Download version 0.1 of EP 415-1-266 Resident Engineer Management Guide REMG for Hazardous Toxic and Radioactive Waste HTRW Projects.pdf

Download version 0.1 of EP 415-1-266 Resident Engineer Management Guide REMG for Hazardous Toxic and Radioactive Waste HTRW Projects.pdf
CEMP-EC
Department of the Army
EP 415-1-266
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Engineer Pamphlet
415-1-266
Washington, DC 20314-1000
Construction
RESIDENT ENGINEER MANAGEMENT
GUIDE (REMG) FOR
HAZARDOUS, TOXIC, AND
RADIOACTIVE WASTE (HTRW)
PROJECT
Distribution Restriction Statement
Approved for public release;
distribution is unlimited.
31 May 2000
DEPARTMENT
OF THE ARMY
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Washington, DC 20314-1000
CEMP-EC
Pamphlet
No. 415-1-266
EP 415-1-266
3 1 May 2000
Construction
RESIDENT ENGINEER MANAGEMENT
GUIDE (REMG) FOR
HAZARDOUS, TOXIC, AND RADIOACTIVE
WASTE (HTRW) PROJECTS
1. Purpose. This Engineer Pamphlet (EP) provides information regarding remedial
design; response actions (remedial actions and removals) involving hazardous, toxic, and
radioactive wastes; and ordnance and explosives (OE) response actions. It highlights the
many unique requirements which resident engineers must be aware of for successful
completion of environmental projects.
2. Applicability.
This EP applies to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers resident and area
offices with delegated authority to administer contracts involving HTRW and OE
response actions.
3. Distribution
Statement.
Approved for public release, distribution unlimited.
4. References. References are provided in Appendix A.
5. Discussion. This EP is intended to highlight aspects of HTRW and OE response
actions that differ from or require additional attention compared to traditional
military/civil construction projects. This pamphlet applies to all HTRW/OE field
activities executed under the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund
Program, the Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP), activities related to
civil works, support for others (SFO), the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action
Program (FUSRAP), etc. This EP could be used as guidance for overseas environmental
work. The resident engineer must use judgment in determining what portions of this EP
are applicable to overseas projects.
FOR THE COMMANDER:
6 Appendices
(See Table of Contents)
’
@!& SSELLL.
Major General, USA
Chief of Staff
This pamphlet supersedes EP 415-l -266, 15 December 1994.
CEMP-EC
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Washington, D.C. 20314-1000
Pamphlet
No. 415-1-266
EP 415-1-266
31 May 2000
Construction
RESIDENT ENGINEER MANAGEMENT GUIDE (REMG) FOR
HAZARDOUS, TOXIC, AND RADIOACTIVE WASTE (HTRW) PROJECTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Paragraph
Page
SECTION 1. INTRODUCTION
Purpose ................................................................................................... 1-1
Applicability ........................................................................................... 1-2
Distribution ........................................................................................... 1-3
References .............................................................................................. 1-4
Background ............................................................................................ 1-5
1-1
1-1
1-1
1-2
1-2
SECTION 2. ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
HQUSACE ............................................................................................. 2-1
Centers of Expertise (CXs) .................................................................... 2-2
Divisions ................................................................................................ 2-3
Districts and Centers .............................................................................. 2-4
USACE Laboratory Capabilities ............................................................ 2-5
USACE QA and Testing Support........................................................... 2-6
USACE Guidance/Hyperlinks ................................................................ 2-7
2-1
2-1
2-3
2-3
2-5
2-7
2-7
SECTION 3. USACE ADMINISTERED PROJECTS
General ................................................................................................... 3-1
Early Involvement .................................................................................. 3-2
Real Estate .............................................................................................. 3-3
Planning.................................................................................................. 3-4
BCOE Reviews ...................................................................................... 3-5
Post-Award Activities - General ............................................................ 3-6
Preconstruction Conference ................................................................... 3-7
HTRW Construction Quality Management (QM).................................. 3-8
Accountability ........................................................................................ 3-9
Chemical Data Quality Management ..................................................... 3-10
i
3-1
3-1
3-1
3-4
3-5
3-9
3-10
3-10
3-12
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31 May 00
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
Paragraph
Page
SECTION 3. USACE ADMINISTERED PROJECTS (Continued)
Submittals – HTRW Specific ................................................................. 3-11
Documentation and Record Keeping Requirements .............................. 3-12
Indemnification ...................................................................................... 3-13
Reporting ................................................................................................ 3-14
Agreements with Regulatory Agencies .................................................. 3-15
3-14
3-15
3-18
3-18
3-19
SECTION 4. HEALTH AND SAFETY
Purpose ................................................................................................... 4-1
Authority ................................................................................................ 4-2
Responsibilities ..................................................................................... 4-3
Policy...................................................................................................... 4-4
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-1
SECTION 5. TRAINING
General ................................................................................................... 5-1
HTRW Health and Safety Training Requirements................................. 5-2
Hazardous Waste Management and Transportation .............................. 5-3
Training Requirements
Asbestos Abatement Training Requirements ......................................... 5-4
Lead Hazard Control (Abatement) Training Requirements ................... 5-5
Ordnance and Explosives (OE) Training Requirements ........................ 5-6
Training Documentation ........................................................................ 5-7
Specialized Training............................................................................... 5-8
5-1
5-1
5-3
5-5
5-6
5-7
5-8
5-8
SECTION 6. FUNDING
EPA Superfund Program ........................................................................ 6-1
DERP Program ....................................................................................... 6-2
6-1
6-4
SECTION 7. MANIFESTS, SHIPPING PAPERS AND OTHER TRANSPORTATION
RELATED REQUIREMENTS
Purpose ................................................................................................... 7-1
Background ............................................................................................ 7-2
ii
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31 May 00
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
Paragraph
Page
SECTION 7. MANIFESTS, SHIPPING PAPERS AND OTHER TRANSPORTATION
RELATED REQUIREMENTS (Continued)
General ................................................................................................... 7-3
Policy...................................................................................................... 7-4
Procedures .............................................................................................. 7-5
DOT Regulated Materials ...................................................................... 7-6
Sample Shipments .................................................................................. 7-7
Asbestos Waste Shipment Records ........................................................ 7-8
Nuclear Regulatory Commission Manifests........................................... 7-9
Other FUSRAP and Radioactive Waste Shipping Requirements .......... 7-10
The Off-Site Rule Requirement ............................................................. 7-11
Certificates of Disposal/Destruction/or Placement ................................ 7-12
Spill Reporting Procedures..................................................................... 7-13
Additional Information ........................................................................... 7-14
7-1
7-2
7-3
7-7
7-7
7-8
7-10
7-10
7-12
7-12
7-12
7-13
SECTION 8. CLOSEOUT PROCEDURES
General ................................................................................................... 8-1
Definitions .............................................................................................. 8-2
Operable Unit Completion Milestone .................................................... 8-3
Construction Completion Milestone ...................................................... 8-4
Site Completion ...................................................................................... 8-5
Site Deletion ........................................................................................... 8-6
Five-Year Review Program .................................................................... 8-7
8-1
8-1
8-4
8-5
8-7
8-8
8-9
SECTION 9. CONTRACT TYPES
Introduction ............................................................................................ 9-1
Contract Methods ................................................................................... 9-2
Contract Pricing...................................................................................... 9-3
Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity Contracts .................................. 9-4
Service Versus Construction Contracts .................................................. 9-5
Major HTRW & OE Contracts............................................................... 9-6
iii
9-1
9-1
9-2
9-2
9-2
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TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
Paragraph
Page
SECTION 10. ORDNANCE & EXPLOSIVES
Background ............................................................................................ 10-1
General ................................................................................................... 10-2
Definitions .............................................................................................. 10-3
Unplanned Discovery of OE .................................................................. 10-4
OE Safety ............................................................................................... 10-5
10-1
10-1
10-2
10-3
10-3
SECTION 11. OVERVIEW OF SPECIFIC REGULATED ACTIVITIES
General ................................................................................................... 11-1
UST Removals ....................................................................................... 11-2
Drum Removals...................................................................................... 11-3
Asbestos ................................................................................................. 11-4
Lead-Based Paint (LBP) ......................................................................... 11-5
Bird, Bat and Rodent Droppings ............................................................ 11-6
Incidental Radioactive Sources .............................................................. 11-7
Mercury .................................................................................................. 11-8
Lighting Fixtures .................................................................................... 11-9
PCBs ....................................................................................................... 11-10
Lead in Firing Ranges ............................................................................ 11-11
Bioaerosols ............................................................................................. 11-12
11-1
11-1
11-2
11-3
11-4
11-5
11-6
11-6
11-7
11-7
11-8
11-8
SECTION 12. USACE OVERSIGHT OF RD/RA PROJECTS
Authority ................................................................................................ 12-1
Enforcement ........................................................................................... 12-2
Interagency Agreement (IAG) ................................................................ 12-3
Execution................................................................................................ 12-4
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-2
SECTION 13. MISCELLANEOUS
Hazard Pay ............................................................................................. 13-1
Liability Concerns .................................................................................. 13-2
Community Relations ............................................................................. 13-3
USACE HTRW Lessons Learned System ............................................. 13-4
Where to Find Regulations ..................................................................... 13-5
iv
13-1
13-1
13-2
13-4
13-5
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TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
Page
APPENDICES
Appendix A - References ...................................................................................................... A-1
Appendix B - Acronyms........................................................................................................ B-1
Appendix C - Glossary .......................................................................................................... C-1
Appendix D - Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects ....................................... D-1
Appendix E - Internet Web Site References ........................................................................ E-1
Appendix F - References (Copies Furnished) ...................................................................... F-1
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SECTION 1
INTRODUCTION
1-1. Purpose. The purpose of this pamphlet is to provide information regarding remedial design
(RD) activities; response actions (remedial action (RA) and removals) involving hazardous, toxic
and radioactive wastes (HTRW); and ordnance and explosives (OE) response actions. It
highlights the unique requirements which resident engineers (RE) must be aware of for the
successful completion of environmental projects.
1-2. Applicability.
a. This pamphlet applies to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) resident and area
offices with delegated authority to administer contracts involving HTRW and OE response
actions. It is intended to highlight aspects of HTRW and OE response actions that differ from or
require additional attention compared to traditional military/civil construction projects. This
pamphlet applies to all HTRW/OE field activities executed under the Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) Superfund Program, the Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP),
activities related to civil works, support for others (SFO), the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial
Action Program (FUSRAP), etc. This pamphlet is subject to modifications as the HTRW/OE
programs evolve.
b. The RE should note that while many of the practices referenced herein and much of
the documentation provided are applicable to asbestos abatement, radioactive waste cleanup, and
OE activities, the regulations and procedures for these are very specialized and complex. The RE
is cautioned to seek out more guidance and assistance when working with asbestos, radioactive
material, or when facing potential exposure to ordnance or chemical warfare material; i.e., the
HTRW design district, the HTRW Center of Expertise (CX) or the OE Mandatory Center of
Expertise (MCX) should be consulted.
c. This EP could be used as guidance for overseas environmental work. The resident
engineer must use judgment in determining what portions of this document are applicable to their
project. The “Status of Forces Agreement” outlines what regulations must be followed. For
additional guidance on overseas environmental projects, refer to the Overseas Environmental
Baseline Guidance Document (OEBGD). The OEBGD can be found at:
http://osiris.cso.uiuc.edu/denix/Public/Library/Intl/OEBGD/toc.html
1-3. Distribution. Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited.
1-4.
References. Refer to Appendix A for a list of all references used in the preparation of
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this document. Hyperlink addresses are provided where possible for referenced documents.
Some references that are not easily obtainable are provided in their entirety in Appendix F.
1-5. Background. The background of the environmental restoration programs is very complex,
particularly those aspects involving HTRW and OE. Therefore, a general description of the
various programs and associated activities is presented below in paragraphs a through g.
a. EPA Superfund Program. In February 1982, USACE entered into an interagency
agreement (IAG) with the EPA to provide assistance in executing Public Law 96-510, the
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980,
also known as Superfund. The Superfund legislation was amended by Public Law 99-499, the
Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. Superfund legislation
mandated that both Federal and non-Federal agencies remedy uncontrolled hazardous and toxic
waste (HTW) sites caused by past and unregulated practices. Upon expiration of the first
agreement between EPA and USACE, a second IAG was signed in December 1984 which
extended the partnership indefinitely. All assignments performed on behalf of the EPA are under
the direct control of the regional EPA remedial project manager (RPM). Regular communication
between the USACE RE, the USACE project manager (PM), and the EPA RPM is essential.
Under these IAGs, the USACE is responsible for execution of activities assigned by EPA. These
assignments may include:
(1) providing technical assistance during EPA's execution of remedial investigations/
feasibility studies (RI/FS);
(2) acting as the contracting officer (CO) for "Federal lead" RD/Remedial Action (RA)
activities;
(3) managing RA and removal projects;
(4) providing technical assistance during EPA enforcement activities;
(5) providing technical assistance and oversight of EPA's Alternative Remedial
Contracting Strategy (ARCS) contractors;
(6) assisting in the acquisition of real estate;
(7) providing operation and maintenance (O&M) support activities; and
(8) assisting EPA in the implementation of community relation plans and EPA's cost
recovery program.
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b. DERP. DERP was formally authorized by Congress in 1986 to evaluate and remediate
contamination at active and formerly used defense sites (FUDS). However, Congress had
provided appropriation since FY 84 (Defense Appropriation Act) for DOD to initiate
environmental restoration activities at properties formerly owned/used by the Department of
Defense (DOD). DERP is implemented subject to and in a manner consistent with CERCLA and
SARA, however, environmental restoration under this program is not limited to only those
activities legally required by CERCLA. At the USACE level, the DERP program is considered
to be comprised of three elements:
(1) The Installation Restoration Program (IRP) in which active Army installations are
investigated and remediated. In addition, USACE is assisting all DOD services and the Defense
Logistics Agency (DLA) with a full range of installation restoration support.
(2) The Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) program in which former DOD properties
(including OE sites) are restored. DOD assigned the Army as the Executive Agent for the FUDS
Program. USACE was delegated by the Army, per memorandum dated 30 Nov 83, the
responsibility for management and execution of the FUDS program, including negotiations to
determine DOD liability as a Potentially Responsible Party (PRP). For FUDS program
guidance/information, refer to the "Defense Environmental Restoration Program for FUDSProgram Manual." The USACE internet address for FUDS is located at:
http://hq.environmental.usace.army.mil/programs/fuds/fuds.html
(3) The Defense State Memorandum of Agreement/Cooperative Agreements
(DSMOA/CA) Program which involves IRP (all services), FUDS, and Base Realignment and
Closure (BRAC) activities. The DSMOA/CA Program was developed to facilitate state
involvement in providing technical assistance required for timely execution of DOD activities
conducted under the DERP. These DSMOAs/CAs provide the mechanism to involve states in
IRP, FUDS, and BRAC activities by establishing the terms and conditions by which they are
reimbursed for the cost of providing technical support. Other than at Formerly Used Defense
Sites, field offices will have no involvement in DSMOA activities unless specifically requested
by the customer (installation/base).
c. BRAC Program. The BRAC program requires closure and subsequent disposal of
designated DOD installations. The USACE may be involved in:
(1) preparing National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation (not generally
required if the project is a remedial action done consistent with CERCLA);
(2) preparing National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) compliance documentation;
(3) performing environmental restoration (including HTRW and OE response
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actions); and
(4) performing real property actions.
d. HTRW SFO Program (other than EPA Superfund).
(1) Upon request, the USACE provides environmental restoration support for non-DOD
agencies on a reimbursable basis.
(2) Past and present customers include the Department of Commerce (DOC), the
Department of Energy (DOE), the Veterans Administration (VA), the General Services
Administration (GSA), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Commodity
Credit Corporation (CCC), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the Farm Services
Agency (FSA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Bureau of Land
Management (BLM). Examples of SFO projects include assisting:
(a) DOE with environmental restoration and waste management activities;
(b) DOC with environmental restoration of contaminated properties acquired through
defaults on government guaranteed loans;
(c) FSA in conducting preliminary assessments of properties acquired through
foreclosure or bankruptcy;
(d) FAA with their underground storage tank remediation program;
(e) GSA on an as-needed basis for underground storage tank removal and environmental
assessments; and
(f) EPA with their Brownfields program.
e. FUSRAP.
(1) FUSRAP was one of several DOE programs created to address radioactive
contamination in excess of current guidelines at a number of sites used by two of DOE's
predecessor agencies, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy
Commission (AEC). The sites were used for processing and storing uranium and thorium ores
from the 1940s through the 1960s. Other sites included foundries, machine shops, research
facilities, and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. Many FUSRAP sites are chemically
contaminated as well. Toxic chemicals include heavy metals (e.g., lead and beryllium),
polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and pesticides. The
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Federal Government owned some of these sites; universities, institutions, and certain private
entities owned others.
(2) The Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act for FY 1998, signed into
law on 13 October 1997, transferred responsibility for the administration and execution of the
FUSRAP from DOE to the USACE. USACE is the "responsible agency" and is responsible for
the hazardous waste generated from FUSRAP sites.
(3) Overall program management resides within Headquarters (HQ) USACE Directorate
of Civil Works. The Directorate of Military Programs is the program manager for current year
execution. Program and project management responsibility resides at the geographical civil
works divisions and districts. Execution is the responsibility of the geographic civil works
districts and the HTRW design districts.
f. Federal Facilities Compliance Support Program. Upon request from a local Federal
facility or agency, the USACE can provide environmental compliance support. Examples of
types of work include:
(1) preparing Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit
applications;
(2) preparing closure plans;
(3) preparing waste analysis plans;
(4) preparing spill prevention, control, and countermeasure plans;
(5) preparing underground storage tank site assessment plans;
(6) preparing contingency plans;
(7) preparing National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit
applications;
(8) preparing air quality permit applications; and
(9) reviewing environmental projects for technical adequacy.
g. Potentially Responsible Party (PRP) Activities.
(1) Under CERCLA, as amended by SARA, PRPs are those groups or individuals
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identified as potentially liable for the costs of cleaning up contaminated sites. When requested,
USACE may also assist EPA in their enforcement actions on sites where a PRP is performing
cleanup activities. USACE's role on these sites generally consists of technical oversight and
quality assurance. This provides assurance to EPA that the technical requirements of the
settlement agreement/consent decree will be met. For additional guidance/information on PRP
activities, refer to Section 12 of this pamphlet.
(2) In executing the DERP program at FUDS properties and as the operator of civil
works facilities, USACE is frequently involved in PRP liability issues. Typically, in those
instances where DOD investigations have not provided an indication of its responsibility for site
contamination, the DOD may receive notification that it is being considered as a PRP under
CERCLA in one of the following ways:
(a) EPA or state regulator provides notice of PRP status;
(b) private party files suit seeking contribution, or provides notice to DOD of alleged
contamination seeking DOD acknowledgment of CERCLA liability; and
(c) another Federal agency currently responsible for the property seeks DOD
acknowledgment of responsibility for past contamination during time of DOD control of the
property, and DOD contribution for remediating the property.
(3) In addition to the normal documents developed during other environmental
restoration activities such as the Inventory Project Report (InPR), project execution report, etc.,
the following documents may be developed as part of the PRP process:
(a) a Site Ownership and Operation History (SOOH) and Cost Allocation report which
serves as the basis for the negotiating position and settlement offer; and
(b) a settlement agreement.
(4) When requested, USACE may also be involved in assisting other Federal agencies
when these agencies become PRPs.
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SECTION 2
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
2-1. HQUSACE. General responsibilities are contained in Office Memorandum (OM) 10-1-1,
Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
a. Military Programs, Environmental Division (CEMP-R). CEMP-R develops, monitors,
coordinates, and generates program execution policies and guidance, and provides funding and
manpower requirements to environmental restoration program customers.
b. Civil Works Programs, Engineering and Construction Division (CECW-E). CECW-E
issues and maintains technical guidance for the environmental restoration program. Timely
guidance to field offices is mainly accomplished through construction bulletins (CBs). All
current CBs may be viewed and a copy obtained by accessing the HQUSACE homepage:
http://www.hq.usace.army.mil/cemp/c/library.htm
CECW-E maintains a frequently updated list of HTRW/OE projects, project type, contract award
date, contract type and the point of contact (POC) for the execution phase of each project. The
purpose of the list is to facilitate contact and exchange of knowledge and experience among
USACE field personnel. The list is provided at Appendix D.
c. HQUSACE Safety and Occupational Health Office (CESO). CESO has overall
responsibility for the USACE safety and health program, including developing HTRW/OE safety
and health policy, procedures, and oversight in accordance with Engineer Regulation
(ER) 385-1-92 and Engineer Manual (EM) 385-1-1.
d. Other. Other major HQUSACE element support includes Office of the Deputy Chief
of Staff for Real Estate, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Resource Management, Office
of the Chief Counsel, and the Principal Assistant Responsible for Contracting (PARC).
2-2. Centers of Expertise (CXs). CXs provide specialized technical capability and support to
HQUSACE, divisions, HTRW design districts, OE design centers, and geographic districts.
Those specific CXs related to USACE environmental restoration programs include the HTRW
CX at the Omaha District (CENWO) in Omaha, Nebraska and the OE MCX at the U.S. Army
Engineering and Support Center (CEHNC) in Huntsville, Alabama.
a. The HTRW CX was established to maintain state-of-the-art technical expertise for all
aspects of HTRW restoration activities and to support HQUSACE, USACE Commands, FOA
and laboratories in performing their HTRW activities by providing technical oversight, review
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coordination, and assistance. The HTRW CX performs the following mandatory functions:
(1) provide technical review of “key documents” for Category B projects, as defined in
CEMP-RT memorandum of 23 September 1997, Subject: Changes in HTRW Technical Roles
and Responsibilities Due to Division Laboratory Closures. A copy of this memorandum is
available on the HTRW CX home page at the following internet address:
http://www.usace.army.mil/inet/functions/cw/cecwe/coexpert/newcoe/mcx/htrw/htrw.htm
Category B projects include: (a) all "non-routine" projects in the site inspection (SI) phase; (b) all
National Priorities List (NPL) sites or BRAC projects in the RI/FS phase; (c) all projects in the
RD/RA Construction phase which involve innovative technologies or with RA estimates over $5
million; and (d) any project that a district, major subordinate command (MSC), or HQUSACE
requests to be reviewed due to special concerns. “Key documents” include specified deliverables
(including scopes of work and/or work plans, reports, decision documents, and concept designs,
as applicable) of each project phase (Refer to Table 2 of referenced memo); and
(2) coordination of all cost tracking procedures for USACE managed EPA financed
Superfund projects for use by EPA in their cost recovery effort.
The HTRW CX is capable of providing a wide range of functions and services that are listed on
the USACE Internet homepage (see paragraph d. below).
b. The OE MCX was established to assist HQUSACE, USACE Commands, and FOAs
in performing their OE activities and maintain state-of-the-art technical expertise for all aspects
of OE response activities. The mission of the OE CX is to safely eliminate or reduce risks from
ordnance, explosives and recovered chemical warfare materiel at current or formerly used
defense sites. The OE CX performs the following mandatory functions: Any USACE activity
involving ordnance or explosives, even those planned or performed as an HTRW or construction
project, must be coordinated with the OE CX. The OE CX is capable of providing a wide range
of functions and services that are listed on the USACE Internet homepage (see paragraph d.
below).
c. For additional guidance on the management of OE response actions, refer to
ER 1110-1-8153, EP 1110-1-18, and the FUDS Program Manual (for FUDS projects).
d. The detailed roles and responsibilities of the CXs are available on the USACE
Internet homepage at:
http://www.usace.army.mil/inet/centers
2-3. Divisions. Divisions are responsible for providing program and quality assurance oversight
for all environmental restoration projects conducted within their areas of responsibility.
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2-4. Districts and Centers.
a. HTRW Design Districts. USACE HTRW design districts:
(1) Provide specialized HTRW expertise for the design of all aspects of assigned
environmental restoration projects. This expertise includes health and safety, chemical and
geotechnical data quality management, environmental laws and regulations, contracting and
procurement, and environmental technical design and engineering support during construction;
(2) Perform investigations and design projects through in-house expertise and/or
architect-engineer (A-E) contracted services; and
(3) Award the subsequent RA contract and transfers it to the geographic district for
execution.
b. OE Design Center(s):
(1) prepare OE contract acquisition strategies;
(2) execute OE response activities in accordance with ER 1110-1-8153,
EP 1110-1-18, and the FUDS Program Manual (for FUDS projects);
(3) prepare project-specific statements of work (SOW) and independent government
estimates for OE response activities;
(4) assist the geographic district approved to execute OE response actions in contracting
for removal actions, and serving as CO when contracts are awarded by the OE Design Center;
(5) provide engineering and design support for the final removal action;
(6) oversee the OE safety and occupational health, technical, and administrative aspects
of the field work for design and removal actions (the geographic district will assume these
responsibilities if the removal action is transferred to the geographic district);
(7) ensure that OE manifest documents (when required) are properly prepared and signed
by the appropriate personnel unless the removal action is transferred to the geographic
district); and
(8) provide OE public affairs support to the geographic district as needed.
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c. Geographic Districts (HTRW):
(1) provide support to the HTRW design district during RI/FS and RD;
(2) issue the Notice to Proceed (NTP) and execute the HTRW RA projects within their
geographic areas. Other execution responsibilities are identified for the FUDS program. For
further information refer to the USACE DERP/FUDS Program Manual;
(3) operate and maintain completed RA projects; and
(4) provide technical support and oversight activities.
d. Geographic Districts:
(1) serve as the PM for the life of OE response projects;
(2) conduct preliminary assessments (PA) and prepare the Inventory Project Report
(InPR) for sites within a district's geographical area;
(3) perform assigned real estate functions (i.e., obtain right of entry, prepare real property
transfer documentation, etc.);
(4) prepare the community relations plan (CRP) and provide public affairs support for
FUDS projects and as required for other projects;
(5) initiate and maintain the project administrative record for FUDS projects in
accordance with (IAW) CERCLA;
(6) execute OE response activities and review and approve project documents IAW ER
1110-1-8153;
(7) coordinate with stakeholders, regulators, and customers within the geographic
and
(8) perform contractor surveillance outside the exclusion zone and provide
administrative support during field work.
e. OE approved Geographic Districts:
(1) coordinate with the OE Design Center in contracting for OE removal actions;
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(2) supervise and administer OE removal action contracts/task orders within assigned
areas, including contract administration and OE safety and occupational health IAW
ER 385-1-95 (to be published at a later date);
(3) execute administrative and field contract modifications (prior coordination with the
OE Design Center and/or the OE MCX is necessary when change orders affect the OE
design); and
(4) ensure the OE manifest documents are properly prepared and signed by the
appropriate personnel.
2-5. USACE Laboratory Capabilities. The Engineer Research and Development Center
(ERDC) is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ research and development command. ERDC
consists of eight unique laboratories: five in Vicksburg, Miss., and one each in Hanover, N.H.,
Champaign, Ill., and Alexandria, Va. ERDC headquarters is located in Vicksburg, Miss. The
ERDC provides world-renowned scientists and engineers utilizing the latest in specialized
equipment to address problems facing the military and the nation. Research support includes:
mapping and terrain analysis; infrastucture design, construction, operations and maintenance;
structural engineering; cold regions and ice engineering; coastal and hydraulic engineering;
environmental quality; geotechnical engineering; and high performance computing and
information technology. In September 1997, the materials testing mission was assigned to
ERDC, and the HTRW chemistry quality assurance mission was assigned to the analytical
chemistry laboratory at Omaha. On 15 March 1998, the Omaha laboratory became the newest
member of the ERDC team while remaining in Omaha. The laboratory was realigned as the
Chemistry Quality Assurance Branch (CQAB) along with the Environmental Chemistry Branch
(ECB) under the Environmental Laboratory of the ERDC. The following summarizes the
capabilities of ERDC laboratories that are used for environmental work:
a. The U.S. Army Engineer and Development Center Environmental Laboratory.
The laboratory has a total capability for QA testing and commercial laboratory inspections. This
includes quality assurance testing for HTRW chemistry and water quality testing for the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers civil works, military projects, and support for others. The laboratory
conducts commercial chemistry laboratory inspections in support of the USACE HTRW CX
Laboratory Validation Program as well as for laboratory inspections for water quality laboratories
performing work for the USACE. These services are performed in accordance with ER 1110-1263, "Chemical Data Quality Management for HTRW Remedial Activities" and ER 1110-18100, "Laboratory Investigations and Testing." The laboratory continues to develop and improve
methodologies to support USACE and Army environmental programs.
b. The U.S. Army Research and Development Center Construction Engineering
Research Laboratory (CERL), located in Champaign, Illinois, is the lead laboratory in the Army
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for installation support. ERDC CERL’s research is directed towards increasing the Army's
ability to more efficiently construct, operate, and maintain its installations and ensure
environmental quality and safety at a reduced life-cycle cost. ERDC CERL is involved in:
(1) protection of threatened and endangered species;
(2) collection, analysis, curation, and retrieval of archeological and cultural resources;
(3) hazardous waste and pollution abatement and management systems;
(4) air pollution control technology;
(5) water supply, treatment, and distribution;
(6) wastewater collection and treatment;
(7) solid waste management; and
(8) industrial operation pollution control.
c. The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Cold Regions Research
and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL). Located in Hanover, New Hampshire, this is the Army's
lead laboratory for research in the physical sciences and engineering for cold regions and winter
conditions impacting military and civil works operations, systems and facilities. ERDC CRREL
provides expertise on the unique influence of cold regions on a variety of environmental quality
research issues including:
(1) characterization of contaminated sites;
(2) low temperature bioremediation/biological processes;
(3) fate and transport processes in frozen ground; and
(4) development of analytical methods (especially for militarily unique analytes).
d. The U.S. Army Engineer and Development Center Topographic Engineering Center
(TEC). ERDC TEC, located in Alexandria, Virginia, supports USACE districts and divisions in
several environmental initiatives. ERDC TEC is investigating more efficient, accurate and
complete transfer of hydrographic survey data for the production of U.S. nautical charts. One of
ERDC TEC’s major thrusts is the development of an extremely accurate positioning system
incorporating the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System for use by USACE hydrographic
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surveyors and the U.S. dredging industry. ERDC TEC can provide computer systems for
digitizing recent and historic imagery to detect fill violation of wetlands.
2-6. USACE QA and Testing Support.
a. Within the HTRW Program, analysis is conducted to support two primary functions.
These functions are primary laboratory support for in-house projects and QA support for
contractor executed work (where the USACE laboratory analyzes split samples on a percentage
basis). The RE shall assure that copies of the RA contract plans and specifications and pertinent
contract modifications are provided to the QA laboratory. The QA laboratory shall follow the
testing procedures as described in the contract specifications so that the USACE and contractor
laboratories are both utilizing the same testing procedures.
b. CQAB is the primary HTRW QA chemistry laboratory and is responsible for
providing technical support at the request of the districts, the HTRW CX, and HQUSACE.
Project services which are available include: (1) technical assistance in development of data
quality objectives (DQOs), Sampling and Analysis Plans (SAP), and commercial laboratory
standard operating procedures; (2) inspecting QA sample shipments and reporting deficiencies;
(3) analyzing QA samples; and (4) providing an independent assessment of the inter-laboratory
analytical data in the form of a Chemical Quality Assurance Report (CQAR) or equivalent,
including resolution of discrepancies with the primary laboratory.
2-7. USACE Guidance/Hyperlinks.
a. USACE criteria documents and guide specifications are distributed on the National
Institute of Building Sciences (NIBS) Construction Criteria Base CD-ROM system. USACE
personnel may contact HQUSACE by E-mail at: [email protected] for "no fee"
subscription requests. USACE criteria documents and guide specifications are also available on
the TECHINFO Internet site:
http://www.hnd.usace.army.mil/techinfo/index.htm
b. All USACE publications are posted on the Internet site:
http://www.usace.army.mil/inet/usace-docs/
c. For HTRW guidance documents only, visit this web site:
http://www.hq.environmental.usace.army.mil/library/guidance/guidance.html
d. For OE guidance documents only, visit this web site:
http://www.hnd.usace.army.mil/oew/policy/regpro.html
e. Copies of the Quality Assurance Representative's Guide (EP 415- 1-261) volumes 1,
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2, 3, 4, and 5 can be obtained from the:
USACE Publications Depot
ATTN: CEIM-IM-PD
2803 52nd Ave.
Hyattsville, MD 20781-1102
You can fax your name, postal address, and the number of copies you want to the Publications
Depot, (301) 394-0084. Copies of other publications may be obtained, if still available.
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SECTION 3
USACE ADMINISTERED PROJECTS
3-1. General. As the HTRW and OE programs have evolved, more and more response actions
and procurements are being issued as negotiated contracts or task orders on large preplaced
contracts. Because of the uncertainties inherent in HTRW remedial activities, more contract
pricing is now becoming cost reimbursable and less fixed price. This means that fewer contracts
are "bid" and the technical requirements provided to the response contractors may be more
general in nature and not in the form of rigid specifications. However, the basic information
outlined in this section can be applied to all projects if the meaning of the word "bid" is expanded
to encompass submittal of cost proposals in a negotiated procurement and the word
"specifications" is expanded to mean the technical requirements provided to the contractor along
with his more detailed work plan which has been approved by all stakeholders.
3-2. Early Involvement. This subsection covers the functions of the resident engineer/office for
HTRW projects that should occur prior to award of the RA contract. The pre-award activities of
the RE and staff are primarily that of active assistance to the USACE PM and to the designated
design district. The EPA Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (OERR) Directive
9355.0-04B, "Superfund Remedial Design/Remedial Action Handbook," was used in developing
a portion of this section on pre-award activities.
a. RI/FS and Record of Decision (ROD). Involvement of the RE at this stage is
encouraged in anticipation of performing RA oversight activities and in order to provide the
greatest amount of input for selection of an efficient remedy based upon biddability,
constructibility, operability, and existing site conditions.
b. RD Phase. Due to USACE mission assignments for the Superfund, DERP, and FUDS
programs, the design district may be located in a different geographical area than the HTRW site.
In these cases, and in addition to the biddability, constructibility, operability, and environmental
(BCOE) reviews during the design stage, the RE may be called upon to perform the quality
assurance requirements for the A-E's field investigation activities. The RE can serve as the field
point of contact (POC) in order to aid the design district.
3-3. Real Estate.
a. General Considerations. Government and contractor personnel frequently require
access to land not owned or controlled by the government during the RI/FS and RD phases of
HTRW RA projects. The RE should rely on the Real Estate Division in the appropriate district
to obtain the required access and to provide all other real estate support services. However, the
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RE should provide local support as needed.
b. Real Estate Planning.
(1) Real Estate representatives will develop a scope of work, cost estimate, and schedule
for completing real estate activities for inclusion in a project management plan (PMP), if such a
plan is required. The Real Estate representative will also coordinate the analysis of project real
estate requirements with other project team members including the RE. This analysis should be
provided in the form of a real estate planning report (REPR).
(2) If access to land not owned or controlled by the government is required, it will
normally be necessary to obtain a right-of-entry (ROE) or to acquire an interest in real property in
order to prevent the occurrence of a trespass or a "taking" of private property under the Fifth
Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The decision whether to obtain a ROE or acquire an
interest in real property will depend, in part, upon the purpose for which access is required. If the
purpose is to perform survey and exploration work, sampling or short-term construction activities
such as the removal of underground storage tanks (UST), then a ROE may be appropriate.
However, work involving long-term construction activities or the installation of facilities such as
monitoring wells generally requires the acquisition of an interest in real property. Approval to
obtain ROEs for any purpose other than survey and exploration work must be obtained from
HQUSACE if the acquisition of necessary real property interests has not been authorized.
c. Acquisition of Real Property. The acquisition of any interest in real property, with the
exception of non-Superfund leases, must be authorized by HQUSACE through the issuance of a
Real Estate Acquisition Directive unless acquisition approval authority has otherwise been
specifically delegated to MSCs. Acquisition may be accomplished through negotiations or the
initiation of condemnation (eminent domain) proceedings. Persons displaced as a result of the
acquisition of real property may be entitled to relocation assistance under Federal law.
d. Additional Considerations for the EPA Superfund Program.
(1) EPA typically obtains access to Superfund sites for design and construction purposes
pursuant to its enforcement authority under CERCLA without acquiring an interest in real
property. The agency may obtain such access on a voluntary basis through a landowner access
agreement or the agency may seek to compel a landowner to provide access by issuing an
administrative compliance order or obtaining an injunction or an order in aid of access in Federal
district court.
(2) Access to lands adjacent to Superfund sites may be required for support zones,
decontamination facilities, stockpile areas, or other purposes. In such cases, EPA may request
USACE to acquire appropriate interests in real property pursuant to EPA's acquisition authority
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under CERCLA. EPA may also request USACE to perform any temporary or permanent
relocations of persons displaced by response actions.
(3) A REPR will be prepared for all projects for which the Corps has been assigned
responsibility for RD. The REPR serves as a planning tool to focus project team members on the
real estate requirements of a project and any issues, which could lead to cost or schedule growth.
The real estate representative, therefore, will coordinate the preparation of the REPR with all
team members, including the RE.
(4) The REPR will identify property recommended for acquisition (estate, acreage,
ownership); the strategy for relocating individuals, farms and businesses; the estimated cost
(lands and damages, relocation assistance, administration, contingencies); and provide a schedule
for completing the real estate work. It is critical that all real estate requirements be identified as
early as possible in the project because a period of 9 months to 1 year is typically required to
complete the acquisition process.
e. Additional Considerations for the FUSRAP.
(1) No HQ review or approval of real estate planning documents is required.
(2) To the greatest extent practical, FUSRAP is to be executed utilizing ROEs and
without the necessity for real property acquisition. Chiefs of Real Estate at districts and MSCs
are authorized to execute ROEs that substantially conform to the approved model.
(3) Any real property interests acquired should, in most instances, be temporary and
terminate at the conclusion of remedial action. Chiefs of Real Estate at MSCs are authorized to
approve the acquisition of real property interests.
(4) Pursuant to the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between USACE and DOE,
real property accountability remains with DOE.
f. Additional Guidance. Additional guidance can be found in the following references:
(1) Memorandum, CEMP-RS/CERE-AP, 22 November 1989, Subject: “USACE Real
Estate Support for EPA Superfund Program,” (Refer to Appendix F);
(2) EPA Publication 9355.5-01/FS, "Real Estate Acquisition Procedures for USACE
Projects," (Refer to Appendix F);
(3) HQUSACE DERP/FUDS Program Manual; and
(4) Memorandum, CERE-AP, 6 February 1998, Subject: “Guidance for the Provision of
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Real Estate Support to the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Delegation of
Authority to Execute Rights-of-Entry and Acquire Real Property and Interests Therein,” (Refer
to Appendix F).
3-4. Planning.
a. The QA plan. Each district office has a generic QA plan that describes projected work
load, organization, staffing, responsibilities, training, pre-award activities, post-award activities,
testing, and documentation. HTRW considerations should be included in this plan. HTRW
training must be included if the office is to conduct any HTRW QA activities. Other areas listed
above should also include HTRW specific items unless they are addressed in the supplemental
project QA plan (a site-specific supplement to the generic QA plan). A supplemental QA plan
should be prepared for each project. For preparation of a QA plan/supplemental project QA plan,
(Refer to ER 1180-1-6, "Construction Quality Management").
b. Training. HTRW QA personnel will need additional training to properly carry out
their duties. The 40-hour Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) training and
8-hour recertification (refresher) are required just to get on the job site. Other courses are almost
always needed (such as training in technologies, special types of contracts, regulatory
compliance, etc.) to properly inspect HTRW work. This training should be identified in the
employee's individual development plan.
c. Using Outside Expertise. If the field office administering the HTRW project lacks the
necessary experience, coordination should be made for qualified outside personnel to assist.
Other construction offices, the district's engineering division, the designated HTRW design
district, or A-E services, are all possible sources of qualified personnel. Assistance from
competent and qualified industrial hygienist (IH) and safety professionals must be obtained for
the review and acceptance of contractor submitted Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP) and for
answering questions concerning project safety and health. It is strongly recommended that the
design engineer for engineering and design (E&D) services be included during execution of RA
contracts. Confirmation must be made that the required expertise is available. The inability to
ensure that engineering division or design district personnel will be available during construction
will often dictate that A-E services be obtained. Determining whether or not outside help is
needed should be made well in advance to allow necessary transfer of funds. Preferably, this
should be done during the design or the BCOE review. This will allow comparison between
HTRW training needs and the field office's training plan. Availability of qualified QA personnel
should be identified during the design phase of the project.
d. Staffing. Some projects, such as those requiring incineration, may require that QA
personnel be on site 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Others may require more than normal time
on site because they have many work features that require QA verification of how something was
constructed. Special contract types (i.e., time and materials, cost reimbursable, etc.) may require
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more and/or different resources. QA personnel must be prepared to meet these requirements.
This may require use of multiple inspectors and payment of hazardous duty, night, holiday, and
Sunday differential payments. These requirements must also be identified during the design
phase.
e. Chemical Data Quality Management (CDQM). Perhaps the most critical area for QA
control is chemical data management. Completion of almost all HTRW projects depends on
meeting cleanup standards measured by chemical testing. Strict requirements are placed on the
quality of this chemical data. ER 1110-1-263, "Chemical Quality Management for Hazardous,
Toxic and Radioactive Waste Remedial Activities," must be used by QA personnel during the
RA planning phase. The QA laboratory is a key player in this process and must be involved early
on.
3-5. BCOE Reviews.
a. All design reviews should be performed by the individual(s) in the field office who
will administer the RA contract. If the field office performing a BCOE review lacks the
necessary expertise, assistance should be obtained from other USACE personnel whose expertise
matches the project's needs. In this case, the geographical district will be responsible for making
arrangements for the experienced personnel to participate in certain activities during design.
This effort should be coordinated with the design district that will be funding the effort. Refer to
CEMP-CM memorandum, 1 Nov 91, Subject: “Transfer of Knowledge and Experience During
Design and Execution of HTRW Projects,” for additional information on this subject. A copy of
this memorandum is under Appendix F. The following is a suggested list of additional items to
be considered by the RE during the BCOE review of HTRW projects:
(1) Confirm that compliance criteria for selecting an off-site RCRA facility is provided;
(2) Confirm construction completion, startup, O&M, and transition of facility to followon operator requirements are detailed in the contract specifications. The RE should also verify
that these requirements are fully coordinated with the facility managers (to whom the completed
facility will be turned over; i.e., the state for Superfund projects) before the BCOE review is
completed. Specifically, project acceptance criteria, including definition of project completion,
must be coordinated, agreed to, and addressed in the contract specifications, to ensure customer
satisfaction;
(3) Confirm that specifications include DQOs required for the preparation of the SAP;
(4) Confirm that submissions of safety, health and emergency response specifications are
sufficient in content and details for the RA contractor to develop a SSHP that is protective of onsite personnel and surrounding communities from the physical, chemical, and/or biological
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hazards at the site;
(5) Confirm that specifications include the requirements for the RA contractor (if off-site
transportation of hazardous waste is required under the contract) to prepare the manifests and
related documents, and to certify that the manifest, packaging, labeling, marking, and placarding
of the waste meet all applicable Federal and state regulations. See Section 7 for additional
information on manifests, shipping papers and other transportation related requirements;
(6) Review the accuracy of the construction schedule, cost estimate, and any estimated
quantities of material. Scheduling considerations include up-front administration and permitting,
climate sensitive activities, production rates, etc.;
(7) Confirm that all work area requirements are identified and are adequate for the
construction and operation phases;
(8) Ensure permit responsibilities are clearly spelled out in the specifications. Generally,
all environmental permits are obtained during the design phase;
(9) Confirm that all field conditions are accurate in the drawings and/or unknown areas
are identified. Confirm that representative chemical and geotechnical sampling and analytical
data is referenced in the contract documents;
(10) Review the bid schedule for completeness and practicability;
(11) If the work will be performed on a cost reimbursable basis, the RE is advised to
become familiar with the content of the following document: A Guide to Best Practices for Cost
Reimbursement Contracts. This document is available on the internet at:
http://hq.environmental.usace.army.mil/tools/reimburse/reimburse.html
(12) Review Section 11, "Demolition," for additional BCOE considerations; and
(13) Assure that required easements are secured by Real Estate Division prior to award of
contract. Failure to do so can cause delays during contract activities.
b. Acquisition Planning.
(1) Written acquisition plans are required for all HTRW work in accordance with Federal
Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Part 7. These plans should consider both contract and in-house
acquisitions. The RE should be familiar with the overall acquisition plan and strategy in order to
participate knowledgeably during the design and acquisition process. The RE is generally
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included in the technical evaluation team for negotiated procurement which are common in
HTRW projects. It is also common practice to include the RE in writing the formal acquisition
plans and participating in the contractor selection process.
(2) Contracting for HTRW work can be significantly different from normal construction
and involves many more uncertainties. Technical and regulatory uncertainties are conditions that
must be handled at every site, irrespective of the extent of site characterization accomplished.
HTRW work is often very expensive to complete and can be even more costly if the wrong
contracting approach is used. Section 9, "Contract Types," addresses non-traditional contracting
approaches that are well suited for HTRW projects.
c. Interfacing with Regulatory Agencies.
(1) During the pre-award RD phase, the RE may be contacted by local regulatory
agencies about the status, time frame and selected remedy at an HTRW site. These regulatory
agencies should be referred to the PM. The RE should become familiar with provisions of any
interagency agreements and/or consent decrees that might impact work execution at the site or
provide for stipulated penalties in the event of schedule delays.
(2) EPA has set forth procedures for addressing compliance with other environmental
statutes. For on-site RAs under CERCLA, permits are not required. However, these actions
shall comply with the substantive requirements of all Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate
Requirements (ARARs) (Federal, state, and local laws) identified in the ROD/Enforcement
Decision Document (EDD). If material is to be taken off-site, the receiving facility must possess
all appropriate environmental permits identified in the ROD/EDD. EPA regulations require
verification of acceptability by EPA of any facility selected for the treatment, storage, and
disposal (TSD) of CERCLA waste (Refer to 40 CFR Part 300, Section 300.440). In general, the
construction contractor will be responsible for obtaining any necessary non-environmental
construction permits and approvals (i.e., building and electrical permits, etc.).
(3) These responsibilities need to be clearly outlined in the contract specifications in
order to avoid delays and disputes during RA activities. The RE's responsibility is to verify that
the plans and specifications identify all permit requirements.
d. Project Management Plan (PMP). As with the Acquisition Plan, the RE should be
included as an active team member in the development of the PMP. This is especially important
if there are any identifiable regulatory milestones that the RA contractor will be responsible for
meeting. The RE should also attend any pre-award negotiations to be held with the RA
contractor.
e. Value Engineering (VE) During the Design Phase.
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(1) For CERCLA funded projects, EPA recommends that the USACE and/or the state
include VE screening during the design phase for all RA projects where a potential for
substantial cost savings exists. The state may be involved in the VE process because it will
ultimately contribute to the RA cost.
(2) VE screening performed during the design phase must be limited to project
refinements that would not significantly change or alter the approved remedy, unless otherwise
approved by EPA. VE screening will consist of listing high cost items that have a potential for
cost savings.
(3) Those RA projects which, as a result of the VE screening, show a reasonable promise
for significant cost savings will be recommended to EPA for approval of a formal VE study by
the USACE or the state. The USACE or the state will identify potential impacts on the RA
project schedule and EPA funding requirements for a formal VE study. The RE as well as the
HTRW CX should review all VE studies.
f. Pre-Bid Site Inspections. The HTRW design district may task the geographic
construction district with the responsibility for coordinating pre-bid/award site inspections by
USACE personnel and/or prospective bidders. All site visitors shall follow all applicable OSHA
regulations on training, medical surveillance and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).
(1) For USACE personnel who are required to enter the exclusion zone, an abbreviated
SSHP will be prepared by the design district with review and concurrence by the RE and the
geographic district Safety and Occupational Health Office (SOHO). The SSHP will cover
entrance procedures that should be followed by all visitors. The SSHP should mandate that a log
be kept of all individuals that plan on entering the site.
(2) All prospective bidders entering the exclusion zone or who will handle samples,
soil/core borings, etc. are responsible for developing their own abbreviated SSHP for the site
visit inspection activities. The SSHP shall address, at a minimum, the training and medical
requirements, appropriate PPE, and proper disposal of PPE in conjunction with all potential site
hazards. Proof of training and compliance with appropriate medical qualifications as required in
accordance with the SSHP shall be made available by the prospective bidders if requested by
USACE. Hold harmless agreements, signed by the visitors, shall be provided to the USACE
representative prior to the prospective bidders entering the exclusion zone. The release should be
part of the solicitation documents; the exact wording should be coordinated with the design
district Office of Counsel (Refer to sample of a release at Appendix F). The RE shall ensure that
the release documentation is maintained as part of the official contract file.
(3) The RE shall coordinate all site visits with the geographic district SOHO and the
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design district IH.
g. Funding of RE Pre-Award Activities. The RE should ensure pre-award tasks,
particularly the BCOE review, are properly funded by the design district. In most cases, the
Corps is required to maintain detailed cost accounting that can be presented as evidence in cost
recovery litigation with responsible parties. (Refer to Section 6, “Funding,” for further guidance
on funding/cost recovery responsibilities). Consult ER 415-1-16, "Fiscal Management,” for
further guidance on what pre-award activities should be charged to other than the supervision and
administration (S&A) account.
h. Community Relations Plan (CRP). EPA is required to maintain a written CRP for
Superfund projects. USACE public affairs officers are required to maintain a written CRP for
DERP-FUDS projects. For DERP-IRP projects, the installation is responsible for the CRP. The
RE should be aware of the support role that will be provided to the EPA RPM or public affairs
officer, as appropriate. It is emphasized here that the RE will only provide a support role and
will not become the lead in community relations activities (Refer to paragraph 13-3, "Community
Relations").
i. Health and Safety. The RE, as the USACE construction manager, must have input on
project safety and health issues at the earliest point. Safety and health are the most important
considerations of HTRW projects, and the RE with support from the district SOHO shall ensure
that the considerations specified in ER 385-1-92 are addressed. Refer to Section 4, “Health and
Safety,” for additional information on health and safety policies, responsibilities, and criteria.
3-6. Post-Award Activities - General. Just as with any other type of project, the field office
will conduct a preconstruction conference, a separate contractor quality control (CQC)/QA
coordination meeting, prepare minutes of each, review submittals, conduct inspections, and
perform other quality management activities as specified in ER 1180-1-6. HTRW submittals are
covered in paragraph 3-11. Some other HTRW aspects of RA implementation are discussed
below.
3-7. Preconstruction Conference.
a. The RE on an HTRW project should invite or coordinate the invitations as appropriate
for USACE personnel, the respective installation, EPA, state, or local officials, to attend the
conference to discuss the scope of work and any pertinent issues on the project. Other invitees
may include the QA laboratory and designer.
b. Items that may be discussed, in addition to the items typically discussed at a regular
preconstruction conference, are the contractors safety and health program and SSHP to include
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activity hazard analyses, inspection/audits, spill and discharge control plan, manifesting, waste
and borrow areas, and permits and security. (Note: The SSHP required by the contract satisfies
the requirement for submission of an accident prevention plan (Federal Acquisition Regulation
(FAR) 52.236-13)).
c. Another item that may be discussed is the SAP. This plan, prepared by the contractor,
describes responsibilities and procedures for the specific project to ensure that all data acquired
meets the intended purposes of the contract. The SAP is referenced in ER 1110-1-263. This ER
also describes a Quality Control Summary Report (QCSR) that is to be prepared by the contractor
at completion of the work. This report contains any deviations from the SAP, any problems
encountered and corrective actions taken, and data presentation. For sites on the NPL, the QCSR
must contain the chemical data required by regulators for deleting the site from the NPL.
d. Frequently, a phased NTP is issued where the contractor may work on submittals or
perform nonintrusive site activities, in the support zone or clean areas of the site, pending
approval of the SSHP. The SSHP and SAP require acceptance and approval, respectively, before
any on-site work commences.
3-8. HTRW Construction Quality Management (QM).
a. Quality Management. QM on HTRW projects is fundamentally the same as on any
other project. The CQC system manages and controls the work to ensure it complies with
contract requirements. The government QA system ensures that the CQC system is functioning
and that the product meets the required level of quality. QM policy and guidance are provided in
ER 1180-1-6. While the provisions of ER 1180-1-6 are fully applicable to HTRW work, the
nature of HTRW work often presents some unique challenges to QA personnel. QA personnel
involved in HTRW work must, therefore, learn how to use some new and different "tools" to
ensure that plans and specifications are met. EP 415-1-261, “Quality Assurance Representatives
Guide -Volume 5,” provides construction representatives with a reliable checklist type reference
for each phase of construction for HTRW work.
b. Definable Features of Work. QA personnel must ensure that the defined features of
work will allow them to conduct proper QM. The three-phase control system (preparatory,
initial, and follow-up inspections) works only if work features have been properly defined. For
example, excavation, stockpiling, characterization, transportation, and disposal of contaminated
soil might be improperly lumped together under one work feature (such as contaminated soil
disposal). The QA personnel might not be able to verify adequacy of field sampling for
preliminary separation of soils into hazardous and non-hazardous piles, disposal sampling
locations, and loading of trucks (some landfills charge by the truck load regardless of how full
the truck is). Without any dishonest intent by the contractor, this could potentially lead to higher
disposal costs, improper disposal, or regulatory violations. Both the QA personnel and the
contractor must fully understand the critical times at which CQC/QA activities must be
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conducted.
c. Three-Phase Control System.
(1) Preparatory Phase. Safety is critical on HTRW projects. QA personnel must ensure
the following:
(a) The site has been set up according to the SSHP;
(b) The contractor has all prescribed PPE and safety equipment on hand and the
equipment is appropriate for the potential on-site hazards. PPE and safety equipment must
comply with the requirements of EM 385-1-1. Many specifications require the contractor to
provide PPE and safety equipment for QA personnel;
(c) Calibration and certification of testing and monitoring equipment have been
performed;
(d) Employees performing testing and monitoring have the appropriate training and
qualifications; and
(e) Transportation, disposal, and other required permits have been obtained by the
contractor and/or government prior to start of work. Failure to do so could lead to illegal
disposal, work delays, and regulatory violations.
(2) Initial and Follow-Up Phases. In most cases, the lack of an obvious sign of
contamination will make these inspections challenging. QA personnel must ensure the
following:
(a) Samples are properly taken at the correct locations;
(b) Samples are handled and transported properly, including chain-of-custody
documentation; and
(c) Procedures outlined in the specifications and approved work plans are strictly
followed.
In other words, QA personnel must inspect how contamination is removed and how the site is
tested. This again points out the importance of having qualified QA personnel. The activity
hazard analysis and spot checks for compliance with safety and health requirements and
procedures are revisited during these phases.
3-9. Accountability.
HTRW inspections must be well documented and the personnel time
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properly documented. In some cases a "customer," such as EPA, will have additional or special
documentation requirements to ensure enforcement actions are properly conducted. Because they
are paying for our work, they will also want accurate time/expense records. In other cases, the
Government may be seeking reimbursement from PRPs. Cost recovery requires detailed records
(which will stand up to legal review) of contractor and USACE work and expenses. Unsigned,
incomplete, or inconsistent inspection reports may allow claims by PRPs that the work was not
done, or done inefficiently, and should therefore not be paid for.
3-10. Chemical Data Quality Management. Quality management of chemical data is critical
to HTRW projects. QA personnel should refer to, and be familiar with, ER 1110-1-263 as well
as EM 200-1-1, EM 200-1-3, and EM 200-1-6. These documents define policy for the HTRW
CDQM Program. Note that it is the role of the designated project "Chemical QA Function" to
perform specified activities which comprise the project-specific approach to CDQM. The
Chemical QA Function is performed by USACE personnel (i.e., HTRW Design District technical
staff and/or a USACE QA Lab) and can be supplemented or supplanted by contract support
under direct management of USACE QA personnel. The Chemical QA Function performs any
or all of the following activities: (1) coordinate the request for USACE lab validation for
primary laboratory services or evaluate alternative credentials for candidate environmental
laboratories; (2) review of contractor personnel qualification documentation contained in the
Contractor Quality Control Plan; (3) review of Sampling and Analysis Plans and other reports
related to environmental testing; (4) inspection of incoming QA samples to verify that samples
have been collected, packaged, and shipped correctly; (5) QA sample analysis; (6) data review
as described in EM 200-1-6; (7) generation of the Chemical Quality Assurance Report (CQAR);
(8) generation of the Chemical Data Quality Assessment Report; and (9) support audits/oversight
of field sampling and laboratory testing activities during RA execution. Further note that both
the district construction office's generic Quality Assurance Plan (for HTRW construction
projects) and the Supplemental Project QA Plan should establish the project-specific QA
compliance monitoring activities as well as the roles and responsibilities for the Chemical QA
Function. The project specifications as well as the Sampling and Analysis Plan should reflect
these requirements as well. Use of the Chemical Quality Assurance Branch (CQAB) Laboratory
(Omaha, Nebraska) for support of the Chemical QA Function is strongly recommended. The
Chemical QA Function needs to be coordinated (including transfer of funds) prior to beginning
of construction. The following paragraphs discuss details of some key compliance monitoring
activities.
a. Review of Sampling and Analysis Plan. HTRW projects require a SAP that includes
the project-specific DQOs for the work. EM 200-1-3, "Requirements for the Preparation of
Sampling and Analysis Plans," contains guidance on the generation of a SAP. The SAP is
composed of two parts: the Field Sampling Plan (FSP); and the Quality Assurance Project Plan
(QAPP). The FSP defines the field activities, including all requirements for sampling, field
documentation, field tests (e.g., conductivity, pH, etc.), sample packaging and shipping, etc. The
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QAPP defines the fixed and field measurement analytical protocol and chemical data reporting
requirements. If specified, ten percent of samples are split or collected in triplicate for quality
control (QC) and QA testing. This frequency can be increased or decreased based on the type of
work and the decision of the management team. ER 1110-1-263 and EM 200-1-6, "Chemical
Quality Assurance for HTRW Projects," contain guidance on QC/QA sampling frequency.
b. Pre-Construction Laboratory Validation. If specified, the primary and/or the QA
laboratory will be validated by the HTRW CX. Validation of a commercial laboratory by the
HTRW CX may take 16 to 24 weeks. EM 200-1-1 contains detailed guidance on laboratory
validations with which the RE needs to be familiar. Project funding may be required for CX
execution, depending on the program for which RA is being conducted (e.g., FUDS, Army
BRAC, Army IRP etc).
c. Laboratory Analysis. QA personnel should ensure that appropriate turn-around times
are specified for all primary and, if applicable, QA lab analyses. This will ensure that needed
data is available in a timely manner in order to make project decisions. In some instances a
cost/benefit analysis is used to determine if mobile laboratory services, or expedited fixed
laboratory turnaround times, are necessary to meet project objectives. The Chemical QA
Function should be consulted to determine if unreasonably short turnarounds are being identified.
These short turnaround times may result in poor quality work by project laboratories.
d. Review of Chemical Data. The overall data review process is specified in the project
planning documents. When split sample analysis is being performed, the guidance provided in
this paragraph must be followed. QA personnel will receive the contractor’s test results. At a
minimum, they should review the results for proper sampling procedures (as described in the
SAP). Normally, the Chemical QA Function will then review the data. QA samples will be sent
to the QA laboratory along with daily quality control reports (when sampling or analyses are
involved) and all of the contractor's test results or, at a minimum, all data that is necessary to
determine chemical data quality. EM 200-1-6 contains guidance on the data package
deliverables. The Chemical QA Function will compare the contractor's sample results against the
QA sample results. The QA laboratory will report to the field office on a frequent basis the
adequacy and acceptability of the data. The Chemical QA Function will generate the CQAR
within 30 days of submission of the contractor's test results.
3-11. Submittals - HTRW Specific.
a. General. HTRW projects have many unique submittal requirements that are not
required for non-HTRW projects. The following paragraphs describe some of these HTRW
specific submittals and identify the required or recommended reviewers and procedures. Due to
the unique nature of HTRW projects, it is highly recommended that the designer be one of the
primary reviewers of these documents. In addition, mandatory reviewers for CDQM submittals
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are covered in detail in ER 1110-1-263. Contractual approval authority of these submittals
remains with the area/resident office.
b. Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP). The SAP is a document prepared for all field and
laboratory activities, contract deliverables related to the acquisition and reporting of chemical
data for HTRW activities. The plan must be approved prior to initiation of any activities
involving sampling and/or chemical analysis. Mandatory reviewers of this document are the QA
laboratory and the HTRW design district, with monitoring performed by the HTRW CX.
c. Quality Control Summary Report (QCSR). The QCSR, submitted at the end of the
contract, addresses chemical quality control practices employed and summarizes the daily quality
control reports prepared throughout the project, including all the chemical data and analyses
collected/performed (this document may be called the chemical quality management final report).
Review and approval of this document is performed by the HTRW design district and the
geographic district/field office respectively, with monitoring by the QA laboratory and the
HTRW CX. This submittal is not required by regulation, however, some divisions still require
its submission.
d. Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP). The SSHP establishes policies and procedures
for protecting workers and members of the public from the specific hazards of the HTRW site for
which the plan was developed. The SSHP includes such programs as medical surveillance,
monitoring and sampling, emergency response, spill containment, site control, activity hazard
analyses, etc. Mandatory review of the SSHP is required by the HTRW design district, the
geographic construction district, and the construction district SOHO. The emergency response
plan (sub-component of the SSHP) must be coordinated with local officials prior to initiation of
any on-site activities. Refer to CB No. 99-2, “Emergency Responder Agreements for Fund-Lead
Remedial Actions - EPA Superfund Program,” for additional information on emergency response
plans.
e. Material Handling Plan (MHP). The MHP consists of procedures for the safe handling
of contaminated material, drummed material, and contaminated liquids in addition to procedures
for off-site transportation and disposal of materials. Manifesting, Department of Transportation
(DOT) shipping papers, and chain-of-custody procedures should also be included. Review
should be performed by the area/resident office with assistance from the design district. The
construction district SOHO may also be asked to review the MHP if the potential for personnel
or public exposure exists. This MHP may also cover importation of clean fill materials for large,
grading projects.
f. Spill and Discharge Control Plan (SDCP). The SDCP consists of contingency
measures and reporting responsibilities for potential uncontrolled spills and discharges of
contaminated and/or hazardous materials. These spills and uncontrolled discharges may include
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leachate decontamination water, sewage, and drummed material. Review should be performed
by the area/resident office, with the assistance from the design district, and the construction
district SOHO.
g. Dust, Vapor, and Odor Control Plan (DVOCP). This plan consists of site procedures
to minimize and control the creation of dust, vapors, and odors. Review of this document should
be performed by the area/resident office with assistance from the design district.
3-12. Documentation and Record Keeping Requirements.
a. Record keeping is a critical element of the HTRW/environmental restoration mission.
Many of the documents created will be made a part of the permanent administrative record for
the site. Project records are often solicited through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and
play a key role in the recovery of costs from identified responsible parties. All records associated
with environmental restoration programs are to be retained permanently, unless otherwise
specified in the latest revision of the Modern Army Record Keeping System (MARKS)
standards. Please refer to the MARKS standards for guidance concerning appropriate
classification, retention, and safeguarding of all documents.
b. In the case of the administrative record, the lead agency or installation for each
program or site will become the office of administrative record. The EPA is the office of
administrative record for the Superfund program. For the Installation Restoration program, each
installation maintains its own records. For FUDS and FUSRAP sites, the executing district
serves as the office of administrative record.
(1) Financial Records. Financial documents consist of all records which substantiate the
work performed or costs incurred on a project/site. Under the Corps of Engineers Financial
Management System (CEFMS), all financial documents, with the exception of invoices, travel
receipts, and cost transfer requests are electronic documents. Prior to transferring their
disbursing authority to the Finance Center, each USACE Resource Management Office is
responsible for retaining the original invoices. All supporting documentation for Superfund
credit card purchases is to be maintained by the supporting activity, in accordance with CEFCAO, Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) No. UFC-13. Only the total page (a copy is
acceptable) is required to be sent to the Finance Center for payment. CERM-F memorandum,
Subject: “Policy for Retention of Travel Receipts,” dated 7 June 1996, provides guidance for
retention of travel receipts. The policy includes special instructions for travel associated with the
Superfund program. All other financial documents are facsimile copies of electronic records and
the retention and security responsibilities for these records reside with the CEFMS Systems staff
under the direction of the Finance Center. Working papers used to establish overhead, indirect
and burden rates are required to be retained unless the CEFMS Budget Module is used to
compute these rates. In accordance with the revised MARKS standards, financial records for
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environmental restoration projects will be retained for 30 years. A CECI-IR/CEMP-R
memorandum, Subject: “Environmental Classification Standards,” dated 10 August 1999
outlines record keeping requirements (see Appendix F). Additional information related to record
keeping requirements can be found at the following Internet site:
http://www.rmd.belvoir.army.mil/markstit.htm
(2) Contract Records. Official contract records consist of, but are not limited to, those
documents detailed on the ENG Forms 3726, 3726-1, and 3726-2 (Official Contract Record
Checklist - Pre-award, Contract, and Contract Modification/Delivery Order). The contracting
division of the performing district is the custodian of these records and is responsible for their
safeguarding. Duplicate copies of official records maintained in other offices are considered
working documents, subject to destruction when no longer needed. When a field or area office
has been designated as an auxiliary "office of record," documents such as construction surveys,
daily inspection reports, progress schedules, etc., must be retired under the same MARKS
number as the official contract records in the custody of the USACE performing district
contracting division. Upon completion of the work, the completed DD Form 1594 (Contract
Completion Statement) must be forwarded to the contracting division for incorporation into the
official contract records. The field records will then be reviewed and duplicate copies,
considered working documents, removed and destroyed when no longer needed. Contract
records include record of procurements made under small purchase authority using DD Form
1155 or other comparable form.
c. Safety Records. Those records relating to HTRW/environmental accidents and
incidents reported on ENG Form 3394 for which the USACE performing district safety office is
the office of permanent record shall be retained and retired in accordance with the revised
MARKS classifications and retentions.
d. Laboratory Test Results. Test reports generated as a result of HTRW/environmental
restoration efforts will be released to the individual or office requesting the services. For
purposes of retirement, these reports will be incorporated into the site-specific files.
e. Site-Specific Environmental Records. These records consist of documents created in
connection with the investigation, planning, design, remedial action, technical assistance and
maintenance of projects associated with the HTRW environmental restoration program. Also
included are program and project management documents, documents associated with the
administrative record, remedial design, remedial action, closeout and other related documents.
These records may be created by engineering, program & project management, construction, real
estate, drill crews, survey crews and laboratories. While many of these documents may also be
maintained by the project manager, a local determination must be made concerning which office
will be the office of permanent record for consolidation and subsequent retirement. All duplicate
records are to be destroyed when no longer required for daily operations. Consolidated site files
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will be retired in accordance with the revised MARKS classifications and retentions.
f. Legal Records. Legal documents include PRP negotiations, Freedom of Information
Act (FOIA) records, and documents created to assist the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) or
EPA in representing the government in liability cases. All legal documents will be maintained by
the local office of counsel.
g. Manifest Records. The fully executed original manifest records and all records related
to the transport of materials shall be permanently retained. The RE should consult with the
customer’s representative to ensure timely completion of all reporting requirements. Manifest
records shall be retained on site for 3 years in accordance with 40 CFR 262.40. After 3 years, the
records shall be incorporated with the site/project file and retired with those records consolidated
under "Site-Specific Environmental Records." All other waste shipping papers shall be
permanently retained in the site/project file.
h. Contractor Records. The contractor is required to maintain and preserve medical
records on employees that are permitted in the support zone for 30 years after leaving
employment in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020. Contractor maintained records forwarded to
the Contracting Officer upon completion of the project consist of training logs, daily reports,
weekly safety reports, air monitoring results, laboratory test results, manifest documents, chainof-custody documents, meteorological records, photographs, decontamination of equipment and
vehicles and any other documents that are pertinent to the project. In addition, any contractor
operating under a cost reimbursable contract is required to maintain all financial records to
support cost recovery.
3-13. Indemnification. CERCLA, as amended by SARA of 1986, provides the President with
discretionary authority to hold harmless and indemnify any response action contractor against any
liability for negligence arising out of the response action contractor's performance in carrying out
response action activities, unless such liability was caused by the conduct of the remedial action
contractor (RAC) which was grossly negligent or which constituted intentional misconduct. This
indemnification applies only to RAC liability resulting from a release of a hazardous substance or
pollutant or contaminant arising out of response action activities. EPA interprets CERCLA
Section 119 as authorization for making indemnification available to response action contractors
undertaking remedial actions on NPL facilities or removal actions. This includes response action
contractors working for USACE in support of the EPA Superfund program. For future
Superfund contracts entered into after the effective date of the final guidelines (25 January 1993),
indemnification will not be offered except in rare cases and with written authorization from EPA.
DOD has elected not to provide indemnification for USACE contracts entered into under DERP.
3-14. Reporting.
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a. Superfund. Each RD/RA district is responsible for management reporting of all
Superfund projects. The following management information systems and reports that require the
RE’s input are utilized to monitor this program as managed by USACE:
(1) USACE Programs and Project Management Information System (PROMIS).
HQUSACE requires all Superfund RA projects to be reported in PROMIS. Districts utilize the
system to prepare and submit monthly Project Executive Summary (PES) reports on USACElead Superfund RD and RA assignments. The RE should assist the PM by providing data related
to the RA project for incorporation into PROMIS. Refer to CEMP-RS memorandum, 7 Jan 99,
on the implementation of PROMIS (see Appendix F);
(2) In a growing number of construction field offices, the Corps of Engineers utilizes a
software package known as the Resident Management System (RMS). This Windows based
software has been implemented as the Corps’ standard nationwide. The USACE RMS is used
for automation and reporting and is linked to PROMIS (downloads information until contract
award), CEFMS (exchanges financial data on contracts) and, in the future, will be linked to the
Standard Procurement System (SPS). Most of the forms required within USACE field offices
have been coded within the RMS software package. In addition, the RMS for Windows program
is compatible with various Report Writers, which can be used to generate special purpose forms
or reporting processes based upon the users need and/or technical ability; and
(3) SF 1080s should be submitted to the EPA monthly for reimbursement of allowable
in-house expenses. EPA regions also require a monthly progress report (prepared by the PM
with input from the RE if involving management of RA activities). EPA region reporting
requirements are found in the site-specific IAG.
b. Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP).
(1) USACE Programs and Project Management Information System (PROMIS).
HQUSACE requires all DERP projects to be reported in PROMIS. Since PROMIS has currently
no upward reporting capability, districts utilize PROMIS data to prepare and submit monthly
PES reports which provide senior management at districts, MSCs and HQUSACE with a brief
overview of project status including project background, cost information, schedule, and major
projects and issues. The RE should assist the PM by providing data related to the RA project for
incorporation into PROMIS.
(2) Refer to paragraph 3-14 a. (2) for information on the USACE RMS.
(3) All program and execution data for the FUDS program are reported by the USACE
PM in the automated web-based FUDS Management Information System (FUDS MIS) located at
the USACE ERDC.
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c. Other Projects. All other projects that fall under Support For Others (SFO), FUSRAP,
BRAC, FUSRAP etc., will be reported in PROMIS. The REs are responsible to report the status
of remedial action projects as soon as contract award is made to RMS.
3-15. Agreements with Regulatory Agencies.
a. Federal Facility Agreements. Environmental restoration work at active DOD facilities,
FUDS, FUSRAP, and civil works facilities may involve Federal IAGs and Federal Facility
Agreements (FFAs) that establish certain milestone dates for specific actions and also may entail
stipulated penalties. Normally, USACE is party to such agreements on FUDS, FUSRAP, and
civil works facilities, whereas the installation is the signature party for active DOD facility sites.
However, all regulatory milestones must be met or a new milestone developed, negotiated with
the regulator, approved by the regulator, and be in writing prior to the expiration of the deadline.
On FUDS, FUSRAP, and civil works facilities, USACE has the lead in negotiating revisions to
the scheduled milestones. On active DOD facility sites, the installation commander will have the
lead with USACE as an active participant.
b. Regulatory Milestones. Missing regulatory milestone dates for submittal of primary
documents or schedules, etc., can result in stipulated penalties being assessed by the regulatory
agency (EPA in the case of NPL sites). It is the PM’s responsibility to carefully monitor
compliance with milestone dates and ensure that needed extensions are obtained. REs managing
projects that have regulated milestones must be aware of the importance of meeting these
milestone dates. In view of the potential for assessment of penalties, the Office of Counsel
should be consulted promptly in the event of any questions on the legal implications of noncompliance with milestone schedules. If missing a deadline is anticipated, it should be
immediately reported to the USACE PM. The RE will be advised to either revise the schedule or
take appropriate action to comply with the established milestone schedule. Under these
agreements, REs should understand that written milestone schedule revisions are required to
avoid the assessment of penalties. Informal verbal agreements between the RE and regulators
may prove inadequate to avoid assessment of penalties should a milestone schedule in the
agreement be missed. REs do not have the authority to approve revisions to the milestone
schedule contained in the agreement nor to approve changes or deviations requested by involved
regulators during performance of the work. All matters concerning these types of issues should
be referred to the PM and to the design district.
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SECTION 4
HEALTH AND SAFETY
4-1. Purpose. This section describes USACE health and safety policy, responsibilities, and
criteria for the effective management of HTRW projects. This includes providing
comprehensive and site-specific safety and health criteria to be used by USACE and contractors
in developing Safety and Health Programs (SHP) and Site Safety and Health Plans (SSHPs) for
all HTRW site activities conducted by USACE or its contractors.
4-2. Authority. The development and implementation of appropriate SHPs and SSHPs for
HTRW site operations are mandated by OSHA 29 CFR 1910.120/29 CFR 1926.65, and is
applicable to all USACE and contractor personnel engaged in on-site activities associated with
Superfund, DERP, SFO, civil works projects, and any other HTRW projects.
4-3. Responsibilities. HTRW health and safety program execution, document preparation, and
the review and approval responsibilities of specific USACE elements (e.g., HQUSACE, OE
MCX, HTRW CX, HTRW design districts, divisions, and geographic districts, etc.) shall be
implemented as described in ER 385-1-92.
4-4. Policy. All USACE elements shall follow ER 385-1-92 and comply with (and specify
contractor compliance with) OSHA standards 29 CFR 1910 (general industry) and 29 CFR 1926
(construction). In addition, the Department of the Army, USACE, and its contractors must
comply with EM 385-1-1, "Safety and Health Requirements Manual," throughout all
investigative, design, and RA phases of HTRW projects.
a. Training.
(1) It is Corps policy that prior to conducting on-site HTRW activities (intrusive or nonintrusive) in contaminated areas (exclusion zone or contamination reduction zone) of an HTRW
site, all USACE and contractor personnel shall have successfully completed the following:
(a) formal 40-hour HTRW health and safety training course;
(b) 3 days of actual on-site training under the guidance of a trained and experienced
supervisor; and
(c) 8 hours of refresher training annually.
(2) All on-site supervisors shall complete the above requirements and an additional 8hour supervisor's course covering at least the following topics:
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(a) employer's safety and health program,
(b) PPE program,
(c) spill containment program, and
(d) health hazard monitoring procedures and techniques.
(3) For additional important information on training, refer to CESO-I memorandum
dated 13 May 1994, subject: "HTRW Safety and Health Training Courses and Medical
Surveillance Required by OSHA standards 29 CFR 1910.120 and 1926.65." This document can
be found in Appendix F. Refer also to Section 5, “Training.”
b. Medical Surveillance and Record Keeping. All USACE personnel performing on-site
HTRW activities (intrusive or non-intrusive) in contaminated areas (exclusion zone or
contamination reduction zone) of an HTRW site shall be evaluated for inclusion in a medical
surveillance program that meets the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.120 (f), ER 385-1-40, and EP
385-1-58. Generally, if employees meet the medical surveillance inclusion criteria, exams can
be given on a biennial frequency (every other year) for most USACE HTRW staff (refer to
CESO-I memorandum “HTRW Medical Surveillance Program Inclusion and Frequency
Criteria), Located in Appendix F). OSHA standards 29 CFR 1910.120/1926.65 require that
occupational exposure monitoring and medical surveillance records be maintained for a period of
30 years. Office of Personnel Management regulation 5 CFR Part 339 specifies personnel
record-keeping procedures be consistent with OSHA standards. Such records are to be
maintained in the individual's employee medical folder (SF-66D). The geographic district
SOHO is the proponent responsible for medical surveillance.
c. Documentation. Copies of certificates of training, medical surveillance, and respirator
fit testing of all USACE project personnel required to enter contaminated areas of the site should
be available on site for examination by OSHA.
d. Staffing. USACE commands shall staff an Industrial Hygienist and safety
professional(s) in the SOHO. These personnel shall support safety and occupational health
(SOH) aspects of in-house preliminary assessments and site investigations. They shall also
provide support during construction activities. In addition, an IH shall be staffed in the HTRW
design district's engineering component to serve as a technical team member in developing and
reviewing contractor or in-house investigations and designs.
e. Submittals. ER 385-1-92 requires several SOH documents be developed and
implemented, as applicable, for all HTRW activities. The content of the Health and Safety
Design Analysis (HSDA) required by ER 385-1-92 is used by the design district along with
CEGS 01351, "Safety, Health, and Emergency Response (HTRW/UST)," to develop the final
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safety, health, and emergency response specifications for an HTRW construction solicitation.
The requirements for the contractor's SSHP are described in the safety, health, and emergency
response specification section of the contract. CEGS-01351 and ER 385-1-92 specify that the
contractor requirement for a separate accident prevention plan (APP), required by FAR clause
52.236-13, shall be considered met if the contractor has integrated the requirements of the APP
into the SSHP submission. Contractor compliance with EM 385-1-1 will be observed.
f. USACE Oversight of "PRP Lead" Projects - EPA Superfund Program. OSHA
requirements concerning developing and implementing an SHP and SSHP are applicable to
USACE and contractor personnel engaged in on-site activities at PRP enforcement sites.
USACE oversight officials on PRP sites must review the PRP’s SSHP prior to conducting on-site
activities. Comments and concerns regarding the PRP's SSHP must be submitted to the EPA
RPM. Site prerequisite training and medical surveillance applicable to USACE oversight
officials shall be met prior to any oversight activities taking place. USACE oversight officials
shall adopt and comply with all applicable requirements of the PRP SSHP.
g. OE and HTRW Combined Waste Sites. On sites where both OE and HTRW wastes
exist, the RE should ensure that the SSHP is properly coordinated among the various Corps and
contractor elements. See Section 10, “Ordnance and Explosives,” for further information.
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SECTION 5
TRAINING
5-1. General.
a. Oversight and management of HTRW projects includes additional responsibilities for
planning, scheduling, and documentation of the required training. The OSHA standards for
hazardous waste operations and emergency response (29 CFR 1910.120 (general industry) and
29 CFR 1926.65 (construction)) require that all employees exposed to hazardous substances, or
safety hazards (directly associated with HTRW to be remediated) receive certain minimum
training and, when required, medical surveillance. Records of employee training and required
medical surveillance must be available at the project site. This training must be received before
the employee can work on a hazardous waste site. Managers and supervisors within the RE
office have the responsibility for determining which of their staff members will receive the
required training and for monitoring their staff to ensure that their training is current. Funding
also needs to be considered in advance to maintain a fully trained staff.
b. An individual development plan is an important tool to successfully manage the
required training that employees have received, are scheduled to receive, and will need in the
future. Special training is required for the duties and responsibilities connected with a hazardous
waste site in addition to the basic requirements. Some of the HTRW required training courses
also have refresher course requirements.
5-2. HTRW Health and Safety Training Requirements. All USACE personnel performing
on-site activities at known or suspected HTRW sites (exclusion or contamination reduction zone)
shall be trained in accordance with the requirements outlined in Department of Labor/OSHA 29
CFR 1910 and 29 CFR 1926. As a minimum, such training shall include:
a. A minimum of 40 hours of off-site classroom HTRW health and safety instruction (29
CFR 1910.120 (e) and 29 CFR 1926.65(e)). This training is mandatory and is available through
the PROSPECT program. The course is entitled "Safety and Health for Hazardous Waste Sites"
(PROSPECT course number 351);
b. Three days of actual field experience under the direct supervision of a trained,
experienced supervisor (29 CFR 1910.120 (e) and 29 CFR 1926.65(e));
c. Eight hours of supervisory training for those on-site USACE personnel who directly
oversee the actions of other USACE employees performing on-site activities (29 CFR
1910.120(e) and 29 CFR 1926.65(e)). The 8-hour supervisory training (a one time requirement)
is not available under the PROSPECT program but is usually offered by local universities and
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training organizations. For information on the availability of such training contact your local
SOHO;
d. Site-specific training (29 CFR 1910.120 (e) and 29 CFR 1926.65(e) and EM 385-1-1,
01.B.02 and 28.D.03). The site-specific training is provided by the contractor as specified in the
contract specification section “Safety, Health and Emergency Response” and through
compliance with the project SSHP and project specific work plans;
e. Eight hours of annual refresher training (29 CFR 1910.120 (e) and 29 CFR
1926.65(e)). This is mandatory training and is available through the PROSPECT program,
"Safety and Health for Hazardous Waste Sites – 8-Hour Refresher" (766 Exportable) or could be
arranged through outside sources. There is also a newly developed web-based 8-hour refresher
available through the Huntsville Training Division (refer to CB No. 99-1, Safety and Health
HTRW Annual Refresher Course). The refresher training should also include site-specific
training as required by paragraph (e)(2) and/or (e)(4) of referenced CFRs;
f. Comprehensive Hazard Communication Training Program for Workers (29 CFR
1910.1200 and 29 CFR 1926.59). The requirement for this training applies to all USACE
personnel who could be exposed to hazardous materials (brought on to the site for use rather than
the waste being cleaned up) while performing their duties on either HTRW or non-HTRW
construction sites. DOD developed the DOD Federal Hazard Communication training program
to be implemented and enforced by all DOD components. Training material consists of two
DOD publications and a videotape. These are: "Defense Federal Hazard Communication
Training Program, Trainer's Guide," "Department of Defense Federal Hazard Communication
Training Program, Student's Workbook," and the associated 90-minute videotape. The SOHOs
at district levels have developed training sessions utilizing the DOD training materials. This
training has to be completed prior to any USACE personnel assuming his/her duties that involve
hazardous materials. The training covers the following areas:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Federal Hazard Communication Standard
Chemical Forms and Exposure Hazards
Types of Physical and Health Hazards
Controlling Chemical Hazards
Introduction to MSDSs and MSDSs Physical Hazard Information
MSDS Health Hazard Information
Using Labels and the Hazardous Chemical Inventory
The SOHO is the responsible proponent for the OSHA-required training; and
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g. Respiratory Protection Program for Employees (29 CFR 1910.134 (c) and 29 CFR
1926.103). Employers are required to develop and implement a written respiratory protection
program with required worksite-specific procedures and elements for required respirator use.
OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.134(k)) require, as part of this program, the employer to
provide effective training to employees who are required to use respirators. The training must be
comprehensive, understandable, and recur annually, and more often if necessary. These
requirements are not specific to HTRW, but apply whenever respiratory protection is needed.
For HTRW projects, site-specific respiratory training requirements should be reiterated in the
SSHP and should meet the requirements set forth in the District respiratory protection program.
Implementation of the appropriate respiratory protection program for USACE personnel on work
sites is the local district’s responsibility. For additional information on respiratory protection,
refer to Sections 5 and 28 of EM 385-1-1.
5-3. Hazardous Waste Management and Transportation Training Requirements.
a. Personnel who manage hazardous waste for the purpose of shipment are required to
complete a program of classroom instruction or on-the-job training that teaches hazardous waste
management procedures and contingency plan implementation relevant to the positions in which
they are employed, as required by EPA under 40 CFR 262.34 (a) and 40 CFR 265.16. An annual
review of initial training material is also required. The training must be designed to ensure that
the employees are able to respond effectively to emergencies by familiarizing them with
emergency systems, procedures, plans, and equipment. The substantive requirements of the
initial training under these standards are met by the initial training under OSHA. The annual
review requirements are met by the OSHA 8 hour refresher including the site-specific training.
b. The Department of Transportation (DOT) 49 CFR 172.700, Subpart H requires
anyone involved in any activities related to the transportation of HAZMAT to receive an initial
training and a recurrent training every three years*. DOT regulations require the employer to
certify that the employees have received the required training. DOT training must cover the
following three areas:
(1) General awareness/familiarization training: this training is designed to enable the
employee to recognize and identify hazardous materials consistent with the DOT hazard
communication standards of 49 CFR Subpart 172. PROSPECT course number 223 (36 hours)
* DOD 4500.9-R, Defense Transportation Regulation II, Chapter 204, October 1999, requires
that all employees who prepare and ship hazardous material by commercial or military vehicle to
be trained every two years. USACE is complying with DOD requirement and requires the
refresher be taken every two years rather than three as required by DOT. The list of DOD
approved courses include USACE PROSPECT courses (223, 429, and 441).
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and course number 429 (12 hours) satisfy the initial and refresher training requirements,
respectively.
(2) Function-specific training: this training provides employees with functional-specific
training concerning requirements of 49 CFR Subpart 172 which are specifically applicable to the
functions the employee performs. For USACE personnel, this training focus on activities related
to the proper DOT and RCRA classification of hazardous wastes and the proper development
and certification of shipping documents. The above PROSPECT courses (223 and 429) are
tailored to satisfy this training requirement and are DOD approved courses in accordance with
the current DOD 4500.9-R. Employees involved with the shipment of Radioactive Class 7
materials require function-specific training for radioactive material. PROSPECT Course 441,
Radioactive Waste Packaging, Transportation & Disposal fulfills the function-specific initial
training requirement. The PROSPECT refresher course 429 with the added Radioactive Waste
module serves as the corresponding function-specific refresher.
(3) Safety Training: this training provides the employee with knowledge of emergency
response information, self-protection measures and accident prevention methods and procedures.
The OSHA initial and annual refresher training described in paragraph 3a. above satisfy this
DOT training requirement.
c. USACE Policies and Procedures.
(1) It is USACE policy that all USACE members executing hazardous waste manifests
and related documents receive the required training before executing such documents. The
refresher PROSPECT training course (429) can be provided on site by a PROSPECT instructor
or locally by the certified district “train-the-trainer” instructor. The train-the- trainer instructor
must be certified by the Professional Development Center (Huntsville), must receive the
necessary up-to-date training, must obtain all the refresher course material needed to teach the
refresher course through Huntsville, and must only teach employees from within his/her own
district. USACE train-the-trainer instructors are only certified to teach the refresher course not
the basic 36-hour course.
(2) After receiving the required DOT training, USACE personnel assigned the
responsibility of signing hazardous waste manifests and related documents, must submit the
training certificate to the district Commander or Deputy Commander to certify that the employee
has been trained and is certified in accordance with 49 CFR 172, Subpart H. If USACE
personnel receive training from sources other than PROSPECT, the district will be responsible to
assure that the training meets DOT requirements and that such training focus on activities related
to the proper DOT and RCRA classification of hazardous wastes and the proper development
and certification of shipping documents. In addition to the training certification, USACE
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personnel must be formally designated and authorized by the district Commander or Deputy
Commander to sign Hazardous Waste Manifests and related documents. In the case of
radioactive waste, only the District Commander can designate and authorize employees to sign
the shipping documents. The authorization letter should also show that the individual is within
his or her scope of employment when signing manifests and related documents. The nomination
should further provide information that the person has the necessary experience and has
satisfactorily performed as a Corps employee. A record of current training, including the
preceding three years have to be kept as long as the employee is employed and 90 days after
employment ends. The record must include the employee’s name; most recent training
completion date; a description, copy or location of the training materials; the name and address
of the training provider; and a copy of the District Commander/Deputy Commander certification.
5-4. Asbestos Abatement Training Requirements. For projects that involve asbestos
abatement, the following training requirements shall be met by USACE personnel responsible
for project oversight:
a. Personnel collecting bulk samples shall be trained as an “Inspector” pursuant to EPA
40 CFR 763, subpart E, appendix C, by an accredited provider.
b. Personnel developing or overseeing asbestos project designs shall be trained as a
“Project Designer” pursuant to EPA 40 CFR 763, subpart E, appendix C, by an accredited
provider.
c. Personnel conducting onsite construction QA shall be trained as a “Contractor/
Supervisor” pursuant to EPA 40 CFR 763, subpart E, appendix C, by an accredited provider.
d. Annual refresher training is required to meet the applicable categories above.
e. All personnel performing typical onsite construction QA of asbestos abatement
projects must meet the training requirements for the “competent person” as defined in the OSHA
29 CFR 1926.1101(o)(4).
f. The EPA asbestos training requirements presented in the above paragraphs are
described in the EPA's Model Accreditation Plan (MAP) subpart E, appendix E of 40 CFR Part
763 - Asbestos. The MAP applies to work in public and commercial buildings as well as to work
being performed in schools. EPA has another asbestos related training requirement in their
National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) at 40 CFR 61.145 (c)(8)
of subpart M. This training requirement applies to at least one on-site representative (such as a
foreman) for demolition and renovation activities that involve the removal, handling, or
disturbance of regulated asbestos containing material. A NESHAP training refresher course is
required every two years. NESHAP considers those individuals who have completed EPA MAP
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Contractor/Supervisor training and annual refresher training to be in compliance with the
NESHAP training requirements.
g. USACE Policy on Asbestos Training Requirements for USACE Personnel.
Department of Defense Instruction (DODI) 4715.10, Environmental Education, Training and
Career Development specifically includes the EPA asbestos MAP training as environmentalrelated Federally mandated training for DOD employees. The instruction also requires DOD
personnel to be certified as required by Federal or state requirements. AR 420-70, “Buildings
and Structures,” requires compliance with Federal, state, and local requirements concerning
asbestos activities including training. AR 200-1 requires USACE Commanders to comply with
legally applicable and appropriate Federal, state, and local environmental regulations and for
Army personnel to meet EPA MAP education and training requirements. Compliance with state
environmental regulations is required, therefore, USACE personnel must check the requirements
of the state in which the work is to be performed (Refer to the legal opinion under Appendix F,
which allows USACE Commands to pay for asbestos training, certifications, licenses, and fees).
h. Sources of Asbestos Training Courses and Technical Information. The Huntsville
Training Directorate has no asbestos training courses (except for a brief coverage of asbestos
waste manifesting that is covered in the 36-hour PROSPECT course entitled "Hazardous Waste
Management and Manifesting"). However, 40 CFR Part 763 provides information on EPAapproved MAP asbestos training courses. To obtain a free listing of training providers in your
state (or nationally), call the EPA contractor, Vista Computer Services, at (800) 462-6706. The
vendor listing is updated quarterly and includes addresses, POCs, phone numbers, and the types
of training offered. For additional information, consult your training officer, library, safety and
occupational health office, local EPA, or OSHA office. Asbestos related reference material may
be obtained by calling the toll-free EPA hotline at (800) 368-5888.
5-5.
Lead Hazard Control (Abatement) Training Requirements.
a. All USACE personnel conducting onsite QA of any lead hazard control (abatement)
project shall be trained in accordance with OSHA 29 CFR 1926.62(l)(2).
b. For projects that involve lead hazard control (abatement) activities in public access
buildings (including target housing and child-occupied facilities as defined in 40 CFR 745), the
following additional training requirements shall be met by USACE personnel responsible for
performing project oversight:
(1) Personnel conducting or overseeing the collection of bulk (i.e., paint chips), dust
(i.e., dust wipes), or soil samples or taking direct reading samples shall be trained in accordance
with EPA 40 CFR 745 and meet the “inspector” qualifications and accreditation requirements;
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(2) Personnel developing or overseeing lead hazard control (abatement) project designs
shall be trained as a “Project Designer” pursuant to EPA 40 CFR 745.226(c)(1), by an accredited
provider; and
(3) Personnel conducting onsite QA of lead hazard control (abatement) projects, shall be
trained as a “Supervisor” pursuant to EPA 40 CFR 745.226(b)(1), by an accredited provider.
c. For lead projects that DO NOT involve public access buildings (including target
housing and child-occupied facilities), such as lead-based paint abatement on steel and hydraulic
structures, USACE personnel responsible for project oversight need only be trained in
accordance with OSHA 29 CFR 1926.62.
5-6. Ordnance and Explosives (OE) Training Requirements. Personnel involved in OE
response activities must receive training on ordnance recognition and safety and must be
thoroughly trained regarding the nature of the materials handled, hazards involved, and necessary
precautions. All personnel performing on-site work activities, wherein they may be exposed to
hazards resulting from hazardous waste site operations, must complete applicable training in
compliance with 29 CFR 1910, 29 CFR 1926, EM 385-1-1, and ER 385-1-92. Additional
training requirements and qualifications concerning OE response activities will be published, in
the near future, in ER 385-1-95. This document will provide guidance concerning both USACE
and contractor personnel, and requirements concerning the specific type of work being
performed. The following training courses are recommended to acquire a working familiarity
with OE policy and procedures:
a. U.S. Army OE Safety Workshops: Typically 3-day workshops (one for conventional
OE and one for CWM projects) are provided by CEHNC Design Center and OE MCX personnel.
The workshop provides a general background of OE projects, reviews the laws and regulations
governing OE projects, provides a comparison of OE and HTRW projects, describes typical OE
project flow, and provides background on the various types and components of OE;
b. OE Recognition Training: This weeklong training course provides an in-depth look at
the types of OE and the procedures for recognizing OE in the field. The hazards associated with
specific ordnance items are explained in a manner to promulgate management of these hazards
onsite; and
c. Site-Specific Training: Often it is beneficial to retain the project’s OE support unit
(i.e., 52nd EOD Group, Army Technical Escort Unit) to conduct site specific training that is
focused on the particular OE items of concern and the associated hazards. The training should
include a review of the measures to be taken to protect workers from OE hazards. Requests for
this support should be made through the OE CX.
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5-7. Training Documentation. In addition to the mandatory training requirements established
under the various environmental and safety laws and regulations, each regulation carries specific
training documentation requirements. Many times, employees are properly trained in accordance
with Federal and state regulatory training requirements; however, the training was not properly
documented in the files or the training files cannot be produced during a regulatory inspection.
Thus, this may result in a violation being pursued by the inspector. Documenting that training
has been completed is the easiest part of training and must be done in accordance with the
specific regulatory requirements. This means that training records must include specifically
designated information and in many cases this information must be maintained at specific
locations at the facility, depending on the regulatory requirement. Documentation of all health
and safety training, including the names of employees trained, the duration of the training, the
contents of the training courses, and the dates of training will be appended to the SSHP. Each
employee who has successfully completed the training and field experience requirements
specified above will be certified as having successfully completed the necessary training and will
maintain a copy of the written certification at the project site.
5-8. Specialized Training. Other highly recommended specialized training includes confined
space entry/rescue and first aid/CPR. There are also many Federal environmental laws that
require specialized training, such as for lead abatement activities. The U.S. Army Environmental
Awareness Support Center published a directory of environmental training courses in July 1997.
Eventually many of the courses in the directory will be part of the Army Environmental Training
Master Plan (AETMP). A list of all PROSPECT courses can be found at:
http://pdsc.usace.army.mil
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SECTION 6
FUNDING
6-1. EPA Superfund Program. Funding for the EPA Superfund program is provided from
EPA with an IAG EPA Form 1610-1. All IAGs from EPA are forwarded to the HTRW CX for
review to ensure compliance with the EPA/USACE National IAG. The HTRW CX is the central
POC for funds tracking of the Superfund program and maintains a sole source database of all
Superfund IAGs. Accounting information for the IAG will be assigned by the HTRW CX. Once
the review is complete and accounting data assigned, the IAG will be forwarded to the
performing USACE district for acceptance. The regulations governing the transfer of funds
between the EPA and USACE can be found in ER 1110-2-500, “Corps/EPA Superfund Program
Funding and Reporting Requirements.”
a. The direct fund cite/revised reimbursable funding method for the Superfund program
was implemented for IAGs issued after 1 Oct 91 and which provide for the following activities:
(1) RD;
(2) RA; and
(3) rapid response.
b. The scope of work section of the IAG will specify a total dollar amount for direct fund
site (for contract payments) and a total amount for revised reimbursable (for in-house payments).
Each amount represents a limitation, and the funds are not interchangeable.
c. The direct fund cite/revised reimbursable method does not apply to the following:
(1) Existing IAGs accepted prior to 1 Oct 91 or any amendments to those IAGs;
(2) Blanket (generic) IAGs and related work authorization forms;
(3) Technical assistance (RI/FS, phase I, enforcement, O&M, state lead), 5-year reviews,
and site assessments;
(4) Real Estate; and
(5) VE and cost estimating.
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d. Direct Fund Cite Method: Contracts awarded with direct fund cite funding will cite
the EPA Appropriation, 68/20X8145, and will identify the EPA Cincinnati Financial
Management Center (CFMC) as the payment office. A copy of the contract documents and
signature cards (for personnel authorized to approve contractor's requests for payment) must be
forwarded by the USACE district procurement office (responsible for the RA contract award) to
EPA at the following address within two weeks of award. Copies of all contract modifications
will also be distributed to EPA CFMC and to the EPA RPM. All contract documents forwarded
to EPA CFMC will use a transmittal sheet and must include the IAG number, site name,
contractor’s name, contract number, fund cite, amount, statement of award, and Contracting
Officer’s dated signature. CFMC will acknowledge receipt of the transmittal within three days
after receipt:
Environmental Protection Agency
Cincinnati Financial Management Center
Cincinnati, OH 45268-7002
The construction division at the executing district will coordinate with the procurement office
and establish proper procedures and delegate responsibilities to ensure that the signature cards
and copies of future contract modifications are forwarded to CFMC and to the EPA RPM in a
timely manner.
(1) The original ENG Form 93, Payment Estimate - Contract Performance, will be
express mailed by the USACE district billing office to the following address with a transmittal
sheet within two business days of signature:
Environmental Protection Agency
Cincinnati Financial Management Center
Attn: Accounting Operations, Suite 300
4411 Montgomery Road
Cincinnati, OH 45212
A copy of the signed payment estimate will be clearly marked "COPY" and forwarded
separately to the EPA RPM. The final payment estimate will be clearly marked "FINAL" and
will be forwarded by the USACE PM to the EPA RPM and to CFMC. The EPA RPM must
approve the contractor final payment estimate before CFMC makes the payment. EPA will
comply with the guidelines established by the Prompt Payment Act and will make the payment
to the contractor. (A sample of ENG Form 93 is included in ER 37-2-10, "Accounting and
Reporting Civil Works Activities.")
(2) In the case of indefinite delivery type contracts using the direct cite method, a
payment estimate will address one delivery order only. If a contractor has performed work on
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more than one delivery order during a billing period, each delivery order will require a separate
ENG Form 93.
(3) For Direct Fund Cite contract awards subject to a Defense Contract Audit Agency
(DCAA) audit, such as a Total Environmental Restoration Contract (TERC) delivery order
contract award, a Public Voucher for Payment (SF1034) is signed and certified by the USACE
Contracting Officer’s Representative (COR).
(a) The contractor's request for payment will be reviewed, certified by the billing
office and express mailed to the cognizant audit office (DCAA, EPA, or other cognizant audit
agency). Refer to the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between DCAA and USACE for
USACE Civil Works Funded Contracts under Appendix F. This agreement changes yearly. The
HQUSACE Audit office issues a memorandum to all audit and procurement offices at the
districts that contain the annual financial agreement (hourly billing rate) between DCAA and
USACE.
(b) A cover letter will be used by the billing office for transmittal of the SF1034 to
the cognizant audit office. The letter will identify a POC with a telephone number, the contract
number, contractor name, pay estimate number, and identify the EPA CFMC as the payment
office. The cover letter will request the audit office to express mail the approved payment
request directly to CFMC at the address shown under paragraph d.(1) above.
(c) The cover letter to the audit office will be copy furnished to CFMC to monitor
receipt of the payment request. If CFMC does not receive the approved request within 14 days
of receipt of the copy-furnished cover letter, the POC identified in this letter will be contacted.
Requests for payment received in EPA without the audit office certification will be returned to
the POC. EPA will not forward documents to the audit office.
(4) The contractor earnings (during the reporting period) and a summary of the
contractor's activities will be reported in the monthly status report (which accompanies the SF
1080 for in-house billings). The monthly status report will be submitted by the USACE PM to
the EPA RPM as standard procedure.
(5) Contract financing payments made under cost-type contracts are not subject to
interest penalties for payment delays per Paragraph (b) "Contract Financing Payments" of FAR
52.232-25(b)(4), "Prompt Payment" (Mar 94), and 52.232-27(b)(2), "Prompt Payment for
Construction Contracts." "Contract Financing Payments" means a government disbursement of
monies to a contractor under a contract clause or other authority prior to acceptance of supplies
or services by the government. Final payments fall under "Invoice Payments" and are subject to
interest penalty assessment. "Invoice Payments" means a government disbursement of monies to
a contractor under a contract or other authorization for supplies or services accepted by the
government. This includes payments for partial deliveries that have been accepted by the
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government and final cost or fee payments where amounts owed have been settled between the
government and the contractor. Although contract-financing payments are not subject to interest
penalty for payment delays, every effort should be made to expedite payments to contractors.
e. Revised Reimbursable Method (for in-house activities). With the direct fund
cite/revised reimbursable method of payment, the revised reimbursable funding is limited to inhouse activities such as labor, travel, small purchase orders and other miscellaneous in-house
costs. The USACE district will forward a monthly certified SF 1080 billing (signature cards for
personnel authorized to approve request for payments for in-house activities are required for
EPA files) with a status report (see paragraph d.(4) above) to the following address:
Environmental Protection Agency
Cincinnati Financial Management Center
Cincinnati, OH 45268-7002
EPA will process a payment to USACE within 5 days of receipt of the SF 1080 billing.
The USACE PM will provide a copy of the SF 1080 billing and status report marked "COPY" to
the EPA RPM. The EPA RPM will discuss any discrepancies with the USACE PM, and any
mutually agreed adjustments will be documented in a memorandum from the EPA RPM to the
USACE PM. The final SF 1080 billing must be clearly marked "FINAL" and will be approved
by the EPA RPM before the payment is processed.
f. IAGs Not Funded Under Direct Fund Cite/Revised Reimbursable Method. For any
EPA Superfund IAGs that are not funded under the direct fund cite/revised reimbursable
method, the revised reimbursable method and SF 1080 billing system will be used for processing
contract payments and payment for in-house activities. The certified SF 1080 billing and status
report procedures, as stated in paragraph e. above, will apply.
6-2. DERP Program. DERP funding generally follows the same financial guidelines as other
defense programs. Funding for DERP programs are provided from the Defense Environmental
Restoration Account (DERA). Although these are "no-year" appropriations, they are transferred
to other service accounts for obligation purposes. Once transferred, the funds take on all the
characteristics of the appropriation to which they are transferred. Therefore, environmental
restoration account funds transferred to the O&M, Army appropriation have a one-year life and
will expire at the end of the fiscal year, unless the funds have been obligated by contract award.
a. Army Installation Restoration Program. The Major Army Command (MACOM)
manages funding for the IRP program. All project funding requests must be submitted by the
PM to the installation and forwarded through their MACOM for approval. Once approved, the
MACOM will either authorize the installation to MIPR the funds to the district or send the
request to the HTRW CX to prepare the Work Authorization Directive (WAD) and distribution
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of the funds by Funds Authorization Document (FAD) through HQUSACE. Once the FAD is
received, funds are obligated and expended the same as other direct funded programs.
Contingency funds (2 percent of the contract at award) will be provided on contracts awarded for
$5 million or more. For contracts less than $5 million, no contingency will be provided.
Additional funds will be provided on an as-needed basis. All fund requests should be processed
through the PM.
b. FUDS. FUDS program managers at the divisions control the distribution of funds
allocated by CEMP-RF. Accounts are established in the HQUSACE budget office for each
division (quarterly) based on requirements stated in the DERP-FUDS workplan. Division
program managers will then determine the amount of in-house and contract funding to issue to
their districts and to Huntsville for the execution of OEW projects. No contingency funds are
provided for FUDS projects. However, divisions have complete flexibility in transferring funds
among approved projects as deemed necessary.
c. Fiscal Year-End Closing. In early September of each FY, funding (including S&A) on
all DERP projects must be reviewed and excess funds returned. Excess funds must be returned
to the DERA account to avoid expiration. Funds left in the O&M, Army appropriation and
similar accounts will expire. The RE should identify the needs of the project to the funding
district (particularly during the beginning of the FY) in order to ensure that sufficient funds are
made available for continuous operation.
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SECTION 7
MANIFESTS, SHIPPING PAPERS AND OTHER TRANSPORTATION
RELATED REQUIREMENTS
7-1. Purpose. When shipping hazardous waste, hazardous materials, or other remediation
materials and wastes, typically the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of
Transportation (DOT) and/or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations must be
followed. In addition, state environmental offices may have more stringent requirements with
respect to manifesting hazardous waste. The purpose of this section is to identify USACE policy
with respect to hazardous waste manifesting, NRC manifesting, and the use of other shipping
papers such as asbestos waste shipping records, chain-of-custody forms, etc. In addition, other
transportation related requirements are discussed. USACE policy and guidance on hazardous
waste manifests and hazardous material shipping has been issued under the following references:
a. ER 1110-1-263, "Chemical Data Quality Management for Hazardous, Toxic, and
Radioactive Waste Remedial Activities;"
b. ER 1180-1-6, "Construction Quality Management."
c. EP 200-1-2, "Process and Procedures for RCRA Manifesting;" and
7-2. Background. The RCRA addresses the "cradle-to-grave" management of hazardous waste.
This includes the generation, storage, treatment, transportation and disposal of hazardous wastes.
The EPA implementing regulations (40 CFR 262) require a generator who transports, or offers
for transportation, hazardous waste for off-site treatment, storage, or disposal to prepare and sign
the EPA Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest Form 8700-22. This form quantifies and describes
the hazardous waste in detail. The DOT also requires a shipping document that describes the
transported hazardous material to accompany the shipment to its final destination. Unless the
receiving state or the state where the shipment has originated from has its own manifest, the EPA
Uniform Manifest is used. The manifest satisfies both EPA and DOT requirements. EPA,
OSHA, and DOT regulations further require various aspects of contingency planning by
hazardous waste generators.
7-3. General. With the exception of hazardous waste generated as the result of USACE
response actions on FUSRAP, Formerly Used Defense Sites, or facilities operated and
maintained by USACE, USACE is not considered to be the owner or generator of the hazardous
waste it transports as part of response activities. The customer agency is the generator for
purposes of execution of the hazardous waste manifest. However, due to logistic complexities, a
customer may not be able to provide an individual to sign hazardous waste manifests in a timely
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manner. The customer may then request USACE to sign project manifests on their behalf. The
EPA regulations (40 CFR 262 appendix, item 16.) makes clear that generators may have an agent
act on their behalf in signing manifest forms. Specifically the instructions say, "Generators may
preprint the words "on behalf of" in the signature block or may hand write this statement in the
signature block prior to signing the generator certifications." As explained in the Federal
Register Notice (51 Fed. Reg. 35192), EPA did not intend to impose personal liability on the
individual who actually signs the certification. Further, EPA clarified that "employees or other
individuals may sign the manifest certification for a generator who is a legal entity, such as a
corporation." This statement makes clear that the generator may permit persons on-site to sign
on behalf of the generator, as long as the signer has clear authority from the generator to do so.
7-4. Policy.
a. It is USACE policy, if requested by its customers, to execute hazardous waste
manifests and related documents on behalf of those customers when not precluded by state
statutes or regulations. Currently, USACE is signing manifest forms and related documents on
behalf of EPA, FEMA, and FSA.
b. Manifest execution and related responsibilities will be performed by USACE at sites
or facilities where USACE is considered the owner/generator of the hazardous waste. Examples
of such sites include civil works facilities or where USACE is considered the agency responsible
for the waste such as DERP-FUDS and FUSRAP sites.
c. With regard to DERP-Installation Restoration (IR) and BRAC environmental
restoration activities, manifest execution and related responsibilities ordinarily belong to the
customer (i.e., the installation or the base).
d. With regard to OE response actions on FUDS sites, if the OE Design Center is
responsible for the execution (not the geographical district), a representative from the OE Design
Center or the contractor shall be responsible for meeting all regulatory requirements and signing
the manifests and related documents.
e. When the additional cost of sending a qualified USACE representative to a remote
location for a small clean up project is unwarranted, the option of requiring the on-site contractor
to sign the manifests on behalf of the generator is permitted and should be considered. This
option can only be exercised on a project-specific basis after written authorization from the
customer and approval of the Chief of Construction Division at the executing district have been
given. Requirements for the contractor to sign the manifests must be approved, as noted above,
prior to the solicitation process and be incorporated into the technical provisions of the contract
solicitation.
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f. In the past, FUSRAP contractors were executing manifests and other shipping
documents on the government's behalf. As new contracts are awarded by the USACE, the
USACE will assume these responsibilities.
7-5. Procedures. Where USACE personnel execute Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest forms
and related documents, procedures will be adopted by the executing districts and centers as
described below:
a. In the Generator's Name and Mailing Address box (block #3) on the Uniform
Hazardous Waste Manifest form, USACE authorized personnel shall enter the following
information: "Environmental Protection Agency/Superfund Program," "DOD (DERP/FUDS),"
"FEMA," or “Department of Agriculture/FSA” as appropriate followed by "c/o" and then the
name and address of the USACE office that manages the returned manifest forms. In the
generator's certification box (Block #16), for Superfund sites, the authorized USACE employee
would then sign his or her name, followed by "USACE" after writing or printing the phrase "On
behalf of the Environmental Protection Agency." On FUDS sites, USACE personnel should
follow the same procedure after typing or printing the phrase "On behalf of the Department of
Defense." For FEMA sites the authorized USACE employee would sign his or her name,
followed by "USACE" after writing or printing the phrase "On behalf of the Federal Emergency
Management Agency," and so on. All other manifest related documents executed by USACE
members on behalf of a customer shall be executed by signature followed by USACE after
writing or printing the phrase "On behalf of the (customer's name)."
b. On facilities where USACE is the "owner/generator" of hazardous wastes or the
"responsible agency," such as civil works facilities or FUSRAP sites, USACE personnel shall
enter in block #3 on the manifest form "U.S. Army Corps of Engineers," followed by the name
and address of USACE office that manages the returned manifest forms. In the generator's
certification block (block #16), the USACE authorized employee would sign his or her name
after typing or printing the phrase "On behalf of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers."
c. When the contractor signs the manifest form on behalf of the USACE or a customer,
the contractor will enter, in block #3, the name and address of its organization. In the generator's
certification box (block #16), the contractor's authorized employee would sign his or her name
after typing or printing the phrase "On behalf of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers" or "On
behalf of (the name of the customer/agency)," as appropriate.
d. USACE personnel authorized to execute manifest forms and related documents shall
ensure compliance with all reporting requirements (e.g., exceptions reports, biennial reports and
state reports) as well as follow-on requirements, including the assembly and retention of all
appropriate documentation and certifications.
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e. USACE personnel executing hazardous waste manifests and related documents must
ensure that the USACE is authorized by its customers to execute hazardous waste manifests and
related documents on their behalf prior to such documents being executed. The customer request
and authorization must acknowledge that the customer retains all responsibilities for the
hazardous waste as a generator. This shall extend to the execution of the hazardous waste
manifests, land disposal restriction notification and certifications, waste profile sheets, and other
forms necessary for the completion of manifests for transportation and disposal of hazardous
waste. This authorization, as well as a customer statement retaining all generator responsibilities,
is most appropriately incorporated as a specific provision within a Memorandum of Agreement,
IAG, or correspondence signed by a recognized agency official. Authorization for executing and
certifying manifest forms and related documents on behalf of EPA is delegated in EPA’s letter
dated 18 October 1990 (a copy of the letter is in Appendix F). Authorization for executing and
certifying manifest forms and related documents on behalf of FSA must be obtained on a projectby-project basis. FEMA's authorization is provided in the MOA between the U.S. Army and
FEMA, signed in 1991.
f. Approval to undertake the delegated responsibility of signing manifest forms and
related documents for customers other than EPA, FEMA, and FSA rests with the chief of
construction division at the executing district. If state statutes or regulations do not permit the
USACE to sign such documents on behalf of the customer, the RE or other designated USACE
representative is to contact the PM for further guidance.
g. All USACE employees executing hazardous waste manifests and related documents
must receive appropriate training before executing such documents. Training records fulfilling
all regulatory requirements must be documented and maintained onsite during the life of the
project in the event of a regulatory inspection. Once the contract is closed, these should become
part of the official contract file. Training requirements and PROSPECT courses that satisfy these
requirements are presented in paragraph 5-3b. of Section 5, “Training.”
h. Only USACE members formally designated and authorized by a MSC or district
commander/deputy commander shall be allowed to execute hazardous waste manifests and
related documents for that site. The authorization letter should identify that the individual is
within his/her scope of employment when executing manifests and related documents. In order
to document appropriate training and the scope of an individual’s signature authority, a
nomination and authorization procedure must be implemented. All persons nominated to be
manifest certifying officials must have completed the required training and obtained certification.
