Activity plan

Activity plan
Caledonian Park Clock Tower
and Visitor Centre
Activity Plan
December 2015
Julia Holberry Associates
Julia Holberry
Alison Porter
Helen Butterworth
HERITAGE
CAPITAL PROJECTS
FUNDING
STRATEGIC PLANNING
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Contents
December 2015
Contents
Chapter 1: Executive Summary
page 1
Chapter 2: Where we are now – organisation and activities
page 9
Chapter 3: Where we are now - audiences
page 21
Chapter 4: Involving people in our project
page 53
Chapter 5: Action plan
page 71
Appendix 1: Consultees
page 113
Appendix 2: Volunteering Plan
page 119
Appendix 3: Training Plan
page 131
Appendix 4: Learning Plan
page 147
Appendix 5: Job descriptions
page 157
Appendices 6 – 11 can be found in the Research Appendices document accompanying this
report.
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Contents
December 2015
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Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 1: Summary
December 2015
1.
Summary
1.1.
A sense of place
Caledonian Park is a remarkable place with a fascinating history that stretches
back to at least the 17th century. It was an 18th century pleasure ground, a
meeting place for political debate and protest demonstrations, a record-breaking
running track, the capital’s main cattle market, a huge eclectic flea market that
survives today as Bermondsey Market and lastly, a public park. There are clues
in and around the Park from its varied past, the most prominent one being the
Clock Tower, which is the focus of this project. But the history of the site starts
200 years before.
Legend has it that Copenhagen House was built during the 17th century,
probably as a refuge for the Danish Ambassador, fleeing the Plague in 1665. By
1740 it was an inn and the surrounding Copenhagen Fields were a popular rural
and genteel resort where visitors drank tea in the gardens and played skittles.
However, within 60 years an unscrupulous landlord was organising bull baiting
and dog fights to boost the sale of drink. The inn became known for heavy
drinking, rough sports and attracted a disreputable clientele. By the 1820s,
Copenhagen House had recovered its reputation and in the 1850s the owner of
the Fields built a professional running track (the ‘Old Cope’), where records were
broken, watched by huge crowds of spectators.
By the 18th century Clerkenwell and Islington were known as a hotbed of
dissent, radicalism and political activism and Copenhagen Fields became the
focus for protest demonstrations and political rallies. The most famous political
meeting was the Tolpuddle demonstration in 1834 in support of the campaign to
release and pardon the Tolpuddle Martyrs. 100,000 people gathered to protest
and marched to Whitehall, across the Thames and on to Kennington Common.
Copenhagen House was demolished in 1853 to make way for the new
Metropolitan Cattle Market, which was relocating from Smithfield. There was
considerable opposition to the proposed market:
The characters who are now found to be associated with cattle and meat
markets and their concomitants of slaughter houses, bone-boiling, gutspinning, knackers establishments, lowlodging houses, beer-houses and
associated stench and miasma, would be damaging to health and the value of
their superior villas.
Opened in 1855, the 30 acre site had numerous abattoirs and pens for cattle,
sheep and pigs. The returns for 1862 show that over 300,000 bullocks, 1.5
million sheep, 28,000 calves and 29,000 pigs passed through the market in that
year. Livestock were driven to the market through Islington’s streets and the
scene described above was probably fairly accurate.
The clues to the Park’s past are all still there: the Clock Tower bell signalled the
beginning and end of trading and housed the clerk of the market and his staff,
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who registered the delivery of animals: the railings surrounding the Park were
used to tether livestock and were once decorated with animal heads, and three
of the four public houses at each corner of the market still survive.
By the 1890s a flea market had grown up alongside the cattle market, known as
‘The Cally’, operating once a week on a Friday. In the 1920s and 1930s the brica-brac market grew, as the cattle market declined:
In the course of ten minutes I would be offered a policeman’s helmet, a
hunting flask in a leather case, a glass full of huge alien butterflies, six Italian
miniatures, a silver champagne cooler, a ruined vapour bath, a huge bag of
stage jewels, a Chinese teapot, a pair of dangerous looking roller skates, an
enormous meerschaum pipe and a porcelain bath.
At the outbreak of World War II in 1939 the flea market and cattle market were
closed down and the site was requisitioned by the army. After the War the flea
market reopened in Bermondsey, but the cattle market never reopened.
However, the slaughter houses continued until 1964. Older residents still recall
encounters with livestock in the surrounding streets. The site opened as a Park in
1970.
This story is a rich resource for interpretation and an inspiration for the activity
programme.
1.2.
Testing the ideas
The ideas proposed in the Round 1 HLF bid were tested during the Development
Phase interviews with staff, councillors, stakeholders and partners; discussions
with community and audience representatives; interviews with teachers and
education stakeholders; an online survey completed by 196 people and a hard
copy survey completed by 123 people and two observation exercises, examining
patterns of use in the Park in August and September 2014.
Everyone who was interviewed knew about the Park because they lived on its
doorstep, but few were aware of its rich story and people were curious about its
varied history and the remnants of its past visible around the Park. Those who
climbed to the top of the Tower were fascinated by the bird’s eye view of their
local area and London and enjoyed picking out the landmarks. There was also
interest in the natural environment of the Park, the trees, plants and gardening.
People wanted the Park’s story to be told in a playful, light-touch way, with
activities for adults and children not only in the Visitor Centre and Park, but also
spilling out from the Park and making wider connections, such as guided walks,
digital trails or treasure hunts around the local area. They wanted practical
gardening workshops, community gardening and ‘citizen science’ activities.
Local teachers were keen to work with the project to make it a relevant and
inspirational resource for schools. Some schools already use the Park regularly
and would enjoy further opportunities to engage with it. They have strong ideas
about the improvements they would like to see and want to be involved in
developing and testing the ideas.
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Local organisations are eager to work in partnership to deliver the programme
and some of the existing art partners want to use the Visitor Centre as a base for
activities, including community engagement, and to support the development of
the interpretation scheme.
One of the major barriers for the project to overcome is the negative perception
of the Park, because of its past association with drugs, anti-social behaviour and
prostitution. One group of older people interviewed never went to the Park
because they did not feel safe in it. Lack of toilets and refreshments was also a
barrier that discouraged people from visiting.
As a result of the consultation, the target audiences for the project were
identified as local primary and special schools, local residents, local families and
local older people aged over 65 years.
1.3.
Engaging audiences
Activities have been developed specifically with the target audiences in mind and
are grouped around three objectives: interpretation, informal and formal learning
programmes.
The interpretation of the Park will be focused on the Clock Tower, in the Visitor
Centre and throughout the Park. Most important of all is to open the Clock
Tower regularly for guided tours, using volunteers, so that visitors can enjoy the
view, explore and learn about the Tower and its clock. Trails will also be available
taking the interpretation across the Park and beyond. The development of the
interpretation will involve and engage the community through volunteering and
testing the ideas with local residents, young people and schools.
A crucial aspect of the Clock Tower and Visitor Centre project is to create a
valued local resource in which people feel connected to their heritage and a
sense of pride and community. To do this, the Clock Tower and Visitor Centre will
actively involve local people in the management of the activity programme and in
local advocacy – by recruiting additional members to the community steering
group and they will be given the skills to contribute to the project.
There will be a festival to launch the project and the regular events programme
will include art and gardening workshops for older people, weekend activities for
local people based on national initiatives, such as the RSPB bird watch or Black
History Month, social events in the Park, activities for under-fives and free family
activities, such as craft activities, puppets and bug hunts.
Projects will include members of the local community working with artists to
provide interpretation of the project on the construction hoardings, subject to
additional funding.
Local primary and special school teachers will be provided with a series of
creative workshops, activities and supporting resources, which will encourage
engagement throughout the year, either mediated by a Learning Officer or
Heritage Ranger, or used independently. These cross-curricular programmes will
focus on a range of topics, such as the history and stories of the Caledonian Park
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site, drawing on the local history archive, the market, the architecture and social
history changes. Activities will involve developing a creative response to the Clock
Tower, with storytelling and role play at the core. There will also be programmes
related to the ecology of the Park, such as soil sampling, wildlife surveys,
observing seasonal changes over the year, pulling together science and
geography field study skills. Other science-related activities will interpret the
clock and how it works. The project will consult local educators to help develop
and pilot new activities help develop content and keep the project team informed
about curriculum changes, through the Festival of Blackboards hosted by Cubitt
Education.
The Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre project will offer
opportunities for students to have work placements, such as students from City
and Islington College. Drawing on the rich history of the site and the local
history archives, a number of talks will be developed and offered both on- and
off-site to U3A groups, and to local History groups and societies in the local
community.
1.4.
Resources to support the project
Three members of staff will be appointed to deliver the project and programmes:

Project Officer (Heritage), full-time for two years to oversee the capital part
of the project

Learning Officer, full-time for three years to oversee the heritage-focused
aspects of the activity programme

Heritage Ranger, full time for three and a quarter years to oversee the
environment-focused aspects of the activity programme.
Additionally a part-time caretaker, employed by Islington Council, will be
engaged to look after the Clock Tower and Visitor Centre.
There will be 109 project volunteers recruited from the community to help deliver
the programmes – as guides to the Clock Tower, Visitor Centre and Park, helpers
in the café, welcomers to the Visitor Centre, assisting with informal and formal
learning activities in the Clock Tower, Visitor Centre and Park, researching and
developing guides, trails and learning resources, researching and developing
interpretation of the Clock Tower and Park, researching and developing
interpretation in the Visitor Centre and for special exhibitions, winding the Clock,
serving on the Steering Group and helping with website content and social
media.
The project is supported by a comprehensive training programme in Appendix 3
that details 25 different training sessions for volunteers and staff to equip them
to be able to deliver the Activity Plan and includes heritage skills training and a
stonemason apprenticeship.
Islington Heritage Service has a highly successful education service and the
Visitor Centre will be established as a satellite base for their activities. In
addition, the Council already has very strong relationships with The Friends of
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Caledonian Park, the nearby Drovers Centre, Cubitt Education and All Change
Arts and these partners will be crucial to delivering the activity programme.
The new Visitor Centre, located at the northern gateway to the Park will provide
the facilities needed to support the activity programme. Core opening times of
the building will be from 10.00am until 4.00pm but it will open for evening
activities. The building will contain a community learning room, with a capacity
for 30 people and, when not in use, will host special exhibitions and be used for
interpretation of the Park and Tower for general visitors. There will be a
volunteers’ storage space for equipment and materials, an office for the Learning
Officer and Heritage Ranger, a kiosk serving teas and coffees to visitors to the
Park and users of the Visitor Centre and public toilets.
The activity programme (excluding the capital works for the building) will cost
£482,779. A full breakdown of the finances is in Chapter 5 and it is estimated
that the new programmes will attract over 500,000 per annum to the Park.
1.5.
Achieving HLF’s outcomes
Heritage
As a result of the HLF investment, the fabric of the Clock Tower will be conserved
and restored, and will be maintained to a high standard by Islington Council.
Through the implementation Management and Maintenance Plan and provision of
additional staff and volunteers, the heritage will be better managed. From the
results of the public consultation it is evident that local people want to know
more about the history of the Park and the Clock Tower and the proposed
displays, trails, guided tours, activities and events about the history and natural
environment of the Park will enhance their understanding and improve their
experience of the Park.
People
The volunteering programme sees 109 people recruited to deliver the programme
and they will be skilled up through the training programme detailed in Appendix
3. In addition the project will provide training for local teachers to help them
deliver teaching programmes about the Park to their pupils.
We will measure the impact of our volunteering programme in terms of acquiring
new skills, increased confidence, enhanced well-being etc through volunteer
supervision and appraisal.
The buildings conservation skills apprentice will acquire new skills and a
qualification and training will be provided to Islington Council staff in heritage
metalwork techniques to skill them up to be able undertake future repair and
maintenance to the Park’s railings.
The formal and informal activity programme is designed to immerse the local
community in the Clock Tower and the Park through activities, workshops, talks
and projects. We will appoint an evaluation consultant at the beginning of the
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Delivery Phase who will help us set a framework for us to be able to measure the
success of our programmes.
One of the strongest themes that emerged from the consultation was the
negative perception of the Park, because of its association with drugs,
prostitution and general anti-social behaviour. Through the project, we want
people to be part of the process that changes the perception of the Park by
becoming involved with its regeneration. One definite performance indicator will
be to talk to the older residents about how safe they feel in the Park, after the
project has begun. They were the ones who said they would not use the Park
because they felt unsafe and they did not like the lack of facilities (toilets and
refreshments).
Our consultation told us that, although people are interested in the history of the
Park, they wanted the interpretation to be light-hearted and enjoyable. More
than that, it was evident that local residents used the Park to sit and chat, picnic,
play sports and play with their children. All those things will continue and people
will have the opportunity to learn about their Park’s history and environment in a
fun, interesting and enjoyable way.
Communities
Currently the Park receives about 457,0001 users a year and our observation
survey in Appendix 9 showed that the Park was well used by (mainly) boys
playing football, young people on the ball court and mothers and their children
around the play area. Notably absent were women aged over 60 years. Our
target audiences are local schools, families and older people and we want to
spread these audiences across the site, engaging them in a range of different
activities (such as trails, horticultural and environmental work) and we will
measure this change through observational surveys after the project has begun.
The project will undoubtedly improve use of the Park and by involving residents,
particularly through volunteering, will provide a sense of the importance of their
place and feelings of pride in its heritage and its natural environment. People will
tell us that the local area is a better place to live, work or visit. Visitors to the
area will also tell us that the Park has improved as a direct result of the project.
Evaluation and legacy
Evaluation of the Clock Tower project will ensure that it is meeting all the
qualitative and quantitative targets set and the results will be used by the project
staff, Islington Council and the volunteers to recalibrate the project, as
appropriate. The observation of the Park will also be repeated after the
restoration of the Clock Tower is complete and the Activity Programme is well
underway to compare the profile of the Park’s visitors.
The legacy of the project will see the Clock Tower and the partial repair and
restoration of the Park’s railings restored to top condition and a new Visitor
Centre as a focus for community and schools engagement and interpretation of
the Park’s heritage. There will be quizzes, trails, a lasting website with visitor
1
6
Data from electronic counters at park entrances from 2015
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information, news, online exhibitions, family and schools resources. The activity
programme will be maintained by the appointment of 1.5 staff members beyond
the life of the Heritage Lottery funding and they will ensure that the formal and
informal learning programmes are sustained. The project will also leave a strong
legacy of volunteering in the Park and engagement of the community in its
upkeep and provision of activities; this will provide capacity to grow and flourish
into the future.
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Chapter 2: Where are we now – our organisation and activities
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2.
Where we are now – our organisation and
activities.
2.1.
Introduction
This chapter looks at the vision for the Park and the local strategies that will
influence its development and programming. It also examines the skills and
strengths that already exist within the Council and its partners to deliver a
successful project.
2.2.
Caledonian Park Clock Tower project
Caledonian Park is managed by Islington Council and sits within the Greenspace
service that forms part of the Environment and Regeneration department. The
Greenspace team works closely with the Heritage Service, which is in the same
department.
The present Park contains a Grade II* listed Clock Tower which was the
centrepiece of the 19th century Metropolitan Cattle Market. Bordering the Park
on two sides (along Market Road and Shearling Way) are the remnants of the
substantial market railings, which are Grade II listed. The only surviving remains
of the cattle market are the Tower, which is included on the Heritage At Risk
Register, and the railings, which have also been identified by English Heritage
(EH) as being at risk.
The project proposes conservation and access improvement works to an historic
Clock Tower at Caledonian Park, conservation of the historic railings and the
creation of a small new building to provide a range of facilities and interpretation
for visitors and to support activities in the adjacent Park.
The overall project objectives are to:

establish the Clock Tower as an attractive destination for people interested in
the history and geography of North London

provide opportunities for the local community to engage with the physical
heritage of the site and connect to its social heritage

conserve the site heritage

provide a framework for the long term protection of the site.
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2.3.
Our policy and operating environment
2.3.1.
Corporate Plan 2011-2015: Towards a Fairer Islington, Islington Council,
2011
As Caledonian Park is part of Islington Council, its future development is
influenced by the strategic priorities of the Council.
The Council’s over-arching Corporate Plan aims to create a fairer Islington,
tackling the poverty and inequalities faced by many Islington residents. The Plan
identifies six priorities for achieving the overall goal of making Islington a fairer
place:
1. decent, suitable and affordable homes
2. lower crime and anti-social behaviour
3. cycle of poverty broken
4. best start in life for all children
5. healthy, active and independent lives
6. delivering basic services efficiently and well.
The Caledonian Park Clock Tower can support these six priorities by promoting
greater use of the Park and increasing resident involvement in its maintenance,
security and programming (1). The activity programmes proposed as part of this
project will provide opportunities to acquire skills through volunteering and work
placements (3), formal and informal learning activities aimed at particular target
audiences, including children, young people and families (4) and the Park
programmes will promote a healthy and active lifestyle and a sense of pride in
the Park and its community (5).
2.3.2.
Core Strategy, Islington Council, 2011
The Core Strategy sets out new planning policies for the borough and covers
heritage and urban design, sustainability, housing, employment, retail and
services, open space, play and sport. The heritage and urban design policies are
relevant to the Clock Tower in that they demonstrate the Council’s commitment
to the active management of its heritage assets and the development of new
buildings, such as the proposed Visitor Centre, to be sympathetic in scale and
appearance to the historic environment.
Similarly the strategies for open space, play and sport include active protection of
open spaces of historic value and improving access to those spaces. Relevant to
Caledonian Park is the strategy to enhance biodiversity across the borough and
access to nature, as it is a borough-designated Site of Importance for Nature
Conservation (Grade 1).
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2.3.3.
Cultural Matters: A Cultural Strategy for Islington Council 2010-2015,
Islington Council, 2011
The Council’s vision for culture is to ensure that:
Islington is a place where culture works for the individual and the community,
promoting life chances, economic prosperity and improving the quality of life
and wellbeing of local residents.
In order to maximise the social and economic value of culture, the strategy
recommends long-term investment across six key themes:

culture for all: maximising access to and participation in cultural activity

place, space and identity: strengthening a sense of place for residents and
visitors

cultural economy and economic prosperity: promoting the economic benefits
of culture

education, skills and future talent: nurturing talent, promoting skills
development and learning opportunities

ensuring the long-term growth and sustainability of Islington’s cultural sector

health and wellbeing: promoting healthier lifestyles and tackling inequalities.
From the 2011 Census, 32% of the Islington population are non-white and the
Park programme will take care to appeal to this diverse audience. Within the one
mile catchment area, 25% of people have no engagement in cultural activity and
the programming of the Clock Tower and Park activities may not be perceived as
‘culture’ and hence could provide a fruitful route for engaging hard to reach
groups.
Whilst the one of the aims is to draw in a wider North London audience, the
activities, interpretation, volunteering and training programmes will be designed
to provide residents with a strong sense of place and identity with the Park and
its history. By encouraging that engagement, the Park will thrive and feel a safer
and more welcoming place.
The Park will provide opportunities for nurturing talent, promoting skills
development and providing learning opportunities through its activities,
volunteering programme and work placements.
Part of the Park programme is likely to be to promote the exploration of the Park,
its habitats and environs through trails and exercise, reflecting the Park’s sporting
history, both of which will fulfil the healthier lifestyle and wellbeing agendas.
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2.3.4.
Islington Heritage Service Audience Development Plan 2015 – 2020,
Islington Council and Learning Unlimited, 2015
The vision for the Heritage Service is:
bringing people in Islington closer together and helping make Islington a happier,
healthier and fairer place to live.
The Plan has four aims:
Aim 1: to increase participation and widen the profile of audiences, harnessing
the power of heritage to enrich peoples’ lives and broaden their thinking
Aim 2: to support the development of cultural confidence across our diverse
communities and empower individuals and communities to explore their own
heritage and develop their own skills
Aim 3: to work with families, children and young people to establish culture and
heritage as part of the exploration of their identities and their lifelong learning
Aim 4: to develop sustainable and responsive audience development work
through building and deepening collaborative relationships within the Council and
with the third sector
The Heritage Service aims mirror the aims and target audiences of the Activity
Plan and the Service has the learning and community engagement expertise that
will help to deliver the activity programme on site.
2.3.5.
Islington Parks Management Team Improvement Plan 2014-15, Islington
Council, 2013
The Action Plan of the Parks Improvement Plan contains key objectives directly
applicable to Caledonian Park project:

increasing positive use of parks, open spaces and estates by Islington’s
diverse community

manage anti-social behaviour in parks and open spaces

to make parks more child friendly

to identify deliver and promote opportunities to improve health and wellbeing
through parks, open spaces and estates

through volunteering and work placements to provide opportunities for work
experience and training to support local people into employment and to
promote local economic activity

maintain and enhance the quality of grounds maintenance and assets in
parks and estate open spaces and to engage the community in that, in order
to deliver basic services efficiently and well and provide value for money for
users.
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The project aims to deliver on all of these objectives, using the Clock Tower
and the Visitor Centre as the focus for activity. By encouraging engagement, the
Park will thrive and be a safer and more welcoming place.
2.4.
Our existing services
2.4.1.
Caledonian Park
Staffing and volunteering
Caledonian Park is managed by Islington Council and sits within the Greenspace
and Leisure Service that forms part of the Environment and Regeneration
Directorate.
Apart from Caledonian Park, Islington has nine other parks and numerous green
pocket spaces. The parks are:

Barnard Park

Elthorne Park

Gillespie Park

Highbury Fields

New River Walk

Paradise Park

Spa Fields

Rosemary Gardens

Whittington Park.
Caledonian Park is Islington’s second largest park and a Site of Importance for
Nature Conservation (SINC). It is managed by one of three area managers and
is serviced by mobile rangers. There are no permanent staff based on site.
The Friends of Caledonian Park (described below in section 2.5), assist with the
maintenance, management and development of the Park. A group from the
nearby Drovers Centre (see section 2.5) also garden on a regular basis in the
Park. Currently Caledonian Park has a team of some 20 volunteers who assist
with planting and conservation works and a further team of 35 volunteers has
been built up as part of the project development phase to assist with clock
winding and open day stewarding.
History and significance
The Park has a fascinating history as a 17th century manor house, a pleasure
ground, sporting venue and rallying point for trade unionists and social
reformers, before being developed by the City of London Corporation and opened
as the Metropolitan Cattle Market in 1855. From the 1890s the site was also
used for a flea market, ‘the Cally’, once a week. By World War II the Cattle
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Market was declining and the flea market dominated the area, but in 1939
the site was closed down at the start of World War II.
After the War, part of the site was still used for slaughtering animals until 1964.
The Market Estate was built on part of the Cattle Market site in the late 1960s
and the rest was laid out as an 18 acre Park. The Market Estate declined in the
1980s and 1990 and the Estate and Park gained a reputation for anti-social
behaviour. The Market Estate was demolished in 2010 and a new mixed
development built, which was completed in 2013.
Nothing remains of Copenhagen House, but the heritage of the Cattle Market
lives on through the Grade II* listed Caledonian Clock Tower , the Grade II listed
Metropolitan Cattle Market Railings and three of the four taverns at each corner.
Opening times
The Park is open from 8am until dusk. The gates are closed at dusk and the Park
is patrolled by a private security company.
Facilities
The Park features semi-mature woodland areas, extensive grass open space, an
orchard, a children's play area, community gardens and a tarmac ball court with
football goals and basketball hoops.
There are no toilets or refreshments on site.
Users and events
Caledonian Park currently has 457,000 visitors per year with some 200 visitors a
year attending the limited clock tower open days.
The Park is well used on a daily basis by local residents, dog walkers, families,
runners and others. Sports training sessions, particularly football, are also
regularly held on the site by a range of groups and local primary schools also
make regular use of the site.
Events in 2014 included three Clock Tower open days, a Family Fun Day and art
exhibition held in the Clock Tower. Other events in previous years have included
a Knit in Public day and a dog show. 2012 saw a theatrical spectacle ‘Babel’,
which involved community groups and local people, with the Clock Tower having
a starring role. The Park is ideally suited for large scale events.
2.4.2.
Islington Heritage Service
Islington Heritage Service comprises of Islington Museum, Islington Local History
Centre and associated borough-wide heritage initiatives
The Heritage Manager, who manages the Service, provides advice, guidance and
support to the local heritage sector, council departments and community and
voluntary sector organisations on strategic heritage development initiatives,
policies and projects.
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Islington Museum is a public museum dedicated to the history of the
London Borough of Islington. It opened in May 2008, funded by a £1 million
grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund and is located beneath Finsbury Library.
The Local History Centre is located in Finsbury Library.
Staff and volunteers
The Service is run by Islington Council and has the following staff:

Heritage Manager

Museum and Local History Manager

Heritage Learning Officer

Museum Exhibitions and Collections Officer

Saturday Heritage Assistant (2)

Archivist

Local Librarian

Project Officers (2)

Heritage Learning Assistant.
The Heritage Service currently has 23 volunteer roles performing front of house
duties, assisting with the learning programmes, curating special exhibitions and
project work.
Collections
Collections include the Joe Orton/Kenneth Halliwell book covers, the Walter
Sickert Archive and the Sadler’s Wells Archive. The Local History centre has over
30,000 photographs of the borough along with a large collection of historic
documents going back to the 16th century.
Islington’s heritage is steeped in radicalism, with a strong commitment to social
justice and personal freedoms. The Museum displays reflect this, covering nine
themes on local and social history: childhood, food and drink, fashion, leisure,
healthcare, radicals, caring, home and wartime. The collection emphasis is on the
20th century, popular culture, social and radical issues. Amongst the items on
display are a bust of Vladimir Lenin, who lived and worked in Clerkenwell, and
some of the book covers defaced by Joe Orton and Kenneth Halliwell.
Opening times
The Museum is open on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday: 10am
- 5pm, and is closed on Wednesday and Sundays. Admission is free.
The Local History Centre is open Monday and Thursday 9.30am – 8pm, Tuesday.
Friday and Saturday 9.30am – 5pm, and is closed on Wednesday and Sundays.
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Audiences
Excluding education visits, the total user figure across the Heritage Service
venues for 2013/14 is over 26,991.
In addition over 2,500 school students took part in Museum sessions in 2013/14,
mostly from primary schools.
Exhibitions and events
The Museum has a lively programme of temporary exhibitions, hosting up to six
per annum. At the time of writing the exhibition is From East to West: Chinese
Life in London since 1900. Previous 2014 exhibitions were:

Living Africa: Through the Art of its Children

Kenneth Halliwell: Collage

“It’s Arsenal around here”: 100 years of Arsenal in Islington.
The Museum hosts talks, performances and historical walks. There are also yearround family friendly and children’s events including:


ReCreate: a project for young parents and their children offering creative
activities, trips and outings and special activities for under 5s including
rhymes and stories.
Under 5s story and art workshops in which children and their carers explore
the history of Islington through sensory storytelling - playing with things to
touch, taste and smell - and making crafts.
Learning
The Museum has dedicated learning spaces in which the learning programme
offers pupils enriching opportunities to explore Local History and Archaeology in
cross-curricular, creative workshops. Through active engagement with archival
documents, artworks, artefacts and costumes, children can creatively explore
their heritage and connect to their local community.
The Museum currently has a very comprehensive early years and primary school
offer of over 40 sessions ranged over nine subject areas, plus sessions
specifically linked to the special exhibitions.
2.4.3.
Arts Service
Islington Council's Arts Service works in partnership with local arts organisations
and community groups to deliver a range of arts activities and events providing
opportunities for local residents to be creative.
Islington’s Arts Service also provides advice, guidance and support for arts
organisations and artists in the borough.
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Islington Arts Service and Heritage Service have a close working
relationship and work jointly on initiatives, projects and in policy guidance.
2.5.
Our partnerships, collaborators and supporters for the
project
2.5.1.
Friends of Caledonian Park
The Friends group were founded in 2000 by a group of local residents to
represent the interests of Park users, initially as a response to the proposals to
develop Market Estate on part of the Park.
The Friends have worked hard to raise awareness of the Park and its history.
They have written a successful illustrated booklet about the history of the Park,
which will be refreshed and reprinted as part of the project, and promote the
Park on their website and at all Park events.
They have worked closely with the Council and others to improve the Park
including creation of a nature garden and an orchard, provision of benches,
improvement and maintenance of the natural habitats, bulb planting, planting the
community orchard and organising events in the Park and supporting those
organised by others.
2.5.2.
Drovers Centre
The Drovers Activities Centre is located next to Caledonian Park and is run by
Age UK on behalf of Islington Council. The Centre runs a huge range of daily
activities for people over 55 years, including IT sessions, fitness, dance, art,
creative writing, reminiscence and song sharing. The Drovers Centre has a group
of volunteers who are designing and developing a community garden bed in
Caledonian Park, with the practical and financial support of Greenspace. The
Drovers Centre team are keen to work in partnership to jointly run activities that
re-engage older people with their heritage and support the health and wellbeing
agenda. The Centre has also actively supported the development phase by
hosting consultation events and helping older people to complete surveys.
2.5.3.
Goodinge Community Centre
The Goodinge Community Centre is located close to Caledonian Park. The Centre
offers a range of activities for the local community, for example lunch clubs for
older local people and drama sessions for children. The Centre has been heavily
involved with community festivals and events run in the Park in previous years
and they would be very keen to support events in the Park, and to promote them
to local residents. The Community Centre will be closing shortly for a
redevelopment of the whole site, when a new centre and additional flats will be
built. The Centre welcomes an additional community space locally to use for
activities, eg for local children.
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2.5.4.
Cubitt Education
Cubitt is an artist-led organisation based in Islington. Founded by a group of
artists in 1991, Cubitt consists of a non-profit gallery that showcases emerging
international contemporary visual arts practice, 32 artists’ studios and a locallyfocused education programme for schools and community groups. Cubitt
Education has a programme that includes a tutoring scheme for young people,
free skills-based workshops, creative workshops and regular participant-led
activities within local schools. Islington Heritage Service works very closely with
Cubitt on a full range of public education initiatives. For example, it has
developed a regular Saturday arts provision for children with them and jointly
runs CPD activities for teachers.
2.5.5.
All Change Arts
All Change Arts is located in Islington and works to develop and promote the role
of the arts in society by bringing artists and communities together to develop
original and innovative arts projects, which promote artistic excellence and affect
positive change for individuals and communities. All Change Arts delivers crossartform projects, working with individuals and communities to produce
performances, festivals, screenings, exhibitions and publications. All Change Arts
has worked with the Heritage Service extensively, including developing evening
events for young people on youth pop culture, and the ReCreate programme for
young parents and their children is currently being delivered in partnership with
the Museum.
All Change Arts supports Arts Award in Islington and recently worked with the
Heritage Service, local primary and secondary schools, the British Postal Museum
and Archive and the Esotorick Collection of Modern Italian Art on an ACE funded
project, Wunderkammer.
2.5.6.
Islington Exhibits
Islington Exhibits is an annual programme that enables ‘hidden’ venues in
Islington to become home to displays of artists and crafts persons. The Heritage
Manager is on the steering group for this initiative and The Clock Tower hosted
an exhibition in 2014 by Eleanor Pearce. Eleanor is Director of Art at the
Islington Arts Factory.
2.5.7.
The Garden Classroom
The Garden Classroom is a non-profit organisation aiming to connect inner city
children and young people to their natural work by providing creative outdoor
experiences that inspire and educate while nurturing a respect for the
environment. They offer cross-curriculum schools workshops, adult talks, walks
and workshops at five venues in Islington:

King Henry’s Walk Garden

Gillespie Park

Whittington Park
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
Graham Street Park

Cape Play and Youth Project.
The Garden Classroom was the winner of the best Learning Outside the
Classroom Innovator Award in 2012.
The Garden Classroom has worked with Caledonian Park in previous years, for
example when they installed the Darwin Trail.
2.5.8.
Hungerford School and Children’s Centre
Hungerford school is located close the Park and are regular users of the Park and
Islington Museum. The staff and children have supported the development
phase of this project and are currently part of the volunteer team that wind the
clock. The Headteacher is a member of the Steering Group and is keen to
develop the role of that group.
The school and children’s centre have offered their support in the on-going
project, for example to develop ideas for activities and to test them out.
2.6.
Implications of the strategic environment for the
project
The strategic context for the project is a strong and consistent one with the
priorities focusing on:

maximising access to and participation in cultural activity and increasing use
of parks by Islington’s diverse community

strengthening a sense of place for residents and visitors

promoting skills development and learning opportunities for children and
young people, supporting local people to employment and promoting the
local economy

delivering opportunities to improve health and wellbeing through cultural
activities and access to open spaces.
The Activity Plan will reflect these priorities.
The Heritage and Greenspace services of the Council already have a strong track
record for reaching out to Islington’s diverse community through active
programming, such as the events and exhibitions hosted by Islington Museum for
Black History Month and community art classes for older people in partnership
with Age UK. Greenspace run a wide range of community based activities. This
experience will be used to inform the Clock Tower activity programme. A
Memorandum of Agreement between Greenspace and Heritage services will be
prepared to cover the formal learning elements of this Activity Plan.
Survey work undertaken for the project has revealed an appetite for community
cohesion and to banish the negative perceptions of the Park. The project will
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offer the opportunity for local people to become involved and help shape
the programme.
The Park already uses volunteers from the Friends of Caledonian Park and from
the Drovers Centre (Age UK) and the Heritage Service also has a well-developed
volunteering programme. The experience from these existing programmes will
be used to develop the Park volunteering programme further and the
involvement of local people will help to strengthen the sense of place and provide
opportunities to gain skills.
The Heritage Service of the Council has an active and successful learning service,
which could expand its remit to deliver sessions in the proposed new Visitor
Centre and use Caledonian Park as an outdoor classroom. Its experience with
particular audiences, such as people with dementia and with hearing and visual
disabilities, can be built upon for the new Visitor Centre learning programmes.
Well-established partners, such as Cubitt Education and All Change Arts (see
2.5.4 and 2.5.5), also have skills to help to develop and deliver an innovative
formal and informal learning programme and the Greenspace Service is working
with the Garden Classroom (see 2.5.7) to develop links between schools and
parks.
The Greenspace team are already delivering against the health and well-being
agenda in their parks through sport events, coaching sessions and provision of
outdoor gyms. This priority will be developed further through the Caledonian
Park project through learning and volunteering programmes and events that
reflect the Park’s sporting heritage and walking trails. Greenspace have
substantial experience running ecology and nature conservation programmes to
formal and informal learners. For example, they run three nature reserves in the
borough and the Ecology Centre, and produce a resource pack for teachers who
are planning their own visits. This experience will be fed into the activity
programme in Caledonian Park.
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3.
Where we are now – audiences
3.1.
Introduction
The Activity Plan builds on research and consultation already conducted for the
Round 1 application and is based upon the following additional research and
consultations:

market research for the catchment area, particularly within one mile of
Caledonian Park, to determine the target audiences for activities and the
appetite for engagement with the project

interviews with one ward Councillor, seven members of Islington Council staff
and the Friends of Caledonian Park

discussions with colleagues from Islington Heritage Service and Greenspace

three consultation evenings with local residents

interviews with three primary head teachers and a focus group with primary
teachers

interviews with learning stakeholders and ‘gatekeeper’ organisations

discussions with community stakeholders and ‘gatekeeper’ organisations

discussions with potential partners and collaborators

observation and consultation at a Big Draw event at the Clock Tower,
involving two Year 4 classes

a discussion with 16 members of the reminiscence and current affairs group
at Drover’s Centre, Age UK

two observation exercises of Park, examining patterns of use over five days in
August and September

an online and hard copy survey completed by 196 people

hard copy surveys completed by 123 people over two open day Clock Tower
tour days and one family fun day

a survey conducted by volunteers at Islington Exhibits exhibition hosted at
the Clock Tower

research and consultation with other heritage organisations

five steering group meetings in June, August, October, December 2014 and
March 2015.
This chapter lays out the findings and implications of the research. A full list of
consultees is in Appendix 1. Consultation write ups are in Appendix 7, 8, 10 and
11; park observation findings in Appendix 9.
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3.2.
Market analysis
The market analysis examines the market for Caledonian Clock Tower and Visitor
Centre. It looks at the market amongst residents in the surrounding boroughs –
Islington and Camden, the one mile catchment area and the market for tourism
in the area.
Data used for the analysis includes:

2011 Census statistics for the local authorities of Islington and Camden

school and college student numbers

tourism statistics for London

audience segmentation data on the resident populations of a one mile
catchment around Caledonian Park.
The full market analysis can be found at Appendix 6.
3.2.1.
Resident population
A summary of the demographics of the catchment boroughs can be found
overleaf.
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Table 1: Census summary
Colours in the table denote: green is above the London average and red is below.
Demographic
Population
Households
Families
Under 24 years
Islington
206,125
93,556
20,940 (22.38%)
30.19%
Camden
220,338
97,534
21,548 (22.09%)
30.89%
London
7,963,763
3,266,173
1,009,843 (30.92%)
32.21%
8.75%
31.83%
10.88%
33.71%
11.07%
40.21%
Socio
Class 1 & 2
(national average 41.73%)
economic
breakdown2 Class 7, 8 & not classified
43.73%
45.33%
36.27%
28.32%
28.73%
27.14%
Deprivation3
14th
74th
-
7.8%
48.1%
15.66%
6.3%
50.5%
14.45%
6.5%
37.7%
14.16%
(national average 30.77%)
Over 65 years (national average 16.34%)
1
BAME communities
(national non-white average 14.58%)
(national average 16.61%)
(rank out of 326 local authorities)
Unemployment (nationally 7.5%)
Qualified to degree or equivalent (national average 27.4%)
Disability
(national average 17.64%)
1
Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic
The 2011 Census classifies residents using the National Statistics Socio-economic Classification (NS-SeC) system which categorises residents by their
occupation. Most visitors to museums and heritage centres are drawn from Classes 1, 2 and 3 (equivalent of AB and C1s).
3
The English Indices of Deprivation 2010 provide a relative measure of deprivation at small area level across England. 1 is most deprived, 326 least
deprived. The domains used in the Indices of Deprivation 2010 are: income deprivation; employment deprivation; health deprivation and disability;
education deprivation; crime deprivation; barriers to housing and services deprivation; and living environment deprivation.
2
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3.2.2.
1 mile catchment
Arts Council England Area Profile Reports for a one mile catchment was
commissioned for the Activity Plan, which was deemed to be a walkable distance
and likely to be the prime catchment area for Caledonian Park.
Area profile reports provide profiles of the population, and particularly of adults,
who live within a defined area and their likelihood to visit museums and other
heritage and cultural venues. They are formed using data from:

the 2011 Census

BMRB International’s Target Group Index survey of adults taken between
20124

The Arts Council’s own geo-demographic segmentation system, Arts
Audiences: Insight.
Figure 1: 1 mile catchment around Caledonian Park
4
www.bmrb-tgi.co.uk
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Table 2: Population within a 1 mile catchment
The colours donate comparisons to the London average (rather than England)
where green denotes above average and red below.
Characteristic
Population
Households
Families with
children
Under 24 years
Over 65 years
Social grades:
1 mile catchment
65,992
30,603
15,105 (44% of all
families)
21,104 (31%)
5,943 (4%)
London
7,963,763
3,394,676
1,010,159 (49%)
England
43,741,289
22,639,533
6,405,564 (43%)
2,632,800 (33%)
904,749 (11%)
16,307,596 (37%)
8,660,529 (20%)
AB
C1
C2
DE
33%
34%
11%
22%
29%
33%
15%
22%
23%
31%
21%
25%
White
Mixed
Asian/Asian British
Black
Other
Unemployment
Students
Qualifications:
Degree or
equivalent
No qualifications
68%
6%
10%
12%
3%
8%
36%
60%
5%
20%
13%
3%
7%
28%
85%
2%
9%
3%
1%
6%
19%
46%
38%
27%
17%
18%
22%
Ethnicity:
3.2.3.
Segmentation
Segmentation is a market research method where a given market is broken down
into distinct groups that behave in similar ways or have similar needs.
Segmentation can help organisations to understand their markets, identify groups
of consumers they would like to target, and develop products and
communications that anticipate their needs.
In the one mile catchment area 15.9% of people are highly engaged with cultural
activity and are over represented in comparison to the rest of London (12.5%),
which is which is encouraging. 59.5% have some level of engagement, which is
below the London average (64.5%), but 24.6% have no engagement with
cultural or heritage activities (London average 22.9%).
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Formal learning sector5
Schools
Islington
Camden
Total pupils
237
14,641
104
11,813
54,752
8,431
9,852
342
539
104
44
Independent
Pupil Referral
Units
Special
Primary
Secondary
Table 3: School pupils6
Nursery
3.2.4.
866
9,231
Schools within walking distance
The following schools are within walking distance of the Park (roughly in distance
order) and should be the primary target audience.
Table 4: Schools within walking distance
Name
Hungerford Primary School
Robert Blair Primary School
The Bridge Primary and
Secondary School
Brecknock Primary School
Torriano Junior School
St Mary Magdalene Academy
Sacred Heart Catholic Primary
School
Gower School
NB: the Gower Nursery is
located beside the Park on North
Road
Holloway School
Camden School for Girls
Total pupils
Primary
Secondary
Special
457
256
166
341
227
180
394
1100
233
c.31 of these
attend the
nursery7
2,088
775
1012
2,887
166
5
Source: 2011 Census, unless otherwise footnoted. All data can be found in Appendix 6
Source: School Census 2014, Department for Education
7
Source: Early Years Foundation Stage Profile Moderation Report; Cambridge Education
@ Islington; 2012
6
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Students
Estimated student numbers attending significant colleges and universities within
the Park’s wider catchment are below:
Table 5: Higher and Further Education students8
University of the Arts, Central St Martin’s
University
City and Islington College
City University
London Metropolitan University
University College London
Regents University London
The Architectural Association
London Academy of Media, Film & TV
TOTAL
3.2.5.
Students
c.4,000 (based at Kings
Cross campus)
9,081 (aged 19+)
16,519 (13,053 fte)
15,770 (2013-14)
28,859 (2013-14)
4,500 (across all London
campuses)
700
900
80,329
Tourism
Islington, and to an even greater extent, Camden both draw a share of the vast
number of tourists who visit London every year. Islington is home to Sadler’s
Wells Theatre, the Almeida Theatre, Islington Museum and LSO St Luke’s
performance spaces, and Camden contains the British Museum, British Library,
Wellcome Collection, ZSL London Zoo, Camden Market and many others. Both
boroughs are rich in heritage and walking tours examining many historical stories
and places take place year round.
Table 6: Tourists9
Islington
Camden
TOTALS
London
Overseas
visitors
300,000
1,000,000
1,300,000
15,300,000
Domestic
visitors
200,000
700,000
900,000
10,100,000
Day visitors
Totals
3,900,000
11,600,000
15,500,000
181,000,000
4,400,000
13,400,000
17,800,000
181,000,000
Day visits to London have risen since these figures were published, to
262,000,000 (2012)10, of which 13,000,000 were visiting attractions in the
capital.
8
Source: Higher Education Statistics Agency and direct contact with college admissions
departments
9
Source: Local Area Tourism Impact Model: Islington and Camden borough reports,
London Development Agency, 2009
10
Source:
http://www.visitengland.org/Images/GBDVS%20Annual%20Report%202013%2011%200
6%2014_FINAL_tcm30-41823.pdf
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3.2.6.
Trends in heritage visits
As well as local and regional trends, The Clock Tower will be affected by changes
in national visiting habits, which is tracked by the Government’s household
survey of cultural behaviour, Taking Part 11. For 2013, it reported that audience
visits to culture, arts and heritage venues were healthy and growing:
3.3.

nearly three quarters of adults (73%) visited a heritage site in the year to
December 2013. A significant increase of three percentage points since the
survey began in 2005/06

between January and December 2013, over half of adults (54%) had visited a
museum or gallery in the last year. This was significantly higher than in any
survey year between 2005/06 and 2011/12 and has been an upward trend
since 2008/09 (43%)

29% of adults had visited a museum or gallery website in the year ending
December 2013, a significant increase since data collection began in 2005/06
when the figure was 16%

in January to December 2013 59.6% of Londoners had visited a museum or
gallery in the last 12 months

there were differences in attendance rates of museums and galleries in the
last year for adults in different ACORN groups. For example those categorised
as Wealthy Achievers (60.1% attendance rate) had significantly higher
attendance rates than those categorised as Comfortably Off (54.6%),
Moderate Means (46.5%) or Hard Pressed (39.9%). Likewise those in the
Urban Prosperity category (68.0%) had significantly higher attendance rates
than those of all other ACORN groups.
Implications of the market research
Looking at the people living within the one mile walking distance they are from a
range of different backgrounds and the programming will need to pay attention
to that diversity. Although there are high levels of wealth and engagement
within the catchment area, nearly a quarter of the people surrounding the Park
have no engagement with cultural or heritage activity. Activities in the wider
Park could be a good way of engaging this group initially.
There are above average numbers of full-time students in the catchment area
and a significant number of families with children, which will be part of the core
audiences for the Park activity programme.
There are nine schools within walking distance of Caledonian Park and these
should be the primary target audience. The Head of Hungerford Primary School
is on the Steering Group for the project and the Head of Primary at The Bridge
School and the Head of Gower School have been interviewed.
11
Source: Taking Part 2013/14 Quarter 3 statistical release, Department for Culture
Media & Sport, March 2014
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3.4.
Stakeholder consultation
Interviews were held with one Councillor and four officers from Islington Council
and the Friends of Caledonian Road Park
3.4.1.
Vision
All stakeholders knew the rich history of the Caledonian Park from its origins as
Copenhagen House in the 17th and 18th centuries, its use a gathering place for
the Tolpuddle Martyrs and their supporters before their march on Parliament in
1834, its brief use as a running track, its use as the Metropolitan Cattle Market
from 1855 until the early 20th century and finally as a bric-a-brac market until
1939. They saw those episodes in the Park’s history as a rich seam for
interpretation and activities based upon history, technology, engineering,
economics, politics, the arts, health and fitness and the natural environment - to
name just a few.
Interviewees wanted the Park to be primarily used by local people, schools and
community groups, but also hoped that curiosity in the site and the Tower itself
might bring people from further across London.
The Clock Tower will continue as the focal point to the Park. Everyone was
pleased that it will be conserved and that people will be able to climb it and that
the Tower and its role within the Cattle Market will be explained through
interpretation. One person thought the theme of the Park should be ‘time’,
linking all the aspects of the Park’s history from the clock in the Clock Tower, the
passing of time and history, the timeline of the site and one of the first fastest
times was set for the mile in the Park during its brief history as a running track.
But stakeholders did not see the interpretation being confined to the Tower; they
wanted it to stretch out into the Park and for the activities and interpretation to
embrace the natural environment and to connect people with the physical
landscape.
There was less agreement on the spaces needed to accommodate activities and
interpretation and, if a new building was required, where it should be located.
However, everyone agreed on the need for a café/kiosk, toilets, new
interpretation and a space for activity and learning programmes. Free wifi access
could be important in attracting local people to the café/kiosk and the building.
3.4.2.
Type of programming
The activities will be inspired by the history of the site and its natural and urban
environment. Stakeholders reiterated that the Clock Tower would be the focal
point with an activity space and interpretation, but that they wanted
interpretation and activities across the site too and to use the Park as an outdoor
classroom. The sorts of activities that were mentioned were:

a community dig on Copenhagen House and the Cattle Market

a community market

hosting part of the Caledonian Road Fair
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
a venue for large and small scale events, such as music, drama

guided tours of the Tower and Park

talks and workshops on gardening, nature, photography, painting, local
history

reminiscence projects to gather memories and objects about the site from
local people

trails around the Park and its immediate surroundings

art markets using the railings to hang paintings

The Big Draw

natural play

camp fires/story telling in the Park

sleepovers in the Tower

after-school clubs

birdwatching, bulb planting and community/school gardening events

community allotments

creation of a nature garden

creation of a weather station

an outdoor gym

sports events.
Stakeholders saw the opportunities for people to acquire skills through
apprenticeships programmes, work experience and volunteering programmes for
adults, students and families.
Interviewees recognised the importance of working with local partners, who
already had the skills and the contacts to help deliver these programmes. Those
partners mentioned repeatedly were:

Cubitt Education

Drovers Centre (Age UK)

Local schools (eg The Bridge School, Hungerford Primary and Robert Blair
Primary Schools)

Pleasance Theatre

Islington Society

Local Tenants’ Associations

Octopus Community Network.
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3.4.3.
Challenges for the project
The challenges for the project include negative perceptions of the Park and its
environs locally because of previous social problems and continuing anti-social
behaviour, albeit on a much lesser scale than in the past.
Stakeholders knew that the support of local residents was critical to the success
of the project and yet there are many competing agendas for the Park. Some
saw the project as a catalyst to bring various interest groups together to work for
its overall benefit.
The HLF bid is purely for the restoration of the Clock Tower and provision of a
Visitor Centre, with associated interpretation and activity programmes. It does
not extend to regeneration of the Park itself and some felt that the Park needed
investment too.
3.5.
Community consultation
Key points raised during public consultation events and discussions with
community stakeholders highlighted the following issues for different target
groups.
3.5.1.
Interpretation themes and range of activities

many people who attended the consultation events were aware of the rich
local history and felt that they would like to find out more

a Visitor Centre could also provide information in the form of exhibitions,
webcam (eg moveable to change view), hands-on exhibits, dressing-up,
models, films, oral history recordings, dioramas

a range of ideas for interpretation of the heritage of the site were discussed,
including smartphone or tablet apps, audio guides, trails, family activities,
website, leaflets and booklets, maps, photographs, timelines and information
boards

it was identified that the heritage could be explored in depth by some people
through facilitated activities, but it was important that there should also be
many ‘light touch’ opportunities as well, particularly for the local community
and regular Park users, who might engage in several, shorter visits to the
Park each week

interpretation should take place both in the Visitor Centre, on the website, in
the Clock Tower, in the children’s playground and in the Park. Much of this
could be quite informal, eg when having a coffee or dog walking

regular Clock Tower open days were thought to be key to this project, with
an advertised programme at predictable times

engaging with the Park’s natural environment was thought to be very
significant, eg identifying trees, wildlife and plants, or through community
gardening (eg adding interpretive labels to trees and plants).
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Add ID labels to the trees and plants – What is it? What can it be used for?
Maybe the Friends and Park Keeper could work together to keep the labels up
to date?
3.5.2.
Local residents
There was great interest in providing activities for local residents:

a wide variety of events was discussed and thought to be useful, including
demonstrations to explain the clock mechanism, or explore clocks in general,
photography or art workshops (one-off for adults and/or children), talks,
children’s activities (e.g. storytelling or role-play)

re-enactments, eg the Tolpuddle Martyrs, were also of interest

adult courses, e.g. local history or art techniques, run over a few weeks also
appealed

consultees suggested guided walks (eg in the local area following a particular
theme, or wildlife/tree walks round the Park)
Hold tree walks around the Park.
Preserve the walnut trees and tell people about them (not too many people
though!)

a number of people were interested in volunteering opportunities, including
people who worked full time. These could include clock winding and
conducting tours, but some people wanted to volunteer to be ‘part of the
community activities’ and this was as important as the activity itself

it was also thought that the project could provide opportunities for local
people, such as staffing the café, and this could include unemployed young
people. The Hillside café was highlighted as a potential partner

local residents were very interested in the Clock Tower Open Days, but many
were disappointed because they were unable to book a place, some had
never climbed the Tower. Regular Open days would be very welcome and
they would be able to visit when they had friends or family visiting

some organised health and well-being activities (eg Nordic Walking) already
take place in the Park, but there were opportunities to develop this further,
including activities for older local people

several people commented on how pleased they were to see the current use
of the Park by young children for football training

local community events and the gathering of groups takes place in the Park
regularly and it was felt important that this spontaneity and access to the
Park should continue, with the added benefit of a possible community space
to use and toilets.
Don't make too many organised activities.
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3.5.3.
Families
The particular requirements of families was highlighted, and the importance of
safety, meeting basic needs and providing appropriate activities was stressed:

the importance of facilities was stressed to enable people to stay longer in
the Park and enjoy it, eg toilets and a café or kiosk. Some families identified
the lack of these facilities as a barrier
We can’t go there with no toilets. We go to Paradise Park, but live on the
doorstep here.
The Visitor Centre will not attract lots of visitors without a café. A café is
essential if the Park is to be a destination.
The café should be near the play area.
There must be a baby change table.

dogs and dog mess were also highlighted, with some seeing this as a barrier
for taking children to the Park. However, there have been a range of views
expressed about this issue
Have dog free picnic area on the grass near the play area [fenced off area] you see them in other parks.
I won’t take my grandchildren there because of the dogs.

activities should be provided for a range of different audiences – families,
children on their own in the school holidays, and also for adults on their own.
This should include a variety of activities from short ‘drop in’ sessions that link
the Visitor Centre with the outdoors and the Clock Tower, to more sustained
activities, such as family ‘back packs’ and Park trails
Dressing up in historic costumes is good for children and for the
interpretation of history.

the local parents and carers’ Pram Attack fitness sessions could be focused
around the Park and begin and end at the Visitor Centre

regular programmed events would be useful for pre-school children during
the week and carers/parents such as storytelling/puppets, crafts or song
sessions

the regularity and predictability of a programme was mentioned, so that
parents/carers can rely on activities taking place at predictable times

the playground was highlighted as an area to continue to develop. It could be
used to make direct links with the Clock Tower. For children who are too
small to climb the Tower for health and safety reasons, it would be ideal to
have a mini Clock Tower equipped with steps, clock face, weights, cogs,
pulleys and bells to chime, with activities available to all children.
The play area could be developed with water play in the Park for small
children.
The play equipment could also be changed to include the Clock Tower (with
clock faces, telling the time, bells, a tower and representations of animals).
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3.5.4.
Local older people
The reminiscence group did not visit the Park and felt that there was nothing
there for them. Several had very established memories about the difficult
historical issues associated with the Park (crime, prostitution, drugs and joy
riding etc) and also that some parts of the Park had been very muddy underfoot,
so walking was not pleasant. This had prevented them visiting the Park. The lack
of facilities (ie toilets and café) compounded this view.
Local community centres, such as the Drover’s Age UK Centre and Goodinge
Community Centre, provided a programme of activities and some are starting to
encourage use in the Park. Additional activities for older people could be
organised in collaboration with Age UK, and the Drover’s Centre would be very
pleased to work in collaboration and build on their emerging relationship. These
activities have started to be developed with support from Greenspace and they
include community gardening and sculptural artwork. These activities will be
limited by the lack of facilities, so should take place in ‘small bursts.’ With a
Visitor Centre available local older people will also be encouraged to visit which
will support Islington Council’s health and well-being agenda. The possibility of
social events, such as Tea Dances, will be an asset for emotional and physical
health, for example.
One member of the reminiscence group had once been involved with the Clock
Tower and its maintenance in earlier years, but did not feel agile enough to do
that again. He would, however, be interested to see more information about the
history and the clock mechanism, which he had found fascinating.
3.5.5.
Other issues
A number of issues, including those related specifically to the Park, were raised
as potential barriers to full engagement with the Caledonian Park Clock Tower
and Visitor Centre, or as concerns during its development:

badly behaved dogs and dog waste management
More dog poo bins.
Hold puppy and dog obedience classes in the Park.
Hooks and water bowls for dogs outside the Visitor Centre, in the shade.

issues around safety, eg sight lines and hidden paths in the Park

late night opening of the Visitor Centre

noise from previous large events has disturbed local residents, and litter and
debris has not always been cleared up by the organisers, with the Park
Rangers and Friends of the Park completing it

sustainability of the long term offer in the Visitor Centre after the HLF funds
stop, and a commitment from Islington Council to maintaining the service and
the buildings

if it was felt that if the Visitor Centre was seen as ‘for children only’ it would
deter adults from using it.
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Additional ideas that were discussed included:
3.6.

regular markets in Shearling Way

charity events in the Park

outdoor gym equipment around the Park (for both older and younger people
to use)

removable goals for football

archaeological dig in the Park

the clock should chime regularly (but not through the night)

artists to make pen and ink drawings as a Park souvenir

water play in the Park for small children

play equipment to reflect Clock Tower (eg clock faces, telling the time, bells
and a tower).
Learning consultation
A range of consultation has been conducted with schools and colleges and with
organisations that support learning activities, such as the British Science
Association and Arts Awards. Other heritage organisations have also been
consulted to give a wider view about starting up new initiatives. Little Architect
and Islington Heritage Service ran a Big Draw consultation event with two Year 4
classes12 and this also provided ideas and information from the child’s
perspective.
Additionally, existing and potential local partners have contributed to the process,
including partners that work with schools, such as Cubitt Education and The
Garden Classroom, and those that work with adults eg the U3A and City and
Islington College. Finally, the role of Creative and Cultural Apprenticeships has
also been explored through consultation. Key issues have been highlighted
below, and further detail from the consultations is provided in Appendix 8.
There was a very positive response to the Caledonian Park and Visitor Centre
project proposals and how the project team could provide a local resource for a
wide range of learners, including children and families, local primary and
secondary schools and adult learners. Additionally, there was a high level of
commitment from those consulted to maintain an ongoing involvement with the
project, for instance by developing some sessions/resources in partnership or
acting in an advisory capacity (eg on an Educators’ Advisory Forum).

12
schools can feel unwelcome in the Park, as there is no dedicated classroom or
base and no toilets. Local schools make visits but they are currently kept
short and focused. With the exception of children from Hungerford School
who volunteer to wind the clock every three weeks, visits do not involve a
http://www.aaschool.ac.uk/STUDY/VISITING/littlearchitect
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visit to the Clock Tower, but might involve sketching and observation of the
Tower from the Park

Hungerford School already use the Park for a range of uses: cross country
run, rounders, Big Bird Watch, seasonal poetry writing, the Darwin Trail,
theatrical work, observational walks, sketching and using the Tower as
inspiration for design and technology projects. The teachers felt that this
worked well and that other schools could be attracted to use the Park in
similar ways. Hungerford School is close by and so the lack of facilities can be
more easily managed as short visits to the Park are feasible. A Visitor Centre
and toilets would be required for other schools to be able to visit easily

teachers would like to achieve a balance of activities. They enjoy working
with, or handing over to, ‘an expert’ in a particular subject, but they also like
to take their own short, focused session and the new offer should allow for
both. The availability of ‘kit’ at the Visitor Centre that could be borrowed by
schools was one suggestion – this might involve simple equipment to use in
the Park, eg hand lenses, binoculars, measuring equipment, compasses,
maps etc. It could also include play equipment replicating outdoor play
activities across the centuries. Teachers did not want activities to be too
prescriptive, but liked the idea of a range of activity ideas being made
available and then they could ‘pick and mix’ and have a tailor made session.
The ‘expert’ sessions should involve a creative element, such as storytelling,
role-play, fire skills, building shelters, or ceramic work and raku firing

free or cheap activities were emphasised by many people consulted – for
some local families the cost of a visit can be prohibitive. In addition to
schools’ visits, teachers also felt that there were immediate links to families,
and that parents and carers should be engaged with such a local resource
too. Schools can promote activities to families, such as holiday programmes,
or weekend activity. The Visitor Centre should also provide activities for
parents and children to do on their own:
Would be good to provide little activities that parents and children can access
together – nature trails and bear hunts.

close working with access and inclusion staff, as well as other teachers, eg
through a teachers’ forum or educators’ advisory panel, would ensure that
developments met a wide range of needs

teachers felt that children liked knowing about the history of the site - that it
was a market and that trading took place, and that the area once had
another ‘life’. They were keen to ‘peel back time’ and find ways to show
children these layers. The theme of ‘time’ and changes over time was of
interest and by providing a timeline there is a framework for showing this
evolution. The changes should include transformation of the physical
landscape alongside the social history
They could be time travellers using the Clock Tower as a Tardis.
Imagining the future…a 25th century Clock Tower.

time was also a theme that linked to clocks, understanding how the clock
works, telling the time and measuring time in various ways. Making clocks,
cogs, cams, clocks through the ages was also suggested
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
changes to the school curriculum as a whole have meant that local primary
schools are re-writing their whole schemes of work. There are opportunities
for the Park and Visitor Centre to work closely with local teachers to develop
activities that will support this work and encourage site visits. A package of
local history study ‘take this place’ focusing on the Park and Clock Tower over
time, using archives, photographs, maps and information about local people
including children, or colourful characters, changes because of events, such
as war and the relationship of the site with the rest of the local area, would
be very welcome. The journeys made by animals at the market locally, how
place and road names have come about, again using maps, was suggested.
This package could cover a wide range of issues such as modes of transport,
housing, shopping and architecture, and how these have changed over time

teachers felt that a visit to the Park could support a range of curriculum
areas, including history (especially the local history) and geography
(particularly for fieldwork. But they would also include activities relating to
science, PSHE, art, PE, literacy, design and technology, maths and drama

the mapping of the ecology of the Park was also suggested – and projects
such as Open Air Laboratory (OPAL) provide activities for schools, families
and adults to do – this could put Caledonian Park on the map as part of these
‘Citizen Science’ projects

a two-site science related trip for primary schools with the Clock Tower and
the London Canal Museum is also feasible

existing partners are keen to be involved with the project (eg Cubitt Education
and The Garden Classroom) and new or emerging partners are equally
enthusiastic, eg City and Islington College and London Metropolitan University,
and are keen to support informal and more formal links, such as volunteer
opportunities for students undertaking Duke of Edinburgh Awards, through to
work placements for students on courses such as Social and Child Care

teachers identified barriers to a visit, which have implications for risk
assessments:
Some children are wary of dogs, we have to be careful.
Rubbish – if you visit in the morning – condoms and drugs left, you have to
be careful.

the Little Architect Big Draw consultation demonstrated that children can be
very inspired in such a building. However, it was important that they had a
chance to climb the building as high as is feasible, and that obscured
windows were a barrier to their enjoyment currently. Children were able to
challenge themselves and, although some were scared of heights, they had a
great sense of achievement when they had succeed in their climb

children wanted to use the Park for play, and had suggestions for
improvements to the Park that ranged from swimming pools to better cycle
and scooter tracks

teachers also though that the inspirational Clock Tower and the view,
combined with the outdoor space, lends itself to creative art opportunities
such as Arts Award13 for young people. Two possible approaches emerged:
13
http://www.artsaward.org.uk/site/?id=1346
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one as a ‘project based’ focused project eg a small team of young people
working together to develop a soundscape – interpreting the noises of the
site (animals, the market, clock etc.). The second approach would be to host
a one-week intensive Arts Award, eg on a theme such as architecture in the
local area, particularly focussed around the Clock Tower
3.7.

local secondary schools could also be involved in CREST14 awards – by
researching the science of the Tower and Clock and making a trail or
activities for younger children. Older pupils could also support STEM activities,
eg at a code club run after school, which could design code to control a clock

the local U3A group is very active and busy. The history group currently
conducts its own research and one member is researching local markets, so
the project is of great interest. The group is already keen to visit and will then
promote the project to others, so this could provide a steady flow of visits to
the Park and local history talks and walks.
Park observations
Observations were carried out in Caledonian Park over four days in August and
September 2014 by the consultant and by volunteers form the Friends of
Caledonian Park. The study was undertaken to find out more about visitor
numbers, gender and age, and more about the activity they engaged in; identify
‘hot spots’ in the Park; and to give people involved with the project a direct
engagement with the Park. There were two types of observation:
1. Mapping people
Mapping people over a three-hour period on a Sunday from 10.30 to 13.30, and
noting where they were first ‘spotted’. The main open spaces were used
predominately by children and adult men; the central Market Road entrance and
seats was well used, possibly by parents waiting for footballers; the west path
nearest York Estate was not seen in use and the greatest concentration of
women was around the play area.
2. Observation of zones.
The area of the Park was broken into three distinct zones to observe numbers,
gender and ages of people at 15 minute ‘snapshots’.
The key findings are:

the Park is well used at times by children aged 5 – 15. These are mainly boys
playing football. For example, approximately 35 played football in the open
space for over an hour (4th September 18.00 – 19.00). These children were
accompanied by parents and carers, many of whom waited and/or watched
the football

the ball court was included in the open space observations. This was also well
used, particularly by young adults (16 – 19 year olds)
14
http://www.britishscienceassociation.org/crest-awards
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
the least represented group were women aged 60+. For example, on 4th
September 2014 (17.30 to 19.30) there were no sightings in this category
and only one man aged 60+ in the same time period

the most frequently sighted women were in the 20-30 age category

the highest number of children spotted at the same time in the playground
and picnic table zone was 14 (15.45 on 28th August 2014)

sport was the most observed activity and this ranged from groups of 5-15
year olds playing football with coaches on the open grass; work colleagues
playing rounders after work; to joggers and individuals exercising. Sports
activity mainly took place in the open space and in the ball court. For
example, on the 4th September over the two hour of observations, 393
‘sightings’ of sport participation were seen, compared to 19 dog walkers
during the same period

a significant number of people stay and sit on a bench in the Park. This
coincides with football and use of the play area at times

walking was a third key activity

a peak number of nine dogs were counted in the Park at 10.30 am on the
12th September 2014 (school day, when there were few children in the Park).
At times, dog walkers were seen to move around the edges of the park when
football or other activities were taking place in the open space.
The full results are in Appendix 9.
3.8.
Open day surveys
Three Open Days took place at Caledonian Park where visitors could climb up the
Clock Tower, assisted by volunteers and guides. They were held on 14th June,
30th August and 21st September 2014, each event being part of another activity
or programme – ie Open Squares Weekend, Family Fun Day and London Open
House weekend. Visitors who climbed the Tower were asked to complete a short
questionnaire.
123 people completed the survey. This section summarises the results, whilst
the full analysis can be found in Appendix 10.
3.8.1.
Respondent profile
Respondent are characterised as local, with about a third of them being regular
visitors. The majority were white, spread across all age ranges and 68% were
adults:

48.18% visited with other adults, 32.37% in a family group, 19.09% alone

50%/50% gender split

respondents were spread relatively evenly across all age bands, with slightly
fewer under the age of 19

90.65% white, 4.67% mixed ethnicity and 4.67% ‘other’
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
4.72% considered themselves to have a disability

59.48% were local residents, 5.17% members of Caledonian Park Friends
Group

43% live within the local N7 postcode, an additional 23.26% from other
North London postcodes, 8.14% from elsewhere in London

57.41% live within walking distance

77.35% employed full time, part time or self-employed.
Table 7: How often do you visit Caledonian Park?
Frequency of visit
Daily
A few times each week
Weekly
Monthly
A few times each year/yearly
Never been
Other
Respondents
26
9
14
15
14
21
8
%
24.3%
8.41%
13.08%
14.02%
13.08%
19.63%
7.48%
Table 8: How did you hear about the event today?
How heard about the open day
Word of mouth
Open Gardens/Open House
Poster/flyer/passing by
Online/via an email
Other
Respondents
32
31
22
19
6
%
29.63%
28.7%
20.37%
17.59%
5.56%
The profile needs to be borne in mind when analysing the questions. For
example, it is not surprising that few people wanted activities for under 5s during
the week (see 4.7.5) as most respondents were adults visiting without children.
3.8.2.
The visit
There was strong agreement with all the suggested statements, though a smaller
proportion of respondents claimed to understand how the clock works:

I enjoyed my visit: 96.69% agree or strongly agree

I found the tour interesting: 94.02%

I learnt something new: 95.69%

I understand how the clock works: 87.83%

I would recommend it to a friend: 95.69%.
Recurring themes when asked what was enjoyed most about the visit were:

the view

seeing the clock, its mechanism and the bell
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3.8.3.

the friendliness and knowledge of the guides and volunteers

the history.
Improvements
When asked how they would like the visitor experience to be improved
respondents suggested:
3.8.4.

making physical improvements to enhance access and make the experience
more pleasant and safe

introducing interpretation, including information boards and images

opening more regularly

providing visitor facilities such as refreshments and toilets.
Heritage
All but one of the heritage topics suggested were received with high levels of
interest. The most popular were:

the design and use of the Clock Tower: 92.31% very or quite interested

the 19th and early 20th Century cattle market and flea market: 90.44%

the 17th century mansion (Copenhagen House and Fields): 90.35%.
The suggestion attracting the lowest level of interest was the use of the site for
sporting activities, cricket, fives, athletics, which gained 69.09% very or quite
interested responses.
3.8.5.
Potential activities
The most popular of the suggested activities were:

regular Clock Tower open days: 91.97% very or quite interested

heritage trails: 86.12%

booklets about the history of the site: 84.26%.
The least popular were:

activities for under 5s during the week: 47.06%

volunteering as part of this project: 59.61%

guided walks with artefacts and actors playing historical characters: 60.18%.
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3.8.6.
Other comments suggestions
Respondents were broadly positive and supportive of the project. Common
comment included:
3.8.7.

the need for a cafe and visitor facilities

the desire for more information about the Park and its history

strong feelings that the Park is an asset and that it should be preserved

the need to restore the Tower.
Visitors who did not climb the Tower
Seven visitors to the first open day did not climb the Tower. Their responses can
be found in Appendix 10.
4.7.8
Islington Exhibits visitor survey
An additional survey was conducted by volunteers over the four day Islington
Exhibits exhibition. Their 13 responses can also be found in Appendix 10.
3.9.
Online survey
An online survey ran between September 8th and October 5th 2014. 1,200
printed copies of the survey were distributed to housing estates surrounding the
Park. The printed copy gave links to the online survey or invited them to
complete and post it to the Council. The survey was also available on the
Consultation and Engagement pages of Islington Council’s website.
This survey tested views about the local heritage and responses to activity ideas,
in addition to feedback on the options for the Visitor Centre building.
196 people completed the survey and a summary of their responses follows. The
full results can be found at Appendix 11.
3.9.1.
Respondent profile
The majority of the respondents are characterised as being local, over 40,
employed and white:

86.3% described themselves as being a local resident, and an additional
2.9% work locally

87% of those who gave their postcode lived within an N7 postcode; an
additional 12% lived in another north London postcode

39.4% were aged 40 to 59 years, and 34.9% were aged 20 to 39 years.
25.2% were aged over 60 years

54.8% were female, 45.2% male
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3.9.2.

90.8% were white, 3.9% mixed ethnicity, 2.6% Asian/Asian British, 1.3%
Black/Black British

12.2% considered themselves to have a disability

63.2% were employed either full or part time, an additional 14.5% were selfemployed. 14.5% were retired and 1.3% were students.
Local heritage
There was strong support for plans to enable local people to find out more about
their heritage:

97.7% of respondents agreed, or strongly agreed, that it is important that
local people have the opportunity to learn about local history

94.4% agreed, or strongly agreed, that it is important that local people have
the opportunity to learn about the history of Caledonian Park and the Clock
Tower.
Respondents were less in favour of contributing their own stories and memories
of Caledonian Park (25.5% agree or strongly agree).
3.9.3.
Proposals
96.9% of respondents agreed with the plans to carry out essential repairs and
access improvements to the Clock Tower.
68.8% wanted a new building providing visitor facilities in the Park. 20% did not.
Those who explained why they did not want a new visitor facility included themes
of:
3.9.4.

the cost and ongoing funding concerns

concerns about noise and antisocial behaviour

the location and its impact on views and loss of green space

fear that it might spoil the peaceful atmosphere of the Park

concerns about the design of the centre.
Facilities and location
The most important facilities were deemed to be:

tool store for Friends Group and Park volunteers: 83.6% agreed or strongly
agreed

displays about site heritage: 83.5%

accessible toilets: 83.6%.
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The most popular location was Option 1: the Gatehouse, with 59.6% agreeing or
strongly agreeing that it was their preferred location. The least popular was
Option 3: the Pavilion, with 35.2% agreeing or strongly agreeing.
Other suggested locations recurring in respondents’ answers were:
3.9.5.

at or near the Park’s Market Road entrance

in or around the Clock Tower

at the East Gate

at the South West Gate

outside the Park or further away from the Clock Tower.
Visitor Centre Option 1: Northern Gatehouse
Themes recurring in what respondents liked about Option 1 were:

the views, and its connection to or relationship with the Tower

that it forms an entry point to the Park

the courtyard space

that it is sociable and welcoming

its symmetry and relationship with the Park’s axis

that it is the least disruptive to the Park.
A significant number of respondents stated that they liked nothing about it.
Themes recurring in what respondents disliked about Option 1 were:
3.9.6.

its impact on views, the setting and the Tower

its impact on planting and green spaces

the perception that it is too close or will have a negative impact on the
surrounding residential buildings

the design of the building

the location.
Visitor Centre Option 2: Base of Clock Tower
Themes recurring in what respondents liked about Option 2 were:

that it is central and has a good relationship with the Tower

that it maintains existing green spaces and is good for the Park

its location.
A significant number of respondents stated that they liked nothing about it.
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Themes recurring in what respondents disliked about Option 2 were:
3.9.7.

its impact on the Tower and views to it

its impact on the Park and green space

concerns about security and antisocial behaviour.
Visitor Centre Option 3: Pavilion
Themes recurring in what respondents liked about Option 3 were:

its location and relationship with the Tower and views to it

its proximity to the play area.
Themes recurring in what respondents disliked about Option 3 were:
3.9.8.

the visual impact on the Clock Tower and views to it

its impact on the Park and green space

the location

the fact that it blocks the view to the play area

concerns about security and antisocial behaviour.
Visitor Centre Option 4: Eastern Gatehouse
Themes recurring in what respondents liked about Option 4 were:

its location and impact on the Tower.
Themes recurring in what respondents disliked about Option 3 were:
3.9.9.

its location, that it is dislocated and too far away from the Tower

the effect on the Park, trees and green spaces

concerns about security and antisocial behaviour

lack of sun and light.
Park improvements
92% agreed with plans to undertake essential repairs and renovations to the
market railings and restore the main Market Road gates to their original
condition.
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Frequency of visit
Almost all of the respondents had visited the Park. Frequency of visit was:

daily: 36.4%

weekly: 31%

monthly: 21.2%

hardly ever: 10.9%.
Barriers to visiting
Dog fouling was the biggest barrier to visiting the Park with 52.9% of
respondents citing it. Other factors attracting over 30% responses were:

lack of toilets: 42.7%

antisocial behaviour: 36.9%

personal safety: 35%

lack of refreshments: 31.2%.
Improvements
Themes amongst improvements requested by respondents were:
3.9.10.

more bins and a cleaner Park

dealing with anti-social behaviour

the introduction of staff or a warden

more and better lighting

a cafe

improvements to planting and Park maintenance

the play area

signage, information and communication about the Park

events and activities

toilets.
Activities
Regular Clock Tower open days were the most popular suggested activity, with
95.24% of respondents agreeing or strongly agreeing. Programming talks about
local history was also popular, with 83.33% agreeing or strongly agreeing.
The least popular suggested activities were guided walks with artefacts and
actors (45.89% agreeing or strongly agreeing) and weekday activities for under
5s (42.95%).
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December 2015
3.9.11.
Volunteering
18.3% of respondents would be interested in volunteering. An additional 39.1%
would be interested but are not able to at the moment.
Suggested volunteering activities included:
3.9.12.

gardening

conducting Clock Tower tours and visits

conservation

research and history related activities

events and special activities.
Other comments
In addition to general support for the project, themes recurring in other
comments were:

a desire not to have a Visitor Centre or any building in the Park

preservation of the Park and its atmosphere

protection of, and improvements to, the planting, Park and gardens.
There were a great many comments all highlighted in Appendix 11, but this one
stood out:
This unsung location is steeped in history going back to Copenhagen Fields,
the great march to repatriate the Dorset farm workers from Australia (the
Tolpuddle Martyrs), the site for the first measured mile race etc. It deserves
to be imaginatively told to visitors, the local community and students. The
Clock Tower itself provides a history lesson as the centre of the great
Metropolitan Cattle Market and additionally creates a 360 degree vantage
point to observe the stunning view of changing London.
3.10.
Implications for activity planning

a regular programme of Clock Tower open days and tours should be
established and promoted to the local community

a programme should also be established for special events such as Open
House and Open Garden Squares weekends etc. which can attract additional
visitors from outside the local area

some visitors find the workings of the Clock difficult to understand, so
activities and interpretation should expand on this. For visitors who are
unable to access the Tower, activities on the ground floor or in the Visitor
Centre would add to this
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
the view from the top of the Tower is appreciated by everyone who gets
there, but could also be enjoyed by others at ground floor level, such as
through the use of webcams. There may also be opportunities to link up the
views across London at ‘high level’ too, so that towers and visitor attractions
can reference each other

there was strong interest in the majority of the historical themes associated
with the Park, indicating that local people want to engage with and ‘claim’
their local history. Social history is important to the local area. Activities that
spill out from the Park, such as guided walks, digital trails or treasure hunts
around the local area can make these wider connections

although there is great interest in having a deep engagement with some of
the historical themes associated with the Park, there are also opportunities to
have a more ‘light touch’ or playful way of exploring the subjects, in the Clock
Tower, Visitor Centre but also in the Park

there is also interest in the natural environment of the Park, the trees, plants
and gardening. Practical gardening workshops, community gardening, ‘citizen
science’ activities and appropriate interpretation were popular ways of
engaging visitors with these subjects

recruitment of a team of volunteers to support the programme of Open Days
and regular clock winding activities is essential and can help to diversify the
current visitors. For example, there are opportunities to engage local young
people though volunteering and through supporting community activities (eg
through Spectrum Youth Project)

local people are enthusiastic about the project offering ‘something to do’ for
families, under 5s and local adults. Although expectations are modest,
activities need to take place regularly and be low cost

family events in the Park – a combination of informal short activities,
regularly available and more sustained activities (eg for Children’s University
activities). Events should also include one off ‘pop up’ activities that provide
seasonal change eg dog shows, music events to tie in with other local events
eg the Cally Festival. As confidence grows, activities in school holidays,
weekends or after school could be considered

local older adults do not tend to use the Park and have said that they do not
feel that the Park is a welcoming place for them. A sustained, gradual,
programme of activity in collaboration with local community groups can
support more engagement with this local group. The regular appearance of
more staff and volunteers in the Park should also help to build confidence

partnership working with local community centres (eg Drovers Centre and
Goodinge) will promote activities to wider audiences and jointly deliver on
initiatives, such as health and wellbeing activities

local organisations want to work in collaboration, and there are some strong
existing partnerships (eg between Islington Museum and Cubitt Education)
that can be built upon. Art partners are keen to use the Visitor Centre as a
base for activities, including community engagement and to support the
development of the interpretation scheme

the Visitor Centre could provide a base to offer heritage inspired Arts Awards,
in collaboration with arts partners, such as All Change Arts and performance
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December 2015
arts organisations. This programme could be run as a week- long immersive
holiday event inspired by the heritage of the local area
3.11.

local teachers are keen to work with the project to make it a relevant and
inspirational resource for schools, and to work in regular dialogue through
and educators’ advisory group. Some schools use the Park regularly and
would enjoy further opportunities to engage with it

changes to the National Curriculum have meant that primary schools are still
testing and developing new schemes of work and this is opening up
opportunities for the project to provide well-targeted programmes to support
schools. Close working, on-going dialogue and collaboration with teachers
can enable the programme will be developed in harmony with their needs.
Any charges for school programmes should be minimal or free

local primary aged children currently use the Park well and have strong ideas
about the improvements they would like to see. Local children and young
people should be consulted and involved as part of project delivery phase,
particularly to test new ideas and activities. This could be developed further
should wider changes to the Park (eg outdoor gym equipment) be possible at
a later date

a programme of CREST activities for secondary age pupils could be run in the
Park in collaboration with local schools and STEM ambassadors

the local colleges, City and Islington College and London Metropolitan
University are interested in volunteering and work placement opportunities
for their students – eg Duke of Edinburgh Awards, through to work
placements for students on courses such as Social and Child Care, and this
would bring more young people into the Park

adult educators have identified opportunities to work in partnership to
develop a range of programmes for local adults

Islington Council has a strong commitment to community consultation and
involvement, so this project lends itself to being developed in collaboration
with the users and potential users, such as through a community forum.
Barriers to engagement
The market research, stakeholder and audience consultation has identified a
number of core barriers that could prevent potential audiences from engaging
with Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre. The activities laid out in the
action plan (Chapter 5) detail a number of ways to build on to minimise and/or
eradicate these barriers and maximise engagement from the target audiences.
Table 9: Barriers key definitions
Organisational The ways in which the project will be managed and which may
in turn serve to exclude or deter potential visitors and users.
Learning and
intellectual
50
Where people have difficulty learning about Caledonian Park and
the Clock Tower because of the way it is presented and/or
interpreted.
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December 2015
Social and
Cultural
Social and cultural barriers arise if the project does not address
the interests and experiences of people from a range of cultures
and different social backgrounds.
Financial
Financial barriers derive from a user’s ability to afford to access
and engage with Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor
Centre.
Physical and sensory barriers relate to those issues which may
affect actual access to the Caledonian Park Clock Tower and
Visitor Centre.
Physical and
Sensory
Table 10: Barriers to engagement with Caledonian Park Clock Tower and
Visitor Centre
Organisational barriers
 the Visitor Centre opening times will impact on when activity can be available
to Park visitors

to engage schools there should be a dedicated member of staff to proactively
build links and establish regular dialogue with local teachers and adapt the
offer in consultation with them

the regular opening of the Clock Tower and tours and the chiming of the
clock are a key factor for the success. Health and safety issues also need to
be addressed.
Learning and intellectual barriers

the operation and mechanism of the Clock is not always clear to visitors

interpretation and activities need to be varied so they appeal to different
people and provide a combination of indoor and outdoor interpretation

interpretation needs to be in the Tower and across the Park

schools have specific curriculum requirements so close working and regular
consultation with teachers and with heritage partners will ensure that these
needs are met

if interpretation does not follow accessibility guidelines and offer different
ways in e.g. layers of information, it will not engage all potential visitors
Social and cultural barriers

some older people do not feel safe in the Park or that there are appropriate
activities for them

negative perceptions of the Park based on its recent history

some people to not visit the Park because they do not like dogs
Financial barriers

activities aimed at families and people on low incomes need to be affordable
(or free) and offer good value for money
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Physical and sensory barriers

the lack of toilets and other facilities is a barrier

the physical nature of the Clock Tower and the necessity to climb to
appreciate the view is a barrier for some visitors

the development needs to ensure physical and intellectual access to those
with mobility impairment, blind and partially sighted people, deaf or hard of
hearing, people with learning disabilities, people with cognitive impairment
and those with long-term mental health problems. Measures to address these
will include Equality Act compliance, induction loops, interpretation appealing
to different learning styles and targeted activities (through relevant local
charities) and appropriate facilities in the Visitor Centre.
The barriers have informed the actions in the Action Plan in Chapter 5.
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December 2015
4.
Involving people in the project
4.1.
Introduction
The chapter draws together all our research and outlines the target audiences,
the activity programme that is translated into the action plan in Chapter 5, target
numbers, outcomes and a framework for evaluation.
4.2.
Our project vision
The project will undertake conservation and access improvement works to the
historic Clock Tower, conservation of the historic railings and the creation of a
new Visitor Centre to provide a range of facilities and interpretation for visitors,
and to support activities in the adjacent Park.
The overall project objectives are to:
4.3.

establish the Clock Tower as an attractive destination for people interested in
the history and geography of North London

provide opportunities for the local community to engage with the physical
heritage of the site and connect to its social heritage

conserve the site heritage

provide a framework for the long-term protection of the site.
Breaking down barriers for people
Table 11: Barriers
Barriers
Organisational
Project Opportunities
The Clock Tower is closed to the public
except for a few advertised days each
year and special events.
A regular, predictable, advertised
programme of Clock Tower tours,
particularly for local people should be
made available.
Health and safety issues related to
tours.
Potential volunteers are put off by
uncertainty about how many hours they
would need to commit, lack of
knowledge about what volunteering
roles are available.
Teachers often have limited time to
organise visits and research new
teaching resources and may not have a
Volunteering opportunities need to be
advertised with practical examples of
the range of work available, the
different levels of commitment
required as well as the social benefits.
Training should include the history of
the local area and health and safety
related to the tours.
Work closely with teachers to develop
the programme and invite local
53 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 4: Involving people in the project
December 2015
full understanding of what is available to
schools.
schools to pilot new activities at
primary and secondary level. Develop
flexible ‘menus’ of activities for local
primary schools and tailor visits to suit
the school.
Learning and intellectual barriers
Some people think that learning about
heritage is serious, ‘not for them’ and
can be dull.
The relationship between the Clock
Tower and the rest of the local area is
not explicit.
The workings of the clock are difficult
for some people to understand.
There are opportunities for fun, short
engagements with the stories of this
heritage and how the clock works.
These engagements can take place in
the Clock Tower, Visitor Centre and
the Park.
Activities targeting families and
children will demonstrate the wider
relevance.
There is no dedicated member of staff to The views of children and young
people will be reflected in the project
discuss schools visits or to provide
through development.
materials or resources for teachers.
Many local people have English as an
additional language.
Recruit a Learning Officer to provide a
flexible range of activities and
resources to meet teachers’ needs.
Continue to build on relationships with
local teachers, including establishing a
method of regular dialogue and
consultation with teachers, regular
‘showcase’ events and ‘private Clock
Tower tours’ and a CPD programme.
Promoting the Visitor Centre, as a
meeting space for local people and
groups will help position the site as a
local resource, open to all.
A range of programming (Clock Tower
tours, family events, creative
workshops, history projects etc.) can
clearly demonstrate the wider appeal
of the Clock Tower and Caledonian
Park.
The interpretation is designed to give
visitors a way to appreciate the
historical, social and geographical
connections of the site.
54 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
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December 2015
The diverse interpretation methods
will enable visitors who have limited
English language skills ways to
engage with the site.
Active promotion of the site to local
children’s centres will attract groups
of parents for whom English is an
Additional Language.
Social and cultural
Some people perceive dogs and dog
mess as a risk in the Park.
Some older local people have strong
views about the Park being unsafe and
not a suitable place to visit, based on
their memories of the Park some years
ago.
Some people are concerned that the
project could make the Park too busy
and noisy.
Continue to work on dog management
and to provide hooks, bins and water
bowls, as dog walking is a popular
activity in the Park.
Continue to host family events such
as a ‘dog show’ and encourage local
providers of puppy classes to use the
Park.
Develop activities for older people in
collaboration with local providers such
as Age UK, the Goodinge Community
Centre and U3A.
Activities and events to be developed
mindful of local residents, and
wherever possible, in consultation. By
continuing an ongoing dialogue with
local people through a Community
Steering Group there will be local
people advocating the project and
also communicating local issues and
concerns.
The Community Steering Group and
other volunteers need to reflect the
cultural and ethnic make-up of the
local community.
Community events in the Visitor
Centre will encourage new users.
Financial
Entry fees and activity costs are a
barrier for many, particularly families
and older people on low incomes.
Activities aimed at families and people
on low incomes need to be free or, if
charged, offer good value for money.
55 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
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December 2015
Schools have to limit the costs that they
pass on to families. Teachers look for
ways to make best use of funds and
organised trips.
Costs for transport for older people can
be a barrier for visits.
School visits need to be costed at an
affordable level, particularly to
encourage regular, short visits to the
Park. Materials and the community
space (when feasible) should be
available for teachers to use without
attending a ‘led’ session.
Islington Museum have an established
relationship with Clerkenwell and
Finsbury Volunteers who provide a
mini-bus service for less mobile
individuals, and Dial a Ride operates a
free service locally.
Physical and sensory
The project needs to offer a broad range
of activities and interpretation that will
appeal to a wide range of intellectual
levels.
The steps, space and height are barriers
for some visitors.
There are no facilities for schools to
leave belongings, or toilets for children,
making the logistics of a visit awkward.
Activities and interpretation will be
accessible to all.
Interpretation and activities in the
Visitor Centre and Park (and
playground) will involve other Park
users who are unable to make the
physical climb.
The capital improvements such as to
steps and handrails will improve the
physical aspects.
A space for schools will improve all
the practical aspects of a visit, making
it easier for teachers to plan visits and
to complete risk assessments.
4.4.
Activity aims
The following aims have been developed around the activity programme. These
are based on a combination of the project objectives and through consultation.
They will be delivered through the interpretation and the activity programme.
The Caledonian Park and Clock Tower project will:
1. Interpret the rich and varied history of Caledonian Park and Clock Tower, its
design and operation
2. Provide a range of events, activities and projects that engage and involve
local people
3. Provide inspiring opportunities for schools, colleges and other learners
56 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 4: Involving people in the project
December 2015
4. Set-up and successfully implement management structures, which
recruit, support and diversify volunteers and audiences.
4.5.
Target audiences
Based on the market research and consultation, four target audiences have been
identified for this project:
Local primary and special schools

Local residents

Local families

Local older people aged 55+.
Local primary and special schools
There are 56,204 school pupils learning within the boroughs of Islington and
Camden. A large proportion of these are primary school age as the table overleaf
shows:
Islington
Camden
TOTAL
237
14,641
104
11,813
56,204
8,431
9,852
342
539
104
44
Independent
Pupil Referral
Units
Special
Secondary
Primary
Table 12: School pupils1
Nursery
4.5.1.

866
9,231
Primary and special schools are a key audience for the Clock Tower project.
There are several primary schools within walking distance in the immediate area,
such as Hungerford School and Children’s Centre, Brecknock Primary School,
Robert Blair Primary School and Torriano Junior and Infant School. There are
several others within a longer walk or bus ride away. The Bridge School is
located within a 5-minute minibus ride away. The Gower Nursery is adjacent to
the Park.
A few primary schools already use the Park for self-directed visits and these
teachers are excited by the prospect of having a dedicated member of staff, ‘an
expert’, to work with them to deepen their experience with the site, and to
develop cross-curricular activities and resources. However, they would also like to
continue to use the Park on their own for short visits and to access materials and
a menu of ideas.
1
Source: School Census 2009, Department for Education
57 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
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December 2015
Islington Museum provides an extensive schools’ programme and is keen to
make their schools’ offer available north of the borough, making use of the
Visitor Centre.
There are a number of existing and potential partner organisations with a track
record of working with schools that are keen to work in collaboration. These
include the Garden Classroom, Cubitt Education, OPAL (Open Air Laboratories),
and All Change Arts.
4.5.2.
Local residents
There are three major housing complexes surrounding the Park:

Parkside Place (421 units)

Southern Housing Group

Residents group

Hyde Village – Shearling Way and North Road = about 100 units

Hyde Housing

Hyde Village Community Association

York Way Court

City of London
Some local residents have dis-engaged with the Park historically over a number
of years. However, the interest around this project and the increased activity at
the Clock Tower eg Open Days has increased. With the close proximity of the
Clock Tower itself to many homes (eg Parkside Place and the York Estate) some
local residents are literally ‘on the doorstep’.
The local residents’ organisations and local community stakeholders have been
informed about, and involved in, the development phase of this project. By
establishing a Community Steering Group, the ideas, needs and feedback of local
residents can be actively sought.
4.5.3.
Local families

Islington and Camden contain 42,488 families with dependent children

approximately 15% of the population of the catchment boroughs are aged
less than 15 years. This equates to 63,969 children.
Local children use the Park, particularly the Park for football activities and also
the playground (see Park Observations Appendix 9). Families use the Park
informally for picnics, cycling and dog walking. Consultation showed that regular
drop in activities for both under 5s and older children, trails covering history and
plants in a fun, engaging way will appeal to this group, and that they would like
58 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
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December 2015
regular access to the Clock Tower. As the lack of toilets is a barrier for
families, the facilities provided by the Visitor Centre will be invaluable.
Holiday events will also be made available for children. These visitors require
layers of information and interpretation relevant to families and children. Handson interactives and activities, tours and trails will all appeal to this group.
By developing the Community Steering Group further and periodic consultations
with the local children’s centres and Youth Parliament the views of young people
and families are heard as part of the delivery of this project and its on-going
programme.
4.5.4.
Local older people

Islington contains 18,036 people over the age of 65

Camden contains 23,973 people over the age of 65.
Older people are not regular Park users, and have spoken about their reluctance
to use the Park, feeling that it is unsafe and that there is nothing there for them.
The lack of facilities is also an issue. This audience was not observed to use the
Park much during the Park observations in August and September 2014.
The local Drovers Centre, which is run by Age UK Islington, has approximately
400 members. The Centre has introduced activities to encourage more use of the
Park, such as taking over a community garden. With improved facilities and
dedicated project staff, such as a Heritage Ranger, this engagement could be
further encouraged. Issues such as health and well-being are also important for
this group, in addition to re-engaging with their local heritage. Socialising, such
as through reminiscence sessions and arts projects in the Visitor Centre, is a
gentle way to start this process and local community centres such as Goodinge
and Drovers Centres are keen to work in partnership. Age UK Islington
represents the whole borough and is also keen to support this project.
Organised activities for older people such as through U3A and local history
societies will also be available.
Within Islington and Camden 17,530 older people claimed Pension Credit in 2012,
of which 11,690 claimed the Guarantee Element only, meaning that they are on a
low income and do not have savings or earnings from a private pension2.
2
Source: Office for National Statistics, August 2012
59 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
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December 2015
4.6.
The activity programme
Activities have been developed specifically with the target audiences in mind and
are grouped around four aims.
Aim 1: Interpret the rich and varied history of Caledonian Park and
Clock Tower, its design and operation
The permanent interpretation in the Park and the Clock Tower is aimed at giving
local visitors and others a way to appreciate the site historically, socially and
geographically. Attention has been given to expressing these ideas to audiences
who are not traditional visitors to cultural attractions, or who may have limited
English language skills.
The key themes have been developed in direct response to the public
consultation (which is summarised in 3.10):

The story of people – with emphasis on diversity of people who have used
the site over the centuries.

The story of change – how Islington’s proximity to London and evolving
needs of London’s population influenced local development.

The story of the tower – with particular detail on design, the clock and
remarkable view from the top.
Additionally there is an emphasis on two significant events, the Tolpuddle Martyrs
Rally and the 4.5 minute mile record set in 1852.
The three themes will be explored using the following techniques:
In the Visitor Centre:
1.
A graphic collage showing the area’s varied use through objects that
people used on the site in its different eras.
2.
A graphic narrative of the Tolpuddle Marchers who met in this spot to
demand justice and to protect workers’ rights.
In the Park:
3.
A cast of twelve historical characters who appear as etched bronze
outlines on robust granite cubes.
4.
A multimedia digital platform for smart devices, allowing imaginative and
changing layers of interpretation around the Park and Tower.
5.
An ambient soundscape around the Clock Tower base to take visitors back
through time.
60 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
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December 2015
6.
Rugged tabletop graphics with Park history and fun facts that can be
enjoyed over a coffee.
7.
A commemorative plaque in the perimeter path about a significant
moment in the area’s sporting history.
In the Clock Tower:
8.
Fact plaques in the Tower chambers about the Tower’s construction and
renovation, and the views from the windows.
9.
Immersive multimedia experience half way up the tower taking visitors
through the sights and sounds of a typical market day.
10.
Graphic interpretation of the clock mechanism explaining the simple
principles of clockwork and timekeeping.
11.
Annotated panoramas of the view from the top of the Clock Tower
referencing past and present and putting the Park into a bigger context.
12.
Browsable Gigapixel view from the Tower, created by the volunteer staff
and viewable online or on a viewing kiosk at the base of the Tower.
To ensure that interpretation reflects the interests of the target audiences, the
Community Steering Group will be involved in the development of both the
permanent interpretation and temporary exhibitions on an ongoing basis.
Aim 2: Provide a range of events, activities and projects that engage
and involve local people
An important aspect of the Clock Tower and Visitor Centre project is to create a
valued local resource in which people feel connected to their heritage and a
sense of pride and community. To do this, the Clock Tower and Visitor Centre will
actively involve local people in the management of the activity programme and
local advocacy – through the Community Steering Group who will be given the
skills to contribute to the project.
A regular programme of Clock Tower tours is the cornerstone of this activity
programme, and a team of volunteers will support the Heritage Ranger in the
delivery of this programme. Younger people can gain experience as volunteers,
such as students from London Metropolitan University, and this could include as
guides or in other roles working on family events, for example.
On a day-to-day level, an activities programme aimed at a range of different
audiences and interests will promote the Clock Tower and Visitor Centre as a
community hub for everyone. These include creative workshops e.g. botanical
drawing and a weekend events programme which links in with wider events such
the local Cally Festival, Family Learning Festival and the RSPB’s Big Garden Bird
Watch, for example.
Regular, low cost, activities for families and weekday activities for under 5s will
take place alongside drop-in weekend sessions for families and older children.
61 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
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December 2015
These will engage children of different ages in the building, its history, the
clock and the Park in a fun and creative way.
Older local people will also be encouraged to re-engage with their local heritage
such as through art workshops, gardening and tea dances.
Aim 3: Provide inspiring opportunities for schools, colleges and other
learners
Local primary and special school teachers will be provided with a series of
creative workshops, activities and supporting resources produced to encourage
engagement throughout the year, either supported by a Learning Officer or
Heritage Ranger, but also independently. These cross-curricular programmes will
focus on a range of topics, such as the history and stories of the Caledonian Park
site, drawing on the local history archive, the market, the architecture, social
history changes, which would be developed as a comprehensive local history
study, looking at changes over time. Activities will involve developing a creative
response to the Clock Tower, with storytelling, role-play and drama at the core.
Teachers will be provided with programmes related to the ecology of the Park,
such as soil sampling, wildlife surveys, observing seasonal changes over the year,
pulling together science and geography field study skills, which are emphasized
in the new curriculum. Other science related activities to interpret the clock and
how it works would also be developed. Local schools will be invited to help
develop and pilot new activities and teachers will be consulted regularly and work
in collaboration.
There will be opportunities for students to volunteer on the project and to have
work placements, such as students from City and Islington College studying
Social and Child Care courses, or MA students from Central Saint Martins,
University of the Arts London, the Institute of Education or City University.
Drawing on the rich history of the site and the local history archives, a series of
talks will be developed and offered to adult groups, eg U3A, and these may well
stimulate additional involvement by U3A members through volunteering. They
will also be promoted to local history groups and societies in the local
community.
4.7.
Resources needed to support our activities
4.7.1.
Staffing
Three members of staff will be appointed to deliver the project:

Project Officer (Heritage), full-time for two years to oversee the capital part
of the project

Learning Officer, full-time for three years to oversee the heritage-focused
aspects of the activity programme

Heritage Ranger, full time for three and a quarter years to oversee the
environment-focused aspects of the activity programme.
62 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
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December 2015
Additionally a part-time caretaker, employed by Islington Council, will be
engaged to look after the Clock Tower and Visitor Centre.
The Project Officer will be managed by the Projects Team Manager.
The Learning Officer will be managed by the Heritage Manager and the Heritage
Ranger will be managed by the Central Area Parks Manager.
An officers’ working group comprising Central Area Parks Manager, Heritage
Manager, Project Officer, Project Learning Officer, Heritage Ranger and Assets
Improvement Officer will be established to meet on a quarterly basis to plan and
coordinate work/ activities.
The Job Descriptions are in Appendix 5.
4.7.2.
Volunteering
There will be 109 volunteers supporting the activity programme over three years
and they will be involved in every aspect of delivery:

guides to the Clock Tower, Visitor Centre and Park

helpers in the café and welcomers to the Visitor Centre

assisting with informal and formal learning activities in the Clock Tower,
Visitor Centre and Park

researching and developing guides, trails and learning resources

researching and developing interpretation of the Clock Tower and Park

researching and developing interpretation in the Visitor Centre and for special
exhibitions

helping and stewarding at Park events

helping with website content and social media

horticultural activities

landscape management

winding the clock

serving on the Steering Group.
The project will build on the Council’s existing partnership with The Friends of
Caledonian Park and the nearby Drovers Centre for recruits, but will also recruit
through Voluntary Action Islington, the websites Do It, Reach, Project Dirt and
VInspired, through various universities, (such as City and Islington College, City
University, UCL, London Metropolitan University and UCL’s Institute of
Education), Islington Adult and Community Learning, and through a range of
community interest groups in the borough, such as the Islington Society and
Islington Archaeology and History Society and through social media.
The Volunteering Plan is in Appendix 2.
63 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
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December 2015
4.7.3.
Training
There is a comprehensive training programme in Appendix 3 that details 25
different training sessions for volunteers and staff to equip them to deliver the
Activity Plan.
Other training includes placement opportunities for students from City and
Islington College, Central Saint Martins, City University or the Institute of
Education and ‘showcase’ and Continuing Professional Development days for local
teachers.
An apprenticeship and a heritage skills programme will also be provided,
including:
 building conservation skills apprenticeship – two or three year apprenticeship
for a stonemason working initially to NVQ Level 2 then Level 3. The
apprentice will be employed by building conservation contractor. The Council
will cover the salary cost for first year through project. The contractor will
undertake to continue employment for further one or two years to completion
of apprenticeship. The apprenticeship will be undertaken in partnership with
the Building Crafts College, based in Stratford, East London.
4.7.4.

basic clock maintenance and inspection – one day’s tuition in clock winding,
inspection and routine maintenance provided by Smith of Derby for eight
clock windings volunteers.

heritage metalwork - three day bespoke training course for four Council
fitters in heritage metalwork covering how castings are made, physical
properties, deterioration, hot and cold repair techniques, preparation and
painting – based in Council workshop and on site.
Facilities
The new Visitor Centre, located at the northern gateway to the Park will provide
the facilities needed to support the activity programme. Although core opening
times of the building will be between 10.00am and 4.00pm daily, the central
covered entrance to the Park that will be opened and closed at the same time as
the Park, from 8.00am until dusk. The covered entrance walls will be used for
interpretation of the Park.
The building will contain:

a community learning room, with a capacity for 30 people which schools can
use as a base and community groups can meet. The room has a sink, toilets,
cloakroom and a furniture store.
The community room will be used for interpretation and special exhibitions
and will be open to general visitors when not in use by schools and
community groups.

64 a volunteers’ room as a base for volunteers working in the Park. It will
provide space for storage of equipment and materials, and tea making
facilities
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 4: Involving people in the project
December 2015
4.7.5.

an office for the Learning Officer and Heritage Ranger

a kiosk serving teas and coffees to visitors to the Park and users of the Visitor
Centre

accessible public toilets.
Partnerships and collaboration
This Activity Plan draws on existing partnerships and has identified new and
emerging partners and organisations who are keen to collaborate. For example,
Greenspace already has very strong relationships with The Friends of Caledonian
Park, the nearby Drovers Centre, Age UK and the Garden Classroom. The
Heritage Service regularly works in partnership with several arts organisations
such as Cubitt Education, All Change Arts and the Arts Development Team and
these partners will be crucial to delivering the activity programme in this new
venue.
By building on these partnerships, and by forging new ones the Activity Plan is
well supported and embedded in the local community. The Hungerford School
and Children’s Centre, staff and children, have taken an active role in the
development phase and keenly advocate the project locally with other schools
and families. City and Islington College (CANDI) and the London Metropolitan
University are keen to involve students in work placements and volunteering
roles. Similarly, student placements for post graduate students eg at the UCL
Institute of Education and at Central Saint Martins will strengthen links.
Local community networks and the close working within the community is also at
the heart of this Activity Plan and collaborations with the Goodinge Community
Centre and the Octopus Community Network are two of the local collaborators
who are keen to advocate the project locally. There are opportunities to engage
young local people through specific project work and by supporting local
community events, eg by working with Spectrum Youth Project.
Other organisations have offered support, eg for joint delivery such as Cubitt
Education and others to provide expertise and advice eg the Open Air Laboratory
(OPAL) project based at Imperial College London.
4.7.6.
Expenditure
The cost of the activity programme is £482,779 and a full breakdown of the costs
is in Chapter 5, section 5.3.
Activity
1 Interpretation
2 Informal activities
3 Formal learning
4 Management
TOTAL
Three year
programme cost
£
£
48,400.00
£
56,005.00
£ 378,374.00
£ 482,779.00
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December 2015
4.8.
Targets and outcomes for the activity programme
Targets for general Park users is to double to 500,000 per annum and below that
are the estimated numbers of Clock Tower tours and target audience
engagement.
Table 13: Targets for Park users
Baseline
(2014/15)
Park visitors
Clock Tower Tours
Schools activities3
Local older people
Local residents
Local families
Online use
457,000
4.9.
How the project meets HLF’s outcomes
4.9.1.
Heritage
Targets for
project over 3
years
1,500,000
10,800
5,400
3,000
3,240
9,750
12,000
The Clock Tower will be:
4.9.2.

in a better condition following the restoration works and implementation of
the Management and Maintenance Plan

better managed through the additional staff and volunteer resource

better interpreted and explained, through the exhibitions, trails, learning and
community programmes

more accessible to the public through tours and interpretation.
People
The Park visitors will:

increase their knowledge about the Park and the Clock Tower and will be
inspired to discover more about local history

share their own knowledge, stories and ideas through the interpretation and
oral history programme

learn new skills through the learning programmes and volunteering

enjoy themselves

feel welcomed and comfortable

recommend the project to others
3
These levels have been informed by current uptake at Islington Museum
66 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
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December 2015

have a long-term relationship with the project partners.
Volunteers will:

be diverse

undertake broad range of roles

have acquired new skills through the volunteering tasks and training

be confident about engaging with a broad range of audiences

feel valued

have a sense of common purpose and ownership

be enthusiastic and motivated

have improved well-being

feel proud to be involved in the project.
The building conservation skills apprentice will:

4.9.3.
have acquired new skills and a qualification
Communities
The local community will:

re-engage with their local heritage and feel a strong sense of place

feel they have a voice in the project

have acquired new skills

feel that their park is a better place to visit

feel proud of Caledonian Park and its amazing history.
The Caledonian Park and Clock Tower project will:

attract a diverse audience

pro-actively reach out into the community

have facilitated the partners developing successful and lasting relationships
with each other

have facilitated the partners developing successful and lasting relationships
with community groups

have developed long lasting skills and capacity for staff.
The collaborators/partners will:

feel involved and confident

feel proud of the project
67 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 4: Involving people in the project
December 2015
4.10.

want to continue to work with each other

consider that their organisation benefitted from the partnership and become
more resilient as a result.
Evaluation and measuring success
The project has £10,000 allocated in the budget to employ a freelance evaluator
who will set the framework for measurement and the mechanisms for the project
staff to collect data. The brief is in Appendix 5. The paragraphs below lay out a
putative framework that will be honed by the consultant.
Clock Tower project will undertake evaluation to ensure that the project is
meeting all the targets and outcomes set. The results of the evaluation will be
used by Islington Council and by project staff to celebrate success and to adjust
the project, if necessary.
The activities and audiences that the project wishes to measure are:

numbers of users of the Visitor Centre

participants in the informal learning activities (on-site and off-site)

participants in the formal learning programme (on-site and off-site)

partner engagement

website and social media effectiveness.
The outcomes the Clock Tower will measure are in 4.8 and will be honed using
Generic Learning Outcomes (GLOs) and Generic Social Outcomes (GSO) toolkits4.
Quantitative measures of success will be:

meeting the numbers for target audiences

achieving annual target number of activities, number and profile of people
attending
4
Inspiring Learning for All includes evaluation toolkits known as Generic Learning
Outcomes (GLOs) and Generic Social Outcomes (GSOs):
GLOs seek to consolidate all recognised features of learning through five main areas:
 Knowledge and Understanding
 Skills
 Attitudes and Values
 Enjoyment, Inspiration, Creativity
 Activity, Behaviour and Progression.
GSOs help museums, libraries and archives to measure the wider impact of their work in
communities. The three outcome areas that relate to government policy priorities:
 Stronger and safer communities
 Health and well-being
 Strengthening public life
http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/what-we-do/supporting-museums/ilfa/about-ilfa/
68 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 4: Involving people in the project
December 2015

achieving annual target number of schools and community projects,
number and profile of people participating

achieving target number of volunteers

online web hits, the time spent by visitors online and the level of participation
in accessing deeper learning resources and participatory activity online such
as downloading resources, uploading content.
Qualitative measures of success will be:

visitors saying that they appreciate and understand the history of the Park
and its natural environment

positive feedback on staff and volunteers from visitors

volunteers having demonstrably benefited from the project

trainees having acquired skills from the project

teachers, children, community participants saying they have learned about
the history of the Park and the natural environment

collaborators/partners say that they have benefitted from working with each
other

each partner organisation has expanded its skills and programmes through
working with other organisations.
The Clock Tower project will measure the impact of the project through:

regular on-line and on-site visitor surveys (e.g. age, gender, ethnic
background, socio-economic group, disability, group composition)

recording the number of sessions and events

recording the number and profile of event participants

evaluation of sample sessions through questionnaires and individual
interviews

observational research

analysis of website and social media usage and statistics provided by LBI
Communications team

recording number and profile of volunteers

review and regular progress meetings with volunteers, partners and staff.
The data will be collected and collated on a quarterly basis and used to inform
activity and business planning and funder reports.
4.11.
The legacy and sharing our experience
The project will see the Clock Tower building and the Park railings restored and
brought back into top condition, and this standard will be maintained by the
Council.
69 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
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December 2015
The new Visitor Centre will provide a lasting base for community and
schools activities, exhibitions and a place for visitors to learn about the Park
through interpretation, quizzes, trails and backpacks. It will provide a facility for
use by volunteers and will also provide toilet and refreshment facilities for the
Park.
The Friends website will be developed during the project and will have visitor
information, news, online exhibitions, quizzes and trails and places where people
can upload their own photographs and contribute their own memories. Lasting
hard copy and online resources will be developed for schools and by running a
programme of CPD events for teachers, teachers will gain new skills and feel
more confident about using the Park’s heritage and natural environment as a
resource.
Investment in the learning and community programmes during the project will
bring local schools, residents and day visitors to the Park and will raise
expectations of the programme provided.
Sustainability is built into the activity programme and the future of the project.
Once the project funding has ended the Council will fund one full time post as
Heritage Ranger and a part-time post as Learning Officer. During the project the
Visitor Centre will be developed as a satellite base for Islington Heritage service
and this will continue beyond the life of the funding.
The whole activity programme is designed to involve local people and to
encourage pride in the Park and its local environment. A large volunteering
programme for 109 volunteers will have been developed and these volunteers
will be skilled up through the training programme to deliver all aspects of the
activity programme, managed by the new post.
During the lifetime of the project, we will work with a community steering group
that will continue to advise on formal and informal learning and programming
beyond the life of the project.
The activity programme will be delivered with the help of a range of local partner
organisations, such as the Drovers Centre (Age UK), the Goodinge Community
Centre, Cubitt Education and All Change Arts and these organisations will
continue to support the programme and facility by running their own sessions at
the Visitor Centre.
The Council will share the experience and knowledge of the project through:

participation at related conferences

publishing the project as a case study

articles for heritage and specialist audiences.
70 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
5.
Action plan
5.1.
Introduction
This chapter draws together all the audience research and turns it into an action
plan that will achieve the three strategic aims for the Activity Plan. The
programme is designed to provide an imaginative and achievable set of activities
that remove barriers and exploit opportunities and will help visitors and
participants to engage with the rich heritage of Caledonian Park and the Clock
Tower.
The activities are tabulated below and grouped around four strategic aims,
namely that Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre will:
1. Interpret the rich and varied history of Caledonian Park and Clock Tower, its
design and operation
2. Provide a range of events, activities and projects that engage and involve
local people
3. Provide inspiring opportunities for schools, colleges and other learners
4. Set-up and successfully implement management structures which recruit,
support and diversify volunteers and audiences.
The activities are tabulated below and address the following factors:

what activities will happen

who will benefit and how

what the impact will be of the activities
who will deliver the activities where the skills and expertise will come from

how much the activities will cost

when the activities will be delivered

how Caledonian Park Clock Tower will measure and evaluate success for each
activity.
71
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Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
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72 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
5.2.
Action plan
Aim 1: Interpret the rich and varied history of Caledonian Park and Clock Tower, its design and operation
1.1
Activity: detailed
description
Audience(s)
Benefits for
people
Outcomes
Resources
Implement the
interpretation scheme as
described in the
Interpretation Plan.
All audiences
A wide range
of people learn
about the
heritage of
Caledonian
Park and the
Clock Tower
The heritage
will be better
interpreted
and explained
Manageme
nt:
Project
Officer
The permanent
interpretation in the Park
and the Clock Tower is
aimed at giving local visitors
and others a way to
appreciate the site:



historically
socially
geographically
Attention has been given to
expressing these ideas to
audiences who are not
traditional visitors to cultural
attractions, or who may have
limited English language
skills.
A wide range
of people learn
about the
operation of
the Clock
People will
have learned
about heritage
Costs in
project
budget
Costs: in the
Interpretation
budget
Timetable
Interpretation
development
phase
Targets and
measure of
success
Aim for
500,000
visitors
per year
People
understand
the historical
significance of
the
site and say
that
they have
learned
new facts
about the
Clock Tower
and Park
Methods of
evaluation
Visitor
numbers
Visitor
Surveys
Feedback
from visitors,
staff and
volunteers
GLO
framework
Positive
feedback
from users
73
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
1.2
Test the interpretation
themes, design and
activity ideas with the
Community Steering
Group, school children
and Islington Youth
Parliament members to
ensure that it engages and
appeals to them.
Local primary
and special
schools
Local residents
Invite local schools such as
Hungerford and Brecknock
and the Youth Parliament
All audiences
benefit from
interpretation
which is clear
and engaging
Work with local artist,
subject to ACE funding
1.3
Regular programme of
Clock Tower Open Days
organised and promoted
The programme will cover
weekends and weekdays to
enable a wide spectrum of
people to take part
Volunteers to act as
welcomers and guides in the
74 Young people
learn new
skills
by helping
with
exhibition
development
and feel
engaged in
their local
community
All audiences
Volunteers
The Clock
Tower, the
mechanism
and the views
over London
are made
available
The
information
about the
Clock Tower is
Outcomes
Resources
People will
have
volunteered
time
Manageme
nt:
Project
Officer
People will
have learned
about heritage
Costs in
project
budget
Costs: in the
interpretation
budget
Timetable
Interpretation
development
phase
Hospitality and
expenses for
consultees in
2.1
The heritage
will be better
interpreted
and explained
Community
Steering Group
participate and
engage with
the process
People will
have had an
enjoyable
experience
People will
have learned
about heritage
People will
have
volunteered
time
The heritage
will be better
interpreted
Targets and
measure of
success
At least 30
primary aged
children and 8
young
people actively
participate in
an
enjoyable
project
Methods of
evaluation
Collection of
statistical
data
Participant
evaluation
forms
GLO
framework
Project team
takes on board
recommendations
from local
people
Manageme
nt:
Heritage
Ranger
Other
input:
Staff and
volunteer
time
Costs:
included in
Training
Plan
Clock Tower
open for 10
guided tours
a week for
36 weeks of
the year
Develop in
the 6 months
before
opening and
implement at
Numbers of
events,
numbers of
visitors (target
of 10,800 over
3 years),
numbers of
volunteers
engaged
Visitors say
that
Collection of
statistical
data
Visitor survey
Feedback
from staff,
volunteers
and
participants
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
Clock Tower
presented in
an
accessible way
to all visitors
Interpretation
appeals to
people with
different
learning styles
Outcomes
and explained
More people,
and a wider
range of
people will
have engaged
with heritage
The local
area/communit
y will be a
better place to
live, work or
visit
The local
economy will
be boosted
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
opening in
April 2018
Targets and
measure of
success
the volunteers
enriched their
visit
Volunteers say
they have
learned
new skills,
gained
confidence
and enjoyed
the experience
Methods of
evaluation
Feedback
cards
GLO
framework
Aim to recruit
27 new
volunteer
guides
People will
have
developed
skills
People will
have had an
enjoyable
experience
75
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
1.4
Work with Islington
Council access group to
ensure that the Clock
Tower and Visitor Centre
are as accessible as
possible
76 All audiences
but particularly
those with
physical,
sensory and
intellectual
disabilities
Local people
can learn
about the
Clock Tower
and local
heritage in an
enjoyable and
accessible way
Outcomes
Resources
More people,
and a wider
range of
people will
have engaged
with heritage
Management:
Project
Officer
Costs in
project
budget
Costs: in the
capital budget
Timetable
From award
of HLF grant
award
onwards
Targets and
measure of
success
Favourable
feedback from
disability
groups on
ease of use
and
effectiveness
Good reviews
on websites
specialising in
disability
awareness
Methods of
evaluation
Observation
of users
Visitor survey
Collection of
statistical
data
Feedback
from
volunteers
and staff
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Aim 2: Provide a range of events, activities and projects that engage and involve local people
2.1
Activity: detailed
description
Audience(s)
Benefits for
people
Outcomes
Resources
Further develop the
Community Steering
Group
Local
residents
Local people will be
actively involved in
the Clock Tower
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
Management:
Heritage
Ranger
To inform the project,
actively engage with the
project development (eg
testing interpretation ideas)
and act as advocates locally to
promote the project. This
will be recruited through
local residents’ groups, community
centres and organisations
such as the Octopus
Community Network and Age
UK Islington.
Develop a community
engagement strategy to
ensure that local people,
schools, people with special
educational needs and
disabilities (SEND), and
community groups are
represented, informed and
actively engaged with the
project.
All audiences
Steering Group
members will learn
new skills and
develop increased
confidence and
deepen their
connection to their
local heritage
People will
have
volunteered
time
The local
community
will be a
better place
to live, work
of visit
Staff time
Costs in
project
budget
Materials and
Expenses and
travel costs:
£1,000 per
year
Timetable
From award
of HLF
grant
award
onwards
Community
engagement
strategy
developed
by
December
2016
Targets and
measure of
success
Target number
of 10 members
Successful
involvement of
local people in
the Clock
Tower project
Positive
feedback from
participants
Increased
numbers of
local people
engaging
77
Methods
of
evaluation
Participant
evaluation
forms
Collection of
statistical
data
Feedback
from staff
and
volunteers
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
2.2
Hoardings project
All audiences
Members of the local
community work with an
artist (or alternatively a
competition is run) to
provide interpretation of the
project hoardings
Engagement with
the project from
the outset
Local people and
visitors to the area
learn more about
the project and the
heritage of the area
Work with local artist,
subject to ACE funding.
Heritage Manager will submit
application on award of HLF
grant
Outcomes
Resources
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
Management:
Heritage
Manager will
seek funding
Project Officer
to oversee
project if
successful
People will
have
volunteered
time
The local
area/
community
will be a
better place
to live, work
or visit
Costs in
project
budget
Subject to
separate
funding
Timetable
Anticipated
start of
October
2016
Targets and
measure of
success
At minimum of
70 people are
engaged with
the artists (or
enter the
competition)
Link to the
ACE targets
specified in the
application
In partnership
with:
Arts
Development
Team
(Children and
Young People)
Methods
of
evaluation
Collection of
statistical
data
Participant
feedback
through
group
discussion
GLO
framework
All Change
Arts
2.3
Launch the Clock Tower
with an opening festival
Encourage local people to
attend. Include activities
that appeal to each target
audience. Live music, drop
in activities, meet heritage
team and other local
heritage organisations, Clock
Tower tours etc.
Local young people eg
78 All
audiences,
but also
targeting
local older
people,
residents,
families and
primary and
special
schools
Increased
awareness of what
the project has to
offer local people
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
Increased
enthusiasm for
visiting the Clock
Tower in the Future
People will
have
volunteered
time
More people,
and a wider
range of
Management:
Learning
Officer
With support
from:
Heritage team
In partnership
with:
Cally Festival
Spectrum
Event costs
£5,000
April 2018
1,000 people
attending
90% of people
attending rate
the event as
good or
excellent in
terms of
enjoyment
75% say that
they are likely
Collection of
statistical
data
Mood
board or
wall
Simple
and quick
self
completion
survey
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
Spectrum Youth Project to
support the organisation,
secondary school bands to
be invited to perform. Local
primary and special schools
to give creative performance
(eg poetry or drama)
Outcomes
Resources
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
Youth Project
People will
have had an
enjoyable
experience
Subject to separate funding
eg from Argent or
community trade union
funding NB they have not
been approached
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
Local schools
Age UK
Islington
Targets and
measure of
success
to recommend
visiting the
Clock Tower to
friends
Methods
of
evaluation
GLO
framework
Goodinge
Community
Centre
Arts
Development
Team
(Children and
Young People)
All Change
Arts
Pleasance
Theatre
2.4
Older people’s art
projects
In collaboration with
partners such as All Change
Arts and Age UK Islington,
develop a programme of
projects for older people,
such as photography,
textiles, sculpture, creative
writing and painting. The
Clock Tower and Park can
inspire their work and they
can make use of the art
Local older
people
Older people learn
new skills, learn
about the history of
the Clock Tower
and Park, and reengage with a local
amenity
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
People will
have
developed
skills
People will
have
changed their
attitudes
Management:
Learning
Officer
In partnership
with:
Age UK
Islington
All Change
Arts
£2,000 start
up costs for
equipment for
art activities
£50 per
session for
consumables
£150 per
session for
artist
Overall cost:
From April
2018
10 participants
take part in a
6-week
programme
once a year
All participants
say that they
enjoyed the
project and
feel more
connected with
the Clock
Tower and
79
Collection of
statistical
data
Participant
feedback
through
group
discussion
Feedback
from
artist
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
2.5
Outcomes
studio space in the Visitor
Centre
and/or
behaviour
Display of artworks in Visitor
Centre over a weekend
More people,
and a wider
range of
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
Develop an activity
programme to make the
most of national or local
initiatives, eg RSPB’s Garden
Bird Watch, Black History
Month, Family Learning
Festival, Big Draw and
Playday
Local
residents,
families and
older people
Audiences can
enjoy the Park and
Clock Tower
Links with national
events will attract
other people from
outside the
immediate area
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
People will
have
developed
skills
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
£1,200 per
annum
Timetable
100 people to
visit the
display
£200 display
costs
Management:
Learning
Officer/
Heritage
Ranger
Costs per
annum £2,000
(ie £500 per
event)
Targets and
measure of
success
Park
8 events
per year
from April
2018
A minimum of
500 people
attending over
the course of
each year
90% of people
to rate the
activities as
good or
excellent
People will
have had an
enjoyable
experience
Heritage will
be identified/
recorded
2.6
Social tea parties in the
Visitor Centre
Held to build the confidence
of local older people who are
80 Local older
people
Local older people
feel that there is an
enjoyable event in
the Park to attract
them and that they
People will
have had an
enjoyable
experience
Methods
of
evaluation
GLO
framework
Collections
of
statistical
data
Staff and
volunteer
feedback
Simple
feedback
cards on
the day,
facilitated by
volunteers
GLO
framework
Management:
Heritage
Ranger
To be led by
£1,200 per
annum
From May
2018 and
then
monthly
between
One event a
month from
May to
September
Collection of
statistical
data
Group
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
not engaging with the Park.
To draw on the pleasure
garden theme from the
Park’s history.
can socialise in a
safe and engaging
environment
Work closely with Age UK
Islington and Goodinge
Community Centre and other
local community groups to
encourage attendance and
promote events
Programme of weekday
activities for under 5s eg
arts and crafts, bug hunts
etc
Promote to young mums;
through Children’s Centres
and through the Pram Attack
Hungerford group
Through the Children’s
Centres invite specific groups
– eg the Somali Stay and
Play group at Hungerford
Children’s Centre
Social and child care
placement student from City
Resources
People will
have
changed their
attitudes
and/or
behaviour
other
community
groups such
as:
The local
community
will be a
better place
to live, work
or visit
To be hosted by external
community groups eg North
London Cares
2.7
Outcomes
Local families
with early
years
children
Families can learn
together about the
Clock Tower and
Park’s history in an
enjoyable and
accessible way
More people,
and a wider
range of
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
People will
have had an
enjoyable
experience
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
May and
September
each year
Targets and
measure of
success
30 people
attend each
event
Methods
of
evaluation
discussion
with
members
and staff
at
community
centre
Positive
feedback from
participants
North London
Cares
Age UK
Islington
Staff and
volunteer
feedback
Goodinge
Community
Centre
Management:
Learning
Officer
Supported by:
City and
Islington
College
student
Volunteers
GLO
framework
Costs approx.
£35 to cover
materials and
refreshments
per session
£1,000 per
annum
From April
2018 then
weekly
Programme
one short drop
in activity each
week on a
regular day,
term time
Aim to attract
at least 10
children and a
parent/ carer
each session
Collection of
statistical
data
Children’s
and
carers’
feedback
eg using
smiley
faces etc
Informal
feedback
Positive
feedback from
participants
Staff and
volunteer
feedback
81
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
Targets and
measure of
success
and Islington College to
support the sessions
2.8
Programme of regular
free family activities
inspired by the Clock
Tower, local heritage and
Park and aimed at local
residents
These could include
practical, hands-on activities
such as craft, model making,
drawing and designing or
traditional games and play
activities
Family activities should take
place regularly and at
predictable times e.g. first
Saturday of the month and
during school holidays
Work in partnership with
local organisations such as
Hungerford Children’s Centre
and local schools to promote
the activities in the local
area, particularly to parents
Events could include Forest
Schools, outdoor living and
other outdoor Park activities
82 Methods
of
evaluation
GLO
framework
Local families
Local
residents
Additional
audience:
Children
aged 5 – 13
taking part in
Children’s’
University
(CU)
activities eg
through
Edmonton
CU
Families can learn
about their local
heritage in an
enjoyable and
accessible way
More people,
and a wider
range of
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
People will
have
volunteered
time
Heritage will
be better
interpreted
and explained
Management:
Learning
Officer and/or
Heritage
Ranger
Supported by:
Volunteers
In partnership
with:
Hungerford
Children’s
Centre
Goodinge
Community
Centre
Octopus
Community
Network
Costs:
Materials and
expenses:
£2,500 per
year
From May
2018
25 events per
year
500
participants
per year
Programme
one drop-in
activity every
week during
school
holidays
One drop in
session per
month at
weekends
Aim to attract
at least 20
children with
families to
each session
90% of people
to rate the
activities as
good or
excellent
Collection of
statistical
data
Participant
evaluation
forms
Children’s
feedback
eg smiley
face etc.
Staff and
volunteer
feedback
GLO
framework
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
Targets and
measure of
success
Methods
of
evaluation
People will
have
developed
skills
Management:
Heritage
Ranger
Cost neutral
From Sept
2017, then
once per
month
spring and
summer
months
only for 2
years
120
participants
over 2 years
Participant
evaluation
forms
Aim to run
one workshop
a month for
up to 10
people from
March to
September
Collection of
statistical
data
Feedback
from
volunteers
and staff
Participants
say that they
have learned
new facts or
skills
GLO
framework
Co-ordinate with Clock
Tower Open Days
Badge and promote though
Children’s University [subject
to ratification by Children’s
University]
2.9
Introduce a regular
programme of practical,
affordable plant based
workshops aimed at local
people
For example, use the
community room to run
workshops and drop-in
sessions on subjects such as
gardening in a small space or
on a balcony, the medicinal
uses of plants and growing
herbs
These activities can also
promote opportunities to
volunteer in the Park
Local
residents,
including
older people
Local people learn
new, practical skills
and enjoy
gardening
People will
have
volunteered
time
Supported by:
Volunteers
Low cost,
charged event
Promote and
advertise
through
Islington
Council
website, social
media and
community
notice boards
90% of people
to rate the
activities as
good or
excellent
83
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
2.10
Introduce a regular
programme of practical,
affordable art workshops
aimed at local people
Local
residents,
including
older people
Local people learn
new, practical skills
and enjoy art
Work with artists to develop
a programme of art based
workshops for local adults,
with the focus on the Clock
Tower, local heritage and the
plants and wildlife in the
Park
Outcomes
Resources
People will
have
developed
skills
Management:
Learning
Officer
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
People will
have had an
enjoyable
experience
Access to Visitor Centre,
Clock Tower and Park
Supported by:
Volunteers
In partnership
with:
Islington
Council Adult
Learning team
Art work to be displayed in
the Clock Tower and Visitor
Centre,
Eg a ‘summer’ and winter’
exhibition
2.11
Develop a ‘plant trail’ and
a ‘heritage trail’ around
the local area
Work in partnership with
local groups such as Friends
of Caledonian Park to
develop trails that helps
people explore the natural
84 All
audiences,
but
particularly
local
residents and
families
Visitors develop a
deeper
understanding of
the Clock Tower,
their local Park, its
history and the
plants within in it
Heritage will
be identified/
recorded
Heritage will
be better
interpreted
and
explained
Management:
Learning
Officer and/ or
Heritage
Ranger
Supported by:
Volunteers
Costs in
project
budget
Total cost
£3,000 over 3
years
Timetable
From
September
2017
Workshops
and exhibitions
to be
promoted and
advertised
through
Islington
Council
website,
Creative
Islington,
social media
and
community
notice boards
Costs: £500
for each trail
design and
production
2 trails
produced =
£1,000
Targets and
measure of
success
100
participants
Aim to run
one workshop
a month for
up to 10
people
Participants
say that they
have learned a
new fact or
skill and
gained
confidence in
art
Develop
Oct 2017
to March
2018 and
offer from
opening in
April 2018
Local people
and families
use the trail to
explore their
local area
Number of
trails used
Methods
of
evaluation
Participant
evaluation
forms
Collection of
statistical
data
Feedback
from
volunteers
and artist
GLO
framework
Feedback
from staff
and
volunteers
Collection of
statistical
data
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
environment and heritage of
the Park and the area
around it
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
Targets and
measure of
success
Methods
of
evaluation
Management:
Learning
Officer in
conjunction
with the
Heritage
Ranger
£5,000 for
specialist to
develop walks
and cycle
routes, design
and printing
of trails and
maps
Develop
Oct 2017
to March
2018 and
offer from
opening in
April 2018
60 participants
Simple
feedback
form for
walk
participants
More people
and a wider
range of
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
Develop the trail to have
‘fun’ and unexpected
engagement points for
children
People will
have
volunteered
time
Additional trails could be
added to the programme,
based on feedback and
uptake, such as seasonal
trails
Trails could be linked to a
sponsored charity event
2.12
Devise and promote two
local guided walks/ cycle
routes around the Park
and local area
(downloadable route
from website and
available in Visitor
Centre).
Develop links with other
heritage and cultural
organisations eg Islington
Society and the London
Canal Museum and
Clerkenwell and Islington
Local
residents and
local older
people
Participants
increase their
awareness and
understanding of
the local heritage
and how this
relates to the Clock
Tower
Heritage will
be better
interpreted
and explained
People will
have
volunteered
time
6 walks per
year
Minimum 10
people per
walk
Supported by:
Volunteers to
deliver walks
In partnership
with:
85
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
Targets and
measure of
success
Methods
of
evaluation
Management:
Heritage
Ranger
Cost neutral as
the abseils will
be charged for
Develop
from Oct
2017
6 abseiling
events per
annum
In partnership
with the Castle
Climbing
Centre
Occasional
free sessions
offers to local
residents
Offer from
April 2018
Collection
of
statistical
data
Guiding Association
(CIGA)
Islington
Society
Can be self-guided, if prefer
London Canal
Museum
CIGA
2.13
Abseiling from the Clock
Tower
All audiences
The abseiling offer at the
clock tower is expected to be
run by an external provider
who will provide instructors,
equipment and insurance
People will gain a
new perspective on
their Park
People will be
inspired to learn
more about the
history of
Caledonian Park
People will have
learned a new skill
More people
and a wider
range of
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
People will
have had an
enjoyable
experience
2.14
Refresh the Caledonian
Park guidebook written
by the Friends
All audiences
People will be able
to learn more about
the history of
Caledonian Park
and its
surroundings
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
Management:
Heritage
Ranger/
Friends of
Caledonian
Park
£3,000
From March
2017
Numbers of
copies sold
Collection
of
statistical
data
2.15
Support community
festivals and events
All audiences
People attending
events in the Park
will be able to
access the Clock
Tower and the
More people
and a wider
range of
people will
have
Management:
Heritage
Ranger
Total £2,700
over three
years
From July
2017
A minimum of
3 events
supported per
annum
Collection of
statistical
data
Local residents organise their
own festivals and events in
86 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
the Park at regular intervals
eg recently a community
choir and the Family Funday
with Parkside residents
The Clock Tower team will
liaise with these community
initiatives and provide Clock
Tower tours if appropriate
and make the community
room available as required
Visitor Centre and
add an additional
layer of
engagement to
their Park visit.
Outcomes
Resources
engaged with
heritage
Supported by:
The local
area/commu
nity will be a
better place
to live, work
or visit
Volunteers
Costs in
project
budget
Cost of £300
per event
Timetable
Targets and
measure of
success
Methods
of
evaluation
Some events
are potential
income
generating
opportunities
The local
economy will
be boosted
87
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Aim 3: Provide inspiring opportunities for schools, colleges and other learners
3.1
Activity: detailed
description
Audience(s)
Benefits for
people
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
Hold teachers’ INSET
sessions in collaboration
with project partners and
other local heritage
organisations to
‘showcase’ local heritage
opportunities
Teachers
from local
schools
Increased
awareness of
educational
potential of
Clock Tower
and Park, and
practicalities of
visiting
More people
and a wider
range of
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
Management:
Learning
Officer
£100 per
annum
refreshments
and materials
From June
2017 and
repeated in
October
2017, then
bi-annually
thereafter
£5,000
To be ready
by January
2018
Free twice yearly twilight
drop in session for teachers
to find out about activities
and the project
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
In partnership
with:
Heritage
partners
Targets
and
measure
of
success
20 teachers
per annum
Methods of
evaluation
Statistical data
Informal
feedback
during session
Cultural
partners
A ‘behind the scenes’ guided
Clock Tower Tour and a
chance to wind the Clock
3.2
Develop online provision
for schools
To include details of:
 available sessions
 resources for before,
during and after a visit
 subject-specific
information
 images
 activity ideas for selfdirected visits
Local primary
and special
school
teachers and
pupils
Teachers and
pupils will be
better
prepared, and
learning
activities to be
better
consolidated
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
Heritage will
be better
interpreted
and explained
Management:
Learning
Officer
With support
from:
Heritage
Learning
Officer
Number of
page views
to grow
annually
At least
75% of
visiting
teachers
use the
website
90% of
88 Google
Analytics to
monitor level
of use and
popularity of
each element
Post-visit
teacher
questionnaire
Advisory panel
feedback
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
Targets
and
measure
of
success
teachers
say website
is useful or
very useful
Methods of
evaluation
People will
have
volunteered
time
Management:
Heritage
Learning
Officer (from
Islington
Museum)
£5,000 to
provide a
duplicate set
of the
Islington
Museum
activities for
use at the
Clock Tower
To be ready
by April 2018
20 sessions
per year
(assuming
30 children
per
session)
Monitor takeup and
number or
pupils
participating
To link in directly with the
existing online provision
offered by Islington Museum
and promoted through
Creative Islington
3.3
Schools learning
programme. Provide a
satellite venue for
existing Islington
Museum school activities
Drawing on the existing
programmes and
approaches, but tailored to
tie in with the local area
around the Park on popular
themes such as:




toys and games
Islington Heroines
World War 2
map reading
Duplicate materials to be
developed and images and
maps generated to link
directly with the local area
Local primary
and special
schools
Sessions to
actively
engage pupils
in learning
about local
heritage, and
motivate
through
creative
activities
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
The
organisation
will be more
resilient
Supported by:
Learning
Officer
Volunteers
600 pupils
per year
90% of
teachers to
rate the
sessions as
good or
excellent
and say
the
sessions
supported
their pupils’
learning
Teacher postvisit
questionnaires
based on GLOs
89
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
3.4
STEM activities bank
A bank of themed materials
that can be used by the
facilitator or teacher, to cater
for the key stage 1, key
stage 2 or SEND pupils in the
Visitor Centre or the Park.
Schools will be able to ‘mix
and match’ from an
advertised menu. This will
enable pupils, through active
exploration, to reveal the
science, technology and
mathematics within the Clock
Tower and Park.
Activities could include:








exploring clock
mechanisms with
cams, cogs and
weights
timekeeping and
telling the time
comparing
clockwork, analogue
and digital clocks
wind up mechanisms
measuring forces
bridges
towers
animal and plant
90 Local primary
and special
school pupils
and teachers
Teachers have
access to a
range of new
ways of
engaging their
pupils in STEM
subjects and
addressing key
national
curriculum
areas
Pupils develop
their
knowledge and
understanding
of their local
heritage
through
creative STEM
activities
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
Management:
Learning
Officer/
Heritage
Ranger
£6,000 startup costs
includes STEM
consultancy,
equipment,
materials and
freelancer
training
To be ready
by February
2018
People will
have
developed
skills
People will
have had an
enjoyable
experience
Heritage will be
better interpret
and
explained
Supported by:
Volunteers for
sessions and
for Tower
Tours
Learning
Officer to
deliver or
freelancer at
£80 per
session
Targets
and
measure
of
success
20 sessions
per year
(assuming
30 children
per
session)
600 pupils
per year
90% of
teachers to
rate the
sessions as
good or
excellent
and say
the
sessions
supported
their pupils’
learning
Methods of
evaluation
Monitor takeup and
number or
pupils
participating
Teacher postvisit
questionnaires
based on GLOs
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people





3.5
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
Targets
and
measure
of
success
Methods of
evaluation
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
Management:
Learning
Officer
£7,000 startup costs to
includes
creative
practitioners,
costumes and
props,
handling
objects,
facsimile
archive
materials and
freelancer
training
To be ready
by February
2018
30 sessions
per year
(assuming
30 children
per
session)
Monitor takeup and
number or
pupils
participating
surveys
bug hunts
identifying habitats
soil sampling
fire pit
estimating heights
and distances.
History and geography
activities bank
A bank of themed materials
that can be used by the
facilitator or teacher, to cater
for the key stage 1, key
stage 2 or SEND pupils in the
Visitor Centre or the Park.
Schools will be able to ‘mix
and match’ from an
advertised menu
A kit of resources, eg
documents, photographs,
aerial views, archive
materials, costumes,
handling objects, sound
recordings, maps, street
plans etc will be developed in
consultation with teachers
These would support local
history and chronological and
geographical understanding
Local primary
school pupils
and teachers
Teachers have
access to a
range of new
creative
history and
geography
resources that
support the
teaching of
key national
curriculum
areas
Pupils develop
their
knowledge
and
understanding
of their local
heritage
People will
have
developed
skills
People will
have had an
enjoyable
experience
A range of
creative
practitioners to
develop the
materials eg
storytellers,
artists and
musicians
Supported by:
Heritage will be Volunteers
better interpret for sessions
and explained and for Tower
Tours
Learning
Officer to
deliver or
storyteller at
£80 per
session
900 pupils
per year
90% of
teachers to
rate the
sessions as
good or
excellent
and say
the
sessions
supported
their pupils’
learning
Teacher postvisit
questionnaires
based on GLOs
91
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
Targets
and
measure
of
success
Methods of
evaluation
People will
have
volunteered
time
Managed by
Learning
Officer and
Heritage
Ranger
£100 per
annum for ‘ad
hoc’ materials
eg photocopies
From April
2018 and
then to
dovetail with
placement
2 students
per annum
Feedback from
students and
tutors
of the locality by exploring
changes to the Park, the
local people and the Park’s
use over time.
Activities could also support
English and art & design,
music and other curriculum
area by including creative,
multi-sensory approaches
such as role-play,
performances, debates,
creative writing,
storytelling activities linked to
the Park and site.
For example, it might include
the Clock Tower as a ‘Time
traveling tardis’ to explore
the local area over the
centuries, and to meet some
of the colourful historical,
characters.
Promote these through
Islington Museum
3.6
Placements opportunities
for students from Central
Saint Martins, City University
or the Institute of Education
92 Students
from post
graduate
courses
Students have
a first hand
experience of
a ‘live’ heritage
project
Successful
completion
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
Offer a placement for 1 or 2
students with clear and
identifiable objectives
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
Timetable
timetables
Targets
and
measure
of
success
of their
placement
and project
Methods of
evaluation
2 sessions
per annum
Simple survey
completed by
teachers at
end of session
People will
have
developed
skills
3.7
Host teachers’ CPD art
sessions eg in botanical
drawing and art and
design
Twilight sessions are held
regularly by Cubitt Education.
This new venue could
provide access to teachers
from North Islington and
Camden to extend this offer
Use the Clock Tower, Clock
mechanisms, and the Park as
inspiration for this content
Primary and
special
school
teachers
Development
of skills and a
greater
awareness of
how to build
on a visit to
the Clock
Tower
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
People will
have
developed
skills
More people
and a wider
range of
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
Management:
Learning
Officer
Cost neutral
With support
from:
Artist’s fee:
£500
Freelancer
artist
Volunteers for
sessions and
for Tower
Tours
Charged event
From
September
2018, then
one in
summer and
autumn
terms each
year
10 teachers
attend
event
Teachers
feel more
confident in
art and
design
techniques
Feedback from
artists and
partner
In
collaboration
with Cubitt
Education
93
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
3.8
Host primary teachers’
CPD history sessions
Local primary
teachers
Use the Clock Tower as the
basis for developing History
skills and for sharing the
local History of the area
Partnership with other local
heritage providers
Opportunity for teachers to
share information with each
other
3.9
Offer a programme of
talks and tours for U3A
and local history societies
Talks will include:



archaeology
local history of the area
the Clock Tower and how
the clock works
94 Adults and
local interest
groups
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
Teachers have
a better
understanding
of the site and
its historical
significance
and they will
have
developed
their historical
understanding
and skills and
therefore be
more
confident
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
Management:
Learning
Officer
Self-funding
(nominal
charge for
materials and
refreshment
and external
speakers
when
relevant)
June 2018
and then
annually
Participants
gain
knowledge and
understanding
about the
Clock Tower
and local
history
More people
and a wider
range of
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
Increased
opportunities
People will
have
developed
skills
People will
have had an
enjoyable
experience
With support
from:
Local History
Manager
Volunteers for
sessions and
for Tower
Tours
Targets
and
measure
of
success
40
teachers
taking part
in annual
CPD
session
Methods of
evaluation
Teacher
feedback form
80% rate
session as
good or
excellent
Ad hoc costs
£80 per
annum
If external
speakers are
invited, then
costs passed
on to teachers
People will
have learnt
about
Management:
Learning
Officer
Talks to be
delivered in
collaboration
with the Local
History
Manager at
the Visitor
Images,
facsimiles and
duplicate
materials
£1,000 start
up budget
Promoted
from January
2018,
Sessions run
from April
2018
240 people
per annum
Programme
one talk per
month,
with at
least 20
people at
each
session
Informal
feedback from
group
organiser
Simple
feedback cards
from
participants
Statistical data
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
The local history archive will
be an essential part of this
programme as will a guided
tour of the Clock Tower
3.10
Host an annual exhibition
of local primary, special
and secondary schools’
photography and
artworks which have
been ‘Inspired by the
Clock Tower’ visits
during the year.
Exhibition in the Clock
Tower and Visitor Centre
Use Parentmail to promote
the event
Invite a local school to
provide an orchestra/ live
music for the exhibition
opening
for recruiting
volunteers
Participants
find out more
about Islington
Museum and
History Centre
Local schools
and pupils’
families
Outcomes
Resources
heritage
Centre or off
site
People will
have
developed
skills
Heritage will
be better
interpreted
and
explained
Pupils’ and
their parents
become more
aware of the
Clock Tower
and its
heritage
More people
and a wider
range of
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
Builds closer
links with local
schools
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
Targets
and
measure
of
success
collected
Staff and
volunteer
feedback
Supported by:
volunteers eg
to run Tower
Tours
Management:
Learning
Officer
Volunteers
Advisory Panel
Arts
Development
Team,
Islington
Council
All Change
Arts
Methods of
evaluation
GLO
framework
£1,000 for
display system
and then £250
per annum for
materials
Small charge
for
refreshments
Work with
schools from
September
2018 and
host first
exhibition
Summer
term 2019
and
thereafter in
each summer
term
Minimum
one
primary
and one
secondary
school
involved
each year
100 people
attend
launch
event
Interviews
with teachers
and mind
mapping with
pupils
Comments
wall/ book in
exhibition
GLO
framework
200 attend
exhibition
Cubitt
Education
95
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
Targets
and
measure
of
success
Methods of
evaluation
More people
and a wider
range of
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
Management:
Learning
Officer
£1,000 to
cover specialist
freelancer
costs and
materials
From April
2018
6 participants
and 6
carers/
personal
assistants
Collection of
statistical data
Invite Community Steering
Group
Input from Art Partners
3.11
Pilot an Art club for local
children with Special
Educational Needs and
Disabilities
Close working with local
special schools and art
partners to provide a holiday
art club for young people.
Local
children with
special
educational
needs and
disabilities
Local special
schools
Young people
can explore
the heritage of
the Park and
Clock Tower
through
creative
activities in a
safe and
supportive
environment
whilst
developing
confidence
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
People will
have
developed
skills
People will
have had an
enjoyable
experience
96 Specialist
freelancer
Volunteers
(with training
such as
Makaton etc)
TBC
Artists
4 sessions
to be run
in the
school
summer
holiday
Observation
and feedback
from parent/
carer and
child
GLO
framework
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
3.12
Develop a pilot
programme of afterschool activities
In collaboration with a range
of partners develop a
programme of after school
drop in activities
The activities would include
arts, crafts and design &
making and would be
inspired by the heritage and
sports from the Park
To be offered from April to
October 2018
Evaluate programme and
uptake.
After first year, a programme
of after school clubs could be
offered as a pay as you go
activity from April 2019.
Children from
local primary
and special
schools
Young people
can explore
the heritage of
the Park and
Clock Tower
through a
range of
activities
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
More people
and a wider
range of
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
Management:
Learning
Officer and
Heritage
Ranger
Allow £1,000
for start-up
materials
From April
2018
onwards
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
People will
have
developed
skills
With support
from:
Volunteers
Freelancers at
£75 per
session
Cost neutral as
participants
will pay to
attend
Targets
and
measure
of
success
450
attendances
per year
25
participant
3 x 6 week
blocks per
year
Methods of
evaluation
Comment
board and light
touch informal
discussions
GLO
framework
Promote
through local
schools and
Goodinge
Community
Centre
People will
have had an
enjoyable
experience
Themes to be developed in
collaboration with feedback
from young participants.
97
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
3.13
Develop a strategy for
engaging supplementary
schools in Islington
Once the programme for
schools and Clock Tower
tours is established then a
strategy for engaging local
supplementary schools at
weekends will be developed.
This will involve a
combination of outreach and
on site activity
3.14
Develop a strategy for
engaging nursery schools
When the events and
activities for under 5s and
primary schools have had a
full year of delivery, review
the activities that are
appropriate as a targeted
offer for local nursery
schools.
98 Local primary
and
secondary
aged children
Local families
Local nursery
and preschools
Young people
can explore
the heritage of
the Park and
Clock Tower
through a
range of
activities
Very young
people can
explore the
heritage of the
Park and Clock
Tower through
a range of
activities
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
More people
and a wider
range of
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
Management:
Learning
Officer and
Heritage
Ranger
Allow £500 for
start up
materials and
travel costs
From
January 2018
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
More people
and a wider
range of
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
Targets and
numbers of
outreach
and on-site
sessions
will be set
in the
strategy
With support
from:
Volunteers
Management:
Learning
Officer
With support
from:
Heritage
Learning
Officer
City and
Islington
Student
Targets
and
measure
of
success
Strategy
completed
January
2018
Allow £500 for
start up
materials and
travel costs
Start up costs
for new
equipment
£1,000
From
January 2018
Sessions on
offer from
September
2018
Strategy
completed
January
2018
Targets and
numbers of
sessions
will be set
in the
strategy
Methods of
evaluation
Collection of
statistical data
Observation
during
activities and
feedback from
participants
Verbal
feedback from
teachers
Collection of
statistical data
Observation
during
activities and
feedback from
participants
Verbal
feedback from
teachers
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
3.15
Building conservation
skills apprenticeship
2 -3 year apprenticeship for
stonemason working to NVQ
level 2 at start.
To be employed by building
conservation contractor. LBI
to cover salary cost for first
year through project.
Young
person
A trainee
would have
gained a
valuable set of
skills and a
qualification.
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
People will
have
developed
skills
Employed by
the Building
Crafts College,
Stratford
£19,371
People will
have learnt
about
heritage
Managed by
contractor and
Project Officer
Apprentice
salary based
on revised
minimum
wage from
2016 @ £7.20
per hour plus
employer oncosts.
Timetable
Targets
and
measure
of
success
1
apprentice
recruited
Attainment
of new
skills and
NVQ level
2.
Methods of
evaluation
Skills
assessment
GLO evaluation
Contractor to undertake to
continue employment for
further 1 or 2 years to
completion of apprenticeship.
99
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Aim 4: Set-up and successfully implement management structures which recruit, support and diversify volunteers
and audiences
4.1
Activity: detailed
description
Audience(s)
Benefits for
people
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
Appointment of new
members of staff to
support the programme:
All audiences
The
appointment
of the
Learning
Officer will
provide
expertise for
the heritage
focused
learning
programme
More and a
wider range
of people will
have
engaged
with heritage
The Project
Officer
(Heritage) will
be managed
by the Project
Team Manager
£322,574 staff
costs, plus
Project
Officer
recruited July
2016
Targets
and
measure
of success
Posts
recruited on
time and to
budget
Heritage
Ranger
recruited
March 2017
Appointed
staff fulfil
the Person
Specification
The
appointment
of the
Heritage
Ranger will
provide
expertise for
the natural
environment
learning
programme
People will
have
developed
skills



Project Officer: full-time
for 2 years to project
manage the project
Learning Officer: 3 years
full-time to oversee the
heritage-focused learning
Heritage Ranger: 3.25
years full-time to oversee
the environment-focused
learning
(See Appendix 5 for JDs)
Low income
local adults
55+
Low income
local families
Schools
Local
residents
Target
audience
volunteers
(low income
adults 55+,
young
people)
Users and
participants
will benefit
from suitably
100 People will
have learned
about
heritage
The heritage
will be better
managed
The heritage
will be in
better
condition
The heritage
will be better
The Learning
Officer will be
managed by
the Museum’s
Heritage
Manager
Heritage
Ranger will be
managed by
the Central
Area Parks
Manager
Recruitment
£1,000
Travel £1,500
Learning
Officer
recruited
June 2016
Methods of
evaluation
Data
collection
Appraisal
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
4.2
Recruitment of 103
volunteers (See
Appendix 2 Volunteering
Plan)









guides to the Clock
Tower and Visitor Centre
welcomers in the Park
helpers in the cafe
assisting with informal
and formal learning
activities in the Clock
Tower, Visitor Centre and
Park
researching and
developing guides and
trails
researching and
developing interpretation
of the Clock Tower and
Park
researching and
developing interpretation
in the Visitor Centre
helping and stewarding
at Park events
helping with website
All audiences
Low income
local adults
55+
Low income
local families
Schools
Local
residents
Target
audience for
volunteers
(older adults,
families,
young
people, local
residents)
Outcomes
qualified staff
who design
and manage
the
programmes
interpreted
and
explained
Visitors and
park users
benefit from
skilled and
knowledgeable
volunteers
People have
developed
skills
Volunteers
benefit from
new skills,
improved job
prospects,
improved
confidence,
improved wellbeing, social
interaction,
strengthened
local pride and
sense of
community
People have
learnt about
heritage
People will
have
volunteered
time
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
Targets
and
measure
of success
Methods of
evaluation
Managed by
the Learning
Officer and
the Heritage
Ranger
12,000 to fund
expenses for
volunteers and
DBS checks
Plan
strategies,
handbook,
roles
descriptions
etc June –
Sept 2017
Target
numbers of
volunteers
recruited
reached
Data
collection on
recruitment
£2,000
recruitment
costs
Recruit from
Oct 2017
onwards
Significant
representation
of target
audiences
Volunteer
supervision
and appraisal
More people
and a wider
range of
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
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Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people


4.3
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
Targets
and
measure
of success
Methods of
evaluation
People will
have
developed
skills
Managed by
the Learning
Officer and
Heritage
Ranger
£17,400
Staff training
begins in
Sept 2017,
volunteers
from Oct
2017
onwards
Number of
people
trained
Data
collection
content and social media
gardening
landscape management.
Training of staff and
volunteers (see Appendix
3 Training Plan)
Volunteers
All audiences
The
participants
on the
courses will
benefit from
learning new
skills
Users benefit
from skilled
and
knowledgeable
volunteers
Volunteers
benefit from
using their
skills, gaining
additional
skills, gaining
confidence,
social
interaction
102 People will
have learnt
about
heritage
Volunteers
say they
have
benefitted
from the
training
Visitors/
users
comment on
the quality of
the staff
Volunteer
feedback
Visitor/user
survey
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
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Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
4.4
Undertake evaluation for
the delivery and
operational phases
All audiences
(See Appendix 5 for the
brief)
Ensuring that
the
programmes
and activities
meet the
needs of the
target
audiences
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
All the target
outcomes
achieved
External
consultant
managed by
the Project
Officer
£10,000 to hire
an external
consultant
Consultants
sets
framework
at beginning
of delivery
phase (About
Oct 2017)
Evaluation of
the Delivery
Phase by July
2018
Development
of systems
before JanMar 2018 to
monitor
implementation
Targets
and
measure
of success
Systems
work
smoothly
and are easy
for staff to
understand
collect and
collate
Methods of
evaluation
Collecting
numerical
and
demographic
data
Evaluation
forms
Systems
clearly
demonstrate
the
satisfaction
levels with
the
programme
Surveys
Positive
feedback
from
teachers
Monitor
using Google
Analytics
Observational
surveys
Individual
feedback
(appraisals,
interviews
etc)
Evaluation of
project by Dec
2019
4.5
Create a website, with
news, events information,
information about the
history of the Clock
Tower and Park, online
exhibitions,
downloadable trails,
resources for schools,
All audiences
Low income
local adults
55+
Low income
local families
Improved
access to
information for
users
People have
learned about
heritage
More people
and a wider
range of
people will
Managed by
the Project
Officer
£1,000 for
general
support and
equipment
Website will be
developed and
hosted by
Developed
from April
2017
Number of
digital trail
users
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Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
volunteering
opportunities, social
media feeds
The Friends’ website
would be developed as
part of this project
Outcomes
Resources
have
engaged with
heritage
Schools
Local
residents
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
Islington
Council
General marketing and
promotional activities
Promotional activities will use
targeted marketing and
adverts on Facebook, Twitter
and Googlesearch and be
supplemented by hard copy
promotion, as required
All audiences
People will
have
volunteered
time
Low income
local adults
55+
Low income
local families
Schools
Local
residents
104 Target
audiences are
aware of the
opportunities
available
through the
project
More people
and a wider
range of
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
Increased
profile of the
Park
People will
have
volunteered
time
Volunteers
learn to use
online
marketing
tools
effectively
People will
have
developed
skills
Methods of
evaluation
Monthly
number of
website
visits and
visitors
Time on the
site, pages
per visit
People have
developed
skills
4.6
Targets
and
measure
of success
Managed by
the Project
Officer, in
conjunction
with the
Learning
Officer and
Heritage
Ranger
Supported by
web and social
media
volunteers
£7,600
General
marketing and
promotional
activities for
Facebook,
Twitter and
Googlesearch
adverts, plus
hard copy
promotion
(such as
schools
brochures) as
required
Launch event
for the project
Marketing
from April
2017
Events and
activities
reach target
numbers
and
audiences
More people
engage with
the Clock
Tower and
the Park
Monitor
using Google
Analytics
Evaluation
forms
Surveys
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
Activity: detailed
Audience(s)
Benefits for
description
people
4.7
Install noticeboards for
community and Friends
use
All audiences
Local people
are able to
find out about
the activities
of their local
groups and
how they can
become
involved
Outcomes
Resources
Costs in
project
budget
Timetable
More people
and a wider
range of
people will
have
engaged with
heritage
Managed by
the Project
Officer, in
conjunction
with the
Learning
Officer and
Heritage
Ranger and
the Friends
£1,500
In February
2018 to
coincide with
interpretatio
n fit out of
the Park
People will
have
volunteered
time
Targets
and
measure
of success
Boards
delivered on
budget and
on time
People
mention the
boards as a
source of
information
on the visitor
surveys
Methods of
evaluation
Surveys
People will
have
developed
skills
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106 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
5.3.
Financial implications
The overall cost of the activity programme is £482,779, being the sum of the one-off set up costs and the three year programme
cost. The first spreadsheet relates the budgets to each action in the action plan; the second in is in Heritage Lottery Fund format.
Table 14: Financial implications according to actions in the Activity Plan
Activity
1 INTEPRETATION
1.1
Implement Interpretation Plan
1.2
Test the interpretation themes
1.3
Regular opening of the Clock Tower
1.4
Make sure Clock Tower is accessible
Subtotal interpretation
2 INFORMAL ACTIVITIES
2.1
Community Steering Group
2.2
Hoardings project
2.3
Opening festival
2.4
Older people's art projects
2.5
National events activity programme
2.6
Tea parties
2.7
U5s weekly programme
2.8
Free family activities
2.9
Plant based workshops
2.10 Art based workshops
2.11 Plant trail
2.12 Guided walks
2.13 Abseiling events
2.14 Refresh the Friends' Caledonian Park Guidebook
2.15 Support community festivals and events
Subtotal informal learning
3 FORMAL LEARNING
3.1
Hold teachers' INSET
3.2
Develop online provision for schools
3.3
Schools learning programme
3.4
STEM activities bank
3.5
History and geography bank
3.6
Placement opportunities
3.7
CPD art sessions
3.8
CPD history sessions
3.9
Talks and tours for U3A
3.10 Annual primary school exhibition
3.11 Art Club with SEN schools
3.12 Develop a programme of after school activities
3.13 Engaging with supplementary schools
3.14 Engaging with nursery schools
3.15 Building conservation skills apprentice
Subtotal formal learning
4 MANAGEMENT
4.1
Staff appointments
Project Officer
Learning Officer
Hertage Ranger
Recruitment
Travel expenses
Volunteer recruitment
4.2
Volunteers and staff training
4.3
4.4
Evaluation
4.5
Website
4.6
Marketing
Install signage and noticeboards
4.7
Subtotal management
TOTAL
Total annual
One off set up costs cost
In
In
In
In
£
capital budget
capital budget
capital budget
capital budget
-
£
£
£
£
£
Three year
programme cost
-
£
£
£
£
£
-
£
In capital budget
£
5,000.00
£
2,000.00
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
1,000.00
£
5,000.00
£
£
3,000.00
£
£
16,000.00
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
1,000.00
1,200.00
2,000.00
1,200.00
1,000.00
2,500.00
1,000.00
900.00
10,800.00
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
3,000.00
3,600.00
6,000.00
3,600.00
3,000.00
7,500.00
3,000.00
2,700.00
32,400.00
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
5,000.00
5,000.00
6,000.00
7,000.00
500.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
500.00
500.00
26,500.00
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
100.00
100.00
80.00
1,000.00
250.00
1,000.00
2,530.00
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
300.00
2,400.00
300.00
240.00
3,000.00
750.00
3,000.00
19,515.00
29,505.00
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
1,000.00
10,000.00
1,000.00
7,600.00
1,500.00
21,100.00
63,600.00
£
£
£
£
£
500.00
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
500.00
£ 13,830.00
£
87,586.00
£
112,794.00
£
122,194.00
£
£
1,500.00
£
14,000.00
£
19,200.00
£
£
£
£
£ 357,274.00
£ 419,179.00
107
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108 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
5.4.
Financial implications in HLF format
This spreadsheet has the activity plan costs in Heritage Lottery Fund
format.
Table 15: Financial implications according to HLF format
Activity Costs
Project Manager (2 years), Learning Officer (3
years), Heritage Ranger (3.25 years)
£ 322,574.00
Training for staff and volunteers
£
19,200.00
Training for staff
Paid training placements
One apprenticeship
£
19,515.00
£
Training for volunteers
Included in staff training above
Travel for staff
Travel for staff
£
1,500.00
£
12,000.00
Travel and expenses for volunteers Expenses for volunteers
Equipment and materials
Interpretation
£
£
48,400.00
Informal learning
£
36,490.00
Formal learning
Professional fees relating to any of
the above
£
Total Activity Costs
£ 459,679.00
7f Delivery phase other costs
Other Costs associates with the Activity Plan
Recruitment
Recruitment of staff
£
1,000.00
Volunteer recruitment
£
2,000.00
Publicity & Promotion
Website
£
1,000.00
£
9,100.00
General marketing and promotion
Evaluation
External consultant
£
10,000.00
Total Other Costs
£ 23,100.00
Total activity cost (7e, 7f)
£ 482,779.00
Total
7e Delivery phase activity costs
New staff costs
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110 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Chapter 5: Action plan
December 2015
5.5.
Timescale
Below is the proposed timetable for the activity programme. Pale green denotes planning and preparation; dark green denotes implementation.
Activity
HLF decision
Resp
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.12
2.13
2.14
2.15
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.10
3.11
Implement Interpretation Plan
Test the interpretation themes
Regular opening of the Clock Tower
Make sure Clock Tower is accessible
Community Steering Group
Hoardings project
Opening festival
Older people's art projects
National events activity programme
Tea parties
U5s weekly programme
Free family activities
Plant based workshops
Art based workshops
Plant trail
Guided walks
Abseiling
Refresh the Friends' Caledonian Park Guidebook
Support community festivals and events
Hold teachers' INSET
Develop online provision for schools
Schools learning programme
STEM activities bank
History and geography bank
Placement opportunities
CPD art sessions
CPD history sessions
Talks and tours for U3A
Annual primary school exhibition
Art Club with SEN schools
PO
PO
HR
PM
HR
HM
LO
LO
LO/HR
HR
LO
LO/HR
HR
LO
LO/HR
LO/HR
HR
HR/Friends
HR
LO
LO
HLO (Museum)
LO/HR
LO
LO/HR
LO
LO
LO
LO
LO
3.12
3.13
3.14
3.15
4.1
Develop a programme of after school activities
Engaging with supplementary schools
Engaging with nursery schools
Building conservation skills apprentice
Staff appointments
Project Officer
Learning Officer
Heritage Ranger
Volunteer recruitment
Volunteers and staff training
Evaluation
Website
Marketing
Install signage and noticeboards
LO/HR
LO/HR
LO
PO
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
2016
2017
2018
J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D
2019
2020
2021
PTM
HM
CAPM
LO/HR
LO/HR
PO
PO
PO
PO
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112 Appendix 1
Consultees
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Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Appendix 1: Consultees
December 2015
1.
Consultees
1.1.
Stakeholders
Mark Aston, Museum & Local History Manager, Islington Council
Rebecca Campbell-Gay, Heritage Learning Officer, Islington Council
Peter Courtie, Arts Officer, Islington Council
Chris Hariades, Project Officer, Caledonian Park Clock Tower, Islington Council
Aroha Rangi, Arts Development Officer (Young People), Islington Council
John Sheppard, Project Archaeologist, Islington Council
Cheryl Smith, Heritage Manager, Islington Council
Councillor Paul Smith, Ward Member for Caledonian Park and Chair of the Steering
Group, Islington Council
Bhupesh Thapa, West Area Parks Manager, Islington Council.
Representatives from the Friends of Caledonian Park
1.2.
Learning Consultees
Paul Alton, Ethnic Minority Achievement Coordinator, Hungerford Primary School
Tricia Austin, Course Leader, MA Narrative Environments, Central Saint Martins,
University of the Arts London
Brian Bench, Headteacher, Hungerford Primary School
Karen Benghiat, Year 6 teacher, Hungerford Primary School
Henry Commander, International Primary Curriculum coordinator, Brecknock Primary
School
Richard Collinson, College Sports Maker, City and Islington College
Penny Doswell, Head of Primary, The Bridge School
Dr Poppy Lakeman Fraser, Programme Coordinator for Open Air Laboratories,
Imperial College
Dolores Victoria (Lola) Ruiz Garrido, Director of Little Architect Visiting School
Geogina Georgia, Year 3 teacher, Hungerford Primary School
Emma Gowers, Principal, The Gower School
Breda Guinan, Student Placements, Centre for Health, Social and Childcare, City and
Islington College
Glinys Hilborne, Children’s University, Edmonton
Naomi Hiscock, British Science Association
Iola Kreizman, Year 2 teacher, Hungerford Primary School
115 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Appendix 1: Consultees
December 2015
Jo Lambert, Deputy Head, Hungerford Primary School
Sarah Lewis, Year 4 teacher, Hungerford Primary School
Catherine McLaughlin, Year 5 teacher, Hungerford Primary School
Mary Michael, Year 6 teacher, Hungerford Primary School
Michelle Myrvold, Year 2 teacher, Hungerford Primary School
Rob Myrvold, Year 4 teacher, Hungerford Primary School
Rakel Perez, Head of Science, STEM Academy
Elena del Pozo, Class teacher, Tufnell Park School
Ekaterina Punter, Subject leader Computing, STEM Academy
Karen Raingold, Programme coordinator Schools and Young People, Cubitt Artists
John Reeve, MA Museum and Gallery Education, Institute of Education
Karina Rigley, Student Engagement Coordinator, City and Islington College
Andrea Smith, Year 1 teacher, Hungerford Primary School
Pascale Vassie, Executive Director, National Resource Centre for Supplementary
Education
Karen Virtue, Student Services, London Metropolitan University
Anne Wilkinson, Local History group coordinator, and member of Exploring London
group, U3A Islington.
1.3.
Other organisations
Background information, testing of ideas and wider context
Naomi Blanche, Programme Producer, All Change Arts
Chris Chadwick, Activity Planner, Tatton Dale Farm
Sadia Farah, Somali speaking worker, Hungerford Children’s Centre
Pat McCann, Quality and NVQ Manager, Victoria and Albert Museum
Kate Kennedy, Youth Programmes Coordinator, Orleans House Gallery
Ricky Palmer, Secretary, Isledon Wolves Football Club
Elaine Sanders, Spectrum Youth Project
Sally Sculthorpe, Learning Officer, British Postal Museum and Archive
Eleanor Shipman, Elders and Community Programme Coordinator, Cubitt Artists
Esmé Ward, Head of Learning and Engagement, Whitworth Art Gallery and
Manchester Museum
Jenny Wedgbury, Family Learning Officer, Victoria and Albert Museum
Jess White, Community Outreach Area Coordinator, Hungerford Children’s Centre.
116 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Appendix 1: Consultees
December 2015
Organisations who are currently working in partnership, or who have expressed an
interest in doing so as part of this project
Daniel Baker, Education Director, Cubitt Artists
Partner with Islington Museum and keen to continue this with opportunities at
Caledonian Park
Anita Gracie, Wild Places Development Officer, Octopus Community Network
Local community project currently working with Greenspace – particularly
supportive of community projects that work with local residents
Doris Hester, Centre Manager, Goodinge Community Centre
Welcomes project and will promote activities, spaces useful for when Goodinge
Community Centre closed
Hattie Kiamil, Heath and Wellbeing Tutor, Drovers’ Centre
Keen to develop new opportunities at Caledonian Park
Suzanne Lee, Artistic Director, All Change Arts
Partner with Islington Museum and keen to continue this with opportunities at
Caledonian Park
Aroha Rangi, Arts Development Officer, Children and Young People, Islington Council
Partner with Islington Museum and keen to continue this with opportunities at
Caledonian Park
Marnie Rose, Chief Executive, The Garden Classroom
Partner with Greenspace and keen to continue this with opportunities at
Caledonian Park
Polly Seward, Activities Programme Manager, Islington Age UK
Partnership working with Greenspace and Heritage team and keen to continue
this with opportunities at Caledonian Park for older people across Islington
Mike Sheriff, Chief Executive, Voluntary Action Islington
Keen to support the recruitment and training of volunteers
Cathy Simpson, Education Officer, London Canal Museum
Keen to work in partnership eg joint programming for learners or walking trails
Andrea Sinclair, Arts, Crafts and Media Tutor, Drovers’ Centre
Partnership working with Greenspace and Heritage team and keen to continue
this with opportunities at Caledonian Park
Tom de Witt, Curator, Tolpuddle Martyrs Museum
Spoke to project manager and has offered to wok in partnership and to share
Tolpuddle Martyrs’ interpretation
Other input from members of the project steering group
Please see Appendices 7 and 8 for further information about consultations.
117 Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
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December 2015
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118 Appendix 2
Volunteering Plan
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Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Appendix 2: Volunteering Plan
December 2015
2.
Volunteering Plan
2.1.
Introduction
This appendix looks at the detail of our volunteering programme and how we
intend to develop it in response to the Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor
Centre project.
2.1.1.
Existing volunteers
Caledonian Park currently has about 20 volunteers, mostly from the Friends of
the Park who were founded in 2000. A further team of 35 volunteers has been
built up as part of the project development phase to assist with clock winding
and open day stewarding.
The Friends have undertaken all sorts of improvement work in the Park, including
planting a community orchard, which they continue to care for, planted
thousands of bulbs throughout the Park and have organising and participating in
community workdays, clearing and wood chipping woodland paths and creating
loggeries to provide habitats for insects The Friends regularly undertake weeding
and planting of the flowerbeds, whilst the Council undertakes the general
maintenance and pruning in the Park. The Friends have also assisted with
guided tours of the Tower on open days and the survey work undertaken as part
of this project.
The Drovers Centre (run by Age UK) has a group of volunteers who garden and
maintain the beds in the Park. Hungerford schoolchildren and four other
volunteers come regularly to help wind the clock in the Tower.
The volunteers are drawn from the existing Friends group and from the Drovers
Centre. Hence there is no active recruitment and any training is provided on the
job by the Greenspace team at Islington Council.
The Heritage Service, who is a key partner in this project for delivery of activities,
has 23 volunteers who undertake a variety of roles including front of house
duties, helping with informal and formal learning programmes and assisting and
running specific projects, such as curating temporary exhibitions.
The Heritage Service has a Volunteer Policy and actively recruits from Voluntary
Action Islington, through various universities, the websites Do It and Reach, and
through a range of community interest groups in the borough, such as the
Islington Society and Islington Archaeology and History Society.
Volunteers at the Museum are mostly trained on the job, but do attend specific
training courses to skill them up for particular roles, particularly for project work.
121
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Appendix 2: Volunteering Plan
December 2015
2.2.
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre Project
The project proposes conservation and access improvement works to the historic
Clock Tower in the Park, conservation of its historic railings and the creation of a
small new building to provide a range of facilities and interpretation for visitors
and to support activities in the Park.
The overall project objectives are to:
2.3.

establish the Clock Tower as an attractive destination for people interested in
the history and geography of North London

provide opportunities for the local community to engage with the physical
heritage of the site and connect to its social heritage

conserve the site heritage

provide a framework for the long-term protection of the heritage of the site.
Opportunities
The project offers great opportunities to involve people who live around the Park
to foster community pride and sense of place and also the chance to provide
skills development for young people looking to enhance their CVs.
Our target audiences are:

local residents

local families

local older people aged 55+

schools (primary and SEN).
Outdoor work, for example, is particularly suited to family volunteering and the
schools will be involved through work placements.
The Drovers Centre, run by Age UK, is a perfect place to recruit older adults and
their relationship with the Park is currently growing. There are other
organisations surrounding the Park, such as the Goodinge Community Centre,
Pram Attack (local parents and carers) and Hillside Café (run by people with
mental health problems), who have been consulted during the Activity Planning
process and are likely to become involved.
2.4.
Research undertaken for the Volunteering Plan
2.4.1.
Face to face interviews
The appetite for volunteering and the nature of the roles was discussed during all
stakeholder interviews with staff and councillors and during interviews with
external organisations such as the Friends of Caledonian Park, the Drover’s
Centre and with local residents through Steering Group meetings.
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Appendix 2: Volunteering Plan
December 2015
2.4.2.
Public consultation
In the 2014 online survey, run as part of the activity planning work, which was
completed by 196 respondents, 18.3% said that they were very interested in
volunteering and a further 39.1% said they were interested but could not
volunteer at the moment.
Their ideas for volunteering roles included:
Gardening, clock mechanism upkeep, railings upkeep and litter picking,
painting over unauthorised graffiti, tidying and wildlife-friendly upkeep of
problem corners like the small area under the billboard at the corner of
Market Road and York Way, wildflower planting of the grassy mound on
Shearling Way...
Gardening/conservation.
Open days
Tours
Education work
Research
Shaping a creative programme
Helping with events.
From the open day surveys, completed by a further 123 people who climbed the
Clock Tower over three open days in the summer of 2014, 26% of respondents
were very interested in volunteering and 34% quite interested.
This demonstrates an appetite to volunteer, at least on paper, and also gives
some pointers about the type of people to aim for.
2.4.3.
Potential partner organisations
The existing partner organisations are the Drover’s Centre and The Friends of
Caledonian Road and those relationships need to be nurtured and built upon.
Potential partners within the local community are the Hillside Club House mental
health project, Parkside Place residents’ group, the Hyde Village Community
Association and Pram Attack local parents and carers.
2.5.
Development of volunteer roles
The present volunteering roles in the Park focus around gardening, landscape
management, guided tours up the Clock Tower and organising or assisting with
Park events.
The existing roles would be continued and expanded, and new roles developed.
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2.6.
Target numbers of volunteers
The targets below are based on some very broad assumptions about volunteering
levels needed for delivering the activity programme. At least half of these will
have to be recruited by April 2018.

guides to the Clock Tower, Visitor Centre and Park

helpers in the café and welcomers to the Visitor Centre

assisting with informal and formal learning activities in the Clock Tower,
Visitor Centre and Park

researching and developing guides, trails and learning resources

researching and developing interpretation of the Clock Tower and Park

researching and developing interpretation in the Visitor Centre and for special
exhibitions

helping and stewarding at Park events

helping with website content and social media

horticultural activities

landscape management

winding the clock

serving on the Steering Group.
Table 16: Volunteer targets
Role
Number
Clock Tower and Park guides
Visitor Centre welcomers/café helpers
Informal and formal learning volunteers
Exhibition, trail and learning resources researchers
Web and social media volunteers
Horticultural and landscape volunteers
Clock winders
Steering group members
Total
26
15
10
6
6
26
12
8
109
Target number assumptions
The Tower will be open for 10 tours a week for 36 weeks of the year and the
number assumes two guides per day each doing a three tours every month.
For the Visitor Centre welcomers, it is assumed one person will be on duty all
weekends (106 days) and 12 weeks of school holidays, with one person working
an average of 12 times a year.
For the horticultural landscape volunteers, the number assumes two people
working for three days each week and each volunteer working one day a month.
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The figures for informal and formal learning volunteers, researchers and digital
volunteers are based on comparators.
It is recognised that these are high targets for the Learning Officer and Heritage
Ranger to manage as part of their other duties.
2.7.
Recruitment
The Park will strengthen its existing relationships with the Friends and Drover’s
Centre for recruitment and explore possibilities with the Hillside Club House
mental health project, Parkside Place residents’ group, the Hyde Village
Community Association, Pram Attack local parents and carers.
Building on the experience of the Museum Service, the project will recruit
through the Voluntary Action Islington, the websites Do It, Reach and VInspired,
through various universities, (such as City University, UCL, London Metropolitan
University and UCL’s Institute of Education), Islington Adult and Community
Learning, and through a range of community interest groups in the borough,
such as the Islington Society and Islington Archaeology and History Society and
through social media.
Otherwise, potential venues for adverts are:

places of worship, e.g. mosques, churches, temples, synagogues

meeting/leisure places, parks, clubs, cafes, pubs

sports centres and fitness groups

shopping centres, markets, supermarkets and shops

Jobcentres, Disability Benefit Centres, Local Authority or Council offices

community centres running key skills or English classes

health centres, e.g. doctors surgeries or hospital waiting rooms

nurseries, schools or adult education colleges

information centres, e.g. law centres or Citizens Advice Bureaux

public libraries

hostels, housing providers or housing associations' newsletters

local facilities, e.g. laundrettes and post offices

weekly groups, such as women's groups or toddler groups

local and free newspapers (through adverts or a weekly column)

community and hospital radio stations

attending school assemblies

seasonal and community events, such as fairs or car boot sales.
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2.8.
Supervision
The management of volunteers will be undertaken jointly by the Learning Officer
and Heritage Ranger.
2.9.
Training
Training of volunteers for the project is itemised in the Training Plan (Appendix
3).
2.10.
Monitoring and evaluation
The performance indicators for the success of the volunteering programme that
the partner will monitor will include:

target numbers of volunteers

type of volunteers eg local family volunteers, local older people and local
residents

the number of volunteers formally trained through the project

the type of training implemented.
This data will be regularly gathered by the Learning Officer and Heritage Ranger.
Individual appraisal of volunteers is difficult with such a large volunteer corps,
but the Learning Officer and Heritage Ranger will make sure that volunteers have
an opportunity to feedback, individually or as a group:

whether volunteers feel welcomed and confident about the tasks they will be
involved in

whether volunteers know what is expected of them and what they can expect
from the project/Islington Council

whether volunteers are being made aware of potential developments that
may impact on their role

whether volunteers’ feedback indicates that training has improved their skills
and personal development.
The following will be tested through regular surveys:

2.11.
levels of visitor satisfaction/schools satisfaction as a result of the work the
volunteers do.
Benefits
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2.11.1.
2.11.2.
For the volunteers

an opportunity to use existing skills and experience while gaining new ones

an opportunity to pass on knowledge to others

gaining confidence

meeting visitors, other volunteers and feeling part of a community

learning about and enjoying the history and heritage

strengthening local pride, well-being, sense of community and quality of life.
For the project

getting more done by having trained people with a range of skills, knowledge
and experience

building new skills and experience that we can use for other work and in the
future

bringing enthusiasm, new perspectives and new ideas or ways of working

ensuring the project reflects local needs

creating links with the community and providing powerful ambassadors for
the partners

more people feeling committed to and understanding their local heritage and
valuing it.
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2.12.
Action Plan
Action
Responsible
Timescale
Cost
Review existing volunteering
documentation, including the
Volunteering Policies, Handbooks and
Role Descriptions from Greenspace and
Islington Heritage Service
Learning Officer and Heritage
Ranger
June – September 2017
n/a
Write new volunteering documents for
the Park and Clock Tower project
Learning Officer and Heritage
Ranger
June – September 2017
n/a
Write Role Descriptions for Park and
Clock Tower project related roles
Learning Officer and Heritage
Ranger
June – September 2017
n/a
Prioritise the new roles for recruitment,
with other members of staff and
volunteers
Learning Officer and Heritage
Ranger
June – September 2017
n/a
Plan the recruitment process with the
existing volunteers
Learning Officer and Heritage
Ranger
June – September 2017
n/a
Recruit volunteers for the roles
Learning Officer and Heritage
Ranger
From October 2017
Costs in the Activity Plan
action plan
Follow up contacts with potential
partners eg Hillside Project, Parkside
Residents’ Group, Pram Attack
Learning Officer and Heritage
Ranger
June – September 2017
n/a
Agree a suitable method for regular
feedback from Park and Clock Tower
volunteers to management.
Learning Officer and Heritage
Ranger
June – September 2017
n/a
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Action
Responsible
Timescale
Cost
Develop a Park and Clock Tower
volunteer pages on the website, with the
help of volunteers
Learning Officer and Heritage
Ranger
From September 2017
Costs in the Activity Plan
action plan
Develop an newsletter for volunteers
Learning Officer and Heritage
Ranger
September 2017 – March 2018
n/a
Develop social events for volunteers
Learning Officer and Heritage
Ranger
September 2017 – March 2018
n/a
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Appendix 3
Training Plan
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Appendix 3: Training Plan
December 2015
3.
Training plan
3.1.
Introduction
The Training Plan draws together all the training threads identified during the
Activity Plan and has also been informed by interviews with partner staff and
volunteers.
3.2.
Organisational context
3.2.1.
Staff training
Heritage Service and Greenspace staff training is done through the Council’s own
training programmes, specific training courses to meet a specific skills need (such
as the programmes provided Museum Development team in London or by The
Conservation Volunteers) and on the job training.
3.2.2.
Volunteer training
Volunteer training includes induction at Islington Museum, training through the
Council’s training programme, specific training courses to meet a skills gap (such
as Society of Genealogists courses to skill up on family history research) and on
the job training.
3.2.3.
Apprenticeships
Greenspace has had apprentices for the last six years and hosts between five and
seven apprenticeships at the same time, working across the Parks in Islington.
The apprenticeships are typically NVQ Level 2 studying in the Environmental
Conservation module and are provided in conjunction with training from Capel
Manor College in Enfield. In the past the training partner has been The
Conservation Volunteers (TCV) – it depends on the funding and the scope of the
apprenticeship.
For example, one apprentice currently reporting to the Central Area Parks
Manager (who is responsible for Caledonian Park) is based at the Ecology Centre
and has a focus on event and community ownership. They attend Capel Manor
weekly for training and Capel Manor staff visit them on site once a month, but
most training is undertaken on the job. All apprentices have to study health and
safety, business studies, horticulture, plant identification, maths and English.
3.2.4.
Training providers
Training providers available to the project are courses provided by the Museum
of London Development Team, The Conservation Volunteers; specialist training
such as the Society of Genealogists and the Oral History Society); the Council’s
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December 2015
in-house training programme and, above all, the skills sharing between staff and
volunteers.
3.3.
Aims of the Plan
3.3.1.
Aims
The aims of the Training Plan are:
3.3.2.

to identify the training needs of staff, volunteers and other groups
responsible for delivery of the project, and sustaining improvements

to formulate a training programme that fulfils those needs

to establish a framework and action plan that enables staff and volunteers
within the three partners to plan and monitor training activities and to
allocate adequate funding and other resources.
Objectives

ensure that staff and volunteers are fully skilled to deliver the project

maximise the opportunities that the project creates for offering training and
work experience to the local community

identify and work with relevant learning providers, where appropriate.
The Action Plan in 3.6 details the way in which the project will deliver these aims
and objectives.
3.4.
The Activity Plan
The Activity Plan contains recommendations for 41 actions which are summarised
below:
1. Interpretation
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
Implement the Interpretation Plan
Test the interpretation themes
Regular opening of the Clock Tower
Ensure the Clock Tower is accessible
2. Informal activities
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
134
Recruit to the Community Steering Group
Hoardings project
Opening festival
Older people’s arts projects
Activity programme based around national/local initiatives
Social tea parties
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December 2015
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.12
2.13
2.14
2.15
U5s weekday programme
Free family activities
Plant-based workshops
Art-based workshops
Plant trails
Guided walks
Abseiling
Refresh Friends’ guidebook
Support community festivals and events
3. Formal learning
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.10
3.11
3.12
3.13
3.14
3.15
Teachers’ INSET
Develop online provision for schools
Satellite base for Islington Museum
STEM activities bank
History and geography activities bank
Placement opportunities
CPD art sessions
Host teachers’ history CPD
Tours and talks for U3A
Annual schools’ exhibition
Art Club with SEN schools
After-school activities
Develop a strategy for engaging supplementary schools
Develop a strategy for engaging nursery schools
Building conservation skills apprenticeship
4. Management
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
Staff appointments
Volunteer recruitment
Volunteer and staff training
Evaluation
Website
General marketing
Install noticeboards for community and Friends use
The Training Plan is based upon the skills needed by staff and volunteers to
deliver the activities 1.1 – 3.15.
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3.5.
Training opportunities arising from the Project
3.5.1.
Skills development
The project offers the opportunity to skill up project staff and volunteers through
skills sharing, particularly through the existing Islington Heritage Service and
Greenspace teams and ‘classroom’ learning for very particular skills.
3.5.2.
Work placements
The project offers work placements for students from Central Saint Martin’s or
UCL’s Institute of Education.
3.5.3.
Apprenticeship and heritage skills training
The project will offer the following heritage skills training:
3.5.4.

building conservation skills apprenticeship – two to three year apprenticeship
for a stonemason working initially working to NVQ Level 2, then Level 3. The
apprentice will be employed by building conservation contractor. The Council
will cover the salary cost for first year through project. The contractor will
undertake to continue employment for further one or two years to completion
of apprenticeship. The apprenticeship will be undertaken in partnership with
the Building Crafts College, based in Stratford, East London

basic clock maintenance and inspection – one day’s tuition in clock winding,
inspection and routine maintenance provided by Smith of Derby for eight
clock windings volunteers

heritage metalwork - three day bespoke training course for four Council fitters
in heritage metalwork covering how castings are made, physical properties,
deterioration, hot and cold repair techniques, preparation and painting –
based in Council workshop and on site.
Teacher training
The Visitor Centre will host an annual twilight teachers’ CPD art sessions in, for
example, botanical drawings and art.
3.5.5.
Conclusions
The project offers a broad range of training opportunities for staff, volunteers,
members of the community and students. The action plan in 3.6 details the way
in which the training will be delivered and who will benefit from it.
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3.6.
Action Plan
The Training Plan Action Plan is based upon two pieces of information:

interviews with staff from Islington Council

the Action Plan of the Activity Plan.
The Training Plan Action Plan also contains the costs for delivering the training,
where appropriate, based upon an audit of currently available training courses
locally and by specialist providers.
The training providers are a mix of in house expertise (within the Heritage
Service, Greenspace and Islington Council), provision by close partners, such as
Cubitt Artists and All Change Arts, by external providers, such as Clerkenwell and
Islington Guides Association (CIGA), The Conservation Volunteers, Voluntary
Action Islington and using the resources of the London Museum Development
Team and lastly a budget has been included for external trainers where a
suitable local trainer is yet to be identified.
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3.7.1.
1
TRAINING NEEDED
WHO
Volunteer management skills
 Learning Officer
 Heritage Ranger


2
Customer care

to support the work of the volunteer
tour guides
to support informal and formal
learning activities
Community engagement

DATE FIRST
NEEDED
Sept/Oct 2017
TRAINING
PROVIDER
Voluntary Action
Islington
or
Museum of London
or
Orleans House
RESOURCES
REQUIRED
£100 per person =
£200
 All volunteers
Nov 2017 – Mar
2018
Islington Heritage
Service
n/a
 Learning Officer
 Heritage Ranger
 Volunteers with people-facing
roles (tour guides, activity
helpers, Visitor Centre
welcomers)
Nov 2017 – Mar
2018
London Museum
Development Team
or
Islington Council
£1,500 for 2 sessions

Nov 2017 – Mar
2018


n/a
to provide background information for
all volunteers

4
to support the development and
implementation of the volunteer
programme
to support the management of
volunteers delivering the activity
programme
Introduction to the history and
environment of Caledonian Park

3
Action plan
to learn the techniques for developing,
engaging and interacting with new
audiences in the community
Volunteers with peoplefacing roles (tour guides,
activity helpers, Visitor
Centre welcomers)
Learning Officer
Heritage Ranger
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5
TRAINING NEEDED
WHO
Tour guide training



Learning Officer
Heritage Ranger
Volunteer tour guides




6
Public speaking


7
RESOURCES
REQUIRED
4 days at £300 a day
= £1,200
Volunteer tour guides
Volunteers who assist with
informal and formal activities
Nov 2017 – Mar
2018
Islington Council
£1,000 for 2 sessions

Volunteers who assist with
informal and formal activities
Nov 2017 – Mar
2018
Project Learning Officer
Islington Museum’s
Heritage Education
Officer
The Conservation
Volunteers
TCV cost £100pp =
£1,000

Volunteers who are working
in the Park
From April 2017
Islington Council’s
Greenspace team
External trainers
£1,000

Community Steering Group
members
Jan – Mar 2017
Project Manager as
organiser
£2,000
To support the work of volunteers
working on the landscape
Community Steering Group
development

TRAINING
PROVIDER
Clerkenwell and
Islington Guides
Association
to support volunteers and staff
assisting with the development,
preparation and delivering of activities
Developing horticultural skills

9
to support informal and formal
learning activities (eg giving talks)
to support the volunteer and staff
Clock Tower and Park guides
Delivering formal and informal
learning activities

8
to support the work of volunteer Clock
Tower and Park tour guides
to support informal and formal
learning activities
DATE FIRST
NEEDED
Nov 2017 – Mar
2018
Visits to comparator organisations
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10
TRAINING NEEDED
WHO
Equality and diversity



Learning Officer
Heritage Ranger
Volunteers with peoplefacing roles (tour guides,
activity helpers, Visitor
Centre welcomers)



11
Disability awareness

12

14
RESOURCES
REQUIRED
1,000 for 2 sessions
All volunteers
Nov 2017 – Mar
2018
London Museum
Development Team
£3,000 for 5 sessions
Research volunteers
Nov 2017 – Mar
2018
Archivist
Local Librarian
n/a
Web and social media
volunteers
Friends of Caledonian Park
Nov 2017 – Mar
2018
External trainer
£1,000
Web and social media
volunteers
Friends of Caledonian Park
Nov 2017 – Mar
2018
External trainer
£1,000
to provide volunteers with the skills to
research information for online and
hard copy resources
E-marketing skills and social media
skills

TRAINING
PROVIDER
Islington Council
to build confidence about interacting
with and supporting disabled visitors
and colleagues
Researching learning and community
engagement resources

13
to build confidence about interacting
with and supporting the diverse range
of visitors
DATE FIRST
NEEDED
Nov 2017 – Mar
2018
to support the promotion of the new
displays and programmes
measuring online success


Website development skills



to support the development of new
areas of the website eg online learning
resources, volunteer section of website
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15
TRAINING NEEDED
WHO
Evaluation of events and activities



Learning Officer
Heritage Ranger
4 volunteers

to learn techniques and mechanisms
for measuring success
DATE FIRST
NEEDED
Jan – June 2018
TRAINING
PROVIDER
External trainer
RESOURCES
REQUIRED
£1,000
16
Event stewarding and security



Learning Officer
Heritage Ranger
All volunteers who help at
events
Nov 2017 – Mar
2018
External trainer
£1,500
17
First aid training



Learning Officer
Heritage Ranger
12 volunteers
Nov 2017 – Mar
2018
External trainer
£1,500



Learning Officer
Heritage Ranger
15 volunteers
Nov 2017 – Mar
2018
Islington Council
n/a



Learning Officer
Heritage Ranger
15 volunteers
Nov 2017 – Mar
2018
Islington Council
n/a

18
Health and safety training

19
to skill up staff and representative
volunteers to be able to deal with
accidents and an emergency
to skill up staff and representative
volunteers to be able to be fully aware
of health and safety issues on and off
site
Fire Marshal training

to skill up staff and representative
volunteers to be able to deal with a
fire
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WORK EXPERIENCE
20
21
Work placements for Central Saint Martins, City
University or UCL Institute of Education students
APPRENTICESHIP AND HERITAGE SKILLS
TRAINING
Building conservation skills apprenticeship – two to
three year apprenticeship for a stonemason working
initially to NVQ Level 2 and then Level 3.
DATE NEEDED
From April 2018
DELIVERED BY
Learning Officer
TRAINING PROVIDER
April 2017 – March 2019
Building Crafts College,
Stratford, East London
and contractor
RESOURCES
REQUIRED
Included in Activity
Plan Action Plan costs
RESOURCES
REQUIRED
Included in Activity
Plan Action Plan
costs
22
Basic clock maintenance and inspection – one day’s
tuition in clock winding, inspection and routine
maintenance provided by Smith of Derby for eight
clock windings volunteers
February 2018
Smiths of Derby clock
specialists
Costs covered as
part of the clock
refurbishment
23
Heritage metalwork - three day bespoke training
course for four Council fitters in heritage metalwork
covering how castings are made, physical properties,
deterioration, hot and cold repair techniques,
preparation and painting – based in Council
workshop and on site.
July 2017
Geoff Wills, freelance
heritage metalwork tutor
£1,300
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24
TEACHER CPD (Continuing Professional
Development)
Teachers’ INSET
Learning Officer
25
Hold teachers’ annual art and history CPD sessions
Cubitt Education
144
DELIVERED BY
RESOURCES
REQUIRED
Included in Activity
Plan Action Plan
costs
Included in Activity
Plan Action Plan
costs
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December 2015
3.7.
Summary costs of the Training Plan
Table 17: Financial implications of the Training Plan
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
Training activity
Volunteer management
Intro to Cally history and environment
Customer care
Community engagement
Tour guide training
Public speaking
Delivering formal and informal learning
Developing horticultural skills
Community Steering Group development
Equality and diversity
Disability awareness
Researching learning resouces
E-marketing and social media skills
Website development skills
Evaluation
Event stewarding
First aid training
H&S traning
Fire Marshall training
Work experience
20
Work placements
Apprenticeship and heritage skills training
21
Building conservation apprenticeship
22
Clock maintenance and inspection
23
Heritage metalwork
Teachers' CPD
Teachers' INSET
24
Hold teachers' annual art and history CPD
25
sessions
Subtotal staff and volunteer training
Cost
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
200.00
1,500.00
1,200.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
2,000.00
1,000.00
3,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,500.00
1,500.00
-
In Activity Plan costs
In Activity Plan costs
£
£
1,300.00
In Activity Plan costs
In Activity Plan costs
£
19,200.00
145
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146
Appendix 4
Learning Strategy
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Appendix 4: Learning strategy
December 2015
4.
Learning Strategy
4.1.
Context
This document summarises key points from the Activity Plan to highlight the learning
opportunities presented by this project.
Islington’s vision for its heritage work is1:
We have a vision of heritage bringing people in Islington closer together and
helping make Islington a happier, healthier and fairer place to live.
The project provides a range of opportunities for formal and informal learners.
Learning is often described as:
‘…a process of active engagement with experience. It is what people do when
they want to make sense of the world. It may involve the development or
deepening of skills, knowledge, understanding, values, ideas and feelings.
Effective learning leads to change, development and the desire to learn more.’ 2
4.2.
Aims of the Activity Plan
There are four aims for the activities:
Aim 1: Interpret the rich and varied history of Caledonian Park and
Clock Tower, its design and operation
Full details about this aim are provided in the HOTROD interpretation strategy.
Aim 2: Provide a range of events, activities and projects that engage and involve
local people
Aim 3: Provide inspiring opportunities for schools, colleges and other learners
Aim 4: Set-up and successfully implement management structures which recruit,
support and diversify volunteers and audiences
The fourth aim is focused on the human resource to deliver the activities. There is a
separate plan (see Appendix 3) that relates to the training of staff and volunteers,
and is closely linked to the learning opportunities presented through this project.
1
2
From the Heritage Audience Development Plan 2015-2020, May 2015
http://www.inspiringlearningforall.gov.uk/learning/
149
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Appendix 4: Learning strategy
December 2015
4.3.
Who are the target groups?
The target audiences for this project are:

local primary and special schools

local residents

local families

local older people aged 55+.
In addition, young people and students will also be catered for as a second priority
audience.
4.4.
What will be available for learners?
The table below provides an overview of audiences and related learning activities.
Table 18: Learning activities
Audience group
Primary and
special schools
Action
plan
3.1
Activity
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
Online materials for schools
Islington Museum satellite activities
STEM activities – self guided and facilitated
History and geography activities – self guided and
facilitated
Teachers’ CPD art sessions
Host primary teachers’ CPD history sessions
Annual exhibition of local schools’ artwork ‘Inspired by
the Clock Tower’
Pilot an art club for local children with special
educational needs and disabilities
Develop a strategy for engaging supplementary schools
in Islington
Develop a strategy for engaging nursery schools
Activity programme with national initiatives eg Big
Draw, RSPB Garden Bird Watch, Family Learning
Festival, Playday, Black History Month
Programme of under 5s weekday activities
Programme of free family activities inspired by Clock
Tower, heritage and Park
Plant trail around local area
Heritage trail around local area
Annual exhibition of local schools’ artwork ‘Inspired by
the Clock Tower’
Pilot an art club for local children with special
educational needs and disabilities
Develop a pilot programme of after school activities
3.7
3.8
3.10
3.11
3.13
Local families
3.14
2.5
2.7
2.8
2.11
2.11
3.10
3.11
3.12
150
INSET sessions for teachers
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Appendix 4: Learning strategy
December 2015
Local residents
Older people
2.1
2.5
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.11
2.12
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.9
2.10
2.12
3.10
Young people
and students
2.3
2.7
All audiences
3.6
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.13
Community steering group to be further developed
Activity programme with national initiatives eg Big
Draw, RSPB Garden Bird Watch, Black History Month
Programme of plant based workshops
Programme of art workshops
Plant trail around local area
Heritage trail around local area
Guided walks in local area
Older people’s art projects
Activity programme with national initiatives eg Big
Draw, RSPB Garden Bird Watch, Playday
Social tea parties in visitor centre
Programme of plant based workshops
Programme of art workshops
Guided walks in local area
Programme of talks and tours for local history groups
and U3A
Clock Tower launch event
City and Islington College student placements to
support programme of under 5s weekday activities
Student placements
Interpretation scheme by HOTROD
Test out interpretation themes, design and activity
ideas during delivery phase
Regular programme of Clock Tower opening days
Islington Council access group to be consulted
Community steering group to be further developed
Hoardings project [NB funding required]
Clock Tower launch event
Support community festivals and events
151
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Appendix 4: Learning strategy
December 2015
4.5.
Early years topics
Activities for families with early years children will be developed with the needs of
this age group in mind – their learning and development needs, their welfare and
safeguarding requirements, and that fact that each child is unique and so learns in
different ways and at different rates. Activities will be developed bearing in mind
that some children will not have English as their first language, and so will be
planned in close collaboration with local teachers.
Activities will include:

playing and exploring

active learning

creating and thinking critically.
Table 19: Early years topics
Areas of learning and
development
Communication and language
Physical development
Personal, social and emotional
development
Literacy
Mathematics
Understanding the world
Expressive arts and design
152
Activities relevant to this project
Storytelling, responses to stories and role
play enabling children to develop their
own explanations and connections
Using equipment to carry out activities in
the visitors centre and the Park, eg play
or sports activities from different time
periods, handling tools and equipment
safely
Supported to try new activities, share
ideas, speak confidently, work in a group
Opportunities to read or write during
creative activities
Using numbers and shape, and
measurements eg time, patterns,
exploring the Park and Clock Tower and
using mathematical language
Activities that observe and explore
similarities and differences related to
communities, traditions, places, objects,
materials and living things
Activities that use a variety of materials,
tools and various techniques to give
children and opportunity to express
imaginative ideas eg role-play, stories,
art, music and dance
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Appendix 4: Learning strategy
December 2015
4.6.
National Curriculum
This is not an exhaustive list, but it highlights key curriculum areas relevant to the
project, listed by subject. In reality, most sessions support a number of different
subject areas.
Table 20: Key curriculum areas
Subject
Key stage 1
5-7 year olds
Key stage 2
7-11 year olds
English
Listening to and discussing a
wide range of poems, stories
and non-fiction at a level
beyond that at which they can
read independently
Using visits to inspire factual
accounts of real events (eg
marching in support of the
Tolpuddle Martyrs)
Role-play
Recite poems by heart (eg in a
heritage setting)
Poetry (eg inspired by noises
and smells of the market, or
the Park)
Writing for different purposes
(eg diary of the market
manager, a time traveller
arriving at the Caledonian
Market)
Role-play
Preparing a play to perform
on site
Mathematics
Numbers, counting, number
patterns, measurement
(including telling the time),
sequencing events, direction
clockwise, geometry 2D and
3D shapes
Collecting data, bar charts,
tally charts, pie charts,
measurement including
distances and timing
activities, analogue and digital
clocks, currency, problem
solving, scale drawings,
averages
Science
Plants – identify, observe and
name a variety of common
wild and garden plants,
including deciduous and
evergreen trees
Plants and animals and their
habitats and how habitat and
micro-habitats provide basic
needs
Food chains
Seasonal changes and weather
Habitats
Materials and simple properties
and their uses
Properties of materials and
uses and unusual and creative
uses for everyday materials
Working scientifically –
observation, recording, fair
153
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Appendix 4: Learning strategy
December 2015
test, identifying similarities,
differences and changes
Soils
Shadows and light (of the
Clock Tower)
Sound (eg bell)
Forces (eg pulleys and gears)
Impact of exercise on bodies
function
History
Changes within living memory,
which should be used to reveal
aspects of change in national
life (eg transport, animals,
leisure time)
Events beyond living memory
that are significant nationally
The lives of significant
individuals in the past who
have contributed to national
and international achievements
Significant historical events,
people and places in their own
locality
Geography
Identify seasonal and daily
weather patterns (eg link this
with wildlife spotting – signs of
Spring or Autumn)
Use aerial photographs and
plan perspectives to recognise
landmarks and basic human
and physical features (eg link
this with views from the Clock
Tower)
Use fieldwork and
observational skills to study
key human and physical
features of its surrounding
environment
Compass skills and map work
(eg North Road and local
landmarks and then further
afield across London)
154
Local history study:
A study of an aspect of history
or a site that is significant in
the locality and including
connections, contrasts and
trends over time (eg a
chronology of changes at
Caledonian Park and how
these map with national
events)
Use fieldwork to observe,
measure, record and present
the human and physical
features in the local area
using a range of methods,
including sketch maps, plans
and graphs, and digital
technologies (eg use the view
from the Clock Tower to
provide a wider context)
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Appendix 4: Learning strategy
December 2015
Art & Design
Designing and making
products
Sketch and observe in greater
detail
Drawing, painting and
sculpture inspired by buildings
and objects
Use a range of techniques (eg
drawing and sculpture) and
materials (eg pencil, charcoal,
paint)
Range of techniques – colours,
texture, pattern and shape
Similarities and differences
between range of artists, craft
makers and designers and
links to their own work
Find out about great artists,
architects and designers and
their role in local history
Music
Perform, listen to, review and
evaluate music across a range
of historical periods, genres,
styles and traditions (eg link
this to music from across the
centuries in the chronology of
the Park)
Perform, listen to, review and
evaluate music across a range
of historical periods, genres,
styles and traditions (eg link
this to music from across the
centuries in the chronology of
Caledonian Park)
Computing
Use technology to create,
organise, store and retrieve
digital content
Use technology to create,
organise, store and retrieve
digital content; make use of
the Internet to access
information
Physical Education
Master basic movements
including running, jumping,
throwing and catching, as well
as developing balance, agility
and co-ordination, and begin
to apply these in a range of
activities (eg when playing
traditional games)
Use running, jumping,
throwing and catching in
isolation and in combination
(eg to celebrate some of the
historical sports associated
with the Park)
Languages
Opportunities to teach English
and new vocabulary to
speakers of other languages
Opportunities to teach English
and new vocabulary to
speakers of other languages
Design & Technology
Technical knowledge - build
structures, exploring how they
can be made stronger, stiffer
and more stable (eg designing
a clock tower)
Making - select from and use
a wider range of materials
and components, including
construction materials,
textiles and ingredients,
Take part in outdoor and
adventurous activity
challenges both individually
and within a team (eg
through forest school
activities)
155
Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre: Activity Plan
Appendix 4: Learning strategy
December 2015
Explore and use mechanisms
[for example, levers, sliders,
wheels and axles], in their
products (eg through clock
making)
4.7.
according to their functional
properties and aesthetic
qualities
Evaluate - understand how
key events and individuals in
design and technology have
helped shape the world
Spaces and resources
There will be a dedicated well-equipped space in the Visitors’ Centre in the Park.
Activities will also take place in the Park and in the Clock Tower. Additionally, there
will be online resources available for teachers to prepare and follow-up visits.
A Learning Officer and Heritage Ranger will be available to work with visitors.
Additionally, the Heritage Learning Officer and Local History Manager will support
some of the activities onsite.
4.8.
Activity Plan
This document should be read in conjunction with the rest of the Activity Plan, which
provides details of timescales, the resources required, costs and measures of
success. In particular:
Chapter 4
Involving people in the project
This gives more detail about project vision, breaking down barriers for engagement,
target audiences, the activity programme, facilities, and partnerships.
Chapter 5
Action Plan
This gives further detail about each planned activity.
Appendix 2
Volunteering plan
Outlines the volunteer recruitment plan and roles.
Appendix 3
Training Plan
Outlines the staff and volunteer training and skills development.
Appendix 8
Learning consultations
This details the consultation findings.
156
Appendix 5
Job descriptions
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JOB DESCRIPTION
POST TITLE:
Project Officer (Heritage)
GRADE:
PO2
SERVICE AREA:
Environment and Regeneration
DIVISION:
Public Realm
UNIT:
Greenspace
REPORTS TO:
Projects Team Manager
CONTRACT PERIOD
Two years’ full-time.
MANAGES/SUPERVISES:
The design team, evaluation consultant
PRIMARY JOB FUNCTION
Introduction
The post holder will be responsible to the Projects Team Manager for managing and delivering the
Caledonian Park (Clock Tower and Visitor Centre) Heritage project. Islington Council is managing
the project, but the majority of the funding is from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF). The post holder
will work with other Islington Council staff, funding partners, local community groups, organisations
and other stakeholders to ensure delivery of the project.
They will oversee and co-ordinate the management, implementation, promotion and monitoring of
the delivery phase of the project. The post is for a fixed term period of two years.
Contract Period
Project Delivery (Stage 2) for two years.
159
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Key Areas
Service

To oversee and co-ordinate the management, implementation, promotion and monitoring of the
appropriate stages of the Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre Project, ensuring
that the project fulfils its aims and objectives and that the contractual requirements of HLF and
other funding partners are fulfilled, including financial and project reporting.

