Download version 0.1 of EP 420-1-1 Installation Support Handbook.pdf

Download version 0.1 of EP 420-1-1 Installation Support Handbook.pdf
CEMP-CI
Department of the Army
EP 420-1-1
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Pamphlet No.
420-1-1
Washington, DC 20314-1000
Construction
INSTALLATION SUPPORT HANDBOOK
Distribution Restriction Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
31 Jan 92
CEMP-CI
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Washington, D.C. 20314-1000
EP 420-1-1
Pamphlet
No. 420-1-1
31 January 1992
Construction
INSTALLATION SUPPORT HANDBOOK
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Paragraph
Page
CHAPTER 1 - INTRODUCTION
Purpose................................................
Applicability..........................................
References.............................................
Use of This Pamphlet and How to Obtain Services........
USACE Major Subordinate Command and District
Boundaries..........................................
District Organizational Structure......................
Installation Support Organizational Structure..........
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-4
1-1
1-1
1-2
1-2
1-5
1-6
1-7
1-3
1-3
1-5
Execution Sources/Options.............................. 2-1
Execution Methods...................................... 2-2
Communications......................................... 2-3
2-1
2-2
2-3
CHAPTER 2 - GENERAL PROGRAM OVERVIEW
CHAPTER 3 - PLANNING AND PROGRAMMING SUPPORT SERVICES
Types of Services......................................
Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines....................
Who Provides These Services............................
How to Obtain These Services...........................
Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish the Service.....
Examples of Planning and Programming Services..........
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3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-6
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CHAPTER 4 - ENVIRONMENTAL SUPPORT SERVICES
Types of Services......................................
Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines....................
Who Provides These Services............................
How to Obtain These Services...........................
Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish the Service.....
Examples of Environmental Services.....................
This Engineer Pamphlet EP 420-1-1, 31 January 1992, with Appendix USACE Activities Directory, May 1994, supersedes Engineer Pamplet EP
420-1-1, 31 January 1992, with Appendix J - USACE Activities Directory,
October 1991.
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TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
Paragraph
Page
CHAPTER 5 - REAL ESTATE SUPPORT SERVICES
Types of Services......................................
Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines....................
Who Provides These Services............................
How to Obtain These Services...........................
Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish the Service.....
Examples of Real Estate Support Services...............
.
CHAPTER 6 - ARCHITECT-ENGINEER SUPPORT SERVICES
5-1
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5-3
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5-5
5-6
5-1
5-3
5-4
5-4
5-4
5-5
Types of Services......................................
Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines....................
Who Provides These Services............................
How to Obtain These Services...........................
Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish the Service.....
Examples of Architect-Engineer Support Services........
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7-10
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9-12
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CHAPTER 7 - ENGINEERING SUPPORT SERVICES
Types of Services......................................
Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines....................
Who Provides These Services............................
How to Obtain These Services...........................
Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish the Service.....
Examples of Engineering Support Services...............
CHAPTER 8 - CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT SUPPORT SERVICES
Types of Services......................................
Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines....................
Who Provides These Services............................
How to Obtain These Services...........................
Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish the Service.....
Examples of Construction Management Services...........
CHAPTER 9 - SPECIAL SUPPORT SERVICES
Contracting............................................
Legal..................................................
Public Affairs.........................................
Safety and Occupational Health.........................
Training...............................................
Information Management Services........................
ii
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
Paragraph
Page
CHAPTER 10 - LOCAL USACE MSC SUPPLEMENT
( For future insertion by local MSC office )
10-1
CHAPTER 11 - LOCAL USACE DISTRICT SUPPLEMENT
( For future insertion by local district office )
11-1
CHAPTER 12 - INSTALLATION SUPPORT NEWSLETTERS
( For future insertion of newsletters )
12-1
APPENDICES :
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.
J.
K.
References.........................................
Glossary - Definition of Terms.....................
Information Management Systems.....................
Major Program Definitions..........................
Financial Management...............................
Centers of Expertise and Laboratories..............
Air Force Project Management Guidelines............
Forms for Installation Support Management..........
DOD Directive 4000.1.1, Installation Management....
USACE Activities - USACE Subordinate Command
Directory and Geographic Boundaries..............
AR 420-10, Facilities Engineering, Management
of Installation Directorates of Engineering
and Housing......................................
iii
A-1
B-1
C-1
D-1
E-1
F-1
G-1
H-1
I-1
J-1
K-1
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
FOREWORD
This pamphlet provides information for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
(USACE) field personnel to assist in organizing and operating a typical
Installation Support Program. The pamphlet also serves as a handbook
for Army Directorates of Engineering and Housing (DEH) and Air Force
Base Civil Engineers (BCE) by providing an overview of typical support
services available at their local Corps District, explanations on how to
obtain them, and time and cost associated with such services. This
pamphlet is issued in various chapters to provide a living reference
document in looseleaf format, so that particular portions can be updated
at frequent intervals. Also, in this format, the Installation Support
Handbook can be easily supplemented by USACE Subordinate Command
implementing procedures with direct reference to the applicable sections
of this pamphlet. Inquiries concerning the Installation Support
Handbook should be addressed to HQUSACE, Attn: CEMP-CI, Construction
Division, Installation Support Branch, Washington, D.C. 20314-1000.
H. J. HATCH
Lieutenant General, USA
Chief of Engineers
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION
1-1.
Purpose.
The purpose of this pamphlet is to provide U.S. Army Corps of
Engineer, Army Directorate of Engineering and Housing (DEH), and Air
Force Base Civil Engineer (BCE) personnel with information that will
assist them in providing or receiving installation support services. It
describes the interface between the installation and USACE activities,
and more importantly, the handbook helps installation managers
supplement their capabilities by making the complete range of talents,
skills and services of USACE easily accessible through the Installation
Support Program. This pamphlet is a guide and does not supersede any
regulations or contract requirements, or abridge command authority or
responsibility.
1-2.
Applicability.
This pamphlet applies to HQUSACE/OCE elements, major subordinate
commands, districts, laboratories, and field operating activities. The
level of expertise or extent to which a service will be accomplished by
the local USACE District may vary. However, the networking system and
ability to share resources and expertise throughout USACE allows access
to any of these support services through the local district Installation
Support coordinator.
a. A key management objective is to make it easy for an
installation to access the many services available from the district.
district not only offers support in a wide variety of engineering
disciplines, but also in construction management, real estate, and
numerous other disciplines and support areas.
A
b.
The chapters within this pamphlet have detailed explanations
of available support services, to include information on typical costs,
schedules and policy guidelines pertaining to each service. Sample
request forms are included as examples of how an installation obtains
support.
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1-3. References. The references and regulatory publications which
govern the Installation Support Program are categorized and included
within this pamphlet in two groups: required references and related
references. Required references are those included in each chapter;
they are mandatory readings to understand the service being described.
Related references are included in Appendix A and are recommended
readings which will further enhance the reader's knowledge and provide a
full understanding of the subject matter.
1-4.
Use of This Pamphlet and How to Obtain Services.
a. This pamphlet is organized for easy reference. The first
chapter gives basic information about USACE, Division/ District
boundaries, points of contact, the organizational structure of a typical
district, and the Installation Support organizational structure.
b. The second chapter of the pamphlet is a general overview of the
Installation Support Program and how a typical district operates the
program. Optional ways of getting projects accomplished are presented.
It also describes some of the many ways to keep installations informed
as to the progress of their work.
c. The third through the ninth chapters are the centerpiece of
the pamphlet. These chapters describe the various support services, who
provides these services, work request forms to initiate a support
request, when to request the service, how long it takes to provide the
service, and, perhaps most importantly, how much the service costs and
what funding sources/alternatives are available.
d. The pamphlet concludes with a series of appendices that will
help an installation understand USACE capabilities, obtain support from
a USACE activity, and provide feedback to districts on their
performance. Key terms relating to installation support are contained
in Appendix B. Information management systems are described in Appendix
C. Major programs encountered by the installation are at Appendix D.
Financial management requirements and relationships are in Appendix E.
USACE centers of expertise and laboratories, and their assigned mission
areas, are listed and defined in Appendix F. Guidelines for supporting
U. S. Air Force projects are in Appendix G. Guidance on how to obtain
USACE support and provide feedback to a district on their performance is
contained in Appendix H. Overall installation management philosophy is
summarized in DoD Directive 4000.1.1, which appears in Appendix I.
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e. Update procedure. Comments and suggestions regarding
improvements to this manual are welcomed at any time. Normally, the
pamphlet will be updated every two years, with revised pages being
prepared more often when needed. Districts and installations will be
provided with copies of all revised pages and will be offered the
opportunity to make comments when revisions are accomplished.
1-5.
USACE Major Subordinate Command and District Boundaries.
a. With nearly 44,000 employees, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
is the worlds largest engineering organization. Under the command of
the Chief of Engineers in Washington, D.C., the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers has 13 Divisions/Major Subordinate Commands (MSC) subdivided
into 39 districts that manage Military and Civil Works engineering and
construction programs worldwide. Each USACE military district has a
major responsibility in managing design and construction programs for
the Army and Air Force in their geographical area. Many civil works
districts have a mobilization support mission for Army installations.
b. Maps of MSC and district civil works and military support
operational boundaries are provided at Appendix J.
c. USACE MSC's and districts which have an assigned mission to
provide direct support to installations through the USACE Installation
Support Program are identified in AR 420-10 (see Appendix K).
1-6.
District Organizational Structure.
Districts are the Corps of Engineers basic operational level
organization. USACE districts typically have four line divisions;
engineering, construction-operations, project management, and real
estate (see Figure 1-1). The construction function has a field
structure consisting typically of area, resident, and project engineer
offices. This construction field structure expands, contracts, and
relocates dependent upon the construction workload. USACE districts are
usually led by a cadre of military officers, but the vast majority of
the staff are civilian members of the USACE team. USACE military
districts provide direct support to installations and USACE civil works
districts.
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* Typical locations for Installation Support Coordinator
Figure 1-1. A Typical District Organizational structure.
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1-7. Installation Support Organizational Structure. The organizational
element directly responsible for the Installation Support program varies
from district to district depending upon workload and staffing levels.
The supporting element ranges from one individual serving as the
Installation Support Coordinator, to a fully staffed Installation
Support Section/Branch.
a. Installation Support Coordinator.
the district who:
A single individual within
(1) Serves as a single point of contact to receive all
Installation Support requests.
(2) Directs incoming requests to the appropriate in-house
resource or other USACE capability.
(3) Coordinates customer requests within the district to ensure
timely execution, efficient and effective project management and
procurement, cost control and quality of construction.
(4)
Monitors installation/customer satisfaction.
b. Project Managers accomplishing Installation Support.
Districts that accomplish a consistent, yet minimal volume of
Installation Support/reimbursable funded projects have a number of
project managers who are responsible for accomplishing installation
support work. These project managers are located within the
Military/Project Management Branch and may assume the role of
Installation Support Coordinator or work in conjunction with that
individual.
c. Installation Support Section/Branch. In a district with a
large reimbursable funded military workload, a dedicated section or
branch has been formed to accomplish the Installation Support mission.
This is the optimum scenario in that it provides the most efficient,
effective and focused support to installations. In this case standard
military construction project management procedures can be most
effectively streamlined or tailored in order to simplify, expedite and
reduce the costs of accomplishing a project. In addition, each major
installation will normally have one or more project managers dedicated
to their needs. An example of this organization is depicted in Figure
1-2 on the following page.
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Figure 1-2.
Typical Organizational Structure of Installation
Support Section or Branch
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CHAPTER 2
GENERAL PROGRAM OVERVIEW
2-1.
Execution Sources / Options.
a. A number of options are available to both the installation
engineer and the district for executing projects. Figure 2-1 shows some
of the options that are typically open to the installation and the
supporting district:
Figure 2-1.
Typical Execution Options.
b. Major commands have the option of obtaining support directly
from a district or a laboratory.
c. The Huntsville Division has a non-geographic support mission
for selected services/programs. Examples are:
(1)
Range Modernization Program.
(2)
Energy Monitoring Control Systems.
(3)
Chemical Demilitarization Program.
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2-2.
Execution Methods.
The following diagram (Table 2-1) outlines seven execution methods
available to the installation engineer (I) and the supporting district
(D) for accomplishing actions during the life cycle of a project:
Table 2-1.
Typical Project Execution Methods
b. Any special studies or post-construction activities necessary
to accomplish a project could also be incorporated into the process and
accomplished by either the installation or the district.
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2-3. Communications. Effective communications are the key to
successful project completion and the maintenance of harmonious working
relationships between the installation and district. In addition to
routine telephonic coordination and written correspondence between the
district and the installation, communications between the installation
staff and the district will be maintained by the following means:
a.
Staff Visits.
(1) District commander visits to the installation. The district
commander will schedule a personal visit with the installation engineer
at least once every six months, or more often if needed. Also, it is
the Chief of Engineer's policy that new district commanders will visit
all of the installations supported by their district within 45 days of
taking command. Incumbent district commanders will visit new
installation engineers within 45 days of their assumption of duties.
The district commander is also available upon request to discuss or
present information regarding special problems, complex projects or
issues.
(2) Installation Support Coordinator's visit to Installation
Engineer. Each large project, group of operation and maintenance-funded
projects, or request for technical engineering or study support will
normally result in a visit by the district Installation Support
Coordinator. The purpose of these visits is to meet the installation
personnel who will be coordinating the work, to acquaint them with the
project design or study team and/or with consultants who will provide
the service, and to solicit concerns and preferences that may affect the
service being provided.
(3) District Chief, Construction Division visit. The chief of the
district construction division will visit the installation at least once
annually to discuss concerns over completed and on-going construction,
coordinate major construction projects scheduled during the year, and
introduce members of the district office construction division staff.
(4) Joint site visits during design and construction.
Installations are encouraged to appoint DEH/BCE coordinators/managers
for each design and construction project being accomplished by the
district. These coordinators will be regularly invited to visit the job
sites with the area or resident engineer staff, and encouraged to bring
representatives of the using organization along with them.
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b.
Meetings.
(1) Monthly/quarterly. Project planning and status meetings may be
conducted at the installation engineer's office, or at the area/resident
engineer office on a monthly or quarterly basis. The frequency and
location of these meetings may be at the installation engineer's
choosing.
(2) Recurring and special. The district office staff and the local
area/resident engineer office are available at all times to conduct
briefings to installation command groups or to meet with the
installation engineer's staff.
(3) Status review. There is almost no such thing as "too much
information" when considering matters of project status. The
Installation Support coordinator is always available to meet with the
installation to discuss ongoing and new projects. Normally, these
meetings are combined with the construction status meetings that are
held monthly at the area/resident engineer office. Installation project
coordinators are encouraged to attend all of these meetings, and minutes
of each session will be provided within one week after the date of the
last meeting.
(4) Area Engineer/Resident Engineer. As mentioned in the
preceding paragraph, status meetings are often held at the area/resident
engineer office and include not only the status of ongoing contracts,
but the status of planned and ongoing design efforts. Additionally, the
area/resident engineer is available to brief status of any ongoing
construction contracts, and can assist the installation staff with
training, construction scheduling and reporting techniques, as well as
other construction management issues.
(5) Design and design review. For Army reimbursable funded
projects there are typically three meetings during the design phase with
the installation engineer. The first meeting is a pre-design/prenegotiation/scope development conference which is held at the project
site. The second meeting is a concept design review, held when the
project is approximately 35% complete. At this stage installation
review comments are discussed for incorporation into the project. The
third meeting is a final design review, held when the project is
approximately 95% complete to solicit detailed technical comments and
determine the final course of action for the project. For the Air Force
an additional meeting is held between the pre-design and concept review.
This meeting occurs at the Project Definition completion phase so the
designer can present conclusions and recommendations to the installation
engineer/user.
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(6) Installation planning board. The USACE MSC commander has
delegated authority to the district to represent the Corps of Engineers
at Installation Planning Board meetings. The district will send a
member from their Military Planning Section staff to each of these
meetings as a technical advisor to the installation master planning
staff.
(7) Six and nine-month warranty enforcement meetings. The
installation engineer's project inspection staff is encouraged to attend
the six and nine month warranty enforcement meetings on all construction
projects supervised and administered by the supporting Corps
area/resident engineer office. Warranty related concerns are the
primary focus of each of these meetings.
c.
Recurring Reports.
(1) Status report. A district will furnish each installation a
monthly status report of all projects and services being provided to
their installation. Appendix H of this handbook has a sample project
status reporting format.
(2) Automated Management and Progress Reporting System (AMPRS).
This automated design and construction execution report is used
throughout the Corps of Engineers to track the progress of each MILCON
or reimbursable/installation support action. Information from this
report is used to monitor design and construction execution at all
levels within the Corps of Engineers.
(3) Reimbursable project data base. There are data fields within
AMPRS for tracking projects that are reimbursable funded, i.e.,
Installation Support Projects.
d. Annual DEH/BCE Conference / Workshop. Each district typically
hosts an annual conference/workshop for DEH/BCE partners. Normally the
conference is held on or near one of the supported installations and
tours of installation facilities are a part of the agenda. During the
conference the district should not dominate the agenda. Typically the
district portion will equal that of the Army and Air Force installation
participants. The last thing a district wants to do is "preach"
district support. Rather, the conference/workshop should provide an
open forum: to share ideas among customers, to meet and get to know each
other, and to hear expert speakers discuss new programs and directions
in the facilities engineering, housing and environmental business.
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(1) Guest and Installation Speakers. Conference speakers should
come from the Corps of Engineers community, the Army and Air Force
community, from private industry and from other Government agencies.
The focus should be on the "where we have been" and "what's new" in the
facilities engineering, housing and environmental arena. One of the
primary speakers at each annual conference/workshop should be a DEH or
BCE from a supported installation.
(2) Survey DEH/BCE for Agenda Items. Before the yearly
conference/workshop is put together, the Installation Support
coordinator will contact installations to determine preferences for
agenda items. Any special or recurrent problems are excellent topics
for presentation or workshop discussion. Controversial items should not
be avoided. Discussion of even the most sensitive Installation Support
problems or issues, with the objective of obtaining resolution or expert
advice, is encouraged.
(3) Schedule. A typical annual conference/workshop is held from
noon on a Tuesday to noon on a Thursday and consists of four four-hour
sessions with frequent breaks. With this scheduling, the
conference/workshop will take only three working days, including travel.
The last four hour session is an "open forum" during which all
participants are given an opportunity to express opinions and share
concerns regarding what has been presented during the previous three
sessions.
e. Customer Feedback System. Each district is required to monitor
installation/customer satisfaction. Examples of formats which may be
utilized to accomplish this are included in Appendix H. Installations
should be asked to complete a customer survey form for each job, or
group of related jobs that a district completes for them. Completion of
such evaluations provides a road map of how support can be improved in
the future.
f. Solicitation of Annual Program from DEH/BCE. The district
should visit each installation engineer during the development of the
"fixed workload" and "variable workload" portions of the Annual Work
Plan for the installation. This provides a "heads up" notice of work
that the district may be asked to perform, or areas where the district
may be able to offer specific expertise or support. Normally, the
deputy district commander or the installation support coordinator will
schedule an annual visit with the installation engineer or deputy for
this purpose during the spring of the year, or when the installation
Annual Work Plan is being assembled.
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CHAPTER 3
PLANNING AND PROGRAMMING
SUPPORT SERVICES
3-1.
Types of Services.
a.
Economic and Social Analysis.
(1) Housing Studies. Housing projects for new facilities
require a three-phase justification procedure. The three phases
include: Segmented Housing Market Analysis (SHMA), the Army
Housing Justification Process (AHJP), and the Economic Analysis
(EA). All new construction and major renovation projects must be
supported by an economic analysis of various public and private
sector alternatives which provide housing facilities. The EA must
accompany the initial project DD Form 1391.
(2) Efficiency Studies. Efficiency studies analyze costs
of equipment or facilities over their economic, physical, or
mission life and evaluate various alternatives to achieve a
specific objective. Examples include commissary expansion and
installation laundry services.
(3) Finance Studies. These studies, which are generally
an appendix to an EA or feasibility study, identify methods of
financing project needs that are outside traditional funding
mechanisms. (Example: in one study, land and facilities were
identified that could be excessed in order to provide funding for
new warehouses on the installation as part of the DoD Sale and
Replace Program.)
(4) Mission Changes. These studies assess the economic
impact a mission change will have on the economy of the local
community. They are generally an appendix to an Environmental
Impact Statement (EIS). (Example: USACE personnel are working
on the socioeconomic portion of Base Realignment Studies to
establish a method to be used for all candidate installations in
the United States.)
(5) Long-Range Stationing Plans. We can provide your
installation assistance in site selection and estimating economic
impacts on the local community that will arise from various
stationing scenarios. Input/output modeling is one of the tools
used to accomplish this task.
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(6) Installation Compatible Use Zone (ICUZ). The goal of
an ICUZ study is to influence development around military
installations so that it is compatible with blast and
noise-generating Army activities. The district can coordinate
planning activities between agencies, counties, planning
commissions, and private-interest groups.
(7) Emergency Preparedness/Mobilization Planning. To
prepare for mobilization, each district has analyzed the
capabilities of the Corps of Engineers as well as the
construction industry in their local geographic area to quickly
provide support for a range of mobilization construction
projects. Working with local installation staffs, districts have
identified a range of problems, needs and opportunities and
addressed alternative solutions. Districts have also prepared,
and are continuously updating, Mobilization Master Plans and
Mobilization Installation Support Books for the Army
installations that they support.
b. Project Development and Advance Planning. The scope
development and programming phases of each project are extremely
important. The completeness of an installations request for
services reduces the time required to start pre-design and design
procurement procedures, and reduces delays during design and
design administration for scope revision modifications. The
critical components for the request for service are shown on the
sample installation support request on the final page of each
support services chapter in this pamphlet. The timing of the
request for services is critical to accomplishing high-quality
design in a timely manner at minimum cost.
c. Real Property Master Plan and Mobilization Component
for Army Installations/Base Comprehensive Planning for Air Force
Installations. Commanders use the installation master plan/base
comprehensive plan for the orderly management and development of
their installations, and as a source of project development
information. The real property master plan/base comprehensive
plan depicts current composition of an installation and the plans
for its future development. Once approved, the real property
master plan/base comprehensive plan is the primary building block
for installation development and is not changed, except for
revisions by the Installation Real Property Planning
Board/Facility Board, unless major mission or strength
alterations occur. The mobilization component is a similar set
of documents prepared at Army installations in the Continental
United States, Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico, based on the
assigned "full" mobilization mission.
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Each district has a military planning staff of professionals who
are capable of aiding the installation in completely updating
their master plan or accomplishing revisions, either by in-house
district staff or by A-E contract.
d. Installation Design Guide. The installation design
guide is a portion of the installation real property master plan.
It also is a specific part of the Army Communities of Excellence
Program. The guide establishes the architectural theme for each
portion of the installation, sets standards for interior and
exterior design including site furnishings and landscaping, and
develops design guidelines for form, massing, color, texture,
scale and spacing amongst the buildings in each area. The
district can prepare this document for the installation, or work
with the installation staff to jointly develop the document.
e. Mapping and Surveying. The district has the capability
of providing aerial surveys and photogrammetric mapping,
cadastral surveys, and resources mapping using satellite
technology. Complete field surveys of any type can be provided
either through use of in-house survey crews or by contract. Each
district can perform topographic, cartographic, hydrographic,
demarkation of wetlands, geodetic, land, control, engineering
and construction surveying. In most cases, surveys can be worked
into schedules within three to four weeks time. In addition,
districts have horizontal and vertical control available for use
at most military installations. Districts can prepare master
planning maps by means of the controlled aerial mosaic method.
The majority of the mapping work is currently recorded on the
computer-aided design and drafting system at the district office.
f. Computer-Aided Design and Drafting Systems (CADD).
With the Corps-wide purchase of CADD systems in late 1987, USACE
obtained the capability to support the DEH/BCE with
state-of-the-art drafting equipment. The Corps-wide purchase
provided Districts with Integraph equipment, which allows them to
place real property master planning drawings, as-builts, archival
site plans as well as design and as-built drawings in computer
files which may be reproduced at virtually any scale, showing
many different combinations of selected information. Districts
also have the technical capability to advise installations
regarding the purchase of CADD equipment for the DEH/BCE staff.
This equipment would be completely compatible with mainframe
equipment at the district and would permit installation designers
and master planner to prepare original drawings and other
(nongraphic) data bases, or to revise those on file at the
district. (Note: automation approval and funding of CADD
equipment for installation use are the responsibilities of the
installation and its parent command.
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g. Feasibility Studies. USACE districts have the
capability to perform virtually any engineering technical
feasibility study, including evaluation of master planning
alternatives, feasibility analyses during programming and design,
and feasibility of alternative operation and maintenance
practices.
h. Space Utilization Planning. AR 405-70, Utilization of
Real Estate; AR 405-45, Inventory of Army Military Real Property;
and AR 210-20, Master Planning, emphasize the maximum use of
existing facilities before new facilities are programmed.
Districts stand ready to assist an installation office in
developing space utilization databases and analyses. Many
Districts have performed this service for the installations they
support. The results have proven successful in terms of usable,
responsive systems for facilities and land use assignment.
3-2.
Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines.
a.
(1)
For Army projects.
AR 210-20, Installation Master Planning.
(2) AR 415-15, Military Construction, Army (MCA) Program
Development.
(3)
AR 405-45, Inventory of Army Military Real Property.
(4)
TM 5-803-5, Installation Design.
(5)
DA Pam 600-45, Army Communities of Excellence.
b.
For Air Force projects.
(1)
AFR 19-9, Air Installation Compatible Use Zone.
(2)
AFR 86-1, Programming Civil Engineer Resources.
(3)
AFR 86-4, Base Comprehension Planning.
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3-3.
Who Provides These Services.
For planning and project development services, the
districts Installation Support coordinator will forward the
installation's request to either the Planning Division or to the
Master Planning and Site Development Section of the Engineering
or Programs and Project Management Division. Mobilization
component service requests will follow the same procedure, or be
assigned to the Emergency Operations Branch of the Construction
and Operations Division. In all cases, the Installation Support
Coordinator will receive, coordinate and monitor the
installations request.
3-4.
How To Obtain These Services.
Use an Installation Support Request Form, or call or write
to the local Installation Support Coordinator to initiate a
request for service. The installation should be prepared to
supply the following:
a. An Installation Support Request Form prepared in
general accordance with the sample format (Figure 3-1) at the
last page of this chapter which gives a narrative summary of work
or services required. After the support request is evaluated:
b. Copies of installation records needed by the district
to provide the service.
3-5.
c.
Applicable documents, correspondence, or regulations.
d.
Document transmitting funds to the district office.
Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish the Service.
Costs and time required for planning services, and
sources/alternatives for funds. The time period and cost for the
preparation of planning projects vary depending on the complexity
of the document or study.
a. Costs. Normally, installation furnished Operation and
Maintenance (O&M) funds are required to finance planning
services. However, some nonreimbursable Army funds are available
on a limited basis for peacetime master planning. Headquarters,
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers funds all mobilization master plans.
The following are examples of the average time and cost range for
various projects:
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(1) Project Development Brochure (PDB) - 6 to 8 weeks
($8,000-$12,000).
(2) Individual utility studies - 9 to 15 months ($75,000$125,000).
(3) Real Property Master Plan update - 9 to 12 months
($80,000-$125,000).
(4) Mobilization component update - 9 to 12 months
($80,000-$120,000 - funded by HQUSACE).
If the required support exceeds the capability of in-house
personnel or current indefinite delivery contracts, additional
lead time (of approximately 3 to 4 months) will be required to
advertise and select an A-E firm. Accordingly, early district
involvement in an installations advance/annual work planning will
help the district provide better support.
b. The annual military construction programming cycle
dictates when the installation needs to submit such documents as
DD Forms 1391 and Project Development Brochures.
c. Army master planning services are augmented by a
limited amount of HQUSACE-distributed, nonreimbursable funds.
Mobilization components are entirely funded by HQUSACE.
Therefore, the district must request that the installation
identify requirements for these services by each February
preceding each fiscal year. This allows the district to identify
master planning and mobilization master planning requirements
through Corps of Engineers channels.
d. Other planning services are not as time sensitive, and
can be provided at any time during the year whenever the
requirement is identified and funded.
3-6.
Examples.
a. Preparation of base line planning studies in support of
base realignment and closure actions at installations.
b. Housing studies prepared by districts have contributed
to high success rates in housing programming at various Army and
Air Force Installations.
c. Space utilization surveys at supported installations as
they prepare to incorporate the Army Real Property Planning
System (RPLANS) at their installations.
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CHAPTER 4
ENVIRONMENTAL SUPPORT SERVICES
4-1.
Types of Services.
a. Environmental and Cultural Resources. The district
can provide a wide range of services to support compliance with
environmental and cultural resources laws and regulations,
including:
(1) Environmental Assessment. An Environmental
Assessment (EA) describes the impacts of a proposed action on the
environment. The elements evaluated include wetlands, cultural
resources, ecology, threatened and endangered species,
socio-economic factors, air, water and noise pollution,
fisheries, navigation, flood plains, and energy needs. An EA is
prepared in accordance with the implementing regulation of the
National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and AR 200-1 and AR
200-2. It is coordinated via Section 309 of the Clean Air Act
with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
(2) Environmental Impact Statement. The Environmental
Impact Statement (EIS) is normally a large, complex document that
incorporates aspects of the Environmental Assessment, and usually
includes more detail, time, funds and coordination. It is also
prepared according to the implementing regulations of the
National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and AR 200-1 and AR
200-2. It involves notification via the Federal Register as well
as wide coordination with various federal and state agencies and
the public.
(3) Biological Assessment of Threatened and Endangered
Species (BATES). The Endangered Species Act requires all Federal
agencies to consult with the Secretaries of Interior and Commerce
to ensure that their actions will not jeopardize the continued
existence of endangered or threatened species or result in the
destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats of such
species. A BATES evaluates, via the Endangered Species Act of
1973, the potential impacts a proposed action may have on various
threatened and endangered species. Following its completion, the
draft document is coordinated with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service for either the "no jeopardy" or "jeopardy" determination.
(4) Evaluation of Dredge and Fill Material. Section
404(b)(l) of the Clean Water Act requires the evaluation of the
environmental impacts a proposed dredge or fill action may have
on biological and chemical integrity of a wetland area.
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The evaluation, usually part of an Environmental Impact Statement
(EIS) or Environmental Assessment (EA), is coordinated with the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in accordance with the
Clean Water Act.
(5) Hazardous and Toxic Wastes (HTW). Districts can
assist installations with cleanup of hazardous or toxic waste
sites in order to comply with provisions of the Comprehensive
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA).
The district can assist in developing a comprehensive plan for
hazardous/toxic waste remediation. The HTW plans also involve
personnel requirements, contracting, health and safety, chemical
data quality management, as well as program coordination. The
District can also provide advice on how best to reduce wastes so
as to minimize future environmental impacts and assure compliance
with the Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).
Preliminary HTW assessments and detailed HTW testing and sampling
can also be performed to support site selections and NEPA
documentation requirements.
(6) Environmental Audits. The district can assist
installations in conducting internal and external Environmental
Audits. This assistance can include preparation of the entire
document or just certain facets. These audits, which are an
environmental compliance review of facility operations,
practices, and records to verify compliance with environmental
laws and regulations, are important in developing annual RCS 1383
reports for reporting environmental funding requirements.
(7) Asbestos Surveys and Removal. Asbestos
identification services for installations are performed by
districts, usually through the use of indefinite delivery type
A-E contracts. Districts can also effectively contract for
asbestos removal.
(8) Cultural Resources Surveys and Evaluation. Cultural
resources must be identified and evaluated as required by the
Archeological and Historic Preservation Act of 1974 and the
National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended.
Districts can assist an installation with investigations of any
size: from a small plot to large multi-acre areas identified for
new construction or training.
(9) Design Services for Air and Noise Abatement Projects.
The district can perform design services for air and noise
abatement projects, such as corrective actions for an incinerator
not meeting state requirements/standards.
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(10) Wetland Surveys. Districts can assist installations
with project site selections and NEPA documentation by
identifying, delineating and mapping wetland critical habitat
areas.
b. Permitting. Regulatory authorities and
responsibilities of USACE are based on Section 10 of the Rivers
and Harbors Act of 1899 (33 USC 403) and Section 404 of the Clean
Water Act (33 USC 1344). Section 10 requires a Department of
Army permit for all work proposed within a navigable water of the
United States. Section 404 requires a Department of Army permit
for the discharge of dredged or fill material into waters of the
United States, including wetlands. The district can provide this
service to an installation, if needed, for such activities as
river crossing sites, waterborne troop training exercises, etc.
c. Underground Storage Tank Program. This environmental
program requires the inventory, survey, reporting and correction
of underground chemical, petroleum, oil and lubricant storage
tanks. The district can provide assistance in meeting survey and
reporting requirements, and can help you develop and execute
projects for correction of those identified as leaking. Cathodic
protection system testing and evaluation, design and technical
assistance are available for underground storage tanks. Such
information is required for the installation, replacement or
upgrade of steel or nonmetallic underground storage tanks and/or
piping components. In addition, testing and technical assistance
on maintenance contracts is available for existing cathodic
protection systems. This program is also supported by
standardized drawings and specifications which may expedite
corrective actions, tank upgrade, replacement or installation
projects.
d. Environmental Base Line Surveys/Preliminary Assessment
Screening. These surveys are required for proposed real estate
transactions. The surveys identify the current status of the
installation, or portion thereof, regarding major or significant
environmental impacts, hazardous and toxic wastes, asbestos,
radon, flood plain management, wetland considerations, and
biological resources.
e. Spill Prevention, Control Countermeasure Plan. This
environmental program requires that a plan be developed to
prevent chemical, petroleum, oil and lubricant spills on military
installations. This plan or a separate plan should address
actions required to immediately put into effect operations to
contain and clean-up spills that do occur.
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f. Landfill Closure Plan. The district can help prepare
plans for closure of landfills at installations. A request to
prepare this type of plan should be submitted two to three years
in advance of the anticipated closure in order that all study and
regulatory requirements can be met. Assistance with site
selection for proposed landfills can also be provided.
g. Flood Plain Management. The objective of the Flood
Plain Management Services Program is to support comprehensive
flood plain management planning at all appropriate governmental
levels and, thereby, to encourage prudent use of the nation's
flood plains. Executive Order 11988 requires each federal
agency, and its installations, to evaluate the effects of its
actions on flood plains, and to avoid financing or issuing
permits for construction in such flood prone areas unless no
practicable alternatives are available. Information provided
through this program includes flood hazard information as well as
a full range of technical services and planning guidance on
techniques for reducing flood damage and damage potential. Some
of the technical services available at the district are:
(1) Flood Hazard Evaluation. Upon request, a district
will evaluate the potential for flood damage at specific sites.
This evaluation can range from simply providing an expected base
flood elevation to the determination and analysis of possible
protection improvements. This analysis would include the
expected results of the improvement. Although this does not
result in a detailed, designed project, it does provide
information upon which to base funding needs.
(2) Floodway Determination. In the development of flood
plain zoning, it is sometimes necessary to determine the area of
the flood plain that is required to remain free of development in
order to safely pass the base flood. Districts can determine
these floodway requirements for an installation.
(3) Flood Plain Regulations. Districts can provide
advice on proper use of an existing flood plain. This could
include zoning regulations and development standards.
(4) Flood-Proofing. Providing guidance on
flood-proofing methods and procedures is another service
available. This action usually results in a modification to a
structure to prevent or minimize potential flood damage.
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(5) Emergency Flood Hazard Evacuation Studies. Special
studies can be conducted to develop guidelines for flood
emergency warning and evacuation at an installation. These
studies would include plans for temporary shelter procedures and
provide a base for development of a post-flood recovery plan.
4-2.
Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines.
a. The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as
amended (NHPA). This Act requires agencies to consider the
effects that an undertaking will have on any resource eligible
for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. The
findings must be coordinated with the state Historic Preservation
Officer and provided to the Advisory Council on Historic
Preservation.
b. Archeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 (ARPA).
This requires a federal land manager to issue a permit to any
qualified archeological investigators working on public lands.
This act prescribes criminal and civil penalties, along with
forfeiture provisions for any person who uses any cultural
resources without correct authorization.
c. The Clean Water Act, Section 404 (b)(l) Evaluation of
Dredge and Fill Material.
d.
National Environmental Policy Act of 1969.
e.
The Endangered Species Act of 1973.
f.
AR 200-1, Environmental Protection and Enhancement.
g.
AR 200-2, Environmental Effects of Army Actions.
h. AR 420-40, Facilities Engineering, Historic
Preservation.
I.
4-3.
Executive Order 11988, Flood Plain Management, 1977.
Who Provides These Services.
Within USACE, the environmental program has experienced
rapid growth and is still evolving in many districts.
For any requested environmental services, the Installation
Support Coordinator will forward the installation's request to
either the Planning Division, the Environmental Resources Branch,
the Regulatory Program Branch or other appropriate office.
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Additionally, USACE has designated a number of districts to
specialize in hazardous, toxic, radiological waste (HTRW) and
general environmental support work. Generally, one district per
division is designated as the HTRW center of expertise and
Environmental Support District. These districts will have
specialized personnel who are extensively trained in
environmental matters. If an installations normal direct support
district is not an HTRW center of expertise or an Environmental
Support District, the installation can access the specialized
services through their direct support district. In any case, an
Installation Support Coordinator is available to assist in
processing installation requests. The Installation Support
Coordinator can also arrange for specialized environmental
support from USACE laboratories, USACE Civil Works districts, or
the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA).
4-4.
How To Obtain These Services.
Use an Installation Support Request Form, call or write to
the district Installation Support Coordinator to initiate a
request for service. The installation should be prepared to
supply the following:
a. An Installation Support Request Form prepared in
general accordance with the sample format (Figure 4-1) at the
last page of this chapter. This form gives a narrative summary of
work or services required. After the support request is
evaluated:
b.
service.
4-5.
Copies of installation records needed to provide the
c.
Applicable documents, correspondence, or regulations.
d.
Document transmitting funds to the district office.
Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish the Service.
a. Costs and time required for environmental services,
and sources for funds. When a request for service is received by
the district, a time and cost estimate will be prepared and
negotiated with the installation. The time and cost for
accomplishing the various requests can range from routine
requests requiring a few hours, costing several hundreds of
dollars, to the more complex evaluations, including field
surveys, requiring several man-months of effort and thousands of
dollars.
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No two environmental support requests are exactly alike, and time
and costs must be tailored to specific requirements. However,
some examples of the average time and cost for typical services
are as follows:
(1)
Historic Preservation Plan (HPP)
- 6 to 12 months ($25,000 to $100,000).
(2)
Environmental Assessment (EA)
- 3 to 12 months ($10,000 to $100,000).
(3)
Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)
- 18 to 36 months ($75, 000 to $250,000).
(4)
Asbestos Identification
- varying time (four to six cents per square foot of
floor area inspected, with identification services
comparable to those of a typical design contract.
(5)
Environmental Baseline Study (EBS)
- 3 to 6 months ($10,000 to $50,000)
b. Current Army funding policies normally require that
environmental services, except wetlands determination, from the
district be funded by the installation on a cost-reimbursable
basis. Usually, installation Operation and Maintenance funds are
used for this purpose. In exceptional cases, such as the base
realignment and closure initiative, limited funds are available
from Headquarters, Department of the Army to support these
environmental studies. In each case the funding must be
furnished to the district prior to starting the project.
4-6.
Examples of Environmental Services.
a. Districts have prepared numerous EAs that often
incorporate many of the other documents highlighted in this
pamphlet.
b. Environmental Impact Statements have been prepared
ranging in complexity from the development of additional family
housing at an installation to the construction of a harbor
complex for TRIDENT missile submarines.
c. Some entire installations are designated as historic,
while others have limited or no historic structures. Districts
have assisted installations in entering many facilities on the
National Register of Historic Places, or in coordinating actions
for facilities eligible to be on the Register.
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d. District assistance was provided to an installation in
preparing a flood contour map of the entire 140,000 acre
installation, including identification of several flood ways.
This map has become a part of the installation master plan. In a
broader sense, districts have used their technical expertise in
flood plain management to help other federal agencies and
installations deal with floods and flood-related matters. Flood
plain management services have been provided in support of land
disposal actions associated with the base realignment and closure
initiative.
e. An ICUZ study was performed for an Air Force Base and
real estate noise easements were purchased as a result of the
study. A noise buffer, based on measurements taken as a part of
the study, virtually eliminates noise complaints from aircraft
operations in the vicinity. In another instance, at an Army
installation, district environmental personnel, along with an
environmental attorney, were able to react to the efforts of a
nearby community to limit the Army's use of installation firing
ranges.
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Figure 4-1.
SAMPLE FORMAT-INSTALLATION SUPPORT REQUEST
INVOLVING ENVIRONMENTAL SUPPORT
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CHAPTER 5
REAL ESTATE SUPPORT SERVICES
5-1. Types of Services. The Chief of Engineers is responsible
for management of the Army real estate program. He also has a
major real estate support role for the U.S. Air Force. As a
member of the Army Staff, the Chief of Engineers, advises the
Army on real property planning, acquisition, construction,
maintenance, repair, and disposal. In this dual function, both
the DEH and the district engineer, have active roles to play in
the arena of Army real property. Certain actions are a DEH
responsibility, while others are a direct responsibility of the
supporting USACE district. Regardless of the assignment of
responsibilities, the district addresses each real estate action
as direct support of the DEH or BCE. Specific services
provided by a district real estate division are described as
follows:
a. Research and prepare required real estate reports for
the expansion, modification or disposal of existing
installations, and for the acquisition of new installations.
Obtain title evidence.
Prepare real estate instruments and
execute those documents within delegated authority.
b. Acquire real property by purchase, lease or
condemnation. Handle other acquisitions involving donation,
exchange, transfers, withdrawals from public domain, and
recapture for national security leasehold. Generally, major land
items, those costing more than $200,000, are programmed and
authorized through the annual Military Construction
appropriation. Minor land acquisition, not exceeding $200,000,
is authorized and accomplished outside military construction
authorization channels. An exception to the $200,000 threshold
for real property acquisitions for the reserve components exists
under 10 U.S.C. 2233. However, all acquisitions for active and
reserve components which exceed $200,000 are reported to the
Armed Services Committees of Congress in accordance with 10
U.S.C. 2662.
c. Negotiate Army leases, including identification of
both the lessor and the premises to be leased, detailed lease
provisions, establishment of terms, and appraisal for fair and
reasonable payment.
d. Conduct appraisals and establish rental schedules for
Government-owned land and housing.
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e.
Centers.
Participate in site selections for U.S. Army Reserve
f. Negotiate temporary easements, permits, rights of
entry, maneuver rights and grazing rights for the Army.
g. Provide assistance in handling annexations by
municipalities.
h. Provide assistance during mobilization periods,
including acquisition of nonindustrial facilities, leasing,
condemnations, annexations, and exercise of recapture rights.
i. Administer the outgranting program, including leases,
easements, licenses and permits granted by the Government for
private purposes.
maps
j. Research and duplicate legal documents and prepare
depicting Federal ownership and other rights.
k. Provide relocation assistance to displaced persons
affected by Army land acquisition.
l. Provide assistance in preparing the Real Property
Survey Report and accomplishing compliance and utilization
inspections.
m. Dispose of land, buildings, timber, gravel, etc., at
the request of the installation to include disposal reporting,
pre-disposal investigations of land and buildings for
contamination, hazardous and toxic wastes, explosive hazards,
coastal zone management program, flood plain management program,
historic and cultural resources, asbestos and PCBs.
n. Provide assistance in the disposal of excess foreign
real estate.
o. Assist in preparation of reports of excess land for
submittal to the General Services Administration.
p. Terminate inleases and outgrants for off-installation
facilities and housing.
q. Arrange for provision of homeowners' assistance for
persons displaced through base realignments and closures.
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r. Process and administer damage claims against the
Government arising from use of land under an expressed or implied
real estate instrument, as well as required restorations of real
estate.
s. Administer the provisions of the McKinney Act
regarding housing facilities for the homeless.
t. Provide assistance with curative matters regarding
encroachment.
u. Prepare and execute of build-to-lease and
lease-purchase arrangements.
v. Provide assistance in determining proper legislative
and legal jurisdiction issues for Army used real property.
w. Execute the disposal of real property assets under
Public Law 100-526, Base Realignment and Closure.
x. Assists installation in determining water rights that
the installation possesses, attempts to secure, or intends to
transfer.
5-2. Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines. The significant
guidelines governing real estate support to military
installations are listed as follows:
a. AR 140-485, Space Allowances: U.S.
Facilities.
Army Reserve
b. AR 210-12, Establishment of Rental Rates for Quarters
Furnished Federal Employees.
c.
AR 210-17, Inactivation of Installations.
d.
AR 210-20, Master Planning for Army Installations.
e.
Therein.
AR 405-10, Acquisition of Real Property and Interests
f.
AR 405-20, Federal Legislative Jurisdiction.
g.
AR 405-25, Annexation.
h.
AR 405-45, Inventory of Army Real Property.
i.
AR 405-70, Utilization of Real Estate.
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5-3.
j.
AR 405-80, Granting Use of Real Estate.
k.
AR 405-90, Disposal of Real Estate.
Who Provides These Services.
For real estate support services, the Installation Support
Coordinator will forward the installations request to the
districts real estate division. However, there are many
established working relationships between DEH/BCE real estate
personnel and those in the district or real estate field office.
It is not necessary to go through our Installation Support
coordinator where these relationships are concerned, but for new
actions not involving established relationships, a work request
form to the Installation Support Coordinator is appropriate.
5-4.
How To Obtain These Services.
Use an Installation Support Request Form, call or write to
the local Installation Support Coordinator to initiate a request
for service. The installation should be prepared to supply the
following:
a. An Installation Support Request Form prepared in
general accordance with the sample format (Figure 5-1) at the
last page of this chapter. The form gives a narrative summary of
work or services required. After the support request is
evaluated:
b.
service.
5-5.
Copies of installation records needed to provide the
c.
Applicable documents, correspondence, or regulations.
d.
Document transmitting funds to the district office.
Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish the Service.
a. Some districts real estate services are provided on a
nonreimbursable basis using centrally distributed Real Estate
Operations (REO) funds. With current budgetary reductions, more
of this work will require reimbursable funding. In all cases,
real estate support is provided based on an estimated cost that
includes district charges plus administrative overhead. Costs
for a significant real estate action can be large due to the time
required by the real estate staff to complete the necessary
planning, perform possibly complex appraisals, coordinate with
all involved personnel and organizations, etc.
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More routine, smaller actions may cost anywhere from a man-day or
two of effort to a visit to the location for which the
installation has requested support.
b. Real estate support requests will be quickly answered
during any time of the year. Within a typical real estate
division, it is standard for a representative of the office to
telephonically contact the installation within 48 hours of
receipt of a request for support. Often, a site visit to the
installation will occur within that same period of time.
Naturally, major acquisitions, disposals, or changes in
utilization require substantial lead time to plan, coordinate,
approve and execute.
5-6.
Examples of Real Estate Support Services.
Many district real estate divisions began their military
support functions before our entry into World War II. Some of
their first actions involved the acquisition of land for U.S.
Army Air Corps installations. Later, the mission shifted to
support Army land- based forces and acquisition of land for Army
division-sized installations. At the end of World War II actions
focused on the disposal of installations, some acres of which are
still in the public domain and are recapturable in the event of
mobilization. Currently, real estate actions cover a broad range
of support capabilities, such as:
a. Assisting installations in leasing and outgranting
programs.
b.
program.
Management of an installations timber harvesting
c. Preparation of site selection studies for U.S. Army
and U.S. Air Force Reserve Centers.
d. Assisting installations in negotiating mineral
activities with private interests.
e. Identification of wetland and flood-plain areas for
communities located adjacent to Army installations.
f. Negotiation of Air Compatibility Use Zone (ACUZ) for
Air Force bases to maintain noise buffers in takeoff and landing
zones.
g. Disposal certification for installations planned for
disposal as part of the present base closure initiative.
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Figure 5-1.
SAMPLE FORMAT-INSTALLATION SUPPORT REQUEST
INVOLVING REAL ESTATE SUPPORT
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CHAPTER 6
ARCHITECT-ENGINEER SUPPORT SERVICES
6-1.
Types of Services.
a. Types of Architect-Engineer Contracts. A district
can provide a variety of architect-engineer (A-E) support
services to an installation. Title 10 U.S.C. 4540 provides the
authority for utilization of A-E services by the Secretary of the
Army. 10 U.S.C. 2304 (a)(4) authorizes negotiation for
professional services. A statutory limit of six percent for
architectural- engineering services (primary services only)
relating to public works or utility projects was established by
10 U.S.C. 2306d, as implemented by DoD FAR Supplement 36-606.
Some of the various types of A-E contracts are described as
follows:
(1) Fixed-Price Type Contract (FAR 16.201). A firmfixed-price contract provides for a price that is not subject to
any adjustment on the basis of the contractor's cost experience
in performing the contract. This type of contract places upon
the contractor maximum risk and full responsibility for all costs
and resulting profit or loss. It provides maximum incentive for
the contractor to control costs and perform effectively and
imposes a minimum administrative burden upon the contracting
parties.
(2) Cost-Reimbursement Type Contract (FAR 16.301-1 & 2).
This type of contract provides for payment of allowable incurred
costs to the extent prescribed in the contract. These contracts
establish an estimate of total cost for the purpose of obligating
funds and establishing a ceiling that the contractor may not
exceed (except at its own risk) without the approval of the
contracting officer. Cost-reimbursable contracts are suitable
for use only when uncertainties involved in contract performance
do not permit costs to be established with sufficient accuracy to
use any type of fixed-price contract.
(3) Letter Contracts (FAR 16.603). A letter contract is
a written preliminary contractual instrument that authorizes an
A-E to begin work immediately. Final terms of the contract must
ordinarily be definitized within 180 calendar days after contract
award. The negotiated agreement is then awarded as a
modification to the letter contract, and is referred to as
contract definitization.
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The letter contract stipulates a not-to-exceed amount, and limits
the amount that may be expended before definitization to no more
than 40% of this amount. The not-to-exceed amount is determined
by developing a Government cost estimate. The terms of the
letter contract also limit the maximum liability of the
Government in case of termination to 50% of the not-to-exceed
amount. A letter contract may only be used when both of the
following conditions are met:
(a) the negotiation of a definitive or defined scope of
work and price is not possible in sufficient time to meet the
Governments requirements, and
(b) the Governments interests demand that the A-E be
given a binding commitment so contract performance can begin
immediately.
Advance authority to utilize a letter contract must be obtained
from HQUSACE. A request for authority to award a letter
contract, in any amount, must include complete justification
(except certain emergency/disaster situations), and shall be
staffed through technical and legal elements, and submitted to
HQUSACE through contracting channels. It is also important to
note that the scope of work of a letter contract may not be
modified after work has begun, without HQUSACE approval.
(4) Indefinite Delivery Contracts (AFARS 36.602). This
type of contract is the primary means through which a district
can support an installation. This type of contract is used when
there is recurring demand for an item, but the timing and/or
extent of the demand are not certain. The contract establishes
all terms that are sure; however, orders are not placed until the
need arises. Since this type of contract is such an important
asset to an installation support program, an explanation of the
selection, award and administration process is included in this
section. And, since the contract can be administered by either
the district or the installation, procedures for each method are
addressed.
b. The Selection and Award of an Indefinite Delivery
Contract ( with contract administration by the installation).
(1) The installation engineer formally requests that the
district obtain an indefinite delivery contract for accomplishing
architect-engineer services. The requesting letter details the
type of service required: civil, electrical, mechanical,
structural, architectural, environmental, life safety, sanitary,
or a combination thereof.
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The letter must also state who the proposed COR/ACOR will be.
Funds to cover district costs for preparation, negotiation and
award of the basic contract must also be provided with the
initial request. In most cases the district has established a
flat rate fee for this acquisition service.
(2) Upon receipt of an installations request, the
district develops a synopsis for publication in the Commerce
Business Daily (CBD). The synopsis appears in the CBD for one
day and must allow at least 30 calendar days for interested A-E
firms to submit a Standard Form 255 depicting their
qualifications, experience and desire to be considered for the
contract.
(3) The district will then invite the installation to
nominate two individuals for appointment to the pre-selection and
selection boards. Two individuals are necessary since the same
person cannot serve on both boards.
(4) When the 30-day period has expired the district will
convene a pre-selection board to review all SF 255's and other
information available on the firms who responded to the synopsis.
This board will disqualify or eliminate firms not meeting the
minimum qualifications needed or contract requirements specified
in the CBD.
(5) The selection board will further evaluate the firms
recommended by the pre-selection board and will rank the top
firms for a negotiating order.
of the
rates,
direct
of the
(6) Negotiate with the A-E or A-E's in the approved order
selection board's preference to establish direct salary
general and administrative (G&A) overhead and overhead on
labor that the firm intends to utilize throughout the life
contract.
(7) The contract includes a provision that the Government
obligates itself for no less than $2,500 during the life of the
contract, therefore the installation must ensure such funds are
available at the district prior to the anticipated award date.
(8) If negotiations are successful and the minimum $2,500
is on hand the indefinite delivery contract may be awarded.
(9) Upon award, the Contracting Officer signs a letter
designating the installation engineer, the Deputy or Chief,
Engineering Plans and Services Division as the contracting
officer's representative (COR) for the contract.
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Contracting officer authority is retained by the district
however, administrative contracting authority can be transferred
to the installation Directorate of Contracting. A copy of the
contract and record of negotiations is furnished the COR, and
procedures are established for processing and executing delivery
orders.
(10) In accordance with ER 715-1-15, steps 1 through 8
above will be accomplished in approximately 109 calendar days for
a standard indefinite delivery contract without an option year.
c. Selection and Award of an Indefinite Delivery Contract
(with contract administration by the district). The procedures
are the same except that:
(1) The letter authorizing the selection is generated
within the district based upon anticipated or known requirements
which will be requested of the district.
(2) Inviting installation representatives to participate
on the selecting boards may be more complex if the A-E is to be
utilized at a number of installations.
(3) The $2,500 necessary for contract award may not be
available until an actual request for support is received from a
supported installation.
(4)
COR responsibilities are retained at the district.
d. Administration of Delivery Orders.
are as follows:
Basic procedures
(1) When a need arises the COR or a project manager
contacts the A-E after determination is made that the service can
be accomplished by delivery order. A meeting is scheduled, at
the project site, to clarify or establish a statement of work.
This meeting should be attended by the project manager, the using
agency or units, the installation representative and someone from
the area/resident engineer office.
(2) Design criteria are furnished to the A-E, including
user-generated requirements. The most important thing to be
provided at this time is a complete project scope of work and the
description of A-E services to be performed.
(3) A detailed record is made of the pre-design
conference. The A-E either prepares or signs this record
indicating that the scope of the proposed contract is understood
and necessary design criteria have been received.
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(4) A Government cost estimate is prepared in preparation
for price negotiations between the district and the A-E. The
Government estimate is prepared using the detailed analysis
method. A profit of between 7% and 15% is allowed the A-E as
part of the estimate. Primary design costs are limited by law to
6% or less of the estimated project cost.
(5) The A-E is requested to submit a proposal and
negotiations are conducted between the Government and the A-E in
accordance with district procedures.
(6) Pre-negotiation and post-negotiation Business
Clearance Memoranda (BCM) are required for contracts over
$100,000 and sometimes utilized for individual delivery orders.
Together, they incorporate a record of the decisions, actions,
and approvals that are involved in a negotiated procurement
action.
(7) When negotiations have been successfully concluded
and all necessary documents have been signed, a delivery order is
prepared at the district and signed by the A-E and then the
contracting officer. When the fully executed contract is
transmitted to the A-E, a notice to proceed with the work is
given.
6-2.
Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines.
a. Public Law 92-582, 92nd Congress, H.R.
72, The Brooks Bill.
12807, 27 Oct
b. Public Law 87-653, Truth in Negotiation Act, as
modified by Public Law 98-369, The Competition in Contracting Act
of 1984.
c. Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) 6.303-2, 14.208,
14.209, 15.804, 15.805, 15.808, 16.403-2, 16.2, 16.202, 16.603,
16.702, 16.703, 31.105, 31.2, 31.205-46, 36.605, 43.101, 43.103,
52.214, 52.236-23, 52.243, 53.246, 53.301-308, 5.3.
d. DoD Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplements (DFARS)
15.902, 16.101, 36.601, 36.602, 36.604, 36.605, 36.606.
e. Army Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (AFARS)
36.602-90.
f. Engineer Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement
(EFARS) 36.602-2, 36.602-90.
g.
ER 715-1-10, A-E Responsibility Management Program.
h. ER 715-1-15, Time Standards for the Architect-Engineer
Acquisition Process, 15 February 1991.
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6-3.
Who Provides These Services.
For architect-engineer services, the Installation Support
Coordinator will forward the installations request to either the
Contracting Division or to the A-E Contract Support or Engineer
Support Section of the Engineering or Programs and Project
Management Division. In all cases, the Installation Support
Coordinator will receive, coordinate and monitor the
installations request.
6-4.
How To Obtain These Services.
Use an Installation Support Request Form, or formal letter
to the district Installation Support Coordinator to initiate a
request for service. The installation should be prepared to
supply the following:
a. A letter or Installation Support Request Form prepared
in general accordance with the sample format (Figure 6-1) at the
last page of this chapter which gives a narrative summary of what
professional services and qualifications are required. Typical
or standard selection factors are as follows:
(1) Professional qualifications necessary for
satisfactory performance of required services.
(2) Specialized experience and technical competence in
the type of work required.
(3)
Capacity to accomplish the work in the required time.
(4) Past performance on contracts with Government
agencies in terms of cost control, quality of work and compliance
with performance schedules.
(5) Location in the general geographic area of the
project and knowledge of the locality.
(6)
Volume of work previously awarded to the firm by DoD.
b. Who the installation desires to serve as COR and a
statement of their qualifications, if not previously furnished.
c. Whether the installation engineer wishes to
participate on the pre-selection and selection boards, and if so,
who the representatives will be.
d.
Document transmitting funds to the district office.
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6-5.
Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish the Service.
a. Funding. Funding is required for each of the three
phases of the indefinite delivery contract cycle. The three
phases are: the selection process, contract award, and processing
and award of individual delivery orders. Funding required at
each phase is as follows:
(1) The selection process. When an installation requests
that a district select an indefinite delivery contract for
exclusive use by an installation, the district charges a fee to
cover all costs associated with the selection process. This fee
funds all activities from receipt of the installation's request,
to contract award. This fee typically ranges from $4,000 to
$6,000.
(2) Contract award. Once the selection process is
complete and approved for award, $2,500 is required to
obligate/award the basic contract. These funds cover the
Government commitment that the selected A-E will receive, as a
minimum, $2,500 throughout the life of the contract. The
installation normally provides these funds by a DA Form 2544 or a
MIPR.
(3) Processing and award of individual delivery orders.
The district also charges a fee to process/award each individual
delivery order. This fee varies significantly from district to
district depending upon the degree of assistance/support
requested by the installation. District assistance can be simply
staffing a delivery order (negotiated, packaged and funded by the
installation) to the district Contracting Officer for signature.
In some cases districts assist in project scope development
and/or negotiations, and prepare delivery order packages for
staffing and award. Therefore, this processing/award fee may
range from $200 to $1,500 per delivery order.
b. Time. Selection time for a single year, $400,000
maximum fee indefinite delivery order contract averages four
months. Selections with unique requirements, or those requiring
an audit, will take more time. Detailed timelines for indefinite
delivery and other contract types are contained in ER 715-1-15.
6-6.
Examples of Architect-Engineer Support Services.
Table 6-1 defines the activities and time standards for
the A-E selection process. A sample of how an installation would
request architect-engineer support/selection is depicted in
Figure 6-1.
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Table 6-1.
Maximum Acceptable Time Standards for Indefinite
Delivery A-E Contracts.
Activity
Contract Cost
$500,000
Greater than
$500,000
or less
DUR
ES
LF DUR
ES
LF
(a) (b) (c) (a) (b) (c)
0
1
1
0
1
1
1.
Project Initiation
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Project Scope
0
Criteria Development
2
Acquisition Plan (d)
0
Synopsis
10
CBD Announcement
30
Pre-selection
10
Selection
10
Higher Authority Selection
0
Approval
Security Clearance
0
A-E Selection Notification
5
Criteria Review by A-E
0
Pre-proposal Conference
0
Revised Scope of Work and
0
Project Schedule
Government Estimate
5
A-E Proposal
14
Technical Analysis (e)
2
Audit
0
Pre-negotiation Analysis (e)
2
Pre-BCM Review & Approval (e) 4
Negotiation
7
Funds Certification
2
Negotiation Documentation
5
Post-BCM Review & Approval (e) 5
Final Contract Preparation
9
Award Authorization
0
Contract Award
5
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
1
1
1
1
11
41
51
60
1
60
1
10
40
50
60
60
0
2
0
10
30
10
12
12
1
1
1
1
11
41
51
63
1
74
1
10
40
50
62
74
60
61
65
65
65
60
65
65
65
65
0
5
0
0
0
74
75
79
79
79
74
79
79
79
79
66
66
80
79
82
84
88
95
95
100
95
104
105
79
79
81
79
83
87
94
104
99
104
104
104
109
10
14
2
45
5
6
8
2
5
5
9
0
5
80
80
94
94
139
144
150
158
158
163
158
167
168
89
93
133
138
143
149
157
167
162
167
167
167
172
Notes:
a. Maximum activity duration (DUR) in calendar days.
b. Early Start (ES).
c. Late Finish (LF).
d. An acquisition plan is required only for contracts
with an estimated cost of $5 million or more per annum,
or a total contract value of $15 million or more.
e. This activity is required only for contracts with an
estimated contractual cost exceeding $100,000.
f. This table was extracted from ER 715-1-15.
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Figure 6-1. SAMPLE FORMAT-INSTALLATION SUPPORT REQUEST
INVOLVING A-E CONTRACT SUPPORT
6-9
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CHAPTER 7
ENGINEERING SUPPORT SERVICES
7-1.
Types of Services.
a. Studies and Investigations. Districts are involved in
special studies and investigations as varied as the imagination
of the requestor. Examples are: seismic and structural analyses,
building and land utilization studies, economic payback studies
for the Energy Conservation Investment Program, various
installation utilities systems studies and plans, electrical
protective system studies, electric power load studies, corrosion
control inspections and surveys, the Energy Engineering Analysis
Program (EEAP), materials testing and evaluation, evaluation of
insulation values in various facilities, soils and foundation
analyses, hydraulics and hydrological studies of aquifers,
airfield aircraft parking and hardstand studies, Commercial
Activities Studies for certain DEH functions, component
inspection for family housing, and scope of work development for
any type of project.
b. Dam and Bridge Inspection. A special capability is
the evaluation of dams and bridges, regardless of the age of the
structure or background regarding its design or construction.
c. Design. USACE districts are known for their mission
as the design and construction agent for Military Construction,
Army (MCA), Military Construction, Air Force (MCAF), Military
Construction, Army Reserve (MCAR), Defense Logistics Agency (DLA)
and industrial projects for the installations within their
geographic area of responsibility. However, in addition to these
programs, Installation Support is also a USACE mission assigned
by HQDA (AR 420-10 and AR 10-87). Under the Installation Support
Program, districts support the installation engineer in the
execution of reimbursable funded programs such as Operations and
Maintenance, Nonappropriated Fund, Family Housing, Industrial
appropriations, and any other project or requirement that the
installation identifies to the district. The district can
provide scope development, design, contracting and construction
services (partial or all) for these type projects. The district
must understand the importance of each installation project,
their time and cost sensitivity, and respond quickly to provide
the type of service requested. The programming, project
initiation process, and design cycle work flow for a reimbursable
project varies greatly from that utilized for MILCON projects. A
comparison of Reimbursable vs. MILCON procedures is shown on the
next three pages in Figure 7-1 through Figure 7-9.
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PROJECT DEVELOPMENT FLOW DIAGRAMS FOR ARMY AND AIR FORCE MILCON
AND REIMBURSABLE FUNDED PROJECTS
Figure 7-3.
Reimbursable Funded Project Development
7-2
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DESIGN INITIATION DOCUMENTATION FOR ARMY AND AIR FORCE MILCON
AND REIMBURSABLE FUNDED PROJECTS
Figure 7-6.
Reimbursable Funded Project Documentation
7-3
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LINES OF COMMUNICATION FOR ARMY AND AIR FORCE MILCON
AND REIMBURSABLE FUNDED PROJECTS
Figure 7-9.
Lines of Communication - Reimbursable Funded
Project Design and Construction
7-4
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d. Reviews. In addition to the reviews normally
conducted on work supervised by the district, the district can
assist with the review of locally prepared components of the
installation master plan/base comprehensive plan and mobilization
master plan, annual work plan, land management plan, DD forms
1391, project development brochures and project definition
documents, installation-prepared designs, surveys, studies to
include value engineering studies, procurement actions relating
to utility services, construction contracting documents and
construction management activities.
e. Surveying. Districts can accomplish topographical
mapping, field engineering, geodetic and plane surveys, profiles
and cross sections, and cadastral surveys. Each military
construction project normally requires these data to ensure the
proper relationship between existing and new construction
Installations can save both time and money by using survey data
obtained as part of major construction projects or Operations and
Maintenance funded projects.
f. Interior Design Services. A relatively new district
service is interior design. This service may be available from
the direct support district, or from the center of expertise for
interior design at the Omaha District. Interior design is a part
of the Army Communities of Excellence Program and the district
can provide the installation and its customers with innovative
ideas for rehabilitating existing space and planning attractive
interiors in new facilities.
g. Cost Engineering. Districts can prepare estimates for
construction programming documents, pre-concept control data,
various estimates as design proceeds, and current working
estimates for construction projects.
h. Specifications. Districts can also prepare
construction specifications for major construction projects and
for reimbursable funded projects. Techniques such as Simplified
Design Methods and Abridged Corps of Engineer Guide
Specifications (ACEGS) were recently developed to streamline and
reduce the cost for a district to prepare designs for
reimbursable funded project.
i. Forensic Engineering. Many installations have one or
more facilities suffering from conditions such as progressively
cracking walls, abnormal foundation settlement, or expansion and
contraction causing roof leaks. Installations should consider
analyzing such items to properly fix the problem or avoid them in
the design of alteration projects or constructing new facilities.
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j. Value Engineering (VE). Millions of dollars are saved
yearly by VE studies that result in alternative construction
techniques and state of the art materials. The District has a
value engineering staff that performs VE studies of projects and
acts as a collection point on new and innovative means of
performing construction. Some VE studies are performed by A-E
firms. Mandatory VE review of military construction projects of
$2,000,000 and over is a current requirement. This service is
available to your installation and should be included early in
the design process, particularly if funding problems exist.
k. Technical Criteria. The District has the capability
to provide information on technical criteria (commercial, local,
federal, DOD, Army, Air Force, professional society/association,
etc.) to you and your installation customers. A new compact disk
read only-memory (CD-ROM) system for storage and retrieval of
technical criteria is now available at the District office, and
is also available for subscription by installation design
personnel.
7-2.
Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines.
An abbreviated list of guidelines applicable to
engineering support services is presented as follows:
a.
AR 5-3, Installation Management and Organization.
b.
AR 210-50, Family Housing Management.
c. AR 415-15, Military Construction, Army (MCA) Program
Development.
d. AR 420-10, Management of Installation Directorates of
Engineering and Housing.
e. DA Pam 210-3, Commander's Handbook for Installation
and Activity Consolidations, Realignments, Reductions and
Closures.
f. DA Pam 420-8, Facilities Engineering Management
Handbook.
g. DA Pam 420-9, Installation Commander's Executive Guide
to Directorate of Engineering and Housing Operations.
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7-3.
Who Provides These Services.
For engineering support services, the district
Installation Support Coordinator will forward the installations
request to either the Technical Engineering Division or to the
Project Management Branch of the Engineering/Programs and Project
Management Division. In all cases, the Installation Support
Coordinator will receive, coordinate and monitor the installation
request.
7-4.
How To Obtain These Services.
Use an Installation Support Request Form, call or write to
the district Installation Support coordinator to initiate a
request for service. The installation should be prepared to
supply the following:
a. An Installation Support Request Form. This form gives
a narrative summary of work or services required. After the
support request is evaluated:
b.
service.
7-5.
Copies of installation records needed to provide the
c.
Applicable documents, correspondence, or regulations.
d.
Document transmitting funds to the district office.
Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish the Service.
a. The cost and time to accomplish engineering services
vary significantly based upon the scope of the request.
Therefore, a district is unable to publish fixed cost or timeline
data that will accurately apply to each service that an
installation could request. However, some typical or average
costs (Figure 7-10) and timelines (Figure 7-11 through Figure 714) for some of the more traditional activities are presented in
the figures that follow. These examples will be beneficial to
the installation as guideline, or order of magnitude costs for
planning or programming purposes.
7-7
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Figure 7-10.
Typical Reimbursable Project Execution Costs.
7-8
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Other example cost guidelines for non-design related engineering
services are as follows:
TASK OR ITEM OF WORK
APPROX. COST
Establish an Indefinite Delivery A-E Contract.
$ 5,000
Processing cost per Delivery Order.
$
Payback analysis for ECIP project.
$ 5,000
Structural analysis for one floor
of permanent building.
$10,000
Provide drainage requirements for creek.
$ 5,000
Perform foundation analysis for building site.
$10,000
Electrical distribution analysis and plan
for an installation.
500
$100,000
b. Funding for engineering services is normally
reimbursable, from the installation to the district, except in
the case of design for military construction projects and special
programs, e.g., ECIP, Environmental Audit Baselines. If
centralized, nonreimbursable program funds are available from
HQUSACE, the Installation Support Coordinator will attempt to
utilize these where appropriate.
c. Performance time for engineering services is, to a
large extent, governed by procurement time. Time to award a
contract for A-E services is approximately 120 days, if a DCAA
audit is not required. Since the majority of the installation
support requests involve reimbursable funded projects, with
single year funding, this 120-day selection time could jeopardize
successful project completion in a timely manner. Therefore,
each district must ensure that adequate indefinite delivery type
contracts are on-hand, at the district, to handle potential
installation requests. The time to accomplish an engineering
study or design after the A-E has been selected can vary from a
month or less for a small project to over a year for a complex
study or design. Time required for engineering studies, surveys,
tests and evaluation is somewhat more flexible, depending on the
scope of the requirement.
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In any case, the installation must be assured that the district
will initiate action on each request in a timely manner and that
any necessary visits from those who will provide the service will
occur within ten working days after a request is received at the
district.
d. Time Required for Delivery of Engineering Services.
Installations should be encouraged to submit requests for design
services for Operation and Maintenance or reimbursable funded
projects as soon as a firm requirement exists and funds are
available. Ideally, design projects requiring year end
construction contract award should be submitted to the district
by the fourth quarter of the previous fiscal year, or the start
of fiscal year when construction contract award is required.
However, most districts are, as an exception to policy, able to
handle previously unknown requirements on a case by case basis
when received later in the fiscal year. Other requests for
engineering services, such as studies and investigations, are
usually not so time-critical because they have shorter
acquisition lead times or do not require follow-on construction
contract award at year end.
7-6.
Examples of Engineering Support Services.
a. Depicting examples of typical engineering support
services could be a boundless task. The type of services
requested by installations should be as broad as the imagination
of the requestor. Therefore, instead of presenting examples of
engineer support requests at the end of this chapter, the
processes associated with accomplishing such requests are
presented. Knowledge of these processes will assist the
installation engineers in their planning efforts and emphasize
their role in the process the district takes to complete their
requested support action.
b. A guide depicting when the installations should
request district engineering support requests, as well as
timelines for a typical study, design and the solicitation for
construction contract award process, are as follows.
7-10
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31 Jan 92
Figure 7-11.
Target Dates for Installation Submission of
Engineering Support Requests.
7-11
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31 Jan 92
CHAPTER 8
CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
8-1.
Types of Services.
a. The primary functions of the district Construction
Division are quality assurance, contract administration, funds
control, and construction project management. The Chief,
Construction Division supervises the district construction
activities. This individual advises contracting officers on
construction management matters and is directly responsible to
the district commander for management of assigned construction
programs (including the quality, cost and timeliness of the
facilities constructed) and for the performance and operation of
designated facilities until they are formally accepted by the
user.
b. The area or resident engineer is charged with
administering construction contracts and is in daily contact with
the contractor. This individual is formally appointed by the
contracting officer as the administrative contracting officer
(ACO) with specific authorities and monetary limitations for each
contract administered by that office.
c. The construction manager, located in the construction
division at the district office, provides the interface between
the district engineering division, the construction division, the
life cycle project manager, and the area/resident engineer and
the district office.
d. Working together, the above mentioned team members
have the primary responsibility of accomplishing the following
activities in support of an installation's construction
requirement:
(1) Quality Assurance. This function involves
enforcement of the technical provisions and quality control
provisions of the contract. The Corps Quality Assurance/Quality
Control system is described in ER 1180-1-6.
(2) Quality Assurance for Hazardous and Toxic Waste
Program. This type of quality assurance differs technically from
the provisions found in a design and construction contract.
Presently, some districts obtain the assistance of Omaha District
(a USACE Center of Expertise for HTW projects) to provide these
services.
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(3) Supervision and Administration During Construction.
Supervision and administration are provided by the area/resident
engineer and district construction project manager in accordance
with the relationship described above.
(4) Warranties. ER 415-345-38, Construction Transfer and
Warranties, prescribes procedures for the transfer of completed
construction to the installation and for the implementation of
warranties. It also requires the district to correct design
defects discovered by the installation engineer after transfer by
the most expedient means. Design defects discovered in this
manner, or as a result of periodic joint warranty inspections
performed at four months and nine months after transfer, are
recorded and entered in the Construction Evaluation Reporting
System (CERS).
(5) Construction Contractor Performance Evaluation. The
Corps utilizes a systematic approach to evaluating, recording and
reporting construction contractor performance. The objective of
this process is to avoid doing business with nonresponsible
contractors. The system is known as the Construction Contractor
Appraisal Support System (CCASS). Both interim and final
performance evaluations are entered into the system and the
resultant information is used to screen bidders on current and
future construction solicitations.
(6) Architect-Engineer Title II Services. An A-E
contract may be structured to contain an option for "Title II"
services. These services provide for assistance by the A-E to
the government during construction and may include visits to the
construction site for inspection of the work or other assistance,
review of shop drawings, and other contract submittals, source
inspection and test witnessing at a supplier's plant, or
engineering and design during construction. The construction
manager will usually be the design project manager's point of
contact for the exercise of the contract option, funding,
monitoring of A-E performance, and payment. Very early
coordination is required during contract development to include
the Title II option and ensure that the services needed by the
construction supervisor will be provided.
(7) Architect-Engineer Responsibilities. The degree of
reliance on the A-E to check their designs and assure a quality
job has necessarily increased in recent years. The A-E is paid
to do a job and profit is provided with due consideration for
risk.
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Therefore, a professional and impartial review by district
engineering division personnel and the design project manager is
accomplished to determine the quality of the A-E's work, the
existence of any design deficiencies, and if there is any A-E
liability involved. (NOTE: ER 715-1-10 establishes a systematic
and formalized approach to investigating and pursuing A-E
liability. This process improves future designs by causing
better A-E quality assurance procedures implementation during the
design process.)
(8) Change Orders. During construction, the need for a
change to the project may occur. There are two principal types
of change order requests. The first is called "operability"
changes, which are unavoidable changes that are required to
construct a complete and operable facility. Such changes
originate from unforeseen factors discovered during
the design and/or construction of the project. The other type of
change order request is called "user originated," which is an
elective or enhancement nature change, as opposed to an
operability necessity, that are originated at the installation or
Major Command. Changes relating to incorporation of Major
Command, installation, or using organization criteria, mission
changes, or facility use requirements are considered as user
originated changes.
(9) Figure 8-1 depicts some of the detailed tasks
involved in the life cycle of the construction contract
management process.
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Figure 8-1.
Flow Chart for
Construction Management
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8-2.
Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines.
a. Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) 6.303-2, 14.208,
14.209, 15.804, 15.805, 15.808, 16.403-2, 16.2, 16.202, 16.603,
16.702, 16.703, 31.105,31.2, 36.605, 43.101, 43.103, 52.214,
52.236-23, 52.243, 53.246, 53.301-308, 5.3.
b. DoD Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplements (DFARS)
15.902, 16.101, 36.601, 36.602, 36.604, 36.605, 36.606.
c.
1.691-3.
Army Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (AFARS)
d. Engineer Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement
(EFARS) 15.808, 36.605/90, 36.606/95, part 43.
e. AR 415-20, Military Construction Program
Management.
f.
8-3.
ER 715-1-10, A-E Responsibility Management Program.
Who Provides These Services.
For construction management support services, the district
Installation Support Coordinator will forward the installation
request either to the Construction Division or to the local area
or resident engineer's office. In all cases, the Installation
Support Coordinator will receive, coordinate and monitor the
installation request.
8-4.
How To Obtain These Services.
Use an Installation Support Request Form, or call or write
to the district Installation Support coordinator to initiate a
request for service, or contact the local area or resident
engineer office. The installation should be prepared to supply
the following:
a. An Installation Support Request Form prepared in
general accordance with the sample format (Figure 8-3) at the
last page of this chapter. This form gives a narrative summary of
work or services required.
b.
service.
Copies of installation records needed to provide the
c.
Applicable documents, correspondence, or regulations.
d.
Document transmitting funds to the district office.
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8-5.
Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish the Service.
a. Corps of Engineers districts are unique as an
organizational element of the Federal Government in that they do
not generally receive operating funds from the Federal budget.
Instead, Corps districts and operating divisions are primarily
funded on a project-by-project reimbursable basis. All operating
costs must be supported through "revenues" provided by its
customers for services rendered. Thus, district and operating
divisions operate on a cost distribution concept. Under this
concept, general and/or administrative expenses associated with
day-to-day operations must be equitably distributed to all direct
funded and reimbursable projects.
b. Cost of construction management with the type of the
construction contract (O&M or MILCON). For a MILCON construction
contract, costs run at 6% of the value of the construction
placed. For operations and maintenance/reimbursable funded work
consisting of minor construction and maintenance and repair work
which require many of the same administrative procedures as
larger scale projects, costs run higher. Current rates for O&M
funded work are 8% for CONUS projects and 8.5% for OCONUS. While
construction management funds for MILCON are appropriated by
Congress along with funds for the actual construction, funding of
S&A for reimbursable funded projects is provided by the
installation, major command, or nonappropriated funding source.
c. Supervision and administration (S&A) charges are
levied by the districts and operating divisions on all projects
executed by the Corps. The S&A charge is passed on to the
installation customer in the form of a flat percentage rate and
covers the costs of construction management during the
construction phase of a project. Construction management costs
include efforts of the construction and engineering divisions,
area, resident or field offices, legal, resource management, and
their associated overhead.
d. District efforts are funded by S&A money once the
design has been completed and the construction contractor has
been selected. All S&A monies collected during a fiscal year
must reflect charges on construction work placed during that
fiscal year; S&A funds for work not placed are returned to the
installation and any remaining S&A fee will be charged to the
installation during the following fiscal year. Figure 8-2
provides funding guidelines which may help simplify this process.
With proper planning, installations and districts and eliminate
excessive year-end transfers of large sums of S&A and other funds
required for construction contract management.
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e. Other fees that may be levied for construction
projects include contract fees for providing contracting division
services, fees for (constructability) design reviews by
construction division, contingency amounts to meet unforeseen
contract requirements, and a charge for preparation of as-built
drawings.
f. When to ask for this service and normal duration.
Lead times needed to initiate construction management depend upon
the complexity of the construction contract itself. A general
rule is to allow three months between the time the installation
requests support and the time the district becomes an active
participant in the management of the contract.
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Figure 8-2.
Construction Cost Funding Guidelines.
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8-6.
Examples of Construction Management Services.
a. Examples of the construction management services
available from a USACE district are typically ongoing at any
installation on reimbursable and MILCON work and other types of
construction support activities.
b. A sample of how to obtain construction management
support services appears on the following sample Installation
Support Request Format (Figure 8-3):
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Figure 8-3. SAMPLE FORMAT-INSTALLATION SUPPORT REQUEST
INVOLVING CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT SUPPORT
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CHAPTER 9
SPECIAL SUPPORT SERVICES
9-1.
Contracting.
a. Definition of Contracting Services. The district
contracting division performs the following functions:
(1) Is consultant and principal advisor to the district
commander and other district staff members on all acquisition
policy and procedural matters (except real estate). Is
responsible for district acquisition activities from advance
planning through completion and delivery.
(2) Plans, directs and exercises staff supervision over
contracting functions of the district. Provides for full and
open competition, in accordance with the Competition in
Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984, through use of competitive
procedures.
(3) Assists Competition Advocate to achieve compliance
with CICA.
(4) Provides staff surveillance over the contract
administration function for the district to assure compliance
with the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), DFARS, AFARS,
EFARS, and other pertinent laws and regulations, and the terms
and conditions of contracts and purchase orders. This function
does not include management of those aspects of contract
administration which involve supervision, inspection, and review
of contractor performance.
(5) Interprets and implements higher authority decisions
and directives that affect the contracting and purchasing
functional areas and develops new or revised procedures to assure
compliance.
(6) Participates in advance procurement planning of
district requirements, providing expertise in such areas as the
breakout of the requirements, contract type, and method of
procurement. Maximizes competition. On actions other than full
and open competition, prepares appropriate justification and
approval (J&A) documents.
(7) Maintains liaison with industry and government
agencies on contracting matters.
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(8) Reviews qualifications and prepares nominations for
appointment of Contracting Officers, Administrative Contracting
Officers, Contracting Officer Representatives, and Ordering
Officers.
(9) Maintains the official contract files (except those
pertaining to real estate). Ensures that documentation is
complete. Advises pertinent district elements of deficiencies
and monitors corrective actions.
(10) Reports on volume and type of contracting actions
and furnishes other data on contracting activities. Analyzes
trends.
(11) Manages the districts small and small disadvantaged
business programs, as well as other socioeconomic programs
related to contracting.
(12) Reviews audit and other investigative reports
relating to contracting.
(13)
System.
Manages the Defense Priorities and Allocation
(14) Manages specific operational responsibilities of the
Contracting Office, in coordination with other elements in the
district, including:
(a) Maintains source selection lists; prepares and issues
bid invitations and requests for proposals (or, where done by
others, reviews for consistency with policy and for regulatory
compliance), and receives, opens, and abstracts bids and
proposals.
(b) Conducts evaluation process to determine lowest
responsive and responsible bidder when the sealed bid procedure
is used; participates on the team when evaluating a negotiated
procurement.
(c) Prepares formal contracting documents, issues notices
of award and notices to proceed. Issues contracting documents
related to personal property sales in support of logistics
management function.
(d)
Conducts pre-award surveys and evaluations thereof.
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(e) Reviews mistakes in bid and protest of award cases in
coordination with Office of Counsel and recommends appropriate
action to contracting officer. Develops and formalizes the
documentation for record file or submission to higher authority.
(f) Prepares contracting officer's report in response to
protests of award when requested by HQUSACE.
(g) Ensures that the official contract documentation is
complete and that an accountability trail facilitates review of
contract modifications. Conducts post-award reviews of
modifications.
(h) Performs or arranges for the performance of
inspection and acceptance of all materials, supplies and
equipment purchased or transferred by the Government, except for
materials and equipment to be incorporated into construction
projects. Inspections requiring technical skills will be
performed by appropriate staff divisions. Assigns, furnishes
detailed instructions for, and monitors inspection when it is
determined that points-of-origin inspection is necessary and to
be accomplished by other districts and DoD agents. Reviews
contract administration actions taken or performed by other
elements of the district to assure compliance with applicable
law, regulations, and policies, and provides recommendations to
the commander for improvements and corrections in district
contract administration procedures.
b. Types of Contracts. A wide selection of contract
types is available to provide the needed flexibility in acquiring
the large variety and volume of supplies and services required.
Contract types vary according to (1) the degree and timing of the
responsibility assumed by the contractor for the cost of
performance and (2) the amount and nature of the profit incentive
offered to the contractor for achieving or exceeding specified
standards or goals. The contract types are grouped into two
broad categories: fixed-price contracts and cost-reimbursement
contracts. The specific contract types range from firm-fixedprice, in which the contractor has full responsibility for the
performance costs and resulting profit (or loss), to cost-plusfixed-fee, in which the contractor has minimal responsibility for
the performance costs and the negotiated fee (profit) is fixed.
In between are the various incentive contracts, in which the
contractor's responsibility for the performance costs and the
profit or fee incentives offered are tailored to the
uncertainties involved in contract performance.
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Some of the special categories of contracts extensively used by
districts in support of the installation are:
(1)
Architect-Engineer (A-E) contracts.
(2) Job Order Contract (JOC). A competitively awarded
firm fixed price, indefinite quantity contract which consists of
a collection of detailed task specifications encompassing most
aspects of facilities engineering construction work. For each of
the tasks listed in the contract, a unit of measure and a
corresponding unit price are included. Offerors are required to
propose two coefficients or multipliers (one for normal working
hours and one for other than normal working hours). During
contract execution the unit price listed in the contract is
multiplied by the appropriate coefficient to determine the actual
price of that item. Each job order required by the DEH is broken
down into these individual tasks of work, and a total price is
developed based upon the government unit price and the
contractor's multiplier(s). After agreement, the DEH or the
supporting USACE district issues a delivery order for performance
of the work. The Individual Job Order Request (IJO) (DA Form
4283) prepared by the facilities occupant at the supported
installation normally serves as the basis for initiating the
delivery order.
(3) Small Purchase. Small purchase procedures are used
to make purchases of $25,000 or less. Under the small purchase
system, procurement is normally accomplished after oral or
written solicitation.
(4) Services Contracts. The full range of service
contracting support is available from the district contracting
division.
(5) Basic Ordering Agreements. These are preliminary
agreements, not enforceable contracts. They merely define the
general provisions that will apply when a contract is awarded at
a future date. Thus, they are time savers in dealing with
suppliers or firms on a recurring basis. However, competition is
required in accordance with FAR 13.106 and synopsis is required
in accordance with FAR 5.2.
(6) Supply Contracting. The full range of supply
contracting is also available from the district contracting
division.
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(7) Construction Contracts. The award of a construction
contract can follow varied procurement procedures depending upon
the scope, complexity or type of requirement. Invitation for
Bids (IFB), Request for Proposals (RFP), One Step, Two Step,
Design-Build/Turnkey, JOC and Small Purchase are some of the
methods for obtaining a construction contract award. Time
requirements for the award of a construction contract, using
Invitation for Bid procedures, are presented in figure 7-14 of
chapter 7.
(8) Laboratory and Testing Services. Professional
laboratory and testing support is obtained by means of a service
or A-E contract as described previously.
(9) Surveying. Surveying services are procured in a
manner similar to the A-E contracting procedure described
previously.
c. Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines for Contracting.
Applicable portions of the following regulations:
(1)
Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR).
(2)
(DFARS).
DoD Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplements
(3)
(AFARS).
Army Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement
(4)
(EFARS).
Engineer Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement
d. How to Obtain These Services. District contracting
support is normally provided only in conjunction with engineering
or construction-related support. The district Installation
Support coordinator is the first point of contact when requesting
procurement-related services. Contract management for
construction projects is handled by the construction division,
through the construction manager at the district office and by
area and resident engineer offices. The majority of other
contract management functions are handled by the district
contracting division. The Installation Support Coordinator will
direct all requests for support to the appropriate action office.
e. When to Ask for this Service and Normal Duration.
Procurement-related support should be requested when requirements
are first known. Procurement is heavily regulated, so early
involvement by the district is important.
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f. Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish Contract
Related Support Services. Some typical cost guidelines and
timelines for accomplishing contracting activities associated
with the A-E selection process and the construction contract
advertisement process are presented in chapters 6 and 7 of this
pamphlet. The cost and time for other types of contracting
support are determined based upon the scope and complexity of the
service requested by the installation. In general, contracting
activities in conjunction with MILCON actions are funded through
the MILCON action, while reimbursable actions are funded by the
installation or MACOM.
9-2. Legal. District legal services are provided in conjunction
with engineering, environmental, planning or construction
services purchased from the district. Legal services are not
normally provided separately from these district support
services.
9-3.
Public Affairs.
a. Definition of Services. The district Public Affairs
Office (PAO) provides the following services:
(1) Publicly communicates the policies and viewpoints of
the district on matters pertaining to the work of USACE and is
the primary spokesperson to the news media. Other members of the
staff may be called upon by the PAO to provide technical
information to the media.
(2) Advises the district commander and key staff of
public affairs matters.
(3) Maintains effective relations with news media and
with organized groups who use information about USACE activities
or who plan information programs. Responds to news media and
public inquiries regarding USACE programs, activities, and
associated issues.
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(4) Researches, writes, edits, and disseminates news and
feature stories for release to media. Arranges for Corps of
Engineers speakers to interested groups, serves as liaison with
speakers, and arranges for preparation and editing of
manuscripts. Coordinates the Corps of Engineers Writer's
Assistance Program.
(5) Arranges/coordinates media interviews for the
district commander, deputy commander and key staff members.
(6) Coordinates and supervises public displays and
exhibits portraying USACE activities.
(7) Plans, coordinates, and supervises production and
dissemination of public and command information materials such as
brochures, pamphlets, newspapers, and information bulletins; and
audio-visual products, including slide, videotape, and motion
picture presentations for internal and external publics.
(8) Serves as point of contact for civilian aides to the
Secretary of the Army Program.
(9) Maintains liaison with other federal, state, and
local
agency public affairs activities and coordinates public affairs
efforts among affected agencies, as appropriate.
b. Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines for Public
Affairs. Public affair offices are organized and operate under
the ER 10-1-3, Organizations and Functions, Divisions and
Districts.
c. How to Obtain These Services. Use an Installation
Support Request Form, call or write the local Installation
Support Coordinator to initiate a request for service. The
audiovisual and publications branches of the Office of Public
Affairs will provide most of the services requested. In some
instances, the district will coordinate a request through the
public affairs offices at their division or at HQUSACE.
The installation should first approach their own Public Affairs
Office to determine if the service can be accomplished locally.
After coordination with the local PAO, and determining that
district support is necessary, the installation should supply the
following with their request to the district:
(1) An Installation Support Request Form which gives a
narrative summary of work or services required.
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(2) Copies of installation records, documents or
correspondence needed to provide the service.
(3)
d.
Document transmitting funds to the district office.
Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish the Service.
(1) Funding. Installation reimbursement is the normal
means of funding these services. Costs vary depending upon the
service requested. For example, an article for publication in a
command information newspaper may cost $1,500.00; a professional
quality slide show about an installation may cost $3,000.00 to
$5,000.00, while a professionally narrated and filmed videotape
will cost an average of $1,500.00 - $2,000.00 per minute.
Editorial or composition service costs approximately $35 per
hour., which means that editing an article written by a
installation staff member may cost between $300.00 and $500.00,
and preparing an article based simply on an installation's input
may cost $1,500.00 to $2,000.00.
(2) Time Requirements. The district can respond
immediately upon notification by the Installation Support
Coordinator. Lead times for several of our services are listed
as follows:
(a) Develop and publish article in the district
newspaper--three months.
(b) Create and edit videotape about an installation--four
to six months.
© Create and edit slide presentation about an
installation--two to three months.
(d) Conduct public attitude evaluation regarding a
proposed action--two to three months.
(e) Prepare and disseminate a news release about an
installation (after clearance by the local public affairs
officer)--one to five working days.
(f) Coordinate a speaking request for appearance by the
District Commander--one to three working days.
(g) Coordinate a speaking request for a Division or
HQUSACE official--five to ten working days.
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(h) Develop and publish an article in the "Engineer
Update" or "DEH Digest" for an installation--two to three months.
9-4.
Safety and Occupational Health.
a. Definition of Services. The district Safety and
Occupational Health Office implements policy and procedure, and
provides reviewing, inspecting and consulting service regarding
safety, industrial hygiene and occupational health. Listed below
are some of the specific services the Safety and Occupational
Health Office provides:
(1) Supervises and directs the USACE safety program
within the district, in accordance with policies and objectives
established in AR 385-10 and Engineer Regulations.
(2) Prescribes and coordinates a balanced program of
safety activities and performs functions set forth in paragraph
5b, AR 385-10.
(3) Advises the district commander of accident potentials
on programs, and requirements for control.
(4) Evaluates the application of safety policy and
criteria in all plans, designs, specifications, operating and
maintenance procedures, and training programs.
(5) Provides advisory safety engineering services for all
district activities in support of accident prevention, including
features of design, occupational health, fire prevention and
protection, radiological safety, and safety in all end use items
or services.
(6) Surveys all activities for compliance with the
policies and objectives of the safety program.
(7) Conducts progressive research into accident problems
and develops corrective controls to prevent future accidents.
(8) Acts as staff advisor on and evaluates the program
for issuing permits to operate motor vehicles and equipment.
(9) Surveys facilities for fire protection, fire
fighting, emergency response, and rescue to establish adequate
and efficient utilization thereof.
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(10) Supervises the accident reporting system and
compiles, analyzes, and disseminates accident data and any
necessary corrective action to be taken.
(11) Performs studies on special safety subjects as
assigned by EM 385-1-1.
(12) Provides accident prevention and safety engineering
guidance and advice to district activities concerning the use of
public recreation areas under the control of USACE, particularly
with respect to water safety considerations.
(13) Provides technical safety training courses, e.g.,
"Design Improvement for Safety."
(14) Provides input to Worker's Compensation and
Continuity of Pay programs.
(15) Develops scopes of work and manages contracts for
industrial hygiene services to include industrial hygiene surveys
and medical advisory services.
b. Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines for Safety and
Occupational Health. There are many Army Regulations and
statutory standards governing safety and occupational health.
The principal documents under which the office operates are AR
385-10 and EM 385-1-1, Corps of Engineers Safety and Health
Requirements Manual.
c. How to Obtain These Services. The installation should
first approach their Safety Office to determine if the service
can be accomplished locally. After coordination with the local
office, and determining that district support is necessary, the
installation should supply the following to the district
Installation Support Coordinator with their request to the
district:
(1) An Installation Support Request Form which gives a
narrative summary of work or services required.
(2) Copies of installation records, documents or
correspondence needed to provide the service.
(3)
Document transmitting funds to the district office.
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d.
Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish the Service.
(1) Funding. Installation reimbursement is the normal
means of meeting the costs of these services. These costs vary
depending upon the service requested. The following costs are
offered only as a guide for an installation to use when budgeting
for district support services:
(a) Occupational Safety and Health Act pre-inspection of
a job site - $2,000.
(b) Industrial hygiene survey, analysis and report on a
DEH complex - $75,000 to $100,000.
© Development of safety plan for DEH CA contract $10,000.
(d) Review plans and specifications for average
maintenance and repair contract - $1,000.
(e)
$1,000.
Conduct two-day construction safety inspection -
(f) Conduct two-day training course on "Design
Improvements for Safety" - $1,500 to $3,000 (includes course
materials).
(2) Time Requirement. An installation should allow one
month between the time that a request for support services is
forwarded to the district and the time that the service needs to
be performed. If a one or two day visit to the installation will
fill the request, a shorter lead time is possible. Requests for
complex services, such as industrial hygiene surveys of entire
activities, will involve procurement of contract services, which
will take as long as six months. Likewise, the duration of
service varies considerably with the type of work requested. A
spot inspection, pre-inspection, or training session can take
only a day or two. A complex industrial hygiene survey can take
as long as 8-10 months before results are analyzed and published.
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9-5.
Training.
a. Definition of Services. The district Employee
Development or Training Branch of the Human Resources Office is
responsible for developing and maintaining programs to meet the
developmental needs of its members and serviced activities.
Examples of these programs include new member orientation and
technical and managerial training. Formal personnel servicing
agreements often enable installations to obtain services,
including training, from a districts Human Resources Office.
However, in the absence of such agreements, installations are
still encouraged to contact the district for information about
Proponent Sponsored Engineer Corps Training (PROSPECT) program
courses. The PROSPECT program offers both classroom and
exportable training courses.
b. Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines for Training. The
Human Resources Office is organized and operates under the policy
of ER 10-1-36. Guidelines for training can best be found in AR
690-400, chapter 410, and ER 350-1-414, PROSPECT Program.
c. How to Obtain These Services. Installations without
their own civilian personnel servicing are encouraged to contact
the district Human Resources Office and develop formal servicing
agreements which include training. Installations with their own
servicing may obtain USACE training by contacting the Corps
Registrar, located within the Huntsville Training Division, at
(205) 722-5821/5822, or DSN: 788-4377/4378.
d.
Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish the Service.
(1) Funding. A district does not charge for assisting
installations with enrollment in Corps of Engineers sponsored
training courses. However, there is a tuition charge for all
students registering for PROSPECT classroom courses. Additional
information about course objectives, tuition and availability is
obtainable from the Huntsville Training Division Registrar.
NOTE: Additionally, a number of video-based exportable training
courses are available for purchase by installations. These are
particularly useful for reducing travel and per diem costs since
the training is sent to the student or installation. Information
about these exportable courses is available from the district
Training Branch or the Huntsville Training Division.
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(2) Time Requirement. Installations are encouraged to
participate in the Corps Annual Training Survey. This survey is
used to assess training requirements and allocate spaces in
PROSPECT courses. Installations wishing to participate should
contact the Huntsville Registrar as soon as possible. After the
survey is completed, installations may request "space available"
allocations throughout the year.
9-6. Information Management Services.
processing and graphics services.
Including automated data
a. Definition of Services. The Information Management
Office (IMO) supports the district Information Mission Area (IMA)
responsibilities. These encompasses automation (including office
automation), voice and data communications, visual information,
records management (including libraries), publications and
printing, and the supporting personnel, equipment, services and
facilities of these functions. The district IMO supports the
U.S. Army Information Systems Command (USAISC) mission by
performing assigned responsibilities and reporting IMA activities
as required through the HQUSACE Directorate of Information
Management (DIM). Figure 9-1 depicts the typical Information
Management Office organization.
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CHIEF,
INFORMATION
MANAGEMENT
OFFICE
INFORMATION
REQUIREMENTS
& PLANNING
BRANCH
INFORMATION
INTEGRATION &
IMPLEMENTATION
BRANCH
INFORMATION
SUPPORT
SERVICES
BRANCH
CUSTOMER
ASSISTANCE
CENTER
Develop
Requirements
Implement
Systems
Information
Management
Operations
Training
Programs
Budgets
Ensure
Integration
Inventories
Executive
Training
Programs
Technical
Evaluation
Printing
Plant
Database
Design
Graphics
Service
Technical
& Legal
Library
Management
Communication
System Design
Communication
Operations
User
Assistance
Preparation
of
Specifications
Mail &
Records
Management
LAN / WAN
Management
Classified
Document
Control
Approval of
Software &
Hardware
Information
Management
Master
Planning
Contingency
Planning
User
Assistance
User
Assistance
Figure 9-1.
User
Assistance
Information Management Office Organization and
Functions.
b. Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines for Information
Management. AR 25-1 and AR 25-3 are key regulations under which
the Information Management Office operates.
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c. How to Obtain These Services. Coordination with the
installation or MACOM Directorate of Information Management
(DOIM) must occur before requests for information management
support services are sent to a district Information Management
Office. The Installation Support coordinator will forward the
installations request to the Information Management Office, which
will actually accomplish or provide the support service. Use an
Installation Support Request Form, call or write to the district
Installation Support coordinator to initiate a request for
service. Installations should be prepared to supply the
following:
(1) An Installation Support Request Form, which gives a
narrative summary of work or services required. After the
support request is evaluated:
(2)
service.
Copies of installation records needed to provide the
(3)
Applicable documents, correspondence, or regulations.
(4)
Document transmitting funds to the district office.
(5)
Requirement Statement approval from installation
d.
Typical Funding and Time to Accomplish the Service.
DOIM.
(1) Funding. Costs for services can vary significantly
based on the scope of services requested. A consultative visit
to the installation to discuss engineering automation
requirements can cost only several hundred dollars. An automated
system design can cost many thousands of dollars.
(2) Time Requirement. Requirements for information
services must be identified to IMO or DOIM as early as possible.
DA Pam 25-2 discusses the IMA Planning Process. Depending on the
program cost of the information system, there are different
organizational levels that a requirement will have to go through
for approval. This approval must be obtained prior to incurring
costs for the information system. If necessary, the district IMO
will visit the installation within several days from receipt of a
request. Provisions of more complex services, such as design of
automated services, can take many months. Planning is essential.
e. Sharing Successes. Installations are encouraged to
share information about successful protypes in IMA technology
(e.g., GIS or CADD Master Planning) so that good ideas are
disseminated Corps-wide. This can be done through district IMO
channels.
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CHAPTER 10
LOCAL USACE MAJOR SUBORDINATE COMMAND SUPPLEMENT
INTRODUCTION
Many USACE Major Subordinate Commands (MSC), also referred to as
division offices, take an aggressive role in monitoring the
Installation Support Program accomplished by districts within
their geographic area of responsibility. MSCs may already
possess their own "Installation Support Handbook" with
specialized procedures and capabilities applicable to their
mission. If this is the case, the MSC should insert a copy of
their handbook within this pamphlet prior to distributing it to
their district offices. As a minimum, or if an MSC does not
possess its own handbook, the MSC should insert a page explaining
their Installation Support policies and procedures, and giving a
"Point of Contact" list of key players responsible for their
Installation Support Program.
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CHAPTER 11
LOCAL USACE DISTRICT SUPPLEMENT
INTRODUCTION
Many USACE District offices take an aggressive role in the
Installation Support Program accomplished within their geographic
area of responsibility. Districts may already possess their own
"Installation Support Handbook" with specialized procedures and
capabilities applicable to their mission. If this is the case,
districts should insert a copy of their handbook within this
pamphlet prior to distributing it to the installations that they
support. As a minimum, or if a district does not possess its own
handbook, the district should insert a page explaining their
Installation Support policies and procedures, and giving a "Point
of Contact" list of key players responsible for their
Installation Support Program.
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CHAPTER 12
INSTALLATION SUPPORT NEWSLETTER
INTRODUCTION
In late spring 1992, the HQUSACE Installation Support Branch, in
conjunction with the Planning Branch from the Engineering and
Housing Support Center, Facilities Management and Planning
Division, began publishing an Installation Support Newsletter.
The objectives of the newsletter are to keep individuals informed
about important issues and to share good (and maybe not-so-good)
news and ideas.
Initially a new edition will be published every other month.
And, since everyone already has enough to read and keep them
busy, every attempt will be made to keep the newsletter brief, as
well as interesting and useful.
Since the newsletter will contain items applicable to, and which
may impact the Installation Support Program, this chapter has
been included in the handbook as a place to maintain and file
each edition of the newsletter.
Please call, fax or write to one of the following offices about
problems, ideas, concerns or successes - on all aspects of the
USACE Installation Support Program. Without input and feedback
from field elements, we are at a tremendous disadvantage in
coming up with newsy and valuable material.
Headquarters
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Directorate of Military Programs
Attn : CEMP-CI
Washington D.C. 20314-1000
Telephone: (202) 540-4804/5
Fax: (202) 504-4783
U.S. Army Engineering and Housing Support Center
Directorate of Facilities Engineering
Attn: CEHSC-FM-P
Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5516
Telephone: (703) 355-2001
Fax: (703) 780-5935
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APPENDIX A
REFERENCES
1.
Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines Applicable to Chapter 3.
a.
b.
(ASIP).
The Army Long Range Facilities Plan (ALRFP).
The Army Long Range Stationing and Installations Plan
c.
AR 210-20, Installation Master Planning.
d.
AR 405-45, Inventory of Army Military Real Property.
d. AR 415-15, Military Construction, Army (MCA) Program
Development.
e.
AFR 19-9, Air Installation Compatible Use Zone.
f.
AFR 86-1, Programming Civil Engineer Resources.
g.
AFR 86-4, Base Comprehension Planning.
h. AFR 87-5, Establishing, Accounting, and Reporting Real
Property; and others of the 87 series.
i.
DA Pam 600-45, Army Communities of Excellence.
j.
AF Pam 88-43, Installation Design.
NOTE: Various Department of the Air Force Bulletins on Base
Comprehensive Planning are typically joint Army-Air Force
publications.
2.
Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines Applicable to Chapter 4.
a.
The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA).
b.
Archeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 (ARPA).
c. AR 420-40, Cultural Resources Management,
Responsibilities.
d.) Section 404 (b)(l) Evaluation of Dredge and Fill
Material. Section 404 (b)(l) of the Clean Water Act.
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e.
National Environmental Policy Act of 1969.
f.
The Endangered Species Act of 1973.
g.
AR 200-1, Environmental Protection and Enhancement.
h.
AR 200-2, Environmental Effects of Army Actions.
i.
Executive Order 11988 - Flood Plain Management, 1977.
3. Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines Applicable to Chapter 5.
The significant guidelines governing real estate support to
military installations are listed as follows:
a. Public Law 92-313, Establishes Standard Level Use
Charges (SLUC) for building spaces and associated services
furnished by the GSA.
b. Public Law 94-579, The Federal Land Policy Management
Act of 1976 - military use of public domain.
c.
Public Law 100-526, Base Realignment and Closure Act.
d.
l0 U.S.C. 2233, U.S. Army Reserve Acquisition.
e.
10 U.S.C. 2667, Military Leasing Statute.
f.
10 U.S.C. 2672, Minor Acquisition Authority.
g.
l0 U.S.C. 2676, Acquisition Authority.
h. 10 U.S.C. 2677, Allows military to fix price of real
property if suitable and likely to be needed for a military
project.
i. 40 U.S.C. 471, Federal Property and Administrative
Services Act.
j. 40 U.S.C. 483, Permanent transfer of land between
military departments.
k. 40 U.S.C. 490, General Services Management Authority
over General Purpose Space.
l. 43 U.S.C. 155, The Engle Act - military withdrawal of
public domain lands in excess of 5,000 acres.
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m. Executive Order 12512, 23 April 1985 Property Management.
Federal Real
n. AR 5-4, Intra-service Support Installation Area
Coordination.
o. AR 5-16, Army Supplement to Defense Regional Interservice Support (DRIS) Regulation.
p. AR 10-5, Organizations and Functions, Department of the
Army - assigns responsibilities for real estate to the DASA
(I&H).
q. AR 10-69, Organization and Functions, U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers - assigns execution and management of the Army' s
real estate program to the Corps of Engineers.
r. AR 140-485, Space Allowances: U.S.
Facilities.
Army Reserve
s. AR 210-12, Establishment of Rental Rates for Quarters
Furnished Federal Employees.
t.
AR 210-17, Inactivation of Installations.
u.
AR 210-20, Master Planning for Army Installations.
v. AR 405-10, Acquisition of Real Property and Interests
Therein.
w.
AR 405-16, Homeowner's Assistance Program.
x.
AR 405-20, Federal Legislative Jurisdiction.
y.
AR 405-25, Annexation.
z.
AR 405-30, Mineral Exploration and Extraction.
aa.
AR 405-45, Inventory of Army Real Property.
bb.
AR 405-70, Utilization of Real Estate.
cc.
AR 405-80, Granting Use of Real Estate.
dd.
AR 405-90, Disposal of Real Estate.
ee. AR 415-28, Facility Classes and Construction
Categories.
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ff.
AR 420-16, Facilities Engineering Reports.
gg.
AR 420-40, Historic Preservation.
hh.
AR 500-10, Non-industrial Facilities for Mobilization.
ii. AR 735-5, Basic Policies and Procedures for Property
Accounting.
jj.
4.
DA Pam 420-10, Space Management Guide.
Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines Applicable to Chapter 6.
a. Public Law 92-582, 92nd Congress, H.R.
72, The Brooks Bill.
12807, 27 Oct
b. 10 U.S.C. 4540, governing utilization of
architect-engineer services.
c.
d.
1947.
10 U.S.C. 2304, governing Small Business set-aside.
10 U.S.C. 4540, The Armed Services Procurement Act of
e. Public Law 87-653, Truth in Negotiation Act, as modified
by Public Law 98-369, The Competition in Contracting Act of 1984.
f. Public Law 97-214, 12 July 1982, Section 2853 as
amended, Military Codification Act.
g. Section 1207, Public Law 99-661 and Section 806, Public
Law 100-180, Small Disadvantaged Business.
h. Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) 6.303-2, 14.208,
14.209, 15.804, 15.805, 15.808, 16.403-2, 16.2, 16.202, 16.603,
16.702, 16.703, 31.105, 31.2, 31.205-46, 36.605, 43.101, 43.103,
52.214, 52.236-23, 52.243, 53.246, 53.301-308, 5.3.
i. DoD Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplements (DFARS)
15.902, 16.101, 36.601, 36.602, 36.604, 36.605, 36.606.
j.
1.691.
Army Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (AFARS)
k. Engineer Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement
(EFARS) 15 .808, 36.605/90, 36.606/95, part 43.
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l.
AR 600-50, Standards of Conduct for Army Personnel.
m.
ER 715-1-10, A-E Responsibility Management Program.
n. ER 715-1-15, Time Standards for the Architect-Engineer
Acquisition Process.
5. Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines Applicable to Chapter 7.
An abbreviated list of guidelines applicable to engineering
support services is presented as follows:
a.
AR 5-3, Installation Management and Organization.
b. AR 5-4, Department of the Army Productivity Improvement
Program.
c.
AR 5-20, Commercial Activities Program.
d.
AR 11-27, Army Energy Program.
e. AR 37-115, Accounting for Special Facilities Engineering
Projects.
f. AR 140-485, Space Allowances, U.S.
Facilities.
Army Reserve
g.
AR 200-17, Inactivation of Installations.
h.
AR 210-20, Master Planning for Army Installations.
i.
AR 210-50, Family Housing Management.
j.
AR 385-10, Army Safety Program.
k. AR 415-15, Military Construction, Army (MCA) Program
Development.
l.
AR 415-28, Facility Classes and Construction Categories.
m. AR 415-32, Performance of Military Construction Projects
in the Continental United States by Troop Units.
n. AR 420-10, Management of Installation Directorates of
Engineering and Housing.
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o.
AR 420-16, Facilities Engineering Reports.
p.
AR 420-40, Historic Preservation.
q.
AR 420-41, Utilities Contracts.
r.
AR 420-43, Electrical Services.
s.
AR 420-46, Water and Sewage.
t. AR 420-49, Heating, Energy Selection and Fuel Storage,
Distribution and Dispensing Systems.
u.
AR 420-53, Refrigeration.
v. AR 420-54, Air Conditioning, Evaporative Cooling,
Dehumidification, and Mechanical Ventilation.
w.
AR 420-55, Food Service and Related Equipment.
x.
AR 420-70, Buildings and Structures.
y. AR 420-72, Surfaced Areas, Railroads, and Associated
Structures.
z. AR 420-74, Natural Resources: Land, Forest, and Wildlife
Management.
aa.
AR 420-90, Fire Protection.
bb. DA Pam 210-3, Commander's Handbook for Installation and
Activity Consolidations, Realignments, Reductions and Closures.
cc. DA Pam 420-8, Facilities Engineering Management
Handbook.
dd. DA Pam 420-9, Installation Commander's Executive Guide
to Directorate of Engineering and Housing Operations.
ee.
DA Pam 420-10, Space Management Guide.
ff.
TM 5-800-3, Project Development Brochure.
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6.
Regulatory and Statutory Guidelines Applicable to Chapter 8.
a. Public Law 97-214, 12 July 1982, Section 2853 as
amended, Military Codification Act.
b.
1984.
Public Law 98-369, The Competition in Contracting Act of
c. Public Law 99-661, Section 1207 and Public Law 100-180,
Section 806, Small Disadvantaged Business.
d.
e.
1947.
10 U.S.C. 2304, Governing Small Business set-aside.
10 U.S.C. 4540, The Armed Services Procurement Act of
f. Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) 6.303-2, 14.208,
14.209, 15.804, 15.805, 15.808, 16.403-2, 16.2, 16.202, 16.603,
16.702, 16.703, 31.105,31.2, 36.605, 43.101, 43.103, 52.214,
52.236-23, 52.243, 53.246, 53.301-308, 5.3.
g. DoD Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplements (DFARS)
15.902, 16.101, 36.601, 36.602, 36.604, 36.605, 36.606.
h. Army Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (AFARS)
1.691-3.
i. Engineer Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement
(EFARS) 15.808, 36.605/90,
36.606/95, part 43.
j.
AR 415-20, Military Construction Program Management.
k.
AR 600-50, Standards of Conduct for Army Personnel.
l.
ER 715-1-10, A-E Responsibility Management Program.
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APPENDIX B
GLOSSARY
PART I
Abbreviations
AAA
AAFES
AAO
AAP
ABO
ABE
ACASS
ACE
ACHP
ACM
ACO
ACOE
ACSI
ACFT
ACTS
ACQ
ADCSOPS
A-E
AEHA
AEI
ADP
ADPE
AFARS
AFCS
AF
AFFARS
AFH
AFLC
AFM
AFMCO
AFMPC
AFMR
AFP
AFR
AFRCE
AFSC
AFWB
Army Audit Agency
Army and Air Force Exchange Service
Army Acquisition Objective
Army Ammunition Plant
Army Budget Objective
Army Budget Estimates
Architect-Engineer Contract Administration
Support System
Assistant Chief of Engineers
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation
Asbestos Containing Material
Administrative Contracting Officer
Army Communities of Excellence Program
Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence
Aircraft Procurement, Army
Army Criteria Tracking System
Acquisition (USAF)
Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and
Plans
Architect-Engineer
Army Environmental Hygiene Agency
Architectural and Engineering Instructions
Automated Data Processing
Automated Data Processing Equipment
Army Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement
Army Facilities Components System (theater of
operation construction), also, Air Force Change
Request.
Air Force
Air Force FAR Supplement
Army Family Housing
Air Force Logistics Command
Air Force Manual
Army Force Modernization Coordination Office
Air Force Manpower and Personnel Center
Air Force Management Reserve
Army Force Program / Air Force Pamphlet
Air Force Regulation
Air Force Regional Civil Engineer
Air Force Systems Command
Air Force Welfare Board
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AHJP
AG
AICUZ
AID
AIF
ALA
AL
ALO
ALRPS
AMC
AMCCOM
AMF
AMIM
AMMO
AMOPS
AMPRS
AMS
AMSCO
ANSI
APAP
APC
APM
APPOR
AR
ARADCOM
ARC
ARCOM
ARNG
ARMS
ARPRINT
ARR
ARMCOM
ASA
ASACG
ASA(CW)
ASA(IL&E)
ASA(M&RA)
ASARC
ASA(RDA)
ASC
ASD
Army Housing Justification Process
Army Guidance / Adjutant General
air installations compatibility use zone
Agency for International Development
Army Industrial Fund
Army Logistics Assessment
Acquisition Letter / Annual Leave
Authorized Level of Organization
Army Long Range Planning System
(U.S.) Army Material Command
(U.S. Army) Armament Munitions and Chemical Command
Army Management Fund
Army Modernization Information Memorandum
Procurement of Army Ammunition (Program)
Army Mobilization and Operations Planning System
Automated Management and Progress Reporting
System
Army Management Structure
Army Management Structure Code
American National Standards Institute
Army Pollution Abatement Program
Air Pollution Control
Army Program Memorandum
Army Power Procurement Officer Representative
Army Regulation
Armament Research and Development Command
Architectural Review Committee
Army Reserve Command
Army National Guard
Automated Review Management System
Army Program for Individual Training
Annual Recurring Requirements
(U.S. Army) Armament Material Readiness Command
Assistant Secretary of the Army / Army Strategic
Appraisal
Army Security Coordinating Group
Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works)
Assistant Secretary of the Army (Installations,
Logistics & Environment)
Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and
Reserve Affairs)
Army Systems Acquisition Review Council
Assistant Secretary of the Army (Research,
Development and Acquisition)
Army Staff Council
Assistant Secretary of Defense
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ASD(D&S)
ASF
ASIP
ATC
ATF
AWP
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Development and
Support)
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs)
Assistant Secretary of Defense (International
Security Affairs)
Assistant Secretary of Defense (International
Security Policy)
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Force Management
and Personnel)
Army Stock Fund
Army Stationing and Installation Plan
Air Training Command / Army Training Center
Army Trust Fund
Annual Work Plan
BA
BAAN
BASE
B&G
BASOPS
BCE
BCM
BCP
BEG
BES
BIL
BLM
BMAR
BMDPM
BOCA
BOD
BOM
BOS
BOQ
BRAC
BRC
BSPT
BTU
BY
Budget Activity
Budget Authorization Account Number
USAF Base
Buildings and Grounds
Base Operations
Base Civil Engineer (Air Force)
Business Clearance Memorandum
Base Comprehensive Plan (USAF)
Budget Estimate Guidance
Budget Estimate Submission (USAF)
Billeting module of HOMES
Bureau of Land Management
Backlog of Maintenance and Repair
Ballistic Missile Defense Program Manager
Building Officials and Code Administrators
Beneficial Occupancy Date
Bill of Materials
Base Operating Support / Base Operations
Bachelor Officer's Quarters
Base Realignment and Closure Program
Budget Review Committee
Base Support (major mission area)
British Thermal Unit
Budget Year
CA
CACES
CADDS
CAPCES
Commercial Activities / Construction Agent
Computer-Aided Cost Estimating System
Computer-Aided Design and Drafting System(s)
Construction Appropriation Programming, Control, and
Execution System
Chief, Army Reserve
ASD(HA)
ASD(ISA)
ASD(ISP)
ASD(FM&P)
CAR
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CAT
CAT CODE
CBD
CBO
CCA
CCASS
CCB
CCH
CCL
CCP
CEA
CEM
CD
CDR
CD-ROM
CDS
CE
CEAGS
CECE
CEPMS
CEQ
CERAMMS
CERCLA
CERL
CERS
CEGS
CETHA
CFE/CI
CFPF
CFR
CFSC
CHEM DEMIL
CI
CID
CIDC
CINC
CINFO
CIP
CJCS
CLL
CLUP
Congressional Activities Team
(Facility) Category Code
Commerce Business Daily publication
Congressional Budget Office
Current Contract Amount
Construction Contractor Appraisal Support System
Configuration Control Board
Chief of Chaplains
Construction Cost Limit
Consolidated Cryptologic Program
Cemeterial Expenses, Army
Concepts Evaluation Model
Construction Division / Compact Disk
Commander
Compact Disk - Read Only Memory
Concept Design Study
Corps of Engineers
Corps of Engineers Abbreviated Guide Specifications
Communications Equipment and Cost Estimate
Corps of Engineers Performance Measurement System
(President's) Council on Environmental Quality
Corps of Engineers Resource and Military Manpower
System
Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation
and Liability Act
Construction Engineering Research Laboratory,
Champaign, Ill.
Construction Evaluation Retrieval System
Corps of Engineers Guide Specifications
U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency
Contractor Furnished Equipment / Contractor
Installed (USAF)
Central Food Preparation Facility
Code of Federal Regulations
(U.S. Army) Community and Family Support Center
Chemical Weapons Demilitarization Program
Contractor Installed (USAF)
Comprehensive Interior Design (USAF), also Criminal
Investigation Division (U.S. Army)
U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Division Command
Commander-in-Chief
Chief of Information
Capital Improvement Program (master planning/base
comprehensive planning)
Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
Chief of Legislative Liaison
Comprehensive Land Use Planning (between
installation and local communities)
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CM
CMBT
CMP
CMR
CNGB
CO (KO)
COA
COB
COE
COEA
COEMIS
COESAT
COLA
CONTRAST
CONUS
COR / COREP
COTR
CPA
CPAF
CPFF
CPIF
CPM
CPO
CQA/CQC
CRC
CRRC
CSA
CSAM
CSPT
CSSP
CSR
CTA
CTEA
CTL
CW
CWE
CY
CZM
C3I
DA
DAART
Construction Manager/Construction Management
Close Combat (major mission area)
Construction Management Plan
Command Management Review
Chief, National Guard Bureau
Contracting Officer
Comptroller of the Army
Command Operating Budget
(U.S. Army) Corps of Engineers/Chief of Engineers
Cost and Operational Effectiveness Analysis
Corps of Engineers Management Information System
Corps of Engineers Systems Approach to Training
Cost of Living Adjustment
Corps of Engineers Nontraditional Systems Training
Program
Continental United States
Contracting Officer's Representative
Contracting Officer's Technical Representative
Chief of Public Affairs
Cost-Plus-Award-Fee (contract)
Cost-Plus-Fixed Fee (contract)
Cost-Plus-Incentive-Fee (contract)
Critical Path Method
Civilian Personnel Office
Contractor Quality Assurance/Control
Criteria Review Conference (pre-negotiation or
pre-design (USAF) )
Construction Requirements Review Committee (U.S.
Army)
Chief of Staff, U.S. Army
Chief of Staff, Army, Memorandum
Combat Support (major mission area)
Combat Service Support (major mission area)
Chief of Staff Regulation
Common Tables of Allowance
Cost and Training Effectiveness Analysis
Construction Technical Letter (USAF)
Civil Works
Current Working Estimate
Current Year / Calendar Year
Coastal Zone Management
Communications, Command, Control and Intelligence
Department of the Army / Design Agent (USAF)
Department of the Army Agency for Ammunition,
Ranges and Training
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DAB
DAC
DAIPR
DAMA
DAPPL
DAPPO
DAR
DARPA
DARS
DAS
DCAA
DCAF
DCFP
DCIS
DCP
DCS
DCSENG
DCSLOG
DCSOPS
DCSPER
DCSRDA
Director of the Army Budget
Department of the Army Civilian
Department of the Army In Process Review
Development and Material Acquisition
Department of the Army Programming Priority Lists
Deputy Army Power Procurement Officer
Defense Acquisition Regulation
Defense Advance Research Projects Agency
Defense Acquisition Regulatory System
Director of the Army Staff
Defense Contract Audit Agency
Design/Construction Analysis Feedback
Design Criteria Feedback Program (3078 Process)
Design Criteria Information System
Decision Coordinating Paper
Deputy Chief of Staff
Deputy Chief of Staff for Engineering
Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics
Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Plans
Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel
Deputy Chief of Staff for Research, Development and
Acquisition
DDESB
Department of Defense Explosive Safety Board
DD Form 1391 Military Construction Project Data
DE
(Corps of Engineers) District/Division Engineer,
also BCE at base, DCS at MAJCOM (USAF)
DEH
Director/Directorate of Engineering and Housing
(Army)
DEPSECDEF
Deputy Secretary of Defense
DEP USD
Deputy Undersecretary of Defense (Policy)
DEP USD (OR) Deputy Undersecretary of Defense (Operations
Research)
DERA
Defense Environmental Restoration Account
DERP
Defense Environmental Restoration Program
DESCOM
(U.S. Army) Depot System Command
DESR
Defense Environmental Status Report
DFARS
Defense Acquisition Regulation Supplement
DFE
Director/Directorate of Facilities Engineering
DFPDB
Defense Force Planning Data Base
DG
Defense Guidance / Design Guide
DI
Design Instruction (USAF)
DIA
Defense Intelligence Agency
DIRNET
(design and construction) Directive Network
DIS
Director/Directorate of Installation Services
DISC4
Director/Directorate for Information Systems
Command, Control, Communication, and Computers
DLA
Defense Logistics Agency
B-6
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
DM
DMA
DMAR
DMFO
DNA
DOC
DOD
DODDS
DODI
DODS
DOE
DOIM
DOL
DOMA
DPAE
DPCA
DPM
DRIS
DRMO
DRMSO
DS
DSAA
DSARC
DSN
DSNS
DSS
DY
EA
ECC
ECAM
ECIP
ECONPAK
ECP
E&D
EEAP
EEO
EFARS
EIG
EIP
EIRS
EIS
EM
Design Manager (USAF)/Director of Management (OCSA)
Defense Mapping Agency
Deferred Maintenance and Repair
Defense Medical Facilities Office
Defense Nuclear Agency
Director/Directorate of Contracting
Department of Defense
Department of Defense Dependent Schools
Department of Defense Instruction
DOD/government-wide support (major mission area)
Department of Energy
Director/Directorate of Information Management
Director/Directorate of Logistics
Director, Operation and Maintenance, Army
Director, Program Analysis and Evaluation (OCSA)
Director/Directorate of Personnel and Community
Activities
Defense Program Memorandum
Defense Regional Inter-service Support
Defense Reutilization Marketing Office
Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service Office
Direct Support
Defense Security Assistance Agency
Defense System Acquisition Review Council
Design
Design Start (USAF)
Directed Stationing System
Design Year
Environmental Assessment / Economic Analysis
Estimated Contract Cost / Estimated Construction
Cost
Energy Conservation and Management Program
Energy Conservation Investment Program
Economic Analysis Package
Engineering Change Proposal
Engineering and Design
Energy Engineering Analysis Program
Equal Employment Opportunity office
Engineer Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement
Engineer Inspector General
Equipment-In-Place
Engineering Improvement Recommendation System
Environmental Impact Statement
Engineering Manual
B-7
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
EMCS
EMP
En/A
ENR
EPA
EPD
EO
EOC
EP
EPA
EPS
EP&S
ER
ERA
ERMD
ES
ETCM
ETL
ERG
ERIS
EUAC
EUSA
EY
Energy Monitoring and Control Systems
Environmental Management Plan
Economic Analysis
Engineering News Record publication
Environmental Protection Agency / Extended Planning
Annex (POM)
Early Preliminary Design (USAF)
Executive Order
Emergency Operations Center
Engineer Pamphlet
Environmental Protection Agency
Engineered Performance Standards
Engineering, Plans and Services Division
Engineer Regulation
Energy Requirements Appraisal
Engineer Resources Management Division
End Strength (population of the services)
Evaluated Total Cost Method (life cycle bidding)
Engineering Technical Letter
Executive Review Group (USAF)
Energy Resource Impact Statement
Equivalent Uniform Annual Costs
Eighth U.S. Army, Korea
Execution Year
F&A
FAA
FAD
FAR
FAS
FASD
FCF
FE
FEAP
FEBC
FEJE
FEMA
FEMC
FEMS
FESS
FETS
FFP
FGO
Finance and Accounting
Federal Aviation Administration
Funding Authorization Document
Federal Acquisition Regulation
Force Accounting System
Fire Support/Air Defense (major mission area)
Foreign Currency Fluctuation (funds)
Facilities Engineer
Facilities Engineering Applications Program
Facilities Engineering Basic Course
Facilities Engineering Job Estimating System
Federal Emergency Management Agency
Facilities Engineering Management Course
Facilities Engineering Management System
Facilities Engineering Supply System
Facilities Energy Technology Services(s)
Firm-Fixed-Price
Field Grade Officer
FH
FHI
FHMA
Family Housing
Family Housing Improvements
Family Housing Management Account
B-8
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
FIRM
FIS
FIT
FLPMA
FM
FMMP
FMS
FNSI
FOA
FONSI
FORCEMOD
FORDIMS
FORSCOM
FP
FPEPA
FPI
FPIF
FPMR
FPORI
FPR
FSRS
FPS
FSS
FUDS
FURN
FWG
FY
FYDP
Flood Insurance Rate Maps
Facilities Investigative Studies
Facilities Installation Tables
Federal Land Policy Management Act of 1976
Field Manual
Force Modernization Master Plan
Foreign Military Sales
Finding of No Significant Impact
Field Operating Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Finding of No Significant Impact
Army Force Modernization Program
Force Development Integration Management System
(U.S. Army) Forces Command
Fixed Price
Fixed Price with Economic Price Adjustment
Fixed-Price-Incentive (contract)
Fixed Price Incentive Fee
Federal Property Management Regulation
Fire Protection Operational Readiness Inspections
Fiscal Planning and Reporting
Final Safety Review Submission
Facilities Planning System
Force Structure Subsystem
Formerly Used Defense Site(s)
Furnishings Management Module of HOMES
Facilities Working Group
Fiscal Year
Five Year Defense Plan/Program
GAO
G&A
GDIP
GE
GFE
GFE/GI
General Accounting Office
General and Administrative
General Defense Intelligence Program
Government Estimate
Government-Furnished Equipment
Government-Furnished Equipment / Government
Installed
Government-Furnished Equipment / Contractor
Installed
Government-Furnished Material
General/Flag Officers Quarters
Guest Housing
Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated
Government-Owned, Government-Operated
General Support
General Services Administration
General Services Board of Contract Appeals
General Staff Council
GFE/CI
GFM
GFOQ
GH
GOCO
GOGO
GS
GSA
GSBCA
GSC
B-9
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
GSF
GY
General Support Forces
Guidance Year
HAC
HAP
HASC
HBC
HCA
HFDA
HFO
HFPA
HL
HNFCP
HOA
HOMES
HPP
HQ
HQDA
HQIFS
HQUSAF
HQUSAF/PRE
HQUSACE
HRO
HR/S
HSC
HTW
HUD
HURB
HVAC
House Appropriations Committee
Homeowners Assistance Program
House Armed Services Committee
House Budget Committee
Head of Contracting Agency
Health Facilities Design Agency
Health Facilities Office (USAF)
Health Facilities Planning Agency
Hired Labor
Host Nation-Funded Construction Program
Homeowner's Assistance Fund
Housing Operations Management System
Historic Preservation Plan
Headquarters
Headquarters, Department of the Army
Headquarters Level Integrated Facilities System
Headquarters, Department of the Air Force
Directorate of Engineering and Services
Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Housing Referral Office
Housing Referral and Survey module of HOMES
Health Services Command
Hazardous and Toxic Wastes
(Department of) Housing and Urban Development
Human Resources Base (major mission area)
Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning
IAO
IAU
IBPP
IC
ICAR
ICARPUS
Intra-Army Order for reimbursable services
International Accounting Units
International Balance of Payments
Installation Commander
Installation Consolidated Accounting Report
Installation Commander's Annual Real Property
Utilization Survey
Internal Control Review
Installation Compatibility Use Zone
Installation Commanders Quarters
Interior Design (USAF)
Installation Design Guide
Industrially Funded
Invitation for Bids
Integrated Facilities Data Entry Process
Integrated Facilities System, Increment I (batch).
Integrated Facilities System, Increment II
ICR
ICUZ
ICQ
ID
IDG
IF
IFB
IFDEP
IFS-I
IFS-II
B-10
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
IFS-M
IG
IJO
I/M
IMET
IMP
INDH
INSCOM
IP
IPB
IPR
IPS
IRP
IRCP
IRP
IS
ISA
ISCP
ITAM
JA
J&A
JAG
JCS
JIEP
JOA
JOC
JOPS
JOR
JPAM
JSAM
JSAMSA
Integrated Facilities System, Mini/Microcomputer
architecture
Inspector General
Individual Job Order
Inspection/Maintenance
Inter-nation Military Education and Training
Information Management Plan
Indirect Hire
(U.S. Army) Intelligence and Security Command
Initial Point / Issue Paper
Installation Planning Board
In-Process Review
Integrated Program Summary
Installation Restoration Program
Intermediate Range Construction Program
Inventory and Resource Planning, also Installation
Restoration Program
Installation Support
Inter-service Support Agreement
Installation Spill Contingency Plan
Integrated Training Area Management Program.
JSCP
JSPS
JTR
Joint Affairs
Justification and Approval
Judge Advocate General (attorney)
Joint Chiefs of Staff
Joint Intelligence Estimate for Planning
Joint Occupancy Agreement (USAF)
Job Order Contracting
Joint Operations Planning System
Job Order Request
Joint Program Assessment Memorandum
Joint Security Assistance Memorandum
Joint Security Assistance Memorandum Supporting
Analysis
Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan
Joint Strategic Planning System
Joint Travel Regulations
KO (CO)
Contracting Officer
LANTCOM
LCC
LCPM
LD
LE
Atlantic Command
Life Cycle Cost
Life Cycle Project Management
Liquidated Damages
Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics and Engineering
(USAF)
B-11
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
LEE
LEED
LEEP
LIN
LIR
LOGSACS
LRCP
LRPS
LURS
Directorate of Engineering and Services, USAF
Installation Development Division, USAF
Programs Division, USAF
Line Item Number
Line Item Review
Logistics Structure and Composition System
Long Range Construction Program
Long Range Planning System
Land Use Requirements Study
MAA
MAC
MACOM
MAJCOM
MAP
MARS
MASB
Mission Area Analysis
Military Airlift Command, U.S. Air Force
Major Command (Army)
Major Command (Air Force)
Military Assistance Program/Mission Area Panel
Military Amateur Radio Station
Material Acquisition Support Base (major mission
area)
Military Construction, Army
Microcomputer-Aided Cost Estimating System.
Military Construction, Air Force (COE term for MCP)
Military Construction, Army Reserve
Military Construction Contract Management
Military Construction, National Guard
Military Construction Program (Air Force - see MCAF)
Mandatory Center of Expertise (COE)
Mobilization Day
Management Decision Package
Military District of Washington
Modernization and Expansion
Maintenance and Repair
Most Efficient Organization (regarding CA Studies)
Military Family Housing (USAF)
Management Base (C4) (major mission area)
Military Community
Military Construction
(U.S. Army) Military Personnel Center
Military Standard
Military Interdepartmental Purchase Request (DD
Form 448)
Management Information System
Major Mission Area
Minor Military Construction, Army
Memorandum of Agreement
Miscellaneous Obligation Document/modification
Military Occupation Specialty
Memorandum of Understanding
MCA
MCACES
MCAF
MCAR
MCCM
MCNG
MCP
MCX
M-DAY
MDEP
MDW
M&E
M&R
MEO
MFH
MGTB
MILCOM
MILCON
MILPERCEN
MIL-STD
MIPR
MIS
MMA
MMCA
MOA
MOD
MOS
MOU
B-12
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
MPA
MPBMA
MPL
M&R
MRI
MRIS
MRPF
MSC
MSLS
MS-3
MTBSP
MTMC
MTOE
MUSARC
MWR
MYPLAN
Military Personnel, Army (program account)
Munitions Production Base Modernization Agency,
Dover, NJ
Munitions Production Base Modernization and
Expansion
Munitions Production Base Support Construction
Program
Mobilization Project Listing
Maintenance and Repair
Maintenance, Repair and Improvements
Modernization Resource Information Submission
Maintenance and Repair of Real Property Facilities
Major Subordinate Command/Medical Service Corps
Procurement of Missiles, Army (program)
Manpower Staffing Standards System
Mobilization Troop Base Stationing Plan
Military Traffic Management Command
Modified Tables of Organization and Equipment
Major U. S. Army Reserve Command
Morale, Welfare and Recreation
Multi-Year Plan
NACSI
NAF
NATO
NAVFAC
NBC
NCO
NCPC
NCR
NEPA
NET
NFPA
NGB
NHPA
NIR
NLT
NOA
NPDES
NPL
NRHP
NSA
NSC
NTP
National Communications Security Instruction
Non-appropriated Funds
North Atlantic Treaty Organization
Naval Facilities Engineering Command
Nuclear, Biological, Chemical
Noncommissioned Officer
National Capital Planning Commission
National Capital Region
National Environmental Policy Act
No Earlier Than
National Fire Protection Association
National Guard Bureau
National Historic Preservation Act
Notice of Intent to Relinquish (real estate)
No Later Than
New Obligation Authority
National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System
National Priority List (for HTW projects)
National Register of Historic Places
National Security Agency
National Security Council
Notice To Proceed
OA
OACE
Operating Agency
Office, Assistant Chief of Engineers
MPBME
MPBSCP
B-13
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
OACSI
Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for
Intelligence
OAP
Operator Assistance Program
OASA
Office, Assistant Secretary of the Army
OASD
Office, Assistant Secretary of Defense
OCA
Office of the Comptroller of the Army
OCAR
Office, Chief, U.S. Army Reserve
OCE
Office, Chief of Engineers
OCONUS
Outside Continental United States
OCR
Office of Correlating Responsibility (USAF)
OJCS
Office, Joint Chiefs of Staff
O&M
Operations and maintenance
OMA
Operations and Maintenance, Army
OMAF
Operations and Maintenance, Air Force
OMAR
Operations and Maintenance, Army Reserve
OMB
Office of Management and Budget
OMEE
Operations and Maintenance Engineering Enhancement
Program
OMNG
Operations and Maintenance, National Guard
OPA
Other Procurement, Army
OPR
Office of Primary Responsibility (USAF)
OSA
Office of the Secretary of the Army
OSD
Office of the Secretary of Defense
OSHA
Occupational Safety and Health Act
OSM
Operating System Manual
OTSG
Office of the Surgeon General
OUSDRE
Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for
Research and Engineering
PA
PAA
PACOM
PA&E
PAED
PAM
PAO
PARC
PARR
PAT
PAVER
PAX
PB
PBAC
PBC
PBD
Programmed Amount/Pollution Abatement/Public Affairs
Procurement of Ammunition, Army
Pacific Command
Program Analysis and Evaluation
Program Analysis and Evaluation Directorate (OCSA)
Pamphlet
Public Affairs Office
Principal Assistant Responsible for Contracting
Program Analysis and Resource Review
(Air Force) Planning Assistance Team
Pavement Maintenance Management System
MILCON Programming, Administration, and Execution
System
Project Book (USAF)
Program Budget Advisory Committee
Program and Budget Committee
Program Budget Decision
B-14
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
PBG
PBM
PBS
PC
PCB
PCCD
PCD
PCI
PCM
PCR
PCS
P&D
PDB
PDC
PDIP
PDM
PDMS
PE
PEMA
PERSACS
PERT
P&F
PFCD
PGCP
PIF
PIRP
PL
PM
PMIG
PMT
PMS
PNC
POC
POL
POM
POMCUS
POTW
PPBERS
PPBES
PPG
PPP (P3)
PREP
Program Budget Guidance
Production Base Manager
Production Base Support/Program Budget System
Personal Computer
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Pre-concept Control Data
Program Change Decision
Pavement Condition Index
Program Continuity Memorandum
Program Change Request
Permanent Change of Station
Planning and Design
Project Development Brochure
Program, Design and Construction (USAF)
Program Development Increment Package (superceded
by MDEP)
Program Decision Memorandum
Planning and Design Management System
Program Element / Professional Engineer
Procurement of Equipment and Missiles, U.S. Army
(superceded)
Personnel Structure and Composition System
Performance, Evaluation and Review Technique
Program and Financing
Project Formulation Control Data
Policy Guidance for Contingency Planning
Productivity Investment Funding
Public Involvement and Response Program
Public Law
Preventative Maintenance/Project Manager/Provost
Marshal
Project Management Integration Group (USAF)
Project Management Team (USAF)
BMAR/DMAR Project Management System
Pre-negotiation Conference (USAF)
Point of Contact
Petroleum, Oil and Lubricants
Program Objective Memorandum
Pre-positioned Material Configured to Unit Sets
Publicly Owned Treatment Works (USAF)
Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution
Review System
Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution
System
Procurement Planning and Policy Guidance
U.S. Army Prime Power Program
Power Reliability and Enhancement Program
B-15
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
PROP
PROSPECT
PRV
P&S
PS&ER
PWG
PWRMS
PWS
PY
Proposal (USAF)
Proponent-Sponsored Engineer Corps Training Program
(Huntsville Division)
Potentially Responsible Party (for HTW cleanup
actions)
Plant Replacement Value
Procurement and Supply
Production Support and Equipment Replacement
Planning Work Group
Pre-positioned War Reserve Material Stocks
Performance Work Statement (regarding CA Studies)
Program Year/Prior Year
QA/QC
QAP
Q/D
QOL
Quality Assurance/Quality Control
Quality Assurance Plan
Quantity/Distance (regarding ordnance storage)
Quality of Life
RCI
RCO
RCM
RCRA
RCS
R&D
R&U
RCS
RDA
RDC
RDT&E
RE
REC
REPR
RFI
Roof Condition Index
Resident Contracting Officer
Resident Construction Manager (USAF)
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976
Reports Control Symbol
Research and Development
Repairs and Utilities
Reports Control Symbol
Research, Development and Acquisition
Regional Data Center
Research, Development, Test and Evaluation
Resident Engineer/Real Estate
Record of Environmental Consideration
Real Estate Planning Report
Radio Frequency Interference/Request for Interest
RFP Request for Proposal
Request for Technical Proposal (USAF)
Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study
Research and Investigation
Real Property Installed Equipment (USAF)
Resource Manager/Resource Management Office
Resource Management Plan
Resource Management System
Report of Availability
Record of Decision
Report of Survey
Right(s) of Way
Reserve Personnel, Army (program account)
Real Property Facility
PRP
RFTP
RI/FS
R&I
RPIE
RM/RMO
RMP
RMS
ROA
ROD
ROS
ROW
RPA
RPF
B-16
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
RPI
RPLANS
RPMA
RPMS
RSA
RTA
Real Property Information (records)
Real Property Planning and Analysis System
Real Property Maintenance Activities
Real Property Management System
Roofing Systems Analysis
Ready to Advertise
SA/SECARMY
S&A
Secretary of the Army
Supervision and Administration (construction
management)
Strategic Air Command, U.S. Air Force, also Senate
Appropriations Committee
Structure and Composition System
Subject to Availability of Funds / Secretary of the
Air Force
Supervision and Inspection
Secretary of the Army for Installations, Logistics
and Environment.
Standard Army Intermediate Level Supply Subsystem
Stationing Analysis Model
Selected Acquisition Report
Superfund Amendments and Re-authorization Act of
1986
Secretary of the Army for Research, Development and
Acquisition
Senate Armed Services Committee
Small Business Administration
Senate Budget Committee/Southern Building Code
Surcharge Collections, Army (program account)
Sensitive Compartmented Information/Intelligence
Facilities
System Concept Paper
Small Disadvantaged Business
Secretary of Defense Decision Memorandum
Simplified Design Methods
Secretary of Defense
select committee
Square Foot / Standard Form
Support Facility Annex (to Army Modernization
Information Memorandum)
Supreme Headquarters, Allied Powers Europe
Segmented Housing Market Analysis
State Historic Preservation Officer
Structural Interior Design (USAF)
Supervision, Inspection and Overhead (construction)
Stationing and Installations Planning Committee
Savings to Investment Ratio
Staff Judge Advocate
SAC
SACS
SAF
S&I
SAIL & E
SAILS
SAM
SAR
SARA
SARDA
SASC
SBA
SBC
SCA
SCIF
SCP
SDB
SDDM
SDM
SECDEF
SELCOM
SF
SFA
SHAPE
SHMA
SHPO
SID
SIOH
SIPC
SIR
SJA
B-17
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
SL
SLUC
SMCP
SMBMA
SNCO
SNU
SO
SOO
SOFA
SOP
SOW
SP
SPC
SPCCP
SPDES
SPECS
SPI
S&R
SRCP
SRP
SSP
STAMMIS
STANFINS
STRC
TAA
TAADS
TAB
TAC
TAEDP
TAGO
TB
TC/A
T&CCP
TCC
TCP
TCX
TDA
TDS
TDY
TEMP
TEMPEST
TF
TI
TIARA
Strength Level
Standard Level User Charges (GSA leasing term)
Supplemental Military Construction Program
Substandard, May Be Made Adequate
Senior Noncommissioned Officer
Substandard, Not Upgradeable
Service Order / Safety Officer
Standard Operations Order
Status of Forces Agreement
Standing Operating Procedure(s)
Statement of Work / Scope of Work
Security Police (USAF)
Secretary of Defense Performance Review
Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure Plan
State Pollution Discharge Elimination System
Specifications
Schedule Performance Index (USAF)
Supervision and Review (design)
Short Range Construction Program
Special Requirements Paragraph (DD Form 1391)
Site Safety Plan
Standard Army Multi-command Management Information
System
Standard Army Financial Information System
Strategic Conflict (major mission area)
Total Army Analysis
The Army Authorization Documents System
Tabulation of existing and required facilities
(master plan)
Tactical Air Command (U.S. Air Force)
Total Army Equipment Distribution Program
The Adjutant General's Office
Technical Bulletins
Terrorism Counteraction
Telecommunications and Command and Control Program
Telecommunications Center
Transportation Control Plan
Technical Center of Expertise
Table(s) of Distribution and Allowances
Treatment, Disposal or Storage
Temporary Duty
Test and Evaluation Master Plan
Protection for compromising electronic emanations
Total Float
Technical Indirect (overhead)
Tactical Intelligence and Related Activities
B-18
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
TM
TOA
TO
TOE
TPC
TPF
TRADOC
TRNG
TSA
TSCA
TSCM
TTY
TWX
Technical Manual
Total Obligation Authority
Technical Order (USAF)
Table(s) of Organization and Equipment
Third Party Contracting
Third Party Financing
(U.S. Army) Training and Doctrine Command
Training (major mission area)
(U.S. Army) Troop Support Agency, Ft. Lee, VA
Toxic Substances Control Act
Technical Surveillance Counter Measures
Teletype
Teletype Message
UBC
UEPH
UFAS
UFR
UIC
UMC
UMMCA
UPB
UOQ
UPH
UPS
U&R
URR
USAATCA
USACE
USAED
USAEHSC
USAF
USAFAC
USAFR
USAHFPA
USAISC
USAMC
USAMSSA
USAR
USARC
USAREUR
USARJ
USARPAC
USARSO
USASDC
USAVNC
Uniform Building Code
Unaccompanied Enlisted Personnel Housing
Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards
Unfinanced Requirement
Unit Identification Code
Unified Military Command
Unspecified Minor Military Construction, Army
Unit Price Book
Unaccompanied Officers Quarters
Unaccompanied Personnel Housing
Uninterrupted Power Supply
Utilization and Requirements
Unconstrained Requirements Report
U.S. Army Air Traffic Control Activity
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
U.S. Army Engineer Division / District
U.S. Army Engineering and Housing Support Center
U.S. Air Force
U.S. Army Finance and Accounting Command
U.S. Air Force Reserve
U.S. Army Health Facilities Planning Agency
U.S. Army Information Systems Command
U.S. Army Material Command
U.S. Army Management Systems Support Agency
U.S. Army Reserve
U.S. Army Reserve Center
U.S. Army, Europe
U.S. Army, Japan
U.S. Army, Pacific
U.S. Army Forces Southern Command
U.S. Army Strategic Defense Command
U.S. Army Aviation Center
B-19
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
USBRO
USC
USEUCOM
USMA
UST
U.S. Base Rights Overseas
United States Code
United States European Command
United States Military Academy, West Point, NY
Underground Storage Tank
VCSA
VE
VECP
VEO
VEQ
VIABLE
VOQ
Vice Chief of Staff, U.S. Army
Value Engineering Program
Value Engineering Change Proposal
Value Engineering Officer
Visiting Enlisted Quarters
Vertical Installation Automation Baseline
Visiting Officers Quarters
WCA
WESTCOM
WHS
WHSB
WIP
WO
WTCV
Wildlife Conservation, Army (program)
(U.S. Army) Western Command
Washington Headquarters Services
Wholesale Support Base (major mission area)
Work in Place (USAF)
Work Order
Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles
(program account)
B-20
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
PART II
Terms
NOTE:
See Appendix C for definitions of major programs.
A-E/Construction Contractor Appraisal Support Systems
(ACASS/CCASS) - These companion systems exist throughout USACE
for the purpose of recording and transmitting appraisals made of
contractor performance. The objective of these systems is to
publicize the performance of contractors throughout the Corps,
thereby encouraging good contractor performance and providing the
means for avoiding contracts with nonresponsible contractors.
While ACASS covers A-E contracts "Corps wide," the CCASS data
base covers the entire Defense Department.
Addition - A change to a real property facility that adds to its
overall external dimensions.
Allocation - An authorization issued by the Comptroller of the
military department for dollars and manpower spaces to specified
major headquarters or agencies to fund or man operations at
subordinate echelons by means of sub-allocations or allotments.
Alteration - A change to interior or exterior facility
arrangements to improve its current purpose. This includes
installed equipment made a part of the existing facility.
Additions, expansions, and extensions are not alterations.
Appropriation - An authorization by an
obligations for specified purposes and
payments therefore out of the treasury
Appropriations are classified as being
continuing, depending on the period of
obligation purposes.
act of Congress to incur
to make subsequent
of the United States.
annual, multi-year, or
time that is available for
Army Guidance - A standing document, revised biannually,
in four volumes and used in preparing the Army program.
Guidance outlines parameters and concept for program and
development, identifies total Army goals, presents Chief
guidance, Army objectives, and priorities.
issued
The Army
budget
of Staff
Army Housing Justification Process (AHJP) - This process replaces
the Navy Family Requirements Survey, drawing its required data
from the Segmented Housing Market Analysis and well as from the
records of the Army Housing Office. As the installation loads
collected information into HOMES data base, they will be
gathering and maintaining the data that is necessary to
produce the AHJP reports.
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The AHJP also gives the decision maker accurate assessments of an
installation's requirements any day of the year with little
required lead time.
Army Long-Range Planning System (ALRPS) - This system establishes
a broad but consistent view or Army long-range goals to be used
by the mid- and near-range planners. It formulates staff long
range plans that describe how the Army is to be manned, equipped,
employed and supported in the 10 - 20 year future.
Army Management Structure Codes (AMSCO) - Provides a single
uniform classification of non-tactical activities. It is used in
programming, budgeting, and accounting and for reporting cost,
performance and manpower data. The codes enable program and
appropriation directors to interrelate changes in Congressional
appropriations and to communicate them to the Staff and major
commands. Facilities engineering activities are accounted
for by this means.
Army Mobilization and Operations Planning System (AMOPS) - A
system that provides specific responsibilities, instructions, and
guidance for mobilization and deployment. The Corps of Engineers
supplementation to this system is called the Corps of Engineers
Mobilization Operations Planning System (CEMOPS).
Army Stationing and Installations Plan (ASIP) - An official
document that provides the projected force structure for planning
and programming of real properties required to support personnel
and activities (Army and other services) scheduled to be located
at Army installations in the United States, Europe, Panama, Korea
and other locations in the Pacific during the periods of the Five
Year Defense Program (FYDP). The ASIP uses authorized projected
strength, except as otherwise noted. All base data is extracted
from the Force Development Management Information Systems
(FDMIS).
Authorization - The basic substantive legislation enacted by
Congress that sets up or continues the legal operation of a
Federal program or agency. Such legislation includes manpower
and is normally a prerequisite for subsequent appropriations, but
it does not usually provide budget authority.
Automated Review Management System (ARMS) - An automated system
being fielded throughout USACE during the early 1990's that will
record and track, and provide feedback to originators, on all
comments made during design and constructability reviews.
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Backlog of Maintenance and Repair (BMAR) and Deferred Maintenance
and Repair (DMAR) - These classifications represent work that was
required during a specific fiscal year, was programmed for
accomplishment, but could not be performed due to insufficient
resources. BMAR/DMAR is a recognized measurement of existing
deficiencies in real property facilities and is used to justify
RPMA and AFH maintenance and repair requirements.
Base Operations (BASOPS) - An aggregation of functional
activities for operating and maintaining installations and for
providing installation type support. This program is part of the
Operations and Maintenance Account of each service.
Basis of Issue Plan (BOIP) - This plan indicates the quantity of
new or modified equipment planned for each type of organization
and the related changes planned for personnel and supporting
equipment.
Breakage - The total cost of designs or portions of designs,
studies or other design related activities, funded with planning
and design funds, started and canceled prior to completion for
whatever reason, including both in-house and contract work; and,
designs or portions of designs completed but not expected to be
advertised or awarded for construction, excluding work defined as
"lost design". This does not include work that is temporarily
shelved due to project deferral. Breakage occurs when a
cancellation order is issued by the office which authorized the
design effort.
Budget Year - Precedes the program year in which funds are made
available for construction and follows the design year. The year
in which the Army defends the Military Construction Program
before OSD, OMB and the Congress, and the year final design is to
be substantially completed. In FY 90, the budget year is FY 91.
Capital Investment - The acquisition cost of Government property
less accumulated depreciation.
Change Orders (design) - Changes to the design of a project
initiated after the award of a design contract or start of
in-house design of the major project. They may result in cost
increase or decrease. Usually, the result of a change in project
scope, sizing, or criteria. A report of design change order
costs is included in the Supplemental Justification
Data submitted to OSD as backup to the MCA Program.
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Command Operating Budget Estimate - Requirements formulated and
submitted by the Army commands to HQDA in mid-July of the budget
year. The input provides appropriation directors with details
essential in developing and evaluating their budget estimates.
The submission also furnishes the commands the opportunity to
inform the Army Staff of any unforseen change in previously
projected program requirements for the upcoming fiscal year. The
information helps appropriation directors to construct
apportionment requests forwarded to OSD-OMB before the 30
September OSD-budget submit.
Commercial Activities - Commercial and industrial facilities that
are Government-owned and Government-operated (GOGO), or
Government-owned and contractor-operated (GOCO) that provide a
product or service used primarily by the Government. Includes
laundries, central kitchens, central pastry kitchens, central
bakeries, meat cutting facilities serving more than one dining
facility, and manufacturing, maintenance and distribution
facilities. The "commercial activity facility" may be a
single facility, or may be included in a group of facilities, or
it may be only a part of a facility that is not wholly devoted to
commercial type activities.
Computer-Aided Design and Drafting (CADD) System - These systems
accomplish drawing, mapping, charting, and illustration tasks
which have in the past been executed manually in a drafting room.
HQUSACE has accomplished a Corps-wide procurement of CADD systems
including Integraph software, maintenance and training. The
Corps contract provides an option for DEH's to buy equipment off
the contract, provided that respective DEH's obtain local ADP
equipment acquisition approval from their local DOIMs and
have sufficient funds to proceed.
Concept Project Design Control Data (CPD) - (Code 2, 35% design)
- Normally this is the second stage of the design directive.
Occasionally this is the first design directive the design office
receives.
Conference Action - Functions of members of both the House of
Representatives and the Senate in joint session, to reconcile
their differences so that a single bill can be recommended which
will gain the approval of both Houses of Congress.
Construction - The erection, installation, or assembly of a new
facility. The addition, expansion, extension, alteration,
conversion, or replacement of an existing facility. Installed
equipment made a part of the facility, related site preparation,
excavation, filling, landscaping, or other land improvements.
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Construction Activity - The activity, or agency, responsible for
contract award or execution of construction work by other means.
Construction Commanders - The officer commanding the organization
responsible for the design and construction of the facilities.
Usually it is a USACE district or division commander.
Construction Project - A single undertaking to produce a complete
and usable facility and/or a complete and usable improvement to
an existing facility. A construction project includes all
construction work, land acquisition, supervision, inspection and
overhead costs, and procurement and/or installation of specific
types of build-in (installed) equipment necessary to make a
facility complete and usable.
Construction Requirements Review Committee (CRRC) - A HQDA
committee that supports the Appropriations Director of Military
Construction, National Guard construction and Army Reserve
construction by providing program analysis, helping program
analysis, helping to develop and defend Army construction budget
estimates, and developing Army-wide programs.
Continuing Resolution - Legislation enacted by Congress to
provide contingency budget authority for specific ongoing
activities when a regular appropriation for such activities has
not been enacted by the beginning of the fiscal year.
Conversion - A change to interior
arrangements so that the facility
This includes installed equipment
facility. Results in a change of
or exterior facility
may be used for a new purpose.
made a part of the existing
facility category code.
Corporate Group - A three part decision making body with members
assigned one each from HQUSACE, the responsible MACOM, and the
cognizant USACE division. The group has, within specific limits,
the authority over all changes other than operability changes
that affect scope, cost, or schedules of projects.
Corps of Engineers Resource and Military Manpower Model System
(CERAMMS) - This system combines computer models, management
policy controls and DA resource constraints to forecast manpower
requirements, planning and design funding requirements, and
supervision and administration funding requirements for all of
USACE and its individual MSCs and districts. The system allows
the Corps to anticipate, and rapidly allocate resources
to locations where the workload becomes the heaviest.
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Current Year - The current fiscal year which is called the
execution year.
DD Form 1391 Processor - An interactive computer based teleprocessing system that assists in the preparation and review of
DD Forms 1391. The main functions of this system are to provide
interactive tele-processing assistance in preparing and editing
DD Forms 1391, and submission and distribution of forms
electronically; to calculate space allowances; to estimate
primary facilities costs; to allow on-line retrieval and updating
of background data files; to provide a single source of official
DD Forms 1391 for all concerned organizations from the
installation to the staff and secretariat level of DA; and to
facilitate the preparation, submission, and review of DD Forms
1391 throughout the Army.
DD Form 1390 Processor - The DD Form 1390 Processor allows users
to electronically prepare, review, accept and print out the DD
Form 1390.
Defense Environmental Restoration Account (DERA) - The central
DOD account used to fund certain IRP and FUDS projects.
Defense Guidance - This is the major product of the Office of the
Secretary of Defense fall planning cycle. Consisting of seven
sections, the guidance guides and directs defense planning, force
development, and force structuring, and supporting programs based
on forecasts of total obligation authority for a ten year period.
DEH Digest - A publication of the Engineering and Housing Support
Center which reviews technical developments, provides a forum for
discussion of current DEH issues, and informs the field of
services available.
DEH Support Services Guide - A catalog of DEH services available
from the Corps of Engineers Engineering and Housing Support
Center.
DEH Worldwide Roster - A listing of names, addresses and PAX-IDs
for DEHs.
Demolition - The removal of existing structures and utilities as
required to clear a construction site. The removal of other
facilities proposed for destruction in the justification of new
construction.
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Design Agency - The organization designated with responsibility
for design of a MILCON project, usually a USACE district or MSC.
Design Directives - Design directives for MILCON projects are
issued by HQUSACE to its subordinate commands for the purpose of
carrying out various steps in the design of a project. The
directives are designated by code numbers, which are defined as
follows:
a. Code 1. The project is authorized for A-E selection and
initiation of preliminary in-house design activities. The design
is authorized to be developed through the investigative phase,
with options to continue to 35% design (Concept Project Design)
and 100% design (Final Project Design). On receipt of a Code 1
directive and proper funding from HQUSACE, initiation of in-house
site investigation work is authorized including surveys,
subsurface (to include analysis of soil content for hazardous
contaminants) and utility investigations, and other work in the
special instructions of the Code 1 directive. If estimates show
that design costs will exceed current statutory limits for 10 USC
2807 requirements, A-E selection or procedures and in-house
design will be delayed until statutory requirements have been
met. Code 1 will be released only after a complete DD Form 1391
has been submitted to CE, and reviewed and released by the
Directorate of Military Programs.
b. Code 2. Concept Project Design (35%) is authorized.
this is the first design authorization, activities prescribed
under Code 1 above, are required as part of Concept Design
process.
c.
Code 3.
If
This code is not currently used.
d. Code 4. The project design is delayed, pending a
supplemental design directive.
e. Code 5. The project is deferred from the program. If
design has not been started, districts do not start any design.
If project design has been started, design may proceed through
the current stage and be retained for future use. If Concept or
Final Design is being performed under an A-E contract, or by
in-house forces, it will be terminated or completed, whichever
will best serve the Government. Completed work will be retained
for future use.
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f. Code 6. The project is authorized for Final Project
Design. If this is the first design authorization, then the
Concept Project design is required as part of the Final Project
Design process.
g.
Code 7.
This code is not currently used.
h. Code 8. The project is canceled. This code is issued
when the project is without support and is not expected to be
required in the future. The Contracting Officer is required to
terminate the design contract or complete it, whichever will best
serve the Government.
i. Code 9.
be awarded.
A construction contract has been authorized to
Design Personnel - People primarily engaged in design or the
administration of design. All personnel whose salaries are paid
primarily from planning and design funds and those who are paid
from other sources, but who are primarily engaged in
design-associated work.
Design Workload - The number of design projects and the dollar
value of designs performed by an office. Design dollars are
spent on activities other than basic design work such as concept
and advance concept studies, development of or revisions of
manuals, specifications, criteria, standard designs and
definitive drawings, attendance at seminars and conferences,
and office overhead.
Design Year (DY) - The year immediately preceding the budget year
and immediately after the guidance year. It is the year design
is started on a construction project.
Directed programs (fenced programs) - Programs that have been
ordered into a program by DA or higher authority. Money for
these programs is usually set aside in the program guidance for
use if valid projects can be identified and construction can be
awarded during the fiscal year that funds are available.
Examples of directed programs are the Energy Conservation
Investment Program (ECIP) and the Army Pollution Abatement
Program (APAP).
Disposal - Any authorized method of permanently divesting the
Army of control and responsibility for real property or an
interest in real property.
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Easement - A right to use property for a particular purpose, such
as a right-of-way for a road, telephone and telegraph lines,
etc..
Energy Monitoring and Control Systems (EMCS) - These systems
monitor and control energy use in a particular building or group
of buildings. The systems conserve energy and reduce costs.
EMCS vary from simple local controls such as time switches to
sophisticated systems that use computer programs to monitor and
control energy use and equipment operation.
Engineer Basing Program - This uses the Real Property Planning
and Analysis System (RPLANS) to help planners at Army
installations, MACOMs and HQDA with stationing, planning,
programming and facilities utilization tasks. RPLANS provides
automated, consistent facilities allowance calculations, an
automated method for developing master planning TABs for
installations, and a predictive model for estimating costs to
maintain and operate facilities in support of various missions.
Engineering During Construction (EDC) - Normally one-half of one
percent of the construction cost is included in the CWE for a
construction project and is set aside for engineering and design
(E&D) during construction. This service includes E&D to meet
changed conditions, user requests for contract modifications, or
changed criteria.
Title II A-E services may be retained to
provide EDC.
Environmental Baseline Study (EBS) or Preliminary Assessment
Screening (PAS) - An inventory and comprehensive evaluation of
existing environmental conditions of the real property which is
the subject of a real estate action. The Army requires the
preparation of an EBS/PAS for any type of real estate
transaction. The EBS/PAS becomes either a part of a Record of
Environmental Consideration (REC), an Environmental Assessment
(EA), or an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).
Evaluated Total Cost Method - Formerly called life cycle bidding,
requires that prospective contractors include time of
construction as part of their bid, thereby making every bidder
estimate the most economical and efficient construction period as
part of the competitive submittal.
These durations are balanced
against the date when the user needs the facility, the costs of
Government supervision over the proposed duration, and
prospective overhead costs resulting from contract changes.
Award is made to the bidder demonstrating the greatest economy
and efficiency to the Government; or, the "least evaluated total
cost".
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Expansion - A change to a real property facility that adds to its
overall external dimension.
Extension - See Addition.
Facilities Energy Technology Service (FETS) - This service
provides timely and authoritative answers to questions about
facilities energy conservation, to include performance of
literature searches to develop answers, providing technical
personnel who can analyze and evaluate information within the
field of energy conservation, and perform field or laboratory
tests on energy saving products and materials.
Facilities Requirements Sketch - The earliest visual depiction of
a project showing each primary facility item and its relation to
the proposed site and supporting facilities.
Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) - The primary regulation for
use by all Federal Executive agencies in their acquisition of
supplies or services with appropriated funds. Defense Federal
Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS), the Army Federal
Acquisition Regulation Supplement (AFARS), the Air Force Federal
Acquisition Regulation Supplement (AFFARS) and the Engineer
Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (EFARS) provide DoD,
Departmental, and Corps of Engineer guidance in conjunction with
the Federal Acquisition Regulation.
Fences - Funding levels established by OSD and OSA for particular
programs. Fences are otherwise known as ceilings or floors, the
term refers to funding levels above or below which a program
manager may not obligate funds.
Final Project Design (FPD) - (Code 6, 100% design) - Normally the
final design directive for military construction projects, which
authorizes full and complete design of projects up to the ready
to advertise stage.
Foreign Areas - All areas outside the Unites States.
Gross Floor Area - The total area of all floors, including
mezzanines, basements and penthouses as determined by the
effective outside dimensions of the building. On-half area will
be included for uncovered loading platforms, covered ground level
or depressed loading facilities and covered but not inclosed
passageways, porches, balconies and stairs.
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Exterior uncovered stairs, uncovered stoops, paved terraces and
all inclosed space having an average ceiling height of less than
seven feet will be excluded.
Guidance Year (GY) - The year preceding the design year. It
begins with the Army Guidance documents providing general
instructions and the present policies of HQDA. Included are
military construction programs and program dollar guidance for
each MACOM's MCA and AFH programs.
Historic Preservation Plans (HPP) - Documentation required by AR
420-40 for all Army installations. HPP contain inventories, set
priorities, establish goals and objectives, policies, procedures,
and resource requirements for preservation of historic facilities
and places on Army installations.
Improvement - Alteration, conversion, modernization, renewal,
addition, expansion, or extension which is for the purpose of
enhancing rather than repairing a facility or system associated
with established facilities.
Incidental Improvement - Minor improvement made within the cost
limitations of the Army Family Housing Operation and Maintenance
Program.
Incremental Construction - The construction of a project in
usable segments. For example, a project to completely upgrade
the paving of an airfield could be broken into increments such as
the runway itself, taxiway or parking apron. Each increment is
complete and usable in itself, but the total project is not
complete until all increments are completed and the total
requirement is satisfied.
Installation - A fixed location together with its land,
buildings, structures, utilities and improvements that is
controlled and/or used by DOD elements.
Interim Facility Requirement - A short-term (3 years or less)
requirement resulting from unforeseen events. The long-term
requirement must be addressed by means of normal MILCON
programming.
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Lease - A real estate contract which provides for exclusive use
of real property for a specified period of time.
License - A real estate instrument which grants no rights to real
property, but which only authorizes an act on the property that
would otherwise constitute a trespass.
Life Cycle Project Management (LCPM) - A management concept
within the Corps of Engineers that assigns "cradle to grave"
responsibility for a design and construction project, or project
related action, to a single project manager.
Lost Design - Design work that must be discarded and redone prior
to award of a construction contract. This may occur because of
changes in the scope of a project, criteria revisions, weapons
systems requirements, or changes for any other reason that
invalidate complete parts of a design. "Lost design" is separate
from "breakage" unless the design of a project is terminated
before completion or the construction of the project is
canceled. At that time, all costs including "lost design" are
accounted for under "breakage". Design changes that do not
result in increased design cost are not "lost design."
MACOM Five Year Program - A program that contains data from the
guidance year and four succeeding fiscal years, as submitted by
the major Army commanders and evaluated by HQDA. Included in the
MACOM FYP are those mobilization group I projects that are
funded, that is, programmed within the command's dollar guidance.
Maintenance - The work required to preserve and maintain a real
property facility in such a condition that it may be effectively
used for its designated functional purpose. Maintenance includes
work done to prevent damage which would be more costly to restore
than to prevent. It also includes work to sustain components.
Major Army Commander - The commander-in-chief, or commander, of a
major Army command.
Major Construction - Construction projects having a funded cost
in excess of the statutory cost limitations of minor construction
projects that are, or are intended to be, authorized and
appropriated under MILCON laws.
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Major Facility - For the purposes of determining suitability for
incremental construction, a major facility is any single facility
costing more than $100 million. Examples include hospitals or
large research facilities. The National Training Center at Fort
Irwin, CA, by contrast, would not be a major facility because it
is a collection of smaller projects.
Management Decision Package (MDEP) - A document prepared to
describe, and show the budgetary and manpower requirements of a
program, including incremental programs. A narrative describes
all or a definite portion of the program, and a resource display
identifies the manpower and total obligation authority associated
with the program.
The document is designed to focus
justification by all components of the Army staff.
Master Plan or Base Comprehensive Plan - An integrated series of
documents the present in graphic, narrative and tabular form the
present composition of an installation and the plans for its
orderly and comprehensive development in the future.
McKinney Homeless Assistance Act and Executive Order (EO) 12682 Title V of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act
requires the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to
screen federal buildings and real property described in surveys
as underutilized, unutilized, or not put to optimum use, and to
identify those facilities suitable for the homeless. Under EO
12682, DOD reports all unutilized, underutilized and excess
properties that could be effectively utilized or renovated to
serve as minimum security facilities for nonviolent prisoners,
drug treatment facilities for nonviolent drug abusers, and
facilities to assist the homeless. HUD makes the final
determination on reported properties for homeless purposes.
MILCON Line Item Review - A conference attended by
representatives of the Assistant Chief of Engineers, HQUSACE, the
MACOM engineer staff, and USACE divisions and districts to
review, on a line item basis, active design programs. The
purpose is to identify any problems which may adversely impact
the project's execution if not resolved in a timely manner.
Military Construction Program Data - Those documents that
represent all unsatisfied facility requirements (except family
housing) regardless of funding source. The data includes the
MACOM Five Year Plan, which includes all mobilization Group I
projects, the Long Range Construction Program, and the
Mobilization Project List which includes all mobilization
Group II and III projects.
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Minor Construction - Those construction projects subject to the
dollar limitation established by Congress in the Military
Construction Authorization Act for the fiscal year in question.
(10 U.S.C. 2805).
Mobilization Project - A project required solely or substantially
to meet an installation's requirement to have the capacity to
mobilize. All mobilization projects in the Army are grouped into
three categories: Group I are those designed and constructed
prior to the order to mobilize; Group II are those designed prior
to mobilization, and Group III are those that are to be designed
and constructed after the receipt of the order to mobilize.
Mobilization Troop Base Stationing Plan - The stationing plan for
troops under mobilized conditions.
Mobilization Project Listing - All projects in mobilization
Groups I, II and III.
Multi-Purpose Use - A real estate term that promotes maximum use
of real estate, e.g., hay leases in parachute drop zones,
recreational uses of buffer zones, and hunting and fishing in
maneuver and training areas.
New Start - See AR 5-20 (Commercial Activities [CA]) for new
start criteria, definitions, geographic application and dollar
thresholds.
Nonreimbursable Work/Funds - Work accomplished for others for
which payment is not made by the recipient, but by a central
appropriation or other source of funds.
Non-Whole House Projects - An AFH project that addresses the
maintenance, repair and/or improvement only of a specific
component or components of a dwelling unit. Also referred to as
a line-item improvement program (LIIP) project.
Obligation - A legal liability of the Government established as a
result of an order placed, contract awarded, services received,
and similar transactions during a given period requiring
disbursements; and which, under the specified conditions of the
transactions, will result in a valid charge against the
appropriation or fund involved.
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Operability changes - Unavoidable changes that are required in
order to build a complete and operable facility. Such changes
originate with unforeseen factors discovered during design and
construction, i.e., changed site conditions after award of
construction contracts, or design errors which must be corrected
in order to make the facility complete and usable. Excluded from
the operability category are all enhancement or elective changes,
even though justified from efficiency of operations,
maintainability, functional or aesthetic needs.
Operations and Maintenance, Army (OMA) (Real Property Maintenance
Activity) - AMS Codes including the "J" Account, for operations
and utilities, the "K" Account for maintenance and repair of real
property, the "L" Account for minor construction and the "M"
Account for engineering support.
Operations and Maintenance Engineering Enhancement (OMEE) - This
is a USACE initiative that secures the services of the
construction contractor to perform operations, maintenance and
repairs for a period of one year, or possibly more, after the
completion of a facility. Installation O&M funds are used to
procure OMEE services. The concept began field trial during FY
90.
PAX System - The Programming, Administration Execution system
which has a tele-processing capability available worldwide,
providing up-to-the-minute information and a variety of
computerized programs to support Army engineers executing their
responsibilities. The DD Form 1391 Processor, the 1390
Processor, CAPCES system and the MYPLAN system are resident in
PAX, which is sponsored by the Directorate of Military Programs,
HQUSACE.
Pavement Maintenance Management (PAVER) System - This system is
the pavement maintenance management system approved for optional
Army-wide use. Installations can use this system in either a
manual or automated mode to divide the pavement network into
manageable sections for rating according to a standardized
method, formulate maintenance strategies, identify maintenance
and repair requirements, and, based on available resources,
develop pavement projects.
Permits - Real estate instruments that are issued by one
Department of Defense agency, or other federal agency, to another
federal agency for the use of property.
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Phasing of Construction - The process of breaking a complete
project into sequential tasks, such as foundation,
superstructure, exterior and interior finish, and site
improvement. One "phase" without companion "phases" will not
produce a complete and usable project. This term should
not be confused with "incremental construction".
Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution System (PPBES) An integrated system that establishes, maintains, and revises the
Five Year Defense Program and the DOD budget.
Planning and Design Management System - A system designed to
improve the delivery of new or remodeled facilities. This is
accomplished thorough decentralized control, greater discipline
of planning and programming processes, clear responsibility and
authority assignment for management activities during the
planning, programming, design, budgetary, and execution phases of
the military construction program. The system does not apply to
medical facilities.
Plant Materials - Trees, shrubs, vines, and/or ground covers.
This term will not usually include seeding and sodding.
Post Acquisition Construction - Constructions projects performed
on existing family housing which improve the structure, installed
equipment, including ECIP projects, and auxiliary support
facilities.
Primary Facility - The main facility or facility complex and
items inside the 5-foot line of the facility, required to perform
an essential mission or function.
Program Analysis and Resource Review (PARR) - An analysis of
resource requirements submitted by selected major commands.
Because the PARR furnishes information applicable to the budget
year, first program year, and last 4 program years, it
constitutes a substantive basis for preparing the Program
Objective Memorandum (POM).
Program Budget Guidance (PBG) - Information regarding
availability of dollar and manpower resources. PBG provides
general guidance and expresses HQDA views on various programs and
identifies programs to be included in the MDEP under the MCA and
AFH appropriations.
Program Development Increment Package (PDIP) - PDIP numbers were
the decision increment packages previous to MDEP. PDIP has been
replaced by MDEP.
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Program Objective Memorandum (POM) - A formal document submitted
to OSD containing the Army proposals for resource allocation in
consonance with program guidance. The POM describes all aspects
of Army programs to increase the operational readiness of the
total Army. It highlights forces, manpower, and material
acquisition and also addresses the equipment distribution and
logistics support required to meet the strategy and objectives
specified by the Secretary of Defense.
Program Year (PY) - The year funds are made available for
construction. It is the first year of the execution phase of
each military construction program. It follows the budget year
and is the current fiscal year.
Project Closure - A HQUSACE and USAF initiative to accomplish
more timely return of excess project funds to the services. The
goal of this initiative is to have financial close-out of each
construction project occur within six months after substantial
completion of the contract.
Project Formulation Control Data (PFCD) - The body of information
produced in the formulation stage of MILCON projects. The PFCD
includes the project development brochure or project book, a full
DD Form 1391, supporting data, an approved site plan, and
preliminary DDESB approval when required.
Project Management - The process whereby and individual is
responsible for planning, organizing, coordinating, directing and
controlling the combined efforts of functional staff and contract
services to accomplish a project objective. It is the integrated
management of a specific project on a systems basis.
Project, Minor Construction - A single undertaking at a military
installation with an approved cost of $1.5 million or less. Each
project must include all work needed to produce a complete and
usable facility or improvement to an existing facility.
Real Property Facility - A separate building, structure, utility
system, or improvement.
Real Property Inventory (RPI) - The reporting of real property
assets that is required by Section 410 of Title IV, National
Security Act of 1947, as amended (10 U.S.C. 2701). All services
are required to develop qualitative and monetary records for
annual reports to the President and to the Congress, for
maintenance of facilities inventories for each service, for
MILCON validation, and for response to stationing and master
planning proposals.
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Real Property Maintenance Activities (RPMA) - The term RPMA is
used to describe the activities funded by the "J","K","L", and
"M" accounts for operation and purchase of utility service,
maintenance and repair of real property, minor construction, and
other engineering support. These accounts represent the largest
single portion of the installations' base operations budget.
Real Property Management System (RPMS) - The life cycle
management process whereby military real property requirements
are planned, programmed, acquired, operated, maintained and
disposed of.
Reimbursable Work/Funds - Work or services performed for others,
for which they make payment to the provider.
Related Furnishings and Equipment - Those items not to be
included in the MILCON or family housing project costs, but to be
identified during planning so that appropriate funds can be
programmed for procurement and delivery of items so as not to
delay full use of the facility upon completion of construction.
Relocatable Building - A building designed for the specific
purpose of being readily moved, erected, disassembled, stored and
reused. This includes all types of buildings designed to provide
relocatable capabilities and building forms such as trailers
(trailer-type buildings). Specifically excluded from this
definition are building types and forms that are provided as an
integral part of a mobile equipment item and that are incidental
portions of such equipment components, e.g., communications vans
or truck trailers.
Relocation - The movement of a building or structure that is
either intact or disassembled, from one site to another. It
includes movement of utility lines, but excludes relocation of
roads, pavements, airstrips or similar facilities.
Renewal - A comprehensive project to completely renew, upgrade,
modernize, renovate, or rehabilitate an existing facility by
doing all required work, maintenance and repair plus improvement,
at one time.
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Repair - The restoration of a real property facility to such a
condition that it may be effectively used for its designated
purpose. Repair may be overhaul, reprocessing, or replacement of
deteriorated components parts or materials. Correction of
deficiencies in failed or failing components of existing
facilities or systems to meet current Army standards and codes
where such work, for reasons of economy, should be done
concurrently with restoration of failed or failing components.
Repair work may involve incidental increases in qualities or
capacities.
Replacement - The complete reconstruction of a facility that has
been destroyed or damaged beyond the point of economical repair.
Replacement also refers to a new facility designed to take the
place of an existing facility.
Roads and Parking - All roads, streets, and parking associated
with a project, including integral curbs and gutters, traffic
control devices, signs and sidewalks.
ROOFER - This system is an engineered management system for
built-up roofing systems, providing the data needed to develop a
cost-effective program for managing built-up roofing assets. The
system allows for inventorying roof assets, development of roof
plans, detection of roof problems, development of condition
indexes, network analysis data, work requests to repair defects,
a five year budget program, and a final report.
Segmented Housing Market Analysis (SHMA) - The analysis used to
determine how adequate the available community housing assets are
for various Army personnel. A SHMA is in direct compliance with
Congressional and Department of Defense policy, which requires
that the services exhaust local community housing assets before
requesting approval for housing acquisitions. The SHMA gives a
precise picture of the civilian community's ability to provide
for the military, and helps the Army justify acquisition of
housing units when the civilian community cannot provide support.
Select Committee (SELCOM) - The Army's senior committee that
reviews, coordinates, and integrates PPBS actions. The committee
may dispose an action on its own authority or recommend action to
the Chief of Staff and Secretary of the Army. Among its specific
functions, SELCOM considers and interprets guidance from the
Secretary of Defense and Secretary of the Army and reviews
overall Army policy, programs, and budget. The SELCOM
employs the Strategy and Planning Committee, the Program Guidance
and Review Committee, the Budget Preview Committee, and the
Program Optimization and Budget Evaluation Steering Committee.
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Selective Energy (SE) Systems - Selective energy systems are
designed to provide most of the electricity and heating or
cooling required by a facility, using an optimum base-loaded
combination of on-site electrical generation and waste heat,
while depending on off-site power to meet peak electrical
demands.
Self-Compensating Project - A minor construction project that
results in savings in maintenance and operation costs in excess
of the project cost. The project must be over $300,000 and the
savings must occur within three years after project completion.
Simplified Design Methods (SDM) - A system of design preparation
that is being implemented throughout the Corps of Engineers to
reduce the cost and time required for simple projects where only
a few building trades are involved. SDM allows photos, sketches,
handwritten design documentation, and letter size plans. Corps
of Engineers Abridged Guide Specifications (CEAGS) is a companion
initiative that provides abbreviated guide specs for simple
construction and maintenance and repair projects.
Site Improvement - Site related construction items that are not
considered an integral part of other supporting facilities such
as walks, walls and fences, site furnishings, grading, etc.
Six Percent Statutory Fee Limitation - Limitation on fees to be
paid under A-E contracts for the production and delivery of
designs, plans, drawings, and specifications for construction
projects. This limitation is imposed by 10 U.S.C. 4540, and is
based on the estimated cost of construction. Examples of
services which are not considered an integral part of the design
and may be excluded from the A-E fee when determining compliance
with the statute: initial site visits; field and topographic
surveys, property, boundary, utility and right-of-way surveys;
subsurface explorations and borings; feasibility, functional,
economic studies and other investigations; flow guagings, model
testing; preparation or verification of as-built drawings;
preparation of general and development criteria; preparation of
general and feature design memoranda; services of consultants
where not specifically applied to the preparation of working
drawings or specifications; preparation of environmental impact
assessments, statements, and supporting data; title II services;
models, renderings, or photographs of completed designs;
reproduction of designs for review purposes; and travel and per
diem in conjunction with excludable services (EFARS 36.605(101)).
Splitting - See "Incremental Construction."
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Stovepipes - Functional and technical staff channels of
communications between organizational levels supplement formal
command and staff relationships. Often termed "stovepipes",
functional channels provide a direct and highly responsive
staffing path to transmit guidance and tasks and to effect staff
coordination.
Superfund - An Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) program for
the cleanup of hazardous and toxic waste sites nationwide. The
Corps of Engineers is the execution agent for EPA in this
program.
Supporting Facilities - Items of construction directly related to
the primary facility such as utilities, communications and
facilities outside the 5-foot line of the structure including
storm drainage, unusual foundations, roads and parking, plant
materials, site improvements, demolition, relocation, and
recreational facilities.
Tables of Distribution and Allowances (TDA) - Authorization
documents for non-combat, non-deployable units. Each document is
unique for a particular unit (predominantly general support
units) or organization.
Tables of Organization and Equipment (TOE) - Requirements guide
for "type" units, usually deployable combat units, e.g. infantry,
artillery or armor battalions.
The Army Plan (TAP) - The TAP provides a definitive basis for
program action. It is prepared by the DCSOPS in coordination
with the ARSTAF and major commands. It implements the decision
by the Chief of Staff and Secretary of the Army as to the desired
alternative for the objective force, discusses the threat and
military strategy, and lays out what the Army wants to do in
support of the mission and how it will build the objective force.
Third Party Financing (TPF) - In times of limited resources, this
program offers an innovative approach toward providing the
government with required facilities and services. TPF means that
a party outside of the government may fund, construct, outlease,
operate, maintain and repair a facility, or provide a complete
service for the government. TPF should be considered for
revenue-generating, non-mission critical facilities and services,
provided that such an initiative is the most economical
alternative.
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Title II Services - An A-E contract may be structured to contain
an option for "Title II" services. These services provide for
assistance by the A-E to the Government during construction and
may include visits to the construction site for inspection of the
work or other assistance, review of shop drawings and other
contract submittals, source inspection and test witnessing at a
supplier's plant, or engineering and design.
Total Energy (TE) Systems - These systems are designed to provide
all of the electricity and heating or cooling required by a
facility. The electricity is generated on site and the waste
heat is recovered and used for heating domestic hot water,
tempering outdoor ventilation air, cooling with adsorption
refrigeration, space heating, or producing process steam.
Total Obligation Authority (TOA) - A measure used by DOD which
refers to the value of the direct Defense Program for each year.
For example, if it is proposed to fund 10 MILCON projects at a
cost of $1 million each, the total equals $10 million in TOA.
United States - The fifty states, the District of Columbia, and
United States territories and possessions.
Usable Increment - The part of a proposed facility that, if the
whole facility were not provided, could be put to use.
User-Requested Change - A change of an elective or enhancement
nature as opposed to an operability nature that is originated by
the using organization, installation, or MACOM. Changes relating
to the incorporation of MACOM, installation or using unit
criteria, mission changes, site changes, or facility use
requirements are considered as user-originated changes, even
though justified from efficiency of operations, maintainability,
functional, or aesthetic preferences. The Corporate Group will
act upon all user-originated MILCON funded changes.
U.S. Overseas - For purposes of MILCON and RPMA, these areas
include Alaska, Hawaii, and U.S. territories and possessions.
U.S. Territories and Possessions - Outlying areas of the U.S.,
including Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, Trust territory of the
Pacific Islands, American Samoa, Wake and Midway islands, and
Guam.
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Whole-House Project - A comprehensive project for renewing,
upgrading, modernizing, renovating, or rehabilitating a dwelling
unit by doing all required work (maintenance and repair plus
improvements) at one time. Normally, this method is used where a
dwelling unit has either failed or failing systems and
components, or where amenities are obsolete when compared with
those found in contemporary housing. Also see "Renewal."
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APPENDIX C
INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
Air Force Automated Pricing Guide - A system, available to USAF
project development and review personnel, that forecasts project
costs based on historical pricing records and other conditions.
The proponent for this system is HQUSAF/LEE.
Army Criteria Tracking System (ACTS) - A system, resident on PAX
system, that provides a single source reference of space
allowances, siting relationships, and other facilities criteria
for use by the project programmer. The system combines data from
the many space criteria documents published by the Army, while
incorporating certain portions of the U.S. Army, Europe
Facilities Planning Guide. The proponent for this system is the
Installations Planning Division, Office of the Assistant
Chief of Engineers, HQDA (DAEN-ZCI).
Army Defense Energy Information System (DEIS) (ADDS) - The DEIS
is an automated engineering management system designed to collect
and report energy consumption data for Army installations
(including Army Reserves and National Guard) to support DA and
DOD reporting requirements. ADDS will also provide management
and analysis data to installation, MACOM and Army Energy
managers. The ADDS was added to the PAX system in October, 1989.
The proponent for this system is the Utilities Division,
Directorate of Facilities Engineering, Engineering and Housing
Support Center, Ft. Belvoir, VA. PAXID: EHSCFUN.
Army Facilities Components System (AFCS) - AFCS is a military
engineering construction planning system for use in the theater
of operations and other OCONUS contingencies requiring austere,
temporary facilities. It provides standard designs, construction
planning data for troop construction, bills of materials, and
specifications to support contractor construction. The Theater
Army Construction Automation Planning System (TACAPS) has been
developed to provide MACOM and installation planners with an
unclassified system for basing Army units in OCONUS
contingencies. Using wartime planning criteria, facility
requirements for each deployable unit in the Army have been
developed to show specific AFCS designs, space and utilities
requirements. The proponent of this system is the Military
Engineering and Topography Division, Office of the Assistant
Chief of Engineers (DAEN-ZCM).
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Army Force Modernization Facilities Planning System (FPS) and
Support Facility Annex System (SFA) -- FPS provides military
planners with the means to compute facility space allowances for
40 category codes representing the most frequently used
unit-driven facilities. Computations are based on the TOE or TDA
for each organization examined, and facilities allowances are
calculated using current Army planning criteria. SFA is an
electronic library of reports for new Army material systems.
Each SFA report describes a material system with its associated
support items and equipment. It also gives facilities allowances
for training, maintenance, storage and day-to-day operations.
The FCS and SFA is available in the PAX system. Proponent is the
Architectural and Planning Branch, Engineering Division,
Directorate of Military Programs, (CEMP-EA) PAXID: FPSINFO.
Automated Army Stationing and Installation Plan (ASIP) - A system
that provides unit and stationing information from HQDA to MACOMs
and installations. This information serves as a basis for the
Five Year Construction Program and for master planning. The
system is interactive, permitting MACOM's and installations to
make off-line review and comment to their current ASIP.
Proponent is the Installations Planning Division, Office of the
Assistant Chief of Engineers, HQUSACE (DAEN-ZCI).
Automated Review Management System (ARMS) - This system was
originated by the Construction Engineering Research Laboratory,
tested by the Sacramento District, and is being fielded
throughout Corps of Engineers divisions and districts during the
early 1990's. ARMS records and tracks project review comments
and provides rapid feedback to originators, making it very
difficult for a comment to be ignored or "get lost". Proponent
is the Engineering Management Branch of the Engineering Division,
Directorate of Military Programs, HQUSACE (CEMP-ES).
A-E/Construction Contractor Appraisal Support System
(ACASS/CCASS) - A system that permits preparation and filing of
contractor performance evaluations made during and after the
performance period of each USACE contract. The purpose of the
system is to encourage a high level of performance from A-E's and
contractors who do business with the Corps of Engineers.
Proponent is the Construction Division, Directorate of Military
Programs, HQUSACE (CEMP-C).
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Automated Management Construction Progress Reporting System
(AMPRS) - An interactive tele-processing system, operational
throughout the Corps of Engineers, that permits detailed
tracking, cost accounting, and reporting of design and
construction projects. Information generated by this system
is used from area/resident engineer office level to Command
Management Reviews conducted by the Chief of Engineers.
Proponent is the Management Branch, Construction Division,
Directorate of Military Programs, HQUSACE (CEMP-CM).
Computer-Aided Cost Engineering System (CACES) - An interactive
system, currently operational throughout the Corps of Engineers,
that allows the user to estimate project costs using an extensive
file of the most current cost information. CACES is also
available to installation master planners and MACOM programmers
for their use in developing DD Forms 1391. Proponent is the Cost
Engineering Branch, Engineering Division, Directorate
of Military Programs, HQUSACE (CEMP-EC).
Computer-Aided Drafting and Design (CADD) Systems - These
systems accomplish drawing, mapping, charting, and illustration
tasks which have in the past been executed manually in a drafting
room. In 1988, HQUSACE made a Corps-wide procurement of CADD
equipment and support including Intergraph software, maintenance
and training. The Corps contract provides an option for DEHs to
buy equipment off the contract, provided that local DOIMs have
approved equipment acquisition. DEHs may also procure reasonably
priced PC-CADD systems that interface with the USACE district
mainframe or minicomputer. Proponent is a users group jointly
sponsored by the Engineering Division, Directorate of Military
Programs, and the Engineering and Housing Support Center.
Proponent At HQUSACE is Engineering Management Branch,
Engineering Division, Directorate of Military Programs (CEMP-ES).
Construction Appropriation Programming, Control and Execution
System (CAPCES) - This system, part of MILCON PAX, lets users
manage and track individual projects in the Military Construction
Program through the planning, programming, budget and execution
phases. The System provides project and program status reports
to Congress, OMB, OSD, Assistant Secretary of the Army, IL&E, and
various DA, MACOM and USACE activities. A new subset called
MOBPRO will perform the same function for mobilization projects.
Proponent is the Programming and Execution Support Office,
Directorate of Military Programs, HQUSACE (CEMP-P).
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Construction Evaluation Retrieval System (CERS) - A system that
records, for simple recall, data relating to design and
completion evaluations, post-completion inspections, design
criteria improvement recommendations, and construction transfer
and warranty information. The system draws upon all the recorded
design and construction errors which have occurred in the design
of Corps projects and allows us to learn from our past mistakes.
The Construction Evaluation Branch of the Huntsville Division
Engineer is proponent.
Contracting Documents and Specifications on Compact Disks--Read
Only Memory (CD/ROM) - Information services available to PC users
provides up-to-date specifications, procurement and contracting
policy to stay abreast of the constant changes that occur. The
proponent for contracting documents is the Policy Branch,
Construction Division, Directorate of Military Programs, HQUSACE
(CEMP-CP). Proponent for specifications is the Architectural and
Planning Branch, Engineering Division, Directorate of
Military Programs, HQUSACE (CEMP-EA).
Corps of Engineers Management Information System (COEMIS) - A
manpower and finance and accounting reporting system operational
throughout the Corps of Engineers. Proponent is the Directorate
of Resource Management, HQUSACE (CERM).
DD Form 1391 Processor - An interactive tele-processing system,
part of MILCON PAX, that assists in the preparation and review of
DD Forms 1391 for many construction programs. The main functions
of this system are to assistance in preparing, editing,
submitting and distributing DD Forms 1391 throughout the Army,
calculating space allowances, estimating primary facilities
costs, and providing a single source of official DD Forms 1391
for all organizations from the installation to the staff and
secretariat level of DA. A companion system, the DD Form 1390
Processor, allows users to electronically prepare, review, accept
and print out installation data in support of military
construction. Proponent is the Programming and Execution Support
Office, Directorate of Military Programs, HQUSACE (CEMP-P).
Design Criteria Information System (DCIS) - DCIS is an automated
repository of design criteria envisioned to be most often used by
the Army. Not all design criteria are in DCIS. The criteria
documents in the system are the most current version available,
and consist of either the original manuscript or updated editions
where changes have been made. Users have the option to "browse"
or "print" criteria 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The
proponent for DCIS is the Architectural and Planning Branch,
Engineering Division, Directorate of Military Programs
(CEMP-EA) PAXID: DCIS1.
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Desktop Resource Real Property (DR-REAL) - This is a PC-based
Real Property Office automation program. It provides many
automated tools for the completion and management of installation
Real Property Office functions including assets accounting tools
to help improve the data presently in HQIFS. It also provides a
means to move the real property records into other computer
applications, e.g., key control inventories, word processing, and
spread sheet software. Proponent is the Planning Division,
Directorate of Facilities Engineering, Engineering and Housing
Support Center (CEHSC-FP-R) PAXID: EHSCRPMP.
Directive Network (DIRNET) - A system, part of MILCON PAX, that
electronically issues a design directive to the Corps of
Engineers division which will review and release the 1391 to the
district simultaneously with the directive. DIRNET
electronically ties HQUSACE to all divisions and districts as
well as the MACOMs and installations. Once a directive is
issued, it is instantly transmitted to all addressees for
their information and action. DIRNET is used to issue Army, Air
Force and DOD project directives. Proponent is the Project
Management Division, Directorate of Military Programs, HQUSACE
(CEMP-MA).
Economic Analysis Computer Package (ECONPACK) - This system
provides generic analytic capabilities and standardized economic
analysis methodology and calculations to support a wide range of
capital investment categories. The system performs standard
life-cycle cost calculations. A sensitivity analysis feature and
graphics capability are included in the program. Mainframe and
PC versions of ECONPACK are available. Proponent is the
Programming and Execution Support Office, Directorate of Military
Programs, HQUSACE (CEMP-P) PAXID: ECON01, ECON02.
Facilities Engineering Job Estimating System (FEJE) - A
tri-service, minicomputer-based, interactive job estimating
system designed to support job scoping and detailed estimating at
the installation level. It computes work-hour requirements using
engineered performance standards, and automatically produces work
order documents, job phase calculations sheets and bills of
materials. Proponent is the Systems Integration Directorate,
Engineering and Housing Support Center, Ft. Belvoir, VA.
(CEHSC-SS).
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Facilities Engineering Supply System (FESS) - An automated
inventory control and supply management system that supports
installation-level DEH operations. The system has interactive
capability with IFDEP, FEJE, and IFS. FESS provides a tool to
improve supply operations management and inventory control,
reducing delays on jobs awaiting materials because warehouses are
more efficiently stocked and resupplied Proponent for this
system is the Systems Maintenance Branch, Systems Integration
Directorate, Engineering and Housing Support Center, Ft. Belvoir,
VA.
Headquarters-Level Integrated Facilities System (HQIFS) - A
family of automated engineering management systems that use data
collected by installation level systems and other sources. HQIFS
provides facilities and cost data for Army installations
worldwide to SUBMACOM, MACOM, HQDA and above. The system
operates on the PAX commercial remote access mainframe computer
environment. Proponent is the Systems Integration Directorate,
Engineering and Housing Support Center, Ft. Belvoir, VA.
(CEHSC-SS) PAXID: EHSCSOS.
Headquarters-Level Integrated Facilities System, Backlog of
Maintenance and Repair (BMAR) - This system will allow electronic
submission of the quarterly DA Form 4954-R, which reports current
backlog of maintenance and repair. MACOMs will be able to review
and adjust the data reported by the installations. Proponent is
the Systems Integration Directorate, Engineering and Housing
Support Center, Ft. Belvoir, VA. (CEHSC-SS) PAXID: EHSCSOS.
Headquarters-Level Integrated Facilities System, Inventory and
Resource Planning Module (IRP-ASSETS) - The Army wide real
property inventory database. This system supports the DA staff
and MACOMs in the areas of inventory, facilities planning and
management. It satisfies DA reporting requirements for assets
data for both peacetime and mobilization planning. Proponent is
the Systems Integration Directorate, Engineering and Housing
Support Center, Ft. Belvoir, VA. (CEHSC-SS) PAXID: EHSCSOS.
Headquarters-Level Integrated Facilities System Technical Data
Reporting System (TDRS) - The TDRS consists of PC and PAX
resident databases which support the entry, validation and use of
the Technical Data Report, thereby producing the Annual Summary
of Operations (Redbook). Proponent is the Systems Integration
Directorate, Engineering and Housing Support Center, Ft. Belvoir,
VA. (CEHSC-SS) PAXID: EHSCSOS.
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Headquarters-Level Integrated Facilities System, Unconstrained
Requirements Reporting (URR) - This system supports the URR
reporting requirement, provides standard and ad hoc reports,
adjusts the data to changing monetary conditions, and presents it
for budgeting and budget review functions. Proponent is the
Systems Integration Directorate, Engineering and Housing Support
Center, Ft. Belvoir, VA. (CEHSC-SS) PAXID: EHSCSOS.
Housing Operations Management System (HOMES) - A standard Army
Multi-command Management Information System that provides
installation housing managers with automated support for housing
referral, housing surveys, furnishings management, financial
management, and unaccompanied personnel and transient billeting.
HOMES is linked to Army Standard systems and to the IFS-M data
base. Proponent for this system is the Systems Integration
Directorate, Engineering and Housing Support Center, Ft. Belvoir,
VA (CEHSC-SH).
Integrated Facilities Data Entry Process (IFDEP) - An interactive
preprocessor for IFS that provides on-line data entry and
retrieval for service orders and individual job orders. IFDEP
creates IFS transactions on tape to update IFS-I. The system is
designed to "front end" IFS-I, but it can stand alone and provide
basic management information. In either mode, IFDEP provides
basic management information interactively or thorough its menu
of reports. Proponent for this system is the Systems Maintenance
Branch, Systems Integration Directorate, Engineering and Housing
Support Center, Ft. Lee, VA (CEHSC-SS-M).
Integrated Facilities System I (Batch) - Is the installation
level management system of IFS. It is a multi-command, automated
information and evaluation system that encompasses the life-cycle
management of Army real property resources from conception
through design, construction, operation, maintenance and
disposal. It will be replaced by IFS-M. Proponent for this
system is the Systems Maintenance Branch, Systems Integration
Directorate, Engineering and Housing Support Center, Ft. Belvoir,
VA (CEHSC-SS-M).
Integrated Facilities System, Increment II - An automated system
that provides data and scenarios for master planning and
stationing decision-making at all levels of command. The Army
Stationing and Installations Plan (ASIP) module provides
installation unit force structure data for the Five Year Defense
Plan. The Stationing Analysis Model (SAM) is a part of this
system. Proponent is the Systems Integration Directorate,
Engineering and Housing Support Center, Ft. Belvoir, VA
(CEHSC-SS).
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Integrated Facilities System - Mini/microcomputer Architecture
(IFS-M) - A redesign of IFS that expands the capability of the
batch system and will replace IFS-I, IFDEP and FEJE. The system
will operate and be maintained on a locally controlled
mini/microcomputer network with telecommunications links to HQDA
for upward reporting. The architecture is compatible with the
Army Information Architecture (DA PAM 25-1). Proponent for this
system is the Systems Integration Directorate, Engineering and
Housing Support Center, Ft. Belvoir, VA (CEHSC-SS).
Job Order Contracting System (JOC) - An interactive system that
gives DEH's the capability of pricing detailed task
specifications for real property maintenance work. JOC develops,
verifies, and updates construction proposals and manages
construction contracts. Software use is restricted to those
installations that have JOC contract capability. The system
operates on the IBM PC or PC-compatible microcomputers.
Proponent for this system is the Engineering and Housing Support
Center, Ft. Belvoir, VA. (CEHSC-FS).
Mobilization Drawings (M-DRAWINGS) - Definitive designs for Army
mobilization construction are on file at military support
districts and divisions throughout the Corps of Engineers.
Currently, designs are available for approximately 130 facility
types. M-Drawing information is available to those having access
to Intergraph CADD equipment and in hard copy from the division
and district offices. Proponent is the Architectural and
Planning Branch, Engineering Division, Directorate of
Military Programs, HQUSACE (CEMP-EA).
Multi-Year Plan (MYPLAN) - This system is designed to provide
automated methods for preparing, reviewing and approving the Five
Year Program (FYP), the Long Range Construction Program (LRCP)
for the POM. These data are maintained in common data fields in
CAPCES, and in the 1391 Processor. Proponent is the Programming
and Execution Support Office, Directorate of Military Programs,
HQUSACE (CEMP-P).
Pavement Maintenance Management System (PAVER) - PAVER gives
DEH's a decision making tool to enable cost effective maintenance
for roads, streets, parking areas and airfields. PAVER records a
systematic inspection of the pavement's surface distresses and
calculates a numerical condition index. The index is used to
develop maintenance priorities and strategies. Proponent is the
Buildings and Grounds Division, Engineering and Housing Support
Center, Ft. Belvoir, VA (CEHSC-FB-P).
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Project Design and Construction (PDC) System, (USAF) - PDC is the
computerized management information system used by the Air Force
to track programming, design, and construction on all engineering
projects. Data is maintained and updated by MAJCOM's, design and
construction managers, and Headquarters, USAF. PDC uses menu
driven report software and users may utilize simple reports to
extract data in a format easy to analyze. Reports can be
extracted by anyone with access to PDC. The system can be
programmed to produce graphs, briefings, network with others to
exchange data for tele-conferences, create executive reports,
etc. AF/LEE is proponent for this system.
Military Construction Program Analysis and Execution System
(MILCON PAX) - The Corps of Engineers Military Construction
Management and Reporting System has been expanded to provide
computer assistance to all engineers throughout the Army. PAX
consists of many applications described elsewhere in this
appendix to include the 1391 Processor, CAPCES, ECONPAK, ACTS,
DCIS, PAXMAIL, RPLANS, FPS, and DIRNET. Primary proponent is the
Programming and Execution Support Office, Directorate of Military
Programs, HQUSACE (CEMP-P).
Programming, Administration and Execution (PAX) Electronic Mail
System (PAXMAIL) - An electronic mail system tailored to operate
in the military construction programming, administrative, and
execution environment. The system has recently been redesigned
to provide a faster, economical and versatile system for informal
daily business transactions between any members of the Army
engineer family. Proponent is the Programming and Execution
Support Office, Directorate of Military Programs, HQUSACE
(CEMP-P).
PCDUGOUT - A PC/mainframe integration system designed to allow
transfer of applications and utilities to and from any user who
has access to the PAX system. The system will provide a fully
automated file transfer capability and an on-line newsletter
addressing PAX techniques and applications. Proponent is the
Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, Champaign, ILL
(CECERL).
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Real Property Planning and Analysis System (RPLANS) - An
integrated automated master planning tool, incorporating aspects
of the Force Modernization Facilities Planning System (FPS), that
provides planners/programmers with the capability to efficiently
calculate peacetime facility space allowances and compare them to
available real property assets for a range of facility types.
This multi-level system is to be a stand-alone user of IFS-M
data. It is being fielded in the early 1990s at the installation
level and, concurrently, as HQRPLANS at the MACOM and DA levels.
The proponent is the Installations Planning Division, Office of
the Assistant Chief of Engineers, HQUSACE (DAEN-ZCI).
Voice Activated Inspection System (VAIC) - The U.S. Army
Construction Engineering Research Laboratory has developed an
inspection support system that permits all types of inspectors
and designers to make field observations on a hand held recorder,
then to print final comments by using a personal computer
equipped with a voice recognition system. Efficiency is
increased by eliminating the need to write observations,
thereby allowing greater focus on actual observation. Proponent
is the Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, Champaign,
IL. (CECERL).
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APPENDIX D
MAJOR PROGRAM DEFINITIONS, LIMITS, PROCEDURES
Air Force Design Awards Program - This program was established in
1976 to recognize and promote design excellence as it relates to
the natural and the built environment. No limit is set on the
number or type of projects recognized and awarded each year.
Ammunition Storage, Explosive Facilities Construction Program Managed by the Department of Defense Explosive Safety Board
(DDESB). Designs and sites for all facilities involving storage
and handling of explosives must be approved by DDESB. DDESB
coordination is normally accomplished through User/Major Command
channels as early as possible in the project design process.
Army Communities of Excellence Program (ACOE) - A program
initiated by the Chief of Staff, U.S. Army, to foster pride, the
fuel of excellent performance. The facilities implications of
this program include improvements to existing facilities and
related services, and provision of excellent new facilities, with
the goal of supporting soldiers and their families and civilian
employees with the best possible installations.
Army Environmental Auditing Program - This program is designed to
help the installation commander make an assessment of his
environmental program. Environmental auditing or compliance
assessments provides the necessary information to organize,
prioritize and direct the environmental program at each
installation. Each installation is required to develop, and
update annually, an Environmental Management Plan (EMP) which
contains an external and internal audit procedures to monitor
compliance problems and corrective actions.
Army Family Housing Renewal Program - A large percentage of
family housing units in the Army are more than 30 years old.
Living, storage areas and utility systems are wearing out and are
functionally obsolete. The program goal is to provide a standard
of living equal to the contemporary civilian community by
renovating existing housing units.
Army Pollution Abatement Program (APAP) - A program directed by
the Secretary of the Army to correct active violations of
environmental requirements. An APAP project is a construction
effort to correct active violations of the Clean Air Act, the
Clean Water Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability
Act, the Noise Control Act, the Toxic Substances Control Act, and
the Archeological and Historic Preservation Act.
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Army Prime Power Program (P3) - This program provides prime
utility grade electric power generation, transmission and
distribution equipment to commanders-in-chief of unified and
specified commands. It trains personnel to install, test,
operate, inspect, maintain and support Prime Power plants and
transmission and distribution systems. Finally, it loans
P3 assets to other military and civilian customers for special
high priority electric power requirements such as major
exercises, military construction or research and development
projects, emergency or planned temporary outages, disaster
relief, and nation-building missions. Proponent is the
Engineering and Housing Support Center, Fort Belvoir, VA.
(CEHSC-M).
Backlog of Maintenance and Repair (BMAR) and Deferred Maintenance
and Repair (DMAR) - These classifications represent work that was
required during a specific fiscal year, was programmed for
accomplishment, but could not be performed due to insufficient
resources. BMAR/DMAR is a recognized measurement of existing
deficiencies in real property facilities and is used to justify
RPMA and AFH maintenance and repair requirements.
Base Operations (BASOPS) - An aggregation of functional
activities for operating and maintaining installations and for
providing installation type support. This program part of the
Operations and Maintenance Account of each service.
Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) - A DOD program, precipitated
by Public Law 100-526, Base Closure and Realignment Act, and
Public Law 101-510, that consolidates defense activities at fewer
installations, while disposing of those no longer essential to
national defense.
Boiler Water and Condensate Chemistry Program - A DA program that
requires periodic analysis of boiler water in Army power, heating
and air conditioning plants. High horsepower plants submit
monthly samples to the Engineering and Housing Support Center and
low horsepower plants submit quarterly samples. Analysis results
and treatment recommendations are returned to the installation.
Training on proper boiler water treatment and cooling water
treatment is available from CEHSC.
Chapel Construction Program - A MILCON sub-program managed by the
Chiefs of Chaplains, various services. The chapel program
includes construction of new chapels and religious education
facilities, rehabilitation of existing buildings, and disposal of
facilities that are no longer required. The Chief of Chaplains'
representatives for the appropriate service must be consulted
prior to any work on chapel facilities.
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Commercial Activities (CA) Program - Commercial and industrial
facilities that are Government-owned and operated, or government
owned and contractor operated that provide a product or service
used primarily by the Government. In cases where Government
operating costs are carefully studied, and are found to exceed
those of a potential contractor, commercial activities are
converted to contractor operation.
Commissaries Construction Program - A MILCON sub-program managed
by the U.S. Army Troop Support Agency, Ft. Lee, VA.
Clubs & Morale, Welfare and Recreational (MWR) Construction
Program - A MILCON sub-program managed by the U.S. Army Community
and Family Support Center. This program includes not only
officers and enlisted persons' clubs, but a wide range of
facilities, constructed by non-appropriated funds, for the direct
benefit of service members and their dependents.
Coastal Zone Management (CZM) Program - The Coastal Zone
Management Act (16 USC 1451 et. seq. requires all Federal actions
affecting a State coastal zone must, to the extent practicable,
be consistent with that State's approved coastal plan. State
plans recognize the unique and environmentally fragile nature of
coastal zones and prescribe actions to protect these areas. The
installation is responsible for determining consistency with the
plan and informing the State of its findings. Corps of Engineers
districts offer assistance in the CZM program.
Corrosion Reduction Program - This program is designed to help
the installation commander assess and enhance their own corrosion
reduction program by providing on-site program evaluation and
specific recommendations for improvements. Corrosion control is
required for compliance with Army policy, and in some cases,
Public Law regarding industrial water treatment for steam boiler
systems protection of underground storage tanks, gas distribution
systems and potable water tanks. In addition, all industrial
water systems (i.e., cooling towers, chilled water and water
heating systems) and all buried or submerged structures require
corrosion control for economical operation and maintenance.
Dam and Bridge Safety Inspection Program - In response to several
disasters in the 1970's, USACE began a rigorous inspection
program of its own facilities and offered this service to
supported installations. USACE has the capability to evaluate
dams and bridges regardless of the age of the structure or
background regarding its design and construction.
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Defense Environmental Restoration Account (DERA) - The central
DOD account used to fund certain IRP and FUDS projects.
Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP), which includes
the Installation Restoration Program (IRP) and the Formerly Used
Defense Sites (FUDS) Program - These programs require each DOD
installation to inventory, manage and clean up all ordnance and
hazardous and toxic waste sites. Focus is upon cleanup of
contamination associated with past activities. IRP funds are
funded through the DERA Account and are classified as operation
and maintenance. Progress is tracked by the DOD Defense
Environmental Restoration Program Management Information System
(DERPMIS).
Design Criteria Feedback Program (DCFP) - This program, also
called the "3078 Program" is active throughout USACE and requires
immediate positive action to be taken by criteria proponents at
HQUSACE, and immediate reply to originators, on criteria changes
recommended by facilities users, MACOM engineers, districts and
divisions.
Dining Facilities Construction Program - A MILCON sub-program
managed by the U.S. Army Troop Support Agency, Ft. Lee, VA.
Directed programs (fenced programs) - Programs that have been
ordered into a program by Departmental or higher authority.
Money for these programs is usually set aside in the program
guidance to be used if valid projects can be identified and
construction can be awarded during the fiscal year that funds are
available. Examples of directed programs are ECIP and APAP.
Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) - The ECIP is a
MILCON funded program for retrofitting existing Department of
Defense energy systems and buildings to make them more energy
efficient and provide substantial savings in operating costs.
The ECIP will assist the Army in accomplishing the objectives of
the National Energy Conservation Policy Act and the Department of
Defense Energy plan.
Engineer Basing Program - This uses the Real Property Planning
and Analysis System (RPLANS) to help planners at Army
installations, MACOM's and HQDA with stationing, planning,
programming and facilities utilization tasks. RPLANS provides
automated, consistent facilities allowance calculations, an
automated method for developing master planning TABs for
installations, and a predictive model for estimating costs to
maintain and operate facilities in support of various missions.
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Fences - Funding levels established by the Office of the
Secretary of Defense and the secretariats of each service for
particular programs. Otherwise known as ceilings or floors, the
term refers to funding levels above or below which a program
manager may not obligate funds.
Future-Year Defense Plan (FYDP) - The FYDP provides a program
that is consistent with current plans, resources, and budget
objectives of the services. The FYDP is the basis for more
detailed program and budget guidance developed by the services,
that outlines the missions and levels of strength needed to meet
estimated enemy threats.
Fish and Wildlife Program - An Army program that sells hunting
and fishing permits to installation residents and to the public.
This program allows for controlled population management,
enjoyment of hunting and fishing sports, while providing the Army
with modest funds to continue the fish and wildlife program.
Future-Year Defense Program (FYDP) - The official OSD publication
that summarizes the approved plans and programs of DoD
components. The FYDP contains data from the budget year, and the
next four years' programs.
Floodplain Management Program - The objective of this program is
to support comprehensive flood plain management planning at all
appropriate governmental levels and, thereby, to encourage and
guide these groups toward prudent use of the nation's flood
plains. Executive Order 11988 requires each federal agency, and
its installations, to evaluate the effects of its actions, and to
avoid financing or issuing permits for construction in such flood
prone areas unless no practicable alternatives are available.
Information provided through this program includes flood hazard
information as well as a full range of technical services and
planning guidance on techniques for reducing flood damage and
damage potential. Examples of services provided by USACE include
evaluation, floodway determination, and determination of 50-year,
100 year and standard project flood outlines for floodplain areas
in the United States.
Forestry Program (P7) - The forestry program is primarily funded
with reimbursable funds realized from the sale of timber from
Army installations. This timber sale program assists trainers
who use the land by reducing timber stands for bivouac sites,
artillery positions, drop zones and maneuver areas. Contract
timber harvesting operations save dollars that would otherwise be
spent on government removal of timber.
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Homeowners Assistance Program (HAP) - A special relief program
which provides financial assistance to those eligible military
and civilian employee homeowners, serving at or near a military
installation who suffer losses incident to the disposal of their
homes caused by a drop in real estate values when such military
installations are ordered closed or operations reduced.
Host Nation-Funded Construction Program - Any construction
program providing facilities in direct support of DOD personnel
or programs that is funded partially or totally by the host
nation in which DOD personnel are stationed.
Installation Restoration (IR) - The IR program is authorized by
the Defense Environmental Restoration Program and is consistent
with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and
Liability Act (CERCLA), and the National Contingency Plan. It
identifies, evaluates and removes or cleans up past hazardous
waste sites. Certain actions identified by this program may be
eligible for funding by the Defense Environmental Restoration
Account (DERA), while others are not; DERA funds are normally
applied to those sites having the greatest actual or potential
threat to human health, welfare, or the environment. IR is not
limited to active installations. Sites on any property for which
the Army is responsible under CERCLA are eligible, including
third-party sites that were used to support Army activities.
Integrated Training Area Management (ITAM) Program - An Army
program that integrates training requirements with
environmentally sound land management practices and rehabilitates
damaged training lands. It uses a Land Condition Trend Analysis
(LCTA) to match land/landscape support capabilities with current
and future training needs.
Joint Land Use Study (JLUS) Program - Urban sprawl near once
rural installation boundaries has increased community involvement
with on-installation training missions and activities. The
Office of Economic Adjustment (OEA) sponsors CLUP to promote
interaction between installations and adjacent communities to
implement compatible land use patterns near military boundaries.
Federal cost-sharing is available to communities taking part in
this program.
Major Command Five Year Development Program - A program that
contains data from the guidance year and four succeeding fiscal
years, as submitted by the major Army commanders and evaluated at
Departmental level. Included in Army MACOM FYDP are those
mobilization construction projects that must be completed prior
to M-Day and are programmed within the MACOM's dollar guidance.
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McKinney Homeless Assistance Act and Executive Order (EO) 12682 Title V of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act
requires the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to
screen federal buildings and real property described in surveys
as underutilized, unutilized, or not put to optimum use, and to
identify those facilities suitable for the homeless. Under
Executive Order 12682 DOD reports all underutilized,
underutilized and excess properties that could be effectively
utilized or renovated to serve as minimum security facilities for
nonviolent prisoners, drug treatment facilities for nonviolent
drug abusers, and facilities to assist the homeless. HUD makes
the final determination on reported properties for homeless
purposes.
Medical Facilities Construction Program - The Defense Medical
Facilities Office (DMFO) is responsible for planning, development
and execution of this program. DMFO requires submission of five
years' worth of program documentation each fiscal year.
Military Construction Program (MILCON) - This term encompasses
the Congressionally authorized and appropriated programs that
provide the majority of facilities needed to meet mission
requirements for Army and Air Force installations and includes
family housing.
Military Construction, Army Reserve Components - Programs for the
construction and rehabilitation of Reserve facilities exist in
all three services. They are generally managed by the Director
of Reserve Components, Department of Defense, with detailed
management delegated to Chiefs of Reserve components in each of
the services. The programs resemble MILCON for the active
components in terms of process, budgetary procedures and
workflow.
Mobilization Construction Program - Land acquisition or
construction that is planned, programmed and executed in support
of mobilization contingency missions. In the Army programming
system, mobilization construction requirements are addressed in
terms of three categories: construction that must be occupied or
available by M-Day, construction that is completely designed and
ready to award at M-Day, and construction for which design will
not proceed until M-Day.
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Operations and Maintenance Engineering Enhancement (OMEE)
Program- This is a USACE initiative that secures the services of
the construction contractor to perform maintenance on repairs for
a period of one year, or possibly more, after the completion of a
facility. The concept began field trial during FY 90.
Operation and Maintenance Funding, Army and Air Force - These
programs, which exist in the Army, Air Force, and their reserve
components, are primarily for the operation, preventative
maintenance and repair of facilities, utilities and other
improvements. Operations and maintenance funds are not
programmed by project or discrete activity, but by category
of expenditure to which funds will be applied, e.g., repair,
utilities, management, minor construction, and engineer support.
Operation and Maintenance, Army, Air Force Reserve - Operations
and maintenance funds for Reserve components facilities are used
for the same purposes as are those for active components, but are
subject to different funding limitations. These funds are
managed by the Director of Reserve Components, Department of
Defense, with detailed management delegated to the Chiefs of
Reserve components in each of the services.
Outgranting Program - The real estate program that includes the
granting of leases, easements, and licenses of Army-controlled
real property for private purposes, and permits for intra- and
inter-departmental purposes.
Permitting Program - The Corps of Engineers has responsibility
for navigable waterways within the United States, and issues
permits for various types of access and use.
Power Reliability Enhancement Program (PREP) - The mission of
this program is to assure reliable, survivable utilities systems
support for critical command, control, communications and
intelligence (C3I) facilities.
Ranges, Army - Managed by the Department of the Army Ammunition,
Ranges and Training Activity (DAART), and Huntsville Division
USACE, for range standards and designs. This program was
initiated in the early 1980's when new weapons systems rapidly
overwhelmed range capability, and a new family of larger, more
sophisticated ranges was required.
Real Property Management System - The life cycle management
process whereby military real property requirements are planned,
programmed, acquired, operated, maintained and disposed of.
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Self-Compensating Project - A minor construction project that
results in savings in maintenance and operation costs in excess
of the project cost. The project must be over $300,000. The
savings must occur within 3 years of project completion.
Sell and Replace Program - Sale of DoD property is used to
generate construction funds to house activities relocated by the
disposal action.
Shared Energy Savings (SES) Program - A DOD program that
implements the provisions of Title VIII, Section 7201, Public Law
99-242 (42 U.S.C. 8287). An SES project is one where the
contractor provides the design, fabrication, construction,
financing, and operation and maintenance for energy saving
devices and systems to be used by the government. The contractor
receives a portion of the resulting energy cost savings and
maintenance cost avoidances in return for the work.
Superfund - An Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) program for
the cleanup of hazardous and toxic waste sites nationwide. The
Corps of Engineers is the execution agent for EPA in this
program.
Traffic Facilities Construction Program - Managed by the Military
Traffic Management Command (MTMC), this program includes any
traffic improvements programmed by installations for road or rail
access. The Defense Access Highway Improvement Program is also
monitored by MTMC.
Unspecified Minor Construction Program. ($300,000 to $1,500,000)
Urgent minor construction guidance is issued annually, based on
funds availability in a single budget line item. Unlike the
MILCON and Family Housing programs, urgent minor construction
projects are not specifically identified in the FYDP budgets or
programs, but are submitted on an "as required" basis by each
service to be met with such funds as are available.
NOTE: Statutory approval levels for the most common major
programs are shown on the following figures. Figure D-1 depicts
approval levels for Operations & Maintenance and MILCON Programs.
Figure D-2 depicts approval levels for Family Housing Programs.
Figure D-3 depicts approval levels through Troop Construction.
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Figure D-1.
Statutory Approval Levels of Various Programs
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Figure D-2.
Family Housing Statutory Approval Levels.
NOTES:
(A) Congress approves maintenance for general officers quarters
of $25K or more per dwelling unit in a FY. For GOQ approved by
Congress, Department can approve maintenance increases up to
$5,000. The Secretariat approves combined O&M for GOQ of $25K or
more per dwelling unit in an FY.
(B) Installation or Major Command commanders are limited to $15K
per non-GOA dwelling unity for major M&R work within a FY. For
non GOQ, major M&R greater than $15K per dwelling unit within a
FY requires Congressional notification.
(C) Installation or Major Command commanders are limited to $2K
per dwelling unit ($5K per dwelling unit when necessary for an
exceptional family member) within a FY and $200K per project.
Secretariat can approve up to $40K adjusted by area cost factors
per dwelling unit for exceptional cases.
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(D) Initial annual program is authorized and appropriated by
Congress based on projects submitted in the Family Housing
Budget. Department has authority for reprogramming of funds up
to $40K per dwelling unit ($35K absolute for foreign source
dwelling units) (adjusted by area cost factor) and $1.5M or 20%,
whichever is less, for projects over $1.5M. Note GOAs will not
be included in BP 183000 reprogramming.
(E) Congress must approve, individually, projects for foreign
source dwelling units whose improvement and major maintenance and
repair work over a three year period exceeds $35K (absolute).
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Figure D-3.
Projects Accomplished by Military Organizations
(Troop Units).
NOTES:
(A) Project costs are directly relatable to construction of
complete and usable facilities.
(B) Materials/supplies, travel per diem, equipment maintenance,
transport of supplies and materials, installed capital equipment,
and COE overhead costs.
(C)
Troop labor, equipment depreciation, planning and design.
(D) Cost of supplies, Class I rations, Class III POL, Class IV
repair parts, Class V ammo, and other costs necessary for
training unit.
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APPENDIX E
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
GENERAL.
The financial planning and management of the armed services
begins with the Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution
System (PPBES) that was established by the Department of Defense
in the early 1960's. The objective of this system is to
articulate the strategy, size, structure and equip the military
force, set programming priorities, allocate resources and ensure
readiness of the total force.
PPBES is an evolutionary process rather than a static system.
While a single PPBES cycle is theoretically divided into three
distinct phases for planning, programming and budgeting, the
reality of the process is far more complex. The length of a
single cycle is such that at least three separate cycles run
concurrently at all times.
Generally speaking, the operations planners of each service are
responsible for the planning phase and for providing resource
allocation priorities as guidance to program and appropriation
directors.
Programming is the responsibility of the program analysis and
review activity of each service. This activity provides the
interface between the military staff and the secretariat of the
each service.
Budgeting and manipulation of funds is the responsibility of the
comptroller of each of the services.
Various senior level committees within each of the services are
responsible for influencing and evaluating PPBES. These
committees determine how each service will configure forces,
resources and missions to meet Defense Guidance, and how
resources will be allocated and suballocated to achieve desired
configurations.
The Defense portion of the President's Budget is formulated by
the above process. Authorizations and appropriations by Congress
are based on review of the President's Budget, and upon many
detailed reviews preceding its actual formulation.
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Other funds in the services that are not appropriated by the
Congress are generated by the following sources:
a. Surcharges made upon, and fees collected from, goods and
services purchased by service members and their families.
b. Deduction of housing allowance funds from pay in
exchange for service-provided housing.
c.
Contributions.
d.
Dues paid for membership in various service clubs.
e. Donations made to activities such as organizational
associations or museums.
f.
Reimbursements and penalty payments.
g.
Foreign Military Sales.
Appropriated funding flows from the General Fund to the services.
The services apportion these funds to their major commands and
functions based on earlier budgetary justification and planning.
Certain of these funds are "fenced" by Congress and may be
applied only to certain programs. MILCON and associated Planning
and Design, represent "fenced" programs. Funds may not be spent
for other purposes. However, appropriations for many other
programs are more flexible, and may be moved by the services from
one sub-program to another based on mission exigencies and
changes in Defense posture.
Funding flow within the services is generally from higher
headquarters to lower, with specified amounts of discretionary
management authority delegated to each level. Some programs
retain a portion of the total amount at higher headquarters to
meet management expenses, fund special actions, meet unforeseen
requirements, or offer incentives to encourage funding from other
sources.
BASOPS AND REAL PROPERTY MAINTENANCE FUNDS.
The real property maintenance activities (RPMA) program is big
business, consuming approximately 51 percent of an average
installation's base operations (BASOPS) budget. In the Army,
worldwide RPMA involves the maintenance of over 1 billion square
feet of building space and acreage equivalent to that of the
combined areas of Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island.
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RPMA funding accounts include categories for operation of
utilities, maintenance and repair of real property, minor
construction, and engineering support. The engineering support
category accounts for the majority of funds sent by installations
to Corps of Engineers districts for various services.
Most of the dollars to finance these functions come from the
operations and maintenance (O&M) appropriations of each service.
In addition to these direct dollars, reimbursable funds are
earned by providing RPMA services to certain customers, the
largest of which is the family housing appropriation.
Measurements used to manage the RPMA account include the Annual
Recurring Requirements (ARR) which is the annual amount of money
needed to sustain and preserve real property to adequately
support assigned missions. Another measurement is the Backlog of
Maintenance and Repair (BMAR) that records the amount of
maintenance and repair work remaining at the end of the fiscal
year. Deferred maintenance and repair is a similar measure
applied to family housing facilities.
DEH / BCE FUNDING RELATIONSHIPS.
DEH/BCE and USACE funding for other-than-MILCON support is
handled in two general ways. The most common method is for the
supported installation to send Operations and Maintenance dollars
to USACE divisions or districts for specific services. Documents
used to transmit funds from installations to USACE subordinate
commands are called Intra-Army Orders (IAO) for reimbursable
services, and are processed through comptroller, or resource
management channels. This method depends upon programming and
budgetary planning by the supported installation and its major
command. Although Operations and Maintenance funds are
"earmarked" specifically for various programs at Departmental
Headquarters, amounts may be transferred between programs to meet
other expenses at the installation. Therefore, the DEH/BCE must
play actively in the installation budget process to ensure
retention of facilities engineering funds, including those used
to purchase USACE support.
A second, more limited, method is HQUSACE-managed and distributed
operations and maintenance funds "earmarked" for specific
programs. Documents transmitting these funds from HQUSACE to
divisions and districts are called Funding Authorization
Documents (FADS). Services provided by to installations are
totally or partially nonreimbursable when this method is used.
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The installation support program at operating subordinate
commands receives a modest amount of nonreimbursable funding to
initiate projects and provide immediate response to requests for
support. Real estate business operations, master planning,
mobilization master planning and installation support books for
Army installations are other programs that are partially, or
totally, funded by nonreimbursable means. It is essential that
division and district engineers inform supported installations of
these funds, and encourage DEH/BCE participation in the budget
formulation process.
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APPENDIX F
CORPS OF ENGINEER CENTERS OF EXPERTISE
AND
LABORATORIES
Refer to ER 1110-3-109, Corps-Wide Centers of Expertise Assigned
to Divisions and Districts, for a more detailed description of
this subject area. Although DEHs and BCEs can contact these
organizations directly, it is recommended that they first
coordinate with their supporting MSC or district to obtain
services from centers of expertise and laboratories.
Centers of expertise, and their mission areas, are listed and
defined as follows:
Technical Center of Expertise (TCX). A TCX is defined as a
division or district organization element which currently
possesses a demonstrated, credible, technical capability in a
specialized subject area applicable to the Army's military
function, that can be of beneficial use to other Corps field
offices. This recognized capability can be resident in a single
person or be the collective capability of an organizational unit.
The service to be rendered by a TCX to an FOA are advisory only,
unless specifically requested to be otherwise by the FOA seeking
assistance.
HQUSACE
Proponent
TCX Mission Area.
Assigned Center
Desalinization Plants
Transatlantic Division
CEMP-ET
Desert Facilities
Transatlantic Division
CEMP-ET
Energy Performance Standards
and Energy Analysis
South Atlantic Division
CEMP-ET
Renewable Forms of Energy
Southwestern Division
CEMP-ET
Subsurface Exploration
Mobile District
CEMP-ET
Aircraft Hanger Fire
Protection
Transatlantic Division
CEMP-ET
Central Boiler Plants
Huntsville Division
CEMP-ET
Heating, Ventilating and Air Savannah District
Conditioning (HVAC) Control Systems
F-1
CEMP-ET
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
TCX Mission Area.
Assigned Center
HQUSACE
Proponent
Interior Design
Omaha District
CEMP-EA
Energy Engineering Analysis
Program (EEAP)
South Atlantic Division
CEMP-ET
Underground Heat
Missouri River Division
Distribution Systems (UGHDS)
CEMP-ET
Superfund/Hazardous Waste
Cleanup
CEMP-ET
Missouri River Division
Mandatory Centers of Expertise (MCX). A MCX is defined as a
division or district organizational element which currently
possesses a demonstrated, credible, technical capability in a
specialized subject area that is of beneficial use to other Corps
field offices, and whose utilization by various other USACE FOA
has been mandated by HQUSACE by regulation.
HQUSACE
Proponent
MCX Mission Area.
Assigned Center
Energy Monitoring and
Control Systems (EMCS)
Huntsville Division
CEMP-ET
Intrusion Detection Systems
Huntsville Division
CEMP-ET
Protective Design
Missouri River Division
CEMP-ET
Army Range Program /
Huntsville Division
Selected Indoor Training Facilities
CEMP-EA
Tactical Vehicle Wash
Facilities
Louisville District
CEMP-ET
Transportation Systems
Missouri River Division
North Pacific Division
South Atlantic Division
CEMP-ET
Expansive Soils
Fort Worth District
CEMP-ET
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Design Centers. A design center is a specified Corps field
office which is assigned a singular technical mission that is
permanent and Corps-wide in scope. The designated office is to
be considered the "lead activity" in a specialized area where
capability needs to be concentrated for maximum effectiveness,
economy, and/or efficiency.
Mission Area.
Assigned Center
HQUSACE
Proponent
Medical Facilities
Medical Facilities
Design Office
CEMP-EM
Mobilization (M) Design
Huntsville Division
CEMP-EA
Technical Management Center. A technical management center
is a specified Corps field office which is assigned a primary
management responsibility for a particular program, and is
authorized by separate correspondence from HQUSACE.
Mission Area.
Assigned Center
HQUSACE
Proponent
Area Oriented Depots
South Pacific Division
Sacramento District
CEMP-MA
Strategic Defense Initiative
Strategic Defense Command
Huntsville Division
CEMP-MG
Chemical Demilitarization
Facilities
Huntsville Division
CEMP-MA
Production Base Support Ammunition Plants
Huntsville Division
CEMP-MG
Mobilization Master Planning North Central Division
for AMC & MTMC Installations
CEMP-EA
Centers of Standardization (COS). A COS is a USACE division
or district organization selected by the USACE Facilities
Standardization Committee to be the supporting USACE design
agency for developing a Department of the Army (DA) standard
design package(s) for a specific facility type.
HQUSACE
F-3
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31 Jan 92
COS Mission Area.
Assigned Center
Army Reserve Centers
Louisville District
Aviation Maintenance Hangers
Huntsville Division
Barracks Modernization
Fort Worth District
Basic Trainee Barracks
Tulsa District
Battalion Headquarters
Sacramento District
Bowling Alleys
Louisville District
Brigade Headquarters
Sacramento District
Central Issue Facilities
Seattle District
Chapels/Family Support
Centers
Omaha District
Child Development Center
Facilities
Huntsville Division
Company Administration
and Supply
Savannah District
Criminal Investigation
Omaha District
Division Command Facilities
Enlisted Personnel Dining
Facilities
Norfolk District
Fire Stations
Huntsville Division
Flight Simulators
Mobile District
General Purpose Warehouse
Seattle District
Information Systems
Warehouses
New York District
NCO Academies
Fort Worth District
Physical Fitness Facilities
Huntsville Division
F-4
Proponent
CEMP-EA
is the
proponent
for all
standards
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
COS Mission Area.
Assigned Center
Tactical Vehicle Maintenance
Facilities
Savannah District
Troop Issue Subsistence
Activities
Norfolk District
Unaccompanied Enlisted
Personnel Housing
Savannah District
Unaccompanied Officer
Personnel Housing
Tulsa District
Youth Activity Centers
Little Rock District
HQUSACE
Proponent
CEMP-EA
is the
proponent
for all
standards
Laboratories. Research and Development Laboratories are
operated by the Corps for the purpose of research, development
and testing of new engineering concepts and systems, or testing
and evaluation of existing engineering and geo-technical
features.
USACE Laboratories: Several laboratories provide services Corpswide and to many other customers. These laboratories are listed
as follows:
U.S. Army Engineer Topographic Engineering Center, CETEC,
Telegraph and Leaf Roads, Fort Belvoir, VA, 22060-5546.
U.S. Army Cold Regions Research Laboratory, CECRL, 72 Lyme Road,
Hanover, NH, 03755-1290.
U.S. Army Waterways Experiment Station, CEWES, 3909 Halls Ferry
Road, Vicksburg, MS, 39180-6199.
U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, CECER,
P.O. Box 4005, Champaign, IL, 61824-4005.
Division and District Laboratories: Each division and most
districts operate geo-technical testing laboratories. In
addition to supporting division and district accomplished
projects, these laboratories are available to the DEH/BCE for
their locally accomplished projects. The laboratories can also
perform various testing and measurement operations, such as those
needed for compliance with state and local environmental laws and
regulations.
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31 Jan 92
Separate Field Operating Activities. There are several
USACE field operating activities (FOA) whose missions include
support to the DEH/BCE community. These FOA's are listed as
follows:
U.S. Army Engineering and Housing Support Center, CEHSC, Building
Number 2593, Fort Belvoir, VA, 22060-5515.
U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency, CETHA, Building
Number E4460, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21010-5401.
F-6
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31 Jan 92
APPENDIX G
U.S. AIR FORCE PROJECT MANAGERS GUIDELINES
The following list of project management guidelines was extracted
from the U.S. Air Force Project Manager's Guide for Design and
Construction, (USAF/LEE, June 1989). It depicts guidance that
Headquarters, Air Staff provides to their "young, lessexperienced" design and construction managers in their field
offices.
It is important that district project managers review
these guidelines to develop an understanding of the Air Force
manager's perspective and priorities.
1.
Scope is the Major Command's responsibility.
conflicts to the Major Command's attention.
Bring
2.
A field design instruction to the Design Agent authorizing
them to proceed with design. Nothing happens without it!
3.
Review the 2807 PDC screens and follow up at the end of this
period if a revised Air Force Design Instruction has not been
issued.
4. Furnish the Design Agent with a good project description,
critical need dates, and any special expertise required.
5.
Design excellence is a prime goal for all Air Force
projects.
6.
The project manager chairs the pre-design conference.
7.
The Air Force considers the functional and visual aspects of
design as essential as the electrical, mechanical and structural
systems in terms of a total integrated facility design.
8. Ensure Comprehensive Interior and Structural Interior Design
requirements are included in the Requirements and Management Plan
(RAMP) and communicate exceptional requirements to the Design
Agent.
9. Ensure the A-E understands the Base Architectural
Compatibility Guidelines are part of the design criteria.
10. Encourage the designer and user to ask questions at the predesign conference.
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31 Jan 92
11. Check with the appropriate security personnel for types of
systems available, and their uses.
12.
Review the RAMP page by page, paragraph by paragraph.
13. Track design progress closely and obtain justification for
any slippage.
14.
A good comment is a good comment, no matter who makes it!
15. The importance of conscientious early review cannot be
overemphasized.
16. Comparison of the cost estimate with the cost plan and the
Air Force Automated Pricing Guide is key to future design
development or changing the budget.
17. Success as project manager during design hinges on the
ability to get the appropriate decision power applied early to
correct deviations from the cost plan.
18. Conservative estimating and excessive contingencies are
often reasons for high cost estimates.
19. Challenge the Design Agents to set demanding performance
periods.
20. The bid documents must establish the order of acceptance of
alternative bid items. This avoids any perception of juggling
alternative bid items to favor a particular contractor.
21. The pre-construction conference is not the time to discuss
potential change requests.
22. If you have a problem and do not get a quick resolution,
elevate the concern and ask for help.
23. It is imperative that data in the Project Design and
Construction (PDC) System be correct and current.
24. Extended overhead can add considerable cost to a project
when construction completion is delayed through no fault to the
contractor.
25.
Manage changes to prevent building fifty year mistakes.
G-2
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31 Jan 92
26. What is hard, and therefore where you need to focus your
attention with the Construction Agent, is to put a price tag on
pending and potential changes and claims without final decisions
by the contracting officer.
27. When responsibility is not quickly determined, have the
Construction Agent unilaterally direct the contractor and/or
designer to correct the deficiency and establish responsibility
and payment later.
28. Joint Occupancy (contractor and user) can be a useful tool,
but use it judiciously.
29. The Resident Construction Manager (Resident Engineer) is
most able to facilitate bringing together the right people, at
the right time, to address the right issues.
30. The target closeout period is four months after physical
completion of the line item. Although the Air Force goal is to
reduce the closeout time, you should not financially close a
project with outstanding construction and design deficiencies.
31.
Don't leave the facility user stranded.
32. While estimates are essential information for predicting and
tracking costs, your management is what controls costs and brings
a project in on budget.
G-3
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
APPENDIX G
U.S. AIR FORCE PROJECT MANAGERS GUIDELINES
The following list of project management guidelines was extracted
from the U.S. Air Force Project Manager's Guide for Design and
Construction, (USAF/LEE, June 1989). It depicts guidance that
Headquarters, Air Staff provides to their "young, lessexperienced" design and construction managers in their field
offices.
It is important that district project managers review
these guidelines to develop an understanding of the Air Force
manager's perspective and priorities.
1.
Scope is the Major Command's responsibility.
conflicts to the Major Command's attention.
Bring
2.
A field design instruction to the Design Agent authorizing
them to proceed with design. Nothing happens without it!
3.
Review the 2807 PDC screens and follow up at the end of this
period if a revised Air Force Design Instruction has not been
issued.
4. Furnish the Design Agent with a good project description,
critical need dates, and any special expertise required.
5.
Design excellence is a prime goal for all Air Force
projects.
6.
The project manager chairs the pre-design conference.
7.
The Air Force considers the functional and visual aspects of
design as essential as the electrical, mechanical and structural
systems in terms of a total integrated facility design.
8. Ensure Comprehensive Interior and Structural Interior Design
requirements are included in the Requirements and Management Plan
(RAMP) and communicate exceptional requirements to the Design
Agent.
9. Ensure the A-E understands the Base Architectural
Compatibility Guidelines are part of the design criteria.
10. Encourage the designer and user to ask questions at the predesign conference.
G-1
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
11. Check with the appropriate security personnel for types of
systems available, and their uses.
12.
Review the RAMP page by page, paragraph by paragraph.
13. Track design progress closely and obtain justification for
any slippage.
14.
A good comment is a good comment, no matter who makes it!
15. The importance of conscientious early review cannot be
overemphasized.
16. Comparison of the cost estimate with the cost plan and the
Air Force Automated Pricing Guide is key to future design
development or changing the budget.
17. Success as project manager during design hinges on the
ability to get the appropriate decision power applied early to
correct deviations from the cost plan.
18. Conservative estimating and excessive contingencies are
often reasons for high cost estimates.
19. Challenge the Design Agents to set demanding performance
periods.
20. The bid documents must establish the order of acceptance of
alternative bid items. This avoids any perception of juggling
alternative bid items to favor a particular contractor.
21. The pre-construction conference is not the time to discuss
potential change requests.
22. If you have a problem and do not get a quick resolution,
elevate the concern and ask for help.
23. It is imperative that data in the Project Design and
Construction (PDC) System be correct and current.
24. Extended overhead can add considerable cost to a project
when construction completion is delayed through no fault to the
contractor.
25.
Manage changes to prevent building fifty year mistakes.
G-2
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
26. What is hard, and therefore where you need to focus your
attention with the Construction Agent, is to put a price tag on
pending and potential changes and claims without final decisions
by the contracting officer.
27. When responsibility is not quickly determined, have the
Construction Agent unilaterally direct the contractor and/or
designer to correct the deficiency and establish responsibility
and payment later.
28. Joint Occupancy (contractor and user) can be a useful tool,
but use it judiciously.
29. The Resident Construction Manager (Resident Engineer) is
most able to facilitate bringing together the right people, at
the right time, to address the right issues.
30. The target closeout period is four months after physical
completion of the line item. Although the Air Force goal is to
reduce the closeout time, you should not financially close a
project with outstanding construction and design deficiencies.
31.
Don't leave the facility user stranded.
32. While estimates are essential information for predicting and
tracking costs, your management is what controls costs and brings
a project in on budget.
G-3
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
APPENDIX H
FORMS FOR INSTALLATION SUPPORT MANAGEMENT
Evaluation and Feedback Process. USACE policy regarding
evaluation and feedback for Installation Support is summarized as
follows:
a. USACE subordinate commands will annually ask
installation engineers at each supported Army and Air Force
installation to evaluate the quality, cost-effectiveness and
timeliness of Installation Support services. A simple evaluation
form, such as the sample included in this appendix (Figure H-1),
will be used for this evaluation. The evaluation forms should be
distributed to all supported installations simultaneously. The
evaluation process should be accomplished during the first or
second quarter of each fiscal year.
b. After the installation has completed the evaluation form and
returned it to the district a detailed review of the responses
will be conducted. This review will be conducted by supervisory
personnel one organizational level above the Installation Support
Coordinator and should consist of the following:
(1)
Evaluate submitted/completed forms for substance.
(2) Contact installation engineers to acknowledge receipt
of completed evaluation.
(3) Identify any high or low ratings, or exceptionally
positive or negative remarks.
(4)
Evaluate other routine comments.
(5) Extract data to generate trends related to Installation
Support service.
(6) Evaluate trends to identify organizational strengths
and weaknesses.
c. The analysis, along with completed evaluation forms, should
be personally reviewed by the district commander and other
appropriate management staff within the district. After this
review, the following actions should occur:
(1) Discuss comments with district project managers,
construction managers, field offices, and other district
personnel as appropriate.
H-1
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
(2) Contact or visit the installation engineer to confirm
any exceptionally positive or negative comments.
(3) Take appropriate management action in the district to
improve Installation Support services, and inform installation
engineers of actions that will be taken.
d. The result of this survey will be forwarded by districts to
their MSC for evaluation of general trends and satisfaction
levels regarding Installation Support services being provided.
The MSC-level analysis will be forwarded annually, as an
executive summary to the district analysis, to HQUSACE, CEMP-CI,
Washington D.C. 20314-1000 with a courtesy copy to CEHSC,
CEHSC-FM, Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5516.
e. The results of the annual evaluation will also serve as a
basis for conferences or visits with key management personnel
from the supported installation.
f. USACE subordinate commands may also develop a customer
satisfaction survey form for individual projects or support
actions. These forms should be used with discrimination, or as a
random sample, since completing one for every project or action
may create a burden on the installation engineer staff. A sample
format for evaluation of individual projects/support actions
(Figure H-2), and a sample format for "quick feedback" (Figure H3) for more streamlined customer evaluations, are also included
in this appendix.
Project Status Reporting. USACE subordinate commands should
provide project status information to supported installations at
least quarterly. For reimbursable funded projects, monthly
status reporting may be more appropriate. Project status reports
can be furnished to the installation through a variety of
methods. Using Automated Management Progress Reporting System
(AMPRS) or Project Management Information System (PROMIS) printouts are methods which take advantage of an existing data base.
Some districts use reports generated with a personal computer, or
an information paper/fact sheet format, tailored to the
installations needs. Regardless of which format is used, the
district must coordinate with the installation to determine what
data they deem important for reporting purposes. Sample status
reporting formats are depicted at Figure H-4 through Figure H-6.
These samples are simply guides, depicting typical items of
interest to the installation.
Installation Support Request Form. A sample (blank) Installation
Support Request format is at Figure H-7 of this appendix.
H-2
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31 Jan 92
Figure H-1.
SAMPLE FORMAT-ANNUAL INSTALLATION SUPPORT EVALUATION
H-3
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31 Jan 92
Figure H-2. SAMPLE FORMAT-INDIVIDUAL INSTALLATION SUPPORT EVALUATION
H-4
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
Figure H-3.
SAMPLE FORMAT-QUICK FEEDBACK
H-5
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31 Jan 92
Figure H-4.
SAMPLE FORMAT-ENGINEERING SERVICES STATUS REPORT
H-6
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31 Jan 92
Figure H-5.
SAMPLE FORMAT-DESIGN SERVICES STATUS REPORT
H-7
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31 Jan 92
Figure H-6.
SAMPLE FORMAT-CONSTRUCTION SERVICES STATUS REPORT
H-8
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31 Jan 92
Figure H-7.
SAMPLE FORMAT-INSTALLATION SUPPORT REQUEST
H-9
Directive for
INSTALLATION MANAGEMENT
–Defense-wide Application of the Model installation Management Approach–
PURPOSE
This Directive establishes the DoD installation management policy.
APPLICABILITY
The provisions of this Directive apply to the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Military
Departments, the Organization of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Defense Agencies (hereafter referred to as “DoD Components”).
POLICY
The Commanding Officer of an installation is responsible for accomplishing the mission assigned to the installation, and should be delegated broad authority to decide how best to
accomplish the mission, and is accountable for all resources applied to the mission.
Headquarters staff activities shall be directed toward facilitating any installation commander’s
ability to accomplish the mission. Regulations that limit installation commanders’ freedom
to do their jobs are contrary to the basic DoD installation management policy, and shall be
cancel led or revised. Exceptions should be rare.
Except where
law or federal
ices wherever
satisfies their
required to preserve essential wartime support capability, or constrained by
regulation, installation commanders shall be free to purchase goods and servthey can get the combination of quality, responsiveness, and cost that best
requirements.
Unless prohibited by law, a share of any resources saved or earned at an installation should
be made available to the installation commander to improve the operations and working and
living conditions at the installation.
RESPONSIBILITIES
Heads of DoD components shall ensure that all regulations for which they are responsible
comply with the policies contained in this Directive. The DoD Inspector General shall review
and report compliance with these policies.
EFFECTIVE DATE AND IMPLEMENTATION
This Directive is effective immediately. Forward one copy of implementing documents to the
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Acquisition and Logistics) within 120 days.
Deputy Secretary of Defense
Date
EXCELLENT INSTALLATIONS - THE FOUNDATION OF DEFENSE
I-1
FOR GENERAL INFORMATION . . . CALL:
202-272-0660
AREA CODE & TELEPHONE NUMBER
DUTY HOURS
General Information
202-272-0660
Personnel Locator**
202-272-0359
NON-DUTY HOURS
EMERGENCY OPERATION
202-272-1001
202-272-0251
HQUSACE Emergency Operations Centers
703-697-0218
703-697-0218*
HQDA Army Operations Center
202-272-1001
DSN 285-1001
DUTY OFFICER HQUSACE/OCE
703-697-0218*
ALL OTHER TIMES
TO MINIMIZE TELEPHONE CHARGES, CALL SHOULD BE PLACED AS FOLLOWS:
1. DSN
3. DIRECT DIALING
2. WATS
4. OPERATOR ASSISTED CALLS
NOTES: PERTAINING TO DIVISIONS AND DISTRICTS
1. Performs military and civil works construction.
8. Provides real property maintenance in the National Capitol Region.
2. Performs civil works construction.
9. Provides Engineering Design Support for hydroelectric projects throughout the
Corps, including modernization and rehabilitation.
3. Performs military constructions.
✶ Amy Operations Center (AOC) will connect callers to the HAUSACE OCE
Duty Officer.
4. Performs military and civil works real estate activities.
✶ ✶ TO reach person whose extension is not known.
5. Performs civil works real estate only.
✶ ✶ ✶ Answering services.
6 . Performs military real estate functions.
7 . Performs construction and related engineer programs for the U.S. and foreign
governments in the Middle East, Africa Southwest Asia, and South Asia.
This Activities List was prepared by the Integration and Programs Office, Directorate of Information Management HQUSACE; it will be
updated semiannually in accordance with ER (1-1-141).
Requests from non-government entities for copies of this Activities List should be submitted in writing, to HQUSACE, Office of Chief
Counsel, CECC-ZA, citing the Freedom of Information Act.
J-2
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
HEADQUARTERS AND NATIONAL CAPTIAL REGION ORGANIZATIONS
HEADQUARTERS, CECG
LTG Arthur E. Williams
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 202-272-0001
DSN 285-0001
HQ, US Army Corps of Engineers
20 Massachusetts Avenue N.W.
Washington, DC 20314-1000
Executive Fax: 202-272-1683+
Executive Corpsmail: CECS
Core Time
0830-1530 ET
Flexitime
0700-1730 ET
ENGINEER INSPECTOR GENERAL, CEIG
COL George C. Clarke
Mail/OffIce Location: COMM/FTS 703-355 -2572/2573
DSN 345-2572/2573
US Army Corps of Engineers
Engineer Inspector General (CEIG)
Kingman Building
7701 Telegraph Road
Alexandria, VA 22310-3863
Executive Fax: 703-355-7389
Executive Corpsmail: CEIG
Core Time
0830-1530 ET
Flexitime
0700-1730 ET
US ARMY HUMPHREYS ENGINEER CENTER SUPPORT ACTIVITY, CEHEC
Mail and Office Location:
COMM 703-355-2214 703-355-2220
FTS 385-2214 DSN 345-2214
7701 Telegraph Road
FTS 385-2200** FTS 385-2220
Alexandria, VA 22310-3860
Executive Fax: 703-355-0188
Executive Corpsmail: John J. Quinn, Jr.
John J. Quinn, Jr.
Director
Flexitime
0700-1800
Safety and Occupational Health Office:
Mail and Office Location:
COMM 703-355-2246
DSN 345-2246
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Humphreys Engineer Center Support Activity
Safety and Occupational Health Office
7701 Telegraph Road
Alexandria, VA 22310-3860
Executive Fax: 703-355-2005
USACE PUBLICATIONS DEPOT, CEHEC-IM-PD
Mail and Office Location:
2803 52nd Avenue
Hyattsville, MD 20781-1102
0730-1600 ET
301-436-2063
DSN 296-2063
+ Executive Fax and corpsmail: are for executive office communication only, and are not to be used for distribution to subordinate elements.
ACTIVITIES
1
J-3
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
MAJOR SUBORDINATE COMMANDS AND SUBORDINATE COMMANDS
US ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, HUNTSVILLE, CEHND
Mail Address:
COMM/FTS 205-955-5460 205-880-2822
DSN 645-5460** DSN 645-5463
P.O. Box 1600
DSN 645-5460
Huntsville, AL 35807-4301
Office Location:
106 Wynn Drive North
Huntsville, AL 35805-1957
Note: 1
Executive Fax: 205-955-4766
Executive Corpsmail: CEHND-DC-DE
COL Robert D. Brown III
Core Time
0830-1530 CT
Flexitime
0700-1700 CT
US ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, LOWER MISSISSIPPI VALLEY, CELMV
Mail Address:
P.O. BOX 80
Vicksburg, MS 39180
Office Location:
1400 Walnut Street
Vicksburg, MS 39180
Notes: 2 & 5
Executive Fax: 601-634-7084
Executive Corpsmail: CELMV-DE
LMVD Laboratory Location:
Mail and Office Location:
3909 Halls Ferry Road
Vicksburg, MS 39180
Soil Testing Facility
Concrete and Materials Testing
Other
BG Eugene S. Witherspoon
601-634-5750
601 -634-5000**
Core Time
0900-1545 CT
Flexitime
0700-1745 CT
BG Eugene S. Witherspoon
601-634-2122
601-634-3277
601-634-3111
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, MEMPHIS CELMM
COMM/FTS 901-544-3221 901-785-6055
Mail Address:
901 -544-3005**
167 North Main Street Room B202
Memphis, TN 38103-1894
Office Location:
Comer of Front & Poplar Streets
Memphis, TN
Note: 1
Executive Fax: 901-544-3792
Executive Corpsmail: CELMM-DE
COL Theodore C. Fox III
Core Time
0730-1600 CT
Flexitime
0700-1745 CT
ACTIVITIES
2
J-4
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS, CELMN
Mail Address:
COMM/FTS 504-862-2204 504-862-2365
P.O. Box 60267
504-865-1121**
New Orleans, LA 70160-0267
Office Location:
Foot of Prytania and Leake Avenue
New Orleans, LA 70118
Note: 2
Executive Fax: 504-862-1785
Executive Corpsmail: CELMN-DE
COL Kenneth G. Clew
Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center 504-862-1404 504-738-7027
Mail Address:
P.O. BOX 61280
New Orleans, LA 70161-1280
Office Location:
Foot of Prytarnia at Leake Avenue
New Orleans, LA 70118
Executive Corpsmail: CEWRC-NDC-CE
David L. Penick, Director
Core Time
0900-1530 CT
Flexitime
0700-1730 CT
0745-1615 CT
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, ST. LOUIS, CELMS
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 314-331-8010
1222 Spruce Street
DSN 555-8010
St. Louis, MO 63103-2833
314-33 1-8000**
DSN 555-8000**
Note: 2 & 5
Executive Fax: 314-331-8770
Executive Corpsmail: CELMS-DE
COL Thomas C. Suermann
Core Time
0900-1515 CT
Flexitime
0630-1745 CT
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, VICKSBURG, CELMK
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 601-631-5010 601-631-5000
601-631-5000**
2101 North Frontage Road
Vicksburg, MS 39180-5191
Note: 2 & 5
Executive Fax: 601-631-5296
Executive Corpsmail: CELMK-DE
COL Stanley G. Phernambucq
Core Time
0800-1645 CT
US ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, MISSOURI RIVER, CEMRD
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 402-221-7200 402-221-7216
402-221-7214**
12565 West Center Road
Omaha NE 68144
Note: 1 & 4
Executive Fax: 402-221-7379
Executive Corpsmail: CEMRD-XO
MRD Laboratory Location
Mail and Office Location:
420 South 18th Street
Omaha, NE 68102-2586
COL John E. Schaufelberger
Core Time
0900-1530 CT
Flexitime
0630-1800 CT
COL John E. Schaufelberger
402-444-4300
ACTIVITIES
3
J-5
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, KANSAS CITY, CEMRK
COMM/FTS 816-426-3201
Mail Address:
700 Federal Building
816-426-3896**
Kansas City, MO 64106-2896
Office Location:
601 East 12th Street
Kansas City, MO 64106-2896
Note: 1 & 4
Executive Fax: 816-426-2730
Executive Corpsmail: CEMRK-IM-SC
816-796-7405
COL Richard H. Goring
Core Time
0915-1515 CT
Flexitime
0630-1800 CT
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, OMAHA, CEMRO
COMM/FTS 402-221-3900 402-221-4148
Mail and Office Location:
402-221-3020**
215 North 17th Street
Omaha, NE 68102-4978
Note: 1
Executive Fax: 402-221-3029/3030
Executive Corpsmail: CEMRO
COL Michael S. Meuleners
Core Time
0830-1530 CT
Flexitime
0700-1730 CT
US ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, NORTH ATLANTIC, CENAD
Mail and Office Location:
COMM/FTS 212-264-7101 212-425-3934
212-264-7102**
90 Church Street
New York, NY 10007-2979
Note: 1
Executive Fax: 212-264-9498
Executive Corpsmail: CENAD-EX
BG Paul Y. Chinen
Core Time
0900-1500 ET
Flexitime
0700-1730 ET
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, BALTIMORE AND SUPERVISOR OF BALTIMORE HARBOR, CENAB
COL J. Richard Capka
Mail Address:
COMM/FTS 410-962-4545
410-962-9232**
P.O. Box 1715
Baltimore, MD 21203-1715
Office Location:
City Crescent Building
10 South Howard Street Room 11000
Baltimore, MD 21201
Note: 1 & 4
Executive Fax: 410-962-7516
Executive Corpsmail: CENAB-DE
Core Time
0800-1630 ET
Flexitime
0700-1730 ET
US ARMY ENGINEER ACTIVITY, CAPITAL AREA, CENAC (DCSEN, MDW)
LTC Robert H. Candido
Mail Address:
COMM/FTS 703-696-6400
DSN 226-6400
ATTN: ANMY-PW
Fort Meyer, VA 22211-5050
Office Location:
Building 305
Fort Meyer, VA 22211-5050
Note: 8
Note: Operation Control transferred to MDW
Executive Fax: 703-696-6422
0730-1600 ET
ACTIVITIES
4
J-6
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, NEW YORK AND SUPERVISOR OF NEW YORK HARBOR, CENAN
Mail and Office Location:
COMM/FTS 212-264-0100 201-433-6110
Jacob K. Javits Federal Building
212-264-0102**
New York, NY 10278-0090
DSN 144-796-0100
Note: 1 & 4
DSN 144-796-0200**
Executive Fax: 212-264-0614
Executive Corpsmail: CENAN-DE
COL Thomas A. York
Core Time
0800-1700 ET
Flexitime
0630-1800 ET
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, NORFOLK AND SUPERVISOR OF NORFOLK HARBOR, CENAO
Mail and Offfice Location: COMM/FTS 804-441-7601
804-441-7717**
Waterfield Building
803 Front Street
Norfolk, VA 23510-1096
Note: 1
Executive Fax: 804-441-7719
Executive Corpsmail: CENAO-DE
804-441-7500***
COL Andrew M. Perkins
Core Time
0630-1630 ET
Flexitime
0700-1730 ET
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, PHILADELPHIA, CENAP
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 215-656-6501
Wanamaker Building
215-656-6515**
100 Penn Square East
Philadelphia, PA 19107-3390
Note: 1
Executive Fax: 215 656-6899
Executive Corpsmail: CENAP-DE
215-656-6756
LTC Richard F. Sliwoski
Core Time
0900-1545 ET
Flexitime
0700-1745 ET
US ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, NEW ENGLAND, CENED
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 617-647-8220 508-772-6288
Frederick C. Murphy Federal Bldg.
617-647-8111**
424 Trapelo Road
Waltham, MA 02254-9149
Note: 1
Executive Fax: 617-647-8821
Executive Corpsmail: CENED-DE
COL Brink P. Miller
Core Time
0900-1530 ET
Flexitime
0700-1800 ET
COL Brink P. Miller
Environmental Laboratory Location:
476 Coldbrook Road
Hubbardston, MA 01452-9743
508-928-4238
US ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, NORTH CENTRAL, CENCD
COMM/FTS 312353-6310 708-432-7279
Mail Address:
312-353-6385**
111 North Canal Street
Chicago, IL 60606-7205
Office Location:
Comer of Washington and Canal Streets
Chicago, IL 60606
Note: 2 & 5
Executive Fax: 312-353-5233
Executive Corpsmail: CENCD-EO
COL Richard W. Craig
0730-1700 CT
ACTIVITIES
5
J-7
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, BUFFALO, CENCB
COL Walter C. Neitzke
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 716-879-4200
716-879-4104**
1776 Niagara Street
Buffalo, NY 14207-3199
Note: 2
Executive Fax: 716-879-4195
Core Time
0900-1500 ET
Flexitime
0630-1730 ET
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, CHICAGO, CENCC
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 312-353-6400 312-353-4009
312-353-6401**
111 North Canal Street, Suite 600
Chicago, IL 60606-7206
Note: 2 & 4
Executive Fax: 312-353-1271
Executive Corpsmail: CENCC
LTC David M. Reed
Core Time
0800-1630 CT
Flexitime
0700-1730 CT
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, DETROIT, CENCE
Mail Address:
COMM/FTS 313-226-6762 313-226-5789
DSN 346-5763 DSN 346-5789
P.O. BOX 1027
Detroit, MI 48231-1027
313-226-6413**
DSN 346-5763**
Office Location:
FTS 700-753-6000
McNamara Federal Building
477 Michigan Avenue
Detroit MI 48226
Note: 2
Executive Fax: 313-226-6009 FTS 700-753-6181
Executive Corpsmail: CENCE-XO
COL Brian J. Ohlinger
Core Time
0800-1630 ET
Flexitime
0700-1730 ET
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, ROCK ISLAND, CENCR
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 309-794-5224 319-328 4707***
309-794-4200**
Clock Tower Building
DSN 793-3446
P.O. BOX 2004
Rock Island, IL 61204-2004
Note: 2
Executive Fax: 309-794-5181
Executive Corpsmail: CENCR-DE
COL Albert J. Kraus,
[COL Charles S. Cox,
effective 28 July 1994]
Core Time
0730-1630 CT
Flexitime
0630-1730 CT
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, ST. PAUL, CENCS
COL James T. Scott
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 612-290-5200
Department of the Army
St. Paul District Corps of Engineers
Army Corps of Engineers Centre
190 5th Street East
St. Paul, MN 55101-1638
Note: 2
Executive Fax: 612-290-5256
District Fax: 612-290-2256
Executive Corpsmail: CENCS-DE
Core Time
0900-1530 CT
Flexitime
0700-1730 CT
ACTIVITIES
6
J-8
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
US ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, NORTH PACIFIC, CENPD
Mail Address:
COMM/FTS 503-326-3700
P.O. BOX 2870
503-326-6021**
Portland, OR 97208-2870
Office Location:
220 N.W. 8th Avenue, Room 206
Portland, OR 97209-3589
Note: 1 & 4
Executive Fax: 503-326-7323
Executive Corpsmail: CENPD-EA
MG Ernest J. Harrell
0730-1615 PT
NPD - Materials Laboratory Location:
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 503-665-4166
1491 N.W. Graham Avenue
Troutdale, OR 97060-9503
Executive Fax: 503-665-0371
Timothy J. Seeman, Director
0730-1615 PT
HYDROELECTRIC DESIGN CENTER, CENPD-PE-HD
Vacant
Mail Address:
COMM 503-326-3835
P.O. BOX 2870
503-326-6021**
Portland, OR 97208-2870
Office Location:
220 N.W. 8th Avenue, Room 309
Portland, OR 97209-3589
Note: 9
Executive Fax: 503-326-7340
Executive Corpsmail: CENPD-EN-HD
0730-1615 PT
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, ALASKA, CENPA
COL John W. Pierce
Mail Address:
COMM/FTS 907-753-2504 907-753-2515
[LTC(P) Peter A. Topp,
907-753-2504** DSN 317-552-2164
P.O. BOX 898
effective 12 July 1994]
Anchorage, AK 99506-0898
DSN 317-552-5233
Office Location:
Core Time
Building 21-700
0730-1600
Elmendorf Air Force Base, AK 99506
Flexitime
Note: 1 & 4
0630-1800
Executive Fax: 907-753-2526
Executive Corpsmail: CENPA-DE
Special Note for Alaska District: During power outages, the following is the only operable number: DSN 317-552-5233 or
907-552-5233 (commercial)
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, PORTLAND, CENPP
COL Charles A.W. Hines
[COL Timothy L. Wood,
effective 14 July 1994]
COMM 503-326-6000
Mail Address:
503-326-6021**
P.O. BOX 2946
Portland, OR 97208-2946
Office Location:
333 SW First Avenue, Tenth Floor
Portland, OR 97204-3945
Note: 2 & 5
Executive Fax: 503-326-3102
Executive Corpsmail: CENPP-DE
Core Time
0730-1615 PT
Flexitime
0630-1800 PT
ACTIVITIES
7
J-9
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, SEATTLE CENPS
Mail Address:
COMM/FTS 206-764-3690 206-764-3742***
P.O. Box 3755
206-764-3742**
Seattle, WA 98124-2255
Office Location:
4735 East Marginal Way South
Seattle, WA 98134-2385
Note l & 4
Executive Fax: 206-764-6544
Executive Corpsmail: CENPS-DE
COL Walter J. Cunningham
Core Time
0730-1600 PT
Flexitime
0630-1800 PT
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, WALLA WALLA, CENPW
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 509-522-6506 509-522-6730
Building 602, City-County Airport 509-522-6427**
Walla Walla, WA 99362-9265
Note: 2 & 5
Executive Fax 509-522-6259
Executive Corpsrnail: CENPW-DE
LTC James Weller
Core Time
0700-1600 PT
Flexitime
0630-1800 PT
US ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, OHIO RIVER, CEORD
Mail Address:
COMM/FTS 513-684-3002
P.O. Box 1159
513-684-3002**
Cincinnati, OH 45201-1159
Office Location:
550 Main Street
Cincinnati, OH 45201-1159
Note: 1
Executive Fax: 513-684-2085
Executive Corpmail: CEORD-DE
MG Albert J. Genetti, Jr.
513-589-3600
Core Time
0730-1600 ET
Flexitime
0630-1800 ET
ORD Laboratory
Mail and Office Location:
513-589-3600
11275 Sebring Drive
Cincinnati, OH 4524-2714
Note: 1
Executive Fax: 513-589-3619
Executive Corpsmail: CEORD-PE-GL
MG Albert J. Genetti, Jr.
Core Time
0730-1600
Flexitime
0630-1800
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, HUNTINGTON, CEORH
Mail and Office Location COMM/FTS 304-529-5395 304-529-5253
304-529-5211**
502 8th Street
DSN 366-6451
Huntington, WV 25701-2070
Note 2 & 5
Executive Fax: 304-529-5591
Executive Corpsmail: CEORH-DE
COL Earl Richardson
Core Time
0800-1645 ET
ACTIVITIES
8
J-10
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, LOUISVILLE, CEORL
Mail Address:
COMM/FTS 502-582-5601 502-774-3514
P.O. Box 59
502-582-5629**
Louisville, KY 40201-0059
Office Location:
Federal Building
600 Dr. Martin L. King, Jr., Place
Louisville, KY 40202
Note: 1 & 4
Executive Fax: 502-582-5475
Executive Corpsmail: CEORL-DE
COL Herbert F. Harback
[COL Ralph Gricco,
effective Jane 1994]
Core Time
0730-1615 ET
Flex-time
0630-1730 ET
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, NASHVILLE, CEORN
LTC John D. Norwood
COMM/FTS 615-736-5626 615-736-5626
Mail Address:
615-736-5626**
P.O. Box 1070
Nashville, TN 37202-1070
Office Location:
Estes Kefauver Federal Building and
Courthouse Annex
110 9th Street South
Nashville, TN 37203-3863
Note: 2 & 5
Executive Fax: 615-736-2052
Executive Corpsmail: CEORN-DE
Core Time
0830-1430 CT
Flexitime
0600-1800 CT
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, PITTSBURGH, CEORP
COL Richard B. Polin
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 412-644-6800 412-366-7758
412-644-6800**
Room 1828
William S. Moorhead Federal Building DSN 245-3185
DSN 245-3186
1000 Liberty Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15222-4186
Note: 2 & 5
Executive Fax: 412-644-4093
Executive Corpsmail: CEORP-DE
0730-1600 ET
US ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, PACIFIC OCEAN, CEPOD
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 808438-1500 808-423-4020
808-438-1331**
Building 230
DSN 315-438-1500
Ft. Shafter, HI 96858-5440
Note: 1
Executive Fax: 808-438-8387
Executive Corpsmail: CEPOD-DE
BG Ralph V. Locurcio
[BG Henry Miller,
effective July 1994]
0730-1600 HT
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, FAR EAST, CEPOF
011-82-2-270-7300 011-82-2-270-7400
Mail Address:
DSN 721-7300 DSN 721-7400
Far East Unit #l5546
APO AP 96205-0610
011-82-2-270-7360**
DSN 721-7360**
Office Location:
Seoul, Korea
Note: 3
Executive Fax: 011-82-2-822-265-8440
COL Robert N. Martin
0800-1700 KST
ACTIVITIES
9
J-11
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, HONOLULU, CEPOH
Mail and Office Location:
808-438-1069
Building 230
808-438-1331**
Ft. Shafter, HI 96858-5440
DSN 315-438-1069
Note: 1
Executive Fax: 808-438-8351
Executive Corpsmail: CEPOH-DE
808-423-4020
LTC M. Bruce Elliott
0730-1600 HT
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, JAPAN, CEPOJ
Mail Address:
011-81-3117-63-3025
Unit 45010
DSN 263-3025
APO AP 96343-0061
DSN 263-4887
Office Location:
Building 250, Camp Zama
Zama-shi, Kanagawa-ken 228 Japan
Note: 3
Executive Fax: 011-81-0462-53-9461
Executive Corpsmail: CEPOJ-DE
DSN 263-5854
COL Mark M. Schnabel
Core Time
0830-1530
Flexitime
0700-1800
US ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, SOUTH ATLANTIC, CESAD
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 404-331-6711
404-331-6716**
Room 313
77 Forsyth Street, SW
Atlanta, GA 30355-6801
Note: 1 & 4
Executive Fax: 404-331-1269
Executive Corpsmail: CESAD-DE
SAD Laboratory Location:
611 South Cobb Drive
Marietta, GA 30060
Lab Fax: 404-421-4977
Corpsmail: CESAD-EN-FL
BG Roger F. Yankoupe
[BG Ralph V. Locurcio,
effective October 1994]
Core Time
0730-1630 ET
Flexitime
0645-1745
404-421-5296
DSN 925-5296
404-421-5296**
BG Roger F. Yankoupe
[BG Ralph V. Locurcio,
effective October 1994]
0730-1615 ET
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, CHARLESTON, CESAC
Mail Address:
COMM/FTS 803-727-4344 803-556-1867
P.O. Box 919
803-727-4299**
Charleston, SC 29402-0919
Office Location:
L. Mendell Rivers Federal Building
334 Meeting Street
Charleston, SC 29403-6479
Note: 2
Executive Fax: 803-7274801
Executive Corpsmail: CESAC-DE
LTC George H. Hazel
Core Time
0830-1530 ET
Flexitime
0700-1700 ET
ACTIVITIES
10
J–12
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, JACKSONVILLE, CESAJ
COL Terrence C. Salt
[COL Terry L. Rice,
effective August 1994]
Mail Address:
COMM/FTS 904-232-2241
904-232-2234**
P.O. Box 4970
Jacksonville, FL 32232-0019
Office Location:
400 West Bay Street
Jacksonville, FL 32202-4412
Note: 2
Executive Fax: 904-232-3430
Executive Corpsmail: CESAJ-DE
Core Time
0900-1530 ET
Flexitime
0700-1730 ET
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, MOBILE CESAM
COMM/FTS 205-690-2511
Mail Address:
205-690-2528**
P.O. Box 2288
DSN 457-2511
Mobile, AL 36628-0001
Office Location:
109 Saint Joseph Street
Mobile, AL 36602-3630
Note: 1 & 4
Executive Fax: 205-690-2424
Executive Corpsmail: CESAM
205-690-2495
DSN 457-2495
COL Robert H. Griffin
Core Time
0830-1500 CT
Flexitime
0630-1715 CT
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, SAVANNAH, CESAS
COMM/FTS 912-652-5226
Mail Address:
P.O. BOX 889
Savannah, GA 31402-0889
Office Location:
Juliette Gordon Low Building
100 West Oglethorpe Avenue
Savannah, GA 31402-0889
Note: 1 & 4
Executive Fax: 912-652-5222
Executive Corpsmail: CESAS-DE
912-652-5822
COL Wayne W. Boy
Core Time
0830-1545 ET
Flexitime
0700-1715 ET
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, WILMINGTON, CESAW
COMM/FTS 910-251-4501 910-791-7315
Mail Address:
910-251-4000** 910-259-7344
P.O. BOX 1890
Wilmington, NC 28402-1890
Note: 1
Office Location:
69 Darlington Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Executive Fax: 910-251-4185
Executive Corpsmail: CESAW-DE
COL Robert J. Sperberg
Core Time
0730-1615 ET
Flexitime
0645-1730 ET
ACTIVITIES
11
J-13
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
US ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, SOUTH PACIFIC, CESPD
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 415-705-1414 415-705-1414**
415-705-2405**
630 Sansome Street Room 720
San Francisco, CA 94111-2206
Note: 1
Executive Fax: 415-705-1465
Executive Corpsmail: CESPD-XA
SPD Laboratory Location:
415-332-3374
Mail and Office Location:
415-556-1245
25 Liberty Ship Way
P.O. Box 37
Sausalito, CA 94965-1768
BG Milton Hunter
0745-1630 PT
James Z. Bedford
0700-1700
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, LOS ANGELES, CESPL
COMM/FTS 213-894-5300 213-894-3440
Mail Address:
213-894-5320**
P.O. Box 2711
Los Angeles, CA 90053-2325
Office Location:
300 North Los Angeles Street
Room 6130
Los Angeles, CA 90012-3375
Note: 1 & 4
Executive Fax: 213-894-2175
Executive Corpsmail: CESPL-DE
COL Robert L. VanAntwerp
[COL Michael R. Robinson,
effective July 1994]
Core Time
0730-1630 PT
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, SACRAMENTO, CESPK
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 916-557-7490 916-452-1535***
916-557-51OO**
1325 J Street
Sacramento, CA 95814-2922
Note: 1 & 4
Executive Fax: 916-557-7859
Executive Corpsmail: CESPK-DE
COL John N. Reese
0745-1630 PST
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, SAN FRANCISCO, CESPN
COMM/FTS 415-744-3021 415-744-3021***
Mail Address:
415-744-3020**
211 Main Street
DSN 586-2379
San Francisco, CA 94105-1905
Office Location:
Comer of Howard and Main Streets
San Francisco, CA
Note: 2
Executive Fax: 415-744-3310
Executive Corpsmail: CESPN-DE
LTC Leonard E. Cardoza
0700-1700 PT
Core Time
0800-1630 PT
Flexitime
0600-1800 PT
ACTIVITIES
12
J-14
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
US ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, SOUTHWESTERN, CESWD
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 214-767-2502
1114 Commerce Street
214-767-2500**
Santa Fe Building, Room 404
Dallas, TX 75242-0216
Note: 1
Executive Fax: 214-767-6499
Executive Corpsmail: CESWD-ZA
COL James P. King
SWD Laboratory Location:
4815 Cass Street
Dallas, TX
COL James P. King
0730-1630 CT
214-767-2502
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, ALBUQUERQUE, CESWA
Mail Address:
COMM/FTS 505-766-2732 505-275-5882
P.O. BOX 1580
505-766-2681**
Albuquerque, NM 87103-1580
Office Location:
517 Gold Avenue, SW
Albuquerque, NM 87102
Note: 1 & 4
Executive Fax: 505-766-1993
Executive Corpsmail: CESWA-DE
LTC Gary R. Burroughs
0730-1600 MT
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, FORT WORTH, CESWF
Mail Address:
COMMFTS 817-334-2300 817-421-4209
817-334-2150**
P.O. Box 17300
Ft. Worth, TX 76102-0300
Office Location:
819 Taylor Street
Ft. Worth, TX 76102-0300
Note: 1 & 4
Executive Fax: 817-334-3311
Executive Corpsmail: CESWF-DE
COL Joseph G. Graf
0745-1630 CT
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, GALVESTON, CESWG
Mail Address:
COMM/FTS 409-766-3001
409-766-3899**
P.O. Box 1229
Galveston, TX 77553-1229
Office Location:
Jadwin Building
2000 Fort Point Road
Galveston, TX 77550
Note: 2 & 6
Executive Fax: 409-766-3951
Executive Corpsmail: CESWG-DE or CESWG-IM
409-766-3899
COL Robert B. Gatlin
0730-1615 CT
ACTIVITIES
13
J-15
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK, CESWL
Mail Address:
COMM/FTS 501-324-5531
P.O. BOX 867
501-324-5551**
Little Rock, AR 72203-0867
Office Location:
700 West Capitol, Room 7530
Little Rock, AR 72201
Note: 1
Executive Fax: 501-324-6968
Executive Corpsmail: CESWL-ZA
501-988-5099
COL David R. Ruf
Core Time
0745-1630 CT
Flexitime
0715-1730 CT
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, TULSA, CESWT
COL Otis Williams
Mail and Office Location: COMM/FTS 918-669-7201
1645 South 101 East Avenue
918-669-7366**
Tulsa, OK 74128-4629
Note: 1
Executive Fax: 918-669-7207
Executive Corpsmail: CESWT-DE
Core Time
0745-1630 CT
Flexitime
0645-1730 CT
US ARMY ENGINEER DIVISION, TRANSATLANTIC, CETAD
Mail Address:
COMM/FTS 703-665-4073 703-869-2314
P.O. BOX 2250
703-665-4019**
Winchester, VA 22604-1450
DSN 265-XXXX
Office Location:
261 Prince Frederick Drive
Winchester, VA 22602
Note: 7
Executive Fax: 703-665-3621
Executive Corpsmail: CETAD-DE
COL Anthony V. Nida
Core Time
0830-1500 ET
Flexitime
0630-1730 ET
US ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, EUROPE, CETAE
Mail Address:
011-49-69-1515001
DSN 320-5001
Unit # 25727
DSN 320-7660**
Attn: CETAE-DE
APO AE 09242
Office Location:
Luebecker Strasse 31
Building #31, Room 302
60323 Frankfurt/Main Germany
Note: 3
Executive Fax: 011-0049-69-5964733
Executive Corpsmail: CETAE-DE
011-49-69-1515047
011-49-69-1515234
COL John M. Gates
0730-1730 CET
ACTIVITIES
14
J-16
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS
COASTAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH BOARD, CECRB
Mail and Office Location:
3909 Halls Ferry Road
Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199
601-634-2513
601-636-3111**
Members
MG Stanley G. Genega, President
COL Bruce K. Howard, Executive Secretary
BG Paul Y. Chinen
BG Ralph V. Locurcio
BG Roger F. Yankoupe
601-634-2485
Dr. Paul D. Komar
Dr. Robert G. Dean
Dr. Edward K. Noda
COL Bruce K. Howard
Core Time
0900-1530 CT
Flexitime
0700-1530 CT
MISSISSIPPI RIVER COMMISSION, CEMRC
601-634-5750
Mail Address (President):
601-634-5000**
P.O. BOX 80
Vicksburg, MS 39181-0080
Office Location:
1400 Walnut Street
Vicksburg, MS 39181-0080
Note: 2 & 5
Executive Fax: 601-634-7084
Executive Corpsmail: CELMV-DE
Members
BG Eugene S. Witherspoon (President Designee)
Mr. Sam E. Angel
Mr. R. D. James
601-636-6771
Core Time
0900-1545 CT
Flexitime
0700-1745 CT
RADM, J. Austin Yeager, Designee
Mr. Frank H. Walk
MG Albert J. Genetti, Jr., Designee
BG Gerald E. Galloway, Jr.
COL Walter S. Tulloch, Secretary
BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS, CEBA
202-272-0369
Mail Address:
DSN 285-0369
HQUSACE (ATTN: CEBA)
Washington, DC 20314-1000
Office Location:
Casimir Pulaski Building, Room 2103
20 Massachusetts Avenue N.W.
Washington, DC 20314-1000
BG Eugene S. Witherspoon
301-989-0870
Wesley Jockisch, Chairman
0745-1615 ET
ACTIVITIES
15
J-17
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER
IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
LABORATORIES
US ARMY TOPOGRAPHIC ENGINEERING CENTER, CETEC
Mail Address:
7701 Telegraph Road
Alexandria, VA 22310-3864
Office Location:
7701 Telegraph Road
Building #2592, Room L-1A
Alexandria, VA 22310-3864
Executive Fax: 703-355-3154
Other Fax: 703-355-3176
Executive Corpsmail: CETEC-ZA
703-355-2600 703-355-2626
DSN 345-2600 DSN-345-2626
703-355-2602**
DSN 345-2602**
Waker E. Boge, Director
LTC Louis R. DeSanzo,
Commander & Deputy Director
Core Time
0730-1600 ET
Flexitime
0600-1800 ET
ENGINEER STRATEGIC STUDIES CENTER, ESSC
Mail and Office Location:
7701 Telegraph Road
Casey Building #2594
Alexandria, VA 22310-3803
Executive Fax: 703-355-2503
Executive Corpsmail: CETEC-ES
Jill M. Davis, Director
703-355-2373
DSN 345-2373
703-355-2373**
0800-1630 ET
US ARMY COLD REGIONS RESEARCH, and ENGINEERING LABORATORY, CECRL
Mail and Office Location:
COMM 603-646-4200 603-646-4450
72 Lyme Road
603-646-4100**
Hanover, NH 03755-1290
Executive Fax: 603-646-4278/4448
Executive Corpsmail: CECRL-EO
COL Palmer K. Bailey, Commander
Core Time
0900-1500 ET
Flexitime
0600-1800 ET
US ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION, CEWES
Dr. Robert W. Whalin, Director
COL Bruce K. Howard, Commander
Mail and Office Location:
COMM 601-634-2664
601-634-2513
3909 Hails Ferry Road
Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199
601-636-3111**
Note: 1
Executive Fax: 601-634-2388
Executive Corpsmail: CEWES-ZA/CEWES-ZB
Core Time
0900-1530 CT
Flexitime
0700-1730 CT
US ARMY CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING RESEARCH LABORATORY, CECER
Mail Address:
P.O. Box 9005
Champaign, IL 61826-9005
Office Location:
2902 Newmark Drive
Interstate Research Park
Champaign, IL 61821-1076
Executive Fax: 217-373-7222
217-373-7201 217-352-6511
217-352-6511**
No New Replacement As of 5/94,
Director
LTC David Rehbein, Commander
0600-1800 CT
ACTIVITIES
16
J-18
ORGANIZATION
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
DUTY HOURS
OFFICER IN CHARGE OFFICE HOURS
NON-DUTY HOURS
FIELD OPERATING ACTIVITIES
US ARMY CENTER FOR PUBLIC WORKS, CECPW
Mail and Office Location:
7701 Telegraph Road
Alexandria, VA 22310-3862
Executive Fax: 703-355-3926
Executive Corpsmail: CECPW-ZA
703-355-2300 703-805-2499
DSN 345-2300 DSN 655-2499
Edward T. Watling, Director
Core Time
0900-1500 ET
Flexitime
0630-1700 ET
US ARMY MARINE DESIGN CENTER, CEMDC
Mail and Office Location:
Wanamaker Building
100 Penn Square East
Room 630 South
Philadelphia, PA 19107-3390
Fax: 215-656-6868
William F. Gretzmacher, Director
215-656-6850
0800-1645 ET
US ARMY HUMPHREYS ENGINEER CENTER SUPPORT ACTIVITY, CEHEC
SEE PAGE ONE FOR ADDRESS, TELEPHONE NUMBERS, AND POCs.
US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS WATER RESOURCES SUPPORT CENTER, CEWRC
Mail and Office Location:
Humphreys Engineer Center
7701 Telegraph Road
Alexandria, VA 22310-3868
Executive Fax: 703-355-3171
Executive Corpsmail: CEWRC
Kenneth H. Murdock, Director
703-355-2250
DSN 345-2250
703-355-2252**
Core Time
0900-1500 ET
Flextime
0630-1700 ET
ACTIVITIES
17
J-19
J-20
J-21
J-22
J-23
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1994 - 301-317 - 814/17654
EP 420-1-1
31 Jan 92
APPENDIX K
AR 420-10, Facilities Engineering, Management of
Installation Directorates of Engineering and Housing
The latest version of AR 420-10, dated 2 July 1987, was
undergoing a major update/revision when this pamphlet was
published. Users of this pamphlet should replace this page with
the revised version of AR 420-10, when it is published.
AR 420-10 is significant in that it contains the basic Department
of Army guidance governing the USACE Installation Support
Program. Therefore, it should be filed within this pamphlet
binder as a primary reference document.
K-1
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