ANCHORAGE SCHOOL DISTRICT ANCHORAGE, ALASKA ASD MEMORANDUM #72 (2009-2010)

ANCHORAGE SCHOOL DISTRICT ANCHORAGE, ALASKA  ASD MEMORANDUM #72 (2009-2010)

ANCHORAGE SCHOOL DISTRICT

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA

ASD MEMORANDUM #72 (2009-2010)

TO:

FROM:

SCHOOL BOARD

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT

October 12, 2009

SUBJECT: DISTRICT

ASD Goal: Increase student academic achievement using data to guide adoption of

curriculum, methods, materials, and professional development specifically designed to ensure that each group as designated by No Child Left Behind makes adequate yearly progress.

PERTINENT FACTS:

The Department of Education and Early Development issues its annual designations of districts in terms of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) each fall.

As the Anchorage School District is in Level 4, or Corrective Action Status, the

No Child Left Behind Act and Alaska state regulations require the District to submit an improvement plan to the Department of Education and Early

Development (Attachment A). The plan’s goals should address the specific areas wherein the District did not make AYP targets. For ASD, the African American,

Alaska Native and American Indian, Low Income, Disabled, and Limited English

Proficient student subgroups did not meet AYP in both language arts and math performance. The Asian and Hispanic subgroups did not meet AYP in language arts only. Instructional strategies, activities, materials, and trainings in the plan should reflect changes to current practice as well as continuing efforts the District has deemed effective.

The District’s Instructional Team crafted the plan with the additional involvement of parents and program advisory group members. The District’s

Six-Year Instructional Plan firmly guided the development of the District

Improvement Plan.

The Anchorage School District continues to focus its efforts on educating all students for success in life. This improvement plan, and the Six-Year

Instructional Plan from which it is drawn, will serve the district well in that mission.

CC/EG/VC

Attachment A - 2009-2010 District Improvement Plan

Attachment B - Sample School Report Card

Attachment C - Scientifically Based Research Document

Prepared by: Vernon Campbell, Director, Accountability

Approved by: Ed Graff, Assistant Superintendent, Instruction

2

Anchorage School District Improvement Plan 2009-2010

Alaska Department of Education

& Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan

Submission Packet

Due to EED – October 1, 2009

Contact:

Angela Love, School Improvement Program Manager

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

801 West 10 th

Street, Suite 200

PO Box 110500, Juneau, AK 99811-0500 [email protected]

(907) 465-8689 www.eed.state.ak.us

Overview of 2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Process

Each district receiving Title I funds that is identified at Level 2 or above is required by NCLB and

Alaska statute and regulations to create or revise a District Improvement Plan that meets federal

and state requirements. This plan should be reflective of the district’s needs as a whole based on the analysis of student achievement data, demographic data and perception data. The needs of the district are identified through this initial data analysis and analyzed further to determine the causes for being unsuccessful in meeting AYP in relation to specific subject areas as well as subgroups. From this analysis, the district identifies district-wide goals and actions in which to assist the teachers and district staff in meeting the goals. These goals will be reflected in the School Improvement Plans including actions to guide implementation based on the needs of the individual school site.

District Improvement Plans are due to EED no later than October 1, 2009. Note: District

Improvement Plans are being requested first to ensure the goals, as based on student achievement data, are identified prior to the writing of School Improvement Plans. School Improvement Plans should be driven by district goals with objectives identified that share the district goals with strategies and actions selected by the site to match the students being served. School Improvement Plans are now due at EED no later than November 2, 2009, but will be accepted earlier if reviewed and approved by the district.

EED will review the District Improvement Plan to determine that federal and state requirements

are met. If the plan does not meet the requirements, the department will contact the district within 3 working days of receipt of the plan to specify any revisions needed to meet the federal and state requirements.

Consequences for Districts

District Improvement Plans that meet all federal and state requirements must be received by EED on

or before October 1, 2009 or federal and state payments will be withheld until receipt.

If the implementation of a District Improvement Plan does not result in making adequate yearly progress, the department will be required to take progressive consequences. Per 4 AAC 06.840(h), the department may take appropriate action while a district is at Level 2 or 3. The department will be

required to take one of the corrective actions specified in 4 AAC 06.840(k) once a district has reached

Level 4.

Required elements of District Improvement Plan

4 AAC 06.850(b) 06.880; 1116 (c) (6 & 7)

Plan Requirement

1. Notify all district parents by direct means (regular mail, email, school newsletters) as well as indirect means

(internet, publications) of the reasons for the identification for improvement and how parents can participate in upgrading the quality of the local educational agency.

2. Consult with parents, school staff, and other interested persons to write plan.

3. Address the teaching and learning needs in the schools

of the district and the specific academic problems of lowachieving students, including a determination of why any

of the district's prior plans failed to bring about increased student academic performance.

EED Review Criteria

Description of notification process provided, copy of parent notification included.

Provide list of names of participants showing representation from each group.

Describe why district’s prior plans have not succeeded in improving student achievement.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 2 of 2

4. Cover a two-year period (submitted one year at a time); Include timeline and dates for current school year.

5. Incorporate scientifically based research strategies that strengthen the core academic program in the schools served by the district.

6. Identify actions that have the greatest likelihood of

improving the achievement of students in meeting the academic performance requirements in 4 AAC 06.810.

Briefly describe scientifically based research for each instructional strategy or curriculum proposed.

Strategies proposed target reasons for not making AYP.

7. Address professional development needs of the instructional staff.

8. Spend 10% of district Title IA allocation each year for professional development.

9. Include specific measurable achievement objectives and

targets for all students collectively and each subgroup of students.

10. Incorporate, as appropriate, activities before school, after

school, during the summer, and during an extension of the school year.

11. Specify any technical assistance to be provided to the district.

12. Include strategies to promote effective parental

involvement in the schools served by the district.

Professional development description provided in plan. This may include professional development already described in other plans such as the NCLB application.

Signature required on cover/assurance page.

Measurable objective(s) and target(s) provided.

Extended learning opportunities described if included in plan.

Describe technical assistance, if any, to be provided to the district.

Parent involvement strategies provided in plan.

District Improvement Process

The department recommends a continuous improvement planning process. In the improvement process you may wish to include the following steps to ensure you are addressing the academic needs of your students. The process might contain the following steps: 1) analysis of data (achievement, demographic, perception), 2) determine measurable goals as based on needs identified through data analysis, 3) identify actions for implementation to support the goals (these will include professional development and parent involvement), 4) identify ways to monitor progress and evaluate meeting of the goals and 5) monitor implementation and effectiveness of plan. The process and plan presented are not intended to replace other more comprehensive reform or improvement efforts, but rather to complement those processes and focus on the specific areas that are causing the district to not meet adequate yearly progress targets.

The following companion document is available on the Department of Education website under Forms

& Grants, School/District Improvement ( http://www.eed.state.ak.us/forms/home ).

• School Improvement Plan Resource Guide – an optional step by step guide through the school improvement planning process

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 3 of 3

District Improvement Plan

School Years 2009-2010

Cover Sheet

District AYP Level (check one):

2 3

District Name: Anchorage School District

4

X

Year

4

Superintendent’s Name: Carol Comeau

District Mailing Address: 5530 East Northern Lights Blvd.

City: Anchorage

AK – Zip: 99502

Phone (907) 742-4312

Fax (907) 742-4318

Superintendent’s Email: [email protected]

District Improvement Contact: Ed Graff

Phone (907) 742-4412

Fax (907) 742-4318

District Contact Email: [email protected]

***************************************************************************************************************

By my signature below, I assure that the requirements for districts at Level 2 or above as designated and outlined in NCLB Section 1116 and Alaska Regulations 4 AAC 06.835-880, have been met. The district will spend 10% of its Title I-A allocation each year for professional development to address the academic problems causing the district to be identified for improvement.

Superintendent’s

Signature:

Date:

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 4 of 4

1. Check each cell in the following table to identify the areas in which the district did NOT meet

AYP:

All students Ethnic group SWD LEP Low-Income

Language Arts

Math

(X) African

American,

(X) Alaska Native /

American Indian,

(X) Asian and (X)

Hispanic

(X) African

American and

(X) Alaska Native /

American Indian

X

X

X

X

X

X

Participation

Grad Rate

2. Describe why the district’s prior plans have not succeeded in improving student achievement.

Background:

In terms of meeting Adequate Yearly Progress as defined by No Child Left

Behind, the Anchorage School District’s 2008-2009 report shows overall test scores dipped slightly; however, results of the district’s graduation rate show an increase of nearly 5 percentage points, from 64.96 to 69.40 percent, or 7 percent of the overall scores. Schoolwide results for the district’s 96 schools are as follows: 96 percent met the test participating requirement, 85 percent met the language arts requirement, 89 percent met the math requirement and 97 percent met the attendance/graduation requirement. Thirty-nine ASD schools met every requirement for which they were accountable. Fifteen schools missed AYP by just one target; 42 schools missed by two or more targets. These indicators demonstrate that, in many respects, the ASD is succeeding in improving student achievement.

Overall language arts performance scores declined from 81.4 to 80.4 percent over last year and overall math performance scores declined from 73.7 to 71.4 percent since last year. The five-year trend shows language arts proficiency increasing slightly from 79.3 percent to 80.4 percent proficient. In math, the five-year trend shows a slight increase of 71.1 to 71.4 percent proficient. This year, six of the twenty-four Title I schools made AYP. In the previous year, six of twenty-three Title I schools made AYP.

In the six non-AYP categories the district targeted for language arts performance in its 2008-2009 improvement plan, the percent proficient in all but one subgroup declined slightly. The African American subgroup’s rate of proficiency remained flat at 70.5% over the past two years.

In the five non-AYP categories the district targeted for math performance in its

2008-2009 improvement plan, the percent proficient declined slightly in all subgroups.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 5 of 5

Key points in the district’s future plans for increased success in improving student achievement:

(1) The district acknowledges that it is not satisfied with its non-AYP results and will continue with its focus and efforts to increase achievement for all students, but most especially with those student subgroups that are not meeting

AYP targets. The district believes that it is on a path that will ultimately lead to improved success. However, that progression is not always commensurate with the rate of improvement required by NCLB Annual Measurable Objectives.

(2) The ASD sees its recent adoption of a new Everyday Math curriculum as requiring continuing professional development. This will lead to even better treatment integrity at the classroom level.

(3) Continued professional development in Social Emotional Learning and

Culturally Responsive Education are seen as important factors in improving student academic success.

(4) Efforts to systematize a Response To Instruction framework throughout the district are well underway and will intensify greatly over the next two years.

The district’s emerging RTI initiative, among other things, will be instrumental in schools significantly improving and better aligning a number of past practices. For example, improved student progress monitoring, improved

Student Support Team processes, improved benchmarking, improved student behavior protocols and increased examination of core curriculum instructional practices for validating treatment integrity. Additionally, the district sees the implementation of improved information systems (e.g. Web-based progress monitoring and benchmarking application) as pivotal in helping schools to manage and analyze the significant amount of data that is needed and generated within an effective RTI framework.

3. Describe the process used to notify all parents of the district status and of their opportunities to be involved in addressing the issues that caused the district to be identified for improvement. Please provide a copy of the notification parents received.

Via school report card mail-outs (sample attached), parents receive direct notification of the district’s AYP status, the reasons for identification, and an invitation to participate in the improvement plan’s development. Additionally, parents were notified of the district’s AYP status and of their opportunity to be involved in the improvement planning process by way of an ad in the

Anchorage Daily News (attached). This information was also included as part of monthly ads the district runs in the Daily News to keep the public informed on a variety of district issues. Information encouraging parent and community involvement is also posted on the district Website at www.asdk12.org.

Additionally, through invitation, members of the ASD instructional leadership team who contributed to the improvement plan worked with parents, community members, and district staff in developing each portion of the plan.

Please see page 8 and the plan itself for more details about parent, community, and staff involvement.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 6 of 6

4. Describe any technical assistance, if any, to be provided to the district in developing or implementing the plan. (Please contact the department if technical assistance is needed from

EED.)

The department’s audio conferencing as well as prompt responses to phone calls and e-mails are appreciated and have been helpful. Each of these supports provides sufficient technical assistance for plan development.

The department’s continued efforts to secure increased funding for education are appreciated. Acquisition of needed educational materials; training and professional development opportunities and technology are helpful in the implementation of our improvement plan.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 7 of 7

District Improvement Planning Team

Regulation requires a district to consult with a variety of participants from the schools and the community: teachers, administrators, other school staff, parents, and the community to be served. Please list members of the team and their roles.

Printed Name

Role within the district/school/community

(i.e. 4 th

Grade teacher, PTA parent, etc.)

Roles/Responsibilities tied to District

Improvement Plan

Parents:

Elbertha C. Anker

Gail Braten

Ms Vanlandingham

Jim Leva

Alicia Lopez

Silvia Tobar

Dean Paulson

Martina Diamond

Cheryl Huber

Margaret Brodie

Sara Gant

Tammy Hogge

Blythe Marston

Tim Steele

Suzanne Hueners

Ron Jones

Sandy Powley

Vicki Warner

Judy Ward

Saree Timmons

Jana Lage

Kevin Albert

Ruddy Taylor

Robin Wittrock

Demaris Hudson

Estelle Thomson-Hale

Kellie Taylor

Tamara Dietrich

Lena Shila

Robyn Rehmann

Teachers & other staff:

Ed Graff

Vernon Campbell

Leslie Vandergaw

Sandy Schoff

Linda Griffith

Marina Gantz

Rick Volk

Matt Gho

Glenn Blake

Lesa Walker

Loni Jirik

Jason Hlasny

Cindy Anderson

Laurie Fredrick

Imtiaz Azzam

Phil Farson

Shirley Greeninger

Parent, Family Partnership Charter School Math Advisory Input

Parent, East HS Math Advisory Input

Parent, South HS Math Advisory Input

Grandparent of ESL student

Aunt of ESL students

Parent of ESL students

King Career Center Parent

AVAIL Parent

AVAIL Foster Parent

SWS Parent & PAC Chair

South PTSO Member/Parent

South PTSO Member/Parent

West Parent/Community Member

West Parent/Community Member

Dimond PTSA President

Dimond PTSA Treasurer

Service PTSA President

Bartlett Parent

Bartlett Parent/BAC

Parent

Parent

Parent rep, Native Advisory Committee

Parent rep, Native Advisory Committee

Parent rep, Native Advisory Committee

Parent rep, Native Advisory Committee

Parent rep, Native Advisory Committee

Parent rep, Native Advisory Committee

Parent rep, Native Advisory Committee

Parent and CPAC Member

Grandparent

DIP input / feedback to ELL program

DIP input / feedback to ELL program

DIP input / feedback to ELL program

Reviewed School Initiatives

Reviewed School Initiatives

Parent Chaperone for Activities

Parent Communication & Involvement

Reviewed school initiatives and goals

Reviewed school initiatives and goals

Remodel West/Romig

West/Romig Issues

Committee Member

Executive Exchange

School Action Plans

School Improvement Plan

School Improvement Plan

Science Advisory Input

Science Advisory Input

NAC input

NAC input

NAC input

NAC input

NAC input

NAC input

NAC input

Title I DIP Advisory

Title I DIP Advisory

Assistant Superintendent, Instruction

Director of District Accountability

Executive Director of Middle Schools

Math Program Coordinator

District Improvement Plan Oversight

DIP Technical Support

DIP Developer and Implementer

DIP Developer and Implementer

Secondary SPED

HS Specialist ELL

Chugiak HS Principal

West HS Indian Ed Teacher

Bartlett HS Assistant Principal

SPED Teacher Consultant

SPED and Math Advisory Input

Math Advisory Input

Math Advisory Input

Math Advisory Input

Math Advisory Input

DIP developer and implementer

SPED Teacher Consultant / Assess & Eval DIP developer and implementer

Supervisor, Secondary SPED DIP developer and implementer

Director, Secondary SPED

ELL Teacher, Lake Hood

Counselor, Newcomers’ Center

ELL Specialist

ELL Specialist

DIP developer and implementer

Input and feedback on the DIP

Input and feedback on the DIP

Input and feedback on the DIP

Input and feedback on the DIP

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 8 of 8

Christine Garbe

Amy Keyser

Missy Corbat

Janice Strickland

Julie Vincek

Chuck Strauss

Vani Pillai

Glenn Blake

Rebecca Vano

Mike Henry

Texas Gail Raymond

Judy Onslow

Trisha Herminghaus

Joanna Hubbard

Linda Carlson

Glen Nielsen

Clara Amidon

Angela Blue

Shannon Gallagher

Catherine Jones

Doreen Brown

Dianne Orr

Jennifer Knutson

John Kito

Gale O’Connell Smith

Debbie Carlson

Additional Members:

Alison Mall

Jordan Tennant

Miles Kehr

Tomissa Comellas

Dr. Brian Wick

Dr Leonard Smiley

Dennis Holway

Supervisor, ELLP

Eagle River HS English Teacher

Eagle River HS Tech Coordinator

East High English Teacher

Safe and Drug Free Schools

South Anchorage HS Math Teacher

Service HS Science Teacher

Service HS Assistant Principal

Bartlett HS Teacher

Executive Director of High Schools

DIP Developer and Implementer

Grade 9 Success Coordinator, DIP Advisory

Technology Integration, DIP Advisory

Initiatives / Goals for Grade 9, DIP Advisory

Input on SEL Goals Initiatives at East HS

Reviewed school initiatives and goals

Steering Committee Health Pathways

NWA Self Study Committee

School Improvement Planning

DIP Developer and Implementer

Science Program Coordinator

ASD Secondary Science Support

ASD Elementary Science Support

ASD Elementary Science Support

Executive Director of Elementary Ed.

Elementary Education Supervisor

Science DIP Developer and Implementer

Science DIP Advisory Input

Science DIP Advisory Input

Science DIP Advisory Input

DIP Developer and Implementer

DIP Developer and Implementer

Teacher Rep, Native Advisory Committee NAC input

Teacher Rep, Native Advisory Committee NAC input

Asst. Principal and NAC at-large member NAC input

McLaughlin Secondary School Principal

Indian Education Supervisor

NAC input

DIP Developer and Implementer

Title I Program Supervisor

RTI Coordinator

Tyson Elementary Principal

Taku Elementary Principal

Title I Preschool Instructional Coach

DIP Developer and Implementer

Title I DIP Advisory

Title I Advisory Council

Title I Advisory Council

Title I Advisory Council

UAA Asst. Professor

East HS Student

Chugiak HS Student

South HS Student

UAA Professor

UAA Professor

Community Member

Math Advisory Input

Math Advisory Input

Math Advisory Input

Math Advisory Input

Math Advisory Input

Math Advisory Input

CRAC Representative

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 9 of 9

DISTRICT IMPROVEMENT PLAN 2009-2010 School Year

Complete one sheet for each goal – expand sections as appropriate

DISTRICT MEASURABLE GOAL (to include specific target):

All student subgroups not meeting the target for AYP in Language Arts will show at least a 10% decrease in the percent of students not proficient in order to meet safe harbor targets. All performance standards will be addressed as required for individual student and subgroup growth.

Title III English Language Proficiency Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAO): Each year, a higher percentage of students will make progress over the previous year and a higher percentage of students will attain proficiency in English over the previous year as measured by the Title III AMAO.

CURRENT PERFORMANCE LEVEL ON SBAs:

Results from ASD 2008-2009 Districtwide AYP Language Arts % proficient:

1. African American – 70.5% proficient in 08-09. The performance target for 09-10 is 73.45% proficient.

2. Alaska Native and American Indian – 62.7% proficient in 08-09. The performance target for 09-10 is 66.43% proficient.

3. Asian – 71.2% proficient in 08-09. The performance target for 09-10 is 74.08% proficient.

4. Hispanic – 74.8% proficient in 08-09. The performance target for 09-10 is 77.32% proficient.

5. Low Income – 66.7% proficient in 08-09. The performance target for 09-10 is 70.03% proficient.

6. Students with Disabilities – 46.2% proficient in 08-09. The performance target for 09-10 is 51.58% proficient.

7. Limited English Proficient – 64.7% proficient in 08-09. The performance target for 09-10 is 68.23% proficient.

Title III English Language Proficiency Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAO):

Make progress in learning English – gain the expected level of proficiency on the English Language Proficiency Assessment per one

year of program service according to the formula set forth by the state department of education.

1. 2008-2009 school year – 21.8% of the students made progress in English on the English Language Proficiency Exam K-12

2. 2009-2010 school year – 60% of the students tested will make progress in English on the English Language Proficiency Exam K-12

A higher percentage of students will attain proficiency in English over the previous year as measured by the AMAO.

1. 2008-2009 school year – 17.5% of the students attained proficiency in English on the English Language Proficiency Exam K-12

2. 2009-2010 school year – 20% of the students tested will attain proficiency in English on the English Lang. Proficiency Exam K-12

Scientifically based research to support each strategy listed below (reference or brief description):

See attached scientifically based research appendix.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 10 of 10

ACTION TO IMPLEMENT

Action, strategies and interventions (include professional development, mentoring, parent involvement- not programs)

Writing Process Through

Technology

Middle school will expand the use of online technology to all

7 th

grade classes, (MyAccess), to help students plan, draft, revise, and edit compositions across the core content areas of language arts, math, science and social studies. Teams will work collaboratively with special education to use online writing tools focused on the writing process and the six traits of effective writing.

Students will be able to access the online tools from home and parents will be encouraged to be part of the instructional process.

TIMELINE

Milestones for current school year

RESOURCES


Materials,


Estimated
costs,
 funding
sources



MyAccess trainings will be completed during

October 2009.

Teachers will receive ongoing training and support.

1500 licenses

$34,500.

Training costs covered per teacher contract/regular duty day. (Team

Planning Time).

Source: ARRA

Title II-D.

PERSONS


RESPONSIBLE


Stacy Miller

Martina Henke.

PROGRESS
MONITORING
AND
EVALUATION


EVALUATION


(Instrument(s)
used
to
 assess)


Data reports from My

Access and scores will increase between first and last submission using

MyAccess prompts.

EVIDENCE
OF
IMPACT
ON
STUDENT


LEARNING



(Outcomes
–
Review
at
district
only
 per
milestone)


Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 11 of 11

Differentiated Reading

Instruction Through

Technology

Expand the use of online technology (Achieve 3000), to provide reading intervention teachers a variety of reading levels of current event articles in order to teach reading comprehension. Students will be able to access the online tool from home and parents will be encouraged to be part of the instruction process.

Language Arts Cohort

Trainings

All middle school language arts and ELL teachers will participate in four half-day trainings on best practices, current research, technology integration, the principals of recreational and academic reading, and implementation of newly adopted materials.

Trainings with

Achieve 3000 will be completed fall

2009.

Teachers will receive ongoing training and support.

Cohort trainings will be scheduled during each quarter of the

2009 school year.

Approximately

200 licenses -

$5,000.

Training costs covered per teacher contract/regular duty day. (Team

Planning Time).

Source: ARRA

Title II-D.

$30,720 for substitutes.

Source: ASD general fund mid-level.

Martina Henke

Jan Thompson.

Martina Henke.

Data reports from Achieve

3000.

Placement, midyear, and end of year Lexile set assessment scores from

Achieve 3000 will increase.

Data report from Survey

Monkey at the end of the academic year and anecdotal evaluations completed by teachers after each training.

Reading and writing scores will improve on the SBA’s.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 12 of 12

Language Arts Curriculum

Review – Core Novel

Expansion

A district-wide committee of language arts teachers, curriculum specialists, and parents will evaluate and identify core novels that will enhance teacher’s ability to differentiate. Recommended purchase and implementation in December 2009.

The Middle

School

Language

Arts

Curriculum

Review

Committee will be completed by

May 14, 2010.

Reading Across the

Curriculum

Middle School will increase teacher proficiency in the use of reading strategies in the content areas.

1. All new-to-division staff will be trained .

2. All staff will receive updated materials to keep the initiative moving forward.

New-tomiddle level teachers will be trained on

September 12,

2009.

High Five posters and reference guides will be distributed to schools fall

2009.

Per Diem for teachers, $8,386 and $2,760 for substitutes.

Source: ASD general fund mid-level.

$4,800 for substitutes .

Source: ASD general fund mid-level.

Summer School Extended

Year

Middle School will offer remediation classes in language arts.

Summer school will be offered for six weeks after the end of the academic year.

$323,731 summer school teachers.

Source: ARRA

SPED Title VI-

B.

Martina Henke.

Martina Henke.

Leslie

Vandergaw,

Martina Henke and

Ruth Mount.

Anecdotal comments and score sheets from the participants.

Reading scores will improve on the SBAs.

Reading scores will improve on the SBAs.

Gates-MacGinite Reading

Test.

Post-test scores on reading assessments will increase in comparison to the pre-tests.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 13 of 13

Extended Learning

Provide opportunity for after school tutoring for middle school students identified as below proficient.

Secondary Special Education will continue to implement

research-based curriculum in reading/language arts for selfcontained special education classes as an extension of the general and remedial curriculum. Included in the programs currently used, My

Access and Achieve 3000 have been made available to self- contained language arts and study skills special education high school and middle school classes self-contained SPED classes. IEPs, with parent

input, will be written to support language arts standards.

09-10 school year.

Fall 2009 –

Spring 2010.

$56,920.

Source: ASD general fund mid-level.

Leslie

Vandergaw.

$40,000 for replacement of consumables for current language arts curriculum.

$180,000 for continued implementation and use of

Achieve 3000 and My Access.

Funding is provided by

SPED grant and general funds.

Jerry Sjolander and Cindy

Anderson.

Student participation records.

Increase in language arts performance proficiency on

SBA and HSGQE.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 14 of 14

Continued training for special education teachers in

direct instruction reading

(Corrective Reading,

Language! Strategic Instruction

Model) will be provided to improve student reading performance. Training in the

implementation of Achieve

3000 and My Access will also be provided so that these programs can be used to enhance curriculum both in regular education and SPED classes. New teachers will

also be provided a SPED

teacher consultant mentor to assist in instruction and support. Implementation of

training in modifying and

accommodating for the new midlevel general language arts curriculum to allow for more inclusion for special education students.

Fall 2009 -

Spring 2010.

Content area training for

ELL program staff in language arts content area.

Reading Strategies Training

will be provided to all ELL program certificated staff.

Aug. 2009 to

May 2010.

2009-2010 school year.

One day w/ outside trainer for elementary and secondary.

Est. Cost: No added cost as per contract within regular duty day teacher/staff salaries.

ASD general fund.

$5,800 for presenter and

$6,000 in sub days.

Source: Title III program budget.

$25,000 for national trainer to provide both new and refresher courses for SPED teachers in

Language!

Also, $12,000 was provided to enhance the current training schedules for My

Access and

Achieve 3000 and collaboration training for new general ed. curriculum.

From ASD general fund

SPED budget.

Jerry Sjolander and Cindy

Anderson.

Specialists from

Title 1.

Outside trainer and then ongoing training and support from

ELL staff.

Increase in language arts performance proficiency on

SBA and HSGQE.

Results on the Annual

English Language

Proficiency Assessment for

Spring 2010 and SBA

Reading.

Results on the Annual

English Language

Proficiency Assessment for

Spring 2010.

Increase in language arts performance proficiency on

SBA.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 15 of 15

Aspire training all new ELLP classified. (See SBR appendix for details related to Aspire.)

09-10 school year ongoing.

Parent classes to include

PASSport to Success Strategies at various locations including

Newcomers’ Center, Mt View,

East and possibly Clark.

October 2009-

May 2010.

SIOP training at Williwaw,

Russian Jack and Tyson. Minilessons at Central, Lake Hood and Chinook. Credit courses also offered.

Ongoing during 09-

2010 school year.

Achieve 3000, a web-based literacy tool for differentiating instruction, will be used at the

Newcomers’ Center for grades

7-12 and with parent classes.

Ongoing during 2009-

2010 school year.

Est. Cost: No added cost as per contract within regular duty day teacher/staff salaries.

ASD general fund.

Addenda for teachers to teach the parent classes

– $2400 per eight-week session.

Title III program budget and

Immigrant Grant.

Est. Cost: No added cost as per contract within regular duty day teacher/staff salaries.

ASD general fund.

Est. Cost: general fund pays for salary of teachers and specialists.

$3,000 for license from

Stimulus Funds.

ELLP staff trainers.

ELLP staff.

ELLP content specialists and supervisor.

ELLP specialist manages the database for

NCC student,

ESL classroom teachers implement in the classroom.

Results on the Annual

English Language

Proficiency Assessment for

Spring 2010.

Increase in language arts performance proficiency on

SBA.

Results on the Annual

English Language

Proficiency Assessment for

Spring 2010.

Increase in language arts performance proficiency on

SBA.

Results on the Annual

English Language

Proficiency Assessment for

Spring 2010.

Increase in language arts performance proficiency on

SBA.

Results on the Annual

English Language

Proficiency Assessment for

Spring 2010.

Increase in language arts performance proficiency on

SBA.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 16 of 16

Implementation of two

Language Acquisition

Programs. Carousel of Ideas at ten elementary schools and

Treasure Chest at 5 schools.

Ongoing during 2009-

2010 school year.

Fast ForWord offered in five comprehensive and four alternative high schools.

Ongoing during 09-10 school year.

Achieve 3000 and MyAccess, web-based literacy tools for differentiating instruction, will be used in all comprehensive and alternative high schools.

Ongoing during 09-10 school year.

Provide inquiry-based science

notebook teacher

professional development to teachers K-12 related to language arts.

Ongoing for

09-10 school year.

Est. Cost: purchase of

Carousel of Ideas

$25,000.

Title III funds.

No cost for

Treasure Chest.

ELLP specialists.

Results on the Annual

English Language

Proficiency Assessment for

Spring 2010.

Increase in language arts performance proficiency on

SBA.

Increase on pre and post assessment, which is the

Critchlow Verbal Language

Scale.

Est. Cost:

$120,000 .

Source: High

School Division remediation budget.

Est. Cost:

$250,000

Source: High

School Division remediation budget.

Est. Cost:

$40,000 and three support teacher salaries at $222,319 + benefits.

Source: Title IIA and ASD

General Fund.

Mike Henry and

High School

Principals.

Mike Henry and

High School

Principals.

Texas Gail

Raymond, Judy

Onslow, Trisha

Herminghaus and Joanna

Hubbard.

Student performance on

State Assessments.

Student performance on

State Assessments.

MLP registration rosters, number of science notebooks printed for teachers through KCC and

PD event evaluations.

Increase in language arts performance proficiency on

SBA and HSGQE.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 17 of 17

Summer school will be offered to all elementary students who are below and far below proficient in language arts. A large percentage of total students served will be in the

Low-income, LEP and

Students with Disabilities groups.

Provide continued professional

support to all schools in their second year of implementation of research based literacy instruction. Provide additional support in all schools through the identification of site-based specialists who will receive professional development in the area of literacy. Provide onsite coaching in all Title I schools and in schools in the second year of implementation.

June and July

2010.

Aug. 09 to

May 10.

Est. Cost:

$512,000.

Source: ASD general budget,

Elementary division &

ARRA funds.

Est. Cost:

$252,000..

Source: ASD general budget,

Elementary division.

K-6 teachers who are new to the ASD will receive

professional development to help them understand and teach the adopted reading curriculum with an emphasis on differentiation, to increase in the percent proficient in language arts on the SBAs for all subgroups, particularly subgroups targeted w/in ASD

DIP.

August to

September

2009.

Est. Cost: Sub teachers and instructor

$10,000.

Source: ASD general fund elementary reading support teacher salaries.

Source: ASD general fund elementary.

Linda Carlson,

Dianne Orr and

Glen Nielsen.

Linda Carlson,

Dianne Orr and school principals.

Gates-McGinitie, CR spelling and reading assessments.

Developmental Reading

Assessment and SBA.

Elementary

Reading Support

Teachers.

Training events evidenced on MLP.com, attendance records, and training effectiveness assessed using evaluation forms.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 18 of 18

Provide instructional

interventions and additional targeted language arts

instruction to identified students who are below or not proficient in language arts, in

60 elementary schools.

Aug. 09 to

May 10.

Est. Cost:

$400,000.

Source: ASD general budget,

Elementary division.

Linda Carlson and elementary school principals.

All School Action Plans to include a Parent Involvement

Plan (PIP) to include measurable parental involvement objectives and plans for each SAP goal.

Title VII Indian Education

Program collaboration with

language arts curriculum

coordinator.

Oct. 09 to

May 10.

Meeting three times a month during 09-10 school year.

Est. Cost: None.

Source: SAP/PIP development and implementation is a function of embedded and regular duties and school processes.

Est. Cost: No added cost as per contract within regular duty day teacher/staff salaries.

ASD general fund and Title

VII Indian

Education

Program.

Division

Executive

Directors and school principals.

Doreen Brown,

Supervisor of

Title VII Indian

Education and

ASD Language

Arts Curriculum

Coordinator.

Developmental Reading

Assessment and SBA.

As documented in each

MLP Web-based SAP/PIP with year-end evaluation.

Increase in language arts performance proficiency on

SBA and HSGQE.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 19 of 19

Title VII Indian Education

Evening Program.

Twice a week during the 09-

10 school year.

Title VII Indian Education

Summer School – Grades 1-8.

Session I:

June 14 to

July 9, 2010.

Session I1:

July 12 to

August 12,

2010.

Contract with Consortium on

Reading Excellence (CORE) for consultation and coaching in research based reading curriculum implementation for

13 Title I Schools.

August 2009 through May

2010.

Est. Cost:

$6,000.

Resources:

Classroom materials and culturally relevant curriculum.

Source: Title VII

Indian Education

Program.

Est. Cost:

$200,000.

Resources:

Classroom materials and culturally relevant curriculum.

Source: Title VII

Indian Education

Program.

Estimated Cost:

$358,362.

Source: Title I

Professional

Development

Budget.

Doreen Brown,

Supervisor of

Title VII Indian

Education.

Doreen Brown,

Supervisor of

Title VII Indian

Education.

Dianne Orr,

Linda Carlson and Title I

Principals.

Increase in language arts performance proficiency on

SBA and HSGQE.

Increase in language arts performance proficiency on

SBA.

Increase in the percent of proficiency in Language

Arts on the SBA’s in all subgroups in those 13 Title I

Schools comparing 08-09

AYP results to 09-10 results.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 20 of 20

Continued implementation of

Parent Information Resource

Center (PIRC) program to help implement successful and effective parent involvement policies, programs, and activities that lead to improvements in student academic achievement and strength partnerships among parents, teachers, principals, administrators, and other school personnel in meeting the educational needs of children.

Design and implementation of five new Title I preschools to expand upon the 3 existing

Title I preschools to provide an early intervention model for long-term school success and improvement in student academic achievement.

DIBELS training offered to

Title I schools to provide professional development on assessment and using data to inform instruction.

Ashlock Houghton Mifflin

program specific training offered to Title I schools to provide professional development to support Tier 1 instruction, along with Tier 2 intervention training and technical support.

2007-2011.

August 2009 through May

2012.

August 2009 through May

2010.

August 2009 through May

2010.

Estimated Cost:

$152,664.00 annually.

Source: APIRC

Grant Project

Budget.

Julie Jessel,

Dianne Orr and four Language and Cultural

Liaisons.

Estimated Cost:

$960,000.

Source: Title I

ARRA Funding.

Estimated Cost:

$15,000.

Source: Title I

Professional

Development

Budget.

Estimated Cost:

$350,000.

Source: Title I

ARRA funding.

Dianne Orr.

Linda Carlson,

Title I Principals, and Preschool

Leadership

Team.

IGDIs, PPVT, with longitudinal data acquired through our district assessment system.

Dianne Orr,

Linda Carlson, and Title I

Principals.

Dianne Orr,

Linda Carlson, and Title I

Principals.

Activities evidenced in

PIRC year-end report and any workshop/meeting registration/sign-in forms.

Increase in the percent of proficiency in Language

Arts on the SBA’s in all subgroups in Title I schools comparing 08-09 AYP results to 09-10 results.

Increase in the percent of proficiency in Language

Arts on the SBA’s in all subgroups in Title I schools comparing 08-09 AYP results to 09-10 results.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 21 of 21

Continue the process of a threeyear goal of implementation

of Response To Instruction into Title I Schools. This practice will provide high quality instruction and interventions matched to student need. This will include progress monitoring to ensure effectiveness of instruction.

August 2009 through May

2012.

Estimated Cost:

$65,000 annually.

Source: Title I

ARRA Funding.

Dianne Orr,

Linda Carlson, and Title I

Principals.

Increase in the percent of proficiency in Language

Arts on the SBA’s in all subgroups in Title I schools comparing 08-09 AYP results to 09-10 results.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 22 of 22

DISTRICT IMPROVEMENT PLAN 2009-2010 School Year

Complete one sheet for each goal – expand sections as appropriate

DISTRICT MEASURABLE GOAL (to include specific target):

All student subgroups not meeting the target for AYP in Math will show at least a 10% decrease in the percent of students not proficient in order to meet safe harbor targets. All performance standards will be addressed as required for individual student and subgroup growth.

CURRENT PERFORMANCE LEVEL ON SBAs:

Results from ASD 2008-2009 District-wide AYP Math % proficient.

1. African American – 52.2% proficient in 08-09. The performance target for 09-10 is 56.98 % proficient.

2. Alaska Native and American Indian – 54.9% proficient in 08-09. The performance target for 09-10 is 59.41% proficient.

3. Low Income – 57.4% proficient in 08-09. The performance target for 09-10 is 61.66% proficient.

4. Students with Disabilities – 37.6% proficient in 08-09. The performance target for 09-10 is 43.84% proficient.

5. Limited English Proficient – 57.3% proficient in 08-09. The performance target for 09-10 is 61.57% proficient.

Scientifically based research to support each strategy listed below (reference or brief description):

See attached scientifically based research appendix.

ACTION TO IMPLEMENT

Action, strategies and interventions (include professional development, mentoring, parent involvement- not programs)

TIMELINE

Milestones for current school year

RESOURCES


Materials,


Estimated
costs,
 funding
sources



PERSONS


RESPONSIBLE


PROGRESS
MONITORING
AND
EVALUATION


EVALUATION


(Instrument(s)
used
to
 assess)


EVIDENCE
OF
IMPACT
ON
STUDENT


LEARNING



(Outcomes
–
Review
at
district
only
 per
milestone)


K-6 pacing guides for new

Everyday Math 3 program will be implemented to help teachers teach all the content and GLE’s required for their grade level.

In place and revised annually to reflect the current school calendar.

Est. Cost: 6 Math

Support Teacher salaries + benefits

$527,350.

Source: Title IIA grant and ASD general fund math.

Sandy Schoff and Elementary

Math Support

Teachers.

Increase in the percent proficient in math on the

SBAs for all subgroups, particularly subgroups targeted w/in ASD DIP, when comparing 08-09

AYP results to 09-10 AYP results.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 23 of 23

Assessment Recording

System (ARS) professional

development will be provided to all elementary and middle school math teachers in schools that are below the district SBA mean, and all high school math teachers. Teachers will use student data from ARS to individualize instruction, particularly differentiation for targeted subgroups.

Teachers who are new to multi-age teaching in

Everyday Math will receive

professional development in how to manage the teaching of multiple grade levels of math at the same time, particularly addressing differentiation for targeted subgroups.

Ongoing 09-

10 school year.

Ongoing support and training for elementary teachers in the Everyday

Math curriculum, to include professional development support for teachers and emphasizing differentiation for students, particularly subgroups targeted w/in ASD DIP and

GLE’s identified as needing support based on the mid-year benchmark results.

Cross-district in-service days and ongoing support during the 09-10 school year to be provided onsite through teacherrelease time with math support teachers.

August to

October 2009.

Est. Cost:

Addenda

$32,312.

Math Support

Teacher salaries

Source: Title IIA grant and ASD general fund math.

Est. Cost:

$120,000 for subs for teacher release time.

Source: Title IIA grant and ASD general fund math.

Est. Cost: Sub teachers and instructor cost

$2,800.

Source: Title IIA grant and ASD general fund math.

Sandy Schoff,

A&E staff and

Math Support

Teachers.

Sandy Schoff and Math

Support

Teachers.

Sandy Schoff and Elementary

Math Support teachers.

Increase in the percent proficient in math on the

SBAs for all subgroups, particularly subgroups targeted w/in ASD DIP, when comparing 08-09

AYP results to 09-10 AYP results.

Training and professional development outcomes documented via session sign-in sheets, MyLearning

Plan.com and event evaluations.

Increase in the percent proficient in math on the

SBAs for all subgroups, particularly subgroups targeted w/in ASD DIP, when comparing 08-09

AYP results to 09-10 AYP results.

Training events evidenced in MLP.com, attendance records and training effectiveness assessed using evaluation forms.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 24 of 24

K-6 teachers who are new to the ASD will receive

professional development to help them understand and teach the adopted math curriculum with an emphasis on differentiation, to increase in the percent proficient in math on the SBAs for all subgroups, particularly subgroups targeted w/in ASD DIP.

August to

September

2009.

Elementary SPED teachers will receive professional

development in the use of the

Everyday Math curriculum, and meeting the needs of

Special Ed students using the components within the curriculum.

Elementary English

Language Learner (ELL) teachers and aides will receive professional

development in the use of the

Everyday Math curriculum, and meeting the needs of ELL students using the components within the curriculum.

Ongoing

2009-10.

Ongoing

2009-10.

Est. Cost: Sub teachers and instructor

$10,000.

Source: ASD general fund elementary math support teacher salaries.

Source: Title IIA grant and ASD general fund math.

Elementary

SPED and Math support teacher salaries.

Source: Title IIA grant and ASD general fund math and SPED fund.

Up to 90 ELL tutors and elementary math support teacher salaries.

Source: Title IIA grant and ASD general fund math and ELL fund.

Sandy Schoff and Elementary

Math Support

Teachers.

Sandy Schoff and Elementary

Math Support teachers.

Sandy Schoff and Elementary

Math Support teachers.

Training events evidenced on MLP.com, attendance records, and training effectiveness assessed using evaluation forms.

Increase in the percent proficient in math on the

SBAs for all subgroups, particularly subgroups targeted w/in ASD DIP, when comparing 08-09

AYP results to 09-10 AYP results.

Increase in the percent proficient in math on the

SBAs for all subgroups, particularly subgroups targeted w/in ASD DIP, when comparing 08-09

AYP results to 09-10 AYP results.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 25 of 25

Benchmark tests aligned to

the AK standards will be given to 1 st

through 6 th

grade students to monitor student progress toward the SBA tests given in April, 2010. Scores will be posted on the ARS and will provide information for differentiation and guiding instruction. Additional support will then be provided for students and concepts that need additional support.

Year-end assessments aligned

to ASD math standards developed from within the elementary math curriculum will be given to kindergarten through 6 th

grade students, to monitor student progress toward the grade level goals.

The scores will be posted on the ARS and will provide information for differentiation and to guide instruction for subsequent teachers.

December

2009.

May 2010.

Professional development for middle school math teachers

and SPED staff on best practices and vertical teaming including support for targeted subgroups.

Ongoing 09-

10 school year.

Elementary math support teacher salaries.

Source: Title IIA grant and ASD general fund math.

Elementary math support teacher salaries.

Source: Title IIA grant and ASD general fund math.

Sandy Schoff and Elementary

Math Support teachers.

Sandy Schoff and Elementary

Math Support

Teachers.

Increase in the percent proficient in math on the

SBAs for all subgroups, particularly subgroups targeted w/in ASD DIP, when comparing 08-09

AYP results to 09-10 AYP results.

Increase in the percent proficient in math on the

SBAs for all subgroups, particularly subgroups targeted w/in ASD DIP, when comparing 08-09

AYP results to 09-10 AYP results.

Elementary math support teacher salaries.

Source: Title IIA grant and ASD general fund math .

Ruth Mount,

Jessica Graziano, middle school math teachers and SPED staff.

Increase in the percent proficient in math on the

SBAs for all middle school

6-8 graders, particularly the subgroups targeted w/in

ASD DIP when comparing

08-09 AYP results to 09-10

AYP results.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 26 of 26

Mid-year benchmark assessments will be implemented in three middle

schools to monitor student progress toward the grade level goals. The scores will provide information for differentiation and to guide instruction.

Ongoing 09-

10 school year.

Implement curriculum materials for middle school

math support class including support for the targeted DIP subgroups.

Ongoing 09-

10 school year.

Professional development for

HS teachers using Carnegie

Bridge-to-Algebra and Algebra to implement curriculum aligned to GLEs and HSGQE.

Ongoing 09-

10 school year.

Support the use of Carnegie

Bridge-to-Algebra in HSGQE prep elective classes.

Ongoing 09-

10 school year.

Middle school math support teacher salaries.

Source: Title IIA grant and ASD general fund math.

Ruth Mount,

Jessica Graziano, middle school math teachers.

Increase in the percent proficient in math on the

SBAs for all subgroups, particularly subgroups targeted w/in ASD DIP, when comparing 08-09

AYP results to 09-10 AYP results.

Est. Cost:

$22,400 in addenda .

Elementary math support teacher salaries.

Source: Title IIA grant and ASD general fund math.

Est. Cost: Sub teachers, addenda and software

$48,000.

Source: ASD general fund math.

Est. Cost: addenda, software and materials.

Source: ASD general fund math.

Ruth Mount,

Jessica Graziano and middle school math teachers .

Sandy Schoff,

Denise Trujillo,

Jan Thompson and high school math teachers.

Sandy Schoff,

Denise Trujillo,

Jan Thompson, and high school math teachers.

Increase in the percent proficient in math on the

SBAs for all middle school

6-8 graders, particularly comparing the subgroups targeted w/in ASD DIP when comparing 08-09

AYP results to 09-10 AYP results.

Increase in the percent proficient in math on the

SBAs for 9

10 th th

and graders, particularly comparing the subgroups targeted w/in ASD DIP when comparing 08-09

AYP results to 09-10 AYP results.

Decrease the number of 11-

12 grade students who must retake the math HSGQE, particularly comparing the subgroups targeted w/in

ASD DIP, when comparing

08-09 AYP results to 09-10

AYP results.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 27 of 27

Develop curriculum guide for

Algebra support for high school students who struggle in

Algebra because they have holes and gaps that inhibit their ability for success in Algebra.

Ongoing 09-

10 school year.

Est. Cost: Sub teachers and addenda

$6,000.

Source: ASD general fund math.

Sandy Schoff, selected high school math teachers.

Professional development for high school Algebra I, Algebra

A/B and Geometry teachers on newly adopted math curriculum.

Cross district

In-service:

8/14/09 and ongoing 09-10 school year.

Est. Cost: new materials, subs, addenda and math coordinator

$6000.

Source: ASD general fund math.

Sandy Schoff.

Curriculum guide for

Algebra Support class will be completed.

When the course is implemented, it should help decrease the failure rate in

Algebra I and Algebra A/B courses and increase in the percent proficient in math on the SBAs for 9 th

and 10 th graders, particularly comparing the subgroups targeted w/in ASD DIP when comparing 08-09

AYP results to 09-10 AYP results.

Increase in the percent proficient in math on the

SBAs for 9 th

and 10 th graders, particularly comparing the subgroups targeted within ASD DIP when comparing 09-09

AYP results to 09-10 AYP results.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 28 of 28

Continued implementation of

Transmath and Algebra

Rescue will be supported in middle and high school SPED self-contained math classes.

These classes have been provided additional supplemental materials and manipulatives to enhance the courses. Also, Carnegie

Math, and other online supplementals are being used for additional intervention supports for students. IEPs,

with parent input, will be written to support specific math standards.

Fall 2009 –

Spring 2010.

$40,000 for consumables, textbooks, supplementals and manipulatives.

Funding will come from ASD general budget

SPED division and grant funds.

Jerry Sjolander and Cindy

Anderson.

Training and implementation

of general education algebra program for self-contained and collaborative classes. The new math materials provide for accommodation and modification for struggling students to be able to meet the graduation requirement of passing algebra.

Fall 2009 –

Spring 2010.

Current cost is

$0 as general education has provided the training and materials for implementation.

Additional purchases will be made once data has been taken to show success of the implementation of the program for SPED students.

Jerry Sjolander and Cindy

Anderson.

Increase in math performance proficiency on

SBA and HSGQE.

Increase in math performance proficiency on

SBA and HSGQE.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 29 of 29

Continued professional development for SPED in

math (Transition Math) will be provided to improve student math performance. Math

teachers will also participate in Carnegie Math, Larson

Math and other online

supplemental trainings. New teachers will also be provided a

SPED teacher consultant

mentor to assist in instruction and support.

Fall 2009 –

Spring 2010.

$5,000 for national trainer to provide both new and refresher courses for SPED teachers from

ASD general fund SPED budget.

Jerry Sjolander and Cindy

Anderson.

Attendance sheets signed by teacher showing that they have attended training.

Increase in math performance proficiency on

SBA and HSGQE.

Content area training for

ELL program staff in math content area.

Aug. 2009 to

May 2010.

SIOP training at Williwaw,

Russian Jack and Tyson. Minilessons at Central, Lake Hood and Chinook. Credit courses also offered.

Ongoing during 09-

2010 school year.

Achieve 3000, a web-based literacy tool for differentiating instruction, will be used at the

Newcomers’ Center for grades

7-12 and with parent classes.

Ongoing during 2009-

2010 school year.

Est. Cost: No added cost as per contract within regular duty day teacher/staff salaries.

ASD general fund.

Est. Cost: No added cost as per contract within regular duty day teacher/staff salaries.

ASD general fund.

Est. Cost: general fund pays for salary of teachers and specialists.

$3,000 for license from

Stimulus Funds.

Specialists from math content area.

ELLP content specialists and supervisor.

ELLP specialist manages the database for

NCC student,

ESL classroom teachers implement in the classroom.

Increase in math performance proficiency on

SBA.

Results on the Annual

English Language

Proficiency Assessment for

Spring 2010.

Increase in math performance proficiency on

SBA.

Results on the Annual

English Language

Proficiency Assessment for

Spring 2010.

Increase in math performance proficiency on

SBA.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 30 of 30

Reading Strategies Training

will be provided to all ELL program certificated staff to improve reading across the content areas and, in the case of math, to improve math problem solving (e.g. story/word problems and the reading of instructions.)

Training will be provided to all ELL program certificated staff in the

2009-2010 school year.

One day w/ outside trainer for elementary and secondary.

$5,800 for presenter and

$6,000 in sub days.

Source: Title III program budget.

Aspire training all new ELLP classified. (See SBR appendix for details related to Aspire.)

Parent classes to include

PASSport to Success Strategies at various locations including

Newcomers’ Center, Mt View,

East and, possibly, Clark.

Prescriptive remediation in math for struggling high school students offered during the school day via math software programs such as Larson

Math.

09-10 school year ongoing.

October 2009-

May 2010.

Ongoing during 09-10 school year.

Outside trainer and then ongoing training and support from

ELL staff.

Est. Cost: No added cost as per contract within regular duty day teacher/staff salaries.

ASD general fund.

Addendum for teachers to teach the parent classes

$2400 per eightweek session.

Title III program budget and

Immigrant Grant.

Est. Cost:

$50,000.

Source: High

School Division remediation budget.

ELLP staff trainers.

ELLP staff.

Mike Henry and

High School

Principals.

Results on the Annual

English Language

Proficiency Assessment for

Spring 2010.

Increase in math performance proficiency on

SBA.

Results on the Annual

English Language

Proficiency Assessment for

Spring 2010.

Increase in math performance proficiency on

SBA.

Results on the Annual

English Language

Proficiency Assessment for

Spring 2010.

Increase in math performance proficiency on

SBA.

Student performance on

Statewide Assessments.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 31 of 31

Prescriptive remediation in math for struggling high school students offered during after school programs and in summer school via math software programs such as

APEX Learning.

Ongoing during 09-10 school year.

All School Action Plans to include a Parent Involvement

Plan (PIP) to include measurable parental involvement objectives and plans for each SAP goal.

Oct. 09 to

May 10.

Provide instructional interventions and additional

targeted math instruction to identified students who are below or not proficient in math, in 60 elementary schools.

Summer school will be offered to all elementary students who are below and far below proficient in math. A large percentage of total students served will be in the Lowincome, LEP and Students with

Disabilities groups.

Aug. 09 to

May 10.

June and July

2010.

Est. Cost:

$400,000.

Source: ASD budget.

Est. Cost:

$512,000.

Source: ASD budget.

Est. Cost:

$150,000.

Source: High

School Division remediation budget.

Mike Henry and

High School

Principals.

Est. Cost: None.

Source: SAP/PIP development and implementation is a function of embedded and regular duties and school processes.

Division

Executive

Directors and school principals.

Linda Carlson and elementary school principals.

Linda Carlson,

Dianne Orr and

Glen Nielsen.

Student performance on

Statewide Assessments.

As documented in each

MLP Web-based SAP/PIP with year-end evaluation.

Criterion-referenced math assessments, SBA.

Criterion-referenced math assessment aligned to summer school curriculum

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 32 of 32

Parent involvement in math will be promoted in parent workshops offered throughout elementary summer school.

Title VII Indian Education

Program collaboration with mathematics curriculum

coordinator.

Title VII Indian Education

Evening Program.

June and July

2010.

Est. Cost:

$2,500.

Source: ASD budget.

Linda Carlson and Mary

Murphy.

Meeting three times a month during 09-10 school year.

Twice a week during the 09-

10 school year.

Est. Cost: No added cost as per contract within regular duty day teacher/staff salaries.

ASD general fund and Title

VII Indian

Education

Program.

Est. Cost:

$6,000.

Resources:

Classroom materials and culturally relevant curriculum.

Source: Title VII

Indian Education

Program.

Doreen Brown,

Supervisor of

Title VII Indian

Education and

ASD

Mathematics

Curriculum

Coordinator.

Doreen Brown,

Supervisor of

Title VII Indian

Education.

Parent participant survey.

Increase in math performance proficiency on

SBA and HSGQE.

Increase in math performance proficiency on

SBA and HSGQE.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 33 of 33

Title VII Indian Education

Summer School – Grades 1-8.

Session I:

June 14 to

July 9, 2010.

Session I1:

July 12 to

August 12,

2010.

Piloting SuccessMaker as a computer-assisted Tier 2 math intervention that aligns with

ASD math curriculum in 11

Title I schools in the 6 th

grade.

October 2009 through

May 2010.

Est. Cost:

$200,000.

Resources:

Classroom materials and culturally relevant curriculum.

Source: Title VII

Indian Education

Program.

Estimated Cost:

None implementation as per regular teacher/staff contracted duties within ASD and

Title I-A salaries

Doreen Brown,

Supervisor of

Title VII Indian

Education.

Increase in math performance proficiency on

SBA.

Dianne Orr, Ruth

Mount and Mary

Wegner.

Increase in the percent proficient in math on the

SBA’s for all subgroups from 08-09 school year to the 09-10 school year in the

11 Title I Schools.

Continued implementation of

Parent Information Resource

Center (PIRC) program to help implement successful and effective parent involvement policies, programs, and activities that lead to improvements in student academic achievement and strength partnerships among parents, teachers, principals, administrators, and other school personnel in meeting the educational needs of children.

2007-2011.

Estimated Cost:

$152,664.00 annually.

Source: APIRC

Grant Project

Budget.

Julie Jessel,

Dianne Orr and four Language and Cultural

Liaisons.

Activities evidenced in

PIRC year-end report and any workshop/meeting registration/sign-in forms.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 34 of 34

Design and implementation of five new Title I preschools to expand upon the 3 existing

Title I preschools to provide an early intervention model for long-term school success and improvement in student academic achievement.

Continue the process of a threeyear goal of implementation

of Response To Instruction into Title I Schools. This practice will provide high quality instruction and interventions matched to student need. This will include progress monitoring to ensure effectiveness of instruction.

August 2009 through May

2012.

August 2009 through May

2012.

Summer School Extended

Year

Middle School will offer remediation classes in math.

Estimated Cost:

$960,000.

Source: Title I

ARRA Funding.

Estimated Cost:

$65,000 annually.

Source: Title I

ARRA Funding.

Summer school will be offered for six weeks after the end of the academic year.

$323,731 summer school teachers.

Source: ARRA

SPED Title VI-

B.

Dianne Orr.

Linda Carlson,

Title I Principals, and Preschool

Leadership

Team.

IGDIs, PPVT, with longitudinal data acquired through our district assessment system.

Dianne Orr,

Linda Carlson, and Title I

Principals.

Leslie

Vandergaw,

Martina Henke and

Ruth Mount.

Increase in the percent of proficiency in Language

Arts on the SBA’s in all subgroups in Title I schools comparing 08-09 AYP results to 09-10 results.

Mathematics Navigation

Screener.

Post-test scores on math assessments will increase in comparison to the pre-tests.

Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet

Page 35 of 35

Bartlett High

About Our Students

Membership

Capacity

Attendance Rate

Transiency Rate

Economically Disadvantaged

Average Weekly Volunteer Hours

Graduation Rate

Dropout Rate - EED’s Regulation Calculation

AP Courses Offered

Students Successfully Completing AP Courses

AP Courses Completed by Students

Students Taking the Alternate Assessment

Number of Students Approved for HSGQE

Alternative Assessment (Gr. 11-12)

Number of Students Meeting HSGQE Requirement

Using an Alternative Assessment (Gr. 11-12)

Change in Enrollment

Bartlett High School Characteristics

School

1,702

84.50%

87.45%

32.21%

40.66%

10

63.76%

7.17%

10

118

175

13

District

48,837

N/A 2009-19 ASD Capital Improvement Plan

92.76% NCLB Summer Data Collection

26.05% NCLB Summer Data Collection

35.58% Fall OASIS

5,136

69.40%

3.57%

127

1,472

2,626

266

Fall OASIS

Source of Information

Department of Education Report Card Report

NCLB Summer Data Collection & A&E

Graduation File

NCLB Summer Data Collection & Fall OASIS

SMS Transcript File

SMS Transcript File

SMS Transcript File

SMS

55

39

0.00%

347

191

-0.04%

SMS

SMS

Fall OASIS

Reading

08-09

07-08

06-07

05-06

04-05

Writing

08-09

07-08

06-07

05-06

04-05

Mathematics

08-09

07-08

06-07

05-06

04-05

Bartlett High School HSGQE Grade 10 Results

Proficient Not Proficient

School

90.13%

82.71%

88.8%

District

91.54%

87.31%

91.4%

School

9.87%

17.29%

11.2%

District

8.46%

12.69%

8.6%

69.8%

62.2%

76.09%

73.66%

77.0%

76.4%

72.5%

80.15%

78.96%

82.5%

30.2%

37.8%

23.91%

26.34%

23.0%

23.6%

27.5%

19.85%

21.04%

17.5%

88.8%

79.3%

76.76%

72.92%

73.2%

74.9%

67.0%

90.8%

85.6%

82.44%

80.60%

82.3%

79.9%

76.3%

11.2%

20.7%

23.24%

27.08%

26.8%

25.1%

33.0%

9.2%

14.4%

17.56%

19.40%

17.7%

20.1%

14.4%

HSGQE: In addition to meeting local school district requirements, Alaska students must pass the state’s

High School Graduation Qualifying Examination to earn a diploma. To pass, students must be rated as at least proficient in all three sections of the exam: reading, writing, math. Students take the HSGQE for the first time in the spring of 10th grade. Sections not passed can be retaken once a semester during 11th and

12th grade until passed.

The double bold line indicates two changes to the passing scores, often called “cut scores,” approved by the State Board of Education & Early

Development for the Alaska High School Graduation Qualifying Examination in July 2006.

Bartlett High School HSGQE Cumulative Proficiency for Grade 11 & 12 Students

Reading

Writing

Mathematics

Grade 11

Number Tested

350

350

350

Percent

94.57%

88.86%

90.86%

Grade 12

Number Tested

324

324

324

Percent

93.52%

92.59%

92.90%

Anchorage School District 5530 E. Northern Lights Blvd. Anchorage,

Permit No. 161 Anchorage,

Anchorage School District

2008-2009

School Report Card for

Bartlett High School

Bartlett is one of eight comprehensive high schools in the Anchorage School

District. Bartlett is located near Elmendorf Air Force

Base and draws students from Elmendorf and Fort

Richardson Army Post, as

Principal

Dan Gallego well as the Muldoon community. The staff at BHS is committed to meeting the individual needs of our diverse student population. These needs are met through varied instructional methods, extracurricular activities and support services.

The students at Bartlett have an opportunity to achieve their highest potential and develop a strong sense of community. Aware of the rapid pace of change, our school community provides students with the tools to function responsibly. We supply each student with the skills to be lifelong learners. Bartlett

High School is dedicated to excellence.

1101 N. Muldoon Road

Elmendorf AFB, Alaska 99504 phone: 907-742-1800 fax: 907-742-1825 www.asdk12.org

School Goals

Goal Level of Attainment

The number of 10th grade students rated proficient on the state language arts and math assessments will increase from 72.3 to 75.07 percent and from 55.2 to 63 percent respectively after the 2009 High School Graduation

Qualifying Exam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Attained

The number of students in grades 9-10 failing one or more classes will decrease from

46 percent in the first quarter to 30 percent after the first semester, and 20 percent by the third quarter . . . . . . . . . . . . . Not Attained

Bartlett will advance to the Level 2 on the Culturally Responsive Education Continuum in the domain of Attitudes. . . . . . . . . Partially Attained

Our school helps students succeed through quality staff, parent involvement and community partnerships.

Parent Involvement

Parents play a crucial role in establishing school goals and making sure their children do well in school. Principals are required to share their school achievement data with parents and they actively seek parents’ suggestions, comments and participation in setting annual school goals.

For schools that did not make Adequate Yearly

Progress, principals will also work with parents and staff to develop detailed school improvement plans. Contact your school’s principal for information on how parents can become involved in these activities.

School Business Partners

the children’s lunchbox, Bean’s Café

PACE

Anchorage Society of Human Resource Management

Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Alaska

Community Volunteers

Parents and other community members volunteer an average of 10 hours per week in the school.

Adequate Yearly Progress

According to the No Child Left Behind Act,

ASD as a whole is in its fourth year of Level

4 corrective status. In 2008-2009, the African-

American, Alaska Native and American Indian,

Low Income, Disabled, and Limited English

Proficient student subgroups did not meet AYP in both language arts and math performance.

The Asian and Hispanic sub-groups did not meet

AYP in language arts only. Parents are invited to participate in the development of a district improvement plan that addresses the achievement of all students.

Alaska Standards Based Assessment

The Alaska Standards Based Assessments

(SBAs) are statewide tests designed to provide information about what students know and are able to do in reading, writing, mathematics and science. They estimate the degree to which students have mastered the Academic Performance Standards as outlined in the Grade Level

Expectations. These assessments are written specifically for Alaska and are the foundation of the Alaska school-accountability system. Charts comparing two years’ results are at right.

Teacher Quality Information (2008-2009)

# of teachers

% fully licensed

% with advanced degrees

#

Nationally

Board

Certified

1

% of classes taught by “highly qualified teachers”

Bartlett

High

School

District

Totals

94

3437

100%

100%

60%

44% 43

95%

90%

All

Students

AF. AM.

AKNA/AI

Asian/NH/

OPI

White

Hispanic

ME

EDS

SWD

LEP

Does Not Meet AYP

Level 5 (Third Year)

Group

(A)

Number

Enrolled

893

94

75

172

323

83

146

411

127

189

Participation Rate

(B)

Number

Tested

875

92

73

171

317

82

140

401

123

187

Participation

Rate (%)

98%

97.9%

97.3%

99.4%

98.1%

98.8%

95.9%

97.6%

96.9%

98.9%

(C)

Participation

Rate Met

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Bartlett High School

2008-09 Adequate Yearly Progress

Status Report

"FAY"

(D)

Tested &

Enrolled

“FAY”

771

83

58

134

299

74

123

337

105

145

Language Arts Performance

(E)

Proficient on LA

(F)

Percent

Proficient on LA

(G)

LA

Target

(H)

Met AMO for LA

568 73.7% 73.7% Yes

249

50

96

206

36

74

67

28

78

80.7%

48.3%

58.2%

83.3%

67.6%

78%

61.1%

34.3%

51%

66.4%

64.3%

68.7%

71.5%

65.8%

68.4%

71.9%

67.6%

69.1%

Yes

No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Yes-SH

(I)

Proficient on

Mathematics

AMO For Language Arts:

AMO For Mathematics:

Mathematics Performance

(J)

Percent

Proficient in

Mathematics

(K)

Mathematics

Target

77.18%

66.09%

(L)

Met AMO for

Mathematics

437 56.7% 62.1% No

45

21

71

198

38

64

157

24

67

54.2%

36.2%

53%

66.2%

51.4%

52%

46.6%

22.9%

46.2%

54%

51.6%

56.6%

59.7%

53.3%

56.1%

60.1%

55.3%

56.9%

Yes

No

Yes-SH

Yes

Yes-SH

No

No

No

Yes-SH

Graduation Rate: Met

N/A is used to indicate:

(1) Subgroups with 20 or fewer students enrolled on the first day of testing shall not be included in participation rate calculation.

(2) Subgroups with 25 or fewer students enrolled for the "full academic year" shall not have the performance score computed.

63.8% (Threshold is 55.58%)

* For the groups where the number enrolled is less than or equal to 40, participation is met when no more than two miss the test. Groups can also meet this target using the average of the past two or three years.

** When a group achieves a “Yes” without meeting the listed target, it has done so using either the 99% confidence interval or Safe Harbor.

*** The results cannot be published without releasing personally identifiable information based upon the EED reporting protocol.

This document was prepared by the ASD Assessment and Evaluation Department. 6/25/2009

Anchorage School District Improvement Planning

Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula

ASD INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES AND CURRICULA

Accelerated Math ............................................................................................................................ 3 


Achieve3000™ ............................................................................................................................... 3 


AIMSweb........................................................................................................................................ 3

Algebra 1 Rescue!........................................................................................................................... 4 


Apex................................................................................................................................................ 4 


Ashlock ........................................................................................................................................... 5

Aspire.............................................................................................................................................. 5 


Bridge to Algebra............................................................................................................................ 6 


Bridges to Literature ....................................................................................................................... 6

Carnegie Math................................................................................................................................ 7

Carousel of IDEAS ......................................................................................................................... 7 


Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach (CALLA)...................................................... 8 


Cognitive Tutor Algebra ................................................................................................................. 8

Conscious Discipline® ................................................................................................................... 8 


Consortium on Reading Excellence (CORE) ................................................................................. 9 


Corrective Math .............................................................................................................................. 9

Corrective Reading ......................................................................................................................... 9 


Do The Math ................................................................................................................................. 10 


Early Intervention in Reading (EIR®).......................................................................................... 10

English in a Flash.......................................................................................................................... 10

English Language Learning Instruction System (ELLIS) ............................................................ 11 


Exemplars Math ............................................................................................................................ 11 


Extended Learning Opportunities ................................................................................................. 12

Everyday Mathematics.................................................................................................................. 13 


Fast ForWord ................................................................................................................................ 13 


First Steps in Mathematics............................................................................................................ 13

Handwriting Without Tears® (HWT) .......................................................................................... 13 


Harcourt Brace .............................................................................................................................. 14 


Houghton Mifflin Reading............................................................................................................ 14

Instructional Technology .............................................................................................................. 14 


Jamestown Reading Fluency Program.......................................................................................... 15 


Kagan Cooperative Learning ........................................................................................................ 15

LANGUAGE! ............................................................................................................................... 15

Larson Math .................................................................................................................................. 16 


Lexia Reading ............................................................................................................................... 16 


Lindamood-Bell Learning Processes ............................................................................................ 16

Love and Logic ............................................................................................................................. 16 


Mathematics Navigator................................................................................................................. 17 


MathScape..................................................................................................................................... 17

MY Access!® ............................................................................................................................... 18 


Number Worlds............................................................................................................................. 18 


Parental Involvement .................................................................................................................... 19

PASSport to Success..................................................................................................................... 19

Phonics for Reading...................................................................................................................... 19 


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Anchorage School District Improvement Planning

Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula

Read 180 ....................................................................................................................................... 19 


Read Naturally .............................................................................................................................. 20

Reading Advantage....................................................................................................................... 20 


Reading Mastery ........................................................................................................................... 21 


Response to Intervention (RTI) .................................................................................................... 21 


Rewards and Rewards Plus........................................................................................................... 21

Road to the Code........................................................................................................................... 22 


Saxon Math ................................................................................................................................... 22 


Science Notebooks (Inquiry-Based) ............................................................................................. 23

Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol – SIOP ..................................................................... 23 


Six-Minute Solution...................................................................................................................... 23 


Six Traits Writing ......................................................................................................................... 24

Skills Alaska ................................................................................................................................. 24 


Small Group Intervention / Remediation Instruction.................................................................... 25 


STELLAR/Strategies for Building Academic Language ............................................................. 25

Step Up to Writing ........................................................................................................................ 26

Strategic Instruction Model (SIM)................................................................................................ 27 


Success for All Reading Programs ............................................................................................... 27 


SuccessMaker ............................................................................................................................... 27

TouchMath.................................................................................................................................... 28 


TransMath ..................................................................................................................................... 28 


Treasure Chest .............................................................................................................................. 29

Waterford ...................................................................................................................................... 29 


WhyTry ......................................................................................................................................... 29 


Write Source ................................................................................................................................. 30

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Anchorage School District Improvement Planning

Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula

Accelerated Math

Accelerated Math, published by Renaissance Learning, is a software tool used to customize assignments and monitor progress in math for students in grades 1–12. The Accelerated Math software creates individualized assignments aligned with state standards and national guidelines, scores student work, and generates reports on student progress. The software can be used in conjunction with the existing math curriculum to add practice components and potentially aid teachers in differentiating instruction through the program’s progress-monitoring data. Studies in this review assess the effectiveness of Accelerated Math as part of a school’s core math curriculum.

Renaissance Learning products and best classroom practices are supported by a body of evidence.

Eighty percent of the research on our products has been conducted independently or externally by university researchers, research firms, or school personnel. Study designs include experimental and quasi-experimental as well as correlational, case study, and psychometric (reliability and validity) research. Many have been published in peer review journals, and thus upheld to the highest scrutiny.

As of September 2007, 66 research studies and reviews support the effectiveness of Accelerated

Math.

Achieve3000™

Achieve3000™ solutions are designed and built upon decades of scientific research into how children learn to read, including studies from the National Writing Commission, the National Reading Panel,

Carol Anne Tomlinson and more. In addition, they utilize accepted and proven benchmarks for assessment and instruction - from the Lexile Framework to the principles of Bloom's Taxonomy.

Achieve3000 also understands that any effective solution to improve student performance must also motivate students. That's why Achieve3000 solutions are designed to develop an intrinsic interest in literacy and a true love of learning.

Achieve3000™ solutions utilize a five-step pedagogy that is designed to improve students' reading comprehension, vocabulary development, reading fluency and writing skills. Equally important, our solutions are designed to motivate students and encourage use, as well to develop an intrinsic interest in literacy and learning. Achieve3000™ Differentiated Instruction Solutions are scientifically proven to accelerate results in language arts instruction in the form of Lexile

gains and dramatically increased scores on end-of-the-year standardized reading tests - including the Scholastic Reading

Inventory (SRI), TerraNova and the Iowa Test of Basic Skills tests. In addition, the differentiated instruction component of our solutions is also scientifically proven effective. Importantly, these results have been proven in multiple independent, large-scale scientific evaluations - aligning

Achieve3000 with the criteria stipulated by NCLB for selecting and implementing educational programs.

AIMSweb

AIMSweb is a progress monitoring system based on direct, frequent and continuous student assessment. The results are reported to students, parents, teachers and administrators via a web-based data management and reporting system to determine response to intervention.

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Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula

The AIMSweb system components provide one comprehensive progress monitoring and RTI

Solution. The three components are:

1. Benchmark – Assess all students three times per year for universal screening (early identification), general education progress monitoring, and AYP accountability.

2. Strategic Monitor – Monitor at-risk students monthly and evaluate the effectiveness of instructional changes.

3. Progress Monitor – Write individualized annual goals and monitor more frequently for those who need intensive instructional services.

Scientific research has shown that when teachers use systematic progress monitoring to track their students’ progress they are better able to identify students in need of additional or different form of instruction, they design stronger instructional programs, and their students achieve better. For more information on AIMSweb, go to http://www.aimsweb.com/.

Algebra 1 Rescue!

Algebra 1 Rescue! is a comprehensive intervention resource that:

• is based on mastery of objectives, rather than the traditional classroom lesson approach has numerous lessons per objective to choose from based on students’ needs addresses all modalities: auditory, visual, and kinesthetic, with a variety of lesson activities zeroes in on the conceptual level, then builds on those concepts through practice and problemsolving activities

Algebra 1 Rescue! is a new approach to teaching algebra that is designed for all students. It can be implemented as a supplement to an existing program or as a stand-alone curriculum. It is a powerful tool that has:

1. Concept-driven objectives that are logically and systematically sequenced

2. Numerous whole-class, small-group, and individual practice activities for each objective, including multisensory and hands-on, that allow for plenty of feedback

3. Reflection and problem-solving activities that require students to apply the skills and concepts they have learned

Any components of Algebra 1 Rescue! can easily be used as supplements in other algebra curricula to deepen learning with increased focus, extended practice, and effective problem-solving.

A significant amount of data has been collected regarding the way students best learn algebra. This data validates the instructional strategies utilized in Algebra 1 Rescue! Each of the 60 objectives and

600 activities in the curriculum are grounded in scientific research and aligned with the National

Council for Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standards.

Apex

Apex Essentials Courses offer a streamlined curriculum to meet high school graduation requirements and support remediation, intervention, and credit recovery programs. Essentials Courses provide a

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Anchorage School District Improvement Planning

Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula complete scope and sequence with original instructional content that focuses student attention on mastering critical skills and developing an understanding of key concepts.

Information is presented in small, manageable "chunks" that require students to make decisions as they navigate through it. Strict attention is given to keeping sentence and paragraph length short in accordance with online reading habits and readability principles. Images, sound tracks, short movies, animations, charts, and graphs integrated throughout the text provide alternative representations and address different learning styles. Prompts and interactive exercises give students frequent opportunities to check their understanding and apply what they learn as they progress through a subject. Rollover vocabulary provides important assistance to students who may otherwise be held back in their learning due to their reading level. Manipulables provide hands-on opportunities for students to master difficult concepts. Extensive use of audio and video that is controllable by the student brings learning to life in a way that no text-based curriculum can.

As with the Advanced Placement and Comprehensive Courses, assessment is embedded throughout.

In Essentials Courses, the emphasis is on computer-graded assessments. Diagnostic assessments included for each unit can be used as a pre- or a post-test to gauge a student’s level of knowledge and understanding. Individual study plans generated based on performance on the diagnostics outline a personalized learning path for every student. Computer-graded quizzes integrated throughout the instructional content give students and teachers immediate feedback on an ongoing basis. Students are required to demonstrate what they have learned through computer-graded unit tests and semester exams.

Essentials Courses include optional teacher-graded summative assessments that can be used to evaluate higher-order and critical thinking skills. Essentials Courses in English include multiple teacher-graded writing assignments as well as teacher-graded semester exams that are important components in the evaluation of a student’s writing ability.

Ashlock

Ashlock is a method of teaching that helps teachers make the connection between scientifically-based reading research instruction and their current program adoption. Ashlock uses lesson maps that outline for teachers the pieces of reading instruction that are a priority for inclusion in a core reading block. They also provide additional explicit practice, connected to the core program, using research-based direct instruction templates to support struggling teachers. For more information go to http://www.ashlockconsulting.com/index.html

Aspire

The Aspire curriculum was developed under a Bilingual Education (OBEMLA) Career Ladder

Program grant from the U.S. Department of Education to the University of Central Florida (UCF).

This project had two goals: to improve educational services to students learning English by providing paraprofessional inservice training; and to increase the number of bilingual paraprofessionals working toward a teaching certificate.

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Anchorage School District Improvement Planning

Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula

The Center for Applied Linguistics (CAL) worked closely with UCF to implement the project and was responsible for designing and implementing the paraprofessional inservice training program and disseminating the resulting professional development curriculum.

The University of Central Florida developed the criteria and application process by which paraprofessionals were selected for tuition support and organized a network of community colleges and universities, throughout the six targeted counties, which Aspire paraprofessionals could attend to earn a teaching certificate.

Bridge to Algebra

Bridge to Algebra is the first and only algebra readiness curriculum built on Cognitive Tutor® technology, one of the only true research based math curricula in the country. Bridge to Algebra combines software, text and classroom instruction covering the five middle school content strands identified in the NCTM standards and most state standards (number, geometry, measurement, probability and statistics, algebra) and emphasizes problem solving and mathematical literacy. Bridge to Algebra is also supported by a comprehensive Professional Development Plan.

This blended curriculum of software and text targets students who may need additional preparation for Algebra I. Throughout the materials, explicit connections are made between different representations, such as fractions, decimals, and percents; visual modeling tools enhance the understanding of these representations.

Carnegie Learning's Cognitive Tutors were developed at Carnegie Mellon University as part of a research project by world-renowned cognitive scientists who were testing a theory of how people learn. Our research references demonstrate that the Cognitive Tutors are not only based on solid learning science, but also that our publications have appeared in respected, peer-reviewed professional journals. As a demonstration of how the Cognitive Tutors meet the Scientifically Based

Research (SBR) requirements of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), we have created a one-page document that parallels the federal SBR requirements with the scientific research on the Cognitive

Tutors.

Bridges to Literature

McDougal Littell’s Bridges to Literature program meets the requirements of programs that work established in the No Child Left Behind Act. The program, designed to bridge the gap between grade level and reading ability for struggling readers in grades 6 through 12, was built on sound reading research and research-based instructional strategies demonstrated to be effective. The program components are based on solid research findings from Put Reading First. In addition, the Teacher’s

Edition provides explicit instruction lessons, teacher modeling and scaffolding, and student applications. The Teacher’s Edition pages present direct instruction for each focus skill and include special SkillBuilder Copymasters. The Bridges to Literature Assessment Book provides diagnostic and prescriptive components, including placement, mid-year and end-of-year tests, which help teachers determine each student’s progress. Finally, McDougal Littell correlated its program to nine researchbased instructional strategies that have been proven to have a positive effect on learning and increased student achievement as shown by educational researchers Robert J. Marzano, Debra J. Pickering, and

Jan E. Pollock in Classroom Instruction That Works, Research-Based Strategies for Increasing

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Student Achievement published by the Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development

(ASCD).

Carnegie Math

Carnegie Learning's curricula are based on over 20 years of research into how students think, learn and apply new knowledge in mathematics. The curricula use students' intuitive problem solving abilities as a powerful bridge to more formal and sophisticated mathematical comprehension.

Carnegie Learning's mathematics curricula immerse and engage students in mathematical problem solving. The software component allows students to work at their own pace. The system is built on cognitive models, which represent the knowledge a student might possess about a given subject. The software assesses the prior mathematical knowledge of students on a step-by-step basis and presents curricula tailored to their individual skill levels.

All of the Cognitive Tutor® mathematics curricula from Carnegie Learning are based on extensive scientific research from Carnegie Mellon University, along with field tests in schools throughout the

United States. The Cognitive Tutors are based on the ACT-R theory of learning, memory and performance, which has been validated by hundreds of lab and field studies. The Tutors themselves were developed using a rigorous empirical testing process resulting in over 50 publications validating the effectiveness of cognitive modeling.

Carousel of IDEAS

Carousel of IDEAS is a comprehensive language development program designed for K-5 English learners at all stages of language proficiency: beginning, early intermediate, intermediate, early advanced, and advanced. It emphasizes a focus on authentic communication as well as grammatical accuracy. Students using Carousel of IDEAS program learn to communicate in social settings and develop academic language proficiency. The program integrates listening, speaking, reading, and writing with major content areas and emphasizes fine literature, phonics, and the development of literacy skills.

Carousel of IDEAS is based on solid educational research and effective practices that include:

• Active Learning and Prior Knowledge

• Authentic and Meaningful Communication

• Cooperative Learning Groups

• Family Involvement

• Learning Modalities

• Phonemic Awareness and Phonics Instruction

• Positive Learning Environment

• Text Comprehension

For more information go to http://www.ballard-tighe.com/carouselInservice/default.asp

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Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach (CALLA)

CALLA is an instructional strategy used with students who are learning using a second language. For a description of its implementation, assessment of its success, and further research-based references -- download The Bilingual Research Journal article found online at http://www.ncela.gwu.edu/pubs/nabe/brj/v19/19_34_chamot.pdf (October 2006).

Cognitive Tutor Algebra

Cognitive Tutor Algebra is curriculum built on Cognitive Tutor® technology, one of the only true research based math curricula in the country. It combines software, text and classroom instruction covering the five middle school content strands identified in the NCTM standards and most state standards (number, geometry, measurement, probability and statistics, algebra) and emphasizes problem solving and mathematical literacy. Cognitive Tutor Algebra is also supported by a comprehensive Professional Development Plan.

This blended curriculum of software and text targets students who may need additional preparation for Algebra I. Throughout the materials, explicit connections are made between different representations, such as fractions, decimals, and percents; visual modeling tools enhance the understanding of these representations.

Carnegie Learning's Cognitive Tutors were developed at Carnegie Mellon University as part of a research project by world-renowned cognitive scientists who were testing a theory of how people learn. Our research references demonstrate that the Cognitive Tutors are not only based on solid learning science, but also that our publications have appeared in respected, peer-reviewed professional journals. As a demonstration of how the Cognitive Tutors meet the Scientifically Based

Research (SBR) requirements of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), we have created a one-page document that parallels the federal SBR requirements with the scientific research on the Cognitive

Tutors.

Conscious Discipline®

Conscious Discipline® is an emotional intelligence program developed by Dr. Becky A. Bailey which consists of brain smart strategies for responding instead of reacting to conflict moments. It is through a person’s ability to calmly respond, that everyday conflict moments become the “teachable moments” whereby we can model and teach respect, helpfulness, kindness, honesty and compassion.

Use of the Conscious Discipline ® approach is a specific process which promotes permanent behavioral changes in parents, children, and teens. When they love and interact consciously with their children, change takes place. Children are no longer motivated by external rewards. They develop motivation to change due to their own intrinsic beliefs about self and others. They move away from the traditional “reward and punishment” paradigm which is based on creating fear in the child. Instead, the Conscious Discipline® approach is love-based, which encourages parent and child to balance thinking with emotions. Children begin to create healthy solutions to their own dilemmas

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Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula under the loving guidance of the parent or teacher. In addition, children become more accountable for their own behaviors rather than shifting the blame to others.

Consortium on Reading Excellence (CORE)

CORE follows guidelines established in the National Research Council Report Preventing Reading

Difficulties in Young Children, the National Reading Panel Report, and Put Reading First. The components of good instruction are :

• Phoneme awareness

• Systematic, explicit phonics

• Fluency

• Vocabulary knowledge

• The process of comprehension

• High-frequency word instruction

• Multisyllabic word attack skills

• Spelling instruction

• Book discussions

• Independent, wide reading

The CORE program is also based on the best practices research on effective professional development as described in The New Structure of School Improvement: Inquiring Schools and

Achieving Students. (Joyce, B., E. Calhoun, and D. Hopkins). CORE integrates its research-based approach to reading instruction on the concept of a stool with three legs. All three legs must be firmly in place to support reading instruction that gets results. The three legs are the following:

• Leg 1-ongoing professional development to build research-based knowledge and skills

• Leg 2-support in selecting and implementing effective research-based instructional tools

• Leg 3-establishment of local support systems to build sustainable success.

Corrective Math

Corrective Math provides intensive support for students who have difficulty with mathematics. The series is organized into seven strategic modules that provide teacher-directed instruction on critical skills and concepts which struggling students often fail to grasp. The seven modules are addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, rations, and equations.

Corrective Reading

Corrective Reading (Grossen, McGraw Hill) is designed to help students who have fallen behind in their reading skills and for whom other methods have not been successful. It allows students to use a decoding program, a comprehension program, or both. Corrective Reading includes a point system based on realistic goals to motivate students who often expect to fail.

It is a complete core program that uses:

Tightly sequenced, carefully planned lessons that give struggling students the structure to become skilled, fluent readers and better learners.

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Four levels for decoding plus four levels for comprehension address the varied reading deficits and skill levels found among older students.

A point system based on realistic goals to motivate students who are often expected to fail.

Even non-readers show immediate improvement in word recognition, fluency and comprehension.

Do The Math

Do The Math is a research-based math intervention program designed to support students who are struggling with elementary arithmetic. The program was developed to address the growing national concern regarding mathematics performance in this country. The National Mathematics Advisory

Panel’s Final Report (2008) states that “to prepare students for algebra, the curriculum must simultaneously develop conceptual understanding, computational fluency, and problem-solving skills.” With a focus on Number and Operations—the cornerstone of elementary math education and a critical foundation of algebra—Do The Math supports students in building a strong foundation in computation, number sense, and problem solving. The research foundation paper can be found online at http://teacher.scholastic.com/products/dothemath/pdfs/DTM_Arithmethic_Intervention.pdf.

Early Intervention in Reading (EIR®)

Early Intervention in Reading (EIR) is an Internet-delivered Professional Development program for teachers to help struggling young readers in grades K-4.

EIR is a daily, 20-minute supplemental small group reading program that helps struggling first and second graders learn to read and helps build fluency and comprehension in grade 3 and 4 students who need more reading support. The kindergarten program helps students develop phonemic awareness and emergent literacy skills as they interact with literature.

Research conducted over 11 years has found that across multiple districts, 72% of first graders at risk of reading failure who received the EIR® program were reading independently by the end of first grade (Taylor,2001). In follow-up evaluations, 91% of the students we have followed from grade 1 to grade 2 have been found to be reading on a grade 2 level in May of grade 2. 85% of the children who entered second grade unable to read at mid-first grade level were reading on a second grade level in

May after receiving the second grade EIR® program (Taylor, 1998a). In two follow-up studies, it was found that 92% of the children who were in EIR® in grade 2 were reading on a third grade level in grade 3.Kindergarten children who had EIR® were found to be significantly higher in May in rhyme, phonemic awareness, and word dictation than comparison students (Taylor, 1999, 2001).Children in

EIR® in grades 3 and 4 made significantly larger gains in their reading fluency than average readers in their class, approaching the grade level mean in their district in May (Taylor, 2001).

English in a Flash

English in a Flash helps students learn the sounds, vocabulary, and basic grammar of English very quickly so they can catch up academically with their peers who grew up speaking English.

With English in a Flash, students learn English the same way children learn their native language— from the bottom up. English in a Flash provides the practice and repetition needed to quickly acquire the building blocks of language.

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English in a Flash helps students:

Acquire English language proficiency in as little as half the time of what is typical in language learning classes.

Focus on vocabulary while learning grammatical structures implicitly.

Move quickly from learning English to learning in English.

Maximize exposure to comprehensible input.

Improve listening, speaking, reading, and writing in English.

It is a patented, innovative, research-based approach to dramatically accelerate English-language learning. The English in a Flash approach mirrors how children learn their native language by providing students the practice and repetition needed to quickly acquire a solid foundation of core vocabulary, the English sound system, and basic grammatical structures. It provides educators with timely feedback on student progress to help them personalize instruction and intervene effectively when necessary.

English Language Learning Instruction System (ELLIS)

The document, “Applied Research in ELLIS,” provides the research-based works that, when applied in ELLIS, make the program one of the best in the field. This work represents the fulfillment of curricula requirements in the No Child Left Behind Act. The research is based on more than 100 studies including benchmark studies spanning decades of research as well as some of the most current research in the relevant fields. The information is presented systematically: 1) An explanation of a principle or theory in language acquisition and instruction; 2) A description of how that principle is applied in ELLIS; and 3) A list of some of the significant empirical and meta-research studies supporting that theory or principle. "Applied Research in ELLIS," is available for download at http://www.ellis.com/whyellis/esl_research.htm (October 2006).

Exemplars Math

Exemplars material is based on sound scientific research that underscores the following about student achievement:

1. Students who do demanding work in school perform better than students who are given less demanding work.

Research done by the Chicago School Research Project, supported by the Annenberg Foundation, reports the results of a three-year study of more than 400 classrooms from 19 different Chicago elementary schools. The intellectual demands of more than 2,000 classroom assignments given to

5,000 third, sixth, and eighth grade students in writing and math were analyzed for their level of difficulty, and linked to the learning gains on standardized tests in reading, writing and mathematics.

Three standards were used to determine the level of intellectual challenge for each assignment. They were the extent that the assignment: (1) requires the construction of knowledge through disciplined

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2. Student achievement is strongly related to effective assessment practices in the classroom, including student self and peer assessment.

A study conducted by Paul Black and Dylan William on the effect of classroom assessment practices on student achievement examined 250 articles and chapters on the subject. The study concluded that effective classroom assessment has a major impact on student achievement.

A second study by Black and william summarizes the finding of over 40 articles that share the following characteristics; quantitative evidence of increased learning was collected for both an experimental group and a control group. All of these studies demonstrate innovations that include strengthening the practice of formative assessment produce significant and often substantial learning gains. Black, Paul and Dylan William, Inside the Black Box: Raising Standards Through Classroom

Assessment. Phi Delta Kappan, October 1998.

3. The style of classroom instruction influences student performance.

In 2001 the RAND Corporation published, "Hands-on Science and Student Achievement", a study written by Allen Ruby that examines the relationship between hands-on science and student achievement on both standardized and performance-based tests.

The study used two sources of data, a RAND survey of 1,400 eighth graders and their teachers and the National Educational Longitudinal Survey of 1988 (NELS:88) a national survey of approximately

25,000 students in eighth, 10 th

and 12 th

grades and their teachers. Students in the RAND survey took both standardized and performance tests. NELS:888 students took only multiple-choice science tests.

In both studies, teachers and students reported on the amount of hands-on science they engaged in during science classes and the data show hands-on science is positively related to test scores on both types of tests. The RAND survey showed a strong relationship between doing hands-on science and achievement on both performance tests and multiple-choice tests. NELS:88 results indicate that students in classrooms with hands-on science showed higher levels of achievement. The evidence for the relationship between hands-on science and multiple-choice tests is particularly strong because it is supported by two different surveys using different multiple-choice tests.

Extended Learning Opportunities

Extended learning opportunities (ELOs) include a broad range of programs that provide children with academic enrichment and/or supervised activities beyond the traditional school day and, in some cases, beyond the traditional school year. Research suggests that regular participation in programs that provide academic and social activities contribute positively to children’s academic and social development. A meta-analysis of afterschool programs that focused on personal and social development found that the programs did, in fact, have a positive impact on students’ grades, academic achievement, and self esteem.

Programs that extend the school year can do more than reduce summer learning loss—they can increase academic achievement, especially for children in poverty. However, researchers point out that simply extending the school day or school year has little effect on student learning unless programs make use of effective teaching strategies and curricula designed to engage students.

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Everyday Mathematics

Everyday Mathematics is a research-based curriculum developed by the University of Chicago School

Mathematics Project. For research papers and other print materials, see http://everydaymath.uchicago.edu/educators/references.shtml. This Website includes the following abstract, The Research Basis of the Everyday Mathematics Curriculum by Andrew Isaacs, William

Carroll, and Max Bell (2001).

According to David J. Hoff of Education Week, “Everyday Mathematics, which is used by 3 million

U.S. students in 175,000 classrooms, was deemed to raise students’ test scores by an average of 12 percentile points in a review of four studies reanalyzed by the What Works Clearinghouse at the U.S.

Department of Education. Based on those results, the report said the curriculum has “potentially positive effects,” the second-highest category on its ranking scale.” (September 20, 2006).

Fast ForWord

The Fast ForWord program has an extensive research base. A Controlled Randomized Clinical Trial

(1994-1995) was conducted at Rutgers University in Newark, New Jersey. The clinical results were published in the January 1996 issue of Science, a peer-reviewed journal (Tallal, et. Al., Science. 271:

81-84). The early data showed rapid improvements in language skills with the research prototype of

Fast ForWord Language, including significant gains in oral language comprehension, speech discrimination, grammar and syntax.

A Multi-Site Field Study conducted in 1996 in collaboration with over 60 independent professionals at 35 sites in the United States and Canada proved the results in a “real world” setting. After Fast

ForWord Language participation, children experienced the same dramatic improvements in language as those who participated in the initial trial.

First Steps in Mathematics

First Steps in Mathematics is a research-based program that provides teachers with a robust mathematics background, diagnostic tools to assess student understanding, and learning activities to further students' conceptual growth. A key focus is on developing the ability to make accurate professional judgments and decisions about student learning. Time-tested by educators around the world, STEPS Professional Development’s suite of courses and educational resources are researched and designed with the Education Department of Western Australia and Edith Cowan University in

Perth, Western Australia. To learn more about the research base for First Steps, go online to http://www.stepspd.org/ (October 2006).

Handwriting Without Tears® (HWT)

Handwriting Without Tears® (HWT) is a proven success in making legible and fluent handwriting an easy and automatic skill for all students. HWT uses fun, entertaining, and educationally sound instructional methods to teach handwriting to all students:pre-k through cursive. The well-planned lessons require minimal preparation time.

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According to research, handwriting is an essential skill for both children and adults (Feder &

Majnemer, 2007). Even in the age of technology,handwriting remains the primary tool of communication and knowledge assessment for students in the classroom. Children spend a majority of their day using handwriting skills. In addition, the demands for handwriting increase with age. Studies have estimated that between 10 to 30 percent of elementary school children struggle with handwriting (Karlsdottir & Stephansson, 2002, as cited in Feder & Majnemer, 2007).

Research literature extensively documents the consequences of poor handwriting on academic performance. Graham, Harris and Fink (2000) suggest that children who experience difficulty mastering this skill [handwriting] may avoid writing and decide that they cannot write, leading to arrested writing development. Other experts claim that illegible handwriting has secondary effects on school achievement and self-esteem (Malloy-Miller, Polatajko & Anstett, 1995).

Children with poor handwriting skills will also have difficulty in other academic areas. Recent research implies that handwriting is critical to the production of creative and well-written text

(Graham & Harris, 2005). Handwriting affects both fluency and the quality of the composition. For a detailed report on the research behind HWT go to http://www.hwtears.com/files/HWT%20Research%20Review.pdf.

Harcourt Brace

Harcourt Brace is a research-based, developmental reading/language arts program. Explicit phonics instruction; direct reading instruction; guided reading strategies; phonemic awareness instruction; systematic, intervention strategies; integrated language arts components; and state-of-the-art assessment tools ensure every student successfully learns to read. http://www.harcourt.com/bu_info/harcourt_school.html (September 2006).

Houghton Mifflin Reading

The Houghton-Mifflin and meets the criteria for effective reading instruction as established by the

National Reading Panel Report. In preliminary results of the effectiveness of the Houghton-Mifflin reading program, significantly positive effects were seen on students’ vocabulary development. Third graders in classrooms where Houghton-Mifflin Reading is used as the primary reading curriculum show statistically significant gains on the vocabulary subtest on the ITBS. Compared to the control group of non-HMR users, there is a slightly higher proportion of grades 2 and 3 students in HMR classrooms who improve their vocabulary test scores from below grade level to at or above grade level over the course of one school year. (Executive Summary of the Scientific Research Base and

Program Efficacy, Houghton-Mifflin Company, 2002).

Instructional Technology

The research base for the use of technology in increasing student achievement is strong. In a 2000 study commissioned by the Software and Information Industry Association, Sivin-Kachala and Bialo

(2000) reviewed 311 research studies on the effectiveness of technology on student achievement.

Their findings revealed positive and consistent patterns when students were engaged in technologyrich environments, including significant gains and achievement in all subject areas, increased achievement in preschool through high school for both regular and special needs students, and improved attitudes toward learning and increased self-esteem.

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O'Dwyer, Russell, Bebell, and Tucker-Seeley (2005) found that, while controlling for both prior achievement and socioeconomic status, fourth-grade students who reported greater frequency of technology use at school to edit papers were likely to have higher total English/language arts test scores and higher writing scores on fourth grade test scores on the Massachusetts Comprehensive

Assessment System (MCAS) English/Language Arts test.

Jamestown Reading Fluency Program

Jamestown's Reading Fluency Program, a research-based approach to increasing fluency, can help students become more fluent readers. Students work in pairs and, at comfortable levels, practice reading aloud smoothly, accurately, and expressively. One student reads aloud a narrative fiction or nonfiction passage from the non-consumable Reader. A partner uses the consumable Reader's

Record, marking errors and scoring the oral reading. Repeated readings encourage students to improve their fluency. For more detailed information please go to http://www.glencoe.com/jamestown/reading_rate/reading_fluency.php#info

Kagan Cooperative Learning

Kagan Cooperative Learning is based on a research program conducted by Dr. Spencer Kagan beginning in 1968. Dr. Kagan and his associates discovered that, world-wide, children of all ages in many parts of the world became more cooperative when they were placed in certain types of situations. Dr. Kagan began a research program to apply those findings to classrooms. Dr. Kagan created simple “structures” that allow teachers to guide the interaction of students. Kagan's structures not only lead to greater cooperativeness; they have proven positive results in many areas, including greater academic achievement, improved ethnic relations, enhanced self-esteem, harmonious classroom climate, and the development of social skills and character virtues. Kagan Structures align instruction with how the brain best learns and engage the range of multiple intelligences. Kagan

Structures are now used world-wide in kindergarten classrooms and college lecture halls, in all academic subject areas. Kagan Structures produce revolutionary positive results.

The Kagan Structures are easy to learn and implement, fun for teachers and students, and produce profoundly positive outcomes along a remarkable number of dimensions. Different structures are designed for different outcomes, including enhanced mastery of subject matter, improved thinking skills, teambuilding, classbuilding, development of social character and social skills, communication skills, classroom management, classroom discipline, and development of and engagement of each of the multiple intelligences.

LANGUAGE!

Based in research and proven effective in schools across the country, LANGUAGE! was created for students in grades 3–12 who score at or below the 35th percentile on national norm-referenced reading tests. LANGUAGE! is appropriate for students in general education and also supports the special instructional needs of English language learners (ELL) and Individualized Education Program

(IEP) populations. Through a six-step lesson design, LANGUAGE! teaches students the structure and use of all language systems necessary for successful reading and writing.

• Phonemic Awareness and Phonics

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• Word Recognition and Spelling

• Vocabulary and Morphology

• Grammar and Usage

• Listening and Reading Comprehension

• Speaking and Writing

For documents speaking to the research base of LANGUAGE! Go on line to:

< http://store.cambiumlearning.com/research.aspx> (September 2006).

Larson Math

Larson Math utilizes multimedia software programs developed with the National Council of Teachers in Mathematics Standards as a guide. Larson Math is a program that can be individualized to match a student proficiency level and correlates with Alaska GLE’s and math content standards. http://meridiancg.com/menucontent/menu_correlations/correlations_ak.htm (September 2006).

Lexia Reading

Lexia Reading software supports reading skills development in students at all levels of ability, building skills with explicit practice in phonemic awareness and phonics while promoting gains in fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension.

Since 1984, Lexia has been dedicated to developing software to assess and improve reading acquisition and cognitive development. Many years of rigorous school-based research have shown that using Lexia software results in significant gains in reading skills performance.

Results of scientifically-based research studies prove that Lexia improves reading scores in K – 3 and

Middle Schools. In all cases, students received instruction consistent with the research-based teaching methods identified by the National Reading Panel and the “No Child Left Behind” Act of 2001, which included systematic instruction in phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. The aim of the research was to assess the effectiveness of Lexia reading skills software as a supplement to classroom instruction.

Lindamood-Bell Learning Processes

Lindamood-Bell’s programs have provided effective instruction even in the context of the learning difficulties associated with dyslexia, hyperlexia, and autism. Through Learning Centers, On-site

School Services, and Professional Development workshops, Lindamood-Bell strives to enhance learning for all people, for all ages…for life. Lindamood-Bell’s philosophy is that accurate assessment and relevant instruction enable all individuals to learn to their potential.

Love and Logic

The primary goal of the Love and Logic program is to give parents, educators, and others working with children practical strategies for reducing behavior problems, increasing motivation, and building assets which contribute to life-long responsibility and resiliency.

Research studies

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Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula show evidence that support using Love and Logic techniques. For the research study go to http://www.loveandlogic.com/research.html

.

Mathematics Navigator

Mathematics Navigator is a research based short-term, tier-two intervention program that helps students repair gaps and misconceptions and master concepts, skills, and problem solving that are critical for success in algebra, geometry, and other higher-level courses.

Based on their research, the six main premises for Mathematics Navigator are:

1) Targeted Concepts

2) The Algebraic Structure of Arithmetic

3) Prior Knowledge and Misconceptions

4) The Language-Rich Environment

5) Better Learners of Mathematics

6) Instructional Support

Go to http://www.americaschoice.org/uploads/PDF_Docs/Mathematics_Navigator_Whitepaper.pdf

for more details on the scientific based research.

MathScape

MathScape is a comprehensive, middle grades mathematics program developed with funds from the

National Science Foundation to address the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Principles and Standards for School Mathematics. The Standards aim to promote mathematical literacy, including an ability to explore, conjecture, reason logically and to use a variety of mathematical methods for problem solving. MathScape was designed to support these goals and is based on the premise that mathematics instruction and curriculum materials in the middle grades should:

• be designed to promote learning for all students;

• center on investigations that engage, challenge and inspire students;

• explore rigorous mathematical concepts that will prepare students for continuing study; and

• engage students as active learners of mathematics.

The MathScape curriculum encourages students to learn mathematics by doing mathematics, by using and connecting mathematical ideas, and by actively constructing their own understanding. The curriculum materials help teachers create an inviting, exploratory classroom in which all students gain mathematical power.

MathScape’s development team included individuals with expertise in teaching, educational research, educational software design, cognitive and development psychology, special education, and curriculum development. The materials were extensively field-tested and revised in response to research and other feedback from teachers and students. For more information on the research that was conducted during the development of the curriculum go to http://www2.edc.org/mathscape/phil/research.asp

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MY Access!® is a web-based instructional writing product that provides students enrolled in grade 4 through higher education with the opportunity to develop their writing skills within an electronic portfolio-based environment. Teachers can create a writing assignment from a large pool of over 700 unique prompts covering grades 4 through higher education, including narrative, persuasive, informative, literary, and expository genres. In order to provide an integrated writing instruction tool, the prompts are aligned to major textbook series, are aligned to state standards, and provide crosscurricular writing opportunities in areas such as science, math, and social studies.

MY Access!® provides both a holistic score and analytical scores in the areas of Focus and

Meaning; Content and Development; Organization; Language, Use and Style; and Mechanics and

Conventions.

According to scientific research, students need to have multiple opportunities to practice writing, writing should be cross-curricular, feedback regarding writing performance must be timely, and writing instruction and assessment should incorporate clear learning objectives. MY Access!® accomplishes theses goals. It provides the opportunity for students to write and receive feedback much more frequently than using traditional methods of writing instruction. It offers over 700 unique prompts aligned to major textbook series and state standards, providing cross-curricular writing opportunities in areas such as science, math, and social studies, provides the timely and appropriate feedback needed to increase student writing proficiency, and provides the detailed scoring rubrics as well as commentaries on exemplar papers do that students are aware of what is required to meet each learning objective.

Number Worlds

Number Worlds is an intensive intervention program that focuses on students who are one or more grade levels behind in mathematics.

Number Worlds is the only program that includes a prevention instruction section for students in grades PreK - 1 (Levels A-C). This unique 30 week course of daily instruction improves students' grasp of the world of mathematics so they can move forward with the head start they need.

For students in grades 2-8 (Levels D-J) who are one or more grade levels behind in mathematics, the

Number Worlds intervention program is an invaluable tool. It builds on students' current level of understanding with six 4-week intensive units per grade for faster assimilation back into math class.

Features:

Targeted instruction through discussion activities, computer activities, and paper and pencil activities

Precise assessment for personalized guidance

Research based for proven results

Flexibility for teachers and students in various settings including Resource Room, After School,

Summer School, and Tutoring programs

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Extra practice provided through Building Blocks activities researched and designed by Doug

Clements and Julie Sarama.

Parental Involvement

Parent involvement is a cornerstone in the No Child Left Behind Act. NCLB advocates through policy that when educators, families, and communities work together, schools get better. As a result, students get the high quality education they need to lead productive lives. For more information about parent involvement strategies and their basis in the NCLB Act, go to the U.S. Department of

Education’s http://www.ed.gov/admins/comm/parents/pntinv.html (October 2006).

PASSport to Success

Parents Assuring Students Success (PASS) is a stairway to greater family involvement in a child's education. Its main focus is to draw home and school, parent and child, closer together to create a

"connection" that has proven to lead to increased student performance in the classroom. Developed in an urban school system in Northwest Indiana, this program successfully motivated and involved lowincome families in their children's education. These parents took greater responsibility for their children's learning after discovering how to teach the study skills and values necessary for success in school. Once schooled at home in specific techniques for learning, children should perform at a higher level in the classroom and their test scores, motivation, and self-esteem all should rise.

Phonics for Reading

Phonics for Reading is a research-based program that reflects the findings of the major national documents on beginning reading, including Becoming a Nation of Readers (Anderson et al., 1985),

Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children (Snow et al., 1998), and more recently, the

National Reading Panel report (2000).

This program meets NCLB and Reading First initiatives for phonics and fluency. Research-based series presents new sounds and words, sight and challenge words, sentences, stories, and more in each lesson. The National Reading Panel report’s findings and recommendations support the benefits of phonics instruction. Phonics for Reading is a research-based program that delivers direct instruction in phonics, increases fluency with Second and Third levels, and provides work-recognition and spelling instruction, plus story reading, and independent activities.

Read 180

The Read180 Papalewis (2004) study explored the impact of implementing the Read 180 intervention among 8th grade struggling readers. Over the course of one academic year, 622 8th grade students from a large urban inner city school district received daily instruction from the Read 180 program.

The Read 180 program is a comprehensive reading intervention that includes smaller class sizes, teacher training, software instruction, audio books, as well as individual, class, and small group practice, Standardized reading scores from 537 of the intervention students were compared with

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Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula matched baseline data from the two academic years prior to the intervention. In addition, the standardized reading scores of the intervention group were compared with data from 536 students in a comparison group that did not receive a reading intervention. The comparison group was comprised of students from the same school district that were matched on pre-test scores, gender, ethnicity, and language proficiency. Students in the Read 180 intervention group demonstrated statistically significant reading gains from the baseline to posttest scores on the NCEs Reading and Language Arts tests. The Read 180 intervention group also demonstrated significantly higher gains on both the NCEs

Reading and Language Arts posttests than the comparison group. In contrast to the reading gains demonstrated by the intervention group, the comparison group scored lower on the posttests. Overall, this study suggests that the Read 180 intervention as a whole may be effective for helping struggling middle school readers, but it is not clear how individual program elements, such as the reading software or smaller class sizes are impacting reading achievement. Additionally, given the unique characteristics of the study sample (high percentage of English language learners and ethnic minorities, severe reading difficulties/most were repeating the 8th grade), the findings and implications of the study should be evaluated in context. (Research conducted by Metiri Group).

Read Naturally

Since 1991, Read Naturally has helped thousands of students become better readers using a unique strategy that combines teacher modeling, repeated reading, and assessment and progress monitoring.

Read Naturally's programs provide a safe, structured, motivating learning environment that encourages reading on a regular basis.

Read Naturally’s strategy and industry-leading products support and reinforce the five essential components of reading, as determined by the National Reading Panel: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. . Read Naturally is derived from scientifically-based research and includes instructional content that addresses these five components.

Using stories, audio recordings, posters, videos, stickers, quizzes, puzzles, and graphs, students work with age-appropriate material at their skill level. With a wide range of products, Read Naturally succeeds with readers of all abilities and ages.

Reading Advantage

The No Child Left Behind Act has placed a national spotlight on the critical issue of reading proficiency. Educators across the nation face the challenge of helping their students read at or above grade level by the end of the third grade; however, many students continue to struggle with reading through high school. In fact, according to the National Center for Education Statistics (2003) only

33% of eighth graders and 36% of twelfth graders are reading at or above the proficient level.

Teachers want to help these students improve their reading and writing ability; however, the task is daunting because of a lack of appropriate instructional materials to address the specific issues with which these students struggle.

Reading Advantage, designed by Laura Robb with a team of nationally known university educators and master classroom teachers, can help this adolescent population improve their reading and writing skills. The four kits address the needs of at-risk adolescents who are reading between a middle of first grade and eighth grade reading level. The program focuses on critical areas where students need the most support: comprehension, word study and phonics, vocabulary and fluency building, and

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Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula assessment, and includes enough reading materials to support each student’s progress. For more details on scientific based research, go online to http://www.greatsource.com/store/ProductCatalogController?cmd=LP&nextPage=GreatSource/gsMai nTemplate.jsp?displayMainCell=researchefficacy.jsp

Reading Mastery

Staff development in reading and literacy curriculum and methods follows the recommendations from the National Reading Panel Report, 1999, and incorporates phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency and comprehension instruction which are all necessary to student success in reading. Our school utilizes a research-based core curriculum that is based on these components.

Response to Intervention (RTI)

Response to Intervention (RTI) is a multi-tier approach to the early identification and support of students with learning and behavior needs. The RTI process begins with high-quality instruction and universal screening of all children in the general education classroom. Struggling learners are provided with interventions at increasing levels of intensity to accelerate their rate of learning. These services may be provided by a variety of personnel, including general education teachers, special educators, and specialists. Progress is closely monitored to assess both the learning rate and level of performance of individual students. Educational decisions about the intensity and duration of interventions are based on individual student response to instruction. RTI is designed for use when making decisions in both general education and special education, creating a well-integrated system of instruction and intervention guided by child outcome data. For RTI implementation to work well, the following components are necessary:

• High-quality, scientifically based classroom instruction.

• Ongoing student assessment.

• Tiered instruction.

• Parent involvement.

Rewards and Rewards Plus

In the past, research on the acquisition of decoding skills has concentrated largely on monosyllabic

(single-syllable) word reading. However, a need exists for research about multisyllabic (two or more syllables) word reading and how students accomplish the learning necessary to read these longer words. Beginning with fourth grade material, multisyllabic words account for anywhere from 10% to

80% of the words students read in a passage. Yet, few curriculum materials exist to teach students to read longer words. The development of the REWARDS program and conducting research regarding its effectiveness was initiated to meet these needs.

Various versions of the REWARDS program have been field-tested and used widely with poor readers and students with reading disabilities. Before any formal studies were conducted, data was collected in several field-tests and in at least four pilot studies. Using the grade equivalent (GE) scores of two subtests from the Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests (Word Attack and Word Identification;

Woodcock, 1973), substantial gains in short periods of time were documented. In approximately five weeks, some students gained as little as one year's worth of reading, while other students showed a gain that was equivalent to eight years on the Word Attack subtest. Anita Archer (1981) found in the

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Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula pilot studies that flexible syllabication procedures focusing on vowel sounds (e.g., ai, ea, ou), word parts vowel conversions, and approximate pronunciations, in conjunction with a word building strategy that taught students to break longer words down into smaller recognizable word parts, read part by part, then read the whole word, were effective in teaching low-performing fourth and fifth grade students to read multisyllabic words.

To validate the strong field-test and pilot test results, and confirm that the intervention was responsible for the results, two studies were completed using previous versions of the REWARDS program as the intervention. In the first study, the experimenter tried three different versions of

REWARDS and compared them to a program not specifically designed to teach multisyllabic words.

In the second study, different versions of the REWARDS program were implemented requiring different success levels for different groups (80% versus 90%) and providing different practice modes

(sentence versus whole paragraphs).To learn more about each study for REWARDS and REWARDS

Plus go online to http://store.cambiumlearning.com/Resources/Research/pdf/sw_Research_REWARDS_RB01.pdf

Road to the Code

Road to the Code is a 11-week program for teaching phonemic awareness and letter sound correspondence. Developmentally sequenced, each of the 44 15-20-minute lessons features three activities — Say-It-and-Move-It, Letter Name and Sound Instruction, and Phonological Awareness

Practice — that give students repeated opportunities to practice and enhance their beginning reading and spelling abilities. Road to the Code is backed by more than 10 years of study in kindergarten and first-grade classrooms.

Road to the Code, published in 2000, is built upon research spanning more than ten years and many of the activities adapted for this program are based on previously validated research. Motivated by the fact that students with learning disabilities and other struggling readers often do not receive special instruction before third or fourth grade, the authors of Road to the Code, not wishing to wait until students experienced failure, developed and validated this program for the kindergarten curriculum with the express intent of improving the early reading and spelling skills of young students.

Saxon Math

The No Child Left Behind Act seeks to improve math education by mandating the use of researchbased programs with long-term records of success in instruction and student achievement. For more than 20 years both classroom results and scientific research have shown Saxon MathTM to be effective. Saxon’s approach to teaching mathematics is supported by solid foundational research in cognitive science, and it has been found to be consistently effective for children of varying ability levels and socioeconomic backgrounds.

The foundational research includes studies that were conducted to test the effectiveness of educational practices (such as the use of explicit instruction and continual practice distributed across a level). Foundational studies document proven educational practices that stand the test of time. Program efficacy studies, on the other hand, are conducted to test the effectiveness of a specific program or curriculum.

The tenents of instruction used in Saxon MathTMhave long been shown to be effective. The Saxon pedagogy and its instructional methods are sound, supported by a variety of scientifically based foundational research studies; independent,program efficacy studies; and documented test score

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Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula increases. Saxon Math provides incremental instruction, continual practice, and cumulative assessment—all of which are distributed throughout the school year and across grade levels. This unique approach is highly effective with students of varying ability levels and allows students to gain and retain math skills essential for life-long learning. To learn more about the research behind Saxon

Math, go online to http://saxonpublishers.harcourtachieve.com/HA/correlations/pdf/s%5Csaxon_math_research.pdf

Science Notebooks (Inquiry-Based)

Amaral et al., 2002 and Jorgenson and Vanosdall, 2002 provides evidence suggesting a strong relationship between inquiry-based science instruction and improved achievement not only in science, but also in reading, writing, and mathematics. Klentschy, 2002, shows a strong connection between science and literacy especially when student science notebooks play a majority role. The science notebook links science and literacy when it is used as a form of writing in constructing meaning with science experiences.

Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol – SIOP

Intervention curriculum and methodology (e.g. sheltered instruction, direct instruction) is grounded in research-based practices that promote learning for students with LEP learning profiles. (Center for

Applied Linguistics, 2002).

The Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) Model (Echevarria, Vogt & Short, 2004) was developed to provide teachers with a well-articulated, practical model of sheltered instruction. The

SIOP Model is currently used in most of the 50 states and in hundreds of schools across the U.S. as well as in several other countries. The intent of the model is to facilitate high quality instruction for

ELLs in content area teaching. The model is based on current knowledge and research-based practices for promoting learning with ELLs. Critical features of high quality instruction for ELLs are embedded within the SIOP Model. <http://www.siopinstitute.net/about.shtml> (September 2006).

Six-Minute Solution

Six-Minute Solution,by Sopris West, is a research-based way to increase fluency. In same-level pairs, students do repeated readings of one-minute nonfiction passages as their partners note the number of words read correctly—an effective peer-monitoring and feedback system that keeps students motivated and on task. Six-Minute Solution builds students' reading fluency—essential for text comprehension—and is a valuable complement to any reading curriculum or as an intervention program.

For nearly 30 years, Sopris West has been providing scientifically based curricula to educators working with at-risk students. Sopris West is an industry leader in developmental, design-based research: a systematic but flexible methodology aimed at improving educational practices through design, implementation, analysis, and redesign. This type of inquiry is consistent with their research-based legacy and prepares Sopris West products to meet the requirements detailed in the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. By utilizing this methodology, their products can be developed and refined before they hit the market—to ensure top-quality, field-tested curricula and interventions.

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Six Traits Writing

The traits-based approach to writing instruction is supported by numerous studies. Reference:

Experimental Study on the Impact of the 6+1 Trait® Writing Model on Student Achievement in

Writing, Dr. Michael Kozlow and Peter Bellamy, Paper Presented at the 2005 ASCD Annual

Conference Orlando, Florida, April 3, 2005 @ http://www.nwrel.org/ascd05/traits.pdf (September

2006) for a comprehensive listing.

Skills Alaska

Skills Alaska is a standards driven technology based project designed to help teachers and students raise achievement and exceed the requirements of NCLB. By providing technology tools, educational resources and hands-on support, Skills Alaska allows teachers to better address individual needs and effectively communicate with everyone involved in a child’s education. At the school level, Skills

Alaska is implemented through the use of two internet-based programs: Assessment Center, by The

Princeton Review Company, is a formative assessment tool aligned to our Alaska State Standards; and SkillsTutor, by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, an interactive diagnostic and instructional program designed to meet the needs of individual students. The emphasis in both programs is on reading, writing and math skills for grades 3 through 11. The Educational Leaders Council (ELC), in partnership with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and The Princeton Review, oversee the Skills Alaska project.

The research base for the use of technology in increasing student achievement is strong. In a 2000 study commissioned by the Software and Information Industry Association, Sivin-Kachala and Bialo

(2000) reviewed 311 research studies on the effectiveness of technology on student achievement.

Assessment Center

The Princeton Review is the premier provider of quality formative assessment programs, test preparation and college admissions services. The Assessment Center is a vital component of The

Princeton Review's assessment solution. It allows school administrators and teachers to create, assign and take assessments on or offline; review student standards-based results, group students according to these results and assign additional resources and assessments to track skill mastery. It provides assessments for students in grades 3-11 in reading, writing and math. Teachers are able to assign activities, capture student performance, create diagnostic reports, demonstrate accountability and meet No Child Left Behind requirements.

The program’s emphasis is on formative assessments; a series of low-stakes tests administered at intervals throughout the year. Aligned to state standards, Princeton Review's formative assessments have a predictive validity that shows how students will perform on state tests. The tests can be print or web-based, and offer snapshots of individual students, or group data by class, school or districts.

Using the Assessment Center tools, the district can also create and deliver customized benchmark assessments in reading, writing and math on a district-wide scale. A typical benchmark assessment would include 25 to 30 questions that represent the type of material the state is likely to include on its own high-stakes assessments.

For more information about The Assessment Cent er, visit http://www.princetonreview.com/educators/instructional/assessment.asp

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SkillsTutor

SkillsTutor, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Learning Technology provides quality instructional content to ensure that all learners master core skills and reach high academic standards.

The Skills Tutor program provides a series if individualized, interactive, diagnostic and instructional modules aligned to state standards and grade level expectations. The emphasis is on reading, writing and math for grades 2-11. However, the program also includes instructional modules for secondary science, information skills, and workforce readiness skills.

In response to the significant impact of the No Child Left Behind Act, they have published several informative Whitepapers <http://www.achievementtech.com/index.cfm?objectId=54E10518-F039-

F4D2-C8272419ADF7DF81> , statistical evidence and Research Papers to demonstrate how

SkillsTutor programs have increased student academic achievement:

Scientifically-Based Principles

<http://www.achievementtech.com/download.cfm?DownloadFile=5277B3D6-CECB-A902-

A428C361315D1670> and teaching sources used to create our proven educational content.

Teaching Methodologies

<http://www.achievementtech.com/download.cfm?DownloadFile=5277B125-B051-2192-

2DAF5B97420A04C9> outlining the philosophy and techniques we employ to publish effective instructional programs.

Effectiveness Studies <http://www.achievementtech.com/index.cfm?objectId=2ADA254C-

FAAB-46AB-BE56C87D9020C5A2> Our effectiveness studies show how educators have implemented our programs and increased student performance in diverse settings.

Small Group Intervention / Remediation Instruction

The historical success rate of increasing student achievement through small group tutoring is high as measured by pre/post assessments of student growth conducted at each school site as a part of the learning opportunity initiatives. This intervention is grounded in research. A meta-analysis of findings from 65 independent evaluations of school tutoring programs showed that these programs have positive effect on the academic performance and attitudes of those who receive tutoring (Cohen,

Kulik, Kulik, 1982).

STELLAR/Strategies for Building Academic Language

Strategies for Teaching English Language Learners for Academic Results (STELLAR) was created in

2005 to meet the needs of regular classroom teachers who teach English language learners (ELL) in

Washoe County School District, located in Reno, Nevada.. This simple program facilitates change first in equipping teachers with easy to implement teaching strategies. Teachers of English language learners were not doing an adequate job of helping them reach benchmarks and seven schools did not meet Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) under the requirements of No Child Left Behind (WCSD,

2005).

The STELLAR program is based on the premise of forming consistent effective teaching habits that take into consideration the needs of diverse students in classrooms. When effective teaching habits are consistently practiced, students will achieve academic results as well as learn to share power and appreciate cultural diversity through interaction with each other. That goal is reached by fostering

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Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula more interaction within a classroom between students. When teachers exhibit these essential habits, it is beneficial for all students. Evidence can be found in the research regarding the importance of practicing these habits. The five essential habits of effective instruction shared in this program are:

1. Share the content and language objectives of the lesson.

2. Focus on vocabulary before, during and when reviewing the lesson.

3. Utilize multiple strategies to engage students.

4. Engage students in strategic reading activities.

5. Facilitate student use of academic language.

One important interactive reading strategy taught in STELLAR is reciprocal teaching. Reciprocal teaching is a teaching strategy developed in 1984 by Anne Marie Palincsar from

Michigan State

University and Anne Brown from the University of Illinois. The purpose of this strategy is to improve reading comprehension of students in grades as low as the first grade through the use of student and teacher collaboration. In this dialogue, the teacher and students take turns assuming the role of teacher in leading the dialogue about a passage of text (Kuth, Jones, 1991). Reciprocal teaching emphasizes the development of both cognitive and metacognitive reading strategies through cooperative learning with scaffolded instruction (Hartman, 1994). The concept of students providing support for one another, the additional concept of expert support as students begin a task and the gradual fading of the teacher’s support are the foundations of reciprocal teaching (Dade, 2005).

Reciprocal Teaching can be used with any grade and with any story or passage. With some variations, it can be adapted for math problem solving or even a science lab. It remotely resembles the scientific process used for science experimentation. According to Hartman (1994), Pallincsar, Ransom, and

Derber (1988/1989), it is stated that reciprocal teaching is based on four principles:

1. The purpose is to improve reading comprehension by equipping students with strategies needed to monitor comprehension and construct meaning.

2. Teacher and students share responsibility for acquiring reading strategies. After initially assuming major responsibility for teaching and leading students through the strategies, the teacher gradually shifts responsibilities to the students.

3. Every student is expected to participate. The teacher provides assistance to support that participation among all students.

4. The teacher regularly turns control of the dialogue over to students. Students involved in

Reciprocal Teaching processes are checking their own understanding of materials they have encountered (Wray, 2004).

Step Up to Writing

Step Up to Writing® features research-based, validated strategies and activities that help students proficiently write narrative, personal narrative, and expository pieces; actively engage in reading materials for improved comprehension; and demonstrate competent study skills.

Aligns with Writing Next

Creates a common language and approach across grade levels and content areas

Provides models of student writing for teacher and student reference

Employs writing as a tool for content learning

Explicitly connects reading and writing

Teaches all stages of the writing process, with an emphasis on planning

Provides tips specifically for kindergarten students in Primary Level

Aligns with the Six Traits assessment model

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Strategic Instruction Model (SIM)

Strategic Instruction Model, or SIM, is about promoting effective teaching and learning of critical content in schools. SIM strives to help teachers make decisions about what is of greatest importance, what we can teach students to help them to learn, and how to teach them well. For scientifically based research supporting SIM, go online to <http://www.kucrl.org/archives> (September 2006).

Success for All Reading Programs

Success for All has had exactly the same objective as Reading First , the centerpiece of No Child Left

Behind, since its beginning in 1987: Every child reading by the 3rd grade. More than 50 scientific research studies have firmly established that Success for All is extremely effective in teaching students to read no matter what their challenges—poverty, limited-English proficiency, or other circumstances. Success for All is exactly what Reading First calls for—putting scientific research into classroom practice.

Success for All is the most extensively and rigorously evaluated core-reading program in existence.

Forty-seven experimental-control comparison studies have evaluated the reading program in grades

K-3. Of these, 30 were done by third parties (see Borman et al., 2003). Many of these studies have been published in the most selective journals in education. Independent reviews have consistently placed Success for All among the most rigorously and successfully evaluated programs. These include reviews by the American Institutes of Research (Herman, 1999), The Thomas Fordham

Foundation (Traub, 1999), the Milken Family Foundation (Schacter, 1999), Pearson & Stahl (2002), and Borman et al. (2003). Many programs, including Success for All, incorporate the five elements derived from the Nation Reading Panel (2000) review, but only Success for All and one other reading program, Direct Instruction, have been subjected to replicated, rigorous experimental studies and found to be successful in comparison to control groups.

A description of research on Success for All according to the federal definition of scientifically based research follows:

• Employs systematic, empirical methods that draw on observation or experiment.

• Involves rigorous data analyses that are adequate to test the stated hypotheses and justify the general conclusions drawn.

• Relies on measurements or observational methods that provide valid data across multiple measurements and observations.

• Has been accepted by a peer-reviewed journal or approved by a panel of independent experts through a comparably rigorous, objective and scientific review.

For more details on scientific based research, go online to http://successforall.com/_images/pdfs/SFA_SBR.pdf

SuccessMaker

SuccessMaker is a comprehensive educational software program used to deliver differentiated oneon-one instruction to learners in grades K-8. SuccessMaker offers a leveled reading curriculum that reflects the National Reading Panel’s five strands for reading instruction-phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension. The mathematics lessons incorporate practice tutorials and assessments based on the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics’ best practices for math instruction.

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The results of an evaluation by What Works Clearinghouse rated SuccessMaker as having potentially positive effects on students’ comprehension and general literacy achievement, with students scoring an average of 11 percentile points higher than students using other digital interventions. For more information on this study go to http://www.pearsonschool.com/live/assets/200929/wwc%20successmaker%20rls%207%207%2009_

23804_1.pdf

According to a study done at McKinley Elementary, students who used SuccessMaker in addition to receiving the daily math instruction in the classroom realized a 12.2 percentage greater increase than the students who did not use SuccessMaker. For a more detailed look at the study go to http://lh102.k12.sd.us/MSET/Evaluation%20Proj/lhmid2.doc

TouchMath

TouchMath offers a comprehensive program to teach counting, addition and subtraction, multiplication and division, and general math - such as time, money and fractions. The products consist of math kits, workbooks and teaching aids, which serve as supplements to the prescribed curriculum. TouchMath follows sequential learning strategies advocated by eminent learning theorists such as Jean Piaget and Jerome Bruner. As a math supplement, the program falls into the constructive classroom philosophy because it is hands-on, sequential, and allows students to make sense of their own learning. TouchMath is a multisensory program that uses its signature TouchPoints to engage students of all abilities and learning styles. TouchMath has been proven to raise math test scores in classrooms around the world for over three decades. For more on the scientific based research on

TouchMath, go to http://www.touchmath.com/pdf/NationalEducatorSurvey.pdf

TransMath

TransMath is a comprehensive program specifically designed to address the needs of struggling late elementary and middle school students who have scored at or below the 40th percentile on national math tests. It targets instruction to fewer topics in greater depth, so students master key foundational skills before moving on to more complex topics. Three levels in three years prepare students for algebra success.

TransMath does the following:

Teaches fewer topics in greater depth

Provides numerous visual representations to help conceptualize the mathematics

Meets individual student needs

Provides a logical sequence, ample practice, and an appropriate pace

Aligns with National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards

Ensures accurate placement and progress monitoring

Provides a solid alternative to basal curricula

Supports teachers with ongoing professional development

Provides a balance between procedural knowledge and conceptual understanding

Three broad design principles distinguish Transitional Mathematics from widely used reform-based programs. The principles include (1) ensuring that students have relevant background knowledge, (2) using a balanced approach in computation practice, and (3) addressing the need for careful time

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Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula management. Each principle has a considerable research base in remedial and special education research.

Treasure Chest

Treasure Chest is a K-6 English Language Learner research-based program providing materials which include instruction and practice in reading, writing, vocabulary and language development published by MacMillan/McGraw-Hill.

Waterford

Waterford plugs into young learners’ comfort with technology. It’s built on basic computer skills many Pre K–2 students already have. The Waterford Institute developed the curriculum with significant contributions from leading researchers. Ongoing research, development, and testing assure that Waterford incorporates the latest scientific learning.

Waterford prides itself on an extensive research base that is unmatched in the industry. During the development of the Waterford Early Learning curriculum, Waterford Institute’s research team consulted a variety of resources, including:

An extensive bibliography of current research findings with over 130 unique entries

Leading experts in the field, including Marilyn Adams, Joe Torgeson, David Geary, Robert

Siegler, Douglas Clements, James Barufaldi, and Dusty Heuston

National and state standards, including the National Reading Panel, the National Council of

Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), Project 2061’s Benchmarks for Science Literacy, and the

National Science Education Standards (NSES)

The result of this exhaustive research is a comprehensive, effective, and uniquely age-appropriate solution for early learning that emphasizes the key elements of a balanced reading curriculum grounded in research, a balanced approach to math and a science curriculum rich in active discovery, regular review and assessment, integration of technology into curriculum, individualized instruction, an engaging learning approach, and parental involvement.

In addition to product development research, ongoing efficacy testing is constantly being carried out at Waterford sites coast to coast as part of our ongoing commitment to providing the most effective products possible. For more information on the scientific research go online to http://www.pearsonschool.com/live/assets/200735/WELP_Brochure_Research_02%20(lo)_1648_1.p

df

WhyTry

The WhyTry Program is a simple, hands-on curriculum which helps youth overcome their challenges and improve outcomes in the areas of truancy, behavior, and academics.

WhyTry teaches critical social and emotional principles to youth (K-12) using a series of ten pictures

(visual analogies) which each teach a principal, such as resisting peer-pressure, or that decisions have

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Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula consequences. The visual components are then reinforced by music and physical activities. The major learning styles—visual, auditory, and body-kinesthetic—are all addressed.

The WhyTry Program is now in use in over 5,000 schools, mental health facilities, and correctional facilities in the US, Canada, Australia and the UK. It has now been demonstrated in a variety of research settings to reduce truancy, improve academic success, and increase graduation rates. For additional information go to http://www.whytry.org/.

Write Source

The Write Source program is a resource for teachers who recognize the importance of effective writing instruction. The activities and strategies presented are based on current research and best instructional practice advocated by classroom teachers, administrators, teacher educators, and policymakers alike. The Write Source program provides students with the skills they need to succeed in school, preparing them ultimately for college and the workplace. In the program, students develop their thinking skills as they choose and develop topics, find information, evaluate the quality of sources, think through relevant issues, formulate a thesis, support an argument, and draw logical conclusions.

The Write Source program presents writing as a process; provides students with frequent opportunities to write; fosters students’ ability to assess and revise their own writing; builds grammar, punctuation, and spelling skills; and develops students’ overall literacy skills, including those of struggling learners and non-native English speakers. For more details on scientific based research, go online to http://www.greatsource.com/store/ProductCatalogController?cmd=LP&nextPage=GreatSource/gsMai nTemplate.jsp?displayMainCell=researchefficacy.jsp

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