Eleven Rack User Guide Version 8.0.4 ®

Eleven  Rack User Guide Version 8.0.4 ®
®
Eleven Rack User Guide
Version 8.0.4
Legal Notices
This guide is copyrighted ©2010 by Avid Technology, Inc.,
(hereafter “Avid”), with all rights reserved. Under copyright
laws, this guide may not be duplicated in whole or in part
without the written consent of Avid.
003, 96 I/O, 96i I/O, 192 Digital I/O, 192 I/O, 888|24 I/O,
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Contents
Part I
Playing Guitar through Eleven Rack
Chapter 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Quick Start Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Requirements and Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Getting Around This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Conventions Used in This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
4
5
5
Chapter 2. Hardware Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Eleven Rack Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Eleven Rack Back Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Chapter 3. Exploring Rigs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rig Select Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rig Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Rigs Live . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What’s In A Rig? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rig View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rig Device and Utility Settings in Rig View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Signal Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Control Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving Your Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Amps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Amp Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Speaker Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Microphones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Effects Controls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Don’t Forget to Save! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
15
16
17
18
18
19
21
22
22
23
27
28
29
30
35
35
Chapter 4. Eleven Rack Live Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Basic Live Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using an Amp Onstage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Effects and Foot Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
External Foot Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display Mode and Visibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
39
41
42
43
Contents
iii
Part II
Setting Up and Using Pro Tools With Eleven Rack
Chapter 5. Installing Pro Tools on Mac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Installation Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Pro Tools LE and Connecting Eleven Rack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Launching Pro Tools LE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional Software on the Pro Tools Installer Disc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Uninstalling Pro Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
47
47
49
49
51
Chapter 6. Installing Pro Tools On Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Installation Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Pro Tools LE and Connecting Your Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Launching Pro Tools LE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional Software on the Pro Tools Installer Disc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Uninstalling Pro Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
53
54
56
57
58
Chapter 7. Pro Tools Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Starting Up or Shutting Down Your System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Pro Tools LE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Optimizing a Mac System for Pro Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Optimizing a Windows System for Pro Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
59
60
67
69
Chapter 8. Eleven Rack Studio Setup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Using Eleven Rack with Pro Tools LE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Listen to Your Sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analog Audio Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital Audio Input and Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MIDI Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Eleven Rack with a Pro Tools|HD or M-Powered System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
74
74
75
76
77
Chapter 9. Eleven Rack with Pro Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Pro Tools LE Capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Eleven Rack Control Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing the Eleven Rack Control Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rig View Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Master Control Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording Guitars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Embedding Rig Settings in Audio Regions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Re-Amping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling Eleven Rack Parameters with MIDI Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iv
Eleven Rack User Guide
81
82
83
84
88
89
90
92
93
Part III
Reference
Chapter 10. User Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Exploring the User Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
User Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Chapter 11. Controlling Eleven Rack with MIDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
General/Frequently Used Controls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Amplifier Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Miscellaneous MIDI Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
103
104
110
115
Chapter 12. Hard Drive Configuration and Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Avoid Recording to the System Drive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supported Drive Formats and Drive Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Formatting an Audio Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Partitioning Drives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defragmenting an Audio Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Mac Drives on Windows Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hard Disk Storage Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
117
117
118
120
120
121
123
Chapter 13. Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Backing Up Your Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performance Factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Before You Call Avid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
125
125
126
126
Chapter 14. Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
About the Pro Tools Guides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
About the Pro Tools Guides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
About www.avid.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Chapter 15. Compliance Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Environmental Compliance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
EMC (Electromagnetic Compliance). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Safety Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Contents
v
vi
Eleven Rack User Guide
Part I: Playing Guitar through Eleven Rack
1
2
Chapter 1: Introduction
Quick Start Instructions
To get started playing guitar with Eleven Rack:
1 Connect outputs from Eleven Rack to your
monitors or headphones:
You’ve Got Eleven Rack, You’ve
Got Your Guitar. What’s Next?
Eleven® Rack is a high-quality audio and MIDI
interface, with classic guitar amp and effects
processing built right in. This means that Eleven
Rack is useful when recording, gigging, and
practicing.
At home or in the studio, you can plug guitars,
microphones, and other instruments into
Eleven Rack, and record directly into Pro Tools.
You can use the amp and effects modelling capabilities of Eleven Rack to process signals as
you record them, or to process previously recorded audio.
When away from the computer, you can use
Eleven Rack as a standalone guitar processor,
sending classic guitar tones straight to a venue’s
PA system, to a guitar amp, or both. You can also
simply plug in a pair of headphones and practice by yourself.
• If you’re connecting to self-powered studio
monitors, a stereo power amp and speakers,
or mixer inputs, use the Main outputs.
Eleven Rack Main outputs (back panel)
• If you’re using a pair of headphones, connect them to the Phones output.
Phones output (front panel)
2 Connect your guitar to the Guitar Input on
the front panel of Eleven Rack.
You’re probably excited to start playing with
your new Eleven Rack right away, so let’s get
started!
Guitar input (front panel)
Chapter 1: Introduction
3
3 Connect the power cable and set the Power
switch to On. The Eleven Rack logo will appear.
As Eleven Rack warms up, check your guitar to
make sure that its volume is turned up.
Before you power on Eleven Rack, make sure
any connected amplifiers or powered monitors are turned off or muted.
4 When the name of the first Rig is displayed,
try playing your guitar. How’s it sound? You may
want to adjust the output volume of Eleven Rack
by turning the Volume knob on the front panel.
System Requirements and
Compatibility
To use Eleven Rack with Pro Tools, you need.
• One of the following:
• A qualified Mac or Windows computer
(when using Eleven Rack with
Pro Tools LE)
– or –
• A qualified Pro Tools|HDTM or M-Powered
system running Pro Tools HD 8.0.1 software or higher (when using Eleven Rack as
an external signal processing device)
• DVD drive for Installation disc
• Internet access for registration purposes
Volume knob (front panel)
5 You can browse through Eleven Rack’s various
preset sounds, called Rigs, by turning the Scroll
wheel.
Avid can only assure compatibility and provide
support for hardware and software it has tested
and approved.
For complete system requirements and a list of
qualified computers, operating systems, hard
drives, and third-party devices, visit:
www.avid.com/compatibility
Scroll wheel (front panel)
6 Try adjusting the lit Control Knobs to change
the featured amp or effects settings. You can see
what kind of control each knob is assigned to on
the display.
7 Try pressing the Effects Bypass buttons, like
Dist, Mod, Delay, and Rev, to toggle the various
effects on and off.
4
Eleven Rack User Guide
Getting Around This Guide
There are two main ways to use Eleven Rack. In
Part 1, we’ll cover using Eleven Rack as a live guitar processor, and in Part 2, we’ll get into how to
use Eleven Rack as an audio and MIDI interface,
and effects processor with Pro Tools.
Conventions Used in This
Guide
Pro Tools guides use the following conventions
to indicate menu choices and key commands:
:
Convention
Action
File > Save
Choose Save from the
File menu
Control+N
Hold down the Control key
and press the N key
Control-click
Hold down the Control key
and click the mouse
button
Right-click
Click with the right mouse
button
Part 1: Eleven Rack for Guitar
You’re looking at it. In Part 1, we take you
through the hardware features of Eleven Rack in
Chapter 2, “Hardware Overview,” show you
how to edit and create your own Rigs in
Chapter 3, “Exploring Rigs,” and teach you how
to use Eleven Rack as a live guitar processor in
Chapter 4, “Eleven Rack Live Setup.”
Part 2: Working With Pro Tools LE
In Part 2, you can learn how to set up and use
Eleven Rack as part of a Pro Tools system. We
cover installation details in Chapter 5, “Installing Pro Tools on Mac,” and Chapter 6, “Installing Pro Tools On Windows,” setting up your studio in Chapter 8, “Eleven Rack Studio Setup,”
and getting the most out of Eleven Rack with
Pro Tools in Chapter 9, “Eleven Rack with Pro
Tools.”
The names of Commands, Options, and Settings
that appear on-screen are in a different font.
The following symbols are used to highlight important information:
User Tips are helpful hints for getting the
most from your Pro Tools system.
Important Notices include information that
could affect your data or the performance of
your system.
Part 3: Reference
In Part 3, we get into the technical details behind the scenes. Learn all about Eleven Rack’s
User Options in Chapter 10, “User Options,”
and how to control Eleven Rack with MIDI in
Chapter 11, “Controlling Eleven Rack with
MIDI.” Hard drive setup for Pro Tools, general
troubleshooting and how to get help with
Eleven Rack are covered in Appendixes C, D,
and E.
Shortcuts show you useful keyboard or
mouse shortcuts.
Cross References point to related sections in
this guide and other related guides.
Chapter 1: Introduction
5
6
Eleven Rack User Guide
Chapter 2: Hardware Overview
Eleven Rack Front Panel
Power
switch
Volume
knob
Edit/Back
and Save
buttons
SW1 and SW2
buttons
Scroll
wheel
Control knobs
Effects Control
buttons
Tap Tempo
and Tuner button
Phones
output
Mic input and controls
Output
To Amp
1 (L)
Guitar
input
Figure 1. Eleven Rack front panel
The Eleven Rack front panel provides the
following:
Power Switch
Use the heavy-duty Power switch to turn Eleven
Rack on and off. Eleven Rack will take a few seconds to warm up. When the Rig name appears
on the display, you’re ready to rock.
Volume Knob
Turning the Volume knob will simultaneously
adjust the output level of the Main outputs and
the Headphone outputs.
The Volume knob can also be set to control
other output volume settings in
Eleven Rack. For more information, see
“Volume Control” on page 104.
Before you power on Eleven Rack, make
sure any powered monitors are turned off
or muted.
Chapter 2: Hardware Overview
7
Edit/Back and Save Buttons
Effects Control Buttons
Use the Edit/Back button to enter Rig View,
which gives you access to the inner workings of
the current Rig (preset). When in Rig View or
any other special mode, press Edit/back to step
backwards to the previous view. When you’re
satisfied with the changes you’ve made, press
the Save button to save your settings.
Use the Effects Control buttons to toggle effects
on and off by type. Press and hold any of the effects buttons to access the controls for that effect. Pressing the FX1 and FX2 buttons simultaneously toggles the Wah effect on and off.
For more information on Rig View, see
Chapter 3, “Exploring Rigs.”
Tap the Tap Tempo/Tuner button at quarternote intervals to set the current Rig’s FX tempo.
Time-based effects like Delay and Tremolo can
be set to synchronize with the new tempo. If
you want to save the new tempo setting with
the current Rig, press the Save button.
User Options Mode
Hold the Edit/Back button to enter User Options
mode, where many settings that change the behavior and configuration of Eleven Rack can be
found.
For information on User Options mode, see
Chapter 10, “User Options.”
Tap Tempo/Tuner Button
To access the built-in guitar tuner, hold the Tap
Tempo/Tuner button down for one second. The
display shows the Tuner view.
SW1 and SW2 Buttons
Use the SW1 and SW2 buttons to toggle various
switched behaviors and navigate through editing views in Eleven Rack. The part of the display
next to the SW1 and SW2 buttons shows the
current function of the buttons.
8
Tuner view
The guitar signal can be muted by pressing SW1.
The reference pitch can be adjusted by turning
the lit Control knob.
When one of the SW buttons are actively usable
in the current screen, they will be lit.
When you’re finished tuning, press any button
to return to the previous screen.
Scroll Wheel
Mic Input and Controls
Use the Scroll wheel to browse through Rigs,
and navigate through sections in Rig View,
along with other miscellaneous scrolling tasks
throughout Eleven Rack.
Use the Mic input to record and/or process miclevel signals. Controls for preamp gain, phantom power, and pad are provided.
Eleven Rack User Guide
Phantom Power
Phones Output
Dynamic microphones (such as a Shure SM57)
do not require phantom power, but are not
harmed by it. Most condenser microphones (like
an AKG C3000) do require phantom power to
operate.
The Phones output is a 1/4-inch TRS jack that
drives a pair of headphones with the same signal
that is being sent out of the Main outputs of
Eleven Rack. This can be either the output of the
current Rig when using Eleven Rack, or the output of Pro Tools or other applications when using Eleven Rack as an audio interface.
Although phantom power is safe for most
microphones, it is possible to damage some
ribbon mics with it. Always turn off phantom power and wait at least ten seconds before connecting or disconnecting a ribbon
microphone.
If you are not sure about the phantom power requirements for your microphone, consult your
microphone’s documentation or contact the
manufacturer.
Control Knobs
Use the Control knobs to access amp and effects
controls, as well as other settings throughout
Eleven Rack. The controls are pre-assigned, depending on the current mode. The knobs light
up in different colors, depending on their state:
Amber The current knob is assigned to an amp,
cab, or FX loop parameter.
Green The current knob is assigned to an effects
parameter.
Red The current knob is positioned differently
than the assigned control’s saved position in the
current Rig. You can match the knob position to
the saved parameter by turning the knob until it
lights Amber or Green again.
When a Control knob isn’t active in the current
screen, it is not lit.
The headphone output level is adjusted in tandem with the Main volume when you turn the
Volume knob on the front panel of Eleven Rack
or adjust the Main volume from within
Pro Tools. If you want the headphone volume to
differ from that going to your speakers, you can
adjust the Headphone Offset setting in User Options mode.
For more information on Headphone Offset,
see“Headphone Volume” on page 103.
Output To Amp 1 (L)
The Output To Amp 1 (L) is one of two outputs
specifically designed for connecting to the input
of a guitar amplifier. Since most amplifier input
jacks are located on the amp’s front panel, we
put one of these jacks on the front panel of
Eleven Rack for easy patching.
The other Output to Amp jack is located on the
back of Eleven Rack. It can be used independently of Output 1, or along with it for stereo
amplifier configurations. The Output to Amp
jacks can output a live guitar signal in real time
as you play, or a pre-recorded signal from
Pro Tools, for re-amping purposes.
You can select from specific points in the signal
chain to feed each Output To Amp jack. This lets
you choose the amount of processing you want
on the output signal.
Chapter 2: Hardware Overview
9
Guitar Input with True-Z
The Guitar input is a 1/4” TS, instrument-level
input. Designed for electric guitars, the jack also
works well with bass and acoustic guitars with
pickups, or even vintage electric pianos.
Most recent keyboards have line-level outputs and should be connected to the Line inputs on the back panel of Eleven Rack.
Eleven Rack features a special variable-impedance circuit called True-Z, which automatically
changes the input impedance of the Eleven Rack
guitar input depending on which amp or effects
model is first in the signal chain of the current
Rig.
True-Z alters the frequency response of your guitar signal by loading your pickups in the same
manner as plugging into a real amp or effect.
This feature can also be manually controlled
and saved as part of a Rig setting.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Eleven Rack Back Panel
Figure 2 identifies each port on the back panel of the Eleven Rack.
FX Loop
I/O
Main output
Output To
Amp 2 (R)
Line input
MIDI I/O
AES/EBU
digital I/O
Exp. Pedal/
Footswitch
input
AC power input
USB port
S/PDIF
digital I/O
Figure 2. Eleven Rack back panel
The Eleven Rack back panel provides the
following:
FX Loop I/O
The FX Loop I/O is a pair of 1/4-inch TRS inputs
and outputs, which can be used to insert a mono
or stereo external effects processor into the guitar signal. A switch is provided to adjust the signal level to be suitable for either a line-level effects processor (Rack FX) or a guitar-level effects
processors (Stompbox FX).
Main Outputs
The Main output section includes a stereo, XLR,
line-level analog output pair. Connect these to
studio monitors, a power amp, mixer, or PA system.
Use caution when connecting the Main Outputs to devices, like mixers, that provide
48V phantom power over the connection.
We recommend that you make sure 48V
phantom power is disabled on these devices
before connecting your Eleven Rack.
The Gnd Lift switch is useful for suppressing
hum in some situations, but should usually be
left switched off unless it is really needed.
Chapter 2: Hardware Overview
11
Output To Amp 2 (R)
AC Power Input
The Output To Amp 2 (R) is one of two outputs
specifically designed for connecting to the input
of a guitar amplifier or effect. It can be used independently of Output 1 (located on the front
panel), or along with it for stereo amplifier configurations.
The AC power input accepts a standard IEC
power cable (one is included with Eleven Rack).
The power supply in Eleven Rack is universal, so
wherever you go, all you need is a standard IEC
power cable with the correct plug for your region.
Digital Inputs and Outputs
Line Inputs
AES/EBU
The AES/EBU In and Out ports are balanced
three-conductor XLR connectors that can run at
up to 24-bit, 96 kHz resolution.
The AES/EBU format is used in many professional digital converters, recorders, and signal
processors.
S/PDIF
The S/PDIF In and Out ports are unbalanced
two-conductor phono (RCA) connectors that
can run at up to 24-bit, 96 kHz resolution.
The Sony/Philips Digital Interface Format
(S/PDIF) is used in many professional and consumer CD recorders and DAT recorders. To
avoid RF interference, use 75-ohm coaxial cable
for S/PDIF transfers and keep the cable length to
a maximum of 10 meters.
Eleven Rack can use either AES/EBU or
S/PDIF, but not both at once. For information on switching between digital formats,
see “Digital Format” on page 66.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
The Line inputs accept one stereo or two mono
line-level analog signals. The Level switch lets
you choose between +4 or –10 dBV, for compatibility with professional and consumer gear.
MIDI I/O
The MIDI In and MIDI Out ports are standard
5-pin MIDI ports, each providing 16 channels of
MIDI input or output. These ports can interface
with a variety of MIDI devices
When Eleven Rack is used as a standalone processor, the MIDI jacks are used to communicate
with MIDI foot controllers, sending and receiving program changes and continuous controller
data.
Exp Pedal/Ext Footswitch Input
The Exp Pedal/Ext Footswitch input supports an
expression pedal or a momentary footswitch
(single or dual). You can control sweepable parameters (like Wah, Volume and Multi FX) with
an expression pedal, or switchable settings (like
Rig switching, amp channel switching, and effects on/off) with a footswitch.
Chapter 2: Hardware Overview
13
14
Eleven Rack User Guide
Chapter 3: Exploring Rigs
Overview
Rig Select Mode
Eleven Rack is a powerful guitar signal processor
that delivers tones from a wide variety of amplifiers, speaker cabinets, microphones, and effects
units. The combination of all of this gear and
their control settings make up a Rig.
When you turn on Eleven Rack, it’s already in
Rig Select mode. In this mode, you can turn the
Scroll wheel to select a Rig. Pressing the SW 1
button will cycle the display through these three
display modes:
Eleven Rack comes loaded with over 100 Rigs
that showcase the range of tones our collection
of amps and effects can achieve. The built-in
Rigs are a good place to start, but the power of
Eleven Rack really comes into play when you
create your own.
• Default mode
• Simple mode
• Details mode
• Outputs mode
Default Mode
You can audition, manage, edit and create Rigs
right from the front panel of Eleven Rack. When
using Eleven Rack with Pro Tools LE, the builtin Eleven Rack Control window offers another
convenient way to do this work.
For details on working with Rigs from
within Pro Tools, see “The Eleven Rack
Control Window” on page 84.
This mode shows the Rig number and name,
and provides a set of amp or effects controls that
you can change without entering Rig View.
Chapter 3: Exploring Rigs
15
Simple Mode
Rig Organization
Rig name
Rig number
Rig Bank
This mode shows the Rig number and name in
the largest type possible. Perfect for seeing from
across a dark stage.
Details Mode
This mode lists the amp, cabinet, and effects
models that are used in the current Rig, plus
their on/off status.
Eleven Rack has storage for 208 Rigs. Half of
these are factory presets, and the other half are
user-editable Rigs. You can also save and store
an unlimited number of your favorite Rigs as
plug-in settings files on your computer.
The 208 Rigs in Eleven Rack are arranged into
two sets of 26 banks, each containing four Rigs.
Each bank is marked with a letter, from A to Z.
For example, the third preset in bank D is referred to as D3. Banks with lowercase letters are
factory presets, and those with uppercase letters
are the user banks.
User Rigs and Factory Rigs
Outputs Mode
This mode offers fast access to the output settings for the current Rig, using four lit control
knobs, labeled TO AMP 1 (Output To Amp 1 volume), TO AMP 2 (Output To Amp 2 volume), AMP
OUT (amp output volume), and RIG VOL (Rig output volume).
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Eleven Rack User Guide
By default, all 104 user Rigs are copies of the 104
factory Rigs. This gives you a place to start when
you set out to make your own Rigs. As you scroll
through, notice that when you get past the end
of the uppercase (user) Rigs, you’ll then begin to
see the lowercase (preset) Rigs.
The user Rigs are yours to edit, change, copy,
and mangle as you see fit. The preset Rigs will always stay the same. If you make changes to a
preset Rig and want to save it, you can save it as
a new User Rig.
Selecting Rigs Live
When using Eleven Rack in live performance situations, we recommend using a footswitch accessory or a dedicated MIDI foot controller to
switch from Rig to Rig.
For info on using a footswitch accessory, see
“External Pedals” on page 102. See
Chapter 11, “Controlling Eleven Rack with
MIDI” for info on using a MIDI controller.
Chapter 3: Exploring Rigs
17
What’s In A Rig?
Figure 3. Eleven Rack Rig devices
Each Rig in Eleven Rack contains the following
devices for processing your guitar signal, and
each of them has settings you can control:
• Amplifier
• Speaker cabinet and microphone
• Seven simultaneous effects (such as Wah, Distortion, Modulation, and Reverb)
• Volume pedal
• FX Loop
In addition, there are a group of “Utility” settings in each Rig:
• Input, which lets you manipulate the True-Z
input impedance circuitry
• Output, which lets you change the Rig volume, To Amp output volume, and switch the
Rig output between mono and stereo
Rig View
Rig View is a special editing mode you access by
pressing the Edit/Back button on the front panel
of Eleven Rack. When you’re done editing, press
the Edit/Back button again to get back to the
main Rig Select mode.
If you make changes you want to save, be
sure to use the Save button before switching
to a different Rig. For details, see “Saving
Your Work” on page 22.
In Rig View, you can access every aspect of the
current Rig, from the amp, cabinet, and microphone type, all the way to choosing effects, and
changing their order in the signal chain.
• Tempo, which lets you set the Rig tempo
• Pedal, which lets you configure an external
footswitch or expression pedal accessory
• Display, which lets you set the device whose
controls are displayed in Rig Select view (like
Amp, Mod, or FX1)
• Meter, which lets you meter the signal level at
various points inside the Rig and at the inputs
and outputs (analog, digital, and USB) of
Eleven Rack.
18
Eleven Rack User Guide
Rig View
Once you’ve entered Rig View, you’ll see a selection of icons, each representing a different device or utility setting within the current Rig.
Turn the Scroll wheel to select the element you
want to access.
As you scroll through the list, certain functions
will be assigned to the lit Control Knobs, like
choosing the type of amp or effect you want to
use.
Page Indicator
When playing Eleven Rack through a guitar
amp, it is recommended that you bypass the
Cab and Mic simulations. Unless the guitar
amplifier has a very flat frequency response,
its own speakers will affect the tone and
make Cab and Mic simulation unneccessary.
In Eleven Rack’s editing screens, a Page indicator appears on the display if there is more than
one page of controls. The Page indicator shows
the number of pages, as well as the name of the
page you’re viewing. Turn the Scroll wheel to
switch between pages.
Effects
Page indicator, showing page two of four
VOL
Rig Device and Utility
Settings in Rig View
Press CONTROLS to access a Control page where
you can adjust the position and minimum volume of the Volume pedal, using the lit Control
knobs.
This section describes the functions of the device and utility settings pages found in Rig View.
If the device or setting you select in Rig View has
additional controls, pressing SW1 (labeled
CONTROLS) takes you to a special Control page
for that device. When you’re finished, press
Edit/Back to go back to Rig View.
For more details on working in Control
pages, see “Control Pages” on page 22.
Amplifier, Cabinet, and
Microphone
WAH
Turn the lit Control knob to select the type of
Wah pedal you want to use. Press CONTROLS to
access a Control page, where you can adjust the
position of the Wah pedal.
DIST
Turn the lit Control knob to select the type of
Distortion effect you want to use. Press CONTROLS to access additional settings for the chosen Distortion effect.
MOD
AMP
Turn the lit Control knob to select the type of
simulated amp you want to use. Press CONTROLS
to access additional amp settings.
Turn the lit Control knob to select the type of
Modulation effect you want to use. Press CONTROLS to access additional settings for the chosen Modulation effect.
CAB
FX1 and FX2
Turn the lit Control knobs to select the type of
cabinet and microphone you want to use. Press
SW1 to bypass the cab and mic simulations.
Press SW2 to toggle the microphone position on
or off-axis.
The FX1 and FX2 pages let you choose two additional effects not found in the other categories
(such as compressor or graphic EQ) as well as a
variety of modulation effects, using the lit Control knob. Press CONTROLS to access additional
settings for the chosen effect.
Chapter 3: Exploring Rigs
19
REV
OUTPUT
Turn the lit Control knob to select the type of
Reverb effect you want to use. Press CONTROLS
to access additional settings for the chosen Reverb effect.
DLY
Turn the lit Control knob to set the output level
of the Rig (known as the Rig volume). Press
CONTROLS to access a Control page, where you
can set the volume of the signals feeding the To
Amp outputs. Press MONO to toggle between stereo or mono output.
Turn the lit Control knob to select the type of
Delay effect you want to use. Press CONTROLS to
access additional settings for the chosen Delay
effect.
The Rig volume setting is a tonally transparent
volume control, intended for making fine adjustments to the relative volume levels of different Rigs.
FX LOOP
The To Amp output volume settings let you optimize signal level for the amp(s) or external processors you are sending signal to.
Press CONTROLS to access a Control page where
you can adjust the gain and blend settings of the
FX Loop, using the lit Control knobs.
Effects and the FX Loop can be moved to
different locations in the signal chain of the
Rig. For that reason, when an effect or the
FX Loop is selected in Rig View, SW2 is labeled MOVE. For more details, see “Signal
Routing” on page 21.
Utility Settings
INPUT
Turn the lit Control knob to manipulate the
True-Z impedance circuitry in Eleven Rack.
When set to Auto, the input impedance is determined by the first active effect or amp in the signal chain. You can also choose a specific load
value to best match your pickups.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
DISPLAY
Turn the lit Control knob to specify what controls are displayed in the Default view of Rig Select mode.
TEMPO
Turn the lit Control knob to set the Rig tempo.
Any amp or effects settings that have a control
set to sync to a specific subdivision of Rig tempo
will lock to this tempo.
Press MIDI to toggle sync of Rig tempo to incoming MIDI clock (from the MIDI input of Eleven
Rack) on or off.
Press FINE to toggle fine tempo editing mode on
or off. In this mode, turn the Scroll wheel to adjust the Rig tempo in tenths of a BPM, rather
than the coarse adjustments that are made with
the Control knob. Press FINE again to return to
the normal mode.
PEDAL
Turn the lit Control knob to choose the parameter controlled by an external expression pedal,
if attached. The following choices are available:
Wah Lets you control the sweep of the Wah effect.
Volume Pedal Lets you control the sweep of the
Volume Pedal effect.
Rig Volume Lets you control the overall Rig
volume.
Multi FX Lets you control up to four different
amp and/or effects parameters at once. Press
FX-Sel for options. There are four pages of options, each one addressing one parameter that is
to be controlled.
On each page, set the device you want to control
and the parameter you want to sweep. The Toe
and Heel settings govern the range of the control that is able to be swept.
If you set the Heel number higher than the
Toe number, the control can be swept in reverse.
None No parameter will be affected when the
pedal is moved.
Signal Routing
The position of many of the devices in the signal
chain can be changed. The order that effects
units are plugged into each other can make a
large difference in the sound you get.
Most effects can be moved anywhere before or
after the amp and cabinet models. The FX Loop
can be moved to one of four places; the beginning of the chain, before the amp and cab, after
the amp and cab, or before the final output.
To move an effect:
1 Turn the Scroll wheel to select the effect you
want to move.
1 Press SW2 to enter Move mode.
2 Turn the Scroll wheel to move the effect to a
different position in the signal chain.
3 Press SW2 again to keep the change, or SW1 to
cancel the move.
Controls Takes you to a page with additional
controls for the selected element. Press
Edit/Back to return to Rig View when you’re finished.
Move Lets you move an effect or the FX loop to
a different point in the signal chain.
For information on how to toggle
Eleven Rack between expression pedal and
footswitch control, see “External Pedals” on
page 102.
METER
Turn the lit Control knob to choose which signal the meter shows. You can choose to meter
various points within the Rig, or the input or
output level of any of the analog, digital, or USB
(Pro Tools LE) I/Os on Eleven Rack. This function is mainly useful for troubleshooting purposes.
Chapter 3: Exploring Rigs
21
Control Pages
When there are additional controls available for
the device or utility setting you’ve selected,
pressing SW1 (labeled CONTROLS) takes you to a
special editing screen for that device, called a
Control page.
If there is more than one page of controls available for the current device or utility setting, a
Page indicator is displayed. Turn the scroll
wheel to switch between pages. You can also use
the Scroll wheel to scroll quickly through all of
the Control pages in the current Rig.
When you’re finished editing, press Edit/Back to
go back to Rig View.
Saving Your Work
Control page for Green JRC OD effect
The Control knobs that are assigned to controls
in the current device will light amber, if you’re
editing Amp, Cab, or FX Loop settings, or green,
if you’re editing an effect. The display shows
what parameter each knob is assigned to, and
each knob’s current setting.
When you’re done editing the current Rig, you
may want to save its settings, or save the new
settings to a different user Rig without affecting
the current Rig.
Keep in mind that if you switch to another Rig
before saving your work, the edits you’ve made
will be lost.
When you turn a knob away from its saved setting, it will light red, to show you that the setting has changed. If you want to return a control
to its saved setting, turn the knob until it goes
back to amber or green.
Save page
SW1 and SW2 are assigned to various functions,
like BYPASS, which toggles the current element
on and off, and other switched behaviors, like
BRIGHT (bright switch) and TREMOLO (tremolo
on/off).
To save the new settings to the current Rig:
1 Press the Save button. The display will show
the Save View.
2 Press Save again to save the updated settings
Individual effects may be toggled on and off
at any time by pressing the corresponding
Effects Control button on the front panel of
Eleven Rack. The Wah effect can be toggled
on and off by pressing FX1 and FX2 simultaneously.
22
Eleven Rack User Guide
to the current Rig.
To create a new Rig with the new settings:
‘59 Tweed Lux
1 Press the Save button. The display will show
the Save View.
2 Turn the scroll wheel to select a preset Rig that
you don’t mind overwriting.
3 Choose a name for your new Rig, using the lit
Control knobs and SW switches:
• The first lit knob moves the cursor from left
to right.
• The second knob lets you choose an uppercase letter from A-Z.
• The third knob lets you choose an lowercase letter from a-z.
• The fourth knob lets you choose a number
or symbol.
• SW1 lets you insert a space.
• SW2 lets you delete an unwanted character.
Based on a classic late-50s tube combo amp with
a single 12-inch speaker and a pair of 6V6 tubes
delivering 15 watts, the ‘59 Tweed Lux model is
the picture of vintage simplicity. With just a
simple treble-cutting tone control, the Tweed
Lux delivers crunchy clean sounds when used
with single-coil pickups, and fat leads when
driven with humbucking pickups.
The inputs on this model are “jumped” so you
can feed both the Instrument and Mic inputs in
parallel.
4 Press Save again to save the new Rig.
‘59 Tweed Bass
The Amps
This section takes you through all of the emulated amplifiers available in Eleven Rack, and
touches on any special features and controls
each amp offers.
Based on a late-50s low-wattage tube bass
combo amp, the ‘59 Tweed Bass model has a
tight bass response and a warm, twang-friendly
high-end. Along with controls for Bass, Middle
(midrange), and Treble, a negative feedback
Presence control also allows for more tweaking
of the high-end frequencies.
Just like the Tweed Lux, the Tweed Bass is also
“jumped” so you can feed both the Bright and
Normal inputs in parallel.
Chapter 3: Exploring Rigs
23
‘64 Black Panel Lux Vibrato and
Normal
The amp we based the ‘64 Black Panel Lux Vibrato and Normal models on is regarded by
some as the ultimate small club amp. A 60s tube
combo with a single 12-inch ceramic-magnet
speaker and a pair of 6V6s putting out just over
20 watts, this amp has long been a standard in
the studio as well as onstage.
At low volumes its crisp, clean high-end has
been favored by country rockers, but push the
amp past 7 with a humbucking pickup, and
you’ve got an amazingly dynamic lead tone. For
Eleven, we’ve modeled both channels of this
classic blackface-era amp.
The Lux Vibrato model has two gain stages and
the tremolo effect is toggled using SW2. Lux
Normal has a single gain stage and tremolo is always on, unless the Intensity control is rolled all
the way off.
‘66 AC Hi Boost
Originally released in 1958, the British amp we
based our ‘66 AC Hi Boost model upon went
through a few design changes that would eventually define the sound of British pop/rock in
the ‘60s.
First available as a modification mounted in the
back of the amp, the “Top Boost” circuit added
an extra tube and controls for Treble and Bass. It
became so popular that it eventually became a
part of the standard componentry of the amp.
The glassy high-end and chime of the AC Hi
Boost lends a classic propulsion to rhythm guitar parts, and at higher gain settings, singing
lead tones are a snap to achieve.
For our model, we’ve “jumped” the Normal and
Brilliant channels. The Cut (presence) control is
active on both channels. However, just like the
original, the Treble and Bass controls are only
part of the Brilliant channel, and have no effect
on the Normal channel.
Go to the second Control page and press SW2 to
toggle the tremolo on and off.
24
Eleven Rack User Guide
‘67 Black Panel Duo
‘69 Plexiglas
Without a doubt, the blackface-era amp we
based our ‘67 Black Panel Duo model upon is
considered one of the greatest combo amps ever
made. With two 12-inch ceramic-magnet speakers and a quartet of 6L6 tubes pushing 80 watts,
no concert stage has been complete without one
since it was introduced in the late 60s.
Based on one of the most highly sought-after
high-volume amplifiers of the late 1960s, our
‘69 Plexiglas model delivers no-nonsense British
crunch. The original amp's dual 4x12 cabinets
and 100-watt head offered unprecedented volume and power for the time, helping to usher in
the era of the Guitar God.
One of the main reasons for the amp’s popularity is that it can maintain classic vintage clean
sounds even at high volume levels. Another special Black Duo feature is the inclusion of a Bright
switch.
For our model, we’ve based it on the legendary
100-watt 1968/69 version. We’ve also “jumped”
both channels, for further gain.
‘82 Lead 800
For our model, just like the original, as you turn
the Volume knob up, the Bright switch has less
of an effect. Dial the Volume knob around 3 or 4
with the Bright switch on, and you’ll get that ultra-clean snap that it’s famous for.
On the first Control page, SW2 is set to toggle
the Bright switch on and off. On the second
page, SW2 toggles vibrato on and off.
Based on the early-80s descendent of the amp
we based our Plexiglas model upon, the ‘82 Lead
800 adds a higher-gain cascaded preamp design
and a master volume control. Unlike the highvolume heads of the 60s, which needed to be on
10 to achieve an overdrive sound, this amp
could conjure up real distortion at any volume
level, and that made it very popular in the burgeoning 80s heavy metal scene.
Chapter 3: Exploring Rigs
25
‘85 M-2 Lead
which leads to a rounder, thicker sound. The
Bright switch circuit has progressively less effect
as the gain is raised, and no effect when the preamp is set to 10.
Toggle the Bright switch on and off with the
SW2 button.
Based on a classic mid-80s high-end tube combo
amp, the ‘85 M-2 Lead model delivers hotrodded overdrive and searing solo tones. With a
full complement of tone controls and independent input volume, overdrive and master volume controls, the gain structure can be tweaked
to your heart's content.
The M-2 Lead emulation is based on the lead
channel with the fat, bright, and gain boost options on.
‘89 SL100 Drive, Crunch, and
Clean
Our ‘89 SL100 model is based on a late-80s highgain 100-watt tube head, which was popular for
its singing sustain and clear articulation. The
Bright switch on the Clean and Crunch models
boosts the high-end for lead lines and cutting
tones.
For the Drive model, we simulated a bright
switch modification that was popular for this
amp. Set to Normal, the amp is stock. With
Bright engaged, the treble boost that would normally happen at lower gain settings is removed,
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Eleven Rack User Guide
’92 Treadplate Modern and
Vintage
Released in 1989, the amp that inspired our ‘92
Treadplate Modern and Vintage models seemed
cooler than a high-performance racecar. With
more tone-tweaking options and distortion
than any amp before it, the amp became the industry standard for players looking to achieve a
massive sound.
With the ability to run on either 6L6 or EL34
tubes, this amp offered a choice between either
tube or silicon diode rectifier circuits. On top of
that, an AC power selection switch offered a
Bold or a Spongy option, which would drop the
voltage like a Variac for a more “brown” sound.
For our Treadplate, we modeled two different
channels and selected the appropriate rectifier
and AC power switch setting. For Treadplate M
(for Modern), we set it on the Red channel using
6L6s, a silicon rectifier, and the Bold power setting for a tight, aggressive tone. For Treadplate V
(for Vintage), we modeled the orange channel
with 6L6s, a tube rectifier, and the spongy power
setting for a more fluid lead tone.
DC Modern Overdrive and DC
Vintage Crunch
Rather than base these two models on any two
specific amps, we blended the characteristics
and features of many of our favorite amps to create a couple of absolute monsters.
The Modern model augments a modified highgain British amp flavor with a Bright switch and
classic American-style Tremolo. The Vintage
model combines tonal attributes of 50s and 60sera American tube amps, with added gain potential and a Bright switch.
On the first Control page, SW2 is set to toggle
the Bright switch on and off. On the second
page, SW2 toggles vibrato on and off.
Eleven Rack is not affiliated with, sponsored,
or endorsed by the makers of the amplifiers
that are emulated in this
product.
General Amp Controls
The Amp controls can be accessed in the Default
view of Rig Select mode, or by selecting the AMP
device in Rig View and pressing CONTROLS.
There are two pages of controls for every amp.
These controls are configured and named to
closely match the amps we modeled for
Eleven Rack.
When you view the Amp controls, a Page indicator is displayed to show you which page of
controls you’re viewing. Turn the Scroll wheel
to switch pages.
Amp Control page
Tremolo Controls
Some amps, like the ‘64 Black Panel Lux Vibrato,
‘66 AC Hi Boost, and DC Modern Overdrive, feature authentic Tremolo circuits. Here’s what
those controls do:
Speed Lets you set the speed of the Tremolo effect’s amplitude modulation.
Sync When set to a rhythmic value, the SYNC
control sets the Tremolo’s speed to cycle at the
selected rhythmic interval, in sync with the Rig
tempo. When set to “OFF”, the speed is not synchronized and can be manually set with the
SPEED control.
Depth Sets the amount of amplitude modulation.
When using Eleven Rack with Pro Tools,
you can choose to sync tremolo and other effects to either the Rig tempo or the tempo of
the Pro Tools session. For more details, see
“Rig Tempo” on page 87.
Chapter 3: Exploring Rigs
27
Noise Gate Controls
Each of the amps in Eleven Rack has a Noise
Gate, which can be used to suppress noise coming from the instrument before the signal
reaches the amp model. Noise can be especially
problematic when boosted heavily at high-gain
settings. Its controls are:
This section describes all of the emulated
speaker cabinets available in Eleven Rack.
Noise Gate Lets you set the threshold of the
Noise Gate. Adjust this control until you find a
good balance between effective gating and cutting off the signal prematurely on sustained
notes.
The Cab page in Rig View
Rel Sets the release time for the envelope that
runs the Noise Gate. A longer release time can
sound more natural, while a shorter release can
help to rein in a really noisy signal.
This cab model is based on the original speaker
and cabinet that match the Lux Vibrato and Lux
Normal amp models. With a single 12-inch ceramic speaker in an open back cabinet, it offers a
bright, warm, dynamic sound.
The Noise Gate remains usable even when
the amp model has been bypassed.
Amp Output
The amp models in Eleven Rack are so faithful to
the classics they’re based on that the output
level can increase significantly as the preamp,
volume or master controls are cranked. Also,
from one amp the next, output levels will vary
depending on their design.
The OUTPUT control lets you compensate for
those differences with no coloration added to
the tone you’re getting.
The amp output volume can also be accessed in Rig View, by selecting AMP and
manipulating the Amp Out Vol Control
knob.
Bypass
The Bypass control toggles the amp simulation
on and off, leaving any effects in the Rig unchanged.
28
The Speaker Cabinets
Eleven Rack User Guide
1x12 Black Lux
1x12 Tweed Lux
This cab model is based on the original speaker
and cabinet that match the Tweed Lux amp
model. With a single 12-inch alnico speaker in
an open-back cabinet, it offers mellow, sweet
warm tones with a hint of vintage grit.
2x12 AC Blue
This cab model is based on the original speakers
and cabinet that match the AC Hi Boost amp
model. With two British ceramic 12-inch speakers in an open-back cabinet, it offers chimey,
mid-focused tones.
2x12 Black Duo
This cab model is based on the original speakers
and cabinet that match the Black Duo amp
model. With two ceramic 12-inch speakers in an
open-back cabinet, it offers bright, full-range
tones.
4x10 Tweed Bass
Dyn 409
This cab model is based on the original speakers
and cabinet that match the Tweed Bass amp
model. With four alnico 10-inch speakers in an
open-back cabinet, it offers warm, bright, tones
with tight bass.
Based on a midsize-diaphragm German dynamic mic, the Dyn 409 offers a detailed midrange and a focused, tight pickup pattern.
4x12 Classic 30
This cab model is based on a classic 1960s 4x12
British closed-back cabinet. The classic 30 watt
speakers we modeled for this unit give it a wide
frequency response and major power.
4x12 Green 25Watt
This cab model is based on a classic 1960s 4x12
British closed-back cabinet. The vintage 25 watt
speakers we modeled for this unit give it a
smooth, thick tone, perfect for soulful leads.
The Microphones
This section describes all of the emulated microphones available in Eleven Rack.
Dyn 421
Based on a large-diaphragm German dynamic
mic, the Dyn 421 model offers deep bass, solid
mids, and smooth treble.
Cond 67
Based on a classic German tube condenser mic,
the Cond 67 model offers a warm, crisp sound.
Cond 87
Based on a solid-state German condenser mic,
the Cond 87 model lacks the fuzzy tube warmth
of Cond 67, but retains a high level of treble detail and nuanced midrange.
Ribbon 121
Based on a modern ribbon microphone, the Ribbon 121 model offers rounded, sweet highs and
mids, and solid, deep lows.
Dyn 7
Based on a large-diaphragm American dynamic
microphone, the Dyn 7 model has a smooth,
powerful tone quality.
Eleven Rack is not affiliated with, sponsored,
or endorsed by the makers of the speaker cabinets or microphones that are emulated in
this product.
Dyn 57
Based on a midsize-diaphragm American dynamic mic, the Dyn 57 model has a classic aggressive tone with a bright edge and pronounced mids.
Chapter 3: Exploring Rigs
29
The Effects
This section takes you through the effects available in Eleven Rack.
Volume Pedal
Wah Effects
Black Wah
Black Wah is a standard wah pedal effect, offering a sweepable resonant filter that lets you add
animation and special timbral effects to the guitar signal.
Like the Volume Pedal, wah effects like Black
Wah are particularly useful when controlled
with an expression pedal or MIDI foot controller.
The Volume Pedal is a sweepable volume control. You can use it to fade notes or chords in
and out, or to vary the volume of your signal in
real time, for timbral or rhythmic effects.
Shine Wah
The Volume Pedal is most useful when controlled with an expression pedal or MIDI foot
controller.
For more information about using an expression pedal or MIDI foot controller, see
“External Foot Controllers” on page 42.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Shine Wah works and sounds similar to Black
Wah, but with a vintage-style filter circuit and
sweep response.
Distortion Effects
Green JRC Overdrive
Tri-Knob Fuzz
The pedal that inspired Tri-Knob Fuzz was a
transistor-based unit, originally popular with
lead guitarists searching for ever-higher gain in
the 70s. It shone again in the 90s grunge rock
scene, probably pushed further into woolly
grind than its makers would have ever anticipated.
Volume Sets the overall output volume of the effect.
Green JRC Overdrive was inspired by a low-gain
70s overdrive pedal, loved by blues and bluesrock players the world over for its sweet, singing
sting. It can be used to simply drive an amp’s input section into gentle clipping, or supply some
dirty glow of its own.
Modulation Effects
Flanger
Sustain Sets the gain of the fuzz circuit.
Tone Changes the tonal balance of the effect,
from deep and full of sub-bass to high and shrill.
BlackOp Distortion
Originating from the act of pressing on the
flanges of tape reels, and becoming even more
popular with the advent of analog pedals, the
Flanger effect can be coaxed into bell-like resonant sweeps, or add a silky, shimmering sheen.
This effect works well when positioned before or
after the amplifier in the signal chain.
Inspired by an 80s-era op-amp-based distortion
pedal, BlackOp Distortion offers massive crunch
and power. Its hard-clipping drive can squeeze
aggressive rhythm and lead tones out of softsounding vintage amps, and create surprisingly
hard-edged tones when paired with more modern amps.
Pre-Dl Sets the amount of pre-delay, which
changes the phase relationship between the dry
signal and the delayed signal, with timbral results.
Chapter 3: Exploring Rigs
31
Depth Sets the amount of delay. The higher the
setting, the more “jet-engine” artifacts will be
introduced.
Fdback Sets the amount of signal fed back into
the modulated delay. Higher settings introduce
more ringing, whistling artifacts.
C1 Chorus/Vibrato
Based on a heavyweight late-70s analog chorus/vibrato pedal, CI Chorus/Vibrato offers
warm, liquid modulation effects. In Chorus
mode, the signal is routed through a modulated
short delay, which is mixed with the dry signal,
creating a washy, doubled sound.
In Vibrato mode, the dry signal is absent and
there is more control over the depth of pitch
modulation, allowing for everything from an
understated “wobble” to wacky, synth-like pitch
modulation.
Chorus Sets the intensity and speed of the Chorus effect, only when the Chorus/Vibrato switch
is set to Chorus.
Depth Sets the depth of the Vibrato effect, only
when the Chorus/Vibrato switch is set to Vibrato.
Rate Controls the Vibrato rate, only when the
Chorus/Vibrato switch is set to on.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Chorus/Vibrato Toggles the effect between Chorus and Vibrato.
When set to CHORUS, the Rate and Depth
controls are inactive. Likewise, when set to
VIBRATO, the Chorus control will not
function.
Vibe Phaser
The psychedelic-era phaser that inspired our
Vibe Phaser effect was traditionally paired with
an expression pedal that could be used to vary
the rate of pitch modulation over time. Like the
C1, you can choose to run it as a Chorus, with
the modulated and dry signals mixed together,
or in Vibrato mode, which leaves the pitchmodulated signal alone, with rippling, disorienting effects.
Chorus/Vibrato Toggles the dry signal on (Chorus) and off (Vibrato).
Orange Phaser
Reverb Effects
Blackpanel Spring Reverb
Don’t let that single knob fool you. Inspired by
a ubiquitous 70s analog phaser pedal,
Orange Phaser offers a deep, warm phasing effect that ranges from a slow harmonic sweep to
out-of-control wobbles.
Speed Controls the Phaser effect’s rate of modulation.
Sync Synchronizes the modulation rate to the
Rig tempo by a specific rhythmic subdivision.
Roto Speaker
Blackpanel Spring Reverb was inspired by a classic outboard tube-driven spring reverb. It can
add a surfy twang and dark, warm ambience to
your signal.
Mix Controls the blend between dry and reverbed signal.
Decay Controls the length of the reverb’s decay.
Tone Applies a high-cut EQ, making the reverb
tone darker.
Eleven SR (Stereo Reverb)
Inspired by the rotating speaker cabinets that
made classic tonewheel organs roar, Roto
Speaker offers added motion and vintage grit.
A smooth, clean digital reverb, Eleven SR is
based on the popular Reverb One Pro Tools
plug-in from Avid.
Speed Sets the speed of the rotating speaker effect, in three increments, Slow, Fast, and Brake
(stopped).
Pre-Dly Sets the amount of pre-delay, which
changes the time relationship between the dry
signal and the reverbed signal. As this setting is
turned higher, the apparent size of the synthesized reverb “room” grows larger.
Balance Sets the blend between the upper and
lower rotors of the rotating speaker.
Type Chooses between various types of rotary
speakers.
Type Selects from a variety of different reverb
types.
Chapter 3: Exploring Rigs
33
Delay Effects
BBD Delay
Tape Echo
Inspired by the ultimate vintage solid state tape
echo unit, Tape Echo supplies supple, crunchy
echoes, and can, with a flick of the wrist, can be
pushed into swells of wild self-oscillation, each
repeat more murky, dusty, and gritty than the
next. A classic.
Rec Lev Controls the signal level running to the
tape circuitry. Higher settings create a more distorted tone color.
Head Simulates the alignment (or misalignment) of the tape head with the tape, which affects the tone of the delay.
Wow Controls the amount of wow and flutter in
the tape mechanism. Lower settings minimize
fluctuations of pitch and tone color, and higher
settings accentuate it.
Hiss For some serious authenticity in your tape
echo tone, this switch Toggles modeled analog
tape hiss in or out of the signal. With high feedback settings, the tape hiss can push the echo
into self-oscillating mayhem.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
When “bucket brigade” analog delays arrived in
the mid-70s, their relatively small size and solidstate reliability made them a godsend to tape
loop-addled guitarists. It went on to become a
classic of its own, with a smooth, round delay
sound and a Chorus-Vibrato mode that let it
double as a modulation effect.
Input Sets the input level to the delay effect.
Cranked up, it can push the signal into useful
distortion.
Mod Switches the modulation effect between Vibrato (only the delayed signal is passed) and
Chorus (both the dry and delayed signal are
passed.)
Depth Controls the level of modulation of the
delayed signal.
Noise Toggles modeled analog hiss in or out of
the signal.
When Hiss or Noise is turned on in one of
the delay effects and the feedback level is
sufficiently high, the delay will self-oscillate
and make sound of its own, even when bypassed. If this effect is not desired, turn
down the feedback control.
EQ & Compressor Effects
General Effects Controls
Graphic EQ
Sync
Useful for simple frequency sculpting, a good
Graphic EQ can find a place in almost any pedalboard. Graphic EQ can wring a variety of tones
out of other pedals, such as when placed before
Distortion effects. The EQ can also be used as a
signal booster when positioned in front of amps.
Gray Comp
Inspired by a well-loved solid-state 70s compressor pedal, Gray Comp can add singing sustain to
leads or lend power and girth to chunky rhythm
guitar parts.
Sustain Sets the threshold, and thus, the
amount of compression, in the Compressor effect.
Level Sets the overall output volume of the effect.
The time-based effects in Eleven Rack (such as
Chorus, Delay and Flanger) can be set to synchronize with Rig or Session tempo. When the
Sync control on these effects is set to a rhythmic
subdivision of the incoming tempo, the effect
locks to it. When Sync is set to Off, or the Rate or
Delay control is moved, the control takes over,
and the rate of modulation or delay can be set
by hand.
Delay+ & Fine
These two controls are included in both delay effects. Delay+ quadruples the available delay
time, for when longer echoes are needed. Fine
switches the delay’s Rate control into a fine-adjust mode, where the delay time can be set by
the millisecond with the Scroll wheel. Press Fine
again to return the Scroll wheel to normal operation.
Don’t Forget to Save!
Remember, when you’ve got things tweaked just
right, make sure to save your settings. If you
switch to a different Rig before saving, you’ll
lose your changes. To simply save the current
state of the Rig you’re working on to the same
Rig memory location, press the Save button,
then press it again.
See “Saving Your Work” on page 22 for
more details.
Eleven Rack is not affiliated with, sponsored, or endorsed by the makers of the effects that are emulated by this product.
Chapter 3: Exploring Rigs
35
36
Eleven Rack User Guide
Chapter 4: Eleven Rack Live Setup
In live performance or practice, Eleven Rack can be used as a standalone guitar preamp and processor,
connected to an amplifier and/or direct to a PA system. This chapter will describe how to make the
necessary connections.
PA Mixer
MIDI Foot Controller
Effects
Footswitch or
Expression Pedal
Figure 4. Eleven Rack Live Setup
Chapter 4: Eleven Rack Live Setup
37
Basic Live Setup
PA Mixer
Figure 5. Eleven Rack connected directly to the PA mixer
Plugging in Your Guitar
Connecting Eleven Rack to a PA
System
Connect your guitar to the Guitar input on the
front of Eleven Rack with a 1/4” TS cable.
The simplest way to play live with Eleven Rack is
to connect it directly to the PA mixer using the
Main XLR outputs. When doing so, it is recommended to tell the person running the PA system that you are providing a line-level signal,
rather than a mic-level signal, so that they can
correctly set the input on the console.
If a buzz or hum occurs, try toggling the Gnd
Lift switch.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Using an Amp Onstage
PA Mixer
Figure 6. Eleven Rack connected to the PA mixer and an onstage amplifier
In some cases, having an amplifier onstage can
be handy for monitoring or tone reasons. Eleven
Rack makes it easy to feed your signal to both a
PA mixer and an amp.
Connecting Eleven Rack to a
Guitar Amplifier
The Output To Amp outputs on Eleven Rack can
be connected to one or more guitar amplifiers
using standard 1/4” TS cables.
• If using a single, mono amplifier, use the Output To Amp 1 (L) output.
• If using two amplifiers, or an amp with stereo
inputs, connect each Output To Amp output
to a separate amp or channel input.
Before you power on Eleven Rack, make sure
any connected amplifiers or mixer channels
are turned off or muted.
Sending the Correct Signal
Eleven Rack lets you choose the point in the signal path that feeds each Output To Amp jack. If
you’re using an amplifier with a distinct tone of
its own, you may want to send it a signal with
little processing (for example, only the effects)
so the sound of the amp can ring through
clearly.
Chapter 4: Eleven Rack Live Setup
39
If you prefer to use the amp simulations in
Eleven Rack to set your tone, you will want to
send the signal just after the amp simulation,
but before the cabinet simulation, to your amplifier.
To set the type of signal to send to the amp:
1 Press and hold the Edit/Back button to show
the User Options mode.
2 Scroll to Outputs To Amp with the Scroll wheel.
3 Press SW1 to enter the Outputs To Amp
screen.
4 Choose the output you plan to use to feed the
amp, with the Scroll wheel.
5 Set the Signal control to one of the following,
using the first lit Control knob:
• Rig Input (no processing)
• Amp Input (pre-amp effects only)
• Amp Output (pre-amp effects and amp simulation)
• Rig Output (all processing)
• Rig Out No Cab (all effects and amp simulation, no speaker or microphone simulation)
When the Signal control is set to Rig Output
or Rig Out No Cab, the Rig Volume setting
no longer has any effect. Output volume
must be set using the To Amp controls in
the Output section in Rig View.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
6 Press Edit/Back twice to leave User Options
mode.
The signal level running to each Output To
Amp output can be set on a per-rig basis in
the Output section in Rig View or in the
Eleven Rack Control window. For more details, see “OUTPUT” on page 20, or “Output to Amp Selectors” on page 88.
Because Eleven Rack simulates various preamps and tone circuits, you may want to bypass your amp’s preamp and tone circuitry
by plugging into the amplifier’s effects return jack(s), if available, rather than the
standard input(s). If your amp does not
have an effects loop, try setting the amp
controls for maximum transparency (EQ
flat, gain stages set to clean.)
Effects and Foot Controllers
Figure 7. Effects and foot controller connections
Connecting Effects
Use the FX loop jacks to connect stomp boxes,
rack effects or other external processors to the
live guitar signal. These can be either rack or
stompbox effects, or a combination thereof, in
mono or stereo. The FX Loop accepts 1/4” plugs.
To connect external effects to Eleven Rack:
1 Connect the FX Loop Send output on Eleven
Rack to the input of your first (or only) effects
unit. If the unit is mono, use the Left/Mono output. If the unit is stereo, use both outputs.
2 Connect the output of the final (or only) ef-
fects unit to the FX Loop Return input on Eleven
Rack. If the unit is mono, use the Left/Mono input. If the unit is stereo, use both inputs.
3 If using a line-level rack effect, toggle the Rack
FX/Stompbox FX switch to the Rack FX position. If using a guitar-level stompbox effect, toggle the switch to the Stompbox FX position.
If using a combination of guitar-level
(stompbox) and line-level (rack) effects, it
may be preferable to put the guitar-level
unit(s) first in the chain. If your line-level
unit(s) have guitar-level outputs available,
the order is not important. See your effects
unit(s) documentation for more details.
The User Options and Rig View modes in
Eleven Rack contain a variety of settings
that control the behavior of the FX loop. For
more information, see “The Amps” on
page 23 and “FX Loop” on page 101.
If using a combination of mono and stereo
effects, it is usually best to put the mono effects units first in the chain, with the final
mono unit connected to the mono input on
the first stereo unit.
Chapter 4: Eleven Rack Live Setup
41
External Foot Controllers
Eleven Rack has a 1/4” TRS input that can accept
input from an expression pedal or a single or
dual momentary footswitch.
7 Sweep the pedal to test its functionality. If the
pedal is working correctly, the Active indicator
on the display will light up.
8 Press Done to exit calibration mode.
9 Press Edit/Back twice to return to the previ-
ously chosen screen.
Expression Pedal
An expression pedal can be used to control continuously variable parameters within Eleven
Rack, such as volume or wah position.
In addition to commonly-used expression pedals, a standard volume pedal with a “Y” adapter
cable (two 1/4-inch TS plugs to one 1/4-inch TRS
plug) can be used, though keep in mind that the
taper of the potentiometer in a volume pedal is
exponential, rather than linear as in an expression pedal.
Expression Pedal Calibration
The response of expression pedals vary slightly
from model to model, and even unit to unit, so
it is important to calibrate Eleven Rack to follow
your pedal’s sweep correctly.
To calibrate Eleven Rack to your expression pedal:
1 Hold the Edit/Back button to enter User Op-
tions mode.
2 Use the Scroll wheel to navigate to External
Pedals.
3 Press Select to access the External Pedals set-
tings page.
4 Press Calib to enter calibration mode.
5 Move the expression pedal to its heel position,
and press Next.
6 Move the expression pedal to its toe position,
and press Next.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Momentary Footswitch
(Single or Dual)
Most single or dual momentary footswitches
can be used to toggle various switched functions
within Eleven Rack, such as effects on/off and
cycling through rigs.
Choose a momentary footswitch with a
1/4-inch TS (single switch) or 1/4-inch TRS (dual
switch) connection.
For more information on the use of pedals
and footswitches with Eleven Rack, “External Pedals” on page 102.
MIDI Foot Controller
You can connect a MIDI foot controller to the
MIDI input on Eleven Rack, providing control
over a larger range of simultaneous parameters.
For details on Eleven Rack controls you can
control with a MIDI foot controller, see
“Controlling Eleven Rack with MIDI” on
page 105.
Display Mode and Visibility
When playing live, you may find it easier to
keep track of what Rig is selected by switching
the display to Simple mode.
For information on switching display
modes, “Rig Select Mode” on page 15.
Chapter 4: Eleven Rack Live Setup
43
44
Eleven Rack User Guide
Part II: Setting Up and Using Pro Tools With Eleven Rack
45
46
Chapter 5: Installing Pro Tools on Mac
This chapter contains information for Mac systems only. If you are installing Pro Tools on a
Windows computer, see Chapter 6, “Installing
Pro Tools On Windows.”
If you’re installing or upgrading Pro Tools HD to
work with Eleven Rack, please refer to the Setup
Guide for your system.
Before installing this version of Pro Tools,
refer to the Read Me information included
on the Pro Tools Installer disc.
Installing Pro Tools LE and
Connecting Eleven Rack
Before connecting your Eleven Rack to the computer, you need to install Pro Tools LE software.
Do not start this procedure with your Eleven
Rack connected to your computer.
To install Pro Tools LE on Mac OS X:
1 Make sure you are logged in as an Administra-
tor for the account where you want to install
Pro Tools.
Installation Overview
Installation of the Eleven Rack on a Mac includes the following steps:
1 “Installing Pro Tools LE and Connecting
Eleven Rack” on page 47.
2 “Launching Pro Tools LE” on page 49.
When the installation is complete, you will
need to reboot your computer.
For details on Administrator privileges in
Mac OS X, see your Apple OS X documentation.
3 Configuring your system for improved perfor-
2 Insert the Pro Tools LE Installer disc in your
mance (see Chapter 7, “Configuring Your
Pro Tools System”).
DVD drive.
4 Making audio connections to the Eleven Rack
3 On the Installer disc, locate and double-click
Install Pro Tools LE.mpkg.
(see Chapter 8, “Eleven Rack Studio Setup”).
The Pro Tools Installer disc includes additional software for your system. For more information, see “Additional Software on the
Pro Tools Installer Disc” on page 49.
Install Pro Tools LE.mpkg icon
Chapter 5: Installing Pro Tools on Mac
47
4 Follow the on-screen instructions to proceed
Installation Options
with installation.
5 Click Continue each time you are prompted.
6 At the Installation Type page, do one of the
following:
• To install all Pro Tools application files and
free plug-in suites (and associated content),
leave the default Installation options selected and click Continue.
– or –
• Select (or deselect) a custom configuration
of Installation options (see “Installation
Options” on page 48) and click Continue.
7 Click Install.
8 If prompted, enter your Administrator pass-
word and click OK to authenticate the installation.
9 Follow the remaining on-screen instructions.
10 When installation is complete, click Restart.
11 After the computer has started, connect the
small end of the included USB cable to the USB
port on Eleven Rack and connect the other end
to any available USB port on your computer.
Eleven Rack may not function properly if
connected to a USB hub. If you need to use a
hub for other USB peripherals, connect the
hub to a separate USB port; Eleven Rack
must be connected to a dedicated port on
the computer in order to function properly.
Pro Tools LE Options
To install a subset of Pro Tools software and
plug-ins (and associated content), click the reveal triangle for the Pro Tools LE option in the
installer, and deselect any of the following options that you do not want installed.
Application Files (Required for Pro Tools) Installs
the Pro Tools application and supporting library
files needed to run Pro Tools. This option also
installs the Avid CoreAudio Driver. This option
must be selected to install Pro Tools.
DigiRack Plug-Ins Installs free plug-ins including
DigiRack plug-ins, free Bomb Factory plug-ins,
TL Utilities, and Digidesign D-Fi and Maxim
plug-ins. For more information, see the Audio
Plug-Ins Guide.
Pro Tools Creative Collection Options
Select any of the Pro Tools Creative Collection
options you want installed. For more information, see the Audio Plug-Ins Guide.
Effect Plug-Ins Installs six free virtual instrument
plug-ins from Avid’s AIR group.
Virtual Instruments Installs 20 free effects plugins from Avid’s AIR group.
Virtual Instrument Content Installs sample content for AIR virtual instruments.
Virtual Instrument Content is very large
and may take up to 20 minutes to install.
During this time, the progress bar may not
appear to move but your software is still installing. Do not terminate your installation.
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Additional Options
The Pro Tools installer provides the following
additional options to install along with
Pro Tools software and plug-ins.
• Create a new session from template.
• Create a new blank session.
• Open any other session on your system.
Avid CoreAudio Drivers This option installs a
multichannel sound driver that allows CoreAudio-compatible applications to record and play
back through Avid audio interfaces.
Avid Video Engine This option lets you integrate
Avid® video peripherals (such as the Avid Mojo®
with your Pro Tools system). Do not install unless you will be using one of these products.
MIDI I/O Driver The MIDI I/O™ Driver is required if you are using the Avid MIDI I/O interface. Do not install unless you will be using a
MIDI I/O.
Launching Pro Tools LE
When launching Pro Tools LE the first time, you
are prompted to enter an authorization code to
validate your software. The code begins with the
letters “DIGI”.
To authorize Pro Tools LE software:
1 Make sure Eleven Rack is connected to your
computer.
2 Click the Pro Tools LE icon in the Dock (or
double-click the application icon in the
Pro Tools folder inside the Digidesign folder).
Quick Start dialog
For more information on the Quick
Start dialog and session templates, see the
Pro Tools Reference Guide (Help >
Pro Tools Reference Guide).
Additional Software on the
Pro Tools Installer Disc
The Pro Tools LE Installer disc provides additional software for your system, including
Eleven Rack-specific template sessions, a general
Pro Tools demo session, and audio drivers (for
playing other audio applications through
Eleven Rack).
Check your Pro Tools Installer disc for additional software and installers.
3 Enter the authorization code in the dialog
(making sure to type it exactly as printed, and
observing any spaces and capitalization), then
click Validate. (Your authorization code is located on the back of your Pro Tools LE DVD wallet.)
4 Use the Quick Start dialog to do one of
the following:
Chapter 5: Installing Pro Tools on Mac
49
Third-Party Applications and
Plug-Ins
Your Pro Tools package also includes several free
applications and plug-ins from selected Third
Party developers. Once you've completed your
Pro Tools installation, you can install these separately. Go to the Additional Files/3rd Party
Content folder on the Pro Tools LE Installer
disc.
Eleven Rack CoreAudio Driver
The Eleven Rack CoreAudio Driver is a multi-client, multichannel sound driver that allows
CoreAudio compatible applications to record
and play back through our hardware.
The Eleven Rack CoreAudio Driver is installed
by default when you install Pro Tools.
For information on configuring the
Eleven Rack CoreAudio Driver, see the CoreAudio Drivers Guide.
Standalone Eleven Rack CoreAudio Driver
The Eleven Rack CoreAudio Driver can be installed as a standalone driver on Mac systems
that do not have Pro Tools software installed.
The standalone version of this driver is available
on the Pro Tools Installer disc (in the Additional
Files Folder).
.
For information on installing and configuring the standalone version of the Eleven
Rack CoreAudio Driver, see the CoreAudio
Drivers Guide.
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Pro Tools Demo Session
The Pro Tools LE Installer disc includes a demo
session that you can use to verify that your system is working.
The demo session for Pro Tools LE is named “Filtered Dream.”
Before installing the demo session to your
audio drive, make sure the drive is configured as described in “Formatting an Audio
Drive” on page 120.
To install the demo session:
1 Insert the Pro Tools LE Installer disc into your
DVD drive.
2 On the Pro Tools LE Installer disc, locate and
open the Additional Files/Demo Sessions Installer folder.
3 Double-click Install LE Demo Session.pkg.
4 Follow the on-screen instructions.
5 When prompted, select your audio drive as
the install location and click Next to begin the
installation. When installation is complete,
click Close.
The demo session can be opened by doubleclicking the Filtered Dream.ptf file (located
in the Filtered Dream Demo Session folder).
Uninstalling Pro Tools
If you need to remove Pro Tools software from
your computer, use the Uninstaller application.
To remove Pro Tools from your computer:
1 Make sure you are logged in as an Administra-
tor for the account where Pro Tools is installed.
For details on Administrator privileges in
Mac OS X, see your Apple OS X documentation.
2 Go to Applications/Digidesign/Pro Tools/
Pro Tools Utilities and double-click
Uninstall Pro Tools.
3 Click Continue to proceed with the uninstall.
4 Choose the type of uninstall you want to perform:
Safe Uninstall Leaves certain plug-ins and system files needed for compatibility with some
Avid products. Use Safe Uninstall if you are using an Avid application or preparing to update
to a CS (customer support) release.
Clean Uninstall Removes all Pro Tools files, including system files, Pro Tools plug-ins, and
MIDI patch names. Use Clean Uninstall whenever you are preparing to upgrade, or to troubleshoot from a clean system.
5 Click Uninstall.
6 Enter your Administrator password and click
OK.
7 Click Finish to close the Installer window.
Chapter 5: Installing Pro Tools on Mac
51
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Chapter 6: Installing Pro Tools On
Windows
This chapter contains information for Windows
systems only. If you are installing Pro Tools on a
Mac computer, see Chapter 5, “Installing
Pro Tools on Mac.”
If you’re installing or upgrading Pro Tools HD to
work with Eleven Rack, please refer to the Setup
Guide for your system.
Installation Overview
Installing the Eleven Rack on a Windows computer includes the following steps:
1 “Installing Pro Tools LE and Connecting Your
Interface” on page 54.
2 “Launching Pro Tools LE” on page 56.
Before installing this version of Pro Tools,
refer to the Read Me information included
on the Pro Tools LE Installer disc.
3 Configuring your system for improved perfor-
mance (see Chapter 7, “Configuring Your
Pro Tools System”).
4 Making audio and MIDI connections to the
Eleven Rack (see Chapter 8, “Eleven Rack Studio
Setup” for details).
The Pro Tools Installer disc includes additional software for your system. For more information, see “Additional Software on the
Pro Tools Installer Disc” on page 57.
Chapter 6: Installing Pro Tools On Windows
53
Installing Pro Tools LE and
Connecting Your Interface
Before connecting your Pro Tools LE interface to
the computer, you need to install Pro Tools LE
software.
Do not start this procedure with your Eleven
Rack connected to your computer.
To install Pro Tools LE:
1 Start Windows, logging in with Administrator
privileges. For details on Administrator privileges, refer to your Windows documentation.
2 Insert the Pro Tools LE Installer disc in your
DVD drive and do one of the following:
• If Windows AutoRun is enabled, the installer splash screen will appear. Click the
on-screen link to install Pro Tools LE. Then
follow the on-screen instructions.
– or –
• If Windows AutoRun is disabled and the
splash screen does not appear, double-click
Setup.exe on the installer disc. Then click
the on-screen link.
Setup.exe icon
3 Follow the on-screen instructions to proceed
with installation and click Next when prompted.
4 To install the complete compliment of
Pro Tools software and plug-ins, leave Pro Tools
selected.
5 At the Select Features page, do one of the fol-
lowing:
• To install all Pro Tools application files and
free plug-in suites (and associated content),
leave the default Installation options selected and click Continue.
– or –
• Select (or deselect) a custom configuration
of Installation options (see “Installation
Options” on page 55) and click Continue.
6 Click Next.
7 Click Install.
8 When prompted, connect the small end of the
included USB cable to the USB port on
Eleven Rack. Connect the other end of the USB
cable to any available USB port on your computer.
Eleven Rack may not function properly if
connected to a USB hub. If you need to use a
hub for other USB peripherals, connect the
hub to a separate USB port; Eleven Rack
must be connected to a dedicated port on the
computer in order to function properly
9 Click OK.
In Windows 7 and Windows Vista, if the
User Account Control dialog appears, click
Allow.
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In Windows 7 and Windows Vista, a series
of Windows Security dialogs may appear.
Click “Install” on each one until they go
away.
Pro Tools Creative Collection Options
In Windows XP, a series of Software Installation dialogs about the driver not passing
Windows Logo testing may appear. Click
Continue Anyway on each one until they go
away.
If any other dialogs appear (such as the
“Found New Hardware” dialog), leave them
open and do not click on them. These dialogs will close on their own.
10 Wait for the installer to finish installing all
software components, drivers, and PACE System
files before proceeding to the next step.
11 When installation is complete, click Finish
and restart your computer.
Installation Options
Pro Tools LE Options
To install a subset of Pro Tools software and
plug-ins (and associated content), click the plus
(+) next to Pro Tools LE option in the Select Features page of the installer, and deselect any of
the following options that you do not want installed.
Application Files (Required for Pro Tools) Installs
the Pro Tools application and supporting library
files needed to run Pro Tools. This option must
be selected to install Pro Tools.
DigiRack Plug-Ins Installs free plug-ins including
DigiRack plug-ins, free Bomb Factory plug-ins,
TL Utilities, and Digidesign D-Fi and Maxim
plug-ins. For more information, see the Audio
Plug-Ins Guide.
Select any of the Pro Tools Creative Collection
options you want installed. For more information, see the Audio Plug-Ins Guide.
Effect Plug-Ins Installs 6 free virtual instrument
plug-ins from Avid’s AIR group.
Virtual Instruments Installs 20 free effects plugins from Avid’s AIR group.
Virtual Instrument Content Installs sample content for AIR virtual instruments.
Virtual Instrument Content is very large
and may take up to 20 minutes to install.
During this time, the progress bar may not
appear to move but your software is still installing. Do not terminate your installation.
Additional Options
The Pro Tools installer provides the following
additional options to install along with
Pro Tools software and plug-ins.
Mac HFS+ Disk Support Option This option lets
your Pro Tools system read, write, record, and
play back using Mac-formatted HFS+ disks. HFS+
disks are commonly referred to as Mac OS Extended disks.
For information on using the Mac HFS+
Disk Support option, see the HFS+ Disk Support Option Guide.
Avid Video Engine This option lets you integrate
Avid® video peripherals (such as the Avid Mojo®
with your Pro Tools system). Do not install unless you will be using one of these products.
Command|8 Controller and Driver This option installs the personality file and device driver for
the Avid Command}8 Control Surface. Do not
install unless you will be using Command}8.
Chapter 6: Installing Pro Tools On Windows
55
Installing QuickTime
While QuickTime is not required to install or
run Pro Tools, it must be installed if you plan to
include movie files, or import MP3 or MP4
(AAC) files in your sessions. QuickTime for Windows is available as a free download from the
Apple website (www.apple.com).
For information on which version of QuickTime is compatible with your version of
Pro Tools, visit the compatibility pages of
our website:
www.avid.com/compatibility
Launching Pro Tools LE
When launching Pro Tools LE the first time, you
are prompted to enter an authorization code.
To authorize Pro Tools LE software:
1 Make sure Eleven Rack is connected to your
computer.
2 Double-click the Pro Tools LE shortcut on
your desktop (or the application icon in the
Pro Tools folder inside the Digidesign folder).
3 Enter the authorization code in the dialog
2 Download the QuickTime installer applica-
(making sure to type it exactly as printed, and
observing any spaces and capitalization), then
click Validate. (Your authorization code is located on the back of your Pro Tools LE DVD wallet.)
tion to your computer.
4 Use the Quick Start dialog to do one of
3 Double-click the QuickTime installer applica-
the following:
To install QuickTime:
1 Visit www.apple.com and go to the Quick-
Time page.
tion and follow the on-screen installation instructions.
• Create a new session from template.
4 Restart your computer.
• Open any other session on your system.
• Create a new blank session.
Quick Start dialog
For more information on the Quick
Start dialog and session templates, see the
Pro Tools Reference Guide (Help >
Pro Tools Reference Guide).
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Additional Software on the
Pro Tools Installer Disc
The Pro Tools LE Installer disc provides additional software for your system, including audio
drivers (for playing other audio applications
through our hardware) and a Pro Tools demo
session.
Refer to your Pro Tools Installer disc for additional software and installers.
Third-Party Applications and
Plug-Ins
Your Pro Tools package also includes several free
applications and plug-ins from selected Third
Party developers. Once you've completed your
Pro Tools installation, you can install these separately. Go to the Additional Files\3rd Party
Content folder on the Pro Tools LE Installer
disc.
Avid Audio Drivers
The Avid Audio Drivers are multi-client, multichannel sound drivers that allow Pro Tools and
third-party audio programs that support the
ASIO Driver or WaveDriver MME/DirectX (Multimedia Extension) standards to record and play
back through qualified Pro Tools audio interfaces.
Pro Tools Demo Session
The Pro Tools LE Installer disc includes a demo
session that you can use to verify that your system is working.
The demo session for Pro Tool LE is named “Filtered Dream.”
Before installing the demo session to your
audio drive, make sure the drive is configured as described in “Formatting an Audio
Drive” on page 120.
To install the demo session:
1 Insert the Pro Tools LE Installer disc into your
DVD drive.
2 From your DVD drive, locate and open the Additional Files\Demo Sessions Installer folder.
3 Double-click LE Demo Session Setup.exe.
4 Follow the onscreen instructions.
5 When prompted, select your audio drive as
the install location and click Next to begin the
install.
6 When installation is complete, click Finish.
The demo session can be opened by doubleclicking the Filtered Dream.ptf file (located
in the Filtered Dream Demo Session folder).
An Eleven Rack driver is installed automatically
when you install Pro Tools.
For additional information on the Pro Tools
Audio Drivers, see the Windows Audio
Drivers Guide.
Chapter 6: Installing Pro Tools On Windows
57
Uninstalling Pro Tools
If you need to remove Pro Tools software from
your computer, use the Uninstaller application.
To uninstall Pro Tools from your computer:
1 Start Windows, logging in with Administrator
privileges. For details on Administrator privileges, refer to your Windows documentation.
2 Go to C:\Program Files\Digidesign\
Pro Tools\Pro Tools Utilities and double-click
Uninstall Pro Tools.exe.
3 Click Next.
4 Click Uninstall to proceed with the uninstall.
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Chapter 7: Configuring Your Pro Tools
System
After you have connected your system and installed Pro Tools software, you are ready to start
up and configure your Pro Tools system.
Starting Up or Shutting Down
Your System
To ensure that the components of your
Pro Tools system communicate properly with
each other, you need to start them in a particular order.
Shut down your Pro Tools system in this order:
1 Quit Pro Tools and any other running applica-
tions.
To quit Pro Tools, choose Pro Tools > Quit
(Mac) or File > Exit (Windows).
2 Turn off or lower the volume of all output devices in your system.
3 Turn off your computer.
4 Turn off any MIDI interfaces, MIDI devices, or
synchronization peripherals.
Start up your Pro Tools system in this order:
5 Turn off any control surfaces.
1 Lower the volume of all output devices in your
6 Turn off any external hard drives.
system.
7 Turn off your Eleven Rack.
2 Turn on your Eleven Rack.
3 Turn on any external hard drives. Wait ap-
proximately ten seconds for them to spin up to
speed.
4 Turn on any control surfaces (such as Command|8).
5 Turn on any MIDI interfaces, MIDI devices, or
synchronization peripherals.
6 Turn on your computer.
7 Launch Pro Tools or any third-party audio or
MIDI applications.
Chapter 7: Configuring Your Pro Tools System
59
Configuring Pro Tools LE
Software
Pro Tools System Settings
In the Playback Engine dialog, Pro Tools lets you
adjust the performance of your system by
changing system settings that affect its capacity
for processing, playback, and recording.
In most cases, the default settings for your system provide optimum performance, but you
may want to adjust them to accommodate large
or processing-intensive Pro Tools sessions.
Hardware Buffer Size
The Hardware Buffer Size (H/W Buffer Size) controls the size of the buffer used to handle host
processing tasks such as RTAS plug-ins.
• Lower Hardware Buffer Size settings are useful
for improving latency issues in certain recording situations or for improving certain system
performance problems. On Pro Tools LE systems, lower settings reduce all input-to-output monitoring latency on any record-armed
tracks or Auxiliary Input tracks with live inputs.
• Higher Hardware Buffer Size settings are useful for sessions that are using more RTAS plugins for playback. These settings allow for more
audio processing. They can also be useful to
reduce errors on machines that require a
higher buffer size.
In addition to causing slower screen response and monitoring latency, higher
Hardware Buffer Size settings can increase
the latency caused by RTAS plug-ins, and
affect the accuracy of plug-in automation,
mute data, and MIDI track timing.
To change the Hardware Buffer Size:
1 Choose Setup > Playback Engine.
Playback Engine dialog (Structure plug-in installed)
2 From the H/W Buffer Size pop-up menu, select
the audio buffer size, in samples.
3 Click OK.
Low Latency Monitoring mode can be used
to circumvent latency caused by higher buffer settings when recording. This can be toggled on and off by clicking Options > Low
Latency Monitoring in Pro Tools.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Host Processors
To set the number of Host Processors:
The Host Processors setting lets you manage
multi-processor support for RTAS (Real-Time
AudioSuite) plug-in processing.
1 Choose Setup > Playback Engine.
Used in combination with the CPU Usage Limit
setting, the Host Processors setting lets you control the way RTAS and other host-based processing tasks are carried out by the system.
For example:
• For sessions with large numbers of RTAS
plug-ins, you can allocate 2 or more processors to Host Processing and set a high CPU
Usage Limit.
• For sessions with few RTAS plug-ins, you can
allocate fewer processors to host processing
and set a low CPU Usage Limit to leave more
CPU resources available for automation accuracy, screen response, and video.
• Depending on the importance of video and
overall screen response, and on the density of
automation being employed, try different
combinations of Host Processors and CPU Usage Limit settings to achieve the best results.
For example, to improve screen response in a
medium-sized session using a moderate number of RTAS plug-ins, try reducing the number
of RTAS plug-ins, but keep the CPU Usage Limit
set to the maximum (up to 99% on a single
processor system).
2 From the Host Processors pop-up menu, select
the number of available processors you want to
allocate. The number of processors available varies depending on how many processors are
available on your computer:
• Select 1 Processor to limit RTAS processing
to one CPU in the system.
• Choose 2 Processors to enable load balancing across two available processors.
• On systems running four or more processors, choose the number of processors for
RTAS processing.
3 Click OK.
System Usage Window and Processing
The System Usage window (Window > System Usage) displays the combined amount of processing occurring on all enabled processors with a
single indicator, regardless of how many processors are available in the system. If the System Usage Window shows that you are at the limit of
available resources, increase the number of processors and adjust the CPU Usage Limit setting.
Chapter 7: Configuring Your Pro Tools System
61
CPU Usage Limit
Host Engine (Error Suppression)
The CPU Usage Limit setting controls the percentage of CPU resources allocated to Pro Tools
host processing tasks. Used in combination with
the Host Processors setting, the CPU Usage Limit
setting lets you control the way Pro Tools tasks
are carried out by the system.
The Host Engine option determines error reporting during playback and recording. This is especially useful when working with instrument
plug-ins.
• Lower CPU Usage Limit settings limit the effect
of Pro Tools processing on other CPU-intensive tasks, such as screen redraws, and are useful when you are experiencing slow system
response, or when running other applications
at the same time as Pro Tools.
• Higher CPU Usage Limit settings allocate more
processing power to Pro Tools, and are useful
for playing back large sessions or using more
RTAS plug-ins.
The maximum available CPU Usage Limit depends on the number of processors in your computer and on the number of processors you specify for host processing. This value can range
from 85% for single-processor computers, and
99% for multiprocessor computers (which dedicate one entire processor to Pro Tools).
On multiprocessor computers, the maximum
CPU Usage Limit is reduced when you use all your
processors (as selected in the Host Processors
pop-up menu). For example, on dual-processors,
the limit is 90%. On four-processor computers,
the limit is 95%.
Increasing the CPU Usage Limit may slow
down screen responses on slower computers.
To change the CPU Usage Limit:
1 Choose Setup > Playback Engine.
2 From the CPU Usage Limit pop-up menu, select
the percentage of CPU processing you want to
allocate to Pro Tools.
3 Click OK.
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You should only enable error suppression if you
are experiencing frequent RTAS errors that are
interrupting your creative workflow. When error suppression is enabled, you can experience a
degradation of audio quality. However, this may
be acceptable in order to avoid interrupting
playback and recording when working with instrument plug-ins. Be sure to disable error suppression when you need to ensure the highest
possible audio quality, such as for a final mix.
To enable error suppression:
1 Choose Setup > Playback Engine.
2 Select Host Engine: Ignore Errors During Playback/Record.
3 You can also select Minimize Additional I/O
Latency.
4 Click OK.
RTAS Error Suppression Options
Ignore Errors During Playback/Record
When enabled, Pro Tools continues to play and
record even if the RTAS processing requirements
exceed the selected CPU Usage Limit. This can result in pops and clicks in the audio, but does not
stop the transport.
Minimize Additional I/O Latency
When enabled, any additional latency due to
suppressing errors during playback and record is
minimized to 128 samples. Suppressing errors
requires at least 128 samples of additional buffering on some systems. If this option is disabled,
the buffer is half the H/W Buffer Size, or at least
128 samples (whichever is greater). If you are using an older, slower computer, you may want to
disable this option to avoid adverse performance.
This option is only available if the Ignore Errors
During Playback/Record option is enabled.
DAE Playback Buffer Size
The DAE Playback Buffer Size setting determines
the amount of memory DAE allocates for disk
buffers. In addition to levels, the DAE Playback
Buffer Size shows values in milliseconds, which
indicate the amount of audio buffered when the
system reads from disk.
The optimum DAE Playback Buffer Size for most
disk operations is 1500 msec; Level 2 (Default).
• DAE Playback Buffer Size settings lower than
1500 msec; Level 2 (Default) may improve
playback and recording initiation speed, as
well as preview in context in DigiBase browsers. However, a lower setting may make it difficult to play or record tracks reliably with
sessions containing a large number of tracks
or a high density of edits, or with systems that
have slower or heavily-fragmented hard
drives.
• DAE Playback Buffer Size settings higher than
1500 msec; Level 2 (Default) allow higher track
count, higher density of edits in a session, or
the use of slower hard drives. However, a
higher setting may increase the time lag when
starting playback or recording, starting preview in context from DigiBase browsers, or
cause a longer audible time lag while editing
during playback.
Using a larger DAE Playback Buffer Size
leaves less system memory for other tasks.
The default setting of 1500 msec (Level 2) is
recommended unless you are encountering
–9073 (“Disk too slow or fragmented”)
errors.
To change the DAE Playback Buffer Size:
1 Choose Setup > Playback Engine.
2 From the DAE Playback Buffer pop-up menu, select a buffer size. Memory requirements for each
setting are shown at the bottom of the Playback
Engine dialog.
3 Click OK.
If Pro Tools needs more system memory for the
DAE Playback Buffer, it will prompt you to restart your computer.
Chapter 7: Configuring Your Pro Tools System
63
Cache Size
Plug-In Streaming Buffer Size
The Cache Size setting determines the amount
of memory DAE allocates to pre-buffer audio for
playback and looping when using Elastic Audio.
(Structure Plug-In Only)
Minimum Reduces the amount of system memory used for disk operations and frees up memory for other system tasks. However, performance when using Elastic Audio features may
decrease.
Normal Is the optimum Cache Size for most sessions.
Large Improves performance when using Elastic
Audio features, but it also decreases the amount
of memory available for other system tasks, such
as RTAS processing.
Using a larger Cache Size leaves less system
memory for other tasks. The default setting
of Normal is recommended unless you are
encountering -9500 (“Cache too small”)
errors.
To change the Cache Size:
1 Choose Setup > Playback Engine.
2 From the Cache Size pop-up menu, select a
disk cache size.
3 Click OK.
This setting appears in the Playback Engine dialog only if Structure, Structure LE, or
Structure Free is installed on your system. The
Plug-In Streaming Buffer Size determines the
amount of memory DAE allocates for streaming
playback from disk with the Structure plug-in.
This setting only affects playback if disk streaming is activated in Structure’s plug-in controls
(see the Air Virtual Instruments Guide for more information).
The optimum Plug-In Streaming Buffer Size for
most sessions is 250 ms (Level 2).
• Plug-In Streaming Buffer Size settings lower
than 250 msec (Level 2) reduce the amount of
system memory used for sample playback and
frees up memory for other system tasks. However, audio quality of sample playback may
decrease.
• Plug-In Streaming Buffer Size settings higher
than 250 msec (Level 2) improve the audio
quality of sample playback, but they also decrease the amount of memory available for
other system tasks, such as RTAS processing.
Using a larger Plug-In Streaming Buffer Size
leaves less system memory for other tasks.
The default setting of 250 ms (Level 2) is
recommended unless you are experiencing
problems with the audio quality of sample
playback.
To change the Plug-In Streaming Buffer Size:
1 Choose Setup > Playback Engine.
2 From the Plug-In Streaming Buffer Size pop-up
menu, select a buffer size.
3 Click OK.
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Optimizing the Plug-In Streaming
Buffer Size
(Structure Plug-In Only)
This option appears in the Playback Engine dialog only if one of the Structure sampler instrument plug-in is installed on your system. This
option is useful when you are playing samples
from the same drive that contains audio for the
current session. When this option is selected,
Pro Tools automatically optimizes the size of the
Plug-In Streaming Buffer to facilitate disk access
for both Pro Tools and Structure. The Plug-In
Streaming Buffer Size pop-up menu is unavailable when this option is selected.
Default Sample Rate
The Sample Rate setting appears as the default
sample rate when you create a new session. (This
setting is available in the Hardware Setup dialog
only when no session is open.)
You can change the sample rate when creating a new Pro Tools session by selecting a
different sample rate in the New Session
dialog. (Refer to the Pro Tools Reference
Guide for details.)
To change the default Sample Rate:
1 Choose Setup > Hardware.
To set Pro Tools to optimize the Plug-In Streaming
Buffer Size:
1 Choose Setup > Playback Engine.
2 Select the Optimize for Streaming Content op-
tion.
3 Click OK.
Hardware Setup dialog for Eleven Rack
2 Select the sample rate from the Sample Rate
Configuring the Pro Tools
Hardware Settings
pop-up menu.
3 Click OK.
In the Hardware Setup dialog, Pro Tools lets you
set the default sample rate and clock source for
your system, as well as a range of controls specific to each type of audio interface.
Chapter 7: Configuring Your Pro Tools System
65
Clock Source
Digital Format
The Pro Tools Hardware Setup dialog lets you select the Clock Source for the system.
The Pro Tools Hardware Setup dialog lets you select the format of Eleven Rack’s digital I/Os.
Internal Use this setting if you are recording analog signals directly into Eleven Rack, and/or are
recording digital inputs into the AES/EBU or
S/PDIF ports on Eleven Rack, where the digital
device is synchronized to the appropriate digital
output.
AES/EBU Use this setting if you are interfacing
Eleven Rack with a digital device that uses the
AES/EBU format.
AES/EBU Use this setting if you are recording
through the Eleven Rack AES/EBU inputs from
an external digital device. This setting will synchronize Pro Tools to that digital device.
S/PDIF Use this setting if you are interfacing
Eleven Rack with a digital device that uses the
S/PDIF format.
To select the Digital Format:
1 Choose Setup > Hardware.
2 Select which digital I/O port on Eleven Rack
S/PDIF Use this setting if you are recording
through the Eleven Rack S/PDIF inputs from an
external digital device. This setting will synchronize Pro Tools to that digital device.
will be active under Digital Format.
3 Click OK.
Configuring I/O Setup
To select the Clock Source:
1 Choose Setup > Hardware.
2 Choose the clock source from the Clock Source
pop-up menu.
3 Click OK.
Your digital input device must be connected
and powered on for Pro Tools to synchronize to it. If your input device is not powered
on, leave the Clock Source set to Internal.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Using the I/O Setup dialog, you can label
Pro Tools LE input, output, insert, and bus signal
paths. The I/O Setup dialog provides a graphical
representation of the inputs, outputs, and signal
routing of the Eleven Rack.
Pro Tools LE has default I/O Setup settings that
will get you started. Use the I/O Setup dialog
only if you want to rename the default I/O
paths.
To rename I/O paths in I/O Setup:
Configuring MIDI Setup
1 Choose Setup > I/O.
If you plan to use any MIDI devices with Pro Tools,
do one of the following:
„ On Mac, configure your MIDI setup with Audio MIDI Setup.
– or –
„ On Windows, configure your MIDI setup with
MIDI Studio Setup.
I/O Setup dialog for Eleven Rack
2 Click the Input, Output, Insert, or Bus tab to display the corresponding connections.
3 To change the name of a path or subpath, double-click directly on the Path Name, type a new
name for the path, and press Enter.
4 Click OK.
Backing Up your System
Configuration
After configuring your system and Pro Tools,
you should save an image of your system drive
using a backup utility such as Norton Ghost. By
doing this, you can quickly restore your system
configuration and settings if you encounter any
problems.
See the Pro Tools Reference Guide (Help >
Pro Tools Reference Guide) for more information on renaming I/O paths.
Chapter 7: Configuring Your Pro Tools System
67
Optimizing a Mac System for
Pro Tools
To ensure optimum performance with
Pro Tools, configure your computer before using
Pro Tools software.
Before configuring your computer, make sure
you are logged in as an Administrator for the account where you want to install Pro Tools. For
details on Administrator privileges in Mac OS X,
see your Apple OS X documentation.
Do not use the Mac OS X automatic
Software Update feature, as it may upgrade
your system to a version of Mac OS that has
not yet been qualified for Pro Tools. For
details on qualified versions of Mac OS, visit
www.avid.com/compatibility.
Disable or Reassign Mac Keyboard
Shortcuts Used by Pro Tools
To have the full complement of Pro Tools keyboard shortcuts, you need to disable or reassign
any conflicting Mac OS X Keyboard Shortcuts in
the Apple System Preferences, including the
following:
• “Show Help menu”
• Under “Keyboard Navigation”
• “Move focus to the window drawer”
• Under “Dock, Exposé, and Dashboard”
• “Automatically hide and show the Dock”
• “All windows”
• “Application windows”
• “Desktop”
• “Dashboard”
• “Spaces”
Turning Off Software Update
To turn off the Software Update feature:
• Under “Spotlight”
• “Show Spotlight search field”
• “Show Spotlight window”
1 Choose System Preferences from the Apple
menu and click Software Update.
2 Click the Scheduled Check tab.
For a complete list of Pro Tools keyboard
shortcuts, see the Keyboard Shortcuts Guide
(Help > Keyboard Shortcuts).
3 Deselect Check for Updates.
Turning Off Energy Saver
To turn off the Energy Saver feature:
1 Choose System Preferences from the Apple
menu and click Energy Saver.
2 Do the following:
68
To disable or reassign Mac OS X keyboard
shortcuts:
1 Choose System Preferences from the Apple
menu and click Keyboard and Mouse.
2 Click the Keyboard Shortcuts tab.
3 Do one of the following:
• Set the computer sleep setting to Never.
• Deselect the Mac OS X options that conflict
with Pro Tools keyboard shortcuts.
• Set the display sleep setting to Never.
– or –
• Deselect Put the hard disk(s) to sleep when
possible option.
• Assign different, non-conflicting keyboard
shortcuts to the corresponding Mac OS X
options.
Eleven Rack User Guide
Reassign Spaces Keyboard Shortcuts
Disabling Spotlight Indexing
If you want to use Spaces, you should reassign
the Spaces keyboard shortcuts to avoid conflicts
with important Pro Tools keyboard shortcuts.
You can reassign Spaces keyboard shortcuts to
use a combination of modifier keys (Command+Option+Control+Shift) in addition to
the default Spaces keyboard shortcut assignments to avoid these conflicts.
The Mac OS X Spotlight feature automatically
indexes files and folders on local hard drives in
the background. In most cases, this is not a concern for normal Pro Tools operation. However,
if Spotlight starts indexing drives while recording in a Pro Tools session with high track counts
for an extended period of time, it can adversely
affect Pro Tools system performance. You may
want to disable Spotlight indexing for all local
drives before using Pro Tools for big recording
projects.
To reassign Spaces keyboard shortcuts to use
modifier key combinations that do not conflict
with Pro Tools keyboard shortcuts:
1 Choose System Preferences from the Apple
menu and click Exposé & Spaces.
Disabling Spotlight indexing also disables
the Find function in Mac OS X.
2 Click the Spaces tab.
To disable Spotlight indexing:
3 Ensure that Enable Spaces is selected.
1 Choose System Preferences from the Apple
menu and click Spotlight.
4 Press and hold Command+Option+Con-
trol+Shift and select “Control+Option+Shift+Command+F8” from the “To activate Spaces” pop-up
menu.
2 In the Spotlight window, click the Privacy tab.
3 To prevent indexing of a drive, drag its icon
from the desktop into the list.
5 Press and hold Command+Option+Con-
trol+Shift and select “Control+Option+Shift+Command+Arrow Keys” from the “To switch between
spaces” pop-up menu.
Enabling Journaling for Audio Drives
To yield higher performance from audio drives,
enable journaling.
6 Press and hold Command+Option+Con-
trol+Shift and select “Control+Option+Shift+Command+Number Keys” from the “To switch directly
to a space” pop-up menu.
To enable journaling:
1 Launch the Disk Utility application, located in
Macintosh HD/Applications/Utilities.
2 Select the volume in the left column of the
Disk Utility window.
3 Click Enable Journaling in the toolbar.
Chapter 7: Configuring Your Pro Tools System
69
Optimizing a Windows System
for Pro Tools
To enable DMA for any IDE hard drives:
1 Choose Start.
2 Right-click Computer (Windows 7, Windows
To ensure optimum performance with
Pro Tools LE, configure your computer before
using Pro Tools hardware and software.
For Mac System Optimization, see
“Optimizing a Mac System for
Pro Tools” on page 68.
Before configuring your computer, make sure
you are logged in as an Administrator for the account where you want to install Pro Tools. For
details on Administrator privileges, see your
Windows documentation.
Required Optimizations
To ensure optimum performance with
Pro Tools, configure the following settings before using Pro Tools hardware and software.
When you are finished changing Windows
system settings, restart your computer.
Enabling DMA
Enabling your computer's DMA (Direct Memory
Access) frees up CPU bandwidth so your computer can do other Pro Tools tasks.
In most cases the DMA option will already be set
correctly, as Windows detects and activates
DMA mode by default.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Vista) or My Computer (Windows XP) and choose
Manage.
3 In the left pane of Computer Management under System Tools, click on Device Manager.
4 In the right pane, click the triangle
(Windows 7) or the plus (+) sign (Windows
Vista, Windows XP) next to IDE ATA/ATAPI
Controllers.
5 Double-click on an IDE Channel.
6 Click the Advanced Settings tab.
7 Under Device Properties, check the box Enable
DMA (Windows 7, Windows Vista) or under each
listed Device, set the Transfer Mode to DMA if
available (Windows XP).
8 Click OK.
9 Repeat for each IDE Channel.
Configuring Windows Power
Management Settings
Pro Tools requires maximum CPU performance
for optimal RTAS processing and disk streaming.
For best performance, use the following recommended Windows Power Management settings.
To configure Windows Power Management
Settings (Windows 7, Windows Vista):
Disabling User Account Control
(Windows 7, Windows Vista)
1 Choose Start > Control Panel.
2 Click Hardware and Sound > Power Options.
3 In the Power Options control panel, click High
Some third-party applications that interface
with Pro Tools may require UAC to be disabled
for proper operation.
Performance.
4 Click Change plan settings.
To disable User Account Control (UAC):
1 Choose Start > Control Panel.
5 Click Change advanced power settings to
change additional settings.
2 Click User Accounts and Family Safety.
6 Click Hard disk > Turn off hard disk after =
3 In the User Accounts and Family Safety control
panel, click User Accounts.
Never. You can make optional changes such as
disabling sleep and disabling shutting down the
monitor.
4 Click Change User Account Control settings
7 Click OK or click Save changes to save the
(Windows 7) or Turn User Account Control on or off
(Windows Vista).
changes.
5 Move the User Account Control slider to Never
8 Close the window.
Notify (Windows 7), or deselect the Use User Account Control (UAC) to help protect your computer
option (Windows Vista).
To configure Windows Power Management
Settings (Windows XP):
1 Choose Start > Control Panel.
6 Click OK.
7 Restart your computer.
2 Double-click Power Options.
3 Click the Power Schemes tab.
Recommended Optimizations
4 From the Power Schemes pop-up menu, select
Pro Tools can also be affected by other software
and hardware drivers installed on your computer. For best possible performance, it is recommended (but not required) that you do the following:
Always On.
5 Verify that the following settings are set to
Never:
• Turn off hard disks
• System standby
• System hibernates
6 Click OK.
• Avoid running any unneeded programs at
the same time as Pro Tools.
• Turn off any software utilities that run in
the background, such as Windows Messenger, calendars, and disk maintenance programs.
• Turn off any non-essential USB devices
while running Pro Tools.
Chapter 7: Configuring Your Pro Tools System
71
• If your video display card supports it, enable Bus Mastering in the manufacturer’s
Control Panel. See the manufacturer’s instructions for details.
Optional Optimizations
The following system optimizations may help
Pro Tools perform better on some systems. It is
recommended that you only try these optimizations if necessary, as they may disable or adversely affect the functionality of other programs on your system.
To disable a network card (Windows XP):
1 Right-click My Computer and choose Manage.
2 Under System Tools, select Device Manager.
3 In the right-hand pane, click “+” to reveal Network adapters.
4 In the Device Manager window, double-click
Network adapters.
5 Right-click on the network adapter and select-
Disable.
6 Repeat as necessary for additional network-
adapters.
Disabling Network Cards
7 Close the Computer Management window.
If applicable, disable any networking cards
(other than a FireWire card that you might use
to connect an external drive to your system).
Adjusting Processor Scheduling
To adjust Processor Scheduling performance:
To disable a network card (Windows 7,
Windows Vista):
1 Choose Start > Computer.
2 Click System Properties.
3 In the left-hand pane under Control Panel
Home, click on Device Manager.
1 Right-click Computer (Windows 7, Windows
Vista) or My Computer (Windows XP) and choose
Properties.
2 Click the Advanced system settings link in the
left pane (Windows 7, Windows Vista) or the
Advanced tab (Windows XP).
3 Under the Performance section, click the Set-
4 In the Device Manager window, double-click
tings button.
Network adapters.
5 Right-click on the network adapter and select
4 In the Performance Options window, click the
Advanced tab.
Disable.
5 Under the Processor Scheduling section, select
6 Repeat as necessary for additional network
the Background Services option.
adapters
7 Close the Device Manager window.
6 Click OK to close the Performance Options
window.
7 Click OK to close the System Properties window.
8 Restart the computer for the changes to take
effect.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Disabling System Startup Items
The fewer items in use by your computer, the
more resources are available for Pro Tools. Some
startup applications may be consuming unnecessary CPU resources, and can be turned off.
If you disable any of the following startup items,
do so carefully:
• Portable media serial number (required for
some applications that utilize a copy protection key)
• The Plug and Play service
• Event log
• Cryptographic services
To Disable System Startup Items:
1 From the Start menu, type “msconfig” in Start
Search (Windows 7, Windows Vista) or in Run
(Windows XP) and click OK to open the System
Configuration Utility.
2 Under the General tab, choose Selective
Startup.
3 Deselect Load Startup Items and click OK.
4 Click Restart to restart the computer.
5 After restarting, the computer displays a Sys-
tem Configuration message. Check to see if
Pro Tools performance has increased before you
deselect the Don't show this message again option. If performance has not changed, run
“msconfig” and return your computer Startup
Selection back to Normal Startup - load all device
drives and services. Alternatively, try disabling
Startup items and non-essential processes individually.
Chapter 7: Configuring Your Pro Tools System
73
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Chapter 8: Eleven Rack Studio Setup
Using Eleven Rack with Pro Tools LE
This chapter will take you through connecting and configuring Eleven Rack to work at its best with
the other gear in your recording setup, like speakers, headphones, instruments and microphones.
Figure 8. Eleven Rack Studio Setup
This first section addresses the connections you’ll want to make when recording with Pro Tools LE.
For using Eleven Rack as a processor with other Pro Tools systems, see “Using Eleven Rack with a
Pro Tools|HD or M-Powered System” on page 79.
Chapter 8: Eleven Rack Studio Setup
75
Listen to Your Sound
To hear audio from Pro Tools, you will need to
connect a set of speakers or a pair of headphones
to Eleven Rack. Sound from Pro Tools cannot be
played through your computer’s speakers or
your computer’s sound output.
Connecting the Main Outputs
The Main outputs on the back of Eleven Rack are
male XLR connectors. To listen to audio coming
from Eleven Rack, these outputs should be connected to a set of monitor speakers (self-powered
or with an external amplifier) or a mixer or
monitor controller system.
Main outputs Left and Right output the audio
that is routed to the Main Out L/R output path
within Pro Tools.
The signal coming out of the Main outputs
is at line level (+4 dbu). Take care to use
line-level (not mic-level) inputs when connecting Eleven Rack to a mixer.
Connecting a Pair of Headphones
On the front panel of the Eleven Rack is a
1/4-inch jack to connect a pair of headphones.
The Phones jack outputs the audio that is
routed to the Main Out L/R output path within
Pro Tools.
s
76
Main output volume (higher or lower) by
changing the setting in User Options Mode. For
more details, see “Headphone Volume” on
page 103.
Analog Audio Inputs
Eleven Rack features three types of analog inputs. There is a dedicated guitar (instrumentlevel) input, a stereo line input, and a mic-level
input. Choose the input type that fits the signal
you want to send to Pro Tools.
Connecting Your Guitar
Use the Guitar input for instruments such as
electric guitar or electric bass that usually have a
lower level of output than line level instruments.
To connect a guitar or other instrument-level
device to Eleven Rack:
Connect your instrument to the Guitar input
on the front panel of Eleven Rack using a standard 1/4-inch TS guitar cable.
„
Connecting Line-Level Devices
Use the Line inputs for line level devices, such as
keyboards, mixers, and mic preamps.
To connect a keyboard, mixer or other line-level
device to Eleven Rack:
Setting Monitor Volume
1 Plug your device into the Line inputs on the
The Volume knob on the front of Eleven Rack
adjusts the output volume of the Main outputs
and the Headphone Outs simultaneously. You
can offset the Headphone volume from the
back panel of Eleven Rack using one or two standard 1/4-inch (TRS or TS) cables. If the device is
mono, plug it into one of the Line inputs. If the
device is stereo, plug it into both the left and
right Line inputs with two cables.
Eleven Rack User Guide
2 Set your device’s output volume to its optimal
level. For example, the optimal level for most
keyboards is between 80% and 100% of maximum volume.
3 If your device has unbalanced (TS) outputs, set
the line inputs on Eleven Rack to –10 dVB by
toggling the Level switch between the Line input jacks to its outward position. If your device
has balanced (TRS) outputs, set the Line inputs
to +4 dVB by toggling the Level switch to its inward position.
Connecting a Microphone to
Eleven Rack
Eleven Rack provides an XLR mic input. It can
accept a microphone, DI box, or any other
mic-level device.
To connect a microphone or other mic-level device
to Eleven Rack:
1 If using a microphone that may be damaged
by phantom power (some ribbons, some tube
condensers), flip the Phantom Power switch (labeled 48V) to OFF.
2 Plug your microphone cable into the Mic in-
put on the front of Eleven Rack.
3 If your microphone requires phantom power,
make sure the microphone is connected, then
flip the Phantom Power switch to ON.
4 Carefully turn the Gain control up to increase
the input level of your microphone signal.
5 If the incoming signal seems too loud or
sounds distorted, even with the Gain knob all
the way down, flip the Pad switch to ON to engage the –20 dB pad.
6 On the front of the Eleven Rack, carefully turn
the Gain control to the right to increase the input level of your microphone signal.
Digital Audio Input and Output
Mic input
Phantom
Pad
Power (48v) On/Off
On/Off
switch
switch
Mic
Gain
control
Eleven Rack mic-level input and controls
Eleven Rack provides digital inputs and outputs
for AES/EBU and S/PDIF format digital audio devices. You can use these connections to record
from digital sources, use external digital effects,
or send Pro Tools audio to an external digital recorder.
Eleven Rack can have devices connected to
both the AES/EBU and S/PDIF ports simultaneously, but only one format of device can
be used at one time. You can switch between these two formats from within Pro
Tools LE, or from the front panel of Eleven
Rack, if using it as a standalone processor.
Chapter 8: Eleven Rack Studio Setup
77
To connect a digital device to Eleven Rack, do one
of the following:
• Connect the AES/EBU output on the device to
the AES/EBU input on Eleven Rack, and the
device’s AES/EBU input to Eleven Rack’s
AES/EBU output, with two AES/EBU-format
XLR cables.
– or –
• Connect the S/PDIF output on the device to
the S/PDIF input on Eleven Rack, and the device’s S/PDIF input to Eleven Rack’s S/PDIF
output port, using two 75-ohm coaxial cables
with male RCA connectors on both ends.
Configuring Digital Devices
When connecting to external gear digitally,
Eleven Rack and Pro Tools must be set to the
same sample rate and digital format as your digital device. Pro Tools must also be set to clock
from the digital device, or no audio can pass between them.
To configure Pro Tools to interface with a digital
device:
1 Choose Setups > Hardware Setup.
2 Select AES External or S/PDIF External from the
Clock Source pop-up menu, to match with the
device.
3 Change the sample rate of your external de-
vice to match the rate you are using or plan to
use in your Pro Tools session. If your device operates in a limited range of sample rates, you’ll
need to stay within that range when choosing
the sample rate for your Pro Tools session.
4 Click OK.
At this point, you can try to record some signal
from the digital device (if it is a sound source,
like a keyboard or CD player), inserting it onto a
pre-recorded track (if it’s an effects processor),
and so on.
If you get no signal or a compromised signal,
double-check that Pro Tools and your external device are set to the same sample rate and
digital I/O format, and that Pro Tools is set
to receive sync from the external device.
MIDI Connections
The two MIDI ports on Eleven Rack let you take
advantage of all the MIDI features of
Pro Tools LE, including recording and editing
MIDI data for to automate controls on Eleven
Rack, and/or compose using virtual or hardware
MIDI sound sources.
If you need additional MIDI ports you can add a
compatible USB-based MIDI interface to your
system.
To connect a MIDI device to Eleven Rack:
1 Connect a standard 5-pin MIDI cable from the
MIDI Out port of your device to the MIDI In
port on the back of Eleven Rack.
2 If the device has a MIDI input and you plan to
send MIDI signals to it from Pro Tools, connect
another MIDI cable from the MIDI Out port on
the back of Eleven Rack to the MIDI In port of
your device.
MIDI Out
MIDI In
Eleven Rack MIDI connections
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Using Eleven Rack with a Pro Tools|HD or M-Powered System
Analog I/O
-or-
Digital I/O
Pro Tools HD Audio Interface
Figure 9. Eleven Rack connected to a Pro Tools|HD system
Apart from its roles as a Pro Tools LE interface
and standalone guitar processor, Eleven Rack
can also be used alongside a Pro Tools|HD or
Pro Tools M-Powered system, acting as a remote-controlled processing system and guitar
preamp.
You’ll need a digital or analog audio connection
to and from the Pro Tools|HD or M-Powered system to run audio through Eleven Rack. If you
want to use the Eleven Rack Control window in
Pro Tools to control Eleven Rack and manage
Rigs, Eleven Rack must be connected to the
computer using USB.
You’ll also need to install the included Pro Tools
HD or M-Powered software update, unless
you’re already using version 8.0.1 or higher.
The included update requires Pro Tools 8.0
software to update from. If your HD or
M-Powered system has not already been
updated to at least Pro Tools version 8.0,
you’ll need to purchase and install that
upgrade before you can control Eleven Rack
and manage Rigs from within Pro Tools.
Visit www.digdesign.com for upgrade
details.
Chapter 8: Eleven Rack Studio Setup
79
Audio Connections
To connect Eleven Rack to your Pro Tools
interface using AES/EBU or S/PDIF digital I/O:
To connect Eleven Rack to your Pro Tools
interface using analog I/O:
1 Connect the Eleven Rack to an open pair of
1 Connect the Main outputs on Eleven Rack to
an open pair of analog line inputs on your audio
interface.
2 Hold the Edit/Back button on Eleven Rack to
enter Edit mode.
3 Choose the input you need for the current
task:
• If you want to re-amp pre-recorded signals
through Eleven Rack, choose Line L+R.
– or –
• If you want to record an analog signal using Eleven Rack’s input circuitry and Rig
processing, choose the Guitar, Mic, or Line
option, to match the input you’re using.
digital inputs and outputs on your audio interface, either AES/EBU or S/PDIF.
2 Hold the Edit/Back button on Eleven Rack to
enter User Options mode.
3 Select Rig Input, and press the SW1 button.
4 Choose the input you need for the current
task:
• If you want to re-amp pre-recorded signals
through Eleven Rack, choose Digital L+R.
• If you want to record an analog signal using the input circuitry and Rig processing
in Eleven Rack, choose the Guitar, Mic, or
Line option, to match the input you’re using.
5 Press Edit/Back to move back to the previous
4 Connect the Line inputs on Eleven Rack to an
screen.
open pair of analog line outputs on your audio
interface.
6 Select Digital Clock/Input, and press SW1.
7 Set the Clock Source to External.
Press Edit/Back twice to return to the main Rig
Select Screen.
8 Set the Digital Input to AES/EBU or S/PDIF, to
match the type of connection you’re using.
9 Press Edit/Back to move back to the previous
screen.
10 Select Digital Output, and press SW1.
11 Choose Rig Outputs.
12 Press Edit/Back twice to return to the main
Rig Select Screen.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Configuring Your Pro Tools|HD or
M-Powered System
First, you’ll need to install the correct Pro Tools
software and connect Eleven Rack to your computer using USB.
If the device is a standalone unit, such as a signal
processor or digital console, you must set the
sample rate and clock behavior of Eleven Rack
using the Digital Clock/Input User Options
page, accessed from the front panel of Eleven
Rack.
For more information on setting the sample
rate and clock source of Eleven Rack using
the front panel controls, see “Digital
Clock/Input” on page 101.
To configure your Pro Tools system to interface
with Eleven Rack:
1 Install the included Pro Tools HD software up-
date from the supplied DVD, unless Pro Tools
version 8.0.1 or higher is already installed.
A pre-existing installation of Pro Tools version 8.0 or higher is required to install this
update.
2 Use the supplied USB cable (or another USB
2.0 cable) to connect Eleven Rack to an open
USB 2.0 port on your computer.
3 Launch Pro Tools. If the software has been installed correctly and Eleven Rack is connected
via USB, the Eleven Rack Control window will
open, giving you access to the controls and Rig
management features.
For more information on controlling Eleven
Rack from Pro Tools, see “The Eleven Rack
Control Window” on page 84.
Setting Eleven Rack Sample Rate and
Clock Source
When Eleven Rack is connected to a digital device, the sample rate must match between the
two devices, and the clock relationship (one device internally clocked, the other receiving external clock) must be established.
The same sample rate and clock rules apply
when connecting Eleven Rack digitally for use
as a standalone processor with a Pro Tools|HD,
LE, or M-Powered system. However, when
Eleven Rack is connected to your computer via
USB (in this case, for control reasons), the sample rate and clock source can no longer be set
from the front panel.
Instead, use the Digidesign Eleven Rack System
Preferences page (Mac) or Control Panel (Windows) to change these settings.
To access Eleven Rack’s sample rate and clock
source settings when connected via USB:
1 Open the Digidesign Eleven Rack settings:
• On Mac, open System Preferences from the
Apple menu and choose Digidesign Eleven
Rack.
– or –
• On Windows, click the Start button, choose
Control Panel and double-click Digidesign
Eleven Rack.
2 The Digidesign Eleven Rack Properties win-
dow will appear.
3 Choose the desired clock source and sample
rate.
4 Close the System Preferences window (Mac) or
the Digidesign Eleven Rack Properties dialog
(Windows) when finished.
Chapter 8: Eleven Rack Studio Setup
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Chapter 9: Eleven Rack with Pro Tools
This chapter shows you how to take advantage
of some of the unique features that Eleven Rack
brings to Pro Tools. If you’ve never recorded
with Pro Tools before, be sure to check out the
Intro to Pro Tools Guide that comes with
Eleven Rack.
Pro Tools LE Capabilities
Pro Tools LE on Mac or Windows provides thefollowing capabilities with Eleven Rack:
• Eight channels of simultaneous audio input:
• Up to 128 audio tracks (with up to 48 active
tracks), 128 Auxiliary Input tracks, 64 Master
Fader tracks, 256 MIDI tracks, and 32 Instrument tracks per session.
• 16-bit or 24-bit audio resolution, at sample
rates up to 96 kHz.
• Non-destructive, random-access editing and
mix automation.
• Audio processing with up to 10 inserts per
track (RTAS® plug-ins or hardware inserts).
• Up to 10 sends per track.
• Up to 32 internal mix busses.
• Stereo Rig output
• All analog inputs
• Stereo digital input
For complete information on recording in
Pro Tools, see the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
• Six channels of simultaneous audio output:
• Main/Phones outputs
• Output To Amp outputs
• Stereo digital output
• Playback of up to 48 mono or stereo digital audio tracks, or a combination of playing back
and recording up to 48 mono or stereo digital
audio tracks, depending on the capabilities of
your computer.
Chapter 9: Eleven Rack with Pro Tools
83
The Eleven Rack Control Window
Master Control
section
Rig View
section
Effect preset
selector
Control section
(Showing the
selected effect’s
controls)
Figure 10. Eleven Rack Control window (in Pro Tools LE)
The Eleven Rack Control window is a special window in Pro Tools that lets you control Eleven Rack
entirely from your computer. It can be accessed when using Eleven Rack as a Pro Tools LE interface,
as well as when connected to a Pro Tools HD or M-Powered system for control using USB.
You can open the Eleven Rack Control window by choosing Window > Eleven Rack.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Accessing the Eleven Rack Control Window
When Pro Tools LE, HD or M-Powered is launched and Eleven Rack is connected to your computer
using USB, The Eleven Rack Control window is displayed. You can always access it by clicking
Window > Eleven Rack.
The Eleven Rack Control window can be minimized to a basic floating window. When minimized, it
shows the Rig Library menu, basic monitoring controls and a button which activates the Tuner.
Eleven Rack Control window, minimized
Similar controls can be accessed from the Guitar panel in the top bar of controls in the Edit window.
Click the small amplifier-shaped icon in the Guitar panel to open the Eleven Rack Control window.
Opens Eleven Rack
Control window
Guitar panel in Edit window control toolbar
The Guitar panel can be hidden and/or moved within the toolbar. For more details,
see the Pro Tools Reference guide by selecting Help > Pro Tools Reference Guide.
Chapter 9: Eleven Rack with Pro Tools
85
Rig View Section
Rig Settings
Effects name/
bypass button
Rig Utility settings
Selected
Effect
To Amp
Output 1
selector
Effect
selector
Figure 11. Eleven Rack Control window (in Pro Tools LE)
In the Rig View section, you can access all of the
amp, cab, effects, and utility parameters of the
current Rig, as well as load and save rigs to and
from your computer.
Clicking on the Rig name brings up a menu
where you can call up any Rig stored in the
memory of Eleven Rack or in your computer, or
load a Rig setting from an audio file with embedded Rig data.
Rig Settings
Load Rig from
Eleven Rack
Load one (or all)
Rigs from compute
Load embedded
Rig from audio
Region
Rig
number
Rig name
Save button
The Rig Settings section lets you load, access,
and save Rigs to and from Eleven Rack and your
computer.
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The chosen Rig will be loaded into Eleven Rack,
and can then be edited via the Eleven Rack Control window or the front panel of Eleven Rack.
For info on embedding Rig data in audio, see
“Embedding Rig Settings in Audio Regions”
on page 92.
Clicking on the Rig number brings up the Rig Librarian, an all-in-one view of all Rigs currently
stored in the memory of Eleven Rack.
The name shown in the Rig Librarian is that of
the most recently loaded Rig. When changes are
been made to the Rig, the Save button turns red
and the Rig number and name are shown in italics.
When Pro Tools is set to manual tempo (ignoring the Conductor track), and Eleven Rack is set
to lock to Session tempo, changes in Rig tempo
will shift the tempo of your Pro Tools session,
and vice versa.
When Pro Tools is set to follow the Conductor
track, and Eleven Rack is locked to Session
tempo, any changes made in the Conductor
track over time will be followed by Eleven Rack.
To save the current state of your Rig Settings:
Click on the Save button. You can choose to
save the changes you’ve made to a Rig on Eleven
Rack, to a file on your computer, or save all of
the Rigs currently on Eleven Rack to the computer in one larger file.
„
To lock Rig tempo to Pro Tools session tempo:
„ Click the small Lock icon next to the tempo
display.
Exp. Pedal
The files you save to the computer can be sent to
collaborators or brought with you as you work
at other computers, so you always have access to
your settings.
Rig Utility Settings
The Rig Utility settings section lets you control
the True-Z impedance-matching circuitry, volume, tempo, and expression pedal functions for
the current Rig.
Rig Tempo
The Exp. Pedal menu lets you set the behavior
and assignment of an external expression pedal.
Multiple FX
When set to Multiple FX, the button to the left
of the assignment name will highlight. Clicking
this button will bring up a window where you
can edit up to four parameters that will be swept
by the pedal simultaneously.
The Rig Tempo menu sets the tempo of the current Rig. Set a tempo, and the time-based effects
(tremolo, delay, etc) that are set to sync will follow the new tempo. You can also choose to have
Rig tempo sync to the tempo of your Pro Tools
session.
Chapter 9: Eleven Rack with Pro Tools
87
Each of the four Configs can be set to one parameter of one of the devices in the Rig. The Toe
and Heel settings govern the top and bottom of
the sweep of the control.
If you set the Heel number higher than the
Toe number, the control can be swept in
reverse.
Output to Amp Selectors
The Output to Amp selectors let you choose
what point in the signal path feeds Output To
Amp outputs one and two, and set the output
volume for each, to better match the input sensitivity of the external amp or processor.
Amp/Cab, Effects and Pedal
Settings
This section of the Rig View pane lets you reveal,
select, move, and bypass all of the amp, cabinet,
effects, and pedals in the current Rig. Click on a
piece of gear to highlight it, and it will show up
in the Control section below.
To set the volume of the signal sent to each To
Amp output:
Left-click the chosen To Amp output selector,
and adjust the volume using the fader.
To choose what signal feeds each To Amp output:
„ Right-click one of the To Amp Output selectors, and do one of the following:
• If the selector you click is not yet assigned
(greyed out), a menu is displayed, letting
you choose to send the signal at the chosen
location to Output to Amp output one,
two, or both in stereo.
– or –
• If the selector you click is already assigned
to an Output to Amp out (highlighted),
you get a menu letting you assign that To
Amp output to another point in the signal
chain.
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For more information on the functions of
the amp, cab, and effects controls, “The
Amps” on page 23, and “The Effects” on
page 30.
Bypassing Amps, Cabs, and
Effects
You can toggle the various gear in the current
Rig on and off by clicking the name of the
desired element.
Changing The Order
Control Section
In the Rig View pane, you can change the order
of the pedals and effects in the current Rig just
like you can in the Rig View on Eleven Rack. Visualize the signal travelling from left to right
through the signal chain.
When a device is highlighted in the Rig View
pane, the controls of the device are shown in the
Control section.
To change the order of gear in the signal path:
1 Click and drag a device.
2 Drop it into the desired position.
Some items in the Rig have restrictions
about where they can be placed. When
dragging a restricted item (like the FX
Loop), it will snap between the allowed
spots.
For more information on signal routing, see
“Don’t Forget to Save!” on page 35.
Selecting Effects
On the displayed device, you can turn the
knobs, toggle the switches, and rock the pedals,
and everything you do is transmitted to
Eleven Rack, so you can hear the changes you
make in real time.s
Effects Preset Selector
Most of the effects have more than one available
model.
The Effects preset selector lets you save and recall preset settings for individual Eleven Rack effects, within Pro Tools.
For example, if you’ve dialed in the perfect lead
tone on the Tri-Knob Fuzz, you can save the settings for that effect and recall them without
having to save or load a new Rig.
To select a different effect:
„ Click the Effect selector beneath the desired
Effect type, and choose a new model from the
menu.
This section will take you through the features
of the Control window.
These presets are handled by the same system
(using the same file types and functions) that
manages plug-in presets in Pro Tools.
For more information on working with presets, see the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
Chapter 9: Eleven Rack with Pro Tools
89
Master Control Section
Figure 12. Master Control section
The Master Control section houses the controls
and features that apply to all of Eleven Rack.
Tuner
This tuner works like the one you can access using the front panel of Eleven Rack, but is much
larger and easier to see when working in
Pro Tools.
Figure 13. Tuner section
For more information on the Tuner controls, see “Tap Tempo/Tuner Button” on
page 8.
Input Selector
This menu lets you choose which input on
Eleven Rack will be fed through the Rig. This can
be a physical input, or the Re-Amp outputs from
Pro Tools.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
User Options Mode
Pressing the User Options button in the Master
Control section brings up User Options mode,
which lets you access many of the under-thehood options you normally would access using
the User Options mode on Eleven Rack.
For more information on User Options
Mode and the settings it provides access to,
see “Exploring the User Options” on
page 99.
Output Mute Buttons
These two buttons let you mute the Headphone
output and the Main outputs on Eleven Rack
from within Pro Tools.
This comes in handy when recording with a microphone while wearing headphones (mute the
main outputs to cut out bleed from the speakers), or when headphones might bleed into a recording track (mute the headphones).
Main Volume Knob
This knob acts just like the Volume knob on the
front panel of Eleven Rack, varying the overall
output volume of the Main and Headphone outputs.
For more information on these controls, see
“Eleven Rack Front Panel” on page 7, and
“User Options” on page 99.
Recording Guitars
The simplest way to record guitar with
Eleven Rack is to simply plug in your guitar, create a track in Pro Tools, and record the sound
coming from the Rig.
To record guitar through the Rig to a track in
Pro Tools:
1 Click on the Track menu in Pro Tools and select New.
2 In the New Tracks dialog, create one stereo au-
dio track.
3 Using the Input Selector, assign the input on
the stereo track you’ve created to Interface >
Eleven Rig L/R.
4 Record-enable the track.
5 Select a Rig in the Eleven Rack Control win-
dow, and tweak its settings, if necessary.
6 Press Record, then Play, in the Pro Tools trans-
port.
7 Record your guitar part.
Recording Wet and Dry Signals
The Guitar Input on Eleven Rack shows up in
Pro Tools as a standard mono input path (Guitar
In). This input passes the guitar signal, unprocessed, to Pro Tools, where it can be recorded as
normal.
The guitar signal also passes through the processing features of Eleven Rack, and the processed stereo output from the amp, cabinet, mic
and effects simulations shows up as a second,
stereo input path in Pro Tools for monitoring
and/or recording (Eleven Rig L and R). Thus, the
dry guitar signal and the output of the Rig can
be recorded onto separate tracks, for processing
and editing flexibility.
This means that when recording guitars with
Eleven Rack, you can decide on a tone you enjoy
and record your parts, but retain a clean version
of those parts as well. Later, if you decide you
want a different sound, or simply want to stack
different tones on top of one another, you can
re-amp those original, unaffected guitar tracks
through a different set of Rig characteristics on
Eleven Rack, or even another external guitar
setup.
Input selector
For information on the re-amping process,
“Re-Amping” on page 94.
To record wet and dry versions of a guitar part
simultaneously for future re-amping:
Record-enable
button
1 Click on the Track menu in Pro Tools and
select New.
2 In the New Tracks dialog, do one of the
following:
• Create one mono audio track
– or –
• Create one stereo audio track.
3 Assign the input on the mono track you’ve
created to Interface > Guitar In.
Chapter 9: Eleven Rack with Pro Tools
91
4 Assign the input on the stereo track you’ve
created to Interface > Eleven Rig L/R.
5 Record-enable the two tracks.
6 Select a Rig in the Eleven Rack Control win-
To embed Rig settings in recorded audio:
1 Open the Eleven Rack Control window.
2 Click the User Options button. The Embed Setting From menu appears.
dow, and tweak its settings, if necessary.
7 Press Record, then Play, in the Pro Tools trans-
port.
8 Record your guitar part.
If you don’t plan to use the dry signal right
away, you can make the mono track inactive
and hide it, using the functions of the Tracks
pane in the Edit window.
3 Set the Embed Setting From menu to the input
you plan to record through, such as
Eleven Rig L/R.
4 Create an audio track, and set its input to the
input you’ve chosen, using the Input selector.
5 Record enable the track.
The dry track will be hidden and will not play,
but Pro Tools will retain the data for later use.
You can access the track again at any time.
The Guitar In input signal will look quite
low when compared to other recorded signals in Pro Tools. If you need to do intricate
rhythmic editing, you may want to increase
the vertical zoom level in the Edit window.
Embedding Rig Settings in
Audio Regions
Despite the fact that we designed Eleven Rack to
store Rig settings to your computer and to its internal memory, we felt there had to be a better
way to keep track of which Rig settings you use
as you track your guitar.
Pro Tools lets you embed the current Rig’s settings into audio regions as you record them, so
that you can retrieve that same setting for further use later.
This can also be helpful when collaborating or
bringing sessions or regions to a different system
using Eleven Rack, because your settings travel
with the files.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
6 Record your part.
The settings of the currently loaded Rig will be
embedded in each audio region that is recorded
from the input you select in the Embed Setting
From menu.
This same method applies when using
Eleven Rack with Pro Tools|HD or M-Powered system.
Audio regions with embedded Rig data are
marked with a small Eleven Rack logo icon in
both the Edit Window and the Region Browser
in Pro Tools.
Indicator icon
Audio region with Eleven Rack logo indicator icon
Retrieving Embedded Rig Settings
You can access Rig settings from any region with
embedded settings that has been recorded or imported into your Pro Tools session. You can do
this by selecting regions directly in the Edit window, or you can access any embedded region in
the session using the Eleven Rack Control Window.
To load an embedded Rig setting from within the
Eleven Rack Control Window:
1 Open the Eleven Rack Control window by
clicking Window > Eleven Rack.
2 Click the Rig Settings menu.
3 Any regions with embedded Rig data will
show up as a list at the bottom of the menu.
4 The Rig is loaded into Eleven Rack and is
To load a Rig setting from a region in the Edit
window:
ready to use.
1 Open the Edit window by clicking Window >
Edit.
2 Locate the region you want to load Rig Set-
tings from.
3 Right-click the region and choose Load Guitar
Rig Settings.
4 The Rig is loaded into Eleven Rack and is
ready to use.
Choosing a region from the RIg Settings menu
Once you have retrieved a Rig setting from a
region, you may want to save it to your computer or the Eleven Rack memory.
Rig settings data can only be embedded in
.WAV or .AIFF files. MP3 encoding strips
audio files of their embedded Rig data, so be
sure to choose .WAV or .AIFF format when
exporting audio files with embedded Rig
data.
Loading settings from a region in the Edit window
Chapter 9: Eleven Rack with Pro Tools
93
Re-Amping
Re-Amping is the process of sending pre-recorded audio (in this case, from within
Pro Tools,) to an external guitar amplifier or effects unit, and then re-recording the processed
audio to a new track.
This is sometimes done when a guitar track is recorded dry and the amp and effects sound is to
be decided upon later (see “Recording Guitars”
on page 91).
In the case of Eleven Rack, re-amping can be
done one of two ways.
• Tracks can be sent from Pro Tools into the onboard guitar processor in Eleven Rack, and rerecorded to a new track.
– or –
• Tracks can be sent from Pro Tools, out
through the Output To Amp outputs on
Eleven Rack, into one or more external guitar
amps or processors, and then re-recorded
through the microphone, line, or guitar inputs on Eleven Rack, depending on the type
of external devices being used.
To re-amp a signal using the guitar processor in
Eleven Rack:
1 Choose the track in Pro Tools to be re-amped.
2 Assign the output of the track to one of the
following:
• Interface > ReAmp L/R (if signal is stereo)
• Interface > ReAmp L or ReAmp R (if signal is
mono)
3 Set the Rig Input on Eleven Rack to Re-Amp,
using the Rig Input setting in User Options, or
the Eleven Rack Control Window in Pro Tools.
4 Create a new audio track, and assign its input
to Interface > Eleven Rig.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
5 In Pro Tools Edit window, click with the Selec-
tor tool at the beginning of the first audio region
on the track to be re-amped.
6 Select a Rig in the Eleven Rack Control win-
dow, and adjust the settings as desired.
7 Start recording in Pro Tools.
8 The audio from the chosen track will be pro-
cessed through Eleven Rack, and re-recorded to
the new stereo Audio track.
By default, the re-amped signal is muted
when you press Play on the transport, but
are not recording. If you want to hear the reamped signal while in playback, turn on Input Only Monitoring mode by clicking
Track > Input Only Monitoring. For more
information on Input Only Monitoring
mode, see the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
To re-amp a signal using the Output To Amp
outputs on Eleven Rack:
1 Choose the track in Pro Tools to be re-amped.
2 In the Eleven Rack Control window, choose
what point in the signal chain will be fed to one
or both of the To Amp outputs using the To Amp
Output selectors.
See “Output to Amp Selectors” on page 88
for details.
3 Create a new audio track, and assign its input
to match the device you are using to re-amp, as
follows:
• If re-amping through a guitar amp and microphone, or a device with an XLR DI output, select Interface > Mic In.
• If re-amping through a guitar-level stompbox or processor, select Interface > Guitar In.
• If re-amping through a processor with a
line-level output, select Interface > Line Input L.
4 Set up and connect your chosen external amp
and microphone and/or processor to the Output
To Amp 1 (L) output and the appropriate input
on Eleven Rack.
• If using the mic input, ensure that the gain
and other settings (such as phantom power
and pad) are set correctly.
• If using an amplifier and microphone in
the same room as your Pro Tools system, be
sure to turn off or mute your monitor
speakers, to avoid feedback.
5 Record-enable the new mono track.
6 In Pro Tools Edit window, click with the Selec-
tor tool at the beginning of the first audio region
on the track to be re-amped.
7 Start recording in Pro Tools.
8 The audio from the selected track is sent out of
Eleven Rack, processed through your amp or
processor, and then re-recorded to the new Audio track.
Controlling Eleven Rack
Parameters with MIDI Data
Using MIDI tracks in Pro Tools, you can record
real time changes to your Rig settings, edit
them, and play them back to Eleven Rack. This
can be quite powerful when re-amping signals
through Eleven Rack.
In the following example, you’ll control the Rig
Volume parameter in Eleven Rack with MIDI
data from Pro Tools.
To control the Rig Volume on Eleven Rack with
MIDI CC data from Pro Tools:
1 Create a MIDI track in Pro Tools.
2 Assign its output to Predefined > Eleven Rack >
channel-1.
3 On Eleven Rack, press and hold the Edit but-
ton for 1 second to enter User Options mode.
4 Scroll with the Scroll wheel to MIDI, and press
the SW1 switch.
5 Use the lit Control knob to choose a MIDI re-
ceive channel. In this example, use channel 1.
6 In the Pro Tools Edit window, select MIDI Vol-
ume in the Track View menu for the MIDI track
you’ve created. You’ll see a line running across
the track. This is the MIDI CC envelope.
7 With the Pencil tool, draw a curving line from
the beginning of the track to a point around 10
seconds later.
8 Press Play on the Pro Tools transport. You will
see the Rig Volume setting on the Eleven Rack
Control window move in time to match the
curve you’ve drawn.
This technique can be used for any of the MIDI
CC controls Eleven Rack can respond to.
For a full list of MIDI CC data that Eleven
Rack can accept, See Chapter 11, “Controlling Eleven Rack with MIDI.”.
For more information on using MIDI CC
data in Pro Tools, see the Pro Tools Reference Guide, which can be accessed from
within Pro Tools by selecting Help > Pro
Tools Reference Guide.
Chapter 9: Eleven Rack with Pro Tools
95
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Part III: Reference
97
98
Chapter 10: User Options
This section describes the details of the User Options mode within Eleven Rack. User Options
mode lets you access the behind-the-scenes controls in Eleven Rack.
To explore User Options mode when using Eleven
Rack with Pro Tools:
1 Show the Eleven Rack Control window, by
clicking Window > Eleven Rack.
2 Press the User Options button on the Control
Exploring the User Options
Let’s start looking into the changes you can
make using User Options.
window.
User Options
This section lists and defines the available options in the User Options menu.
User Options mode
To explore User Options mode from the front panel
of Eleven Rack:
These descriptions and parameter names
match those within the display on Eleven
Rack. The Eleven Rack Control window’s
User Options mode contains most of these
controls, but some are named slightly differently.
1 Press and hold the Edit/Back button until the
User Options screen appears.
2 Turn the Scroll wheel to select the option you
want to change.
3 Press the SW1 button to access the controls for
that option.
4 Press Edit/Back once to return to the User Options menu, or twice to exit User Options mode
and return to the previous screen.
Chapter 10: User Options
99
Rig Input
Cabinet Resonance
This setting lets you specify which input on
Eleven Rack will be routed through the Rig. This
can be set any of the analog or digital inputs on
Eleven Rack, or the signal sent to the Re-Amp
output in Pro Tools LE.
Part of what's captured in the speaker cabinet
emulation of Eleven Rack is the acoustical nature that a cabinet will resonate when driven by
an amplifier.
For more information on Re-Amping, see
“Re-Amping” on page 94
It is a phenomenon particular to the type of amplifier used as well the type of cabinet used.
Each combination reacts in a different way depending on the gain settings of the amp.
Running the mic input through the Rig with
your monitor speakers on can result in severe feedback, due to the amount of gain
available in the amp and effects emulations. Be sure to mute or turn down the
main outputs before proceeding.
The button labeled RESO (SW2) will indicate the
continued presence of cabinet resonance even
when the cabinet is bypassed. If the Output to
Amps User Option is set to Amp Output or Rig Output No Cab, the cabinet resonance will still affect
the signal feeding the Output to Amp.
Outputs To Amp
In this page, you can what signal feeds the Output To Amp outputs. Turn the Scroll wheel to
switch between controlling Output 1 or Output
2. If you want to use the Outputs To Amp in stereo, you may want to match the controls for
both channels.
Signal
Using the Signal control, you can set what point
in the signal path feeds each Output to Amp
output:
Rig Input The clean, unprocessed guitar signal,
as is present at the input of the Rig.
Amp Input The signal after any processing that
occurs before the Amp model in the signal
chain.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
If the continued presence of cabinet resonance
is disengaged by pressing SW2, bypassing the
cabinet will also turn off the resonance. If the
Output to Amps User Option is set to Amp Output, the signal feeding the Output to Amp will
not be affected by cabinet resonance.
In either case, it is not possible to remove cabinet resonance when the cabinet is not bypassed.
By default, when an Output to Amp is set to Amp
Output, the signal is fed directly from the amp
model to the output. When RESO is switched
on, the signal is fed from the amp model,
through the cabinet resonance model, and then
to the output.
Depending on settings, this can produce a fatter,
thicker sound, especially with high amp gain.
Amp Output The signal after passing through the
amp emulation, but before the cab, mic, and
any effects emulations placed after the amp in
the signal path.
Rig Output The fully processed signal, run
through every part of the current Rig (including
cab and mic emulation).
Rig Out No Cab The fully processed signal, with
the Cab model automatically bypassed.
When either Output to Amp is set to Rig
Output or Rig Out No Cab, the other will be
set to the same setting. Output to Amp 1
will output the left channel of the Rig, and
Output to Amp 2 will output the right channel.
When feeding signal to a external guitar
amplifiers, it is generally preferred to apply
no cab and mic emulation to the signal.
Since the speaker being driven by the amplifier will naturally shape the tone of your
signal, using the cab and mic emulations in
Eleven Rack could produce compromisedsounding results.
When Eleven Rack is plugged into a computer
with USB for use with Pro Tools LE.
Pro Tools HD or Pro Tools M-Powered, these options must be set in the host software (Pro Tools
LE or other). The Digital Clock/Input screen will
just show the current settings and whether or
not there is a valid clock signal present at the
currently chosen digital input.
For more information on how to access
these controls from within Pro Tools LE,
see “Configuring the Pro Tools Hardware
Settings” on page 65.
Digital Output
Adjust the Output control to choose the type of
signal being passed to the digital outputs.
DAW The output from the Digital Out L/R output path in Pro Tools LE will be sent to the digital outs.
Digital Clock/Input
Mirror Analog The same signal that is being sent
to the Main Outputs will be sent to the digital
outs.
When Eleven Rack is being used standalone and
is not plugged into a computer, it lets you
choose the clock source (internal or external),
sample rate (if using internal clock), and digital
format you want to work with.
Rig Outputs The left and right Rig outputs are
sent to the left and right digital outputs respectively.
Clock Source Lets you choose between the following clock sources:
• Int 44.1 kHz (Internal clock)
• Int 48 kHz (Internal clock)
• Int 88.2 kHz (Internal clock)
• Int 96 kHz (Internal clock)
• External
Digital Input Lets you choose the digital format
you want to use for input, either AES/EBU, or
S/PDIF.
Split In/Out The left and right Rig outputs are
summed and sent to the left digital output, and
the signal as present at the Rig input (the “dry”
signal) is sent to the right digital output.
FX Loop
The FX Loop screen is where you control the
mono/stereo behavior of the FX loop. Set the
control to Mono if using a mono effect, to Mono
to Stereo, if using an effect that takes a mono
signal but has a stereo output, or Stereo, if using
a true stereo effects unit.
Chapter 10: User Options
101
External Pedals
Rig Balancing
This screen lets you set up an expression pedal
or a dual footswitch, plugged into the Exp
Pedal/Ext Footswitch jack on the back of Eleven
Rack.
This screen lets you adjust the relative signal
level of each of the saved Rigs. If you find that a
certain Rig is much louder or quieter than the
others, you can tweak it here.
Turn the Scroll wheel to select the type of pedal
you’ll be using. In expression pedal mode, you
can press SW1 to enter calibration mode. Follow
the on-screen instructions to calibrate your expression pedal. In Dual Footswitches mode, you
can use the Tone Control knobs to select a function for each footswitch.
Turn the scroll wheel to select a Rig to adjust,
and use the lit Tone Control knob to adjust the
volume.
Each footswitch can be set to do one thing,
whether it’s cycling through Rigs, turning a certain effect on and off or just bringing up the
tuner.
Amp/Cab Linking
The MIDI page lets you set up how Eleven Rack
responds to MIDI data.
This parameter toggles the linking of amplifier
and cabinet models that were historically used
together. With Amp/Cab Linking on, when you
choose certain amps in Rig View, the cabinet
that goes with it will also be chosen. You can
still change the cabinet you want to use later.
Channel Sets the MIDI receive and send channel,
from 1-16.
Display Contrast
MIDI
Thru Toggles MIDI thru on and off.
CC When engaged, front-panel control changes
will send corresponding MIDI CC messages to
Pro Tools, and be output through the MIDI output jack.
102
When you’re done editing these settings and
you back out of the Rig Balancing screen, a “Saving” message appears on the display for a few
moments as the new settings are saved.
Eleven Rack User Guide
This control allows you to set the contrast of the
LCD display to match your viewing angle or
light conditions.
Knob Display/Action
Headphone Volume
This screen lets you configure the way knob settings are displayed onscreen, and how they act.
This control sets the volume of the Headphone
outputs on Eleven Rack, as an offset from the
Main output volume.
Display
This control lets you see the current positions of
the control knobs as either graphic knobs or as
numeric values. If you choose to display the
controls as knobs, keep in mind that you can see
the exact numeric value of a control temporarily
by turning the knob slightly.
Persistent Volume Pedal
By default, the Volume Pedal setting is stored as
a fixed setting just like the other amp and effects
settings in a Rig. This can be handy when the
fixed setting is used to affect gain staging within
the Rig in a manner that you would want to recall each time you used that Rig.
Action
This control lets you choose between the following knob behaviors:
Normal Moving a Control knob will cause the
currently assigned setting to immediately follow
the knob’s position.
Latch When a Control knob is positioned differently than the current value of the assigned control, the control’s setting will not update until
the knob is swept past the current setting.
Blink
The Tempo button on the front panel of
Eleven Rack can be set to blink in time with the
current Rig tempo. The Blink control toggles
this behavior on and off.
Engaging the Persistent Volume Pedal behavior
will allow you control the Volume Pedal in manner more like using a real volume pedal. With
an external pedal or MIDI controller set to control the Volume Pedal setting, its position will
override the stored setting in each Rig. Even as
you switch Rigs, the position of your external
pedal will determine the Volume Pedal setting.
To make the most of this feature, use it with Rigs
that have the same Taper and Minimum Volume settings so the behavior is consistent when
you switch Rigs. For even more consistency,
make sure the Volume Pedal is located in the
same place in the signal chain.
In the Persistent Volume Pedal User Option
page, pressing SW1 will toggle the Persistent
Volume Pedal behavior on and off. When the
PERSIST label is lit, the Volume pedal setting
will stay with your foot pedal position, regardless of Rig setting.
Chapter 10: User Options
103
Volume Control
MIDI CC Reference
In this screen, use the lit control knob to choose
which output volume is controlled by the Volume knob on the front panel of Eleven Rack.
This screen contains a chart of all MIDI continuous controllers that are assigned to controls in
Eleven Rack. This is useful when setting MIDI
controllers when you don’t have a copy of the
manual handy.
The choices are as follows:
• Main Outputs (default setting)
• Output to Amp 1
Scroll up and down the list with the Scroll
Wheel.
• Output to Amp 2
• Outputs to Amp 1 & 2
• Main + Outputs to Amp 1 & 2
If the Volume knob is set to control one or
both Output to Amp settings, the main and
headphone outputs will be reset to their
highest output level.
Reset Memory
In this screen, pressing SW1 will reset the memory of Eleven Rack back to factory specs. All usercreated Rigs and settings will be erased.
You can exit this screen without resetting the
memory by pressing the Edit/Back button.
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This reference chart can also be found in
Chapter 11, “Controlling Eleven Rack with
MIDI”.
Firmware Version
On this screen, you can check to see what firmware version is running on your Eleven Rack.
Chapter 11: Controlling Eleven Rack
with MIDI
Many of the parameters in Eleven Rack can be controlled using MIDI. This opens up the possibility of
using both external MIDI devices (such as foot controllers) and the MIDI capabilities of Pro Tools to
vary Eleven Rack’s tonal aspects in real time.
This section lists the available MIDI controls for use with Eleven Rack. If you use external MIDI controllers or record/automate Rig settings in Pro Tools, use the list below to determine which MIDI Continuous Controller numbers are assigned to specific Eleven Rack amp or FX settings.
General/Frequently Used Controls
DIST BYPASS
25
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
MOD BYPASS
50
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
DELAY BYPASS
28
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
REVERB BYPASS
36
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
FX LOOP BYPASS
107
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
FX1 BYPASS
63
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
FX2 BYPASS
86
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
WAH BYPASS
43
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
AMP BYPASS
111
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
VOLUME PEDAL POSITION
7
WAH POSITION
4
MULTI FX CONTROL
11
TAP TEMPO
64
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105
Amplifier Controls
Applies to all amps
AMP BYPASS
111
AMP OUTPUT
92
CAB/MIC BYPASS
71
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
Tweed Lux
TONE
13
INSTRUMENT VOLUME
14
MIC VOLUME
15
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD
16
NOISE GATE RELEASE
21
Tweed Bass
PRESENCE
13
MIDDLE
14
BASS
15
TREBLE
16
BRIGHT VOLUME
21
NORMAL VOLUME
10
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD
112
NOISE GATE RELEASE
3
Black Panel Lux Vibrato
106
VOLUME
13
TREBLE
14
BASS
15
VIBRATO SPEED
16
VIBRATO SYNC
21
VIBRATO INTENSITY
10
VIBRATO ON/OFF
112
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD
3
NOISE GATE RELEASE
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Eleven Rack User Guide
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
Black Panel Lux Normal
VOLUME
13
TREBLE
14
BASS
15
VIBRATO SPEED
16
VIBRATO SYNC
21
VIBRATO INTENSITY
10
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD
3
NOISE GATE RELEASE
84
AC Hi Boost
NORMAL VOLUME
13
BRILLIANT VOLUME
14
BASS
15
TREBLE
16
CUT
21
TREMOLO SPEED
10
TREMOLO SYNC
112
TREMOLO DEPTH
3
TREMOLO ON/OFF
22
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD
84
NOISE GATE RELEASE
24
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
Black Panel Duo
VOLUME
13
TREBLE
14
MIDDLE
15
BASS
16
BRIGHT
21
VIBRATO SPEED
10
VIBRATO SYNC
112
VIBRATO INTENSITY
3
VIBRATO ON/OFF
22
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD
84
NOISE GATE RELEASE
24
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
Chapter 11: Controlling Eleven Rack with MIDI
107
Plexiglas – 100W
PRESENCE
13
BASS
14
MIDDLE
15
TREBLE
16
VOLUME 1
21
VOLUME 2
10
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD
112
NOISE GATE RELEASE
3
Lead 800 – 100W
PRESENCE
13
BASS
14
MIDDLE
15
TREBLE
16
PREAMP VOLUME
10
MASTER VOLUME
21
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD
112
NOISE GATE RELEASE
3
M-2 Lead
108
VOLUME
13
TREBLE
14
BASS
15
MIDDLE
16
DRIVE
21
MASTER
10
BRIGHT
112
PRESENCE
3
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD
84
NOISE GATE RELEASE
24
Eleven Rack User Guide
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
SL-100 Drive
PREAMP
13
BASS
14
MIDDLE
15
TREBLE
16
PRESENCE
21
MASTER
10
MOD
112
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD
3
NOISE GATE RELEASE
84
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
SL-100 Crunch
PREAMP
13
BASS
14
MIDDLE
15
TREBLE
16
PRESENCE
21
MASTER
10
BRIGHT
112
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD
3
NOISE GATE RELEASE
84
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
SL-100 Clean
PREAMP
13
BASS
14
MIDDLE
15
TREBLE
16
PRESENCE
21
MASTER
10
BRIGHT
112
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD
3
NOISE GATE RELEASE
84
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
Chapter 11: Controlling Eleven Rack with MIDI
109
Treadplate Modern
MASTER
13
PRESENCE
14
BASS
15
MIDDLE
16
TREBLE
21
GAIN
10
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD
112
NOISE GATE RELEASE
3
Treadplate Vintage
MASTER
13
PRESENCE
14
BASS
15
MIDDLE
16
TREBLE
21
GAIN
10
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD
112
NOISE GATE RELEASE
3
DC Modern Crunch
110
GAIN
13
BASS
14
MIDDLE
15
TREBLE
16
PRESENCE
21
MASTER
10
BRIGHT
112
TREMOLO SPEED
3
TREMOLO SYNC
84
TREMOLO DEPTH
24
TREMOLO ON/OFF
45
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD
23
NOISE GATE RELEASE
22
Eleven Rack User Guide
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
DC Vintage Overdrive
GAIN
13
BASS
14
MIDDLE
15
TREBLE
16
PRESENCE
21
MASTER
10
BRIGHT
112
TREMOLO SPEED
3
TREMOLO SYNC
84
TREMOLO DEPTH
24
TREMOLO ON/OFF
45
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD
23
NOISE GATE RELEASE
22
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
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111
Effects
BBD Delay
BYPASS*
28
DELAY
62
SYNC†
33
MIX
85
FEEDBACK
35
INPUT LEVEL
87
MOD
34
DEPTH
48
NOISE
55
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
EXPANDED DELAY
49
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
Black Op Distortion
BYPASS*
25
DISTORTION
27
CUT
78
VOLUME
79
Black Wah
BYPASS*
43
POSITION
4
Blackpanel Spring Reverb
BYPASS*
112
(0-63=”Chorus”, 64-127=”Vibrato”)
36
MIX
18
DECAY
38
TONE
40
Eleven Rack User Guide
C1 Chorus/Vibrato
BYPASS*
(as MOD)
(as FX1)
(as FX2)
50
63
86
CHORUS
61
20
113
RATE
52
42
114
SYNC†
53
60
115
DEPTH
54
77
96
CHORUS/VIBRATO
57
116
97
(0-63=”CHORUS” 64-127=”VIBRATO”)
Eleven SR (Stereo Reverb)
BYPASS*
36
MIX
18
DECAY
38
TONE
40
PRE-DELAY
39
TYPE
76
TYPE Setting:
Value:
Echo Room
0-2
Studio
3-7
Small Room
8-13
Jazz Club
14-18
Small Club
19-23
Garage
24-29
Medium Room
30-34
Tiled Room
35-39
Wood Room
40-45
Small Theater
46-50
Medium Theater
51-55
Large Theater
56-61
Rich Hall
62-66
Concert Hall
67-71
Bright Hall
72-77
Church
78-82
Cathedral
83-87
Arena
88-93
Small Plate
94-98
Medium Plate
99-103
Large Plate
104-109
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113
Canyon
110-114
Supa Long
115-119
Early Reflect 1
120-125
Early Reflect 2
126-127
Flanger
(as MOD)
(as FX1)
BYPASS*
50
63
86
PRE-DELAY
61
20
113
DEPTH
52
42
114
RATE
53
60
115
SYNC†
54
77
96
FEEDBACK
57
116
97
FX Loop
BYPASS*
107
SEND
19
RETURN
108
MIX
88
Graphic EQ
(as FX1)
(as FX2)
BYPASS*
63
86
100 Hz
20
113
370 Hz
42
114
800 Hz
60
115
2 kHz
77
96
3.25 kHz
116
97
OUTPUT
117
98
Gray Compressor
BYPASS*
114
(as FX1)
(as FX2)
63
86
SUSTAIN
20
113
LEVEL
42
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Eleven Rack User Guide
(as FX2)
Green JRC Overdrive
BYPASS*
25
DRIVE
27
TONE
78
LEVEL
79
Orange Phaser
(as MOD)
(as FX1)
(as FX2)
BYPASS*
50
63
86
RATE
61
20
113
SYNC†
52
42
114
Roto Speaker
(as MOD)
(as FX1)
(as FX2)
BYPASS*
50
63
86
SPEED
61
20
113
BALANCE
52
42
114
TYPE
53
60
115
SPEED Setting:
Value:
Slow
0-31
Brake
32-95
Fast
96-127
TYPE Setting:
Value:
120
0-9
122
10-27
21H
28-45
Foam Drum
46-63
Rover
64-82
Memphis
83-100
Wolf
101-118
Watery
119-127
Shine Wah
BYPASS*
43
POSITION
4
Chapter 11: Controlling Eleven Rack with MIDI
115
Tri-Knob Fuzz
BYPASS*
25
VOLUME
27
SUSTAIN
78
TONE
79
Tap Tempo
TAP
64
(0-63=”tap”, 64-127=”tap”)
Tape Echo
BYPASS*
28
DELAY
62
SYNC†
33
MIX
85
FEEDBACK
35
REC LEVEL
87
HEAD
34
WOW
48
HISS
55
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
EXPANDED DELAY
49
(0-63=”Off”, 64-127=”On”)
Tuner
BYPASS*
69
Vibe Phaser
BYPASS*
(as MOD)
(as FX1)
(as FX2)
50
63
86
VOLUME
61
20
113
DEPTH
52
42
114
RATE
53
60
115
SYNC†
54
77
96
CHORUS/VIBRATO
57
116
97
(0-63=”CHORUS” 64-127=”VIBRATO”)
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Volume Pedal
BYPASS*
75
POSITION
7
*BYPASS Setting Values
Bypass
0-63
Un-bypass (ON)
64-127
†FX SYNC Setting Values
Off
0-4
Whole Note
5-14
Dotted Half Note
15-24
Half Note
25-34
Half Note Triplet
35-44
Dotted Quarter Note
45-54
Quarter Note
55-63
Quarter Note Triplet
64-73
Dotted Eighth Note
74-83
Eighth Note
84-93
Eighth Note Triplet
94-103
Dotted Sixteenth Note
104-113
Sixteenth Note
114-123
Sixteenth Note Triplet
124-127
Miscellaneous MIDI Controls
Multiple FX Control (MULTI FX)
PEDAL POSITION
11
Rig Volume
PEDAL POSITION
17
User/Factory Bank Change (precedes Program Change)
Bank Change
32
Value 1 = Factory Rigs,
0= User Rigs
Chapter 11: Controlling Eleven Rack with MIDI
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Chapter 12: Hard Drive Configuration
and Maintenance
It is recommended that you start with a newly
formatted external or secondary internal audio
drive. You should also periodically defragment
your audio drive to ensure continued system
performance.
Always back up any important data on your
drive before formatting it, as it will erase all
data on the drive.
Avoid Recording to the
System Drive
Recording to your system drive is not recommended. Recording and playback on a system
drive may result in lower track counts or fewer
plug-ins.
Supported Drive Formats and
Drive Types
Drive Formats
Mac Mac systems should use drives formatted
with HFS+ or HFS file system only.
HFS drives are supported as Transfer drives
only.
Windows Windows XP systems should use drives
formatted as NTFS only.
Windows systems can also support Mac
drives formatted with HFS+ system (also
commonly referred to as Mac OS Extended).
Refer to the Pro Tools Reference Guide for
more information (Help > Pro Tools Reference Guide).
Hard drive performance depends on factors including system configuration, number of tracks,
session sample rate, density of edits, and the use
of crossfades and other processes such as Beat
Detective in a session.
For complete hard drive requirements, visit our
website (www.avid.com).
Chapter 12: Hard Drive Configuration and Maintenance
119
SCSI Hard Drives
We recommend qualified SCSI hard drives and a
qualified SCSI host bus adapter (HBA) card or
(on Windows systems) a qualified built-in SCSI
HBA connector on the motherboard.
For complete information on track count and
the supported number and configuration of
SCSI drives, visit our website (www.avid.com).
Formatting an Audio Drive
Formatting Mac Audio Drives
For optimum performance, audio drives should
be formatted as Mac OS Extended (Journaled).
To format an audio drive:
1 Launch the Disk Utility application, located in
FireWire Hard Drives
We recommend qualified FireWire drives and
(on Windows systems) a qualified FireWire host
adapter.
Macintosh HD/Applications/Utilities.
2 Click the Erase tab.
For complete information on track count and
the supported number and configuration of
FireWire drives, visit our website
(www.avid.com).
IDE/ATA/SATA Hard Drives
A qualified internal IDE/ATA/SATA drive may be
used as a dedicated audio drive.
For complete information on track count with
internal drives, visit our website
(www.avid.com).
Disk Utility (Mac OS X)
3 Select the drive you want to initialize in the
column on the left side of the window.
4 Choose the Mac OS Extended (Journaled) format.
Do not choose the “Case-Sensitive” format
option. Pro Tools will not operate properly
with case-sensitive formatted drives.
5 Type a name for the new volume.
6 If you plan to connect the drive to a Mac OS 9
computer, select Install Mac OS 9 Drivers.
(Mac OS 9 options only appear in 10.5 or lower).
7 Click Erase. The drive appears on the Desktop
with the new volume name.
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Formatting Windows Audio Drives
For optimal performance, audio drives should
be formatted as NTFS.
Pro Tools only supports Basic drive types.
Do not convert the drive to a Dynamic type.
To format an audio drive (Windows 7,
Windows Vista, and Windows XP):
1 Right-click Computer (Windows 7,
Windows Vista) or My Computer (Windows XP)
and choose Manage.
2 Under Storage, choose Disk Management.
• Click OK.
4 If the volume is “Unallocated,” do the following:
• In the Disk Management window, Rightclick the hard drive you will use for audio
and choose New Partition.
• In the New Partition Wizard window, click
Next.
• When prompted, select the partition type.
We recommend using Primary partitions,
instead of Extended partitions.
• Follow the on-screen instructions to select
a partition size and other partition settings.
• When prompted, choose a file system. For
optimum performance, audio drives
should be formatted as NTFS.
• Select Perform a quick format.
• Make sure Enable file and folder compression
is not selected.
• Set the Allocation unit size to Default.
• Click OK.
Disk Management window (Windows XP)
3 If the volume is “Healthy,” do the following:
Healthy volumes are volumes that have previously been partitioned and formatted.
• In the Disk Management window, rightclick the hard drive you will use for audio
and choose Format.
• In the Format window, name the volume.
• Choose a file system. For optimum performance, audio drives should be formatted as
NTFS.
• Select Perform a quick format.
• Make sure Enable file and folder compression
is not selected.
• Set the Allocation unit size to Default.
Chapter 12: Hard Drive Configuration and Maintenance
121
Partitioning Drives
Partitioning creates a logical volume or volumes
on a physical drive, almost as if you were creating virtual hard drives. Partitions can then be
formatted with the appropriate file system
(NTFS for Windows, HFS+ for Mac).
Mac OS allows drives larger than 4096 MB
to be seen as whole volumes. Drives must be
initialized with a disk utility that recognizes the 2 terabyte limit. Single Pro Tools
audio files cannot exceed 3.4 GB in size.
Windows XP allows drives formatted with
the NTFS file system to be seen as whole
volumes. Single Pro Tools audio files cannot exceed 3.4 GB in size.
Seek Times on Partitioned Drives
Seek times are actually faster on partitioned
drives (assuming that reads and writes are performed on a single partition), since the heads
only have to seek within the partition boundaries, rather than the whole capacity of the drive.
Smaller partitions perform faster than larger partitions, but this comes at the expense of contiguous storage space. When you partition a drive,
you will need to find the compromise that best
suits your performance and storage requirements.
Avoid distributing audio files within a session over different partitions on the same
drive since this will adversely affect drive
performance.
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Defragmenting an Audio Drive
Mac Systems
When working with larger files (such as video),
you can limit fragmentation by backing up your
important files to another disk, erasing the files
from the original hard disk, then copying the
files back, instead of doing a defragmentation.
Window Systems
Periodically defragment audio drives to maintain
system performance.
For maximum recording and playback efficiency, data should be written to your hard
drive in a contiguous fashion—minimizing the
seek requirements to play back the data. Unfortunately, your computer can’t always store the
sound files in this way and must write to disk
wherever it can find space.
In multitrack recording, audio tracks are written
in discrete files, spaced evenly across the disk.
While fragmentation of individual files may be
zero, the tracks may be far enough apart that
playback will still be very seek-intensive. Also,
the remaining free space on the disk will be discontiguous, increasing the likelihood of file
fragmentation on subsequent record passes.
Increased fragmentation increases the chance of
disk errors, which can interfere with playback of
audio, and result in performance errors.
On Windows, to avoid fragmentation, format drives with higher cluster sizes (such as
32K).
Optimizing (Defragmenting) Drives
To prevent fragmentation, you can optimize
your drive, which rearranges your files into a
contiguous format. Most optimizing software
lets you run a check on a drive to find out the
percentage of fragmentation. If your drive
shows moderate to heavy fragmentation, you
should consider optimizing it.
