VMware | VIEW 4.5 | Configuring Kiosk Mode in VMware

Configuring Kiosk Mode
VMware Horizon 6.0 with View
W H I T E PA P E R
Configuring Kiosk Mode
Table of Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
How Kiosk Mode Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Supported Features and Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Planning and Preparation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Kiosk Client Device Types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Setting Up the View Environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Preparing Active Directory for Kiosk Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Preparing Desktops for Kiosk Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Configuring and Connecting Kiosk Clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Configuring Clients. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Connecting Clients. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Optional Configuration Tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Displaying Kiosk Client Accounts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Removing Kiosk Client Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Assigning ThinApp Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Provisioning Desktop Pools and Creating Entitlements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Configuring Policies for Kiosk Clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Configuring Automatic USB Redirection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Configuring Printing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
About the Authors and Contributors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
W H I T E PA P E R
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Configuring Kiosk Mode
Introduction
Many organizations provide interactive customer kiosks in public places where users can perform specific
tasks without having to log in. VMware Horizon® with View supports this “anonymous use” functionality with
View kiosk mode. Endpoint devices configured as kiosk clients display View virtual desktops and allow users to
perform a limited set of functions specified by the Horizon administrator.
How Kiosk Mode Works
Kiosk mode associates a View virtual desktop with the MAC address or client ID of a kiosk endpoint device
rather than with a user’s login credentials. The endpoint device can be a zero client, a thin client, or a lockeddown PC running either Windows or Linux.
When a kiosk user activates an input device—for instance, by pressing a key or clicking a mouse button—the
kiosk client contacts a View Connection Server. The View Connection Server authenticates the client, connects
it to a View virtual machine running in kiosk mode, and launches a remote desktop session. The session is then
displayed on the endpoint device.
The kiosk user is normally presented with a session that displays either a View desktop with a limited set
of applications or a single, dedicated application that appears to be running on the kiosk endpoint. The
infrastructure is user-transparent.
With View kiosk mode
•Users do not have access to the operating system or file system of the View desktop.
•No user authentication is required.
•No user data is preserved.
•There is no need for persistent virtual desktops.
These considerations mean that kiosk functionality can be provided at low cost, with inexpensive endpoints,
non-persistent virtual desktops, and no additional storage. Very little is required of IT resources beyond initial
setup and provisioning.
Authentication
Using MAC addresses or client IDs to associate View virtual desktops with kiosk devices rather than with users
simplifies the authentication model.
Although kiosk users might be required to provide authentication information for certain applications, they
do not ordinarily log in to the View desktop. In most cases, they simply use the session or application that is
presented to them.
In some circumstances, however, an administrator might require all kiosk users to log in to the View desktop
with the same, predetermined username and password. This scenario can be desirable when use of the kiosk
or an application is restricted to a known set of users, such as company employees or registered students, but
is not available to the general public. In this case, people who know the password can use the kiosk, but these
users are not identified by personal credentials.
Because kiosks are usually placed in public locations, kiosk mode is not recommended for transactions that
require transfer of sensitive information, such as credit card numbers, user email addresses and passwords, or
patient records.
For general information on View security, including comments about kiosk mode, see the VMware Horizon with
View Security Hardening Overview.
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Configuring Kiosk Mode
Supported Features and Limitations
Commonly used View features supported in kiosk mode include
•USB redirection – When a client session for a kiosk desktop is established, USB peripherals attached to a client
endpoint are connected immediately to the View desktop.
•Printing – Virtual printing is enabled by default.
•Multiple monitors – Kiosk endpoints are not usually set up with multiple monitors, but kiosk mode supports
the capability by distributing the remote View desktop across all monitors attached to the kiosk endpoint.
Kiosk users cannot alter the display mode.
•Flash URL redirection – Flash content can be streamed from Adobe Media Servers to kiosk endpoints.
•Multimedia redirection (MMR) – Multimedia content can be streamed to kiosk endpoints.
The following limitations apply to View kiosk mode:
•Real-Time Audio-Video (RTAV) is supported on many thin clients and PCs but is not supported on zero clients.
•Hosted applications that use Remote Desktop Services (RDS) servers are not supported in kiosk mode.
•Configuration of kiosk mode on View desktops hosted on Remote Desktop Session Host (RDSH) servers
requires a custom user account (see step 7 under Configuring Clients).
Planning and Preparation
Use the following guidelines to set up the View environment and to prepare for configuration of the kiosk client
AD accounts:
•Determine the purpose, type, and location of the kiosk endpoints.
•Prepare the hardware for the kiosk endpoints, if necessary.
•If using PCs as kiosk endpoints, install Horizon Client software.
•Attach USB peripherals, if any, to the kiosk endpoints.
The instructions for setting up View desktops in kiosk mode are similar to those for setting up other nonpersistent View desktops. Additional steps needed to configure clients in kiosk mode are described in the
following sections:
•Preparing Active Directory for Kiosk Mode
•Preparing Desktops for Kiosk Mode
•Configuring and Connecting Kiosk Clients
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Configuring Kiosk Mode
Kiosk Client Device Types
Most traditional desktop and portable computing devices, such as PCs, have memory and storage capabilities
as well as processors, and they can function whether connected to a network or not. Zero clients have no
memory or storage and only limited processing ability, and they can function only with a network connection.
Thin clients also depend on a network connection, but they often have some software installed on them, such
as an operating system or device drivers.
Thin and zero clients are less expensive to acquire than PCs, and their maintenance cost is minimal. In some
settings, however, such as public libraries, it can be more economical to repurpose old PCs as kiosks than to
buy new hardware.
PCs have more local processing power than thin or zero clients, but they also require maintenance and tend to
be less secure. For a more detailed discussion of types of clients, see Key Considerations in Choosing a Zero
Client Environment for View Virtual Desktops in VMware Horizon and the VMware Compatibility Guide.
Setting Up the View Environment
In most cases, kiosks are added to an existing View deployment. If the View environment is not yet set up, refer
to the following documentation:
•View Installation
•Setting Up Desktop and Application Pools in View
•Reviewer’s Guide for View in Horizon 6
Preparing Active Directory for Kiosk Mode
As a best practice, do not use the same View Connection Server to handle both a production environment
and clients in kiosk mode. Instead, use dedicated View Connection Server instances, and create dedicated
organizational units (OUs) and groups in Active Directory for kiosk client accounts. This practice simplifies
client configuration and can help to prevent intrusions.
For more detailed information, see Prepare Active Directory and View for Clients in Kiosk Mode in View
Administration and Create an OU for View Machines in Setting Up Desktop and Application Pools in View.
Preparing Desktops for Kiosk Mode
To prepare View desktops to run in kiosk mode
1.Create a virtual machine template for the guest operating system as explained in Creating Virtual Machine
Templates in the Setting Up Desktop and Application Pools in View guide.
2.Install the View Agent on the virtual machine template.
The View Agent Virtual Printing component includes the ThinPrint driver.
Virtual printing does not require installation of printer drivers on the remote View desktop. For more
information, see Configuring Printing.
Because kiosk passwords are usually unknown, kiosks should not be shut down automatically in most
settings. To enable user access to the kiosks at any time, configure the guest Windows OS so that clients
are never locked when left unattended.
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Configuring Kiosk Mode
3.In View Administrator, create a floating-assignment desktop pool.
On the Desktop Pool Settings page, select Refresh Immediately in the Delete or refresh machine on
logoff option. This option prevents inadvertent changes in settings from being preserved and applied for
future kiosk users. Other desktop pool settings include whether to log out automatically after the session
disconnects.
4.Entitle the kiosk client or group to this desktop pool.
If requiring kiosk users to log in with the same credentials, create an Active Directory group for the kiosks
they can access. It is easier to identify kiosk clients by their group name than by individual MAC addresses.
Setting up an AD group for kiosks is optional, but the kiosk clients must have entitlement to the pool
regardless of whether users are required to log in with a password.
For more information, see Pools for Kiosk Users and Add Entitlements to a Desktop or Application Pool in
the Setting Up Desktop and Application Pools in View guide.
5.Install the kiosk application or applications, if any, on the View desktop virtual machine template.
For information on associating VMware ThinApp applications with the desktop pool, see Assigning
ThinApp Applications.
6.Configure View policies and group policy objects (GPOs), for instance to enable or disable USB devices.
For more information, see Setting Policies in View Administrator and Configuring Settings for Client
Sessions in the View Administration guide.
Configuring and Connecting Kiosk Clients
Horizon Client software is pre-installed on many thin and zero clients. See the VMware Compatibility Guide for
a current list of compatible units, or contact the vendor for Horizon Client updates. To use PCs instead of thin or
zero clients as kiosk endpoints, install Horizon Client on each PC.
To perform configuration tasks such as establishing communication, setting up applications, and assigning
custom Client IDs instead of using MAC addresses, use View Administrator on the View Connection Server.
No View or kiosk configuration tasks are performed on the endpoint devices except for installation of Horizon
Client software where necessary.
Use the vdmadmin command with the -Q option from the View Connection Server to set defaults and create
accounts for clients in kiosk mode, to enable authentication for these clients, and to display information about
their configuration. The vdmadmin directory location is automatically set in the system PATH: C:\Program
Files\VMware\VMware View\Server\tools\bin.
For help with the vdmadmin command, type
vdmadmin -help
Configuring Clients
Perform the following steps to configure clients in kiosk mode.
1.Set default values for the organizational unit (OU), password expiration, and group membership of clients
in kiosk mode. For example:
vdmadmin -Q -clientauth -setdefaults -ou "OU=kiosk-ou,DC=MYORG,DC=com"
-noexpirepassword -group kc-grp
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Configuring Kiosk Mode
2.Verify that the defaults are set.
vdmadmin -Q -clientauth -getdefaults
3.To create an account for a client based on its MAC address, use the appropriate command to discover the
MAC address. Skip this step if using a custom account name.
Windows client:
C:\Program Files (x86)\VMware\VMware Horizon View Client\vmware-view.exe
printEnvironmentInfo
Linux client:
vmware-view -printEnvironmentInfo -s connection_server
4.Add accounts for clients in kiosk mode.
The View Connection Server creates a user account and password for each client based on the client’s
MAC address, which it uses to authenticate the client when connecting it to the View desktop. From the
administrator’s point of view, it is usually more convenient to establish a client ID that assigns a name to
the client than to use the MAC address.
Either use the vdmadmin command to create a client ID using the kiosk endpoint’s MAC address, or create
an account name with up to 20 characters, beginning with the string custom-.
The following example adds an account for a client specified by its MAC address, with an automatically
generated password that never expires.
vdmadmin -Q -clientauth -add -domain MYORG -clientid 00:10:db:ee:76:00
-group kc-grp -genpassword -noexpirepassword
The following example adds an account for a named client in the specified OU group, and specifies a
password to be used with the client. Any kiosk user can use this password, but it is ordinarily distributed
only to a restricted group of users.
vdmadmin -Q -clientauth -add -domain MYORG -clientid custom-csh1 -ou
"ou=kou,DC=MYORG,DC=com" -password "VMware1!"
5.Enable authentication of clients in kiosk mode for each View Connection Server instance, as in the
following example:
vdmadmin -Q
-enable -s connection_server
6.Verify the configuration of kiosk clients, for example:
vdmadmin -Q -clientauth -list
7.For RDSH servers, entitle the client account to the View desktop by logging in to the RDSH server and
adding the account name to the RDS Kiosk Users group: Control Panel > System and Security > System >
Remote settings > Select users > Add.
Connecting Clients
By default, the account name is based on the MAC address of the kiosk endpoint and has an automatically
generated password. To assign a client ID instead of the MAC address, specify the client ID in the form
custom-xxxxx.
For example, to connect a Windows client with an assigned client ID and password:
vmware view.exe -unattended -serverURL 192.168.13.245 -userName custom-csh1
-password "VMware1!"
Note: It is not necessary to specify the -userName option for clients in kiosk mode when using the MAC
address of the client device.
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Configuring Kiosk Mode
To connect a Linux client:
vmware-view --kioskLogin --fullscreen --once --noninteractive
--nomenubar -s connection_server
For information about using the vmware-view command, see Running Horizon Client from the Command Line
in the Using VMware Horizon Client for Windows guide or Using the Horizon Client Command-Line Interface
and Configuration Files in the Using VMware Horizon Client for Linux guide.
For zero clients and thin clients, contact the vendor for the kiosk mode options used to connect to the View
Connection Server.
If the View Connection Server successfully authenticates the kiosk client, and a View remote desktop is
available, the View Connection Server starts a remote session and displays it on the kiosk endpoint.
For more information about command-line options for kiosk mode, see Setting Up Clients in Kiosk Mode and
Configuring Clients in Kiosk Mode Using the -Q Option in the View Administration guide.
Optional Configuration Tasks
This section offers tips for setting up kiosk client accounts.
Displaying Kiosk Client Accounts
The following command-line example shows how to display connected kiosk endpoints currently authenticated
by the View Connection Server:
vdmadmin –Q –clientauth –list
Client Authentication User List
=================================================================
GUID : acdbf1ea-91e8-4635-af67-1d68d2b0c977
ClientID : custom-gch1
Domain : vmware-view
Password Generated : false
GUID : af645bdb-e1be-44cb-a2c9-8d59aca95416
ClientID : custom-gch2
Domain : vmware-view
Password Generated : true
GUID : 89df116f-8d22-4945-8d81-e6325711c68e
ClientID : custom-gch3
Domain : vmware-view
Password Generated : true
GUID : 9948528a-76b8-4efa-a50c-ba1554ce5f4e
ClientID : cm-12_34_56_78_9a_bc
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Configuring Kiosk Mode
Domain : vmware-view
Password Generated : false
Client Authentication Connection Servers
========================================
Common Name : VIEW-BROKER
Client Authentication Enabled : true
Password Required : false
Removing Kiosk Client Accounts
The following example shows how to remove the client ID for a kiosk endpoint:
vdmadmin -Q –clientauth –clientid custom-csh1 –domain vmware-view –remove
Client authentication user was removed successfully.
The following example shows how to remove all client IDs:
vdmadmin -Q -clientauth –removeall
Are you sure you want to remove all Client Authentication users? YES/NO>: yes
Assigning ThinApp Applications
Use View Administrator to distribute and manage applications that have been packaged with ThinApp. To have
the kiosk endpoint access certain application groups, prepare the guest operating system with applications in
the base image, or associate the ThinApp applications with the desktop pool. Kiosk mode supports both local
and streaming deployment of ThinApp packages.
For more information, see Managing ThinApp Applications in View Administrator in the View Administration
guide.
Provisioning Desktop Pools and Creating Entitlements
The vdmadmin command does not support the configuration of entitlements. To create desktop pools and
entitlements, use View Administrator on the View Connection Server.
Configuring Policies for Kiosk Clients
Use View Administrator on the View Connection Server to manage desktop pools and configure kiosk client
settings.
Configure specific kiosk endpoints with Windows GPOs and scripts, and add specific applications to the
Windows startup application list.
If the kiosk has a physical keyboard, disable all function keys and keystroke sequences, such as
Control+Alt+Delete, that can override kiosk mode.
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Configuring Kiosk Mode
Configuring Automatic USB Redirection
Although access to USB devices is convenient, it can also expose the environment to data theft and malware.
USB devices are currently enabled by default when the View desktop session is launched or the devices are
plugged in. The following GPO policies are set to true at connection:
•ConnectUSBOnStartup – Connect all USB devices to the desktop on launch.
•ConnectUSBOnInsert – Connect USB devices to the desktop when they are plugged in.
To control which USB devices are redirected, configure GPO settings for the View Agent or Horizon Client. To
disable USB devices, set the USB Access policy to Deny in View Administrator. The default value for this policy
is Allow. The USB Access settings in View Administrator override the USB connection settings for a client in
kiosk mode.
For more information, see View Policies in the View Administration guide, Overview of Setting Up USB
Redirection in Setting Up Desktop and Application Pools in View, and USB Device Redirection, Configuration,
and Usage in VMware Horizon with View.
Configuring Printing
Virtual printing gives kiosk users access to local or network printers without requiring that additional printer
drivers be installed in the View desktop. In virtual printing, the printers connected to the client are redirected to
the View desktop.
To make virtual printing available to kiosk users, install the Virtual Printing component of View Agent, which
includes the ThinPrint driver, on the View desktop. Kiosk users can set preferences for print quality, doublesided printing, and so on from their View desktop sessions.
Summary
VMware Horizon with View offers a versatile kiosk mode to facilitate the use of unattended, self-service kiosks
in public and semi-public locations where anonymous access to specific applications is required. Configuration
options provide convenient user functionality at minimal acquisition (CapEx) and maintenance (OpEx) costs.
This paper describes View kiosk mode and provides references to more detailed material to help administrators
and decision makers design and implement virtual kiosks.
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Configuring Kiosk Mode
About the Authors and Contributors
Gary Sloane, Consulting Editor, VMware, and Karen Smith, formerly of VMware, updated this paper for Horizon
6 with View.
An earlier version of the paper was written by Cynthia Hsieh, formerly of VMware.
The following people helped to update and review this paper:
•Stephane Asselin, Senior End-User-Computing Architect, VMware
•Peter Brown, Senior Research and Development Manager, VMware
•Dean Flaming, Senior Technical Marketing Manager, VMware
•Rick Li, Senior Member of the Technical Staff, Enterprise Desktop Quality Engineering, VMware
•Jessica Lu, Technical Staff, Enterprise Desktop Quality Engineering, VMware
•Jack McMichael, Solutions Consultant, VMware
•Felix Yan, Senior Member of the Technical Staff, Enterprise Desktop, VMware
•Victor Zhang, Technical Staff, Enterprise Desktop Quality Engineering, VMware
To comment on this paper, contact us at twitter.com/vmwarehorizon.
Additional Resources
•Configuring Kiosk Mode in VMware View Manager 4.5 and Later (KB 1028287)
•Extra configuration required when setting up kiosk mode for a View desktop or application on an RDS host
(KB 2081492)
•Key Considerations in Choosing a Zero Client Environment for View Virtual Desktops in VMware Horizon
•Reviewer’s Guide for View in Horizon 6
•Setting Up Desktop and Application Pools in View
•USB Device Redirection, Configuration, and Usage in VMware Horizon with View
•Using VMware Horizon Client for Linux
•Using VMware Horizon Client for Windows
•VMware Compatibility Guide
•VMware Horizon with View Security Hardening Overview
•VMware Horizon View 6 Desktop Virtualization Cookbook
•VMware View 5 – Configure and Deploy Clients in Kiosk Mode
VMware, Inc. 3401 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto CA 94304 USA Tel 877-486-9273 Fax 650-427-5001 www.vmware.com
Copyright © 2015 VMware, Inc. All rights reserved. This product is protected by U.S. and international copyright and intellectual property laws. VMware products are covered by one or more patents listed at
http://www.vmware.com/go/patents. VMware is a registered trademark or trademark of VMware, Inc. in the United States and/or other jurisdictions. All other marks and names mentioned herein may be
trademarks of their respective companies. Item No: VMW-WP-CONFIGKIOSKMODE-USLET-20150129-WEB.indd
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