Important Notices

Important Notices
Important Notices
This Calendar is printed some months before the year for which it is intended to provide
guidance, and students are advised that matters dealt with in it are under continuing review
and revision. The content of this Calendar is subject to change without notice, and every
student accepted for registration in the University shall be deemed to have agreed to any
such deletion, revision or addition whether made before or after said acceptance.
The University will make every reasonable effort to offer courses as required within
programs. Prospective students should note that admission to a degree or other program
does not guarantee admission to any given course except those specified as required
within that program. Students should select elective courses so as to ensure that courses
are taken at the most appropriate time within their schedule.
The University of New Brunswick does not accept any responsibility for loss or damage
suffered or incurred by any student as a result of suspension or termination of services,
courses or classes caused by reason of strikes, lockouts, riots, weather, damage to
university property or for any other cause beyond the reasonable control of the University
of New Brunswick.
The University of New Brunswick Undergraduate Calendar is available in
electronic form on the World Wide Web at:
http://www.lib.unb.ca/Texts/calendar
Inquiries regarding academic matters should be directed to one of the Offices of the Registrar
Fredericton Campus
2nd Floor, Sir Howard Douglas Hall
University of New Brunswick
Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 5A3
Telephone: (506) 453-4864 Fax: (506) 453-5016
E-mail: registrar@unb.ca
Saint John Campus
Room 141, Philip W. Oland Hall
University of New Brunswick
Saint John, New Brunswick, E2L 4L5
Telephone: (506) 648-5670 Fax: (506) 648-5691
E-mail: sjreg@unbsj.ca
The editor, Alison Webb, acknowledges the production assistance of Jason Nugent
and the UNB Electronic Text Centre and all those who have
helped with proof- reading this edition of the Undergraduate Calendar.
Errors and omissions are the responsiblity of the editor.
3
Calendar of Academic Dates 2003-2004
NOTE: The dates shown below apply to undergraduate programs. They do not necessarily apply to the School of Graduate Studies, The Faculty of Law, or to
courses offered through the College of Extended Learning. Students in other programs should consult the appropriate
calendar or brochure.
FALL TERM 2003
July
Tuesday
Wednesday
01
02
Canada Day - University closed
Summer Term begins.
August
Monday
Saturday
04
09
New Brunswick Day. University closed.
Summer Term ends.
September
Monday
Tuesday-Friday
Tuesday
01
02-05
02
Monday
Monday
Sunday
08
08
21
Friday
26
Labour Day.
Academic Programming and Orientation week. Details to be announced.
Start of classes for UNB Fredericton Faculty of Nursing students in the 4th year of the BN Basic Program and Advanced Standing
Program
Start of classes. Both Campuses.
Last day for payment of appropriate University fees.
Last day for adding Fall term and full-year courses. Fall term and full year courses dropped up to and including this date not shown
on transcript of record.
Last Day to opt-out of Health and Dental Plan.
October
Monday
Thursday
Friday
Sunday
13
23
24
26
Thanksgiving Day. University closed.
Fall Convocation - Fredericton Campus
Fall Convocation - Saint John Campus
Last day to withdraw from Fall term course with refund (see University Refund Policy, Section C).
November
Tuesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Thursday
11
12
19
27
Remembrance Day. University closed.
Last day to withdraw from Fall term courses without academic penalty (no refund).
Last day in Fall term to hold class tests. (see regulations on Examination, Standings and Promotion, Section B.)
End of casses for UNB Fredericton Faculty of Nursing students in the 4th year of the BN Basic Program and the Advanced
Standing Program
December
Monday-Wednesday
01-03
Wednesday
Thursday-Friday
Saturday
Thursday
03
04-05
06
18
Final examination period for UNB Fredericton Faculty of Nursing students in the 4th year of the BN Basic Program and the
Advanced Standing Program.
Last day of classes.
Reading period.
First day of Examinations.
Last day of Examinations.
WINTER TERM 2004
January
Monday
Friday
Sunday
05
09
18
Friday
Friday
Sunday
23
30
22
Start of classes - Winter term.
Last day for payment of Winter term fees.
Last day for adding Winter term courses. Winter term courses dropped up to and including this date not shown on transcript of
record.
Last day to withdraw from full-year courses without academic penalty with refund (see University Refund Policy, Section C).
Last Day to opt-out of Health and Dental Plan for those students who enrolled in January 2004.
Last day for payment of University fees for full-time students paying by installments.
Last day to withdraw from Winter term courses with refund (see University Refund Policy, Section C).
March
Monday-Friday
Monday
Thursday
Thursday
01-05
08
18
25
Mid-term break. No classes.
Advising and Registration for continuing students begins. Details to be announced by Faculties. Fredericton Campus.
Last day to withdraw from Winter term courses without academic penalty (no refund).
Last day in Winter term to hold class tests (see regulations on Examination, Standings and Promotion, Section B.)
April
Thursday
Friday-Monday
Tuesday
Saturday
08
09-12
13
24
Last day of classes.
Easter Weekend. University closed.
First day of Examinations.
Last day of Examinations.
May
Monday
Wednesday-Thursday
Friday
Monday
03
19-20
21
24
Intersession begins.
The One Hundred and Seventy-Fifth Encaenia - Fredericton Campus.
Thirtieth Convocation - Saint John Campus.
Victoria Day University Closed
June
Friday
Monday-Wednesday
18
21-23
Intersession ends.
Intersession Examination Period
July
Monday
05
Summer Session begins.
August
Monday
Friday
02
13
New Brunswick Day . University closed.
Summer Session ends.
February
Teaching days:
4
Fall Term 2003 - 61;
Winter Term 2003 - 65
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CALENDAR OF ACADEMIC DATES ............. 4
SECTION D:
ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
PEOPLE AT UNB:
Board of Governors 2002-2003.......................... 11
Fredericton Senate 2002-2003............................ 12
Saint John Senate 2002-2003 ............................. 13
Officers of the University................................... 14
Deans of Faculties .............................................. 14
Administrative Staff .....................................14-15
Allan P. Stuart Excellence in Teaching
Award Recipients ............................................... 15
The Faculty
Professors and Deans Emeriti ......................... 16
Fredericton Faculty ....................................16-22
Saint John Faculty .....................................22-23
Associated Alumni ............................................. 24
SECTION A:
HISTORICAL SKETCH ..............................25-28
SECTION B:
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
See Section B Table of Contents .......................... 29
SECTION C:
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Fee Payment Information...................................... 55
Fredericton Campus Undergraduate Fees............. 56
Saint John Campus Undergraduate Fees............... 57
Fredericton Residene Fees ...............................58-59
Saint John Residene Fees...................................... 59
Notes to Fees Tables ........................................60-61
University Refund Policy...................................... 61
Regulations for Payment of University Fees ........ 61
Regulations for the Payment of Residence Fees... 62
Estimate of Costs .................................................. 63
Governmental Student Loans................................ 63
Scholarships, Prizes & Awards
Regulations and General Information................... 63
Scholarships Open to High School Students ...... 65
Scholarships Open to High School &
Continuing Students ........................................... 71
Prizes and Awards .............................................. 96
Scholarships for Part-time Students ................. 114
Scholarships Administered by Outside Agencies ... 115
Loans ................................................................ 120
Accommodations ................................................ 123
Aboriginal Student Services and Programs ........ 125
Associated Alumni.............................................. 126
Athletics .............................................................. 126
Awards Office (Undergraduate).......................... 126
Bank ....................................................................126
Bookstores........................................................... 127
Campus Ministry.................................................127
Childcare Services............................................... 127
Computing Services ............................................127
Continuine Education and Programs for Part-Time
Students...............................................................127
Counselling Services...........................................128
Employment Services ......................................... 129
English Language Programme ............................129
Faculty Advisors .................................................129
Financial Aid.......................................................130
Fine Arts..............................................................130
Food Services...................................................... 131
Graduate Studies .................................................131
Health Insurance, Student ................................... 131
Health Services ................................................... 132
Information Centres ............................................132
Integrated Technology Services..........................132
International Student Advisor/CIDA
Coordinator/Canadian Student Exchanges..........133
Libraries ..............................................................133
Lost and Found Items.......................................... 134
Math Help and Writing Centre............................ 134
Museums and Collections ................................... 134
Parking ................................................................134
Part-Time Students..............................................134
Post Office........................................................... 134
Research Centres.................................................135
Security and Traffic ............................................135
Sexual Harassment Policy...................................135
Spring and Summer Sessions.............................. 136
Student Affairs and Services...............................136
Student Centres ...................................................136
Students with Disabilities, Services For ............. 137
Undergraduate Student Organizations ................ 138
TABLE OF CONTENTS
5
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION E:
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Bachelor Of Applied Management.................. 140
Accounting ...................................................... 141
Electronic Commerce ...................................... 141
Hospitality And Tourism.................................. 142
Bachelor Of Arts ............................................... 143
Biology Major .................................................. 144
Cogniitve Neuroscience.................................... 144
Communication And Professional Writing ...... 145
Criminal Justice Minor ..................................... 145
Economics ........................................................ 146
Education.......................................................... 146
English.............................................................. 147
French ............................................................... 148
Gender Studies.................................................. 150
History .............................................................. 151
Information And Communication Studies........ 152
International Development Studies Minor ....... 153
International Studies......................................... 153
Law In Society.................................................. 154
Mathematics And Statistics .............................. 154
Philosophy ........................................................ 155
Politics .............................................................. 155
Psychology ....................................................... 156
Psychosocial Dimensions Of Sport Minor ....... 156
Sociology.......................................................... 157
Sport And Exercise Psychology ....................... 158
Bachelor Of Business Administration............. 159
BBA Co-op Option ....................................... 163
Bachelor of Computer Science......................... 167
Bachelor of Data Analysis ................................ 167
Bachelor of Health Sciences ............................. 169
Bachelor Of Nursing Degree ............................ 169
Bachelor Of Recreation And Sports Studies .. 171
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Bachelor Of Science ..........................................175
Biology Option .................................................175
Environmental Biology Option ........................ 176
Marine Biology Option..................................... 176
Chemistry Option .............................................176
Geology Option ................................................177
General Science Option ....................................177
Mathematics And Economics Options ............. 177
Mathematics And Statistics Options................. 177
Physics Option ..................................................178
Psychology Option ........................................... 178
Biology-Psychology Option ............................. 179
Interdepartmental Programs .............................179
Pre-Professional Programs in Science .............. 179
Bachelor Of Science In Computer Science ..... 180
Bachelor Of Science In Engineering................ 182
Bachelor Of Science In Kinesiology ................ 184
Concurrent Bachelor Of Science in
Kinesiology / Bachelor Of Education Program ..186
Diploma Of Advanced Undergraduate
Studies ................................................................187
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION F:
SECTION G:
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
FREDERICTON PROGRAMS
Standard Course Abbreviations .......................... 189
Biology................................................................ 190
Biology-Psychology............................................ 193
Business Administration ..................................... 194
Chemical Engineering......................................... 201
Chemistry............................................................ 202
Civil Engineering ................................................ 203
Classics And Ancient History............................. 204
Communication And Professional Writing......... 205
Computer Engineering ........................................ 205
Computer Science ............................................... 206
Data Analysis ...................................................... 209
Economics........................................................... 210
Education ............................................................ 212
Electrical Engineering......................................... 213
English ................................................................ 214
French ................................................................. 217
Gender Studies .................................................... 221
Geology............................................................... 221
German................................................................ 222
Greek................................................................... 222
Health Sciences................................................... 223
History ................................................................ 223
History & English Joint Honours Program......... 227
Hospitality And Tourism .................................... 228
Humanities .......................................................... 229
Information And Communication Studies .......... 230
International Studies ........................................... 230
Kinesiology ......................................................... 231
Latin .................................................................... 232
Linguistics........................................................... 232
Mathematics........................................................ 233
Mechanical Engineering ..................................... 235
Nursing................................................................ 236
Philosophy .......................................................... 238
Physics ................................................................ 239
Politics ................................................................ 240
Psychology.......................................................... 242
Science ................................................................ 245
Social Sciences ................................................... 245
Sociology ............................................................ 246
Spanish................................................................ 248
Statistics .............................................................. 249
Surveying Engineering ....................................... 250
Bachelor Of Arts ...............................................252
Anthropology.................................................... 255
Classics And Ancient History........................... 256
Culture & Language Studies............................. 257
German..........................................................257
German Studies .............................................258
Liinguistics.................................................... 259
Russian And Eurasian Studies ......................260
Spanish And Latin American Cultures .........261
World Literature And Culture Studies ..........262
Economics ........................................................264
English ..............................................................267
Fine Arts ...........................................................269
French ...............................................................270
History ..............................................................272
International Development Studies ..................274
Law In Society..................................................274
Multimedia Studies...........................................275
Philosophy ........................................................ 277
Political Science ...............................................278
Psychology........................................................ 279
Sociology .......................................................... 280
Women's Studies............................................... 281
Concurrent Degree Programs ...........................282
Certificate In Family Violence Issues ..............284
Certificate In Film Production .......................... 284
Certificate Of Proficiency In French ................284
Arts And Law ...................................................284
Bachelor Of Applied Arts (Craft And Design).. 285
Bachelor Of Business Administration ............. 286
Concurrent BBA/BEd Degree Program ........... 291
Bachelor of Computer Science......................... 292
Concurrent Degree Programs ...........................295
Certificate In Computer Telephony Integration296
Certificate In Software Development ............... 297
Bachelor Of Education .....................................298
Certificate In Adult Education..........................305
Certificate In French Immersion Teaching.......305
Certificate In Mi'kmaq Linguistics And
Curriculum Development ................................. 305
Certificate in Teaching English as a
Second Language..............................................306
Diploma In Advanced Undergraduate Study ...306
TABLE OF CONTENTS
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Environmental Studies Programs .................. 307
Bachelor Of Science In Forest Engineering.... 360
Bachelor Of Laws.............................................. 308
Bachelor Of Science In Kinesiology ................ 361
Concurrent Bachelor Of Science In Kinesiology /
Bachelor Of Education Program....................... 363
Bachelor Of Nursing ......................................... 308
Certificate In Critical Care ............................... 310
Certificate In Holistic Care............................... 311
Certificate In Mental Health Nursing ............... 311
Bachelor Of Philosophy In Interdisciplinary
Leadership (Renaissance College) ................... 312
Bachelor Of Recreation And Sports Studies .. 313
Bachelor Of Science .......................................... 317
Biology Option ................................................. 319
Chemistry Option ............................................. 321
Environmental Biology Option ........................ 322
Environmental Geochemistry Option............... 323
Geology Option ................................................ 323
Mathematics And Statistics Options ................ 325
Physics Option.................................................. 329
Psychology Option ........................................... 331
Interdepartmental Programs ............................. 332
General Science Option.................................... 334
Bachelor Of Medical Laboratory Science ........ 335
Joint Program In Arts And Science .................. 335
Concurrent Degrees In Arts And Science ........ 336
Concurrent Degrees In Computer Science
and Science....................................................... 336
Bachelor Of Science In Engineering ............... 337
Co-op Education Programs in Engineering...... 338
Chemical Engineering ...................................... 339
Civil Engineering.............................................. 342
Computer Engineering...................................... 344
Electrical Engineering ...................................... 346
Geodesy & Geomatics Engineering ................. 348
Geological Engineering .................................... 351
Mechanical Engineering................................... 353
Diploma in Technology Management
and Entrepreneurship .................................... 356
Bachelor Of Science In Forestry...................... 357
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Bachelor Of Science In Software
Engineering........................................................ 364
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION H:
FREDERICTON COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Aboriginal Studies .............................................. 368
Anthropology ...................................................... 369
Arts...................................................................... 373
Astronomy .......................................................... 373
Biology................................................................ 374
Bridging Year For Aboriginal Students.............. 379
Business Administration ..................................... 380
Chemical Engineering......................................... 386
Chemistry............................................................ 390
Chinese................................................................ 393
Civil Engineering ................................................ 393
Classics And Ancient History
Introductory Level Courses .............................. 397
Advanced Classics Courses.............................. 397
Computer Engineering ........................................ 400
Computer Science ............................................... 401
Economics........................................................... 405
Education ............................................................ 409
Electrical Engineering......................................... 418
English
Introductory - Level Courses............................ 420
Intermediate - Level Courses............................ 420
Advanced - Level Courses................................ 421
Special Topics In English................................. 423
Honours Seminars ............................................ 423
Environmental Studies ....................................... 424
Family Violence Issues ....................................... 425
Fine Arts ............................................................. 426
Forest Engineering .............................................. 427
Core Courses .................................................... 427
Elective Courses ............................................... 428
Forestry
Core Courses .................................................... 429
Elective Courses ............................................... 431
French
Introductory Level Courses .............................. 433
Advanced Level Courses.................................. 434
French Linguistics Courses .............................. 437
Geodesy & Geomatics Engineering.................... 438
Geography........................................................... 441
Geological Engineering ...................................... 441
Geology............................................................... 442
German And German Studies ............................. 445
Greek................................................................... 446
History
Introductory Courses ........................................447
Advanced Level Courses .................................. 449
Ancient History .............................................449
European History ..........................................449
Canadian History........................................... 450
American History..........................................452
Far Eastern, African And Latin American
History...........................................................452
History Of Art And Music ............................ 453
Military History............................................. 454
History Of Science ........................................ 454
Honours Seminars ......................................... 455
International Development Studies.....................459
Japanese ..............................................................459
Kinesiology ......................................................... 460
Latin ....................................................................466
Law......................................................................466
Law In Society .................................................... 466
Linguistics...........................................................467
Mathematics ........................................................ 468
Mechanical Engineering .....................................472
Medical Laboratory Science ...............................476
Multimedia Studies .............................................477
Nursing................................................................ 479
Philosophy........................................................... 484
Physics ................................................................ 486
Political Science
Canadian Government And Politics..............490
Comparative Government, International
Politics And Area Studies ............................. 491
Political Theory And Analysis...................... 493
Independent Study......................................... 493
Honours Research ......................................... 494
Psychology .......................................................... 495
Recreation And Sports Studies ...........................499
Renaissance College ...........................................501
Russian ................................................................503
Russian And Eurasian Studies ............................503
Sociology ............................................................504
Software Engineering..........................................509
Spanish And Latin American Cultures ............... 510
Statistics .............................................................. 512
Technology Management and
Entrepreneurship .................................................514
World Literature And Culture Studies ................515
Women's Studies .................................................516
TABLE OF CONTENTS
9
THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS
2002-2003
Ex Officio
Chancellor: Fredrik S. Eaton, OC, BA, LLD (Term Ends May 2003)
Chancellor: Dr. Richard J. Currie, CM, BScChE, MBA, LLD, DSc (Effective May 2003)
President and Vice-Chancellor: John D. McLaughlin, BScE, MScE, PhD, PEng
Acting Vice-President (Academic): Michael C. Ircha, BSc, MPI, MPA, NDC, PhD, PEng
Vice-President (Finance and Administration): Daniel V. Murray, CA, BComm
Vice-President (Research): Gregory S. Kealey, BA, MA, PhD, FRSC, FRHistS
Acting Vice-President(Saint John): Thomas J. Condon., BA, MA, PhD
Mayor of Fredericton: His Worship L.I. Hull
Mayor of Saint John: Her Worship Shirley McAlary
Director of Alumni Affairs: Mark Hazlett, BPE, MPE
Appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor-In-Council
David O'Brien, BBA, LLB, MScBA, Florenceville, N.B. (June 2003)
David Stevenson, BBA, CA, Moncton, N.B. (Sept. 2004)
Georges Roy, BScEng, PEng, Edmundston, NB (Sept 2004)
Gerry Pond, BA, Saint John, N.B. (June 2003)
Kathryn McCain, BA, Toronto, N.B. (Sept. 2004)
Nancy McFadyen, BA, Toronto, Ont. (June 2005)
Appointed by the Board of Governors
Anne-Marie McGrath, BA, BEd, MEd, Saint John, N.B. (June 2004)
David A. Ganong, BBA, MBA, St. Stephen, N.B. (June 2004)
G. Wayne Squibb, BA, Toronto, Ont. (June 2005)
Roderick Nolan, BScE, MScE, PEng, Fredericton, N.B. (June 2003)
Elected by Alumni and Alumnae
Earl Brewer, BA, LLB, Fredericton, NB (June 2003)
Margie Gregg, BA, Fredericton, NB (June 2006)
Kevin Ratcliff, BA, LLB, B.C.L., Montreal, PQ (June 2004)
Marti-Lou Neill, BA, Fredericton, N.B. (June 2004)
Sally McAllister, BA, BEd, Fredericton, N.B. (June 2005)
Elected by the New Brunswick Teachers' Association
Mary Wilson, BA, BEd, MEd (June 2004)
Elected by the Faculty
Thomas Kuttner, BA, MA, LLB, LLM, Fredericton Campus (June 2005)
Constantine Passaris, BA, MA, PhD, Fredericton Campus (June 2005)
Marian Small, BA, MA, EdD, Fredericton Campus (June 2005)
Rod Hill, BA, Diploma, MA, PhD, Saint John Campus (June 2005)
John Johnson, BSc, MSc, PhD Saint John Campus (June 2003)
Demetres Tryphonopoulos, BA, MA, PhD, Fredericton Campus (June 2004)
Elected by the Student Body
Fredericton Campus
Scott Deschenes (June 2003)
Kate Whitfield (June 2003)
Saint John Campus
Cory Brown (June 2003)
Governors Emeriti
M. Louise Lynch, QC, BCL, LLD, DCL
M. Patrick Gillin, BSc, BScE, DSc, Ottawa, Ont.
Reginald E. Tweeddale, BEng, DSc, PEng
Thomas J. Condon, BA, MA, PhD
Secretary
Stephen Strople, BA, MA
FREDERICTON SENATE
2002-2003
EX OFFICIO
President: John D. McLaughlin, BScE, MScE, PhD, PEng
Acting Vice-President (Academic):
Michael C. Ircha, BSc, MPI, MPA, NDC, PhD, PEng
Vice-President (Finance and Administration):
Daniel V. Murray, CA, BComm
Vice-President (Research): Gregory S. Kealey, BA, MA, PhD, FRSC,FRHistS
Acting Vice-President (Saint John): Thomas J. Condon BA, MA, PhD
President of St. Thomas University:
Daniel W. O'Brien, BComm, MSW, DSW
Dean of Administration: Daniel Coleman, BA, PhD
Dean of Arts: John Rowcroft, BSc, MSc, PhD
Dean of Computer Science: Virendra Bhasvar, BEng (Poona), MTech, PhD
(ITT/B), Dean (effective July 1/03)
Dean of Education: Marian Small, BA, MA, EdD
Dean of Engineering: David Coleman, BScE, PhD, PEng
Dean of Forestry and Environmental Management:
David MacLean, BSc, PhD
Dean of Graduate Studies: Gwendolyn Davies, BA, Cert Ed, MA, PhD
Dean of Kinesiology: Christopher Stevenson, BSc, MA, MPE, PhD
Dean of Law: Anne LaForest, BA, LLB, LLM
Dean of Nursing: Cheryl Gibson, BN, MScN, PhD
Dean of Renaissance College (non-voting):
Terry Haggerty, BA, BPHE, Dip Educ, MA, PhD
Dean of Science: Allan R. Sharp, BSc, MSc, PhD
Director of Alumni Affairs: Mark Hazlett, BPE, MPE
Director of College of Extended Learning: Judith Potter, BSc, MAdEd, EdD
Director of Libraries (Fredericton): John Teskey, BA, MLS
Director of Student Affairs and Services:
Jane McGinn-Giberson, BScEng, MEng
Registrar (Fredericton): David J. Hinton, BSc, MSc
FACULTY REPRESENTATIVES
Faculty of Administration
Judy A. Roy, BPR, MBA (2004)
Muhammed Rashid, MA, PhD (2003)
Faculty of Arts
Evelyn Plaice, BA, MA, PhD (2004)
Gail Campbell, BA, MA, PhD (2005)
Peter Kent, BA, BEd, MScEcon, PhD (2004)
Allan Reid, BA, MA, PhD (2005)
Will van den Hoonaard, BA, MA, PhD (2004)
Faculty of Computer Science
Gerhard Dueck, BSc, MSc, PhD (2004)
Faculty of Education
Helmut W. Ott, BA, MA, PhD (2004)
Lawrence Bezeau, BSc, MEd, MA, PhD (2004)
Faculty of Engineering
Eldo Hildebrand, BASc, PhD, PEng (2005)
Michael C. Ircha, BSc, MPI, MPA,NDC, PhD, PEng (2004)
Michel Couturier, BSc, MSc, PhD, PEng (2003)
Faculty of Forestry & Environmental Management
John A. Kershaw, BS, MS, PhD (2003)
Faculty of Kinesiology
Phillip H. Wright, BA, BPE, MS, EdD (2003)
12
PEOPLE AT UNB
Faculty of Law
Donald Fleming, BA, LLB, LLB (2005)
Faculty of Nursing
M.L. Ouellet, BSN, MSN (2004)
Renaissance College
Jennifer Pazienza, BA, MEd, PhD (2004)
Faculty of Science
Bruce Broster, BSc, PhD (2004)
John Stockie, BMath, PhD (2005)
Saba M. Mattar, BSc, MSc, PhD (2004)
Tom Al, BSc, MSc, PhD (2004)
LIBRARY REPRESENTATIVE
Janet Moss, BA, MLS (2004)
FACULTY MEMBERS ELECTED AT LARGE
Brian Lowry, BASc, MASc, PhD (2003)
Eric Aubanel, BSc, PhD (2005)
Julia Noel, BA, MN (2003)
Richard Tervo, BSc, MSc, Phd (2004)
Ali-Akbar Ghorbani, BS, MS, PhD (2005)
Mary McKenna, BSc, MSc, DPhil (2005)
ALUMNI REPRESENTATIVE
Richard Scott, BBA, LLB (2005)
THE ELECTED FREDERICTON FACULTY MEMBERS
OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS
Demetres Tryphonopoulos, BA, MA, PhD (2004)
Thomas Kuttner, BA, MA, LLB, LLB (2005)
Constantine Passaris, BA, MA, PhD (2005)
Marian Small, BA, MA, EdD (2005)
MEMBERS APPOINTED BY THE BOARD FROM THE
MEMBERS OF THE BOARD EXCLUSIVE OF THE ELECTED
FACULTY MEMBERS OF THE BOARD
Sally McAllister, BA, BEd (2004)
Kate Whitfield (2003)
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES ELECTED AT LARGE
Clarence Bennett (2004)
Danny Elias (2003)
Michelle Sarchfield (2003)
Janice Linton (2003)
Jennie Shaw (2003)
Matt Clark (2003)
PART-TIME STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE
Penny Decker (2003)
GRADUATE STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE
Carla Peck (2003)
SECRETARY
Stephen Strople, BA, MA
SAINT JOHN SENATE
2002-2003
EX OFFICIO
President: John D McLaughlin, BScE,MScE, PhD, PEng
Acting Vice President (Saint John): Thomas J. Condon, BA, MA, PhD
*Associate Vice President (Saint John): Muhammed Kabir , BA, MA, MA, PhD
Acting Vice President (Academic): Michael C. Ircha, BSc, MPI, MPA, NDC, PhD, PEng
Vice President (Finance and Administration): Daniel V. Murray, BComm, CA
Vice President (Research): Gregory Kealey, BA, MA, PhD, FRSC, FRHistS
Dean of Arts: Robert MacKinnon, BA, MA, PhD
Dean of Business: Shelley Rinehart, BA, MBA, PhD
Dean of Science, Applied Science and Engineering: Keith DeBell, BSc, MSc, PhD
Dean of Graduate Studies: Gwendolyn Davies, BA, Cert Ed., MA, PhD
Registrar (Saint John): John A. Johnson, BSc, MSc, PhD
Director of Information Services & Systems (Saint John): Susan Collins, BA, MLS
*Director of Student Life and Support Services (Saint John): Richard Papenhausen, BSC, BEd, MA, PhD
*Subject to revision of the University of New Brunswick Act
FACULTY REPRESENTATIVES:
Faculty of Arts
Lee Chalmers, BA, MA, PhD (2005)
Leslie Jeffrey, BA, MA, PhD (2005)
Faculty of Business
Jsun Wong, BS, MA, MBA, PhD (2003)
Ebrahim Roumi, BSc, MBA, PhD (2003)
Faculty of Science, Applied Science and Engineering
Lawrence Garey, BSc, MA,PhD(2003)
Ramesh Prasad, BScE, MTech, MScE, PhD (2004)
FACULTY MEMBERS ELECTED AT LARGE
Frances Amatucci, BS, MA, PhD (2005)
Sandra Bell, BA, MA, PhD (2005)
Debra Lindsay, BA, MA, PhD (2003)
Miriam Jones, BA, MA, PhD (2005)
Rameshwar Gupta, BSc, MSc, MA, PhD (2004)
Robyn Humphries, GRIC, MSc, PhD (2004)
Ruth Shaw, BSc DA, MScCS, PhD(2003)
ALUMNI REPRESENTATIVE
Anne-Marie McGrath, Ba, BEd, MEd (2003)
THE ELECTED SAINT JOHN FACULTY MEMBERS OF THE BOARD
Rod Hill, BA, Diploma, MA, PhD (2005)
John Johnson, BSc, MSc, PhD (2003)
MEMBER APPOINTED BY AND FROM THE MEMBERS
OF THE BOARD EXCLUSIVE OF THE ELECTED FACULTY MEMBERS OF THE BOARD
Cory Brown (2003)
THREE STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES ELECTED AT LARGE
Jason Kiervin (June 2003)
Kelly Griffith (October 2003)
Angela Sherman (October 2004)
SECRETARY
Stephen Strople, BA, MA
PEOPLE AT UNB
13
PEOPLE AT UNB
OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY
ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF - FREDERICTON
President and Vice-Chancellor: John D. McLaughlin, BScE, MScE, PhD, PEng
Acting Vice-President (Academic):
Michael C. Ircha, BSc, MPI, MPA, NDC, PhD, PEng (term ends June 30, 2003)
Vice-President (Academic):
Angelo Belcastro, BA, BPE, MSc , PhD (effective July 1, 2003)
Vice-President (Finance and Administration):
Daniel V. Murray, CA, BComm
Vice-President (Research ): Dr. Gregory S. Kealey, BA, MA, PhD, FRSC, FRHistS
Acting Vice-President (Saint John):
Thomas J. Condon, BA, MBA, PhD (term ends June 30, 2003)
Vice-President (Saint John): Kathryn B. Hamer, BA, MA, PhD (effective July 1, 2003)
Assistant Vice-President (Saint John) (Financial & Administrative Services):
Christopher Callbeck, BBA, CA
Assoc Vice-President (Campus Services and Planning):
Michael Ryan, BEng, MCP, PEng
Assoc. Vice-President (Academic/Students):
Michael C. Ircha, BSc, MPI, MPA, NDC, PhD, PEng
Assoc. V-P (Human Resources and Organizational Development):
Peter McDougall, BA, MIR, CHRP
Assoc. Vice-President (Saint John): Muhammed Kabir, BA, MA, MA, PhD
Comptroller and Director of Financial Services:
Larry J. Guitard, BA, LLB, CA
Director of Information Services & Systems (Saint John):
Susan Collins, BA, MLS
Director of Libraries (Fredericton): John Teskey, BA, MLS
Registrar (Fredericton): David J. Hinton, BSc, MSc
Registrar (Saint John): John A. Johnson, BSc, MSc, PhD
University Secretary: Stephen Strople, BA, MA
Alumni Affairs: Mark Hazlett, BPE, MPE, Executive Director
Art Centre: Marie Maltais, BA, MA, AOCA, Director
Athletics: Clint Hamilton, BEd, MEd, Director Athletics/Aitken Centre
Bookstore:Sharon Fillmore, Manager
Campus Services and Planning:
Michael Ryan, BEng, MCP, PEng, Associate Vice-President
Centre for Musical Arts: Richard A. Hornsby, BMus, MMus, Director of Music
College of Extended Learning: Judith Potter,BSc, MAdEd, EdD, Director
Counselling: Reg Craft, BA, MA, PhD, Director
Development and Donor Relations: Susan Montague, BA, MSEd, Director
Financial Aid: Shelley Clayton, Director
Financial Services
Ernest A. Robinson, BBA, CMA, Director of Fin. Acting and Reporting Serv.
Larry J. Guitard, BA, LLB, CA, Comptroller and Director
Trevor Gonnason, CMA, Director, Budget and Risk Management
Human Resources and Organizational Development:
Peter McDougall, BA, MIR, CHRP, Assoc. VP
Institutional Research and Analysis, Office of
Averlyn Pedro, BA, MA, MEd, Ed.D, Co-ordinator
HONORARY OFFICERS
President Emeritus:
Colin B. Mackay, O.C., Q.C., BA, LLB, DCL, DésL, DEd, LLD
Chancellor Emerita: Lady Aitken, LLD
Vice-President (Academic) Emeritus:
Robert E. Burridge, BScE, MS, PhD, Peng
Vice-President (Finance and Administration) Emeritus:
James O'Sullivan, BBA, LLD
Vice-President (Saint John) Emeritus: Thomas J. Condon, BA, MA, PhD
Vice-President (Research and International Cooperation) Emeritus:
Frank Wilson, BScE, MScE, PhD, FCAE, FCSCE, FEIC, P.Eng
Registrar Emeritus: Barry Beckett, BSc, Dip Ed, Phd
Residence Fellow Emeritus: Neill MacGill, Neil, BA, MA - Philosophy
DEANS OF FACULTIES
Fredericton
Administration: Daniel Coleman, BA, PhD
Arts: John Rowcroft, BSc, MSc, PhD
Computer Science: Virendra Bhasvar, BEng, MTech, PhD (effective July 1/03)
Education: Marian Small, BA, MA, EdD
Engineering: David Coleman, BScE, PhD, PEng
Graduate Studies: Gwendolyn Davies, BA, Cert.Ed, MA, PhD
Forestry and Environmental Management: David MacLean, BSc, PhD
Kinesiology: Christopher Stevenson, BSc, MA, MPE, PhD
Law: Anne La Forest, BA, LLB, LLM
Nursing: Cheryl Gibson, BN, MScN, PhD
Renaissance College: Terry Haggerty, BA, BPHE, Dip Educ, MA, PhD
Science: Allan Sharp, BSc, MSc, PhD
Integrated Technology Services
Greg L. Sprague, BSc, MSc, Executive Director
John Webster, BA, Director ITS, & Director of Web & Instruct. Support Svcs
Stephen Rosenfeld, BSc, Director ITS Head Hall
International Student Advisor: Kay Nandlall, BA, MEd
Physical Plant: Michael Carter, PEng, Director
President's Office: Exec.Secretary/Assistant to President: Trudy Abernethy
Registrar's Office
David J. Hinton, BSc, MSc, Registrar
Jean E. Fisher, BA, Associate Registrar - Administrative Systems & Services
Kathy Waugh, BBA, Assistant Registrar - Undergraduate Awards
Shirley Carroll, BEd, MEd, Associate Registrar - Admissions and Enrolment
Research and Development Services
Dwight Ball, BSc, MSc, Executive Director of Office of Research Services, and Director of
Industry Government Services
Residential Life and Conference Services
John Craighead, Assoc. Director (Residential Life)
Michel Ouellette, BA, MA, PhD, Director
Safety: Patricia A. Burrows, BSc, Safety Coordinator
Security and Traffic: Reg Jerrett, BA, Director
Student Employment Service: Lois Clowater, BBA, MEd (Adult Educ.), Director
Student Health Services: H. Ross Myers, BSc, MD, Medical Director
Saint John
Arts: Robert MacKinnon, BA, MA, PhD
Business: Shelley Rinehart, BBA, MBA, PhD
Graduate Studies: Gwendolyn Davies, BA, Cert.Ed, MA, PhD
Science, Applied Science, and Engineering: Keith De'Bell, BSc, MSc, PhD
Student Affairs and Services: Jane McGinn-Giberson, BScEng, MEng, PEng, Director
Student Recruitment and Integrated Marketing: Susan Mesheau, Director
Undergraduate Calendar: Alison Webb, BBA, Editor
University Secretariat: Stephen Strople, BA, MA, University Secretary
Wu Conference Centre: Margot Young, BEd, Director
14
PEOPLE AT UNB
ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF - SAINT JOHN
Advancement, Communication & Recognition
David Emerson, BAA, EcD, Director
Math Help Centre
Thanaa Anis Kamel, BSc, Director
Alumni
Mary Duffley, BPR, Coordinator
Modern Languages Centre
Elaine Armstrong, BSc, PBEd, MEd, Director
Associate Vice-President’s Office:
Barry Beckett, BSc, DipEd, PhD, Senior Advisor Internationalization
Robert Chanteloup, BA, MA, PhD, Senior International Advisor
Rosemary Dionne, Secretary to the Associate Vice-President
Doreen MacAuley, BSc, MBA, Program Manager, Beijing Concord College
Operations
Thomas R. McHugh, BA, Director
Athletics
Robert A. Bonnell, BPE, BA, MA, Director
Bookstore
Pat Joas, Manager
Partnerships and Innovation
Kimberly A. Newman, BBA, MBA, Director
Registrar’s Office
John A. Johnson, BSc, MSc, PhD, Registrar (Saint John)
Margaret V. Murphy, BBA, Assistant Registrar (Saint John)
Susan Ellis-Loparco, BScPE, MBA, Manager of Admissions
Residence
Katherine McGuire, BA, MEd (UNB), Don
Shirley Gardiner, Manager
Community Relations
Gina Wilkins, BA, Director
Safety and Security
Joanne Croft, Manager
Electronic Commerce Centre
Shelley Rinehart, BA, MBA, PhD, Director
Senate Office
Sarah DeVarenne, BSc, Asstistant Senate Secretary
Stephen Strople, BA, MA, Senate Secretary
Faculty of Education Co-ordinator
Neil H. Scott, BA, BEd, MEd, PhD
Financial and Administrative Services
Christopher Callbeck, BBA, CA, Assistant Vice-President
Health Sciences Coordinator
Brenda Schyf, BN, BA, MEd
Student Services
Richard Papenhausen, BSc, BEd, MA, PhD, Director
Kevin Bonner, BA, MEd, Assistant Director
Vice President’s Office
Nancy Waugh, Assistant to the Vice-President
Sarah DeVarenne, BSc, Project Administrator
Information Services & Systems
Susan Collins, BA, MLS, Director
Integrated Technology Services
Osborne, Steven, BScCS, MScCS (UNB) Director, Computing Services
Ward Chipman Library
Susan Collins, BA, MLS, Chief Librarian
Web Services
John Webster, BA, Director
Isil Flynn, BA, Web Manager
International Liaison Office
Debra McLatchy, BSc, PhD, Director
International Recruitment Centre
Robb Parker, BA, BEd, Manager
ALLAN P. STUART EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING
AWARD RECIPIENTS
Fall Convocation 1972
Leonard P. Edwards (Mathematics, F)
Barbara J. Pepperdene (Sociology, F)
Encaenia 1987
Barbara MacKinnon (Biology, F)
Donald F. Rowan (English, F)
Encaenia 1973
Allan P. Stuart (Chemistry, F)
R. Wayne Jollinau (Administration,SJ)
Encaenia 1988
James M. Tolliver (Administration, F)
Teresa Killoran (Education, F)
Encaenia 1974
William Y. Smith (Economics, F)
Zdenek Valenta (Chemistry, F)
Encaenia 1989
Jane M. Fritz (Computer Science, F)
Friedrich Grein (Chemistry, F)
Encaenia 1975
Lawrence E. Garey (Mathematics, SJ)
Leonard C. Smith (Classics, F)
Encaenia 1990
Byron Walton (Engineering, SJ)
William Chernoff (Mathematics & Statistics, F)
Encaenia 1976
Sidney I. Pobihushchy (Political Science, F)
Joanne E. Harris (Mathematics, SJ)
Encaenia 1991
Roger Ploude (English, F)
William Mullin (Biology, F)
Encaenia 1977
Gilbert Allardyce (History, F)
Wilfred B.W. Martin (Sociology, F)
Encaenia 1992
Barbara Trenholm (Administration, F)
Fall Convocation 1992
Phillip Wright (Administration, F)
Ronald M. Lees (Physics, F)
Verne M. Ireton (Mechanical Engineering, F)
Encaenia 1993
David Townsend (Law, F)
Thomas A. Austin (Computer Science, F )
Daniel M. Keppie (Biology & Forestry, F)
Spring Convocation 1993
Robert Chanteloup (Sociology, SJ)
Encaenia 1994
Lesley Fleming (Biology, F)
Spring Convocation 1994
Mohammad Hamdan (Mathematics, Statistics
Encaenia 1995
Gracie Getty (Nursing, F)
Steven Turner, (History, F)
Encaenia 1978
Encaenia 1979
Encaenia 1980
Clayton R. Lewis (Mathematics, F)
C. Shirley MacLeod (Nursing, F)
Encaenia 1981
Kevin Halcrow (Biology, SJ)
Howard McFarlane (Civil Engineering, F)
Fall Convocation 1996
Encaenia 1982
Daniel M. Hurley (Law, F)
Linda A. Parker (Psychology, SJ)
James Murray (Classics & Ancient History, F)
Judy Buchanan (Nursing, SJ)
Fall Convocation 1997
Encaenia 1983
G. Charles Kuun (Political Science, F)
Reavley Gair (English, F)
Katherine Frego (Biology, SJ)
Wendy Robbins (Women's Studies, F)
Fall Convocation 1998
Encaenia 1984
Beverley G. Smith (Law, F)
David Rehorick (Sociology, F)
Ruth Shaw (Mathematics, Statistics & Computer Science)
Stephen Ross (Physics, F)
Fall Convocation 1999
Encaenia 1985
Arun J. Valsangkar (Civil Engineering, F)
Wiktor Askanas (Administration, F)
Lilly Both (Psychology, SJ)
Paul McDonnell (Psychology, F)
Fall Convocation 2000
Encaenia 1986
Jillian Sullivan (Mathematics & Statistics, F)
Diana Austin (English, F)
Thom Erdle (Forestry & Environmental Management, F)
Spring Convocation 1986
Peter McGahan (Dean of Faculty, SJ)
Fall Convocation 2001
Barry G. Bisson (Engineering, F)
Edward W. Robak (Forestry & Environmental Management F)
PEOPLE AT UNB
15
THE FACULTY
Professors and Deans Emeriti
Faig, Wolfgang, Dipl Ing, MscE, DrIng, PEng
Methven, Ian, BScF, PhD
Nair, K. P. K., BE, MTech, PhD
Unger, Israel, BSc, MSc, PhD
Wasson, W. Dana, BSc(EE), SM, PhD
Professors Emeriti
Acheson, T. William, BA, MA, PhD - History
Alcoe, Shirley, BA, BEd, MA, MEd, EdD - Nursing
Allardyce, Gilbert D., BA, MA, PhD - History
Beattie, Ira M., BScE, MS - Civil Engineering
Bottomley, Frank, BSc, MSc, PhD, DSc, FCIC-Chemistry
Brown, Wallace, BA, MA, MA, PhD - History
Buckner, Phillip, BA, PhD-History
Burt, Michael D. B., BSc, PhD, FLS - Biology
Cameron, Ann C, BA, MA, PhD-Psychology
Cameron, Ian R., BSc, PhD - Physics, Saint John
Chrzanowski, Adam J., BScE, MScE, Dr Ing - Geodesy and Geomatics Engineering
Cogswell, Frederick W., OC, BA, MA, PhD - English
Davies, Huw, BSc, PhD, PEng - Mechanical Engineering
El Khadem, Saad E. A., Dr Phil - German and Russian
Eppert, Franz, Wissenschaftliche Profong fur das Lehramt an Hoheren Scholen, Zweite Philologische Staatsprufung, DPhil - Culture and Language Studies
Ericson, Penelope, BScN, MScN - Nursing
Forbes, Ernest, BA, BEd, MA, PhD - History
Gibbs, Robert J., BA, MA, PhD - English
Graham, Dominick S., BA, MA, PhD - History
Grein, Friedrich, BSc, MSc , PhD, FCIC - Chemistry
Gujar, Uday, BE, MTech, MScE - Computer Science
Hamilton, Angus C., BASc, MASc - Surveying Engineering
Hamilton, Willis D., BA, MA, BEd - Education
Hawkes, Robert E., BA, BEd, MA - Education
Kaiser, Reinhold, BSc, MSc, PhD - Physics
Kelly, Ronald B., BSc, MSc, PhD - Chemistry, Saint John
Krause, Margarida, Licenciature, MSc, PhD - Biology
Lane, Lauriat, Jr., AB, MA, PhD, FRSC - English
Leckie, Irene, BScN, MSN - Nursing
Lees, Ronald, BSc, MSc, PhD - Physics
Levine, Aaron Lawrence, BA, MA, PhD - Economics
Logan, Alan, BSc, PhD - Physical Sciences, Saint John
London, J. Dalton G., BA, MA, D d'U - Education
Love, Robert J., BA, MA, BPaed, DEd, LLD - Education
MacIver, Donald A., BEd, MEd, PhD - Educational Foundations
MacKeracher, Dorothy, BSc, MEd, PhD - Education
McAllister, Arnold L., BSc, MSc, PhD, FRSC - Geology
McDonnell, Paul M., BA, MA, PhD - Psychology
McFarlane, Howard W., BSc, MSE - Civil Engineering
McLaughlin, Robert H.B., BScE, MScE, Bldg Eng - Civil Engineering
Milham, Mary Ella, BA, MA, PhD - Classics
Morris, David, BSc, PhD - Chemical Engineering
Paim, Uno, BA, PhD - Biology
Picot, Jules J. C., BE, MSc, PhD - Chemical Engineering
Powell, Graham, BSc, Msc, PhD - Forestry & Environmental Management
Poyatos, Fernando, BA, MA, PhD - Spanish
Pullman, Douglas R., BEd, MA, PhD - Sociology
Rowan, Donald F., BA, BA, MA, PhD - English
Scott, Robert N., BSc , DSc - Electrical Engineering
Shyu, Larwrence N., BA, MA, PhD - History
Smith, Beverley G., BCL - Law
Stevens, Albert M., BScE, MScE - Civil Engineering
Stirling, Mary Lou, BA, MEd, EdD - Education
Taylor, A. Ronald A., BA, PhD - Biology
Thomas, Martin L. H., Bsc, MSA, PhD - Biology, Saint John
Tupper, Brian O.J., BSc, PhD, DSc, FIMA - Mathematics and Statistics
Valenta, Zdenek, Dipl. Ing. Chem., MSc, PhD - Chemistry
Vanicek, Petr, MEng, PhD - Geodesy & Geomatics Engineering
Venart, James, BASc, PhD - Mechanical Engineering
Verma, Ram D., BSc, MSc, PhD- Physics
Wells, David E., BSc, BASc, MASc, PhD - Geodesy and Geomatics Eng
Young, D. MacMurray, BA, PhD - History
Librarian Emerita
Gunn, Gertrude E., BA, MA, MLS, PhD
16
PEOPLE AT UNB
FREDERICTON FACULTY
FACULTY OF ADMINISTRATION
Abekah, Joseph Y., BScAdmin (Ghana), MSc (Boston), MAc (BGSU), PhD (UNL), Assoc
Prof - 1991
Askanas, Wiktor, BA (Poznan), MBA, PhD (Warsaw), Prof - 1983
Audas, Richard, BBA (UNB), MBA, MA (Dal), PhD (Wales), Asst Prof - 2000
Betts, Norman, BBA (UNB), PhD (Qu),CA, Assoc Prof - 1992
Boothman, Barry E.C., BA (Brock), MBA, PhD (York), Prof - 1986
Coleman, Daniel, BA, PhD (SUNY-Buffalo), Prof and Dean - 1986
Dunnet, Jane, BSc, MBA (UNB), PhD (Qu.), Asst Prof - 2000
DuPlessis, Dorothy, BComm, LLB, MBA (Dal), LLM (Lond), Prof - 1982
Eiselt, Horst A., BA (Hannover), MBA, PhD (Georgia Augusta), Prof - 1986
Flint, Douglas, BA (S. Fraser), MSc (McM.), MASc (Wat.), PhD (Tor.), Asst Prof - 2001
Grant, E. Stephen, BBA (UNB), MBA (Maine at Orono), PhD (Memphis), Prof and Assoc
Dean (Research & Outreach) - 1993
Hinton, Joanne, BSc (Guelph), CMA, Lecturer - 1999
Kabadi, Santosh N., BS (Bom), MTech (IIT/B), PhD (Texas), Prof - 1985
Laughland, Alan R., BSc, MSc (Guelph), MBA (McM), CMA, Assoc Prof - 1971
Lim, William, BComm (Alta), MS (Econ), PhD (Carnegie-Mellon), Asst Prof -1999
Maher, Elin, BBA (UWO), MBA (Maine at Orono), CA, Assoc Prof - 1988
Maher, Robert, BSc (UNB), MBA (McG.), CA, FCA, Prof - 1988
Mitra, Devashis, BA (Delhi), CA, PhD (Mass-Amherst), Prof - 1991
Nasierowski, Wojciech, BAEngME, MScEng (Warsaw Univ. of Tech), PhD (Warsaw Mgmt. Inst. for Organization Develop), Prof - 1991
Nevers, Richard, BA (St Thomas(NB)), MBA (UNB), Lecturer - 2000
Otuteye, Eben, BA (Ghana), MA (UNB), PhD (Qu), Assoc Prof - 1987
Ouyang, Ming, BEng (Tsinghua), MA (UBC), PhD (Manit.), Asst Prof -2001
Rahim, Mohammed, BSc, MSc (Dacca), DS (Rome), MSc (Ott), PhD (Windsor),
Prof - 1983
Rashid, Muhammad, MA (York), PhD (Qu), Prof - 1985
Ritchie, Pamela, BA (UNB), MSc (Sask), PhD (Lanc), Prof and Ext Prgms Mgr - 1989
Roy, Judy Ann, BPR (Mt.St Vin.), MBA, PhD (UNB), Sr.Teaching Assoc - 1993
Sharma, Basu D., BA, MA (Tribhuvan) AM, PhD (Ill), Prof - 1985
Sheppard, Reginald, BEd, BSc, BA (Nfld.), MEd (UNB), PhD (Univ of Bath),
Lecturer - 1999
Simyar, Farhad, AA (Tehran), BS (Abadan Inst of Tech), MBA (Tehran), MAcc, DBA
(S. Calif), CPA, CGA, FCGA, Prof - 1996
Srinivasan, Gopalan, BComm (Madurai), MComm (S Venkat), Fellow (IIM Ahmedabad),
CGA, Prof - 1987
Thomas, Mark, BSc (Dal), BBA, LLB (UNB), MBA, PhD (Tor), Asst Prof - 1999
Tolliver, James M., BS, PhD (Ohio), Prof - 1981
Trenholm, Barbara A., BComm (Mt.All.), MBA (Maine at Orono), CA, FCA, Prof - 1980
Whalen, Hugh, BSc, BBA (UNB), PhD (U. of Minnesota), CA, Sr. Teaching Assoc and
Assoc Dean (Programs) - 1992
Wielemaker, Martin, BSc (UBC), MSc (Tech. Univ. Delft), PhD (Erasmus), Candidate,
Asst. Prof. - 2002
FACULTY OF ARTS
Department of Anthropology
Black, David W., BA (S.Fraser), MA, PhD (McM), Prof - 1991
Lovell, Peter R., BA (Wat), MA, PhD (McM), Assoc Prof - 1980
Mitra, Koumari, BSc, MSc, PhD (Delhi), Asst Prof - 2000
Paponnet-Cantat, Christiane, BA (UBC), MA, PhD (S.Fraser), Prof and Chair - 1988
Plaice, Evelyn, BA (Oxf.Brookes), MA (Nfld), PhD (Manc), Assoc Prof (Jt Educ) - 1999
Pool, Gail R., AB (Calif), MA (McM), PhD (McG.), Prof - 1976
Wiber, Melanie, BA (Leth), MA, PhD (Alta), Prof - 1987
Department of Classics and Ancient History
Geyssen, John W., BA, MA (Qu), PhD (Duke), Assoc Prof - 1998
Kerr, William G., BA (Tor), BA (Oxon), MA, PhD (Prin), Assoc Prof - 1987
Mills, Michael J., BA, MA, MLitt (Oxon), Prof - 1968
Murray, James S., BA, MA (UNB), PhD (Pitt.), Prof and Chair - 1984
Department of Culture and Language Studies
Dueck, Cheryl, BA, MA (Sask), PhD (McG.), Asst Prof - 2000
Hamling, Anna, BA, BEd (Cardiff), MA (Qu), PhD (Warsaw), Sr. Instr. - 1999
Linton, Murray, BA, MA (UNB), Sr. Inst and Dir Multimedia Studies - 1999
Lorey, Christoph, Industriekaufmann (Germany), BA, MA, PhD (Alta), Prof - 1994
Reid, Allan, BA (Sask), MA, PhD (Alta), Prof and Chair - 1991
Department of Economics
International Development Studies Program
Brander, John R.G., BA (UNB), MA (Qu), Hon Res Prof - 1998
Cook, Beverly A., BA, MA (UNB), PhD (S.Fraser), Prof and Chair - 1980
Dickson, Vaughan, BA (UNB), MA, PhD (UWO), Prof - 1974
Farnsworth, Mike, BA, PhD (McM), MA (Qu.), Asst. Prof.
Ferguson, Brian, PhD (ANU, Canberra), Adjunct Prof. - 2002
Lantz, Van, BA (Car.), MA (Dal), PhD (S.Fraser), Asst Prof (Jt For & Enviro Mgmt) - 2000
Law, Stephen, PhD (Toronto), Adjunct Prof. - 2001
Levine, Larry, BA (Alberta), MA (Tor), PhD (LSE), Prof. Emeritus
McDonald, Ted, BA (St. F.X.), MCom, PhD (Melbourne), Assoc Prof - 2001
McGaw, Richard L., BA, MA (UNB), PhD (Manc), Prof - 1974
Murrell, David, BA (Duquesne),BSocSc, MA (Ott), PhD (Qu), Prof - 1985
Myatt, Anthony E., BA (Lancaster), MA, PhD (McM), Prof - 1983
Passaris, Constantine E., BA (American U, Cairo), MA (Nfld), PhD (Leicester), Prof - 1972
Rezun, Miron, BA (York), MA (Tor), MA, PhD (Geneva), Prof (Jt Political Science) - 1987
Rowcroft, John E., BSc, MSc (Manc), PhD (S.Fraser), Prof and Dean - 1973
Ruggeri, Giuseppe, MA (Mich), PhD (State Univ of NY), Prof and Vaughan Chair - 2000
Yevdokimov, Yuri, BSc (Sumy), MA (Academy of Science), MSc (Ill), PhD (Manit.), Asst
Prof. (Joint Civil Eng.) - 1999
Yu, Weiqiu, BSc (Shandong), MA (UNB), PhD (S.Fraser), Assoc Prof - 1993
D. Noel (Spanish), Director, C. Paponnet-Cantat (Anthropology), A. Brown (French),
J. McFarland (Economics, St Thomas), G. Pool (Anthropology), M. Rezun
(Economics), T. Workman (Political Science), T. Myatt (Economics), J. Ball (English),
G. Whiteford (Education).
Department of English
Andrews, Jennifer, BA (McG.), MA (Tor), PhD (Tor), Assoc. Prof. - 1999
Austin, Diana, BA (UNB), MA (Qu), DPhil (Oxon), Prof - 1983
Ball, John C., BA, MA, PhD (Tor), Assoc Prof - 1995
Canitz, A. E. Christa, BA, MA (Birmingham), PhD (UBC), Prof - 1993
Davies, Gwendolyn, BA (Dal), MA, Ed. Cert. (Tor), PhD (York), Prof & Dean of Graduate
Studies - 2000
Doerksen, Daniel, BA (Winn), Bed (Manit), MA, PhD (Wis), Hon Res Prof - 1998
Falkenstein, Len, BA, MA (Sask), PhD (Alta), Asst Prof - 1999
Gants, David L., BA (Wash), MA, PhD (Virginia), CRC Chair in Hum. Computing Dept. of
English/Electronic Text Ctr., Asst. Prof. - 2002
Jarman, Mark, BA (Vic), MFA ((Iowa), Assoc Prof - 2000
Klinck, Anne, BA, MA (Oxon), MA (McG.), MA, PhD (UBC), Prof - 1990
Leckie, Ross, BA (McG.), PD/AD (Educ)(Alta), MA (C’dia.)PhD (Tor), Prof. - 1997
Martin, Randall, BA (Tor), MA(Birmingham), D.Phil (Oxon), Prof & Univ. Research Prof.
- 1994
Mullaly, Edward J., BA (Windsor), MA, PhD (UNB), Hon Res Prof - 1999
Ploude, Roger J., BA (St Thomas(NB)), MA (Dal), PhD (Qu), Prof and Chair - 1972
Rimmer, Mary P., BA (C’dia.), AM, PhD (Harv), Prof - 1991
Robbins, Wendy J., BA (Bishops), MA, PhD (Qu), Prof - 1984
Snook, Edith, BA, MA (Alta), PhD (UWO), Asst Prof - 2001
Tryphonopoulos, Demetres, BA, MA, PhD (UWO), Prof and Asst Dean, Sch of Graduate
Studies - 1990
Department of French
Brown, Anne, BA (UNB), MA (McM), PhD (McG.), Prof - 1988
Carrière, Marie, BA (Ottawa), MA (Qu), PhD (Tor), Asst Prof - 2001
Charron, Danielle, BA (Ottawa), MA (Ottawa) Lecturer - 2001
Cichocki, Wladyslaw, BSc, MA, PhD (Tor), Prof - 1985
Horne, Christine, BA (Sainte-Anne), MA, PhD (Dal), Assoc Prof - 1999
LeBlanc, Doris C., BA, BEd, MEd (M'ton), Prof & Chair - 1973
Sauvé, Rachel, BA (Laval), MA (McM), PhD (Tor), Assoc Prof - 1997
Viau, Robert, BA, MA, PhD (Ott), Prof - 1989
Villiard, Pierre, BA, MA (Sher), PhD (Toulouse-Le Mirail), Assoc Prof - 1988
Department of History
Brown, Jeffrey S., BA (St John Fisher, NY), MA (SUNY- Brockport), MA (York), PhD
(Rochester), Asst Prof.- 2002
Campbell, Gail, BA, MA (UWO), PhD (Clark), Prof - 1989
Charters, David, BA, MA (UNB), PhD (Lond), Assoc Prof - 1988
Conrad, Margaret, BA (Acad), MA, PhD (Tor), Can. Research Chair in Atl. Canada Studies
& Prof. - 2002
Frank, David, BA (Tor), MA, PhD (Dal), Prof - 1980
Kealey, Gregory S. BA, MA, PhD, FRSC, FRHistS, Prof and
Vice President (Research) - 2001
Kealey, Linda, BA, BLS, MA, PhD (Tor), Prof - 2002
Kennedy, Sean, BA (Nfld), MA, PhD (York), Asst Prof - 1999
Kent, Peter C., BA, BEd (UNB), MScEcon, PhD (Lond), Prof - 1965
Lemire, Beverly J., BA, MA (Guelph), DPhil (Oxf), Prof and Univ Res Prof- 1987
McTavish, Lianne, BA (Western), MA, Cert in Women's Studies, PhD (Rochester), Assoc
Prof - 1996
Milner, J. Marc, BA, MA, PhD (UNB), Prof and Chair - 1986
Parenteau, William M., BA, MA (Maine), PhD (UNB), Asst Prof. - 2000
Thompson, D. Gillian, BA (UBC), MA (Stan), PhD (UBC), Prof - 1972
Tracy, Nicholas, BA, BAHist (Sask), MPhil, PhD (S’ton.), Adjunct Prof - 2002
Turner, R. Steven, BA (N Carolina), PhD (Prin), Prof - 1971
Waite, Gary K., BTh (Ont. Bible Col), BA, MA, PhD (Wat), Prof - 1987
Wiggers, Richard D., BA (Car.), MA (Ott.), PhD (Georgetown), Adjunct Prof. - 2002
Interdisciplinary Studies
Rathwell, Tom, Adjunct Prof - 2002
Law in Society Program
L. Neilson (Sociology), W. Kerr (Classics and Ancient History), K. Culver (Philosophy)
Director , D. Bedford (Pol. Science), C. Poulin (Psychology), R. Sigurdson (Political
Science), L. Wisniewski (Sociology), D. Duplessis (Administration).
Linguistics Program
P. Villiard (French), W. Cichocki (French)- Director, A. Klinck (English),
R. Leavitt (Education), V. Hill (UNBSJ).
Department of Philosophy
Ahern, Daniel, BA (St Thomas(NB)), MA (UNB), PhD (McM), Assoc. Prof - 1999
Culver, Keith, BA (Vic.B.C.), MA (McM), PhD (Guelph-McM), Assoc Prof (Cross Appt:
Nat. Research Council) - 1997
Cupples, Brian W., BA (Cal State Coll), MA, PhD (UWO), Prof and Chair - 1972
Larmer, Robert A., BA (Car), MA, PhD (Ott), Prof - 1986
Neill, Warren, BA (Car.), MA (McG.), PhD (Georgia), Asst Prof - 2000
Rahmanian, Ahmad, Asst. Prof. - 2002
Department of Political Science
Allen, J. Garfield, BA (Alta), Assoc. Prof. - 1969
Bedford, David W., CEGEP Dip (Sir G Wms), BA (C'dia), MA, PhD (York), Prof. - 1989
Howe, Paul, BA (Tor), MSc (London School of Economics & Pol. Sc.), PhD (UBC), Asst.
Prof. - 2001
Murray, Karen, BA (Tor), MA (Tor), PhD (UBC), Asst. Prof. - 2001
Rezun, Miron, BA (York), MA (Tor), MA, PhD (Geneva), Prof. (Joint Economics) - 1987
Sigurdson, Richard, BA, MA (Manit), PhD (Tor), Prof. & Chair- 1999
Workman, W. Thom, BA(Car), MA, PhD (York), Prof. - 1994
Department of Psychology
Byers, E. Sandra, BA (Roch), MA, PhD (W Virginia), Prof & Chair - 1978
Clark, David A., BSc (Houghton Col NY), MA (New Sch for Soc Res), MPhil, PhD
(Lond), Prof - 1988
D'Entremont, Barbara, BSc, MSc (Dal), PhD (Qu), Assoc. Prof - 2000
Donaldson, A. Wayne, BSc, MA (Alta), PhD (Tor), Prof and Assoc Dean - 1971
Fields, Donald L., BA (Alta), MEd (Calg), PhD (York), Prof - 1974
Griew, Stephen, Adjunct Prof. - 2002
Hiew, Chok Choong, BA, MA, PhD (Colorado), Prof - 1974
LaChapelle, Diane, BSC (McM), MA, PhD (Regina) - Asst Prof - 2002
Piercey, Darren, H.B.Sc (Toronto), PhD (Alberta), Asst Prof - 2001
Poulin, Carmen, BA (UNB), MA, PhD (Qu), Prof - 1991
Robinson, Gilbert B., BSc (Dal), PhD (McM), Prof - 1987
Sears, Heather, BSc (Acad.), MA, PhD (Victoria), Assoc Prof - 1995
Spinner, Barry, BA (Wat), MA, PhD (Manit), Prof - 1981
Stoppard, Janet M., BSc (Exeter), MSc (Qu-Belf), PhD (Qu-Kingston), Prof - 1979
Szeligo, Frank, BS (Akron), MS, PhD (Pitts), Assoc Prof - 1975
Voyer, Daniel, BSc, MSc (Montr.), PhD (Wat.), Prof - 2000
Russian Studies Program
A. Reid (German & Russian) Director, M. Rezun (Econ), T. Rhinelander (St Thomas).
Department of Sociology
Ameh, Robert, BA (Ghana), BA (Oslo), MPhil (Oslo), MA (S.Fraser), PhD (S.Fraser), Asst
Prof - 2001
Bowden, Gary, BA (W. Wash), MA, PhD (Calg), Assoc Prof - 1990
Harrison, Deborah, BA (Qu), MA, PhD (York), Prof - 1995
Hornosty, Jennie M., BA (Cal Berkeley), MA (Dal), PhD (York), Prof - 1980
Kufeldt, Kathleen, BSW, MSW, PhD (Calgary), Adjunct Prof - 1997
Lautard, Hugh, BA, MA (UNB), PhD (UBC), Prof - 1975
Low, Jacqueline, BA, MA (Conc.), PhD (McM.), Asst Prof - 2001
Macdonell, Allan, BA (StFX), PhD (Boston Coll), Prof - 1971
Miedema, Baukje, BA, MA, PhD (UNB), Adjunct Prof - 1996
Nason-Clark, Nancy BSc (Houghton Col. NY), MA (Wat), PhD (Lond), Prof - 1984
Neilson, Linda, BA, LL.B (UNB), PhD (Lond), Assoc Prof - 1993
Rehorick, David A., BA, MA, PhD (Alta), Prof (Cross Appt- Renaissance College) - 1974
Richardson, C. James, BComm (Alta), MA (Tor), PhD (Lond), Prof - 1975
Rideout, Vanda, BA (Qu), MA, PhD (Car), Assoc. Prof - 1998
van den Hoonaard, Will C., BA (UNB), MA (Nfld), PhD (Manc), Prof - 1979
Wisniewski, Lawrence J., BA (St John's), MA (N Dakota), PhD (McM), Assoc Prof &
Chair - 1974
Women's Studies Program
D. Bedford (Political Science), A. Brown (French), B. Lemire (History), J. Hornosty
(Sociology), J. Murray (Classics and Ancient History), N. Nason-Clark (Sociology),
C. Poulin (Psychology),A/Coordinator, W. Robbins (English), J. Stoppard (Psychology),
G. Thompson (History), M. Wiber (Anthropology), Thom Workman (Political Science),
J. Richardson (Sociology).
PEOPLE AT UNB
17
FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE
Aubanel, Eric, BSc (Trent), PhD (Qu.), Asst Prof - 2002
Bhavsar, Virendrakumar C., BEng (Poona), MTech, PhD (IIT/B), Prof & Dean (effective
July 1/03) - 1983
Boley, Harold, MSc, PhD (Hamburg), Adjunct Prof. - 2002
Bremner, David, BSc (Calg), MSc (S.Fraser), PhD (McG.), Asst Prof - 1999
Cooper, Rodney H., BMath, MMath (Wat), Prof (Cross Appt-Chemistry)- 1975
DeDourek, John M., BS, MS (Case), Prof - 1970
Deslongchamps, Ghislain, BSc (Sher), PhD (UNB), Assoc Prof (Cross Appt-Chem) - 1992
Du, Weichang, Bsc (Beijing), MSc, PhD (UVic), Prof - 1991
Dueck, Gerhard, BSc, MSc, PhD (Manit), Prof - 1999
Evans, Patricia, BscCS(Alta), MscCS, PhD (UVic), Asst Prof - 1997
Fleming, Michael, BSc (Mt.All.), MMath, PhD (Wat.), Asst Prof - 2003
Fritz, Jane M., BSc (McG.), MScCS (UNB) DPhil (York, Britain), Prof - 1982
Ghorbani, Ali Akbar, BS (Tehran), MS (GWU), PhD (UNB), Prof - 1999
Goldfarb, Lev, Dipl Math & CS (USSR), PhD (Wat), Assoc Prof - 1982
Horton, Joseph D., BSc (Manit), MA (York), PhD (Wat), Prof - 1981
Hyslop, William F., BScE, MSc(CS) (UNB), PhD (Tor), Sr.Teaching Assoc - 1991
Iturriaga, Claudia, BMat (Nat. Univ. of Mexico), MScCS (Ott), PhD (Wat),
Adjunct Prof - 1999
Jacobs, Cheryl, BSc (CS), MSC (CS) (UNB), Sr. Instructor - 2002
Kent, Kenneth, BSc (MUN), MSc, PhD (UVic), Asst Prof - 2002
Kurz, Bernd J., Dipl Ing (Stuttgart), MScE, PhD (UNB), Prof -1979
Lopez-Ortiz, Alejandro, BMath (Natl Univ Mexico), MMath, PhD (Wat),
Adjunct Prof - 1998
Lumsden, Joanna, BSc (Software Engineering), PhD (Glas), Adjunct Prof. - 2002
MacIsaac, Dawn, BPE (McM.), BEd (Qu.), BEng (McM.), MScE (UNB), PhD candidate
(UNB), Asst Prof (Joint Electrical and Computer Engeering) - 2002
Macneil, David G., BEng, MEng (NSTC), Prof - 1971
McAllister, Andrew, BA, MSc(CS)( UNB), PhD (Sask), Assoc Prof - 1994
McAnany, Debbie, BSc (McG.), Sr. Inst - 1998
Nickerson, Bradford G., BScE, MScE (UNB), PhD (Rensselaer Polyt Inst), PEng,
Prof - 1986
Pochec, Przemyslaw, BEng (Warsaw), MSc(CS), PhD (UNB), Assoc Prof - 1989
Rauch, Steven W., BSc (Rensselaer Polyt Inst), PhD (Maryland), Assoc Prof - 1970
Spencer, Bruce, BSc (Dal), MMath, PhD (Wat), Adjunct Prof. - 1990
Stockie, John, BMath (Wat), PhD (UBC), Asst Prof (Cross Appt - Math & Stats)- 2001
Ward, Kirby, BSc (UPEI), MScCS (UNB), Research Assoc - 2000
Ware, Colin, BSc (Durham), MA (Dal), MMath CS (Wat), PhD (Tor),
Adjunct Prof - 1985
Webber, Natalie, BSC, MCS (UNB), Sr. Instructor - 2001
Wightman, Richard, BScF, MScF (UNB), Sr Instr - 2001
Zhang, Huajie, BSc (China), MSc (China), PhD (UWO), Asst Prof - 2002
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Allen, Paul H., BBA, BBE (StFX), MEd (Maine), Assoc Prof - 1985
Belczewski, Andrea, Lecturer - 2002
Berry, Kathleen, BA (York), MEd, DPhil (Alta), Prof - 1991
Bezeau, Lawrence, BSc, MEd (Alta), MA, PhD (Stan), Prof - 1982
Blatherwick, Mary, BA(Ed), BFA (NSCAD), MA (UBC), PhD (Roehampton),
Asst. Prof. 2000
Burge, Elizabeth, ALAA (Lib. Assoc. of Australia), BA (Adel), Grad Dip Ed Tech
(U of South Aust), MEd, EdD (Tor), Prof - 1993
Carusetta, Ellen, BA (McM), MEd (Brock), PhD (Tor), Assoc Prof - 1993
Cashion, Marie, BSc, BA (MTSTV), MEd (UNB), Prof - 1982
Clarke, Gerald M., BA (Kenyon), MAT (Fordham), DA (Carnegie-Mellon),
Prof (Cross Appt- Renaissance College) - 1975
Conrad, Diane, BA, Hon. BA, Dip. Bus. Admin. (Lakehead), MEd (Alberta), PhD Candidate, Asst. Prof. - 2002
Cooper, Timothy G., BMus, MMus (Tor), DMA (UGA), Prof - 1978
Dicks, Joseph, BA, BEd (Nfld), MEd, PhD (Ott), Prof & Assoc. Dean
(Grad. Studies, Res. & International Dev.) - 1998
Doige, Lynda, BA, BEd, MEd (UNB), PhD (Nottingham), Asst Prof, Micmac-Maliseet
Institute - 2001
Eyre, Linda, Cert. of Ed (Northern Counties College), BA, MAHED (Mt.St.Vin),
PhD(UBC), Prof - 1992
Gill, Barbara Ann, Cert. of Ed (Ripon Col), BEd (Alta), MMus (Oregon), MEd (Regina),
PhD (Sask), Prof - 1992
Goodnough, Karen, BSc, BEd, MEd (Nfld.), PhD (Toronto), Asst Prof - 2001
Grant McLoughlin, John, BM (Wat.), MSc Teaching (Tor), Dphil (Suny),
Assoc. Prof. - 2002
Haley, George T., BA (St.FX), MA (UNB), MScEd (Indiana), Hon Res Prof - 1999
Hughes, Andrew, BA, MA (Dub), BEd, MEd (Acad), PhD (Alta),
Univ. Teaching Prof - 1983
Latchford, Sandra, BA (Guelph), MEd (UNB), Assoc Prof - 1986
Leavitt, Robert, BA, MAT (Harv), Prof and Dir., Micmac-Maliseet - 1981
McFadden Charles F., BSc (UBC), BEd (SMU), MSc (UBC), PhD (UWO),
Adjunct Prof - 2001
McKenna, Mary, BSc (Fd Sci) (McG.), MSc (Nutn)(Cornell), PhD (Nottingham), Assoc
Prof - 1993
18
PEOPLE AT UNB
Morrison, Ruth, BMus, DPhil (McG.), MEd (UNB.), Assoc. Prof. - 2002
Morrison, William, BEd, MEd, (UNB.), PhD (Alberta), Asst. Prof. - 2002
Myers, Sharon, Bed, BA (UPEI), MEd (Ott), MEd, EdD (Harvard), Prof - 1996
Nason, Pamela N., MA (Stan), Cert of Ed (Birm), Prof - 1974
Ott, Helmut Walter, BA, MA, PhD (Tor), Prof - 1976
Paul, Lissa, BA (Tor), MA, PhD (York), Prof - 1987
Pazienza, Jennifer, BA (Wm Patterson), MEd, PhD (Penn), Prof
(Cross Appt-Renaissance College) - 1989
Plaice, Evelyn, BA (Oxf.), MA (Nfld), PhD (Manc), Assoc Prof (Jt Anthropology) - 1999
Radford, Keith, BPE, BEd (Manit), MA (Birm), PhD (Oregon), Prof and Assoc Dean
(Undergraduate Programs) - 1987
Randall, Lynn, BPE (Brock), BEd, MEd (UNB), Asst Prof - 2000
Rehorick, Sally, BA, MA (Alta), DA (Grenoble), CAS (Harv), Prof - 1987
Rose, Ellen, BA, BEd (Victoria), MEd, DPhil (UNB), Asst Prof (Joint Arts) - 2001
Sears, Alan, BEd, MEd (UNB), PhD (UBC), Prof - 1988
Sloat, Elizabeth, BEd (UNB), MEd, PhD (McG.), Assoc. Prof - 1999
Small, Marian S., BA (Adelphi), MA, EdD (UBC), Prof and Dean - 1973
Soucy, Donald A., BA, MA (NSCAD), PhD (UBC), Prof - 1984
Stewart, John, BA, BEd (Acad), MEd (UNB), EdD (OISE), Prof - 1990
Stirling, Mary Lou S., BA (UNB), MEd (Tor), EdD (Penn), Hon Res Prof - 1999
Sullenger, Karen, BSc (Towson), MSc (Morgan), MNRM (Duke), DPhil (Georgia),
Prof - 1990
Varma-Joshi, Manju, BA (St Thomas(NB)), MA (Dal), BEd (St Thomas (NB)), MA
(Moncton), PhD (OISE/UT), Asst Prof - 2002
Whiteford, Gary, BA (Tor), MA (Clark), PhD (Okla), Prof - 1974
Whitty, Pam A. M., BA (McM), BEd, MEd (UNB), EdD (Maine), Prof - 1991
Willms, Jon Douglas, BEng (Royal Military College and Kingston), MA (UBC), MSc,
PhD (Stanford), Prof - 1995
Winslow, Katherine M., BSc (St FX), MS (N. Dakota), PhD (Minn), Assoc Prof- 1987
FACULTY OF ENGINEERING
Department of Chemical Engineering
Bendrich, Guida, Dipl. Ing. (T.F.H. Berlin), PhD (McM), PEng, Prof - 1995
Chaplin, Robin A., BSc, MSc (Cape T), MSc, DIC (Lond), PhD (Qu), PEng, Prof, NBEPC
Chair, Power Plant Eng.- 1986
Collins, Frank, BScE (UNB), PEng, Sr. Instructor - 2002
Couturier, Michel F., BSc (UNB), MSc (MIT), PhD (Qu), PEng, Prof and
Assoc Dean- 1983
Eic, Mladen, Dipl. Ing. (Sarajevo), MSc (Zagreb), MSc (Worcester Poly. Inst), PhD (UNB),
PEng, Prof - 1990
Li, Kecheng, BEng, MASc (Northwest Inst. of Light Industry), PhD (Tor),
Asst. Prof. - 2002
Lister, Derek, BScTech, MScTech (Manchester), PhD (Leicester), PEng, Prof and Chair in
Nuclear Engineering, Dept Chair - 1992
Lowry, Brian, BASc, MASc (Tor), PhD (Cornell), Assoc Prof - 1995
Ni, Yonghao, BEng (Northwest Inst of Light Industry), MEng, PhD (McG.),
Prof and Canada Research Chair in Pulping Technology - 1993
Ring, Zbigniew, MEng (Warsaw), MASc, PhD (Tor.), PEng, Adjunct Prof. - 2002
Sain, Mohini, BSc (Calc.), MSc (Indian Inst of Tech), PhD (Tech Univ of Czech),
Adjunct Prof - 2001
Sarria, Bienvenido, Adjunct Prof. - 2002
Singh, Kripa, BE (Birla Inst), ME (Asian Inst), PhD (Regina), PEng, Asst Prof
(Joint - Civil Eng.) - 2000
Whidden, Thomas, BSc (Mt.All.), PhD (UNB), Sr. Research Assoc. - 2002
Xiao, Huining, BEng, MEng (Nanjing), PhD (McM.), Assoc Prof - 2001
Zhang, Zisheng (Jason), BESc (Hebei), MSc (Sask.), PhD (Wat.), PEng, Asst Prof - 2001
Zheng, Ying, BESc, MESc (Northwest), PhD (UWO), Asst Prof - 1999
Department of Civil Engineering
Bischoff, Peter H., BASc (UBC), MEng (McG.), PhD, DIC (Imperial Col, Univ. of London), PEng, Assoc Prof - 1992
Bisson, Barry G., BScE, MScE (UNB), MBA (Harv), PEng, Prof and J. Herbert Smith/
ACOA Chr in Tech. Mgmt. & Entrepreneurship - 1982
Bremner, Theodore W., BScE (UNB), MSc, DIC, PhD (Lond),FCSCE, FACI, PEng, Hon
Res Prof - 1969
Christian, John, BEng (Sheff), PhD (Brad), FICE, FCSCE, PEng, CEng, Prof and M.
Patrick Gillin Chair in Construction Engineering - 1987
Cooke, A. Brian, BSc (Dal), Dipl Eng (SMU), BEng (Tuns), PhD (Qu.), Assoc Prof - 1997
Dawe, John L., BSc (Nfld), BEng (NSTC), MSc, PhD (Alta), PEng, Prof - 1971
Gordon, Martin J., BScE, MScE (UNB), PEng, Asst Prof - 2001
Haralampides, Katy, BA, BSc (Qu), MScEng (Windsor), DPhil in Eng (New Orleans,), Asst
Prof - 2000
Hildebrand, Eldo, BASc, PhD (Wat), PEng, Assoc Prof and Asst Dean- 1987
Hildebrand, Eric D., BScE, MScE (UNB), PhD (Wat), PEng, Assoc Prof - 1993
Innes, J. David, BScE, MEng (UNB), PEng, Prof (seconded) - 1976
Ircha, Michael C., BSc, MPI, MPA (Qu.), NDC (Nat'l Defence College), PhD (Cardiff Wales), PEng, Prof and Assoc V.P. (Academic/Students) - 1979
Kondratova, Irina, BScEE (Kiev State), PhD (UNB), PEng, Adjunct Prof. - 2002
MacQuarrie, Kerry, BScE (UNB), Msc, PhD (Wat), PEng, Assoc Prof - 1990
Mrawira, Donath M, BScE (Dar-es-Salaam), PhD (Wat), PEng, Asst Prof and D.C. Campbell Chair in Highway Construction and Pavement - 1998
Rankin, Jeff, BScE, MScE (UNB), PhD (UBC), PEng, Adjunct Prof - 1999
Schriver, Allison, B., BScE, MScE (UNB), PhD (McM), PEng, Assoc Prof - 1986
Singh, Kripa, BE (Birla Inst), ME (Asian Inst), PhD (Regina), PEng, Asst Prof
(Joint - Chemical Eng.) - 2000
Thomas, Michael D.A., BSc, PGCE (Nottingham), PhD (Aston), PEng, Prof - 2002
Valsangkar, Arun J., BE (Marathwada), ME, PhD (IIS Bangalore), FEIC, PEng, Prof - 1981
Waugh, Lloyd, BScE (UNB), MS, Engr, PhD (Stan), FCSCE, PEng, Prof and Chair- 1984
Wilson, Bruce, BASc, MASc (Tor.), PhD (McM), PEng, Asst Prof - 2001
Wilson, Frank R., BScE, MScE (UNB), PhD (Birm), FCAE, FCSCE, PEng,
Hon Res Prof - 1967
Yevdokimov, Yuri, BSc (Sumy), MA (Academy of Sciences), MSc (Ill), PhD (Manit),
Asst Prof (Joint Economics) - 1999
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Briggs, William, BSc (Mt. A), MScE (UNB), PEng, Sr Instructor - 2001
Brown, Anthony, BSc (UNB), PhD(UNB), Research Assoc. - 2001
Chang, Liuchen, BSc (N.Jiatong), MSc (China Acad of Railway Sciences), PhD (Qu.),
P.Eng., NSERC Chair in Environmental Design Engineering, Prof - 1992
Colpitts, Bruce, BScE, MScE, PhD (UNB), PEng, Prof - 1988
Diduch, Christopher Peter, BScE, MScE, PhD (UNB), PEng, Prof - 1981
Doraiswami, Rajamani, BEE (VJI, Bombay), MEE (IIS, Bangalore), PhD (Johns H),
PEng, Prof - 1981
Englehart, Kevin, BScE, MScE, PhD (UNB), PEng, Assoc. Prof and Assoc Dir Inst of Biomedical Eng -1998
Hill, Eugene F., BScE, MScE (UNB), PhD (NC State), PEng, Prof - 1966
Hudgins, Bernard, BScE, MScE, PhD (UNB), PEng, Prof. and Director Inst. of
Bio. Eng. - 2001
Kaye, Mary E., BScE (UNB), MEng (Car), PEng, Assoc Prof - 1979
Lewis, J. Eugene, BScE (UNB), PhD (UBC), PEng., Director CADMI Microelectronics,
Prof and Chair - 1969
Lovely, Dennis, BSc (Southampton), PhD (Strathclyde), PEng, Prof - 1982
Luke, David McG.., BScEng, MScEng (Natal), Prof - 1969
MacIsaac, Dawn, BPE (McM.), BEd (Qu.), BEng (McM.), MScE (UNB), PhD candidate
(UNB), Asst Prof (Joint Computer Science) - 2001
Meng, Julian, BSc (UNB), MSc, PhD (Qu.), Assoc. Prof. - 2002
Narraway, John J., MSc, PhD (Cran IT), PEng, Hon Res Prof - 1996
Parker, Philip A., BScE, PhD (UNB), MSc (St And), PEng, Prof - 1976
Petersen, Brent R., BEng (Car), MASc (Wat), PhD (Car), Assoc Prof - 1997
Scott, Robert, BSc (UNB), DSc (Acad.), PEng, Professor Emeritus
Sharaf, Adel M.M., BSc (Cairo), MSc, PhD (Manit), PEng, Prof - 1981
Stevenson, Maryhelen, BEE (Gatech), MSEE, PhD (Stan), PEng, Prof - 1990
Taylor, James Hugh, BSEE, MSEE (Rochester), PhD (Yale), PEng, Prof - 1994
Tervo, Richard, BSc, MSc (McM), PhD (Laval), PEng, Prof - 1986
Veach, Ian, BA, BScE, MScE (UNB), Sr Instructor - 1985
Department of Geodesy and Geomatics Engineering
Bedard, Yvan, BSc, MSc (Laval), PhD (Maine at Orono), Adjunct Prof - 1999
Coleman, David, BScE, MScE (UNB), PhD (Tasmania), PEng, Prof and Dean
(Engineering) - 1993
Dare, Peter, BSc (East London), MASc (Erindale College), PhD (East London),
Assoc Prof & Chair - 2000
Featherstone, William, BSc (Newcastle-Upon-Tyne), D Phil (Oxf.), Adjunct Prof - 2000
Hughes Clarke, John E., BA (Oxf), MSc (S'ton), PhD (Dal), Assoc Prof andChair in Ocean
Mapping- 1991
Kim, Donghyun, BS, MS, PhD (Seoul National), Research Assoc. - 2002
Langley, Richard B., BSc (Wat), PhD (York), Prof - 1981
Lee, Yuk-Cheung, BSc (S.Fraser), MSc, PhD (UNB), PEng, Prof - 1986
Mayer, Larry, BSc (Rhode Island), PhD (Scripps), Adjunct Prof - 2001
McLaughlin, John D., BScE, MScE (UNB), PhD (Wis), PEng, Prof and President - 1972
Nichols, Susan, BSc (Acad.), MEng, PhD (UNB), PEng, Prof - 1992
Pagiatakis, Spiros, Dipl. Ing. (Nat'l Tech Univ of Athens), MScE, PhD (UNB), PEng,
Adjunct Prof - 2000
Santos, Marcelo, BSc (Rio de Janeiro), MSc (National Observatory), PhD (UNB),
Assoc Prof - 2000
Secord, James M., BScE, MScE, PhD (UNB), PEng, Sr Teaching Assoc - 1986
Szostak-Chrzanowski, Anna, MSc (Warsaw), MEng (UNB), PhD (Krakow), PEng,
Sr. Research Assoc. - 2000
Woolnough, David, BSc (Glasgow), MScE, PhD (UNB), Adjunct Prof - 2000
Zhang, Yun, BSc (Wuhan), MSc (East China), PhD (Free University Berlin),
Asst Prof - 2000
Zwart, Peter, BSc (Delft), MScE (UNB), PhD (Tasmania), Adjunct Prof - 2000
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Biden, Edmund N., BScE (UNB), DPhil (Oxf), Prof and Assoc Dean of Gradute
Studies - 1987
Bonham, David J., BSc (Qu), MEng, PhD (McM), PEng, Prof - 1974
Carretero, Juan A., BEng (UNAM), MASc, PhD (Victoria), Asst Prof - 2002
Davies, Huw G., BSc, PhD (Imperial), PEng., Prof. Emeritus and Hon Res Prof - 1975
Dubay, Rickey, BSc Mech, MSc Mech (UWI), PhD (DalTech), PEng, Assoc Prof - 1998
Gerber, Andrew, BScE, PhD (UNB), BA (Ambassador), PEng, Assoc. Prof - 2000
Hassan, Marwan, BSc (Helwan), MSc (Tuskegee), PhD (McM.), Asst Prof - 2001
Holloway, Gordon, BSc (UNB), MASc, PhD (Ott), PEng, Prof - 1989
Holt, Richard T., B.Met. (Sheffield), MSc (Lond.), PhD (BC), PEng, Adjunct Prof. - 1997
Hussein, Esam M.A., BSc, MSc (Alexandria), PhD (McM), PEng, Prof and Chair - 1984
Johnston, Andrew, BSc (UNB), PhD (UBC), PEng, Adjunct Prof - 2001
Kishawy, Hossam, BSc (Helwan), MSc (Tuskegee), PhD (McM), PEng, Asst Prof - 2000
Lyon, Donald E., BS, MS, PhD (Purdue), PEng, Prof (Exec. Dir of Enterprise UNB) - 1991
Reddy, Bale Viswanadha, B.Tech (Nagarjuna), M.Tech, PhD (ITT), Assoc Prof - 2002
Rogers, Robert J., BSc (Calgary), MASc, PhD (Wat), PEng, Prof - 1977
Sousa, Antonio C.M., ME (Lco Marques), MSc, PhD (Manc), Prof - 1980
Sullivan, Pearl L., BEng, MASc (TUNS), PhD (UBC), PEng, CEng, Prof - 1994
Venart, James E.S., BASc (Tor), PhD (Glas), PEng, Prof Emeritus, Hon Res Prof - 1973
Waller, Edward, BSc, MScE (UNB), PhD (Rensselaer), PEng, Adjunct Prof
(Jt Phys) - 1998
FACULTY OF FORESTRY AND ENVIRONMENTAL
MANAGEMENT
Afzal, Muhammad, BScEng (UAF, Pak), MEng (AIT, BKK), PhD (Ehime),
Asst Prof - 2000
Arp, Paul A., BSc (Car), PhD (McG.), Prof - 1978
Beckley, Thomas, AB (Boudoin), MS, PhD (Wisconsin-Madison), Assoc Prof - 2000
Bhatti, Jagtar, Adjunct Prof. - 2002
Boer, Arnold, BSc (Agr), MSc (Guelph), PhD (UNB), Adjunct Prof 1989
Bourque, Charles, BSc (Dal), BSc (Alta), MScF, PhD (UNB), Assoc Prof - 1994
Chui, Ying Hei, BSc (S'ton), PhD (Brighton Poly), PEng, Prof and Dir, WSTC - 1993
Clair, Tom, BSc (Mt.All.), MSc (Ott.), PhD (McM), Adjunct Prof - 2000
Cooper, Paul, BSc, BEd, PhD (Tor), MSc (Oregon), Adjunct Prof - 1998
Cox, Roger, BSc (London), PhD (Liverpool), Adjunct Prof - 1999
Cunjak, Richard, BSc (Geulph), MSc (Nfld), PhD (Wat), Prof, Meighen-Molson Prof.
in Atlantic Salmon Res. and Can. Res. Chair in River Ecosystem Science
(Joint Biology) - 1997
Curry, Allen, BES (Wat), MSc (Trent), PhD (Guelph), Asst Prof , Recreational Fisheries,
(Joint Biology) - 1997
Daugharty, David A., BScF, MScF (UNB), Sr Teaching Assoc and Asst Dean - 1972
Davies, Jessie, BA (Cornell), MPhil (Camb.), Dir., Environment & Sustainable Dev.
Research Centre - 1994
Diamond, Antony W., BA (Cantab), MSc, PhD (Aberd.), Prof and Sr Chair/Dir Atlantic
Coop Wildlife Ecology Res Network (Joint Biology) - 1994
Dalton, Shawn, Research Assoc. Environment & Sustainable Dev. Research Centre - 2002
Erdle, Thom, BScF (UNB), MF (UBC), PhD (UNB), Prof - 1995
Eveleigh, Eldon, BSc, MSc (Nfld.), PhD (Tor.), Adjunct Prof - 1992
Forbes, Graham, BA(York), MA, PhD (Wat), Assoc Prof , Sir James Dunn Wildlife
Research Centre (Joint Science) - 1994
Jaeger, Dirk, MSc, PhD (Goettingen), Assoc Prof - 2002
Jordan, Glenwood A., BScF, MScF (UNB), Prof - 1974
Keppie, Daniel M., BS (Wis), MS (Ore), PhD (Alta), Prof (Joint Biol) - 1974
Kershaw, John A., BS, MS (Purdue), PhD (Wash), Prof - 1991
Krasowski, Marek, BSc (Academy of Agricultural Sciences), MSc, PhD (Vic),
Assoc Prof - 1999
Krause, Helmut H., Diplom-Forstwirt (Freib), PhD (Wis), Hon Res Prof - 1999
Lantz, Van, BA (Car.), MA (Dal), PhD (S.Fraser), Asst Prof (Joint Economics) - 2000
Leblon, Brigitte, Dip Agricultural Eng (Universite Catholique de Louvain), PhD (Ecole
Nationale Superieure d'Agronomie), Assoc Prof - 1994
Li, Xiu-Qing, BSc (Shandong Argiculture), MSc, PhD (Paris), Adjunct Prof - 1998
Loo, Judy, BSc (UNB), MS, PhD (Oklahoma State), Adjunct Prof - 1994
MacLean, David, BSc, PhD (UNB), Prof and Dean - 1999
Meng, Chao-Ho, Bsc (Taiwan), MscF (UNB), PhD (Mich State), Hon Res Prof - 1999
Meng, Fan-Rui, BS, MS (Northeast Forestry Univ.), PhD (UNB), Assoc Prof and Dir, Ctr
for Watershed Mgmt & Conversation Research - 1995
Methven, Ian, BScF (UNB), PhD (Duke), Prof. & Dean Emeritus - 1999
Naderi, Nader, BSc, MSc (Tehran), PhD (laval), Adjunct Prof - 2000
Needham, Ted, BScF, MScF, PhD (VPI & SU), Prof - 1987
Ostaff, Donald, BSc (Lakehead), MSc, PhD (UNB), Adjunct Prof - 2001
Park, Yill Sung, Bsc (Seoul Nat. Univ)MSc, PhD (Penn State), Adjunct Prof - 1994
Percy, Kevin, BScF, MSc (UNB), PhD (Bristol), Adjunct Prof - 2000
Powell, Graham R., BSc (Edin), MSc (UNB), PhD (Edin), Professor Emeritus - 1996
Quiring, Daniel T.W., BSc (S.Fraser), PhD (Laval), Prof - 1986
Richards, Evelyn, BA, MA, MBA (UNB), DPhil (Dal Tech), Asst Prof - 1999
Rickards, E. Jeremy P.S., Dip Eng (Lond), Dip Man (McG.), PEng, Hon Res Prof- 1998
Robak, Edward W., BScFE (UNB), MBA (Maine), PEng, Prof - 1979
Roberts, Mark R., BS, MS (Montana), PhD (Duke), Prof - 1983
Savidge, Rodney A., BScF, MScF (Tor), PhD (Wales), Prof - 1985
Schneider, Marc H., BS, MS, PhD (SUNY Syr), Prof - 1967
Sergeant, Brian, BScF (UNB), Sr Teaching Assoc - 1986
Smith, Ian, BScCE (Sunderland Poly), MSc (Durh), PhD (Poly S Bank), PEng, Prof - 1986
Sweeney, Jonathan D, BSc (S.Fraser), PhD (UNB), Adjunct Prof - 1999
Turgeon, Jean, BSc, PhD (Laval), Adjunct Prof - 1992
Whitney, Norman, BSc (Alta), MSc (UWO), PhD (Tor), Adjunct Prof - 1994
Zundel, Pierre, BScF, MScF (Tor), PhD (Laval), Prof and Univ Teach Prof (Cross ApptRenaissance College) - 1991
PEOPLE AT UNB
19
FACULTY OF KINESIOLOGY
Albert, Wayne, BSc (Ott), MA (UWO), PhD (Qu), Asst Prof. - 1999
Barclay, Katherine, BSc (UNB), MSc (Wat.), PhD (Guelph), Instr - 2001
Belcastro, Angelo, BA, BPE (McM), MSc (Dal), PhD (Alta), Prof. - 2003
Burkard, Jeffrey, BA (State Univ. College, Brockport), MPE (UNB), Sr. Teaching
Assoc. - 2002
Chester, Victoria, BScHK (Guelph), MA (Laur), PhD Candidate (UNB), Lecturer - 2002
Cleave, Shirley, BA, MA (UWO), PhD (Ill), Assoc Prof. - 1979
Haggerty, Terry, BA, BPHE (Qu), Dip Educ, MA, (UWO), PhD (SUNYBuffalo), Prof & Dean Renaissance College - 1991
McGarry, Timothy, BSc (Liv), MSc (Brad), MPE, PhD (UBC) Asst Prof. - 2000
Neary, J. Patrick, BEd, MA (Vic), PhD (Alta), Assoc Prof. - 2002
Potvin, Diane, BPE, BEd, MPE (Ott), Assoc. Prof. & Asst. Dean - 1976
Reid, Ian, BPE (Manit), MPE (UBC), PhD (Texas A & M), Assoc Prof. - 1987
Scott, David, BA, PGCE (Ulster), MA, MA, PhD (Vic B.C.), Assoc Prof. - 1997
Sexsmith, James R., BSc (Leth), MSc, PhD (Alta), Prof - 1984
Shannon, Charlene, BBA, B of Recr Mgmt (Acad.), MA, PhD (Wat), Asst. Prof. - 2002
Sleivert, Gordon, BSc, MA, PhD (Vic), Prof. - 2000
Stacey, Cynthia, BSc (Acad.), MSc (Guelph), PhD (Ott), Assoc Prof. - 1995
Stevenson, Christopher L., BSc (Lond), MA (UBC and Stan), MPE (UBC), PhD (Stan),
Prof. and Dean - 1974
Tymowski, Gabriela, BA, BEd, MA (UWO), Asst. Prof. - 1999
Wright, Phillip H., BA (Acad.), BPE (McM), MSc, DEd (Tenn), Assoc Prof - 1974
FACULTY OF LAW
Bell, David G., BA, MA (Qu), LLB (UNB), LLM (Harv), Prof - 1985
Bird, Richard W., QC, BBA, BCL (UNB), LLM (Col), Prof - 1968
Bladon, Geoffrey, BA (Manit), LLB (Qu), Prof - 1987
Dore, Karl, QC, BBA, BCL (UNB), LLM (Yale), Prof - 1984
Fleming, Donald J., BA (Mt.All.), LLB (UNB), LLB (Cantab), Prof - 1977
Gochnauer, Myron, BA (Roch), MA, PhD (UWO), LLB (Tor.), LLM (Osgoode),
Assoc Prof - 1980
Kuttner, Thomas S., BA, MA, LLB, LLM (Tor), Prof - 1979
La Forest, Anne, BA (Ott), LLB (UNB), LLM (Cambridge- Emmanuel Col), Prof and
Dean - 1996
Mathen, Carissima, BA (McG.), LLB (Osgoode), LLM (Columbia), Asst. Prof. -2002
McCallum, Margaret, LLB, BA, MA, PhD (Tor), Prof - 1990
McEvoy, John P., BA (St Thomas(NB)), LLB (UNB), LLM (Osgoode), Prof - 1980
Pearlston, Karen, LLB (York), LLM (UBC), DJur candidate (York), Asst Prof - 2001
Penney, Steven, BA, LLB(Alta), LLM (Harvard), Asst Prof - 1998
Plaxton, Michael, BA (Western), LLB, LLM (Alta), SJD (Tor), Candidate, Asst.
Prof. - 2002
Siebrasse, Norman V., BSc, LLB (Qu), LLM (Chicago), University Research Prof - 1993
Townsend, David A., BA (StM), LLB (Dal), LLM (Osgoode), Prof - 1979
Veitch, Edward, MA, LLB (Edin), Prof - 1979
Williamson, John R., BBA, LLB (UNB), LLM (Harv), Prof and Associate Dean - 1974
FACULTY OF NURSING
Amirault, Debra, BN, MN (UNB), Sr. Inst - 1999
Aquino-Russell, Catherine, BScN (Lakehead Univ), MN (Man), PhD (Candidate, Curtin,
Australia), Asst. Prof. - 2002
Barclay, Katherine, BSc (UNB), MSc (Wat.), PhD (Guelph), Inst (Joint Biology and
Kinesiology) - 2001
Connell, Mary, Inst - 2001
Cruttenden, Kathleen, BScN (Tor), MHSc (McM.), PhD (Wat.), Asst Prof - 2001
Didyk, Andy, BA, PhD (UNB) Asst Prof Moncton/Bathurst Campuses
(Joint Biology) - 1999
Dioron Maillet, Nancy, BN (UNB), MN (Dal), Sr Inst - 1991
Doucet-Clark, Celia, BN (UNB), Inst (Bathurst) - 2001
Dykeman, Margaret, BNRN (UNB), MS (ILL), PhD (UIC), Assoc Prof - 1998
Ellingsen, Roberta, BN (UNB), MN (Dal), MSA (Michigan), Inst (Bathurst) - 1995
Getty, Gracie A.M., BN (Manit), MN (Dal), Prof - 1980
Gibson, Cheryl H., BN (UNB), MScN (Tor), PhD (Boston), Prof and Dean - 1979
Haddon, Debra, Instructor - 2001
Haller, Lorraine, BScN (Ott), MScN (UWO), Assoc Prof - 1987
Hodgins, Marilyn, BSN (UWO), MN, PhD (Alta), Asst Prof - 1998
Lewis, Kathryn E., BN, BEd, MEd (UNB), Prof and Asst Dean BN/RN Proram - 1976
MacDonald, Heather, BN (UNB), MScN (Tor), Assoc Prof - 1990
MacIntosh, Judith, BN (Dal), MScN (McG.), Asst. Dean BN/RN Program - 1990
Mallet-Boucher, Monique, BScN, BEd, MEd (M'ton), MN (UNB), Sr Inst, Moncton
Campus- 1995
McDermid, Anne, BSc (Victoria), MSc (McGill), Asst Prof - 2001
20
PEOPLE AT UNB
McKay, Aileen, BN (UNB), BEd (Mt. Allison), MN (UNB), Sr Inst, Moncton-1997
Merritt-Gray, Marilyn, BN (UNB), MSN (Wash), Prof - 1987
Noel, Julia, BA (UNB), MN (Dal), Sr Inst - 1988
Ouellet, Louiselle L., BSN (M'ton), MSN (UBC), Prof - 1986
Pelletier-Hibbert, Maryse, BN (UNB), MN (Dal), Prof - 1985
Robinson, Pamela, BN (UNB), Inst - 1991
Rogers, Ada, BN, MN (UNB), Senior Inst - 1999
Sangster-Gormley, Esther, BSN (N. Florida), MSN (S. Florida), Senior Inst - 2001
Savoie, Daniel, BScN (M'ton), MSc(A) (McGill), Asst. Prof. - 1997
Seaman, Patricia, BN (UNB), MN (Dal), Senior Inst. - 2001
Storr, Gail, BN, MEd (UNB), MN (Dal), Prof - 1982
Tamlyn, Karen, BN (UNB), MN (Dal), CON (c), Prof and Asst Dean - 1987
Trail, Marcia, BN (UNB), BEd (M'ton), MN (UNB), Inst - 1999
Vickers, Martha, BN (UNB), Inst, Bathurst Campus - 1999
Weaver, Kathy, BN (Dal), MN (UNB), Sr. Inst - 1991
Williamson, Joan, BN, BA, MN (UNB), Inst, Bathurst Campus - 1999
Wilson, Kathryn, BN (UNB), MN (Dal), Asst. Prof. & Asst Dean (Humber College) - 1991
Winans, Patricia, BScN, BEd (M'ton), MN (UNB), Senior Inst, Moncton Campus - 1995
Woodside, Reida, BN (McG.), MScN (UWO), Assoc Prof - 1985
Wuest, Judith, BScN (Tor), MN (Dal), PhD (Wayne State), Prof - 1987
RENAISSANCE COLLEGE
Aubanel, Eric, BSc (Trent), PhD (Qu.), Asst Prof (Joint Computer Science)- 2002
Clarke, Gerald M., BA (Kenyon), MAT (Fordham), DA (Carnegie-Mellon), Prof
(Cross Appt- Education) - 1975
Haggerty, Terry, BA, BPHE (Qu), Dip Educ, MA (UWO), PhD (SUNY-Buffalo), Prof
and Dean, Renaissance College - 1991
Pazienza, Jennifer, BA (Wm Patterson), MEd, PhD (Penn State), Prof (Cross ApptEducation) - 1989
Rehorick, David A., BA, MA, PhD (Alta), Prof (Cross Appt Sociology) - 1974
Sharp, Allan R., BSc (McM), MSc, PhD (Wat), Prof and Dean of Science
(Cross Appt-Physics) - 1975
Valk, John, BA (Calvin) MA (St. Michaels) PhD (Toronto) (Cross Appt-Campus Ministry)
Zundel, Pierre, BScF, MScF (Tor), PhD (Laval), Prof and Univ Teach Prof
(Cross Appt- Forestry) - 1991
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Department of Biology
Ballard, Warren B., BSc (New Mexico State Univ.), MSc (Kansas State Univ.), PhD (Univ.
Arizona), Adjunct Prof. - 1998
Barbeau, Myriam, BSc (McG.), PhD (Dal), Assoc Prof - 1999
Barclay, Katherine, BSc (UNB), MSc (Wat.), PhD (Guelph), Instructor (Joint Kinesiology
and Nursing) - 2001
Benfey, Tillmann, BSc (McG.), MSc (Nfld), PhD (UBC), Prof - 1989
Campell, Douglas A., BSc (Acad.), PhD (UWO), Adjunct Prof - 2001
Cashion, Peter J., BSc (Boston Coll), PhD (Tufts), Prof - 1972
Castell, John, Adjunct Prof - 2001
Chardine, John, BSc (Guelph), MSc (Brock), PhD (Durham), Adjunct Prof - 1998
Clark, Denise V., BSc (UBC), PhD (S. Fraser), Assoc Prof - 1994
Coombs, David H., BA (Dartmouth), PhD (UCLA), Prof - 1980
Crowe, David G., BA, PhD (UNB), Sr Teaching Assoc, Dir, Animal Care &
Asst. Dean - 1973
Culp, Joseph, BSc (Oklahoma Univ.), MSc, PhD (Calg.), (Cross Appt. Visiting Res. Prof.) - 2002
Cunjak, Richard, BSc (Guelph), MSc (Nfld), PhD (Wat), - Prof, Canada Research Chair and
Can. Res. Chair in River Ecosystem Science (Joint Forestry) - 1997
Curry, Allen, BES (Wat), MSc (Trent), PhD (Guelph), Assoc Prof, Recreational Fisheries
(Joint Forestry) - 1997
Cwynar, Les C., BSc, MSc, PhD (Tor), Prof - 1988
Diamond, Antony W., BA (Cantab), MSc, PhD (Aberd.), Prof and Sr Chair/Dir. Atlantic
Coop. Wildlife Ecology Res. Network (Joint Forestry)- 1994
Didyk, Andy, BA PhD (UNB), Asst Prof, Moncton/Bathurst Campuses
(Joint Nursing) - 1999
Dilworth, Timothy G., BSc (Ohio State), MSc (UNB), Prof and Chair - 1969
Durnford, Dion, BSc (Dal), PhD (UBC), Assoc Prof - 1997
Fleming, Lesley C., BA (Mt.All.), PhD (UNB), Sr Teaching Assoc - 1980
Forbes, Graham, BA (York), MA, PhD (Wat), Assoc. Prof. (Joint Forestry) - 1997
Gloss, Angelique, BSc (UNB), Sr Teaching Assoc - 1973
Gordon, Karen J., BSc (UNB), Sr Teaching Assoc - 1980
Hamilton, Diana, BSc (McGill), MSc (Western), PhD (Guelph), Research Assoc - 2001
Heard, Stephen, BSc (Wat.), PhD (Pennyslvania), Assoc Prof - 2002
Keppie, Daniel M., BS (Wis), MS (Ore), PhD (Alta), Prof (Joint Forestry) - 1974
Klassen, Gregory, Adjunct Prof. - 2002
Little, Charles, BScF (UNB), MF, PhD (Yale), Adjunct Prof (Joint Biology &
Forestry) - 1989
Lynch, William H.W., BSc, PhD (UBC), Prof - 1975
Maxwell, Denis, BSc, PhD (UWO), Assoc. Prof - 2000
Mayes, Charlene, BSc, MS (S.Fraser), BCIDP (Vancouver Community College),
Sr Inst - 1997
Munnkittrick, Kelly, BSc, MSc (Guelph), PhD (Wat), Adjunct Prof. & Canada Research
Chair in studying the fish populations of the St. John River and the effects of industrial and
urban effluents - 1999
Nedelcu, Aurora, BSc (Romania), PhD (Dal), Asst Prof - 2002
Peake, Stephan, BSc General, BSc Honors (Guelph), MSc (Wat.), PhD (S.Fraser),
Asst. Prof. - 2002
Pelletier, Yvan, BSc, MSc (Laval), PhD (Penn State), Adjunct Prof - 2000
Pohle, Gregory, Adjunct Prof. - 2002
Riding, Richard T., BS (Maine), MS (Wis), PhD (U of Cal, Davis), Prof - 1972
Saunders, Gary W., BSc, MSc (Acad.), PhD (S. Fraser), Prof & Canada Research Chair in
Molecular Systematics & Biodiversity - 1995
Sharp, Lisa, BSc (UBC), MSc (Vic. (BC)), Instructor - 2001
Sivasubramanian, Pakkirisamy, BSc, MSc (Annamalai), MS, PhD (Ill), Prof - 1975
Whoriskey, Fred, BSc (Ariz), PhD (Laval), Adjunct Prof - 1998
Department of Chemistry
Adam, Allan G., BSc, MSc (UWO), PhD (Wat), Prof (Cross Appt - Physics)- 1991
Balcom, Bruce, BSc (Mt.All.), PhD (UWO), Prof (Cross Appt - Physics) - 1993
Banks, Jeffrey, BSc (UPEI), PhD (Ottawa), Assoc. Prof. - 2002
Bottomley, Frank, BSc, MSc (Hull), PhD (Tor), DSc (Hull), FCIC, Hon Res Prof - 1999
Calhoun, Larry, BSc, MSc, PhD (UNB), Sr Research Assoc - 1994
Cooper, Rodney H., BMath, MMath (Wat), Prof (Cross Appt Computer Science)- 1975
Decken, Andreas, Dip (Duisburg), PhD (McM), Research Assoc - 1995
Deslongchamps, Ghislain, BSc (Sher), PhD (UNB), Prof (Cross Appt- C.S.) - 1992
Findlay, John A., BSc, PhD (UNB), FCIC, Hon Res Prof - 1995
Grein, Friedrich, BSc, MSc (Goett), PhD (Fran), FCIC, Hon Res Prof - 1995
Kang, Guojun, BS (Nankai), PhD (McG.), Research Assoc - 1993
Kassimi, El Bakal, BS (Morocco), MS, PhD (Paris), Sr. Inst - 2000
MaGee, David I., BSc, PhD (UNB), Prof and Chair - 1990
Mattar, Saba M., BSc (Alexandria), MSc (Amer U Of Cairo), PhD (McG.), Prof - 1986
Munro, Paul, BSc, BEd, MSc (UNB), Sr Teaching Assoc and Asst Dean - 1990
Neville, John, BSc (UNB), PhD (UBC), Asst Prof - 1999
Ni, Yonghao, BEng (Northwest Inst of Light Industry), MEng, PhD (McG.), Prof and Chair
in Pulping Tech. (Joint Chemical Eng) - 1993
Passmore, Jack, BSc, Dipl Ed (Brist), PhD (UBC), DSc (Brist), FCIC, Prof - 1969
Penner, Peter, BSc, MSc (Manit), PhD (Qu), Sr Teaching Assoc - 1995
Strunz, George, Adjunct Prof - 2001
Thakkar, Ajit, BSc, PhD (Qu), FCIC, University Research Prof - 1984
Tong, James P.K., BSc (McG.), PhD (Car), Sr Teaching Assoc - 1979
Villemure, Gilles, BSc, PhD (Ott), Prof - 1990
Xiang, Yan, BSc (Peking), PhD (UNB), Instructor - 2001
Department of Geology
Al, Tom, BSc, MSc (Nfld.), PhD (Wat), Assoc Prof - 1996
Broster, Bruce, BSc (Wat), PhD (UWO), Prof - 1987
Butler, Karl, BSc (Ou's), MSc, PhD (UBC), Asst Prof - 1999
Donovan, Stephen, BSc (Manchester), PhD, DSc (Liverpool), Adjunct prof - 2000
Gingras, Murray, BSc, PhD (Albt), Asst Prof - 2000
Grieve, Richard, BSc (Aberd.), MSc, PhD (Tor), MA (Brown), Dsc (Aberd.), Adjunct Prof
- 1995
Lentz, David Richard, BSc, MSc (UNB), PhD (Ott), Assoc Prof - 2000
McCutcheon, Steven, Adjunct Prof - 2001
Pickerill, Ronald K., BSc, PhD (Liv), Prof - 1975
Shaw, Cliff, BSc (Goldsmith), MSc, PhD (Western), Asst Prof - 2002
Spray, John G., BSc (Cardiff), PhD (Camb), Prof - 1986
Susak, Nicholas John, BS (Penn State), MA, PhD (Prin), Assoc Prof - 1982
White, Joseph C., BSc, PhD (UWO), Prof and Chair - 1981
Williams, Paul F., BSc (Durh), MSc (NSW), PhD (Syd), Prof - 1980
Department of Physics
Adam, Allan G., BSc, MSc (UWO), PhD (Wat), Prof (Cross Appt - Chemistry)
Balcom, Bruce, BSc (Mt.All.), PhD (UWO), Prof (Cross Appt - Chemistry) & Canada
Research Chair -1993
Benton, J. Bruce, BSc, MSc (UNB), Sr Teaching Assoc - 1983
Ghosh, S.N., BSc (Calc), MSc (Calc & Nfld), PhD (UNB), Sr Teaching Assoc - 1978
Hamza, Abdelhaq, BSc (Algiers), MSc, PhD (MIT), Prof - 1995
Lee, Ker-Ping, BSc (HK), MSc (UBC), PhD (McG.), Sr Teaching Assoc - 1973
Lees, Georgina, BSc (UBC), Sr Teaching Assoc and Asst Dean - 1982
Linton, Colan, BSc, PhD, DIC (Lond), Prof - 1969
Mastikhin, Igor, MSc, PhD (Novosibirsk State), Asst. Prof. - 2002
Newling, Benedict, BA, PhD (Camb.), Asst Prof - 2002
Ross, Stephen, BSc (Tor), MSc, PhD (Car), Prof - 1988
Sharp, Allan R., BSc (McM), MSc, PhD (Wat), Prof (Cross Appt-Renaissance College)
and Dean - 1975
Tokaryk, Dennis, BSc (Sask), MSc (Guelph), PhD (Guelph) - Asst Prof - 2002
VanderLinde, Jacob, BSc, PhD (UBC), Prof and Chair - 1973
Ward, William, BSc (UWO), PhD (York) - Assoc Prof - 2001
Yan, Zong-Chao, BSc (Shanghai Teachers U.), MSc (Tongji), MSc (Nfld), PhD (Windsor),
Assoc Prof - 1999
Zhao, Saibei, BSc, MSc, PhD (UNB) Sr Inst - 2000
LIBRARIANS - Fredericton
Allan, Erma P., BA (UNB), BLS (Tor), Head, Cataloguing, HIL - 1967
Balcolm, Lesley, BA (Mt.All.), MLIS (UWO), HIL - 2001
Belier, Patricia, BA, MA, MLS (Tor), Collections Dev, HIL - 1982
Bragdon, Marc, BA (St Thomas(NB)), MLIS (Dal), HIL - 1999
Burk, Alan C., BA (Hanover), MA, PhD (Brown), MLS (UWO), Assoc Dir, HIL and Dir
Electronic Text Centre - 1982
Charters, Mary, BSc (UNB), BEd (Qu), MLS (UWO), Cataloguing, HIL - 1975
Crocker, C. Anne, BA (UNB), BLS (Tor), Head, Law Lib - 1976
Cull, Barry, BA (Nfld), BA (Dal), MLS (Dal), HIL - 1999
Fisher, Sue, BA (Western), MA (Qu.), MLIS (Alta.), HIL - 2001
Hamilton, Elizabeth C., BA (UNB), MLS (UWO), MA (UNB), Head, Govt Doc, HIL 1978
Holyoke, Francesca, BA (UNB), MLS (Dal), Head, Science and Forestry Lib - 1979
Johnston, Patricia E., BA, BEd (UNB), MLS (McG.), MA (York) - 1980
MacKenzie, James, BMus (Mt.All.), MA (Western), MLS (Dal), HIL - 2002
Moss, Janet, BA (UNB), MLS (UWO), Law Library - 1991
Neilson, John, BA, MA (Acad.), MLS (McG.), Documents, HIL - 1989
Pope, Andrew T., BA (New Sch NY), BEd (UNB), MLS (Tor), HIL - 1974
Rauch, Doris, BA, MSEd (Brooklyn), MLS (Pitt), Head, Engineering Lib - 1978
Renner, Melinda, BA, MSLS (Emory), SLS (Atlanta), Law Library - 1998
Sloan, Stephen, BA (Tor), MLS (UWO), HIL - 1988
Teskey, John, BA (Guelph), MLS (UWO), Dir of Libraries - 1991
Thompson, Jocelyne, BA (C'dia), MLS (McG.), Head, Collections and Public Services 2000
Wells, Leanne, BA (Acad), MA (UBC), MLS (Dal), HIL - 2002
Wheeler, Barbara, BA (Mt.St Vin.), MSL (Dal), Cataloguing, HIL - 1985
ARTISTS-IN-RESIDENCE - Fredericton
Bobak, Bruno, LLD (St Thomas(NB)), DLitt (UNB), Honorary Painter-in-Residence
McKoogan, Ken, BAA (Tor), MFA (UBC), Writer-in-Residence
Allen, Peter, BMus (Mt.All.), MMus (Yale), Musician-in-Residence
Department of Mathematics & Statistics
Barclay, David W., BSc (Car), MMath (Wat), PhD (UWO), Prof - 1975
Chernoff, William W., BA (Sask), MSc (Tor), PhD (UNB), Prof - 1969
Gegenberg, Jack D., BA (Colorado), MSc (UBC), PhD (S.Fraser), Prof - 1985
Husain, Viqar, BSc (Manchester), PhD (Yale), Assoc Prof - 1999
Ingalls, Colin, BSc (Dal), PhD (MIT), Asst Prof - 2000
Jones, Caroline, BA, MSc, BEd (UNB), Inst - 2001
Kucerovsky, Dan, BSc (UWO), Dphil (Oxf.), Assoc Prof - 1999
Ma, Renjun, BS, MSc (Wuhan), PhD (UBC), Asst Prof (Joint CRISP) - 2000
Marchand, Eric, BSc, MSc, PhD (Montr.), Prof - 1999
Mason, Gordon R., BSc (Bishops), MSc, PhD (McG.), Prof - 1969
McKellar, Robert J., BMath, MMath (Wat), PhD (Ariz), Assoc Prof - 1984
Menz, Petra, BEd, MSc (UBC), BSc (Scarborough), Instructor - 2001
Monson, Barry R., BSc (Sask), MSc, PhD (Tor), Prof - 1979
Mureika, Roman A., AB, MA, PhD (CUA), Prof - 1976
Ni Chuiv, Nora, BA, MA (NUI), MS, PhD (Wash), Prof - 1973
Small, R. Donald, BASc (Tor), MS, PhD (Cal Tech), Prof - 1973
Stockie, John, BMath (Wat), PhD (UBC), Asst Prof (Cross Appt-Computer Science) - 2000
Tasic, Vladimir, BSc (Novi Sad, Yugoslavia), PhD (Manit), Assoc Prof - 1995
Thompson, Jon H., BSc (UNB), MA, PhD (Tor), Prof and Chair - 1970
Tingley, Daryl, BSc, MA (Dal), MSc, PhD (Mich State), Prof - 1985
Tingley, Maureen A., BA (Adelaide), MA (Dal), MAT, MSc (Mich Stat), PhD (Dal),
Prof - 1986
Tupper, Brian O.J., BSc, PhD, DSc (Lond), FIMA, Hon Res Prof - 1998
Turner, T. Rolf, BA (Vic.(BC)), MSc (Qu), PhD (Mich), MStat (UNSW), Prof - 1988
Watmough, James, BASc, MSc, PhD (UBC), Assoc Prof - 2000
PEOPLE AT UNB
21
RESEARCH INSTITUTES AND CENTRES
Fredericton
Atlantic Cooperative Wildlife Ecology Research Network
Diamond, Antony BA (Cantab), MSc, PhD (Aberd.), Prof and Senior Chair / Director
Avenor-Noranda Forest Centre for Watershed Conservation & Mgmt
Arp, Paul A., BSC (Car), PhD (McG.), Director
Biomedical Engineering, Institute of
Bush, Greg, BA, Dip O/P (Clin) CP(C), Research Prosthetist
Englehart, Kevin, BScE, MScE, PhD (UNB), Assoc. Prof. and Assoc. Dir.
Hudgins, Bernard S., BScE, MScE (UNB), PEng, Prof. and Director
Kyberd, Peter, BSc (Durh.), MSc, PhD (S’ton), Assoc. Prof., and Canada Research Chair
Paasche, Per E., BSc (Dal), MEng (TUNS), PEng, Project Engineer
Hill, Wendy, BScOT (Dal), Res. Occupational Therapist
Hughes, Glen, BSc (UNB), PEng, Project Engineer
Canadian Centre for Geodetic Engineering
Adam Chrzanowski, Dipl. Eng., MSc, PhD (Krakow), PEng, Director
Canadian Research Institute for Social Policy
Audas, Rick, BBA (UNB), MBA (MA (Dal), PdD (Wales), Asst Prof
Ma, Renjun, BS, MSc (Wuhan), PhD (UBC), Asst Prof (Joint Math) - 2000
Sloat, Elizabeth, BEd, MEd, PhD (McG.), Asst Prof
Willms, Jon Douglas, Beng (RMC), MA (UBC), MSc, PhD (Stanford), Prof and Director &
Can. Research Chair
Canadian Rivers Institute
Cunjak, Richard, BSc (Guelph), MSc (Nfld), PhD (Wat), Director
Munkittrick, Kelly, BSc, MSc (Guelph), PhD (Wat), Assoc Director
CADMI - Microelectronics Centre
Lewis, Eugene, BScE (UNB), PhD (UBC), PEng - Electrical Eng, Director
Centre for Conflict Studies: Charters, David, BA, MA (UNB), PhD (Lond), Director
Centre for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Armstrong, Larry, BA (UNB), Director
Centre for International Business Studies: Armstrong, Larry, BA (UNB), Director
Centre for Nuclear Energy Research: Steward, Frank R., SB, SM, ScD (MIT), Director
Centre for Property Studies : Methven, Ian, BScF (UNB), PhD (Duke), Director
Centre for Social Innovation Research:Keith Culver, Director
Construction Technology Centre Atlantic Inc.
Rankin, Jeff H., BScE, MScE (UNB), PhD (UBC), PEng, Exec. Director
Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
Forbes, Graham J., BA (York), MA, PhD (Wat), Assoc Prof and Dir, Joint
Forestry and Science
Dr. Jack McKenzie Limerick Pulp & Paper Research and Education Centre
Ni, Yonghao, BEng (Northwest Inst of Light Industry), MEng, PhD (McG.), Director, Prof.
& Canada Research Chair
Early Childhood Centre: Pam Whitty, Director
Enterprise UNB: Don Lyons, Manager
Environment and Sustainable Development Research Centre: Davies, Jessie, Director
Information Technology Centre
Nickerson, Bradford G., BScE, MScE (UNB), PhD (Renssselaer Polyt Inst), Director
Meighen/Molson Professorship in Atlantic Salmon Research
Cunjak, Rick, BSc (Guelph), MSc (Nfld), PhD (Wat), Prof and Chair
Mi'kmaq-Maliseet Institute
Leavitt, Robert, BA, MAT (Harv), Director
Muriel McQueen Ferguson Centre for Family Violence Research
Arsenault, Rina, BA, MSW (Moncton), Associate Director
Bothwell-Myers, Connie, Director
Stirling, Mary Lou. BA (UNB), MEd (Tor), EdD (Penn)
New Brunswick Centre for Educational Administration
Steve Pierce, Executive Director
Nexfor/Bowater Forest Watershed Research Centre
Meng, Fan-Rui, BS, MS (Northeast Forestry Univ.), PhD (UNB), Asst Prof and Director
Planetary & Space Science Centre: John Spray, Director
Second Language Education Centre
Rehorick, Sally, Ba, MA (Alta), DA (Grenoble), CAS (Harv), Director
Sir James Dunn Wildlife Research Centre
Forbes, Graham J., BA (York), MA, PhD(Wat), Prof and Dir, Joint Forestry and Science
Teaching and Learning Centre
Mighty, Joy E., BA, DipEd, MA, Dip Mgmt. Studies (West Indies), MBA (Howard), PhD
(York), Assoc. Prof., Coordinator - 1992
Wood Science and Technology Centre
Chui, Ying Hei, Bsc (S'ton), PhD (Brighton Poly), PEng, Prof and A/Director
Cooper, Paul, BScF (Tor), MSc (Oregon State), BEd, PhD (Tor), Hon Res Prof
22
PEOPLE AT UNB
SAINT JOHN FACULTY
FACULTY OF ARTS
Department of History and Politics
Cavaliere, Patrick, BA, MA (York), D.Phil. (Oxf), Asst Prof - 1999
Dartnell, Michael, BA (Winn), MA, PhD (York Can.), Asst. Prof. - 2002
Desserud, Donald A., BA, MA (Dal), MA (UNB), PhD (UWO), Prof 1989
Donnelly, Frederick, BA (Car) MA, PhD (Sheff), Prof & Chair 1979
Everitt, Joanna, BA (Car), MA, PhD (Tor), Assoc Prof - 1997
Goud, Thomas, BA (Calg), MA, PhD (Tor), Asst Prof - 1994
Hyson, Stewart, BA (Acad), MA (McG.), PhD (Car), Asst. Prof. - 2002
Jeffrey, Leslie, BA (Acad), MA (Car), PhD (York), Asst Prof - 1998
Lindsay, Debra, BA (Sask), MA, PhD (Man), Assoc Prof- 1997
Marquis, Greg, BA (SFX), MA (UNB), PhD (Qu), Asst Prof - 1999
Toner, Peter M., BA (St Thomas(NB)), MA (UNB), PhD (NUI), Prof 1971
Whitney, Robert, BA, MA (Alta.), PhD (Qu), Asst Prof - 2000
Department of Humanities and Languages
Belanger, Louis, BA (Montr), MA (Queb), PhD (Sher), Assoc Prof - 1990
Bell, Sandra, BA, MA (McM), PhD (Qu), Asst Prof - 2000
Creelman, David, BA (Acad), MA (UNB), PhD (York), Assoc. Prof. - 1998
Flagel, David, BA (UNB), MA, PhD (Qu), Assoc Prof - 1989
Hill, Virginia, MA (Bucharest), MA, PhD (Geneva), Prof - 1990
Jones, Miriam, BA (Tor), MA, PhD (York), Asst Prof - 1999
Maier, Sarah, BA, MA, PhD (Alta.), Assoc Prof - 1998
Moore, Robert, BA, MA, PhD (McM), Prof & Chair - 1990
Nkunzimana, Obed, Lic(Tanzania), MA, PhD(Sher), Asst Prof - 2000
Noble, James E., BA (Bishops), DipEd, MA, PhD (UWO), Prof - 1989
Serrano, Pedro, BA (El Salvador), MA (ITCA), Instructor - 1999
StewartRobertson, J. Charles, BA (Tor), MA (UWO), PhD (Edin), Prof 1971
Department of Psychology
Best, Lisa, BA (York), MA (Arkansas Little Rock), PhD (Maine), Asst. Prof. - 2002
Both, Lilly E., BA (Manit), MA, PhD (Wat), Asst Prof - 1996
Bradley, Michael T., BSc (Vic.(BC)), MA, PhD (Manit), Prof & Acting Chair - 1980
DiTommaso, Enrico, BA (McG.), MA, PhD (UNB), Asst Prof - 1997
Gendreau, Paul, BA, MA (OH), PhD (Qu), Univ. Research Prof - 1990
Goddard, Murray J., BA (Calg), PhD (McM), Univ. Teaching Prof - 1987
MacKewn, Angelina, BA (Laur), MA (C. Oklahoma), Lecturer - 2001
Taukulis, Harald, BA (N Ill), MSc, PhD (Nfld), Prof 1986
Wilson, Alexander, BA (Mt.All.), MA, PhD (Manit), Prof - 1981
Department of Social Science
Bonnell, Robert A., BPE, BA (UNB), MA (UWO), Assoc Prof and Director of Athletics
1970
Burns, Janet, M. C. , BA (Alta) MA (Victoria), PhD (S.Fraser), Assoc Prof & Chair 1988
Chalmers, D. Lee V., BA, MA (Regina), PhD (Essex), Assoc Prof - 1995
Childs, Jason, BA (Mt.All.), MA (McM), Lecturer - 2002
Doran, Christopher, J., BA (York), MA, PhD (Calg), Assoc Prof 1989
Downes, Daniel, BA (Ott.), MA (Car.), PhD (McG.), Asst Prof - 2001
Duchesne, Ricardo, BA, MA (C’dia), PhD (York), Assoc Prof - 1995
Ezeala-Harrison, Fidel, Adjunct Prof. - 2002
Galbo, Joseph, BA (CUNY), MA, PhD (York), Asst Prof - 1997
Hill, Roderick, BA (Tor), Diploma (Stockholm), MA, PhD (UWO), Assoc Prof 1990
Kabir, Muhammed, BA, MA (Dacca), MA, PhD (McM), Prof and Associate Vice-President
(Saint John) 1983
MacKinnon, Robert, BA (Mt.All.), MA (Nfld.), PhD (UBC), Prof and Dean of Arts - 2001
Moir, Robert, BA (McM), MA (Qu), PhD (McM), Assoc. Prof - 1996
Ridler, Neil B., BA (Oxf.), MA, PhD (S.Fraser), Prof 1973
Scott, Neil, BA (Mt.All.), BEd (Dal), MEd (UNB), PhD (Alberta), Assoc Prof and Education Coordinator - 1993
Worrell, Gary L., BPE (UNB), MSc (Penn State), PhD (Florida State), Assoc Prof 1977
Xu, Xiaoping, Adjunct Prof - 2001
FACULTY OF BUSINESS
Amatucci, Frances, BS (Mass), MBA, PhD (Pitt), Assoc Prof - 2001
Comeau, Jana, BSSc-Crim (Ott), MBA (UNB), Instructor - 2002
Davis, Charles, BA, MA, PhD (Montr.), Prof - 1997
Davis, M. Gary, BA (UNB), MBA (UWO), PhD (Bath), Prof - 1977
Dewar, Keith, BES, PhD (Wat), BEd (Lakehead), MA (Car) Assoc. Prof. - 2002
Dunstan, Judith E., BBA (Acad), LLB (UofT), CA, Sr Instr - 1998
Dupuis, Rachelle, BA, MBA (UNB), Instructor - 2002
Farnsworth, Regena BBA (Chapman), MBA (UTA), PhD (Texas A), Asst. Prof. - 1999
Fleet, Gregory, BA, MA, PhD(UNO), Assoc Prof - 2000
Frooman, Jeff, BS, BA (Ilinois - urban) MA (Pitt) MBA (Ann Arbor Michigan) Asst Prof 2000
Gilbert, S. Elizabeth, BA, MBA (Qu), PhD (Tor), Prof 1976
Huq, ABM Saiful, BA, MA (Dhaka), MA, PhD (Boston), Assoc Prof - 2001
Hurley, Catherine, BBA, MBA (UNB), Sr Teaching Assoc - 2001
Jolliffe, Lee, BA (W. Laur), MA (Tor), PhD (Leicester), Asst Prof - 2001
McLean, Marion, BSc, MA, BEd (UNB), Instructor - 2002
Mellon, Mark, BA (StFX), MSc (St Marys (Can)), Asst. Prof. - 2002
Mendelson, Morris, BA (C’dia), MSc (St Marys (Can)), Asst Prof - 2001
Moro, Francisco, BS (Rio Grande do Sul), MEng (Santa Catarina), DrEng (Santa Catarina),
PhD (Wisconsin), Asst Prof - 1999
Pike, Eileen, BBA (UNB), MBA (Dal), CMA, Prof 1979
Rinehart, Shelley, BA, MBA (UNB), ABD, PhD (U of Oklahoma), Director - Electronic
Commerce Centre, Asst Prof and Dean, Business -1988
Roumi, Ebrahim, BSc (Arya-Mehr), MSc, PhD (Wat), Prof 1988
Shannahan, Kirby, BSc (Nfld), MA (UNB), Lecturer - 2002
Sterniczuk, Henryk, MB, PhD (Warsaw), Prof 1987
Wong, Jsun Yui, BS (SGW), MBA (Detroit), PhD (Wis), Prof 1972
FACULTY OF SCIENCE, APPLIED SCIENCE, AND
ENGINEERING
Department of Computer Science & Applied Statistics
Garey, Lawrence E., BSc (St FX), MA, PhD (Dal), Prof - 1971
Gupta, R. Dayal, BSc, MSc (Meerut), MA, PhD (Dal), Prof - 1980
Kaser, Owen, BCSS (Acad), MS, PhD (SUNY, Stony Brook), Assoc Prof - 1993
Light, Janet, BEng (College of Tech., Madras), MEng (College of Tech.,
Bharathian), Asst Prof - 2002
Mahanti, Prabhat, BSc (Calc.), MSc, PhD (Indian Inst. of Technology), Prof - 2001
Shaw, Ruth, BScDA, MScCS, PhD (UNB), Prof and Chair - 1986
Tasse, Josee, BScCS (Montr.), PhD (McG.), Asst Prof - 1997
Thompson, Caryn, BSc, MSc (Guelph), PhD (Oregon State), Assoc Prof - 2001
Webb, Hazel, BScDA (UNB), Instructor - 2002
Department of Biology
Brillant, Martha, BSc, PhD (UNB), Instructor - 2002
Chopin, Thierry B. R., BSc (Lyon), MSc (Brest), DEA (Paris), PhD (Brest), Prof & Chair 1989
Dowding, Barbara, BSc, MSc (Nfld.), Instructor - 2001
Frego, Katherine, BSc (Winn.), MSc (Manit.), PhD (Tor) Univ. Teaching Prof - 1993
Halcrow, Kevin, BSc (Manc.), MSc, PhD (Dal), Honorary Research Prof - 1999
Hunt, Heather, Asst. Prof. - 2002
Johnson, John, BSc, MSc, PhD (UNB), Prof and Registrar (Saint John) - 1989
Kieffer, James, BSc (Ott.), MSc, PhD (Qu.), Assoc Prof - 1996
Klassen, Gregory, BSc, MSc (Guelph), PhD (Tor), Adjunct Prof - 2002
Lem, Nora, BSc (Trin.Coll.Tor.), MSc, PhD (Tor.), Sr. Instructor - 2002
Litvak, Matthew K., BSc (York), MSc, PhD (Tor), Assoc. Prof - 1995
MacDonald, Bruce A., BSc (Acad.), MSc (UNB), PhD (Nfld.) Prof - 1992
MacLatchy, Deborah L., BSc (Acad.), PhD (Manit.), Assoc Prof - 1994
Methven, David, BSc (Mt.All.), MKSc, PhD (Nfld.), Asst. Prof. - 2002
Munkittrick, Kelly, BSc, MSc(Guelph), PhD(Wat), Prof & Canadian Research Chair and
Associate Director of Canadian Rivers Institute - 2001
Pohle, Gerhard, Adjunct Prof - 1996
Robinson, Shawn, Adjunct Prof - 2002
Rochette, Rémy, BSc, PhD(Laval), Asst Prof -2001
Roff, John, Adjunct Prof. - 2002
Terhune, John M., BScAgr, MSc (Guelph), Lic Scient (Aarhus), Prof 1975
Trippel, Edward, Adjunct Prof - 2001
Turnbull, Stephen D., BSc (Manit.), BEd, MSc, PhD (UNB), Sr Instructor - 1994
Department of Mathematical Sciences
Alderson, Timothy, BSc, Msc, PhD(UWO), Asst Prof - 2000
DeBell, Keith, BSc (Kings), MSc, PhD (Westfield), Prof & Dean - 1999
Hamdan, Mohammad, BSc, MSc, PhD (Windsor), Prof 1991
Kamel, Merzik T., BSc (Assiut), MSc, PhD (Windsor), Prof & Chair- 1981
Punnen, Abraham P., BSc (Kerala), MSc (Kanpur), PhD (IIT), Prof - 1994
Stoica, Gheorghe, Dip., MSc(Bucharest), PhD(Paris), Assoc. Prof.-2000
Department of Nursing
Buchanan, Judith, RN Dip (StJosSN), MHSc (McM.), Sr Instructor - 2002
Campbell, Cheryl, (Cross Appt. Saint John Regional Hospital) - 2002
Carr, Tracy, BN (UNB), MSc (Tor), Asst Prof - 1995
Clark, C. Roberta, RN Dip (Miramichi), BN (UNB), MN (Dal), Assoc Prof & Chair -1992
Furlong, Karen, RN Dip (SJSN), BN (UNB), Instructor 2000
Hahn, Sandee, BN (Dal), MN (UNB), Asst Prof - 2001
Hicks-Moore, Trudean, RN Dip (SJGH), BN, MN (Dal), Asst Prof - 1995
Lockerbie, Linda (Cross Appt. Saint John Regional Hospital) - 2002
Logue, Nancy, BN (UNB), MN (Dal), Sr Instructor - 1995
Mallory, Patricia, RN Dip (StJosSN), BN, MN (Dal), Instructor 1999
McCloskey, Rose, BSc (Acad.), RN Dip (Hfx.Inf.SN), BN, MN (UNB), Asst Prof 2000
McCormack, Dianne, BN (Nfld.), MSc (McG.), Prof 1998
Nugent, Linda, RN Dip (VG Hosp), BN (Dal), MScN (Tor), Prof 1980
Pastirik, Pamela, BN (UNB), MScN (Br.Col.), Asst. Prof. - 2002
Department of Physical Sciences
Feicht, Anton, BSc, PhD (UNB), Asst Prof & Chair - 2001
Fullerton, Frances, BSc (UNB), Sr Teaching Assoc 1986
Hsu, Chimei J., BSc (Prov Taiwan), MSc (Nat Taiwan), MSc, PhD (Nfld), Sr Teaching
Assoc - 1986
Humphries, Robyn E., GRIC (Teesside Poly), MSc (Sus), PhD (LUT), Assoc Prof 1980
Kayser, Margaret, BSc, MSc, PhD (Ott), Prof 1986
Leung, Chi -Hong, BSc, BScSpec (HK), PhD (Manit), Prof - 1979
Logan, Alan, BSc, PhD (Dunelm), Honorary Res. Prof. - 2002
Scott, Richard, Adjunct Prof 2000
Wilson, Lucy, BA (UNB), DEA, PhD (Univ.of Paris VI), Asst. Prof. - 2002
Xiao, Shaorong, Cert. In IT, Phd, MSc (Central Lancashire), Instructor 2001
Xu, Li-Hong, BSc (Suzhou), PhD (UNB), Assoc Prof - 1994
LIBRARIANS - Saint John
Collins, Susan, BA (Qu), MLS (Pitt), Chief Librarian & Director, Information Services &
Systems - 1979
Hansen, Linda S., BA (UNB), MLS (SUNY), Electronic Services Librarian -1996
Kerr, William A.L., BA (UNB), ALA, Reference/Collection Development Librarian - 1969
RESEARCH CENTRES AND INSTITUTES
Saint John
Canadian Rivers Institute
Munkittrick, Kelly, BSc, MSc (Guelph), PhD (Wat.) - Canadian Research Chair & Assoc
Director
Centre for Coastal Studies and Aquaculture
Litvak, Matthew K., BSc (York), MSc, PhD (Tor.), Director
Centre for Criminal Justice Studies
Paul Gendreau, BA, MA (OH), PhD (Qu.), Director
Electronic Commerce Centre
Rinehart, Shelley, BA, MBA (UNB), PhD (U of Oklahoma), Director
Modern Languages Centre
Armstrong, Elaine, BSc, BEd, MEd, Director
Department of Engineering
Christie, James S., BScE, MScE, PhD (UNB), PEng, Assoc Prof 1989
Cotter, G. Terrance, BScE, MScE (UNB), PhD (Purdue), PEng, Prof - 1972
Prasad, Ramesh C., BScE (BhU), MTech (IIT), MScE, PhD (UNB), PEng, Prof - 1982
Riley, Peregrine, BScE (Qu), PhD (UNB), PEng, Sr Teaching Assoc 1986
Roach, Dale, BScEng, PhD (UNB), Instructor - 2001
Sollows, Kenneth F., BScE, MScE, PhD (UNB), PEng, Assoc Prof & Chair 1985
Walton, Byron A., Eng Cert (Mt.All.), BScE (NSTC), MScE (UNB), PEng, Asst Prof 1975
PEOPLE AT UNB
23
ASSOCIATED ALUMNAE COUNCIL 2003
President: Margie Gregg, BA’92
1st Vice-President: Bonnie (Price) Murray, A’78
Secretary: Heather Baird-Perritt, BPE '69
Treasurer: Kim Poffenroth, BA’92, LLB’95
Past President: Marti Lou Neill, BA '69
The Associated Alumnae was founded in 1910 and incorporated in 1919. The
object of the Association is to promote, directly and indirectly, the educational
and financial interests of the University, especially as such interests are related
to the women graduates and undergraduates of the University. Membership in
the Associated Alumnae consists of women graduates and former women students of the University who have successfully completed one year.
The Association furnished and equipped UNB's first residence for women, the
Maggie Jean Chestnut House, generously donated to the Alumnae by Lord Beaverbrook. In May 1952, this residence was transferred to the University. The
Alumnae Memorial Library, located in Lady Dunn Hall, and libraries in other
Councillors
Althea Macaulay, BA '39, MA, PhD, LLD '90
Mardi Cockburn, BA '52
Deborah Hackett, BA '88, LLB '95
Representatives to the Board of Governors
Marti-Lou Neill, BA
Margie Gregg, BA
residences for women students, were established and are maintained by the
Association.
The Associated Alumnae annually awards several scholarships to women students, including: an Entrance Scholarship in Education named in honour of
Muriel Farris Baird; the Zula V. Hallett Scholarship, awarded to a woman student entering third-year Physical Education; the Marion Fleet Rogers Scholarship to a woman student entering third year at UNB Saint John; and an award
for part-time students. The total annual value of all scholarships provided
exceeds $18,000. Two prizes, the Dorothy Elson Prize and the Agnes Grey
Wilon Prize, are also donated by the Associated Alumnae.
ASSOCIATED ALUMNI COUNCIL 2003
EXECUTIVE
Executive Director
Mark A. Hazlett, BPE '87, MPE '89
President: Richard J. Scott, BBA '74, LLB '76
1st Vice-President: Carey Ryan, BA '70, MEd '79
2nd Vice-President: Richard R. Tingley, BScCE '67, DSc '99
Treasurer: Marti-Lou Neill (November 15, 2001-June 30, 2002)
Secretary: Kathie Brien , BBA '67
Saint John Rep: Gerald (Gary) M. Lawson, BBA '76, LLB '79
Past-President: Robert Chambers, BBA '58
Representatives To The Board Of Governors
Sally McAllister, BA '72, BEd '73 (June 2002)
Earl Brewer, BA '70, LLB '74 (June 2003)
Kevin Ratcliff, BBA '82 (June 2004)
The Associated Alumni was founded in 1862 for "the advancement of the interests of the University of New Brunswick by all honourable means." Its membership consists of all those who have attended at least one semester at UNB and
numbers over 40,000.
ELECTED COUNCILLORS
With Terms Expiring June 2003
With Terms Expiring June 2004
J. Blair Drummie, BBA '85, LLB '89
Jane Kilburn-Boyle, MA '95
Jeffrey E. Bujold, BA '93
Kim Langille, BEd '88
Jeff Clark, BSc’97, BBA’98
Lynn Hruczkowski, BA’82
Jill Jollineau, Class of ‘75, MEd’02
Heather Neilson, BPE’72
APPOINTED COUNCILLORS
With Terms Expiring June 2003
With Terms Expiring June 2004
Allison W. MacPhail, BScEng '61
Judith Weeks, BBA '77
Barry Beckett, PhD’70
David Leblanc, BBA’82
Mary Ellen McKinney, BBA’77,
BN’00
Warren McKenzie, BScCS’76
ASSOCIATED ALUMNI OBJECTIVES
1.
2.
THE ALUMNI COUNCIL
Each spring the membership of the Associated Alumni elects a representative
group of individuals to act as a council for the Alumni Association. This council
meets at least three times a year and conducts the business of the Associated
Alumni through various committees.
The Office of Alumni Affairs, an office of the University, works with the
Council of the Associated Alumni in attaining its objectives.
3.
4.
5.
6.
24
PEOPLE AT UNB
The Association strives to enhance the image of the University in the
eyes of the general public.
The Association is a liaison between the University administration and
the student body.
The Association fosters good relations among the student body, the
Fredericton and Saint John communities and the Alumni Association.
The Association endeavours to make students' stay at UNB as rewarding
as possible, developing an "Alumni conscious" student body.
The Association assists the University in its fund raising activities with
(a) governments, (b) private corporations and (c) individuals, be they
Alumni or others.
The Association encourages, through personal contact and through its
scholarship program, top-quality prospective students to attend UNB and
maintains an interest in their welfare during their University careers.
SECTION A
THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW BRUNSWICK
Historical Sketch
As the American Revolutionary War drew to a close, thousands of Loyalists gathered in New York City to await transportation to homes in
other British Colonies. Among these Loyalists were Charles Inglis, a former interim President of King's College, New York (Columbia University);
Benjamin Moore, later President of Columbia; and Jonathan Odell, minister, poet and pamphleteer. These men were the visionaries of their day. In
the midst of war, privation and exile, they drew up a plan for the future education of their sons in the Nova Scotia wilderness. Recognizing that the
new American nation would provide instruction only in revolutionary "Principles contrary to the British Constitution" and that the cost of an overseas
education would be prohibitive, they urged the representatives of the British government to consider the "founding of a College . . . where Youth may
receive a virtuous Education" in such things as "Religion, Literature, Loyalty, & good Morals . . . ."
Initially, these gentlemen intended that the area of Nova Scotia have only one college. However, in 1784 when the Province of New
Brunswick was created from a part of Nova Scotia, New Brunswickers began a clamour for their own school which led to the foundation of two of
Canada's oldest institutions of higher learning - King's College, Windsor, Nova Scotia (now affiliated with Dalhousie University) and the academy
which became the University of New Brunswick.
UNB began with a petition presented to Governor Thomas Carleton on 13 December 1785. Headed by William Paine, the seven
memorialists asked Carleton to grant a charter of incorporation for an "academy or school of liberal arts and sciences," which they maintained would
result in many "public advantages and . . . conveniences." In addition, the "principal Officers of disbanded Corps and other Inhabitants" in and around
the provincial capital of Fredericton asked that the Governor reserve a substantial grant of land in support of this academy.
Despite the approval of Carleton, it was many months before the academy opened. During this period a draft charter was written, based on
the 1754 Charter of King's College, New York, urging that the college never "exclude or restrain any Person . . . of any religious Denomination, Sect,
or Profession . . . from equal . . . Liberties, Privileges, [or] Degrees" - a very liberal notion in the eighteenth century. Unfortunately, times were
changing in New Brunswick and such sentiments seemed to recall the recent American Revolution. Therefore, while the academy had commenced
operation by the 1790s, it functioned less as a college and more as a symbol of Carleton's governmental policy for the promotion of the twin tenets of
the Anglican religion and the British Constitution. As the provincial leaders of the opposition dismissed the academy as nothing but a "country
school," Carleton realized he must more actively and effectively offer it support. On 12 February 1800, over the signature of Provincial Secretary
Jonathan Odell, the College of New Brunswick received a Provincial Charter, the first college in Canada to be so honoured. It was intended that the
academy would serve as the College's preparatory school and that the two would be governed by a common College Council drawn almost entirely
from the ranks of a governmental hierarchy. As for the professors, they were all to be Anglicans.
For a number of years, the history of the future University continued to lie with the academy. A series of masters came and went until 1811
when the Reverend James Somerville, an ex-patriate Scotsman, took the position of Principal Preceptor. There can be no question that Somerville,
a graduate of the University of Aberdeen, was a superb teacher who provided the Council and New Brunswick with their first chance to have a real
College. In 1820, Somerville was formally named President of the College of New Brunswick and, in April 1822, he held the very first college classes
in Fredericton. This development helped spur efforts to set the institution on a firmer footing. A new Charter for "Brunswick College" was proposed in
1823, asking for permanent and substantial funding directly from the King. Lieutenant Governor Sir Howard Douglas quickly threw his influence
behind the scheme. Douglas viewed the welfare of the College to be of prime importance to the success of New Brunswick. To this end, he pressed
for a Royal Charter and urged the erection of a fine stone building to house the institution.
Three designs for the building were submitted in 1825 to the Council, which selected that drawn by J.E. Woolford. There was, of course, a
good deal more involved in the transformation of the neglected College of New Brunswick into King's College, Fredericton. Douglas spent the next
four years keeping a wary eye on the growth of his "child." In 1826, having chosen the site for the building himself, Douglas laid the cornerstone. In
December 1827, largely through Douglas' efforts in Great Britain, King's College, Fredericton, received a Royal Charter nearly identical to that
granted to King's College, Toronto. Before allowing the new Charter to take effect, the College of New Brunswick performed one final, official act, on
21 February 1828, by awarding degrees to its first and last three graduates.
On 1 January 1829, King's College and the structure (now known as Sir Howard Douglas Hall, formerly referred to as the Old Arts
Building) erected to house it were officially opened. In one way, King's was a failure. In its thirty-year tenure it graduated fewer than 125 students, in
large measure because its classical curriculum was not well-suited to the needs of New Brunswickers. Yet, it was at King's that many of the courses
offered in later years by the University of New Brunswick had their start. In 1834, for example, three of the professors proposed admitting "young
men of good abilities and diligence" to a special, one-year course entitling each to a teacher's certificate. Even after the creation of the Provincial
Normal School this kind of university training continued sporadically and in various forms until the Faculty of Education emerged in the twentieth
century.
It was also in the 1830s that King's introduced "public lectures," more familiar to today's students as "extension courses." These early
lectures dealt with subjects such as geology, chemistry, physics and astronomy. Much to the disgust of one professor, James Robb, some of his
lectures at the College were open to the general public, including the young women of Fredericton. Some years later, Mr. McMahon Cregan, an
engineer from England who was brought to New Brunswick to conduct a survey for the European and North American Railway, offered "instruction of
a really practical and useful character" in the field of engineering to students and non-students alike.
King's spent several tumultuous periods in conflict with members of the New Brunswick Legislature. Ostensibly, they were arguing over the
issues of curriculum and religion but the real issue was probably the cost of higher education. Fortunately, King's did have defenders, in particular,
the elegant debater William Needham who, in the face of threats to burn down the College or to turn it into an agricultural school, made an
impassioned speech that saved the institution from such ignominious fates. Through the efforts of Needham, Lieutenant Governor Sir Edmund Head
and a few others, the Legislature was persuaded to reform rather than destroy the College. On 13 April 1859, the act creating the secular, provincial
University of New Brunswick was passed.
HISTORICAL SKETCH
25
SECTION A
At first, the UNB Charter seemed to promise more than the University could deliver but, slowly, under the guidance and tutelage of several
innovative professors, both the University's attitude and curriculum blossomed. In 1880, UNB began offering a certificate to those women who
performed well in entrance (matriculation) examinations, though women were not permitted to enrol at the University. In 1885 a brilliant young
woman named Mary Kingsley Tibbits met head-on the University's stricture against women and, in 1886, became UNB's first, regularly admitted,
woman student. The racial barrier had been broken earlier with the completely non-controversial entry of Arthur St. George Richardson, a black who
came to UNB via Bermuda and Saint John. Gradually, the University expanded its educational horizons. In 1887 the four-year program was
introduced and in 1891 a Bachelor of Science degree was added to complement the traditional BA. Just after the turn of the century, when Cecil
Charles Jones took over as Chancellor of the institution, whose title subsequently was changed to that of President, the foundations were laid for
three major faculties: Law, Engineering and Forestry.
The post-World War I era brought the first great expansion of the physical facilities of the campus. In 1920, UNB consisted of the Sir
Howard Douglas Hall (Old Arts Building), the Science Building, the small Observatory, a small gymnasium and the Dominion Entomological
Laboratory. By 1931, Memorial Hall, a modern Library and a Forestry and Geology Building had been added. The first university residence was a gift
from Lord Beaverbrook who, growing up in New Brunswick as William Maxwell Aitken, studied law, and over the succeeding years developed an
increasing interest in the welfare of the university. Other buildings brought into being through his efforts and those of his family were the Lady
Beaverbrook Gymnasium, Aitken House, Ludlow Hall, for the Faculty of Law, and the Aitken Centre. In 1947, his Lordship became the University's
Chancellor, to be succeeded by his son, Sir Max Aitken, in 1966 and in turn by Lady Violet Aitken, the wife of Sir Max, who served until 1993.
After World War II, returning veterans pushed registration to over 770 in 1946, almost double the number enrolled in 1941. With this
increased student population came a commensurate increase in faculty and course offerings, and a surge of building activity from 1953 to 1977 that
transformed the campus. The year 1964 brought three important developments: Teachers' College (the old Provincial Normal School) was relocated
on the campus, to become incorporated into an enlarged Faculty of Education in 1973; St. Thomas University also relocated on campus, moving
from Chatham and affiliating with UNB; and a second UNB campus was established in Saint John.
UNB reached the end of its second century as a major provincial and national institution, offering a wide range of graduate and
undergraduate programs in administration, arts, computer science, education, engineering, forestry, law, nursing, physical education and science:
the University enters its third century proudly treasuring its past and eagerly facing the challenges of the future.
Saint John
The University of New Brunswick in Saint John (UNBSJ) was established in September 1964 on the recommendation of the Royal
Commission on Higher Education, chaired by the late Dr. John J. Deutsch, Vice Principal (Administration) and subsequently Principal of Queen's
University. The Commission emphasized the need for facilities for higher education in this metropolitan community of over 100,000 persons.
During the first five years of operation, classes were held at various locations in the city of Saint John, including Beaverbrook House,
formerly the home of the UNB Faculty of Law. In the fall of 1969, the new campus at Tucker Park was opened. This site, proposed by the City Council
as early as 1963, was originally bequeathed to the City of Saint John for park purposes. At the request of the City, the New Brunswick Legislature
authorized that a portion of this land be used for the new campus.
Construction of the Tucker Park campus began after the then Governor General and Madame Vanier turned the first sod on the site.
Originally consisting of three buildings - Sir Douglas Hazen Hall, William Ganong Hall and the Ward Chipman Library Building - the new campus
opened officially in 1969. In 1975 the G. Forbes Elliot Athletics Centre was added to the physical plant. This versatile, well-equipped building serves
the recreational needs not only of the students, faculty and staff of UNBSJ, but also of the wider Saint John community. In 1985 the Jeux Canada
Games Stadium was constructed on the UNBSJ campus, and in 1986 the Thomas J. Condon Student Centre was opened. UNBSJ's physical
facilities expanded again in the 1990s with the opening of a new academic building, Philip W. Oland Hall, in late 1992, and the addition of the
campus's first on-site student housing facility, the Sir James Dunn Residence, in the fall of 1993. The campuses newest building, K.C. Irving Hall,
opened in January 1999.
A special feature of UNBSJ is the fact that all of the permanent buildings on the campus are connected by a series of tunnels and
walkways, allowing comfortable access to all facilities during inclement weather and the months of winter.
Operating initially as a feeder institution offering only the first year or first two years of certain programs, UNB Saint John now offers full
four-year degree programs in Arts, Business, Data Analysis, Science, Health Sciences and Hospitality & Tourism. In addition to the full-time
enrollment, large numbers of part-time students are now pursuing their studies at the Saint John Campus.
PRINCIPALS (1820-1860) AND
PRESIDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY (1861-PRESENT)
26
James Somerville
1820-1829
Colin B. Mackay, O.C., Q.C.
1953-1969
Edwin Jacob
1829-1860
James O. Dineen
1969-1972
Joseph Hea
1860-1861
Desmond Pacey (Acting)
1972-1973
William Brydone Jack
1861-1885
John M. Anderson
1973-1979
Thomas Harrison
1885-1906
Thomas J. Condon (Acting)
1979-1980
Cecil Charles Jones
1906-1940
James Downey, O.C.
1980-1990
Norman MacKenzie, C.C.
1940-1944
Robin L. Armstrong
1990-1996
Milton F. Gregg, V.C.
1944-1947
Elizabeth Parr-Johnston
1996-2002
A. Foster Baird
1947-1948
James F. O'Sullivan (Acting)
1997
Albert Trueman, O.C.
1948-1953
John D. McLaughlin
2002 -Present
C. William Argue (Acting)
1953
HISTORICAL SKETCH
SECTION A
HISTORIC BUILDINGS
Fredericton Campus
Burden Academy
As a Centennial project, the University brought to the campus and restored a one-room New Brunswick schoolhouse, located for more
than a hundred years at Burden in York County. The schoolhouse, located at the King's College Road entrance, was officially opened in May 1967.
McCord Hall
McCord Hall, located at the east entrance of the Sir Howard Douglas Hall (Old Arts Building), was once used as the University's ice house.
The nineteenth-century structure was restored in 1963 and named in honour of David T.W. McCord, the distinguished writer and former executive
director of the Harvard University Fund Council, and honorary graduate of UNB.
The Neville Homestead
The Neville Homestead, a small white clapboarded house on the east side of the campus, dates back to 1876. It was the home of Fred
Neville, University groundskeeper for 42 years, who lived in the house from his birth in 1878 to his death in 1969. The Neville family first settled the
land in 1850 with a purchase from the Hon. William Odell. In its 84th year, the house was moved a short distance to its present location to make way
for a new men's residence, named to honour Mr. Neville. The Homestead now houses the Student Employment Service.
Sir Howard Douglas Hall
The building that housed King's College is now known as the Sir Howard Douglas Hall (Old Arts Building) and is the oldest university
building in Canada still functioning as a viable part of a university campus. In the Great Hall are portraits of past presidents and two memorial stained
glass windows. Immediately to the left of the front entrance is the Edwin Jacob Chapel, named in memory of the Vice-President and Principal of
King's College. A permanent display illustrating the history of the University is located in the Great Hall, including the cornerstone of the building, laid
in 1826 and excavated in 1978 prior to the sesquicentennial celebrations.
William Brydone Jack Observatory
The Observatory, located at the east entrance to the Sir Howard Douglas Hall (Old Arts Building), was built in 1851 through the efforts of
William Brydone Jack, Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy at King's College and later President of UNB. Constructed of wood, it has
an octagonal tower especially designed to house its equatorial telescope. It now houses a small museum.
Saint John Campus
Sir Douglas Hazen Hall
This building is named for Sir Douglas Hazen (1860-1937), a prominent former premier, member of the federal cabinet and Chief Justice of
the province. Hazen Hall houses the offices of all departments in the Faculty of Arts, the campus computing centre, classrooms and a 240-seat
lecture theatre.
William Ganong Hall
The Science building, William Ganong Hall, is named after William Francis Ganong (1864-1941), a graduate of UNB, long-time faculty
member at Smith College and a former president of the Botanical Society of America. The four-storey building is designed to provide facilities for
Biology, Chemistry, Geology and Physics. Ganong Hall houses the largest lecture theatre on the campus, a micro-lab, a spacious display area,
student laboratories, and facilities of a more specialized nature, such as a large greenhouse, a controlled environment room and research
laboratories.
Philip W. Oland Hall
Philip W. Oland Hall opened in December, 1992 at UNB Saint John and houses the campus's Faculty of Business, its Nursing program and
most of its administrative offices, including the Registrar's Office, the Business Office, the President's Office, the Vice-President's Office, the
International Liaison Office, Community Relations, the Alumni Office, Student Services, and the Office of the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies.
Five classrooms, an audio-visual theatre, a business case room with four break-out labs, a micro-computer lab and health labs for the nursing
program are also contained in Philip W. Oland Hall.
The building is named for one of UNB's staunchest supporters. A loyal alumnus (BSc 1930, DLitt 1978), Philip W. Oland (1910-1996) was
chairperson and CEO of Moosehead Breweries Ltd. Dr. Oland dedicated a lifetime of service to his country and his community. He served in the
Canadian Armed Forces during World War II, was the founder of the New Brunswick Youth Orchestra and sat on numerous boards and committees
for such organizations as the United Way, the YM/YWCA, the University of New Brunswick and St. Thomas University.
HISTORICAL SKETCH
27
SECTION A
Ward Chipman Library
The Ward Chipman Library, one of the three original buildings on campus, is named in honour of Ward Chipman (1754-1824), a
Massachusetts Loyalist who was deputy muster-master general to the British forces during the American Revolution; thereafter, he settled in Saint
John where he culminated a distinguished legal career in being named to the New Brunswick Supreme Court.
The building accommodates the campus library, a study area, bookstore, classrooms, the language laboratory, art gallery and snack bar.
For a description of library holdings, facilities and services, see Libraries in Section D.
K.C. Irving Hall
The K.C. Irving Hall is UNBSJ's newest academic building, to be opened in fall, 1998. The home of the campus's Biology, Engineering and
Nursing Departments, Irving Hall features modern classrooms and state-of-the-art research and computer laboratories. Like all buildings at UNBSJ,
Irving Hall is accessible for disabled persons and is part of the campus's inside walkway connection.
The building is named for Kenneth Colin Irving, founder of the renowned Irving empire of companies, in recognition of his and his family's
significant contribution to the economy of New Brunwick and to the lives, culture and education of New Brunswickers. The Irvings have not only
provided generous support to the university, but have also continually supported innumerable community groups and initiatives.
Thomas J. Condon Student Centre
UNBSJ's Student Centre, located adjacent to the Athletics Centre, is interconnected to the other buildings on campus by an overhead
walkway and an underground tunnel. The centre houses the cafeteria, Student Representative Council offices, OPTAMUS (The Organization for
Part-Time and Mature Students), a social club and lounge. The building was named in honour of former Vice-President (Saint John) Thomas J.
Condon.
G. Forbes Elliot Athletics Centre
UNBSJ's Athletics Centre features a 30,000 square foot surface with an all purpose synthetic floor. The Athletics Centre includes space for
four basketball courts, four tennis courts, four volleyball courts, six badminton courts and a four-lane running track. There is also plenty of space for
activities such as soccer and flag football. Spectators can enjoy the Campus's athletic teams, the Seawolves, from the 900 bleacher seats
overlooking the main court surface. The ground floor also includes locker and shower rooms, equipment storage rooms, a trainer's room, and an
officials' room. Upstairs, in addition to a suite of offices and a reception area, there is also a classroom, a lounge, a games room, and a conditioning
room that includes fitness and strength-training equipment.
The Athletics Centre serves the recreational and physical education needs of UNBSJ students, faculty and staff, as well as several
community groups who are encouraged to make use of the building's excellent facilities which have added significantly to the recreational
opportunities of citizens of the greater Saint John area. The Centre bears the name of the founding principal of the Saint John campus. It was the
dynamic leadership of G. Forbes Elliot and his awareness of the needs of both the young undergraduate and the part-time mature student which
launched the campus on a successful start and set the pattern for the future.
Canada Games Stadium
UNB Saint John boasts one of the finest track and field facilities in the country. A legacy of the 1985 Jeux Canada Games, the Stadium has
a 400-meter, eight-lane all weather running track and a natural grass infield lighted for night play. There is fixed seating for 5,000, a press box, and
other auxiliary facilities.
Sir James Dunn and New Residences
UNB Saint John offers two residences on campus overlooking the beautiful Kennebecasis River.
The new residence, opening September 2003, was designed with input from our own students. It offers 170 beds in the form of spacious
double suites for independent style living. Suites include two single bedrooms, kitchenette, complete with microwave and fridge and private threepiece bath. At UNB Saint John, housing is non-smoking, co-ed and security locked. Each room is furnished with a double bed, and desk set and
standard house amenities include furnished TV rooms and study lounges, high-speed Internet and cable tv connections and laundry facilities.
The Sir James Dunn Residence, which opened in September 1993, offers 71 beds and an indoor connection to the campus. Single and
double rooms are available. Construction of the Dunn was made possible by a generous donation from the Sir James Dunn Foundation. It is named
in honour of the noted Canadian industrialist and philanthropist, Sir James Dunn, who was a native of Bathurst, NB.
For information on the residences, please contact: Housing & Food Services, Sir James Dunn Residence - e-mail: res@unbsj.ca,
telephone 648-5755, fax 648-5762, Monday - Friday 8:15 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Modern Languages Centre
The Modern Languages Centre is UNBSJ's newest building. The Centre offers non-credit, Second Language training for more than 350
international and domestic students. Phase I of the building, completed in September 2002, consists of 8 modern classrooms, a staff lounge and
administration offices. Phase II of construction will bring forth additional classrooms, and offices as well as a state of the art computer language lab.
Annexes
Located on campus, temporary buildings called annexes house facilities for the International Office, International Recruiting, for part-time
faculty and for graduate students.
28
HISTORICAL SKETCH
SECTION B
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS and
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Contents
I. ADMISSION FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2002-2003
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS TABLE
VI. ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
30-35
A. Class Attendance
A. General Information
36
B. Adding Courses
B. Non Public-Schooled Applicants
36
C. Dropping Courses
43
43
43-44
C. Mature Applicants
36
D. Final Course Grades
44
D. Academic Probation for Transfer Students
36
E. Other Regulations
44
E. Admission from Community College
37
F. Permission to Study Off Campus at Another
University or Other Post-Secondary Institution
44
F. Admission with Advanced Standing
37
G. Applicants from Great Britain and Other Countries
with GCE Equivalent Examinations
37 VII. OFFICIAL WITHDRAWAL (VOLUNTARY)
FROM UNIVERSITY
H. Applicant from the United States of America or from
High Schools Using American - Based High School
Curriculum
37 VIII. EXAMINATION, STANDING AND
PROMOTION
I. Bachelor of Education Concurrent Program
37-38
44
A. General Information
45
J. Bachelor of Education Consecutive Program
38
B. Competence in English
45
K. Bachelor of Philosophy Offered by Renaissance College
38
C. Dean's List Criteria
46
L. Certificate of Proficiency in French
38
D. Deferred Examinations
M. New Brunswick Youth Apprenticeship Program
38
E. Grading System and Classification
N. Re-Admissions
O. Requirements for a Second Undergraduate Bachelor
Degree
39
39-40
46
46-47
F. Calculation of Grade Point Averages
47
G. Standing and Promotion Requirements
48
P. Transfer Students
40
H. Review of Grades
48-49
Q. Application Fraud or Misconduct
40
I. Repeating Courses
49
R. Challenge for Credit
41
J. Language of Examination
49
S. Prior Learning Assessment
41
K. Supplemental Examinations
49
II. CONFIDENTIALITY, SECURITY AND RELEASE
OF STUDENT ACADEMIC RECORDS
42-43 IX. ACADEMIC OFFENCES
A. Plagiarism
III. FRENCH LANGUAGE POLICY - FREDERICTON
43
49-50
B. Other Academic Offences
50
C. General
50
IV. FRENCH LANGUAGE POLICY - SAINT JOHN
43
D. Right Of Appeal
V. MINOR PROGRAMS
43 X. GENERAL REGULATIONS ON CONDUCT
50-51
52
XI. LISTING OF GRADUATES
53
XII. ACADEMIC DRESS
54
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS & ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
29
SECTION B : ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Program
NB
PEI
NS
NF
QC (High School
Leaving Examination)
Bachelor of Arts and
Sciences,
Bachelor of Arts/ Bachelor of Science
English 122 (minimum
grade of 60%), Adv. Math
120 + Math 121/122,
Physics 122, Chemistry
122, 1 unit of Social Studies,
Minimum admission
average 75%
Engl 621 (minimum grade
of 60%), Math 521, Math
621, Phys 621, Chem 621,
1 unit of Social Studies,
Minimum admission
average 75%
English 12 (minimum
grade of 60%),
Pre-Calc 11,
Pre-Calc 12, Physics 12,
Chemistry 12, 1 unit of
Social Studies,
Minimum admission
average 75%
Two of English 3101,
3201, 3202 (minimum
grade of 60%), Math
2200, Math 3200, Physics
3204, Chemistry 3202, 1
unit of Social Studies,
Minimum admission
average 75%
English 516 (minimum
grade of 60%), Math 436,
Math 536, Phys 534,
Chem 534, 1 unit of
Social Studies,
Minimum admission
average 75%
Bachelor of Arts,
English 122 (min. grade
of 60%), French 122 or
Math 111/112, 1 unit Soc.
Studies, 2 electives Group 1, 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 3,
Minimum admission
average 65%
English 621 (min. grade
of 60%), French 621 or
Math 521, 1 unit Soc.
Studies, 2 electives Group 1, 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 3,
Minimum admission
average 65%
English 12 (min. grade of
60%), French 12 or Math
11 or Pre-Calc 11, 1 unit
Soc. Studies , 2 electives Group 1, 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 3,
Minimum admission average 65%
Two of English 3101,
3201, 3202 (min. grade of
60%), French 3200 or
Math 2200, 1 unit Soc.
Studies, 2 electives Group 1, 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 3,
Minimum admission
average 65%
English 516 (min. grade
of 60%), French 594 or
Math 436, 1 unit Soc.
Studies, 2 electives Group 1, 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 3,
Minimum admission
average 65%
Bachelor of Arts /
Bachelor of Computer
Science
English 122 (minimum
grade of 60%), Adv. Math
120 + Math 121/122 (minimum grade of 65%),
Physics 122 or Chem 122
(minimum grade of 65%),
1 unit Social Studies (minimum grade of 60%), 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
3 (minimum grade of
60%), Minimum
admission average 75%
Engl 621 (minimum grade
of 60%), Math 521 (minimum grade of 65%), Math
621 (minimum grade of
65%), Phys 621 or Chem
621 (minimum grade of
65%), 1 unit Social Studies (minimum grade of
60%), 1 elective - Group 1
or 2 or 3 (minimum grade
of 60%),
Minimum admission
average 75%
English 12 (minimum
grade of 60%), Pre-Calc
11 (minimum grade of
65%), Pre-Calc 12 (minimum grade of 65%),
Physics 12 or Chemistry
12 (minimum grade of
65%), 1 unit Social Studies (minimum grade of
60%), 1 elective - Group 1
or 2 or 3 (minimum grade
of 60%),
Minimum admission
average 75%
Two of English 3101,
3201, 3202 (minimum
grade of 60%), Math 2200
(minimum grade of 65%),
Math 3200 (minimum
grade of 65%), Physics
3204 or Chemistry 3202
(minimum grade of 65%),
1 unit Social Studies (minimum grade of 60%), 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
3 (minimum grade of
60%), Minimum
admission average 75%
English 516 (minimum
grade of 60%), Math 436
(minimum grade of 65%),
Math 536 (minimum
grade of 65%), Phys 534
or Chem 534 (minimum
grade of 65%), 1 unit
Social Studies (minimum
grade of 60%), 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 3 (minimum grade of 60%),
Minimum admission
average 75%
Bachelor of Business
Administration,
English 122 (min. grade
of 60%), Adv. Math 120 +
Math 121/122 (min. grade
of 60%), 2 electives Group 1, 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 3,
Minimum admission
average 75%
Engl 621 (min. grade of
60%), Math 521, Math
621 (min. grade of 60%),
2 electives - Group 1, 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
3,
Minimum admission
average 75%
English 12 (min. grade of
60%), Math 11, Math 12
or Pre-Calc 12 (min. grade
of 60%), 2 electives Group 1, 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 3, Minimum admission
average 75%
Two of English 3101,
3201, 3202 (min. grade of
60%), Math 2200, Math
3200 (min. grade of 60%),
2 electives - Group 1, 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
3, Minimum admission
average 75%
English 516 (min. grade
of 60%), Math 436, Math
536 (min. grade of 60%),
2 electives - Group 1, 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
3,
Minimum admission
average 75%
English 122 (minimum
grade of 60%), Adv. Math
120 + Math 121/122 (minimum grade of 65%),
Phys 122 or Chem 122
(minimum grade of 65%),
1 elective - Group 1 (min.
grade of 60%), 1 elective Group 1 or 2 (min. grade
of 60%), Minimum
admission average 75%
Engl 621 (minimum grade
of 60%), Math 521 (minimum grade of 65%), Math
621 (minimum grade of
65%), Phys 621 or Chem
621 (minimum grade of
65%), 1 elective - Group 1
(min. grade of 60%), 1
elective - Group 1 or 2
(min. grade of 60%),
Minimum admission
average 75%
English 12 (minimum
grade of 60%), Pre-Calc
11 (minimum grade of
65%), Pre-Calc 12 (minimum grade of 65%), Phys
12 or Chem 12 (minimum
grade of 65%), 1 elective Group 1 (min. grade of
60%), 1 elective - Group 1
or 2 (min. grade of 60%),
Minimum admission
average 75%
Two of English 3101,
3201, 3202 (minimum
grade of 60%), Math 2200
(minimum grade of 65%),
Math 3200 (minimum
grade of 65%), Physics
3204 or Chemistry 3202
(minimum grade of 65%),
1 elective - Group 1 (min.
grade of 60%), 1 elective Group 1 or 2 (min. grade
of 60%), Minimum
admission average 75%
English 516 (minimum
grade of 60%), Math 436
(minimum grade of 65%),
Math 536 (minimum
grade of 65%), Phys 534
or Chem 534 (minimum
grade of 65%), 1 elective Group 1 (min. grade of
60%), 1 elective - Group 1
or 2 (min. grade of 60%),
Minimum admission average 75%
Bachelor of Computer
Science / Bachelor of
Science
English 122, Adv. Math
120 + Math 121/122 (min.
grade of 60%), Physics
122,
Chemistry 122, 1 elective
- Group 1 or 2,
Minimum admission
average 75%
Engl 621, Math 521, Math
621 (min. grade of 60%),
Phys 621, Chem 621, 1
elective - Group 1 or 2,
Minimum admission
average 75%
English 12, Pre-Calc 11,
Pre-Calc 12 (min. grade of
60%), Physics 12, Chemistry 12, 1 elective Group 1 or 2,
Minimum admission
average 75%
Two of English 3101,
3201, 3202, Math 2200,
Math 3200 (min. grade of
60%), Physics 3204,
Chemistry 3202, 1 elective - Group 1 or 2,
Minimum admission
average 75%
English 516, Math 436,
Math 536 (min. grade of
60%), Physics 534, Chemistry 534, 1 elective Group 1 or 2,
Minimum admission
average 75%
Bachelor of Computer
Science / Bachelor of
Science in Engineering
(Geodesy & Geomatics)
English 122 (min. grade
of 60%), Adv. Math 120 +
Math 121/122 (min. grade
of 65%), Physics 122
(min. grade of 65%),
Chem 122 (min. grade of
65%), 1 elective - Group 1
or 2 or 4 (min. grade of
60%),
Minimum admission
average 75%
Engl 621 (min. grade of
60%), Math 521 (min.
grade of 65%), Math 621
(min. grade of 65%), Phys
621 (min. grade of 65%),
Chem 621 (min. grade of
65%), 1 elective - Group 1
or 2 or 4 (min. grade of
60%),
Minimum admission
average 75%
English 12 (min. grade of
60%), Pre-Calc 11 (min.
grade of 65%), Pre-Calc
12 (min. grade of 65%),
Physics 12 (min. grade of
65%), Chemistry 12 (min.
grade of 65%), 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 4 (min.
grade of 60%),
Minimum admission
average 75%
Two of English 3101,
3201, 3202 (min. grade of
60%), Math 2200 (min.
grade of 65%), Math 3200
(min. grade of 65%),
Physics 3204 (min. grade
of 65%), Chemistry 3202
(min. grade of 65%), 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
4 (min. grade of 60%),
Minimum admission
average 75%
English 516 (min. grade
of 60%), Math 436 (min.
grade of 65%), Math 536
(min. grade of 65%), Phys
534 (min. grade of 65%),
Chem 534 (min. grade of
65%), 1 elective - Group 1
or 2 or 4 (min. grade of
60%),
Minimum admission
average 75%
Bachelor of Applied Arts
(Craft and Design)
Bachelor of Hospitality
and Tourism (Saint
John)
Bachelor of Computer
Science,
Bachelor of Data
Analysis (Saint John),
Bachelor of Science in
Computer Science (Saint
John)
30
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
SECTION B
ON
MB,SK,AB,BC,
NT,NU,YT
US
INFO
English 4U (min. grade of
60%)
Math MGA4U
Math MCB4U
Physics SPH4U
Chemistry SCH4U
1 unit Soc. Studies
Minimum admission
average 75%
English (minimum grade
of 60%), 2 Maths, Physics, Chemistry, 1 unit of
Social Studies,
Minimum admission
average 75%.
English (minimum grade
of 60%), 2 Maths, Physics, Chemistry, 1 unit of
Social Studies,
See box below
Senior-year Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry are required courses for admission to these programs.
An average of the marks in senior-year math and the best two grades from grade 12 Biology, Chemistry,
Geology and Physics must be at least 75%.
Students should note that two years each of high school Chemistry & Physics will normally be required;
students lacking these courses will be considered on an individual basis.
Courses which can be used to fulfill the unit of Social Studies include: History (Jr. or Sr. Year), Geography (Jr. or Sr. Year), senior-year Economics, Political Science, Sociology or World Issues.
See note #13.
English 4U (min. grade of
60%), MCF3M or
MCR3U or FS F4U
1 unit Soc. Studies
2 electives - Group 1
1 elective - Group 1, 2 or
3
Minimum admission average 65%
English (min. grade of
60%), French or Math, 1
unit Soc. Studies, 2 electives - Group 1, 1 elective
- Group 1 or 2 or 3,
Minimum admission
average 65%
English (min. grade of
60%), French or Math, 1
unit Soc. Studies, 2 electives - Group 1, 1 electiveGroup 1 or 2 or 3,
See box below
Courses which can be used to fulfill the unit of Social Studies include: History (Jr. or Sr.
Year), Geography (Jr. or Sr. Year), senior-year Economics, Political Science, Sociology
or World Issues.
Students interested in the Bachelor of Applied Arts (Craft and Design)must make application to both UNB and the New Brunswick College of Craft and Design (NBCCD). As
well as the BAA requirements listed here, applicants must meet the NBCCD diploma
program admission requirements. Students must contact the NBCCD directly for information regarding admission requirements, as well as the application procedures, for the
diploma program.
See note 16 re. Math requirement for New Brunswick applicants.
English 4U (min. grade of
60%) MGA4U (min. grade of
65%)MCB4U (min. grade of
65%) SPH4U, Chem or
SCH4U (min. grade of 65%)
1 unit Social Studies (min.
grade of 60%)
1 elective - Group 1, 2 or 3
(min. grade of 60%)
Minimum admission
average 75%
English (minimum grade of
60%), 2 Maths (minimum
grade of 65%), Physics or
Chemistry (minimum grade of
65%), 1 unit Social Studies
(minimum grade of 60%), 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or 3
(minimum grade of 60%),
Minimum admission
average 75%
English (minimum grade
of 60%), 2 Maths (minimum grade of 65%),
Physics or Chemistry
(minimum grade of 65%),
1 unit Social Studies (minimum grade of 60%), 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
3 (minimum grade of
60%),
See box below
Courses which can be used to fulfill the unit of Social Studies include: History (Jr. or Sr.
Year), Geography (Jr. or Sr. Year), senior-year Economics, Political Science, Sociology
or World Issues.
See note #13.
English 4U (min. grade of
60%)
Math MGA4U
Math MCB4U (min. grade of
60%)
2 electives - Group 1
1 elective - Group 1, 2 or 3
Minimum admission average
75%
English (minimum grade
of 60%), Math 11, Math
12 (minimum grade of
60%), 2 electives - Group
1, 1 elective - Group 1 or
2 or 3, Minimum
admission average 75%
English (minimum grade
of 60%), Math 11, Math
12 (minimum grade of
60%), 2 electives - Group
1, 1 elective - Group 1 or
2 or 3, See box below
Applicants who do not meet the admission requirements for direct entry to the degree
program, but offer a minimum admission average of 60% (and other conditions as may
be required by the admitting faculty) will be given conditional admission to the appropriate faculty in an entrance program
English 4U (min. grade of
60%)
Math MGA4U (min. grade of
65%)
Math MCB4U (min. grade of
65%)
Phys SPH4U or Chem SCH4U
(min. grade of 65%)
1 elective - Group 1 (min.
grade of 60%)
1 elective - Group 1 or 2 (min.
grade of 60%)
Minimum admission
average 75%
English (minimum grade
of 60%), 2 Maths (minimum grade of 65%),
Physics or Chemistry
(minimum grade of 65%),
1 elective - Group 1 (min.
grade of 60%), 1 elective Group 1 or 2 (min. grade
of 60%),
Minimum admission
average 75%
English (minimum grade
of 60%), 2 Maths (minimum grade of 65%),
Physics or Chemistry
(minimum grade of 65%),
1 elective - Group 1 (min.
grade of 60%), 1 elective Group 1 or 2 (min. grade
of 60%), See box below
Applicants who do not meet the admission requirements for direct entry to the degree
program, but offer a minimum admission average of 60% (and other conditions as may
be required by the admitting faculty) will be given conditional admission to the appropriate faculty in an entrance program.
See note #13.
English 4U
Math MGA4U
Math MCB4U (min. grade
60%)
Physics SPH4U
Chemistry SCH4U
1 elective - Group 1 or 2 Minimum admission average 75%
English, Math 11, Math 12
(min. grade of 60%),
Physics, Chemistry, 1
elective - Group 1 or 2,
Minimum admission
average 75%
English, Math 11, Math 12
(min. grade of 60%),
Physics, Chemistry, 1
elective - Group 1 or 2,
See box below
Senior-year Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry are required courses for admission to
these programs. An average of the marks in senior-year Math and the best two grades
from grade 12 Biology, Chemistry, Geology and Physics must be at least 75%.
Students should note that two years each of high school Chemistry and Physics will normally be required; students lacking these courses will be considered on an individual
basis.
See note #13.
English 4U (min. grade of
60%)
Math MGA4U (min. grade of
65%)
Math MCB4U (min. grade of
65%)
Physics SPH4U (min. grade of
65%)
Chemistry SCH4U (min. grade
of 65%)
1 elective - Group 1, 2 or 4
(min. grade of 60%) Minimum
admission average 75%
English (min. grade of
60%), 2 Maths (min.
grade of 65%), Physics
(min. grade of 65%),
Chemistry (min. grade of
65%), 1 elective - Group 1
or 2 or 4 (min. grade of
60%),
Minimum admission
average 75%
English (min. grade of
60%), 2 Maths (min.
grade of 65%), Physics
(min. grade of 65%),
Chemistry (min. grade of
65%), 1 elective - Group 1
or 2 or 4 (min. grade of
60%), See box below
Note: Students offering less than 70% in high school Chemistry, Physics and senior-year
Mathematics may have to take additional courses.
Students should note that two years each of high school Chemistry and Physics will normally be required; students lacking these courses will be considered on an individual
basis.
See note #13.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
31
SECTION B : ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Program
NB
PEI
NS
NF
QC (High School Leaving Examination)
Bachelor of Nursing
English 122 (min. grade
of 60%), Math 111/112 or
Math 121/122 (min. grade
of 60%), Chemistry 122
(min. grade of 60%), Biology 120 (min. grade of
60%), 2
electives - Group 1,
Minimum admission average 70%
Engl 621 (min. grade of
60%), Math 521 or Math
621 (min. grade of 60%),
Chem 621 (min. grade of
60%), Biol 621 (min.
grade of 60%), 2 electives
- Group 1,
Minimum admission average 70%
English 12 (min. grade of
60%), Math 11 or PreCalc 11 or Math 12 (min.
grade of 60%), Chemistry
12 (min. grade of 60%),
Biol 12 (min. grade of
60%), 2 electives - Group
1,
Minimum admission average 70%
Two of English 3101,
3201, 3202 (min. grade of
60%), Math 2200 or Math
3200 (min. grade of 60%),
Chemistry 3202 (min.
grade of 60%), Biol 3201
(min. grade of 60%), 2
electives - Group 1, Minimum admission average
70%
English 516 (min. grade
of 60%), Math 436 or
Math 536 (min. grade of
60%), Chemistry 534
(min. grade of 60%), Biology 534 (min. grade of
60%), 2 electives - Group
1, Minimum admission
average 70%
Bachelor of Philosophy
(in Interdisciplinary
Leadership Studies)
English 122, Math 111/
112, 3 electives - Group 1,
1 elective - Group 1 or 2
or 3, Minimum admission
average 75%
Engl 621, Math 521, 3
electives - Group 1, 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
3, Minimum admission
average 75%
English 12, Math 11 or
Pre-Calc 11, 3 electives Group 1, 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 3, Minimum admission average
75%
Two of English 3101,
3201, 3202, Math 2200, 3
electives - Group 1, 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
3, Minimum admission
average 75%
English 516, Math 436, 3
electives - Group 1, 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
3, Minimum admission
average 75%
Bachelor of Recreation
and Sport Studies
English 122 (min. grade
of 60%), either Math 121/
122 or Advanced Math
120, One of: Biology 120,
Chemistry 122, or Physics 122, 2 electives Group 1, 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 3 or 5,
Minimum admission
Average: 65%
Engl 621 (min. grade of
60%), Math 621, One of:
Biol 621, Chem 621, or
Phys 621, 2 electives Group 1, 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 3 or 5,
Minimum admission
Average: 65%
English 12 (min. grade of
60%), Math 12 or PreCalc 12, One of: Biol 12,
Chemistry 12, or Physics
12, 2 electives - Group 1,
1 elective - Group 1 or 2
or 3 or 5, Minimum
admission Average: 65%
Two of English 3101,
3201, 3202 (min. grade of
60%), Math 3200, One of:
Biol 3201, Chemistry
3202, or Physics 3204, 2
electives - Group 1, 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
3 or 5, Minimum admission Average: 65%
English 516 (min. grade
of 60%), Math 536, One
of: Biol 534, Chem 534,
or Phys 534, 2 electives Group 1, 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 3 or 5,
Minimum admission
Average: 65%
Bachelor of Science in
Engineering
English 122 (min. grade
of 60%), Adv. Math 120 +
Math 121/122 (min. grade
of 60%), Physics 122
(min. grade of 60%),
Chemistry 122 (min.
grade of 60%), 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 4 (min.
grade of 60%),
Minimum admission average 70%
Engl 621 (min. grade of
60%), Math 521 (min.
grade of 60%), Math 621
(min. grade of 60%), Phys
621 (min. grade of 60%),
Chem 621 (min. grade of
60%), 1 elective - Group 1
or 2 or 4 (min. grade of
60%),
Minimum admission average 70%
English 12 (min. grade of
60%), Pre-Calc 11 (min.
grade of 60%), Pre-Calc
12 (min. grade of 60%),
Physics 12 (min. grade of
60%), Chemistry 12 (min.
grade of 60%), 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 4 (min.
grade of 60%),
Minimum admission average 70%
Two of English 3101,
3201, 3202 (min. grade of
60%), Math 2200 (min.
grade of 60%), Math 3200
(min. grade of 60%),
Physics 3204 (min. grade
of 60%), Chemistry 3202
(min. grade of 60%), 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
4 (min. grade of 60%),
Minimum admission average 70%,
English 516 (min. grade
of 60%), Math 436 (min.
grade of 60%), Math 536
(min. grade of 60%), Phys
534 (min. grade of 60%),
Chem 534 (min. grade of
60%), 1 elective - Group 1
or 2 or 4 (min. grade of
60%), Minimum admission average 70%
Bachelor of Science in
Forest Engineering
English 122 (min. grade
of 60%), Adv. Math 120 +
Math 121/122 (min. grade
of 60%), Physics 122
(min. grade of 60%),
Chemistry 122 (min.
grade of 60%), 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 4 (min.
grade of 60%), Minimum
admission average 70%
Engl 621 (min. grade of
60%), Math 521, Math
621 (min. grade of 60%),
Phys 621 (min. grade of
60%), Chem 621 (min.
grade of 60%), 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 4 (min.
grade of 60%),
Minimum admission average 70%
English 12 (min. grade of
60%), Pre-Calc 11, PreCalc 12 (min. grade of
60%), Physics 12 (min.
grade of 60%), Chemistry
12 (min. grade of 60%), 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
4 (min. grade of 60%),
Minimum admission average 70%
Two of English 3101,
3201, 3202 (min. grade of
60%), Math 2200, Math
3200 (min. grade of 60%),
Physics 3204 (min. grade
of 60%), Chemistry 3202
(min. grade of 60%), 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
4 (min. grade of 60%),
Minimum admission average 70%
English 516 (min. grade
of 60%), Math 436, Math
536 (min. grade of 60%),
Phys 534 (min. grade of
60%), Chem 534 (min.
grade of 60%), 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 4 (min.
grade of 60%),
Minimum admission average 70%
Bachelor of Science in
Forestry
English 122 (min. grade
of 60%), Adv. Math 120 +
Math 121/122 (min. grade
of 60%), Chemistry 122
(min. grade of 60%), Biology 120 or Physics 122
(min. grade of 60%), 1
elective - Group 1 or 2
(min. grade of 60%) ,
Minimum admission average 70%
Engl 621 (min. grade of
60%), Math 521, Math
621 (min. grade of 60%),
Chem 621 (min. grade of
60%), Biol 621 or Phys
621 (min. grade of 60%),
1 elective - Group 1 or 2
(min. grade of 60%),
Minimum admission average 70%
English 12 (min. grade of
60%), Math 11, Math 12
(min. grade of 60%),
Chemistry 12 (min. grade
of 60%), Biol 12 or Physics 12 (min. grade of
60%), 1 elective - Group 1
or 2 (min. grade of 60%),
Minimum admission average 70%
Two of English 3101,
3201, 3202 (min. grade of
60%), Math 2200, Math
3200 (min. grade of 60%),
Chemistry 3202 (min.
grade of 60%), Biol 3201
or Physics 3204 (min.
grade of 60%), 1 elective Group 1 or 2 (min. grade
of 60%), Minimum
admission average 70%
English 516 (min. grade
of 60%), Math 436, Math
536 (min. grade of 60%),
Chem 534 (min. grade of
60%), Biol 534 or Phys
534 (min. grade of 60%),
1 elective - Group 1 or 2
(min. grade of 60%),
Minimum admission average 70%
Bachelor of Science in
Kinesiology
English 122 (min. grade
of 60%), Advanced Math
120 + Math 121/122,
Chemistry 122, Biology
120 or Physics 122, 1
elective - Group 1, 1 elective - Group 1 or 2 or 3 or
5, Minimum admission
Average: 65%
Engl 621 (min. grade of
60%), Math 621, Chem
621, Biol 621 or Phys 621,
1 elective - Group 1, 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
3 or 5,
Minimum admission
Average: 65%
English 12 (min. grade of
60%), Pre-Calc 12, Chemistry 12, Biol 12 or Physics 12, 1 elective - Group
1, 1 elective - Group 1 or
2 or 3 or 5, Minimum
admission Average: 65%
Two of English 3101,
3201, 3202 (min. grade of
60%), Math 3200, Chemistry 3202, Biol 3201 or
Physics 3204, 1 elective Group 1, 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 3 or 5,
Minimum admission
Average: 65%
English 516 (min. grade
of 60%), Math 536, Chem
534, Biol 534 or Phys 534,
1 elective - Group 1, 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
3 or 5, Minimum admission Average: 65%
32
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
SECTION B
ON
MB,SK,AB,BC,
NT,NU,YT
US
INFO
English 4U (min. grade of
60%), Math MCF3M or
MCR3U (min. grade of
60%), Chemistry SCH4U
(min. grade of 60%),
Biology SBI4U (min.
grade of 60%),
2 electives - Group 1
Minimum admission
average 70%
English (min. grade of
60%), Math 11 or Math 12
(min. grade of 60%),
Chemistry (min. grade of
60%), Biology (min.
grade of 60%), 2 electives
- Group 1, Minimum
admission average 70%
English (min. grade of
60%), Math 11 or Math 12
(min. grade of 60%),
Chemistry (min. grade of
60%), Biology (min.
grade of 60%), 2 electives
- Group 1, See box below
Senior-year Chemistry and Biology are required. A minimum overall average of 70% is
required on English, Math, Biology and Chemistry.
Other forms in addition to the normal application are required for this program; these
forms are available from your guidance office and from the Admissions Office.
All admissions are on a competitive basis; satisfaction of the minimum requirements
does not guarantee admission.
English 4U
Math MCF3M or MCR3U
3 electives - Group 1
1 elective - Group 1, 2 or
3
Minimum admission average 75%
English, Math, 3 electives
- Group 1, 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 3, Minimum admission average
75%
English, Math, 3 electives
- Group 1, 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 3, See box
below
An average of 75% or higher on senior-year English and the required Mathematics is
required.
All admissions are on a competitive basis; satisfaction of the minimum requirements
does not guarantee admission. Applicants must also submit to the Admissions Office a
résumé which clearly and concisely outlines the applicant’s : educational and career
goals, volunteer activities, prior learning experiences, diversity of background and skills
(such as, but not limited to: artistic, musical, athletic, cultural, linguistic), and leadership
experience. Typically, this information can be communicated well in two or three pages.
No special forms or formats are required.
English 4U (min. grade of
60%)
Math MGA4U or MCB4U,
One of Biology SBI4U, Chem
SCH4U, Phys SPH4U
2 electives - Group 1
1 elective - Group 1, 2, 3 or 5
Minimum admission average
65%
English (min. grade of
60%), Math, One of: Biology, Chemistry, or Physics, 2 electives - Group 1,
1 elective - Group 1 or 2
or 3 or 5,
Minimum admission
Average: 65%
English (min. grade of
60%), Math, One of: Biology, Chemistry, or Physics, 2 electives - Group 1,
1 elective - Group 1 or 2
or 3 or 5, See box below
All admissions are on a competitive basis; satisfaction of the minimum requirements
does not guarantee admission.
English 4U (min. grade of
60%)
Math MGA4U (min. grade of
60%)
Math MCB4U (min. grade of
60%)
Chemistry SCH4U (min. grade
of 60%)
Physics SPH4U (min. grade of
60%)
1 elective - Group 1, 2 or 4
(min. grade of 60%)
Minimum admission average
70%
English (min. grade of
60%), 2 Maths (min.
grade of 60%), Physics
(min. grade of 60%),
Chemistry (min. grade of
60%), 1 elective - Group 1
or 2 or 4 (min. grade of
60%),
Minimum admission average 70%
English (min. grade of
60%), 2 Maths (min.
grade of 60%), Physics
(min. grade of 60%),
Chemistry (min. grade of
60%), 1 elective - Group 1
or 2 or 4 (min. grade of
60%), See box below
Students not offering at least 70% in high school Chemistry, Physics and senior-year
Math may have as much as 9 credit hours added to their programs because of course substitutions which take place in 1st year when such prerequisites are not met.
Students should note that two years each of high school Chemistry and Physics will normally be required; students lacking these courses will be considered on an individual
basis.
Applicants who do not meet the admission requirements for direct entry to the degree
program, but offer a minimum admission average of 60% (and other conditions as may
be required by the admitting faculty) will be given conditional admission to the appropriate faculty in an entrance program.
Only the first two years of Engineering are offered at UNB Saint John.
See Note #13.
English 4U (min. grade of
60%)
Math MGA4U (min. grade of
60%)
Math MCB4U (min. grade of
60%)
Physics SPH4U (min. grade of
60%)
Chemistry SCH4U (min. grade
of 60%)
1 elective - Group 1, 2 or 4
(min. grade of 60%)
Minimum admission average
70%
English (min. grade of
60%), Math 11, Math 12
(min. grade of 60%),
Physics (min. grade of
60%), Chemistry (min.
grade of 60%), 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 4 (min.
grade of 60%),
Minimum admission average 70%
English (min. grade of
60%), Math 11, Math 12
(min. grade of 60%),
Physics (min. grade of
60%), Chemistry (min.
grade of 60%), 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 4 (min.
grade of 60%), See box
below
Students not offering at least 70% in high school Chemistry, Physics and senior-year
Math may have as much as 9 credit hours added to their programs because of course substitutions which take place in 1st year when such prerequisites are not met.
Applicants who do not meet the admission requirements for direct entry to the degree
program, but offer a minimum admission average of 60% (and other conditions as may
be required by the admitting faculty) will be given conditional admission to the appropriate faculty in an entrance program
Students should note that two years each of high school Chemistry and Physics will normally be required; students lacking these courses will be considered on an individual
basis.
See note #13.
English 4U (min. grade of
60%), Math MGA4U (min.
grade of 60%)
Math MCB4U (min. grade of
60%), Chemistry SCH4U
(min. grade of 60%), Biology
SBI4U or Physics SPH4U
(min. grade of 60%)
1 elective - Group 1 or 2 (min.
grade of 60%), Minimum
admission average 70%
English (min. grade of
60%), Math 11, Math 12
(min. grade of 60%),
Chemistry (min. grade of
60%), Biology or Physics
(min. grade of 60%), 1
elective - Group 1 or 2
(min. grade of 60%),
Minimum admission average 70%
English (min. grade of
60%), Math 11, Math 12
(min. grade of 60%),
Chemistry (min. grade of
60%), Biology or Physics
(min. grade of 60%), 1
elective - Group 1 or 2
(min. grade of 60%), See
box below
BScF applicants who have a mark less than 70% in senior year Chem must take Chem
1801 which will add 4 credit hours to the program.
Applicants who do not meet the admission requirements for direct entry to the degree
program, but offer a minimum admission average of 60% (and other conditions as may
be required by the admitting faculty) will be given conditional admission to the appropriate faculty in an entrance program.
See note #13.
English 4U (min. grade of
60%)
Math MGA4U and MCB4U
Chem SCH4U
Biol SCI4U or Phys SPHAU
1 elective - Group 1
1 elective - Group 1, 2, 3 or 5
Minimum admission average
65%
English 12 (min. grade of
60%), Math, Chemistry,
Biology or Physics, 1
elective - Group 1, 1 elective - Group 1 or 2 or 3 or
5, Minimum admission
Average: 65%
English 12 (min. grade of
60%), Math, Chemistry,
Biology or Physics, 1
elective - Group 1, 1 elective - Group 1 or 2 or 3 or
5, See box below
All admissions are on a competitive basis; satisfaction of the minimum requirements
does not guarantee admission.
Only the first year of this program is offered at UNB Saint John.
Only the first year of this program is offered at UNB Saint John.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
33
SECTION B : ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Bachelor of Science in
Software Engineering
English 122 (minimum
grade of 60%), Adv. Math
120 + Math 121/122 (minimum grade of 60%),
Physics 122 (minimum
grade of 60%), Chem 122
(minimum grade of 60%),
1 elective - Group 1 or 2
or 4 (minimum grade of
60%),
Minimum admission average 75%
Engl 621 (minimum grade
of 60%), Math 521 (minimum grade of 60%), Math
621 (minimum grade of
60%), Phys 621 (minimum grade of 60%),
Chem 621 (minimum
grade of 60%), 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 4 (minimum grade of 60%), Minimum admission average
75%
English 12 (minimum
grade of 60%), Pre-Calc
11 (minimum grade of
60%), Pre-Calc 12 (minimum grade of 60%),
Physics 12 (minimum
grade of 60%), Chemistry
12 (minimum grade of
60%), 1 elective - Group 1
or 2 or 4 (minimum grade
of 60%),
Minimum admission average 75%
Two of English 3101,
3201, 3202 (minimum
grade of 60%), Math 2200
(minimum grade of 60%),
Math 3200 (minimum
grade of 60%), Physics
3204 (minimum grade of
60%), Chemistry 3202
(minimum grade of 60%),
1 elective - Group 1 or 2
or 4 (minimum grade of
60%), Minimum admission average 75%
English 516 (minimum
grade of 60%), Math 436
(minimum grade of 60%),
Math 536 (minimum
grade of 60%), Phys 534
(minimum grade of 60%),
Chem 534 (minimum
grade of 60%), 1 elective Group 1 or 2 or 4 (minimum grade of 60%), Minimum admission average
75%
Bachelor of Science,
English 122, Adv. Math
120 + Math 121/122,
Physics 122, Chemistry
122, 1 elective - Group 1
or 2, Minimum admission
average 75%
Engl 621 Math 521, Math
621, Phys 621, Chem 621,
1 elective - Group 1 or 2,
Minimum admission average 75%
English 12, Pre-Calc 11,
Pre-Calc 12, Physics 12,
Chemistry 12, 1 elective Group 1 or 2, Minimum
admission average 75%
Two of English 3101,
3201, 3202, Math 2200,
Math 3200, Physics 3204,
Chemistry 3202, 1 elective - Group 1 or 2, Minimum admission average
75%
English 516, Math 436,
Math 536, Physics 534,
Chemistry 534, 1 elective
- Group 1 or 2, Minimum
admission average 75%
Bachelor of Medical
Laboratory Science
Notes to Admissions Chart:
1.
A pass at the high school level is required for each subject counted for admission (unless otherwise specified).
2.
To count for admission a subject must be taken at the "academic" level (N.B. level 2) unless otherwise specified; level 1, French Immersion, and advanced courses are satisfactory
substitutes (where they exist). Courses taken at the "general" or “open” levels will not be accepted for admission purposes.
3.
Students intending to enter the Science program (BSc), programs offered concurrently with the Science program (BA/BSc, BCS/BSc), the Bachelor of Medical Laboratory
Science program (BMLS), the Bachelor of Arts and Sciences program (BASc), the Engineering programs (BScE and BScFE), and the Bachelor of Computer Science/Engineering
concurrent program (BCS/BScE) should note that two years each of high school Chemistry and Physics will normally be required. Students who do not meet these requirements
may be given special consideration.
4.
Students whose first language is French may offer French in place of English in the required subjects and may then offer English as an elective.
5.
Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission to any program.
6.
The faculties of Arts and Science (Fredericton) or Science, Applied Science & Engineering (Saint John) offer a number of combined programs. These faculties offer a concurrent
BA/BSc program (5 years of study lead to both a BA and a BSc degree), and a BASc (4 years of study lead to a Bachelor of Arts and Sciences degree). See Admission Chart for
admission requirements for these programs.
7.
The Faculty of Arts offers the Bachelor of Applied Arts (Craft and Design) (BAA). This degree program is designed for students who wish to combine practical work in craft and
design with elements of the Bachelor of Arts academic program. Students will complete two years at each of the University of New Brunswick and the New Brunswick College of
Craft and Design. Students must be recommended for admission to the BAA program by the New Brunswick College of Craft and Design following an interview with the College.
Students must also meet the admission requirements as listed in the Admissions chart. For further information, contact the Admissions Office.
8.
The Faculty of Science offers a Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science (BMLS). This program consists of courses offered at UNB (Fredericton and Saint John) and at the New
Brunswick Community College. Admission requirements are as for the BSc program.
9.
A concurrent program in Arts and Computer Science is available on the Fredericton campus in which both a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Computer Science degree can be
completed in 5 years.
10.
A concurrent program in Computer Science and Science (BCS/BSc) is available on the Fredericton campus in which both a Bachelor of Computer Science and a Bachelor of
Science degree can be completed in 5 years. Admission requirements are the same as the BSc program, with the additional qualification of a mark of 60% or higher in senior-year
Mathematics.
11.
A concurrent program in Computer Science and Engineering (BCS/BScE) is available on the Fredericton campus in which both a Bachelor of Computer Science and a Bachelor of
Science in Engineering (Geodesy & Geomatics) can be completed. This concurrent program requires at least 6 years of study. Admission requirements are the same as the
Bachelor of Science in Engineering program, with the additional qualification of a mark of 60% or higher in senior-year Mathematics.
12.
Students intending to enroll in MATH 1003, Introduction to Calculus I, must take a Placement Test which will be administered during Orientation week in September. Materials to
prepare for this test are available on the web at http://math.unb.ca/ready as well as from the Mathematics Departments in New Brunswick High Schools and UNB. Based on their
test scores, and the regulations set out by the Mathematics Departments, students will be required to take a Pre-Calculus course (Math 0863 UNBF or Math 1863 UNBSJ) or a
special section of Math 1003 that covers the material of the course over two semesters, or a regular (one semester) section of Math 1003.
13.
Ontario applicants presenting 3A and 4A courses from the old curriculum should contact the Registrar’s Office for clarification regarding specific program requirments.
14.
Science 122 is an approved Group 1 elective but it wll not be accepted as a substitute for Chemistry 122 or Physics 122 for admission to programs requiring either of these courses.
15.
New Brunswick students applying for the 2004 intake should present the following Mathematics courses:
a. For programs not requiring calculus (Arts and Nursing), UNB will require Geometry and Applications in Mathematics 111/112 PLUS Functions and Relations 111/112 with
a minimum pass mark of 60% in both courses. The grade achieved in Functions and Relations 111/112 will be used to determine the admission average.
b. For programs requiring a calculus course (including Business Administration), UNB will require Trigonometry and 3-space 121/122 PLUS Advanced Mathematics with an
Introduction to Calculus 120 with a minimum pass mark of 60% in both courses. The grades earned in both courses will be used to determine the admission average.
34
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
SECTION B
English 4U (min. grade of
60%)
Math MGA4U (min. grade of
60%)
Math MCB4U (min. grade of
60%)
Chem SCH4U (min. grade of
60%)
Physics SPH4U (min. grade
of 60%)
1 elective - Group 1, 2 or 4
(min. grade of 60%) Minimum
admission average 75%
English (minimum grade
of 60%), 2 Maths (minimum grade of 60%),
Physics (minimum grade
of 60%), Chemistry (minimum grade of 60%), 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
4 (minimum grade of
60%), Minimum admission average 75%
English (minimum grade
of 60%), 2 Maths (minimum grade of 60%),
Physics (minimum grade
of 60%), Chemistry (minimum grade of 60%), 1
elective - Group 1 or 2 or
4 (minimum grade of
60%), See box below
Note: Students offering less than 70% in high school Chemistry, Physics and senior-year
Mathematics may have to take additional courses.
Students should note that two years each of high school Chemistry and Physics will normally be required; students lacking these courses will be considered on an individual
basis.
See note # 13.
English 4U
Math MGA4U
Math MCB4U
Physics SPH4U
Chemistry SCH4U
1 elective - Group 1 or 2 Minimum admission average 75%
English, 2 Maths, Physics,
Chemistry, 1 elective Group 1 or 2, Minimum
admission average 75%
English, 2 Maths, Physics,
Chemistry, 1 elective Group 1 or 2, See box
below
Senior-year Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry are required courses for admission to
these programs. An average of the marks in senior year Math and the best two grades
from grade 12 Biology, Chemistry, Geology and Physics must be at least 75%.
Students should note that two years each of high school Chemistry and Physics will normally be required; students lacking these courses will be considered on an individual
basis.
Applicants who do not meet the admission requirements for direct entry to the degree
program, but offer a minimum admission average of 60% (and other conditions as may
be required by the Faculty of Science) will be given conditional admission to the Science
entrance program
See note # 13.
TABLE OF ELECTIVES
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
Group 4
Group 5
Adv. Math 120,
Biology 120,
Cdn. Literature 120,
Computer Ed. 110 or 120,
Economics 120,
French 122,
Geography 120,
Geometry 120,
History 122,
Physics 122,
Sociology 120,
Atlantic Lit. 120,
Calculus 120,
Chemistry 122,
Co-op Educ 120,
Envir Studies 112 or 122,
Geography 110,
Geology 120,
History 112,
Latin 120,
Political Science 120,
World Issues 120,
Science 122
Intro. to Accounting 120,
Law 120,
Native Studies 120,
Business Organization &
Management 120,
Accounting 120 (Computerized)
Theatre Arts 120 (Drama 122),
Comm. 120 (Media Studies
120),
Fl Techniques in Comm. 120,
Art 110,
Art 122,
Fine Arts 110,
Jazz Improvization 110,
Music 110 or Music 120
Computer Assisted Manufacturing 110,
Computer Assisted Drafting
110,
Intro. Electronics 110,
Micro Electronics 120,
Health & Physical Educ. 120
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
35
SECTION B
I. ADMISSION FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR
2003-2004
A. General Information
B. Non Public-Schooled Applicants
1.
Applicants in this category may have been home-schooled or may have
attended a private school that does not follow a regular provincial
curriculum. These applicants must provide the following:
Applicants may obtain information or application forms from the
Admissions Office, University of New Brunswick, P.O. Box 4400,
Fredericton, N.B. E3B 5A3 (call (506) 453-4865, or fax (506) 4535016), or the Admissions Office, UNB Saint John, P.O. Box 5050,
Saint John, NB E2L 4L5, (call (506) 648-5671, or fax (506) 6485691).
Applicants are also encouraged to consult UNB's Home Page on
the Internet (http://www.unb.ca) for up-to-date developments,
including an on-line application.
2.
3.
A student applying for entrance to the University of New
Brunswick (UNB) must complete an application form and forward
it to the Admissions Office together with the application
processing fee of $35. A tuition confirmation deposit of $75 is
required from all applicants after they have been accepted.
The final date for application, including required supporting
documentation, for the 2003-2004 session is 31 March 2002 (31
January for BEd programs). Applications received after that date
may be considered, provided that space is available, but late
applicants are cautioned that their applications will not be
processed until the earlier applications are dealt with, and that
they may not necessarily be accepted for the campus or Faculty
of their choice. This closing date does not apply to applications for
Graduate Studies. It is recommended that applications for
programs with enrollment limits, i.e. Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of
Business Administration, Bachelor of Education, Bachelor of
Computer Science, Bachelor of Nursing, Bachelor of Science in
Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Forestry, Bachelor of Science
in Forest Engineering and Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology,
and Bachelor of Recreation and Sports Studies programs be
submitted early.
4.
Applicants for University scholarships must complete the
Scholarships Section of the application.
5.
Given the lead time required for processing of visas, international
students are encouraged to apply early; UNB expedites the
processing of such applications, which includes offering to fax
acceptances and rendering early decisions as soon as
applications become complete. Offers of admission can be made
throughout the year, until such time as competitions are declared
closed.
6.
Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee
admission to any program. For example there are limitations on
enrollment in the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Business Administration, Bachelor of Education, Bachelor of Computer Science,
Bachelor of Nursing, Bachelor of Science in Forestry, Bachelor of
Science in Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Forest
Engineering and Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology, and
Bachelor of Recreation and Sports Studies programs.
7.
Students will normally follow the regulations in the Calendar for
the year of their admission.
36
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
1.
A complete Application for Admission form with the application
processing fee.
2.
A letter identifying the applicant's "non public-schooled" status
and including a transcript detailing grade 11 and grade 12
courses. Course outline, syllabus, evaluation criteria, and a list of
resource materials should be provided for each course.
3.
Evidence of a minimum score of 1100 in the SAT 1.
4.
For programs requiring specific grades in particular courses,
evidence of achievement can be provided as follows:
5.
a.
Complete a SAT 2 test in required courses and achieve a
minimum of 550 out of 800, or
b.
Complete the Grade 12 Adult High School Certification
Provincial exam for that subject and achieve the grade
specified in the program pre-requisite (e.g. a minimum
grade of 60% is required in English 122 for admission to
the Faculty of Arts), or
c.
Achieve a minimum grade of 4 in an approved Advanced
Placement (AP) course.
Submit evidence of achievement as outlined above by having
official documents (transcripts/statements of results) sent directly
from the testing agency to the Admissions Office. (Documents will
not be accepted from applicants).
C. Mature Applicants
1.
Canadian citizens and permanent residents who do not meet the
usual entrance requirements and who are 21 years of age or
older by the session for which acceptance is sought may be
considered for admission. In addition to the documentation
normally requested, such applicants are encouraged to submit a
letter indicating why they feel they are likely to profit from a
university education.
2.
Normally admission to an undergraduate program will be
assessed after a mature applicant has completed UNB courses
on a part-time basis approved for the purpose; high school
graduates, adult high school diploma recipients and holders of
high school equivalency certificates (GED) may be exempted
from this requirement. Since some Faculties specifically require
certain courses in Mathematics and Science, qualifying course
work may also be required; proof of successful completion in the
specified course, as offered by the N.B. Department of Advanced
Education & Labour and/or the NBCC network, is acceptable. All
applicants should consult the Registrar's Office before registering.
3.
Applicants who have attended another college or university but
who have been away from formal education for a minimum of five
years may make application under this regulation. However, clear
evidence of ability to handle university-level studies, or of
extenuating circumstances, will be required. In select cases,
qualifying course work may not be required.
4.
The University reserves the right to refuse admission.
SECTION B
D. Academic Probation for Transfer Students
1.
When students transferring from another Faculty, University or
post-secondary institution are admitted on Academic Probation,
that placement on Academic Probation will be considered to be
the one allowable placement under these regulations.
H. Applicant from the United States of America or
from High Schools Using American - Based High
School Curriculum
1.
Applicants from Grade 12 of an accredited American-based high
school curriculum must offer a rigorous program of required
university preparatory courses and receive a favourable
recommendation from the high school principal. Criteria such as
academic standing, rank in class, and SAT score will also be used
to determine a candidate's admissibility.
2.
Normally students will be required to offer an average of B- or
better, a rank in the upper half of the graduating university
preparatory class, and offer a total SAT I score of at least 1100.
Significantly higher standards may be required of those
requesting admission to restricted enrollment programs.
E. Admission from Community College
Graduates from Community College Programs and students who have
successfully completed study in community college programs should
request that official transcripts of their work be forwarded to the
Registrar's Office.
1.
Such transcripts will be considered for transfer credit provided
that:
a.
the courses being considered for credit satisfy the program
requirements at the University of New Brunswick;
b.
the courses being considered meet the standard of grade
required within the program at the University of New
Brunswick.
F. Admission with Advanced Standing
1.
2.
An admitted applicant who has taken recognized OAC credits
may be considered for transfer credit in appropriate courses.
Normally a mark of 65% will be required in each subject for which
credit is sought. In some subjects a higher grade may be
required.
Credit may be given for appropriate courses if an applicant has
completed at least one full year of CEGEP. Normally a minimum
mark of 65% will be required in each subject for which credit is
sought.
3.
The maximum amount of transfer credit which may be allowed
under 1 or 2 above will not be more than the normal number of
credit hours in first year of the program to which the student is
admitted.
4.
Applicants from overseas who already possess entrance
requirements as stated on GCE 'O' level or its equivalent may be
considered for transfer credit, for appropriate courses in the
program they propose to enter, on the basis of GCE 'A' level
passes with at least a grade of 'C'.
I. Bachelor of Education Concurrent Program
Admission is granted in consultation with the Faculty of Education. The
number of places available in the program is limited and admission is
competitive.
Criteria for Admissions
Minimum requirements for admission to the Faculty of Education
Concurrent Degree Program are:
1.
successful completion of a minimum of 30 credit hours or
equivalent of undergraduate studies from a recognized university,
college or other post-secondary institution;
2.
good academic standing; and
3.
eligibility to register in another undergraduate program at UNB.
Note: Although students may be admitted after completing only 30
credit hours of undergraduate studies, effective Fall term 2004,
they must fulfill one of the following requirements before the BEd
will be awarded:
G. Applicants from Great Britain and Other
Countries with GCE Equivalent Examinations
1.
2.
1. GCE O level at B or grade-three level in English, Mathematics,
and four academic options is required.
Students whose native language is not English must write one of
the tests from the following institutions:
a.
The University of Michigan English Language Institute,
Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. (Minimum score 85)
b.
IELTS offered by the University of Cambridge, Local
Examinations Syndicate, Syndicate Building, Cambridge,
England. (Minimum overall band 6.5)
c.
TOEFL offered by the Educational Testing Services,
Princeton, New Jersey, 08540, USA. (Contact Registrars
Office at either UNB Fredericton or UNB Saint John for
minimum score requirements.)
d.
Other language proficiency tests may also be considered.
a.
In the Early Years program, students must complete at
least 30 credit hours of course work in teachable subjects
involving courses in at least four different teachable
subjects.
b.
In the Middle or Young Adult programs, students must
complete a major of at least 30 credit hours in one
teachable subject and 18 credit hours in another teachable
subject, or a double minor of at least 24 credit hours in
each of two different teachable subjects.
Significant weight will be given to the academic record. Consideration
will also be given to the applicant's suitability for and interest in
education. Individual interviews may be conducted as required.
To be admitted to the Consecutive BEd Early Years Program, effective
Fall Term 2004, students must have at least 30 credit hours of course
work in teachable subjects involving courses in at least four different
teachable subjects.
To be admitted to the Consecutive BEd Middle or Young Adult Programs,
effective Fall Term 2004, students must have a major of 30 credit hours
in one teachable subject and 18 credit hours in another teachable
subject or, a double minor of 24 credit hours in two different teachable
subjects.
Required Documentation
The following documents must be submitted by January 31st of the
academic year for which the applicant is seeking admission:
1.
Application form and education supplementary forms, which
include evidence of experience and education indicating a
suitability for and an interest in education, and a personal
statement of intent and purpose.
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
37
SECTION B
2.
3.
Official transcript(s) of academic record to date, other than
University of New Brunswick transcripts. Applicants must arrange
for an official transcript at each university, college, or other postsecondary institution attended to be sent directly to the
Admissions Office by the academic records department of the
institution. Applicants must also arrange for an official transcript of
all grades received after the time of application to be sent directly
to the Admissions Office as soon as it becomes available. The
Admissions Office cannot accept the applicant's copy of any
transcript.
Two references, submitted directly to the Admissions Office, by
persons able to comment on matters relevant to the criteria for
admission.
K. Bachelor of Philosophy Offered by
Renaissance College
In order to meet learning objectives and to provide the planned
experiential learning and mentorship components, the program will have
a limited enrollment.
Criteria for Admissions
1.
High School applicants must meet admission requirements as
specified in the chart of First Year Required Academic Subjects
and accompanying notes found in Section B of the UNB
Academic Calendar.
2.
The UNB regulations applicable to transfer students and Mature
students are outlined in Section B of the UNB Academic
Calendar. Normally, a minimum assessment grade point average
of 3.0 (or equivalent) is required for a student to be considered for
transfer to Renaissance College.
3.
All applicants must also submit to the Admissions Office a resume
which clearly and concisely outlines the applicant's educational
and career goals, volunteer activities, prior learning experiences,
diversity of background, and skills (such as but not limited to:
artistic, musical, athletic, cultural, linguistic), and leadership
experience. Typically, this information can be communicated well
in two or three pages. No specific forms or formats are required.
4.
Transfer credit toward required RCLP courses will be given on the
basis of evidence provided by the student for demonstrated
competence in the learning outcomes associated with each
Renaissance College course.
Internal and external applicants will follow the same admissions
procedures.
J. Bachelor of Education Consecutive Program
Admission is granted in consultation with the Faculty of Education. The
number of places available in the program is limited and admission is
competitive.
Criteria for Admissions
Minimum requirement for admission to the Faculty of Education
Consecutive Degree Program is the successful completion of an
undergraduate degree with teachable subjects from a recognized
university, college or other post-secondary institution.
Significant weight will be given to the academic record. Consideration
will also be given to the applicant's suitability for and interest in
education. Individual interviews may be conducted as required.
Required Documentation
The following documents must be submitted by January 31st prior to
beginning of the academic year for which the applicant is seeking
admission:
1.
2.
3.
38
Application form, and education supplementary forms which
includes evidence of experience and education indicating a
suitability for and an interest in education, and a personal
statement of intent and purpose.
Official transcript(s) of academic record to date, other than
University of New Brunswick transcripts. Applicants must arrange
for an official transcript at each university, college, or other postsecondary institution attended to be sent directly to the
Admissions Office by the academic records department of the
institution. Applicants must also arrange for an official transcript of
all grades received after the time of application to be sent directly
to the Admissions Office as soon as it becomes available. The
Admissions Office cannot accept the applicant's copy of any
transcript.
Two references, submitted directly to the Admissions Office by
persons able to comment on matters relevant to the criteria for
admission.
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
Admissions Committee
An Admissions Committee of faculty members, in cooperation with the
Office of the UNB Registrars, will review the applications. In admitting
students, the Admissions Committee will strive to assemble a diverse
cohort of highly capable learners and match the student to the program
by determining what the College can contribute to the individual, what
the individual can contribute to the College, and what the individuals can
contribute to each other.
L. Certificate of Proficiency in French
Successful completion of New Brunswick Grade XII French, or the
equivalent, is the minimum requirement for admission. Appropriate oral
and/or written tests may be given to place students at the proper level.
M. New Brunswick Youth Apprenticeship Program
The following action has been approved for this group of applicants:
1.
The University of New Brunswick guarantees successful New
Brunswick Youth Apprenticeship students access to relevant
undergraduate programs, which are accessible directly from high
school, provided all minimum requirements for admission are met
and enrollments are not limited;
2.
An application deadline of 15 February has been created for such
applicants and where it appears that the level of interest shown by
student apprentices exceeds 5% of anticipated enrollment, a
competition will be established to stay within this target;
3.
Such applicants are required to submit a Youth Apprenticeship
Program progress report in addition to the normal admission
documentation to provide verification of participation and to
provide background information should the need arise to open a
competition;
4.
Such students may be referred to the Challenge for Credit
regulations in the event that they have acquired by the work
experience and occupational training within the Apprenticeship
Program, a high level of competence in certain areas closely
related to UNB courses.
SECTION B
N. Re-Admissions
1.
2.
3.
Students who have been absent from study for a period of at least
12 consecutive months since their last attendance are required to
seek re-admission. Students re-admitted to the original or another
program of study following an absence from study, or re-admitted
since being required to withdraw, will normally follow the calendar
for the year study resumes. Individual faculties may have
established additional conditions. Students should refer below for
further information concerning re-admission since being required
to withdraw.
Students who have been required to withdraw from this university
or any other university or college will not be accepted, under any
circumstances, in the following academic year. Such students
may be considered for readmission or admission after they have
spent some time (at least 12 months) away from university and
can provide a satisfactory personal letter outlining why they feel
they will now be successful as well as a satisfactory letter of
recommendation from employers and/or others. The admitting
faculty or the Admissions Committee may require evidence, such
as successful completion of designated courses, that applicants
are likely to be successful in further studies.
A student readmitted since being required to withdraw from this
university or any other university, will automatically be on
academic probation. Failure to meet the normal academic
regulations at the next time of assessment will result in final
dismissal from the program. Further applications for readmission
to the program will not be considered.
8.
Only in special circumstances will students be admitted to a third
different undergraduate degree program.
9.
The final decision on the course work requirements for a second
different undergraduate bachelor degree shall be a matter of
agreement between the Registrar and the Dean, after
consultation with the Chairs of Departments concerned.
Second Same Undergraduate Bachelor Degree
1.
a.
b.
2.
2.
The general regulations of the University and the regulations of
the degree program concerned must be satisfied. Refer to the
appropriate section of this calendar for the regulations of the
degree program.
The minimum number of credit hours, or courses, which must be
successfully completed beyond the work required for the previous
degree must not be less than the normal load of the final
academic year in the degree program concerned. More than the
minimum number of credit hours, or courses, may be required.
4.
The courses taken must be approved by the Dean and the
Department, or Departments, under which the option,
concentration, Major, or Honours, falls.
5.
In Faculties where the credit system is used, at least half the
credits for a degree, diploma or certificate must be taken at this
University; in Faculties where the year-system is used, two years
must be taken at this University. It is normally expected that the
final year of study be completed at this University.
6.
Candidates for a second degree may not normally choose the
same major, honours, option or concentration as in the first
undergraduate degree.
Degree and departmental regulations concerning option,
concentration, Major or Honours must be satisfied.*
Student may be permitted to upgrade a Minor or a Major from the
first degree under the following conditions:
a.
A Minor from the first degree may be upgraded to a Major
or Honours after completely of the first degree.
b.
A Major from the first degree may be upgraded to an
Honours after completion of the first degree.
c.
In either case, a notation only will be included on the
student record and a second degree will not be awarded.
* Throughout these regulations, the use of terms "option", "concentration", "major", and "honours" vary by faculty. All these terms
denote some degree of specialization.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
The minimum number of credit hours, or courses, which must be
successfully completed beyond the work required for the previous
degree must not be less than the normal load of the final
academic year in the degree program concerned. More than the
minimum number of credit hours, or courses, may be required.
The courses taken must be approved by the Dean and the
Department, or Departments, under which the option,
concentration, Major, or Honours, falls.
In Faculties where the credit system is used, at least half the
credits for a degree, diploma or certificate must be taken at this
University; in Faculties where the year-system is used, two years
must be taken at this University. It is normally expected that the
final year of study be completed at this University.
Candidates for a second different degree may not normally
choose the same major, honours, option or concentration as in
the first undergraduate degree.
Students must make specific application to the Associate
Registrar/Admissions for entry to the second different degree
program.
Degree and departmental regulations concerning option,
concentration, Major or Honours must be satisfied.*
3.
Second Different Undergraduate Bachelor Degree
1.
At this time on the Fredericton campus, only the Faculty of
Science will permit a second same Undergraduate
Bachelor degree.
At this time on the Saint John campus only the Faculty of
Arts and the Faculty of Science, Applied Science and
Engineering will permit a second same undergraduate
Bachelor degree.
* Throughout these regulations, the use of terms "option", "concentration", "major", and "honours" vary by faculty. All these terms
denote some degree of specialization.
O. Requirements for a Second Undergraduate
Bachelor Degree
Graduates of UNB may apply for admission to and follow a program
towards a second different undergraduate bachelor degree and in limited
cases a second same undergraduate bachelor degree under the
following regulations:
A second same degree is permitted in limited cases. The general
regulations of the University and the regulations of the degree
program concerned must be satisfied. Refer to the appropriate
section of this calendar for the regulations of the degree program.
Students will not be permitted to include a Minor in the second
degree.
7.
Students must make specific application to the Associate
Registrar/Admissions for entry to the second degree program.
8.
Only in special circumstances will students be admitted to a third
undergraduate degree program.
9.
The final decision on the course work requirements for a second
different undergraduate bachelor degree shall be a matter of
agreement between the Registrar and the Dean, after
consultation with the Chairs of Departments concerned.
Graduates of other universities are not eligible to apply under these
regulations. Applications from such candidates will be considered for
possible acceptance and advanced standing on receipt of official
transcripts submitted to the Associate Registrar/Admissions.
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
39
SECTION B
Students who desire to complete requirements for two different Bachelor
Degrees at the same time will be granted such permission provided
approval from both Faculties concerned has been granted. If permission
is granted, students must be admitted to the second program by the
Admissions Office. Requirements for each degree program are
determined by each Faculty. This arrangement is separate from the
Concurrent Degree Programs offered by the University.
6.
A student accepted as a transfer student from another AUCC
recognized university or post-secondary institution may be given
credit hours towards a degree for acceptable previous courses,
but the cumulative grade point average, will be based only on
courses taken at this University (i.e. those listed in the UNB
Undergraduate Calendar, including certain approved St. Thomas
University courses).
P. Transfer Students
7.
Students who transfer from another post-secondary institution to a
Concurrent Degree program at UNB must complete at least half
the total credit hours for that concurrent program and at least half
of the credit hours normally required for each included program at
this University.
8.
Current university regulations governing the number of credits
that must be taken at the University of New Brunswick apply.
9.
From time to time and in special circumstances, Faculties may
recommend that credits in addition to the normal 50 per cent of
the degree program be transferred. Such recommendation will be
considered by the Registrar. In situations where approval is
denied, and at the request of the Faculty, the matter will be
referred to the Senate Admissions Committee for resolution.
University of New Brunswick Students
University of New Brunswick students wishing to transfer to another
degree program must complete a Transfer Request form, preferably
before March 31st (January 31st for BEd applicants). Applications
received after that date will be considered, provided that space is
available. It is recommended that transfer applications for degree
programs requiring special forms, i.e. BN and Kinesiology, be submitted
in January or February (November or December for BEd). Applications
to transfer are available at the Registrar's Office on both campuses. The
record to date will be assessed by the Registrar in consultation with the
administrative head of the degree program concerned. If the transfer is
accepted, a statement of the student's position in the new program,
including the credit hours permitted towards the new degree program,
will be made.
Q. Application Fraud or Misconduct
1.
Students from other Universities or Post Secondary
Institutions
A student wishing to transfer from a recognized university or college to
UNB will be considered for admission subject to the following University
of New Brunswick regulations:
1.
Students should apply in writing by March 31 (January 31st for
BEd applicants). Applications received after that date will be
considered, provided that space is available.
2.
Students who for academic reasons are not eligible for
readmission to the university at which they last registered will not
be admitted to UNB.
3.
A transfer student eligible to continue at the university last
attended will be considered on the same basis as UNB students.
Note: The Faculty of Law is excluded from these regulations.
4.
Courses for which credit has been awarded at the transferring
institution will be accepted provided that:
5.
a.
the courses being considered for credit satisfy the program
requirements at the University of New Brunswick.
b.
the courses being considered meet the standard of grade
required within the program at the University of New
Brunswick.
Official records will be evaluated and notification will be forwarded
from the Registrar's Office concerning the student's position in the
program at the University of New Brunswick, including the
number of transfer credits awarded.
Applications for transfer to UNB must be submitted to the
Admissions Office. They will be reviewed by the Dean of the
Faculty concerned who, together with appropriate University
authorities, will determine the position of the applicant.
In Faculties where the credit system is used, at least half the
credits for a degree, diploma or certificate must be taken at this
University; in Faculties where the year-system is used, two years
must be taken at this University. It is normally expected that the
final year of study be completed at this University.
Applicants wishing to transfer to UNB are advised to address their
request to the Admissions Office.
40
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
Undergraduate students who at the time of application fail to
provide required information regarding attendance at another
post-secondary institution will normally be required to withdraw
from the University for a period of at least twelve months. Where a
student is required to withdraw,
a.
b.
2.
work taken during the period after the failure to disclose will
be considered for credit only if the student is readmitted
and after consultation with the Faculty concerned; and
the notation "Required to Withdraw" will be a permanent
statement on the student's transcript of record.
Where the Registrar has reason to believe that a student failed at
the time of application to disclose attendance at another postsecondary institution as required, the Registrar, where possible,
shall discuss the matter with the student. Where the Registrar
determines that the student failed to disclose such information as
required, the Registrar shall impose such penalty as considered
appropriate in the circumstances. By registered mail, the
Registrar shall:
a.
b.
c.
d.
notify the student of the decision and the penalty imposed;
provide the student with the basis and reasons for the
decision;
advise the student of the right to appeal to the appropriate
Senate Admissions Committee; and
in the event of an appeal, request that the student submit a
written statement regarding the case within three weeks,
and encourage the student to be present when the case is
heard.
The regulations with respect to a student's right to appeal on academic
matters shall apply with any necessary modifications to a case referred
to the Committee involving a failure to disclose attendance at another
post-secondary institution.
SECTION B
R. Challenge for Credit
S. Prior Learning Assessment
A significant number of students are entering university having acquired,
by work experience and/or forms of study other than attendance at
university, a high level of competence in certain areas closely related to
courses offered at this University. The Challenge for Credit scheme
makes it possible for the University to give recognition to such
attainment.
Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) refers to the systematic evaluation of
learning which an individual has achieved through work, life and
educational experiences, and the relating of that learning to the expected
learning outcomes of courses and programs in which the individual is
enrolled at UNB for the purpose of granting credit where appropriate.
PLA is not the granting of credit for experience but rather for learning.
The validity of PLA is based on the recognition that learning takes place
in a variety of settings and through a variety of experiences, and that
students who bring university-level learning upon entrance to a UNB
degree, diploma or certificate program should receive credit for what
they already know or can do, as assessed against the expected
outcomes of that program.
The regulations which follow provide a mechanism for Departments to
offer Challenge for Credit examinations in courses which they consider
appropriate.
Regulations
The Challenge for Credit scheme does not apply to the School of
Graduate Studies or the Faculty of Law or the Faculty of Education.
1.
(a) Only students who have been admitted to a degree, diploma
or certificate program at the University of New Brunswick may
challenge for credit. (b) The result of Challenge examinations will
be recorded subsequent to registration.
2.
Normally, a request for challenge for credit will not be considered
after one year from the date of the student's first registration in a
degree, diploma or certificate program at UNB.
3.
A student may receive credit by Challenge only when registered
in a formal degree, diploma or certificate program, i.e. no credit
for students in "no degree", "visiting" or "qualifying" programs.
4.
A student shall not be allowed to challenge for credit more than
once in any course.
5.
No student may challenge for credit in a course for which the
student has previously registered (including registration for audit)
either at UNB or any other university or equivalent institution.
6.
(a) The maximum credit which a student may obtain by challenge
is whichever is the lesser of 30 credit hours or 25% of the
requirements of the program. (Please note certain Faculties may
have a more restrictive policy.) (b) Students must still complete at
least 50% of the program at UNB excluding credits obtained by
Challenge.
7.
A student on "academic probation" or "required to withdraw" may
not challenge for credit.
8.
A student may not challenge for credit in a course of a lower level
than one already attempted.
9.
Courses challenged will be identified as such on the student's
transcript and will be shown as "Credit" (CR), or "No Credit"
(NCR). A grade of 'C' must be obtained for credit to be allowed.
10.
The challenge for credit will normally be in the form of a
comprehensive examination. In some cases additional proof of
expertise, such as evidence of laboratory experience, will be
required.
11.
The Department or faculty member concerned will determine the
content and form of the challenge for credit examination.
12.
Applications must be approved by the department concerned
which should be satisfied that there is a reasonable basis for
requesting a challenge, such as previous work or educational
experience.
13.
(a) Challenge for credit examinations will be held only on the
campuses of the University of New Brunswick. (b) Normally,
challenge examinations will be held during the first week of
lectures in the Fall Term or, in the case of a student admitted to
start in January, during the first week of lectures in the second or
Winter Term. Application to challenge for credit must be made 30
days in advance of these examination periods. At the discretion of
the department concerned and with the agreement of the
Registrar, this period may be shortened (e.g. if an examination
paper suitable for challenge for credit is already available).
If credit is approved, then a grade of "transfer credit" (TR) will be shown
on the transcript of record.
Specific course/s for which credit has been approved through prior
learning assessment will be identified as such on the student's record.
Unassigned credit to be applied to a student's program will be identified
as such on the student record.
Partial course credit as a result of prior learning assessment will not be
shown on the student transcript of record. Such a result will form part of
a student's computer record if possible in any student information
system the University is using and will be held on file in the student's
program Faculty and the Registrar's Office.
The result of a PLA evaluation will be recorded subsequent to
registration.
For further information, please contact the Dean of your Faculty or the
Director, PLA Services.
Applications must be accompanied by the appropriate fee in full.
(See Section C.) Application forms are available at the Registrar's Office.
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
41
SECTION B
II. CONFIDENTIALITY, SECURITY AND
RELEASE OF STUDENT ACADEMIC
RECORDS
The term "official academic record" when used in these policies means
the information concerning admission and academic performance of
students as it is contained in any record of information however recorded
or stored.
A.
The official academic records of students are the property of the
University.
B.
The Registrars and any designated officer, where applicable, shall
retain the custody of the official student academic records,
however recorded or stored, in the Office of the Registrar, the
School of Graduate Studies, the Department of Integrated
Technology Services, and the Faculty of Law, all of the University
of New Brunswick Fredericton and Saint John ("the University"),
and shall be responsible for their security and maintenance.
C.
h.
To a person who has been authorized by the individual to
whom the information related to make an enquiry on that
individual's behalf or, where that individual is incapacitated,
has been authorized by the next of kin or legal
representative of that individual.
5.
The Campus Registrar may authorize access to academic
records for the purpose of research. Students of the University
may examine their personal official academic records held in
paper files, with the exception of letters of reference provided to
the University in confidence. A member of the Registrar's Office or
a designated officer on the campus where the record is held will
be present during such an inspection. Students may examine
letters of reference or other information provided to the University
in confidence only with the written permission of the referee or
writer being first obtained and received by the appropriate
Registrar or designated officer holding the file.
6.
The Office of the Registrar will not normally provide students or
third parties, except as noted below, with copies of documents on
file, such as transcripts from other institutions, or correspondence
provided to the University in confidence. In the case of a request
for copies of documents made to a Campus Registrar's office, an
exception may be made in severe situations such as where an
international student is unable to obtain copies of original
documents. If the request is approved, the Registrar will authorize
copies of such documents be forwarded to another institution
marked "copy of original documents on file."
7.
The University considers certain information, that is, a student's
name, dates of university attendance, verification of degrees
obtained, to be public information. Such information may be
disclosed by the Campus Registrar or designated officer without
the consent of the student. Students who object to the release of
such information shall notify the Registrar of the campus where
the information is held, in writing, giving the specific objection or
objections. The Registrar shall then determine what action, if any,
will be taken and advise the student and the designated Officer
where necessary.
Students desiring to have their names changed on their official
student record be it by means of alteration, deletion, substitution
or addition must submit appropriate supporting documentation.
D.
RELEASE OF INFORMATION
1.
Except as provided herein, official academic records are
confidential and shall not be divulged to any third party, including
parents or guardians, except as noted in this statement, without
the written consent of the student concerned.
2.
Students have the right to official copies of their University of New
Brunswick transcripts of record. Official transcripts issued to
students are indicated as such on the transcript. Any requests
should be submitted to the appropriate Registrar's office with the
required fee. Transcripts and degree parchments will be withheld
for students, including former students, who have failed to meet
their financial obligations to the University. Students have the right
to access their transcripts of record as held in the computerized
files and to print unofficial copies of their transcripts of record.
3.
Partial transcripts will not be issued.
8.
4.
Transcripts shall only be released or personal information
contained in the official student records released in accordance
with University policy:
The University routinely releases student e-mail identifiers while
the student is enrolled at the University. Students who object to
such release must notify the Campus Registrar.
9.
The University routinely provides, through secure on-line access,
a digitized image of the student identification photograph to
individual instructors during the period the student is registered in
that instructors course. The Deans, the Director of the College of
Extended Learning, Directors of Student Services, the Director
and Associate Director of Residential Life, and the Universitys
Department of Security will also have access to such images.
Students who object to such use of their student identification
photograph should notify the Campus Registrar.
10.
(a) Deans, Associate/Assistant Deans, faculty Student Advisors
and the Director of the College of Extended Learning shall have
unrestricted electronic access to academic student records.
(b)
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Where the person to whom the information relates has
identified that information in particular and has consented
to its disclosure;
For the purpose for which it was obtained or compiled or
for a purpose consistent therewith;
To an officer or employee of the University who needs the
record in the performance of his or her duties;
For the purpose of complying with a requirement to provide
information lawfully imposed upon the University by a
federal/provincial government authority;
Where disclosure is necessary to aid in the investigation of
allegations that individuals have made false statements or
engaged in other misleading conduct concerning their
attendance or performance or status within or completion
of an academic program of the University;
In compelling circumstances affecting the health or safety
of an individual, if, upon disclosure, notification thereof is
mailed to the last known address of the individual to whom
the information relates;
In compassionate circumstances, to facilitate contact with
the next of kin or a friend of an individual who is injured, ill
or deceased; or
i. Full time faculty members shall have electronic access to academic
student records of students registered or formally seeking registration
in their courses as may be required in the performance of the faculty
members duties.
ii. Stipendiary part-time faculty members may be granted electronic
access to academic student records of students registered or formally
seeking registration in their courses required in the performance of the
faculty members duties as authorized by the Dean or Director of the
College of Extended Learning.
iii. Normally, part-time faculty members who are also students at UNB,
should not have access to student academic records.
iv. Access is provided during the period the student is registered or formally seeking registration in the faculty members course and for 45
days following the end of term in which the course is scheduled.
42
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
SECTION B
11.
Other Faculty and College personnel may be granted electronic
access to academic student records required in the performance
of their duties as authorized by the Dean or Director of the
College of Extended Learning on such specific terms as the Dean
or Director shall determine.
12.
Members of administrative and other academic units may be
granted electronic access to academic student records required in
the performance of their duties upon request to and as authorized
by the Campus Registrar or designate on such specific terms as
the Registrar or designate shall determine.
13.
Access is provided on the explicit condition that such information
in the electronic academic student records shall not be released
to others except as may be permitted in accordance with these
regulations.
III. FRENCH LANGUAGE POLICY FREDERICTON
The University undertakes to meet the needs of undergraduate students
with respect to French:
1.
By providing French language courses at a level and of a type
appropriate for graduates of French immersion programs in the
public schools of New Brunswick;
2.
By providing students in all faculties who are not bilingual with
more information, encouragement and opportunity for the study of
French. (See Certificate of Proficiency in French in Section G.)
minimum of 24 credit hours) and shall be selected to form a
coherent set or sequence of courses. The student must achieve a
grade of "C" or better in each course for it to be counted as part of
the Minor. Compulsory or required courses in a student's degree
program normally may not form part of the Minor.
4.
A student who has completed a Minor located in one degree
program may apply to and, if admitted, enter a second degree
program to obtain a second bachelor's degree. Such a student
could obtain the Majors or Honours designation in the same field
as the Minor if the requirements are completed successfully under
the regulations governing a "Second Undergraduate Bachelor's
Degree.
5.
Students interested in pursuing more than one minor program
must have permission from their faculty advisor. All above
regulations apply.
VI. ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
A. Class Attendance
1.
Students are expected to attend all classes, laboratories, tutorials,
or other class meetings officially designated for a particular
course. They are expected, also, to complete all assignments.
Departments, or individual instructors, may make specific
requirements about attendance and class participation. An
instructor may assign a final grade of F in the course to a student
who fails to meet any one of these requirements, including failure
to maintain the stipulated attendance policy. Such requirements
must be communicated in writing to students within the first two
weeks of the course (see item A(4) under Examination, Standing
and Promotion). It is the responsibility of a student who is absent
during the first two weeks to ascertain the requirements of the
course.
2.
Students are advised to check course restrictions to determine
the policy in effect concerning class attendance during the first
week of lectures. In some courses, for example, those with limited
enrollment, failure to attend during the first week or to make
arrangements with the instructor may result in the cancellation of
the registration. Approval of the Departmental Chair, or the Dean
in Faculties where there is no Chair, is required.
3.
It is expected that most problems caused by a student's absence
from classes, including absence from mid-term tests, can be
resolved with the instructor concerned. If through sickness or
other unavoidable cause, a student is absent from classes, the
student must advise the instructors immediately upon return to
classes. The instructor may request suitable documentation if
such confirmation is considered necessary. Health certificates will
be accepted for consideration only from the health care
professional who attended the student during the period of
absence.
IV. FRENCH LANGUAGE POLICY SAINT JOHN
The Saint John Campus of the University of New Brunswick intends to
meet the needs of its undergraduate students with respect to French by
providing (where feasible) French Language courses at a level and of a
type appropriate for graduates of French immersion programs in the
public schools of New Brunswick, and by providing students in all
programs who are not bilingual with more information, encouragement
and opportunity for the study of French.
Cette politique s'adresse aux étudiant(e)s anglophones. Les
étudiante(e)s francophones sont également encouragé(e)s à suivre des
cours au niveau approprié dans la discipline de français.
V. MINOR PROGRAMS
The University offers students an opportunity to broaden and
complement their programs of study by completing the requirements for
a Minor. A complete list of approved Minor Programs is available in the
Registrar's Office. A Minor program can be a University interdisciplinary
Minor or one offered through a faculty or department.
1.
Students interested in pursuing a Minor Program should consult
with their program advisor to determine if a Minor will be permitted
and to discuss its relation to their program of study. Advice and
course approval must then be obtained from the coordinator,
committee or individual responsible for the Minor. Normally, a
student must declare a Minor on or before registration for final
year. A student may declare a Minor after this date only with the
approval of the Registrar, with the concurrence of the
Department(s) concerned.
2.
A Minor can be taken only in conjunction with a degree program
and must be completed while the student is qualifying for the
degree. Successful completion of the Minor will be recorded on
the student's transcript of record. The same procedure must be
followed for each successive Minor.
3.
A Minor shall consist of eight term courses or the equivalent (a
B. Adding Courses
A period of two weeks is allowed from the commencement (first day of
lectures)of fall term for addition of fall term and full year courses and
from the commencement of winter term for addition of winter term
courses. A student adding a course is responsible for ascertaining the
requirements of the course and for completing them.
C. Dropping Courses
To avoid academic penalty students are advised to pay particular
attention to the following information concerning the meaning of
symbols, based on the date of withdrawal from a course, which will
appear on the official transcript. Exact dates in effect for the current year
are noted in the academic calendar at the front of this publication.
Students are strongly encouraged to consult with their advisor before
withdrawing from a course.
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
43
SECTION B
Full Year Courses
•
Courses dropped up to two weeks following the commencement
of classes are deleted from the record. Courses dropped up to the
end of the second week of classes in January carry no academic
penalty and are shown as a "W" on the transcript.
•
Courses dropped after the above-described no-penalty period but
within at least two weeks prior to the end of scheduled classes are
recorded on the transcript as "WF" and a grade of zero (0) is
carried into the GPA.
•
Courses dropped within the last two weeks of classes are
recorded as an "F" on the transcript.
F. Permission to Study Off Campus at Another University
or Other Post-Secondary Institution
1.
All transfer of credits from other universities or other postsecondary institution must be approved by the Registrar. A
student at UNB who wishes to take courses at another university
for credit towards the degree program at UNB must obtain a letter
of permission, in advance, from the Registrar at UNB. A letter of
permission will not be granted to a student required to withdraw
and normally will not be granted to a student on academic
probation.
2.
Courses taken with permission at other universities or postsecondary institutions will be considered for transfer credit if credit
is granted at the transferring institution, provided that the standard
of grade required within the student's UNB program is met.
Students will be notified in writing at the time permission is given
of the specific minimum grade which must be achieved.
3.
In Faculties where the credit hour system is used, at least half of
the credit hours for a degree must be taken at this University. In
Faculties where the year-system is used, two years, including the
final year, must be taken at this University. These provisions may
be waived by the Registrar in consultation with the Faculty
concerned in extraordinary circumstances.
4.
Students entering a concurrent degree program are advised that
at least one half of the requirements for each degree must be
UNB credits.
5.
Faculties may impose an academic decision based on the
student's performance while studying at another university or
post-secondary institution.
6.
Grades of C - earned at the other institution normally will not be
accepted if a minimum grade of "C" in the course is required in
the student's program of study. Special requests for consideration
of transfer should be made in writing to the Registrar. A decision
will be made in consultation with the Faculty concerned.
Term Courses
•
Courses dropped up to two weeks after the commencement of
classes are deleted from the record.
•
Courses dropped between the above-described deletion period
and the final fifteen days of the term are recorded on the transcript
as a "W" and carry no academic penalty.
•
Courses dropped after the no-penalty period are recorded on the
transcript as "WF" and a grade of zero (0) is carried into the GPA.
D. Final Course Grades
1.
The term work in a course (excluding any work given in lieu of a
final examination, see Examination, Standing and Promotion
regulations, item A(6)) must be submitted by the last day of
lectures or earlier as required by the instructor. The instructor
must submit a final grade based on the work submitted by the
student, including term work and examination, as determined by
the instructor.
2.
Once a grade has been submitted a student is not permitted to do
work extra or additional to that required of other students in a
course in order to gain a better grade in the course.
3.
A request to change a recorded grade in a course is to be made in
writing by the instructor to the Registrar. An explanation of the
reason/s for the change must be included at the time of the
submission.
E. Other Regulations
1.
The last date to withdraw without academic penalty from courses
of duration shorter or longer than the usual one term or full-year
period is the point where approximately three quarters of the
course time has elapsed.
2.
Students may specify that a course is "extra" to the program and
should not be included in their grade point average. Such a
notation must be requested by the mid point of the term.
3.
(a) It is the function of the instructor to evaluate and assess a
student's work in a course, and to award interim and final course
grades.
(b) The decisions made by the instructor as to the content of the
course syllabus are not appealable. Decisions made by the
instructor as to the weighting of tests, assignments and
examinations, are not subject to appeal unless demonstrably
unfair in the circumstances.
(c) Regulations governing review or appeal of a grade assigned
are found in the Review of Grades section of this Calendar.
4.
44
Academic probation constitutes notice of unsatisfactory
performance and is a warning that the student must improve to
meet the grade point average requirements of the program in
order to avoid being required to withdraw from the University.
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
VII. OFFICIAL WITHDRAWAL (VOLUNTARY)
FROM UNIVERSITY
A student who is considering withdrawing from study is strongly advised
to consult with his or her faculty advisor. If the student decides to
withdraw from University, the Registrar's Office must be notified in writing
and the necessary process on the computerized registration system
must be completed to avoid failing grades. The official date of withdrawal
will be the date written communication is received in the Registrar's
Office or the date recorded on the computerized system. Notifying
instructors or ceasing to attend lectures does not constitute official
withdrawal.
SECTION B
VIII. EXAMINATION, STANDING AND
PROMOTION
8.
Normally, tests held during the regular lecture period (other than
final examinations scheduled by the Registrar) are to be
conducted during a regularly scheduled class time. In exceptional
circumstances and with the approval of the Dean, an instructor
may schedule a test for another time. Such a test is to replace,
rather than add to, the regularly scheduled class periods for the
course and it must not interrupt other regularly scheduled classes
or tests for students.
9.
Permission to write early examinations is almost never granted.
Students may apply to the Registrar's Office to write a deferred
examination on the basis of documented extenuating
circumstances (See Item D., Deferred Examinations). Students
who, because of documented extenuating circumstances, wish to
write a final examination before the date of the examination on the
official University schedule should request such an arrangement
with the instructor of the course involved. Instructors have no
obligation to permit a student to write an examination ahead of the
scheduled date.
10.
A student who is scheduled to write three examinations in one 24hour period during the formal examination period may apply to the
Registrar to write one of the examinations at another time during
the examination period.
11.
Instructors must notify students, in writing, as soon as possible
and no later than two weeks prior to the end of classes, of the
specific items, other than normal writing instruments (such as
pens, pencils, rulers and erasers), they may use in the
examination room. These include tables, formulae, memoranda,
other electronic or mechanical aids.
12.
(a) Students admitted without having passed the appropriate high
school or equivalent English course, or who were not required to
demonstrate on admission an acceptable level of English usage
on an approved English test, may, at the discretion of the
instructor in consultation with the Registrar, be given special
consideration in writing examinations, tests and assignments.
Such special consideration may include oral examinations and/or
extension of the time to write an examination. Consideration will
not be granted after two years at UNB or any other English
speaking institution.
A. General Information
1.
The method of examination in a course is determined by the
instructor.
2.
The final standing of each student, in each course, is assessed on
the final examination, if one is held, and term work (essays,
reports, tests, including mid-course examinations, attendance
requirements, etc.).
3.
Final examinations, if any, for fall term courses and mid-course
examinations, are held in December. Final examinations are
normally held in April and May for all year courses (two terms)
and all winter term courses.
4.
Within two weeks of the first day of lectures the instructor must
provide the students attending the course with a full explanation
of the basis on which the final grade will be calculated, that is: the
weighting of tests, examinations, assignments, attendance
requirements, and any other work which contributes to the final
grade. Such notification shall be in writing distributed to the class
in a regular class period. Email notification is satisfactory where
email has been established as a common method of
communication within the course. Notification on the Internet for
courses taught electronically is satisfactory.
5.
6.
7.
Instructors must notify students, preferably within the first two
weeks of lectures but by the mid-point of a course, if the final
examination is to be a take-home examination or one that is to be
included in the University's official examination schedule.
Students must be informed if the final examination is an open or
closed book format by the mid-point of the course. Such
notification shall be in writing distributed to the class in a regular
class period. Email notification is satisfactory where email has
been established as a common method of communication within
the course. Notification on the Internet for courses taught
electronically is also satisfactory.
The final examination in any course may be waived by the
instructor. Notice that an examination has been waived must be
communicated to the students attending the course within two
weeks of the first lecture.
(b) Students with disabilities may request reasonable
accommodations to enable them to complete academic
requirements. The student may be required to provide the
University with professional reports which contain specific
recommended accommodations which are necessary for the
student to achieve course, examination and program completion.
The University will respond to requests for reasonable
accommodations as its resources permit. For more information
see the Policy and Guideline Handbook for Students with
Disabilities.
(a) No examination or test may be held in the last 10 lecture days
of any term or during the reading period, but see d) below.
(b) All term work is due not later than the last day of lectures.
(c) A paper, assignment or take-home examination given in lieu of
a final examination is due the last day of the examination
schedule.
(d) The following may be exceptions to the regulations (a) and (c):
i.
ii.
iii.
courses with regular, usually weekly, tests;
courses requiring laboratory examinations of a practical
nature;
courses in which oral examinations are given. In such
cases a mutually agreeable time may be arranged
between the student and the instructor.
In the case of the exceptions i) and ii) the tests or examinations
must be held during the regular class period.
A student or faculty member reports instances of contravention of
this regulation to the Registrar.
(c) Students who wish to be considered under the provisions in a)
or b) must make the request to the instructor no later than the mid
point of the term.
13.
Students may see their own examinations and papers, by
arrangement with the instructor, after the grades have been
released.
B. Competence in English
The University places great importance on its students achieving
competence in English. To this end, students are required to complete
successfully with a mark of C or above a minimum of 12 ch of courses
that contain a significant amount of writing in English. Students should
consult their Faculty advisors to determine which courses satisfy this
requirement. The courses which satisfy this requirement are identified by
(W).
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
45
SECTION B
C. Dean's List Criteria
The Faculties of the University publicly recognize superior academic
performance of their students by publishing Dean's lists. Such distinction
is also noted on the transcript of record. Criteria for inclusion on a Dean's
list are as follows:
1.
Decisions for full-time and part-time students are based on
assessment grade point averages which are calculated in May of
each year provided at least 24 credit hours have been attempted
since the last assessment grade point average was recorded.
2.
In all Faculties an assessment grade point average of 3.7 or
higher must be achieved, except in the Faculty of Law where the
minimum assessment grade point average for inclusion on the
Dean's list is 3.3 and the student stands among the top 10% of his
or her class.
3.
4.
5.
Courses, including practicum courses, with final evaluations of
credit/no credit rather than a letter grade will be included as part
of the 24 credit hours required in the grade point average
assessment.
Students who in their final year of study do not have any
assessment grade point calculation will be included on a Dean's
list provided such a distinction was earned on the last assessment
and provided a letter grade of "B" or higher was achieved in all
courses taken. At least 12 credit hours of work must have been
undertaken to have Dean's list status under this provision.
Co-op students will be subject to these regulations:
a.
b.
c.
d.
6.
7.
one work term in the assessment period - at least 24 credit
hours required
two work terms in the assessment period - at least 15
credit hours required
December program completion - at least 15 credit hours
from September 1 - December 31
Second year co-op students with a January work term - at
least 15 credit hours required
Students on a professional experience program (PEP) must have
successfully completed the work term and have completed at
least 15 credit hours in one term during the assessment grade
point average period.
instructor or an invigilator before leaving the examination room.
They should then go immediately to be examined medically. They
may then apply to the Registrar within two weeks of the final
examinations they were unable to write for a deferred
examination.
3.
Application for a deferred examination on grounds not considered
acceptable by the Registrar may be referred to the appropriate
Senate Committee. The student must make such request to the
Registrar within two weeks from the date of the Registrar's letter
of notification of this decision.
4.
Students are responsible for all charges incurred for deferred
examinations written off-campus.
5.
The designation Incomplete (INC) is recorded for courses in
which deferred examinations are to be written. Refer to the
regulations on Incompletes for a further explanation of "INC"
grades.
E. Grading System and Classification
Courses
Courses in the University are offered in a classroom setting, laboratory
setting or through some method of distance education. The regular
academic session year is September - April. Within this session, there
are two terms, 15 weeks each (including the examination period)
September - December and January - April. In addition, there is an
intersession on the Fredericton Campus, May - June, a spring session,
May - August, on the Saint John Campus and a summer session, July August, on both campuses. All courses offered by the University are
referred to as term courses or full-year courses.
•
Full-Year Courses: Those courses that are normally completed
over the two terms associated with the regular academic session
year.
•
Term Courses: Those courses that are normally completed in one
term during the regular academic session year.
Credit Hours
1.
Course work done off-campus with permission will not form part of
the assessment grade point average and subsequent decision
concerning inclusion on a Dean's list. The Dean has the right to
add such students to the Dean's List where deemed appropriate.
8.
Students must be enrolled in a degree, diploma or certificate
program to be included on a Dean's list.
9.
Students enrolled in a concurrent or joint degree program will be
considered for the Dean's list in both Faculties represented.
Students should consult the Financial Information Section of this
calendar for information on tuition charges and full-time/part-time
status based on the credit value of courses taken.
2.
Most Faculties, in their own regulations, state the minimum
number of credit hours which must be successfully completed for
graduation in each degree program. Credit hour requirements for
degree programs in Saint John are given in Section E, and in
Fredericton are given in Section G.
3.
Students accumulate credit hours, as assigned, for courses
completed with a grade of D or better (See below).
4.
Faculties may consider courses offered by other Faculties to have
satisfied a half-course (normally 3 credit hours) or a full course
(normally 6 credit hours) regardless of the credit hours attached to
the course in the calendar and recorded on the student's
transcript of record. Students should consult the relevant sections
of this calendar for Faculty policies.
D. Deferred Examinations
1.
2.
46
Students who by reason of illness or extenuating circumstances
are unable to write final examinations at the specified times may
apply to the Registrar for permission to write deferred
examinations. For examinations to be written on campus, the
student must contact the instructor in the course to determine the
time and place. The Registrar makes arrangements with the
students for deferred examinations written off campus. Deferred
examinations take the place of the final examinations which the
student was unable to write. Applications for such deferred
examinations, supported by health certificates or other evidence,
must reach the Registrar within two weeks of the final
examinations which the student was unable to write.
Students who become ill and withdraw for this reason during a
final examination, or who feel that their performance was affected
seriously by illness, even if they do not withdraw, must, if they
wish to be eligible for a deferred examination, notify their
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
Each Faculty is responsible for assigning credit values to courses
within its jurisdiction. These credit values are approved by the
appropriate University Senate. Credit hour values may range from
- 18 although the typical term course has a 3 credit hour weight
and a typical full-year course has a 6 credit hour weight.
SECTION B
Grades
3.
A student wishing to attend classes in a given degree credit
course without being assigned a grade may register to "audit" the
course, subject to the following regulations:
a.
Registrations for audit will not be accepted without
permission of the course instructor.
b.
The degree of class participation allowed an auditor is at
the discretion of the course instructor. No grade is
assigned for the course and such a course is not a credit.
c.
The normal regulations and deadlines regarding course
adds and drops apply.
d.
A 'credit registration' in a course may not normally be
changed to an 'audit' after the first two weeks of the term.
Similarly a registration for 'audit' may be changed to a
'credit registration' only with the support of the faculty, and
with the permission of the Registrar.
e.
In courses with enrollment requirements and/or
restrictions, priority for registration will be given to
individuals taking the courses as full fee-paying registrants.
f.
For a part-time student the audit fee will be one-half of the
regular course fee (see Fees, Section C).
With the exception of the School of Graduate Studies and Faculty of
Law, a candidate's final standing in a course is indicated by the following
letter grades:
A+
A
4.3 grade points
excellent performance
AB
4.0 grade points
3.7 grade points
B+
3.3 grade points
good performance
B-
3.0 grade points
2.7 grade points
C+
2.3 grade points
C
satisfactory performance
2.0 grade points
D
less than satisfactory
performance
1.0 grade point
F
failure
0.0 grade points
•
A grade of D will be considered for program credit only in certain
circumstances. See Faculty regulations and refer to program
descriptions in this calendar.
•
Departments have the right to decide whether or not a D meets
prerequisite or Major requirements. See appropriate degree and
departmental listings.
•
•
Credit hours for courses with an "F" grade may not be counted
towards graduation, but will be used as credit hours attempted in
assessing grade point average.
Courses taken at St. Thomas University as part of a student's
regular course load in which the final grade is C- will normally not
be accepted for credit if a grade of at least C in the course in
question is required in the student's program of study.
Notations
1.
INC (Incomplete)
Issued on the recommendation of the instructor and approved by
the Registrar, in situations where students present written
evidence of medical or extenuating circumstances which prevent
completion of the work within the stated time period. It is expected
that the work will be completed within two months after the final
date for classes in the course. A grade of F will normally be
assigned if the work is not completed. The period for completion
may be extended upon recommendation of the instructor and with
the approval of the Registrar. It is the responsibility of the student
to seek such an extension before the expiration of the two month
period. Evidence of medical or compassionate grounds to
substantiate such a request must be submitted to the Registrar.
The designation incomplete (INC) is recorded for courses in
which deferred examinations are to be written.
2.
Aegrotat (AEG) Standing
Used rarely. The student has been unable to complete the course
because of a serious illness or a compassionate situation but has
been given pass standing on the basis of previous work.
Requests should be addressed to the Registrar.
AUD (Audit)
The following actions may also appear on the student transcript in
lieu of or adjacent to the grade:
4.
CR (credit) NCR (no credit)
5.
X (Extra)
Extra course, not credited to the program the student is enrolled
in during that session. Such a notation must be requested by the
mid-point of the term.
6.
# On the basis of an appeal, the grade shown but not included in
grade point average calculations.
7.
W (Withdraw without academic penalty)
8.
WF (Withdraw and equated to a grade of "F")
9.
CTN (Course continues in next term)
F. Calculation of Grade Point Averages
Grade point averages are calculated by dividing the total number of
grade points obtained (credit hours x grade point weight) by the number
of credit hours attempted during the period in question in the program.
Grade point averages are shown to one decimal place. The University
calculates two grade point averages, which form part of the student's
official record: the Assessment Grade Point Average; and the
Cumulative Grade Point Average.
Assessment GPA: For all students, the assessment GPA is calculated
at the end of the assessment period, May - April, provided that 24 credit
hours or more have been attempted in the program since the last
assessment in that program. All work attempted toward the current
program of study (including the no degree program) is included in the
assessment.
Cumulative GPA: Is based on all work taken toward a degree program.
The cumulative grade point average is used to determine the student's
divisional standing at graduation.
Scholarship GPA: In addition, for the purpose of awarding scholarships
a Scholarship GPA is calculated at the end of the assessment year (May
to April) provided that 24 credit hours or more have been attempted,
regardless of program. For students involved in work placement
programs such as Co-op or PEP, the scholarship average is calculated
using the Dean's List criteria. This GPA is held internally and is not
displayed on the student's transcript of record.
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
47
SECTION B
G. Standing and Promotion Requirements
1.
In order to continue in good academic standing a student must
achieve an assessment g.p.a. of at least 2.0 for the assessment
period. A transcript notation "In good academic standing";
appears at the end of the term record.
a.
b.
c.
A student whose assessment g.p.a. falls below 2.0 but
above 1.0 in an assessment period is placed on academic
probation. A student is allowed to go on academic
probation only once in a program.
A student who has previously been placed on academic
probation and whose g.p.a. in any subsequent assessment
period falls below 2.0 is, subject to review by the Faculty
concerned, required to withdraw from the University for at
least 12 months. If such a student is readmitted, it is
normally on academic probation.
A student whose g.p.a falls to 1.0 or below in any
assessment period is required to withdraw from the
University for at least 12 months. If such a student is
readmitted, it is normally on academic probation.
Note: No credit is granted for courses taken during the 12 month
period during which a student is required to withdraw.
2.
3.
iii.
Students whose g.p.a. on assessment is such that they would
normally be placed on academic probation, or be required to
withdraw from the University, will be allowed to graduate if all
other requirements of the program have been completed at that
time. Law students should refer to the Faculty regulation in the
Faculty of Law Calendar.
If, at the end of the term in which a student has completed all the
other requirements of the program, the student has not reached
the end of an assessment interval, the student will be allowed to
graduate without reference to the g.p.a. in that session.
H. Review of Grades
2. Group Projects
Evaluations on material which is the product of two or more students
may be reviewed at the request of one or more of the participants. The
above regulations will apply. The instructor has the right to change the
grade awarded to each student if the grade is to be altered.
3. Practicum and Co-op Courses
The grades assigned in practicum and co-op courses are also subject to
review.
4. Reviews in Courses with Computerized Testing
Students in courses with computerized testing should consult with their
instructors if they feel a review is warranted. The instructor will determine
that: the response sheet was not lost, that valid answers were not
missed, imperfect erasures not excluded and that the computer
generated grade was correct, the computer grade was transferred
correctly and that essay, lab and other additional credits were included.
5. Review in Courses with Oral Tests and/or Final
Examinations
Students in courses that have oral tests and/or final examinations,
should consult with the instructor if they have concerns about the grade
awarded.
6. General Information
a.
In all reviews, it is expected that the process will be carried out
expeditiously by the reviewer/s.
b.
Marked materials held by the instructor must be retained for
twelve months after the end of the term. Students are expected to
have returned graded assignments available for review by the
reviewers. Such assignments cannot have been altered (please
refer to the section on university regulations governing academic
offences).
c.
Work will be reviewed, as requested, in a manner that ensures
that all concerns raised by the student have been properly
addressed taking into account the course outline and that the
totaling of the marks and other items contributing to the grade
were done accurately. In instances where consistency in grading
is being considered, a minimum of three other pieces of class
work completed by other students will be examined by the
reviewer(s).
d.
The grade originally assigned may be raised, remain the same or
be lowered as a result of the review.
1. Review of Grade on an Individual Piece of Work
a.
Students may discuss with the course instructor the mark on any
piece of work regardless of its value. For a course that is not the
responsibility of a single academic unit, the co-ordinator of the
course will replace the role of the Department Chair.
b.
For purposes of the formal review process, an individual piece of
work refers to: Term tests, major term papers, essays, book
reports, etc. worth at least 25 per cent in the calculation of the
final grade in the course.
c.
Students have the right to request a formal review of marked
material according to the above list. The grounds are restricted to:
the overall assessment of the evaluation is demonstrably unfair;
the evaluation was not consistent within the class; there was a
miscalculation of the grade.
d.
There are two steps to follow for the formal review process:
i.
ii.
48
The piece of work must be discussed with the instructor
involved within two weeks of the receipt of the grade for the
individual item.
After this first step and if requested by the student in writing
to the Chair of the Department, or Dean of the Faculty if
there is no Department or Chair, a review will be conducted
with such Chair, the instructor and the student. If desired, a
student has the right to meet with the Chair without the
instructor present prior to this review. The review must be
conducted within 7 days after the review with the instructor.
The decision of this review is final and the reasons for the
decision will be provided to the student in writing by the
Chair.
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
A student who has not requested a grade review of an
individual piece of work that is reviewable, or who has
requested a grade review of an individual piece of work
and was not satisfied with the result, may not ask for a
review of a final grade on the basis of that individual piece
of work.
7. Review of Final Course Grade
a.
Students have the right to request a review of the official final
grade received in a course on the proper form available in the
Registrar's Office. Such requests must be received by the
Registrar, in writing, within 90 days after the end of the
examination period. A fee of $15.00 must accompany the request.
The fee will be refunded if the grade is subsequently raised. The
student should clearly outline the reasons for the request to
review the final grade. Normally, the grounds are restricted to: the
overall assessment of the final grade or of the final examination
evaluation is demonstrably unfair; the evaluation of the final
examination was not consistent within the class; the final grade
was not calculated on all the work completed; there was a
miscalculation of the final grade.
SECTION B
b.
c.
d.
e.
The Chair of the Department involved, or the Dean if there is no
Chair or Department, will discuss the matter with the instructor of
the course to determine if a change in the final grade is
warranted. The student will be advised of the result of this review
by the Registrar. If the student is not satisfied with the outcome of
the review conducted by the Chair and the Instructor, he/she may
request the Registrar to have the Chair of the Department
involved, or the Dean or a delegate if there is no Chair or
Department, select three individuals normally from the
Department or Faculty if there is no Department: including the
instructor, or one alternate designated by the instructor, one
selected by the student and one selected by the Chair, or the
Dean if there is no Chair or Department. In the event that the
student or instructor is unable to select a member for this review
committee, the Dean will select. If it is a class action request the
students will select one member of the Committee. If more than
one instructor, the instructors involved in the teaching of the
course will select.
The student or instructor may forfeit the right to select one of the
Committee members and should so advise the Registrar at the
time the request is made. The Chair or Dean will select the
member/s to serve on the Committee in such cases. The
Committee may interview the instructor if not part of the
Committee and/or the student. All materials submitted during the
first review will be made available to the Committee.
The decision of the Committee will be forwarded to the Registrar.
The reasons for the decision must be given and the student will
be so notified.
Students who intend to appeal the results of a review of a final
course grade must do so within 4 weeks after the date of
notification from the Registrar's Office. The procedures for filing
an appeal must be followed and reasons for the basis of the
appeal are to be clearly outlined.
IX. ACADEMIC OFFENCES
Note: Consideration of a request to withdraw from a course or courses
involved in an academic offence will not be given until the case is
resolved
Academic offences include, but are not limited to, the following:
A. PLAGIARISM
Plagiarism includes:
1.
quoting verbatim or almost verbatim from a source (such as
copyrighted material, notes, letters, business entries, computer
materials, etc.) without acknowledgment;
2.
adopting someone else's line of thought, argument, arrangement,
or supporting evidence (such as, for example, statistics, bibliographies, etc.) without indicating such dependence;
3.
submitting someone else's work, in whatever form (film,
workbook, artwork, computer materials, etc.) without acknowledgment;
4.
knowingly representing as one's own work any idea of another.
NOTE: In courses which include group work, the instructor must define
and warn against plagiarism in group work. Unless an act of plagiarism is
identified clearly with an individual student or students, a penalty may be
imposed on all members of the group.
Procedures
In the case of plagiarism, the instructor must make every reasonable
effort to discuss the case with the student or group and follow one of two
courses of action.
1.
I. Repeating Courses
Students may without special permission register for a course already
taken in order to meet a prerequisite or other degree requirement, or in
order to improve their grade point average. However, both the original
grade and the new grade will each be counted separately towards a
grade point average. Students should note that while the credit hours of
a repeated course will be used each time in calculating a grade point
average and in the totals of courses attempted and passed, they can
only be counted once towards the minimum number of credit hours
required for a degree.
A student may take, and complete, a course a maximum of three times
(excluding courses which are designated with the "#" notation). Beyond
that, the student must obtain the permission of the Dean of the student's
Faculty to register again in the repeated course.
In the case of plagiarism resulting from genuine misunderstanding, the instructor may permit the student to submit a genuine
piece of work to be graded in place of the one plagiarized. If the
student does not appeal, the time allowed for submission of work
is three weeks from the date of the Registrar's letter of
notification. In the case of an appeal, where the instructor's
decision is upheld, the period of time allowed for submission is as
determined by the appropriate Appeals Committee.
J. Language of Examination
Students who wish to write their examinations in French rather than
English must apply in writing to the Registrar one month in advance of
the examination date. Permission may be denied in certain courses,
particularly in courses where language is part of the course content.
K. Supplemental Examinations
Supplemental examinations are not offered in any Faculty of the
University, except the Faculty of Law.
If the instructor is satisfied that the plagiarism was the result of a
genuine misunderstanding, the instructor shall submit the
student's name to the Registrar who shall advise the appropriate
Dean, and the Chair of the student's program or Department
where applicable. The Registrar shall notify the student by
registered letter of the regulations governing plagiarism, the
possible consequences, the student's right to appeal, the right to
appear before the appropriate Appeals Committee, and the
procedures involved. While a case of genuine misunderstanding
will not be considered a student's first offence, a second plea of
ignorance by the student will be so considered. A student
appealing the instructor's decision must do so in writing within
three weeks of the date of the Registrar's notification. The student
is urged to submit to the appropriate Appeals Committee a written
statement regarding the case.
2.
If the instructor decides that the plagiarism was deliberate, the
instructor shall submit the student's name and relevant evidence
to the Registrar, who will advise the Dean, and the Chair of the
student's program or department where applicable. The Registrar
shall notify the student by registered letter of the regulations, the
right to appeal, the right to appear before the appropriate Appeals
Committee, and the procedures involved. The student is urged to
submit to the Committee a written statement regarding the case.
A student appealing the instructor's decision, must do so in writing
within three weeks of the date of the Registrar's letter of
notification. At the discretion of the Registrar, cases may be
referred to the appropriate Committee for review and action. The
Registrar shall inform the student by registered letter of the
referral to the Committee, and the wish of the Committee that the
student be present when the case is heard.
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
49
SECTION B
Penalties for Deliberate Plagiarism
Procedures
In a case of deliberate plagiarism, the penalties are:
The instructor, invigilator or other appropriate person shall, where
practical, discuss the matter with the student concerned. An instructor,
invigilator or other person satisfied that an academic offence has been
committed shall report that finding to the Registrar, who shall report it to
the Chair of the Department and the Dean of the Faculty concerned.
Each case will be referred by the Registrar to the appropriate Committee
for review and appropriate action. The Registrar shall inform the student
by registered letter of the referral to the Committee, the student's right to
appeal and the wish of the Committee that the student be present when
the case is heard. The student is urged to submit to the Committee a
written statement regarding the case. A student appealing the decision,
shall do so in writing within three weeks of the date of the Registrar's
letter of notification.
First Offence: If the student does not appeal, or if, on appeal, the
Committee upholds the instructor's decision:
1.
A notation will be placed on the student's transcript of academic
record concerning the academic offence. The length of time the
notation appears on the student's transcript of academic record is
to be decided when the penalty is imposed and will depend on the
severity of the offence.
2.
The student may be required to submit a satisfactory and genuine
piece of work to replace the one involving plagiarism. If the
assignment is not resubmitted or is unsatisfactory, the student will
receive a grade of F(zero) in the course. Note: If this penalty is
assessed, the period of time allowed for the submission of the
work will be determined by the Registrar in consultation with the
faculty member making the charge, and, where appropriate, the
Committee.
3.
The student will receive a grade of F (zero) on the piece of work
and, depending on the severity of the offence, may receive a
grade of F for the course.
4.
Other penalties as outlined in penalties for Other Academic
Offences may be imposed.
Subsequent Offence:In cases where the Committee considers that the
student has plagiarized again:
1.
2.
the student will receive a grade of F in the course and a notation
of the academic offence will appear on the student's transcript of
record. The length of time the notation appears on the student's
transcript of academic record is to be decided when the penalty is
imposed.
Other penalties as outlined in penalties for Other Academic
Offences may be imposed.
B. OTHER ACADEMIC OFFENCES
1.
Cheating on examinations, tests, assignments or reports.
2.
Impersonating a candidate at an examination or test or in
connection with any assignment in a course or availing oneself of
the results of impersonation.
3.
A student who is found guilty of an academic offence will have two
penalties imposed:
1.
2.
b.
an examination or test paper prior to the date and time for
writing the examination or test;
academic materials belonging to another person, e.g.
laboratory reports, assignments, papers, computer
materials, datasets.
4.
Falsifying or knowingly submitting false assignments or
credentials, records, transcripts, or other academic documents.
5.
Submitting a false health or other certificate.
6.
Submitting identical or substantially similar work for one course or
program of study, which has been or is being submitted for
another course or program of study, without the prior express
knowledge and approval of the instructors.
7.
Interfering with the right of other students to pursue their studies.
8.
Knowingly aiding or abetting any of the above offences.
9.
Tampering with, or altering, in any deceptive way, work
subsequently presented for a review of the grade awarded.
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
Notation on the student's transcript of academic record
concerning the academic offence. The length of time the notation
appears on the student's transcript of academic record is to be
decided when the penalty is imposed.
A failing grade in an examination, test or course.
One of the following penalties may also be imposed:
3.
Recommendation to the President for suspension for a specified
period. The recommendation is to include the length of time the
notation is to appear on the student's transcript of academic
record.
4.
Recommendation to the President for expulsion from the
University. If the student is expelled a permanent notation will
appear on the student's transcript of academic record.
C. GENERAL
1.
Consideration of a request to withdraw from a course or courses
involved in an academic offence will not be given until the case is
resolved.
2.
Students on the Fredericton Campus will submit appeals to the
Senate Student Standings and Promotions Committee; on the
Saint John Campus, appeals will be submitted to the Student
Appeals Committee.
Obtaining, through theft, bribery, collusion, purchase or other
improper manner,
a.
50
Penalties
D. RIGHT OF APPEAL
Students on the Fredericton Campus will submit appeals to the Senate
Student Standings and Promotions Committee; on the Saint John
Campus, appeals will be submitted to the Student Appeals Committee
1. Entitlement and Jurisdiction
1.
Student appeals will not normally be considered by the
appropriate campus Senate Appeals Committee if one year or
more has elapsed since the academic decision in question was
made.
2.
Student appeals on the Fredericton Campus are considered by
the Senate Committee on Student Standings and Promotions, and
on the Saint John Campus by the Senate Appeals Committee.
Appeals pertaining to admissions are heard on the Fredericton
Campus by the Senate Admissions Committee and by the Senate
Student Appeals Committee on the Saint John Campus.
3.
The University reserves the right to withhold notification of an
academic decision if a student has not satisfied financial
obligations. The Senate Student Standings and Promotions
Committee in Fredericton, or the Appeals Committee in Saint
John, may refuse to hear appeals submitted after the deadline
because the notification of an academic decison was witheld for
failure to satisfy financial obligations or because notification of an
SECTION B
in delay in the determination of the case. Where the student's
subsequent registration in a course or program is dependent on
the determination of the case, and where that determination is
made after the registration period in the following academic year
has expired, a late registration fee will be charged (see Fees
Section C).
academic decision was not received as a result of a failure to
provide the University with an accurate mailing address.
4.
Subject to the following regulations, students may appeal
academic decisions.
NOTE: Most reviews concerning grades assigned for individual pieces of
work or final grades are subject to the Grade Review Process. An appeal
to the appropriate Appeals Committee is permissible only if the review
was conducted without due regard to proper procedure or in a manner
which is unfair in all of the circumstances. Students may appeal final
grades only after all steps of the grade review process have been
completed.
7.
After receiving an appeal, the Secretary of the Committee shall:
a.
make a reasonable attempt to give notice to the student, or
the person acting on the student's behalf, of the time, place
and manner in which the Committee will proceed, and
further shall give access to the student or the person acting
on the student's behalf to the materials relevant to the
Appeal;
b.
give notice to the instructor, Chair of the Department and
Dean of the Faculty concerned of the time, place and
manner in which the Committee will proceed, and request
that any written materials relevant to the Appeal be filed
with the Committee in a manner such that the right of
access provided for in a.) will be facilitated.
2. Grounds for Appeal
1.
The appropriate Appeals Committee may grant an exemption
from the application of a University Regulation or from the effect
of an academic decision, on the grounds of compassion, health,
or other extenuating circumstances beyond the control of the
student. A student requesting such an exemption must state the
grounds on which the request is based and provide
documentation to support the grounds cited.
2.
The Committee may grant relief on the ground that an academic
decision has been made without due regard to proper procedure,
or in such a manner which is unfair in all of the circumstances. A
student requesting such relief on appeal must state the grounds
on which the request is based and provide any pertinent material.
8.
The Committee hears and determines the matter. The decision of
the Committee, which is provided to the student in writing, is final
(see below). No re-appeal of the decision will be heard by the
Committee unless new evidence is presented and deemed by the
Committee to be of sufficient importance to justify clearly the
reopening of the case.
3. Settlement Process
5. Senate Review
It is understood that appeals of academic decisions such as being
required to withdraw or being placed on academic probation, and
appeals involving academic offences, are made directly to the
appropriate Appeals Committee.
A student may request that the relevant Senate review a decision of the
appropriate Appeals Committee.
Where practicable, in other instances, students should attempt to settle
the matter prior to submitting an appeal by:
1.
discussing the matter with the instructor;
2.
if unresolved, discussing the matter with the instructor and the
Chair of the appropriate Department, or the Dean if there is no
Chair;
3.
if still not resolved, discussing the matter with the instructor, the
Chair and the Dean of the appropriate Faculty.
4. Appeals Procedure
1.
A student is entitled to seek the advice of the Director of Student
Affairs and Services (for Fredericton appeals) or the Director of
Student Life and Support Services (for Saint John appeals),
concerning the right of Appeal.
2.
Where so requested in writing by a student, the Director of
Student Affairs and Services (for Fredericton appeals) or the
Director of Student Life and Support Services (for Saint John
appeals), shall act on behalf of the student.
3.
Appeals are to be made in writing, addressed to Secretary of the
Student Standings and Promotions Committee.
4.
Appeals pertaining to academic status at the end of an
assessment period must be filed on or before July 15 of that year.
Where circumstances warrant, the Committee may consider
student appeals which do not meet the normal deadline
requirement.
5.
Appeals shall state the grounds on which the Appeal is based,
provide supporting documentary evidence and state whether the
student will attend the hearing and whether the Director of
Student Affairs and Services (Fredericton appeals) or the Director
of Student Life and Support Services (Saint John appeals) will
represent the student at the hearing.
6.
The Committee may receive documentation in support of an
Appeal after the July 15th deadline set for the filing of the appeal
itself. The late filing of such supporting documentation may result
The only grounds for such a request are:
a.
b.
The decision was made without due regard to proper procedures,
such that the student was materially disadvantaged; and/or
The decision was made in a manner which is not fair in all of the
circumstances.
Advice and Assistance
A student is entitled to seek the advice of the Director of Student Affairs
and Services (Fredericton appeals) or the Director of Student Services
(Saint John appeals) with respect to an application for Senate
Review.Where so requested in writing by a student, the Director of
Student Affairs and Services (Fredericton) or the Director of Student
Services (Saint John) shall act on behalf of the student to the extent
requested in the application for Review.
Procedures
An Application for Senate Review shall:
a.
b.
be filed in the Office of the Secretary of Senate within thirty (30)
days of the date of the letter of notification of the decision of the
Appeals Committee made under the provisions of the Appeal
Procedure,
be made in writing, addressed to the Secretary of Senate, and
state the grounds on which the application is based.
On filing of an Application for Senate Review, the Secretary of Senate
shall:
a.
notify the student or the person acting on the student's behalf, of
the time, place and manner in which the Review will proceed, and
further shall ensure access by the student, or the person acting
on the student's behalf, to the materials relevant to the
application;
b.
give notice to the appropriate Appeals Committee of the time,
place and manner in which the Review will proceed and request
that any written material relevant to the application be filed with
Senate in such a manner as that the right of access stipulated in
1) will be facilitated;
c.
ask the Senate Nominating Committee and the President to
establish a Review Committee
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
51
SECTION B
X. GENERAL REGULATIONS ON
CONDUCT
8.
The following general regulations have been approved by the Board of
Governors of the University and are now in effect until such time as they
may be revised by the Board.
9.
A.
B.
C.
The University of New Brunswick is a community of faculty, staff,
students and administrators involved in teaching, learning,
research and related activities. The University assumes that
students come to the University for a serious purpose and accept
responsibilities as members of the University community.
In accordance with the commitment set out in the University's
Mission Statement to provide an environment conducive to the
development of the whole person, all members of the University
community - staff, faculty, students and administrators - have the
right to work and/or study in an environment which affords them
respect and dignity, and is free from danger, discrimination,
harassment, intimidation, and behaviour which is destructive,
disruptive, or unlawful.
4.
5.
abide by University regulations;
respect the integrity of University programs and activities;
acknowledge the diversity of the University community and
the freedom of all members to participate in University
programs and activities;
promote the peaceful and safe enjoyment of University
facilities by other members of the University and public;
conduct themselves at all times in a manner that will reflect
credit on themselves and the University.
The University has defined standards of student behaviour and
made provisions for student discipline when they engage in
conduct that is inconsistent with the foregoing principles. It shall
be deemed, and the Board considers, that each of the following
types of conduct is a breach of University regulations, and is
grounds for consideration of discipline up to and including
suspension or expulsion. As the types of misconduct are stated in
general terms, students are advised to familiarize themselves in
greater depth with University regulations, and to consult with
University officials where they have any doubt about the propriety
of an intended action or behaviour.
Unacceptable types of behaviour include, but are not limited to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
52
12.
13.
14.
E.
violence, harm or threat of harm to any person or the
person's property;
unnecessarily endangering the health or safety of other
persons;
possession of a firearm or other weapon on University
premises without specific University permission;
acting or speaking in a disruptive, disorderly, indecent or
offensive manner, or in a way that might reasonably cause
fear;
unauthorized infringement or prevention of access by
others to University classes services, events, facilities and
property;
disruption or obstruction of any authorized activity, event,
class or service of the University, or interference with any
person's rights to carry out legitimate activities, speak or
associate with others;
refusal to comply with a reasonable request by authorized
University officials including Security and the Student
Campus Police;
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
The University of New Brunswick Act provides broad authority for
dealing with non-academic student conduct. For example:
1.
The University recognizes students' freedom to manage their
personal lives, behaviour and interpersonal relations in a manner
consistent with the above principles, with the laws of Canada and
New Brunswick, and with University regulations. In exercising
their entitlement to participate in University programs and
activities, students are expected to:
1.
2.
3.
D.
10.
11.
2.
3.
4.
F.
failure to provide identification to authorized University
officials when asked, or providing false identification or
information;
obstruction of Security or Student Campus Police in the
performance of their duties;
unauthorized use or occupation of any University property;
conduct that results directly or indirectly in damage,
misuse, defacing, or theft of University property;
improper use or consumption of alcoholic beverages,
restricted drugs, or intoxication or impairment in a public
place;
other conduct that is prohibited or proscribed by University
rule, regulation or policy;
contravention of any provision of any federal, provincial or
municipal statute on University premises or while engaged
in University authorized events or activities.
the President has broad discretionary disciplinary powers
including suspension for dealing with academic and nonacademic disciplinary matters;
the Board of Deans has jurisdiction for matters of student
discipline;
the Board of Governors may approve the expulsion of a
student from the University;
the Board of Governors may make rules and regulations
for the discipline of students and the imposition of fines and
other penalties and sanctions; the Student Disciplinary
Code and the Internal Residence Discipline Policy are
examples.
As a general principle, the various authorities for dealing with
student discipline shall be exercised so as to avoid the imposition
of punishment by more than one authority for the same or an
included offence.
This principle shall not preclude University authority being
exercised to suspend a student from the University, or to suspend
or evict a student from a University residence, pending or
following the imposition of discipline, where such action is
deemed to be in the best interests of the University community.
This principle is not intended to preclude a student organization
from taking action against a student in accordance with its
constitution and bylaws on the same facts giving rise to
disciplinary action under University authority.
G.
Information regarding University disciplinary regulations and
procedures is available from the offices of the Director of Student
Affairs and Services, the Director of Security and Traffic, the Chief
of Student Campus Police, and the Commissioner of Student
Discipline on the UNBF campus and from the Director of Student
Services and the Manager of Safety and Security on the UNBSJ
campus.
When students believe that a member of the University
community has violated the principles stated in B above in relation
to them, or where students are uncertain about whether behaviour
they are contemplating may violate University regulations, they
should consult the Chair of their Department, or the Dean of their
Faculty, or the Director of Student Affairs and Services (UNBF), or
the Director of Student Services (UNBSJ), or the Director of
Security and Traffic (UNBF) or the Manager of Safety and
Security (UNBSJ), or the Chief of Student Campus Police, or the
Commissioner of Student Discipline, as appropriate.
SECTION B
XI. LISTING OF GRADUATES
A.
APPLICATION TO GRADUATE
1.
2.
B.
Students must make application to graduate by 1 March,
for May graduation and 1 September for October
graduation. Such application is done either by submitting
an electronic "Application to Graduate" form available from
the UNB Hompage (http://www.unb.ca)or by completing an
"Application to Graduate" card available from the
Registrar's Office.
Courses that are attached to a distinct session that ends
after the January - April session are not counted in the
assessment for May graduation eligibility.
Candidates for all undergraduate degrees, except candidates for
the degree of Bachelor of Laws, shall be listed in the graduation
program alphabetically by First Division, and General Standing,
based on the cumulative grade point average of all UNB courses
(including certain approved Saint Thomas courses) attempted in
the program. Candidates with Honours and Distinction standing
will be listed separately.
Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws are listed
alphabetically without divisions.
C.
Divisional standing will be recorded in the student's transcript
based on the cumulative grade point average as follows:
First division
3.5 or better
Second division
2.5 or better but less than 3.5
Third division
Less than 2.5
D.
A student who has received a bachelor's degree from UNB may
return and complete the requirements of the honours program in
the same field as in the original degree or the requirements in
another major or honours field in the same degree. Such a
student will not receive the degree again but a record of the
completion of the second requirements will be carried on the
student's transcript.
E.
Students are not permitted to graduate at a ceremony during
spring Encaenia other than the one for which they are scheduled,
except in special circumstances at the discretion of the Registrar.
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
53
SECTION B
XII. ACADEMIC DRESS
A. GOWNS
Undergraduates
Plain black stuff material, sleeveless.
Bachelors
Black stuff gown falling below knee, with full sleeves reaching to the wrist and terminating in a point.
Masters
Black silk or stuff gown, falling below knees, with long sleeve with semi- circular cut bottom.
Doctors
A scarlet cloth robe, faced with silk of the same colour as the lining of the hood worn.
B. HOODS
Each degree has its distinctive hood as follows:
54
BA
Black stuff bordered with white fur.
BAA
Black stuff lined with ivory silk bordered with white fur.
BASc
Black stuff bordered with white fur and scarlet band.
BSc
Black stuff lined with scarlet silk bordered with white fur.
BSc (Applied)
Black stuff lined with green silk bordered with white fur.
BCS
Black stuff lined with green silk bordered with white fur.
LLB
Pale blue silk bordered with white fur.
BBA
Black stuff lined with light brown silk bordered with white fur.
BPE
Black stuff lined with claret silk bordered with white fur.
BKin
Black stuff lined with claret silk bordered with white fur.
BScKin
Black stuff lined with claret silk bordered with white fur with a dark green band.
BRLS
Black stuff lined with claret silk bordered with white fur with a navy band.
BN
Black stuff lined with peach bordered with white fur.
BEd
Black stuff lined with blue grey silk bordered with white fur.
BOM
Black stuff lined with pale yellow silk bordered with white fur.
BAM-HT
Black stuff lined with gold silk bordered with white fur.
BHS, BMLS
Black stuff lined with teal silk bordered with white fur.
BPhil
Black stuff lined with dark blue silk bordered with white fur.
MA
Black stuff lined with crimson silk.
MSc, MCS
Black silk lined with white silk bordered with scarlet.
MSc (Applied)
Black silk lined with white silk bordered with green.
MScE, MScF, MEng and MFor
Black silk lined with white silk bordered with green.
MEd
Black silk lined with blue grey silk bordered with crimson.
MPE, MSc (KIN), MA (KIN)
Black silk lined with white silk bordered with claret.
MN
Black silk lined with white silk bordered with peach.
MPA
Black silk lined with grey silk bordered with light brown.
MBA
Black silk lined with white silk bordered with light brown.
PhD
Scarlet cloth with dark blue silk lining.
LLD
Scarlet cloth with pale pink silk lining.
DSC
Scarlet cloth with white corded silk lining.
DCL
Scarlet cloth with pale blue silk lining.
DLitt
Scarlet cloth with grey silk lining.
UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS
SECTION D
ACCOMMODATION, FACILITIES and
SERVICES
This section provides information about University residences, and offcampus housing as available in Fredericton and Saint John.
ACCOMODATION
Fredericton Campus
RESIDENCES
The University maintains thirteen residence halls, including mens,
womens and co-ed houses. Each room is furnished with desks,
bookshelves, wastebaskets, bulletin boards, single beds, dressers and
wardrobes. Pillows are provided but Residents bring all other bedding
(sheets, pillow cases, quilt/duvet, etc. for a twin bed) as well as towels.
Extra transitional residences also are created each fall to help
accommodate students given the tight local housing market and campus
residences having more space as the term progresses.
UNB believes in a developmental residential living experience,
supporting both academic success and personal development. Living to
Learn fosters an academic context within the Residence Community,
facilitating a peer-supported learning environment. Leading to Learn
seeks to develop student leadership skills. Another UNB initiative is the
ResNet program, which involves the installation of a hardwired
connection to the University network and the Internet, as well as cable
TV access, in campus residence rooms. Please consult the UNB
Residences Application Form for current ResNet availability. UNB further
fosters a positive living environment through attractive common areas,
recent infrastructure improvements, and policies such as all residences
being non-smoking, zero tolerance for illegal drugs, and unbreakable
beverage containers except for products not otherwise available.
The residences are administered by Residential Life & Conference
Services with a team based approach to life and leadership within the
community, clusters and houses. Each house is supported by a House
Team of elected and selected Student Leaders and functions as part of a
Cluster. The Cluster is supported by a full-time Community Coordinator.
The House Teams and Community Coordinators work closely with the
central Residence Office.
The functions of the resource persons within the residence community
are as follows:
Residential Life & Conference Services: the office has overall
responsibility for the Residence Community and concentrates on
physical facilities, academic, administrative and quality of life issues and
policies with the objective of providing a quality residence experience in
a strong academic environment.
Director: a full-time professional responsible for leadership, overall
management, governance, quality, development, and long-term vision of
the Residence Community.
Associate Director (Residential Life): a full-time professional with
overall responsibility for the Residence Community but generally
concentrating on academic residence issues (supportive academic
environment, Living to Learn, etc.), quality of life issues (residence
conduct, discipline, etc.), residence policy, and food services.
Assistant Director (Residential Life): a full-time professional working
with the Associate Director (Residential Life) whose responsibilities
include heading the Residence Life Team's day-to-day activities; guiding
and directing programming, orientation, leadership development; and
contributing actively to broader unit direction and policy.
Residence Facilities Manager, also acting Associate Director
(Operations and Finance): a full-time professional responsible for the
physical operation of the residences (including janitorial services,
maintenance, repairs, and capital improvements), finance and administration, conferences, and vending contracts.
Community Coordinators: full-time professionals responsible for all
day to day residential life matters within their Cluster.
ResNet Support Administrator: a full-time professional responsible for
the effective operation of ResNet, coordinating the House ResNet
Consultants and working cooperatively with Integrated Technology
Services on main network issues affecting ResNet.
Residence Operations Coordinator: a full-time professional
responsible for the day-to-day management of residence janitorial and
maintenance staff.
Administrative Secretaries, Budget/Magee Coordinator &
Receptionist: full-time support personnel who are the first resources
when visiting or contacting Residential Life & Conference Services as
well as supporting the Cluster and House Teams.
After Hours Counsellors: full-time professional counsellors who are
members of UNB Counselling Services and on-call after hours for crisis
intervention, through the Community Coordinators.
Residence Security: Members of UNB Security providing after hours
residence coverage and working closely with the Cluster and House
Teams regarding group and individual situations, providing not only
security but also support and advice.
House Dons: University faculty, staff members or graduate (or second
degree) students living in each residence who are responsible for
heading House Teams, mentoring and supporting students, and
furthering the academic and educational goals of the Residence
Community.
Associate Don (Joy Kidd & McLeod): shares the same qualifications
and responsibilities as the Don, except for the Don heading the House
Team.
Proctors (Educational & Hall): experienced undergraduate students
living on residence floors who work cooperatively with other House Team
Members to provide support and a positive, developmental living
environment in residence. In addition to working collaboratively and the
common responsibilities shared by all Proctors (house coverage,
programming, discipline, etc.), Educational and Hall Proctors also have
unique responsibilities:
•
Hall Proctors focus on their hall providing support, building
community and implementing life skills programs for
approximately 35 students.
•
Educational Proctors focus on providing academic/wellness
support and programs for the House with one Educational Proctor
per approximately 100 students.
House Committees: elected Student Leaders who promote a
welcoming and supportive environment through developing community.
Residential Network Consultants (RNCs): Students in houses having
ResNet who are responsible for helping Students with ResNet.
Janitorial Forepersons, House Cleaners, & Residence Maintenance
Person: full-time personnel responsible for cleaning (common areas)
and maintaining residences.
ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
123
SECTION D
RESIDENCE ADMISSION
•
General
•
1.
2.
3.
4.
Since residence space at UNB is limited, no one can be
guaranteed admission or readmission to residence until a formal
offer of residence is issued, accepted and confirmed by the
payment of the residence deposit.
The University recognizes the desirability and value of Students
living in residence in their first undergraduate year as well as
having senior students remain in residence. Hence, every effort is
made to ensure a reasonable balance between new admission
and returning students.
Although consideration is given to the student's preferences,
admission/readmission to residence guarantees a student a place
in residence as opposed to a particular room. Initial room
assignments or later changes are at the sole discretion of the
University.
•
The entire deposit is forfeited if the student cancels after August 21, fails
to take up the reserved accomodation or enters and then subsequently
withdraws from residence.
RESIDENCE FEES
1.
For Regulations governing the payment of fees, withdrawal, etc.
please refer to Section C of this Calendar.
2.
Information concerning current residence rates may be obtained
from Residential Life & Conference Services.
3.
(a) Rooms with meals: Each student's residence fee covers room
and board from the day the residences open in the fall (date
differs for new and returning students) until the day after the
student's last regularly scheduled examination in December, and
from the day before classes start in January until the day after the
student's last regularly scheduled examination in the spring.
RESIDENTIAL MEALS ARE NOT SERVED during Thanksgiving
Weekend in the first term or during the March Break in the second
term although retail dining services remain open and dining plan
cash may be used. (b)Rooms without meals (limited number
only): Each student's residence fee covers room rent and use of
communal cooking facilities only for the same periods as
specified in 3(a) above. Students also have the option of
purchasing a residence meal plan from the food services
contractor.
4.
(a) Although the Christmas vacation period is not covered by
residence fees and residences are closed, Residents who plan to
resume occupancy of their rooms in January may leave their
belongings in their rooms during the holidays, but the University
accepts no responsibility for these belongings. (b) International
and other students who are unable to return home at Christmas or
make other arrangements may request permission to remain in
residence from Residential Life & Conference Services.
Permission is granted only for those students with a genuine need
and such students may not be able to remain in their regular
residence.
Room assignment information will be mailed out in late July.
New Residents
1.
Students requesting residence must complete and submit a UNB
Residences Application Form. Please note that this is a separate
document from the University of New Brunswick Application for
Admission. For incoming first year students, the UNB Residences
Application Form is included in the UNB Admissions Handbook.
All other students (transfer students, St. Thomas University
students, students entering law/graduate school, etc.) should
contact Residential Life & Conference Services directly for
instructions on residence application. There is currently no
residence application fee.
2.
New residence applicants should note that admission to
residence will not be offered until admission to a UNB Fredericton
program has been granted by the University Registrar and that
acceptance to the University does not guarantee a place in
residence.
3.
Upon acceptance into their University program, residence
applicants will be sent an offer of residence as well as a
Response to Offer of Admission to Residence form. Students are
asked to complete this form and return it with a $300.00 residence
deposit in accordance with the instructions found on the form. The
receipt of this form and deposit by UNB serve as a residence
confirmation and allows a room assignment to proceed. Please
note that room assignments cannot take place without the receipt
of the residence deposit.
Returning Residents
1.
Students must apply each year for residence accommodation.
2.
Reapplication forms are distributed to all residence students
during March. Completed forms and a deposit should be
submitted according to instructions issued by Residential Life &
Conference Services.
3.
Returning students are considered for readmission to residence
provided:
a.
They have attained a minimum assessment grade point
average of 2.0;
b.
Their conduct has been acceptable.
Appeals of a decision to deny readmission may be addressed to
the Associate Director (Residential Life).
4.
Reapplicants are, where possible, readmitted to a house of their
choice but are not guaranteed readmission to a particular house
and may be offered readmission to other houses.
RESIDENCE DEPOSIT REFUNDS
Requests for refunds should be directed to Residential Life &
Conference Services. Students who have paid a deposit but send written
notice of cancellation to Residential Life & Conference Services receive
refunds as follows:
124
ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
a refund of $150 if the written notice is received on or before July
31 . The balance of $150 is NOT REFUNDABLE.
a refund of $50 if the written notice is received after July 31 but on
or before Aug. 21 . The balance of $250 is NOT REFUNDABLE.
NO REFUND IF THE WRITTEN NOTICE IS RECEIVED AFTER
AUGUST 21.
OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING
Students are responsible for making their own arrangements for offcampus housing. The UNB Student Union maintains an Off-Campus
Housing List to assist students with finding suitable off-campus housing.
This list and information are available from UNB Student Union at http://
www.frederictonstudenthousing.com, Tel. (506) 453-4955 or Fax (506)
453-4958. Copies of the list also are available at the Residence
Administration Building. It is advisable to visit the city well in advance of
registration in order to locate suitable housing.
The University operates one apartment building, Magee House, on the
Fredericton Campus, which can house 102 families in 49 one-bedroom,
48 two-bedroom and five three-bedroom apartments. Student families
wishing to apply for housing in Magee House may obtain application
forms and information from the Residential Life & Conference Services,
matilto: cmacfarl@unb.ca, Tel. (506) 453-4800, Fax (506) 453-3585.
Students living off-campus may choose from a variety of meal plans
available from the food services contractor.
GENERAL
For further information about the above and other regulations pertinent
to the residence system, please contact Residential Life & Conference
Services, UNB, P.O. Box 4400, Fredericton, N.B. E3B 5A3. Phone (506)
453-4800; FAX (506) 447-3059; mailto: resadmin@unb.ca; http://
www.unb.ca/residence/reslife.html.
SECTION D
ACCOMMODATION
OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING
Saint John Campus
Do you need help finding suitable off-campus housing? An apartment,
perhaps, or a room in an owner-occupied home? Maybe you need help
finding a roommate? Do you have concerns about your present accommodations?
RESIDENCES
UNB Saint John offers two residences on campus overlooking the
beautiful Kennebecasis River.
The new residence, opening September 2003, was designed with input
from our own students. It offers 170 beds in the form of spacious double
suites for independent style living. Suites include two single bedrooms,
kitchenette, complete with microwave and fridge and private three-piece
bath. At UNB Saint John, housing is non-smoking, co-ed and security
locked. Each room is furnished with a double bed, and desk set and
standard house amenities include furnished TV rooms and study
lounges, high-speed Internet and cable TV connections and laundry
facilities.
The Sir James Dunn Residence offers 71 beds and an indoor connection
to the campus. Single and double rooms are available. If you prefer a
more subdued, quiet lifestyle, the residence also has a section that
offers a 24-hour quiet policy.
Food Services and Residence Fees
Sir James Dunn residents must choose one of three meal plans which
will be incorporated into the total residence fees as set out in the
residence fees schedule. Students living in the new residence may elect
to purchase a meal plan. Meal plans are administered on a declining
balance basis. For example, this means that if a meal plan that was
valued at $1,000 per term were purchased, the student's account would
be credited with this amount toward food services. The cost of any
purchases at the Baird Dining Hall or Chippy's Snack Bar during the term
would be deducted from the balance until a zero balance is reached.
Ideally, a zero balance is reached at the end of each term; however, food
service accounts can be supplemented at any time in increments of $25
or greater. It is important to keep in mind when choosing a meal plan that
although an account can be supplemented at any time, any balance
remaining at the end of April is non-refundable.
Residence Activities
Living in residence is not just about studying and sleeping. Student
house committees are elected each fall to plan social events such as
Frosh Week, Winter Carnival, Holiday Formal and charity fundraisers.
They also assist in establishing residence policy and procedure,
administering the residence and student activities, and representing the
residences in student government. The Committee uses house dues,
which are collected from the students at registration time to provide
Orientation activities, subscriptions to cable television, newspapers etc.
for the common areas, and anything else they would like to sponsor.
Residences are served by a Residence Community Coordinator and a
Don in addition to a number of Residence Assistants who live on
campus.
Applying to Residence:
Applicants who are interested in living accommodations in the university
residences must complete the application form, which is included in the
UNB Saint John Application for Admission package or they may apply
online at https://www.unb.ca/sweb/application/
Residence applicants should note that acceptance to UNB Saint John
does not guarantee a place in residence; acceptance into residence will
not be offered until admission to UNB Saint John has been granted.
Upon acceptance, students will be sent a residence deposit form. The
form must be returned with a confirmation deposit of $300.00 as quickly
as possible to ensure a place in residence.
For information on the residences, please contact: Housing & Food
Services, Sir James Dunn Residence - mailto: res@unbsj.ca, telephone
648-5755, fax 648-5762, Monday - Friday 8:15 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
The Off-Campus Housing Office has been established to help students
find off-campus accommodations as well as to offer assistance with
concerns they may have regarding current accommodations. The Office
keeps up-to-date listings of apartments for rent and rooms available in
privately-owned homes, as well as a list of students who are looking for a
roommate.
The Off-Campus Housing Coordinator, Bonnie Sudul, is located in
Annex A, Room A1, mailto: och@unbsj.ca, telephone 648-5952, fax
648-5959, website: http://www.unbsj.ca/och/, Monday - Friday 8:15 am 4:30 pm. Please feel free to stop in to pick up copies of the current
housing listings and other helpful information, or to discuss any concerns
you may have about housing.
Aboriginal Student Services and Programs
Fredericton Campus
Special services and programs for Aboriginal students are provided on
the Fredericton campus through the Mikmaq-Maliseet Institute (Marshall
d'Avray Hall, Rooms 343-344). The Institute is an academic unit of the
University which administers UNB Academic programs for Aboriginal
students and engages in research and publication in Aboriginal Studies
and Aboriginal Education. The Institute's goal is to maintain the high
quality of UNB programs for First Nations students and to broaden the
Aboriginal content and perspectives in these programs. In addition, MMI
develops new programs which meet the stated needs of the First Nations
communities of the region and contribute to their educational and
professional growth.
MMI services, which are intended for the use of Aboriginal students in all
Faculties, include academic counselling and tutoring, access to the
Mikmaq-Maliseet Resource Collection in the Harriet Irving Library, an
Aboriginal student lounge, and opportunities to participate in social and
other group events.
Degree credit courses are available in the Mikmaq and Maliseet
languages and cultures, and in Aboriginal Business and Aboriginal
Education.
For information on the special BEd Program for Aboriginal students and
the First Nations Business Administration Certificate, see Section G of
the Calendar.
Bridging Year Program
The Institute also offers a Bridging Year Program for Aboriginal students
who are not ready for admission to regular status in a UNB Faculty.
Applications for the program are welcome from:
1. High school graduates.
2. Students with Grade 11 who have been out of school for at least 3 years.
3. Mature students as defined in the UNB undergraduate Calendar.
Admissions are competitive. Satisfaction of the minimum criteria will not
guarantee acceptance. The deadline for applications is March 31. Late
applications can be considered only if spaces remain unfilled.
In their Bridging Year students register for four courses each term, at
least one of which must be a university credit course (See Bridging Year
courses in Section H of the Calendar). Course schedules are individually
planned in consultation with the Faculty in which a student wishes to
enrol the following year.
Students who achieve a pass standard in their non-credit courses and a
grade point average of 2.0 or higher in their credit courses are eligible to
transfer to the Faculty for which the Bridging Year was designed.
Students who do not meet these standards will be required to withdraw
from university.
ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
125
SECTION D
Associated Alumni of the University of
New Brunswick
The Associated Alumni of the University of New Brunswick has 50,000+
alumni (graduates) around the world.
The Associated Alumni keeps graduates connected with each other and
the University, and provides opportunities for alumni to contribute to
UNB's well-being. The Associated Alumni is governed by an elected
council of 30 former students from various graduating classes,
geographical areas and faculties.
Our Alumni are "energized and involved" in the life of the University of
New Brusnwick. Alumni help with governing the University, advocating
on behalf of the university, volunteering, recruiting students, and making
financial donations. Alumni give time, talent and treasures to their alma
mater. One valuable contribution the Associated Alumni makes to
current UNB students is by providing scholarships and merit awards.
You are a student for a defined period of time, but, you will be an
alumnus or alumna of the University of New Brunswick for life! UNB's
alumni are an integral part of the future of this university. So, what do you
call yourself when you graduate? A UNB...
Definitions: ALUMNI - all graduates both males and females ALUMNAE plural, females ALUMNUS - singular male ALUMNA - singular female
The Associated Alumni of the University of New Brunswick began in
1862 when seven of the approximately 200 UNB graduates met. They
subsequently formed an "alumni society" based on the following motion
by Mr. G.S. Smith (class of 1854): "that the objects of such a society be first, the advancement of the interests of the University of New
Brunswick by all honourable means." The association has been an
active and important part of the UNB family every since.
"Floreat Alma Mater - May the Alma Mater Prosper"
Athletics
Fredericton Campus
The University, through its Faculty of Kinesiology, provides opportunities
for participation in a wide variety of recreational and competitive varsity
athletic activities. The offices of the Faculty, together with classrooms
and laboratories are located in the Lady Beaverbrook Gymnasium. Other
features of this building include two gymnasium floors (one with
spectator accommodation for 1,200), the Sir Max Aitken Pool (500
spectators), four squash/handball courts, a dance studio, conditioning
room, and equipment issue rooms.
The Education Gym contains a full gymnasium plus facilities for
gymnastics and the martial arts. There are playing fields adjacent to both
gyms and to the Aitken University Centre, as well as a fourth field and
running track situated on the lower campus.
The Aitken University Centre is the home of the UNB Varsity Reds and
the administrative offices for this athletics program are located at there.
The building is widely used by the University and includes classroom
and training room facilities, noon hour skating, as well as an indoor
walking/jogging area.
Thus, with the facilities of three gymnasia, one swimming pool, four
playing fields, an arena, and specialty rooms, supplemented by
changing facilities for over 3,000 persons and a program that ranges
from highly organized intercollegiate competition to casual recreational
play, UNB is able to provide sport and recreational activities for all
members of the University community.
The Varsity Reds Athletic Program competes in the Atlantic University
Sport Conference and Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) in the sports
of Men's and Women's Basketball, Volleyball, Soccer, Wrestling,
Swimming, Hockey and Cross-Country as well as Women's Field
Hockey.
126
ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
Saint John Campus
The University varsity athletics program in Saint John as a member of
both the Atlantic and Canadian Colleges Athletic Associations offers
such sports as soccer, basketball, badminton, and volleyball for men and
women. In conjunction with the SRC, club programs are also available in
a wide variety of sports as interest develops, such as indoor soccer,
fencing, cheerleading and hockey.
The G. Forbes Elliot Athletics Centre opened in 1975 and hosts a wide
range of competitive and recreational sports for the university and,
community. Thousands of people use the Athletics Centre each year,
and it is the hub of many community events and tournaments. Students
are able to take part in organized intramural, and recreational and
wellness activities such as volleyball, basketball, badminton, soccer,
tennis, and table tennis, and fitness classes. The fitness facilities as well
as the indoor tennis courts are particularly appealing to the community.
The Jeux Canada Games Stadium, built for the 1985 Jeux Canada
Games, overlooks the Kennebecasis and Saint John rivers. It features a
400-metre all-weather track, a natural grass field, and seating for 5,000,
as well as ancillary facilities.
The University Athletics Department provides an all-around program of
healthy recreational and wellness activities for the total university
population and foster sports competition through varsity teams.
Awards Office (Undergraduate)
The University maintains facilities on the Fredericton campus, located in
Sir Howard Douglas Hall, where students may make application for
scholarships and bursaries. The Awards Office looks after scholarship
and bursaries for both campuses.
See Section C of this calendar for Financial Information.
Bank
Fredericton Campus
A Bank of Montreal Financial Management Centre, specializing in credit,
investment and financial management services, is located on Dineen
Drive in the UNB Bookstore building. The branch offers two on site full
service banking machines, passbook update and statement printer,
telephone banking centre and internet banking. There are three
additional cash machines on campus (two located at the Student Union
Building and a third at St. Thomas University).
Branch Hours are 10:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Monday - Friday.
Saint John Campus
A Bank of Nova Scotia banking machine is available in the lobby of the
Student Centre.
SECTION D
Bookstores
Computing Services
There are well equipped bookstores on both campuses in central
locations from which students may obtain books and supplies at a
reasonable cost.
See Integrated Technology Services.
Fredericton Campus
The University Bookstore offers a vide variety of services to the student
community. It is a well stocked retail operation selling textbooks and
reference books for all courses taught at UNB and STU, general interest
books, special order books, a full line of stationery and office supplies,
computer hardware, software and peripherals, as well as university
crested clothing and gift items.
Visit the Bookstore Online at: http://www.unb.ca/bookstore/ or contact
them by telephone at 453-4664 or mailto: bookstor@unb.ca.
Saint John Campus
The University Bookstore on the Saint John campus stocks all textbooks
and course-related materials for students to purchase. In addition, it
offers a full line of reference and general interest books (with a special
order service for books not in stock), school and office supplies,
computer hardware, software and peripherals, as well as crested
university clothing and giftware. The Bookstore is located on the main
floor of the Ward Chipman Library building, and is open year-round:
September through May: 8:30 am - 7 pm Monday - Thursday 9:00 am - 4
pm Friday and Saturday
June through August: 9:00 am - 4 pm Monday through Saturday
Visit the Bookstore online at: http://www.unbsj.ca/bookstore/ or contact
them by telephone at (506) 648-5540 or via email at sjbooks@unbsj.ca
Campus Ministry
Fredericton Campus
The Campus Ministry team consists of Roman Catholic, Anglican and
multi-denominational Protestant chaplains. They seek to minister to the
religious needs of all members of the university community. They offer
spiritual counselling, worship services, and opportunities by which
members of this community are encouraged to integrate their faith and
learning. Campus Ministry conducts worship services, Bible studies,
discussion groups, special lectures, and Christian Scholars gatherings,
and the chaplains are involved in the academic community as sessional
lecturers in various departments. Students can contact members of the
Campus Ministry team at the Campus Ministry Office (Room 10, Alumni
Memorial Building) or by calling (506) 453-5089.
Saint John Campus
The Campus Ministry is composed of a number of clergy and spiritual
advisors of different faiths in the Saint John area. They volunteer their
time in the Campus Ministry Office, Room 33, Ward Chipman Library
building. The Campus Ministry sponsors religious services, debates and
guest lecturers on the campus during the year. Phone (506) 634-0446.
The Ministry motto is: "God cares, so do we."
Childcare Services
Continuing Education and Programs for
Part-Time Students
The University provides a variety of courses, programs and services for
individuals who need or prefer to study on a part-time basis at either
campus as well as at several off-campus locations. These learning
opportunities are designed to meet the variety of roles of the individual:
occupational, professional, personal, familial and communal.
Fredericton Campus
The following types of programs and services are offered through the
UNB College of Extended Learning (CEL). Further information is
available through the Fall/Winter and Spring/Summer calendars
published by the CEL and the CEL website (http://www.unb.ca/extend).
Part-time Degree and Certificate Courses: Degree-credit courses in
many disciplines which can be applied towards a variety of degree
programs; credit courses for certificate programs (e.g. Certificate in
Family Violence Issues; Certificate in Administration; Certificate Program
in Software Development; Certificate in Film Production; Certificate of
Proficiency in French; Certificate of Proficiency in Spanish; Certificate in
Adult Education). To serve the needs of part-time students in off-campus
communities, the Faculties of Education and Nursing offer academic
programs to selected locations. These programs include the Masters in
Education, the Bachelor of Nursing for RN's, and the Masters in Nursing.
Academic sessions are offered throughout the calendar year, and parttime students can elect to take courses during the day or evening or
independently, according to their interests and needs. Responsibility for
the degree/certificate courses rests with the respective academic units,
which are also responsible for the academic advising. The advising of
part-time students who are not enrolled in a program is conducted
through the College of Extended Learning.
Non-Degree Certificates and Workshops: The College of Extended
Learning offers a number of specialized certificate programs to enhance
the personal and professional development of individuals. Professional
development certificate programs include Management Development;
Human Resources Management; Public Service Management; Project
Management; Health, Safety and Environmental Processes; and
Fluency in Information Technology (FITness). The College offers 1 to 4
day workshops on a variety of topics for effective leadership,
management and supervision in the changing workplace. A wide range
of courses are offered which are designed to enhance thepersonal
development of learners including courses in creative writing, American
Sign Language, painting and drawing, as well as programs like the
Maritime Writer's Workshop and KidsQuest.
English Language Programme: See Separate Section entitiled English
Language Programme - Fredericton Campus, below.
Distance Education and E-Learning: In order to better meet the
diverse needs of learners, UNB offers a variety of options in course
delivery, including audio and video conferencing, text-based
correspondence courses, as well as e-learning options through webbased study in the Open Access Learning Program (OALP).
Fredericton Campus
Visual Arts and Music: The UNB Arts Centre and the Centre for
Musical Arts offer a variety of participation and learning (credit and noncredit) opportunities to UNB students and community members.
College Hill Daycare Co-op Ltd.
The College Hill Daycare is a non-profit daycare servicing University of
New Brunswick and Saint Thomas University staff, faculty and students.
This High Scope based program offers childcare for children 6 months to
7 years of age. Located at 850 Montgomery Street in Fredericton, the
Hours of Operation are Monday to Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m..
For further information, contact Wendi Lunney at (506) 458-2883.
Writing and Math Centre: The Centre provides individual tutoring and
small-group workshops, as well as Saturday and evening sessions. The
Writing and Study Skills Program covers essay and report writing,
reading techniques, examination preparation, and time management.
The Math Help Program is available for all first-year Math courses.
Services are free to full-and part-time UNB students; sessions are
available by appointment.
ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
127
SECTION D
Financial Assistance: Advice and information on loans, bursaries and
scholarships for part-time students is offered.
Adult Learner Services: Advice and information for adults considering
or enrolled in academic studies at UNB.
Prior Learning Assessment: In some circumstances, students/
potential students may have attained university-level learning through
means other than formal university courses. Information and guidelines
related to UNB's Prior Learning Assessment policy are available to
students, prospective students and faculty.
Adult Learners and Part-time Students (ALPS): This organization is
an information and support network for mature and part-time
undergraduate students. ALPS serves as an advocate, responding to
the unique concerns and issues of these learners, to help create an
enriched university environment.
For additional information, contact the College of Extended Learning,
P.O. Box 4400, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5A3; (506) 453-4646 (phone);
(506) 453-3572 (fax); mailto: extend@unb.ca; website: http://
www.unb.ca/extend.
Saint John Campus
1.
2.
The Saint John campus operates an integrated program which
treats part-time students on essentially the same basis as full-time
students. Credit courses are under the administrative control of
the Faculties, and are scheduled at the time of day or evening
which makes them most accessible to both the full-time and parttime clientele. The only credit courses not under the auspices of
the Saint John Faculties are those in Education which are offered
at Saint John through a co-operative arrangement with the
respective faculties on the Fredericton campus. Academic
advising for part-time students is available through the
Departments and Faculties, as it is for those in full-time studies.
In addition to degree programs, the campus offers certificate
programs in Data Analysis, Social Science for Police Personnel
and in Business Administration, Human Resource Managment,
Accounting, Electronic Commerce, Economics, Financial
Markets, Communication and Professional Writing and General
Studies, which are of particular relevance to part-time students.
All courses offered towards a certificate are degree-credit courses
and students who subsequently enroll in a degree program will
normally be able to count courses taken towards the certificate as
credits towards the degree. Another certificate program offered is
the Certificate of Proficiency in French, Level I and II, which is
open to students whether or not they are currently working
towards a degree.
3.
A variety of non-degree courses is also offered to meet the
needs of professional associations and other groups.
4.
The Writing Centre; Counselling; Employment Liaison;
information on scholarships and bursaries for part-time study;
student success strategies; and financial advising for part-time
students are available at the Student Services Centre, ground
floor of Philip W. Oland Hall. Phone (506) 648-5501.
5.
6.
The campus offers a Math Centre available for all full-time and
part-time students regardless of degree program. Phone (506)
648-5776.
The Modern Language Centre offers Second Language Training
Courses (non-credit), designed to allow students to acquire
rapidly the ability to function and communicate in English and
French.
a.
French Help Centre: this service provides extra help for
full and part-time students, covers all language skills with
emphasis on problems encountered when learning French.
b.
Second Language Training Courses (non-credit):
designed to allow students to acquire rapidly the ability to
function and communicate in French, English, or Spanish.
c.
Testing Service: three types (for French or English): the
Diagnostic Test, the Proficiency Test, or the Written Test.
Institutional TOEFL testing also available.
d.
Consulting Service: evaluates second language needs in
the work place.
Information about degree-credit courses/certificate programs may be
obtained from the Chair of the appropriate Department, the Dean of the
Faculty of Business or, for Education courses, from the Education
Coordinator for the campus, (506) 648-5674.
Counselling Services
Fredericton Campus
At Counselling Services, there is a friendly, helpful staff, including
professional counsellors, and a Career Consultant, who helps students
use the library. Services are accessible on a drop-in basis as well as by
appointment.
All staff maintain strict confidentiality in their dealings with students who
make use of Counselling Services.
Counselling Services provides the following:
1.
Personal and Career Counselling services to help students deal
with, for example, social, personal, marital and relationship
problems, career problems and concerns, concerns that impact
on academic performance, etc.
2.
Career Resource Library which includes up-to-date information
concerning careers, academic calendars, self-development, job
search techniques, Canadian companies, and study and work
abroad.
3.
Consultation regarding concerns a friend, staff or faculty member,
or other individual may have about a student or situation. Note
that no counselling staff person will discuss or release any
information about any individual who might be a client of
counselling services.
Counselling Services is located in Room 19, Alumni Memorial Building.
Services are available free of charge to all full-time and part-time
students of UNB and Saint Thomas University. Fall and winter office
hours are weekdays: 8:15 a.m. - 12:00 noon, and 1:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Summer hours are weekdays: 7:45 a.m. - 12:00 noon, and 1:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m. For information or to make an appointment call 453-4820.
After-hours emergency services are provided by CHIMO Helpline, Inc. call Counselling Services at 453-4820 after hours and you will be
connected to someone who can assist you.
For additional information please visit our website at: http://www.unb.ca/
counselling/
Saint John Campus
Counselling Services provides confidential help for students
experiencing:
1.
Anxiety and depression
2.
Personal problems
3.
Relationship & communication problems
4.
Substance abuse problems
5.
Time and stress management problems
6.
Work related issues
7.
Career indecisions
Counselling services are provided in a concerned, supportive
environment. Students in crisis will be seen without appointments. Every
effort is made to provide constructive intervention and counselling followup. Counselling Services is located in Oland Hall, G18. To make an
appointment, please call 506-648-5557 or mailto: davisl@unbsj.ca.
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ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
SECTION D
Employment Services
C.
Fredericton Campus
The Student Employment Service , located in the historic Neville
Homestead, helps students find full-time degree-related employment
after graduation, part-time employment on campus during the academic
year, as well as summer jobs and internships. We provide in-depth
resume, cover letter and interview guidance and on-going Job Search
Strategy counselling (by appointment and by workshop/seminar). There
are approximately 1,500 employment opportunities and over 80
company information sessions held on campus each year. All students
are encouraged to contact the Student Employment Service at the
beginning of the academic year to review the many opportunities and to
take part in the fall recruitment campaigns as well as our Career Fairs
and Work-study Program (part-time on-campus employment).
Student employment opportunities and other helpful tips and job search
information can be seen on our web-site: http://www.unb.ca/
employment.
For information contact: Phone (506) 453-4620; Fax (506) 453-4610;
mailto: employment@unb.ca.
Saint John Campus
The Campus Employment Office on the Saint John campus assists
students and graduates in obtaining permanent, summer and part-time
employment. Services for students include: work-study programs,
employment counselling, labour market information, assistance with
resumes and cover letters, job search strategies and interview
preparation. Employer services include posting job notices on-campus
and assisting with employer information sessions for students and
graduates. Service is provided throughout the year. Students and
graduates are encouraged to contact the Campus Employment Office
early in the academic year to review job opportunities and take part in
the fall recruiting campaigns offered by many employers. The
Employment Office and the Career Resource Centre are located in
Student Services, Room G18, Oland Hall. Phone: 506-648-5680 or email kbonner@unbsj.ca
English Language Programme
Fredericton Campus
Established in 1953, the UNB English Language Programme offers
courses to assist non-aglophones to function in an English milieu. In all
formats, the language of instruction is English; all communication is to be
carried on in English as well. Each hour the student is faced with
changes in instructor and language focus. Credit and non-credit courses
are available.
A.
B.
(Total Intense) SUBMARINE© Immersion: This approach
incorporates round the clock classes and activities. A pledge to
function only in English for the duration of enrolment is the basis
of operation.
1.
Three-week, small-group modules featuring individualized
attention and personalized scheduling. Offered monthly
September through April.
2.
Five-week, large-group sessions. Offered May/June and
July/August.
English Language Classes:
1.
September - April: Term format in fourteen-week units; 23
hours per week.
2.
September - April: Daily classes, in one-week units; 10 - 30
hours per week.
3.
September - April: Evening classes a three-hour block per
week; undergraduate and graduate, credit and non-credit.
Specialized Formats:
1.
Tutorial Classes available to meet individual needs.
2.
Focus workshops / specialized formats.
3.
Professional / Labour Market Language Training©
4.
Session for High School students.
All proficiency levels are offered. Students are placed in classes
according to their level in each area; thus, they might find themselves at
one level in writing, another in oral production, a third in grammar, a
fourth in sound , and so on.
For information and registration, please contact: UNB English Language
Programme. Telephone: (506) 453-3564 mailto: elp@unb.ca website:
http://elp.unb.ca
Saint John Campus
The Modern Languages Centre is a Language school, offering courses
in both English as a Second Language (ESL) and French as a Second
Language (FSL), operated by the University of New Brunswick, Saint
John campus. It offers part-time FSL programs to the Saint John
Community. In addition, it offers full-time ESL programs to students from
other parts of Canada and from around the world. The 14-week English
for Academic Purposes Program which prepares students for academic
studies at UNB Saint John. The 7/14 week English Immersion program
enriches the students English communication ability, and offers the
chance to experience Canadian culture first-hand by living with a local
family in the MLCs Host Family program. Exciting workshops and
activities outside the classroom are part of the Immersion experience.
The MLC also offers an ESL Support Program for students with a TOEFL
Score of between 500 and 549 and who wish to pursue academic
studies. Other Specialized English Programs are offered based on our
learners needs and requirements (Part-Time Evening ESL, Business
ESL and Japanese ESL Study Programs).
Students interested in studying at the Modern Languages Centre should
be aware that application procedures, schedules and fees are different
from those of other UNB departments. Courses for 7 weeks begin in
January, March, May, July, September and November. Courses for 14
weeks begin in January, May and September. Fees are $1,470 for a 7week course and $2,940 for a 14-week course, and are subject to
change without notice.
Please contact the Modern Languages Centre directly for more detailed
information and for application forms. The phone number is (506) 6485599; the fax number is 506-648-5846; the e- mail address is modlang@unbsj.ca, and the mailing address is Modern Languages Centre,
University of New Brunswick, P.O. Box 5050, Saint John, New
Brunswick, CANADA, E2L 4L5. Students can also visit the website at
http://www.unbsj.ca/mlc.
Faculty Advisors
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
It is very important that students consult with their faculty in
planning their program.
Faculty advisors are available to all students in the university, and
are available for consultation during students full stay on the
campus.
If students wish to see a faculty advisor they should contact their
respective Faculty or Deans Office and ask to be assigned a
faculty advisor. Each faculty has its own procedures for assigning
students to faculty advisors.
In the faculty of Science, academic advising is provided by the
Dean or Associate Deans for the first two years, with individual
advisors appointed when students select their major programs of
study.
In the Faculty of Arts, academic advising in the first two years is
done primarily through the core ARTS 1000 course. ARTS 1000
tutorial leaders also provide academic advising. Students without
an ARTS 1000 advisor will see an Associate Dean for
counselling. When students select their field of study
departmental advisors will be assigned.
ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
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SECTION D
Financial Aid
2.
Fredericton Campus
Contact the UNB Financial Aid Office for information/assistance on
Government loans. The Financial Aid Office acts as a liaison between
students and all governmental student aid offices. Assistance is
available to students who need to obtain a provincial student loan
application; require an explanation of their government student aid
assessment; wish to initiate an appeal for further loan assistance; need
information on Canada Study Grants, Millennium Scholarships and;
terms of repayment. Additionally, should you not be eligible for
Government Loan Assistance, you may discuss alternative funding
options such as chartered bank Student Loans and Line-of-Credit
procedures with the Financial Aid Office.
3.
4.
Other services provided by the Financial Aid Office include, but,
are not limited to:
1.
University Small Loan Program are low-interest loans available to
full-time students who have successfully completed one term at
UNB. Maximum loan award for an academic year is $800.00.
2.
Work-Study Program is a subsidized work program designed to
assist financially needy students with the high costs associated
with post-secondary study. The program will also provide students
with an opportunity to gain valuable skills/experience within an
on-campus part-time employment situation.
3.
5.
6.
UNB Special Bursary Program is available to undergraduate
students who have been assessed to receive maximum combined
federal and provincial government student aid funding for the
current academic year.
For application information and deadlines, please contact the Financial
Aid Office of UNB, Room 3, Alumni Memorial Building, (506) 453-4796 or
mailto: finaid@unb.ca.
Saint John Campus
7.
The UNB Saint John Financial Aid Office provides advice and answers
questions on all matters relating to financial aid including: government
student loans, student line of credit, bank loans, University and
Emergency funding, bursaries and scholarships, as well as funding by
outside agencies. Information is available for both full and part-time
students. Budgeting and financial advising is another of our important
services.
For more information or to make an appointment, contact Renea Sleep,
Oland Hall, G15, 648-5765 or mailto: rsleep@unbsj.ca.
8.
Fine Arts
9.
UNB has a long tradition of encouraging the fine arts and has directed its
resources into sustaining diversified cultural activities.
Fredericton Campus
On the Fredericton campus, Fine Arts offerings reflect the philosophy
that in a modern university the creative and intellectual aspects of life
must be closely integrated.
Fine arts facilities and activities include:
1.
130
UNB Art Centre: Founded in 1941 by Pegi Nicol MacLeod and
Lucy Jarvis, the UNB Art Centre is considered one of the oldest
art centres in the Atlantic region. It remains a focus for a range of
informative and stimulating exhibitions and programs. It is home
to UNB's student art group, ARTZONE. The UNB Art Centre is the
custodian of the UNB Permanent Collection which totals close to
1500 artworks assembled through the generosity of alumni and
benefactors. The collection is on display throughout the
Fredericton and Saint John campuses.
ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
The Centre for Musical Arts, established in 1992, is under the
direction of Richard Hornsby. It includes a Concert Series, a
Young Musicians Program, and a Summer Music Camp. There
are many ensembles available to students such as the
Bicentennial Choir (Director, Shari Saunders), and instrumental
ensembles (concert band, brass ensemble, flute choir, jazz
band)(Director, Richard Hornsby), as well as the musician-inresidence program (1993-97, Robert Kortgaard - piano; 19972001, Richard Raymond - piano).
Theatre at UNB. Theatre UNB produces several shows (7 last
season) in Memorial Hall allowing students to acquire experience
in acting, designing, directing, producing, set construction, lighting
and stage managing. These activities are organized by Len
Falkenstein (Director of Drama).
The Creative Arts Committee, chaired by Tony Short, offers an
annual concert series in which nationally and internationally
acclaimed artists and touring companies are brought to campus
throughout the academic year. In addition, the Committee
generally promotes student participation in different areas of the
Fine Arts.
Film and Video. A series of courses in film studies is offered by
the Department of English. These may be taken as optional
courses or as part of the Fine Arts Minor. The program is directed
by Dr. Barry Cameron of the Department of English.
Writer-in-Residence. This position has been held by Norman
Levine (1965-66), Dorothy Livesay (1966-68), John Metcalfe
(1972-73), Alden Nowlan (1968-83), David Adams Richards
(1985-87), Douglas Glover (1987-88), Helen Weinzweig (198889), Nancy Bauer (1989-90), William Gaston (1990-92), Don
Hannah (1992-93) and Karen Connelly (1993-94) and Beth
Harvor (1994-95), Anne Michaels (1995-96), Bill Bissett (1998),
Richard Sanger (1998-99), Doug Fetherling (2000-01), John
Steffler (2001-02), Anne Simpson (2002-03), Ken McKoogan
(2003-04).
The Fiddlehead Magazine. Canada's oldest continuing journal of
poetry and short stories was conceived more than three decades
ago by Alfred Bailey, and grew from a few mimeographed sheets
of poems by students and some faculty to include short stories
and book reviews. It has been called a WHOS WHO of Canadian
Literature, and it has been edited by various faculty members
over the years, including Fred Cogswell, Kent Thompson, Roger
Ploude, Peter Thomas, Robert Gibbs, and Don McKay. The
current editor is Ross Leckie. Although its emphasis is on
Canadian prose and poetry, the Fiddlehead is open to good
writing in English from contributors around the world.
Memorial Hall is the site for on-campus as well as touring drama
and music productions. It also houses the UNB Art Centre and the
Centre for Musical Arts.
Special events and programs. Concerts, music master classes
and workshops, summer music programs, writers conferences,
exhibitions, poetry-readings, and drama productions are arranged
or sponsored by the UNB Art Centre, the Centre for Musical Arts,
Theatre UNB and the Creative Arts Committee.
Saint John Campus
Cultural activities on the Saint John campus are presented under the
auspices of the Lorenzo Society .
1.
The Saint John String Quartet consisting of David Adams
(principal violin), Enoch Kwan (violin), Chris Buckley (viola), and
Sonja Adams (cello) offer a series of 5 lecture/recitals and 2
concerts annually.
2.
Exhibitions by local, Canadian and International artists are
regularly displayed. In addition, the Cormorant , the Lorenzo
Societys literary magazine, has published the works of students
and Saint John area writers since 1983.
3.
On-campus as well as touring drama productions are
presented.
4.
Special events and programs. Concerts, writers conferences,
exhibitions and poetry and prose readings are arranged or
sponsored by the Lorenzo Society .
SECTION D
Food Services
Fredericton Campus
On-campus food services are provided:
1.
in the four residence dining areas with Residential Students
having the choice of various dining plans with varying
combinations of structured meals and discretionary cash.
Students who live off campus also have the option of buying
various dining plans or occasional meals on a cash basis.
2.
in the Student Union Building, Head Hall, Harriet Irving Library,
IUC, and DAvray Hall; and
3.
in vending machines located in various university buildings.
Health Insurance, Student
Basic Health Coverage
Basic health and hospital benefits for Canadian students are provided by
the Medicare Plan of their province of permanent residence. Students
must ensure that they are registered and in good standing with the
Hospital Commission of their province.
International students with student visas do not qualify for Medicare
coverage. Basic health coverage for international students is provided
through an insured plan administered by the University. International
students on both campuses should refer to the following web site for
information concerning opt-out dates, refunds, etc.: http://www.unb.ca/
services/financialservices/students/interhealth.htm
General information concerning food services, vending, and beverage
contracts may be obtained from the Associate Director (Residential Life),
whose office is in the Residence Administration Building, calling 4534800, or mailto: resadmin@unb.ca.
International students with landed immigrant status do qualify for
Medicare and hospital benefits and must register with the Province
immediately upon arrival. Please also refer to the above web site for
more information.
Information concerning planning an on-campus event involving food or
beverages, or hosting a conference on campus may be obtained from
the Conference Coordinator at Residential Life & Conference Services
(Residence Administration Building, 453-4800, mailto: unbhotel@unb.ca) or, if for these specific facilities, the Director of the Wu
Centre (Wu Centre, 453-5135, mailto: wu@unb.ca) or Event & Marketing
Coordinator of the Aitken Centre (Aitken Centre, 458-7803, mailto: morrell@unb.ca).
Supplementary Health and Dental Coverage
Saint John Campus
On the Saint John campus, food services are located in the Thomas J.
Condon Student Centre and Ward Chipman Library Building. Information
regarding catering, food services or hosting a conference on campus
may be obtained from the Office of Housing and Food Services by
calling 648-5755.
Graduate Studies
The University offers a wide range of post-graduate programs through its
School of Graduate Studies. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is
offered in Graduate Academic Units in the departments of Biology,
Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Science,
Education, Electrical Engineering, English, Forestry and Environmental
Management, Geodesy and Geomatics (Surveying) Engineering,
Geology, History, Interdisciplinary Studies, Mathematics and Statistics,
Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Psychology, and Sociology. Master's
degrees are offered in Graduate Academic Units in almost all
departments. Graduate studies are carried out on both campuses of the
University.
Detailed information concerning the programs offered, financial
assistance for graduate students, and regulations governing admission
and degree requirements will be found in the School of Graduate Studies
Calendar available on request from the School of Graduate Studies (
mailto: gradschl@unb.ca ) or on the Internet at http://www.unb.ca/
gradscchl/.
All full-time undergraduate students on both campuses are automatically
enrolled in the Student Health/Dental Plan. The Plan is designed to
supplement the coverage provided by the provincial Medicare plans, or
by the plan for international students. Administered by the Student Union
on the Fredericton campus, and by the Student Representative Council
(SRC) on the Saint John campus, the Plan provides students with a
comprehensive set of extended health and dental benefits including 80%
coverage on prescription drugs, paramedical services, ambulance
services, etc. The coverage runs from September 1 through August 31.
Students wishing to enroll dependents must contact the Student Union/
SRC to make arrangements (Fredericton students: 453-4955; Saint John
students: 648-5684 ).
Students providing proof of alternate coverage may opt out of the
Student Health/Dental Plan. To opt out, students must complete an optout form and have it signed by a Student Union/SRC staff member.
Students who opt out will be credited for the Health/Dental fee. The
deadline to complete the opt-out process is September 26, 2003 for both
campuses, with no exceptions beyond this date. It is the responsibility of
the student to follow all steps and adhere to the deadline in order to
receive credit. Students must opt out annually as the opt-out does not
automatically carry forward from year to year. The opt-out deadline for
new students starting in January (those who were not full-time in
September) will be January 23, 2004.
Please refer to Section C - Financial Information for Health Insurance
fees and payment deadlines.
For further information about the Plan, please contact: Fredericton
Student Union, Room 126, Student Union Building [(506) 453-4955] or
Saint John Student Representative Council, Room 213, T.J. Condon
Student Centre [(506) 648-5684].
ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
131
SECTION D
Health Services
The University has an AIDS Information Officer who provides information
and counselling to those at the University who contract the AIDS virus or
may be concerned about AIDS. The Officer may be contacted at (506)
453-4642.
Fredericton Campus
The Student Health Centre is located in the East end of Tibbits Hall.
Weekday hours are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Closed weekends and
holidays. Phone (506) 453-4837. After hours physician on call through
UNB Security, 453-4830.
Nursing and physician services are available to UNB and STU students.
The main function of the Student Health Centre is to provide acute
episodic care. In addition, the Centre is interested in preventive
medicine, health education and counselling in medical matters. Referral
to specialists is arranged when necessary.
Saint John Campus
Students requiring medical assistance may access one of the after-hour
clinics in the greater Saint John area. Please consult the yellow pages
under Clinics - Medical. Medical emergencies are handled by St.
Josephs Hospital or the Saint John Regional Hospital, which is adjacent
to the UNB Saint John campus.
Information Centres
Fredericton Campus
Advocacy Centre
The UNB Student Union-run Advocacy Centre is a place where
undergraduate students can access free, confidential legal information
from student advocates. If they cannot provide you with specific
information, they will find the information for you, or direct you to
somewhere that the information can be provided. The advocates are a
prime avenue to access Universal Legal Coverage. The Advocacy is
located in room 31 in the SUB. Call 447-3068 or mailto: univaff@unb.ca
for more information.
Saint John Campus
At the student-run Campus Information Centre, located in the Thomas
J. Condon Student Centre, you can obtain general information, find out
what is happening on campus, meet other students, send faxes, get
photocopies, pick up bus schedules, maps, job postings and much more.
The Office of Advancement, Communications and Recognition
(ACR) is the University's key contact point for members of the public
seeking information on UNB Saint John. If you are a prospective student
or parent, or a high school guidance counselor, principal or teacher, the
ACR Office is your source of information on academic programs,
facilities, services and campus life at UNB Saint John and its host city
(call 506-648-5698 or mailto: tellmemore@unbsj.ca) . The ACR Office
also works regularly with the media, community interest groups,
government officials, benefactors and potential donors, and many
others, and provides a news service and internal communications for
faculty, staff and students. Check out News@UNB on our website (http://
www.unbsj.ca) for the latest UNB Saint John news, a calendar of events
taking place on campus, a list of experts at UNB Saint John and more.
Integrated Technology Services
Fredericton Campus
In support of UNBs technology needs, the eight units of Integrated
Technology Services provide a variety of facilities and services for
students. See http://www.unbf.ca/its/students/ for a listing of these
services and for step-by-step instructions on how to activate your PIN,
computing accounts and UNB e-mail, access your personal information
(marks, timetables) and more.
ITS Help Desk
The ITS Help Desk can answer or refer technology questions to the
proper location. Questions involving application software, accounts,
general access computer labs, student printing, accessing web services,
and problems with technology misuse (such as abusive e-mail) are some
of the many types of questions handled by the ITS Help Desk, open 8
a.m. to midnight every day except Christmas and New Years Day. Just
mailto: helpdesk@unb.ca, phone (506) 453-5199, or drop by in person
to D-11 Head Hall . Free software, the status of services, information
about outages and other information is available from the ITS Help Desk
website at http://www.unb.ca/helpdesk.
PaperTrail
The Student Union-run PaperTrail is located in the lobby of the Student
Union building. Photocopies, fax service, a binding service, as well as
stationary and other merchandise, are available. Also offered are Bus
passes, campus maps, and tickets for most activities. The PaperTrail
acts as a photofinishing drop-off location, and also a Pharmacy
Prescription drop-off which arranges for your prescriptions to be
delivered to your home for free. Call 447-3079 for hours and information.
Imaging Services
Student Information Centre
The Student Union-run Information Centre is located in the lobby of the
Student Union Building (sharing space with the Paper Trail), room 105.
Information on any event, program, club, employment opportunity, etc. is
available. The Information Centre also coordinates several workshops
throughout the school year. Other popular services are the Odd Job
Bank and the Used Book Sale, which takes place at the beginning of
each term. Call 447-3079 for more information, or mailto:
resource@unb.ca.
Media Services
Media Services is equipped to provide audio visual service, equipment
and production support to all teaching/research functions at UNB. All
standard types of audio-visual equipment such as laptops, digital
cameras, projectors, VCRs and tape recorders are available for loan.
Technical assistance, photographic, slide and print production are also
available. Media Services can be reached at (506) 453-4704, mailto:
avbookng@unb.ca, or visit room 124 in the Eaton Multimedia Centre.
University Womens Centre
Governed by a Board consisting of various members of the UNB, STU
and Fredericton Community, the University Womens Centre opened in
the fall of 2002. Located in room 129 in the Student Union Building, the
centre provides information, space and support for all members of the
university community. For more information, phone (506) 452-6124 or
mailto: women@unb.ca.
132
ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
Among the services offered by Imaging Services are colour copying,
digital printing, desktop publishing, high quality scanning, offset printing,
booklet making, report binding, laminating, faxing, photo ID cards and
printing T-shirts. The main Imaging Services location is room 106, Eaton
Multimedia Centre. Satellite locations are room 109 Carleton Hall and
room E10A Head Hall. To contact Imaging Services call (506) 453-4843
or mailto: imaging@unb.ca.
SECTION D
Web & Instructional Support Services
This unit consists of two main groups: the Web Team (who is responsible
for the UNB website) and the Instructional Support Team (who provides
non-credit instructional workshops and operates two IT labs at the top
and bottom of the hill running both Mac and Windows operating
systems). These labs, located in the Eaton Multimedia Centre, room
234, (506) 458-7660 and in Head Hall, room D69, (506) 452-6329,
support a variety of multimedia software, flatbed and slide scanning,
digital and analog video editing, colour printing on plain paper and
transparencies and access to a plotter capable of printing posters up to 3
feet wide as well as one-on-one assistance to help you help yourself.
(Not all services are provided in both labs.) The Eaton Multimedia Centre
Lab also houses the UNB non-print library, loans tapes for language
courses and provides two viewing areas for VHS, DVD and 16 mm
media.
Saint John Campus
Integrated Technology Services (ITS) provides facilities and services for
computers, networks, multimedia and audio-visual equipment in support
of the academic and research needs of our students and employees. ITS
manages and provides user support for more than a dozen servers that
provide file storage space, networked applications, print services, web
page storage, email services, off-campus FTP access to files, and
Internet connectivity services. ITS Saint John operates six computer labs
containing more than 150 microcomputers for student use. ITS maintains
and supports technology-enhanced classrooms including one videoconferencing facility. For more information, visit our web site:
www.unbsj.ca/ITS
International Student Advisor/CIDA
Coordinator/Canadian Student Exchanges
Fredericton Campus
The International Student Advisors Office is located in Room 18 of the
Alumni Memorial Building and is open during the regular campus office
hours. Orientation, counselling and information are available to all nonCanadian students and their families at UNBF and UNBSJ. The office
provides advice and information on such items as student authorization,
health insurance, financial issues, community resources and social
events for international students. The International Students Advisor's
office also administers all aspects of the CIDA contracts for students
studying at UNB under CIDA's various agencies.
The office also provides information to Canadian students regarding
exchange programs. Phone (506) 453-4860.
Saint John Campus
http://www.unbsj.ca/international
International Student Advisors
The International Student Advisors office on the Saint John campus is
located in Room A10 of the International Centre, Annex A. Orientation,
counselling and information are available to all international and landed
immigrant students and their families. The International Student Advisors
provide assistance and information on arriving in Saint John, finding
accommodations, student authorizations, health insurance, campus and
community resources, and social events. Phone (506) 648-5775 or
mailto: donahue@unbsj.ca.
Student Abroad Coordinator
Go Further! Study Abroad! Information and advice on study and work
abroad opportunities for UNB Saint John students are available. UNB
Saint John offers a number of competitive bursaries each year to
financially assist Canadian students to study abroad for one term. To find
out more, check out the website at http://www.unbsj.ca/international/
studentabroad, or phone (506) 648-5618 or mailto: studentabroad@unbsj.ca.
International Development Project Coordinator
The International Office at UNB Saint John provides support to faculty,
staff and students involved with international development projects.
Present initiatives include projects in China, Vietnam, Africa and Cuba.
The Coordinator is also available to assist faculty, staff and students
wishing to develop opportunities and proposals to work, study or do
research in developing countries. An active World Universities Services
of Canada chapter is also coordinated in this office. For more information
on international development, contact: (506) 648-5819 or mailto:
sklenk@unbsj.ca.
Libraries
Fredericton Campus
The UNB library system on the Fredericton campus comprises the
Harriet Irving Library and two branch libraries, one serving the faculties
of Computer Science and Engineering, the other, the faculties of
Forestry and Science. The Law Library is an integral part of the Faculty
of Law.
Collectively the libraries hold over one million bound volumes, three
million microforms, 220,000 government documents, 50,000 maps, and
3,500 current print journals, as well as many rare books, manuscripts,
the University archives and a number of other special collections. Each
library has a non-circulating Reference collection consisting of
dictionaries, encyclopedias, handbooks, bibliographies, indexes and
abstracts. Most materials can, however, be borrowed for home use, and
books and periodicals are shelved in open stacks for easy access by
library users. QUEST, UNB Libraries online catalogue, lists the materials
in all of the university libraries, including Ward Chipman Library on the
Saint John campus, and provides location information.
Reflecting the technological advances of recent years, many information
resources including some 8,000 full-text journals, a number of major
indexing and abstracting tools, and a variety of reference materials are
available online from the library web site. These electronic resources can
be accessed through computers on campus or at home.
General library tours are offered for all students in September, while
more detailed instruction sessions are provided later in the term by
librarians and other library staff. Reference staff are also available to
give individual instruction on QUEST and on locating material in the
libraries collections.
Study tables and individual carrels are provided in all libraries.
Photocopiers and printers are also provided. Furthermore, laptop
computers can be borrowed for in-house use at the Harriet Irving Library,
as well as at the Science and Forestry and Engineering Libraries.
Opening hours are posted at the entrance to each library and on the
library web site at http://www.lib.unb.ca
Saint John Campus
As part of Information Services & Systems, UNBSJs Library Services
provide several kinds of access, from physical books to computer
databases, to virtual documents through the Internet. The Ward
Chipman Library houses a physical collection of approximately 186,000
volumes, 58,000 microforms, government documents and maps, and
600 current serial titles, which is supplemented by a document delivery
service allowing users rapid access to materials not held locally. Library
users share Quest, the University Libraries system with the Fredericton
campus libraries. Users have electronic access to the full library
catalogue and over 80 licensed bibliographic databases, which include
indexes, abstracts, and full-text material. Among the items appearing in
full-text are approximately 8,000 serial titles. Students can read needed
material on-screen, download it to disk or email it to themselves for
future reference and study.
ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
133
SECTION D
Through campus labs, library computer workstations or home Internet
connections, students have access to the Librarys extensive website.
This site http://www.unbsj.ca/library/ provides on-line instructional
materials and a variety of links to research and informational items and is
open to any user with Internet connections, 24 hours a day, seven days
a week. From books to the web, the library staff offers formal and
informal instruction, and assistance to students seeking information in
support of their course work and their research interests.
Beginning September 2004, laptop computers can be borrowed for inhouse use in the Ward Chipman Library.
Library services are available year-round to students and faculty of both
campuses and to adult residents of Saint John and surrounding areas.
Lost and Found Items
Fredericton Campus
A repository for articles lost and found is located at the Security and
Traffic Section in the Wu Conference Centre, Fredericton campus.
Another Fredericton location is the Equipment Room at the Lady
Beaverbrook Gymnasium.
Saint John Campus
A repository for articles lost and found is located in the Security Office, in
the Athletics Centre Foyer.
Math Help and Writing Centre
Fredericton Campus
Math Help Centre:
The Math Help Centre provides individual tutoring, group tutorials,
workshops and exam review sessions for all students taking first year
Math courses. Services are free to full-and part-time UNB students. The
Centre is located in Keirstead Hall Room 317. Call the College of
Extended Learning (453-4646) for an appointment or mailto:
mhc@unb.ca.
Writing Centre:
The Writing Centre (318-319 Keirstead Hall) offers free individual and
small group tutoring as well as a variety of workshops for full- and parttime students. Topics include essay and report writing, effective reading
and study techniques, examination preparation, and time management.
Individual appointments can be booked through the College of Extended
Learning (453-4646). The current Writing Centre workshop schedule and
contact information are available online: http://www.unb.ca/extend/wss/
wss.htm
Museums and Collections
Fredericton Campus
Harriet Irving Library - houses a large number of historical documents
and pictures, and several collections, including: the Rufus Hathaway
Collection of Canadian Literature; the Beaverbrook Collection of 15,000
volumes; and a collection of first editions, manuscripts and other items
also donated by Lord Beaverbrook that contains the papers of Viscount
Bennett. A unique collection of tapestries by Dr. Ivan Crowell depicting
the historic buildings on campus is on display in the main lobby.
Sir Howard Douglas Hall (Old Arts Building) - the Kings College
Exhibit in the Great Hall, made possible by donations of the Class of
1930, illustrates the history of the building.
Department of Electrical Engineering Museum - located in Head Hall,
Room D-36, contains many items, some dating from circa 1900.
Department of Geology - a large display of rocks, minerals and fossils.
Brydone Jack Observatory Museum - houses a unique collection of
nineteenth-century astronomical instruments and related photographs.
Provincial Archives of New Brunswick - occupies the Bonar LawBennett Building and contains the historical records of the Provincial
Government from 1784 together with manuscript collections of
individuals and institutions. The Archives also houses 150,000
photographic negatives and prints, 295,000 cartographic sheets, 1,800
videotapes and films and 4,600 hours of oral recordings of historical
interest. The Archives is open to the public from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Monday to Friday, and 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Saturday for inquiries
and use of the records.
Saint John Campus
New Brunswick Museum (Saint John) - the oldest museum in Canada,
was founded by Abraham Gesner and contains collections in natural
science, art and history. It also features touring exhibitions.
Parking
See Security and Traffic.
Part-Time Students
See Continuing Education and Programs for Part-Time Students
Post Office
Fredericton Campus
Saint John Campus
Math Help Centre:
Individual and small group tutoring available for various math and stats
courses. The Centre also offers review sessions on remedial
mathematics. Drop by the Help Centre at Oland Hall G11 to schedule an
appointment. Sign-up sheets are posted weekly. Phone (506) 648-5776
Writing Centre
One-on-one tutoring providing help with any academic writing, including
assistance with planning, organization, documentation, grammar and
punctuation, and academic conventions. To make an appointment, call
(506) 5501 or drop by the Student Life and Support Services Office,
Oland Hall G18.\
134
ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
The UNB Student Union-run Canada Post Outlet is located at the Paper
Trail in the Student Union Building. The Outlet provides a full range of
postal services including, but not limited to, meter stamp sales, student
loan processing and money orders. Phone (506) 447-3079 for operating
hours or contact the UNB Student Union at (506) 453-4955 for more
information. Campus Mail remains the responsibility of the university.
Saint John Campus
Mailboxes exist in various locations on campus. Stamps are available at
the Bookstore.
SECTION D
Research Centres
Sexual Harassment Policy
Fredericton and Saint John Campuses
Sexual harassment is unwanted attention of a sexual nature, often with
an underlying element of threat or coercion. It can also include sexist
remarks or verbal abuse directed towards a person or a gender. There
are four major dimensions of sexual harassment:
With research being conducted on both the Fredericton and Saint John
campuses, the University is the largest research centre in New
Brunswick. Most faculty members are active in research, often in
cooperation with graduate students. A number of interdisciplinary
research programs exist in which faculty members and students from
various Departments collaborate in the investigation of problems of
mutual interest. Active interdisciplinary research units include the
Institute for Biomedical Engineering, the Centre for Conflict Studies, the
Muriel McQueen Fergusson Centre for Family Violence Research, the
Centre for Nuclear Energy Research, the Canadian Research Institute
for Social Policy, the Centre for Property Studies and the Canadian
Rivers Institute, to name a few. The Office of Research Services, the
research administration and development unit, facilitates the undertaking
of research within the university on behalf of industrial, government and
other clients and sponsors. It also promotes the application of research
results to industrial problems and where appropriate the transfer of
technology through commercialization arrangements.
Further information concerning research activities at the University may
be obtained from the Office of the Vice-President(Research).
Security and Traffic
Security services are provided for the protection of university property,
as well as the security and safety of the university community at both the
Fredericton and Saint John Campuses. Some of the services provided
by our department include:
Campus Patrols Campus Inspections Proactive Crime Prevention
Strategies Residence Security
In addition to the physical security of the campuses, security is
responsible for parking and traffic control. Parking regulations are in
effect and students, faculty and staff and visitors must register their
vehicles with the Security and Traffic office and purchase a parking
permit to park on campus. The Security and Traffic Department
personnel will gladly address questions relative to parking.
Parking violations will result in fines. Violation tickets that are not paid
within seven days could result in having the violating vehicle towed from
campus without notice and at the owners expense and risk. Vehicles left
contrary to the parking regulations constitute or create a traffic hazard
and may also be towed away at the owners expense and risk without
prior notification. Non-payment of parking fines may result in withholding
of grades and transcripts or deductions from financial awards to
students.
For further information on parking regulations, services provided, as well
as information on safety and security tips, refer to the UNB website at
http://www.unb.ca/security.
1.
when acceptance or rejection of sexual advances is a condition of
education or employment;
2.
when acceptance or rejection of sexual advances affects grades,
performance evaluations, or any academic or personnel decisions
that concern the student or employee;
3.
when conduct of a sexual nature interferes with work or creates
an intimidating, hostile, offensive or humiliating environment;
4.
when sexual remarks and behaviour of an individual or group of
individuals, which may not be physically threatening, create an
environment that makes you uncomfortable.
You can contact, on a confidential basis, a Sexual Harassment Advisor,
whose role is to provide you with support and information on the options
available to you, both informal and formal. Advisors' names and
telephone numbers are listed below. The Policy and Procedure on
Sexual Harassment of the University of New Brunswick provides several
options for action which include: The Direct Approach, Intervention By
An Advisor, Mediation, and Formal Investigation.
The complete Policy can be accessed at : http://www.unb.ca/hr/
Policies/harassment.html
Fredericton Campus
ADVISORS UNDER SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY
CAMPBELL, Gail
History, Tilley Hall, Rm. 116
458-7430/453-4621
campbell@unb.ca
CRAFT, Sandra
Biology, Bailey Hall, Rm. 214
452-6333/453-4583
scraft@unb.ca
HARALAMPIDES, Katy
Head Hall, Rm. B4
453-5125
katy@unb.ca
MAHER, Robert
Administration, Singer Hall, Rm. 346
458-7654
maherr@fac.fadmin.unb.ca
MERRITT-GRAY, Marilyn
(Nursing, MacLaggan Hall, Rm. 213)
458-7634/453-4642
mmerritt@unb.ca
SPARKS, Maureen
(Kinesiology, LB Gym, Rm. C-120)
447-3333 Ext.7040
sparks@unb.ca
Saint John Campus
ADVISORS UNDER SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY
DESSERUD, Donald
History & Politics,
Hazen Hall, Rm. 346
648-5600/648-5727
desserud@unbsj.ca
DEVARENNE, Sarah
Oland Hall, Rm. 126
648-5795
sdevaren@unbsj.ca
MUNRO, David
G. Forbes Elliot Athletics Centre,
Rm. 105
648-5520/648-5532
munro@unbsj.ca
WAYE, Daphne
Financial & Admin. Srvs., Oland Hall,
Rm. 119
648-5523
wayed@unbsj.ca
ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
135
SECTION D
Spring and Summer Sessions
Saint John Campus
Fredericton and Saint John Campuses
Director of Student Life and Support Services
The Director, together with the Student Life and Support Services staff,
administers the Writing Centre, Counselling, Financial Aid, Campus
Employment Office, Athletics, Residence Life and student orientation
activities. The Director also acts as the campus ombudsperson for
students in dealing with academic appeals and disciplinary matters;
assists in helping persons with disabilities and international students who
need to adjust to university; manages the student Peer Helper and Peer
Mentor programs; offers counselling on study and university related
problems; manages the Student Success and Study Skills programs; is
chair of the Student Life and Orientation Committee; and, finally, is
responsible for the general management of the Student Services
Resource Centre, which includes career and job information, study skills
books and videos, scholarship, loan and graduate study information, and
a host of related test application forms. Phone: (506) 648-5690; Fax:
(506) 648-5681; mailto: rwp@unbsj.ca
The University offers a variety of academic sessions during the spring
and summer period: Intersession (Fredericton only) during May and
June, Spring Session (Saint John only) from May through July, and
Summer Session (Fredericton) during July and August. Courses are
offered in a variety of disciplines.
Spring and summer study allows current undergraduate and graduate
students to progress in their programs as well as new or visiting students
to participate in UNB offerings. Special professional development
opportunities exist for teachers as well as travel/study options.
The University also offers three special programs as part of its overall
Summer Session on the Fredericton campus: two six-week immersion
sessions, (May-June and July-August), are available through the English
Language Programme for those wishing to increase their facility in
English. Also, a six-week immersion program is available for high school
students during July-August. Contact the English Language Programme,
College of Extended Learning.
In addition to the degree-credit courses, a variety of cultural and related
educational activities (e.g. Maritime Writers Workshop, Summer Music
Camp, Summer Music Festival) are provided.
Calendars for the Spring and Summer sessions are available in the
spring of each year.
For further information, contact the College of Extended Learning, UNB
Fredericton, P.O. Box 4400, Fredericton, N.B. E3B 5A3, (506) 453-4646
(phone), (506) 453-3572 (fax), web site: http://www.unb.ca/web/extend/.
In Saint John, contact the Registrars Office, UNB Saint John, P.O. Box
5050, Tucker Park, Saint John, N.B. E2L 4L5, (506)648-5670 (phone).
Student Affairs and Services
Fredericton Campus
Director of Student Affairs and Services
The Director of Student Affairs and Services Office is located in the
Alumni Memorial Building, Room 8, phone (506) 453-4527, fax (506)
453-5005. The Director acts as an advocate for students, assisting
individual students or groups of students in dealing with such things as
academic matters, appeals, disciplinary matters. The Director is administratively responsible for a comprehensive array of programs including
Counselling, Financial Aid, Health, International Student Advisor,
Services for Students with Disabilities, Student Development, Student
Employment and Campus Ministry. Students who are uncertain of where
to begin to address a problem or concern should contact the Director's
office for information or referral to the appropriate offices or persons who
will address the student's concerns.
Student Development Coordinator
UNB Fredericton offers a variety of orientation programs for all entering
students, first year and transfer students, both part-time and full-time
status. These activities assist with a successful transition into all aspects
of university life. In concert with the Faculties, this office coordinates
various other peer-based programs, including peer mentors and peer
tutors. For further information contact the Student Development
Coordinator in the Alumni Memorial Building, room 3A, phone (506) 4534898, fax 453-5005.
Student Centres
Fredericton Campus
Student Union Building
The Student Union Building (SUB), completed in January 1969, is the
result of student-administration cooperation. The cost was shared
among the students of the University of New Brunswick, Saint Thomas
University, and the former Teachers College, with the University of New
Brunswick matching the student contribution.
The SUB houses the offices of several student groups and
organizations. Both the Saint Thomas University and the University of
New Brunswick student newspaper offices and the student government
offices are located in the office wing as well as CHSR-FM, the student
radio station. In the main part of the building there are several meeting
rooms, a lounge area, a large cafeteria, the College Hill Social Club, The
Cellar Pub n' Grill, the Information Centre, the PaperTrail, The Advocacy
Centre, the University Women's Centre, the ballroom and the main
administrative office for the SUB. For the convenience of the students
there are also several retail outlets such as a clothing store, hair styling
salon, travel office, two automated banking machines, a sundry shop
and a jewelry store.
The Student Union Building is advised by a Board made up of UNB and
STU students and members of the Board of Governors of UNB who
strive to provide the services and atmosphere which will make student
life enjoyable.
Saint John Campus
Thomas J. Condon Student Centre
Opened in 1986, the Thomas J. Condon Student Centre houses the
offices of student government, the student-run Campus Information
Centre (information, photocopying and fax services), the student
newspaper (The Baron, the Baronian (yearbook), Campus Radio Saint
John (CFMH, 92.5 FM), lounges, meeting rooms, offices of various
student clubs and societies, the office of the part-time student
organization, OPTAMUS, and food services. A skywalk connects the
Student Centre to the G. Forbes Elliot Athletics Centre. Overseen by the
Student Centre Advisory Committee, comprised of students, faculty and
administration, the Centre consolidates most aspects of student life.
Three rooms the Dr. K.A. Baird Dining Room, the E.A. Whitebone
Lounge and the Tanya Hume Room were named in memory of ardent
UNB Saint John supporters.
Funding for the Student Centre was provided by the Third Century Fund
(donations from faculty, staff and students) and the provincial
government. In 1987, the building was named in honour of Thomas J.
Condon, Vice-President of the Saint John Campus from 1977-1987, and
2001-2002.
136
ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
SECTION D
Students with Disabilities, Services For
The University of New Brunswick strives to help students pursue their
studies with as much independence as possible. Students will, with in
reason, be provided with the accommodations that they need to follow
their program of study.
Fredericton Campus
Physical Accessibility
UNB Fredericton which is located on the side of a hill, has more than 50
buildings, the oldest of which opened in 1829. Some of the buildings
have been modified to include ramps and accessible washrooms
however older buildings have limited accessibility. Information on
building accessibility and can be obtained from the Director of Student
Affairs and Services and /or the Coordinator of Services for Students
with Disabilities at (506) 453-3515.
Academic Accommodations
The university makes an effort to provide the accommodations needed
by students with disabilities to participate fully in thier program of study.
Please contact the Coordinator of Services for Students with Disabilities
at (506) 453-3515 for more detailed information.
Saint John Campus
Services for Students with Disabilities are coordinated through Student
Life and Support Services. Students requiring special accommodations
should contact Student Life and Support Services in advance of classes
to discuss their needs.
Please contact Student Life and Support Services, Oland Hall G18, 6485501, mailto: stuserv@unbsj.ca
ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
137
SECTION D
UNDERGRADUATE
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
FREDERICTON CAMPUS
SAINT JOHN CAMPUS
Student Union
Student Representative Council
The UNB Student Union is the official student organization of the University of
New Brunswick (Fredericton) undergraduates. The Student Union acts as both a
service organization and a political body to promote and enhance student issues
for the benefit of all students at UNB. Membership is paid automatically by fulltime students whereas the option of paying the fee is given to part-time students
and graduate students.
The Students' Representative Council (SRC) of UNB Saint John is a non-profit,
apolitical organization run by students for students. The SRC has ensured representation of the needs of UNB Saint John's full-time students since 1967.
The Student Union fee is used to support student activities, services and entertainment, both social and academic. The Student Union Council consists of five
(5) elected executive members: President, Vice-President (University Affairs),
Vice-President (Finance), Vice-President (Student Services) and Vice-President
(Executive); representatives from the various faculties; representatives elected
at large; and student members of the Board of Governors and Senate. These
elected students are empowered to represent students at UNB in an effective and
accountable manner. Council meets regularly during the academic year to discuss issues and to hear reports on matters of finance, services, constitution, and
general administration.
The objectives of the Student Union are:
1.
to promote artistic, literary, educational, social, recreational and
charitable activities for the advancement of its membership and others;
2.
to provide for the material, intellectual, cultural and professional needs of the
members and promote a sense of responsibility and co-operation and to establish
good relations with other national and international
student associations; and
3.
to promote and maintain communications between the student body and various
areas of the University.
The Union achieves these objectives in various areas of campus life. It operates
many valuable services for students, including the Student Information Centre,
the Student Advocacy Centre, a photocopying centre and Postal Outlet, Saferide, and Off-Campus Housing website, and a Student Health Plan. Campus programming has also greatly expanded over the years, through the Student Union's
efforts, and includes such events as the Festival of Cultural Diversity, the annual
Red and Black Revue variety show, a movie series, a comedy act, and an energetic concert program.
In addition, the Union supports over 70 clubs, societies, and committees which
are active both on and off campus. These clubs and societies range from international associations, general interest groups, to many faculty societies. Its support
also reaches to the nationally acclaimed peer alcohol education program entitled
SMART PACC, a published yearbook, and the student owned pub, "The
Cellar Pub & Grill".
Please come and visit us in room 126 of the Student Union Building (SUB), or
give us a call at (506) 453-4955 for more information on our programs and our
volunteer positions.
Adult Learners and Part-time Students (ALPS)
This organization is an information and support network for mature and parttime undergraduate students. It responds to the unique concerns and issues of
these learners, to help create an enriched university environment and to act as an
advocate. ALPS not only organizes social events for part-time and mature students, but also provides a support system for students in its constituency, offering peer support, subsidized tutoring, and financial support in the form of
scholarships and bursaries. The ALPS offices are located on the ground level of
MacLaggan Hall in Room 3A, 453-3596 (alps@unb.ca).| Visit our website at
http://www.unbf.ca/alps.
138
ACCOMODATION, FACILITIES & SERVICES
The main function of the SRC is to co-ordinate and promote student activities
on campus and within the community. The Student Council runs its own campus
radio station, CRSJ-FM, and newspaper, The Baron. It also finances a great
number of on-campus clubs and societies, from those organized for academic
association to those for social interests. The SRC also holds a yearly winter carnival, orientation week, and many other social events.
A less perceptible side of the SRC's work is that of non-party political representation. This takes place on three major levels:
University - the SRC works with OPTAMUS (Organization of Part-time and
Mature University Students) to enhance the quality of student life at UNB Saint
John, from acting as an ombudsperson to student complaints to ensuring a certain standard of academic and social alternatives for the students;
Provincial - through the New Brunswick Student Alliance, the SRC works for
the improvement of student aid programs and student representation in the provincial decision making process; and
Federal - through involvement with several national student organizations, the
SRC strives for the resolution of student needs and the establishment of a strong
nationwide student presence.
The SRC offices are located in the Thomas J. Condon Student Centre in Room
213, and are open Monday through Friday, 9:00 a. m. to 5:00 p. m. Telephone:
(506)648-5864;
e-mail: src@unbsj. ca.
SECTION E
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
The University of New Brunswick in Saint John Campus offers the
following four-year degree programs:
•
•
BACHELOR OF APPLIED MANAGEMENT
OTHER PROGRAMS
•
•
•
•
A Bachelor of Nursing degree for the post RN student is available.
•
A five-year Bachelor of Education Degree in Elementary Education is
offered concurrently with the Bachelor of Arts Degree.
•
UNBSJ also offers the first two years of programs leading to Majors and
Honours degrees in other Arts disciplines and to additional discipline
Majors and Honours degrees in Science.
•
The first two years of degree programs in Engineering and in Computer
Science, and the first year of degree programs in Kinesiology, and
Recreation and Sports Studies are also available.
•
Certificate programs are offered in:
•
Accounting
•
Business Administration
•
Communication & Professional Writing
•
Computing
•
Data Analysis
•
Economics
•
Electronic Commerce
•
Financial Markets
•
French Levels I and II
•
Gender Studies
•
Human Resource Management
•
Mental Health Nursing.
•
A Diploma of Advanced Undergraduate Studies is also available.
Bachelor of Applied Management in Accounting
Bachelor of Applied Management in Electronic Commerce
Bachelor of Applied Management in Hospitality and Tourism
BACHELOR OF ARTS
Majors:
Honours:
•
Cop-op Option
Majors in: Economics, French, Accounting, Electronic Commerce,
Human Resource Management
BACHELOR OF DATA ANALYSIS
Majors :
•
Nuclear Medicine
Radiation Therapy
Radiography
Respiratory Therapy
BACHELOR OF NURSING
•
•
•
Computer Science, Economics, Mathematics, and
Statistics
BACHELOR OF HEATH SCIENCES
•
•
•
•
•
Economics, English, History, Politics, Psychology and
Sociology
BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
•
•
•
Biology, Economics, English, French, History,
Information and Communication Studies, International
Studies, Mathematics, Philosophy, Politics,
Psychology, Sociology, Sport and Exercise
Psychology, Statistics
BN Basic Program
BN/RN Program
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Majors :
Specializations :
•
Detailed information about these academic programs follows under Degree
Programs.
ADMISSION, FEES, FINANCIAL AID, SERVICES
Information pertaining to admissions requirements and procedures, fees, financial
aid and University services and facilities is located elsewhere in this Calendar.
Students should consult the appropriate section of the Calendar as indicated below.
General Biology, Environmental Biology,
Marine Biology, Psychology, BiologyPsychology, Mathematics, Statistics, and
General Science
Admission and University Regulations
See Section B
Fees
See Section C
Scholarships and Loans
See Section C
Biology with Specialization in Zoology
Services and Facilities
See Section D
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
Specializations :
Software Engineering, and High-Performance
Scientific Computing
Honours:
Software Engineering, and High-Performance
Scientific Computing
WRITING REQUIREMENT
Note: This requirement is currently under suspension (Saint John Senate,
October 2000) The following writing requirements are applicable to all degree
programs UNB Saint John:
1.
Students in all full degree programs at UNBSJ are required to pass, with a
minimum grade of C, 12 ch in courses requiring a significant amount of
writing in English. These courses are designated (W) in Section H.
2.
That a minimum of three and preferably six credit hours of courses with a
significant writing component must be taken in the first half of the degree
program.
3.
That a minimum of three and preferably six credit hours of courses with a
significant writing component must be taken in the student's own field of
study.
4.
In each course designated as one with a significant writing component,
MINOR PROGRAMS
•
•
Each of the following disciplines also offers a Minor program which may be
taken in conjunction with the degree programs listed above, with approval
of the appropriate Departments:
•
Cognitive Neuroscience
•
Communication & Professional Writing
•
Criminal Justice
•
English
•
French
•
Gender Studies
•
History
•
Information and Communication Studies
•
International Development Studies
•
International Studies
•
Mathematics
•
Philosophy
•
Politics
•
Statistics
In addition, a Minor is offered in Psychosocial Dimensions of Sport.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
The forms of writing that fulfill this requirement will include types of
writing appropriate to particular disciplines (i.e. reports, case
studies, etc. as well as essays);
At least one substantial writing assignment or several shorter
writing assignments will be required per term;
Written work completed by a group of student will not fulfill this
requirement;
Students will receive explicit instruction in the steps involved in the
writing process (with assistance from the writing lab as desired);
Student will be encouraged (if professors so desire) to submit rough
draft prior to the due date for review either by faculty or by Writing
Lab instructors
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
139
SECTION E
BACHELOR OF APPLIED MANAGEMENT
General Information
3.
C.
An articulation agreement is a formal, systematic, written collaboration
between two institutions designed to identify block transfer credits and to
clarify requirements to facilitate student transfers between the two
institutions. These agreements are approved by the Maritime Provinces
Higher Education Commission and are regularly updated to reflect any
changes in curriculum or requirements at the institutions involved.
The Faculty of Business at UNBSJ offers articulated programmes in
accounting, electronic commerce or hospitality and tourism leading to
The Bachelor of Applied Management (BAM). Students first earn a
diploma from a participating community college and then enter the third
year of the BAM at UNBSJ.
The BAM in Hospitality and Tourism also offers a high school entry
option whereby students attend UNBSJ in their first year, transfer to the
New Brunswick Community College in St. Andrews for their second year
and return to UNBSJ to complete the final two years of the degree.
D.
E.
B.
1.
2.
140
F.
For purposes of the BAM degree, any course taught
outside of the Faculty of Business, which has a course
number ending in and which is taught over the full
academic year, will receive the number of credit hours
normally assigned by the Faculty in which the course is
taught, up to a maximum of 6.
For purposes of the BAM degree, any course taught
outside of the Faculty of Business, which has a course
number ending in other than and which is offered in one
term of the academic year, will receive the number of credit
hours normally assigned by the Faculty in which the course
is taught, up to a maximum of 3.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
A student who has been registered in the BAM program
and who withdrew while on probation or who was required
to withdraw from the program will not be eligible to re-enter
the program without the approval of the Faculty of
Business.
3.
To earn the BAM degree, a student must successfully
complete at least 60 ch in approved courses at UNB and
must achieve a minimum grade of C in all courses
designated as required or elective.
Transfer Students
Changes in Degree Requirements
Normal Course Loads
The normal course load for students in the BAM program will be
five courses per term. Students with a cumulative gpa of at least
2. 5 may, with the written permission of the Director of
Undergraduate Studies or the Dean of the Faculty of Business,
take a maximum of six courses in a given term.
G.
Repeating Courses
A student who fails to obtain a grade of C or better in a required
course must retake the course as soon as it becomes available
during a session in which the student is in attendance.
Credit Hours
The number of credit hours assigned each course is stated in
Section F of this Calendar. (In most cases the Faculty of Business
assigns a 6 ch weight to a two-term course and a 3 ch weight to a
term course.) Due to differences in the methods used by the
various Faculties in the calculation of credit hours, students who
elect to register for courses taught outside of the Faculty of
Business should note the following:
2.
Improvements in the BAM program may lead to changes in the
requirements for the degree. The University reserves the right to
require candidates already enrolled to meet the revised
requirements.
Grading and Classification
Note: A grade of C or better is necessary in all required and
elective courses (including work term reports, where applicable).
A grade of D or better is necessary for all options.
See Section B of this Calendar for detailed regulations on
standing and promotion requirements.
At least half the credit hours for the BAM degree must be taken at
UNB and must normally include all the required courses in the
BAM degree program. (Students may be permitted to take some
of these courses elsewhere with the prior permission of the
Faculty of Business and the Registrar.)
II. BAM Regulations for Students in the Degree Program
The regulations in respect to the BAM degree are expressed in
terms of letter grades, credit hours and grade point averages.
These are explained in Section B of the Calendar. In order to take
a BA or HTM course that has a prerequisite, students must earn a
C or better in the prerequisite course(s), regardless of the
program in which the student is registered.
1.
Course credits may only be transferred from another university
when the grade is equivalent to at least a C at UNB.
I. University Regulations on Admission and Academic Regulations
A.
Grade Point Average
The University regulations in respect to students transferring to
the BAM degree program from another UNB degree program and
students transferring to UNB from another university or postsecondary institution are stated in the General Regulations of the
University.
The programs are designed to offer students the opportunity to
experience two very different types of learning environments while they
develop proficiency in both the theoretical and applied areas of their
chosen fields.
Students are strongly advised to read the General University
Regulations, Section B of this Calendar, and in particular the subsection
headed "Grading System and Classification". The General University
Regulations will govern any point not covered in the regulations that
follow. Questions concerning the application of regulations should be
directed to the Registrar.
Students may take up to 3 one-credit hour courses of an
academic nature during their program.
H.
Course Requirements
Students are responsible for ensuring that they meet all the
requirements specified for the degree. These include the
minimum credit hour requirements, minimum grade point
averages, minimum grades in specified courses, successful
completion of all specifically required courses, and compliance
with the restrictions on elective and option courses.
Students are advised to consult Section F of this Calendar for
detailed course descriptions, including the number of credit hours
assigned to each course.
SECTION E
III. Degree Standing on Graduation
Example of a Typical Student's Program BAM Accounting Degree
At graduation all successful candidates for the degree of Bachelor of
Applied Management shall be listed in alphabetical order within the
appropriate degree category as stated below:
Third Year
a.
Distinction: A student who attains a cumulative grade point
average of at least 3.8 and no grade less than C (2.0) over the
final 90 ch of course work shall graduate with Distinction.
b.
First Division: A student who attains a cumulative grade point
average of at least 3.5 shall graduate in First Division.
c.
Second Division: A student who attains a cumulative grade
point average of at least 2.5 but less than 3.5 shall graduate in
Second Division.
d.
Third Division: A student who attains a cumulative grade point
average of less than 2.5 shall graduate in Third Division.
IV. Bachelor of Applied Management Curriculum and Degree
Requirements
It is the responsibility of students to ascertain that their elective and
option courses are acceptable for BAM degree credit. Credit will not be
granted for FREN 1103 , CS 1703 , ECON 1004 , MATH 1863 or PSYC
1273 in the BAM program.
Students enrolled in a degree or certificate program under the aegis of
the Faculty of Business are not to register in the following courses or
similar courses without prior permission of the Faculty of Business:
PSYC 2901 , PSYC 3913 , STAT 1793 , STAT 3093 (The content of
these courses is similar to required or optional BBA or BAM courses.).
Note: Students should contact the Faculty of Business at the beginning
of each regular academic year for a revised list of courses in this
category. Courses listed elsewhere in this Calendar, as service courses
by other Faculties or Departments are normally not credits for the BAM
degree.
BACHELOR OF APPLIED MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING
Admission Requirements
Students must have successfully completed the two-year Business
Technology program with the Information Systems Specialist Option at
NBCC-Saint John, or an equivalent program, with an average of at least
70%. Additional admission requirements will depend upon the institution
from which a student graduated.
Fall Term
MATH 1853 , BA 2123 , BA 2672 , BA 4223 ,
3 chs electives or non-business options
Winter Term
BA 1504 , BA 2606 , BA 3224 , BA 4207 ,
3 chs of electives or non-business options
Fourth Year
Fall Term
BA 2858 , BA 4221 , BA 4229 , 6 chs of electives or
non-business options
Winter Term
BA 3304 , BA 3623 , 9 chs electives or non-business
options
Co-operative Education Component
Students may choose the co-op mode. Work terms follow years 2 and 3
for High School entry students; a work term follows year 3 (i.e. first year
at UNBSJ) for College entry students. These work terms provide "ands
on" multi-level practical experiences.