To ensure that the Project is carried out in accordance with a rigorous project management
approach.

To procure goods, professional and other services in line with Council and HLF requirements,
liaise with the Council’s Legal and Procurement Teams to ensure the processes and contracts
are fit for purpose.

To lead and manage diverse teams of both in–house and consultant professionals and
craftspeople to deliver a high quality public realm improvement scheme. These may include,
but are not limited to: architect, structural engineer, civil engineer, mechanical and electrical
engineer, heritage metalwork specialists, blacksmith, carpenter, landscape architect, quantity
surveyor, archaeologist, interpretation consultant, evaluation consultant.

To monitor the implementation of the Activity Plan, which is being managed in conjunction with
other Council departments

To ensure that project delivery is in line with relevant Islington Council policies, strategies and
guidance and meets the project’s aims and objectives.

To organise Steering Group meetings and produce information to consult with and inform the
Steering Group of project progress; and to report on the Steering Group’s input to the Council's
Greenspace Project Board.

To organise regular internal Officer Group meetings to plan, co-ordinate and monitor project
works and activities.

To report regularly to the Project Board on financial, programme and project development
issues, including outcomes of Steering Group meetings; to maintain and manage the Risk
Register and Issue Log and highlight any major risks, issues or deviations from programme /
budget to Project Board.

To manage the development of the evaluation framework for the Delivery and Implementation
Phases, in liaison with the project’s Learning Officer and Community Ranger, and to oversee
the evaluation of the Delivery Phase of the project.

To act as the client advisor in relation to the Construction Design and Management Regulations
2015 ensuring that the project is at all times compliant with requirements of the regulations and
that the Council’s CDM recording systems are regularly updated.
160
Finance

To be responsible for financial management for the project, tracking all income and expenditure
and ensuring all contractual monitoring information is returned to the relevant organisations,
both internal and external.

To complete all HLF grant payment requests and Delivery Phase Progress Reports.

To profile possible funding opportunities for the project and identify match funding possibilities
through a developed understanding of public realm funding regimes, regeneration partnerships
and local / regional / central government initiatives.

To be responsible for developing and submitting funding applications where opportunities are
identified.
Consultation, Information and Communications

To promote community involvement in all aspects of service delivery.

To organise, promote, co-ordinate and run community consultation events for the project, in
liaison with the project’s Learning Officer and Community Ranger, and to publish and circulate
results of these in line with departmental project processes and corporate guidelines. This will
involve working with diverse and often disadvantaged user groups and all effort should be
made to ensure events are as accessible as possible.

To promote project milestones through press releases, community networks and social media.

To record and disseminate the process of the project development

To hold regular co-ordination meetings with officers from Greenspace and other Council units,
divisions and service areas to ensure more effective delivery systems, clarity of communication
and transparency of operations.

To ensure that all services within the area of responsibility are provided in accordance with the
Council’s commitment to best value.

To ensure that all services within the area of responsibility are provided in accordance with the
Council’s commitment to high quality service provision to the consumers.

To produce reports and attend meetings of council committees, working parties, neighbourhood
forums and community groups, as necessary.

To carry out duties and responsibilities in accordance with the Council’s Health and Safety
Policy and relevant Health and Safety legislation.

At all times, to carry out responsibilities and duties within the framework of the Council’s Dignity
in the Workplace Policy.

To perform any other duties as agreed with the Projects Team Manager (Greenspace)
161
ADDITIONAL:

To use and assist others in the use of information technology systems to carry out duties in the
most efficient and effective manner.

To achieve agreed service outcomes and outputs, and personal appraisal targets, as agreed by
the line manager.

To undertake training and constructively take part in meetings, supervision, seminars and other
events designed to improve communication and assist with the effective development of the
post and post holder.

To carry out duties and responsibilities in accordance with the council’s commitment to
customer service excellence and ensure compliance with the customer care standards.

To be committed to the Council’s core values of public service, quality, equality and
empowerment and to demonstrate this commitment in the way duties are carried out.

To ensure that duties are undertaken with due regard and compliance with the Data Protection
Act and other legislation.
The title of the post to which I normally report is: PROJECTS TEAM MANAGER – GREENSPACE
162
PERSON SPECIFICATION
The person specification is a picture of skills, knowledge and experience required to carry out the
job. It has been used to draw up the advert and will also be used in the short-listing and interview
process for this post.
You should demonstrate on your application form how you meet each of the following essential
criteria. Please ensure that your address each one of the criteria as this will be used to assess
your suitability for the post.
Division: Public Realm
Service Area: Environment and Regeneration
Unit: Greenspace
Post Title: Project Officer (Heritage)
Grade: PO2
REQUIREMENTS
EDUCATION and EXPERIENCE
A/I/T*
E1
Experience of managing heritage and / or large construction projects
A/I
E2
Experience of managing contracts
A/I
KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS and ABILITY
E3
The ability to prioritise, complete tasks and work under own initiative, delivering own work
to agreed deadlines and quality levels
A/I
E4
A strong working knowledge of contract management and the ability to deliver excellent
services
A/I
E5
The ability to communicate effectively, both verbally and in writing, with a wide variety of
people including contractors, other agencies, funders, Members and the local community.
Good communication and interpersonal skills to deal with and engage a broad range of
people in the Project Delivery
E6
A/I/T
A/I
E7
Ability to consult effectively with a wide range of stakeholders, particularly young people
and disadvantaged groups. A good working knowledge of consultation techniques,
including both qualitative and quantitative approaches.
A/I
E8
Ability to deliver a strong customer focused approach to service delivery
A/I
E9
Ability to form, build and maintain strong, effective working partnerships with other teams,
contractors and external agencies
A/I
E10
The ability to engage the wider community in the delivery of service aims
A/I
E11
The ability to engage effectively in the political process and develop good working
relationships with Lead Members and Ward Councillors
A/I
E12
The ability to develop effective networks to deliver results. Ability to form working
relationships across professional and operational boundaries within an organisation and
with external organisations and to enhance the reputation of the division
A/I
163
E13
The ability to manage and control capital and revenue budgets and to manage financial
systems
A/I
E14
The ability to manage diverse teams of consultants, suppliers and contractors
A/I
E15
A/I
E16
The ability to assess the design requirements for open space improvement schemes and
to critique design submissions produced by external consultants
The ability to adopt a customer focused approach to service delivery.
E17
A knowledge of quality systems and the ability to monitor and ensure service compliance
A/I
E18
A working knowledge of funding streams and the ability to submit funding applications
A/I
E19
The ability to work outside normal office hours when necessary including evening
meetings and weekends and to take a flexible approach to working arrangements
A/I
COMMITMENT TO EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES
E20
Ability to adhere to the Council’s Dignity for All policy
E= Essential
*Assessed by:
164
A/I
D= Desirable
A= Application
I= Interview
T= Test
JOB DESCRIPTION
POST:
Learning Officer
POST NO:
GRADE: SO1
SERVICE AREA: Environment and Regeneration
SECTION: Heritage Service
RESPONSIBLE TO: Heritage Manager
CONTRACT PERIOD: Three years full-time
MANAGES/SUPERVISES: Project volunteers
PRIMARY JOB FUNCTION
Develop and implement a programme of education and lifelong learning for Caledonian Park Clock
Tower as part of the HLF Activity Plan. The post holder will have a key role in developing and
establishing activities onsite in the Clock Tower, Visitor Centre and Park, and also off site.
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Work with the Project Officer and Heritage Ranger to deliver the HLF Activity Plan and to establish
a sustainable programme.

Establish and develop informal and formal learning strategy for the Clock Tower, in
collaboration with colleagues from Greenspace and Islington’s Heritage team

Maintain partnerships that will help to achieve the project’s programming vision and objectives,
eg Arts Development Team, All Change Arts, City and Islington College, and Hungerford
Children’s Centre

Organise and lead imaginative cross curricular learning programmes for local primary, special
and secondary schools relevant to the National Curriculum including those around STEM
subjects, history and geography

Support the Heritage Learning Officer from Islington Museum to establish a satellite base for
their existing schools’ programmes

Develop and tailor activities through close collaboration with local communities eg through
regular consultation with local schools and through the Community Steering Group

Develop, promote and deliver a programme of activities for families and for under 5s, working
with the Heritage Ranger
165

Develop, promote and deliver a programme of activities for local people including art
workshops and activities such as RSPB’s Garden Bird Watch, Black History Month, Family
Learning Festival, Big Draw and Playday

Develop, promote and deliver a programme of activities for older people eg art projects,
working closely with All Change Arts and Age UK Islington

Develop and promote a programme of talks and tours for groups such as U3A and local history
societies, working closely with the local history archive

Work in partnership with local groups such as Friends of Caledonian Park and the Heritage
Ranger to develop walks and trails that help people explore the natural environment and
heritage of the Park and the area around it

Hold regular teachers’ INSET sessions in collaboration with project partners and other local
heritage organisations and CPD activities (eg art and history) in partnership with others eg local
heritage organisations and Cubitt Education

To develop, train and supervise the learning programme volunteers and work placements, eg
from Central Saint Martins and City University

To be responsible for the budgets relating to learning and engagement

To keep up to date with current community and learning priorities locally and nationally and
take responsibility for own personal development and professional awareness

Report on the progress on a regular basis and maintain records of learning programmes,
including evaluation as part of the Activity Plan

Ensure the requirements of Health and Safety legislation and the Council’s relevant policies are
carried out in relation to the responsibilities of the job

At all times carry out responsibilities and duties with due regard to the Council’s Dignity for All
Policy and the Data Protection Act and other legislation

Ensure all services within the area(s) of responsibility are provided in accordance with the
Council's commitment to high quality service provision to users

Achieve agreed service outcomes and outputs, and personal appraisal targets, as agreed by
the line manager

Work in a corporate, co-operative and collaborative way with other Council officers

Work effectively within teams and take responsibility for constantly trying to improve the overall
performance of the Service

Undertake training and constructively take part in meetings, supervision, seminars and other
events designed to improve communication and assist with the effective development of the
post and post holder
166

Use, and assist others to use, information and communications technology to the benefit of the
service and its customers

The post holder is expected to be committed to the Council’s core values of public service,
quality, equality and empowerment and to demonstrate this commitment in the way they carry
out their duties
The title of the post to which I normally report is: Heritage Officer
Signed:
Date:
167
PERSON SPECIFICATION
The person specification is a picture of skills, knowledge and experience required to carry out the
job. It has been used to draw up the advert and will also be used in the short-listing and interview
process for this post.
You should demonstrate on your application form how you meet the following essential criteria.
Service Area: Environment and Regeneration
Section : Heritage Service
Designation: Learning Officer
Grade: SO1
REQUIREMENTS
EDUCATION and EXPERIENCE
A/I/T
E1
Recognised professional museum or heritage education qualification or equivalent relevant
experience
A
E2
Experience of working in a heritage site, museum or similar cultural environment
A
E3
Experience of designing and delivering learning programmes that meet the identified
needs of students, young people and adults, including people facing discrimination or
social exclusion
A/I
D1
Experience of collaborating with colleagues, external groups and the public to produce
new, innovative learning initiatives
A/I
KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS and ABILITY
E4
Excellent written and oral communication and interpersonal skills with both colleagues,
partners and the general public
A/I
E5
Ability to work effectively as part of a team within the Service and supervise staff and
volunteers
A/I
E6
Good project management skills with the ability to schedule events, prioritise tasks and
complete work to time and budget
A/I
E7
Good IT skills, including knowledge of Word and Excel packages and databases
A
E8
Knowledge of, and commitment to, the educational role of heritage sites and parks and
awareness of current learning issues and thinking within the wider cultural sector
A/I
E9
Ability to use collections, heritage and outdoor spaces creatively with young people and
adults from all sectors of the local community
A/I
E10
Ability to use social media and willingness to develop new skills ways of working within
social media and similar applications
A/I
E11
Ability to research and apply for external grants and funding to support the outreach and
learning needs of the project
A/I
E12
Able to work weekends and evenings where necessary to meet the requirements of the
project
A/I
168
E= Essential D= Desirable
Assessed by:
A= Application
I= Interview
T= Test
169
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170
JOB DESCRIPTION
POST TITLE:
Heritage Ranger
GRADE:
SO1
SERVICE AREA:
Environment and Regeneration
DIVISION:
Public Realm
UNIT:
Greenspace
REPORTS TO:
Central Area Parks Manager
CONTRACT PERIOD
3.25 years full-time.
MANAGES/SUPERVISES:
Project volunteers
PRIMARY JOB FUNCTION
Develop and implement a programme of community engagement and participation for Caledonian
Park Clock Tower as part of the HLF Activity Plan. The post holder will have a key role in
developing and establishing activities in the Clock Tower, Visitor Centre and Park.
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Work with the Project Officer and Learning Officer to deliver the HLF Activity Plan and to establish
a sustainable programme.

Establish and develop community engagement strategy for the Clock Tower, in collaboration
with colleagues from Greenspace and Islington’s Heritage team

Maintain partnerships that will help to achieve the project’s programming vision and objectives,
eg Octopus Community Network, Goodinge Community Centre and Age UK Islington

Organise and promote a regular programme of Clock Tower Open Days

Develop and manage the Community Steering Group to facilitate effective community liaison
and engagement

Keep the Park noticeboards updated with local community and Park Friends information

Support local community groups to organise festivals and events in the Park

Develop, promote and deliver a programme of activities for families and for under 5s, working
with the Learning Officer

Develop, promote and deliver a programme of activities for local people including plant
workshops and activities such as RSPB’s Garden Bird Watch, Black History Month, Family
Learning Festival, Big Draw and Playday, working with the Learning Officer

Develop, promote and deliver a programme of activities for older people to build confidence in
visiting the Park, working closely with organisations such as Age UK Islington

Work in partnership with local groups such as Friends of Caledonian Park and the Learning
Officer to develop walks and trails that help people explore the natural environment and
heritage of the Park and the area around it
171

Support the Learning Officer in the development and delivery of activities for schools and for
after school clubs on site

To recruit, train, timetable and supervise volunteers and build a vibrant team

To be responsible for the budgets relating to community engagement and participation

To keep up to date with current community priorities locally and nationally and take
responsibility for own personal development and professional awareness

Monitor Park visitor figures, visitors to Clock Tower and volunteers working in the Park and
contribute to evaluation as part of the Activity Plan

Ensure the requirements of Health and Safety legislation and the Council’s relevant policies are
carried out in relation to the responsibilities of the job including supporting the Premises
Manager in managing the building.

At all times carry out responsibilities and duties with due regard to the Council’s Dignity for All
Policy and the Data Protection Act and other legislation

Ensure all services within the area(s) of responsibility are provided in accordance with the
Council's commitment to high quality service provision to users

Achieve agreed service outcomes and outputs, and personal appraisal targets, as agreed by
the line manager

Work in a corporate, co-operative and collaborative way with other Council officers

Work effectively within teams and take responsibility for constantly trying to improve the overall
performance of the Service

Undertake training and constructively take part in meetings, supervision, seminars and other
events designed to improve communication and assist with the effective development of the
post and post holder

Use, and assist others to use, information and communications technology to the benefit of the
service and its customers

The post holder is expected to be committed to the Council’s core values of public service,
quality, equality and empowerment and to demonstrate this commitment in the way they carry
out their duties
The title of the post to which I normally report is: Projects Team Manager - Greenspace
Signed:
Date:
172
PERSON SPECIFICATION
The person specification is a picture of skills, knowledge and experience required to carry out the
job. It has been used to draw up the advert and will also be used in the short-listing and interview
process for this post.
You should demonstrate on your application form how you meet the following essential criteria.
Service Area: Environment and Regeneration
Section : Greenspace
Designation: Heritage Ranger
Grade: SO1
REQUIREMENTS
A/I/T
EDUCATION and EXPERIENCE
E1
Experience of working in a heritage site, park or similar cultural environment
A
E2
Experience of designing and delivering community programmes that meet the identified
needs of students, young people and adults, including people facing discrimination or
social exclusion
A/I
D1
Experience of recruiting, training and managing volunteers
A/I
KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS and ABILITY
E3
Excellent written and oral communication and interpersonal skills with colleagues, partners
and the general public
A/I
E4
Ability to work effectively as part of a team within the Service and supervise staff and
volunteers
A/I
E5
Good project management skills with the ability to schedule events, prioritise tasks and
complete work to time and budget
A/I/T
E6
Good IT skills, including knowledge of Word and Excel packages and databases
A
E7
Knowledge of, and commitment to, the educational role of heritage sites and parks and
awareness of current learning issues and thinking within the wider cultural sector
A/I
D2
Knowledge or interest in habitat management and horticulture
A/I
E8
Ability to use parks and outdoor spaces creatively with young people and adults from all
sectors of the local community
A/I
E9
Ability to build relationships and engage with local communities
A/I
E10
Ability to research and apply for external grants and funding to support the outreach and
learning needs of the project
A/I
E11
Able to work weekends and evenings where necessary to meet the requirements of the
project
A/I
E= Essential D= Desirable
Assessed by:
A= Application
I= Interview
T= Test
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CALEDONIAN PARK AND VISITOR CENTRE
BRIEF FOR AN EVALUATION CONSULTANT
1. Introduction
Islington Council seeks to appoint a consultant to develop a monitoring and
evaluation framework for the delivery phase of this Heritage Lottery Fund project.
2. Background to the project
Caledonian Park is managed by Islington Council and sits within the Greenspace
service that forms part of the Environment and Regeneration department. The
Greenspace team works closely with the Heritage Service, which is in the same
department.
The present Park contains a Grade II* listed Clock Tower which was the centrepiece
of the 19th century Metropolitan Cattle Market. Bordering the Park on two sides
(along Market Road and Shearling Way) are the remnants of the substantial market
railings, which are Grade II listed. The only surviving remains of the cattle market are
the Tower, which is included on the Heritage At Risk Register, and the railings, which
have also been identified by English Heritage (EH) as being at risk.
The project proposes conservation and access improvement works to an historic
clock tower at Caledonian Park, conservation of the historic railings and the creation
of a small new building to provide a range of facilities and interpretation for visitors
and to support activities in the adjacent Park.
The overall project objectives are to:
 establish the Clock Tower as an attractive destination for people interested in the
history and geography of North London
 provide opportunities for the local community to engage with the physical heritage
of the site and connect to its social heritage
 conserve the site heritage
 provide a framework for the long term protection of the heritage of the site.
The new Visitor Centre, located at the northern gateway to the Park will provide the
facilities needed to support the activity programme. A central covered entrance to
the Park that will be opened and closed at the same time as the Park, from 8.00am
until dusk. The building will contain:
 a community learning room, with a capacity for 30 people which schools can use
as a base and community groups can meet. The room has a sink, toilets,
cloakroom and a furniture store.
The community room will be used for interpretation and special exhibitions and will
be open to general visitors when not in use by schools and community groups.
 a volunteers’ storage space for equipment and materials and tea making facilities
 an office for the Learning Officer and Heritage Ranger
 a kiosk serving teas and coffees to visitors to the Park and users of the Visitor
Centre
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 accessible public toilets.
The interpretation of the Park will be focused on the Clock Tower, in the Visitor
Centre and throughout the Park. Most important of all is to open the Clock Tower
regularly for guided tours, using volunteers, so that visitors can enjoy the view,
explore and learn about the Tower and its clock. Trails will also be available taking
the interpretation across the Park and beyond. The development of the interpretation
will involve and engage the community through volunteering and testing the ideas
with local residents, young people and schools.
A crucial aspect of the Clock Tower and Visitor Centre project is to create a valued
local resource in which people feel connected to their heritage and a sense of pride
and community. To do this, the Clock Tower and Visitor Centre will actively involve
local people in the management of the activity programme and in local advocacy – by
recruiting additional members to the community steering group and they will be given
the skills to contribute to the project.
There will be a festival to launch the project and the regular events programme will
include art and gardening workshops for older people, weekend activities for local
people based on national initiatives, such as the RSPB bird watch or Black History
Month, social events in the Park, activities for under-fives and free family activities,
such as craft activities, puppets and bug hunts.
Projects will include members of the local community working with artists to provide
interpretation of the project on the construction hoardings, subject to additional
funding.
Local primary and special school teachers will be provided with a series of creative
workshops, activities and supporting resources, which encourage engagement
throughout the year, either mediated by a Learning Officer or Heritage Ranger, or
used independently. These cross-curricular programmes will focus on a range of
topics, such as the history and stories of the Caledonian Park site, drawing on the
local history archive, the market, the architecture and social history changes.
Activities will involve developing a creative response to the Clock Tower, with
storytelling and role play at the core. There will also be programmes related to the
ecology of the Park, such as soil sampling, wildlife surveys, observing seasonal
changes over the year, pulling together science and geography field study skills.
Other science-related activities will interpret the clock and how it works. The project
will consult local educators to help develop and pilot new activities help develop
content and keep the project team informed about curriculum changes, through the
Festival of Blackboards hosted by Cubitt Education.
The Caledonian Park Clock Tower and Visitor Centre project will offer opportunities
for students to have work placements – such as students from City and Islington
College. Drawing on the rich history of the site and the local history archives, a
number of talks will be developed and offered both on- and off-site to U3A groups,
and to local History groups and societies in the local community.
Three members of staff will be appointed to deliver the project and programmes:
 Project Manager, full-time for two years to oversee the capital part of the project
 Learning Officer, full-time for three years to oversee the heritage-focused aspects
of the activity programme
 Heritage Ranger, full time for three and a quarter years to oversee the
environment-focused aspects of the activity programme.
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There will be 109 project volunteers recruited from the community to help deliver the
programmes – as guides to the Clock Tower, Visitor Centre and Park, helpers in the
café, welcomers to the Visitor Centre, assisting with informal and formal learning
activities in the Clock Tower, Visitor Centre and Park, researching and developing
guides, trails and learning resources, researching and developing interpretation of
the Clock Tower and Park, researching and developing interpretation in the Visitor
Centre and for special exhibitions, winding the Clock, serving on the Steering Group
and helping with website content and social media.
The project is supported by a comprehensive training programme that details 25
different training sessions for volunteers and staff to equip them to be able to deliver
the Activity Plan and includes heritage skills training and a stonemason
apprenticeship.
3. The scope of the work
The scope of the work is to review the existing evaluation methods used by Islington
Council, the Greenspace Unit and Islington Museum and to devise a framework that
will measure the outputs and outcomes of our HLF project. The framework will
detail:

what data will be collected

how achievement will be monitored and evaluated

how the results will be reported

how the results will be used to inform future programming and forward planning.
Staff and volunteers will carry out the actual evaluation of the project during the
delivery phase. However, the consultant will undertake certain specialist parts of the
evaluation work, such as focus group consultation. The scope of the project is to
establish a simple framework that we will use and this will include the production of
evaluation materials and tools.
4. Summary of outputs
The consultant will write an evaluation framework, in keeping to HLF guidelines
Evaluating your HLF Project and will have specific responsibility for the following
outputs:

compiling a detailed evaluation framework which identifies those outputs that are
expected with delivery of each activity

the framework should set out the key performance indicators (and associated
quality indicators) expected from delivering each of the activities identified within
the activity plan as well as identifying the time-line when results are expected to
materialise

the framework should be mindful of the requirements of HLF and their
expectations in relation to the delivery of outputs that have been committed to be
delivered within this funded project

within this framework, detailing the frequency with which monitoring will be
carried out and identifying the most effective manner in which it should be carried
out with specific audiences – e.g. by 1-1 phone call or follow-up questionnaire or
by more direct approaches such as observation or focus group discussion
177

identifying the appropriate reporting format and frequency of reports – both for
the Project Board, Steering Group and also the HLF

within the framework, developing a mechanism by which the results gleaned from
the monitoring activity can be reviewed, collated and interpreted such that an
action plan can be created identifying all steps necessary to enhance our future
programme development and delivery.
5. Available documentation

The HLF Round 2 application form

The Round 2 Activity Plan (including the Training Plan, Volunteering Plan and
Learning Strategy)

The Round 2 Interpretation Plan
6. Management of the commission
The commission will be managed by [Title] and on a day-to-day basis by [Title].
We expect a commissioning meeting and regular communication throughout the
project.
7. Requirements of the submission
Your proposal should include:

Approach to the project

Methodology

CVs of proposed team members

Track record

Two client references

A fixed fee showing your daily rates between individuals, number of days spent
on each task and including all fees and expenses

Projected timescale.
8. Skills required
The consultant should have experience and expertise in:

evaluation of heritage projects

analysis of data, outputs and outcomes

working with heritage organisations

writing evaluation framework documents to HLF guidelines

ability to write clear and accurate copy.
We are looking for a consultant with excellent communication skills, able to inspire
and talk to people with a wide range of backgrounds and skills.
178
9.
Date of submission and timescale
The closing date for submissions is [date of submission].
The submission should be emailed to [name, email, address].
The interview date is planned for [date of interview].
The start date for the project is [date].
The completion date for the project is [date].
10. Fee
The fixed fee for the Evaluation Plan is £10,000 excluding VAT, but including all
expenses.
11. Terms and conditions
We will require evidence of Professional Indemnity insurance cover.
12. Further information
For further information and/or a site visit, please contact [name].
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