R S C A. I

R S C A. I
REPORT OF THE SENATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE
Saint John Senate
15 May 2007
Agenda Item # 12.
15 MAY 2007
A. INTRODUCTION
B. FACULTY OF BUSINESS
1. BBA, BAM, ACCOUNTING CERTIFICATE
i)
Program changes
4
ii)
Course changes: BA 2758, 3129
7
C. FACULTY OF SCIENCE, APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
1. PHYSICAL SCIENCES
i)
New courses: APSC 2023, PHYS 1801
8
ii)
Course changes: CHEM 1041, 1072
9
2. MATHEMATICS
i)
New course: MATH 1001
9
3. BIOLOGY
a) Bio-Psychology
i)
Program changes
10
ii)
Course deletion: BIPS 4000
10
iii) New courses: BIPS 4001, 4002
10
b) BSc Biology, BSc Environmental Biology, BSc Marine Biology
i)
Program changes
11
4. HEALTH SCIENCES
i)
Program changes
11
ii)
Course changes: HSCI 3032
13
5. NURSING
i)
Course changes: NURS 1235, 2063, 2156
13
6. ENGINEERING
i)
Course deletions: EE 2213, 2703, 2783, ME 2322
14
ii)
New courses: CPME 2213, EE 2722, ME 2111, 2122, 2125, 2145
14
iii) Course changes: CMPE 2013, EE 1013, 2773, ME 2143
15
7. BSC PSYCHOLOGY OPTION
i)
Program changes
16
D. FACULTY OF ARTS
1. PSYCHOLOGY
a) Psychology
i)
Program changes
17
ii)
New course: PSYC 3453
18
iii) Course changes: PSYC 1273, 3293, 4813
19
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 2 of 42
2. HUMANITIES AND LANGUAGES
a) Humanities
i)
New course: HUM 3966
20
b) English
i)
Program changes
20
c) Linguistics
i)
20
New course: LING 1102
d) Philosophy
i)
Course deletion: PHIL 3110
21
ii)
New courses: PHIL 3085, 3115, 3116, 3117
21
3. SOCIAL SCIENCES
a) Economics
i)
Program changes
22
ii)
Course changes: ECON 4645
23
b) Information and Communication Studies
i)
Program changes
24
ii)
New courses: ICS 2102, 3101, 4101
27
iii) Course changes: ICS 3001, 3003, 3004, 3005, 3006, 3007
27
4. HISTORY AND POLITICS
a) International Studies
i)
Program changes:
28
ii)
Course deletions: IS 3301, 3401, 3501
29
iii) Course changes: IS 1002
30
b) History
i)
Program changes
30
ii)
Course deletions:
32
HIST 2000, 2010, 3101, 3105, 3107, 3275, 3285, 3290, 3485,
3560, 3715, 4361, 4362, 4451, 4461, 4475.
iii) Course changes:
33
HIST 2101, 2102, 2207, 2208, 2301, 2302, 2407, 2408, 3003,
3041, 3102, 3106, 3174, 3185, 3195, 3202, 3205, 3212, 3255,
3265, 3295, 3303, 3305, 3311, 3312, 3315, 3316, 3317, 3321,
3335, 3361, 3362, 3363, 3365, 3377, 3381, 3382, 3383, 3386,
3403, 3421, 3455, 3465, 3471, 3473, 3475, 3481, 3491, 3505,
3525, 3555, 3567, 3577, 3588, 3945.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 3 of 42
INTRODUCTION
This lengthy report contains a number of changes to programs and courses, as well as the introduction of some new
courses. Although the changes are all important, they are, in the main, fairly routine. For example, many of the
changes from the Faculty of SASE were occasioned by the decision to introduce a new one-term course in
Mathematics in place of MATH 1003 and 1013. That necessitated changes to a number of programs. Similarly, in
response to the QAR the discipline of History undertook to eliminate a number of courses, adjust prerequisites, and
make changes to course descriptions to more accurately represent the courses as they are currently taught. This kind
of undertaking generates a great deal of paperwork, but is fairly formulaic in character. Short explanations for the
several changes have been included throughout the report and it is hoped that the organization and presentation of the
material is fairly self-explanatory.
The following recommendations are respectfully submitted to Senate:
1. That the Senate approve the program changes and course changes for the BBA, BAM, and
Accounting Certificate (pp. 4-8) as proposed.
2. That the Senate approve the new courses and course changes for Physical Sciences and
Mathematics (pp. 8-9) as proposed.
3. That the Senate approve the program changes, new courses, and course deletions and changes
for Biology, Health Sciences, and Nursing (pp. 10-13) as proposed.
4. That the Senate approve the new courses, and course deletions and changes for Engineering
(pp. 14-15) as proposed.
5. That the Senate approve the program changes for the BSc Psychology (pp. 16-17) as proposed.
6. That the Senate approve the program changes, new course, and course changes for Psychology
(pp. 17-19) as proposed.
7. That the Senate approve the program changes, new courses, and course deletions and changes
for Humanities and Languages (pp. 20-21) as proposed.
8. That the Senate approve the program and course changes for Economics (pp. 22-23) as
proposed.
9. That the Senate approve the program changes, new courses, and course changes for
Information and Communication Studies (pp. 25-27) as proposed.
10. That the Senate approve the program changes and course deletions and changes for
International Studies (pp. 28-30) as proposed.
11. That the Senate approve the program changes and course deletions and changes for History (pp.
30-42) as proposed.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 4 of 42
FACULTY OF BUSINESS
1. BBA, BAM, ACCOUNTING CERTIFICATE
i)
Program changes
BBA: The program changes for the BBA concern the Social Science electives and the removal of the informal term
“service courses.”
Current (p. 215)
X.
Business Administration Curriculum and Degree
Requirements
Proposed
X.
Business Administration Curriculum and Degree
Requirements
1 Students must successfully complete at least 120 ch of
course work and must obtain a grade of at least C in all
required and elective courses specifically required for the
degree.
1 Students must successfully complete at least 120 ch of
course work and must obtain a grade of at least C in all
required and elective courses specifically required for the
degree.
2 The normal course load for students in the BBA program
will be five courses per term. Students with a cumulative
gpa of at least 2. 5 may, with the written permission of the
Director of Undergraduate Studies or the Dean of the
Faculty of Business, take a maximum of six courses in a
given term.
2 The normal course load for students in the BBA program
will be five courses per term. Students with a cumulative
gpa of at least 2. 5 may, with the written permission of the
Director of Undergraduate Studies or the Dean of the
Faculty of Business, take a maximum of six courses in a
given term.
3 It is the responsibility of students to ascertain that their
elective and option courses are acceptable for BBA degree
credit. Credit will not be granted for CHEM 1831, FREN
1103, IT 1703, ECON 1004, PSYC 1273 or MATH 1863,
MATH 2633 OR MATH 3633 in the BBA program. Credit
will be granted for only one of MATH 1003 and MATH
2853 .
3 It is the responsibility of students to ascertain that their
elective and option courses are acceptable for BBA degree
credit. Credit will not be granted for CHEM 1831, FREN
1103, IT 1703, ECON 1004, PSYC 1273 or MATH 1863,
MATH 2633 OR MATH 3633 in the BBA program. Credit
will be granted for only one of MATH 1003 and MATH
2853 .
Students enrolled in a degree or certificate program under
the aegis of the Faculty of Business are not to register in
the following courses or similar courses without prior
permission of the Faculty of Business. (The content of
these courses is similar to required or option BBA
courses.)
Students enrolled in a degree or certificate program under
the aegis of the Faculty of Business are not to register in
the following courses or similar courses without prior
permission of the Faculty of Business. (The content of
these courses is similar to required or option BBA
courses.)
ECON 1073, PSYC 2901, PSYC 3913, STAT 1793, STAT
2263, STAT 2264, STAT 2593, STAT 3093 .
ECON 1073, PSYC 2901, PSYC 3913, STAT 1793, STAT
2263, STAT 2264, STAT 2593, STAT 3093 .
Note: Students should contact the Faculty of Business at
the beginning of each regular academic year for a revised
list of courses in this category. Courses listed elsewhere in
this Calendar as service courses by other Faculties or
Departments are normally not credits for the BBA degree.
Note: Students should contact the Faculty of Business at
the beginning of each regular academic year for a revised
list of courses in this category. Courses listed elsewhere in
this Calendar as service courses by other Faculties or
Departments are normally not credits for the BBA degree.
4 Candidates for the degree must successfully complete the
following credit hours: a) 51 required, b) 18 Business
electives, c) 6 Social Science electives, d) 6 Humanities
and Languages electives, e) 39 options, of which a
maximum of 18 may be chosen from Business and a
maximum of 12 of the 39 may be at the introductory level.
43 Candidates for the degree must successfully complete the
following credit hours: a) 51 required, b) 18 Business
electives, c) 6 Social Science electives, d) 6 Humanities
and Languages electives, e) 39 options, of which a
maximum of 18 may be chosen from Business and a
maximum of 12 of the 39 may be at the introductory level.
An elective course is one chosen from a specified group of
courses, e.g. "from Social Science or Business". An option
course is an approved course chosen by the student from
any approved discipline.
An elective course is one chosen from a specified group of
courses, e.g. "from Social Science or Business". An option
course is an approved course chosen by the student from
any approved discipline.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 5 of 42
Electives:
Humanities and
Languages
Classics, English, German, Greek,
History, Humanities, Latin,
Philosophy, Spanish, (or other
courses as approved by the Faculty
of Business)
Social Sciences
Gender Studies, Geography,
Information & Communication
Studies, International Studies,
Linguistics, Politics, Psychology,
Social Science, Sociology (or other
courses as approved by the Faculty
of Business)
Business
All courses prefixed with BA which
are not listed as required in section
5 below.
Options: Except as noted below, options may be
chosen from any of the elective areas listed above as
well as: Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science,
Geology, Information Technology, Mathematics,
Physics, Science, or other courses as approved by the
Faculty of Business.
4 It is the responsibility of students to ascertain that their
elective and option courses are acceptable for BBA degree
credit. Credit will not be granted for CHEM 1831, FREN
1103, IT 1703, ECON 1004, PSYC 1273 or MATH 1863,
MATH 2633 or MATH 3633 in the BBA program. Credit will
be granted for only one of MATH 1003 and MATH 2853 .
Students enrolled in a degree or certificate program under
the aegis of the Faculty of Business are not to register in
the following courses or similar courses without prior
permission of the Faculty of Business. (The content of
these courses is similar to required or option BBA
courses.)
ECON 1073, PSYC 2901, PSYC 3913, STAT 1793, STAT
2793, STAT 2263, STAT 2264, STAT 2593, STAT 3093 .
Note: Students should contact the Faculty of Business at
the beginning of each regular academic year for a revised
list of courses in this category. Courses listed elsewhere in
this Calendar as service courses by other Faculties or
Departments are normally not credits for the BBA degree.
5 Course Requirements
5 Course Requirements
Students are responsible for ensuring that they meet all
the requirements specified for the degree. These include
the minimum credit hour requirements, minimum grade
point averages, minimum grades in specified courses,
successful completion of all specifically required courses
and compliance with the restrictions on elective and option
courses as in regulation X.3 and 4 above.
Students are responsible for ensuring that they meet all
the requirements specified for the degree. These include
the minimum credit hour requirements, minimum grade
point averages, minimum grades in specified courses,
successful completion of all specifically required courses
and compliance with the restrictions on elective and option
courses as in regulation X.3 and 4 above.
Students are advised to consult Section F of this Calendar
for detailed course descriptions, including the number of
credit hours assigned to each course.
Students are advised to consult Section F of this Calendar
for detailed course descriptions, including the number of
credit hours assigned to each course.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 6 of 42
Example of a Typical Student's Program
(15 ch per term, total 120 ch)
Example of a Typical Student's Program
(15 ch per term, total 120 ch)
…
…
**************
**************
…
…
Notes:
Notes:
* All students must include Math 1853 within their first 30 ch;
6 ch from the Social Science disciplines of Anthropology,
Politics, Psychology or Sociology within their first 60 ch,
and 6 ch from the Humanities and Languages disciplines
of Classics, English, French, German, History, Humanities,
Latin, Philosophy or Spanish within their first 60 ch.
* All students must include Math 1853 within their first 30 ch;
6 ch from the Social Science disciplines of Anthropology,
Politics, Psychology or Sociology listed above within their
first 60 ch, and 6 ch from the Humanities and Languages
disciplines of Classics, English, French, German, History,
Humanities, Latin, Philosophy or Spanish listed above
within their first 60 ch.
** Option courses may be selected from the offerings of any
faculty provided that the selections are in accord with
regulations X.3 and 4 above, and provided they are
approved by the Faculty of Business.
** Option courses may be selected from the offerings of any
faculty provided that the selections are in accord with
regulations X.3 and 4 above, and provided they are
approved by the Faculty of Business.
Program changes (continued)
BAM: The program changes for the BBA concern the Social Science electives and those the removal of the informal term
“service courses.”
Current (p. 141)
IV. Bachelor of Applied Management Curriculum and
Degree Requirements
Proposed
IV. Bachelor of Applied Management Curriculum and
Degree Requirements
It is the responsibility of students to ascertain that their
elective and option courses are acceptable for BAM
degree credit. Credit will not be granted for FREN 1103 ,
CS 1703 , ECON 1004 , MATH 1863 or PSYC 1273 in
the BAM program.
It is the responsibility of students to ascertain that their
elective and option courses are acceptable for BAM
degree credit. Credit will not be granted for FREN 1103 ,
CS 1703 , ECON 1004 , MATH 1863 or PSYC 1273 in
the BAM program.
Students enrolled in a degree or certificate program under
the aegis of the Faculty of Business are not to register in
the following courses or similar courses without prior
permission of the Faculty of Business: PSYC 2901 ,
PSYC 3913 , STAT 1793 , STAT 3093 (The content of
these courses is similar to required or optional BBA or
BAM courses.).
Students enrolled in a degree or certificate program under
the aegis of the Faculty of Business are not to register in
the following courses or similar courses without prior
permission of the Faculty of Business: PSYC 2901 ,
PSYC 3913 , STAT 1793 , STAT 3093 (The content of
these courses is similar to required or optional BBA or
BAM courses.).
Note: Students should contact the Faculty of Business at
the beginning of each regular academic year for a revised
list of courses in this category. Courses listed elsewhere in
this Calendar, as service courses by other Faculties or
Departments are normally not credits for the BAM degree.
Note: Students should contact the Faculty of Business at
the beginning of each regular academic year for a revised
list of courses in this category. Courses listed elsewhere in
this Calendar, as service courses by other Faculties or
Departments are normally not credits for the BAM degree.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 7 of 42
Program changes (continued)
Certificate in Accounting: BA 4238, currently a required course for the Certificate in Accounting, is an elective course for
the Accounting major, concentration, and the BAMAC degree. BA 4238 may not be offered every year which may result in
an unacceptable delay for Certificate students. Removing BA 4238 as a required course will maintain consistency with the
other programs and will offer Certificate students some choice in an otherwise restricted program. This change will also
ensure that Certificate students will be able to complete the certificate in a timely manner.
Current (p. 171)
Proposed
Certificate in Accounting
Certificate in Accounting
REQUIREMENTS:
REQUIREMENTS:
A Certificate in Accounting will be awarded to individuals who:
A Certificate in Accounting will be awarded to individuals who:
a
b
achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0
over the 34 credit hours required, and
successfully complete (with a C or better):
a
b
achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0
over the 34 credit hours required, and
successfully complete (with a C or better):
BA 1216
Accounting for Managers I
3 ch
BA 1216
Accounting for Managers I
3 ch
BA 1218
Accounting Lab
1 ch
BA 1218
Accounting Lab
1 ch
BA 1605
Business Decision Analysis I (Note
C above)
3 ch
BA 1605
Business Decision Analysis I (Note
C above)
3 ch
BA 2217
Accounting for Managers II
3 ch
BA 2217
Accounting for Managers II
3 ch
BA 3224
Accounting for Managers III
3 ch
BA 3224
Accounting for Managers III
3 ch
BA 3235
Intermediate Accounting I
3 ch
BA 3235
Intermediate Accounting I
3 ch
BA 3236
Intermediate Accounting II
3 ch
BA 3236
Intermediate Accounting II
3 ch
BA 3425
Managerial Finance
3 ch
BA 3425
Managerial Finance
3 ch
BA 4221
Advanced Management Accounting
3 ch
BA 4221
Advanced Management Accounting
3 ch
BA 4223
Accounting Information Systems
3 ch
BA 4223
Accounting Information Systems
3 ch
BA 4229
Advanced Financial Accounting
3 ch
BA 4229
Advanced Financial Accounting
3 ch
BA 4238
Auditing
3 ch
BA 4238
Auditing
34 ch
3 ch
Accounting or Finance Elective (see note A)
3 ch
34 ch
Note A: 3 ch accounting or finance elective chosen from
BA 3421, BA 4223, BA 4237, BA 4238, BA 4242, BA 4437,
or BA 4455 or other course(s) approved by the Faculty of
Business.
ii) Course changes: BA 2758, 3129
The proposed prerequisite for BA 2758 is designed to restrict the course to students who are either in their second year of
full-time study or above, or are part-time students enrolled in a certificate program.
