Bigger Rigs Brighter Lights NEW T680

Bigger Rigs Brighter Lights NEW T680
TOUGH TALK
“No wonder some companies pay you more if you’re a team driver,” PG. 16
TV Trucker
Derek Martin
The Business Magazine of Canada’s Trucking Industry
Bigger Rigs
Brighter Lights
Canadian Mail Sales Product Agreement #40063170. Return postage guaranteed. NEWCOM Business Media Inc., 451 Attwell Dr., Toronto, ON M9W 5C4. Registration No. 10788
AND
A COMPLETE ROUND-UP OF NEW
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES, PG. 39
PLUS:
WE TAKE
KENWORTH’S
NEW
T680
FOR A SPIN
PG.33
HOW TO MAKE
YOUR COMPANY
SFW
May 2012
PG. 20
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
+
OWNER/OPERATORS &
DRIVERS WANTED
Opposite Page 44
www.todaystrucking.com
THE CURVES MAKE IT EFFICIENT.
THE EDGE MAKES IT OURS.
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,62&RS\ULJKW‹'DLPOHU7UXFNV1RUWK$PHULFD//&$OOULJKWVUHVHUYHG:HVWHUQ6WDU7UXFN6DOHV,QFLVDVXEVLGLDU\RI
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VOLUME 26, NO. 5
May 2012
44
UNPRECEDENTED BELLY ROOM: Presenting International’s LoadStar,
designed with input from drivers and fleet managers alike.
16
33
SEMI-TOUGH:
This reality show’s for real.
COVER WHIRL: We take the
KWT680 out for a spin.
NEWS & NOTES
FEATURES
OPINIONS
8 DISPATCHES
20 DRIVERS
5 LETTERS
7 ROLF LOCKWOOD
54 PETER CARTER
— BY JASON RHYNO
SERVICE DEPT
WRESTLING WITH
TRUCKING’S BIGGEST
CHALLENGE
HE’S JUST NOT THAT INTO YOU
Your industry is going to need one million
more people. Very soon. Here’s how you’re
going to attract them.
33 TEST DRIVE
16 LESSONS LEARNED FROM
— BY JIM PARK
19 TOP 10 TRUCKING LESSONS
27 THE TRANSMISSION SHIFT
STATE OF THE PACC-ART
Kenworth’s T680 is a truck built for drivers
who love trucks.
39
10 Far northern hospitality
11 Trucking events to pencil in
12 The British are braking!
13 Who’s where now?
14 Sited on todaystrucking.com
15 Truck sales statistics
NEW PRODUCTS
SOMETHING IN THE AIR
If the number of new product introductions is
anything to go by (and it is) this industry’s
future looks as bright as LED headlights.
Here’s a special Spring roundup of new gizmology
that’ll rock your fleet.
— BY ROLF LOCKWOOD
ONE TOUGH TRUCKER
— By Tom Berg
EXTRA!!
PAGE
New Free-and-Easy Contest
53
We’re betting our hat you can’t
guess where this place is.
MAY 2012
3
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©2012 Goodyear Canada Inc. All rights reserved.
Letters tothe Editor
The Business Magazine of Canada’s Trucking Industry
Email [email protected] or send a letter to Newcom Business Media, 451 Attwell Dr., Toronto, ON M9W 5C4
NEWCOM BUSINESS MEDIA INC.
451 Attwell Dr., Toronto, ON M9W 5C4
416/614-2200 • 416/614-8861 (fax)
VICE PRESIDENT, EDITORIAL
Rolf Lockwood, MCILT
[email protected] • 416/614-5825
EDITOR
Peter Carter
[email protected] • 416/614-5828
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Jason Rhyno
[email protected] • 416/614-5827
CONTRIBUTORS: Jim Park, Allan Janssen,
Steve Bouchard, Tom Berg
ART DIRECTOR
Tim Norton
[email protected] • 416/614-5810
PUBLISHER
Joe Glionna
[email protected] • 416/614-5805
NATIONAL ACCOUNTS MANAGER
Heather Donnelly
[email protected] • 416/614-5804
QUÉBEC SALES MANAGER
Denis Arsenault
[email protected] • 514/938-0639
PRESIDENT
Jim Glionna
CONTROLLER
Anthony Evangelista
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Lilianna Kantor
[email protected] • 416/614-5815
DIRECTOR OF CIRCULATION
Pat Glionna
CIRCULATION INFORMATION
P.O. Box 370, Station B, Toronto, ON M9W 5L3
416/614-2200 • 416/614-8861 (fax)
Today’s Trucking is published monthly by NEWCOM BUSINESS MEDIA INC.,
451 Attwell Dr., Toronto, ON M9W 5C4. It is produced expressly for owners
and/or operators of one or more straight trucks or tractor-trailers with gross
weights of at least 19,500 pounds, and for truck/trailer dealers and heavy-duty
parts distributors. Subscriptions are free to those who meet the criteria. For
others: single-copy price: $5 plus applicable taxes; one-year subscription: $40
plus applicable taxes; one-year subscription in U.S.: $60 US; one-year subscription
foreign: $90 US. Copyright 2012. All rights reserved. Contents may not be
reproduced by any means, in whole or in part, without prior written consent
of the publisher. The advertiser agrees to protect the publisher against legal
action based upon libelous or inaccurate statements, unauthorized use
of photographs, or other material in connection with advertisements placed
in Today’s Trucking. The publisher reserves the right to refuse advertising
which in his opinion is misleading, scatological, or in poor taste. Postmaster:
Address changes to Today’s Trucking, 451 Attwell Dr., Toronto, ON M9W 5C4.
Postage paid Canadian Publications Mail Sales Agreement No.40063170.
ISSN No. 0837-1512. Printed in Canada.
We acknowledge the financial support of the Government
of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund (CPF) for
our publishing activities.
Kenneth R. Wilson
Award Winner
Member
Canadian Business Press
One Sussex-ful Convoy
Top 100 and counting
Another year has come and gone and our
local Convoy for Wishes held our Third
Annual event on Aug. 27, 2011.
A warm sunny day blessed us all as the
trucks lined up at Four Corners Wheeler
Road, starting at 10:00 a.m. At 11:00, 80
trucks and a few support vehicles went
down the highway and through Sussex.
People lined the roadside to watch the
trucks all gather in Princess Louise Park in
front of the Sussex and
Area Seniors Complex.
We organizers would
like to thank the sponsors for making this a
successful event and we certainly plan to be
back once again in support of the Children’s
Wish Foundation in August, 2012.
Coordinator,
Judy Jordan,
Picadilly, NB
With 174 straight trucks, 633 tractors,
1,143 trailers, 156 owner-operators and
1,140 employees, the Erb Group of Baden
ON is the 20th largest for-hire fleet in
Canada, but because of an oversight on
our end, Erb’s name was omitted from our
list of Canada’s Top 100 carriers in the
March issue of Today’s Trucking.
(Erb is actually tied for 20th place with
the XTL Group.)
Further, according to our listing, George
Leger Transports of Valleyfiled, PQ was
the 100th largest carrier on the list,
but it came to our attention after the magazine was published that the company
had gone into bankruptcy and ceased
operations in late 2010. So the 100th
largest for-hire carrier is now J.D. Smith &
Sons, of Concord, ON.
We regret any inconvenience the errors
might have caused.
If we don’t blow our horn who will?
The founding editor of this magazine has been named one of the (if not
the) most influential trucking journalists in North America.
Rolf Lockwood, currently Vice-President Editorial of Newcom
Business Media, which produces Today’s Trucking, Truck World, Transport
Routier, Truck and Trailer, Plumbing & HVAC, Canadian Technician, Canadian Car Owner
and their attendant websites was presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award by
the Truck Writers of North America (TWNA) at the organization’s annual dinner on
Thursday, March 22.
The award celebrates a person who exhibits the highest standard of journalism or
communications within the trucking industry over a career.
The magazine earned several other writing awards. Lockwood’s feature on natural-gas
trucks “Doing without Diesel,” won two gold medals. And his editorial called “Hi-Tech
Side Up” earned a silver. Former Senior Editor of Today’s Trucking and current VP
Communications and New Media at the Ontario Trucking Association (OTA) Marco
Beghetto earned a gold for an HOS feature called “Going Back in Time.”
Contributing editors Steve Bouchard and Allan Janssen earned silvers; Bouchard for a
clear-eyed analysis of the local-food movement called “Grains of Truth;” Janssen for a
look at unlicensed truck drivers called “Papers, Please.”
Today’s Trucking Editor Peter Carter collected a silver for his column Rear View, which
appears on the back page of each issue.
Go
Online
todaystrucking.com
For Industry News, Weekly Features,
Daily Management Tips, Truck Sales Stats,
Product Reviews, and MORE!
MAY 2012
5
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CAT, CATERPILLAR, their respective logos, “Caterpillar Yellow” and the “Power Edge” trade dress, as well as
corporate and product identity used herein, are trademarks of Caterpillar and may not be used without permission.
Editorial
By Rolf Lockwood
A Blue Ribbon ‘Tsk’ Force
What industry leaders are saying to fleets: “Tsk tsk.”
What industry leaders should hear: “If you want to really
fix the driver problem, look deep within yourself... then act.”
W
ho is it that trucking depends on most? I’m talking about
the freight world, not the various corners of vocational
trucking. And you know what I’m going to say next.
With the possible exception of the people who provide the
financial wherewithal to launch the whole thing in the first place,
there’s really only one answer.
Drivers.
Whether we’re talking owner-operators or employees, nothing
would happen if there weren’t someone sometimes going through
hell to get that load of tightly strapped drywall to the next stage
of its journey from factory to market.
All of it for too little money and, nowadays especially, too
much heartache. I’ll hazard a guess and say that for some, owneroperators especially, the situation goes way beyond ‘heartache’
and into the realm of mental health. It’s bad out there, only
getting worse.
Frankly, I’m a bit tired of writing about this, and you may
well be tired of reading it. But I’ve seen it all and I can say with
utter conviction that almost nobody respects drivers enough.
Themselves included.
Yes, there are many exceptions, and more of them all the time.
But at the heart of things in a
lot of fleets both large and
small, even in the midst of a
so-called shortage, the driver
remains a commodity.
You may have heard by now
that there’s a move afoot to
change things. The Canadian
Trucking Alliance (CTA) has formed what it calls a ‘Blue Ribbon
Task Force on the Driver Shortage’ and its stated aim is to develop “a coherent direction for moving forward on the issue.”
The CTA task force is made up of people sitting on its board of
directors, from across the country. I know a lot of these guys pretty well, count some as friends, and they’re a smart bunch with
good intentions. Self-serving intentions of course, but what’s
good for them is good for drivers.
So this is all great news, even if it comes awfully late in the day.
It’s not as if the ‘shortage’ of qualified drivers is new. It’s not as
if legitimate moans and groans haven’t been emanating from
thousands of cabs for 10 years or more.
Is this a case of better late than never? Yes, but I’ve already
heard a bunch of comments from drivers and owner-ops
I’d say there’s no driver
shortage at all, rather
a shortage of jobs fit
for qualified drivers.
expressing a predictable skepticism. Sure, sure, they say, where
have I heard this before? Words, words, words.
Well, you could hardly expect otherwise, but some of the words
at least sound right...
“Drivers are the industry’s number one resource, the backbone
of the industry,” says the task force in its initial report. “Without
them there is no trucking industry. It should not take a crisis to
address the situation and there is no guarantee the industry
would emerge stronger following a crisis, where it could lose
whatever ability it currently has to exercise at least some control
over its destiny.
“The Blue Ribbon Task Force is not content, nor does it believe
that the right thing to do is to sit back and wait for a crisis. The
industry will always be captive to market forces, but it can also take
action to help itself and ensure its continued dominance in the
freight market. It just cannot do it without drivers. There will be no
quick fixes, no magic bullets that will easily solve the industry’s
human resources challenges. In the short to medium-term, the situation and its resulting impact on capacity, is unlikely to change.
Addressing the driver shortage will require a long, multi-year effort.”
To its credit, the task force report correctly identifies three key
compensation issues, and I’m quoting here:
■ Truck drivers should have an improved ability to predict what
their weekly pay is going to be;
■ Truck driver compensation packages need to be competitive
with or better than alternative employment options and more
transparent;
■ Truck drivers should be paid for all the work that they do and
earn enough to cover all reasonable out-of-pocket expenses
incurred while on the road for extended periods.
I really do welcome this effort—don’t get me wrong—but I have
a few observations to make.
One, we’re already in crisis; there’s nothing to wait for.
Two, I’d say there’s no driver shortage at all, rather a shortage
of jobs fit for qualified drivers.
And three, I think this task force is not aptly named. It should
be called the ‘Blue Ribbon Task Force on the Culture of Trucking’.
It’s one thing for the suits to decide on a course of change, quite
another to get folks further down the ladder to buy in.
This is a challenge that has to be met from the bottom up. ▲
Rolf Lockwood is vice-president, editorial, at Newcom Business Media.
You can reach him at 416-614-5825 or [email protected]
MAY 2012
7
BY JASON RHYNO
Memo to Carriers:
Solve the Driver Crisis
A super-sized report on the state of trucking is best summed up
by Pogo the possum: “We have met the enemy, and he is us.”
“
8
I
’ve grown up in the
industry—third
generation after my
grandfather and father—
and I’ve talked about this
many times with my
father,” Ben Lehman, a
driver with six years’
experience, tells me
over the phone.
“He says it’s almost like
when he was driving—
there hasn’t been that
change that there should
be with the modern times.”
The conversation
started on Twitter after
this magazine tweeted a
link to a story on the
Canadian Trucking
Alliance’s (CTA) much
anticipated Blue Ribbon
Task Force on the
Driver Shortage.
What Lehman was
referring to, specifically,
was the rate of pay in the
trucking industry for
drivers—something the
TODAY’S TRUCKING
Blue Ribbon report notes
as one of the key issues of
the driver shortage, among
many other core problems.
The report is refreshingly honest in tone and
approach, not wishy-washy
like much of the literature
on the subject. It also puts
the burden of the driver
shortage directly onto
the carriers.
“It is the carriers—the
entities that hire, fire,
determine what and how
to pay their drivers, who
price their service and deal
with their customers—who
are ultimately responsible
for their businesses and
therefore for ensuring they
have the people to do the
work,” the report states.
While governments,
customers, and associations all have a role to play,
nothing is going to change
until the carriers first take
action themselves, the
report concludes.
But there are a couple
of things that need to
happen before a full-blown
action plan can be put
into motion, the report
soberly states.
“The first most basic
thing the industry needs to
PUT’IM THERE:
Not everybody agrees on
the best way to attract
drivers to your trucks.
do is to quantify the driver
shortage in the coming
years and forecast its
potential impact on the
Canadian economy if not
addressed […] The industry
cannot rely upon out-dated
or anecdotal information.”
The Blue Ribbon report
“Truck driver compensation packages need to
be competitive with or
better than alternative
employment options
and more transparent.”
— Blue Ribbon Report
calls on the CTA to conduct a
study to provide up-to-date
facts and a forecast of the
driver shortage. It needs to
look at the problem from a
national, regional and
provincial perspective over
the next 5 to 10 years, and
then address the impact on
the Canadian economy.
POINTS OF
CONTENTION
The Blue Ribbon Report
doesn’t gloss over differences
of opinion on the driver
shortage, but instead calls
them out.
The first debate? Whether
the industry should address
the driver shortage at all.
“There is an argument that
the current rate environment
is not conducive to making
the kinds of changes (particularly in the area of driver
compensation) needed to
address the problem in a
meaningful way. It is a fact
that the industry has, since
economic deregulation
occurred in the 1980s, often
been plagued with overcapacity, which has been
reflected in depressed freight
rates, inadequate ROI and
squeezed margins. There
is a case to be made, at least
in the short-term period
of modest and uncertain
economic growth that “the
driver shortage is your
friend”; that it is creating
tightness in capacity that in
turn creates the economic
backdrop for upward pressure on freight rates and
the conditions for improved
profitability.”
Proponents of the “driver
shortage is your friend”
argument, says the report,
believe that the shortage will
be addressed by allowing
market forces to work—
that a crisis is needed for
market conditions to
change enough to address
the driver shortage.
That’s short-term thinking, the report says. It is not
sustainable, and it shouldn’t
take a crisis to solve the
problem. “Unless the industry begins to address the
issue, the combination of a
shrinking labour pool and
economic growth will, at
some point in the future,
create a situation where the
industry will not be able to
meet standards of service
that have been the hallmark
of trucking’s rise to become
the predominant mode
of freight transportation
in Canada.”
The report lists what it
calls “core values” that must
first be established in order
to address the underpinnings
of the problem:
Driver Demographics
Truck drivers are our most
important asset, the face of
the industry—to our customers and to the public;
They are deserving of
respect;
Their welfare is at the core
of the industry’s success;
People of all ages, genders,
religions, and races are
welcome to work in the
industry so long as they
meet our standards of safe
driving, performance and
professional conduct.
Driver Compensation
Truck drivers should have an
improved ability to predict
what their weekly pay is
going to be;
Truck driver compensation
packages need to be competitive with or better than alternative employment options
and more transparent;
Truck drivers should be
paid for all the work that
they do and earn enough to
cover all reasonable out-ofpocket expenses incurred
while on the road for
extended periods.
Driver Quality of Life
Truck drivers should be able
plan their lives like most
other employees and predict
or anticipate their time away
from work;
MAY 2012
9
Dispatches
Their time at work should
not be wasted—at shipper/
consignee premises, waiting
for their trucks in the shop,
or waiting for a response to
a question of their carrier;
They should be able to
rely on their carrier not to
interfere with their personal
time by (for example) calling
them back to work early;
Driver wellness should be
a top priority for employers;
Driver security while on
the road should also be a
priority with the rise in
cargo crime.
Driver Qualifications
A minimum standard of
entry level, apprenticeship
or apprenticeship-like truck
driver training should be
mandatory;
Truck driving should be
considered a skilled trade
and be recognized as such
by the various levels and
NO, SERIOUSLY,
BABY, WE MEAN
IT—WE’LL
CHANGE!
Many drivers have lost faith
in their relationship with
upper management, in the
industry itself. They’ve heard
these promises before.
Those core values need to
be adopted by industry leaders, and the message needs
to be strong so that current
and future drivers will
realize they are indeed
serious, the report stresses.
“Everything in the report
has been discussed at one
time or another,” a driver
with 35 years behind him
writes in an email. “You tell
me who is going to step up
and say that, starting
tomorrow, 300,000 men and
women must be paid for
that time?”
There’s no “magic bullet,”
no one solution fits all, the
report acknowledges, and it’s
going to take a long, multiyear effort.”
“But,” the report acknowledges, “it is also an industry
of problem-solvers and
innovators.” — Jason Rhyno
WELCOME TO
TWIN
LAKES
POPULATION: 2
Twin Lakes Paradise is
located in Alberta on
McKenzie Highway North,
between Peace River and
High Level—about a halfhour north of Manning, and
one and a half hour south
of High Level.
There is a gift shop
with very unique things,
a restaurant with great
SIGHT FOR SORE DRIVERS: Kindly take off your shoes when you enter this home away from home.
branches of government,
standards councils, etc.,
who certify such things;
There should be a program
of mandatory ongoing training and/or recertification
(e.g., TDG Act, pre-trip
inspection, load securement,
hours of service, etc.)
throughout a driver’s career.
10
TODAY’S TRUCKING
While he admitted that
everything in the report is
“bang on,” and reminded
him of how trucking used to
be when he first started driving, actions speak louder
than words. Only time will
tell if this report will light a
fire under the industry’s
collective butts.
food, fully licensed, and a
very quiet motel currently
being renovated.
All the baking is homemade, and they try to serve
healthy food as much as
possible. Open hours may
vary depending on the season, but as a rule it is open
from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
and sometimes I’ve seen
them open later.
Rosanne ( “Rosie” to
friends) Mitchell operates
the store and restaurant
while Peter Lear takes care
of the premises, the yard and
the camping grounds. He is
also a talented mechanic
and inventor who enjoys fabricating all kind of tools for
their maintenance needs.
You must see the inside of
this place to appreciate how
great a carpenter he is.
They live on the premises
and are always willing to
help stranded motorists.
Rosie is a perfectionist about
keeping a very clean place—
you must remove your shoes
at the door before going
further. You’ll know why
when you will visit the place.
For the one in need of a
toilet but doesn’t want to
remove his shoes, they’ve
also installed a new addition
called Honest Joe’s Trading.
It is a small building where
you can use the inside
outhouse 24 hours a day,
where you can trade something with anything that is
inside and you can also sit
down, read a book or play a
card game.
There is some neat stuff to
trade, and if you have nothing
to trade with, dropping a few
coins in the money bank is
always welcome.
And believe me everything is clean. The inside
washrooms allow you to
relax with magazines, with
the men’s room walls decorated with Rosie’s favorite
idol Marilyn Monroe. On the
women’s bathroom walls
there are plenty of Anne
Geddes’ baby pictures.
The restaurant is home to
a collection of over 600
teapots; some old, some new,
Dispatches
june 2012
logbook
3-5
The Logistics and Supply Chain
Spring Forum 2012
The Doral Resort, Florida
Power-networking for senior logistics and
supply chain decision makers and providers of
logistics/supply chain products and services.
Contact: Robert Houston: 212-651 8766
Website: www.logisticsforum.com
8-10
BCTA Conference and
Annual General Meeting
Fairmont Chateau Whistler Resort, Whistler, B.C.
BCTA Annual Convention.
Contact: 604-888-5319
Website: www.bctrucking.com
16
Alberta Truck Driving Championships
Roseneau Transport, Calgary
Alberta’s top drivers test compete for best
in the west. Sponsored by the Alberta Motor
Transport Association
Contact: 780-448-7456
Website: www.amta.ca
20-21
august
Private Motor Truck Council of Canada,
2012 Annual Conference
Kingbridge Conference Centre
and Institute, King City
Contact: 905-827-0587
Website: www.pmtc.ca
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2-5
Rodeo du Camion
NOTRE DAME DU NORD, Quebec
The Rodeo attracts upwards of 60,000 people to
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Go Online
for more events, visit
todaystrucking.com
National Network
National Warranty
N
Pros all the Way
P
Dispatches
some useable and some not. This is a
big attraction for everyone. The decor is
somewhat new, but done with lots of
antiques. They love seeing people come
through the front door with a big smile,
saying “Wow, this place is awesome.”
“Our company is our customers,”
Rosie says, “who we like sharing stories
and experiences with. In today’s society,
there just is not enough one-on-one
anymore. Everyone is in a hurry. No one
has time to share.”
The population of Twin Lakes is two,
as far as humans. Then you add two
more: Pussycat and Critter, their cats.
Twin Lakes Paradise was built in
1972 and I have been stopping at this
place for rest, relaxation, great food
and friendship since 1982. Rosie and
Pete have owned it for the past eight
years and have always treated me
as one of their trusted friends. By
writing this I’m hoping to get them
recognized in the trucking industry
because they always strive to serve
the truckers. On Thanksgiving, all the
meals were free for the truck drivers
and it was open for them only.
— Rene Robert
Author and owner-operator Rene Robert
was the very first Highwaystar of the Year.
THE BRITISH ARE
BRAKING!
And we’re speeding, apparently. A
recent report by GreenRoad, a
company that offers driver performance
and safety management tools for
fleets, highlights some interesting
differences between North American
fleets with those across the pond
in the U.K.
The report, titled 2011 Worldwide
Fleet Driver Performance Benchmark,
aggregated 2011 data representing
actual driving behavior of 85,000 fleet
drivers logging over 127 million trips
and 7.4 billion miles across North
America and United Kingdom.
Driving was measured across five
major categories: braking, acceleration,
corner handling, lane handling and
speeding. Data was collected and
12
TODAY’S TRUCKING
WHO’S ON THE
BLUE RIBBON
TASK FORCE?
Paul Easson (CTA Chair), Eassons Transport, NS
Gord Peddle (CTA Executive Committee, Chairman of the Canadian
Trucking Human Resources Council (CTHRC), Atlantic Diversified, NF
Don Streuber (CTA 1st Vice Chair), Bison Transport, MB
Mark Seymour (CTA 2nd Vice Chair), Kriska Transportation, ON
Brian Taylor (CTA Board, OTA Chair), Liberty Linehaul, ON
Bruno Muller (CTA Immediate Past Chair), Caron Transport, AB
Ed Malysa (CTA Executive Committee), Trimac Transportation, AB
Carl Rosenau (CTA Board, Alberta Motor Transport Association
(AMTA) Chair), Rosenau Transport, AB — By Jason Rhyno
calculated to determine a safety
score—the lower the better.
Geographic differences between
the two regions show in the category
breakdown: North America’s most dominant safety event was speeding, making
up for 40 percent of the average safety
score’s risky maneuvers. In the U.K., it
was the exact opposite of speeding:
harsh braking, coming in at 43 percent.
For North America, sharp cornering
was second, at 26 percent, with harsh
braking following at 16 percent, lane
handling at 10 percent and rapid
acceleration at eight percent.
Sharp cornering was also second in
the U.K., at 39 percent, lane handling
and acceleration at 8 percent each and
speeding at 2 percent.
“U.K. fleet routes are largely urban
environments with extensive roundabouts and other road features that
require precise cornering ability,”
says Jim Heeger, chief executive of
GreenRoad. “On the other hand, North
American fleets tend to drive in a more
mixed environment of urban, suburban
and rural environments with more
freeway and highway driving, thus you
see the tendency for fleet drivers to
speed in the U.S.”
The data also showed that 11:00 p.m.
to 1:00 a.m. is the riskiest driving time
in North America, and in the U.K.,
11:00 p.m. to midnight is riskiest. In
the U.K., December is the safest fleet
driving month, and January the riskiest
month, while in North America,
average safety scores do not vary
widely month-to-month.
Taken together, the GreenRoad
worldwide average safety score dropped
to 22 versus 29, a 24-percent drop—
something both the Brits and we here
in the colonies can be proud of.
— Jason Rhyno
Dispatches
Heard
BESTWAY
on the
Street CLEM DALESSANDRO
In Memoriam
FOUNDER
WAS RESPECTED, PASSIONATE LEADER
Clem Dalessandro loved his wife Laurie, his daughters Gina and Jessica, his son Vince,
his granddaughter Naomi, antique cars and the trucking business.
Dalessandro died Saturday April 7 at Credit Valley Hospital in Mississauga just three
weeks after being diagnosed with cancer. He was 62.
Dalessandro was the founder of Bestway Cartage Ltd, which he started in 1976.
He moved to Canada from his native Italy at 13 and had a small business as a residential
painter before getting into trucking.
Over the years he grew Bestway from a one-straight-truck local p&d operation to a fleet
of more than 50 trucks and 100 trailers, handling LTL shipments throughout the Golden
Horseshoe area and to and from the U.S.A.
He retired in August 2011 and handed
the Bestway reins to his brother Peter and
his friend and colleague Larry Franch.
Dalessandro, Franch told
todaystrucking.com, was a
well-respected businessman
whose charm and sense of humor won him many friends in the industry.
“Clem had a passion for the service industry, especially the
trucking industry,” Franch said. “Whether he was meeting with
customers or dealing with new equipment salespeople, he
always took the time to get to know them on a personal level.
“He truly enjoyed the friendships he built from his years at
Bestway. He respected his employees and always held truck
drivers in the highest regard.”
“Clem was a big fan of good wine, good food and a good
golf course,” Franch added.
A funeral service was held at Scott Funeral Home in
Mississauga, Thursday, April 12, at 11:30 a.m.
‘‘
Clem had a passion
for the service
industry, especially
the trucking industry.
T
he Canadian Trucking
Alliance has announced
the new executive committee
of the board of directors for the
2012-14 term. The officers are:
Chairman: Don Streuber,
President, Bison Transport,
Winnipeg, MB
1st Vice Chairman: Mark Seymour, President, Kriska Transportation, Prescott, ON
2nd Vice Chairman: Gene Orlick, President, Orlicks Transport Inc., Calgary, AB
Treasurer: Scott Smith, President, J.D. Smith & Sons Limited, Vaughan, ON
Secretary: Ed Malysa, President & COO, Trimac Transportation Ltd., Calgary, AB
The League
of
EXTRAORDINARY
TRUCKERS
The at-large members of the Executive Committee are:
Gord Peddle, President, Atlantica Diversified Transportation Systems, Mt. Pearl, NF
Jean-Claude Fortin, President, J.E. Fortin Inc., St-Bernard-de-Lacolle, QC
Gord Smith, President, Manitoulin Transport Inc., Gore Bay, ON
Murray Scadeng, President, Triton Transport Ltd., Langley, BC
Paul Easson of Eassons Transport is the outgoing chairman.
Trimac’s $9-million
expansion
The largest bulk hauler in Canada,
Trimac Transportation Ltd., has
closed its previously announced
acquisition of a 29-percent interest
in Northern Resource Trucking
Limited Partnership for a purchase
price of $9 million. The “cash-andshare” transaction saw $1 million of
the purchase price paid in cash and
the rest by the issuance of 1,720,430
Class A shares of Trimac.
Ingersoll ramps up
One of the brightest spots in the
southeastern Ontario economy shone
just a little brighter. Ingersoll Axles
(a division of IMT Company), based in
the town of the same name, took its
maiden bow at the huge Mid America
Trucking Show in Kentucky with the
introduction of a line of Ontario-built
heavy-duty suspensions.
People
Move
on the
The Trucking Safety Council of BC
(TSCBC) announced yesterday the
appointment of John McMahon to
Executive Director.
Formerly the Director of Operations
& Marketing at FIOSA-MIOSA Safety
Alliance of BC, McMahon is a senior
Environmental Health & Safety
Practitioner with international
experience working across a broad
range of industry sectors, including
transportation and trucking.
MAY 2012
13
S I T ED
ON T HE
W EB
Rodeo To Ride Again!
NOTRE DAME DU NORD — Show Manager Lorraine McLean told
todaystrucking.com that despite some uncertainty heading into
2012, local supporters of this annual trucking extravaganza have
re-organized with a new board of directors, a new manager (her)
and renewed enthusiasm.
MORE @ http://ow.ly/ad4W7
A Little Trucking Bird Told Me…
Want up-to-the-minute industry news?
Want to join the conversation on all things trucking?
FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @todaystrucking
From
@todaystrucking
Twitter Feed
Dodge the Deer:
Wildlife-Detection System
Means Safer Roads
NORTHERN ONTARIO — The Ontario
Ministry of Transportation (MTO) is
taking some extraordinary (and quite
space-age) measures to cut down the
number of truck-animal collisions.
Todaystrucking.com caught up with a
government spokesman who explained
the life-saving technology.
MORE @ http://ow.ly/ad59c
VIDEO: How to Haul 800,000 lb.
Generator Vessels
This is cool on a few levels. Perkins Specialized Transportation
Contracting of Northfield, Minnesota, needed to transport 800,000 lb.
decommissioned generator vessels from a San Onofre, California,
nuclear generating station to a Clive, Utah, disposal site.
MORE @ http://ow.ly/ad5LK
Got Facebook?
So do we. Come write on our wall.
facebook.com/TodaysTrucking
14
TODAY’S TRUCKING
MORE @ twitter.com/todaystrucking
Dispatches
February 2012
Eastern
Canada
14.2%
3,000
International 314
669
537
15.7%
20.5%
2,500
Peterbilt
329
558
296
13.1%
11.3%
2,000
Volvo
157
336
275
7.9%
10.5%
Western Star
151
319
169
7.5%
6.4%
Mack
152
270
146
6.3%
5.6%
TOTAL
2151
4264
www.easterncanada.cummins.com
• Wholesale parts
distribution
• Retail parts sales
• Engine and
power generation
equipment sales
• Maintenance & Repair
1,500
1,000
500
0
12-month Class-8 Sales
2624 100.0% 100.0%
30.2%
Kenworth
33
64
62
13.9%
20.8%
Peterbilt
35
50
34
10.8%
11.4%
Hino Canada
21
40
36
8.7%
12.1%
TOTAL
217
461
298 100.0% 100.0%
300
U.S. – Retail Truck Sales
CLASS 8
150
0
12-month Class-7 Sales
40.6%
50.7%
21
37
48
13.2%
35.8%
2
3
0
1.1%
0.0%
198
281
Hino Canada
Peterbilt
TOTAL
134 100.0% 100.0%
CLASS 5 This Month YTD ’12 YTD ’11 Share ’12 Share ’11
Hino Canada 132
213
151
60.0% 84.4%
International 79
108
25
30.4% 14.0%
Mitsubishi Fuso 13
25
0
7.0%
0.0%
Freightliner
4
4
1
1.1%
0.6%
Kenworth
1
3
0
0.8%
0.0%
Peterbilt
2
2
2
0.6%
1.1%
TOTAL
231
355
179 100.0% 100.0%
100
Feb. 2012
68
Jan. 2012
114
300
200
100
5760
10,300
34.9%
International
2628
6004
20.3%
Kenworth
2437
4435
15.0%
Peterbilt
2035
4063
13.8%
Mack
1020
2221
7.5%
Volvo
1354
2114
7.2%
184
398
1.3%
0
2
0.0%
Other
TOTAL
12-month Class-6 Sales
0
21,000
20,000
19,000
18,000
17,000
16,000
15,000
14,000
13,000
12,000
11,000
10,000
9,000
12-month Class-5 Sales
YTD ’12 Share ’12
Freightliner
Western Star
0
Jan. 2012
Feb.’12
International 102
200
Dec. 2011
13.4%
Nov. 2011
45.2%
Oct. 2011
18
July 2011
Aug. 2011
Sept. 2011
Oct. 2011
Nov. 2011
Dec. 2011
127
March 2011
73
April 2011
May 2011
June 2011
Freightliner
Mar. ’11
April 2011
May 2011
June 2011
July 2011
Aug. 2011
Sept. 2011
CLASS 6 This Month YTD ’12 YTD ’11 Share ’12 Share ’11
This Month
15,418 29,537 100.0%
May 2011
June 2011
27.8%
March 2011
90
April 2011
128
Jan. 2012
62
Feb. 2012
International
450
Dec. ’11
25.5%
Nov. 2011
38.8%
Oct. ‘11
76
Sept. ’11
179
Aug. 2011
66
June ’11
July 2011
Freightliner
Mar. ’11
April ’11
May ’11
CLASS 7 This Month YTD ’12 YTD ’11 Share ’12 Share ’11
February 2012
20.8%
Dec. 2011
January 2012
372
Oct. 2011
Nov. 2011
889
Sept. 2011
450
Jan. 2012
Feb. 2012
Kenworth
Nov. ’11
3,500
Dec. ’11
31.6%
Oct. 2011
28.7%
Sept. 2011
829
June ’11
July 2011
Aug. 2011
1223
May ’11
598
Mar. 2011
Freightliner
Apr. 2011
CLASS 8 This Month YTD ’12 YTD ’11 Share ’12 Share ’11
July 2011
August 2011
Canada – Truck Sales Index
12-month Class-8 Sales, United States
Canada – Provincial Sales (Class 8)
CLASS 8
Freightliner
Kenworth
International
Peterbilt
Volvo
Western Star
Mack
TOTAL
YTD 2012
BC
AB
SK
MB
ON
QC
NB
NS
PE
NL
CDA
32
48
13
31
6
36
8
174
399
49
209
41
119
11
52
29
510
1017
13
11
11
21
11
7
17
91
144
43
18
23
35
15
4
15
153
275
335
73
131
66
66
15
49
735
1468
91
85
64
53
35
16
25
369
728
10
6
22
4
10
4
7
63
127
22
0
6
0
2
17
1
48
84
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
3
0
2
0
1
0
1
7
21
598
450
314
329
157
151
152
2151
4264
Sources: Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers Association and Ward’s Communication.
Sterling ceased production in 2009 and has been removed from the truck sales listing.
MAY 2012
15
Street Smarts
INSIDE:
19 Top 10 Lessons Learned
in Kentucky
MANAGING PEOPLE, TECHNOLOGY, BUSINESS, AND SAFETY
EIGHT IS ENOUGH: Canadian Driver Derek Martin (far right) went nose-to-nose
against these other drivers for the title “World’s Toughest Trucker.”
Derek Martin:
The World’s Toughest Trucker?
What an already excellent driver can learn from a most unusual competition. By Peter Carter
T
ruck driver Derek Martin sat
behind the steering wheel of
the right-hand-drive Kenworth,
peered over his left shoulder to his codriver and navigator Mike Thomas-Clark
and stated the obvious. They were lost.
They weren’t just lost, lost. The pair—
Martin from Hamilton, ON., Thomas-Clark
from Scotland—were tens of thousands of
miles from home with nothing more than
16
TODAY’S TRUCKING
a backpacker’s GPS to guide them. They
had driven off course about 40 km earlier
and they were in the Australian desert.
Worse, they were on the verge of watching
a $150,000 prize go up in fumes.
The men were two of eight drivers from
around the world vying for the right to call
themselves the World’s Toughest Trucker.
It was day two of what would eventually
be a total of 18 days (filmed in various
chunks over nine weeks) of competition
in Australia, Mongolia, Squamish B.C.,
the jungles of Brazil, and two locations in
India. The competition is basically an
eight-team four-truck cross-country rally,
with organizers assigning points for timeliness, speed, skill and problem-solving
but detracting points for tardiness, driving too fast, damage or problem-creating.
Their very first assignment found them
Street Smarts
near Alice Springs, Australia, where the
eight drivers had to learn quickly how to
load cattle into oversized trailers and
then navigate across the outback. (In real
life, Martin delivers automobiles around
Southern Ontario)
Day One had gone well for Martin and
Thomas-Clark.
Right off the start, a little fuelling trick
that Martin figured out gave them a huge
head start. The film crew told them that
the day’s trip would be about 600 miles
and instructed them to fuel accordingly.
“The thing is, my tank was already
three quarters full,” Martin laughs. “So I
just put in five bucks worth and headed
out and the rest of the them lost a lot of
time filling up their fuel even though they
didn’t need to.”
So Martin and Thomas-Clark nabbed a
serious 40-point head start.
Then on day two, they
missed the turn. They knew
they were losing ground to
the other competitors. And
they also knew that as part
of the competition, at least
two of the drivers would be
sent home, dropped from
the competition.
They took a GPS reading,
found their way back to the
road, and a few hours later,
Martin steered his rig over
a rise, expecting to see
nothing by Australian desert
ahead.
But down the slope, they saw all three of
their competitors, mired in mud up to the
axles; stuck solid. It was a happy moment
for Martin and Thomas-Clark. If they hadn’t made a wrong turn, they would have
been the first truck into the mud but
because they erred, they avoided the trap
altogether and emerged, from the first
round of the competition, in first place.
“It was so bad they had to walk an excavator 250 km in to there to get those trucks
out,” Martin laughs now, months later.
The World’s Toughest Trucker, a
Discovery Channel special, debuted in
Canada in mid April. It runs for eight
episodes. By the eighth, the competition
will be down to three competitors. (One
writer said the program is like “Ice Road
Truckers meets Survivor.”)
At the time of this writing, we did not
know if Martin had won. He wasn’t
allowed to tell us. What we can tell you is
that Martin was a top performer from day
one and advanced to the final competition
in India.
As well, we can tell you that, according
to Martin, the descriptive “tough” actually
applies. These teams were put through
serious paces. And Martin learned some
very important lessons about trucking.
The first challenge he faced, he said,
was the surprising climatic shocks. “The
climate changes were incredible,” he said.
“I’ve never seen humidity like we had in
Brazil. And Mongolia was freezing, though
that was okay with me.”
Very little of the driving was on pavement. Martin estimates that 90 percent of
the tasks were on dirt or gravel roads. “And
in the Himalayas, where there’s no guard
rails we were going down these singlelane mountain roads battling school
buses for room.”
And in British Columbia, the eight drivers were tasked with hauling 53-ft logs
down mountains. On silty one-lane trails.
These are hills you descend slower than
you go up.
“You drive down the mountains in
second gear, and if you miss one of those
hairpin turns, you don’t get a second
chance,” he says.
“When I was coming down I was
completely focused. My partner Stuart
was in the passenger seat making jokes
and comments but I didn’t hear him. I was
just completely driving.” (Martin passed
that test in more ways than one. One of
the B.C. carriers offered both him and
Stuart full-time jobs.)
Furthermore, the competitors were
trying to navigate using GPS in foreign
countries where passers-by spoke strange
languages. Even Google Translate doesn’t
attempt Mongolian.
Martin also learned a very valuable
lesson about the compatibility of teams.
The show’s producers made the drivers
work in pairs, and they all spent some
time in cabs together.
“No wonder some companies pay you
more if you’re a team driver,” Martin says.
MRS. TOUGH: Martin’s wife Jennifer also
drives for the same carrier, Automobile
Transportation Services.
Derek Martin
MAY 2012
17
“Superior
moisture
protection
for the best
durability.”
Learn more at prolamfloors.com
:h_l[dXo?ddelWj_ed
Street Smarts
“I’m not a team driver and after this, I’m
not sure I could ever be one.”
In several episodes, the drivers lose
their composure; and Martin says the
emotions viewers see on the screen are
real. “In one episode I’m with a guy named
Rodney and he totally loses it; he was just
goin’ nuts and throwing the GPS and
papers around.”
“Truck drivers can be a pretty tightly
wound bunch, you know,” he said.
One competitor quit three times. “He
actually jumped out of the truck in
Mongolia and walked three kilometers
back to the motel he was so mad.”
Early on, Martin earned the nickname
“Iceman” because he wasn’t one to lose
his cool. He’s a soft-spoken extremely
articulate, 36-year-old father of four. His
wife Jennifer Martin who also drives
for the same company can attest to his
calm demeanor.
“Derek is very easy going, easy to get
along with and will do anything for you,”
she says. “While other drivers lose their
cool, Derek always seems to stay calm
and collected.”
He admits to losing his composure once
on the show. He was trying to back an
oversized load into a space but his spotter
Mike wasn’t doing his job. “I sorta got
frustrated when he was just walking
around back there and not guiding me,”
Martin says.
After all, it was his backing up skills
that earned him a place on the show.
By pure coincidence, Martin happened
to stop at a Flying J in Montreal last
year at the same time as the show’s talent
scouts were there. One of the show
staffers watched him blindsidedly back his
’05 Pete 379 into a parking space and
approached him about auditioning.
TOP 10 LESSONS LEARNED IN KENTUCKY
T
he public part of the huge
MID AMERICA TRUCKING SHOW
(MATS) is huge but so is that part
of the show given over to equipment
announcements, at which industry
insiders and members of the press hear
from truck builders and industry suppliers
as they outline their plans and new
products for the coming year. For the
2012 show, the operative cliché of the
show seemed to be integration, which
company after company heralded as
they talked about the apparent inherent
advantages of having drive trains, axles,
engines and transmissions all emerge
from the same factories.
However it wasn’t all integration.
TODAY’S TRUCKING’s small platoon
of reporters attended the events
and distilled the following “10 Most
Memorables” that seem to sum up
the industry, as we know it today.
“Data is the new oil.”
— Joe McAleese, President and
CEO of Bendix Commercial Systems LLC,
on the importance of information on
trucking going to back office.
“The cost of a human fatality is now
$7 million; it used to be $3 million.”
— Ibid., McAleese.
“You design a cab around the door.”
— Preston Feight, Kenworth Chief
Engineer at launch of Kenworth’s new
T680, Kenworth’s most aerodynamic
truck to date.
“Magnesium/calcium chloride
and winter road chemicals are a
10
9
8
7
She took his photo, asked for some references, and then a few months later contacted him again and asked for more information. He eventually won the audition
over about 10,000 other Canadian truckers.
“The funny thing is they had no idea if
we could even drive or not,” Martin said
during a recent visit to our offices.
If you go to the Toughest Trucker
website, you’ll find him described thusly:
“A confident friendly guy with a passion
for trucks, and a serious habit of keeping
his cab in immaculate condition. He
comes from a trucking family and just
married a fellow trucker.”
cancer that’s been affecting our products
and that is corrosion.”
— Adam Hill, Vice President, Product
and Sales Engineering, Great Dane at
product demonstration.
“2012 could be the fourth-best year in
North American Class-8 market history.”
— Bill Kozek, Peterbilt General Manager
and PACCAR Vice President at launch of
Peterbilt’s new 579.
“This isn’t going to be about barbeque
sauce and mirror brackets, this is
going to be real stuff.”
— Jim Hebe, Senior Vice President,
Northern Sales Operations, Navistar Inc.,
introducing his company’s expansion
into natural gas powered engines.
“The move to natural gas is an
incredibly important move for us;
even more for our customers and for the
country; and International’s doing the
right thing for this country.”
— Ibid, Hebe.
“Tracking is because you can’t
be everywhere you’d like to be.”
— Gayatri Abbott, Global Director of
SMART products & Telemetics EM,
discussing Thermo King’s TracKIng
software program.
“I think 40 percent of the sale in refuse
industry will be CNG and I think it’ll go
up in the next few years.”
— Kevin Flaherty, President Mack Trucks
North American Sales & Marketing.
“It’s the fuel economy, stupid.”
— Dave McKenna, Director,
Powertrain Sales, talking about Mack’s
Super Econodyne integrated package.
6
5
4
3
2
1
With 16 safe and proud years of trucking under his belt, Martin is quick to credit
his employer Drew Krueger for giving him
support during the filming. His company,
Auto Transportation Services, held his job
open for him. (The film company paid
him to take his truck off the road so he
wouldn’t lose money and Martin said he
put in a lot of overtime in the months
leading up to the filming so the family
wouldn’t fall behind.)
Plus Kreuger held his job for him.
“Drew,” Martin says, “has been fabulous
with all this; and I couldn’t have done it
without him.” ▲
MAY 2012
19
HE’S JUST
NOT
THAT
INTO
YOU
dustry,
n
I
g
in
k
c
u
r
T
r
Dea
nments are
working enviro
ent,
well, your
career advancem
You don’t pay
f
o
k
c
la
a
s
e’
er
unfavorable, th e just not that cool.
’r
u
yo
y,
and frankl
r You.
Sincerely,
ant to Work fo
W
t
n’
o
D
o
h
W
e
Talented Peopl
Your industry
is going to need
BY JASON RHYNO
That’s the general attitude towards careers in the transportation
and logistics (T&L), according to a recent report titled Winning the
Talent Race, part of PwC’s Transportation and Logistics 2030 series.
There will be over eight billion people living on Earth in 2030,
the report states. More people means more production, and that
means the transportation and logistics industry will have to keep a
lot more goods flowing a hell of a lot faster.
It’s 2012 now, baby boomers are going to start retiring and the
pool of future transportation and logistics employees is drying
up. The Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals estimates that the U.S. trucking industry will need to hire one million new drivers in the next 15 years just to deal with replacing
retirees and the increasing levels of freight.
This shouldn’t come as a surprise. “It’s been an issue that has
plagued us for a while,” said Ken Evans, U.S. transportation &
logistics leader for PwC. “Typically, we aren’t subject to violent
swings in transportation demand. Normally, we grow about the
rate of GDP. But it’s kind of staggering when you look at the basic
math and what our needs are going to be.”
20
TODAY’S TRUCKING
One
Million
More
People
Very soon. Here’s how you’re
going to attract them.
Like Yourself
And Others Will Like You Too
While there are different schools of thought on
what constitutes a solid brand, authenticity is key.
“For an employer brand to be successful over
the long-term,” explained PwC, “it needs to be
authentic. So if you’re promoting advancement
opportunities, but most potential high-flyers
complain they’ve hit a dead end mid-career,
you’ll need to rethink either your
recruiting messaging or your
development procedures.”
A STRONG NEED for a
better and
“sexier” image
for the industry,
notes the PwC report, pointing to Apple
and Google as the two most valuable
brands last year—and also the
two employers that most young
professionals wanted
to work for.
The biggest hurdle is the image of transportation careers, and
the industry is going to have to update its look and style, if you
will, to compete with other sectors. The industry as a whole—
all over the world, not just here in North America—has some
very particular challenges right now. Compensation and benefits
consistently place near the bottom end of industry wage comparison lists. The adoption of technology is changing the very nature of
the jobs, government regulations are increasing while infrastructure and congestion is worsening.
All of these challenges, Evans explains, are magnified by the
negative image. And as far as image goes, there’s also the problem
of transparency. While jobs in logistics bring up the bottom on top
places to work lists, the transportation industry doesn’t even read
on the job-hunting radar.
There’s a strong need for a better and “sexier” image for the
industry, notes the PwC report, pointing to Apple and Google
as the two most valuable brands last year—and also the two
employers that most young professionals wanted to work for.
That’s not to say that transportation companies should become
like Apple and Google, but rather that they should put more effort
into branding the company. Branding isn’t only good for tech
firms; accounting firms, oil and gas, mining companies—all put
considerable money and effort into their brand image, into HR, as
well as programs that help not only groom new, young hires, but
also the more seasoned employees who bring all that valuable
experience.
For Evans, that’s the first step. “Upgrade and put the focus on
HR professionals in the industry,” he advises. Currently, HR people
in the transportation industry spend most of their time hiring
people because of the significant amount of turnover in the business. “There is a lot of time devoted to filling up the seats, and
searching for qualified people, but a lot more can be done and will
have to be done to improve the image and the brand of their company. Having more and better trained HR professionals is a step in
the right direction.”
When it comes to branding and becoming an employer of
choice, the first place to start is internally. Having a stronger HR
department will help clean up your house—it’s what they do.
They’ll help create employee-centric programs, aid in recruiting
efforts, and fine-tune the uniqueness of your particular company—
your brand. This, as one of PwC’s experts notes, should reflect the
characteristics of top management, who are often the role models
for the general workforce and company culture.
MAY 2012
21
Volvo Trucks. Driving Success.
®
PROVEN FUEL EFFICIENCY
so you can get more out of every drop.
“Our Volvo trucks are delivering excellent fuel economy
across the board, and we have the data to support it.”
– Dean DeSantis, Heritage Transport
Find out how to maximize your fuel efficiency
at your nearest Volvo dealer, or visit us at volvotruckscanada.com.
©2012 Volvo Group North America, LLC
He’s Just Not That Into You
SUPPLY CHAIN &
LOGISTICS EXECUTIVE
2010/2011
EMPLOYMENT
MARKET SURVEY
EMPLOYER VALUES
15
20
%
REPORT
‘Employer values’ rates almost as high
as ‘more money’ as the top reason for
taking a job at a logistics company.
MORE MONEY
Experience and age will always trump youth in
the transportation industry. Asked what makes a quality driver,
Evans stressed people who maintained a career in driving for many
years. “They are dedicated, they are disciplined in how they drive and how
they approach the job. They take in pride in high performance. More and more
they are in their forties and fifties as opposed to their 20’s and 30’s. And drive millions
of miles without an accident without an issue of any kind.”
So that begs the question, how do we get tomorrow’s drivers up to snuff?
“I have a daughter-in-law who finished nursing school and she can’t find a job because
everyone wants a nurse who has a year or more in nursing,” Evans said.“It’s the same thing
with drivers. The best companies want the best drivers to have been driving for years, but
you can’t get a job without experience. So where do those people come from? More
emphasis has to be on training programs for drivers where they can come in and be
apprenticed for a period of time, go to driving school, team with other drivers. The
industry has to change its views. Yes, we need to get that experience but we have
to get those people qualified and they need to invest more upfront to keep
people coming into the business.”
%
SOURCE:
National Statistics Offices,
PwC Analysis
TRUCKING’S
CATCH-22
COMPARISON OF
YEAR-OLDS
WAGE LEVELS
ACROSS INDUSTRIES
United Kingdom
US
$70,000
(2010)
$65,150
-33%
$60,000
(2010)
£60,000
£51,620
£50,000
$43,400
$50,000
$40,000
£40,000
-46%
£30,000
£28,022
$30,000
£20,000
SOURCE:
National
Statistics Offices,
PwC Analysis
$20,000
£10,000
$10,000
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MAY 2012
23
He’s Just Not That Into You
Corporate values tied with job security
as the third most cited criteria (after ‘more
money’ and ‘career advancement’) for reasons of accepting a job with a company,
Supply Chain & Logistics Executive
2010/2011 Employment Market Survey
Report. Fifteen percent rated it as the
most important factor in their decision to
accept a position with a company. This,
too, is a part of your brand.
PwC advises looking internally to get a
sense of your brand. What do employees
value about the company? Why do people
want to leave to work somewhere else?
Conversely, you can look outside your
company, too. What types of people come
knocking at your door?
Once company culture has been established internally, you can start to make it
public. HR can write articles, give interviews to trade magazines like this one—
truth be told, this magazine gets a whack
of press releases from carriers that want to
let us know they have raised wages or
implemented such and such program for
drivers. And they aren’t large carriers,
either—many are small- to medium-size
carriers. But they are mostly American.
A shortage of training programs topped
with insufficient learning and development
is also hurting many companies, PwC
noted. “The quality of the professionals in
the business needs to improve,” Evans says.
“The distinct profitability advantage of
having highly qualified individuals at all
levels of the organization, especially drivers
—the top ten or 20 percent of your drivers
are hugely more profitable than the bottom
20 percent of your drivers in everything,
from miles per gallon, to compliance and
regulations, to avoiding time and penalties, health care claims, injuries.”
Implementing training programs and
encouraging on-going learning and development (for when those new, complicated
regulations kick in) keeps your talent on
point. “The quality of people providing the
service will cover a significant part of the
compensation increase,” Evans advises.
Better quality people means better quality
service. “It’s going to cost more if you want
on time, every time, 99.8 percent of the
time with no damage to what we’re hauling, great communication along the way—
that quality service demands—deserves
—higher pricing,” Evans stresses. ▲
AND FINALLY,
SIZE
DOES
NOT
MATTER
The Truckload Carriers Association (TCA) and CarriersEdge announced the winners of the fourth annual Best Fleets to Drive
For survey and contest at their annual convention in March. In the “Best Fleet for Company Drivers” category, sponsored by
Marsh Canada, Ltd, a carrier called Motor Carrier Services (MCS) of Northwood, Ohio took the title.
Voted the Best Fleet for Owner-Operators was Paramount Freight Systems (PFS) Ft. Myers, Florida.
TCA said that like most carriers, MCS measures driver performance routinely. However, the major difference is that
where most carriers develop evaluation methods at the management level, then communicate it to the drivers, MCS
actively solicits drivers’ feedback upfront.
MCS, for example, asked drivers what they should be measured on and which factors they believed were less useful
indicators of performance. Drivers said that truck cleanliness and attitude should be taken into consideration, which MCS
then put into the overall evaluation procedure.
The result, said Keith Tuttle, MCS president, “changed things dramatically.
“Both of this year’s
“The process resulted in better understanding between management and
overall winners
drivers—especially when it became clear that both groups agreed!”
are fairly small
A Driver Liaison Committee reviews company policies and makes
fleets of under
recommendations for changes and future programs. That feedback, MCS says,
in integral to their success.
200 drivers each.”
Safety meetings are held in conjunction with driver rodeos. A committee
— Mark Murrell, president of CarriersEdge
watches the drivers perform maneuvers, then suggest improvements, offers
advice, and helps their fellow drivers understand how local and national regulations might apply to the situation at hand.
It’s all driver-to-driver feedback, and MCS says that it has been highly effective.
Like MCS, Paramount Freight Systems maintains a committee of drivers who provide input on company policies
and procedures. It also uses a “buddy program” to pair experienced contractors with those just starting out. Both
programs are fairly common in carriers that employ company drivers, TCA noted, but are somewhat unusual for an
all-owner-operator fleet.
PFS also embraced social media tools early on, and now runs an aggressive social media campaign that has helped
them hire 25 new operators.
In general, TCA said, drivers leased to the company seem content.“Paramount has great runs, and they get me home
weekly so I can be a mother and still have a good paying job,” wrote one owner-operator.“They are really focused on hiring women and have always done what they said they are going to do. The operations department is helpful and friendly
and always willing to go the extra mile to help out owner operators. With the high price of parts, the parts discounts they
offer are saving me thousands of dollars each year. Paramount is truly a class act and second to none.”
The TCA survey noted that most of PFS’s owner-operators’ shared that opinion.
This opinion seems to reflect the feelings of most of the drivers leased to PFS, as the company enjoys a very low
driver turnover rate. In fact, 60 percent of its drivers have been with the company for more than five years. Of fleets
operating in the United States, it has one of the highest percentages of drivers who have been with the company for
10 years or longer.
Mark Murrell, president of Toronto-based CarriersEdge, said, “Both of this year’s overall winners are fairly small
fleets of under 200 drivers each,” noted Mark Murrell, president of CarriersEdge “yet they act like ‘big companies’ in
terms of their driver outreach efforts, committees and programs. They are out there every day pushing the boundaries
of what is traditionally thought of as a ‘normal’ program, and it’s clearly working. It goes to show you don’t have to be
big to be progressive.”
Gary Salisbury, outgoing chairman of TCA and the president and CEO of Fikes Truck Line, Inc., of Hope, Arkansas,
agrees.“Motor Carrier Service, Inc. and Paramount Freight Systems dispel the myth that small companies can’t compete
with the big guys.
“No matter what your size, you can still create an outstanding work environment for your people.”
MAY 2012
25
!LLWEATHERGRIP!LLYEARLONG
39
(IGHWAY4RACTION
w w w. y o ko h a m a . c a
It’s durable and tough. The SY767 4-season tire will not let winter sneak up on
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snow without sacrificing the long-lasting tread life that you expect from our best
highway traction tire. Featuring a multi-season rubber compound and optimized
tread pattern designed to overcome wet, muddy and snowy conditions. The
SY767 can keep up with the extreme demands of the open highway.
By Tom Berg
Shift
The
in
TRANSMISSION
Still spec’ing manual gearboxes?
You’re not alone. Not by a long shot.
Here’s why.
T
alk about transmissions in commercial trucks, and
you’ll talk a lot about Eaton. The Michigan-based
manufacturer continues to dominate the business
in Class 8 and remains strong in Classes 6 and 7. However, there
are other names in the business, and they all play a role in what’s
built and bought in a market that’s slowly changing.
Eaton makes most of the Class 8 manual transmissions for the
U.S. and Canada, while Mack markets its own manual gearboxes
but also sells Eaton’s products. Eaton is also the principal player
in automated mechanical transmissions, or AMTs.
Those, along with Eaton manuals, are sold by most truck
builders. Volvo and Mack are building some volume in their own
AMTs, and Daimler introduced the Detroit Transmission at the
Mid-America Truck show in March.
In heavy trucks and tractors, about 80 percent of buyers still
choose manuals, according to Shane Groner, Eaton’s manager of
development and product planning. “Look at the price point and
durability of the thing,” he says. “It’s fairly easy to drive, and the
entire country is trained to drive them.”
One of those buyers is Groner himself, who has a small trucking company he runs outside of his Eaton duties. “I have some 13speeds, one with more than a million miles, and it’s still going
strong. The durability is incredible.”
Of the manual transmissions sold in heavy trucks, 60 percent
are 10-speeds that go primarily into over-the-road tractors,
Groner says.
“Performance” 13- and 18-speeds, plus LL types with low-low
gearing for vocational trucks, together take about 20 percent.
The other 20 percent choose ATMs
AMT growth
Automated manual transmissions are making steady inroads in
linehaul tractors, growing by two to three percent a year in the
past decade (except during the recent recession, when people
who bought trucks had to cut expenses). At that rate, automated
mechanical transmissions will grow to 30 percent of the Class 8
market by 2014.
AMTs can cost almost as much as fully automatic transmissions but claim superior fuel economy.
This is partly because they transmit power through metal gears
and not through hydraulic torque converters. When compared to
manuals, AMTs shift better and choose gears more wisely than
inexperienced or inept drivers.
Eaton’s AMTs have suffered niggling problems, mostly electronic,
through their history. Eaton engineers seem to have driven out
most bugs, and they’ve expanded the numbers of programming
modes in their UltraShift Plus products to better match transmission controls with various engines and duty applications.
Volvo engineers seem to have gotten the I-Shift right at the
very start of its introduction in North America (it made its debut
in Europe more than 10 years ago). An increasing number of
customers are buying the concept—literally.
In 2011, 80 percent of Volvos were spec’d with Volvo diesels,
which a truck or tractor must have to be mated to the I-Shift.
Of those 80 percent with Volvo diesels, 47 percent were spec’d
with I-Shifts, says Volvo spokesman Brandon Borgna. (Volvo and
Mack do not offer Eaton’s UltraShift products.)
In Europe, a high percentage of Volvo trucks are ordered with
the I-Shift.
Automatics important
A small percentage of Class 8 users buy Allison automatics. Most
are operators of trash collection trucks, an excellent place for full
automatics, Eaton acknowledges. Allison, meanwhile, recognizes
that over-the-road tractors are not the best application for its fully
automatic transmissions, and it’s responding with a 10-speed
MAY 2012
27
GOOD DRIVERS
ARE HARD TO FIND
SO OFFER THEM TRUCKS THEY LOVE TO DRIVE
©2012 Navistar, Inc. All rights reserved. All marks are trademarks of their respective owners.
The Shift in Transmission
‘DOWNSPEEDING’ IN CLASS 8
A
automated box that includes a torque
converter. The TC10, as it’s called, will be
available in limited numbers this fall.
Daimler Trucks North America is well
aware of the trend toward AMTs.
Mercedes-Benz, a sister operation in
Europe, has likewise seen its AMTs gain
popularity. DTNA has adapting a heavyduty Mercedes-Benz automated model for
use in Freightliners and Western Stars,
says Brad Williamson, a marketing manager with Daimler Trucks. It will be branded as a Detroit, the new name for Detroit
Diesel, whose product line has already
expanded from engines to axles. Like
other builders, Daimler originally offered
Eaton’s Auto-Shift and UltraShift products, and it now offers the UltraShift Plus.
Last year, it introduced the AMT3,
another European innovation, for
Freightliner medium-duty trucks, while
still offering Eaton’s midrange UltraShift.
Fuel efficiency is an AMT’s principal
virtue, and it’s the main reason for their
increasing sales to fleets, which are again
grappling with a driver shortage and having to hire less-then-sterling drivers. With
an AMT, even the worst among them can
get decent fuel economy they can’t with a
manual gearbox.
side from manual versus automated versus automatic, there are trends in heavy
trucks that affect transmissions. A major trend is the continuing quest for efficiency. Shane Groner, Eaton’s manager of development and product planning,
says 99 percent of his work is focused on how to make the truck more fuel-efficient.
A key strategy is what is known as “gear fast, run slow,” slowing the engine to achieve
better fuel economy. This requires low numerical ratios in top gears and/or differentials,
as well as setting the road-speed limiter or Class 8 trucks in North America. Volvo has
coined the term “downspeeding” for its XE 13 integrated drivetrain, which builds on the
concept using its I-Shift transmission. This also relates to a continuing move to directdrive transmissions, whose top gears have 1:1 ratios that match an engine’s crankshaft
speed with that of the driveshaft. The current thinking among engineers is that directdrive transmissions are more efficient than overdrive ratios, which send power and
torque through an extra set of gears that impose a bit more friction and oil “churn.”
With a direct-drive top gear, spinning of the transmission’s output shaft is comparatively fast, so the rear axle ratio has to have a low numerical ratio to keep engine speed
Mechanical vs. Automated Sales CLASS 8 TRUCKS IN NORTH AMERICA
70%
2014
2012
30%
75%
25%
80%
2010
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
Mechanical
20%
90%
100%
Automated
down. Direct drive is easier on the driveline because torque is better handled by the
drive shaft’s fast rotation, but the rear diff’s metal must be strong enough to take the
torque at low speed.
With overdrive gearing in the tranny, the driveline spins slower, and the axle ratio is
faster to keep engine speed in its proper range. High torque can stress the driveline, so
it might have to be upsized to take the beating, but the differential is safer at its higher
gear speeds.
Sometimes the fuel economy difference between direct and overdrive transmissions
can be measured, and sometimes it can’t. And feelings run strong among truckers.
“Some love it, some hate it,” Groner says of direct drive.
“There’s no in between.”
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MAY 2012
29
Better.
Where It Counts.
TM
The Right Combination. Every ISX Engine.
Cummins ISX15 and ISX12 are better where it counts, in every type of truck.
The ISX15 offers the best fuel economy, broadest power range and big-bore
performance with exceptional resale value. The ISX12 delivers up to 12% better
fuel economy in a compact heavy-duty engine. Plus, you get 24/7/365 access
to Cummins Care and twice as many authorized service locations as the nearest
competitor’s. Visit cumminsengines.com or your local distributor or dealer. You’ll
see – Cummins ISX engines are better where it counts most — your bank account.
©2012 Cummins Inc., Box 3005, Columbus, IN 47202-3005 U.S.A.
The Shift in Transmission
replaced older five- and four-speed types
in most light trucks.
General Motors and Ford dropped manual trannies two to three years ago. GM
uses Allisons and its own Hydra-matics,
and Ford employs its TorqShift automatics.
The vast majority of Ram commercial
trucks get Chrysler and Aisin automatics.
A handful of Rams go out with MercedesBenz six-speed manuals, the latter a
holdover from Chrysler’s now-ended ownership by Daimler.
Buyers of new light trucks have shunned
manual gearboxes, which is why they’re no
longer the “standard” transmission and are
almost gone as an option. Some dealers,
though, pointedly advertise stickshiftequipped used pickups and ask premium
prices for them because they appeal to a
small but enthusiastic crowd. ▲
Fleet Sense 101
Today’s Lesson: Cab Heating
Light- and medium-duty
Another Daimler company, Mitsubishi
Fuso Truck & Bus Corp. in Japan, and its
subsidiary, Mitsubishi Fuso Commercial
Truck of America, now install Duonic
automated mechanical transmissions in
all their Canter models (called mediumduty here but light-duty in Japan). No
manuals are offered.
Although heavier midrange trucks from
UD and Hino and Class 6 and 7 domestic
trucks still offer manuals, all have automatics or automated transmissions as
options. Some of the automatics are
Allisons, and some are supplied by Aisin, a
major Japanese supplier.
Domestic medium-duty trucks have
long been a strong market for fully automatic transmissions.
Drivers usually have a primary job
other than driving, such as beverage sales,
furniture delivery or lawn care, and might
not even know how to operate a manual
transmission.
Operations tend to be more urban and
suburban with a lot of stops and starts, for
which automatics are very useful.
Allisons go into six out of 10 midrange
trucks, but its penetration was once eight
of 10, according to Eaton, which claims to
be taking some business with its UltraShift
HS (for Highway Value) medium-duty
automated mechanical products.
In the light end of midrange and in light
commercial trucks, nearly all have automatics, a trend that mirrors what’s happened in automobiles and light trucks.
More efficient six-speed automatics have
Whether your drivers are sleeping, loading, unloading or eating,
once the cold weather hits, they’ll idle to keep the cab warm.
Diesel
Consumed
Diesel
Consumed
IDLING
3.8 Liters p/h
ESPAR
.15 Liters p/h
$5.05*
$0.20*
($7,575† per year)
($300† per year)
That’s $4.85 saved every hour, every truck.
How many trucks do you have?
Espar Heaters:
They Just Make Sense.
Canada and U.S. (800) 387-4800
www.espar.com
* Based on $1.33 p/l; the average price of diesel in Canada on Sept. 08, 2011.
†Based on DOE/Argonne National Laboratory estimates: 1,500 hours overnight idling.
MAY 2012
31
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In Gear
INSIDE:
39 Lockwood’s Products
53 You Can’t Get
There From Here
EQUIPMENT NEWS, REVIEWS, AND MAINTENANCE TIPS
SPEC SHEET
KENWORTH T680, 76-IN.
AERODYNE SLEEPER
POWERTRAIN:
• Cummins ISX15 485 hp @ 1800 rpm,
397 hp @ 2100 rpm
• 1650 lb-ft @ 1200 w. Intebrake
• Eaton UltraShift Plus transmission,
FO16E313A-MHP 13-spd.
• 0.73:1 overdrive with Hill Start Aid feature
• UltraShift Cobrahead controller
integrated into dash
FRONT END:
State of the Art
test drive Kenworth’s T680 is a truck built for drivers who
love trucks. By Jim Park
W
hen I first clapped eyes on
Kenworth’s T680 at the MidAmerica Trucking Show in
Louisville last month, my first impression
was been there, done that. From a distance, it looked much like the T700, which
first saw the light of day in 2010. I wondered why Kenworth would be revamping
that truck so soon.
What can I say; it was a first impression.
The T680 is anything but a rehash of the
T700. It does bear some outward similarity, but aerodynamics are what they are.
Anything but what you see would be a
compromise, and it’s clear Kenworth compromised very little in the design and
development of this truck.
Practically everything north of the
frame rails is new—clean-slate new. From
the stamped aluminum cab to the
Diamond VIT upholstery, no stone was
left unturned.
At its official unveiling, Kenworth
General Manager, Gary Moore, said the
company had invested $400 million over
four years bringing this truck to market. If
the guided tour and the short test drive I
had in Louisville are any indication, I’d say
the company got its money’s worth with
this one.
The Finer Points
On Friday afternoon—day two of the
show—Kenworth invited a few of the Alist truck writers out for an up close and
personal tour of the truck with director of
product planning, Jim Bechtold. He took
us through the design features of the T680,
sharing some of the anecdotes of the
design process as well as the nuts and
bolts of the final product.
The biggest news is the cab itself. A first
for Kenworth, this one is made of stamped
aluminum. It’s highly tooled for greater
• Dana Spicer E-1322I axle, 13,200-lb,
3.5-in. drop
• Kenworth AG130 air suspension, 13,200-lb
• Bendix air-disc brakes rated for 14,600 lb
• Dana LMS wheel hubs
• Kenworth 7-spoke alum. wheels
• Michelin XZA3+ 275/80R22.5 tires
• Sheppard HD94 power steering gear,
13,200-lb
REAR END:
• Dana Spicer DSP41 tandem axles,
40,000-lb, 3.42:1 ratio
• Kenworth AG400L suspension 40,000-lb
tandem, 52-in. spread
• Bendix air-disc brakes rated for 45,000-lb
• Kenworth 7-spoke alum. wheels
• Michelin XDA Energy 275/80R22.5 tires
CAB & CHASSIS:
• 76-in. Aerodyne sleeper and cab
• Dual 120-gal 24.5-in. alum. fuel tanks
• High Intensity Discharge, Xenon headlamps
• Driver Performance Center w. 5-in. full
color active matrix display
• Interior trim: Diamond VIT
w. woodgrain and alum. accents
• Wheelbase: 229 in.
• Paint: Spinnaker blue effect
• Dry weight: 17,955
MAY 2012
33
Quality
Service
Value
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manufacturing consistency, and held
together with self-piercing Henrob fasteners. To make sure they got it right,
Kenworth enlisted the design and build
expertise of Magna International, one of
North America’s largest automotive supplier with a great deal of auto industry
know-how in stamped aluminum designs.
While it may seem like a small item,
Bechtold says they are quite proud of the
new door design. Not only does it open
wider and close with less effort than
past designs, its hinges are an in-swing
design, rather than a traditional piano
hinge design.
“The in-swing door gave us more latitude in hinge placement,” Bechtold says.
“We were able to optimize the fit of the
door, adding strength to the assembly, and
making it virtually air tight.”
In fact, the cab is fitted with pressure
relief devises to make opening and closing
the door physically easier—and easier on
the eardrums as well.
The integrated sleeper isn’t just a box
attached to the back of the cab. It was
designed with ease of repair in mind in
areas where damage has historically been
a problem, namely, the rear quarters that
are subject to trailer strikes during tight
backing maneuvers.
Engineers did jackknife tests on the
sleeper and sought the input of body shop
workers on how best to build the sleeper
for ease of repair. They kept the huck fasteners in this area for ease and cost purposes. The rear side panels can be replaced
without removing the roof, which saves
downtime and labor cost. 636
Driver Environment
Inside the cab and sleeper is where the
T680 really shines. One of the more significant changes is the width of the cab.
At 83 inches, it’s 10 inches wider than a
T660, and about eight inches narrower
than a T700. T680 will appeal to solo
drivers who like larger cabs, but not nec-
SPACE-AGE INNOVATION: The swivel table is usable from
the passenger seat or the sleeper. It’ll support 400 lb.
The A-pillar is steeply raked to improve
airflow over the cab, and the windshield—
50 percent larger than other Kenworth
models—is dramatically curved to move
air around the cab as well as over the top.
Bechtold says the curve of the glass is as
much as supplier Pilkington could put
into a windshield. The glass is thicker than
traditional windshield glass, Bechtold
says, to minimize damage from rock
strikes, etc. On the upside, he told us that
thanks to a new adhesive, replacement
takes a fraction of time (about two hours)
of other bonded windshields, so downtime
won’t be as much of a concern.
essarily the barn-like cab of the T700,
which is very well suited to team operations. There’s 23 inches between the seats
for easy access to the 76-inch sleeper.
This truck has all the room any solo
driver could ask for and it sure wouldn’t
leave team drivers wanting.
Getting to 83 inches was in interesting
exercise. Bechtolds says engineers took a
cab mock up and literally cut it into quarters—right front, left front, right rear, and
left rear—and mounted them on motorized tracks. They then invited more than
800 drivers to fit the cab sections around
themselves using a hand-held controller
MAY 2012
35
www.ridewellcorp.com
In Gear
In Gear
to position the sections. The dimensions
of the T860 cab reflect the preferences of
that crowd of test pilots. So, while the cab
dimensions won’t appeal to everyone, I’m
sure they will enjoy a pretty broad cross
section of fans.
In a similar fashion, the drivers designed
their own dash panel, right down to the
gauge and switch placement.
In designing the T680’s storage cabinets,
Bechtold says engineers visited dozens of
truck stops and interviewed drivers about
their storage requirements.
“Not only did we ask the obvious questions, we took an inventory of everything
those drivers had on board, and then we
went out and bought tool boxes, boots, oil
jugs, hardhats, etc, and brought them
back to the labs,” he says. “We then made
it our mission to find a place to store the
gear drivers carry.”
One of the results of this innovative
research was the cabinet above the doors.
According to Bechtold, it easily accommodates a hardhat—one of the toughest
items to store.
36
TODAY’S TRUCKING
Another interesting innovation is the
pivoting work table located on the righthand side of the sleeper. It swivel 270
degrees for better space utilization, and
drivers can use it equally comfortably
while sitting on the bed, or from the passenger seat if the optional seat swivel feature is selected. The seat turns to face
rearward, and the table swivels forward to
meet the seat, creating a convenient work
space. The table will support up to 400 lb,
Bechtold says, so it’s built with longevity
in mind.
One of the things engineers were looking to change was the traditional diamond
tuck upholstery. Boy, did they get an earful
from drivers.
“We thought it looked rather dated, but
when we checked our order summaries, it
turned out to be one of the most soughtafter options,” Bechtold notes. “So instead
of dumping it, we redesigned it with contemporary stitching, shallower pillows
and a new fabric.”
It’s a subtle change, but the new look is
quite refreshing.
At the Helm
Our test drive was a short one—only
about 75 miles. A teaser really, but enough
to get a sense of how all this fresh thinking translates into a 17,950-lb freight
hauling machine.
I got into the truck at Peterson
Kenworth, a dealer located at the junction
of I-264 and I-65 on the south side of
Louisville, not far from the Kentucky
Fairgrounds. Jim Bechtold spent an hour
with us, and then we headed south on I-65
toward Elizabethtown, where we turned
and headed back again.
The most striking thing about the T680
is the quiet. Kenworth claims in its press
material there is 40-percent less interior
noise—compared to what they didn’t
say—but it’s darned quiet.
When I say it’s quiet, imagine driving
down the highway at cruise speed in the
rain, and the loudest sound in the cab is
the raindrops hitting the windshield. The
rain was louder than the engine noise,
louder than the road noise, and louder
than the virtually absent wind noise.
In Gear
IT FITS: Prioritizing gauge and switch placement,
and repositioning the throttle pedal has improved
the ergonomics of the driver’s space.
Actually, the mixture of sounds the
driver is exposed to is very nicely balanced. The low growl of the ISX engine is
clearly obvious, but not intrusive. In fact,
it’s quite pleasant.
The other big improvement is the position of the throttle pedal. It’s still hung
from the firewall, but it’s also hinged to the
floor, so the driver’s heel can rest on the
floor. It’s much more natural position, and
infinitely more comfortable than previous
recent designs.
The truck had an Eaton UltraShift+ so
we weren’t able to get the full benefit of the
new throttle pedal position as far as shift
timing goes, nor the air-over-hydraulic
clutch, which is very east to depress.
However, I will say the UltraShift+ and the
ISX are speaking the same language, and
the shifting algorithms are very well tuned.
The larger windshield and narrower
A-pillar improve forward and lateral visibility without leaving you feeling that
you’re sitting in an aquarium, and the mirror placement could not have been better.
A close look reveals that while the mounts
are in the same place on the cowl, the right
hand mirror is positioned a little further
back in the driver’s line of sight for better
viewing. That’s attention to detail.
Driving the truck was simply a joy. It’s
easy to maneuver, but very solid feeling.
While it smoothes out the bumps and
jolts, it’s not sloppy about it, and you never
lose the feeling of where the wheels are
on the road.
There’s a lot new about the T680, and
it is definitely not, as I had originally
suspected, a rehash of the T700. And
there’s a lot to like too. My short drive left
me wanting more, but escape plans from
Mid-America limited the time we had to
drive thing.
This truck could set ride and driver
environment benchmarks for some time
to come. ▲
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MAY 2012
37
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Product Watch
PRODUCTWATCH
WHAT’S NEW AND NEWS FROM SUPPLIERS
8
Online Resources:
For more new product items, visit
PRODUCT WATCH
on the web at todaystrucking.com
ISX15 diesel engine and will build on the
same spark-ignited technology used elsewhere in the Cummins Westport lineup.
A simple, maintenance-free three-way
catalyst will be the only required exhaust
aftertreatment. The engine will run on
compressed natural gas, liquefied natural
gas or biomethane.
Predictably, natural gas was a big
theme at the show, especially at the huge
Navistar display area where the fuel’s key
proponent, T. Boone Pickens, joined
Navistar vice president Jim Hebe and
others for an evening’s worth of discussion before a huge crowd of dealers and
analysts and some media types. Its new
LoadStar low-cab-forward trucks will
come with a natural-gas option.
Other OEMs were
The 12-liter ISX12 G from Cummins
keen to note their
Westport will begin production in 2013
natural gas offerings
while a 15-liter gas engine—the ISX15 G
—is expected to be in limited production too, if not in such a
big way, with Volvo
by 2014, aimed at linehaul use.
announcing a VNL
is 10 in. wider than the T660 and some
daycab with the Cummins Westport
eight in. narrower than the cavernous
ISX12 G engine. Kenworth did the same.
T700. You still get 23 in. between the
There are those, however, yours truly
seats. (For an early take on the T680, read among them, who see something of a
“State of the Art” by Jim Park on pg.33 of
bandwagon forming here. Clearly, natural
this issue.)
gas has a place, and its benefits are real.
Another piece of significant news
But it doesn’t suit everyone.
came from Cummins. Following on the
Andreas Renschler, head of Daimler
heels of its ISX12 G launch a few weeks
Trucks and member of the Board of
ago, the engine-maker announced that
Management of Daimler AG, agrees.
it’s begun development of a 15-liter
He calls it a “niche” market. That
heavy-duty, spark-ignited natural-gas
said, he also allows that his company
engine to meet coming demand for onhas been and will be there with a
highway trucks powered by the fuel that
natural gas product, while saying there
everyone loves to love.
are no plans for Detroit Diesel to go
As with the ISL G and ISL12 G, the
down this road.
ISX15 G will be a product of Cummins
Dan Sobic, PACCAR executive vice
Westport, its joint venture with Westport president, speaking at the annual Heavy
Innovations in Vancouver, B.C.
Duty Manufacturers Association breakThe 12-liter ISX12 G will begin
fast during the show, said much the same
production in 2013 while the 15-liter
thing. He pegged the market at about
gas engine is expected to be in limited
8,000 trucks today, out of a total of
production by 2014.
240,000 likely to be sold this year. Diesel
The ISX15 G will be based on the
is still king, he said.
SOMETHING
AIR
IN
THE
W
hile there were clear trends
to be seen at this year’s
Mid-America Trucking
Show (MATS)—natural gas, 6x2 drive
axles, vertical integration—the most
obvious aspect of the Louisville affair
was probably the positive mood in
the air. Business seems good amongst
the manufacturer and supplier crowd.
In terms of product announcements
the Kenworth T680 and Peterbilt
Model 359 stole the show. All new and
replacing nothing in their respective
lineups, the trucks clearly have the same
DNA. Peterbilt opted for a detachable
sleeper while Kenworth chose the
integrated route and created some very
slippery contours in the process.
The excitement of both KW and
Pete staff prior to the unveilings—at
separate events, of course—was palpable.
Kenworth chief engineer Preston Feight
was almost giddy with delight, telling me
beforehand that no previous Kenworth
had seen so much attention paid to its
development. It shows, equally on the
Pete, and you see it in the fine details of
how body components meet, for
instance. Both interiors look awfully
good with a new and seemingly tighter
focus on how drivers actually live their
lives on the road.
Both the KW and Pete are medium in
terms of cab width at 83 in. I don’t have
as many details on the 579, but the T680
MAY 2012
39
Product Watch
DETROIT TRANSMISSION
Peterbilt’s all-new Model 579
PETERBILT MODEL 579
THE ALL-NEW 579 CLAIMS
BEST-IN-CLASS AERODYNAMICS
Calling it the result of “the most extensive,
rigorous product development process
in the company’s history,” Peterbilt
unveiled its all-new Model 579 during
the Mid-America Trucking Show.
The cab structure is a new design that
features greater strength and enhanced
safety, says Pete. With 83-in. or 2.1-meter
width, the aluminum cab is light, and
both cab and sleeper are tested to SAE
and ECE crashworthiness standards.
As part of the Unibilt family, the sleeper
is fully detachable for enhanced resale
value and increased versatility in secondand third-life operations.
Aerodynamic performance is achieved
through modular aero packages that
meet the EPA’s SmartWay designation.
They include variable-length chassis
fairings, sleeper extenders and rubber
flares, under-cab close-outs, and underfairing skirts.
The Model 579’s sleeper area includes
an integrated entertainment center
that includes an inverter, fourth battery,
and duplex power outlets. You get
all-LED interior lighting. Other sleeper
features include a strong-looking
pull-out workstation.
The dash gauges are completely visible
through the steering wheel, and the 5-in.
Driver Information Display can also display ‘virtual’ gauges. The pedal package
allows adjustments for pedal-position
and pedal-effort preferences.
40
TODAY’S TRUCKING
NEW DETROIT TRANSMISSION COMPLETES
INTEGRATED POWERTRAIN
The Model 579’s all-new electrical
system sports optimized routings, and
enhanced protection for connections
and routing troughs. Pete says the best
improvement to the electrical system
may be the new electric-over-air rocker
switches that enable critical interlocks.
This removes air plumbing from the dash
and ensures the correct operation settings of critical systems.
The backbone of the Model 579 is a
new chassis design that’s said to be light
and stiff while providing an “exceptional”
turning radius. New routings for air and
fuel lines reduce repair times, as do
separation of key air, fuel, and emissions
fluid lines and electrical wiring.
The 579 comes standard with front
air-disc brakes and the Bendix ESP
stability control system.
See www.peterbilt.com
Daimler Trucks North America used
the Mid-America show to launch the
Detroit transmission, thus completing its
integrated powertrain offering, all from
in-house sources, including Detroit axles
and heavy-duty engines.
Part of a long-established global plan,
development of these powertrain products has been an international effort,
with resources drawn from all of
Daimler’s capabilities around the world.
The no-clutch-pedal transmission has
been tested and proven in series production for European markets since 2005.
It’s a 12-speed, direct or overdrive
automated transmission combining a
traditional clutch-actuated manual
gearbox with computer-controlled shift
and clutch actuators. It’s claimed to
provide the operational ease of an automatic with the efficiency of a manual
transmission. DTNA says the directdrive version will be the best technical
solution to maximize fuel efficiency for
linehaul/long-haul operations while
Detroit
transmission
STABILITY CONTROL STANDARD
P
ETERBILT has made the Bendix ESP full-stability system with Automatic Traction
Control standard equipment, as of this month, on all its heavy-duty class 8 trucks
and tractors except the Models 320 and 382.
“Stability control has long been an option for our product lineup and we are now
advancing it to a standard feature due to customer demand,” said Bill Kozek, Peterbilt
general manager and PACCAR vice president.
The system is especially well suited for loads with a high center of gravity, such as mixer,
dump and tanker applications, says Pete.
Mack and Volvo, it’s worth noting, made the Bendix system standard fare in 2005.
It’s also worth noting that air disc brakes, made standard by Peterbilt in 2010 as a
delete option, are being spec’d more and more often. Before being made standard, Pete
chief Bill Kozek says they represented about 12 percent of the build but that doubled to
24 percent last year and the current order book reflects a takeup rate of about 30 percent.
Product Watch
providing improved slow-speed
maneuvering capabilities. Features
include torque limiting and “active
driveline protection,” which anticipates
torque windup.
It will skip-shift, of course, enabling
drivers to run through lower gears faster
to achieve cruising speed sooner. Its
EcoRoll feature helps the vehicle coast
more efficiently, the company says. The
transmission’s use of aluminum is said to
result in weight savings of up to 300 lb
vs. cast-iron designs.
Driver-friendly features include helical
gears that reduce noise; a control module
that communicates with the entire
powertrain; and a kick-down feature
that improves acceleration.
Additional features of the Detroit transmission include: Hill-Start Aid option to
prevent roll-back after standing still on a
hill; enhanced cruise control; improved
dash display; and driver-selectable shift
modes for performance or economy.
See www.demanddetroit.com
MERITOR 6X2 DRIVE AXLE
option of running wide-based single
tires or duals; a 2.50 to 4.10 ratio range;
and a 12.7-mm wall housing that’s
compatible with all current 40,000-lb
tandem air suspensions.
All SoloDrive Series axles will use
the same rear tag axle for simplified
maintenance and are designed to
function optimally with Meritor brakes
and options.
The warranty for linehaul applications
is five years or 750,000 miles with parts
and labour included.
See www.meritor.com
THE FUELLITE TANDEM AXLE SAVES
WEIGHT AND INCREASES FUEL EFFICIENCY
Meritor’s new FuelLite drive axle is the
first member of its SoloDrive Series of
6x2 tandem rears. Based on the Meritor
160 series drive axle, it’s designed for
SAVE ON FUEL
MACK LAUNCHES SUPER
ECONODYNE POWERTRAIN PACKAGE
linehaul applications to maximize weight
savings and increase fuel efficiency.
The Meritor FuelLite tandem axle
delivers nearly 400 lb in weight savings
and approximately a two-percent increase
in fuel efficiency when compared to a
traditional 6x4, the company says.
Features include: Meritor’s 160
DualTrac housing that allows the
Mack Trucks says its Super Econodyne
powertrain package can produce a 3.5percent improvement in fuel economy.
It uses all-Mack proprietary components—MP8-445SE engine, mDrive
automated manual transmission,
C125 proprietary drive axles, and
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MAY 2012
41
Product Watch
The low-speed Econodyne engine
comes out of the 1960s, notes Dave
McKenna, Mack director of powertrain
sales. “Historically, we’ve insisted on
gearing fast, running slow. Now, we’ve
designed a completely integrated system
to run efficiently at 450 rpm above idle
speed when before it was 700 to 800 rpm
above idle speed.”
See www.macktrucks.com
PARTS CROSSREFERENCE
ALLIANCE TRUCK PARTS
LAUNCHES ONLINE TOOL
custom software—and is rated up to
88,000 lb GCWR.
The central idea, not unlike Volvo’s
XE13 system, is what Mack calls the
“down speed” feature. Super Econodyne
is engineered to drop engine speed
more than 200 rpm at a highway speed
of 65 mph, cruising at 1,160 instead of
1,380 rpm. This reduces fuel consumption by up to two percent compared with
previous engine models, says Mack,
while its proprietary C125 drive axles
are claimed to deliver an additional
1.5-percent fuel economy saving.
The Mack MP8-445SE offers 445 hp
and up to 1,760 lb ft of torque. The C125
axles have a 2.66:1 ratio. All powertrain
components communicate with each
other via Mack software.
Mack says the system, available on
Pinnacle models, does not compromise
power or performance.
New from Alliance Truck Parts is an
online parts lookup tool to help
customers find the right part among
countless competing numbers and
naming conventions. The web-based
tool consolidates data from the top
OEM and independent manufacturers,
creating a single point of access.
Alliance Truck Parts is a brand of
Daimler Trucks North America.
With a simple web interface, visitors
can search for the part needed in two
Product Watch
ECO-FRIENDLY TIRES
BRIDGESTONE INTRODUCES ECOPIA TIRES
AND MATCHING BANDAG RETREADS
ways: by the Alliance number or by a
competing supplier’s part number. The
new tool provides the suggested part
number and information from Alliance,
and if the user enters a city name, it
offers links to dealers and relevant parts
specials in the area.
The cross-reference tool is currently
loaded with information from more than
30 different product lines, with more
being added as new products become
available from Alliance.
See www.alliancetruckparts.com/products/partsreference.asp
Bridgestone debuted its new Ecopia
truck tires and Bandag FuelTech retreads
at Mid-America. The two product lines
—five new tires and four retreads—are
designed to work together.
Specially engineered compounds
paired with matching retread patterns
promote an eco-friendly system that
continues low rolling resistance from
new tire to retread while extending casing life, the company says.
The Ecopia line includes the Greatec
M835 Ecopia drive and Greatec R135
Ecopia trailer wide-base singles. Both use
Bridgestone’s patented NanoPro-Tech
polymer technology in the tread compound and a high-rigidity tread pattern
that’s claimed to promote even wear
while reducing rolling resistance. Retread
patterns based on the Greatec M835
Ecopia and R135 Ecopia are available in
the FuelTech retread line.
The Ecopia line also includes the new
R283 steer tire plus conventional duals for
drive and trailer positions—the new
M710 drive (shown here) and R197 trailer
radials. They’re all EPA SmartWay verified
and comply with CARB requirements.
See www.trucktires.com/
us_eng/index.asp
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©2012 PeopleNet.
Product Watch
INTERNATIONAL
LOADSTAR
International
LoadStar
STAINLESS-STEEL CAB ON LIGHTWEIGHT
WORK TRUCK FROM NAVISTAR
The all new International LoadStar is a
lightweight low-cabover work truck.
Designed from the ground up with input
from drivers and fleet managers, the
LoadStar was built for the waste, concrete
pumping, and airplane refuelling markets.
Features include a stainless-steel cab
to minimize corrosion and increase
durability; variable-depth frame rails;
“ergonomically designed” cab interior;
and Diamond Logic multiplexed electrical
system with capabilities that provide
seamless body integration for increased
safety and ease of operation.
The industry’s first stainless-steel
cabover design, it offers a standard
tilt/telescoping steering column and
10-in. fore/aft and 6.5-in. up/down seat
travel, providing what Navistar calls
“unprecedented” belly room. A wide 90degree door opening and easy 18-in. first
step height were also included. You’ll
also get up to 40-degree wheel cuts.
The truck will available with 10-, 11or 13-liter MaxxForce engines, and a
Cummins Westport ISL-G compressed
natural gas engine will be available in
spring 2013. First orders will be taken
in October.
See www.navistar.com
FUEL-BASED TRACKING
ZONAR RELEASES FUEL-BASED
GPS TRACKING TECHNOLOGY
Zonar Systems, a provider of electronic
fleet inspection, tracking and operations systems, has announced a new
44
TODAY’S TRUCKING
patent-pending technology that adds
fuel as a fifth dimension to the firm’s
GPS reporting.
Zonar’s vehicle telematics platforms
have always utilized four-dimensional—
latitude, longtitude, time, and odometer
—GPS reporting. With the addition of
fuel as the fifth dimension, Zonar’s
telematics platforms will not only determine sample rates based on geographical
data, but also fuel consumption.
The sampling methodology accounts
for route and driving changes, the company says. For example, if a vehicle is
driving in the city with frequent stops
and turns, the computer samples much
more frequently than if the vehicle is
running down a long straight highway.
Fleets will now be able to identify, easily
and with tremendous detail, says Zonar,
the routes and lanes over which their
vehicles are most and least fuel-efficient.
Zonar’s telematics platforms also
transmit engine fault codes and verified
electronic vehicle inspection data in
real-time, as well as a set of driver performance metrics including accelerating
too quickly, hard braking, excessive
idling, ABS activation, and roll-stability
control activation.
See www.zonarsystems.com
LINKED SAFETY SYSTEMS
BENDIX ADVANCED SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES
CONNECTED THROUGH WEB PORTAL
SafetyDirect from Bendix is a Web portal
that provides fleet operators with a comprehensive view of their fleet and each
driver. It now connects to three of the
company’s onboard safety technologies.
The Bendix Wingman Advanced collision-mitigation system, ESP Electronic
Stability Program full-stability system,
and SmarTire Tire Pressure Monitoring
System (TPMS) provide SafetyDirect
with safety performance data, which the
system then delivers to fleet operators as
actionable information.
A fourth onboard safety system,
the AutoVue Lane Departure Warning
(LDW) System (bought from Iteris
last year), was already connected to
SafetyDirect.
Product Watch
SafetyDirect information is wirelessly
transmitted via telematics devices
already on the trucks. The system can
provide immediate warnings and critical
safety information. For example, explains
Bendix, fleet operators can easily see if
their drivers are having difficulty staying
in their lanes—often a first indicator of
drowsiness—or other potential problems, such as stability control activation,
collision mitigation system activation, or
critical tire alerts.
The system collects the data and
translates it into easy-to-understand
information that a fleet can use in daily
operations. There’s real-time driver
performance data, as well as event-based
information—including video clips of
severe occurrences—for analysis by fleet
safety personnel and to aid fleets in
developing targeted, ongoing driver
education and training.
Among the essential information on
the portal are following-distance
histograms, event counters, and system
usage details for each driver. This information will better help fleet managers
vehicle speed, and GPS location.
SafetyDirect is available on vehicles
at all major North American OEMs, and
it can be retrofitted to vehicles already
in service.
See www.bendix.com
Bendix SafetyDirect
VOLVO NG DAYCAB
THE NEW VOLVO VNL DAYCAB COMES
WITH NATURAL GAS POWER
identify risky driver behaviour and provide drivers with targeted training they
need to reinforce safe driving practices.
The system captures and reports
events in more than a dozen pre-set categories, including excessive curve speed,
lane changes without turn signal, and
forward collision warning. Data reports
can be created for individual drivers and
the entire fleet. Bendix can expand the
system to meet a fleet’s particular needs
by building in certain reporting functions
—say, tailgating monitoring—using the
fleet’s chosen parameters.
Along with video, severe events are
captured and stored with time and date,
driver and vehicle ID, odometer reading,
Volvo says its new VNL daycab gives
customers a larger 123-in. bumper-toback-of-cab (BBC) and is rated up to
80,000 GCWR, with a more robust spec
than the natural-gas powered Volvo
VNM daycab. Introduced in 2011, the
VNM features a 113-in. BBC and is rated
up to 66,000 lb.
Equipped with a 12-liter, 400-hp
Cummins Westport ISX12 G engine that
develops 1,450 lb ft of torque, it requires
only a three-way catalyst to meet EPA
2010 emissions standards, says Volvo.
Production will begin in conjunction
with commercial availability of the
12-litre gas engine.
See www.volvotrucks.us.com
Join our growing membership of
motor carriers and industry partners.
By putting our open capacity to work for
charity, we’re making a difference
in our communities and raising the
profile of our industry.
Community Impact. Asset Efficiency. Industry Recognition.
Trucks For Change Network is a nonprofit organization endorsed by
Become part of something bigger today • www.trucksforchange.org • 905 844 8658
MAY 2012
45
Product Watch
SELF-STEER AXLE
SUSPENSION
SAF-HOLLAND SYSTEM COMES
STANDARD WITH AIR-DISC BRAKES
From SAF-Holland comes the CBX
integrated suspension/axle system with
self-steering capability. It will feature the
company’s latest lightweight ‘Fusion
Beam’ technology, available in two different steer-angle models—with wheel cuts
of 20 degrees or 25-to-30 degrees. SAF
Integral air disc brakes (photo) are
standard on the initial offering, while
drum-brake configurations and other
options are planned for the future.
The company says the CBX system is
“designed to turn easier, greatly reducing
tire wear, while improving fuel economy
by reducing drag and tire scrubbing.”
The integration of
the company’s Fusion
Beam Technology is
said to reduce beam
weight without compromising beam
strength or integrity.
This is accomplished
through the
fusion of a lighter-weight cast beam
and a fabricated tail section.
Various capacities are available in the
series which include the SAF Self-Steer
CBX23, CBX25 and CBX25/30. While the
CBX23 and CBX25 models deliver capacities of 23,000 and 25,000 lb respectively,
the CBX25/30 offers an additional 30,000
lb of load carrying capacity at creep
speed (five mph or less) and 25,000 lb of
capacity for on highway operation. The
CBX25/30 delivers its additional load
capacity through the addition of a larger
air spring.
See www.safholland.com
ONBOARD RECORDER
NEW VDO ROADLOG EOBR HAS
A BUILT-IN PRINTER
The new VDO RoadLog electronic
onboard recorder (EOBR) is described
as a “simple, all-in-one solution for daily
logbook and other compliance reporting.” It’s designed to allow drivers and
fleets to record and report hours of
service and other key compliance data
quickly, easily and without monthly
fees, says Continental Commercial
46
TODAY’S TRUCKING
FREIGHTLINER’S REVOLUTION
F
REIGHTLINER showed off its Revolution ‘innovation truck’ in Louisville, a concept
truck featuring the latest technologies. The fully functional tractor includes some
of the most advanced elements in efficient design, the company says.
Its asymmetric crossover cab design is unique, a daycab with a sleek, integrated raised
roof. It makes for a roomy interior—with a convertible jumpseat that transforms into a
sleeper—but also seamless integration of body panels that removes air gaps and
improves air-flow management between the tractor and trailer.
The truck’s wrap-around windshield, dramatically sloped hood, and low-mounted
front grille are stylish but they also enhance performance. To reduce drag, a top step is
hidden behind the door and the door handles have been removed from the cab. Sideview cameras transmit a wide-angle view of the road into the cab via monitors mounted
inside, replacing cab-mounted mirrors, further benefiting overall aerodynamics.
Vehicles & Aftermarket, a business unit
of Continental Tire.
In fact, Continental claims to be the
world leader in EOBR technology, having
put over five million such devices in use
worldwide over the past 30 years. The
VDO name is a European mainstay.
The RoadLog can automatically track
a driver’s time in one of four categories:
On-duty, Driving, Sleeper Berth, and
Off-duty, and will provide a warning if
allowable limits will be exceeded. The
driver’s data can be transferred in
seconds from a USB without the need
for a smartphone, the company says.
RoadLog features a built-in printer,
which provides an instant paper report
of daily logbook data at roadside inspections, with all the information provided
by a handwritten log.
It can also record data for a variety of
reports that can help make trucking
operations more efficient, including
International Fuel Tax Agreement and
International Registration Plan.
The RoadLog fleet-management soft-
Product Watch
VDO RoadLog
calipers is the first and only air-disc
pad listed on TMC’s list of approved
replacement linings.
TMD’s “premium” drum brake lining,
Textar T5000, has also passed the
RP 628 qualification testing for standard
16.5x7 drum brakes. Together, these two
products offer the first TMC-approved
replacement option for newer tractor
designs with air-disc brakes on steer
axles and drum brakes on drive axles, an
increasingly common configuration.
Compatibility issues facing operators
of vehicles with different brake designs
on front and rear axles was a major
reason TMD developed and certified to
aftermarket standards a disc brake pad
formulated to replicate the performance
of drum lining material.
See www.tmdfriction.com
ware provides can manage an unlimited
number of drivers and vehicles.
It’s FMCSA-compliant and also meets
Canadian rules, says Continental, while
being “easily” upgradeable to future U.S.
and Canadian EOBR mandates.
An optional wireless download feature
will be available in 2013 to allow data
collection via cellular networks.
See www.vdoroadlog.com
TRAILER SUSPENSION
INGERSOLL EXPANDS INTO
TRAILER SUSPENSIONS
Ingersoll Axles (a division of IMT
Company), based in the town of the
same name, showed off its first line of
Ontario-built heavy-duty suspensions at
the Mid-America show. It’s been building
axles since 1947.
Several years in development, the
Ingersoll Suspension System (ISS) is said
to have been engineered for durability,
strength and customization.
The ISS features an optimum I-beam
trailing beam design, a fully wrapped axle
connection, and industry-standard parts.
The company’s current axle offerings
include standard, drop-centre, steerable,
and in-line types, among others, as well
any of their 15 new suspension designs.
See www.ingersollaxles.com
Performance
Enhancer
(Relax, this one’s perfectly legal)
1SPGFTTJPOBMUSVDLFSTFWFSZXIFSFMPWFUIFEJõFSFODF
)PXFT.FBOFS1PXFS,MFBOFSNBLFTJOUIFJSSJHT
1VNQFEVQQFSGPSNBODFBOEQPXFSXJUICFUUFSGVFM
FDPOPNZJUTBMNPTUMJLFDIFBUJOH
$MFBOTUBOLTMJOFT – UIFXIPMFGVFMTZTUFN
'FFMNPSFQPXFSXJUIMFTTFNJTTJPOT
JNQSPWFNFOUJOGVFMFDPOPNZ – (VBSBOUFFE
&OIBODFEMVCSJDJUZGPSMFTTXFBS
AIR DISC FRICTION
1BSUJDVMBUFmMUFSGSJFOEMZBOEXBSSBOUZTBGF
TMD OFFERS FIRST FRICTION
MATERIAL TO MEET TMC’S RP 628
3FNPWFTXBUFSIBSNMFTTMZ
MZ
TMD Friction of North America says
its air-disc brake-pad friction material,
Textar T3070, has met the FMVSS
121 dynamometer requirements of
TMC’s Recommended Practice 628—
‘Aftermarket Brake Lining Qualification’
—as verified by SAE’s Performance
Review Institute. As a result, TMD
says, its friction material for 225-size
Deluxe
Shower Bag
FREE Howes
when you purchase 3 bottles of Howes Products
oducts
Visit www.howeslube.com for details or call 1-800
800 GET HOWES
Offer ends: 9/30/12, available while supplies last.
st
Professional Grade Performance Since 1920
Toiletries not included.
(&5)08&4
tXXXIPXFTMVCFDPN
MAY 2012
47
Private Motor Truck Council of Canada
Association Canadienne du Camionnage d’Entreprise
ER
T
S
I
G
RE
E
N
I
L
N
O pmtc.ca
www.
PMTC
CONFERENCE
JUNE 20 & 21, 2012
technology
innovation
awards
networking
education
training
King City, Ontario
Product Watch
COMPACT PTO
PARKER CHELSEA SAYS INSTALLATION TIME
IS CUT WITH THE NEW 899 SERIES PTO
Parker Chelsea says its new 899 Series
makes PTO and pump installation
simpler and more reliable on oil-field
exploration and maintenance trucks.
Because of the large physical size of
the pumps used in such applications, the
company says clearance has always been
Subscribers receive a full complement
of training resources designed to follow
all 33 chapters of the training manual.
Each chapter includes training resources
such as an instructor’s guide, student
manual, PowerPoint presentations,
quizzes, plus related documents, charts,
images and clip art.
A free 30-day trial is available by
calling 800-327-6868, ext. 8523 and
referencing Promo Code 53583.
See www.jjkellertraining.com/driver
ONLINE INFLATION
CALCULATOR
YOKOHAMA CREATES WEB-BASED
INFLATION-PRESSURE CALCULATOR
a challenge. The 899 was designed with
this in mind to provide maximum clearance for the 4700 Series transmissions.
Another challenge is the torsional vibrations from today’s diesel engines that
prematurely wear out mating PTO and
pump splines. The wet-spline system that
lubricates the mating PTO and pump
shafts is claimed to increase the life of
these components seven to 10 times
longer than a dry-mating connection.
The 899 features six speed ratios,
eight output types, and is a constantmesh shifter which is a useful option
for variable-displacement piston
pump applications.
See www.parker.com
ONLINE DRIVER
TRAINING
J. J. KELLER LAUNCHES ONLINE
TRACTOR-TRAILER DRIVER TRAINING,
SCHOOL EDITION
New from J. J. Keller is online TractorTrailer Driver Training, School Edition,
based on the U.S. Federal Highway
Administration model curriculum.
It follows the Professional Truck Driver
Institute’s (PTDI) curriculum standards.
Housed on the company’s ‘Training On
Demand’ site, the course provides
resources for instructors to enhance
their curriculum.
Yokohama Tire has launched an interactive, online tool that helps truck owners
manage tire costs through proper maintenance. The company’s inflation-pressure calculator recommends appropriate
inflation levels, thus preventing damaging under-inflation or over-inflation.
The calculator is designed to optimize
the performance of commercial tires on
all axles based on load rating and whether
a truck has a single or tandem configuration. This allows for specific recommendations to be returned, the company says.
The calculator also connects users to
local Yokohama dealers and product
experts. It can be found here.
See www.yokohamatire.com/
air_pressure_calculator
BRAKE ANALYZER
S-CAM BRAKE-SERVICE TOOL
ALLOWS MECHANICS TO SEE
ACTUAL CAMSHAFT TRAVEL
Find out how Espar Heaters
can SAVE YOU MONEY.
WEEKLY PUMP PRICE SURVEY / cents per litre
Prices as of April 10, 2012 • Updated prices at www.mjervin.com
CITY
WHITEHORSE
VANCOUVER *
VICTORIA
PRINCE GEORGE
KAMLOOPS
KELOWNA
FORT ST. JOHN
YELLOWKNIFE
CALGARY *
RED DEER
EDMONTON
LETHBRIDGE
LLOYDMINSTER
REGINA *
SASKATOON
PRINCE ALBERT
WINNIPEG *
BRANDON
TORONTO *
OTTAWA
KINGSTON
PETERBOROUGH
WINDSOR
LONDON
SUDBURY
SAULT STE MARIE
THUNDER BAY
NORTH BAY
TIMMINS
HAMILTON
ST. CATHARINES
MONTRÉAL *
QUÉBEC
SHERBROOKE
GASPÉ
CHICOUTIMI
RIMOUSKI
TROIS RIVIÈRES
DRUMMONDVILLE
VAL D'OR
SAINT JOHN *
FREDERICTON
MONCTON
BATHURST
EDMUNDSTON
MIRAMICHI
CAMPBELLTON
SUSSEX
WOODSTOCK
HALIFAX *
SYDNEY
YARMOUTH
TRURO
KENTVILLE
NEW GLASGOW
CHARLOTTETOWN *
ST JOHNS *
GANDER
LABRADOR CITY
CORNER BROOK
CANADA AVERAGE (V)
Price
140.9
150.6
142.9
129.9
131.9
131.7
135.9
137.6
115.9
115.4
115.6
120.4
116.6
122.6
122.3
125.9
120.9
119.4
130.4
132.7
131.4
128.9
125.7
130.2
134.0
133.9
134.3
134.0
134.9
128.9
130.0
141.4
141.2
140.4
141.4
139.9
140.4
140.9
137.9
139.9
138.1
138.4
138.7
140.7
139.8
139.8
139.9
138.6
141.9
135.1
138.6
137.7
137.2
136.2
137.7
131.3
142.2
138.6
147.5
142.9
130.2
(+/-) Previous
Excl. Taxes
Week
0.0
2.6
0.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.2
0.7
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
2.5
0.0
0.0
0.5
-0.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.4
2.6
0.0
0.0
-1.5
0.0
-1.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
-0.3
-0.4
-0.9
-0.4
-0.3
-0.3
1.1
-0.4
-0.6
-1.0
-1.0
-1.0
-0.6
-1.4
-1.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
-0.2
0.0
0.1
123.0
107.0
107.2
98.3
100.2
100.0
104.0
117.9
97.4
96.9
97.1
101.7
98.0
97.7
97.5
100.9
99.6
98.2
97.1
99.1
98.0
95.8
92.9
96.9
100.3
100.2
100.5
100.3
101.1
95.8
96.7
100.8
100.6
99.9
104.6
103.3
101.8
100.3
97.7
103.3
99.0
99.3
99.5
101.3
100.5
100.5
100.6
99.5
102.3
98.1
101.1
100.3
99.9
99.0
100.3
100.8
105.3
102.2
110.0
106.0
99.2
V-Volume Weighted
(+/-) indicates price variations from previous week.
Diesel includes both full-serve and self-serve prices.
The Canada average price is based on the relative weights of 10 cities (*)
Developed by a commercial-vehicle
inspection technician, the Foundation
Brake Analyzer (FBA) from Hubtech
Systems is claimed to be the
MAY 2012
Retail Diesel Price Watch
www.espar.com
49
Product Watch
Hubtech Systems brake analyzer
transportation industry’s “most accurate” tool to determine the size of the
brake drum present or to establish actual camshaft travel at each wheel end,
without removing the drum. Costing
C$185 plus shipping, it’s not new, but
new to us. In fact, during a four-year
project, KPMG inspection technicians
used the FBA
to verify compliance on over 6000
commercial vehicles.
This tool is claimed to eliminate the
time-consuming removal of a brake drum
to determine if it meets manufacturer’s
specifications or is within legal standards.
The system is said to be simple and
easy to use. The gauge has three discs that
are stacked one on top of the other, with
an ever-present stainless steel pointer.
The largest disc measures the total
amount of S-cam travel evident in a specific S-cam brake assembly. The second
largest disc converts the lining thickness
you measure in the specific brake assembly into a number representing the number of degrees of S-Cam travel used up by
lining wear. The smallest disc is used to
determine the size of the brake drum.
See www.hubtechsystems.com
information about the job. It displays an
accurate time of arrival, which can be
used to inform the customer.
The app also displays tracks on the
map for selected trips by date and
vehicle, and supports seven different
languages—English, Dutch, French,
German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish.
It’s available in app stores for US$9.99.
See http://business.tomtom.com
ARROW USED-TRUCK
WARRANTY
NEW WARRANTY COVERS 2005MODE- YEAR AND NEWER TRUCKS,
ALL MAKES AND MODELS
MITSUBISHI FUSO INTRODUCES NEW
2013 MODEL-YEAR CANTER TRUCKS
Arrow Truck Sales has announced its
ConfidencePlus Comprehensive
Coverage Program, a 90-day/25,000-mile
comprehensive warranty program
available on 2005 or newer class 8 and
medium-duty trucks.
It offers coverage on the truck’s major
components, including the engine, transmission, and rear ends, even injectors and
Mitsubishi Fuso Truck of America
(MFTA) has announced the availability
of its 2013 model-year medium-duty
cabover trucks. The new Fuso Canters
are in production now.
In addition to the five cab colours
MFTA has traditionally offered, the 2013
Canters can be ordered in solid black.
All new Canters will come standard
with dual batteries and will also include
a factory-installed PTO wiring harness
designed to receive an optional, matched
control switch and to make connection to
optional PTOs easy. As well, mirrors will
have new, wider mounting arms that facilitate the installation of bodies with outside widths up to 102 in. on all FE models.
See www.mitfuso.com
fuel pumps. On 2008 and newer trucks, it
also covers turbochargers, radiators, and
ECM modules. Cumulative claims can go
up to $10,000 during warranty period, and
there are no deductibles.
Arrow says this much coverage on
2005 and newer trucks is unprecedented.
See www.arrowtruck.com
THE 2013 CANTER
MANAGE VIA TABLET
TOMTOM OFFERS FLEET MANAGEMENT
ON IPAD AND ANDROID TABLETS
TomTom has released an updated version
of its WebFleet Mobile fleet management
app, extending its use to tablets for
managers on the move. Tablet usage is
growing rapidly, the company says,
accounting for around 30 percent of
non-PC internet traffic worldwide.
WebFleet Mobile 1.2 offers new functionality, the company says, that allows
users to view details for all current
orders, manage workflow, and meet
service agreements. New jobs can be sent
straight from the smart phone or tablet
to a driver or field worker’s TomTom Pro
device, providing them with all critical
Mitsubishi Fuso Canter
MAY 2012
51
Product Watch
LOW-PLATFORM TIRE
CONTINENTAL OFFERS A
HIGH-LOAD-CAPACITY TIRE FOR
LOW PLATFORM TRAILERS
A new Continental tire for low platform
trailers, the HTL2 Eco Plus (Heavy Trailer
Long-Haul), is said to combine structural
durability and improved fuel economy.
It’s now available in sizes 215/75R17.5,
235/75R17.5 and 245/70R17.5.
The tire provides low-profile sizes for
high-cube applications but incorporates
compounding that’s claimed to offer low
rolling resistance and increased fuel
savings at cooler operating temperatures.
The tire’s tread pattern has married two
Continental design favourites—patented
groove technologies that reduce stone
retention for increased casing life, along
with groove geometry that’s said to promote efficient water evacuation, traction
and wet braking capabilities throughout
the tire’s life. Its 18-ply construction
allows its heavy capacity.
The HTL2 Eco Plus is available in
load range J and tread depths from
13 to 15/32nds.
See www.continental-truck.com
LIGHTER SIDE RAIL
STRONG AND LIGHT RASR SIDE RAIL
ON ALL FONTAINE INFINITY TRAILERS
Fontaine Trailer now offers the patented
RASR routed-aluminum side rail on the
2012 line of Infinity platform, dropdeck,
and twistlock container trailers.
The side rail is a one-piece aluminum
extrusion that’s said to be significantly
lighter than steel while withstanding
impact damage better. The design also
offers faster, easier, more convenient
WASTE-HEAT RECOVERY
C
UMMINS Turbo Technologies offered a glimpse of its
advanced waste-heat expander prototype at the
Mid-America show. We’ll likely be seeing this in a
couple of years time as engine and truck makers struggle
to meet EPA fuel-economy mandates.
The system can reduce fuel consumption by up to six
percent the company says.
“With increasing pressure to reduce CO2 emissions
and fuel consumption, engine manufacturers and
integrators are searching for fresh ways to achieve
improvements in the efficiency of their equipment,” said Adrian Tipling, Cummins Turbo
Technologies account executive for Global OEMs.
“Our waste-heat expander captures what would
otherwise be lost energy—in the form of heat—
from a number of sources on board the vehicle and
turns it into useful mechanical or electrical power.”
The principles of waste-heat recovery, which uses
organic fluids to draw energy from available and
waste heat, have been proven in applications such
as electricity generation and very large marine diesel
engines, says Cummins.
load securement and greater durability,
Fontaine says.
The entire Infinity line is constructed
with fabricated-steel main beams and
steel cross-bracing with aluminum
siderails, floor, and rear skirt. The result
is said to deliver the right blend of
strength, weight, and economy. Infinity
main beams are built with grade-130
flanges and welded continuously on
both sides. The design and construction
are so strong that Fontaine backs it
in writing with the XtremeBeam
Lifetime Warranty.
See www.fontainetrailer.com
EATON WARRANTY
EATON OFFERS BUNDLE PACKAGE
TO EXTEND FULLER REMAN
TRANSMISSION WARRANTY
Eaton Corp. will now extend warranty
coverage of an Eaton Fuller Reman
transmission to three years with the
combined purchase and installation of
an Eaton Advantage Series clutch and
Roadranger-approved lubricant.
Eaton Solo Advantage and Easy Pedal
Advantage clutches feature extended
50,000-mile standard lubrication intervals for linehaul use, along with premium
patent-pending release bearings.
The program is available only for standard Fuller Reman transmissions in linehaul applications in the U.S. and Canada.
See www.eaton.com/Eaton/index.htm ▲
52
TODAY’S TRUCKING
Free Product Information
Today’s Trucking makes it possible for you to make fast, convenient connections
to the advertisers in this issue. Log on to todaystrucking.com
NATIONAL
ADVERTISERS
Air-Weigh
36
www.Air-Weigh.com
CAT
6
www.DriveCat.com
Cummins Eastern
Canada
15
www.easterncanada.cummins.com
Cummins Inc
30
www.cumminsengines.com
Espar
31, 49
www.espar.com
Goodyear
4
www.goodyear.ca/truck
Great Dane Trailers
55
www.greatdanetrailers.com
Hankook Tires
34
www.hankooktire.ca
Hendrickson
24
www.hendrickson-intl.com
Howes Lubricator
47
www.howeslube.com
International
Truck & Engine
28
www.internationaltrucks.com
J.D Factors
29
www.jdfactors.com
Karcher
37
www.karcher.ca
Northbridge Insurance
38
www.nbfc.com
PeopleNet
Communications
42-43
www.peoplenetonline.ca
Peterbilt
back cover
www.peterbilt.com
PMTC
48
www.pmtc.ca
Prolam
18
www.prolamfloors.com
Ridewell
35
www.ridewellcorp.com
Ryder
www.ryder.com
Shell
www.shell.ca
Today’s Trucking
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Truck & Trailer
www.truckandtrailer.ca
TruckPro
www.truckpro.ca
Trucks for Change
Network
www.trucksforchange.org
VehiclePath
www.VehiclePath.ca
Volvo Trucks
North America
www.volvotruckscanada.com
Western Star
www.westernstartrucks.com
Yokohama Tire
www.yokohama.ca
32
36
50
41
11
45
41
22
2
26
YOU CAN’T GET THERE FROM HERE
Care to take a shot at where this photo was snapped?
Every month we print a photo of a landmark visible from a major artery and award
fabulous Today’s Trucking caps to the first 10 readers who identify the object.
Last month’s 24-ft tall coffee pot on the outskirts of Davidson, SK, was erected to
symbolize the town’s friendliness and hospitality. Davidson is about halfway between
Regina and Saskatoon. Today’s Trucking’s resident algebra wiz estimates a coffee
urn of this heft would hold about 2.9 million regular timmies.
This month’s mystery landmark was sent to us by the eagle-eyed Ottawa-Valleybased trucker/photographer Ron Pridmore, who insists that no matter where he
drives across North America, there’s no place like Carleton Place. Think you know
where this? Contact Jason Rhyno at:
April
Answer:
Davidson, SK.
YOU CAN’T GET THERE FROM HERE
c/o Today’s Trucking Magazine
451 Attwell Drive, Toronto, ON M9W 5C4
Phone: 416-614-5827 • Fax: 416-614-8861
Or email: [email protected]
MAY 2012
53
Rear View
By Peter Carter
A Reading from the Book of Tom
Why you should never put a $40 saddle
on a $10 horse, and other lessons
E
ven though my father, Tom, died 20 years ago, he insists
on hanging around. I hear from him pretty much on a
moment-by-moment basis. When I’m, say, in a truck
factory, watching robots paint new tractors, I cannot help but
sense Tom looking over my shoulder. Or when I’m walking
through a garage and smelling the coolants and lubes, there he is.
Nobody warned me that this would happen but I should have
seen it coming.
When I was growing up, Tom and his brother Ed ran a fleet of
buses in Sudbury, so I and my eight brothers and sisters were
raised around pits. We played on small mountains of tires, using
welding rods as swords. The guys at the garage were accustomed
to tripping over Carters, and on any day of the week you’d find
drivers, mechanics, cleaners and handymen at our kitchen table.
Late-night phone calls only meant one thing and that was,
somebody was going out to work, and mostly it was Dad.
In our family, which made much of the original 10
Commandments, “drive safely” was the 11th. “Drive so your passengers are comfortable” was the 12th.
LITERARY LICENSE:
Tom was a man of a
few very carefully
selected words.
Although I have this desk job now, I was thrilled when once, a
few years back, one of my daughters mentioned in passing that
she really liked the smell of diesel.
One of the first magazines that ever came into our house in
Sudbury was Today’s Trucking’s granddaddy and it was called
Bus&Truck.
And you wonder why Tom has such a presence in my life?
Frequently, when I’m going into an uncertain situation, I ask,
“What would Tom do?”
And I quote him. I bet I use my late father’s words more than
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TODAY’S TRUCKING
my own. Some day after I’ve died one of my daughters is going to
look at her brother and say: “Remember how Dad always used
to say, ‘Like my dad always used to say.’”?
Recently, my son Michel faced a minor driving situation.
I cited the Book of Tom: “If you’re a good driver, you don’t need
a license.”
Translation: You only need a license if you have to show it to
the authorities and a good driver will never be in that position
because every accident is avoidable.
Here’s another: “No point putting a $40 saddle on a $10 horse.”
My older sister Norma got sore when I tried that one with her.
She had asked my opinion of a new dress. Dad used it when he
figured there was little point spending money on a unit with no
future. (My point exactly Norma!)
“While you’re resting, split some wood,” was a favorite. As was
“there’s no such thing as spare time.” I cannot remember Dad
ever doing nothing. Other kids’ dads took holidays.
“The only driver you have to worry about is the guy behind the
guy in front of you,” is self-explanatory. As was, “The most important part of the vehicle is the nut that holds the wheel.”
Dad wasn’t all about work, though. “One drink,” he said, “is
just right. Two is too many and three isn’t half enough.”
He also drew on the wisdom of his years and observed that if
you’re going to drink and drive you’re better off driving a horse
and buggy because no matter how much you’ve imbibed, the
horse could find its way home.
Tom also knew an apple was a better breath freshener than
the Sen-Sen drivers used to try to cover their tracks with.
Finally, more often than not, when I do ask for Tom’s advice, it’s
almost always right. And that’s just weird.
Recently, I was on the phone with a rather pushy sales agent. It
was a dispute over something and about a grand was at stake.
Things were not going my way. She insisted. Very by-the-book,
she was. She was annoying. She threw out an ultimatum.
She waited for my reaction.
Channeling Tom’s “99 times out of a 100 you’re better off saying
nothing,” I just decided to stop talking. Clammed up.
She hesitated, hemmed and then for some reason felt the need
to fill the dead air. Miraculously, she said, “well if that’s the case”
[I had not made a case] then delivered a counter offer we could
both live with.
Thanks to Tom I had shut up before I got into more trouble.
Just like I’m going to do now. ▲
in evolution, there are no shortcuts
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