The nomination package should contain a one-page summary of the person's training and
experience in HTRW and manifesting. The nomination package should also have the
authorization letter (to be coordinated with the local counsel) ready for signature. The
authorization letter must clearly state that the execution of manifests and related documents are
within the scope of the individual’s official duties. The nomination should further provide
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information that the person has satisfactorily performed as a USACE employee. For FUSRAP
sites, only the District Engineer with delegated FUSRAP responsibility for a particular site shall
authorize USACE personnel to sign manifests and shipping documents for that site. Prior to
offsite transport of waste, the responsible USACE District must ensure that the waste has been
adequately characterized for the potential presence of radioactive contaminants and hazardous
waste. Waste will be transported only to facilities that may lawfully accept the contaminants
present in the waste.
i. Where USACE employees are executing hazardous waste manifests and related
documents, the contract under which the waste is being transported must address supporting
chemistry-related requirements and procedures. These items are imposed by the specifications
and addressed by the contractor in the Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP). The SAP addresses
among other things, laboratory activities, chemical data documentation, equipment, sampling
documentation, quality control, sample custody and shipment, analytical methods and document
preparation. The project specific supplement to the QA Plan, developed by the RE, must define
the USACE quality assurance role in the manifesting process. Area and Resident Engineers are
encouraged to periodically request a review (by qualified in-house project support staff such as
regulatory specialists, chemists, industrial hygienists or the HTRW CX) of project specific
transportation and disposal related documents prior to signature. This is especially true in the
case of a large and variable number of waste streams.
j. When USACE or customers are going to be signing hazardous waste manifests, but
contractors are going to be preparing materials for shipment, the contractor should be required by
contract to certify that materials have been properly packaged, labeled, and marked in accordance
with all Federal and state regulations. This will enable the USACE/customer representative to
certify on the manifest that the materials are properly packaged, labeled, and marked even though
these activities were conducted by other persons. Likewise, the contractors should be required to
certify as accurate any other documents he prepares relative to the shipment of hazardous waste
including the manifest, the Land Disposal Restriction Notifications and waste profile sheets. All
contractor certifications should be retained by USACE as supporting documentation in
accordance with paragraph 3-12 of Section 3, “USACE Administered Projects.”
k. For FUSRAP sites, a large volume of soil will be moved by rail. In such a case, the
words "and rail" must be added to the language currently found in block 16 of the hazardous
waste manifest. The two words should be added after the word "highway" in the certification
block as described in the instructions for completing the manifest in the appendix to Part 262.
The word "highway" should be crossed out if the shipment from the site to the disposal facility is
entirely by rail. In addition, when transporting by rail, the manifest is not handled in the same
manner as for the highway mode. Section 49 CFR 172.205(f) should be consulted for the
additional requirements pertaining to manifest dissemination when waste is transported by rail.
In addition to RCRA manifest requirements, there may be instances when a NRC Uniform Low
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Level Radioactive Waste Manifest is required. In general this NRC manifest will be required on
sites with low level radioactive wastes as defined by the NRC or it may be required by the
recycling or disposal facility for shipments of low activity radioactive material. The NRC
manifest and associated requirements can be found in Appendix G to 10 CFR 20. This NRC
manifest, when properly completed, will fulfill the NRC and DOT requirements. It should be
noted that there will be situations when neither a NRC nor a hazardous waste manifest is
required, however a DOT shipping paper may be required (most likely due to a reportable
quantity of radionuclides in the package). Conversely, there may be situations when both a NRC
and a hazardous waste manifest will be required. Lastly, there may be situations when the
FUSRAP remediation waste is not regulated by EPA, NRC or DOT. For example, if the waste
contains less than 2000 picocuries per gram and there is not a reportable quantity of any
hazardous substance in the shipment and the waste does not contain a hazardous waste, then the
shipment would not be regulated by the EPA, NRC, or DOT. In those cases, while not required
by Federal regulations, the USACE requires a chain-of-custody form be developed and used to
track all FUSRAP shipments to treatment and/or disposal facilities (See paragraph 7-10a. of this
section).
l. As per 49 CFR 172 subpart G, a person who offers a hazardous material for
transportation must provide a 24-hour emergency response telephone number for use during the
event of an emergency. This number must be monitored at all times the hazardous material is in
transportation and the person must be either knowledgeable about the material and has
comprehensive emergency information or has immediate access to a person who possesses such
knowledge and information. This number must be entered on the shipping papers (hazardous
waste manifests, NRC manifests, Bills of Lading, Asbestos Waste Shipment Records, etc.). The
Corps may retain this duty or contractually require the contractor to perform this duty.
m. For all wastes shipped on a hazardous waste manifest (including TSCA regulated
PCBs), a copy of the hazardous waste manifest with the written signature of the owner or
operator of the designated treatment/storage/disposal (TSDF) facility should be received within
35 days of the date the waste was accepted by the initial transporter. If this copy is not received
from the TSDF within this period, the USACE signatory of the manifest must contact the
transporter and/or owner or operator of the designated facility on the 35th day to determine the
status of the waste. If a copy of the signed hazardous waste manifest is not received within 45
days of the date the waste was accepted by the initial transporter, an Exception Report must be
filed on the 45th day with the EPA and/or authorized state hazardous waste office as required in
40 CFR 262.42. The RE must assure that office procedures are in place for manifest signatory to
track receipt of the TSDF manifest copy and provide for timely issuance of the Exception Report
as required.
7-6. DOT Regulated Materials. For DOT regulated hazardous materials that are not
transported with EPA hazardous waste manifests or NRC manifests, either the contractor (if
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required by the contract) or a USACE member formally designated as specified above may sign
the DOT shipping papers with the exception of any FUSRAP waste. DOT training is mandatory
to perform this function.
7-7. Sample Shipments.
a. There are instances when analytical samples may be considered RCRA regulated
hazardous wastes, TSCA PCB wastes, and/or DOT regulated hazardous materials. However,
RCRA and TSCA provide an important exclusion for analytical samples being transported to and
from the laboratory if the sample meets the conditions outlined below. If the samples meet the
terms specified below, a hazardous waste manifest is not needed. If the terms are not met, a
manifest is required for transporting these samples to and from the laboratory.
(1) Under Federal EPA regulations, a sample of solid waste or a sample of water, soil, or
air, which is collected for the sole purpose of testing to determine its characteristics or
composition, is not subject to the manifesting requirements of RCRA or TSCA, when:
•
•
•
•
•
•
the sample is being transported to a laboratory for the purpose of testing; or
the sample is being transported back to the sample collector after testing; or
the sample is being stored by the sample collector before transport to a laboratory for
testing; or
the sample is being stored in a laboratory before testing; or
the sample is being stored in a laboratory after testing but before it is returned to the
sample collector; or
the sample is being stored temporarily in the laboratory after testing for a specific
purpose (for example, until conclusion of a court case or enforcement action where
further testing of the sample may be necessary).
(2) In order to qualify for the exemption from manifesting under RCRA and/or Toxic
Substances Control Act (TSCA) regulations, a sample collector shipping samples to a laboratory
and a laboratory returning samples to a sample collector must:
•
•
comply with U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), U.S. Postal Service (USPS),
or any other applicable shipping requirements; or
comply with the chain-of-custody and packaging requirements found in either 40 CFR
261.4(d)(2)(ii) or 40 CFR 761.65(i)(3) (e.g., include sample collector's name, mailing
address, and telephone number; laboratory's name, mailing address, and telephone
number; quantity; date of shipment; sample description; and package the sample so
that it does not leak, spill, or vaporize).
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b. While a sample may be excluded from the RCRA and/or TSCA manifesting
requirements, the sample may still be considered a DOT regulated hazardous material if the
sample collector anticipates that the sample meets a DOT hazardous class. For example, a
sample preserved with acid may exhibit a corrosive hazard class (class 8), a sample of TNT
contaminated soil may be explosive (class 1) or a flammable solid (class 4.1), a sample involving
chemical agent may be toxic (class 6.1) or may be an irritant (class 9). For samples suspected to
be regulated hazardous materials, compliance with the DOT regulations in 49 CFR 171-180 is
mandatory. This includes the appropriate requirements for the preparation of shipping papers,
marking, labeling, packaging and placarding. In addition, if these samples are to be shipped by
air, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) regulations must be followed.
Companies routinely used to ship samples will have a Dangerous Goods Bill of Lading or similar
shipping document that should be used when transporting samples that may potentially be DOT
hazardous materials. In addition, persons offering these shipments must be DOT trained and
emergency response information must be provided to the shipper.
c. Detailed guidance pertaining to the transportation of samples that are potentially
hazardous materials can be found in Appendix F of EP 200-1-3.
7-8. Asbestos Waste Shipment Records.
a. Asbestos-containing waste material is regulated by EPA under the Clean Air Act.
DOT also regulates Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) as a hazardous material during the
course of transportation. OSHA has also established worker protection standards (including
training requirements) for all activities that involve ACM such as manufacturing, fabricating, and
demolition and renovation of structures that contain ACM. Many states have been authorized by
EPA (EPA agreement states) to act as the regulatory authority for asbestos abatement activities.
The state regulations may be more stringent than the Federal regulations but as a minimum
should meet the Federal requirements.
b. The EPA requires the use of an asbestos Waste Shipment Record (WSR) or a similar
form when ACM is transported offsite (40 CFR 61.150(d)). Though not a federally regulated
hazardous waste, a hazardous waste manifest could be used when shipping asbestos if all the
WSR required information is placed on the manifest. The following additional information is
required to be placed on any form used to transport asbestos:
(1) name, address, and telephone number of the waste generator;
(2) name and address of the local, state, or EPA regional office responsible for
administering the NESHAP program;
(3) approximate quantity of asbestos in cubic meters or yards;
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(4) name and telephone number of the disposal site operator;
(5) name and physical site location of the disposal site;
(6) transport date;
(7) name, address, and telephone number of the transporter(s); and
(8) a certification that the contents are fully and accurately described by the proper
shipping name and are classified, packed, marked, placarded, and labeled and are in all respects
in proper condition for transport by highway according to applicable regulations.
c. In addition to the information required on the WSR or similar form, asbestos is a DOT
regulated hazardous material thus all DOT shipping paper, labeling, marking, packaging and
placarding requirements must be met. The WSR, manifest, or a similar form may be used as the
DOT shipping paper if all the required DOT information (49 CFR 172 subpart C) is also included
on the form.
d. Unless specified otherwise in the asbestos demolition and renovation contract, the
prime contractor is considered to be both the operator and authorized agent for the waste
generator and will be required to complete and sign the generator portion of the WSR (Operator's
certification, line 9 of the WSR form), and be responsible for ensuring that both the transporter
and the waste disposal site owner/operator complete and sign their sections of the form. This is
in line with the NESHAP regulations, 40 CFR Part 61.
e. NESHAP (40 CFR 61.150(a)) specifies that containers or wrapped materials that
contain asbestos-containing waste material must have warning labels specified by OSHA under
29 CFR 1926.1101(k)(8). Labels will indicate the name of the waste generator and location
where the waste was generated. NESHAP 40 CFR 61.150(c) requires that vehicles used to
transport asbestos-containing waste material be marked with a warning sign during loading and
unloading of the waste. The specific EPA marking requirements for vehicles are found in 40
CFR 61.149(d). In addition, compliance with the DOT regulations in 49 CFR 171-180 is
required when transporting asbestos as asbestos is a DOT regulated hazardous material.
f. This WSR will be provided to the owner or operator of the waste disposal facility at
the time the waste is delivered to that facility. Upon completion of this "cradle-to-grave"
reporting procedure, the contractor must return the original completed and signed WSR to the
USACE RE within the timeframe established by the contract. The RE must maintain a copy of
the completed WSR for the contract file and provide the original to the facility owner/waste
generator.
g. EPA regulations (40 CFR 61.150(d)(3) and (4)) state that if the WSR signed by the
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disposal site owner or operator is not received by the waste generator (or its authorized agent)
within 35 days of the date the waste was accepted by the initial transporter, the waste generator/
authorized agent shall contact the transporter and/or disposal site owner/operator to determine the
status of the waste shipment. NESHAP directs the waste generator to submit an exception report
to EPA if the signed WSR is not received within 45 days of the date the waste was accepted by
the initial transporter. The prime contractor is responsible for completing the exception report on
behalf of the waste generator and submitting it to the NESHAP office with a copy to the RE.
WSRs must be kept on-site by the generator for at least two years as specified in 40 CFR
61.150(d)(5).
h. For demolition and renovation contracts, designated Corps personnel shall be assigned
the responsibility of overseeing contractor actions and assuring that the WSR is properly
prepared, signed by all parties, and returned within the established timeframes. USACE
personnel must be trained as described in paragraph 5-4 of Section 5, “Training.”
i. The Abatement Contractor must provide a person or persons who are both trained in
NESHAP/state regulations and DOT regulations as per 49 CFR 172, Subpart H and capable of
complying with them. That person is required to be onsite whenever regulated ACM is stripped,
removed, or disturbed. EPA training requirements are provided in 40 CFR 61.145 (c)(8). AR
200-1, Chapter 8, also requires that Army personnel involved in asbestos abatement activities
meet the EPA's Model Accreditation Plan training requirements found in 40 CFR 763, Appendix
C to Subpart E. For a complete discussion of training requirements, see Section 5, “Training,” of
this pamphlet.
7-9. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Manifests. For Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)
manifests, the policies and procedures outlined for hazardous waste manifests, training, and
record keeping are applicable.
7-10. Other FUSRAP and Radioactive Waste Shipping Requirements.
a. In some cases, FUSRAP and radioactive wastes will not be regulated during the course
of transportation by the DOT, EPA or the NRC. In these instances, a chain-of-custody form shall
be developed and used for each shipment of waste in order to track the waste from the original
site to ultimate placement/disposal. A copy of that document shall be placed in the project file.
An example chain-of-custody form can be found in EP 200-1-2.
b. There is a basic Corps of Engineers disposal notification requirement for all
radioactive and FUSRAP wastes. HQUSACE requires all USACE disposal of Low Level
Radioactive Waste (LLRW) (both DOD and non-DOD generated) to be reported to the HTRW
CX prior to shipment. This is strictly for record keeping purposes. The HTRW CX maintains
the data and reports this data to HQUSACE. The notification requirements found in the
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memorandum can be found in EP 200-1-2.
c. In addition to the DOT markings and labels, a specially designed label shall be placed
on all containers of FUSRAP waste regardless of whether the material is a hazardous material or
not. The label indicates the Disposal/Recycling Facility destination and a telephone number of a
USACE point of contact with knowledge of the contents. This additional label duplicates
existing information that is required on shipping papers for DOT hazardous materials. Therefore
it must not violate any DOT requirements or create any confusion (e.g., label color). Several
highly visible labels must be placed on top of the container liner (e.g., burrito bags in gondolas)
or exterior sides of transport vehicles, to ensure workers observe the information. The label
should read as shown. Labels may be ordered through any commercial label manufacturing
company; however, the label specification should adhere to the design shown at Figure 7-1.
3" minimum
5 " minimum
Warning: Empty Only @
Destination: (name of Recycling/Disposal Facility)
Shipper POC: (name of Corps Constr. Representative)
Telephone No. (24-hour monitored phone )_________
Color: Purple, Pink or Chartreuse
Figure 7-1, FUSRAP Waste Label
d. Since a majority of the FUSRAP waste is shipped via railroad, FUSRAP Districts
should obtain access rights to the NetREDI internet system. The NetREDI system, developed by
the American Association of Railroads, receives input from over 300 railroads for shipments.
The NetREDI system is an immediately available resource for the construction representatives or
project managers if they want an instant method to verify tracking information supplied by their
contractors. Free registration can be obtained by calling (800) 872-1045 ext 65403 or
http://registration.railnetredi.com/
7-11. The Off-Site Rule Requirement.
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a. CERCLA Requirement. Besides the waste profile, manifest, and land disposal
restriction notification paperwork, there is an additional obligation found under the implementing
regulations of CERCLA. That requirement is the "Off-Site Rule" found at 40 CFR 300.440
Procedures for planning and implementing off-site response actions. Basically, the regulation
requires that when CERCLA waste is to be managed off-site, the waste must be managed in a
permitted facility that is not releasing hazardous waste, hazardous constituents, or hazardous
substances into the environment. Further, the authority of this regulation applies to entities
conducting removals and remedial actions under CERCLA authority at any type of site
(Superfund, FUDS, IRP, BRAC, FUSRAP, etc.).
b. Verification of Facility Status. The treatment and disposal facility compliance is
determined by the EPA Regional Administrator in which the facility resides. Thus, it is
necessary that prior to shipping CERCLA remediation wastes off-site that the EPA regional point
of contact be called to verify the facility status. The Regional POCs can be obtained from the
EPA Hotline (1-800-424-9346). While there is no regulatory requirement to maintain a record of
the conversation, it is highly recommended that the call be documented so that you can prove to a
regulator that you did indeed make the phone call if questioned.
7-12. Certificates of Disposal/Destruction/Placement. While not a Federal regulatory
requirement, USACE requires that for all hazardous wastes, CERCLA remediation wastes,
FUSRAP wastes, asbestos, PCBs, etc., a "Certificate of Disposal/Destruction/Placement" be
required from the ultimate disposal facility. The certificate must correlate to each shipment of
waste to the facility. This certificate will be a requirement of the contract. The certificate shall
be placed in the project/site file.
7-13. Spill Reporting Procedures. USACE spill reporting procedures can be found on the
Internet at:
http://www.environmental.usace.army.mil/info/technical/comply/complys/complys.html
Each district currently has an Emergency Operations Center (EOC) or an Emergency
Management Office (EMO). USACE ER 500-1-1, chapter 11, requires all districts to have a
designated EOC/EMO and a plan outlining the upward reporting requirements should a natural
disaster or hazardous material spill occur. It is recommended that the district (MSCs) build upon
the existing emergency response structure by including any additional hazardous waste and/or
FUSRAP reporting requirements within their existing plans.
7-14. Additional Information.
a. EP 200-1-2 outlines the requirements for proper disposal of RCRA waste and
shipment of hazardous materials. The pamphlet covers the following subjects and more:
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(1) obtaining a generator number;
(2) properly describing the waste;
(3) shipping paper requirements;
(4) signature requirements;
(5) record-keeping requirements;
(6) marking, labeling and placarding requirements;
(7) spill reporting requirements;
(8) responsibilities as a generator and as QA personnel;
(9) liabilities associated with transporting hazardous materials;
(10) technical assistance hotline numbers, web sources, and sources of training; and
(11) manifest preparation checklists.
The EP can be found on the Internet at:
http://www.usace.army.mil/inet/usace-docs/eng-pamphlets/ep.htm
b. The HTRW CX publishes a newsletter titled "Environmental Compliance and
Transportation Information Bulletin" for distribution to districts and divisions. The document
disseminates changes in hazardous material transportation requirements and regulations. The
Bulletin is available on the Internet at:
http://www.environmental.usace.army.mil/info/technical/comply/complpub/complpub.html
c. The HTRW CX also has a web site that contains additional HTRW regulatory
compliance information. Most helpful would be the Environmental Regulatory Fact Sheets and
Frequently Asked Questions. The web address is as follows:
http://www.environmental.usace.army.mil/info/technical/comply/comply.html
d. In addition, all field offices that transport hazardous materials must have access to the
latest federal and state regulations in order to keep current with all requirements. The Code of
Federal Regulations is now available on the Internet at:
http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/cfr-table-search.html
e. Field personnel also need to review state regulations for appropriate requirements as
they often differ from the Federal requirements. State regulations are available to government
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employees at no cost on the Internet at:
http://www.denix.osd.mil/
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SECTION 8
CLOSEOUT PROCEDURES
8-1. General. This section provides procedural information on accomplishing operable unit
completion, construction completion, site completion, and site deletion. This guidance applies
only to those sites that are on the NPL. Additional guidance on closeout and 5-year review of
sites is provided in the following documents:
a. OSWER Directive 9320.2-09A-P, “Close Out Procedures for National Priorities List
Sites”, January 2000.
b. OSWER Directive 9355.7-02, “Structures and Components of Five-Year
Reviews;” and
c. OSWER Directive 9355.7-03B-P, “Comprehensive Five-Year Review Guidance;”
8-2. Definitions.
a. Section 105 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and
Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and
Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), requires EPA to maintain a National Priorities List (NPL)
on uncontrolled hazardous waste sites that have released or pose a threat of release of hazardous
substances into the environment. Sites on the NPL are eligible for Superfund-financed remedial
actions.
b. Superfund addresses NPL sites through early and long-term actions using removal
and/or remedial authority. Early actions are cleanup actions that take less than five years to
complete. They achieve prompt risk reduction and are performed under either removal or
remedial authority. Cleanup actions that take more than five years to implement are called longterm actions. Long-term actions are conducted under remedial authority and achieve risk
reduction through more extensive remediation activities.
c. Cleanup activities under remedial authority are called remedial actions (RA). An RA
typically begins at an NPL site after completion of the remedial investigation/feasibility study
(RI/FS). The RI/FS determines the nature and extent of contamination, and identifies
alternatives for the remedy. EPA’s Record of Decision (ROD) documents the remedial activities
selected to achieve protectiveness. RAs are designed to protect human health and the
environment, and they include treating, containing, and removing contaminated material;
providing alternate water supplies; and/or imposing institutional controls that address site use.
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Treatment that reduces waste toxicity, mobility, or volume is the preferred cleanup action.
However, not all the waste needs to be treated or removed as long as protectiveness is achieved.
d. A Superfund site may require several RAs to address all the site hazards. In that case,
the site is divided into distinct segments known as operable units. Completion of an operable
unit (OU) can be achieved through early actions, long-term actions, or a combination of both.
e. Long-Term Remedial Actions (LTRAs) are typically response actions undertaken for
restoring ground or surface water quality and require a long period of operation and
maintenance.
f. EPA introduced the site construction completion date to capture a milestone in site
remediation prior to site deletion and to communicate more accurately the progress of NPL site
cleanups. Construction completion at a site occurs when: (1) the physical construction of the last
OU (or the single OU) is complete (whether or not final cleanup levels have been achieved), and
(2) the preliminary closeout report has been prepared and signed. The signature date of the
report marks the construction completion milestone date. Construction completion criteria are
satisfied when the final remedy or remedies have been constructed at the site in accordance with
design plans and specifications and a pre-final inspection has been conducted to document punch
list items. The punch list items (in this context) are described as activities that are part of the
contract specifications that do not affect the functioning of the remedy. Typical punch list items
that allow a construction completion determination include items such as: revegetation of
disturbed areas, removing construction debris, installing support equipment such as fire
extinguishers, demobilizing activities, installing monitoring wells, etc.
g. A remedy becomes operational and functional (O&F) when the remedy is determined
to be functioning properly and is performing as designed. For O&M transfer purposes, the
remedy becomes operational and functional either one year after the construction is accepted (the
one year period is known as the shake down period) or when EPA and the state concur that it is
performing as designed, whichever occurs first. The shake down period enables minor
modifications in the remedy to ensure the remedy is operating as designed.
h. Remedial Action Report (RA). The RA Report documents the cleanup activities that
took place at a single operable unit and is prepared upon completion of the shake down period
(when the remedy is determined to be operational and functional). For multiple OUs, an RA
report must be completed for each OU, including the final operable unit. For LTRAs, an interim
RA Report is prepared when the physical construction of the system is complete and the OU is
operating as designed. The report is amended and completed when the LTRA cleanup standards
specified in the ROD are achieved. The RA report includes information of all early and longterm actions within the OU. In addition, it documents that the cleanup standards specified in the
Record of Decision (ROD) have been met. At PRP-Lead sites, the RA report also certifies that
the requirements in all applicable enforcement documents have been satisfied. The RA report
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becomes part of the site completion documentation. The elements of the RA report are as
follows:
(1) Description of the site and remedies selected;
(2) Chronology of events;
(3) Performance standards and construction quality control;
(4) Construction activities;
(5) Final inspection;
(6) Certification that the remedy is O&F;
(7) O&M plan; and
(8) Summary of project costs.
i. Operation and maintenance (O&M) activities are performed to protect the integrity of
the remedy at the site. At fund-lead sites, the state performs O&M after the remedy is declared
to be operational and functional. Exceptions to this are LTRAs where EPA operates the system
for up to 10 years.
j. Site completion occurs when no further response is required at the site (except for
O&M activities that are performed or controlled by the state or responsible parties), the
constructed remedies are operational and performing according to engineering design
specifications, all cleanup goals have been achieved, and the site is deemed protective of human
health and the environment. When site completion requirements are achieved the RPM prepares
a draft Final Closeout Report (COR). The RPM sends the draft report to EPA Headquarters for
comments, and requests the Regional Administrator’s signature of the final report after
incorporating Headquarters’ comments. Once site completion is achieved, the site becomes a
candidate for NPL deletion.
k. When no further response is required after site completion, the site is eligible for
deletion from the NPL. This stage is known as site deletion. Essentially, this process entails
documenting the response activities for the site, verifying that activities have been conducted and
documented, and offering the public an opportunity for notice and comment before the site is
formally deleted from the NPL.
l. Preliminary Closeout Report. A Preliminary Closeout Report (PCOR) is required
when site construction completion is achieved prior to site completion (i.e., when cleanup levels
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specified in the ROD have not been met when construction completion is achieved). The PCOR
demonstrates and documents that construction at a site has been completed. The PCOR focuses
on site conditions, construction activities, construction QA/QC, and a detailed schedule of steps
remaining for site completion. The report is prepared by the EPA RPM and is sent to EPA
Headquarters for comments. After incorporating Headquarters’ comments and obtaining the
signature of the EPA Superfund Regional Division Director, the report is forwarded to EPA
Headquarters. The construction completion milestone is achieved on the date the PCOR is
signed. A PCOR may not be needed when construction and site completion are achieved
simultaneously. In these cases, the Final Closeout Report satisfies documentation requirements
for both events.
m. Final Closeout Report. When site completion requirements are achieved, a Final
Closeout Report is prepared. The final COR consolidates the results of all previous site activities
and ensures that all issues regarding site completion have been addressed (e.g., O&M assurances,
cleanup concentrations, and implementation of institutional controls).
8-3. Operable Unit Completion Milestone.
a. Operable unit completion is achieved when:
(1) All construction activities within the OU are complete;
(2) The contractual final inspection (attended by EPA, state, customer, etc. has been
conducted and the work has been accepted;
(3) The remedy is operational an functional; and
(4) The designated regional or state official signs a letter accepting the RA Report.
b. The NCP requires an additional set of inspections at fund lead sites to satisfy the
operable unit completion milestone criteria. An inspection is conducted jointly by EPA and the
state at the end of all construction activities to concur that the remedy has been constructed in
accordance with the ROD and the remedial design. This inspection can be conducted in
conjunction with the contractual final inspection. This requirement applies mostly to sites
requiring O&M. During this inspection, EPA and the state determine concurrently the beginning
of the shake down period or O&M testing period. The remedy becomes operational and
functional either one year after the construction is accepted or when the EPA and the state concur
that the remedy is performing as designed, whichever occurs first. In the latter case, the NCP
requires an additional EPA/state joint inspection to declare the remedy operational and
functional.
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c. Normally, the primary contracting/oversight party is tasked with preparing the RA
report. For USACE projects, this responsibility will be included in the work assignment or the
Interagency Agreement (IAG). The RA report is prepared by an individual who is familiar with
both the design and construction efforts associated with the RA (usually the RE) and should be
signed and dated by the preparer. The report will then be submitted to the RPM for review and
comment. Once the RPM’s comments are incorporated, the designated regional official signs a
letter accepting the final RA Report.
d. For LTRAs, an interim RA Report is prepared when the construction of the system is
complete and the unit is operating as designed. The report is amended and completed when the
LTRA cleanup standards specified in the ROD are achieved.
e. Completion of the final operable unit frequently means the site is eligible for
construction completion and eventually site completion. Initiation of the operable unit
completion and construction completion process can be simultaneous requiring the preparation
of many reports. However, an RA Report for the final operable unit must still be prepared.
8-4. Construction Completion Milestone.
a. When the physical construction at the NPL site is complete, the RE will assist the EPA
RPM in completing the PCOR report by providing any requested documentation, information
and data.
b. NPL sites that are fully addressed by early actions under removal authority (i.e.,
removal actions) can meet the construction completion and site completion simultaneously. In
such cases, a PCOR may not be needed. The Final Closeout Report can satisfy documentation
requirements for both events.
c. Construction completion criteria at LTRAs sites is met when the physical construction
of the remedy (e.g., construction of the treatment plant, pumps, and initial extraction wells) is
complete and a pre-final inspection has been conducted to document punch list items. The
PCOR should address five-year review requirements even though this milestone is independent
from site completion and site deletion.
d. The process of achieving construction completion for final OUs with bioremediation
and in-situ soil vapor extraction remedies is similar to that for LTRAs. When the remedy is
constructed, and no further construction is anticipated, these sites may qualify for inclusion on
the Construction Completion List. The key criterion is whether the follow-on work necessary to
operate the remedy is minor. If significant post construction activity is likely, the site is not
candidate for construction completion.
e. A site may be included in the Construction Completion List before monitoring
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activities or institutional controls are in place if those activities are included in the PCOR.
Although future RAs may or may not result from such monitoring, the need for monitoring (as
long as it is not significant or is considered part of O&M activities) does not prohibit listing a site
as a construction completion. Institutional controls are legal and administrative measures to
prevent exposure to contaminants at concentrations above health-based risk levels that may
remain at a site. Usually institutional controls limit activities at or near sites. Examples are: land
and natural resource restrictions, deed restrictions, prohibition of well drilling, building permits,
etc. Institutional controls may constitute a remedy by themselves or supplement containment
and treatment remedies to reduce potential threats to human health and the environment.
f. If the site is a No-Action ROD site where EPA has not previously undertaken a RA,
the construction completion and site completion milestones may be achieved when the ROD is
signed. A No-Action ROD results when the lead agency determines that no remedial action is
necessary to protect human health and the environment. If the site is a No-Action ROD site, no
Preliminary or Final COR is needed and the following certification of completion is included in
the declaration section of the No-Action ROD: “EPA has determined that its response at this site
is complete and no action/no further action is necessary at this site. Therefore, the site now
qualifies for inclusion on the Construction Completion List.”
g. No-Action RODs where EPA has previously conducted RAs triggers statutory
documentation requirements. At those sites, the RPM may choose to either prepare a Final COR
or a No-Action ROD that: (a) Incorporates the information normally included in the Final COR
and (b) includes the above certification of completion. The construction completion and site
completion milestones are achieved upon signature of either the No-Action ROD or the Final
COR.
h. A site with a final operable unit ROD requiring passive remediation only may achieve
construction completion when the delegated regional official approves the ROD.
Implementation of institutional controls is an example of passive remedies as are some types of
bioremediation and natural attenuation. No-Action RODs requiring monitoring only (for other
than O&M purposes) fall within this category. These No-Action RODs do not meet the
requirements of construction completion and site completion simultaneously as site completion
is not achieved until such time as all cleanup levels and other ROD requirements have been met.
The RPM does not need to prepare a PCOR to meet the construction completion criteria.
Instead, the following certification of completion is placed in the declaration section of the ROD:
“EPA has determined that its future response at this site does not require physical construction.
Therefore, the site now qualifies for inclusion on the Construction Completion List.”
i. Construction completion criteria for PRP projects are identical to those for fund lead
projects. Inclusion of a site on the Construction Completion List does not have any legal
significance and does not affect any enforcement agreement with PRPs.
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j. Construction completion procedures for Federal sites are identical to those for PRPfinanced RAs. A signed PCOR or No-Action ROD generally documents construction
completion.
k. For state-lead sites with no ROD and sites where the state assumes all responsibility
for overseeing PRP response actions, additional documentation is required. EPA includes these
sites on the Construction Completion List based on a determination by the state that all response
action is complete. To initiate the construction completion process, EPA must receive a letter
from the state’s Division Director (or equivalent) certifying completion as follows: “The state of
_____ has determined this site is protective of human health and the environment. Therefore, all
response action at this site is complete and no further construction is anticipated.” In most
instances, the state prepares the PCOR and EPA concurs with this decision by signing the PCOR
and by including the site in the Construction Completion List.
8-5. Site Completion. A site is eligible for site completion following successful
implementation of the final operable unit RA. Approval of the final COR signifies that all
cleanup levels specified in the RODs have been achieved and the site has entered O&M. A
Remedial Action Report for each operable unit, including the final, is required to document that
the work was performed according to design specifications. An RA report, however, cannot
document site completion. Only the Final COR satisfies completion requirements. The
following describes NPL site completion requirements for cleanup activities under removal and
remedial authority:
a. NPL sites addressed entirely by early actions under removal authority reach the
construction completion and site completion simultaneously when: (1) the RPM documents in
the final Pollution Report (POLREP) that the site contractor has demobilized and left the site or
that the PRP's contractor has completed the early action in accordance with the enforcement
document, and (2) a No-Action ROD or a Notice of Intent to delete (NOID) states that all
necessary remediation is complete. In general, cleanup actions under removal authority will not
have a ROD.
c. Sites addressed under remedial authority are eligible for site completion when all
early and long-term actions have been implemented and the site completion criteria are met.
When site completion requirements are achieved, the RPM prepares a draft final COR. The
RPM sends the draft report to EPA Headquarters for comments and requests the Regional
Administrator’s signature of the final COR (after incorporating Headquarters’ comments). If the
ROD for the final operable unit requires no additional cleanup activities, site completion can be
documented through either a final COR or a No-Action ROD. The No-Action ROD, however,
should address all the components of a final COR including information on previous site
activities. RODs requiring passive remediation or monitoring for other than O&M purposes do
not meet the site completion criteria immediately following the ROD signature. Once the
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institutional controls are in place, natural attenuation has reached the clean-up concentrations, or
all monitoring requirements specified in the ROD are met, the site is eligible for site completion
and site deletion. If a site requires no response action, the EPA RPM prepares either a NoAction ROD or a final COR (in an abbreviated form because there was no cleanup activities).
c. The final COR provides the overall technical justification for site completion. Usually
the RPM prepares the final COR, but the RPM may task the state to prepare it at state-lead sites.
8-6. Site Deletion.
a. The NPL deletion process begins at most sites once the site completion milestone has
been achieved. Site deletion requirements ensure that: (1) the documentation of activities and
decision making at the site is complete, (2) the activities conducted and documented are verified,
and (3) the public has an opportunity for notice and comment before a site is formally deleted
from the NPL. O&M activities which are performed (after the remedy is determined to be
operational and functional) to protect the integrity of the remedy at the site do not bar deletion.
LTRAs meet the requirements of site completion and site deletion when the LTRA cleanup
standards specified in the ROD are achieved.
b. The deletion process is divided into three steps: process initiation, publication of
Notice of Intention to Delete, and preparation of a responsiveness summary.
c. The following flow diagram (Figure 8-1) summarizes the CERCLA NPL Site
Closeout Process.
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NPL SITE CLOSEOUT PROCESS
Remedial Design (RD)
Remedial Action (RA)
Site Construction Completion
-
physical construction complete for entire site
no further construction deemed necessary
does not require attainment of clean-up levels
closeout report (COR) completed
Site Completion
-
clean-up levels attained
all clean-up actions implemented
constructed remedies operational and functioning in accordance
with design specifications
site is protective of human health and environment
only remaining activities are O&M
-
Site Deletion
-
all required response actions implemented
or, RI showed release poses no threat to public health or
environment, therefore, no remedial measures are necessary
Figure 8-1, NPL Site Closeout Process
8-7. Five-Year Review Program.
a. Sites Subject To Review. EPA will conduct a statutory review at any site at which a
Post-SARA remedy, upon attainment of the cleanup levels, will not allow unlimited use and
unrestricted exposure (i.e., the remedy will leave waste onsite after response is complete). EPA
will conduct a policy review of (1) sites where no hazardous substances will remain above levels
that allow unlimited use and unrestricted exposure after completion of the RA, but the cleanup
levels specified in the ROD will require five or more years to attain (such as LTRAs); and (2)
pre-SARA sites at which the remedy, upon attainment of the ROD cleanup levels, will not allow
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unlimited use and unrestricted exposure. Although a site may have a No-Action ROD or a no
further action ROD, if waste remains onsite, and continued monitoring and/or access and
institutional controls are required, the site is subject to five-year review.
b. Timing. The events that trigger reviews differ for statutory and policy reviews.
Statutory reviews are triggered by the initiation of the RA (actual RA onsite construction start
date); policy reviews are now triggered by construction completion. All subsequent statutory
and policy reviews are due five years after the completion date of the previous review. If a site
has multiple OUs, the triggering event for a statutory review is the initiation of the RA at the first
OU at which substances will remain above levels that allow for unlimited use and unrestricted
exposure after completion of the RA. In cases where separate five-year review reports are
written for different OUs, the trigger appropriate to that OU should be used.
c. Prioritization. If an EPA Region has a backlog of uncompleted reviews the region
should prioritize them. The first priority should be for all statutory five-year reviews, the second
priority should be policy five-year reviews at sites where the lead agency has completed the RA
and is no longer onsite, and third priority should be all remaining policy sites.
d. Discontinuation. CERCLA does not provide for the discontinuation of statutory
reviews. Sites are subject to statutory reviews if hazardous substances, pollutants or
contaminants will remain at the site above levels that allow for unlimited use and unrestricted
exposure after the completion of RA. In other words, if the remedy upon completion will not
meet health-based standards such as chemical-specific ARARs, five-year reviews cannot be
discontinued. EPA may discontinue policy five-year reviews when no hazardous substances,
pollutants or contaminants remain at the site above levels that allow for unlimited use and
unrestricted exposure. Upon determination that a five-year policy review is no longer necessary,
a cover letter from the Regional Administrator to EPA Headquarters should accompany the fiveyear review report, stating that the region has decided to discontinue reviewing the site. The
report should document that contaminants of concern are below appropriate levels and that the
remedy meets ARARs.
e. Deletion of Sites From the NPL. Deletion of a site from the NPL has no bearing on
whether or not five-year reviews can be discontinued. It is EPA’s policy to delete sites from the
NPL when applicable NPL deletion criteria have been satisfied. EPA will not retain sites on the
NPL solely because they are subject to five-year review. The five-year review requirement is
separate from, and unaffected by, the deletion process. Sites requiring a five-year review must
have that review regardless of whether they are still on the NPL.
f. Responsibility for Five-Year Reviews. EPA is responsible for the conduct of all fiveyear reviews of NPL sites, except those sites under the responsibility of DOD, DOE, or the Coast
Guard. For other Federal facilities where EPA and the pertinent agency or department has
entered into a site-specific Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), EPA may delegate the conduct of
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five-year reviews to that agency or department. Federal agencies are responsible for planning
and funding the costs of five-year reviews at Federal facilities under their jurisdiction, custody,
and control. When EPA incurs substantial expenses (e.g., for data review and analysis, or
oversight) in connection with a five-year review being conducted pursuant to a FFA, that
agreement may require or otherwise set forth, the procedure for the other Federal agency to
reimburse EPA for those expenses. EPA has the final responsibility to review and comment on
any Federal agency recommendations contained in the five-year review to ensure protectiveness
consistent with its statutory and regulatory duties. Thus, even if EPA has delegated its conduct
of a five-year review to a Federal facility, EPA remains responsible for ensuring the remedy is
protective of human health and the environment. In most cases, EPA will maintain a limited
oversight and concurrence role where it is not the lead Federal agency. In the absence of an
agreement specifying which agency should perform the review, the responsibility for conducting
the review rests with the EPA.
g. Overview of the Five-Year Review Process. The five-year review process is
summarized in the following steps: (1) planning for the review which includes assembling the
five-year review team, establishing a schedule, notifying the site manager/local authorities, and
obtaining site documents; (2) as part of a five-year review, a number of documents are typically
reviewed. These include the examination of ROD or equivalent remedial and enforcement
documents, O&M documents, legal and regulatory standards, toxicology databases, and other
scientific data; (3) interviews conducted with individuals and groups such as the O&M Site
Manager, O&M staff, local authorities and response agencies, community action groups, and
other stakeholders. The interviews should address any problems or successes with the
implementation of the remedy and provide suggestions for future reference; (4) a site visit to
observe site conditions and review documents at the site; (5) evaluation of findings - information
gathered through document reviews, interviews, site visits and other review activities are used to
develop conclusions supporting the protectiveness determination, identify deficiencies, and
develop recommendations; (6) a report is prepared for each five-year review. The report
documents whether the remedy remains protective of human health and environment and what
actions are needed to achieve or continue to assure protectiveness; (7) follow-up on
recommendations - the five-year report includes recommended actions necessary to achieve or
continue to assure protectiveness and a timetable for implementing them. The EPA regions
follow-up on the implementation of recommended actions, and report progress to EPA HQ
within one year of the signature date of the five-year review report; and (8) involving the
community - EPA informs the public when a five-year review is to be performed and initiates
community involvement in the five-year review process.
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SECTION 9
CONTRACT TYPES
9-1 Introduction. The very nature of HTRW remediation not only creates the need for more
innovative methods for cleaning up hazardous sites, but also requires innovative types of
contracts to accomplish cleanup missions. This section summarizes the various contracts used by
the USACE for remediation services and presents an overview of their advantages over
traditional contracting methods. It is the policy of the USACE to maximize use of sealed bid
procedures for execution of its contracts. The policy is in accordance with 10 U.S.C. 2304 (a)
and FAR 36.103. Most construction contracts follow the typical sequence of completion of
design before initiation of construction. Most of these same contracts are executed by sealed bid
procedures and awarded as a firm-fixed price (FFP) contract. However, remediation activities
typically include many unknowns, and do not always involve construction. Most criteria are
performance based and involve subsurface conditions, quantities, and concentrations that are
difficult to define. These uncertainties make it impossible, in many cases, for technical planners
and the contracting community to accurately define the remediation requirements.
Characterization of sites presents special contracting problems, as does the need for continuity of
the entire work effort. Federal, state, and local regulatory agencies significantly impact the
contracting strategy as does the potential threat to life and property. Therefore, when developing
contracting strategies, project objectives, client organization, and external influences/pressures
should be considered. Contracting strategies should also consider the number of contracts,
criteria for award, and type of contract to be utilized. The contract delivery strategy should
include a review of the contract options available by comparing all project requirements with the
contracting methods available. For this reason, contract forms other than Invitation for Bid (IFB)
are commonly used to achieve environmental restoration. Any contract type other than an IFB
negotiated. Negotiated contracts can be either cost-reimbursable or firm fixed price. Some
contracts are specific to the job, others are indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity (ID/IQ) with the
flexibility to issue task orders specific to the job. These features are described in the following
paragraphs.
9-2 Contract Methods. Negotiation is one of two major methods of arriving at a price for a
project. The other method is "sealed bidding" which requires contracts be awarded to responsive
and responsible offerors only on the basis of price and price-related factors. Negotiation can be
utilized with competitive or other-than competitive proposals. Any contract awarded without the
use of sealed bidding is a negotiated contract. The key benefit of the negotiated contract is that it
is a flexible, but orderly, procedure that includes the receipt of proposals from offerors, permits
bargaining, and usually affords offerors an opportunity to revise their offers before the award of a
contract. Negotiation is used for both fixed price and cost-reimbursable contracts.
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9-3 Contract Pricing. Contract pricing arrangements can either be "fixed price" or "costreimbursable." If the nature and quantity of unknowns is such that a fixed price contract can not
be defined, the contractor’s accounting system is adequate for the determination of costs
applicable to the contract, and the government surveillance during performance will be such to
provide reasonable assurance that efficient methods and cost controls are used, then a costreimbursable contract can be used. For information on USACE procedures for administration of
cost contracts refer to the following web site:
http:\\hq.environmental.usace.army.mil/tools/reimburse/reimburse.html
9-4 Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity Contracts. Indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity
(ID/IQ) contracts are basic contracts against which task orders are issued. The task orders are
issued and treated as separate projects. Basic contract management procedures or advance
agreements may govern matters related to all task orders under the basic contract. Dollar ceilings
are established for the total value of all task orders to be issued and can be established for
individual task orders.
9-5 Service Versus Construction Contracts. Many procurements for remediation actions are
actually "service" not "construction" contracts. It is fairly common for task orders of contracts,
or full contracts, to be issued as "service" with separable "construction" items within the broader
service contract. The impact is, that a portion of the workers on site will be covered by the
Service Contract Act wage determination and others will be covered by the Davis Bacon Act,
construction wage determination. In addition, there is no requirement for a performance bond on
a service contract. There is also no requirement for a performance bond on a cost reimbursable
construction contract except for the portion of the contract that comprises a fixed price
subcontract greater than $100,000. Finally, the warrants held by most area/resident/project
engineers are for construction contract actions and are not applicable to service contract actions.
Incineration, disposal, and operations and maintenance contracts have been appropriately
classified as service contracts.
9-6 Major HTRW and OE Contracts. USACE utilizes many different contract strategies to
execute its HTRW and OE missions. Table 9-1 compares and contrasts several contracting
methods for remediation services which have proved to be especially effective in dealing with the
uncertainties of HTRW and OE work:
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Table 9-1
Major HTRW and OE Contract Tools
Contract Tool
ID/IQ or
project
specific
Invitation for Bid
Project
Specific
Request for
Proposal
Project
Specific
Preplaced
Remedial Action
Contract (P-RAC)
ID/IQ
Ceilings
Typical Use
Construction/
Service
Firm Fixed
Price
ACO
Construction/
Service
Firm Fixed
Price/CostReimbursable
ACO/COR
Typically
$50 M ceiling
Construction/
Service
(only incidental
A-E services)
CostReimbursable
- with Fixed Fee
Award Fee or
Incentive Fee
ACO, unless
service, then
COR only
One year base
contract with
four 1-yr options
Multiple Award
Remediation
Contract (MARC)
ID/IQ
Typically greater
than $200 M
Typically no task
order limit
ID/IQ
Authority
Delegated to
Field
None –
determined by
bid
None −
determined by
bid
Typically no task
order limit
Total
Environmental
Restoration
Contract
( TERC)
Contract
Pricing
One four year
base contract
with two 3-yr
options
Collective
ceiling is
established for
multiple
contracts.
i.e.,
One award could
be $100 M for
four contracts.
One contractor
could get the
bulk of that.
- or -
Cradle to Grave
Investigation,
Design,
Construction/
Service
Construction/
Service (only
incidental A-E
services)
Fixed Price
CostReimbursable
- with Fixed Fee
Award Fee or
Incentive Fee
CostReimbursable
- with Fixed Fee
Award Fee or
Incentive Fee
- or Fixed Price
9-3
COR
ACO, unless
Service, then
COR only
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Table 9-1
Major HTRW and OE Contract Tools (Continued)
Contract Tool
Small Action
Remedial Tool
Contract (SmART)
ID/IQ or
project
specific
ID/IQ
Ceilings
Less than $3M
contract ceiling
$500,000 or no
task order limit
Rapid Response
ID/IQ
One two year
base with one
three year option
Typically $50M
Typically no task
order limit
Miscellaneous
ID/IQ
Time and
Materials
ID/IQ
One base year
with four one-yr
options.
Varies
extensively
Varies by
contract
Typical Use
Contract
Pricing
Authority
Delegated to
Field
ACO, unless
Service, then
COR only
Construction/
Service (only
incidental A-E
services)
Firm Fixed
Price
Emergency or
Time Critical
Construction/
Service
Cost
Reimbursable
with Fixed Fee/
Fixed Price
None,
retained in
Omaha
Drilling,
Analytical
Services,
Sampling,
Geophysical
Services, Tank
Removal, Long
Term O & M,
Asbestos/Lead
Removal
Typically has
been used for
ordnance
removal or
emergency
situations
Typically Fixed
price/Cost
Reimbursable
COR
9-4
Reimbursement ACO, unless
of labor at fixed service, then
COR only
hourly rates
(which include
profit) and cost
only for
material
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SECTION 10
ORDNANCE AND EXPLOSIVES (OE)
10-1. Background.
a. In conjunction with its other missions, the USACE is responsible for managing
environmental restoration projects in the specialized field of OE at Formerly Used Defense Sites
(FUDS) and for providing OE services to other customers (e.g., BRAC, IR, etc.) as requested.
b. The U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville (CEHNC) is designated,
in ER 1110-1-8158, as the USACE OE Mandatory Center of Expertise (MCX) for OE and is also
an OE Design Center. Current MCX guidance documents can be found on the OE Homepage:
http://www.hnd.usace.army.mil/
c. Typically, the OE Design Center designs the OE project and then conducts the OE
Removal through existing contracts. The district is the Project Manager (PM) during removal
actions and coordinates all project activities with engineering, safety and contract expertise
provided by the OE Design Center through project completion.
d. Districts may execute final removal actions when approved by the MSC Commander
after receiving written concurrence from the OE MCX. This process is described in ER 1110-18153 and the FUDS Program Manual (for FUDS projects).
10-2. General.
a. The OE Response process is defined in ER 1110-1-8153, EP 1110-1-18 (Chapter 5),
and the FUDS Program Manual (for FUDS projects).
b. For projects under the management of an active or transferring installation, the
installation may want to retain some degree of management control. In such cases, the PM will
hire the appropriate OE Design Center to provide USACE assistance in a manner that is
transparent to the customer, but the PM will remain the interface with the installation.
c. Districts preparing to work on a project (FUDS, BRAC, IR, SFO, etc.) with known or
suspected OE (including Civil Works) will coordinate the project with the OE Design Center and
the OE MCX as defined in ER 1110-1-8153. Once notified, safety issues will be addressed and a
determination will be made concerning the appropriate actions to be taken.
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d. OE concerns will be addressed before initiating any work on a project. The type of
OE action required (i.e., OE removal, anomaly avoidance, OE support during construction, etc.)
will be determined on a case-by-case basis. The district is responsible for preparing the scope of
work and work plans for ordnance/anomaly avoidance and OE support during construction.
These documents require OE MCX review. The OE MCX will provide written concurrence or
non-concurrence.
10-3. Definitions.
a. Ordnance and Explosives (OE). OE consists of either (1) ammunition, ammunition
components, chemical or biological warfare material or explosives that have been abandoned,
expelled from demolition pits or burning pads, lost, discarded, buried, or fired. Such
ammunition, ammunition components, and explosives are no longer under accountable record
control of any DOD organization or activity, or (2) explosive soil (see below).
b. Explosive Soil. Explosive soil refers to mixtures of explosives in soil, sand, clay, or
other solid media at concentrations such that the mixture itself is explosive. Typically, this
means in concentrations of 10% or more by weight. This is not defined for all types of
explosives. See ER 1110-1-8153 for a complete definition and contact the OE MCX for current
guidance on this issue.
c. Ordnance/Anomaly Avoidance. This refers to techniques employed by Explosive
Ordnance (EOD) or Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) personnel at sites with known or suspected
OE to avoid any potential surface UXO and any subsurface anomalies. This usually occurs at
mixed hazard sites when HTRW investigations must occur prior to execution of an OE removal
action. Intrusive anomaly investigation is not authorized during ordnance avoidance
operations.
d. OE Support During Construction. This is support provided by qualified UXO
personnel during construction activities at potential OE sites to ensure the safety of construction
personnel. Coordination with the OE MCX to determine the type of support is required. See ER
1110-1-8153 for complete definition.
e. Unexploded Ordnance (UXO). UXO refers to military munitions that have been
primed, fuzed, armed, or otherwise prepared for action, and have been fired, dropped, launched,
projected or placed in such a manner as to constitute a hazard to operations, installations,
personnel, or material and remain unexploded either by malfunction, design, or any other cause.
f. Chemical Warfare Materiel (CWM). This refers to items configured as a munition
containing a chemical substance that is intended to kill, seriously injure, or incapacitate a person
through its physiological effects. It also includes V- and G- series nerve agent, H- series blister
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agent and lewisite in other-than-munition configurations. Due to their hazards, prevalence, and
military-unique application, chemical agent identification sets (CAIS) are also considered CWM.
CWM does not include: riot control agents, chemical herbicides, smoke and flame producing
agents, or soil, water, debris or other media contaminated with chemical agent.
g. Removal Action (RA). A RA is the actual cleanup or removal of OE from the
environment to include the disposal of removed material. The term includes, in addition, without
being limited to, security fencing or other measures to prevent, minimize, or mitigate damage to
the public health or welfare or to the environment.
10-4. Unplanned Discovery of OE. The OE Design Center typically performs removals when
OE is known, or suspected to be present, during the planning stage. In cases when OE, or
suspected OE, is unexpectedly discovered during construction or everyday operations at any
USACE project site, the following steps will be taken:
• Cease all operations;
• Contact the local EOD unit (for BRAC, IR etc.) or local law enforcement officials
for FUDS projects) who will respond and dispose of the item(s); and
• Notify the OE MCX to determine the conditions under which work may be resumed.
10-5. OE Safety.
a. Explosive safety requirements are contained in DOD 6055.9-STD, AR 385-64, and
AR 385-61. Projects involving OE will not begin field work until the appropriate plans and
explosive safety submissions are reviewed and approved by the proper authority.
b. OE Safety and Occupational Health requirements are found in ER 385-1-92. These
requirements will be covered in (ER 385-1-95) which will be published in the near future.
c. OE activities will be conducted by qualified UXO contractor personnel or USACE OE
Safety Specialists. Qualifications and work standards for conducting UXO work may be
obtained from the OE MCX. Some work practices are peculiar to UXO work such as number of
hours that may be worked while conducting UXO activities. Currently there is a limit of 40
hours per week with two consecutive days’ rest between work weeks.
d. The OE MCX may conduct spot checks of field operations at project sites where OE is
a concern.
e. Specific training requirements for OE project personnel are contained in Section 5 of
this pamphlet.
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f. Personnel without appropriate training, and non-essential personnel, will not be
allowed into an exclusion zone during UXO operations.
g. Points of contact for OE concerns and questions are located on the OE homepage.
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SECTION 11
OVERVIEW OF SPECIFIC REGULATED ACTIVITIES
11-1. General. This section describes common HTRW issues such as regulatory concerns,
worker safety, and disposal practices that arise during the demolition of facilities.
11-2. UST Removals. Underground Storage Tank (UST) removals must comply with
applicable Federal, state, and local regulations. The Federal Government has delegated the
authority to regulate UST’s to the states that in turn may delegate control to local governments
that have more stringent regulations than the state. However, many states do not yet have EPA
approved state programs and project personnel should check the most current volume of 40 CFR
282 to check the status of EPA’s approval for the state UST program in which the project is
located. Regulations vary by location and the responsible implementing agency (IA). Multiple
agencies are often involved in different aspects of a single project. The appropriate agency
approvals must be obtained for UST closures. Typically, the IA will provide regulatory and
closure information to anyone closing a UST. The RE must also keep the IA informed of
unforeseen contamination or other problems encountered during UST removal and closure
activities. Under no circumstances should a project be stopped and contamination left in the
ground without consulting with the IA.
a. References and Information. The following USACE references, in addition to the
appropriate IA regulations and guidelines, provide information concerning removal and closure
of UST’s:
(1) RE’s involved in UST projects should reference EM 1110-1-4006, “Removal of
Underground Storage Tanks.” This document contains USACE guidance on all phases of UST
work;
(2) The HTRW lessons learned database, described in Section 13, provides lessons
learned from USACE UST projects;
(3) USACE Personnel. USACE has extensive UST and drum handling experience. This
experience may be found in other construction offices, the designated HTRW design district, the
HTRW CX, and the OE MCX. See the list of HTRW projects/POCs in Appendix D;
(4) CEGS 01351, “Safety, Health, and Emergency Response (HTRW/UST)” and CEGS
01450, “Chemical Data Quality Control,” should be used for all UST removal projects; and
(5) CEGS 02115, “Underground Storage Tank Removal,” should be used for all UST
removal projects.
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b. Construction. Care needs to be exercised during tank excavation so that contaminated
material is not mixed with clean material. Keep surface water out of excavations to avoid
additional disposal costs. The RE should be familiar with all confined space safety requirements
and require strict compliance with current procedures. Plan with the contractor how your
partnership will react to the potential unknowns including notification requirements for
leakage/spills.
c. Regulatory Concerns. When removing underground storage tanks, the following
potential regulatory issues must be taken into consideration:
(1) The tank contents and any rinsate generated in the process of cleaning the tank
may be hazardous waste and/or Department of Transportation (DOT) regulated hazardous
material. However, any product in the tank, which can still be used for its original intended
purpose, for example, fuel would not be a hazardous waste. All wastes should be characterized
per 40 CFR 261 or corresponding state regulations. All shipments, whether products or waste,
should be evaluated to determine whether they are DOT regulated hazardous materials;
(2) The tank, if transported offsite intact and containing residue of a hazardous
material, may be subject to DOT packaging, marking, labeling, and/or placarding requirements
as well as shipping papers. It may be beneficial to clean and cut up the tank not only to render it
non-regulated, but also to ensure it is not put back into service at another location;
(3) Tanks exhibiting hazardous characteristics D018 - D043 may be able to take
advantage of an exclusion from hazardous waste regulations found in 40 CFR 261.4(b)(10). This
is a limited exclusion, however, and would not apply to tanks exhibiting an ignitability
characteristic or failing TCLP for lead;
(4) Tanks constituting hazardous waste, which do not qualify for an exclusion, can be
rendered non-hazardous via debris treatment standards in 40 CFR 268.45. However, treatment
may be subject to permit requirements unless cleaning takes place prior to the point of generation
of the waste; and
(5) Tank coatings sometimes contain regulated substances such as PCBs or asbestos.
This can impact disposal requirements.
11-3. Drum Removals. There are a number of unique safety and environmental hazards
associated with drum handling at hazardous waste sites. The Comprehensive Environmental
Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 established a national program
for the cleanup of hazardous waste sites. When large numbers of buried drums are encountered,
it may be cost effective to perform compatibility testing and bulk drum contents on-site. The
bulk drums are subsequently shipped off-site for disposal. Information on drum handling can be
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found in EPA publication EPA/600/2-86/013, "Drum Handling Practices at Hazardous Waste
Sites."
11-4. Asbestos. Asbestos-containing materials (ACM) must be identified and quantified prior
to renovation or demolition of any structure. ACM are defined as materials containing more than
one percent (1%) asbestos. Suspect materials installed prior to 1980 must be assumed to contain
asbestos unless inspected and analyzed using Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act
(AHERA) protocol (refer to references below).
a. Types of Asbestos. ACM are divided into two broad categories: friable and nonfriable. Friable is defined as ACM that can be crumbled in the hand. Friable asbestos is far
more dangerous since virtually any action including wind can stir up breathable fibers. Usually
all friable asbestos materials must be removed from a building prior to demolition. Friable
materials must be disposed of in a landfill approved by either the state or EPA and which is in
compliance with the requirements of 40 CFR 61.154 or an EPA approved site that converts
asbestos-containing waste materials into non-asbestos containing materials according to 40 CFR
61.155. Materials that often contain asbestos include the following: pipe and boiler insulation;
sprayed-on or troweled-on fireproofing, plaster and stucco; caulks and mastics; floor tile and
linoleum; and cement asbestos (transite) pipe, sheets, and shingles. Roofing materials have
relaxed requirements, but should be tested prior to disposal. Previously unidentified materials
found once demolition/renovation has begun usually result in a contract modification.
b. Asbestos Surveys. If no asbestos survey exists for the building(s) to be demolished or
renovated, one must be conducted by a certified asbestos inspector so that correct specifications
can be developed. If a survey exists, but was done more than 3 to 4 years ago, a confirmatory
inspection is required.
c. Regulations. The following paragraphs briefly describe some of the Federal
regulations which pertain to ACM. Local regulations must also be checked because they may
contain more stringent criteria than Federal requirements.
(1) NESHAP 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart M, requires the owner or operator of a facility to
determine the presence or non-presence of ACM prior to conducting renovation or demolition
activities. It also specifies requirements for the handling, shipping and disposal of regulated
ACM.
(2) OSHA standard 29 CFR 1926.1101 pertains to asbestos exposure in construction,
renovation, and building maintenance work places. Building owners are required to notify
employees, tenants, and prospective employers (e.g., bidding contractors) of the descriptions,
locations, and quantities of ACM at their facilities.
(3) The AHERA contains rules and regulations (40 CFR Part 763) addressing issues of
identifying, evaluating, and controlling asbestos containing materials in schools. The AHERA
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inspections must be conducted by certified individuals using specific guidelines which include
analysis of a minimum number of samples per material type to prove that a suspect material does
not contain asbestos. The majority of requirements found in 40 CFR Part 763 do not apply to
work being conducted at non-school structures. The requirements of the Model Accreditation
Plan (MAP) found in Appendix C to Subpart E of 40 CFR 763 apply to work done in public or
commercial buildings as well as to work done in schools.
d. Quality Assurance Personnel Responsibilities for Asbestos Abatement. It is USACE
construction policy that construction QA personnel enter the asbestos abatement areas and fully
QA the work performed. Two USACE documents, the newly revised CEGS 13280, "Asbestos
Abatement" and EP 1110-1-11, "Asbestos Abatement Guideline Detail Sheets," provide
comprehensive guidance for asbestos abatement activities. The CEGS requires that, upon
completion of the final cleaning, the contractor and the USACE authorized representative
conduct a visual inspection of the cleaned area and document the results of the final cleaning and
visual inspection as specified in the Setup Detail Sheet 19. Training is required before a person
enters an area where regulated asbestos abatement activities are taking place. Refer to paragraph
5-4 for training requirements. In addition, requirements for medical surveillance, personnel
protective equipment, respirators, and heat stress prevention must be observed. EP 1110-1-11
complements the guide specification and contains detail sheets pertaining to the asbestos
abatement process.
11-5. Lead-Based Paint (LBP). LBP should be identified prior to renovation or demolition
primarily for worker protection. Buildings that were built prior to 1978 are particularly suspect.
LBP is defined by the EPA and Housing and Urban Development (HUD) at ≥0.5 percent by
weight or ≥1.0 mg/cm2 by area. Paint should be sampled and tested prior to renovation or
demolition, either with a direct-reading instrument (X-ray fluorescence) or by lab analysis of a
bulk sample.
a. LBP Removal. Generally, LBP need not be removed prior to demolition of a
structure. If the paint is peeling or flaking, it may require removal for worker protection.
However, there is no environmental regulatory requirement (EPA or TSCA) for paint removal
prior to demolition. The decision to remove LBP prior to demolition should be carefully
considered, as the unnecessary removal of LBP prior to demolition can be costly. If the decision
to remove LBP prior to demolition is made, it can be done by either pressure washing and wet
scraping to remove the paint that is not intact, or by spraying the structure with an encapsulate.
LBP becomes particularly hazardous whenever heated, sanded, or abraded. Coated items should
be stripped before applying heat, such as in cutting and soldering. Debris containing intact paint
can currently be disposed of as general construction debris. On 18 December 1998, EPA
proposed new regulations for the management and disposal of LBP debris. Final regulations
were not available at the time of the finalization of this guide; therefore, project personnel should
check with an environmental regulatory specialist prior to disposal of LBP debris to ensure
current regulatory requirements are being met. Paint that is removed by pressure washing or
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scraping could potentially be classified as a RCRA hazardous waste. Proper waste
characterization should be conducted prior to the disposal of paint related wastes. Soils that have
been contaminated from peeling lead-based paint should be handled according to HUD
guidelines for housing and EPA guidelines for non-housing projects.
b. Worker Safety. Generally, workers not exposed to lead paint demolition debris for
more than 30 days annually require only LBP orientation. A contractor specializing in
demolition (greater than 30 days/year) will likely need to have workers trained in lead hazards
and placed in a medical surveillance program. LBP abatement should be done only by
contractors who are properly trained and certified.
c. Regulations. The following paragraphs briefly describe some of the Federal
regulations that pertain to LBP.
(1) The OSHA Lead Exposure in Construction Standard, 29 CFR 1926.62, applies to
employers of persons potentially exposed to lead from construction operations. Where the lead
exposure resultant from a given work activity is not known, the use of personal protective
equipment and engineered controls, coupled with exposure monitoring are generally required
until the exposure level is established. OSHA has stated that any detectable concentration of
lead may trigger certain provisions of 29 CFR 1926.62.
(2) HUD ACCN-5646, (1990; Rev May 1991) Lead-Based Paint: Interim Guidelines for
Hazard Identification and Abatement in Public and Indian Housing may also apply when LBP is
present during demolition activities.
(3) Toxic Substances Control Act Regulations, 40 CFR 745, Lead-Based Paint Poisoning
Prevention in Certain Residential Structures. These regulations contain training and certification
requirements for LBP abatement activities in target housing and child-occupied facilities.
(4) RCRA regulations for the Identification and Listing of Hazardous Wastes (40 CFR
261) and Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 262). These
regulations contain requirements for generators of waste to determine whether or not the waste is
a RCRA hazardous waste and establish required disposal requirements.
11-6. Bird, Bat, and Rodent Droppings. Bird, bat, and rodent droppings accumulate in and on
structures and machinery, creating an environment favorable to the development of disease
organisms. Infections from droppings typically occur by inhaling the pathogenic spores.
Droppings are most dangerous when they are dry and subject to becoming airborne as a fine
dust, such as when disturbed by sweeping or scraping.
a. Safety. Demolition of buildings containing droppings may cause pathogens to become
airborne in the breathing zone. When entering a building where excessive droppings have
accumulated, disposable shoe covers and protective gloves should be worn. Hands should be
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washed thoroughly after removal of the gloves. U. S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency, TG
142, Managing Health Hazards Associated With Bird and Bat Excrement provides additional
information on applicable safety procedures when dealing with droppings.
b. Cleanup. Safe cleanup of droppings is based on protection from spore inhalation and
minimization of spore dispersal. Although droppings are usually easier to remove when they are
dry, saturating them with water prior to removal is recommended to prevent the debris and any
pathogens from becoming airborne. This should be done with a low-velocity mist spray. Using
high pressure and/or a concentrated stream may scatter the droppings before they can be
adequately wetted. A portable, hand pressurized sprayer is satisfactory for applying limited
amounts of water. A vacuum with a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter can be used to
pick up the accumulated debris. Disposal can be accomplished in a Class III landfill.
11-7. Incidental Radioactive Sources. The following paragraphs provide examples of
incidental radioactive sources that may be encountered during demolition activities. Regulatory
requirements for protection, monitoring, storage, and disposal of incidental radioactive sources
are described in 10 CFR 20, “Standards for Protection Against Radiation.”
a. Gauges and Instruments. The military used radium in gauges and instruments in
vehicles and aircraft. Radium was also occasionally used in compasses and radar devices.
Residue can be found in instrument shops and motor pools. Gauges typically contained between
1 and 15 microcuries of radium-226 per device. The average dose rate on contact with a radium
gauge may range from 50 microR/hr to 2 milliR/hour. The exposure to a worker's extremity
(such as the hand) cannot exceed 50,000 millirem/year (assume 1 millirem = 1 milliR).
b. Smoke Detectors. Many smoke detectors use a radioactive element to screen for
smoke. If crushed or disposed of improperly, these smoke detectors can release dangerous
amounts of contamination. Disposal should be in accordance with the manufacturer’s
recommendations.
11-8. Mercury. Mercury may be encountered during building demolition and may require
special handling and disposal. Mercury is commonly found in fluorescent light tubes,
thermostats, circuit boards, rectifiers, manometers, thermometers, and batteries. It is also likely
to be found wherever mercury has been routinely used such as in dental clinics using mercury
amalgams or in laboratories. Mercury is found in laboratories not only in equipment, but also as
a result of analysis. For example, a mercury compound is used in some test methods for
analyzing phosphorous and total kjeldahl nitrogen.
a. Regulations. Mercury is one of the hazardous constituents on the toxicity
characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) table, 40 CFR 261.24, which may cause a waste to
exhibit a hazardous characteristic. Therefore, mercury-containing wastes are potentially subject
to requirements for generators of hazardous waste (40 CFR 262) and land disposal restriction
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treatment requirements (40 CFR 268). Mercury containing hazardous wastes have different
treatment requirements depending upon whether it is classified as high concentration or low
concentration mercury.
b. Regulatory Exceptions. Some mercury containing wastes may be excluded from
hazardous waste regulation. 40 CFR 261.9 allows mercury thermostats and fluorescent light
tubes to be managed as “universal waste” in accordance with regulations in 40 CFR 273. Many
states have adopted similar requirements. Through the universal waste program, they can be
collected and recycled in lieu of being managed as hazardous waste. Certain batteries may also
be managed as universal waste rather than hazardous wastes as stipulated by the MercuryContaining and Rechargeable Battery Management Act, Public Law 104-142.
11-9. Lighting Fixtures. Spent fluorescent light tubes and high intensity discharge (HID)
lamps contain mercury which, when disposed in a municipal landfill, can leach into the soil and
ground water. Spent fluorescent light tubes can be recycled, allowing for the recovery of the
mercury, glass, and aluminum end caps. These lighting fixtures must be managed in one of two
ways. Either they must be managed as a RCRA hazardous waste or as Universal Waste as per 40
CFR 273. 40 CFR 273 provides alternative management provisions using the more stringent
RCRA generator provisions. In order to utilize the provisions in 40 CFR 273, the applicable
state agency must adopt similar regulations within the generator’s state as well as the disposal
state. Light ballasts may also contain PCBs that can pose potential problems when good disposal
practices are not used. See paragraph 11-10 for additional information on PCBs in light ballasts.
11-10. PCBs. Polychlorinated biphenyl containing wastes may be encountered during building
demolition and may require special handling and disposal. PCB dielectric fluid is commonly
found in electrical equipment manufactured prior to 2 July 1979 including transformers, light
ballasts, large and small capacitors, circuit breakers, reclosers, voltage regulators, switches, oilfilled cable, and electromagnets. It has also been found in other areas such as in household and
industrial appliances, motors, and hydraulic equipment. PCBs were also widely found in
manufactured products. EPA has termed these as “PCB bulk product waste.” They are PCBs in
solids including but not limited to applied dried paints, sealants, caulking, adhesives, coal tar
coatings on underground tanks, plastic insulation from wire or cable, furniture laminates, sound
deadening or other types of insulation, and potting material within fluorescent light ballasts.
a. Restrictions on Storage. Once removed from service for disposal, PCB containing
wastes must be disposed of within one year. During this time, storage is limited to only 30 days
unless conforming storage is provided. See 40 CFR 761.65 for requirements.
b. Disposal Options. In lieu of disposal, PCB contaminated metal may be recycled by
sending it to a scrap metal recovery oven or smelter after all free-flowing PCBs have been
removed. Conditions and requirements for scrap metal recovery are specified in 40 CFR 761.72.
Flushing to remove high concentration PCBs prior to recovery may be required.
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(1) Disposal of PCBs is contingent primarily on concentration and leachability of the
PCBs. High concentration liquids, greater than or equal to 500 ppm PCBs must be incinerated.
Lower concentration PCBs liquids, greater than 50 ppm but less than 500 ppm PCB, can be
incinerated or burned in a high efficiency boiler. PCBs in oil at or above 2 ppm, but less than 50
ppm PCBs can be burned as off-specification used oil in an off-specification used oil boiler or
industrial furnace.
(2) Chemical waste landfills, which are TSCA approved landfills, can be used to dispose
of solids such as drained equipment. Equipment formerly containing high concentrations of
PCBs must usually be flushed to remove excess PCBs prior to being placed in the landfill.
Equipment formerly containing lower concentrations of PCBs (less than 500 ppm) can typically
be landfilled directly after draining in accordance with regulations in 40 CFR 761.60.
(3) Municipal solid waste landfills can be used to dispose of small, non-leaking
capacitors (those containing less than three pounds of PCBs); drained PCB contaminated
equipment formerly containing less than 500 ppm PCB; and PCB bulk product wastes (dried
applied paints, sealants, caulking, adhesives, etc.). However, prior to disposing of PCB bulk
product waste at a solid waste landfill, written notice must be provided to the landfill a minimum
of 15 days prior to the first shipment of waste. Depending upon the type of PCB bulk product
waste being disposed of, it may also be necessary to establish the leachability of the bulk product
waste because leachable wastes must be segregated from organic liquids in the landfill and the
landfill must be monitored for PCBs.
11-11. Lead in Firing Ranges. Facilities that are, or previously were, used as indoor firing
ranges pose a particular problem due to lead contamination. These facilities must be cleaned
prior to being used for something other than a firing range. Soil or sand that contains spent
ammunition could potentially be classified as a RCRA hazardous waste. Proper waste
characterization should be performed prior to disposal of firing range sands or soils. Surfaces of
the facility must be cleaned and sealed with paint or wax prior to reuse for purposes other than as
a firing range. Cleaning and sealing is not required for demolition.
11-12. Bioaerosols. Disturbance of air handling systems may cause the release of bioaerosols.
Bioaerosols include viruses, bacteria, fungi, molds, algae, and protozoa and their products.
Some bioaerosols cause infectious disease, and others produce toxins which may act as
sensitizing agents in allergic persons. The ideal breeding ground for bacterial molds and fungi is
an enclosed, dark, humid, controlled environment. Highly allergic individuals may react to
extremely small concentrations.
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SECTION 12
USACE OVERSIGHT OF RD/RA PROJECTS
12-1. Authority. This section covers USACE oversight of RD/RA projects on non-USACE
contracts. The oversight is provided to other governmental agencies such as DOE, EPA, etc.
This section will focus on specifics of oversight for the EPA (under CERCLA/SARA), although
it may apply to other agencies (and programs) as well. Pertinent documents relating to this
subject which may be consulted for further information are as follows:
a. OSWER Directive 9355.5.01, Feb 1990, "Interim Final Guidance on EPA Oversight of
Remedial Designs and Remedial Actions Performed by Potentially Responsible Parties;" and
b. The site-specific IAG for oversight of RA.
12-2. Enforcement. When non-Federal Potentially Responsible Parties (PRP) elect to conduct
the RD/RA activities at a Superfund site, they must do so in accordance with the terms of the
negotiated Settlement Agreement (either as an administrative order on consent or ordered as a
judicial consent decree). These serve as legally binding documents to enforce the commitment
by the PRPs (or the EPA's order) to finance and perform the RD and/or RA in accordance with
the provisions set forth. To fulfill these requirements PRPs develop work plans, QA/QC plans,
and/or contract documents, which are reviewed and accepted (and/or approved) by EPA prior to
implementation.
12-3. Interagency Agreement (IAG). The site-specific IAG is an agreement signed by the
USACE geographical district and the EPA region. It lists specific tasks and responsibilities of
the parties, and provides a proposed budget for the oversight activities. Oversight tasks may
include:
a. review and evaluation of proposed plans (work plans, QA/QC plans), contract
documents, design analyses, etc.;
b. site visits and inspections;
c. review of proposed design/construction plan changes; and
d. oversight of RA. The specific tasks and responsibilities should be reviewed with the
EPA's RPM prior to the start of an individual task identified above. A USACE work plan is
recommended to document the details of the work tasks. This should include tasking details
such as reporting format and period, staffing levels, etc. The reporting requirements for RA
oversight should be established before the pre-construction conference.
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12-4. Execution. The responsibilities of USACE officials performing oversight on behalf of
EPA, on PRP enforcement projects, are very different from typical USACE contract
administration. The following paragraphs outlines some of these differences:
a. The PRP is responsible for enforcement of all laws, regulations, and requirements and
to meet all performance standards required by EPA. The USACE has no contractual relationship
with the PRP and is limited to the role/authorities outlined in the site-specific IAG.
b. The USACE official’s oversight responsibility is to provide technical support to the
EPA RPM in monitoring PRP compliance with EPA requirements and report directly to the EPA
RPM.
c. Construction oversight is limited to serving construction activities and comparing the
work to the approved documents or applicable laws and regulations, and reporting the findings to
the EPA. The necessary technical documents (i.e., IAG, plans and specifications, change orders,
SSHP, etc.) must be obtained to accomplish the monitoring. The USACE representative should
also attend the weekly progress meeting.
d. USACE oversight officials on PRP enforcement projects are not authorized to provide
directions to the RA contractors. They only provide recommendations and evaluations to the
EPA RPM. USACE oversight personnel are not authorized to change the contract documents or
consent decree in any way; only the EPA RPM has the authority to do so.
e. Imminent safety hazards are the most controversial issue on any enforcement site. The
site-specific IAG should spell out exactly what the USACE representatives should do if a safety
hazard is observed. The language must be carefully crafted to ensure that a responsible PRP
representative is immediately notified of the situation, and that if the representative fails to act,
the EPA RPM has a contingency plan in place to provide adequate direction and to protect the
USACE and EPA from potential third party liability.
f. It should be noted that the EPA RPM is not required to utilize USACE for oversight
activities; the RPM may choose an A-E or an ARCS contractor for this service. For this reason,
the USACE needs to "satisfy the customer" and reach agreement on what the RPM (our
customer) expects.
g. Standard USACE guide specifications, the safety manual (EM 385-1-1), ERs, etc., do
not apply. PRPs generally use standard commercial American Institute of Architects (AIA)
contracts and are governed by OSHA and other Federal/state/local regulations. For additional
guidance on compliance with SSHP requirements on PRP or technical assistance assignments,
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refer to Section 4, Health and Safety.
h. Since the EPA generally seeks to recover oversight costs from PRPs, accurate and
detailed records of labor and other costs are essential.
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SECTION 13
MISCELLANEOUS
13-1. Hazard Pay. Hazard pay is required for duty involving unusual physical hardships,
hazards, or working conditions of an unusually severe nature. Hazard pay is considered to be
warranted if the following conditions exist:
a. The employee must perform duty that is subject to eligible physical hardships or
hazards criteria as described in the CEHR-E/CESO-I memorandum regarding supplemental
guidance on hazard pay differentials for civilian work at HTRW sites, dated 9 October 1990. A
copy of this document can be found in Appendix F. This guidance specifies that workers
required to wear level "A" or level "B" personal protective equipment (PPE) automatically are
entitled to hazard pay. Workers who wear level "C" PPE require an assessment by the district
SOHO of the hazards and the procedures to mitigate the hazard. If this review assessment
concludes that adequate controls are provided so that the degree of risk to the worker is
"practically eliminated," no hazard pay is authorized.
b. The duty must not affect the grade of the Federal wage system position or the
classification of the position. The USACE human resources office will be responsible for
determining whether the hazardous work constitutes an element in determining the grade of the
position.
13-2. Liability Concerns.
a. Personal Liability. The Office of Counsel should be contacted immediately in all
instances where a USACE employee becomes aware of, or has reason to suspect, a violation of
CERCLA, RCRA, or any other law has occurred. The Office of Counsel will provide guidance
to USACE employees regarding the availability of legal representation from the Department of
Justice (DOJ) relating to any such violation. The DOJ is responsible for determining whether
Federal employee requests for government legal representation will be approved in such matters.
b. CERCLA. Substantial civil and criminal penalties are authorized by CERCLA. Two
categories of administrative civil penalties are authorized. One category (Class I) provides for
penalties of up to $25,000 per violation. The second category (Class II) provides for penalties of
up to $25,000 per day for each violation, which may be increased to $75,000 per day for a second
or subsequent violation. These administrative penalties relate, among other things, to failure to
provide notice of a reportable quantity release of a hazardous substance, or destruction or
alteration of records required to be maintained by CERCLA. Moreover, upon conviction for
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knowing failure to report a hazardous substance release, or for destruction or alteration of records
required by CERCLA under section 103, criminal penalties under the Federal Criminal Code and
imprisonment of up to 3 years (5 years for subsequent convictions) can also be imposed.
c. RCRA. Civil and criminal penalties may also be imposed under RCRA. Stiff criminal
enforcement provisions providing for substantial penalties ($50,000 per day) and multi-year
imprisonment terms (2 to 5 years) are possible for knowing violation of RCRA's transport,
treatment, storage, disposal, export, reporting, or record requirements associated with hazardous
waste. The Conference Report on the 1980 RCRA Amendments indicated congressional intent
that these criminal provisions not be aimed at punishing minor or technical variations from
permit regulations or conditions if the facility operator is acting responsibly. However, where a
violation is committed by a person with knowledge that such action will place another person in
imminent danger of death or serious bodily injury, RCRA provides for fines of not more than
$250,000, or imprisonment for not more than 15 years, or both. Civil penalties assessed through
the use of administrative compliance orders are also permitted by RCRA. Violation of a
compliance order may result in civil penalties of up to $25,000 per day for non-compliance, and
suspension or revocation of any permits issued to the violator. Moreover, under RCRA's citizen
suit provision, any person may bring a lawsuit on his or her behalf against any other person
including the U.S. based on allegations of violation of any permit, standard, regulation,
condition, requirement, or order under RCRA. RCRA specifically provides that agents,
employees and officers of the U.S. shall not be personally liable for any civil penalty under
Federal, state, interstate, or local solid or hazardous waste law with respect to any act or omission
within the scope of their official duties; but, notes that such agent, employee, and officer is
subject to criminal sanctions under Federal or state solid or hazardous waste law, including but
not limited to fines and imprisonment.
13-3. Community Relations.
a. General. Community relations play a critical role at most HTRW sites. Every site has
the potential for public concern about government actions and sensationalism by special interest
groups, individuals, and the news media. When construction work starts, the level of public
concern and media interest may rise. The level of sensitivity and public interest is not always
related to the technical complexity of the problems at the site. Community opposition to
government plans has led to delays, work stoppage, cost overruns, and the obstruction of
technically sound remedies.
b. Public Affairs. The Public Affairs Office (PAO) from the RE's district, the local
military installation, or the EPA regional office is a key player in the cleanup effort. The staff
members from these offices are trained to effectively work with the public and media and can be
of great assistance to the RE's staff. The PAO should be involved at the earliest time, including
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pre-construction conference and partnering workshops, to aid in the preparation of community
relation’s plans and the assignment of responsibility for responding to queries from the media
and general public. Community relation’s plans are recommended for every site, but are required
by CERCLA for all sites on or being considered for inclusion on the NPL. The more complex
the site, the more comprehensive the plan. A site in the middle of a military installation which
has never attracted concern by the public may require very little community relations effort. A
FUDS project on which an elementary school has been built may require a substantial effort. The
public affairs staff can also support the RE in a variety of other ways. These include:
(1) preparing, staffing, and distributing news releases, fact sheets, project updates, and
other pertinent materials for the information repository;
(2) assisting in planning, scheduling, arranging, and conducting public meetings;
(3) assisting with tours of the site when appropriate; and
(4) planning, developing, and conducting workshops about environmental activities,
characteristics and concerns.
c. RE Responsibilities. As a general rule, the EPA is responsible for community
relations at Superfund sites. The local military public affairs office is responsible for IRP sites,
and the USACE district public affairs office for FUDS and FUSRAP projects. Queries from the
media and public should be directed to the appropriate public affairs office for response.
However, RE's may find themselves in the position of being the only USACE representative
available when members of the media or public come calling. Procedures for dealing with this
must be coordinated during the early planning stages of the project. These procedures should
address the day-to-day contact with the public and private property owners and should be clearly
and concisely addressed with the RPM. Every attempt should be made for the RE to be
responsible for the daily contact with the public for the coordination of the RA work. Special
emphasis must be given to ensure that in dealing with sites where PRP negotiations are
underway, under the auspices of another PRP negotiation district, no actions are taken or
comments are made by the executing district which might be detrimental to the successful
resolution of the PRP negotiations. When it falls to the RE to respond, listen to the question and
answer it:
(1) Honestly: Tell the truth. If you don't know the answer, say so. Talk only about what
you know. Don't speculate;
(2) Ethically: Don't play games with a reporter or a member of the public. Don't
withhold significant information just because the person failed to ask exactly the right question;
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(3) Accurately: Don't speculate or guess. If you don't know the answer, try to find it and
then get back to the questioner; and
(4) Responsibly: This means answering the question or explaining why the question
cannot be answered. Don't be evasive.
d. Community Relations Plan (CRP). See Appendix F for an example copy of a CRP.
13-4. USACE HTRW Lessons Learned System.
a. Introduction. The HTRW CX is the home for the nationwide USACE HTRW &
Environmental Lessons Learned System. The CX was mandated by HQUSACE to develop and
maintain the official HTRW Lessons Learned System for the USACE. The original HTRW
Lessons Learned System, developed in the early 1990s, was revamped in 1997 and changed to
the HTRW & Environmental Lessons Learned Informational System. The purpose of this system
is to ensure that USACE employees involved in HTRW and environmental programs such as
compliance, pollution prevention and conservation are provided with the tools to enable them to
document and share problems, solutions, and experience gained while performing their job
related duties, improve efficiency, and enhance the cost effectiveness of USACE processes and
operations.
b. Accessing the System. This system serves as a central repository for HTRW and
environmental lessons learned. Individuals having access to the world wide web can access the
system through the following address:
http://hq.environmental.usace.army.mil/tools/lessons/lessons.html
This address takes you to the USACE Environmental Division home page. From there click on
“Initiatives,” then “Environmental Lessons Learned Program.” This screen is the home page for
the HTRW & Environmental Lessons Learned Program.
c. Browsing the Web Site. Once linked to the system, individuals will have the
capability to search and retrieve information, submit a lessons learned, view the lessons learned
data base, link to other lessons learned systems/servers, view standard operating procedures for
the system or browse the USACE organization. Individuals can also browse other news events or
hot topics in the environmental arena. This site is accessible to all individuals having access to
the world wide web.
d. Lessons Learned Submittals. The process of submitting lessons learned is relatively
simple, and can be accomplished via the world wide web, e-mail, fax, or regular mail. If you are
using the Internet, once at the appropriate address, go to the “Submitting a Lessons Learned” icon
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and complete the required data in the template. Next, click on the “submit” window to review
your data. If correct, click on “submit” again. Your completed submittal will then be forwarded
to the program manager at the CX. Individuals who do not have access to the world wide web
may e-mail, fax or mail the information to the program manager at the HTRW CX. The e-mail
address is: [email protected] The fax number is (402) 697-2639. The mailing
address is U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, HTRW CX, ATTN: CENWO-HX-T (Lessons
Learned PM), 12565 West Center Road, Omaha, NE 68144.
e. Lessons Learned Review Process. All lessons learned submittals are reviewed by
subject matter experts at the HTRW CX, and are also reviewed and validated by HQUSACE
personnel prior to dissemination on the system. The system program manager is assigned to the
Environmental, Cost and Compliance Branch at the CX, and is the point of contact for the
system.
13-5. Where to Find the Environmental Regulations.
Environmental Act
Code of Federal Regulations
Nuclear Regulatory Commission
(NRC)
10 CFR Parts 1-199
Department of Energy (DOE)
10 CFR Parts 200-1099
Occupational Safety and Health
Act (OSHA)
29 CFR Parts 1900-1999
Surface Mining Control and
Reclamation Act (SMCRA)
30 CFR Parts 301-999
Department of Defense (DOD)
32 CFR Parts 1-190
Clean Air Act
40 CFR Parts 50-87
Clean Water Act (CWA)
40 CFR Parts 104-140, 401-471
Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)
40 CFR Part 150
Federal Insecticide, Fungicide
and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA)
40 CFR Parts 150-186
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Radiation Protection Programs (Environmental)
40 CFR Parts 190-195
RCRA - Solid Waste
40 CFR Parts 240-259
Resource Conservation and Recovery
Act (RCRA) - Hazardous Waste
40 CFR Parts 260-279
Underground Storage Tanks (USTs)
40 CFR Parts 280-282
Comprehensive Environmental
Response, Compensation and Liability
Act (CERCLA) and Superfund Amendments
and Reauthorization Act (SARA)
40 CFR Parts 300-372
Emergency Planning, Community
Right-To-Know Act (EPCRA)
40 CFR Parts 355-374
Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)
40 CFR Parts 700-799
National Environmental Policy
Act (NEPA)
40 CFR Parts 1500-1508
Hazardous Materials Transportation
Act (HMTA)
49 CFR Parts 100-180
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APPENDIX A
REFERENCES
A-1. Public Laws (PL).
PL 94-580, “Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976”
PL 96-510, "Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act
(CERCLA) of 1980"
PL 99-499, "Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986"
PL 104-142, “Mercury-Containing and Rechargeable Battery Management Act”
PL 97-177, “Prompt Payment Act of 1982”
A-2. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR).
5 CFR 339, "Medical Qualification Determinations"
10 CFR 20, “Standards for Protection Against Radiation”
28 CFR 50.15, "Representation of Federal officials and employees by Department of Justice
attorneys or by private counsel furnished by the Department in civil, criminal, and congressional
proceedings in which Federal employees are sued, subpoenaed, or charged in their individual
capacities"
29 CFR 1910, "Occupational Safety and Health Standards" (refer to 29 CFR 1910.120,
“Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response” which is applicable to site inspections
and investigations during RD)
29 CFR 1910.120, “OSHA Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response”
29 CFR 1910.120(e), “Training”
29 CFR 1910.134, “Respiratory Protection”
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29 CFR 1910.1020, “Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records”
29 CFR 1910.1200, “Occupational Safety and Health Standards - Hazard Communication”
29 CFR 1926, "Safety and Health Regulations for Construction" (refer to 29 CFR 1926.65,
"Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response" Federal Register, 30 June 1993, which
is applicable to remedial action activities)
29 CFR 1926.59, “Hazard Communication”
29 CFR 1926.62, OSHA “Lead Exposure in Construction Standard”
29 CFR 1926.65(e), “Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response – Training”
29 CFR 1926.103, “Respiratory Protection”
29 CFR 1926.1101, “Asbestos”
32 CFR 203, “Technical Assistance for Public Participation (TAPP) in Defense Environmental
Restoration Activities”
40 CFR Part 61, “National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants”
40 CFR 61.145, “Standard for Demolition and Renovation”
40 CFR 61.150, “Standard for waste disposal for manufacturing, fabricating, demolition,
renovation, and spraying operations”
40 CFR 261, “RCRA Regulations for the Identification and Listing of Hazardous Wastes”
40 CFR 261.4, “Exclusions”
40 CFR 261.9, “Requirements for Universal Waste”
40 CFR 261.24, “Toxicity Characteristic”
40 CFR 262, "Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste"
40 CFR 262.34 (a)(4) and 40 CFR 265.16, "Personnel Training"
40 CFR 262.40, “Record Keeping”
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40 CFR 265.16, “Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste
Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities - Personnel Training”
40 CFR 268, “Land Disposal Restrictions”
40 CFR 268.45, “Treatment Standards for Hazardous Debris”
40 CFR 273, “Standards for Universal Waste Management”
40 CFR 282, “Approved Underground Storage Tank Programs”
40 CFR 300, “EPA National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan”
40 CFR 300.440, "Off-Site Rule"
40 CFR 745, Toxic Substances Control Act Regulations, Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention
in Certain Residential Structures
40 CFR 761.60, “Disposal Requirements”
40 CFR 761.65, “Storage for Disposal”
40 CFR 761.72, “Scrap Metal Recovery Ovens and Smelters”
40 CFR 763, “Asbestos - Model Accreditation Plan”
49 CFR 171-180, “Subchapter C- Hazardous Materials Regulations”
49 CFR 172, Subpart G, “Emergency Response Information”
49 CFR 172, Subpart H, "Training for Hazardous Materials Transportation"
49 CFR 172.205, “Hazardous Waste Manifest”
49 CFR 172.700, “Purpose and Scope”
49 CFR 173.1, “Purpose and Scope”
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A-3. Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR).
FAR Subpart 7 and applicable supplements there to, "Acquisition Planning"
FAR 36.103, “Construction and Architect-Engineer Contracts-Methods of Contracting”
FAR 52.232-25(b)(4), "Prompt Payment" (Mar 94),
FAR 52.232-27(b)(2), "Prompt Payment for Construction Contracts"
FAR 52.236-13, "Accident Prevention"
A-4. Army Regulations (AR).
AR 200-1, “Environmental Protection and Enhancement”
AR 385-61, “The Army Chemical Agents Safety Program” 27 Feb 97
AR 385-64, “Ammunition and Explosives Safety”
AR 420-70, “Buildings and Structures”
A-5. USACE Engineering Regulations (ER).
ER 5-1-11, "Program and Project Management"
ER 37-2-10, "Accounting and Reporting--Civil Works Activities"
ER 385-1-40, "Occupational Health Program"
ER 385-1-92, "Safety and Occupational Health Document Requirements for Hazardous, Toxic
and Radioactive Waste (HTRW) and Ordnance and Explosive Waste (OEW) Activities"
ER 415-1-16, "Fiscal Management"
ER 500-1-1, “Natural Disaster Procedures”
ER 1110-1-263, "Chemical Data Quality Management for Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive
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Waste Remedial Activities"
ER 1110-1-8100, "Laboratory Investigations and Testing."
ER 1110-1-8153, “Ordnance and Explosives Response“
ER 1110-1-8158, "Corps-Wide Centers of Expertise Program"
ER 1110-2-500, "Corps/EPA Superfund Program, Funding and Reporting Requirements"
ER 1180-1-6, “Construction Quality Management”
A-6. USACE Engineering Pamphlets (EP).
EP 200-1-2, "Process and Procedures for RCRA Manifesting"
EP 200-1-3, “Environmental Restoration at Formerly Used Defense Sites”
EP 385-1-58, "Medical Surveillance Handbook"
EP 415-1-260, "Resident Engineer Management Guide"
EP 415-1-261, “Quality Assurance Representatives Guide – Volume 5”
EP 1110-1-11, "Asbestos Abatement Guideline Detail Sheets"
EP 1110-1-18, "Ordnance and Explosives Response”
A-7. USACE Engineering Manuals (EM).
EM 200-1-1, "Validation of Analytical Chemistry Laboratories"
EM 200-1-2, "Technical Project Planning"
EM 200-1-3, "Requirements for the Preparation of Sampling and Analysis Plans"
EM 200-1-6, "Chemical Quality Assurance for HTRW Projects"
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EM 385-1-1, "Safety and Health Requirements Manual"
EM 1110-1-4006, "Removal of Underground Storage Tanks (USTs)"
A-8. USACE Guide Specifications (CEGS).
CEGS 01351, "Safety, Health, and Emergency Response (HTRW/UST)"
CEGS 01450, “Chemical Data Quality Control”
CEGS 02115, "Underground Storage Tank Removal"
CEGS 13280, "Asbestos Abatement"
A-9. USACE Construction Bulletins (CB).
CB No. 99-1, “Safety and Health HTRW Annual Refresher Course”
CB No. 99-2, “Emergency Responder Agreements for Fund-Lead Remedial Actions - EPA
Superfund Program”
A-10. USACE Office Memorandums (OM).
OM 10-1-1, "Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers"
A-11. USACE Memorandums and Other Documents.
ASA(CW) memorandum, 7 Dec 84, "Corps/EPA Superfund Agreement"
CECC-J memorandum, 13 Mar 98, “Fees for Licensing, Certification, Training, and Professional
Engineers Stamps” (CF: Appendix F)
CECI-IR/CEMP-R memorandum, 10 Aug 99, “Environmental Classification Standards”
(CF: Appendix F)
CEHNC 1105-3-9, 10 Aug 92, "Management Plan for OEW MCX and Design Center"
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CEHR-E/CESO-I memorandum, 19 Oct 90, "Supplemental Guidance on Hazard Pay
Environmental Differentials regarding Hazardous and Toxic Waste (HTW) Sites" (CF:
Appendix F)
CEMP-CM memorandum, 1 Nov 91, "Transfer of Knowledge and Experience During Design
and Execution of HTRW Projects"
CEMP-M memorandum, 7 Jan 99, “Implementation of the Program and Project Management
Information System (PROMIS) for Environmental Programs” (CF: Appendix F)
CEMP-M memorandum, 28 April 97, on the implementation of PROMIS (see Appendix F).
CEMP-RS/CERE-AP memorandum, 22 Nov 89, "USACE Real Estate Support for EPA
Superfund Program" (CF: Appendix F)
CEMP-RT memorandum, 3 Mar 93, "USACE Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste
(HTRW) Lessons Learned System"
CEMP-RT memorandum, 30 Apr 93, "Signatory Responsibility for Hazardous Waste Manifests
and Related Documents-Policy Guidance"
CEMP-RT memorandum, 23 Sep 1997, “Changes in HTRW Technical Roles and
Responsibilities Due to Division Laboratory Closures” (CF: Appendix F)
CERE-AP memorandum, 6 Feb 98, “Guidance for the Provision of Real Estate Support to the
Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Delegation of Authority to Execute
Rights-of Entry and Acquire Real Property and Interests Therein” (CF: Appendix F)
CERM-F memorandum, 7 June 96, “Subject: Policy for Retention of Travel Receipts”
CESO-I memorandum, 13 May 94, "HTRW Safety and Health Training Courses and Medical
Surveillance Required by OSHA Standards 29 CFR 1910.120 and 1926.65"
CESO-I (40-5) memorandum, 23 Sep 99, “HTRW Medical Surveillance Program Inclusion and
Frequency Criteria” (CF: Appendix F)
A Guide to Best Practices for Cost Reimbursement Contracts
Annual Financial Agreement Between the Defense Contract Audit Agency and the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers, Fiscal Year 2000, Agreement Number 002900 (CF: Appendix F)
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Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) for Formerly used Defense Sites (FUDS) Program Manual
OE CX Interim Guidance, Safety Concepts and Basic Considerations for Unexploded Ordnance
Operations, 16 Feb 96
Pre-Award Site Visit Agreement, “Liability Release for Contractor Site Visit” (CF: Appendix F)
USACE Management Plan, Pre-Placed Remedial Action Contracts (PPRA), 8 Sep 89
A-12. EPA Guidance Documents and Correspondence.
EPA/600/2-86/013, 1986, “Drum Handling Practices at Hazardous Waste Sites”
EPA OSWER 9320.2-09A-P, Jan 2000, “Close Out Procedures for National Priorities List Sites”
EPA OSWER Directive 9355.0-4A, Jun 86, "Superfund Remedial Design and Remedial Action
Guidance" (to be replaced by OSWER 9355-22; in final draft)
EPA OSWER Directive 9355.0-04B, "Superfund Remedial Design/Remedial Action Handbook,"
EPA OSWER Directive 9355.5-01, Feb 90, "Interim Final Guidance on EPA Oversight of
Remedial Designs and Remedial Actions Performed by Potentially Responsible Parties"
EPA OSWER Directive 9355.5-01/FS, Feb 90, "Real Estate Acquisition Procedures for USACE
Projects" (CF: Appendix F)
EPA OSWER Publication 9355.5-01/FS, Feb 90, "EPA Oversight of Remedial Designs and
Remedial Actions Performed by PRPs"
EPA OSWER Directive 9355.5-05/FS, Dec 89, "USACE Preplaced and Rapid Response
Contracts"
EPA OSWER Directive 9355.5-14/FS, May 90, "EPA/USACE Payment Process-Direct
Cite/Revised Reimbursement Methods"
EPA OSWER Directive 9355.7-02, “Structures and Components of Five-Year Reviews”
EPA OSWER Directive 9355.7-03B-P, “Comprehensive Five-Year Review Guidance”
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EPA Superfund Construction Completion Care Package, May 93.
EPA Five-Year Guidance (Second Interim Draft), March 16, 1998.
OERR, EPA Office of Emergency and Remedial Response - Directive 9355.0-04B
U.S. EPA letter, 18 Oct 90, Authorizing CE personnel to sign manifests on their behalf (CF:
Appendix F)
A-13. Housing and Urban Development Guidance.
HUD ACCN-5646, 1990; Rev May 1991, “Lead-Based Paint: Interim Guidelines for Hazard
Identification and Abatement in Public and Indian Housing”
A-14. Miscellaneous References.
DODI 4715.10, Environmental Education, Training and Career Development
Federal Register (FR) 51-35192, “Hazardous Waste Management System: Standards for
Generators of Hazardous Waste”
OEBGD, Overseas Environmental Baseline Guidance Document
TG 142, “Managing Health Hazards Associated With Bird and Bat Excrement”, U. S. Army
Environmental Hygiene Agency
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APPENDIX B
ACRONYMS
*All of these acronyms do not appear in the text of this pamphlet but are provided as a
reference for the RE to illustrate terms commonly used in HTRW work.
A
ACM............................Asbestos-Containing Material
ACGIH ........................American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists
ACO ............................Administrative Contracting Officer
A-E ..............................Architect-Engineer
AEA.............................Atomic Energy Act
AEC .............................Army Environmental Center
AEDA..........................Ammunition, Explosives, and Dangerous Articles
AEO.............................Army Environmental Office
AEHA..........................Army Environmental Hygiene Agency
AETMP .......................Army Environmental Training Master Plan
AF ................................U.S. Air Force
AFARS ........................Army Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement
AG ...............................Attorney General (U.S.)
AHERA .......................Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act
AIA ..............................American Institute of Architects
AMC............................U.S. Army Materiel Command
AMPRS .......................Automated Management and Progress Reporting System
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ANSI............................American National Standards Institute
AO ...............................Administrative Order
AOAC .........................Association of Official Analytical Chemists
AOC ............................Area of Contamination
AOR ............................Area of Responsibility
APP .............................Accident Prevention Plan
AR ...............................Army Regulation
ARAR..........................Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements
ARCS ..........................Alternative Remedial Contracting Strategy (EPA)
ARMS .........................Automated Review Management System
ARNG .........................Army National Guard
ASA (IL&E) ................The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Installations, Logistics, and
Environment)
ASD .............................Assistant Secretary of Defense
ARSTAF .....................Army Staff
ATS .............................Air Toxic Standard
ATSDR........................Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
B
BCO.............................Biddability, Constructibility, Operability
BCOE ..........................Biddability, Constructibility, Operability, and Environmental
BD ...............................Base Detonating
BD/DR.........................Building Demolition/Debris Removal
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BDAT ..........................Best Demonstrated Available Technology
BLM ............................Bureau of Land Management
BMP ............................Best Management Practices
BRAC ..........................Base Realignment and Closure
BTU .............................British Thermal Unit
C
CA ...............................Cooperative Agreement
CAA ............................Clean Air Act
CAIS ............................Chemical Agent Identification sets
CAMU.........................Corrective Action Management Unit
CAP .............................Corrective Action Plan (RCRA)
CAS .............................Chemical Abstracts Service
CASRN .......................Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number
CB................................Construction Bulletin
CCC .............................Commodity Credit Corporation
CD ...............................Consent Decree
CDAP ..........................Chemical Data Acquisition Plan
CDQM .........................Chemical Data Quality Management
CDQMP ......................Chemical Data Quality Management Plan
CDR.............................Commander
CE ................................Corps of Engineers
CECER ........................U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory
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CECRL ........................U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory
CECPW .......................U.S. Army Center For Public Works
CECW .........................U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Civil Works Directorate
CEFMS........................Corps of Engineers Financial Management System
CEGS...........................Corps of Engineers Guide Specification
CEHNC .......................U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville
CEIG............................U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Inspector General
CELDS ........................Computer-Aided Environmental Legislative Data System
CEMP ..........................U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Military Programs Directorate
(CEMP-R - Environmental Restoration Division)
CENAD .......................U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, North Atlantic Division
CENWO ......................U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District
CEPOD........................U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Pacific Ocean Division
CEQ .............................Council on Environmental Quality
CERCLA .....................Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability
Act (Superfund)
CERCLIS ....................CERCLA Information System
CERE...........................U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Directorate of Real Estate
CESO...........................HQUSACE Safety and Occupational Health Office
CETEC ........................U.S. Army Topographic Engineering Center
CEWES .......................U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station
CFC's ...........................Chlorofluorocarbons
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CFMC..........................EPA Cincinnati Financial Management Center
CFR .............................Code of Federal Regulations
CG ...............................Commanding General
CHEMTREC...............Chemical Transportation Emergency Center
CINC ...........................Commander in Chief
CLP..............................Contract Laboratory Program
CMI .............................Corrective Measures Implementation
CMS ............................Corrective Measures Study
CO ...............................Contracting Officer
COE .............................Chief of Engineers
CON/HTW ..................Containerized Hazardous and Toxic Waste
CONUS .......................Continental U.S.
COR.............................Contracting Officer's Representative
CPAF ...........................Cost Plus Award Fee
CPFF ...........................Cost Plus Fixed Fee
CQA ............................Construction Quality Assurance
CQAB ........................ Chemistry Quality Assurance Branch
CQAR..........................Chemical Quality Assurance Report
CQC.............................Chemical/Quality Control
CQCP ..........................Contractor Quality Control Plan
CQI ..............................Command Quarterly Inspections
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CR................................Community Relations
CRA.............................Continuing Resolution Authority
CRDEC .......................Chemical Research, Development, and Engineering Center
CRP .............................Community Relations Plan
CSI...............................Construction Specification Institute
CSM ............................Chemical Surety Material
CWA ...........................Clean Water Act
CWM ...........................Chemical Warfare Materiel
CX ...............................Center of Expertise
CY ...............................Calendar Year
CZMA .........................Coastal Zone Management Act
D
DA ...............................Department of the Army
DCAF ..........................Design/Construction Analysis Feedback
DASA(ESOH) ............Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army (Environment, Safety and
Occupational Health)
DASD(E).....................Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Environment
DASAF........................Director of Army Safety
DCAA .........................Defense Contract Audit Agency
DEH.............................Director of Engineering and Housing (at installations)
DEIS ............................Draft Environmental Impact Statement
DERA ..........................Defense Environmental Restoration Account
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DERP...........................Defense Environmental Restoration Program
DERPMIS ...................DERP Management Information System
DESOH .......................Deputy for Environment, Safety, and Occupational Health
DESR...........................Defense Environmental Status Report
DFARS ........................Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement
DLA.............................Defense Logistics Agency
DOA ............................Department of Agriculture
DOC ............................Department of Commerce
DOD ............................Department of Defense
DODI ...........................DOD Instruction
DOE.............................Department of Energy
DOI ..............................Department of Interior
DOJ .............................Department of Justice
DOL.............................Department of Labor
DOS .............................Department of State
DOT.............................Department of Transportation
DPM ............................Defense Priority Model
DPW ............................Director of Public Works (at installations)
DQCR..........................Daily Quality Control Report
DQO ............................Data Quality Objectives
DRMO.........................Defense Reutilization and Marketing Organization
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DRMR .........................Defense Reutilization and Marketing Region
DRMS .........................Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service
DSHE ..........................Director of Safety, Health, and Environment
DSMOA/CA ...............DOD and State Memorandum of Agreement/Cooperative Agreement
DVOCP .......................Dust, Vapor, and Odor Control Plan
DWSP..........................Drinking Water Surveillance Program
E
EA................................Environmental Assessment (Endangerment)
E&D ............................Engineering and Design
EBS..............................Environmental Baseline Study
EC .............................. Engineering Circular EC
ECAS...........................Environmental Compliance Assessment System
ECB .............................Environmental Chemistry Branch
ECC .............................Environmental Chemistry Center
EDD.............................Enforcement Decision Document
EE/CA .........................Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis
EED .............................Electroexplosive Devices
EFARS ........................Engineering Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement
EHS .............................Extremely Hazardous Substance
EIS ...............................Environmental Impact Statement
EM ...............................Engineer Manual
EMM ...........................Earth Moving Machinery
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EMO .......................... Emergency Management Office
EMR ............................Electromagnetic Radiation
ENG.............................Engineer
EO................................Executive Order
EOD.............................Explosive Ordnance Disposal
EOC .............................Emergency Operations Center
EP ................................Extraction Procedure
Engineer Pamphlet
EPA .............................U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
EPCRA ........................Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act
EQCC ..........................Environmental Quality Control Committee
ER ................................Engineer Regulation
ERA .............................Expedited Response Action
ERCS ...........................Emergency Response Cleanup Services
ERDA ..........................Environmental Restoration Defense Account
ERDC ..........................U.S. Army Engineer Research Development Center
ERGO ..........................Environmental Review Guide for Operations (Civil)
EROD ..........................Enforcement Record of Decision
ERRIS .........................Emergency and Remedial Response Information System
ERT .............................Environmental Response Team (EPA)
ESA .............................Endangered Species Act
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ESD ............................Environmental Services Division (EPA)
Environmental Support District
Explanation of Significant Difference
ESS ..............................Explosives Safety Submission
ETAB ..........................Environmental Technical Advisory Board
ETIS ............................Environmental Technical Information System
ETL..............................Engineer Technical Letter
F
FAA .............................Federal Aviation Administration
FACA ..........................Federal Advisory Committee Act
FAD .............................Funding Authorization Document
FAR .............................Federal Acquisition Regulations
FARES ........................Federal Activities Regional Evaluation System
FDE .............................Finding and Determination of Eligibility
FEIS .............................Final Environmental Impact Statement
FEMA..........................Federal Emergency Management Agency
FEPCA ........................Federal Environmental Pesticide Control Act
FFA..............................Federal Facilities Agreement
FFCA ...........................Federal Facilities Compliance Act
FFIS .............................Federal Facilities Information System
FFP ..............................Firm Fixed Price
FIFRA..........................Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act
FINDS .........................Facility Index System
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FIP ...............................Federal Implementation Plan
FIT ...............................Field Investigation Team (EPA)
FmHA..........................Farmers Home Administration
FMO ............................Facilities Management Officer
FMS .............................Financial Management System
FNSI ............................Finding of No Significant Impact
FOA .............................Field Operating Activity
FOIA............................Freedom of Information Act
FORSCOM .................U.S. Army Forces Command
FPI ...............................Fixed Price Incentive
FR ................................Federal Register
FS ................................Feasibility Study
FSA..............................Farm Services Agency
FSP ..............................Field Sampling Plan
FTE ..............................Full-Time Equivalent
FUDS...........................Formerly Used Defense Site
FUSRAP......................Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program
FWCA .........................Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act
FWPCA .......................Federal Water Pollution Control Act
FWS.............................Federal Wage Service
FY ................................Fiscal Year
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G
GAO ............................General Accounting Office
GDQM ........................Geotechnical Data Quality Management
GIS...............................Geographic Information System
GMD ...........................Geographic Military District
GOCO .........................Government Owned, Contractor Operated
GSA .............................General Services Administration
H
HAZMAT....................Hazardous Materials
HAZMIN .....................Hazardous Waste Minimization
HEA.............................Health Effects Assessment
HEPA ..........................High Efficiency Particulate Air
HHI ..............................Health Hazard Inventory
HHS .............................Department of Health and Human Services
HID ..............................High Intensity Discharge
HM ..............................Hazardous Material
HMTA .........................Hazardous Materials Transportation Act
HMR............................Hazardous Materials Regulation
HMTC .........................Hazardous Materials Technical Center
HMTUSA....................Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Act
HQ ...............................Headquarters
HQDA .........................Headquarters, Department of the Army
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HQUSACE..................Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
HRS .............................Hazard Ranking System
HSC .............................Health Services Command
HSDA ..........................Health and Safety Design Analysis
HSL .............................Hazardous Substance List
HSWA .........................Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (RCRA)
HTM ............................Hazardous and Toxic Materials
HTRW .........................Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste
HTRW CX ..................Hazardous, Toxic and Radioactive Waste Center of Expertise
HTW............................Hazardous and Toxic Waste
HTW-MP ....................Hazardous and Toxic Waste Management Plan
HW ..............................Hazardous Waste
HWM ..........................Hazardous Waste Management
HUD ............................Housing and Urban Development
I
I-DERPMIS .................Interim DERP Management Information System
IA .................................Implementing Agency
IAG ..............................Interagency Agreement
IATA ...........................International Air Transport Association
IAW .............................In Accordance With
IC .................................Installation Commander
ID/IQ ...........................Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity
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IDT ..............................Indefinite Delivery Type Contract
IFB ...............................Invitation For Bids
IG .................................Inspector General
IH .................................Industrial Hygienist
IHW .............................Installation Hazardous Waste
IHWM .........................Installation Hazardous Waste Manager
IIA................................Initial Installation Agreement
I/M ...............................Inspection and Maintenance
INPR ............................Inventory Project Report
IOSC ............................Installation On-Scene Coordinator
IR .................................Interim Report Installation Restoration
IRA ..............................Interim Remedial Action
IRIS .............................Integrated Risk Information System
IRP ...............................Installation Restoration Program
IR/RR ..........................Immediate Response/Rapid Response
IRT...............................Installation Response Team
ISCP ............................Installation Spill Contingency Plan
ITA ..............................Innovative Technology Advocate
IWTP ...........................Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant
L
LBP..............................Lead-Based Paint
LC ................................Lethal Concentration
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LCED ..........................Life Cycle Environmental Documentation
LCPM ..........................Life Cycle Project Management
LD................................Lethal Dose
LD50............................Lethal Dose Where Fifty Percent of Animals Tested Die
LEPC ...........................Local Emergency Planning Commission
LLRW..........................Low Level Radioactive Waste
LOE .............................Level of Effort
LQMM ........................Laboratory Quality Management Manual
LRS..............................Life Cycle Project Management Reporting System
LTM ............................Long Term Measure
LTRA ..........................Long-Term Response Action
LUST ...........................Leaking Underground Storage Tank
MACOM .....................Major Army Command
MACT .........................Maximum Achievable Control Technology
MAJCOM ...................Major Air Force Command
MAP ............................Model Accreditation Plan
MARC .........................Multiple Award Remediation Contract
MARKS ......................Modern Army Record Keeping System
MBE ............................Minority Business Enterprise
MCA............................Military Construction, Army
MCL ............................Maximum Contaminant Level (Maximum Concentration Limit)
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MCLG .........................Maximum Contaminant Level Goal
MCS ............................Media Cleanup Standard
MCX .......................... Mandatory Center of Expertise
MED ............................Manhattan Engineers District
MEDCOM...................Medical Command
MHP ............................Materials Handling Plan
MILCON .....................Military Construction
MIPR ...........................Military Interdepartmental Purchase Request
MOA ...........................Memorandum of Agreement
MOSCA ......................McNamara-O'Hara Service Contract Act
MPRSA .......................Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act
MOU ...........................Memorandum of Understanding
MSC ............................Major Subordinate Command
MSCCES .....................MSC Commander Executive Summary
MSDS ..........................Material Safety Data Sheet
MTC ............................Materials Testing Center
MUSARC....................Major U.S. Army Reserve Command
N
NAAQS .......................National Ambient Air Quality Standards
NCLP...........................National Contract Laboratory Program
NCP .............................National Contingency Plan [National Oil and Hazardous Substances
Pollution Contingency Plan (40 CFR 300)]
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NADI ...........................No Defense Action Indicated
NEIC............................National Enforcement Investigation Center
NEPA ..........................National Environmental Policy Act
NESHAP .....................National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants
NGB ............................National Guard Bureau
NGR ............................National Guard Regulation
NHPA ..........................National Historic Preservation Act
NIBS ............................National Institute of Building Sciences
NIOSH.........................National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health
NOA ............................Notice of Availability
NOAA .........................National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
NOI ..............................Notice of Intent
NOID ...........................Notice of Intent to Delete
NOV ............................Notice of Violation
NPDES ........................National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System
NPL .............................National Priorities List
NPS .............................Non-Point Source
NRC.............................National Response Center (EPA)
NRC.............................Nuclear Regulatory Commission
NRT .............................National Response Team
NSF..............................National Strike Force; National Science Foundation
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NSN .............................National Stock Number
NSPS ...........................New Source Performance Standards
NTIS ............................National Technical Information Service
NTP .............................Notice to Proceed
O
OASA ..........................Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army
OB/OD ........................Open Burning or Open Detonation
OCE .............................Office of the Chief of Engineers
OCLL ..........................Office of Congressional Legislative Liaison
OCONUS ....................outside of continental U.S.