If you use your system for intensive editing, or if
you frequently delete audio or fade files from
your hard drive, you may need to optimize your
drives on a weekly basis, or even every few days,
since it doesn’t take long for even a large hard
drive to become fragmented.
Backing Up Data Before Optimizing
Since your files will be rewritten by the optimization process, always make a backup copy of
the data on your hard drive before you optimize
it. You should also use a hard drive utility to find
and repair any problems before optimizing data
or re-initializing your drives. If there is any damage to your hard drive's directories prior to optimizing, serious data loss may result.
5 When defragmenting is complete, close the
Disk Defragmenter window.
In Windows 7 you can Ctrl-Click on the
drive names to select multiple drives to defragment, and once more than one drive is
selected, the button changes to “Defragment disks.”
The “Defragment Now” (Vista only) command defragments all your hard drives.
This can take a lot of time, especially on
systems with multiple drives.
Advanced users can use the command line
tool Defrag.exe to defragment individual
drives. See your Windows Vista documentation for more information.
To defragment an audio drive (Windows XP):
1 Right-click My Computer and choose Manage.
2 Under Storage, choose Disk Defragmenter.
3 In the Disk Defragmenter window, choose the
drive you want to defragment
4 Click the Defragment button and follow the
on-screen instructions.
Defragmenting Windows Audio Drives
To defragment an audio drive (Windows 7 and
Windows Vista):
1 Click Start.
2 Type “disk defragmenter” in the search field at
the bottom. “Disk Defragmenter” should appear
at the top of the search results.
3 Click the Disk Defragmenter.
4 Click the Defragment disk button (Windows 7)
or the Defragment now button (Windows Vista).
Follow the on-screen instructions.
5 When defragmenting is complete, close the
Computer Management window.
Using Mac Drives on Windows
Systems
Pro Tools for Windows lets you record and play
back sessions directly from a Mac-formatted
(HFS+) drive connected to a Windows system.
This functionality requires that all Mac session
and audio files be stored on Mac-formatted
drives.
Chapter 12: Hard Drive Configuration and Maintenance
123
During Pro Tools installation, make sure to select the Mac HFS+ Disk Support option. This option lets your Pro Tools system read, write, record, and play back using Mac-formatted HFS+
disks.
For information on using the Mac HFS+
Disk Support option, see the HFS+ Disk Support Option Guide.
For information on sharing sessions between Mac and Windows systems, see the
Pro Tools Reference Guide (Help >
Pro Tools Reference Guide).
Formatting and Maintaining HFS+
Drives
To format and partition any drives as HFS+, connect the drives to a Mac computer and use the
Apple OS X Disk Utility to format the drives as
Mac OS Extended (Journaled).
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Hard Disk Storage Space
Mono audio tracks recorded with 16-bit resolution at 44.1 kHz (CD quality) require approximately
5 MB of hard disk space per minute. The same tracks recorded with 24-bit resolution require about
7.5 MB per minute.
Stereo audio tracks recorded with 16-bit resolution at 44.1 kHz (CD quality) require approximately
10 MB of hard disk space per minute. The same tracks recorded with 24-bit resolution require about
15 MB per minute.
Table 13 lists the required disk space for certain track numbers and track lengths, to help you estimate
your hard disk usage.
Table 13. Required hard drive space for audio tracks (44.1 kHz and 48 kHz sessions shown)
Number of Tracks and Length
16-bit at
44.1 kHz
16-bit at
48 kHz
24-bit at
44.1 kHz
24-bit at
48 kHz
1 mono track, 1 minute
5 MB
5.5 MB
7.5 MB
8.2 MB
1 stereo track (or two mono
tracks), 5 minutes
50 MB
55 MB
75 MB
83 MB
1 stereo track (or two mono
tracks), 60 minutes
600 MB
662 MB
900 MB
991 MB
24 mono tracks, 5 minutes
600 MB
662 MB
900 MB
991 MB
7 GB
7.8 GB
10.5 GB
11.6 GB
32 mono tracks, 5 minutes
800 MB
883 MB
1.2 GB
1.3 GB
32 mono tracks, 60 minutes
9.4 GB
10.4 GB
14 GB
15.4 GB
48 mono tracks, 5 minutes
1.2 GB
1.3 GB
1.8 GB
1.9 GB
48 mono tracks, 60 minutes
14 GB
15.6 GB
21 GB
23.2 GB
24 mono tracks, 60 minutes
Double the 44.1 kHz hard drive space requirement when recording at 88.2 kHz, and
double the 48 kHz numbers when recording
at 96 kHz.
Chapter 12: Hard Drive Configuration and Maintenance
125
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Chapter 13: Troubleshooting
Backing Up Your Work
Common Issues
It is highly recommended that you back up your
work on a regular basis, and especially before
making changes to your system configuration.
Pro Tools Won’t Launch
Problem
Backing Up Your Session Data
Back up your session and audio data frequently.
There are a variety of media that are suited to
back up projects of various sizes, from automated tape backup systems to high-capacity optical drives, or to CD burners.
The best way to back up an entire session is to
use the Save Copy In command. This command
lets you save the session file and all of its associated files to a new location.
You can also use the Auto Save Backup feature (in the Operation Preferences page) to
have Pro Tools automatically save backups
of the session file while you work.
When you double-click the Pro Tools application or a Pro Tools session file, Pro Tools doesn’t
launch, or displays an error message.
Possible Solutions
Check to be sure your computer has the required amount of RAM to launch Pro Tools. Refer to our website (www.avid.com).
‹
‹ Try a complete restart. Turn off your audio interfaces, computer peripherals and your computer, and then turn them on again in the
proper sequence.
‹ If you tried to launch Pro Tools by doubleclicking a Pro Tools session file, do the following:
• Close any error message.
Backing Up Your System
Configuration
After configuring your system and Pro Tools,
you should save an image of your system drive
using a backup utility such as Norton Ghost
(Windows) or Bombich Carbon Copy Cloner
(Mac). By doing this, you can quickly restore
your system configuration and settings if you
encounter any problems.
• Double-click the Pro Tools application.
• In Pro Tools, choose File > Open Session to
open the session.
‹ Reinstall the Pro Tools application, using the
Pro Tools Installer disc.
Chapter 13: Troubleshooting
127
Audio Interface Is Not Recognized
Problem
When you launch Pro Tools it does not recognize an audio interface, or a connected audio interface is not available.
Power Saver Features Some automatic power
saver features, such as those that spin down the
system hard drive, can affect Pro Tools performance. These features should be turned off.
Before You Call Avid
Possible Solutions
Turn off your computer and check to be sure
your cables are properly and securely connected
to your computer and to your audio interface.
‹
‹ Verify that your Hardware Setup dialog settings are correct.
‹ Try unplugging the USB cable from the
Eleven Rack USB port and plugging it back in. If
the USB LED still does not illuminate, shut
down the computer, disconnect Eleven Rack
and start the computer. Once the computer has
fully restarted, reconnect Eleven Rack.
Performance Factors
There are several conditions that may adversely
affect the performance of Pro Tools. These include:
Network Connections Close any network connections unless you are using them for network
interchange of audio data.
Register Your System
Register your purchase immediately after reviewing the Registration Information Card included with every Pro Tools system. Registering
your purchase is the only way you become eligible to receive information about technical support and future upgrade offers. Registering is
one of the most important steps to complete as
a new user.
Gather Important Information
Avid wants to help you resolve problems as
quickly and efficiently as possible. If you have
the following information handy when you
contact Technical Support, it will make the diagnosis of your problem easier. Take a few minutes
to collect the following basic information:
System Information
Computer
• Make, model, processor speed
Background Applications Any software utilities
that run in the background or generate disk activity, such as virus protection, disk optimization, or file savers, should be turned off or removed.
Screen Savers Screen saver software should be
completely disabled on your computer before
running Pro Tools.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
• Amount of system RAM
• Operating system (version of Windows or
Mac OS)
• Any Drivers, Disk Utilities, or other systemrelated applications you may have installed
Pro Tools Hardware
• Type of cards, interfaces, or peripherals
Hard Drives
• Make, Model
• Drive size (GB)
Diagnostic Information
Note any DAE errors or other error codes you encounter. Also note the ability to reproduce the
problem under different conditions, for example, with another session, or after changing settings (such as the Hardware Buffer Size).
• Drive speed (RPM)
• Drive type (SCSI, FireWire, IDE/ATA)
• Utility used to format the drive
• Number and size of partitions on the drive
Pro Tools Software
• Pro Tools software version
• Plug-In versions
• Other Pro Tools software options or components
• Additional plug-ins from Avid Development Partners
Other Hardware
Refer to the manufacturer’s documentation for
operational details.
The most common hardware additions include:
• 1394 (FireWire) cards for Windows systems
(manufacturer, model)
• Video Capture cards (manufacturer, model)
To verify that your hardware is qualified for use
with your Pro Tools system, refer to our website
(www.avid.com).
Other Software
If you are using other audio or video applications, refer to the manufacturer’s documentation for operational details.
Make note of any other software that was running when a problem occurred.
Chapter 13: Troubleshooting
129
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Chapter 14: Resources
Whether you are new to Pro Tools or just starting out with your new system, we encourage
you to read and utilize the many guides that
Pro Tools provides. There are also useful online
resources available, giving you everything from
Pro Tools tips to Pro Tools answers.
Printed Intro to Pro Tools Guide
The printed Intro to Pro Tools has tutorials on using Pro Tools (such as recording in a Pro Tools
session, importing audio from a CD, and creating an audio CD from a Pro Tools session).
Guides Accessible in Pro Tools
About the Pro Tools Guides
In addition to any printed guides included with
your system, PDF versions of the printed guides
and many additional Pro Tools guides and Read
Mes are installed automatically during Pro Tools
installation (see “Documentation Installed Automatically with Pro Tools” on page 132). The
PDFs are located in the Digidesign/Documentation folder on your local drive.
Printed copies of the Pro Tools Reference
Guide and other guides in the Pro Tools guide
set can be purchased separately from the
Avid Store (http://shop.avid.com).
User Guide
The User Guide for your system gives you detailed instructions for setting up and configuring software and hardware for optimum performance.
The main Pro Tools guides are accessible from
the Pro Tools Help menu. (Choose Help, then select a guide.)
These include:
• Pro Tools Shortcuts provides a complete list of
keyboard and Right-click shortcuts for
Pro Tools.
• Audio Plug-Ins Guide describes the audio plugins included with Pro Tools for both real-time
and file-based audio processing as well as
many other paid plug-in option offered from
Avid.
• Pro Tools Menus Guide covers all the Pro Tools
on-screen menus.
• Pro Tools Reference Guide explains Pro Tools
software in extensive detail.
Chapter 14: Resources
131
Documentation Installed
Automatically with Pro Tools
About www.avid.com
When you install Pro Tools, you get useful PDF
versions of many Pro Tools guides and
Read Mes. This documentation can be found in
the following locations:
The Avid website (www.avid.com) is your best
online source for information to help you get
the most out of your Pro Tools system. The following are just a few of the services and features
available.
Mac Applications/Digidesign/Documentation
Windows C:\Program Files\Digidesign\
Documentation
To view or print PDF guides, you can use
Adobe Reader (recommended) or Apple
Preview (Mac only).
Read Me Files
These contain late-breaking information and
known issues pertaining to Pro Tools software
and hardware configurations. Read Me files are
installed in the Documentation folder when you
install Pro Tools.
Helpful Online Resources
Once you get going, here are some helpful
online resources:
• For questions about installation, visit
Avid’s online Knowledge Base. Go to:
http://www.avid.com/onlinesupport
• Get useful information, help, and tips from
the worldwide community of Pro Tools users
at the online User Conference. Go to:
http://duc.avid.com
• If you can’t find your answer on the User Conference or the Knowledge Base, contact Avid
email support. Go to:
http://www.avid.com/support
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Product Registration Register your purchase
online.
Support and Downloads Contact Avid Customer
Success (technical support); download software
updates and the latest online manuals; browse
the Compatibility documents for system requirements; search the online Knowledge Base
or join the worldwide Pro Tools community on
the User Conference.
Training and Education Study on your own using
courses available online or find out how you can
learn in a classroom setting at a certified
Pro Tools training center.
Products and Developers Learn about Avid
products; download demo software or learn
about our Development Partners and their
plug-ins, applications, and hardware.
News and Events Get the latest news from Avid
or sign up for a Pro Tools demo.
Chapter 15: Compliance Information
Environmental Compliance
Disposal of Waste Equipment by Users
in the European Union
Proposition 65 Warning
This product contains chemicals, including lead,
known to the State of California to cause cancer and
birth defects or other reproductive harm. Wash hands
after handling.
Perchlorate Notice
This product may contain a lithium coin battery. The State of
California requires the following disclosure statement:
“Perchlorate Material – special handling may apply, See
www.dtsc.ca.gov/hazardouswaste/perchlorate.”
This symbol on the product or its packaging indicates that this
product must not be disposed of with other waste. Instead, it
is your responsibility to dispose of your waste equipment by
handing it over to a designated collection point for the recycling
of waste electrical and electronic equipment. The separate
collection and recycling of your waste equipment at the time of
disposal will help conserve natural resources and ensure that
it is recycled in a manner that protects human health and the
environment. For more information about where you can drop
off your waste equipment for recycling, please contact your
local city recycling office or the dealer from whom you
purchased the product.
Recycling Notice
Chapter 15: Compliance Information
133
EMC (Electromagnetic
Compliance)
Australian Compliance
Avid declares that this product complies with the following
standards regulating emissions and immunity:
• FCC Part 15 Class B
• EN55022 Class B
• EN55024 Class B
• AS/NZS 3548 Class B
• CISPR 22 Class B
Canadian Compliance
FCC Compliance for United States
This Class B digital apparatus complies with Canadian
ICES-003
Radio and Television Interference
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the
limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the
FCC Rules.
Avid
Cet appareil numérique de la classe A est conforme à la norme
NMB-003 du Canada
CE Compliance
(EMC and Safety)
DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY
We, Avid, 2001 Junipero Serra Boulevard
Daly City, CA 94014-3886, USA
650-731-6300
declare under our sole responsibility that the product
Eleven Rack
complies with Part 15 of FCC Rules.
Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
(1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and
(2) this device must accept any interference received,
including interference that may cause undesired operation.
Communication Statement
NOTE: This equipment has been tested and found to comply
with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part
15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference in a
residential installation. This equipment generates, uses,
and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed
and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause
harmful interference to radio communications. However,
there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a
particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful
interference to radio or television reception, which can be
determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is
encouraged to try and correct the interference by one or
more of the following measures:
• Reorient or locate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and
receiver.
• Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit
different from that to which the receiver is connected.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician
for help.
Any modifications to the unit, unless expressly approved by
Avid, could void the user's authority to operate the
equipment.
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Eleven Rack User Guide
Avid is authorized to apply the CE (Conformité Europénne)
mark on this compliant equipment thereby declaring conformity
to EMC Directive 89/336/EEC and Low Voltage Directive
2006/95/EEC.
Safety Compliance
Safety Statement
This equipment has been tested to comply with USA and
Canadian safety certification in accordance with the
specifications of UL Standards: UL60065 7th /IEC 60065 7th
and Canadian CAN/CSA C22.2 60065:03. Avid Inc., has been
authorized to apply the appropriate UL & CUL mark on its
compliant equipment.
Warning
12) For products that are not rack-mountable: Use only with a
cart, stand, tripod, bracket, or table specified by the
manufacturer, or sold with the equipment. When a cart is used,
use caution when moving the cart/equipment combination to
avoid injury from tip-over.
13) Unplug this equipment during lightning storms or when
unused for long periods of time.
14) Refer all servicing to qualified service personnel. Servicing
is required when the equipment has been damaged in any way,
such as power-supply cord or plug is damaged, liquid has been
spilled or objects have fallen into the equipment, the
equipment has been exposed to rain or moisture, does not
operate normally, or has been dropped.
15) For products that are a Mains powered device:
The equipment shall not be exposed to dripping or splashing
and no objects filled with liquids (such as vases) shall be
placed on the equipment.
Warning! To reduce the risk of fire or electric shock, do not
expose this equipment to rain or moisture.
16) For products containing a lithium battery:
CAUTION! Danger of explosion if battery is incorrectly
replaced. Replace only with the same or equivalent type.
Important Safety Instructions
1) Read these instructions.
2) Keep these instructions.
17) For products with a power switch:
The main power switch is located on the front panel of the
Eleven Rack. It should remain accessible after installation.
18) The equipment shall be used at a maximum ambient
temperature of 40° C.
3) Heed all warnings.
4) Follow all instructions.
5) Do not use this equipment near water.
6) Clean only with dry cloth.
7) Do not block any ventilation openings. Install in accordance
with the manufacturer’s instructions.
8) Do not install near any heat sources such as radiators, heat
registers, stoves, or other equipment (including amplifiers)
that produce heat.
9) Do not defeat the safety purpose of the polarized or
grounding-type plug. A polarized plug has two blades with one
wider than the other. A grounding type plug has two blades and
a third grounding prong. The wide blade or the third prong are
provided for your safety. If the provided plug does not fit into
your outlet, consult an electrician for replacement of the
obsolete outlet.
10) Protect power cords from being walked on or pinched
particularly at plugs, convenience receptacles, and the point
where they exit from the equipment.
11) Only use attachments/accessories specified by the
manufacturer.
Chapter 15: Compliance Information
135
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Eleven Rack User Guide
index
A
AES/EBU 12
amp models 23
DC Modern & DC Vintage 27
Lead 800 25
Plexiglas 25
SL100 26
Treadplate 26, 23
Amp Output control 28
Amplifier 19
ASIO 57
audio
digital connections 75
audio drivers
CoreAudio driver (Mac) 50
Windows 57
authorizing Pro Tools LE
Mac 49
Windows 56
Avid
customer success 130
Avid Audio Drivers 57
B
banks 16
Black Wah 30
bypass 28
C
Cache Size 64
Clean Uninstall (Mac) 51
Clock Source 65
Internal setting 65, 66
S/PDIF (digital) setting 66
Control knobs 4, 9, 18
Control pages 19, 22
Control window 82
CoreAudio driver (Mac) 50
CPU Usage Limit 61, 62
D
DAE Playback Buffer Size 63
Display 18
DMA option (Windows), enabling 69
drive formatting
Mac 118
Windows 119
drive maintenance 117
drivers
Mac 50
Windows 57
E
Edit/Back button 8, 18
Effects 19
Effects Bypass buttons 4
Effects Control buttons 8
effects models 30
delay 34
BBD Delay 34
Tape Echo 34
31
Black Op Dist 31
Green JRC OD 31
Tri Fuzz 30, 31
Graphic EQ 35
modulation 31
C1 Chor/Vib 32
Flanger 31
Orange Phaser 33
Roto Speaker 33
Vibe Phaser 32
Index
137
reverb 33
Blackpanel Spring Reverb 33
Eleven SR 33
Volume Pedal 30
wah 30
Black Wah 30
Shine Wah 30
Eleven Rack Control Window 82
Eleven Rack Control window 15
accessing 83
Embedded Rig settings 90
Energy Saver (Mac), turning off 67
Exp. Pedal/Footswitch input 13
Expression pedal 42
calibration 42, 85
F
FireWire requirements 118
footswitch accessory 17
FX Loop 21
FX Loop I/O 11
G
guitar amp outputs (Output to Amp) 9
Guitar input 10
H
hard drives
drive formats 117
FireWire requirements 118
formatting 118, 119, 118
IDE/ATA requirements 118
maintenance 117, 120
optimizing 121
partitioning 120
SCSI requirements 118
space requirements 123
Hardware Buffer Size 60
headphones 3
Host Processors setting 61
input and output connectors 12
installing Pro Tools LE
Mac 47
Windows 54
installing QuickTime (Windows) 56
J
journaling (Mac), enabling 68
K
key commands 5
L
latency
Hardware Buffer Size 60
Line inputs 12
live setup 37
M
Main outs 11
Master Control section 88
Mic input 8
microphone models 29
Cond 67 29
Dyn 409 29
Ribbon 121 29
MIDI
connections 76, 93
I/O ports 13
MIDI foot controller 17
Minimize Additional I/O Latency option 63
MME 57
N
network cards (Windows), disabling 70
network connections 126
Noise 28
Noise Gate 28
O
I
I/O Setup
Windows 66
IDE/ATA requirements 118
Ignore Errors During Playback/Record option 63
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Eleven Rack User Guide
optimizing hard drives 121
Output to Amp outputs 9, 12
P
Page indicator 19
partitioning hard drives 120
phantom power 75
when to use 9
Phones output 9
Playback Engine
Host Processors setting 61
Plug-in Streaming Buffer 65
Plug-in Streaming Buffer Size 64
plug-ins
Host Processors setting 61
multiprocessors 61
power switch 4, 7
Pro 77
Pro Tools
demo session (Windows) 50, 57
removing (Windows) 51, 58
Pro Tools HD
using with Eleven Rack 77
Pro Tools LE 15
configuration (Windows) 60
installing (Mac) 47, 54
Pro Tools M-Powered
using with Eleven Rack 77
Processor Scheduling performance (Windows) 71
Q
QuickTime
installing (Windows) 56
R
re-amping 92
recording guitars 89
removing Pro Tools
Windows 51, 58
Rig devices
Amp 19
Cab 19
Dist 19, 20
FX Loop 20, 19
Mod 19
moving 21
Rev 20
Vol 19
Wah 19
Rig Select mode 15
Default display mode 15, 16
Simple display mode 16
Rig View 18
Rig volume 20
Rigs 15, 16
devices 18
embedding in audio regions 90
moving devices 21
organization 16
User & Factory rigs 16
RTAS processors (see Host Processors)
S
S/PDIF 12
Safe Uninstall (Mac) 51
Sample Rate 65
Save button 8, 22
saving 22
screen savers 126
Scroll wheel 4, 8, 18
SCSI requirements 118
Shine Wah 30
signal routing 21
Software Update (Mac), turning off 67
speaker cabinet models
1x12 Black Lux 28
2x12 AC Blue 28
4x10 Tweed Bass 29
Spotlight indexing (Mac), disabling 68
Startup items (Windows), disabling 71, 72
Stereo Width control 76
studio monitors 3
studio setup 73
SW1 and SW2 switches 8
system
optional optimizations (Windows) 70
recommended optimizations (Windows) 70, 69
shutting down 59
system optimization
Windows 70
system settings
Cache Size 64, 65, 62
Hardware Buffer Size 60
I/O Setup 66
Plug-in Streaming Buffer 65, 64
Sample Rate 65
Index
139
T
Tap Tempo 8
technical support 130
product registration required 126
The 23
Tremolo 27
troubleshooting 125
True-Z 10
Tuner view 8
U
uninstalling Pro Tools
Windows 51, 58
User Account Control (UAC)
disabling 70
User Options mode 8
settings 97
Utility settings
Display 20
Input 18, 20
Output 18, 20
Pedal 18, 21
Tempo 18, 20
V
volume knob 4, 7
W
WaveDriver 57
website 130
140
Eleven Rack User Guide
Avid
Technical Support (USA)
Product Information
2001 Junipero Serra Boulevard
Daly City, CA 94014-3886 USA
Visit the Online Support Center at
www.avid.com/support
For company and product information,
visit us on the web at www.avid.com
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