Influence  of  the  ballast  on  the  dynamic  properties of a truss railway bridge  Lucie Bornet 

Influence  of  the  ballast  on  the  dynamic  properties of a truss railway bridge   Lucie Bornet 

 

 

Influence  of  the  ballast  on  the  dynamic  properties of a truss railway bridge 

Lucie Bornet 

May 2013 

TRITA‐BKN. Master Thesis 383, 2013 

ISSN 1103‐4297 

ISRN KTH/BKN/EX‐383‐SE 

 

©Lucie Bornet, 2013 

Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) 

Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering 

Division of Structural Engineering and Bridges 

Stockholm, Sweden, 2013

 

 

 

 

Preface 

 

 

This Master Thesis was carried out at the division of Structural Engineering and Bridges, at the Royal 

Institute  of  Technology,  KTH,  in  Stockholm.

 

I  would  like  to  express  my  sincerest  gratitude  to  my  supervisors  Associate  Professor  Jean‐Marc  Battini,  and  Ph.D  researcher  Andreas  Andersson,  at  the 

Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering at KTH for their continuous assistance during this  project. Thank you for devoting me valuable time and providing me wise and constructive advice to  fulfil this thesis. 

This  Master  Thesis  is  based  on  the  preliminary  work  of  Jaroslaw  Zwolski,  researcher  at  Wroclaw 

University of Technology, at the Department of Civil Engineering in Poland. The project was initiated  in  2010  during  the  construction  of  the  Malczyce  viaduct  when  the  dynamic  measurements  were  performed.  All  along  this  thesis,  Jaroslaw  Zwolski  provided  me  with  crucial  information  about  the  bridge  and  the  experimental  measurements  and  answered  very  rapidly  to  my  questions.  Thus,  I  would like to express my sincerest regards to him. 

Finally,  I  would  like  to  thank  the  research  team  at  the  Department  of  Civil  and  Architectural 

Engineering at KTH for their help and advice at key moments. 

 

 

Stockholm, May 2013 

 

 

Lucie Bornet 

  i 

 

 

 

  ii 

 

 

Abstract 

 

To  deal  with  a  rapid  development  of  high‐speed  trains  and  high‐speed  railways,  constant  improvement  of  the  railway  infrastructure  is  necessary  and  engineers  are  continuously  facing  challenges in order to design efficient and optimized structures. Nowadays, more and more railway  bridges are built and thus, they require the engineers’ attention both regarding their design and their  maintenance.  A  comprehensive  knowledge  of  the  infrastructures  and  the  trains  is  crucial:  their  behaviours need to be well known. However, today, the ballast ‐ the granular material disposed on  the track and on which the rails lie – is not well known and its effect in dynamic analyses are rarely  accounted  for.  Engineers  are  still  investigating  the  role  played  by  the  ballast  in  the  dynamic  behaviour of bridges.   

This  master  thesis  aims  at  quantifying  the  influence  of  the  ballast  on  the  dynamic  properties  of  a  bridge.  Is  the  ballast  just  an  additional  mass  on  the  structure  or  does  it  introduce  any  additional  stiffness? Thus, this project investigates different alternatives and parameters to propose a realistic  and  reliable  model  for  the  ballast  superstructure  and  the  track.  For  the  purpose  of  this  study,  a  simply  supported  steel  truss  bridge  located  in  Poland  is  studied.  The  bridge  was  excited  by  a  harmonic  force  and  the  interesting  point  regarding  the  experiments  is  that  acceleration  measurements  were  collected  before  and  after  the  ballasted  track  setting  up  on  the  bridge  deck. 

Then,  these  data  are  processed  through  MATLAB  in  order  to  obtain  the  natural  frequencies  of  the  bridge at two different times during its construction. The determined natural frequencies for the un‐ ballasted  case  are  then  compared  with  analytical  values  obtained  with  a  3D  finite  element  model  implemented  in  the  software  LUSAS.  This  step  aims  at  calibrating  the  un‐ballasted  finite  element  model so that the bridge is represented as realistically as possible.  

 

Once it has been done, a model both for the ballast and the track is proposed using solid elements  for  the  ballast  superstructure  and  beam  elements  for  the  rails,  the  guard  rails  and  the  sleepers. 

Different parameters influencing the natural frequencies and modes shapes of the bridge are testing  and  it  appears  that  the  ballast  introduces  an  additional  stiffness  through  a  bending  stiffness  in  the  ballast  and  a  change  in  the  support  conditions.  Finally,  the  contribution  of  these  parameters  is  assessed and discussed: the stiffness of the ballast increases the stiffness of the bridge by more than 

20%  for  the  2 nd

  vertical  bending  vibration  mode  and  the  support  conditions  increase  the  bridge’s  stiffness  by  more  than  15%  and  30%  respectively  for  the  1 st

  vertical  bending  the  1 st

  torsional  vibration modes. 

Keywords:  Ballast,  Railway  bridges,  Experimental  dynamics,  Finite  element  modelling,  Natural  frequencies, Eigenmodes, Bridge stiffness.    iii 

   

  iv 

 

 

Contents 

Preface ...................................................................................................................................................... i 

Abstract ................................................................................................................................................... iii 

Contents ................................................................................................................................................... v 

1  Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 1 

1.1  Introduction ............................................................................................................................. 1 

1.2  Purpose of the study ‐ Aims and scope ................................................................................... 2 

1.3  Literature review ..................................................................................................................... 2 

1.4  Method and outline of the thesis ............................................................................................ 4 

2  Implementation of the finite element model in LUSAS .................................................................. 5 

2.1  The studied bridge ................................................................................................................... 5 

2.2  Geometry of the bridge ........................................................................................................... 5 

2.2.1  Global geometry .............................................................................................................. 5 

2.2.2  Cross sectional properties ............................................................................................... 8 

2.2.3  Orthotropic deck ........................................................................................................... 10 

2.2.4  Foundations ................................................................................................................... 12 

2.3  Materials and loads ............................................................................................................... 14 

2.3.1  Material ......................................................................................................................... 14 

2.3.2  Permanent loads ........................................................................................................... 14 

2.4  Quality assurance .................................................................................................................. 15 

2.4.1  Mass checking ............................................................................................................... 15 

2.4.2  Influence of the elements’ number ............................................................................... 16 

3  Experimental data processing ....................................................................................................... 17 

3.1  Procedure of the vibration tests ........................................................................................... 17 

3.2  Analysis of the experimental data ......................................................................................... 19 

3.2.1  Extract the frequency value .......................................................................................... 19 

3.2.2  Mode shape identification ............................................................................................ 20 

3.2.3  Damping ratio determination ........................................................................................ 20 

3.3  Experimental results .............................................................................................................. 22 

3.3.1  Test 1: before the installation of the ballast and the track ........................................... 22 

3.3.2  Test 2: after the installation of the ballast and the track .............................................. 37 

3.3.3  Discussion ...................................................................................................................... 46  v 

4  Eigenvalue analysis and calibration of the un‐ballasted FEM model ............................................ 47 

4.1  Eigenvalue analysis results .................................................................................................... 47 

4.2  Calibration of the un‐ballasted FEM model .......................................................................... 54 

5  Ballast and tracks models .............................................................................................................. 57 

5.1  Ballast superstructure and properties of the track ............................................................... 57 

5.2  Modelling the track ............................................................................................................... 60 

5.3  Different alternatives to model the ballast ........................................................................... 62 

5.3.1  Influence of the ballast stiffness ................................................................................... 62 

5.3.2  Influence of the ballast mass ......................................................................................... 63 

5.3.3  Influence of the support conditions .............................................................................. 65 

6  Discussion and conclusion ............................................................................................................. 73 

6.1  Comparison of the experimental and analytical results ....................................................... 73 

6.1.1  Reference un‐ballasted and ballasted models .............................................................. 73 

6.1.2  Modelling the ballast ..................................................................................................... 74 

6.2  Further research .................................................................................................................... 75 

References ............................................................................................................................................. 77 

Appendix A ............................................................................................................................................... I 

 

Appendix B ........................................................................................................................................... XIII 

  vi 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1 

 

 

1 Introduction 

1.1 Introduction 

The  design  phase  is  a  crucial  step  in  the  lifecycle  of  bridges.  Swedish  codes  and  Eurocodes  provide,  to  design  engineers,  calculation  methods  and  safety  coefficients  which  takes  into  account  different parameters: the bridge type (Railway Bridge, Suspension Bridge, Cable Stayed Bridge…), the  materials (steel, concrete, pre‐stressed concrete…), the geometry of the bridge, the foundations and  other  constraints.  Regarding  railway  bridges,  specific  rules  and  recommendations  exist  and  a  dynamic analysis is more and more required in order to adapt the bridge design to the passing train  vibrations, especially for high‐speed trains. A dynamic analysis is generally required for train speeds  over 200 km/h.  

Nowadays, high‐speed trains and fast railway networks are rapidly developing and a gradual  increase of trains speed can be observed. The world speed record is currently held by the TGV (Train 

à Grande Vitesse, french for "High‐Speed Train") and achieved by SNCF, the French national railway  in 2007. The maximal reached speed is 574,8 km/h. Thus, this research field is constantly stimulated  to  develop  more  efficient  technologies,  materials  and  structures.  An  accurate  and  comprehensive  knowledge  of  the  bridge,  the  tracks  and  the  ballast  behaviour  is  therefore  required  to  study  and  model the bridge, track and train interactions.  

Railway  bridges  are  complex  structures,  consisting  of  several  structural  components  with  different  mechanical  properties  and  frequently,  discrepancies  between  theoretical  results  and  experimental ones are observed in the dynamic analysis, especially for short railway bridge [1]. The  bridge model is often the most accurately defined since the geometrical and material properties are  perfectly known by the design office at the end of the design phase. The train model is also, most of 

  the time, well defined: for a particular type of train (LM71 and SW/2 for statics, HSLM for dynamics),  the design codes provides the axle loads and the geometrical and mechanical characteristics.  

However,  the  track  is  more  complicated  to  model  and  there  is,  so  far,  no  clear  recommendation  in  design  codes  about  how  to  take  into  account  the  effect  of  the  ballasted  superstructure. Nonetheless, EN 1991‐2, Part 6.5.4 provides rules for the combined response of the  track and the bridge [2].  

 

The ballast is a “material such as broken stone, gravel, slag, cinders, burnt clay, etc... (10‐60  mm), which is placed on the finished roadbed to form a support for the ties, to provide a means of  draining  water  away  from  them,  and  to  make  it  possible  to  surface  or  raise  track  or  make  tie  renewals, without disturbing the roadbed”[3]. The ballast layer “provides a firm and even bearing for  the ties by evenly distributing the pressure due to the weight and thrust of trains passing over the  tracks”[3]. Due to its granular character, the properties and the behaviour of the ballast are difficult  to  assess.  Therefore,  modelling  the  ballast  in  an  accurate  way  is  still  nowadays  a  challenge  for  engineers. Although studies show that the ballast has a significant influence on the bridges vibrations  and, possibly on the stiffness of the whole bridge itself, the contribution of the ballast to the bridge  stiffness is still studied. Indeed, the natural frequencies of a structure are proportional to the square  root of the stiffness divided by the mass [4]. The mass and the stiffness are, hence, two antagonist  parameters  in  relation  to  the  natural  frequency  and  it  is  crucial  to  know  and  understand  how  the  ballast affects these two parameters. 

1.2 Purpose of the study ‐ Aims and scope 

 

The  purpose  of  this  project  is  to  estimate  the  influence  of  the  ballast  on  the  bridge  vibrations  by  implementing  an  accurate  FEM  model  of  a  truss  bridge  and  comparing  the  analytical  natural  frequencies  of  the  bridge  with  experimental  ones.  One  interesting  fact  about  this  project  is  that  vibrations were measured, first without the ballast and then after the ballast and the track were in  place. The project aims at assessing the influence of the ballast on both the natural frequencies and  on the damping ratio and it aims also at determining if the ballast gives any additional stiffness to the  bridge. Ballasted models will thus be proposed. 

1.3 Literature review 

Since  the  behaviour  of  the  ballast  is  not  well  known,  numerous  models  of  the  ballast  have  been  proposed, considering and analysing different properties of the granular material.  Numerous studies  deal with the way of modelling the ballast and railway tracks lying on the ground, and some of them  propose  very  detailed  models  for  the  ballast,  using,  for  instance,  the  discrete  element  method  [5]. 

With this method, the grains constituting the ballast layer are modelled as non‐deformable polygonal  solids so that it models the interaction between the deformable ground and the track. 

 

However, just few studies are focusing on the ballast behaviour when it comes to railway bridges and  to the train‐track bridge dynamic interactions. This section aims at presenting and summarizing some  of the works published about this particular subject.  

Most of the studies about the interaction train‐track‐bridge [6‐8] propose to model the bridge deck  and the track as two linear‐elastic Bernoulli‐Euler beams and the connection between these beams is  ensured by a more or less complex springs and dampers system. These models introduce a vertical  and horizontal stiffness for the ballast.  

In  [9],  ZACHER  et  al.  implement  a  2D  model  of  stiff  ballast  grains  represented  as  balls  with  three  degrees of freedom. The contact between the grains is then ensured through non‐linear springs and  viscous dampers. However, the 2D model implemented by ZACHER et al. is not conceivable for the  purpose of this thesis with a 3D finite element model.  

Other studies show that the stiffness of the ballast is frequency dependent. For that, in [10], HERRON  et  al.  consider  a  ballast  stiffness  range  from  100  MN/m  to  500  MN/m  and  model  the  ballast  as  discrete particles. In contrast, in [11], REBELO et al. model the ballast layer as a plate connected to  the bridge deck with springs and take into account only the shear stiffness of the ballast. These two  studies  result  in  the  observation  that  the  natural  frequencies  of  a  structure  vary  according  to  the  vibration amplitude. Besides, it has been shown that an increase in free vibration’s amplitude result  in the decrease of the 1 st

 natural frequency of a bridge. 

Then,  in  [12],  LIU  et  al.  implement  a  3D  finite  element  model  and  describe  the  ballast  as  solid  elements,  the  sleepers  as  lumped  masses  and  the  rails  as  linear  beams.  Appropriate  boundary  conditions are also applied on the bridge longitudinal direction to simulate the continuity of the rails  and  the  ballast  before  and  after  the  structure.  The  connection  between  the  track  and  the  deck  is  ensured by a spring and damper system. In this study, the influence of the train model is investigated  but  all  the  models  give  a  good  match  with  the  experiment.  Such  a  model  for  the  ballast  seems  to  provide interesting results and it will be further developed in this thesis. 

FINK et al. in [1] and BATTINI et al. [13] study the non‐linear effect of the ballast superstructure on  the  bridge.  Both  studies  introduce  a  2D  model,  consisting  of  two  beams:  one  modelling  the  bridge  and the other modelling the ballast layer. Then, they study the interaction at the interface between  these two beams. In [1] and [12], the effect of ballast is introduced through a non‐linear longitudinal  stiffness  and  the  slip  at  the  beam  interface  is  taken  into  consideration  into  the  ballast  stiffness  matrix.  Good  agreements  between  experimental  and  analytical  results  are  found  in  both  studies. 

Such a model can also be implemented in a 3D FEM‐program.  

These different works and conclusions about the train‐track bridge dynamic interactions are taken as  a  starting  point  of  the  thesis.  No  convincing  model  for  the  ballast  superstructure  has  been  implemented yet and as a result, the thesis will focus exclusively on this purpose and on the different  parameters that can have a more or less significant influence on the ballast model and therefore, on  the dynamic analysis of a bridge. 

 

1.4 Method and outline of the thesis 

 

The crucial point of this project is to have a finite element model as realistic as possible so that the  model does not lead to any source of error or misinterpretation of the experimental data. Therefore,  an  accurate  and  comprehensive  knowledge  of  the  truss  bridge  is  necessary.  It  has  been  possible  thanks to the help of Jaroslaw Zwolski who did the first study about the bridge [14]. The engineering  analysis software LUSAS is used for all the parts of the project related to finite element modelling and  the implementation of the un‐ballasted FEM model is detailed in Chapter 2.  

The next step consists in processing experimental measurements ‐ first without the ballast and then,  after  the  ballast  and  tracks  were  in  place  ‐  in  order  to  get  the  lowest  natural  frequencies  and  the  damping  ratios  of  the  bridge.  Once  again,  a  deep  knowledge  of  the  experimental  conditions  –  weather,  exciter  properties,  sensors  and  data  acquisition  systems  –  is  important  to  extract  the  natural frequencies of the railway bridge as accurately as possible. The experimental data processing  is specified in Chapter 3.  

The  experimental  values  for  the  un‐ballasted  bridge  are  then  compared  with  the  values  from  the 

LUSAS eigenvalue analysis. Thus, the third step of the project aims at optimizing and improving the  un‐ballasted  finite  element  model  of  the  railway  bridge  to  get  it  as  close  as  possible  to  the  real  behaviour  of  the  structure.  Different  parameters  which  might  influence  the  accuracy  of  the  model  are  then  tested:  the  support  conditions,  the  mesh  size  or  the  type  of  element  for  instance.  The  calibration of the un‐ballasted model and the influence of these parameters are discussed in Chapter 

4. 

The final step, which is also the purpose of this project, consists in proposing several alternatives to  model the ballast and the track on railway bridges. Previous studies are taken as a starting point and  different  parameters  are  studied:  the  element  type,  the  continuity  of  the  ballast  superstructure  before  and  after  the  bridge,  the  influence  of  the  mass  of  the  ballast  and  the  support  conditions. 

These different alternatives are presented in Chapter 5. 

Finally, the influence of the ballast on the natural frequencies and on the damping of the bridge, and  the estimation of its contribution or not to the bridge stiffness is discussed in Chapter 6. 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2 

 

 

2 Implementation of the finite element model  in LUSAS 

An accurate finite element model of the bridge is required to perform a reliable dynamic analysis; the  engineering analysis software LUSAS 14.7 has been used to carry out the finite element analysis. A 3D  model  of  the  overall  bridge  was  created  in  order  to  determine  the  mode  shapes  and  eigenfrequencies of the bridge. 

2.1 The studied bridge 

This  project  is  focusing  on  a  simply  supported  truss  bridge.  The  railway  bridge  is  located  in  Poland  over  a  main  double‐track  line.  It  supports  a  single‐track  railway  line  slightly  curved  with  radius 

330/290m  [14].  The  bridge  is  composed  of  a  truss  structure  and  a  bracing  system  connecting  the  girders  truss  arrangement  and  all  its  structural  components  are  in  steel.  The  bridge  deck  is  an  orthotropic plate where the ballast and the track are placed. The track is composed of main rails and  guard rails and due to the track’s curve, the track is inclined with a slope of 2%. 

2.2 Geometry of the bridge 

2.2.1 Global geometry 

The overall geometry of the bridge is shown in Figures 2.1, 2.2 and 2.4. All dimensions are in meters. 

The total length of the span is 38,4m and the total width is 6,7m; the height is 6,2m (Figure 2.2).The 

main structural system consists of longitudinal beams connected by angled cross‐members forming  equilateral  triangular  units:  this  truss  structure  is  composed  of  16  diagonal  elements.  The  diagonal  elements are subject alternatively to tension and compression. The orthotropic deck is composed of  two  longitudinal  beams,  13  cross  beams  and  14  stringer  beams.  A  thin  steel  plate  covers  the  deck  framework  (Figure  2.3  and  2.4).  The  upper  part  of  the  bridge  consists  of  a  reinforcement  system  composed of bracing elements. The bridge is slightly unsymmetrical in the transverse direction due  to  drainage  slopes  of  the  deck  plate  and  to  a  non‐symmetrical  arrangement  of  the  stringer  beams 

(Figure 2.4).  

Figure 2.1: Photo of a longitudinal view of the bridge. 

 

 

Figure 2.2: Overall geometry and dimensions. 

 

The  beam  elements  are  modelled  and  meshed  as  3D  Thick  (Timoshenko)  Beam  elements  and  the  steel plate is modelled as Thin (Kirchhoff) shell elements. The influence of the element length or the  number of the elements division will be further investigated. 

 

Figure 2.3: Photo of the truss structure, the steel plate and the load exciter used for the field measurements. 

 

Figure 2.4: Cross section of the bridge. 

 

 

 

2.2.2 Cross sectional properties 

 

All  dimensions  in  Table  2.1  are  in  metres.  Table  2.1  shows  the  cross  sections  of  the  different  elements of  the bridge. The shape of  the sections  was determined based on drawings  provided by  the design office of the bridge in Poland.   

The  longitudinal  beams  of  the  deck  are  I‐beams  with  unequal  flanges  and  their  characteristic  dimensions and properties are shown in Table 2.1. Their location is shown in Figure 2.4. 

According  to  the  drawings  provided  by  the  design  office,  the  cross  section  of  the  cross  beams  is  varying along the transverse axis in order to create a drainage slope. For the purpose of the study, it  has been assumed an average constant cross section for these beams and it has been checked that  this  assumption  does  not  influence  the  eigenvalue  analysis  of  the  bridge.  The  13  cross  beams  are  reversed T beam section and their characteristic dimensions and properties are shown in Table 2.1. 

Their location is shown in Figure 2.4. 

The  14  stringer  beams  are  divided  in  three  geometric  categories:  two  L  cross  sections  and  one  reversed T cross section. There are seven L‐beams S1, one L‐section S2 which is a shorter version of 

S1 aiming at leaving space for pipes to cross the bridge deck and there are six  reversed T‐beams S3. 

Their characteristic dimensions and properties are shown in Table 2.1. Figure 2.5 shows the stringer  beams arrangement and Figure 2.6 shows an overall view of the bridge deck without the steel plate. 

 

Figure 2.5: Stiffener beams arrangement. 

 

 

Figure 2.6: Arrangement of the beam elements of the deck without the steel plate. 

 

 

Table 2.1: Cross section properties. 

Cross section definition 

Type of section 

I beam 

Element 

Longitudinal  beams bottom 

Diagonal  elements 

Longitudinal  beam top 

Reinforcement 

Cross beams  top 

Name of the  elements 

Number of  elements 

D1

D2

LT1

LT2 

CBT 

26 

 

 

1,25 

0,52

0,4

0,508

0,52 

0,12 

0,34 

 

 

Type of section 

Reversed T  beam 

Bt=Bb  T1 

0,46  0,02 

0,46

0,44

0,46

0,46 

0,024

0,02

0,024

0,03 

0,013  0,01 

0,46  0,02 

T2 

0,03 

0,024 

0,02 

0,024 

0,03 

0,01 

0,02 

t  r 

0,02  0,065 

0,02 

0,02 

0,02 

0,02 

0,01

0,01

0,01

0,01 

0,007  0,005 

0,016  0,01 

 

Element 

Cross beams  bottom 

Stiffening  beams 

Name of the  elements 

Number of  elements 

CBB  13 

S3  6 

0,754 

0,26 

Type of section 

Element 

Stiffening  beams 

L beam 

Name of the  elements 

S1

S2 

Number of  elements 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0,25

0,16 

0,46 

0,1 

0,114

0,114 

0,03 

0,01 

0,01

0,01 

t  r 

0,016  0,015 

0,014  0,015 

t  r 

0,014  0,015

0,014  0,015 

The  16  diagonal  elements  are  I‐beams  with  equal  flanges  and  their  characteristic  dimensions  and  properties are shown in Table 2.1. These elements are named D1 and D2 and their location is shown  in Figure 2.7. 

The  longitudinal  beams  of  the  upper  part  of  the  bridge  are  I‐beams  with  equal  flanges  and  their  characteristic dimensions and properties are shown in Table 2.1. These elements are named LT1 and 

LT2 and their location is shown in Figure 2.7 and Figure 2.8. 

 

Figure 2.7: Diagonal elements D1,2 location and upper longitudinal beam LT1,2 location. 

 

The  two  cross  beams  of  the  upper  part  of  the  bridge  are  I‐beams  with  equal  flanges  and  their  characteristic dimensions and properties are shown in Table 2.1. These elements are named CBT and  their location is shown in Figure 2.8. 

The  16  bracing  beams  of  the  upper  part  of  the  bridge  are  I‐beams  with  equal  flanges  and  their  characteristic dimensions and properties are shown in Table 2.1. These elements are named R and  their location is shown in Figure 2.8. 

 

Figure 2.8: View of the bracing system from above.

 

2.2.3 Orthotropic deck 

 

In order to have the most realistic model of the deck, all the geometrical points of the model belong  to  the  mid‐surface  of  the  plate  (Figure  2.2)  and  then,  offsets  are  applied  (Table  2.2)  to  have  the  correct  locations  for  each  element.  The  steel  plate  is  directly  connected  to  the  cross  beams,  the  longitudinal  beams  and  the  stiffening  beams  and  it  rests  above  the  top  of  the  reversed  T‐shaped  cross  beams.  The  inclined  edge  parts  of  the  steel  plate  (Figure  2.4)  are  taken  into  account  by  increasing  the  thickness  of  the  edge  parts  of  the  steel  plate  from  0,015  m  to  0,025  m  but  in  conserving the same mass of steel (Figures 2.9 and 2.10). Two models had been compared: one with 

10 

inclined  edge  parts  and  one  with  thicker  horizontal  edge  parts.  The  difference  between  the  two  models was negligible and the simplest model was kept for the rest of the analysis. Therefore, the  following thickness has been used:  t  steel plate central part 

= 0,015 m  t  steel plate edge parts  

= 0,025m  

Figure 2.9: Transverse view of the steel deck. 

 

 

Figure 2.10: Overall view of the steel deck. 

 

The values of the offsets are the following (Table 2.2): 

Table 2.2: Offsets values. 

Element 

CBB 

CBT 

S1 

S2 

S3 

Main steel plate part 

Edges steel plate parts 

Offset value (m) 

‐0,387 

+0,09 

+0,2 

‐0,028 

‐0,077 

‐0,026 

+0,185 

+0,19 

11 

 

2.2.4 Foundations 

The bridge foundations are not studied in the project and therefore, they are not included in the FE‐ model. Nonetheless, realistic support conditions must be specified to perform the calculation. These  boundary conditions have been applied at the bottom of the longitudinal beams to model the real  support conditions as realistically as possible (Figure 2.11 and Figure 2.12). 

 

 

 

Figure 2.12: Stiff beam.

Figure 2.11: Support conditions.

In order to apply the boundary conditions at the bottom of the longitudinal beams, a stiff beam has  been added between the centre of gravity of the longitudinal beam cross section and the bottom of  the  longitudinal  beam  (Figure  2.12).  This  stiff  beam  is  modelled  as  one  3D  Thick  Beam  element,  a 

Timoshenko  beam,  where  the  following  properties  have  been  adopted  for  the  un‐ballasted  model 

(Table 2.3). The dimensions of the stiff beam are five times higher than the thickness of the web of  the longitudinal beams.  

Table 2.3: Stiff beam properties. 

Length  L = 0,57 m 

Rectangular cross sections  A = 0,1 x 0,1 m 

Mass density  ρ = 100 kg/m

Young’s Modulus  E = E  steel 

= 205 GPa 

 

The  influence  of  the  stiffness,  i.e.  the  Young’s  Modulus  of  this  stiff  beam,  on  the  bridge  natural  frequencies  is  studied  in  Chapter  4.2  and  it  will  be  further  investigated  in  Chapter  5.3.3  for  the  ballasted model. The values presented here are the ones which fit the best with the real behaviour of  the bridge without the ballast. 

The boundary conditions are then applied according to the drawings from the design office. They are  represented on Figure 2.13. Figure 2.14 shows a view of the final model without the ballast. 

 

12 

 

 

Figure 2.13: Boundary conditions in the xy plane. 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2.14: 3D model of the bridge. 

 

13 

2.3 Materials and loads 

2.3.1 Material 

 

The bridge consists entirely of steel components. Table 2.4 shows the steel properties that have been  used for the 3D FEM model. 

Table 2.4: Steel properties. 

Young’s Modulus  

Mass density 

Poisson’s ratio 

E = 205 GPa 

ρ = 7 849 kg/m

ν = 0,3 

2.3.2 Permanent loads 

The weight of the structure is considered based on the geometry obtained from the finite element  model and taking the density of steel as 7 849 kN/m

3

. In LUSAS, the self‐weight is applied as a body  force with linear acceleration of 9,81 m/s

2

 in the vertical direction . 

The  total  mass  of  the  exciter  is  about  1050kg.  The  exciter’s  dead  weight  is  modelled  by  a  lumped  mass applied in the vertical direction at two different positions (Figure 2.15): one corresponding to  the 1 st

 test without the ballast and   

 one corresponding to the 2 nd

 test with the ballast. 

 

 

  a) 

        b) 

Figure 2.15: Exciter’s dead weight position in LUSAS,   a) test without the ballast, b) test with the ballast and the track in place. 

 

14 

 

2.4 Quality assurance 

Throughout the different stages of the modeling work, it is crucial to perform a quality control of the  model. In fact, wrong inputs in LUSAS gives wrong outputs and the FEM results are wrong. This step  of the design process is a necessity for all bridge designers and must be a natural and common part  of their work.  

2.4.1 Mass checking 

 

The  total  mass  of  the  model  need  to  be  compared  with  hand  calculations  to  ensure  the  model  accuracy.  Table  2.11  summarizes  the  different  steps  done  to  perform  the  hand  calculation  for  the  mass  checking.  Then,  the  hand  calculated  value  is  compared  with  the  sum  of  the  four  vertical  reaction forces obtained from LUSAS when the self‐weight of the model is applied (Figure 2.15). 

 

Figure 2.16: Self‐weight vertical reactions (N). 

 

 

 

 

According  to  Table  2.11,  the  difference  between  the  result  obtained  from  LUSAS  and  the  hand  calculation is very low: only 0, 046 %. This value is more than acceptable. 

 

15 

 

Table 2.5: Mass model checking. 

 

ELEMENT 

Longitudinal beams bottom 

Cross beams bottom 

D1 

D2 

Cross beams top 

LT1 

LT2 

Reinforcements 1 

Reinforcements 2 

Reinforcements 3 

S1 

S2 

S3 

Steel plate 1 

Steel plate 2 

Steel plate 3 

Exciter 

Hand calculated total mass (kg) 

  

Total mass from LUSAS (kg) 

  

Percentage of difference (%) 

  

Number of  element 

16 

13 

 

  

  

  

Area (m2)  Length (m) Density  Mass (kg) 

0,0506268

0,0254806

38,4 

6,7 

0,0368858 7,841 

0,0248858 7,841 

0,0232858

0,0313658

0,0368858

3,32E‐03 

6,7 

9,6 

9,6 

4,633 

3,32E‐03 

3,32E‐03 

4,55E‐03 

3,29E‐03 

6,7 

3,713 

38,4 

38,4 

4,54E‐03 

0,1005 

0,00166 

0,010663 

38,4 

38,4 

38,4 

38,4 

  

  

  

  

  

  

7849 

30518,00 

7849 

17419,76 

7849 

18160,80 

7849 

12252,58 

7849 

7849 

2449,12 

9453,70 

7849 

7849 

5558,72 

1932,53 

7849 

7849 

1397,36 

387,19 

7849 

7849 

9596,03 

991,10 

7849 

8215,46 

7849 

30290,86 

7849 

1000,65 

7849 

3213,85 

1050 

153888 

153958 

0,046 

2.4.2 Influence of the elements’ number 

Then, a convergence analysis needs to be performed to evaluate the influence of the mesh size and  the number of divisions for each element constituting the bridge. This analysis is crucial to test the  accuracy of our finite element model and to find the most efficient mesh size to have an acceptable 

CPU time and accurate results.  

The following numbers of divisions are used: 

N  cross beams bottom 

= 1 

N  longitudinal beams bottom 

= 5 

N  stiffening beams 

= 5 

N  cross beams top 

= 5 

N  longitudinal beams top 

= 5 

N  bracing elements 

= 5 

 

The difference in frequency between the mesh described above and a finer mesh is not higher than 

0,1%. The current mesh enables to have both a good accuracy and an efficient CPU time. 

16 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3 

 

 

3 Experimental data processing 

 

Experimental  dynamic  aims  at  determining  the  real  behavior  of  a  structure  and  its  dynamic  properties.  Usually,  experimental  dynamic  is  used  to  verify  and  calibrate  finite  element  models. 

These  types  of  field  measurements  are  very  costly  due  to  the  high  accuracy  and  quality  of  the  instrumentation  material  (sensors  and  data  acquisition  systems).  The  two  mains  steps  of  experimental dynamic are of crucial importance: the data acquisition and then, the data processing,  using signal analysis particularly based on Jean‐Baptiste Fourier and Harry Nyquist theories [4]. The  first step has already been carried out and therefore, this thesis is going to focus on the experimental  data processing only. The method and the results are described is the following chapter. 

3.1 Procedure of the vibration tests 

The vibration tests were carried on by Dr. Jaroslaw Zwolski from Wroclaw University of Technology, 

Department of Civil Engineering in Poland. Two sessions of tests were performed; the first one took  place on the 06/10/2010, before the ballast and tracks’ installation; the second one took place on the 

09/04/2011 after the tacks’ installation. The source of vibration is a Rotational Eccentric Mass (REM)  exciter (Figures 3.1 and 3.2) which generates a sinus excitation with continuously variable frequency  and its positions for the first and the second testing sessions are shown in Figures 3.3 and 3.4. The  mass of the exciter is 1050 kg.  

17 

 

Figure 3.1: Exciter position for the first test.  Figure 3.2: Exciter position for the second test. 

For the first test, the exciter was fixed to a short section of the track so as to prevent the exciter from  bouncing  while  the  REM  excited  the  bridge  at  high  frequencies  i.e.  when  the  excitation  force  exceeded the exciter’s weight. For the second testing session, the exciter was placed on the track. 

 

Figure 3.3: Exciter's position ‐ View of the bottom part of the bridge ‐ Test 1. 

 

 

 

 

Figure 3.4: Exciter's position‐ View of the bottom part of the bridge ‐ Test 2. 

The exciter generated a sweep signal in the predefined frequency range from 3 to 30 Hz. However, it  became  rather  unstable  over  15Hz  (Figure  3.5)  and  after  270s,  the  force  does  not  increase  as  a  parabola.  The  duration  of  both  tests  was  6  min  and  47  sec  and  a  sample  frequency  of  400  Hz  was  used. 

The response of the bridge has been  measured by twelve accelerometers for the first test without  the ballast and ten for the second test with it. They were used in pair: one accelerometer measuring  the  vertical  acceleration  and  the  other  one  measuring  the  transverse  acceleration.  The  1 st

  test  session consisted of 12 tests corresponding to 12 arrangements of accelerometers and the 2 nd

 test  session of 14 arrangements of accelerometers (Appendix 1). Two pairs of accelerometers were fixed  at the same position as the REM exciter as the reference for test 1 and one pair for test 2. 

18 

-0.5

-1

0.5

0

1.5

x 10

4

1

-0.5

-1

0.5

0

1.5

x 10

4

1

-1.5

0 50 100 150 200 250

Time (s)

300 350 400 450

 

-1.5

0 50 100 150

Figure 3.5: Plot of the vertical force [N] – Test 1 (blue) and 2 (red). 

200 250

Time (s)

300 350 400 450

 

3.2 Analysis of the experimental data 

The raw experimental data for each accelerometer and each setup has been provided by Dr. Jaroslaw 

Zwolski.  For  each  setup,  the  interesting  accelerometers  or  combination  of  accelerometers  are  studied. The experimental data processing aims at extracting the eigenfrequencies of the bridge, the  corresponding mode shapes and damping ratios for both tests i.e. before and after the setting up of  the track. 

3.2.1 Extract the frequency value 

For each frequency, the same process has been adopted to extract the value. Figure 3.6 displays the  process to extract one eigenfrequency of the bridge. The corresponding code in MATLAB is shown in 

Appendix B. 

 

Figure 3.6: Eigenfrequency extraction method. 

19 

 

The  zero‐padding  procedure  consists  in  completing  a  signal  with  n  zeros.  It  aims  at  improving  the  accuracy  of  the  signal  analysis  by  increasing  the  number  of  points.  The  peak  value  is  thus  more  precisely pinpointed. 

3.2.2 Mode shape identification 

Figure  3.7  displays  the  process  to  identify  a  vibration’s  mode  shape.  The  corresponding  code  in 

MATLAB is shown in Appendix B. 

 

Figure 3.7: Mode shape identification method. 

3.2.3 Damping ratio determination  

Figure  3.8  displays  the  process  to  determine  the  damping  ratio  corresponding  to  one  natural  frequency of the bridge. The corresponding code in MATLAB is shown in Appendix B. 

 

20 

 

Figure 3.8: Damping ratio determination method. 

Method: Half power bandwidth method [3,14]:  

This  method  aims  at  determining  the  damping  ratio  ξ  for  an  eigenfrequency  corresponding  to  a  resonance of the bridge. It uses the frequency spectrum plot to determine the damping ratio. First,  the maximal amplitude A

1

 is determined and then, the amplitude A

2

 is calculated: 

  (3.1) 

The  two  frequencies  corresponding  to  the  value  of  the  amplitude  A

2

  are  determined  on  the  frequency plot. They are located on both side of the frequency peak as shown in Figure 3.9 [4,15]. 

 

Figure 3.9: Half Power Bandwidth method [4]. 

 

Then, the damping ratio is obtained using the following relation: 

ξ

  (3.2) 

21 

 

3.3 Experimental results 

Table 3.1 shows the results extracted from the experimental data. The following chapter presents the  different graphs enabling to extract these values and to conclude on the type of mode shape. All the  values presented in Table 3.1 are an average of 4 values determined from relevant accelerometers. 

Table 3.1: Experimental results. 

 

Without the track – Test 1  With the track – Test 2 

Mode type 

Frequency  value (Hz) 

Damping ratio  estimation (%) 

Frequency  value (Hz) 

Damping ratio  estimation (%) 

1 st

 vertical bending 

1 st

 vertical bending 

1 st

 torsional 

1 st  horizontal bending 

1 st

 horizontal bending 

2 nd  vertical bending 

3 rd  vertical bending 

8,05 

9,68 

10,1 

14,0 

14,4 

18,5 

21,6 

2,5 

0,4 

5,39 

9,26 

10,3 

12,3 

2,2 

0,4 

 

3.3.1 Test 1: before the installation of the ballast and the track 

Examples of a vertical and transverse acceleration’s plots and their corresponding FFT are shown in 

Figure 3.11 and 3.12. Figure 3.10 shows where the studied accelerometers were located. 

 

Figure 3.10: Test 1 – Accelerometers’ arrangement, Setup 04. 

22 

 

 

 

 

Whole Signal

0

-0.5

1

0.5

-1

0 50 100 150 200

Time (s)

250

FFT Whole Signal

300 350 400

1

0.8

0.6

0.4

0.2

0

0 x 10

-3

2 4 6 8 10

Frequency (Hz)

12 14 16 18

Figure 3.11: Signal Z9 processing – Vertical acceleration – Setup 04 –Test 1. 

450

20

Whole Signal

1

0.5

0

-0.5

-1

0 50 100 150 200 250

Time (s)

FFT Whole Signal

300 350

1.2

x 10

-3

1

0.8

0.6

0.4

0.2

0

0 2 4 6 8 10

Frequency (Hz)

12 14 16

Figure 3.12: Signal Y6 processing – Transverse acceleration Setup 04. 

400

18

450

20

 

 

23 

 1 st

 frequency 

 

 

0.025

0.02

0.015

0.01

0.005

0

-0.005

-0.01

-0.015

-0.02

-0.025

As the Fast Fourier Transform plot on Figure 3.11 shows, a peak is clearly visible between 7,5 Hz and 

8,5 Hz. The band pass filter is then applied between these two limits. Figure 3.13 shows the part of  the time signal we are looking at and Figure 3.14 shows the acceleration plot obtained after filtering  the signal. The next step consists in applying the window function and the zero‐padding: Figure 3.15  shows the result of this step. The FFT of the isolated filtered signal is then plotted in Figure 3.16.  

1

Filtered Signal

0.8

0.6

0.4

0.2

0

-0.2

-0.4

-0.6

-0.8

0 50 100 150 200

Time (s)

250 300 350 400

Figure 3.13: Part of the time signal ‐ Z9, Setup 04. 

450  

0.025

0.02

0.015

0.01

0.005

0

-0.005

-0.01

-0.015

-0.02

-0.025

125 130 135 140 145 150 155

Time (s)

160 165 170 175

 

Figure 3.14: Filtered signal Z9 – Setup 04. 

 

Isolated filtered signal

1.6

x 10

-3

FFT of isolated filtered signal

1.4

X: 8.049

Y: 0.001555

1.2

1

0.8

0.6

0.4

0.2

135 140 145 150 155

Time (s)

160 165 170

Figure 3.15: Isolated filtered signal Z9 – Setup 04. 

 

0

0 2 4 6 8 10 12

Frequency (Hz)

14 16 18

Figure 3.16: Frequency spectrum of the isolated filtered  signal Z9 – Setup 04.

20

An  average  between  four  values  obtained  from  relevant  accelerometers  has  been  done  and  it  has  been observed that the value of the first frequency oscillates around the following value: 

f

1 vertical 

= 8,05 ± 0,01 Hz 

 

Then,  two  isolated  filtered  signals  and  the  corresponding  displacements  are  plotted  in  order  to  compare the phase between them. As Figures 3.17 and 3.18 show, accelerometers Z5 and Z9 are in 

24 

 

  phase for Setup 04; it is the same for Z1‐Z3 or Z3‐Z11. In addition, the studied accelerations have the  same  amplitude.  Therefore,  it  can  be  concluded  that  the  1 st

  frequency  extracted  corresponds  to  a 

first vertical bending mode

Phase comparison of two signals

Phase comparison of two signals

0.015

0.025

0.02

0.015

0.01

0.005

0

-0.005

-0.01

-0.015

-0.02

-0.025

150.9

151 151.1

151.2

Time (s)

151.3

151.4

151.5

151.6

 

Figure 3.17: Phase comparison Z5 (red) – Z9 (blue) 

 Setup 04. 

0.01

0.005

0

-0.005

-0.01

-0.015

151.7

151.8

151.9

152

Time (s)

152.1

152.2

152.3

 

Figure 3.18:  Phase comparison Z1 (blue) – Z3 (red)  

Setup 04.

 

The  corresponding  damping  ratio  is  then  calculated  and  is  equal  to:  ξ

2,5%.  This  value  is  an  average of 4 values with an uncertainty of ±0,05%. 

 2 nd

 frequency 

As the Fast Fourier Transform plot on Figure 3.11 shows, a peak is clearly visible between 9,4 Hz and 

9,8 Hz. A band pass filter is then applied between these two limits. Figure 3.19 shows the part of the  time signal we are looking at and Figure 3.20 shows the acceleration plot obtained after filtering the  signal.  The  next  step  consists  in  applying  the  window  function  and  the  zero‐padding:  Figure  3.21  shows the results of this step. The isolated filtered signal’s FFT is then plotted (Figure 3.22).  

Whole Signal

0.8

0.6

0.4

0.2

0

-0.2

-0.4

-0.6

-0.8

0 50 100 150 200 250

Time (s)

300 350 400 45

 

Filtered Signal

0.05

0.04

0.03

0.02

0.01

0

-0.01

-0.02

-0.03

-0.04

-0.05

175 180 185 190 195

Time (s)

200 205 210 215

Figure 3.19: Part of the time signal ‐ Z9, Setup 04. 

Figure 3.20: Filtered signal Z9 – Setup 04.

 

25 

 

Isolated filtered signal

0.01

0

-0.01

-0.02

-0.03

-0.04

0.04

0.03

0.02

185 190 195

Time (s)

200

Figure 3.21: Isolated filtered signal Z9 – Setup 04. 

205

 

2.5

x 10

-3

2

1.5

1

0.5

FFT of isolated filtered signal

X: 9.64

Y: 0.002369

0

0 2 4 6 8 10 12

Frequency (Hz)

14 16 18

Figure 3.22: Frequency spectrum of the isolated filtered  signal Z9 – Setup 04.

20

 

An  average  between  four  values  obtained  from  relevant  accelerometers  has  been  done  and  it  has  been observed that the value of the second frequency oscillates around the following value: 

f

1 vertical 

= 9,68 ± 0,03 Hz 

 

 

Then,  two  isolated  filtered  signals  and  their  corresponding  displacements  are  plotted  in  order  to  compare the phase between them. As Figures 3.23 shows, accelerometers Z5 and Z9 are in phase for 

Setup  04;  it  is  the  same  for  Z1‐Z3  or  Z3‐Z11.  It  can  be  concluded  that  the  2 nd

  frequency  extracted  corresponds to another first vertical bending mode as well. The behaviour of the bridge’s upper part  would enable to differentiate these two modes.  

Signals Comparison

0.002

0

-0.002

-0.004

-0.006

-0.008

-0.01

0.01

0.008

0.006

0.004

196.3

196.4

196.5

Time (s)

196.6

196.7

196.8

 

Figure 3.23: Phase comparison Z5 (red) – Z9 (blue), Setup 04 

26 

 3 rd

 frequency 

As the Fast Fourier Transform plot on Figure 3.11 shows, a peak is clearly visible between 10 Hz and 

10,2 Hz. A band pass filter is then applied between these two bounds. Figure 3.24 shows the part of  the time signal we are looking at and Figure 3.25 shows the acceleration plot obtained after filtering  the signal. The next step consists in applying the window function and the zero‐padding and Figure 

3.26 shows the results of this step. The isolated filtered signal’s FFT is plotted in Figure 3.27.  

Filtered Signal

 

0.01

0.005

0

-0.005

-0.01

 

-6

-8

-2

-4

2

0

Figure 3.24: Part of the time signal ‐ Z9, Setup 04. 

6

4

8 x 10

-3

Isolated filtered signal

190 192 194 196 198 200 202 204 206 208

Time (s)

 

Figure 3.26: Isolated filtered signal Z9 – Setup 04. 

2.5

2

1.5

1

0.5

0

0

-0.015

190 195 200

Time (s)

205 210

Figure 3.25: Filtered signal Z9 – Setup 04. 

4.5

4

3.5

3

5 x 10

-3

FFT of isolated filtered signal

X: 10.11

Y: 0.004533

2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18

215

 

20

 

Figure 3.27: Frequency spectrum of the isolated filtered  signal Z9 – Setup 04. 

 

An  average  between  four  values  obtained  from  relevant  accelerometers  has  been  done  and  it  has  been observed that the value of the peak oscillates around the following value: 

f

1 torsional 

= 10,10 ± 0,04 Hz 

 

As Figures 3.28 and 3.29 show, accelerometers Z5 and Z9 are in phase opposition for Setup 04; it is  the same for Z1‐Z3 or Z3‐Z11. The displacements of these accelerometers are also out of phase. The 

27 

  opposition  is  not  perfect  and  this  might  be  due  to  the  bridge  deck’s  slight  asymmetry  in  the  transverse direction. Nonetheless, it can be concluded that the 3 rd

 extracted frequency corresponds a 

first torsional mode. Moreover, the amplitudes of two opposite accelerometers are not equal; that  means that the torsional deformations are combined with vertical ones. 

Signals Comparison Signals Comparison

0.015

0.02

0.01

0.01

0.005

0

0

-0.01

-0.005

-0.02

-0.01

-0.03

197 197.05 197.1 197.15 197.2 197.25 197.3 197.35 197.4 197.45

Time (s)

 

Figure 3.28: Phase comparison Z5 (red)–Z9 (blue)  

Setup 04. 

 

-0.015

196.8

196.9

197 197.1

197.2

Time (s)

197.3

197.4

197.5

 

Figure 3.29: Phase comparison Z1 (blue) ‐Z3 (red) 

 Setup 04. 

 4 th

 frequency 

0.2

0

-0.2

-0.4

-0.6

As  the  Fast  Fourier  Transform  plot  on  Figure  3.11  shows,  a  peak  is  observed  between  13,8  Hz  and 

14,1 Hz. The band pass filter is then applied between these two limits. Figure 3.30 shows the part of  the time signal we are looking at and Figure 3.31 shows the acceleration plot obtained after filtering  the signal. The next step consists in applying the window function and the zero‐padding and Figure 

3.32 shows the results of this step. The isolated filtered signal’s FFT is then plotted in Figure 3.33.  

Whole Signal

Filtered Signal

0.8

0.6

0.4

0.01

0.005

0

-0.005

-0.01

235 240 245 250

Time (s)

255 260

-0.8

0 50 100 150 200 250

Time (s)

300 350 400

Figure 3.30: : Part of the time signal – Y10, Setup 04. 

45

 

Figure 3.31: Filtered signal Y10 – Setup 04. 

 

28 

 

Isolated filtered signal

2.5

x 10

-3

FFT of isolated filtered signal

X: 13.95

Y: 0.002404

0.01

2

0.005

1.5

0

-0.005

1

0.5

-0.01

 

244 246 248

Time (s)

250 252

Figure 3.32: Isolated filtered signal Y10 – Setup 04. 

254

 

0

0 2 4 6 8 10 12

Frequency (Hz)

14 16 18

Figure 3.33: Frequency spectrum of the isolated filtered  signal Y10 – Setup 04.

20

 

 

An  average  between  four  values  obtained  from  relevant  accelerometers  has  been  done  and  it  has  been observed that the value of the peak oscillates around the following value: 

f

1 transverse 

= 13,95 ± 0,04 Hz 

As Figures 3.34 and 3.35 show, accelerometers Y6 and Y10 are in phase for Setup 04; it is the same  for  Y2‐Y4.  It  can  be  concluded  that  the  4 th

  extracted  frequency  corresponds  to  a  first  horizontal 

bending mode

Signals Comparison

Phase comparison of two signals

0.01

0.01

0.005

0.005

0 0

-0.005

-0.005

-0.01

248.45

248.5

248.55

248.6

248.65

248.7

248.75

248.8

Time (s)

248.85

 

 

Figure 3.34: Phase comparison Y6 (blue)‐Y10 (red)  

Setup 04. 

 

-0.01

248.35 248.4 248.45 248.5 248.55 248.6 248.65 248.7 248.75 248.8

Time (s)

 

Figure 3.35: Phase comparison Y2 (blue)‐Y14 (red)  

Setup 04. 

29 

 

 5 th  frequency 

As the Fast Fourier Transform plot on Figure 3.12 shows, a peak is noticeable between 14,2 Hz and 

14,5 Hz. A band pass filter is then applied between these two limits. Figure 3.36 shows the part of the  time signal we are looking at and Figure 3.37 shows the acceleration plot obtained after filtering the  signal. The next step consists in applying the window function and the zero‐padding and Figure 3.38  shows the results of this step. The isolated filtered signal’s FFT is then plotted in Figure 3.39. 

Filtered Signal

Whole Signal

0.2

0

-0.2

-0.4

-0.6

0.8

0.6

0.4

-0.8

0 50 100 150 200 250

Time (s)

300 350 400

Figure 3.36: Part of the time signal – Y10, Setup 04. 

450

 

0.015

0.01

0.005

0

-0.005

-0.01

-0.015

240 245 250 255

Time (s)

260

Figure 3.37: Filtered signal Y10 – Setup 04. 

265 270

 

0.015

0.01

0.005

0

-0.005

-0.01

Isolated filtered signal

-0.015

246 248 250 252 254

Time (s)

256 258 260

Figure 3.38: Isolated filtered signal Y10 – Setup 04. 

 

1.4

1.2

1

0.8

0.6

0.4

1.8

1.6

2 x 10

-3

0.2

0

0 2

FFT of isolated filtered signal

X: 14.38

Y: 0.001948

4 6 8 10 12

Frequency (Hz)

14 16 18

Figure 3.39: Frequency spectrum of the isolated filtered  signal Y10 – Setup 04. 

20

 

 

An  average  between  four  values  obtained  from  relevant  accelerometers  has  been  done  and  it  has  been observed that the frequency value oscillates around the following value: 

f

1 transverse

= 14,39 ± 0,007 Hz 

 

30 

 

As Figures 3.40 and 3.41 show, accelerometers Y2‐Y4 are in phase for Setup 04; it is the same for Y6‐

Y10  and  Y8‐Y12.  It  can  be  concluded  that  the  5 th

  frequency  extracted  corresponds  also  to  a  first 

horizontal bending mode

Signals Comparison Phase comparison of two signals

0.015

0.01

0.01

0.005

0.005

0

0

-0.005

-0.01

252.8

252.9

253 253.1

Time (s)

253.2

253.3

Figure 3.40: Phase comparison Y2‐Y4 Setup 04. 

253.4

 

-0.005

-0.01

-0.015

253 253.1

253.2

253.3

Time (s)

253.4

Figure 3.41: Phase comparison Y8‐Y12 Setup 04.

253.5

 

 6 th  frequency 

4

3

2

1

6

5

7 x 10

-3

0

0

As  the  Fast  Fourier  Transform  plot  on  Figure  3.42  shows,  a  peak  is  visible  between  18,4Hz  and 

18,6Hz.  This  peak  has  been  identified  by  plotting  the  FFT  of  the  signal  between  a  large  frequency  interval (18Hz‐19Hz) and the peak around 18,5Hz was clearly dominating among the others.  

The band pass filter is then applied between 18,4Hz and 18,6Hz. Figure 3.43 shows the part of the  time signal we are looking at and Figure 3.44 shows the acceleration plot obtained after filtering the  signal. The next step consists in applying the window function and the zero‐padding and Figure 3.45  shows the results of this step. The isolated filtered signal’s FFT is then plotted in Figure 3.46.  

FFT Whole Signal

X: 18.53

Y: 0.0009981

5 10 15

Frequency (Hz) )

Figure 3.42: FFT Frequency spectrum of the signal Z9 – Setup 03 

 

20 25

 

31 

 

Whole Signal

Filtered Signal

2

1.5

1

0.5

0

-0.5

-1

0.1

0.05

0

-0.05

-1.5

-2

0 50 100 150 200 250

Time (s)

300 350 400

Figure 3.43: Part of the time signal – Z7, Setup 03. 

450

 

0.02

0.015

0.01

0.005

0.04

0.035

0.03

0.025

-0.1

285 290 295 300 305

Time (s)

310 315

Figure 3.44: Filtered signal Z7 ‐ Setup 03. 

320

 

325 330

 

FFT of isolated filtered signal Isolated filtered signal

0.1

0.08

0.06

0.04

0.02

0

-0.02

-0.04

-0.06

-0.08

-0.1

295 300

Time (s)

305 310

Figure 3.45: Isolated filtered signal Z7 ‐ Setup 03. 

 

X: 18.49

Y: 0.03533

0

0 2 4 6 8 10 12

Frequency (Hz)

14 16 18

Figure 3.46: Frequency spectrum of the isolated filtered  signal Z7 – Setup 03. 

20

 

 

An  average  between  four  values  obtained  from  relevant  accelerometers  has  been  done  and  it  has  been observed that the peak value oscillates around the following value: 

f

2 vertical 

= 18,48 ± 0,04 Hz 

 

 

As Figures 3.47 shows, accelerometers Z1‐Z9 are out of phase for Setup 05; it is the same for Z1 and 

Z7  (Figure  3.48).  However,  Z5  and  Z9,  for  example,  are  in  phase  (Figure  3.49).  It  can  be  concluded  that the 6 th

 frequency extracted corresponds to a second vertical bending mode

32 

 

 

Signals Comparison

0.2

0.15

0.1

0.05

0

-0.05

-0.1

-0.15

-0.2

304.9

304.95

305 305.05

Time (s)

305.1

305.15

Figure 3.47: Phase comparison Z9 (blue) ‐Z1 (red)  

Setup 05. 

Signals Comparison

 

0.2

0.15

0.1

0.05

0

-0.05

-0.1

-0.15

-0.2

305.5

305.55

305.6

305.65

305.7

305.75

305.8

305.85

305.9

Time (s)

 

Figure 3.48: Phase comparison Z7 (red) ‐Z1 (blue)  

Setup 05. 

Signals Comparison

-0.05

-0.1

-0.15

0.15

0.1

0.05

0

305.1

305.15

305.2

305.25

Time (s)

305.3

305.35

305.4

 

Figure 3.49: Phase comparison Z5 (red) ‐Z9 (blue), Setup 05. 

 7 th

 frequency 

As the Fast Fourier Transform plot on Figure 3.50 shows, a peak is visible between 21 Hz and 22 Hz. 

The band pass filter is then applied between these two limits. Figure 3.51 shows the part of the time  signal  we  are  looking  at  and  Figure  3.52  shows  the  acceleration  plot  obtained  after  filtering  the  signal. The next step consists in applying the window function and the zero‐padding and Figure 3.53  shows the results of this step. The isolated filtered signal is then plotted in Figure 3.54.  

33 

 

3.5

3

2.5

2

1.5

1

0.5

0

0

4.5

4

5 x 10

-3

FFT Whole Signal

X: 21.57

Y: 0.004213

5 10

Frequency (Hz) )

15 20 25

 

Figure 3.50: FFT Frequency spectrum of the signal Z7 – Setup 03. 

 

Whole Signal

Filtered Signal

1.5

1

0.5

1

0.5

0

-0.5

0

-0.5

-1

 

-1.5

-1

-2

0 100 150 200 250

Time (s)

300 350 400

Figure 3.51: Part of the time signal – Z7, Setup 03. 

0.4

0.2

0

-0.2

-0.4

-0.6

-0.8

-1

1

0.8

0.6

334

50

336 338

Isolated filtered signal

340 342

Time (s)

344 346 348

Figure 3.53: Isolated filtered signal Z7 ‐ Setup 03. 

 

45

 

0.045

0.04

0.035

0.03

0.025

0.02

0.015

0.01

0.005

0

0

325 330 335 340

Time (s)

345 350

Figure 3.52: Filtered signal Z7 ‐ Setup 03. 

355

 

FFT of isolated filtered signal

X: 21.59

Y: 0.04448

360

 

5 10 15

Frequency (Hz)

20 25

 

Figure 3.54: Frequency spectrum of the isolated filtered  signal Z7 – Setup 03.

 

34 

 

An  average  between  four  values  obtained  from  relevant  accelerometers  has  been  done  and  it  has  been observed that the frequency value oscillates around the following value: 

f

3 rd

/4 th

  vertical 

= 21,60 ± 0,05 Hz 

 

 

As Figures 3.55 shows, accelerometers Z1‐Z9 are out of phase for Setup 05; it is the same for Z3‐Z5 

(Figure 3.56). However, accelerometers Z5‐Z9, Z1‐Z3 and Z3‐Z5 are in phase (Figures 3.57, 3.58 and 

3.59).  It  can  be  concluded  that  the  6 th

  frequency  extracted  corresponds  also  to  a  combination  between a third vertical bending mode and a fourth vertical mode. Figure 3.60 summarizes all these  observations. The points which have the same colour are in phase.  

Signals Comparison

1

0.5

0

-0.5

-1

340.25

340.3

340.35

Time (s)

340.4

340.45

Figure 3.55: Phase comparison Z1 (red) ‐Z9 (blue)  

Setup 04. 

Signals Comparison

 

Signals Comparison

0.1

0

-0.1

-0.2

-0.3

-0.4

0.4

0.3

0.2

340.55

340.6

340.65

Time (s)

340.7

340.75

Figure 3.56: Phase comparison Z3 (red) ‐ Z5 (blue) 

 Setup 04. 

Signals Comparison

 

1

0.5

0

-0.5

-1

0

-0.1

-0.2

-0.3

0.3

0.2

0.1

340.5

340.6

340.7

340.8

Time (s)

340.9

341

 

Figure 3.57: Phase comparison Z1 (blue) ‐ Z3 (red)  

Setup 04. 

 

339.55 339.6 339.65 339.7 339.75 339.8 339.85 339.9 339.95 340 340.05

Time (s)

Figure 3.58: Phase comparison Z5 (red) ‐ Z9 (blue)  

Setup 03. 

 

35 

Signals Comparison

0.5

0.4

0.3

0.2

0.1

0

-0.1

-0.2

-0.3

-0.4

-0.5

342.15

342.2

342.25

342.3

Time (s)

342.35

342.4

342.45

 

Figure 3.59: Phase comparison Z3 (blue) ‐ Z5 (red), Setup 05. 

 

Figure 3.60: Bridge deck’s point’s phase. 

 

This  combination  of  3 rd

  and  4 th

  vertical  bending  mode  will  be  confirmed  in  Chapter  4  with  the  dynamic  analysis  of  the  FEM  model  in  LUSAS  and  Figure  3.61  extracted  from  LUSAS  shows  the  corresponding mode shape. 

 

 

 

 

Figure 3.61: Mode shape for the 3 rd

/4 th

 vertical bending frequency, from LUSAS. 

 

36 

3.3.2 Test 2: after the installation of the ballast and the track 

Examples  of  a  vertical  and  transverse  acceleration  plots  and  their  corresponding  FFT  are  shown  in 

Figure  3.63  and  3.64.  Figure  3.62  shows  where  the  studied  accelerometers  are  located  on  the  bridge’s deck. 

 

 

 

 

Figure 3.62: Test 2 – Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 02. 

Whole Signal

3.5

3

2.5

2

1.5

0 50 100 150 200

Time (s)

250

FFT Whole Signal

300 350 400

0.4

0.2

0

0

0.8

0.6

1 x 10

-3

2 4 6 8 10

Frequency (Hz) )

12 14 16

Figure 3.63: Signal Z5 processing – Vertical acceleration – Setup 02 –Test 2. 

18

450

20

 

37 

 

Whole Signal

1.4

1.3

1.2

1.1

1

0.9

0 50 100 150 200

Time (s)

250

FFT Whole Signal

300 350 400

1

0

0

3

2

5 x 10

-4

4

2 4 6 8 10

Frequency (Hz) )

12 14 16

Figure 3.64: Signal Y6 processing – Transverse acceleration – Setup 02 –Test 2. 

18

450

20

 

 1 st  frequency 

As the Fast Fourier Transform plot on Figure 3.63 shows, a peak is observed between 5,1 Hz and 5,8 

Hz. The band pass filter is then applied between these two bounds. Figure 3.65 shows the part of the  time signal we are looking at and Figure 3.66 shows the acceleration plot obtained after filtering the  signal. The next step consists in applying the window function and the zero‐padding and Figure 3.67  shows the results of this step. The isolated filtered signal’s FFT is then plotted in Figure 3.68.  

Whole Signal

4.5

4.45

4.4

4.35

4.3

4.25

0

4.75

4.7

4.65

4.6

4.55

50 100 150 200 250

Time (s)

300 350 400 450

 

Figure 3.65: Part of the time signal – Z5, Setup 02. 

0.015

0.01

0.005

0

-0.005

-0.01

Filtered Signal

75 80 85

Time (s)

90 95

Figure 3.66: Filtered signal Z5 – Setup 02. 

100

 

38 

  x 10

-3

Isolated filtered signal

8 x 10

-4

7

FFT of isolated filtered signal

6

4

2

0

-2

-4

-6

6

5

4

3

2

X: 5.394

Y: 0.0007303

1

75 80 85

Time (s)

90 95 100

Figure 3.67: Isolated filtered signal Z5 – Setup 02. 

 

0

0 2 4 6 8 10 12

Frequency (Hz)

14 16 18

Figure 3.68: Frequency spectrum of the isolated filtered  signal Z5 – Setup 02.

20

 

An  average  between  four  values  obtained  from  relevant  accelerometers  has  been  done  and  it  has  been observed that the value of the first frequency oscillates around the following value: 

f

1 vertical 

= 5, 387 ± 0,015 Hz 

 

 

Then  two  filtered  isolated  signals  and  their  corresponding  displacements  are  plotted  in  order  to  compare  the  phase  angle  between  them.  As  Figures  3.69  shows,  accelerometers  Z5  and  Z7  are  in  phase for Setup 02; it is the same for Z5‐Z7, Setup 03 or Z1‐Z5, Setup 03 (Figure 3.70). In addition, the  studied accelerations have the same amplitude when the accelerometers have the same longitudinal  position.  Therefore,  it  can  be  concluded  that  the  1 st

  frequency  extracted  corresponds  to  a  first 

 

vertical bending mode. It is confirmed by the displacements.  x 10

-3

Signals Comparison

8 x 10

-3

Signals Comparison

4

6

3

4

2

2

1

0

0

-1

-2

-2

-4

-3

-6

-4

-5

-8

84.4

84.6

84.8

Time (s)

85 85.2

85.4

 

85 85.5

86

Time (s)

86.5

87

Figure 3.69: Phase comparison Z5 (red) – Z7 (blue) 

 Setup 02. 

Figure 3.70: Phase comparison Z1 (blue) – Z5 (red)  

Setup 03. 

 

39 

 

The corresponding damping ratio is then calculated:  ξ

2,21%. This value is an average of 4 values  with an uncertainty of ±0,01%. 

 2 nd  frequency 

-0.005

-0.01

-0.015

-0.02

0.02

0.015

0.01

0.005

0

As  the  Fast  Fourier  Transform  plot  on  Figure  3.63  shows,  a  peak  is  clearly  noticeable  between  9Hz  and 9,4Hz. The band pass filter is then applied between these two limits. Figure 3.71 shows the part  of  the  time  signal  we  are  looking  at  and  Figure  3.72  shows  the  acceleration  plot  obtained  after  filtering the signal. The next step consists in applying the window function and the zero‐padding and 

Figure  3.73  shows  the  results  of  this  step.  The  FFT  of  the  isolated  filtered  signal  is  then  plotted  in 

Figure 3.74.  

Filtered Signal

Whole Signal

4.75

4.7

4.65

4.6

4.55

4.5

4.45

4.4

4.35

4.3

4.25

0 50 100 150 200 250

Time (s)

300 350 400

Figure 3.71: Part of the time signal – Z5, Setup 03. 

450

 

0.03

0.02

0.01

0

-0.01

-0.02

175 180 185

Time (s)

190 195

Isolated filtered signal

4 x 10

-3

Figure 3.72: Filtered signal Z5 – Setup 03. 

FFT of isolated filtered signal

X: 9.254

Y: 0.003985

3.5

3

2.5

2

1.5

1

0.5

200

 

174 176 178 180 182 184 186 188 190 192

Time (s)

 

Figure 3.73: Isolated filtered signal Z5 – Setup 03. 

0

0 2 4 6 8 10 12

Frequency (Hz)

14 16 18

Figure 3.74: Frequency spectrum of the isolated filtered  signal Z5 – Setup 03.

20

 

 An average  between four values obtained from relevant accelerometers has  been  done and it  has  been observed that the peak value oscillates around the following value: 

f

1 torsional 

= 9,262 ± 0,007 Hz 

40 

 

 

 

Then,  two  filtered  isolated  signals  and  their  corresponding  displacements  are  plotted  in  order  to  compare the phase angle between them. As Figures 3.75 and 3.76 show, accelerometers Z5 ‐Z7 and 

Z1‐Z5 are in phase opposition for Setup 03; it is the same for Z5‐Z7, Setup 02 or Z1‐Z5, Setup 03. The  same  observations  can  be  drawn  by  studying  the  displacements.  In  addition,  the  studied  accelerations have the same amplitude when the accelerometers have the same position along the  longitudinal  direction.  However,  in  Figure  3.77,  the  signals  are  in  phase.  Therefore,  it  can  be  concluded that the 2 nd

 frequency extracted corresponds to a first torsional mode

Signals Comparison

0.02

0.015

0.01

0.005

0

-0.005

-0.01

-0.015

-0.02

185.2

185.3

185.4

185.5

185.6

185.7

185.8

185.9

Time (s)

Figure 3.75: Phase comparison Z5 (red) – Z7 (blue)  

Setup 03. 

Signals Comparison

0.02

0.015

0.01

0.005

0

-0.005

-0.01

-0.015

-0.02

 

182.9

183 183.1 183.2 183.3 183.4 183.5 183.6 183.7 183.8

Time (s)

 

Figure 3.76: Phase comparison Z5 (red) – Z1 (blue) 

 Setup 03. 

Signals Comparison

0.015

0.01

0.005

0

-0.005

-0.01

-0.015

183 183.1

183.2

183.3

183.4

183.5

183.6

183.7

183.8

Time (s)

 

Figure 3.77: Phase comparison Z1 (blue) – Z7 (red), Setup 03. 

 3 rd  frequency 

As the Fast Fourier Transform plot on Figure 3.63 shows, a peak is clearly visible between 10 Hz and 

10,5 Hz. The band pass filter is then applied between these two limits. Figure 3.78 shows the part of  the time signal we are looking at and Figure 3.79 shows the acceleration plot obtained after filtering 

41 

  the signal. The next step consists in applying the window function and the zero‐padding and Figure 

3.80 shows the results of this step. The isolated filtered signal’s FFT is then plotted in Figure 3.81.  

Filtered Signal

Whole Signal

5.4

0.03

5.2

0.02

5

0.01

4.8

0

4.6

-0.01

4.4

-0.02

4.2

-0.03

 

4

0 50 100 150 200 250

Time (s)

300 350 400 450

 

2

1.5

1

4.5

x 10

-3

4

3.5

3

2.5

190 192 194 196 198 200 202 204 206 208 210

Time (s)

 

Figure 3.79: Filtered signal Z7 – Setup 03. 

Figure 3.78: Part of the time signal – Z7, Setup 03. 

Isolated filtered signal

0.025

0.02

0.015

0.01

0.005

0

-0.005

-0.01

-0.015

-0.02

-0.025

FFT of isolated filtered signal

X: 10.2

Y: 0.004092

192 194 196 198 200

Time (s)

202 204 206 208 21

 

Figure 3.80: Isolated filtered signal Z7 – Setup 03. 

0.5

0

0 2 4 6 8 10 12

Frequency (Hz)

14 16 18

Figure 3.81: Frequency spectrum of the isolated filtered  signal Z7 – Setup 03. 

20

 

An  average  between  four  values  obtained  from  relevant  accelerometers  has  been  done  and  it  has  been observed that the frequency value oscillates around the following value: 

f

2 vertical 

= 10,25 ± 0,025 Hz 

 

Then,  two  filtered  isolated  signals  and  their  corresponding  displacements  are  plotted  in  order  to  compare the phase angle between them. As Figure 3.82 show, accelerometers Z5 and Z7 are in phase  for  Setup  03;  it  is  the  same  for  Z5‐Z7,  Setup  02  or  Z5‐Z7,  Setup  04.  In  addition,  the  studied  accelerations have the same amplitude when the accelerometers have the same abscise. The same  observations  can  be  drawn  by  studying  the  displacements.  However,  Z1‐Z5  and  Z1‐Z9  for  Setup  03  are  in  phase  opposition  (Figures  3.83  and  3.84).  Besides,  one  can  observe  on  Figure  3.85  that  the 

42 

 

 

0.8

0.6

0.4

0.2

0

0 peak is not visible for an accelerometer located in the middle of the bridge deck. Therefore, it can be  concluded that the 3 rd

 frequency extracted corresponds to a second vertical bending mode

Signals Comparison Signals Comparison

0.025

0.02

0.015

0.01

0.005

0

-0.005

-0.01

-0.015

-0.02

-0.025

199.5

199.6

199.7

199.8

Time (s)

199.9

200 200.1

0.03

0.02

0.01

0

-0.01

-0.02

-0.03

 

198.95

199 199.05 199.1 199.15 199.2 199.25 199.3 199.35 199.4

Time (s)

 

Figure 3.82: Phase comparison Z5 (blue) – Z7 (red)  

Setup 03. 

Figure 3.83: Phase comparison Z1 (blue) – Z9 (red) 

Setup 03. 

Signals Comparison

1 x 10

-3

0.03

0.02

0.01

0

-0.01

-0.02

-0.03

199.2

199.3

199.4

199.5

Time (s)

199.6

199.7

199.8

 

Figure 3.84: Phase comparison Z1 (red) – Z5 (red) Setup 03.

 

FFT Whole Signal

 

2 4 6 8 10

Frequency (Hz) )

12

Figure 3.85:  FFT plot – Signal Z3 – Setup04. 

14 16 18 20

 

43 

 

 4 th  frequency 

As the Fast Fourier Transform plot on Figure 3.63 shows, a peak is observed between 12 Hz and 12,5 

Hz. The band pass filter is then applied between these two bounds. Figure 3.86 shows the part of the  time signal we are looking at and Figure 3.87 shows the acceleration plot obtained after filtering the  signal. The next step consists in applying the window function and the zero‐padding and Figure 3.88  shows the results of this step. The FFT of the part of the signal is then plotted in Figure 3.89.  

Whole Signal Filtered Signal

5.2

0.1

5

4.8

0.05

4.6

4.4

0

-0.05

4.2

4

-0.1

3.8

0 50 100 150 200 250

Time (s)

300 350 400

Figure 3.86: Part of the time signal – Z7, Setup 02. 

450

 

220 225

Time (s)

230

Figure 3.87: Filtered signal Z7 – Setup 02. 

235

 

0.1

0.05

0

-0.05

-0.1

Isolated filtered signal

215 220 225 230

Time (s)

235 240

Figure 3.88: Isolated filtered signal Z7 – Setup 02. 

 

FFT of isolated filtered signal

0.018

0.016

0.014

0.012

0.01

0.008

0.006

0.004

0.002

0

0

X: 12.29

Y: 0.01623

2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20

 

Figure 3.89: Frequency spectrum of the isolated filtered  signal Z7 – Setup 02. 

 

An  average  between  four  values  obtained  from  relevant  accelerometers  has  been  done  and  it  has  been observed that the peak value oscillates around the following value: 

f

3 rd

/4 th

 vertical 

= 12,26 ± 0,08 Hz            

 

44 

 

Then,  two  filtered  isolated  signals  and  their  corresponding  displacements  are  plotted  in  order  to  compare the phase angle between them. As Figures 3.91 shows, accelerometers Z1‐Z7 are in phase  opposition for Setup 02; it is the same for Z1‐Z5 and Z1‐Z9 (Figure 3.92). However, accelerometers 

Z1‐Z7, Setup 04 and Z5‐Z7, Setup 02 are in phase (Figures 3.90 and 3.93). It can be concluded that the 

6 th

 extracted frequency corresponds once again to a combination between a third vertical bending 

mode and a fourth vertical bending mode. This observation has been confirmed by using the process 

OMA (Operational Modal Analysis) with the software Artemis (Figure 3.94). 

 

3 x 10

-5

Displacement comparison Signals Comparison

0.15

2

0.1

1

0.05

0

0

-0.05

-1

-0.1

-2

-0.15

-3

225.3

225.4

225.5

225.6

225.7

225.8

225.9

Time (s)

226 226.1

 

Figure 3.90: Phase comparison Z1 (blue) – Z7 (red) 

 Setup 04. 

Signals Comparison

225.4

225.5

225.6

225.7

Time (s)

225.8

225.9

 

Figure 3.91: Phase comparison Z1 (blue) – Z7 (red) 

 Setup 02. 

Signals Comparison

0.15

0.1

0.1

0.05

0.05

226

 

0

0

-0.05

-0.1

-0.15

225.4

225.5

225.6

225.7

225.8

Time (s)

225.9

226 226.1

 

 

Figure 3.92: Phase comparison Z1 (blue) – Z5 (red) 

 Setup 02. 

-0.05

-0.1

225.6

225.7

225.8

225.9

Time (s)

226 226.1

Figure 3.93: Phase comparison Z5 (red) – Z7 (blue)  

Setup 02. 

 

45 

 

 

Figure 3.94: Mode shape for the 3 rd

/4 th

 vertical bending mode from ATeRMIS (f = 12,2 Hz, ξ = 1,6%). 

 

3.3.3 Discussion  

The experimental data processing through MATLAB has enabled to extract seven frequencies for the  un‐ballasted  case  and  four  for  the  ballasted  case  (Table  3.1).  However,  the  transverse  frequencies  determined for the un‐ballasted case are not as accurately known as the vertical and torsional ones,  since  the  bridge  had  only  been  excited  vertically.  For  the  rest  of  this  project,  the  vertical  and  torsional  frequencies  will  be  used  and  compared  with  frequencies  extracted  from  eigenvalue  analyses with the finite element software LUSAS. One can observe from Table 3.1 that influence of  the ballast is more important for vertical bending modes: a decrease in frequency of 33% to 44% is  noticed; for the torsional mode, the decrease is only of 8%. This diminution is due to the additional  mass  brought  by  the  ballast  superstructure  but  might  also  be  due  to  an  increase  of  the  bridge  stiffness, induced by the ballast stiffness itself. This is what Chapter 5 will focus on. 

Furthermore,  from  this  chapter,  it  can  also  be  noticed  that  a  value  for  the  damping  ratio  was  determined only for the 1 st

 vertical bending mode for both cases (Table 3.1). Indeed, an accurate and  reliable  estimation  of  the  damping  ratio  could  not  be  obtained  for  other  frequencies:  large  differences had been observed. The raw signal was directly used to determine to the damping ratio  and  the  corresponding  FFT  plot  for  the  other  frequencies  did  not  have  enough  points  to  enable  to  determine an accurate value of the damping ratio.  

Nonetheless, it can be concluded that, for the 1 st

 vertical bending mode, the ballast seems to have a  slight influence on the damping but it is not possible to draw a general conclusion on that point. One  would expect that the ballast increases the damping ratio, due to the energy dissipation. However,  the damping ratio is lower after the ballast is in place and it can be explained by a decrease of the  amplitude  of  the  vibrations  due  to  the  additional  mass.  This  conclusion  needs  to  be  confirmed  for  higher  amplitudes.  Moreover,  it  has  been  observed  from  OMA  that  the  damping  ratio  for  the  1 st

  torsional mode in both cases is equal to 0,4%. Hence, it seems that the ballast does not influence the  damping ratio for torsional modes.    

46 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4 

 

4 Eigenvalue  analysis  and  calibration  of  the  un‐ballasted FEM model 

The  un‐ballasted  finite  element  model  has  been  implemented  according  to  information,  drawings  and  indications  from  Dr  Jaroslaw  Zwolski.  The  main  remarkable  fact  here  is  that  there  are  few  unknown  parameters  on  which  it  is  possible  to  play:  the  support  conditions,  the  mesh  size  or  the  type of element for instance. The influence of these crucial parameters has been tested in order to  get  a  model  as  realistic  and  accurate  as  possible  and  thus,  the  support  conditions  are  going  to  be  thoroughly studied. For that, an eigenvalue analysis of the finite element model is performed and the  frequency values are compared with the experimental ones. The mode shapes will also be analysed. 

4.1 Eigenvalue analysis results 

An  eigenvalue  analysis  is  performed  for  the  un‐ballasted  3D  finite  element  model  established  in 

Chapter 2. The results displayed in this chapter are obtained for the most realistic model, presented  in Chapter 2. This analysis aims at extracting the natural frequencies of the bridge corresponding to  several eigenmodes (Table 4.1). Numerous modes are extracted and most of them are local bending  or local torsional modes, due mainly to the behaviour of the upper part of the bridge and its diagonal 

  elements. To extract only the global modes, two tools are used.  

47 

 

 

The  mass  participation  factors  enable  to  determine  which  modes  require  the  most  important  contribution of the mass of the bridge (Table 4.1).  The local modes are easy to identify because they  require less than 0,001% of the mass of the bridge in the three directions. Height global modes are  identified. 

Table 4.1: Frequency values and mass participation factors. 

Mode  number 

Mode type 

1 st

 vertical bending  

1 st

 vertical bending  

1 st

 vertical bending  

Frequency  

values (Hz) 

8,14 

8,82 

9,89 

Mass participation factors (%) 

X  Y  Z 

0,05 

0,004 

0,005 

69,2 

4,52 

6,99 

36 

1 st

 torsional 

2 nd

 vertical bending  

10,2 

18,3 

0,004 

0,054 

0,002 

0,025 

41 

44 

3 rd

/4 th

 vertical bending 

3 rd

/4 th

  vertical bending 

21,2 

21,6 

5,19 

46  3 rd

/4 th

  vertical bending  22,1  0,004  0  3,07 

 

 

Then, another confirmation of the global modes determination is done by generating a steady state  analysis of the bridge. This analysis aims at solving the following frequency response spectrum [4,15]: 

(‐ω²M + iωC + K).x(ω) = F   (4.1) 

 

Where:  

-

M is the mass matrix, 

-

C is the damping matrix, 

-

K is the stiffness matrix, 

-

F is the force vector, 

x is the steady state response, 

-

ω is the natural frequency. 

 

This  analysis  uses  a  harmonic  loading  of  1kN  applied  in  one  node,  recreating  the  experimental  conditions.  The  response  is  generated  at  the  point  on  the  steel  plate  shown  in  Figure  4.1.  No  damping has been introduced in this steady state analysis. As Figure 4.2 shows, eight peaks can be  observed and they correspond to global modes. The intensity of the peaks at 18,3 Hz and 21,6 Hz is  too high to allow seeing clearly the other peaks; hence, to visualize correctly the frequency spectrum,  they have been truncated.  

 

One can observe from Figure 4.2 and Table 4.1 that three frequencies are extracted for both the first  vertical  and  third  vertical  bending  modes.  The  modes  which  required  the  most  mass  and  have  the  maximal  intensity  on  the  frequency  spectrum  are  used  for  the  rest  of  the  project.  The  difference  between these three frequencies for both modes is induced by the behaviour of the upper part of  the bridge. Finally, five eigenmodes are extracted (Table 4.2). 

48 

 

Figure 4.1: Studied point for the steady state analysis. 

 

 

 

Figure 4.2: Harmonic response to a point load of 1kN at (16; 5,2;0). 

 

As  Table  4.2  shows,  a  good  agreement  is  obtained  between  the  implemented  un‐ballasted  finite  element model and the experimental results, both for the natural frequencies values and the modes  shapes, especially regarding the combination of the 3 rd

 and 4 th

 vertical bending mode which is a type  of  mode  shape  specific  to  this  particular  truss  bridge.  This  is  encouraging  for  the  ballasted  model  implementation. The global and main mode shapes are then presented in Table 4.3 and on Figure 4.3  are  plotted  of  the  displacements  of  a  longitudinal  beam  belonging  to  the  deck  along  the  x  axis.  As  one can notice from Figure 4.3 and Table 4.3, the 3 rd

/4 th

 vertical bending mode is unsymmetrical, as  it  has  already  been  highlighted  in  Chapter  3.3.1.  This  asymmetry  is  confirmed  through  the  FEM  analysis  and  can  be  explained  by  the  asymmetry  of  the  bridge  itself  in  the  transverse  direction. 

49 

 

 

Indeed, the stringer beams’ arrangement is not symmetric and this can lead to a global asymmetrical  behaviour of the bridge when it comes to high vibration’s amplitudes.  

Table 4.2: Comparison between the experimental and the analytical results. 

Mode type 

1 st

 vertical bending 

1 st

 vertical bending  

1 st

 torsional 

2 nd

 vertical bending  

3 rd

/4 th

   vertical bending 

LUSAS values (Hz) 

8,14 

9,89 

10,2 

18,3 

21,6 

Experimental values (Hz) 

8,05 

9,68 

10,1 

18,5 

21,6 

% of difference 

1,11 

2,21 

0,70 

‐0,98 

0,19 

Eigenmode shape for the un‐ballasted model

5,00E‐03

4,00E‐03

3,00E‐03

2,00E‐03

1,00E‐03

0,00E+00

0

‐1,00E‐03

‐2,00E‐03

‐3,00E‐03

‐4,00E‐03

‐5,00E‐03

6,4 12,8 19,2 25,6 32 38,4

1st vertical bending

1st torsional bending

2nd vertical bending

3rd/4th vertical bending

Position along the x axis (m)

Figure 4.3: Eigenmodes for the un‐ballasted case. 

 

 

However,  this  good  correlation  results  from  a  comprehensive  study  of  the  influence  of  different  parameters which is detailed thoroughly in the next Chapter 4.2. 

 

 

50 

 

Plane XZ 

f

1 vertical  

=  

8,14 Hz 

Isometric  view 

Table 4.3: Eigenmodes shapes. 

Mode 5: 1 st

 vertical bending 

 

 

 

 

Mode 8: 1 st

 vertical bending 

 

Plane XZ 

 

 

f

1 vertical  

=  

9,68 Hz 

Isometric  view 

51 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mode 9: 1 st

 torsional 

 

Plane YZ 

 

f

1 torsional  

 10,2 Hz 

Plane XZ 

Isometric  view 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

52 

 

Mode 36 : 2 nd

 vertical bending 

 

Plane XZ 

f

2 vertical  

18,3 Hz 

Isometric  view 

 

 

 

Plane XZ 

f

3 vertical  

21,6 Hz 

Isometric  view 

 

Mode 42 : 3 rd

/4 th

 vertical bending mode 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

53 

 

 

4.2 Calibration of the un‐ballasted FEM model 

The  influence  of  different  parameters  on  the  frequencies  has  been  thoroughly  investigated  in  this  chapter. First, the influence of the mesh size has been studied and as a result, an optimal mesh size  for  each  element  has  been  adopted  to  perform  all  the  analyses.  However,  the  mesh  size  does  not  have  a  significant  influence  on  the  results  as  long  as  realistic  element  sizes  are  chosen.  Then,  the  influence  of  the  type  of  element  has  been  investigated.  For  instance,  the  transverse  beams,  which  are  slightly  unsymmetrical  due  to  the  drainage  slope,  have  been  modelled  in  a  more  realistic  way  than the one presented in Chapter 2. The difference observed from the eigenvalue analyses between  symmetrical  and  unsymmetrical  cross  beams  was  insignificant:  around  0,3%  at  most.  Therefore,  symmetrical cross beams are used so that the model is simplified.  

The  parameter  which  appears  to  influence  most  the  natural  frequencies,  and  consequently  the  vibrations of the bridge, is the type of support conditions. Thus, this parameter is thoroughly studied  and  both  the  influence  of  the  stiff  beam  characteristics  and  the  boundary  conditions  type  are  investigated (Table 4.4). First, the boundary conditions were applied at the node at the intersection  between the centre of gravity of the longitudinal beams and the cross beams. From this analysis, it  appears  that  the  stiffness  of  the  bridge  is  too  high  in  torsion:  the  difference  for  the  1 st

  torsional  frequency  between  the  experiments  and  the  model  is  about  6%  whereas  the  agreement  for  the  other  frequencies  remains  acceptable  (Table  4.4).  Then,  to  model  as  realistically  as  possible  the  support conditions, a stiff beam between the centre of gravity of the beam and the bottom flange of  the beam is defined. However, it appears from a comprehensive analysis that the Young’s Modulus  of  the  stiff  beam  has  a  significant  influence  on  the  natural  frequencies  and  as  a  result,  different  values of the Young’s Modulus have been tested. 

It can be observed from Table 4.4 that the Young’s Modulus of the stiff beam need to be equal to the 

Young’s Modulus of steel in order to get the best agreement between the experiments and the finite  element model. Indeed, the agreement remains good for the vertical bending modes no matter the  stiffness of the stiff beam is. However, the agreement for the torsional mode is not acceptable at all  when the stiffness of the stiff beam is 100 times higher than the Young’s Modulus of steel.  

It is quite hard to explain what phenomenon happens here but one hypothesis can be that the web  of the longitudinal beam is bending in the transverse direction when the structure is in resonance for  the first torsional mode. The web of the longitudinal beams would then contribute to the transverse  flexibility  of  the  bridge.  It  would  have  been  interesting  to  model  the  longitudinal  beams’  web  belonging to the deck as shell elements but by lack of time, it has not been done. This shell modelling  may have been the appropriate solution to model the behaviour of the web.  

54 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 4.4: Influence of the stiff beam definition. 

 

 

   

Reference model’s support conditions applied: 

 

Mode type 

1 st  vertical bending 

1 st

 vertical bending 

1 st  torsional  

2 nd

 vertical bending 

3 rd

/4 th

 vertical bending 

  

Experimental  frequencies (Hz)

8,05 

9,68 

10,1 

18,5 

21,6 

Reference model 

LUSAS  values 

(Hz) 

% of difference

8,14 

9,89 

1,11 

2,21 

10,2 

18,3 

21,6  stiff beam

 = E  steel

 

0,70 

‐0,98 

0,19 

At the longitudinal beam’s   centre of gravity 

LUSAS values 

(Hz)  

% of difference 

LUSAS  values 

(Hz) 

8,15 

9,89 

1,26 

2,19 

At the bottom of the   longitudinal beam and  

E  stiff beam

 = 100.E  steel

 

8,08 

9,86 

% of difference  

0,39 

1,89 

10,8 

18,3 

6,20 

‐1,13 

11,2 

19,1 

10,10 

3,16 

21,3  ‐1,35  21,8  0,81 

 

55 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nonetheless, the web of the longitudinal beam seems to deform in two different ways both in the  longitudinal  and  transverse  directions  with  different  stiffness  for  different  modes.  These  deformations influence mainly the torsional mode. 

Another  conclusion  can  be  drawn:  the  type  of  boundary  conditions  has  no  significant  influence  for  the  un‐ballasted  model.  Indeed,  there  is  no  difference  in  the  eigenvalue  analysis  when  all  the  supports  are  fixed  in  all  directions  or  if  they  are  not  (see  boundary  conditions  detailed  in  Chapter 

2.1.4).The stiffness of the stiff beam is a much more important parameter to study when the ballast  is not in place yet. Nevertheless, the boundary conditions detailed in Chapter 2.1.4 and specified by  the design office are adopted for the un‐ballasted case. 

56 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 5 

5 Ballast and tracks models 

5.1 Ballast superstructure and properties of the track 

The  information  about  the  ballast  and  the  track  has  been  extracted  from  CAD  drawings,  from  directions  given  by  Dr  Jaroslaw  Zwolski  and  from  [14].  The  track  is  composed  of  wooden  sleepers,  rails  UIC60  and  guard  rails  UIC49.  The  shape  and  the  mass  of  the  ballast  profile  (Figure  5.4)  have  been  determined  according  to  Figures  5.1,  5.2  and  5.3.  However,  it  is  important  to  mention  that  there  is  an  uncertainty  on  the  ballast  profile:  an  accurate  mass  of  the  ballast  has  not  been  determined  after  the  ballast  has  been  placed  on  the  bridge  bed.  Table  5.1  summarizes  all  the  adopted properties for the track and ballast elements.  

Load exciter 

Figure 5.1: A view along the bridge with the track in place. 

Table 5.1: Track element properties. 

57 

 

 

Wooden sleepers 

 

Dimensions 

Space between two sleepers 

Number of elements 

Young’s modulus 

Mass density 

 

Total mass 

Rails UIC60  

 

Linear mass 

Number of elements 

Cross section area 

Young’s Modulus 

Mass density 

 

Total mass 

Guard rails UIC49 

 

Linear mass 

Number of elements 

Cross section area 

Young’s Modulus 

Mass density 

 

Total mass 

Ballast 

 

Mass density  

Volume 

Cross section area  

 

Mass 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,6 x 0,15 x 0,26 m 

0,6 m 

44 

12 GPa 

750 kg/m

3

 

3345 kg 

60 kg/m  

0,0153 m

205 GPa 

7849 kg/m

4608 kg 

50 kg/m  

0,0127 m

2

205 GPa 

2

7849 kg/m

3

3840 kg 

3

 

1800 kg/m

3

 

131 m

3

3,42 m

2

 

253 800 kg 

 

 

 

The total mass of the track is: m  track

 = 265 600 kg and the total mass of the bridge without the ballast  is: m

 steel bridge 

= 154 000 kg. The mass of the track is then 1,7 times larger than the mass of the steel  bridge. 

58 

Figure 5.2: Ballast cross section in the middle of the  bridge. 

 

 

 

Figure 5.3: Ballast cross section at the ends of the bridge. 

 

 

Figure 5.4: Ballast cross sections.

59 

 

5.2 Modelling the track 

Several alternatives to model the ballast have been tested in the literature and some throughout this  project.  The  most  relevant  results  are  shown  in  this  chapter.  For  the  purpose  of  the  project,  the  ballast is modelled as 3D solid elements and the rails and the sleepers as 3D thick beams.   

To  model  the  ballast  layer,  solid  elements  are  created  and  arranged  on  the  bridge  deck  and  16  m  before and after the bridge in order to recreate the continuity of the ballast (Figure 5.8). The solid  elements are meshed as a volume with tetrahedral elements. The slope of the track is taken from the  drawings  and  an  equivalent  cross  section  is  determined  (Table  5.1  and  Figure  5.5).  The  points  and  lines of the steel plate and of the ballast bottom surface are merged.   

 

 

Figure 5.5: Ballast cross section. 

 

 

Then, the rails and the guard rails are created and meshed as 3D thick beams. The cross sections are  determined  through  reference  tables  [16].  An  example  of  the  rails  cross section  is  shown  in  Figure 

5.6.  The  steel  rails  are  separated  from  the  guard  rail  by  0,3m.  Regarding  the  wooden  sleepers,  a  rectangular cross section of 0,26 x 0,15 m is adopted. In order to simplify the model, 48 sleepers are  created instead of the 44 originally present on the bridge. In reality, the space between the sleepers  is equal to 0,6 m but here, it is equal to 0,56 m. An equivalent density for the wood is then calculated  and  it  is  equal  to  688  kg/m

3

.  An  offset  of  ‐0,075  m  is  applied  to  the  sleepers  and  of  +0,08  m  and 

+0,085m respectively for the guard rails and the rails. Figure 5.7 shows a cross section of the track  and Figure 5.8 shows an overall view of the ballasted model. 

60 

Figure 5.6: Rail cross section. 

 

 

Figure 5.7: Track cross section. 

 

 

 

Figure 5.8: Ballast and track model. 

 

 

The ballast, which is not on the bridge deck, is vertically fixed at the bottom surface and the ballast  layer  ends  are  fixed  in  the  longitudinal  direction  and  in  the  transverse  direction  (Figures  5.9  and 

5.10). Besides, the rails and the guard rails are blocked in the longitudinal direction.  The boundary  conditions are shown by green arrows on Figure 5.9 and Figure 5.10. 

61 

Figure 5.9: Longitudinal view of the ballasted model. 

 

 

Figure 5.10: Zoom on an end element of the ballast layer. 

 

 

5.3 Different alternatives to model the ballast 

5.3.1 Influence of the ballast stiffness 

The first step of the ballasted model implementation consists in evaluating the ballast stiffness and  the contribution of the ballast stiffness to the bridge stiffness.  

For the first analysis, the model described in the previous section is used and the support conditions  described in Chapter 2.2.4 are considered. A Young’s modulus of 10 MPa is chosen for the ballast: the  ballast is thus considered just as an additional mass and does not bring any stiffness to the bridge.  

The following results are obtained (Table 5.2):  

Table 5.2: Results from the analysis when the ballast is considered as an additional mass i.e. E  ballast 

= 10 MPa. 

Mode type 

1 st

 vertical bending 

1 st

 torsional 

2 nd

 vertical bending 

3 rd

/4 th

 vertical bending 

Experimental  frequencies (Hz) 

5,39 

9,26 

10,3 

12,3 

LUSAS values for  

E  ballast 

= 10 MPa (Hz) 

4,83 

8,10 

8,97 

9,89 

% of difference from  the experiment 

‐11,6 

‐14,4 

‐14,2 

‐24,0 

 

As  one  can  notice,  the  agreement  between  experimental  values  and  analytical  ones  is  not  good:  a  difference higher than 10% is observed for all the frequencies. This difference may either come from  the stiffness of the ballast itself or from other parameters of the model of the bridge and this is what  will be investigated in the rest of this chapter. Therefore, it can be concluded that the ballast appears  to give an additional stiffness to the bridge: from 25% to 50% according to the mode.  

62 

 

 

Thereafter,  the  influence  of  the  ballast  stiffness  on  the  bending  stiffness  of  the  bridge  is  tested.  A 

Young’s  Modulus  equal  to  300  MPa  is  taken  for  this  analysis.  This  value  has  been  determined  according  to  several  studies  on  the  subject,  notably  [8,  9,  10]  and  according  to  discussions  with  researchers from the department. Except the value of the ballast Young’s Modulus, the exact same  bridge model parameters are kept. 

The following results are obtained (Table 5.3):  

 

1 st

Table 5.3: Influence of the ballast stiffness on the eigenfrequencies of the bridge (E  ballast 

= 10 MPa or 300 MPa).

 

Mode type 

 vertical bending 

1 st

 torsional 

Experimental  frequencies 

(Hz) 

5,39 

9,26 

LUSAS values  

E  ballast 

=  

300 MPa (Hz) 

4,94 

8,20 

% of difference  from the  experiment 

‐8,94 

‐13,0 

% of difference  between E  ballast 

 

10 MPa or 300 MPa 

2,38 

1,21 

2 nd

 vertical bending 

3 rd

/4 th

 vertical bending 

10,3 

12,3 

9,91 

‐3,41 

9,48 

One  can  notice,  once  again,  that  the  agreement  is  not  acceptable,  especially  for  the  1 st

  vertical  bending and the 1 st

 torsional modes. The 3 rd

/4 th

 vertical bending is not observed. However, the value  for the 2 nd

 vertical  bending frequency is closer to the experiments than the  one from the previous  analysis. Table 5.3 also shows that for the two first modes, the difference between the frequencies of  the model using a low Young’s Modulus value (10 MPa) and the one using a higher value (300 MPa) is  very low. It can be concluded that for the two first eigenmodes of the studied bridge, the ballast does  not bring any stiffness to the structure in a significant way and that the end moments do not play a  significant  role.  Nonetheless,  one  can  assume  that  the  contribution  of  the  ballast  stiffness  to  the  bridge  stiffness  may  be  non‐negligible  for  the  second  vertical  bending:  around  9,5%  according  to 

Table 5.3. 

The contribution of the ballast stiffness does not enable to match the experimental results for all the  eigenfrequencies.  Other  parameters  need  to  be  further  investigated  so  that  a  good  correlation  between the experiment and the FEM model is found. 

5.3.2 Influence of the ballast mass 

As it has been mentioned in Chapter 5.1, there is a relative uncertainty regarding the mass of ballast  which  has  been  placed  on  the  bridge.  This  uncertain  parameter  can  be  a  source  of  error  and  therefore, it must be further investigated.  

 

A minimal mass density of the ballast is calculated in order to see the influence of the mass of the  ballast  on  the  natural  frequencies  of  the  bridge.  This  value  is  calibrated  so  that  the  1 st

  numerical  vertical  bending  frequency  matches  the  corresponding  experimental  frequency.  This  mass  density,  unrealistically low, is equal to:  

ρ

 ballast 

= 1 355 kg/m

3

 

63 

In  order  to  compare  similar  models,  the  ballast  shape  previously  used  is  kept  and  an  equivalent  minimal  mass  corresponding  to  the  minimal  mass  density  is  thus  calculated.  This  minimal  mass  corresponds to a value of:  m  minimal 

= 191 000 kg 

This minimal mass corresponds to a reduction of 24,7% from the mass previously used. Figure 5.11  shows this reduction in terms of area.  

 

 

Figure 5.11: Minimal mass cross section. 

Once  again,  the  model  described  in  Chapter  5.2  is  used,  using  the  support  conditions  described  in 

Chapter 2.1.4 and a Young’s Modulus for the ballast equal to 300 MPa.  

Table 5.4: Eigenvalue analysis for m  minimal.

 

Mode type 

1 st

 vertical bending 

1 st

 torsional 

2 nd

 vertical bending 

3 rd

/4 th

 vertical bending 

Experimental  frequencies (Hz) 

5,39 

9,26 

10,3 

12,3 

LUSAS values for   m  minimal

 

5,39 

8,68 

10,9 

% of difference from  the experiment 

‐0,02 

‐6,65 

6,16 

 

As  one  can  notice  form  Table  5.4,  the  difference  for  the  1 st

  torsional  and  the  2 nd

  vertical  bending  modes is around 6,5% which is not good enough, although the agreement is good for the 1 st

 vertical  bending mode. 

64 

 

 

The  uncertainty  of  the  mass  of  the  ballast  does  not  enable  to  explain  the  differences  between  the  experimental values and those obtained from the FEM model. Other parameters regarding the model  itself  need  to  be  further  studied,  since  the  uncertain  parameters  of  the  ballast  have  already  been  tested: both its mass and its stiffness. The only not well known parameters are the characteristics of  the bearings. 

5.3.3 Influence of the support conditions 

5.3.3.1 Reference mass of ballast 

In  this  chapter,  the  support  conditions  are  studied;  both  the  influence  of  the  stiffness  of  the  stiff  beam  and  the  type  of  boundary  conditions.  It  appears  that  the  bridge  is  not  stiff  enough  if  the  boundary conditions are kept in the same way as the un‐ballasted model, according to the previous  analyses.  For  this  analysis,  the  ballast  stiffness  is  assumed  equal  to  300  MPa  and  the  ballast  mass  originally determined in Chapter 5.1 is used.  

Table  5.5  summarizes  the  influence  on  the  natural  frequencies  of  the  two  parameters  mentioned  above.  It  can  be  noticed  from  Table  5.5  that  the  stiff  beam  definition,  i.e.  its  stiffness,  plays  a  significant role on the natural frequencies of the bridge.  

Indeed, if the Young’s Modulus of the stiff beam is equal to the Young’s Modulus of steel, no matter  what  type  of  boundary  conditions  is  applied  (translations  fully  fixed  or  not),  it  is  not  possible  to  match the experimental frequencies. Furthermore, if the initial boundary conditions are used and the  stiffness  of  the  stiff  beam  is  increased  to  be  100  times  higher  than  the  steel  stiffness  (E stiff  beam

  = 

2,05.10

GPa),  one  can  notice  from  Table  5.5  that  the  agreement  for  the  three  vertical  bending  modes is still not acceptable, especially for the 3 rd

/4 th

 vertical bending. Nevertheless, it can also be  observed that the agreement with the experimental value is very good for the 1 st

 torsional mode. 

Then, the translations of the four bearings are fully fixed in the three directions and it can be noticed  from  the  last  column  of  Table  5.5  that  the  agreement  is  acceptable  for  all  the  modes,  both  the  vertical bending ones and the torsional one.  

The type of boundary conditions influences significantly the results in that case and the increase of  the stiffness of the stiff beam enables to improve the agreement for the torsional mode. 

65 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 5.5: Influence of the support conditions on the natural frequencies. 

 

 

Mode type 

1st vertical bending 

1st torsional  

2nd vertical bending 

Experimental  values (Hz) 

5,39 

Reference boundary  conditions  

E  stiff beam

 = E  steel

 

LUSAS  values (Hz) 

% of  difference  

4,94  ‐8,94 

9,26 

10,3 

8,20 

9,91 

‐13,0 

‐3,41 

All supports fixed          

E  stiff beam

 = E  steel

 

LUSAS  values (Hz) 

% of  difference 

Reference boundary  conditions  

E  stiff beam

 = 100.E  steel

 

LUSAS  values (Hz) 

% of  difference  

4,95  ‐8,74  5,00  ‐7,71 

8,28 

9,91 

‐11,9 

‐3,37 

9,23 

9,68 

‐0,38 

‐5,84 

 

3/4th vertical bending 

12,3 

/  /  /  /  10,8  ‐13,6 

All supports fixed          

E  stiff beam

 =100.E  steel

 

LUSAS  values (Hz) 

5,37 

9,42 

9,84 

% of  difference  

‐0,30 

1,63 

‐4,12 

12,3  0,53 

66 

A  steady  state  analysis,  done  in  the  same  way  as  it  is  described  in  Chapter  4.1,  confirms  that  four  global mode can be extracted from this analysis and that a good correlation with the experiments is  achieved (Figure 5.12). 

 

Figure 5.12: Harmonic response to a point load of 1kN at (16; 5,2;0). 

As  a  result,  one  can  conclude  that  the  stiff  beam  stiffness  plays  a  significant  role  especially  on  the  torsional  mode;  and  the  boundary  conditions,  in  contrast,  have  an  important  influence  on  the  vertical bending modes. It would have been interesting to model the longitudinal beams belonging to  the  deck  using  shell  elements,  as  it  has  already  been  mentioned  in  Chapter  4.2.  What  can  be  concluded  from  the  above  analysis  is  that  the  additional  mass  brought  by  the  ballast  changes  the  support conditions types. First, it appears to increase the stiffness of the stiff beam and therefore the  stiffness of the longitudinal beam web in the transverse direction. In addition, it can be assumed that  the mass of the ballast and the track, which represent almost twice the mass of the bridge, makes all  the supports unable to move.  

It is also interesting to compare the mode shapes for the un‐ballasted model and the best ballasted  model in order to confirm the agreement through the mode shapes (Figure 5.13 to 5.16). The vectors  of the displacements have been normalized to have a norm equal to one. One can observe that the  global shape of the four modes remains the same from the un‐ballasted model to the ballasted one. 

Nonetheless, small difference can be noticed. For the 1 st

 vertical bending mode and the 1 st

 torsional  mode (Figures 5.13 and 5.14), the effect of the end moment is clearly visible for the ballasted case. 

Besides,  differences  can  also  be  noticed  for  the  2 nd

  vertical  bending  mode  and  the  3 rd

/4 th

  vertical  bending  mode  (Figures  5.15  and  5.16).  It  appears  that  the  ballast  modifies  slightly  the  vibration’s  amplitude and shapes. 

 

67 

 

 

 

Mode shapes 1st vertical bending ‐ Lower longitudinal beam 

0,2

0,18

0,16

0,14

0,12

0,1

0,08

0,06

0,04

Ballasted model

Unballasted model

0,02

0

0,0 6,4 12,8 19,2 25,6

Position along the x axis (m)

32,0 38,4

Figure 5.13: Mode shapes comparison between the un‐ballasted case and the ballasted case – 1 st

 vertical bending mode. 

 

Mode shapes ‐ 1st torsional ‐ Lower longitudinal beam 

0,2

0,18

0,16

0,14

0,12

0,1

0,08

0,06

0,04

0,02

0

0 6,4 12,8 19,2 25,6

Position along the x axis (m)

32 38,4

Ballasted model

Unballasted model

 

Figure 5.14: Mode shapes comparison between the un‐ballasted case and the ballasted case – 1 st

 torsional mode. 

68 

 

Mode shapes ‐ 2nd vertical bending Lower longitudinal beam  

0,2

0,15

0,1

0,05

0

0

‐0,05

‐0,1

‐0,15

6,4 12,8 19,2 25,6 32 38,4

Ballasted model

Unballasted model

‐0,2

Position along the x axis (m)

Figure 5.15: Mode shapes comparison between the un‐ballasted case and the ballasted case – 2 nd

 vertical bending mode. 

 

 

3,00E‐01

Mode shapes ‐ 3rd/4th vertical bending ‐ Lower longitudinal beam 

2,00E‐01

1,00E‐01

0,00E+00

0

‐1,00E‐01

‐2,00E‐01

6,4 12,8 19,2 25,6 32 38,4

Ballasted model

Unballasted model

‐3,00E‐01

‐4,00E‐01

Position along the x axis (m)

 

Figure 5.16: Mode shapes comparison between the un‐ballasted case and the ballasted case – 3 rd

/4 th

 vertical bending  mode. 

 

69 

 

Therefore,  one  can  conclude  from  these  observations  that  solid  and  beam  elements,  associated  to  realistic boundary conditions for both the bridge and the ballast layer, seem to be a good alternative  to model the ballast and the track.   

However,  this  model  results  from  a  comprehensive  and  thorough  analysis  of  different  parameters  influencing the natural frequencies of the truss bridge. Thus, it is also interesting to test the influence  of the support conditions on the previous models implemented in Chapters 5.3.1 and 5.3.2.  

5.3.3.2 Minimal ballast mass 

The minimal ballast mass density determined in Chapter 5.3.2 is used here to study the influence of  the support conditions on the natural frequencies if the ballast mass is minimal. A similar study of the  support  conditions  is  done  with  the  minimal  mass  and  Table  5.6  summarizes  the  results  from  the  analysis.  

From Table 5.6, it cannot be found an acceptable model which matches the natural frequencies for  all the modes with this minimal ballast mass. Even though the mass of the ballast is not accurately  known, it can be concluded from this analysis that the uncertainty on the ballast mass is not higher  than 20% and also that the one provided by the design office seems correct according to Table 5.5. 

Indeed, the results from the last column of Table 5.5 are good, using the model described in Chapter 

5.3.3.1.   

 

70 

 

 

 

 

Mode type 

1st vertical bending 

1st torsional  

2nd vertical bending 

3/4th vertical bending 

Table 5.6: Influence of the ballast mass (minimal mass) and the support conditions on the natural frequencies. 

 

Experimental  values (Hz) 

5,39 

9,26 

10,3 

12,3 

Reference  boundary  conditions  

E  stiff beam

 = E  steel

 

All supports fixed 

E  stiff beam

 = E 

LUSAS  values (Hz) 

% of  difference 

LUSAS  values (Hz) steel

 

% of  difference 

5,39 

8,68 

10,9 

‐0,02 

‐6,23 

6,56 

5,39 

8,77 

10,9 

0,14 

‐5,34 

6,59 

Reference  boundary  conditions 

E  stiff beam

 = 100.

E steel

 

LUSAS  values (Hz) 

% of  difference 

All supports fixed          

E  stiff beam

LUSAS  values (Hz) 

 =100.E  steel

% of 

  difference  

5,45 

9,62 

10,6 

11,9 

1,14 

3,87 

3,68 

‐3,10 

5,85 

9,82 

10,8 

13,7 

8,64 

6,01 

5,74 

11,9 

71 

5.3.3.3 Ballast stiffness 

Chapter  5.3.1  has  highlighted  the  contribution  of  the  stiffness  of  the  ballast,  mainly  for  the  2 nd

  vertical bending mode. The influence of the support conditions has been confirmed in this  chapter  and thus, it is interesting to study the influence of this parameter if the ballast stiffness is decreased  so  that  the  ballast  is  considered  just  as  an  additional  mass.  The  ballast  stiffness  is  therefore  taken  equal  to  10  MPa  and  a  study,  similar  to  the  previous  ones,  about  the  influence  of  the  support  conditions  is  done.    Table  5.7  presents  the  results  when  all  the  supports  are  fixed  in  the  three  directions and a stiff beam’s Young’s modulus is equal to 100 times the steel one. 

 

Table 5.7: Results from the analysis studying the influence of the support conditions when the ballast considered as an  additional mass. 

Mode type 

 

1 st

 vertical bending 

1 st

 torsional 

2 nd

 vertical bending 

3 rd

/4 th

 vertical bending 

Experimental  frequencies 

(Hz) 

5,39 

9,26 

10,3 

12,3 

LUSAS values for 

E  ballast 

= 300 MPa 

(Hz)  

5,37 

9,42 

9,84 

12,32 

LUSAS values for  

E  ballast 

= 10 MPa 

(Hz) 

5,22 

9,22 

8,93 

% of difference  between the  two models 

2,72 

2,04 

9,25 

As  one  can  notice  from  Table  5.7,  the  contribution  of  ballast  stiffness  to  the  bridge  stiffness  is  approximately the same, no matter what boundary conditions are used (Tables 5.3 and 5.7). Besides,  this  analysis  confirms  the  higher  contribution  of  the  ballast  stiffness  to  the  bridge  stiffness  for  the  second  vertical  bending  mode.  In  contrast,  the  ballast  stiffness  does  not  play  any  significant  role  when it comes to the 1 st

 vertical bending and 1 st

 torsional modes. 

 

 

72 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 6 

6 Discussion and conclusion 

6.1 Comparison of the experimental and analytical results 

6.1.1 Reference un‐ballasted and ballasted models 

This study results in the implementation of two optimized finite element models: one corresponding  to the un‐ballasted case and one corresponding to the ballasted case. Differences between the two  bridge models have been highlighted in Chapter 5. They are mainly related to the support conditions. 

The difference between the support conditions of the two models are summarised in Table 6.1. 

Table  6.2  summarises  the  results  obtained  from  the  eigenvalue  analysis  for  both  models.  For  both  cases, a good agreement between the experimental eigenfrequencies and mode shapes, determined  in Chapter 3, and the analytical results is achieved.  

 

73 

Table 6.1: Support conditions for both final models. 

UN‐BALLASTED CASE  BALLASTED CASE 

Stiff beam  Stiff beam 

Young’s Modulus   E stiff beam

= E  steel 

=205 GPa Young’s Modulus  E stiff beam

= 100.E  steel 

=2,05.10

4

 GPa

 

Boundary conditions  

Translations 

Support 1 

Support 2 

Support 3 

Support 4 

X  free  fixed  free  fixed 

Y  free  free 

Boundary conditions 

Translations fixed  Support 1  fixed  Support 2  fixed  fixed  Support 3  fixed  fixed  Support 4 

X  fixed  fixed  fixed  fixed 

Y  fixed  fixed  fixed  fixed 

Z  fixed  fixed  fixed  fixed 

Table 6.2: Results from the eigenvalue analysis for un‐ballasted and ballasted final finite element models. 

 

 

UN‐BALLASTED CASE  BALLASTED CASE 

Mode type 

1 st

 vertical bending 

1 st

 vertical bending  

1 st

 torsional 

2 nd

 vertical bending  

3 rd 

/4 th

 vertical bending 

 

Experimental  values (Hz) 

LUSAS  values (Hz)

% of  difference

Experimental  values (Hz) 

LUSAS  values (Hz) 

% of  difference

8,05 

9,68 

10,1 

18,5 

21,6 

8,14 

9,89 

10,2 

18,3 

21,6 

1,11 

2,21 

0,70 

‐0,98 

0,19 

5,39 

9,26 

10,3 

12,3 

5,37 

9,42 

9,84 

12,3 

‐0,30 

1,63 

‐4,12 

0,53 

6.1.2 Modelling the ballast 

Table 6.3 summarizes the contribution to the stiffness of the structure for the ballasted model of the  different parameters studied above. The contribution of the stiffness of the stiff beam is determined  for  the  initial  boundary  conditions  and  E ballast

  =  300  MPa  and  therefore,  the  contribution  of  the  boundary conditions is assessed once all the translations at the supports are fixed.  

 

It  has  been  shown  that  the  ballast  gives  an  additional  stiffness  to  the  bridge:  from  25%  to  50%  according  to  the  mode.

Moreover,  from  Table  6.3,  different  conclusions  can  be  drawn.  First,  it  appears that the ballast stiffness has a non‐negligible influence on the 2 nd

 vertical bending mode of  the  studied  truss  bridge.  Other  studies  [8,  9]  have  shown  that  the  stiffness  of  the  ballast  may  be  frequency‐dependent. In the presented case, when the stiffness of the ballast is multiplied by 30, the 

  stiffness  of  the  model  is  increased  by  22%.  However,  for  the  two  first  modes,  its  contribution  represents less than 5%. 

74 

 

Table 6.3: Contribution in stiffness of different parameters to the bridge stiffness for the ballasted model. 

 

Mode type 

1 st

 vertical bending 

1 st

 torsional 

2 nd

 vertical bending 

 

3 rd

/4 th

 vertical bending 

Ballast stiffness 

4,9 

2,5 

22,0 

Contribution of the: (%) 

Stiff beam stiffness 

2,3 

26,7 

‐4,5 

Boundary conditions 

15,3 

4,1 

3,3 

30,3 

Furthermore, the ballast seems to alter the support conditions: the mass of the ballast changes the  behaviour  of  the  bearings  of  the  bridge  but  also  it  modifies  the  behaviour  of  the  web  of  the  longitudinal beams.  

Table  6.3  highlights  the  significant  influence  of  the  definition  of  the  stiff  beam  on  the  1 st

  torsional  frequency  for  the  ballasted  case.  Besides,  the  influence  had  also  been  noticed  for  the  un‐ballasted  case (see Chapter 4.2). For the 1 st

 torsional mode, if the stiffness of the stiff beam is multiplied  by 

100,  the  bridge  stiffness  is  increased  by  27%,  whereas  for  the  two  other  modes,  the  stiff  beam  stiffness has a minor influence (less than 5%).  

 

Finally, the crucial role of the boundary conditions is emphasized in the above table where it can be  observed that the additional mass brought by the ballast appears to fix all the bearings of the bridge:  they are thus unable to move in all directions.  

To  conclude,  the  influence  of  the  support  conditions  can  be  questioned  and  it  is  surely  specific  to  each  bridge  but  it  can  partly  explain  the  difference  between  the  experimental  and  the  numerical  analysis. It is also important to mention that the uncertainty of the ballast mass is clearly a limitation  in this project. A better and more accurate estimation of the ballast mass is necessary to strengthen  the conclusions drawn in this thesis. 

6.2 Further research 

Regarding the bridge studied in this thesis, an interesting suggestion to broaden the analysis would  be  to  model  the  two  longitudinal  beams  of  the  deck  by  shell  elements.  It  might  enable  to  model  more accurately the behaviour of the webs because they seem  to bend in the transverse direction  when the bridge is in resonance for the 1 st

 torsional mode. 

The  next  step  of  this  project  would  consist  in  using  the  implemented  models  for  high‐speed  train  applications.  It  would  be  interesting  to  compare  experimental  measurements  of  high‐speed  trains  passing  with  a  numerical  dynamic  response  to  study  the  influence  of  a  passing  train  on  the  ballast  model. However, the ballasted model proposed in this project might result in very time consuming  analyses  for  high‐speed  train  applications.  First,  a  2D  truss  model  can  be  implemented,  in  first 

75 

assumption, only including the mass of the ballast. Indeed, a mismatch in frequency would result in a  change in resonance speed. 

All  the  conclusions  drawn  in  this  thesis  need,  of  course,  to  be  strengthened  and  confirmed  by  additional  studies  about  other  bridges  of  different  types.  It  would  be  of  interest  to  implement  a  similar ballasted model than the one used in this project and to test the influence of the highlighted  parameters: the stiffness of the ballast and the support conditions.  

 

Finally, the interesting fact regarding the Polish truss bridge is the experimental measurements of the  acceleration under a dynamic loading, before and after the track installation: that is what makes this  study  unique.  It  is  rare  to  be  allowed  to  perform  experimental  dynamic  measurements  before  the  track is placed; railway bridges are indeed not designed to be excited before their completion. This  could be one of the main potential hindrances to pursue of the study. 

 

 

76 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References 

[1] FINK, J., MÄHR, T., (2009), Influence of the ballast superstructure on the dynamics of slender steel 

railway bridges, Institute of Structural Engineering, Department of Steel Structure, Vienna University  of Technology, Vienna, Austria. 

 

[2] EN 1991‐2, CEN (2003). Eurocode 1: Actions on structures – Part 2: Traffic loads on bridges. 

[3] BUELL, D. C., (1914), Ballast: a reprint of The Railway Educational Bureau’s Track course Lesson, 

University of Wisconsin. 

[4]  KAROUMI,  R.,  (2012),  Lectures  hand‐outs  in  Structural  dynamics,  Department  of  civil  and 

Architectural Engineering, KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. 

[5]  SAUSSINE,  G.,  CHOLET,  C.,  GAUTIER,  P.E.,  DUBOIS,  F.,  BOHATIER,  C.,  MOREAU,  J.J.,  (2005), 

Modeling  ballast  behavior  under  dynamic  loading.  Part  1:  A  2D polygonal  discrete  element  method 

approach, SNCF Research and Technology Department, Paris, France.

[6] CHENG, Y.S., AU, F.T.K., CHEUCNG, Y.K., (2001), Vibration of railway bridges under a moving train 

using  bridge  track‐vehicle  element,  Department  of  Civil  Engineering,  The  University  of  Hong  Kong, 

Hong Kong. 

[7]  RIGUEIRO,  C.,  REBELO,  C.,  DA  SILVA,  L.S.,  (2010),  Influence  of  ballast  models  in  the  dynamic 

response of railway viaducts, Departments of Civil Engineering EST and FCT, Portugal. 

[8] ZHAI, W.M., WANG, K.Y., LIN J.H., (2004), Modelling and experiment of railway ballast vibrations, 

Southwest Jiatong University, Chengdu, China. 

[9] ZACHER, M., BAEßLER, M., (2009), Dynamic behaviour of ballast on railway bridges, Germany. 

[10] HERRON, D., JONES, C., THOMPSON, D., RHODES, D., (2009), Characterising the high‐frequency 

dynamic stiffness of railway ballast, Institute of Sound Vibration, UK. 

77 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[11] REBELO, C., DA SILVA, L.S., RIGUEIRO, C., PIRCHER, M., (2008), Dynamic behaviour of twin single‐

span ballasted railway viaducts, Departments of Civil Engineering EST and FCT, Portugal. 

[12] LIU, K. REYNDERS, E., DE ROECK, G., LOMBAERT, G., (2008), Experimental and numerical analysis 

of  a  composite  bridge  for  high‐speed  trains,  Department  of  Civil  Engineering,  K.U.  Lewen,  Lewen, 

Belgium. 

[13]  BATTINI,  J.M.,  ÜLKER‐KASUTELL  M.,  (2011),  A  simple  finite  element  to  consider  the  non‐linear 

influence  of  the  ballast  vibrations  of  railway  bridges,  Department  of  civil  and  Architectural 

Engineering, KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. 

[14]  ZWOLSKI,  J.,  (2011),  Influence  of  ballasted  railway  track  on  bridge  dynamic  performance

Wroclaw University of Technology, Wroclaw, Poland, EVACES 2011. 

[15] Anil K. Chopra, (2007), Dynamic of structure, Pearson, Prentice Hall, New Jersey.  

 

[16] Arcelormittal‐ Reference table for European rails, available at:  http://www.arcelormittal.com/rails+specialsections/en/types‐of‐train‐rails.html (10 May 2013) 

78 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix A 

 

 

 

Accelerometers arrangements for test 1 and test 2 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A.1 Setups for the un‐ballasted bridge 

Figure A.1: Accelerometers' arrangement Setup 01.  

DECK

 

 

DECK

Figure A.2: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 02. 

DECK

 

Figure A.3: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 03. 

II 

 

Figure A.4: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 04. 

 

Figure A.5: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 05. 

 

DECK

 

 

DECK

 

DECK

Figure A.6: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 06. 

 

III 

 

 

Figure A.7: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 07. 

DECK

UPPER 

BRACING 

 

DECK

UPPER 

BRACING 

 

Figure A. 8: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 08. 

 

 

IV 

 

Figure A.9: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 09. 

 

DECK

UPPER 

BRACING 

 

DECK

UPPER 

BRACING 

 

Figure A.10: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 10. 

 

 

 

 

DECK

Figure A.11: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 11. 

 

UPPER 

BRACING 

 

DECK

UPPER 

BRACING 

 

Figure A.12: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 12. 

 

 

VI 

 

A.2 Setups for the ballasted bridge 

Figure A.13: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 00. 

Figure A.14: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 01. 

 

DECK

 

DECK

 

DECK

Figure A.15: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 02. 

 

VII 

 

Figure A.16: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 03. 

 

Figure A.17: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 04. 

 

DECK

 

DECK

 

DECK

Figure A.18: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 05. 

 

VIII 

DECK

Figure A.19: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 06. 

 

UPPER 

BRACING 

 

DECK

 

Figure A.0.10: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 07. 

 

IX 

 

UPPER 

BRACING 

DECK

Figure A.21: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 08. 

 

 

UPPER 

BRACING 

DECK

 

Figure A. 22: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 09. 

 

UPPER 

BRACING 

 

DECK

Figure A.23: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 10. 

 

 

TRACK 

UPPER 

BRACING 

 

Figure A.24: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 11. 

 

 

XI 

DECK

 

UPPER 

BRACING 

 

TRACK 

Figure A.25: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 12. 

 

DECK

 

 

TRACK 

Figure A.0.26: Accelerometers’ arrangement Setup 13. 

 

 

 

 

 

DECK

 

 

XII 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix B 

 

 

MATLAB codes to process the experimental data 

 

 

XIII 

 

B.1 Natural frequency extraction 

 

%% Setup & Acceleration load( 'setup04' ); acceleration = x13;

%% Whole signal processing

% Plot of the whole signal figure(1); subplot (2,1,1), plot(time,acceleration1, 'b' ); grid; xlabel( 'Time (s)' , 'FontSize' , 11) ylabel( 'Acceleration amplitude' , 'FontSize' ,11) title( 'Whole Signal' );

% Plot of the whole signal FFT fft_acceleration1 = (abs(fft(acceleration1))/N); figure(1); subplot(2,1,2), plot(f(f<20),fft_acceleration1 (f<20), 'r' );grid; axis ([0, 20, 0, 0.002]); xlabel( 'Frequency (Hz)' , 'FontSize' , 11) ylabel( 'FFT signal' , 'FontSize' ,11) title( 'FFT Whole Signal' );

%% Frequency extraction

%% 1st Frequency

%% Variables filter_order=4; freq_inf = 7.8; freq_sup = 8.3; start_window= 52500; end_window=70000;

N=end_window-start_window;

%% Filter

% butter_filter (filter_order , freq_inf , freq_sup, signal) filtered_signal=butter_filter (filter_order , freq_inf , freq_sup, acceleration1);

%% Isolate signal

% [isolated_signal,isolated_signal_freq]=isolate_signal (start_window, end_window, signal)

[isolated_signal1,isolated_signal_freq]=isolate_signal (start_window, end_window, filtered_signal);

%% Eigenfrequency value

% [peak_position] = extract_eigenfrequency(signal)

[peak_position] = extract_eigenfrequency(isolated_signal_freq)

% The same process is adopted for the other eigenfrequencie

XIV 

 

Functions used: 

 Butterworth function:  function filtered_signal = butter_filter (filter_order , freq_inf , freq_sup, signal) load( 'variables_global' )

[B,A]=butter( filter_order , [freq_inf freq_sup]/(0.5*Fs) , 'bandpass' ); filtered_signal = filter(B,A,signal);

% Plot the filtered signal figure; plot(time, filtered_signal, 'g' ); grid; xlabel( 'Time (s)' , 'FontSize' , 11) ylabel( 'Acceleration amplitude (m/s2)' , 'FontSize' ,11) title( 'Filtered Signal' ); end

 Signal isolation function:  function [isolated_signal,isolated_signal_freq] = isolate_signal

(start_window, end_window, signal) load( 'variables_global' )

N= end_window - start_window;

% zero padding

% Put 0 before the chosen window for i = 1:start_window

signal(i) = 0; end

% Put 0 after the chosen window for i = end_window:length(signal)

signal(i) = 0; end

% compute the Hamming window win_hamming = zeros(length(signal),1); win_hamming(start_window:end_window-1, 1) = hamming(end_windowstart_window);

% compute the isolated signal (signal * windows) isolated_signal = signal.*win_hamming; figure, plot(time,isolated_signal, 'b' ); grid; xlabel( 'Time (s)' , 'FontSize' , 11) ylabel( 'Aceeleration amplitude (m/s2)' , 'FontSize' ,11) title( 'Isolated filtered signal' );

XV 

 

% compute fft isolated_signal_freq = (abs(fft(isolated_signal))/N);

% plot fft figure,plot(f(f<20), isolated_signal_freq (f<20), 'r' ); grid; xlabel( 'Frequency (Hz)' , 'FontSize' , 11) title( 'FFT of isolated filtered signal' ); end

 Eigenfrequency extraction :  function [peak_position] = extract_eigenfrequency(signal) load( 'variables_global.mat' );

[peak_value, peak_position]=max((signal));

% give the peak frequency value peak_position = f(peak_position); end

B.2 Mode shape identification 

 

  acceleration1=x13; acceleration2=x7;

%% Mode shape

%% Phase acceleration comparison

% Signal 1 filtered_signal=butter_filter (filter_order , freq_inf , freq_sup, acceleration2);

[isolated_signal2,isolated_signal_freq]=isolate_signal (start_window, end_window, filtered_signal);

% Signal 2 filtered_signal=butter_filter (filter_order , freq_inf , freq_sup, acceleration2);

[isolated_signal2,isolated_signal_freq]=isolate_signal (start_window, end_window, filtered_signal);

% Plot the time signals on the same graph figure; hold on plot(time,isolated_signal1, 'b' ); plot(time,isolated_signal2, 'r' ); grid; xlabel( 'Time (s)' , 'FontSize' , 11) ylabel( 'Acceleration amplitude (m/s2)' , 'FontSize' ,11) title( 'Signals Comparison' );

XVI 

%% Displacement comparison: Newmark method

%[a,v,d,t]=Newmark(beta,gamma,x_bis,rate,fmin,fmax) fmin=7.5; fmax=8.5;

[a1,v1,d1,t1]=Newmark(1/4,1/2,acceleration1,Fs,fmin,fmax);

[a2,v2,d2,t2]=Newmark(1/4,1/2,acceleration2,Fs,fmin,fmax); figure(2); hold on plot(time,d1, 'b' ); plot(time,d2, 'r' ); xlabel( 'Time (s)' , 'FontSize' , 11); ylabel( 'Displacements ' , 'FontSize' ,11); grid; title( 'Displacement comparison' );

B.3 Damping estimation 

%% Damping ratio of the 1st Frequency

%% Variables filter_order=2; freq_inf = 5.28; freq_sup = 5.4;

%% Filter

% butter_filter (filter_order , freq_inf , freq_sup, signal) filtered_signal=butter_filter (filter_order , freq_inf , freq_sup, acceleration);

%% Isolated signal for damping calculation t_inf=78; delta_t=18; acceleration_2=acceleration(time>t_inf); t=time(time>t_inf)-t_inf; acceleration_isolated=acceleration_2(t<delta_t); t=t(t<delta_t); figure(3); plot(t,acceleration_isolated, 'b' );grid;

T_2=max(t);

N=length(t); f_2 = 0:1/T_2:Fs;

  isolated_fft = (abs(fft(acceleration_isolated))/N); figure(4); plot(f_2(f_2<20),isolated_fft(f_2<20), 'r' ); axis ([0, 20, 0, 0.00125]);grid;

XVII 

 

%% Peak frequency & Damping ratio

%[peak_position , damping_ratio] = damping_calculation (signal)

[peak_position, damping_ratio] = damping_calculation (isolated_fft)

Functions used: 

 Damping calculation:  function [peak_position , damping_ratio] = damping_calculation (signal) load( 'variables_global.mat' );

[peak_value, peak_position]=max((signal));

% compute the threshold

A=peak_value/sqrt(2);

% compute the lowest bandwidth frequency freq_inf =peak_position; while signal(freq_inf)>A

freq_inf = freq_inf-1; end

% choose the most accurate point if abs(A-signal(freq_inf))>abs(A-(signal(freq_inf)-1))

freq_inf=freq_inf-1; end

% compute the lowest bandwidth frequency freq_sup =peak_position; while signal(freq_sup)>A

freq_sup= freq_sup+1; end

% choose the most accurate point if abs(A-signal(freq_sup))>abs(A-(signal(freq_sup)-1))

freq_sup=freq_sup-1; end

 

% Compute the damping ratio damping_ratio=100*(freq_sup-freq_inf)/(freq_sup+freq_inf);

% Give the peak frequency value peak_position = f(peak_position);

  end

 

XVIII 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

383 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

XIX 

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement