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iPhoto 2: Visual
QuickStart Guide
Greetings!
Welcome to this sample chapter from my book iPhoto 2 for
Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide. I appreciate the time you
spent downloading the file, and I hope you find it helpful as
you use Apple’s iPhoto 2.
Of course, my not-so-secret goal is that you’ll find the many
tips and techniques here so useful that you’ll want to buy
a copy of the book so you can read the rest of the chapters.
They document everything you can do in iPhoto 2 with the
same step-by-step style used in the following pages.
Notice that I’ve left the full Table of Contents and Index in
this file so you can get a sense for what more you can learn
from the complete book.
If you’re not used to electronic books, note that I created
bookmarks (in the left pane) for each page and made it so
every entry in the Table of Contents is a link; just click one to
jump to the appropriate page. All email addresses, Web links,
and internal chapter references are also clickable to help you
avoid unnecessary typing and navigating. And if you like
using this PDF, keep in mind that a PDF of the full book is
available for free for anyone who buys the paper version.
Enjoy!
–Adam Engst, May 2003
Click the image to order the book!
B O O K
L E V E L
advanced
iPHOTO 2
FOR MAC OS X
Takes an easy, visual approach to teaching iPhoto, using pictures to guide
you through the software and show you what to do.
Works like a reference book—you look up what you need and then get
straight to work.
No long-winded passages—concise, straightforward commentary explains
what you need to know.
Adam Engst is the publisher of TidBITS, one of the oldest and most-respected
Internet newsletters, distributed weekly to many thousands of readers. His writing
credits include the first edition of the iPhoto Visual QuickStart Guide, a co-author
spot on The Wireless Networking Starter Kit, and two editions of the Eudora Visual
QuickStart Guide, all for Peachpit Press. He is also the author of the best-selling
Internet Starter Kit series and many magazine articles stemming from contributing
editor positions at MacUser, MacWEEK, and Macworld. Industry surveys repeatedly
rank him as one of the most influential and visionary people in the Macintosh
industry, and he has been turned into an action figure. He is never far from his
digital camera.
USA $19.99 Canada $31.99 UK £14.99
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ADAM
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Visual
QuickStart
Guide
iPHOTO
FOR MAC OS X
Teach yourself iPhoto the
quick and easy way! This
Visual QuickStart Guide uses
pictures rather than lengthy
ENGST
Peachpit Press
1249 Eighth Street, Berkeley, CA 94710
800 283-9444 510 524-2178 fax 510 524-2221
Find us on the World Wide Web at: www.peachpit.com
FOR MAC OS X
Companion Web site at http://iphoto.tidbits.com/ offers answers to frequently
asked questions.
iPHOTO 2
Need to learn iPhoto fast?
Try a Visual QuickStart!
VISUAL QUICKSTART GUIDE
✓ beginning
✓ intermediate
explanations. You’ll be up
FOR COMPUTERS USING: Mac OS X 10.1.5 or later
COMPUTER BOOK SHELF CATEGORY: Multimedia / Digital Photography
and running in no time!
VISUAL QUICKSTART GUIDE
IPHOTO 2
FOR MAC OS X
Adam C. Engst
Peachpit Press
Visual QuickStart Guide
iPhoto 2 for Mac OS X
Adam C. Engst
Peachpit Press
1249 Eighth Street
Berkeley, CA 94710
510/524-2178
800/283-9444
510/524-2221 (fax)
Find us on the World Wide Web at www.peachpit.com.
To report errors, please send a note to [email protected]
Peachpit Press is a division of Pearson Education.
Copyright © 2003 by Adam C. Engst
Editor: Nancy Davis
Production Coordinator: Lisa Brazieal
Copyeditor: Tonya Engst
Compositor: Adam C. Engst
Indexer: Rebecca Plunkett
Cover Design: The Visual Group
Cover Production: Nathalie Valette
Notice of rights
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any
form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise,
without the prior written permission of the publisher. For information on getting
permission for reprints and excerpts, contact [email protected]
Notice of liability
The information in this book is distributed on an “As Is” basis, without warranty.
While every precaution has been taken in the preparation of the book, neither the
author nor Peachpit Press, shall have any liability to any person or entity with respect
to any loss or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by the
instructions contained in this book or by the computer software and hardware
products described in it.
Trademarks
Visual QuickStart Guide is a registered trademark of Peachpit Press, a division of
Pearson Education.
iPhoto, iTunes, iDVD, and iMovie are registered trademarks and/or registered service
marks of Apple Computer, Inc.
ISBN 0-321-19776-3
9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Printed and bound in the United States of America
Dedication
To my son, Tristan Mackay Engst, the
subject of so many of my photographs.
About the Author
Adam C. Engst is the publisher of TidBITS,
one of the oldest and largest Internet-based
newsletters, distributed weekly to many
thousands of readers (find TidBITS at
www.tidbits.com). He has written numerous
Internet books, including the best-selling
Internet Starter Kit series, and many articles
for magazines, including Macworld, where
he is currently a contributing editor. He
has appeared on a variety of internationally
broadcast television and radio programs.
His indefatigable support of the Macintosh
community and commitment to helping
people has resulted in numerous awards
and recognition at the highest levels. In the
annual MDJ Power 25 survey of industry
insiders, he ranked as the second (2000) and
third (2001 & 2002) most influential person in the Macintosh industry, and he was
named one of MacDirectory’s top ten visionaries. And how many industry figures can
boast of being turned into an action figure?
Please send comments about the book
to Adam at [email protected] or
post them on the book’s Web site at
http://iphoto.tidbits.com/.
Other Books
by Adam C. Engst
The Wireless Networking Starter Kit
Eudora 4.2 for Windows & Macintosh: Visual
QuickStart Guide
Crossing Platforms: A Macintosh/Windows
Phrasebook
Internet Starter Kit for Macintosh
Special Thanks
Featured Photographers
No book is the work of a single person, and
many people helped with this one, including
I took most of the photos you see in this
book, but I also included some pictures from
friends and the folks at Peachpit Press. A
tip of the lens cap to: Marjorie Baer, Trish
Booth, Lisa Brazieal, Doug Davenport, GaryPaul Prince, and Mimi Vitetta.

Tonya Engst (not only my wonderful
wife, but also a great copyeditor)

Nancy Davis (an excellent editor and an
almost geographically suitable friend)

Lisa Brazieal (who can spot a
wayward pixel at ten paces)

Nancy Ruenzel (for giving me the
nod on this book)

Kim Lombardi and Scott Cowlin
(for PR and marketing wizardry)

Chris Engst (for watching Tristan!)

Glenn Fleishman and Marshall Clow
(without whose help I could never
have explained color management
and resolution)

Keith Kubarek, Sandro Menzel, Cory
Byard, and Laurie Clow (for their
photography knowledge and tips)

Jeff Carlson, Geoff Duncan, Matt
Neuburg, and Mark Anbinder (for
helping keep TidBITS running)
Technical Colophon
I wrote this book using the following
hardware and software.

A dual-processor 1 GHz Power Mac G4
with two 17-inch Apple Studio Display
monitors for writing and layout, a
Canon PowerShot S100 camera, and an
Addonics Pocket DigiDrive card reader

Mac OS X 10.2 Jaguar, iPhoto 2, Adobe
InDesign 2.0 for layout that actually
works in Mac OS X, Snapz Pro X for
screen shots, GraphicConverter 4.4, and
the Peachpit VQS template
Contents at a Glance
Getting Started
1
Chapter 2:
Importing and Managing Photos
11
Chapter 3:
Organizing Photos
29
Chapter 4:
Editing Photos
53
Chapter 5:
Creating Books
75
Chapter 6:
Sharing Photos
99
Chapter 7:
Troubleshooting
147
Appendix A:
Deep Background
159
Appendix B:
Taking Better Photos
167
Index
179
v
Contents at a Glance
Chapter 1:
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Chapter 1:
Chapter 2:
Chapter 3:
Getting Started
1
Hardware and Software Requirements . . . . . . . . . .
Acquiring iPhoto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing iPhoto via Software Update . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing iPhoto Manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating from 1.1.1 to 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Launching iPhoto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iPhoto’s Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interface Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Importing and Managing Photos
11
Entering Import Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing from a Camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing from a Card Reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing from Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing from a Kodak Photo/Picture CD . . . .
Importing from an iPhoto Disc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing Only Selected Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iPhoto Directory Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Multiple iPhoto Library Folders . . . . . .
Switching between iPhoto Library Folders . . . . .
Backing Up Your Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other Backup Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Merging iPhoto Library Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iPhoto and Image Capture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
Organizing Photos
29
Entering Organize Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Organize Tools Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Display Pane’s Layout . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Display Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contextual Menu Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving Around in iPhoto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Film Rolls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Albums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Duplicating Albums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Renaming and Rearranging Albums . . . . . . . . . . .
vi
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
Table of Contents
Chapter 4:
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
Editing Photos
53
Entering Edit Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contextual Menu Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit Tools Overview (Display Pane) . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit Tools Overview (Separate Window) . . . . . . .
Customizing the Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Zooming Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Duplicating Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rotating Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enhancing Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Making Photos Black-and-White . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting Brightness and Contrast . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Portions of Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specific Aspect Ratios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cropping Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reducing Red-Eye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retouching Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Undoing Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing in Another Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recommended Image-Editing Programs . . . . . . .
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
Creating Books
75
Switching Modes while Creating Books . . . . . . . .
Book Tools Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Designing Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Designing Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Arranging Photos on Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dealing with Warning Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering and Editing Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Typing Text “Correctly” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
vii
Table of Contents
Chapter 5:
Deleting Albums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Photos to Albums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Photos from Albums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Arranging Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning Titles to Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning Comments to Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Photo Dates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning and Removing Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching via Keyword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching for Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Photo Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table of Contents
Changing Fonts and Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Text Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking Spelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking Spelling As You Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Previewing Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing Books on Your Own Printer . . . . . . . . . . .
Catalog Book Example and Ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Classic Book Example and Ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Picture Book Example and Ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Portfolio Book Example and Ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Story Book Example and Ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Year Book Example and Ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table of Contents
Chapter 6:
viii
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
Sharing Photos
99
Accessing Sharing Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing Tools Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Previewing Prints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing Contact Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing Full-Page Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing Greeting Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing N-Up Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing Sampler Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing Standard Prints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing Custom Layouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up Slideshows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running Slideshows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Slideshow Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating an iMovie Slideshow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emailing Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other Ways of Emailing Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up an Apple ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Your Apple ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing to Order Prints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ordering Prints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ordering Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Book Observations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up a .Mac Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Major .Mac Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Publishing Photos Using HomePage . . . . . . . . . .
Managing HomePage Albums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Publishing .Mac Slides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Subscribing to .Mac Slides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
Table of Contents
Chapter 7:
Troubleshooting
147
General Problems and Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing Problems and Solutions . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Problems and Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing Problems and Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Print and Book Problems and Solutions . . . . . . .
Print and Book Ordering Problems and Solutions
Help Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dealing with Warning Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix A:
Deep Background
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
148
150
152
154
155
156
157
158
159
Understanding Aspect Ratios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Understanding Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Understanding Color Management . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Appendix B:
Taking Better Pictures
167
What Kind of Photographer Are You? . . . . . . . .
Choosing a Camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Where to Read Camera Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Camera Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Photo Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
More General Photo Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Portrait Photo Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Child and Pet Photo Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Landscape Photo Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Travel Photo Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Index
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
179
ix
Table of Contents
Setting the Desktop Picture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Screen Saver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a DVD Slideshow with iDVD . . . . . . . .
iDVD Slideshow Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing Photos on Disc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Receiving an iPhoto Disc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting Files by Dragging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting to Web Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Web Page Export Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting to QuickTime Movies . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Distributing QuickTime Movies . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing Photos with Users on Your Mac . . . . . .
Sharing Photos with Networked Macs . . . . . . . .
Extending iPhoto with AppleScript . . . . . . . . . . .
iPhoto AppleScript Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing
Photos
6
iPhoto shines when it comes to sharing
photos. It lets you print photos on your own
printer, run custom slideshows with music,
email photos to friends, order higher quality
prints than you may be able to coax out of
your printer, order the books we created in
the last chapter, publish photos on Apple’s
Web-based .Mac HomePage service, create
custom screen savers, export pictures to
individual files, create Web pages for posting
on your own Web site, and even generate
QuickTime movie slideshows that you can
share with anyone. Phew!
For the most part, Apple has done a good
job of implementing these features, although
I’ll help you avoid some pitfalls and tell you
about some other programs and plug-ins
that extend iPhoto’s flexibility and power.
99
Sharing Photos
I can imagine an avant-garde photo exhibit
where all the frames are empty, because
the artist is making a statement about his
reluctance to transfer art from the hidden
world of the camera to the open light of day.
Luckily, I’m sure no one reading this book
would suffer from such intellectual foolishness. We take pictures to look at them, and
to share them with our family, friends,
colleagues, and customers.
Chapter 6
Accessing Sharing Tools
In iPhoto 2, Apple eliminated the share
mode that existed in the previous versions,
moving some of the sharing tools to organize
mode, and making others available only from
iPhoto’s menus.
Figure 6.1 To switch into organize mode at any time,
click the Organize button.
Ways to access sharing tools:
Accessing Sharing Tools

At any time, click the Organize button
under the display pane (Figure 6.1). See
“Entering Organize Mode” in Chapter 3,
“Organizing Photos,” for other methods.

You can run a slideshow at any time.
Just select an album or some individual
photos, and then click the triangular
slideshow button under the album pane.

Some of the sharing tools are accessible
from the File menu even when you’re
in other modes (Figure 6.2). You can
print photos at any time by selecting
one or more photos (or an entire album)
and choosing Print from the File menu
(xP )—it’s the same as clicking the
Print button. You can also print copies of
books on your own printer, but the only
way to do so is to choose Print from the
File menu (xP ) when you’re in book
mode. Also, choosing Export from the
File menu (xsE ) is now the only
way to display the Export Photos dialog.
100
Figure 6.2 You can
access the Print and
Export commands from
the File menu.
Sharing Photos
Sharing Tools Overview
When you click a button for a sharing tool
in the organize pane (Figure 6.3), expect
iPhoto to open a window or dialog.
 Tip

Album pane. Create and work
with collections of photos here.
This indicator
shows the number of photos
selected (4) in the
current set (26).
Remember that exporting and printing
books must be done from the File menu.
Selected pictures
(note the frames
around the images).
Info pane.
Information
about your
images and
albums
shows up
here. You can
modify titles,
dates, and
comments.
Size slider.
Adjust this
slider to
resize the
contents of
the display
pane.
Click to run
a slideshow.
Click to add
an album.
Burn button.
Click to start
the process
of burning
selected
photos to
CD or DVD.
Click to hide
or show the
info pane.
Click to rotate
the selected
image(s)
clockwise.
Option-click to
rotate counterclockwise.
Print button.
Click to display
the Print dialog, in which
you select print
styles and
other options.
Order Prints
button. Click
to display the
Order Prints
window, which
lets you pick
photo sizes
and enter order
Email button. details before
Click to email uploading your
the selected photos autophotos.
matically.
Order Book
button. Click
to display
the Order
Book window,
which lets you
enter details
about your
order before
uploading your
photos automatically.
Slideshow button. Click to display the Slideshow
Settings window, in which you set options for
slideshows and choose music to play during slideshows.
.Mac Slides
button. Click
to upload the
selected photos
to your .Mac
account for sharing with others.
iDVD button.
Click to send the
selected photos
to iDVD for a DVDbased slideshow.
Desktop button. Click to use
selected photos
as screen savers
and Desktop
backgrounds.
HomePage button. Click to show the
Publish HomePage window, which
lets you change photo titles and pick
page themes before uploading your
photos automatically.
101
Sharing Tools Overview
Figure 6.3
Chapter 6
Printing Photos
Many people prefer to print their photos on
inexpensive color inkjet printers rather than
waiting for online orders.
To print photos:
1. Select one or more photos to print.
Select your
printer here.
Click to see a
preview in the
Preview program.
Help button.
Click for help.
Select preset
printing
options here.
Select
iPhoto’s
printing
style
here.
Click for Set options
more
for the style
options. here.
Printing Photos
2. Either choose Print from the File menu
(xP ), or click the Print button in the
organize pane.
iPhoto displays the Print dialog
(Figure 6.4).
3. From the Presets pop-up menu, choose
appropriate settings (the contents are
printer-specific). If you don’t like
the presets, you can access all available
settings by clicking Advanced Options.
Figure 6.4 To print selected photos, choose Print from
the File menu to display the Print dialog, select your
desired options, and click the Print button.
4. From the Style menu, choose the desired
style: Contact Sheet, Full Page, Greeting
Card, N-Up, Sampler, or Standard Prints.
5. Set the options for the style you selected.
6. Enter the number of copies to print.
7. Click the Print button.
iPhoto sends your photos to the printer.
 Tips




In book mode, choosing Print from the
File menu lets you print book pages that
mix photos and text on a single page.
If you see a yellow warning icon in the
Print dialog, see “Dealing with Warning
Icons” in Chapter 7, “Troubleshooting.”
Photos print at their aspect ratios; iPhoto
shrinks images proportionally to make
them fit, thus increasing the border size.
Save changes made in Advanced Options
for repeated use by choosing Save As
from the Presets menu while you’re viewing the Advanced Options settings.
102
Adding a Printer
If you’ve never printed from Mac OS X
before, follow these steps to add a printer.
1. In the Print dialog, choose Edit Printer
List from the Printer pop-up menu to
display the Printer List window.
2. Click the Add button to show the
printer selection sheet.
3. Choose a printer connection method
from the pop-up menu at the top of
the sheet.
4. In the area below the pop-up menu,
enter printer details or select a printer.
5. Click the Add button to dismiss the
sheet.
6. Close the Printer List window.
Sharing Photos
Previewing Prints
Ink and paper for color inkjet printers are
expensive, particularly glossy photo paper.
If you’re unsure about what’s going to print,
it’s best to preview the output before
committing it to expensive paper. Another
reason to preview your printout is that the
preview in the Print dialog only shows you
the first page of photos to print.
To preview prints:
1. Select one or more photos to print.
Figure 6.5 To preview a printout in Apple’s Preview
application (shown above), click Preview in the Print
dialog.
Test, Test, Test!
A few things can affect how a photo looks
when it comes out of your printer.



Printer capabilities, both what they
can do physically and what their drivers allow in the Page Setup and Print
dialogs, vary by brand and model.
Inkjet printers print very differently
on different sorts of paper, and it’s
important to match the print settings
to the type of paper you’re using.
iPhoto’s print styles (covered next)
offer a variety of options.
It may take several tries to determine the
best combination of options. You may
be able to try some in economy mode
on cheap paper, but in the end, you may
have to expend some ink on a few sheets
of expensive photo paper. To reduce the
waste and cost, keep good notes for subsequent printing sessions.
3. Pick a style and set desired options.
4. Click the Preview button.
iPhoto “prints” the selected photos to
a temporary PDF document called
“Untitled” and opens it in Apple’s
Preview application (Figure 6.5).
5. Click the thumbnails on the right side
to see multiple pages, and when you’re
done, close the window.
 Tips

You can save the temporary document
in the Preview application if you want
a PDF version.

Previewing in this fashion won’t help you
determine if your photos will fit within
the margins of your printer. Also, any
printer-specific changes you make (such
as forcing black ink on a color printer)
won’t be reflected in the preview. See
if your printer has an economy or draft
mode you can use to test printer-specfic
features on a single page of photos.
103
Previewing Prints
2. Either choose Print from the File menu
(xP ), or click the Print button in the
organize pane to display the Print dialog.
Chapter 6
Printing Contact Sheets
The first printing style iPhoto offers is the
Contact Sheet style, which prints multiple
images per sheet of paper (Figure 6.6).
Uses for contact sheets
Printing Contact Sheets


Contact sheets are traditionally used
to look at a number of photos at once,
which is handy for comparing different
versions of the same picture, or for letting
relatives who don’t have a computer pick
which photos they’d like you to order for
them as prints.
Figure 6.6 iPhoto’s Contact Sheet style prints multiple
images per sheet of paper.
You can buy special paper for stickers or
decals, so printing a contact sheet could
be an easy way to make custom stickers.
You don’t have enough control in iPhoto
to print on perforated sticker stock, so
you must cut out the stickers.
 Tips

If you select only one photo and print a
contact sheet, iPhoto replicates the photo
to as many spots on the page as are available. That’s handy for wallet photos.

See “Printing N-Up Photos” in this
chapter for slightly different options.

The maximum number of photos to print
across the page is 8; that gives you 13
rows for a total of 104 pictures.

For more white space between photos
and a layout that doesn’t print all the
photos in landscape orientation, deselect
the Save paper checkbox.

If you want titles or comments printed as
well, print pages from the Year Book or
Catalog book theme instead.

If you see a yellow warning icon on a
photo in the Print dialog, try increasing
the number of photos per page to print
the photos at a smaller size.
104
ImageBuddy
For more control over your contact
sheets, check out the $17 ImageBuddy
from KepMad Systems. ImageBuddy lets
you set the number of columns and rows,
whether titles will print under the images,
and even the font and size of the titles.
The demo version of ImageBuddy, which
you can download from www.kepmad.com,
prints the word Demo over each photo,
but it should give you a good idea of
whether or not you need ImageBuddy’s
extra capabilities.
Sharing Photos
Printing Full-Page Photos
iPhoto’s second printing style prints each
selected photo at the largest size that will fit
on a piece of paper (Figure 6.7).
Uses for full-page prints:
Anything you want to print as large
as possible but don’t mind if it doesn’t
match standard aspect ratios.

Prints on special 4" x 6" or roll paper;
make sure to choose Page Setup from the
File menu (xsP ) and select the
proper paper size in the Page Setup dialog
before printing (Figure 6.8).
 Tips
Figure 6.8 To print on 4" x 6" paper, you must
first select the appropriate paper size in the
Page Setup dialog, accessible by choosing
Page Setup from the File menu.

If a photo’s aspect ratio does not match
that of your paper, iPhoto shrinks the
photo proportionally to make it fit, which
increases the white borders.

If your printer has the same margins on
every side of the paper, you can enter the
paper size into the Custom fields in the
image editing window’s toolbar before
cropping to get the largest possible image
on paper. (If the printer margins aren’t
the same on every side, convert the paper
size to millimeters and subtract the
margins from each side appropriately.)

Don’t assume iPhoto can print to your
printer’s minimum margins. Test a few
full-page prints in economy mode first to
learn what will come out.

Don’t bother entering your printer’s
minimum margins to get the smallest
possible margins; any number (including
0.00) lower than the printer’s minimum
margins results in a printout that uses as
much of the paper as possible.

If you see a yellow warning icon in the
Print dialog, try increasing your margins.
Gimp-Print Drivers
What your printer can do is determined
by its driver, system-level software provided by the manufacturer or by Apple.
There’s also Gimp-Print, an open source
set of drivers for over 500 printers, which
offers full support for printer options
that the manufacturers may not support
in Mac OS X. For instance, if you want
to print on 4" x 6" borderless paper or
from roll paper and your Mac OS X driver
doesn’t support those options, your best
bet is Gimp-Print. Find it at http://gimpprint.sourceforge.net/MacOSX.php3
and make sure to give your printer a
unique name when adding it. Be careful
to check all of Gimp-Print’s Page Setup
and Print dialog options before printing.
105
Printing Full-Page Photos

Figure 6.7 iPhoto’s Full Page style prints a single
photo at the largest size that will fit on a piece of
paper.
Chapter 6
Printing Greeting Cards
iPhoto’s third printing style offers two
options for printing folded greeting cards
(Figure 6.9).
Uses for greeting cards:
Printing Greeting Cards

Print your own holiday cards rather than
buying pre-printed ones.

Make custom birthday cards for friends
and family.

Print invitations to a party.
Figure 6.9 iPhoto’s Greeting Card style lets you
choose between single-fold and double-fold greeting
cards. Unfortunately, it doesn’t let you enter text.
Greeting Card Alternatives
 Tips

You can choose between single-fold and
double-fold greeting cards. Single-fold
greeting cards print the photo on half the
paper; double-fold greeting cards print
the photo on one-quarter of the paper.

Cropping a photo to an aspect ratio of
8 x 5 increases the size of the photo for
a single-fold greeting card. However,
cropping to 5.5 x 4.25 for a double-fold
greeting card doesn’t make a noticeable
difference because it’s too close to the
original aspect ratio of 4 x 3.

There’s no way to prevent photos from
printing right at the folded edges, which
looks particularly amateurish with
double-fold cards. Easy Card Creator
(see sidebar) does a better job.


iPhoto doesn’t let you enter text inside
the greeting cards or print a photo on the
inside of the card. Consider one of the
alternatives mentioned in the sidebar to
work around this problem.
So you want more control over your
greeting cards? Yeah, me too. Here are
some options.

Most online photo processors enable
you to print and mail customized
greeting cards from your photos, and
in fact, Kodak’s Ofoto service, which
is what Apple uses for ordering prints
online, also offers this feature. Until
iPhoto supports it internally, however,
you’ll have to upload prints to an
online service manually and customize your greeting card on the Web.

Buy a copy of Script Software’s $30
Easy Card Creator, which does a great
job of creating and printing greeting
cards and custom envelopes. You can
even drop photos into it from iPhoto.
Download Easy Card Creator from
www.scriptsoftware.com.

Buy a copy of Nova Development’s
$59.95 Print Explosion, which is
designed to create greeting cards,
along with a wide variety of other
printed materials. Find them on the
Web at www.novadevelopment.com.

Write your message inside the card by
hand! (Perhaps that’s obvious.)
You can buy special photo paper for
greeting cards that’s pre-scored for
easier and more attractive folding.
106
Sharing Photos
Printing N-Up Photos
iPhoto’s fourth printing style looks and
works much like the Contact Sheet style
covered previously, but lets you pick exactly
how many photos you want to appear on the
page: 2, 4, 6, 9, or 16 (Figure 6.10).
Figure 6.10 iPhoto’s N-Up style lets you pick how
many photos will appear on the page from a pop-up
menu.
Uses for N-Up prints:

Full-page layouts of photos with even
margins.

Anything for which you might use the
Contact Sheet style.

If you select only one photo when using
the N-Up style, iPhoto replicates the
photo in as many spots on the page as are
available. That’s handy for wallet photos.

If you want titles or comments printed as
well, print pages from the Catalog book
theme instead of using N-Up.

If you see a yellow warning icon on a
photo in the Print dialog, try increasing
the number of photos per page to print
the photos at a smaller size.
N-Up vs. Contact Sheet?
The N-Up and Contact Sheet styles differ
in two important ways.

With the N-Up style, you pick how
many photos will appear on the page,
whereas with Contact Sheet you pick
how many columns of photos will
print on the page.

The N-Up style does a better job spacing photos out so they fill the entire
page. The Contact Sheet style can
leave a large bottom margin.
Whether you use N-Up or Contact Sheet
depends on precisely what you’re trying
to achieve, since they’re very similar.
107
Printing N-Up Photos
 Tips
Chapter 6
Printing Sampler Sheets
iPhoto’s fifth printing style provides two
templates that mix photos of different sizes.
The first template places three photos on a
page; the second arranges six photos on a
page (Figure 6.11).
Printing Sampler Sheets
Uses for sampler sheets:

Print collections of photos for sending to
relatives instead of individual prints.

Print your most recent photos for an
informal gallery-style display.
Figure 6.11 Template 1 of iPhoto’s Sampler style prints
three photos on a page.
 Tips

Unless you plan to cut the printed photos
out, make sure all the photos you print
with a Sampler layout are of the same
orientation. If you mix landscape (horizontal) and portrait (vertical) photos,
iPhoto can’t orient them all correctly.

If you want your printed page to be
in portrait orientation, use landscape
photos with Template 1 (Figure 6.12) or
portrait photos with Template 2. If you
want your printed page to be landscape
orientation, use portrait photos with
Template 1 or landscape photos with
Template 2 (Figure 6.13).

Pay close attention to iPhoto’s preview
to make sure you know exactly what will
print before clicking the Print button!

To control their page location, arrange
the photos manually in an album first.

If you select only one photo, iPhoto uses
that photo in all the spots on the page.

With careful cutting, you can probably fit
sampler sheets into 8" x 10" frames.

For different layouts, either print pages
from a book layout or see “Printing
Custom Layouts” later in this chapter.
108
Figure 6.12 Here’s the preview of landscape photos printed with Sampler
Template 1, which results in a page in
portrait orientation.
Figure 6.13 Here’s the preview of landscape photos
printed with Sampler Template 2, which results in a
page in landscape orientation.
Sharing Photos
Printing Standard Prints
iPhoto’s sixth and final printing style prints
photos in four standard sizes: 2" x 3", 4" x 6",
5" x 7", and 8" x 10" (Figure 6.14).
Uses for standard prints:

Print photos for inclusion in traditional
photo albums that accept only standardsize prints.

Frame your pictures using standard
frame sizes.
Figure 6.14 iPhoto’s Standard Prints style enables
you to print photos at traditional sizes so they fit in
standard frames and photo albums.

It’s important to crop photos to the
appropriate aspect ratio before printing,
because otherwise iPhoto shrinks the
images proportionally to fit, increasing
the white borders and ensuring that your
photo will not be exactly the right size.

If you are printing more than one 2" x 3",
4" x 6", or 5" x 7" photo, deselect the “One
photo per page” checkbox to print two
per page, thus saving paper.

You can buy photo paper in sheets of
4" x 6" paper that work with specific
brands of printers. To print on paper of
unusual sizes, you must change the paper
size in the Page Setup dialog. Open it by
choosing Page Setup from the File menu
(xsP ) and selecting the desired
paper size. You may see better results
with using the Full Page style instead;
my printer doesn’t quite print to two
edges when I use the 4" x 6" option in
Standard Prints.

If you see a yellow warning icon in the
Print dialog, check to see if you get the
warning icon in the Full Page style as
well. If not, the warning icon is probably
spurious; otherwise pick a smaller print
size. See “Dealing with Warning Icons”
in Chapter 7, “Troubleshooting.”
109
Printing Standard Prints
 Tips
Chapter 6
Printing Custom Layouts
Despite the addition of the Sampler style in
iPhoto 2, many people want more flexibility
printing custom layouts. iPhoto won’t help
you beyond what you can do with book layouts, but several third-party utilities will.
Printing Custom Layouts
Portraits & Prints
The $20 Portraits & Prints, from Econ
Technologies, provides a number of layouts,
some of which merely try to fit many samesize photos onto a page, others of which
provide a mix of sizes (Figure 6.15). With
the addition of the $10 Portraits & Prints
Template Maker, you can design your own
custom layouts with photos, simple graphics
(boxes and lines), and even text.
To bring photos in from iPhoto, just drag
them from iPhoto to the Portraits & Prints
window, then pick a template and choose
which photo goes in which slot. Especially
nice is the way Portraits & Prints lets you
slide a photo around in its slot if the aspect
ratios between the slot and the photo don’t
match. No need for cropping! Download
from www.econtechnologies.com.
ImageBuddy
Another option, though trickier to use, is
KepMad Systems’ $17 ImageBuddy. As with
Portraits & Prints, you drag your photos
from iPhoto into the ImageBuddy window
to import them, and once there, you can
double-click a photo in the collection on
the right side to add it to the page at the
selected size. Although ImageBuddy is a bit
more aimed at printing contact sheets, if
you check the Manual Layout checkbox, you
can drag individual images around on the
page to whatever location you want (Figure
6.16). X and Y coordinates for each image
help you line things up. Download a copy
from www.kepmad.com.
110
Figure 6.15 Portraits & Prints offers numerous layouts
that mix different sizes of photos.
Figure 6.16 With the Manual Layout checkbox
selected, ImageBuddy lets you drag images around
wherever you want in your layout.
Remember Book Layouts
Keep in mind that the cheapest and
easiest way to put a number of photos on
the same page is by printing a page from
a book layout. See Chapter 5, “Creating
Books,” for details.
Sharing Photos
Printing Tips
Paper Types
Computer superstores sell a vast number
of different types of inkjet papers. What
should you buy? You’re almost certain to
get good results with paper made by the
manufacturer of your printer. Papers from
other manufacturers will likely work well
too, but aren’t as guaranteed. The basic
paper types include:
Plain paper. Use it only for drafts or
text; photos will look awful.

Matte paper. These papers are heavier
than plain paper and have a smooth,
but not glossy, finish.

Glossy photo paper and film. These
papers, which come in a bewildering variety of types and weights, are
heavier yet and have a glossy surface
that looks like standard photo paper.
Glossy film is actually polyethylene,
not paper. Use glossy paper for your
best prints.

Specialty papers. You can buy papers
that look like watercolor paper, have a
metallic sheen, are of archival quality,
or are translucent. Other speciality
papers can be ironed onto T-shirts, are
pre-scored for folding, have magnetic
backing, and more.
If you like printing photos on your own
printer, I strongly encourage you to buy
a variety of papers and see what you like.
Also fun to try is a sample pack from Red
River Paper, an online paper vendor at
www.redrivercatalog.com.
Printing tips:

Use a good quality inkjet printer. Sixcolor printers produce better output than
four-color printers, and printers designed
to print photos will do a better job than
general-purpose printers (but may not
print text as well).

Make sure your print head is clean and
aligned. If your printouts don’t look quite
right, try cleaning the print head.

Use good paper. Modern inkjets lay
down incredibly small drops of ink, and
standard paper absorbs those drops more
than photo paper, blurring printouts.

Make sure to print on the correct side of
the paper (it’s usually whiter or shinier).

Don’t handle the surface of the paper that
will be printed on. Oils from your skin
can mess up the printout.

Remove each sheet from the output tray
after printing, particularly with glossy
films, and be careful not to touch the
surface until it has dried.

In the Advanced Options of the Print
dialog, make sure you’re using the highest
resolution and appropriate other settings.
In particular, aim for settings that favor
quality over speed.

Make sure to crop photos to the right
aspect ratio before printing, or you’ll
end up with larger white borders.
111
Printing Tips

How can you achieve the best quality prints?
Try these tips, and test, test, test. Every
combination of printer and paper is slightly
different, so testing is the only way to be sure
what will come out.
Chapter 6
Setting up Slideshows
A slideshow is the easiest way to display
your photos while at your computer. iPhoto
2 offers enhanced slideshow capabilities
thanks to iPhoto’s integration with Apple’s
free iTunes MP3 music playing software.
To configure slideshows:
Setting up Slideshows
1. In organize mode, click the Slideshow
button in the organize pane.
iPhoto opens the Slideshow Settings
window (Figure 6.17).
2. Enter the length of time you want each
photo to remain on the screen.
3. Select “Display photos in random order”
and “Repeat slideshow” if desired.
4. If you want music to play during your
slideshow, select the Music checkbox and
choose a song from the list.
Figure 6.17 To configure a slideshow, click the
Slideshow button in the organize pane to bring up the
Slideshow Settings window, in which you can configure slide duration, repetition, and music.
5. Click Save Settings or Play Slideshow.
 Tips

The Slideshow Settings window may
appear slowly the first time you click the
Slideshow button after launching iPhoto,
due to reading data from iTunes.

Each album can have its own setting for
slideshow music.

There’s no way to chain songs together
or use an entire playlist of songs from
iTunes. The selected song repeats until
the slideshow finishes. See “Slideshow
Tips” in this chapter for a workaround.

Sort the music list by time to simplify
picking a song that matches your
slideshow’s length.

The longest duration you can enter is 60
seconds per photo; clicking the arrow
buttons won’t let you go past 30 seconds.
112
Music Controls
Because of iPhoto 2’s integration with
iTunes, you now can pick from many
more songs more easily than before.

To limit the songs that appear to
those in an iTunes playlist, select the
playlist from the pop-up menu.

To search for a specific song, enter
a few characters from its name or
the artist’s name in the Search field.
iPhoto narrows the list as you type.
Click the X button to clear the Search
field and fully expand the list of songs.

To sort the list, click the header of the
Song, Artist, or Time column.

Click the triangular Play button to listen to the selected song; click it again
to stop the song from playing.
Sharing Photos
Running Slideshows
Click to run a
slideshow.
Configuring slideshows is easy, but running
them is even easier.
To run a slideshow:
1. Select the photos you want to appear
in the slideshow.
To control a slideshow:

To pause and restart the slideshow,
press z . Note the subtle pause/
play indicator in the lower-right corner of
the screen (Figure 6.19).

To move back to the previous slide and
pause, press D (the left arrow) while the
slideshow is running (not paused).

To move on to the next slide and pause,
press F (the right arrow) while the
slideshow is running (not paused).

Press R (the up arrow) to speed the slide
display time up by one second per slide;
press C (the down arrow) to slow it
down by one second per slide.

To stop the slideshow, press any other
key or click the mouse.
Pause/ play
indicator.
Figure 6.19 Note the indicators that iPhoto displays
in the lower-right corner when you press the spacebar
or one of the other keys to control the slideshow.
Ordering Your Slideshow
Slideshows start with the image in the
upper-left position of the selection or the
album. But if you have the “Place most
recent photos at the top” option set in
iPhoto’s Preferences window, you’ll find
it impossible to show a chronological
sequence of pictures. Turn that setting
off in iPhoto’s Preferences window and
make sure to arrange by film roll (import
order) to get a first-to-last ordering of
your photos.
 Tips

If no photos are selected, iPhoto shows all
the photos in the album.

Clicking the arrow keys while the
slideshow is paused switches photos, but
iPhoto doesn’t update the screen properly
until you press z again.
113
Running Slideshows
Figure 6.18 To run a slideshow, click either the permanent slideshow button under the album pane, or
click the Slideshow button in the organize pane to
display the Slideshow Settings window, and then
click Play Slideshow. The permanent button is easier
unless you need to change some settings.
2. Click the slideshow button that’s
always available under the album
pane (Figure 6.18).
or
In organize mode, click the Slideshow
button, and then click Play Slideshow in
the Slideshow Settings window.
Chapter 6
Slideshow Tips
Although setting up and playing slideshows
is easy, you can produce better results by
keeping these tips in mind.
Slideshow Tips
Slideshow tips:

To avoid black edges on monitors that
don’t use a 4 x 3 aspect ratio (such as
most of Apple’s flat-panel displays), crop
images to the size of your screen.

When possible, use photos in landscape
orientation, since portrait photos will
have huge black bands on the edges.

Avoid using images smaller than your
screen (in pixels), since they will look
jaggy when iPhoto scales them up to fit.

If you really want to show small images,
consider pasting them onto a larger background in a graphics program to increase
their size and avoid iPhoto’s scaling.

Although iPhoto limits you to a single
song per slideshow, repeating it as
necessary, you can splice multiple songs
together, either in iMovie or in other
audio-editing programs. It’s probably
easier to create the slideshow in iMovie
entirely at that point.

Remember that PowerBooks and iBooks
can display on TVs via an S-video cable
(you may have to buy it separately). If you
have a huge television handy, why not
use that for a slideshow instead of the
Mac’s monitor?

Another way of running a slideshow on
a TV is to copy selected photos to your
digital camera’s memory card via a USB
card reader and then display them via the
camera, with its TV cable. Make sure to
name them appropriately and put them
in the right location to fool your camera
into displaying them.
114
Other Slideshow Tools
iPhoto can play any MP3 file you may
have in iTunes, along with AIFF and
WAV files. You can create MP3 files from
your audio CD collection in iTunes, or
you can download (legally!) MP3 files
from the Internet; just browse around a
music site like MP3.com or search with
Google (www.google.com).
Also check out SmartSound Software’s
SmartSound Movie Maestro program,
which helps you generate soundtracks
for movies and slideshows. It works
with iPhoto and comes with a slew of
soundtrack-type sounds that you can
customize. The program costs $49.95,
and you can find more information at
www.smartsound.com.
Finally, other tools can create more
sophisticated slideshows than iMovie
and either play them on your computer
or export them to QuickTime movies.
In particular, I recommend checking
out Granted Software’s free Still Life
(www.grantedsw.com/still-life) and
iView Multimedia’s iView Media Pro
(www.iview-multimedia.com).
Sharing Photos
Ken Burns
Effect pane.
Preview pane.
Timeline.
Drag clips
here.
Photos Audio Titles
button. button. button.
Play and Play Full
Screen buttons.
Creating an
iMovie Slideshow
What if you want to add captions or narration to a slideshow? Turn to Apple’s free
iMovie video editor. These instructions are
just an overview; refer to iMovie’s help or
Jeff Carlson’s iMovie 3 for Mac OS X: Visual
QuickStart Guide for more details.
To create an iMovie slideshow:
Figure 6.20 Use iMovie 3 to produce and distribute
slideshows that are significantly more complex than
is possible in iPhoto alone.
2. Click the Audio button, click the button
next to Microphone, and record your narration, clicking the button again to stop
recording (Figure 6.21). Repeat for each
photo’s voice-over.
3. In the timeline, arrange your photo clips
with the voice-over clips underneath.
Figure 6.21 To record audio, click the Audio button,
click the round button to the right of the Microphone
feedback, and speak. Click that button again to stop.
4. Check the length of each photo’s voiceover, and in the Ken Burns Effect pane,
set the length of time for the photo clip to
match that of the voice-over.
5. Click the Titles button, type your text in
the available fields, and select a title style.
Adjust the time the title will display to
match the photo clip length. Drag the
title style on top of the desired photo clip
(Figure 6.22). Repeat for each photo.
6. View your slideshow by positioning the
timeline slider all the way to the left and
clicking Play or Play Full Screen.
 Tip
Figure 6.22 To add
titles, click the Titles
button and use the
controls to type and
format your title.

To avoid applying the Ken Burns Effect
(panning and zooming) to a photo, press
x. right after dragging that photo
into the timeline.
115
Creating an iMovie Slideshow
1. In iMovie 3, click the Photos button
and drag your desired photos into the
timeline (Figure 6.20). iMovie can see all
your photos stored in iPhoto, and you can
limit the display by selecting an album.
Chapter 6
Emailing Photos
For many people, email is the preferred
method of communication, and it works
well for sending photos to others.
To configure iPhoto for email:

In iPhoto’s Preferences window, choose
your email program from the Mail popup menu (Figure 6.23).
iPhoto changes the Email button’s icon
to match your email program.
To send photos via email:
Emailing Photos
1. Select the photos you want to send.
Figure 6.23 In iPhoto’s Preferences window,
choose your email program from the Mail
pop-up menu.
2. Click the Email button.
iPhoto displays a dialog with options for
your photos (Figure 6.24).
3. Choose the maximum size you want the
photos to appear at from the Size pop-up
menu, and, if you want to include titles
and comments, select their checkboxes.
4. Click the Compose button.
iPhoto exports the photos (converting them to JPEG files in the process),
launches your email program, creates a
new message, and attaches the photos,
which appear inline only in Apple’s Mail
(Figure 6.25).
Figure 6.24 Make sure to set a reasonable size for
your photos before sending them via email or they’ll
take too long to transfer for you and your recipient.
 Tips

iPhoto lets you use only Apple’s Mail,
Eudora, Microsoft Entourage, or America
Online. To use iPhoto with Mailsmith,
PowerMail, QuickMail Pro, Outlook
Express, or Claris Emailer, try Simon
Jacquier’s free iPhoto Mailer Patcher
(http://homepage.mac.com/jacksim/
software/imp.html).

If you send too many photos, or don’t
shrink their sizes enough, your message
may be too large to be delivered.
116
Figure 6.25 Here’s what the message looks
like in Mail. You don’t get much control over
the layout, but don’t worry, since there’s no
way of telling what it will look like on the
receiving end anyway.
Sharing Photos
Other Ways of
Emailing Photos
Although I recommend that you use iPhoto’s
built-in support for sending photos via
email, there are several alternative methods.
In some situations, one of them might work
better for you.
Ways to send photos via email:
Drag one or more photos from iPhoto
into a message window of your favorite
email program (Figure 6.26).

Drag one or more photos onto the Dock
icon for your favorite email program.
 Tips

Dragging photos into new outgoing email
messages or onto Dock icons works with
at least Apple’s Mail, Eudora, Mailsmith,
and Microsoft Entourage.

When dragging photos into an email
program, remember that you aren’t
compressing or resizing them, so they
may take a long time to send and receive.

When you drag photos into an email
message, only Eudora and Mail display
the photos inline in the body of the
message.

When you drag photos onto an email
program’s Dock icon, only Mail displays
the photos inline in the body of the
message; the others treat the photos as
normal attachments.
Figure 6.26 To send photos via email, drag them from
iPhoto into an outgoing message window, as I’ve
done here with Eudora.
117
Other Ways of Emailing Photos

Chapter 6
Setting up an Apple ID
Before you can order prints or books, you
must have an Apple ID with 1-Click ordering
enabled. If you haven’t previously set up an
Apple ID to order from the Apple Store, you
can create one within iPhoto.
To set up an Apple ID:
Setting up an Apple ID
1. Make sure you’re connected to the
Internet, and in organize mode click the
Order Print button to display the Order
Prints window.
Figure 6.27 To create a new Apple ID, click the Set Up
Account button in the Order Prints window to bring
up the Set Up Account dialog. Then click the Create
Account button.
2. Click the Set Up Account button.
iPhoto displays the Set Up Account
dialog (Figure 6.27).
3. Click the Create Account button.
iPhoto displays the first of three dialogs
that collect the data necessary to create
an account (Figure 6.28). The first asks
for your email address and password, the
second collects billing information, and
the third garners shipping information.
4. Enter the necessary information, clicking
the Continue button to move through the
process until you’re done.
Apple sends an email confirmation at the
end of the process.
 Tips

Remember that your Apple ID is always
your email address.

Choose a password that can’t be easily
guessed. Otherwise miscreants could go
in, change your shipping settings, order
prints or books with your credit card, and
switch back without you realizing.

If you have trouble with your Apple ID,
visit http://myinfo.apple.com/ and
confirm or re-enter your settings. You
can also set up an Apple ID at this site
if necessary.
118
Figure 6.28 Enter your sign-in information, billing
details, and shipping address in the dialogs that
appear.
Strong Passwords
Apple requires that your password be
at least six characters long, but you can
make it stronger by ensuring that it
contains numbers and punctuation along
with uppercase and lowercase letters. One
good strategy is to take a phrase you’ll
remember, like “Take me out to the ball
game!” and use the first letter of each
word, adding numbers where possible.
The above phrase could be turned into
this strong password: Tmo2tbg!
Whatever you do, do not use a proper
name or a word that will appear in the
dictionary—they’re too easy to guess.
Sharing Photos
Using Your Apple ID
Once you have your Apple ID set up, you
use it with Apple’s print- and book-ordering
services. It’s also useful if you want to use
some of Apple’s online tech support services
or order from the Apple Store. iPhoto usually
remembers your Apple ID, but if not, you can
always sign in.
To sign in using your Apple ID:
2. Enter your email address and password,
and then click the Sign In button.
iPhoto displays the Account Info dialog
(Figure 6.29).
3. If 1-Click purchasing is turned off, select
Enable 1-Click Purchasing.
4. Verify that everything else looks correct
(if not, click the Edit button next to the
incorrect data and make the necessary
corrections), and then click the Done
button.
 Tips
Figure 6.30 To enter a new shipping address, choose
Add New Address from the Address pop-up menu,
and then enter the new address in the Edit Shipping
Addresses dialog.

You can switch between Apple IDs using
the method above with two sets of email
addresses and passwords. This is handy
if multiple people want to order prints or
books on separate accounts.

You can add additional shipping
addresses by clicking Edit Shipping in
the Account Info dialog, choosing Add
New Address from the pop-up menu,
and filling in the details in the dialog that
appears (Figure 6.30). Switch between
the addresses by choosing the desired
one from the Ship To pop-up menu in the
Order Prints or Order Books window.
Forgotten Passwords
If you forget your password, enter your
email address in the Apple ID field in the
sign-in dialog, click the Forgot Password
button, and go through the necessary
Web pages. Apple sends you an email
message containing your password. The
vagaries of Internet email mean that the
message may not arrive immediately.
119
Using Your Apple ID
Figure 6.29 Verify and change your Apple ID settings
in the Account Info dialog.
1. In either the Order Prints or the Order
Books window, click either the Account
Info button or the Set Up Account button
to display the sign-in dialog (Figure 6.27
on the previous page).
Chapter 6
Preparing to Order Prints
You will want to spend some time preparing
your photos for printing by cropping them to
the appropriate aspect ratios for prints. But
what if you, like me, want to use the same
photos for a book, which uses a 4 x 3 aspect
ratio? Follow these steps for a solution.
To prepare photos for printing:
Preparing to Order Prints
1. Make a new album, and add the photos
that you want to order prints of.
2. Switch to the album, and edit each photo
as desired, other than cropping.
3. In organize mode, select all the photos
(xA ) and choose Duplicate from
the File menu (xD ) to make copies
(see “Duplicating Photos” in Chapter 4,
“Editing Photos” for details).
4. Open the Keywords/Search window
(xK ) and search for “copy” to select
just the copies in your album.
5. Drag them to the album pane to create
a new album of just the copies, and then
return to the previous album and delete
the copies from it.
You now have two albums with identical photos; one with the originals, the
other with copies. To keep them straight,
append “Prints” to the name of one,
“Book” to the name of the other.
6. Go through the photos in the Prints
album again, this time cropping each to
the desired aspect ratio.
7. If you’re printing photos in different
sizes, manually group them by size in the
album. That makes keeping track of them
in the Order Prints window easier.
8. Now you’re ready to order the prints, and
the “Book” album is ready to be arranged
and laid out in a book.
120
Pixels and Prints
You may have noticed that iPhoto reports
how large your photo is in pixels in the
info pane. But how does that match up
with print sizes that you order? You
mostly don’t have to care, since iPhoto
displays a low-resolution warning icon
when a photo doesn’t have enough pixels
to print well at the desired size. For reference, though, here are the sizes at which
iPhoto starts adding the warning icon,
given in terms of a 4 x 3 aspect ratio and
with the appropriate cropping.
Note that these are the minimum recommended resolutions. The larger your
photos and the more they exceed these
minimums, the better the final quality.

For wallet-sized prints (about 2.4" x
3.4"), you need at least 320 x 240 pixels
(when cropped to the above aspect
ratio, keep the largest side above
320 pixels).

For a 4" x 6" print, you need at least
640 x 480 pixels (when cropped to
4 x 6, keep the largest side above
640 pixels).

For a 5" x 7" print, you need at least
1024 x 768 pixels (when cropped to
5 x 7, keep the largest side above
1024 pixels).

For an 8" x 10" print, you need at least
1365 x 1024 pixels (when cropped to
8 x 10, keep the smallest side above
1024 pixels).

For 16" x 20" or 20" x 30" prints, you
need at least 1600 x 1200 pixels (when
cropped, keep the smallest side above
1200 pixels).
Sharing Photos
Ordering Prints
Once you’ve prepared your photos, it’s time
to order prints.
To order prints:
1. Make sure you’re connected to the
Internet, select one or more photos, and
click the Order Prints button.
iPhoto opens the Order Prints window
(Figure 6.31).
2. For each picture, enter the number of
each size print you’d like to order.
iPhoto automatically updates the total
cost as you add and subtract prints.
4. Check your order carefully to make sure
you’re getting the right number of each
print, and confirm that each photo can
print at the size you’ve selected.
5. Click the Buy Now button.
iPhoto uploads your pictures and alerts
you when it’s done.
 Tips

If nothing is selected when you click
Order Prints, iPhoto includes all the
photos in the current album.

Uploading takes a long time on a slow
Internet connection because iPhoto
uploads full-size images for best quality.

If you mostly want 4" x 6" prints, click the
Quick Order 4 x 6’s arrows to increase or
decrease the number of 4" x 6" prints of
each photo. You can reset the numbers
for individual prints later.

If you see a yellow warning icon next to a
size you want, see “Dealing with Warning
Icons” in Chapter 7, “Troubleshooting.”
Shipping Details
Unfortunately, you can have prints
delivered only to U.S. and Canadian
addresses right now, and they must
be ordered from an English version of
iPhoto. Check Apple’s iPhoto Web page at
www.apple.com/iphoto/ for any updates
to this situation.
Shipping charges vary with the number
of prints you order. For 1 to 20 prints, it
costs $2.99. For 21 to 50 prints, it’s $4.99.
And if you order more than 50 prints,
you’ll pay $6.99 in shipping.
121
Ordering Prints
Figure 6.31 To order prints, select one or more photos, click the Order Prints button, and in the Order
Prints window, enter the number of prints of each
photo that you want. When you’re ready, click the
Buy Now button.
3. Choose the appropriate shipping address
and method from the Ship To and Ship
Via pop-up menus.
Chapter 6
Ordering Books
Once you’ve designed a book (see Chapter 5,
“Creating Books”), ordering it is easy.
To order a book:
Ordering Books
1. Select the album for which you want to
order a book, and verify that each page
looks right in the preview window.
Figure 6.32 If some photos aren’t of sufficient quality
to print well, iPhoto warns you with this dialog.
2. Making sure that you’re connected to the
Internet, click the Order Book button in
either book or organize mode.
iPhoto assembles the book, warning
you if some photos aren’t high enough
resolution to print well (Figure 6.32) or
if some text doesn’t fit. iPhoto then opens
the Order Book window (Figure 6.33).
3. Choose a color for the cover from the
Cover Color pop-up menu.
4. Choose the appropriate shipping address
and method from the Ship To and Ship
Via pop-up menus.
5. Enter the number of books you want to
order in the Quantity field.
iPhoto automatically updates the total
cost as you add and subtract books.
Figure 6.33 To order a book, click Order Book to open
the Order Book window. Choose a cover color from
the Cover Color pop-up menu, choose the shipping
address and method, enter the number of books you
want to order, and click the Buy Now button.
6. Click the Buy Now button.
iPhoto uploads your pictures and alerts
you when it’s done.
 Tips

Books cost $3 per page, with a 10-page
minimum and a 50-page maximum.

Uploading takes a long time on a slow
Internet connection because iPhoto
uploads full-size images for best quality.

If you’re warned about low-resolution
images, see “Dealing with Warning Icons”
in Chapter 7, “Troubleshooting.”
122
Shipping Details
Unfortunately, you can have books
delivered only to U.S. and Canadian
addresses right now, and they must
be ordered from an English version of
iPhoto. Check Apple’s iPhoto Web page at
www.apple.com/iphoto/ for any updates
to this situation.
It costs $7.99 to ship a single book; each
additional book shipped to the same
address adds only $1 to your total.
Sharing Photos
Book Observations
Since the relatively high cost of printing a
book from iPhoto may cause some people
to shy away from trying them, I thought I’d
offer a few observations based on the books
I’ve ordered.
The good stuff:
It turns out that if people who can’t use
iPhoto want to order a book like those
you can design in iPhoto, they can do
so from a service called myPublisher.
You can visit myPublisher’s Web site at
www.mypublisher.com. I don’t know
the relationship between Apple and
myPublisher; it’s possible myPublisher
is printing the books for Apple, or Apple
may have licensed the same technology
that myPublisher uses.
The main advantages to building a book
using iPhoto over building one using
myPublisher’s service are that you don’t
have to upload photos manually, the process is much easier in iPhoto, and Apple
provides better-designed layouts and
more fonts. The only advantage of ordering from myPublisher is that they also
offer leather covers ($10) and laminated
book jackets ($5). Also helpful is the fact
that myPublisher.com can now deliver
books to Europe and Japan, which isn’t
currently possible with iPhoto.
The binding for the books is top-notch. It
looks and feels completely professional.

The paper is heavy stock, quite glossy,
and acid-free, so it should last well
(although it does show creases quickly).

Turnaround time from placing the order
to receiving a book is only about a week.

The packaging for the book was very
good, with the book inside a reusable
plastic sleeve, everything packed snugly
inside a cardboard box that protected
the edges from being dinged, and all that
inside a mailing box.
The bad stuff:

The image quality of the photos in books
isn’t as good as prints you can order in
iPhoto or prints you can create with an
inexpensive, six-color inkjet printer like
my Epson Stylus Photo 870. Overall, the
book print quality is similar to that you’d
see in a magazine, with the caveat that
consumer-level digital cameras can’t
match the output quality of equipment
used by professional photographers. That
said, no one to whom I’ve shown a book
has noticed this on their own.

On one book I ordered, the cover photo
was pasted on slightly crooked.

Black-and-white photos don’t print well
because of the color printing process
used for the books. Avoid using blackand-white photos in books.
123
Book Observations
Similar Book Service

Chapter 6
Setting up a .Mac Account
Before you can use Apple’s HomePage Web
publishing tool or .Mac Slides tool, you need
a .Mac account. It’s easy to set up but does
cost $99 per year. Luckily, Apple offers a
60-day free trial so you can see if HomePage
and .Mac Slides, along with .Mac’s other
features, are worth $99 per year to you.
Setting up a .Mac Account
To set up a .Mac account:
1. Choose System Preferences from
the Apple menu to open the System
Preferences window, and then click the
Internet icon to display the Internet
preferences pane (Figure 6.34).
Figure 6.34 To start setting up a .Mac account, click
the Sign Up button in the Internet preferences pane,
which takes you to a .Mac signup page in your Web
browser.
2. Make sure you’re connected to the
Internet and click the Sign Up button.
iPhoto launches your default Web
browser and takes you to the .Mac
signup page (Figure 6.35).
3. Enter your information in the fields
provided. When you’re done, click
Continue at the bottom of the page.
iPhoto displays a summary page
(Figure 6.36), offers you the chance
to send an iCard announcing the fact
that you have a new email address
([email protected]—you don’t have
to use it), and takes you to the .Mac home
page.
Figure 6.35 Enter your information in the .Mac signup
page, and click the Continue button
4. Click System Preferences to return to the
Internet preferences pane, and enter your
new .Mac member name and password.
5. Close the System Preferences window.
 Tip

Since many people have registered .Mac
accounts, you may need to choose a more
awkward username than would be ideal.
Try combining your first name and last
name and, if all else fails, add a number.
124
Figure 6.36 A confirmation page appears; copy
the username and password from that page to the
Internet preferences pane and you’re done.
Sharing Photos
Major .Mac Features
Figure 6.37 To use
.Mac, connect to the
.Mac Web page and
click the links at the
top of the page.
iDisk
Apple provides 100 MB of disk space on
its servers for each .Mac user, accessed
like any other disk—to mount your iDisk,
choose iDisk from the Finder’s Go menu
(xsI ). Predefined folders store backups, documents, pictures, movies, public files
to share, Web pages, music, and software
you can download (Figure 6.38).
When you publish pictures using .Mac Slides
or HomePage, the photos go in your Pictures
folder, and the HomePage Web page itself
goes in your Sites folder.
HomePage
Figure 6.39 Use the
HomePage Web publishing tool to create
and manage a number of different types
of Web pages.
The HomePage Web publishing tool enables
you to create different types of Web pages
without learning any HTML (Figure 6.39).
If you know how to create Web pages, you
can upload them to your Sites folder to make
them available to anyone on the Web at
http://homepage.mac.com/yourusername/.
iCards
Figure 6.40 Use the
iCards tool to create
personalized email
greeting cards using
your own photos.
The iCards tool helps you use the photos
in your Pictures folder or Apple’s images to
send email greeting cards (Figure 6.40).
Mail
You probably have an email address, but
.Mac provides you with another address—
[email protected] You can either
retrieve mail from it directly or have it
forward messages to another account.
125
Major .Mac Features
Figure 6.38 To connect to your iDisk, choose iDisk
from the Finder’s Go menu.
.Mac provides many features, some of which
integrate with iPhoto. Click the icons at
the top of the .Mac page at www.mac.com to
configure and use each tool, or to download
the free software like Virex and Backup, plus
various free games (Figure 6.37).
Chapter 6
Publishing Photos on
the Web Using HomePage
It’s easy for .Mac members to create a Webbased photo album from within iPhoto.
To publish photos using HomePage:
Publishing Photos Using HomePage
1. In organize mode, select an album or the
individual photos you wish to publish.
2. Making sure that you’re connected to
the Internet, click the HomePage button.
iPhoto opens the Publish HomePage
window, displaying a rough preview of
how your page will appear (Figure 6.41).
3. Enter or edit titles for the page and the
individual photos (iPhoto picks up album
and photo titles automatically).
4. Pick a theme from the five at the bottom
to change the font and frame style.
5. Select the desired .Mac account from the
Publish to pop-up menu.
Figure 6.41 Preview your photos in the Publish
HomePage window and click Publish when you’re
ready to upload them.
 More Tips

Clicking Visit Page Now in the
confirmation dialog loads the page in
your Web browser, where you can easily
copy the URL from the Address field.
7. Click the Publish button.
iPhoto uploads your pictures to your
iDisk, and, when it’s done, shows a dialog
that tells you the URL for your page and
offers to take you there.

You can have up to 48 images in each
HomePage photo album.

Changes you make to photo titles in
the Publish HomePage window are not
reflected anywhere else, unfortunately.
 Tips

iPhoto’s spell-checking tools work in the
Publish HomePage window.

You can’t control line wrapping at all.

Titles are limited to 40 characters,
although you can enter up to 80 online.

You can choose among additional frame
styles by editing your album online.

To publish to your own Web site, see
“Exporting to Web Pages” in this chapter.
6. Select how many columns you want to
display, and if you want a counter or a
“Send me a message” button to show.


The photos appear in the same order
as those in the album or your selection,
but you can drag them to new locations
within the Publish HomePage window.
iPhoto compresses and resizes images
to 800 x 600 to reduce upload time. To
avoid this, you can upload photos to your
iDisk and create albums manually in
HomePage online at www.mac.com.
126
Sharing Photos
Managing
HomePage Albums
Figure 6.42 To make any changes to your HomePage
iPhoto albums, first connect to .Mac and then click
the HomePage link at the top.
You can only create Web-based albums
from within iPhoto. Changing albums after
publishing requires using the .Mac Web
site. For all these tasks, first log in to .Mac at
www.mac.com and click the HomePage button
at the top of the page (Figure 6.42).
To edit text:

To remove photos:

In the “Edit your page” window, deselect
the checkboxes on the photos you want
to remove (they aren’t deleted from your
iDisk’s Pictures folder; do that in the
Finder). Click Publish when you’re done.
To add photos:

You can upload and add photos manually, but it’s easier to delete the album
and republish it from iPhoto.
To change the layout:
Figure 6.44 Edit your album in the “Edit your page”
window. After you have made changes to the text, the
number of columns, the theme, or anything else, click
the Publish button at the top of the page to save your
changes.You can also click Preview to see what it will
look like before you commit to publishing.

To change the theme, in the “Edit your
page” window, click the Themes button
and click the desired theme.

To change the number of columns, select
a columns radio button at the top.

Drag photos to rearrange them.

To show and hide the counter and the
“Send me a message” button, select or
deselect their checkboxes at the bottom.
To delete an album:

Select an album in the Pages list and click
the Delete button.
127
Managing HomePage Albums
Figure 6.43 To edit a photo album, select it in the
Pages list and click the Edit button. To delete an
album, select it and click the Delete button.
Select an album in the Pages list, click the
Edit button underneath it (Figure 6.43),
and in the “Edit your page” window,
change the text in the desired text boxes
(Figure 6.44). Click Publish when done.
Chapter 6
Publishing .Mac Slides
Using the .Mac Slides Publisher feature of
.Mac along with iPhoto, .Mac members can
easily upload a set of photos that anyone
with a Mac runing Mac OS X 10.2 or later
can use as a screen saver.
To publish photos as .Mac Slides:
Figure 6.45 iPhoto checks to make sure you realize
that publishing photos as .Mac Slides replaces the
previous set of .Mac Slides.
Publishing .Mac Slides
1. Select the photos you want to publish,
and click the .Mac Slides button.
iPhoto displays a confirmation dialog
(Figure 6.45).
2. Click the Publish button.
iPhoto compresses and shrinks the size
of the photos to reduce transfer time,
and uploads the photos to your iDisk,
showing a progress dialog as it uploads
(Figure 6.46).
When it’s done, it shows a confirmation
dialog (Figure 6.47).
3. Click the Announce Slideshow button.
In your selected email program, iPhoto
creates a message with instructions you
can send to the people who might want
to subscribe to your .Mac Slides.
Figure 6.46 iPhoto provides a visual
progress dialog as it uploads your
photos as .Mac Slides.
 Tips

Although it’s not obvious, you can move
the .Mac Slides upload progress window
out of the way and keep working while
iPhoto uploads in the background.

You can find the .Mac Slides in your iDisk
in Pictures/Slide Shows/Public.

It appears that you can select as many
photos to upload as .Mac Slides as you
want, subject to the amount of free disk
space available on your 100 MB iDisk.

You can store only one set of .Mac Slides
at a time—every time you click the .Mac
Slides button, the selected photos replace
the previous set.
128
Figure 6.47 Once iPhoto finishes uploading your .Mac
Slides photos to your iDisk, it lets you announce the
slideshow via email to your friends and relatives.
Sharing Photos
Subscribing
to .Mac Slides
Although only .Mac members can upload
.Mac Slides, anyone whose Mac runs Mac
OS X 10.2 or later can subscribe to them and
have them shown automatically as a screen
saver slideshow.
To subscribe to .Mac Slides:
Figure 6.48 Configure the .Mac screen saver in the
Screen Effects preferences pane.
2. Click .Mac in the Screen Effects list.
iPhoto switches to the .Mac screen saver.
3. Click the Configure button to display the
Subscriptions and Display Options sheet.
4. Enter the member name of the .Mac
member whose slides you want to view
in the .Mac Membership Name field and
click OK.
iPhoto adds the .Mac member name to
the available subscriptions and closes the
sheet.
Figure 6.49 Enter the .Mac membership name of
the person whose slides you want to view and set
screen saver options in the Subscriptions and Display
Options sheet.
Using the Screen Saver
The screen saver comes on automatically after the idle time you set in the
Activation tab of the Screen Effects
preferences pane. You can also invoke it
manually by putting the pointer in a corner defined in the Hot Corners tab, also in
the Screen Effects preferences pane.
5. Click Configure again to make sure the
checkbox for your newly entered .Mac
member name is selected, and select
the other screen saver options from the
checkboxes at the bottom of the sheet
(Figure 6.49).
6. Click OK and close System Preferences.
 Tips

Mac OS X downloads the .Mac Slides in
the background when you connect to
the Internet; there’s no way to force it to
download them immediately.

Because .Mac Slides are compressed and
reduced in size, they’re not as crisp as
local pictures used for slideshows.
129
Subscribing to .Mac Slides
1. From the Apple menu, choose System
Preferences, and click the Screen Effects
icon to open the Screen Effects preferences pane (Figure 6.48).
Chapter 6
Setting the
Desktop Picture
In Mac OS X, you can display a picture on
your Desktop, and with iPhoto, putting one
(or more, in rotation) of your photos on your
Desktop is a matter of just clicking a button.
Setting the Desktop Picture
To set the Desktop picture:
1. Select one or more photos, and click the
Desktop button (Figure 6.50).
If you selected only one photo, iPhoto
immediately changes the picture on your
Desktop (Figure 6.51).
If you selected multiple photos, iPhoto
displays the Screen Effects dialog
(Figure 6.52).
Figure 6.50 Click the Desktop button to set the
selected photo as your Desktop picture.
2. Either leave the pop-up menu set to
Current Selection, or choose an album
from it, and then click OK.
 Tips

If the picture is in landscape orientation,
iPhoto scales the photo to make it fit.

If the photo is in portrait orientation,
iPhoto takes a landscape chunk out of
the middle to display on the Desktop.
Stick with photos in landscape orientation, or crop them appropriately first.

There’s an item in the edit pane’s
Constrain pop-up menu to help you
constrain photos to the size of your Mac’s
screen. This is especially helpful if your
screen is not a 4 x 3 aspect ratio.

iPhoto can put a picture on only one
monitor. To put a picture on the second
monitor, you must use the Desktop
preferences pane in System Preferences;
select the Screen Effects folder in your
iPhoto Library folder to rotate through
the same set of photos on the second
monitor.
130
Figure 6.51 With a single click, you can put the photo
you have selected in iPhoto on your Desktop.
Figure 6.52 iPhoto gives you the choice of rotating
through multiple selected photos or an entire album.
Sharing Photos
Creating a Screen Saver
The Desktop button in iPhoto 2 does double
duty, not just putting one or more photos on
your Desktop, but also setting them as your
screen saver.
To create a screen saver:
Figure 6.53 In the Screen Effects dialog, choose an
album to use for your screen saver and click OK. You
can also click Screen Effects Preferences to open the
Screen Effects preferences pane.
1. With more than one or no photos
selected, click the Desktop button.
iPhoto displays the Screen Effects dialog.
 Tips

Landscape photos generally work better
than portrait photos because they don’t
need to be zoomed as much to fill the
screen.

To configure the screen saver settings,
click the Screen Effects Preferences
button in the Screen Effects dialog to
open the Screen Effects preferences pane
(Figure 6.54). You can, of course, go
there manually as well.

If you have an album selected when you
click Desktop, iPhoto thoughtfully makes
it the default choice in the pop-up menu.

If you click Screen Effects Preferences to
configure your screen saver, when you
come back to iPhoto, you must still click
the OK button to set the selected photos
or album as the screen saver.
Figure 6.54 In the Screen Effects preferences pane of
System Preferences, use the tabs and the Configure
button to adjust settings for your screen saver.
Configuring the Screen Saver
If you click Configure in the Screen
Effects preferences pane, you’re presented
with a number of options related to how
Mac OS X crops the photos, zooms in on
them, fades between them, centers them
onscreen, and presents them in order.
Play with these settings to see how they
interact with the photos you’re using—
I’ve found varying results with different
types and sizes of photos.
131
Creating a Screen Saver
2. Either leave the pop-up menu set to
Current Selection, or choose an album
from it (Figure 6.53), and then click
OK to save your selection and close the
dialog.
iPhoto sets Mac OS X’s Picture Folder
screen saver to use the selected photos or
album. The next time your screen saver
kicks in, you’ll see it displaying those
photos.
Chapter 6
Creating a DVD
Slideshow with iDVD
Drawer Click to choose Click to set
buttons. a theme.
photo and edit.
Burn
button.
One of iPhoto 2’s new integration features
is the capability to send a set of photos to
iDVD 3 to create a slideshow on DVD that
can be viewed on any TV with a consumer
DVD player. You must have iDVD 3 and a
Macintosh with a SuperDrive to do this.
Creating a DVD Slideshow with iDVD
To create a DVD slideshow with iDVD:
1. Create up to 6 albums containing up to
99 photos each, select the albums (s or x -click to select multiple albums),
and click the iDVD button.
iPhoto works for a bit, launches iDVD 3,
and shows the iDVD main screen.
2. Click the Customize button, choose a
theme from the drawer that appears
(iDVD has several themes that are perfect
for photo slideshows), and customize it
with text and images (Figure 6.55).
Figure 6.55 Select a theme for your DVD slideshow
and click the albums to select an initial photo and to
change the title.
Click to
Photo list. Drag to
open and rearrange; press
close
Delete to remove.
drawer.
Click to
Audio drawer.
preview.
Drag a song
to the Audio
Audio
well to add it.
well.
Click to
return
to the
main
screen.
3. To add audio to the main title screen,
click the Audio button in the drawer and
drag the desired song from your iTunes
collection into the main window.
4. Set how long the song plays (up to 30 seconds) by clicking the Settings button in
the drawer and moving the Motion slider.
Adjust other options here as well.
5. Double-click a slideshow to switch to a
screen where you can add, delete, and
rearrange photos, plus set other options
for the slideshow (Figure 6.56).
6. As you work, use the Preview button to
verify that your slideshows play as you
desire. A small player window simulates
a DVD remote control (Figure 6.57).
7. When you’re ready, click the Burn button
twice to start the process of burning your
DVD.
132
Figure 6.56 When working in a slideshow, you can set
a variety of options and add music by dragging from
the Audio drawer to the Audio well on the right side
of the window.
Figure 6.57 When you’re
previewing a slideshow,
you can use the small
player window to simulate
the DVD’s remote control.
Sharing Photos
iDVD Slideshow Tips
Making Good DVD Slideshows
It may be easy to work with iPhoto and
iDVD, but you must still expend some
effort when creating a DVD-based
slideshow if you want the best results.
Keep in mind that no matter what, TV
quality will be lower than the quality on
the computer screen.
Use Preview heavily, and make sure
to run through all of your slideshows
from start to end before burning.

Landscape photos work better than
portrait photos, which have large
black borders.





It’s tempting to put as many photos in
each slideshow as possible, but resist
the temptation and whittle down the
slideshow to the most relevant photos.
Very similar photos are boring when
seen one after another.
You can still have only a single song
per slideshow in iDVD; to work
around that limitation, create your
slideshows in iMovie first, and import
them into iDVD as movies, instead of
photo slideshows.
You can choose the duration between
slides, but it’s generally best to fit the
slideshow length to the song length.
Be forewarned; it can be hard to find
good music for slideshows. Think
about the subject and the mood of the
photos and then browse through your
iTunes collection to see what songs
might fit. It’s easier to browse quickly
in iTunes than in iDVD.
Click the Motion button to toggle the
theme’s motion while you work, but
make sure it’s on when you burn.
Tips for using iDVD

iDVD 3 is free with new Macs, but the
only way to upgrade is with the $49 iLife
suite of Apple’s iApp software. Go to
www.apple.com/store/ to buy a copy.

You’re limited to 6 albums per DVD and
99 photos per album.

Save your iDVD project with a good
name; it’s the disc name in the Finder.

Turn on “Show TV Safe Area” in the
Advanced menu to verify that everything
you’re doing will fit on the TV screen.

Make sure “Always scale slides to TV Safe
area” is set in iDVD’s Preferences window
(choose Preferences from the iDVD menu
and click the Slideshow tab).

iDVD automatically picks up the music
attached to the album in iPhoto, but you
can switch to a different song by dragging
it from the Audio drawer to the Audio
well in the slideshow’s window.

If you select “Add original photos on
DVD-ROM” in the slideshow window,
iDVD also makes the photos available as
files on the DVD for use with computers.
These are stored as normal files, and not
in an iPhoto Library folder.

Quit all unnecessary applications when
burning; if anything interrupts the burn
process, it can ruin your DVD-R disc.

DVD-R discs hold 4.7 GB, so you probably
won’t be able to fill one with slideshows.
To use all the space, add video.
133
iDVD Slideshow Tips

Look to other sources for full instructions on
how to use iDVD, such as Jim Heid’s book
and DVD-video combination The Macintosh
iLife, also from Peachpit Press. That said,
these tips should help.
Chapter 6
Sharing Photos on Disc
Although creating DVD slideshows is great,
a better way to share photos with people
who also use iPhoto is to burn the photos
to a CD-R or DVD-R disc as files.
To burn an iPhoto disc:
1. Select the photos you want to share by
selecting entire film rolls or entire albums
(Figure 6.58).
Sharing Photos on Disc
2. Click the Burn button.
iPhoto asks you to insert a blank disc.
3. Insert a blank disc and click OK.
In the info pane, iPhoto shows the name
of the disc and information about how
much data will be burned to the disc
(Figure 6.59). The disc icon will be red if
it can’t hold the selected photos.
4. Select fewer or more photos to use the
space on your destination disc as desired.
Figure 6.58 Here I’ve selected several albums, and
I’m about to click the Burn button.
Figure 6.59 Once you’ve clicked the
Burn button, the info pane lets you
name your disc and gives you information about how much data will be
burned to it.
5. Change the name of the disc if you want.
6. Click the Burn button again, and when
iPhoto asks you to confirm one last time,
click Burn (Figure 6.60).
iPhoto creates a disk image, copies the
selected photos to it, and burns the disc.
 Tips

The statistics in the info pane aren’t relevant until you click Burn the first time.

If you select albums to burn, the iPhoto
disc will retain those album references.
Film roll information is lost, however.

Titles and keywords are maintained.

Your disc name appears only in iPhoto. In
the Finder, it’s called “iPhoto Disc.”

On the disc, your photos are stored in an
iPhoto Library folder like the main one.
134
Figure 6.60 iPhoto verifies that you really want to
burn a disc with one last warning dialog.
Backups and Non-iPhoto Users
Two additional notes. First, this is a great
way to make backup discs to protect your
irreplaceable photos in case of harm to
your computer. See “Backing up Your
Photos” in Chapter 2, “Importing and
Managing Photos.” Also, not everyone
uses iPhoto (especially Windows users).
For them, export files and burn CD-R
discs in the Finder.
Sharing Photos
Receiving an iPhoto Disc
What if friends or relatives who use iPhoto
send you iPhoto discs containing their
photos? Although you can view their photos
directly from the disc, if you want to edit
a photo or create a book, you must first
import the desired images. (See Chapter 2,
“Importing and Managing Photos,” for more
on importing photos.)
To import from an iPhoto disc:
1. Insert the iPhoto disc into your Mac’s
optical drive and switch to iPhoto.
iPhoto displays the disc in your album
pane (Figure 6.61).
2. Select one or more photos and drag them
to your Photo Library album to import
them just into the Photo Library, into
an album to import them and add them
to that album, or to the bottom of the
album pane to import them and create a
new album (Figure 6.62).
iPhoto starts importing the photos,
showing thumbnails and a progress bar.
Click Stop to halt a mistaken import.
Figure 6.62 The easiest way to import files into
iPhoto is to drag the desired files or folders into the
display pane or the album pane, as I’ve done here.
 Tips

iPhoto checks for duplicates when
importing from iPhoto discs just as it
does with other importing methods.

To import an album from an iPhoto disc,
click the album in the album pane, select
all the photos in it (xA ), and drag
them to the bottom of the album pane to
import them and create a new album.
135
Receiving an iPhoto Disc
Figure 6.61 iPhoto
discs appear in your
album pane with any
albums on the disc
showing up under the
disc name.
Chapter 6
Exporting Files
iPhoto’s export capabilities are fairly limited,
but they should suffice for most situations.
To export files:
1. Select one or more photos.
2. Choose Export from the File menu
(xsE ).
iPhoto displays the Export Photos dialog
(Figure 6.63).
Exporting Files
3. If it’s not already selected, click the File
Export tab.
4. Choose the format for the exported
photos from the Format pop-up menu,
select how you want them named, and
select an image scale. Then click the
Export button.
Figure 6.63 Use the File Export tab in the Export
Photos dialog to choose the format, name, and scale
for your exported images.
5. iPhoto displays a save dialog. Navigate to
your desired folder and click OK to save
your images.
 Tips


iPhoto can export into only JPG, TIFF,
and PNG formats. For other formats,
use a tool like GraphicConverter; see the
sidebar to the right.
Only JPG files can be scaled to a
different size; if you save in TIFF or
PNG format, you’re stuck with the full
image size.

When iPhoto scales an image, it does so
proportionally with the limits you set.

If you export only a single image, iPhoto
gives you a chance to rename the image
manually before saving (Figure 6.64).

iPhoto 2 removed Export from the sharing tool buttons; the Export menu item
and keyboard shortcut are the only ways
to open the Export Photos dialog.
136
Figure 6.64 If you export only a single image, iPhoto
lets you name it from within a sheet.
Use GraphicConverter
If you want to do anything more than
basic exporting of files, try the $30
shareware GraphicConverter, available
at www.lemkesoft.com/us_index.html.
GraphicConverter is far better at
converting images between formats,
resizing them, and performing many
other useful tasks, a number of which
can be used in batch mode on an entire
collection of images.
Sharing Photos
Exporting
Files by Dragging
If you just want copies of a couple of photos
and don’t need to reformat or resize them,
you can just drag the files to the Finder.
To export multiple files:
Figure 6.65 For a quick export without any chance to
reformat, rename, or resize the exported photos, just
drag one or more to the Finder.

 Tips
Exported Photos
May Not Be Rotated

If you hold down xo while
dragging a photo to the Finder, iPhoto
makes an alias of the photo instead of
copying it there.

When you drag photos to export them,
you aren’t given the opportunity to
change their scale or image format.

You can also drag photos to other photorelated programs. So, for instance, you
could maintain another photo catalog
in a program like iView MediaPro by
dragging photos from iPhoto into iView
MediaPro’s window. This is not actually
exporting, since the other programs are
working with the same file as iPhoto.
Because of this, don’t drag files to imageediting programs and make changes,
because iPhoto won’t be able to track
those changes.

If you want to export photos in order to
burn them to a CD-R disc for a person
who doesn’t use iPhoto, your best bet is
to drag photos from iPhoto to folders in
the Finder, and then burn those folders.
Watch out for the rotation problem; see
the sidebar to the left.
If you want to export a photo you’ve
edited only by rotating it, you’ll notice
the exported file isn’t rotated if you
use the drag-to-the-Finder method of
exporting. This error happens because
iPhoto rotates only the photo’s thumbnail
initially, rotating the actual photo only if
necessary.
You can work around this problem in
two ways. First, use the Export Photos
dialog instead of dragging to the Finder.
Second, make another editing change to
the photo, such as red-eye reduction, and
then undo that change before dragging
the photo to the Finder. Any editing
change other than rotation forces iPhoto
to modify the photo’s file instead of just
the thumbnail, which sets the rotation
properly as well.
137
Exporting Files by Dragging
Select one or more photos and drag
the selection to a folder in the Finder
(Figure 6.65).
iPhoto saves the files where you drop
them, using each file’s original name.
Chapter 6
Exporting to Web Pages
Along with using Apple’s HomePage Web
publishing tool, iPhoto can export selected
images to a set of Web pages you can upload
to your own Web server or to Web space at
your Internet service provider.
Exporting to Web Pages
To export photos to Web pages:
1.
Select an album or the individual photos
you wish to publish.
2.
Choose Export from the File menu
(xsE ).
iPhoto shows the Export Photos dialog.
3.
If it’s not selected, click the Web Page
tab (Figure 6.66).
4.
Enter the title for your Web page.
5.
Enter the desired number of columns
and rows of photo thumbnails.
6.
If desired, select a background color
or image.
7.
Select the maximum width and height
for the thumbnails and the full-size
images.
8.
Select the Show title and Show comment checkboxes as desired.
9.
Click Export, navigate to the desired
destination folder (it’s best to create a
new folder inside your user directory’s
Sites folder), and click OK.
iPhoto exports the photos and builds
the appropriate HTML files, naming
everything for the enclosing folder.
10. Switch to the Finder, open the folder in
which you saved your Web page, and
double-click the HTML file to open it in
your Web browser (Figure 6.67).
11. If necessary, upload the folder to your
Web site using an FTP program like
Interarchy (www.interarchy.com).
138
Figure 6.66 Use the options in the Web Page tab of
the Export Photos dialog to set how your photos will
appear on the Web page.
Figure 6.67 To see how your Web page turned out,
switch to the Finder, open your destination folder,
and double-click the HTML file inside it. To view an
image at full size, click its thumbnail.
Export Plug-Ins
Although the only export plug-in available now is BetterHTMLExport (next
page), which has its own installer, it’s
conceivable others may appear again.
To manage them, select iPhoto in the
Finder, choose Get Info (xI ) from the
File menu, and use the checkboxes and
buttons in the Plug-ins pane to enable,
disable, install, and uninstall the plug-ins.
Sharing Photos
Web Page Export Tips
As you may have guessed, iPhoto’s Web page
export isn’t particularly flexible, although
Apple fixed its more glaring limitations in
iPhoto 2. There are workarounds for some of
its limitations, though not for others.
Web page export tips:
Figure 6.68 BetterHTMLExport provides all the functionality of iPhoto’s Web export tool and much more,
while retaining an interface similar to the original, as
you can see in its export tab and Advanced Settings
sheet above.
Other tools can generate significantly
more flexible Web-based photo albums.
Two of my favorites right now are Simon
Leifer’s BetterHTMLExport and iView
Multimedia’s iView MediaPro.
Simeon Leifer’s $20 shareware
BetterHTMLExport 2.0.3 improves on
iPhoto’s Web page export. It can control the quality of the exported images,
lets you save your settings, and offers
more flexibility than iPhoto. Best of all,
BetterHTMLExport lets you create and
edit the templates from which it generates Web pages (Figure 6.68). Download
a copy from www.droolingcat.com/
software/betterhtmlexport/.
The $50 shareware iView MediaPro does
many things well (including extremely
flexible slideshows), not the least of which
is HTML export. It can generate both a
traditional site with a page of thumbnails and a framed site with a thumbnail
frame. You can customize the HTML,
and it can also reduce the size and quality of exported images to make the site
load quickly for users. Pick up a copy at
www.iview-multimedia.com.
iPhoto doesn’t let you add a line of
descriptive text to your thumbnail page,
as it does when using HomePage. If you
knew a little HTML, you could easily add
text to that page using a text editor.

Since title text is always black, stick with
light background colors. To pick a background color, use the standard Mac OS X
color panel. See “Changing Text Color”
in Chapter 5, “Creating Books,” for more
information about using the color picker.

If you select a background image instead
of a color, iPhoto tiles the image under
the thumbnails. That can work well if the
image is large and light colored, but avoid
using small, dark, background images—
they make for a cluttered presentation.

Assuming you have a permanent Internet
connection (like DSL or a cable modem)
and an IP address that never changes,
you can make your pages available on
your Mac by turning on Personal Web
Sharing in the Sharing preferences pane.
If you have a permanent Internet connection but not a static IP address, you can
learn more about how to work around
this limitation with dynamic DNS. See
www.technopagan.org/dynamic/ for more
information.

Want to serve photos from your own
Mac without exporting? Check out the
free myPhoto from Michael Mulligan; it’s
at http://agent0068.dyndns.org/~mike/
projects/myPhoto/.
139
Web Page Export Tips
Alternative Web Export Tools

Chapter 6
Exporting to
QuickTime Movies
iPhoto slideshows are great if people can
gather at your computer, but iPhoto’s
QuickTime movie export is the easiest way
to create a slideshow you can send to others
in email or on CD. (It’s much easier than
iMovie or iDVD, though not as powerful.)
Exporting to QuickTime Movies
To export photos to
a QuickTime movie:
1. Select an album or the individual photos
you wish to publish.
2. Choose Export from the File menu
(xsE ).
iPhoto displays the Export Photos dialog.
Figure 6.69 Use the options in the QuickTime tab of
the Export Photos dialog to configure your QuickTime
movie.
3. If it’s not selected, click the QuickTime
tab (Figure 6.69).
4. Enter the maximum width and height
for the images, how long each image
displays, and select a background color.
5. If you want the music currently selected
for use with the current album to play
with the movie, select the “Add currently
selected music to movie” checkbox.
6. Click Export, name your movie in the
Save dialog, choose a destination for it,
and click Save.
iPhoto builds the movie.
7. Switch to the Finder, locate your movie,
and double-click it to see the results in
QuickTime Player (Figure 6.70).
 Tips

Background images must be larger than
the photo and only show when the photo
doesn’t take up the entire window.

When iPhoto resizes images, it does so
proportionally with the limits you set.
140
Figure 6.70 To see what your movie looks like,
double-click it in the Finder to open it in QuickTime
Player.
Flipping through Movies
No matter how you create a QuickTime
movie of still images, you can flip through
the final movie in QuickTime Player one
photo at a time (plus transitions) by using
D and F (the left and right arrow keys)
while the movie is stopped.
Sharing Photos
Fast Start Movies
To make QuickTime movies viewed on
the Web start as soon as possible when
someone clicks the link, use these steps.
1. Open your movie in QuickTime Player
Pro (you need the Pro version).
2. Choose Export from the File menu.
4. Choose Photo–JPEG from the pop-up
menu, set the quality slider to Medium
or High, and set the frame rate to
match how long you set each slide to
display in iPhoto. Click OK.
5. Click the Settings button under Sound
to open the Sound Settings dialog.
QuickTime movies can be an excellent way
to distribute slideshows.
Ways to distribute QuickTime movies:

Copy the movie to a CD-R. Don’t worry
about reducing the size of images when
exporting from iPhoto.

Send the movie via email, but be sensitive
about the size of movies.

If you have FTP or Web space available
with your Internet account, upload the
movie and send people the link. Similarly,
if you’re a .Mac member, you can upload
to your iDisk’s Public folder for others to
download and play.

If you’re a .Mac member, copy the movie
to your iDisk’s Movies folder and use the
HomePage Web publishing tool to make
a movie page. Unfortunately, this method
results in a rather small viewing size.

If you’re a .Mac member, you can also
copy the movie to your iDisk’s Sites folder
and send people the link in the form:
6. Choose QDesign Music 2 from the
Compressor pop-up menu. Leave the
other settings alone and click OK.
7. Choose Fast Start from the pop-up
menu under Prepare for Internet
Streaming, and then click OK.
http://homepage.mac.com/membername/
8. Name your movie, select a location,
and then click Save.
moviename.mov.
With this method, the movie plays at the
size you chose in iPhoto, and the movie is
hidden from the world (but not secured!).
 Tips
QuickTime for Windows
One of the nice things about QuickTime
is that it’s available for both the Mac
and Windows. Many Windows users
don’t have QuickTime installed on
their PCs, however, so you may need to
tell them how to get it. Send them to
www.apple.com/quicktime/download/
for a free copy.

Using QuickTime Player Pro (a $30
upgrade from the free QuickTime Player;
visit www.apple.com/quicktime/buy/),
you can play movies at full-screen size.

QuickTime Player Pro also lets you
make some changes to your movies, see
QuickTime 6 for Macintosh & Windows:
Visual QuickStart Guide for details, or
just use iMovie 3 instead.
141
Distributing QuickTime Movies
3. Click Options, and in the Movie
Settings dialog, click the Settings
button under Video to open the
Compression Settings dialog.
Distributing
QuickTime Movies
Chapter 6
Sharing Photos
with Users on Your Mac
Mac OS X is a multi-user operating system,
so it’s common for people who share a Mac
each to have their own account. But what if
you want to share the same iPhoto Library?
Sharing Photos with Users on Your Mac
To share photos among users:
Figure 6.71 Your iPhoto Library folder should be
stored in the Shared folder at the same level as your
user folder.
1. With iPhoto not running, move your
iPhoto Library folder from the Pictures
folder to the Shared folder at the same
level as your user folder (Figure 6.71). It
may or may not contain other items.
2. Select the iPhoto Library folder and
choose Get Info (xI ) from the File
menu in the Finder to display the iPhoto
Info window.
3. Click the expansion triangle for
Ownership & Permissions. If the lock is
closed, click it and enter your administrator password.
4. From the Access menu under Group
(which should be set to staff), choose
Read & Write, and click the “Apply to
enclosed items” button (Figure 6.72).
iPhoto asks for confirmation; click OK.
5. Hold down xo and drag the
iPhoto Library folder to the iPhoto icon
in your Dock. Launching iPhoto without
doing this will cause it to ask you to find
your iPhoto Library folder; do that if
necessary instead of the xo -drag.
6. Choose Log Out from the Apple menu,
and log in as the other user.
7. Repeat step 5 for the other user, and
verify that both users can view and edit
photos. If the other user can view but not
edit photos, verify permissions for all the
folders inside the iPhoto Library folder.
8. From now on, launch iPhoto normally.
142
Figure 6.72 To set permissions properly, make sure
the group is set to staff, choose Read & Write from
the Access pop-up menu, and click the “Apply to
enclosed items” button.
Sharing Photos
Sharing Photos with
Users on Networked Macs
Lots of families have multiple Macs, as do
small offices that may wish to share a single
iPhoto Library.
To share photos among Macs:
2. For each user, hold down xo and
drag the shared iPhoto Library folder to
the iPhoto icon in the Dock. Launching
iPhoto without doing this will cause it to
ask you to find the shared iPhoto Library
folder; do that if necessary instead of the
xo -drag.
3. For each user, make an obvious edit
change, quit iPhoto, and relaunch iPhoto
to see if your change sticks. If so, skip to
step 7. If not, or if iPhoto’s editing tools
don’t work right, keep going.
Figure 6.73 If necessary, make sure Owner, Group,
and Others are all set to Read & Write, and click
“Apply to enclosed items.”
The Necessary Network
For best performance, all the Macs using
this shared iPhoto Library folder must be
using 100Base-T Ethernet (which runs at
100 megabits per second—Mbps). AirPort
Extreme (54 Mbps) might work, but
standard 10Base-T (10 Mbps) or AirPort
(11 Mbps) will make you want to gnaw
your arm off in frustration.
4. Select the iPhoto Library folder, choose
Get Info (xI ) from the File menu
in the Finder, and click the expansion
triangle for Ownership & Permissions. If
the lock is closed, click it and enter your
administrator password (Figure 6.73).
5. From the Access menu under Group, and
from the Others pop-up menu, choose
Read & Write, and click the “Apply to
enclosed items” button.
iPhoto asks for confirmation; click OK.
6. Repeat steps 2 and 3 for the other users.
7. From now on, launch iPhoto normally.
 Tip

Only one Mac should use the shared
iPhoto Library folder at a time!
143
Sharing Photos with Networked Macs
1. Copy your iPhoto Library folder to a
location that’s accessible to other users
on your network, such as a file server or a
Mac which everyone can log into.
Chapter 6
Extending iPhoto with AppleScript
Extending
iPhoto with AppleScript
One of Apple’s least known but most
useful technologies is AppleScript, a relatively easy programming language that lets
AppleScript-savvy applications perform
repetitive actions and communicate with
one another. Now that iPhoto 2 supports
AppleScript, you can write scripts to do all
sorts of things that would have been tedious
to do by hand before.
Needless to say, it’s way beyond the scope
of this book to teach you how to write
AppleScript scripts. Check out AppleScript
for Applications: Visual QuickStart Guide for
help learning AppleScript.
Figure 6.74 iPhoto’s AppleScript dictionary lists the
commands and syntax necessary to write AppleScript
scripts that can control iPhoto.
To write an AppleScript for iPhoto:
1. Launch Script Editor by double-clicking
its icon in the AppleScript folder in your
Applications folder.
Script Editor opens a new, untitled script
window.
2. From Script Editor’s File menu, choose
Open Dictionary, and in the Open
Dictionary dialog, select iPhoto and
click Open to open iPhoto’s AppleScript
dictionary (Figure 6.74).
An application’s dictionary is a list of
all the AppleScript commands that the
application understands and their syntax.
3. Write your script in the untitled script
window, saving it when you’re done
(Figure 6.75).
4. Click Run to test your script.
 Tip

Realistically, you’ll probably go through
many iterations of testing, changing
something, testing again, and so on.
144
Figure 6.75 Enter your script into Script Editor, and
when you’re ready to test it, click Run.
Crib Code, Ask Friends
A good way to get started with scripting
when you realize you need to automate
a repetitive action is to find a script that
does something similar and start modifying its behavior. Of course, it always helps
to have AppleScript-savvy friends to ask
for help, too!
Sharing Photos
iPhoto AppleScript Scripts
Apple provides a number of scripts that
are useful both on their own and as
examples. Download these scripts from
www.apple.com/applescript/iphoto/.
Apple’s iPhoto AppleScript scripts:
Do Photoshop Action performs an
action in Photoshop 7 for each of the
selected photos, one at a time.

Photo Summary creates an HTML page
summarizing information about the
selected photos and opens it in TextEdit.

Open in Preview opens the selected
photos in Apple’s Preview application.

Speak Comments speaks the comments
for selected photos.

Photo to iDVD Background exports
the selected photo to iDVD as the background for the current menu screen.

Prepare Images for iDVD uses
Photoshop to scale selected photos to
640 x 480, with the comment overlaid on
the bottom of each photo as a caption.

Show Image File displays the selected
photo’s actual file in the Finder.

Delete Album and Contents deletes an
album and its contents. The twist is that
it moves the album’s photos to the Trash,
which deleting an album wouldn’t normally do. Use it when archiving photos to
CD or DVD. Be careful with this one.

Find Unassigned Images creates a
new album called “Unassigned” with all
photos not currently in another album.

Assign Keywords for Last Import
cycles through all the photos from the
last import and presents a dialog for each
that lets you assign keywords.
Figure 6.76 Invoke AppleScript scripts in iPhoto by
choosing them from the Scripts menu.
Installing the Script Menu
Although you can run a script by selecting some photos in iPhoto, switching
to the Finder, and double-clicking the
desired script, there’s an easier way—a
Script menu on your menu bar at all
times. Follow these instructions to install
the Script menu and populate it with
Apple’s scripts.
1. Open the AppleScript folder in your
Applications folder. In it you’ll see a
folder called Script Menu.menu.
2. Drag Script Menu.menu onto the right
side of the menu bar, near where your
clock is, and release it. You should see
a little scroll icon appear.
3. Move the iPhoto Scripts folder that
you downloaded from Apple into
the Scripts folder inside your user’s
Library folder.
4. From now on, when you want to
invoke a script, select a photo and
choose the desired script from the
hierarchical iPhoto Scripts menu in
the Scripts menu (Figure 6.76).
145
iPhoto AppleScript Scripts

i
Index
1-Click ordering
can’t enable, 156
enabling, 119
A
B
B & W button, 56, 64
backing up photos
to discs, 24, 25
recovering photos, 21
179
Index
Account Info dialog, 119
Activation tab (Screen Effects preferences
pane), 129
Administrator password, 5
album pane
creating albums in, 37
dragging photos into, 37
illustrated, 9, 17, 31, 77
iPhoto disc display in, 135
albums, See also books
adding photos to, 42
backing up, 24
creating, 37
deleting, 40
deleting photos from, 20
duplicate photos in, 61
duplicating, 38
film rolls in Photo Library, 12, 36
importing from iPhoto disc, 17
importing photos and creating, 15
keywords vs., 37, 48
Last Import, 12
managing HomePage, 127
removing photos from, 43
renaming and rearranging, 39
simulating hierarchical, 39
Albums folder, 19
aligning photos to grid, 33
Apple
checking on order status, 156
downloading iPhoto AppleScripts, 145
iPhoto help, 157
not all prints received from, 155
setting up .Mac account, 124
shipping information for books and prints,
121
Apple ID
email address as, 118
setting up, 118
sign in with, 119
Apple .Mac Signup Web page, 124
AppleScript scripts for iPhoto, 144–145
archiving photos, 24, 25
arranging photos
on book pages, 44, 81
by date, 44
for slideshows, 113
artistic photography, 168
aspect ratios
constraining Desktop pictures to fit screen,
130
constraining selection to, 66
including extra space on edges of photos, 68
moving and resizing selection rectangle while
maintaining, 66
specific and custom, 67
understanding, 160–161
assigning
comments, 46
keywords, 49
titles, 45
Audio button (iMovie 3), 115
automatic launching of iPhoto, 12, 13
Index
Index
batteries, 171
BetterHTMLExport, 138, 139
black-and-white photos
avoiding in books, 79, 123, 155
making, 64
bold text, 86
Book button, 76
book mode
defined, 8
pages jump around in, 155
printing photos and text from, 102
switching in/out of, 76
book themes. See books; themes
books, 75–97
about, 75
arranging photos, 44, 81
avoiding black-and-white photos in, 79, 123,
155
Catalog book theme, 92
checking spelling, 88–89
choosing theme for, 79
Classic book theme, 93
creating, 78
creating new themes for, 78
customizing page designs, 78
deleting introduction pages, 83
designing pages, 80
entering or editing text, 83
font changes, 85
low-resolution warning icons, 82
1-Click ordering, 119, 156
Picture book theme, 94
Portfolio book theme, 95
previewing, 90
printing on own printer, 91
quality of self-printed vs. ordered, 124
Story Book theme, 96
styles, 85, 86
switching in/out of book mode, 76
text color changes, 87
tools in book mode, 77
typing punctuation and text, 84
Year Book theme, 97
brightness, 65
bullets, 84
Burn button, 24, 101, 134
Burn Disc dialog, 24, 134
burning iPhoto disc, 134
buttons, See also specific button by name
dimmed, 56
mode, 9
180
C
cameras. See digital cameras
card readers
importing photos from, 11, 14
not recognized in iPhoto, 150
removing memory card from, 14
Catalog book theme, 92
CCD (charge-coupled device), 160
CDs
backing up photos to, 24, 25
burning iPhoto, 134
importing photos from backup, 17
importing photos from Photo CD/
Picture CD, 16
receiving iPhoto, 135
reusing CD-RW discs, 25
simulating hierarchical albums on, 39
using CD-R for archiving, 25
changing layout
for display pane, 32
for HomePage albums, 127
Check Spelling As You Type command, 89
checking spelling, 88–89
checkmark keyword, 50
child photos, 175
Classic book theme, 93
color
changing text, 87
color-matching systems, 165
correcting, 165
perception of, 164
rendering, 164
selecting cover, 122
Color panel, 87
color-matching systems, 165
comments
adding to books, 79
on albums, 39
assigning to photos, 46
printing for contact sheets, 104
Constrain pop-up menu, 56, 57, 161
constraining
Desktop pictures, 130
selection to aspect ratios, 56
Contact Sheet print style, 104, 107
contextual menu shortcuts
about, 34
for editing, 55
contrast, 65
controls of current mode, 9
copyright symbols, 84
Index
correcting color, 165
crashes
troubleshooting, 148
when photos double-clicked, 152
when viewing thumbnail, 153
creating keywords, 48
cropping photos
Crop button for, 56, 57
low-resolution warning icon and heavy, 68
pixels and, 163
steps for, 68
culling photos, 20
custom aspect ratios, 67
custom stickers, 104
Customize button, 57, 58
customizing toolbar, 58
D
E
Easy Card Creator, 106
Edit button, 54
Edit commands, 34, 55
Edit in external editor command, 72
edit mode, See also editing
defined, 8
entering, 54
editing, 53–73
aspect ratios, 67
181
Index
damaged photo warnings, 151
Data folders, 19
dates
arranging photos by, 44
editing film roll, 36
editing photo, 47
unable to search by, 51
deleting
albums, 40
HomePage albums, 127
introduction pages, 83
keywords, 48
methods for deleting photos, 20
photos from memory card, 14
photos on book pages, 80
deselecting photos, 41
designing books
arranging photos on pages, 81
customizing page designs, 78
designing pages, 80
setting design theme and preferences, 79
Desktop button, 101, 130, 131
Desktop pictures, 130
destination albums, 42
digital cameras, See also photography
accessories for, 171
choosing, 169
compatible, 2
drivers for USB still cameras, 13
editing photo dates, 47
erasing contents of, 13
importing photos from, 13, 150–151
not recognized in iPhoto, 150
reviews of, 170
setting iPhoto to launch when connecting, 7,
12, 13
disappearing photos, 148
discs. See CDs
Disk Copy, 5
display pane, 9
changing layout, 32
editing tools in, 56
importing files and folders by dragging to,
15, 17
resizing contents of, 31
zooming photos in, 60
distributing QuickTime movies, 141
documentary photography, 168
Download Some button (Image Capture
window), 18, 27
downloading
image thumbnail display during, 13
photos from Image Capture, 27
downsampling, 163
dragging
creating selection rectangle by, 66
files and folders into iPhoto, 15, 17
photos to albums, 42
multiple photos, 41
photo files to Finder, 137
photo to Trash album, 43
photos into album pane, 37
photos to outgoing email window, 117
thumbnails to arrange photos, 77, 81
drivers
Gimp-Print drivers, 105
for USB still cameras, 13
Duplicate command, 34, 61
Duplicate Photo dialog, 18
duplicating
albums, 38
checking for duplicates during import, 13, 17
duplicate copying prevented, 18
duplicate photos after import, 151
photos, 61, 80
DVD slideshows, 132–133
Index
Index
avoiding excessive, 153
brightness and contrast, 65
contextual menu shortcuts for, 55
cropping photos, 68
customizing toolbar, 58
duplicating photos, 61
edit tools for display pane, 56
enhancing photos, 63
entering edit mode, 54
in external editor, 72
film roll title and date, 36
image-editing programs, 73
making black-and-white photos, 64
photo dates, 47
photos on book page, 80
reducing red-eye, 69
retouching photos, 70
rotating photos, 62
selecting parts of photo, 66
setting preferences for, 54
text, 83
tools for separate window, 57
unable to edit photos, 152
undoing changes, 71
using toolbar, 59
zooming photos, 60
electronic edition of book, 1, 64, 167
Email button, 101, 116
emailing photos, 116–117
Enhance button, 56, 63
enhancing photos, 63
entering text, 83
erasing contents of digital camera, 13
errors during ordering, 156
Export command, 100, 136, 138, 140
Export Photos dialog, 136, 138, 140
export plug-ins, 138
exporting photos
after rotating, 137
by dragging to Finder, 137
file export, 136
to Finder folders, 25, 26, 137
to QuickTime movies, 140
to Web pages, 138–139
Exposure tab (Photo Info window), 52
external editors
photos don’t open in, 152
using, 72
F
File Export tab (Export Photos dialog), 136
file formats
for export, 136
182
rotating and converting GIF images to JPEG,
62
supported, 13, 15
File menu, 100
files, See also file formats; PDF files
compatible iPhoto formats, 13, 15
don’t appear after import, 150
exporting photo, 136, 137
importing photo, 15
manually finding original, 71, 145
stopping photo importing, 15
stored in Trash, 21
troubleshooting problems after importing,
151
film rolls
adding photos to, 36
arranging photos by, 44
creating for imported folders, 15
editing, 36
in organize mode, 31
showing or hiding, 32
tracking imports as separate, 12, 36
Finder
exporting photos from, 137
locating photos in, 19, 71, 145
managing export plug-ins from, 138
Fit button, 57, 60
flaky behavior
after file import, 151
troubleshooting, 148
folders
creating iPhoto Library, 22
directory structure of, 19
extracting to Desktop with Safari, 5
importing, 15
locating iPhoto Library, 23
merging iPhoto Library, 26
switching between iPhoto Library, 23
fonts, 85
Fonts panel, 85
Full Page print style, 105
G
General preferences pane (Mac OS X), 35
getting started, 1–9
acquiring iPhoto software, 3
comparison of iPhoto 1.1.1 and 2, 6
first launch, 7
hardware and software requirements, 2
iPhoto interface, 9
iPhoto modes, 8
launching, 7, 12, 13
manual iPhoto installation, 5
Index
Software Update utility installations, 4
sources for iPhoto software, 3
updating from 1.1.1 to 2, 6
GIF images, 62
Gimp-Print drivers, 105
GraphicConverter, 73, 136
Greeting Card print style, 106
guide lines, 83
H
hard disk, backing up photos to external, 25
hardware requirements, 2
help, 157
HomePage
about, 125
managing albums, 127
navigating to, 127
publishing photos using, 126
HomePage button, 101, 126
Hot Plug Action, 7
I
183
Index
iCards, 125
icons. See warning icons
iDisk
about, 125
locating .Mac Slides on, 128
iDVD
creating slideshows, 6, 132–133
illustrated, 132
using, 133
iDVD folder, 19
iLife, 3
Image Capture
downloading photos with, 27
resetting Hot Plug Action in, 7, 12
ImageBuddy, 104, 110
image-editing programs, 73
image-editing window, 57–60
iMovie 3, 115
import mode
defined, 8
manually switching to, 12
importing photos
adding photos to film roll, 36
from card reader, 14
from digital camera, 13
entering import mode, 12
from files, 15
importing selected photos, 18
from iPhoto disc, 17, 135
from Kodak Photo CD or Picture CD, 16
multitasking while, 11
preventing copying of duplicates, 18
stopping, 15
troubleshooting, 150–151
info pane
assigning title in, 45
Comments field of, 46
defined, 9
editing photo dates, 47
illustrated, 31, 36, 101
viewing photo information, 52
inkjet printers, 103, 111, 171
Install iPhoto 2 dialog box, 5
installing
iPhoto, 4, 5
Script menu, 145
Internet preferences pane, 124
interpolation, 163
iPhoto, 1–9
AppleScripts for, 144–145
compatible email software, 116
contextual menu shortcuts, 34
crashes when photos double-clicked, 152
directory structure, 19
functions of iPhoto Library Manager, 23
getting started first time, 7
hardware and software requirements, 2
importing photos from disc, 17
installing Script menu, 145
installing with Software Update utility, 4
keeping copy on disk after downloading, 5
Knowledge Base, 157
launching, 7, 12, 13
manually installing, 5
modes, 8
multitasking while importing photos, 11
preventing copying of duplicates, 18
refreshing display, 85
sources for software, 3
supported file formats, 13, 15
updating from 1.1.1 to 2, 6
user interface, 9
version 1.1.1 vs. 2, 6
iPhoto Library folders
creating multiple, 22
locating, 23
maintaining location and names of contents,
19
merging, 26
setting access for photos in, 142
sharing photos on network, 143
switching between, 23
iPhoto Library Manager, 23
iPhoto.pkg file, 5
Index
italic text, 86
iTunes
playing files in iPhoto, 114
selecting music for slideshows in, 112
iView Media Pro, 114, 139
J
JPEG, 13, 15, 62
K
Ken Burns Effect pane (iMovie 3), 115
keywords
albums vs., 37, 48
assigning and removing, 49
checkmark, 50
creating, renaming, or deleting, 48
searching via, 50
showing or hiding, 32
undoing assignments, 49
Keywords/Search window, 48–51
Knowledge Base, 157
Kodak Photo CD or Picture CD, 16
Index
L
landscape view
for Desktop pictures, 130
DVD slideshows in, 133
printing sampler sheets and, 108
for screen savers, 131
switching to portrait, 67
landscapes, 176
Last Import album, 12
launching iPhoto, 7, 12, 13
lens cleaners, 171
Lock Page checkbox, 77, 81
Low Quality Warning dialog, 122
low-resolution warning icons
dealing with, 82, 158
heavy cropping and, 68
troubleshooting, 158
M
.Mac account
HomePage, 125
iCards, 125
iDisk, 125
Mail, 125
setting up, 124
.Mac Slides
publishing photos as, 128
184
subscribing to, 129
.Mac Slides button, 101, 128
Mac OS X
adding printer for, 102
changing scrolling behavior, 35
Developer Tools, 78
driver for USB still camera, 13
Macintosh
acquiring iPhoto, 3
change Mac OS X behavior for scrolling, 35
hardware requirements for iPhoto, 2
network sharing of photos, 143
sharing photos with users on your, 142
Mail Photo dialog, 116
Mail pop-up menu (Preferences window), 116
managing photos
backing up photos, 24–25
creating multiple iPhoto Library folders, 22
culling photos, 20
deleting photos, 20
directory structure of iPhoto, 19
Image Capture, 27
merging iPhoto Library folders, 26
recovering photos, 21
switching between iPhoto Library folders, 23
memory, 149
memory cards
buying bigger, 171
deleting photos from, 14
removing from card reader, 14
merging iPhoto Library folders, 26
Microsoft Windows, QuickTime movies for, 141
mode buttons, 9
modes
book, 8, 76
edit, 8, 54
import, 8, 12
organize, 8, 30
switching in and out of book, 76
monopod/tripod, 171
movies
creating iMovie slideshow, 115
distributing QuickTime, 141
exporting to QuickTime, 140
flipping through QuickTime, 140
unable to download, 13
MP3 files, 114
multiple picture selection, 41
music
adding to DVD slideshow, 132, 133
for slideshows, 112, 114
myPhoto, 139
myPublisher service, 123
Index
N
navigating
to HomePage, 127
photos listed on memory card, 14
and selecting photos for importing, 15
through photos, 35
network sharing of photos, 143
New Album dialog, 37
N-Up print style, 107
O
P
Page Design pop-up menu, 80
page numbers for books, 79
Page Setup dialog, 105
pages, See also albums; books; themes
adding custom pages to book PDF files, 78
arranging photos in book, 81
deleting introduction, 83
designing book, 80
printing single book, 91, 110
working with photos on, 81
paper
sizes for standard prints, 109
types for printing, 111
passwords
creating, 118
entering Administrator, 5
forgotten, 119
.Mac account, 124
pause/play indicator, 113
PDF files
adding custom pages to book, 78
downloading this iPhoto book in, 1, 64, 167
viewing book, 90
perception of color, 164
performance
increasing scrolling speed, 32, 33, 149
searches, 51
for shared network photos, 143
troubleshooting problems with, 149
permissions
for shared network photos, 143
for shared photos on your computer, 142
pet photos, 175
Photo CD/Picture CD, 16
photo info pane, viewing photo information, 52
185
Index
Ofoto service, 106
opening Spelling panel, 88
Order Book button
illustrated, 77, 101
process initiated with, 78, 122
viewing PDF file of book, 90
Order Book window, 122
Order Prints button
illustrated, 101
ordering prints with, 121
Order Prints window, 121
ordering books and prints, See also shipping
information
about ordered books, 123
errors during ordering, 156
not all prints received from, Apple, 155
1-Click Ordering, 119, 156
order damaged or not received, 156
ordering books, 122
ordering prints, 121
preparing to order prints, 120
quality of self-printed vs. ordered books, 123
troubleshooting problems with prints and
books, 155
viewing PDF file of book, 90
Organize button, 30, 100
organize mode
accessing sharing tools in, 100
defined, 8
entering, 30
tools in, 31
organizing photos, 29–52
adding comments, 46
adding photos to albums, 42
arranging photos, 44
assigning and removing keywords, 49
assigning titles to photos, 45
changing display pane layout, 32
changing display preferences, 33
contextual menu shortcuts, 34
creating albums, 37
deleting albums, 40
duplicating albums, 38
editing film rolls, 36
editing photo dates, 47
entering organize mode, 30
managing keywords, 48
navigating through photos, 35
removing photos from album, 43
renaming and rearranging albums, 39
searching for text, 51
searching via keyword, 50
selecting photos, 41
tools for, 31
viewing photo information, 52
orientation. See landscape view; portrait view
Originals folders, 19
Index
Index
Photo Library album, film rolls in, 12, 36
Photo tab (Photo Info window), 52
photography
artistic and documentary, 168
child and pet, 175
choosing cameras, 169
color, 164–165
finding reviews of cameras, 170
general tips for, 172–173
landscape, 176
portrait, 174
resolution, 162–163
slideshow tips, 114, 133
tips for printing, 111
travel, 177
understanding aspect ratios, 160–161
photos, See also books; importing photos;
managing photos; organizing photos;
sharing photos
adding/removing HomePage photos, 127
arranging by date, 44
arranging on book pages, 81
artistic vs. documentary, 168
black-and-white, 64, 79, 123, 155
burning iPhoto disc, 134
can’t edit, 152
can’t upload, 155
child and pet photos, 175
crashes when double-clicked, 152
cropping, 68
culling, 20
damaged photo warnings, 151
deleting, 20
deleting from memory card, 14
disappearing, 148
displaying on Desktop, 130
don’t open in external program, 152
dragging into album pane, 37
dragging to Trash album, 43
editing date of, 47
emailing, 116–117
exporting, 136–137, 138–139, 140
flipping through QuickTime movie, 140
including extra space on edge, 68
landscape photos, 176
paper sizes for standard prints, 109
portrait photos, 174
previewing before printing, 103
printing custom layouts of, 110
printing from book mode, 102
publishing as .Mac Slides, 128
publishing using HomePage, 126
receiving iPhoto disc, 135
recovering, 21, 71
186
reducing red-eye, 69
retouching, 70
rotating, 62
selecting parts of, 66
travel photos, 177
undoing editing changes, 71
working with on book pages, 80
zooming, 60
Picture Book theme
about, 94
text and page numbers for, 79
Pictures folder, 19
PixelNhance, 65, 73
pixels
about, 162–163
downsampling vs. interpolation, 163
pixels-to-inches conversion, 120
resolution and, 162–163
“Place most recent photos at top” checkbox, 44,
113
Play/Play Full Screen buttons (iMovie 3), 115
Portfolio book theme, 95
portrait photos, 174
portrait view
Desktop pictures and, 130
DVD slideshows in, 133
printing sampler sheets and, 108
switching to landscape, 67
Portraits & Prints, 110
preferences, setting Image Capture, 27
Preferences window
illustrated, 33, 44, 116
selecting another program for editing, 72
setting editing preferences, 54
setting rotation direction in, 62
Preview button, 77, 90
Preview pane (iMovie 3), 115
previewing
books, 77, 90
photos in Publish HomePage window, 126
prints, 103
Print button, 101, 102
Print command, 100, 102
Print dialog
illustrated, 91
options described, 102
yellow warning icon in, 104, 158
Print Explosion, 106
print styles
Contact Sheet, 104, 107
Full Page, 105
Greeting Card, 106
N-Up, 107
Sampler, 108
Index
Standard Prints, 109
printers
adding, 102
Gimp-Print drivers for, 105
selecting color, 171
testing output of, 103
printing
book page numbers, 79
books on own printer, 91
contact sheets, 104
custom layouts, 110
full-page photos, 105
greeting cards, 106
including extra space on edges of photos, 68
paper types for, 111
photos, 102
photos and text from book mode, 102
photos print at incorrect size, 154
poor print quality, 154
previewing prints, 103
prints don’t appear on page correctly, 154
quality of self-printed vs. ordered books, 123
sampler sheets, 108
single pages of books, 91
standard print sizes, 109
tips for, 111
prints
don’t appear on page correctly, 154
errors during ordering, 156
not all received from Apple, 155
order damaged or not received, 156
ordering, 121
poor quality, 154
printing at incorrect size, 154
too dark, 155
refreshing display, 85
Remove from Album command, 34
removing
HomePage photos, 127
keywords, 49
photos from albums, 43
renaming
albums, 39
exported photos, 136
keywords, 48
rendering color, 164
resize handle, 57
resolution
of imported Photo CD/Picture CD photos, 16
low-resolution warning icons, 68, 82, 158
pixels and dots, 162–163
pixel-to-inches conversion, 120
recommended ranges for print sizes, 120
Retouch wand, 56, 70
retouching photos, 70
reversing sort order of photos, 44, 113
Revert to Original command
on contextual shortcut menu, 34
dimmed, 152
undoing changes with, 71, 80
revising Hot Plug Action, 7
Rotate buttons, 62
Rotate commands, 34
rotating photos
on book pages, 80
exporting after, 137
setting rotation direction, 62
running slideshows, 113
Q
Safari Web browser, 5
Sampler print style, 108
Screen Effects dialog, 130, 131
Screen Effects preferences pane, 129, 131
screen savers
configuring, 131
configuring and subscribing to .Mac Slides,
129
creating, 131
using, 129
Scripts menu, 145
scrolling
change Mac OS X behavior for, 35
increasing speed of, 32, 33, 149
searching
finding duplicate copies, 61, 120
for text, 51
via keyword, 50
R
RAM, 149
RAW files, 13
recovering photos, 21, 71
Red-Eye button, 56, 57, 69
red-eye reduction
aspect ratios and, 67
editing tips for, 69
187
Index
quality
of ordered books, 124
of prints, 154
QuickTime movies, 140, 141
QuickTime Player Pro, 141
QuickTime tab (Export Photos dialog), 140
quotation marks, 84
S
Index
Index
selecting
before zooming, 60
multiple pictures, 41
parts of photo, 66
photos, 41
selection rectangle, 56, 57
Set Title To commands, 34, 45
Set Title To Date/Time dialog, 45
Set Up Account dialog, 118
sharing photos, 99-145, See also ordering books
and prints; slideshows
about ordered books, 123
AppleScripts for iPhoto, 144–145
burning iPhoto disc, 134
contact sheets, 104
custom layouts, 110
displaying on Desktop, 130
as DVD slideshows, 132–133
emailing photos, 116–117
exporting files, 136, 137
exporting to QuickTime movies, 140
exporting to Web pages, 138–139
full-page photos, 105
greeting cards, 106
with HomePage, 125–127
with .Mac account, 125
.Mac Slides, 128, 129
as movies, 115, 140, 141
on networked Macs, 143
ordering books, 122
ordering prints, 121
paper types for printing, 111
preparing to order prints, 120
previewing prints, 103
printing photos, 102–111
receiving iPhoto disc, 135
running slideshows, 113
sampler sheets, 108
screen savers, 129, 131
setting up Apple ID, 118
setting up .Mac account, 124
setting up slideshows, 112
sign in with Apple ID, 119
slideshow tools, 114
standard print sizes, 109
tips for slideshows, 114
tools for, 100–101
with users on your Mac, 142
sharing tools, 100
shipping information
for books and prints, 121, 122
shipping address, 119
shipping costs, 122
188
Show Colors command, 87
Show Image File AppleScript script, 19
Show More Info command, 34
showing all photos, 50, 51
size slider
illustrated, 9
moving and adjusting settings for, 32
in edit mode, 60
in organize mode, 31
Slideshow button, 101, 112, 113
Slideshow Settings dialog, 112
slideshows
arranging photos, 44, 113
DVD, 132–133
exporting photos to QuickTime movies, 140
iMovie, 115
music for, 112, 114, 132, 133
running, 113
setting up, 112
tips for, 114, 133
tools for, 114
SmartSound Movie Maestro, 114
software
BetterHTMLExport, 138, 139
compatible email, 116
Easy Card Creator, 106
GraphicConverter, 73, 136
ImageBuddy, 104, 110
iView Media Pro, 114, 139
keeping iPhoto copy on disk after
downloading, 5
myPhoto, 139
photos don’t open in external program, 152
Portraits & Prints, 110
Print Explosion, 106
QuickTime Player Pro, 141
SmartSound Movie Maestro, 114
Still Life, 114
software requirements, 2
Software Update preferences pane, 3
Software Update utility, installing iPhoto with, 4
Speech menu, 89
spelling check, 88–89
Spelling panel, 88
Standard Prints print style, 109
Start Speaking command, 89
Still Life, 114
stopping photo importing, 15
Story Book theme, 96
style changes, 85, 86
styles. See print styles
subscribing to .Mac Slides, 129
Subscriptions sheet (.Mac), 129
Index
T
189
Index
taking better photos, 167–177
accessories for cameras, 171
artistic vs. documentary photos, 168
child and pet photos, 175
choosing cameras, 169
finding reviews of cameras, 170
general tips for, 172–173
landscape photos, 176
portrait photos, 174
travel photos, 177
testing AppleScripts, 144
text
changing color of, 87
checking spelling as you type, 89
deleting when switching themes, 83
editing on HomePage, 127
entering or editing, 83
fonts, 85
printing photos and text from book mode,
102
searching for, 51
styles, 85, 86
typing punctuation and, 84
text warning icons, 82
Theme pop-up menu, 77, 79
themes
Catalog book, 92
choosing for books, 79
Classic book, 93
creating new, 78
Picture book, 94
Portfolio book, 95
Story Book, 96
text deleted when switched, 83
Year Book, 97
thumbnails
arranging photos as, 77, 81
crashes viewing, 153
display during image downloading, 13
don’t reflect changes, 153
organizing film roll as, 12
Thumbs folders, 19
TidBITS, 157
titles
adding to books, 79
arranging by, 44
assigning, 45
changing film roll, 36
illustrated, 31
printing for contact sheets, 104
showing or hiding, 32
toolbar
customizing, 58
displaying tools on, 59
using, 59
tools
book mode, 77
displaying on toolbar, 59
editing, 56–57
organize mode, 31, 100
for sharing photos, 100–101
for slideshows, 114
Web export, 139
tracking imports as separate film rolls, 12, 36
Trash
dragging photo to Trash album, 43
dragging photo to Trash icon on Dock, 20
removing photos from, 21
travel photos, 177
troubleshooting, 147–158
avoiding black-and-white photos in books,
79, 123, 155
avoiding Crop keyboard shortcut, 55
camera or card reader not recognized, 150
can’t enable 1-Click ordering, 156
crashes viewing thumbnail, 153
damaged photo warnings, 151
dealing with warning icons, 158
disappearing photos, 148
duplicate photos after import, 151
excessive editing, 153
files not appearing after import, 150
flaky behavior and crashes, 148
font and style changes, 86
help for, 157
importing photos from card reader, 14
iPhoto crashes when photos double-clicked,
152
keywords, 49
miscellaneous problems, 149
order damaged or not received, 156
performance problems, 149
photos don’t open in external program, 152
printing, 154
problems after file import, 151
problems with prints and books, 155
Revert to Original command dimmed, 152
thumbnails don’t reflect changes, 153
unable to edit photos, 152
typing punctuation and text, 84
Index
U
underlined text, 86
undoing
changes, 71, 80
keyword assignments, 49
updating iPhoto, 4
USB Card/PC Card Reader, 171
USB ports, 2
user interface, 9
V
version 1.1.1 vs. 2, 6
View menu, 44
viewing
crashes during thumbnail, 153
last set of imported photos, 12
PDF file of book, 90
photo information, 52
Index
W
warning icons
low-resolution, 68, 82, 158
in Print dialog, 104
text, 82
troubleshooting, 158
Web Page tab (Export Photos dialog), 138
Web pages
Apple .Mac Signup, 124
exporting photos to, 138–139
publishing photos using HomePage, 126
Web sites
downloading iPhoto from, 3
extracting folders to Desktop, 5
windows, See also Preferences window; and
specific windows
dragging photos to outgoing email, 117
Keywords/Search window, 48
Publish HomePage, 126
tools for editing in separate, 57
zooming photos in image-editing, 60
writing AppleScripts, 144
Y
Year Book theme, 97
Z
Zoom buttons, 57, 60
zooming photos, 60
190
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