Sigma-Delta Based Techniques For Future Multi-Standard Wireless Radios

Sigma-Delta Based Techniques For Future Multi-Standard Wireless Radios
Sigma-Delta Based Techniques For
Future Multi-Standard Wireless Radios
Ste f fe n Albr ec ht
Stockholm 2005
Laboratory of Electronics and Computer Systems
Department of Microelectronics and Information Technology
Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
Thesis submitted to Royal Institute of Technology in partial
fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Technology
ii
Steffen Albrecht
Sigma-Delta Based Techniques For Future Multi-Standard Wireless Radios
ISBN 91-7178-170-6
ISSN 1651-4076
ISRN KTH/IMIT/LECS/AVH-05/07--SE
TRITA-IMIT-LECS AVH 05:07
 Steffen Albrecht, 2005
Royal Institute of Technology
Department of Microelectronics and Information Technology
Laboratory of Electronics and Computer Systems
Isafjordsgatan 39
164 40 Stockholm, Sweden
iii
To the esteemed reader.
iv
v
Contents
Abstract
Acknowledgements
Relevant Publications
List of Abbreviations
1.
Introduction
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
2.
3.
1
1
3
4
4
9
12
16
Sigma-Delta Modulation
23
2.1
2.2
23
27
The Modulation Principle
Modulator Topologies
Frequency-Locked Loop
35
3.1
3.2
35
42
42
45
53
57
61
3.3
4.
A Brief History of Communication
Motivation of this work
Wireless Radio Principles & Standards
1.3.1 Modulation
1.3.2 Access Techniques
1.3.3 Wireless Communication Standards
Radio Receiver Architectures
vii
ix
xi
xiii
Frequency Synthesizer Concepts
Frequency-Locked Loop
3.2.1 Synthesizer Architecture and Principle
3.2.2 Detection Process
3.2.3 Conversion Process
3.2.4 Settling Time Limit
Simulations and Results
Multi-Standard ADC
69
4.1
4.2
69
71
72
73
76
77
4.3
Data Converter Introduction
Dual-Standard ADC
4.2.1 ADC Performance Specifications
4.2.2 Converter Architecture
4.2.3 Decimation filter
Simulations Results
5.
Summary and Conclusion
81
6.
Bibliography
83
vi
vii
Abstract
Improvements in process technology and design innovations have resulted in compact and cost effective digital baseband solutions. The radio part, however, has remained a bottleneck in terms of chip area and power consumption as the feature size
of analog devices does not directly benefit from scaling. With the addition of yet more
standards into emerging products, the requirements of future radios will extend over
characteristic performance features into demands of programmable and reconfigurable
hardware for radios covering multiple frequency bands. Hence, a guideline in the design of such radios is a large degree of hardware sharing.
The thesis investigates the application of sigma-delta modulation to arising multistandard wireless radios. First, it reviews principles in wireless radios, such as selected
modulation and access techniques. It also examines several communication standards
of personal wireless radios as well as common receiver architectures for their implementation. This is followed by general considerations and background information
about sigma-delta modulators. In the third and fourth chapter, implementations to two
blocks of a wireless radio receiver system are suggested: An architecture for a frequency synthesizer and an implementation of an analog-to-digital converter.
In the first contribution, the thesis develops a novel concept for frequency synthesis
that is more suitable for multi-band, multi-standard radio architectures, achieving a
large amount of hardware sharing among different wireless standards. As a second pillar, the thesis contributes with the design of a dual-standard sigma-delta modulator for
data conversion within a radio receiver. Parts of the work concerning the dual-standard
modulator are embodied in a granted swedish patent.
viii
ix
Acknowledgements
The studies presented in this thesis would naturally not have been achievable without the help of many, both from university and industry. I therefore would like to express my sincere gratitude and thanks to everybody who helped me with advice,
discussions and directions in the pursuit of my studies.
In particular, I am thankful to my supervisors Prof. Mohammed Ismail and Prof.
Hannu Tenhunen. They gave me the opportunity to carry out the presented studies and
provided guidance though instructions and consultation. I very much appreciate their
encouragement and advice in the process of the last few years.
Significant additions to my studies also came from outside KTH. Here, I like to
mention Prof. Yasuaki Sumi from Tottori Kankyo University in Japan. His expertise
and background in the field of frequency synthesizers helped in the conduct of my research. I am thankful for the twofold opportunity to visit his department and university
for several months as a visiting scholar. Noticeable contribution also came from
Michael Wang, with St. Jude Medical AB. His insight and understanding of circuit design and RF background was an important contribution. He helped to find solutions to
overcome seemingly unmanageable problems.
I furthermore would like to thank all my colleagues at Royal Institute of Technology
who contributed in one or another way with discussion, questions and ideas towards
new and different thoughts and perspectives. Representative for them all, I would like
to highlight the names of a few in alphabetical order: Jad Atallah, Abhijit Kumar Deb,
Xinzhong Duo, Andreas Gothenberg, Jinliang Huang, René Krenz, Bingxin Li, Wim
Michielsen, Costantino Pala, Dinesh Pamunuwa, Delia Rodríguez de Llera González,
Ana Rusu, Saúl Rodríguez, Adam Strak, Yiran Sun, Nil Tarim, and Li-Rong Zheng.
Undoubtedly, I am indebted to my family and friends for their continued support
and for their sacrifice due to my absence from home throughout the years of my studies. And last, but not least, I would like to thank the Swedish Foundation for Strategic
Research (SSF) for funding my studies.
x
xi
Relevant Publications
[1]
Steffen Albrecht, Adam Strak, Yasuaki Sumi and Mohammed Ismail; "Frequency Detector Analysis for a Wireless LAN Frequency Synthesizer"; IEEJ
Analog International VLSI Workshop, Macao; 2004
[2]
Steffen Albrecht, "A Frequency-Locked Loop Using Sigma-Delta Modulation", Conference for Design Automation & Test in Europe (DAC), Ph.D.Forum, Germany; 2003
[3]
Steffen Albrecht, Yasuaki Sumi, Mohammed Ismail, and Hannu Tenhunen, "A
Frequency Synthesizer Using Frequency Difference Detection", 46th IEEE
Midwest Symposium on Circuits and Systems, Cairo, Egypt; 2003
[4]
Steffen Albrecht, and Hannu Tenhunen, "A Frequency Synthesizer Architecture for RF Applications", Proceedings of Norchip conference, Riga, Latvia;
2003
[5]
Steffen Albrecht, Andreas Gothenberg, Yasuaki Sumi, and Hannu Tenhunen,
"A Study of Nonlinearities For a Frequency-Locked Loop Principle", SouthWest Symposium for Mixed Signal Design (SSMSD), Las Vegas, USA; 2003
[6]
Steffen Albrecht, Yasuaki Sumi and Hannu Tenhunen, "A Frequency Synthesizer Principle with Sigma-Delta Loop Filtering", IEEJ International Analog
VLSI Workshop, Singapore; 2002
[7]
Steffen Albrecht et al., "A Dual-Standard GSM/DECT Baseband Sigma-Delta
ADC", NorChip conference, Turku, Finland; 2000
xii
[8]
Steffen Albrecht et al., "A Front-End Receiver Sigma-Delta Modulator",
Swedish Patent SE0002065-1, Stockholm; 2000
[9]
Steffen Albrecht, Xiaopeng Li, Bingxin Li, Costantino Pala, Yonghong Gao,
Mohammed Ismail and Hannu Tenhunen, "A Sigma-Delta A/D Based Architecture for Multi-Standard Front-End Radio Receivers", IEEJ International
Analog VLSI Workshop, Stockholm, Sweden; 2000
[This paper received the best paper award at the IEEJ Analog VLSI Workshop]
xiii
List of Abbreviations
AC
Alternating Current
ADC
Analogue-to-Digital Converter
AM
Amplitude Modulation
AMPS
Advanced Mobile Phone Service
ASK
Amplitude Shift Keying
BPSK
Binary Phase Shift Keying
CCK
Complementary Code Keying
CDMA
Code Division Multiple Access
CT
Continuous Time
DAC
Digital-to-Analog Converter
DC
Direct Current
DECT
Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications
DNL
Differential Nonlinearity
DR
Dynamic Range
DSP
Digital Signal Processor
DT
Discrete Time
EDGE
Enhanced Data for Global Evolution
ETSI
European Telecommunications Standards Institute
F
Noise Factor
FCC
Federal Communications Commission
FDMA
Frequency Division Multiple Access
fFB
frequency of feedback signal
FHSS
Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum
FM
Frequency Modulation
fREF
frequency of reference signal
xiv
fs
sampling frequency
FS
Frequency Synthesizer
FSK
Frequency Shift Keying
GFSK
Gaussian Frequency Shift Keying
GMSK
Gaussian minimum Shift Keying
GSM
Global System for Mobile communication
IF
Intermediate Frequency
IMT-2000
International Mobile Communications at 2000 MHz
INL
Integral Nonlinearity
ISM
Industrial, Scientific and Medical (frequency band)
ITU
International Telecommunication Union
MASH
Multi-stAge noise SHaping
NF
Noise Figure
NMT
Nordic Mobile Telephone
NTF
Noise Transfer Function
OFDM
Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple access
OSR
OverSampling Ratio
OTA
Operational Transconductance Amplifier
PA
Power Amplifier
PDC
Personal Digital Cellular
PHS
Personal Handyphone System
PM
Phase Modulation
PSK
Phase Shift Keying
QAM
Quadrature Amplitude Modulation
QPSK
Quaternary Phase Shift Keying
RF
Radio Frequency
ROM
Read Only Memory
xv
Σ∆
Sigma-Delta
SC
Switched Capacitor
SNDR
Signal-to-Noise plus Distortion Ratio
SNR
Signal-to-Noise Ratio
SOI
Silicon On Insulator
SQNR
Signal-to-Quantization Noise Ratio
STF
Signal Transfer Function
TACS
Total Access Communication System
TDMA
Time Division Multiple Access
UMTS
Universal Mobile Telecommunications System
WCDMA
Wideband Code Division Multiple Access
WLAN
Wireless Local Area Network
xvi
1. Introduction
This chapter will first give a brief historical review on wireless communications and mention
the motivation for this work. Then, principles of selected modulation and access techniques employed in today’s radio communication are examined. The impact of modulation schemes on the
requirements of utilized hardware is viewed upon. Secondly, several communication standards
are compared with respect to application area and performance parameters. The third section
describes radio architectures, typically found in today’s radio communication.
1.1 A Brief History of Communication
Before stepping into principles and standards of radio communication, this section
will glance over a few important milestones in the development of information transmission. This review is of course by no means complete, as this is not the scope of this
thesis, nor is it intended to be encyclopaedically. May the inventors of past and present
excuse, if they have been left out here.
Today’s accessibility of communication around the globe using telephones, fax, radio and television, internet connections, mobile phones at relatively low costs is a matter of course. However, this development has been a long process. Transmission of
information, i.e. the desired data, over distance to a receiving instance has always
played a large role in human life. Without it, human interaction and coordination or imparting of knowledge would not have be possible. Before an automated procedure for
a transmission was invented, messages had to be carried from a sender to the destination: Afoot or mounted, oral or written, crypted or plain; using letters, smoke, trumpets
or flags. Limits in number of symbols, transmission distance and speed made these
transmissions time consuming or complicated.
In the beginning of the 18th century, during the French revolution, Claude Chappe,
a former priest, built a mechanical-optical communication device, a so called semaphore telegraph (figure 1.1). It was first used in 1794 and consisted of 15 repeating stations in a line of sight, linking the cities Lille and Paris [Chapp1794]. The distance of
about 200 km could be covered in a few minutes what used to be many hours for a
mounted courier. A technology that proved critical for an aspiring France. Other telegraph systems had also been tested before, but Chappe was presumably the first who
constructed an applicable and mechanical, wireless communication system.
2
Introduction
The invention of the galvanometer by Johann Schweigger and the work on electromagnetism by people like Hans Christian Oerstedt, André Marie Ampère, William
Sturgon and Michael Faraday in the 1820’s laid the basics for Joseph Henry’s principle
of telegraphing [Henry1831]. This principle was later used in the development of a
long distance telegraph communication system like the ones by Wheatstone and Cooke
[Wheat1837] and by Samuel F.B. Morse [Morse1840]. In 1876, Elisha Gray and Alexander Graham Bell developed a device that transmitted speech electrically
[Bell1876]; the telephone was invented. Although communication was bound to wires,
both telephone and telegraph provided fast and reliable means of communication of
both text and sounds, and their technological successors are still in use today.
Figure 1.1: Claude Chappes optical telegraph and part of his signal transmission code.
The physicist Heinrich Rudolf Hertz extended Maxwells ideas on electromagnetic
waves. He proved the physical existence of radio waves experimentally [Hertz1892].
The path was open for the wireless telegraph and the radio. Physicist Nikola Tesla is
credited with the invention of modern radio [Tesla1897]. He obtained more than 100
patents in the areas of motors/generators, transformers, lightning, radio, engines and
other areas. In the dawn of a new century, Guglielmo Marconi, an italian inventor, built
a first practical radio communication link in England [Marco1900]. The first transatlantic wireless transmission of Morse code followed in 1901. With the development of
the audion tube by De’Forest [DeFor1906], radio waves could be amplified, which enabled the advance of wireless telephony. Military and enterprise interests pushed for
improvements in radio communications. Commercial radio and first television broadcasting started in the 1920’s, radar detection was fit for service in 1936. With the invention of the transistor by Shockley, Brattain and Bardeen in 1947 and the advance
into integrated circuits, [Kilby1959] and [Noyce1959], the area of smaller, lighter and
more powerful radios began. Mobile, hand held terminals became available and cellu-
Motivation of this work
3
lar radio communication systems were developed. The first commercial cellular phone
system was in operation in Tokyo in 1979.
1.2 Motivation of this work
With communication technology developing in different parts of the world and driven by different economic interests, naturally, a large variety of communication methods matured. Today’s frequency spectrum is crowded by a large number of
applications. The same method might occupy different bands in different countries.
With numerous standards defined for wireless communication, the need for interoperability between various technologies arises. Mobile terminals such as phones, PDAs or
notebooks gain seamless access to a multitude of available services. This in turn reduces the number of devices and increases user-friendliness. But interoperability comes at
the expense of added complexity. Powerful signal processing is accomplished using
programmable DSPs. However, radio interface specifications vary considerably and
transceiver hardware is typically optimised for a specific standard.
An evolutionary trend for transceivers is therefore not only towards higher data
rates. Also integration of several radio interfaces into one programmable and reconfigurable hardware supporting multiple standards and multiple frequency bands becomes
important. Although accommodating several individual, optimised transceivers into
one terminal already enables multi-standard operation, it would cause larger implementation costs, higher power consumption and bulkier terminal size.
Due to advances in manufacturing, feature size, speed and area usage of integrated
structures improve continuously. An estimation for this development was first given
by Gorden Moore in [Moore1965]. The advance of recent processes can be followed
from the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors [ITRS04] or relevant
internet publications from manufacturing companies. However, the mentioned improvements mainly benefit digital processing. Area, size and power reduction of analog circuits is limited by different noise sources.
The work presented in this thesis targets the above mentioned objective of increased
flexibility to reduce implementation costs and to add functionality. Multi-standard and
multi-band operation is achieved by making use of digital processing and configurability.
4
Introduction
1.3 Wireless Radio Principles & Standards
A wireless transmission does not necessarily have to be a radio connection. For instance, Chappes telegraph system [Chapp1794] used a combination of optical and mechanical means, a connection without wires. Also, capacitive or inductive crosstalk is
a wireless connection, but does not constitute radio communication. For the scope of
this thesis, radio communication is referred to as the transmission, emission and reception of information (signs, symbols, images, sound or data) by means of modulated
electromagnetic waves. A generalized block diagram of a wireless radio communication system is shown in figure 1.2. Information from the source, e.g. a baseband signal,
is modulated with and frequency translated onto electromagnetic carrier waves in the
transmitter prior to emission from an antenna. These waves travel through the channel
medium and are then received at another antenna. The receiver detects and demodulates the information before handing it over to its destination. During transmission,
propagation loss, multipath fading, delay differences and interferences from other
communications affect the quality of the signal depending on the used frequency band
and the application environment. More details on disturbances of radio communication
channels can be found in e.g. [Rappa1996].
Channel
Source
Transmitter
Receiver
Destination
Figure 1.2: Block diagram of a general radio communication system.
1.3.1 Modulation
Modulation and demodulation are essential functions in wireless radio communication systems. Modulation improves transmission, reception and detection properties in
the presence of noise within the transmission channel. It also adds to security of data
transmission. Important attributes of modulation and demodulation are signal transmission quality, spectral efficiency and power efficiency. Local and international authorities regulate and limit frequency bands for communication. Hence, the same
application might occupy different bands in other countries, i.e. requiring a different
carrier signal. Different communication standards employ different modulation tech-
Wireless Radio Principles & Standards
5
niques, for reasons of required bit rate, application area or noise impact to the air interface.
The transmission quality can be quantified with parameters like Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) for analog or audible applications, or with the Bit Error Rate (BER) for digital and data transmission. SNR expresses the ratio of signal power to noise power that
is present during communication. The BER, on the other hand, states the ratio of bits
that were received erroneously to the total number of transmitted bits within a certain
time frame. Hence, it is a measure of how many bits have to be resent to complete the
information transfer. A higher transmission quality allows to lower the transmission
energy for the same distance and increases battery life. Alternatively, the signals could
be transferred over larger distances. Spectral efficiency expresses the ratio of channel
throughput to the required radio spectrum. More complex modulation techniques combine several bits into symbols that are transmitted within the same or a smaller spectrum. If the amplitude envelope of a signal becomes variable due to modulation, then
the power amplifier (PA) needs to provide amplification with higher linearity. Otherwise, the signal will experience spectral regrowth, causing lower spectral efficiency
and energy leakage into adjacent channels [Morai1980], [Sevic1996]. However, highly
linear PAs have considerably lower power efficiency. Hence, modulation scheme requirements for spectral efficiency and power efficiency have to be traded off.
The basis of modulation is the variation of a carrier by a baseband signal. This carrier, e.g. a sinusoid, can be modulated by both, amplitude and phase. This converts the
baseband signal to the passband. A passband signal can be described as
x c ( t ) = a ( t ) ⋅ cos ( ω c t + φ ( t ) )
(1.1)
where ωc is the carrier frequency and a(t) and φ(t) are the amplitude and phase of
the carrier signal, that vary proportionally with the baseband signal. In analog modulation, the carrier is modulated by an analog baseband signal. When varying a(t), φ(t),
or dφ/dt, the scheme is called amplitude (AM), phase (PM), or frequency modulation
(FM), respectively. AM is more susceptible to noise and interferences and requires linear power amplifiers. PM and FM carry the baseband information in the phase or frequency instead. Hence, the carrier envelope is constant, leading to lower linearity
requirements for the PA.
Modern modulation schemes employ digital baseband signals for carrier alteration.
Digital modulation offers higher resilience to noise or multi-path effects, increases
quality of communication and spectral efficiency, and brings better compatibility with
digital services. Data security is improved and modern, powerful digital signal processors (DSPs) can be employed for complex modulation schemes. Similar to analog
6
Introduction
modulation, the schemes are called Amplitude Shift Keying (ASK), Phase Shift Keying (PSK) and Frequency Shift Keying (FSK). Their principles are depicted in
figure 1.3(a-c) for the case of binary modulation. A general expression of the digital
baseband signal xbb(t) is
x bb ( t ) =
∑ b n Π ( t – nT b )
(1.2)
n
with bn being the bit values and Π(t-nTb) the pulse function of interval Tb. The
number of discrete values of bn defines the levels of modulation, for instance [-1, 1] or
[0, 1] for binary modulation. Each digitally modulated waveform x(t) can be expressed
as a linear combination of basis functions:
x( t ) = α1 ⋅ Ψ1 + α2 ⋅ Ψ2 + … + αm ⋅ Ψm
(1.3)
where the Ψj are the orthogonal basis functions and the αj are their parameters that
were modified by xbb(t), respectively. For m = {1, 2, 3}, the symbols of x(t) in equation (1.3) can be represented graphically. Such representations are called signal constellations. The larger the geometrical distance between the symbols, the lower the
probability of detecting a wrong symbol.
t
a) ASK
t
b) BPSK
t
c) BFSK
Figure 1.3: (a) Amplitude, (b) Phase, and (c) Frequency shift keying for modulation
with binary base band signals (shown above)
ASK encodes information in the amplitude of one carrier. In binary signalling, the
carrier can simply be switched either on or off. ASK offers low circuit complexity, but
suffers from signal quality loss due to higher sensitivity to amplitude noise during
transmission than PSK and FSK. It is therefore not often used in digital radio communications [Razav1998]. Since there is only one basis function, Ψ1, the signal constellation is one dimensional, as shown in figure 1.4a. The modulated signal x(t) of
equation (1.3) is described with α1 = {0, Ac} and Ψ1 = cos(ωct), with Ac being the car-
Wireless Radio Principles & Standards
7
rier amplitude and ωc the carrier frequency, respectively. Phase and frequency shift
mechanisms are much less susceptible to amplitude variations, and are hence most often used for wireless radio transmission. In PSK, information is coded in the phase of
the carrier. Figure 1.3b and figure 1.4b show the time domain diagram and signal constellation for the binary case, i.e. BPSK. The modulated signal x(t) can be described
with x(t) = Ac·cos(ωct + φ), where the phase φ can take the values 0 or 180 degree. The
constellation now comprises a single carrier, Ψ1 = cos(ωct ), and two amplitudes
α1 = {-Ac, Ac}. The symbol distance is now twice as large as for binary ASK, which
means lower detection error probability. When using coherent detection, phase synchronisation is required between the received carrier and the receiver oscillator.
In frequency shift keying, different symbols are encrypted with frequencies. This
principle is illustrated in figure 1.3c. In binary FSK (BFSK), the baseband signal selects one of two carriers with equal amplitudes. Hence, the signal x(t) has two basis
functions: Ψ1 = cos(ωc1t) and Ψ2 = cos(ωc2t). The two carrier frequencies are ωc1 and
ωc2, and [α1 α2] = {[0 Ac], [Ac 0]} are the amplitude values. The constellation of
BFSK is shown in figure 1.4c. It can be seen that the symbol distance is reduced by a
factor of √2 with respect to BPSK. Hence, the probability of detecting a symbol erroneously is increased. Also in frequency shift keying modulation, phase synchronization is required if coherent detection is used. Despite the higher error probability,
BFSK enables simpler detection schemes and better power efficiency [Razav1998].
In binary modulation, one symbol representing a binary value is modulated onto one
carrier signal. Higher data rates can be obtained by multiplexing more symbols onto a
single carrier. For instance, pairs of two bits [b0 b1] = {[00], [01], [10], [11]} can be
mapped to one out of four symbols, say [a b c d]. This requires x(t) of equation (1.3)
to have two basis functions, Ψ1 and Ψ2, that are orthogonal with respect to each other.
Such modulation scheme is called quadrature modulation. If the phase of the basis signals is modulated, the scheme is called quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK). Equation (1.3) becomes x(t) = α1·cos(ωct) + α2·sin(ωct), with [α1 α2] = [±Ac ±Ac]. As two
bits comprise one new symbol, the symbol rate is half the bit data rate. Hence, the required bandwidth for the same data stream is reduced by a factor of two with respect
to BPSK. Alternatively, twice as much data could be send. The signal constellation for
QPSK is shown in figure 1.4d. Variations of quadrature modulation are for instance
offset-QPSK (O-QPSK), π/4-QPSK and Mean Shift Keying (MSK). These techniques
introduce time offsets, phase rotation, or smooth phase transitions to improve spectral
or power efficiency. The higher data rate of QPSK comes at the expense of higher detection complexity.
The signal amplitudes in PSK modulation schemes are constant. A combination of
phase shifts and amplitude variations allows for a higher level of modulation, for in-
8
Introduction
stance in Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM). Each out of M possible symbols
represents m bits, with m = log2(M). When modulated with QAM, the signal of equation (1.3) becomes x(t) = α1·cos(ωct) + α2·sin(ωct), where α1 = [±A1, …, ±Ak] and
α2 = [±A1, …, ±Ak] are the k amplitudes of each basis function.
a) ASK
Ψ2
b) BPSK
0
1
0
Αc
0
Ψ1
c) BFSK
1
−Αc
0
+Αc
Ψ1
Αc
1
0
0
d) QPSK
Ψ2
Αc
10
Αc
Ψ1
e) 16-QAM Ψ2
00
Α2
0010
0110
0010
0111
1110
1010
Α1
−Αc
Αc
Ψ1
−Α2
1111
−Α1
Α1
1011
Α2
Ψ1
−Α1
11
−Αc
0001
0101
0000
0100
1101
1001
−Α2
01
1100
1000
Figure 1.4: Signal constellation for (a) ASK; (b) BPSK; (c) BFSK; (d) QPSK; and
(e) 16-QAM. The digital numerals represent the modulated symbols.
The constellation of 16-QAM is shown in figure 1.4e. The modulation accuracy and
quality of the transmitted QAM signal can be expressed with the error vector magnitude (EVM). EVM represents the vector distance between ideal and measured symbol
in a QAM constellation. As with the techniques mentioned above, more symbols give
higher data rates, and hence, better spectral efficiency. But it also increases amplitude
and phase noise performance requirements of the (de)modulating circuitry. Increased
symbol energy can only partly improve transmission quality, as regulations on maximum transmit power limit this option. Therefore, power and bandwidth efficiency
need to be traded off. More detailed discussions on digital modulation schemes can be
found e.g. in [Couch1993], [Feher1995], [Proak1989], and [Rappa1996].
Wireless Radio Principles & Standards
9
Coherent detection requires phase synchronization between transmitter and receiver. This phase information is usually obtained from training sequences carried in pilot
signals. However, in the presence of strong interferences and low signal levels, phase
recovery becomes difficult. Alternatively, noncoherent detection schemes can be employed. For instance, differential phase shift keying (DPSK) does not require phase
alignments, as information lies within the phase change from one symbol relative to
the previous one, not in absolute phase values. Only an extra starting bit prior to the
first transmitted symbol is required for correct interpretation of the symbol sequence.
Symbols modulated with noncoherent FSK are detected with bandpass filters (to determine if the wanted frequency component is present) and envelope detectors instead
of correlation filters. The error performance of noncoherent modulation is slightly
worse than for coherent systems. However, reduced complexity and robustness to interference make these modulation schemes attractive [Burr1992], [Colav1999],
[Razav1998].
1.3.2 Access Techniques
Access techniques regulate the management of available communication channels
and allocate connections to the users. Multiple access techniques permit that many users simultaneously access the same fixed bandwidth. A selection of methods employed
in todays radio communications are described here.
(a)
(b)
Frequency
Frequency
Slot
Frame
m
m-1
Bandwidth
...
Carrier
bandwidth
fc
4
3
2
1
1 2 3 4
...
n 1 2 3 4
...
Time
n
Time
Communication duration
Figure 1.5: Channel definitions for (a) TDMA for n channels, and (b) FDMA for m channels
In Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA), a time frame is split into several fractions, so called slots [figure 1.5(a)]. Signals are transmitted for the duration of one time
slot within the frame. Hence, the number of physical channels corresponds to the
number of time slots. Different users can be assigned to these slots which makes it pos-
10
Introduction
sible to transmit signals from several users within one time frame. The data is buffered
and transmitted at a high rate. Each time slot uses the whole assigned frequency band.
The receiver decompresses the signal to its original timing schedule, so that its output
is a seemingly continuous stream. Due to buffering and synchronisation, TDMA cannot send analog data directly and is used only for digital communication.
In Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA), the available spectrum is divided
into several narrower bands [figure 1.5(b)]. A physical channel is now such narrow
band, e.g. 30 kHz, with a carrier frequency, fc, at the channel centre. The transmission
is continuous, i.e. is suitable for analog signals. Each user is assigned to one carrier for
receiving and for transmission to achieve simultaneous access. Hence, the number of
signals that can be transmitted corresponds to the number of carriers, and no additional
synchronisation data is needed. To increase the number of users, the available spectrum can be divided into more, narrower bands. However, the modulation technique
defines the minimum carrier spacing. In a hybrid FDMA/TDMA system, both access
methods are combined. For each carrier with its bandwidth, the time frame is separated
into several slots. A physical channel corresponds to a time slot within one carrier.
(a)
(b)
Spreading Codes
Frequency
Channels
Time
Channel 6
1
5
2
4
2
6
Channel 5
2
3
6
1
5
4
Channel 4
3
4
5
2
1
3
Channel 3
4
6
1
3
6
5
Channel 2
5
2
4
6
4
1
Channel 1
6
1
3
5
3
2
Sub-carrier
bandwidth
Time
Figure 1.6: Channel definitions for spread spectrum applications: (a) DSSS, and (b) FHSS
Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) is a technique where many users use the
whole assigned spectrum and transmit simultaneously. Two different techniques to
spread the bandwidth of the original data signal are used. In Direct Sequence Spread
Spectrum, DSSS or DS-CDMA, each data signal is assigned a pseudo random noise
code (thereof the name ‘code’ division). This canalization or spreading code is a sequence of binary symbols (chips) and each code corresponds to a physical channel. For
each successive connection, the spreading code changes. The required bandwidth for
transmission is much larger than the bandwidth of the original signal. To send one bit
of information, e.g. a “1”, the whole code sequence is sent. To send a “0”, the complement of the code is sent. After spreading, the signal is modulated to the RF band. Since
Wireless Radio Principles & Standards
11
the signal is coded, the receiver cannot distinguish certain time slots or carriers. The
receiver input contains small parts of all signals at each instant of time. The received
signal is first down-converted from RF before it is recovered by correlation with the
same spreading code as in the transmitter. A second technique used to spread the data
bandwidth is Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum, FHSS or FH-CDMA. The RF
spectrum is divided into a larger number of sub-carriers and the transmitted signal
switches rapidly between different carriers in a predetermined, pseudo random sequence. The receiver has to know beforehand where to find the signal at any given
time. To cause interference, another transmitter has to send at the same time at the same
sub-carrier. The channel definitions are depicted in figure 1.6.
CDMA offers a high immunity to interferences during transmission because the signal energy is spread over a large bandwidth. The effect of band spreading is depicted
in figure 1.7. The larger the processing gain, i.e. the ratio of the spread bandwidth to
the original data bandwidth, the higher the interference immunity. Longer spreading
codes increase the processing gain and improve the system transmission rate. If too
many signals are sent out simultaneously by different stations, the bit error rate increases due to intersymbol interference. Hence, the channel capacity in DS-CDMA is defined as the highest number of codes that are used simultaneously while keeping a
defined bit error rate of the receiver.
Transmitter
Receiver
...
...
a
b
c
d
BWdata
BWspreaded
BWreceived
BWdata
Figure 1.7: CDMA spectra: (a) original data, (b) spread spectrum after modulation with PN
code, (c) received spectrum containing noise and interference, and (d) de-spread signal.
Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) resembles FDMA, but provides several sub-carriers for each channel in the band [figure 1.8]. The sub-carriers are
orthogonal to one another, so they can be placed close together in the band without
causing interference. A high data rate bit stream is converted into n parallel low rate
bit streams. Each parallel bit stream is then modulated on a sub-carrier, where each carrier modulation can be different (BPSK, QPSK or QAM). To get a higher bandwidth
12
Introduction
efficiency, the sub-carriers are overlapping. The symbol rate in each carrier is low, so
intersymbol interference occurs only for large delay spreads. This gives higher tolerance to multipath delay spread and fading. However, challenges of OFDM are for instance sensitivity to frequency offsets, oscillator phase noise and the more complicated
design of (de)modulation circuitry.
n sub-carriers
m channels
...
...
Carrier Spacing
...
...
Channel Spacing
Frequency
Communication Band
Figure 1.8: Channel and carrier definitions for Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing
1.3.3 Wireless Communication Standards
For any wireless communication to function, both transmitter and receiver shown in
figure 1.2 have to comply to the same frequency band, method of modulation, and access technique. For this reason, communication standards are defined. The standards
mentioned below represent only a small selection of the range of existing radio communication systems.
Since the spectra for wireless services are limited, frequency resources have to be
shared to ensure service to a large number of customers. Here, radio communication
lends a principle from radio and TV broadcast. If two senders are positioned at a sufficiently long distance from each other, their signals have only negligible interference.
Hence, they can use the same frequency band for transmission. This frequency reuse
principle is commonly extended into a cellular system, as depicted in figure 1.9 for the
example with 7 adjacent cells. Each neighbouring cell operates in a different frequency
band. Users within a cell are served by one base station until leaving the cell. Then,
communication is handed off to the nearest base station with the help of a mobile telephone switching office (MTSO).
Wireless Radio Principles & Standards
13
Technologies that make extensive use of this cellular approach are for instance personal wireless phone systems. Though already available in the 1940’s, technical and
administrative restrictions delayed its advance until the late 1970’s and early 1980’s.
Today termed as analog, or first generation wireless telephone, systems like the scandinavian Nordic Mobile Telephone (NMT) and the german C-Netz commenced operation in 1981.
MTSO
2
7
3
1
4
6
5
Figure 1.9: A 7 cell system for personal communication systems with handoff by an MTSO.
Also, the Advanced Mobile Phone Service (AMPS) and Total Access Communication System (TACS) were operational in 1983 and 1985, respectively. Second generation systems employing digital modulation schemes offered increased data rates, better
quality and new types of communication. The Global System for Mobile communication (GSM) became a unified standard for Europe and many other countries. Corresponding systems in the US are based on standards IS-54/IS-136 and IS-95. In either
case, the number of subscribers quickly exceeded channel capabilities, so that additional frequency bands were needed. Whereas first generation systems allowed roaming only on a national or bilateral basis, communication standards are largely unified
for second generation on a more continental basis. However, roaming with one device
on different continents requires multiple transceiver interfaces to be included in the
mobile terminal, increasing costs and weight. Wireless communication of the third
generation aims for wider roaming services as well as new applications due to higher
data rates and more effective use of the available spectrum. Besides improved voice
communication, third generation services include transmission of data, video, and internet access, all at reduced costs for subscribers. The standard International Mobile
Telecommunications-2000 (IMT-2000) comprises several individual standards, e.g.
14
Introduction
Universal Mobile Telecommunication System (UMTS), CDMA2000, Enhanced Data
rate for Global Evolution (EDGE), and Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications (DECT). Though IMT-2000 greatly improves roaming capabilities, there is yet
no single worldwide standard.
(a)
Data Rate
[kbps]
1 000 000
UWB
Wi
MAX
100 000
Hyperlan 2
10 000
1000
100
WLAN &
Bluetooth
UMTS /
CDMA2000
GSM, PCS, PDC
ZigBee
GPS
Satellite
DECT, PHS
10
Pager
1
10 m
100 m
1 km
10 km
100 km
1000 km
Distance
Band Occupation
(b)
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
5000
5500
6000
Frequency [MHz]
GSM
Bluetooth
PDC
IS-95
WLAN b
UMTS
DECT
WLAN a
PHS
PCS
WLAN g
AMPS
Hyperlan 2
ZigBee
Figure 1.10: (a) Data rate versus cell size for selected wireless standards;
(b) Band occupation for selected standards of Table .
Whereas wireless phone systems aim for long distance connections with relatively
low data rate, other applications like wireless local area network (WLAN) services, Ultra Wide Band (UWB) or HiperLan target transmission of large amount of data over
shorter distances. Additionally, short distance, low data rate applications for very low
costs (e.g. ZigBee) and large data rate, long distance (e.g. WiMAX) systems are available. Figure 1.10 shows an overview of selected standards with relevant data rates versus applicable cell sizes as well as their band occupation. Table 1 compares access
Wireless Radio Principles & Standards
15
technologies, modulation schemes and other parameters of radio interfaces for various
mobile communication standards.
Table 1: Overview for selected mobile communication standardsa
Standard
AMPS
PCS
Frequency
Bands
(MHz)b
824 - 849
869 - 894
Data Rate
(air interface)
Access
Modulation
No. of
Channels
No. of
Carriers
Spacing
10 kbps
FDD
FM
1
832
30 kHz
48 kbps
TDMA/
FDD
DQPSK
3
832
30 kHz
1.2288 Mbps
DS-CDMA
QPSK,
O-QPSK
256
1
1.25 MHz
270 kbps
FDMA/TDMA
FDD
GMSK
8
124
200 kHz
42 kbps
TDMA
DQPSK
3
640
25 kHz
824 - 849
869 - 894
(IS-54 / IS-136)
1850-1910
1930-1990
IS-95
824-849
869-894
890-915
935-960
GSM
1710-1785
1805-1880
810-826
940-956
PDC
1429-1453
1477-1501
DECT
1880-1930
1.152 Mbps
TDMA/TDD
GFSK
12
10
1.728 MHz
PHS
1895-1918.1
384 kbps
TDMA/TDD
DQPSK
4
77
300 kHz
Bluetooth
2400-2483.5
1 Mbps
FH-CDMA
TDD
GFSK
79
79
1 MHz
UMTS/WCDMAc
1900 - 2025
2110 - 2200
3.84 Mbps
DS-CDMA
QPSK
4...256
1
5 MHz
CDMA-2000
422.5-457.475
462.5-467.475
1.2288 Mbps
3.6864 Mbps
DS-CDMA
QPSK/BPSK
4...128
4...256
1
3
1.25 MHz
WLAN
802.11a
5150-5350
5425-5675
5725-5875
54 Mbps
OFDM
BPSK,
QPSK,
16/64 QAM
12
52
20 MHz
WLAN
802.11b
2400-2484
11 Mbps
DS-CDMA
CCK
13
13
5 MHz
WLAN
802.11g
2400-2497
54 Mbps
OFDM
BPSK/QPSK
CCK
12
52
30 MHz
Hiperlan 2
5150-5350
5470-5725
54 Mbps
OFDM
BPSK/QPSK
16/64 QAM
5
52
20 MHz
802.15.4
(ZigBee)
868.0-868.6
902.0-928.0
2400-2483.5
20 kbps
40 kbps
250 kbps
DS-CDMA
BPSK
BPSK
OQPSK
1
10
16
3
_
2 MHz
5 MHz
UWBd
3100-10600
480 Mbps
OFDM
QPSK
255
3
528 MHz
a.
b.
c.
d.
References: [IEEE1999a], [IEEE1999b], [IEEE2003a], [IEEE2003b], [IEEE2003c], [Holma2001], [ETSI2001], [MBOA2004], [Goodm1997]
The lower bands correspond to uplink, higher bands to downlink connections.
Spectrum according to IMT-2000, including bands for satellite, licensed and nonlicended bands.
Standardization in progress.
16
Introduction
1.4 Radio Receiver Architectures
In wireless radio communication, all signals are transmitted as electromagnetic
waves, occupying the same transmission medium. Receiver and transmitter shown in
figure 1.2 perform different tasks. Receivers need to select a desired, narrow channel
from a broad spectrum that is supplied by the antenna. The task of a transmitter is to
convert a given baseband signal of limited bandwidth to RF and transmit it to the antenna with adequate output power without disturbing neighbouring channels. Hence,
design challenges for both parts differ. The most important characteristics of a receiver
are its sensitivity and selectivity. Sensitivity expresses the level of the smallest possible
input signal that can still be detected correctly (i.e. within a given BER). Selectivity,
on the other hand, describes the receivers ability to detect a weak desired signal in the
presence of strong adjacent channels, so called interferers. These interferers are sometimes also called blockers that desensitize the receiver. Important characteristics of
transmitters are power efficiency, antenna insertion loss and linearity, as nonlinear
products create interferers in neighbouring channels. The following section reviews receiver architectures that are commonly employed in modern radio communication systems.
Radio communication systems operate typically with carrier frequencies at many
hundreds of MHz to several GHz. Directly converting the antenna signals to digital
form in an integrated ADC would require prohibitively large sensitivity, selectivity,
linearity, and very high conversion speed. As of today, such analog-to-digital converters do not exist. Therefore, the received RF signals have to be converted to lower frequencies, for signal processing steps like channels selection and amplification. This
conversion is accomplished in a mixing process, producing a downconverted (used in
receiver) and an upconverted (used in transmitter) component. Low- or high-pass filtering then selects the desired band. However, mixing includes two inherent sources of
problems. First, nonlinearities generate many other signal components, e.g. harmonics
and intermodulation products, which distort desired information. The second problem
is that of images. Interferers that are present at frequencies symmetrical from the desired band to the local oscillator (LO) are mixed into the same target band as the desired
channel. This corrupts the signal and degrades the receiver sensitivity. A larger difference between RF and LO signal allows for a simpler image rejection filter. But it also
raises the intermediate frequency (IF), making channel selection with practical on-chip
filters more difficult. Hence, there is a design trade-off between sensitivity and selectivity. The architectures described below display different design challenges, e.g. capability for monolithic integration, sensitivity/selectivity trade-off, linearity, and
power consumption.
Radio Receiver Architectures
17
Heterodyne Receiver
Conventional radio transceivers utilize the so called heterodyne architecture
(hetero = different, dyne = mix). This architecture, introduced first by [Armst1918],
usually has two or more stages for frequency conversion. An example is shown in
figure 1.11. A passive bandpass filter limits the input spectrum provided by the antenna. Due to noise introduced in the mixer, the signal is first amplified in a low noise amplifier (LNA). Interferers at frequencies symmetrically with fIF to the local oscillator
(LO) signal will create images during mixing. Hence, these bands have to be removed
by an image reject filter first. For that, the signal goes off-chip into an image rejection
(IR) filter using passives with high quality factor. Then, mixing with a tunable LO signal at RF downconverts the selected channel to IF. This LO1 output needs to be variable in small frequency steps for narrow band selection. To alleviate the aforementioned
sensitivity-selectivity trade-off in image rejection, an off-chip, high-Q bandpass filter
performs partial channel filtering at a relatively high intermediate frequency. A second
downconversion mixing step translates the signal down to baseband and further reduces the requirements for the final, integrated channel selection filter.
integrated
Channel
Select
I
ADC
Band
Select
Image
Reject
Channel
Select
LNA
LO 2
90°
LO1
ADC
off-chip
RF
RF
...
1 2 3 ... n
IF
LO1
...
f
Channel
Select
Q
...
1 2 3 ... n
2fIF
f
1 2 3 ... n
BB
BB
LO2
...
f
3
f
3
fIF
Figure 1.11: Example of a heterodyne receiver architecture with high-Q off-chip
filters.Channel selection is done partly at IF and partly at baseband.
f
18
Introduction
Digital modulation schemes, like those presented in section 1.3.1, use both in-phase
and quadrature elements of a signal. Both components can be generated in the second
mixing stage, as shown in figure 1.11. Since the channel of interest is already selected
by the first mixer, the frequency of the second LO is fixed.
Off-chip passive components provide filters with a high Q-factor. This results in
good performance for both sensitivity and selectivity and makes the heterodyne architecture a common choice. Furthermore, noise introduced by the local oscillator is less
problematic, as it is filtered by subsequent channel selection. The filters can be manufactured in different technologies, e.g. bipolar and CMOS. However, off-chip filtering
comes to the price of extra signal buffering (driving typically 50 Ohm loads), increased
complexity, higher power consumption and larger size. Drawbacks that are contradicting the goals of increased portability. Examples using a heterodyne architecture can be
found for instance in [Stetz1995], [Fenk1997], [Razav2001], and [Ahola2004].
Homodyne Receiver
The homodyne (homo = same, dyne = mix) architecture uses a single frequency
translation step to convert the RF channel directly to baseband without operations at
intermediate frequencies.
Channel
Select
I
ADC
Band
Select
LNA
90°
LO
ADC
off-chip
RF
integrated
Channel
Select
Q
BB
LO
...
1 23
...
BB
...
n
f
1 2 3
...
n
f
3
f
Figure 1.12: Zero-IF receiver architecture with quadrature downconversion.
It is therefore also called zero-IF or direct conversion architecture. Figure 1.12
shows this architecture for the case of quadrature downconversion. As in the hetero-
Radio Receiver Architectures
19
dyne case, an off-chip RF filter first performs band limitation, before the received signal is amplified by an integrated LNA. Channel selection is done by tuning the RF
frequency of the LO to the centre of the desired channel, making the image equal to the
desired channel. Hence, the problem of images is not present, and the off-chip IR filter
can be omitted. A subsequent channel selection low-pass filter (LPF) then removes
nearby channels or interferers prior to A/D conversion. Channel filtering is now possible entirely on-chip. But since neither image rejection filter nor channel select filtering
is done prior mixing, all adjacent channel energy is untreated. This requires the LPF
and ADC to have a sharp cutoff profile and high linearity, respectively. In the view of
low-Q values of integrated components this implies tougher design challenges.
A severe problem in homodyne receivers are DC offsets. If one mixer input contains
signal components from the second input, then mixing will generate a DC component.
Caused by leakage from the local oscillator to the LNA (or vice versa), self-mixing will
corrupt the baseband signal at DC and saturate subsequent processing blocks. If the receiver moves spatially, it receives reflected LO signals at the antenna which generates
time varying offsets. These DC offsets need to be compensated. One technique is to
disregard a small part of the signal band close to DC and employ a high-pass filter with
very sharp cutoff profile at low corner frequencies. This requires large time constants,
and hence, large capacitors, i.e. area. It is only practical for wide-band applications,
where the loss of a few tens of hertz bandwidth at DC does not degrade the receiver
performance significantly. For narrow band applications, this would cause large performance losses. Alternatively, in non-continuous transmission schemes, e.g. TDMA
access, the DC offset can be periodically sensed and compensated by the receiver during the quiescent time intervals. Compensation is either carried out prior to the ADC,
or in the digital domain using digital-to-analog conversion in a feedback path.
Due to direct conversion to DC, homodyne receivers are more susceptible to disturbances arising from I/Q phase mismatches, nonlinearities and flicker noise than heterodyne designs. To control the performance loss, additional circuitry and design efforts
are required. However, there is no need for image rejection or other off-chip filters,
saving power and total receiver volume. Its monolithic integration capabilities make
the homodyne architecture an attractive alternative for wireless receivers. More information regarding cancellation of offset and other limitations, can be found e.g. in
[Abidi1995], [Yoshi1998], [Razav1997], [Matin2000], [Namgo2001], [Cheun2001],
[Faulk2002], [Sohn2002], and [Cao2004]. If the RF signal is downconverted in a single step to a low (but not to DC) frequency, then limitations at DC have less impact on
the receiver performance. This approach is followed in low-IF architectures.
20
Introduction
Low-IF
In a low-IF architecture, example shown in figure 1.13, an off-chip bandpass filter
performs band selection prior to amplification by an LNA. In order to overcome the
drawbacks associated with the homodyne architecture, the RF signal is downconverted
to a frequency close to the baseband, but not including DC (typically between a several
100 kHz and few MHz). Hence, the problem of DC-offset is eliminated, and the effects
of flicker noise and distortion are notably reduced. Furthermore, the conversion is done
in a single step and all subsequent filtering can be performed on-chip. This improves
integration capabilities. Similar to zero-IF, a tuneable local oscillator selects the desired RF channel. However, the image from downconversion is now different from the
wanted signal and it has to be taken care of after the mixing stage. This can be achieved
with integrated complex bandpass filters or in the digital domain using DSPs. However, gain and phase errors originating from mismatches in the quadrature mixing limit
the image suppression. Compared to the homodyne architecture, power consumption
is increased (due to analog-to-digital conversion at IF). Moreover, bandpass filter and
ADC have to deal with double as wide bandwidth. Further details on low-IF receiver
architectures can be found for instance in [Seven1994], [Gray1995], [Crols1995],
[Crols1998], [Adise2002], and [Fang2005].
Channel
Select
I
ADC
Band
Select
LNA
LO
90°
ADC
off-chip
RF
Channel
Select
Q
integrated
...
123
BB
BB
LO
...
...
n
f
1 2 3
...
n
f
3
f
Figure 1.13: Low-IF receiver architecture with quadrature conversion.
Radio Receiver Architectures
21
Wideband-IF
An alternative to the designs above is the wideband-IF architecture shown in
figure 1.14. Signals that passed the off-chip band selecting filter are amplified in the
LNA and are then downconverted to IF. In contrast to the previous architectures, the
first local oscillator frequency is fixed. All available channels are converted to intermediate frequency, resulting in a wide bandwidth at IF. Upconverted frequency components are removed by a simple low-pass filter. Channel selection and filtering are
done at IF. The requirements for the tuneable LO and low-pass filter in the second
downconversion stage are relaxed due to the lower operation frequency. Hence, a narrow channel can be selected and filtered without off-chip components. Furthermore,
filtering can be performed partly in the digital domain, which adds to multi-standard
operation capabilities of this architecture. This flexibility comes to the expense of
higher linearity requirements of the ADC.
Channel
Select
I
ADC
Band
Select
LPF
LNA
LO 2
90°
LO1
off-chip
LO1
ADC
integrated
IF
RF
...
Channel
Select
Q
...
...
1 2 3 ... n
f
BB
BB
LO2
1 2 3 ... n
f
123
...
n
f
3
f
Figure 1.14: Wideband-IF receiver architecture.
Since the first local oscillator output is fixed and different from the channel frequencies, the problem of DC offset is alleviated in the wideband-IF architecture. The still
existing self-mixing in LO1 or LO2 results in constant DC offsets that can be removed
either in analog or digital domain. Isolation from the channel selection oscillator (LO2)
to the antenna is much larger than in the heterodyne case. This greatly reduces problems associated with time varying offsets. Using a fixed frequency at LO1 allows for
22
Introduction
phase noise optimization for this oscillator [Rudel1997]. Frequency conversion to IF
introduces images again. These can be removed using a Weaver architecture
[Weave1956], but mismatches between the I and Q paths limit the image suppression.
Also, additional components from the second conversion stage inevitably result in
larger power consumption. These problems are balanced by good monolithic integration capabilities and improved multi-standard prospects due to programmable filtering
in the DSP. Further information on wideband-IF architectures can be found for instance in [Rudel1997] and [Bernd2003].
2. Sigma-Delta Modulation
This chapter reviews the principle of sigma-delta modulation and characterizes different
noise shaping topologies, e.g. low and higher order modulators, single and multi-bit quantization, as well as continuous time modulation. At the end, design challenges are presented.
2.1 The Modulation Principle
Digital signal processing relies on discrete samples of data. According to the
Nyquist theorem, [Nyqui1928] and [Shann1949], the sampling (or processing) frequency, fs, has to be at least twice as large as the bandwidth of the input signal, fB, to
obtain an unambiguous reproduction of the signal. If this theorem is not fulfilled, aliasing will occur and information is lost. Data converters using fs = fNy = 2·fB are hence
called Nyquist converters. However, for reasons of noise margin and filter design complexity, a sampling speed of fs > fNy is usually applied.
As has been shown in literature, e.g. [Johns1997], the process of quantization can
be modelled a process where the output y(n) is determined from the input sample x(n)
plus an additive noise component e(n) as shown in figure 2.1. With the assumption that
the additive quantization noise is independent and has white distribution, its power Pe
is derived to equal ∆2 /12, where ∆ corresponds to the quantization step size. Therefore,
the spectral density of the quantization noise, Se(f) is constant for a certain ∆.
y(n)
e(n)
x(n)
=
x(n)
+
Figure 2.1: Linear quantizer model with additive noise source, e(n).
y(n)
24
Sigma-Delta Modulation
Sampling at a frequency much higher than the Nyquist rate is called oversampling
and the rate by which fs exceeds fNy is called the oversampling ratio, OSR
fs
fs
OSR = ------ = ------f Ny
2f B
(2.1)
Due to the white noise assumption, a larger sampling frequency causes the constant
quantization noise power to be distributed over a larger spectrum. This reduces the
noise power in the band of interest, fB. A filter that limits the band to fB cuts off all
noise components for f > fB reducing the remaining quantization noise power, Pe0,
within DC and fB. It can be shown [Norsw1997] that the quantization noise power is
decrease by a factor OSR. Each doubling of the oversampling ratio decreases the quantization noise power by a factor of two.
2
P e0
∆
1
= ------ ⋅ ----------12 OSR
(2.2)
E(z)
X(z)
+
-
H(z)
+
Y(z)
Figure 2.2: Linear model of sigma-delta modulator (1st order) with injection of
quantization noise E(z) in the quantizer.
The technique of sigma-delta (or delta-sigma) modulation originates from the
1960‘s [Inose1963] and 70‘s [Candy1974]. Its name is derived from the difference and
summing nodes in a loop configuration. Additional to oversampling, sigma-delta (Σ∆)
modulators modify the spectral properties of the quantization noise. They are said to
shape the noise spectral density, Se(f), such that it is low in the band of interest and
high elsewhere. This spectral shaping results from a negative feedback loop system as
shown in figure 2.2. Here, the linear quantizer model from figure 2.1 is employed. Signal input x(n) and quantization noise contribution e(n) are assumed to be independent,
leading to an examination using the superposition principle. With the help of the ztransform, the output is described as
The Modulation Principle
25
Y( z) = ( X(z ) – Y(z )) ⋅ H(z ) + E(z )
(2.3)
where H(z) denominates a generic filter function. Two transfer functions can be derived: A Signal Transfer Function (STF) and a Noise Transfer Function (NTF):
Y(z )
H(z )
STF ( z ) ≡ ----------- = --------------------X(z)
1 + H( z)
(2.4)
Y(z)
1
NTF ( z ) ≡ ----------- = --------------------E(z)
1 + H(z)
(2.5)
With equations (2.4) and (2.5), the loop output is determined as:
Y ( z ) = SFT ( z ) ⋅ X ( z ) + NTF ( z ) ⋅ E ( z )
(2.6)
In order to minimize the effect of quantization noise at the output, the NTF(z) should
reach its minimum in the band of interest. That is achieved when H(z) reaches its maximum, i.e. has a pole. However, STF(z) would be close to unity for a maximum of H(z),
leaving the input signal almost unchanged.
e(n)
x(n)
+
-
+
z
-1
+
y(n)
Figure 2.3: First order sigma-delta modulator with discrete time integrator.
First order noise shaping can be obtained by choosing the pole of H(z) to be located
at DC. A straightforward integrator satisfies this requirement having
1
H ( z ) = ----------z–1
(2.7)
A possible implementation of a first order sigma-delta modulator is shown in
figure 2.3. It is also called a single-loop, first order modulator architecture. With equation (2.7), the signal transfer functions becomes a simple delay
26
Sigma-Delta Modulation
1
----------z–1
1
–1
STF ( z ) = -------------------- = --- = z
1
z
1 + ----------z–1
(2.8)
whereas the noise transfer function describes a high-pass filter function
1
–1
NTF ( z ) = -------------------- = ( 1 – z )
1
1 + ----------z–1
(2.9)
The quantization noise power for first order noise shaping, Pe1, is approximated in
the band of interest [Johns1997] with
2
2
2 2
∆ π 2f 3
∆ π
1 3
P e1 ≈  ------  -----  -------B- = ------------  -----------
 12  3   f s 
36  OSR
(2.10)
Compared to equation (2.2), this is a significant reduction in quantization noise
power. Each doubling of OSR decreases this power now by a factor of 8. The higher
the filter order of H(z), the more quantization noise is moved out of the signal band fB.
Se(f)
Nyquist rate
Oversampling, with
noise shaping
Oversampling, no
noise shaping
f
fB
fNy
fB·OSR
Figure 2.4: Noise density of sigma-delta modulation for 1st and 2nd order
noise shaping compared to Nyquist rate and oversampling.
It should be noted, however, that sigma-delta modulation only alters the spectral
properties of the quantization noise. The noise power is shifted to higher frequencies
and still needs to be removed from the signal by means of low-pass filtering. In fact,
the total amount of quantization noise increases for higher modulation orders. The fil-
Modulator Topologies
27
tering is achieved by means of a decimation filter which also reduces the sampling rate
and thereby the number of samples to be processed in DSPs.
2.2 Modulator Topologies
Sigma-delta modulators find a wide range of applications in data conversion systems, especially where high signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) are required. As indicated in
equation (2.10), the reduction in noise power comes at the expense of a high sampling
speed. This inherently limits the application range of this modulation technique. For
instance, employing an oversampling ratio of OSR = 128 for a 20 kHz input signal, requires a sampling speed of 5.12 MHz. This relatively low sampling speed does not result in implementation difficulties. However, if the input is a wideband signal, of say
5 MHz, a sampling rate of fs = 1280 MHz is needed. A high sampling rate naturally
has a negative effect on power consumption. Also, some circuit technologies, e.g.
CMOS switched capacitor designs, are not suitable for high speed operation in the GHz
range. Hence, sigma-delta modulation has long been used in audio and narrow band
applications. In recent years however, modulators with input bandwidth extending into
the MHz range have been reported, e.g. [Fujim2000], [Geert2000a], [Tabat2000],
[Burge2001], [Salo2001], [Vleug2001], [Dezza2003], [Veldh2002], [Veldh2003].
To maintain a reasonable power consumption, the oversampling rate must be reduced for wideband applications, resulting in insufficient removal of quantization
noise. Thus, a different approach than brute force sampling rate increase must be taken.
Some options to expand the signal bandwidth while maintaining a high signal-to-quantization noise ratio (SNDR) are summarized below.
Higher Order Modulation
In a first order modulator, the quantization error from the previous sample is subtracted from the present sample. Higher order modulation is achieved by adding more
integration stages. This results in a sharper high-pass filter transfer function H(z) and
shapes the quantization noise more aggressively out of the input signal band. In general, a modulator of Mth order exhibits an M times better noise shaping property compared to a first order modulator, whereas the input is only delayed by a factor of M.
The SQNR improves by about (6·M+3) dB per octave of fs [Johns1997]. Equation
(2.11) presents a general modulator transfer function for an Mth order sigma-delta
modulator.
28
Sigma-Delta Modulation
Y(z) = X(z ) ⋅ z
–M
–1 M
+ E(z) ⋅ (1 – z )
(2.11)
The single loop topology in figure 2.5(a) is a straightforward extension of the simple
first order architecture presented in figure 2.3. Several integration stages are accommodated in a single loop. The gain stages in the feedback path adjust signal amplitudes.
Local feedback (or local resonators), introduced in [Fergu1991], can be added to shift
the NTF zeros away from DC to further reduce the inband noise power. A one bit quantizer reduces the DAC implementation in the feedback path to a simple switch with
good linearity.
(a)
δ
+
-
in
α
+
-
+
-
β
γ
out
DAC
(b)
2
in
+
-
+
+
out
DAC
Figure 2.5: Single loop higher order modulators: (a) chain of inverters and
local resonators; (b) low distortion feed forward architecture
An architecture using feed forward of the input signal, figure 2.5(b), has been proposed in [Steen1998] and [Silva2001] and was further developed in [Gothe2003]. It approaches the problem of integrator nonidealities such as finite slew rate and gain for
wideband applications at low oversampling ratios. The reduced sensitivity to circuit
nonidealities derives from decoupling of sensitive circuits from the input signal. The
Modulator Topologies
29
integrator stages ideally only process quantization noise, reducing their performance
requirements.
Major limitations to high order, single loop structures are concerns of stability. If the
input signal level to the quantizer exceeds its normal range, the quantizer becomes
overloaded, i.e. the quantization error becomes larger than ±∆/2. The system might not
be able to return to a stable state even if the quantizer input returns to low values. The
larger the number of integrators, the higher the risk to overload the quantizer. Solutions
to this problem lie in adding sensing circuitry to reset the modulator in the event of instability or by reducing the input signal level. The latter method impacts the dynamic
range performance, and hence, the sensitivity of the total receiver. Different methods
for this are discussed for instance in [Johns1997].
Alternative topologies are cascaded (MASH) modulator architectures. They employ
2 or more modulator loops, each comprising a low order modulator to maintain stability. Each following loop processes only the quantization noise of the previous loop,
which improves the total resolution. The quantization noise of the following loops is
subtracted from the output of the first loop in a digital error cancellation logic, further
reducing the total quantization noise. An architecture with four integration steps arranged in two 2nd order loops is shown in figure 2.6. This 2-2 MASH modulator provides 4th order noise shaping. The DACs in the feedback paths have the same
resolution as their corresponding quantizers, e.g. 1 bit.
in
+
-
+
-
Delay
+
+
-
-
DAC
Error
Cancellation
Logic
out
+
DAC
Figure 2.6: Cascaded modulator showing a 4th order, dual loop architecture.
The MASH topology was first introduced in [Matsu1987] and quickly gained much
interest in sigma-delta applications. The main advantage of a MASH architecture is the
high degree of noise shaping without emerging stability problems. In theory, there is
30
Sigma-Delta Modulation
no limit on how many cascades can be used. However, cascaded modulators require
very good matching between analog and digital processing paths. In practice, the second and following loops do not only process noise and the quantization error is not cancelled completely resulting in leakage noise at the modulator output. Furthermore,
internal signal level scaling impacts the dynamic range. In order to improve matching,
bigger analog components are used, increasing the silicon area. The larger number of
components also contributes to a higher power consumption.
Error Feedback Structure
A modulator using a noise shaping filter in the feedback part is the error feedback
topology shown in figure 2.7 [Anast1989], [Norsw1997]. Its transfer functions are
readily derived as STF = 1 and NTF = G(z)-1. This modulator leads to simple circuit
implementations. An important drawback, however, is its susceptibility to analog component mismatch. The zeros of the NTF, i.e. G(z) = 1, are not created by a large DC
gain. Therefore, small coefficient mismatches cause the remaining quantization noise.
Hence, this circuit is more suitable for digital modulator implementations, where no
component mismatches occur.
X(z)
Y(z)
+
-+
E(z)
G(z)-1
Figure 2.7: General, first order error feedback architecture.
Modulator Topologies
31
Multi-Bit Quantization
Another option for improving the signal to noise ratio at low oversampling ratios is
to extend the single bit quantization into multiple bits. This reduces the quantization
step size ∆, and hence lowers the quantization noise power. A more linear quantizer
gain allows for higher orders of noise shaping before the modulator reaches instability.
For single bit quantization, the feedback DAC comprises only a switch between positive and negative reference voltage. For the case of multi-bit quantization, a multi-bit
DAC is needed. Any nonlinearities that are introduced in the feedback DAC directly
add to the input signal and experience the same transfer function as the original input.
These nonlinearities are therefore not noise shaped, regardless of the filter transfer
function H(z). The effects of nonlinearities can be reduced by randomizing the errors
(dynamic element matching), employing digital compensation techniques, non uniform quantizing, and/or careful layout. For instance, modulators having a signal-tonoise ratio of larger than 90 dB have been reported in e.g. [Fujim2000], [Geert2000b],
and [Vleug2001]. However, each compensation technique also increases the required
die area and power consumption.
Continuous Time Modulators
Discrete time (DT) sigma-delta modulators use a sample and hold stage after the
anti-aliasing filter and prior to the actual modulator. These modulators are implemented using switched capacitor (SC) circuits. In order to comply to settling time requirements for fast sampling, the operational amplifier needs to have a high slew rate.
Alternatively, sigma-delta noise shaping can also be achieved in the continuous time
(CT) domain. These modulators employ sampling first after the noise shaping filter, as
part of the quantizer. Loop filtering remains in the analog domain. This already performs an anti-aliasing function which relaxes the requirements of the preceding filter
or even eliminates its need. Area and power advantage of CT modulators originate
from reduced kT/C-noise, as the input of the modulator is not a sampling capacitor.
Since much smaller capacitors can be employed, the settling time requirements are reduced, allowing for higher speed or lower power consumption.
However, as input subtraction and the noise shaping filter operate continuously,
clock jitter from the feedback path severely impacts the modulator SNR performance.
Furthermore, since the filter relies on absolute component values rather than capacitor
ratios, the impact of process and temperature variations is worse than for a SC implementation. To achieve similar performance, CT modulators require additional power/
32
Sigma-Delta Modulation
area expensive biasing, tuning, compensation, and calibration techniques. These and
other techniques are described for instance in [Cherr1999], [Gerfe2001], [Henke2002],
[Ortma2002], [Veldh2003], and [Thoma2005].
Future Design Challenges
Sigma-delta modulation employs oversampling and noise shaping to obtain high
signal to noise ratios. Trading precision in amplitude for resolution in time, they rely
on high operating speeds for relatively small signal bandwidths. Traditionally, sigmadelta modulators have preferably been used in narrow band applications.
An eminent challenge for sigma-delta application in wireless radios is the demand
for ever more bandwidth, i.e. several tens of MHz. Simply increasing the operating frequency would result in prohibitively large power consumption and also renders circuit
implementation very difficult. New modulator architectures have to be designed that
obtain sufficient SNR at low oversampling ratios. An increase of modulator order, use
of multi-bit quantization as well as continuous time loop filtering are further measures
to qualify sigma-delta modulators for wideband applications. Additional circuitry for
more modulator loops, compensation and tuning circuits contrast the design goals for
lower power consumption and smaller die size.
Continuous time, single loop modulators with single bit quantization are suitable for
wideband applications of up to 5 MHz bandwidth (e.g. Bluetooth, WCDMA, GSM).
For larger bandwidths, like WLAN, continuous time, single loop modulators with multi-bit quantization are preferable [LeGui2005].
With continuing technology development, device sizes are scaled down. Following
the projection of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors
[ITRS04], feature sizes around 30 nm by the year 2010 can be expected. Shrinking gate
oxide thickness of active devices is likewise anticipated. This in turn requires the supply voltage to drop (about 0.7 Volt in 2010) to maintain similar electric field strengths,
leaving very low margins for device operation and noise immunity. New architectures
and devices for circuits like amplifiers are essential for operation in such supply realm.
Another design challenge is that for ultra-low power consumption. A low supply
voltage contributes to this goal. But the increase of circuit complexity offsets this advantage. Especially in the field of multi-standard operation, hardware sharing between
the standards should be maximized.
Although CMOS circuits consume most power during switching operation, static
consumption due to leakage currents plays an increasing role. Arising from gate tun-
Modulator Topologies
33
nelling and junction or sub-threshold leakage, these currents remain in the order of few
nA, but the large number of digital gates needed for sophisticated filtering sums up to
significant amount of power that is dissipated even in a non-active state. Future implementations of sigma-delta converters should therefore include shut down/wake up
functions for both, analog and digital signal processing.
Another design challenge is noise immunity. Integration of RF and analog baseband
circuits onto the same die as the digital logic makes the analog circuits prone to noise
from switching events in the digital domain. This materializes for instance in form of
substrate noise coupling, signal crosstalk or power supply variations. Noise isolation
can be improved by increasing the on-chip distance between analog and digital circuit
blocks, separate power supplies, design of defined signal return paths and improved
layouts. However, this not only raise die costs, but also lowers the production yield.
Hence, alternative technologies, e.g. silicon on insulator (SOI), are envisioned to solve
the noise coupling problem.
Future sigma-delta topologies need to incorporate innovative solutions on device,
circuit and system level. Nevertheless, sigma-delta modulators are well suited for
wideband applications, as they provide high signal to quantization noise ratios and offer relaxed requirements of preceding analog filters. Their qualification for standard
CMOS processes contributes to low-cost wireless radio transceiver implementations.
Further discussions and applications of sigma-delta modulator topologies can be found
for instance in [Boser1988], [Schre1989], [Jantz1991], [Zhang1991], [Candy1992],
[Karem1994], [Baird1995], [Razav1995], [Brook1997a], [Brook1997b], [Johns1997],
[Norsw1997], [Marqu1998], [Li2003], [Li2003], and [Gothe2003].
34
Sigma-Delta Modulation
3. Frequency-Locked Loop
Chapter three introduces a novel frequency synthesizer concept and architecture. Placing
emphasis on flexibility of frequency bands, its applications are envisioned in a multi-standard,
multi-band environment of future wireless radio communications. The synthesizer uses a negative feedback loop to lock on a target output frequency. The architecture and its processing
blocks are described, their functionality is analysed and design trade-offs as well as limitations
are presented. In the end of this chapter, simulation results and possible directions for further
research are presented. Frequency synthesizer concepts and application areas are reflected
over in the beginning of this chapter.
3.1 Frequency Synthesizer Concepts
Frequency Synthesizers, FS, form an essential part in any wireless communication
device. Their tasks include e.g. clock signal alignment and recovery for data exchange
over different frequency domains, carrier generation and clock multiplication, deskewing, modulation, and spectrum spreading. When used for carrier generation, parameters like frequency accuracy (or phase noise) and spurious tones, settling time,
frequency (channel) step size, as well as power consumption characterize the performance.
Frequency synthesizers often employ oscillation devices. One option is the use of
off-chip crystal oscillators. They have limited ability for frequency tuning, but provide
very accurate, though low frequency signal sources. They are often used to provide reference signals. Being an off-chip component, they contribute to larger volume and
higher manufacturing cost. L-C oscillators, on the other hand, are on-chip devices that
output high frequencies over a wide spectrum. However, their on-chip passives have a
low Q-value, making the synthesizer output susceptible to noise. Larger sizes of inductors and capacitors address this problem but increase the die size. Hence, L-C oscillators are put inside feedback loops to compensate for their frequency drifting.
In the following section, selected frequency synthesizer concepts used in communication applications are reviewed before the novel architecture is introduced.
36
Frequency-Locked Loop
Ring Oscillators
As illustrated in figure 3.1, ring oscillators have a straightforward implementation.
They consist of a chain of inverters and a feedback of unity gain. Each inverter drives
one other inverter and contributes with delay, τinv, to the today delay of the chain. In
order to maintain oscillation, the number of inverters, M, has to be at least three and
must be odd. To realize different clock frequencies and phases, the oscillation signal
can be taken out after any of the inverters.
1
2
3
2n+1
Figure 3.1: Ring oscillator using an odd number of inverters in a chain.
Assuming identical delay values for each of the M inverters of the chain, the ring
oscillator frequency is determined by equation (3.1),
1
f osc = ---------------------, M = 3, 4, …, ( 2n + 1 )
2M ⋅ τ inv
(3.1)
where n ∈ N, n > 0. The oscillator output frequency can be varied by changing the
number of inverters in the chain or adjusting the block delay τinv. Ring oscillators produce outputs that resemble pulse signals and hence, they are suited for digital processing. Each inverter also adds jitter to the output signal. As this is not compensated, ring
oscillators are appropriate only for applications that have an inherent jitter tolerance.
The phase of the output signal is not aligned to a reference, which excludes signal
processing or communication applications using phase informations. However, the absence of off-chip components and the straightforward design and implementation of
ring oscillators still make them an attractive choice.
Frequency Synthesizer Concepts
37
Delay-locked Loop
The delay-locked loop, as depicted in figure 3.2, can be seen as an extension of the
ring oscillator architecture. A chain of buffers with variable delay forms a delay line,
which is driven by an input clock, CLKin. Phase alignment between CLKin and the
loop output signal, CLKout, is accomplished by adding delay to the input. Phase differences between delay line output and its reference, CLKref, are discriminated in the
phase detector (PD). The output of the phase detector is typically integrated by a charge
pump and processed by a loop filter to produce a control voltage, Vc. This voltage regulates the delay by either adjusting supply voltage or capacitive load of the buffers. As
the loop has negative feedback, the output phase approaches the reference phase.
Delay-locked loops achieve clock synchronization between different circuit domains. Adding delay can also be used to generate multiple or quadrature clock phases.
Another application of DLLs are clock multiplication or division which is particularly
interesting when a clock is to be distributed with a lower rate on the board level in order
to address signal to noise or power consumption problems.
The basic delay-locked loop is implemented in a straightforward design and comprises mainly digital elements. Hence, it does not require off-chip components, which
in turn reduces implementation costs. Restricted phase capture ranges typical limit the
application for DLLs. In [Sidir1997], a dual DLL is presented that offers an unlimited,
i.e. modulo 2π phase shift option. More recent developments of delay-locked loops
have been reported in e.g. [Suspl2003], [Zhuan2003], and [Chang2005].
CLKin
CLK out
Vc
PD
CLKref
Figure 3.2: Block diagram of a delay-locked loop
38
Frequency-Locked Loop
Direct Digital Synthesis
As the name implies, these synthesizers generate their output waveform digitally.
The points of the waveform, i.e. the phase increments, that are to be synthesized are
stored in memory, typically in a fixed or programmable ROM. To access the predetermined phase values of the memory, a counter operating in wrap around mode selects
an address where digital numbers are stored. These numbers correspond to amplitude
values of the waveform that is to be generated. Digital-to-analog conversion of the
ROM values produces an analog wave. The resulting signal is finally low-pass filtered
and amplified to reduce spurious tones and to produce the required signal level.
Tuning of the direct digital synthesizer is achieved by changing the step size in the
counter. This is effectively a division of the reference clock. A larger step size completes the full phase cycle faster and the output frequency increases. A smaller step size
causes the cycle to take longer time for completion of a full cycle. Hence, the output
frequency decreases. Changes of the counter value will instantly result in a step size
change. There is no need for a settling time as in the case for feedback loop synthesizers. This makes the direct digital synthesizer a highly agile circuit.
ROM
LPF
DAC
Counter
fout
0...2n, 0...2n , ...
fclk
1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0
90
a
a
b
0
b
180
time
270
Figure 3.3: Direct Digital Synthesis Architecture based on read only memory
Frequency Synthesizer Concepts
39
The frequency resolution at the output is determined by the number of points available in the memory accessed by the counter. A small phase step size conceptually requires the ROM to be large. Much research focuses on reducing the ROM size or even
omitting it [Morte1999]. For generated waveforms of high amplitude resolution, a
large number of bits in the DAC is required. That leads to increased costs regarding
area and power consumption.
An inherent limitation to DDS synthesizers is their dependency on a reference clock.
that is already larger than the maximum intended output frequency. To satisfy the
Nyquist criteria, the reference clock has to be at least twice as high as the maximum
generated frequency. This makes this synthesizer type unsuitable for RF applications
where a high (carrier) frequency is to be generated from a low rate source within the
circuit. Further information about recent direct digital synthesizers can be found in,
[Mohie2002], [Vankk1998], [Calba2002], [Yamag1998], [Bella2000], [Jiang2002],
[Madis1999], [Toros2003], [Nosak2001], [Richt2001] and [Morte1999].
Phase-locked Loop
A phase-locked loop, PLL, is a closed-loop control system that uses phase adjustments to achieve either frequency generation, phase alignment or both. The loop parameter is the phase difference between the oscillator output and a provided reference.
A delay-locked loop operates by adding delay until two input signals are phase aligned.
A phase-locked loop, however, increases or decreases the oscillator output frequency
to reduce the phase difference to acceptable levels.
A block diagram of a PLL is shown in figure 3.4. A phase and frequency detector,
PFD, discriminates amount and sign of phase difference. The amount is expressed as
a pulse length, whereas the sign, whether the input leads or lags, is expressed as the
pulse being present on either UP or DN signal. The phase error pulse of length ∆t is
converted into a voltage by integration with a charge pump, CP. For a leading input
signal, the oscillator frequency is increased by raising the control voltage, Vc. For a
lagging input, the oscillator control voltage is reduced by decreasing Vc. The succeeding loop filter, with transfer function F(s), extracts the DC component of Vc before biasing a voltage (or current) controlled oscillator, VCO (or ICO).
The VCO output is fed back to the detector via a divider stage to reduce the high rate
signal to a frequency close to the reference. This division is accomplished by detection
of zero crossing and omitting of pulses. Due to negative feedback, the PLL output frequency tracks the reference input rate with a multiple of factor N, i.e.
40
Frequency-Locked Loop
f OUT = N ⋅ f REF
(3.2)
In order to tune the PLL to different output frequencies, the divider ratio is modified.
The most straightforward implementation of rate changing is integer-N division, for instance presented in [Parke1998] and [Herna2002]. As the name suggests, the divider
ratio is changed only with integer step size, carried out by e.g. a counter or pulse swallowing circuit.
VC
∆t
t
PFD
fREF
CP
VCO
Loop Filter
UP
+-
fOUT
DN
Divider
fFB << fOUT
÷N
÷ N/N+1
Σ∆
÷N/N+1
Integer-N
Fractional-N
Sigma-Delta
Fractional-N
Figure 3.4: Architecture of a phase-locked loop and possible divider implementations.
A PLL is a system with contradicting design objectives. Modern communication applications need to use their available spectrum efficiently.They desire a high synthesizer output frequency and a small channel bandwidth. This in turn requires the PLL to
provide a small step size at the output which is accomplished with a small reference
input rate. A second important design objective is the realisation of output changes
within in short time. The design contradiction lies in the loop dynamics of the PLL. Inside the closed loop bandwidth, the transfer function gain is high. This implies that ref-
Frequency Synthesizer Concepts
41
erence changes at frequencies much below the loop bandwidth are tracked well by the
oscillator. However, phase changes at frequencies outside the loop bandwidth are subject to much lower transfer function gain. Hence, they are not tracked well. A small
fREF also results in a slower settling time of the output. An alternative to equation (3.2)
is that the division ratio could be chosen to be small. Though that would cause detector,
charge pump and low-pass filter to operate at a high speed.
Fractional-N loops overcome much of this problem. The output frequency can be
changed in smaller (not only integer) fractions of the reference input. In practice, the
division ratio is an average between two integers, say N and N+1. The reference frequency can now be much higher, allowing a larger loop bandwidth and hence, faster
settling. However, spectral spurs occur at the output at multiples of the changing rate
between N and N+1, causing problems in transceiver applications. These spurs can be
reduced by randomizing the division rate change. One possible option for this is sigmadelta (Σ∆) modulation of the feedback division ratio e.g. presented in [Riley1993],
[Filio1998], [Rhee2000], [Lee2001], [Tang2001], and [Ahola2003].
Another approach for fast frequency lock and small channel spacing is the dual-loop
synthesizer, presented for instance in [Aytur1997], [Yan2001], and [Kan2002]. The
output of a variable, low frequency loop is mixed with a fixed, high output frequency
loop. Nonlinearities in the mixer or loop mismatches can, however, degrade the synthesizer noise performance due to side band spurs. A variation to this is the dual-PLL
architecture, e.g. [Yuen1997], comprising two individual loops. During one PLL supplies the output signal, the other is locking to a new output frequency. Frequency agility is limited by the selecting switch. Drawbacks of this architecture are larger chip area
and power consumption.
Table 2: Qualitatively Overview for selected frequency synthesizer concepts
Phase Noise
Switching
Speed
Tuneability
Complexity
Wireless
Usability
Ring Osc.
High
--
Low
Low
Limited
DDS
Medium
High
High
High
No
DDL
Low
Medium
High
Medium
Yes
PLL
Low
Medium
High
High
Yes
Wireless communication applications, typically employing radio frequencies, demand synthesizers with low phase noise, fast channel switching, wide tuning bandwidth as well as low circuit complexity and power consumption. In order to find a
42
Frequency-Locked Loop
satisfactory design solution, a designer needs to trade off these different and sometimes
contradicting design objectives. Table 2 qualitatively summarizes the presented frequency synthesizer concepts with respect to different performance factors. Feedback
systems like delay- or phase-locked loops imply more complicated and power hungry
circuits. However, they justify this with very low phase noise values that are required
by many communication applications. More detailed descriptions about building
blocks, loop analysis, noise impact and design trade-offs of phase-locked loops can be
found e.g. in [Best1984], [Crawf1994], [Egan2000], and [Razav2000].
3.2 Frequency-Locked Loop
An alternative way to frequency synthesis is presented in this thesis. Owing to operation in different frequency bands and with different performance specifications,
multi-standard applications require a large degree of flexibility. An overall guideline
for this synthesizer architecture was therefore the possibility of uncomplicated configurability. The synthesizer targets the generation of frequencies in different bands by
means of frequency multiplication from a highly accurate, low frequency reference. It
does not aim for phase lock. Possible options for phase looking are briefly discussed
later in this chapter.
3.2.1 Synthesizer Architecture and Principle
Wireless radio communication applications using frequency division or frequency
hopping access technologies utilize only a limited number of frequencies for channel
implementation. Hence, the synthesizer needs to generate a set of discrete channel centre frequencies.
The architecture of the frequency-locked loop, FLL, is presented in figure 3.5. It
shows a loop employing negative feedback to stabilize its output frequency to a multiple of a given reference. This reference is split into two entities: a time signal of frequency fREF and a digital value information, NREF. Contrary to traditional PLLs, where
the output is tuned by changes in the feedback divider, the FLL keeps the feedback ratio, N, at a constant value. Output frequency changes are performed by changing the
digital reference word instead. This moves the loops tuning point into the detector and
Frequency-Locked Loop
43
simplifies divider implementation to an integer-N type with constant and low division
ratio.
Detection
Conversion
VCO 2
fREF
Detector
...
...
Channel
Sequence
Generator
∆VC
N D IFF
N R EF
DAC
VC
LPF
fVCO
VCO 1
Sign
Divider
f FB=fVCO /N
Figure 3.5: Frequency-locked loop block diagram with generic DAC
A consequence of the twofold reference is the straightforward implementation of the
reference sequence. Synthesizer applications that require a repeated change of output
frequency, e.g. spread spectrum or frequency hopping, need a predetermined sequence
of output rates. In PLLs, this is implemented as a sequence of divider values in memory
or as external command. The presented frequency-locked loop uses a set of multi-bit
reference words that is provided by the Channel Sequence Generator in figure 3.5. It
can simply be implemented as read only memory (ROM) or alternatively as part of the
digital signal processing. Application to a different standard is simplified by modifying
the word sequence of NREF instead of implementing complex divider hardware.
Figure 3.6 shows definitions of detection and conversion phase as well as the relation of reference and feedback signals. The reference time period, TREF = 1/fREF, is divided into two phases. The duty cycle of TREF forms the detection phase where
possible frequency differences are discovered. The number of completed feedback periods, TFB = 1/fFB = N/fVCO, that occur during each detection phase, is compared to
the predetermined value NREF. At the end of the detection phase, the detector stores a
multi-bit word, NDIFF, and the detection process is suspended. NDIFF represents the
amount of frequency (period) difference between NREF and the feedback signal, making the detector a frequency to digital converter. One additional bit delivers the sign
information, i.e. whether the loop output frequency is faster or slower than its target
value.
44
Frequency-Locked Loop
The second phase, i.e. the remaining time of TREF, is the conversion phase. A digital-to-analog converter (DAC) succeeding the detector converts NDIFF into an analog
voltage, ∆VC, that subsequently controls the oscillator frequency. Using the time reference with fREF as an enable signal for both DAC and detector ensures that only a
completed detection result is further processed. The detector resolution limits how accurate a following control voltage can be produced. In the design and simulations presented in this thesis, a duty cycle time of α = 50% is assumed. However, other values
for α are possible, allowing for further design freedom.
τ settle
TREF
Detection Phase
Conversion Phase
Time Reference
fR EF
Feedback Signal
f FB
Figure 3.6: Definitions of synthesizer signals and phases.
The feedback signal is not only an input to the detector. It also serves as a clock signal to the digital parts in the architecture. Therefore, no additional clock needs to be
provided externally, the synthesizer clocks itself.
The settling time τsettle is composed of the detection phase, i.e. α·TREF, and the time
needed for digital-to-analog conversion. This D/A conversion time must be smaller
than the duration of the conversion phase. Otherwise, the oscillator control voltage is
altered during the following detection phase, which would distort the following detector result. To ensure that τsettle < TREF, a sufficiently high clock rate must be chosen
with the feedback division ratio.
After settling of the DAC output, the voltage change ∆VC is low-pass filtered and
added to VC, the control voltage finally applied to the VCO, that had been unchanged
until then. This control voltage VC adjusts the oscillator output frequency. For operation in different frequency bands, VC can be switched to one of several VCOs. This
enables reuse of the synthesizer architecture and avoids the use of wide band oscillators. The reference value NREF has to be adjusted accordingly for each targeted output
band.
Frequency-Locked Loop
45
3.2.2 Detection Process
The detector identifies the number of completed feedback periods that occur during
the detection phase. A straightforward implementation of the detector is the realization
as a synchronous counter in a count-down mode as shown in figure 3.7. The counter is
loaded with the current value of NREF during the previous conversion phase. The feedback signal is used to trigger counting events, whereas the reference signal with frequency fREF is used as an enable signal. Each NREF value corresponds to a particular
target frequency. At the end of the detection phase, counting stops and the remaining
counter value and sign, representing a frequency difference, are stored in a register for
further processing during the conversion phase. The detector can therefore also be seen
as a frequency-to-digital converter with its resolution limited to 1TFB. Additional signals for load and reset commands need to be supplied by the controller circuit that also
instructs channel or application changes.
Stop counting,
store results,
preload NREF again
Begin of
counting
operation
Reset
fREF
fR EF
fFB
Load
NDIFF
Sign
J
Q
K
J
fFB
Q
K
Q
NDIFF
J
NREF
Counter
...
...
NREF
K
J
Q
K
...
Figure 3.7: Detector implementation as counter in count-down mode. Prior to the detection
phase, the counter is loaded with the current NREF value.
46
Frequency-Locked Loop
Detector Functionality
The following derivations aim for a functional description of the detector. It should
be noted that the reference inputs are considered to be ideal, i.e. the bit values of NREF
are assumed to be stable without glitches and fREF originates from an external signal
source such as a crystal oscillator or a SAW device. The effect of timing errors on the
detector output will be illustrated later in this section. Considering figure 3.6, the
number of completed feedback periods that can be counted during the detection phase,
Ncnt, is determined by the ratio
N cnt =
α ⋅ T REF
-------------------T FB
=
α ⋅ T REF
--------------------N ⋅ T VCO
=
α ⋅ f VCO
------------------N ⋅ f REF
(3.3)
with α again being the duty cycle factor, 0 < α < 1. Replacing periods with frequencies
and taking the feedback division ratio N into account, the required bit width of the
counter, Bm, is expresses as
Bm =
α ⋅ f VCOmax 
log 2  --------------------------- 
 N⋅f
REF
(3.4)
The value fVCOmax in equation (3.4) is the highest designed oscillator output frequency, including possible frequency drifts. The ceiling function … in equation (3.4)
originates from the assumption of binary processing.
For given values of α, TREF, and N in equation (3.3), each value of Ncnt corresponds
to a certain VCO frequency (though not vice versa, as the periods are counted in discrete time intervals). The values of NREF are the expected, predetermined counter outputs within the possible range of Ncnt. At the end of the detection phase, the counter
output NDIFF = NREF - Ncnt represents a detected frequency difference. Larger VCO
frequencies result in higher values of Ncnt. The maximum detected difference Ndiff,max
is therefore given as
max ( N DIFF ) = max ( N REF – N cnt ) = N cnt, H – N cnt, L
(3.5)
where Ncnt,H and Ncnt,L are the highest and lowest expectation values, respectively.
Applying equation (3.3) to (3.5) leads to
max ( N DIFF ) =
α ⋅ T REF
α ⋅ T REF
--------------------------- – -------------------------N ⋅ T VCO, H
N ⋅ T VCO, L
(3.6)
Frequency-Locked Loop
47
Substituting frequencies for periods in equation (3.6) yields
α ⋅ ( fH – f L )
α ⋅ ( f H – fL )
---------------------------- – 1 < max ( N DIFF ) ≤ ---------------------------- + 1
N ⋅ f REF
N ⋅ f REF
(3.7)
where fH and fL are the highest and lowest output frequencies for a particular band
∆f = |fH-fL| as shown in figure 3.8. The required bit width, BDIFF, to represent possible
differences at the detector output is then
α ⋅ ( f H – fL )
α ⋅ ( fH – f L )
log 2  ---------------------------- – 1 < B DIFF ≤ log2  ----------------------------
N ⋅ f REF
N ⋅ f REF
(3.8)
α ⋅ ∆f
α ⋅ ∆f
log 2  ------------------- – 1 < B DIFF ≤ log 2  ------------------- + 1
N ⋅ f REF
N ⋅ f REF
(3.9)
For a zero frequency difference, or differences smaller than the detector resolution,
the counter output is zero. However, the VCO cannot be driven to the correct frequency
by a zero voltage. NDIFF therefore only represents a voltage change, ∆Vc, and not the
final control voltage, Vc, itself. For the duration of detection and conversion, i.e. τsettle,
Vc is stored at the oscillator input.
∆f2
∆f1
fL2
fL1
∆f3
fH 1
f H2
fL3
fH 3
f
Figure 3.8: Definition of different spectra for frequency synthesis.
Application Trade-offs
The synthesizer architecture allows to trade off operational parameters to react to
changing requirements from different applications. A first trade-off is that of settling
speed, τsettle, versus accuracy of the control voltage. As VC is updated within one TREF,
the settling time is bound to the reference period. The most significant contribution to
τsettle is the detection phase (α·TREF). Hence, the most effective way to reduce the set-
48
Frequency-Locked Loop
tling time of the synthesizer is to reduce TREF, or an increase of fREF, while N and α
are kept constant. Shortening the detection phase also reduces the detector resolution,
as fewer feedback periods are now counted. This will in turn reduce the accuracy of the
analog control voltage. After hardware implementation, the bit width of the digital
blocks is fixed, only the used range of processed values changes. If for instance only
10 of 12 available bits are used, then the 2 leading MSBs are zero. The digital reference
NREF and DAC conversion gain need to be adjusted to accommodate for the different
voltage equivalent of one LSB. The time-accuracy trade-off also applies in reverse. A
longer detection phase allows for higher detector resolution. This trade-off enables the
synthesizer to operate with variable output frequency steps: For instance fast settling
with coarse frequency step size (e.g. tracking of channel switching) and slow settling
with small frequency variations (e.g. maintaining of a target output rate).
A second trade-off apparent from equation (3.8) is between settling speed and detection range, ∆f. Also here it is assumed that α and N are kept constant. If another application requires a different detection range, say ∆f2 = β·∆f1, the synthesizer can
accommodate this change if the reference frequency is modified to fREF,2 = fREF,1/β.
As fREF translates into settling time, the trade-off is between wide band synthesis with
slower settling and a small band, but fast settling operation. Again, the values of NREF
need to be adjusted accordingly to maintain detector resolution. Shifting the synthesizer application from ∆f1 to ∆f3, only influences internal counter bit width Bm, but not
its BDIFF if ∆f1 = ∆f3.
A third trade-off between ∆f and detection accuracy becomes feasible if the counting step size is made variable. An increased oscillator range can be covered for larger
counter steps. For instance, only every second feedback edge will trigger a counting
event, while NREF and fREF are kept constant. A one LSB change would then represent
a larger voltage step, degrading the resolution of the detector voltage. This is effectively a variation of the division ratio.
Detector Limitations
The detection process has inherent limitations. The frequency discrimination process is confined to the detection phase. During the conversion phase, the counter is inhibited, which means that is it blind to frequency changes at the output. This blind
zone, δbz, is the time of the conversion phase and can be expressed as:
δ bz = ( 1 – α ) ⋅ T REF
(3.10)
Frequency-Locked Loop
49
This differs from the detection mechanism in phase-locked loops. Their detector
output is updated with the reference rate. In order to drive the VCO, the steady state
phase error in a PLL is set to a fixed, non-zero value, e.g. to π. Phase changes occurring
after the steady state phase error will be accounted for in the following reference cycle.
For the same reference frequency, the blind zone in the proposed architecture is therefore as large as in traditional PLLs.
Ncnt
Ncnt
2
δdz(fε«f REF )
5
4
3
2
1
δ dz(fε »fREF)
1
1/2
Bm
1/2
Bm-1
∆t
-1
∆t
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
Figure 3.9: Dead zone δdz for different appearance rate fε, as well as detector output step size
Noise inflicting the synthesizer will alter the feedback period length TFB, thereby
impacting the counter result. The number of feedback periods occurring during the detection phase is compared to the digital reference value. If period errors appear at a rate
fε, that is comparable to the reference signal, fε ≅ fREF, the timing error magnitude
needs to exceed one TFB in order to cause a detector output change.
N
δ dz ( f ε ≈ f REF ) ≥ T FB = ----------f VCO
(3.11)
50
Frequency-Locked Loop
However, period errors that appear often compared to the reference signal, i.e.
fε >> fREF, will be summed during the detection phase, up to Ncnt times. This means
that a period difference as small as TFB/Ncnt causes the detector output to change.
2
N ⋅ f REF
T FB
- = ---------------------δ dz ( f ε » f REF ) ≥ ----------2
N cnt
α ⋅ f VCO
(3.12)
The error δdz from equations (3.11) and (3.12) is defined as the dead zone of the detector. That means that δdz is the smallest detectable timing error. The property of higher sensitivity to errors that appear often during the detection phase is consistent to their
higher impact on the oscillator output frequency. It should be noted that fε is the frequency of frequency error appearance, not the frequency difference itself. The effect
of jitter will be illustrated in more detail below. High rate period errors with opposite
sign will largely chancel out. Equations (3.11) and (3.12) provide a design guideline to
fulfil accuracy requirements of target applications. Figure 3.9 depicts both, detector
dead zone and its step wise output change due to period errors ∆t.
As TFB varies with the oscillator frequency, the synthesizer needs to be designed
such that its resolution still fulfils the requirements for frequency track and hold operations at its lowest output rate and for all targeted applications.
Detector Timing Errors
So far, description of detector functionality assumed ideal conditions. Two types of
timing errors impacting the detection process are identified. These error sources origin
from phase offsets between the detector inputs and from jitter in the feedback signal.
For the following analysis, the inputs to the detector are assumed to be square wave
signals. The analysis can, however, be extended to cover other signals such as sine
waves, and no generality is lost. It will further be assumed that the reference time signal
is provided by an ideal signal source, i.e. it is free from phase drifts and jitter components.
The feedback signal can, however, be subject to a time shift with respect to the reference. This results in a delay for the first triggering impulse in the counter and corresponds to a constant time shift during the ith detection phase. Denoted as tφ(i), this
phase offset is depicted in figure 3.10. A second type of detector error arises from jitter,
i.e. high frequency variations on each individual feedback edge during the ith detection
phase. Jitter errors are shown as coloured area in figure 3.10. These errors originate
Frequency-Locked Loop
51
from timing variations in oscillator and feedback divider. They are here denoted as
δj(i), with j = (1, 2, … , k) being the number of feedback edged within the ith detection
phase. Though the magnitude of each jitter contribution is small compared to TFB, the
amount of jitter will sum up during detection. In worst case, the jitter components have
equal sign and accumulate over TREF/2, thereby contributing to detector errors.
Counting starts with the reference duty cycle at time t0. Only rising feedback edges
at t > t0 trigger a counting event. Counting finishes at t = t3, with the last accounted
feedback edge occurring at t2 ≤ t3. Outside the detection window, i.e. for t > t3, the
counter is idle. This limits possible jitter accumulation in the loop to a duration of
TREF/2, as the loop will appear open during the conversion period.
TREF/2
Reference
δ1 (i)
δk-1 (i) δk(i)
δ2 (i)
...
Feedback
tφ(i)
t0
time
TFB
t1
t2
t3
Figure 3.10: Time offset and jitter contribution in detector.
With the assumptions above, the number of actual trigger events, M, is determined
by the two inequalities (3.13) and (3.14):
M
M ⋅ T FB ( i ) + t φ ( i ) +
T REF
∑ δk ( i ) < ----------2
(3.13)
k=1
M+1
( M + 1 ) ⋅ T FB ( i ) + t φ ( i ) +
∑
k=1
Solving (3.13) and (3.14) for M yields
T REF
δ k ( i ) > -----------2
(3.14)
52
Frequency-Locked Loop
M
∑ δk ( i )
T REF
tφ ( i )
=1
M < ------------------- – k--------------------- – ---------------2T FB ( i )
T FB ( i )
T FB ( i )
and
(3.15)
M+1
∑ δk ( i )
T REF
tφ ( i )
k=1
M > ------------------- – ---------------------- – ---------------- – 1
2T FB ( i )
T FB ( i )
T FB ( i )
(3.16)
From expressions (3.15) and (3.16), the number of rising edges in the presence of
phase offsets and jitter errors is derived as
M( i) =
T REF
------------ – t φ ( i )
2
-----------------------------------T FB ( i ) + δ M ( i )
(3.17)
where δ M ( i ) is the mean of the jitter components during the ith detection phase. Due to
the large number of counting events, and assuming white Gaussian noise distribution
for the jitter, this mean value is zero:
M
1
δ M ( i ) = ----M
∑ δk ( i )
= 0
(3.18)
k=1
Then, the jitter contribution in equation (3.17) can be neglected. However, if error
sources cause the mean value to drift, e.g. due to temperature changes or power supply
variations, then δ M ( i ) contributes to M(i). A deviation in M(i) due to timing errors can
be observed and compensated if
M
tφ ( i ) +
∑
1
δ k ( i ) ≥ ----------Bm
2
k=1
(3.19)
Even a small change in jitter mean is identified, as its effect is amplified by a factor
equal to the number of rising edges within the detection phase. The final detector output including timing uncertainties is given as:
N DIFF ( i ) = N REF ( i ) – M ( i )
(3.20)
Frequency-Locked Loop
53
3.2.3 Conversion Process
With the beginning of the conversion phase, NDIFF needs to be converted into an analog voltage. Digital-to-analog conversion can be realized with different converter architectures. An apparent DAC implementation is the addition of binary weighted
voltages, e.g. using resistors or capacitors. But this requires the value of the passive
component to double for each additional bit. A more effective way to convert digital
information into an analog output voltage are for instance R/2R networks. The Thevenin resistance to ground seen from any point in the ladder towards the LSB is one R.
This makes the converter independent of the absolute value or R. A change in the reference voltage changes the converter gain. However, matching of the resistor values is
critical. Expensive laser trimming of the resistors is often needed to achieve accuracy
requirements.
Using currents instead of voltages, adding is a property that comes for free. A current proportional to the sum of all input currents, will automatically flow through the
summing node, avoiding the need of many passive components. The drawback, however, is the need for precisely weighted current sources and large current amplitudes in
the branches representing the higher bit values.
The principle of adding currents is often used together with thermometer code,
where monotonicity reduces the possibility of glitches at the output. Each source contributes with exactly the same amount of current and no precise binary weighting is
needed. However, difficulties arise from the large number of required current sources.
For instance, a 12 bit thermometer DAC requires 4096 individual sources, demanding
large die area. Matching becomes a major challenge for high resolutions. More details
about DAC architectures and their circuit implementations can be found for instances
in [Johns1997].
In the proposed architecture, the DAC is implemented using a 1-bit converter and a
digital sigma-delta (Σ∆) modulator as depicted in figure 3.11. Trading off resolution in
time for that in amplitude, the Σ∆ modulator converts the parallel input bits of width
BDIFF of low frequency to a bit stream of width BΣ∆ = 1 at high output rate. The subsequent 1-bit converter integrates the stream of single bits, thereby simplifying the
converter implementation. The resulting analog output corresponds to the correction
voltage for the VCO and is provided at discrete time instances, τDAC.
The sigma-delta modulator and the discrete integrator offer high flexibility for parameter changes like conversion gain and resolution with low circuit complexity. This
combination is therefore highly suitable for multi-standard applications. Single bit
conversion has the additional advantage of being inherently linear. The conversion is
54
Frequency-Locked Loop
accomplished using mostly fast digital circuits, reducing the number of analog components that are susceptible to manufacturing tolerances and noise.
τDAC
BDIFF
Σ∆
Modulator
BΣ∆
1-bit
DAC
Figure 3.11: Proposed implementation of digital-to-analog converter using a digital
sigma-delta converter and a 1-bit DAC
Sigma-Delta Modulator
The sigma-delta modulator is implemented as an error truncation noise shaper, as
presented in [Norsw1997]. It comprises only digital blocks, i.e. an adder and a register.
Both are clocked with the feedback signal, avoiding the need for additional external
clock supplies.
As the objective of the modulator here is parallel to serial bit conversion, a first order
architecture [Norsw1997] was chosen for simplicity as shown in figure 3.12. At system
start up, register and adder are reset to zero. For the ith conversion phase, NDIFF is a
constant adder input. Since the adder sums two values of equal bit width, its sum is 1
bit wider than the inputs. If the most significant bit (MSB) of the sum yj = 1, then addition has reached the overflow threshold Sth
S th = 2
B DIFF
(3.21)
Then, the MSB is truncated from the sum and used as the 1-bit output yj. All remaining bits representing the truncation error εj
B DIFF

ε j = ( N DIFF + ε j – 1 ) –  y j ⋅ 2


(3.22)
are fed back via the register. The value of εj will be added to NDIFF during the following clock event (j+1).
Frequency-Locked Loop
55
...
Time
tp2s = 2
NDIFF(i)
B DIFF
yj
+
B DIFF+1
1
Pulse
Former
BDIFF
· TFB
Yout(i)
1
Register
B D IFF
B DIFF
εj
Delay
fFB
Figure 3.12: Implementation of parallel-to-serial bit converters with sigma-delta modulator
and pulse former
Since the feedback signal is used to clock the modulator, the pulse width of yj, and
hence the integration duration in the 1-bit DAC, varies with fFB. To unify the pulse
width, a pulse former with a fixed and known delay is introduced as shown in
figure 3.12. The modulator output Yout(i) is a serial pulse stream with
2
Y out ( i ) =
B DIFF
∑
y j ( i ) = N DIFF
(3.23)
j=1
This stream contains exactly NDIFF pulses within the time needed for parallel to serial bit conversion, tp2s. After each tp2s, the output bit pattern repeats itself and the register content returns to its initial, i.e. zero value. Hence the required time needed for
parallel-to-serial conversion is
t p2s = 2
B DIFF
⋅ T FB
(3.24)
The statements above and equations (3.23) and (3.24) are verified with the following formal proof:
56
Frequency-Locked Loop
Condition 1: The number of input bits shall be B, and the number of performed clock
cycles is assumed to be n = 2B with B ∈ N.
Condition 2: The initial register value is zero.
Condition 3: The input value X to the digital sigma-delta modulator remains constant within each conversion phase, i, and it is a natural number limited by the bit
width, i.e.
X(i) = constant ∀ n, X ∈ N, X ≤ 2B
(3.25)
The function performed by the bit truncation in the loop is the modulo-2B operation
(where modulo is also expressed by the "%" symbol) of the sum of input and previous
register value during each clock cycle. This sum, Sreg, is stored again in the register
and can be expressed as
Sreg = (( (X%2B) + X)%2B + X)%2B + …
(3.26)
After n clock cycles, this sum becomes
S reg
 n 
B
=  ∑ X i mod2
i = 1 
(3.27)
From condition 3, X is constant and the Sreg can be rewritten as
Sreg = (X·n)%2B
(3.28)
Inserting the value of n from condition 1 leads to
Sreg = (X·2B)%2B = 0, X ∈ N
(3.29)
This proves that the register content of the loop will return to zero after n = 2B clock
cycles if its initial value is zero. Applying the contra-positive law, it can also be concluded that for any register value Sreg ≠ 0, the number of performed clock cycles is not
an integer multiple of 2B
B
n = 2 → S reg = 0 and S reg ≠ 0 → n ≠ 2
B
(3.30)
Each overflow of the modulo operation results in an output pulse yj > 0. Therefore,
the total number of output pulses Yout from figure 3.12 within n clock cycles is
Frequency-Locked Loop
57
Y out =
n⋅X
--------B
2
(3.31)
Applying again condition 1 leads to
B
Y out
2 ⋅X
= ------------- = X
B
2
(3.32)
Hence, the total number of output pulses within 2B cycles is equal to the input value,
proving equation (3.23). Q.E.D. Figure 3.13 depicts an architecture to for implementation of 1-bit DAC and integrator circuit.
Y j(i)
Sign
C2
VREF
C1
-VREF
τs
∆VC
+
0
CVc
1-bit DAC
Integrator
Figure 3.13: 1-bit DAC implementation (single ended example) using switches for inputs of
±VREF and zero and an integrator.
3.2.4 Settling Time Limit
B DIFF
The serial bit stream yj completes after 2
feedback clock cycles. D/A conversion and integration are performed concurrently with the bit stream generation. The final serial bit requires one additional clock cycle for integration. Hence, the sigma-delta
modulator inhibits after t = tp2s , whereas integration finishes one feedback cycle later
at t = tp2s + 1·TFB. Using equation (3.24), the minimum settling time, τs, is therefore
determined as
58
Frequency-Locked Loop
T REF
B DIFF
τ s = --------------- + T FB  2
+ 1 + τ VCO


2
(3.33)
Here, τVCO is the delay needed for the VCO itself to adjust to the new control voltage. The first term in equation (3.33) accounts for the detection phase, the second term
for conversion into an analog voltage using the described sigma-delta modulator and a
single bit DAC with integrator. Following the definitions of figure 3.6, the limit for the
settling time is given as
1
τ settle = τ s < T REF = ---------f REF
(3.34)
18
16
Number of bits
14
Limit due to τsettle
12
10
8
∆f = 500 MHz
6
∆f = 100 MHz
4
∆f = 10 MHz
2
0
3
10
4
10
5
10
Reference frequency fREF [Hz]
Figure 3.14: Maximum number of bits (red dotted line) according to equation (3.34) and
detector bit width BDIFF (black lines) due to fREF. Simulation for parameters
N=10 and fVCO=2.4GHz.
The impact of equation (3.33) is shown in figure 3.14. The dotted red line indicates
the maximum detector resolution in bits that can be converted within the settling time
limit of equation (3.34). The three black lines show the detector output resolution re-
Frequency-Locked Loop
59
quirement of equation (3.8) for bandwidths ∆f of 10 MHz, 100 MHz, and 500 MHz,
respectively. Here, a division factor of N = 10, output frequency fVCO = 2.4 GHz and
τVCO ≈ 0 were assumed. The reference frequency range on the abscissa corresponds to
settling time limits of 1 ms, …, 10 µs. Two conclusions can be drawn from figure 3.14.
Firstly, sufficient conversion time margin exists to convert the detector bits of width
BDIFF into an analog voltage for a wide range of synthesizer bandwidths. Secondly, for
a given settling time limit, figure 3.14 presents the maximum number of bits that can
be counted and converted within the limit of equation (3.34).
10
Feedback frequency, fFB [Hz]
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
12
11
fREF = 100 kHz
10
fREF = 10 kHz
9
fREF = 1 kHz
8
7
6
5
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Detector resolution, BDIFF [bit]
Figure 3.15: Minimum feedback rate versus detector resolution for various reference
frequencies of 1 kHz, 10 kHz and 100 kHz, respectively.
The settling time of equation (3.33) can be rewritten using the actual output frequency, fosc, and neglecting τVCO
1
N B DIFF
τ s ( f osc ) = ---------------- + --------  2
+ 1
2f REF f osc
(3.35)
Equation (3.35) constrains the synthesizer output frequency to ensure that digitalto-analog conversion will complete during the conversion phase. Shown in figure 3.15
60
Frequency-Locked Loop
is the minimum output frequency versus detector resolution for three reference frequency values.
The settling time limit of equation (3.35) holds only true if the frequency difference
between fosc and the target frequency, fL < ftarget < fH, varies within the designed bandwidth, i.e. f diff = fosc – ftarget ≤ ∆f so that
τ settle ( f diff ≤ ∆f ) = τ s ( f osc )
(3.36)
For fdiff > ∆f, the achievable frequency adjustment within one TREF corresponds
only to the maximum detector output. The remaining difference must be compensated
for in the following reference periods, leading to
τ settle ( f diff > ∆f ) = N f ⋅ T REF + τ s ( f osc ± N f ⋅ ∆f )
(3.37)
where Nf is determined by the integer ratio of actual to the designed frequency range
f osc – f t arg et
N f = ------------------------------ – 1 ,
∆f
N f ∈ N, N f > 0
(3.38)
Presented in figure 3.16, two ranges are defined with respect to settling time. Settling time within the lock range follows equation (3.36) regardless of ftarget. The bands
Pull-in Range
Lock Range
Pull-in Range
∆f
f L-∆f
fL
fH
fH+∆f
fosc
Figure 3.16: Application and detection range with defined settling time, and unlimited pull-in
range with uncertain settling time.
outside the lock range are defined as pull-in range, as fosc is slowly pulled back into
the targeted frequency band. The settling time then follows equation (3.37).
Scenarios where fosc is out of the designed band are for instance start up conditions,
changes of synthesizer application or the presence of large supply voltage variations.
Simulations and Results
61
In theory, there is no limit of how far off fosc can be from its target, suggesting an unlimited pull-in range. Only the time required to pull the oscillator back into the band
fL < fosc < fH will increase. However, control voltage amplitude restrictions and speed
constraints of the involved circuitry will put practical limits on the pull-in range.
Phase Lock & Pull-In Range
The presented frequency synthesizer does not lock to the phase of the reference signal. Direct application in wireless radio communications is therefore limited to noncoherent communication systems.
Phase lock can however be achieved with little additional effort. One alternative is
to apply the control voltage change from the DAC output to the VCO with the rising
edge of the reference signal, thereby synchronising reference and oscillator output. The
VCO reaches its target frequency after an additional delay of τVCO. However, this
τVCO is a function of frequency step size τVCO = ƒ(∆f), leading to small variations of
the total settling time and hence, to phase errors. Furthermore, changes of fVCO will
fall into the succeeding detection phase and cause counter errors.
A second way to achieve phase lock is the addition of a delay-locked loop at the oscillator output. This DLL does not require frequency tunability. It only adds delay to
align the output phase of the frequency synthesizer to another reference input, allowing
also application for coherent communication schemes. The tuning of phase delay will
limit the final phase noise performance of this solution.
3.3 Simulations and Results
With the descriptions of the previous sections, the parameter trade-offs and limitations, what are the possible applications of the suggested frequency synthesizer? And
how does the performance of this new architecture compare with existing synthesizers
in a multi-standard and multi-band environment?
Figure 3.17 shows a revised architecture of the synthesizer shown in figure 3.5. The
generic DAC is now replaced by a digital sigma-delta modulator and a 1-bit DAC. Its
digital blocks are clocked by the feedback signal. The simulation results presented below refer to this architecture. In order to comply with output frequency tolerance limits
62
Frequency-Locked Loop
placed by the application, the control voltage, Vc, needs to satisfy a certain signal-tonoise ratio.
The output frequency tolerance, ftol, and the VCO sensitivity, KVCO, determine the
largest acceptable voltage variation at the oscillator input. With a given input control
voltage range, ∆Vc max, the required control voltage accuracy, SNRVc expressed in dB,
becomes
K VCO ⋅ ∆V cmax
SNRVc = 20 ⋅ log10  ------------------------------------
f tol
(3.39)
1/τ s
Detection
Conversion
VCO2
fREF
Counter
...
...
Channel
Sequence
Generator
∆V C
N D IFF
N R EF
1
Σ∆
Modulator
1-bit
DAC
fFB =fVCO/N
VC
fVCO
LPF
VCO1
÷N
Figure 3.17: Revised architecture from figure 3.5: Frequency synthesizer comprising digital
sigma-delta modulator and 1-bit DAC.
As KVCO is defined as the ratio of output frequency range, ∆f, to its input voltage
range ∆Vc max, equation (3.39) simplifies to
∆f
SNRVc = 20 ⋅ log 10  -------
f tol
(3.40)
This comes as no surprise, as the input resolution to the oscillator cannot be lower
than its output resolution requirement. The same holds true for the preceding blocks of
the frequency synthesizer. The required detector resolution must therefore provide at
least a resolution of SNRVc. This resolution requirement is depicted in figure 3.18 for
different values of KVCO and a control voltage range of ∆Vc max = 1 Volt.
Simulations and Results
63
This synthesizer architecture targets applications covering multiple communication
standards and different frequency bands. The proposed architecture is able to support
several voltage controlled oscillators while all other building blocks of the loop are reused. The author suggests to employ several VCOs, for instance one for each targeted
frequency band. Using few oscillators each covering a moderate bandwidth instead of
one wideband VCO obviously presents an area penalty. However, as seen from
figure 3.18, this is offset by reduced resolution requirements. Furthermore, the design
task is simplified and already existing IP from previous single standard applications
can be employed.
110
KVCO = 200 MHz/V
100
KVCO = 150 MHz/V
KVCO = 100 MHz/V
90
SNRVc [dB]
KVCO = 50 MHz/V
80
70
60
50
10
3
10
4
10
5
ftol [Hz]
Figure 3.18: Required control voltage resolution, SNRVc in [dB], versus output tolerances, ftol in
[Hz], for various oscillator sensitivities, KVCO, and a voltage range of ∆Vc max = 1V.
Table 3 lists synthesizer requirements for bandwidths, frequency accuracy and settling time limits for selected applications. Here, ∆Vc max = 1 Volt and a linear value for
KVCO sensitivity over the entire output range were assumed.
64
Frequency-Locked Loop
100
Control Voltage, SNRVc [dB]
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
20
30
-4
40
50
60
Frequency range, ∆f [MHz]
70
80
-7
10
10
-6
10
-5
10
-3
10
Settling time, τs [s]
Figure 3.19: Design space for frequency synthesizer architecture, trading off settling time,
frequency range and control voltage accuracy (SNR).
The design space of the frequency synthesizer is demonstrated in figure 3.19. The
graph shows a mesh grid for SNRVc (in dB), that can be delivered by the architecture
for given values of frequency range, ∆f, and settling time limits, τs. The proposed architecture is suitable for all synthesizer applications that comply to the parameter space
{SNRVc, ∆f, τs} under the plotted surface. Its parameters can be traded off with sufficient control voltage resolution. A larger SNRVc is for instance possible for a longer
settling time.
The resolution for very short settling times is restricted to only a few bits. This is not
enough for sustaining a determined frequency by direct voltage control. However, the
condition of fast adjustments is practical for implementation of coarse, long range frequency steps (band shifts). It also provides means for fast band selection at power start
up. It should be noted that this graph does not include limitations posed by noise im-
Simulations and Results
65
pacting the analog circuitry, but rather presents the capabilities and flexibility of this
synthesizer architecture.
Table 3: Synthesizer specifications for selected standards
Frequency
Accuracy
Settling Time
Limit
SNRVc
Bluetooth
2400-2485 MHz
± 20 ppm
(± 48 kHz)
312 µs
65 dB
(11 bit)
802.11b
2400-2485 MHz
± 25 ppm
(± 60 kHz)
224 µs
63 dB
(11 bit)
Hiperlan2
5150-5350 MHz
± 20 ppm
(± 103 kHz)
1 ms
66 dB
(11 bit)
Output power [dB]
Application
band
Output signal frequency [GHz]
Figure 3.20: Simulated output spectrum of the frequency-locked loop for the example
of fVCO = 2.44 GHz, σ = 1 ps, fREF = 100 kHz, and ∆NDIFF = 1 LSB
66
Frequency-Locked Loop
Functionality and performance of the frequency synthesizer were simulated using
Matlab and Simulink for applications in the ISM band. Figure 3.20 shows the synthesizer output spectrum for the example of output frequency 2.44 GHz and reference signal fREF = 100 kHz. The detector output resolution in this simulation was 9 bit.
3
Power consumption [mW]
10
2
10
1
10
Direct Digital Synthesis
Frequency -Locked Loop
Phase-Locked Loop
Dual -Loop PLL
10
-8
-7
10
-6
10
-5
10
10
-4
10
-3
10
-2
Settling time [s]
Figure 3.21: Estimated power versus settling time performance of frequency-locked loop
architecture compared to reported phase-locked loops (blue), dual-loop PLLs
(red) and direct digital synthesizers (black).
The oscillator was assumed to cover 85 MHz range with a control voltage range of
1 Volt. To examine the synthesizer performance in the presence of timing errors as derived in section 3.2.2, a detector error of ∆NDIFF = 1 LSB in each detection phase and
a jitter standard deviation in the feedback signal of σjitter = 1 ps were considered for
this simulation. The time for the new control voltage to be computed was fount to be
τsettle ≅ 7.2 µs. Since this synthesizer does not perform phase alignment to the reference signal by more than 1 LSB of the detector resolution, only a modest phase noise
performance of -90 dBc/Hz at a 5 MHz offset from the carrier was achieved.
The faster any synthesizer settles to a new target frequency, the more power is consumed. This is due to additional gain needed to speed up circuit operation. The power
Simulations and Results
67
consumption of the proposed synthesizer comprises digital operations, Pdig,
[Dally1998], [Rabae1996], and power for analog circuits.
2
P dig = C load ⋅ V ⋅ f clk ⋅ γ
(3.41)
Here, Cload is the capacitive load of the logic, V is the supply voltage, fclk represents
the operating frequency and γ is a switching duty factor with γ < 1, as not all gates
switch at the same time. It is furthermore assumed that the power consumption for the
VCO dominates over the analog integrator and the low-pass filter.
Counter and sigma-delta modulator comprise about the same number of gates running at speed fFB. But they do not perform simultaneously, reducing the overall needed
power. Figure 3.21 presents the estimated power consumption of the complete synthesizer versus its settling time performance. The detector accuracy was fixed to
BDIFF = 10 bits. Further parameters are described in table 4.
Table 4: Power estimation parameters and simulation values
Parameter
Value Range
Number of gates
300
Average fan-out/gate
2
Gate + fringing capacitance
838·10-5 pF/µm2
Gate length, L
0.18 µm
Gate width, W
0.25 µm
Gate input capacitance
1.5 fF
Settling time, τsettle
1 µs … 10 ms
Feedback clock, fFB
2050 MHz … 205 kHz
Supply voltage, V
1.8 Volt
Switching duty factor, γ
0.5
Power of digital circuits
5 mW … 500 µW
VCO + Divider
10 mW
The settling time requirement determined the needed feedback rate. The estimated
performance is compared to synthesizers reported in literature in recent years for
68
Frequency-Locked Loop
phase-locked loops and direct digital synthesizers [Yuen1997], [Crani1998],
[Filio1998], [Vankk1998], [Yamag1998], [Morte1999], [Rhee2000], [Jiang2002],
[Lee2001], [Tang2001], [Yan2001], [Herna2002], [Kan2002], [Wahee2002],
[Fahim2003a], [Fahim2003b], [Toros2003]. It can be observed that the estimated power consumption of the digital processing blocks approaches the value of the VCO only
for settling times close to 1 µs. For longer settling times, the VCO dominates the power
consumption by at least one order of magnitude.
4. Multi-Standard ADC
This chapter begins with definitions and a brief introduction of data converters. This is followed by descriptions of the concept and motivation for a dual-standard ADC. The identification
of converter performance requirements and the sigma-delta modulator architecture are then derived from standard specifications and sigma-delta properties. The design of a decimation filter,
needed to complete the sigma-delta ADC is mentioned before simulation results are presented.
4.1 Data Converter Introduction
Natural signals in our world, like for instance electromagnetic waves, light, or sound
are of analog, continuous nature, yet most processing of these signals is done in the digital realm. Hence, data converters are needed to mediate between these domains. The
output of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is characterized by bit representations
of time discrete, i.e. sampled signal levels. A digital-to-analog converter (DAC), on the
other hand, defines analog output levels to corresponding digital inputs. The number
of analog-digital data pairs is called the resolution of the converter, and is expressed in
bits. An N-bit resolution implies that 2N digital words are mapped to the same number
of distinct analog levels (or vice versa). Figure 4.1 shows transfer characteristics and
converter errors at the example of a 3-bit DAC. The ideal transfer characteristic of data
converters is a straight line representing a linear gain. The accuracy of data converters
is the difference between expected (ideal) and actual transfer response. The unit of accuracy is also given in bits, with the full scale input as reference. Factors limiting the
accuracy are offset, gain and linearity errors.
An offset error is defined as the actual output value that is present at inputs that are
expected to produce a zero output. Offsets, given in units of least significant bits
(LSBs), result in constant, i.e. DC shifts of the transfer curve and usually refer to analog signals. A gain error is the difference between predicted and real output value at
full scale inputs, after offsets are removed. It can also be thought of as a difference in
slope to the ideal line. Illustrations of gain and offset error are given in figure 4.1a. The
ideal deviation between any two consecutive levels is one LSB. The differential nonlinearity (DNL) expresses errors between any two consecutive symbols and describes
the largest difference from 1 LSB. For instance, a DNL error of ±0.2 LSB results in
actual output steps of 0.8 or 1.2 LSB. Since digital levels always change with multiples
70
Multi-Standard ADC
of LSBs, DNL errors refer only to the analog parameters. A second linearity error is
the integral nonlinearity (INL). It describes the maximum deviation from a straight line
passing through the end points of the actual input/output characteristics. Both, DNL
and INL are defined after offsets and gain errors have been removed. They are illustrated in figure 4.1b. Nonlinearities cause corruptions of the desired signal by inducing
harmonics and intermodulation products and by gain reductions. This can severely impact the performance of data converters and the entire communication system.
a)
b)
Output
Output
Ideal
1
Gain error
1
Ideal
3/4
3/4
1/2
1/2
1/4
1/4
DNL
INL
Offset error
Input
0
0
001
010
011
100
101
110
111
Input
0
0
001
010
011
100
101
110
111
Figure 4.1: Data transfer characteristic and definitions of converter errors for a 3-bit example. (a)
offset and gain error, (b) differential (DNL) and integral (INL) nonlinearity errors.
Further important performance parameters of data converters are sampling rate, i.e.
the maximum rate at which data can be converted continuously, and the dynamic
range, DR. The dynamic range here denotes the ratio of maximum input signal amplitude to the input level at which the converter exhibits a signal-to-noise ratio of one. The
low end of the DR is usually limited by the noise performance, whereas the upper end
is restrained by nonlinearities.
In the process of analog-to-digital conversion, quantization noise is added. With the
assumption that no quantizer overload occurs and that the quantization error signal is
a random variable uniformly distributed between the ±∆/2, the signal-to-noise ratio
(SNR) is given by
SNR ≈ 6.02·N + 1.76dB
(4.1)
Dual-Standard ADC
71
Here, N is the number of bits and ∆ is the quantization level ∆ = Vpeak-to-peak / 2N, i.e.
1 LSB. Hence, the number of quantization levels determines the power of quantization
noise that is present in the data conversion system. Each additional bit reduces the
quantization noise power by about 6 dB. Further details on data converter background
and quantization noise can be found for instance in [Razav1995], [Johns1997], and
[Razav1998].
4.2 Dual-Standard ADC
Modern communication devices are required to support more than one mobile application. This section describes an analog-to-digital converter capable to operate in
both GSM (Global System for Mobile communication) and DECT (Digital Enhanced
Cordless Telecommunication) standard. A mobile terminal supporting both applications enables wireless access in high concentrations of locally confined mobile users
(DECT) as well as continuous mobile connection while travelling fast and over large
distances (GSM). This contributes to improved access capabilities and user comfort as
well as to reduced terminal costs.
The suitability of sigma-delta data converters for multi-standard applications derives from their ability to employ the same architecture for different combinations of
input signal bandwidth and sampling speed. Their potential for high resolution, obtained from oversampling and noise shaping, makes these converters an attractive
choice for input signals of narrow bandwidth. In addition, requirements for analog prefiltering are relaxed and the processing power of advanced digital signal processors
(DSPs) can be used for post-processing steps.
A complete sigma-delta converter comprises a modulator and a decimation filter.
The modulator oversamples the input signal and moves its quantization noise to higher
frequencies. The decimation filter removes the high frequency components and thereby most of the quantization noise. It also reduces the sample rate. This chapter focuses
on the design of the modulator part of the ADC. The decimation filter was not part of
the implementation and is only briefly touched upon later.
72
Multi-Standard ADC
4.2.1 ADC Performance Specifications
The requirements of the analog-to-digital converter derive from the specifications
and test requirements provided by the communication standards and the choice of radio
front-end. A suggested design for the receiver for GSM and DECT is the wideband-IF
architecture presented in section 1.4. This architecture combines a high degree of integration with multi-standard capabilities due to channel select filtering at baseband.
The sensitivity, S, of a receiver is defined as the minimum signal level that can be
detected in the presence of a strong in-band signal while maintaining an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio. It can be expressed as [Razav1998]:
S = 10 log ( kT ) + 10 ( log BW ) + 10 log ( F ) + SNR min
(4.2)
where k is the Boltzman constant (1.384·10-23 J/K), T is the temperature in Kelvin, BW
is the bandwidth of the system, and F is the noise factor of the system, defined as
SNRin
F = ----------------SNRout
(4.3)
The term 10·log(F) is also called the noise figure, NF, and expresses the noise contribution in dB. At room temperature (T = 300 K), 10·log(kT) equates to -174 dBm and
presents a typical resolution limit for measurement equipment. SNRmin in equation
(4.2) is the minimum signal-to-noise ratio required by the baseband processor to correctly demodulate the received symbols. SNRmin was estimated to 6 dB.
Due to finite matching and insertion loss, the processing in the receiver chain imposes sensitivity degradation of the received signal. Each receiver stage contributes to
this degradation. When the noise figure (NFm) and gain (Apm) of each stage are known,
the overall noise figure of an m-stage receiver can be estimated using Friis equation
[Friis1944]:
NF1 – 1 NF2 – 1
NF m – 1
NFtotal = 1 + ( NF 1 – 1 ) + ------------------- + ------------------- + … + -------------------A p1
A p2
A pm
(4.4)
Equation (4.4) shows that the noise contribution of each stage is reduced by the gain
of the preceding stage. This indicates that the noise contribution in the first stages is
most critical. If a stage exhibits a power loss, the noise is effectively amplified.
Using the specifications given in [ETSI1996a], [ETSI1996b], as well as the receiver
block specifications for a wideband-IF receiver architecture presented in [Rudel2000],
Dual-Standard ADC
73
the signal-to-noise requirements are found to be 80-100 dB and 60-80 dB for GSM and
DECT mode, respectively. The necessary converter resolution for GSM is hence about
13 to 16 bit, whereas in DECT mode, only 10 to 13 bits are needed. After down-conversion to baseband and channel select filtering in previous receiver stages, the ADC
needs to process two signals of bandwidths 100 kHz for GSM and 700 kHz for the
DECT mode. Table 5 summarizes the specifications for both operating modes.
Table 5: Specifications for GSM and DECT receiver [ETSI1996a], [ETSI1996b]
Parameter
GSM
DECT
RF Band
1710-1785 MHz
1805-1880 MHz
1880-1930 MHz
Signal Band
100 kHz
700 kHz
Sensitivity (BER = 10-3)
-100 dBm
-83 dBm
Largest Blocker
-26 dBm
-33 dBm
Input Noise
-120 dBm
-112 dBm
Carrier to Noise Ratio
9 dB
10.3 dB
Needed SNRADC
80-100 dB (13-16 bit)
60-80 dB (10-13 bit)
4.2.2 Converter Architecture
The ADC is part of the back-end in a receiver chain, converting the analog baseband
signal to the digital realm. The peak signal-to-quantization noise ratio (SQNR) of a sigma-delta modulator can be estimated as [Rabii1999]
2
3 ( 2L + 1 )
2L + 1 B
SQNR peak = --- -------------------(
OSR
)
(
2
–
1
)
2 π 2L
(4.5)
where B is the quantizer‘s resolution in bits, L is the modulator order and OSR is the
oversampling ratio. From equation (4.5) it can be concluded that modulators of low order imply low circuit complexity but require a high sampling frequency to obtain the
same SQNR. On the contrary, higher modulator orders effectively increase SQNR by
improved noise shaping and demand lower sampling rates. They are therefore suitable
for wideband applications. But as presented in [Riebn1991], they also imply problems
with loop stability and increase circuit complexity. Several studies on modulator archi-
74
Multi-Standard ADC
tectures have been reported, e.g. [Karem1989], [Karem1994], [Medei1998],
[Gothe2003]. Based on equation (4.5), the oversampling ratios (and hence the sampling frequencies) that are needed to achieve the required ADC resolution are determined for both modes.
Table 6: Frequency requirements for different modulator orders in GSM and DECT mode.
GSM (100 kHz)
DECT (700 kHz)
Resolution
62 dB
(10 bit)
74 dB
(12 bit)
86 dB
(14 bit)
98 dB
(16 bit)
L=2
L=4
L=6
L=2
L=4
L=6
OSR
32
16
8
32
16
8
fs
6.4 MHz
3.2 MHz
1.6 MHz
44.8 MHz
22.4 MHz
11.2 MHz
OSR
64
16
8
64
16
16
fs
12.8 MHz
3.2 MHz
1.6 MHz
89.6 MHz
22.4 MHz
22.4 MHz
OSR
128
32
16
128
32
16
fs
25.6 MHz
6.4 MHz
3.2 MHz
179.2 MHz
44.8 MHz
22.4 MHz
OSR
256
32
16
N.a.
N.a.
N.a.
fs
51.2 MHz
6.4 MHz
3.2 MHz
N.a.
N.a.
N.a.
Besides operation in two different communication applications, implementation
costs need to be minimized. A leading design guideline for the converter was therefore
the ability to re-use as much of the architecture as possible for both standards to obtain
a hardware efficient realization. Operation in GSM or DECT mode is accomplished by
modification of parameters like oversampling ratio, feedback gain and quantizer resolution.
Table 7: Operating Mode Summary
Mode
Signal
Bandwidth
Sampling
Frequency
OSR
Quantization
in 2nd loop
GSM
100 kHz
13 MHz
64
1 bit
DECT
700 kHz
26 MHz
16
3 bit
The architecture of choice was a fourth-order, double loop 2-2 MASH architecture
as reported in [Karem1989] and [Baher1992]. This structure exhibits stability behaviour like a second order modulator. Based on the frequency requirements listed in Table 6, the sampling rates were chosen to be 13 MHz for GSM and 26 MHz for the
DECT mode. Table 6 would suggest a DECT sampling rate of 44.8 MHz. But this high
Dual-Standard ADC
75
rate would also cause an increased power consumption and involve a more elaborated
clock generation circuitry. To compensate for the lower sampling frequency, a 3-bit
quantizer in the second modulator loop is used for the DECT mode. The parameters for
both modes of operation are summarized in Table 7.
Figure 4.2 depicts a block diagram of the implemented architecture. The modulator
consists of two loops, each comprising a second order modulator. The digital output of
the first loop is fed into an error cancellation logic. It is also converted back to the analog domain with a 1-bit digital-to-analog converter. This 1-bit DAC is basically a
switch and not shown in figure 4.2. The weighted input of the quantizer then subtracted
from its output to obtain the quantization noise. This quantization noise is further processed in the second modulator loop. The quantization noise contributions from both
loops are subtracted in the digital error correction logic to obtain fourth order noise
shaping.
Time
discrete
input
0.2
+
-
1-bit
Quantizer
Integrator
Integrator
0.5
+
-
-0.2
Delay
0.25
0.1
Error
Cancellation
Logic
0.5
+Integrator
+
Switch
1
+
-
-0.2
1-bit
Quantizer
Integrator
1 (4)
To
Decimation
Φ
0.5
(2)
3-bit
Quantizer
Φ
3
3 bit
DAC
Switch
Figure 4.2: Sigma-delta modulator architecture: Fourth-order, 2-2 MASH architecture
for GSM and DECT mode
The integrator stages employ fully-differential, switched capacitor operational
transconductance amplifiers (OTAs). The input to the first integrator also serves as a
sampling instance of the modulator. In order to the limit kT/C noise contribution, a
sampling capacitor of 2 pF is used. This in turn requires a larger driving capabilities in
76
Multi-Standard ADC
the OTA. In DECT mode, the fourth integrator needs to drive a 3-bit quantizer which
constitutes a large capacitive load. It therefore also requires a larger slew rate. A 2stage OTA implementation is therefore chosen for the first and fourth integrator. The
integrators in the second and third stage exhibit relaxed slew rate requirements. They
are implemented using folded cascode OTAs.
All modulator blocks are dimensioned for operation at 26 MHz. During operation in
GSM mode, the clock frequency is reduced to 13 MHz. An externally supplied mode
selection signal, Φ, selects a 1-bit quantizer (GSM) or a 3-bit quantizer (DECT) in the
second loop. Φ also adjusts the gain parameters prior the fourth integrator to accommodate the different driving capabilities in the feedback. With signal Φ adjusting the
modulator to the different requirements of the two modes, a large extent of hardware
sharing is achieved.
4.2.3 Decimation filter
In the previous section, the modulator part of the sigma-delta ADC was described.
After modulation, noise from the quantization process is still present in the modulator
output signal. It is only shifted to higher frequencies. A combination of digital filters
is used to remove high frequency components. Furthermore, the number of samples to
be processed in the DSP is reduced using a decimation filter. Decimation by a factor
of M is the reduction by simply taking every Mth sample and discarding the rest. (The
actual word originates from punishing an army, i.e. the beheading of every 10th soldier,
during the times of the Roman Empire.) The signal needs to be low-pass filtered prior
to decimation to avoid aliasing due to emergence of images.
IN
Fifth-order
comb filter
Halfband
filter
Halfband
filter
M1 = 16 or 8
M2 = 2
M3 = 2
FIR filter
OUT
Figure 4.3: Multi-stage, linear phase decimation filter with
programmable decimation rate M1
The decimation filter was not part of the implementation, nor has the author of this
thesis a contribution in this field. The filter structure is merely mentioned here for completeness of the overall ADC.
Simulations Results
77
Whereas sampling rate and resolution of the overall sigma-delta converter are determined by the analog modulator, power consumption of the whole ADC is governed by
the digital filters. It is possible to removed the quantization noise and undesired adjacent channels in one single filter stage followed by an decimator. This requires many
filter taps and results in high power consumption. By using a multi-stage approach instead, the complexity of the decimation filter is reduced and the subsequent filter stages
operate at a lower sampling rate.
Cascaded-Integrator-Comb (CIC) filters [Hogen1981] are an efficient implementation of the first filter stage. To meet the requirements of both ADC modes, a low power,
fifth-order CIC filter stage with programmable decimation stage was designed
[Gao2000]. Here, M = 16 for GSM and M = 8 for DECT mode.
Low rate
filtered output
High rate input
M
Integrator Stages
Decimation
d
dt
d
dt
Differentiator Stages
Figure 4.4: Architecture of a Cascaded-Integrated-Comb filter as presented in
[Hogen1981] with decimation after integration stages
4.3 Simulations Results
The signal-to-noise pulse distortion ratio (SNDR) was determined by sweeping the
input signal amplitude from Vin = 10 µV to Vin = 1 mV. Figure 4.5 presents the SNDR
for both modes, resulting in a peak SNDR of 97 dB for GSM and 82 dB for the DECT
mode when circuit nonidealities were included.
Figure 4.6 presents a layout view of the fourth order 2-2 MASH sigma-delta modulator. The regions of the modulator blocks are highlighted. The circuits were laid out
using common analog layout techniques to address performance reduction arising from
matching problems (due to temperature or manufacture drifts) and noise. These techniques included the composition of larger devices out of several small devices, maintaining constant perimeter-to-area ratios of components, the implementation of dummy
units, and a common-centroid layout. Unoccupied die area was filled with metal to provide on-chip bypass capacitance for the power supply network. Furthermore, guard
78
Multi-Standard ADC
rings were used to protect sensitive active devices. Despite these techniques for careful
layout, the chip returned not functioning. Hence, only simulation results, as summarized in Table 8, are given.
DECT Mode
GSM Mode
Ideal Circuits
SNDR
SND R[dB]
(d B )
SNDR
S N DR (d[dB]
B)
Ideal Circuits
Including Nonidealities
Including Nonidealities
input (v) [V]
Input amplitude
input (v) [V]
Input amplitude
Figure 4.5: SNDR versus input amplitude for GSM and DECT mode.
The area of the core is 1.3·0.7 mm2, whereas the total area of the chip (including
pads) is about 2·2mm2. The chip was designed in a 0.35 µm, double poly, 3 Volt
CMOS process. The power consumption of the core area was determined to be 13 mW
and 19 mW for GSM and DECT mode, respectively.
Table 8: Simulation Results for Dual-Mode Σ∆-ADC
Mode
SNDR
Quantizer
Power
GSM
97 dB (16 bit)
1-bit/1-bit
13 mW
DECT
82 dB (13 bit)
1-bit/3-bit
19 mW
Simulations Results
79
Capacitor Area
OTAs & Bias
1-bit
Quantizer
Clock
Generation
3-bit DAC
3-bit Quantizer
Figure 4.6: Layout view of fourth order sigma-delta modulator.
80
Multi-Standard ADC
5. Summary and Conclusion
Frequency synthesizers form essential parts of any modern wireless radio communication device. Being a small part of a whole transceiver chain, they generate the local
oscillator signal needed for both transmission and receiving of communication data.
This thesis presents a synthesizer architecture based on a frequency-locked loop for
wireless radio communications. In particular, it targets multi-standard applications
with operation in several different frequency bands. Its main objectives are two-fold:
Firstly, the synthesizer is to provide flexibility in loop parameters such that employment in several standards becomes feasible. This is achieved by decoupling reference
input signal and oscillator output. Instead, the output frequency is controlled by a digitally given reference word. Settling time and output frequency accuracy are regulated
with a variable reference signal. Secondly, implementation costs are to be reduced for
operation in a multi-standard environment. This is accomplished by reusing most of
the synthesizer hardware.
The frequency-locked loop, its building blocks and performance were described and
analysed. A digital scheme is employed for detecting differences between target and
actual output frequency. A target frequency is represented by a digital number, whereas the actual frequency in the feedback path is determined from the number of periods
within a given time frame. Operation in a different application is accomplished by adjusting the digital reference word, whereas the feedback division factor remains constant. This results in a flexible detector output range and is the key to multi-standard
operation. The digital information representing frequency differences is subsequently
converted into an analog voltage. This is carried out by means of a digital sigma-delta
modulator and a 1-bit digital-to-analog converter, both clocked by the synthesizers
own feedback signal. The combination of modulator and 1-bit DAC produces inherently linear D/A conversion at little hardware expense. Using different VCOs and adjusting conversion gain values, the same loop architecture can be employed for a multitude
of frequency bands. Since much of data processing is done in the digital domain, the
settling time performance will benefit from future technology scaling.
The presented synthesizer generates frequencies in different bands, but in the presented form, it does not lock its phase to the reference and is hence suitable for noncoherent communications schemes. Also, phase noise performance is yet inferior compared to phase-locked loops dedicated to one standard. In order to achieve phase lock
and comparable phase noise performance, an additional locking circuit, e.g. a delay-
82
Summary and Conclusion
locked loop, needs to be applied. This will also enable operation in coherent communications. This locking scheme, however, does not anymore require frequency tuning
capabilities. It is hence available at less implementation costs.
The synthesizer parameters like settling time, output frequency accuracy and oscillation bandwidth can be traded-off for each other, allowing for flexible application of
the presented architecture. A three dimensional space formed by these parameters was
derived. It was shown that the new synthesizer architecture is relevant for all applications that fall within this parameter space. Simulation results were given for the example of operation in the licence free ISM band (2400 - 2483.5 MHz).
It can be concluded that, compared to traditional phase-locked or delay-locked
loops, this architectures is a suitable alternative for frequency synthesis in a multistandard environment. The author suggests its use when several frequency bands are
to be incorporated in a multi-standard application. The proposed architecture is also
suitable as a tuning circuit for band acquisition at power start up.
As with many designs, this synthesizer leaves opportunities open for further improvement and continued research. Most importantly, an integrated circuit implementation of the complete architecture has yet to be demonstrated. Furthermore, the
detection principle could be extended to include phase lock to an external signal in future versions of this synthesizer.
A fourth order sigma-delta modulator for a dual-standard analog-to-digital converter was also presented in this thesis. Being the back-end in a radio receiver, an ADC
converts the symbols that are detected by the analog front-end into the digital realm.
Demodulation and reconstruction of the original user data are implemented with the
use of digital signal processors.
Using sigma-delta modulation provided necessary converter resolution. But it also
enabled application versatility. Adjusting sampling frequency and quantizer resolution, the modulator allows a large degree of hardware sharing while meeting the specifications of both, GSM and DECT standard. Compared to an implementation using
two individual converters, required power and die area are significantly reduced. The
modulator circuit was designed in a 0.35 µm CMOS process using a 3 Volt supply.
6. Bibliography
[Abidi1995]
Asad A. Abidi, "Direct-Conversion Radio Transceivers for Digital
Communications", IEEE Transactions of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 30, No. 12, pp:
1399-1410; 1995
[Adise2002]
Adiseno, Mohammed Ismail, and Håkan Olsson, "A Wide-Band RF Front-End for
Multiband Multistandard High-Linearity Low-IF Wireless Receivers", IEEE
Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 37, No. 9, pp: 1162-1168; 2002
[Ahola2003]
Rami Ahola and Kari Halonen, "A 1.76-GHz 22.6-mW DS Fractional-N
Frequency Synthesizer", IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol.38, No.1, 2003
[Ahola2004]
Rami Ahola, "A Single Chip CMOS Transceiver for 802.11 a/b/g WLANs",
International Solid-State Circuit Conference; 2004
[Albre2000a]
Steffen Albrecht, Xiaopeng Li, Bing-xin Li, Costantino Pala, Yonghong Gao,
Mohammed Ismail, and Hannu Tenhunen, "A Sigma-Delta A/D Based
Architecture for Multi-Standard Front-End Radio Receivers", IEEJ Analog VLSI
Workshop, pp: 37-42; 2000
[Albre2000b]
Steffen Albrecht, Bing-xin Li, Costantino Pala, Xiaopeng Li, Mohammed Ismail,
and Hannu Tenhunen, "A Dual-Standard GSM/DECT Baseband Sigma-Delta
ADC", Proceedings NorChip conference, pp. 326-331, 6-7 November,
Turku, Finland; 2000
[Albre2001]
Steffen Albrecht, et al., "A Front-End Receiver Sigma-Delta Modulator", Swedish
Patent SE0002065-1 (International Publication Number: WO 01/93430 A1); 2001
[Albre2002a]
Steffen Albrecht, Yasuaki Sumi and Hannu Tenhunen, "A Frequency Synthesizer
Principle with Sigma-Delta Loop Filtering", IEEJ International Analog VLSI
Workshop, pp. 150 -155, Singapore; 2002
[Albre2002b]
Steffen Albrecht and Yasuaki Sumi, "A Phase-Locked Loop Using An
Oversampled Detector and Sigma-Delta Filtering", Patent application
SE0201500-6, Stockholm; 2002
[Albre2003a]
Steffen Albrecht, Andreas Gothenberg, Yasuaki Sumi, and Hannu Tenhunen, "A
Study of Nonlinearities For a Frequency-Locked Loop Principle", South-West
Symposium for Mixed Signal Design (SSMSD), Las Vegas, page 71-75; 23-25;
2003
84
Bibliography
[Albre2003b]
Steffen Albrecht, "A Frequency-Locked Loop Using Sigma-Delta Modulation",
Ph.D.-Forum, Conference for Design Automation & Test in Europe (DAC),
Germany; 2003
[Albre2003c]
Steffen Albrecht, and Hannu Tenhunen, "A Frequency Synthesizer Architecture
for RF Applications", Proceedings of Norchip conference, Latvia; 2003
[Albre2003d]
Steffen Albrecht, Yasuaki Sumi, Mohammed Ismail, and Hannu Tenhunen, "A
Frequency Synthesizer Using Frequency Difference Detection", Proceedings of
46th IEEE Midwest Symposium on Circuits and Systems; 2003
[Albre2004]
Steffen Albrecht, Adam Strak, Yasuaki Sumi and Mohammed Ismail; "Frequency
Detector Analysis for a Wireless LAN Frequency Synthesizer"; IEEJ Analog
International VLSI Workshop, Macao; 2004
[Amper1820]
André M. Ampère, publications in Académie Royale des Sciences, Paris; 1820
[Anast1989]
Dimitris Anastassiou, "Error Diffusion Coding for A/D Conversion", IEEE
Transactions on Circuits and Systems, Vol. 36, No. 9, pp: 1175-1186; 1989
[Armst1918]
Edwin, H. Armstrong, french patent no. 107.057, December 1918
[Aytur1997]
T. Aytur and J. Khoury, “Advantages of Dual-Loop Frequency Synthesizers for
GSM Applications“, Proceedings of International Symposium on circuits and
Systems, pp: 17-20; 1997
[Baher1992]
H. Baher and E. Afifi, "Novel Fourth-Order Sigma-Delta Converter", IEE
Electronics Letters, Vol. 28, No. 15, pp: 1437-1438; 1992
[Baird1995]
R.T. Baird and T.S. Fiez, "Improved Delta-Sigma DAC Linearity Using DataWeighted Averaging", Proceedings Symposium on Circuits and Systems
(ISCAS), pp: 13-16; 1995
[Barde1948]
John Bardeen and Walter Brattain, "Three-Electrode Circuit Element Utilizing
Semiconductive Materials", US patent No. 2,524,035; 1948
[Bell1876]
Alexander Graham Bell, US patent 174,465; 1876
[Bella2000]
Abdellatif Bellaouar, Michael S. O´brecht, Amr M. Fahim, and Mohamad I.
Elmasry, "Low-Poer Direct Digital Frequency Synthesizer for Wireless
Communications", IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 35, No. 3, pp:385390; 2000
[Bernd2003]
Holger Berndt, Raik Richter, and Hans-Joachim Jentschel, "A 100 MS/sec, 8thorder Quadrature Sigma-Delta ADC for Complex-IF Signal Digitization in a
Wideband-IF Sampling Receiver", Proceedings of International Conference on
ASIC, Vol. 1, pp: 669-672; 2003
Bibliography
85
[Best1984]
Roland E. Best, "Phase-Locked Loops - Theory, Design and Applications",
McGraw-Hill; 1984
[Boser1988]
B.E. Boser and B.A. Wooley, "The Design of Sigma-Delta Modulation AnalogTo-Digital Converters", IEEE journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 23, pp:12981308; 1988
[Brook1997a]
Todd L. Brooks, David H. Robertson, Daniel F. Kelly, Anthony DelMuro, and
Stephen W. Harston, "A 16b Σ∆ Pipeline ADC with 2.5 MHz Output Data Rate",
International Solid-States Circuit Conference, pp: 208-209; 1997
[Brook1997b]
Todd L. Brooks, David H. Robertson, Daniel F. Kelly, Anthony DelMuro, and
Stephen W. Harston, "A Cascaded Sigma-Delta Pipeline A/D Converter with 1.25
MHz Signal Bandwidth and 89 dB SNR", Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 32,
No. 12, pp: 1896-1906; 1997
[Burge2001]
T. Burger and Q. Huang, "A 13.5-mW 185-MSamples/s Delta-Sigma Modulator
For UMTS/GSM Dual-Standard IF Reception", IEEE Journal of Solid-State
Circuits, Vol. 36, pp:1868-1878; 2001
[Burr1992]
A.G. Burr, "Comparison of coherent and noncoherent modulation in the presence
of phase noise", IEE Proceedings-I, Vol. 139, No. 2; 1992
[Calba2002]
Dorin E. Calbaza and Yvon Savaria, “A Direct Digital Period Synthesis Circuit“,
IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 37, No. 8, pp. 1039-1045; 2002
[Candy1974]
J.C. Candy, "A Use of Limit Cycle Oscillations to Obtain Robust Analog-toDigital Converters", IEEE Tansactions on Communications, Vol. COM-22, pp:
298-305; 1974
[Candy1992]
J.C. Candy and G.C. Temes, "Oversampling Delta-Sigma Data Converters", IEEE
Press; 1992
[Cao2004]
Mingzheng Cao, Yuanjin Zheng, and H.K. Garg, "A Novel Algorithm for DC
Offset and Flicker Noise Cncellation in Direct Conversion Receivers",
International Conference on Communications and Systems, pp: 441-445; 2004
[Chapp1794]
Claude Chappe, Letters in Gentleman's Magazine, Paris; 1794
[Chang2005]
Hsiang-Hui Chang and Shen-Iuan Liu, "A Wide-Range and Fast-Locking AllDigital Cycle-Controlled Delay-Locked Loop", Journal of Solid-State Circuits,
Vol. 40, No. 3, pp. 661-670; 2005
[Cherr1999]
J.A. Cherry and W.M. Snelgrove, "Clock Jitter and Quantizer Metastability in
Continuous-Time ∆Σ Modulators", IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems II,
Vol. 46, pp: 661-676; 1999
86
Bibliography
[Cheun2001]
Hung Yan Cheung, King Sau Cheung, and Jack Lau, "A Low Power Monolithic
AGC With Automatic DC Offset Cancellation for Direct Conversion Hybrid
CDMA Tranceiver Used in Telemetering", International Symposium on Circuits
and Systems, ISCAS, Vol. 4, pp: 390-393; 2001
[Chien2000]
George Chien, "Low-Noise Local Oscillator Design Techniques using a DLLbased Frequency Multiplier for Wireless Applications", Ph.D. dissertation,
University of California, Berkeley; 2000
[Colav1999]
Giulio Colavolpe, and Riccardo Raheli, "Noncoherent Sequence Detection", IEEE
Transaction on Communication, Vol. 47, No. 9; 1999
[Couch1993]
L.W. Couch, "Digital and Analog Communication Sustems", 4th Edition,
Macmillan; 1993
[Crani1998]
Jan Craninckx and Michel Steyaert, “A Fully Integrated CMOS DCS-1800
Frequency Synthesizer“, IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 33, No. 12,
pp. 2054-2065; 1998
[Crawf1994]
James A. Crawford, "Frequency Synthesizer Design Handbook", Artech House;
1994
[Crols1995]
Jan Crols and Michiel S.J. Steyaert, "A Single-Chip 900 MHz CMOS Receiver
Front-End with a High Performance Low-IF Topology", IEEE Journal of SolidState Circuits, Vol. 30, No. 12, pp: 1483-1492; 1995
[Crols1998]
Jan Crols and Michiel S.J. Steyaert, "Low-IF Topologies for High-Performance
Analog Front Ends of Fully Integrated Receivers", IEEE Transactions on Circuits
And Systems - II, Vol. 45, No. 3; 1998
[Dally1998]
William J. Dally and John W. Poulton, "Digital Systems Engineering",
Cambridge university Press; 1998
[DeFor1906]
Lee De’Forest, US patent No. 879,532; 1906
[DeMue2002]
Bram DeMuer, and Michel S.J. Steyaert, “A CMOS Monolithic ∆Σ-Controlled
Fractional-N Frequency Synthesizer for DCS-1800“, IEEE Journal of Solid-State
Circuits, Vol. 37, No. 7, pp. 835-844; 2002
[Dezza2003]
A. Dezzani and E. Andre, "A 1.2-V Dual-Mode WCDMA/GPRS Sigma-Delta
Modulator", Proceedings IEEE International Solid-State Circuit Conference, pp:
58-59; 2003
[Duviv2003]
Eric Duvivier, et al., “A Fully Integrated Zero-IF Tranceiver for GSM-GPRS
Quad-Band Application“, IEEE International Solid-State Circuit Conference
(ISSCC), Session 15.7; 2003
Bibliography
87
[Egan2000]
William F. Egan, "Frequency Synthesis by Phase Lock", John Wiley & Sons, Inc.,
second edition; 2000
[ETSI1996a]
European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI), "Digital cellular
telecommunications system, radio transmission and reception (GSM 5.05)";1996
[ETSI1996b]
European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI), "Radio Equipment and
Systems (RES); Digital European Cordless Telecommunications (DECT),
common interface (CI), PHL"; 1996
[ETSI2001]
European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI), TS 101 475,
Broadband Radio Access Networks (BRAN), Hiperlan 2 functional specification;
2001
[Fahim2003a]
Amr M. Fahim and Mohamed I. Elmasry, “A Fast Lock Digital Phase-LockedLoop Architecture for Wireless Applications“, IEEE Journal of Solid-State
Circuits, Vol. 50, No. 2; 2003
[Fahim2003b]
Amr M. Fahim and Mohamed I. Elmasry, “A Wideband Sigma-Delta PhaseLocked Loop Modulator for Wireless Applications“, IEEE Transactions on
Circuits and Systems - II, Vol. 50, No. 2; 2003
[Fang2005]
Sher Jiun Fang, Abdellatif Bellaouar, See Taur Lee, and David J. Allstot, "An
Image-Rejection Down-Converter for Low-IF Receivers", IEEE Transactions on
Microwave Theory and Techniques, Vol. 53, No. 2, pp: 478-487; 2005
[Faulk2002]
M. Faulkner, "DC Offset and IM2 Removal in Direct Conversion Receivers", IEE
Proceedings Communications, Vol. 149, No. 3, pp: 179-184; 2002
[Feher1995]
K. Feher, "Wireless Digital Communications", Englewood Cliffs, Prentice Hall;
1995
[Fenk1997]
Josef Fenk, "Highly Integrated RF-IC’s for GSM and DECT Systems -- A Status
Review ", IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory an dTechniques, Vol. 45, No.
12; 1997
[Fergu1991]
Paul Ferguson, et al., "An 18b 20 kHz Dual Sigma-Delta A/D Converter",
International Solid-State Circuit Conference, pp:68-69; 1991
[Filio1998]
N. Filiol, T. Riley, C. Plett, and M. Copeland, "An Agile ISM Band Frequency
Synthesizer with Built-in GMSK Data Modulation", IEEE Journal of Solid-State
Circuits, Vol. 33, pp: 998-1008; 1998
[Friis1944]
H.T. Friis, "Noise Figure of Radio Receivers", Proceedings Iinstitute of Radio
Engineers, Vol. 32, pp: 419-422; 1944
88
Bibliography
[Fujim2000]
I. Fujimori, L. Longo, A. Hairapetian, K. Soiyama, S. Kosic, J. Cao, and S. Chan,
"A 90 dB SNR, 2.5 MHz Output Rate ADC Using Cascaded Multibit DeltaSigma Modulation at 8x Oversampling Ratio", IEEE Digest of Technical Papers,
International Solid-State Circuits Conference, pp: 338-339; 2000
[Gao2000]
Yonghong Gao, "A Fifth-Order Comb Decimation Filter for Multi-Standard
Tranceiver Applications", International Symposium on Circuits And Systems,
ISCAS; 2000
[Geert2000a]
Y. Geerts, M. Steyaert, and W. Sansen, "A 2.5 MSamples/s Multi-Bit DeltaSigma CMOS ADC with 95 dB SNR", IEEE Digest of Technical Papers,
International Solid-State Circuits Conference, pp: 336-337; 2000
[Geert2000b]
Y. Geerts, M. Steyaert, and W. Sansen, "A High-Performance Multibit ∆Σ CMOS
ADC", IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 35, No. 12, pp: 1829-1840;2000
[Gerfe2001]
F. Gerfers, M. Ortmanns, Y. Manoli, "A 12 bit Power Efficient Continuous-Time
Σ∆ Modulator With 250 µW Power Consumption", Prodeedings of European
Solid-State Circuit Conference (ESSCIRC), pp: 536-539; 2001
[Goodm1997]
David J. Goodman, “Wireless Personal Communication Systems”, AddisonWesley Wireless Communication Series; 1997
[Gothe1998]
Andreas Gothenberg and Hannu Tenhunen, "Performance Analysis of Low
Oversampling Ratio Sigma-Delta Noise Shapers for RF Applications",
Proceedings of IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems, Vol 1,
pp: 401-404; 1998
[Gothe2003]
Andreas Gothenberg, "Modeling and Analysis of Wideband Sigma-Delta Noise
Shapers", Ph.D. Thesis, Royal Institute of Technology; 2003
[Gray1995]
P.R. Gray and R.G. Meyer, "Future Directions in Silicon ICs for RF Personal
Communications", Proceedings of Custom Integrated Circuits Conference, pp.
83-90; 1995
[Hegas2003]
Emad Hegazi and Asad A. Abidi, “A 17 mW transmitter and frequency snthesizer
for 900 MHz GSM fully intergrated in 0.35µm CMOS“, IEEE Journal of SolidState Circuits, Vol. 38, No. 5, pp. 782-792; 2003
[Henke2002]
Frank Henkel, Ulrich Langmann, André Hanke, Stefan Heinen, and Elmar
Wagner, "A 1-MHz-Bandwidth Second-Order Continuous-Time Quadrature
Bandpass Sigma-Delta Modulator For Low-IF Radio Receivers", IEEE Journal of
Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 37, No. 12, pp. 1628-1635; 2002
[Henry1831]
Joseph Henry, "On the Application of the Principle of the Galvanic
Multiplier to Electro-Magnetic Apparatus, and Also to the Developement
of Great Magnetic Power in Soft Iron, with a Small Galvanic Element";
American Journal of Science and Arts, No. 19; January 1831
Bibliography
89
[Herna2002]
E. Juarez-Hernandez and A. Diaz-Sanchez, "A 1.35 GHz CMOS Wideband
Frequency Synthesizer for Mobile Communications", Midwest Symposiumon
Circuits and Systems, Vol. 3, pp: 512-515; 2002
[Hertz1892]
Heinrich Rudolf Hertz, "Untersuchungen Ueber Die Ausbreitung Der
Electrischen Kraft", Analen der Physik; 1892
[Hogen1981]
Eugene B. Hogenauer, "An economical Class of Digital Filters fro Decimation
and Interpolation", IEEE Transactions on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal
Processing, Vol. ASSP-29, No. 2; 1981
[Holma2001]
Harri Holma and Antti Toskala, "WCDMA For UMTS: Radio Access For Third
Generation Mobile Communication", John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; 2001
[IEEE1999a]
IEEE standard 802.11a; 1999
[IEEE1999b]
IEEE standard 802.11b; 1999
[IEEE2003a]
IEEE standard 802.11g; 2003
[IEEE2003b]
IEEE Standard 802.15.4; May 2003
[IEEE2003c]
IEEE standard 802.15.1, Specification of the Bluetooth System, Version 1.2;
November 2003
[Inose1963]
Hiroshi Inose and Yasuhiko Yasuda, "A Unity Bit Encoding Method by Negative
Feedback", IEEE Proceedings, Vol. 51, pp: 1524-1535; 1963
[ITRS04]
International Technology Semiconductor Roadmap (ITRS); http://public.itrs.net
[Jantz1991]
Stephen Jantzi, Richard Schreier, and Martin Snelgrove, "Bandpass Sigma-Delta
Analog-to-Digital Conversion", IEEE Transactions On Circuits And Systems,
Vol. 38, No. 11, pp: 1406-1409; 1991
[Jiang2002]
Jiandong Jiang and Edward K. Lee, “A Low-Power Segmented Nonlinear DACBased Direct digital Frequency Synthesizer“, IEEE Journal of Solid-State
Circuits, Vol. 37, No. 10, pp. 1326-1330; 2002
[Johns1997]
David A. Johns and Ken Martin, "Analog Integrated Circuit Design", John Wiley
& Sons, Inc.; 1997
[Kan2002]
T.K. Kan, G.C. Leung, and H.C. Luong, “A 2-V 1.8-GHz Fully Integrated CMOS
Dual-Loop Frequency Synthesizer“, IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol.
37, No. 8, pp: 1012-1020; 2002
[Karem1989]
T. Karema, T. Ritoniemi, and H. Tenhunen, "Fourth-Order Sigma-Delta
Modulator Circuit For Digital Audio and ISDN Applications",IEE Proceedings of
European Circuit Theory and Design Conference, pp: 223-227; 1989
90
Bibliography
[Karem1994]
Teppo Karema, "Oversampling A/D and D/A Converters Using One-Bit SigmaDelta Modulation", Ph.D. Thesis, Tampere University of Technology; 1994
[Kenny1999]
Terence P. Kenny, Thomas A.D. Riley, Norman M. Filiol, and Miles A.
[Kilby1959]
Jack S. Kilby, "Miniaturized Electronic Circuits", US patent No. 3,138,743;
applied February 1959
[Kim2005]
Hyung-Seuk Kim and Mourad N. El-Gamal, “A 1-V Fully Integrated CMOS
Frequency Synthesizer for 5-GHz WLAN“, IEEE International Symposium on
Circuits and Systems (ISCAS), pp: 4389-4392; 2005
[Lam2000]
C. Lam and B. Razavi, “A 2.6-GHz / 5.2-GHz Frequency Synthesizer in 0.4 µm
CMOS Technology“, IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 37, No. 5,
pp:788-794; 2000
[Lee1994]
Thomas Lee et al. "A 2.5 V CMOS dealy-locked loop for an 18 Mbit, 500 MB/s
DRAM", IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 29; 1994
[Lee2000]
T.H. Lee and S.S. Wong, "CMOS RF Integrated Circuits at 5 GHz and beyond",
IEEE Proceedings, Vol. 88, No. 10, pp: 1560-1571; 2000
[Lee2001]
S. Lee, M Yoh, J. Lee, and I. Ryu, "A 17 mW, 2.5 GHz Fractional-N Frequency
Synthesizer for CDMA-2000", proceedings of European Solid-State Circuit
Conference (ESSCIRC), pp: 40-43; 2001
[Lee2002]
Young-Mi Lee, Ju-Sang Lee, Ri-A. Ju, Kang-Wook Kim, and Sang-Dae Yu, “A
1.8-V frequency synthesizer for WCDMA in 0.18-µm CMOS process“, Midwest
Symposium on Circuits And Systems, Vol. 3, pp: 613-616; 2002
[Lee2005]
Shuenn-Yuh Lee, Chung-Han Cheng, Ming-Feng Huang, and Shyh-Chyang Lee,
“A 1-V 2.4-GHz Low-power Fractional-N Frequency Synthesizer with SigmaDelta Modulator Controller“, IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and
Systems (ISCAS), pp: 2811-2814; 2005
[LeGui2005]
Yann Le Guillou, "Analysing Sigma-Delta ADCs In Deep-Submicron CMOS
Technology", RF Design Magazine, pp: 18-26; 2005
[Lewis1987]
Stephen H. Lewis and Paul R. Gray, "A Pipelined 5-MSamples/s 9-bit Analog-toDigital Converter", IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. SC-22, No. 6, pp:
954-961; 1987
[Li2003]
Bingxin Li, "Design of Multi-bit Sigma-Delta Modulators for Digital wireless
Communications", Ph.D. Thesis, Royal Institute of Technology; 2003
Copeland, "Design and Realization of a Digital ∆Σ Modulator for Fractional-N
Frequency Synthesis", IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology, Vol. 48, No.
2; 1999
Bibliography
91
[Madis1999]
Avanindra Madisetti, Alan Y. Kwentus, and Alan N. Willson, “A 100-MHz, 16-b,
Direct Digital Frequency Synthesizer with a 100-dBc Spurious-Free Dynamic
Range“, IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 34, No. 8, 1034-1043; 1999
[Marqu1998]
A. Marques, V. Peluso, M. Steyaert, and W. Sansen, "Optimal Parameters for SD
Modulator Topologies", IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems II, Vol. 45,
pp: 1232-1241; 1998
[Matin2000]
Babak Matinpour, Sudipto Chakraborty, and Joy Laskar, "Novel DC-Offset
Cancellation Techniques for Even-Harmonic Direct Conversion Receivers", IEEE
Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques, Vol. 48, No. 12, pp: 25542559; 2000
[Matsu1987]
Yasuyuki Matsuya, Kuniharu Uchimura, Atsushi Iwata, Tsutomu Kobayashi,
Masayuki Ishikawa, and Takeshi Yoshitome, "A 16-bit Oversampling A-to-D
Conversion Technology Using Triple-Integration Noise Shaping", IEEE Journal
of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. SC-22, No. 6, pp: 921-929; 1987
[Marco1900]
Guglielmo Marconi, UK patent 7777, "Tuned or Syntonic Telegrpahy"; 1900
[MBOA2004]
Multiband OFDM Alliance SIG, "Multiband OFDM Physical Layer Proposal for
IEEE 802.15"
[Medei1998]
Fernando Medeiro, Belén Pérez-Verdú, José M. de la Rosa, and Angel RodríguezVázquez, "Fourth-Order Cascade SC Σ∆ Modulators", IEEE Tansactions on
Circuits and Systems, vol. 45, No. 10; pp: 1041-1051; 1998
[Minni2002]
Brian Minnis and Paul Moore, "A Re-Configurable Receiver Architecture for 3G
Mobiles", IEEE Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits Symposium; 2002
[Mohie2002]
Ahmed N. Mohieldin, Ahmed A. Emira, and Edgar Sanchez-Sineccio, “A 100MHz 8-mW ROM-Less Quadrature Direct Digital Frequency Synthesizer“, IEEE
Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 37, No. 10, pp. 1235-1243; 2002
[Moore1965]
Gordon E. Moore, "Cramming More Components Onto Integrated Circuits",
Journal of Electronics, Vol. 38, No. 8; 1965
[Morai1980]
D.H. Morais and K. Feher, "The Effects of Filtering and Limiting on the
Performance of QPSK, Offset QPSK, and MSK Signals", IEEE Transactions on
Communications, Vol. 28; 1980
[Morse1840]
Samuel Finley Breese Morse, US Patent No. 1,647; 1840
[Morte1999]
Siamak Mortezapour and Edward K. Lee, “Design of Low-Power ROM-Less
Direct Digital Frequency Synthesizer Using Nonlinear Digital-to-Analog
Converter“, IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 34, No. 10, pp. 1350-1359;
1999
92
Bibliography
[Musch1999]
Thomas Musch, Ilona Rolfes, and Burkhard Schiek, “A Highly Linear Frequency
Ramp Generator Based on a Fractional Divider Phase-Locked-Loop“, IEEE
Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement, Vol. 48, No. 2; 1999
[Namgo2001]
Won Namgoong and Teresa H. Meng, "Direct-Conversion RF Receiver Design",
IEEE Transactions on Communications, Vol. 49, No. 3, pp: 518-529; 2001
[Norsw1997]
S.R. Norsworthy, R. Schreier, and G.C. Temes, "Delta-Sigma Data Converters:
Theory, Design and Simulation", IEEE Press; 1997
[Nosak2001]
Hideyuki Nosaka, et al., “A Low-Power Direct Digital Synthesizer Using a SelfAdjusting Phase-Interpolation Technique“, IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits,
Vol. 36, No. 8, pp. 1281-1285; 2001
[Noyce1959]
Robert N. Noyce, “Silicon Based Integrated Circuit“, US patent No. 2,981,877;
applied July 1959
[Nyqui1928]
Harry Nyquist, "Certain Topics In Telegraph Transmission Theory", Transactions
AIEE, Vol. 47, pp: 614-644; 1928
[Ortma2002]
M. Ortmanns, Y. Manoli, and F. Gerfers, "A Continuous-Time Sigma-Delta
Modulator with Reduced Jitter Sensitivity", Proceedings of European Solid-State
Circuit Conference (ESSCIRC), pp: 287-290; 2001
[Parke1998]
James F. Parker and Daniel Ray, "A 1.6-GHz CMOS PLL with On-Chip Loop
Filter", IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 33, No. 3, pp: 337-343; 1998
[Perra2004]
L. Perraud, et al., “A Dual-Band 802.11a/b/g Radio in 0.18µm CMOS“, IEEE
International Solid-State Circuit Conference (ISSCC), Session 5.3, pp. 94-95,
515; 2004
[Proak1989]
John G. Proakis, "Digital Communications", McGraw-Hill; 1989
[Proak1996]
John G. Proakis and Dimitris G. Manolakis, "Digital Signal Processing:
Principles, Algorithms, and Applications", third edition, Prentice-Hall
International, Inc.; 1996
[Rabae1996]
Jan M. Rabaey, "Digital Integrated Circuits", Prentice Hall; 1996
[Rabii1999]
S. Rabii and B.W. Wooley, "The Design of Low-Voltage, Low-Power SigmaDelta Modulators", Kluwer Academics; 1999
[Rappa1996]
T.S. Rappaport, "Wireless Communications, Principles and Practice", Englewood
Cliffs, Prentice Hall; 1996
[Razav1995]
Behzad Razavi, "Principles of Data Conversion System Design", IEEE Press,
IEEE Circuits and System Society; 1995
Bibliography
93
[Razav1997]
Behzad Razavi, "Design Considerations for Direct-Conversion Receivers", IEEE
Transactions on Circuits And Systems-II, Vol. 44, No. 6; 1997
[Razav1998]
Behzad Razavi, "RF Microelectronics", Prentice Hall, Inc.; 1998
[Razav2000]
Behzad Razavi, "Design of Analog CMOS Integrated Circuits", McGraw-Hill
Higher Education, Preview Edition; 2000
[Razav2001]
Behzad Razavi, "A 5.2-GHz CMOS Receiver with 62-dB Image Rejection", IEEE
Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 36, No. 5; 2001
[Rhee2000]
W. Rhee, B.-S. Song, and A. Ali, "a 1.1-GHz CMOS Fractional-N Frequency
Synthesizer with a 3-b Third-Order ∆Σ Modulator", IEEE Journal of Solid-States
Circuits, Vol. 35, No. 10, pp: 1453-1460; 2000
[Riebn1991]
David B. Riebner, "A Comparison of Modulator Networks for High-Order
Oversampled Σ∆ Analog-to-Digital Converters", IEEE Transactions on Circuits
and Systems, Vol. 38, No. 2, pp: 145-159; 1991
[Richt2001]
Raik Richter and Hans-Joachim Jentschel, “A Virtual Clock Enhancement
Method for DDS Using an Analog Delay Line“, IEEE Journal of Solid-State
Circuits, Vol. 36, No. 7, pp. 1158-1161; 2001
[Riley1993]
T.A. Riley, M.A. Copeland, and T.A. Kwasniewski, "Delta-Sigma Modulation in
Fractional-N Frequency Synthesis", IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits,Vol. 28,
No. 5, pp: 553-559; 1993
[Roger2005]
John W.M. Rogers, Foster F. Dai, Mark S. Cavin, and David G. Rahn, “A
Multiband ∆ΣFractional-N Frequency synthesizer for a MIMO WLAN
Tranceiver RFIC“, IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 40, No. 3, pp: 689678;2005
[Rudel1997]
Jacques C. Rudell, Jia-Jiunn Ou, Thomas B. Cho, George Chien, Francesco
Brianti, Jeffrey A. Weldon, and Paul R. Gray, "A 1.9-GHz Wide-Band IF Double
Conversion CMOS Receiver for Cordless Telephone Applications", IEEE Journal
of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 32, no. 12, pp: 2071-2088; 1997
[Rudel2000]
Jacques C. Rudell, "Frequency Translation Techniques for High-Integration HighSelectivity Multi-Standard Wireless Communication Systems", Ph.D. thesis,
University of California Berkeley; 2000
[Salo2001]
T. Salo, S. Lindfors, and K. Halonen, "An 80 MHz Band-Pass Sigma-Delta
Modulator For A 100 MHz IF Receiver", Proceedings of European Solid-State
Circuits Conference, pp: 528-531; 2001
[Schre1989]
R. Schreier and M. Snelgrove, "Bandpass Sigma-Delta Modulation", Electronics
Letters, Vol. 25, No 23, pp: 1560-1561;1989
94
Bibliography
[Seven1994]
J. Sevenhans, D. Haspeslagh, A. Delarbre, L. Kiss, Z. Chang, and J.F. Kukielka,
"An Analog Radio Front-End Chip-Set for a 1.9GHz Mobile Radio Telephone
Application", Proceedings of Integrated Solid-States Circuit Conference, pp: 4445; 1994
[Sevic1996]
J.F. Sevic and J. Staudinger, "Simulation of Adjacent Channel Power for Digital
Wireless Communication Systems", Microwave Journal, pp. 66-80; 1996
[Shann1949]
Claude E. Shannon, "Communication In The Presence Of Noise", Proceedings of
the Institute of Radio Engineers, Vol. 37, No. 1, pp: 10-21; 1949
[Shock1948]
William Shockley, "Semiconductor Amplifier", US patent No. 2,502,488; 1948
[Sidir1997]
Stefanos Sidiropoulos and Mark A. Horowitz, "A Semidigital Dual Delay-Locked
Loop", IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol.32, No. 11; 1997
[Silva2001]
J. Siva, U. Moon, J. Steensgaard, and G.C. Temes, "Wideband Low-Distortion
Delta-Sigma ADC Topology", IEE Electronics Letters, Vol. 37, No. 12, pp: 737738; 2001
[Sohn2002]
Il-Hyun Sohn, Eui-Rim Jeong, and Yong H. Lee, "Data-Aided Approach to I/Q
Mismatch and DC Offset Compensation in Communication Receivers", IEEE
Communication Letters, vol. 6, No. 12, pp: 547-549; 2002
[Steen1998]
Jesper Steeensgaard, "Nonlinearities In SC Delta-Sigma A/D Converters",
International Conference on Electronics, Circuits and Systems, Vol. 1, pp: 355358; 1998
[Stetz1995]
Trudy D. Stetzler, Irving G. Post, Joseph H. Havens, and Mikio Koyama, "A 2.74.5 V Single Chip GSM Transceiver RF Integrated Circuit", IEEE Journal of
Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 30, No. 12; 1995
[Sumi2002]
Yasuaki Sumi, Steffen Albrecht, and Hannu Tenhunen, "A Sigma-Delta
Frequency Synthesizer", International Conference on Soft Computing and
Intelligent Systems (SCIS & ISIS), 24P5-5, October 21-25, Tsukuba, Japan; 2002
[Suspl2003]
O. Susplugas and P. Phillipe, "Multimode Clock Generation Using Delay-Locked
Loop", IEE Electronics Letters, Vol. 39, No. 4, pp: 347-349; 2003
[Tang2001]
Y. Tang, Adem Aktas, Mohammed Ismail and Steve Bibyk , "A Fully Integrated
Dual-Mode Frequency Synthesizer for GSM and Wideband CDMA in 0.5 µm
CMOS", Proceedings of Midwest Symposium on Circuits and Systems, Vol. 2,
pp: 866-869; 2001
[Tabat2000]
A. Tabataei, K. Kaviani, and Bruce A. Wooley, "A Two-Path Bandpass SigmaDelta Modulator with Extended Noise Shaping", IEEE Digest of Technical
Papers, International Solid-State Circuits Conference, pp: 342-343; 2002
Bibliography
95
[Tesla1897]
Nikola Tesla, US patent 645,576; 1897
[Thoma2005]
K.P.J. Thomas, R.S. Rana, and Y. Lian, "A 1 GHz CMOS Fourth-Order
Continuous-Time Bandpass Sigma-Delta Modulator For RF Receiver End A/D
Conversion", Proceedings of Asia and South Pacific Design Automation
Conference, Vol. 2, pp: 665-670; 2005
[Toros2003]
Arthur Torosyan, Dengwei Fu, and Alan N. Willson, “A 300-MHz Quadrature
direct Digital Synthesizer/Mixer in 0.25-µm CMOS“, IEEE Journal of Solid-State
Circuits, Vol. 38, No. 6, pp. 875-887; 2003
[Vankk1998]
Jouko Vankka, Mikko Waltari, Marko Kosunen, and Kari Halonen, “A Direct
Digital Synthesizer with an On-Chip D/A-Converter“, IEEE Journal of SolidState Circuits, Vol. 33, No. 2, pp. 218-227; 1998
[Vassi2003]
Iason Vassiliou, et al. “A Single-Chip Digitally Calibrated 5.15-5.825-GHz 0.18−
µm CMOS Transceiver for 802.11a Wireless LAN“, IEEE Journal of Solid-State
Circuits, Vol. 38, No. 12, pp. 2221-2231; 2003
[Veldh2002]
R. van Veldhoven, K. Philips, and B. Minnis, "A 3.3mW Sigma-Delta Modulator
for UMTS in 0.18µm CMOS with 70dB Dynamic Range in 2MHz Bandwidth",
IEEE Digest of Technical Papers, International Solid-State Circuits Conference,
pp: 222-223; 2002
[Veldh2003]
R. van Veldhoven, "A Tri-Mode Continuous Time Sigma-Delta Modulator With
Switched Capacitor DAC for a GSM-EDGE/CDMA2000/UMTS Receiver",
IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference, pp: 60-61; 2003
[Verma2004]
Shwetabh Verma, Jungfeng Xu, and Thomas H. Lee, “A Multiply-by-3 CoupledRing Oscillator for Low-Power Frequency Synthesis“, IEEE Journal of SolidState Circuits, Vol. 39, No. 4, pp. 709-713; 2004
[Vleug2001]
K. Vleugels, S. Rabii, and B.A. Wooley, "A 2.5V Broadband Multi-bit SigmaDelta Modulator with 95dB Dynamic Range", IEEE Digest of Technical Papers,
International Solid-State Circuits Conference, pp: 50-51, p. 428; 2001
[Wahee2002]
Khurram Waheed, Keyur Desai, Parmoon seddighrad, and Fathi Salam, “A
Complete Integrated, Low Noise, Low Power CMOS Frequency Synthesizer for
GSM Communications“, Midwest Symposium on Circuits And Systems, Vol. 3,
pp:540-543; 2002
[Weave1956]
D. Weaver, "A Third Method of Generation and Detection of Single-Sideband
Signals", Proceedings Institute of Radio Engineers, Vol. 44, pp: 1703-1705; 1956
[Wheat1837]
UK patent No. 7390, "Five Needle Telegraph"; 1837
96
Bibliography
[Yamag1998]
Akihiro Yamagishi, Masayuki Ishikawa, Tsuneo Tsukuhara, and Shigeru Date,
“A 2-V, 2-GHz Low-Power Direct Digital Frequency Synthesizer Chip-Cet for
Wireless Communication“, IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 33, No. 2,
pp. 210-217; 1998
[Yan2001]
W.T. Yan and H.C. Luong, “A 2-V 900-MHz Monolithic CMOC Dual-Loop
Frequency Synthesizer for GSM Receivers“, IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits,
Vol. 36, No. 2, pp: 204-216; 2001
[Yoshi1998]
Hiroshi Yoshida, Hiroshi Tsurumi, and Yasuo Suzuki, "DC Offset Canceller in a
Direct Conversion Receiver for QPSK Signal Reception", IEEE International
Symposuim on Personal, Indoor and Mobile Communication, Vol. 3, pp: 13141318; 1998
[Yuen1997]
C.M. Yuen, C.N. Wong and K.F. Tsang, “1 µS Fast Acquisition 2.4GHz Low
voltage Frequency Synthesizer For FH-CDMA Mobile Communications“, Asia
Pacific Microwave Conference, pp. 317-320; 1997
[Zarga2004]
Masoud Zargari et al., “A Single-Chip Dual-Band Tri-Mode CMOS Tranceiver
for IEEE 802.11a/b/g WLAN“, IEEE International Solid-State Circuit Conference
(ISSCC), Session 5.4, pp. 96-97, 515; 2004
[Zhang1991]
Z. Zhang and G.C. Temes, "Multibit Oversampled Σ−∆ A/D Converter With
Nonuniform Quantization", Electronics Letters, Vol. 27, No. 6, pp: 528-529; 1991
[Zhuan2003]
Jingchen Zhuang, Qingjin Du, and T. Kwasniewski, "A 107-dBe 10 kHz carrier
offset 2-GHz DLL-based Frequency Synthesizer", Prodeedings of IEEE Custom
Integrated Circuit Conference, pp: 301-304; 2003
Bibliography
97
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement