Landfill Mining - Prospecting metal in Gärstad $(function(){PrimeFaces.cw("Tooltip","widget_formSmash_items_resultList_18_j_idt799_0_j_idt801",{id:"formSmash:items:resultList:18:j_idt799:0:j_idt801",widgetVar:"widget_formSmash_items_resultList_18_j_idt799_0_j_idt801",showEffect:"fade",hideEffect:"fade",target:"formSmash:items:resultList:18:j_idt799:0:fullText"});});

Landfill Mining - Prospecting metal in Gärstad $(function(){PrimeFaces.cw("Tooltip","widget_formSmash_items_resultList_18_j_idt799_0_j_idt801",{id:"formSmash:items:resultList:18:j_idt799:0:j_idt801",widgetVar:"widget_formSmash_items_resultList_18_j_idt799_0_j_idt801",showEffect:"fade",hideEffect:"fade",target:"formSmash:items:resultList:18:j_idt799:0:fullText"});});

 

Landfill Mining: Prospecting metal in Gärstad landfill

Ariana Tanha

Daniel Zarate

Division of Environmental Technology and Management

Master Thesis

Department of Management and Engineering

LIU-IEI-TEK-A- -12/01454- -SE

 

 

   

 

 

Landfill Mining: Prospecting metal in Gärstad landfill

Master Thesis in Landfill Mining

Department of Management and Engineering

Division of Environmental Technology and Management

Linköping University by

Ariana Tanha

Daniel Zarate

LIU-IEI-TEK-A- -12/01454- -SE

Supervisors:

Examiner:

NILS JOHANSSON

IEI, Linköping University

MAGNUS HAMMAR

Tekniska Verken i Linköping

JOAKIM KROOK

IEI, Linköping University

Linköping, 19 September, 2012

 

Linköping University Electronic Press 

Upphovsrätt 

Detta dokument hålls tillgängligt på Internet – eller dess framtida ersättare – från publiceringsdatum  under förutsättning att inga extraordinära omständigheter uppstår. 

Tillgång till dokumentet innebär tillstånd för var och en att läsa, ladda ner, skriva ut enstaka kopior  för enskilt bruk och att Accesseda det oförändrat för ickekommersiell forskning och för undervisning. 

Överföring  av  upphovsrätten  vid  en  senare  tidpunkt  kan  inte  upphäva  detta  tillstånd.  All  annan 

Accessedning  av  dokumentet  kräver  upphovsmannens  medgivande.  För  att  garantera  äktheten,  säkerheten och tillgängligheten finns lösningar av teknisk och administrativ art. 

Upphovsmannens ideella  rätt innefattar rätt att bli nämnd som upphovsman i den omfattning som  god  sed  kräver  vid  Accessedning  av  dokumentet  på  ovan  beskrivna  sätt  samt  skydd  mot  att  dokumentet ändras eller presenteras i sådan form eller i sådant sammanhang som är kränkande för  upphovsmannens litterära eller konstnärliga anseende eller egenart. 

För  ytterligare  information  om  Linköping  University  Electronic  Press  se  förlagets  hemsida  http://www.ep.liu.se/  

Copyright 

The publishers will keep this document online on the Internet – or its possible replacement –from the  date of publication barring exceptional circumstances. 

The  online  availability  of  the  document  implies  permanent  permission  for  anyone  to  read,  to  download,  or  to  print  out  single  copies  for  his/hers  own  use  and  to  use  it  unchanged  for  non‐ commercial research and educational purpose. Subsequent transfers of copyright cannot revoke this  permission. All other uses of the document are conditional upon the consent of the copyright owner. 

The  publisher has taken  technical and  administrative measures  to assure authenticity, security and  accessibility. 

According to intellectual property law the author has the right to be mentioned when his/her work is  accessed as described above and to be protected against infringement. 

For  additional  information  about  the  Linköping  University  Electronic  Press  and  its  procedures  for  publication  and  for  assurance  of  document  integrity,  please  refer  to  its  www  home  page:  http://www.ep.liu.se/  

 

© Ariana Tanha, Daniel Zarate. 

 

 

 

 

Abstract

All  processes  in  society  produce  waste.  In  nature,  the  waste  is  normally  used  as  a  resource  for  another process, but in human societies waste is often discarded. These discarded materials end up  in places for depositing waste known as landfills. The increase in population, and humans’ tendency  to  improve  their  quality  of  life,  has  led  to  an  increase  in  consumption  of  material.  More  material  consumption means generating more waste, and more waste means bigger landfills. The increasing  size of landfills has brought some other issues, such as increased land use and higher environmental  impact. However in these landfills a lot of valuable materials are discarded and the concept of landfill  mining (LFM) has been proposed in order to solve these issues and use landfills as a possible source  of  materials.  Landfill  mining  is  not  yet  a  common  practice,  and  the  first  barrier  for  this  is  the  uncertainty of the amount and value of materials within landfills. 

The  purpose  of  this  study  is  to  prospect  the  amount  of  metals  in  one  specific  landfill,  in  this  case 

Gärstad landfill in Linköping, Sweden.  This is a first step to show the feasibility of landfill mining as an  alternative way of extracting materials. The study is limited only to metals because they are one of  the most important resources in today’s society. 

The theoretical background of the study is based on material flow analysis (MFA). Two approaches  are  used  to  study  the  materials  in  the  landfill.  The  first  is  top‐down  which  studies  the  flows  of  materials and the second is bottom‐up which studies the stocks of material in the landfill. Based on  these approaches the method was developed. First  the system  boundaries in  time and space were  defined. Then the amount of waste in landfill was estimated from the two mentioned approaches. In  the end the metal content of the waste was estimated. Some criteria are also defined to compare the  accessibility of the metals in the landfill.  

The results of this study show that there is a considerable amount of metals in the landfill, and that  ash  deposits  resulting  from  incineration  are  the  most  interesting  source  of  metals;  with  iron,  aluminium,  copper  and  zinc  being  the  most  abundant.  The  results  are  presented  by  type  of  waste,  area of the landfill and accessibility in order to identify the hotspots. 

Later  it  is  discussed  that  the  method  is  cheap  and  fast  but  highly  depends  on  previous  data  and  available information. Also the metal content of the landfill is compared with natural ores. In the end  the metal content of the landfill is evaluated and estimated to be around 3 billion SEK. It shows that  aluminium, titanium and copper have the highest value money wise.  

As conclusion it was shown material flow analysis is a valid way to prospect landfills. But further cost‐ benefit  analysis  must  be  carried  out  to  determine  if  landfill  mining  is  justifiable.  Also  some  recommendations are proposed to Tekniska Verken in order to facilitate future studies. The first is to  develop  a  systematic  way  for  landfilling  different  kind  of  waste  and  document  them.  Second  is  to  include metals which have economic potential in the regular sampling from landfill. 

 

Keywords

  waste, landfill, landfill mining, material flow analysis, metals, metal stocks, ashes. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acknowledgements

We  would  like  to  thank  Nisse,  our  supervisor,  who  despite  of  being  on  parental  leave  met  with  us  regularly  to  provide  guidance  and  feedback,  and  his  son  Mio,  who  brought  joy  to  our  supervisory  meetings. 

  

We  would  like  to  thank  Magnus  Hammar  from  Tekniska  Verken,  our  contact  person,  who  always  provided us with necessary data, information and amusing comment in his emails, even though he  was very busy at work.  

 

We  would  like  to  thank  Joakim  Krook,  our  examiner,  for  his  guidance  and  help  during  writing  the 

  thesis. 

Finally we would like to thank all the people who in some way or another where involved and helped 

  in this process. 

Linköping, September, 2012 

Ariana Tanha 

 

 

Daniel Zarate 

 

 

Table of Contents

1  Introduction ................................................................................................................................... 15 

1.1  Aim ........................................................................................................................................ 15 

1.2  Limitation ............................................................................................................................... 16 

1.3  Background ............................................................................................................................ 16 

2  Theoretical Framework ................................................................................................................. 19 

2.1  Industrial Ecology .................................................................................................................. 19 

2.2  Landfill Mining ....................................................................................................................... 20 

2.3  MFA (Material Flow Analysis) ................................................................................................ 21 

3  Method .......................................................................................................................................... 23 

3.1  Assumptions .......................................................................................................................... 25 

4  Collected Data and Estimations .................................................................................................... 27 

4.1  Gärstad Landfill History ......................................................................................................... 28 

4.1.1  The old Incinerator ........................................................................................................ 28 

4.1.2  KV1 ................................................................................................................................. 28 

4.1.3  Gärstad Verket ............................................................................................................... 28 

4.1.4  FUDD .............................................................................................................................. 29 

4.1.5  Landfill Tax ..................................................................................................................... 29 

4.2  Flows and stocks of waste ..................................................................................................... 29 

4.2.1  Estimation of flows between 1974‐1990 and outflows ................................................ 32 

4.2.2  Waste flow history......................................................................................................... 33 

4.3  Concentrations ...................................................................................................................... 33 

4.3.1  Ashes ............................................................................................................................. 33 

4.3.2  Construction and demolition waste .............................................................................. 35 

4.3.3  Me‐OH Sludge................................................................................................................ 36 

4.3.4  Household Waste .......................................................................................................... 36 

4.3.5  Mixed Waste .................................................................................................................. 37 

4.3.6  Others ............................................................................................................................ 37 

4.4  Accessibility Criteria .............................................................................................................. 37 

5  Results ........................................................................................................................................... 39 

5.1  Scrap metal ............................................................................................................................ 40 

5.2  Metal content in ashes .......................................................................................................... 40 

5.3  Metal content in C&D waste ................................................................................................. 41 

5.4  Metal content in Metal hydroxide sludge ............................................................................. 42 

 

5.5  Metal Content in Household Waste ...................................................................................... 42 

5.6  Metal Content by Areas ......................................................................................................... 43 

5.7  Accessibility and Hotspots ..................................................................................................... 44 

6  Discussion ...................................................................................................................................... 47 

6.1  Method .................................................................................................................................. 47 

6.2  Data ....................................................................................................................................... 47 

6.3  Comparing concentrations with mining ................................................................................ 48 

6.4  Comparing LFM with modern mining .................................................................................... 48 

6.5  Value ...................................................................................................................................... 50 

6.6  National Numbers ................................................................................................................. 50 

6.6.1  Gärstad landfill as a source of material ......................................................................... 51 

7  Conclusion ..................................................................................................................................... 53 

7.1  Recommendations for the company ..................................................................................... 53 

8  Bibliography ................................................................................................................................... 55 

Appendix A: Inflows of the landfill per year .......................................................................................... 59 

Appendix B: Metal amounts in different types of ash .......................................................................... 65 

10 

 

List of Figures

Figure 1: Location of Gärstad landfill, 3 Km northeast of Linköping, Sweden. ..................................... 18 

Figure 2: The life cycle of a product; the disposal stage includes all the material inside a landfill. ..... 19 

Figure 3: Closing the loop; instead of disposing of material, they are reinserted into the life cycle. 

Own illustration based on Frosch & Gallopoulos (1989) ....................................................................... 19 

Figure 4: Diagram of the two methods used in the study. The left one was used for estimating  amounts of landfilled waste and metal and the right for verifying the amount of waste and allocating  the metal. .............................................................................................................................................. 24 

Figure 5: The different areas of Gärstad landfill, each area used for different purposes, except for E  which is a lake........................................................................................................................................ 27 

Figure 6: Ashes in all forms (BA, FA and sludge) sent from each power plant for landfilling in Gärstad. 

The old incinerator was decommissioned in 1980 and thus no more ash was sent from there. Own  illustration, based on data from all Gärstad landfill environmental reports and county administration  permissions. .......................................................................................................................................... 29 

Figure 7: Schematic view of the waste flows to and from the landfill (the oval shape) currently. The  two circles are power plants that send their incineration residue to landfill which makes up around 

85% of the total incoming waste. .......................................................................................................... 31 

Figure 8: The landfilled amount of main types of wastes since landfill started operating, 1974 until  now, 2011. ............................................................................................................................................. 33 

Figure 9: Estimated amount of landfilled metals in all forms calculated from flows of waste. ............ 39 

Figure 10: Estimated amount of different metals in all types of landfilled ash. ................................... 41 

List of Tables

Table 1: generated and treated waste in Sweden in years 2004, 2006 and 2008 (dry weight) 

(Naturvårdverket, 2012). The landfilled mining waste is the landfilled waste generated from the  mining industry and should not be confused with LFM. ....................................................................... 17 

Table 2: Usage description of the landfill areas. ................................................................................... 27 

Table 3: All identified waste flows of Gärstad; from which the interesting waste flows were selected  for calculating metal amount in the landfill .......................................................................................... 30 

Table 4: Area, volume and waste content of each area until 2009 (Hammar, 2012). .......................... 32 

Table 5: Identified outflows of ash from Gärstad landfill. .................................................................... 33 

Table 6: Estimated metal concentrations in bottom ash generated from different fuels (waste, coal  and wood). ............................................................................................................................................ 34 

Table 7: Estimated metal concentrations in fly ash, generated from different fuels; and for wood from  different filters. ..................................................................................................................................... 34 

Table 8: Conversion factor used to obtain the amount of metals from their oxide form. ................... 35 

Table 9: Estimated metal concentrations in C&D waste based on (Boverket, 1998). .......................... 35 

Table 10: Concentrations of metal in me‐OH sludge from different studies (weight %). ..................... 36 

Table 11: Estimated metal concentrations in household waste ........................................................... 36 

Table 12: Accessibility criteria applied to different areas of the landfill. .............................................. 38 

Table 13: Estimated total amount of waste based on flows approach; and estimated amount of  landfilled metals in all forms calculated from flows of waste and its ratio compared to total amount  of waste. ................................................................................................................................................ 39 

11 

 

Table 14: Estimated total amount of waste based on volume approach; and estimated amount of  metals using the rate from the flows approach. ................................................................................... 40 

Table 15: Estimated total amount of scrap metal in the landfill, and its rate compared to the total  amount of waste. .................................................................................................................................. 40 

Table 16:  Estimated total amount of landfilled ash and the estimated amount of metals within. ..... 40 

Table 17 : Iron and Aluminium in scrap form in bottom ash from waste incineration. ........................ 41 

Table 18: Total amount of landfilled C&D waste and the estimated amount of metals within. .......... 42 

Table 19: Total amount of me‐OH waste and the estimated amount of metals within. ...................... 42 

Table 20: Total amount of Household waste and the estimated amount of metals within. ................ 43 

Table 21: Estimated amount of metals in A0 ........................................................................................ 43 

Table 22: Estimated amount of metals in A1, underground ................................................................. 43 

Table 23: Estimated amount of metals in A1, above ground ................................................................ 43 

Table 24: Estimated amount of metals in A2, underground ................................................................. 43 

Table 25: Estimated amount of metals in A2 aboveground .................................................................. 44 

Table 26: Estimated amount of metals in FUDD cell ............................................................................. 44 

Table 27: Estimated amount of metals in B .......................................................................................... 44 

Table 28: Estimated amount of metals in C .......................................................................................... 44 

Table 29: Estimated amount of metals in D .......................................................................................... 44 

Table 30: Estimated amount of metals in F ........................................................................................... 44 

Table 31: Estimated amount of metals in me‐OH cell........................................................................... 44 

Table 32: Concentration of different metals in ores compared to those in ashes. .............................. 48 

Table 33: Concentrations of metals in ores compared to those in the landfill. .................................... 48 

Table 34: Estimated economic value of some metals in the landfill. .................................................... 50 

Table 35: Deposited ashes in Sweden compared to those in Gärstad and the ratio between them. .. 50 

Table 36: Total amount of metal in landfilled bottom ash in Sweden; then downscaled to Gärstad  landfill and compared with results of this study. All units are in tonne. .............................................. 51 

Table 37: Domestic material consumption of some metals in Sweden downscaled to Östergötland  and compared with landfilled amount of metals in Gärstad landfill. ................................................... 51 

12 

 

Terms

Anthropogenic stocks: Refers to the material in the technosphere that already has been extracted,  processed, used, or discarded. 

Ash: Is the non‐combustible residues of an incineration process. 

Bottom Ash: Is the ash which is taken out from the bottom of an incinerator after burning the fuel.  

Flue  gas: Is  the gas emitted  to  the  atmosphere  from  an  incineration  process;  which  usually  goes  through a smokestack.  

Fly ash: Is the ash that follows the flue gas. 

Metal‐Hydroxide: Is any metal element which has formed a compound with hydroxide anion (OH

),  and thus shown with Me‐OH. 

Metal‐Oxide: Is any metal element which has formed a chemical compound with oxygen anion (0

‐‐

). 

Mixed Waste: Mixed waste is a mixture of household, industrial, ash and all other waste which used  to be landfilled.  

Natural  Stock:  Refers  to  the  material  available  in  natural  sources  (e.g.  ores),  where  the  elements  have been gathered through geological processes.  

Sludge: Refers to the fluid residue from cleaning flue gas and bottom ash with water. 

 

Wastes: “are substances or objects which are disposed of or are intended to be disposed of or are  required to be disposed of by the provisions of national law” (EIONET, 2009). 

13 

 

Abbreviation

BA: Bottom Ash  

CHP: Combined Heat and Power 

CY: Cyclone Filter 

C&D: Construction and Demolition 

EL: Electrostatic Filter 

EPA: Environmental Protection Agency 

FA: Fly Ash 

FUDD

Funktionsanpassad Deponidesign [Landfill designed for specific function]

KV: Kraftvärmeverket

 [CHP Plant] 

LFM: Landfill Mining 

Me‐OH: Metal Hydroxide  

MSW: Municipal Solid Waste 

MSWI: Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator 

WEEE: Waste from Electrical and Electronic Equipment 

 

Number system

Comma (,) is used as decimal separator and space ( ) is used as thousands separator. All the units are  based on the International System of Units (SI). 

 

14 

 

1 Introduction

All  processes  in  society  produce  waste.  In  nature,  the  waste  is  normally  used  as  a  resource  for  another process, but in human societies waste is often discarded. These discarded materials end up  in places for depositing waste known as landfills. The increase in population, and humans’ tendency  to  improve  their  quality  of  life,  has  led  to  an  increase  in  consumption  of  material.  More  material  consumption means generating more waste, and more waste means bigger landfills.  

This  thesis  focuses  on  the  valuable  materials  that  are  deposited  in  landfills.  Since  landfills  are  the  most  common  way  for  waste  disposal  and  exist  all  over  the  world  (UNSD,  2011)  .  The  landfills  are  becoming  bigger,  and  represent  different  threats  to  society  and  the  environment;  for  example  numerous hazardous substances reside inside them which can pollute the water and the land (Baas,  et al., 2011). 

 In  order  to  tackle  the  waste  problem,  The  EU  Commission  on  environment  has  defined  a  waste  hierarchy which sets priority on how the waste should be treated. From the highest priority to the  lowest  they  are:  prevention,  re‐use,  recycling,  recovery  and  disposal  (EU,  2008).  Based  on  this  definition, landfilling falls under the disposal step. Disposal of waste has the lowest priority and thus  needs  to  be  avoided  as  much  as  possible.  A  solution  to  this  problem  could  be  the  emerging  LFM 

(Landfill Mining) concept, which makes it possible to shift landfill from a disposal stage to a recycling  or recovery stage. LFM means recovering the landfilled waste, and use the buried material for other  purposes. There are many barriers for doing so, including economical, technical, legal, and health and  safety (Baas, et al., 2011).  

Just like a normal mining project, before you can extract material from a landfill you need to know  what resides inside it and what kind of waste has been deposited; thus it could be argued that the  first barrier is prospecting. After searching for other studies about waste composition inside landfills,  we  found  out  that  most  of  them  focus  on  the  environmental  impact  of  heavy  metals  and  leachate 

(Cossu, et al., 1995; Rettenberger, 1995). A few pilot studies (Hogland, 2002; Hogland, et al., 2004)  which prospect landfills in Sweden classify metals as a single category without any more details. This  can also be seen in the review made by Krook et al (2012) where no papers about prospecting metals  in  landfills  were  identified.  Previous  research  (Cossu,  et  al.,  1995;  Hogland,  2002)  shows  that  the  waste  composition  of  landfills  has  large  variations  in  physical  and  chemical  characteristics.  This  makes  the  estimation  of  the  content  and  thus  determination  of  valuable  resources  or  hazardous  substances difficult.  

Hence  prospecting  is  a  key  challenge.  Earlier  studies  have  used  sampling  method  for  prospecting 

(Hogland, et al., 2004) which is expensive, time consuming and reflects only a fraction of the landfill  and  thus  leads  to  an  isolated  understanding.  In  this  study  we  will  use  another  method  called  MFA 

(Material  Flow  Analysis)  which  maps  all  the  waste  that  has  entered  and  left  the  landfilled  through  time.  By  this  means,  we  will  be  able  to  give  a  better  picture  of  landfill  and  its  content.  The  main  objective of this thesis is to prospect for metals, not because of its environmental impacts but for its  economic value; so it is intended to serve as a base for future feasibility studies. 

1.1 Aim

The  main  goal  of  the  project  is  to  prospect  Gärstad  landfill.  Thereby  the  occurrence  of  different  metals will be estimated, their location and distribution will be shown and the accessibility of these 

15 

 

metal  stocks  will  be  assessed.  The  secondary  goal  is  to  develop  a  generic  method  for  prospecting  landfills. The research questions that we try to answer are as follows: 

1. How much different metals have been landfilled in Gärstad landfill over time? 

2. Where is the metal located? 

3. In what forms are the metal found? 

4. What  are  the  advantages  and  disadvantages  of  MFA  compared  to  direct  measurements  when applied to prospecting landfills? 

1.2 Limitation

In  this  study  we  included  the  metals  that  we  could  find  data  for.  For  this  decade  more  data  was  available, and twenty different kinds of metals were included: (Iron (Fe), Aluminium (Al), Arsenic (As), 

Boron  (B),  Barium  (Ba),  Cadmium  (Cd),  Cobalt  (Co),  Chromium  (Cr),  Copper  (Cu),  Mercury  (Hg), 

Manganese (Mn), Molybdenum (Mo), Nickel (Ni), Lead (Pb), Antimony (Sb), Selenium (Se), Tin (Sn), 

Titanium (Ti), Vanadium (V), and Zinc (Zn)). For previous decades, where data couldn’t be found, we  limited the metal types to ferrous and non‐ferrous. Also the study only considers the metals within  the  underground  and  above  ground  waste  in  Gärstad  landfill  area.  None  of  the  structures  such  as  office buildings, processing facilities and transportation equipment are included in the prospecting. 

Also temporary flammable waste deposits which are stored for a short time are not included in the  calculations, since they will be eventually used as fuel for the incinerators, and thus converted into  ash in the future.  Temporary non‐flammable waste will be considered as landfill by law only if it is  stored more than 3 years (Hammar, 2012), and the same concept was applied in the calculations.  

1.3 Background

Sweden’s  waste  management  history  starts  in  1969  when  the  Environment  Protection  Act  came  in  force  and  put  new  environmental  obligations  on  waste  treatment  facilities.  In  the  1970s,  the  government  emphasized  that  waste  has  to  be  seen  as  a  resource.  In  the  1980s,  the  phase‐out  or  substitution  of hazardous substances started. In 1992 the concept of “producer responsibility” was  introduced  which  obliged  certain  producers  to  collect  and  dispose  their  products  after  being  used. 

After  Sweden  joined  EU  in  1995,  the  waste  management  got  greatly  influenced  by  EU  policies  and  regulatory frameworks like the Framework Directive on Waste, the Landfill Directive, and the Waste 

Incineration  Directive.  In  1997  the  landfill  bans  were  imposed  which  prohibited  landfilling  of  flammable  and  organic  waste;  later  in  2000,  tax  on  landfilled  waste  started.  These  steps  in  waste  management go on to this date (Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, 2005).  

 

 

 

In 2008 about 98 million tonne of waste was generated in Sweden. Out of this, more than 70 million  tonnes (72%) of waste was generated by the mining industry. Household waste was about 5 million  tonnes  (5%)  and  the  rest  belongs  to  other  sectors.  In  table  1,  the  generated  and  treated  waste  in 

Sweden  in  years  2004,  2006,  and  2008  can  be  seen.  It  is  important  to  consider  that  the  figures  represent  the  dry  weight  (without  water)  of  waste;  thus  the  mining  industry  waste  becomes  59  million tonnes instead of 70 million tonnes.  

16 

 

Table 1: generated and treated waste in Sweden in years 2004, 2006 and 2008 (dry weight) (Naturvårdverket, 2012). The  landfilled mining waste is the landfilled waste generated from the mining industry and should not be confused with LFM.  

kton  household waste  industrial waste  mining industry waste  recycled waste  incinerated waste  landfilled waste  landfilled mining waste hazardous waste  non‐hazardous waste 

2004 2006  2008  2004  2006  2008 

373  489  349  4 459  4 643  4 044 

981  2 288 1 715 113 482 116 093 80 061

58 400  61 800  58 699

292  339  108  17 544  26 059  2 853 

382  312  187  10 773  18 598  8 311 

494  378  384  3 937  3 765  3 837 

58 400  61 800  58 699

 

Currently  the  Swedish  waste  management  system  tries  to  achieve  maximum  environmental  and  social benefits from the waste. This has been possible through the cooperation of different actors,  business, municipality and people. The producers are responsible for some products in their end of  life  stage,  municipalities  are  responsible  for  household  waste  and  people  are  responsible  for  separating their waste. Actually as of 2011, 99% of the household waste was recycled for energy or  material (Avfall Sverige, 2011).  

The  most  important  methods  for  waste  treatment  in  Sweden  include  material  recycling  for  packaging, paper, scrap, and WEEE (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment), biological treatment  through digestion or composting of green and food (organic) waste, waste‐to‐energy of combustible  waste (household), and finally landfilling for waste that cannot be recycled (Avfall Sverige, 2011).  

Since this study is about landfills, we chose Tekniska Verken i Linköping AB (publ), a company which  itself  belongs  to  Linköping  Municipality.  This  company  is  involved  in  different  areas  like  electricity  production, district heating, water and sewage treatment, waste treatment and biogas. The company  also owns the Gärstad Landfill where waste is deposited. The Gärstad landfill falls under the energy  division in the company (Tekniska Verken i Linköping AB (publ), 2010). 

Currently  the  Landfill  receives  all  kinds  of  waste  from  more  than  30  municipalities  in  Östergötland 

County.  Household  waste  and  other  flammable  waste  are  incinerated  for  energy  recovery.  Other  waste like C&D is deposited and some other like WEEE is sent to other facilities for treatment.   

Gärstad landfill is located about 3 Km northeast of Linköping, Sweden. The map of the facility can be  seen in figure 1.  

17 

 

 

Figure 1: Location of Gärstad landfill, 3 Km northeast of Linköping, Sweden. 

 

18 

 

2 Theoretical Framework

All  products  that  we  use  are  made  out  of  different  materials  like  metals,  plastics  and  etc.  These  materials are extracted from different sources that lay in the rigid outer part of the earth known as  lithosphere.  After being  processed into different products  they  enter  the anthroposphere, which is  the  regions  of  the  surface  of  earth  affected  by  humans,  like  cities  and  villages.  Then  the  products  start to be used in everyday applications. Materials inside different products that are in  this phase  are known as “stock in use”. Then the product is thrown away after being used.  The life cycle of a  product can be seen in figure 2. 

Material 

Extraction

Manufacture Distribution Usage Disposal

 

Figure 2: The life cycle of a product; the disposal stage includes all the material inside a landfill. 

2.1 Industrial Ecology

With  the  raise  in  awareness  of  environmental  and  economic  issues  such  as  mineral  depletion  and  scarcity  of  mineral  resources,  it  has  been  proposed  (Frosch  &  Gallopoulos,  1989)  that  the  material  life cycle should be a closed loop, meaning that all the material that goes to waste should be reused  or  recycled,  and  that  material  in  stock  which  is  no  longer  used  but  not  thrown  away  should  be  recovered to replace natural sources. For this purposes all the waste that normally goes to disposal  should be instead send to one of the previous phases. It is even suggested that all the material that  has been deposited already in the landfill should be extracted and reinserted into the cycle as shown  in figure 3 (Frosch & Gallopoulos, 1989). 

Material 

Extraction/ 

Recovery

Disposal / 

Recolection

Manufacture

Usage Distribution

 

Figure 3: Closing the loop; instead of disposing of material, they are reinserted into the life cycle. Own illustration based  on Frosch & Gallopoulos (1989) 

The concept of closing the cycle is, however, much more complex to achieve in practice; because the  different  phases  of  one  product  are  not  independent  from  other  products  or  materials,  meaning  each life cycle stage of a product may interact with a life cycle stage of another product or material 

19 

 

and the efficiency of these interactions will determine the amount of waste of the whole system. To  optimize these interactions it is necessary to have a system approach in which the industry emulates  the natural processes to maximize the efficiency of energy and resources use and to minimize waste. 

This  concept  was  first  introduced  by  Frosch  and  Gallopoulos  (1989)  and  is  known  as  Industrial 

Ecology. 

To  minimize  the  waste  it  is  necessary  that  different  industries  interact  with  each  other  in  the  way  that the waste of one process can be used as raw materials for another. The practice of this industrial  symbiosis leads to reduced needs for extraction of virgin materials, reduced costs for companies, and  less discarded waste. The success of this approach depends on the correlation between government,  manufacturers  and  consumers;  normally  the  interactions  between  industries  appear  naturally,  but  then the challenge appears when the materials leave the industrial level and are scattered in the rest  of  the  society,  and  the  recollection  and  recovery  processes  become  much  harder.  Here  the  role  of  governments and consumers gains importance as it is their duty to facilitate the ways in which waste  is treated and where the materials will reach their end of life (Frosch & Gallopoulos, 1989).   

When  materials  reach  their  end  of  life  stage,  two  things  can  happen:  either  they  persist  without  being used or they are discarded in the form of waste. The first case is called material hibernation,  where  a  material  stays  in  the  anthroposphere  for  years  without  being  collected  by  any  waste  management process (UNEP, 2010). In the latter case, where materials are thrown away, they can be  managed in several ways in order to return to the material cycle, but when it is not possible, they are  discarded and generally end up in landfills. 

2.2 Landfill Mining

One  of  the  biggest  challenges  for  industrial  ecology  is  how  to  deal  with  these  growing  hibernating  stocks  in  the  anthroposphere,  and  is  has  been  suggested  (UNEP,  2010)  that  mining  them  can  be  a  solution to reintroduce material into the cycle and as a replacement for natural resource extraction.  

The process of extracting these materials and bring them back in the material cycle is called urban  mining  (UNEP,  2011).  And  more  specifically  if  the  extraction  comes  from  a  landfill  the  associated  term  is  landfill  mining.  Landfill  mining  is  defined  by  Krook  et  al  (2011)  as  “a  process  for  extracting  minerals or other solid natural resources from waste materials that previously have been disposed of  by burying them in the ground”.  

According to previous studies (Hogland, 2002; Krook, et al., 2011), there are many additional benefits  from  landfill  mining,  which  includes:  conservation  of  landfill  space,  reduction  of  landfill  area,  expanding  landfill  lifetime,  prevention  and  remediation  of  pollution  and  other  sources  of  contamination like leachate

1

, material and energy recovery, reduction in management system costs,  site redevelopment, and reclamation of land.  

Landfill  mining  was  first  carried  out  in  1953  in  order  to  obtain  fertilizer  for  orchards  (Krook,  et  al., 

2011). Historically the attempts on landfill mining have been done for land reclamation and recovery  of the soil, but not for material recovery.  

                                                            

1

 A liquid material that drains from stockpiled material and contains environmentally harmful substances (wiki).  

20 

 

2.3 MFA (Material Flow Analysis)

One of the tools used in industrial ecology is MFA. It allows the user to quantify the flows or stocks of  certain  material  that  goes  into,  through  and,  out  of  a  system  of  interest.  To  make  a  MFA  it  is  necessary  to  define  a  system  boundary  and  a  time  scale.  The  system  boundary  is  spatial  boundary  that confines a specific area (i.e. a factory, city or county). Defining a system boundary facilitates the  data  collection  phase  in  a  study.  The  time  scale  chosen  is  normally  one  year,  because  most  of  the  data from governments, organizations and agencies are reported annually.  

After defining the system boundary and time scale, the estimating method is defined. The standard  methods for estimating a material stock are the bottom‐up, and top‐down (UNEP, 2010).  

Bottom‐up: in this method the data about the level of stock is collected and used for estimating the  amount of material stock. This can be shown with the below formula: 

   (1) 

Where   is stock of a material in time t,   is the quantity of good i at time t, and   is the material  concentration of good i, and A is the number of different types of goods.  This method depends on  the stock data. This approach is used when there is not enough information about the flows of the  system. 

Top‐down: this method is used when the flows of a material into and out of a system are considered,  and their cumulative difference shows the stock. This method can be shown as followed: 

  (2) 

Where   is stock of a material in time t,   is the initial time step, T is current time step, and   is the  stock the material in the initial time step. This method depends on the inflow and outflow data. 

Both methods have their advantages and disadvantages. And then in the study a mixture of both is  used considering the availability of the data. The top‐down method uses the stocks’ flow rate, and  thus shows the evolution of stock over time; and since it is done considering the flows and not the  actual stock, it can be seen as a less accurate method compared to bottom‐up. On the other hand,  the  bottom‐up  method  can  present  a  high  level  of  uncertainty  depending  on  the  quality  of  the  information about material concentrations, especially if the stock is mixed with other kind of material 

(UNEP, 2010).  

For  the  specific  case  of  metal  stocks  above  the  ground  (such  as  landfills)  and  because  of  the  non‐ homogeneous characteristics of waste, the methods presented before are not enough and should be  use  together  with  rough  estimates  made  based  on  calculations  of  discard  of  end‐of‐life  products 

  combined with information on the amount of recycled metal used over time (UNEP, 2010). 

21 

 

 

22 

 

3 Method

In this study we will use case study as our research method in order to investigate the LFM concept in  a real life context which is the Gärstad landfill. Since it is a case study, generalization of the results  must  be  done  with  care,  but  the  approach  developed  during  the  study  might  be  useful  for  similar  cases. In this case the system boundary is Gärstad landfill, and the time boundary is the time period  in which the landfill has been operational.  

The calculations are done based on the methods proposed in a UNEP report called “Metals Stocks in 

Society” (UNEP, 2010), In the case of data unavailability, assumptions will be made based on relevant  data or similar studies.   

In the study the current state of the landfill is described in order to know where the different waste  goes and where it is landfilled. All the incoming and outgoing flows of different types of waste in the  landfill are identified, and the amount of different types of waste inside the landfill is determined by  using these flows.  

To  quantify  the  flows  is  necessary  to  gather  the  information  given  by  Gärstad  Landfill  annual  environmental  reports,  which  cover  the  time  period  between  1990  and  2011.  For  estimating  the  flows during previous years, assumptions will be done based on environmental permissions given to 

Tekniska Verken by the Swedish EPA (Statens Naturvårdsverket) and other documents collected from  the  Municipality  of  Linköping  (Linköpings  kommun)  and  the  Östergötland’s  county  administration 

(Östergötlands Länstyrelssen).  

Equation  3  represents  how  the  data  will  be  used  to  quantify  the  amount  of  the  different  types  of  waste, from the periods from    to    .  

  (3) 

All  flow  units  are  given  in  tonne  and  the  periods  are  defined  depending  on  the  available  data  and  milestones, and are not necessarily equal.  

 In a parallel approach, the amount of waste in the landfill (Sw) is estimated by using the volumes (V)  of the different areas (z) described for the landfill.  

Sw

∗  

(4) 

The density of the waste (  are taken from results of geotechnical analysis done on Gärstad landfill  by  the  Swedish  Geotechnical  Institute  (Statens  Geotekniska  Institut).  The  information  about  the  different  areas  of  the  landfill  is  obtained  from  Tekniska  Verken  annual  environmental  reports  and  from interviews and mail communication with the contact person (Magnus Hammar) and other staff  of Tekniska Verken. 

In  order  to  estimate  the  total  amount  of  waste  based  on  the  flows  of  the  landfill  (equation  3)  it  is  required to identify all the flows over time. This approach requires more attention to details through  the  time  period.  When  estimating  the  amount  of  waste  based  on  volume  (equation  4),  it  is  only  required to measure the dimensions of the waste deposits. This approach requires less data and thus  less  processing  time  compared  to  the  flows  approach.  The  flows  approach  gives  detailed  results  about  the  composition  of  waste  meanwhile  the  volume  approach  gives  detailed  results  about  the 

23 

 

allocation of waste, resulting in a detailed description of the waste in the landfill. The estimated total  amount  of  waste  is  considered  to  be  more  precise  by  the  flows  approach  compared  to  volume  approach, since the latter highly depends on density of waste, which is influenced by several factors  such as type of waste and the pressure on it. 

Thereafter  the  concentrations  of  different  metals  in  the  different  types  of  waste  are  established. 

Because  of  the  non‐homogeneous  characteristics  of  waste,  the  concentrations  will  be  estimated  based on studies performed for the same type of waste. Depending on the amount of the collected  information, the concentrations will be given in a range obtained from statistical analysis of the data  using a 95% confidence interval. Since the data about metal concentrations in waste depends on the  type of waste, the estimated amount of each waste types obtained from the flow approach will be  used to estimate the total amount of metals on each type of waste (equation 1), and then added up  to estimate the total amount of metal in the landfill (equation 2). 

By assuming a uniform distribution of waste and metal in the landfill, the rate between the estimated  total  amount  of  metals  and  the  estimated  total  amount  of  waste  will  be  used  as  the  metal  concentration in the whole landfill (using equation 1 as a basis). This rate is used as an approximation  of  metal  concentration  in  mixed  waste  and  also  for  estimating  the  amount  of  metals  in  area  with  mixed waste. A schematic view of the method can be seen in figure 4. 

Define Boundaries:

Gärstad Landfill: 1974-

2011

Identify Inflows and outflows per year

Exlude insignificant flows

Identify type of waste in each area

Determine density of each type of waste

Obtain volume of waste in each area

Add all flows for each type of waste

(Eq 3)

Add totals of different types of waste

Determine amount of waste in each area (Eq 4)

Determine concentration of metals in each type of waste

Determine amount of each metal per year in each type of waste (Eq 1)

Compare Results

Add the amount of waste in each area

Find the total amount of each metal in each type of waste (Eq 2)

Calculate the ratio

Find the total of each metal to Calculate metal by amount of each total amount of area metal in the landfill waste

 

Figure 4: Diagram of the two methods used in the study. The left one was used for estimating amounts of landfilled  waste and metal and the right for verifying the amount of waste and allocating the metal. 

24 

 

Finally,  all  the  information  obtained  will  be  analysed  to  determine  the  quantity,  distribution,  form  and accessibility of the metal stocks in the landfill.  

In  order  to  determine  the  accessibility  of  the  metal  in  waste,  a  few  criteria  are  defined.  Later  the  criteria are applied to each identified area of the landfill. The first criterion is if there is a construction  or facility built above the area. It is considered that areas with such characteristic are not accessible  and  thus  are  not  interesting  for  LFM.  The  second  criterion  is  if  the  area  is  in  use  or  has  it  been  covered and closed. Since waste located in these areas are supposed to be hard to access physically. 

The third criterion is the type of waste, which gives an overview of the amount and forms of metal  within each area, and determines the ease of accessibility and the required technology to extract the  metal.  

3.1 Assumptions

When estimating the amount of flows, volumes and metal concentrations, due to lack of data it was  necessary  to  make  assumptions.  All  the  assumptions  can  be  found  through  chapter  4,  especially  sections 4.2 and 4.3 where flows and concentrations are shown respectively.  

 

 

It  is  important  to  make  assumptions  where  there  is  lack  of  data  in  order  to  show  a  more  precise  picture of the landfill use; thus the reliability of the results depend on the quality of the assumptions.  

25 

 

 

26 

 

4 Collected Data and Estimations

Gärstad landfill is approximately 0,6 km

2

. It consists of six areas, named from A to F. In these areas  different activities are done which consist of receiving, treating, recovering, storing, and landfilling of  waste. In figure 5, a map of the landfill can be seen. 

 

Figure 5: The different areas of Gärstad landfill, each area used for different purposes, except for E which is a lake. 

In  the  past  all  the  areas  (except  E,  which  is  not  used)  were  used  to  landfill  mixed  industrial  and  household waste, filling existing holes up to ground level. After that each area has been used for a  specific  purpose.  A  description  of  the  current  use  of  each  area  can  be  seen  in  table  2  (Tekniska 

Verken, 2012): 

Table 2: Usage description of the landfill areas. 

Name 

A

A

1

 

A

2

 

FUDD Cell 

Description of current usage 

Treatment of oil contaminated soil, and temporary storage of  waste for incineration. 

Sorting and Landfilling of BA from MSWI, and organic residues. 

Storing and landfilling of BA from the different boilers. 

Fly ash cell (RGR‐cell, included in A2), covered and closed in 

2004. 

Sorting and recycling of incoming waste, covered in 1994. 

Treatment and storage of different kinds of fuel (wood and  plastic); covered in 2009. 

Landfill of industrial waste, storing of MSW, operating since 

1992. 

Landfill for hazardous waste, storing of MSW. (Landfill of Metal‐

OH in this area started in 2009) 

27 

 

4.1 Gärstad Landfill History

It  is  important  to  consider  the  history  of  the  landfill  and  its  milestones,  since  it  directly  affects  the  waste composition and makes it possible to make better assumption where there is a lack of data. 

The history of different power plants in Linköping will also be stated, since all their incineration by‐ products go to the landfill.  

4.1.1 The old Incinerator

Everything started in 1958, when Tekniska Verken started to burn waste in the old incineration plant,  known as “Sopförbränningsanläggningen”. Back then the ash from incineration was sent to another  landfill  which  was  on  the  verge  of  filling  up  (Tekniska  Verken,  1999).  In  1973  Tekniska  Verken  was  granted permission from County Administration to landfill waste in the new landfill, Gärstad. Gärstad  was a clay land, excavated by a local clay factory for producing bricks. This left the land with big holes  in  the  ground,  which  was  suitable  for  landfilling.  The  waste  that  was  intended  to  be  landfilled  consisted  of  construction  and  demolition,  inflammable  waste,  soil  and  excavated  material,  slaughterhouse  waste,  a  small  percentage  of  industrial  and  household  waste,  and  finally  the  ash  generated from burning the flammable waste. The incineration capacity of the incineration plant was 

45 000  tons  of  household  waste  per  year.  The  plant  used  to  send  its  ash  to  the  landfill  from  1974  until 1980, when it was shut down (Tekniska Verken, 1999).  

4.1.2 KV1

In  1962,  the  construction  of  Kraftvärmeverk  (KV1)  started,  which  is  a  CHP  (Combined  Heat  and 

Power)  plant.  It  got  operational  in  1964  with  two  oil  boilers.  Later  in  1971  they  added  another  oil  boiler to it. In 1985 two of the oil boilers were converted to coal and wood boilers, which resulted in  generation of bottom ash. Also, a flue gas cleaning system was installed, which resulted in generation  of  fly  ash.  From  this  date  until  1992  the  BA  and  the  FA  from  the  boilers  were  mixed  together  and  then landfilled. In 1992 the boilers were renovated, which led to increase in ash generation (Tekniska 

Verken, 1999). Also at the same year a NO x

 reduction and flue gas condensing system was installed  on  wood  boiler  in  KV1  because  of  the  new  environmental  regulations,  introducing  FA  from  the  cyclone  filter  and  Electrostatic  filters  into  the  landfill  (Tekniska  Verken,  2004).  Due  to  its  hazardousness, since 2005 the ashes collected from the electrostatic filter of wood incineration are  sent to Norway for treatment. 

4.1.3 Gärstad Verket

In 1979 the construction of Gärstad Verket (GV) started. In 1981 the first phase started to work with  waste and tree as fuels. In 1982 the second waste  boiler started to work and thus reaching its full  operational capacity. In 1985 a flue gas cleaning system was installed, and around x ton of fly ash was  collected.  Due  to  increased  demand  in  power  production,  in  1993  and  1994  the  boilers  got  fit  for  steam production which increased their incineration capacity.  

In 2001 a contractor started to separate the ferrous metal from BA with a magnet. This resulted in  less  concentration  of  ferrous  metal  in  the  BA  which  was  sent  for  construction.  In  2005  the  fourth  boiler  (KV60)  was  put  into  operation,  which  doubled  the  nominal  incineration  capacity  of  GV,  and  thus the ash generation increased. In 2006 the contractor started to recover non‐ferrous metal from 

BA, which resulted in less concentration of such metals in the final BA. In the same year, three of the  boilers (KV50) were shut down for maintenance, which resulted in a reduction in ash generation. The  ashes (BA, FA, and sludge) sent by all the power plants through time can be seen in figure 6.  

28 

 

90 000

80 000

70 000

60 000

50 000

Tonne

40 000

30 000

20 000

10 000

0

Old Incinerator

KV1

Gärstadverket

Figure 6: Ashes in all forms (BA, FA and sludge) sent from each power plant for landfilling in Gärstad. The old incinerator  was decommissioned in 1980 and thus no more ash was sent from there. Own illustration, based on data from all 

Gärstad landfill environmental reports and county administration permissions.  

4.1.4 FUDD

In  1992  the  FA  from  Gärstad  Verket  started  to  be  landfilled  in  a  special  cell  called  FUDD 

(Funktionsanpassad deponidesign [

Landfill designed for specific function]

). Before this date all the FA  from  waste  was  mixed  and  landfilled  with  all  the  other  ashes.  This  cell  was  decommissioned  and  covered in 2004. Since then the FA from waste is sent to Norway for treatment.  

4.1.5 Landfill Tax

In  2000  with  the  introduction  of  landfill  tax,  Tekniska  Verken  started  to  use  BA  as  a  construction  material,  and  thus  no  more  BA  was  officially  landfilled.  These  stocks  of  ash  that  are  used  for  construction  are  referred  to  as  “hidden  landfills”;  and  are  considered  as  landfilled  material  in  our  calculations.  

4.2 Flows and stocks of waste

Gärstad landfill receive several types of waste, but nowadays many of them never reach the landfill  itself, instead they are sent to other facilities to be treated (e.g. electronic waste, batteries and other  hazardous  substances)  or  recycled  (e.g.  asphalt,  concrete  or  scrap  metal).  These  wastes  are  mentioned  in  Gärstad  landfill  environmental  reports  but  are  excluded  from  the  calculations  since  they are never landfilled. In Table 3 all different types of waste flows that have been sent to Gärstad  over  its  history  can  be  seen.  In  order  to  estimate  the  total  amount  of  waste,  all  the  flows  except  those  who  were  not  landfilled  or  excluded  due  to  low  amount  are  used.  But  to  estimate  the  total  amount of metal, only the flows mentioned in Table 3 as “included” are used.  

When estimating the total amount of waste, it is necessary to include as many flows as possible since  it will affect  the rate of  metal  to waste in the landfill. But flows such as leachate and dust will  not  affect the final results due to their very low amounts. 

 Also, when estimating the total amount of metal, it is necessary to include as many flows as possible  which  contain  metal.  But  flows  such  as  sludge  and  asbestos  can  be  excluded  since  their  low  metal  content will not affect the final results. More details regarding these comments can be found further  in the report. 

 

 

29 

 

Table 3: All identified waste flows of Gärstad. The flows except those that are not landfilled or excluded due to low  amount are used to estimate total amount of waste. The flows marked as “included” are the ones used for estimating  the total amount of metal.  

Waste 

Ashes 

Inert waste 

Municipality waste water 

Industrial waste water 

Commercial waste 

Contaminated soil 

Hazardous 

Other 

Waste subgroups 

Bottom ash KV1 coal 

Fly ash KV1 coal 

Sludge KV1 

Bottom ash KV1 wood 

Fly ash KV1 wood 

Bottom ash Gärstad 

Fly ash Gärstad 

Sludge Gärstad 

Wood Ash from other sources 

Construction and demolition 

Asphalt 

Asbestos 

Comments 

Included 

Included 

Excluded due to low concentrations 

Included 

Included 

Included 

Included 

Excluded due to low concentrations 

Included 

Included 

Excluded due to low concentrations 

Excluded due to low concentrations 

Concrete 

Excavated material 

Not landfilled 

Not landfilled 

Excluded due to low concentrations 

Sludge from street gullies and industry Excluded due to low concentrations 

Oil separated sludge 

Slaughter waste 

Metal Hydroxide sludge 

Forest Waste 

Excluded due to low concentrations 

Excluded due to low concentrations 

Included 

Not landfilled 

Not landfilled 

Batteries, chemicals, acids, explosives,  electronic waste and etc. 

Latrine 

Scrap metal 

Glass 

Not specific industrial waste 

Household Waste 

Leachate 

Dust 

Not landfilled 

Excluded due to low concentrations 

Not Landfilled 

Excluded due to low concentrations 

Excluded due to low concentrations 

Included 

Excluded due to low amount 

Excluded due to low amount 

 

Currently inside the landfill, the waste can be treated in three different ways: landfilled, recovered  and stored.  

Waste  is  landfilled  when  it  is  deposited  in  the  area  and  currently  has  no  more  use.    This  category  includes  BA,  FA,  sludge  from  various  sources,  construction  and  demolition  waste,  asbestos, 

Industrial, and commercial waste. These wastes are the inflows of the landfill.  

Waste  is  recovered  when  it  is  reused,  recycled  or  sold.  By  this  definition,  metal  scrap  is  recovered  since  it  is  separated  from  other  waste  and  sold  to  other  entities.  Some  waste  can  be  recovered  without  being  processed,  for  example  BA  and  asphalt  are  recovered  and  used  as  construction  or  covering material, or sold to other landfills. The main outflows (scrap metal and a small amount BA)  of the landfill come from this category.  

Waste is stored when it is possible to be reused or recycled, but there is no immediate need for it. 

This  means  that  there  is  no  difference  between  the  characteristics  of  recovered  and  stored  waste,  but stored waste may be more accessible. These kinds of waste are neither inflow nor outflow. In this  study it is assumed that stored ash is the same as landfilled and stored C&D waste is sent outside the  landfill.  

30 

 

 

The  amount  of  landfilled  and  stored  waste  is  easier  to  determine,  because  they  are  stated  in  the  reports. For recovered waste, it is necessary to exclude the outflows. So it is necessary to determine  how much was send outside to estimate the amount in stock. In most of the cases the outflows is  bottom  ash  sold  to  other  landfills  used  as  covering  material  and  coal  bottom  ash  used  for  construction of roads.  The remaining recovered material is used internally.  

There are other types of waste which are sorted inside Gärstad landfill, such as hazardous waste and  scrap metal. These types of waste come inside the landfill facilities, are sorted and leave. Thus they  are not included in the calculations. 

 

 

Figure 7: Schematic view of the waste flows to and from the landfill (the oval shape) currently. The two circles are power  plants that send their incineration residue to landfill which makes up around 85% of the total incoming waste.  

The volume is presented based on areas, from A to F. as it can be seen in table 4, there are two kind  of volumes; underground volume and above surface volume. Underground volume is the volume of  waste from below the surface to ground level and above surface volume is the volume of waste from  ground level to above. The reason for this separation is that most of the underground waste is mixed  waste with its own characteristics and above surface waste are mostly ashes and a small amount of 

C&D.  

 

 

 

31 

 

Table 4: Area, volume and waste content of each area until 2009 (Hammar, 2012). 

Name 

A

0

 

A

1

 

A

2

 

FUDD 

Average  height 

‐ 

+6 m 

+7 

+9 

+4 

Area 

(m

2

50 000 

61 500 

54 500 

5 600 

45 000 

87 000 

75 500 

45 000 

Underground  volume (m³) 

250 000 

307 500 

272 500  n/a 

225 000 

435 000 

377 500 

225 000 

Underground  content 

Mixed waste 

Mixed Waste 

Mixed Waste  n/a 

Mixed waste 

Mixed waste 

Industrial Waste 

Industrial Waste 

Surface volume 

(m

3

 

369 500 

381 500 

50 400 

0  n/a 

180 000 

Above surface content 

 

BA from Waste, Ash from  coal and wood 

BA from Waste, Ash from  coal and wood 

FA from waste  n/a  n/a 

C&D 

Asbestos and industrial 

Waste 

 

The amount of waste in stock is calculated using a density of 1 tonne/m³ for waste and 1,4 tonne/m³  for ashes (Statens Geotekniska Institut, 1999). 

4.2.1 Estimation of flows between 1974‐1990 and outflows

From  1990  to  2011  the  flows  are  presented  in  the  environmental  reports  on  a  yearly  basis,  but  to  identify and quantify the flows for previous years, permissions given by country administration were  used. Since there was no specific values for material flows for each year, previous years were divided  into  groups  (1985‐1989,  1982‐1984,  1980‐1981,  1974‐1979).  These  groups  are  based  on  different  milestones and changes in the landfill and its related facilities, such as opening of a new incinerator. 

These groups are explained in the following.  

Since the date of the permission to use Gärstad as a landfill was given in the end of 1973, year 1974  was  considered  as  the  starting  point.  For  the  period  between  1974  and  1979  the  permit  given  by 

Naturvårdsverket which describes the future use of the land (Statens Naturvårdsverk, 1973) is used  for estimating the flows. The amount for different waste are given in m

3

 and in order to convert the  values into tonne, a density of 1 tonne/m

3

 is used for all waste, and 1,5 tonne/m

3

 for ashes (Statens 

Geotekniska Institut, 1999). 

In 1980 construction permission for Gärstad Verket is given, which describes that the old incinerator  will be decommissioned that year and predicts that Gärstad Verket incinerators will reach their full  capacity  in  5  years,  and  for  the  period  between,  the  amount  of  incinerated  waste  will  be  reduced,  and the rest will be landfilled (Statens Naturvårdsverk, 1980). Alas it was found that in 1982 one of  the boilers becomes fully operational (Tekniska Verken, 1999), and thus it was assumed that all the 

Gärstad Verket incinerators were fully operational in 1982.  

The  flows  during  years  1982‐1989  are  taken  from  the  description  of  the  new  facilities  (Statens 

Naturvårdsverk, 1981), and the introduction of the coal and wood boilers in KV1 (Tekniska Verken, 

1999). 

It  is  also  assumed  that  the  landfilled  amounts  of  waste  during  each  period  (group  of  years)  are  constant before 1990. Their yearly amount until 1990 is taken from the assumptions made above.  

As mentioned in section 4.2. The main outflow is bottom ash. But as it can be seen in table 5, there is  no  specific  pattern  for  these  flows.  Thus  it  is  assumed  that  the  occurrences  of  the  outflows  are  random.  The  outflows  will  be  considered  zero  unless  it  is  clearly  documented.  And  since  for  1974‐

1989 such documents were not found, it is assumed that there are no outflows during this period.  

32 

 

Table 5: Identified outflows of ash from Gärstad landfill. 

Usage  Year  amount unit Type 

Construction of Parking Space  2010 6300  ton  bottom ash from coal 

Sold to other landfills 

Sold to other landfills 

2010

2009

4700 

6 000  ton  bottom ash from waste  ton  bottom ash from waste 

Sold to other landfills 

Sold to other landfills 

2008 4000  ton  bottom ash from waste 

2007 1700  ton  bottom ash from waste 

Construction (expanding)  2002 17000  m3  All bottom ash 

Construction (Road to Ekängen) 2001 4500  ton  Bottom ash from coal 

Send away (Stenugnssund)  1990 4000  ton  Bottom ash from coal 

 

There  are  other  outflows  from  GA  which  are  mainly  emissions  to  water  in  form  of  leachate  and  emissions  to air  in  form  of  exhaust  gases,  and  dust.  The  amount  of  lost  mass  in  these  emissions  is  assumed to be insignificant compared to the amounts inside the landfill; thus they are excluded from  the calculations. 

4.2.2 Waste flow history

Using  the  information  collected  from  Gärstad  Landfill’s  environmental  reports  from  1990  to  2011,  and  the  estimations  of  the  use  of  the  landfill  collected  from  the  different  permissions  given  to 

Tekniska  Verken  by  the  environmental  authorities.  The  annual  landfilled  amount  can  be  seen  on  figure 8. More detailed information can be found in appendix A. 

Landfilled amount of waste 

Tonne

120 000

100 000

80 000

60 000

40 000

20 000

0

Ash

C&D

Household

Other

Figure 8: The landfilled amount of main types of wastes since landfill started operating, 1974 until now, 2011. 

4.3 Concentrations

The next step after estimating the amount of different waste in stock is to find the concentration of  different  metals  in  them.  Then  the  amount  of  each  type  of  waste  is  multiplied  by  its  metal  concentration, and then summed up in order to find the total amount of each metal.  

4.3.1 Ashes

The  generated  ashes  have  been  analysed  in  Gärstad  facilities  in  order  to  determine  the  amount  of  hazardous  material,  most  of  them  are  the  metals  considered  for  this  study.  After  comparing  these  measurements  with  data  from  ALLASKA  database,  and  seeing  similar  results,  it  was  assumed  that  data  about  missing  metals  (iron  and  aluminium)  in  Gärstad  reports  could  be  derived  from  these  databases  (värmeforsk,  2011;  Vägverket,  2000).  Since  these  metals  are  not  hazardous,  they  do  not  appear  on  the  Tekniska  Verken  analysis,  but  must  be  included  due  to  their  importance  in  society. 

 

33 

 

Tables  6  and  7  show  the  concentration  range  of  different  metals  in  ashes,  calculated  from  measurements done by Tekniska Verken since 2000. 

Table 6: Estimated metal concentrations in bottom ash generated from different fuels (waste, coal and wood).  

Estimated Concentrations  mg/kg 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Arsenic 

Boron 

Barium 

Cadmium 

Cobalt 

Chromium 

Copper 

Mercury 

Manganese 

Molybdenum 

Nickel 

Lead 

Antimony 

Selenium 

Tin 

Titanium 

Vanadium 

Minimum 

Waste (untreated / treated) 

69 997

B

  45 150

A

54 389

 B

  25 890

A

Maximum 

Coal  Wood 

10 585

A

Waste (untreated / treated) 

90 178

B

  82 150

A

33 744  8 163  56 911

B

  27 506

A

Coal 

‐ 

57 614 

Wood 

13 458

12 237 

28 

90 

1 138 

‐ 

5 628 

22 

184

A

794 

38 

252

A

1 745 

31 

‐ 

138 

234

26 532  1 976 

10 

25 

309 

3 255 

70 

189 

272 

129 

314 

16 

54 

484 

4 611 

123 

392 

767 

21 

334 

976 

911 

18 

186 

894 

101 

250 

3 473 

28 

993 

115 

69 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

59 

1 972 

1 450 

27 

308 

0

A

‐ 

22

A

 

1 252

A

 

15 

848 

1 125 

29 

310 

2 531 

163

A

552

A

 

3 542

A

 

33 

5 523 

1 435 

27 

244 

251 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

119 

3 333 

1 737 

78 

672 

12

 A

 

‐ 

33* 

3 325

 A

 

43 

2 564  Zinc  4 460 

A

Taken from Allaska database 

B

 Calculated from SGI (Statens Geotekniska Institut, 1999)

 

Table 7: Estimated metal concentrations in fly ash, generated from different fuels; and for wood from different filters.  

Estimated Concentrations  mg/kg 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Arsenic 

Boron 

Barium 

Cadmium 

Cobalt 

Chromium 

Copper 

Mercury 

Manganese 

Molybdenum 

Nickel 

Minimum 

Waste  Coal  Wood 

14 694

 A

  29 147

 A

  12 210

A

Wood CY

12 210

B

C

Wood EL

  12 210

D

Waste 

B

  26 322

A

27 401

 A

  54 310

 A

  23 447

A

23 447

B

  23 447

B

  39 021

A

10  76 

155

A

 

817 

65 

31 

370 

169 

344 

292

A

 

1 533 

28 

12 

77 

292

B

 

1 586 

12 

751 

292

B

 

1 453 

66 

12 

191 

175

A

 

2 189 

103 

50 

674 

703 

759

29 

123 

A

 

42 

271 

700 

21 

135 

275 

2 183 

‐443 

116 

180 

1 061 

30 

164 

421 

3 893 

‐1 165 

964 

941 

54 

177 

Coal 

49 611

A

66 939

20 

605 

236 

70 

304 

14 

64 

A

Maximum 

Wood  Wood CY 

C

  Wood EL 

D

15 662

 A

  15 662

 B

  15 662

B

 

32 219

 A

  32 219

 B

  32 219

B

 

465 

357

 A

 

2 561 

39 

21 

332 

415 

0  1  3 

1 490

A

  2 401

A

  2 635 

17 

1 394 

143 

357

 B

 

2 964 

24 

358 

340 

1 729 

73 

Lead 

Antimony 

Selenium 

Tin 

Titanium 

2 454  234  1 543  288 

872 

0

A

 

237 

40 

10 

0

 A

 

107 

13 

17

A

 

28 

13 

17

B

 

6 096

 A

  2 390

 A

  2 846

A

  2 846

B

 

41  46

 A

  38

A

  38

B

 

3 454  4 703  501  3 062  666 

227 

13 

17

B

 

2 085 

6

A

 

87 

14 

16

A

 

204 

16 

29

 A

 

48 

18 

29

 B

 

2 846

B

  9 975

A

  3 336

A

  4 864

 A

  4 864

 B

 

38

B

 

580 

54  115

A

  52

 A

  52

 B

  Vanadium 

Zinc  17 947  19 730  8 032 

A

 Taken from Allaska Database 

‐1 620  22 741  28 331 

No data available, concentration assumed to be the same as Fly ash from wood concentration 

42 470  21 154  13 923 

C

 CY: fly ash collected from the cyclone filters.  

EL: fly ash collected from electrostatic filter. 

955 

357

1 947 

91 

17 

291 

529 

4 017 

30 

3 407 

6 713 

441 

14 

29

B

 

B

 

4 864

B

 

52

B

 

32 174 

34 

 

When no values are found in the measurements by Tekniska Verken, tables 5 and 6 were completed  using the Allaska database. The search criteria were waste, coal and wood as fuels for incineration,  and grate furnace as the boiler type for waste incineration. 

All  the  recent  measures  for  BA  from  waste  incineration  were  taken  after  metal  separation,  so  in  order to identify changes in concentration a study done by SGI in 1999 was used. The only relevant  changes were identified for Iron and Aluminium, so the concentration values in this report are used  for the BA flows before 2000 and 2005 respectively.  

In some cases, the generated ashes are not separated, and only the total amount is given. In these  cases the concentration of metals is calculated based on the average ratio of generated BA and FA. It  was calculated that ashes from waste incineration has 87% BA – 13% FA, coal incineration 35% BA – 

65% FA, wood incineration 75% BA – 25% FA, and FA from wood incineration 40% EL – 60% CY. 

There are elements which are found in oxidized form, and some metal concentration values given in 

Allaska database are in oxidized form, so to obtain the concentration of the element, it was needed  to use the conversion factors shown in table 8 (British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines, 2011). 

Table 8: Conversion factor used to obtain the amount of metals from their oxide form. 

Original form 

Al2O3 

Fe2O3 

MnO 

TiO2 

To Obtain  Divide By 

Aluminium  1,8895 

Iron

1,4297 

Manganese

1,2912 

Titanium  1,6681 

 

Elements such as Iron and aluminium can be found mainly in oxidized form, because the scrap form  is separated. Nevertheless older ashes still contain metal in both oxidized and scrap form. Comparing  the concentrations of metal before and after metal recovery, it is estimated that approximately 45‐

55% of the iron and 52‐54% of the aluminium in the ashes prior to separation are in scrap form. For  other  metals  there  is  no  significant  difference  between  the  concentration  after  and  before  metal  separation.  

4.3.2 Construction and demolition waste

Based on the visual inspection by Tekniska Verken in years 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2009, the waste has  approximately 3% metal. They contain mainly copper, aluminium and iron.  

A study published by Boverket (1998), measured the materials used for construction and the  generated waste after renovation processes, the results can be seen in table 9.  

Table 9: Estimated metal concentrations in C&D waste based on (Boverket, 1998). 

 

 

Construction waste 

Renovation and demolition waste 

Estimated total amounts 

Total waste per year  in Sweden (Kt) 

419 

195 

614 

Metals 

0,50% 

8% 

3% 

Ferrous metals  ratio (Iron) 

73% 

75% 

2,15% 

Aluminium  Copper 

0% 

2% 

0,05% 

27% 

5% 

0,22% 

Others 

(unclassified) 

0% 

18% 

0,46% 

After comparing the study with the visual inspection, it is possible to assume that the concentrations  are in the same range for both cases. 

35 

 

4.3.3 Me‐OH Sludge

Metal  Hydroxide  is  any  metal  element  which  has  formed  a  compound  with  hydroxide  anion  (OH),  and thus shown with Me‐OH. Me‐OH sludge is the sediment left after filtering the wash water used  in  different  industries.  The  Me‐OH  received  at  Gärstad  comes  mainly  from  different  surface  treatment industries, such as painting, galvanizing, electroplating, etc. The metal concentration in the  sludge  is  very  high,  but  varies  depending  on  the  industry;  but  regardless  the  industry,  the  main  component  is  Iron.  The  sludge  also  contains  high  concentrations  of  other  metals  such  as  chrome,  copper, nickel, and zinc. Table 10 shows the most common results:

 

Table 10: Concentrations of metal in me‐OH sludge from different studies (weight %). 

Iron  Aluminium  Zinc  Chromium  Manganese  Copper 

26,42  0,36  21,37  2,5  0,21  n/a 

15  1,5  0,3  1  n/a  2 

Source 

(Sılvia C.R. Santos, 2008) 

(S. Netpradita, 2003) 

It can be seen that it is an important source of valuable metals. However, as the name indicates, the  metals here are basically in hydroxide form, which are highly unstable and are difficult to treat 

(Dulski, 1996). 

4.3.4 Household Waste

Although household waste is not currently being landfilled in Gärstad, a considerable amount of this  type of waste was deposited in the 70s. The amount of metals in household waste is calculated from  the  concentration  of  metals  in  ash  from  waste  incineration.  It  was  seen  from  collected  data  that  around  25%  of  waste  mass  remains  after  incineration  as  ashes.  so  in  order  to  find  the  metal  concentration in waste before incineration, the metal concentration in ashes are multiplied by 25%,  assuming there has been no losses in metal during the incineration process. In table 11 the calculated  concentrations can be seen.

 

Table 11: Estimated metal concentrations in household waste 

Household 

Waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Arsenic 

Boron 

Barium 

Cadmium 

Cobalt 

Chromium 

Copper 

Mercury 

Manganese 

Molybdenum

Nickel 

Lead 

Antimony 

Selenium 

Tin 

Titanium 

Vanadium 

Zinc 

44 

274 

50 

62 

89 

731 

223 

953 

1553 

Concentration (mg/kg) 

Min 

15702 

Max 

20469 

12720 

25 

274 

13646 

14 

61 

451 

73 

703 

103 

139 

13 

137 

1034 

293 

1095 

2122 

36 

 

 

4.3.5 Mixed Waste

The landfilled waste in the past is hard to characterize, because there are no measurements about its  composition. In order to tackle this problem this old waste was named ‘mixed waste’ and its metal  concentration is a combination of the metal concentrations of the different types of waste present in  the  landfill.  The  concentrations  are  calculated  as  the  rate  between  the  total  amount  of  estimated  metal and the total amount of estimated waste in the landfill. 

These  concentrations  are  used  to  give  an  overview  of  the  metal  concentration  if  a  uniform  distribution  of  waste  is  assumed  over  the  landfill.  In  addition,  these  concentrations  are  used  to  estimate  the  amount  of  metals  by  volume,  in  the  areas  where  the  waste  is  presented  in  a  mixed  state. 

4.3.6 Others

The focus of this study is the flows that have a relevant content of metal. So the flows whose metal  concentration are too little or have no metal has been omitted from the results.  This includes flows  such as latrine, municipality waste water and slaughter waste which are not  included due to being  organic  compounds,  and  their  recovery  being  important  for  other  applications  such  as  decomposition, gasification, composting. 

The metal concentration of leachate has a unit ratio of less than 1 mg/kg (Tekniska Verken, 2012) and  all together (Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd, and As) adds up to around 20 kg per year. The exception is Iron 

(Fe) and Manganese (Mn) which have a concentration unit of mg/kg but because of the small flows  they are assumed to be insignificant compared to metal content of the ashes and landfilled waste,  and thus not included in the calculations. 

Industrial  waste  sludge  has  high  amount  of  toxic  metals  like  lead,  mercury,  and  cadmium.  These  metals are phased out, and thus are not interesting for recovery. Asbestos is a family of carcinogenic  minerals; their composition may include iron, aluminium or magnesium in complex forms, but in very  low concentration.  

To simplify calculations, it is assumed that the metal concentrations in such flows presented above  are zero.  

4.4 Accessibility Criteria

Since the beginning, different types of waste have been deposited separately. But when new layers  of  waste  appear,  the  landfilling  is  done  without  considering  the  previous  use.  For  this  reason  the  waste  inside  each  area  is  considered  as  mixed  waste,  unless  the  area  has  been  specified  for  a  particular type of waste. Table 12 brings an overview of the characteristics of the different areas of  the landfill. As it can be seen, type of waste is categorized as above and under ground. The reason is  that  the  information  about  waste  above  ground  is  more  detailed  compared  to  the  underground. 

Also, the waste above ground is easier to access physically. 

 

37 

 

 

Table 12: Accessibility criteria applied to different areas of the landfill. 

 

A0  

A1 

A2 

FUDD (in A2) 

Construction  above 

No 

No 

No 

No 

Yes 

Partly 

Final coverage

Yes 

No 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

Partly 

D  No  No 

F  No  No  metal‐OH cell 

(old)  

No  Yes 

Metal‐OH cell 

(new, in F) 

No 

                

                

Fly ash only from waste incineration 

Without ashes 

No 

Type of waste 

(aboveground) n/a 

Mixed ashes 

Mixed ashes 

FA 

A

  n/a  n/a 

Mixed

B

 

Mixed 

Type of waste 

(underground) 

Mixed 

Mixed 

Mixed  n/a 

Mixed 

Mixed 

Mixed 

Mixed 

Metal‐oh 

Metal‐oh  n/a  n/a 

38 

 

5 Results

The  figure  bellow  shows  the  estimated  total  amount  of  the  most  common  metals  in  the  whole  landfill  based  on  the  flow  approach.  The  total  amount  of  waste  in  the  landfill  is  the  sum  of  the  different  types  of  waste,  including  those  whose  metal  concentration  is  assumed  to  be  zero  which  adds  up  to  4  million  tonne.  And  the  total  amount  of  metal  is  the  sum  of  the  estimated  amount  of  metal in each type of waste, described in section 5.2 to 5.5. 

Metals in Landfill

200 000

150 000

Ton

100 000

50 000

0

Iron Aluminium Copper Zinc Others

 

Figure 9: Estimated amount of landfilled metals in all forms calculated from flows of waste.  

As it can be seen in figure 9, iron and aluminium have the largest amounts in the landfill. Copper and  zinc are also found in considerable amounts. The values used for the figure above are shown in table 

13, which also shows the rate of estimated total metal to estimated total landfilled waste. This rate is  later used to estimate the amount of metal in areas where the landfill consists of mixed waste. 

Table 13: Estimated total amount of waste based on flows approach; and estimated amount of landfilled metals in all  forms calculated from flows of waste and its ratio compared to total amount of waste. 

 

 

Total waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Copper 

Zinc 

Others 

Amount (ton) 

Min  Max 

4 000 000 

127 015 

98 075 

180 283 

110 912 

7 388 

16 126 

22 633 

9 392 

27 069 

33 714 

Min 

Rate (%) 

Max 

100 

3,18 

2,45 

0,18 

0,40 

0,57 

4,51 

2,77 

0,23 

0,68 

0,84 

In table 14 the total amount of waste calculated based on the volume approach can be seen. Since  there is no detailed data about the metal contents within each area of the landfill, the total amount  of each metal is calculated based on the rates presented in table 13. 

 

 

 

39 

 

Table 14: Estimated total amount of waste based on volume approach; and estimated amount of metals using the rate  from the flows approach. 

Total 

Total Waste 

Iron 

Aluminum 

Copper 

Zinc 

Others 

Amount (ton) 

Min 

3 553 000 

Max 

118200 

96120 

6720 

15700 

20800 

159500 

108600 

8600 

26200 

31700 

Since the amount of waste calculated from volume, depends greatly on the used values for density of  each type of waste, it is considered that the results given by the flows approach are more accurate,  and is used for showing the metal content in the following sections. Nevertheless, the results from  both approaches are in the same order of magnitude and only vary around 10%. This shows that both  approaches are valid for estimating the amount of waste in a landfill.   

5.1 Scrap metal

Scrap metal is mainly found in C&D waste, bottom ash and household waste. While the biggest share  of scrap metal is found in bottom ashes, and specifically in ash deposits that belong to the period of  time before 2000 for ferrous, and 2005 for non‐ferrous. Since after these dates, the metal has been  sorted out from the bottom ash. These values are obtained after assuming that all the metal in C&D  and household waste are in scrap form, and oxidizing process for scrap metal is not happening. 

Table 15: Estimated total amount of scrap metal in the landfill, and its rate compared to the total amount of waste. 

 

  

Iron 

Aluminium 

Copper 

Other Metals 

Scrap (tonne)  min 

48 700  max 

67 000 

35 300 

2010 

5909 

38 200 

2180 

6834  min 

1,22 

0,88 

0,05 

0,15 

Rate (%)  max 

1,68 

0,96 

0,05 

0,17 

 

As it can be seen in table 15, the biggest amount of scrap metal is iron and aluminium. Scrap metal  add up to around 2,5 % of the landfill and 30% of the total amount of metal.  

5.2 Metal content in ashes

Table  16  shows  the  estimated  total  amount  of  ashes  and  the  concentrations  of  some  of  the  most  common  metals.  It  can  be  seen  that  more  than  half  of  the  landfilled  waste  consists  of  ash,  which  shows the influence of ash on the final results.  

Table 16:  Estimated total amount of landfilled ash and the estimated amount of metals within. 

  

  

Waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Copper 

Zinc  others 

Concentration (%) 

Min  Max 

100 

4,26 

3,92 

6,37 

4,43 

0,23 

0,62 

0,72 

0,29 

0,99 

1,13 

Min 

Total (tonne) 

Max 

97915 

2 298 656 

146383 

90039 

5278 

14155 

16496 

101856 

6612 

22679 

25971 

40 

 

Figure  10  shows  the  total  amount  of  metal  in  ashes,  in  logarithmic  scale  (to  see  the  order  of  magnitude of the results). More detailed information can be found in appendix B.  

1 000 000

Ton

100 000

10 000

1 000

100

10

Figure 10: Estimated amount of different metals in all types of landfilled ash. 

As it can be seen in figure 10, the biggest amounts of metals belong to iron, aluminium and Zinc. All  other metals except for mercury can be found in considerable amounts. This shows that ashes from  incineration are a good source of different metals.  

In  order  to  find  the  amount  of  scrap  metal  in  ashes,  the  difference  between  metal  concentrations  before and after recovery was used. It is assumed that all scrap metal is recovered. The ferrous and  non‐ferrous scrap metal inside bottom ash from waste incineration has been recovered since 2000  and 2005 respectively. After comparing the concentration of different metals after and before these  dates,  it  was  found  that  only  iron  and  aluminium  concentrations  changed  significantly.  Table  17  shows  the  estimated  amount  of  metal  in  scrap  form  in  the  landfill,  which  can  be  found  in  the  underground mixed waste, and the first layers of areas A1 and A2. 

Table 17 : Iron and Aluminium in scrap form in bottom ash from waste incineration. 

 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Year of 

Recovery 

2000 

2005 

Landfilled  amount before  recovery (tonne)  min 

54 489  max 

70 460 

53 440  56 220 

Landfilled amount of scrap 

(tonne)  min 

22 799  max 

38 359 

27 343  29 742 

Rate of scrap in total  ashes (%)  min  max 

0,99 

1,18 

1,66 

1,29 

 

As seen in table 17, around half of the landfilled iron and aluminium was in scrap form. Scrap metal  makes up around 2, 5% of the total landfilled ashes. 

5.3 Metal content in C&D waste

It is assumed that all metals in this type of waste are in scrap form. C&D waste is generated mostly  from the construction and renovation industry. The main metal used in Swedish constructions is steel 

(iron  and  zinc),  used  in  pipes,  covering  and  structures.  It  is  possible  also  to  find  small  amounts  of 

 

41 

 

aluminium and copper (Boverket, 1998). In total, it is estimated that there is approximately 360 000  tonnes of C&D waste in the landfill.  

The metal concentrations in table 18 are based on several studies made by Boverket, and from visual  inspection done in the Weigh Bridge in Gärstad facilities. 

 

Table 18: Total amount of landfilled C&D waste and the estimated amount of metals within. 

C&D waste 

(tonne) 

Waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Copper 

Other Metals 

Concentration (%)  Total (tonne) 

100 

2,2 

0,1 

0,2 

0,5 

777 468 

17 100 

800 

1 600 

3 900 

 

5.4 Metal content in Metal hydroxide sludge

Around  5000  tonne  of  Metal  Hydroxide  can  be  found  in  a  special  cell  in  area  C,  which  has  been  covered.  The  technical  barriers  are  similar  to  the  ones  of  the  FUDD  cell.  Around  16000  tonne  of 

Metal‐OH  is  landfilled  in  a  special  cell  in  area  F.  Table  19  shows  the  estimated  amount  of  metal  within these areas. 

Table 19: Total amount of me‐OH waste and the estimated amount of metals within. 

Me‐OH sludge 

(tonne) 

Waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Copper 

Others Metals 

Zinc 

Concentration (%) 

Min  Max 

100 

15 

0,5 

0,5 

5,00 

5,00 

25 

10,00 

15,00 

Total (tonne) 

Min  Max 

21 000 

3 200 

100 

100 

1 100 

1 100 

5 300 

600 

600 

2 100 

3 200 

 

 

Even though the amount of Me‐OH is small, it has a very high concentration of metals. Around 40%  of this area is made out of metals, but in hydroxide form.   

5.5 Metal Content in Household Waste

There is a considerable amount of household waste landfilled in the earlier stages of Gärstad. Due to  the  characteristics  of  the  data  collected  for  this  period,  the  total  amount  of  landfilled  household  waste  includes  a  great  uncertainty.  Moreover  this  type  of  waste  is  expected  to  be  in  the  deepest  parts  of  the  landfill  only.  Table  20  shows  the  total  amount  of  estimated  waste  and  the  amount  of  metal within. 

 

42 

 

Table 20: Total amount of Household waste and the estimated amount of metals within. 

Household 

Waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Arsenic 

Boron 

Barium 

Cadmium 

Cobalt 

Chromium 

Copper 

Mercury 

Manganese 

Molybdenum 

Nickel 

Lead 

Antimony 

Selenium 

Tin 

Titanium 

Vanadium 

Zinc 

89 

731 

223 

44 

274 

50 

62 

953 

1553 

Concentration (mg/kg) 

Min  Max 

100 

15702 

12720 

20469 

13646 

25 

274 

14 

61 

451 

13 

137 

1034 

293 

73 

703 

103 

139 

1095 

2122 

28 

35 

535 

871 

50 

410 

Min 

Total (tonne) 

Max 

8800 

7136 

561 000 

11500 

7656 

8  5 

14 

154 

34 

253 

125 

25 

154 

77 

580 

164 

41 

395 

58 

78 

614 

1190 

 

5.6 Metal Content by Areas

All the areas of the landfill have mixed waste below ground level; they contain a mixture of all the  different  types  of  waste  received  by  the  landfill.  Tables  21  to  31  shows  the  estimated  amount  of  metals by area, calculated using equation 4. And the concentrations used for underground waste (all  areas) are taken form the total results shown in the beginning of section 5, in table 13. 

Table 21: Estimated amount of metals in A0  Table 23: Estimated amount of metals in A1, above ground 

A0 

Total waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Copper 

Concentration (%) 

Min  Max 

100 

3,18 

2,45 

0,18 

4,51 

2,77 

0,23 

Amount (ton) 

Min  Max 

250 000 

7900 

6100 

500 

11300 

6900 

600 

Zinc  0,40  0,68  1000  1700 

Others  0,57  0,84  1400  2100 

 

Table 22: Estimated amount of metals in A1, underground 

A1 A 

Total waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Copper 

Concentration (%) 

Min  Max 

100 

4,20 

3,87 

0,23 

6,29 

4,38 

0,28 

Amount (ton) 

Min  Max 

553 500 

23200 

21400 

1300 

34800 

24300 

1600 

Zinc  0,63  1,01  3500  5600 

Others  0,72  1,13  4000  6200 

 

Table 24: Estimated amount of metals in A2, underground 

A1 U 

Total waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Copper 

Zinc 

Others 

Concentration (%) 

Min  Max 

100 

3,18 

2,45 

0,18 

0,40 

0,57 

4,51 

2,77 

0,23 

0,68 

 

 

0,84 

Amount (ton) 

Min  Max 

307 500 

17600  13900 

13600  15300 

1000  1300 

2200 

3100 

3700 

4700 

 

A2 U 

Total waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Copper 

Zinc 

Others 

Concentration (%) 

Min  Max 

100 

3,18 

2,45 

0,18 

0,40 

0,57 

4,51 

2,77 

0,23 

0,68 

0,84 

Amount (ton) 

Min  Max 

272 500 

8700  12300 

6700 

500 

1100 

1500 

 

7600 

600 

1800 

2300 

43 

 

Table 25: Estimated amount of metals in A2 aboveground 

A2 A 

Total waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Concentration (%) 

Min 

4,20 

3,87 

100 

Max 

6,29 

4,38 

Amount (ton) 

Min  Max 

572 250 

24200  36200 

22300  25200 

Copper 

Zinc 

0,23 

0,63 

0,28 

1,01 

1300 

3500 

1600 

5600 

Others  0,72  1,13  4100  6400 

 

Table 26: Estimated amount of metals in FUDD cell 

Table 28: Estimated amount of metals in C 

Total waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Concentration (%) 

Min 

3,18 

2,45 

100 

Max 

4,51 

2,77 

Amount (ton) 

Min  Max 

435 000 

13800  19600 

10700  12100 

Copper 

Zinc 

0,18 

0,40 

0,23 

0,68 

800 

1800 

1000 

2900 

Others  0,57  0,84  2500  3700 

 

Table 29: Estimated amount of metals in D 

FUDD 

Total waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Copper 

Concentration (%) 

Min  Max 

100 

1,47 

2,74 

0,07 

2,63 

3,90 

0,09 

Amount (ton) 

Min 

100 

75 600 

1100 

2100 

Max 

2000 

2900 

100 

Zinc  1,79  2,83  1400  2100 

Others  1,24  2,28  900  1700 

 

Table 27: Estimated amount of metals in B 

Total waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Copper 

Concentration (%) 

Min  Max 

100 

3,18 

2,45 

0,18 

4,51 

2,77 

0,23 

Amount (ton) 

Min  Max 

377 500 

12000  17000 

9300 

700 

10500 

900 

Zinc  0,40  0,68  1500  2600 

Others  0,57  0,84  2100 

 

Table 30: Estimated amount of metals in F 

3200 

Total waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Copper 

Zinc 

Others 

Concentration (%) 

Min  Max 

100 

3,18 

2,45 

4,51 

2,77 

0,18 

0,40 

0,57 

0,23 

0,68 

 

0,84 

Amount (ton) 

Min  Max 

300 000 

9500  13500 

7400 

600 

1200 

1700 

8300 

700 

2000 

2500 

Total waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Copper 

Zinc 

Others 

Concentration (%) 

Min  Max 

100 

3,18 

2,45 

4,51 

2,77 

0,18 

0,40 

0,57 

0,23 

0,68 

0,84 

Table 31: Estimated amount of metals in me‐OH cell 

Amount (ton) 

Min  Max 

405 000 

12900  18300 

9900 

700 

1600 

2300 

11200 

1000 

2700 

3400 

Me‐OH 

Total waste 

Iron 

Aluminium 

Copper 

Zinc 

Others 

Concentration (%) 

Min  Max 

100 

15,00 

0,50 

25,00 

3,00 

0,50 

5,00 

5,00 

3,00 

15,00 

10,00 

Amount (ton) 

Min 

4 000 

Max 

600 

20 

1000 

100 

20 

200 

200 

100 

600 

400 

 

It can be seen that the largest deposit of metal are in A1 and A2, which is a consequence of having  the largest amount of waste in those areas. The smallest amounts of metals are found in the special  cells, the FUDD cell and the Me‐OH cell.  

5.7 Accessibility and Hotspots

In this section first the areas will be ranked from least accessible to most accessible, considering the  accessibility  criteria  described  in  section  4.4  and  shown  in  table  12.  The  least  accessible  area  is  B,  because it has built facilities above, making the underground mixed waste there unreachable. Then it  is area C, which has been partially used for constructions above it. The underground mixed waste in  this area is totally covered and closed. After that, come areas A0, FUDD cell, and Me‐OH cell, which 

44 

 

  are also covered and closed.  Then it come areas D, F, A1 and A2 which have no construction above  them  and  are  open,  and  based  on  these  criteria  they  have  the  same  accessibility  conditions.  To  compare  these  areas,  the  third  criterion,  type  of  waste,  is  used.  The  type  of  waste  determines  the  concentration of different metals. Based on the results about scrap metal content in the mixed waste  and in ashes, areas A1 and A2 are considered to be more accessible than D and F. 

By considering the factors for accessibility and the amount of metals, areas A1 and A2 become the  hotspot for metal recovery. 

 

45 

 

 

46 

 

6 Discussion

6.1 Method

The method that was used in this report has a couple of advantages. The first is that it is a quit cheap  and fast process for estimating the metal stock, or any other kind of stock in a landfill, compared to  traditional methods such as drilling and sampling. Of course in this study, the composition analysis of  previous  studies  done  by  the  company  was  used,  but  there  was  no  need  for  any  new  sampling  or  measuring.  

Of  course  there  are  some  disadvantages  to  this  method.  First  of  all,  it  only  works  if  there  is  any  previous  data  available.  In  case  of  a  landfill  which  no  measuring  has  been  done,  it  is  impossible  to  apply  this  method.  Second,  it  is  not  as  precise  as  direct  sampling,  in  the  sense  that  this  method  shows  the  amount  of  flows  which  has  entered  or  left  the  landfill,  but  it  doesn’t  say  where  it  is  landfilled, unless a systematic way for depositing the waste has been applied.  

After  comparing  the  concentrations  obtained  by  direct  measuring  in  Gärstad  landfill  with  the  concentrations given by Allaska database, it can be seen that databases can be used in cases where  there is no direct data available, and the results can be still relevant. 

Two approaches were used in the method. The flows approach and the volume approach. The flows  approach  is  useful  for  quantifying  the  types  of  flows,  and  specific  information  about  them  can  be  derived such as metal concentration and density. This approach mostly works on the boundaries of  the defined system, but can not be used to track the flows inside the boundaries. Thus waste and its  metal  content  can  not  be  allocated  precisely  with  this  approach.  Also,  this  approach  requires  extensive  data  and  background  information.  On  the  other  hand,  the  volume  approach  needs  less  data and information, and can be performed faster. It also can give the location of landfilled waste  but  can  not  be  used  for  analysing  the  content  of  the  waste  stocks.  Thus  these  two  methods  are  complementary and should be used together in order to get a better understanding of the system,  which in this case is Gärstad landfill. 

6.2 Data

When observing the data obtained from several measurements with more detail, there may be some  inconsistences,  like  extreme  values  or  ranges  which  include  negative  numbers.  This  reminds  of  the  possibility  of  errors  in  measurement.  Nevertheless,  these  exotic  values  were  not  modified  to  keep  the validity of the method used. 

There are factors that can influence in great way the values used in the study (metal concentrations),  more precisely when considering the different fuels used for incineration. All the incinerators use a  mixture of different materials as fuel (waste‐wood; coal‐rubber) which are a result of the  needs of  the  moment,  these  combinations  do  not  follow  any  pattern,  so  the  values  used  are  expected  to  represent all the possibilities. 

All the documents were in Swedish, and language barrier became another limit; this could have led  to  some  misunderstanding  during  the  translation  phase  and  thus  some  of  our  assumptions  which  were based on those translations might have been imprecise or even wrong.  

47 

 

6.3 Comparing concentrations with mining

In  order to decide if  it  is profitable to  do more research about recovering metals from landfill,  it is  good  to  compare  the  concentration  of  metal  in  the  landfill  with  the  concentration  of  natural  body  ores  used  for  mining.  Tables  32  and  33 show the concentrations of some of the metals in  the landfill. The presented concentrations are the median value obtained from the statistical analysis  of  the  data,  and  it  is  given  in  mg/kg  because  several  metals  are  found  in  very  low  concentrations  which are hard to show in percentage. 

Table 32: Concentration of different metals in ores compared to those in ashes. 

mg/kg 

Iron  60000 

Aluminium  50000‐60000 

Chromium 

Copper 

1 to 3000 

6000 

Mercury 

Manganese 

Nickel 

Lead 

Antimony 

Tin 

Vanadium 

Zinc 

1000 – 2500 

4400 

3000 

30000‐100000 

150 

1200 

50000‐150000 

Metal Ore 

Bottom ash (median) 

Waste (Before/after  metal recovery) 

74100  40428 

Coal  n/a 

Wood 

12230 

Waste 

16017 

Coal 

35672 

Fly ash (median) 

Wood 

11191 

Wood Cy 

11191 

Wood el 

11191 

55600 

385 

3400 

26047  45309  10200  31754  60175  20005 

203 

437 

284 

725 

887 

774 

56 

285 

238 

340 

1140 

 ‐  0 

1330  1500 

864 

1  2 

1200  2409 

14000 

230 

254 

1395 

37000 

250 

470 

3955 

170 

1200 

115 

212 

30 

4400 

141 

120 

39 

 ‐ 

89 

2990  1250  23250  27550  13286 

 

45 

500 

24 

29 

138 

3820 

1085 

396 

44 

48 

310 

61 

70 

47 

2627 

137 

20 

33 

52 

545 

36 

20 

28 

2450 

39 

5800 

290 

20 

87 

29800 

Table 33: Concentrations of metals in ores compared to those in the landfill. 

  

Iron 

Aluminium 

Copper 

Zinc 

Metal Ore (%) 

6,0 

5,0  6,0 

0,6 

5,0  15,0 

In Landfill (%) 

2,7 

2,2 

3,9 

2,5 

0,1 

0,4 

0,2 

0,7 

 

It can be seen that the biggest potential for the more interesting metals can be found in the metal  hydroxide  sludge,  only  limited  by  the  available  technologies.  But  is  also  important  to  mention  that  the  iron,  aluminium  and  copper  in  C&D  waste  is  in  scrap  form,  which  is  expected  to  be  easier  to  recover.  

In the case of ashes, it can be seen that the potential varies depending on the metal.  It is important  to mention that the iron ores contain mainly iron oxide, which is the same form in which appears in  ashes, which leads to the possibility of applying traditional mining techniques. This is not the case for  aluminium,  in  which,  despite  the  fact  that  it  is  found  naturally  in  oxidized  form,  it  is  mined  from  bauxite,  and  also  because  separating  from  the  oxide  is  not  yet  cost‐effective.  For  other  metals,  though the concentrations are lower, they can be found already separated, reducing the processes  needed for separation. 

6.4 Comparing LFM with modern mining

Even though based on our results the metal concentrations in the landfill are less then commercial  mines, there are other factors that makes LFM financially attractive. There are five stages in modern  mining,  prospecting,  exploration,  development,  exploitation,  and  reclamation.  Prospecting  is  the 

48 

 

search for metal ores or other minerals and exploration determines the size and value of the ore or  mineral deposit.  

Based on Hartman (2002) the cost for prospecting is 1, 3 – 65 million SEK (0, 33 – 7, 15 SEK/tonne)

2

This cost includes searching and studying geological reports and maps, conduct and study aerial and  satellite  photographs,  establishing  base  of  operations  and  ground  units,  conduct  geo  surveys  and  analysing  the  findings.  This  stage  takes  between  1  –  3  years.  The  exploration  stage  costs  6,5  –  98  million  SEK  (1,43  –  10,73  SEK/tonne)  and  takes  2  ‐5  years.  This  stage  includes  sampling  (drilling  or  excavation), estimating tonnage and concentration, and deposit valuation. This stage determines to  whether develop the project further or terminate it.  

On the other hand, in LFM, the prospecting stage is much shorter and cheaper since the locations of  most  landfills  are  already  known.  There  is  no  need  for  searching  for  a  landfill,  especially  if  it  is  an  active one. So in reality the cost and time spent for this stage can be skipped or reduced significantly. 

As  for  the  exploration  stage,  in  our  case  4  million  tonne  of  waste  was  examined  with  no  cost  in  6  months  by  two  students,  of  course  the  cost  of  used  manpower  (supervisor,  contact  person),  used  utilities  (university  rooms,  computers),  previous  reports  and  samplings  are  not  considered;  still  compared to a similar prospecting‐exploration project, which will cost around 7 – 71 million SEK and  take 3 – 8 years, LFM is much cheaper and faster. It can be argued that that our results are not as  concrete as a mining project, neither as detailed or statistically proven; but by establishing a standard  method for prospecting‐exploring landfills, this problem can be resolved.  

Development  is  preparation  necessary  to  bring  a  mine  into  full  operation.  It  includes  planning,  design, and construction. Before the development stage can start, a few factors must be considered 

(Howard L. Hartman, Jan M. Mutmansky, 2002). The first one is the locational factors; this includes  transportation  of  mineral  products  and  supplies,  availability  of  labour  and  support  services,  operational impacts on environment, and employees’ satisfaction with their lifestyle.  Almost none of  these  factors  are  an  issue  in  LFM.  All  active  landfills  have  already  access  roads,  and  are  close  to  population centres, thus labour is available. Since landfill itself is a threat to the environment, mining  it helps to mitigate the undesirable environmental impacts. Still, employees’ satisfaction might be an  issue  since  landfills  smell  bad.  The  other  factor  is  geological  factors  that  include  topography,  dimension of the ore body, geologic consideration, chemical and metallurgical properties of ore. This  factor is the same in LFM, but instead of ore body, we have waste. The other mentioned factor is a  social‐economic‐political‐environmental factor that is out of the scope of this study.  

Exploitation is the recovering of minerals from the mine and delivering it to other facilities. There are  many  factors  that  affect  the  mining  method  (Hartman,  2002).  For  LFM,  these  factors  and  available  technologies can be found in a thesis done by Shojai (2012).  

The final stage in mining is reclamation where the mine is closed and the land is restored. This stage  takes  1  –  10  years  with  a  cost  of  6,5  –  130  million  SEK  (1,43  –  29  SEK/tonne).  In  LFM,  reclamation  stage is becomes a part of the exploitation stage since the waste is being removed or reduced in the  exploitation stage. So unlike modern mining, as the exploitation reaches its end, the less waste and  land there is to cover and restore.  

                                                            

2

 The prices are originally in U.S. $, the used conversion rate is 1 $=6,5 SEK.  

49 

 

6.5 Value

Based on the recent price of several metals that can be attractive for the market, we calculated the  approximate value of the metals landfilled; Iron, Aluminium, Copper and Zinc are estimated using the  total previously presented, other metals are shown only based on the amounts expected in ashes. 

  

  

Iron 

Aluminium 

Cobalt 

A

 

Molybdenum

 A

 

Nickel

 A

 

Copper 

Lead

 A

 

Tin

 A

 

Titanium

 A

 

Zinc 

Table 34: Estimated economic value of some metals in the landfill. 

Min 

127 015 

98 075 

100 

40 

319 

7 388 

2 442 

476 

7 959 

Amount (ton) 

16 §126 

Max 

180 283 

110 912 

161 

62 

676 

Price

3

 

(USD/kg) 

0,14 

2,13

27 

27 

18,86 

7,97 

9 392 

4 726 

1 031  21,93 

9 648  8 

27 069 

A

 Amount in ashes only 

1,9 

Estimated Value

4

(Msek)  

Min 

116 

Max 

164 

1358 

17 

39 

1536 

28 

11 

83 

383 

32 

68 

414 

199 

487 

61 

147 

502 

334 

 

It can be seen in table 34 that there is great economic value in metals, adding up to around 3 billion 

Swedish kronor, being aluminium the most interesting metal in the study worthy around 1,4 billion 

Swedish  kronor.  In  addition,  metals  such  as  Copper,  Titanium  and  Zinc  represent  relatively  high  values. On the downside, the most abundant metal in the landfill, iron, is not as valuable because of  its  low  price,  being  less  valuable  than  the  metals  presented  before,  but  reaching  however  an  important value. 

However, since separation process and technological barriers can bring extraordinary costs, the ideal  way of LFM to increase the profitability would be to find a direct use of the landfilled waste. 

6.6 National Numbers

In order to verify our results we compared them with an unpublished paper (Krook, et al., 2012), in  which the metal amount in Swedish waste incineration ashes has been assessed. The study includes  the BA and FA deposited for the period 1985 to 2010. In table 35, the generated ashes in Sweden and 

Gärstad has been compared. 

Table 35: Deposited ashes in Sweden compared to those in Gärstad and the ratio between them. 

Period   BA (tonne)  FA (tonne)  Total (tonne) 

Krook, et al.  1985‐2010  11,780,000  3,000,000  14,730,000 

Our study  1985‐2010  1,810,000  203,000  2,076,000 

Ratio (%)  15  7  14 

 

This shows that for the past 25 years, on average 14% of the generated ashes has been deposited in 

Gärstad landfill. Now we will apply this percentage on the metal amount of ashes from the study and 

                                                            

3

 Prices taken from (Index Mundi, 2012) after calculating the average price from October 2011 to April 2012  

4

 The prices are originally in U.S. $, the used conversion rate is 1 $=6,5 SEK. 

50 

 

compare  with  our  results,  as  shown  in  table  36.  In  case  of  Fe  and  Al  the  scrap  form  has  been  excluded,  thus  only  the  elemental  from  are  being  shown.  It  can  be  seen  that  numbers  are  not  the  same; this goes back to the fact that MFA is not a very precise method. But the important thing is  they all have the same order of magnitude and it can be concluded that our numbers agree with the  previous study (Krook, et al., 2012).   

Table 36: Total amount of metal in landfilled bottom ash in Sweden; then downscaled to Gärstad landfill and compared  with results of this study. All units are in tonne.  

 

Al 

Fe 

Ti 

Zn 

Cu 

Sweden (Krook, et al., 

2012) 

500000 

400000 

100000 

80000 

70000 

Gärstad (14%) 

70000 

56000 

14000 

11200 

9800  median (min‐max) based  on this study 

66000(62000‐74000) 

69000 (67000‐116000) 

7100 (7000‐8500) 

16500 (14000‐23000) 

5500 (5200‐6600) 

 

By downscaling the results of Krook’s (2012) study about bottom ash to the level of bottom ash in 

Gärstad landfill, and comparing them with this study’s result, it can be seen that the figures are  in  same order of magnitude. This suggests that national studies about discarded metal can be used as  an additional approach to estimate the metal stocks in a region.  

6.6.1 Gärstad landfill as a source of material

In order to estimate the potential of Gärstad landfill as a source for raw materials, it can be seen in  table 37 a comparison between the material consumption in 2005 in Sweden and Östergötland with  the estimated amount of some metals landfilled in Gärstadverket (Statistika Centralbyrån, 2009). 

Table 37: Domestic material consumption of some metals in Sweden downscaled to Östergötland and compared with  landfilled amount of metals in Gärstad landfill.  

 

Iron 

DMC in 2005 (kton) 

Sweden Östergötland 

B

4460  202 

Landfilled in Gärstad 

(kton) 

Min 

127 

Max 

180 

Copper 

Nickel

 A

 

Lead

 A

 

Zinc 

Tin

 A

 

532 

31 

‐21 

35 

24 

‐1 

7,4 

0,3 

2,4 

16,1 

9,4 

0,7 

4,7 

27,1 

1  0,05  0,5  1,0 

Aluminium  236  11  98,1 

A

 Amount in ashes only 

110,9 

B

 Considering Östergötland as 5% of Sweden consumption, based on population ratio 

It can be seen that the amount of metals in the landfill is enough to fulfil the consumption of metals 

(Production + Import ‐ Export) in Östergötland for metals such as Zinc, Tin, and Aluminium for several  years.  

The  difference  between  the  consumption  and  the  landfilled  amount  of  metals  may  lead  to  the  conclusion  that  landfill  mining  is  not  a  reliable  source  of  materials  for  the  Östergötland  area;  however  this  can  be  explained  as  a  result  of  the  recycling  policies  that  have  been  implemented  in  recent years which have resulted in low concentrations of metals in waste. 

51 

 

 

Nevertheless, in other countries with less strict policies about waste management, is expected that  landfills have a great potential as a source of raw materials. 

52 

 

7 Conclusion

Though there is a considerable amount of metals in this specific landfill, it appears that is not yet an  attractive source of metals compared  to a normal  mine. But if  other advantages of LFM  like waste  deposit space reduction, mitigation of environmental impacts (leachate) and others are considered,  it  might  be  economically  and  at  the  same  time  environmentally  interesting  to  carry  out  LFM. 

Especially  if  the  landfill  runs  out  of  space  and  expanding  it  becomes  needed.  Then  a  cost‐benefit  analysis  must  be  done  to  determine  whether  expanding  the  landfill  or  implementing  LFM  is  more  justifiable, economically and environmentally.  

As for the applied method, MFA, it was shown that it is possible to prospect and explore the amount  of metals in a landfill by analysing the background of the landfill, resulting in a faster and cheaper but  not  as  accurate  process  as  direct  measuring,  leaving  the  technological  barriers  as  the  principal  limitation for landfill mining. 

7.1 Recommendations for the company

This  study  has  shown  that  it  may  be  interesting  to  consider  in  the  near  future  the  possibility  of  recovering  metals  from  landfills;  however,  some  additional  procedures  can  be  implemented  to  facilitate future explorations. 

A systematic way for depositing waste can be implemented; or a more detailed record on how and  where the different types of waste are being deposited all over the landfill can be made. 

Considering  the  large  amounts  of  waste  that  are  deposited  monthly,  and  sampling  is  done  on  a  regular  basis,  the  analysis  of  the  ashes  could  include  some  more  metals,  based  not  only  on  environmental impact, but also on value, like iron, aluminium, and titanium. 

Nevertheless,  the  reason  why  ashes  are  hazardous  and  then  landfilled  is  the  metal  contamination. 

Since metals are not combustible it seems as a waste of energy and space to have them inside the  incinerators,  so  the  possibility  to  use  metal  extraction  technologies  for  waste  before  incineration  should be considered. 

53 

 

   

54 

 

Bibliography

Avfall Sverige, 2011. Swedish Waste Managment 2011, Malmö: Avfall Sverige AB. 

Baas, L., Krook, J., Eklund, M. & Svensson, N., 2011. Industrial ecology looks at landfills from another  perspective. Regional Development Dialogue, 31(2), pp. 169‐182. 

Boverket, 1998. Brukstidens restmaterial, Karlskrona: Boverket. 

British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines, 2011. MINFILE Coding Manual Version 5.0 Apendix 

VII. [Online]  

Available at:  http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/MINING/GEOSCIENCE/MINFILE/PRODUCTSDOWNLOADS/MINFILEDOCU

MENTATION/CODINGMANUAL/APPENDICES/Pages/VII.aspx 

[Accessed 2012‐05‐20]. 

Cossu, R., Motzo, G. & Laudadio, M., 1995. Preliminary Study For A Landfill Mining Project In Sardinia. 

Caligary, Department of Geoengineering and Environmental Technologies, University of Cagliari. 

Dulski, T. R., 1996. Sodium oxide precipitation. i: A manual for the chemical analysis of metals. Ann 

Arbor: American society for testing and materials, p. 189. 

EIONET, 2009. Definitions & glossary: Waste. [Online]  

Available at: http://scp.eionet.europa.eu/definitions/waste 

[Accessed 2012‐06‐5]. 

EU, 2008. DIRECTIVE 2008/98/EC on waste (Waste Framework Directive), Brussels: Official Journal of  the European Union. 

Frosch, R. A. & Gallopoulos, N. E., 1989. Strategies for Manufacturing. Scientific American , 3(261),  pp. 144‐152. 

Hammar, M., 2012. Gärstad Landfill [Intervju] (February‐May 2012). 

Hogland, W., 2002. Remediation of an old landfill site. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION 

RESEARCH, 9(1), pp. 49‐54. 

Hogland, W., Marques, M. & Nimmermark, S., 2004. Landfill mining and waste characterization: a  strategy for remediation of contaminated areas. MATERIAL CYCLES AND WASTE MANAGEMENT, 6(2),  pp. 119‐124. 

Howard L. Hartman, Jan M. Mutmansky, 2002. Introductory Mining Engineering. 2nd red. New Jersey: 

John Wiley and Sons. 

Index Mundi, 2012. Historical commodity prices. [Online]  

Available at: http://www.indexmundi.com/commodities/ 

[Accessed 2012‐06‐03]. 

Krook, J., Svensson, N. & Eklund, M., 2011. Landfill mining: a critical review of two decades of  research. Waste Management, 32(3), pp. 513‐520. 

55 

 

Krook, J., Svensson, N. & Steenari, B.‐M., 2012. Potential metal resources in waste incineration ash 

deposits, u.o.: u.n. 

Naturvårdverket, 2012. Avfallsstatistik. [Online]  

Available at: http://www.naturvardsverket.se/sv/Start/Statistik/Avfall‐och‐ avloppsvatten/Avfallsstatistik/ 

[Accessed 2012‐06‐5]. 

Obermeier, T., Hensel, J. & Saure, T., 1997. Landfill Mining: Energy Recovery. Sardinia, Proceedings 

Sardinia 97, Sixth International Landfill Symposium. 

Rettenberger, G., 1995. Results from a landfill mining demonstration project. Caligary, Italy, 

Proceedings Sardinia 95, Fifth International Landfill Symposium. 

S. Netpradita, P. T. S. T., 2003. Application of ‘waste’ metal hydroxide sludge for adsorption. Water 

Research, Volym 37 , p. 763–772. 

Sılvia C.R. Santos, V. J. V. R. A. B., 2008. Waste metal hydroxide sludge as adsorbent for a reactive  dye. Journal of Hazardous Materials, Volym 153, pp. 999‐1008. 

Statens Geotekniska Institut, 1999. Slaggrus Miljömässiga och materialtekniska egenskaper, 

Linköping: Statens Geotekniska Institut. 

Statens Naturvårdsverk, 1973. Beslut Nr215 DNR1878‐82‐73‐0580, Solna: Statens Naturvårdsverk. 

Statens Naturvårdsverk, 1980. Delbeslut Nr32 DNR350‐2985‐79, Solna: Statens Naturvårdsverk. 

Statens Naturvårdsverk, 1981. Beslut Nr32 DNR505‐215/81, Solna: Statens Naturvårdsverk. 

Statistika Centralbyrån, 2009. Varuflöden/materialflöden (MFA), biomassa, mineraler och fossila 

bränslen.. Import, export, inhemsk produktion och konsumtion av produkter/varor efter produkt, nivå 

5. År 1998‐2005. [Online]  

Available at:  http://www.ssd.scb.se/databaser/makro/Visavar.asp?yp=dddbbf&xu=96487001&huvudtabell=Mater ialFloden&deltabell=03&deltabellnamn=Varufl%F6den%2Fmaterialfl%F6den+%28MFA%29%2C+biom assa%2C+mineraler+och+fossila+br%E4nslen%2E%2E+Import%2C+export%2C+inhemsk+produ 

[Accessed 2012‐05‐24]. 

Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, 2005. A Strategy for Sustainable Waste Management ‐ 

Sweden's Waste Plan, Stockholm: Swedish Environmental Protection Agency. 

Tekniska Verken, 1999. Från ånga till breband. 1st red. Linköping: Tekniska Verken. 

Tekniska Verken, 2004. Gärstadanläggningen, Linköping: Tekniska Verken. 

Tekniska Verken, 2012. Gärstad avfallsanläggning Miljörapport 2011 , Linköping: Tekniska Verken. 

UNEP, 2010. Metal Stocks in Society ‐ Scientific Synthesis, Paris: UNEP. 

UNEP, 2011. Assessing Mineral Resources in Society, Paris: UNEP. 

56 

 

UNSD, 2011. ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS ‐ Waste. [Online]  

Available at: http://unstats.un.org/unsd/environment/wastetreatment.htm 

[Accessed 2012‐06‐06]. 

Vägverket, 2000. Accessedning av restprodukter i Vägbyggnad, Stockholm: Vägverket. 

 

 

värmeforsk, 2011. Allaska. [Online]  

Available at: http://www.varmeforsk.se/forskningsprogram/askprogrammet/allaska‐sv 

[Accessed 2012‐06‐08]. 

 

57 

 

 

58 

 

 

Appendix A: Inflows of the landfill per year

Inflows 2007‐2011 

 

 

Tonne

Waste subgroups 

Bottom ash KV1 coal 

Fly ash KV1 coal 

Wet ash and sludge KV1 

Bottom ash KV1 wood 

Fly ash KV1 wood 

Bottom ash Garstad 

Fly ash Garstad

Wet and sludge Garstad 

Wood Ash from other sources 

Construction and demolition 

Asphalt

Asbestos

Concrete 

Excavated material 

Municipality waste water 

Latrine 

Scrap metal

Glass

Not specific industrial waste 

Household Waste 

20 

Sludge from street gullies and industry  2500 

Oil separated sludge  slaughter waste

Metal Hydroxide sludge 

Forest Waste

1900 

410 

2011 2010 2009 2008 2007

Landfilled Recovered Stored Landfilled Recovered Stored Landfilled  Recovered Stored Landfilled Recovered Stored Landfilled Recovered Stored 

6300 ‐3200 400 3800 3300 3100 3600 

5500  7100 

60

8500  7300  8800 

530 220 

11400 

2200 

1200

1700

10200

240

6400

1700

3600

470

1400

2600

9300

1400

8800

92300  ‐11900 71300  7100  100  59300  10600 54400  17500 43400  25500 

1010  180 120 40 20

10200 

3050 

4260 9900

590

4260 9000

640

150

4210 11300

950

110

3780 10400

530

200

4480

340

8500

30

1550

30 

6400

20

1490

30 

9700

100

900

2570

30 

8800

200

2000

200

1400

30 

9200

 

59 

 

 

 

 

 

Inflows 2002‐2006 

Tonne

Waste subgroups 

Bottom ash KV1 coal 

Fly ash KV1 coal

Wet ash and sludge KV1 

Bottom ash KV1 wood 

Fly ash KV1 wood 

Bottom ash Garstad 

Fly ash Garstad

Wet and sludge Garstad 

Wood Ash from other sources 

Construction and demolition 

Asphalt

Asbestos

Concrete

Excavated material 

9500 

490 

 

Municipality waste water 

 

100 

Sludge from street gullies and industry  2000 

Oil separated sludge 

2006 2005 2004 2003 2002

Landfilled Recovered Stored Landfilled Recovered Stored Landfilled  Recovered Stored Landfilled Recovered Stored Landfilled Recovered Stored 

11900 

1600 

5500

6000

1210

2500

6100

1180

3100

1500

300 1500

4700

700

1100 2900 200

6700

1000

5100

9400 3100 13200 3400 14500 22200

1600 

20 

38800

280

10900

9500

2200

9700

60

600

60700

140

8700

3500

1800

6600

70

1090

44100 ‐2100

8600

3600

3200

6400

240

500

42100 ‐1700

5900

380

590

30000 13400 

3110

1480

10200

420

30

13700 

450

5400

12200

530

4600

13200

380

100

500

2400

200

700

2300

100

900

2700

3800

1200

3600

  slaughter waste

Metal Hydroxide sludge 

Forest Waste

Latrine

Scrap metal

Glass

Not specific industrial waste 

Household Waste 

2490 

50 

5700

2890

320

9000

40

2570

830

6600

140

340

900

5700

220

230

540

6700

 

60 

 

Inflows 1997‐2001 

 

 

Tonne

Waste subgroups 

Bottom ash KV1 coal 

Fly ash KV1 coal

Wet ash and sludge KV1 

Bottom ash KV1 wood 

Fly ash KV1 wood 

Bottom ash Garstad 

Fly ash Garstad

Wet and sludge Garstad 

Wood Ash from other sources 

Construction and demolition 

Asphalt

Asbestos

Concrete

Excavated material 

Municipality waste water 

Oil separated sludge 

2001 2000 1999 1998 1997

Landfilled Recovered Stored Landfilled Recovered Stored Landfilled  Recovered Stored Landfilled Recovered Stored Landfilled Recovered Stored 

300  3070 1340 4850 1000 6140 14344 13200

4800 

860 

12700  8100

5900

710

9000 5700

7087

792

19244

1273

20846 21877

400 

5300 

220 

430 

20500 

39900 7500 44700

5200

560

1050

16700

6900 57240

4414

378

1878

10999

49942

7462

1277

1745

9507

49673

7422

6722

7800 12 7360 9851 

400  370 278 297

1846

2212

976

1717 1410 

11400 

Sludge from street gullies and industry  1380 

4610 

770

1460

4830

19675

654

6708

773

7126

567 slaughter waste

Metal Hydroxide sludge 

Forest Waste

Latrine

Scrap metal

Glass

Not specific industrial waste 

Household Waste 

110 

330 

380 

6200

110

560

190

4140 1180

8476

499

283

3764 949

7102

539

237

1704 238

1099

17

?

700

2546

381 

119464 

 

61 

 

Inflows 1992‐1996 

 

Tonne

Waste subgroups 

Bottom ash KV1 coal 

Fly ash KV1 coal

Wet ash and sludge KV1 

Bottom ash KV1 wood 

Fly ash KV1 wood 

Bottom ash Garstad 

Fly ash Garstad

Wet and sludge Garstad 

Wood Ash from other sources 

Construction and demolition 

Asphalt

Asbestos

Concrete

Excavated material  slaughter waste

Metal Hydroxide sludge 

Forest Waste

Latrine

Scrap metal

Glass

Not specific industrial waste 

Household Waste 

579 

385 

6539 

1996

Landfilled Recovered

21229 

20848 

51330 

7670 

389 

Municipality waste water 

Sludge from street gullies and industry 

Oil separated sludge 

17661 

106 

7822 

295 

3835

Stored

12585

1750

1330

141373

3833

17458

19693

42873

6406

267

5649

2167

317

197

8512

1995

14163

1997

1173

9456

1445

4643

20148 

18191 

34253 

5118 

12622 

396

5528 

70

244

2478 

1994

16679

37816

5650

8657

403

1993

15337

38246

5714

19219

414

428

5320

497

1992

Landfilled Recovered Stored Landfilled  Recovered Stored Landfilled Recovered Stored Landfilled Recovered Stored 

4875

1330

2925

10971

4671

402

264

3422

2783

972

8411

10632

278

2698

2576

380

6098 

62 

 

Inflows 1974‐1991 

 

Tonne

Waste subgroups

Bottom ash KV1 coal

Fly ash KV1 coal

Wet ash and sludge KV1

Bottom ash KV1 wood

Fly ash KV1 wood

Bottom ash Garstad

Fly ash Garstad

Wet and sludge Garstad

Wood Ash from other sources 

Construction and demolition 

Asphalt

Asbestos

Concrete

Excavated material

1991 

8170 

9446 

43588 

21942 

434 

Municipality waste water 569 

Sludge from street gullies and industry  6991 

Oil separated sludge 662  slaughter waste

Metal Hydroxide sludge

Forest Waste

Latrine

Scrap metal

Glass

Not specific industrial waste 

Household Waste

646 

330 

48 

1990

6300

3600

8100

38000

13000

450

6150

3130

1985‐1989 1982‐1984 1980‐1981 1974‐1979

Landfilled  Landfilled Landfilled Landfilled Landfilled Landfilled

5544

3168

7128

38000

30000

2000

33060

30000

2000

5600

3000

2000

16500

10500

47000

7200

200

3050

88000

 

 

 

64 

 

Appendix B: Metal amounts in different types of ash

Estimated Median Values 

 

Tonne

Ash from Waste 

Incineration (BA + FA) 

Bottom ash

 from WI 

Bottom ash

 from WI 

Bottom ash

 from WI 

Fly ash

 from WI 

Ash from Coal 

Inineration (BA + FA) 

Bottom ash from Coal 

Incineration 

Bottom ash from Coal 

Incineration 

Bottom ash from Coal 

Incineration 

Fly ash from Coal 

Incineration 

Fly ash from Coal 

Incineration 

Ash from Wood 

Incineration (BA + FA) 

Ash from Wood 

Incineration (BA + FA) 

Ash from Wood 

Incineration (BA + FA) 

Bottom ash from Wood 

Inineration 

Bottom ash from Wood 

Inineration 

Fly ash from wood 

Incineration (Cyclone) 

Fly ash from wood 

Incineration (Elfilter) 

  

Total

Landfilled

Total 

271 588 

594 656 

564 974 

85 500 

80 350 

159 712 

12 940 

14 820 

24 140 

93 987 

1 500 

245 619 

20 100 

5 700 

39 490 

63 080 

17 400 

Fe 

18 074 

42 047 

22 841 

3 457 

1 227 

3 703 

3 353 

54 

2 943 

241 

68 

483 

771 

195 

Al

14 258 

31 768 

20 826 

2 989 

2 354 

8 780 

586 

671 

1 094 

5 656 

90 

3 083 

252 

72 

403 

643 

314 

As

12 

20 

16 

33 

3 100  35  115  3 

2 298 656  99 490  93 955 111

Recovered  Stored

18 

107

25 

Co

18 

21 

28

Cd

54 

11 

13 

B

37 

Ba

492 

77  1 077 

73  558 

127 

106 

214 

39 

12 

91 

36 

1  5 

305 3 390

388 

32 

57 

44 

72 

42 

67 

11 

18 

46 

1  1 

758 5 550

155 

13 

29 

37 

62 

17 

Cr Cu

122  831 

237  2 104 

159  1 868 

Hg 

11 

27 

332 

59 

54 

422 

35 

10 

59 

20 

32 

113 

95 

36 

12 

2 826

97 

65 

199 

17 

Ma

300 

671 

642 

40

Mo

13 

11 

11 

19 

10 

13 

Ni

45 

Pb

418 

110  807 

100  623 

103 

245 

39 

32 

34 

0  18  1 

327 2 649 313

11 

78 

Sb

65 

69 

62 

248 

20 

20 

29 

11

Se

1 017 

83 

24 

49 

44 

72 

2 607 

41 

1 861 

2 620 

2 649 

451 

1 627 

3 027 

39 

79 

170 

92 

16 553 

18 

25 

Sn Ti

64  1 125 

V

135  2 086  18 

121  1 982  16 

300 

570 

305 

12 

61 

33 

0  6 

372 7 108

292 

24 

38 

276 

84

65 

 

Estimated Minimum Values 

 

Tonne

Ash from Waste 

Incineration (BA + FA)

Bottom ash

 from WI 

Bottom ash

 from WI 

Bottom ash

 from WI 

Fly ash

 from WI 

Ash from Coal 

Inineration (BA + FA) 

Bottom ash from 

Coal Incineration 

Bottom ash from 

Coal Incineration 

Bottom ash from 

Coal Incineration 

Fly ash from Coal 

Incineration 

Fly ash from Coal 

Incineration 

Ash from Wood 

Incineration (BA + FA)

Ash from Wood 

Incineration (BA + FA)

Ash from Wood 

Incineration (BA + FA)

Bottom ash from 

Wood Inineration 

Bottom ash from 

Wood Inineration 

Fly ash from wood 

Incineration 

(Cyclone) 

Fly ash from wood 

Incineration (Elfilter) 

Total

   Landfilled

Total 

271 588 

594 656 

564 974 

85 500 

80 350 

159 712 

12 940 

14 820 

24 140 

93 987 

1 500 

245 619 

20 100 

5 700 

39 490 

63 080 

17 400 

Fe 

17 058 

40 136 

25 508 

3 860 

1 181 

3 026 

2 739 

44 

2 740 

224 

64 

418 

668 

212 

Al

13 819 

31 102 

20 521 

2 949 

2 202 

7 524 

437 

500 

815 

5 104 

81 

3 319 

272 

77 

322 

515 

408 

3 100  38  73 

2 298 656  97 915  90 039

Recovered 

As

17 

16 

33 

96

Stored

B

27 

54 

51 

12 

54 

12 

Ba

298 

728 

532 

122 

66 

353 

73 

83 

136 

35 

259 

21 

31 

50 

28 

1  5 

237 2 825

27

Cd

16 

21 

Co

15 

20 

32 

15 

Cr

97 

Cu

794 

197  2 026 

159  1 868 

37 

54 

332 

56 

Hg 

25 

74 

43 

12 

20 

Mo

11 

10 

66 

419 

34 

128 

13 

15 

24 

10 

57 

91 

Ma

242 

545 

523 

79 

61 

Sb

55 

61 

61 

11 

70 

‐34 

‐3 

‐1 

Ni

48 

Pb

298 

118  643 

100  623 

19 

10 

103 

197 

22 

182 

15 

28 

12 

19 

0  2  3  0  18  0  1  5  0 

93

623

5 278

12 

2 340

35

‐4 

274

11 

2 168

277

Se

Sn Ti

68  1 036 

V

156  2 067  17 

142  1 962  16 

21 

19 

297 

490 

225 

445 

36 

248 

10 

49 

79 

1 940 

30 

826 

68 

2 158 

26 

29 

48 

19 

33 

54 

1 687 

2 652 

2 649 

451 

1 442 

0  50  1  ‐28 

10

0  9 

414 7 006

71

70 

14 155 

66 

 

Estimated Maximum Values 

 

Tonne

Ash from Waste 

Incineration (BA + FA)

Bottom ash

 from WI 

Bottom ash

 from WI 

Bottom ash

 from WI 

Fly ash

 from WI 

Ash from Coal 

Inineration (BA + FA) 

Bottom ash from 

Coal Incineration 

Bottom ash from 

Coal Incineration 

Bottom ash from 

Coal Incineration 

Fly ash from Coal 

Incineration 

Fly ash from Coal 

Incineration 

Ash from Wood 

Incineration (BA + FA)

Ash from Wood 

Incineration (BA + FA)

Ash from Wood 

Incineration (BA + FA)

Bottom ash from 

Wood Inineration 

Bottom ash from 

Wood Inineration 

Fly ash from wood 

Incineration 

(Cyclone) 

Fly ash from wood 

Incineration (Elfilter) 

Total

   Landfilled

Total 

119 588 

470 436 

564 974 

85 500 

80 350 

124 864 

12 940 

14 820 

24 140 

93 987 

1 500 

217 107 

20 100 

5 700 

39 490 

63 080 

17 400 

Fe 

22 237 

53 144 

46 413 

7 024 

2 115 

5 150 

4 663 

74 

3 495 

286 

81 

531 

849 

273 

Al

14 825 

32 489 

21 610 

3 110 

3 135 

10 170 

746 

854 

1 391 

6 291 

100 

4 723 

387 

110 

483 

772 

561 

As

16 

23 

16 

15 

62 

B

66 

150 

143 

22 

14 

68 

15 

Ba

490 

1 053 

556 

126 

176 

1 546 

343 

393 

640 

55 

536 

44 

12 

78 

125 

52 

3 100  49  100  3  1  6 

2 298 656  146 383  101 856 168 501 6 232

Recovered  Stored

39

Cd

82 

29 

13 

21 

Cr Cu

148  1 123 

Hg 

290  2 752 

159  1 868 

37 

77 

332 

76 

28 

192 

16 

74 

10 

11 

19 

39 

62 

22 

31 

Co

15 

31 

25 

Mo

18 

11 

226 

504 

41 

329 

19 

21 

35 

12 

69 

110 

Ma

318 

663 

634 

96 

120 

Ni

80 

Pb Sb

764  112 

185  1 519  97 

100  623  64 

19 

14 

103  11 

378  168 

20 

45 

132  371 

11  30 

66 

27 

42 

19 

Se

0  6  6  0  30  0  1  12  1  0 

147

1  2 

900 6 612

12 

3 241

54

11 

602

21 

4 023

494

Sn Ti V

151  1 189  10 

321  2 105  20 

311  2 001  17 

47 

47 

303 

801 

314 

949 

78 

346 

22 

131 

210 

11 

11 

19 

3 878 

64 

2 228 

182 

4 595 

43 

49 

80 

52 

101 

162 

2 305 

3 221 

2 649 

451 

2 276 

1  85  1  242 

16

0  15  0  100 

892 8 553 108 22 679 

67 

 

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Related manuals

Download PDF

advertisement