Current (p. 179)
Proposed
BA 2758
Employment Law
3 ch (3C)
This course examines Canadian employment legislation and
its application. Includes a study of laws governing unionmanagement relations, work standards, employment equity,
and relevant laws governing recruitment, selection, and
employment of personnel, Differences in federal and
provincial employment laws will be discussed.
BA 2758
Employment Law
3 ch (3C)
This course examines Canadian employment legislation and
its application. Includes a study of laws governing unionmanagement relations, work standards, employment equity,
and relevant laws governing recruitment, selection, and
employment of personnel, Differences in federal and
provincial employment laws will be discussed. Prerequisite:
Successful completion of a minimum of 30 credit hours,
or admission to a certificate program within the Faculty
of Business.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 8 of 42
BA 3129, which was approved by Senate in January 2007, replaces BA 4319, BA 4829, and HTM 4129. A note is to be added
to ensure that students do not take a course for which they will not receive credit.
Current (not in calendar; approved Jan 07)
Proposed
BA 3129
Business Research Methods
3 ch (3C, E)
Students will learn how to design, conduct and analyze
research for making informed business decisions. The course
will focus on basic methodologies, qualitative and quantitative
methods, data sources, reliability, validity, and other
measurement issues, data collection and research design,
ethics in research, and report writing and presentation.
Prerequisite BA1605 and one of BA2303, 2858 or HTM1103
and co-requisite BA2606.
BA 3129
Business Research Methods
3 ch (3C, E)
Students will learn how to design, conduct and analyze
research for making informed business decisions. The course
will focus on basic methodologies, qualitative and quantitative
methods, data sources, reliability, validity, and other
measurement issues, data collection and research design,
ethics in research, and report writing and presentation.
Prerequisite BA1605 and one of BA2303, 2858 or HTM1103
and co-requisite BA2606. NOTE: Credit will be given for
only one of BA 3129, BA 4319, BA 4829, and HTM 4129.
FACULTY OF SCIENCE, APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
1. PHYSICAL SCIENCES
i)
New courses: APSC 2023, PHYS 1801
APSC 2023 was introduced at UNBF last year and has been offered on Registrar’s Warrant as well as by video conference
on both campuses.
th
th
APSC 2023 A Survey of 19 and 20 Century Physics
3 ch (3C, E)
An introduction to ideas developed in Physics over the last two centuries. Topics will be drawn
from Thermodynamics, Geometric and Physical Optics, Relativity, Quantum Mechanics and
Atomic Physics. Prerequisite: APSC 1013, MATH 1013.
PHYS 1801 is a one-term 5 ch introduction to basic Physics needed for understanding biological systems. The course is
intended for students in the biological sciences, but could also be of interest as a general elective. Students who require
more advanced Physics, such as those majoring in Chemistry, Geology, Physics, or General Science, or students
intending to pursue health related professional programmes such as medicine, should not take this course..
PHYS 1801 Introductory Physics for Biological Sciences
5 ch (3C 1T 3L, E)
An general introduction to Physics, with applications to biological systems. Topics include
mechanics, fluid mechanics, electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, and radiation phenomena.
This course is intended primarily for students in Biological Sciences. Note: Credit will not be
given for both PHYS 1801 and PHYS 1010/1020. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of 70% in
high school Physics. Co-requisite: MATH 1001 or MATH 1003.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 9 of 42
ii) Course changes: CHEM 1041, 1072
Changes in the corequisites for CHEM 1041 and 1072 are needed to accommodate the replacement of MATH 1003/1013 with
MATH 1001 in the Biological and Health Sciences programs.
Current (not in calendar; approved Jan 07)
Proposed
CHEM 1041 General Chemistry I
3 ch (3C 1T)
Introductory course designed primarily for B.Sc. students.
Topics covered include atoms, molecules & ions;
stoichiometry; thermochemistry; atomic structure & quantum
theory; periodic trends - atomic size, ionization, electron
affinity; chemical bonding - Lewis structure, VSEPR, polarity,
electronegativity, hybridization, hydrocarbons - alkanes,
alkenes, alkynes, nomenclature, isomerism, functional
groups. Prerequisite: Grade 12 Chemistry or equivalent.
Corequisite: MATH 1003.
CHEM 1041 General Chemistry I
3 ch (3C 1T)
Introductory course designed primarily for B.Sc. students.
Topics covered include atoms, molecules & ions;
stoichiometry; thermochemistry; atomic structure & quantum
theory; periodic trends - atomic size, ionization, electron
affinity; chemical bonding - Lewis structure, VSEPR, polarity,
electronegativity, hybridization, hydrocarbons - alkanes,
alkenes, alkynes, nomenclature, isomerism, functional
groups. Prerequisite: Grade 12 Chemistry or equivalent.
Corequisite: MATH 1001 or MATH 1003.
CHEM 1072 General Chemistry II
3 ch (3C 1T)
A continuation of CHEM 1041. Topics covered include gas
laws & kinetic theory; oxidation & reduction - oxidation
numbers, balancing redox equations; equilibria - equilibrium
constant K, Le Chatelier’s Principle, homo- and
heterogeneous equilibria; acid-base equilibria - weak acids &
bases, pH, common ion effect, buffers, solubility, selective
precipitation; thermodynamics - entropy & free energy;
electrochemistry - electrode potentials, galvanic & electrolytic
cells, quantitative aspects. Prerequisite: CHEM 1041.
Corequisite: MATH 1013 or MATH 1003 repeated.
CHEM 1072 General Chemistry II
3 ch (3C 1T)
A continuation of CHEM 1041. Topics covered include gas
laws & kinetic theory; oxidation & reduction - oxidation
numbers, balancing redox equations; equilibria - equilibrium
constant K, Le Chatelier’s Principle, homo- and
heterogeneous equilibria; acid-base equilibria - weak acids &
bases, pH, common ion effect, buffers, solubility, selective
precipitation; thermodynamics - entropy & free energy;
electrochemistry - electrode potentials, galvanic & electrolytic
cells, quantitative aspects. Prerequisite: CHEM 1041.
Corequisite: MATH 1013 1001 or MATH 1003 repeated.
2. MATHEMATICS
i)
New course: MATH 1001
MATH 1001 was introduced in the first instance to accommodate students in the Health Sciences who will no longer be
required to take MATH 1013. There was concern expressed as MATH 1003 does not cover integration; hence the creation
of this course. The course has been taught on Registrar’s Warrant and has been deemed suitable for students in the
Biological Sciences as well as the Health Sciences.
MATH 1001 Calculus for Life Sciences
3 ch (4C, E)
Functions, limits, continuity, the concept of derivative, basic rules of differentiation. Derivatives
of polynomials, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Extreme values and
related rates. Introduction to integration, area, volume, average value. Applications to life
sciences will be stressed throughout the course. This course is restricted to students in Health
Sciences, Nursing, and Biological Sciences. Notes: (1) Credit will not be given for both MATH
1001 and MATH 1003; (2) A minimum grade of B is required in MATH 1001 to take MATH
1013. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of 60% in New Brunswick Advanced Math (120), or
equivalent.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 10 of 42
3. BIOLOGY
a) Bio-Psychology
i)
Program changes
There are three changes to the Bio-Psych program: i) replace MATH 1003, 1013 with MATH 1001; ii) change 6 ch of
approved electives to 9 ch of approved electives; iii) replace BIPS 4000 with BIPS 4001 and BIPS 4002.
Current (p. 182)
Proposed
Honours and Majors Program
This interdepartmental program is intended to meet the needs
of students who are interested in the interdisciplinary areas
covered by both psychology and zoology.
Honours and Majors Program
This interdepartmental program is intended to meet the needs
of students who are interested in the interdisciplinary areas
covered by both psychology and zoology.
First Year
CHEM 1041 , 1046 , 1072 , 1077 , BIOL 1001 , 1012 , 1017 ,
MATH 1003 , 1013 , PSYC 1003 / 1004 , 6 ch of approved
electives (total 36 ch).
First Year
CHEM 1041 , 1046 , 1072 , 1077 , BIOL 1001 , 1012 , 1017 ,
MATH 1003 , 1013, MATH 1001, PSYC 1003 / 1004 , 6 ch 9
ch of approved electives (total 36 ch).
Second Year
BIOL 2015 , 2065 , 2615 , CHEM 2401 or CHEM 2441 ,
PSYC 2102 , PSYC 2901 (or equivalent), plus 11 ch of
approved electives (total 33 ch).
Second Year
BIOL 2015 , 2065 , 2615 , CHEM 2401 or CHEM 2441 ,
PSYC 2102 , PSYC 2901 (or equivalent), plus 11 ch of
approved electives (total 33 ch).
Third and Fourth Years
BIOL 4935 , PSYC 3913 , 4053 , plus approved electives
equivalent to 54 ch (total 63 ch). The electives in years 2, 3
and 4 must contain at least 24 ch in psychology courses and
at least 24 ch in biology courses. At least 132 approved
credits are required to complete the program of which a
minimum of 46 ch must be beyond the second year level.
Third and Fourth Years
BIOL 4935 , PSYC 3913 , 4053 , plus approved electives
equivalent to 54 ch (total 63 ch). The electives in years 2, 3
and 4 must contain at least 24 ch in psychology courses and
at least 24 ch in biology courses. At least 132 approved
credits are required to complete the program of which a
minimum of 46 ch must be beyond the second year level.
To register for the honours program, students must have a
cumulative grade point average of at least 3.3 at the end of
the third year and must take BIPS 4000 in addition to the
above requirements.
To register for the honours program, students must have a
cumulative grade point average of at least 3.3 at the end of
the third year and must take BIPS 4000 BIPS 4001 and BIPS
4002 in addition to the above requirements.
ii) Course deletion: BIPS 4000
BIPS 4000 Biology-Psychology Joint Major-Honours Project is being replaced by two term-courses, BIPS 4001 and
BIPS 4002. This arrangement brings the Bio-Psych program in line with the Psychology program in that it ensures that
students are, in fact, able to complete the Honours thesis successfully.
iii) New courses: BIPS 4001, 4002
BIPS 4001
Designing Research Proposals
3 ch (E)
Under the direction of co-supervisors from the departments of Psychology and Biology a
student develops a thesis proposal which is assessed and approved by both departments.
Prerequisite: Eligibility for the Honours Bio-Psych program.
BIPS 4002
Honours Thesis
3 ch (E)
Under the direction of co-supervisors from the departments of Psychology and Biology a
student conducts, completes, and defends the research. Prerequisite: A grade of B+ or higher
in BIPS 4001.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 11 of 42
b) BSc Biology, BSc Environmental Biology, BSc Marine Biology
iv) Program changes
The changes to the BSc Biology, BSc Environmental Biology, BSc Marine Biology reflect the replacement of MATH
1003/1013 with MATH 1001.
Current (p. 178)
Proposed
BIOLOGY OPTION
First Year
1. BIOL 1105, 1205, 1017
2. CHEM 1041, 1046, 1072, 1077
3. MATH 1003, 1013
4. GEOL 1044, 1074
5. A minimum of 6 ch in approved electives for a total of 40
ch.
BIOLOGY OPTION
First Year
1. BIOL 1105, 1205, 1017
2. CHEM 1041, 1046, 1072, 1077
3. MATH 1003, 1013 MATH 1001
4. GEOL 1044, 1074
5. A minimum of 6 ch 9 ch in approved electives for a total
of 40 ch.
Current (p. 178)
Proposed
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY OPTION
First Year
1. BIOL 1105, 1205, 1017, 1302
2. CHEM 1041, 1046, 1072, 1077
3. MATH 1003
4. GEOL 1044
5. ECON 1013, 1023
6. A minimum of 3 ch in approved electives for a total of 38
ch.
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY OPTION
First Year
1. BIOL 1105, 1205, 1017, 1302
2. CHEM 1041, 1046, 1072, 1077
3. MATH 1003 MATH 1001
4. GEOL 1044
5. ECON 1013, 1023
6. A minimum of 3 ch in approved electives for a total of 38
ch.
Current (p. 179)
Proposed
MARINE BIOLOGY OPTION
First Year
1. BIOL 1105, 1205, 1017, 1302
2. CHEM 1041, 1046, 1072, 1077
3. MATH 1003, STAT 2264
4. GEOL 1044
5. A minimum of 3 ch in approved electives for a total of 38
ch.
MARINE BIOLOGY OPTION
First Year
1. BIOL 1105, 1205, 1017, 1302
2. CHEM 1041, 1046, 1072, 1077
3. MATH 1003 MATH 1001, STAT 2264
4. GEOL 1044
5. A minimum of 3 ch in approved electives for a total of 38
ch.
4. HEALTH SCIENCES
i)
Program changes
The changes in the Bachelor of Health Sciences are as follows:
•
MATH 1001 will replace MATH 1003/1013 as the required course in mathematics. MATH 1001 has been introduced
precisely to accommodate this change.
•
Reduction of credit hour requirements from 150 (75 from each partner) to 140 (70 from each partner). This reduction
brings the total number more in line with other programs in SASE and should permit the students to take 5 rather than
6 courses per term in the final two years of the program.
•
Removal of Sociology grouping as part of the reduction in credit hours.
The reduction in credit hours and the removal of MATH 1013 and the Sociology grouping as requirements have been
reviewed and approved by the Health Sciences Advisory Committee. Discussions were also had with representatives from
each of the partner institutions and the departments of Mathematics and Physical Sciences.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 12 of 42
Current (p. 173)
Proposed
BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCES
BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCES
To be admitted to the Bachelor of Health Sciences (BHS)
degree, students must be accepted by a Canadian Medical
Association (CMA) accredited program in Nuclear Medicine,
Radiation Therapy, Respiratory Therapy or Radiography or
have completed such an accredited program.
To be admitted to the Bachelor of Health Sciences (BHS)
degree, students must be accepted by a Canadian Medical
Association (CMA) accredited program in Nuclear Medicine,
Radiation Therapy, Respiratory Therapy or Radiography or
have completed such an accredited program.
To earn the degree, students must successfully complete 150
credit hours. Note: 77 credit hours are required to be taken at
UNB and 75 credit hours are allotted on successful
completion of the accredited program. Proof of acceptance to
or completion of the accredited program must be submitted to
the Registrar’s Office before entrance to the BHS program will
be granted.
To earn the degree, students must successfully complete 150
140 credit hours. Note: 77 70 credit hours are required to be
taken at UNB and 75 70 credit hours are allotted on
successful completion of the accredited program. Proof of
acceptance to or completion of the accredited program must
be submitted to the Registrar’s Office before entrance to the
BHS program will be granted.
Students entering the University who have not yet been
admitted to an accredited program should enroll in the B.Sc.
program.
Students entering the University who have not yet been
admitted to an accredited program should enroll in the B.Sc.
program.
Required Courses:
Required Courses:
YEAR 1:
• MATH 1003 / MATH 1013 ,
• BIOL 1001 / BIOL 1012 / BIOL 1017
• CHEM 1041 / CHEM 1046 / CHEM 1072 / CHEM 1077
• PHYS 1000
• PSYC 1003 / PSYC 1004
YEAR 1:
• MATH 1003 / MATH 1013, MATH 1001 (3 ch)
• BIOL 1001 / BIOL 1012 / BIOL 1017 (8 ch)
• CHEM 1041 / CHEM 1046 / CHEM 1072 / CHEM 1077
(10 ch)
• PHYS 1000 1010 / 1020 (10 ch)
• PSYC 1003 / PSYC 1004 (6 ch)
YEARS 2, 3, and 4:
In addition to the requirements of the appropriate accredited
program, students must complete the following University
courses:
• BA 2504
• one of SOCI 2376 , SOCI 2703 or GEND 2001
• HSCI 3032
• STAT 2263
• one of PSYC 3383 , PSYC 3693 , PSYC 3711 , PSYC
3723 , PSYC 3724 or PSYC 3752 (PSYC 3711 is
strongly recommended)
• NURS 4144
• PHIL 3133 and PHIL 3134
• HSCI 4091
• PSYC 3033
• one (3ch) elective of 3000/4000 level PSYC, NURS or
BIOL courses
• one (3ch) elective (any level)
YEARS 2, 3, and 4:
In addition to the requirements of the appropriate accredited
program, students must complete the following University
courses:
• BA 2504 (3 ch)
• one of SOCI 2376 , SOCI 2703 or GEND 2001
• HSCI 3032 (3 ch)
• STAT 2263 (3 ch)
• one of PSYC 3383 , PSYC 3693 , PSYC 3711 , PSYC
3723 , PSYC 3724 or PSYC 3752 (PSYC 3711 is
strongly recommended) (3 ch)
• NURS 4144 (3 ch)
• PHIL 3133 and PHIL 3134 (6 ch)
• HSCI 4091 (3 ch)
• PSYC 3033 (3 ch)
• one (3ch) elective of 3000/4000 level PSYC, NURS or
BIOL courses (3 ch)
• one (3ch) elective (any level) (3 ch)
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 13 of 42
ii) Course changes: HSCI 3032
HSCI 3032 is being changed from a 4 ch to a 3 ch course to bring it in line with the communications course offered from
UNBF to students in Moncton. In addition, the prerequisites have been slightly altered.
Current (p. 220)
Proposed
HSCI 3032
Communication for Health
4 ch (3C 1L)
Professionals (Cross Listed:
NURS 3031)
Includes reflection, discussion and inquiry on concepts related
to understanding and improving interpersonal communication
within a health care context. Focuses on complex
interpersonal dilemmas, demands and difficulties faced by
health care professionals in the workplace. Students will
analyse interactions using knowledge of communication
theory; demonstrate appropriate interpersonal skills in
caring/helping relationships; and apply self-knowledge in
interpersonal relations.
Prerequisite: BN students successful completion of year 2 Nursing courses; BHS
students - successful completion of year 1 BSc courses or
CMA certification in Radiation Technology, Nuclear Medicine,
Radiation Oncology or Respiratory Therapy.
HSCI 3032
Communication for Health
4 3 ch (3C 1L)
Professionals (Cross Listed:
NURS 3031)
Includes reflection, discussion and inquiry on concepts related
to understanding and improving interpersonal communication
within a health care context. Focuses on complex
interpersonal dilemmas, demands and difficulties faced by
health care professionals in the workplace. Students will
analyse interactions using knowledge of communication
theory; demonstrate appropriate interpersonal skills in
caring/helping relationships; and apply self-knowledge in
interpersonal relations.
applying professional
communication skills to therapeutic helping, complex
interpersonal dilemmas and difficulties faced by health
care professionals in the workplace. Prerequisite: BN
students - successful completion of year 2 Nursing courses;
BHS students - successful completion of year 1 BSc courses
or CMA certification in Radiation Technology Radiography,
Radiation Therapy, Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Oncology or
Respiratory Therapy.
5. NURSING
i)
Course changes: NURS 1235, 2063, 2156
NURS 1235, 2063, and 2156 are all clinical courses which are being reduced to 3 ch. This change will bring these courses
in line with the corresponding courses in the Fredericton, Moncton, Bathurst, and Humber sites of the UNB Nursing
program.
Current (p. 237)
Proposed
NURS 1235 Clinical Practice: Nursing
and Wellness
4 ch (12L)
NURS 1235 Clinical Practice: Nursing
and Wellness
4 3 ch (12 9L)
NURS 2063 Concentrated Clinical
Practice I
5 ch (15L)
NURS 2063 Concentrated Clinical
Practice I
5 3 ch (15 9L)
NURS 2156 Clinical Practice: Chronic
Health Challenges
4 ch (12L)
NURS 2156 Clinical Practice: Chronic
Health Challenges
4 3 ch (12 9L)
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 14 of 42
6. ENGINEERING
i)
Course deletions: EE 2213, 2703, 2783, ME 2322
EE 2213 Digital Logic I (being replaced by CMPE 2213 Digital Systems)
EE 2703 Introduction to Electrical Design (matches changes in ECE program in Fredericton)
EE 2783 Networks (being replaced by EE 2722 Circuits and Systems)
ME 2332 Design of Machine Elements (being replaced by ME 2122 Mechanics of Materials II)
ii) New courses: CPME 2213, EE 2722, ME 2111, 2122, 2125, 2145
The new courses and course changes from Engineering are all required to match changes in the various Engineering
programs in Fredericton.
CMPE 2213 replaces EE 2213 Digital Logic I.
CMPE 2213 Digital Systems
4 ch (3C 2L, E)
Introduces the design of digital systems, including basic design concepts and implementation
technology, number representations, synthesis of combinational and sequential logic, and the
use of HDL and computer-based design tools. Prerequisite: CS 1073 or equivalent, EE 1813
recommended.
EE 2722 replaces EE 2783 Networks.
EE 2722
Circuits and Systems
4 ch (3C 3L 1T, E)
Network analysis. Transient and steady state responses. Transfer functions, complex
frequencies, poles and zeros, Laplace Transforms. Frequency Response and Bode Plots.
Filters (passive and active). Prerequisite: CS 1073 or equivalent, EE 1813 recommended.
ME 2111 duplicates the lecture component of CE 2023.
ME 2111
Mechanics of Materials I
3 ch (3C 1T, E)
Basic concepts, uniaxial stress and strain, Hooke’s law, torsion, pure bending, bending design,
shear flow, transverse loads, stress and strain transformation, Mohr’s circle, strain
measurement. Prerequisite: APSC 1023.
ME 2122 replaces ME 2332 Design of Machine Elements.
ME 2122
Mechanics of Materials II
3 ch (3C 1T, E)
Fatigue, yield criteria, thin-wall pressure vessels, strength and deflection of beams, buckling of
columns, instability, indeterminate beams, energy methods, Castigliano’s theorem. Prerequisite:
ME 2111 or ME 2121 or CE 2023.
ME 2125 replaces the lab component of ME 2332.
ME 2125
Mechanics of Materials Design Project
1 ch (2L, E)
Analysis of the strength of a mechanical device. Shapes and materials will be modified to meet
deflection and stress limits. Written reports will document choices made and assessment of
design. Group oral reports. Prerequisite: ME 2111 or ME 2121 or CE 2023. Corequisite: ME
2122.
ME 2145 replaces the lab component of ME 2143.
ME 2145
Kinematics and Dynamics Design Project
1 ch (2L, E)
Student groups to design and build working model of planar linkage mechanism, based on a
mechanical application. Cooperation and project management skills. Written reports to
document choices made; evaluation of working model performance; and position, velocity,
acceleration and force analyses. Group oral reports. Prerequisite: APSC 1023. Corequisite: ME
2143.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 15 of 42
iii) Course changes: CMPE 2013, EE 1013, 2773, ME 2143
Current (p. 236)
Proposed
CMPE 2013 Simulation and
4 ch (3C 3L)
Engineering Analysis
Introduces modeling and numerical methods as applied in the
solution of engineering problems. Linear equations,
polynomials, statistical tools, numerical integration and
difference equations. Simulation tools such as MATLAB will
be used. Prerequisites: CS 1073 or equivalent, EE 1013 or
equivalent, MATH 1013, and MATH 1503 or equivalent.
CMPE 2013 2412 Simulation and
4 ch (3C 3L)
Engineering Analysis
Introduces An introduction to modeling and numerical
methods as applied in the solution of engineering problems.
Linear The solution of nonlinear equations, polynomials,
statistical tools, curve fitting, numerical integration and
difference equations. Simulation tools such as MATLAB will
be used. Prerequisites: CS 1073 or equivalent, EE 1013 or
equivalent, MATH 1013; and MATH 1503 or equivalent.
EE 1013
Electricity and Magnetism
4 ch (3C 3L 1T)
Introduces the fundamentals of electricity, magnetism and
applications. Covers concepts of charge, voltage, current,
power, energy, electric and magnetic fields, and the
electromagnetic spectrum. Includes resistors, resistance,
Ohm=s law, Kirchoff’s voltage and current laws, branch
current analysis, some electrical properties of materials,
electric sources, simple series, parallel and series-parallel dc
circuits. The basic concepts of digital switching logic are
introduced, including gates and truth tables. Energy
conversion and simple electric machines are examined, as
are the behaviour and use of common sensors and
transducers.
EE 1013 1813 Electricity and Magnetism 4 ch (3C 3L 1T)
Introduces the fundamentals of electricity, magnetism and
applications. Covers concepts of charge, voltage, current,
power, energy, electric and magnetic fields, and the
electromagnetic spectrum. Includes resistors, resistance,
Ohm=s law, Kirchoff’s voltage and current laws, branch
current analysis, some electrical properties of materials,
electric sources, simple series, parallel and series-parallel dc
circuits. The basic concepts of digital switching logic are
introduced, including gates and truth tables. Energy
conversion and simple electric machines are examined, as
are the behaviour and use of common sensors and
transducers.
EE 2773
Electric Circuits
4 ch (3C 1T 3L)
Introduces A. C. circuits, phasors, network analysis, network
theorems and polyphase systems. Prerequisites: MATH 1013
and EE 1013 or equivalent.
EE 2773 2711
Electric Circuits
4 ch (3C 1T 3L)
Introduces A. C. Basic DC circuits: network analysis and
theorems:. AC circuits: introduction of phasors, network
analysis, network and theorems and polyphase systems.
applied to AC circuits. Prerequisites: MATH 1013, EE 1813
or and EE 1013 or equivalent.
ME 2143
ME 2143
Kinematics and Dynamics
4 ch (3C 2L)
of Machines
Fundamental concepts, kinematic linkages, model
construction; displacement analysis; instant centers; velocities
and accelerations in mechanism, Coriolis acceleration; design
of cams; analysis of ordinary and planetary gear trains; simple
linkage synthesis. Transmission of forces in machines, inertia
forces in machines; dynamic force analysis; dynamically
equivalent systems. Prerequisite: APSC 1023.
Recommended: CS 1003 or other introductory programming
course.
Kinematics and Dynamics 4 3 ch (3C 2L 1T)
of Machines
Fundamental concepts, kinematic of linkages, model
construction; displacement, velocity and acceleration
analysis using graphical and analytical methods. ; instant
centers; velocities and accelerations in mechanism, Coriolis
acceleration; design of cams; analysis of ordinary and
planetary gear trains; simple linkage synthesis. Transmission
of forces in machines, inertia forces in machines; dynamic
force analysis; dynamically equivalent systems. Static and
dynamic force analysis of linkages. Introduction to cams.
Gears: involute nomenclature; bevel. helical and worm
gears; ordinary and planetary gear trains. Balancing
rotating masses. Simple gyroscopic effects. Prerequisite:
APSC 1023. Recommended: CS 1003 or other introductory
programming course.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 16 of 42
7. BSC PSYCHOLOGY OPTION
i)
Program changes
The changes to the BSc Psychology are as follows: i) replace MATH 1003/1013 with MATH 1001; ii) replace 1.5 full-course
electives with 2.5 full course electives; iii) add PSYC 3453 to the Social/Personality grouping of courses for the Honours program;
iv) add PSYC 4813 to the Clinical grouping of courses for the Honours program.
Current (p. 181)
Proposed
PSYCHOLOGY OPTION
PSYCHOLOGY OPTION
General Information and Curriculum
General Information and Curriculum
The Psychology discipline offers Majors and Honours
Bachelor of Sciences degrees. Course requirements common
to the Majors and Honours BSc degree are as follows:
The Psychology discipline offers Majors and Honours
Bachelor of Sciences degrees. Course requirements common
to the Majors and Honours BSc degree are as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
PSYC 1003, 1004
PSYC 2012
PSYC 2901
PSYC 3913 (in second or third year)
PSYC 4053 (in third or fourth year)
•
•
•
•
•
PSYC 1003, 1004
PSYC 2012
PSYC 2901
PSYC 3913 (in second or third year)
PSYC 4053 (in third or fourth year)
Each degree program requires the equivalent total of 20 full
courses and course selection for each program should
conform to the following pattern.
Each degree program requires the equivalent total of 20 full
courses and course selection for each program should
conform to the following pattern.
First and Second Year
First and Second Year
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BIOL 1205, 2615
CHEM 1041, 1046, 1072, 1077
MATH 1003, 1013
PSYC 1003, 1004, 2102, 2901 (or equivalent)
1 additional full course equivalent in Psychology
2 full course equivalents from list A
1 1/2 full course equivalents as electives
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BIOL 1205, 2615
CHEM 1041, 1046, 1072, 1077
MATH 1003, 1013 1001
PSYC 1003, 1004, 2102, 2901 (or equivalent)
1 additional full course equivalent in Psychology
2 full course equivalents from list A
1 1/2 2 1/2 full course equivalents as electives
Third and Fourth Year
• 5 1/2 full course equivalents in Psychology
• 2 full course equivalents from list A (1 full course
equivalent must be from either the third or fourth year)
• 2 1/2 full course equivalents as electives from either the
third or fourth year
Third and Fourth Year
• 5 1/2 full course equivalents in Psychology
• 2 full course equivalents from list A (1 full course
equivalent must be from either the third or fourth year)
• 2 1/2 full course equivalents as electives from either the
third or fourth year
List A: Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Data Analysis,
Geology, Mathematics, Physics, Statistics.
List A: Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Data Analysis,
Geology, Mathematics, Physics, Statistics.
BSc Honours Program
BSc Honours Program
An Honours BSc has requirements beyond those outlined
above. PSYC 4143, 4145 must be taken. In addition 27 ch of
elective psychology courses must be chosen in the following
manner. At least 9 ch must be successfully completed from
each of the three groups outlined below:
An Honours BSc has requirements beyond those outlined
above. PSYC 4143, 4145 must be taken. In addition 27 ch of
elective psychology courses must be chosen in the following
manner. At least 9 ch must be successfully completed from
each of the three groups outlined below:
1. Biological/Cognitive Basis of Behaviour: PSYC 3343, PSYC
3383, PSYC 3503, PSYC 3603, PSYC 3632, PSYC 3693,
PSYC 3711, PSYC 3723, PSYC 3743, PSYC 3752, PSYC
4021, PSYC 4583, PSYC 4693, PSYC 4733, PSYC 4833;
1. Biological/Cognitive Basis of Behaviour: PSYC 3343, PSYC
3383, PSYC 3503, PSYC 3603, PSYC 3632, PSYC 3693,
PSYC 3711, PSYC 3723, PSYC 3743, PSYC 3752, PSYC
4021, PSYC 4583, PSYC 4693, PSYC 4733, PSYC 4833;
2. Social/Personality: PSYC 2201, PSYC 2401, PSYC 3222,
PSYC 3232, PSYC 3263, PSYC 3293, PSYC 3352, PSYC
3412, PSYC 3461, PSYC 4463;
2. Social/Personality: PSYC 2201, PSYC 2401, PSYC 3222,
PSYC 3232, PSYC 3263, PSYC 3293, PSYC 3352, PSYC
3412, PSYC 3453, PSYC 3461, PSYC 4463;
3. Clinical/Applied: PSYC 3033, PSYC 3313, PSYC 3323,
PSYC 3362, PSYC 3393, PSYC 3493, PSYC 3553, PSYC
3724, PSYC 3725, PSYC 3803, PSYC 4213, PSYC 4214,
PSYC 4233, PSYC 4493.
3. Clinical/Applied: PSYC 3033, PSYC 3313, PSYC 3323,
PSYC 3362, PSYC 3393, PSYC 3493, PSYC 3553, PSYC
3724, PSYC 3725, PSYC 3803, PSYC 4213, PSYC 4214,
PSYC 4233, PSYC 4493, PSYC 4813.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 17 of 42
PSYC 3362, PSYC 3393, PSYC 3493, PSYC 3553, PSYC
3724, PSYC 3725, PSYC 3803, PSYC 4213, PSYC 4214,
PSYC 4233, PSYC 4493.
PSYC 3362, PSYC 3393, PSYC 3493, PSYC 3553, PSYC
3724, PSYC 3725, PSYC 3803, PSYC 4213, PSYC 4214,
PSYC 4233, PSYC 4493, PSYC 4813.
An Honours student must successfully complete an Honours
Thesis (PSYC 4143 and 4145). This typically requires that a
student conceive, plan, perform and report an experiment
under the supervision of a Faculty advisor. Normally, the
thesis research is completed during the student’s final year of
study.
An Honours student must successfully complete an Honours
Thesis (PSYC 4143 and 4145). This typically requires that a
student conceive, plan, perform and report an experiment
under the supervision of a Faculty advisor. Normally, the
thesis research is completed during the student’s final year of
study.
Applicants to the Honours program should apply in writing to
the Coordinator of the Honours program. To be eligible for
admission to the program a student should have a minimum
cumulative grade point average of 3.3 (B+). After admission, a
cumulative grade point average of 3.3 must be maintained. To
graduate with an honours degree, a grade point average of
3.3 is needed in all required Psychology courses.
Applicants to the Honours program should apply in writing to
the Coordinator of the Honours program. To be eligible for
admission to the program a student should have a minimum
cumulative grade point average of 3.3 (B+). After admission, a
cumulative grade point average of 3.3 must be maintained. To
graduate with an honours degree, a grade point average of
3.3 is needed in all required Psychology courses.
.
.
FACULTY OF ARTS
1. PSYCHOLOGY
i)
Program changes
The changes to the BA Psychology are as follows: i) replace “credit hour” terminology with “term-course” language; ii)
adjust the groupings to include new courses and to correct for redundancy across the groupings..
Current (p. 155)
Proposed
PSYCHOLOGY
PSYCHOLOGY
General Information and Curriculum
General Information and Curriculum
Successful completion of PSYC 1003 or an equivalent is
necessary before taking PSYC 1004 . Both PSYC 1003 and
PSYC 1004 must be completed before taking any of the
remaining psychology courses.
Successful completion of PSYC 1003 or an equivalent is
necessary before taking PSYC 1004 . Both PSYC 1003 and
PSYC 1004 must be completed before taking any of the
remaining psychology courses.
Major and Honours
Major and Honours
MAJOR
MAJOR
To qualify for a Major degree a student must accumulate 42
ch of approved psychology courses. Fifteen ch of courses are
compulsory as follows: PSYC 1003 , PSYC 1004 , PSYC
2102 , PSYC 2901 , PSYC 4053 . A minimum grade of C
(2.0) is required for all Psychology courses taken to meet the
Majors requirement.
To qualify for a Major degree a student must accumulate 42
ch of approved psychology courses 14 approved termcourses in Psychology. Fifteen ch of courses Five termcourses are compulsory as follows: PSYC 1003 , PSYC 1004
, PSYC 2102 , PSYC 2901 (or equivalent), PSYC 4053. A
minimum grade of C (2.0) is required for all Psychology
courses taken to meet the Majors requirement.
A student who wishes to do a double major in Psychology and
another discipline must complete 36 ch including 24 ch in
upper level courses and all the compulsory courses for the
single Major in psychology. A minimum grade of C(2.0) is
required for all psychology courses taken to meet the Majors
requirement.
A student who wishes to do a double major in Psychology and
another discipline must complete 36 ch 12 term-courses
including 24 ch 8 term-courses in upper level courses and all
the compulsory courses for the single Major in psychology. A
minimum grade of C (2.0) is required for all psychology
courses taken to meet the Majors requirement.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 18 of 42
HONOURS
HONOURS
The Honours program in Psychology provides a broad
knowledge of this field and its research methods. Students
planning to pursue graduate studies in psychology are
advised to consider this program.
The Honours program in Psychology provides a broad
knowledge of this field and its research methods. Students
planning to pursue graduate studies in psychology are
advised to consider this program.
Students may apply to the Honours program at the end of
their third year. To be eligible to apply they must have a
minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.3 (B+).
Students may apply to the Honours program at the end of
their third year. To be eligible to apply they must have a
minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.3 (B+).
Students must complete 51 ch of approved Psychology
courses for the Honours degree. Of the 51 ch of approved
Psychology courses for the Honours degree, the following 24
ch are compulsory: PSYC 1003, PSYC 1004, PSYC 2102,
PSYC 2901, PSYC 3913, PSYC 4053, PSYC 4143, PSYC
4145 .
Students must complete 51 ch of approved Psychology
courses 17 approved term-courses in Psychology for the
Honours degree. Of the 51 ch of approved Psychology
courses for the Honours degree, 17 term-courses the
following 24 ch 8 term-courses are compulsory: PSYC 1003,
PSYC 1004, PSYC 2102, PSYC 2901 (or equivalent), PSYC
3913, PSYC 4053, PSYC 4143, PSYC 4145 .
An additional 27 ch derived from a selection of 9 ch from each
of the following 3 groups is necessary.
An additional 27 ch 9 term-courses derived from a selection
of 9 ch 3 term-courses from each of the following 3 groups is
necessary.
Group I: Biological/Cognitive Basis of Behaviour I
Group I: Biological/Cognitive Basis of Behaviour I
PSYC 3343, PSYC 3383, PSYC 3503, PSYC 3603, PSYC
3632, PSYC 3693, PSYC 3711, PSYC 3723, PSYC 3743,
PSYC 3752, PSYC 4021, PSYC 4583, PSYC 4693, PSYC
4733, PSYC 4833
PSYC 3343, PSYC 3383, PSYC 3503, PSYC 3603, PSYC
3632, PSYC 3693, PSYC 3711, PSYC 3723, PSYC 3743,
PSYC 3752, PSYC 4021, PSYC 4583, PSYC 4693, PSYC
4733, PSYC 4833
Group II: Social/Personality
Group II: Social/Personality
PSYC 2201, PSYC 2401, PSYC 3222, PSYC 3232, PSYC
3263, PSYC 3293, PSYC 3343, PSYC 3352, PSYC 3412,
PSYC 3461, PSYC 3752, PSYC 4463
PSYC 2201, PSYC 2401, PSYC 3222, PSYC 3232, PSYC
3263, PSYC 3293, PSYC 3343, PSYC 3352, PSYC 3412,
PSYC 3453, PSYC 3461, PSYC 3752, PSYC 4463
Group III: Clinical/Applied
Group III: Clinical/Applied
PSYC 3033, PSYC 3263, PSYC 3313, PSYC 3323, PSYC
3362, PSYC 3393, PSYC 3493, PSYC 3553, PSYC 3724,
PSYC 3725, PSYC 3803, PSYC 4213, PSYC 4214, PSYC
4233, PSYC 4493
PSYC 3033, PSYC 3263, PSYC 3313, PSYC 3323, PSYC
3362, PSYC 3393, PSYC 3493, PSYC 3553, PSYC 3724,
PSYC 3725, PSYC 3803, PSYC 4213, PSYC 4214, PSYC
4233, PSYC 4493, PSYC 4813
All Psychology courses taken for the Honours degree must be
passed with at least a C (2.0). Furthermore, to graduate with
an Honours degree in Psychology an overall cumulative grade
point average of 3.3 (B+) is necessary, as well as, a
cumulative grade point average of 3.3 in all required
Psychology courses. For first class Honours, a grade point
average of 3.6 is required in such Psychology courses. For
second class Honours, a grade point average of 3.3 is
required in such Psychology courses.
All Psychology courses taken for the Honours degree must be
passed with at least a C (2.0). Furthermore, to graduate with
an Honours degree in Psychology an overall cumulative grade
point average of 3.3 (B+) is necessary, as well as, a
cumulative grade point average of 3.3 in all required
Psychology courses. For first class Honours, a grade point
average of 3.6 is required in such Psychology courses. For
second class Honours, a grade point average of 3.3 is
required in such Psychology courses.
ii) New course: PSYC 3453
PSYC 3453 complements the Psychology offerings and UNBSJ’s international focus. The course has been taught on
Registrar’s warrant.
PSYC 3453 Cross Cultural Psychology
3 ch (3C, O)
Cross cultural influences on behaviour, cognition, motivation, and personality variation.
Methodological issues are examined. Prerequisite: PSYC 1003, 1004.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 19 of 42
iii) Course changes
The course changes for PSYC 1273, 3293, and 4813 primarily affect prerequisites. Adjustments have been made to
remove both duplication and undue restrictions.
Current
PSYC 1273
Life Span Development
Proposed
3 ch (3C)
PSYC 1273
Life Span Development
3 ch (3C)
An introduction to theory, methods, and research finding in
lifespan developmental psychology. The life cycle as a whole
and basic processes in socialization, cognition, and
personality development will be examined. This course is
designed primarily for Nursing students. Enrollment of other
students is by permission of the instructor. Students currently
enrolled in the BN programme are exempt from the PSYC
1004 requirement. Note: Students who take PSYC 1273 may
not take PSYC 2201.
An introduction to theory, methods, and research finding
findings in lifespan developmental psychology. The life cycle
as a whole and basic processes in socialization, cognition,
and personality development will be examined. This course is
designed primarily for Nursing students. Enrollment of other
students is by permission of the instructor. Students currently
enrolled in the BN programme are exempt from the PSYC
1004 requirement. Note: Students who take PSYC 1273 may
not take PSYC 2201 or PSYC 3293.
PSYC 3293
PSYC 3293
The Psychology of Aging
3 ch (3C)
The Psychology of Aging
3 ch (3C)
Focuses on changes in learning ability, memory, perception,
physical development, personality and social development
associated with aging, beginning in young adulthood and
extending to late adulthood. Prerequisites: PSYC 1273 or
PSYC 2201 or ED 3021.
Focuses on changes in learning ability, memory, perception,
physical development, personality and social development
associated with aging, beginning in young adulthood and
extending to late adulthood. Prerequisites: PSYC 1273 or
PSYC 2201 or ED 3021.
PSYC 4813 Substance Abuse and
3 ch (3C, E)
Dependence
This course covers a broad spectrum of topics in the area of
addiction including the epidemiology of substance abuse and
dependence, the biopsychosocial bases of addiction, as well
as, issues of comorbidity and treatment. Prerequisite: PSYC
1003, PSYC 1004, PSYC 3553, PSYC 3752
PSYC 4813 Substance Abuse and
3 ch (3C, E)
Dependence
This course covers a broad spectrum of topics in the area of
addiction including the epidemiology of substance abuse and
dependence, the biopsychosocial bases of addiction, as well
as, issues of comorbidity and treatment. Prerequisite: PSYC
1003, PSYC 1004, PSYC 3553, PSYC 3752 or PSYC 4833
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 20 of 42
2. HUMANITIES AND LANGUAGES
a) Humanities
i)
New course
This course, which will typically be offered in Spring session, complements the scheme of Humanities offerings. It has
been offered on Registrar’s Warrant last year and this year and must, therefore, be regularized.
HUM 3966
Art of Photography
3 ch (3C, O)
The course explores how photography developed in various historical, economic, political, and
cultural settings worldwide and discusses the many uses to which photography has been put
from art to vernacular, documentary to photojournalism, and science to advertising. It examines
today’s use of digital photography and how digital process and its capacity for manipulation has
changed current notions of what photography is as well as what photography represents.
b) English
i)
Program change
Two changes in wording are proposed for the English program in the interests of correcting and clarifying the information
on prerequisites for upper-level English courses and students’ eligibility to register in those courses.
Current (p. 215)
Proposed
The prerequisite for upper-level courses in English is 3 termcourses of English at the lower level, two of which must be
ENGL 2101 and ENGL 2102 unless otherwise indicated, or
unless special permission is obtained from the instructor.
The prerequisite for upper-level courses in English is 3 termcourses of English at the lower level, two of which must be
ENGL 2101 and ENGL 2102 unless otherwise indicated, or
unless special permission is obtained from the instructor.
Current (p. 149)
Proposed
ENGLISH
Honours, Major and Minor
ENGLISH
Honours, Major and Minor
Special note: Students are not eligible to undertake any
upper-level courses in English until they have completed
three term-courses at the lower level in English, or unless
permission is obtained from the instructor. For Majors
and Honours students in English, two of the lower-level
courses must include ENGL 2101 and ENGL 2102.
c) Linguistics
i)
New course
This course looks at spoken English, not at the standard literary variety. Secondly, the exercises will consist of paradigms
(columns) of forms and functions versus application of grammar concepts to writing. The students will learn morpho-syntax
as it applies to categories.
LING 1102
English Syntax
3 ch (3C, O)
An introduction to traditional concepts in English syntax. Covers two areas: grammatical
categories (noun, verb, adjective, adverb, etc.) and sentence structure (subjects, predicates,
complements; main vs subordinate clauses). The course is a theoretical presentation of
grammatical concepts.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 21 of 42
d) Philosophy
th
PHIL 3110 is being split into two new courses (PHIL 3115 and 3116), which divides 20 century philosophy into two
traditions (Analytic Anglo-American Philosophy and Continental Philosophy). In addition two new courses, both of which
have been offered on Registrar’s Warrant are being introduced; these courses complement the programs in ICS and
Politics.
i)
Course deletion
Delete PHIL 3110 Contemporary Philosophy.
ii) New courses
PHIL 3085
Philosophy & Film
3 ch (3C, O)
An exploration of the philosophical themes and issues in selected films. Prerequisite: PHIL
1000 or permission of the instructor.
PHIL 3115
Contemporary Continental Philosophy
3 ch (3C, O)
An in-depth study of the origins of and subsequent developments in Contemporary Continental
Philosophy: the European philosophical tradition in western philosophy. Prerequisite: PHIL
1000 or permission of the instructor.
PHIL 3116
Contemporary Analytic Philosophy
3 ch (3C, O)
An in-depth study of the origins of and subsequent developments in Contemporary Analytic
Philosophy: the Anglo-American philosophical tradition in western philosophy. Prerequisite:
PHIL 1000 or permission of the instructor.
PHIL 3117
Contemporary Political Philosophy
3 ch (3C, O)
An in-depth study and evaluation of the major political theories and ideas of the contemporary
era. Topics will include liberalism, communitarianism, socialism, feminism, multiculturalism,
rights, sustainable economic development, social justice and the environment. Prerequisite:
One term-course in Philosophy or Politics or permission of the instructor.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 22 of 42
3. SOCIAL SCIENCES
a) Economics
i)
Program changes
Current
Proposed
HONOURS
Intent
The BA in Economics Honours is designed to prepare a
student to work or study as an Economist. Students interested
in applying to graduate schools for further Economics degrees
are strongly recommended to complete their Honours degree.
Requirements
A minimum of 20 term-courses in Economics are required to
obtain an Honours degree. To remain in the program,
students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 in ECON (or approved
substitute courses). Furthermore, to remain in the Honours
program, students must receive no less than a B- in the
required term-courses beyond the 1000- level as listed below.
A First Class Honours degree will be awarded to those
graduating students who have a GPA of 3.7 (A-) or greater
averaged over ECON term-courses (excluding ECON 1013,
ECON 1023 and STAT 1793). For Second Class Honours; an
average of 3.0 is required in these term-courses.
Required Courses
HONOURS
Intent
The BA in Economics Honours is designed to prepare a
student to work or study as an Economist. Students interested
in applying to graduate schools for further Economics degrees
are strongly recommended to complete their Honours degree.
Requirements
A minimum of 20 term-courses in Economics are required to
obtain an Honours degree. To remain in the program,
students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 in ECON (or approved
substitute courses). Furthermore, to remain in the Honours
program, students must receive no less than a B- in the
required term-courses beyond the 1000- level as listed below.
A First Class Honours degree will be awarded to those
graduating students who have a GPA of 3.7 (A-) or greater
averaged over ECON term-courses (excluding ECON 1013,
ECON 1023 and STAT 1793). For Second Class Honours; an
average of 3.0 is required in these term-courses.
Required Courses
ECON 1013, 2013, 3013, 4045 –Microeconomics
ECON 1023, 2023, 3023, 4035 –Macroeconomics
STAT 1793 (or equivalent)
ECON 3665 (Mathematical Economics)
ECON 4645 (Econometrics)
ECON 1013, 2013, 3013, 4045 –Microeconomics 4 term-courses
ECON 1023, 2023, 3023, 4035 –Macroeconomics 4 term-courses
STAT 1793 2793 (or equivalent)
1 2 term-courses
ECON 3665 (Mathematical Economics)
1 term-course
ECON 4645 (Econometrics)
1 term-course
11 12 term-courses
4 term-courses
4 term-courses
1 term-courses
1 term-course
1 term-course
11 term-courses
Students in this program are required to pass MATH 1003
and MATH 1013 but these term-courses do not count towards
the 20 term-courses in Economics.
Electives
The remaining 9 term-courses of Economics electives will
normally be taken in the Economics discipline, but up to 3
discipline-approved term-courses may be substituted for noncompulsory Economics electives (see the Economics
coordinator for a list).
Students in this program are required to pass MATH 1003
and MATH 1013 but these term-courses do not count towards
the 20 term-courses in Economics.
Electives
The remaining 9 8 term-courses of Economics electives will
normally be taken in the Economics discipline, but up to 3
discipline-approved term-courses may be substituted for noncompulsory Economics electives (see the Economics
coordinator for a list).
MAJOR
Intent
The BA in Economics Major option is designed to give
students a working knowledge of Economics and prepare
them to work in business or in a policy-making environment.
Students interested in applying to graduate schools for a
future degree in Economics are strongly recommended to
apply to the Honours programme.
Requirements
A total of 16 term-courses in Economics are required to obtain
a Major degree. Students must obtain at least a B- in ECON
2013, and 2023 in order to stay in the program.
Required Courses
MAJOR
Intent
The BA in Economics Major option is designed to give
students a working knowledge of Economics and prepare
them to work in business or in a policy-making environment.
Students interested in applying to graduate schools for a
future degree in Economics are strongly recommended to
apply to the Honours programme.
Requirements
A total of 16 term-courses in Economics are required to obtain
a Major degree. Students must obtain at least a B- in ECON
2013, and 2023 in order to stay in the program.
Required Courses
ECON 1013, 2013, 3013–Microeconomics
ECON 1023, 2023, 3023–Macroeconomics
STAT 1793 (or equivalent)
ECON 1013, 2013, 3013–Microeconomics
ECON 1023, 2023, 3023–Macroeconomics
STAT 1793 2793 (or equivalent)
3 term-courses
3 term-courses
1 term-courses
7 term-courses
Students in this programme are required to pass MATH 1003
(or MATH 1853 and MATH 2853 as substitute) but this does
not count in the 16 term-courses in Economics.
3 term-courses
3 term-courses
1 2 term-courses
7 8 term-courses
Students in this programme are required to pass MATH 1003
(or MATH 1853 and MATH 2853 as substitute) but this does
not count in the 16 term-courses in Economics.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 23 of 42
not count in the 16 term-courses in Economics.
Electives
The remaining 9 term-courses of Economics electives will
normally be taken in the Economics discipline, but up to 3
discipline-approved term-courses may be substituted for noncompulsory Economics electives (see the Economics
coordinator for a list).
Double Majors
The same required courses for the Major (including the Math
requirements), and 7 term-courses of Economics electives for
a total of 14 term-courses in Economics. Up to 3 disciplineapproved term-courses may be substituted for noncompulsory Economics electives (see the Economics
coordinator for a list).
Minor
Intent
The BA in Economics Minor is designed to give students
knowledge of the basic issues in economics so they can make
more informed choices in their work and private lives.
Requirements
A total of 8 term-courses in Economics are required to obtain
a Minor Degree
Required Courses
not count in the 16 term-courses in Economics.
Electives
The remaining 9 8 term-courses of Economics electives will
normally be taken in the Economics discipline, but up to 3
discipline-approved term-courses may be substituted for noncompulsory Economics electives (see the Economics
coordinator for a list).
Double Majors
The same required courses for the Major (including the Math
requirements), and 7 6 term-courses of Economics electives
for a total of 14 term-courses in Economics. Up to 3 disciplineapproved term-courses may be substituted for noncompulsory Economics electives (see the Economics
coordinator for a list).
Minor
Intent
The BA in Economics Minor is designed to give students
knowledge of the basic issues in economics so they can make
more informed choices in their work and private lives.
Requirements
A total of 8 term-courses in Economics are required to obtain
a Minor Degree
Required Courses
ECON 1013, 2013 –Microeconomics
ECON 2013, 2023 – Macroeconomics
ECON 1013, 2013 –Microeconomics
ECON 2013, 2023 – Macroeconomics
2 term-courses
2 term-courses
4 term-courses
Electives
The remaining 4 term-courses of Economics electives must
be taken in the Economics Discipline. Of these 4 termcourses, at least 2 must be at the 3000-level or above.
2 term-courses
2 term-courses
4 term-courses
Electives
The remaining 4 term-courses of Economics electives must
be taken in the Economics Discipline. Of these 4 termcourses, at least 2 must be at the 3000-level or above.
ii) Course changes
Current (p. 207)
ECON 1004 Economics and Society
Proposed
3 ch
ECON 1004 Economics and Society
3 ch (3C, O)
Designed for students who do not intend to major in
economics. Examines the working of the market system,
competition policy, price supports and regulation, labour
markets and unions, and social issues. Note: BBA students
cannot take this course for credit. Students with credit for
ECON 1013 or ECON 1073 or taking those courses, cannot
take this course for credit.
Designed for students who do not intend to major in
economics. Examines the working of the market system,
competition policy, price supports and regulation, labour
markets and unions, and social issues. Note: BBA students
cannot take this course for credit. Students with credit for
ECON 1013 or ECON 1073 or taking those courses, cannot
take this course for credit.
ECON 3091 Urban Economics I
ECON 3091 Urban Economics I
3 ch (3S)
3 ch (3S, O)
An introduction to the economic analysis of the development
of urban areas. Topics include the evolutionary development
of cities, the location of cities and of activities within them, and
theories of urban growth. Prerequisites: ECON 1013 or ECON
1073, and ECON 1023.
An introduction to the economic analysis of the development
of urban areas. Topics include the evolutionary development
of cities, the location of cities and of activities within them, and
theories of urban growth. Prerequisites: ECON 1013 and
ECON 1023, or ECON 1073, and ECON 1023.
ECON 3203 Public Sector
Economics I
ECON 3203 Public Sector
Economics I : Taxation
3 ch (3C)
The principles of taxation and government expenditures, with
emphasis on Canadian institutions and issues. Prerequisites:
ECON 1013 or ECON 1073, and ECON 1023.
3 ch (3C, O)
The principles of taxation and government expenditures, with
emphasis on Canadian institutions and issues. Prerequisites:
ECON 1013 and ECON 1023, or ECON 1073, and ECON
1023. Students with only ECON 1013 may can enter with
instructor’s permission.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 24 of 42
ECON 4645 Introduction to Applied
3 ch (3S)
Econometrics
The objective of the course is to explain the problems and
issues associated with empirical measurement of economic
relationships, and an assessment of the techniques by which
those problems may be solved. Prerequisites: BA 1605 (or
equivalent), BA 2606, and 12 chs of economics.
ECON 4645 Introduction to Applied
3 ch (3S, O)
Econometrics
The objective of the course is to explain the problems and
issues associated with empirical measurement of economic
relationships, and an assessment of the techniques by which
those problems may be solved. Prerequisites: BA 1605 (or
equivalent), BA 2606, and 12 chs of economics. STAT 1793
and STAT 2793 (or equivalent), and 4 term-courses in
Economics. Note: Credit will not be given for both ECON
4645 and STAT 4703.
b) Information and Communication Studies
i)
Program changes
Description of Changes:
Changes in degree requirements to bring the ICS programme requirements closer to other programmes in the Faculty of
Arts (both in terms of number of courses offered and minimum grade standard); changes to prerequisites of upper level
courses to ensure that students are adequately prepared for the course material and expectations of upper level ICS
courses; addition of new courses ICS2102, ICS 3101 and ICS 4101; and changes to program description to reflect Faculty
of Arts adoption of “term-course” rather than “credit hours.”
Rationale for changes:
These changes reflect changes in other disciplines that have affected the ICS Program (changes to SOCI 1001 (was SOCI
1000 when the ICS programme began), obsolescence of SOCI 2253, replacement of CS1703 and 1713 with IT 1703 and
1713. In addition the changes reflect recommendations from an internal MPHEC review conducted in 2003-04. These are
minor changes intended to accurately reflect the current operation of the program and will be adequate until the completion
of the university’s academic planning process.
Current (pp. 154-5)
Proposed
General Information
The University of New Brunswick at Saint John offers a
Bachelor of Arts in Information and Communication Studies
(ICS), a Double Major in ICS, and a Minor in ICS. The ICS
program seeks to provide students with a comprehensive
understanding of the social, political, economic and cultural
impact of information and communication technologies and
practices. As an interdisciplinary Arts program based in the
tradition of the social sciences and humanities, the ICS
approach combines theoretical, historical, empirical, and
practical study, with an emphasis on emerging media of
communication and information gathering and distribution.
Course offerings are grouped into three primary areas: Media
Studies; Technology, Information and Society; and Public
Opinion and Information Gathering. These areas of
concentration, combined with the interdisciplinary organization
of the program, provide students with broad exposure to a
variety of perspectives in information and communication
studies.
General Information
The University of New Brunswick at Saint John offers a
Bachelor of Arts in Information and Communication Studies
(ICS), a Double Major in ICS, and a Minor in ICS. The ICS
program seeks to provide students with a comprehensive
understanding of the social, political, economic and cultural
impact of information and communication technologies and
practices. As an interdisciplinary Arts program based in the
tradition of the social sciences and humanities, the ICS
approach combines theoretical, historical, empirical, and
practical study, with an emphasis on emerging media of
communication and information gathering and distribution.
Course offerings are grouped into three primary areas: Media
Studies and Culture; Technology, Information and Society
and Communication Practices; and Public Opinion and
Information Gathering, Governance and Policy. These areas
of concentration, combined with the interdisciplinary
organization of the program, provide students with broad
exposure to a variety of perspectives in information and
communication studies.
Major
Students are eligible to declare an ICS Major after having
completed 20 term-courses towards a Bachelor of Arts
degree. To graduate with a Major in ICS, students must
complete 17 term-courses (8 lower level/9 upper level)
comprised of the following courses:
Major
Students are eligible to declare an ICS Major after having
completed during the session in which they will complete
20 term-courses towards a Bachelor of Arts degree. To
graduate with a Major in ICS, students must complete 17 15
term-courses (8 6 lower level/9 upper level) comprised of the
following courses:
Lower Level: 8 term-courses
• ICS 2001 Introduction to Information & Communication Studies
• SOCI 1001 Introduction to Sociology
Lower Level: 8 6 term-courses
• ICS 1001 History of Communication
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 25 of 42
• SOCI 2251 Film and Society
• SOCI 2253 From TV to the Internet
• CS 1703 Introduction to Computing Concepts
• CS 1713 Multimedia and the Information Highway
• POLS 1201 Introduction to Canadian Politics
Upper Level: 9 term-courses
• ICS 3001 Theories of Information and Communication
• ICS 3003 Electronic Research
AND
1 term-course selected from the following:
• POLS 4411 Special Topics in Political Theory; OR
• POLS 4211 Special Topics in Canadian Politics; OR
• SOCI 4503 Research Seminar in Popular Culture, OR
• ICS 4001 Research Seminar in ICS
AND
2 term-courses of 3000/4000 POLS from the “ICS-eligible” list [See
Note 1]
2 term-courses of 3000/4000 SOCI from the “ICS-eligible” list
2 term-courses of 3000/4000 electives from the “ICS-eligible” list [See
Note 2]
Notes:
[1] The list of current ICS-eligible courses is updated annually, and is
available from the ICS Coordinator. Students seeking credit for
courses not on this list must have written approval from the ICS
Coordinator prior to enrolling in the course.
[2] ICS students are responsible for ensuring they have
completed appropriate pre-requisites for their ICS-eligible
electives.
Double Major
Students are eligible to declare an ICS Double Major after
having completed 20 term-courses towards a Bachelor of Arts
degree. To graduate with a Double Major in ICS, students
must complete 12 term-courses (5 lower level/7 upper level)
comprised of the following courses:
Lower Level: 5 term-courses
•
•
•
•
•
ICS 2001 Introduction to Information & Communication Studies
SOCI 2251 Film and Society
SOCI 2253 From TV to the Internet
CS 1703 Introduction to Computing Concepts
CS 1713 Multimedia and the Information Highway
•
•
•
•
•
AND
2 term-course selected from the following:
• CS IT 1703 Introduction to Computing Concepts
• CS IT 1713 Multimedia and the Information Highway
• POLS 1201 Introduction to Canadian Politics
• IT 2773 Java Programming for the Internet
Upper Level: 9 term-courses
• ICS 3001 Theories of Information and Communication
• ICS 3003 Electronic Research or an upper-level research
methods course approved by the ICS co-ordinator
AND
1 term-course selected from the following:
• POLS 4411 Special Topics in Political Theory; OR
• POLS 4211 Special Topics in Canadian Politics; OR
• SOCI 4503 Research Seminar in Popular Culture, OR
• ICS 4001 Research Seminar in ICS
AND
2 term-courses of 3000/4000 POLS from the “ICS-eligible” list [See
Notes 1 & 2]
2 term-courses of 3000/4000 SOCI from the “ICS-eligible” list [See
Notes 1 & 2]
2 term-courses of 3000/4000 electives from the “ICS-eligible” list [See
Notes 1 & 2]
No grade lower than a C in an ICS course or an ICS eligible
elective will count for credit towards a Majors degree in ICS.
Notes:
[1] The list of current ICS-eligible courses is updated annually, and is
available from the ICS Coordinator.posted each spring on the ICS
website: http://www.unbsj.ca/arts/ICS. Students seeking credit for
courses not on this list must have written approval from the ICS
Coordinator prior to enrolling in the course.
[2] ICS students are responsible for ensuring they have completed
appropriate pre-requisites for their ICS-eligible electives.
Double Major
Students are eligible to declare an ICS Double Major after
having completed during the session in which they will
complete 20 term-courses towards a Bachelor of Arts
degree. To graduate with a Double Major in ICS, students
must complete 12 term-courses (5 lower level/7 upper level)
comprised of the following courses:
Lower Level: 5 term-courses
•
•
•
•
Upper Level: 7 term-courses
• ICS 3001 Theories of Information and Communication
• ICS 3003 Electronic Research
AND
1 term-course selected from the following:
• POLS 4411 Special Topics in Political Theory; OR
• POLS 4211 Special Topics in Canadian Politics; OR
• SOCI 4503 Research Seminar in Popular Culture, OR
• ICS 4001 Research Seminar in ICS
ICS 2001 Introduction to Information & Communication Studies
SOCI 1001 Introduction to Sociology
SOCI 2251 Film and Society
SOCI 2253 From TV to the Internet
ICS 2102 Media Living: Audio-visual and New Media in
Everyday Life
ICS 2001 Introduction to Information & Communication Studies
SOCI 2251 Film and Society
SOCI 2253 From TV to the Internet
ICS 2102 Media Living: Audio-visual and New Media in
Everyday Life
AND
2 term-course selected from the following:
• CS IT 1703 Introduction to Computing Concepts
• CS IT 1713 Multimedia and the Information Highway
• IT 2773 Java Programming for the Internet
Upper Level: 7 term-courses
•
•
ICS 3001 Theories of Information and Communication
ICS 3003 Electronic Research or an upper-level research
methods course approved by the ICS co-ordinator
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 26 of 42
AND
2 term-courses of 3000/4000 POLS from the “ICS-eligible” list [See
Note 1]
2 term-courses of 3000/4000 SOCI from the “ICS-eligible” list
2 term-courses of 3000/4000 electives from the “ICS-eligible” list [See
Note 2]
Notes:
[1] The list of current ICS-eligible courses is updated annually, and is
available from the ICS Coordinator. Students seeking credit for
courses not on this list must have written approval from the ICS
Coordinator prior to enrolling in the course.
[2] ICS students are responsible for ensuring they have completed
appropriate pre-requisites for their ICS-eligible electives.
NOTE: Upper division courses count for credit in ONE major
field only (e.g., POLS 4411 credit assigned to an ICS Double
Major will not be counted for credit towards a Politics Major or
Double Major, or vice-versa).
.
methods course approved by the ICS co-ordinator
AND
1 term-course selected from the following:
• POLS 4411 Special Topics in Political Theory; OR
• POLS 4211 Special Topics in Canadian Politics; OR
• SOCI 4503 Research Seminar in Popular Culture, OR
• ICS 4001 Research Seminar in ICS
AND
2 term-courses of 3000/4000 POLS from the “ICS-eligible” list [See
Notes 1 & 2]
2 term-courses of 3000/4000 SOCI from the “ICS-eligible” list [See
Notes 1 & 2]
2 term-courses of 3000/4000 electives from the “ICS-eligible” list [See
Notes 1 & 2]
Notes:
[1] The list of current ICS-eligible courses is updated annually, and is
available from the ICS Coordinator.posted each spring on the ICS
website: http://www.unbsj.ca/arts/ICS. Students seeking credit for
courses not on this list must have written approval from the ICS
Coordinator prior to enrolling in the course.
[2] ICS students are responsible for ensuring they have completed
appropriate pre-requisites for their ICS-eligible electives.
NOTE: Upper division courses count for credit in ONE major
field only (e.g., POLS 4411 credit assigned to an ICS Double
Major will not be counted for credit towards a Politics Major or
Double Major, or vice-versa).
Minor
Students are eligible to declare an ICS Minor after having
completed 20 term-courses towards a Bachelor of Arts
degree. To graduate with a Minor in ICS, students must
complete 8 term-courses comprised of the following courses:
Lower Level: 5 term-courses
•
•
•
•
•
ICS 2001 Introduction to Information & Communication Studies
SOCI 2251 Film and Society
SOCI 2253 From TV to the Internet
CS 1703 Introduction to Computing Concepts
CS 1713 Multimedia and the Information Highway
Minor
Students are eligible to declare an ICS Minor after having
completed during the session in which they will complete
20 term-courses towards a Bachelor of Arts degree. To
graduate with a Minor in ICS, students must complete 8 termcourses comprised of the following courses:
Lower Level: 5 term-courses
•
•
•
•
Upper Level: 7 term-courses
• ICS 3001 Theories of Information and Communication
• ICS 3003 Electronic Research
AND
1 term-course of 3000/4000 electives from the “ICS-eligible” list [See
Note 2]
Notes:
[1] The list of current ICS-eligible courses is updated annually,
and is available from the ICS Coordinator. Students seeking
credit for courses not on this list must have written approval
from the ICS Coordinator prior to enrolling in the course.
[2] ICS students are responsible for ensuring they have
completed appropriate pre-requisites for their ICS-eligible
electives.
ICS 2001 Introduction to Information & Communication Studies
SOCI 2251 Film and Society
SOCI 2253 From TV to the Internet
ICS 2102 Media Living: Audio-visual and New Media in
Everyday Life
AND
2 term-course selected from the following:
• CS IT 1703 Introduction to Computing Concepts
• CS IT 1713 Multimedia and the Information Highway
• IT 2773 Java Programming for the Internet
Upper Level: 7 term-courses
•
•
ICS 3001 Theories of Information and Communication
ICS 3003 Electronic Research or an upper-level research
methods course approved by the ICS co-ordinator
AND
2 term-courses of 3000/4000 electives from the “ICS-eligible” list [See
Notes 1 & 2]
No grade lower than a C in an ICS course or an ICS eligible
elective will count for credit towards a Minor in ICS.
Notes:
[1] The list of current ICS-eligible courses is updated annually, and is
available from the ICS Coordinator.posted each spring on the ICS
website: http://www.unbsj.ca/arts/ICS. Students seeking credit for
courses not on this list must have written approval from the ICS
Coordinator prior to enrolling in the course.
[2] ICS students are responsible for ensuring they have completed
appropriate pre-requisites for their ICS-eligible electives.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 27 of 42
ii) New courses
ICS 2102
Media Living: Audio-visual and the
3 ch (3C, E)
New Media in Everyday Life
Explores the political, economic, ideological and organizational settings within which
contemporary media operate and examines their importance in many aspects of contemporary
life. Topics include: the rise of broadcast television; the role of television in everyday life; the
rise of new media (such as the world wide web) and their growing significance in everyday life.
Prerequisite: ICS 2001.
ICS 3101
Special Topics in ICS
3 ch (3C, O)
Exploration of specialized topics in media studies, technology and society, or communication
policy issues. Prerequisite: ICS 3001 and 3003, or permission of the instructor.
ICS 4101
Advanced Topics in ICS
3 ch (3S, O)
An advanced seminar in media studies, technology and society, or communication policy
issues. Prerequisite: ICS 3001 and 3003, or permission of the instructor.
iii) Course changes
Students should not enrol in the 3000 level ICS courses earlier than the second half of the second year of study. While ICS
2001 is sufficient discipline specific preparation, students do need breadth and some academic experience. To this end,
the prerequisite for these courses is to be changed to:
“Successful completion of fifteen term-courses, including ICS 2001, or permission of the instructor.”
The courses affected are:
ICS 3001 Theories of Information and Communication
ICS 3003 Electronic Research
ICS 3004 Media Production I
ICS 3005 The Digital Revolution
ICS 3006 Media Production II
ICS 3007 Digital Democracy
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 28 of 42
4. HISTORY AND POLITICS
a) International Studies
i)
Program changes
th
These changes drop the requirement for IS specific courses except for IS 1001 and 1002 and the 4 year seminar, IS
4501. This means the elimination of the IS specific courses. All upper level requirements will be met by taking approved
courses from the relevant disciplines. The aim is to make the program more explicitly interdisciplinary. The changes also
include introducing the Faculty of Arts’ use of “term-course”.
Current (p. 155)
Proposed
Programme of Study
Programme of Study
The International Studies Program is one half of a double
major in the Faculty of Arts.
The International Studies Program is one half of a double
major in the Faculty of Arts.
International Studies 1001 and 1002 are prerequisites to all
courses in International Studies. A grade of C in both IS 1001
and IS 1002 is the minimum grade requirement for a Major in
International Studies. Students apply for permission to Major
in International Studies during the term in which they
complete 60 ch of study. Students entering the IS Program
must have a cumulative GPA of 2.7 (B-). To complete the
double Major in IS students must maintain a "B-" average
overall in their IS courses with no IS course lower than a "C".
Courses in the 4000 series are specialized courses intended
mainly for Majors students. Students must satisfy the
prerequisite requirements for all upper level courses. Any
student in any program may take IS 1001 or IS 1002 as an
elective.
International Studies IS 1001 and 1002 are prerequisites to all
courses in International Studies required courses. A grade of
C in both IS 1001 and IS 1002 is the minimum grade
requirement for a Major in International Studies. Students
apply for permission to Major in International Studies during
the term session in which they complete 60 ch 20 termcourses of study. Students entering the IS Program must
have a cumulative GPA of 2.7 (B-). To complete the double
Major in IS students must maintain a "B-" average overall in
their IS courses and in the IS designated electives with no
IS course grade lower than a "C". Courses in the 4000 series
are IS 4501 is a specialized courses intended mainly for
Majors students. Students must satisfy the prerequisite
requirements for all upper level courses. Any student in any
program may take IS 1001 or IS 1002 as an elective.
Double counting courses in the IS program will not be
permitted.
Double counting courses in the IS program will not be
permitted.
For a list of IS eligible electives contact the Department of
History and Politics.
Double Major in International Studies
1
Lower level requirements: (18 credit hours)
Students must, in their first 60 credit hours, meet the regular
Faculty of Arts breadth requirements. Students must include
in their program the following:
a
12 credit hours of a modern language other than
English.
b
Six credit hours of lower level International
Studies courses:
IS 1001 Introduction to International Studies
An interdisciplinary introduction to the regional
approach to International Studies. The course
examines the political, social and economic aspects of
developing and developed regions.
IS 1002 Global Issues
An interdisciplinary examination of issues and
problems relating to the environment, human rights,
gender and inequality, migration, and poverty in a
global perspective.
Double Major in International Studies
1
Lower level requirements: (18 credit hours 6
term-courses)
Students must, in their first 60 credit hours, 20 term-courses,
meet the regular Faculty of Arts breadth requirements.
Students must include in their program the following:
a
12 credit hours of a modern language other than
English. IS 1001 and IS 1002
b
Six credit hours of lower level International
Studies courses: 4 term-courses of a modern
language other than English
IS 1001 Introduction to International Studies
An interdisciplinary introduction to the regional
approach to International Studies. The course
examines the political, social and economic aspects of
developing and developed regions.
IS 1002 Global Issues
An interdisciplinary examination of issues and
problems relating to the environment, human rights,
gender and inequality, migration, and poverty in a
global perspective.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 29 of 42
gender and inequality, migration, and poverty in a
global perspective.
global perspective.
2 Upper level requirements: (24 credit hours)
Students must complete a minimum of 24 credit hours of
upper level courses. These courses must include:
a
International Studies 3501: Seminar in International
Studies (3 credit hours).
b
International Studies 4501: Research Project in
International Studies (3 credit hours). This course is limited
to students with 15 ch in IS courses or permission of
instructor.
c
A minimum of 9 credit hours, selected from the list of
International Studies electives and 9 credit hours from
related disciplinary electives determined in consultation
with the International Studies program advisor(s). Students
will be advised in their first and second year that many of
the upper level related disciplinary electives have specific
prerequisites that must be completed for these upper level
courses to be selected.
For the double Major in a discipline, students will be required
to meet the double Majors requirement for one of the existing
Faculty of Arts disciplines. These requirements vary - please
consult the calendar for further details.
Minor in International Studies
The minor in International Studies will consist of 6 ch of lower
level IS courses and 6 ch of course in a language other than
English, and a minimum of 12 ch of upper level courses in IS.
A grade of C or better is required in all courses to be counted
for the minor in IS. A minor must be declared at the same time
as the major.
2 Upper level requirements: (24 credit hours 8 termcourses)
Students must complete a minimum of 24 credit hours of 8
upper level term-courses. These courses must include:
a
International Studies 3501: Seminar in International
Studies (3 credit hours). IS 4501: Research Project in
International Studies (one term-course). This course is
limited to students with IS 1001 and IS 1002 and 3
term-courses of IS designated electives or to those
with permission of the instructor.
b
International Studies 4501: Research Project in
International Studies (3 credit hours). This course is limited
to students with 15 ch in IS courses or permission of
instructor. A minimum of 7 term-courses selected from
related disciplinary electives determined in
consultation with the International Studies program
advisor(s). Students will be advised in their first and
second year that many upper level related disciplinary
electives have specific prerequisites that must be
completed for these upper level courses to be
selected.
c
A minimum of 9 credit hours, selected from the list of
International Studies electives and 9 credit hours from
related disciplinary electives determined in consultation
with the International Studies program advisor(s). Students
will be advised in their first and second year that many of
the upper level related disciplinary electives have specific
prerequisites that must be completed for these upper level
courses to be selected.
For the double Major in a discipline, students will be required
to meet the double Majors requirement for one of the existing
Faculty of Arts disciplines. These requirements vary - please
consult the calendar for further details.
Minor in International Studies
The minor in International Studies will consist of 6 ch of lower
level IS courses IS 1001 and IS 1002, and 6 ch of course two
term-courses in a language other than English, and a
minimum of 12 ch of 4 upper level courses in IS selected
from related disciplinary electives determined in
consultation with the International Studies program
advisor(s). A grade of C or better is required in all courses to
be counted for the minor in IS. A minor must be declared at
the same time as the major.
ii) Course deletions
The following courses are to be deleted:
IS 3301
The Contemporary Mediterranean Region
IS 3401
Contemporary Latin America
IS 3501
Work and Labour in the International Economy
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 30 of 42
iii) Course changes
Initially IS 1002 was expected to be a continuation of IS 1001, but it has never actually been taught as such and the
requirement to have IS 1001 has limited students’ access to this introductory course.
Current (p. 232)
IS 1002
Global Issues
Proposed
3 ch (3C)
An interdisciplinary examination of issues and problems
relating to the environment, human rights, gender and
inequality, migration, and poverty in a global perspective.
Prerequisite: IS 1001.
IS 1002
Global Issues
3 ch (3C, E)
An interdisciplinary examination of issues and problems
relating to the environment, human rights, gender and
inequality, migration, and poverty in a global perspective.
Prerequisite: IS 1001.
b) History
The changes in History are not as extensive as may first appear. The changes from History have been prompted by: i)
changed terminology in the Faculty of Arts to replace credit hours with term-courses; ii) the Quality Assessment Review; iii)
inconsistencies in the program requirements; and iv) changes in the English regulations regarding the Joint Honours
program.
i)
Program changes
Current (p. 153)
Proposed
Honours
Honours
Students in Honours History must meet the requirements for
the History Major and complete an additional 12 ch in history,
as outlined below:
Students in Honours History must meet the requirements for
the History Major and complete an additional 12 ch 4 termcourses in history, as outlined below:
•
•
•
•
•
HIST 4900: Honours Thesis: This is a required course for
Honours students who will complete a research project
leading to a thesis. Topics must be approved by the
Honours co-ordinator.
HIST 4333: History: Theory and Practice
HIST 4906: Honours Seminar
one additional course offered at the 3000 level
For the awarding of a first-class Honours degree, a minimum
grade point average of 3.6 is required in all History courses
needed to meet the minimum number of credit hours for the
program. For a second-class Honours degree, a minimum
grade point average of 3.0 is required in these courses. In
both cases, a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.7
is required.
•
•
•
HIST 4900: Honours Thesis: This is a required course for
Honours students who will complete a research project
leading to a thesis. Topics must be approved by the
Honours co-ordinator.
HIST 4333: History: Theory and Practice
HIST 4906: Honours Seminar
one additional course offered at the 3000 level
For the awarding of a first-class Honours degree, a minimum
grade point average of 3.6 is required in all History courses
needed to meet the minimum number of credit hours for the
program. For a second-class Honours degree, a minimum
grade point average of 3.0 is required in these courses. In
both cases, a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.7
is required.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 31 of 42
Joint Honours Program - English and History
Joint Honours Program - English and History
Students interested in pursuing a joint honours program in
English and History must apply in writing to either the
Coordinator of English or the Coordinator of History.
Students interested in pursuing a joint honours program in
English and History must apply in writing to either the
Coordinator of English or the Coordinator of History.
To satisfy the History requirements for the joint honours
degree, students must complete 6 ch of lower level History
and 30 ch of upper level History courses, of which 6 ch will be
an Honours seminar.
To satisfy the History requirements for the joint honours
degree, students must complete 6 ch 4 term-courses of
lower level History and 30 ch 10 term-courses of upper level
History courses, of which 6 ch 2 term-courses will be an
Honours seminar.
To satisfy the English requirements for the joint honours
degree, students must complete 12 ch of lower level English
courses and 30 ch of upper level courses in English. The 30
ch of courses at the upper level must include 3 ch from each
of the following five (5) areas:
1
2
3
4
5
Medieval/Renaissance Non-Dramatic/18th century
Renaissance Dramatic
Romantic/Victorian
Twentieth-Century Literature/Special Studies
Literary Theory
As part of the 30 ch in either English or History, students must
complete HENG 4000, a 6 ch thesis course. Once a student
has decided whether the primary emphasis will be on English
or History, supervisors will be assigned from the two
disciplines. Credit for the thesis will be assigned to the
discipline receiving the primary emphasis.
To satisfy the English requirements for the joint honours
degree, students must complete 12 ch of lower level English
courses and 30 ch of upper level courses in English. The 30
ch of courses at the upper level must include 3 ch from each
of the following five (5) areas:
1
2
3
4
5
Medieval/Renaissance Non-Dramatic/18th century
Renaissance Dramatic
Romantic/Victorian
Twentieth-Century Literature/Special Studies
Literary Theory
As part of the 30 ch in either English or History, students
Students must complete HENG 4000, a 6 ch thesis course
(equivalent to 2 term-courses). Once a student has decided
whether the primary emphasis will be on English or History,
supervisors will be assigned from the two disciplines. Credit
for the thesis (HENG 4000) will be assigned to the discipline
receiving the primary emphasis.
For detailed information on the English requirements
please consult the rules and regulations for ENGLISH (in
Saint John Degree Programs, UNB Calendar)
Major
Major
To be admitted to the Major in History students must have
completed 60 ch in the Bachelor of Arts program. To enter the
History Majors program a student must have a minimum GPA
of 2.7 (B-) in 15 ch of lower division history courses as
follows:
To be admitted to the Major in History students must have
completed 60 ch in the Bachelor of Arts program. Students
are eligible to apply to the programme during the session
in which they expect to complete successfully their first
20 term-courses, To enter the History Majors program a
student must have a minimum GPA of 2.7 (B-) in 15 ch 5
term-courses in History at the lower level (i.e. 1000 and
2000 level courses) of lower division history courses as
follows:
a
A minimum of 3 credit hours of 1000 level history
courses, typically in the first 30 ch of their program. NOTE:
Students who have already received credit for 2000 or
3000 level history courses may only register for a 1000
level history course with written permission from the
instructor
b
A minimum of 12 credit hours of 2000 level courses,
typically in the second 30 ch of the program. NOTE:
Classics courses designated as Ancient History count as
History courses.
In the Majors History program students must complete 30 ch
of upper division History courses and obtain an average of 2.7
(B-) with no grade lower than 2.3 (C+) in these courses. The
total credit hours in the History Major will include a minimum
of 15 ch lower division History and 30 ch upper division
History courses for a total of 45 ch in History.
a
A minimum of 1 term-course of 1000 level History
3 credit hours of 1000 level history courses, typically in the
first 30 ch of their program. NOTE: Students who have
already received credit for 2000 or 3000 level history
courses may only register for a 1000 level history course
with written permission from the instructor
b
A minimum of 4 term-courses of 2000 level History
12 credit hours of 2000 level courses, typically in the
second 30 ch of the program. NOTE: Classics courses
designated as Ancient History count as History courses.
NOTE: Classics courses designated as Ancient History
count towards a major in History.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 32 of 42
In the Majors History program students must complete 30 ch
10 term-courses of upper division level History courses and
obtain an average of 2.7 (B-) with no grade lower than 2.3
(C+) in these courses. The total credit hours in the History
Major will include a minimum of 15 ch lower division History
and 30 ch upper division History courses for a total of 45 ch in
History. In total the History Major requires a minimum of 5
term-courses in History at the lower level and 10 termcourses in History at the upper level for a total of 15 termcourses in History. Please note: Faculty of Arts
regulations stipulate that no more than 6 term-courses of
1000 and 2000 courses in any one discipline may be
counted towards a B.A.
Double Major
Double Major
To obtain a Double Major in History students must complete a
minimum of 33 ch in History of which at least 24 ch will be
upper division courses. All History courses credited towards
the double Major in History must have a minimum grade of
2.3 (C+) and those at the upper level must have an average
of 2.7 (B-).
To obtain a Double Major in History students must complete a
minimum of 33 ch 11 term-courses in History of which at
least 24 ch 8 term-courses will be upper division courses at
the 3000 level. All History courses credited towards the
double Major in History must have a minimum grade of 2.3
(C+) and those at the upper level must have an average of
2.7 (B-).
Minor
Minor
To obtain a Minor in History students must complete 12 ch of
lower division History courses and 12 ch of upper division
History courses with a minimum grade of 2.3 (C+) in all
History courses for a total of 24 ch.
To obtain a Minor in History students must complete 12 ch of
lower division 4 term-courses in History at the lower level
(1000 and 2000 level courses) courses and 12 ch of upper
division 4 term-courses in History at the 3000 level courses
with a minimum grade of 2.3 (C+) in all History courses for a
total of 24 ch 8 term-courses.
ii) Course deletions
Partially as a matter of housecleaning and partially in response to the QAR, the discipline is proposing the elimination of a
number of courses which are not likely to be taught. The following courses are to be deleted:
HIST 2000
World History
HIST 2010
Comp. Colonial Settlements 1450-1763
HIST 3101
European Personalities, Power and Politics
HIST 3105
Fascism on Film
HIST 3107
Propaganda, Politics and Film in Modern Europe
HIST 3275
History of Scotland I
HIST 3285
Social History of Modern Scotland
HIST 3290
An Intro to the History of Ireland
HIST 3485
American History & the Mass Media
HIST 3560
American Intellectual History
HIST 3715
European Union: Historical Roots, Obstacles and Achievements
HIST 4361
Studies in the Historical Sociology of Saint John: Community
HIST 4362
Studies in the Historical Sociology of Saint John: Religion
HIST 4451
The US as a Great Power, 1900-1939
HIST 4461
The US as a Great Power, 1945-Present
HIST 4475
The American South: From Jamestown to Jimmy Carter
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 33 of 42
iii) Course changes
Three things are being addressed: i) changes in prerequisites in many cases to increase access to the courses; ii) using
“term-course” instead of “ch” where appropriate; and iii) updating course descriptions to reflect course content.
Current (pp. 224ff.)
Proposed
HIST 2101 European History: French
3 ch
Revolution to the Great War
A survey of political, social, economic and cultural
developments in modern Europe from 1789 to 1919. Topics
examined include the French Revolution and Napoleon, the
Restoration, Nation-building, colonial rivalry and the Great
War of 1914-1918.
HIST 2101 European History: French
3 ch (3C, E)
Revolution to the Great War
World War I
A survey of political, social, economic and cultural
developments in modern Europe from 1789 the Renaissance
to 1919. Topics examined include the French Revolution and
Napoleon, the Restoration, Nation-building, colonial rivalry
and the Great War of 1914-1918. Prerequisite: Any one
term-course of 1000 level History.
HIST 2102 European History: Great War 3 ch (3C)
to European Union
A survey of the political, social, economic and cultural
development of Modern Europe from the Great War to the
emergence of the European Union. Topics examined will
include: the rise of Fascism and Nazism; the Russian
Revolution and Stalinism; Antisemitism and the Holocaust;
and the re-birth of Europe since 1945. Prerequisite: HIST
2101
HIST 2102 European History: Great War 3 ch (3C, E)
World War I to European Union
A survey of the political, social, economic and cultural
development of Modern Europe from the Great War World
War I to the emergence of the European Union. Topics
examined will include: the rise of Fascism and Nazism; the
Russian Revolution and Stalinism; Antisemitism and the
Holocaust; and the re-birth of Europe since 1945.
Prerequisite: HIST 2101
HIST 2207 England and Scotland: 1483-1708 3 ch
A political history of these two countries in the early modern
era. Prerequisite: Any 3 ch of 1000 level History or Classics
HIST 2207 England and Scotland: 1483-1708 3 ch (3C,E)
A political history of these two countries in the early modern
era. Prerequisite: Any 3 ch one term-course of 1000 level
History. or Classics
HIST 2301 Canadian History Before
3 ch
Confederation
A survey of Canadian history from the age of exploration
through the Colonial era to the British North American Act of
1867. Prerequisite: HIST 1301 or equivalent
HIST 2301 Canadian History Before
3 ch (3C, E)
Confederation
A survey of Canadian history from the age of exploration
through the Colonial era to the British North American Act of
1867. Prerequisite: HIST 1301 or equivalent Any one termcourse of 1000 level History.
HIST 2302 Canadian History Since
3 ch
Confederation
A survey of Canadian history from 1867 through western
expansion, the growth of an industrial society, the wars of the
20th century and into the re-examination of Confederation of
the late 20th century. Prerequisite: HIST 2301.
HIST 2302 Canadian History Since
3 ch (3C, E)
Confederation
A survey of Canadian history from 1867 through of western
expansion, the growth of an industrial society, the wars of the
20th century and into to the re-examination of Confederation
of the late 20th century. Prerequisite: HIST 2301.
HIST 2407 U.S. History: Colony to Nation 3 ch
A general survey of political, economic, and social
developments from the colonial period to the 19th century.
Themes examined will include: Puritan New England, native
peoples and colonists, slavery, the American Revolution, and
nationalism. Prerequisites: 3ch of (any) 1000 level history
course
HIST 2407 U.S. History: Colony to Nation 3 ch (3C, E)
A general survey of political, economic, and social
developments from the colonial period to the 19th century.
Themes examined will include: examining topics such as
Puritan New England, native peoples and colonists, slavery,
the American Revolution, and nationalism. Prerequisites: 3 ch
of (any) Any one term-course of 1000 level History. course
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 34 of 42
HIST 2408 U.S. History: Since Independence 3 ch
A general survey of political, economic, and social
developments from the Revolution to the present. Themes
examined will include: territorial expansion, the Civil War, the
rise of corporate America, protest and reform movements, and
the US in international affairs. Prerequisites: HIST 2407
HIST 3003 Women in European History 3 ch (3C)
A survey of the changing roles of women from the Middle
Ages through modern industrialization. Studies major texts
defining woman’s place in European society. Specific topics
include attitudes to women, family and work patterns,
education, and emerging public roles.
HIST 2408 U.S. History: Since
3 ch (3C, E)
Independence
A general survey of political, economic, and social
developments from the Revolution to the present. Themes
examined will include: examining topics such as territorial
expansion, the Civil War, the rise of corporate America,
protest and reform movements, and the US in international
affairs. Prerequisites: HIST 2407
HIST 3003 Women in European History 3 ch (3C, O)
A survey of the changing roles of women from the Middle
Ages through modern industrialization. Studies major texts
defining woman’s place in European society. Specific topics
include attitudes to women, family and work patterns,
education, and emerging public roles. Prerequisites: HIST
2102 or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3041 Global Issues in the
3 ch
20th Century
This course examines a series of contemporary global issues
in historical perspective. It will take a thematic approach to a
variety of key 20th century subjects and will cover such topics
as women's rights, anti-Semitism, the origins of the
environmental movement, economic integration and
globalization, indigenous land rights, urbanization, trends in
popular culture, technological innovations, and militarization.
HIST 3041 Global Issues in the
3 ch (3C, O)
20th Century
This course examines a series An examination o f
contemporary global issues in historical perspective. It will
take a thematic approach to a variety of key 20th century
subjects and will cover such A thematic approach covering
topics as women's rights, anti-Semitism, the origins of the
environmental movement, economic integration and
globalization, indigenous land rights, urbanization, trends in
popular culture, technological innovations, and militarization.
Prerequisites: One of HIST 2102, HIST 2208, HIST 2302,
HIST 2408 or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3102 Racism in Europe: Science, 3 ch
Myth and Politics
Traces the rise and fall of Fascist racism in 20th century
Europe. Topics include the background and genesis of Fascist
racial doctrines, and the political rationale legitimizing
genocide in the period between 1922 and 1945. Special
attention will be given to Fascist eugenics, racial propaganda,
antisemitism and the Holocaust, the impact of survivor
testimony in oral history, and the political significance of war
crimes tribunals. Prerequisites: HIST 2101 and HIST 2102 or
permission of the Instructor.
HIST 3102 Racism in Europe: Science, 3 ch (3C, O)
Myth and Politics
Traces the rise and fall of Fascist racism in 20th century
Europe. Topics include the background and genesis of Fascist
racial doctrines, and the political rationale legitimizing
genocide in the period between 1922 and 1945. Special
attention will be given to Fascist eugenics, racial propaganda,
antisemitism and the Holocaust, the impact of survivor
testimony in oral history, and the political significance of war
crimes tribunals. Prerequisites: HIST 2101 and HIST 2102 or
permission of the Instructor 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3106 The Rise of Fascism and Nazism 3 ch
in Europe 1890s to 1945
Examines the crises faced by European nations from the
1890s to 1945 that produced fascist movements. Using
primary sources the course explores the relation between
fascism and other tendencies such as nationalism,
imperialism, antisemitism and biological racism. Prerequisites:
Two of the following: HIST 2101, HIST 2102, HIST 2207,
HIST 2208.
HIST 3106 The Rise of Fascism and Nazism 3 ch (3C, O)
in Europe 1890s to 1945
Examines the crises faced by European nations from the
1890s to 1945 that produced fascist movements. Using
primary sources the course explores the relation between
fascism and other tendencies such as nationalism,
imperialism, antisemitism and biological racism. Prerequisites:
Two of the following: One of HIST 2101, HIST 2102, HIST
2207, or HIST 2208, or 5 term-courses of History.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 35 of 42
HIST 3174 Nation-States in Modern Europe: 3 ch
France, Germany and Italy in
Comparative Perspective
This course will provide a comparative survey of the political,
social, economic and cultural aspects of important liberal
democracies of continental Western Europe: France,
Germany and Italy. Topics include: governmental functions
and structures; modernization; democracy; supra-nationalism;
sovereignty and the European Union. Prerequisites: Two of
the following: HIST 2101, HIST 2102, HIST 2207, HIST 2208.
HIST 3174 Nation-States in Modern Europe: 3 ch (3C, O)
France, Germany and Italy in
Comparative Perspective
This course will provide a comparative survey of the political,
social, economic and cultural aspects of important liberal
democracies of continental Western Europe: France,
Germany and Italy. Topics include: governmental functions
and structures; modernization; democracy; supra-nationalism;
sovereignty and the European Union. Prerequisites: Two of
the following: One of HIST 2101, HIST 2102, HIST 2207, or
HIST 2208, or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3185 Britain, 1688-1760: The Age of
3 ch (3C)
Oligarchy
Analyzes the Glorious Revolution and its consequences, the
intellectual revolution of the late 17th century, the emergence
of Britain as a military power under William and Anne and the
union with Scotland, the roots and course of the Agricultural
Revolution, the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution, the
rule of the Whig oligarchy and the social development and the
cultural transformation of the period. Prerequisites: Two of
HIST 2101, 2102, 2207, 2208
HIST 3185 Britain, 1688-1760: The Age of
3 ch (3C, A)
Oligarchy
Analyzes the Glorious Revolution and its consequences, the
intellectual revolution of the late 17th century, the emergence
of Britain as a military power, under William and Anne and the
union with Scotland, the roots and course of the Agricultural
Revolution, the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution, the
rule of the Whig oligarchy and the social development and the
cultural transformation of the period. Prerequisites: One of
HIST 2101, HIST 2102, HIST 2207, or HIST 2208, or 5 termcourses of History.
HIST 3195 Britain in the Age of Revolution, 3 ch (3C)
1760-1832
Studies Great Britain and Ireland in the years of transition
from the age of classicism and aristocracy to the age of
romanticism and liberal reform. Emphasis on political history
and on the modernization of government in response to the
problems of war, the dramatic increase in population and the
agricultural and industrial revolutions. Attention is also paid to
the treatment of convicts and slaves in an increasingly
humanitarian age, and the development of new economic,
social and political ideologies. Prerequisites: Two of HIST
2101, HIST 2102, HIST 2207, HIST 2208.
HIST 3195 Britain in the Age of Revolution, 3 ch (3C, A)
1760-1832
Studies Great Britain and Ireland in the years of transition
from the age of classicism and aristocracy to the age of
romanticism and liberal reform. Emphasis with emphasis on
political history, specifically and on the modernization of
government in response to the problems of war, the dramatic
increase in population growth and the agricultural and
industrial revolutions in agriculture and industry. Attention is
also paid to Other topics include the treatment of convicts
and slaves in an increasingly humanitarian age, and as well
as the development of new economic, social and political
ideologies. Prerequisites: One of HIST 2101, HIST 2102,
HIST 2207, or HIST 2208, or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3202 England Under the Tudors
3 ch
An examination of the events and conditions in England
during the Tudor dynasty, 1485-1603. Attention will be paid to
political, religious, intellectual, economic and social issues.
Prerequisites: Two of HIST 2101, HIST 2102, HIST 2207,
HIST 2208.
HIST 3202 England Under the Tudors
3 ch (3C, O)
An examination of Examines the events and conditions in
England during the Tudor dynasty, 1485-1603. Attention will
be paid to focusing on political, religious, intellectual,
economic and social issues. Prerequisites: One of H I S T
2101, HIST 2102, HIST 2207, or HIST 2208, or 5 termcourses of History.
HIST 3205 Victorian and Edwardian
3 ch (3C)
Britain, 1833-1910
Considers the political, economic and social structures of
Victorian and Edwardian Britain. Topics include religion, the
family, trade unionism, imperialism, Darwinism and
urbanization. Prerequisites: Two of HIST 2101, HIST 2102,
HIST 2207, HIST 2208.
HIST 3205 Victorian and Edwardian
3 ch (3C, A)
Britain, 1833-1910
Considers the political, economic and social structures of
Victorian and Edwardian Britain. Topics include religion, the
family, trade unionism, imperialism, Darwinism and
urbanization. Prerequisites: One of HIST 2101, HIST 2102,
HIST 2207, or HIST 2208, or 5 term-courses of History.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 36 of 42
HIST 3212 England Under the Stuarts
3 ch
An examination of the changing political, intellectual, religious
and social conditions in England during the tumultuous period
dating from the reign of James I in 1603 to the end of the
Glorious Revolution in 1688-89. Prerequisites: Two of HIST
2101, 2102, 2207, 2208.
HIST 3212 England Under the Stuarts
3 ch
An examination of E x a m i n e s the changing political,
intellectual, religious and social conditions in England during
the tumultuous period dating from the reign of James I in 1603
to the end of the Glorious Revolution in 1688-89.
Prerequisites: One of HIST 2101, HIST 2102, HIST 2207, or
HIST 2208, or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3255 Anglo-Irish Relations
3 ch (3C)
This course will examine the history of Ireland and the United
Kingdom between 1780-1980. It will seek to discover the
sources of Anglo-Irish conflict and the various steps taken to
resolve that conflict. Credit cannot be obtained for both this
course and HIST 3290. This course together with HIST 3265
will replace HIST 3290. Prerequisites: Two of HIST 2101,
HIST 2102, HIST 2207, HIST 2208.
HIST 3255 Anglo-Irish Relations
3 ch (3C, A)
This course will examine Examines the history of Ireland and
the United Kingdom between 1780-1980. It will seek to
discover focusing on the sources of Anglo-Irish conflict and
the various steps taken to resolve that conflict. Credit cannot
be obtained for both this course and HIST 3290. This course
together with HIST 3265 will replace HIST 3290.
Prerequisites: One of HIST 2101, HIST 2102, HIST 2207, or
HIST 2208, or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3265 Ireland: Conquest and
3 ch (3C)
Subordination 1500-1800
A survey of Ireland from the rise of the Tudor Monarchy to the
Act of Union with Britain. Note: Credit cannot be obtained for
both this course and HIST 3290. This course, together with
HIST 3295 and HIST 3255, will replace HIST 3290.
Prerequisites: Two of HIST 2101, HIST 2102, HIST 2207,
HIST 2208.
HIST 3265 Ireland: Conquest and
3 ch (3C, A)
Subordination 1500-1800
A survey of Ireland from the rise of the Tudor Monarchy to the
Act of Union with Britain. Note: Credit cannot be obtained for
both this course and HIST 3290. This course, together with
HIST 3295 and HIST 3255, will replace HIST 3290.
Prerequisites: One of HIST 2101, HIST 2102, HIST 2207, or
HIST 2208, or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3295 Medieval and Norman
3 ch (3C)
Ireland, 500-1500
A survey of early Irish history from the introduction of
Christianity to the establishment of control by Tudor England.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both this course and HIST
3290. This course, together with HIST 3265 and HIST 3255,
will replace HIST 3290. Prerequisites: Two of HIST 2101,
HIST 2102, HIST 2207, HIST 2208.
HIST 3295 Medieval and Norman
3 ch (3C, A)
Ireland, 500-1500
A survey of early Irish history from the introduction of
Christianity to the establishment of control by Tudor England.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both this course and HIST
3290. This course, together with HIST 3265 and HIST 3255,
will replace HIST 3290. Prerequisites: One of HIST 2101,
HIST 2102, HIST 2207, or HIST 2208, or 5 term-courses of
History.
HIST 3303 Women in Canadian History 3 ch (3C)
A survey of changing roles of women in Canadian History.
Studies major texts on the condition of women in Canadian
history. Specific topics include: attitudes to women, education,
work patterns, family and public roles.
HIST 3303 Women in Canadian History 3 ch (3C, O)
A survey of changing roles of women in Canadian History.
Studies major texts on the condition of women in Canadian
history. Specific topics include: attitudes to women, education,
work patterns, family and public roles. Topics such as
education, work and family, suffrage and women’s rights,
sexuality and social reform, as well as feminism will be
studied. Primary sources and gender theory will be
examined. Prerequisites: HIST 2302 or 5 term-courses of
History.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 37 of 42
HIST 3305 Canadian Nationalism
3 ch (3C)
Course will examine the phenomenon of nationalism, its role
in Canadian development in the nineteenth century and such
alternate movements as French Canadian nationalism,
provincial rights, Continentalism, and Imperialism. Writings of
major political and cultural leaders will be studied. Credit will
not be granted for both HIST 3305 and HIST 3320. This
course with HIST 3315 will replace HIST 3320.
HIST 3305 Canadian Nationalism
3 ch (3C, A)
Course will examine Examines the phenomenon of
th
nationalism, specifically its role in Canadian 19 century
economic development, in the nineteenth century and such
alternate movements as French Canadian nationalism,
provincial rights, Continentalism, and Imperialism. Writings of
Documents/texts produced by the major political and
cultural leaders will be studied. Credit will not be granted for
both HIST 3305 and HIST 3320. This course with HIST 3315
will replace HIST 3320. Prerequisites: HIST 2302 or 5 termcourses of History.
HIST 3311 Canada-U.S. Relations
3 ch
1867-1945
This course examines the major themes in Canada-United
States relations from Confederation until the end of World War
II. Specific areas include trade, diplomacy, military relations,
cultural issues and how Americans and Canadians viewed
each other’s societies. Prerequisite: HIST 2301.
HIST 3311 Canada-U.S. Relations
3 ch (3C, A)
1867-1945
This course examines Examines the major themes in
Canada-United States relations from Confederation until the
end of World War II, . Specific areas include specifically
trade, diplomacy, military relations, and cultural issues, and
including how Americans and Canadians viewed each
other’s societies. Prerequisite: HIST 2301. 2302 or 5 termcourses of History.
HIST 3312 Canada-United States Relations 3 ch
Since 1945
This course examines Canadian-American Relations from
1945 to the Mulroney-Reagan era. It explores diplomatic,
defence, economic, cultural and environmental issues.
Prerequisite: HIST 2302.
HIST 3312 Canada-United States Relations 3 ch (3C, A)
Since 1945
This course examines Canadian-American Relations from
1945 to the Mulroney-Reagan era. It explores diplomatic,
defence, economic, cultural and environmental issues.
Prerequisite: HIST 2302 or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3315 Twentieth Century Canada
3 ch (3C)
Course will investigate the quest for Canadian autonomy in
politics, foreign affairs, constitutional reform and cultural
expression since 1914. The efforts of the central government
to foster national unity in the face of sustained regional and
ethnic tension will be studied. Credit will not be granted for
HIST 3315 and HIST 3320. This course with HIST 3305 will
replace HIST 3320.
HIST 3315 Twentieth Century Canada
3 ch (3C, A)
Course will investigate Investigates the quest for Canadian
autonomy in politics, foreign affairs, constitutional reform and
cultural expression since 1914. The Federal efforts of the
central government to foster national unity in the face of
sustained regional and ethnic tension will also be studied.
Credit will not be granted for HIST 3315 and HIST 3320. This
course with HIST 3305 will replace HIST 3320. Prerequisite:
HIST 2302 or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3316 Immigration and Identity in 3 ch
Canadian History
Examines the changing pattern of immigration to Canada from
the early seventeenth century to the present, and the
contribution of the various immigrant groups to the creation of
a sense of Canadian identity. Prerequisite: HIST 2302.
HIST 3316 Immigration and Identity in 3 ch (3C, O)
Canadian History
Examines the changing pattern of immigration to Canada from
the early seventeenth century to the present, and the
contribution of the various immigrant groups to the creation of
a sense of Canadian identity. Prerequisite: HIST 2302 or 5
term-courses of History.
HIST 3317 Historical Geography of Canada 3 ch (3C)
before Confederation
The development of Canada from European contact until the
middle of the nineteenth century from a geographical
perspective. This course deals with exploration, migration and
settlement, the staple trades, the agricultural economy and
the developing urban system. Prerequisite: 15 ch of History
courses.
HIST 3317 Historical Geography of Canada 3 ch (3C, O)
before Confederation
The Geographical perspective of the development of
Canada from European contact until the middle of the
nineteenth century, from a geographical perspective. This
course deals with specifically exploration, migration and
settlement, the staple trades, the agricultural economy and
the developing urban system. Prerequisite: 15 ch HIST 2302
or 5 term-courses of History courses.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 38 of 42
HIST 3321 Canadian Colonial Society
3 ch
Examines the formation and nature of community in preindustrial English Canada. Particular attention given to
demography, immigrant and religious traditions, economic and
environmental factors, poverty, social structure and the growth
of towns. Prerequisite: HIST 2302.
HIST 3321 Canadian Colonial Society
3 ch (3C, O)
Examines the formation and nature of community in preindustrial English Canada. Particular attention given to
demography, immigrant and religious traditions, economic and
environmental factors, poverty, social structure and the growth
of towns. Prerequisite: HIST 2302 or 5 term-courses of
History.
HIST 3335 Canadian Military History (O) 3 ch (3C)
Provides an historical overview of the military in Canada, and
of the evolving relationship between the military and society
from colonial times through to the present. Prerequisite: HIST
2301 or HIST 2302.
HIST 3335 Canadian Military History (O) 3 ch (3C, O)
Provides an historical overview of the military in Canada, and
of the evolving relationship between the military and society
from colonial times through to the present. Prerequisite: HIST
2301 or HIST 2302 or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3361 Atlantic Provinces 1497 - 1784
3 ch
A history of the Atlantic region of Canada from the time of
earliest European explorations to the formation of the second
Empire in North America. Prerequisite: HIST 2302 or
equivalent.
HIST 3361 Atlantic Provinces 1497 - 1784
3 ch (3C, A)
A history of the Atlantic region of Canada from the time of
earliest European explorations to the formation of the second
Empire in North America. Prerequisite: HIST 2302 or 5 termcourses of History.
HIST 3362 Atlantic Provinces 1784 - 1867
3 ch
A history of the Atlantic region of Canada from the formation
of the Second Empire to Confederation with Canada.
Prerequisite: HIST 2302 or equivalent.
HIST 3362 Atlantic Provinces 1784 - 1867
3 ch (3C, A)
A history of the Atlantic region of Canada from the formation
of the Second Empire to Confederation with Canada.
Prerequisite: HIST 2302 or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3363 History of the Atlantic Provinces 3 ch
After Confederation
A history of the region after Confederation to the present day
with focus on movements for social, economic, and political
reform. Equivalent to HIST 4342 UNBF. Prerequisite: HIST
2302 or equivalent.
HIST 3363 History of the Atlantic Provinces 3 ch (3C, A)
After Confederation
A history of the region after Confederation to the present day
with focus on movements for social, economic, and political
reform. Equivalent to HIST 4342 UNBF. Prerequisite: HIST
2302 or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3365 The Formation of Loyalist
3 ch (3C)
Canada
Traces the settlement of the Loyalists in Nova Scotia, New
Brunswick, Quebec, and Upper Canada after the American
Revolution. Particular attention is paid to Loyalist ideology and
the types of communities and institutions they established in
British North America and to the subsequent impact of the
Loyalist myth on Canadian history.
HIST 3365 The Formation of Loyalist
3 ch (3C, O)
Canada
Traces the settlement of the Loyalists in Nova Scotia, New
Brunswick, Quebec, and Upper Canada after the American
Revolution. Particular with particular attention is paid to
Loyalist ideology, and the types of communities and
institutions they established in British North America, and to
the subsequent impact of the Loyalist myth on Canadian
history. Prerequisite: HIST 2302 or 5 term-courses of
History.
HIST 3377 Social History of Crime
3 ch (3C)
in Canada
An examination of how Canadian society has perceived and
reacted to crime and criminals from early Colonial times to the
mid-twentieth century. Prerequisite: HIST 2302 or equivalent.
HIST 3377 Social History of Crime
3 ch (3C, O)
in Canada
An examination of Examines how Canadian society has
perceived and reacted to crime and criminals from early
Colonial times to the mid-twentieth century. Prerequisite: HIST
2302 or 5 term-courses of History.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 39 of 42
HIST 3381 The Family and the State
3 ch (3C)
in North America
Examines the economic and social functions of the family in
the transition from pre-industrial to industrial society. Topics
include the religious underpinnings of the family, gender
relations, the role of laws and state regulation, the impact of
social policy and the emergence of a North American “politics
of the family”. Prerequisite: one of HIST 2301, HIST 2302,
HIST 2407, HIST 2408 or 15 ch of History courses.
HIST 3381 The Family and the State
3 ch (3C, O)
in North America
Examines the economic and social functions of the family in
the transition from pre-industrial to industrial society. Topics
include the religious underpinnings of the family, gender
relations, the role of laws and state regulation, the impact of
social policy and the emergence of a North American “politics
of the family”. Prerequisite: one of HIST 2301, HIST 2302 or
HIST 2407, HIST 2408 or 15 ch 5 term-courses of History
courses.
HIST 3382 The City in North America (O)
3 ch (3C)
Examines the development of the commercial, industrial, and
post-industrial city in North America. Prerequisite: Two termcourses in Canadian or American HIST at 2000 level, or three
term-courses in History.
HIST 3382 The City in North America (O)
3 ch (3C, O)
Examines the development of the commercial, industrial, and
post-industrial city in North America. Prerequisite: Two termcourses in Canadian or American HIST at 2000 level, HIST
2302 or HIST 2408 or three 5 term-courses in History.
HIST 3383 Police and Society
3 ch (3C)
in North America
Examines the development of the “new Police” and its
relationship to 19th and 20th century North American society.
Themes will include the European origins of policing, police
reform, professionalization, labour relations, relations with
minorities, political policing and private security. Prerequisite:
one of HIST 2301, HIST 2302, HIST 2407, HIST 2408 or 15
ch of History courses.
HIST 3383 Police and Society
3 ch (3C, O)
in North America
Examines the development of the “new Police” and its
relationship to 19th and 20th century North American society.
Themes will include the European origins of policing, police
reform, professionalization, labour relations, relations with
minorities, political policing and private security. Prerequisite:
one of HIST 2301, HIST 2302 or HIST 2407, HIST 2408 or 15
ch 5 term-courses of History courses.
HIST 3386 Canadian Criminal Justice
3 ch
System
An examination of the Canadian criminal justice system with
an emphasis on criminal law, courts, police and corrections
from the Colonial era to the mid-twentieth century.
Prerequisite: HIST 2302 or equivalent
HIST 3386 Canadian Criminal Justice
3 ch (3C, O)
System
An examination of the Canadian criminal justice system with
an emphasis on criminal law, courts, police and corrections
from the Colonial era to the mid-twentieth century.
Prerequisite: HIST 2302 or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3403 Women in American History 3 ch (3C)
Survey of the changing roles of women from colonial times
until today. Studies major texts on the condition of women.
Specific topics include education, work patterns, the
suffragette movement and feminist theory.
HIST 3403 Women in American History 3 ch (3C, O)
Survey of the changing roles of women from colonial times
until today. Studies major texts on the condition of women.
Specific topics include education, work patterns, the
suffragette movement and feminist theory. Topics such as
education, work and family, suffrage and women’s rights,
sexuality and social reform, as well as feminism will be
studied. Primary sources and gender theory will be
examined. Prerequisite: HIST 2408 or 5 term-courses of
History.
HIST 3421 From the Age of Discovery 3 ch (3C)
to the Atomic Age: Science
in America
America's position as a world superpower has many sources,
none more important than science. This course will focus on
the American fascination with science. Social and political
themes will be examined, in addition to intellectual
developments in science.
HIST 3421 Science in America
3 ch (3C, O)
America's position as a world superpower has many sources,
none more important than science. This course will focus on
the American fascination with science. Social and political
themes will be examined, in addition to intellectual
developments in science. Examines the American
th
fascination with science from colonial times to the 20
century, focusing on the social, political, and intellectual
dimensions of science. Prerequisite: HIST 2408 or 5 termcourses of History.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 40 of 42
HIST 3455 Colonial America
3 ch (3C)
Deals with the exploration, settlement and development of
America from the beginning until the 18th century both in the
context of local history and the broad European-American
background, focusing on the original thirteen colonies that
became the United States.
HIST 3455 Colonial America
3 ch (3C, O)
Deals with Examines the exploration, settlement and
development of America from the beginning until the 18th
century both in the context of local history and the broad
European-American background, focusing on both the local
and imperial context within the original thirteen colonies that
became the United States. Prerequisite: HIST 2408 or 5
term-courses of History.
HIST 3465 The American Revolution
3 ch (3C)
Deals with the causes, results and nature of the American
Revolution. Themes include imperial relations, the internal
development of the colonies and states, the development of
revolutionary ideas, and the formation of the federal
government. Attention given to the conflicting interpretations
of these themes.
HIST 3465 The American Revolution
3 ch (3C, O)
Deals with Examines the causes, results and nature of the
American Revolution. Themes include imperial relations, the
internal development of the colonies and states, the
development of revolutionary ideas, and the formation of the
federal government republican government at the local and
federal level. Attention given to the conflicting interpretations
of these themes. Prerequisite: HIST 2408 or 5 term-courses
of History.
HIST 3471 Indigenous Peoples in
3 ch (3C)
America before 1800
This course will focus on the history of Native People in the
post-contact period. Relationships based on missions, the fur
trade, and colonization will be examined.
HIST 3471 Indigenous Peoples in
3 ch (2C, 1S, A)
America before 1800
This course will focus on the history of Native People in the
post-contact period. Relationships based on missions, the fur
trade, and colonization will be examined. Prerequisite: HIST
2408 or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3473 Native People in the
3 ch (3C)
United States since the
American Revolution
This course will focus on government policies pertaining to
Native People, beginning in the early National period. The
history of Natives and Newcomers in the nineteenth century
will be emphasized, although twentieth century issues will also
be examined.
HIST 3473 Native People in the 3 ch (2C, 1S, A)
United States after 1800
This course will focus on government policies pertaining to
Native People, beginning in the early National period. The
history of Natives and Newcomers in the nineteenth century
will be emphasized, although twentieth century issues will also
be examined. Prerequisite: HIST 3471 or 5 term-courses of
History.
HIST 3475 The American South 3 ch (1.5C 1.5S)
Beginning with the arrival of the first settlers and their
relationship with aboriginal peoples, through the development
of a distinctive culture and society based on slavery, HIST
3475 will focus on social, intellectual, economic and political
themes in southern history. Prerequisites: HIST 2407 and
HIST 2408.
HIST 3475 The American South 3 ch (2C, 1S, A)
Beginning with the arrival of the first settlers and their
relationship with aboriginal peoples, through the development
of a distinctive culture and society based on slavery, HIST
3475 will focus on social, intellectual, economic and political
themes in southern history. Prerequisites: HIST 2407 and
HIST 2408 or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3481 American Society, 1830-1900 3 ch (3C)
With the Revolution and its aftermath consolidated, the United
States embarked on nation-building and continental
expansion, profoundly altering the economic, social and
political character of revolutionary America. The course traces
these changes and seeks to assess how well Americans and
American society adapted to them. Prerequisite: HIST 2400 or
permission of the instructor.
HIST 3481 American Society, 1830-1900 3 ch (3C, O)
With the Revolution and its aftermath consolidated, the United
States embarked on nation-building and continental
expansion, profoundly altering the economic, social and
political character of revolutionary America. The course traces
these changes and seeks to assess how well Americans and
American society adapted to them. Traces the changes that
occurred when the United States embarked on nationbuilding and continental expansion in the postRevolutionary period. The economic, social and political
character of American society will be examined.
Prerequisite: HIST 2400 or permission of the instructor. HIST
2408 or 5 term-courses of History.
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 41 of 42
HIST 3491 American Society, 1900-1980 3 ch (3C)
Examines how the United States came to terms with the
legacy of nineteenth-century growth and development as it
transformed itself into a mature nation and society. Considers
the impact of the depression, World War I and World War II on
the United States, along with its growing impact on the world.
Prerequisite: HIST 2400 or permission of the instructor.
HIST 3491 American Society, 1900-1980 3 ch (3C, O)
Examines how the United States came to terms with the
legacy of nineteenth-century growth and development as it
transformed itself into a mature nation and society. Considers
the impact of the depression, World War I and World War II on
the United States, along with its growing impact on the world.
Prerequisite: HIST 2400 or permission of the instructor. HIST
2408 or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3505 History of Reform in
3 ch (3C)
Modern America
The political and social struggle of Populists, Progressives,
New Dealers and Radicals are the focal points of this survey.
Prerequisite: HIST 1400 or permission of the instructor.
HIST 3505 History of Reform in
3 ch (3C, O)
Modern America
The political and social struggle of Populists, Progressives,
New Dealers and Radicals are the focal points of this survey.
Prerequisite: HIST 1400 or permission of the instructor. HIST
2408 or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3525 US Diplomatic History
3 ch (3C)
in the 20th Century
The growth of the great power from isolation to world
leadership. The basic premises of American policy are studied
as well as the United States’ role in the great confrontations of
the century from World War One to the Cold War, the
American withdrawal from Vietnam and the reorientation of
US policy. Prerequisite: HIST 1400 or permission of the
instructor.
HIST 3525 US Diplomatic History
3 ch (3C, O)
in the 20th Century
The growth of the great power from isolation to world
leadership. The Examines the basic premises of American
policy are studied as well as the United States’ role in the
great confrontations of the century major events from World
War One I to the Cold War, as well as the American
withdrawal from Vietnam and the reorientation of US policy.
Prerequisite: HIST 1400 or permission of the instructor. HIST
2408 or 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3555 History of the Atlantic World 3 ch (3C)
History of the Atlantic slave trade, plantation societies in the
Caribbean region, Atlantic trade networks, the abolition of
Atlantic slavery, and emancipation. Prerequisite: 15 credit
hours of History.
HIST 3555 History of the Atlantic World 3 ch (3C, A)
History of the Atlantic slave trade, plantation societies in the
Caribbean region, Atlantic trade networks, the abolition of
Atlantic slavery, and emancipation. Prerequisite: 15 credit
hours 5 term-courses of History.
HIST 3567 The Colonial History of
3 ch
Latin America
The objective of the course is to provide a broad social,
political, and economic overview of Latin America under
Spanish and Portuguese colonial rule. Prerequisites: At least
6 ch of lower level history or permission of the Instructor.
HIST 3567 The Colonial History of
3 ch (3C, O)
Latin America
The objective of the course is to provide a broad social,
political, and economic overview of Latin America under
Spanish and Portuguese colonial rule. Prerequisites: At least
6 ch 2 term-courses of lower level history or permission of
the Instructor.
HIST 3577 The History of the Caribbean 3 ch (3C)
Since 1492
Provides a broad social, political, and economic overview of
the Caribbean since 1492. Prerequisites: At least 6 ch of
lower level history including HIST 1501 or permission of the
instructor.
HIST 3577 The History of the Caribbean 3 ch (3C, O)
Since 1492
Provides a A broad social, political, and economic overview of
the Caribbean since 1492. Prerequisites: At least 6 ch 2 termcourses of lower level history including HIST 1501 or
permission of the instructor.
HIST 3588 Modern Latin American
3 ch (3C)
Revolutions
Origins, course, and development of the Mexican Revolution
(1910-40) and the Cuban Revolution (1959-present).
Prerequisite: 15 credit hours of History
HIST 3588 Modern Latin American
3 ch (3C, O)
Revolutions
Origins, course, and development of the Mexican Revolution
(1910-40) and the Cuban Revolution (1959-present).
Prerequisite: 15 credit hours 5 term-courses of History
Senate Curriculum Committee: 15 May 2007 Page 42 of 42
HIST 3945 Women, Science and Medicine
3 ch (3C)
This course will focus on the relationship between gender and
science. Women's participation in science and medicine will
be examined, as well as the philosophical and empirical
underpinnings of science and medicine. Contemporary issues
will be discussed, but the focus is historical, beginning with
Aristotelian science and Hippocratic medicine.
HIST 3945 Women, Science and Medicine
3 ch (3C, A)
This course will focus Focuses on the relationship between
gender and science. Women's participation in science and
medicine will be examined, as well as the philosophical and
empirical underpinnings of science and medicine.
Contemporary issues will be discussed, but the focus is
historical, beginning with Aristotelian science and Hippocratic
medicine. Prerequisite: 5 term-courses of History.
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