OCPA ..........................Office of the Chief of Public Affairs
OE................................Ordnance and Explosives
OE MCX .....................Ordnance and Explosives Mandatory Center of Expertise
OERR ..........................Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (EPA)
OEW............................Ordnance and Explosive Waste
O&F.............................Operational and Functional
O&M ...........................Operation and Maintenance
OFA .............................Office of Federal Activities
OGC ............................Office of General Counsel
OHW ...........................Other Hazardous Waste
OIG ..............................Office of the Inspector General
OM ..............................Operations Manual
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OMA ...........................Operation and Maintenance, Army
OMB............................Office of Management and Budget
OM&M........................Operations, Maintenance, and Monitoring
O/O ..............................Owner/Operator
O&F.............................Operational and Functional
ORC.............................Office of Regional Counsel
ORD ............................Office of Research and Development (EPA)
ORTA ..........................Offices of Research and Technology Applications
OSC .............................On-Scene Coordinator
OSD .............................Office of the Secretary of Defense
OSHA ..........................Occupational Safety and Health Administration
OSWER.......................EPA Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response
OTSG ..........................Office of Surgeon General
OU ...............................Operable Unit
P
PA ................................Preliminary Assessment
PA/SI ...........................Preliminary Assessment/Site Inspection
PAO .............................Public Affairs Office
PARC ..........................Principle Assistant Responsible for Contracting
PCBs ............................Polychlorinated Biphenyls
PCOR ........................ Preliminary Closeout Report
PE ................................Professional Engineer
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PES ..............................Project Executive Summary
PESR ...........................Project Executive Summary Report
PHRED........................Public Health Risk Evaluation Database
PIRP ............................Public Involvement and Response Plan
PL ................................Public Law
PM ...............................Project Management
Project Manager
PMP .............................Project Management Plan
PO ................................Project Officer
POC .............................Point of Contact
POL .............................Petroleum, Oils, and Lubricants
POLREP .................... Pollution Report
POM ............................Program Objective Memorandum
POTW .........................Publicly Owned Treatment Works
PPBES .........................Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution System
PPE ..............................Personal Protective Equipment
PPM/PPB ....................Parts Per Million/Parts Per Billion
PPRA ...........................Pre-Placed Remedial Action
PR ................................Procurement Request (Public Relations)
PRAC ..........................Pre-Placed Remedial Action Contract
PRB .............................Project Review Board
PROMIS ......................Project Management Information System
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PROSPECT.................Proponent Sponsored Corps of Engineers Training
PRP ..............................Potentially Responsible Party
PTS ..............................Project Tracking System
PSD .............................Prevention of Significant Deterioration
PWSS ..........................Public Water Supply System
PZ ................................Piezoelectric
Q
QA ...............................Quality Assurance
QAP .............................Quality Assurance Personnel
QAPP...........................Quality Assurance Project Plan
QA/QC ........................Quality Assurance/Quality Control
QC ...............................Quality Control
QCSR ..........................Quality Control Summary Report
QM ..............................Quality Management
R
R&D ............................Research and Development
RA ...............................Remedial Action
Regional Administrator
RAB.............................Restoration Advisory Board
RAC.............................Remedial Action Contractor
RAGS ..........................Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund
RAP .............................Remedial Action Plan
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RCRA ..........................Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
RD ...............................Remedial Design
RD/RA ........................Remedial Design/Remedial Action
RE ................................Resident Engineer
REC .............................Record of Environmental Consideration
REL .............................Recommended Exposure Limit (NIOSH)
REM/FIT .....................Remedial Planning/Field Investigation Team
REMG .........................Resident Engineer Management Guide
REPR ...........................Real Estate Planning Report
RF ................................Radio Frequency
RFA .............................RCRA Facility Assessment
RFI...............................RCRA Facility Investigation
RFP ..............................Request For Proposals
RI .................................Remedial Investigation
RIA ..............................Regulatory Impact Analysis
RI/FS ...........................Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study
RMA............................Rocky Mountain Arsenal
RMS .......................... Resident Management System
ROD ............................Record of Decision
ROE .............................Right of Entry
RPM ............................Remedial Project Manager
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RPMA .........................Real Property Maintenance Activities
RPO .............................Regional Project Officer
RQ ...............................Reportable Quantity
RR/IR ..........................Rapid Response/Immediate Response
RRC .............................Regional Response Center
RRT .............................Regional Response Team (EPA)
RS ................................Responsiveness Summary
RSCRC ........................Regional Superfund Community Relations Coordinator
RSPA ...........................Research and Special Program Administration
RTC .............................Response to Comments
S
SA ................................Secretary of the Army
SAB .............................Science Advisory Board
SAC .............................Support and Coordination
S&A........................... Supervision and Administration
SADBU(S) ................ Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (specialist)
SAP ........................... Sampling and Analysis Plan
SARA ........................ Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act
SB .............................. Statement of Basis Small Business
SBA ........................... Small Business Administration
SCAP ......................... Superfund Comprehensive Accomplishments Plan (EPA)
SCP ............................ State Contingency Plan
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SDBE......................... Small and Disadvantaged Business Enterprise
SDCP ......................... Spill and Discharge Control Plan
SDWA ....................... Safe Drinking Water Act
SERC ......................... State Emergency Response Commission
SF .............................. Standard Form
SFO............................ Support for Others
SHP ........................... Safety and Health Program
SI ............................... Site Inspection
SIP ............................. State Implementation Plan
SITE .......................... Superfund Innovative Technology & Evaluation (EPA)
SMCRA ..................... Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act
SMR .......................... Senior Management Review
SNC ........................... Significant Noncomplier
SOFA......................... Status of Forces Agreement
SOH ........................... Safety and Occupational Health
SOHO ........................ Safety and Occupational Health Office
SOOH ........................ Site Ownership and Operation History
SOP ........................... Standard Operating Procedure
SOW .......................... Scope of Work Statement of Work
SPCC ......................... Spill Prevention Control & Countermeasure System
SPHEM ..................... Superfund Public Health Evaluation Manual
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SPL ............................ State Priorities List
SPO ........................... State Project Officer
SPS ............................ Standard Procurement System
SSA ........................... Staff Support Activity
SSC ............................ Superfund State Contract
SSHP ......................... Site Safety and Health Plan
SWMU ...................... Solid Waste Management Unit
T
T&E ........................... Test and Evaluation
TA.............................. Technical Assistance
TAC ........................... Technical Advisory Committee
Tactical Air Command
TAP ........................... Technical Assistance Program
TAT ........................... Technical Assistance Team (EPA)
TBC ........................... To Be Considered
TC .............................. Toxicity Characteristic
TCL ........................... Target Compound List
TCLP ......................... Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure
TCX ........................... Technical Center of Expertise
TDA........................... Table of Distribution and Allowances
TERC......................... Total Environmental Restoration Contract
TEU ........................... Technical Escort Unit
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TFO ........................... Transactions for Others
TJAG ......................... The Judge Advocate General
TLM .......................... Technical Liaison Manager
TM ............................. Technical Manual
Technical Manager
TPQ ........................... Threshold Planning Quantity
TQM .......................... Total Quality Management
TRADOC .................. U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command
TRC ........................... Technical Review Committee
TSCA......................... Toxic Substances Control Act
TSD ........................... Treatment, Storage, and Disposal
TSDF ......................... Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility
TSG ........................... The Surgeon General
U
UAO .......................... Unilateral Administrative Order
USACE ...................... U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
USAF......................... U.S. Air Force
USAEHA................... U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency
USC ........................... U.S. Code
USCG ........................ U.S. Coast Guard
USE ........................... Used Solvent Elimination
USGS......................... U.S. Geological Survey
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USPS ......................... U.S. Postal Service
UST ........................... Underground Storage Tank
UXO .......................... Unexploded Ordnance
V
VA ............................. Veterans Administration
VE.............................. Value Engineering
VOC .......................... Volatile Organic Compound
W
WA ............................ Work Assignment
WAD ......................... Work Authorization Document/Directive
WAM......................... Work Assignment Manager
WFO .......................... Work for Others (now Support for Others)
WP ............................. White Phosphorus
WSR .......................... Waste Shipment Record
WSRA ....................... Wild and Scenic Rivers Act
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APPENDIX C
GLOSSARY *
*All of these terms do not appear in the text of this pamphlet but are provided as a
reference for the RE to illustrate terms commonly used in HTRW work.
Administrative Order - A legal document signed by EPA directing an individual, business, or
other entity to take corrective action or refrain from an activity. It describes the violations and
actions to be taken, and can be enforced in court.
Administrative Order of Consent - A legal and enforceable agreement signed between EPA and
private potentially responsible parties for site contamination, whereby the responsible parties
agree to perform or pay the cost of site cleanup. The agreement describes actions to be taken at a
site and may be subject to a public comment period. Unlike a consent decree, an administrative
order does not have to be approved by a judge. An administrative order can be required for both
CERCLA and RCRA sites.
Administrative Record - A compilation of documents that records the decision-making process
regarding the selection of a response action to be taken at a site.
Air Stripping - A treatment system that removes, or "strips" volatile organic compounds from
contaminated ground water or surface water for forcing an air stream through the water and
causing the compounds to evaporate.
Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirement (ARAR) - Requirements that are legally
applicable or relevant and appropriate under site-specific circumstances. ARARs may include,
but are not limited to, cleanup standards, standards of control, and other environmental protection
requirements, criteria, or limitations. ARARs may also be Federal, state, or local in origin.
Aquifer - A water bearing geologic formation composed of soil or rock that can supply
groundwater to wells and springs.
Baseline Risk Assessment - An evaluation of the potential threat to human health and the
environment in the absence of any remedial action at a site.
Byproduct Material - Means "any radioactive material, except special nuclear material, yielded in
or made radioactive by exposure to the radiation incident to the process of producing or utilizing
special nuclear material". [H&S Code, Chapter 7.6, Section 25805 (d)].
Carcinogen - A substance that causes cancer.
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Carbon Adsorption - A treatment system where contaminants are removed from groundwater,
surface water, or air when the water/air is forced through tanks containing activated carbon, a
specially treated material that attracts the contaminants.
Categorical Exclusion - A category of actions which do not individually or cumulatively have a
significant effect on the human environment and for which neither an environmental assessment
or an environmental impact statement is required.
Chemical Data Acquisition Plan - A written plan, utilized for all contract and in-house HTRW
projects, which describes all details regarding sampling and analysis for chemical parameters. It
is prepared in accordance with ER 1110-1-263 and is functionally equivalent to the EPA's
Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP).
Chemical Warfare Material(CWM) - This refers to items configured as a munition containing a
chemical substance that is intended to kill, seriously injure, or incapacitate a person through its
physiological effects. It also includes V- and G- series nerve agent, H- series blister agent and
lewisite in other-than-munition configurations. Due to their hazards, prevalence, and militaryunique application, chemical agent identification sets (CAIS) are also considered CWM. CWM
does not include: riot control agents, chemical herbicides, smoke and flame producing agents, or
soil, water, debris or other media contaminated with chemical agent.
Cleanup - Actions taken to deal with a release or threatened release of hazardous substances that
could affect public health and/or the environment. The term "cleanup" is often used broadly to
describe various response actions or phases of remedial responses such as the remedial
investigation/feasibility study.
Clean Air Act (CAA) - The Clean Air Act was enacted in 1970 to protect and enhance the quality
of the nation's air resources in order to protect and maintain the public health and welfare.
Through the Clean Air Act, National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) were established
for six criteria pollutants: carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, particulates
and lead. Monitoring data for these pollutants are used to measure the air quality around the
country. In areas that meet the NAAQSs, "Prevention of Significant Deterioration" programs are
required to maintain air quality standards. In non-attainment areas, programs are required to
reduce air pollutants to meet NAAQSs. To control air emissions, notification and permitting
programs have been instituted which evaluate and monitor air pollution activities. In addition to
establishing NAAQSs, the CAA also regulates toxic air pollutants. There are specific regulations
on a limited number of toxics such as asbestos, mercury, and vinyl chloride. However, under the
new CAA of 1990, regulations for an extensive list of toxic chemicals are to be developed.
Clean Water Act (CWA) - The Clean Water Act was enacted in 1972 as a means to restore and
maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nations' waters. This is primarily
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accomplished through the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Program
and the Section 404 Permit Program.
Closure (as stated in RCRA) - The process in which the owner/operator of a hazardous waste
management facility discontinues active operation by treating, removing form the site, or
disposing of onsite, all hazardous wastes in accordance with an approved closure plan. Closure
entails specific financial guarantees and technical tasks that are included in a closure plan and
which must be implemented. Under RCRA, the facility must be closed in a way that (1)
minimizes the need for further facility maintenance; and (2) controls, minimizes, or eliminates
post-closure escapes of hazardous waste, its Constituents, or byproducts to groundwater or
surface water or to the atmosphere.
Closure Plan - A written plan, subject to approval by authorized regulatory agencies, which the
owner/operator of a hazardous waste management facility must submit with the RCRA permit
application or for interim status closure. The approved plan becomes part of the permit
conditions subsequently imposed on the applicant. The plan identifies steps required to (1)
completely or partially close the facility at any point during its intended operating life, and (2)
completely close the facility at the end of its intended operating life.
Combined Waste - Waste that is not mixed waste and contains both (1) radioactive material and
(2) hazardous waste.
Comment Period - A time period during which the public can review and comment on various
documents and EPA actions. For examples, a comment period is provided when EPA proposes
to add sites to the National Priorities List. Also, a minimum 3-week comment period is held to
allow community members to review and comment on a draft feasibility study.
Community Relations - EPA and/or DOD program to inform and involve the public in the site
remediation process and respond to community concerns.
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA or
Superfund) - A Federal law passed in 1980 and amended in 1986 by the Superfund Amendments
and Reauthorization Act (SARA). The law created a special tax that goes into a Trust Fund,
commonly known as Superfund, to investigate and clean up abandoned or uncontrolled
hazardous waste sites. Under the program, EPA can either:
• Pay for site cleanup when parties responsible for the contamination cannot be located or
are unwilling or unable to perform the work.
• Take legal action to force parties responsible for site contamination to cleanup the site or
pay back the Federal government for the cost of cleanup.
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Consent Decree - A legal document, approved and issued by a judge, that formalized an
agreement reached between EPA and potentially responsible parties (PRPs) where PRPs will
perform all or part of a Superfund site cleanup. The consent decree describes actions that PRPs
are required to perform and is subject to a public comment period.
Containerized HTW (CON/HTW) - HTW which is contained within an underground storage
tank, aboveground storage tank, transformer, hydraulic system, etc. If a release is discovered, the
project category becomes HTW rather than containerized HTW.
Contract Lab Program - Laboratories under contract to EPA which analyze soil, water, and waste
samples taken from areas at or near Superfund sites.
Contracting Officer - An individual with the authority to enter into, administer, and/or terminate
contracts and make related determinations and findings.
Contracting Officer's Representative (COR) - An individual trained to prepare procurement
requests and to monitor contractor performance. The COR is not authorized to sign contracts or
to make changes and modifications to a contract.
Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) - A contiguous area within a facility (as
designated by EPA) for the purpose of implementing RCRA Corrective Action, and which may
contain discrete, engineered land-based sub-units.
Corrective Measures Implementation - Phase IV of the RCRA Corrective Action Process.
Involves designing, constructing, operating, maintaining, and monitoring selected corrective
measures.
Corrective Measures Study - Phase III of the RCRA Corrective Action Process. Required if the
need for corrective measures is identified during the RFI phase and involves identifying,
investigating, and selecting measures to clean up contamination.
Cost-Effective Alternative - The cleanup alternative selected for a site on the National Priorities
List based on technical feasibility, permanence, reliability, and cost. The selected alternative
does not require EPA to choose the lease expensive alternative. It requires that if there are
several cleanup alternatives available that deal effectively with the problems at a site, EPA must
choose the remedy on the basis of permanence, reliability, and cost.
Cost Recovery - A legal process where potentially responsible parties can be required to pay back
the Federal government for money it spends on any cleanup actions.
Data Quality Objectives - Quantitative and qualitative statements that specify the data needed to
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support decisions regarding remedial response activities.
Decision Document - Documentation of response action decisions for all actions at non-NPL
sites and for interim response actions at NPL sites.
Defense Environmental Restoration Account (DERA) - A transfer account, established by the
defense Appropriation Act of 1984, that funds the Installation Restoration Program for active
installations and the Formerly Used Defense Sites Program for formerly owned or used
installations. The account also funds the other goals of the Defense Environmental Restoration
Program.
Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) - Provide centralized program management
for the cleanup of DOD hazardous waste sites consistent with the provisions of CERCLA. The
goals of the program are: (1) the identification, investigation, research and development and
cleanup of contamination from hazardous substances, pollutants, and contaminants, (2)
correction of other environmental damage which creates an imminent and substantial
endangerment to the public health, welfare, or to the environment and (3) demolition and
removal of unsafe buildings and structures.
Delisting - The exclusion (or petitioning for exclusion) of a solid waste from the definition of
"hazardous waste" even though that waste is listed as hazardous under RCRA. To have a waste
delisted, the owner/operator of a facility must petition for a regulatory amendment. The
amendment would exclude only the waste generated at the specific facility for which the
applicant provides demonstrations (sampling, testing, and other procedures subject to strict
requirements under RCRA). To be successful in having a waste delisted, the applicant must
satisfy EPA and/or state authorities that the waste does not meet any of the criteria under which
the waste was listed as "hazardous" or have other harmful constituents.
Endangered Species Act (ESA) - The Endangered Species Act serves to protect species
threatened with extinction.
Endangerment Assessment - A study conducted as a supplement to a remedial investigation to
determine the nature and extent of contamination at a Superfund site and the risks posed to
public health and/or the environment. EPA or State agencies conduct the study when legal action
is pending to require potentially responsible parties to perform or pay for the site cleanup.
Enforcement - EPA's efforts, through legal action if necessary, to force potentially responsible
parties to perform or pay or a Superfund site cleanup.
Enforcement Decision Document - A public document that explains EPA's selection of a cleanup
alternative at a Superfund site through an EPA enforcement action. Similar to a Record of
Decision.
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Environmental Response Team - EPA hazardous waste experts who provide 24-hour technical
assistance to EPA Regional Offices and States during all types of emergencies involving releases
at hazardous waste sites and spills of hazardous substances.
Environmental Assessment - A concise public document for which a Federal agency is
responsible that serves to provide evidence for determining whether to prepare an environmental
impact statement of a finding of no significant impact.
Environmental Impact Statement - A public document with a primary purpose of ensuring that
NEPA policies and goals are incorporated early into the programs and actions of Federal
agencies.
Facility (as stated under CERCLA) - (1) Any building, structure, installation, equipment, pipe or
pipeline (including any pipe into a sewer or publicly owned treatment works), well, pit, pond,
lagoon, impoundment, ditch, landfill, storage container, motor vehicle, rolling stock, or aircraft;
or (2) any site or area where a hazardous substance has been deposited, stored, deposed of or
placed, or has otherwise come to be located.
Feasibility Study (FS) - A study undertaken to develop and evaluate alternatives for remedial
action.
Federal Agency Hazardous Waste Compliance Docket - A list, maintained by EPA of Federal
hazardous waste treatment, storage, disposal, and spill sites. The Docket include information
submitted by Army installations under Sections 3005, 3010, and 3016 of the Solid Waste
Disposal Act and Sections 103 and 120 of CERCLA.
Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA) - The Federal Facilities Compliance Act of 1992
amended the Solid Waste Disposal Act to clarify provisions concerning the application of certain
requirements and sanctions to Federal Facilities. Important aspects of this Act are:
• The United States has waived sovereign immunity with respect
to certain substantive or procedural requirements of the Solid Waste Disposal Act.
• Federal facilities are now subject to administrative orders, civil and administrative
penalties and fines.
• No Federal employee, or officer of the U.S. shall be personally liable for any civil
penalty under any Federal, State, interstate, or local solid or hazardous waste law with
respect to any act or omission within the scope of the official duties of the agent,
employee or officer.
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• The Act does not provide Federal employee protection for criminal penalties or
fines.
• Federal facilities are subject to reasonable service charges for fees assessed in
connection with the processing and issuance of permits, renewal of permits, amendments
to permits, review of plans, studies, and other documents, and inspection and monitoring
of facilities, as well as any other nondiscriminatory charges that are assessed in
connection with a Federal, state, interstate, or local solid waste or hazardous waste
regulatory program.
Finding of No Significant Impact - A document prepared by a Federal agency presenting reasons
why an action will not have a significant effect on the human environment and for which an
environmental impact statement will not be prepared.
First Line Review - A detailed review of a deliverable by all technical disciplines at one level up
from the production of the deliverable. For the HTRW CX, all appropriate technical disciplines
will provide a review, with or without comments.
Formal Project Management - Project management in accordance with ER 5-1-11.
FUDS Project - For the purposes of "project management", a FUDS project is defined as all
activities at an eligible site necessary to cleanup the site in accordance with all applicable
environmental laws, regulations, and policies.
Generator (as stated in RCRA) - Any person, by site, whose process produces a hazardous waste
or whose actions first cause a hazardous waste to become subject to regulation.
Groundwater - Water found beneath the earth's surface and located in voids between soil and
rock.
Hazardous Material - A Department of Transportation term used to describe materials regulated
under the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA). Materials designated as hazardous
for the purpose of transportation are listed in 49 CFR 172. This list of hazardous materials
includes hazardous substances, hazardous wastes, and petroleum products.
Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) - Modifications to RCRA that were enacted
on November 8, 1984.
Hazardous Chemical [as defined in CERCLA Title III, Section 311(e)] - Any chemical that is a
physical hazard or a health hazard, except:
• Any food, food additive, color additive, drug, or cosmetic regulated by the Food and Drug
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Administration;
• Any substance present as a solid in any manufactured item to the extent exposure to the
substance does not occur under normal conditions of use;
• Any substance to the extent it is used for personal, family, or household purposes, or is
present in the same form and concentration as a product packaged for distribution and use by the
general public;
• Any substance to the extent it is used in a research laboratory or a hospital or other
medical facility under the direct supervision of a technically qualified individual; and
• Any substance to the extent it is used in routine agricultural operations or as a fertilizer
held for sale by a retailer to the ultimate customer.
Hazardous Constituent (as defined in RCRA, Appendix VIII to 40 CFR 261 or Appendix IX of
40 CFR 264) - chemicals which have been shown in reputable scientific studies to have toxic,
carcinogenic, mutagenic or teratogenic effects on humans or other life forms.
Hazard Ranking System - A scoring system used to evaluate potential relative risks to public
health and the environment from releases or threatened releases of hazardous substances. EPA
and States use the HRS to calculate a site score, from 0 to 100, based on the actual or potential
release of hazardous substances from a site through air, surface water, or groundwater to affect
people. This score is the primary factor used to decide if a hazardous waste site should be placed
on the National Priorities List.
Hazardous Substance (as stated in CERCLA) - Any substance designated pursuant to Section
311(b) (2) (A) of the Clean Water Act; any element, compound, mixture, solution or substance
designated pursuant to Section 102 of [email protected] any hazardous wastes having the
characteristics identified under or listed pursuant to Section 3001 of the Solid Waste Disposal
Act (but not including any waste the regulation of which under the Solid Waste Disposal Act has
been suspended by Act of Congress) ; any toxic pollutant listed under Section 307 (a) of the
Clean Water Act; any hazardous air pollutant listed under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act and
any imminently hazardous chemical substance or mixture with respect to which the EPA
Administrator has taken action pursuant to Section 7 of the Toxic Substances Control Act. The
definition specifically excludes petroleum, including crude oil or any fraction thereof which is
not otherwise specifically listed or designated as a hazardous substance in the first sentence of
this paragraph, and the term does not include natural gas, natural gas liquids, liquefied natural
gas of synthetic gas usable for fuel (or mixtures of natural gas and such synthetic gas). The list
of hazardous substances is found in 40 CFR 302.
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Hazardous Waste
a. General Definition - in general, the term "hazardous waste" is used to cover all
hazardous wastes and toxic chemicals. However, "hazardous waste" has a specific meaning
under RCRA. Alternately, CERCLA governs "hazardous substances, pollutants, and
contaminants" which includes more than just RCRA "hazardous waste".
b. RCRA Definition (as defined in Title 40 CFR 261) - hazardous waste is a waste
material that is:
(1) "listed" on one of the four predetermined hazardous waste lists; the (F, K, P, or U
lists)
F - Specific Source Waste
K - Non-specific Source Waste
P - Acutely toxic wastes from discarded commercial chemical products, off specification
species, container residues, and spill residues.
U - Toxic wastes from discarded commercial chemical products, off-specification
species, container residues, and spill residues.
or
(2) one that possesses one of four hazardous characteristics:
(a) ignitability
(b) corrosivity
(c) reactivity
(d) toxicity
Health Assessment - An assessment of existing risk to human health posed by NPL Sites,
prepared by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.
Hazardous, Toxic and Radioactive Waste (HTRW) - A USACE idiom referring to substances
which because of their properties, occurrence, concentration, or regulatory status, may potentially
pose a threat to human health and welfare, or the environment. This includes, but is not limited
to, PCBs regulated by TSCA, radioactive wastes, and materials - defined as hazardous waste,
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hazardous substances, and pollutants by Federal regulation. Refer to ER 1165-2-132 for Civil
Works limitations on this definition.
High Level Radioactive Waste - Means "(1) irradiated reactor fuel, (2) liquid waste resulting
from the operation of the first cycle solvent extraction system, or equivalent, and the
concentrated wastes from subsequent extraction cycles, or equivalent, in a facility for processing
irradiated reactor fuel, and (3) solids into which such liquid wastes have been converted". [H&S
Code, Chapter 7.6, Art.2, Section 25805 (1)].
HTRW Program - Activities managed by USACE involving the cleanup of HTRW and OEW
sites, UST removals, implementation of the ECAS program, and other related activities.
Hydrology - The science dealing with the properties, movement, and effects of water on the
earth's surface, in the soil and rocks below, and in the atmosphere.
Incineration - Burning of certain types of solid, liquified, or gaseous materials under controlled
conditions to destroy hazardous waste.
Information Repository - A file containing current information, technical reports, and reference
documents regarding a Superfund site. The information repository is usually located in a public
building that is convenient for local residents - such as a public school, city hall, or library.
In-House Project - A project or portions of a project that are planned and executed by in-house
technical staff at the HTRW design district.
Innovative Technology - Technology for which the design criteria are still under development
and for which there are few full-scale demonstrations. In functional terms, innovative
technologies are defined "as those treatment technologies for source control other than
incineration and solidification/stabilization and pumping with conventional treatment for
groundwater." Consideration of innovative and alternatives technology was mandated by SARA.
Interim Status (as stated in RCRA) - The period during which the owner/operator of an existing
TSD facility is treated as having been issued a RCRA permit even though he/she has not yet
received a final determination. Owner/operator of new facilities cannot by definition qualify for
interim status. An existing facility may automatically qualify for interim status if the
owner/operator files both timely "notification" and the first part (Part A) of the RCRA permit
application. Interim status continues until the permit is issued. Interim status should not be
confused with interim authorization that relates to state programs, not to permit applicants.
IRP Project - For the purposes of "project management", an IRP project consists of all remedial
activities executed by USACE on an installation. Remedial activities may occur on one or more
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operable units, contiguous areas, or a group of contaminated areas defined on a workplan.
Leachate - A contaminated liquid resulting when water percolates, or trickles, through waste
materials and collects components of those wastes. Leaching may occur at landfills and may
result in hazardous substances entering soil, surface water, or ground water.
Lead Quality Assurance (QA) Laboratory - A laboratory capable to provide QA analytical
support for all needed analytical methods in all required matrices. Able to provide QA support
for analytical work being performed in-house by other division laboratories. Develop procedures
and protocols for adoption by other division laboratories.
Low-Level Radioactive Waste - Means "any radioactive waste except high-level radioactive
waste and transuaranic wastes". [H&S Code, Chapter 7.6, Art. 2, Section 25805 (1)].
Management - The act of directing or supervising the activities of others to accomplish a
mission.
Mandatory Review - First or second line review of "key" deliverable documents as delineated in
appendices D, E, F, and G. All mandatory reviews are concurrent or within established project
schedules. The CX will provide disposition of review and comments in the form of official
correspondence to the district for this type of review.
Manifest (as stated in RCRA) - Shipping document EPA form 8700-22 and, if necessary, EPA
form 8700-22A, originated and signed by the generator in accordance with the instructions
included in the Appendix to 40 CFR 262.
Matrix Management - Utilizing USACE corporate resources for execution support (i.e., assets of
HTRW CX, design districts," divisions, etc.).
Mixed Waste - Means "waste that contains both hazardous waste and source, special nuclear, or
byproduct material subject to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954". [Federal Facility/Compliance
Act, Section 3021 (b)(41)]
Monitor (review function) - Deliverables are provided for information. No time critical
mandatory review is required.
Monitoring Wells - Special wells drilled at specific locations on or off a hazardous waste site
where groundwater can be sampled at selected depths and studied to determine such things as the
direction in which groundwater flows and the types and amounts of contaminants present.
National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) - The National Environmental Policy Act was
established in 1969 to ensure Federal activities safeguard against environmental degradation.
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Federal agencies are required to include NEPA in their planning process.
National Priorities List - EPA's list of the most serious uncontrolled or abandoned hazardous
waste sites identified for possible long-term remedial response using money from the Trust Fund.
The list is based primarily on the score a site receives on the Hazard Ranking System (HRS).
EPA is required to update the NPL at least once a year.
National Oil and Hazardous Substance Contingency Plan [National Contingency Plan (NCP)] - A
plan that provides for efficient, coordinated and effective response to discharges of oil and
releases of hazardous substances, pollutants and contaminants in accordance with CERCLA and
the Clean Water Act. Its full title is the "National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution
Control Plan" and is found at 40CFR 300.
National Response Center (NRC) - The Federal operations center that receives notification of all
releases of oil and hazardous substances into the environment. The Center is operated by the
U.S. Coast Guard, which evaluates all reports and notifies the appropriate agency. The NRC can
be contacted 24 hours a day, toll-free at (800) 424-8802.
National Response Team (NRT) - Representatives of 13 Federal agencies who, as a team,
coordinate federal response to nationally significant incidents of pollution and provide advice
and technical assistance to the responding agencies before and during a response action.
Non-Time-Critical Removal Action - A removal action with six months or more available for
planning (compares to Time-Critical Removal Action).
Notice of Intent - A notice that an environmental impact statement will be prepared and
considered.
On-Scene Coordinator (as stated in the NCP) - A Federal official predesignated by EPA or the
US Coast Guard to coordinate and direct Federal responses under Subpart D (Operational
Response Phase for Oil Removal), or the Official designated by the lead agency to coordinate
and direct removal actions under Subpart E (Hazardous Substance Response), of the NCP.
Operable Unit (as stated in the NCP) - A discrete portion of a remedial response that by itself
eliminates or mitigates a release, threat of a release or pathway of exposure and that requires no
additional action to accomplish its objective. The cleanup of a site can be divided into a number
of "operable units", depending on the complexity of the problems associated with the site.
Operable units may consist of any set of actions performed over time or any actions that are
concurrent but located in different parts of a site.
Operation and Maintenance - Activities conducted at a site after a response action occurs, to
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ensure that the cleanup or containment system is functioning properly.
Ordnance and Explosive Waste (OEW) - Bombs and warhead; guided and ballistic missiles;
artillery, mortar, and rocket ammunition; small arms ammunition; anti-personnel and anti-tank
land mines; demolition charges; pyrotechnics; grenades; torpedoes and depth charges;
containerized or uncontainerized high explosives and propellants; chemical agents; and all
similar or related items or components explosive in nature or otherwise designed to cause
damage to personnel or material. Soils contaminated with explosives will be considered OEW if
the concentration is sufficient to present an imminent safety hazard due to explosion or exposure
to chemical warfare agents. Soils contaminated with explosives that do not constitute an
imminent safety hazard due to explosion or exposure to chemical warfare agents will be
evaluated following HTRW procedures. Surface water and groundwater contaminated with
explosives will be evaluated following HTRW procedures.
Part A (as stated in RCRA) - The first part of the two-part RCRA permit application. To satisfy
application requirements for Part A, an applicant must complete and submit the appropriate
federal and/or state Consolidated Permit Application Forms. The Part A (and Part B) deadline
for new facilities is at least 180 days before construction of a facility is scheduled to begin.
Part B (as stated in RCRA) - The second and more complicated part of the two-part RCRA
permit application. Applicants must submit Part B in narrative form to the designated agency
and include detailed treatment of a wide range of activities and procedures needed for their
facilities to demonstrate proper protection of human health and the environment. To satisfy
requirements for Part B, there may be a state form, but there is no federal form to guide you as in
Part A. For existing facilities, HSWA defines the deadlines for submitting Part B which will be
called at the discretion of regulatory authorities.
Parts Per Billion/Parts Per Million - Units commonly used to express low concentrations of
contaminants. For example, 1 ounce of trichloroethylene (TCE) in 1 million ounces of water is 1
ppm; 1 ounce of TCE in 1 billion ounces of water is 1 ppb. If one drop of TCE is mixed in a
competition-size swimming pool, the water will contain about 1 ppb of TCE.
Pollutant and Contaminant (as stated in the NCP) - Any element, substance, compound or
mixture, including disease-causing agents, which after release into the environment and upon
exposure, ingestion, inhalation or assimilation onto any organism, either directly from the
environment or indirectly by ingestion through food chains, will or may reasonably be anticipated
to cause death, disease, behavioral abnormalities, cancer, genetic mutation, physiological
malfunctions (including malfunctions in reproduction) or physical deformations, in such
organisms or their offspring. The term does not include petroleum, including crude oil or any
fraction thereof which is not otherwise specifically listed or designated as a hazardous substance
under Section 101(14) (a) through (f) of CERCLA, nor does it include natural gas, liquefied
natural gas or synthetic gas of pipeline quality (or mixtures of natural gas and such synthetic gas).
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For purposes of Subpart E (Hazardous Substance Response) of the NCP, the term pollutant or
contaminant means any pollutant or contaminant that may present an imminent and substantial
danger to public health or welfare.
Post-Closure Plan (as stated in RCRA) - Like a closure plan, except that this plan identifies the
activities (monitoring, maintenance, etc.) to be carried on after closure of a hazardous waste
management facility.
Potentially Responsible Party (PRP) - Current and former owners or operators and persons who
may be accountable for having generated hazardous substances or were involved in transport,
treatment, or disposal of hazardous substances at a site under litigation.
Predesign - Activities involved in defining the problems on a site and in determining the most
feasible solution(s) which ultimately lead to the preparation of a design (i.e., plans and
specifications) for remediation of the problem.
Preliminary Assessment (PA) - An initial analysis of existing information to determine if a
release may require additional investigation or action.
Program Management - A systematic way of making certain a program is conducted efficiently.
Program management includes Providing adequate resources and guidance, conducting audits,
and continually reviewing the program to ensure the success of the program.
Project - For the purpose of project management, a "project" is defined as all activities at an
HTRW site necessary to clean up the site in accordance with all applicable environmental laws,
regulations, and policies.
Project Management - A systematic way of integrating all aspects of a project including
technical, contractual, real estate, regulatory, and policy considerations to make certain a quality
project is completed and delivered to the customer within budget and on schedule.
Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) - A system of procedures, checks, audits, and
corrective actions used to ensure that field work and laboratory analysis during the investigation
and cleanup of Superfund sites meet established standards.
Radioactive Material - Means "any material or combination of materials that spontaneously emits
ionizing radiation". [H&S Code, Chapter 7, Section 256000.5(f)].
Radioactive Waste - Equipment or materials, which are radioactive or have radioactive
contamination and which are required, pursuant to any governing laws, regulations, or licenses,
to be disposed of as radioactive waste. For handling and disposal purposes radioactive waste is
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31 May 00
categorized as high level, transuranic, or low level. Low level waste that also contains
chemically hazardous components is termed mixed waste. The category most likely to be
encountered on USACE projects is low level radioactive waste including mixed waste. Low
level waste is divided into classes based on the degree of rigor required of the disposal method.
Refer 10 CFR, Part 61. Also, radioactive waste means "any radioactive material that is discarded
as nonusable". [H&S Code, Chapter 7, Section 256000.5(g)].
RCRA Facility Assessment - Phase I of the RCRA Corrective Action process. An evaluation of
a RCRA-regulated site performed by EPA or a State agency to establish the likelihood of a threat
at the site and the need for subsequent corrective action.
RCRA Facility Investigation - Phase II of the RCRA Corrective Action process. A technical
phase that follows a RCRA facility assessment, executed to thoroughly characterize the nature
and extent of releases at a site.
Record of Decision - A public document that explains which cleanup alternative(s) will be used
at National Priorities List sites where the Trust Fund pays for the cleanup. The Record of
Decision is based on information and technical analysis generated during the remedial
investigation/feasibility study and consideration of public comments and community concerns.
Regional Response Team - Representatives of Federal, State, and local agencies who may assist
in coordination of activities at the request of the On-Scene Coordinator or Remedial Project
Manager before and during response actions.
Release (as stated in CERCLA) - Any spilling, leaking, pumping, pouring, emitting, emptying,
discharging, injecting, escaping, leaching, dumping or disposing, into the environment (including
the abandonment or discarding of barrels, containers and other closed receptacle containing any
hazardous substance or pollutant or contaminant), but excludes (A) any release which results in
exposure to persons solely within a workplace, with respect to a claim which such persons may
assert against the employer of such persons, (B) emissions from the engine exhaust of a motor
vehicle, rolling stock, aircraft, vessel, or pipeline pumping station engine, (C), release of source,
by-product, or special nuclear material from a nuclear incident, as those terms are defined in the
Atomic Energy Act of 1954, if such release is subject to requirements with respect to financial
protection established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under Section 170 or such Act or,
for the purposes of Section 104 of this title or any other response action, any release of source byproduct, or special nuclear material from any processing site designated under Section 102(1) or
302(a) of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, and (D) the normal
application of fertilizer.
Remedial Action (RA) - The actual construction or implementation phase that follows the
remedial design of the selected cleanup alternative at a site on the National Priorities List.
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Remedial Design (RD) - An engineering phase that follows the Record of Decision when
technical drawings and specifications are developed for the subsequent remedial action at a site
on the National Priorities List.
Remedial Investigation (RI) - The process undertaken to determine the nature and extent of the
problem presented by a release which emphasizes data collection and site characterization. The
remedial investigation is generally performed concurrently and in an interdependent fashion with
the feasibility study.
Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study - Two distinct but related studies. They are usually
performed at the same time, and together referred to as the "RI/FS". They are intended to:
• Gather the data necessary to determine the type and extent of contamination at a
Superfund site;
• Establish criteria for cleaning up the site;
• Identify and screen cleanup alternatives for remedial action; and
• Analyze in detail the technology and costs of the alternatives
Remedial Project Manager (RPM) - An individual, designated within an EPA Region, who
directs Federal fund-financed remedial actions and coordinates all other Federal actions at the
scene. The RPM is the counterpart of the On-Scene Coordinator for removal actions.
Remedial Response - A long-term action that stops or substantially reduces a release or
threatened release, of a hazardous substance, that is serious, but does not pose an immediate
threat to public health and/or environment.
Removal Action (RA) ( as stated in CERCLA) - The cleanup or removal of released hazardous
substances from the environment, such actions as may be necessary taken in the event of the
threat of release of hazardous substances into the environment, such actions may be necessary to
monitor, assess and evaluate the release or threat of release of hazardous substances, the disposal
of removal material, or the taking of such other actions as may be necessary to prevent, minimize
or mitigate damage to the public health or welfare or to the environment, which may otherwise
result from a release or threat of release. The term includes, in addition, without being limited to,
security fencing or other measures to limit access, provision of alternative water supplies,
temporary evacuation and housing of threatened individuals not otherwise provided for, action
taken under Section 104(b) of this Act and any emergency assistance which may be provided
under the Disaster Relief Act of 1974.
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Reportable Quantity (RQ) - The quantity of hazardous substance considered reportable under
CERCLA in the event of a release. Reportable quantities are identified in 40 CFR 302.5 and may
be 1, 10, 100, 1,000, or 5,000 pounds. Quantities are to be measured over a 24-hour period.
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) - A Federal law passed in 1976 and modified
in 1984 by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). RCRA has established a
regulatory system to track hazardous waste from the time of generation to disposal, (cradle-tograve). The law requires safe and secure procedures to be used in treating, transporting, storing,
and disposing of hazardous waste. RCRA is designed to prevent new, uncontrolled hazardous
waste sites.
Response Action - Any remedial action, removal action, or cleanup at a site under CERCLA 101
(25). Includes, but is not limited to:
• Enforcement-related activities.
• Removing hazardous materials from a site to an EPA approved, licensed hazardous waste
facility for treatment, containment, or destruction.
• Containing the waste safely on-site to eliminate further problems.
• Destroying or treating the waste on-site using incineration or other technologies.
• Identifying and removing the source of ground-water contamination and halting further
movement of the contaminants.
Responsiveness Summary - A summary of oral and/or written public comments received by EPA
during a comment period on key EPA documents, and EPA's responses to those comments. The
responsiveness summary is especially valuable during the Record of Decision phase at a site on
the National Priorities List when it highlights community concerns for EPA decision-makers.
Risk Assessment - A qualitative and quantitative evaluation performed to determine the risk
posed to human health and/or the environment by the presence or potential presence and/or use
of specific pollutants. Baseline risk assessments are performed as part of the RI.
Safety and Health Program/Plan (SHP) - A written safety and health program/plan for employees
involved in hazardous waste operations meeting the criteria contained in 29 CFR 1910.120 (b),
and EM 385-1-1, Section 1, paragraph 01.A. Safety and health programs developed and
implemented to meet other Federal, State, or local government regulations are considered
acceptable if they cover or are modified to fully cover the applicable topics in these criteria.
Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) - The Safe Drinking Water Act was enacted in 1974 to ensure
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31 May 00
the quality of the nations drinking water. Water quality standards have been established to
achieve this goal. Primary drinking water standards, are either maximum contaminant levels
(MCLs) that must be attained, or specific treatment technologies that must be applied. Secondary
drinking water standards are aesthetic standards dealing with properties such as color and odor
that are a measure of water quality, but are not enforceable standards. Whereas water exceeding
primary drinking water standards can not be distributed for consumption, water exceeding
secondary drinking water standards can be distributed. In addition to establishing primary and
secondary standards, EPA also promulgates maximum contaminant level goals (MCLGs). These
are risk-based goals toward which water quality is aimed, but attainment is not mandatory.
Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) - A contractor is required to prepare and submit a SAP for
acceptance prior to commencement of sampling activities. A SAP is comprised of a Field
Sampling Plan (FSP) and a Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP). The FSP defines
requirements for sampling, field documentation, onsite chemical analysis, sample packaging, etc.
The QAPP defines the laboratory analytical and chemical data reporting requirements.
Second Line Review - At a minimum, second line review takes the form of a QA review. A QA
review involves a limited review of the deliverable and/or review of the first line review
comments.
Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP) - A written plan, separate and distinct from the SHP
(although considered a site-specific component of the SHP), prepared by USACE contractors
(either AE or Construction Services Contractor) or developed by qualified USACE occupational
health/industrial hygiene/safety personnel for in-house HTRW field activities which describes the
methods by which the contractor or USACE personnel will meet the safety and health
requirements of OSHA standards, 29 CFR 1910 and 1926 (specifically 1910.120, EM 385-1-1,
and the technical contract specification provision - SAFETY, HEALTH, AND EMERGENCY
RESPONSE, if applicable). The SSHP will be considered to satisfy the provision for an
Accident Prevention Plan required by FAR clause 52.236-13 if it incorporates the requirements
of EM 385-1-1, specifically section 01.A to include activity hazard analyses. (In addition to
construction contracts, service, supply, or research and development contracting
actions for HTRW site investigation, design, or remediation activities shall specify the use of
FAR 52.236-13).
Site Inspection (SI) - An on-site inspection to determine whether there is a release or potential
release and the nature of the associated threats. The purpose is to augment the data collected in
the preliminary assessment and to generate, if necessary, sampling and other field data to
determine if further action or investigation is appropriate. The information is used to score the
site with the Hazard Ranking System.
Small Quantity Generator (as stated in RCRA) - A regulated facility that generates more than 100
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31 May 00
kilograms and less than 1,000 kilograms (about 1 ton) of hazardous waste in a calendar month.
However, even if a small quantity generator avoids the permitting process itself, the facility may
still be subject to certain RCRA conditions (e.g., if the quantity of acutely hazardous wastes
generated in a calendar month exceeds quantities specified under RCRA).
Solid Waste (as stated in RCRA) - Any garbage, refuse, sludge, or other waste materials not
excluded by definition. Exclusions (materials not defined as "solid wastes") include domestic
sewage and any mixture of other wastes that pass through a sewer system to a publicly owned
treatment works; industrial wastewater discharges that are point source discharges subject to
regulation under the Clean Water Act, as amended; irrigation return flows; material defined by
the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; and in-situ mining material. Note: EPA defines
hazardous waste as a subset of solid waste.
Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) - Any discernable waste management unit from which
hazardous constituents may migrate, irrespective of whether the unit was intended for the
management of solid or hazardous wastes. The types of units considered SWMUs are landfills,
surface impoundments, waste piles, land treatment units, incinerators, injection wells, tanks,
container storage areas, wastewater treatment systems, and transfer stations. In addition, areas
associated with production processes at facilities that have become contaminated as a result of
routine, systematic, and deliberate releases of wastes (which may include abandoned or discarded
product), or hazardous constituents from wastes, are considered SWMUs.
Source Material - Means "(1) uranium or thorium, or any other material which the department
declares by rule to be source material after the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, or
any successor thereto, has determined the material to be such, or, (2) areas containing one or
more of the foregoing materials, in such concentration as the department declares by rule to be
source material after the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, or any successor thereto,
has determined the material in such concentration to be source material. [H&S Code, Chapter
7.6, Art. 2, Section 25805 (e)].
Special Nuclear Material - Means "(1) Plutonium, uranium 233, uranium enriched in the isotope
233 or in the isotope 235; and any other material which the department declares by rules to be
special nuclear material after the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission or any successor
thereto, has determined the material to be such, but does not include source material; or, (2) any
material artificially enriched by any of the foregoing; but does not include source material".
[H&S Code, Chapter 7.6, Art. 2, Section 25805 (f)].
Subtitle C (of RCRA) - A principal regulatory provision of RCRA which establishes a
comprehensive "cradle to grave" program to regulate hazardous wastes from generation through
disposal.
Surface Water - Bodies of water that are above ground, such as rivers, lakes, and streams.
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31 May 00
Superfund - The common name used for the Comprehensive Environmental Response,
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), also referred to as the Trust Fund, and any
amendments thereafter.
Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) - Modifications to CERCLA enacted
on October 17, 1986.
Superfund Project - For the purposes of "project management", a Superfund project is a Federal
lead project executed by USACE. A project consists of all phases (RD and RA) and all operable
units at a site.
Technical Review - The review of those aspects of a project relating to the application of
scientific, engineering, regulatory, and legal principles to solve a problem or achieve a goal.
Time-Critical Removal Action - A removal action with less than six months available for
planning (compare to Non-Time-Critical Removal Action).
Toxic Substances Control Act - Whereas RCRA controls the disposal of hazardous wastes after
they have been generated, TSCA was enacted in 1976 to evaluate toxic substances before they
are used and to control the manner in which they are used.
Transuranic Waste - Means "any waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting
transuaranic elements per gram of waste material". [H&S Code, Chapter 7/6, Art. 2, Section
25805 (1)]
Treatability Study - A bench or pilot scale study conducted during the pre-design or design phase
to demonstrate the feasibility of and to refine operational parameters for a candidate remedial
technology.
Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) Facility - Any building, structure, or installation where a
hazardous waste has been treated, stored, or disposed. TSD facilities are regulated by EPA and
States under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.
Trust Fund - A fund set up under CERCLA to help pay for cleanup of hazardous waste sites and
to take legal action to force those responsible for the sites to clean them up.
Underground Storage Tank (UST) - One or more tanks, including underground connective
piping, that stores "regulated substances" and that is more than 10%, by volume, below the
surface of the ground. Regulated substances include hazardous chemical products regulated
under CERCLA and petroleum products. The UST program, under Subtitle I of RCRA, for the
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31 May 00
first time applies the RCRA program for storage of products and hazardous substances.
Underground tanks containing hazardous waste are regulated under Subtitle C of RCRA.
Volatile Organic Compound - An organic (carbon-containing) compound that evaporates
(volatilizes) readily at room temperature.
Water Purveyor - A public utility, mutual water company, county water district, or municipality
that delivers drinking water to customers, (i.e., Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW)).
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Appendix D
Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects
Location
Technology
Const. Contractor
Contract
Type
Award Date
POC
Bruin Lagoon
SUPERFUND
Bruin, PA
Ex-Situ Stabilization
Geo-Con, Inc.
FFP/UP
22 Nov 88
Gary J. Lang
(412) 472-0256
Groundwater Extraction System
SUPERFUND
Erie, PA
Pump & Treat
IT Corp.
FFP
13 Oct 89
Gary J. Lang
(412) 472-0256
Water Treatment Plant
SUPERFUND
Erie, PA
Pump & Treat
YWC, Inc.
(Wheelabrator, Inc.)
FFP
06 Jun 90
Gary J. Lang
(412) 472-0256
Drake Chemical
SUPERFUND
Lock Haven, PA
Incineration
OHM
CPFF
Nov 94
David Modricker
(717) 748-4505
Waldick
SUPERFUND
Sea Girt, NJ
Low Temp. Incineration
Rust
FFP
Nov 92
David Modricker
(717) 748-4505
Aberdeen Proving Ground
IRP/BRAC
Aberdeen, MD
UXO&CWM removal, groundwater
groundwater pump &treat, RCRA
cap, Sand cap cover, low level
radiation fragmentation barriers
Weston
Foster Wheeler (IDT)
Kaiser (TERC)
Weston
T&M
CPFF
CPIF
CPFF
Robert Rizzieri
Craig Maurer
Billy Sanders
Craig Mauer
(410) 671-6003
Halby Chemical Site
SUPERFUND/Removal Action
Wilmington, DE
In-Situ Oxidation of Reactive
TERRA Construction Ltd. Lagoon soil, capture and
Incineration Of reaction off-gas, drum
Disposal, Soil stabilization
-
Craig Maurer
(410) 671-6003
Croyden TCE
SUPERFUND/PRP
Croyden, PA
Waterline construction
-
05 Oct 89
Lawrence J. Piazza
(717) 895-7052
Heleva Landfill
SUPERFUND/PRP
Lehigh Cty, PA\
Landfill Cap
CWM
14 Mar 89
Lawrence J. Piazza
(717)895-7052
Palmerton Zinc
SUPERFUND/PRP
Palmerton, PA
Land reclamation
Beneficial use of waste
Products (sewage sludge &
Flyash)
Horsehead Resource
-
90
Lawrence J. Piazza
(717) 895-7052
Heleva
SUPERFUND/PRP
Lehigh Cty, PA
Groundwater Pump &Treat
McLaren Hart
FFP
98
Lawrence J. Piazza
(717) 895-7052
Onsite Incineration,
Excavation & Grading, use
Synthetic leaching procedure
Foster Wheeler
97
Lawrence J. Piazza
(717) 895-7052
Project
Phone
D-1. BALTIMORE DISTRICT
Revere Chemical Site
SUPERFUND.PRP
PA
D-1
-
FFP
-
89
94
95
95
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects
Project
Location
Technology
Const. Contractor
Contract
Type
Award Date
POC
OHM
-
98
Lawrence J. Piazza
-
-
87
Lawrence J. Piazza
(717) 895-7052
Phone
(in lieu of TCLP)
Revere Chemical Site
SUPERFUND/PRP
PA
Landfill Cap, use synthetic
leaching procedure (in lieu
of TCLP)
(717) 895-7052
Taylor Borough Landfill
SUPERFUND/PRP
Taylor, PA
Landfill Containment
Drum Removal, Excavation,
Offsite Disposal
Warrington Nike Site
FUDS
Warrington, PA
Asbestos Removal, USTs
OHM
CPFF
89
Lawrence J. Piazza
(717) 895-7052
913th Air Wing
BRAC
Willow Grove, PA
USTs
Env. Const. &
Remediation Inc.
FFP
97
Lawrence J. Piazza
(717) 895-7052
-
98
Lawrence J. Piazza
(717) 895-7052
13 Oct 89
Jim Harbert
(717) 894-7052
Oversight
27 Sep 89
Craig Maurer
(410) 671-6003
C&D Recycling
SUPERFUND/PRP
Foster township, PA
In-Situ, Ex-Situ Stabilization
Demolition, Excavation,
Offsite Disposal, TCLP/SLP
Reduction using proprietary
Additive (Enviroblend)
Earth Tech/ERM
Moyers Landfill
SUPERFUND/PRP
Montgomery, PA
Cap
-
Delaware Sand and Gravel
SUPERFUND/PRP
New Castle, DE
Cap
Lagoon Closure
IRP
Letterkenney Army Depot On-site Low Temp Thermal
Chambersburg, PA
Desorption/Landfill
Containment
Associated Chemical
& Env. Services
(ACES)
FFP
20 Sep 88
Bill Werntges
(717) 782-3750
East Mt Zion Landfill
SUPERFUND
York, PA
Republic Env.
(Philips Services)
FFP
30 May 97
Bill Werntges
(717) 782-3750
Rodale
SUPERFUND/PRP
Lehigh Valley, PA
Groundwater Pump &
Treat, Onsite Incineration
Uses thermal desorption
To clear gas stream
Square D
-
-
Lawrence J. Piazza
(717)895-7052
Tacony Warehouse
BRAC
Philadelphia, PA
Groundwater Pump &
Treat, Asbestos Removal,
Drum Removal
Radian Intl / Env.
Constr.&Remediation
Inc.
FFP/
CPFF
95
Lawrence J. Piazza
(717)895-7052
Landfill Containment
(Cap)
Sevenson Env.
-
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects
Location
Technology
Tysons Dump
SUPERFUND/PRP
Tyson, PA
Vapor Extraction
TERRA VAC / ERM
Dorney Road
SUPERFUND/PRP
Allentown, PA
Landfill Containment
Former Frankford Arsenal
FUDS
Philadelphia, PA
Moyer Landfill
SUPERFUND/PRP
Montgomery County,
PA
Moyer Landfill Treatment
SUPERFUND/PRP
Montgomery County,
PA
Tacony Warehouse
BRAC
Tacony, PA
Groundwater Pump &
Treat, Asbestos Removal,
USTs
Strasburg Landfill
SUPERFUND
Chester County, PA
Landfill Containment,
Groundwater Pump &
Treat, use UV oxidation
to destroy VOCs, AOP
treatment of groundwater
Philadelphia Naval Gear
Industrial Facility
FUDS/PRP
Lester, PA
USTs
Austin Ave. Radiation
SUPERFUND/PRP
Landsdown, PA
Valley Forge General Hospital
FUDS/PRP
Project
Const. Contractor
Contract
Type
Award Date
POC
Phone
-
89
Lawrence J. Piazza
(717)895-7052
Four Seasons
-
98
Lawrence J. Piazza/
James M. Harbert
(717) 895-7052
Demolition, Asbestos
Removal, USTs, ASTs
Env. Constr &
Remediation Radian
International
FFP/
CPFF
95
Lawrence J. Piazza
(717)895-7052
Landfill Containment
Chemical Waste Management
90 & 93
James M. Harbert
(717) 895-7052
-
98
James M. Harbert
(717) 895-7052
FP/
CPFF
93
James M. Harbert
(717) 895-7052
Smith Tech. (bankrupt)
Reliance National
(Surety Earth Tech
completion KR)
FFP
97
James M. Harbert/
Roger A. Moore
(717) 895-7052
Radian Int’l
FFP
96
James M. Harbert
(717) 895-7052
Demolition, Radioactive
Sevenson Env.
Removal/Cleanup
Rebuild of homes
(used Argone Nat’l Lab for QA testing)
FFP
95
James M. Harbert
(717) 895-7052
Phoenixville, PA
Landfill Containment,
Mercury, AST/UST, Transformers
Various
FFP
97
James M. Harbert
(717) 895-7052
Tonolli
SUPERFUND/PRP
Nesquehoming, PA
Ex-situ Stabilization, Demolition
Asbestos Removal, Lead
Abatement Excavation, offsite
disposal, USTs TCLP Reduction of
lead contaminated with enviroblend
Nactec
98
James M. Harbert
(717) 895-7052
Lackawana Refuse
Lackawana, PA
Landfill Containment (cap),
87
James M. Harbert
(717) 895-7052
Groundwater Pump &Treat
Biological Reduction of
VOC & COD
-
Env. Restoration Co./
Radian Int’l
Chemical Waste
D-3
-
FFP
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects
Project
Location
SUPERFUND
Technology
Const. Contractor
Drum Removal, Excavation,
Offsite Disposal
Management
Stanley Kessler
SUPERFUND/PRP
King of Prussia, PA
Groundwater Pump &Treat
Advanced Geo Services
Recticon/Allied Steel
EPA/PRP
Parker Ford, PA
Groundwater Pump & Treat
Drum Removal
Cryochem
EPA/O&M
Pottstown, PA
Havertown PCP
SUPERFUND/PRP
Havertown, PA
Paoli Railyard
SUPERFUND/PRP
Paoli, PA
Contract
Type
Award Date
POC
Phone
-
98
Roger A. Moore
(610) 486-0570
Dames & Moore
PRP
98
Roger A. Moore
(610) 486-0570
Groundwater Pump & Treat
ETA
CPFF
98
Roger A. Moore
(610) 486-0570
Landfill Containment,
Groundwater Pump & Treat,
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
Extraction well install., AOP
Treatment for GW
Radian Int’l
CPFF
97
Tim Gallagner/
James M. Harbert
(610) 853-5492
Landfill Containment, In-Situ
Stabilization, Ex-Situ Stabilization,
Demolition, Asbestos Removal,
Excavation, Offsite Disposal,
USTs
-
-
-
Tim Gallagner
(610) 853-5492
D-2. NEW ENGLAND DISTRICT.
New Bedford Harbor Hot Spot
OU II
SUPERFUND
New Bedford, MA
Dredge PCB/Dewater
Perland Env.
FFP
92
Moe Beaudoin
(508) 990-2550
Nyanza Chemical
SUPERFUND
Ashland, MA
Consolidation/Capping
(Mercury, Pesticides)
Foster Wheeler Env.
Corp.
CPFF
13 Oct 88
Christopher Turek
(508) 990-2550
Baird & McGuire OU #1
SUPERFUND
Holbrook, MA
Groundwater Treatment
O&M
Metcalf & Eddy
Services
FFP
20 Feb 91
Jack Connolly
(617) 767-0085
Baird & McGuire OU #2
SUPERFUND
Holbrook, MA
Incineration
(Pesticides, Dioxin)
OHM Remediation
Services Corp.
FFP
30 Mar 92
James Doucakis
(978) 318-8691
Charles George Landfill
SUPERFUND
Tyngsboro, MA
Leachate/Groundwater
Treatment
Roy F. Weston, Inc.
CPFF
01 Nov 96
David O'Connor
(978) 772-0148
Silresim Superfund Site
Lowell, MA
Groundwater Treatment
Foster Wheeler Env.
CPFF
21 Jul 94
Chris Zevitas
(978) 441-9009
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects
Const. Contractor
Corp.
Contract
Type
Project
SUPERFUND
Location
Technology
(Solvents)
Silresim Superfund Site
SUPERFUND
Lowell, MA
Soil Vapor Extraction
Foster Wheeler Env.
Corp.
CPFF
Norwood Superfund Site
SUPERFUND
Norwood, MA
Groundwater Treatment
(PCB)
Foster Wheeler Env.
Corp.
CPFF
Army Material Testing Lab
BRAC
Watertown, MA
Building Decontamination
(Chemicals & Radium)
Roy F. Weston, Inc.
Stratford Superfund Site
SUPERFUND
Stratford, CT
Residential soil removal
(Asbestos, Lead)
Pre-Treatment Facilities
Charles George Landfill
SUPERFUND
Tyngsboro, MA
Alternative Water Supply
Davis Liquid Superfund Site
SUPERFUND
POC
Phone
Aug 96
Chris Zevitas
(978) 441-9009
19 Aug 94
Christopher Turek
(508) 990-2550
CPFF
93-97
William Haynes
(978) 318-8691
Foster Wheeler Env.
Corp.
CPFF
May 94
Ray Goff
(413) 593-6791
Groundwater Pump&Treat
Sewerline, Pumping Stations
(Ion Bacteria)
Roy F. Weston, Inc.
CPFF
07 Mar 97
Dave O’Connor
(978) 772-0148
Smithfield, RI
Water Supply System
Process Const.
Management
FFP
12 Jun 96
Moe Beaudoin
(508) 990-2550
Demolition of Raymark Buildings
SUPERFUND
Stratford, CT
Landfill Containment,
Groundwater Pump&Treat,
Demolition, Drum Removal,
Lagoon Remediation, USTs,
Asbestos Removal
Foster Wheeler Env.
Corp.
CPFF
29 Mar 95
Ray Goff
(413) 593-6791
Lonczak Drive Area
Former Westover AFB
FUDS
Chicopee, MA
Air Sparging
(Jet Fuel)
Env. Chemical Corp.
CPFF
12 Feb 98
Ray Goff
(413) 593-6791
Remedial Action
FUDS
Prudence Island, RI
Bioremediation,
Air Sparging
Roy F. Weston, Inc.
CPFF
24 Jun 97
Christine JohnsonBattista
(978) 772-0148
Various Remedial Actions
Fort Devens
BRAC
Ayer, MA
Ordnance Explosives,
Landfill Containment,
Drum Removal, USTs,
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
Roy F. Weston, Inc.
CPFF
05 Feb 96
Steve Umbrell
(978) 772-0148
Former Fuel Farm
FUDS
Long Island, ME
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
Roy F. Weston, Inc.
CPFF
16 Jul 97
Christine JohnsonBattista
(978) 772-0148
PCB Remediation
Picillo Farm
SUPERFUND
Coventry, RI
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
(PCB)
Roy F. Weston, Inc.
CPFF
10 Jul 97
Joe Ferrari
(978) 772-0148
D-5
Award Date
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects
Technology
Const. Contractor
Contract
Type
POC
Phone
26 Jun 97
Joe Ferrari
(978) 772-0148
FFP
15 Oct 97
Joe Ferrari
(978) 772-0148
J&W Company, Inc.
FFP
16 Jul 97
Joe Ferrari
(978) 772-0148
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
(PCB)
Stone & Webster Env.
Technical Services
CPFF
24 Sep 97
Christine JohnsonBattista
(978) 772-0148
Boston, MA
Asbestos Removal, Lead
Abatement, Excavation,
Offsite Disposal, Cleanup
of former chain forge shop,
blacksmith & locomotive
shops for future museum
Stone & Webster Env.
Technical Services
CPFF
25 Jun 97
Steve Umbrell
(978) 772-0148
Remedial Action at Campbell
School
FUDS
Bourne, MA
Excavation/Offsite Disposal
(pesticides), PCB Removal
(calking), Demolition
Stone & Webster Env.
Technical Services
CPFF
Jul 98
Larry Davis
(508) 759-8270
Blue Beach Landfill,
Quonsett Point
North Kingston, RI
Landfill Containment,
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
Env. Chemical Corp.
CPFF
Jul 98
Joe Ferrari
(978) 772-0148
Dow Pines Recreation Area
FUDS
Great Pond, ME
Demolition, Drum Removal,
Excavation, Offsite Disposal,
Aboveground Storage Tanks
Coastal Env. Corp.
FFP
Aug 98
Dave O’Connor
(978) 772-0148
Demolish Building 108,
Charleston Navy Yard
FUDS
Boston MA
Power Plant Demolition,
Asbestos Removal
Stone & Webster Env.
Technical Services
CPFF
Jul 98
Steve Umbrell
(978) 772-0148
Ordnance Removal,
Cohen Property
SUPERFUND
Taunton, MA
Ordnance/Explosives
Env. Chemical Corp.
CPFF
Jul 98
Moe Beaudoin
(508) 990-2550
Asbestos Remediation
Nashua River
SUPERFUND
Nashua, NH
Excavation/Offsite Disposal
(asbestos in river & banks)
Stone & Webster Env.
Technical Services
CPFF
Feb 98
Joe Ferrari
(978) 772-0148
Project
Location
Aqua Tank Farm
FUDS
Quonset Point, RI
Air Sparging
Roy F. Weston, Inc.
CPFF
Restore Camp Avenue
Dump Site
FUDS
Quonset Point, RI
Landfill Containment,
Drum Removal,
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
Coastal Env. Corp.
Demolition/Closure of
Unsafe Structures
FUDS
Hingham, MA
Ammunition/Bunkers
Demolition, Asbestos
Removal
Remedial Action, Hope Island
FUDS
Portsmouth, RI
Building 105, Charles Navy
Yard
FUDS
Award Date
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects
Technology
Const. Contractor
Contract
Type
Award Date
POC
FFP
1998
Eugine Urbanik
(732) 846-5830
Bechtel National, Inc.
CPFF
1998
Eugine Urbanik
(732) 846-5830
Radioactive Waste Removal
Cleanup, Excavation, Offsite
Disposal
Bechtel National, Inc.
CPFF
1998
Eugine Urbanik
(732) 846-5830
Wayne, NJ
Radioactive Waste Removal
Cleanup, Excavation, Offsite
Disposal
Bechtel National, Inc
CPFF
1998
Eugine Urbanik
(732) 846-5830
Higgins Farm Site
SUPERFUND
Franklin Township, NJ
Groundwater Pump & Treat
Radian Int’l
FFP
1997
Eugine Urbanik
(732) 846-5830
Metaltec/Aerosystems Site
SUPERFUND
Franklin Borough, NJ
Low Temp Volatilization
System, Excavation, Offsite
Disposal
Sevensen Env.
Services, Inc.
FFP
1996
Eugine Urbanik
(732) 846-5830
U.S. Radium Site
SUPERFUND
Orange, NJ
Radioactive Waste Removal,
Cleanup, Excavation, Offsite
Disposal
Sevensen Env.
Services, Inc.
FFP
1996
Eugine Urbanik
(732) 846-5830
Asbestos Dump Site
SUPERFUND
Milington, NJ
Excavation, Offsite Disposal,
Asbestos Contaminated Soil
CDM
FFP
1997
Eugine Urbanik
(732) 846-5830
Kin-Buc Landfill
SUPERFUND
Edison, NJ
Landfill Containment (cap&
slurry wall), drum removal
Chemical Waste
Management
FFP
1995
Montclair, Glen Ridge, and
West Orange Radium Sites
SUPERFUND
Essex County, NJ
Radioactive Waste Removal
Cleanup, Excavation, Offsite
Disposal
Sevensen Env.
Services, Inc.
FFP
1990
Eugine Urbanik
(732) 846-5830
Bog Creek Farm Site
SUPERFUND
Howell Township, NJ
On-Site Incineration
Chemical Waste
Management
FFP
1989
Eugine Urbanik
(732) 846-5830
Metaltec Aerosystems Site
SUPERFUND
Franklin Borough, NJ
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
Sevensen Env.
Services, Inc.
FFP
1988
Eugine Urbanik
(732) 846-5830
Industrial Latex Site
Wellington, NJ
Contaminated Building
Sevensen Env.
FFP
1986
Eugine Urbanik
(732) 846-5830
Project
D-3. NEW YORK DISTRICT.
Location
Fried Industries
SUPERFUND
East Brunswick, NJ
Contaminated Building
Demolition
IT Corp.
Middlesex FUSRAP Site
FUSRAP
Middlesex, NJ
Radioactive Waste Removal
Cleanup, Excavation, Offsite
Disposal
Maywood FUSRAP Site
FUSRAP
Maywood, NJ
Wayne FUSRAP Site
FUSRAP
D-7
Eugine Urbanik
Phone
(732) 846-5830
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects
Project
Location
SUPERFUND
Technology
Const. Contractor
Contract
Type
Award Date
POC
Phone
Demolition, Asbestos
Services, Inc.
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
USTs
Depot Road Leasing
FFP
1997
Eugine Urbanik
(732) 846-5830
Former Raritan Arsenal
FUDS
Edison, NJ
Kilmer Reserve Center
FUDS
Edison, NJ
USTs
Abatement Env.
Resources Inc.
FFP
1997
Eugine Urbanik
(732) 846-5830
Great Swamp National Refuge
SFO (Fish & Wild Life Services)
Great Swap, NJ
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
R&R International
FFP
1996
Eugine Urbanik
(732) 846-5830
Bog Creek Farm, Long Term
O&M (year 2)
SUPERFUND
Howell Township, NJ
Groundwater Treatment
Wleelabrator EOS, Inc.
FFP
23 Sep 96
George Paprocki
(732)389-3040
Circutron OU2
SUPERFUND
Farmingdale, NY
Groundwater Treatment
Radian International
FFP
27 Jul 98
Vincent Monaster
(516) 794-2913
Claremont Polychemical Corp.
SUPERFUND
Bethpage, NY
Groundwater Treatment
Radian International
LLC
FFP
29 Sep 95
Mark Kucera
(516) 249-8912
Glenzale Plating D.O. 18
SUPERFUND
Franklin Square, NY
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
Sevensen Inc.
FFP
5 Aug 97
Shewen Bian
(516) 794-2913
Lang O&M Task Order 2
SUPERFUND
Pemberton, NJ
O&M GW Treatment Plant
Sevensen Inc.
FFP
14 Nov 97
Tom Roche
(609) 893-0983
Vestal 1-1 D.O. 8
SUPERFUND
Vestal, NY
Soil Vapor Extraction
Sevensen Inc.
FFP
26 Mar 96
Nick Patsis
(914) 938-8313
GCL Tie & Treating
SUPERFUND
Sidney, NY
Soil Treatment
National Env.
Serv. Co.
FFP
31 Mar 98
John Canby
(914) 938-4701
Brewster Weldfield O&M
SUPERFUND
Brewster, NY
O&M of Groundwater
Extraction Treatment/
Discharge System
Kemron
FFP
Dec 97
Nick Patsis
(914) 938-8313
Colonie Site
FUSRAP
Colonie, NY
Designated Area TCE
& PCE
ICF Kaiser
Engineers Inc.
CPFF
29 Apr 98
Randy Battaglia
(607) 869-1523
Jackson County, MS
Pesticide Removal/Cleanup
OHM Corp.
CPFF
1997
Joe Shields
(402) 293-2535
D-4. OMAHA DISTRICT.
Methyl Parathyon Pesticide
Contamination
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects
Project
EPA Removal Action
Location
Technology
Const. Contractor
Contract
Type
Award Date
POC
Phone
Geothermal Test Facility
Brine Bond
DOE Removal Action
El Centro, CA
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
OHM Corp.
CPFF
1996
Andy Winslow
(402) 293-2533
Joliet Army Ammunition Plant
BRAC
Joliet, IL
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
Oil Sludge Pit, UXO Removal
OHM Corp.
CPFF
1996
Jim O’Neil
(402) 293-2516
Low Level Radioactive Waste
Removal
DOE Removal Action
Ames, IA
Radioactive Waste Removal/
Cleanup
OHM Corp.
CPFF
1995
Tim Gouger
(402) 293-2514
National Wood Preservative
Site
SUPERFUND
Havertown, PA
Demolition/Excavation, Offsite
Disposal/Landfill Cap
OHM Corp.
CPFF
1996
Waleed Shaheen
(402) 293-2517
Selma Products Wood
Preservative Site
SUPERFUND
Fresno, CA
Groundwater Pump and Treat
IT Corp.
CPFF
1997
Waleed Shaheen
(402) 293-2517
Tennessee Products Site
EPA Removal Action
Chattanooga, TN
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
of Coal Tar Waste
IT Corp.
CPFF
1997
Matt Ellender
(402) 293-2534
Fawick Park
EPA Removal Action
Sioux Falls, SD
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
of Coal Tar Waste
IT Corp.
CPFF
1997
Mary Darling
(402) 293-2513
Westbank Asbestos Site
EPA Removal Action
New Orleans, LA
Residential Asbestos
Removal Action
IT Corp.
CPFF
1996
Jude Hobza
(402) 293-2533
Palos Forest Preserve, Site A
DOE Removal Action
Chicago, IL
Low Level Radioactive Waste
Stabilization and Removal
IT Corp.
CPFF
1996
Tim Gouger
(402) 293-2514
Denver Federal Center
Interim Corrective Measures
WFO
Denver, CO
In-Situ Remediation Through
Gate and Funnel Technology
IT Corp.
CPFF
1996
Tom Westenburg
(402) 293-2530
Hazardous Landfill Cap
March AFB
BRAC
March AFB, CA
Landfill Containment RCRA
Cell Construction
IT Corp.
CPFF
1994
Jude Hobza
(402) 293-2533
AF Plant 85
WFO (AF & GSA)
Columbus, OH
PCB Removal Action
IT Corp.
CPFF
1995
Larry Leahy
(402) 293-2531
Oconomowoc Electroplating
Ashippun,WI
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
IT Corp.
CPFF
1994
Jude Hobza
(402) 293-2533
D-9
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects
Project
Location
Superfund Site
SUPERFUND
Technology
Const. Contractor
Contract
Type
Award Date
POC
Phone
from contaminated wetlands
D-5. PHILADELPHIA DISTRICT.
Bridgeport Rental and
Oil Services
Bridgeport, NJ
Incineration on-site
Ebasco (FosterWheeler)
FFP
01 Mar 89
Mark Wheeler
(609) 241-1671
Helen Kramer Landfill
Mantua Twp, NJ
Capping & slurry wall,
pump & treat
IT-Davy Joint Venture
FFP
06 Oct 89
John Poserina III
(609) 569-0124
Lipari Landfill Phase I
Mantua Twp, NJ
Capping/slurry wall
D’Appolonia (IT Corp)
FFP
26 Jul 83
Scott Fritzinger
(215)656-6670
Lipari Landfill
Mantua Twp, NJ
Pump and treat
Bechtel Corp
FFP
12 Jul 89
Howie Klei
(609) 485-2145
Lipari Landfill O&M
Mantua Twp, NJ
Pump & Treat O&M
Radian
CPFF
92
Steve Creighton
(609) 582-7396
DeRewal Chemical Site
Frenchtown, NJ
Contaminated soil removal/
disposal
R&R International
RFP/FFP
97
Brian Duffy
(609) 485-2145
FAA Technical Center,
Area D Fuel Farm
Pomona, NJ
Free product recovery,
O&M treatment facility
Aguilar
FFP/UP
19 Mar 96
Clyde Lake
(609) 485-2145
FAA Technical Center,
Area 20 Groundwater
Pomona, NJ
Pump/treat/reinjection
M.L. Ruberton
FFP
96
"Murphy" Flynn
(609) 485-2145
FAA Technical Center,
Area 20 PCB Soil Removal
Pomona, NJ
PCB Contaminated soil
removal/disposal
Radian
FFP
26 May 98
Clyde Lake
(609) 485-2145
Vineland Chemical Demolition
Vineland, NJ
Demolition/disposal
Castle Abatement
FFP
95
Joseph Hoag
(609) 241-1671
Vineland Chemical Soils/GW
Vineland, NJ
Arsenic treatment
Black & Veatch
FFP
97
Mark Wheeler
(609) 241-1671
South Jersey Clothing Co.
Buena Boro, NJ
Pump/treat/reinjection
Sevenson
RFP/FFP
97
Joseph Hoag
(609) 241-1671
DuPont Chemical Plant
Deepwater, NJ
FUSRAP site
Lee Phillips
(609) 241-1671
Krysowaty Farm Site
Hillsborough Twp, NJ
Disposal of excav soil
Sevenson
FFP/UP
27 Sep 85
Lee K. Phillips
(609) 241-1671
D'Imperio Property Site
Phase I
Hamilton Twp, NJ
Disposal of excav soil/drum
Sevenson
FFP/UP
21 Jul 86
Mark Wheeler
(609) 241-1671
D'Imperio Property Site
Phase II
Hamilton Twp, NJ
Groundwater pump, treat,
reinjection
WATEC
Oversight
1995
Clyde Lake
(609) 485-2145
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects
Project
Industrial Latex
Location
Wallington, NJ
Technology
Low Temp Thermal
Desorption, PCB Soil
Const. Contractor
ECC Inc
Contract
Type
RFP/FFP
Award Date
31 Aug 98
POC
John Poserina III
Phone
(609) 485-2145
Pepe Field
Boonton, NJ
In-Situ Stabilization
Off-Site Disposal
Radian
CPFF
Jun 98
Brian Duffy
(609) 485-2145
Cosden Chemical Demolition
Beverly, NJ
Demolition/disposal
CATI Inc.
FFP
97
Ray Morgan
(609) 241-1671
Diamond State Salvage
Wilmington, DE
Soil removal/Disp
OHM
Oversight
98
Ray Morgan
(609) 241-1671
Remediation of Burning
Grounds and Unlined
Evaporation Pond
IRP
Longhorn Army
Ammo Plant, TX
Low temp thermal desorp
for soils, air stripping for
groundwater (TCE), (water
collection in trenches)
Radian International,
LLC
CPAF
09 May 93
Dudley Beene
Vic Heister
(318) 676-3365
(918) 669-7244
Groundwater extraction
& treatment plus ground
water reinjection, Tower
Area & Southwest Landfill
(T.O. 6, Design and Phase I)
BRAC
Reese AFB, TX
Various incl. air stripping
for groundwater
OHM Remediation
Svcs., Inc.
CPAF
15 Mar 95
Frank Roth
Ramona Wagner
(918) 669-7413
(918) 669-7505
Groundwater extraction
& treatment plus ground
water reinjection, Tower
Area & Southwest Landfill
(T.O. 20, Phase II)
BRAC
Reese AFB, TX
Various incl. air stripping
for groundwater
OHM Remediation
Svcs., Inc.
CPAF
26 Sep 96
Frank Roth
Ramona Wagner
(918) 669-7413
(918) 669-7505
Tar Creek Superfund Site
(T.O. 11, Residential
Removal Action)
SUPERFUND
Ottowa Cty, OK
Soil excav, removal to
repository, and replace
w/clean soil
Morrison Knudsen
CPAF
01 May 96
Frank Roth
Ramona Wagner
(918) 669-7413
(918) 669-7505
Tar Creek Superfund Site
(T.O. 20, Remedial Action)
SUPERFUND
Ottowa Cty, OK
Soil excav, removal to
repository, and replace
w/clean soil
Morrison Knudsen
CPAF
CPIF
10 Nov 97
Frank Roth
Ramona Wagner
(918) 669-7413
(918) 669-7505
D-6. TULSA DISTRICT.
D-11
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects
Contract
Type
Award Date
POC
Phone
IT Corporation (IT)
CPAF
12 Aug 93
Vic Heister
Ramona Wagner
(918) 669-7244
(918) 669-7505
Tank removal, soil excav
landfarming
IT
CPAF
27 Sep 93
Vic Heister
Ramona Wagner
(918) 669-7244
(918) 669-7505
Ft. Sill, OK
Tank removal, soil excav
landfarming
OHM Remediation
(OHM) Svcs., Inc.
CPAF
17 Apr 95
Vic Heister
Ramona Wagner
(918) 669-7244
(918) 669-7505
Tinker AFB, OK
Waste excav, shipment to
Envirocare, thermal
desorption, landfill grading,
RCRA cover
IT
CPAF
31 Jul 97
Rex Ostrander
James Allard
(918) 669-4916
(918) 669-7158
Oil Spill & Tank Closure
IRP
Davis Monthan AFB
& Titan Missile
Museum, AZ
Bioremediation,
In-Situ Stabilization,
Ex-Situ Stabilization,
USTs Removal
Morrison Knudson
FFP
PRAC
98
Melvin S. Weiss
(602) 988-9340
UST Removal/Upgrades &
Misc. Cleanup
FUDS
FT Huachuca, AZ
Ordnance Explosives,
Bioremediation,
In-Situ Stabilization,
Demolition, USTs Removal,
Radioactive Waste Cleanup
Morrison Knudson
FFP
PRAC
98
Melvin S. Weiss
(602) 988-9340
KTAR/KAAA
SFO (FEMA)
FEMA Sites, AZ
USTs Removal
Maness Env.
FFP
ID/IQ
98
Melvin S. Weiss
(602) 988-9340
Hassayampa Landfill Closure
EPA Oversight
Buckeye, AZ
Landfill Containment,
Groundwater Pump &Treat
PRP Oversight
N/A
96
Melvin S. Weiss
(602) 988-9340
Dateland Army Airfield Closure
FUDS
Dateland, AZ
Bioremediation,
Ex-Situ Stabilization,
USTs Removal
Morrison Knudson
FFP
PRAC
97
Melvin S. Weiss
(602) 988-9340
US Border Patrol Aviation Tanks
SFO
Various Locations, AZ
USTs Removal
Maness Env.
FFP
ID/IQ
98
Melvin S. Weiss
(602) 988-9340
Lead Abatement,
Morrison Knudson
FFP
98
Melvin S. Weiss
(602) 988-9340
Technology
Project
Location
Ft. Sill (T.O. 16, Group A
Tank Removals)
IRP
Ft. Sill, OK
Tank removal, soil excav,
landfarming
Ft. Sill (T.O. 20, Group B
Tank Removals)
IRP
Ft. Sill, OK
Ft. Sill (T.O. 10, POL Site
Remediation)
IRP
Low Level Radioactive Waste
IRP
Const. Contractor
D-7. LOS ANGELES DISTRICT.
Luke AFB JP-8 Tanks
Luke AFB, AZ
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects
Project
IRP
Location
Technology
Asbestos Removal
Const. Contractor
Tank Replacement/LBP Removal
SFO (US Border Patrol)
Yuma & Douglas AZ
Lead Abatement,
USTs
Morrison Knudson
Las Vegas AFS Closure
FUDS
Angel Peak, NV
Demolition, PCB,
Drum Removal, USTs
Maness Env.
Del Amo Superfund Site
SUPERFUND
Torrance, CA
McColl Superfund Site
SUPERFUND (PRP)
Fullerton, CA
Contract
Type
PRAC
Award Date
POC
Phone
FFP
PRAC
97
Melvin S. Weiss
(602) 988- 9340
FFP
ID/IQ
98
Melvin S. Weiss
(602) 988-9340
John Smock
Landfill Containment,
Parsons Env.
(626) 401-4044
John Moreno
(805) 734-4670
Richard Magruder
(626) 401-4044
UST Removal – Bldg 358,
380, 1577, 12000, 7425,
Facility 1987
Vandenberg AFB, CA
UST Removal
Morrison Knudsen
FFP
IDIQ
Stringfellow Hazardous Waste
Site
SUPERFUND
Riverside, CA
Groundwater Pump & Treat
Metcalf & Eddy
FFP
Operating Industries, Inc.
SFO
Monterey Park, CA
Landfill Containment
Corp.
CDM-Federal Programs
CPAF
93
Richard Magruder
(626) 401-4044
Montrose Superfund Site
SUPERFUND
Torrance, CA
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
Env. Chemical Corp.
FFP
98
Eleanor E. Nevarez
(626) 401-4044
Ft. Irwin Range Maintenance
IRP
Ft. Irwin, CA
Ordnance/Explosives,
Demolition
ATI/OES
T&M
97
Jim Reed
(760) 386-2097
East Elliot, Time Critical
Santee, San
Ordnance/Explosives
Applications
T&M
98
BJ Allen
(619) 674-6766
Removal Action
FUDS
Diego, CA
Uranium Mine Investigation
SUPERFUND
Navajo Nation, NV
Radioactive Waste Removal/
Cleanup
T&M
98
Glen Alsup
(626) 401-4044
Brown & Bryant
SUPERFUND
Arvin, CA
Vapor Extraction
FFP
98
John Smock
(805) 277-9927
FFP
90
Don Peterson
(309) 782-2198
D-8.
Human Factors
Morrison Knudsen
97
Frank Hubel
LOUISVILLE DISTRICT.
Incineration of Explosives
Contaminated Soils
Savanna Army
Depot, Il
Excavation/Onsite Incineration
of Explosives Contaminated
Roy F. Weston
D-13
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects
Project
Location
BRAC
Technology
Const. Contractor
Contract
Type
Award Date
POC
Phone
Soils
Thermal Vitrification
Demonstration Project
SFO (CERL)
Rock Island Arsenal,
IL
Demonstration Project, Thermal
Vitrification Technology for
Removal of Lead based paint
Midwest Foundation
Corp.
FFP
97
Don Peterson
(309) 782-2198
Garfield Navel Weapons Plant
FUDS
Decatur, IL
Removal of Free Product in
Ground Water and Cleanup of
Hazardous from Several Pits
Aneptek Corp.
FFP
98
Don Peterson
(309) 782-2198
RCRA Closure, APE-1236
Deact Furnace
BRAC
Savanna Army Depot,
IL
Ordnance/Explosives (sweep/
clearance of area prior to
work), Stabilization of lead
Contaminated soil
Westinghouse
Remediation Services
FFP
95
Don Peterson
(309) 782-2198
Open Burning Grounds
Demonstration Project
BRAC
Savanna Army Depot,
IL
Sifting/Screening technology to
remove UXOs and other related
ordnance debris from soils
FFP
94
Don Peterson
(309) 782-2198
Firing Training Pit, Soils
Remediation
BRAC
Savanna Army Depot,
IL
Clearance/Removal of
Unexploded Ordnance, onsite
Incineration of Petroleum
Contaminated Soils
Four Seasons
Environmental
FFP
93
Don Peterson
(309) 782-2198
Removal of Fill Material
BRAC
Fort Sheridan, IL
Excavation/Disposal of Fill
Containing Coal Fragments,
Removal of USTs.
International
Technologies
CPFF
97
Chris Karem/
Don Mangialardo
(502) 625-7248
(847) 266-1160
Interim RA for Landfill 6 & 7
BRAC
Fort Sheridan, IL
Demolition, Landfill Containment,
Excavation/Disposal, Leachate
Pump & Treat, Gas Pump & Treat
Stone & Webster
CPFF
96
Bob Fileccia/
Don Mangialardo
(502) 625-7541
(847) 266-1160
D-9.
Env. Science&Eng., Inc.
Ordnance/Explosives
Env.Services
NEW ORLEANS DISTRICT.
Bayou Bonfouca Source
Control OU
SUPERFUND
Slidell, LA
Incineration of Creosote
Contaminated Waste
IT and OHM
FFP
31 May 91
Joseph Sensebe/
Ted Eilts
(504) 862-2861
American Creosote Works
SUPERFUND
Winnfield, LA
Incineration/in-situ
bioremediation
IT
FFP
01 Jul 94
Joseph Sensebe
Ted Eilts
(504) 862-2861
Southern Shipbuilding
Slidell, LA
Incineration
OHM
CPAF
16 Aug 95
Joseph Sensebe
(504) 862-2861
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects
Technology
Const. Contractor
Contract
Type
Award Date
POC
Ted Eilts
Phone
CPAF
29 Aug 97
Joseph Sensebe
Ted Eilts
(504) 862-2861
OHM
CPAF
19 Sep 97
Joseph Sensebe
Ted Eilts
(504) 862-2861
Asbestos removal
OHM
CPAF
Pending
Joseph Sensebe
Ted Eilts
(504) 862-2861
Ashtabula City, OH
Landfill Containment, Pump &
Treat
Sevensen Env.
Services, Inc.
FFP
Sep 88
Wren Wilson
(304) 529-5282
Rock Creek, OH
Pump & Treat, Excavation,
Aptus Corp.
FFP
Mar 88
25 Mar 88
Wren Wilson
Joseph R. Turner
(304) 529-5282
(304) 529-5282
OH Materials
Bhatt Contracting
FFP
28 Aug 90
Wren Wilson
(304) 529-5282
92
Wren Wilson
(304) 529-5282
Project
SUPERFUND
Location
Popile Superfund Site
SUPERFUND
El Dorado, AR
Bioremediation (land
treatment)
Morrison-Knudsen
Agriculture Street Landfill
SUPERFUND
New Orleans, LA
Removal of Contaminated
Soil & 2 feet Barrier
Defense Information Systems
Agency
SFO
Slidell, LA
New Lyme Landfill
SUPERFUND
Old Mill Landfill
D-10. HUNTINGTON DISTRICT.
SUPERFUND
West Virginia Ordnance
Works
FUDS
Lockborne AF Base
FUDS
Summit Equipment
SFO (DRMS)
Offsite Disposal
Pt. Pleasant, WV
Landfill Containment, Pump&
Treat, Demolition, Asbestos
Removal
Columbus, OH
Excavation, Offsite Disposal,
USTs
Petro Env.
FFP
Excavation, Offsite Disposal
(PCB)
ECC
FFP,
CPFF
Jul 98
Wren Wilson
(304) 529-5282
Int. Technology Corp./
Kipin Industries, Inc.
CFF
1997
Bill DeBruyn
(615) 885-0010
CPAF
1998
Bill DeBruyn
(615) 885-0010
1998
Dan Farrell
(606) 337-6162
Akron, OH
D-11. NASHVILLE DISTRICT.
Tennessee Products
SUPERFUND
Chattanooga, TN
Excavation/Offsite Disposal
Pesticide/Herbicide, Thermal
Destruction
WSM Transmitter AST
Upgrade
SFO/FEMA
Brentwood, TN
Upgrade Above Storage
Tank
Env. Chemical Corp./
PMI
Pineville
SFO/Army Reserve
Pineville, KY
Lead Abatement, USTs,
Excavation/Offsite Disposal
Chemical Corp.
D-15
CPAF
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
Construction Points of Contact on HTRW Projects
Project
Location
202 Non Structural Program
USACE/CW
Several Sites, KY
Asbestos, Lead Abatement
Tank Removal
SFO/Army Reserve
Several Sites, KY
Technology
Const. Contractor
Contract
Type
Award Date
POC
Phone
Asbestos Removal/
Demolition
ASTECH Corp./
Asbestos&Env.
Services
FFP
1995
Dan Farrell
(606) 337-6162
Asbestos Removal, Lead
Abatement, Excavation/
Offsite Disposal, USTs
ASTECH
FFP
1992
Dan Farrell
(606) 337-6162
FAA UST Removal
SFO (FAA)
Gray, TN
Excavation/Offsite
Disposal, USTs
Marion Env.
FFP
1996
Dan Farrell
(606) 337-6162
Asbestos Removal
SFO/ Army Reserve Center
Knoxville/Greenville,
TN
Asbestos Removal
American Env.
Protection
FFP
1991
Dan Farrell
(606) 337-6162
FAA Emergency Generator
Backup for Radar Station
SFO (FAA)
Lynch, KN
USTs
Ferfuson-Harbour, Inc.
FFP
1995
Dan Farrell
(606) 337-6162
FAA UST Removals
SFO (FAA)
Several Sites, KY
Excavation/Offsite
Disposal USTs
Four Seasons Industrial
Services, Inc.
FFP
1992
Dan Farrell
(606) 337-6162
FAA UST Removals
Several Sites
(TN, NC, VA)
Excavation/Offsite
Four Seasons Industrial
FFP
1991
Dan Farrell
(606) 337-6162
Disposal, USTs
Services, Inc.
Lead Abatement
ASTECH Corp.
FFP
1993
Dan Farrell
(606) 337-6162
SFO (FAA)
Lead Abatement
SFO/Army Reserve Center
Several Sites, KY
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
APPENDIX E
INTERNET WEB SITE REFERENCES
Subject
Internet Address
All USACE Publications
http://www.usace.army.mil/inet/usace-docs/
USACE Criteria Documents
and Guide Specifications
http://www.hnd.usace.army.mil/techinfo/
index.htm
USACE HTRW Guidance Documents
http://hq.environmental.usace.army.mil/
library/guidance/guidance.html
USACE Environmental Division
Home Page
http://hq.environmental.usace.army.mil/
USACE FUDS Website
http://hq.environmental.usace.army.mil/
programs/fuds/fuds.html
USACE Spill Reporting Procedures
http://www.environmental.usace.army.mil/info/
technical/comply/complys/complys.html
USACE Procedures for Administration
of Cost Contracts and Guide to Best
Practices for Cost Reimbursement
Contracts
http://hq.environmental.usace.army.mil/
tools/reimburse/reimburse.html
USACE Construction Bulletins
http://www.hq.usace.army.mil/cemp/c/library.htm
USACE CX Roles and Responsibilities
http://www.usace.army.mil/inet/centers
USACE PROSPECT Courses
http://pdsc.usace.army.mil
HTRW CX
http://www.environmental.usace.army.mil/
HTRW CX Review Responsibilities
http://www.usace.army.mil/inet/functions/cw/
cecwe/coexpert/newcoe/mcx/htrw/htrw.htm
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31 May 00
HTRW and Environmental
Lessons Learned
http://hq.environmental.usace.army.mil/
tools/lessons/lessons.html
Environmental Compliance and
Transportation Information Bulletin
http://www.environmental.usace.army.mil/
info/technical/comply/complpub/complpub.html
Environmental Regulatory Fact Sheets
and Frequently Asked Questions
http://www.environmental.usace.army.mil
/info/technical/comply/comply.html
OE MCX Homepage
http://www.hnd.usace.army.mil
OE Guidance Documents
http://www.hnd.usace.army.mil/oew/
policy/regpro.html
EP 200-1-2 Process and Procedures
for RCRA Manifesting
http://www.usace.army.mil/inet/
usace-docs/eng-pamphlets/ep.htm
Modern Army Record Keeping
System (MARKS)
http://www.rmd.belvoir.army.mil/markstit.htm
The Code of Federal Regulations
http://www.access.gpo.gov/
nara/cfr/cfr-table-search.html
Federal Acquisition Regulations
(FAR)
http://farsite.hill.af.mil/
State Regulations
http://www.denix.osd.mil/
Overseas Environmental Baseline
Guidance Document (OEBGD)
http://osiris.cso.uiuc.edu/denix/Public/
Library/Intl/OEBGD/toc.html
NetREDI system
http://registration.railnetredi.com
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31 May 00
APPENDIX F
REFERENCES (Copies Furnished)
CECC-J memorandum, 13 Mar 98, “Fees for Licensing, Certification, Training, and Professional
Engineers Stamps”(pg.F-2)
CEHR-E/CESO-I memorandum, 19 Oct 90, "Supplemental Guidance on Hazard Pay
Environmental Differentials Regarding Hazardous and Toxic Waste (HTW) Sites" (pg. F-5)
CECI-IR/CEMP-R memorandum, 10 Aug 99, “Environmental Classification Standards”
(pg. F-28)
CEMP-RS/CERE-AP memorandum, 22 Nov 89, "USACE Real Estate Support for EPA
Superfund Program" (pg. F-53)
CERE-AP memorandum, 6 Feb 98, “Guidance for the Provision of Real Estate Support to the
Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Delegation of Authority to Execute
Rights-of-Entry and Acquire Real Property and Interests Therein (pg. F-62)
CESO-I (40-5) memorandum, 23 Sep 99, “HTRW Medical Surveillance Program Inclusion and
Frequency Criteria” (pg. F-67)
EPA OSWER Directive 9355.5-01/FS, Feb 90, "Real Estate Acquisition Procedures for USACE
Projects" (pg. F-72)
Pre-Award Site Visit Agreement, "Liability Release for Contractor Site Visit" (pg. F-78)
U.S. EPA letter, 18 Oct 90, authorizing CE personnel to sign manifests on EPA’s behalf (pg. F79)
Annual Financial Agreement Between the Defense Contract Audit Agency and the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers, Fiscal Year 2000, Agreement Number 002900 (pg. F-82)
CEMP-RS memorandum, 7 Jan 99, “Implementation of the Program and Project Management
Information System (PROMIS) for Environmental Programs” (pg. F-89)
CESO-I memorandum, 13 May 94, “HTRW Safety and Health Training Courses and Medical
Surveillance Required by OSHA Standards 29 CFR 1910.120 and 1926.65” (pg. F-94)
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CECC-J
13 MAR 1998
MEMORANDUM FOR CHIEF, GENERAL ENGINEERING BRANCH, DIRECTORATE OF
CIVIL WORKS (ATTN: CECW-EP/Charles Pearre)
SUBJECT: Fees for Licensing, Certification, Training, and Professional Engineers Stamps
1.
Reference:
a.
Electronic Mail from Charles Pearre to Robert Nichols, September 5, 1997,
subject: Help;
b.
Memorandum from Chief, Engineering Division, Louisville District, USACE, for
Commander, USACE, Attn: CECW, 14 January 1997, subject: Request for determination under
1110-1-8152, sec. 5.e(3) and waiver of ER 1110-1-8152, sec. 5.f;
c.
1995; and
d.
ER 1110-1-8152, Engineering and Design, Professional Registration, 8 August
EC 1110-1-76, Appendix B, Legal Opinion, 6 November, 1992.
2.
Pursuant to your request, our office reviewed two issues involving the use of appropriated
funds to pay fees associated with Corps employees performing their jobs. This memorandum
addresses those issues.
3.
Fees for Licenses, Certifications, and Associated Training. The first issue, discussed in
your reference 1b memorandum, is whether the Louisville District may pay state and local
licensing and certification fees for Corps asbestos inspectors, asbestos management planners,
lead-based paint risk assessors, and water management engineers. Further questions have also
been raised concerning the applicability and restrictions of ER 1110-1-8152 with regard to this
issue.
a.
Legality of Paying Expenses. The Comptroller General (CG) addressed the issue
of using appropriated funds to pay such licensing and certification fees (and associated fees for
training) in two opinions, B-257895, Oct. 28, 1994, and B-252467, June 3, 1994. In those cases,
the CG stated that such expenses generally are personal expenses not properly chargeable to
agency appropriations. However, an exception to this general rule exists when: (1) the primary
interest in obtaining the license or certification lies with the Federal agency; (2) the Federal
employees are required by law to comply with licensing or certification requirements; and (3) the
license or certification is not being obtained for the purpose of qualifying the employee for the
employee's position. B-257895; B-252467. According to the information provided by your
office, each of these three conditions has been met for the Corps asbestos inspectors, asbestos
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EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
management planners, and lead-based paint risk assessors; thus, the Corps may, at its discretion,
pay the licensing and certification (and related education) expenses of those employees. This
exception, however, would not apply to the licensing and certification expenses of the Corps
water management engineers. As the CG stated in B-252467, engineers and other professional
personnel are fully aware of the licensing requirements of their professions from the time they
begin their professional education, and, in that sense, the licensing and certification requirements
are considered to be more for the personal benefit of the individuals than for their employers. Id.
Thus, the Corps may not use appropriated funds to pay the licensing and certification fees for
water management engineers.
b.
ER 1110-1-8152. In the reference lb memorandum, the Louisville District
asserted that a waiver of ER 1110-1-8152, section 5f was necessary to pay the licensing and
certification fees discussed in the preceding paragraph. The Louisville District also requested a
determination as to whether ER I 110-1-8152, section 5e(3), permitted the payment of fees for
the requisite training for such licensing or certification. This section addresses those requests.
(1)
The express purpose of ER 1110-1-8152 is to provide "policy and
guidance concerning professional registration for engineer, architect, landscape architect,
surveyor and geologist team members in all functional areas of the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers . . . ." Thus, of the employment positions discussed in your requests, only water
management engineers fall within the scope of ER 1110-1-8152; the regulation does not apply to
asbestos inspectors, asbestos management planners, and lead-based paint risk assessors.
(2)
Section 5f provides as follows: "Payment by the Government for the cost
of any (initial or subsequent) licensing examination is permitted only in two rare cases,
inapplicable to the Corps." This section does not establish a Corps policy; it restates the CG's
position that appropriated funds may not be used to pay the licensing and certification
requirements of engineers. Therefore, a waiver of this provision is infeasible.
(3)
Section 5e(3) of ER 1110-1-8152 provides as follows:
There are limited circumstances under which an agency may pay for the costs of training
for additional licenses beyond the initial license that qualifies an employee for a position.
The "head of the agency" must determine, under the Employees-Training Act, that
members of a particular professional staff should take a course, and the course must be
directly related to the performance by the employee of official duties for the Government.
Thus, although the Corps may not use appropriated funds to pay the licensing and certification
fees of Corps engineers, the Corps may pay for continuing education of such engineers, provided
that the agency makes the noted necessary determinations. This position is consistent with the
CG's rule described in paragraph 3a.
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EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
4.
Fees for Professional Engineers Stamp. The reference 1 a e-mail raised the issue of
whether the Corps may use appropriated funds to pay for professional engineers stamps for
Corps employees. In accordance with the principles described in paragraph 3a of this opinion,
the Corps may not use appropriated funds to pay such fees, as the primary benefit would accrue
to the employee engineer.
5.
If you have further questions, please contact Robert Nichols or me at (202) 761-4931
/s/
RUPERT JENNINGS
Senior Counsel
For Military Programs
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EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Washington, D.C. 20314-1000
REPLY TO
ATTENTION OF:
CEHR—E/CESO—I
19 October 1990
MEMORANDUM FOR SEE DISTRIBUTION
SUBJECT: Supplemental Guidance on Hazard Pay Environmental
Differentials Regarding Hazard Toxic Waste (HTW) Sites
1. Enclosed is supplemental guidance regarding the payment of
hazard pay for GS/GM positions and environmental differential
for FWS positions specifically assigned/detailed to on—site HTW
site predesign, design and construction activities where
exposure’ conditions identified in paragraphs 5 and 9 of the
guidance are met. This guidance should be implemented upon
receipt. We are continuing to work towards publishing this
guidance in a more permanent format.
2. Questions regarding this guidance should be directed to
Millie Edwards, CEHR-E, (202) 475—9029, or to Robert Stout,
CESO—I, (202) 272—0091.
FOR THE COMMANDER:
Encl
R. LOSCHIALPO
Director of Human Resources
JOHN E. GEIGLEIN
Chief, Safety and Occupational
Health Office
DISTRIBUTION:
Division Commander, ATTN: Civilian Personnel Offices
District Commander, ATTN: Civilian Personnel Offices
Commander, Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency, ATTN: Civilian
Personnel Office
Director, Humphreys Engr Center Support Activity, ATTN: Civilian
Personnel Office
Commander/Director, Construction Engineering Research
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31 May 00
Laboratory, ATTN: Civilian Personnel Office
Commander/Director, Cold Regions Research and Engineering
Laboratory, ATTN: Civilian Personnel Office
Commander/Director, Waterways Experiment Station, ATTN:
Civilian Personnel Office
Division Commanders, ATTN: Safety and Occupational Health
Offices
District District Commanders, ATTN: Safety and Occupational
Health Offices
Commander, Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency, ATTN: CETHA-SO
Director, Humphreys Engr Center Support Activity,
ATTN: CEHEC-SO
Commander/Director, Construction Engineering Research
Laboratory, ATTN: CECER-SO
Commander/Director, Cold Regions Research and Engineering
Laboratory, ATTN: CECRL-SO
Commander/Director, Waterways Experiment Station, ATTN: Safety
and Occupational Health Office
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31 May 00
SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE
Civilian Personnel Policy on Hazard Pay
Environmental Differentials
1.
References.
a.
AR
690—532—1
b.
ER
37—1—20
c.
EP
37-2-1, Chapter 7
d.
5 U.S. Code 5545(d) and 5548(b)
e.
5 C.F.R. 550.901 et. seq.
f.
29
CFR 1910.120, Appendix B
g.
Federal Personnel Manual Supplement 532—1, Paragraph
8-7 and Appendix J
h.
Federal Personnel Manual Supplement 990—2, Book 550,
Subchapter S.9, and Appendices A and E
i.
USACE Hazard Toxic Waste Management Plan, June 1988
2.
The purpose of this document is to provide supplemental
guidance for the payment of pay differentials for irregular or
intermittent duty involving unusual physical hardships, hazards,
or working conditions of an unusually severe nature.
3.
This guidance is generally applicable to all USACE GS/GM
and Federal Wage System (FWS) positions specifically assigned/
detailed to on-site hazard toxic waste (HTW) site predesign,
design and construction activities where exposure conditions
identified in paragraph 5 and 9 are met. HTW sites are sites as
defined in the USACE HTW Management Plan (reference li). Also,
for ease of reference, both hazard pay (GS/GM) and environmental
differential (FWS) are collectively referred to as hazard pay.
4.
Paragraph 1 lists the references governing payment of
hazard pay. However, there has been a difference of
interpretation among the various USACE servicing personnel
offices as to when hazard pay should be granted at hazardous
waste sites. As a result, some of our employees receive hazard
pay. Others, in seemingly comparable situations, do not. This
is intended to provide clear USACE-wide guidance for Field
Operating Agencies (FOA) to use when determining eligibility for
hazard pay at HTW site activities.
5.
References la through le, lg, and lh provide authoritative
guidance on the payment of hazard pay for GS/GM and FWS
employees respectively. Applying this guidance to USACE HTW
positions, hazard pay is considered to be warranted if ALL of
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31 May 00
the following three conditions exist:
a.
The employee must perform duty that is subject to
eligible physical hardship or hazards criteria as described in
references la, 1g, and lh.
b.
The duty must be irregular or intermittent as
described in paragraph 7.
c.
The duty must not affect the grade of the FWS position
or the classification of the GS/GM position.
d.
In order to establish a common interpretation of the
three conditions listed above, the explanations in paragraphs 6
through 9 shall apply.
6.
Those conditions that warrant hazard pay are described in
references la, lg, and lh. The most common hazard would include
exposure to hazardous agents, e.g., toxic chemical materials,
when there is a possibility of leakage or spillage or physical
hazard such as described in the examples found in Appendix A.
b.
Hazard pay is not permitted for work activities of
GS/GM or FWS employees not listed in references la, 1g, and lh.
When FCA who identify exposure to unusual physical hardships or
hazards not eligible for hazard pay as described in the
references above, they may request that such unusual hardship or
hazard conditions be added to the list of eligible categories.
Such requests shall be submitted to the Director of Personnel,
ATTN: CEHR—E. Such requests will be processed through the Army
civilian personnel channels to the Office of Personnel
Management for evaluation.
7.
a. Time Administration. Irregular or intermittent means
that the duties are not performed on a regular basis in
accordance with an established schedule. Most USACE employees
concerned with on-site HTW pre—design, design and construction
activities involving physical hardship or hazardous conditions
do not normally perform this work in accordance with an
established schedule. Rather, the work is performed on an asrequired basis. The bulk of such USACE employees concerned with
physical hardship or hazardous duty situations are in
professional and technical occupations that involve
responsibility for program development and management,
preliminary assessments and site inspections, predesign
evaluations, technical analyses, on—site design efforts and
construction management oversight. Therefore, USACE employees
who are exposed to physical hardships or hazardous conditions on
a sporadic basis can be considered to fall within this
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31 May 00
definition of irregular or intermittent.
b.
Position Classification.
(1) The opposite of irregular or intermittent is regular
and recurring. Performing HTW predesign, design and
construction tasks involving physical hardships or hazardous
conditions can, be considered irregular or intermittent if
exposure to physical hardship or hazards is infrequent, i.e.,
normally consisting of less than a substantial amount of the
time. The rationale for this is rooted in the classification
concept of “major duty” which is generally defined as one that
recurs periodically and occupies a substantial amount of the
incumbent’s time. Therefore, if involvement in physical
hardship or hazardous duty situations occupies less than a
substantial amount of an employee’s time, it could be considered
a minor rather than a major duty and, consequently, irregular or
intermittent. However, there may be situations where hazard pay
can be granted even if physical hardship or hazardous duty
situations occupy more than a substantial amount of the
employee’s time. Such rare cases could occur, for example, when
an employee suddenly encounters a “catastrophic” type situation,
and exposure to physical hardship or hazardous situations
dramatically increases. In such cases, hazard pay could be
granted, if warranted, because emergency one-time “catastrophic”
situations are, by definition, infrequent and unusual.
(2) The definition of what is “substantial” is not
included in law or OPM regulation. Ten percent or more of an
employees time (per annum) provides a useful benchmark.
Servicing personnel offices involved in tracking hazard pay for
GS/GM employees should see to it that the time actually spent in
exposure to physical hardship or hazard situations counts as
part of the overall total and not the time for which hazard pay
is received. This is because a GS/GM employee who is exposed to
a physical hardship/hazard situation of one hour, for example,
normally receives eight hours hazard pay. However, only the one
hour of exposure to the physical hardship/hazard situation
should be counted in making the determination of whether the
duty is irregular or intermittent. This is in contrast to FWS
employees, who receive hazard pay for hours of actual exposure.
8.
Hazard pay may not be granted to FWS employees when duties
involving exposure to physical hardship or hazard have been
taken into account in the grading of their positions. For GS/GM
employees, a hazardous duty differential is not payable when the
hazard has been taken into account in the classification
process, whether or not the duty has resulted in a change in the
grade of the position.
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31 May 00
a.
In the USACE, virtually all wage system and GS/GM
positions concerned with HTW on-site predesign, design and
construction activities are graded on the basis of their
professional, technical, and/or administrative responsibilities
rather than on the basis of being exposed to physical hardship
or hazardous duty situations. GS/GM positions classified by FES
standards address both “physical demands” and “work
environment.” When 50 points are granted for these factors, it
may be considered that the hazard has been taken into account in
the classification process. Positions granted 20 points or less
for these factors would be eligible for hazard pay for the HTW
conditions described elsewhere in this circular. Consequently,
it is almost inconceivable that GS/GM employees could be
deprived of hazard pay on account of the classification of their
positions.
b.
Working conditions are included in the grading of FWS
jobs. However, if exposure to conditions of any unusual nature
is regular and recurring, any related skill and knowledge, and
responsibility should be taken into account in grading the jobs.
This may or may not result in changes in the basic grades of the
jobs as shown by applicable classification standards.
9.
Safety.
a.
(1) The Command’s safety and occupational health
policy is that no USACE employee be exposed to physical hardship
or hazardous duty situations without protective safeguards. In
consonance with the objectives of the Hazard Pay/Environmental
Differential Pay Procedures, the overwhelming number of
potentially hazardous job exposures can and must be adequately
controlled. Through operation of the Army and USACE safety and
occupational health programs, safety and health hazards can be
adequately controlled and pose little significant hazard if
controls are provided and properly used. Where the job—related
hazard or environmental condition is “practically eliminated” by
provision of personal protective measures, standard operating
procedures, or devices, hazard pay is not warranted and should
not be paid. Where effective measures are provided but are not
utilized because of inconvenience to the employee, no basis
exists for payment, and disciplinary action should be
considered.
(2) When payment for a job—related hazard or environmental
condition is questionable, the servicing civilian personnel
office will, request a hazard survey and/or determination by FOA
safety and occupational health authorities. For industrial
hygiene/occupational health related exposures the hazard
F-10
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31 May 00
determination shall be made by the FOA safety and occupational
health office’s industrial hygienist. The opinions of these
authorities on whether the conditions can be or are controlled
to the extent that personal hazard to the individual employee is
“practically eliminated” will be a major consideration.
(3) Most adverse working conditions can be avoided by
providing adequate protection to remove physical and health
hazards. Such protection, however, may not be technically
feasible, may require considerable time for engineering controls
to be provided, or may create other adverse environmental
conditions. In such cases local safety or occupational health
authorities will determine the practicality of additional
environmental or hazard controls. The findings will serve as a
key consideration for determining the requirement for additional
payment pending provision of such controls.
(4) Where environmental differential is currently being
paid and safety and/or occupational health authority findings
have not been obtained, such authorities will be promptly
consulted. Results will be documented and the Personnel office
will determine whether to continue or discontinue payment.
b.
If a HTW predesign, design or construction activity
involving eligible hazardous conditions requires the wearing of
personal protective equipment (PPE) as described in 29 CFR
1910.120, Appendix B, Part A.I and A.II (reference 1f), then it
can be considered that no safety precautions can be taken which
will reduce the degree of risk to a negligible level. In such
situations, hazard pay should be authorized, provided all other
regulatory requirements are met. Hazard pay shall not be
granted for a HTW predesign, design or construction activity
involving eligible hazardous conditions that requires the
wearing of PPE as described in 29 CFR 1910.120, Appendix B, Part
A.III (reference lf), unless a formal site—specific hazard
determination has been conducted by the FOA Safety and
Occupational Health Office, and that determination clearly
demonstrates that the wearing of such PPE will not “practically
eliminate” all the potential eligible physical hardships or
hazards to be encountered during the conduct of that activity.
c.
If the PPE as described in subparagraph 9b are worn at
a site of unknown hazard as a precautionary measure only and the
situation later turns out to be nonhazardous, as determined by
the FOA Safety and Occupational Health Office’s hazard
evaluation, hazard pay may not be granted.
d.
If the PPE as described in 9b are not worn at a site
presumed to be nonhazardous, which later turns out to be
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31 May 00
hazardous to the extent that such protective equipment should
have been worn, and the FOA Safety and Health Office has
determined that the wearing of such PPE would not have
practically eliminated all the potential physical hardship or
hazards, then hazard pay should be granted.
10. a.
Implementation of the time, labor and accounting
procedures for providing hazard pay to employees meeting
eligible conditions shall be IAW provisions of references lb and
1c.
b.
Each servicing personnel office is encouraged to
develop local procedures to supplement this USACE guidance, and
provide whatever training may be required to implement the
hazard pay policy effectively.
c.
Explanatory information regarding this policy
memorandum is included at Appendix A.
d.
An example procedure for the determination and
documentation of HTW hazard duty eligible for hazard pay is
included at Appendix B. This information can be used in
developing local differentiate between time spent exposed to
physical hardship or hazardous conditions and time for which
hazard pay is granted. (see paragraph 7b(2) above).
e.
Policy and responsibilities for requesting a hazard
determination to evaluate the physical hardship or hazardous
duty exposure conditions and authorizing hazard pay shall be in
accordance with the guidance contained in Appendix C.
f.
The effective date of this policy is the date of
receipt in the local personnel office. Retroactive pay for
exposure to hazardous conditions may NOT be granted except in
accordance with the provisions of applicable law or regulations,
e.g., 5 U.S.C. 5596 or 5 C.F.R. 550.801 et. seq. You should
seek the advice of your legal counsel in such cases.
3 Appendices
APP A-Hazard Pay/
Environmental Differential
APP B-Local Procedures
APP C—Auth of Performance
of Hazardous Duty
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APPENDIX A
HAZARD PAY/ ENVIRONMETAL DIFFERENTIAL
EXPLANATORY INFORNATION
INTRODUCTION
This Appendix provides explanatory information about Hazard
Pay/Environmental Differentials. The purpose is to help users
better understand and apply the concepts of Hazard Pay
Environmental Differential and help explain them to employees
and supervisors.
ISSUES THAT MAY BE RAISED
Issues that may be raised that require further explanation are
discussed below in order of the subject matter of the circular.
1.
PURPOSE.
a.
Issue.
Is the stated purpose appropriate?
b.
Response. In order to apply this guidance in the
spirit in which it is intended, good judgment must be applied.
It is not possible to describe every specific circumstance
within the context of the hazard pay universe. Emergency
conditions are frequently amorphous and unsettled and just are
not susceptible to precise regulatory application. Therefore,
the entire situation must be considered when determining whether
hazard pay should be granted. Decisions should be rendered
considering the philosophy or sense of the Agency and the spirit
of the law and regulations governing hazard pay. Technical
assistance regarding a hazard determination is available from
the FOA safety and occupational health office professionals
(designated officials). These designated officials are the
individuals responsible for determining if hazardous work
conditions exist. The personnel officer is responsible for
coordinating supervisory recommendations with the designated
official and assuring that the other requirements of law and
regulation are met.
2.
APPLICABILITY.
a.
Issue. Are commissioned officers included in Hazard
Pay/Environmental Differentials covered by this policy?
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APPENDIX A (Cont.)
b.
Response. Hazard Pay/Environmental Differential under
5 U.S. Code 5545 et.seg. does not apply to commissioned
officers.
3.
NO COMMENTS PROVIDED
4.
NO COMMENTS PROVIDED
5.
NO COMMENTS PROVIDED
6.
CONDITIONS.
a.
Issue. Is there provision of sufficient objective
criteria to determine hazard pay authorizations?
b.
Response. Subchapter S.8-7 and Appendix J of (FPM)
Supplement 532-1 and S.9. and Appendices A and E of Book 550 of
Federal Personnel Manual Supplement (FPM) 990-2 includes the OPM
guidance concerning environmental differential and hazard pay.
The appendices provide examples of hazardous duty situations.
Most of these examples are sufficient to enable any reasonable
person to make hazard pay determinations. Two work situations
are identified below that constitute reasonable interpretations
as to what can be considered as exposure to toxic materials and
other related conditions warranting hazard pay. In addition,
the Headquarters, OPM maintains files of approved hazard pay
requests and these files contain a large amount of supplemental
material that augment the examples described in the Appendices.
At our request, the OPM hazard pay expert will research these
files to determine if the examples contained therein can
reasonably apply to the USACE. Therefore, if a hazardous
condition exists for which existing guidance is insufficient to
warrant hazard pay, it should be referred to CEHR-E who can then
discuss it with the Army Civilian Personnel Office and OPM to
obtain a decision. The work situation examples referred to
above include:
(1) The storage site contained hundreds of drums of toxic
materials with some leakage noted. There was potential for fire
and explosion if strong oxidizing materials were to contact
organic materials that were both present.
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APPENDIX A (Cont)
(2) The warehouse contained 400 drums of organic solvents
and acids. Drums were rusty and leaking, improperly stacked,
deteriorating at their base, and not segregated to avoid
incompatibles next to one another. The building was poorly
venti1ated and puddles of unknown material were on the floor. A
drum of nitric acid was fuming. There was imminent danger of
fire or explosion.
7.
NO COMMENTS PROVIDED
8.
NO COMMENTS PROVIDED
9.
SAFETY.
a.
Issue. Does paragraph 9c prevent employees from
receiving hazard pay for exposure to heat while wearing Level A
protective equipment, even if a determination was later made
that such equipment was not necessary with regard to the site
hazards?
b.
Response. Not necessarily? OPM authorizes a 4%
hazard pay differential for hot work when an employee is
subjected to temperatures in excess of 110 degrees Fahrenheit
while working in a confined space. (Wearing Level. A protective
equipment (fully encapsulated suit) can be reasonably
interpreted as “working in a confined space.”). A hazard
determination wou1d have to be made regarding the temperature
inside the suit the employee was wearing to determine if heat
exposure was a factor even though environmental monitoring
conducted in the work area showed that the levels of
contamination did not warrant the wearing of Level A protective
equipment.
10.
IMPLEMENTATION.
a.
Issue. Concerns about training of supervisors,
retroactive back pay, records, and the date of implementation
will undoubtedly surface.
b.
Response. Retroactive back pay issues are especially
complex and should be referred to your legal counsel. Advice
and assistance is also available from the Office of General
Counsel in HQUSACE.
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APPENDIX B
LOCAL PROCEDURE
DETERMINATION AND DOCUMENTATION OF HTW HAZARD
DUTY ELIGIBLE FOR HAZARD PAY
1.
FOA Safety and Occupational Health Official.
a.
In accordance with criteria in Appendix C, FOA Safety
and Occupational Health Officials shall conduct a formal sitespecific hazard determination, upon request from supervisors,
where USACE employees will/have perform(ed) HTW work activities
that meet eligible conditions for hazard pay and requires the
wearing of level C PPE. Hazard determinations are NOT required
for HTW work activities that meet eligible conditions for hazard
pay and requires the wearing of level A or B PPE. Such HTW
eligible work activities conducted while wearing level A or B
PPE in accordance with paragraph 9b of this EC may receive
hazard pay.
b.
If possible, hazard determinations shall be conducted
prior to the performance of the hazard duty. However, at times,
this is not possible due to time constraints, scheduling of
work, etc; and, therefore, the determination is made following
completion of the work activity. A sample checklist, “Safety
and Occupational Health Checklist for HTW Site-Specific Hazard
Determinations,” has been developed to be used as a guide to
conduct the formal hazard determination. (See sample format at
pages B-3 and B—4.) A similar checklist should be completed by:
the responsible FOA Safety and Occupational Health Office
official in documenting the site-specific hazard determination.
The checklist should document the specific management factors,
hazardous conditions and safeguards regarding the hazardous work
activity to be performed. Upon completion, the checklist should
be signed and dated by the FOA Safety and Occupational Health
Office official who conducted the hazard determination
(Industrial Hygienist, Safety and Health Manager, Safety
Engineer). A copy shall be provided to the supervisor that
requested the hazard determination and a copy shall be
maintained on file in the FOA Safety and Occupational Health
Office.
2.
Supervisors.
a.
Supervisors shall notify the FOA Safety and
Occupational Health Office to request the conduct of a formal
hazard evaluation when they have determined that HTW eligible
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APPENDIX B (Cont.)
hazardous work conditions exist that will require/required the
wearing of level C PPE and the wearing of that PPE will not/did
not “practically eliminate” the potential physical hardship(s)
or hazard(s) during the performance of that activity.
Supervisors are not required to request this formal
determination when similar work conditions exist that require
the wearing of level A or B PPE.
b.
Supervisors shall ensure the documentation of the
performance of hazardous duty eligible for hazard pay on a
record sheet. (See sample format, Hazardous Duty Record Sheet,
at page F-20. A Hazard Duty Record Sheet shall be utilized on
all HTW projects to document actual time spent performing
eligible hazardous duty (as opposed to the time for which hazard
pay is recorded for CS/GM employees on the time card).
c.
To complete a Hazard Duty Record Sheet, record the
name/date/actual time spent conducting the work activity that
required the wearing of the PPE. Under the “PPE” column,
indicate the type of respiratory and/or dermal protection used.
For example: “Level B: SCBA and Saran Coated Tyvek.” Under
“Zone Entered,” cite area of site entered and/or degree of
exclusion (if any). For example: “Sludge Mixing Pits, Exclusion
Zone” Under the “Work in Progress” column, describe the activity
which produced the requirement for PPE. For example:
“Hauling/Stabilizing Acid Sludge.”
d.
A Hazard Duty Record Sheet shall be retained at all
HTW project sites and shall be filled out by all USACE employees
who engage in eligible hazardous duty.
e.
To document eligible hazard duty time into the CETAL/
timekeeping system, employee time shall be transmitted to the
timekeeper via whatever local form is utilized. All hazardous
duty shall be documented on this form and signed by the
supervisor (see references lb and 1c of memorandum). When
recording eligible hazard duty time, it is important to note
that, for GS/CM employees, hazard pay is paid for all duty hours
in pay status on the calendar day of work, not just those hours
during which the actual duty was performed.
f.
At Pages F-21 and F-22 is an example of a CETAL time
and attendance report which shall be used to document time and
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APPENDIX B (Cont.)
attendance (including hazardous duty).
g.
At Page F-23 is an example of a CETAL labor cost
report which shall be used to document the hours worked on any
project including HTW projects. It will require signature
verification by the supervisor. This report is used to satisfy
cost recovery efforts (Superfund, etc.).
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SAMPLE FORMAT
SAFETY AND OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH CHECKLIST
FOR
HTW SITE—SPECIFIC HAZARD DETERMINATIONS
A.
BEFORE ACTIVITY PERFORMED:
1.
HAZARD LOCATION:
2.
HTW MISSION ASSIGNMENT:___ predesign ___ design ___ construction ___
a. Type of activity performed: drilling
__ excavation _____
design investigations
___ safety & health surveys _ __ emergency
response actions
___ construction oversight
_ other _____
3.
a.
b.
SITE _______ CITY ______ STATE ______
SITE-SPECIFIC SAFETY AND HEALTH PLAN:
Not developed
Available on site: Yes
No
Adequate for task(s) to be performed? Yes
No
__
4. SUSPECTED OR IDENTIFIED PHYSICAL HARDSHIP(S) OR HAZARD(S):
(A)
(B)
__ (C) _____________
(D)
(E)
_ (F) _____________
5. PFE LEVEL REQUIRED TO BE WORN FOR ACTIVITY:
a. Level A______ Level B______ Level C _____ Level D______
b. If Levels A, B or C required, indicate reason in comment section
below.
NAME
6. IF LEVELS A, B OR C REQUIRED, IDENTIFY PERSON(S) WHO WILL WEAR THIS
EQUPMENT (USE CONTINUATION SHEET IF NECESSARY):
HTW
PAY
TRAINING
CATEGORY
COMPLETED
MEDICAL
RESPIRATOR
OFFICE
WAGE
INITIAL
ANNUAL EVAL.
FIT-TEST
SYSTEM
CS/GM
(40HR)
(8HR)
CURRENT
CURRENT
SYMBOL
7. HAZARD DETERM1NAT1ON~REQUIRED FOR WORK ACTIVITIES WHERE LEVEL C IS
TO BE WORN:
a.
Do site-specific eligible hazardous work conditions exist?
Yes_____ No_____
b. If yes, are existing safeguards (SOPs, PPE, Engineering
controls adequate to “practically eliminate” the eligible
physical hardship(s) or hazard(s)? Yes_____ No_____
c.
If no, what additional safeguards are necessary?
___________________________________________________________
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__________________________________________________________
d. Will the existing or additional safeguards “practically
eliminate’ all the potential hardships or hazards that
may be encountered during the performance of the work
activity?
Yes_____ No _____
(1) If no, explain: _____________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
B.
AFTER ACTIVITY PERFORMED:
1. PROTECTIVE LEVEL USED: (A)_____ (B)_____ (C)_____ (D)______
a. If Level A, B or C was used, provide reason in comment section.
b. Upon hazard evaluation (air monitoring. etc.) of actual site
conditions during use, should Levels A, B or C protective equipment
have been required? Yes______ No _____
c. If Level A, B or C protection was not required initially, and a
lower level of protection was worn (Level D or general work
clothing), should Level A, B or C have been used based on the
hazard evaluation of site conditions during the performance of
the work? Yes______ No _____
2.
LIST IDENTIFIED PHYSICAL HARDSHIPS OR HAZARDS:
(A)
(B)
__ (C)______________
(D)
(E)
_ (F) _____________
3. Equipment:
(a) Clothing
(b) Respirator
(c) Monitoring
Decontamination
Disposed:
Cleaned:
No Action:
4.
APPROXIMATE TIME SPENT IN LEVEL A, B OR C PROTECTION:
Information prov1ded on local hazardous duty record sheet. Obtain from
supervisor.
5.
WAS MEDICAL ATTENTION/EXAMINATION REQUIRED FOLLOWING WORK
ACTIVITY? Yes______ No_______
HAZARD DETERMINAT1ON PREPARED BY FOA SAFETY AND OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH OFFICE:
Industrial Hygienist
Safety & Health Mgr____ Safety Engineer
NAME OF PREPARER
COMMENTS:
DATE
_________
______________________________________________________
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SAMPLE FORMAT
HAZARDOUS DUTY RECORD SHEET
FOA NAME
OFFICE SYMBOL
PROJECT NAME_
LOCATION
CONTRACT NUMBER
IN-HOUSE
WORK ACTIVITY: Predesign ____ Design____ _Construction
Superfund___________ DERP___________ Other __________
Corps Lead________
IRP____________
State Lead
FUDs ___________
PRP Lead__________
EMPLOYEE
NAME
JOB SERIES
(WS/GS/GM)
DATE
ACTUAL
IN
F-21
TIME
OUT
PPE
__
___
Other
ZONE
ENTERED
WORK IN
PROGRESS
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
PROGRAM-ID-P5FATE
RCS-EXEMPT
PCN YFA-O1R
DATE 09/23/87
TIME 13:42:39
COEMIS ENTRY OF TIME, ATTENDANCE AND LABOR (CETAL)
*EMPLOYEE TIME AND ATTENDANCE*
**FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY – PRIVACY ACT DATA **
ORGANIZATION TITLE: CIVILIAN PAYROLL BRANCH
TIMEKEEPER 11
NAME
PAY-BLK
PAY-LOC-CODE
06F0 FLSA: N
DATE
09/14
09/15
09/16
09/17
09/18
09/21
09/22
09/23
09/24
09/25
DAY
MON
TUE
WED
THU
FRI
MON
TUE
WED
THU
FRI
HOURS
8.00
7.50
8.00
8.00
8.00
8.00
8.00
8.00
8.00
8.00
TYPE
REG
REG
REG
REG
REG
ALV
ALV
REG
REG
REG
S
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
REGULAR = 63.50
OVERTIME = 0.00
TOTAL HOURS = 80.00
SSN: 123-45-6789
TIME/ATTENDANCE THRU 09/26/87
HOURS TYPE
S
0.50
1
ALV
P-LEAVE = 16.50
HOURS
NP-LEAVE = 0.00
NDF HOURS = 0.00
SUPERVISOR’S SIGNATURE:
** ALL HOURS HAVE BEEN REVIEWED AND ARE CERTIFIED CORRECT
AS OF THE END OF THE REPORTING PERIOD. ALL PREMIUM HOURS
HAVE BEEN APPROVED AND WORKED ACCORDING TO THE APPROPRIATE
LAWS AND REGULATIONS.
REMARKS:
09/14/87
09/14/87
09/15/87
09/15/87
09/21/87
09/22/87
“REQ TOD: 0700-1530
“ENG 4704 ON FILE
“SF 71 ON FILE
“.50 ALV 0830-0900
“SF 71 ON FILE
“SF 71 ON FILE
“
“
“
“
“
“
F-22
TYPE
_
S
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
COEMIS ENTRY OF TIME, ATTENDANCE AND LABOR (CETAL)
SUPERVISOR’S CERTIFICATION PAGE
FOR
CERTIFIED LABOR REPORTS
LABOR-COST FROM: 07/19/87
TIMEKEEPER NO. 1
EMPLOYEE COUNT 03
LABOR—COST TO: 08/01/87
THE FOLLOWING EMPLOYEES LABOR-COST REPORTS ARE CERTIFIED AS CORRECT:
EMPLOYEE 1
EMPLOYEE 2
EMPLOYEE 3
SUPERVISOR’S SIGNATURE
______________________
T= HAZARD DUTY COLUMN
F-23
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PROGRAM—ID P5FATJ
RCS – EXEMPT
PCN YFA—02R
VERSION 87166
DATE 07/28/87
TIME 09:42:57
PAGE 1
COEMIS ENTRY OF TIME, ATTENDANCE AND LABOR (CETAL)
*CERTIFIED LABOR COST REPORT*
** FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY — PRIVACY ACT DATA **
ORGANIZATION TITLE:
F&A CONTROL SECTION
TIMEXEEPER:
11
NAME: EMPLOYEE 1
PAY-BLK: C2E
PAY-LOC-CODE: 06D3 FLSA: E
SSN: 315-48-5626
LABOR COST THRU: 08/01/87
ADP WORKCODE
VW55020002000000
VW55020000200000
VW55020000200000
REGULAR = 77
OVERTIME = 2
TOTAL 40 HOURS=82
P—LEAVE— 3 NP-LEAVE =
SP—RATE—HR S=
*****************************************************************************
ORGANIZATION TITLE: F & A CONTROL SECTION
TIMEKEEPER: 1
NAME: EMPLOYEE 2
SSN:478—86—6905
PAY—BLK:
C2E
PAY—LOC-CODE: 06D3
FLSA: N
LABOR COST THRU: 08/01/87
ADP WORKCODE
VW5502000020000
VW5502000020000
VW5502000020000
REGULAR = 56
OVERTIME = 8
TOTAL HOURS = 88
P-LEAVE =
NE-LEAVE = 24 SP-RATE-HRS=
*****************************************************************************
ORGANIZATION TITLE: F & A CONTROL SECTION
TIMEKEEPER: 11
NAME: EMPLOYEE 3
SSN:504-60-5427
PAY—BLK:
C2E
PAY—LOC-CODE: 06D3
FLSA: N
LABOR COST THRU: 08/01/87
ADP WORKCODE
VW5502000020000
REGULAR = 80
OVERTIME =
TOTAL HOURS = 80
P-LEAVE =
NE-LEAVE =
T = HAZARD DUTY COLUMN
F-24
SP-RATE-HRS=
EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
APPENDIX C
AUTHORIZATION OF PERFORMANCE OF HAZARDOUS DUTY
1. PURPOSE. This Appendix defines hazardous duty and sets
forth USACE policy and management responsibility for identification and authorization of hazardous work performed by Agency
personnel.
2. BACKGROUND. The Army and USACE Occupational Safety and
Health requirement documents set forth policies, responsibilities, and procedures for implementation of the Agency’s health
and safety program. The purpose of the program is to assure
safe and healthful working conditions for all USACE employees
under Section 19(a) of P.L. 91-56, Occupational Safety and
Health Act of 1970 and 5 U.S.C. 7902(c) (1), Executive Order
12196 and other Federal, DOD, DA and USACE requirements. For
work, which involves identifiable potential hazards, USACE
management provides safety and occupational health,
environmental and procedural controls necessary to protect
employees from harmful or unsafe working conditions.
Infrequently, it may be necessary to consider the performance of
essential work which is hazardous and for which the provision of
adequate safeguards is not practicable.
3. DEFINITION. Hazardous duty is the performance of assigned,
essential work on an intermittent or irregular basis which
involves an occupational health and/or safety hazard for which a
determination has been made that the provision of safeguards
adequate to reduce the hazard to a negligible level is not
practicable.
4.
POLICY.
It is USACE policy to:
a.
Provide adequate Safeguards against potential hazards
for USACE employees in the work place;
b.
Provide that hazardous work which is not adequately
safeguarded is identified and that appropriate action is
subsequently taken; and
c.
Permit the performance of hazardous duty by USACE
employees only after:
(1) The duty to be performed has been identified as
hazardous;
F-25
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31 May 00
APPENDIX C (Cont.)
(2) It has been determined that the provision of adequate
safeguards is impracticable;
(3) It has been determined that the hazardous duty is
essential; and
(4) The employee or employees who are to perform the
hazardous work are fully informed in advance regarding the
potential hazards of the work.
This policy is not intended to foster or approve the frequent,
regular, or recurring performance of hazardous duty by any USACE
employee.
5.
RESPONSIBILITIES.
a.
Supervisors.
responsible for:
Supervisors at all levels are
(1) Identifying potentially hazardous work for which
safeguards may be inadequate;
(2) Notifying the FOA Safety and Occupational Health (SOH)
Manager or person designated for such purpose by SOH Manager;
and
(3) Notifying the servicing personnel office when an
employee has performed or will perform hazardous duty in
accordance with procedures outlined in this circular.
b.
FOA Safety and Occupational Health Managers. FOA
Safety and Occupational Health Managers or persons designated
for such purpose is responsible for:
(1) Determining if a site—specific eligible hazardous work
condition exists;
(2)
Determining whether existing safeguards are adequate;
(3)
Determining what additional safeguards are necessary;
(4)
Determining whether the existing or additional
or
and
F-26
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31 May 00
APPENDIX C (Cont.)
safeguards will practically eliminate the physical hardship
or hazard to be encountered in the performance of the work.
c.
FOA Commanders and Laboratory Commanders/Directors.
FOA Commanders and Laboratory Commanders/Directors or their
designees are responsible for:
(1)
Installing or implementing the necessary safeguards;
(2) Determining that the hazardous work to be performed is
essential in the event that adequate safeguards are
impracticable;
(3) Authorizing the performance of hazardous duty and
hazard pay; and
(4) Assuring that the employees who are to perform the
work are fully informed regarding its potential hazards and are
willing to accept them.
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CECI-IR/CEMP-R (25-400-2d)
10 Aug 99
MEMORANDUM FOR Commanders, Major Subordinate Commands, Staff Principles and
HQUSACE
SUBJECT: Environmental Classification Standards
1. Reference CEIM-IR/CEMP-R memorandum, dated 11 February 1998, subject: Continued
Moratorium on Destruction of Environmental Restoration Records.
2. This memorandum lifts the moratorium on destruction of environmental restoration records
as referenced in paragraph 1. The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) has
approved the environmental restoration Modern Army Recordkeeping System (MARKS)
standards.
3. Action is being taken by Department of the Army to incorporate these standards into
MARKS. In the interim, it is critical that the records relating to the Comprehensive
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) environmental actions
reflect these new MARKS disposition standards. Enclosure 1 contains an executive summary of
the MARKS file numbers affected by this change. Enclosure 2 contains the detailed technical
recordkeeping requirements.
4. The HQUSACE technical point of contact is Ms Nancy Porter at (202) 761-5245. The
recordkeeping point of contact is Ms Dianne Barnes at (202) 761-5021.
FOR THE COMMANDER:
/s/
2 Enclosures
as
RUSSELL L. FUHRMAN
Major General, USA
Chief of Staff
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EP 415-1-266
31 May 00
5 Management
File Category
New Dispositions
Originals - Permanent
Copies – Destroy after 3 years
5c
USACE Environmental Restoration
Agreements
37 Financial Administration
File Category
New Dispositions
37-1f
Accounting Documents
HTRW – 30 years
37-2-1b
COEMIS, F&A Site Audit Outputs
HTRW – 30 years
37-2-10d
Basis and Intermediate Cost Media Files
HTRW – 30 years
37-2-10r
Civil Works Site Audits
HTRW – 30 years
37-2-10s
Disbursing Officers Vouchers (CW)
HTRW – 30 years
37-2-10u
Fiscal Accounting Files
HTRW – 30 years
37-103dd
Original Disbursing Officers Accounts
(Mil)
HTRW – 30 years
NOTE: EPA Superfund Only - Must obtain authorization from EPA before destruction of documents.
200 Environmental Quality
File Category
New Dispositions
200-1d
Environmental Restoration Remedial
Assessment Files
Permanent
200-1e
Army Environmental Restoration
Administration Record
Permanent
200-1f
Environmental Restoration Project Files
Permanent
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385 Safety
File Category
New Dispositions
385-10f
Accident and Incident Cases
HTRW – 50 Years (Field)
HTRW – 30 Years (HQ)
405 Real Estate
File Category
New Disposition
405-90h
Real Property Title/Historical Files
No Time Event - permanent
415 Construction Contracts (Military)
File Category
New Disposition
415-10c
Military Construction Contracts
HTRW – 30 years
715 Procurement Contracts
File Category
New Dispositions
715c
Master, Open-end, and Call-type
Contracts
715j
Small Purchase Categories
HTRW – 30 years
715k
Contract Actions
HTRW – 30 years
715p
Contract Clause Deviations
HTRW – 30 years
HTRW – 30 years
Note: EPA Superfund Only - Must obtain authorization from EPA before destruction of documents.
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1110 Corps of Engineers Engineering and Design Files
File Category
New Dispositions
1110-1-8100e
Environmental Restoration – Raw Data
Files
Destroy samples after 1 year or when
regulatory requirements are met.
Laboratory backup analytical data,
destroy after 2 years
1110-1-8100f
Environmental Restoration Quality
Assurance and Quality Control (QA/QC)
Files
Permanent
1110-1-8100g
Environmental Restoration Waste
Identification, Tracking, and Disposal
Files
Permanent
1180 Corps of Engineers Contracts
File
Category
New Dispositions
1180-1-1a
Civil Works Contracts
HTRW – 30 years
1180-1-1q
Civil Works Construction and
Maintenance Contracts
HTRW – 30 years
Note: EPA Superfund Only - Must obtain authorization from EPA before destruction of documents.
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ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION FILE CATEGORY
(AR 25-400-2, 26 February 1993, The Modern Army Recordkeeping Systems (MARKS))
File Category 5 – Agreements
Pertinent Background Information
This is a new classification description and disposition standard for File Category 5 Agreements relating to environmental restoration clean-up actions. These records are necessary
for litigation and possible cost recovery actions. In order to follow the retention period of the
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) classification standard and for the Comprehensive
Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), a permanent disposition
is the proposed retention period. Included in this classification standard are agreements for
Superfund, Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) and DOD Base Realignment
and Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration Program, Work for Others, and Operational and
Maintenance.
File Number: 5c (or next available suffix) (MARKS Page #33)
Title: Environmental Restoration Agreements
Authority: To be assigned
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
ADD NEW RECORD CATEGORY AND DISPOSITION STANDARD:
Description: Includes the original life cycle documentation establishing agreements for
environmental restoration work through financial and contractual closeout. Specific types of
agreements may include national agreements, interagency agreements, cooperative agreements
with Federal, State and local government agencies, access agreements, implementation
agreements, technical assistance agreements and other types of environmental restoration
agreements, agreement oversight documentation, and other sharing of agency resources and
services. Other types of records include documentation of significant actions and decisions,
applications, agreement oversight activities, correspondence relating to the agreement, noncompliance/dispute documentation, and closeouts documentation for completed agreements.
Disposition:
a. Original Agreement Documents: Permanent.
b. Copies: Retain in CFA 3 years after project completion and destroy.
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File Category 37: FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION
Pertinent Background Information
These are updated classification standards for the File Category: 37 Financial Administration.
The current descriptions, authorities, and Privacy Act standards remain the same. Additional
descriptions and disposition standards are being proposed to cover the Comprehensive
Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), to cover Superfund cost
recovery actions, and provides descriptions and disposition instructions for environmental
restoration appropriations involving either Civil Works; Air Force; Department of Defense; and
Non-Department of Defense. Programs include records generated in support of the Defense
Environmental Restoration Program (DERP), and DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC)
Environmental Restoration Program, and all other Support Work for Others.
File Number: 37-1f (MARKS Page #79)
Title: Accounting Documents
Authority: NC1-AU-86-55
Privacy Act: Not Applicable.
ADD NEW DISPOSITION INSTRUCTIONS: l and m:
l. File documents supporting USACE mission which are not environmental restoration in nature;
Retain in CFA 2 years, Retire FRC, and Destroy 6 years 3 months after end of Fiscal Year in
which payment or collection is effected, providing there are no outstanding claims; exceptions;
or pending litigation in connection therewith.
m. HQUSACE environmental restoration mission related records; retain in CFA 2 years
Retire FRC; Destroy after 30 years providing there are no outstanding claims; exceptions; or
pending litigation in connection therewith.
File Number: 37-2-1b (MARKS Page #82)
Title: COEMIS, F&A Site Audit Outputs
Authority: NC1-AU-76-25 & GRS 6, Item 1a
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
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ADD NEW RECORDS DESCRIPTIONS AND DISPOSITION INSTRUCTIONS:
c through e:
c. Description: USACE accounts and supporting documents generated in support of the
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) recovery
actions for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA), Superfund Program will be
reviewed for financial closeout per ER 37-5-3 for site-specific cost recovery documentation prior
to transferring from the current file are (CFA). EPA Superfund Cost Recovery documents may
not be destroyed unless authorized by EPA. This category is not applicable to records generated
after February 1998. The USACE was fully deployed on CEFMS after February 1998.
c. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years after financial closeout per ER 37-5-3. Transfer to RHA
for 5 years, Retire to FRC: Destroy after 30 years providing there are no outstanding claims;
exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all Superfund Cost Recovery
(NA Form 13001) Request for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost Recovery Coordinator to
obtain disposal authorization.
d. Description: Documents generated in support of Defense Environmental Restoration
Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration
Program and other non-superfund environmental restoration programs.
d. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years after final billing and transfer to RHA 5 years and retire
FRC: Destroy 30 years after end of Fiscal Year in which payment or collection is effected,
providing there are no outstanding claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in connection
therewith.
e. Description: HQUSACE environmental restoration mission related records for Superfund,
Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and Closure
(BRAC) Environmental Restoration Program and all other Support Work for Others.
e.
Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years after final billing and Retire FRC: Destroy after 30 years
providing there are no outstanding claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in connection
therewith.
File Number: 37-2-10d (MARKS Page #83)
Title: Basic and Intermediate Cost Media Files
Authority: GRS 22, Item 1b and GRS 23, Item 5
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
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ADD NEW RECORDS DESCRIPTION AND DISPOSITION INSTRUCTIONS:
b through d:
b. Description: USACE accounts and supporting documents generated in support of the
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) recovery
actions for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Superfund Program will be reviewed for
financial closeout per ER 37-5-3 for site-specific cost recovery documentation prior to
transferring from the current file area (CFA). EPA Superfund Cost Recovery documents may
not be destroyed unless authorized by EPA. May also, include documents in support of the
Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and Closure
(BRAC) Environmental Restoration Program, Work for Others, and Operational and
Maintenance.
b. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years after financial closeout per ER 37-5-3. Transfer to RHA
for 5 years. Retire to FRC, destroy after 30 years providing there are no outstanding claims;
exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all Superfund Cost Recovery
(NA Form 13001) Request for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost Recovery Coordinator to
obtain disposal authorization.
c. Description: Documents generated in support of Defense Environmental Restoration
Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration
Program and other non-superfund environmental restoration programs.
c. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years after final billing and destroy 6 years and 3 months after
end of Fiscal Year in which payment or collection is effected, providing there are no outstanding
claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith.
d. Description: HQUSACE environmental restoration mission related records for Superfund,
Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) and DOD Base Realignment and Closure
(BRAC) Environmental Restoration Program related records.
d. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years after final billing and retire to FRC, destroy after 30
years providing there are no outstanding claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in connection
therewith.
File Number: 37-2-10r (MARKS Page #84)
Title: Civil Works Site Audits
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Authority: NC1-AU-76-39
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
F-36
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ADD NEW RECORDS DESCRIPTION AND DISPOSITION INSTRUCTIONS:
c through e:
c. Description: USACE accounts and supporting documents generated in support of the
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) recovery
actions for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
s Superfund Program will be reviewed for
financial closeout per ER 37-5-3 for site-specific cost recovery documentation prior to transfer
from the current file area (CFA). EPA Superfund Cost Recovery documents may not be
destroyed unless authorized by EPA.
c. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years after financial closeout per ER 37-5-3. Transfer to RHA
for 5 years. Retire to FRC, destroy after 30 years providing there are no outstanding claims;
exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all Superfund Cost Recovery
(NA Form 13001) Request for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost Recovery Coordinator to
obtain disposal authorization.
d. Description: Documents generated in support of Defense Environmental Restoration
Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration
Program and other non-superfund environmental restoration programs.
d. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years after final billing: Destroy 30 years after end of Fiscal
Year in which payment or collection is effected, providing there are no outstanding claims;
exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith.
e. Description: HQUSACE environmental restoration mission related records for Superfund,
Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) and DOD Base Realignment and Closure
(BRAC) Environmental Restoration Program and all other Support Work for Others.
e. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years after final billing and retire to FRC: Destroy after 30
years providing there are no outstanding claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in connection
therewith.
File Number: 37-2-10s (MARKS Page #84)
Title: Disbursing Officer’s Vouchers
Authority: GRS 6, Item 1a
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
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ADD NEW RECORDS DESCRIPTION AND DISPOSITION INSTRUCTIONS: b
through d:
b. Description: USACE accounts and supporting documents generated in support of the
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), which
may include the Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) and DOD Base
Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration Program. Recovery actions for
the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
s Superfund Program will be reviewed for financial
closeout per ER 37-5-3 for site-specific cost recovery documentation prior to transferring from
the current file area (CFA). EPA Superfund Cost Recovery documents may not be destroyed
unless authorized by EPA.
b. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years after financial closeout per ER 37-5-3. Transfer to RHA
for 5 years then retire to FRC: Destroy after 30 years providing there are no outstanding claims;
exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all Superfund Cost Recovery
(NA Form 13001) Request for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost Recovery Coordinator to
obtain disposal authorization.
c. Description: Documents generated in support of Defense Environmental Restoration
Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration
Program and other non-superfund environmental restoration programs.
c. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years final billing: Destroy 30 years after end of Fiscal year in
which payment or collection is effected, providing there are no outstanding claims; exceptions;
or pending litigation in connection therewith.
d. Description: HQUSACE environmental restoration mission related records for Superfund,
Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) and DOD Base Realignment and Closure
(BRAC) Environmental Restoration Program and all other Support Work for Others.
d. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years after final billing then retire to FRC: Destroy after 30
years providing there are no outstanding claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in
connection therewith.
File Number: 37-2-10u (MARKS Page #84)
Title: Fiscal accounting files
Authority: GRS 7, Item 2
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
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ADD NEW RECORDS DESCRIPTION AND DISPOSITION INSTRUCTIONS: b
through d:
b. Description: USACE accounts and support documents generated in support of the
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) recovery
actions for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
s Superfund Program will be reviewed for
financial closeout per ER 37-5-3 for site-specific cost recovery documentation prior to transfer
from the current file area (CFA). EPA Superfund Cost Recovery documents may not be
destroyed unless authorized by EPA.
b. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years after financial closeout per ER 37-5-3. Transfer to
RHA for 5 years then retire to FRC: Destroy after 30 years providing there are no outstanding
claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all Superfund Cost
Recovery (NA Form 13001) Request for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost Recovery
Coordinator to obtain disposal authorization.
c. Description: Documents generated in support of Defense Environmental Restoration
Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration
Program and other non-superfund environmental restoration programs.
c. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years after final billing: Destroy 30 years after end of Fiscal
Year in which payment or collection is effected, providing there are no outstanding claims;
exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith.
d. Description: HQUSACE environmental restoration mission related records for Superfund,
Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) and DOD Base Realignment and Closure
(BRAC) Environmental Restoration Program and all others Support Work for Others.
d. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years after final billing then retire to FRC: Destroy after 30
years providing there are no outstanding claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in
connection therewith.
File Number: 37-103dd (MARKS Page #89)
Title: Original Disbursing Officer Accounts
Authority: GRS 2, Item 1; GRS 6, Item 1a, and NC1-AU-84-42
Privacy Act: A0037-104-1bSAFM
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ADD NEW RECORDS DESCRIPTION AND DISPOSITION INSTRUCTION c:
c. Description: Documents generated in support of Defense Environmental Restoration
Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration
Program and other military environmental restoration programs.
c. Disposition: USACE retain in CFA 2 years after final billing. Transfer RHA 5 years then
retire to FRC: Destroy 30 years after end of Fiscal Year in which payment or collection is
effected, providing there are no outstanding claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in
connection therewith.
File Category 200: Environmental Quality
Pertinent Background Information
These are new classification standards for the file category 200 Environmental Quality. The
authority will be assigned by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), and
the Privacy Act does not pertain. A permanent disposition standard is being proposed to address
the preservation of environmental restoration records necessary to protect the legal and financial
interests of the Federal Government.
Proposed File Number: 200-1d (MARKS Page #181)
Title: Environmental Restoration Remedial Assessment Files
Authority: To be assigned.
Privacy Act: Not Applicable.
Description: Example of records are correspondence, memorandums, quality assurance project
plans (QAPPs), endangerment assessment, risk assessment, health and safety plans, potentially
responsible party (PRP) searches and investigations, projects management plans (PMP), preremedial reports, remedial investigation (RI) reports, feasibility study (FS) reports, proposed
plans for selected remedial action, and applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements
(ARARs), congressional inquiries, community relation plans and other public awareness records.
Disposition:
Permanent.
Proposed File Number: 200-1e (MARKS Page #181)
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Title: Army Environmental Restoration Administrative Record
Authority: To be assigned
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
Description: The Administrative Record is a subset of the remedial assessment file compiled
made available to the public as the basis for selected Defense Environmental Restoration
Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration
Program, and Work for Others response actions. Example of records include: site discovery
documentation, health and endangerment assessments, action memoranda, administrative orders,
consent orders, applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARAR), the preliminary
assessment, site inspection, site investigation, the remedial investigation reports, feasibility
study, community relations plans, correspondence, fact sheets, news clippings, work plans,
natural resource trustee information, site reports, the proposed and approved remedial action,
potentially responsible party (PRP) letters, PRP steering committee documents, letters, the
Record of Decision (ROD) and ROD briefing documents, technical assistance documentation,
technical issue papers, technical assistance grants, natural resources trustee release, trustee
notification form and selection guide, public meeting transcripts, public comments on the
development of the administrative Record, and an index of the record.
Disposition: Permanent.
Proposed File Number: 200-1f (Page 180)
Title: Environmental Restoration Project Files
Authority: To be Assigned
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
Description: Documents and videotapes created in connection with the investigation, planning,
design, remedial actions, technical assistance operations, and maintenance of projects associated
with environmental restoration of sites contaminated. These environmental restoration actions
may include Civil Works sites; and sites designated by the Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA), or sites designated by other agencies, assigned to Army; Air Force; Department of
Defense; Non-Department of Defense; active military installations; DOD Base Realignment and
Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration Program, Defense Environmental Restoration
Program (DERP). Included are program and project management documents, as well as
documents associated with the administrative record, remedial design, remedial action and
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31 May 00
closeout, operations and maintenance, and other related documents.
Disposition: Permanent.
File Category 385: SAFETY
Pertinent Background Information
This is an updated classification standard for the file category 385: Safety. The description,
authority and Privacy Act standards remain the same. Based on possible litigation, a permanent
disposition standard is being proposed to address recordable accidents and incidents reports
relating to environmental restoration work performed for Superfund, Defense Environmental
Restoration Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental
Restoration Program and other environmental restoration program accidents or incidents. The
current MARKS regulation rescinded file number 385-40b, Accidents and Incidents Cases. The
proposal recommends file number 385-40b be reinstated because the responsibilities are better
defined in this regulation. Recommend File Number 385-10f be disestablished and the updated
description and disposition standards as discussed below be moved to FN 385-40b. Recommend
the time event disposition identified as 385-10f b, “OCE records created prior to 1 Jan 82:
Destroy after 30 years”be changed from a time event disposition standard to a straight 30 year
file to read as described in b below. A new disposition standard for environmental restoration is
being added at paragraph d below.
ADD NEW DESCRIPTION AND DISPOSITION b through d:
File: 385-10f (MARKS Page #226)
Title: Accident and Incident Cases
Authority: NC1-AU-82-8
Privacy Act: A385-10/400SA
Description: Information relating to individual accidents and incidents. Included are reports of
accidents and incidents and investigation thereof, involving Army missile systems, Army and
non-Army motor vehicles, Army marine equipment, fires, explosives, and damage to Army
property; harmful chemical, biological, radiological, environmental restoration clean-up and
accidents; occupational injuries, illnesses, or death of military, Army civilian employees, or
contractor personnel, injury or illness to non-Army personnel or damage to non-Army property
as a result of Army operation, artillery misfires or accidents, and similar information.
Disposition:
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31 May 00
a. No change.
b. Change to read: USACE retain in CFA and destroy after 30 years.
c. No change.
d. Environmental restoration reports, retain in CFA 5 years, transfer RHA 5 years,
50 years.
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File Category 405: Real Estate
Pertinent Background Information
This is a major change to the classification standard for the file category 405: Real Estate.
The description for 405-90h has been significantly changed. The Privacy Act standard remains
the same. The proposed disposition standard is permanent rather than the current time event
disposition standard. We are proposing this new disposition standard because of potential
environmental liabilities relating to real property transactions.
File Number: 405-90h (MARKS Page # 233)
Title: Real Property Title/Historical Files
Authority: NC1AU-83-5 and GRS 4
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
Description: Information documenting the condition of title and the life cycle of the acquisition,
management, and disposal of real property. The acquisition documents include directives, real
estate planning reports, title evidence, deeds and judgments; disposal documents include deeds,
grants and papers relating to transfer, assignment or relinquishment; documents relating to the
extent of Federal jurisdiction; documents of permanent value relating to relocations; general
correspondence and miscellaneous environmental restoration documents including those relating
to claims; final project maps, and documents relating to the Comprehensive Environmental
Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), Superfund, Defense Environmental
Restoration Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental
Restoration Program, or other remediation program documents which may substantiate potential
environmental claims or liabilities resulting from the acquisition, use or occupancy of real
property or interests in real property; and similar materials.
Disposition:
a. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Division and Districts having operational real estate
responsibilities: Offer all records and indexes to NARA 10 years after unconditional disposal of
property, Permanent.
b. Other Offices: Destroy copies when no longer needed for current business.
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File Category 415: Construction
Pertinent Background Information
These are updated classification standards for the file category 415 Construction. The
description, authority, and Privacy Act standard remain the same. A 30 year disposition standard
is being proposed when the contract relates to Environmental Restoration cleanup actions.
File Number: 415-10c (MARKS Page #233)
Title: Military Construction Contracts
Authority: NC-AU-75-19
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
Add new Description e, f and Disposition Standard c, d:
e. Description: Military contracts relating to the Comprehensive Environmental
Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), Superfund, Defense Environmental
Restoration Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental
Restoration Program, Work for Others, and Operational and Maintenance. USACE contracts
and supporting documents generated in support of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA),
Superfund Program, may not be destroyed unless authorized by EPA IAW EPA Managers
Financial Guide.
c. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 year after closeout of the contract in which final payment is
effected. Transfer to RHA for 5 years. Retire to FRC, Destroy after 30 years providing there are
no outstanding claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all
Superfund Contract (NA Form 13001) Request for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost
Recovery Coordinator to obtain disposal authorization.
f. Description: HQUSACE environmental restoration mission correspondence relating to
contract records. USACE contracts and supporting documents generated in support of the
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Superfund Program, may not be destroyed unless
authorized by EPA IAW EPA Managers Financial Guide.
d. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years and retire FRC, destroy after 30 years providing there are
no outstanding claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all
Superfund Contract (NA Form 13001) Requests for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost
Recovery Coordinator to obtain disposal authorization.
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File Category 715: Procurement Contracts
Pertinent Background Information
These are updated classification standards for the file category 715 Procurement Contracts.
The description, authority, and Privacy Act standards remain the same. A 30 year disposition
standard is being proposed when the contracts relates to Environmental Restoration cleanup
actions.
File Number: 715c (MARKS Page #294)
Title: Master, Open-End, and Call-Type Contracts
Authority: NC-64-75-4
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
ADD NEW DESCRIPTION b, c and DISPOSITION c, d:
b. Description: Records relating to the Comprehensive Environmental Response,
Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), Superfund, Defense Environmental Restoration
Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration
Program, Work for Others, and Operational and Maintenance. USACE contracts and supporting
documents generated in support of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Superfund
Program, may not be destroyed unless authorized by EPA IAW EPA Managers Financial Guide.
c. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years after closeout of the contract in which final payment is
effected. Transfer to RHA for 5 years. Retire to FRC, and destroy after 30 years providing there
are no outstanding claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all
Superfund Contract (NA Form 13001) Requests for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost
Recovery Coordinator to obtain disposal authorization.
c. Description: HQUSACE environmental restoration contract correspondence records.
USACE contracts and supporting documents generated in support of the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA), Superfund Program, may not be destroyed unless authorized by EPA
IAW EPA Managers Financial Guide.
d. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years and retire FRC, destroy after 30 years providing there are
no outstanding claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all
Superfund Contract (NA Form 13001) Requests for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost
Recovery Coordinator to obtain disposal authorization.
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File Number: 715j (MARKS Page #295)
Title: Small Purchase Categories
Authority: NC1-330-78-13
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
ADD NEW DESCRIPTION AND DISPOSITION b & c:
b. Description: Records relating to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation
and Liability Act (CERCLA), Superfund, Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP),
DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration Program, Work for
Others, and Operational and Maintenance. USACE contracts and supporting documents
generated in support of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Superfund Program, may
not be destroyed unless authorized by EPA IAW EPA Managers Financial Guide.
b. Disposition: Retain in CFA 1 year after closeout of the contract in which final payment is
effected. Retire to FRC, destroy after 30 years providing there are no outstanding claims;
exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all Superfund Contract (NA
Form 13001) Request for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost Recovery Coordinator to
obtain disposal authorization.
c. Description: HQUSACE environmental restoration contract correspondence records.
USACE contracts and supporting documents generated in support of the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA), Superfund Program, may not be destroyed unless authorized by EPA
IAW EPA Managers Financial Guide.
c. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years and retire FRC, destroy after 30 years providing there are
no outstanding claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all
Superfund Contract (NA Form 13001) Requests for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost
Recovery Coordinator to obtain disposal authorization.
File Number: 715k (MARKS Page #295)
Title: Contract Actions
Authority: NC-217-75-8
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
ADD NEW DESCRIPTION b, c, and DISPOSITION c, d:
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b. Description: Records relating to the Comprehensive Environmental Response,
Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), Superfund, Defense Environmental Restoration
Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration
Program, Work for Others, and Operational and Maintenance. USACE contracts and supporting
documents generated in support of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Superfund
Program, may not be destroyed unless authorized by EPA IAW EPA Managers Financial
Guide.
c. Disposition: Retain in CFA 1 year after closeout of the contract in which final payment is
effective. Retire to FRC, destroy after 30 years providing there are no outstanding claims;
exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all Superfund Contract (NA
Form 13001) Requests for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost Recovery Coordinator to
obtain disposal authorization.
c. Description: HQUSACE environmental restoration contract correspondence records.
USACE contracts and supporting documents generated in support of the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA), Superfund Program, may not be destroyed unless authorized by
EPA IAW EPA Managers Financial Guide.
d. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years and retire FRC, destroy after 30 years providing there are
no outstanding claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all
Superfund Contract (NA Form 13001) Requests for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost
Recovery Coordinator to obtain disposal authorization.
File Number: 715p (MARKS Page #295)
Title: Contract Clause Deviations
Authority: NC1-AU-80-45
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
ADD NEW DESCRIPTION b & c AND DISPOSITION b & c:
b. Description: Records relating to the Comprehensive Environmental Response,
Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), Superfund, Defense Environmental Restoration
Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration
Program, Work for Others, and Operational and Maintenance. USACE contracts and supporting
documents generated in support of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Superfund
Program, may not be destroyed unless authorized by EPA IAW EPA Managers Financial Guide.
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b. Disposition: Retain in CFA 1 year after closeout of the contract in which final payment is
effected. Retire to FRC, destroy after 30 years providing there are no outstanding claims;
exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all Superfund Contract (NA
Form 13001) Request for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost Recovery Coordinator to
obtain disposal authorization.
c. Description: HQUSACE environmental restoration contract correspondence records:
USACE contracts and supporting documents generated in support of the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA), Superfund Program, may not be destroyed unless authorized by EPA
IAW EPA Managers Financial Guide.
c. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years and retire FRC, destroy after 30 years providing there are
no outstanding claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all
Superfund Contract (NA Form 13001) Requests for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost
Recovery Coordinator to obtain disposal authorization.
File Category 1110: Corps of Engineers, Engineering and Design
Pertinent Background Information
These are new classification standards for the file category 1110: Corps of Engineers,
Engineering and Design.
File Number: 1110-1-8100e (Page #317)
Title: Environmental Restoration - Raw Data Files
Authority: To be assigned
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
Description: Records relate to chemical analysis services performed to support the
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), for
Superfund, Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and
Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration Program, Work for Others, and Operations and
Maintenance. Examples of documentation include: QA/QC laboratory Chemical Quality
Assurance reports. Chemical Data Quality Assessment reports, raw data inventory forms, field
sheets, chain of custody documents, data worksheets, analyst logbooks, sample logbooks,
correspondence, and QA/QC data logs.
Disposition:
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a. Dispose of all raw test samples within 90 days after regulatory holding times, but not to
exceed 1 year, whichever is sooner.
b. Raw test data reports shall be retained for 2 years from date of generation.
File Number: 1110-1-8100f (Page #317)
Title: Environmental Restoration Quality Assurance and Quality Control (QA/QC) Files
Authority: To be assigned.
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
Add New Description and Disposition Standards:
Description: Records relate to chemical analysis QA/QC final reports supporting the
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), for
Superfund, Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and
Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration Program, Work for Others, and Operations and
Maintenance. Examples of documentation include: QA/QC laboratory Chemical Quality
Assurance reports, Chemical Data Quality Assessment reports, raw data inventory forms, field
sheets, chain of custody documents, data worksheets, analyst logbooks, sample logbooks,
correspondence, QA/QC data logs, and independent data validation reports (if generated).
Disposition:
a. Permanent.
b. Cutoff logbooks on completion of project: Destroy after 30 years if listed on the National
Priorities List; all others will be destroyed after 5 years.
File Number: 1110-1-8100g
Title: Environmental Restoration Waste Identification, Tracking, and Disposal Files
Authority: To be assigned
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
Add New Description and Disposition Standard:
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Description: Records relate to waste identification, tracking and disposal documentation
supporting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act
(CERCLA), for Superfund, Defense Environmental Restoration Program, Work for Others, and
Operations and Maintenance. Examples of documentation includes, generator knowledge
determination, waste analysis reports and associated waste profile sheets, waste shipping records
and hazardous waste manifests, land disposal restriction notifications and certificates of disposal.
Disposition: Permanent.
File Category 1180: Corps of Engineers Contracts
Pertinent Background Information
These are updated classification standards for the file category 1180 Corps of Engineers
Contracts. The description, authority, and Privacy Act standards remain the same. A 30 year
disposition standard disposition standard is being proposed when the contracts relate to the
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA)
Superfund, Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and
Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration Program, Work for Others, and Operational and
Maintenance.
File Number: 1180-1-1a (MARKS Page #326)
Title: Civil Works Contracts (CE)
Authority: NC1-AU-76-75
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
ADD NEW DESCRIPTION c AND DISPOSITION INSTRUCTIONS c, d:
c. Description: USACE Civil Works contracts relating to the Comprehensive Environmental
Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), Superfund, Defense Environmental
Restoration Program (DERP), DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental
Restoration Program, Work for Others, and Operational and Maintenance or any other contracts
relating to environmental restoration clean-up actions. USACE contracts and supporting
documents generated in support of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Superfund
Program, may not be destroyed unless authorized by EPA IAW EPA Managers Financial Guide.
c. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 years after closeout of the contract in which final payment is
effected. Transfer to RHA for 5 years, retire to FRC, destroy after 30 years providing there are
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no outstanding claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all
Superfund Contract (NA Form 13001) Requests for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost
Recovery Coordinator to obtain disposal authorization.
d. Disposition: HQUSACE environmental restoration contract correspondence records; retain in
CFA 2 years and retire FRC, destroy after 30 years providing there are no outstanding claims;
exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all Superfund Contract (NA
Form 13001) Requests for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost Recovery Coordinator to
obtain disposal authorization.
File Number: 1180-1-1q (MARKS Page #327)
Title: Civil Works Construction and Maintenance Contracts
Authority: NC1-AU-76-47
Privacy Act: Not Applicable
ADD NEW DESCRIPTION f AND DISPOSITION STANDARD b & c:
f. Description: USACE Civil Works contracts relating to the Comprehensive Environmental
Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), Superfund, Defense Environmental
Restoration Program (DERP), and DOD Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental
Restoration Program, Work for Others, and Operational and Maintenance. USACE contracts
and supporting documents generated in support of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA),
Superfund Program, may not be destroyed unless authorized by EPA IAW EPA Managers
Financial Guide.
c. Disposition: Retain in CFA 2 year after closeout of the contract in which final payment is
effected. Transfer to RHA for 5 years and retire to FRC, destroy after 30 years providing there
are no outstanding claims; exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all
Superfund Contract (NA Form 13001) Requests for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost
Recovery Coordinator to obtain disposal authorization.
c. Disposition: HQUSACE environmental restoration contract correspondence records; retain in
CFA 2 years and retire FRC, destroy after 30 years providing there are no outstanding claims;
exceptions; or pending litigation in connection therewith. Forward all Superfund Contract (NA
Form 13001) Requests for Disposal of Records to the USACE Cost Recovery Coordinator to
obtain disposal authorization.
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DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
U S. Army Corps of Engineers
Washington, DC, 20314.1000
REPLY TO
ATTENTION OF:
CEMP-RS/CERE-AP
22 Nov 1989
MEMORANDUM FOR SEE DISTRIBUTION
SUBJECT: USACE Real Estate Support for EPA Superfund Program
1. The purpose of this memorandum is to provide guidance and
procedures for preparation of Real Estate Planning Reports
(REPR) and Real Estate support for the EPA Superfund Program.
The attached draft guidance is for immediate implementation.
Request you provide copies to all Superfund district project
managers and real estate offices for action. This guidance has
been concurred in by HQEPA.
2. Points of contact at this headquarters are Jim Gibson,
CEMP—RS, (202) 504-4709 and Laura Norman, CERE—AP, (202)
272—0495.
FOR THE COMMANDER:
/s/
BARRY J. FRANKEL
Director of Real Estate
/s/
GEORGE R. ROBERTSON
Major General, USA
Assistant Commander and Director
Military Programs
Encl
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DISTRIBUTION:
ALL DIVISION SUPERFUND COORDINATORS
COMMANDER,
HUNTSVILLE DIVISION
LOWER MISSISSIPPI VALLEY DIVISION
MISSOURI RIVER DIVISION
NEW ENGLAND DIVISION
NORTH ATLANTIC DIVISION
NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION
NORTH PACIFIC DIVISION
OHIO RIVER DIVISION
PACIFIC OCEAN DIVISION
SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION
SOUTH PACIFIC DIVISION
SOUTHWESTERN DIVISION
CEMRD-ED-EA (Winnike)
CF:
ASA(CW), ATTN: Ms. Tornblom
HQEPA, ATTN: CDR William Zobel
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REAL ESTATE SUPPORT PROCEDURES FOR EPA SUPERFUND PROJECTS
1. Purpose. Describe Real Estate procedures and provide
guidance for conducting real estate planning and acquisition in
support of Superfund projects.
2.
Background.
a.
The Corps of Engineers is supporting the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) in its mission to clean up hazardous and
toxic waste sites. This support has principally taken the form
of engineering, construction, and related contract management
activities. However, EPA now envisions a need for real estate
support, including Real Estate Planning Reports (REPRs),
acquisition activities, and other real estate support for
enforcement actions.
b.
To obtain the necessary real estate interests to
perform remedial actions, EPA will normally either exercise its
enforcement power on contaminated/threatened lands, pursuant to
42 U.S.C. Section 104(e) without just compensation to a
landowner, or acquire non—contaminated/threatened lands,
pursuant to 42 U.S.C. Section 104(j), with just compensation to
a landowner. Enforcement activities will generally be handled
by EPA and acquisition will generally be handled by USACE Real
Estate for USACE assigned projects; however, there will be times
when USACE will provide support activities to EPA in obtaining
the necessary real estate under EPA enforcement powers. The
following paragraphs describe the duties and responsibilities of
relevant USACE and EPA offices in REPR, enforcement, and
acquisition activities.
3.
REPRs General.
a.
REPRs will be required for all Corps lead projects.
The need for a REPR is established between the Corps and EPA
pursuant to paragraph 4a(1). Appropriate USACE and EPA elements
will then follow the procedures set out below for initiating,
developing, and completing REPRs.
b.
Typically, REPRs will take no more than 60 days to
draft depending on the complexity of the project and the type
and amount of land involved. The Real Estate FOA responsible
for producing a REPR shall coordinate any delays in REPR
production with the USACE FOA Design Project Manager (PM) in
Kansas City or Omaha and the EPA Regional Project Manager (RPM).
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c.
In addition to the information outlined in Figure 2-1
of ER 405-1-12, REPRs shall in all cases identify those areas of
contaminated, threatened, and clean lands and should include
such other information as is necessary and desirable for project
purposes. (See Appendix A for more guidance on REPR contents.)
4. REPR Procedures. The following paragraphs describe the
process for initiating, developing, and completing REPRs in
support of EPA Superfund projects.
a.
Requests for REPRs.
(1) As soon as feasible during the design phase of all
Corps projects, the FOA Design PM and the EPA RPM will establish
real estate requirements to be incorporated in the project
budget for remediation of the Superfund site. The point for
determining real estate requirements may vary by project. For
example, the need for off—site real estate may be adequately
identified in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study
(RI/FS). Other projects may undergo design changes affecting
the location and amount of real estate needed for the project.
Normally, a REPR should be initiated by 0% design (i.e. when the
design commences). Once real estate needs have been reasonably
identified, the FOA Design PM will record these requirements on
a map or maps and forward this information to CEMRD-ED-E to
determine the adequacy of the project’s scope in relation to
real estate needs.
(2) CEMRD-ED-E will review and concur on project
documentation to support the limits of work. CEMRD—ED-E will
then coordinate real estate needs with CEMRD-RE. After these
real estate needs have been coordinated, CEMRD—RE will formally
notify the Chief of Real Estate for the relevant geographical
divisions that a REPR must be initiated. Additionally, CEMRD-RE
will forward a copy of the REPR tasking to HQUSACE CERE-AP, the
FOA Design PM, and the USACE Superfund Division Coordinator in
the appropriate geographical division.
(3) The Chief of Real Estate for the appropriate
geographical division will task appropriate Real Estate FOA to
produce REPRs. The division will forward a copy of this tasking
to CEMRD—RE.
b.
REPR Processing.
(1) The relevant Real Estate FOA will produce REPRs
according to division tasking instructions. REPRs should be
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completed no later than 60 days from receipt of tasking unless
there is sufficient justification for extending the REPR
completion deadline. Extensions will be granted by CEMRD-RE.
(a) EPA Regions will provide the necessary funding
for preparation of REPRs by maintaining and ensuring funding is
available through USACE/EPA Inter Agency Agreements (IAGs)
(b) Real Estate FOA will maintain documentation of
REPR production costs for later cost recovery actions by the
Department of Justice (DOJ) on behalf of EPA.
(c) Real Estate FOA will coordinate with the FOA
Design PM and the appropriate EPA RPM as necessary during
production of the REPR.
(2) Real Estate FOA will submit final draft REPRs to their
respective command division for review.
(3) Divisions will timely review and forward final draft
REPRs to CEMRD-RE for approval. An information copy of the REPR
will be furnished from the division to HQUSACE CERE-AP. In no
case will REPRs be forwarded to EPA until they are commented
upon by HQUSACE and reviewed and approved by CEMRD-RE. CEMRD-RE
will approve REPRs within 15 days of receipt.
(4) CEMRD-RE will review and approve final draft REPRs
before they are distributed outside USACE channels. If CEMRD—RE
approves the REPR, CEMRD-RE will forward a copy of the approved
final draft REPR to the FOA Design PM, the USACE Superfund
Division Coordinator, HQUSACE CERE—AP, and two copies to the
appropriate EPA RPM. If any changes are required before
distributing the REPR beyond CEMRD-RE, CEMRD-RE will request.
such changes through appropriate geographical divisions to the
responsible Real Estate FOA.
(5) REPRs may also be refined and enhanced after EPA
review. In such cases, EPA will coordinate any changes or
refinements through the FOA Design PM to the appropriate Real
Estate FOA. Upon completion, the Real Estate FOA will
distribute the refined or enhanced REPRs to the following
activities: division, CEMRD-RE, HQUSACE CERE-AP, the FOA Design
PM, the USACE Superfund Division Coordinator, the EPA RPM, and
Headquarters EPA as necessary.
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5. Real Estate Support. EPA Regions will determine whether
land required for projects will be obtained through EPA’s
enforcement power, or by the acquisition of an interest in real
property. After receiving the approved final draft REPR, EPA
will determine how it will obtain real estate for the project as
well as the need for subsequent Corps real estate support. If
EPA determines to use its enforcement powers to obtain necessary
real property interests, Real Estate FOA may assist EPA as
outlined in paragraph 6 below. On the other hand, if EPA
determines real property acquisition is necessary, and wishes
USACE assistance in performing such acquisitions, the procedures
set out below in paragraph 7 shall be followed. In some cases
EPA may request real estate support where no REPR has been
prepared. In such cases, the following procedures will also
apply.
6. Enforcement. EPA Regions may request USACE to provide
support on EPA enforcement actions as outlined below.
a.
The EPA RPM will request assistance from the FOA
Design PM for real estate support for enforcement activities.
Such support may include surveying, mapping, title evidence,
legal descriptions, rights-of-entry etc., but shall not include
discussions or negotiations leading to the implementation of
enforcement actions (i.e., landowner access agreements) without
approval from HQUSACE CERE-AP.
b.
The FOA Design PM will refine and coordinate requests
for real estate support from EPA Regions and then forward these
requests for real estate support to CEMRD-RE for action and
implementation.
c.
CEMRD—RE will coordinate all requests for real estate
support from the FOA Design PM and task appropriate divisions to
provide real estate support.
d.
Divisions will receive real estate tasking from CEMRD—
RE and will task appropriate Real Estate FOA to perform real
estate support activities.
e.
Real Estate FOA will perform real estate support in
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response to EPA Region tasking received through CEMRD—RE and
division. Such support shall include surveying, mapping, title
evidence, rights—of—entry etc.; however, Real Estate FOA will
not participate in negotiations leading to the implementation of
enforcement actions (i.e., landowner. access agreements) without
HQUSACE CERE-AP approval.
(1) Real Estate FOA will maintain documentation of real
estate support activities for later cost recovery actions by DOJ
on behalf of EPA.
f.
In the event the EPA Region requests expanded USACE
real estate support in an enforcement action, (such as
negotiations, for landowner access agreements), this expansion
must first be approved by HQUSACE CERE-AP. All requests for
expansion of USACE activities shall be forwarded from the EPA
Region to CEMRD-RE who will then forward the request to HQUSACE
CERE-AP for approval.
7. Acquisition. Pursuant to a directive from HQUSACE CERE-AP,
Real Estate FOA shall perform real estate acquisition in
accordance with established laws and regulations applying to
USACE Real Estate acquisitions.
a.
If land shall be acquired by acquisition pursuant to
PL 91-646, EPA Regional Offices must obtain EPA Headquarters
approval prior to acquiring real property at the project. Where
a REPR has been prepared, the REPR will accompany any request to
acquire real property, and will become part of the acquisition
strategy plan for the project, which must be approved by EPA
Headquarters.
b.
EPA Headquarters will approve the EPA Region’s request
for acquisition of real property and will then issue a real
estate directive to HQUSACE CERE-AP authorizing the Corps to
acquire real estate. However, EPA Headquarters will not issue a
directive to acquire real estate until the State Superfund
Contract (SSC) with the relevant real estate provisions is in
place. Without a SSC containing language indicating the State
will take title to the land once the remedial action is
completed, EPA has no authority to acquire any interest in real
property.
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c.
HQUSACE CERE—AP will issue real estate directives to
relevant divisions to perform real estate acquisition at
Superfund sites.
d.
Divisions will receive tasking from HQUSACE CERE-AP to
acquire real estate at Superfund projects and will then task
appropriate Real Estate FOA to acquire real estate based on the
directive from HQUSACE ERE-AP.
e.
Real Estate FOA will perform real estate acquisition
only pursuant to a directive from HQUSACE CERE-AP.
(1) Real Estate FOA will coordinate acquisition of
real property with the FOA Design PM.
(2) Real Estate FOA will maintain documentation of
real estate acquisition costs for later cost recovery actions by
DOJ on behalf of EPA.
f.
In the event condemnation proceedings are instituted
to acquire the real estate specified in the directive to the
Real Estate FOA, the Real Estate FOA will prepare the necessary
documents for assembly of the Declaration of Taking (DT) to
implement condemnation proceedings. The Real Estate FOA,
through the appropriate geographical division, will then forward
the DT “package” to HQUSACE CERE-AP. HQUSACE CERE-AC will
review and transmit the DT “package” to Headquarters EPA, who
will approve, sign and return the DT “package” to HQUSACE CERE—
AC for forwarding to DOJ.
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REAL ESTATE PLANNING REPORT
1. Purpose: Brief description of the project and reason for
real estate access at the project.
2.
Scope:
Estimated acreage requirements.
3. Contaminated/Noncontaminated Lands: Identify whether
necessary real estate is contaminated/noncontaminated/
threatened.
4. Estate: Recommended estate to be acquired (e.g. Fee Title,
Easement, License, etc.)
5. Ownership: Brief discussion of number and names of owners,
and if known, their attitudes concerning the proposed
acquisition.
6. Value:
involved.
7.
Estimated value of real estate interests to be
Problems:
Discuss any known or potential problem areas.
Exhibits:
A.
REPR authorizing letter
B.
Map of area to be acquired
C.
Summation of how real estate values were derived
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CERE-AP (405-10)
6 February 1998
MEMORANDUM FOR SEE DISTRIBUTION
SUBJECT: Guidance for the Provision of Real Estate Support to the Formerly Utilized Sites
Remedial Action Program and Delegation of Authority to Execute Rights-of-Entry and Acquire
Real Property and Interests Therein
1. References:
a. Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1998, Pub. L. No. 105-62, 111
Stat. 1326 (1997).
b. Memorandum, CECW-B, 31 Oct 97, subject: Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial
Action Program (FUSRAP) Operations Order (OPORD) 98-01.
c. Letter from Chairmen, House and Senate Subcommittees on Energy and Water
Development, Committees on Appropriations, to Secretaries of Energy and Defense dated
6 November 1997.
d. Uniform Appraisal Standards for Federal Land Acquisitions, Interagency Land
Acquisition Conference (1992).
e. Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Regulations for Federal
and Federally Assisted Programs, 49 C.F.R. Part 24.
f. Memorandum, CERE-E, 27 Nov 90, subject: Delegation of Approval Authority for
Real Estate Appraisal Reports.
g. Memorandum, CERE-AP, 6 Oct 95, subject: Delegation of Authority to Accept
Offers to Sell, Approve Administrative Settlements and Settlement Offers in Condemnation
Actions and Establishment of Performance Measures.
h. Office of Federal Procurement Policy, Policy Letter on Inherently Governmental
Functions, 57 Fed. Reg. 45,096 (1992).
2. Reference 1a, above, transferred program execution responsibility for the Formerly Utilized
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CERE-AP
SUBJECT: Guidance for the Provision of Real Estate Support to the Formerly Utilized Sites
Remedial Action Program and Delegation of Authority to Execute Rights-of-Entry and Acquire
Real Property and Interests Therein.
Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) from the Department of Energy to the Army Corps
of Engineers. Reference 1b, above, charged Divisions and Districts with responsibility for
executing the program. This memorandum is intended to provide guidance on the provision of
CERE-AP real estate support activities. We have been given an opportunity to demonstrate our
creativity, our ability to work in an uncertain environment and respond quickly to change, and
our partnering skills. We have imposed relatively few constraints on Districts in order to meet
this challenge.
3. District real estate elements shall take appropriate steps to plan the real estate aspects of
FUSRAP projects within their Civil Works geographic boundaries. This planning effort should
include the identification of project real estate requirements, a determination of whether existing
Government rights are sufficient to permit the Corps to construct, operate and maintain the
projects, and the development of a strategy to meet any unsatisfied requirements including the
development of costs and schedules to a level of detail consistent with the complexity of the
project. No Headquarters review or approval of District real estate plans is required. Districts
shall execute approved real estate plans in a timely fashion. It is critical that program
momentum be maintained. Relevant program data should be entered into the Real Estate
Management Information System (REMIS).
4. Chiefs of Real Estate at Major Subordinate Commands (MSC’s) and Districts are authorized
to execute rights-of-entry which substantially conform to enclosed model (Encl 1). This
authority may be further delegated to the section chief level. It is desired that, to the greatest
extent practicable, the FUSRAP program be implemented utilizing rights-of-entry and without
the necessity for real estate acquisition.
5. Chiefs of Real Estate at MSC’s are authorized to approve the acquisition of real property and
interests therein in connection with FUSRAP. This authority may be further delegated to District
Chiefs of Real Estate. Any real property interests acquired should, in most cases, be temporary
and terminate at conclusion of remedial action. Should condemnation of real property interests
be required, citation should be made to 33 U.S.C. § 591, 40 U.S.C. §§ 257-258a, and the Energy
and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1998, Pub. L. No. 105-62, 111 Stat. 1326 (1997).
6. Where a detailed appraisal of any real property interests to be acquired is required, such
interests shall be appraised in accordance with reference 1d, above. It is anticipated, however,
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CERE-AP
SUBJECT: Guidance for the Provision of Real Estate Support to the Formerly Utilized Sites
Remedial Action Program and Delegation of Authority to Execute Rights-of-Entry and Acquire
Real Property and Interests Therein.
that most real property interests required to implement FUSRAP will not require the in-depth
analysis and presentation necessary in a detailed appraisal by virtue of their low value or
simplicity. See 49 C.F.R. §§ 24.102(c), 24.103. Authority to approve appraisals is as delegated
in reference 1f, above, or subsequent delegations.
7. Authority to accept offers to sell, approve administrative settlements and settlement offers in
condemnation actions is as delegated in reference 1g, above.
8. Chiefs of Real Estate at MSC’s and Districts are authorized to approve payment of nominal
consideration for rights-of-entry and licenses required in connection with FUSRAP. The
following language may be inserted after “in consideration of” in the first paragraph of the form:
“the payment of $[INSERT AMOUNT], receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, and”.
Chiefs of Real Estate at MSC’s and Districts are authorized to extend existing DOE licenses and
access agreements containing terms which, if not contrary to law, are not consistent with USACE
policy if deemed reasonable, prudent and in the Government’s interest.
9. Our current position is that real property accountability remains with DOE consistent with the
expression of legislative intent contained in reference 1c, above. DOE project real estate records
have been obtained by the Oak Ridge Transition Team and distributed to the appropriate
geographic Districts. Real property records should be returned to DOE upon site closeout.
10. Districts may determine the nature and extent of contract real estate support, if any, to be
provided by Bechtel National, Inc. under its existing contract with the Government for projects
within their area of responsibility. Districts shall not contract for the performance of inherent
Government functions such as appraisal review and approval. See reference 1h, above.
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CERE-AP
SUBJECT: Guidance for the Provision of Real Estate Support to the Formerly Utilized Sites
Remedial Action Program and Delegation of Authority to Execute Rights-of-Entry and Acquire
Real Property and Interests Therein.
11. Real estate issues which cannot be resolved locally should be elevated through command
channels to CERE-AP. Our point of contact for this guidance is Mr. Cribbin at (202) 761-1704.
FOR THE COMMANDER:
Enclosure
as
B. J. FRANKEL
Director of Real Estate
DISTRIBUTION:
COMMANDER,
GREAT LAKES AND OHIO RIVER DIVISION, ATTN: CELRD-OR-ET-R
MISSISSIPPI VALLEY DIVISION, ATTN: CEMVD-ET-R
NORTH ATLANTIC DIVISION, ATTN: CENAD-ET-R
NORTHWESTERN DIVISION, ATTN: CENWD-MR-ET-A
CECW-B (Augustine)
CEMP-R (Huston)
CECC-T (Simpson)
CECS
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DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20314-1000
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
RIGHT OF ENTRY
___________________________________
(Site Name)
______________________________
(Tract Number)
1. This Right of Entry is granted for purposes of performing surveys and investigations, collecting samples and making
test borings, and remediating radiological and chemical contamination of soils, groundwater and structures including, but not
limited to, the right to store, move and remove equipment and supplies; excavate and dispose of contaminated soil and backfill
with suitable soil and restore the property to its previous condition; construct, operate, maintain, repair, replace, and remove
groundwater extraction, treatment and injection systems and monitoring wells; and perform such other work as may be necessary
and incident to implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program for a period not to exceed
_________________beginning with the date of this instrument.
2. This Right of Entry includes the right of ingress and egress on other lands of the Grantor provided that such ingress
and egress is necessary and not otherwise conveniently available to the Government.
3. All tools, equipment, and other property taken or placed upon the land by the Government shall remain the property
of the Government and may be removed by the Government at any time within a reasonable period after the expiration of this
Right of Entry.
4. The Government shall have the right to patrol and police the land during the period of this Right of Entry.
5. If any action of the Government in the exercise of the rights granted herein results in damage to the real property, the
Government will, in its sole discretion, either repair such damage or make an appropriate settlement with the Grantor. In no event
shall such repair or settlement exceed the fair market value of the fee simple title to the real property at the time immediately
preceding such damage. The Government's liability under this clause is subject to the availability of appropriations for such
payment, and nothing contained in this agreement may be considered as implying that Congress will at a later date appropriate
funds sufficient to meet any deficiencies. The provisions of this clause are without prejudice to any rights the Grantor may have
to make a claim under applicable laws for any damages other than those provided for herein.
WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL this _____ day of ________________________, 199__.
__________________________(SEAL)
[Typed Name]
Accepted
__________________________(SEAL)
[Typed Name]
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
By: _________________________
[Typed Name]
[Title]
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CESO-I (40-5)
23 SEP 1999
MEMORANDUM FOR COMMANDERS, USACE COMMANDS
SUBJECT: HTRW Medical Surveillance Program Inclusion and Frequency Criteria
1. References:
a. Title 29 CFR 1910.120 / 29 CFR 1926.65, Hazardous Waste Operations and
Emergency Response.
b. Engineer Pamphlet (EP) 385-1-58, Safety and Occupational Health, Industrial
Hygiene and Occupational Health Handbook (Draft).
c. Position Paper, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, HTRW-CX; Criteria for the
Application of 29 CFR 1910.120.
d. Memorandum; Medical Examination Frequency for Hazardous Waste Operations
Personnel, Washington Occupational Health Associates, dated 12 March 1999.
2. After reviewing the data contained in reference 1.b., and evaluating the requirements of
reference 1.a. and l.c., the HQUSACE Medical Advisor (Contract Occupational Health
Physician), has recommended to the HQUSACE Safety and Occupational Health Office (CESO)
that the frequency of Hazardous, Toxic and Radioactive Waste (HTRW) examinations for
USACE personnel meeting OSHA inclusion criteria, as stated in 29 CFR 1910.120 and 29 CFR
1926.65, should, in general, be performed on a biennial basis (reference 1.d.). The
memorandum stating this is enclosed.
3. The Occupational Health physician recommendations are as follows:
a. Only "covered" personnel (personnel who meet the OSHA inclusion criteria) shall
receive medical examinations. USACE Commands are advised to review criteria for employee
participation in the local HAZWOPER medical surveillance program. We advise comparing
each HTRW employees' recent work activities and potential future workload to the following
criteria to determine need for program participation and associated examination frequency. We
also advise team (employee, employee supervisor, local SOHO with support of the local
occupational physician) participation when performing the evaluation.
(1) Generally those employees participating in an HTRW medical surveillance program
are those that enter into an exclusion or contamination reduction zone (who may be exposed at or
above the established permissible exposure limits) for more than 30 days per year, or those who
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may be exposed to high concentrations of contaminants over a brief period, such as those
individuals working on investigative drill crews where unknown contaminants and
concentrations may be encountered.
(2) Employees who wear a respirator for more than 30 days or more per year shall be
included in the program.
(3) All employees who are injured, become ill or develop signs or symptoms due to possible
overexposure involving hazardous substances or health hazards from an emergency response or
hazardous waste operation shall also be included in the program.
b. In general, covered personnel should be examined only every other year. This decision is
based on a review of information that indicates that for most types of work activities USACE
employees perform on HTRW sites (contract managers with some in-house execution), there is a
lack of exposures that even approach OSHA Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs) or Action
Levels (usually considered one-half of the PEL).
c. There are local conditions, however, that may warrant more frequent examinations.
(1) Should an employee demonstrate signs or symptoms that may be associated with
increased exposure, the local examining physician may make a professional judgment for that
individual to be provided with more frequent examinations;
(2) when the USACE Command (design or geographic executing District) determines that a
project's site safety and health requirements (either in-house or contractor plan that USACE
employees follow) require more frequent examinations or specific medical tests (example: blood
lead determinations);
(3) when an OSHA substance specific standard is invoked which requires a more frequent
medical examination;
(4) as otherwise determined by the local examining physician based on individual employee
circumstances.
4. Under the updated OSHA standard for respiratory protection 29 CFR 1910.134, there is no
frequency or periodicity required after the initial medical evaluation. There are, however,
criteria established where medical reevaluation might be required. As stated in 29 CFR
1910.134(e)(7) medical clearance to wear a respirator may be required beyond the initial
evaluation for one of the following reasons:
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a. The employee reports medical signs or symptoms that are related to the ability to wear a
respirator;
b. the health care professional, supervisor or respirator administrator informs the employee
that a more frequent reevaluation is necessary;
c. information from the respiratory protection program, including observations made during
fit testing and program evaluation indicate a need for reevaluation; or
d. a change occurs in workplace conditions (e.g. physical work effort, protective clothing,
temperature) that may result in a substantial increase in the physiological burden placed on the
employee.
5. USACE Commands should ensure that contractors executing HTRW work receive notice of
this policy.
6. If there are any questions please contact Mr. Robert Stout, 202-761-8566 or Mr. Richard
Wright, 202-761-8565.
FOR THE COMMANDER:
Encl
CONNIE K. DEWITTE
Chief, Safety and Occupational
Health Office
CF: Chief, SOHO, USACE Commands
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WASHINGTON OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH ASSOCIATES, INC.
Suite 410
1120 19th Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20036
Consultants in Occupational
and Environmental Health
Telephone (202) 463-6696
Telecopier (202) 223-6625
March 12,1999
Mr. Robert Stout
U. S. Army Corps of Engineers
CESO-I
I Room 4124C
20 Massachusetts Avenue N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20314-1000
Subject: Medical Examination Frequency for Hazardous Waste Operations Personnel
References:
1. Position Paper, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; Criteria for the Application of 29 CFR
1910.120 (HAZWOPER).
2. 29 CFR 1910.120 (f), Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response; Medical
Surveillance
3. 29 CFR 1926.65 (f), Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, Medical
Surveillance
4. EP 385-1-58 (October 1998) Safety and Occupational Health, Industrial Hygiene and
Occupational Health Handbook (Draft)
5. EP 385-1-58, Appendix D - 1, Medical Examination Requirements for Potentially Hazardous
Chemical Agents ( Draft)
6. EP 385-1-58, Appendix D - 2, Medical Examination Requirements for Potentially Hazardous
Work (Draft)
Dear Mr. Stout:
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Based upon reviews of potential occupational exposures (ref 1), the regulations for hazardous
waste workers (ref 2, 3), and medical examination protocols (ref. 4, 5, 6) it is recommended that
the normal frequency of periodic medical examinations for occupationally exposed USACE
personnel engaged in hazardous waste operations be established on a biennial frequency. The
biennial frequency shall prevail unless a specific OSHA standard is invoked which requires a
more frequent medical examination be conducted.
Under the applicable OSHA standards medical surveillance shall be instituted for
"...employees who are or may be exposed to hazardous substances or health hazards at or above
the permissible exposure limits or, if there is no permissible limit, above the published exposure
levels for these substances, without regard to the use of respirators, for 30 days or more a year;.
." A review of the exposure levels of USACE personnel (ref. 1) has shown that very few persons
would be included within the group for whom medical surveillance is mandated due to exposures
at or near the PEL. The frequency of periodic examination for covered workers described by the
regulations should be "...At least once every twelve months for each employee covered unless
the attending physician believes a longer interval (not greater than biennially) is appropriate;. . ".
Based upon review of historical information regarding USACE employees given
hazardous waste operations assignments, it is our professional opinion that a biennial frequency
for periodic examinations should be instituted for the general case. Should certain individuals
demonstrate signs or symptoms that may be associated with increased exposure, the local
examining physician may make a professional judgment for that individual to be provided more
frequent examinations. The reasons for such deviations from the normal examination
frequencies shall be noted in the individual's medical files.
Sincerely,
Samuel J. Scott, Jr., M.D., M.P.H.
Senior Clinical Associate
cc: Dr. Neil Juriniski
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United States
Environmental Protection
Agency
EPA
Office of Emergency
and Remedial
Response
Publication:
9355.5-01/FS
February 1990
Real Estate Acquisition
Procedures for USACE Projects
Office of Emergency and Remedial
Hazardous Site Control Division OS-220
Quick Reference Fact Sheet
Introduction
The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) as
amended, authorizes the US Environmental Agency (EPA) to cleanup the nation’s hazardous
waste sites. Prior to planning and implementing a remedial action (RA), EPA will select one
delivery mechanism from among several available options. The US Army Corps of Engineers
(USACE), because of their extensive experience in real estate activities has been asked to assist
EPA where EPA has determined that USACE is the appropriate supporting agency and that
health based relocation is not required. Health based relocations (or emergency relocations) are
beyond the scope of this document and will be addressed at a later date.
EPA, under Section 104(j)(1) of the
Superfund Statute, is authorized to
Superfund Real Estate
acquire by purchase, lease, donation,
Alternatives Flow Chart
condemnation, or otherwise, any real
property needed to conduct a remedial
action. Recent experience with real
property acquisitions for the Superfund
program has emphasized the need for
Remedial Project Managers (RPMs) to
anticipate that:
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•
Time frames for acquisitions may be long in duration.
•
Site activities may be delayed due to acquisition issues.
•
Initial planning must begin early in the remedial design process.
The process by which property is acquired for the remediation depends upon the remedy
selected, the design of the remedy, the parties involved in implementation of the remedy, and the
role of the state in which the site is located. Generally, EPA will only acquire through purchase,
lease, donation, or condemnation, property which is not contaminated. The Enforcement Access
Provisions of 104(e) grants EPA the authority to access any real property which is contaminated
or threatened with contamination.
Initial Planning
During the initial planning phase of the acquisition process, the Region must determine the real
estate needs based on the requirements of the Record of Decision (ROD). In order to make this
determination, the Region must task USACE with the development of a Real Estate Planning
Report (REPR) in the Interagency Agreement (LAG). The REPR, completed during the design
phase of the project, summarizes specific characteristics of the properties needed for the remedial
action (see Summary of the REPR in the sidebar). REPRs are to be developed for all USACE
designs, even if acquisitions are not anticipated.
Upon reviewing the REPR, the Region in consultation with the Regional Counsel (RC), ‘will
determine those interests to be acquired and then develop a strategy for acquiring those interests
(see Real Estate Decision Flow Chart). The following issues would be considered in the
Region’s acquisition strategy:
• Method of acquisition (purchase, lease, donation, or condemnation).
• Summary of criteria for determination of acquisition method.
• Federal funding availability
• Acquisition schedule
• Plan for public involvement related to acquisition (coordinated with overall site
community relations effort).
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Request and Approval Process
Once the Site Acquisition Strategy has been developed, the Region (with USACE assistance as
needed) will submit a formal request for acquisition to the Assistant Administrator, Office of
Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER).
This request, based on the site acquisition strategy, must include:
• A rationale for the required acquisition.
• The legal description of all parcels.
• Estimated cost of acquiring the interest.
• The REPR.
Prior to initiating the request, the Region must verify that the State will agree to accept title to
the property on or before the completion of the remedial action. The acquisition cannot be
completed until the Superfund State Contract (SSC) is signed.
Real Estate Decision Flow Chart
Headquarters review is coordinated by the
Hazardous Site Control Division (HSCD) within
OSWER. OSWER will evaluate the Region’s
Request to determine if the acquisition is
technically feasible and cost effective. Before
OSWER approves the request, the Region must be
able to demonstrate that all reasonable attempts
have been made to limit the acquisition. Prior to
formal approval by OSWER, the request will be
sent to the Office of General Counsel (OGC) whose
role is to concur with the strategy ensuring that the
acquisition does not violate or contradict any
current EPA policies or regulations. Upon OGC
concurrence, and OSWER’s approval, a transmittal
memo will be sent from HSCD to the Facilities and
Management Services Division (FMSD) to
complete the acquisition.
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Acquisition
The Facilities Management and Services Division (FMSD), an EPA Headquarters organization,
has the sole authority in the Agency to accept titles and record deeds on behalf of the Federal
Government. This division, with their specialists in real estate, will facilitate USACE support in
the actual acquisition phase of the project by formally transmitting the Region’s request to the
USACE Headquarters’ real estate division. USACE Headquarters will determine what support is
available and then make the appropriate assignments.
In order for FMSD to perform their role adequately, they will examine the acquisition request
and supporting documentation provided by the Region to determine whether any additional
information such as detailed property descriptions, surveys, or appraisals are necessary to
complete the acquisition in accordance with existing Federal regulations. Once the USACE
district is formally tasked, they will prepare and submit an acquisition implementation plan
complete with scheduling requirements to FMSD with a copy to the Region. FMSD, with
assistance from the Region, will review the plan and use it in assessing the status of the project.
After the Region and FMSD review the final acquisition documents prepared by USACE, then
USACE will send the offer to the property owner, negotiate, and settle, at which time FMSD will
accept the title.
Upon or before the completion of remedial activities, EPA will transfer the title to the State. The
Region prepares a memo to FMSD explaining any deed restrictions referenced in the Record of
Decision. FMSD, upon receipt of the memo, will proceed with the transfer.
The acquisition process for USACE performed projects is detailed in the “Real Estate
Acquisition Flow Chart”.
Summary of the Major Roles and Responsibilities
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Region requests REPR through the Remedial Design IAG.
Region review the REPR and devises a strategy for site acquisition.
Region submits the request to the Assistant Administrator, OSWER.
OSWER (thru HSCD) coordinates EPA-HQ response.
OGC concurs/nonconcurs with the request.
OSWER approves/disapproves the request.
State provides assurances of its intent to accept title.
OSWER prepares transmittal memo to FMSD
FMSD tasks USACE to offer support
USACE prepares the final offer and title for EPA review
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• USACE makes the offer, negotiates and conducts the closing
• FMSD signs and accepts the title
Timetable for 104 (j) Acquisitions
The following real estate acquisitions activities required by the “Uniform Relocation Assistance
and Real Property Acquisitions Policies Act of 1970” (PL 91-646) normally require the listed
durations to complete. These time frames should be incorporated into any planning schedules
for real estate acquisitions.
ACTIVITY
TITLE EVIDENCE
APPRAISAL
FAIR MARKET LETTER
NEGOTIATIONS
CLOSING
DURATION
90 DAYS
90 DAYS
FOLLOWING APPRAISAL
60 DAYS
30 DAYS
TOTAL ESTIMATED TIME
9-10 Months
Real estate needs must be identified early in the design phase of the project to prevent any
unnecessary delays. The RPM can receive real estate support from USACE by requesting a Real
Estate Planning Report in the RD/RA LAG.
This guidance covers the most basic type of acquisitions for EPA involving non-contaminated
properties. When contaminated property is needed to carry out the remedial action, then the
Region must contact EPA-HQ directly for further guidance.
For additional information, please contact Ms. Jo Ann Griffith, EPA-HQ, OSWER, HSCD at
FTS-475-6704 or commercially at (202) 475-6704.
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Summary of REPR
Site Background Information
Acreage Needed
Site Boundaries
Sketches of Property Features
Rough Appraisal on Interest to be
Acquired
Current Owner Attitudes on Access/
Acquisition
Public Involvement Issues
Real Estate Definitions
“Access” a right to enter, pass to and from, obtain or make
use of a property interest or parcel of land.
“Acquisition” obtaining an interest in real property by means
of purchase, donation, transfer, or condemnation activities.
“Assessment” a limited right to use another party’s land or
property interest for a special purpose such as construction
during a remedial action or for purposes of exploration
(surveys, appraisals, test borings, etc.) necessary to the
design of a public works project.
‘Enforcement Access” the use of SARA 104(e) to gain
access to a contaminated property.
“Interest” share, right or title in property.
“Short-term Interest” a need for involvement at a site of
duration limited to completion of the Remedial Action (RA)
phase of site cleanup.
“Long term interest” an extended (past duration of RA
construction) limited to completion of the Remedial Action
(RA) phase of site cleanup.
“Real Estate Planning Report” (REPR): a research report
describing a parcel of land including land title, ownership,
estimated value and acreage prepared by USACE to assist
EPA Regions in decisions regarding necessary real estate for
Remedial Actions.
“Right of Entry” a permit to enter in, on, over, and across
property or land for a limited period of time.
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LIABILITY RELEASE
FOR
CONTRACTOR SITE VISIT
Site Name:___________________________________________
Solicitation No.:____________________________________
I ______________________________ of ______________________________ hereby release
from liability and agree to hold harmless the U.S. Government, its officers, employees, and agents
of all consequences, including personal injury or disease, death, or property damage, related to or in
any way arising from potential or actual hazards or conditions present or encountered at the site
during my visit(s) on ___________________________________________.
I further certify that, pursuant to 29 CFR 1910.120 and 29 CFR 1926.65, my employer has reviewed
all documents related to the subject solicitation and has developed the appropriate safety and health
program, including a site-specific portion, related to my activities during the site visit. I will furnish
and properly utilize my own personal protective equipment, in accordance with this plan, and be
responsible for my own decontamination and/or disposal of used personal protective equipment. I
also certify that I currently, (on the date of the visit(s)), meet all health and safety training, medical
surveillance, and other requirements of 29 CFR 1910.120 and 29 CFR 1926.65, and, if requested,
will produce evidence of these, along with a copy of my employer safety and health program, before
site entry.
_______________________________ Name (print)
_______________________________ Signature
_______________________________ Date
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UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460
####################### ENCLOSURE FOR CONSTRUCTION BULLETIN NO. 13 DATED 7/3/91 #################
OFFICE OF
SOLID WASTE AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE
OCT 18, 1990
Colonel Wayne J. Scholl
Acting Chief
Environmental Restoration Division
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
20 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20314—1000
Dear Colonel Scholl:
The purpose of this letter is to provide guidance on authorizing
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to sign uniform
hazardous waste manifests on the Environmental Protection
Agency’s (EPA) behalf without becoming a generator. Since
signature of land ban notifications and certifications presents
the same issue of generator and transporter liability, we will
address land ban records as well. It is the Agency’s intent
that USACE personne1 will routinely sign manifests and land ban
records.
It has come to our attention that EPA Regional Superfund
staff are being designated to sign manifest forms far off—site
transport of hazardous waste. This requires their presence
during the remedial action when off—site transportation of
hazardous waste is anticipated. It also requires Regional
Project Managers to spend many hours at the site, diverting them
from their appropriate program management roles.
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The applicable Federal regulation associated with this
issue is 40 CFR 262, Appendix, Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest
Instructions, Item 16, it describes the uniform hazardous waste
manifest certification requirements which are applicable to
generators of hazardous wastes who initiate a shipment of
hazardous waste from a treatment, storage or disposal facility.
This instruction makes clear that generators may have an agent
on their behalf in signing the manifest forms. Specifical1y,
the instructions say, “Generators may preprint the words, ‘on
behalf of’ in the signature block or may hand write this
statement in the signature block prior to signing the generator
certifications.” As explained in the Federal Register Notice on
October 1, 1986 (51 Fed. Reg. 35192) , EPA did not intend to
impose personal liability on ‘the individual who actually signs
the certification. Further, EPA clarified that “employees or
other individuals may sign the manifest certification for a
generator who is a legal entity, such as a corporation”. This
statement makes clear that the generator, so long as the signer
has clear authority from the generator to do so.
Under the Federal regulations, USACE, when tasked by EPA to
perform on-site remedial actions that initiate the off-site
shipment of hazardous waste (such as excavation, dewatering, and
packaging of contaminated soils), may sign the manifests for the
EPA after receiving clear authority from EPA to do so, and after
writing or printing the phrase “On behalf of the United States
Environmental Protection Agency” or “On behalf of U.S.E.P.A.” in
the signature block of the manifest. USACE acting on behalf of
EPA in this situation at Superfund sites does not become a
generator of hazardous waste solely as a result of having signed
the manifests. USACE would merely be performing a technical
confirmation for EPA in signing the manifest form.
With this letter, we are directing USACE to sign the
manifest after writing or printing the phrase “On behalf of the
United State Environmental Agency” or “On behalf of U.S.E.P.A.
in the signature block of the manifest and land ban record for
remedial actions assigned to USACE for construction management.
However, if State regulations will not permit USACE to sign such
documents on behalf of EPA, the USACE should not sign for the
Agency and contact the Region for further guidance on signature
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of manifests and land ban records.
Your assistance is this matter is greatly appreciated.
Should you have any questions regarding this matter, please
contact CDR William Zobel at 703/308/8354
Sincerely,
/s/
Kenneth W. Ayers, Chief
Design and Construction Management Branch
cc: Regional Branch Chiefs
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ANNEX II
Annual Financial Agreement
Between
The Defense Contract Audit Agency
and
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
FISCAL YEAR 2000
I.
AGREEMENT NUMBER: 002900
PURPOSE
This annex, known as the Annual Financial Agreement to the Memorandum of
Understanding (MOU) between the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) and the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers sets forth the financial provisions under which
reimbursable audit services are provided.
II.
AUTHORITY
DCAA reimbursable audit services will be provided under the authority of the Economy
Act of 1932, as amended (31 U.S.C. 1535).
III.
SCOPE OF WORK
Services are to be provided under the provisions stated in the standard MOU
between the DCAA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This annex defines the
amount of the annual effort agreed to by the parties concerned and establishes
reimbursement policies for audit effort performed.
IV.
DURATION OF THE AGREEMENT
This annex is operative for work to be performed during FY 2000. It is effective on 1
October 1999 through 30 September 2000. An annual renewal for each subsequent
fiscal year may be made by the written mutual consent of both parties.
V.
RATES FOR AUDIT SERVICES
DCAA will provide audit services on a reimbursable basis. Reimbursement will be
based on applying billable audit hours to the billing rate approved by the Secretary of
Defense. The hourly rate, which is computed annually is reviewed in detail by the
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Accounting Policy level of the Department of Defense and, upon approval by the
Secretary of Defense, remains in effect for each respective fiscal year.
VI.
BILLING PROCEDURES
Each month, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will be sent a request for payment for
DCAA's reimbursable audit services. The request will be either:
1. Online Payment And Collection (OPAC) Transaction
2. Billing Invoice mailed from DFAS, Columbus (SF 1080)
With all requests for payment, DCAA will provide supporting detail to U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers. To the extent possible, the supporting detail will be
transmitted electronically to: __________________________ (provide e-mail
address). In the event that electronic transmission is not possible, the
supporting detail will be mailed to the address shown on the attached "CoE
Billing Address List" dated 10/28/1999.
VII.
PAYMENT PROCEDURES
Under the provisions of 31 CFR 208, The, Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 Federal
payments are to be made electronically, this is the preferred method of payment. Until such time
as Online Payment And Collection (OPAC) procedures have been established between U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers and DCAA's accounting service provider (DFAS - Columbus Center)
your payments should be sent to:
DFAS-Columbus Center
DFAS-CO-FPDD
PO Box 182267
Columbus, OH 43218-2267
A copy of the request for payment should be included with your check. The check must
reference the specific DCAA bill number being paid, and there should be one check per request
for payment.
VIII.
RESPONSIBILITIES
A. DCAA will provide contract audit coverage and related services to the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers.
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B. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will promptly reimburse DCAA for services rendered and
billed not later than 45 days from the date the bill was issued.
IX
SPECIAL BILLING PROVISIONS
DCAA agrees to provide the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers the following specific
billing information:
No special provisions.
X.
CONTESTED BILLINGS
In the event a bill is unclear or in dispute:
A. The billing office shown on the supporting documentation should be contacted when
question(s) pertains to audit services, authorization for audit services, or other non-administrative
details.
B. If, after taking the action shown above, questions cannot be resolved, the issue in question
must be submitted in writing to the following address:
DCAA Headquarters
Attention: CFO
8725 John J. Kingman Road, Suite 2135
Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6219
Adjustments in billings can only be made through this office in DCAA Headquarters.
C. If payment has not been made within 60 days of our official request for payment, DCAA will
take action that could result in discontinuation of audit services.
XI. FY 2000 WORKHOUR AND COST ESTIMATE
ESTIMATED
HOURS
22,000
APPROVED
HOURLY
RATE
$74.77
ESTIMATED
COST
$1,644,940
If the FY 2000 hours change after consummation of this agreement, the following steps will
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be taken:
A. DCAA will immediately notify the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers if the hours appear likely
to increase.
B. The recipient of DCAA audit services will take immediate advance action to provide the
funding necessary for the increased audit work, or notify DCAA to terminate audit services, as
appropriate.
XII.
SIGNATORIES
Your organization should provide a copy of your funding document and return it to
DCAA Headquarters, Attention: CFB, as an enclosure to this signed agreement. If
you choose not to provide a funding document, the signature on this agreement (Number
002900) will authorize DCAA to utilize it as the funding and obligational instrument.
This agreement (Number 002900) and any subsequent changes thereto will be
effective when executed by the Chief, Financial Management Division, DCAA and an
authorized representative of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers within 30 days of receipt.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Department of Defense
Defense Contract Audit Agency
/s/
Russell Fuhrman
Major General, USA
Deputy Commander
6 Dec 1999
NAME
/s/
Gary H. Gloinsky
Chief, Financial Management Division
DATE
23 Nov 1999
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Mar 00
CoE Billing Address L ist
10/28/99
USA Engineer Dist, Mobile
ATTN:CESAM-CT
PO Box 2288
Mobile, AL 36628-0001
USA Engineer Dist, Little Rock
ATTN: CESWL-CT
PO Box 867
Little Rock, AR 72203-0867
USA Engineer Dist, Sacramento
ATTN: CESPK-CT
1325 J Street
Sacramento, CA 95814-2922
USA Eng Dist, San Francisco
ATTN:CESP14-CT
211 Main Street
San Francisco, CA 94105-1905
USA Engineer Dist, Los Angeles
ATTN: CESPL-CT
PO Box 2711
Los Angeles, CA 90053-2325
USA Engineer Dist, Jacksonville
ATTN: CESAJ-CT
PO Box 4970
Jacksonville, FL 32232-0019
USA Engineer Dist, Savannah
ATTN:CESAS-CT
PO Box 889
Savannah, GA 31402-0869
USA Engineer Dist., Chicago
ATTN: CENCR-CT
111 North Canal Street
Chicago, IL 60606-7206
USA Engineer Dist, Louisville
ATTN: CEORL-CT (Kathy Dole)
PO Box 59
Louisville, KY 40201-0059
USA Engineer Dist, New Orteans
ATTN: CELMN-CT
PO Box 60267
New Orleans, LA 70160-0267
USA Eng Dist, Baltimore Contracting Div
ATTN: CENAB-CT
PO Box 1715
Baltimore, MD 21203-1715
USA Engineer Dist, New England
ATTN: CENED-CT
424 Trapelo Road
Waltham, MA 02254-9149
USA Engineer Dist, Detroit
ATTN: CENCE-CT
PO Box 1027
Detroit, MI 48231-1027
USA Eng Dist, St. Paul
ATTN: CENCS-CT
190 Fifth Street East
St. Paul, MN 55101-1638
USA Eng Dist, Vicksburg
ATTN:CELMK-CT
3515 I-20 Frontage Rd
Vicksburg, MS 39180-5191
USA Eng Waterways Exp Sta
ATTN: CEWES-CT-Z ( Cont Div)
3909 Halls Ferry Rd
Vicksburg, MS 39181-6199
USA Engineer Dist, Kansas City
700 Federal Bldg, ATTN: CEMRK-CT
601 East 12th Street
Kansas City, MO 64106-2896
USA Engineer Dist, St Louis
ATTN: CELMS-CT
1222 Spruce Street
St Louis, MO 63101-2833
USA Engineer Dist, Omaha
ATTN: CEMRO-CT
215 North 17th Street
Omaha, NE 68102-4978
USA Engineer Dist, Albuquerque
ATTN: CESWA-CT
PO Box 1580
Albuquerque, NM 87103-1580
USA Engineer Dist, Buffalo
ATTN:CENC3-CT (Cont Div)
1776 Niagara Street
Buffalo, NY 14207-3199
USA Eng Dist, NY
Cont. Div, ATTN: CENAN-CT
26 Federal Plaza
New York, NY 10028-0090
USA Engineer Dist, Wilmington
ATTN: CESAW-CT
PO Box 1890
Wilmington, NC 28402-1890
USA Eng Dist, Tulsa
ATTN:CESWT-CT
PO Box 61
Tulsa, OK 74121-0061
USA Engineer Dist, Portland
ATTN: CENPP-CT
PO Box 2946
Portland, OR 97208-2946
USA Eng Dist, Pittsburgh
ATTN: CEORP-CT-SADBUS
1000 Liberty Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15222-4186
USA Engineer Dist, Rock Island
Clock Tower Building, ATTN: CENCR-CT
PO Box 2004
Rock Island. IL 61202-2004
USA Eng Dist, Charleston
ATTN:CESAC-CT
PO Box 919
Charleston, SC 0919
USA Eng Dist, Phil
ATTN: CENAP-CT, Cont Div
110 Penn Square East, Wanarn2ker Bldg
Phil, PA 19107-3390
USA Eng Dist, Nashville
ATTN:CEORN-CT
PO Box 1070
Nashville, TN 37202-1070
USA Eng Dist, Forth Worth
ATTN:CESWF-CT
PO Box 17300
USA Eng Dist, Galveston
ATTN:CESWG-CT
PO Box 1229
USA Eng Dist, Norfolk
Contracting Div, ATTN:CENAO-CT
803 Front Street
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Forth Worth, TX 76102-0300
Galveston, TX 77553
Norfolk, VA 23510-1096
USA Eng Dist, Memphis
ATTN: CEIMM-CT
B-202 Clifford Davis Fed Bldg
Memphis, TN 38103-1894
USA Engineer Dist, Seattle
ATTN:CENPS-CT
PO Box C-3755
Seattle, WA 98124-2255
USA Eng Dist, Walla Walla
ATTN: CENPW-CT
201 N. Third Street
Walla Walla, WA 99362-1876
USA Eng Dist, Huntington
ATTN:CEORH-CT
502 8th Street
Huntington, WV 25701-2070
USA Humphreys Engineer Center
Support Activity, ATTN: CEHEC-CT
Kingman Bldg
Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5580
USA Eng Ord Prog Div
ATTN:CETAD-OP-C
APO, AE 09803-1303
USA Eng Topog Laboratories
ATTN:CETEC-CT
Cude Bldg#2592
Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5546
USA Eng Transatlantic Div
ATTN:CETAD-CT-P
201 Prince Frederick Dr
Winchester, VA 22604
USA Eng Dist, Japan
ATTN:CEPOJ-CT
Unit 45010
APO, AP 96343-0061
USA Engineer Dist, Far East
APO, AP 96205-0610
USA Eng Dist, Pacific Ocean
ATTN: CEPOD-CT
Bldg 230
USA Engineer Dist, Alaska
PO Box 895
Anchorage, AK 99506-0898
USA Eng Dist, Huntsville
ATTN:CEHND-CT
PO Box 1600
Huntsville, AL 35807-4301
USA Construction Engineering
Research Laboratory
ATTN:CECER-CT, PO Box 4005
Champaign, IL 61820-1305
USA Engineer Div, Europe
ATTN:CETAE-CT
Unit 25727
APO, AE 09242-5301
F-87
USA Cold Region Research and
Engineering Laboratory
ATTN: CECRL-LM-CT, 72 Lyme Rd
Hanover, NH 03755-1290
EP 415-1-266
Mar 00
SAMPLE
On-Line Payment and Collection (OPAC)
Trading Partnership Agreement
OPAC Trading Partners:
DFAS-Columbus Center, Accounting Directorate (ALC: 00006551)
(ALC:_________________)
Reimbursable billings (SF 1080) will be generated by DFAS-Columbus, Accounting Directorate on
behalf of the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) for collection from your agency. OPAC is the
preferred method of collection for these receivables. This agreement states your agencies data
requirements for all collections processed-by DFAS-Columbus, Accounting Directorate.
The required data elements to be submitted by DFAS-Columbus, Accounting Directorate for all collection
transactions are as follows:
1. Bill Number.
DFAS-Columbus, Accounting Directorate point of contact and phone number.
2. Your agency has the right to reverse any transaction that does not contain the required information
referenced above or exceeds authorized funding.
*DFAS-CO agrees not to process any transactions during the last five working days of the month.
This agreement will commence immediately. Any amendments must be agreed upon by,DFASColumbus,
Accounting Directorate and your agency.
SAMPLE
Your organization name
Chief, Financial Officer
Your Office Symbol
SAMPLE
Date
Ron R. Holloway
OPAC Project Officer
DFAS-CO-F
SAMPLE
Your POC name
OPAC Project Officer
POC Office Symbol
Date
SAMPLE
Date
Charla Haney
Chief, Reimbursable Branch
DFAS-CO-AAR
F-88
Date
EP 415-1-266
Mar 00
CEMP-RS (200-1a)
07 JAN 1999
MEMORANDUM FOR SEE DISTRIBUTION
SUBJECT: Implementation of the Program and Project Management Information System
(PROMIS) for Environmental Programs
1. References:
a. Memorandum, CEDC dated 28 February 1997, subject: PROMIS Implementation
Guidance Memorandum Number 1.
b. Memorandum, CEMP-M dated 28 April 1997, subject: PROMIS Implementation
Guidance Memorandum Number 2.
c. E-mail message, CEDC dated 29 April 1998, subject: PROMIS.
2. Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (HQUSACE) formed a Program and Project
Management (PM) Tiger Team to research, develop a Course of Action analysis and decision
brief for Automated Information System(s) AIS(s) to support the USACE PM process. The PM
Tiger Team recently recommended and the Chief of Engineers concurred that PROMIS will be
the PM AIS.
3. The enclosure provides instructions to enter and maintain environmental projects in PROMIS.
4. The point of contact for this action is Mr. Jim Strait (202) 761-0414, fax (202) 761-0525.
FOR THE COMMANDER:
Encl
//s//
MILTON HUNTER
Major General, USA
Director of Military Programs
DISTRIBUTION:
COMMANDER,
U.S. ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, MISSISSIPPI VALLEY
U.S. ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, NORTH ATLANTIC
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CEMP-RS
SUBJECT: Implementation of the Program and Project Management Information System
(PROMIS) for Environmental Programs
DISTRIBUTION: (CONT)
U.S. ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, GREAT LAKES AND OHIO RIVER
U.S. ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, NORTHWESTERN
U.S. ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, PACIFIC OCEAN
U.S. ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, SOUTH ATLANTIC
U.S. ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, SOUTH PACIFIC
U.S. ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, SOUTHWESTERN
CF:
CEMVD-PM (D. Herndon)
CEMVD-PM-E (D. Sills)
CENWD-MR-PM (L. Turney)
CENWD-MR-PM-H (D. Tosoni)
CENWD-PM-H (T. Matula)
CENAD-PM (J. Tyler)
CENAD-PM-M (J.D’Agosta)
CENAD-PM-M (A. Jimenez)
CELRD-GL-P (L. Hiipakka)
CELRD-GL-P (B. McPheron)
CELRD-GL-E (S. Nakib)
CELRD-GL-P-M (R. Warda)
CENAE-DD-PM (W. Scully)
CENAE-PP-E (M. Otis)
CENWD-NP-PM (C. Barnhill)
CENWD-NP-PM-M (L. Anderson)
CENWD-NP-PM (M. White)
CELRD-OR-DL-MS (D. Spellman)
CELRD-OR-DL-MS (P. Bertsch)
CEPOD-PM (T. Ushijima)
CEPOD-PM (G. Kitkowski)
CESAD-PM (C. Dever)
CESAD-PM-M (J. Sanders)
CESAD-PM-M (S. Taylor)
CESPD-PM (W. Dawson)
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CESPD-PM (J. Wharry)
CESPD-PM-M (J. Davidson)
CESPD-PM-C (J. Hritz)
CESPD-PM-R (A. Mei)
CEMP-RS
SUBJECT: Implementation of the Program and Project Management Information System
(PROMIS) for Environmental Programs
CF: (CONT)
CESWD-PM (R. Armstrong)
CESWD-PM-M (T. Hudspeth)
CESWD-PM-C (J. Medlock)
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Instructions for Entering and Maintaining Environmental Projects in the Program and
Project Management Information System (PROMIS)
1. General. All work managed by USACE will be entered and maintained in PROMIS with
appropriate links to the Corps of Engineers Financial Management System (CEFMS). Specific
guidance for PROMIS implementation is provided below for each of the major Environmental
programs. Each district executing any portion of a project where other portions are executed by
another district must manage their portion separately in their district’s PROMIS database. This
is necessary because PROMIS, like CEFMS, is a District level system and information is not
exchanged corporately between district systems. Districts are encouraged to develop customized
WBS templates and virtual projects that can be quickly retrieved and edited for specific project
requirements resulting in shorter loading time.
CENWD has initiated an Internet based PROMIS, CEFMS and RMS reports application
at URL - http://wpc21.usace.army.mil:9713/. Districts, Divisions, and HQUSACE can access
this application for project and program reports. The reports application is maintained by Robert
E. Taylor, CENWP, 503-808-4977, and Karen L. Morgan, CENWS, 206-764-6086. They can be
contacted regarding report specifications currently available and for creating additional reports.
The following conventions for entering project narrative information in PROMIS comment fields
will allow for consistent retrieval of that information for reports: project background and scope
will be entered as a Synopsis comment; project status will be entered as a General comment; and,
project issues will be entered as Issue comments.
2. Lowest Reasonable Cost Line Charts. Environmental Division requires that project cost
estimates as well as actual costs be tracked over time with the goal of reducing project costs.
Total Estimated Project Cost Estimates and Actual Project Cost verses time are graphically
depicted as lines over the life of the project. Various graphical approaches may be used. One
suggestion shown on enclosure 1 is for the Southern Maryland Wood Treating project. The
initial total estimated project cost was created at the beginning of the project. The negotiated
total project cost estimate was subsequently prepared that saved $17M of the initial $47M cost
estimate and saved 145 days of the initial 945 days. The negotiated project costs are now $30M
and time to complete is now 800 days. Actual project costs are also plotted so management can
compare to the projected costs and make appropriate adjustments. The lowest reasonable cost
line charts are to be prepared by the executing district in PowerPoint or Excel and submitted to
HQ semi-annually via e-mail.
3. Intergovernmental and Superfund Support Projects. Intergovernmental and Superfund
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programs define a project in PROMIS as an operable unit where one or more phases (i.e.
remedial investigation/feasibility study, remedial design, remedial action, real estate, etc) are
executed for the same scope of work. Each phase is required to be resourced to the third level of
the Hazardous, Toxic and Radioactive Waste (HTRW) Work Breakdown Structure (WBS).
Enclosure 2 provides a diagram of the PROMIS HTRW WBS elements and CEFMS HTRW
Work Category Elements with appropriate links at the third level. Project Managers may
resource at lower levels if desired. Minimum Milestones include Start RI, Final RI submitted,
Start FS, Final FS report completed, Design started, Pre-final (90%) design submittal, Advertise
(IFB) or issue RFP for RA, Award RA (Construction contract), RA NTP Issued, RA physically
complete, RA contract complete, Start Real Estate Planning Report (REPR), Complete REPR,
Start RE Acquisition for RD, Complete RE Acquisition for RD, Start RE acquisition for RA, and
Complete RE Acquisition for RA.
4. Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Projects. Enclosure 3 provides detailed guidance
for entering IRP into PROMIS.
5. Army Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental Restoration (ER) Projects.
Enclosure 4 provides detailed guidance for entering BRAC-ER projects into PROMIS.
6. The Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) Projects. Enclosure 5 provides detailed guidance
for entering FUDS projects into PROMIS.
7. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Detailed guidance for
entering FUSRAP projects in PROMIS is provided in Enclosure 6.
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