MIG-TIG-STICK | KUMJR250 | Instruction manual | MIG-TIG-STICK KUMJR250 Instruction manual

MIG-TIG-STICK KUMJR250 Instruction manual
3YEARS Warranty
MIG-TIG-STICK BUILT-IN
TECHNOLOGY
(Power Source)
MIG-TIG-STICK
BUILT-IN
Lift Arc
DC/TIG
ADVANTAGE
240 Volt
Standard
TECHNOLOGY
L
MIG / MAG
TECHNOLOGY
TECHNOLOGY
Plasma CUTMIG-TIG-STICK
TECHNOLOGY
ADVANTAGE
OPERATING MANUAL
MIG-TIG-STICK
KUMJR250
Please read and understand this instruction manual carefully
before the installation and operation of this equipment.
1
© Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD 2012
Thank you for your purchase of your UNI-MIG welding machine.
We are proud of our range of welding equipment that has a proven track record of innovation,
performance and reliability.
Our product range represents the latest developments in Inverter technology put together by our
professional team of highly skilled engineers. The expertise gained from our long involvement with
inverter technology has proven to be invaluable towards the evolution and future development of
our equipment range. This experience gives us the inside knowledge on what the arc
characteristics, performance and interface between man and machine should be.
Within our team are specialist welders that have a proven history of welding knowledge and
expertise, giving vital input towards ensuring that our machines deliver control and performance to
the utmost professional level.
We employ an expert team of professional sales, marketing and technical personnel that provide
us with market trends, market feedback and customer comments and requirements. Secondly they
provide a customer support service that is second to none, thus ensuring our customers have
confidence that they will be well satisfied both now and in the future.
UNI-MIG welders are manufactured and compliant with - AS/NZ60974.1 2006 - AS60974-6:2006
guaranteeing you electrical safety and performance.
• 3 Years from date of purchase.
WARRANTY
•Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD Ltd warranties all goods as specified by the manufacturer of those goods.
•This Warranty does not cover freight or goods that have been interfered with.
•All goods in question must be repaired by an authorised repair agent as appointed by this
company.
•Warranty does not cover abuse, mis-use, accident, theft, general wear and tear.
•New product will not be supplied unless Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD has inspected
product returned for warranty and agree’s to replace product.
•Product will only be replaced if repair is not possible
• Please view full Warranty term and conditions supplied with machine or at www.unimig.com.au/
warranty.asp or at the back of this manual.
2
CONTENTSPAGE
Warranty2
Technical Data, Product Information
4
Safety - Cautions
5-7
Machine Layout Pictogram
8
Installation Operation Cautions
9
Installation & Operation for MMA (stick) Welding
10
MMA (Stick) Welding Information
11-12
Installation & Operation for MIG Welding with Gas
13-14
Wire Feed Drive Roller Selection
16
Wire Installation Set up Guide
16
Installation & Operation for MIG Welding with No Gas
17-18
Installation Guide for Mig Torch Liner Installation
19
Mig Torch and Wire Feeder Set Up Guide for Aluminium Mig Wire
20-21
Installation & Operation for MIG Welding with Spool Gun
22-23
MIG (Metal Inert Gas) Welding
24-25
Basic MIG Welding Guide
26-29
Installation & Operation for DC TIG Welding with Lift Arc
30-31
DC TIG Welding
32-33
Tungsten Electrodes
34-35
24 MIG Torch Parts Breakdown
36-37
SP200 Spool Gun Torch Parts Breakdown
38-39
17VTIG Torch Parts Breakdown
40-41
Mig Welding Shooting Guide
42-43
TIG Welding Shooting Guide
44-45
MMA Welding Trouble Shooting Guide
46
Machine Spare Parts Breakdown
47
Warranty48-50
3
2YEARS Warranty
KUMJR250
(Power Source)
MIG/MMA/TIG - 250 Amp DC Welding Machine Lightweight & Portable
Welds: Steels, Stainless, Cast Iron, Bronze, Aluminium, Copper
Features
• Latest IGBT inverter technology
• Mig/Mag with Gas and Gasless wire function
• Stick electrode (MMA) function
• DC Tig welding with Lift Arc Start
• Industrial application
• Optional trolley
• Internal wire feeder, gear driven for up to 300mm Ø spool
• Euro mig torch connection
• IP21S rating for environmental/safety protection • Tolerant to variable power supply
• Seamless voltage and wire feed control
• Excellent mig welding with CO2 gas
• Excellent arc stability with all electrodes
• Light weight and portable
Technical Data
Power Supply / Phases (V-Ph)
240v - 1 +/- 15%
Duty Cycle @ 40°c as per AS/NZ60974 40% @ 250 Amps MIG
40% @ 224 Amps MMA
Duty Cycle @ 25°c (approximate)
70% @ 250 Amps MIG
70% @ 224Amps MMA
Output Current Range MIG 30A/15.5V - 250A/26.5V
Output Current Range MMA 10A/20.4V - 350A/33.0V
Rated Power MIG
10.8 KVA
I Max MIG
45 Amps
MMA
51 Amps
I ieff MIG
26.6 Amps
MMA
28 0 Amps
Power factor
0.72
Protection Class
P 21S
Insulation Class
F
Wire Feeder Type
Gear Driven 2 Roll
Wire Diameter Range (mm)
0.6, 0.8, 0.9, 1.0, 1.2
Dimensions Power Source (LxWxH) 585x280x440mm
Weight Power Source
35 Kg
Dimensions Trolley (LxWxH)
880x430x410mm
Warranty
2 years on machine
MULTIFUNCTION INVERTER OPTIONS
SPOOL GUN
Part No: SPG200
MACHINE TROLLEY
Part No: UMJRTROLLEY2
17V TIG WELDING TORCH
Part No: 17V4MCP35/50
Overview
The UNI-MIG250 is a new inverter-based portable Mig welding machine with added MMA and Tig function. The Mig
function allows you to weld with both Gas Shielded and Gas-less wire applications. Easy step less adjustment of voltage and
wire feed make for easy setting of welding parameters giving excellent, professional welding results. Wire inch gives easy
feeding of the wire during set up without gas wastage and the Burn Back adjustment leaves the wire stick out ready for the next
weld. MMA welding capability delivers easy electrode welding with high quality results, including cast Iron, stainless and low
hydrogen. Connection of the 17V tig torch provides quality DC Tig with Lift Arc start for welding of steel, stainless steel and
copper. An additional feature is the Spoolgun ready function that allows the simple connection of the SPG200 Spoolgun for the
use of thin or softer wires that don’t have the column strength to feed through standard mig torches, such as aluminium wire.
This an industrial machine that is lightweight and portable, an optional trolley with drawer and cylinder rack provides off the
floor operation and better manoeuvrability around the workshop. Being 240v single phase gives great portability. Ideal for
general engineers, maintenance workshop, rural workshop, panel beaters, home workshop. Designed and built to our
specification. Certified to - AS/NZ60974.1
MACHINE PACKAGE: KUMJR250
4
UNI-MIG 250 Multifunction Welding Inverter / SB24 4M Xcel-Arc Sure Grip MIG torch with Euro connector
4M ARC lead set 35/50mm Dinse style connections / UNI-FLAME Twin Gauge Argon Regulator
2M Gas Hose Complete with fittings
SAFETY
Welding and cutting equipment can be dangerous to both the operator and people in or near the
surrounding working area, if the equipment is not correctly operated. Equipment must only be
used under the strict and comprehensive observance of all relevant safety regulations.
Read and understand this instruction manual carefully before the installation and operation of this
equipment.
Machine Operating Safety
•Do not switch the function modes while the machine is operating. Switching of the function modes during
welding can damage the machine. Damage caused in this manner will not be covered under warranty.
•Disconnect the electrode-holder cable from the machine before switching on the machine, to avoid arcing
should the electrode be in contact with the work piece.
•Operators should be trained and or qualified.
Electric shock: It can kill. Touching live electrical parts can cause fatal shocks or severe
burns. The electrode and work circuit is electrically live whenever the output is on. The input
power circuit and internal machine circuits are also live when power is on. In Mig/Mag welding,
the wire, drive rollers, wire feed housing, and all metal parts touching the welding wire are
electrically live. Incorrectly installed or improperly grounded equipment is dangerous.
•Connect the primary input cable according to Australian and New Zealand standards and regulations.
•Avoid all contact with live electrical parts of the welding circuit, electrodes and wires with bare hands.
The operator must wear dry welding gloves while he/she performs the welding task.
•The operator should keep the work piece insulated from himself/herself.
• Keep cords dry, free of oil and grease, and protected from hot metal and sparks.
• Frequently inspect input power cable for wear and tear, replace the cable immediately if damaged,
bare wiring is dangerous and can kill.
•Do not use damaged, under sized, or badly joined cables.
•Do not drape cables over your body.
• We recommend (RCD) safety switch is used with this equipment to detect any leakage of current to earth.
Fumes and gases are dangerous. Smoke and gas generated whilst welding or cutting can
be harmful to people’s health. Welding produces fumes and gases. Breathing these fumes and
gases can be hazardous to your health. •Do
not breathe the smoke and gas generated whilst welding or cutting, keep your head out of the fumes
•Keep the working area well ventilated, use fume extraction or ventilation to remove welding fumes and
gases.
•In confined or heavy fume environments always wear an approved air-supplied respirator.
Welding fumes and gases can displace air and lower the oxygen level causing injury or death. Be sure the
breathing air is safe.
•Do not weld in locations near de-greasing, cleaning, or spraying operations. The heat and rays of the arc
can react with vapours to form highly toxic and irritating gases.
•Materials such as galvanized, lead, or cadmium plated steel, containing elements that can give off toxic
fumes when welded. Do not weld these materials unless the area is very well ventilated, and or wearing
an air supplied respirator.
Arc rays: harmful to people’s eyes and skin. Arc rays from the welding process produce
intense visible and invisible ultraviolet and infrared rays that can burn eyes and skin.
•Always
wear a welding helmet with correct shade of filter lens and suitable protective clothing including
welding gloves whilst the welding operation is performed.
•Measures should be taken to protect people in or near the surrounding working area. Use protective
screens or barriers to protect others from flash,glare and sparks; warn others not to watch the arc.
5
Fire hazard. Welding on closed containers, such as tanks,drums, or pipes, can cause them
to explode. Flying sparks from the welding arc, hot work piece, and hot equipment can cause
fires and burns. Accidental contact of electrode to metal objects can cause sparks, explosion,
overheating, or fire. Check and be sure the area is safe before doing any welding.
•The
welding sparks & spatter may cause fire, therefore remove any flammable materials well away from the working area. Cover flammable materials and containers with approved covers if unable to be moved from the welding area.
•Do not weld on closed containers such as tanks, drums, or pipes, unless they are properly prepared
according to the required Safety Standards to insure that flammable or toxic vapors and substances are
totally removed, these can cause an explosion even though the vessel has been “cleaned”.
Vent hollow castings or containers before heating, cutting or welding. They may explode.
•Do not weld where the atmosphere may contain flammable dust, gas, or liquid vapours (such as petrol)
•Have a fire extinguisher nearby and know how to use it. Be alert that welding sparks and hot materials
from welding can easily go through small cracks and openings to adjacent areas. Be aware that welding
on a ceiling, floor, bulkhead, or partition can cause fire on the hidden side.
Gas Cylinders. Shielding gas cylinders contain gas under high pressure. If damaged, a cylinder can explode. Because gas cylinders are normally part of the welding process, be sure to
treat them carefully. CYLINDERS can explode if damaged.
•Protect
gas cylinders from excessive heat, mechanical shocks, physical damage, slag, open flames,
sparks, and arcs.
•Insure cylinders are held secure and upright to prevent tipping or falling over.
•Never allow the welding electrode or earth clamp to touch the gas cylinder, do not drape welding cables
over the cylinder.
•Never weld on a pressurised gas cylinder, it will explode and kill you.
•Open the cylinder valve slowly and turn your face away from the cylinder outlet valve and gas regulator.
Gas
build up. The build up of gas can causes a toxic environment, deplete the oxygen content
in the air resulting in death or injury. Many gases use in welding are invisible and odourless.
•Shut off shielding gas supply when not in use.
•Always ventilate confined spaces or use approved air-supplied respirator.
Electronic magnetic fields. MAGNETIC FIELDS can affect Implanted Medical Devices.
•Wearers of Pacemakers and other Implanted Medical Devices should keep away.
•Implanted Medical Device wearers should consult their doctor and the device manufacturer before going
near any electric welding, cutting or heating operation.
Noise can damage hearing. Noise from some processes or equipment can damage hearing.
Wear approved ear protection if noise level is high.
Hot parts. Items being welded generate and hold high heat and can cause severe burns.
Do not touch hot parts with bare hands. Allow a cooling period before working on the welding
gun. Use insulated welding gloves and clothing to handle hot parts and prevent burns.
6
CAUTION
1. Working Environment.
1.1 The environment in which this welding equipment is installed must be free of grinding dust, corrosive
chemicals, flammable gas or materials etc, and at no more than maximum of 80% humidity.
1.2 When using the machine outdoors protect the machine from direct sun light, rain water and snow etc;
the temperature of working environment should be maintained within -10°C to +40°C.
1.3 Keep this equipment 30cm distant from the wall.
1.4 Ensure the working environment is well ventilated.
2. Safety Tips.
2.1 Ventilation
This equipment is small-sized, compact in structure, and of excellent performance in amperage output.
The fan is used to dissipate heat generated by this equipment during the welding operation.
Important: Maintain good ventilation of the louvers of this equipment. The minimum distance between
this equipment and any other objects in or near the working area should be 30 cm. Good ventilation is
of critical importance for the normal performance and service life of this equipment.
2.2
Thermal Overload protection.
2.3
Over-Voltage Supply
Should the machine be used to an excessive level, or in high temperature environment, poorly
ventilated area or if the fan malfunctions the Thermal Overload Switch will be activated and the
machine will cease to operate. Under this circumstance, leave the machine switched on to keep the
built-in fan working to bring down the temperature inside the equipment. The machine will be ready for
use again when the internal temperature reaches safe level.
Regarding the power supply voltage range of the machine, please refer to “Main parameter” table.
This equipment is of automatic voltage compensation, which enables the maintaining of the voltage
range within the given range. In case that the voltage of input power supply amperage exceeds the
stipulated value, it is possible to cause damage to the components of this equipment. Please ensure
your primary power supply is correct.
2.4 Do not come into contact with the output terminals while the machine is in operation. An electric shock
may possibly occur.
MAINTENANCE
Exposure to extremely dusty, damp, or corrosive air is damaging to the welding machine. In order to prevent any possible failure or fault of this welding equipment, clean the dust at regular intervals with clean and
dry compressed air of required pressure.
Please note that: lack of maintenance can result in the cancellation of the guarantee; the guarantee of
this welding equipment will be void if the machine has been modified, attempt to take apart the machine or
open the factory-made sealing of the machine without the consent of an authorized representative of the
manufacturer.
TROUBLE SHOOTING
Caution: Only qualified technicians are authorized to undertake the repair of this welding equipment.
For your safety and to avoid Electrical Shock, please observe all safety notes and precautions
detailed in this manual.
Note:
Minimum Motor Generator Power Suggested:- 5.5KVA for Mig175 - 7KVA for MIG190
7
1
2
3
4
5
FRONT PANEL LAYOUT
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
6. 7.
8. 9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Amperage Meter
Voltage Meter
VRD LED
Wire Inch Button
Mig/MMA/Tig Mode Selector Switch
Wire Feed Adjustment Knob (MIG/MAG)
Standard Mig / Spoolgun Selector Switch
“-” Output terminal
SpoolGun Power Supply Connection
“+” Output terminal
Euro Mig Torch Connector (MIG/MAG)
Voltage Adjustment Knob (MIG/MAG)
Amperage Adjustment Knob (MMA/TIG)
Thermal Overload LED
Mains Power LED
15
14
6
13
12
7
8
9
10
11
20
BACK PANEL LAYOUT
16. Input power cable
17. Power switch
18. Fan
19. Gas Inlet
20. Data Plate
16
17
18
19
20
22
21
INTERNAL PANEL LAYOUT
20. DC Positive output terminal
21. DC Negative output terminal
22. Burn back control
23. Spool holder assembly
24. Wire feeder mechanism
8
24
23
INSTALLATION & OPERATION
Please install the machine strictly according to the following steps.
The protection class of this machine is IP21S, so avoid using it in rain.
Connection of Input Cables
Primary input cable is supplied with this welding equipment. Connect the primary input cable with power
supply of required input voltage. Refer to data plate on machine for Input voltage, IMAX and IEFF.
WARNING!
Before MMA (Stick)Welding:
Disconnect the cable with twist lock connector
that is attached to the wire feeder from the output
socket’s “GAS” “NO-GAS” on the backboard.
If cable is not disconnected welding voltage is
present on MIG torch and can cause arcing or
flash.
9
Installation set up for MMA (Stick) Welding with UNI-MIG MIG250 MTS
(1) Turn the power source on and select the MMA function with the Tig/MMA/Mig selector switch.
(2) Connection of Output Cables
Two sockets are available on this welding machine. For MMA welding the electrode holder is shown
connected to the positive socket, while the earth lead (work piece) is connected to the negative
socket, this is known as DC+ polarity. However various electrodes require a different polarity for
optimum results and careful attention should be paid to the polarity, refer to the electrode
manufacturers information for the correct polarity.
DC+ Electrode connected to
output socket.
DC- Electrode connected to
output socket.
(3) Set the welding current relevant to the electrode type and size being used as recommended by the
electrode manufacturer.
(1) Set Tig/MMA/Mig selector
switch to MMA
(2) Connect earth
lead to
(2) Connect the electrode
lead to
(3) Set the welding current using the amperage (4) Place the electrode into the electrode holder (5) Strike the electrode against the workpiece to
create an arc and hold the electrode steady to
control dial.
and clamp tight.
maintain the arc.
(6) Hold the electrode slightly above the work
maintaining the arc while travelling at an even
speed.
10
(7) To finish the weld, break the arc by quickly
snapping the electrode away from the work
piece.
(8) Wait for the weld to cool and carefully chip
away the slag to reveal the weld metal below.
MMA (Manual Metal Arc) Welding
One of the most common types of arc welding is manual metal arc welding (MMA) or stick welding. An electric current is used to strike an arc between the base material and a consumable electrode rod or ‘stick’. The electrode rod
is made of a material that is compatible with the base material being welded and is covered with a flux that gives off
gaseous vapours that serve as a shielding gas and providing a layer of slag, both of which protect the weld area from
atmospheric contamination. The electrode core itself acts as filler material the residue from the flux that forms a slag
covering over the weld metal must be chipped away after welding.
Core wire
+
Flux coating
Gas shield from flux melt
Power Source
Arc with core wire melt
Flux residue forms slag cover
Weld metal
▬
• The arc is initiated by momentarily touching the electrode to the base metal.
Core wire
Flux coating
Base metal
• The heat of the arc melts the surface of the base metal to form a molten pool
at the end of the electrode.
• The melted electrode metal is transferred across the arc into the molten pool
and becomes the deposited weld metal.
• The deposit is covered and protected by a slag which comes from the
electrode coating.
• The arc and the immediate area are enveloped by an atmosphere of
protective gas
Protective gas
Arc
Manual metal arc ( stick) electrodes have a solid metal wire core and a flux
coating. These electrodes are identified by the wire diameter and by
a series of letters and numbers. The letters and numbers identify the metal
alloy and the intended use of the electrode.
The Metal Wire Core works as conductor of the current that maintains the arc.
The core wire melts and is deposited into the welding pool.
Slag
Weld pool
The covering on a shielded metal arc welding electrode is called Flux.
The flux on the electrode performs many different functions.
These include:
● producing a protective gas around the weld area
● providing fluxing elements and deoxidizers
● creating a protective slag coating over the weld as it cools
● establishing arc characteristics
● adding alloying elements.
Covered electrodes serve many purposes in addition to adding filler metal to
the molten pool. These additional functions are provided mainly by the covering on the electrode.
11
MMA (Stick) Welding Fundamentals
Electrode Selection
As a general rule, the selection of an electrode is straight forward,in that it is only a matter of selecting an
electrode of similar composition to the parent metal. However, for some metals there is a choice of several
electrodes, each of which has particular properties to suit specific classes of work. It is recommend to
consult your welding supplier for the correct selection of electrode.
Electrode Size
Average Thickness
of Material
Maximum Recommended
Electrode Diameter
1.0 - 2.0mm
2.0 - 5.0mm
5.0 - 8.0mm
8.0 - > mm
2.5mm
3.2mm
4.0mm
5.0mm
The size of the electrode generally depends on the
thickness of the section being welded, and the thicker
the section the larger the electrode required. The table
gives the maximum size of electrodes that maybe used
for various thicknesses of section based on using a
general purpose type 6013 electrode.
Welding Current (Amperage)
Correct current selection for a particular job is an
important factor in arc welding. With the current set too
low, difficulty is experienced in striking and maintaining
a stable arc. The electrode tends to stick to the work,
2.5mm
60 - 100
penetration is poor and beads with a distinct rounded
3.2mm
100 - 130
profile will be deposited. Too high current is
4.0mm
130 - 165
accompanied by overheating of the electrode resulting
5.0mm
165 - 260
undercut and burning through of the base metal and
producing excessive spatter. Normal current for a particular job may be considered as the maximum, which
can be used without burning through the work, over-heating the electrode or producing a rough spattered
surface.The table shows current ranges generally recommended for a general purpose type 6013
electrode.
Electrode Size
ø mm
Current Range
(Amps)
Arc Length
To strike the arc, the electrode should be gently scraped on the work until the arc is established. There is a
simple rule for the proper arc length; it should be the shortest arc that gives a good surface to the weld. An
arc too long reduces penetration, produces spatter and gives a rough surface finish to the weld.
An excessively short arc will cause sticking of the electrode and result in poor quality welds. General rule of
thumb for down hand welding is to have an arc length no greater than the diameter of the core wire.
Electrode Angle
The angle that the electrode makes with the work is important to ensure a smooth, even transfer of metal.
When welding in down hand, fillet, horizontal or overhead the angle of the electrode is generally between 5
and 15 degrees towards the direction of travel. When vertical up welding the angle of the electrode should
be between 80 and 90 degrees to the work piece.
Travel Speed
The electrode should be moved along in the direction of the joint being welded at a speed that will give the
size of run required. At the same time, the electrode is fed downwards to keep the correct arc length at all
times. Excessive travel speeds lead to poor fusion, lack of penetration etc, while too slow a rate of travel
will frequently lead to arc instability,slag inclusions and poor mechanical properties.
Material and Joint Preparation
The material to be welded should be clean and free of any moisture, paint, oil, grease, mill scale, rust or
any other material that will hinder the arc and contaminate the weld material. Joint preparation will depend
on the method used include sawing, punching, shearing, machining, flame cutting and others. In all cases
edges should be clean and free of any contaminates. The type of joint will be determined by the chosen
application.
12
Installation set up for MIG with Gas for UNI-MIG MIG250 MTS
(1) Select the MIG function with the Tig/MMA/Mig selector switch.
(2) Select Standard using the Standard/Spool Gun selector switch.
(3) Plug the welding torch into the Euro Mig torch connection socket on the front panel, and tighten it.
IMPORTANT : When connecting the torch be sure to tighten the connection. A loose connection can
result in the connector arcing and damaging the machine and gun connector.
This damage is not covered under warranty.
(4) Insert the earth cable plug into the negative socket on the front of the machine and tighten it.
(5) Connect Gas Line to Gas Regulator and connect the gas regulator to the Gas Cylinder.
(6) Connect the weld power cable plug inside the wire feeder to the output socket GAS, and tighten it.
(7) Place the Wire Spool onto the Spool Holder - Note: the spool retaining nut is Left Hand thread.
Snip the wire from the spool being sure to hold the wire to prevent rapid uncoiling. Feed the wire into
thewire feeder inlet guide tube through to the drive roller.
(8) Carefully feed the wire over the drive roller into the outlet guide tube, feed through about 150mm into
the torch receptacle. Check that the drive roller being used complies with the wire diameter, replace the
roller if necessary.
(5) Connect the gas line to the regulator
and connect to the gas cylinder
(1) Set Tig/MMA/Mig selector
switch to Mig
(2) Set Standard/Spoolgun
selector switch to Standard
(4) Connect earth lead to
(3) Connect Mig torch
IMPORTANT : When connecting the torch
be sure to tighten the connection. (6) Connect weld power lead to GAS
Caution:
(7) Place wire onto spool holder - (spool
retaining nut is left hand thread ) Feed the wire
through the inlet guide tube on to the drive
roller.
(8) Feed wire over the drive roller into the outlet
guide tube, Push the wire through approx
150mm.
Disconnect the Electrode Holder cable from the machine before using MIG function. If cable is not disconnected welding
voltage is present and can cause arcing or flash.
Note: Pictures may vary from your model machine
13
Continued set up for MIG with Gas for UNI-MIG MIG250 MTS
(9) Align the wire into the groove of the drive roller and close down the top roller making sure the wire is in
the groove of the bottom drive roller, lock the pressure arm into place.
(10) Apply a medium amount of pressure to the drive roller.
(11) Remove the gas nozzle and contact tip from the torch neck,
(12) Press and hold the inch button to feed the wire through to the torch neck, release the inch button when
the wire exits the torch neck.
(13) Fit the correct sized contact tip and feed the wire through it, screw the contact tip into the tip holder of
the torch head and nip it up tightly.
(14) Fit the gas nozzle to the torch head.
(15) Carefully open the gas cylinder valve and set the flow rate to between 5-20 l/min.
(16) Set the welding parameters using the wire feed and voltage control knobs.
(17) Using the Burn Back control set the amount of wire to ‘burn back’ after you release the torch
trigger. This prevents the wire becoming stuck in the weld pool when finishing the weld.
(9) Close down the top roller bracket and clip
the pressure arm into place.
(10) Apply a medium amount of
pressure to the drive roller
(11) Remove the gas nozzle and contact tip
from the front end of the mig torch.
(12) Press and hold the inch wire button to
feed the wire down the torch cable through
to the torch head.
(13) Fit the correct size contact tip over
the wire and fasten tightly into the tip
holder.
(14) Fit the gas nozzle to the torch head.
(15) Carefully open the valve of the gas
cylinder, set the flow to 10 l/min
14
Note: Pictures may vary from your model machine
(16) Set welding parameters using the
voltage and wire feed controls.
(17) Adjust the burn back control to prevent
the wire sticking in the weld pool.
Wire Feed Roller Selection
The importance of smooth consistent wire feeding during MIG welding cannot be emphasized enough.
Simply put the smoother the wire feed then the better the welding will be.
Feed rollers or drive rollers are used to feed the wire mechanically along the length of the welding gun.
Feed rollers are designed to be used for certain types of welding wire and they have different types of
grooves machined in them to accommodate the different types of wire. The wire is held in the groove by
the top roller of the wire drive unit and is referred to as the pressure roller, pressure is applied by a tension
arm that can be adjusted to increase or decrease the pressure as required. The type of wire will determine
how much pressure can be applied and what type of drive roller is best suited to obtain optimum wire feed.
Solid Hard Wire - like Steel, Stainless Steel require a drive roller with a V shape groove for optimum grip
and drive capability. Solid wires can have more tension applied to the wire from the top pressure roller that
holds the wire in the groove and the V shape groove is more suited for this. Solid wires are more forgiving
to feed due to their higher cross sectional column strength, they are stiffer and don’t bend so easy.
Soft Wire - like Aluminium requires a U shape groove. Aluminium wire has a lot less column strength, can
bend easily and is therefore more difficult to feed. Soft wires can easily buckle at the wire feeder where the
wire is fed into inlet guide tube of the torch. The U-shaped roller offers more surface area grip and traction
to help feed the softer wire. Softer wires also require less tension from the top pressure roller to avoid deforming the shape of the wire, too much tension will push the wire out of shape and cause it to catch in the
contact tip.
Flux Core / Gasless Wire - these wires are made up of a thin metal sheath that has fluxing and metal
compounds layered onto it and then rolled into a cylinder to form the finished wire. The wire cannot take
too much pressure from the top roller as it can be crushed and deformed if too much pressure is applied.
A knurled drive roller has been developed and it has small serrations in the groove, the serrations grip the
wire and assist to drive it without too much pressure from the top roller. The down side to the knurled wire
feed roller on flux cored wire is it will slowly over time bit by bit eat away at the surface of the welding wire,
and these small pieces will eventually go down into the liner. This will cause clogging in the liner and added
friction that will lead to welding wire feed problems. A U groove wire can also be used for flux core wire
without the wire particles coming of the wire surface. However it is considered that the knurled roller will
give a more positive feed of flux core wire without any deformation of the wire shape.
Top Pressure Roller
Top Pressure Roller
V Groove
U Groove
Wire
Wire
mm8
Drive Rollers
Top Pressure Roller
Knurled Groove
Wire
V Groove Drive Roller - Steel Wire
Part Number 0.6-0.8V30/22
0.8-1.0V30/22
0.9-1.2V30/22
1.0-1.2V30/22
1.2-1.6V30/22
Description
Drive Roll V Groove 0.6-0.8mm
Drive Roll V Groove 0.8-1.0mm
Drive Roll V Groove 0.9-1.2mm
Drive Roll V Groove 1.0-1.2mm
Drive Roll V Groove 1.2-1.6mm
35mm
U Groove Drive Roller - Soft Wire
25mm
Part Number 0.8-1.0U30/22
0.9-1.0U30/22
0.9-1.2U30/22
1.0-1.2U30/22
Description
Drive Roll U Groove 1.0-1.2mm
Drive Roll U Groove 0.9-1.0mm
Drive Roll U Groove 0.9-1.2mm
Drive Roll U Groove 1.0-1.2mm
Knurled Drive Roller - Flux Core Wire
Part Number 0.6-0.8F30/22
0.8-0.9F30/22
0.9-1.2F30/22
1.2-1.6F30/22
Description
Drive Roll Knurled 0.6-0.9mm
Drive Roll Knurled 0.8-0.9mm
Drive Roll Knurled 0.9-1.2mm
Drive Roll Knurled 1.2-1.6mm
15
Wire Installation and Set Up Guide
Again the importance of smooth consistent wire feeding during MIG welding cannot be emphasized enough.
The correct installation of the wire spool and the wire into the wire feed unit is critical to achieving an even
and consistent wire feed. A high percentage of faults with mig welders emanate from poor set up of the wire
into the wire feeder. The guide below will assist in the correct setup of your wire feeder.
(1) Remove the spool retaining nut.
(2) Note the tension spring adjuster
and spool locating pin.
(4) Snip the wire carefully, be sure to hold the
wire to prevent the spool uncoiling. Carefully
feed the wire into the inlet guide tube of the
wire feed unit.
(5) Feed the wire through the drive roller and
into the outlet guide tube of the wire feeder.
(7) Check that the wire passes through
the centre of the outlet guide tube without
touching the sides. Loosen the locking
screw and then loosen the outlet guide
tube retaining nut too make adjustment if
required. Carefully retighten the locking nut
and screw to hold the new position.
16
(8) A simple check for the correct drive tension
is to bend the end of the wire over, hold it
about 100mm from your hand and let it run into
your hand, it should coil round in your hand
without stopping and slipping at the drive
rollers, increase the tension if it slips.
Note: Pictures may vary from your model machine
(3) Fit the wire spool onto the spool holder
fitting the locating pin into the location hole
on the spool. Replace the spool retaining
nut tightly
(6) Lock down the top pressure roller and
apply a medium amount of pressure using the tension adjustment knob
(8) The weight and speed of the wire spool
turning creates an inertia that can cause the
spool to run on and the wire loop over the
side of the spool and tangle. if this happens
increase the pressure on the tension spring
inside the spool holder assembly using the
tension adjustment screw.
Installation set up for MIG with Gasless wire for UNI-MIG MIG250 MTS
(1) Switch on the machine, select the MIG function with the Tig/MMA/Mig selector switch.
(2) Select Standard using the Standard/Spool Gun selector switch.
(3) Plug the welding torch into the Euro Mig torch connection socket on the front panel, and tighten it.
IMPORTANT : When connecting the torch be sure to tighten the connection. A loose connection can
result in the connector arcing and damaging the machine and gun connector.
This damage is not covered under warranty.
(4) Insert the earth cable plug into the Positive socket on the front of the machine and tighten it.
(5) Connect the weld power cable plug inside the wire feeder to the output socket NO GAS, and tighten it.
(6) Fit the correct size Knurled drive roller for Gas Less Flux Core wire.
(7) Place the Wire Spool onto the Spool Holder - Note: the spool retaining nut is Left Hand thread.
Snip the wire from the spool being sure to hold the wire to prevent rapid uncoiling. Feed the wire into
thewire feeder inlet guide tube through to the drive roller.
(1) Set Tig/MMA/Mig selector
switch to Mig
(2) Set Standard/Spoolgun
selector switch to Standard
(4) Connect earth lead to
(3) Connect Mig torch
IMPORTANT : When connecting the torch
be sure to tighten the connection. (5) Connect weld power lead to
NO GAS
Caution:
(6) Fit the correct sized Knurled
Drive roller for Gas Less Flux
Cored wire
(7) Place wire onto spool holder - (spool
retaining nut is left hand thread ) Feed the wire
through the inlet guide tube on to the drive
roller.
Disconnect the Electrode Holder cable from the machine before using MIG function. If cable is not disconnected welding
voltage is present and can cause arcing or flash.
Note: Pictures may vary from your model machine
17
Continued set up for MIG with Gasless wire for UNI-MIG MIG250 MTS
(8) Carefully feed the wire over the drive roller into the outlet guide tube, feed through about 150mm into
the torch receptacle. Check that the correct drive roller is being used.
(9) Align the wire into the groove of the drive roller and close down the top roller making sure the wire is in
the groove of the bottom drive roller, lock the pressure arm into place.
(10) Apply a light amount of pressure to the drive roller. Too much pressure will crush the cored wire.
(11) Remove the gas nozzle and contact tip from the torch neck,
(12) Press and hold the inch button to feed the wire through to the torch neck, release the inch button when
the wire exits the torch neck.
(13) Fit the correct sized contact tip and feed the wire through it, screw the contact tip into the tip holder of
the torch head and nip it up tightly.
(14) Fit the gas nozzle to the torch head.
(16) Set the welding parameters using the wire feed and voltage control knobs.
(17) Using the Burn Back control set the amount of wire to ‘burn back’ after you release the torch
trigger. This prevents the wire becoming stuck in the weld pool when finishing the weld.
(8) Feed wire over the drive roller into
the outlet guide tube, Push the wire
through approx 150mm. Use a Knurled
Drive Roller of the correct size
(9) Close down the top roller bracket and clip
the pressure arm into place.
(11) Remove the gas nozzle and contact tip
from the front end of the mig torch.
(12) Press and hold the inch wire button to
feed the wire down the torch cable through
to the torch head.
(14) Fit the gas nozzle to the torch head.
18
Note: Pictures may vary from your model machine
(16) Set welding parameters using the
voltage and wire feed controls.
(10) Apply a medium amount of
pressure to the drive roller
(13) Fit the correct size contact tip over
the wire and fasten tightly into the tip
holder.
(17) Adjust the burn back control to prevent
the wire sticking in the weld pool.
Mig Torch Liner Installation
(1)
(2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) Lay the torch out straight on the ground and remove the front end parts
Remove the liner retaining nut.
Carefully pull the liner out of the torch cable assembly
Select the correct new liner and carefully unravel avoiding putting any kinks in the liner, if you kink the
liner it will make it no good and will require replacement.
Carefully and slowly feed the liner in short forward movements down the cable assembly all the way
through and out the torch neck end. Avoid kinking the liner, kinking liner it will make it no good and
require replacement.
Fit the liner retaining nut and screw down only 1/2 way
Leaving the torch straight snip the liner approximately 3mm past the end of the torch neck
Place the tip holder over the end of the liner and screw into the torch neck nipping it up tight.
Screw down the liner nut the remaining 1/2 and nip it up tight. This method compresses the liner
inside the torch cable assembly preventing it moving during use and ensures good wire feed.
(1) Remove mig torch front end parts
(2) Remove the liner retaining nut
(3) Carefully pull out and completely
remove the liner
(4) Carefully unravel the new liner
(5) Carefully feed in the new liner down
the torch lead all the way to exit the torch
neck.
(6) Fit the liner retaining nut and screw
only 1/2 way down
(7) Snip the liner off 3mm past the end
of the torch neck.
(8) Replace the front end parts
(9) Fully screw down the liner retaining
nut and nip it up tight.
19
Torch & Wire Feed Set Up for Aluminium Wire
(1)
(2) (3) (4) (5) (5) (8) (9) 20
Lay the torch out straight on the ground and remove the front end parts
Remove the liner retaining nut.
Carefully pull the liner out of the torch cable assembly
Select a Polymide or liner, carefully and slowly feed the liner in short forward movements down the cable assembly all the way through and out the torch neck end. Avoid kinking the liner, kinking the liner will ruin it and require replacement.
Leave the liner extending out the end of the torch neck end by 3mm.
Fit the liner retaining nuttogether with the liner o-ring.
Push the liner firmly into the torch lead and tighten the liner retaining nut.
Install a U groove drive roller of the correct size to match the wire diameter being used.
(1) Remove mig torch front end parts
(2) Remove the liner retaining nut
(3) Carefully pull out and completely
remove the liner
(4) Carefully unravel the new liner
(5) Carefully feed in the new liner in short
forward movements down the torch lead
all the way to exit the torch neck. Be careful not to kink the liner
(6) Replace the front end parts
(7) Fit the liner collet, liner O-ring and
liner retaining nut.
(8) Push the liner firmly into the torch lead
and tighten the liner retaining nut
(9) Install a U groove drive roller of the
correct size for the diameter wire being
used.
Note: Pictures may vary from your model machine
Continued Torch & Wire Feed Set Up for Aluminium Wire
(10) Loosen off the inlet guide tube retaining screw
(11) Remove the inlet guide tube from the front end machine euro connector using long nose pliers.
(12) Carefully feed the extended Polymide liner section into the inlet guide tube hole of the machine euro
connector
(13) Feed the extended Polymide liner all the way up and over the drive roller
(14) Tighten the torch euro connection to the machine euro connector
(15) Cut the extended liner with a sharp Stanley knife just in front of the drive roller
(16) Fit an Aluminium contact tip of the correct size to match the diameter of the wire being used
(17) Fit the remaining front end parts to the torch neck ready for welding
(10) Loosen the inlet guide tube retaining screw.
(11 Remove the inlet guide tube using long
nose pliers.
(12) Carefully feed the Polymide liner into
the inlet guide tube hole of the torch euro
receptacle
(13)Take the extended Polymide liner all the
way up and over the drive roller
(14 Tighten and secure the torch euro
connector to the machine euro receptacle
(15) Cut the extended Polymide liner with
a sharp Stanley knife just in front of the
drive roller
(16) Fit an Aluminium contact tip of the
correct size to match the wire diameter
being used
Note: Pictures may vary from your model machine
(17) Fit the remaining front end parts to the
torch neck ready for welding.
21
Installation set up of the Spool Gun with UNI-MIG-MIG250MTS
(1) Switch on the machine, select the MIG function with the Tig/MMA/Mig selector switch.
(2) Select Spool Gun using the Standard/Spool Gun selector switch.
(3) Connect the Spool Gun to the Euro Mig torch connection socket on the front panel, and tighten it.
Connect the Spool Gun control cable to the receptacle and tighten it.
(4) Insert the earth cable plug into the Negative socket on the front of the machine and tighten it.
(5) Connect Gas Line to Gas Regulator and connect the gas regulator to the Gas Cylinder.
(6) Connect the Weld power cable to the Positive socket.
(7) Take the Spool Gun and push the Cover Release Button to unlock the wire feed / spool cover.
(8) Place the Wire Spool onto the Spool Holder - Note: the spool retaining nut is Left Hand thread.
Hold and snip the wire from the spool being sure to hold the wire to prevent rapid uncoiling.
(5) Connect the gas line to the regulator
and connect to the gas cylinder
(1) Set Tig/MMA/Mig selector
switch to Mig
(4) Connect earth
lead to
(2) Set Standard/Spoolgun
selector switch to Spool Gun
(3) Connect Spool Gun control cable and
gun cable connector
IMPORTANT : When connecting the torch
be sure to tighten the connection.
(6)Connect weld power lead to
Connect earth lead to
Caution:
(7) Push the cover release button to
unlock the wire feed /spool cover
(8) Place a spool of wire onto the Spool
holder. Note: the spool retaining nut is Left
Hand thread, turn it clockwise to undo it
Disconnect the Electrode Holder cable from the machine before using MIG function. If cable is not disconnected welding
voltage is present and can cause arcing or flash.
22
Note: Pictures may vary from your model machine
Continued set up of the Spool Gun with UNI-MIG-MIG250MTS
(9) Carefully feed the wire over the drive roller into the outlet guide tube, feed through into the torch neck. Check that the drive roller being used complies with the wire diameter, replace the roller if necessary.
(10) Align the wire into the groove of the drive roller and release the tension arm making sure the wire is
inthe groove of the drive roller.
(11) Apply a medium amount of pressure to the drive roller by winding in the tension adjusting knob.
(12) Remove the gas nozzle and contact tip from the torch neck, Pull the trigger to drive the wire through
the neck until it exits the contact tip holder
(13) Fit the correct sized contact tip and feed the wire through it, screw the contact tip into the tip holder of
the torch neck and nip it up tightly.
(14) Fit the gas nozzle to the torch head and close the wire spool cover.
(15) Carefully open the gas cylinder valve and set the flow rate to between 8-12 l/min.
(16) Set the welding parameters using the wire feed and voltage control knobs.
(17) Using the Burn Back control set the amount of wire to ‘burn back’ after you release the torch
trigger. This prevents the wire becoming stuck in the weld pool when finishing the weld.
(9) Carefully feed the wire through the inlet
guide tube onto the drive roller through into
the outlet guide tube. Squeezing the tension
arm adjustment knob to release the pressure
of the tension arm will allow the wire to be
guided through the drive roller easily
(10) Check to make sure that the wire
passes cleanly through the drive roller into
the outlet guide tube.
(12) Remove the gas nozzle and contact tip.
Pull the trigger to drive the wire through the
neck until it exits the contact tip holder
(13) Fit the contact tip over the wire and
screw it into the tip holder, nip it up tight.
(15) Carefully open the valve of the gas
cylinder, set the flow to 8-12 l/min
Note: Pictures may vary from your model machine
(16) Set welding parameters using the
voltage and wire feed controls.
(11) Apply a medium amount of pressure
using the tension arm adjustment knob.
(14) Fit the gas nozzle and close the wire feed
spool cover
(17) Adjust the burn back control to prevent
the wire sticking in the weld pool. Burn back
control is located above the wire feed motor
23
MIG (Metal Inert Gas) Welding
Definition of MIG Welding - MIG (metal inert gas) welding also known as GMAW (gas metal arc
welding) or MAG (metal active gas welding), is a semi-automatic or automatic arc welding process
in which a continuous and consumable wire electrode and a shielding gas are fed through a welding gun. A constant voltage, direct current power source is most commonly used with MIG welding.
There are four primary methods of metal transfer in MIG welding, called short circuit (also known as
dip transfer) globular transfer, spray transfer and pulsed-spray, each of which has distinct properties
and corresponding advantages and limitations. To perform MIG welding, the basic necessary equipment is a welding gun, a wire feed unit, a welding power supply, an electrode wire, and a shielding
gas supply. Short circuit transfer is the most common used method whereby the wire electrode is
fed continuously down the welding torch through to and exiting the contact tip. The wire touches the
work piece and causes a short circuit the wire heats up and begins to form a molten bead, the bead
separates from the end of the wire and forms a droplet that is transferred into the weld pool. This
process is repeated about 100 times per second, making the arc appear constant to the human eye.
MIG Circuit Diagram
5
6
4
1
2
3
1. Mig Torch - 2. Work Piece - 3. Power Source - 4. Wire Feeder - 5. Wire Spool - 6. Gas
24
MIG (Metal Inert Gas) Welding
Short Circuit Transfer - Short circuit transfer is the most common used method whereby the wire
electrode is fed continuously down the welding torch through to and exiting the contact tip. The
wire touches the work piece and causes a short circuit the wire heats up and begins to form a
molten bead, the bead separates from the end of the wire and forms a droplet that is transferred
into the weld pool. This process is repeated about 100 times per second, making the arc appear
constant to the human eye.
short circuit
The wire approaches the work
piece and touches the work creating a short circuit between the
wire and the base metal, because
there is no space between the wire
and the base metal there is no arc
and current flows through the wire.
droplet
separates
The pinch causes the forming
droplet to separate and fall towards the now creating weld pool.
wire heating
The wire cannot support all the
current flow, resistance builds
up and the wire becomes hot
and weak and begins to melt
arc flattens
the droplet
An arc is created at the separation
of the droplet and the heat and force
of the arc flattens out the droplet
into the weld pool. The heat of the
arc melts the end of the wire slightly
as it feeds towards the base metal
magnetic
field pinches
wire
The current flow creates a magnetic field that begins to pinch the
melting wire forming it into droplet
cycle
repeats
The wire feed speed overcomes
the heat of the arc and the wire
again approaches the work to
short circuit and repeat the cycle.
25
Basic MIG Welding .
Good weld quality and weld profile depends on gun angle, direction of travel, electrode extension
(stick out), travel speed, thickness of base metal, wire feed speed (amperage) and arc voltage.
To follow are some basic guides to assist with your setup.
Gun Position - Travel Direction, Work Angle
Gun position or technique usually refers to how the wire is directed at the base metal, the angle
and travel direction chosen. Travel speed and work angle will determine the characteristic of the
weld bead profile and degree of weld penetration.
Push Technique - The wire is located at the leading edge of the weld pool and pushed towards
the un-melted work surface. This technique offers a better view of the weld joint and direction of
the wire into the weld joint. Push technique directs the heat away from the weld puddle allowing
faster travel speeds providing a flatter weld profile with light penetration - useful for welding thin
materials. The welds are wider and flatter allowing for minimal clean up / grinding time.
Perpendicular Technique - The wire is fed directly into the weld, this technique is used primarly for automated situations or when conditions make it necessary. The weld profile is generally
higher and a deeper penetration is achieved.
Drag Technique - The gun and wire is dragged away from the weld bead. The arc and heat is
concentrated on the weld pool, the base metal receives more heat, deeper melting, more penetration and the weld profile is higher with more build up.
(A) Push Technique
(B) Gun Perpendicular
(C) Drag Technique
10°
10°
travel direction
travel direction
wire pointed ahead of bead
flat even weld profile
light penetration
26
travel direction
wire pointed back into bead
narrower weld profile
even penetration
narrow higher weld profile
more penetration
Travel Angle - Travel angle is the right to left angle relative to the direction of welding. A travel
angle of 5°- 15° is ideal and produces a good level of control over the weld pool. A travel angle
greater that 20° will give an unstable arc condition with poor weld metal transfer, less penetration,
high levels of spatter, poor gas shield and poor quality finished weld.
Not enough angle
Angle 5°- 15°
good level of control over the
weld pool, even flat weld
Angle more than 20°
less control over the weld pool
more spatter
poor control, unstable arc, less
penetration, lots of spatter
Angle to Work - The work angle is the forward back angle of the gun relative to the work piece.
The correct work angle provides good bead shape, prevents undercut, uneven penetration, poor
gas shield and poor quality finished weld.
Not enough angle
Correct angle
good level of control over the
weld pool, even flat weld
less control over the weld pool
more spatter
Too much angle
poor control, unstable arc, less
penetration, lots of spatter
Stick Out- Stick out is the length of the unmelted wire protruding from the end of the contact tip.
A constant even stick out of 5-10mm will produce a stable arc, and an even current flow providing
good penetration and even fusion. Too short stick out will cause an unstable weld pool, produce
spatter and over heat the contact tip. Too long stick out will cause an unstable arc, lack of penetration, lack of fusion and increase spatter.
Normal stick out
Too short
Too long
5-10mm
Even arc, good penetration
even fusion, good finish
Unstable arc, spatter, over
heat contact tip
Unstable arc, spatter, poor
penetration and fusion
27
Travel Speed - Travel speed is the rate that the gun is moved along the weld joint and is usually
measured in mm per minute. Travel speeds can vary depending on conditions and the welders
skill and is limited to the welders ability to control the weld pool. Push technique allows faster
travel speeds than Drag technique. Gas flow must also correspond with the travel speed, increasing with faster travel speed and decreasing with slower speed. Travel speed needs to match the
amperage and will decrease as the material thickness and amperage increase.
Too Fast Travel Speed - A too fast travel speed produces too little heat per mm of travel resulting
in less penetration and reduced weld fusion, the weld bead solidifies very quickly trapping gases
inside the weld metal causing porosity. Undercutting of the base metal can also occur and an unfilled groove in the base metal is created when the travel speed is too fast to allow molten metal to
flow into the weld crater created by the arc heat.
high narrow bead
Too Fast Travel Speed
porosity
undercut
spatter
lack of fusion
lack of joint penetration
Too Slow Travel Speed - A too slow travel speed produces a large weld with lack of penetration
and fusion. The energy from the arc dwells on top of the weld pool rather than penetrating the
base metal. This produces a wider weld bead with more deposited weld metal per mm than is
required resulting in a weld deposit of poor quality.
Too Slow Travel Speed
large wide bead
porosity
lack of fusion
cold lap
lack of joint penetration
Correct Travel Speed - The correct travel speed keeps the arc at the leading edge of the weld
pool allowing the base metal to melt sufficiently to create good penetration, fusion and wetting out
of the weld pool producing a weld deposit of good quality.
Correct Travel Speed
even shaped bead
good side wall fusion
28
good toe fusion
good penetration
Wire types and sizes - Use the correct wire type for the base metal being welded. Use stainless
steel wire for stainless steel, aluminium wires for aluminium and steel wires for steel.
Use a smaller diameter wire for thin base metals. For thicker materials use a larger wire diameter
and larger machine, check the recommended welding capability of you machine.
As a guide refer to the “Welding Wire Thickness Chart” below.
WELDING WIRE DIAMETER CHART
RECOMMENDED WIRE DIAMETERS
MATERIAL
THICKNESS
MIG SOLID WIRE
0.6mm
0.8mm
0.9mm
GASLESS FLUX CORED WIRE
1.0mm
0.8mm
0.9mm
1.2mm
24 Gauge (.60mm)
22 Gauge (.75mm)
20 Gauge (.90mm)
18 Gauge (1.0mm)
16 Gauge (1.2mm)
14 Gauge (1.9mm)
3.0mm
5.0mm
6.0mm
8.0mm
10.mm
12.0mm
For material thickness of 5.0mm and greater, multi-pass runs or a beveled joint
design may be required depending on the amperage capability of your machine.
Gas selection - The purpose of the gas in the MIG process is to protect / shield the wire, the arc
and the molten weld metal from the atmosphere. Most metals when heated to a molten state will
react with the air in the atmosphere, without the protection of the shielding gas the weld produced
would contain defects like porosity, lack of fusion and slag inclusions. Additionally some of the gas
becomes ionised (electrically charged) and helps the current flow smoothly.
The correct gas flow is also very important in protecting the welding zone from the atmosphere.
Too low flow will give inadequate coverage and result in weld defects and unstable arc conditions.
Too high flow can cause air to be drawn into the gas column and contaminate the weld zone.
Use the correct shielding gas. Co2 is good for steel and offers good penetration characteristics,
the weld profile is narrower and slightly more raised than the weld profile obtained from Argon Co2
mixed gas. Argon Co2 mix gas offers better weld ability for thin metals and has a wider range of
setting tolerance on the machine. Argon 80% Co2 20% is a good all round mix suitable for most
applications.
Argon Co2
Co2
Penetration Pattern for Steel
29
Installation and set up for DC TIG welding for UNI-MIG MIG250 MTS
(1) Switch on the machine, select the TIG function with the Tig/MMA/Mig selector switch.
(2) Insert the power cable plug of the Tig torch into the Negative socket on the front of the machine and
tighten it.
(3 Insert the earth cable plug into the Positive socket on the front of the machine and tighten it.
(4) Connect the gas line of the Tig torch to regulator and connect the regulator to the gas cylinder.
(5) Carefully open the valve of the gas cylinder, set the flow to 6-10 l/min
(6) Set the welding current using the amperage control dial
(4) Connect the gas line to the regulator
and connect to the gas cylinder
(2) Connect the TIG torch cable
connector to
(1) Set Tig/MMA/Mig selector
switch to TIG
(3) Connect earth
lead to
(5) Carefully open the valve of the gas
cylinder, set the flow to 6-10 l/min
Caution:
(6) Set the welding current using
the amperage control dial
Disconnect the Electrode Holder cable from the machine before using MIG function. If cable is not disconnected welding
voltage is present and can cause arcing or flash.
30
LIFT ARC DC TIG Operation for UNI-MIG MIG250 MTS
Lift Arc ignition allows the arc to be started easily in DC Tig by simply touching the tungsten to the
work piece and lifting it up to start the arc. This prevents the tungsten tip sticking to the work piece and
breaking the tip from the tungsten electrode. There is a particular technique called “rocking the cup” used in
the Lift Arc process that provides easy use of the Lift Arc function.
(5) Make sure the front end parts of the tig torch are correctly assembled, use the correct size and type of
tungsten electrode for the job, the tungsten electrode requires a sharpened point for DC welding.
(6) Turn on the Gas Valve located on the tig torch handle.
(7) Lay the outside edge of the Gas Cup on the work piece with the Tungsten Electrode 1- 2mm from the
work piece.
(8) With a small movement rotate the Gas Cup forward so that the Tungsten Electrode touches the work
piece.
(9) Now rotate the Gas Cup in the reverse direction to lift the Tungsten electrode from the work piece to
create the arc.
5) Assemble front end parts of the TIG torch,
fitting a sharpened tungsten suitable for DC
welding.
(6) Turn on the Gas Valve
(8) With a small movement rotate the Gas Cup
forward so that the Tungsten Electrode touches
the work piece.
(7) Lay the outside edge of the Gas Cup on the
work piece with the Tungsten Electrode 1- 2mm
from the work piece.
(9) Now rotate the Gas Cup in the reverse
direction to lift the Tungsten electrode from the
work piece to create the arc.
Caution:
Disconnect the Electrode Holder cable from the machine before using MIG function. If cable is not disconnected welding
voltage is present and can cause arcing or flash.
31
DC TIG Welding
The DC power source uses what is known as DC (direct current) in which the main electrical component known as electrons flow in only one direction from the negative pole
(terminal) to the positive pole (terminal). In the DC electrical circuit there is an electrical
principle at work which should always be taken into account when using any DC circuit.
With a DC circuit 70% of the energy (heat) is always on the positive side. This needs to
be understood because it determines what terminal the TIG torch will be connected to
(this rule applies to all the other forms of DC welding as well ).
30%
70%
argon gas
power source
nozzle
DC TIG welding is a process in which an arc is struck between a
TUNGSTEN electrode and the metal work piece. The weld area is
shielded by an inert gas flow to prevent contamination of the tungsten, molten pool and weld area.
When the TIG arc is struck the inert gas is ionized and superheated changing it’s molecular structure which converts it into a plasma
stream. This plasma stream flowing between the tungsten and the
work piece is the TIG arc and can be as hot as 19,000°C. It is a very
pure and concentrated arc which provides the controlled melting of
most metals into a weld pool. TIG welding offers the user the greatest
amount of flexibility to weld the widest range of material and thickness
and types. DC TIG welding is also the cleanest weld with no sparks
or spatter.
The intensity of the arc is proportional to the current that flows from the
tungsten. The welder regulates the welding current to adjust the power
of the arc. Typically thin material requires a less powerful arc with less
heat to melt the material so less current (amps) is required, thicker
material requires a more powerful arc with more heat so more current high
current
(amps) are necessary to melt the material.
low
current
LIFT ARC IGNITION for TIG (tungsten inert gas) Welding
Lift Arc is a form of arc ignition where the machines has low voltage on the electrode to only a few volts, with
a current limit of one or two amps (well below the limit that causes metal to transfer and contamination of the
weld or electrode). When the machine detects that the tungsten has left the surface and a spark is present,
it immediately (within microseconds) increases power, converting the spark to a full arc. It is a simple, safe
lower cost alternative arc ignition process to HF (high frequency) and a superior arc start process to scratch
start.
gas flow
tungsten off the
work
Lay the nozzle on the job
without the tungsten touching the work
32
tungsten touches
the work
Rock the torch sideways so
that the tungsten touches
the work & hold momentarily
arc ignition
Rock the torch back in the
opposite direction, the arc
will ignite as the tungsten
lifts off the work
established
TIG arc
Lift the torch to maintain
the arc
TIG Welding Fusion Technique
Manual TIG welding is often considered the most difficult of all the welding processes.
Because the welder must maintain a short arc length, great care and skill are required
to prevent contact between the electrode and the workpiece. Similar to Oxygen Acetylene torch welding, Tig welding normally requires two hands and in most instances
requires the welder to manually feed a filler wire into the weld pool with one hand
while manipulating the welding torch in the other. However, some welds combining thin
materials can be accomplished without filler metal like edge, corner, and butt joints.
This is known as Fusion welding where the edges of the metal pieces are melted together using only the
heat and arc force generated by the TIG arc. Once the arc is started the torch tungsten is held in place until
a weld pool is created, a circular movement of the tungsten will assist is creating a weld pool of the desired
size. Once the weld pool is established tilt the torch at about a 75° angle and move smoothly and evenly
along the joint while fusing the materials together.
75°
Travel direction
Form a weld pool
Angle torch
Move the torch slowly
and evenly forward
TIG Welding with Filler Wire Technique
It is necessary in many situations with TIG welding to add a filler wire into the weld
pool to build up weld reinforcement and create a strong weld. Once the arc is started
the torch tungsten is held in place until a weld pool is created, a circular movement of
the tungsten will assist is creating a weld pool of the desired size. Once the weld pool
is established tilt the torch at about a 75° angle and move smoothly and evenly
along the joint. The filler metal is introduced to the leading edge of the weld
pool. The filler wire is usually held at about a 15° angle and fed into the leading edge of the molten pool, the arc will melt the filler wire into the weld pool as the torch is moved
forward. Also a dabbing technique can be used to control the amount of filler wire added, the wire
is fed into the molten pool and retracted in a repeating sequence as the torch is moved slowly and
evenly forward. It is important during the welding to keep the molten end of the filler wire inside the
gas shield as this protects the end of the wire from being oxidised and contaminating the weld pool.
75°
Travel direction
Form a weld pool
15°
Angle torch
Add Tig filler wire
gas
shield
Retract the filler wire
Move the torch forward to
the front of the weld pool
Repeat the process
33
Tungsten Electrodes
Tungsten is a rare metallic element used for manufacturing TIG welding electrodes. The TIG process relies on tungsten’s hardness and high-temperature resistance to carry the welding current to the arc. Tungsten has the highest
melting point of any metal, 3,410 degrees Celsius.
Tungsten electrodes are nonconsumable and come in a variety of sizes, they are made from pure tungsten or an alloy of tungsten and other rare earth elements. Choosing the correct tungsten depends on the material being welded,
the amount of amps required and whether you are using AC or DC welding current.
Tungsten electrodes are colour-coded at the end for easy identification.
Below are the most commonly used tungsten electrodes found in the New Zealand and Australian market.
Thoriated
Thoriated tungsten electrodes (AWS classification EWTh-2) contain a minimum of 97.30 percent tungsten and 1.70
to 2.20 percent thorium and are called 2 percent thoriated. They are the most commonly used electrodes today and
are preferred for their longevity and ease of use. Thorium increases the electron emission qualities of the electrode,
which improves arc starts and allows for a higher current-carrying capacity. This electrode operates far below its melting temperature, which results in a considerably lower rate of consumption and eliminates arc wandering for greater
stability. Compared with other electrodes, thoriated electrodes deposit less tungsten into the weld puddle, so they
cause less weld contamination.
Thorium however is a low-level radioactive hazard and many users have switched to other alternatives. Regarding the radioactivity, thorium is an alpha emitter but when it is enclosed in a tungsten matrix the risks are negligible.
Thus holding a stick of Thoriated tungsten in your hand should not pose a great threat unless a welder has open cuts
on their skin. Thoriated tungsten should not get in contact with open cuts or wounds. The more significant danger
to welders can occur when thorium oxide gets into the lungs. This can happen from the exposure to vapours during
welding or from ingestion of material/dust in the grinding of the tungsten. Follow the manufacturer’s warnings, instructions, and the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for its use.
Ceriated (Color Code: Orange)
Ceriated tungsten electrodes (AWS classification EWCe-2) contain a minimum of 97.30 percent tungsten and 1.80 to
2.20 percent cerium and are referred to as 2 percent ceriated. Ceriated tungstens perform best in DC welding at low
current settings. They have excellent arc starts at low amperages and become popular in such applications as orbital
tube welding, thin sheet metal work. They are best used to weld carbon steel, stainless steel, nickel alloys, and
titanium, and in some cases it can replace 2 percent thoriated electrodes. Ceriated tungsten is best suited for lower
amperages it should last longer than Thoriated tungsten higher amperage applications are best left to Thoriated or
Lanthanated tungsten.
Lanthanated (Color Code: Gold)
Lanthanated tungsten electrodes (AWS classification EWLa-1.5) contain a minimum of 97.80 percent tungsten and
1.30 percent to 1.70 percent lanthanum, and are known as 1.5 percent lanthanated. These electrodes have excellent
arc starting, a low burn off rate, good arc stability, and excellent re-ignition characteristics. Lanthanated tungstens
also share the conductivity characteristics of 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Lanthanated tungsten electrodes are ideal
if you want to optimise your welding capabilities. They work well on AC or DC electrode negative with a pointed end,
or they can be balled for use with AC sine wave power sources. Lanthanated tungsten maintains a sharpened point
well, which is an advantage for welding steel and stainless steel on DC or AC from square wave power sources.
Zirconiated (Color Code: White)
Zirconiated tungsten electrodes (AWS classification EWZr-1) contain a minimum of 99.10 percent tungsten and 0.15
to 0.40 percent zirconium. Most commonly used for AC welding Zirconiated tungsten produces a very stable arc and
is resistant to tungsten spitting. It is ideal for AC welding because it retains a balled tip and has a high resistance to
contamination. Its current-carrying capacity is equal to or greater than that of thoriated tungsten. Zirconiated tungsten
is not recommended for DC welding.
Tungsten Electrodes Rating for Welding Currents
34
Tungsten
Diameter
mm
DC Current Amps
Torch Negative
2% Thoriated
AC Current Amps
Un-Balanced Wave
0.8% Zirconiated
AC Current Amps
Balanced Wave
0.8% Zirconiated
1.0mm
1.6mm
2.4mm
3.2mm
4.0mm
15 - 80
70 -150
150- 250
250 - 400
400 - 500
15 - 80
70 - 150
140 - 235
225 - 325
300 - 400
20 - 60
60 - 120
100 - 180
160 - 250
200 - 320
Tungsten Preparation
Always use DIAMOND wheels when grinding and cutting. While tungsten is a very hard material, the surface of a
diamond wheel is harder, and this makes for smooth grinding. Grinding without diamond wheels, such as aluminium
oxide wheels, can lead to jagged edges, imperfections, or poor surface finishes not visible to the eye that will contribute to weld inconsistency and weld defects.
Always ensure to grind the tungsten in a longitudinal direction on the grinding wheel. Tungsten electrodes are manufactured with the molecular structure of the grain running lengthwise and thus grinding crosswise is “grinding against
the grain.” If electrodes are ground crosswise, the electrons have to jump across the grinding marks and the arc can
start before the tip and wander. Grinding longitudinally with the grain, the electrons flow steadily and easily to the end
of the tungsten tip. The arc starts straight and remains narrow, concentrated, and stable.
grind longitudinal on the
grinding wheel
don’t grind across
the grinding wheel
Electrode Tip/Flat
The shape of the tungsten electrode tip is an important process variable in precision arc welding. A good selection
of tip/flat size will balance the need for several advantages. The bigger the flat, the more likely arc wander will occur
and the more difficult it will be to arc start. However, increasing the flat to the maximum level that still allows arc start
and eliminates arc wonder will improve the weld penetration and increase the electrode life. Some welders still grind
electrodes to a sharp point, which makes arc starting easier. However, they risk decreased welding performance from
melting at the tip and the possibility of the point falling off into the weld pool.
2.5 times tungsten diameter
pointed tip
flat tip
Electrode Included Angle/Taper - DC Welding
Tungsten electrodes for DC welding should be ground longitudinally and concentrically with diamond wheels to a
specific included angle in conjunction with the tip/flat preparation. Different angles produce different arc shapes and
offer different weld penetration capabilities. In general, blunter electrodes that have a larger included angle provide
the following benefits:
• Last Longer
flat spot diameter
• Have better weld penetration
• Have a narrower arc shape
• Can handle more amperage without eroding.
included angle
Sharper electrodes with smaller included angle provide:
• Offer less arc weld
• Have a wider arc
• Have a more consistent arc
The included angle determines weld bead shape and size. Generally, as the included angle increases, penetration
increases and bead width decreases.
Tungsten
Diameter
Diameter at
the Tip - mm
Constant Included
Angle - Degrees
Current Range
Amps
Current Range
Pulsed Amps
1.0mm
1.6mm
1.6mm
2.4mm
2.4mm
3.2mm
3.2mm
.250
.500
.800
.800
1.100
1.100
1.500
20
25
30
35
45
60
90
05 - 30
08 - 50
10 - 70
12 - 90
15 - 150
20 - 200
25 - 250
05 - 60
05 - 100
10 - 140
12 - 180
15 - 250
20 - 300
25 - 350
35
UNI-FLAME AUTOLIFT
UNI-FLAME
Suregrip Series
SB24 MIG TORCH
250A AIR COOLED MIG WELDING TORCH
Rating:250A CO² 220A mixed gas EN60974-7 @ 60% duty cycle. 0.8 to 1.2mm wires
1
9
8
* Front end parts
shown
on opposite page
* Liners shown
on opposite page
36
Torch Model
Description
Part Number
3 Mt
4 Mt
5 Mt
SB Suregrip Ergo Torch Package
SB24-3
SB24-4
SB24-5
Spare Parts
Part Number Description
Swan Neck
Ergo handle complete with Trigger
Trigger
1 SNK24
8 BZLH
9BX0020
UNI-FLAME AUTOLIFT
UNI-FLAME
Suregrip Series
SB24 MIG TORCH
Front end consumables
SB24 Contact Tips
Ø 8.0
M6 x 1.0
M6 x 1.0
M6 x 1.0
28.0
Part Number PCT0009-06 PCT0009-08
PCT0009-09
PCT0009-10
PCT0009-12
PCT0009-16
PCTZR009-09
PCTZR009-12
PCTAL0009-09
PCTAL0009-10
PCTAL0009-12
Description
Contact Tip Steel (0.6mm)
Contact Tip Steel (0.8mm)
Contact Tip Steel (0.9mm)
Contact Tip Steel (1.0mm)
Contact Tip Steel (1.2mm)
Contact Tip Steel (1.6mm)
Contact Tip Steel Long Life (0.9mm)
Contact Tip Steel Long Life (1.2mm)
Contact Tip Aluminium (0.9mm)
Contact Tip Aluminium (1.0mm)
Contact Tip Aluminium (1.2mm)
SB24 Tip Holder
Part Number PCTH24
Description
Contact Tip Holder
26.0
Ø 13.1
Ø 14.5
SB24 Gas Diffuser
Part Number PCGD24
PCGDR24
Ø 17.2
Bore
Ø 20.0
25.0
63.5
Liners
Description
Gas Diffuser (Ceramic)
Gas Diffuser (Rubber)
SB24 Gas Nozzle
Part Number PGN24CYL
PGN24CON
PGN24TAP
PGN24SPOT
Description
Cylindrical Nozzle
Conical Nozzle
Tapered Nozzle
Spot Nozzle
SB24 Liners
Part Number SLB3M
SLB4M
SLB5M
SLR3M
SLR4M
SLR5M
TLB3M
TLB4M
TLR3M
TLR4M
TLY3M
TLY4M
NKSTL
Description
Blue Steel Liner 3 Metre
Blue Steel Liner 4 Metre
Blue Steel Liner 5 Metre
Red Steel Liner 3 Metre­
Red Steel Liner 4 Metre
Red Steel Liner 5 Metre
Blue Aluminium Liner 3 Metre
Blue Aluminium Liner 4 Metre
Red Aluminium Liner 3 Metre
Red Aluminium Liner 4 Metre
Yellow Aluminium Liner 3 Metre
Yellow Aluminium Liner 4 Metre
Neck Spring for Aluminium
37
UNI-FLAME AUTOLIFT
UNI-FLAME
SPG200
38
Torch Model
Description
XcelArc Spool Gun x 6m
Spare Parts
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
Part Number
LMZ2017
LMH2114
LMH2111
LMH2115
LMS2101
LMZ2001
LMZ2011
LMZ2012
LMZ2013
LMZ2016
LMT2101
LMH2112
LMH2113 LMJ2101
Part Number
SPG200II Description
Speed Adjusting Knob
Open/Close Button
Left-Gun Case
Hang Hook
Spring Support
Motor
Motor Plate
Suspension Screw
Drive Roll Assembly
Wire Nipple
Spool Shaft
Right-Gun Case
Upper-Gun Case
Switch
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
Part Number
LMZ2014
LMZ2015
LMK2001
EF1101
SEE PAGE 38
SEE PAGE 38
SEE PAGE 38
LML2140
ES1201
EH2201
LMV2007
EP2001
LMU2001
Description
Potentiometer
Push Roll
Conducting Board
Conducting Tube
Tip Holder
Contact Tip
Gas Nozzle
Welding Cable
Spring Support (Back)
Adaptor Support
Adaptor Support Nut
Adaptor
7 Pin Plug
UNI-FLAME AUTOLIFT
UNI-FLAME
SPG20011
Front end consumables
SB24 Contact Tips
Ø 8.0
M6 x 1.0
M6 x 1.0
M6 x 1.0
28.0
Part Number PCT0009-06 PCT0009-08
PCT0009-09
PCT0009-10
PCT0009-12
PCT0009-16
PCTZR009-09
PCTZR009-12
PCTAL0009-09
PCTAL0009-10
PCTAL0009-12
Description
Contact Tip Steel (0.6mm)
Contact Tip Steel (0.8mm)
Contact Tip Steel (0.9mm)
Contact Tip Steel (1.0mm)
Contact Tip Steel (1.2mm)
Contact Tip Steel (1.6mm)
Contact Tip Steel Long Life (0.9mm)
Contact Tip Steel Long Life (1.2mm)
Contact Tip Aluminium (0.9mm)
Contact Tip Aluminium (1.0mm)
Contact Tip Aluminium (1.2mm)
SB24 Tip Holder
Part Number PCTH24
Description
Contact Tip Holder
26.0
Ø 13.1
Ø 14.5
SB24 Gas Diffuser
Part Number PCGD24
PCGDR24
Ø 17.2
Bore
Ø 20.0
25.0
63.5
Description
Gas Diffuser (Ceramic)
Gas Diffuser (Rubber)
SB24 Gas Nozzle
Part Number PGN24CYL
PGN24CON
PGN24TAP
Description
Cylindrical Nozzle
Conical Nozzle
Tapered Nozzle
©All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted by any means,
electronic, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise without the prior permission of ©Uniarc® the copyright holder.
39
UNI-FLAME AUTOLIFT
UNI-FLAME
17V TIG TORCH
150A AIR COOLED TIG WELDING TORCH
Rating: 150Amp DC, 105Amp AC @35% duty cycle.
For use with non gas solenoid machines
Stub
ens
s
serie
as L
dard
by G
Stan
s
serie
Front end parts identification
on opposite page
Torch Model
Description
Part Number
4m
8m
17V Tig Torch Package c/w 4m Gas Hose
17V-4MCP50
17V-8MCP50
Spare Parts
Part Number
Description
Torch head
4
VS2
Torch Body Gas valve
1a
WP17V
Torch head c/w valve
3
57Y02
Back cap long
1b
WP17F
Torch head flexible
3a
57Y03
Medium back cap
1c
HWP17
Torch handle
3b
57Y04
Short back cap
1d
WP17VF
Torch Head Flexi c/w valve
8
HWP17
Torch Handle
1
40
WP17
©All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted by any means,
electronic, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise without the prior permission of ©Uniarc® the copyright holder.
UNI-FLAME AUTOLIFT
17V TIG TORCH
UNI-FLAME
Standard Front End Parts
Part #
18CG
Description
Cup Gasket
Part #
10N30
10N31
10N32
10N28
Part #
10N22
10N23
10N24
10N25
Description
Collet Body 1.0mm
Collet Body 1.6mm
Collet Body 2.4mm
Collet Body 3.2mm
Description
Collet 1.0mm
Collet 1.6mm
Collet 2.4mm
Collet 3.2mm
Part #
10N49L
53N48L
53N47L
Part #
10N50
10N49
10N48
10N47
10N46
10N45
10N44
Description
Alumina Nozzle
Alumina Nozzle
Alumina Nozzle
Alumina Nozzle
Alumina Nozzle
Alumina Nozzle
Alumina Nozzle
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
6mm
8mm
10mm
11mm
13mm
16mm
19mm
Description
Long Alumina Nozzle Ø 8mm #5L
Long Alumina Nozzle Ø 10mm #6L
Long Alumina Nozzle Ø 11mm #7L
#4
#5
#6
#7
#8
#10
#12
Compact Gas Lens Front End Parts
Part #
54N01
Description
Gas Lens Gasket
Part #
45V25
45V26
45V27
Description
Gas Lens Body 1.6mm
Gas Lens Body 2.4mm
Gas Lens Body 3.2mm
Part #
54N14
54N15
54N17
Description
Gas lens ceramic 8.0mm
Gas lens ceramic 7.0mm
Gas lens ceramic 5.0mm
TR0004-16
RED
ANSI/AWS A5.12-98
ISO 6848 WT20
2% Thoriated: Best stability
at medium currents, good arc
starts, medium tendency to spit,
medium erosion rate.
Commonly used for steel and
stainless steel applications
Part #
TR0004-10
TR0004-16
TR0004-24
TR0004-32
Description
1.0mm x 175mm
1.6mm x 175mm
2.4mm x 175mm
3.2mm x 175mm
thoriated
thoriated
thoriated
thoriated
tungsten
tungsten
tungsten
tungsten
electrode
electrode
electrode
electrode
2%
2%
2%
2%
1/16 x 7” (1.6mm x 175mm)
3/32 x 7” (2.4mm x 175mm)
1/8 x 7” (3.2mm x 175mm)
©All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted by any means,
electronic, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise without the prior permission of ©Uniarc® the copyright holder.
41
MIG WELDING TROUBLE SHOOTING
The following chart addresses some of the common problems of MIG welding. In all cases of equipment malfunction, the manufacturer’s recommendations should be strictly adhered to and followed.
1: Excessive Spatter
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Wire feed speed set too high
Select lower wire feed speed
Voltage too high
Select a lower voltage setting
Wrong polarity set
select the correct polarity for the wire being used - see machine setup guide
Stick out too long
Bring the torch closer to the work
Contaminated base metal
Remove materials like paint, grease, oil, and dirt, including mill scale from base metal
Contaminated mig wire
Use clean dry rust free wire. Do not lubricate the wire with oil, grease etc
Inadequate gas flow or too much gas Check the gas is connected, check hoses, gas valve and torch are not restricted. Set
flow
the gas flow between 6-12 l/min flow rate. Check hoses and fittings for holes, leaks etc
Protect the welding zone from wind and drafts
2: Porosity - small cavities or holes resulting from gas pockets in weld metal.
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Wrong gas
Check that the correct gas is being used
Inadequate gas flow or too much gas Check the gas is connected, check hoses, gas valve and torch are not restricted. Set the
flow
gas flow between 10 - 15 l/min flow rate. Check hoses and fittings for holes, leaks etc.
Protect the welding zone from wind and drafts
Moisture on the base metal
Remove all moisture from base metal before welding
Contaminated base metal
Remove materials like paint, grease, oil, and dirt, including mill scale from base metal
Contaminated mig wire
Use clean dry rust free wire. Do not lubricate the wire with oil, grease etc
Gas nozzle clogged with spatter,
worn or out of shape
Clean or replace the gas nozzle
Missing or damaged gas diffuser
Replace the gas diffuser
Mig torch euro connect o-ring missing or damaged
check and replace the o-ring
4: Wire stubbing during welding
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Holding the torch too far away
Bring the torch closer to the work and maintain stick out of 5-10mm
Welding voltage set too low
Increase the voltage
Wire Speed set too high
Decrease the wire feed speed
5: Lack of Fusion − failure of weld metal to fuse completely with base metal or a proceeding weld bead.
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Contaminated base metal
Remove materials like paint, grease, oil, and dirt, including mill scale from base metal
Not enough heat input
Select a higher voltage range and /or adjust the wire speed to suit
Improper welding technique
Keep the arc at the leading edge of the weld pool.
Gun angle to work should be between 5 & 15°
Direct the arc at the weld joint
Adjust work angle or widen groove to access bottom during welding
Momentarily hold arc on side walls if using weaving technique
5: Excessive Penetration − weld metal melting through base metal
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Too much heat
Select a lower voltage range and /or adjust the wire speed to suit
Increase travel speed
6: Lack of Penetration − shallow fusion between weld metal and base metal
42
Poor in incorrect joint preparation
Material too thick. Joint preparation and design needs to allow access to bottom of
groove while maintaining proper welding wire extension and arc characteristics
Keep the arc at the leading edge of the weld pool and maintain the gun angle at
5 & 15° keeping the stick out between 5-10mm
Not enough heat input
Select a higher voltage range and /or adjust the wire speed to suit
Reduce travel speed
Contaminated base metal
Remove materials like paint, grease, oil, and dirt, including mill scale from base metal.
MIG WIRE FEED TROUBLE SHOOTING
The following chart addresses some of the common WIRE FEED problems during MIG welding. In all cases of equipment
malfunction, the manufacturer’s recommendations should be strictly adhered to and followed.
1: No wire feed
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Wrong mode selected
Check that the TIG/MMA/MIG selector switch set to MIG position
Wrong torch selector switch
Check that the STANDARD/SPOOLGUN selector switch is set to STANDARD position
for MIG welding and SPOOLGUN when using the Spoolgun
2: Inconsistent / interrupted wire feed
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Adjusting wrong dial
Be sure to adjust the WIRE FEED and VOLTAGE dials for MIG welding.
The AMPERAGE dial is for STICK and TIG welding mode
Wrong polarity selected
Select the correct polarity for the wire being used - see machine setup guide
Incorrect wire speed setting
Adjust the wire feed speed
Voltage setting incorrect
Adjust the voltage setting
Mig torch lead too long
Small diameter wires and soft wires like aluminium don’t feed well through long torch
leads - replace the torch with a lesser length torch
Mig torch lead kinked or too sharp
angle being held
Remove the kink, reduce the angle or bend
Contact tip worn, wrong size, wrong
type
Replace the tip with correct size and type
Liner worn or clogged (the most
common causes of bad feeding)
Try to clear the liner by blowing out with compressed air as a temporary cure,
it is recommended to replace the liner
Wrong size liner
Install the correct size liner
Blocked or worn inlet guide tube
Clear or replace the inlet guide tube
Wire misaligned in drive roller groove Locate the wire into the groove of the drive roller
Incorrect drive roller size
Fit the correct size drive roller eg; 0.8mm wire requires 0.8mm drive roller
Wrong type of drive roller selected
Fit the correct type roller (e.g. knurled rollers needed for flux cored wires)
Worn drive rollers
Replace the drive rollers
Drive roller pressure too high
Can flatten the wire electrode causing it to lodge in the contact tip - reduce the drive
roller pressure
Too much tension on wire spool hub
Reduce the spool hub brake tension
Wire crossed over on the spool or
tangled
Remove the spool untangle the wire or replace the wire
Contaminated mig wire
Use clean dry rust free wire. Do not lubricate the wire with oil, grease etc
43
TIG WELDING TROUBLE SHOOTING
The following chart addresses some of the common problems of DC TIG welding. In all cases of equipment malfunction, the
manufacturer’s recommendations should be strictly adhered to and followed.
1: Tungsten burning away quickly
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Incorrect Gas
Check that pure Argon is being used
No gas
Check the gas cylinder contains gas and is connected and the torch gas valve is open
Inadequate gas flow
Check the gas is connected, check hoses, gas valve and torch are not restricted. Set
the gas flow between 10 - 15 l/min flow rate
Back cap not fitted correctly
Make sure the torch back cap is fitted so that the o-ring is inside the torch body
Torch connected to DC +
Connect the torch to the DC- output terminal
Incorrect tungsten being used
Check and change the tungsten type if necessary
Tungsten being oxidised after weld
is finished
Keep shielding gas flowing 10–15 seconds after arc stoppage. 1 second for each 10
amps of weld current.
2: Contaminated tungsten
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Touching tungsten into the weld
pool
Keep tungsten from contacting weld puddle. Raise the torch so that the tungsten is off of
the work piece 2 - 5mm
Touching the filler wire to the tungsten
Keep the filler wire from touching the tungsten during welding, feed the filler wire into the
leading edge of the weld pool in front of the tungsten
Tungsten melting into the weld pool
Check that correct type of tungsten is being used. Too much current for the tungsten
size so reduce the amps or change to a larger tungsten
3: Porosity - poor weld appearance and colour
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Incorrect Gas
Check that pure Argon is being used
Inadequate gas flow / gas leaks
Check the gas is connected, check hoses, gas valve and torch are not restricted. Set the
gas flow between 10 - 15 l/min flow rate. Check hoses and fittings for holes, leaks etc.,
Moisture on the base metal
Remove all moisture from base metal before welding
Contaminated base metal
Remove materials like paint, grease, oil, and dirt, including mill scale from base metal
Contaminated filler wire
Remove all grease, oil, or moisture from filler metal.
Incorrect filler wire
Check the filler wire and change if necessary
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Incorrect Gas
Use pure Argon gas
Inadequate gas flow
Set the gas flow between 10 - 15 l/min flow rate
4: Yellowish residue / smoke on the alumina nozzle & discoloured tungsten
Alumina gas nozzle too small for size Increase the size of the alumina gas nozzle
of tungsten being used
5: Unstable Arc during DC welding
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Torch connected to DC +
Connect the torch to the DC- output terminal
Contaminated base metal
Remove materials like paint, grease, oil, and dirt, including mill scale from base metal.
Tungsten is contaminated
Remove 10mm of contaminated tungsten and re grind the tungsten
Arc length too long
Lower torch so that the tungsten is off of the work piece 2 - 5mm
7: Arc wanders during DC welding
44
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Poor gas flow
Check and set the gas flow between 10 - 15 l/min flow rate
Incorrect arc length
Lower torch so that the tungsten is off of the work piece 2 - 5mm
Tungsten incorrect or in poor condition
Check that correct type of tungsten is being used. Remove 10mm from the weld end of
the tungsten and re sharpen the tungsten
Poorly prepared tungsten
Grind marks should run lengthwise with tungsten, not circular. Use proper grinding
method and wheel.
Contaminated base metal
Remove contaminating materials like paint, grease, oil, and dirt, including mill scale from
base metal.
Contaminated filler wire
Remove all grease, oil, or moisture from filler metal.
Incorrect filler wire
Check the filler wire and change if necessary
continued- TIG WELDING TROUBLE SHOOTING
8: Arc difficult to start or will not start DC welding
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Incorrect machine set up
Check machine set up is correct
No gas, incorrect gas flow
Check the gas is connected and cylinder valve open, check hoses, gas valve and torch
are not restricted. Set the gas flow between 10 - 15 l/min flow rate
Tungsten is contaminated
Remove 10mm of contaminated tungsten and re grind the tungsten
Incorrect tungsten size and or tungsten being used
Check and change the size and or the tungsten if required
Loose connection
Check all connectors and tighten
Earth clamp not connected to work
Connect the earth clamp directly to the work piece wherever possible
ATTENTION! - CHECK FOR GAS LEAKS
At initial set up and at regular intervals we recommend to check for gas leakage.
Recommended procedure is as follows:
1. Connect the regulator and gas hose assembly and tighten all connectors and clamps.
2. Slowly open the cylinder valve.
3. Set the flow rate on the regulator to approximately 8-10 l/min.
4. Close the cylinder valve and pay attention to the needle indicator of the contents pressure
gauge on the regulator, if the needle drops away towards zero there is a gas leak.
Sometimes a gas leak can be slow and to identify it will require leaving the gas pressure in the
regulator and line for an extended time period. In this situation it is recommended to open the cylinder valve, set the flow rate to 8-10 l/min, close the cylinder valve and check after a
minimum of 15 minutes.
5.If there is a gas loss then check all connectors and clamps for leakage by brushing orspraying
with soapy water, bubbles will appear at the leakage point.
6. Tighten clamps or fittings to eliminate gas leakage.
Important: We strongly recommend that you check for gas leakage prior to operation of
your machine. We recommend that you close the cylinder valve when the machine is not
in use. Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD, authorised representatives or agents of
Welding Guns Of Australia will not be liable or responsible for the loss of any gas.
45
MMA (Stick) WELDING TROUBLE SHOOTING
The following chart addresses some of the common problems of MMA welding. In all cases of equipment malfunction,
the manufacturer’s recommendations should be strictly adhered to and followed.
1: No arc
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Incomplete welding circuit
Check earth lead is connected. Check all cable connections.
Wrong mode selected
Check the MMA selector switch is selected
No power supply
Check that the machine is switched on and has a power supply
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Arc length too long
Shorten the arc length
Work piece dirty, contaminated or
moisture
Remove moisture and materials like paint, grease, oil, and dirt, including mill scale from
base metal
Damp electrodes
Use only dry electrodes
2: Porosity − small cavities or holes resulting from gas pockets in weld metal.
3: Excessive Spatter
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Amperage too high
Decrease the amperage or choose a larger electrode
Arc length too long
Shorten the arc length
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Insufficient heat input
Increase the amperage or choose a larger electrode
Work piece dirty, contaminated or
moisture
Remove moisture and materials like paint, grease, oil, and dirt, including mill scale from
base metal
Poor welding technique
Use the correct welding technique or seek assistance for the correct technique
3: Weld sits on top, lack of fusion
4: Lack of penetration
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Insufficient heat input
Increase the amperage or choose a larger electrode
Poor welding technique
Use the correct welding technique or seek assistance for the correct technique
Poor joint preparation
Check the joint design and fit up, make sure the material is not too thick. Seek assistance for the correct joint design and fit up
5: Excessive penetration - burn through
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Excessive heat input
Reduce the amperage or use a smaller electrode
Incorrect travel speed
Try increasing the weld travel speed
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Unsteady hand, wavering hand
Use two hands where possible to steady up, practise your technique
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Excessive heat input
Reduce the amperage or use a smaller electrode
Poor welding technique
Use the correct welding technique or seek assistance for the correct technique
Poor joint preparation and or joint
design
Check the joint design and fit up, make sure the material is not too thick. Seek assistance for the correct joint design and fit up
Possible Reason
Suggested Remedy
Incorrect polarity
Change the polarity, check the electrode manufacturer for correct polarity
6: Uneven weld appearance
7: Distortion − movement of base metal during welding
7: Electrode welds with different or unusual arc characteristic
46
Spare Parts Identification - MIG250 MTS
19
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
18
17
16
1
2
25
3
4
5
6
7
20
31
32
33
30
21
22
23
37
36
24
26
27
28 29
35
38
39
34
40
#
Part Number Description
1B2290
B22170
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
MMA/TIG/MIG
TIG/MMA/Mig Switch
switch
B22278
B22276
Standard/Spool
Standard/ SpoolGun
GunSwitch
Switch
C02066
C02065
- Panel Socket DKJ35-50
10-25
B20667
B20669
Spool Gun Connector
C02066
C02065
+ Panel Socket DKJ35-50
10-25
B25018
D30050
Euro Connector
J10519
J10518
Front Plastic Panel
J24020
J030156
Big
MIGhandle
175 Black Metal Cover
D20037
Digital Volt Meter
D20037
Digital Amp Meter
B22171
B22172
Inch Wire Switch
B09124
Wire Speed
FeedPotentiometer
Potentiometer
1K2W1K
ohm
B09123
B09125
Amperage Potentiometer 2W4.7K
4.7K ohm
B09123
B09125 B09125 Voltage Potentiometer 2W4.7K
4.7K ohm
C14003
Black & Silver Knob
B04274
B04272
Control board
PCB 1
B04273
Control PCB board
2
2
B05108
B05222
Power
MIG 175
supply
Power
board
supply PCB
J06498
J06497
Rear Plastic Panel
B15040
B15096
Fan ? Volts
#
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
41
Part Number Description
B10351
Gas Solenoid
Solenoid Assembly
Assembly
B10060
Gas
B16031
IGBT BoardPCB
B16928
Invertering
B03071
Input PCB
Power PCB
B06201
Filter
B02056-1
Output diodes
DiodesPCB
B02039
Output
B06200
EMC PCB
board
B06201
EMC
B06070-1
Peak current
Currentsampling
SamplingPCB
PCB
B06070
Peak
D03524
Main transformer
D03519Transformer
D16207-1
Inductor
D16220Transformer
B06185
Voltage
FeederPCB
PCB
B06069
Port
absorbing
J030155
MetalHinge
cover 1
J28006
Door
J030161
Metal cover 2 wire reel door
C13010
Cable Support
Support
C13010
Cable
B11304
Power cord
H05VV-3*4mm2(3M)
B11057
Primary
Input
Cable
B24094
Main Switch
C16023
On/Off
Switch
B10351
Gas Solenoid
Solenoid Outlet
Assembly
B10060
Gas
Nipple
B09037
Burnback
B09126
Burn
Backpotentiometer
Potentiometer2W100K
? ohm and wire
C02066
socket DKJ35-50
C02065
+no-gas
Panelwelding
Socket 10-25
C02066
welding
socket
DKJ35-50
C02065
-gas
Panel
Socket
10-25
J07024
Metal PCB
plateProtection Plate
J07021
Front
B21403
Primary
cable
with plug
B21144
Cable
Plug
10-25
B25018
Wire Feed
Feed Assembly
Assembly with
with Motor
Motor
D30050
Wire
J28009
BinzelHolder
Spool Holder
Assembly 15kg
J28013
Spool
Assembly
47
PO Box 3033, Lansvale NSW 2166, AUSTRALIA
112 Christina Rd, Villawood, NSW 2163
Phone: (02) 9780 4200
Fax: (02) 9780 4244
Email: sales@unimig.com.au / Web: www.unimig.com.au
Welding Guns Of Australia Pty Ltd
ABN: 14 001 804 422
Welding Guns Of Australia Pty Ltd (‘Us’, ‘We’) warrants that the following products under UNI-MIG, UNI-TIG,
UNI-PLAS, UNI-FLAME, TECNA, T&R, HIT-8SS & ROTA, supplied by Us and purchased by you from an Authorised
UNI-MIG, UNI-TIG, UNI-PLAS, UNI-FLAME, TECNA, T&R, HIT-8SS & ROTA Dealer throughout Australia are free of
Material and Faulty Workmanship defects except for those products listed under ‘Warranty Exclusions’.
These terms and conditions supersede and exclude all former and other representations and arrangements relating
to any warranties on these products.
WARRANTY PERIOD
We offer the following ‘Warranty Periods’ from ‘date of purchase’:
An Extended Warranty Period of 6 months total shall apply only to Machinery where offered and warranty
is registered online.
UNI-MIG WELDING MACHINES
UNI-MIG DIY Series (Power Source Only)
UNI-MIG Procraft Series (Power Source Only)
UNI-MIG Trade Series (Power Source Only)
UNI-MIG Trade Series SWF (Power Source / Seperate Wire Feeder Only)
UNI-MIG Workshop Series (Power Source Only)
UNI-MIG Workshop Series SWF (Power Source / Separate Wire Feeder Only)
UNI-MIG Jasic Inverter MIG (Power Source Only)
UNI-MIG Jasic Inverter MIG SWF (Power Source / Separate Wire Feeder Only)
UNI-TIG Jasic Inverter TIG (Power Source Only)
UNI-MIG Water Cooler
T&R Pulse MIG (Power Source Only)
T&R Pulse MIG SWF (Power Source / Separate Wire Feeder Only)
UNI-PLAS (Power Source Only)
UNI-PLAS Jasic Series (Power Source Only)
UNI-PLAS Site Cut Series (Power Source Only)
UNI-FLAME Gas Cutting and Welding Kits
UNI-FLAME Straight Line & Gas Cutting Machines (Power Source Only)
UNI-FLAME Regulators Argon/ Acetylene / Oxygen / LPG / Bobbin Flowmeter
UNI-FLAME Automatic Welding Helmet
UNI-MIG Automatic Welding Helmets
TECNA (Power Source Only)
HIT-8SS Automatic Carriage (Power Source Only)
ROTA 102 Rotating table
HOTBOX ElectrodeOven
SPOTCAR 3500
TORCHES -GMAW, GTAW, MMAW, PLASMA, EARTH LEADS,
INTERCONNECTING CABLES, GAS HOSE
2 Years
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
1 Year
2 Year
2 Year 3 Years
2 Years
1 Year
3 Months 1 Year 1 Year
2 Years
2 Years
1 Year 1 Year
1 Year
1 Year
1 Year
(Clause 3)
(Clause 1&3)
(Clause 1&3)
(Clause 1&3))
(Clause 1&3)
(Clause 1&3)
(Clause 3)
(Clause 3)
(Clause 3)
(Clause 3)
(Clause 3)
(Clause 3)
(Clause 3)
(Clause 3)
(Clause 3)
(Clause 2&3)
(Clause 3)
(Clause 3)
(Clause 3)
(Clause 3)
3 Months (Clause 3)
(Clause 1) 3 year warranty on transformers, inductor and rectifier. 1 year warranty on PCB, and all other
components, .
(Clause 2) Gas Hose, Flashbacks are subject to and covered by the Manufacture’s Individual Warranty, Contact
the manufacturer for details
(Clause 3) This only Covers Manufactures defaults on all accesories for the first three months after date of purchase.
48
WARRANTY / RETURNS / EXCHANGES
We understand that sometimes you may need to return a product you have purchased from Welding Guns Of
Australia PTY LTD Authorised Dealer Network, to assist you, we have set out below the Welding Guns Of Australia
PTY LTD Returns Policy that you should know.
Our Returns Policy includes the rights you have under the Australian Consumer Law and other relevant laws.
Your Rights under the Australian Consumer Law - Our goods come with guarantees that cannot be excluded under
the Australian Consumer Law. You are entitled to a replacement or refund for a major failure and for compensation for
any other reasonably foreseeable loss or damage. You are also entitled to have the goods repaired or replaced if the
goods fail to be of acceptable quality and the failure does not amount to a major failure.
• You shall inspect the Goods on delivery and shall within seven (7) days of delivery (time being of the essence)
notify Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD of any alleged defect, shortage in quantity, damage or failure to comply
with the description or quote.
• You shall also afford Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD the opportunity to inspect the Goods within a reasonable
time following delivery if you believe the Goods are defective in any way.
• If you shall fail to comply with these provisions the Goods shall be presumed to be free from any defect or damage.
For defective Goods, which Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD has agreed in writing that you are entitled to reject,
Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD liability is limited to either (at the Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD
discretion) replacing the Goods or repairing the Goods except where you have acquired Goods as a consumer within
the meaning of the Trade Practices Act 1974 or the Fair Trading Acts of the relevant state or territories of Australia,
and is therefore also entitled to, at the consumer’s discretion either a refund of the purchase price of the Goods, or
repair of the Goods, or replacement of the Goods.
Returns will only be accepted provided that:
(a) You have complied with the provisions outlined above, and
(b) where the Goods are unable to be repaired, the Goods are returned at your cost within thirty (30) days of the
delivery date, and
(c) Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD will not be liable for Goods which have not been stored or used in a proper
manner, and
(d) the Goods are returned in the condition in which they were delivered and with all packaging material, brochures
and instruction material in as new condition as is reasonably possible in the circumstances.
• Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD Accepts no responsibility for products lost, damaged or mislaid whilst in transit
• Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD may (at their sole discretion) accept the return of Goods for credit but this may
incur a handling fee of up to fifteen percent (15%) of the value of the returned Goods plus any freight costs.
• Where a failure does not amount to a major failure, Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD is entitled to choose
between providing you with a repair, replacement or other suitable remedy.
• Your rights under the Australian Consumer Law are not limited by a defined time. However, the Australian
Consumer Law does recognise that the relevant time period can vary from product to product, depending on factors
such as the nature of the product and the price. Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD adopts the same approach. As
you can appreciate, the type of remedy we can offer you may also vary depending on how long it takes you to return
the product to us.
MAKING A CLAIM
If you wish to make a claim under this Warranty, you should:
• Return the product to the point of purchase either in person or on a prepaid courier; or
• Contact Us by Telephone on 02 9870 4200 or Mail PO Box 3033 Lansvale NSW 2166.
When returned, the product must be accompanied with the original invoice including the purchase price and
disclosing the purchase date
All costs of installation, cartage, freight, travelling expenses, hiring tools and insurance are paid by the
Customer.
To the extent permitted by law, our total liability for loss or damage of every kind related to the product in any way
whatsoever is limited to the amount paid to the retailer by you for the product or the value of the product.
No responsibility will be taken for products lost, damaged or mislaid whilst in transit.
49
WARRANTY EXCLUSIONS
This Warranty covers Material and Faulty Workmanship defects only.
This Warranty does not cover damage caused by:
•
•
•
•
• •
•
•
•
•
Normal wear and tear due to usage
Misuse or abusive use of the UNI-MIG, UNI-TIG, UNI-PLAS, UNI-FLAME, TECNA, T&R, HIT-8SS & ROTA, instructions supplied with the product.
Failure to clean or improper cleaning of the product
Failure to maintain the equipment such as regular services etc
Incorrect voltage or non-authorised electrical connections
Improper installation
Use of non-authorised/non-standard parts
Abnormal product performance caused by any ancillary equipment interference or other external factors
Failure or any breakage caused by overload, dropping or abusive treatment or use by the customer
Repair, modifications or other work carried out on the product other than by an Authorised UNI-MIG, UNI-TIG, UNI-PLAS, UNI-FLAME, TECNA, T&R, HIT-8SS & ROTA Service Dealer
Unless it is a manufacturing fault, this Warranty does not cover the following parts:
MIG Welding Torches and Consumables to suit, such as:
Gas Nozzels, Gas Diffusers, Contact Tip holder, Contact tip, Swan Necks, Trigger, Handle, Liners,
Wire Guide, Drive Roller, Gas Nozzle Spring. Neck Spring, Connector Block, Insulator, Gas Nipple, Cap, Euro Block,
Head Assembly, Gas Block, Trigger Spring, Spring Cable Support, Neck Insulator, Shroud Spring,
Gun Plug Cover, Lock Nut, Snap On Head, Spring Cap, Ball, Motor 42 Volt, Pot 10K standard, Knob, Drive Roll Seat,
Washer, Bow, Ball Bearing, Wire Condue Nipple, Central Plug, Printed Circuit Board, Gun Plug House, Cable
Support, Gas Connector, Handle To Suit PP36 with Knobs, All Xcel-Arc/ Magmaweld Mig Welding Wires &
Electrodes, Arc Leads, Welding Cable, Electrode Holder, Eatch Clamps
.
TIG Welding Torches and Consumables to suit, such as:
Tungsten Electrodes, Collet, Collet Body, Alumina Nozzle, Torch Head, Torch Head water Cooled,
Torch Head Flexible,Back Caps, Gas Lens, Torch Handle, Cup Gasket, Torch Body Gas Valve, O-ring,
All UNI-MIG TIG Welding Rods, All Xcel-Arc/ Magmaweld Electrodes, Arc Leads, Welding Cable, Electrode Holder,
Eatch Clamps.
PLASMA Cutting Torches and Consumables to suit, such as:
All Cutting Tips, All Diffuser/Swirl Ring, All Electrode, Retaining Caps, Nozzle Springs, All Spacers, All Shield Caps,
All Air and Power Cables, All Switches, All O-rings, All Springs, All Circle Guides and Cutting Kits, Torch Bodies, Air
Filter Regulator, Arc Leads, Welding Cable, Electrode Holder, Eatch Clamps
STRAIGHT LINE CUTTING MACHINES and Consumables to suit, such as:
Hoses, Fittings, Track, Cutting Nozzles.
HIT-8SS Welding Carriage Consumables to suit, such as:
Input Cord, Inter-connecting Cord, Triggering Cable.
This Warranty does not cover products purchased:
• From a non-authorised UNI-MIG, UNI-TIG, UNI-PLAS, UNI-FLAME, TECNA,T&R, HIT-8SS & ROTA Dealer
(such as purchases from unauthorised retailers and purchases over the Internet from unauthorised
local/international sellers or sites such as EBay)
• At an auction;
• From a private seller
Unless it is a manufacturing fault, this Warranty does not apply to any products sold to Hire Companies.
These conditions may only be varied with the written approval of the Directors of Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD
REMEMBER TO RETAIN YOUR ORIGINAL INVOICE FOR PROOF OF PURCHASE.
50
51
© Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD 2012
UNI-FLAME AUTOLIFT
UNI-FLAME
Welding Guns Of Australia PTY LTD Pty Ltd
ABN: 14 001 804 422
PO Box 3033, Lansvale NSW 2166, AUSTRALIA
112 Christina Rd, Villawood, NSW 2163
Phone: (02) 9780 4200
Fax: (02) 9780 4244
Email: sales@unimig.com.au / Web: www.unimig.com.au
52
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising