event notification via the RAIDWatch Manager, LCD screen, or RS232C terminal
Technical Specifications
Appendix B: Specifications
B.2 Controller Specifications
Configuration Specifications
0, 1, (0 + 1), 3, 5, 10, 30, 50, JBOD, and Non-
RAID Levels
RAID disk spanning
Host O/S
Compatibility
Host O/S independent
Host Interface
SCSI-320
Host Channels
Pre-configured host channels
Drive Interface
Supports up to 16 channels of SATA-II
All drive channels are pre-set and cannot be
Drive Channels
changed.
Cache Mode
Write-through or write-back
Up to 1GB DDR RAM DIMM memory
Cache Memory
with/without ECC
Number of LUNs
Up to 32 per SCSI ID
Multiple Target
Yes
IDs/Host Channel
Aliases for Target IDs
Yes
Firmware on Flash
Yes
Memory
Drive Hot-swapping
Yes
Specification
CPU
600MHz PowerPC 750FX
SCSI Controllers
LSI 1030 T
DIMM Slot
One 184-pin DIMM module
PC-133 Support
Yes
ASIC
RAID 64-bit chipset (IFT-500266)
Flash ROM
32Mbit (4MB)
NVRAM
32KB with RTC
Hardware XOR
Yes
Real-time Clock
For event messages with time record
Controller Specifications
B-3
Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
B.3 Drive Tray Specifications
Specifications
Height
28mm
Width
110mm
Depth
218.92mm
Key-lock
Yes
B.4 Power Supply Specifications
Specifications
Nominal Power
Input Frequency
460W with active PFC
12.0V: 32A (Max.)
5.0V: 32A (Max.)
3.3V: 30A (Max.)
47 ~ 63Hz
Input Voltage
100VAC @ 10A – 240VAC @ 5A with PFC
Power Factor
Correction
Yes
Hold-up Time
At least 16ms at 115/230VAC full load after a loss
of AC input
DC Output
I2C
Over-temperature
Protection
Through backplane to controller
Cooling Fans
Two fans for each unit (inside PSU)
Temperature
Humidity
Altitude
Acoustic Noise
B-4
Lost cooling or excessive ambient temperature
Operating: 0°C to 50°C (32°F to 122°F)
Storage: -40°C to 70°C (-40°F to 158°F)
Operating: 20% ~ 90% non-condensing
Non-operating: 5% ~ 95% non-condensing
Operating: 0 - 10,000 ft
Non-operating: 0 - 40,000 ft
115V input, full load of
50 dB max.
+5V; 0.5A of +12V
Drive Tray Specifications
Appendix B: Specifications
B.5 Cooling Module Specifications
Specifications
Max. Air Flow
High speed: 31.8 CFM
Low speed: 20.1 CFM
Input Power
9 W max.
Input Current
0.89A max.
Rated Voltage
DC 12V
Acoustic Noise
Temperature
High speed: 55dB max.
Low speed: 44dB max.
Operating: -10 to +60ºC
Storage: -20 to +70ºC
B.6 RAID Management
Specifications
•
Configuration
Performance
Monitoring
Remote Control and
Monitoring
Event
Broadcast/Alert
Event Notification
Hardware Connection
Configuration on
Disk
Failure Indicator
Cooling Module Specifications
•
•
Text-based firmware-embedded utility over
RS-232C through the included serial cable
LCD keypad panel
The RAIDWatch Manager program using inband or Ethernet connection
Yes
Yes
Yes, via Java-based RAIDWatch Manager and
Event Monitor
Yes, via the RAIDWatch Configuration Client
sub-module
In-band over SCSI/Fiber, out-of-band via Ethernet
or RS232C
Configuration data stored on disks for logical drive
assemblies to exist after controller replacement.
Faults are indicated via alarm, module LED
indicators, LCD panel, RAIDWatch Manager, or
terminal emulation.
B-5
Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
B.7 Fault Tolerance Management
Specifications
Drive S.M.A.R.T Support
Battery Back-up Option
ISEMS (RAID Simple Enclosure
Management Service) via I2C interface
B-6
Yes, with user-configurable
detect only, clone and replace,
and perpetual clone functions.
Yes
Yes
Automatic Drive Failure Detection
Yes
Automatic Rebuild on Spare Drives
Yes
Regenerate Logical Drive Parity
Yes
Bad Block Reassignment
Automatic Rebuild upon Failed Drive
Replacement
Yes
Manual Clone of Suspected Failed Drive
Concurrent Rebuild on Multiple Drives
in a RAID (0 + 1) Logical Drive
Salvage the 2nd Temporary Failed Drive
in a RAID 1, 3 or 5 Logical Drive
Salvage the 1st Temporary Failed Drive
in a RAID 0 Logical Drive
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Fault Tolerance Management
Appendix C: Spare Parts and Accessories
Appendix C
Spare Parts and Accessories
C.1 Spare Parts
The active components and their model names are listed in the following
tables:
Spare Parts
Model Name
Description
IFT-9273CDTray
Drive tray, Type-III bezel and Type-II LED
lightpipe
IFT-9273ADT1S1P
HDD tray (Type-III bezel and Type-II LED light
pipe), SATA-to-PATA conversion, for singlecontroller subsystems
IFT-9270AN1S1P
HDD
dongle
board,
SATA-to-PATA
conversion, 3U single-controller subsystems
IFT-9273CPSU
Power supply module, enhanced Falcon II 16-bay
subsystem, 460W capacity
IFT-9273CFanMod
Cooling fan module for enhanced Falcon II 16bay subsystem
IFT9273CHandLLCD
Left side forearm handle for enhanced 3U
enclosure, LCD panel included
IFT-9270CHandR
Right side forearm handle for 3U subsystem,
applicable to the left or right-side of JBOD
subsystems
IFT-83AU24GD16
SCSI to SATA RAID controller module, 2
SCSI-320 host channels, 16 SATA-II drive
channels, enhanced 3U enclosure, 2 dualstacked VHDCI connectors
IFT-83AU24GD16M2
SCSI to SATA RAID controller module, 2
SCSI-320 host channels, 16 SATA-II drive
channels, enhanced 3U enclosure, 2 dualstacked VHDCI connectors, 256MB DDR
memory included
C-1
Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
C.2 Accessories
The accessories and their model names are listed in the table below:
C-2
Model Name
Description
IFT-9273CBT-C
Battery cell pack, Li-Ion, enhanced Falcon II
16-bay subsystems
IFT-9270UHSTCAB
SCSI external round cable, DB68 to VHDCI
IFT-9270UJBODCAB
SCSI external round cable, VHDCI to VHDCI
IFT-9270ASCab
RS-232C serial cable, audio-jack to DB-9
IFT-9270CUPSCab0030
UPS cable, audio-jack to DB-9
IFT-9011
Null modem, DB9 female to DB9 male, wires
swapped
IFT-9273CSlider36
Slide rail assembly for enhanced Falcon II 3U
enclosures, 23"~36" rack depth
IFT-9273CSlider32
Slide rail assembly for enhanced Falcon II 3U
enclosures, 23"~32" rack depth
Accessories
Appendix D: Pin Outs
Appendix D
Pin Outs
D.1 VHDCI SCSI Port Pin Outs
VHDCI SCSI port pin out definitions are shown below.
(NOTE: NC = No Connection, GND = Ground, and TPWR = Terminator
Power)
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
VHDCI SCSI Port Pin Outs
Name
Pin
Name
SD12+
SD13+
SD14+
SD15+
SDP1+
SD0+
SD1+
SD2+
SD3+
SD4+
SD5+
SD6+
SD7+
SDP0+
GND
DIFSENS
TPWR
TPWR
NC
GND
SATN+
GND
SBSY+
SACK+
SRST+
SMSG+
SSEL+
SC_D+
SREQ+
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
SD12SD13SD14SD15SDP1SD0SD1SD2SD3SD4SD5SD6SD7SDP0GND
GND
TPWR
TPWR
NC
GND
SATNGND
SBSYSACKSRSTSMSGSSELSC_DSREQ-
D-1
Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
30
31
32
33
34
SI_O+
SD8+
SD9+
SD10+
SD11+
64
65
66
67
68
SI_OSD8SD9SD10SD11-
Table E-1: SCSI Port Pin Outs
D.2 DB9 Audio Jack Pin Outs
This cable is able to connect the COM1 serial port on the controller module
rear panel for terminal emulation management.
PN: IFT-9270ASCab
Figure E- 1: RS-232C (Audio Jack) Pin Outs
CN1 Pin Number
1
2
3
CN2 Pin Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Pin Name
Ground
TXD
RXD
Pin Name
NC
RXD
TXD
DTR (Shorted)
GND
DSR (Shorted)
RTS (Shorted)
CTS (Shorted)
NC
Table E-2: RS-232C (Audio Jack) Pin Out Definitions
D-2
DB9 Audio Jack Pin Outs
Appendix D: Pin Outs
D.3 DB9 Audio Jack UPS Cable Pin Outs
Use this cable to connect the COM2 serial port to UPS.
PN: IFT-9270CUPSCab
Figure E- 2: RS-232C (Audio Jack) Pin Outs
CN1 Pin Number
1
2
3
CN2 Pin Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Pin Name
Ground
TXD
RXD
Pin Name
TXD
RXD
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
Ground
Table E-3: RS-232C (Audio Jack) Pin Out Definitions
D.4 Null Modem
PN: IFT-9211
Swap pin 2 and pin 3
Swap pin 4 and pin 6
Swap pin 7 and pin 8
Table E-4: Null Modem Pin Outs
DB9 Audio Jack UPS Cable Pin Outs
D-3
Falcon II SCSI-SATA Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
D.5 Ethernet Port Pin Outs
Figure E- 3: LAN Port Pin Outs
Pin
Pin Name
Pin
Pin Name
1
LAN_TXP
5
N2
2
LAN_TXN
6
LAN_RXN
3
LAN_RXP
7
N1
4
N2
8
N1
Table E-5: Ethernet Port Pin Outs
D.6 Main Power
IEC-type receptacle.
D-4
Ethernet Port Pin Outs
Index
A
accessory items, 2-4
airflow clearance, 2-2
Airflow, 2-2
Ambient temperature, 4-5
ASIC, 1-1
ATA cable, 2-12
audible alarm, 1-11, 3-2, 3-9, 3-10
audio jack cable, 2-4
audio jack serial port, 1-7
authorized battery disposal sites, 2-7
B
backplane, 1-4
battery backup unit, 1-1
BBU module, 1-1, 1-4, 1-7, 3-3, 3-7, 45, 5-7
BBU Warnings, 2-6
C
Cable connection, 4-5
Cabling, 2-2
capacity, 2-8
chassis ID, 4-4
chassis, 1-2
component check, 2-1
configuration client, 3-2
Controller Initialization, 3-6
Controller Module LEDs, 3-5
controller module, 1-6, 3-3, 5-1, 5-2, 53
cooling module side latches, 5-12
cooling module slot, 1-9
cooling module, 1-4, 1-9, 3-3, 3-8, 5-1,
5-11
D
DAEMON, 3-2
daisy chain, 4-3
Data Compare Errors, 5-13
data flow, 4-3
DDR RAM, 1-4, 5-5
Device-status-indicating LED, 3-2
DIMM module, 1-4, 5-2, 5-5, 5-6
DIMM socket, 1-6
dongle kit, 1-6, 5-1, 5-16
drive bay, 1-3, 1-5, 2-9
drive ID, 1-3
Drive Tray LEDs, 3-4
drive tray, 1-5, 2-9, 2-12, 3-3, 4-5, 5-1,
5-14
dummy plate, 1-4, 2-7
E
easily accessible button, 1-5
electrical earth connection, 2-3
electrostatic discharge, 2-1
ESD damage, 2-3
Ethernet port, 3-1, 3-7
event notification, 1-11
F
failover software, 4-3
fan failure, 1-8
fan speed, 1-9 faulty
module, 2-2
firmware, 1-10, 3-1
front flap, 2-13, 5-13
front panel, 1-2, 1-4
G
Generic Operation Manual, 2-5, 3-1,
3-9, 4-7
groove, 2-13
GUI, 1-10
H
handles, 5-13
hard drive, 2-2, 2-8, 4-5, 5-1, 5-14
Hardware Manual, 2-5
host channel, 1-6, 1-7
host connection, 4-1, 4-2
host redundancy, 4-3
hot-swap mechanism, 1-4
hot-swappable, 5-1
I
I2C bus, 1-10
I2C, 3-2, 3-10
initial screen, 1-5
international transportation
regulation, 1-8
IO access, 4-8, 5-3
K
key-lock, 1-5, 2-13
L
LAN Port LEDs, 3-7
LAN port, 3-3
LCD display, 3-3
LCD panel, 1-3, 1-5, 3-2
LCD, 4-7
LED, 1-10
left handle, 1-3
lower level, 2-4
M
management software, 4-4
memory capacity, 1-7, 5-5
memory module, 4-5
metal base plate, 2-9
minimum gap, 2-14
monitoring methods, 1-10
mute button, 3-3
N
normalized airflow, 1-11, 5-2
numbering of drive trays, 1-3
Index - 1
O
over-voltage, 1-8
P
PATA drive, 1-6, 2-9, 2-12
path redundancy, 4-3
PC hyper-terminal, 3-1
permanent IP, 3-7
Phillips-head screwdriver, 2-7, 2-14
physical dimensions, 1-2
power cable, 2-12, 4-5
power down, 4-8
power on, 4-5
power outlet, 2-2
power range, 2-2
power socket, 4-6
power supply unit, 1-3
power switch, 1-4, 4-6
Pre-installed Components, 2-5
PSU Bracket, 8
PSU, 1-3, 1-4, 1-8, 3-3, 3-7, 5-1, 5-8, 59
Q
quick installation guide, 2-4
R
rack cabinet, 2-2
Rackmounting, 2-14
RAIDWatch User’s Manual, 2-5
RAIDWatch, 1-10, 3-1
rear panel, 1-3, 1-4
retention screws, 2-2
right handle, 1-3
RJ-45, 3-7
S
safety precaution, 2-2
safety precautions, 2
SATA connector, 1-6, 2-11, 2-13
SATA drives, 1-6, 2-9
SATA-II drives, 1-6, 2-9
SATA-to-PATA dongle kit, 2-9
screw sizes, 2-11, 2-15
SCSI cable, 2-4, 4-1
SCSI termination, 4-2
SCSI-320, 1-1
Self-monitoring, 3-1
sensors, 3-9
single connector attachment, 2-11
single host, 4-3
startup, 4-7
static electricity, 2-3
static free, 2-1
Subsystem Maintenance, 1
T
terminal emulation program, 1-10
thermal notice, 2-2
threshold values, 3-9
transfer rates, 4-1
Index - 2
U
Uninstalled Components, 2-5
unpacking list, 2-4
upper level, 2-4
V
ventilation, 2-2
VHDCI SCSI connector, 1-6
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