TEST DRIVE:
TEST DRIVE: A veteran driver reconsiders the Coronado, PG.71
Freightliner’s
KING OF
THE ROAD
March 2007
www.todaystrucking.com
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PG. 41
INSIDE: Meet Rob Donaghey. He’s
prepping one of Canada’s biggest
and oldest fleets to do battle in the
new millennium, PG. 47
How the income-trust
bust hits you
PG. 61
Top100
CANADA’S
SPECIAL ISSUE:
Our annual tally of Canada’s
biggest for-hire carriers
PLUS: Exclusive shipper survey
reveals top fleets, pg. 54
Why new stopping
rules make air discs
attractive
LIFE’S UNCERTAIN.
STERLING’S READY.
ST/MC-A-469. ©2006, Freightliner LLC. All rights reserved. Sterling Truck Corporation is a member of the Freightliner Group. Freightliner LLC is a DaimlerChrysler company.
Three things of which you can be certain: warehouses don’t empty themselves, you are the link between supply
and demand and a Sterling® truck is ready to get the job done. With outstanding maneuverability, visibility and
cab comfort, these trucks are always prepared to give you their all – which is a lot, because you have a lot of
work to do. Contact a Sterling truck dealer today at 1-800-STL-HELP or visit sterlingtrucks.com.
“I DON’T TRUST MY RIG
TO JUST ANYONE.”
After 25-years on the open road, owner/operator Mike
Penrod knows how to gauge his engine’s performance,
recognize problems and get things fixed right – the first
time. So it’s no surprise that when it came time for an
overhaul, Mike made the smart choice – a genuine StepUP
Overhaul from Detroit Diesel.
With four unique options, StepUP Overhaul provides costeffective solutions for a wide-range of symptoms. And of
course, every StepUP Overhaul is installed by Detroit Diesel
factory-trained experts, and backed by up to a 3-year,
300,000 mile warranty. From basic components to complete
replacement engines, there’s a StepUP Overhaul to restore
power, efficiency and durability to any Series 60. See your
Detroit Diesel Authorized Service Outlet today.
WHAT’S YOUR GENUINE STORY?
Visit www.detroitdieselstepup.com to tell it.
VOLUME 21, NO. 2
March 2007
74
Familiar truck
with brave
new power
27 Dispatch survival tips
71
King of the road?
NEWS & NOTES
FEATURES
OPINIONS
10 DISPATCHES
32 COVER
7 LETTERS
9 ROLF LOCKWOOD
18 MARCO BEGHETTO
23 JIM PARK
25 BRIAN BOTHAM
86 PETER CARTER
RULES FOR VAN CARGO
CANADA’S TOP 100
Our annual tally of for-hire carriers.
BY TODAY’S TRUCKING STAFF
41 COVER
THE HALLOWE’EN SURPRISE
Stan Dunford compares the federal government
to Enron. BY PETER CARTER & ANTHONY EVANGELISTA
47 TOP 100
ANYBODY CAN BE A FORWARDER
13 A global truck
13 Dates to pencil in
15 10 big issues
17 Arvin sells division
17 People in the news
18 ROI in the FAST lane
21 OEM sales stats
How Rob Donaghey weds a century of trucking
to the new millennium. BY DUFF MCCUTCHEON
54 TOP 100
BEST IN CLASS
Shippers name their favorite carriers. A Today’s
Trucking exclusive. BY MARCO BEGHETTO
61 BRAKES
WHAT’S STOPPING YOU?
Air discs are looking better by the day.
BY ROLF LOCKWOOD
76 ENTERPRISE
SERVICE DEPT
27 DISPATCH TIPS
67 ONLINE TRAINING HINTS
71 QUICK SPIN: CORONADO
74 HEAVY-DUTY HYBRID
79 LOCKWOOD’S PRODUCTS
COVER PHOTO:
JULIAN LAFLEUR, IMAGE CONTROL
MONTREAL. APRIL 12. BE THERE.
How to profit from the year’s biggest truck show.
MARCH 2007
5
Letters
Attention shoppers!
The Business Magazine of Canada’s Trucking Industry
PUBLISHER & EDITORIAL DIRECTOR
Rolf Lockwood, MCILT
(rolf@todaystrucking.com)
416/614-5825
EDITORIAL DEPT.
Editor
Peter Carter (peter@)
416/614-5828
Marco Beghetto (marco@)
416/614-5821
Senior Editor
Contributors Jim Park, Duff McCutcheon, Stephen Petit,
Allan Janssen, Steve Bouchard, Raymond Mercuri,
Steve Mulligan, David Kosub, Steve Sturgess
DESIGN & PRODUCTION
Director
Tim Norton (production@)
416/614-5810
Frank Scatozza
Associate Art Director
GROUP PUBLISHER
Mark Vreugdenhil
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NEWCOM BUSINESS MEDIA GROUP
President
Jim Glionna
Vice President
George Evans
Controller
Anthony Evangelista
Director, Quebec Operations
Joe Glionna
Production Manager
Lilianna Kantor
(lkantor@newcom.ca) • 416/614-5815
Re: “Timing is Everything,” by Bryant Harris
(Dec., ’06)
I have been involved in trucking for over
30 years and have never been more concerned about our industry and its future
than I am now.
HOS rules have made it so not many
young people want into trucking. My own
son is one. He works in our company in an
office capacity but will not consider highway work.
His explanation: You bust your butt all
day trying to make connections with customers and shippers, where your time is
not important, but get to the inspectors
and that is a different story.
Your time is their business and the logbook is a way to generate revenue through
fines. Do you honestly think a driver is
going to shut down for eight to 10 hours
when he is only one or two hours away
from home?
As I see it, two things need to happen.
Shippers and receivers need to be flexible
and accommodate drivers, as Bryant
stated in his column, or the alternative is
Pat Glionna
Director of Circulation
Show Division Manager
Elizabeth McCullough
(emccullough@newcom.ca) • 416/614-5817
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rates need to rise to accurately reflect the
cost of idle equipment and drivers who are
“on duty, not driving”.
I do not see either of these happening
until consumers are at their local store or
shopping mall facing empty shelves due to
a lack of trucks and qualified drivers.
Ken W. Bilben,
Airdrie, Alta.
Fun’s over
Fortunately I did my trucking in the early
’60s to the late ’80s, when it was still fun.
I still work in the industry and do
get into a truck on occasion. However,
next spring the Ministry can take the
licence I will have held for 50 years and
stuff it! I have no intention of giving
them the opportunity to practise age discrimination on me.
Harley F. Bickmore,
Toronto
The straight facts
We are in the landscaping business. We
also do large-tree moving with truckmounted tree spades. It is not uncommon
for us to suffer from a high turnover of
drivers since most are required to work
physically when they are not busy driving.
We can live with that.
What we have issues with is that over
the last several years we have had numerous drivers apply for work shortly after
receiving their AZ licences. Only a small
percentage of them have been able to
back up and park a straight truck, with
no trailer.
Do provincial transportation ministries’
driving tests not include backing up?
It’s high time the testers got their heads
out of the dark place (you know which one
I mean) where they’ve been keeping them
for far too long.
Herman Baguss,
Prescott, Ont.
HOW TO REACH US: We want your feedback.
Write editors@todaystrucking.com, or Letters to
the Editor, Today’s Trucking, 451 Attwell Dr.,
Etobicoke, ON M9W 5C4; fax: 416/614-8861.
Online Resources
For industry news, weekly features, daily management tips, truck sales stats,
product reviews, and more, go to todaystrucking.com.
MARCH 2007
7
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(418) 836-6022
PIERQUIP, INC.
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(306) 657-5600
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Editorial
By Rolf Lockwood
On Our Own
A look at the challenges of 2007, with only one prediction.
raditionally, I use this Top 100 issue to talk about the state
of our industry and peer into the closest crystal ball I can
find. Well, I can offer an opinion or three about various
aspects of trucking in 2007, but there’s no way I’m looking very
far ahead. At least not with any degree of confidence, and I’m
certainly not alone in this cautious approach. In any case, have
you seen a prediction you’re ready to trust lately?
So where are we? And if it’s not a good place, what do we need?
The broad truck transportation situation is not exactly dire, but
the challenges sure are big. Some of them are beyond our control,
like the price of fuel, of course. Topsy-turvy as always, so anything
can happen and there’s precious little you can do to prepare.
The value of our buck is not doing nice things to our centralCanada industrial core or to our share of cross-border traffic—
southbound freight is getting hard to find and American carriers
are starting to eat our northbound lunch. Is the loonie going to
drop any time soon? I don’t think so.
Also beyond our control is the
American regulatory regime and a
bunch of border issues. The FAST program is a mess, with almost no shipper
buy-in at all except in the automotive
world. And it’s ruthless in excluding
some drivers with truly minor blemishes in the distant past on their
record. I know one veteran owner-operator who’s about to lose it
all because he can’t make anybody see just how utterly minor his
single blemish was and thus clear the way for a FAST card.
The newish U.S. hours-of-service regime is another factor in our
inability to be as productive as we can be. Our own HOS rules are
more or less in place now, and they offer a bit more flexibility than
the Americans allow. But, for reasons I’ll never be able to fathom,
the two are not perfectly harmonized. Why ever not? Regardless,
the issue here is productivity, and the downside is substantial—a
5 percent drop in the best case, maybe more like 10 percent or even
higher in some situations. Again, I know owner-ops who have big
trouble here, including one who now does two rounds a week
instead of the three he used to manage. And many others who
blame a heartless dispatch desk for leaving them stranded in odd
places when—quite predictably—they run out of hours.
And what did we gain? Almost nothing, as far as I can see,
except one further roadblock in our efforts to attract and
especially to retain drivers and owner-operators. Which is pretty
T
much all we’ll ‘gain’ if we actually let a speed-limiter rule happen.
I continue to oppose this one passionately. Rules will never make
us successful. And excessive rules will only get in our way.
So then there’s the driver shortage. I’ve always had problems
defining this one, and have sometimes said the real shortage is in
jobs worth having. That’s not necessarily my perception—while it
may be tough in a lot of ways, the truck driver job is an honorable
one that can bring both satisfaction and a decent pay packet, but
Why do we keep
s not how young folks see it.
focusing on drivers that’
And that’s not how every carrier
alone when
constructs it. So there’s also, I
often say, a shortage of the manthe technician
agement skills required to retain
shortage may
the drivers we do have.
And why do we keep focusing
be just as severe?
on drivers alone when the technician shortage may be just as severe? Not to mention a shortage of
sales people and rate clerks and you name it.
These shortages, drivers included, are actually not completely
in the out-of-our-hands category. We can’t defeat demographic
realities—we’re simply not adding enough young people to the
mix across the board because the baby-making slowed down over
the last few decades—so we’re left with the challenge of competing for live bodies with other industries. Which means in turn
that we have to make ourselves more attractive.
Or more productive with the people we have. Thankfully, there
are some renewed efforts to expand our use of long combination
vehicles, but getting government buy-in is tough. We have to
keep trying.
The single thing that interests me most these days, having
more to do with efficiency than productivity, is the hybrid powertrain. It will come on strong in the next few years because the
technology is developing fast. We could be enjoying the benefits
much sooner if the federal and provincial governments would
apply some imagination and some funding to get the commercialization process in gear. But as always, they don’t see and they
don’t decide and they don’t lead. And I hold out no hope that this
will change.
As always, we’re on our own. ▲
Rolf Lockwood is editorial director and publisher of Today’s Trucking.
You can reach him at 416-614-5825 or rolf@todaystrucking.com.
MARCH 2007
9
BY MARCO BEGHETTO
Strapped in the Box
Innovator Transport Robert has invented a way to see what really happens
to your load inside a van trailer. It could soon be the industry standard.
Y
ou have to secure a
load on a flat-bed
trailer? No problem.
Standard 10 of the National
Safety Code on Cargo
Securement, adopted in
2004, should give you pretty
good instructions on how
to proceed.
But what about securing
loads inside a van trailer?
Know anyone else who
wings it?
Apparently, the only
requirements for freight
hauled in a van are limited to
the following: “The cargo
securement system shall be
capable of withstanding the
forces that result if the vehicle
is subjected to each of the
following accelerations: (a)
0.8 g deceleration in a forward
direction; (b) 0.5 g deceleration in a rearward direction;
(c) 0.5 g acceleration in either
sideways direction.
Do you know if the freight
in your van trailer can support these forces? Probably
not, and you are not alone.
The truth is nobody really
10
TODAY’S TRUCKING
knows what happens inside
the walls of a van trailer. Are
pallets placed on the floor
truly stable and do they really
support the G-forces required?
The Minister of Transport
of Quebec (MTQ) wants to
know. In collaboration with
Camtech Consultants, an
engineering firm from St.
Nicolas, Que., the MTQ
recently performed an array
of tests to determine how
loads react when they are
submitted to lateral and
longitudinal strengths.
To see inside the box, the
engineering team did not
install cameras in a moving
vehicle nor did they observe
a load of pallets with X-rays.
Instead, they rented a tilt
table designed by innovative
carrier Transport Robert of
Rougement, Que. It seems
that hauling freight isn’t all
Robert is good at.
The table is made so
different loads can be placed
and tested at the same time.
Two hydraulic cylinders
smoothly tilt the table,
simulating movements that
can occur inside a van trailer.
Robert designed the table
from scratch a year ago to
validate its own loading
practices to customers.
“There’s some criteria for
securement of freight inside
van trailers, but it’s difficult
for carriers and their customers to know if they comply or not. When the new
rules arrived in 2004, many
wondered if they were
CAN I TAKE YOUR ORDER: Hauling freight
isn’t all Transport Robert offers. It’s added
super-sized securement to the menu.
Colani futuristic
truck design
meeting the acceleration
and decelerations standards,”
says Réjean Laflamme
of Robert.
“It is important for
Transport Robert to make
sure the loads hauled in trailers are perfectly secured.”
Folks at Robert wanted
the table to be as versatile as
possible, so they tested it
with a wide assortment of
loads: pallets, cylindrical
freight like steel or paper
rolls, and even frozen goods.
The floor surface can be
changed to perform tests on
wood, aluminum, and laminated floor, so it’s possible to
determine the friction of the
freight on each surface.
The homemade tests
performed by Robert led to
some changes in the way the
company and its customers
wrap and load freight.
Cellophane used to wrap
goods is known to stabilize
the pallet and its contents.
Without revealing too many
secrets, Robert’s Laflamme
told us that the tests
showed some customers
were not using enough
wrapping, while others were
wasting it.
It wasn’t long before the
MTQ came knocking. It
asked Robert if it could rent
the table and hired Camtech
Consultants to enhance the
device’s capacities with an
even wider selection of
measurement and data
capture options.
“Our goal is to define
guidelines that will allow us
to give some parameters to
the industry, to reach a global
agreement so we can tell
carriers, shippers, and road
inspectors what are the best
ways to place loads in van
trailers,” says Guy Desrosiers,
who is in charge of securement at the MTQ.
The ministry set out to
SILVER BULLET:
No, NASA hasn’t launched a truckline company to poach your freight. This is one of many future
concept trucks designed by world-famous German engineer
and designer Luigi Colani. The Berlin native has been drawing
up and building these futuristic tractor-trailers since the 1950s,
when he started in the vehicle industry with Fiat in Italy.
Obviously, the trucks aren’t used in commercial transport but
are hot items in corporate marketing campaigns and car-show
events around the world. Not that Colani would have a problem
with these hyper haulers moving freight.
“Just why the auto industry never adopted Colani’s ideas,
which he has propagated for 30 years, and never put the series
into mass production will remain one of life’s great mysteries,”
states his official website.
This one, pictured above, is based on a Mercedes platform.
More recent versions are based on the DAF XF. It features a
12-speed ZF automatic transmission and a six-cylinder,
four-valve diesel engine with direct injection, turbocharging,
charge-air cooling, and horsepower performance from 381 hp
to 530 hp.
Almost all of Colani’s designs—everything from trucks to
teacups—are based on vicious circular curves.“Why should I
join the straying mass who want to make everything angular?”
goes one of Colani’s most popular quotes.“I am going to pursue
Galileo Galilei’s philosophy:‘My world is also round.’” To see
more of Colani’s trucks and other works go to www.colani.de.
Want more news? Go to todaystrucking.com
Send us your feedback. E-mail editors@todaystrucking.com
test different scenarios and
determine the reactions of
palletized products in a van
trailer depending on the
number of rows, the height,
and the type of product.
“Among others, we made
some tests to verify if the top
of a load on a pallet moved
more than the center or the
bottom of the load, or if the
whole pallet and load move
in the trailer,” says Jean
Grandbois, engineer at
Camtech Consultants.
Today’s Trucking sister
publication Transport
Routier got an exclusive look
at some of the MTQ tests
performed on the tilt table.
For the tests, three “displacement sensors” were placed at
MARCH 2007
11
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April 12, 13 and 14, 2007
www.expocam.ca
Place Bonaventure,
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to get your free parking coupon.
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Dodge Ram 2500 Quad Cab with 6.7L Cummins Turbo Diesel Engine, 6 Speed Automatic, 6’3” Box • One Year’s Supply of Castrol Oil
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For a listing of the complete rules and regulations of the Sweepstakes visit us online at www.expocam.ca/rules/
*Contest entry forms must be submitted in person at ExpoCam 2007. Truck may not be exactly as shown.
Dispatches
FULL TILT: Robert’s tilt table invention simulates freight movements
that can occur inside a van trailer.
different heights on the load
to compare lateral movements. Those sensors
showed what part of the
load “slips” first.
An “accelerometer,” also
installed on the tilt table,
then showed the lateral
acceleration applied to the
load. In some cases, a
second accelerometer was
affixed to the load itself to
measure the force of impact
when the freight hit the
trailer wall.
Some tests surprised even
the research team. In certain
situations, the load tested
was more unstable than
anticipated, indicating many
similar loads inside van trailers do not meet the require-
LOG BOOK
ments of the Standard 10.
Pallet loads aren’t all that’s
being studied. MTQ is trying
to determine some securement standards for specific
loads like cylindrical freight
as well.
“This research will be
exportable to the rest of
Canada and the United
States,” says MTQ’s
Desrosiers. “We believe that
the results will make the
Standard 10 more precise.
One goal behind those
experiments is to share our
findings to North American
load securement authorities,
to trailer manufacturers, and
to carriers and shippers.”
Desrosiers says the ministry is eager to share the
results with the industry. A
meeting with the North
American committee on
load securement, of which
Transport Robert’s Jean-Yves
Letarte is a member,
should be held in the next
few months.
Canadian Trucking
Alliance President David
Bradley says he’s aware of
the MTQ project and is
hopeful of its implications.
“We will work with stakeholders in order to try and
develop common sense
cargo securement standards
that fulfill the promise of a
uniform national standard,”
he said. Right now it’s a
dog’s breakfast.”
— Steve Bouchard
Integration
Suppliers Spin
Around the World
Will a “global” truck ever
catch on in North America?
Globalization, in fact a lot
of “tions”—everything from
harmonization to vertical
integration—were the hot
topics at this year’s Heavy
Duty Dialogue and
Aftermarket Week in
Las Vegas.
Despite increased talk
that heavy-duty truck makers are looking more and
more towards proprietary
powertrains, several engine
makers and other top-tier
suppliers don’t seem to be
particularly worried.
While some form of vertical integration among truck
OEMs is inevitable as manufacturers look for ways to
reduce costs and increase
productivity, suppliers
agreed that many don’t have
the core competencies,
enough unit volume, or the
research and development
capital for a completely
integrated truck.
The predicted demise of
independent component
manufacturers (still 60 percent of heavy-duty sales)
stretches back almost three
decades, but the market
remains ripe for “consumer
choice” type of OEs, says Ed
Pence of Cummins.
Go online for more events, visit www.todaystrucking.com
March 19-21
Supply Chain World 2007 North American Conference, Sheraton
Philadelphia City Center Hotel, Philadelphia. Enabling Profitable
Customer Satisfaction through Supply-Chain Integration is the
name of the game. Contact: 202/962-0440 or go to
www.supply-chain.org.
March 22-24
Mid-America Trucking Show, Kentucky Exposition Center,
Louisville, Ken. With over 1 million square feet of space, Mid-America
is the largest OEM, carrier, and component-supplier show in the U.S.
Contact: Tim Young Exhibit Management: 502/899-3892 or click on
www.truckingshow.com.
March 22-23
National Heavy Equipment Show, International Centre, Toronto.
Presented by the Canadian Association of Equipment Distributors,
which represents over 1,500 providers of equipment to the
construction, forestry, mining, marine, and oil industries in Canada.
Contact: 613/822-8861 or go to www.caed.org.
APRIL 12-14
ExpoCam 2007
ExpoCam 2007, Place Bonaventure, Montreal.
Canada’s National Truck Show, ExpoCam will
feature more than 300 exhibitors and over 200,000 sq ft of new
trucks and equipment.This year’s show will kick off with opening
remarks by Marc Garneau, the first Canadian astronaut to venture
into outer space.This year’s theme emphasizes the impact of new
technology on Canada’s trucking industry. ExpoCam is the only truck
show in Quebec to be endorsed by the Quebec Trucking Association
and the Canadian Trucking Alliance. Call Elizabeth McCullough at
416/614-5817 or go to www.expocam.ca for more info.
MARCH 2007
13
Take delivery of any 2007 Cat ® On-Highway Engine and you’ll get free
Extended Service Coverage plus the Cat On-Time Promise. That’s Pure Confidence
Mile upon mile, year after year, fleets and owner-operators count on Cat engines
with ACERT™ Technology to drive their business. Our 2007 engines will continue
the Cat tradition of reliability, performance, fuel economy and life to overhaul.
In fact, we’re so confident in the next generation of ACERT Technology that we’re
backing it with our Pure Confidence Program:
Pure Confidence Program
Powerful results
Over the last year, 56 fleets have rolled up
nearly 12 million miles on more than 100 Cat
2007 pre-production engines. Customers
agree that those engines delivered the same
reliability, fuel economy and performance as
current Cat engines with ACERT Technology.
Extended Service Coverage Cat On-Time Promise
ESC covers 100% of parts and labor
cost for repair of covered engine
components and covered emissions
components.
If your engine is down for warrantable
repair more than 24 hours during 2007,
Caterpillar will reimburse you for a
rental truck to deliver your load.
“In the past 12 months,
we’ve put 160,000
miles on the Cat
pre-production engine
and had only one minor
repair. We feel much
better with the Cat
technology than with
the other competitors
out there.”
• C15, C13 & C9: 3 years/300,000 miles
• C7: 3 years/150,000 miles
David Freymiller
President
Freymiller Inc.
Valid on any 2007 Cat C15, C13, C9 or C7 delivered to customers for commercial service
between now and June 30, 2007. Some restrictions apply.
“Regarding fuel
economy, the Cat ’07
pre-production engine
runs right in the same
ballpark as our current
Cat engines. I see no
difference in this truck.
And we will go on with Curtis Wright
this ‘07 Cat engine.”
Maintenance Director
Caterpillar is ready for 2007
There are nearly 450,000 Cat engines with ACERT Technology on the road today.
Our 2007 solution, based on proven ACERT building blocks, has been fully
tested and overwhelmingly accepted by customers. More than
100 pre-production engines have logged nearly 12 million miles
hauling freight under actual operating conditions. And the Cat
C15, C13 and C7 have all been EPA certified. You can be
sure that we’re ready for 2007. To learn more about our
Pure Confidence Program see your Cat or truck dealer.
A. Passmore & Sons Trucking
Bill Chaney
Controller
L.H. Chaney Materials Inc.
© Caterpillar 2007. All rights reserved. CAT, CATERPILLAR, their respective logos, ACERT,
“Caterpillar Yellow” and the POWER EDGE trade dress, as well as corporate and product
identity used herein, are trademarks of Caterpillar and may not be used without permission.
“Since putting two Cat
’07 pre-production
engines into service,
we’ve had no problems.
Based on our
experience, we feel
extremely confident
with Cat’s product
moving into ’07.”
Dispatches
10 FOR 10
A
T THE RECENT HEAVY DUTY DIALOGUE IN LAS VEGAS,
PETER NESVOLD OF RENOWNED WALL STREET
TRANSPORTATION MARKET ANALYST FIRM BEAR
STEARNS OUTLINED WHAT HE THINKS WILL BE THE TRUCKING
INDUSTRY’S 10 MOST PRESSING ISSUES OVER THE NEXT 10 YEARS.
HERE THEY ARE, IN DESCENDING ORDER:
10
Longer life cycles. Useful
lives of components and
vehicles will continue to
improve. More rebuilds are
moving from OEM control to
secondary markets.
Global consolidation at all
levels.Will larger OEMs try to
squeeze prices from suppliers or
will suppliers to big OEMs benefit
from higher volumes?
Decreasing U.S. dependence
on foreign oil and the
emergence of alternative biofuels
and market penetration of hybrid
commercial trucks.
Vertical integration.
International and Paccar are
two truck makers that will have
their own heavy-duty engines
starting 2009.Volvo increased
proprietary engine penetration
from 10 percent in 1992 to 65
percent today and recently
announced its own automated
transmissions.What’s next?
(Be sure to read the related story on
this page for more on this issue.)
Vehicle idling creates
demands for auxiliary power
units, but are there alternatives
for fleets that don’t want the
added weight?
Global sourcing. International
is seeking to buy $1 billion
worth of components through its
9
8
7
6
5
In fact, Cummins’ top-10
customers all make their
own engines in certain
applications somewhere in
the world, and the company
keeps growing.
Speculation that North
American trucks will
naturally become more
joint venture in India. Paccar just
opened a purchasing office in
China. Is this a threat or opportunity for suppliers? How will this
impact the ability of the supply
chain to bounce back when sales
and manufacturing picks up
in the latter half of this year
and in 2008?
Safety. New stopping distance
rules are in the works.Will the
rule bring disc brakes to the
forefront in North America and
what will the impact be on brake
and trailer manufacturers?
Driver and technician
shortage. More freight, less
drivers with each passing year.
The math isn’t changing.
Diesel emissions. Jan. 1, 2007
is behind us, but regulations
only go in one direction—they get
stricter.Will 2010 bring SCR or yet
another solution? And just what
do politicians have in store
beyond that? (See “Inventing and
Avoiding the Next Crisis,” by Jim
Park, page 22).
Highway congestion. It’s not
always the water cooler
issue of the day, per se. But
it’s always there in the background, heavily impacting
everyday operations like fuel
consumption, safety, and
driver productivity.
4
3
2
1
streamlined like European
equipment is also overstated, adds Chuck Kleinhagen,
senior VP of Haldex. He
points out that other than
engines, transmissions, and
drive axles, European truck
makers have moved away
from vertical integration and
adds Cat’s George Taylor.
closer to outside specialists
Still, both engine reps say
for many other components.
dialogue on uniform stanCaterpillar’s General
dards—both among indusManager George Taylor sees
try and within the United
the future of trucking to be
Nations—continues to make
more about “virtual”
sense. “Global alignment
integration than vertical.
one day could ensure
Component suppliers will
consistent treatment, a
have to work closer with
competitive playing field,
OEMs in co-creating
and cut unnecessary costs,”
technologies, building
says Pence.
product support networks,
and offering a total package,
ADVANCED TECH
which in the case of engine
FINDING AUDIENCE:
companies, “goes beyond the
Meanwhile, on this side of
engine block.”
the pond, suppliers and
In other words, adds Eaton’s
truck makers are bracing for
James Sweetnam, “don’t give
an expected 35-percent
them [truck OEMs] any
class-8 downturn.
reason to look inward.”
While new tractor sales in
Another issue with a lot of
the near future will no doubt
buzz was the development
be less than stellar (transof trucking’s version of the
portation analysts Bear
Swiss Army knife—or
“global” engine
SMALLER WORLD: Truck and component
standard. Engine
makers are looking to squeeze as much
makers have long
standardized technology around the
dreamed about the
globe as they can.
day where they
could produce a
single engine technology and strategy
that serves many
different markets
around the world.
Some companies
are targeting a 2015
timeframe for such
a reality, but
Stearns insist the truckCummins’ Ed Pence warns
making recession is going to
that emission regulation
be worse than industry
variances—and more imporpredictions), a core of
tantly, inconsistencies in the
innovative, high-tech add-on
willingness to enforce them
products are starting to
around the globe—mean “a
emerge to give the trucking
one size fits all” strategy
industry a welcome boost.
could still be a long way off.
Technology advanceFurthermore, the “sticker
ments in telematics,
shock” in some developing
equipment safety, and driver
countries and the lack of
warning devices—such as
quality fuel and technicians,
electronic braking, lanemeans that engine companies
departure warning, roll
probably couldn’t force the
stability, collision warning
latest technology on many
and night vision technology,
markets in the near future,
MARCH 2007
15
Dispatches
as well as driver fatigue
monitoring—have grown
rapidly in recent years.
Challenges for speedy
market penetration still exist,
says Joe McAleese, president
and CEO of Bendix
Commercial Vehicle Systems,
but barriers such as cost and
small-fleet compatibility are
coming down. Manufacturers
are also doing a better job of
laying out ROI for customers,
says McAleese.
Helping buyers select the
right technology for their
application, eliminate
redundancy in product
offerings, and implementing
the technology in broader
truck systems are also things
the industry is improving on,
notes Garrick Hu of
ArvinMeritor.
Adds Qualcomm Wireless’
Norm Ellis: “When these
things start to happen, even a
small van delivering flowers
can justify a $200 solution
that does what the [operator]
needs as opposed to a complicated $2000 solution.”
Suppliers
Arvin Lets Air Out
of Emissions Biz
Just a few months after
boosting its market share in
the commercial-vehicle
emissions solutions industry,
ArvinMeritor has agreed to
sell its Emissions
Technologies business group
to New York-based equity
investment firm One Equity
Partners (OEP) for about
$310 million.
ArvinMeritor President
and CEO Charles G. “Chip”
McClure said the decision to
sell the growing business is
part of a long-term strategy
to concentrate on “strengths
and core competencies” such
heard on the
Street
■ What can a Canadian boy do for Brown?
The North American LTL and parcel
delivery giant is about to find out. UPS
recently announced the appointment
of Mike Tierney as president of
UPS CANADA—the first Canadian to
hold the position.Tierney’s focus is
centered on enabling Canadian business
to reach new markets and succeed in an
increasingly competitive global economy,
the company says.
A 25-year veteran of the company,Tierney
began his career with UPS in 1981 as a
package car driver in Mississauga, Ont. His
leadership and business acumen, says UPS,
allowed him to scale the corporate ladder.
Tierney played a critical role in the development of UPS Canada’s infrastructure.
■ Speaking
of UPS, the company recently
announced that
original artwork
by Canadian
painter and
muralist, Yannick Picard, was chosen to
commemorate 100 years of service for the
company.The 15-ft centennial mural
(pictured) was unveiled last month at UPS’
global headquarters in Atlanta, Ga.
as chassis, drivetrain, and
vehicle safety in light-duty
and commercial markets.
“The proceeds from this
sale will support our continued efforts to strengthen our
balance sheet, and increase
our ability to invest in
technology, research and
development that more
closely aligns with our
strategic focus on selected
vehicle systems,” he said.
Those systems the company has identified as having
“strong market positions,
and higher margins,” include:
“Yannick was chosen because of his
artistic ability to skillfully weave images,
into a story, that visually captures
UPS’s legacy of corporate giving,
volunteerism, and sustainable business
practices,” says Sylvie Hamel, UPS manager
of Identity and Design.
■ Meanwhile, competitors FedEX were
also busy north of the border, as the
company officially launched its direct
long-haul LTL service through newly
formed FedEx Freight Canada and FedEx
National LTL in the U.S. The divisions were
created via last year’s acquisitions of
Watkins Motor Lines and Watkins
Canada Express.
FedEx Freight Canada will handle LTL
shipments moving into and out of Canada
and as well as intra-Canada loads.This
door-to-door service through FedEx companies will provide greater visibility for
Canadian LTL shipments and trans-border
pickup and delivery points in the U.S., the
company says.
■ From the order desk to marketing
director of WAKEFIELD CANADA,
Anthony Stadelman has come a
long way in a short time. Starting with
Castrol Canada (predecessor to Wakefield)
in 1993 as a marketing clerk, Stadelman
rose to marketing manager in 2002.
During his tenure, the Castrol brand has
risen from seven percent in 1995 to
almost 18 percent in 2006, the
company says.
vehicle stability; steer axles,
drivelines, suspensions; trailer axles and all-wheel drive
systems; and hybrids.
McClure said he thinks
the emissions business portfolio will be better served by
a company in a position to
invest capital and resources
in its development.
Says OEP Senior Partner,
Lee Gardner: “OEP is looking forward to [executing] a
focused and aggressive
growth plan. We believe that
the worldwide push to
reduce pollutants and green-
house gas emissions will
create long-term opportunities for companies focused
on advanced exhaust and
emissions technology.”
McClure said ArvinMeritor’s overarching strategy
is to become a global systems
leader in its target markets,
starting with the implementation of an aggressive strategy
in Asia, where the company
currently has nine-percent
and 16-percent market share
in consolidated and joint
ventures respectively.
The company said in a
MARCH 2007
17
Dispatches
LABOR PAINS
THE BLOC HAS BEEN TRYING FOR YEARS TO EXPORT A PRO-UNION LAW TO THE
REST OF CANADA. UNFORTUNATELY FOR TRUCKING, IT SEEMS TO HAVE WORKED.
H
ere’s an interesting stat I stumbled on
while researching this column: 97 percent
of all labor contracts in Canada are
resolved before any union workers walk out to
picket their employers with biting signs and
songs of solidarity.
That’s too bad, I say. Nothing makes a Monday
morning like listening to grown men chant “Hey
hey, ho ho, fake raises gotta’ go” while you’re
stopped at a red light.
Regardless, the majority of our parliamentarians in Ottawa feel there’s a need to give a huge—
and I mean huge—leg up to unions when negotiations collapse in those remaining three percent
of contracts.
In January, a union-spurred private-member’s
bill that bans federally regulated companies from
bringing in replacement workers, contractors, or
picket crossers wanting to work during strikes,
moved another step closer to becoming law.
The anti-scab Bill C-257—which naturally is
being denounced by most Canadian businesses,
including trucking companies—passed a second
reading vote in the House of Commons by 167
to 101 last December. At press time the bill was
before the Commons Standing Committee on
Human Resources, Social Development and the
Status of Persons with Disabilities, and barring a
springtime federal election, it’s likely to pass the
formality of third reading and become law just
in time for strikers to enjoy the improved outdoor weather.
Inspired by provincial anti-scab legislation in
force in Quebec and B.C., the bill was introduced
by Bloc Quebecois MP Richard Nadeau, whose
party has been trying to export the law nationwide
for over a decade. Call it competitive imbalance.
This time around, the proposal was backed
unanimously by the NDP, and with a small handful of pinkish Tories jumping on the bandwagon,
the survival of the bill rested with the Liberal
Party. It swayed heavily left, of course. But it
kinda’ makes you wonder, if the Grits were so hot
for this idea, why they didn’t greenlight likeminded proposals in their own 14-year rule. Oh well, I
guess the issues just look different from the
opposition benches.
Nadeau insists a similar 30-year-old law in
Quebec has cut the average length of strikes in
half compared to those under the Canada Labour
18
TODAY’S TRUCKING
Code. Business groups like the Canadian
Chamber of Commerce and the Canadian
Trucking Alliance (CTA) say the opposite is true.
Either way, it’s not hard to imagine how it would
bite into that aforementioned 97-percent
pre-strike settlement rate.With almost all the
leverage, why wouldn’t unions be a little braver
about doing battle—at least until they squeeze a
better deal through arbitration?
While the level of unionization in the trucking
industry is relatively low—only about 20 percent
of drivers in the for-hire sector (many of those in
LTL) versus 32 percent of the general workforce—
the portion of the industry that is unionized is
characterized by a stable labor-relations climate,
points out CTA chief David Bradley. He adds that
from 2000 to 2006, there were only seven work
stoppages in trucking companies regulated
under the Canada Labour Code, and there were
no strikes or lockouts at all in 2004 or 2005.
“From our perspective Bill C-257 is unnecessary—some have called it a solution in search of
a problem,” he says.
While only one in five drivers is unionized,
trucking companies, as any link in the supply
chain, are at the mercy of other businesses—
many unionized—in order to operate efficiently.
And how many more truckers’ livelihoods are
dependent on the federally regulated railways,
seaports, and airports—all prime targets for
unions to test their new, legislated muscle?
Also, as Bradley warns, MPs shouldn’t expect
the trucking industry as a whole to step in and
keep freight moving in the event of a prolonged
strike affecting one of these modes—especially
rail.“Capacity constraints in trucking and the
physical nature of much rail freight would prevent the trucking industry from taking up all the
slack,” he says.
Successful economies crave stability. After
years of legislating away the stability of what
Bradley calls the “labor relations balance”, Canada
increasingly looks like a country that does its best
to scare away investment. And wouldn’t a little
more investment in say, the auto sector, look
good to unions right about now? ▲
Marco Beghetto is the senior editor of Today’s
Trucking. He can be reached at 416/614-5821,
or marco@todaystrucking.com.
conference call it hopes to
triple sales in Asia within
five years, leading to a
healthy mix of local and
global OEM business.
“We also are planning to
increase our global aftermarket and specialty businesses,
and we are funding advanced
engineering, research and
development initiatives that
will better position us for the
challenges ahead,” he said.
The Emissions
Technologies business, which
has 7,500 employees in operations in 19 countries, will have
dual headquarters in
Columbus, Ind., and Detroit.
Borders
Truckers See
FAST ROI
FAST-approved drivers
submitting e-manifests can
now take advantage of a new
incentive program that allows
them to use dedicated FAST
infrastructure at two OntarioWestern New York ports even
if the shipper is not cleared
under C-TPAT, the Ontario
Trucking Association
(OTA) confirms.
As TodaysTrucking.com
first reported last fall, due to
the lack of C-TPAT participation among shippers, the
bridge authority has been
allowing drivers to take
advantage of the dedicated
FAST lane at the QueenstonLewiston Bridge, provided the
carrier was approved under
the C-TPAT security program.
Under the original U.S.
Homeland Security rule, only
under shipments of “pure
FAST” (FAST driver and
C-TPAT approved carriers as
well as shippers) could
drivers enjoy the benefits of
the binational borderclearance program.
highwaySTAR presents the
2007 highwaySTAR of the Year Award
15,000
$
in cash and prizes
trucker-friendly laptop
• $10,000 in cash
• Road-ready,
from OBAC
Travel and accommodations for two to
•Montreal
during EXPOCAM 2007
leather highwaySTAR jacket
•Special-edition
with winner’s name and highwaySTAR
• An Espar Heater System
of the Year logo
Join us at ExpoCam in Montreal on April 14 where we’ll be
introducing our highway STAR of the year for 2007.
The ceremony will take place on Saturday afternoon.
Watch the ExpoCam show guide for exact time and location.
Hope to see you there.
“We, along with our valued sponsors – Freightliner Trucks, ArvinMeritor, Espar Heater Systems, Caterpillar, Chevron, Michelin,
SelecTrucks, and OBAC – believe that owner-operators are a ‘driving’ force behind Canada’s trucking industry.
An under-appreciated force at that. So once again we honor one of these dedicated, professional truckers with our
2007 highwaySTAR of the Year Award.”
Jim Park, Editor highwaySTAR
PROUDLY SPONSORED BY:
GOLD SPONSORS:
PLATINUM SPONSOR:
ASSOCIATION SPONSOR:
SILVER SPONSORS:
SELECTRUCKS
Dispatches
truck sales index
This Month
CLASS 6
International
12
Hino Canada
16
General Motors
10
Freightliner
21
Ford
6
Sterling
2
TOTAL
67
YTD ’06
YTD ’05
Share
445
287
221
146
95
61
1255
552
211
267
198
116
122
1466
35.5%
22.9%
17.6%
11.6%
7.6%
4.9%
100.0%
This Month
CLASS 5
Ford
203
General Motors
223
Hino Canada
40
International
35
Freightliner
40
Sterling
1
TOTAL
542
YTD ’06
YTD ’05
Share
2473
1802
732
531
213
1
5752
2231
1482
680
637
69
0
5099
43.0%
31.3%
12.7%
9.2%
3.7%
0.0%
100.0%
12-month Class-8 Sales
750
600
450
300
150
0
12-month Class-7 Sales
300
200
100
Oct. 2006
Nov. 2006
Dec. 2006
25.2%
23.0%
13.1%
12.9%
9.3%
7.4%
7.2%
1.9%
100.0%
0
Sept. 2006
Share
1319
702
508
545
656
282
436
226
4674
500
0
12-month Class-6 Sales
1200
900
600
300
June 2006
YTD ’05
1468
1338
765
751
540
430
420
113
5825
1,000
July 2006
Aug. 2006
Sept. 2006
Oct. 2006
Nov. 2006
Dec. 2006
YTD ’06
2,500
2,000
1,500
March 2006
April 2006
May 2006
June 2006
July 2006
Aug. 2006
CLASS 7
This Month
International
92
General Motors
140
Peterbilt
37
Kenworth
84
Freightliner
52
Hino Canada
29
Sterling
49
Ford
16
TOTAL
499
4,000
3,500
3,000
April 2006
May 2006
20.1%
19.8%
17.1%
11.7%
10.1%
7.4%
7.1%
6.8%
100.0%
January 2006
February 2006
March 2006
April 2006
May 2006
June 2006
July 2006
August 2006
September 2006
October 2006
November 2006
December 2006
Share
7943
7644
5177
3479
3319
2628
2566
2253
35,009
Jan. ’06
Feb. 2006
March 2006
April 2006
May 2006
June 2006
July 2006
August 2006
Sept. 2006
October 2006
Nov. 2006
Dec. 2006
YTD ’05
7857
7735
6709
4562
3935
2915
2769
2649
39,131
Jan. 2006
Feb. 2006
YTD ’06
Jan. 2006
Feb. 2006
March 2006
CLASS 8
This Month
Freightliner
716
International
600
Kenworth
687
Peterbilt
349
Volvo
513
Sterling
275
Western Star
321
Mack
264
TOTAL
3725
December 2006
0
12-month Class-5 Sales
U.S. RETAIL TRUCK SALES
CLASS 8
This Month
Freightliner
6688
International
4014
Peterbilt
3407
Kenworth
3225
Volvo
3499
Mack
3641
Sterling
1540
Western Star
366
Other
82
TOTAL
26,462
YTD ’06
YTD ’05
Share
78,428
53,373
37,322
33,091
30,716
29,482
16,712
3463
1379
283,966
74,453
46,093
30,211
27,153
26,446
27,303
15,733
2924
623
250,939
27.6%
18.8%
13.1%
11.7%
10.8%
10.4%
5.9%
1.2%
0.5%
100.0%
27,000
24,000
21,000
18,000
15,000
12,000
9,000
0
January 2006
February 2006
March 2006
April 2006
May 2006
June 2006
July 2006
August 2006
September 2006
October 2006
Nov. 2006
December 2006
U.S. Customs and
Border Protection (CBP) in
Buffalo and Lewiston
working in cooperation
with the Niagara Falls
Bridge Commission, the
Peace Bridge Authority and
the OTA have expanded
the incentive program also
for FAST-registered drivers
submitting e-manifests.
“In the absence of more
participation by the companies whose goods we
haul, this is a welcome
measure,” says OTA
President David Bradley.
Companies who have
invested in C-TPAT and
FAST have been frustrated
at the minimal benefit of
the program due to the
lack of interest from nonauto related shippers.
One trucking insider
recently told Today’s
Trucking: “you might as
well wave the white flag
when it comes to the shipper [participation in CTPAT]. It’s not happening.”
Carriers should be aware
that each bridge will have
different criteria for carriers.
The Queenston-Lewiston
Bridge will allow carriers to
use the dedicated FAST-lane
under “pure FAST; C-TPAT
carriers using FAST drivers;
and FAST drivers submitting e-Manifest.
At the Peace Bridge,
reports OTA, preferential
access to the staging yard
will continue to be provided to pure FAST movements, as well as FAST
drivers submitting e-manifests. OTA is reportedly is
also in discussions with
the other Ontario border
crossing authorities at the
Blue water Bridge in
Sarnia, and Windsor’s
Ambassador Bridge. ▲
12-month Class-8 Sales, United States
Online Resources: For more truck sales stats, go to todaystrucking.com
Sources: Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers Association and Ward’s Communication.
MARCH 2007
21
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Commentary
Inventing (and Avoiding) the Next Crisis
driver’s side The 2007s aren’t even rolling off the line yet, and we’re already
worrying about 2010. By Jim Park
A
s of mid-February, as
I pen this column,
very few trucks have
rolled off the assembly lines
equipped with EPA ’07
engines (designated 2008
model year). Mostly, the
OEMs are building the last of
their 2007 models (with the
pre-’07 engines), thus fulfilling
the last of the pre-buy orders.
We’ve not yet even begun
to experience the effects of
the ’07 EPA emissions reductions, and we’re already beginning to sweat the details of
the 2010 round of reductions.
There’s a large crowd of
people here at the ATA’s
Technology and Maintenance
Conference (TMC) in Tampa,
Fla. already losing sleep over
EPA’s 2010 standards—with
good cause. They’re concerned
over which strategy might be
anointed to meet those
standards, and how they’ll be
affected by those changes.
EPA 2010 requires a further
85-percent reduction in NOx
output, and that will mean
some additional exhaust
aftertreatment devices in all
likelihood. Several bits of
technology offer some hope
of making 2010, including
Homogenous Charge
Compression Ignition (HCCI),
clean NOx adsorbers, plasma
reformers with NOx traps,
and Selective Catalytic
Reduction (SCR).
Don’t worry about what all
these terms mean for the
moment. You’ll be reading
more about them in the
months to come. Presently,
the solution that seems most
promising is SCR. It’s widely
used in Europe, and some
engine makers have lots of
experience with the technology. The upside to SCR is that
it could permit improvements
in fuel economy by scaling
back the level of EGR
required to meet current NOx
emissions levels.
The downside to SCR is
that it requires an additional
catalytic converter—which
could be integrated with present aftertreatment devices—
an additional storage tank on
the truck, and a national
distribution infrastructure.
Detroit Diesel (Freightliner),
Mack, and Volvo have already
committed to using Ureabased SCR to meet 2010.
They’ve all got the European
experience behind them.
Caterpillar and Cummins have
yet to commit, though
Cummins has been doing a lot
of work with NOx adsorbers.
There’s a lot at stake this
time, and the decision on
which technology gets the
nod will affect many more
people than just the truck
makers and their customers.
Canadian trucks may not
have the frame space
required to fit the additional
catalytic device and the urea
storage tanks. Or, if there’s
room for that stuff, we’ll be at
wit’s end trying to fit APUs,
EPA 2010 requires
a further 85-percent
reduction in NOx
exhaust output.
storage boxes, and other
accessories—like largecapacity fuel tanks. All that
could (should) prompt a
close look at Canada’s 244-in.
wheelbase limits.
Fleets will certainly want
time to test the new technology in real-world situations.
There was almost no evaluation time going into Oct 2002.
We had a little more road
time going into 2007, but any
fleet will tell you it wasn’t
enough. And even with that
additional time, we’re still
hurting from a suspicioninduced pre-buy that will lay
many assembly plants idle for
some months this year.
So, if we hope to avoid a
repeat performance going
into 2010, the truck makers
are going to have to make test
units available much sooner
than last time.
At a TMC technical session
on 2010 technology, a chap
from Ryder Truck Rentals
said he wants 16 to 18 months
evaluation time to check out
the new equipment. Other
maintenance and purchasing
personnel expressed the
same desire.
Another significant
concern is the distribution
network we’ll need for the
liquid urea catalyst.
Estimates suggest trucks
will consume urea at a rate of
one gallon of urea to 100 gallons of fuel. Most trucks will
need at least a gallon a day.
Truckstop owners, we’re told,
are really unhappy about having to make substantial
changes to their fuel islands
to accommodate the urea dispensing hardware. The upside
for those guys is they’ll have
another revenue stream.
With several thousand fuel
outlets in Canada and about
33,000 outlets in the U.S. we’ll
need a lot of urea pumps.
How long will it take to
install all those pumps? We
won’t need full coverage by
day one—probably only 15
percent coverage would be
adequate—but we’re still not
sure if all the truck makers
will be using urea, or how
long it might be until a better
solution than urea emerges.
If we hope to avoid another
pre-buy in 2010, we’ll need to
consider incentives for buyers
too. This industry has swallowed a lot in the course of
reducing our environmental
footprint; we simply can’t
afford to take too much more
uncertainty on the chin. ▲
A former owner-operator, Jim
Park is the editor of highwaySTAR
magazine. Reach him at 416/6145811 or jim@todaystrucking.com.
MARCH 2007
23
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Street Smarts
The Last Word In Safety
safety Clip and post this column in the lunchroom. It could keep you out of jail.
By Brian Botham
I
f you haven’t already heard
about Bill C-45, you should.
So should your staff.
Also known as the Westray
Bill, C-45 was introduced on
March 31, 2004, and came
about after 26 miners were
killed in an explosion at the
Westray Coal Mine in Nova
Scotia because the company
skirted safety rules.
The bill changed the
Criminal Code so now
companies and their
representatives must take
every precaution possible to
protect their workers and
the general public or risk
criminal prosecution.
The bill also states that
individuals and organizations
must ensure their workers
and the public are protected
from injury and death.
Section 217.1 of the Criminal
Code of Canada reads:
Everyone who undertakes, or
has the authority, to direct how
another person does work or
performs a task is under a legal
duty to take reasonable steps to
prevent bodily harm to that
person or any other person
arising from that work or task.
Let’s examine that section
of the code and apply it to a
general trucking company.
“Everyone who undertakes or
has authority to direct how
another person does work or
performs a task.”
In a trucking company how
many people do you have who
direct another person in their
work? There are of course
managers of different departments, operations, safety,
maintenance, administration,
warehouse, etc. Each of these
individuals directs other people how to perform their tasks.
Break it down even further
to dispatchers, supervisors,
lead hands, trainers, and the
list continues.
Under C-45, each of these
individuals is “under a legal
duty to prevent bodily harm
or injury to that person or
any other person arising
from that work or task they
are performing.”
Let’s run this scenario
because, unfortunately, it is
one that happens all too often.
Your dispatcher directs a
driver to get that load to the
customer and never mind
that they are out of hours or
maybe they have hours available but are tired. In doing so,
the driver falls asleep at the
wheel and in the subsequent
collision is killed, along with
another motorist.
That dispatcher has not
met the legal duty to ensure
that they prevent bodily harm
to that driver or John Q.
Public, who was also killed in
the collision. As well, did the
operations manager know
that the dispatcher was doing
this? They have a legal duty
as well to ensure that the dispatcher is not pushing drivers
to run when tired or beyond
the HOS regulations. Did the
owner know what kind of
constraints he or she was
putting on the ops manager?
As you can see it can very
quickly go from a hot load
that just has to get there to a
fatality followed by criminal
charges and finally convictions resulting in prison sentences and fines.
Things can very quickly go from a hot load
that just has to get there to a fatality followed
by criminal charges and finally convictions
resulting in prison sentences and fines.
I’ve heard of two cases so
far where charges have been
laid under this new legislation. The first was a worker
killed in Ontario while in an
improperly shored-up trench
that collapsed.
The second was in Quebec
where a worker was killed
when the machine he was
working on jammed and the
safety lock outs had been
disabled. While trying to clear
the jam, the machine started
and the worker was killed. In
both of these cases, the
charges laid under the
Criminal Code came on top of
Health and Safety charges laid
under the Occupational
Health and Safety Act (OHSA).
While I haven’t heard of
any charges against trucking
companies under this legisla-
tion, it is important to note
that the legislation is still
fresh and the police, courts,
and prosecutors are still
learning about the rules.
Can we expect to see more
charges under this new
provision of the Criminal
Code of Canada? The answer
is a definitive yes.
Will they be laying these
charges against transport
companies? Again, yes.
Don’t let it happen to you. ▲
Brian Botham, CDS, is a Certified
Director of Safety through NATMI.
Brian is the President of CMV
Safety Consulting Inc., specializing in safety and compliance
consulting with transport
companies across Canada. He
can be reached at 519-533-3656
or bbotham@cmvsafety.ca.
MARCH 2007
25
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Street Smarts
MANAGING PEOPLE, TECHNOLOGY, BUSINESS, AND SAFETY
ON YOUR MARK: Ever had one of those days
when you didn’t know where to start?
When You Want To Tell
Them Where To Go
human resources A few tips for getting rid of dispatch stress.
By Jennifer May
L
ast Thursday was busier than
usual in my dispatch office. It was
around four o’clock in the afternoon, and a few of the day-runners were
hanging around the dispatch window at
the end of their shift.
I had dispatch pretty much squared
away, when the phone rang. An important
customer needed to move a load of
stretch wrap to Toronto by eight o’clock
the next morning. I was out of resources.
It had been a busy week.
A lot of my drivers had been worked to
their limit and all of my equipment was
spoken for. My job just went from difficult
to impossible. I told the customer “of
course” but as I hung up the phone, I could
feel my heart racing. I scrambled for a way
to turn no drivers, no trucks, and no trailers into at least one of each for this load.
A mentor of mine used to say that
unless you are two trucks, two trailers, or
two drivers short, you aren’t busy
enough. That may be true, but working
under those conditions on a consistent
basis is stressful. With the fluctuating
nature of the transportation industry, it
is to be expected that there are going to
be busier, more stressful times. The trick
is, how do you handle the stress and
nutsy workload?
1. BE ORGANIZED
I’ve trained dispatchers from Toronto to
Montreal and the one constant in every
dispatch office, whether it be a one-person
MARCH 2007
27
Street Smarts
show or filled with a dozen dispatchers,
is the chaos.
It’s a constant flurry of paperwork,
drivers, phone calls, and beeping two-way
radios. The key to handling stress? Stay
organized. In my experience, the dispatchers who are organized are less stressed
than their manic colleagues. Even if it
doesn’t look organized to an outsider,
knowing where the bills of lading you need
are and what you want the next driver who
comes to the window to do next make
your day much less stressful.
One office supply I can’t live without is
the sticky note. Instead of having a traditional “to-do” list on one piece of paper, I
put all of my “to-do” items on different
colored sticky notes and put them right on
my monitor where I can see them at all
times. (The IT department isn’t too
thrilled with this, but they don’t have to
dispatch.) As a task gets completed, I can
rip the sticky note off. When there are too
many to fit on the monitor I know I need
to step up my productivity. It’s a very visual clue that shows me where I stand
throughout the day.
2. BE PREPARED
One of the most stressful situations is
dealing with a problem when you don’t
have enough time to solve it. Just like
drivers have to drive ahead of the road,
you need to work ahead too.
For example, when a driver shows up at
the window on Monday morning coughing and looking miserable, plan your dispatch with some flexibility in case that
driver is not available for Tuesday. A speed
bump isn’t a big problem when you’ve seen
it and had time to slow down for it. A
speed bump taken unexpectedly at full
speed has a totally different outcome. To
make sure that I stay prepared, I stop
every hour and scan my desk, calendar,
and go through my list of drivers to make
sure that I’m not only on top of what is
happening now, but what will be happening over the next hour or two.
3. BE ENERGETIC
If you can get it done today, do it.
Leaving yourself a long list of things to
do is definitely going to be stressful if they
all come due at the same time as disaster
hits in dispatch. Getting everything done
promptly leaves room for surprises the
next day – like when a customer comes up
with an unexpected load or ten to get out
of their warehouse by month’s end.
You have to be self-motivating in dispatch. There are not a lot of external
rewards, so I motivate myself by how
much work I can put through our terminal
in a day. It leaves me room in my schedule
the next day to say “yes” to a customer’s
last-minute request. It’s always better than
saying “no.” I use a spreadsheet to keep
track of how many loads we move daily
and that helps motivate me to stay on or
above target. I also celebrate every 100
orders with my co-dispatcher. It keeps the
energy high in the office.
4. BE AWARE
Take note of your customer’s trends. Each
dispatch office has its own rhythm. Some
start off the week slowly and build to
unbelievably busy on Friday. Others peak
mid-week. There are even daily ups and
downs. LTL operations usually have a
flurry of phone calls all morning with
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TODAY’S TRUCKING
Since 1953
3003 W. Breezewood Lane, P.O. Box 368
Neenah, WI USA 54957-0368
Action Code 15250
CT H R C, S u p p o r t in g Ca na da ’s Truc k i ng Indus try
The Canadian Trucking Human Resources
Council is the national leader in human
resource practices for Canada’s trucking
industry. The Council was created to identify
and assist with many human resource
challenges that face our industry
and provide lasting solutions.
With the combined support of representatives
from business, labour and government,
CTHRC is poised to assist with our trucking
industry’s human resource challenges.
Visit our website to discover how we can
help with your company or career needs
and discover...
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• and much more
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together we can keep
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Visit us online at www.cthrc.com
This project is funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.
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Street Smarts
some down-time in the afternoon, while
those working truckload can start the day
off with a relaxing coffee, and never have
the phone off their ear for the two hours
before business close.
Knowing these trends helps you anticipate the busy times and helps you use the
slower times more wisely. At the end of the
day I tally up all my trailers to see how
many trailers each customer had that day.
When I look at this data over a week or a
month I can see the patterns in their trailer usage, which gives me a rough idea of
volumes for each customer and helps my
resource planning. I’ve been doing this for
two years now, and I am starting to see
seasonal trends as well. Rarely does a customer have to ask me to send over trailers
now, I know their needs so well that I can
usually anticipate them.
Also, technology can be a help in dealing with people as well. It can be easier to
keep to the facts when communicating
with e-mail or instant messages.
7. BE GOOD TO YOURSELF
When you are off duty, try to do all those
things that we are supposed to, like eating
right, exercising, and getting enough sleep.
It’s always easier to face a dispatch nightmare on a full stomach and a good night’s
sleep. It can be all too easy to take work
home with you.
I have a little trick that helps me keep
work at work. On my drive home from
work I have to drive under a railroad
bridge. I allow myself to worry and fret
about work until I get to the railroad
bridge, but once I reach there, I don’t let
myself think about work. Instead I focus
on my home life and what I’m going to
do with my evening at home. That helps
me to be good to myself when I’m not
at work. ▲
Former radio broadcaster Jennifer May
is a dispatcher with B-Line Distribution
in Belleville, Ontario.
5. BE ACTIVE
While dispatch may get your heart pumping, it’s usually stress and not physical
exertion that’s causing you to sweat.
Doing a few stretches at your desk or a
walk around the yard to do a quick trailer
check can go a long way to relieving the
stress that builds as you hunch over your
keyboard tearing your hair out over complicated logistics problems.
6. BE UNDERSTANDING
Sometimes it is the people you have to
deal with that are the stressors. That angry
receiver who always makes you beg for
appointments, or a frantic billing clerk
demanding yesterday’s bills when you
haven’t had a chance to sort them out yet.
In some ways it would be really satisfying
to tell them off, but that will likely only
lead to more stress later on when you need
something from them. So take a deep
breath and remember that they have
stressful jobs to do too. This can be a
tough one to deal with. I try to keep
focused on the job at hand and just get
and give the necessary information.
MARCH 2007
31
BY PETER CARTER
W
hat the heck kind of
year was that? Between
the last time we published this list Canadian truckers faced,
among other things:
■ a soaring Canadian dollar;
■ skyrocketing fuel prices;
■ an unprecedented pre-buy in anticipation of more stringent emission-controls
on diesel engines;
■ and finally, the Federal Government’s
decision to change the rules by which
income trusts operate; a.k.a, the Hallowe’en
surprise. (Trimac CEO, Terry Owen, said at
the time he was “flabbergasted” with the
announcement.)
After several good quarters of rising
prices and smooth operating, truckers
from Cape Fear to Tofino felt the air seep
out of the tires. Truckers undercut each
other, lumber trucks were switched off,
and so were some OE assembly lines.
Still.
If you compare this Today’s Trucking’s
2007 Top 100 For-Hire carriers list to last
year’s, you’ll see that in many ways, it has
been a year of growth. For the big guys,
that is.
TransForce last year boasted 12,183 total
units. This year, it’s up to 15,500.
Two years ago, The Mullen Group was
the eighth largest for-hire trucking company in Canada.
In ’06, after a particularly busy time in
the oil fields, Mullen leapt up the charts to
the number six spot. Now this Western
Canadian powerhouse is the third biggest
for-hire carrier in the country.
Vitran, the only publicly traded equity
corporation on the charts, increased its
total equipment count by more than 2,500
units to 9,778 from 7,230. In October,
Vitran bolstered its stable with the purchase of Pittsburgh, Pa.-based LTL carrier
PJAX for a reported $132 million.
The innovator L.E. Walker Transport
Ltd., out of St. Thomas, Ont., makes its
debut on our list at number 65.
And there’s a new name near the top,
too. Calyx Transportation Group Inc. is
the 18th biggest for-hire carrier in the
32
TODAY’S TRUCKING
Top100
CANADA’S
Our annual tally of the 100 biggest for-hire
carriers in the land.What can a trucker learn
by seeing who’s growing and who’s not?
country and odds are you’ve never even
heard of them. For more on Calyx, see
“Anybody can be a Freight Forwarder,” by
Duff McCutcheon, beginning on page 47.
Calyx is the combined force of Muir’s,
Nesel, National Fast Freight, and a handful
of other freight-specialists. As McCutcheon
writes, you might not know about Calyx
yet, but with more than 2,000 pieces of road
equipment at the ready, the company’s on
the verge of blossoming.
Calyx is one of those few companies
who can be optimistic because their eggs
are spread through so many baskets.
For others, those with too much ener-
gy in, say the North American automotive market or the Quebec lumber business—the coming dozen months is going
to be grueling.
Competition will be fierce. Which makes
another addition to this year’s Top 100 on
page 54, “Best in Class,” by Marco Beghetto,
even more compelling. Beghetto’s story
gives an exclusive look at which LTL carriers shippers prefer and why.
If you’re interested in growing your
company over the next 12 months—and
who isn’t?—you could do much worse
than examining what the best in class
does and follow suit. ▲
Our annual survey of Canada’s largest for-hire fleets
2004
7
CANADA’S TOP 100
Rank (2006)
Company Name, City, Province
Total
Trucks
Tractors
Trailers
O/O’s
Employees
1 (1)
TransForce Income Fund, Saint-Laurent, PQ
15500
0
4700
10800
1560
10000
2 (2)
Vitran Corporation Inc.,Toronto, ON
9778
0
2265
7513
439
4496
3 (6)
Mullen Group Inc., Aldersyde, AB
8443
200
1666
6577
1139
3937
4 (3)
TransX,Winnipeg, MB
5582
65
1485
4032
890
2276
5 (4)
Challenger Motor Freight Inc., Cambridge, ON
4835
10
1490
3335
298
1593
6 (5)
SLH Transport, Kingston, ON
4405
0
305
4100
450
900
7 (10)
Groupe Robert, Boucherville, PQ
4385
10
875
3500
354
2311
8 (7)
Day & Ross Transportation Group, Hartland, NB
4303
462
1556
2285
2993
1972
9 (8)
Paul’s Hauling Group,Winnipeg, MB
4079
82
1075
2922
151
1705
10 (9)
Contrans Income Fund,Woodstock, ON
3946
0
1570
2376
813
2072
11 (44)
Canada Cartage Diversified Income Fund,Mississauga,ON
3860
610
1250
2000
400
2400
12 (11)
Armour Transportation Systems, Moncton, NB
3505
140
790
2575
75
1650
13 (13)
Bison Transport Inc.,Winnipeg, MB
3200
0
900
2300
250
1507
14 (14)
Trimac Transportation Services LP, Calgary, AB
2822
0
453
2369
571
1216
15 (15)
Schneider National Carriers Canadian Division,Aberfoyle,ON
2454
0
454
2000
83
707
16 (17)
Transfreight, Cambridge, ON
2419
1
314
2104
60
1204
17 (23)
Manitoulin Transport Group, Gore Bay, ON
2055
77
585
1393
139
0
18 (nr)
Calyx Transportation Group Inc., Concord, ON
2032
71
322
1639
242
977
19 (18)
Reimer Express Lines,Winnipeg, MB
2019
27
537
1455
207
1382
20 (20)
Bruce R. Smith Limited, Simcoe, ON
1932
0
430
1502
130
600
21 (19)
Yanke Group of Companies, Saskatoon, SK
1930
0
512
1418
185
807
22 (30)
Quik X Group of Companies, Mississauga, ON
1855
65
540
1250
180
1100
23 (22)
Gibson Transport, Alliston, ON
1763
0
371
1392
57
591
24 (25)
H&R Transport Limited, Lethbridge, AB
1734
0
439
1295
100
952
25 (32)
Erb Group of Companies, New Hamburg, ON
1710
151
578
981
156
1079
26 (24)
Wilson’s Truck Lines, Etobicoke, ON
1684
0
450
1234
265
400
27 (31)
Gibson Energy Ltd., Calgary, AB
1670
70
570
1030
410
166
28 (26)
XTL Group of Companies, Etobicoke, ON
1650
0
450
1200
200
150
29 (28)
C.A.T./Canadian American Trans., Coteau du Lac, PQ
1635
0
450
1185
50
550
30 (27)
SGT 2000, St-Germain-de-Grantham, PQ
1624
0
379
1245
82
491
31 (33)
Verspeeten Cartage, Ingersoll, ON
1623
0
546
1077
353
316
32 (36)
M-O Freightworks, Brampton, ON
1622
138
364
1120
384
327
33 (21)
Allied Systems Canada, Burlington, ON
1604
0
792
812
100
1220
34 (37)
Groupe Thibodeau, Portneuf, PQ
1580
5
425
1150
15
850
35 (29)
Groupe Guilbault, Ste-Foy, PQ
1526
3
309
1214
85
762
1
MARCH 2007
33
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2004
7
CANADA’S TOP 100
Rank (2006)
Company Name, City, Province
Total
Trucks
Tractors
Trailers
O/O’s
Employees
36 (39)
Purolator, Mississauga, ON
1510
150
410
950
14
12500
37 (40)
Kriska Transportation, Prescott, ON
1483
0
381
1102
109
515
38 (35)
Meyers Transport,Peterborough, ON
1440
16
342
1082
65
592
39 (nr)
Rosedale Group, Mississauga , ON
1435
60
500
875
110
650
40 (41)
Northern Industrial Carriers, Edmonton, AB
1365
0
265
1100
5
200
41 (42)
HBC Logistics, Mississauga, ON
1362
0
210
1152
0
275
42 (40)
Celadon Canada, Kitchener, ON
1345
0
385
960
230
200
43 (55)
Shadow Lines Transportation Group, Langley, BC
1259
0
275
984
275
85
Penner International, Steinbach, MB
1250
0
368
882
332
136
Clarke Inc., Etobicoke, ON
1160
55
100
1005
170
550
46 (52)
Vedder Transportation Group, Abbotsford, BC
1112
0
397
715
85
381
47 (46)
Consolidated FastFrate,Woodbridge, ON
1076
38
270
768
125
1294
48 (51)
Arnold Bros. Transport Ltd.,Winnipeg, MB
1071
1
320
750
157
370
49 (53)
BLM Group, Kitchener, ON
1023
1
296
726
80
479
50 (47)
Cooney Group, Belleville, ON
1022
0
222
800
7
300
51 (49)
Travelers Transportation Services, Brampton, ON
977
2
287
688
14
346
52 (66)
Team-Transport Services Ltd, Richmond, BC
971
118
118
735
118
22
53 (63)
Rosenau Transport, Edmonton, AB
956
51
195
710
68
340
54 (74)
DCT Chambers Trucking,Vernon, BC
934
40
286
608
110
201
55 (54)
Arrow Transportation Systems Inc., Richmond, BC
918
70
298
550
240
220
56 (59)
Glenncoe Transport Ltd., Kelowna, BC
917
48
246
623
48
358
Simard Transport, Lachine, PQ
905
60
195
650
136
535
Thomson Terminals, Etobicoke, ON
900
3
232
665
9
0
59 (57)
Transport Morneau, Saint-Arsene, PQ
897
22
211
664
136
550
60 (67)
B&R Eckel's Transport, Bonnyville, AB
896
25
181
690
25
302
61 (58)
Musket Melburne, Mississauga, ON
885
0
225
660
115
320
62 (60)
Groupe Boutin, Plessisville, PQ
875
8
231
636
23
446
63 (65)
Sokil Transportation Group, Edmonton, AB
842
132
145
565
0
270
64 (62)
RAM Contract Carriers, Cottam, ON
838
1
195
642
189
48
65 (61)
MacKinnon Transport Inc., Guelph, ON
830
0
280
550
190
190
66 (nr)
L.E.Walker Transport Ltd., St.Thomas, ON
820
0
145
675
85
330
67 (68)
Wolverine Freight System,Windsor, ON
798
3
250
545
85
332
68 (nr)
International Truckload Services, Belleville, ON
747
2
195
550
125
270
69 (70)
Normandin Transit Inc., Napierville, PQ
744
2
226
516
25
318
70 (75)
Speedy Transport, Brampton, ON
741
3
3
735
291
400
71 (69)
Williams Moving & Storage, Coquitlam, BC
699
195
138
366
79
400
72 (71)
Mackie Moving Systems, Oshawa, ON
680
20
260
400
190
150
73 (78)
Hyndman Transport,Wroxeter, ON
673
0
208
465
17
232
74 (72)
Big Horn Transport, Calgary, AB
654
17
112
525
0
160
44 (45)
45 (43)
3
57 (64)
58 (56)
2
MARCH 2007
35
2004
7
CANADA’S TOP 100
Rank (2006)
Company Name, City, Province
Total
Trucks
Tractors
Trailers
O/O’s
Employees
75 (76)
Big Freight Systems Inc., Steinbach, MB
635
0
230
405
65
255
76 (77)
System 55 Transport, Oakville, ON
614
4
134
476
53
98
77 (82)
ProNorth Transportation, North Bay, ON
590
0
160
430
15
215
78 (83)
ECL Group of Companies Ltd., Calgary, AB
578
34
152
392
57
409
79 (84)
Transport Herve Lemieux, Saint-Laurent, PQ
576
53
208
315
37
360
80 (85)
Totalline Transport Inc.,Vaughan, ON
575
47
206
322
65
267
81 (80)
Fluke Transport, Hamilton, ON
570
25
70
475
90
210
82 (87)
Groupe Goyette, Saint-Hyacinthe, PQ
568
2
78
488
67
271
83 (79)
Andlauer Transportation Services, Etobicoke, ON
551
187
118
246
242
692
84 (86)
Muskoka Transport, Bracebridge, ON
544
4
155
385
40
190
85 (94)
Groupe Jules Savard, Jonquiere, PQ
532
0
157
375
1
250
86 (92)
Transport LFL,Vallée-Jonction, PQ
531
34
147
350
7
300
87 (90)
Transport Bourret Inc., Drummondville, PQ
528
12
153
363
17
393
88 (nr)
Payne Transportation L.P.,Winnipeg, MB
505
0
200
305
187
105
89 (92)
Transport Bourassa Inc., St-Jean-sur-Richelieu, PQ
503
2
115
386
7
235
90 (91)
Gosselin Express,Thetford Mines, PQ
500
25
80
395
20
165
91 (93)
Transport V.A. Inc., Laurier-Station, PQ
498
7
104
387
1
387
92 (97)
J.D. Smith & Sons, Concord, ON
484
58
87
339
0
300
93 (99)
Transport Couture & Fils ltee, Saint-Ephrem, PQ
473
0
119
354
14
213
94 (nr)
Ayr Motor Express Inc.,Woodstock, NB
465
0
115
350
40
290
95 (96)
Elgin Motor Freight, London, ON
465
0
165
300
18
225
96 (81)
Samuel Son and Company Ltd., Mississauga, ON
456
6
170
280
135
0
Con-way Freight - Canada, Mississauga, ON
428
2
168
258
0
284
McKevitt Trucking,Thunder Bay, ON
427
2
140
285
6
175
99 (100)
Empire Transportation, Grimsby, ON
426
1
75
350
11
100
100 (95)
Les services logistiques Trans West Inc., Lachine, PQ
425
0
150
275
60
300
97 (89)
98 (98)
2
FOOTNOTES: 1) Day & Ross figures do not include McCain Transport, a wholly owned reefer fleet based in Maine. 2) Estimates.The company was on last year’s Top 100 list,
but their numbers were not updated in time for this year’s deadline. 3) Clarke Inc.’s listing of number of trucks includes tractors, flatbeds and vans.
nr = not previously ranked.na = information not available.
HOW WE DID IT
1. Companies are ranked based on total vehicle counts, including power units and trailers owned by owner-operators, as reported in January, 2007. Only
trucks of class 6 or above are enumerated unless otherwise noted. Vehicles and employees based in the United States are included provided they are
administered from a Canadian head office.
2. Most of the statistics were entered into the Today’s Trucking data base by representatives of the companies themselves. The remaining companies and
additions were gathered by Today’s Trucking editors via phone, email or fax. While we strive to present accurate figures, the statistics have not been
independently verified.
3. Several large fleets do not respond to our requests for information. These include Irving Transportation Services (comprising Midland Transport,
Sunbury Transport and RST Industries based in New Brunswick, and RTL Robinson of Yellowknife. As well, the Canadian operation of Federal Express is not
on the list. UPS provided numbers but not a breakdown on vehicle types.
4. If you have any enquiries or if you think your company should be on next year’s list,please contact Peter Carter at 416-614-5828 or peter@todaystrucking.com
36
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2004
7
CANADA’S TOP 100
Company Name
Total Units Rank (’06)
A
Allied Systems Canada
Andlauer Transportation Services
Armour Transportation Systems
Arnold Bros.Transport Ltd.
Arrow Transportation Systems Inc.
Ayr Motor Express Inc
1604
551
3505
1071
918
465
33 (21)
83 (79)
12 (11)
48 (31)
55 (54)
94 (nr)
B
B&R Eckel's Transport
Big Freight Systems Inc.
Big Horn Transport
Bison Transport Inc.
BLM Group
Bruce R.Smith Limited
896
635
654
3200
1023
1932
60 (67)
75 (76)
74 (72)
13 (13)
49 (53)
20 (20)
C
C.A.T./Canadian American Trans.
Calyx Transportation Group Inc.
Canada Cartage Diversified Income Fund
Celadon Canada
Challenger Motor Freight Inc.
Clarke Inc.
Consolidated FastFrate
Contrans Income Fund
Con-way Freight - Canada
Cooney Group
1635
2032
3860
1345
4835
1160
1076
3946
428
1022
29 (28)
18 (nr)
11 (44)
42 (40)
5 (4)
45 (43)
47 (46)
10 (9)
97 (89)
50 (47)
D
Day & Ross Transportation Group
DCT Chambers Trucking
4303
934
8 (7)
54 (74)
E
ECL Group of Companies Ltd.
Elgin Motor Freight
Empire Transportation
Erb Group of Companies
578
465
426
1710
78 (83)
95 (96)
99 (100)
25 (32)
570
81 (80)
G
Gibson Energy Ltd.
Gibson Transport
Glenncoe Transport Ltd.
Gosselin Express
Groupe Boutin
Groupe Goyette
Groupe Guilbault
Groupe Jules Savard
Groupe Robert
Groupe Thibodeau
1670
1763
917
500
875
568
1526
532
4385
1580
27 (31)
23 (22)
56 (89)
90 (91)
62 (60)
82 (87)
35 (29)
85 (94)
7 (10)
34 (37)
H
H&R Transport Limited
HBC Logistics
Hyndman Transport
1734
1362
673
24 (25)
41 (42)
73 (78)
I
International Truckload Services
747
68 (nr)
J
J.D.Smith & Sons
484
92 (97)
1483
37 (40)
F
Fluke Transport
K
Kriska Transportation
L
L.E.Walker Transport Ltd.
Les services logistiques Trans West Inc
38
Company Directory
TODAY’S TRUCKING
820
425
66 (nr)
100 (95)
Company Name
Total Units Rank (’06)
M
Mackie Moving Systems
MacKinnon Transport Inc.
Manitoulin Transport Group
McKevitt Trucking
Meyers Transport
M-O Freightworks
Mullen Group Inc.
Musket Melburne
Muskoka Transport
680
830
2055
427
1440
1622
8443
885
544
72 (71)
65 (61)
17 (23)
98 (98)
38 (35)
32 (36)
3 (6)
61 (58)
84 (86)
N
Normandin Transit Inc.
Northern Industrial Carriers
744
1365
69 (70)
40 (41)
P
Paul’s Hauling Group
Payne Transportation L.P.
Penner International
ProNorth Transportation
Purolator
4079
505
1250
590
1510
9 (8)
88 (nr)
44 (45)
77 (82)
36 (39)
Q
Quik X Group of Companies
1855
22 (30)
R
RAM Contract Carriers
Reimer Express Lines
Rosedale Group
Rosenau Transport
838
2019
1435
956
64 (62)
19 (18)
39 (nr)
53 (63)
S
Samuel Son and Company Ltd.
Schneider National Carriers Canadian Division
SGT 2000
Shadow Lines Transportation Group
Simard Transport
SLH Transport
Sokil Transportation Group
Speedy Transport
System 55 Transport
456
2454
1624
1259
905
4405
842
741
614
96 (81)
15 (15)
30 (27)
43 (55)
57 (64)
6 (5)
63 (65)
70 (75)
76 (77)
971
900
575
15500
2419
503
528
473
576
3681
897
498
5582
977
2822
52 (66)
58 (56)
80 (85)
1 (1)
16 (17)
89 (92)
87 (90)
93 (99)
79 (84)
86 (92)
59 (57)
91 (93)
4 (3)
51 (49)
14 (14)
V
Vedder Transportation Group
Verspeeten Cartage
Vitran Corporation Inc.
1112
1623
9778
46 (52)
31 (33)
2 (2)
W
Williams Moving & Storage
Wilson’s Truck Lines
Wolverine Freight System
699
1684
798
71 (69)
26 (24)
67 (68)
X
XTL Group of Companies
1650
28 (26)
Y
Yanke Group of Companies
1930
21 (19)
T
Team-Transport Services Ltd.
Thomson Terminals
Totalline Transport Inc.
TransForce Income Fund
Transfreight
Transport Bourassa Inc.
Transport Bourret Inc.
Transport Couture & Fils ltee
Transport Herve Lemieux
Transport LFL
Transport Morneau
Transport V.A.Inc.
TransX
Travelers Transportation Services
Trimac Transportation Services LP
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O
n July 23, 2002, Contrans
Corp. reorganized into an
income fund and completed an IPO for $46 million.
Not only was it the first trucking company to become an income fund, it was
the very first publicly traded equity corporation in Canada to change into an
income fund.
Now led by CEO Stan Dunford, Contrans
sits at number 10 on Today’s Trucking’s list
of Top 100 for-hire carriers.
Like the other income trusts on the Top
100 list, Contrans has been not only seeing
year-over-year revenue growth, it has been
growing by acquisition.
In the past year alone, Dunford says
about 70 companies solicited Contrans
with offers to sell.
Of them, he says, “we bought four.”
One of them Contrans purchased a few
days after the Federal Government slapped
the entire income-trust business with
the announcement that it’s changing the
rules (See “Hallowe’en Scare” by Anthony
Evangelista, page 42.)
“The acquisition was a good business
decision in spite of the new legislation,”
Dunford says.
So, the days of growing by acquisition
are not over.
But according to Dunford and others in
the business, the Federal Government has
done the industry a huge disservice with
the Hallowe’en announcement.
Mostly, Dunford says, the unforeseen
changes to the legislation robbed income
trusts of their ability to purchase companies through the issuance of equity by as
much as 30 to 40 percent.
“Prior to the announcement, each of
the trusts was trading at a much higher
multiple, which allowed them to pay more
for the companies they acquired.
“In fact, it improved shareholder value
in the public companies when they
bought a company at below the income
trust’s multiple.”
Dunford also says that the larger a privately held firm is, the more likely it is that
the purchaser would be one of the publicly
held income trusts.
“It has a ripple effect throughout the
entire industry and it’s sad that this had to
Top 100
happen,” Dunford says, “because for years
the trucking industry was never an industry
that the financial industry liked but we were
finally changing the credibility of trucking
[within the investment community].
Right now, the income trust community is still deciding how to proceed. Some
might convert to equity corporations, others may go private while others might stay
the course.
Is there any reason to remain a trust?
“That’s the question. What’s the world’s
opinion going to be on income trusts
after this?
“Most of them will have to reduce their
distribution by the amount of the tax and
there’s going to be a need for that.”
Dunford says after last fall’s announcement, he was interviewed on TV and
received thousands of supportive emails
afterwards.
According to one email—this one from
an investment advisor in Toronto—“if
they [the government] had stopped the
creation of any new trusts and grandfathered in all existing trusts it would have
had the affect of stopping BCE and Telus
from converting with the destructive
impact upon the rest of the market.
“Where,” the email continues in reference to Dunford, “can I vote for you?”
While the Contrans boss does insist he’s
TRUST –
BY PETER CARTER
WORTHY
Why Contrans’ STAN
DUNFORD thinks what
the federal government
did to income trusts
borders on criminal.
therefore offer a yield or return much less
than what it was before.
“Today, if you buy a Contrans share, you
get an 11-percent return. What publicly
traded equity company pays a dividend
that’s anything comparable to that?
Of course Dunford’s confident that
Contrans will adapt in whatever way it has
to in order to continue growing and making money.
“One thing that’s interesting is that
shareholders in the marketplace got a
taste—through this trust model—of what
it’s like to have an investment in a public
company that pays you a return every
month and the company can’t make a
mistake or they get caught right away.
“The trusts brought a real discipline to
the management of the companies. The
world loves that model of a company that
delivers returns on a monthly basis and
staying out of politics, he does like pointing out that the men who were convicted
in the Enron scandal got 25 years for losing
$100 billion. The WorldCom disaster cost
about $11 billion and one man got 30 years.
“So far,” Dunford says. “[Prime Minister]
Harper and [Finance Minister] Flaherty
are in second place in world-wealth
destruction at $40 billion. With zero
accountability.”
Dunford also says there’s an election
between now and the time the incomefund changes kick in. “Maybe after these
people lose the election and all they have to
do is organize games at church functions,
they’ll learn a thing or two about keeping
promises. You can’t go around breaking
promises and taking millions of dollars
away from unsuspecting taxpayers.” ▲
MARCH 2007
41
Top 100
F
ederal Finance Minister Jim
Flaherty stunned the investment community last fall
when he announced that publicly traded
income trusts would be subject to the
same corporate tax as public corporations. Flaherty stated this move was necessary “due to the growing trend towards
corporate tax avoidance.” In 2006, a number of corporations with a market value of
over $70 billion converted to income-trust
status—mainly to take advantage of the
favorable tax rules for trusts.
The Finance Minister stated that this
trend would cost the federal government
between $500 million and possibly more
than $1.6 billion annually.
What changed for income trusts?
Income trusts pay out monthly cash
distributions to unit holders—and they
are paid out from pre-tax dollars. This
attribute allows trusts to pay little or no
corporate tax. The government plan
scare
The Hallowe’en
BY ANTHONY EVANGELISTA
would place a distribution tax on the payouts made to unit holders from publicly
traded income trusts (excluding some
Real Estate Income Trusts–REITs).
Newly formed trusts are subject to the tax
effective this year. All other trusts will have a
tax holiday until 2011 when corporate taxes
will be 31.5 percent (18.5 percent federal and
13 percent provincial). This four-year tax holiday allows trusts to address the new tax
laws and make any necessary adjustments.
Flaherty’s about-face effectively ends
any tax advantage income trusts had over
corporations.
The TSX dropped nearly $20 billion in
value the day after the announcement.
Some income trusts have since rebounded
TRUST YOURSELF:
IT’S BIZ AS USUAL FOR THESE GUYS
I
f there are any fleet owners out there crying into their Timmy’s because they’re afraid no
income trust is going to come a-courtin’, they’re not talking about it. Whomever Today’s
Trucking talked to had an opinion of income trusts, but it wasn’t disappointment.
Apparently, healthy fleets are in business to truck, not to sell out.
Dan Noseworthy of Montreal’s 100-truck fleet GTI Roll says that a few years ago one of the
bigger income trusts approached his company to discuss selling, but the Noseworthys were
simply not in selling mode.
And Mark Brandt, whose fleet of about 60 beautiful Petes is the pride of Arburg, Man., says
some of his personal portfolio took a hit when the income trust laws were changed.
However, he’s quick to add that it’s such a small part of his portfolio it’s almost negligible.
“As for the announcement and how it’s affected the industry, I had more pertinent issues
to tend to.”
Like making money. Brandt reports a better-than-average January and he’s bullish for the
coming season.
Cornwall, Ont.’s Bob Gauthier, founder and president of Seaway Express, a 20-power unit
fleet, says the changes aren’t worrying him.
“Someone like Alain Bédard,” he says,“was buying up companies before he changed over
to a trust fund.“Ultimately, Alain Bédard will buy a company that he sees potential upside if
he gets it for a bargain whether TransForce is a trust unit or not.”
And yet another successful operator with 30 trucks out of Guelph, Ont., agrees with what
the Federal Government did to the income trust act.
Rick Way of Wayfreight says “we survived nicely before income trusts became an issue and
we’ll be fine after that. Generally, if a company is good value and fits somebody else’s
strategy, I think they’ll still find a way.
— By Peter Carter and Marco Beghetto
42
TODAY’S TRUCKING
from the drop in unit prices, but few have
retained their pre-Hallowe’en values. On
average the transportation trusts are
down nine percent in the four months
since the announcement.
Income trusts enjoyed virtually corporate-tax-free status prior to this announcement, providing them with a 20 to 30 percent trading premium. The distribution
tax wipes out the premium, and will lower
growth potential of all trust investments.
According to Walter Spracklin, an analyst
covering the Transportation and Income
Trusts sectors at RBC Capital Markets, “the
tax would have a more significant impact
on the trucking trusts. The reason is that
trucking trusts have been dependent on
acquisitions in order to achieve abovetrend growth in cash flow per unit. Without
the trust ‘premium’, the ability for the
trucking trusts to grow through acquisition is now significantly impaired.”
Does this mean that the trucking trusts
will whither away? Not necessarily. These
trusts will continue to grow, but growth
will be fueled by greater economies of
scale and more prudent consolidation.
Consolidation will be attained through
acquisitions of higher quality businesses,
which are a better fit and value.
A few obvious points that can make for
an attractive takeover target are businesses that have a steady cash flow or solid
business contracts; businesses that fit well
due to the geographic or industrial segment they service; and businesses servicing
growing or under-serviced market segments. Trusts will be more frugal with their
money and targets, but acquisitions will
still be a part of the growth strategy for
Canada’s trucking trusts—but don’t expect
Alain Bédard or Stan Dunford to pay the
acquisition premiums they once did. The
small guys lose on this deal, too. ▲
Anthony Evangelista, MBA, is controller
of Newcom Business Media, publisher of
Today’s Trucking.
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partners Richard Muir and Rob Donaghey found
themselves at a very enviable crossroads—their
group of companies had outgrown them and they were casting
about for a solution to position their enterprise for the future.
Since Donaghey joined Muir at Muir’s Cartage back in 1990 and
the two became partners, they had grown their various businesses
from $10 million a year in sales to $245 million in 2005—largely on
the back of some shrewd acquisitions in the form of National Fast
Freight, Nesel Transport, and Euroworld Transport System, as
well as a lot of organic growth.
“It was really a case of two guys who had grown the company
to a very serious size,” says Calyx CEO Rob Donaghey. “We needed to set the company up for future growth—it had outgrown
what two people wanted to do.”
Muir and Donaghey started talking with the Chicago-based
Wynnchurch Capital Partners, and by May 2006, they’d
announced that the equity firm was buying a 55-percent stake in
Calyx, with the two original partners holding the remaining
shares as well as retaining a leadership role in the company.
“The rationale was we’d grown the group from $10 million to
$245 million just the two of us, and our net worth was completely wrapped up in the companies, which any financial planner will
tell you is insane. It just seemed like a good time to address our
personal plans going forward to diversify our holdings a bit—and
set Calyx up for the future. The private equity scenario allowed us
to put Calyx on a platform that provided for stability, long term
growth, and certainly there’s money there if we want to do some
acquisitions.”
So what exactly is Calyx Transportation Group? And how did
they get to be so big?
First off, about that name. A calyx is a botanical term for the
part of a flower that holds the bloom before it opens—a good
“FREIGHT
ANYBODY
FORWARDER
CAN
BE A
”
But it takes more than
a century of trucking
and some 22ndcentury financing to
transform a trucking
company into a Calyx.
AN EXCLUSIVE
TOP 100 PROFILE.
MARCH 2007
47
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THE BUSINESS OF TRUCKING
metaphor for a holding company. Plus it’s
something that holds the promise of
growth—the bloom—and it’s green, the
color of money.
If you’ve never heard of it, that’s because
Muir and Donaghey haven’t exactly been
shouting it from the rooftops. They’ve purposefully been very low-key in their various acquisitions over the past 15 years. In
fact, this is the first story that’s been written about the company.
You’ll definitely know some of its component companies: National Fast Freight,
the domestic intermodal freight forwarding outfit; Nesel, the specialized electronics/furniture/white goods hauler; and, of
course, Muir’s Cartage, the 118-year-old
trucking company that carries goods for
Home Depot and Future Shop, among
many others.
Perhaps lesser known, in the trucking
world anyway, are the company’s container
freight specialists: Euroworld Transport
System Canada Inc, an international freight
forwarder specializing in liquor products;
and Creditstone Container Services Inc., an
ocean container lifting and storage company. And then there’s Calyx’s most recent
concern: Indis, the group’s supply chain
management company.
The main driver of Calyx’s 19 percent-ayear growth has been National Fast
Freight, which grew from zero as a startup
to $110 million a year.
“It’s definitely the largest subsidiary in
terms of revenue,” says Donaghey. “It’s our
domestic intermodal freight forwarder,
partnering with both CN and CP.” Started
in 1991, it’s grown to be a significant player
in domestic freight forwarding and is CN’s
largest domestic freight forwarder out of
Toronto. It’s primarily an LTL cross-dock
operation, serving Ontario and Quebec
over the road, and the Maritimes and the
West via intermodal.
Muir’s Cartage and Muir’s International,
the company’s north-south LTL hauler, is
also a significant part of Calyx’s revenue.
It’s the largest asset-based company, “and
for many years it was looked upon as our
main company because it was the original
company,” says Donaghey.
It’s also the group’s dedicated carrier
company, handling freight for retail giants
like Home Depot and Best Buy/Future Shop
as part of Muirs’ Core Carrier Program—a
program that builds a supply chain structure around the needs of clients.
In Home Depot’s case, Muir’s reacted to
a freight-congestion problem at retail outlets by devising racking kits for its trailers
servicing Home Depot outlets. The racking allows for more freight volume per
trailer per store, reducing congestion and
improving efficiency.
“We’ve been blessed by the fact that we
have Home Depot and Future Shop as customers,” says Donaghey. “Home Depot is
very dynamic—it now has 145 stores.
That’s dynamic growth for us that comes
from partnering with a good client. And
that comes from a situation of good service, efficiency, and trust. We like to think
we played a role in assisting their growth,
and clearly they’ve played a major role in
assisting our growth.”
‘‘GET ME
COPIES
OF THAT
ARTICLE!
‘‘
Top 100 Feature
CHINA
SYNDROME
And Nesel, one of Muir and Donaghey’s
first acquisitions back in 1991, has also
proven to be a steady performer for the
group. It specializes in hauling electronics,
and furniture in Ontario, Quebec, and the
Maritimes; and has recently started carrying a lot of white goods to make up for
losses in furniture business thanks to
Chinese imports.
Another chunk of Calyx’s growth has
come from ocean freight, in the form of
Euroworld Transport Systems. Purchased
in 2002, the international freight forwarder deals primarily in wine and spirits,
servicing Canadian liquor control boards,
as well as Labatt, Molson, Diageo, and
Sleeman. It has evolved to become one of
the world’s foremost transporters of liquor
in the world.
“We bought Euroworld to reach one
more step out in the supply chain,” says
Donaghey. “At that time our portfolio provided warehousing and distribution—we
were acting as service providers to other
third parties. So we purchased an outside
international freight forwarder to try and
go that extra step and obtain the control
of freight from point of origin overseas
right through to our own distribution system here in Canada.”
It’s also proven to be an effective growth
vehicle for Calyx, accounting for close to
MARCH 2007
49
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Top 100 Feature
$38 million of total sales—up from $7 million when it was first acquired. “We see it
as one of our main growth vehicles going
forward,” he says.
To date, there hasn’t been a lot of
crossover between the various companies
within Calyx, which Donaghey admits is
an ongoing challenge for the group.
“That’s one of the reasons we established Calyx—because we had these silos,”
he says. They were all individual companies with their own management teams,
mode of operations and growth plans; and
Muir and Donaghey were forever struggling to get the ‘siblings’ to work together.
“We have thousands of clients that only use
the services of one business. We’ve made
some progress in that area but not
enough—we need to educate our salespeople in our companies better, and we need to
perhaps come out from under the barrel.”
One company that has benefited from
using Calyx’s full reach has been petproduct supplier Hagen, the first client
of Indis—Calyx’s supply chain management company.
100 YEARS AND COUNTING:
Muir’s is considered the “main” division
because it’s the oldest.
Now servicing Hagen’s distribution needs
in Canada, Indis devised a plan where
Hagen freight is picked up from its suppliers in Asia using Euroworld. It hits the
Vancouver port and is taken to Edmonton
via National Fast Freight where it’s
transloaded into National equipment for
backhaul out of Edmonton and brought to
Toronto to a warehouse managed by Indis.
There it’s stored, pick and packed, and eventually put on a truck and delivered by Indis.
“In that concept we’ve touched freight
four times,” says Donaghey. “Our margins don’t need to be as high if we were
only touching it once, the total opportunity presented by our client is greater
and we can offer the client a more cost
effective solution.
“Currently, this is not the case with most
clients. But long term, yes, we’d like to see
that happen. I think we have a service
offering where we can add benefit and cost
efficiencies to our clients. But we need to
break those cross-company barriers down
and utilize each other’s services. That’s
going to be a challenge for us until we get
the culture of Calyx established as opposed
to the culture of individual companies.”
Creating and promoting this cross-over
is what Calyx is banking on for future
growth, with much of it coming from
the international side, where Donaghey
thinks Calyx bring the most value.
Telephone: 952-887-3699 / Toll-free phone: 866-484-8350 / Fax: 952-887-3716 / www.donaldson.com
50
TODAY’S TRUCKING
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TM
7:3/D31=;>3B7B=@A7<B632CAB
/<2/BB63>C;>
AURfWb`aPN[¹aXRR]]NPRdVaUZf6[aR_[NaV\[NY”=_\@aN_–.[QSbYY`PNYR
dV[Qab[[RYaR`aV[T]_\cRQaURf[RcR_dVYYaUN[X`a\N&!Q_NT_RQbPaV\[
\cR_aURYRNQV[TP\Z]RaVaV\[DUVPUR[Q`b]`NcV[TZRZ\_RaUN[!V[N[[bNYSbRYP\`a`DVaU[RcR_ORS\_R`RR[V[[\cNaV\[`YVXR
N]NaR[aRQ_\\SQR`VT[dVaU\]aVZVgRQ`Y\]RZV[VZVgRQObZ]R_TN]N[QY\dR_RQU\\QZf=_\@aN_YVaR_NYYfPba`aU_\bTUdV[QdVaU
aURT_RNaR`a\SRN`R@\6¹Z[\aWb`aQ_VcV[T6¹ZQ_VcV[TaURO\aa\ZYV[RAUR6[aR_[NaV\[NY=_\@aN_:VYR`NURNQ3_\ZObZ]R_a\OYbR`Xf
A33B63E7<2BC<<3:@3AC:BA
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Top 100 Feature
FLEXIBILITY
RULES
“We have some very good relationships
with the steamship lines but our biggest
value-add is when it lands in the country.
Anybody can be a freight forwarder and
negotiate the price of a box from a
steamship line; but when it gets into our
infrastructure, we bring something
nobody else has—physical assets on the
ground. I think the biggest thing that’s
going to set us up for growth going forward
in the next five years is our combination of
strengths: we have a mixture of asset-based
in Nesel, Muir’s and Muir’s International,
we have asset-lite in National Fast Freight,
and we have non-asset in Indis. So the
combination and flexibility of those offerings allow us to look at a client and find the
best solution for them. We’re not going
with any preconceived notions that we
need to fill our equipment. I think that’s
going to allow us to grow the most.”
Of course, Calyx is not immune to the
challenges facing the transportation
industry at large, namely capacity issues
like the ongoing driver shortage and rail
capacity constraints.
“Because we’ve had significant growth,
I would say the primary challenges we’ve
faced are issues related to capacity,” says
Donaghey. In terms of rail, this translates
into things like limiting train lengths at
certain times of year, and the need to
expand rail siding lengths. “We are constantly bumping up against the capacity
limitations of our rail operations. And
the same can be said for our international freight forwarding side—it’s really a
commodity game and it’s based on trade
lanes, trade patterns, currencies, and the
capacity of ports.
“We’re hoping over the next five years
some of these capacity issues will be
resolved, though some are out of our control,
like ports, steamship lines, and railways.
Trade is growing, infrastructure is limited,
so I think we’re going to be constantly faced
with that over the next five years.”
Partnering with Wynnchurch should
also be good for Calyx’s future. Muir and
Donaghey are banking on the private
equity firm bringing their life’s work to the
next level, with financial expertise, greater
access to lenders, an eye for potential
acquisitions, and most importantly, corporate discipline.
“Private companies tend take on the
mode of their operators, be it my style or
Richard’s style or key people’s style. Now
we’re starting to work very diligently on
getting a corporate style, and that discipline is going to pay off. No matter how
well you think you’re running the company, when you have a personal style there’s
always going to be areas that you concentrate on, and other areas get sloppy.
Wynnchurch provides more of a global
perspective and causing us to be a more
disciplined, and well governed.”
To go back to the Calyx/flower analogy,
the Wynnchurch move is kind of like a
shot of nitrogen to a flower—it can’t help
but make the Calyx bloom bigger and
brighter than before. ▲
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MARCH 2007
53
BY MARCO BEGHETTO
CLASS
BEST
IN
This indepth customer-satisfaction survey of
some of CANADA’S LTL CARRIERS shows how
the elite players get to be that way and what it
takes to keep customers happy.
T
demands—especially from the big box
crowd—call for more complete service
providers and supply chain managers, the
LTL business depends on much more
than just moving freight from point A to B.
The competitive landscape has also
changed, as the biggest mergers and acquisitions seem to be in this sector.
Consolidation has meant LTL is not as seg-
he modus operandi for
less-than-truckload (LTL)
carriers is forever evolving. Arguably, the sector is the quickest of
all transportation segments to react to
changing market needs. As customer
A1: MASTI & CO. Canadian LTL Study – 2006
In Rank Order by Overall CV Index Score
COMPANY
CRITERION 1
CRITERION 2
CRITERION 3
Number of
Respondents
CV Weighted
Benefit Score
Overall CV
Index Score
UPS FREIGHT
70
100.36
102.72
TST OVERLAND EXPRESS
56
105.03
102.19
PUROLATOR COURIER LTD.
39
103.47
101.84
CON-WAY
43
102.36
100.83
APEX MOTOR EXPRESS
32
100.60
100.77
YELLOW ROADWAY [CDN OPS]
54
100.41
100.69
MEYERS TRANSPORT
68
102.54
100.68
MIDLAND TRANSPORT
156
100.99
100.56
KINGSWAY TRANSPORT
51
100.62
100.27
54
TODAY’S TRUCKING
mented as it once was and carriers have
either had to hunker down regionally or
expand into full-service international
long-haul companies such as Yellow
Roadway (now known as YRC Worldwide);
Con-Way, Vitran, UPS Freight, and
FedEx have done after major acquisitions.
(The latter company launched FedEx
National LTL in the U.S. and FedEx Freight
Canada last month.)
LTL companies, therefore, are under
immense pressure to quickly adapt to customer’s changing needs, while still successfully recouping all the added costs
that come with such services and still turn
a decent buck or three.
So which fleets do it best—at least
according to their customers? That’s what
U.S.-based market research firm Mastio &
Co. set out to discover. The company,
which specializes in research, benchmarking, process reengineering, and market
trends for specific industries, had done a
couple of LTL customer-value surveys
south of the border, before publishing an
inaugural Canadian LTL shipper study
last year—a synopsis of which has been
made available to Today’s Trucking.
Shippers
SHIPMENTS DELIVERED WITH
NO SHORTAGES OR DAMAGE
TST Overland Express (9.04)
15
Thibodeau Transport (9.20)
21
Bourret (8.95)
21
Bourret (9.00)
29
Apex Motor Express (8.83)
55
TST Overland Express (8.78)
39
Purolator Courier Ltd. (8.74)
38
Quik X Transportation (8.74)
40
Con-Way (8.70)
26
ABF (8.69)
66
Meyers Transport (8.70)
51
Kingsway Transport (8.59)
15
Thibodeau Transport (8.67)
37
Purolator Courier Ltd. (8.59)
22
Trans X (8.64)
65
Reimer (8.57)
19
Hercules Freight (8.63)
22
Trans X (8.55)
38
Quik X Transportation (8.63)
67
Meyers Transport (8.54)
SHIPMENTS PICKED UP
WHEN PROMISED
2
4
6
8
0
WORST
10
BEST
COMPETITIVE
PRICING
IMPORTANCE (9.47)
INDUSTRY MEAN (8.51)
2
4
6
26
ABF (8.85)
14
Thibodeau Transport (8.64)
18
Transport Robert (9.06)
15
Thibodeau Transport (8.60)
55
TST Overland Express (8.42)
38
Purolator Courier Ltd. (9.03)
63
UPS Freight (8.54)
26
ABF (8.35)
21
Bourret (8.95)
18
Hercules Freight (8.50)
19
Bourret (8.21)
27
ABF (8.93)
21
Trans X (8.48)
60
Reimer (8.07)
25
FedEx (8.88)
15
Kindersley Transport (8.47)
67
Meyers Transport (8.06)
51
Yellow Roadway (8.86)
18
FedEx (8.39)
21
FedEx (7.95)
55
TST Overland Express (8.85)
29
Consolidated Fastfrate (8.38)
22
Trans X (7.95)
66
Reimer (8.83)
31
Purolator Courier Ltd. (8.32)
16
Kindersley Transport (7.94)
38
Quik X Transportation (8.71)
52
TST Overland Express (8.31)
18
Robert Transport (7.89)
4
6
8
10
BEST
0
WORST
2
4
6
RESPONDENTS
Thibodeau Transport (9.07)
2
10
BEST
IMPORTANCE (9.33)
INDUSTRY MEAN (7.65)
C5
15
0
WORST
8
EFFECTIVE PROBLEM
RESOLUTION
IMPORTANCE (9.46)
INDUSTRY MEAN (8.24)
C4
RESPONDENTS
RESPONDENTS
IMPORTANCE (9.60)
INDUSTRY MEAN (8.25)
C2
54
0
WORST
C3
IMPORTANCE (9.74)*
INDUSTRY MEAN (8.34)**
RESPONDENTS
RESPONDENTS
C1
SHIPMENTS DELIVERED
WHEN PROMISED
8
* IMPORTANCE: The average level of importance all shippers responded for this attribute.
** INDUSTRY MEAN: The average score for all the carriers for the particular attribute measured in the exhibit.
10
BEST
0
2
4
6
8
WORST
10
BEST
MARCH 2007
55
Shippers
FedEx
(9.14)
Purolator
Courier Ltd.
(9.14)
TST Overland
Express
(9.06)
Bourret
(9.00)
3
7
9
34
1
Trans X
(9.33)
Quik X
Transportation
(9.06)
Bourret
(9.00)
Kingsway
Transport
(9.00)
Transport
Robert
(9.00)
RESPONDENTS
10
8
6
4
2
0
9
18
1
18
4
Kindersley
Transport
(9.50)
Purolator
Courier Ltd.
(9.44)
ABF
(9.20)
Quik X
Transportation
(9.17)
FedEx
(8.86)
2
9
10
18
7
Hercules
Freight
(10.00)
ABF
(9.40)
Kingsway
Transport
(9.06)
Trans X
(9.00)
18
9
TST Overland
Express
Kingsway
Transport
35
18
RESPONDENTS
10
8
6
4
2
0
RESPONDENTS
10
8
6
4
2
0
1
RESPONDENTS
10
8
6
4
2
0
FedEx
(8.83)
2
6
TST Overland
Express
(9.50)
Maritime-Ont.
Freight Lines
(9.00)
Day &
Ross
(8.93)
Yellow
(8.93)
Manitoulin
Transport
(8.80)
2
1
14
15
10
ABF
(8.60)
Reimer
(8.52)
Day &
Ross
(8.50)
Manitoulin
Transport
(8.50)
Purolator
Courier Ltd.
(8.43)
5
23
14
10
14
FedEx
(9.00)
Trans X
(9.00)
(9.00)
Yellow
(9.00)
Reimer
(8.87)
11
3
1
14
15
Trans X
(9.67)
Maritime-Ont.
Freight Lines
(9.00)
Midland
Transport
(9.00)
TST Overland
Express
(9.00)
FedEx
(8.86)
3
1
1
2
7
TST Overland
Express
Kindersley
Transport
Day & Ross
RESPONDENTS
10
8
6
4
2
0
RESPONDENTS
10
8
6
4
2
0
RESPONDENTS
10
8
6
4
2
0
RESPONDENTS
10
8
6
4
2
0
Trans X
(8.33)
(7.77)
14
13
Hercules
Freight
(9.50)
Quik X
Transportation
(9.14)
Roadway
(9.12)
Byers Trans.
System
(9.00)
Reimer
(9.00)
4
7
8
1
20
Byers Trans.
System
(10.00)
Hercules
Freight
(9.25)
Thibodeau
Transport
(9.20)
Con-Way
(9.12)
Bourret
(9.00)
1
4
15
8
20
Byers Trans.
System
(10.00)
DHL
(9.50)
Reimer
(9.30)
Con-Way
(9.25)
Roadway
(9.25)
1
2
20
8
8
Byers Trans.
System
(9.00)
Hercules
Freight
(9.00)
Roadway
(8.86)
Thibodeau
Transport
(8.60)
Con-Way
(8.57)
1
4
7
15
7
Hercules
Freight
(9.25)
Byers Trans.
System
(9.00)
ABF
(8.91)
Roadway
(8.75)
Thibodeau
Transport
(8.60)
4
1
11
8
14
RESPONDENTS
10
8
6
4
2
0
(8.28)
(7.79)
RESPONDENTS
10
8
6
4
2
0
TST Overland
Express
(8.37)
2
RESPONDENTS
10
8
6
4
2
0
10
21
RESPONDENTS
10
8
6
4
2
0
Reimer
(8.24)
ABF
(8.50)
3
RESPONDENTS
10
8
6
4
2
0
24
Kindersley
Transport
(9.00)
RESPONDENTS
10
8
6
4
2
0
10
UPS
Freight
(9.08)
RESPONDENTS
(8.00)
SHIPMENTS DELIVERED WITH
NO SHORTAGES OR DAMAGE
IMPORTANCE (9.79)
INDUSTRY MEAN (8.44)
D1
SHIPMENTS DELIVERED
WHEN PROMISED
IMPORTANCE (9.69)
INDUSTRY MEAN (8.32)
SHIPMENTS PICKED UP
WHEN PROMISED
IMPORTANCE (9.60)
INDUSTRY MEAN (8.47)
COMPETITIVE
PRICING
IMPORTANCE (9.57)
INDUSTRY MEAN (8.42)
EFFECTIVE PROBLEM
RESOLUTION
IMPORTANCE (9.28)
INDUSTRY MEAN (7.77)
SHIPMENTS DELIVERED WITH
NO SHORTAGES OR DAMAGE
IMPORTANCE (9.67)
INDUSTRY MEAN (8.19)
SHIPMENTS DELIVERED
WHEN PROMISED
IMPORTANCE (9.36)
INDUSTRY MEAN (8.00)
SHIPMENTS PICKED UP
WHEN PROMISED
IMPORTANCE (9.31)
INDUSTRY MEAN (8.39)
COMPETITIVE
PRICING
IMPORTANCE (9.14)
INDUSTRY MEAN (8.23)
EFFECTIVE PROBLEM
RESOLUTION
IMPORTANCE (9.21)
INDUSTRY MEAN (7.26)
SHIPMENTS DELIVERED WITH
NO SHORTAGES OR DAMAGE
IMPORTANCE (9.75)
INDUSTRY MEAN (8.31)
SHIPMENTS DELIVERED
WHEN PROMISED
IMPORTANCE (9.67)
INDUSTRY MEAN (8.31)
SHIPMENTS PICKED UP
WHEN PROMISED
IMPORTANCE (9.46)
INDUSTRY MEAN (8.62)
COMPETITIVE
PRICING
IMPORTANCE (9.53)
INDUSTRY MEAN (8.07)
EFFECTIVE PROBLEM
RESOLUTION
IMPORTANCE (9.44)
INDUSTRY MEAN (7.73)
MARCH 2007
ONTARIO ANALYSIS
DHL
(9.67)
D2
WESTERN CANADA ANALYSIS
10
8
6
4
2
0
D3
QUEBEC & MARITIMES ANALYSIS
This exclusive value study provides
in-depth analysis concerning the major
buyers of LTL services in Canada by
identifying factors most important to
customers’ perception of value, and in
effect driving carrier selection. The study
also allows the benchmarking of carrier
performance competition.
The data was collected in interviews
with transport-related decision makers at
587 different Canadian shippers; resulting
in 1,800 observations on over 200 LTL
service providers the shippers had done
business with in the last 12 months.
The methodology used to create the
study is called Customer Loyalty & Value
Analysis—based on renowned value mapping expert Dr. Bradley Gale’s groundbreaking 1994 book Managing Customer
Value. The text analyzes how companies
are recommended among potential customers in their industry.
“This isn’t something we invented in
the backyard. There’s a lot of science
behind it,” says Kevin Huntsman, director
of sales and marketing. “Also when you
look at our [shipper respondents] we’re
not just talking to a company rep, we’re
talking directly with people who have a
relationship with the [carrier] and know
something about them.”
Out of the 205 total carriers that were
cited as providers by the respondents,
Mastio only ranked the top 32, which the
firm described as having sufficient ratings
to be included in the final report. Because
of a lack of space on these pages, Today’s
Trucking highlighted either the top 10
total, or top five regional carriers for a
particular attribute—meaning only the
best of the best in the opinion of their
common customers.
The decision makers interviewed
answered a mixture of demographic
questions, opened-ended questions, and
then rated the carriers they use on
21 attributes.
The five most important attributes
deemed by all shipper respondents are,
starting with most important:
■ Shipments delivered with no shortages
or damages;
■ Shipments delivered when promised;
■ Shipments picked up when promised;
■ Competitive pricing, and;
■ Effective problem resolution.
57
Shippers
E1: HEAD TO HEAD BENEFIT ANALYSIS Company A vs. Company B
Shipments picked up when promised
Shipments delivered when promised
SERVICE OFFERING
Shipments delivered with no shortages or damage
Speed of transit
Broad range of services
Timely and accurate invoices and statements
Proactive communications
Effective problem resolution
Customer service personnel are courteous and professional
CUSTOMER SERVICE
Effective technology and tracking systems
Knowledgeable and helpful sales representatives
Willing to be flexible when needed
Drivers are courteous and professional
Pricing terms are easy to understand
Trucks and facilities look clean and safe
Financial strength and stability
COMPANY IMAGE
Strong positive corporate image and reputation
Highly trusted carrier
WEAKNESS
-0.25
-0.20 -0.15 -0.10 -0.05
0
0.05
0.10
0.15
0.20
0.25
STRENGTHS
Relative Impacts On Customer Value
BEST IN CLASS
In Table A1 (pg. 54) are the top nine LTL
companies with a total customer value
(CV) score over 100. (Other random carriers that made the top 20 include Vitran,
Reimer, Quik X, Day & Ross, Canadian
Freightways, and Manitoulin Transport.)
While the carriers are ranked in this
table by Overall Index Score—which
includes all 21 attributes—the firm also
included a Weighted Benefit Score,
which is tallied with all the pricingrelated attributes removed from the
equation. Furthermore, to get a good
overall CV score, a carrier has to achieve
100 pts or higher on all the non-cost
quality factors to be considered the overall CV index winner.
“We don’t just want people ranking
mainly on price since price already carries
such a large weight in the overall CV index
score,” says Huntsman. “We already know
that [all carriers] have to be good on price.
That’s a given or else most won’t even be
considered by the shipper. Once we get
58
TODAY’S TRUCKING
beyond that, then we can look at what the
real drivers are.”
In tables C1 to C5 (pg. 55), the top 10 carriers [Mastio lists the top 30] are ranked for
each of the top five attributes. While it looks
like the same 15 or so trucking companies
are spattered across all the charts, their
placements vary depending on the attribute.
The same goes for tables D1 to D3,
which, based on the same five attributes,
pits the five top carriers in a particular
Canadian geographical region.
“One attribute doesn’t necessarily constitute as being ‘better’ than another one,”
says Huntsman. “It’s just what’s important
to some customers. Some just prefer to
play in one end of the sandbox.”
The real value of such a study, says
Huntsman, is for the carriers, who, if they
use the data correctly, can create a “value
proposition” for their whole organization.
Upon request Mastio can formulate
independent carrier value profiles and even
conduct head-to-head comparisons
between two or more carriers based on how
they’re viewed by common customers. An
example is Table E1 (above), where carrier A
is measured up against carrier B (the chart
is actually a real comparison between two
Canadian carriers). A trucking company
can clearly see where its strengths and
weaknesses are versus another service
provider on a variety of factors.
“First off, it shows what you could
improve upon, which is an easy thing to
figure out,” says Huntsman. “But more
importantly, if you truly understand what
you’re good at and what other people are
good at, you can be more targeted and be
able to refine your script depending on the
company you’re talking to.”
On the other hand, the study can also
point out where truckers are wasting their
time and resources.
“Some carriers,” concludes Huntsman,
“might look at the analysis and say it’s not
worth going after this business because
they put too much value on a certain
attribute, like say, price, and that’s not
‘what we as a carrier are about.’” ▲
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WE KNOW HOW WICKED THE ROAD CAN BE.
Don’t back down. Bandag’s world-class retreads keep trucks rolling through you-know-what and back. And thanks to Bandag’s new
inspection and emergency services, there’s even more uptime on the horizon. Learn how a customized tire and service plan, backed by
national support, can help your fleet get further ahead. Contact your proven, local Bandag dealer, call 1-800-831-9405 or visit bandag.com.
©2007 BANDAG, INCORPORATED
Disc Brakes
S
How will they do it? By adding brake torque,
topping a truck is no small task,
BY ROLF LOCKWOOD
certainly on the steer axle, and possibly even
and it’s nearly miraculous that
on that axle alone. That could simply mean bigger 16.5-in. cam
conventional braking systems do it as well as they do.
brakes, maybe a combination of cam and disc brakes, or possibly
With advances in aerodynamics and reductions in other ‘natural’
disc brakes all round. Johnston says you can gain 20-percent
retardation sources like tire rolling resistance and driveline
brake torque with bigger cam brakes, 28-percent with discs up
friction, we ask almost twice as much of our brakes as we did in
front and S-cams out back, or 38-percent with air discs at all trac1980. The challenge is about to get bigger, though the new stoptor wheel positions.
ping-distance regulations we’ll see this month are actually quite
All of those options will cost more, he admits, though the nummanageable. It does mean that the new truck you spec in 2009 or
ber is very unclear at this point—NHTSA guesses $300 to $1,000
thereabouts will need at least bigger S-cam brakes up front, or it
per axle—and there may be a small weight penalty, but regardless
may well have air discs. In fact, the era of the air disc brake,
of which combination you spec, you’ll see significantly longer
already seen on nearly all new trucks in Europe, may finally be
brake life to offset the downsides. That means 25 percent to as
launched here in the New World. And it will come, as many such
much as 100 percent, and it’s those resulting lower life-cycle costs
things do, by way of American regulation.
that have driven European truck operators to air discs. Note that
A couple of years back the U.S. National Highway Traffic
a 16.5-in. steer-axle drum brake also provides a 65-percent
Safety Administration (NHTSA) proposed a stopping-distance
increase in wearable lining volume, compared to the current 15-in.
reduction of 20-30 percent for three-axle highway tractors.
brake, which means longer life for that combination as well.
ArvinMeritor brake chief Paul Johnston is betting on 30 percent
Incidentally, some 37 percent of trucks are already equipped
in the final rule. The likely implementation date is 2009, he
with 16.5-in. brakes up front, and fully 98 percent of trailer axles.
adds, and probably 2011 for what are called ‘specially configured’
tractors—meaning anything other than the basic three-axle
At present, air discs make up a lowly one or two percent of steervehicle that makes up 80 percent of what’s produced.
axle brakes.
So what does a 30-percent reduction mean? The present
Bendix Spicer has done much testing of trucks in real-life servNHTSA rule, mirrored here in Canada, demands that an airice, of course, and has some very interesting figures to show. It
braked three-axle tractor pulling an unbraked trailer (for testing
purposes only, not as an attempt to mimic real life) must be able
to stop in 355 ft from 60 mph. In fact, truck makers test for stops
in about 280 ft. Assuming a 30-percent reduction, that same
tractor will have to stop in 248 ft as of 2009, with a 10-percent
compliance margin. In practice, OEMs will aim for—and reach—
220 ft, which is getting very near to car territory.
What’s
Stopping
You?
Air disc brakes can’t
quite make your
trucks stop on a dime,
but new stoppingdistance regulations
make them more
attractive than ever.
Bendix ADB22X
MARCH 2007
61
Disc Brakes
Average Stopping Distance (ft)
Tractor Stopping Distance Testing
56,500 lbs. Configuration with an Un-Braked Trailer
600
Standard Brake Configuration
High Performance Drum Brakes
500
Front Air Disc Brakes
541
All Wheel Air Disc Brakes
387
400
FMVSS - 121-355 ft
353
324
300
267
223
217
204
200
100
0
60 MPH Stopping
Distance Summary
75 MPH Stopping
Distance Summary
The stopping-distance benefit afforded by air disc brakes
is dramatic when road speeds rise.The problem with drums is in-stop
fade. But note the commendable performance of ‘high performance’
drum brakes even at 75 mph.
Data courtesy Meritor WABCO Vehicle Control Systems.
North American Life Projection – Average of 6 Vehicles
2.5
Rotors
Front
Pads
Front
2.0
Million Miles
projects that dry-freight vans in the 60-80,000-lb GVW category
can get over two million miles on front disc pads and nearly 1.2
million on the drives, compared to 500,000 miles on ordinary
drum-brake linings. The rotors should be equally long-lived—2.4
million miles up front and 1.5 million out back.
The company’s projections for a 117,000-lb bulk hauler are significantly different, as the accompanying chart shows, but the
disc advantage is still clear.
Will there be balance problems if big braking capability is
sitting ahead of an ordinary cam-braked trailer? Possibly, and this
is an issue being addressed, but they would only appear in panic
stops. Given that the vast majority of braking applications are at
25 psi or less, most drivers will never know the difference because
in those circumstances the brakes will feel and act more or less as
they always have.
So does it make sense to test stopping ability from just 60
mph? Only from a regulatory standpoint, as a means to establish
standards, but many experts suggest it would probably make
more sense these days to test at 75 mph.
The disc advantage is even more apparent at 75 mph, and dramatically so. Using that unbraked test trailer and a GVW of
56,500 lb, ArvinMeritor tests show that a tractor with currentspec drum brakes can stop in 267 ft from 60 mph.
And from 75 mph? You don’t want to know.
Actually, with those extra 15 mph the stopping distance more
than doubles to a whopping 541 ft, and there are some tests that
note a figure of 618 ft.
Put discs all around the tractor and the 60-mph stop is accomplished in 204 ft, or 324 from 75. Note that bigger drum brakes
also record decent numbers (see the chart above).
The bottom line here is that you won’t necessarily need to spec
air disc brakes on your 2009 and later tractors because a highperformance S-cam will quite possibly meet the standard. Every
application is different, of course, but do you gain enough by
spec’ing discs? The upside is pretty compelling.
There are five key advantages: shorter stopping distances, virtually no fade, truly automatic adjustment, much increased side-toside braking balance, and very quick, very easy friction changes.
The fade issue is especially important if you drive the mountains. Rather than seeing the drum expand away from the friction
lining as heat builds up on a long downgrade or in a panic stop,
which you have with an S-cam brake every time, the opposite
happens with an air disc—the rotor expands into the friction pad
so you get constant braking torque all the way down that nasty
seven-percent grade with the right turn at the bottom. If your
drum brakes aren’t properly adjusted, fade could leave you with
no braking power at all halfway down that hill. It happens all the
1.5
Pads
Rear
Rotors
Rear
Rotors
Front Rotors
Rear
1.0
Drum
Brake
0.5
Pads
Front
Pads
Rear
0.0
Dry Freight 60-80k GCW
Bulk Hauler 117,000 GCW
Engineers at Bendix Spicer Foundation Brake have done extensive
in-service testing to chart disc-vs-drum differences, including
pad/lining life. Current air-disc brakes win the battle hands down
when gross weights are low. At higher weights the disc’s superiority
is still clear, though less startling.
time. But adjustment really isn’t an issue with discs, and the more
they heat up, the closer that rotor gets to the friction.
Is there a downside? Sure, starting with up-front costs as
already mentioned. The only other issue of any consequence is
that, with all three air discs presently on the market, changing
the rotor means removing the hub, which makes that a longer
job than the equivalent changing of a drum. But unlike early
FOR MORE INFORMATION
ArvinMeritor — www.meritorhvs.com
Bendix — www.bendix.com
Bendix Spicer — www.foundationbrakes.com
Haldex — www.hbsna.com
Meritor WABCO — www.meritorwabco.com
62
TODAY’S TRUCKING
Drum
Brake
Meritor WABCO offers two
air-disc brakes, the EX225
shown here, developed in
the U.S. for severe service,
and the newer, lighter NG
designed and built by
WABCO in Europe.
The Haldex ModulX
brake can be fitted to
every axle on a truck.
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March 2007
FAX: 416/614-8861
SIGNATURE (MUST)
NAME _______________________________________ TITLE ____________________________
COMPANY NAME _______________________________________________________________
COMPANY ADDRESS ___________________________________________________________
CITY ___________________________PROV. _____________ POSTAL CODE _____________
TEL (
) ____________________________ FAX (
) ______________________________
E-MAIL _______________________________________________________________________
HOW MANY VEHICLES ARE BASED AT (OR
CONTROLLED FROM) THIS LOCATION?
PLEASE INDICATE QUANTITIES BY TYPE
TRUCKS __________TRUCK TRACTORS ________
TRAILERS _____________BUSES _____________
OFF ROAD VEHICLES _______________________
ARE ANY OF THESE VEHICLES ...
A. In any of the following Gross Vehicle Weight Classes?
❏ Yes ❏ No
Class 8: 33,001 lbs. GVW & Over
Class 7: 26,001 to 33,000 GVW
❏ Yes ❏ No
Class 6: 19,501 to 26,000 GVW
❏ Yes ❏ No
Class 3,4, or 5: 10,001 to 19,500 GVW
❏ Yes ❏ No
Class 1 or 2: Under 10,000 lbs. GVW
❏ Yes ❏ No
B. Refrigerated
❏ Yes ❏ No
DO YOU HAVE MAINTENANCE SHOP FACILITIES
❏ YES ❏ NO
AT THIS LOCATION?
How many mechanics here?________________
INDICATE YOUR PRIMARY TYPE OF BUSINESS:
Check ONE category only.
(A) ❏ For-hire (Common & Contract Trucking)
(B) ❏ Lease-Rental
(C) ❏ Food & Beverage Production/Distribution
(D) ❏ Farming
(E) ❏ Government (Fed.,Prov.,Local)
(F) ❏ Public Utility (electric, gas, telephone)
(G) ❏ Construction/Mining/Sand & Gravel
(H) ❏ Petroleum/Dry Bulk/Chemicals/Tank
(I) ❏ Manufacturing/Processing
(J) ❏ Retail/Wholesale/Delivery
(K) ❏ Logging/Lumber
(L) ❏ Bus Transportation
(M) ❏ Moving & Storage
(N) ❏ Waste Management
(O) ❏ Other
DATE
DO YOU SPECIFY, SELECT OR APPROVE THE PURCHASE
FOR ANY OF THE FOLLOWING?
Check ALL that apply.
A. New vehicles & components
❏ 01 Trucks, Tractors
❏ 02 Trailers
❏ 03 Powertrain components
(engines, transmissions, axles)
❏ 04 Vehicle systems
(brakes, lighting, suspensions, cooling, electrical)
❏ 05 Tires, Wheels (new or replacement)
❏ 06 Vehicle appearance
(paints, markings - new or replacement)
B. Replacement Components,
Parts & Supplies
❏ 07 Replacement parts
(filters, electrical, engine parts,
brakes, suspensions, exhaust)
❏ 08 Major replacement components
(engine, transmissions, exhaust)
❏ 09 Oils, Additives & Lubricants
❏ 10 Shop equipment and tools
C. Fleet Products & Services
❏ 11 Equipment Leasing
❏ 12 Computers, Software
❏ 13 Financial services, Insurance
❏ 14 Fleet management services
(fuel reporting, permits, taxes)
D.
❏ 15 None of the above
* ATTENTION TRUCK
OPERATORS... YOU MUST
ANSWER QUESTIONS
1 THRU 5 IN FULL.
* NON-TRUCK OPERATORS
USE BOX BELOW ONLY
TO BE COMPLETED
BY NON-TRUCK
OPERATORS ONLY!!!
What best describes your
basic business as it relates
to truck/bus fleets?
(Check Only ONE)
❏ MANUFACTURER
(including factory branches) of
trucks, buses, trailers, bodies,
components, parts, supplies or
equipment.
❏ NEW/USED VEHICLE DEALER/
trucks, tractors, trailers.
❏ HEAVY DUTY WHOLESALER/
components, parts, supplies
or equipment.
❏ INDEPENDENT FLEET
SERVICE/REPAIR
SPECIALIST
❏ OTHER (Specify)
_______________________________
_______________________________
What’s inside a
Bridgestone radial?
North America’s largest dealer and truckstop network
Tires are just the beginning
More tires, more places than any other brand.
That makes Bridgestone your best bet, close to home
– or far from it. Ask your dealer or truckstop
what else choosing Bridgestone can do for you.
BridgestoneTrucktires.com
Disc Brakes
Old Paradigms and New
Technology
A
t the Commercial Vehicle Safety
Alliance Brake Safety Symposium
(CVSA), held in Indianapolis in early
December, a terrific debate arose between
the three manufacturers of air disc brakes
and several CVSA inspectors on how to
inspect these brakes at roadside.
Led by Lt. Charles Hanafin, training coordinator for commercial vehicle enforcement with the Massachusetts State Police,
the inspectors wanted to know how to
determine if and when an air disc brake
could be declared out of service.
But they don’t have external adjustment
mechanisms like S-cam brakes. Given that all
of the working parts on an air disc brake are
inside the caliper, an external visual
inspection won’t reveal much.
The brake people, led by Paul Johnston of
ArvinMeritor, countered that air discs really
can’t go out of adjustment.“They’re subject
to normal wear,” Johnston told the crowd,
“but there’s really very little that could go
wrong with any of these systems.”
Johnston explained that on each of the
three different air disc brands, there are ways
to determine if the internal components are
working properly, though each is slightly
different. He told the inspectors that with air
discs, as the brake heats up during normal
use, the rotors will expand, tightening the
clearance between the rotor and the pad.That
means an air disc actually performs better as
it heats up, while the opposite is the case with
S-cam brakes.
Still, the inspectors remained skeptical.
“We need to be able to tell if the brake is
in satisfactory condition to be operating on
our highways,” said Hanafin.“We know drivers
don’t do proper brake inspections, so there
has to be some way of determining if these
things are working properly.”
Hanafin then urged the three brake
manufacturers to explore ways of developing
some sort of an external indicator that drivers, technicians and inspectors might rely on
to prove the air disc brakes are up to snuff.
Johnston and his counterparts at Bendix
Spicer and Haldex, Ron Planton and Randy
Petresh respectively, agreed to look into
the issue. — Jim Park
examples of air discs in the 1980s,
today’s rotors are far more robust. When
you factor in the simple pad changes,
life-cycle costs clearly favor discs in
most cases.
So are you bound to have air discs on
the trucks you run in the future? It‘s
probably a safe bet for many of you, and
there are some fleets—especially those
hauling hazmat tanker loads—that have
already made the switch. More and more
operations will follow that lead over the
next few years. It’s simply inevitable. ▲
Online Resources:
The NHTSA PROPOSAL
For the full text of the original rule-making
proposal in the U.S. Federal Register — http://
a257.g.akamaitech.net/7/257/2422/01jan200518
00/edocket.access.gpo.gov/2005/05-24070.htm.
THE UNDISPUTED CHAMPION
With over 30 years as the industry’s heavy hitter, the Holland
3500 fifth wheel continues to be recognized as the most durable,
reliable and versatile in the world—even in the most extreme
conditions. Precision machined, heat treated lock components
combined with Holland’s industry-best 6-year/600,000 Mile
Performance Guarantee—it will go the distance and won’t wear
out—make the 3500 tough to beat.
To learn more, visit thehollandgroupinc.com.
3500
AD-FW022
Fifth Wheels
Pintle Hooks, Couplers and Kingpins • Trailer Suspensions • Landing Gear • Truck and Bus Suspensions
MARCH 2007
65
LOCKWOOD’S
PRODUCT WATCH
Your new VP
of Purchasing
(he's hiding inside your computer)
We've just stuffed your computer with useful
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Alerts provide the most important late-breaking
industry news. What's hiding in your computer?
Go to todaystrucking.com and find out.
www.todaystrucking.com
THE BUSINESS OF TRUCKING
In Gear
INSIDE:
71 Driving the Coronado
79 Lockwood’s products
EQUIPMENT NEWS, REVIEWS, AND MAINTENANCE TIPS
SIGN OF THE TIMES:
e-learning takes the learner
out of the classroom.
THE BRAKES OF
ONLINE LEARNING
E
Roads Scholar
tech tips HOS, load securement, cross-border rules starting to
pass truckers by? Catch up without having to come off the road.
By Marco Beghetto
H
ow many of us actually liked
our teachers? Truthfully. Sure,
sure, there was that grade-nine
(insert subject here) hero who today we all
claim changed our lives. But overall, truckers aren’t generally delighted by the
thought of spending consecutive hours
stuck behind a desk.
Or else—like your 28-year-old son or
daughter majoring in liberal arts—they’d
still be there trying to figure out how
Postmodern Re-constructionist Theory
of Humanity 101 is going to put food on
their table.
Knowing that drivers and owner-ops
would much rather be on the road making
miles or at home with the wife and kids than
in a classroom—but also recognizing the
need for fleets to have drivers evolve with
the rapidly changing trucking landscape—
Mark Murrell, president of Markham, Ont.-
based CarriersEdge, is shopping one of the
more complete e-learning systems specifically for the trucking industry.
CarriersEdge, developed with consultation from driver training schools, trucking
carriers, and insurers, is a comprehensive
online training solution for Canadian carriers, covering regulatory and safety topics, as well as professional development
issues such as fuel management and
financial planning.
The so-called qualified driver shortage
discussed at water coolers for decades in
this industry isn’t just a recruitment
issue, but also a professional-development challenge.
“Many fleets are starting to ask themselves not just ‘where do I get more professional drivers,’ but also ‘what do I do with
the ones I have now?’” says Murrell.
While adaptable veteran drivers are the
–learning opportunities abound today,
and some of the more effective bits of
training revolve around technical or procedural applications, such as learning about air
brakes or conducting pre-trip inspections. Given
the right amount of technical detail, structured in
a way that suits adult learners, the learning
process can be far more effective—and cost
effective—than traditional classroom instruction.
With the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s
online air brake course, for example, drivers are
the target audience, so the format is highly
visual, with instant validation of the answers, and
dialog boxes. It’s straight forward, and very easy
to understand. At the same time, the student
learns at a comfortable pace and as time allows.
The CVSA course is divided into three
sections:
■ TRAINING NEEDS ANALYSIS: a short test
measures the student’s current knowledge of air
brake theory and best practice;
■ TRAINING: individual training programs are
based on the strengths and weaknesses
revealed in the needs analysis.The focus of the
recommended learning modules reflect the
results of the needs analysis;
■ FINAL ASSESSMENT: feedback on questions answered right or wrong as well as best
practice feedback. Students get three attempts
to gain a passing score.
The course is broken down into modules for
compartmentalized training. Each features a
narrated video description of the system in
question, as well as animations that describe
the system and its function.The student can go
back any time for a review, but cannot move
forward until the previous section has been
successfully completed.
The CVSA course is sponsored, underwritten,
and co-developed by Zurich Insurance. Fees are
$55.00 per student for CVSA member organizations and Zurich insureds and their employees, or
$66.00 for non-members and non-insureds. For
more info, visit www.cvsa.org, and click on Virtual
Risk Manager, Air Brakes. — Jim Park
MARCH 2007
67
What is The Full Story?
The Full Story offers a deeper look at our industry’s
key current issues — border-crossing, hours-of-service legislation,
and pending diesel emissions, among others. If you want to know more
about issues in the news, look here.
todaystrucking.com
Wherever you are, whenever you want, we’re there for you. Get a broader, more unique
view of your industry. Written by our award-winning journalists and editors,
todaystrucking.com provides you with the information you need whenever you want it.
Check us out!
In Gear
hottest manpower commodities in trucking, there’s a huge pool of journeymen who
perhaps have let the industry pass them
by—increasing carrier’s costs in compliance and productivity.
“The issue for many employers is
always about getting better drivers—
which is good—but many people don’t
realize they already have a good quality
fleet, they just need to pull it out.”
The beauty of CarriersEdge, says
Murrell, is that it appeals to young, more
digitally educated drivers, but also to veteran employees and their managers—neither of who like sacrificing pay miles or
home time for retraining.
“Unfortunately, traditional delivery
methods for these programs hamper the
effort by forcing unwelcome compromises,”
says Murrell. “With [e-learning], drivers
can do it during downtime, in 15-minute
sessions. Or if they have to do it at home,
well, at least they’re still with the family.”
Furthermore, Web-based systems eliminate the loads of paper literature or CD
programs a fleet manger has to maintain
and keep tabs on.
So far, the courses packaged with
CarriersEdge (see carriersedge.com for
more info) are mainly focused on safety and
compliance: defensive driving; logbooks and
hours-of-service; pre-trip inspections; TDG;
border crossing regs; and cargo securement.
Other “business management and
finance 101 stuff” is on the radar, such as
learning how to establish rate-per-mile, controlling costs, and understanding contracts.
Another bonus of an Internet-based
system is that it’s completely forward
compatible with the ever-changing regulatory environment.
“You basically log in the next day and
the new features are in there. It’s updated,”
says Murrell.
It’s also completely customizable for
specific fleet preferences. “We’ve got a
framework for adding additional training
models. We can drop other people’s content in there for their own custom suite.”
The interface is simple so it won’t overwhelm less tech-savvy drivers. The content
has been vetted by industry professionals,
training schools, and even carriers with “in
the trenches experience” so that the programs make sense in real-world scenarios.
Commands are clear and text is in plain
language. Audio voiceovers often comple-
ment the text, and visuals, diagrams, and
virtual walkthroughs are used to illustrate
content as much as possible.
After each component in a particular
course, there’s a short quiz. The final step is
to summarize all the main points through-
out every part of the course in a review
before taking a final exam. Throughout the
whole process, a supervisor can log on and
monitor the driver’s progress and even offer
assistance if it’s needed.
The ROI on such a system is obviously a
smarter, more profitable driver. But now
insurers are offering direct incentives too.
In January, CarriersEdge entered into a
multi-year, national agreement with
Marsh Canada to provide Marsh customers a customized version of the driver
development system, as well as preferred
pricing on all services—not to mention
the improved fleet risk assessment an
underwriter is likely to consider for carriers that administer the system to drivers.
In this business, that kind of grade goes
a long way. ▲
BECAUSE
KING OF THE
SERVICE BAY
JUST DOESN’T
SOUND RIGHT.
Fleets are built to run, and run, and run. Problem
is, they’re often running into the service bay. That’s
why Hypuron S is uniquely engineered with a high
Total Base Number and low ash content. So you
can safely extend your fleet’s drains beyond normal
intervals, keeping profits high and costs low. It’s time
to make your regularly scheduled oil drains less
regular. Call 1-888-CASTROL for more info. Or check
out castrol.com/hypuronad
IT’S MORE THAN JUST OIL. IT’S LIQUID ENGINEERING.
TM
TM
MARCH 2007
69
In Gear
King Of the Road?
quick spin Freightliner’s Coronado has found a niche with the
younger crowd—and those who think that way. By Jim Park
SPEC SHEET
FREIGHTLINER CORONADO
POWERTRAIN
DDC Series 60-14.0L 515 Hp @
1,800 rpm; 1,650 lb ft @ 1,200 rpm
Clutch: Eaton Fuller 15.5-in.
Ceramic Solo Xl
Transmission: Eaton Fuller
RTLO-20918B 18-speed
FRONT END
Meritor MFS-12-143A 12,000-lb axle;
12,000-lb taper leaf springs;
Meritor LX500 Q+ extended-lube
S-cam brakes; Meritor autoslacks;
Haldex long-stroke chambers;
TRW PCF-60 Power Steering;
Goodyear G395 LHS tires.
REAR END
Meritor RT-40-145 R-SRS 40,000-lb
tandem rears with 3.90 ratio;
Freightliner Airliner 40,000-lb
suspension; Meritor LX500 Q+
extended-lube S-cam brakes;
Meritor autoslacks; Haldex long-stroke
parking chambers; Goodyear G328
24.5-in. tires.
CAB
T
he first Coronado hit the streets
in 2003 and it was quickly labeled
an “aspirational” model—a truck
that people move up to.
Freightliner knows the Coronado doesn’t appeal to everyone. Marketing research
shows it’s more popular among younger
owner-operators and that western ownerops tend to prefer the Classic XL.
As one of the older drivers, I confess I was
a little less than enthusiastic when I first
saw it, but it has grown on my tired eyes
over the past few years. As a widening driver, I do appreciate the room between the
seats as well as the easy access into the cab.
I fit pretty comfortably into the Coronado,
and that was really my first impression.
Coronado isn’t exactly a new Freightliner
model, but they remain fairly rare birds in
Canada. Typically, they’re built on a longer
chassis than is allowed in Canada, that is;
something less than 244 in. With the long
hood and the 70-in. sleeper, it just won’t
work with our archaic length rules unless
the frame is trimmed just a little.
The truck I drove around Oregon late in
October had a rather generous rear deck—
more room than you’d really need—and
Jennifer Harris, on-highway marketing
manager at Freightliner, tells us that’s
where they make the 25-in. cut to get the
trucks legal for Canada.
Canadians wishing to install an APU or
a genset might have to give up a little fuel
capacity or some under-cab storage space
in the form of the right-hand-side toolbox.
There are several design features worth
mentioning, like the two-piece windshield—it’s cheaper and easier to repair
than a one-piece window. And the fenders
are bolted to the hood, not molded, meaning they can be replaced inexpensively
Opal Gray Chaparral vinyl interior;
Color coordinated carpet;
Premium noise abatement
and insulation.
Paint: Citrus metallic PPG base/clear;
Phantom Silver metallic PPG base/clear
Wheelbase: 269 in.
Tractor weight, tanks full: 19,760 lb
MARCH 2007
71
In Gear
without major surgery to the hood. The
headlights are a snap to replace, and you
don’t need as much as a screwdriver to do it.
In the cab, you’ll find the power-distribution module located on the topside of
the passenger dash, making it awfully easy
to reset a breaker or change a fuse. The
HVAC fan has—get this—eight speed settings. And the climate-control system in
the cab is separate from the sleeper, giving
occupants of both full control.
CREATURE COMFORTS
Freightliner has always done a good job
with the driver environment, I think, and
Coronado is certainly no different. From the moment I put it in
gear and left the Test Engineering
center in Portland, I felt at home
behind the wheel—especially
with the pedal / shifter / steering
wheel arrangement. This is
where you spend the bulk of your
time in a truck, so it needs to be
right for you. It couldn’t be much
righter for me.
The shifter was right where
the right hand naturally falls,
and the pedals were very intuitively
placed. I like to sit fairly far forward in the
seat travel, and I felt like I was right on top
of everything I needed to manage
moment by moment. If I had any complaints about the driver’s perch, it’s that
the dash lights are a little dim at night; and
the little red night lights shouldn’t be spot
lights, rather, regular flood lights.
ROOM TO SPARE: (Above) There’s lots of room between the seats here, and
as you can see, headroom isn’t an issue.The gear shifter has only two bends
in it, keeping the shifting pattern nice and tight.
PADDING THE DEAL: (Left) An optional extreme thermal insulation
package gets you double-lined doors to keep out noise and cold air.
The 70-in. sleeper is worth crowing
about a little, too. Getting up to the upper
bunk wasn’t too much trouble, and the
upper windows open for ventilation.
Where I had trouble was getting down.
There’s this seatbelt-type catch right dead
center on the front edge of the platform,
which, when a guy attempts to slide off of,
tends to grab at certain body parts… I’ll
say no more, but be cautioned.
There’s a nifty little pull-out desk built
into the driver’s side cabinet, and the cabinet top is a non-slip surface that really is
non-slip. There’s lots of room back there
for your duds and other stuff as well, and
it’s pre-wired for an entertainment center,
fridge, and possibly a microwave if there’s
an inverter installed.
Put the brakes
on rising costs
For better control of your transportation
costs, lease your semi-trailers from
Brossard Leasing. Get a very competitive
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72
TODAY’S TRUCKING
In Gear
ACCESSIBLE MECHS: Drivers and
technicians will like the room under the
hood. Daily-check items are within easy
reach, and the serviceable components
are all easy to get at. This truck had a
2006 Series 60, but the ’07 version won’t
crowd the engine room much more than
you see here.
TWO-LANE TIME
Oregon is home to some really interesting
driving environments, and what a truck to
be driving them in. I ran east out of
Portland along I-84, past The Dalles, to
Biggs, where I cut south on U.S. Highway
97. While the scenery along I-84 is nothing
to sneeze at, the road didn’t offer much of
a challenge to the Coronado. U.S. 97 was
better in that it was two-lane, but darned
good two-lane.
The front-end geometry on the truck
made U.S. 97 feel as smooth and straight
as an Interstate anyway. Even the twists
and turns were rendered nearly routine by
the TRW PCF 60 steering gear and the
Freightliner front suspension. I’d look for
that setup on any truck I was buying.
The front axle is set back slightly—35.7
in.—from the bumper, which improves the
smoothness of the ride without any side
effects in handling.
That setup also yields a 50-degree
wheel cut, which really narrows the turning radius.
The real test of the steering system’s stability came later when I snuck down state
highways 138, 230, and 62 around Crater
Lake National Park and down to Grant’s
Pass. That’s an awesome road for anyone
who really likes to drive and happens to be
driving a truck that likes to be driven.
There are some pretty tight curves and
steep grades down there, but all were laid
flat and straight by the Coronado and its
standard 1,650-lb-ft Series 60 (Cat’s C15
is optional).
Heading north on I-5 toward Portland,
one finds some long grades. Again, the
515-hp Series 60 took them in stride and
all the while the cooling system did its
thing without the aid of the big fan.
Coronado is available in a day-cab configuration, or with a choice of two sleepers:
a 70-in. mid-roof or the full-height raisedroof model. When the 2008 models hit the
street early this year, you won’t see any
changes to the outward look of the truck,
despite a radiator that has grown from
1,500 to 1,900 sq in. The DPFs will be frame
mounted, and the exhaust stacks will be
routed much the same as they are now.
Demographics aside, any driver would
find the Coronado a good compromise
between aerodynamics and traditional
styling. The bright trim and chrome accents
on the outside might appeal to a younger
buyer, but like George Bernard Shaw said,
“youth is wasted on the young.” ▲
Montreal 1-800-361-9720 • Quebec City 1-800-397-2433 • www.brossard.com
MARCH 2007
73
In Gear
A WELL-BRED HYBRID: This Mack Granite dump truck was on
display recently in Washington, DC. It sports a diesel-electric
hybrid powertrain that should be for sale in 2009.
Heavy-Duty Hybrid
powertrain Mack and Volvo show off a Granite hybrid
dump truck. By Rolf Lockwood
C
ommercialization of the heavyduty hybrid truck is closer to reality, now that Mack and Volvo
executives have shown their diesel-electric technology in a Granite dump truck.
They say it will be ready for sale in 2009,
promising a 30-35 percent fuel-economy
improvement in a stop-and-go application
like garbage trucks.
The internally developed ‘I-SAM’
(Integrated Starter, Alternator, and
Motor) hybrid system at the heart of
things is indeed commercially viable, they
74
TODAY’S TRUCKING
say, though Mack president Paul Vikner
adds with some passion that government
funding is needed to “jump start” the
commercialization process.
The dump truck on display recently in
Washington, D.C., was ordered by the U.S.
Air Force. Four have been built to date for
testing purposes, and more are on the way.
Development of the truck was carried out
in close co-operation with the USAF.
The I-SAM answer has an “electric
machine” that develops 161 hp and 590 lb ft
of torque at its peak (94 hp and 295 lb ft
continuous) sandwiched between a Mack
315-hp MP-7 engine and a Volvo automated mechanical 12-speed direct-drive
transmission based loosely on the Volvo
I-Shift gearbox. It’s a two-pedal system.
There are no storage batteries, instead
using ultra-capacitors to store energy
extracted from the heat of braking. They
don’t store as much power as batteries,
but in low-speed stop-and-go applications
there’s no need for massive storage capacity—with that much braking going on,
there’s more than enough energy recovery
to keep things rolling.
In a demonstration ride, electric power
launched the truck strongly with the diesel
kicking in seamlessly at about 5 mph. The
two can be combined after that point if
required. Torque from the two power
sources is blended very, very smoothly.
In Gear
LIGHTWEIGHT POWER:
The ultracapacitors—not heavier
batteries—live inside this right-side box.
One of the advantages of the Volvo/
Mack system, according to Guy Rini,
Mack’s director of advanced propulsion
systems, is relatively light weight. The use
of ultra-capacitors instead of batteries
saves many pounds.
Unlike many other hybrid systems, the
I-SAM system doesn’t automatically shut
the diesel down at, say, a stoplight. The
fifth truck they build will have that feature, Rini says, but it demands major
modifications—specifically electrification of engine-driven auxiliaries like the
power-steering pump, air compressor, AC
compressor, etc. That will further improve
fuel efficiency.
Leif Johansson, Volvo Group president
and CEO, said price will be entirely
dependent on volume, and he expects
customers to see a payback on the I-SAM
system within two years when the “right”
sales volume is reached.
Will we ever see a similar hybrid system
in a heavy-duty over-the-road truck? Rini
says it will happen, but don’t expect more
than single-digit fuel savings—because
there’s not enough braking going on,
which means a smaller source of energy
for those hungry batteries.
Coincidentally, ArvinMeritor has announced its agreement with Wal-Mart
Transportation to develop what it calls a
“dual-mode” diesel-electric drivetrain for a
class 8 tractor. The truck in question, said
to be the first diesel-electric tractor prototype being developed in North America, will
be an International ProStar tractor powered
by a Cummins engine. Wal-Mart intends to
double the fuel efficiency for its fleet of
heavy-duty trucks in the next 10 years. ▲
Durable WindMaster Fans deliver high-performance,
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© 2007 Horton Holding, Inc. All rights reserved.
MARCH 2007
75
ExpoCam Preview
Montreal. April 12.
Be There!
show preview Huge show promises information and ideas
that’ll help your business thrive. By Today’s Trucking Staff
N
obody in Canada delivers helpful
trucking-industry information
like Newcom Business Media,
publishers of this magazine.
And now, the trade-show division of
Newcom is about to put its mark on
Montreal’s ExpoCam. Place Bonaventure
will be bursting at the seams with trucks,
trucking stuff, and the people who make
trucking happen on April 12, 13, and 14.
All the major North American truck and
engine manufacturers will have displays at
ExpoCam, along with nearly 300 more
exhibitors. If it’s a product or service related
to Canada’s trucking industry, it’ll be at
ExpoCam. This year’s theme is “Trucking
into the Future,” and ExpoCam 2007 is
placing a heavy emphasis on the impact of
new technology.
We’ll also feature a series of seminars to
highlight the good things that are happening in our industry.
But it’s not all serious at ExpoCam. You
might want to test your virtual driving skills
on SelectTruck’s Remote Control Rally
course. Choose your car, wait for the green
flag, and go for the gold.
We’ll have more than $75,000 in prizes
and giveaways for attendees at this year’s
show. Saturday is hat day at ExpoCam—all
visitors will receive a free ball cap. (Preregistered guests will also be able to park
their cars or big rigs for free that day.)
More than 8,000 visitors are already registered and they’re coming in by the busload
from as far away as Val D’Or and Riviere
du Loup.
Admittance to ExpoCam 2007 is open to
industry members for an advance online
registration fee of $10.00 or $20.00 at the
door. Free registration forms are available
from exhibitors, truck dealers, and truck
stops throughout Quebec. Advance registrants will receive an extra ballot for the
grand prize draw.
ExpoCam is owned and produced by
Newcom Business Media Inc., Canada’s
leading trucking media company. Newcom
produces Truck World (Toronto) and
CamExpo (Quebec City) as well as two new
shows in Western Canada (Manitoba and
Alberta), and publishes Transport Routier,
Today’s Trucking, highwaySTAR, and Truck
& Trailer.
Sweepstakes
GRAND PRIZE
Dodge Ram 2500 Quad Cab with 6.7L Cummins
Turbo Diesel Engine, 6 Speed Automatic, 6’3” Box
• One Year’s Supply of Castrol Oil Custom Alcoa Wheels
• Kinedyne STEADYMATE nylon straps
• Sirius Radio Hardware and Subscription Package
Show Hours:
Thursday, April 12th
10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Friday, April 13th
10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Saturday, April 14th
9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Place Bonaventure,
Montreal, Quebec
DOUBLE YOUR
CHANCES TO WIN!
Register before March 23, 2007
and receive an extra entry form
for the Grand Prize Draw
For a listing of the complete rules and
regulations of the Sweepstakes visit us online
at www.expocam.ca/rules/
$75,000 IN PRIZES!*
*Contest entry forms must be submitted in person at ExpoCam 2007.
Truck may not be exactly as shown.
ExpoCam is sponsored and endorsed by the Quebec Trucking Association and the Canadian Trucking Alliance.
76
TODAY’S TRUCKING
ExpoCam Preview
ExpoCam Line-Up
THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2007
WIDE-BASE SINGLE TIRES
Are wide-base singles the tires of the future
in Canada? They do offer significant fuel
and weight savings, but several Canadian
jurisdictions just aren’t sure yet if the cost
savings to operators is a good trade-off
against potential pavement damage. Join
Ralph Beaveridge of Michelin Canada for a
discussion of the benefits and drawbacks.
LOCATION:
South Mezzanine, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.
ULTRA-LOW-SULFUR AND
BIODIESEL UPDATE
Roger Mondou of Ultramar Canada brings
us up to speed on the introduction of Ultra
Low Sulfur Diesel fuel (ULSD), and the
challenges related to the new formulation.
And what about biodiesel? Is there a
future for this organic alternative to hydrocarbon-based diesel fuel? Find out more at
this informative session.
LOCATION:
South Mezzanine, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, APRIL 13
THE FUTURE OF LIFE ON EARTH
World famous cosmologist and science
communicator, Hubert Reeves, B.Sc., shares
his insights about the future of life on earth.
LOCATION:
* South Mezzanine, 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
THE RIGHT WHEEL FOR
THE RIGHT JOB
There’s more to spec’ing the right wheels
than price and looks. Join Alcoa’s François
Vaillancourt and find out how to get the
best value from your wheel spec’ing dollar.
LOCATION:
South Mezzanine, 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
GREEN TECHNOLOGIES: NEW
STRATEGIES FOR PROTECTING
THE ENVIRONMENT
Trucking is vital to the forestry sector, and
thanks to emerging technologies, we’re leaving a smaller footprint than ever. Join Yves
Provencher, business development manager
of the Forest Engineering Research Institute
of Canada (FERIC) for a visual presentation
of the technologies that are reducing the
environmental impact of trucking.
LOCATION:
* South Mezzanine, 1:00 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.
LAW 130: LEGISLATION MODIFYING
MEDICAL INSURANCE
Hear a panel discussion on this vital issue,
presented by Michel Paquet from Quebec’s
Health Ministry and Monique L. Gauthier,
manager of group insurance at Burrowes
insurance brokers.
LOCATION:
* South Mezzanine, 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 2007
OWNER-OPERATOR COST PER MILE
How can you calculate how much you’ll
make on a load if you don’t know how
much it costs to run the trip? Transport
Routier (Today’s Trucking’s Quebec-based
sister publication) contributor Michel
Patry will help you identify and tally
operating costs so you’ll know your bottom line.
LOCATION:
South Mezzanine 11:00 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.
COMPARING CARRIER PAY PACKAGES
What’s a better deal: $1.25 a mile for all
miles, or $1.10 a mile plus drops, layovers,
and a fuel surcharge? Transport Routier’s
Michel Patry helps drivers and owner-operators clarify the claims in the recruiting ads
and to sort the drops from the surcharges
for a more profitable business relationship.
LOCATION:
South Mezzanine, 12:30 p.m. to 1:15 p.m.
EPA 2007 AND YOUR NEXT
TRUCK ENGINE: HOW WILL YOUR
BUSINESS CHANGE?
The EPA 2007-compliant engines are now
hitting the street. Michel Bergeron of
Cummins Canada East explains what is
different about these engines and how this
technology will affect your operation—
and your bottom line. This program was
developed in cooperation with all North
American truck engine manufacturers.
LOCATION:
South Mezzanine, 2:00 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.,
and 3:30 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.
EXPOCAM SEMINAR SCHEDULE
(n.b.. Seminars will be in French, of course.)
EXPOCAM VIP BREAKFAST
MARC GARNEAU, THE FIRST CANADIAN IN SPACE
M
eet astronaut and distinguished
naval officer, Marc Garneau at
ExpoCam’s feature VIP breakfast.
He became the first Canadian to fly on a
NASA space shuttle mission in 1984, and
went on to log nearly 700 hours in space
on three shuttle missions. Since then, Mr.
Garneau has served as the president of
the Canadian Space Agency and is an
honorary fellow with the Canadian
Aeronautics and Space Institute.
Join us for this thought-provoking session and share Mr. Garneau’s reflections of
his time in orbit high above the Earth, and
thoughts regarding the environment—
inspired in no small way by his very
unique perspective of our planet.
Hilton Bonaventure Hotel, Ballroom
Thursday, April 12, 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.
Admission: $60 per person.Visit expocam.ca
to order tickets.
SPONSORED BY SHELL AND SASKTEL
* Reserved seating for this session is available through the Quebec Trucking Association • info@carrefour-acq.org
MARCH 2007
77
C o m m e r c i a l Ve h i c l e
Safety Alliance
Promoting Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety and Security
Introducing
The 2007 edition of the
North American Standard
Out-of-Service Criteria
Handbook and Pictorial
The North American Standard Out-of-Service
Criteria is an important tool for every commercial motor carrier and driver. Not only does it
identify critical vehicle inspection items following a roadside inspection but it also details
criteria that can prohibit a motor carrier or
operator from driving or operating a commercial motor vehicle for a specified period of time
or until the condition is corrected.
Knowing the criteria in advance will save you
time and money.
order now at www.cvsa.org
Non-Member
Associate Member
Enforcement Member
$37
$25
$20
(plus shipping and handling)
JOIN US
NOW!
visit our we
bsite
www.cvsa.o
rg
Get Your 2007
Decal On!
Safety is what we do everyday
1101 17th St., N.W. Suite 803 Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-775-1623 Fax: 202-775-1624 www.cvsa.org
In Gear
PRODUCTWATCH
WHAT’S NEW AND NEWS FROM SUPPLIERS
EATON’S
VORAD
SYSTEM
The VS-400 is smaller, lighter,
easier to buy and use
LEAPS TO THE NEXT LEVEL
E
ATON CORPORATION has introduced its next generation Vorad
safety system, the VS-400, available
on a limited quantity basis next month
with full production in June. It’s a
modular design, and very different from
previous versions—incompatible—with
them, in fact. It’s been effectively integrated into the company’s Fleet Resource
Manager safety package, giving managers
the ability to monitor, benchmark and
proactively improve driver and fleet
safety. With RF, cell, and GPS wireless
capability built in, users will be able to
access safety information wirelessly and
in real-time.
Fleet Resource Manager is powered by
@Road, a web-based mobile resource
management tool aimed specifically at
the trucking industry.
Among the system’s capabilities are
fuel-tax recording, trip recording, ECM
fault-code reading, and vehicle position
tracking. The launch also includes the
introduction of a new 77-GHz radar,
which makes it capable worldwide, and a
new LCD driver interface unit.
Customers will have the option to buy
any one or all VORAD offerings. A standard collision-warning system with forward-looking radar can be expanded with
Blindspotter side sensor and SmartCruise
adaptive cruise control. They can be purchased separately or together as one
package, and don’t require a subscription
to Fleet Resource Manager.
The new 77-GHz radar unit is 70
percent lighter and 60 percent smaller
than the existing EVT-300 radar. It also
replaces both the EVT-300 radar and
CPU and reduces the amount of wires
from 18 to four resulting in easier and
faster installation. All wiring can be done
in the engine compartment. Significantly,
it allows the use of standard bumpers,
not Vorad-specific ones as in the past.
Online Resources:
For more new product items, visit
PRODUCT WATCH
on the web at todaystrucking.com
The new driver interface unit is said to
be intuitive and user-friendly. It features
visual and audio alerts and is user-programmable with the capability to accept
driver identification and up to four personal identification numbers. It will also
support current lane departure warning
systems and other technologies that follow defined protocol structure.
The new Vorad in-vehicle device is
fully compatible with all major cell and
satellite network providers, Eaton says.
The device captures vehicle and
safety information and uses the Fleet
Resource Manager system to produce
reports that fleets can use to
make real-time improvements to
their operations.
The basic Vorad package (without the
Fleet Resource Manager data capture
capability) is available through all North
American OEMs as a factory-installed
option, and through the aftermarket as a
retrofit system. Pre-wiring systems,
bumper designs, and installation
procedures may vary from one OEM to
another, Eaton says.
See www.roadranger.com or call
1-800-826-4357.
MACK’S TERRAPRO
CABOVER
AIMED AT REFUSE, CONCRETE JOBS
The new Mack TerraPro cabover model
is an evolution of the company’s MR.
Aimed at refuse and construction applications, including concrete pumping, it
features a new driver environment.
Driver comfort is enhanced by: a
steering column positioned for ample
belly room; ergonomic seats; integrated
armrest; easy-to-read gauges and easy-toreach switches; accelerator and brake
pedals suspended above the cab floor
and mounted in-line to reduce driver
effort; efficient HVAC system; easy-toreach parking brake; cab lighting controls reachable from the ground; and
MARCH 2007
79
In Gear
plenty of storage. Not to mention, of
course, a cup holder.
The vehicle’s low-profile electronic
dash enhances outward vision and offers
comprehensive driver information with
all-electronic gauges. The instrument
cluster features 25 indicator lights and
an automatic transmission temperature
gauge. An engine-hour meter features a
wake-up display when the ignition is off.
A battery backup protects vital information stored in the engine control system—
which is the next generation of Mack’s
Vehicle Management and Control
System—V-MAC IV. New programmable
features include road-speed tamper detection and integrated starter protection.
Customers and bodybuilders will
appreciate the in-cab Control Link and
back-of-cab Body Link II interface
systems. They provide quick connections
to the bodybuilder’s control unit, as well
as pass-through harnesses and connectors from the controller to the body.
Offered with the proven Mack camelback suspension, the TerraPro can also
be spec’d with the Mack M-Ride six-rod
Faster PMs = 300% ROI
(maybe more)
suspension, allowing up to 17-in.
articulation for maneuverability.
Standard engine is the EPA ‘07-certified
11-liter Mack MP7, with ratings from 325
to 405 hp and torque from 1,200 to 1,560
lb ft. Also available is the 13-liter MP8
(415 to 485 hp).
See your dealer or visit
www.macktrucks.com.
SET-FORWARD STERLING
WITH BODYBUILDER-FRIENDLY FEATURES
Sterling’s latest heavy-duty vocational
truck is the Set-Forward model with an
updated look, improved functionality,
and better outward vision, plus it’s said
to be easier to maintain. The truck is
available in 101- and 111-in. BBCs.
Now there's evidence that adding a Rotary lift means more
operating profit. A lot more. Documented case in point:
A Pennsylvania fleet service location performed six PMIs per
night. Each took 3.5 hours to perform and, at a $58 labor rate,
cost the fleet $203 per vehicle.
By adding a Rotary lift, PMIs were completed in 2.5 hours. Eight
could be completed each night instead of just six, reducing the
PMI cost by 28% to $145. Nightly labor savings on six PMIs was
$348, or $104,000 annually based on 300 working days per year.
Bottom line: a $30,000 Rotary lift generated savings of over
300% ROI. That’s over $100,000.
More maintenance. Done faster. That's what a lift can mean
to your fleet’s bottom line. For more details on this and other
documented case studies, go to www.rotarylift.com/roi.
80
TODAY’S TRUCKING
The truck’s practical benefits start
with the hood, the company says, which
has a claimed 12-percent better sight
range than comparable products.
Constructed from new polymer
substrate, the hood is also said to be
more durable than fiberglass and boasts
In Gear
20- and 25-lb weight reductions on the
101- and 111-in. models respectively.
Getting to the engine is easier with
advanced hood access door openings of
more than one foot. Quick-change headlamps are easily serviceable from the
front of the truck without bezel removal.
The Set-Forward Sterling was developed with body builders in mind. An
updated quarter fender allows a 111-in.
BBC model with a vertical frame-mounted exhaust to hold up to 120 gal of fuel
with a clean CA. The 101-in. BBC model
can hold up to 70 gal with a clean CA.
See your dealer or visit
www.sterlingtrucks.com.
W900S DAY CAB
KENWORTH OPTION FOR W900S
VOCATIONAL MODEL
Kenworth now offers its popular extended day-cab option for the W900S model,
used in mixer applications. The big day
cab provides an additional six inches of
length and five inches of cab height
compared to Kenworth’s traditional day
Kenworth W900S
cab. The extended model also offers two
more inches behind the wheel, additional
leg room, up to 21 degrees of recline in
the driver’s seat, and two extra cubic feet
of storage behind the driver’s seat.
Kenworth says the extended day cab
option is a great incentive for mixer fleets
to use for driver recruitment and
retention, while helping to enhance
driver performance and productivity.
It’s also available on T660, T800, and
W900 models.
Kenworth has also enhanced the
W900S model’s maneuverability. The
steering gear was moved forward ahead
of the axle and longer front springs were
added as part of a front end redesign
that increases wheel cut by four degrees
and reduces the overall turning radius.
Other W900S features include an
engine that sits high in the frame and
ahead of the cab for easy maintenance
access; straight sections of reinforced
rubber hose that are more easily available
and much less expensive to replace than
preformed hoses; and an electrical
system designed for durability and
streamlined troubleshooting.
See your dealer or visit
www.kenworth.com.
KNOW YOUR GREASES
CHEVRON’S LUBRICANTS UNIVERSITY
Chevron’s Lubricants University, an
educational website, has introduced two
new courses, Automotive Grease and
Industrial Grease, as part of its course
catalog. The two modules are self-study,
web-based programs designed for maintenance professionals interested in
expanding their knowledge of proper
grease use and formulations.
The Automotive Grease course provides information on how grease products differ in terms of performance, base
oil, additives, and thickener types. In
addition, the module offers an overview
of automotive grease, examines lubrication performance specifications, and
looks at automotive grease products currently in use. The course increases awareness of the specialized automotive greases designed to meet the requirements of
highway automobiles and trucks, as well
as off-road wheel and track vehicles.
The Industrial Grease course covers
the appropriate quantity, re-greasing
intervals, and product selection for
proper lubrication in industrial applications such as electric motors, pumps and
conveyors, and pins and bushings.
Other courses available include:
Fundamentals of Lubrication (free), Heavy
Duty Engine Lubrication, Base Oils,
Fundamentals of Lubricant Additives,
Hydraulic System Lubrication, Industrial
Gear Lubrication, Automotive Gear
Lubrication, and Heavy Duty Coolants.
Courses are available to the general
public and cost US$59.95 each. All
Lubricants University courses offer a
certificate of completion once a student
has successfully completed the training.
To purchase a course call Chevron at
1-866-758-2378. See www.chevron.com
and www.lubricantsuniversity.com.
MARCH 2007
81
Retail Diesel Price Watch
Find out how Espar Heaters
can SAVE YOU MONEY.
WEEKLY PUMP PRICE SURVEY / cents per litre
Prices as of February 13,2007 • Updated prices at www.mjervin.com
CITY
WHITEHORSE
VANCOUVER *
VICTORIA
PRINCE GEORGE
KAMLOOPS
KELOWNA
FORT ST.JOHN
YELLOWKNIFE
CALGARY *
RED DEER
EDMONTON
LETHBRIDGE
LLOYDMINSTER
REGINA *
SASKATOON
PRINCE ALBERT
WINNIPEG *
BRANDON
TORONTO *
OTTAWA
KINGSTON
PETERBOROUGH
WINDSOR
LONDON
SUDBURY
SAULT STE MARIE
THUNDER BAY
NORTH BAY
TIMMINS
HAMILTON
ST.CATHARINES
MONTRÉAL *
QUÉBEC
SHERBROOKE
GASPÉ
CHICOUTIMI
RIMOUSKI
TROIS RIVIÉRES
DRUMMONDVILLE
VAL D'OR
SAINT JOHN *
FREDERICTON
MONCTON
BATHURST
EDMUNDSTON
MIRAMICHI
CAMPBELLTON
SUSSEX
WOODSTOCK
HALIFAX *
SYDNEY
YARMOUTH
TRURO
KENTVILLE
NEW GLASGOW
CHARLOTTETOWN *
ST JOHNS *
GANDER
LABRADOR CITY
CORNER BROOK
CANADA AVERAGE (V)
Price
106.6
101.0
98.7
92.1
100.2
100.4
103.2
107.9
90.8
94.2
91.0
95.6
94.9
92.1
94.2
97.4
92.4
90.9
87.5
89.2
89.8
94.4
86.5
88.8
91.9
90.9
96.9
91.1
97.1
88.7
84.9
99.9
100.1
98.9
99.4
97.2
98.9
100.4
96.9
99.4
95.9
97.0
95.6
96.1
97.8
97.0
97.2
95.6
99.4
95.3
100.0
98.7
96.7
96.7
98.4
93.9
104.7
102.3
110.8
103.4
93.5
(+/-) Previous
Excl. Taxes
Week
1.2
1.3
-1.3
-0.5
-1.2
-2.7
-0.1
-0.4
0.2
0.5
0.4
-0.2
1.0
5.8
1.9
3.0
-0.1
0.8
2.1
-0.1
0.5
0.8
1.4
3.3
2.0
3.0
0.8
1.5
2.0
3.2
3.9
2.7
2.0
3.1
4.0
3.7
4.3
5.0
6.4
5.7
5.7
5.7
5.7
4.8
2.8
4.8
4.8
0.9
89.3
70.3
71.6
67.9
75.5
75.7
78.4
88.7
72.7
75.9
72.9
77.2
76.5
67.9
69.9
72.9
71.7
70.3
64.2
65.8
66.4
70.8
63.3
65.5
68.4
67.5
73.1
67.6
73.3
65.4
61.8
67.5
67.6
66.6
67.0
65.1
65.1
65.1
65.1
65.1
63.2
64.1
63.0
63.4
64.9
64.2
64.4
63.0
66.3
64.2
68.3
67.2
65.4
65.4
66.9
65.1
71.3
69.2
76.7
70.2
68.1
V-Volume Weighted
(+/-) indicates price variations from previous week.
Diesel includes both full-serve and self-serve prices.
The Canada average price is based on the relative weights of 10 cities (*)
www.espar.com
In Gear
ROOF SNOW REMOVER
AUTOMATIC, MADE IN QUEBEC
The Yeti snow remover, developed in
Quebec by Michel Couture, president of
Mire Equipment and former president of
Couture Transport, is fully automatic
and cleans
roofs of any
vehicle or
trailer. Its
integrated
snow blower
projects ice or
snow 20 ft from the run-up lane into one
pile, or into a dump truck or snowmelter. Pay-back is rapid, the company
claims, adding that roof damage and
accidents are history. It’s distributed by
SecuriTrim in Ville de Saint-Georges, Que.
Named after the legendary Himalayan
abominable snowman, the Yeti deals
with the very serious implications—
fines, demerit points, and possible
liability claims—that can easily result
from accidents caused by windborne
pieces of ice and snow from trailer roofs.
New models have all electrical cables
mounted either within the frame or protected under metal sheaths, to eliminate
vandalism. Upright supports are bolted
instead of welded to the angled legs, making both shipping and installation less
awkward, and parts are easily replaceable
should an accident occur. An integrated
washing system is being designed that
would allow a Yeti to be used for cleaning.
The snow remover was designed and
built to clean snow and ice off nearly
every type of heavy vehicle. Each one
is individually crafted by experienced
machinists and technicians.
Call 888-666-4961 or visit www.
securitrim.ca.
BATTERY CABLES
standard black and red battery
cables corrosion is hidden,
silently robbing power from a
truck’s electrical system.
Replacing OEM battery cables
with Clear-VU cables lets you
see any corrosion developing
from the inside, which could
ultimately save you from replacing your alternator, starter, and
battery, the company says. The
heavy wall shrink tubing gives
additional corrosion protection
by stopping water and contaminants
from entering the charging system. The
cables are available in smoke and
translucent red in both two- and
three-lug configurations.
See www.phillipsind.com.
PHILLIPS CABLES CUT CORROSION COSTS
Phillips Industries has introduced
Clear-VU battery jumpers, which allow
early detection of costly corrosion buildup. Maintaining electrical capacity is
critical to maximizing the reliability of a
vehicle, but Phillips says that with
DISC-BRAKE PAD
MARATHON PAD FOR HEAVY TRUCKS
Major performance advantages are
claimed for a new ceramic-formula disc
brake pad for heavy-duty truck and bus
air-brake systems, according to
Carry more, earn more.
Ancra’s Lift-A-Deck II system was designed to make you money.
By maximizing the available cube, you can increase your pay load. Lift-A-Deck II gives
you two cargo decks and handles pallets or mixed loads.
Beams easily
moved by one
operator
When not needed, beams
slide to the ceiling, out of
the way and can’t get lost.
Beveled, low-profile
track helps prevent
forklift damage.
Track can be surfacemounted or made as
integral part of sidewall.
Available for 96 or 102inch trailer widths.
82
TODAY’S TRUCKING
Adjusts in one-inch increments
to accommodate any cargo.
Double-engagement
lock has simple trigger
release.
Cargo Systems Division
Ancra Cincinnati • 2685 Circleport Drive
Erlanger, KY 41018 • Phone Toll Free: 1-800-233-5138
Fax: 1-800-347-2627 • www.ancra-llc.com
In Gear
Marathon Brake Systems. Based on a
combination of ceramics and brass
chips, the new formula—not seen
before—has shown wear and braking
efficiency improvements in bus and transit coach applications, and helps control
problems of brake noise and dusting, the
company says.
In benchmark
testing against
conventional
semi-metallic
pads, the new
ceramic pads are
said to show significantly less
wear, along with
less brake rotor wear. The pads also feature
a ‘secure-lock’ backing plate designed to
ensure lining-to-plate attachment. They’re
also said to put noise issues to rest.
Another advantage is what Marathon
calls ‘elimination of morning sickness,’ an
ailment described as common to semimetallic brake pads that results in poor
stopping power when they’re cold. The
ceramic formulation is said to overcome
the problem.
See www.marathonbrake.com.
Haldex claims. Once the air has passed
through the desiccant bed of the cartridge, the coalescent filter removes the
oil particles remaining in the air stream.
At the same time, the MTC+ is said to
remove more than 99 percent of contaminants from the system, effectively
eliminating oil while still maintaining its
high adsorption capability. Using a fivestage process to deliver dry, clean air, the
new cartridge is claimed to give three
times the drying capacity of competitive
air dryers but does not impede air flow,
says Haldex.
The cartridge is also said to last
longer, and instead of a spin-on mount, a
four-bolt slide-in and -out design allows
for quick replacement while the air dryer
is still on the vehicle.
See www.hbsna.com. ▲
AIR-DRYER CARTRIDGE
HALDEX CARTRIDGE TO BE STANDARD
Haldex recently announced that the new
Multi-Treatment Cartridge Plus (MTC+)
will soon be offered as standard on all
Haldex DRYest and PURest air dryers.
The coalescent filter on the outlet passage of the patented MTC+ removes 40percent more of the fine oil and hydrocarbon particles from the air system
than competitive air drying cartridges,
Online Resources:
TODAYSTRUCKING.COM
Much more product news can be found online
at www.todaystrucking.com. Better yet,
subscribe at no charge to Lockwood’s
Product Watch. It’s an e-newsletter published
every two weeks, a heads-up notice about
what’s going on with trucking technology,
where you’ll find in-detail coverage of nearly
everything that’s new. Plus interesting
products that may not have had the ‘air play’
they deserved within the last few months.
You can subscribe easily online.
If you have a comment, or maybe a product
I should know about, please contact
Rolf Lockwood at rlockwood@newcom.ca.
MARCH 2007
83
MARKETPLACE
C L A S S I F I E D
A D V E R T I S I N G
S E C T I O N
TRANSPORTATION REAL ESTATE
MARK CASCAGNETTE
VICE PRESIDENT, INDUSTRIAL
905-501-6426
800-870-5862
mark.cascagnette@ca.cushwake.com
CANADA’S LEADING TRANSPORTATION
& LOGISTICS TEAM
ABERFOYLE – FOR SALE
■ 2.72 Acres includes 1,800 sq.ft.house
■
Close to Hwy 401; ideal for truck repair / leasing
PUSLINCH – INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY – FOR SALE
■ 29.62 Acres; total 28,600 sq.ft.bldg; 9 drive-in
FOR LEASE – BRANTFORD – $3.95 PSF GROSS!
Divisible from 30,043 to 202,317 square feet ■ Excellent Warehouse Storage Space
CN Rail spur and heavy craneage available ■ Zoned M2, permitting outside storage
■
■
BRAMPTON – FOR LEASE
40,000 to 100,000 sq.ft.; trailer parking; outside storage
■
ANCASTER – REPAIR GARAGE – FOR SALE
■ 4,100 sq.ft.on 2.0 acres; 18’clear; 1 drive-in door
AYLMER – TRANSPORTATION FACILITY – FOR SALE
6,000 sq.ft.on 2.5 acres; 20’clear; 4 doors
■
MISSISSAUGA – FOR SALE/LEASE
FALL 2006 OCCUPANCY
■ 48,000 to 60,000 sq.ft. warehouse; Up to 36 doors;
up to 141 truck/trailer parking spots
TORONTO – 3.5 ACRES – OUTSIDE STORAGE – FOR LEASE
12,000-24,000 sq.ft.design-build facility
Warehouse/Garage; Hwy 427 frontage
■
■
TORONTO – HWY 401 EXPOSURE – CROSS DOCK – FOR SALE
40,567 sq.ft.on 6.71 acres; 48 doors; 16’-18’clear throughout building
■
PICKERING – CROSS DOCK – FOR LEASE
■
14 doors; office; yard parking
WHITBY – CROSS DOCK – FOR LEASE ■ 36 doors; plus 20 trailer spots
MISSISSAUGA – FOR LEASE ■ 11,500 sq.ft.repair garage
Truck And Trailer Parking
Space Available In The
Quebec City Area
Park In A Safe, Fenced In, Well Lit
Area, With 24 Hours A Day Access
Call 1-800-363-4216, Ext. 2276
For Further Details
ADVERTISING
To advertise in MARKETPLACE call
Mark Vreugdenhil
416-614-5819
mark@newcom.ca
www.todaystrucking.com
FINANCIAL SERVICES
Are you getting all your
FUEL SURCHARGES?
If not, call me!
Bob Tebbutt
1.866.220.0247
We use highly sophisticated financial
instruments that guarantee you 100%
protection against rising diesel prices.
Peregrine Financial Group Canada Inc.
1290 Central Parkway
West, Suite 200
Mississauga, ON
L5C 4R3
905.896.8383
Fax 905.896.8806
rtebbutt@pfgcan.com
Titan Group
of Co’s
Close to International Airport –
15 acres (SECURED)
200,000 sq. ft.
Available for Warehousing
Cross-Dock
CN Rail Spur
Expedited & LTL/Trailer/
Container throughout Ontario
Call Angelo at:
905-799-2675
Free Product Information
Today’s Trucking makes it possible for you to make fast, convenient connections
to the advertisers in this issue. Log on to todaystrucking.com
Ancra International
82
www.ancra-llc.com
ArvinMeritor
37, 85
www.drivetrainplus.com
Bandag
60
www.bandag.com
Bridgestone
64
www.bridgestone-firestone.com
Brossard Location de Camions
72-73
www.locationbrossard.qc.ca
Caterpillar
14
www.cattruckengines.com
Chevron
26
www.chevron.com
CTHRC
29
www.cthrc.com
Cummins Est
63 (split ad)
Cummins
51
www.cummins.com
Cummins Comfortguard
53
www.cumminscomfortguard.com/offer
Cushman & Wakefield LePage
84
1-800-870-5862
CVSA
78
www.cvsa.org
DaimlerChrysler Truck Financial
46
www.daimlerchryslerservices.com
Detroit Diesel Parts
4
www.detroitdieselstepup.com
Donaldson Filtration Solutions
50
www.shoptalk.donaldson.com
Espar
31, 81
www.espar.com
ExpoCam 2007
44-45
www.expocam.com
Firestone
30
www.bridgestone-firestone.com
General Motors
43
www.gmcanada.com
Great Dane Trailers
8
www.greatdanetrailers.com
HighwayStar of the Year
20
www.highwaystar.ca
Holland Hitch Canada
65
www.thehollandgroupinc.com
Horton
75
www.hortoninc.com
Howes Lubricator
16
www.howeslube.com
International Truck & Engine
52
www.internationaldelivers.com
Irving Oil
66 (split ad)
www.irvingoil.com
J.J. Keller
28
www.jjkeller.com
Kenworth
insert (split)
www.kenworth.com
Mack Trucks Inc.
34
www.macktrucks.com
Michelin
24
www.michelin.ca
OTC/SPX
83
www.otctools.com
Pana-Pacific/Sirius
59
www.panaoem.com
PeopleNet
Communications
48, 49 (split ads)
www.peoplenetonline.com
Peterbilt
back cover
www.peterbilt.com
Petro Canada
87
www.petro-canada.com
PFG Canada
84
905-896-8383
Rotary Lift
80
www.rotarylift.com
SGT 2000
84
1-800-363-4216
Shaw Tracking
19
www.shawtracking.ca
Stemco
39
www.BATRF.com
Sterling
2-3
www.sterlingtrucks.com
Titan Group of Co’s
84
905-789-2675
Trailcon Leasing
56
www.trailcon.com
Trucklite
40
www.truck-lite.com
TruckPro
insert (split)
www.truckpro.ca
Utility Trailer Manufacturing Co.
22
www.utilitytrailer.com
Volvo Trucks North America
70
www.volvotruckscanada.com
Vulcan On-Board Scales
84
www.vulcanscales.com
Wakefiled Canada Inc. (Castrol)
69
www.castrol.com/hypuronad
Western Star
6
www.westernstartrucks.com
www.meritorhvs.com
1775
• Axles
• Complete braking system
• Drivelines
• Clutches and transmissions
• Aftermarket parts
• Trailer products and suspensions
• Ride control products
• ABS and stability enhancement
• Emissions technologies
systems
For technical or sales assistance, please contact your local
ArvinMeritor representative: Pierre Perron 519-949-5149
MARCH 2007
85
Rear View
By Peter Carter
Nurse, Meet Driver
Amazing things happen when people
are given the right chance.
T
hree of my four sisters are RNs. More importantly, if a
certain RN (my mom) didn’t make nice with a certain
commercial driver (my Dad) about 50 years ago, I wouldn’t
even be here.
So you might say I have it bad for nurses.
And with all those nurses running around my life, you’d think
I’d be a health nut. But you’d be wrong.
The only health-and-fitness book I’ve ever read was called
“Stay Fit and Healthy Until You’re Dead,” by Dave Barry. He
offered advice such as “the best time to start exercising is right
after Easter, but not the one coming up.”
I used to think that the best sport to play is darts because you
could play it in a bar.
I’m more health conscious than I used to be, but that’s not the
point. The point is, I’m a pushover for nurses. Especially when
they meet drivers.
So when a woman named Diane Betts told me a few months
back about a bunch of Humber College-University of New
Brunswick Nursing Students getting involved with a crew of drivers from Thomson Terminals in Toronto, I thought “tell me more!”
Nurse Betts along with seven of her third-year students offered
Thomson drivers a chance to do a health checkup, get lectured a
bit if it meant feeling better, and the drivers loved it. Go figure.
After the nursing students studied the truck-driver lifestyle
and their health habits for three months, they took their findings,
their stethoscopes and those things they use to check blood
pressure over to Thomson HQ, and put on a special one-day driver-health program. At the workshop, the students talked about
driver health and why it’s important to be active and eat well.
They took blood-pressure measurements and then offered health
counseling to the truckers.
The drivers, Thomson’s safety guy Tom Mead said, ate it up. He
was amazed at the turnout.
So was I.
You’d have to be a recent immigrant from another galaxy not to
know that the long-distance lifestyle has been linked to things
like obesity, high blood pressure, fatigue, and ailments resulting
from living with constantly high levels of stress.
My colleague Duff McCutcheon, who frequently writes about
trucker health for our sister magazine highwaySTAR puts it this
way: “Pick any ailment going that can be linked to sedentary
lifestyle, bad food and age, and you can apply it to truckers.”
So the health problems don’t come as a surprise. What surprises me is when I find out guys and women who you might not
86
TODAY’S TRUCKING
BUILD IT AND THEY WILL COME: The APPS
gym is proving more popular than predicted.
think care about stuff like this, care about stuff like this.
My pal Duff and I got even more proof last month when we
visited the APPS Transport Group’s splashy 160,000-sq-ft headquarters in Brampton, Ont.
APPS is one of those new-age truck outfits you’re always
reading about that have things like innovative employee-rewards
programs, low driver turnover, and a happy staff.
Definitely, one of the highlights of the tour was the company’s
on-site gym, with dumbbells, spinning cycles, and some other
fitness doodads I don’t recognize. And it’s well used.
In addition to drivers, dispatchers, sales reps, and technicians,
APPS actually employs a fitness trainer/former body-builder
named John Siembida, whose sole job is to encourage APPS’
people to take better care of themselves.
Siembida offers two private half-hour sessions each week to
employees, and so many staffers have signed on that Siembida’s
shifts have gone from three days a week to five.
Like the drivers at Thomson, APPS’ folks crave the chance to
be fit.
When my (late) brother Pat drove truck in Southern Ontario,
he lived on a steady diet of Player’s Filter cigarettes, regular coffee
from Styrofoam cups and, well, that was pretty much it. He died
too young.
Not to make too much of it, but sometimes I wish that the guys
he drove for had a bit of Thomson, Humber or APPS DNA in them,
and encouraged their drivers to take better care of themselves.
Pat would have gotten a kick out of reading his brother’s
trucker stories. ▲
Peter Carter is the editor of Today’s Trucking. You can reach him at
416/614-5828 or peter@todaystrucking.com.
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