ASD Memorandum # 76

ASD Memorandum # 76
ANCHORAGE SCHOOL DISTRICT
ANCHORAGE, ALASKA
ASD MEMORANDUM #76 (2010-2011)
October 11, 2010
TO:
SCHOOL BOARD
FROM:
OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
SUBJECT:
DISTRICT IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR 2010-2011 SCHOOL YEAR
ASD Goal: The achievement gap between racial, ethnic and economic groups in the
highly diverse ASD will be eliminated through education that is accessible, culturally
responsive, supportive of students and safe.
PERTINENT FACTS:
The Alaska Department of Education and Early Development issues its annual
designations of districts in terms of Adequate Yearly Progress each fall. As the
Anchorage School District is in Level 4, or Corrective Action Status, the
Elementary and Secondary Education Act and Alaska state regulations require
the district to submit an improvement plan to the Department of Education and
Early Development (Attachment A). The plan’s goals should address the specific
areas wherein the District did not make AYP targets. In the ASD, AfricanAmerican, Disabled and Limited English Proficient student groups did not meet
AYP in both language arts and math performance. The Alaska Native, Asian and
Low Income student groups did not meet AYP in language arts only.
Instructional strategies, activities, materials and trainings in the plan should
reflect changes to current practice, as well as continuing efforts the district has
deemed effective.
The District’s Instructional Team crafted the plan with the additional
involvement of parents and program advisory group members. The Anchorage
School District continues to focus its efforts on educating all students for success
in life. This improvement plan will serve well in that mission.
CC/EG/VC
Attachments
Attachment A - 2010-2011 District Improvement Plan
Attachment B - Sample School Report Card
Attachment C - Adequate Yearly Progress 2010 Ad
Attachment D - Scientifically Based Research Document
Prepared by:
Vernon Campbell, Director, Accountability
Approved by: Ed Graff, Assistant Superintendent, Instruction
2
Anchorage School District Improvement Plan 2010-2011
Alaska Department of Education
& Early Development
2010-2011 District Improvement Plan
Submission Packet
Due to EED – October 1, 2010
Contact:
Angela Love, School Improvement Program Manager
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
801 West 10th Street, Suite 200
PO Box 110500, Juneau, AK 99811-0500
[email protected]
(907) 465-8689
www.eed.state.ak.us
Overview of 2010-2011 District Improvement Plan Process
Each district receiving Title I funds that is identified at Level 2 or above is required by NCLB and
Alaska statute and regulations to create or revise a District Improvement Plan that meets federal
and state requirements. This plan should be reflective of the district’s needs as a whole based on the
analysis of student achievement data, demographic data and perception data. The needs of the district
are identified through this initial data analysis and analyzed further to determine the causes for being
unsuccessful in meeting AYP in relation to specific subject areas as well as subgroups. From this
analysis, the district identifies district-wide goals and actions in which to assist the teachers and district
staff in meeting the goals. These goals will be reflected in the School Improvement Plans including
actions to guide implementation based on the needs of the individual school site.
District Improvement Plans are due to EED no later than October 1, 2010. Note: District
Improvement Plans are being requested first to ensure the goals, as based on student achievement data,
are identified prior to the writing of School Improvement Plans. School Improvement Plans should be
driven by district goals with objectives identified that share the district goals with strategies and actions
selected by the site to match the students being served. School Improvement Plans are now due at EED
no later than November 1, 2010, but will be accepted earlier if reviewed and approved by the district.
EED will review the District Improvement Plan to determine that federal and state requirements
are met. If the plan does not meet the requirements, the department will contact the district within 3
working days of receipt of the plan to specify any revisions needed to meet the federal and state
requirements.
Consequences for Districts
District Improvement Plans that meet all federal and state requirements must be received by EED on
or before October 1, 2010 or federal and state payments will be withheld until receipt.
If the implementation of a District Improvement Plan does not result in making adequate yearly
progress, the department will be required to take progressive consequences. Per 4 AAC 06.840(h), the
department may take appropriate action while a district is at Level 2 or 3. The department will be
required to take one of the corrective actions specified in 4 AAC 06.840(k) once a district has reached
Level 4.
Required elements of District Improvement Plan
4 AAC 06.850(b) 06.880; 1116 (c) (6 & 7)
Plan Requirement
EED Review Criteria
1. Notify all district parents by direct means (regular mail,
Description of notification process
provided, copy of parent notification
included.
email, school newsletters) as well as indirect means
(internet, publications) of the reasons for the identification
for improvement and how parents can participate in
upgrading the quality of the local educational agency.
2. Consult with parents, school staff, and other interested
persons to write plan.
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2010)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Provide list of names of participants
showing representation from each group.
2010-2011 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 2 of 36
3. Address the teaching and learning needs in the schools
of the district and the specific academic problems of lowachieving students, including a determination of why any
of the district's prior plans failed to bring about increased
student academic performance.
Describe why district’s prior plans have not
succeeded in improving student
achievement.
4. Cover a two-year period (submitted one year at a time);
Include timeline and dates for current
school year.
5. Incorporate scientifically based research strategies that
Briefly describe scientifically based
research for each instructional strategy or
curriculum proposed.
strengthen the core academic program in the schools served
by the district.
6. Identify actions that have the greatest likelihood of
improving the achievement of students in meeting the
academic performance requirements in 4 AAC 06.810.
7. Address professional development needs of the
instructional staff.
8. Spend 10% of district Title IA allocation each year for
professional development.
9. Include specific measurable achievement objectives and
targets for all students collectively and each subgroup of
students.
Strategies proposed target reasons for not
making AYP.
Professional development description
provided in plan. This may include
professional development already
described in other plans such as the NCLB
application.
Signature required on cover/assurance
page.
Measurable objective(s) and target(s)
provided.
10. Incorporate, as appropriate, activities before school, after Extended learning opportunities described
school, during the summer, and during an extension of the
school year.
11. Specify any technical assistance to be provided to the
district.
12. Include strategies to promote effective parental
involvement in the schools served by the district.
if included in plan.
Describe technical assistance, if any, to be
provided to the district.
Parent involvement strategies provided in
plan.
District Improvement Process
The department recommends a continuous improvement planning process. In the improvement process
you may wish to include the following steps to ensure you are addressing the academic needs of your
students. The process might contain the following steps: 1) analysis of data (achievement, demographic,
perception), 2) determine measurable goals as based on needs identified through data analysis, 3)
identify actions for implementation to support the goals (these will include professional development
and parent involvement), 4) identify ways to monitor progress and evaluate meeting of the goals and 5)
monitor implementation and effectiveness of plan. The process and plan presented are not intended to
replace other more comprehensive reform or improvement efforts, but rather to complement those
processes and focus on the specific areas that are causing the district to not meet adequate yearly
progress targets.
The following companion document is available on the Department of Education website under Forms
& Grants, School/District Improvement (http://www.eed.state.ak.us/forms/home).
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2010)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
2010-2011 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 3 of 36
•
School Improvement Plan Resource Guide – an optional step by step guide through the school
improvement planning process
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2010)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
2010-2011 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 4 of 36
District Improvement Plan
School Years 2010-2011
Cover Sheet
District AYP Level (check one):
2
3
4
X
Year
5
District Name: Anchorage School District
Superintendent’s Name: Carol Comeau
District Mailing Address: 5530 East Northern Lights Blvd.
City: Anchorage
AK – Zip: 99502
Phone (907) 742-4312
Fax (907) 742-4318
Superintendent’s Email: [email protected]
District Improvement Contact: Ed Graff
Phone (907) 742-4412
Fax (907) 742-4318
District Contact Email: [email protected]
***************************************************************************************************************
By my signature below, I assure that the requirements for districts at Level 2 or above as
designated and outlined in NCLB Section 1116 and Alaska Regulations 4 AAC 06.835-880, have
been met. The district will spend 10% of its Title I-A allocation each year for professional
development to address the academic problems causing the district to be identified for
improvement.
Superintendent’s
Signature:
Date:
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2010)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
2010-2011 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 5 of 36
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2010)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
2010-2011 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 6 of 36
1. Check each cell in the following table to identify the areas in which the district did NOT meet
AYP:
All students
Ethnic group
SWD
LEP
Low-Income
Language Arts
(X) African
American,
(X) Alaska
Native/American
Indian and
(X) Asian/N.H./P.I.
X
X
X
Math
(X) African
American
X
X
Participation
Grad Rate
2. Describe why the district’s prior plans have not succeeded in improving student achievement.
Background:
The district’s prior improvement plan was successful in improving student
achievement; however, the rate of improvement was not sufficient for making
AYP. In all but one AYP student category the ASD improved proficiency rates
in math performance when comparing 2008-2009 results to 2009-2010. (The
exception was the Limited English Proficient student group, which dropped
from 57.3 to 52.4 percent proficient.) In language arts performance, all but
three student groups improved. The Caucasian student group’s language arts
proficiency remained static at 88.5 percent. The African American/Black and
LEP student groups dropped by 0.7 and 9.2 respectively.
This year, 47 ASD schools met every AYP requirement, an increase of eight
schools over last year. Sixteen schools missed AYP by just one target and 34
schools missed by two or more targets. This year, 14 of the 26 Title I schools
made AYP. Title I schools went from three schools being at AYP Level 0 in
2008-2009 to having eight in 2009-2010.
The all students group language arts scores moved up slightly from 80.4 to 80.6
percent as compared to last year. Math scores increased from 71.4 to 73.5
percent.
Key points in the district’s future plans for increased success in improving student
achievement:
(1) The district acknowledges that continued and substantive improvement is
needed and it will continue its efforts to increase achievement for all students,
but especially with student groups that are not meeting AYP targets. The ASD
believes it is on a path that will result in continued success. Its progression,
however, has not been commensurate with the rate of improvement required by
ESEA/NCLB Annual Measurable Objectives.
(2) Math performance on 2009-2010 AYP results indicates that the 2007-2008
adoption of a revised Everyday Math curriculum is helping with achievement
gains. EDM professional development plans are designed to improve teachers’
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2010)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
2010-2011 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 7 of 36
comfort with the content and the adoption, thus leading to increased program
fidelity at the classroom level. Additionally, an external audit of the EDM
curriculum is being conducted.
(3) Continued professional development in Social Emotional Learning and
Culturally Responsive Education are seen as important factors in improving
student academic success. All district schools are required to develop an
SEL/CRE goal. The SEL/CRE goals is accompanied by an action, professional
development and parent involvement plan to help with attaining the goal
(4) Efforts to extend the Response To Instruction framework throughout the
district continue. The district’s emerging RTI efforts are instrumental in
schools improving alignment of instructional practices and decision-making.
The alignment includes: Improved student progress monitoring, improved
Student Support Team processes, improved benchmarking, improved student
behavior protocols and increased examination of core curriculum instructional
practices for validating program fidelity. The implementation of improved
information systems (e.g. Web-based progress monitoring and benchmarking
application) is pivotal to helping schools to manage and analyze the significant
amount of data that is needed and generated within an effective RTI framework.
(5) Increased focus on writing skills. All ASD schools will develop and
implement schoolwide plans for improving students’ writing achievement.
(6) Develop a comprehensive plan to address obstacles to expanding career/technical
and vocational programs in middle and high schools, including “highly qualified”
teacher certification and high school core credit eligibility.
3. a. Describe the process used to notify all parents of the district status and of their
opportunities to be involved in addressing the issues that caused the district to be identified
for improvement. Please provide a copy of the notification parents received.
Via school report card mail-outs (sample attached), parents receive direct notification
of the district’s AYP status, the reasons for identification and an invitation to
participate in the improvement plan’s development. Parents are notified of the
district’s AYP status and of their opportunity to be involved in the improvement
planning process by way of an ad in the Anchorage Daily News (attached). The ASD
sends out monthly emails (ASD Connect) to parents containing stories, events and news
items. Information encouraging parent and community involvement is also posted on
the district Website at www.asdk12.org. By invitation, members of the ASD
instructional leadership team who contributed to the improvement plan work with
parents, community members and district staff to develop each portion of the plan.
Please see page 8 and the plan itself for more details about parent, community and staff
involvement.
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2010)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
2010-2011 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 8 of 36
b. Describe any technical assistance, if any, to be provided to the district in developing or
implementing the plan. (Please contact the department if technical assistance is needed from
EED.)
The department’s audio conferencing and prompt responses to phone calls
and e-mails are appreciated and are helpful. Each of these supports provides
sufficient technical assistance for plan development.
The department’s continued efforts to secure increased funding for education are
appreciated. Acquisition of needed educational materials; training and professional
development opportunities and technology are helpful in the implementation of our
improvement plan.
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2010)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
2010-2011 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 9 of 36
District Improvement Planning Team
Regulation requires a district to consult with a variety of participants from the schools and the
community: teachers, administrators, other school staff, parents, and the community to be served. Please
list members of the team and their roles.
Role within the district/school/community
(i.e. 4th Grade teacher, PTA parent, etc.)
Roles/Responsibilities tied to District
Improvement Plan
Parents:
Debra Fitzgerald
Tom Amodio
Marc Giampaoli
Rachel Hubbard
Ok-Kyung Farson
Elena Reierson
PTA Parent
PTA Parent
Parent
PTA Parent
ELL Parent
Parent and Title I CPAC President
Elem STEM DIP reviewer
Elem STEM DIP reviewer
Elem STEM DIP reviewer
Elem STEM DIP reviewer
ELL DIP reviewer
Title I DIP Advisory
Heather Provence
Demaris Hudson
Kellie Taylor
Kimberly Burnett
James Biddle
Robin Wittrock
Cheryl Huber
Blythe Marston
Ron Pruitt
Kelly McNaugton
Parent and Title I CPAC Vice President
Native Advisory Committee Chair/Parent
Native Advisory Committee/Parent
Native Advisory Committee/Parent
Native Advisory Committee/Parent
Native Advisory Committee/Parent
AVAIL Foster Parent
West Parent/Community Member
CHS Parent/Community Member
SHS Parent Community Member
Title I DIP Advisory
Title VII Indian Ed DIP review
Title VII Indian Ed DIP review
Title VII Indian Ed DIP review
Title VII Indian Ed DIP review
Title VII Indian Ed DIP review
Parent Chaperone for Activities
Remodel West/Romig
Reviewed school initiatives and goals
Reviewed school initiatives and goals
Teachers & other staff:
Enid Silverstein
Mary Hoppas
Ann Ibele
Dawn Wilcox
Penny Williams
Christine Garbe
Imtiaz Azzam
Phil Farson
Michael Fenster
Denise Trujillo
Dianne Orr
John Kito
Gale O’Connell-Smith
Jennifer Knutson
Debbie Carlson
Robyn Rehmann
Doreen Brown
Angela Blue
Shannon Gallagher
Douglas Gray
Anita Allen
Melissa Frentzel
Lori Rucksdasel
Katherine Staples
Christine Zelinsky
LaDonna Rees
Laura Allen
Exec Director of Curriculum & Instruction
STEM Teacher Trainer
STEM Teacher Trainer
STEM Teacher Trainer
STEM Teacher Trainer
ELL Program Supervisor
Counselor Newcomers’ Center
ELL Specialist
STEM Curriculum Coordinator
Secondary Ed. Tech. Specialist
Title I Program Supervisor
Tyson Elementary Principal
Taku Elementary Principal
RTI Coordinator
Title I Preschool Coach
Title I Principal Support
Title VII Indian Ed. Program Supervisor
Native Advisory Committee Teacher Rep
Native Advisory Committee At-large Rep
ECE Special Education Director
ECE Special Education Coordinator
ECE Special Education Supervisor
ECE Special Education Supervisor
SPED Teacher Consultant
SPED Teacher Consultant
SPED Teacher Consultant
SPED Teacher Consultant
Elem STEM DIP collaborator
Elem STEM DIP direct contributor
Elem STEM DIP direct contributor
Elem STEM DIP direct contributor
Elem STEM DIP direct contributor
ELL DIP facilitator
ELL DIP team member
ELL DIP team member
STEM DIP coordinator
Carnegie Math Program oversight
Title I DIP Developer and Implementer
Title I Advisory Council
Title I Advisory Council
Title I DIP Advisory
Title I Advisory Council
Title I DIP Advisory
Title VII Indian Ed DIP facilitator
Title VII Indian Ed DIP review
Title VII Indian Ed DIP review
DIP developer and implementer
DIP developer and implementer
DIP developer and implementer
DIP developer and implementer
ECE SPED DIP Support Staff
ECE SPED DIP Support Staff
ECE SPED DIP Support Staff
ECE SPED DIP Support Staff
Printed Name
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2010)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
2010-2011 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 10 of 36
Susie Wilson
Sharon Lester
Amye Wallace
Kristen Brown
Priscilla Brandon
Linda Griffith
Tammy Counts
Jason Hlasny
Kathy Adamich
Rebecca Case
Deanna Youngren
Loni Jirik
Lesa Walker
Cindy Anderson
Linda Carlson
Julie Vincek
Chuck Strauss
Rebecca Vano
Mike Henry
Vani Pillai
Amy Keyser
Martina Henke
Jessica Graziano
Leslie Vandergaw
SPED Teacher Consultant
SPED Teacher Consultant
SPED Teacher Consultant
SPED Teacher Consultant
SPED Teacher Consultant
Director, Secondary Special Education
Supervisor, Secondary Special Education
Supervisor, Secondary Special Education
MS SPED Teacher and SPED DC
Asst. Principal, Whaley Special Schools
Middle School SPED Teacher
SPED Teacher Consultant/Assess & Eval.
Secondary SPED Teacher Consultant
Executive Director, Special Education
Executive Director, Elementary Ed.
Safe and Drug Free Schools Staff
South Anchorage High Math Teacher
Bartlett High LA & Transitions Teacher
Executive Director, High Schools
Service High Science Teacher
Eagle River High LA Teacher
Language Arts Coordinator
STEM middle school instructional support
Executive Director, Middle School Ed.
ECE SPED DIP Support Staff
ECE SPED DIP Support Staff
ECE SPED DIP Support Staff
ECE SPED DIP Support Staff
ECE SPED DIP Support Staff
DIP Developer and Implementer
SPED Math & LA Advisory Input
SPED Math & LA Advisory Input
SPED LA Advisory Implementer
SPED LA Advisory Input
SPED Math & LA Implementer
SPED Advisory Input and Implementer
SPED Advisory Input and Implementer
SPED Developer and Implementer
Elem. DIP Developer
Input on SEL goal initiative at East High
Review HS initiatives and goals
HS DIP reviewer
HS District Improvement Plan Facilitator
Steering Committee Health Pathways
Grade 9 Success Coordinator
MS Language Arts DIP Contributor
MS STEM DIP contributor
MS DIP Facilitator
Additional Members:
Terri Mitchell
Community member
ELL DIP reviewer
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2010)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
2010-2011 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 11 of 36
DISTRICT IMPROVEMENT PLAN 2009-2010 School Year
Complete one sheet for each goal – expand sections as appropriate
DISTRICT MEASURABLE GOAL (to include specific target):
All student subgroups not meeting the target for AYP in Language Arts will show at least a 10% decrease in the percent of students not
proficient in order to meet safe harbor targets. All performance standards will be addressed as required for individual student and
subgroup growth.
Title III English Language Proficiency Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAO): Each year, a higher percentage of students
will make progress over the previous year and a higher percentage of students will attain proficiency in English over the previous year as
measured by the Title III AMAO.
CURRENT PERFORMANCE LEVEL ON SBAs:
Results from ASD 2009-2010 Districtwide AYP Language Arts % proficient:
1. African American – 69.8% proficient.
2. Alaska Native / American Indian – 64.8% proficient.
3. Asian / N.H. / P.I. – 71.4% proficient.
4. Low Income – 69.1% proficient.
5. Students with Disabilities – 46.3% proficient.
6. Limited English Proficient – 55.5% proficient.
The performance target for these student groups in 2010-2011 is to (at least) reduce by 10% the percent not proficient.
Title III English Language Proficiency Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAO):
 Make progress in learning English – gain the expected level of proficiency on the English Language Proficiency Assessment per one
year of program service according to the formula set forth by the state department of education.
1. 2009-2010 school year – 37% of the students made progress in English on the English Language Proficiency Exam K-12
2. 2010-2011 school year – 40% of the students tested will make progress in English on the English Language Proficiency Exam K-12
 A higher percentage of students will attain proficiency in English over the previous year as measured by the AMAO.
1. 2009-2010 school year – 15% of the students attained proficiency in English on the English Language Proficiency Exam K-12
2. 2010-2011 school year – 16% of the students tested will attain proficiency in English on the English Language Proficiency Exam K12
Scientifically based research to support each strategy listed below (reference or brief description):
•
See attached scientifically based research appendix
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 12 of 36
ACTION TO IMPLEMENT
Action, strategies and
interventions (include
professional development,
mentoring, parent involvementnot programs)
TIMELINE
Milestones for
current school
year
RESOURCES
Materials,
Estimated costs,
funding sources
PERSONS
RESPONSIBLE
Materials: no
cost
Parent classes to include
PASSport to Success Strategies
at various locations including
Newcomers’ Center, Mt View,
East and possibly Clark
SIOP training at Ursa Minor,
Muldoon, Chester Valley,
Williwaw and Klatt
Achieve 3000, a web-based
literacy tool for differentiating
instruction, will be used at the
Newcomers’ Center for grades
7-12 and with parent classes
Sept 2010May 2011
Ongoing
during 20102011 school
year
Ongoing
during 20102011 school
year
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Est. Cost: $2400
for each 8 week
program
Fund Source:
Title III grant
and Refugee
Impact Grant
Est. Cost: No
added cost as per
contract within
regular duty day
teacher/staff
salaries.
ASD general
fund
Est. Cost:
general fund
pays for salary of
teachers and
specialists.
$34 a seat from
Special
Education
ARRA funding
ELLP Staff
PROGRESS MONITORING AND EVALUATION
EVIDENCE OF IMPACT ON
EVALUATION
STUDENT LEARNING
(Instrument(s) used to
(Outcomes – Review at district only per
assess)
milestone)
Results on the Annual
English Language
Proficiency Assessment for
Spring 2011.
Increase in language arts
performance proficiency on
SBA.
ELLP content
specialists and
supervisor
ELLP specialist
manages the
database for
NCC student,
ESL classroom
teachers
implement in the
classroom
Results on the Annual
English Language
Proficiency Assessment for
Spring 2011
Increase in language arts
performance proficiency on
SBA.
Results on the Annual
English Language
Proficiency Assessment for
Spring 2011
Increase in language arts
performance proficiency on
SBA.
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 13 of 36
Continuation/Implementation
of two Language Acquisition
Programs. Carousel of Ideas at
ten elementary schools and
Treasure Chest at 5 schools
Ongoing
during 20102011 school
year
Est. Cost:
purchase of
Carousel of Ideas
$27,000
Results on the Annual
English Language
Proficiency Assessment for
Spring 2011
ELLP specialists
ARRA funds
$27,000
Increase on pre and post
assessment, which is the
Critchlow Verbal Language
Scale.
Materials:
$6,200 for
materials
Implement Promoting Success
for All Modules
Contract with Consortium on
Reading Excellence (CORE)
for consultation and coaching
in research based reading
curriculum implementation for
13 Title I Schools.
Continued implementation of
Parent Information Resource
Center (PIRC) program to help
implement successful and
effective parent involvement
policies, programs, and
activities that lead to
improvement in student
academic achievement and
strengthen partnerships among
parents, teachers, principals,
administrators, and other
school personnel in meeting the
educational needs of children.
Ongoing
during 20102011 school
year
August 2010
through May
2011
Est. Cost:
$252,843
Fund Source:
Title III for
materials and
ARRA for
addenda
Est. Cost:
$415,000
Fund Source:
Title I ARRA
funding
Est. Cost:
$151,045
2007-2011
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Fund Source:
APIRC Grant
Project Budget
Increase in language arts
performance proficiency on
SBA.
ELLP specialists,
Math and
Science
Department
Results on the Annual
English Language
Proficiency Assessment for
Spring 2011
Increase in language arts
performance proficiency on
SBA.
Dianne Orr,
Linda Carlson
and Title I
Principals
Increase in the percent of
proficiency in Language
Arts on the SBA’s in those
13 Title I Schools
comparing 09-10 AYP to
10-11 results
Julie Jessel,
Dianne Orr, and
five Language
Cultural Liaisons
Activities evidenced in
PIRC year-end report and
any workshop/meeting
registration/sign-in forms.
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 14 of 36
Global Goal: Development and
implementation of 8 high
quality ECE programs that
utilize RTI-recognition and
response service delivery
model for long-term school
success and improvement in
student academic achievement
Specific Action:
Implementation of Individual
Growth and Development
Indicators (IGDIs) -assessing students three times a
year to establish Benchmark
levels and use those measures
to evaluate effectiveness of
language and literacy program.
Specific Action:
Implementation of Gold
Assessment System to
measure individual student
growth across 5 domains.
Specific Action:
Improvement of Tier 1
program components by
utilizing CC implementation
checklist in the areas of
environment, teacher-child
interactions, program structure
and family involvement.
Progress monitoring training
offered to Title I Schools to
provide professional
development on assessment
and using data to inform
instruction.
Est. Cost:
$350,000
August 2010
through May
2011
Fund Source:
Title I ARRA
funding and Title
I-A Basic
Dianne Orr,
Linda Carlson
and Title I
Preschool
Principals and
Preschool
Leadership Team
Est. Cost:
$400,000
August 2010
through May
2011
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Fund Source:
Title I ARRA
funds and Title I
professional
development
budget
Dianne Orr,
Linda Carlson
and Title I
Principals
IGDI;s
CC Gold Assessment
System
Creative Curriculum Check
List
Increase in the percent of
proficiency in Language
Arts on the SBA’s in all
Title I Schools who use
progress monitoring
comparing 09-10 AYP to
10-11 results
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 15 of 36
Ashlock Houghton Mifflin
program-specific training
offered to Title I schools to
provide professional
development to support Tier 1
instruction, along with Tier 2
intervention training and
technical support.
Continue the process of a threeyear goal of implementation
of Response to Instruction in
Title I schools. This practice
will provide high-quality
instruction and interventions
matched to students’ needs.
August 2010
through May
2011
August 2009
through May
2012
Est. Cost:
$300,000
Fund Source:
Title I ARRA
Funding
Est. Cost:
$65,000 annually
Fund Source:
Title I ARRA
Funding
Dianne Orr,
Linda Carlson
and Title I
Principals
Increase in the percent of
proficiency in Language
Arts on the SBA’s in all
Title I Schools comparing
09-10 AYP to 10-11 results
Dianne Orr,
Linda Carlson
and Title I
Principals
Increase in the percent of
proficiency in Language
Arts on the SBA’s in all
Title I Schools comparing
09-10 AYP to 10-11 results
Dianne Orr,
Linda Carlson
and Title I
Principals
Increase in the percent of
proficiency in Language
Arts on the SBA’s in the
Title I Schools who use Step
Up to Writing comparing
09-10 AYP to 10-11 results
Doreen Brown,
Title VII Support
Staff, ASD
Reading
Specialists and
Language Arts
Curriculum
Coordinator
Increase in LA performance
proficiency on SBA and
HSGQE.
Doreen Brown
and Title VII
Support Staff
Increase in LA performance
proficiency on SBA and
HSGQE.
Est. Cost: 20,000
Step Up to Writing training
offered to Title I Schools to
provide professional
development on explicit
writing instruction.
August 2010
through May
2011
Content area training for
Title VII Indian Education
staff
August 2010May 2011
Provide supplemental
support for instructional
interventions to eligible Title
VII Indian Education Alaska
Native and American Indian
students who are below or not
proficient in Language Arts.
August 2010May 2011
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Fund Source:
Title I
Professional
Development
Budget
No added cost,
as per contract,
within regular
duty day staff
salaries.
Source: Title VII
Indian Education
and ASD
General Fund
No added cost
per contract,
within regular
duty day staff
salaries.
Source: Title VII
Indian Education
and ASD
General Fund
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 16 of 36
Est Cost:
$200,000
Title VII Indian Education
Summer Enrichment –
Grades 1-8
ECE Special Education will
continue to provide an
intensive reading clinic
featuring Lindamood Bell
strategies during the summer
for those elementary school
students at a severe deficit
level.
ECE Special Education
Department will work toward
providing a winter/spring
training in Lindamood Bell
strategies for teachers
working during summer
school to support the Summer
Reading Clinic.
All new elementary special
education resource programs
will be provided with
opportunities to receive
training in the core reading
program (Houghton Mifflin)
focusing on pre teaching and re
teaching skills.
Continue to provide training
in adopted reading
curriculum to support students
needing supplemental and
replacement programs.
Session 1:
June 6-24,
2011
Session 2:
July 11-29,
2011
Ongoing
during the
2010-2011
school year
Ongoing
during the
2010-2011
school year
Ongoing
during the
2010-2011
school year
Ongoing
during the
2010-2011
school year
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Resources:
Classroom
materials and
culturally
relevant
curriculum
Doreen Brown,
Supervisor of
Title VII Indian
Education
Increase in LA performance
proficiency on SBA and
HSGQE.
Source:
Classroom
materials and
culturally
relevant
curriculum
Est. Cost:
$100,000
Source: ASD
general fund and
SPED
Est. Cost:
$20,000
Source: SPED
budget through
ASD general
fund
Est. Cost:
$25,000
Source: ASD
general fund and
SPED grant
Est. Cost:
$10,000
Source: ASD
general fund and
SPED Grant
Douglas Gray,
Lori
Rucksdashel,
Melissa Frentzel
and
Anita Allen
State Wide Assessments;
Gates McGinitie and SBAs.
Douglas Gray,
Lori
Rucksdashel,
Melissa Frentzel
and
Anita Allen
SBAs and post training
evaluations.
Douglas Gray,
Lori
Rucksdashel,
Melissa Frentzel
and
Anita Allen
SBAs and post training
evaluations.
Douglas Gray,
Lori
Rucksdashel,
Melissa Frentzel
and
Anita Allen
SBAs and post training
evaluations.
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 17 of 36
ECE Special Education will
work with Title I to develop a
Step Up to Writing Trainer
of Trainers model.
ECE Special Education will
work towards selecting a webbased support curriculum
focusing on reading and
writing to support life skills
and structured learning
classrooms
Secondary Special Education
will continue to implement
research-based intervention
curriculum in language arts
including reading and writing
for self-contained special
education classes as an
extension of the general and
remedial curriculum.
Supplemental supports will
continue to be provided and
implemented both curricular
and strategy supports e.g.
phonics based instruction,
differentiated instruction,
multi-sensory approach,
fluency, writing structures, and
other instructional strategies.
Teachers will implement the
new data collection, progress
monitoring system to support
instructional decision-making
and assist with individual
intervention needs. IEPs, with
parent input, will be written
to support language arts
standards.
Ongoing
during the
2010-2011
school year
Ongoing
during the
2010-2011
school year
Fall 2010Spring 2011
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Est. Cost:
$20,000
Source: ASD
general fund and
SPED Grant
Curriculum
Est. Cost:
$15,000
Source: ASD
General Fund
and SPED
Training
materials,
textbooks,
replacement
consumables,
assessment
materials, and
supplemental
materials
Douglas Gray,
Lori
Rucksdashel,
Melissa Frentzel
and
Anita Allen
SBAs and post training
evaluations.
Douglas Gray,
Lori
Rucksdashel,
Melissa Frentzel
and
Anita Allen
SBAs and post training
evaluations.
Cindy Anderson
and Linda
Griffith
Increase in reading and
writing performance
proficiency on SBA and
HSGQE
$20,000
Funding from the
ASD general
budget and Title
1 budget
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 18 of 36
Continued training for
special education teachers in
direct instruction reading
and writing to include the new
data collection and progress
monitoring system used with
the intervention curriculum for
self-contained SPED classes.
Teachers will also receive
additional training with a
national trainer for the
Language Arts intervention
curriculum, which will include
the beginning of the year
training and mid-year review
with the beginning of on—site
coaching supports. Training
will continue with the
instructional supplemental
supports, materials and
strategies to enhance the
curriculum both in general and
SPED classes. New teachers
will also be provided a SPED
teacher consultant mentor to
assist in instruction and
support.
K-6 teachers who are new to
the ASD will receive
professional development to
help them understand and teach
the adopted reading curriculum
with an emphasis on
differentiation, to increase in
the percent proficient in
language arts on the SBAs for
all subgroups, particularly
subgroups targeted w/in ASD
DIP.
Fall 2010Spring 2011
National trainer
to provide both
new and
refresher training
and on-site
modeling for
SPED selfcontained
Language Arts
teachers
Cindy Anderson
and Linda
Griffith
Increase in reading and
writing performance
proficiency on SBA and
HSGQE
Elementary
Reading
Training
Instructional
Specialists
Training events evidenced
on MLP.com, attendance
records; and, training
effectiveness assessed using
evaluation forms.
$18,000
Funding is
provided by
Secondary SPED
budget
August to
September
2010
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Est. Cost: Sub
teachers and
instructors
$10,000
Source: ASD
General Fund
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 19 of 36
Provide continued professional
support to all schools in their
implementation of research
based literacy instruction with
a particular emphasis on
differentiation. Provide
additional support in all
schools through the utilization
of site-based specialists and
ASD support staff.
Provide instructional
interventions and additional
targeted language arts
instruction to identified
students who are below or not
proficient in language arts, in
60 elementary schools.
Est. Cost:
$1,000,000
August 2010
to May 2011
Fund Source:
ASD General
Fund-Elementary
Division, and
ARRA funds
Linda Carlson,
Dianne Orr,
school principals
and District
Training
Instructional
Specialists
Developmental Reading
Assessment and SBA
Est. Cost:
$200,000
September
2010 to April
2011
Fund Source:
General Fund,
Elementary
Division
Linda Carlson
and Elementary
school principals
Est. Cost: As per
regular
contracted duties
All school Action Plans to
include a Parent Involvement
Plan (PIP) to include
measurable parental
involvement objectives and
plans for each SAP goal.
Summer School will be
offered to elementary students
who are below proficient in
language arts. A large
percentage of total students
served will be in the lowincome, Limited English
Proficient and Students with
Disabilities groups.
Achieve 3000 and MyAccess,
web-based literacy tools for
differentiating instruction, will
be used in all comprehensive
and alternative high schools.
September
2010 to May
2011
June and July
2011
Ongoing
during 201011 school year
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Fund Source:
SAP/PIP
development and
implementation
is a function of
embedded and
regular duties
and school
processes
Est. Cost:
$500,000
Fund Source:
ASD General
Fund –
Elementary
Division and
ARRA
Est. Cost:
$250,000
Source: ARRA
funding
Division
Executive
Directors and
school principals
As documented on ASD
“District Connection” with
year-end evaluation.
Linda Carlson,
Dianne Orr and
Glen Nielsen
Gates-McGinitie, CR
Spelling and Reading
Assessments
Mike Henry and
High School
Principals
Student performance on
State Assessments
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 20 of 36
Est. Cost:
$120,000
Fast ForWord offered in five
comprehensive and four
alternative high schools.
Ongoing
during 201011 school year
Writing Process Through
Technology
Middle school will expand the
use of online technology within
grade 7 classes, (MY Access),
to help students plan, draft,
revise and edit compositions
across the core content areas of
language arts, math, science
and social studies. Teachers
will utilize MY Access on a
quarterly basis to teach their
required curriculum.
Introductory
MY Access
trainings will
be completed
by the end of
October 2010.
Follow-up
training and
support will
occur
throughout the
remainder of
the school
year.
Differentiated Reading
Instruction Through
Technology
Expand the use of online
technology (Achieve 3000), to
provide reading intervention
teachers a variety of reading
levels of current event articles
in order to teach reading
comprehension. Students will
be able to access the online tool
from home and parents will be
encouraged to be part of the
instruction process.
Language Arts Cohort
Trainings
All middle school language arts
and ELL teachers will
participate in three half-day
trainings on best practices,
current research, technology
integration, the principles of
independent and academic
reading, and implementation of
newly adopted materials.
Trainings with
Achieve 3000
will be
completed by
November
2010.
Teachers will
receive
ongoing
training and
support.
Cohort
trainings will
be scheduled
in October,
January and
March of the
2010-11
school year.
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Source: High
School Division
Remediation
Budget
Training costs
covered per
teacher
contract/regular
duty day. (Team
planning time).
Mike Henry and
High School
Principals
Mary Richards,
Stacy Miller and
Martina Henke
Source: ARRA
Title II-D
Training costs
covered per
teacher
contract/regular
duty day. (Team
Planning Time).
Martina Henke,
Stacy Miller,
Mary Richards
and
Julie Besch
Source: ARRA
Title II-D
$30,720 for
substitutes
Source: ASD
general fund
mid-level
Martina Henke,
Stacy Miller and
Mary Richards
Student performance on
State Assessments
Data reports from My
Access will be used to
evaluate success. Average
holistic scores will increase
between first and last
submissions in the program.
Data reports from Achieve
3000.
Placement, midyear, and
end of year Lexile set
assessment scores from
Achieve 3000 will increase.
Data report from evaluation
surveys at the end of the
academic year and
anecdotal evaluations
completed by teachers after
trainings.
Reading and writing scores
will improve on the SBA’s.
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 21 of 36
Language Arts Curriculum
Review – Core Novel
Expansion
A district-wide committee of
language arts teachers,
curriculum specialists, and
parents will evaluate and
identify core novels that will
enhance teacher’s ability to
differentiate instruction.
Purchase process completed by
January 2011.
Summer School Extended
Year
Middle School will offer
extended learning opportunities
in language arts.
Extended Learning
Provide opportunity for after
school tutoring for middle
school students identified as
below proficient.
The Middle
School
Language
Arts
Curriculum
Committee
review and
approval will
be completed
by December
2010.
Purchase By
January, 2011.
Summer
school will be
offered for six
weeks after
the end of the
academic
year.
$3000 for
substitutes
Source: ASD
general fund
mid-level
$323,731
summer school
teachers
Source: ASD
general fund
Martina Henke
and
Stacy Miller
Leslie
Vandergaw,
Martina Henke
and
Stacy Miller
Anecdotal comments and
score sheets from the
participants.
Reading scores will improve
on the SBAs.
Achieve 3000 Reading
Lexile levels
MY Access Writing data
reports
Students will show
academic growth in both
language arts programs used
as part of the MS Summer
School curriculum
$75,000
10-11 school
year
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Source: ASD
general fund
mid-level
Leslie
Vandergaw
Student participation
records
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 22 of 36
DISTRICT IMPROVEMENT PLAN 2009-2010 School Year
Complete one sheet for each goal – expand sections as appropriate
DISTRICT MEASURABLE GOAL (to include specific target):
All student subgroups not meeting the target for AYP in Math will show at least a 10% decrease in the percent of students not proficient in
order to meet safe harbor targets. All performance standards will be addressed as required for individual student and subgroup growth.
CURRENT PERFORMANCE LEVEL ON SBAs:
Results from ASD 2009-2010 District-wide AYP Math % proficient.
1. African American – 55.3% proficient.
2. Students with Disabilities – 40.6% proficient.
3. Limited English Proficient – 52.4% proficient.
The performance target for these student groups in 2010-2011 is to (at least) reduce by 10% the percent not proficient.
Scientifically based research to support each strategy listed below (reference or brief description):
•
See attached scientifically based research appendix.
ACTION TO IMPLEMENT
Action, strategies and
interventions (include
professional development,
mentoring, parent involvementnot programs)
TIMELINE
Milestones for
current school
year
RESOURCES
Materials,
Estimated costs,
funding sources
PERSONS
RESPONSIBLE
ASD website
Ensure teachers’ awareness
of the Alaska GLE supports
available on the ASD STEM
website.
September
2010 – May
2011
As per
contracted
salaries
STEM Program
Staff
ASD general
fund
Algebra Back-mapping will
be used to identify two to three
GLEs per grade level for
focused ongoing formative
assessment and instructional
strategy.
October
2011– May
2011
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
STEM Program
Training and
Instructional
Support (TIS)
salaries
Title II-A or
general funds
STEM Program
Staff
PROGRESS MONITORING AND EVALUATION
EVIDENCE OF IMPACT ON
EVALUATION
STUDENT LEARNING
(Instrument(s) used to
(Outcomes – Review at district only per
assess)
milestone)
Conscious awareness of the
GLEs will lead to an
increase in the percent
proficient in math and
science on the SBAs for all
subgroups, particularly
subgroups targeted w/in
ASD DIP, when comparing
09-10 AYP results to 10-11
AYP results.
Questions addressing these
GLEs will be on the MidYear Benchmark.
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 23 of 36
Benchmark tests aligned to
the AK standards will be
given to 1st through 6th grade
students to monitor student
progress toward the SBA tests
given in April, 2010. Scores
will be posted on the ARS and
will provide information for
differentiation and guiding
instruction. Follow up training
and support will be provided
for schools’ whose scores fall
blow the mean. This will be
done in partnership with A&E.
K-6 pacing guides for new
Everyday Math 3 program will
be implemented to help
teachers teach all the content
and GLE’s required for their
grade level.
Math Consortium promotes
increasing math content
knowledge, pedagogy, and
level of confidence while
targeting 35 K-12 teachers.
December
2010- April
2011
In place and
revised
annually to
reflect the
current school
calendar
January –
May 2011
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
STEM Program
TIS salaries
Title II-A or
general funds
ASD general
fund
Salary for three
instructors
Title II-A or
general funds
STEM Program
Staff in
collaboration
with A&E
STEM Program
Staff
ASD in
collaboration
with UAF
Conscious awareness of the
GLEs and re-teaching
focused on problematic
GLEs will lead to an
increase in the percent
proficient in math on the
SBAs for all subgroups,
particularly subgroups
targeted w/in ASD DIP,
when comparing 09-10
AYP results to10-11 AYP
results.
Awareness of and adherence
to pacing guidelines will
ensure teachers are able to
cover the material and
support the GLEs. This will
lead to an increase in the
percent proficient in math
on the SBAs for all
subgroups, particularly
subgroups targeted w/in
ASD DIP, when comparing
09-10 AYP results to 10-11
AYP results.
Increased conceptual
understanding and best
practice pedagogy on the
part of the teacher will lead
to an increase in the percent
proficient in math on the
SBAs for all subgroups,
particularly subgroups
targeted w/in ASD DIP,
when comparing 09-10
AYP results to 10-11 AYP
results.
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 24 of 36
Professional Development
piloted in STEM schools
patterned after the Boston
Public Schools Model provides
support and training for
teachers focused on the
integration of Math, Science,
and Technology.
Professional Development for
K-6 include explicit use of use
of technology through
modeling of lessons, training in
science focused math lessons at
every grade level
K-6 teachers who are new to
the ASD and / or grade level
will receive professional
development to help them
understand and teach the
adopted math curriculum with
an emphasis on differentiation,
to increase in the percent
proficient in math on the SBAs
for all subgroups, particularly
subgroups targeted w/in ASD
DIP.
August 2010May 2011
August 2010May 2011
August to
October 2010
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
STEM Program
TIS salaries
Title II-A or
general funds
STEM Program
TIS salaries
Title II-A or
general funds
Substitute
teachers and
instructor
salaries
Title II-A funds
STEM Program
Staff
STEM Program
Staff
STEM Program
Staff
Increased awareness of
GLEs for both math and
science, integration
strategies and
implementation of best
practice pedagogy will lead
to an increase in the percent
proficient in math on the
SBAs for all subgroups,
particularly subgroups
targeted w/in ASD DIP,
when comparing 09-10
AYP results to 10-11 AYP
results.
Increased awareness of
GLEs for both math and
science, integration
strategies and
implementation of best
practice pedagogy will lead
to an increase in the percent
proficient in science on the
4th grade SBAs for all
subgroups, particularly
subgroups targeted w/in
ASD DIP, when comparing
09-10 AYP results to 10-11
AYP results.
Training events evidenced
on MLP.com, attendance
records, and training
effectiveness assessed using
evaluation forms.
Increase in the percent
proficient in math on the
SBAs for all subgroups,
particularly subgroups
targeted w/in ASD DIP,
when comparing 09-10
AYP results to10-11 AYP
results.
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 25 of 36
New to District/New to Grade
Level K-6 teachers received
training on elementary science
kits which intentionally
integrates math into lessons
and activities
ASD Tube science kit trainings
completed and online for all 21
kits. Face-to -face trainings and
meetings will incorporate use
of the videos.
Teachers who are new to
combination classroom
teaching in Everyday Math
will receive professional
development in how to
manage the teaching of
multiple grade levels of math at
the same time, particularly
addressing differentiation for
targeted subgroups.
September
2010 – March
2011
Addenda for 63
trainers and 300
attending
teachers
STEM Program
Staff
Title II-A grant
August 2010May 2011
Ongoing
support as
needed
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
STEM Program
TIS salaries
Title II-A or
general funds
Sub teachers and
STEM Program
TIS salaries
STEM Program
Staff
STEM Program
Staff
Knowledge of the
components and pedagogy
of the adopted math
curriculum and it’s
alignment to the state GLEs
will enable teachers to teach
while emphasizing the
content of the state GLEs.
This will lead to an increase
in the percent proficient in
science on the 4th grade
SBAs for all subgroups,
particularly subgroups
targeted w/in ASD DIP,
when comparing 09-10
AYP results to 10-11 AYP
results.
Opportunities to view and
review trainings as needed
will enable teachers to more
effectively teach the
curriculum with an
awareness of the links to the
GLES Increase in the
percent proficient in science
on the 4th grade SBAs for all
subgroups, particularly
subgroups targeted w/in
ASD DIP, when comparing
09-10 AYP results to 10-11
AYP results.
Training events evidenced
in MLP.com, attendance
records and training
effectiveness assessed using
evaluation forms.
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 26 of 36
Elementary SPED teachers
will receive professional
development in the use of the
Everyday Math curriculum,
and meeting the needs of
Special Ed students using the
components within the
curriculum.
Elementary English
Language Learner (ELL)
teachers and aides will
receive professional
development in supporting
math and science integration
through the use of Sheltered
Instruction Strategies.
September December
2010 –
ongoing at
school sites
Elementary
SPED and
STEM Program
TIS salaries
STEM Program
Staff
Ongoing
2010-11
Title III-A ELL
STEM Program
Staff in
collaboration
with ELL
Program Staff
Training for Indian
Education Tutors to better
support students in the adopted
math curriculum.
September –
October 2010
Title III-A ELL
STEM Program
Staff
Math Teacher for third session
Newcomers’ Students
End of Sept
2010 – end of
November
and January
2011-March
2011
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Teaching Special Ed
students in the adopted
curriculum ensures that all
of the GLEs will be
covered. This will lead to
an increase the percent
proficient in math on the
SBAs for all subgroups,
particularly subgroups
targeted w/in ASD DIP,
when comparing 09-10
AYP results to 10-11 AYP
results.
Using Sheltered Instruction
Strategies in the teaching of
Math and Science should
lead to an increase in the
percent proficient in math
and science on the SBAs for
all subgroups, particularly
subgroups targeted w/in
ASD DIP, when comparing
09-10 AYP results to10-11
AYP results.
One on one support by
tutors in the adopted math
curriculum will lead an
increase in the percent
proficient in math on the
SBAs for all subgroups,
particularly subgroups
targeted w/in ASD DIP,
when comparing 09-10
AYP results to10-11 AYP
results.
Materials: $2000
Est. Cost: $6248
Fund Source:
ARRA Funds
ELLP Staff
Increase on SBA Math
scores for High School
Students
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 27 of 36
Materials: no
cost
Parent classes to include
PASSport to Success Strategies
at various locations including
Newcomers’ Center, Mt View,
East and possibly Clark
SIOP training at Ursa Minor,
Muldoon, Chester Valley,
Williwaw and Klatt
Achieve 3000, a web-based
literacy tool for differentiating
instruction, will be used at the
Newcomers’ Center for grades
7-12 and with parent classes.
Academic language
development is critical to math
problem solving success.
Continuation/Implementation
of two Language Acquisition
Programs. Carousel of Ideas at
ten elementary schools and
Treasure Chest at 5 schools
Sept 2010May 2011
Ongoing
during 20102011 school
year
Ongoing
during 20102011 school
year
Ongoing
during 20102011 school
year
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Est. Cost: $2400
for each 8 week
program
Fund Source:
Title III grant
and Refugee
Impact Grant
Est. Cost: No
added cost as per
contract within
regular duty day
teacher/staff
salaries.
ASD general
fund
Est. Cost:
general fund
pays for salary of
teachers and
specialists.
$34 a seat from
Special
Education
ARRA funding
Est. Cost:
purchase of
Carousel of Ideas
$27,000
ARRA funds
$27,000
ELLP Staff
Results on the Annual
English Language
Proficiency Assessment for
Spring 2011.
Increase in language arts
performance proficiency on
SBA.
ELLP content
specialists and
supervisor
ELLP specialist
manages the
database for
NCC student,
ESL classroom
teachers
implement in the
classroom
Results on the Annual
English Language
Proficiency Assessment for
Spring 2011
Increase in language arts
performance proficiency on
SBA.
Results on the Annual
English Language
Proficiency Assessment for
Spring 2011
Increase in language arts
performance proficiency on
SBA.
Results on the Annual
English Language
Proficiency Assessment for
Spring 2011
ELLP specialists
Increase in language arts
performance proficiency on
SBA.
Increase on pre and post
assessment, which is the
Critchlow Verbal Language
Scale.
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 28 of 36
Materials:
$6,200 for
materials
Implement Promoting Success
for All Modules
Curriculum guide for
Algebra I will be
implemented
Ongoing
during 20102011 school
year
Oct 2010 to
May 2011
Est. Cost:
$252,843
Fund Source:
Title III for
materials and
ARRA for
addenda
Est. Cost:
Salaries of
teachers
involved, and
support from
curriculum
department
ELLP specialists,
Math and
Science
Department
Results on the Annual
English Language
Proficiency Assessment for
Spring 2011
Increase in language arts
performance proficiency on
SBA.
Jessica Graziano
and Michael
Fenster
Teacher feedback and
yearly SBA results.
Jessica Graziano,
Michael Fenster
Teacher survey results and
yearly SBA results.
Middle school
and high school
math department
chairs, Jessica
Graziano and
Michael Fenster
Teacher feedback and
yearly SBA results.
Fund Source:
Title IIA grant
and ASD general
fund
Cost: Salaries of
teachers who
took the training.
Algebra II in-service with
publisher rep
Geometry Proof module
established and implemented
August 2010
June 2010 and
Oct 2010
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Fund Source:
Title IIA grant
and ASD general
fund
Cost: Salaries of
teachers
involved.
Fund Source:
Title IIA grant
and ASD general
fund
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 29 of 36
Cost: Salaries of
teachers and staff
involved.
Program of Studies for
Algebra will be reviewed by a
committee and
recommendations made for
revision
Jan 2011
Continuation of Carnegie
Math Program at middle and
high schools, with about 420
students involved
Aug 2010 –
May 2011
Provide professional
development and begin to
build professional learning
communities to increase
mathematical pedagogy for
teachers through math coaching
support, conference
opportunities and math
consortium opportunities
Pilot SuccessMaker as a
computer-assisted Tier 2 math
intervention that aligns with
ASD math curriculum in 11
Title I schools in grade 6
Continued implementation of
Parent Information Resource
Center (PIRC) program to help
implement successful and
effective parent involvement
policies, programs, and
activities that lead to
improvement in student
academic achievement and
strengthen partnerships among
parents, teachers, principals,
administrators, and other
school personnel in meeting the
educational needs of children.
Fund Source:
Title IIA grant
and ASD general
fund
Cost: Salaries of
involved staff
and teachers.
Fund Source:
Title IIA grant
and ASD general
fund
Michael Fenster,
Jessica Graziano
and middle/high
school math
department
representatives
Inclusion of students,
parents, teachers and
administrators
Denise Trujillo
and Michael
Fenster
Yearly SBA results
Dianne Orr, Ann
Ibel, Trish
Flanigan and
Title I Principals
Increase in the percent of
proficiency in Math on the
SBA’s in the Title I Schools
comparing 09-10 AYP to
10-11 results
Dianne Orr, Ann
Ibel, Trish
Flanigan and
Title I Principals
Increase in the percent of
proficiency in Math on the
SBA’s in the 11 Title I
Schools comparing 09-10
AYP to 10-11 results
Julie Jessel,
Dianne Orr and
five Language
Cultural Liaisons
Activities evidenced in
PIRC year-end report and
any workshop/meeting
registration/sign-in forms
Est. Cost: 20,000
August 2010
through May
2011
Fund Source:
Title I
Professional
Development
Budget
Est. Cost:
$140,000
August 2010
through May
2011
Fund Source:
Title I ARRA
funding and Title
I Basic
Est. Cost:
$151,045
2007-2011
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Fund Source:
APIRC Grant
Project Budget
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 30 of 36
Content area training for
Title VII Indian Education
staff
August 2010May 2011
Provide supplemental
support for instructional
interventions to eligible Title
VII Indian Education Alaska
Native and American Indian
students who are below or not
proficient in Math.
August 2010May 2011
Title VII Indian Education
Summer Enrichment –
Grades 1-8
Review current special
education adopted math
programs to determine their
alignment with the district core
math curriculum
No added cost,
as per contract,
within regular
duty day staff
salaries.
Source: Title VII
Indian Education
and ASD
General Fund
No added cost
per contract,
within regular
duty day staff
salaries.
Source: Title VII
Indian Education
and ASD
General Fund
Est Cost:
$200,000
Session 1:
June 6-24,
2011
Session 2:
July 11-29,
2011
Ongoing
during the
2010-2011
school year
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Resources:
Classroom
materials and
culturally
relevant
curriculum
Doreen Brown,
Title VII Support
Staff, ASD
Reading
Specialists and
Language Arts
Curriculum
Coordinator
Increase in LA performance
proficiency on SBA and
HSGQE.
Doreen Brown
and Title VII
Support Staff
Increase in LA performance
proficiency on SBA and
HSGQE.
Doreen Brown,
Supervisor of
Title VII Indian
Education
Increase in LA performance
proficiency on SBA and
HSGQE.
Douglas Gray,
Lori
Rucksdashel,
Melissa Frentzel
and
Anita Allen
SBAs and post training
evaluations.
Source:
Classroom
materials and
culturally
relevant
curriculum
Est. Cost: $5,000
Source: ASD
general fund and
SPED grant
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 31 of 36
Develop a committee to
evaluate various math
replacement programs that
would be aligned with the
district math curriculum
Ongoing
during the
2010-2011
school year
Continue to provide training
in adopted math curriculum
to support students needing
supplemental and replacement
programs.
Ongoing
during the
2010-2011
school year
ECE Special Education will
work towards selecting a
web-based support
curriculum focusing on math
to support life skills and
structured learning classrooms
ECE Special Education will
be working with Secondary
Special Education to provide
Transitional Math training to
teachers providing support to
students who are in a
replacement curriculum
transitioning to middle school
for the 2011-12 school year
Ongoing
during the
2010-2011
school year
Ongoing
during the
2010-2011
school year
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Est. Cost:
$10,000 for
additional days
and materials
Source: ASD
general fund and
SPED grant
Est. Cost:
$20,000
Source: ASD
general fund and
SPED Grant
Est. Cost:
$15,000
Source: ASD
general fund and
SPED Grant
Est. Cost: As per
regular duty day
contract.
Source: ASD
General Fund
Douglas Gray,
Lori
Rucksdashel,
Melissa Frentzel
and
Anita Allen
Douglas Gray,
Lori
Rucksdashel,
Melissa Frentzel
and
Anita Allen
Douglas Gray,
Lori
Rucksdashel,
Melissa Frentzel
and
Anita Allen
Douglas Gray,
Lori
Rucksdashel,
Melissa Frentzel
and
Anita Allen
SBAs and post training
evaluations.
SBAs and post training
evaluations.
SBAs and post training
evaluations.
SBAs and post training
evaluations.
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 32 of 36
Implementation of the new
updated edition of the
research-based intervention
math curriculum supporting
middle school and high school
self-contained math classes.
These classes have been
provided additional
manipulatives and teacher
instructional supplemental
supports. Teachers will
implement edition of the
curriculum as well as the new
data collection progress
monitoring system to support
instructional decision-making
and assist with individual
intervention needs. IEPs, with
parent input, will be written
to support math standards.
Fall 2010Spring 2011
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Purchase of the
new edition
materials
(teacher supplies,
student text,
consumables,
manipulatives,
assessment
materials, and
supplemental
materials were
purchased in
May of 2010
from the 09-10
budget
Cindy Anderson
and Linda
Griffith
Increase in reading and
writing performance
proficiency on SBA and
HSGQE
$104,000
Funding was
provided by the
SPED Grant
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 33 of 36
Continued training for
special education teachers in
direct instruction selfcontained special education
math classes to include the
new data collection and
progress monitoring system
used with the intervention
curriculum. Teachers will also
receive additional training with
a national trainer for the math
intervention curriculum, which
will include the beginning of
the year training and mid-year
review with the beginning of
on—site coaching supports.
Training will continue with the
instructional supplemental
supports, materials and
strategies to enhance the
curriculum both in general and
SPED classes. New teachers
will also be provided a SPED
teacher consultant mentor to
assist in instruction and
support.
Provide instructional
interventions and additional
targeted Math instruction to
identified students who are
below proficient in math in 60
elementary schools. Also,
provide supplemental EDM
online games to all elementary
schools utilizing Everyday
Math curriculum.
Fall 2010Spring 2011
National trainer
to provide both
new and
refresher training
and on-site
modeling for
SPED selfcontained math
teachers
Cindy Anderson
and Linda
Griffith
Increase in reading and
writing performance
proficiency on SBA and
HSGQE
Linda Carlson
and Elementary
school principals
EDM mid-year and end of
year assessments and SBA
$11,000
Funding is
provided by
Secondary SPED
budget
Est. Cost:
$300,000
September
2010 to May
2011.
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Fund Source:
ASD General
Fund –
Elementary
Division
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 34 of 36
Est. Cost: As per
regular
contracted duties
All school Action Plans to
include a Parent Involvement
Plan (PIP) to include
measurable parental
involvement objectives and
plans for each SAP goal.
September
2010 to May
2011
Summer School will be
offered to elementary students
who are below proficient in
language arts. A large
percentage of total students
served will be in the lowincome, Limited English
Proficient and Students with
Disabilities groups.
June and July
2011
Prescriptive remediation in
math for struggling high
school students offered during
the school day via math
software programs such as
Larson Math.
Ongoing
during 201011 school year
Prescriptive remediation in
math for struggling high
school students offered during
after school programs and in
summer school via math
software programs such as
APEX Learning.
Ongoing
during 201011 school year
Professional development for
middle school math teachers
on best practices and vertical
teaming including support for
targeted subgroups.
Ongoing 1011 school year
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Fund Source:
SAP/PIP
development and
implementation
is a function of
embedded and
regular duties
and school
processes.
Est. Cost:
$500,000
Fund Source:
ASD General
Fund –
Elementary
Division and
ARRA
Est. Cost:
$50,000
Source: High
School Division
Remediation
Budget
Est. Cost:
$150,000
Source: High
School Division
Remediation
Budget
Training costs
covered per
teacher
contract/regular
duty day.
Source: Title IIA
grant and ASD
general fund
math
Division
Executive
Directors and
school principals
As documented on ASD
“District Connection” with
year-end evaluation.
Linda Carlson,
Dianne Orr and
Glen Nielsen
Gates-McGinitie, CR
Spelling and Reading
Assessments
Mike Henry and
High School
Principals
Student performance on
Statewide Assessments
Mike Henry and
High School
Principals
Student performance on
Statewide Assessments
Jessica Graziano
Increase in the percent
proficient in math on the
SBAs for all middle school
6-8 graders, particularly the
subgroups targeted w/in
ASD DIP when comparing
09-10 AYP results to 10-11
AYP results.
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 35 of 36
Integrate technology
curriculum materials for
middle school math support
class including support for the
targeted DIP subgroups.
Ongoing 1011 school year
Professional development for
middle school math teachers
using pre-algebra resources to
meet student needs in grades 68.
Ongoing 1011 school year
Summer School Extended
Year
Middle School will offer
remediation classes in math.
Summer
school will be
offered for six
weeks after
the end of the
academic
year.
Training costs
covered per
teacher
contract/regular
duty day.
Jessica Graziano
Increase in the percent
proficient in math on the
SBAs for all middle school
6-8 graders, particularly the
subgroups targeted w/in
ASD DIP when comparing
09-10 AYP results to 10-11
AYP results.
Jessica Graziano
Increase in the percent
proficient in math on the
SBAs for all middle school
6-8 graders, particularly the
subgroups targeted w/in
ASD DIP when comparing
09-10 AYP results to 10-11
AYP results.
Title IIA grant
and ASD general
fund math
Form # 05-09-003 (Revised May 2009)
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
$3,000 in
materials and
$100,000 for
summers school
teacher salaries
ASD general
fund
Leslie
Vandergaw and
Jessica Graziano
Mathematics Navigation
Screener
Post-test scores on math
assessments will increase in
comparison to the pre-tests.
2009-2010 District Improvement Plan Submission Packet
Page 36 of 36
Abbott Loop Elementary School Characteristics
School
434
95.81%
92.68%
0.23%
24.35%
54.84%
100
8
-5.45%
2
Membership
Percent Capacity
Attendance Rate
Retention Rate K-8
Transiency Rate
Percent Economically Disadvantaged
Average Weekly Volunteer Hours
Students Taking the Alternate Assessment
Percent Change in Enrollment
School Business Partnerships
District
49,592
N/A
92.23%
0.26%
27.00%
41.93%
4,870
294
1.55%
N/A
Source of Information
Fall OASIS
2009-19 ASD Capital Improvement Plan
NCLB Summer Data Collection
SMS and NCLB Summer Data Collection
NCLB Summer Data Collection
Fall OASIS & SMS
Department of Education Report Card Report
SMS
Fall OASIS
School Report Card
Anchorage School District
Non-Profit Organization
U.S. POSTAGE
PAI D
Permit No. 161
Anchorage, AK
Abbott Loop
About Our Students
2009-10
School Report Card for
Abbott Loop
Elementary School
Abbott Loop Elementary
School houses K-6 students
with a full-day kindergarten
program, three special education resource classes, and
two intensive-needs classes.
Abbott Loop emphasizes
academic achievement and
mastery of the basics for all
students.
Principal
The academic staff
Robin Pfannstiel
includes classroom teachers, a music teacher, physical education teacher,
librarian, Indian Education and bilingual tutors
and a health teacher. An art teacher, band teacher,
orchestra teacher, speech specialists, school
nurse, counselor and a school psychologist provide instruction and services.
Elementary, Middle & K-8 Schools
TerraNova: The TerraNova is a standardized norm-referenced test used to provide information about students’ achievement
in various areas of the curriculum. When standardized tests are administered, the scores compare your student’s performance
with all other students who took the same test in the national norm group.
Abbott Loop Elementary School TerraNova Grade 5 - Percent in Each Quartile
Above Average
4th Quartile
(76-99 percentile)
School
District
33.33%
33.93%
39.44%
27.37%
26.73%
26.55%
31.94%
39.29%
22.54%
24.95%
23.75%
23.73%
22.22%
17.86%
19.72%
24.24%
24.55%
24.08%
12.50%
8.93%
18.31%
23.45%
24.98%
25.65%
36.11%
40.00%
42.25%
23.02%
22.84%
21.89%
22.22%
30.91%
28.17%
24.93%
24.30%
24.12%
25.00%
18.18%
15.49%
27.90%
27.77%
27.20%
16.67%
10.91%
14.08%
30.99%
41.07%
35.21%
24.91%
24.62%
23.68%
33.80%
42.86%
30.99%
23.96%
24.62%
24.47%
21.13%
10.71%
22.54%
26.52%
28.08%
26.40%
14.08%
5.36%
11.27%
NP of Mean NCE
School District
49
38
Number Tested
School
35
41
50
51
72
56
71
24.15%
25.10%
26.79%
38
36
36
51
52
53
72
55
71
24.62%
22.68%
25.45%
39
29
37
50
50
51
71
56
71
Source: Data is from the TerraNova File and SMS on the first day of testing. NP of Mean NCE is from the CTB McGraw-Hill paper reports.
Detailed information regarding the school’s performance is available in the
Profile of Performance. More school report card information is available at
www.eed.state.ak.us/tls/assessment. This document and the district report
card are available online at www.asdk12.org/depts/assess_eval or through the
Communications Department, 742-4153.
09-10
08-09
07-08
Language
09-10
08-09
07-08
Mathematics
09-10
08-09
07-08
Average
2nd Quartile
3rd Quartile
(26-50 percentile)
(51-75 percentile)
School
District School District
Anchorage School District
5530 E. Northern Lights Blvd.
Anchorage, AK 99504-3135
Reading
Below Average
1st Quartile
(1-25 percentile)
School
District
8427 Lake Otis Pkwy.
Anchorage, Alaska 99507
phone: 907-742-5400
fax: 907-742-5411
www.asdk12.org
School Goals
Goal
Level of Attainment
The percentage of students in grades 3-6
proficient on the state reading assessment will
increase by 5 percentage points, from 76.2 to
81.2 percent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Attained
The percentage of students in grades 3-6 proficient on the estimation and computation strands
of the state math assessment will increase by 5
percentage points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Attained
Climate and Connectedness Survey scores for
students in grades 5-6 will increase from 3.21 to
3.25 in Peer Climate. . . . . . . . . Partially Attained
Parent Involvement
Parents play a crucial role in establishing school
goals and making sure their children do well
in school. Principals are required to share their
school achievement data with parents, and they
actively seek parents’ suggestions, comments
and participation in setting annual school goals.
For schools that did not make Adequate Yearly
Progress, principals will also work with parents
and staff to develop detailed school improvement
plans. Contact your school’s principal for information on how parents can become involved in
these activities.
School Business Partners
Adequate Yearly Progress
Alaska Standards Based Assessment
According to the No Child Left Behind Act, ASD is in its fifth year of Level 4 corrective status. In 2009-10, the
African-American, Disabled and Limited English Proficient student groups did not meet AYP in both language
arts and math performance. The Alaska Native, Asian and Low Income student groups did not meet AYP in
language arts only. Parents are strongly encouraged to participate in the development of a district improvement
plan that addresses the achievement of all students.
The Alaska Standards Based Assessments
(SBAs) are statewide tests designed to provide
information about what students know and are
able to do in reading, writing, mathematics and
science. They estimate the degree to which
students have mastered the Academic Performance Standards as outlined in the Grade Level
Expectations. These assessments are written
specifically for Alaska and are the foundation of
the Alaska school-accountability system. Charts
comparing two years’ results are below.
Abbott Loop Elementary School
2009-10 Adequate Yearly Progress
Status Report
Does Not Meet AYP
Level 3
Group
All
Students
AF AM
(A)
Number
Enrolled
Parents and other community members volunteer
an average of 100 hours per week in the school.
Participation Rate
(B)
Number
Tested
%
(C)
Met
"FAY"
(D)
Tested &
Enrolled
Language Arts Performance
(F)
Percent
(G)
(E)
Proficient
Target
Proficient
(H)
Met
AMO
Mathematics Performance
(J)
Percent
(K)
(I)
Proficient
Target
Proficient
(L)
Met
AMO
249
249
100.0%
Yes
236
178
75.4%
70.8%
Yes
167
70.8%
58.9%
Yes
16
16
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
AKNA/AI
Asian/NH
/OPI
White
28
28
100.0%
Yes
28
19
67.9%
58.7%
Yes
18
64.3%
45.2%
Yes
59
59
100.0%
Yes
54
41
75.9%
63.9%
Yes
42
77.8%
51.1%
Yes
64
64
100.0%
Yes
61
49
80.3%
64.7%
Yes
45
73.8%
52.0%
Yes
Hispanic
2 or
More
EDS
44
44
100.0%
Yes
42
31
73.8%
62.1%
Yes
27
64.3%
49.1%
Yes
38
38
100.0%
Yes
35
26
74.3%
60.7%
Yes
24
68.6%
47.4%
Yes
134
134
100.0%
Yes
125
84
67.2%
68.4%
No
80
64.0%
56.2%
Yes
SWD
46
46
100.0%
Yes
46
20
43.5%
62.8%
No
21
45.7%
49.8%
Yes-SH
LEP
55
55
100.0%
Yes
49
29
59.2%
63.2%
No
30
61.2%
50.3%
Yes
Attendance Rate: Met
92.68% (Threshold is 85.00%)
Two Year SBA Comparison for Abbott Loop Elementary School
Reading
2009-10
2008-09
Writing
2009-10
2008-09
Mathematics
2009-10
2008-09
Science**
2009-10
2008-09
% Proficient
% Not
Proficient
# Tested
76.89%
75.19%
23.11%
24.81%
238
270
75.21%
72.59%
24.79%
27.41%
238
270
72.08%
64.07%
27.92%
35.93%
240
270
27.87%
30.77%
72.13%
69.23%
61
78
** Science administered for grades 4, 8, and 10 only
ASD Teacher Quality Information (2009-2010)
Subway of Alaska
Fred Meyer, Abbott Road
Community Volunteers
AMO For Language Arts: 77.18%
AMO For Mathematics: 66.09%
Abbott Loop
Elementary
District Totals
Number of
Teachers*
Fully
Licensed
Teachers*
29
100%
3101
100%
National
Board
Certified
Teachers**
Classes Taught By
Highly Qualified
Teachers**
28%
0
100%
47%
46
95%
Teachers With
Advanced
Degrees*
Data source: 2009-2010 Certificated Staff Accounting Data Collection *October 2009 and **May 2010
ANCHORAGE SCHOOL DISTRICT
Adequate Yearly Progress 2010
What happens if my child’s school did not make AYP?
Parents should use the table on the right to determine 1) if the school receives Title I funds; and 2) if the school is in a Level
below:
Title I
schools
only
Other
Level 1
Level 2*
Level 3*
Level 4
Level 5
SCHOOL
IMPROVEMENT
PLAN
Your school needs
to develop a “school
improvement plan”
to address ways to
improve student
achievement. Parents
are urged to help
develop the plan with
staff. Please talk with
your child’s principal
about how you can
become involved.
School
Improvement Plan
+ S UPPLEMENTAL
SERVICES
Your child may be
eligible to receive extra
help funded by the
school district. Parents
of eligible students will
be notified by mail.
School
Improvement Plan
+ Supplemental
Services
+ SCHOOL
CHOICE
Your child may be
eligible to attend
another school
with transportation
provided by the
district. Application
information and a
chart showing your
options are displayed
below.
School
Improvement Plan
+ Supplemental
Services
+ School Choice
+ CORRECTIVE
ACTION
The district works
with the school to
take corrective action,
such as curricular or
structural change.
School
Improvement Plan
+ Supplemental
Services
+ School Choice
+ Corrective Action
+ RESTRUCTURING
In year one, the
district prepares a
plan for alternative
governance. In year
two of restructurning,
the district implements
the plan.
S C H O O L I M P ROV E M E N T P L A N
*The U.S. Department of Education has approved the ASD to offer supplemental services at Level 2 status and to move school choice to Level 3 status.
ASD has also been approved to directly provide supplemental services to its students.
School choice and open enrollment
Our district has an open enrollment policy, allowing students to attend schools outside their neighborhood if space is available
and if parents provide transportation**. For Title I schools in Level 3 or higher school improvement status, the district will
provide transportation to other schools. Parents must apply for transfers by August 13. Applications are available at your school,
at the district offices and online at www.asdk12.org. Some special programs offered at Title I schools may not be available at
other schools. The table below outlines choices available.
** Open enrollment not available at schools during the first year of a boundary change.
Title I School
Receiving schools
Airport Heights Elementary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nunaka Valley Elementary or Rogers Park Elementary*
Chinook Elementary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bayshore Elementary or Kincaid Elementary
Clark Middle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska Native Cultural Charter or Highland Tech Charter**
Fairview Elementary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inlet View Elementary or Turnagain Elementary
Lake Otis Elementary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rogers Park Elementary or Tudor Elementary
Muldoon Elementary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creekside Park Elementary or Nunaka Valley Elementary
North Star Elementary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Northwood ABC Elementary or Turnagain Elementary
Ptarmigan Elementary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creekside Park Elementary or Scenic Park Elementary
Russian Jack Elementary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creekside Park Elementary or Tudor Elementary
Spring Hill Elementary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scenic Park Elementary or Tudor Elementary***
Tyson Elementary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nunaka Valley Elementary or Scenic Park Elementary
Williwaw Elementary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inlet View Elementary or Kasuun Elementary
Willow Crest Elementary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inlet View Elementary or Northwood ABC Elementary
* Rogers Park is the only option available for grade 6 applicants from Airport Heights. **Highland Tech is the only option available for grade 8 applicants from Clark Middle School. *** Tudor Elementary is the
only option available for grade 6 applicants from Spring Hill.
How will this impact “receiving schools?”
The Anchorage School District has a 30-year history of promoting open enrollment and school choice within its schools and
programs. The transfer policy provided for in ESEA/NCLB is an extension of that philosophy. Transfers that occurred have
gone smoothly and provided great opportunities for cooperation between parents, staff and students. Receiving schools will
be staffed to accommodate students transferring. Please talk with your child’s principal if you have questions or concerns.
AYP is determined for:
• The Anchorage School District as a whole
• Each individual school
• Student groups at each school within the district, if the
group is large enough to be numerically significant
- African American
- Alaska Native & American Indian
- Asian
- Caucasian
- Hispanic
- Multi-Ethnic
- Economically Disadvantaged
- Students with Disabilities
- Limited English Proficiency
Consequences
• Schools that do not make AYP must noti­fy parents and
develop a school improvement plan.
• Extra services are offered to students if a Title I school
continues in school improvement status for a second
year.
• Schools receiving Title I funds that do not make AYP
three years in a row must offer students the choice to
transfer to another school with paid transportation.
• The district must take corrective action in Title I
schools not making AYP for four years in a row.
Corrective action could include changes in curriculum
or school structure.
• Non-Title I schools that do not make AYP two years
in a row continue to implement school improvement
plans.
• A school is eligible to exit school improvement status
if it makes AYP two years in a row.
District and school AYP designation information has
been provided by the Anchorage School District
Department of Assessment and Evaluation. Additional
information about ESEA/NCLB and Adequate Yearly
Progress is available on the federal website at
www.nclb.gov, on the state’s website at www.eed.state.
ak.us, and on the district’s website at www.asdk12.org.
●
●●
●
d
ofi
Pr
gli
sh
En
d
ite
●
●●
●●
●●
●●
●●
●●
●
cie
nc
y
ge
D
ith
Li
m
●
●●
For schools that did not make
adequate
yearly progress,
For schools
that did areas
not make adequate
needing
improvement:
yearly progress, areas needing
● Test participation (must be
improvement:
95% or better)
● Test participation
(must be 95% or
● Language
arts performance
● Mathematics
better) performance
● Graduation/attendance
rate
● Language arts performance
Mathematics
performance
The● data
used in this report
● Graduation/attendance
rate
is preliminary
only and has
been provided by the State
The data used in this report is
of Alaska's Department
preliminary
of Education
andonly
Early and has been provided
by
the
State
of
Alaska’s
Development. Preliminary
dataDepartment
of
Education
and
Early
Development.
is subject to change.
Preliminary data is subject to change.
●●
●
●●
sw
St
ud
en
t
om
●
●
●●
isa
bi
lit
ies
ta
va
n
isa
d
D
ica
lly
ic
hn
●
Ec
on
isp
a
H
W
hi
te
●
ul
tiEt
ni
c
ive
at
/N
●●
M
&
ive
at
N
As
ian
ric
an
Al
as
ka
id
e
ol
w
er
Pa
cifi
c
ian
Proficiency in language arts and math is determined by
performance on Alaska Standards Based Assessment
(grades 3 –10).
●
/O
th
In
d
Summary
AYP is reported as part of ESEA/NCLB, a national
education law. Alaska’s AYP calculations are based on
certain factors:
• Percentage of students meeting or exceeding state
standards in language arts and math.
• Testing participation rate – all schools, districts and
student groups must have at least 95 percent of their
students take the designated state tests.
• Schools must also make the “other academic indicator”
of average daily attendance or graduation rate.
no/Level 3
●
no/Level 4
yes
●
no/Level 5
yes
yes
yes
yes
●●
no/Level 5
yes
yes
yes
●
no/Level 3
●
no/Level 5
yes
no/Level 4
yes/Level 2
no/Level 5
yes/Level 2
yes/Level 4
yes
yes
no/Level 5
no/Level 5 ●●
●
no/Level 4
yes/Level 2
●
no/Level 5
yes
yes/Level 5
no/Level 4
no/Level 5
yes
no/Level 1
no/Level 1
●●
no/Level 5
no/Level 5
●
no/Level 5
no/Level 1
yes
yes
no/Level 2
yes/Level 3
no/Level 1
no/Level 5
no/Level 5
yes
yes
yes
yes
no/Level 1
yes
no/Level 2
no/Level 2
no/Level 4
●●
no/Level 5
no/Level 5
no/Level 2
yes
yes/Level 2
no/Level 3
no/Level 5
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
no/Level 5
●
no/Level 1
yes
yes
no/Level 1
no/Level 5
no/Level 3
no/Level 2
●
no/Level 1
yes
no/Level 5
no/Level 2
no/Level 3
yes
no/Level 2
yes/Level 2
no/Level 2
yes
no/Level 1
yes/Level 5
yes
yes
no/Level 5
●
no/Level 5
no/Level 5 ●●●●
yes/Level 5
●
no/Level 5
yes
yes/Level 2
H
aw
aii
an
Am
er
ica
n
Federal requirements for accountability in the Elementary
and Secondary Education Act (formerly known as No
Child Left Behind) mandate that all students in grades
3–10 score proficient for language arts and mathematics
by 2014. Districts and schools in Alaska must demonstrate
Adequate Yearly Progress toward meeting that goal.
-A
m
er
ica
n
Adequate Yearly Progress
Abbott Loop
Airport Heights
Alaska Native Cultural Charter School
Alaska State School for Deaf & Hard of Hearing
Alpenglow
Aquarian Charter
Aurora
AVAIL
Bartlett High School
Baxter
Bayshore
Bear Valley
Begich Middle School
Benson Secondary School
Birchwood ABC
Bowman
Campbell
Central Middle School of Science
Chester Valley
Chinook
Chugach Optional
Chugiak Elementary
Chugiak High School
Clark Middle School
COHO School
College Gate
Continuation Program
Creekside Park
Crossroads
Denali Montessori
Dimond High School
Eagle Academy Charter
Eagle River Elementary
Eagle River High School
East High School
Fairview
Family Partnership Charter
Fire Lake
Frontier Charter
Girdwood
Gladys Wood
Goldenview Middle School
Government Hill
Gruening Middle School
Hanshew Middle School
Highland Tech Charter
Homestead
Huffman
Inlet View
Kasuun
Kincaid
Klatt
Lake Hood
Lake Otis
McLaughlin Secondary School
Mears Middle School
Mirror Lake Middle School
Mount Spurr
Mountain View
Muldoon
North Star
Northern Lights ABC
Northwood ABC
Nunaka Valley
Ocean View
O’Malley
Orion
Polaris K–12 School
Ptarmigan
Rabbit Creek
Ravenwood
Rilke Schule Charter
Rogers Park
Romig Middle School
Russian Jack
Sand Lake
SAVE High School
Scenic Park
Service High School
South High School
Spring Hill
Steller Secondary School
Susitna
Taku
Trailside
Tudor
Turnagain
Tyson
Ursa Major
Ursa Minor
Wendler Middle School
West High School
Whaley Center
Williwaw
Willow Crest
Winterberry Charter
Wonder Park
Af
SCHOOL
Adequate
Yearly
Progress?
Sc
ho
TITLE I SCHOOLS ARE INDICATED IN BOLD BLUE TYPE
Most Sincerely,
Guide
for
Parents
Isl
an
de
r
Overall, test scores are up, and that’s a positive sign of progress made over the last year. Based on Adequate
Yearly Progress standards, 47 ASD schools met every requirement for which they were accountable; an increase
of eight schools over last year. Sixteen schools missed AYP by just one target; 34 schools missed by two or more
targets.
The district’s language arts scores, a combination of reading and writing, held steady, moving up slightly from
80.4 to 80.6 percent as compared to last year. Math scores increased from 71.4 to 73.5 percent.
I am pleased to see that, overall, our test scores are moving in the right direction. I applaud the flexibility of
staff and the leadership of our principals as education evolves and adapts to meet the needs of a high-tech, global
economy. I expect nothing but the highest quality work from district employees as well as our students.
The district’s preliminary graduation rate is 68.26 percent, down 1 percent from last year. This number generally
increases before becoming final later this fall and is significantly higher than in 2004-05, when 59.3 percent of ASD
students were graduating in four years. We will continue efforts to assist students to be college and career ready by
using our general and stimulus funds to place Career Guides in middle schools and Graduation Coaches in high
schools. We want all of our students to graduate with a high school diploma, no matter how long it takes.
The district’s complete review of student achievement, test scores and progress toward achievement of board
goals will come with the release of Profile of Performance in late October. Profile of Performance is a thorough
report of ASD demographics and academic achievement by students. Unlike AYP, which evaluates only language
arts and math scores, Profile of Performance tracks students’ proficiency in reading, writing, math and science.
AYP has helped the district in many ways. We now do a better job of tracking smaller subgroups of students and
monitoring their progress. However, AYP is just one form of assessment conducted by the district. We determine
student progress based on the complete test results found in the Profile of Performance.
I encourage you to review the Profile of Performance and become informed about the quality of education
that children in our community are receiving. Upon reviewing the information, I’m confident that you’ll agree our
students are receiving an excellent education.
●●
●
●
●●
●●
●
●●
●●
●
●
●●
●●
●
●●
●●
●●
●●
●
●
●●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●●
●●
●
●●
●●
●
●●
●
●
●●
●
●
●
●
●
●●
●
Glossary of Terms
Adequate Yearly Progress
(AYP): Adequate Yearly Progress is
the minimum level of improvement
that school districts and schools must
achieve each year as determined
under the federal ESEA/NCLB
guidelines.
Annual Measurable Objective
(AMO): The percentage of
proficient students needed in order
to obtain AYP. Student proficiency
levels rise every three years.
2009-10
●●
●
●●
Lang. arts
77.18%
Math
66.09%
Beginning in 2010-11 AMO levels
will rise each year until they reach
100 percent in 2013-14.
Percent Proficient: Set by the
state, this is the percentage of
students that must be proficient on
exams each year to make AYP.
●
●
●
Proficiency: Proficiency is mastery
or the ability to do something at
grade level.
●●
●●
Title I: Title I provides federal
funding for schools to help students
who are behind academically or
at risk of falling behind. Funding is
based on the number of low-income
children in a school, generally those
eligible for the free lunch program.
●●
●●
●
●
●
●
●
●●
●●
●●
●
●
●●
●
●
●●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●●
●●
●●●
●
●●●
●
●
●●
●●
●
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
ASD INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES AND CURRICULA
Accelerated Math ............................................................................................................................3
Achieve3000™................................................................................................................................3
AIMSweb ........................................................................................................................................3
Algebra 1 Rescue! ...........................................................................................................................4
Apex ................................................................................................................................................4
Ashlock............................................................................................................................................5
Aspire ..............................................................................................................................................5
Bridges to Literature........................................................................................................................6
Carnegie Math .................................................................................................................................6
Carousel of IDEAS..........................................................................................................................7
Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach (CALLA) ......................................................7
Cognitive Tutor Algebra .................................................................................................................7
Conscious Discipline®....................................................................................................................8
Consortium on Reading Excellence (CORE) ..................................................................................8
Corrective Math...............................................................................................................................8
Corrective Reading..........................................................................................................................9
Do The Math ...................................................................................................................................9
Early Intervention in Reading (EIR®) ............................................................................................9
Educational Technology................................................................................................................10
English in a Flash ..........................................................................................................................10
English Language Learning Instruction System (ELLIS) .............................................................11
Exemplars Math ............................................................................................................................11
Extended Learning Opportunities .................................................................................................12
Everyday Mathematics ..................................................................................................................12
Fast ForWord.................................................................................................................................12
First Steps in Mathematics ............................................................................................................13
Handwriting Without Tears® (HWT) ...........................................................................................13
Harcourt Brace ..............................................................................................................................13
Houghton Mifflin Reading ............................................................................................................14
Jamestown Reading Fluency Program ..........................................................................................14
Kagan Cooperative Learning.........................................................................................................14
LANGUAGE! ...............................................................................................................................14
Larson Math ..................................................................................................................................15
Lexia Reading................................................................................................................................15
Lindamood-Bell Learning Processes.............................................................................................15
Love and Logic..............................................................................................................................16
Mathematics Navigator .................................................................................................................16
MathScape .....................................................................................................................................16
MY Access!®................................................................................................................................17
Number Worlds .............................................................................................................................17
Parental Involvement.....................................................................................................................18
PASSport to Success .....................................................................................................................18
Phonics for Reading ......................................................................................................................18
Read 180........................................................................................................................................18
Version 9/30/10
Page 1
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
Read Naturally...............................................................................................................................19
Reading Advantage .......................................................................................................................19
Reading Mastery............................................................................................................................19
Response to Intervention (RTI) .....................................................................................................20
Rewards and Rewards Plus ...........................................................................................................20
Road to the Code ...........................................................................................................................20
Saxon Math....................................................................................................................................21
Science Notebooks (Inquiry-Based)..............................................................................................21
Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol – SIOP......................................................................21
Six-Minute Solution ......................................................................................................................22
Six Traits Writing ..........................................................................................................................22
Skills Alaska..................................................................................................................................22
Small Group Intervention / Remediation Instruction ....................................................................23
STELLAR/Strategies for Building Academic Language ..............................................................23
Step Up to Writing ........................................................................................................................24
Strategic Instruction Model (SIM) ................................................................................................25
Success for All Reading Programs ................................................................................................25
SuccessMaker ................................................................................................................................26
TouchMath ....................................................................................................................................26
TransMath .....................................................................................................................................26
Treasure Chest ...............................................................................................................................27
Waterford.......................................................................................................................................27
WhyTry .........................................................................................................................................27
Write Source..................................................................................................................................28
The following entries are summaries of SBR abstracts published by
the providers of the listed strategies and curricula.
Version 9/30/10
Page 2
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
Accelerated Math
Accelerated Math, published by Renaissance Learning, is a software tool used to customize
assignments and monitor progress in math for students in grades 1–12. The Accelerated Math
software creates individualized assignments aligned with state standards and national guidelines,
scores student work, and generates reports on student progress. The software can be used in
conjunction with the existing math curriculum to add practice components and potentially aid
teachers in differentiating instruction through the program’s progress-monitoring data.
Renaissance Learning products and best classroom practices are supported by a body of evidence.
Eighty percent of the research has been conducted independently or externally by university
researchers, research firms, or school personnel. Study designs include experimental and quasiexperimental as well as correlational, case study, and psychometric (reliability and validity) research.
Many have been published in peer review journals. As of September 2007, 66 research studies and
reviews support the effectiveness of Accelerated Math.
Achieve3000™
Achieve3000™ solutions are designed and built upon decades of scientific research into how children
learn to read, including studies from the National Writing Commission, the National Reading Panel,
Carol Anne Tomlinson and more. In addition, they utilize accepted and proven benchmarks for
assessment and instruction - from the Lexile Framework to the principles of Bloom's Taxonomy.
Achieve3000 understands that any effective solution to improve student performance must also
motivate students.
Achieve3000™ solutions utilize a five-step pedagogy that is designed to improve students' reading
comprehension, vocabulary development, reading fluency and writing skills. Equally important, their
solutions are designed to motivate students and encourage use, as well as to develop an intrinsic
interest in literacy and learning. Achieve3000™ Differentiated Instruction Solutions are scientifically
proven to accelerate results in language arts instruction in the form of Lexile™ gains and dramatically
increased scores on end-of-the-year standardized reading tests - including the Scholastic Reading
Inventory (SRI), TerraNova and the Iowa Test of Basic Skills tests. In addition, the differentiated
instruction component of their solutions is also scientifically proven effective. Importantly, the results
have been proven in multiple independent, large-scale scientific evaluations - aligning Achieve3000
with the criteria stipulated by NCLB for selecting and implementing educational programs.
AIMSweb
AIMSweb is a progress monitoring system based on direct, frequent and continuous student
assessment. The results are reported to students, parents, teachers and administrators via a web-based
data management and reporting system to determine Response To Intervention (RTI).
The AIMSweb system components provide one comprehensive progress monitoring and RTI
Solution. The three components are:
Version 9/30/10
Page 3
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
1. Benchmark – Assess all students three times per year for universal screening (early
identification), general education progress monitoring, and Adequate Yearly Progress
accountability.
2. Strategic Monitor – Monitor at-risk students monthly and evaluate the effectiveness of
instructional changes.
3. Progress Monitor – Write individualized annual goals and monitor more frequently for those who
need intensive instructional services.
Scientific research has shown that when teachers use systematic progress monitoring to track their
students’ progress they are better able to identify students in need of additional or different form of
instruction, they design stronger instructional programs, and their students achieve better. For more
information on AIMSweb, go to http://www.aimsweb.com/.
Algebra 1 Rescue!
Algebra 1 Rescue! is an intervention resource that:
•
•
•
•
is based on mastery of objectives, rather than the traditional classroom lesson approach
has numerous lessons per objective to choose from based on students’ needs
addresses all modalities: auditory, visual, and kinesthetic, with a variety of lesson activities
zeroes in on the conceptual level, then builds on those concepts through practice and problemsolving activities
Algebra 1 Rescue! is an approach to teaching algebra that is designed for all students. It can be
implemented as a supplement to an existing program or as a stand-alone curriculum. It is a tool that
has:
1. Concept-driven objectives that are logically and systematically sequenced
2. Numerous whole-class, small-group, and individual practice activities for each objective,
including multisensory and hands-on, that allow for plenty of feedback
3. Reflection and problem-solving activities that require students to apply the skills and concepts
they have learned
Any components of Algebra 1 Rescue! can be used as supplements in other algebra curricula to
deepen learning with increased focus, extended practice, and effective problem-solving.
A significant amount of data has been collected regarding the way students best learn algebra. This
data validates the instructional strategies utilized in Algebra 1 Rescue! Each of the 60 objectives and
600 activities in the curriculum are grounded in scientific research and aligned with the National
Council for Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standards.
Apex
Apex Essentials Courses offer a streamlined curriculum to meet high school graduation requirements
and support remediation, intervention, and credit recovery programs. Apex Essentials Courses
provide a complete scope and sequence with original instructional content that focuses student
attention on mastering critical skills and developing an understanding of key concepts.
Version 9/30/10
Page 4
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
Information is presented in small, manageable chunks that require students to make decisions as they
navigate through it. Strict attention is given to keeping sentence and paragraph length short in
accordance with online reading habits and readability principles. Images, sound tracks, short movies,
animations, charts, and graphs integrated throughout the text provide alternative representations and
address different learning styles. Prompts and interactive exercises give students frequent
opportunities to check their understanding and apply what they learn as they progress through a
subject. Rollover vocabulary provides important assistance to students who may otherwise be held
back in their learning due to their reading level. Manipulables provide hands-on opportunities for
students to master difficult concepts.
In Apex Essentials Courses, the emphasis is on computer-graded assessments. Diagnostic
assessments included for each unit can be used as a pre- or a post-test to gauge a student’s level of
knowledge and understanding. Individual study plans are generated based on performance on the
diagnostics outline a personalized learning path for every student. Computer-graded quizzes
integrated throughout the instructional content give students and teachers immediate feedback on an
ongoing basis. Students are required to demonstrate what they have learned through computer-graded
unit tests and semester exams.
Apex Essentials Courses include optional teacher-graded summative assessments that can be used to
evaluate higher-order and critical thinking skills. Apex Courses in English include multiple teachergraded writing assignments as well as teacher-graded semester exams, which are important
components in the evaluation of a student’s writing ability.
Ashlock
Ashlock is a method of teaching that helps teachers make the connection between scientifically-based
reading research instruction and their current program adoption. Ashlock uses lesson maps that
outline for teachers the pieces of reading instruction that are a priority for inclusion in a core reading
block. Lesson maps also provide additional explicit practice connected to the core program that uses
research-based direct instruction templates to support struggling teachers. For more information go to
http://www.ashlockconsulting.com/index.html
Aspire
The Aspire curriculum was developed under a Bilingual Education Career Ladder Program
(OBEMLA) grant from the U.S. Department of Education to the University of Central Florida (UCF).
The project had two goals: 1) to improve educational services to students learning English by
providing paraprofessional inservice training; and 2) to increase the number of bilingual
paraprofessionals working toward a teaching certificate.
The Center for Applied Linguistics (CAL) worked closely with UCF to implement the project and
was responsible for designing and implementing the paraprofessional in-service training program and
disseminating the resulting professional development curriculum.
The University of Central Florida developed the criteria and application process by which
paraprofessionals were selected for tuition support and organized a network of community colleges
and universities, throughout the six targeted counties, which Aspire paraprofessionals could attend to
earn a teaching certificate.
Version 9/30/10
Page 5
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
Bridges to Literature
McDougal Littell’s Bridges to Literature program meets the requirements of programs that were
established in the No Child Left Behind Act. The program, designed to bridge the gap between grade
level and reading ability for struggling readers in grades 6 through 12, is built on sound reading
research and research-based instructional strategies demonstrated to be effective. The program
components are based on research findings from Put Reading First. In addition, the Teacher’s
Edition provides explicit instruction lessons, teacher modeling and scaffolding, and student
applications. The Teacher’s Edition pages present direct instruction for each focus skill and include
special SkillBuilder Copymasters. The Bridges to Literature Assessment Book provides diagnostic and
prescriptive components, including placement, mid-year and end-of-year tests, which help teachers
determine each student’s progress. Finally, McDougal Littell correlated its program to nine researchbased instructional strategies that have been proven to have a positive effect on learning and increased
student achievement as shown by educational researchers Robert J. Marzano, Debra J. Pickering, and
Jan E. Pollock in Classroom Instruction That Works, Research-Based Strategies for Increasing
Student Achievement published by the Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development
(ASCD).
Carnegie Math
Carnegie Learning's curricula are based on over 20 years of research into how students think, learn
and apply new knowledge in mathematics. The curricula use students' intuitive problem solving
abilities as a powerful bridge to more formal and sophisticated mathematical comprehension.
Carnegie Math’s curricula immerse and engage students in mathematical problem solving. The
software component allows students to work at their own pace. The system is built on cognitive
models, which represent the knowledge a student might possess about a given subject. The software
assesses the prior mathematical knowledge of students on a step-by-step basis and presents curricula
tailored to their individual skill levels.
All of the Cognitive Tutor® mathematics curricula from Carnegie Learning are based on scientific
research from Carnegie Mellon University, along with field tests in schools throughout the United
States. The Cognitive Tutors are based on the ACT-R theory of learning, memory and performance,
which has been validated by hundreds of lab and field studies. The Cognitive Tutors themselves were
developed using a rigorous empirical testing process resulting in over 50 publications validating the
effectiveness of cognitive modeling.
Carnegie Math includes Bridge to Algebra, which is built on Cognitive Tutor® technology, a
research-based math curricula. Bridge to Algebra combines software, text and classroom instruction
covering the five middle school content strands identified in the NCTM standards and most state
standards (number, geometry, measurement, probability and statistics, algebra) and emphasizes
problem solving and mathematical literacy. Bridge to Algebra is also supported by a comprehensive
professional development plan.
The blended curriculum of software and text targets students who may need additional preparation for
Algebra I. Throughout the materials, explicit connections are made between different representations,
such as fractions, decimals, and percents; visual modeling tools enhance the understanding of these
representations..
Version 9/30/10
Page 6
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
Carousel of IDEAS
Carousel of IDEAS is a comprehensive language development program designed for K-5 English
learners at all stages of language proficiency: beginning, early intermediate, intermediate, early
advanced, and advanced. It emphasizes a focus on authentic communication as well as grammatical
accuracy. Students using Carousel of IDEAS program learn to communicate in social settings and
develop academic language proficiency. The program integrates listening, speaking, reading, and
writing with major content areas and emphasizes fine literature, phonics, and the development of
literacy skills.
Carousel of IDEAS is based on educational research and effective practices that include:
• Active Learning and Prior Knowledge
• Authentic and Meaningful Communication
• Cooperative Learning Groups
• Family Involvement
• Learning Modalities
• Phonemic Awareness and Phonics Instruction
• Positive Learning Environment
• Text Comprehension
For more information go to http://www.ballard-tighe.com/carouselInservice/default.asp
Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach (CALLA)
CALLA is an instructional strategy used with students who are learning using a second language. For
a description of its implementation, assessment of its success, and further research-based references -download The Bilingual Research Journal article found online at
http://www.ncela.gwu.edu/pubs/nabe/brj/v19/19_34_chamot.pdf (October 2006).
Cognitive Tutor Algebra
Cognitive Tutor Algebra is curriculum built on Cognitive Tutor® technology. It combines software,
text and classroom instruction covering the five middle school content strands identified in the
NCTM standards and most state standards (number, geometry, measurement, probability and
statistics, algebra) and emphasizes problem solving and mathematical literacy. Cognitive Tutor
Algebra is also supported by a comprehensive professional development plan.
This blended curriculum of software and text targets students who may need additional preparation
for Algebra I. Throughout the materials, explicit connections are made between different
representations, such as fractions, decimals, and percents; visual modeling tools enhance the
understanding of these representations.
Version 9/30/10
Page 7
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
Conscious Discipline®
Conscious Discipline® is an emotional intelligence program developed by Dr. Becky A. Bailey
which consists of brain smart strategies for responding instead of reacting to conflict moments. It is
through a person’s ability to calmly respond, that everyday conflict moments become the teachable
moments, whereby the teacher can model and teach respect, helpfulness, kindness, honesty and
compassion.
Use of the Conscious Discipline ® approach is a specific process which promotes permanent
behavioral changes in parents, children, and teens. When they love and interact consciously with
their children, change takes place. Children are no longer motivated by external rewards. They
develop motivation to change due to their own intrinsic beliefs about self and others. They move
away from the traditional “reward and punishment” paradigm which is based on creating fear in the
child. Instead, the Conscious Discipline® approach is love-based, which encourages parent and child
to balance thinking with emotions. Children begin to create healthy solutions to their own dilemmas
under the loving guidance of the parent or teacher. In addition, children become more accountable
for their own behaviors rather than shifting the blame to others.
Consortium on Reading Excellence (CORE)
CORE follows guidelines established in the National Research Council Report Preventing Reading
Difficulties in Young Children, the National Reading Panel Report, and Put Reading First. The
components of good instruction are:
• Phoneme awareness
• Systematic, explicit phonics
• Fluency
• Vocabulary knowledge
• The process of comprehension
• High-frequency word instruction
• Multisyllabic word attack skills
• Spelling instruction
• Book discussions
• Independent, wide reading
The CORE program is also based on the best practices research on effective professional
development as described in The New Structure of School Improvement: Inquiring Schools and
Achieving Students. (Joyce, B., E. Calhoun, and D. Hopkins). CORE integrates its research-based
approach to reading instruction on the concept of a stool with three legs. All three legs must be firmly
in place to support reading instruction that gets results. The three legs are the following:
• Leg 1-ongoing professional development to build research-based knowledge and skills
• Leg 2-support in selecting and implementing effective research-based instructional tools
• Leg 3-establishment of local support systems to build sustainable success.
Corrective Math
Version 9/30/10
Page 8
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
Corrective Math provides intensive support for students who have difficulty with mathematics. The
series is organized into seven strategic modules that provide teacher-directed instruction on critical
skills and concepts which struggling students often fail to grasp. The seven modules are addition,
subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, rations, and equations.
Corrective Reading
Corrective Reading (Grossen, McGraw Hill) is designed to help students who have fallen behind in
their reading skills and for whom other methods have not been successful. It allows students to use a
decoding program, a comprehension program, or both. Corrective Reading includes a point system
based on realistic goals to motivate students who often expect to fail.
It is a complete core program that uses:
•
•
•
•
Tightly sequenced, carefully planned lessons that give struggling students the structure to become
skilled, fluent readers and better learners.
Four levels for decoding plus four levels for comprehension address the varied reading deficits
and skill levels found among older students.
A point system based on realistic goals to motivate students who are often expected to fail.
Even non-readers show immediate improvement in word recognition, fluency and
comprehension.
Do The Math
Do The Math is a research-based math intervention program designed to support students who are
struggling with elementary arithmetic. The program was developed to address the growing national
concern regarding mathematics performance in this country. The National Mathematics Advisory
Panel’s Final Report (2008) states that, “to prepare students for algebra, the curriculum must
simultaneously develop conceptual understanding, computational fluency, and problem-solving
skills.” With a focus on Numbers and Operations—the cornerstone of elementary math education and
a critical foundation of algebra—Do The Math supports students in building a strong foundation in
computation, number sense, and problem solving. The research foundation paper can be found online
at http://teacher.scholastic.com/products/dothemath/pdfs/DTM_Arithmethic_Intervention.pdf.
Early Intervention in Reading (EIR®)
Early Intervention in Reading (EIR) is an Internet-delivered professional development program for
teachers to help struggling young readers in grades K-4. EIR is a daily, 20-minute supplemental
small group reading program that helps struggling first and second graders learn to read and helps
build fluency and comprehension in grade 3 and 4 students who need more reading support. The
kindergarten program helps students develop phonemic awareness and emergent literacy skills as they
interact with literature.
Research conducted over 11 years has found that across multiple districts, 72% of first graders at risk
of reading failure who received the EIR® program were reading independently by the end of first
grade (Taylor, 2001). In follow-up evaluations, 91% of the students we have followed from grade 1 to
grade 2 have been found to be reading on a grade 2 level in May of grade 2. 85% of the children who
Version 9/30/10
Page 9
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
entered second grade unable to read at mid-first grade level were reading on a second grade level in
May after receiving the second grade EIR® program (Taylor, 1998a). In two follow-up studies, it was
found that 92% of the children who were in EIR® in grade 2 were reading on a third grade level in
grade 3. Kindergarten children who had EIR® were found to be significantly higher in May in rhyme,
phonemic awareness, and word dictation than comparison students (Taylor, 1999, 2001). Children in
EIR® in grades 3 and 4 made significantly larger gains in their reading fluency than average readers
in their class, approaching the grade level mean in their district in May (Taylor, 2001).
Educational Technology
There is research base for the use of technology in increasing student achievement. In a 2000 study
commissioned by the Software and Information Industry Association, Sivin-Kachala and Bialo (2000)
reviewed 311 research studies on the effectiveness of technology on student achievement. Their
findings revealed positive and consistent patterns when students were engaged in technology-rich
environments, including significant gains and achievement in all subject areas, increased achievement
in preschool through high school for both regular and special needs students, and improved attitudes
toward learning and increased self-esteem.
O'Dwyer, Russell, Bebell, and Tucker-Seeley (2005) found that, while controlling for both prior
achievement and socioeconomic status, fourth-grade students who reported greater frequency of
technology use at school to edit papers were likely to have higher total English/Language arts test
scores and higher writing scores on fourth grade test scores on the Massachusetts Comprehensive
Assessment System (MCAS) English/Language Arts test.
English in a Flash
English in a Flash helps students learn the sounds, vocabulary, and basic grammar of English very
quickly so they can catch up academically with their peers who grew up speaking English.
With English in a Flash, students learn English the same way children learn their native language—
from the bottom up. English in a Flash provides the practice and repetition needed to quickly acquire
the building blocks of language.
English in a Flash helps students:
•
Acquire English language proficiency in as little as half the time of what is typical in language
learning classes.
•
Focus on vocabulary while learning grammatical structures implicitly.
•
Move quickly from learning English to learning in English.
•
Maximize exposure to comprehensible input.
•
Improve listening, speaking, reading, and writing in English.
English in a Flash is a patented, innovative, research-based approach to dramatically accelerate
English-language learning. The English in a Flash approach mirrors how children learn their native
language by providing students the practice and repetition needed to quickly acquire a solid
foundation of core vocabulary, the English sound system, and basic grammatical structures. It
Version 9/30/10
Page 10
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
provides educators with timely feedback on student progress to help them personalize instruction and
intervene effectively when necessary.
English Language Learning Instruction System (ELLIS)
The document, Applied Research in ELLIS, provides the research behind English Language Learning
Instruction System (ELLIS). ELLIS represents the fulfillment of curricula requirements in the No
Child Left Behind Act. The research is based on more than 100 studies including benchmark studies
spanning decades of research as well as some of the most current research in the relevant fields. The
information is presented systematically: 1) An explanation of a principle or theory in language
acquisition and instruction; 2) A description of how that principle is applied in ELLIS; and 3) A list
of some of the significant empirical and meta-research studies supporting that theory or principle.
Applied Research in ELLIS is available for download at
http://www.ellis.com/whyellis/esl_research.htm (October 2006).
Exemplars Math
Exemplars Math material is based on scientific research that underscores the following about student
achievement:
1. Students who do demanding work in school perform better than students who are given less
demanding work.
Research done by the Chicago School Research Project, supported by the Annenberg Foundation,
reports the results of a three-year study of more than 400 classrooms from 19 different Chicago
elementary schools. The intellectual demands of more than 2,000 classroom assignments given to
5,000 third, sixth, and eighth grade students in writing and math were analyzed for their level of
difficulty, and linked to the learning gains on standardized tests in reading, writing and mathematics.
Three standards were used to determine the level of intellectual challenge for each assignment. They
were the extent that the assignment: (1) requires the construction of knowledge through disciplined
inquiry including the use of prior knowledge and in-depth understanding; (2) requires elaborated
communication; and (3) has value beyond success at school.
2. Student achievement is strongly related to effective assessment practices in the classroom,
including student self and peer assessment.
A study conducted by Paul Black and Dylan William on the effect of classroom assessment practices
on student achievement examined 250 articles and chapters on the subject. The study concluded that
effective classroom assessment has a major impact on student achievement.
3. The style of classroom instruction influences student performance.
In 2001 the RAND Corporation published, "Hands-on Science and Student Achievement", a study
written by Allen Ruby that examines the relationship between hands-on science and student
achievement on both standardized and performance-based tests.
Version 9/30/10
Page 11
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
The study used two sources of data, a RAND survey of 1,400 eighth graders and their teachers and
the National Educational Longitudinal Survey of 1988 (NELS:88), a national survey of approximately
25,000 students in 8th, 10th and 12th grades and their teachers. Students in the RAND survey took
both standardized and performance tests. In NELS:88, students took only multiple-choice science
tests. In both studies, teachers and students reported on the amount of hands-on science they engaged
in during science classes and the data show hands-on science is positively related to test scores on
both types of tests. The RAND survey showed a strong relationship between doing hands-on science
and achievement on both performance tests and multiple-choice tests. In NELS:88, the results
indicate that students in classrooms with hands-on science showed higher levels of achievement. The
evidence for the relationship between hands-on science and multiple-choice tests is particularly strong
because it is supported by two different surveys using different multiple-choice tests.
Extended Learning Opportunities
Extended Learning Opportunities (ELOs) include a broad range of programs that provide children
with academic enrichment and/or supervised activities beyond the traditional school day and, in some
cases, beyond the traditional school year. Research suggests that regular participation in programs
that provide academic and social activities contribute positively to children’s academic and social
development. A meta-analysis of afterschool programs that focused on personal and social
development found that the programs did, in fact, have a positive impact on students’ grades,
academic achievement, and self esteem. Programs that extend the school year can do more than
reduce summer learning loss—they can increase academic achievement, especially for children in
poverty. However, researchers point out that simply extending the school day or school year has little
effect on student learning unless programs make use of effective teaching strategies and curricula
designed to engage students.
Everyday Mathematics
Everyday Mathematics is a research-based curriculum developed by the University of Chicago School
Mathematics Project. For research papers and other print materials, see
http://everydaymath.uchicago.edu/educators/references.shtml. This website includes the following
abstract, The Research Basis of the Everyday Mathematics Curriculum by Andrew Isaacs, William
Carroll, and Max Bell (2001).
According to David J. Hoff of Education Week, “Everyday Mathematics, which is used by 3 million
U.S. students in 175,000 classrooms, was deemed to raise students’ test scores by an average of 12
percentile points in a review of four studies reanalyzed by the What Works Clearinghouse at the U.S.
Department of Education. Based on those results, the report said the curriculum has “potentially
positive effects,” the second-highest category on its ranking scale.” (September 20, 2006).
Fast ForWord
The Fast ForWord program has an extensive research base. A Controlled Randomized Clinical Trial
(1994-1995) was conducted at Rutgers University in Newark, New Jersey. The clinical results were
published in the January 1996 issue of Science, a peer-reviewed journal (Tallal, et. Al., Science. 271:
81-84). The early data showed rapid improvements in language skills with the research prototype of
Fast ForWord Language, including significant gains in oral language comprehension, speech
discrimination, grammar and syntax.
Version 9/30/10
Page 12
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
A Multi-Site Field Study conducted in 1996 in collaboration with over 60 independent professionals
at 35 sites in the United States and Canada proved the results in a “real world” setting. After Fast
ForWord Language participation, children experienced the same dramatic improvements in language
as those who participated in the initial trial.
First Steps in Mathematics
First Steps in Mathematics is a research-based program that provides teachers with a mathematics
background, diagnostic tools to assess student understanding, and learning activities to further
students' conceptual growth. A key focus is on developing the ability to make accurate professional
judgments and decisions about student learning. Time-tested by educators around the world, First
Steps Professional Development’s suite of courses and educational resources are researched and
designed with the Education Department of Western Australia and Edith Cowan University in Perth,
Western Australia. To learn more about the research base for First Steps, go online to
http://www.stepspd.org/ (October 2006).
Handwriting Without Tears® (HWT)
Handwriting Without Tears® (HWT) is a research-based program in making legible and fluent
handwriting an easy and automatic skill for all students. HWT uses fun, entertaining, and
educationally sound instructional methods to teach handwriting to all students:pre-k through cursive.
The well-planned lessons require minimal preparation time.
According to research, handwriting is an essential skill for both children and adults (Feder &
Majnemer, 2007). Even in the age of technology, handwriting remains the primary tool of
communication and knowledge assessment for students in the classroom. Children spend a majority
of their day using handwriting skills. In addition, the demands for handwriting increase
with age. Studies have estimated that between 10 to 30 percent of elementary school children
struggle with handwriting (Karlsdottir & Stephansson, 2002, as cited in Feder & Majnemer, 2007).
Research literature extensively documents the consequences of poor handwriting on academic
performance. Graham, Harris and Fink (2000) suggest that children who experience difficulty
mastering this skill may avoid writing and decide that they cannot write, leading to arrested writing
development. Other experts claim that illegible handwriting has secondary effects on school
achievement and self-esteem (Malloy-Miller, Polatajko & Anstett, 1995).
Children with poor handwriting skills will also have difficulty in other academic areas. Recent
research implies that handwriting is critical to the production of creative and well-written text
(Graham & Harris, 2005). Handwriting affects both fluency and the quality of the composition. For a
detailed report on the research behind HWT go to
http://www.hwtears.com/files/HWT%20Research%20Review.pdf.
Harcourt Brace
Harcourt Brace is a research-based, developmental reading/language arts program. The program
includes explicit phonics instruction; direct reading instruction; guided reading strategies; phonemic
awareness instruction; systematic, intervention strategies; integrated language arts components; and
Version 9/30/10
Page 13
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
state-of-the-art assessment tools ensure every student successfully learns to read. For more
information on the research go to www.harcourt.com/bu_info/harcourt_school.html (September
2006).
Houghton Mifflin Reading
The Houghton-Mifflin Reading program meets the criteria for effective reading instruction as
established by the National Reading Panel Report. In preliminary results of the effectiveness of the
Houghton-Mifflin Reading program, significantly positive effects were seen on students’ vocabulary
development. Third graders in classrooms where Houghton-Mifflin Reading is used as the primary
reading curriculum show statistically significant gains on the vocabulary subtest on the ITBS.
Compared to the control group of non-HMR users, there is a slightly higher proportion of grades 2
and 3 students in HMR classrooms who improve their vocabulary test scores from below grade level
to at or above grade level over the course of one school year. (Executive Summary of the Scientific
Research Base and Program Efficacy, Houghton-Mifflin Company, 2002).
Jamestown Reading Fluency Program
Jamestown's Reading Fluency is a research-based program to increase fluency in reading. Students
work in pairs and, at comfortable levels, practice reading aloud smoothly, accurately, and
expressively. One student reads aloud a narrative fiction or nonfiction passage from the nonconsumable Reader. A partner uses the consumable Reader's Record, marking errors and scoring the
oral reading. Repeated readings encourage students to improve their fluency. For more information
go to http://www.glencoe.com/jamestown/reading_rate/reading_fluency.php#info
Kagan Cooperative Learning
Kagan Cooperative Learning is based on a research program conducted by Dr. Spencer Kagan
beginning in 1968. Dr. Kagan and his associates discovered that, world-wide, children of all ages in
many parts of the world became more cooperative when they were placed in certain types of
situations. Dr. Kagan began a research program to apply those findings to classrooms. Dr. Kagan
created simple “structures” that allow teachers to guide the interaction of students. Kagan's structures
not only lead to greater cooperativeness; they have proven positive results in many areas, including
greater academic achievement, improved ethnic relations, enhanced self-esteem, harmonious
classroom climate, and the development of social skills and character virtues. Kagan Structures align
instruction with how the brain best learns and engage the range of multiple intelligences. Kagan
Structures are used world-wide in kindergarten classrooms and college lecture halls, in all academic
subject areas.
Different structures are designed for different outcomes, including enhanced mastery of subject
matter, improved thinking skills, teambuilding, classbuilding, development of social character and
social skills, communication skills, classroom management, classroom discipline, and development of
and engagement of each of the multiple intelligences.
LANGUAGE!
Version 9/30/10
Page 14
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
Based in research and proven effective in schools across the country, LANGUAGE! was created for
students in grades 3–12 who score at or below the 35th percentile on national norm-referenced
reading tests. LANGUAGE! is appropriate for students in general education and also supports the
special instructional needs of English language learners (ELL) and Individualized Education Program
(IEP) populations. Through a six-step lesson design, LANGUAGE! teaches students the structure and
use of all language systems necessary for successful reading and writing.
• Phonemic Awareness and Phonics
• Word Recognition and Spelling
• Vocabulary and Morphology
• Grammar and Usage
• Listening and Reading Comprehension
• Speaking and Writing
For documents speaking to the research base of LANGUAGE! Go on line to:
< http://store.cambiumlearning.com/research.aspx> (September 2006).
Larson Math
Larson Math utilizes multimedia software programs developed with the National Council of Teachers
in Mathematics Standards as a guide. Larson Math is a program that can be individualized to match a
student proficiency level and correlates with Alaska GLE’s and math content standards. For more
information go to: http://meridiancg.com/menucontent/menu_correlations/correlations_ak.htm
(September 2006).
Lexia Reading
Lexia Reading software supports reading skills development in students at all levels of ability. It
builds skills with explicit practice in phonemic awareness and phonics while promoting gains in
fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension.
Since 1984, Lexia has been developing software to assess and improve reading acquisition and
cognitive development. Many years of chool-based research have shown that using Lexia software
results in significant gains in reading skills performance.
Results of scientifically-based research studies prove that Lexia improves reading scores in K – 3 and
Middle Schools. In all cases, students received instruction consistent with the research-based teaching
methods identified by the National Reading Panel and the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, which
included systematic instruction in phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary and
comprehension. The aim of the research was to assess the effectiveness of Lexia reading skills
software as a supplement to classroom instruction.
Lindamood-Bell Learning Processes
Lindamood-Bell’s programs have provided effective instruction even in the context of the learning
difficulties associated with dyslexia, hyperlexia, and autism. Through learning centers, on-site school
services, and professional development workshops, Lindamood-Bell provides training for all their
programs for all educators. Lindamood-Bell’s philosophy is that accurate assessment and relevant
instruction enable all individuals to learn to their potential.
Version 9/30/10
Page 15
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
Love and Logic
The primary goal of the Love and Logic program is to give parents, educators, and others working
with children practical strategies for reducing behavior problems, increasing motivation, and building
assets which contribute to life-long responsibility and resiliency. Research studies show evidence
that support using Love and Logic techniques.
For the research study go to
http://www.loveandlogic.com/research.html.
Mathematics Navigator
Mathematics Navigator is a research based short-term, tier-two intervention program that helps
students repair gaps and misconceptions and master concepts, skills, and problem solving that are
critical for success in algebra, geometry, and other higher-level courses.
Based on their research, the six main premises for Mathematics Navigator are:
1) Targeted Concepts
2) The Algebraic Structure of Arithmetic
3) Prior Knowledge and Misconceptions
4) The Language-Rich Environment
5) Better Learners of Mathematics
6) Instructional Support
Go to http://www.americaschoice.org/uploads/PDF_Docs/Mathematics_Navigator_Whitepaper.pdf
for more details on the scientific based research.
MathScape
MathScape is a comprehensive, middle grades mathematics program developed with funds from the
National Science Foundation to address the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Principles
and Standards for School Mathematics. The Standards aim to promote mathematical literacy,
including an ability to explore, conjecture, reason logically and to use a variety of mathematical
methods for problem solving. MathScape was designed to support these goals and is based on the
premise that mathematics instruction and curriculum materials in the middle grades should:
• be designed to promote learning for all students;
• center on investigations that engage, challenge and inspire students;
• explore rigorous mathematical concepts that will prepare students for continuing study; and
• engage students as active learners of mathematics.
The MathScape curriculum encourages students to learn mathematics by doing mathematics, by using
and connecting mathematical ideas, and by actively constructing their own understanding. The
curriculum materials help teachers create an inviting, exploratory classroom in which all students gain
mathematical power.
MathScape’s development team included individuals with expertise in teaching, educational research,
educational software design, cognitive and development psychology, special education, and
curriculum development. The materials were extensively field-tested and revised in response to
research and other feedback from teachers and students. For more information on the research that
Version 9/30/10
Page 16
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
was conducted during the development of the curriculum go to
http://www2.edc.org/mathscape/phil/research.asp
MY Access!®
MY Access!® is a web-based instructional writing product that provides students enrolled in grade 4
through higher education with the opportunity to develop their writing skills within an electronic
portfolio-based environment. Teachers can create a writing assignment from a large pool of over 700
unique prompts covering grades 4 through higher education, including narrative, persuasive,
informative, literary, and expository genres. In order to provide an integrated writing instruction tool,
the prompts are aligned to major textbook series, are aligned to state standards, and provide crosscurricular writing opportunities in areas such as science, math, and social studies.
MY Access!® provides both a holistic score and analytical scores in the areas of Focus and Meaning;
Content and Development; Organization; Language, Use and Style; and Mechanics and Conventions.
According to scientific research, students need to have multiple opportunities to practice writing,
writing should be cross-curricular, feedback regarding writing performance must be timely, and
writing instruction and assessment should incorporate clear learning objectives. MY Access!®
accomplishes theses goals. It provides the opportunity for students to write and receive feedback
much more frequently than using traditional methods of writing instruction. It offers over 700 unique
prompts aligned to major textbook series and state standards, providing cross-curricular writing
opportunities in areas such as science, math, and social studies, provides the timely and appropriate
feedback needed to increase student writing proficiency, and provides the detailed scoring rubrics as
well as commentaries on exemplar papers do that students are aware of what is required to meet each
learning objective.
Number Worlds
Number Worlds is an intensive intervention program that focuses on students who are one or more
grade levels behind in mathematics.
Number Worlds includes a prevention instruction section for students in grades PreK - 1 (Levels AC). This 30 week course of daily instruction improves students' grasp of the world of mathematics so
they can move forward with the head start they need.
For students in grades 2-8 (Levels D-J) who are one or more grade levels behind in mathematics, the
Number Worlds intervention program builds on students' current level of understanding with six 4week intensive units per grade for faster assimilation back into math class.
The program features:
•
•
•
•
Targeted instruction through discussion activities, computer activities, and paper and pencil
activities
Precise assessment for personalized guidance
Research based for proven results
Flexibility for teachers and students in various settings including Resource Room, After School,
Summer School, and Tutoring programs
Version 9/30/10
Page 17
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
•
Extra practice provided through Building Blocks activities researched and designed by Doug
Clements and Julie Sarama.
Parental Involvement
Parent involvement is a cornerstone in the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). NCLB advocates
through policy that when educators, families, and communities work together, schools get better. As a
result, students get the high quality education they need to lead productive lives. For more
information about parent involvement strategies and their basis in the NCLB Act, go to the U.S.
Department of Education’s http://www.ed.gov/admins/comm/parents/pntinv.html (October 2006).
PASSport to Success
Parents Assuring Students Success (PASS) is a stairway to greater family involvement in a child's
education. Its main focus is to draw home and school, parent and child, closer together to create a
connection that has proven to lead to increased student performance in the classroom. Developed in
an urban school system in Northwest Indiana, this program motivated and involved low-income
families in their children's education. These parents took greater responsibility for their children's
learning after discovering how to teach the study skills and values necessary for success in school.
Once schooled at home in specific techniques for learning, children should perform at a higher level
in the classroom and their test scores and motivation and self-esteem should rise.
Phonics for Reading
Phonics for Reading is a research-based program that reflects the findings of the major national
documents on beginning reading, including Becoming a Nation of Readers (Anderson et al., 1985),
Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children (Snow et al., 1998), and more recently, the
National Reading Panel report (2000).
This program meets NCLB and Reading First initiatives for phonics and fluency. The research-based
series presents new sounds and words, sight and challenge words, sentences, stories, and more in each
lesson. The National Reading Panel report’s findings and recommendations support the benefits of
phonics instruction. Phonics for Reading delivers direct instruction in phonics, increases fluency with
second and third levels, and provides work-recognition and spelling instruction, plus story reading,
and independent activities.
Read 180
The Read 180 program is a comprehensive reading intervention that includes smaller class sizes,
teacher training, software instruction, audio books, as well as individual, class, and small group
practice.
The Read180 Papalewis (2004) study explored the impact of implementing the Read 180 intervention
among 8th grade struggling readers. Over the course of one academic year, 622 8th grade students
from a large urban inner city school district received daily instruction from the Read 180 program.
Version 9/30/10
Page 18
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
Standardized reading scores from 537 of the intervention students were compared with matched
baseline data from the two academic years prior to the intervention. In addition, the standardized
reading scores of the intervention group were compared with data from 536 students in a comparison
group that did not receive a reading intervention. The comparison group was comprised of students
from the same school district that were matched on pre-test scores, gender, ethnicity, and language
proficiency. Students in the Read 180 intervention group demonstrated statistically significant reading
gains from the baseline to posttest scores on the NCEs Reading and Language Arts tests. The Read
180 intervention group also demonstrated significantly higher gains on both the NCEs Reading and
Language Arts posttests than the comparison group. In contrast to the reading gains demonstrated by
the intervention group, the comparison group scored lower on the posttests. Overall, this study
suggests that the Read 180 intervention as a whole may be effective for helping struggling middle
school readers, but it is not clear how individual program elements, such as the reading software or
smaller class sizes are impacting reading achievement.
Read Naturally
Read Naturally's programs provide a safe, structured, motivating learning environment that
encourages reading on a regular basis. Since 1991, Read Naturally has helped thousands of students
become better readers using a unique strategy that combines teacher modeling, repeated reading, and
assessment and progress monitoring.
Read Naturally’s strategy and industry-leading products support and reinforce the five essential
components of reading, as determined by the National Reading Panel: phonemic awareness, phonics,
fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. . Read Naturally is derived from scientifically-based
research and includes instructional content that addresses these five components. Using stories, audio
recordings, posters, videos, stickers, quizzes, puzzles, and graphs, students work with age-appropriate
material at their skill level.
Reading Advantage
Reading Advantage, designed by Laura Robb with a team of nationally known university educators
and master classroom teachers, is a scientific research-based program designed to help 8th-12th graders
read and write. The four kits address the needs of at-risk adolescents who are reading between a
middle of first grade and eighth grade reading level. The program focuses on critical areas where
students need the most support: comprehension, word study and phonics, vocabulary and fluency
building, and assessment, and includes enough reading materials to support each student’s progress.
For more details on scientific based research, go online to
http://www.greatsource.com/store/ProductCatalogController?cmd=LP&nextPage=GreatSource/gsMai
nTemplate.jsp?displayMainCell=researchefficacy.jsp
Reading Mastery
Staff development in reading and literacy curriculum and methods follows the recommendations from
the National Reading Panel Report, 1999, and incorporates phonemic awareness, phonics,
vocabulary, fluency and comprehension instruction which are all necessary to student success in
reading. Our school utilizes a research-based core curriculum that is based on these components.
Version 9/30/10
Page 19
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
Response to Intervention (RTI)
Response to Intervention (RTI) is a multi-tier approach to the early identification and support of
students with learning and behavior needs. The RTI process begins with instruction and universal
screening of all children in the general education classroom. Struggling learners are provided with
interventions at increasing levels of intensity to accelerate their rate of learning. These services may
be provided by a variety of personnel, including general education teachers, special educators, and
specialists. Progress is closely monitored to assess both the learning rate and level of performance of
individual students. Educational decisions about the intensity and duration of interventions are based
on individual student response to instruction. RTI is designed for use when making decisions in both
general education and special education, creating a well-integrated system of instruction and
intervention guided by child outcome data. For RTI implementation to work well, the following
components are necessary:
• High-quality, scientifically based classroom instruction.
• Ongoing student assessment.
• Tiered instruction.
• Parent involvement.
Rewards and Rewards Plus
REWARDS program was created to teach students to read longer words. Various versions of the
REWARDS program have been field-tested and used widely with poor readers and students with
reading disabilities. Before any formal studies were conducted, data was collected in several fieldtests and in at least four pilot studies. Using the grade equivalent (GE) scores of two subtests from the
Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests (Word Attack and Word Identification; Woodcock, 1973),
substantial gains in short periods of time were documented. In approximately five weeks, some
students gained as little as one year's worth of reading, while other students showed a gain that was
equivalent to eight years on the Word Attack subtest. Anita Archer (1981) found in the pilot studies
that flexible syllabication procedures focusing on vowel sounds (e.g., ai, ea, ou), word parts vowel
conversions, and approximate pronunciations, in conjunction with a word building strategy that
taught students to break longer words down into smaller recognizable word parts, read part by part,
then read the whole word, were effective in teaching low-performing fourth and fifth grade students
to read multisyllabic words.
To validate the strong field-test and pilot test results, and confirm that the intervention was
responsible for the results, two studies were completed using previous versions of the REWARDS
program as the intervention. In the first study, the experimenter tried three different versions of
REWARDS and compared them to a program not specifically designed to teach multisyllabic words.
In the second study, different versions of the REWARDS program were implemented requiring
different success levels for different groups (80% versus 90%) and providing different practice modes
(sentence versus whole paragraphs).To learn more about each study for REWARDS and REWARDS
Plus go online to
http://store.cambiumlearning.com/Resources/Research/pdf/sw_Research_REWARDS_RB01.pdf
Road to the Code
Road to the Code, published in 2000, is built upon research spanning more than ten years and many
of the activities adapted for this program are based on previously validated research. Motivated by the
fact that students with learning disabilities and other struggling readers often do not receive special
instruction before third or fourth grade, the authors of Road to the Code, not wishing to wait until
Version 9/30/10
Page 20
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
students experienced failure, developed and validated this program for the kindergarten curriculum
with the express intent of improving the early reading and spelling skills of young students.
Road to the Code is a 11-week program for teaching phonemic awareness and letter sound
correspondence. Developmentally sequenced, each of the 44 15-20-minute lessons features three
activities — Say-It-and-Move-It, Letter Name and Sound Instruction, and Phonological Awareness
Practice — that give students repeated opportunities to practice and enhance their beginning reading
and spelling abilities. Road to the Code is backed by more than 10 years of study in kindergarten and
first-grade classrooms.
Saxon Math
The No Child Left Behind Act seeks to improve math education by mandating the use of researchbased programs with long-term records of success in instruction and student achievement. For more
than 20 years both classroom results and scientific research have shown Saxon Math to be effective.
Saxon’s approach to teaching mathematics is supported by solid foundational research in cognitive
science, and it has been found to be consistently effective for children of varying ability levels and
socioeconomic backgrounds.
The foundational research includes studies that were conducted to test the effectiveness of educational
practices (such as the use of explicit instruction and continual practice distributed across a level).
Foundational studies document proven educational practices that stand the test of time. Program
efficacy studies, on the other hand, are conducted to test the effectiveness of a specific program or
curriculum.
The tenents of instruction used in Saxon Math have been shown to be effective. The Saxon pedagogy
and its instructional methods are sound, supported by a variety of scientifically based foundational
research studies; independent,program efficacy studies; and documented test score increases. Saxon
Math provides incremental instruction, continual practice, and cumulative assessment—all of which
are distributed throughout the school year and across grade levels. This unique approach is highly
effective with students of varying ability levels and allows students to gain and retain math skills
essential for life-long learning. To learn more about the research behind Saxon Math, go online to
http://saxonpublishers.harcourtachieve.com/HA/correlations/pdf/s%5Csaxon_math_research.pdf
Science Notebooks (Inquiry-Based)
Amaral et al., 2002 and Jorgenson and Vanosdall, 2002 provides evidence suggesting a strong
relationship between inquiry-based science instruction and improved achievement not only in science,
but also in reading, writing, and mathematics. Klentschy, 2002, shows a strong connection between
science and literacy especially when student science notebooks play a majority role. The science
notebook links science and literacy when it is used as a form of writing in constructing meaning with
science experiences.
Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol – SIOP
The Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) Model (Echevarria, Vogt & Short, 2004) was
developed to provide teachers with a well-articulated, practical model of sheltered instruction. The
SIOP Model is currently used in most of the 50 states and in hundreds of schools across the U.S. as
well as in several other countries. The intent of the model is to facilitate high quality instruction for
Version 9/30/10
Page 21
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
English Language Learners (ELLs) in content area teaching. The model is based on current
knowledge and research-based practices for promoting learning with ELLs. Critical features of high
quality instruction for ELLs are embedded within the SIOP Model.
Intervention curriculum and methodology (e.g. sheltered instruction, direct instruction) is grounded in
research-based practices that promote learning for students with limited English proficient learning
profiles. (Center for Applied Linguistics, 2002). For more information got to
http://www.siopinstitute.net/about.shtml.
Six-Minute Solution
Six-Minute Solution,by Sopris West, is a research-based program to increase fluency. In same-level
pairs, students do repeated readings of one-minute nonfiction passages as their partners note the
number of words read correctly, an effective peer-monitoring and feedback system that keeps
students motivated and on task. Six-Minute Solution builds students' reading fluency, which is
essential for text comprehension, and is a valuable complement to any reading curriculum or as an
intervention program.
Six Traits Writing
The Six Traits based approach to writing instruction is supported by numerous studies. The studies
can be read at http://www.nwrel.org/ascd05/traits.pdf The effects of Six Traits Writing was also
presented at the 2005 ASCD Annual Conference Orlando, Florida, April 3, 2005 by Dr. Michael
Kozlow and Peter Bellamy in Experimental Study on the Impact of the 6+1 Trait® Writing Model on
Student Achievement in Writing.
Skills Alaska
Skills Alaska is a standards driven technology based project designed to help teachers and students
raise achievement and exceed the requirements of NCLB. By providing technology tools, educational
resources and hands-on support, Skills Alaska allows teachers to better address individual needs and
effectively communicate with everyone involved in a child’s education. At the school level, Skills
Alaska is implemented through the use of two internet-based programs: Assessment Center, by The
Princeton Review Company, is a formative assessment tool aligned to our Alaska State Standards;
and SkillsTutor, by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, an interactive diagnostic and instructional program
designed to meet the needs of individual students. The emphasis in both programs is on reading,
writing and math skills for grades 3 through 11. The Educational Leaders Council (ELC), in
partnership with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and The Princeton Review, oversee the Skills Alaska
project.
The research base for the use of technology in increasing student achievement is strong. In a 2000
study commissioned by the Software and Information Industry Association, Sivin-Kachala and Bialo
(2000) reviewed 311 research studies on the effectiveness of technology on student achievement.
Assessment Center
The Princeton Review is a provider of quality formative assessment programs, test preparation and
college admissions services. The Assessment Center is a vital component of The Princeton Review's
assessment solution. It allows school administrators and teachers to create, assign and take
Version 9/30/10
Page 22
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
assessments on or offline; review student standards-based results, group students according to these
results and assign additional resources and assessments to track skill mastery. It provides assessments
for students in grades 3-11 in reading, writing and math. Teachers are able to assign activities,
capture student performance, create diagnostic reports, demonstrate accountability and meet No Child
Left Behind requirements.
The program’s emphasis is on formative assessments; a series of low-stakes tests administered at
intervals throughout the year. Aligned to state standards, Princeton Review's formative assessments
have a predictive validity that shows how students will perform on state tests. The tests can be print
or web-based, and offer snapshots of individual students, or group data by class, school or districts.
Using the Assessment Center tools, the district can also create and deliver customized benchmark
assessments in reading, writing and math on a district-wide scale. A typical benchmark assessment
would include 25 to 30 questions that represent the type of material the state is likely to include on its
own high-stakes assessments.
For more information about The Assessment Center, visit
http://www.princetonreview.com/educators/instructional/assessment.asp
SkillsTutor
SkillsTutor, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Learning Technology, provides quality
instructional content to ensure that all learners master core skills and reach high academic standards.
The SkillsTutor program provides a series of individualized, interactive, diagnostic and instructional
modules aligned to state standards and grade level expectations. The emphasis is on reading, writing
and math for grades 2-11. However, the program also includes instructional modules for secondary
science, information skills, and workforce readiness skills.
In response to the significant impact of the No Child Left Behind Act, they have published several
informative Whitepapers that demonstrate how SkillsTutor programs have increased student
academic achievement. Those can be found at
www.achievementtech.com/index.cfm?objectId=54E10518-F039-F4D2-C8272419ADF7DF81.
Small Group Intervention / Remediation Instruction
The historical success rate of increasing student achievement through small group tutoring is high as
measured by pre/post assessments of student growth conducted at each school site as a part of the
learning opportunity initiatives. This intervention is grounded in research. A meta-analysis of
findings from 65 independent evaluations of school tutoring programs showed that these programs
have positive effect on the academic performance and attitudes of those who receive tutoring (Cohen,
Kulik, Kulik, 1982).
STELLAR/Strategies for Building Academic Language
Strategies for Teaching English Language Learners for Academic Results (STELLAR) was created in
2005 to meet the needs of regular classroom teachers who teach English language learners (ELL) in
Washoe County School District, located in Reno, Nevada. This program facilitates change first in
equipping teachers with easy to implement teaching strategies. Teachers of ELLs in Reno were not
doing an adequate job of helping them reach benchmarks and seven schools did not meet Adequate
Yearly Progress (AYP) under the requirements of No Child Left Behind (WCSD, 2005).
Version 9/30/10
Page 23
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
The STELLAR program is based on the premise of forming consistent effective teaching habits that
take into consideration the needs of diverse students in classrooms. When effective teaching habits
are consistently practiced, students will achieve academic results as well as learn to share power and
appreciate cultural diversity through interaction with each other. That goal is reached by fostering
more interaction within a classroom between students. When teachers exhibit these essential habits, it
is beneficial for all students. Evidence can be found in the research regarding the importance of
practicing these habits. The five essential habits of effective instruction shared in this program are:
1. Share the content and language objectives of the lesson.
2. Focus on vocabulary before, during and when reviewing the lesson.
3. Utilize multiple strategies to engage students.
4. Engage students in strategic reading activities.
5. Facilitate student use of academic language.
One important interactive reading strategy taught in STELLAR is reciprocal teaching. Reciprocal
teaching is a teaching strategy developed in 1984 by Anne Marie Palincsar from Michigan State
University and Anne Brown from the University of Illinois. The purpose of this strategy is to improve
reading comprehension of students in grades as low as the first grade through the use of student and
teacher collaboration. In this dialogue, the teacher and students take turns assuming the role of teacher
in leading the dialogue about a passage of text (Kuth, Jones, 1991). Reciprocal teaching emphasizes
the development of both cognitive and metacognitive reading strategies through cooperative learning
with scaffolded instruction (Hartman, 1994). The concept of students providing support for one
another, the additional concept of expert support as students begin a task and the gradual fading of the
teacher’s support are the foundations of reciprocal teaching (Dade, 2005).
Reciprocal Teaching can be used with any grade and with any story or passage. With some variations,
it can be adapted for math problem solving or even a science lab. It remotely resembles the scientific
process used for science experimentation. According to Hartman (1994), Pallincsar, Ransom, and
Derber (1988/1989), it is stated that reciprocal teaching is based on four principles:
1. The purpose is to improve reading comprehension by equipping students with strategies needed
to monitor comprehension and construct meaning.
2. Teacher and students share responsibility for acquiring reading strategies. After initially assuming
major responsibility for teaching and leading students through the strategies, the teacher gradually
shifts responsibilities to the students.
3. Every student is expected to participate. The teacher provides assistance to support that
participation among all students.
4. The teacher regularly turns control of the dialogue over to students. Students involved in
Reciprocal Teaching processes are checking their own understanding of materials they have
encountered (Wray, 2004).
Step Up to Writing
Step Up to Writing® features research-based, validated strategies and activities that help students
proficiently write narrative, personal narrative, and expository pieces; actively engage in reading
materials for improved comprehension; and demonstrate competent study skills.
Step Up to Writing program does the following:
•
Aligns with Writing Next
Version 9/30/10
Page 24
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Creates a common language and approach across grade levels and content areas
Provides models of student writing for teacher and student reference
Employs writing as a tool for content learning
Explicitly connects reading and writing
Teaches all stages of the writing process, with an emphasis on planning
Provides tips specifically for kindergarten students in Primary Level
Aligns with the Six Traits assessment model
Strategic Instruction Model (SIM)
Strategic Instruction Model, or SIM, is about promoting effective teaching and learning of critical
content in schools. SIM strives to help teachers make decisions about what is of greatest importance,
what teachers can teach students to help them to learn, and how to teach students well. For
scientifically based research supporting SIM, go online to <http://www.kucrl.org/archives>
(September 2006).
Success for All Reading Programs
Success for All has had exactly the same objective as Reading First, the centerpiece of No Child Left
Behind, since its beginning in 1987: The objective is every child reading by the 3rd grade. More than
50 scientific research studies have firmly established that Success for All is extremely effective in
teaching students to read no matter what their challenges—poverty, limited-English proficiency, or
other circumstances. Success for All is exactly what Reading First calls for, putting scientific research
into classroom practice.
Success for All is a research-based core-reading program. Forty-seven experimental-control
comparison studies have evaluated the reading program in grades K-3. Of these, 30 were done by
third parties (see Borman et al., 2003). Many of these studies have been published in the most
selective journals in education. Independent reviews have consistently placed Success for All among
the most rigorously and successfully evaluated programs. These include reviews by the American
Institutes of Research (Herman, 1999), The Thomas Fordham Foundation (Traub, 1999), the Milken
Family Foundation (Schacter, 1999), Pearson & Stahl (2002), and Borman et al. (2003). Many
programs, including Success for All, incorporate the five elements derived from the Nation Reading
Panel (2000) review.
A description of research on Success for All according to the federal definition of scientifically based
research follows:
• Employs systematic, empirical methods that draw on observation or experiment.
• Involves rigorous data analyses that are adequate to test the stated hypotheses and justify the
general conclusions drawn.
• Relies on measurements or observational methods that provide valid data across multiple
measurements and observations.
• Has been accepted by a peer-reviewed journal or approved by a panel of independent experts
through a comparably rigorous, objective and scientific review.
For more details on scientific based research, go online to
http://successforall.com/_images/pdfs/SFA_SBR.pdf
Version 9/30/10
Page 25
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
SuccessMaker
SuccessMaker is a comprehensive educational software program used to deliver differentiated oneon-one instruction to learners in grades K-8. SuccessMaker offers a leveled reading curriculum that
reflects the National Reading Panel’s five strands for reading instruction-phonemic awareness,
phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension. The mathematics lessons incorporate practice
tutorials and assessments based on the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics’ best practices
for math instruction.
The results of an evaluation by What Works Clearinghouse rated SuccessMaker as having potentially
positive effects on students’ comprehension and general literacy achievement, with students scoring
an average of 11 percentile points higher than students using other digital interventions. For more
information on this study go to
www.pearsonschool.com/live/assets/200929/wwc%20successmaker%20rls%207%207%2009_23804
_1.pdf
According to a study done at McKinley Elementary, students who used SuccessMaker in addition to
receiving the daily math instruction in the classroom realized a 12.2 percentage greater increase than
the students who did not use SuccessMaker. For a more detailed look at the study go to
http://lh102.k12.sd.us/MSET/Evaluation%20Proj/lhmid2.doc
TouchMath
TouchMath offers a comprehensive program to teach counting, addition and subtraction,
multiplication and division, and general math - such as time, money and fractions. The products
consist of math kits, workbooks and teaching aids, which serve as supplements to the prescribed
curriculum. TouchMath follows sequential learning strategies advocated by eminent learning theorists
such as Jean Piaget and Jerome Bruner. As a math supplement, the program falls into the constructive
classroom philosophy because it is hands-on, sequential, and allows students to make sense of their
own learning. TouchMath is a multisensory program that uses its signature TouchPoints to engage
students of all abilities and learning styles. TouchMath has been proven to raise math test scores in
classrooms around the world for over three decades. For more on the scientific based research on
TouchMath, go to http://www.touchmath.com/pdf/NationalEducatorSurvey.pdf
TransMath
TransMath is a comprehensive program specifically designed to address the needs of struggling late
elementary and middle school students who have scored at or below the 40th percentile on national
math tests. It targets instruction to fewer topics in greater depth, so students master key foundational
skills before moving on to more complex topics. Three levels in three years prepare students for
algebra success.
TransMath does the following:
•
•
•
Teaches fewer topics in greater depth
Provides numerous visual representations to help conceptualize the mathematics
Meets individual student needs
Version 9/30/10
Page 26
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
•
•
•
•
•
•
Provides a logical sequence, ample practice, and an appropriate pace
Aligns with National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards
Ensures accurate placement and progress monitoring
Provides a solid alternative to basal curricula
Supports teachers with ongoing professional development
Provides a balance between procedural knowledge and conceptual understanding
Three broad design principles distinguish TransMath from widely used reform-based programs. The
principles include (1) ensuring that students have relevant background knowledge, (2) using a
balanced approach in computation practice, and (3) addressing the need for careful time management.
Each principle has a considerable research base in remedial and special education research.
Treasure Chest
Treasure Chest is a K-6 English Language Learner research-based program providing materials which
include instruction and practice in reading, writing, vocabulary and language development published
by MacMillan/McGraw-Hill.
Waterford
Waterford is built on basic computer skills that many Pre K–2 students already have. The Waterford
Institute developed the curriculum with significant contributions from leading researchers. Ongoing
research, development, and testing assure that Waterford incorporates the latest scientific learning.
During the development of the Waterford Early Learning curriculum, Waterford Institute’s research
team consulted a variety of resources, including:
•
•
•
An extensive bibliography of current research findings with over 130 unique entries
Leading experts in the field, including Marilyn Adams, Joe Torgeson, David Geary, Robert
Siegler, Douglas Clements, James Barufaldi, and Dusty Heuston
National and state standards, including the National Reading Panel, the National Council of
Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), Project 2061’s Benchmarks for Science Literacy, and the
National Science Education Standards (NSES)
Waterford emphasizes key elements of a balanced reading curriculum grounded in research, a
balanced approach to math and a science curriculum rich in active discovery, regular review and
assessment, integration of technology into curriculum, individualized instruction, an engaging
learning approach, and parental involvement. For more information on the scientific research go
online to
www.pearsonschool.com/live/assets/200735/WELP_Brochure_Research_02%20(lo)_1648_1.pdf
WhyTry
The WhyTry Program is a simple, hands-on curriculum which helps youth overcome their challenges
and improve outcomes in the areas of truancy, behavior, and academics.
Version 9/30/10
Page 27
Anchorage School District Improvement Planning
Scientifically Based Research to Support Strategies and Curricula
WhyTry teaches critical social and emotional principles to youth (K-12) using a series of ten pictures
(visual analogies), which each teach a principle, such as resisting peer-pressure. The visual
components are then reinforced by music and physical activities. The major learning styles—visual,
auditory, and body-kinesthetic—are all addressed.
The WhyTry Program is now in use in over 5,000 schools, mental health facilities, and correctional
facilities in the US, Canada, Australia and the UK. It has now been demonstrated in a variety of
research settings to reduce truancy, improve academic success, and increase graduation rates. For
additional information go to www.whytry.org/.
Write Source
The Write Source program is a resource for teachers who recognize the importance of effective
writing instruction. The activities and strategies presented are based on current research and best
instructional practice advocated by classroom teachers, administrators, teacher educators, and
policymakers alike. The Write Source program provides students with the skills they need to succeed
in school, preparing them ultimately for college and the workplace. In the program, students develop
their thinking skills as they choose and develop topics, find information, evaluate the quality of
sources, think through relevant issues, formulate a thesis, support an argument, and draw logical
conclusions.
The Write Source program presents writing as a process; provides students with frequent
opportunities to write; fosters students’ ability to assess and revise their own writing; builds grammar,
punctuation, and spelling skills; and develops students’ overall literacy skills, including those of
struggling learners and non-native English speakers. For more details on scientific based research, go
online to
www.greatsource.com/store/ProductCatalogController?cmd=LP&nextPage=GreatSource/gsMainTem
plate.jsp?displayMainCell=researchefficacy.jsp
Version 9/30/10
Page 28
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement