AD9260

AD9260
High Speed Oversampling CMOS ADC with
16-Bit Resolution at a 2.5 MHz Output Word Rate
AD9260
STAGE 1:2X
16-BIT:
DECIMATION
10MHz
FILTER
REFERENCE
BUFFER
DRVDD
DRVSS
DIGITAL
DEMODULATOR
12-BIT:
20MHz
AD9260
STAGE 2:2X
16-BIT:
DECIMATION
5MHz
FILTER
OTR
16-BIT: STAGE 3:2X
2.5MHz DECIMATION
FILTER
VREF
SENSE
REFCOM
BANDGAP
REFERENCE
DAV
BIAS
CIRCUIT
CLOCK
BUFFER
MODE
REGISTER
BIAS ADJUST
CLK
MODE
READ
PRODUCT DESCRIPTION
The AD9260 is a 16-bit, high-speed oversampled analog-todigital converter (ADC) that offers exceptional dynamic range
over a wide bandwidth. The AD9260 is manufactured on an
advanced CMOS process. High dynamic range is achieved with
an oversampling ratio of 8× through the use of a proprietary
technique that combines the advantages of sigma-delta and
pipeline converter technologies. The AD9260 is a switchedcapacitor ADC with a nominal full-scale input range of 4 V. It
offers a differential input with 60 dB of common-mode rejection of common-mode signals. The signal range of each differential input is ±1 V centered on a 2.0 V common-mode level.
The on-chip decimation filter is configured for maximum
performance and flexibility. A series of three half-band FIR
filter stages provide 8× decimation filtering with 85 dB of stopband attenuation and 0.004 dB of pass-band ripple. An onboard
digital multiplexer allows the user to access data from the
various stages of the decimation filter. The on-chip
programmable reference and reference buffer amplifier are
configured for maximum accuracy and flexibility. An external
reference can also be chosen to suit the user’s specific dc
accuracy and drift requirements.
The AD9260 operates on a single +5 V supply, typically
consuming 585 mW of power. A power scaling circuit is
provided allowing the AD9260 to operate at power consump-
BIT1–
BIT16
CS
00581-C-001
REF TOP
REF
BOTTOM
COMMON
MODE
AVSS
AVDD
AVSS
MULTIBIT
SIGMA-DELTA
MODULATOR
OUTPUT REGISTER
VINB
RESET/
SYNC DVSS DVDD
OUTPUT MODE MULTIPLEXER
VINA
AVSS
AVDD
Monolithic 16-bit, oversampled A/D converter
8× oversampling mode, 20 MSPS clock
2.5 MHz output word rate
1.01 MHz signal passband with 0.004 dB ripple
Signal-to-noise ratio: 88.5 dB
Total harmonic distortion: –96 dB
Spurious-free dynamic range: 100 dB
Input referred noise: 0.6 LSB
Selectable oversampling ratio: 1×, 2×, 4×, 8×
Selectable power dissipation: 150 mW to 585 mW
85 dB stop-band attenuation
0.004 dB pass-band ripple
Linear phase
Single 5 V analog supply, 5 V/3 V digital supply
Synchronize capability for parallel ADC interface
Twos complement output data
44-lead MQFP
AVDD
FUNCTIONAL BLOCK DIAGRAM
FEATURES
Figure 1.
tion levels as low as 150 mW at reduced clock and data rates.
The AD9260 is available in a 44-lead MQFP package and is
specified to operate over the industrial temperature range.
PRODUCT HIGHLIGHTS
The AD9260 is fabricated on a very cost effective CMOS
process. High speed, precision, mixed-signal analog circuits are
combined with high density digital filter circuits. The AD9260
offers a complete single-chip 16-bit sampling ADC with a 2.5
MHz output data rate in a 44-lead MQFP.
Selectable Internal Decimation Filtering—The AD9260
provides a high performance decimation filter with 0.004 dB
pass-band ripple and 85 dB of stop-band attenuation. The filter
is configurable with options for 1×, 2×, 4×, and 8× decimation.
Power Scaling—The AD9260 consumes a low 585 mW of
power at 16-bit resolution and 2.5 MHz output data rate. Its
power can be scaled down to as low as 150 mW at reduced
clock rates.
Single Supply—Both the analog and digital portions of the
AD9260 can operate off of a single +5 V supply, simplifying
system power supply design. The digital logic will also
accommodate a single +3 V supply for reduced power.
Rev. C
Information furnished by Analog Devices is believed to be accurate and reliable.
However, no responsibility is assumed by Analog Devices for its use, nor for any
infringements of patents or other rights of third parties that may result from its use.
Specifications subject to change without notice. No license is granted by implication
or otherwise under any patent or patent rights of Analog Devices. Trademarks and
registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
One Technology Way, P.O. Box 9106, Norwood, MA 02062-9106, U.S.A.
Tel: 781.329.4700
www.analog.com
Fax: 781.326.8703
© 2004 Analog Devices, Inc. All rights reserved.
AD9260
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Specifications..................................................................................... 3
Theory of Operation ...................................................................... 23
Clock Input Frequency Range .................................................... 3
Analog Input and Reference Overview ....................................... 24
DC Specifications ......................................................................... 3
Input Span ................................................................................... 24
AC Specifications.......................................................................... 4
Input Compliance Range........................................................... 24
Digital Filter Characteristics ....................................................... 6
Analog Input Operation ............................................................ 24
Digital Filter Characteristics ....................................................... 7
Driving the Input........................................................................ 25
Digital Specifications ................................................................... 9
Reference Operation ...................................................................... 28
Switching Specifications ............................................................ 10
Digital Inputs and Outputs ........................................................... 30
Absolute Maximum Ratings.......................................................... 11
Digital Outputs ........................................................................... 30
Thermal Characteristics ............................................................ 11
Mode Operation ......................................................................... 31
ESD Caution................................................................................ 11
Bias Pin Operation ..................................................................... 32
Terminology .................................................................................... 12
Power Dissipation Considerations ............................................... 33
Pin Configuration and Function Descriptions........................... 13
Digital Output Driver Considerations (DRVDD) ................. 33
Typical Performance Characteristics ........................................... 14
Grounding and Decoupling...................................................... 34
Typical AC Characterization Curves
vs. Decimation Mode ................................................................. 15
Evaluation Board General Description ....................................... 36
Typical AC Characterization Curves for 8× Mode ................ 16
Typical AC Characterization Curves for 4× Mode ................ 17
Typical AC Characterization Curves for 2× Mode ................ 18
Typical AC Characterization Curves for 1× Mode ................ 19
Typical AC Characterization Curves ....................................... 20
Features and User Controls....................................................... 36
Shipment Configuration............................................................ 37
Quick Setup................................................................................. 37
Application Information ........................................................... 38
Outline Dimensions ....................................................................... 43
Ordering Guide .......................................................................... 43
Additional AC Characterization Curves ................................. 21
REVISION HISTORY
7/04—Changed from Rev. B to Rev. C
Changed “trimpot” to “variable resistor” ..................... Universal
Updated Format................................................................ Universal
Updated Outline Dimensions ......................................................43
Changes to Ordering Guide .........................................................43
5/00—Changed from Rev. A to Rev. B.
1/98—Changed from Rev. 0 to Rev. A.
Rev. C | Page 2 of 44
AD9260
SPECIFICATIONS
CLOCK INPUT FREQUENCY RANGE
Table 1.
Parameter—Decimation Factor (N)
CLOCK INPUT (Modulator Sample Rate, fCLOCK)
OUTPUT WORD RATE (FS = fCLOCK/N)
AD9260 (8)
1
20
0.125
2.5
AD9260 (4)
1
20
0.250
5
AD9260 (2)
1
20
0.500
10
AD9260 (1)
1
20
1
20
Unit
kHz min
MHz max
kHz min
MHz max
DC SPECIFICATIONS
AVDD = +5 V, DVDD = +3 V, DRVDD = +3 V, fCLOCK = 20 MSPS, VREF = +2.5 V, Input CML = 2.0 V TMIN to TMAX unless otherwise noted,
RBIAS = 2 kΩ.
Table 2.
Parameter—Decimation Factor (N)
RESOLUTION
INPUT REFERRED NOISE (TYP)
1.0 V Reference
2.5 V Reference1
ACCURACY
Integral Nonlinearity (INL)
Differential Nonlinearity (DNL)
No Missing Codes
Offset Error
Gain Error2
Gain Error3
TEMPERATURE DRIFT
Offset Error
Gain Error2
Gain Error3
POWER SUPPLY REJECTION
AVDD, DVDD, DRVDD (+5 V ±0.25 V)
ANALOG INPUT
Input Span
VREF= 1.0 V
VREF= 2.5 V
Input (VINA or VINB) Range
Input Capacitance
INTERNAL VOLTAGE REFERENCE
Output Voltage (1 V Mode)
Output Voltage Error (1 V Mode)
Output Voltage (2.5 V Mode)
Output Voltage Error (2.5 V Mode)
Load Regulation4
1 V REF
2.5 V REF
REFERENCE INPUT RESISTANCE
POWER SUPPLIES
Supply Voltages
AVDD
AD9260 (8)
16
AD9260 (4)
16
AD9260 (2)
16
AD9260 (1)
12
Unit
Bits min
1.40
0.68 (90.6)
2.4
1.2 (86)
6.0
3.7 (76)
1.3
1.0 (63.2)
LSB rms typ
LSB rms typ (dB typ)
± 0.75
± 0.50
16
0.9 (0.5)
2.75 (0.66)
1.35 (0.7)
± 0.75
± 0.50
16
(0.5)
(0.66)
(0.7)
± 0.75
± 0.50
16
(0.5)
(0.66)
(0.7)
± 0.3
± 0.25
12
(0.5)
(0.66)
(0.7)
LSB typ
LSB typ
Bits Guaranteed
% FSR max (typ @ +25°C)
% FSR max (typ @ +25°C)
% FSR max (typ @ +25°C)
2.5
22
7.0
2.5
22
7.0
2.5
22
7.0
2.5
22
7.0
ppm/°C typ
ppm/°C typ
ppm/°C typ
0.06
0.06
0.06
0.06
% FSR max
1.6
4.0
+0.5
+AVDD –0.5
10.2
1.6
4.0
+0.5
+AVDD –0.5
10.2
1.6
4.0
+0.5
+AVDD –0.5
10.2
1.6
4.0
+0.5
+AVDD –0.5
10.2
V p p Diff. max
V p p Diff. max
V min
V max
pF typ
1
± 14
2.5
± 35
1
± 14
2.5
± 35
1
± 14
2.5
± 35
1
± 14
2.5
± 35
V typ
mV max
V typ
mV max
0.5
2.0
8
0.5
2.0
8
0.5
2.0
8
0.5
2.0
8
mV max
mV max
kΩ
+5
+5
+5
+5
V (± 5%)
Rev. C | Page 3 of 44
AD9260
Parameter—Decimation Factor (N)
DVDD and DRVDD
Supply Current
IAVDD
IDVDD
IDRVDD
POWER CONSUMPTION
AD9260 (8)
+5.5
+2.7
AD9260 (4)
+5.5
+2.7
AD9260 (2)
+5.5
+2.7
AD9260 (1)
+5.5
+2.7
Unit
V max
V min
115
115
115
12.5
10.3
6.5
0.450
613
0.850
608
1.7
600
115
134
2.4
3.5
2.6
585
630
mA typ
mA max
mA typ
mA max
mA typ
mW typ
mW max
1
VINA and VINB connect to DUT CML.
Including Internal 2.5 V reference.
3
Excluding Internal 2.5 V reference.
4
Load regulation with 1 mA load current (in addition to that required by AD9260).
2
AC SPECIFICATIONS
AVDD = +5 V, DVDD = +3 V, DRVDD = +3 V, fCLOCK = 20 MSPS, VREF = +2.5 V, Input CML = 2.0 V TMIN to TMAX unless otherwise noted,
RBIAS = 2 kΩ.
Table 3.
Parameter—Decimation Factor (N)
DYNAMIC PERFORMANCE
INPUT TEST FREQUENCY: 100 kHz (typ)
Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
SNR and Distortion (SINAD)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
Total Harmonic Distortion (THD)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
Spurious-Free Dynamic Range (SFDR)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
INPUT TEST FREQUENCY: 500 kHz
Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
SNR and Distortion (SINAD)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
Total Harmonic Distortion (THD)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
Spurious-Free Dynamic Range (SFDR)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
AD9260(8)
AD9260(4)
AD9260(2)
AD9260(1)
Unit
88.5
82.5
82
78
74
68
63
58
dB typ
dB typ
87.5
82
82
77.5
74
69
63
58
dB typ
dB typ
–96
–93
–96
–98
–97
–96
–98
–98
dB typ
dB typ
100
94
98
100
98
94
88
84
dB typ
dB typ
86.5
80.5
82.5
82
74
63
77
68
58
dB typ
dB min
dB typ
86.0
80.0
82.0
81
74
63
77
68
58
–97.0
–90.0
–95.5
–92
–89
–86
–96
–89
–86
99.0
90.0
92
91
88
Rev. C | Page 4 of 44
dB typ
dB min
dB typ
dB typ
dB max
dB typ
dB typ
dB max
AD9260
Parameter—Decimation Factor (N)
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
INPUT TEST FREQUENCY: 1.0 MHz (typ)
Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
SNR and Distortion (SINAD)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
Total Harmonic Distortion (THD)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
Spurious-Free Dynamic Range (SFDR)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
INPUT TEST FREQUENCY: 2.0 MHz (typ)
Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
SNR and Distortion (SINAD)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
Total Harmonic Distortion (THD)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
Spurious-Free Dynamic Range (SFDR)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
INPUT TEST FREQUENCY: 5.0 MHz (typ)
Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
SNR and Distortion (SINAD)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
Total Harmonic Distortion (THD)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
Spurious-Free Dynamic Range (SFDR)
Input Amplitude = –0.5 dBFS
Input Amplitude = –6.0 dBFS
INTERMODULATION DISTORTION
fIN1 = 475 kHz, fIN2 = 525 kHz
fIN1 = 950 kHz, fIN2 = 1.050 MHz
DYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS
Full Power Bandwidth
Small Signal Bandwidth (AIN = –20 dBFS)
Aperture Jitter
AD9260(8)
98
AD9260(4)
100
AD9260(2)
91
AD9260(1)
82
Unit
dB typ
85
80
82
76
74
68
63
58
dB typ
dB typ
84.5
80
81
76
74
69
63
58
dB typ
dB typ
–102
–96
–96
–94
–82
–84
–79
–77
dB typ
dB typ
105
98
98
96
83
87
80
80
dB typ
dB typ
82
76
74
68
63
58
dB typ
dB typ
81
76
73
69
62
58
dB typ
dB typ
–101
–95
–80
–80
–75
–76
dB typ
dB typ
104
100
80
83
78
79
dB typ
dB typ
59
57
dB typ
dB typ
58
57
dB typ
dB typ
–58
–67
dB typ
dB typ
59
70
dB typ
dB typ
–93
–95
–91
–86
–91
–85
–83
–83
dBFS typ
dBFS typ
75
75
2
75
75
2
75
75
2
75
75
2
MHz typ
MHz typ
ps rms typ
Rev. C | Page 5 of 44
AD9260
DIGITAL FILTER CHARACTERISTICS
Table 4.
Parameter
8× DECIMATION (N = 8)
Pass-Band Ripple
Stop-Band Attenuation
Pass-Band
Stop-Band
Pass-Band/Transition Band Frequency
(–0.1 dB Point)
(–3.0 dB Point)
Absolute Group Delay1
Group Delay Variation
Settling Time (to ± 0.0007%)1
4× DECIMATION (N = 4)
Pass-Band Ripple
Stop-Band Attenuation
Pass-Band
Stop-Band
Pass-Band/Transition Band Frequency
(–0.1 dB Point)
(–3.0 dB Point)
Absolute Group Delay1
Group Delay Variation
Settling Time (to ± 0.0007%)1
2× DECIMATION (N = 2)
Pass-Band Ripple
Stop-Band Attenuation
Pass-Band
Stop-Band
Pass-Band/Transition Band Frequency
(–0.1 dB Point)
(–3.0 dB Point)
Absolute Group Delay1
Group Delay Variation
Settling Time (to ± 0.0007%)1
1× DECIMATION (N = 1)
Propagation Delay: tPROP
Absolute Group Delay
1
AD9260
Unit
0.00125
82.5
0
0.605 × (fCLOCK/20 MHz)
1.870 × (fCLOCK/20 MHz)
18.130 × (fCLOCK/20 MHz)
dB max
dB min
MHz min
MHz max
MHz min
MHz max
0.807 × (fCLOCK/20 MHz)
1.136 × (fCLOCK/20 MHz)
13.55 × (20 MHz/fCLOCK)
0
24.2 × (20 MHz/fCLOCK)
MHz max
MHz max
µs max
µs max
µs max
0.001
82.5
0
1.24 × (fCLOCK/20 MHz)
3.75 × (fCLOCK/20 MHz)
16.25 × (fCLOCK/20 MHz)
dB max
dB min
MHz min
MHz max
MHz min
MHz max
1.61 × (fCLOCK/20 MHz)
2.272 × (fCLOCK/20 MHz)
2.90 × (20 MHz/fCLOCK)
0
5.05 × (20 MHz/fCLOCK)
MHz max
MHz max
µs max
µs max
µs max
0.0005
85.5
0
2.491 × (fCLOCK/20 MHz)
7.519 × (fCLOCK/20 MHz)
12.481 × (fCLOCK/20 MHz)
dB max
dB min
MHz min
MHz max
MHz min
MHz max
3.231 × (fCLOCK/20 MHz)
4.535 × (fCLOCK/20 MHz)
0.80 × (20 MHz/fCLOCK)
0
1.40 × (20 MHz/fCLOCK)
MHz max
MHz max
µs max
µs max
µs max
13
(225 × (20 MHz/fCLOCK)) + tPROP
ns max
ns max
To determine overall Absolute Group Delay and/or Settling Time inclusive of delay from the sigma-delta modulator, add Absolute Group Delay and/or Settling Time
pertaining to specific decimation mode to the Absolute Group Delay specified in 1 ×decimation.
Rev. C | Page 6 of 44
AD9260
DIGITAL FILTER CHARACTERISTICS
0
–40
–60
–80
–120
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1.0
1.2
FREQUENCY (NORMALIZED TO π)
0.6
0.4
0.2
0
–0.2
–0.4
00581-C-002
–100
0.8
0
100
Figure 2. 8x FIR Filter Frequency Response
400
500
600
–40
–60
–80
–120
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1.0
1.2
FREQUENCY (NORMALIZED TO π)
0.6
0.4
0.2
0
–0.2
00581-C-003
–100
0.8
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
CLOCK PERIODS (RELATIVE TO CLK)
Figure 3. 4x FIR Filter Frequency Response
00581-C-006
NORMALIZED OUTPUT RESPONSE
1.0
–20
MAGNITUDE (dB)
300
Figure 5. 8x FIR Filter Impulse Response
0
Figure 6. 4x FIR Filter Impulse Response
1.0
NORMALIZED OUTPUT RESPONSE
0
–20
–40
–60
–80
–100
–120
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1.0
FREQUENCY (NORMALIZED TO π)
1.2
00581-C-004
MAGNITUDE (dB)
200
CLOCK PERIODS (RELATIVE TO CLK)
Figure 4. 2x FIR Filter Frequency Response
0.8
0.6
0.4
0.2
0
–0.2
0
5
10
15
20
CLOCK PERIODS (RELATIVE TO CLK)
Figure 7. 2x FIR Filter Impulse Response
Rev. C | Page 7 of 44
25
00581-C-007
MAGNITUDE (dB)
–20
00581-C-005
NORMALIZED OUTPUT RESPONSE
1.0
AD9260
Table 5. Integer Filter Coefficients for First Stage
Decimation Filter (23-Tap Half-Band FIR Filter)
Table 7. Integer Filter Coefficients for Third Stage
Decimation Filter (107-Tap Half-Band FIR Filter)
Lower Coefficient
Upper Coefficient
Integer Value
Lower Coefficient
Upper Coefficient
Integer Value
H(1)
H(2)
H(3)
H(4)
H(5)
H(6)
H(7)
H(8)
H(9)
H(10)
H(11)
H(12)
H(23)
H(22)
H(21)
H(20)
H(19)
H(18)
H(17)
H(16)
H(15)
H(14)
H(13)
–1
0
13
0
–66
0
224
0
–642
0
2496
4048
H(1)
H(2)
H(3)
H(4)
H(5)
H(6)
H(7)
H(8)
H(9)
H(10)
H(11)
H(12)
H(13)
H(14)
H(15)
H(16)
H(17)
H(18)
H(19)
H(20)
H(21)
H(22)
H(23)
H(24)
H(25)
H(26)
H(27)
H(28)
H(29)
H(30)
H(31)
H(32)
H(33)
H(34)
H(35)
H(36)
H(37)
H(38)
H(39)
H(40)
H(41)
H(42)
H(43)
H(44)
H(45)
H(46)
H(47)
H(48)
H(49)
H(50)
H(51)
H(52)
H(53)
H(54)
H(107)
H(106)
H(105)
H(104)
H(103)
H(102)
H(101)
H(100)
H(99)
H(98)
H(97)
H(96)
H(95)
H(94)
H(93)
H(92)
H(91)
H(90)
H(89)
H(88)
H(87)
H(86)
H(85)
H(84)
H(83)
H(82)
H(81)
H(80)
H(79)
H(78)
H(77)
H(76)
H(75)
H(74)
H(73)
H(72)
H(71)
H(70)
H(69)
H(68)
H(67)
H(66)
H(65)
H(64)
H(63)
H(62)
H(61)
H(60)
H(59)
H(58)
H(57)
H(56)
H(55)
–1
0
2
0
–2
0
3
0
–3
0
1
0
3
0
–12
0
27
0
–50
0
85
0
–135
0
204
0
–297
0
420
0
–579
0
784
0
–1044
0
1376
0
–1797
0
2344
0
–3072
0
4089
0
–5624
0
8280
0
–14268
0
43520
68508
Table 6. Integer Filter Coefficients for Second Stage
Decimation Filter (43-Tap Half-Band FIR Filter)
Lower Coefficient
Upper Coefficient
Integer Value
H(1)
H(2)
H(3)
H(4)
H(5)
H(6)
H(7)
H(8)
H(9)
H(10)
H(11)
H(12)
H(13)
H(14)
H(15)
H(16)
H(17)
H(18)
H(19)
H(20)
H(21)
H(22)
H(43)
H(42)
H(41)
H(40)
H(39)
H(38)
H(37)
H(36)
H(35)
H(34)
H(33)
H(32)
H(31)
H(30)
H(29)
H(28)
H(27)
H(26)
H(25)
H(24)
H(23)
3
0
–12
0
35
0
–83
0
172
0
–324
0
572
0
–976
0
1680
0
–3204
0
10274
16274
NOTE: The composite filter undecimated coefficients (i.e.,
impulse response) in the 4× decimation mode can be
determined by convolving the first stage filter taps with a
“zero stuffed” version of the second stage filter taps (i.e., insert
one zero between samples). Similarly, the composite filter
coefficients in the 8× decimation mode can be determined by
convolving the taps of the composite 4× decimation mode (as
previously determined) with a “zero stuffed” version of the third
stage filter taps (i.e., insert three zeros between samples).
Rev. C | Page 8 of 44
AD9260
DIGITAL SPECIFICATIONS
AVDD = +5 V, DVDD = +5 V, TMIN to TMAX unless otherwise noted.
Table 8.
Parameter
CLOCK1 AND LOGIC INPUTS
High Level Input Voltage
(DVDD = +5 V)
(DVDD = +3 V)
Low Level Input Voltage
(DVDD = +5 V)
(DVDD = +3 V)
High Level Input Current (VIN = DVDD)
Low Level Input Current (VIN = 0 V)
Input Capacitance
LOGIC OUTPUTS (with DRVDD = 5 V)
High Level Output Voltage (IOH = 50 µA)
High Level Output Voltage (IOH = 0.5 mA)
Low Level Output Voltage2 (IOL = 0.3 mA)
Low Level Output Voltage (IOL = 50 µA)
Output Capacitance
LOGIC OUTPUTS (with DRVDD = 3 V)
High Level Output Voltage (IOH = 50 µA)
Low Level Output Voltage (IOL = 50 µA)
2
Unit
+3.5
+2.1
V min
V max
+1.0
+0.9
± 10
± 10
5
V min
V max
µA max
µA max
pF typ
+4.5
+2.4
+0.4
+0.1
5
V min
V min
V max
V max
pF typ
+2.4
+0.7
V min
V max
Since CLK is referenced to AVDD, +5 V logic input levels only apply.
The AD9260 is not guaranteed to meet VOL = 0.4 V max for standard TTL load of IOL = 1.6 mA.
S2
S1
tC
ANALOG INPUT
tCL
tCH
INPUT CLOCK
tDI
tDS
DATA OUTPUT
tOE
tH
DAV
tDAV
tOD
READ
00581-C-008
1
AD9260
CS
Figure 8. Timing Diagram
Rev. C | Page 9 of 44
AD9260
tRES-DAV
tCLK-DAV
INPUT CLOCK
00581-C-009
RESET
DAV
Figure 9. RESET Timing Diagram
SWITCHING SPECIFICATIONS
AVDD = +5 V, DVDD = +5 V, CL = 20 pF, TMIN to TMAX unless otherwise noted.
Table 9.
Parameters
Clock Period
Data Available (DAV) Period
Data Invalid
Data Set-Up Time
Clock Pulse-Width High
Clock Pulse-Width Low
Data Hold Time
RESET to DAV Delay
CLOCK to DAV Delay
Three-State Output Disable Time
Three-State Output Enable Time
Symbol
tC
tDAV
tDI
tDS
tCH
tCL
tH
tRES–DAV
tCLK–DAV
tOD
tOE
Rev. C | Page 10 of 44
AD9260
50
tC ×Mode
40% tDAV
tDAV –tH –tDI
22.5
22.5
3.5
10
15
8
45
Unit
ns min
ns min
ns max
ns min
ns min
ns min
ns min
ns typ
ns typ
ns typ
ns typ
AD9260
ABSOLUTE MAXIMUM RATINGS
Table 10.
Parameter
AVDD to AVSS
DVDD to DVSS
AVSS to DVSS
AVDD to DVDD
DRVDD to DRVSS
DRVSS to AVSS
REFCOM to AVSS
CLK, MODE, READ, CS, and RESET to
DVSS
Digital Outputs to DRVSS
VINA, VINB, CML, and BIAS to AVSS
VREF to AVSS
SENSE to AVSS
CAPB and CAPT to AVSS
Junction Temperature
Storage Temperature
Lead Temperature (10 s)
Rating
–0.3 V to +6.5 V
–0.3 V to +6.5 V
–0.3 V to +0.3 V
–6.5 V to +6.5 V
–0.3 V to +6.5 V
–0.3 V to +0.3 V
–0.3 V to +0.3 V
–0.3 V to DVDD + 0.3 V
–0.3 V to DRVDD + 0.3 V
–0.3 V to AVDD + 0.3 V
–0.3 V to AVDD + 0.3 V
–0.3 V to AVDD + 0.3 V
–0.3 V to AVDD + 0.3 V
150°C
–65°C to +150°C
300°C
Stresses above those listed under Absolute Maximum Ratings
may cause permanent damage to the device. This is a stress
rating only; functional operation of the device at these or any
other conditions above those indicated in the operational
sections of this specification is not implied. Exposure to
absolute maximum ratings for extended periods may affect
device reliability.
THERMAL CHARACTERISTICS
Thermal Resistance
44-Lead MQFP
θJA = 53.2°C/W
θJC = 19°C/W
ESD CAUTION
ESD (electrostatic discharge) sensitive device. Electrostatic charges as high as 4000 V readily accumulate on the
human body and test equipment and can discharge without detection. Although this product features
proprietary ESD protection circuitry, permanent damage may occur on devices subjected to high energy
electrostatic discharges. Therefore, proper ESD precautions are recommended to avoid performance
degradation or loss of functionality.
Rev. C | Page 11 of 44
AD9260
TERMINOLOGY
Integral Nonlinearity (INL)
INL refers to the deviation of each individual code from a line
drawn from “negative full scale” through “positive full scale.”
The point used as “negative full scale” occurs 1/2 LSB before the
first code transition. “Positive full scale” is defined as a level 1
1/2 LSB beyond the last code transition. The deviation is
measured from the middle of each particular code to the true
straight line.
Differential Nonlinearity (DNL, No Missing Codes)
An ideal ADC exhibits code transitions that are exactly 1 LSB
apart. DNL is the deviation from this ideal value. Guaranteed
no missing codes to 14-bit resolution indicates that all 16384
codes, respectively, must be present over all operating ranges.
NOTE: Conventional INL and DNL measurements don’t really
apply to ∑∆ converters: the DNL looks continually better if
longer data records are taken. For the AD9260, INL and DNL
numbers are given as representative.
Zero Error
The major carry transition should occur for an analog value 1/2
LSB below VINA = VINB. Zero error is defined as the deviation
of the actual transition from that point.
Gain Error
The first code transition should occur at an analog value 1/2
LSB above negative full scale. The last transition should occur at
an analog value 1 1/2 LSB below the nominal full scale. Gain
error is the deviation of the actual difference and the ideal
difference between first and last code transitions.
Aperture Jitter
Aperture jitter is the variation in aperture delay for successive
samples and is manifested as noise on the input to the A/D.
Signal-to-Noise and Distortion (S/N+D, SINAD) Ratio
S/N+D is the ratio of the rms value of the measured input signal
to the rms sum of all other spectral components below the
Nyquist frequency, including harmonics but excluding dc. The
value for S/N+D is expressed in decibels.
Effective Number of Bits (ENOB)
For a sine wave, SINAD can be expressed in terms of the
number of bits. Using the following formula, it is possible to get
a measure of performance expressed as N, the effective number
of bits:
N = (SINAD − 1.76)/6.02
Thus, effective number of bits for a device for sine wave inputs
at a given input frequency can be calculated directly from its
measured SINAD.
Total Harmonic Distortion (THD)
THD is the ratio of the rms sum of the first six harmonic
components to the rms value of the measured input signal and
is expressed as a percentage or in decibels.
Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR)
SNR is the ratio of the rms value of the measured input signal to
the rms sum of all other spectral components below the Nyquist
frequency, excluding the first six harmonics and dc. The value
for SNR is expressed in decibels.
Temperature Drift
The temperature drift for zero error and gain error specifies the
maximum change from the initial (+25°C) value to the value at
TMIN or TMAX.
Spurious-Free Dynamic Range (SFDR)
SFDR is the difference in dB between the rms amplitude of the
input signal and the peak spurious signal.
Power Supply Rejection
The specification shows the maximum change in full scale from
the value with the supply at the minimum limit to the value
with the supply at its maximum limit.
Two-Tone SFDR
The ratio of the rms value of either input tone to the rms value
of the peak spurious component. The peak spurious component
may or may not be an IMD product. May be reported in dBc
(i.e., degrades as signal level is lowered), or in dBFS (always
related back to converter full scale).
Rev. C | Page 12 of 44
AD9260
BIAS
38
MODE
39
CAPT
40
CAPB
41
AVSS
42
NC
VINA
43
CML
NC
44
VINB
AVDD
PIN CONFIGURATION AND FUNCTION DESCRIPTIONS
37
36
35
34
DVSS 1
AVSS 2
33 REFCOM
PIN 1
IDENTIFIER
32 VREF
DVDD 3
31 SENSE
AVDD 4
30 RESET
DRVSS 5
AD9260
29 AVSS
DRVDD 6
TOP VIEW
(Not to Scale)
28 AVDD
CLK 7
27 CS
8
26 DAV
(LSB) BIT16 9
25 OTR
READ
17
18
19
20
BIT8
BIT7
BIT6
BIT5
21
22
NC = NO CONNECT
Figure 10. Pin Configuration
Table 11. Pin Function Descriptions
Pin No.
1
2, 29, 38
3
4, 28, 44
5
6
7
8
9
10–23
24
25
26
27
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
39
40, 43
41
42
Mnemonic
DVSS
AVSS
DVDD
AVDD
DRVSS
DRVDD
CLK
READ
BIT16
BIT15–BIT2
BIT1
OTR
DAV
CS
RESET
SENSE
VREF
REFCOM
MODE
BIAS
CAPB
CAPT
CML
NC
VINA
VINB
Description
Digital Ground.
Analog Ground.
+3 V to +5 V Digital Supply.
+5 V Analog Supply.
Digital Output Driver Ground.
+3 V to +5 V Digital Output Driver Supply.
Clock Input.
Part of DSP Interface—Pull Low to Disable Output Bits.
Least Significant Data Bit (LSB).
Data Output Bit.
Most Significant Data Bit (MSB).
Out of Range—Set When Converter or Filter Overflows.
Data Available.
Chip Select (CS): Active LOW.
RESET: Active LOW.
Reference Amplifier SENSE: Selects REF Level.
Input Span Select Reference I/O.
Reference Common.
Mode Select—Selects Decimation Mode.
Power Bias.
Noise Reduction Pin—Decouples Reference Level.
Noise Reduction Pin—Decouples Reference Level.
Common-Mode Level (AVDD/2.5).
No Connect (Ground for Shielding Purposes).
Analog Input Pin (+).
Analog Input Pin (–).
Rev. C | Page 13 of 44
00581-C-010
16
BIT3
15
BIT4
14
BIT9
13
BIT10
12
BIT11
23 BIT2
BIT12
24 BIT1 (MSB)
BIT14 11
BIT13
BIT15 10
AD9260
TYPICAL PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS
AVDD = DVDD = DRVDD = +5.0 V, 4 V Input Span, Differential DC Coupled Input with CML = 2.0 V, fCLOCK = 20 MSPS, Full Bias.
0
100kHz INPUT
20MHz CLOCK
8 × DECIMATION
THD: –96dB
dB BELOW FULL SCALE
–40
–60
–80
–60
–80
–100
–120
–120
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1.0
1.2
FREQUENCY (MHz)
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 11. Spectral Plot of the AD9260 at 100 kHz Input, 20 MHz Clock,
8x OSR (2.5 MHz Output Data Rate)
Figure 14. Spectral Plot of the AD9260 at 100 kHz Input, 20 MHz Clock,
Undecimated (20 MHz Output Data Rate)
0
110
100kHz INPUT
20MHz CLOCK
4 × DECIMATION
THD: –98dB
–12dBFS/TONE
WORST CASE SPUR (dBFS)
–20
dB BELOW FULL SCALE
–40
–100
0
100kHz INPUT
20MHz CLOCK
1 × DECIMATION
THD: –98dB
–20
00581-C-011
dB BELOW FULL SCALE
–20
00581-C-014
0
–40
–60
–80
–100
106
102
–6.5dBFS/TONE
98
–26dBFS/TONE
–46dBFS/TONE
94
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
FREQUENCY (MHz)
90
00581-C-012
0
Figure 12. Spectral Plot of the AD9260 at 100 kHz Input, 20 MHz Clock,
4x OSR (5 MHz Output Data Rate)
0
0.4
0.6
0.8
1.0
FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 15. Dual-Tone SFDR vs. Input Frequency (F1 = F2, Span = 10% Center
Frequency, Mode = 8x)
0
100kHz INPUT
20MHz CLOCK
2 × DECIMATION
THD: –98dB
–40
–60
–80
–40
–60
–80
–100
–120
–120
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
4.5
5.0
FREQUENCY (MHz)
00581-C-013
–100
0
DUAL-TONE TEST
f1 = 1.0MHz
f2 = 975kHz
20MHz CLOCK
8 × DECIMATION
IM3: –94dB
–20
dB BELOW FULL SCALE
–20
Figure 13. Spectral Plot of the AD9260 at 100 kHz Input, 20 MHz Clock,
2x OSR (10 MHz Output Data Rate)
Rev. C | Page 14 of 44
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
FREQUENCY (MHz)
1.0
1.2
00581-C-016
0
dB BELOW FULL SCALE
0.2
00581-C-015
–120
Figure 16. Two-Tone Spectral Performance of the AD9260 Given Inputs at
975 kHz and 1.0 MHz, 20 MHz Clock, 8x Decimation
AD9260
TYPICAL AC CHARACTERIZATION CURVES VS. DECIMATION MODE
AVDD = DVDD = DRVDD = +5 V, 4 V Input Span, Differential DC Coupled Input with CML = 2 V, AIN = 0.5 dBFS Full Bias.
90
90
8 × MODE
75
80
2 × MODE
70
65
75
2 × MODE
70
65
1 × MODE
60
60
1 × MODE
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
50
0.1
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 17. SINAD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 20 MSPS) 8x SINAD
performance limited by noise contribution of input differential
op amp driver
00581-C-020
1.0
55
00581-C-017
55
50
0.1
8 × MODE
4 × MODE
4 × MODE
80
SINAD (dBFS)
85
SINAD (dBFS)
85
Figure 20. SINAD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 10 MSPS)
–50
–70
1 × MODE
1 × MODE
–75
–60
–80
–85
THD (dBFS)
THD (dBFS)
–70
–80
2 × MODE
–90
2 × MODE
–95
–100
–90
8 × MODE
4 × MODE
–105
4 × MODE
–110
8 × MODE
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
–120
0.1
00581-C-018
–110
0.1
–115
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 18. THD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 20 MSPS)
00581-C-021
–100
Figure 21. THD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 10 MSPS)
–50
–70
1 × MODE
–75
1 × MODE
–60
–80
–85
SFDR (dBFS)
–80
2 × MODE
–90
2 × MODE
–95
4 × MODE
–100
8 × MODE
–90
–105
–110
–100
4 × MODE
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 19. SFDR vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 20 MSPS)
–120
0.1
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 22. SFDR vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 10 MSPS)
Rev. C | Page 15 of 44
00581-C-022
–115
8 × MODE
–110
0.1
00581-C-019
SFDR (dBFS)
–70
AD9260
TYPICAL AC CHARACTERIZATION CURVES FOR 8× MODE
AVDD = DVDD = DRVDD = +5 V, 4 V Input Span, Differential DC Coupled Input with CML = 2 V, Full Bias.
90
85
–0.5dBFS
85
–0.5dBFS
80
–6.0dBFS
80
–6.0dBFS
SINAD (dB)
75
70
75
70
–20dBFS
–20dBFS
65
65
1.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
60
0.1
00581-C-023
60
0.1
1.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 23. SINAD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 20 MSPS) SINAD performance
limited by noise contribution of input differential op amp driver.
00581-C-026
SINAD (dB)
90
Figure 26. SINAD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCk- = 10 MSPS)
–70
–70
–75
–75
–20dBFS
–80
–80
–20dBFS
–90
–100
–95
–6.0dBFS
–105
–100
–0.5dBFS
–110
0.1
1.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
–105
0.1
Figure 24. THD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 20 MSPS)
Figure 27. THD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 10 MSPS)
105
105
100
100
–6.0dBFS
–6.0dBFS
SFDR (dBc)
95
–0.5dBFS
90
85
80
0.1
–0.5dBFS
90
–20dBFS
1.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
95
85
–20dBFS
00581-C-025
SFDR (dBc)
1.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
00581-C-027
–6.0dBFS
–85
Figure 25. SFDR vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 20 MSPS)
80
0.1
1.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 28. SFDR vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 10 MSPS)
Rev. C | Page 16 of 44
00581-C-028
–95
THD (dB)
–0.5dBFS
–90
00581-C-024
THD (dB)
–85
AD9260
TYPICAL AC CHARACTERIZATION CURVES FOR 4× MODE
AVDD = DVDD = DRVDD = +5 V, 4 V Input Span, Differential DC Coupled Input with CML = 2 V, Full Bias.
90
90
85
85
–0.5dBFS
80
–0.5dBFS
80
75
SINAD (dB)
SINAD (dB)
–6.0dBFS
70
65
–20dBFS
–6.0dBFS
75
70
60
65
55
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
60
0.1
00581-C-029
1.0
1.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 29. SINAD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 20 MSPS)
00581-C-032
–20dBFS
50
0.1
Figure 32. SINAD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 10 MSPS)
–70
–70
–75
–75
–20dBFS
–80
–80
–0.5dBFS
–85
–0.5dBFS
THD (dB)
–90
–95
–100
–105
–105
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
–110
0.1
00581-C-030
–110
0.1
1.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 30. THD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 20 MSPS)
Figure 33. THD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 10 MSPS)
110
110
105
105
–0.5dBFS
100
100
SFDR (dBc)
–6.0dBFS
95
90
–6.0dBFS
95
–20dBFS
90
85
85
–0.5dBFS
–20dBFS
80
0.1
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
00581-C-031
SFDR (dBc)
–6.0dBFS
00581-C-033
–100
–95
–6.0dBFS
–20dBFS
–90
Figure 31. SFDR vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 20 MSPS)
80
0.1
1.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 34. SFDR vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 10 MSPS)
Rev. C | Page 17 of 44
00581-C-034
THD (dB)
–85
AD9260
TYPICAL AC CHARACTERIZATION CURVES FOR 2× MODE
AVDD = DVDD = DRVDD = +5 V, 4 V Input Span, Differential DC Coupled Input with CML = 2 V, Full Bias.
80
80
75
75
–0.5dBFS
–0.5dBFS
70
–6.0dBFS
SINAD (dB)
65
65
60
55
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
50
0.1
00581-C-035
50
0.1
–60
–65
–65
–75
–0.5dBFS
THD (dB)
THD (dB)
–70
–20dBFS
–80
–80
–20dBFS
–85
–85
–90
–90
–0.5dBFS
–100
0.1
–6.0dBFS
–6.0dBFS
–95
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
–100
0.1
00581-C-036
–95
10.0
Figure 38. SINAD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 10 MSPS)
–60
–75
1.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 35. SINAD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 20 MSPS)
–70
–20dBFS
55
–20dBFS
00581-C-038
60
–6.0dBFS
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 36. THD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 20 MSPS)
00581-C-039
SINAD (dB)
70
Figure 39. THD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 10 MSPS)
100
100
95
95
–6.0dBFS
SFDR (dBc)
90
–6.0dBFS
85
–0.5dBFS
80
–0.5dBFS
85
–20dBFS
80
75
75
70
0.1
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 37. SFDR vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 20 MSPS)
70
0.1
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 40. SFDR vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 10 MSPS)
Rev. C | Page 18 of 44
00581-C-040
–20dBFS
00581-C-037
SFDR (dBc)
90
AD9260
TYPICAL AC CHARACTERIZATION CURVES FOR 1× MODE
AVDD = DVDD = DRVDD = +5 V, 4 V Input Span, Differential DC Coupled Input with CML = 2 V, Full Bias.
70
70
65
65
–0.5dBFS
–0.5dBFS
60
SINAD (dB)
SINAD (dB)
60
–6.0dBFS
55
50
–6.0dBFS
55
50
45
45
–20dBFS
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
40
0.1
00581-C-041
40
0.1
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 41. SINAD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 20 MSPS)
00581-C-044
–20dBFS
Figure 44. SINAD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 10 MSPS)
–55
–55
–0.5dBFS
–60
–60
–20dBFS
–65
–65
–20dBFS
–70
–70
THD (dBc)
THD (dB)
–6.0dBFS
–75
–80
–75
–80
–85
–85
–90
–90
–95
–95
–0.5dBFS
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
–100
0.1
00581-C-042
–100
0.1
Figure 42. THD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 20 MSPS)
100
95
95
–0.5dBFS
90
–0.5dBFS
85
–6.0dBFS
SDFR (dBc)
–6.0dBFS
75
70
65
80
75
70
65
–20dBFS
60
60
55
55
50
0.1
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 43. SFDR vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 20 MSPS)
50
0.1
1.0
10.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 46. SFDR vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 10 MSPS)
Rev. C | Page 19 of 44
00581-C-046
–20dBFS
00581-C-043
SDFR (dBc)
85
80
10.0
Figure 45. THD vs. Input Frequency (fCLOCK = 10 MSPS)
100
90
1.0
INPUT FREQUENCY (MHz)
00581-C-045
–6.0dBFS
AD9260
TYPICAL AC CHARACTERIZATION CURVES
AVDD = DVDD = DRVDD = +5 V, 4 V Input Span, AIN = –0.5 dBFS, Differential DC Coupled Input with CML = 2 V.
–60
100
95
FULL BIAS
–65
90
–70
80
HALF BIAS
THD (dBc)
SFDR (dBFS)
85
75
70
QUARTER BIAS
–75
FIN = 1MHz, 2 × MODE
–80
–85
65
FIN = 100kHz, 8 × MODE
–90
60
0
5
10
15
20
CLOCK FREQUENCY (MHz)
–100
1.0
00581-C-047
50
1.2
1.4
1.6
1.8
2.0
2.2
2.4
2.6
2.8
3.0
COMMON MODE INPUT LEVEL (V)
00581-C-050
–95
55
Figure 50. THD vs. Common-Mode Input Level (CML)
Figure 47. SFDR vs. Clock Rate (fIN = 100 kHz in 8x Mode)
–40
100
FULL BIAS
–50
80
CMR (dB)
SFDR (dBFS)
HALF BIAS
60
QUARTER BIAS
40
FS = 20MHz
–60
FS = 10MHz
–70
FS = 5MHz
5
10
15
25
20
CLOCK FREQUENCY (MHz)
00581-C-048
0
–90
1k
10k
100k
1M
10M
100M
INPUT FREQUENCY (Hz)
Figure 48. SFDR vs. Clock Rate (fIN = 500 kHz in 4x Mode)
00581-C-051
–80
20
Figure 51. CMR vs. Input Frequency (VCML = 2 V p-p, 1x Mode)
100
100
FULL BIAS
95
4V SPAN SFDR-2 × MODE
SFDR (dBFS)
60
HALF BIAS
40
90
4V SPAN SNR-8 × MODE
85
1.6V SPAN SNR-8 × MODE
QUARTER BIAS
20
80
5
10
15
20
25
CLOCK FREQUENCY (MHz)
75
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1.0
1.2
1.4
1.6
FREQUENCY (MHz)
Figure 52. 4 V vs. 1.6 V Span SNR/SFDR (fCLOCK = 20 MSPS)
Figure 49. SFDR vs. Clock Rate (fIN = 1.0 MHz in 2x Mode)
Rev. C | Page 20 of 44
00581-C-052
1.6V SPAN SFDR-2 × MODE
0
00581-C-049
SFDR (dBFS)
80
AD9260
ADDITIONAL AC CHARACTERIZATION CURVES
AVDD = DVDD = DRVDD = +5 V, 4 V Input Span, AIN = –0.5 dBFS, Differential DC Coupled Input with CML = 2 V, Full Bias, unless
otherwise noted.
120
120
20 MSPS (dBFS)
FULL BIAS
20 MSPS
FULL BIAS
SFDR (dBFS)
110
WORST SPUR (dBc AND dBFS)
110
10 MSPS
FULL BIAS
105
100
20 MSPS
HALF BIAS
95
90
10 MSPS
HALF BIAS
80
–50
–45
–40
–35
–30
–25
–20
–15
–10
20 MSPS (dBc)
FULL BIAS
90
80
10 MSPS (dBc)
HALF BIAS
70
60
–5
50
–60
00581-C-053
85
10 MSPS (dBFS)
HALF BIAS
100
0
AIN (dBFS)
–50
–40
–30
–20
–10
0
AIN (dBFS)
Figure 53. Single-Tone SFDR vs. Amplitude (fIN = 100 kHz, 8x Mode)
00581-C-056
115
Figure 56. Two-Tone SFDR (F1 = 475 kHz, F2 = 525 MHz, 8x Mode)
110
120
FULL BIAS (dBFS)
105
110
WORST SPUR (dBc AND dBFS)
10 MSPS
FULL BIAS
95
10 MSPS
HALF BIAS
20 MSPS
FULL BIAS
90
85
HALF BIAS (dBFS)
90
FULL BIAS (dBc)
80
70
HALF BIAS (dBc)
–40
–35
–30
–25
–20
–15
–10
–5
50
–60
00581-C-054
–45
0
AIN (dBFS)
Figure 54. Single-Tone SFDR vs. Amplitude (fIN = 1.0 MHz)
–40
–30
–20
–10
0
AIN (dBFS)
Figure 57. Two-Tone SFDR (F1 = 0.95 kHz, F2 = 1.05 MHz, 8x Mode, 20 MSPS)
110
120
10 MSPS
HALF BIAS
100
110
WORST SPUR (dBc AND dBFS)
105
20 MSPS
FULL BIAS
95
10 MSPS
FULL BIAS
90
85
dBFS
100
dBc
90
80
70
60
–45
–40
–35
–30
–25
–20
–15
–10
–5
00581-C-055
80
–50
–50
00581-C-057
60
80
–50
SFDR (dBFS)
100
0
AIN (dBFS)
Figure 55. Single-Tone SFDR vs. Amplitude (fIN = 500 kHz, 2x Mode)
Rev. C | Page 21 of 44
50
–60
–50
–40
–30
AIN (dBFS)
–20
–10
0
00581-C-058
SFDR (dBFS)
100
Figure 58. Two-Tone SFDR (F1 = 1.9 MHz, F2 = 2.1 MHz, 4x Mode 20 MSPS)
AD9260
+
–
+
–
5B
DAC1
INT1
+
–
INT2
5B
ADC
3B
ADC
5B
DAC
+
–
4
3B
ADC
3B
DAC
3B
DAC
4
4B
ADC
PIPELINE CORRECTION LOGIC
5B
DAC2
8 LSBs
SHUFFLE
MOUT
Z–D
++
LSB
DIFFERENTIATOR
COUT
CONTROL/TEST
LOGIC
HALF-BAND
DECIMATION FILTER STAGE 1
BANDGAP
REFERENCE
HALF-BAND
DECIMATION FILTER STAGE 2
REFERENCE
BUFFER
HALF-BAND
DECIMATION FILTER STAGE 3
OUTPUT BITS
Figure 59. Simplified Block Diagram
Rev. C | Page 22 of 44
00581-C-059
VIN
+
–
16
AD9260
THEORY OF OPERATION
The AD9260 utilizes a new analog-to-digital converter
architecture to combine sigma-delta techniques with a high
speed, pipelined A/D converter. This topology allows the
AD9260 to offer the high dynamic range associated with sigmadelta converters while maintaining very wide input signal
bandwidth (1.25 MHz) at a very modest 8 oversampling ratio.
Figure 59 provides a block diagram of the AD9260. The
differential analog input is fed into a second order, multibit
sigma-delta modulator. This modulator features a 5-bit flash
quantizer and 5-bit feedback. In addition, a 12-bit pipelined
A/D quantizes the input to the 5-bit flash to greater accuracy. A
special digital modulation loop combines the output of the 12bit pipelined A/D with the delayed output of the 5-bit flash to
produce the equivalent response of a second order loop with a
12-bit quantizer and 12-bit feedback. The combination of a
second order loop and multibit feedback provides inherent
stability: the AD9260 is not prone to the idle tones or full-scale
idiosyncrasies sometimes associated with higher order single bit
sigma-delta modulators.
The output of this 12-bit modulator is fed into the digital
decimation filter. The voltage level on the MODE pin
establishes the configuration for the digital filter. The user may
bring the data out undecimated (at the clock rate), or at a
decimation factor of 2×, 4×, or a full 8×. The spectra for these
four cases are shown in Figure 11, Figure 12, Figure 13, and
Figure 14, all for a 100 kHz full-scale input and 20 MHz clock.
The spectra of the undecimated output clearly shows the second
order shaping characteristic of the quantization noise as it rises
at frequencies above 1.25 MHz.
The on-chip decimation filter provides excellent stopband
rejection to suppress any stray input signal between 1.25 MHz
and 18.75 MHz, substantially easing the requirements on any
antialiasing filter for the analog input path. The decimation
filters are integrated with symmetric FIR filter structures,
providing a linear phase response and excellent passband
flatness. The digital output driver register of the AD9260
features both READ and CHIP SELECT pins to allow easy
interfacing. The digital supply of the AD9260 is designed to
operate over a 2.7 V to 5.25 V supply range, though 3 V supplies
are recommended to minimize digital noise on the board. A
DATA AVAILABLE pin allows the user to easily synchronize to
the converter’s decimated output data rate. OUT-OF-RANGE
(OTR) indication is given for an overflow in the pipelined A/D
converter or digital filters. A RESETB function is provided to
synchronize the converter’s decimated data and clear any
overflow condition in the analog integrators.
An on-chip reference and reference buffer are included on the
AD9260. The reference can be configured in either a 2.5 V
mode (providing a 4 V p-p differential input full scale), a 1 V
mode (providing a 1.6 V p-p differential input full scale), or
programmed with an external resistor divider to provide any
voltage level between 1 V and 2.5 V. However, optimum noise
and distortion performance for the AD9260 can only be achieved
with a 2.5 V reference, as shown in Figure 52.
For users who want to operate the part at reduced clock
frequencies, the bias current of the AD9260 is designed to be
scalable. This scaling is accomplished through use of the proper
external resistor tied to the BIAS pin: the power can be reduced
roughly proportionately to clock frequency by as much as 75%
(for clock rates of 5 MHz). Refer to Figure 47 to Figure 49 and
Figure 53 to Figure 57 for characterization curves showing
performance tradeoffs.
Rev. C | Page 23 of 44
AD9260
ANALOG INPUT AND REFERENCE OVERVIEW
Figure 60, a simplified model of the AD9260, highlights the
relationship between the analog inputs, VINA, VINB and the
reference voltage VREF. Like the voltage applied to the top of
the resistor ladder in a flash A/D converter, the value VREF
defines the maximum input voltage to the A/D converter. An
internal reference buffer in the AD9260 scales the reference
voltage VREF before it is applied internally to the AD9260 A/D
core. The scale factor of this reference buffer is 0.8.
Consequently, the maximum input voltage to the A/D core is
+0.8 × VREF. The minimum input voltage to the A/D core is
automatically defined to be –0.8 × VREF. With this scale factor,
the maximum differential input span of 4 V p-p is obtained
with a VREF voltage of 2.5 V. A smaller differential input span
may be obtained by using a VREF voltage of less than 2.5 V at
the expense of ac performance (refer to Figure 52).
VINA
Σ
16
A/D CORE
VINB
–0.8 × VREF
00581-C-060
–
Figure 60. Simplified Input Model
INPUT SPAN
The AD9260 is implemented with a differential input structure.
This structure allows the common-mode level (average voltage
of the two input pins) of the input signal to be varied
independently of the input span of the converter over a wide
range, as shown in Figure 50. Specifically, the input to the A/D
core is the difference of the voltages applied at the VINA and
VINB input pins. Therefore, the equation,
VCORE = VINA − VINB
(1)
defines the output of the differential input stage and provides
the input to the A/D core.
The voltage, VCORE, must satisfy the condition,
−0.8 × VREF ≤ VCORE ≤ +0.8 × VREF
AVSS + 0.5V < VINB < AVDD + 0.5V
(3)
where AVSS is nominally 0 V and AVDD is nominally +5 V,
defines this requirement. Thus the valid inputs for VINA and
VINB are any combination that satisfies both Equations 2 and 3.
Note that the clock clamping method used in the differential
driver circuit shown in Figure 63 is sufficient for protecting the
AD9260 in an undervoltage condition.
For additional information showing the relationships between
VINA, VINB, VREF, and the digital output of the AD9260, see
Table 13.
Refer to Table 12 for a summary of the various analog input and
reference configurations.
ANALOG INPUT OPERATION
+0.8 × VREF
+
AVSS + 0.5V < VINA < AVDD − 0.5V
(2)
where VREF is the voltage at the VREF pin.
INPUT COMPLIANCE RANGE
The analog input structure of the AD9260 is optimized to meet
the performance requirements for some of the most demanding
communication and data acquisition applications. This input
structure is composed of a switched-capacitor network that
samples the input signal applied to pins VINA and VINB on
every rising edge of the CLK pin. The input switched capacitors
are charged to the input voltage during each period of CLK. The
resulting charge, q, on these capacitors is equal to C × VIN,
where C is the input capacitor. The change in charge on these
capacitors, delta q, as the capacitors are charged from a previous
sample of the input signal to the next sample, is approximated
in the following equation,
delta q ~ C × deltaVN = C × (VN − VN −2 )
(4)
where VN represents the present sample of the input signal and
VN–2 represents the sample taken two clock cycles earlier. The
average current flow into the input (provided from an external
source) is given in the following equation,
I = delta q / T ~ C × (VN − VN −2 )× f CLOCK
(5)
where T represents the period of CLK and fCLOCK represents the
frequency of CLK. Equations 4 and 5 provide simplifying
approximations of the operation of the analog input structure of
the AD9260. A more exact, detailed description and analysis of
the input operation follows.
In addition to the limitations on the differential span of the
input signal indicated in Equation 2, an additional limitation is
placed on the inputs by the analog input structure of the
AD9260. The analog input structure bounds the valid operating
range for VINA and VINB. The condition,
Rev. C | Page 24 of 44
AD9260
circuitry must provide additional charge, qdelta, to capacitors
CS1 and CS2, which is the difference between the precharged
value, Q(n–1), and the new value, Q(n), as given in the
following equation,
SS3
SS1
CS1
SH1
VINA
CPA1
CPB1
SS2
SS4
CS2
ANALOG
MODULATOR
SH2
VINB
CPB2
00581-C-061
SH3
SH4
Figure 61. Detailed Analog Input Structure
Figure 61 illustrates the analog input structure of the AD9260.
For the moment, ignore the presence of the parasitic capacitors
CPA and CPB. The effects of these parasitic capacitors will be
discussed near the end of this section. The switched capacitors,
CS1 and CS2, sample the input voltages applied on pins VINA
and VINB. These capacitors are connected to input pins VINA
and VINB when CLK is low. When CLK rises, a sample of the
input signal is taken on capacitors CS1 and CS2. When CLK is
high, capacitors CS1 and CS2 are connected to the Analog
Modulator. The modulator precharges capacitors CS1 and CS2
to minimize the amount of charge required from any circuit
used in combination with the AD9260 to drive input pins VINA
and VINB. This reduces the input drive requirements of the
analog circuitry driving pins VINA and VINB. The Analog
Modulator precharges the voltages across capacitors CS1 and
CS2, approximately equal to a delayed version of the input
signal. When capacitors CS1 and CS2 are connected to input
pins VINA and VINB, the differential charge, Q(n), on these
capacitors is given in the following equation,
Q(n) = q1 − q2 = CS × VCORE
(6)
where q1 and q2 are the individual charges stored on capacitors
CS1 and CS2 respectively, and CS is the capacitance value of
CS1 and CS2. When capacitors CS1 and CS2 are connected to
the Analog Modulator during the preceding precharge clock
phase, the capacitors are precharged equal to an approximation
of a previous sample of the input signal. Consequently the
differential charge on these capacitors while CLK is high is
given in the following equation,
Q(n − 1) = CS × VCORE (delay ) + CS × Vdelta
(7)
where VCORE(delay) is the value of VCORE sampled during a
previous period of CLK, and Vdelta is the sigma-delta error
voltage left on the capacitors. Vdelta is a natural artifact of the
sigma-delta feedback techniques utilized in the Analog
Modulator of the AD9260. It is a small random voltage term
that changes every clock period and varies from 0 to ±0.05
×VREF.
The analog circuitry used to drive the input pins of the AD9260
must respond to the charge glitch that occurs when capacitors
CS1 and CS2 are connected to input pins VINA and VINB. This
(8)
Qdelta = CS × [VCORE − VCORE (delay ) + Vdelta ]
(9)
DRIVING THE INPUT
Transient Response
The charge glitch occurs once at the beginning of every period
of the input CLK (falling edge), and the sample is taken on
capacitors CS1 and CS2 exactly one-half period later (rising
edge). Figure 62 presents a typical input waveform applied to
input Pins VINA and VINB of the AD9260.
TRACK SAMPLE TRACK SAMPLE TRACK SAMPLE TRACK SAMPLE
CLOCK
VINA-VINB
00581-C-062
CPA2
Qdelta = Q(n) − Q(n − 1)
Figure 62. Typical Input Waveform
Figure 62 illustrates the effect of the charge glitch when a source
with nonzero output impedance is used to drive the input pins.
This source must be capable of settling from the charge glitch in
one-half period of the CLK. Unfortunately, the MOS switches
used in any CMOS-switched capacitor circuit (including those
in the AD9260) include nonlinear parasitic junction
capacitances connected to their terminals. Figure 61 also
illustrates the parasitic capacitances, Cpa1, Cpb1, Cpa2, and
Cpb2, associated with the input switches.
Parasitic capacitor Cpa1 and Cpa2 are always connected to Pins
VINA and VINB and therefore do not contribute to the glitch
energy. Parasitic capacitors Cpb1 and Cpb2, on the other hand,
cause a charge glitch that adds to that of input capacitors CS1
and CS2 when they are connected to input Pins VINA and
VINB. The nonlinear junction capacitance of Cpb1 and Cpb2
cause charge glitch energy that is nonlinearily related to the
input signal. Therefore, linear settling is difficult to achieve
unless the input source completely settles during one-half
period of CLK. A portion of the glitch impulse energy kicked
back at the source is not linearly related to the input signal.
Therefore, the best way to ensure that the input signal settles
linearly is to use wide bandwidth circuitry, which settles as
completely as possible from the glitch during one-half period of
the CLK.
The AD9260 utilizes a proprietary clock-boosted bootstrapping technique to reduce the nonlinear parasitic
Rev. C | Page 25 of 44
AD9260
capacitances of the internal CMOS switches. This technique
improves the linearity of the input switches and reduces the
nonlinear parasitic capacitance. Thus, this technique reduces
the nonlinear glitch energy. The capacitance values for the input
capacitors and parasitic capacitors for the input structure of the
AD9260, as illustrated in Figure 61, are listed as follows.
499Ω
499Ω
50Ω
VIN
VINA
+5V
CS
100pF
AD9260
AD8138
50Ω
VINB
CS = 3.2 pF, Cpa = 6 pF, Cpb = 1 pF (where CS is the
capacitance value of capacitors CS1 and CS2, Cpa is the value of
capacitors Cpa1 and Cpa2, and Cpb is the value of capacitors
Cpb1 and Cpb2). The total capacitance at each input pin is CIN
= CS + Cpa + Cpb = 10.2 pF.
499Ω
499Ω
CS
100pF
10µF
0.1µF
00581-C-063
VREF
Figure 63. AD8138 Single-Ended Differential ADC Driver
Input Driver Considerations
The optimum noise and distortion performance of the AD9260
can ONLY be achieved when the AD9260 is driven differentially
with a 4 V input span. Since not all applications have a signal
preconditioned for differential operation, there is often a need
to perform a single-ended-to-differential conversion. In the
case of the AD9260, a single-ended-to-differential conversion is
best realized using a differential op amp driver. Although a
transformer will perform a similar function for ac signals, its
usefulness is precluded by its inability to directly drive the
AD9260 and thus the additional requirement of an active low
noise, low distortion buffer stage.
Single-Ended-to-Differential Op Amp Driver
There are two single-ended-to-differential op amp driver
circuits useful for driving the AD9260. The first circuit, shown
in Figure 63, uses the AD8138 and represents the best choice in
most applications. The AD8138 is a low distortion differential
ADC driver designed to convert a ground-referenced singleended input signal to a differential output signal with a
specified common-mode level for dc-coupling applications. It is
capable of maintaining the typical THD and SFDR performance
of the AD9260 with only a slight degradation in its noise
performance in the 8 mode (i.e., SNR of 85 dB–86 dB).
In this application, the AD8138 is configured for unity gain and
its common-mode output level is set to 2.5 V, functioning like
the VREF of the AD9260, to maximize its output headroom
while operating from a single supply. Note that the singlesupply operation has the benefit of not requiring an input
protection network for the AD9260 in dc-coupled applications.
A simple R-C network at the output is used to filter out high
frequency noise from the AD8138. Recall, the AD9260’s small
signal bandwidth is 75 MHz. Therefore, any noise falling within
the baseband bandwidth of the AD9260 defined by its sample
and decimation rate, as well as images of its baseband response
occurring at multiples of the sample rate, will degrade its overall
noise performance.
The second driver circuit, shown in Figure 64, can provide
slightly enhanced noise performance relative to the AD8138,
assuming low noise, high speed op amps are used. This
differential op amp driver circuit is configured to convert and
level-shift a 2 V p-p single-ended, ground-referenced signal to a
4 V p-p differential signal centered at the common-mode level
of the AD9260. The circuit is based on two op amps that are
configured as matched unity gain difference amplifiers. The
single-ended input signal is applied to opposing inputs of the
difference amplifiers, thus providing differential outputs. The
common-mode offset voltage is applied to the noninverting
resistor leg of each difference amplifier providing the required
offset voltage. This offset voltage is derived from the commonmode level (CML) pin of the AD9260 via a low output
impedance buffer amplifier capable of driving a 1 µF capacitive
load. The common-mode offset can be varied over a 1.8 V to
2.5 V span without any serious degradation in distortion
performance as shown in Figure 50, thus providing some
flexibility in improving output compression distortion from
some ±5 op amps with limited positive voltage swing.
To protect the AD9260 from an undervoltage fault condition
from op amps specified for ±5 V operation, two 50 Ω series
resistors and a diode to AGND are inserted between each op
amp output and the AD9260 inputs. The AD9260 will
inherently be protected against any overvoltage condition if the
op amps share the same positive power supply (AVDD) as the
AD9260. Note, the gain accuracy and common-mode rejection
of each difference amplifier in this driver circuit can be
enhanced by using a matched thin-film resistor network
(Ohmtek ORNA5000F) for the op amps. Resistor values should
be 500 Ω or less to maintain the lowest possible noise.
The noise performance of each unity gain differential driver
circuit is limited by its inherent noise gain of two. For unity gain
op amps only, the noise gain can be reduced from two to one
Rev. C | Page 26 of 44
AD9260
R
(1 dB–2 dB) when compared to the OPA642. Note that the
majority of the AD9260 test and characterization data presented
in this data sheet was taken using the AD9632 op amp in this
dc-coupled driver circuit. This driver circuit is also provided on
the AD9260 evaluation board since the AD8138 was unreleased
at that time.
R
50Ω
50Ω
VINA
R
R
VIN
CF
CC
100pF
VCML-VIN
R
CF
AD9260
CD
100pF
50Ω
50Ω
VINB
R
CC
100pF
R
R
CML
0.1µF
1.0µF
Figure 64. DC-Coupled Differential Driver with Level-Shifting
beyond the input signals passband by adding a shunt capacitor,
CF, across the feedback resistor of each op amp. This will
essentially establish a low-pass filter which reduces the noise
gain to one beyond the filter’s f–3 dB while simultaneously
bandlimiting the input signal to f–3 dB. Note that the pole
established by this filter can also be used as the real pole of an
antialiasing filter. Since the noise contribution of two op amps
from the same product family are typically equal but
uncorrelated, the total output-referred noise of each op amp
will add root-sum square leading to a further 3 dB degradation
in the circuit’s noise performance. Further out-of-band noise
reduction can be realized with the addition of single-ended and
differential capacitors, CS and CD.
The distortion and noise performance of the two op amps
within the signal path are critical in achieving optimum
performance in the AD9260. Low noise op amps capable of
providing greater than 85 dB THD at 1 MHz while swinging
over a 1 V to 3 V range are a rare commodity, yet these parts are
the only ones that should be considered. The AD9632 op amp
was found to provide superb distortion performance in this
circuit due to its ability to maintain excellent distortion
performance over a wide bandwidth while swinging over a 1 V
to 3 V range. Since the AD9632 is gain-of-two or greater stable,
the use of the noise reduction shunt capacitors discussed above
was prohibited, thus degrading its noise performance slightly
00581-C-064
AD817
The outputs of each op amp are ac coupled via a small series
resistor and capacitor (i.e., 50 Ω and 0.1 µF) to the respective
inputs of the AD9260. Similar to the dc coupled driver, further
out-of-band noise reduction can be realized with the addition of
100 pF single-ended and differential capacitors, CS and CD. The
lower cutoff frequency of this ac-coupled circuit is determined
by RC and CC in which RC is tied to the common-mode level pin,
CML, of the AD9260 for proper biasing of the inputs. Although
the OPA642 was found to provide the lowest overall noise and
distortion performance (88.8 dB and 96 dB THD @ 100 kHz),
the AD8055, or dual AD8056, suffered only a 0.5 dB to 1.5 dB
degradation in overall performance. It is worth noting that
given the high level of performance attainable by the AD9260,
special consideration must be given to both the quality of the
test equipment and test set-up in its evaluation.
Common-Mode Level
The CML pin is an internal analog bias point used internally by
the AD9260. This pin must be decoupled to analog ground with
at least a 0.1 µF capacitor as shown in Figure 65. The dc level of
CML is approximately AVDD/2.5. This voltage should be
buffered if it is to be used for any external biasing.
Note: the common-mode voltage of the input signal applied to
the AD9260 need not be at the exact same level as CML. While
this level is recommended for optimal performance, the
AD9260 is tolerant of a range of input common-mode voltages
around AVDD/2.5.
Rev. C | Page 27 of 44
CML
0.1µF
AD9260
Figure 65. CML Decoupling
00581-C-065
VCML-VIN
AD9260
REFERENCE OPERATION
The AD9260 contains an on-board band gap reference and
internal reference buffer amplifier. The onboard reference
provides a pin-strappable option to generate either a 1 V or 2.5
V output. With the addition of two external resistors, the user
can generate reference voltages other than 1 V and 2.5 V.
Another alternative is to use an external reference for designs
requiring enhanced accuracy and/or drift performance. See
Table 12 for a summary of the pin-strapping options for the
AD9260 reference configurations. Note, the optimum noise and
distortion can only be achieved with a 2.5 V reference.
SENSE and another resistor (R2) connected between SENSE
and REFCOM. The other comparator controls internal circuitry
that will disable the reference amplifier if the SENSE pin is tied
to AVDD. Disabling the reference amplifier allows the VREF
pin to be driven by an external voltage reference.
TO A/D
5kΩ
CAPT
6.25kΩ
6.25kΩ
Figure 66 shows a simplified model of the internal voltage
reference of the AD9260. A pin-strappable reference amplifier
buffers a 1 V fixed reference. The output from the reference
amplifier, A1, appears on the VREF pin and must be decoupled
with 0.1 µF and 10 µF capacitor to REFCOM. The voltage on
the VREF pin determines the full-scale input span of the A/D.
This input span equals:
A2
5kΩ
DISABLE
A2
CAPB
LOGIC
– +
1V
VREF
A1
7.5kΩ
7.5k
Full - Scale Input Span = 1.6 × VREF
AD9260
SENSE
DISABLE
A1
LOGIC
5kΩ
REFCOM
00581-C-066
The voltage appearing at the VREF pin, as well as the state of
the internal reference amplifier, A1, is determined by the
voltage appearing at the SENSE pin. The logic circuitry contains
two comparators that monitor the voltage at the SENSE pin.
The comparator with the lowest set point (approximately 0.3 V)
controls the position of the switch within the feedback path of
A1. If the SENSE pin is tied to REFCOM, the switch is
connected to the internal resistor network, thus providing a
VREF of 2.5 V. If the SENSE pin is tied to the VREF pin via a
short or resistor, the switch is connected to the SENSE pin. A
short will provide a VREF of 1.0 V while an external resistor
network will provide an alternative VREF SPAN between 1.0 V
and 2.5 V. The external resistor network, for example, may be
implemented as a resistor divider circuit. This divider circuit
could consist of a resistor (R1) connected between VREF and
Figure 66. Simplified Reference
The reference buffer circuit level shifts the reference to an
appropriate common-mode voltage for use by the internal
circuitry. The on-chip buffer provides the low impedance
necessary for driving the internal switched capacitor circuits
and eliminates the need for an external buffer op amp.
Table 12. Reference Configuration Summary
Reference
Operating Mode
INTERNAL
INTERNAL
INTERNAL
EXTERNAL
Input Span (VINA–VINB)
(V p-p)
1.6
4.0
1.6 ≤ SPAN ≤ 4.0 and
SPAN = 1.6 × VREF
1.6 ≤ SPAN ≤4.0
Required VREF (V)
1
2.5
1 ≤ VREF ≤ 2.5 and
VREF = (1+R1/R2)
1 ≤ VREF ≤2.5
Rev. C | Page 28 of 44
Connect
SENSE
SENSE
R1
R2
SENSE
VREF
To
VREF
REFCOM
VREF and SENSE
SENSE and REFCOM
AVDD
EXT. REF.
AD9260
bandlimits the noise contribution from the reference. The turnon time of the reference voltage appearing between CAPT and
CAPB is approximately 15 ms and should be evaluated in any
power-down mode of operation.
Rev. C | Page 29 of 44
AD9260
VREF
0.1µF
+
10µF
SENSE
REFCOM
0.1µF
CAPT
0.1µF
+
10µF
CAPB
0.1µF
Figure 67. Recommended Reference Decoupling Network
00581-C-067
The actual reference voltages used by the internal circuitry of
the AD9260 appear on the CAPT and CAPB pins. If VREF is
configured for 2.5 V, thus providing a 4 V full-scale input span,
the voltages appear at CAPT and CAPB are 3.0 V and 1.0 V
respectively. For proper operation when using the internal or an
external reference, it is necessary to add a capacitor network to
decouple the CAPT and CAPB pins. Figure 67 shows the
recommended decoupling network. This capacitive network
performs the following three functions: (1) along with the
reference amplifier, A2, it provides a low source impedance over
a large frequency range to drive the A/D internal circuitry; (2) it
provides the necessary compensation for A2; and (3) it
AD9260
DIGITAL INPUTS AND OUTPUTS
Table 14. CS and READ Pin Functionality
DIGITAL OUTPUTS
The AD9260 output data is presented in a twos complement
format. Table 13 indicates the output data formats for various
input ranges and decimation modes. A straight binary output
data format can be created by inverting the MSB.
Table 13. Output Data Format
Input (V)
Condition (V)
8× Decimation Mode
VINA–VINB
< –0.8 ×VREF
VINA–VINB
= –0.8 ×VREF
VINA–VINB
=0
VINA–VINB
= +0.8 ×VREF – 1 LSB
VINA–VINB
>= + 0.8 ×VREF
4× Decimation Mode
VINA–VINB
< –0.825 ×VREF
VINA–VINB
= –0.825 ×VREF
VINA–VINB
=0
VINA–VINB
= +0.825 ×VREF –1 LSB
VINA–VINB
>= + 0.825 ×VREF
2× Decimation Mode
VINA–VINB
< –0.825 ×VREF
VINA–VINB
= –0.825 ×VREF
VINA–VINB
=0
VINA–VINB
= +0.825 ×VREF –1 LSB
VINA–VINB
>= + 0.825 ×VREF
CS
Low
Low
High
High
READ
Low
High
Low
High
Condition of Data Output Pins
Data Output Pins in Hi-Z State
ADC Data on Output Pins
Data Output Pins in Hi-Z State
Data Output Pins in Hi-Z State
Digital Output
DAV Pin
1000 0000 0000 0000
1000 0000 0000 0000
0000 0000 0000 0000
0111 1111 1111 1111
0111 1111 1111 1111
1000 0001 0001 1100
1000 0001 0000 1100
0000 0000 0000 0000
0111 1110 1110 0011
0111 1110 1110 0011
1000 0000 0100 0001
1000 0000 0100 0001
0000 0000 0000 0000
0111 1111 1011 1110
0111 1111 1011 1110
The slightly different ± full-scale input voltage conditions and
their corresponding digital output code for the 4× and
2× decimation modes can be attributed to the different digital
scaling factors applied to each AD9260 FIR decimation stage for
filter optimization purposes. Thus, a + full-scale reading of
0111 1111 1111 1111 and – full-scale reading of 1000 0000 0000
0000 is unachievable in the 2× and 4× decimation modes. As a
result, a digital overrange condition can never exist in the 2× or
the 4× decimation mode and thus OTR being set high indicates
an overrange condition in the analog modulator.
The output data format in 1× decimation differs from that in
2×, 4× and 8× decimation modes. In 1× decimation mode the
output data remains in a twos complement format, but the
digital numbers are scaled by a factor of 7/128. This factor of
7/128 is the product of an internal scale factor of 7/8 in the
analog modulator and a 1/16 scale factor caused by LSB
justification of the 12-bit modulator data.
CS and Read Pins
The CS and READ pins control the state of the output data pins
(BIT1–BIT16) on the AD9260. The CS pin is active low and the
READ pin is active high. When CS and READ are both active
the ADC data is driven on the output data pins, otherwise the
output data pins are in a high-impedance (Hi-Z) state. Table 14
indicates the relationship between the CS and READ pins and
the state of Pins Bit 1 to Bit 16.
The DAV pin indicates when the output data of the AD9260 is
valid. Digital output data is updated on the rising edge of DAV.
The data hold time (tH) is dependent on the external loading of
DAV and the digital data output pins (BIT1–BIT16) as well as
the particular decimation mode. The internal DAV driver is
sized to be larger than the drivers pertaining to the digital data
outputs to ensure that rising edge of DAV occurs before the data
transitions under similar loading conditions (i.e., fanout)
regardless of mode. Note that minimum data hold (tH) of 3.5 ns
is specified in the Figure 4 timing diagram from the 50% point
of DAV’s rising edge to the 50% of data transition using a
capacitive load of 20 pF for DAV and BIT1–BIT16. Applications
interfacing to TTL logic and/or having larger capacitive loading
for DAV than BIT1–BIT16 should consider latching data on the
falling edge of DAV since the falling edge of DAV occurs well
after the data has transitioned in the case of the 2×, 4×, and 8×
modes. The duty cycle of DAV is approximately 50% and it
remains active independent of CS and READ.
RESET Pin
The RESET pin is an asynchronous digital input that is active
low. Upon asserting RESET low, the clocks in the digital
decimation filters are disabled, the DAV pin goes low and the
data on the digital output data pins (Bit 1–Bit 16) is invalid. In
addition, the analog modulator in the AD9260 and internal
clock dividers used in the decimation filters are reset and will
remain reset as long as RESET is maintained low. In the 2×, 4×,
or 8× mode, the RESET must remain low for at least a clock
period to ensure all the clock dividers and analog modulator
are reset. Upon bringing RESET high, the internal clock
dividers will begin to count again on the next falling edge of
CLK and DAV will go high approximately 15 ns after this
falling edge, resuming normal operation. Refer to Figure 9 for
a timing diagram.
The state of the internal decimation filters in the AD9260
remains unchanged when RESET is asserted low. Consequently,
when RESET is pulsed low, this resets the analog modulator but
does not clear all the data in the digital filters. The data in the
filters is corrupted by the effect of resetting the analog
modulator (this causes an abrupt change at the input of the
digital filter and this change is unrelated to the signal at the
input of the A/D converter). Similarly, in multiplexed
Rev. C | Page 30 of 44
AD9260
applications in which the input of the A/D converters sees an
abrupt change, the data in the analog modulator and digital
filter will be corrupted.
For this reason, following a pulse on the RESET pin, or change
in channels (i.e., multiplexed applications only), the decimation
filters must be flushed of their data. These filters have a
memory length, hence delay, equal to the number of filter taps
times the clock rate of the converter. This memory length may
be interpreted in terms of a number of samples stored in the
decimation filter. For example, if the part is in 8× decimation
mode, the delay is 321/fCLOCK. This corresponds to 321 samples
stored in the decimation filter. These 321 samples must be
flushed from the AD9260 after RESET is pulsed high prior to
reusing the data from the AD9260. That is, the AD9260 should
be allowed to clock for 321 samples as the corrupted data is
flushed from the filters. If the part is in 4× or 2× decimation
mode, then the relatively smaller group delays of the 4× and 2×
decimation filters result fewer samples that must be flushed
from the filters (108 samples and 23 samples respectively).
In 2×, 4×, or 8× mode, RESET may be used to synchronize
multiple AD9260s clocked with the same clock. The decimation
filters in the AD9260 are clocked with an internal clock divider.
The state of this clock divider determines when the output data
becomes available (relative to CLK). In order to synchronize
multiple AD9260s clocked with the same clock, it is necessary
that the clock dividers in each of the individual AD9260s are all
reset to the same state. When RESET is asserted low, these clock
dividers are cleared. On the next falling edge of CLK following
the rising edge of RESET, the clock dividers begin counting and
the clock is applied to the digital decimation filters.
OTR Pin
The OTR pin is a synchronous output that is updated each CLK
period. It indicates that an overrange condition has occurred
within the AD9260. Ideally, OTR should be latched on the
falling edge of CLK to ensure proper setup-and-hold time.
However, since an overrange condition typically extends well
beyond one clock cycle (i.e., does not toggle at the CLK rate).
OTR typically remains high for more than a clock cycle,
allowing it to be successfully detected on the rising edge of CLK
or monitored asynchronously.
An overrange condition must be carefully handled because of
the group delays in the low-pass digital decimation filters in the
output stages of the AD9260. When the input signal exceeds the
full-scale range of the converter, this can have a variety of
effects upon the operation of the AD9260, depending on the
duration and amplitude of this overrange condition. A short
duration overrange condition (<< filter group delay) may cause
the analog modulator to briefly overrange without causing the
data in the low pass digital filters to exceed full scale. The
analog modulator is actually capable of processing signals
slightly (3%) beyond the full-scale range of the AD9260 without
internally clipping. A long duration overrange condition will
cause the digital filter data to exceed full scale. For this reason,
the OTR signal is generated using two separate internal out-ofrange detectors.
The first of these out-of-range detectors is placed at the output
of the analog modulator and indicates whether the modulator
output signal has extended 3% beyond the full-scale range of
the converter. If the modulator output signal exceeds 3%
beyond full scale, the digital data is hard-limited (i.e., clipped)
to a number that is 3% larger than full scale. Due to the delay of
the switched capacitor analog modulator, the OTR signal is
delayed 3 1/2 clock cycles relative to the clock edge in which the
overranged analog input signal was sampled.
The second out-of-range detector is placed at the output of the
stage three decimation filter and detects whether the low pass
filtered data has exceeded full scale. When this occurs, the filter
output data is hard limited to full scale. The OTR signal is a
logical OR function of the signals from these two internal outof-range detectors. If either of these detectors produces an outof-range signal, the OTR pin goes high and the data may be
seriously corrupted.
If the AD9260 is used in a system that incorporates automatic
gain control (AGC), the OTR signal may be used to indicate
that the signal amplitude should be reduced. This may be
particularly effective for use in maximizing the signal dynamic
range if the signal includes high-frequency components that
occasionally exceed full scale by a small amount. If, on the other
hand, the signal includes large amplitude low frequency
components that cause the digital filters to overrange, this may
cause the low pass digital filter to overrange. In this case the
data may become seriously corrupted and the digital filters may
need to be flushed. See the RESET pin function description
above for an explanation of the requirements for flushing the
digital filters.
OTR should be sampled with the falling edge of CLK. This
signal is invalid while CLK is HIGH.
MODE OPERATION
The Mode Select Pin (MODE) allows the user to select one of
four available digital filter modes using a single pin. Each mode
configures the internal decimation filter to decimate at: 1×, 2×,
4×, or 8×. Refer to Table 15 for mode pin ranges.
The mode selection is performed by using a set of internal
comparators, as illustrated in Figure 68, so that each mode
corresponds to a voltage range on the input of the MODE pin.
The output of the comparators are fed into encoding logic
where, on the falling edge of the clock, the encoded data
is latched.
Rev. C | Page 31 of 44
AD9260
Table 15. Recommended Mode Pin Ranges
and Configurations
BIAS PIN OPERATION
4R
3R
MODE PIN
2R
The Bias Select Pin (BIAS) gives the user, who is able to operate
the AD9260 at a slower clock rate, the added flexibility of
running the device in a lower, power consumption mode when
it is clocked at less than 20 MHz.
This is accomplished by scaling the bias current of the AD9260
as illustrated in Figure 69. The bias amplifier drives a source
follower and forces 1 V across REXT, which sets the bias current.
This effectively adjusts the bias current in the modulator
amplifiers and FLASH preamplifiers. When a large value of REXT
is used, a smaller bias current is available to the internal
amplifier circuitry. As a result these amplifiers need more time
to settle, thus dictating the use of a slower clock as the power
is reduced. Refer to the characterization curves shown in Figure
47 to Figure 54 revealing the performance tradeoffs.
The scaling is accomplished by properly attaching an external
resistor to the BIAS pin of the AD9260 as shown in Table 17.
REXT is normally 2 kΩ for a clock speed of 20 MHz and scales
inversely with clock rate. Because BIAS is an external pin,
minimization of capacitance to this pin is recommended in
order to prevent instability of the bias pin amplifier.
Rev. C | Page 32 of 44
ENCODED MODE
LATCH
CLOCK
R
00581-C-068
Decimation Mode
8×
2×
4×
1×
AVSS
Figure 68. Simplified Mode Pin Circuitry
BIAS CURRENT
1V
BIAS PIN
REXT
Figure 69. Simplified Bias Pin Circuitry
00581-C-069
Typical Mode Pin
GND
VREF/2
CML
AVDD
ENCODER
Mode Pin Range
0 V–0.5 V
0.5 V–1.5 V
1.5 V–3.0 V
3.0 V–5.0 V
AVDD
AD9260
POWER DISSIPATION CONSIDERATIONS
30
The power dissipation of the AD9260 is dependent on its
application specific configuration and operating conditions.
The analog power dissipation as shown in Figure 70 is primarily
a function of its power bias setting and sample rate. It remains
insensitive to the particular input waveform being digitized or
digital filter MODE setting. The digital power dissipation is
primarily a function of the digital supply setting (i.e., +3 V to
+5 V), the sample rate and, to a lesser extent, the MODE setting
and input waveform. Figure 71 and Figure 72 show the total
current dissipation of the combined digital (DVDD) and digital
driver supply (DRVDD) for +3 V and +5 V supplies. Note,
DVDD and DRVDD are typically derived from the same supply
bus since no degradation in performance results. A 1 MHz fullscale sine wave was used to ensure maximum digital activity in
the digital filters and the digital drivers had a fanout of one.
Note also that a twofold decrease in digital supply current
results when the digital supply is reduced form +5 V to +3 V.
4 × MODE
20
SAMPLE RATE (MSPS)
IDVDD/IDRVDD (mA)
00581-C-070
IAVDD (mA)
30
Figure 70. IAVDD vs. Sample Rate (AVDD = +5V, Mode 1x-4x)
8 × MODE
4 × MODE
IDVDD/IDRVDD (mA)
12
1 × MODE
10
2 × MODE
8
6
4
0
15
20
SAMPLE RATE (MSPS)
Figure 71. IDVDD/IDRVDD vs. Sample Rate (DVDD = DRVDD = 3 V,
fIN = 1 MHz)
00581-C-071
2
10
20
Clock Input and Considerations
The AD9260 internal timing uses the two edges of the clock
input to generate a variety of internal timing signals. The clock
input must meet or exceed the minimum specified pulse width
high and low (tCH and tCL) specifications for the given A/D as
defined in the Switching Specifications at the beginning of the
data sheet to meet the rated performance specifications. For
example, the clock input to the AD9260 operating at 20 MSPS
may have a duty cycle between 45% and 55% to meet this
timing requirement since the minimum specified tCH and tCL is
22.5 ns. For clock rates below 20 MSPS, the duty cycle may
deviate from this range to the extent that both tCH and tCL are
satisfied. All high speed, high resolution A/Ds are sensitive to
the quality of the clock input. The degradation in SNR at a
given full-scale input frequency (fIN) due to only aperture jitter
(tA) can be calculated with the following equation:
[
]
SNR = 20 log10 1/(2π f IN t A )
In the equation, the rms aperture jitter, tA, represents the
rootsum square of all the jitter sources which include the clock
input, analog input signal, and A/D aperture jitter specification.
For example, if a 500 kHz full-scale sine wave is sampled by an
Rev. C | Page 33 of 44
00581-C-072
15
The AD9260 output drivers can be configured to interface with
+5 V or 3.3 V logic families by setting DRVDD to +5 V or 3.3 V,
respectively. The AD9260 output drivers in each mode are
appropriately sized to provide sufficient output current to drive
a wide variety of logic families. However, large drive currents
tend to cause glitches on the supplies and may affect SINAD
performance. Applications requiring the AD9260 to drive large
capacitive loads or large fanout may require additional
decoupling capacitors on DRVDD. The addition of external
buffers or latches helps reduce output loading while providing
effective isolation from the data bus.
QUARTER BIAS [8kΩ]
5
10
DIGITAL OUTPUT DRIVER CONSIDERATIONS
(DRVDD)
HALF BIAS [4kΩ]
14
10
Figure 72. IDVDD/IDRVDD vs. Sample Rate (DVDD = DRVDD = 5 V, fIN = 1
MHz)
70
16
2 × MODE
SAMPLE RATE (MSPS)
90
15
15
5
110
10
1 × MODE
0
FULL BIAS [2kΩ]
5
20
5
130
50
8 × MODE
25
AD9260
A/D with a total rms jitter of 15 ps, the SNR performance of the
A/D will be limited to 86.5 dB.
The clock input should be treated as an analog signal in cases
where aperture jitter may affect the dynamic range of the
AD9260. In fact, the CLK input buffer is internally powered
from the AD9260’s analog supply, AVDD. Thus the CLK
logic high and low input voltage levels are +3.5 V and
+1.0 V, respectively.
Analog and Digital Supply Decoupling
The AD9260 features separate analog, digital, and driver supply
and ground pins, helping to minimize digital corruption of
sensitive analog signals.
Figure 73 shows the power supply rejection ratio vs. frequency
for a 200 mV p-p ripple applied to AVDD, DVDD, and
DAVDD.
90
Supplies for clock drivers should be separated from the A/D
output driver supplies to avoid modulating the clock signal with
digital noise. Low jitter crystal controlled oscillators make the
best clock sources. If the clock is generated from another type of
source (by gating, dividing, or other method), it should be
retimed by the original clock at the last step.
85
DVDD AND DRVDD
80
PSRR (dBFS)
75
GROUNDING AND DECOUPLING
70
65
60
AVDD
55
Analog and Digital Grounding
50
Proper grounding is essential in any high speed, high resolution
system. Multilayer printed circuit boards (PCBs) are
recommended to provide optimal grounding and power
schemes. The use of ground and power planes offers
distinct advantages:
The minimization of the loop area encompassed by a signal
and its return path.
2.
The minimization of the impedance associated with
ground and power paths.
3.
The inherent distributed capacitor formed by the power
plane, PCB insulation, and ground plane.
These characteristics result in both a reduction of
electromagnetic interference (EMI) and an overall
improvement in performance.
It is important to design a layout that prevents noise from
coupling onto the input signal. Digital signals should not be run
in parallel with input signal traces and should be routed away
from the input circuitry. While the AD9260 features separate
analog and digital ground pins, it should be treated as an analog
component. The AVSS, DVSS and DRVSS pins must be joined
together directly under the AD9260. A solid ground plane under
the A/D is acceptable if the power and ground return currents
are managed carefully. Alternatively, the ground plane under
the A/D may contain serrations to steer currents in predictable
directions where cross-coupling between analog and digital
would otherwise be unavoidable. The AD9260/EB ground
layout, shown in Figure 83, depicts the serrated type of
arrangement. The analog and digital grounds are connected by
a jumper below the A/D.
101
0
102
103
104
FREQUENCY (kHz)
Figure 73. AD9260 PSRR vs. Frequency (8x Mode)
In general, AVDD, the analog supply, should be decoupled to
AVSS, the analog common, as close to the chip as physically
possible. Figure 74 shows the recommended decoupling for the
analog supplies; 0.1 µF ceramic chip capacitors should provide
adequately low impedance over a wide frequency range. Note
that the AVDD and AVSS pins are co-located on the AD9260 to
simplify the layout of the decoupling capacitors and provide the
shortest possible PCB trace lengths. The AD9260/EB power
plane layout, shown in Figure 84 depicts a typical arrangement
using a multilayer PCB.
4
AVDD
AVDD 44
3
AVSS
AVSS 38
0.1µF
0.1µF
AD9260
28 AVDD
0.1µF
29 AVSS
Figure 74. Analog Supply Decoupling
The digital activity on the AD9260 chip falls into two general
categories: digital logic and output drivers. The internal digital
logic draws surges of current, mainly during the clock
transitions. The output drivers draw large current impulses
while the output bits are changing. The size and duration of
these currents are a function of the load on the output bits: large
capacitive loads are to be avoided. Note that the digital logic of
Rev. C | Page 34 of 44
00581-C-073
40
00581-C-074
1.
45
AD9260
the AD9260 is referenced DVDD while the output drivers are
referenced to DRVDD. Also note that the SNR performance
of the AD9260 remains independent of the digital or driver
supply setting.
The decoupling shown in Figure 75, a 0.1 µF ceramic chip
capacitor, is appropriate for a reasonable capacitive load on the
digital outputs (typically 20 pF on each pin). Applications
involving greater digital loads should consider increasing the
digital decoupling proportionally, and/or using external
buffers/latches.
DRVDD 6
AD9260
1
DVSS
DRVSS 5
0.1µF
INSERT 5/3 VOLT LINEAR REGULATOR
FOR 3 OR 3.3V DIGITAL OPERATION
FERRITE
BEAD CORE*
Figure 75. Digital Supply Decoupling
A complete decoupling scheme will also include large tantalum
or electrolytic capacitors on the PCB to reduce low frequency
ripple to negligible levels. Refer to the AD9260/EB schematic
and layouts in Figure 80 to Figure 84 for more information
regarding the placement of decoupling capacitors.
An alternative layout and decoupling scheme is shown in Figure
76. This layout and decoupling scheme is well suited for
applications in which multiple AD9260s are located on the
same PC board and/or the AD9260 is part of a multicard
mixed-signal system in which grounds are tied back at the
system supplies (i.e., star ground configuration). In this case,
the AD9260 is treated as an analog component in which its
analog (i.e., AVDD) and digital (DVDD and DRVDD) supplies
are derived from the systems +5 V analog supply and all of the
AD9260’s ground pins are tied directly to the analog ground
plane which resides directly underneath the IC.
Referring to Figure 76, each supply pin is directly decoupled to
their respective ground pin or analog ground plane via a
ceramic 0.1 µF chip capacitor. Surface mount ferrite beads are
used to isolate the analog (AVDD), digital (DVDD), and driver
Rev. C | Page 35 of 44
VA
10µF
DVDD
DRVDD
DVSS
DRVSS
0.1µF
0.1µF
VA
AD9260
AVDD
0.1µF
AVSS
BITS 1–16,
DAV
BUFFER
LATCH
AVDD
0.1µF
AVSS
CLK
AVDD
0.1µF
AVSS
SAMPLING CLOCK
GENERATOR
Figure 76. High Frequency Supply Rejection
00581-C-076
DVDD
00581-C-075
3
0.1µF
supplies (DRVDD) of the AD9260 from the +5 V power bus.
Properly selected ferrite beads can provide more than 40 dB of
isolation from high frequency switching transients originating
from AD9260 supply pins. Further noise immunity from noise
is provided by the inherent power supply rejection of the
AD9260 as shown in Figure 70. If digital operation at 3 V is
desirable for power savings and or to provide for a 3 V digital
logic interface, a 5 V to 3 V linear regulator can be used to drive
DVDD and/or DRVDD. A more complete discussion on this
layout and decoupling scheme can be found in Chapter 7, pages
7-27 to 7-55 of the High speed Design Techniques seminar
book, which is available at:
www.analog.com/support/frames/lin_frameset.hml
AD9260
EVALUATION BOARD GENERAL DESCRIPTION
Table 17. Evaluation Board Recommended Resistance Value
for External Bias Resistor
The AD9260 Evaluation Board is designed to provide an easy
and flexible method of exercising the AD9260 and demonstrate
its performance to data sheet specifications. The evaluation
board is fabricated in four layers: the component layer, the
ground layer, the power layer, and the solder layer. The board is
clearly labeled to provide easy identification of components.
Ample space is provided near the analog and clock inputs to
provide additional or alternate signal conditioning.
Resistor Value
2 kΩ
4 kΩ
8 kΩ
16 kΩ
Clock Speed (max)
20 MHz
10 MHz
5 MHz
2.5 MHz
Power Consumption
585 mW
325 mW
200 mW
150 mW
Data Interfacing Controls
FEATURES AND USER CONTROLS
The data interfacing controls (RESETB, CSB, READ, DAV) are
all accessible via SMA connectors (J2–J5) as illustrated in
Figure 78 within the data interfacing control block. The
RESETB, CSB, and READ connections are each supplied with
two sets or resistor pin cups to allow the user to pull-up or pulldown each signal to a fixed state. R5, R6, and R30 will terminate
to ground, while R7, R28, and R29 terminate to DRVDD. The
DAV and OTR signals are also directly connected to the data
output connector P1. All interfacing controls are buffered
through the CMOS line driver 74HC541.
Jumper Controlled Mode/OSR Selection
The choice of Mode/OSR can easily be varied by jumping either
JP1, JP2, JP3, or JP4 as illustrated in Figure 78 within the
Mode/OSR Control Block. To obtain the desired mode, refer to
Table 16.
Table 16. AD9260 Evaluation Board Mode Select
Connect Jumper
JP4
JP2
JP3
JP1
Buffered Output Data
The twos complement output data is buffered through two
CMOS noninverting bus transceivers (U2 and U3) and made
available at pin connector P1 as illustrated in Figure 78 within
the data output block.
Selectable Power Bias
The power consumption of the AD9260 can be scaled down if
the user is able to operate the device at a lower clock frequency.
As illustrated in Figure 78, pin cups are provided for the
external resistor (R2) tied to the BIAS pin of the AD9260.
Table 17 defines the recommended resistance for a given clock
speed to obtain the desired power consumption.
U5
1
NC
2.5/3V
7
2
AD780R
+VIN
NC
6
3
TEMP
VOUT
5
4
GNDS
TRIM
Jumper Controlled Reference Source
The choice of reference for the AD9260 can easily be varied
between 1.0 V, 2.5 V or external by using jumpers JP5, JP6, JP7,
and JP9 as illustrated in Figure 78 within the reference
configuration block. To obtain the desired reference, see
Table 18.
8
1KPOT
VCC2
C18
0.1µF
R10
1kΩ
C19
0.1µF
AGND
R3
15kΩ
R12
15kΩ
C14
0.1µF
VREFEXT
JP10
R11
49.9Ω
AD817R
1V
U6
R4
10kΩ
R13
10kΩ
C17
10µF
Q1
2N2222
R9
1kΩ
+
C12
0.1µF
C13
10µF
R8
390Ω
+
C15
0.1µF
AGND
VCC2
AGND
Figure 77. Evaluation Board External Reference Circuitry
Rev. C | Page 36 of 44
00581-C-077
Mode/OSR
1×
2×
4×
8×
AD9260
For signal tone input signal: The user would remove jumper
(JP8) and use only IN-1 as the input signal connector.
Table 18. Evaluation Board Reference Pin Configuration
Reference
Voltage
2.5 V
1.0 V
External
Connect Jumper
JP7
JP6
JP5, JP9, and JP10
Input Voltage
(p-p FS)
4.0 V
1.6 V
4.0 V
Selectable Input Signal Common-Mode Level Source
The input signal’s common-mode level (CML) can be set
by U10.
The external reference circuitry is illustrated in Figure 77. By
connecting or disconnecting JP10, the external reference can be
configured for either 1.0 V or 2.5 V. By connecting JP10, the
external reference will be configured to provide a 2.5 V
reference and by disconnecting JP10 reference, it will be
configured for 2.5 V. By leaving JP10 open, the external
reference will be configured to provide a 1.0 V reference.
Flexible DC or AC Coupled External Clock Inputs
As illustrated in Figure 78, the AD9260 Evaluation Board is
designed to allow the user the flexibility of selecting how to
connect the external clock source. It is also equipped with a
playpen area for experimenting with optional clock drivers or
crystals.
Selecting DC or AC Coupled External Clock:
DC Coupled: To directly drive the clock externally via the
CLKIN connector, connect JP11 and disconnect JP12. Note:
50 Ω terminated by R27.
AC Coupled: To ac couple the external clock and level shift it to
midsupply, connect JP12 and disconnect JP11. Note: 50 Ω
terminated by R27.
Flexible Input Signal Configuration Circuitry
The AD9260 Evaluation Board’s Input Signal Configuration
Block is illustrated in Figure 79. It is comprised of an input
signal summing amplifier (U7), a variable input signal
common-mode generator (U10), and a pair of amplifiers (U8
and U9) that configure the input into a differential signal and
drive it, through a pair of isolation resistors, into the input pins
of AD9260. The user can either input a signal or dual signal into
the evaluation board via the two SMA connectors (J6 and J7)
labeled IN-1 or IN-2.
The user should refer to the Driving the Input section of the
data sheet for a detailed explanation of how the inputs are to be
driven and what amplifier requirements are recommended.
To use the Input CML generated by U10: Disconnect jumper
JP13 and Connect resistors RX3 and RX4. The CML generated
by U10 is variable and adjustable using the 1 kΩ Variable
Resistor R35.
SHIPMENT CONFIGURATION
The AD9260 Evaluation Board is configured as follows
when shipped:
1.
2.5 V external reference/4.0 V differential full-scale input:
JP5, JP9, and JP10 connected, JP6 and JP7 disconnected.
2.
8× Mode/OSR: JP1 connected, JP2, JP3, and JP4
disconnected.
3.
Full Speed Power Bias: R2 = 2 kΩ and connected.
4.
CSB pulled low: R6 = 49.9 Ω and connected, R29
disconnected.
5.
RESETB pulled high: R7 = 10 kΩ and connected, R30
disconnected.
6.
READ pulled high: R28 = 10 kΩ and connected, R5
disconnected.
7.
Single Tone Input: JP8 removed, input applied via IN-1
(J7).
8.
Input signal common-mode level set by Variable Resistor
R35 to 2.0 V: Jumper JP12 is disconnected and resistors
R×4 and R×3 are connected.
9.
AC-Coupled Clock: JP12 connected and JP11
disconnected. Note: 50 Ω terminated by R27.
QUICK SETUP
1.
Selecting Single or Dual Signal Input
The input amplifier (U7) can either be configured as a dual
input signal inverting summer or a single tone inverting buffer.
This flexibility will allow for slightly better noise performance
in the single tone mode due to the inherent noise gain
difference in the two amplifier configurations. An optional
feedback capacitor (C9) was added to allow the user additional
out-of band filtering of the input signal if needed.
For two-tone input signals: The user would leave jumpers (JP8)
connected and use IN-1 and IN-2 (J7 and J6) as the connectors
for the input signals.
Connect the required power supplies to the Evaluation
Board as illustrated in Figure 28:
± 5 VA supplies to P5—Analog Power
+5 VA supply to P4—Analog Power
+5 VD supply to P3—Digital Power
+5 VD supply to P2—Driver Power
2.
Connect a Clock Source to CLKIN (J1):
Note: 50 Ω terminated by R1.
3.
Connect an Input Signal Source to the IN-1 (J7).
4.
Turn on power.
5.
The AD9260 Evaluation Board is now ready for use.
Rev. C | Page 37 of 44
AD9260
poor jitter performance. See Note 8 if a crystal-based clock
generator is used during FFT testing.
APPLICATION INFORMATION
1.
The ADC analog input should not be overdriven. Using a
signal amplitude slightly lower than FSR will allow a small
amount of headroom so that noise or DC offset voltage will
not overrange the ADC and hard limit on signal peaks.
2.
Two-tone tests can produce signal envelopes that exceed
FSR. Set each test signal to slightly less than –6 dB to
prevent hard limiting on peaks.
3.
Band-pass filtering of test signal generators is absolutely
necessary for SNR, THD, and IMD tests. Note that a low
noise signal generator along with a high Q band-pass filter
is often necessary to achieve the attainable noise
performance of the AD9260.
4.
Test signal generators must have exceptional noise
performance to achieve accurate SNR measurements.
Good generators, together with fifth-order elliptical bandpass filters, are recommended for SNR tests. Narrow
bandwidth crystal filters can also be used to filter generator
broadband noise, but they should be carefully tested for
operation at high signal levels.
5.
6.
The analog inputs of the AD9260 should be terminated
directly at the input pin sockets with the correct filter
terminating impedance (50 Ω or 75 Ω), or it should be
driven by a low output impedance buffer. Short leads are
necessary to prevent digital noise pickup.
A low noise (jitter) clock signal generator is required for
good ADC dynamic performance. A poor generator can
seriously impair good SNR performance particularly at
higher input frequencies. A high frequency generator,
based on a clock source (e.g., crystal source), is
recommended. Frequency-synthesized clock generators
should generally be avoided because they typically provide
A low jitter clock may be generated by using a highfrequency clock source and dividing this frequency down
with a low noise clock divider to obtain the AD9260 input
CLK. Maintaining a large amplitude clock signal may also
be very beneficial in minimizing the effects of noise in the
digital gates of the clock generation circuitry.
Finally, special care should be taken to avoid coupling
noise into any digital gates preceding the AD9260 CLK pin.
Short leads are necessary to preserve fast rise times and
careful decoupling should be used with these digital gates
and the supplies for these digital gates should be connected
to the same supplies as that of the internal AD9260 clock
circuitry (Pins 44 and 38).
7.
Two-tone testing will require isolation between test signal
generators to prevent IMD generation in the test generator
output circuits.
8.
A very low-side lobe window must be used for FFT
calculations if generators cannot be phase-locked and set to
exact frequencies.
9.
A well designed, clean PC board layout will assure proper
operation and clean spectral response. Proper grounding
and bypassing, short lead lengths, separation of analog and
digital signals, and the use of ground planes are
particularly important for high frequency circuits.
Multilayer PC boards are recommended for best
performance, but if carefully designed, a two-sided PC
board with large heavy (20 oz. foil) ground planes can give
excellent results.
10. Prototype plug-boards or wire-wrap boards will not
be satisfactory.
Rev. C | Page 38 of 44
JP1:8×
JP2:2×
JP3:4×
C3
0.1µF
C1
0.1µF
C5
0.1µF
TP2
C2
0.1µF
AGND
C6
10µF
CML
J1
CLKIN
R27
49.9kΩ
C61
10µF
12
R29
10kΩ
R6
49.9Ω
AD9260
C62
0.1µF
78
3 456
JP13
AC COUPLED
JP11
DC COUPLED
R33
1kΩ
R30
49.9Ω
J4
91 01 1
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
R5
49.9Ω
READ
J3
BIT03
BIT04
BIT05
BIT06
BIT07
BIT08
BIT09
BIT10
BIT11
BIT12
BIT13
R28
10kΩ
33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23
MODE
BIAS
CAPB
CAPT
AVSS
CML
NC
VINA
VINB
NC
AVDD
CT20
39
40
41
42
43
44
34
35
36
37
38
R31
1kΩ
W2
C8
0.1µF
CT19
C7
0.1µF
INVDD
VINA
VINB
W1
TP4:REFB
TP5:REFT
C11
0.1µF
JP6:1V REF
JP7:2.5V REF
TP6
DVDD
C4
10µF
TP3
C10 +
10µF
JP5:EXT REF
R2
2kΩ
VREFEXT
TP7 TP9 TP11 TP12 TP13 TP15
00581-C-078
1V
CML
MDAVDD
JP4:1×
MODE/OSR
CONTROL BLOCK
MDAVDD
DVDD
FLAVDD
R7
10kΩ
REFCOM
VREF
SENSE
RESET
AVSS
AVDD
CS
DAV
SHIELDED_TRACE
Figure 78. Evaluation Board Top Level Schematic
RD
Rev. C | Page 39 of 44
DVSS
AVSS
DVDD
AVDD
DRVSS
DRVDD
CLK
READ
BIT16(LSB)
BIT15
JP9:EXT REF
CS
OTR
BIT01(MSB)
BIT02
BIT14
REFERENCE CONFIGURATION
BLOCK
DRVDD
MDAVDD
RESET
J5
DAV
J2
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
U4
VCC
OUT_EN
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
B8
U3
74HC245
DIR
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
GND
DRVDD
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
NC = NO CONNECT
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
CT18
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
DRVDD
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
38
40
TP10
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1 39
P1 37
P1 35
P1 33
P1 38
TP8:OTR
JP15
DATA OUTPUT BLOCK
CT9
CT10
CT11
CT12
CT13
CT14
CT15
CT16
DRVDD
CT1
CT2
CT3
CT4
CT5
CT6
CT7
CT8
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
P1
TP1:RD
RD
DRVDD
DRVDD
CT17
VCC
OUT_EN
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
B8
U2
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
74HC245
DIR
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
GND
RESETB
CSBBUE
Y1
Y2
Y3
Y4
Y5
Y6
Y7
Y8
20
VCC 10
GND
74HC541
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
1 G1
19 G2
DATA OUTPUT CONTROL BLOCK
AD9260
AD9260
R18
390Ω
C20
0.1µF
VCC2
C9
TBD
R21
390Ω
J6
IN-2
R19
390Ω
R22
390Ω
JP8
8
3
VEE
R1
57.6Ω
IN-1
5
2
4
5
C16
100pF
U7
AD9632
R15
57.6Ω
VEE R20
390Ω
6
7
3
6
4
2
R17
390Ω
R16
390Ω
J7
U8
7
AD9632
R47
50Ω
R46
50Ω
JP16
VINA
8
R14
50Ω
VCC2
R23
390Ω
VCC2
C24
100pF
8
3
7
AD9632
R48
50Ω
JP17
6
R49
50Ω
VINB
4
2
R24
390Ω
U9
C26
100pF
5
R32
390Ω
IKPOT
R35
1kΩ
RX3
XXX
2
7
U10
AD817R
3
RX4
XXX
JP12
6
9260CML
4
+ C23
10µF
C25
0.1µF
C22
0.1µF
00581-C-079
R34
390Ω
VEE R26
390Ω
R25
390Ω
VCC2 CX4
XXX
Figure 79. Evaluation Board Input Configuration Block
L3
1
+ C36
10mF
R41
R40
FLAVDD
C38
0.1µF
P5:+5AUX
P5
R43
MDAVDD
+ C40
10µF
R42
C42
0.1µF
P5:–5AUX
L5
C43
0.01µF
P5
P2:VDD
R45
INVDD
+ C44
10µF
P4
P3:D5
2
L2
1
2
C46
0.1µF
C55
0.1µF
2
L7
1
P2
VEE
C57
0.1µF
2
L2
1
R37
DRVDD
R36
C29
0.1µF
2
VEE
R39
R53
R52
+ C28
47µF
C47
0.01µF
C45
0.1µF
VEE
VCC2
VEE
VCC2
VCC2
DVDD
+
P3
R44
VCC2
+ C56
47µF
C41
0.1µF
R51
R50
+ C27
47µF
C39
0.01µF
C37
0.1mF
L4
L6
1
C32
22µF
R38
C34
0.1µF
C30
0.1µF
C35
0.01µF
C31
0.1µF
U7
U8
VCC2
EVALUATION BOARD POWER SUPPLY CONFIGURATION
U10
U7
U9
DRVDD DRVDD
C51
0.1µF
C52
0.1µF
U2
C48
0.1µF
C64
0.1µF
C33
0.1µF
U9
C54
0.1µF
U4
DEVICE SUPPLY DECOUPLING
Figure 80. Evaluation Board Power Supply Configuration and Coupling
Rev. C | Page 40 of 44
U8
C50
0.1µF
DRVDD
C53
0.1µF
U3
C49
0.1µF
00581-C-080
P4:+5V
AD9260
Figure 81. Evaluation Board Component Side Layout (Not to Scale)
Figure 82. Evaluation Board Solder Side Layout (Not to Scale)
Rev. C | Page 41 of 44
AD9260
Figure 83. Evaluation Board Ground Plane Layout (Not to Scale)
Figure 84. Evaluation Board Power Plane Layout (Not to Scale)
Rev. C | Page 42 of 44
AD9260
OUTLINE DIMENSIONS
1.03
0.88
0.73
13.45
13.20 SQ
12.95
2.45
MAX
33
SEATING
PLANE
23
34
22
10.20
10.00 SQ
9.80
TOP VIEW
(PINS DOWN)
2.20
2.00
1.80
7°
0°
0.25 MAX
0.10 MIN
VIEW A
PIN 1
44
COPLANARITY
0.10
VIEW A
ROTATED 90° CCW
12
1
11
0.80
BSC
0.45
0.29
COMPLIANT TO JEDEC STANDARDS MS-022AB
-
Figure 85.44-Lead MQFP
(S-44)
Dimensions shown in millimeters and inches
ORDERING GUIDE
Model
AD9260AS
AD9260ASRL
AD9260ASZ2
AD9260ASZRL
AD9260-EB
2
1
2
Temperature Range
–40°C to +85°C
–40°C to +85°C
–40°C to +85°C
–40°C to +85°C
Package Description
44-Lead MQFP
44-Lead MQFP
44-Lead MQFP
44-Lead MQFP
Evaluation Board
S = Metric Quad Flatpack.
Z = Pb-free part.
Rev. C | Page 43 of 44
Package Option1
S-44
S-44
S-44
S-44
AD9260
NOTES
© 2004 Analog Devices, Inc. All rights reserved. Trademarks and
registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
C00581–0–7/04(C)
Rev. C | Page 44 of 44
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