BACHELOR OF APPLIED MANAGEMENT ELECTRONIC COMMERCE
Admission Requirements
Students must have successfully completed the two-year Business
Technology program with the Information Systems Specialist Option at
NBCC-Saint John, or an equivalent program, with an average of at least
70%. Additional admission requirements will depend upon the institution
from which a student graduated.
Curriculum and Degree Requirements
Students must have successfully completed at least 60 ch of course
work and must obtain the minimum required grades in all required,
elective and option courses specifically required for the degree and in
the prerequisites for those courses.
Candidates for the degree must successfully complete the following
credit hours:
a.
39 chs of required courses;
b.
6 chs of Electives chosen from BA 3126 , BA 3328 , BA 4108 , BA
4109 , BA 4126 , BA 4223 , CS 2773 or other courses as
approved by the Faculty of Business;
Curriculum and Degree Requirements
c.
Students must have successfully completed at least 60 ch of course
work and must obtain the minimum required grades in all required,
elective and option courses specifically required for the degree and in
the prerequisites for those courses.
6 chs of Electives chosen from BA 3557 , BA 4866 , an ICS
course as approved by the Faculty of Business or other courses
as approved by the Faculty of Business;
d.
3 chs Elective chosen from ECON 2091 , SOCI 2413 or 3 chs
Psyc or other courses as approved by the Faculty of Business;
e.
6 chs non-business options.
Candidates for the degree must successfully complete the following
credit hours:
Example of a Typical Student's Program BAM Electronic Commerce
Degree
a.
39 chs of required courses
b.
3 chs Accounting Elective chosen from BA 4237 , BA 4238 or BA
4242
Third Year
c.
3 chs Finance Elective chosen from BA 4418 , BA 4437 , BA 4448
or other courses as approved by the Faculty of Business
Fall Term
Math 1853 , BA 2123 , BA 2217 , BA 2672 ,
3 chs elective or option.
d.
3 chs Elective courses chosen from ICS 2001 , IS 1001 , IS 1002
, SOCI 2413 , ECON 2091 , 3 chs Psychology or other courses as
approved by the Faculty of Business.
Winter Term
BA 1504 , BA 2606 , BA 2663 , 6 chs elective or
option.
e.
3 chs Business Elective chosen from BA 3123 , BA 3134 , BA
3557 , BA 4101 , BA 4193 or other business course as approved
by the Faculty of Business.
f.
9 chs non-business options
FOURTH YEAR
Fall Term
BA 2858 , BA 3125 , BA 3305 , BA 3718 , 3 chs
electives or options
Winter Term
BA 3304 , BA 4506 , 9 ch electives or options
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
141
SECTION E
BACHELOR OF APPLIED MANAGEMENT HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM
Admission
a.
C. Course Requirements
Students are responsible for ensuring that they meet all the
requirements specified for the degree. These include the
minimum credit hour requirements, minimum grade point
averages, minimum grades in specified courses, successful
completion of all specifically required courses, electives and
options course and compliance with the restrictions on elective
courses as in regulation IV above. Students are advised to consult
Section H of this calendar for detailed course descriptions,
including the number of credit hours assigned to each course.
High School Entry ("3+1" Program)
Students must have an overall average of 65% in English 122,
Math 112/122, Math 120 and 3 electives. In addition they must
achieve a minimum of 60% in English 122 and Math 120.
b.
College Entry ("2+2" Program)
Students must have successfully completed a two-year diploma
program in Hospitality and Tourism at a recognized community
college with an average of at least 70%. Additional admission
requirements will depend upon the institution from which a
student graduated. Students should visit the BAMHT website
(www.business.unbsj.ca/bamht) or contact the Faculty of
Business for details.
Co-operative Education Component
Students may choose the co-op mode. Work terms follow years 2 and 3
for High School entry students; a work term follows year 3 (i.e. first year
at UNBSJ) for College entry students. These work terms provide "hands
on" multi-level practical experiences.
Curriculum and Degree Requirements
A. High School Entry
Students must successfully complete at least 90 chs of course
work and must obtain the minimum required grades in all required
and elective courses specifically required for the degree and in
the prerequisites for those courses.
First Year: Fall Term
•
•
•
•
•
Math 1853 Math for Business I*
BA 1504 Intro to Organizational Behaviour
ECON 1013 Intro to Economics - Micro
Social Science Elective*
Humanities or Language Elective**
First Year: Winter Term
•
•
•
•
•
HTM 1503 Introduction to Tourism
BA 1216 Accounting for Managers I
ECON 1023 Intro to Economics - Macro
Social Science Elective*
Humanities or Language Elective*
Second Year: Fall and Winter Term
•
Students must satisfactorily complete a year-long program at an
approved community college.
College Entry 2+2 Students must successfully complete at least
60 chs of course work and must obtain the minimum required
grades in all required, elective and option courses specifically
required for the degree and in the prerequisites for those courses.
Second Year: May-August
B. Candidates for the degree must successfully complete the
following:
Third Year: Fall Term
High School Entry ("3+1")
a.
45 credit hours required courses;
b.
6 credit hours of Social Science Electives;
c.
9 credit hours of Humanities and/or Languages Electives;
d.
9 credit hours chosen from approved HTM electives
(includes BA 4108 );
e.
24 credit hours of options of which no more than 12 credit
hours may be at the introductory level, and no more than 6
credit hours may be chosen from HTM or business
courses); and
f.
30 credit hours of block transfer credit in hospitality and
tourism from an approved community college.
College Entry ("2+2)
a.
30 credit hours required courses; Note: Students who do
not have the equivalent of ECON 1013 and ECON 1023 as
part of their diploma must take these courses in addition to
the required courses for the BAMHT.
b.
9 credit hours chosen from approved HTM electives
(includes BA 4108 );
c.
21 credit hours of options of which no more than 12 credit
hours may be at the introductory level and no more than 6
credit hours may chosen from HTM or business courses;
and
d.
60 credit hours of block transfer credit in hospitality and
tourism from an approved community college.
142
EXAMPLE OF A TYPICAL STUDENT'S PROGRAM High School
Entry - BAMHT Degree (3+1")
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
•
•
•
•
•
Optional co-op work term
BA 1605 Business Decision Analysis I
HTM 2217 Management Accounting for the Hospitality Industries
BA 2672 Introduction to Management Information Systems
Electives or Options** 6 ch
Third Year: Winter Term
•
•
•
BA 2123 Introduction to Electronic Commerce
BA 2606 Business Decision Analysis II
Electives or Options** 9 ch
Third Year: May-August
•
Optional co-op work term
Fourth Year: Fall Term
•
•
•
•
•
BA 3371 Marketing of Services
BA 3425 Managerial Finance
HTM 4101 Advanced Management, Hospitality and Tourism
Operations
HTM 4129 Tourism and Research Methods
Electives or Option** 3 ch
Fourth Year: Winter Term
•
•
HTM 4161 - Planning and Development of Sustainable Tourism
12 ch Electives or Options
SECTION E
EXAMPLE OF A TYPICAL STUDENT'S PROGRAM College EntryBAMHT Degree (2 + 2"):
BACHELOR OF ARTS
Third Year: Fall Term
General Information
•
•
•
•
On the Saint John campus there are fourteen programs leading to the
degree of Bachelor of Arts: Majors programs in Biology, French,
Information and Communication Studies, International Studies,
Philosophy, Sport and Exercise Psychology and Statistics, and Majors
and Honours programs in Economics, English, History, Politics,
Psychology and Sociology.
BA 1605 Business Decision Analysis I
HTM 2217 Management Accounting for the Hospitality Industries
BA 2672 Introduction to Management Information Systems
6 ch electives or options **
Third Year: Winter Term
•
•
•
BA 2123 Introduction ton to Electronic Commerce
BA 2606 Business Decision Analysis II
9 ch electives or options**
Third Year: May-August
•
Optional Co-op Work Term Fourth Year
BA DEGREE REGULATIONS
INTENT. The BA Degree regulations are intended to ensure that the
student is exposed to a good range of academic disciplines in the first
half of the degree program, and to give the student a more specialized
and concentrated knowledge of one or two academic disciplines in the
second half of the program.
Fourth Year: Fall Term
Grading System and Classification
•
•
•
The grading system used is that adopted by the University in 1974. The
regulations governing grades, grade points, grade point averages and
cumulative grade point averages for the BA degree are the same as the
General University Regulations, for full-time students, part-time students,
and for students enrolled before 1974. For their own benefit all students
should study these regulations (see Section B of the Calendar) carefully.
•
•
BA 3371 Marketing of Services
BA 3425 Managerial Finance
HTM 4101 Advanced Management, Hospitality and Tourism
Operations
HTM 4129 Tourism and Research Methods
3 ch electives or options**
Fourth Year: Winter Term
•
•
1.
The BA degree will be granted on successful completion of at
least 120 hours of courses, except that certain Honours programs
may require successful completion of up to 126 ch of courses. A
grade of D or above indicates successful completion of a course,
except as stated elsewhere in the Calendar. All programs of study
must have the approval of the Dean of the Faculty.
2.
Normally the student will successfully complete 60 ch of lowerlevel courses (i.e. courses whose number begins with 1 or 2)
before taking the 60 ch (or more for certain Honours programs) of
upper-level courses (i.e. courses whose numbers begin with 3 or
4) which complete the degree program, in accordance with the
requirements of either one or two majors programs. Under special
circumstances up to 12 ch of lower-level courses may be
substituted in the total of 60 ch of upper-level courses. The written
permission of the appropriate chair(s) is required for such a
concession.
3.
During the session in which students expect to complete
successfully the first 60 ch of courses, they must choose one or
two academic disciplines or fields of study in which they wish to
specialize. If the students choose to specialize in one academic
discipline or field of study they are said to be taking a single
major; if they choose to specialize in two academic disciplines or
fields of study they are said to be taking a double major. Students
of high ability may choose to honour rather than major, in one or
two disciplines. The honours programs involve more intensive
study and are typically taken by students in preparation for
postgraduate work. When students have decided on the
academic discipline(s) or field(s) of study in which they wish to
specialize, they must apply to the appropriate Department(s) for
permission to enter the majors program(s) concerned. Students
who fail to apply for acceptance to a majors program before they
have successfully completed 60 ch of courses may find that they
will be required to complete successfully more than 120 ch of
courses in order to fulfill the majors requirements and get a
degree. A student cannot get a BA degree without fulfilling the
requirements for at least one majors program. Course selections
for students in majors programs must be approved by the
appropriate Chair of Departments (or their designates) as well as
by the Dean of the Faculty.
HTM 4161 Planning and Development of Sustainable Tourism
12 ch electives or options**
* All students must include Math 1853 within their first 30 ch; 6 ch from
the Social Science disciplines of Anthropology, Politics, Psychology or
Sociology within their first 60 ch, and 6 ch from the Humanities and
Languages disciplines of Classics, English, French, German, History,
Humanities, Latin, Philosophy or Spanish within their first 60 ch.
** Option courses may be selected from the offerings of any faculty
provided that the selections are in accord with regulations V above, and
provided they are approved by the Faculty of Business.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
143
SECTION E
4.
Among the 60 ch of lower-level courses, a student must
successfully complete at least 6 ch of courses from each of any
three of the four groups listed below. Up to 18 ch of courses may
be taken in any one discipline, but not more than 12 ch may be
taken in any other discipline.
Group 1:
5.
Classics, English, History, Humanities,
Philosophy. Courses in French, German, or
Spanish Civilization also form part of this
group.
Group 2:
French, German, Greek, Latin, Spanish.
(Language, not Civilization, courses.)
Group 3:
Economics, Information & Communication
Studies, Politics, Psychology, Sociology.
Group 4:
Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science,
Geology, Mathematics, Physics, Science,
Statistics.
With the exceptions noted below only credit hours successfully
completed in disciplines listed above will count towards the BA
degree.
a.
up to 12 ch of some Education and, for the purposes of this
degree only, up to 27 ch of Kinesiology courses can be
counted towards a BA degree, subject to the agreement of
the appropriate departments.
b.
all credit hours successfully completed in Humanities
courses (designated HUM) and Social Science courses
(designated SOCS) and Business Administration courses
(designated BA) count towards a BA degree, provided that
program regulations are adhered to.
c.
all core studies courses in Education may be used for Arts
elective credits up to the maximum of 12 ch. Methods
courses in Education are not eligible for Arts elective
credits. Non-core studies courses which are similar to Arts
courses may be considered for Arts elective credit on an
individual basis by the Dean of Arts.
6.
A student may not take more than 6 courses at any one time
without the written permission of the Dean.
7.
For the purposes of the BA degree, a course offered at UNB with
a number ending in shall have the credit-hour rating assigned to it
by the Faculty offering the course, up to a maximum of 6 ch.
8.
For the purposes of the BA degree, a course offered at UNB with
a number ending 1 to 9 shall have the credit-hour rating assigned
to it by the Faculty offering the course, up to a maximum of 3 ch.
9.
Exceptions to these credit hour designations in the BA program
may be made only by the Dean of the Faculty and the Registrar.
10.
Requirements for the 60 ch of upper-level courses are listed in the
regulations of the appropriate majors programs.
11.
Candidates for the degrees of BA (Major) are listed with divisions
based on the cumulative grade point averages of all courses
taken. See Section B of this Calendar, -Listing of Graduates-.
12.
A student who attains a grade point average equal to or greater
than 3.75 over credit hours 61-120 and no grades less than C
over the last 90 ch shall be awarded a Distinction upon
graduation.
BIOLOGY MAJOR
Students who wish to major in Biology will have to plan their course
selections carefully in order to meet the various prerequisite
requirements. The Biology Major in the BA programme will include
courses in whole organisms and ecology but will exclude biochemistry,
cell biology and a few of the marine biology courses.
During the first year the student will take either BIOL 1551 (a minimum
grade of B is required to continue in the major) or BIOL 1001 during Term
1. In Term 2, BIOL 1012 and BIOL 1017 are required. Students must also
complete a year of Chemistry courses. Students must take either CHEM
1831 and CHEM 1842 (a minimum grade of B is required in both
courses) or CHEM 1041 / 1046 / 1072 / 1077 . Students taking CHEM
1041 etc. must also take MATH 1003 .
During second year the students will take BIOL 2125 , BIOL 2485 , BIOL
2585 , BIOL 2615 and STAT 2263 or equivalent. During the third and
fourth year the students will complete at least eight upper level Biology
courses. Students must have the appropriate 2000 level Biology course
to enrol in upper level courses. The course descriptions list the
necessary prerequisites.
Except where noted above, a grade of C or higher is required for all core
courses. Students must also complete the general BA requirements.
There is not a Minor in Biology.
COGNIITVE NEUROSCIENCE
General Information
Cognitive neuroscience is a multi-disciplinary study of the neurological
underpinnings of cognitive activity. Cognitive neuroscience brings in
perspectives from psychology, linguistics, philosophy, mathematics, and
computer science to tackle the complex area of the neurological basis of
cognition.
Eligibility
Admission to the minor in Cognitive Science is open to students who
have completed 60 credit hours towards their degree and have achieved
a minimum GPA of 2.0. The minor requires a minimum of 24 credit
hours. Courses cannot be counted towards both a minor and a major. A
minimum grade of C is required in all required courses.
Note: PSYC 1003 , 1004 is a prerequisite for all Psychology courses.
Psychology courses (15 credit hours) (Required)
PSYC 3383
Perception
PSYC 3693
Cognitive Processes
PSYC 3723
Human Neuropsychology (Prerequisite: PSYC 3711
Physiological Psychology)
PSYC 4733
Cognitive Neuroscience (Prerequisites: PSYC 3711
and either PSYC 3383 or PSYC 3693 )
One of:
PSYC 3724
Clinical Neuropsychology
PSYC 4833
Psychopharmacology
PSYC 3503
Learning
Linguistic Courses (6 credit hours) (Required)
LING 2101
Intro to Linguistics 1
LING 2102
Intro to Linguistics 2
Philosophy, Mathematics (3 credit hours) (Required)
One of:
144
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
PHIL 3140
Philosophy of the Mind
MATH 3753
Applications of Mathematical Modelling
SECTION E
COMMUNICATION AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING
CRIMINAL JUSTICE MINOR
The Minor in Communication and Professional Writing (27 ch) is an interdisciplinary program designed to complement a range of degrees.
The Criminal Justice interdisciplinary minor provides an academic
opportunity for systematic study in the fields of criminology, penology
and criminal justice.
The Certificate, intended for persons who would like official recognition
of their competence in professional communication, is available to any
student enrolled in the Minor upon successful completion of a further 3
credit hours. The Certificate is also open to persons not enrolled in a
degree program. Each program (the Minor and the Certificate) has a
bilingual stream (French and English) which would be accredited as
such.
Eligibility
Admission to the Criminal Justice Minor is open to students who are
majoring in either Sociology or Psychology. Students must select the
Minor in consultation with a Faculty Advisor and this should normally be
done at the same time as they declare a Major.
Program of Study
Program of Study
The Minor consists of 27 ch and the Certificate consists of 30 ch. A
grade of "C+" or better must be attained in all required and elective
courses in both programs.
The Minor program in Criminal Justice shall consist of at least 24 ch of
instruction. The three courses listed below are mandatory. A minimum
grade of C+ is necessary in the mandatory courses to qualify for the
Minor. Prerequisites are noted in brackets.
The following 12 ch are required in each program (Minor and Certificate
in English, Bilingual Minor and Certificate): CPW1001 , CPW1002 ,
CPW2001 and CPW2002.
Mandatory Courses
For the Bilingual Stream (Minor and Certificate), in addition to the above,
the following 9 ch are required FR3203 , FR3204 and FR4204 .
For the Minor in the Bilingual Stream an additional 6 ch are required (for
a total of 27 ch) which may be selected from the following: CPW2003 ,
CPW3003 , CPW3004 , CPW4005 and CPW4006 or list one.
For the Certificate in the Bilingual Stream an additional 9 ch are required
(for a total of 30 ch) which may be selected from the following: CPW2003
, CPW3003 , CPW3004 , CPW4005 , and CPW4006 or list one.
PSYC 3263
(3 ch)
PSYC 4233
(3 ch)
List One: Other possible electives: (each course is 3 ch)
Programme Evaluation
(PSYC 1003 , 1004 , 2102 , 2901 ).
Sociology students may substitute
Sociology 3100 for PSYC 2901.
SOCI 2611
(3 ch)
Language, Crime and Human Agency
(SOCI 1001 and one of SOCI 1002 , 1003 ,
1004 , 1005 or 1006 ).
SOCI 2614
(3 ch)
For the Minor in English, a further 15 ch of elective courses may be
selected (for a total of 27 ch) from the following: CPW2003 , CPW3003 ,
CPW3004 , CPW4005 and CPW4006 or list one.
For the Certificate in English, a further 18 ch of elected courses may be
selected (for a total of 30 ch) from the following: CPW2003 , CPW3003 ,
CPW3004 , CPW4005 and CPW4006 or list one.
Psychology of Criminal Behaviour
( PSYC 1003 , PSYC 1004 )
Culture , Criminal Justice and Social
Structure
(SOCI 1001 , and one of SOCI 1002 ,
1003 , 1004 , 1005 , or 1006 ; SOCI 2611 ).
Students must choose the remaining 12 ch from the following
courses, some of which may have prerequisites.
BA 3557
(3 ch)
ECON 1004
(3 ch)
The Management of Planned Change
Economics & Society, OR
(3 ch)
Intro. Economics : Microeconomics
BA2001
Verbal Communication
ECON 1013
FR3084
Le monde des affaires en français/Conducting
Business French
ENGL 3714
(3 ch)
Special Topics II: Tales from the Scaffold
HIST 3195
(3 ch)
Britain in the Age of Revolution 1760-1832
FR3714
Aspects des cultures acadienne et francoontarienne/Aspects ofAcadian and Franco Ontarian
Culture
HIST 3377
(3 ch)
Social History of Crime in Canada
HIST 3381
(3 ch)
Family and the State in North America
HIST 3383
(3 ch)
Police and Society in North America
FR3724
Aspects de la culture québécoise/Aspects of Quebec
Culture
HIST 3386
(3 ch)
Canadian Criminal Justice System
HUM2120
Effective Writing
NURS3092
Nursing Research
PSYC2102
General Experimental Psychology
PHIL 2124
(3 ch)
Contemporary Moral Problems
POLS 1201
(3 ch)
Introduction to Canadian Politics
POLS 3365
(3 ch)
Special Topics in Comparative Politics
PSYC 3313
(3 ch)
Introduction to Psychological Testing
PSYC 3493
(3 ch)
Changing Behaviour
PSYC 3553
(3 ch)
Psychopathology
PSYC 3752
(3 ch)
Drugs and Behaviour
SOCI 2603
(3 ch)
Sociology of Deviance
SOCI 3611
(3 ch)
Socio-Legal Studies
SOCI 3901
(3 ch)
Sociology of Policing
SOCI 4603
(3 ch)
Special Topics in Criminological Theory
SOCI 4613
(3 ch)
Special Topics in Socio-Legal Studies
Note: These courses cannot be double counted. That is, any course
taken to fulfill the requirements of the Criminal Justice minor cannot be
counted towards any other program.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
145
SECTION E
ECONOMICS
Honours, Major and Minor
Honours
A student wishing to honour in Economics must obtain a minimum of 60
ch in Economics (or approved substitutes). To remain in the honours
program a grade point average of 3.0 in economics courses and
approved substitutes must be maintained.
The program requires the following compulsory courses: ECON 1013 ,
1023 , 2013 , 2023 , 3013 , 3023 , 3665 , 4035 , 4045 , BA 1605 , 2606 ;
and ECON 4265 is recommended but not required. Students are also
required to pass MATH 1003 and MATH 1013 .
For the award of a first class Honours degree, a grade point average of
3.6 is required in all the courses required for the degree, excluding those
which the Department considers introductory in scope. For a second
class Honours degree an average of 3.0 is required in these courses.
EDUCATION
BA/BEd Concurrent Degree Program
(Early Years Option)
The BA/BEd Concurrent Degree Program (early years option) is
designed for students who prefer to combine their studies in Arts and
Elementary Education rather than approach them separately in the
Consecutive Program. After a minimum of five years, successful
students will be granted both BA and BEd degrees. Graduates normally
qualify for a level 5 teaching certificate in elementary education from the
provincial Department of Education.
Admission Procedures
1.
Students apply for entry to the Bachelor of Arts degree program
upon completion of their high school program.
2.
Students should apply to the Education Faculty for admission to
the Concurrent Program before January 31 of their first year in the
BA program. Upon successful completion of 30 ch and meeting
other admission criteria, they may be admitted to the Concurrent
Program.
Major
A student wishing to major in Economics will complete a minimum of 48
ch in Economics or approved substitutes. (Students usually choose a
major in the second or third year.)
ECON 1013 , 1023 , 2013 , 2023 , 3013 , 3023 , BA 2603 ,
(or equivalent). Total 21 ch.
Concurrent Program Requirements (168 ch)
1.
60 ch from the Faculty of Education.
The mathematics requirement for this major will consist of MATH 1823
with the substitution of MATH 1003 , where appropriate.
2.
120 ch approved by the Faculty of Arts of which 12 ch of specified
Education credits may be used as Arts electives.
The remaining 27 ch will normally be taken in the Economics discipline
but up to 9 ch may be substituted for non-compulsory Economics
courses, with the approval of the Economics discipline.
3.
A student cannot obtain a BEd degree by itself in this program. If
a student decides to leave the Concurrent Program, only those
Education courses eligible as Arts electives may be transferred to
the BA program.
Students who desire to undertake a double major must complete 21 ch in
the compulsory courses, as listed above and 21 ch of Economics
electives, with the allowance of a 9 ch substitution if approved by the
Economics discipline, for a total of 42 ch.
Minor
A minor in economics will consist of at least 24 ch of courses in
Economics. The following courses are compulsory: ECON 1013 , 1023 ,
2013, 2023 and 6 ch of upper level Economics courses.
Certificate in Economics
This certificate is a stand-alone program intended for visiting
international students and for members of the community interested in
economics. It will not be awarded to a student enrolled in a degree
program, but students who have withdrawn from an undergraduate
degree program may apply. A maximum of 50% of required credits may
be transferred from another degree, certificate, or similar program,
whether taken at UNB or elsewhere.
The Certificate requires completion of 24 credit hours including ECON
1013 , 1023 , 2013 , 2023 , plus an additional four courses at or above
the 2000 level. To earn a Certificate, a student must achieve a grade of
at least a C in all specifically required courses, and achieve a cumulative
grade point average of at least 2.0. While no specific prerequisites are
required for admission to this Certificate program, a background in high
school mathematics is strongly recommended.
Certificate in Financial Markets
The Certificate requires completion of 24 credit hours including
BA 1216 , ECON 1013 , 1023 , 2013 , 2023 , 3114 , plus two additional
courses in Business or Economics which are in Accounting, Finance, or
International/Macro Economics.
To earn a Certificate, a student must achieve a grade of at least a C in all
specifically required courses, and achieve a cumulative grade point
average of at least 2.0. While no specific prerequisites are required for
admission to this Certificate program, a background in high school
mathematics is strongly recommended
146
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Concurrent BEd courses offered at UNBSJ over a 4-year cycle:
ED 3041 , 3621 , 3031 , 3361 , 4451 / 4791 , 4354 , 3021 , 4211 , 3241 ,
3415 / 3416 , 3051 , 5314 , 3511 , 3475 , 3424 , 4164 , 5000 .
Please note: Only the early years option of the Concurrent BEd is
offered to full-time students on the Saint John Campus of UNB. It is also
possible, however, for part-time students in the early years option of the
Consecutive BEd Program to complete their requirements over a fouryear period. For more details of other options, refer to Section G of this
Calendar.
SECTION E
ENGLISH
Honours, Major and Minor
Honours
Students interested in pursuing an honours degree in English should
consult with any member of the English discipline prior to submitting a
formal letter of application to the discipline for admission to the Honours
Coordinator. Prospective students may obtain further information and
advice by consulting the Honours Coordinator.
Courses
ENGL 4801 : Honours Essay: Reading and Research (3 ch): This course
is devoted to the research portion of the honours project.
ENGL 4802 : Honours Essay (3ch) Upon successful completion of ENGL
4801 , and honours essay will be written and presented.
Joint Honours Programme - English and History
Although students are encouraged to declare their intention to pursue an
honours degree while in their second year, they are not eligible to apply
until they have completed 60 ch, including 12 ch at the lower level (6 ch
which must be 1200 and 1500 (or equivalent). Because of the seminar
requirements (see below), only in exceptional circumstances will
students be admitted in their fourth year, or after 90 ch. To enter the
Honours Programme, students must have achieved an average of B+
(3.3) in English courses. An average of B+ (3.3) in English courses and
C+ (2.3) in non-English courses must be maintained if the student is to
retain Honours standing.
Students interested in pursuing a joint Honours Programme in English
and History must apply in writing to either the Honours Coordinator of
English or the Coordinator of History.
a.
Medieval/Renaissance Non-dramatic/18th Century ( ENGL 3002 ,
3003 , 3004 , 3007 , 3105 , 3106 , 3107 , 3108 or 3109 )
Requirements
b.
Renaissance Dramatic ( ENGL 3105 , 3106 or 3107 )
Students admitted to the Honours Programme are required to complete
60 ch in English including 12 ch of English at the lower level, and 48 ch
of English at the upper level with 3 chs from each of the coverage areas.
As part of the 48 ch, students have the option to complete English 4801 :
Honours Reading and Research (3 ch) and English 4802 : Thesis (3 ch).
c.
Romantic/Victorian Literature ( ENGL 3301 , 3302 , 3303 , 3304 ,
3311 , 3312 , 3313 or 3314 )
d.
Modern British/Canadian/American ( ENGL 3401 , 3402 , 3403 ,
3404 , 3405 , 3501 , 3502 , 3503 , 3504 , 3505 , 3506 , 3508 ,
3509 , 3511 , 3512 , 3513 , 3514 or 3515 )
The Honours Programme requires the successful completion of at least
two of the upper-level courses designated as an honours seminar. In
each academic year, at least two of the upper-level courses in the
Discipline of English will be designated as honours seminars. Although
these courses will be open to all students , honours students will be
expected to complete assignments additional to the regular course load.
e.
Literary Theory ( ENGL 3601 )
Students will design their Honours Programme in consultation with any
member of the English discipline. A minimum of 3 ch is required in each
of the following areas:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
Medieval ( ENGL 3002 , 3003 , 3004 , or 3007 )
Renaissance Dramatic ( ENGL 3105 , 3106 or, 3107 )
Renaissance Non-dramatic ( ENGL 3108 or 3109 )
Restoration and Eighteenth Century ( ENGL 3203 , 3204 ,
or 3205 )
Romantic ( ENGL 3301 , 3302 , 3303 or 3304
Victorian ( ENGL 3303 , 3311 , 3312 , ENGL 3313 or 3314 )
Modern British ( ENGL 3401 , 3402 , 3403 , 3404 or 3405 )
Canadian ( ENGL 3501 , 3502 , 3503 , 3504 , 3505 , 3506 ,
3508 or 3509 )
American ( ENGL 3511 , 3512 , 3513 , 3514 or 3515 )
Literary Theory ( ENGL 3601 )
Electives may be chosen from each of these areas and from the area of
Special Studies ( ENGL 3602 , 3621 , 3622 , 3631 , 3702 , 3706 , 3707 ,
3709 , 3711 , 3712 , 3713 , 3714 , 3721 , 3722 , 3751 , 3721 , 3801 ,
3802 , 3803 , 3808 , 3901 , 3903 ). Up to 6 ch of approved upper level
courses (See Honours Coordinator) in literature other than English may
be substituted for up to 6 ch of English.
For first-class honours, a minimum grade point average of 3.6 is required
in English courses. For second-class honours, a minimum grade point
average of 3.0 is required in these courses. Averages are calculated on
the basis of the minimum number of credit hours required in the
programme; credit hours successfully completed above this minimum
are treated as "non-required" courses.
To satisfy the English requirements for the joint honours degree,
students must complete 12 ch of lower level English courses and 30 ch
of upper level courses in English. The 30 ch of courses at the upper level
must include 3 ch from each of the following five (5) areas:
As part of the 30 ch in either English or History, students must complete
HENG 4000 , a 6 ch thesis course. Once the student has decided
whether the primary emphasis will be on English or History, the
supervisors will be assigned from the two disciplines. Credit for thesis
will be assigned to the discipline receiving the primary emphasis.
To satisfy the History requirements for the joint honours degree, students
must complete 6 ch of lower level History and 30 ch of upper level
History courses, of which 6 ch will be an Honours Seminar.
Major
Although students are encouraged to signify their intention to pursue a
Major in English while in their second year, they are not eligible to
declare a major until they have completed 60 ch. Students will design
their programme in consultation with any member of the English
discipline, or with the Honours/Majors Co-ordinator.
A single Major in English will consist of at least 42 ch in English, of which
at least 30 ch must be in upper level courses. Students electing to Major
in English will be expected to complete a minimum of 12 ch of English at
a lower level (6 ch which must be 1200 or 1500 or equivalent). At the
upper level, a minimum of 3 ch is required in each of the following areas:
a.
Medieval, Renaissance Nondramatic, Restoration & Eighteenth
Century ( ENGL 3002 , 3003 , 3004 , 3007 , 3108 , 3109 , 3201 ,
3203 , 3204 , 3205 )
b.
Renaissance Dramatic ( ENGL 3105 , 3106 , or 3107 )
c.
Romantic/Victorian Literature ( ENGL 3301 , 3302 , 3303 , 3304 ,
3311 , 3312 3313 , or 3314 )
d.
Modern British/Canadian/American ( ENGL 3401 , 3402 , 3403 ,
3404 , 3405 , 3501 , 3502 , 3503 , 3504 , 3505 , 3506 , 3508 ,
3509 3511 , 3512 , 3513 , 3514 . 3515 )
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
147
SECTION E
Electives may be chosen from these areas and from the area of Sepcial
Studies ( ENGL 3601 , 3602 , 3621 , 3622 , 3631 , 3702 , 3706 , 3709 ,
3711 , 3712 , 3713 , 3714 , 3721 3722 , 3751 , 3801 , 3802 , 3803 , 3808
, 3901 , 3903 ). Up to 6 ch of approved upper level courses (See
Honours Coordinator) in literature other than English may be substituted
for up to 6 ch of English.
An English course will count towards the fulfilment of the Major
requirements only when it is passed with a grade of C or above.
A Double Major including English will consist of a minimum of 30 ch in
English, with 6 ch of 1200 or 1500 , or equivalent, and with at least 21 ch
in upper-level courses which includes at least 3 ch to be taken in each of
categories (a),(b),(c) and (d) above.
Optional Programme: English (Drama)
Students wishing to concentrate in drama may elect the Majors option in
English (Drama). This programme will consist of at least 48 ch in
English, of which at least 30 ch must be in upper level courses. Students
electing the drama option will be required to complete 6 ch from ENGL
2201 , ENGL 2202 , and ENGL 3801 . At the upper level, in addition to
Shakespeare, they will be required to complete 6 ch of upper level
devoted to the study of dramatic literature. Among their upper level
courses, students must complete at least 3 ch from each of categories
(a), (b), (c), or (d).
Minor
The Minor in English will consist of a minimum of 9 ch ( 6 ch of which
must be 1200 or 1500 , or equivalent) and a maximum of 12 ch in
English at the lower level and a minimum of 12 ch at the upper level for a
total of 24 ch. A grade of C or better is required in all courses.
FRENCH
Major and Minor
Major
A student who wishes to major in French Communication and Culture
will normally have completed 12 ch in French ( FR 1203 , 1204 and FR
2203 , 2204 ) and have received a grade of C or above. A student who
has successfully completed a school French Immersion program may
begin a major in French Communication and Culture following
completion of FR 1304 and FR 2304 with a grade of C or above.
A Single Major in French Communication and Culture will consist of at
least 30 ch of upper level courses. A Double Major including French
Communication and Culture will consist of at least 24 ch of upper level
courses.
A French Communication and Culture course will count towards the
fulfilment of the Major requirement only when it is passed with a grade of
C or above.
Students will normally apply for admission to the Major Program while
completing FR 2204 or FR 2304 . Prospective major students should
consult a faculty advisor in French when selecting French
Communication and Culture courses.
Students may elect to take French courses at other campuses (e.g., in
summer school). These credits may be counted for credit in the major
program here if prior authorization has been obtained from the
Department and the Registrar. This can be done by completing a form
available from the Registrar's Office. The student is responsible for
providing a detailed description of the course and any other information
the Department may require in order to assess it. Only in special cases
will students currently enrolled in the program be given retroactive
approval for courses tak en at other institutions.
In exceptional circumstances, one or more required courses may be
replaced by other upper-level French courses.
A Single Major would normally comprise FR 3203 , 3204 , 4204 and one
of 3704 , 3714 , 3724 and 18 ch chosen among upper level courses.
Students who have completed FR 1304 and FR 2304 and are admitted
into FR 3203 will do 24 ch chosen among upper level courses.
Six (6) ch must be chosen from
GROUP A ( FR 3084 , 3324 , 3412 , 3422 , 3432 , 3434 , 3442 , 3464 ,
4324 ), and at least 6 ch from
GROUP B ( FR 3514 , 3524 , 3614 , 3615 , 3616 , 3704 , 3714 , 3724 ,
3734 , 3744 , 3814 , 3824 , 3844 ).
A Double Major including French Communication and Culture would
normally comprise FR 3203 , 3204 , 4204 and one of 3704 , 3714 3724 ,
and 12 ch chosen among upper level courses, 6 from Group A and 6
from Group B.
There is also a French Major as part of the Business Administration
program. See relevant section under Business Administration.
Minor
Students completing a French Minor are required to complete 12 ch of
upper level French courses. FR 3203 and FR 3204 will be required. A
minimum grade of C or above is required. The Minor must be declared at
the same time as the Major.
There is also a French Minor as part of the Business Administration
program. See relevantsection under Business Administration.
148
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
SECTION E
BBA With a Major/Minor in French Communication
and Culture
BBA With a Major in French Communication and Culture
In addition to complying with the existing curriculum requirements and
regulations governing the award of a BBA degree, BBA students wishing
to Major in French Communication and Culture must also comply with
the following regulations and requirements of the Faculty of Business
and the French discipline:
a.
b.
Students electing to major in French Communication and Culture
should declare the major by the beginning of their third year. All
courses taken to comply with the major requirement must be
approved by the Department of Humanities and Languages and
by the Faculty of Business.
(i.) A BBA student who wishes to major in French Communication
and Culture will normally have completed 12 ch in French ( FR
1203 , 1204 and FR 2203 , 2204 ) and have received a grade of C
or above. A student who has successfully completed a school
French Immersion program may begin a major in French
Communication and Culture following completion of FR 1304 and
FR 2304 with a grade of C or above. Students receiving a grade
between C and B in FR 2304 would normally proceed to FR 2203
and FR 2204. A BBA with a major including French
Communication and Culture will consist of at least 24 ch of upper
level French courses.
(ii.) All students must earn a minimum grade of C in FR 3203 , FR
3204 , and FR 4204 ; and one of FR 3704 , FR 3714 , or FR 3724
and 12 ch of approved French Communication and Culture upper
level electives, 6 from Group A and 6 from Group B.
BBA With a Major in French (Honours) Communication and Culture
In addition to the above requirements for the major, students must obtain
a GPA of 3.3 on compulsory and elective courses required for the major.
Students may apply to enter the Certificate program at any time before
their completion of FR 4204 . They are encouraged to apply for entry as
soon as they register in a course in the program.
The Certificate of Proficiency in French will be awarded by the University
through the Registrar's Office. The student's transcript will bear a
separate entry showing that the Certificate has been awarded and
recording the grades obtained in the four areas of language competence
(speaking, listening comprehension, reading comprehension, and
writing).
These grades are: A (very good); B (good), and C (satisfactory), and
they may be interpreted as follows:
Speaking:
A.
participate with ease in conversation
B.
can participate adequately in conversation albeit with a certain
degree of hesitancy
C.
can make themselves understood in conversation
Listening Comprehension:
A.
can understand lectures in a job-related context and radio and TV
news and programs which interest them
B.
can understand lectures on non-technical subjects and group
conversations
C.
can understand what is said to them in individual conversation
with one other person
Reading Conversation:
A.
can understand the main ideas in books, magazines and
newspapers without the aid of a dictionary
B.
can read printed material of personal interest with occasional help
from a dictionary
C.
can read, with the aid of a dictionary, standard texts written
without stylistic difficulties on subjects within their interest
BBA With a Minor in French Communication and Culture
Students completing a French Minor are required to complete at least 12
ch of upper level courses in French Communication and Culture, with a
maximum of 12 ch at the lower level ( FR 1203 , 1204 and FR 2203 ,
2204 ). FR 3203 and 3204 will be required; the remaining 6 ch will be
chosen from advanced courses. A minimum grade of C, in lower level
courses, and C, in upper level courses, are required. The Minor must be
declared at the same time as the Major.
Students who have completed FR 1304 and FR 2304 and are admitted
into FR 3203 will also do 12 ch in upper level courses.
Certificate of Proficiency in French
Saint John - Certificate of Proficiency in French Communication
and Culture
Persons who would like to have official recognition of their competence
in the French language may apply for admission to the above-mentioned
program, which is administered for the University by the Department of
French on the Fredericton campus and the Department of Humanities
and Languages on the Saint John campus. The program consists
normally of FR 1203/1204 , 2203/2204 , 3203 and 3204 , 4204 and one
of 3704 , 3714 , 3724 , in all of which the student is to attain a mark of C
or higher, and the Certificate is awarded on the basis of a
comprehensive examination upon termination of FR 4204 .
Writing:
A.
can write papers, essays, etc., which are acceptable in form and
format
B.
can write résumés, letters, short compositions, which are
structurally acceptable but which would need some revision
C.
can write sentences and short paragraphs which are
grammatically acceptable
Diplôme de Bilinguisme (Certificate Level Two)
All students who have successfully completed the Certificate of
Proficiency in French and students who have completed FR 4204 (or
equivalent) with a grade of C or higher (or the equivalent) are eligible for
admission.
24 ch must be completed, from any of the 3000/4000 level French
courses. Approval of courses will be required. The requirements for the
diploma are: (a) satisfactory completion of the program with a grade of C
or higher in each course, and (b) the passing of a comprehensive final
examination.
Full-time students who are not majoring or honouring in French may take
these courses as part of their undergraduate program. Persons not
working towards a degree may enrol for the courses as part-time
students.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
149
SECTION E
GENDER STUDIES
Programs in Gender Studies
Minor in Gender Studies
Admission to the Minor is open to students majoring in any Arts
discipline and could be available to students in other faculties as minors
become available. Students must select the Minor in consultation with
the Gender Studies Coordinator, and this should normally be done at the
same time as they declare a Major. The Minor requires 24 ch, comprised
of Gender Studies 2001 and 21 ch selected from GEND-eligible courses.
(NOTE: The required 24ch does not include the prerequisites required
for the GEND-eligible courses.) A grade of C or better is required in all
courses counting towards the Minor in Gender Studies.
Certificate in Gender Studies
Students meeting the Universitys entry requirements or the requirements
for admission as a mature student may be admitted to the Certificate in
Gender Studies programme in consultation with the Gender Studies
Coordinator. The Certificate requires 30 ch, comprised of Gender
Studies 2001 and 27 ch selected from GEND-eligible courses. (NOTE:
The required 30ch does not include the prerequisites required for the
GEND-eligible courses.) A grade of C or better is required in all courses
counting towards the Certificate in Gender Studies.
Elective Courses
For the GEND Minor: 21ch from the following list of GEND-eligible
courses with at least 6ch in two of the three groups.
For the Certificate in Gender Studies: 27ch from the following list of
GEND-eligible courses with at least 6ch in two of the three groups.
GEND 4001 is available as a 3ch elective, and its categorization into the
3 groupings will vary depending upon the specialization of the instructor
(please consult with the Gender Studies Coordinator).
Note: Unless otherwise indicated, students will be admitted to the
following courses when (a) they have met the disciplinary prerequisites
for these courses, or (b) they have completed GEND 2001 with a grade
of C or better and have obtained permission from the instructor.
GROUP 1:
ENGL3621
Writing by Women I
ENGL3622
Writing by Women II
ENGL3631
Studies in Gender and Genre
HIST3402
Women in American History (disciplinary
prerequisites apply)
GROUP 2:
POLS3225
Gender and Politics
POLS3325
Gender and Comparative Politics
POLS3625
Global Gender Issues
POLS4311
Global Politics of Prostitution
SOCI3105
Qualitative Methods in the Social Sciences
SOCI3543
Sociology of Gender Relations
SOCI4263
Discourse and Text (prerequisite: Sociology 3105)
SOCI4555
Gender and Organization
150
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
GROUP 3:
HIST3945
Women, Science and Medicine (disciplinary
prerequisites apply)
NURS3053
Gendered Experiences in Health Care
PSYC3223
Sex Differences (disciplinary prerequisites apply)
PSYC3263
Psychology of Women (disciplinary prerequisites
apply)
SCI3155
Women and Science
SCI3255
Women, Development, and the Environment
SOCI3544
Gender and Technology
FOR STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE GENDER STUDIES MINOR:
These courses cannot be double counted for those enrolled in Arts. That
is, any course taken to fulfil the requirements of the Minor in Gender
Studies cannot be counted towards any other programme within Arts.
PLEASE NOTE: The list of GEND-eligible courses is updated annually,
and is available from the GEND Coordinator. Students seeking credit for
courses not on this list must have written approval from the GEND
Coordinator prior to enrolling in the course. GEND students are
responsible for ensuring they have completed the appropriate
prerequisites for their GEND-eligible electives.
SECTION E
HISTORY
Honours
Students in Honours History must meet the requirements for the History
Major and complete an additional 12 ch as outlined below:
•
HIST 4900 : Honours Thesis: This is a required course for
Honours students who will complete a research project leading to
a thesis. Topics must be approved by the Honours co-ordinator.
•
HIST 4906 Honours Seminar I
•
HIST 4907 Honours Seminar II
For the awarding of a first-class Honours degree, a minimum grade point
average of 3.6 is required in all History courses needed to meet the
minimum number of credit hours for the program. For a second-class
Honours degree, a minimum grade point average of 3.0 is required in
these courses. In both cases, a minimum cumulative grade point
average of 2.7 is required.
Double Major
To obtain a Double Major in History students must complete a minimum
of 33 ch in History of which at least 24 ch will be upper division courses.
All History courses credited towards the double Major in History must
have a minimum grade of 2.3 (C+) and those at the upper level must
have an average of 2.7 (B-).
Minor
To obtain a Minor in History students must complete 12 ch of lower
division History courses and 12 ch of upper division History courses with
a minimum grade of 2.3 (C+) in all History courses for a total of 24 ch.
Joint Honours Program - English and History
Students interested in pursuing a joint honours program in English and
History must apply in writing to either the Coordinator of English or the
Coordinator of History.
To satisfy the History requirements for the joint honours degree, students
must complete 6 ch of lower level History and 30 ch of upper level
History courses, of which 6 ch will be an Honours seminar.
To satisfy the English requirements for the joint honours degree,
students must complete 12 ch of lower level English courses and 30 ch
of upper level courses in English. The 30 ch of courses at the upper level
must include 3 ch from each of the following five (5) areas:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Medieval/Renaissance Non-Dramatic/18th century
Renaissance Dramatic
Romantic/Victorian
Twentieth-Century Literature/Special Studies
Literary Theory
As part of the 30 ch in either English or History, students must complete
HENG4000 , a 6 ch thesis course. Once the students has decided
whether the primary emphasis will be on English or History, supervisors
will be assigned from the two disciplines. Credit for the thesis will be
assigned to the discipline receiving the primary emphasis.
Major
To be admitted to the Major in History students must have completed 60
ch in the Bachelor of Arts program. To enter the History Majors program
a student must have a minimum GPA of 2.7 (B-) in 15 ch of lower division
history courses as follows:
a.
A minimum of 3 credit hours of 1000 level history courses,
typically in the first 30 ch of their program. NOTE: These 1000
level courses are not open to students who have already taken
higher level university history courses without written permission
from the course instructor.
b.
A minimum of 12 credit hours of 2000 level courses, typically in
the second 30 ch of the program. NOTE: Classics courses
designated as Ancient History count as History courses.
In the Majors History program students must complete 30 ch of upper
division History courses including HIST 3333 and obtain an average of
2.7 (B-) with no grade lower than 2.3 (C+) in these courses. The total
credit hours in the History Major will include a minimum of 15 ch lower
division History and 30 ch upper division History courses for a total of 45
ch in History.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
151
SECTION E
INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION STUDIES
General Information
The University of New Brunswick at Saint John offers a Bachelor of Arts
in Information and Communication Studies (ICS), a Double Major in ICS,
and a Minor in ICS. The ICS program seeks to provide students with a
comprehensive understanding of the social, political, economic and
cultural impact of information and communication technologies and
practices. As an interdisciplinary Arts program based in the tradition of
the social sciences and humanities, the ICS approach combines
theoretical, historical, empirical, and practical study, with an emphasis on
emerging media of communication and information gathering and
distribution. Course offerings are grouped into three primary areas:
Media Studies; Technology, Information and Society; and Public Opinion
and Information Gathering. These areas of concentration, combined with
the interdisciplinary organization of the program, provide students with
broad exposure to a variety of perspectives in information and
communication studies.
Lower Level: Total 15 chs
*
ICS 2001
Introduction to Information & Communication
Studies
*
SOCI 2251
Film and Society
*
SOCI 2253
From TV to the Internet
*
CS 1703
Introduction to Computing Concepts
*
CS1713
Multimedia and the Information Highway
Upper Level: Total 21 ch
*
ICS 3001
Theories of Information and Communication
*
ICS 3003
Electronic Research
AND
*
3 credit hours selected from the following:
POLS 4411
Special Topics in Political Theory, or
POLS 4211
Special Topics in Canadian Politics, or
SOCI 4503
Research Seminar in Popular Culture, or
ICS 4001
Research Seminars in ICS
AND
*
Major
Students are eligible to declare an ICS Major after having completed 60
credit hours towards a Bachelor of Arts degree. To graduate with a Major
in ICS, students must complete 51 credit hours (24 lower level/27 upper
level) comprised of the following courses:
Lower Level: Total 24 ch
NOTE: Upper division courses count for credit in ONE major field only
(e.g., POLS 4411 credit assigned to an ICS Double Major will not be
counted for credit towards a Politics Major or Double Major, or viceversa).
Notes:
*
ICS 2001
Introduction to Information & Communication
Studies
*
SOCI 1000
Introduction to Sociology
*
SOCI 2251
Film and Society
*
SOCI 2253
From TV to the Internet
*
CS 1703
Introduction to Computing Concepts
*
CS 1713
Multimedia and the Information Highway
*
POLS 1201
Introduction to Canadian Politics
[1] The list of current ICS-eligible courses is updated annually, and is
available from the ICS Coordinator. Students seeking credit for courses
not on this list must have written approval from the ICS Coordinator prior
to enrolling in the course.
[2] ICS students are responsible for ensuring they have completed
appropriate pre-requisites for their ICS-eligible electives.
Minor
Upper Level: Total 27 chs
*
ICS 3001
Theories of Information and Communication
*
ICS 3003
Electronic Research
AND
*
12 credit hours of 3000/4000 electives from the ICS-eligiblelist [See
Note 2]
3 credit hours selected from the following:
POLS 4411
Special Topics in Political Theory; OR
POLS 4211
Special Topics in Canadian Politics; OR
SOCI 4503
Research Seminar in Popular Culture, OR
ICS 4001
Research Seminar in ICS
Students are eligible to declare an ICS Minor after having completed 60
credit hours towards a Bachelor of Arts degree. To graduate with a Minor
in ICS, students must complete 24 credit hours comprised of the
following courses:
Lower Level: Total 15 ch
*
ICS 2001
Introduction to Information & Communication
Studies
Introduction to Computing Concepts
*
CS 1703
*
6 credit hours of 3000/4000 POLS from the ICS-eligible list [See Note 1]
*
CS 1713
Multimedia and the Information Highway
*
6 credit hours of 3000/4000 SOCI from the ICS-eligible list
*
SOCI 2251
Film and Society
*
6 credit hours of 3000/4000 electives from the ICS-eligible list [See
Note 2]
*
SOCI 2253
From TV to the Internet
AND
Notes:
[1] The list of current ICS-eligible courses is updated annually, and is
available from the ICS Coordinator. Students seeking credit for courses
not on this list must have written approval from the ICS Coordinator prior
to enrolling in the course.
Upper Level: Total 9 ch
*
ICS 3001
Theories of Information and Communication
*
ICS 3003
Electronic Research
*
3 credit hours
of 3000/4000 electives from the ICS-eligible
list [See Note 2]
Notes:
[2] ICS students are responsible for ensuring they have completed
appropriate pre-requisites for their ICS-eligible electives.
Double Major
Students are eligible to declare an ICS Double Major after having
completed 60 credit hours towards a Bachelor of Arts degree. To
graduate with a Double Major in ICS, students must complete 36 credit
hours (15 lower level/21 upper level) comprised of the following courses:
152
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
[1] The list of current ICS-eligible courses is updated annually, and is
available from the ICS Coordinator. Students seeking credit for courses
not on this list must have written approval from the ICS Coordinator prior
to enrolling in the course.
[2] ICS students are responsible for ensuring they have completed
appropriate pre-requisites for their ICS-eligible electives.
SECTION E
INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES MINOR
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
General Information
General Information
The minor in International Development Studies is an interdisciplinary
program jointly administered by participating departments. It offers
students a broad base of courses with an international orientation.
The University of New Brunswick at Saint John offers a double major in
International Studies. This interdisciplinary program permits students to
combine studies in language, culture, politics, economics, history, and
literature and offers a comprehensive introduction to global and regional
developments.
Programme of Study
The Minor consists of 24 ch. A grade of C or better must be attained in all
required and elective courses. Note: None of the courses taken for this
Minor may be counted towards the requirements for another Minor or
Major.
The following 9 ch of courses are required:
POLS 1601
Introduction to International Politics
(6 ch)
ECON 3531
Introduction to International Development
(Note: ECON 1013 and 1023 are prerequisites.)
(3 ch)
A further 15 ch of elective courses selected from the following:
HIST 2000
World History
(6 ch)
HIST 3025
Econ Development of Pre-Industrial
Europe
(3 ch)
HIST 3035
Industrialization of Europe
(3 ch)
POLS 3303
Politics of the Developing World
(3 ch)
POLS 3622
International Organization and Law
(3 ch)
Programme of Study
The International Studies Program is one half of a double major in the
Faculty of Arts.
International Studies 1001 and 1002 are prerequisites to all courses in
International Studies. A grade of C in both IS 1001 and IS 1002 is the
minimum grade requirement for a Major in International Studies.
Students apply for permission to Major in International Studies during the
term in which they complete 60 ch of study. Students entering the IS
Program must have a cumulative GPA of 2.7 (B-). To complete the
double Major in IS students must maintain a "B-" average overall in their
IS courses with no IS course lower than a "C". Courses in the 4000
series are specialized courses intended mainly for Majors students.
Students must satisfy the prerequisite requirements for all upper level
courses. Any student in any program may take IS 1001 or IS 1002 as an
elective.
Double counting courses in the IS program will not be permitted.
Double Major in International Studies
POLS 3631
Survey of Global Issues
(3 ch)
ECON 3542
Topics in International Development
(3 ch)
ECON 3755
Environmental and Resource Economics
(3 ch)
ECON 3702
Cost-Benefit Analysis
(3 ch)
Students must, in their first 60 credit hours, meet the regular
Faculty of Arts breadth requirements. Students must include in
their program the following:
BA 4193
International & Comparative
Management
(3 ch)
a.
12 credit hours of a modern language other than English.
BA 4858
International Human Resources
Management
(3 ch)
b.
Six credit hours of lower level International Studies
courses:
SOCI 3523
Sociology of Third World Development
(3 ch)
1.
Lower level requirements: (18 credit hours)
IS 1001 Introduction to International Studies
An interdisciplinary introduction to the regional approach to
International Studies. The course examines the political,
social and economic aspects of developing and developed
regions.
IS 1002 Global Issues
An interdisciplinary examination of issues and problems
relating to the environment, human rights, gender and
inequality, migration, and poverty in a global perspective.
Upper level requirements: (24 credit hours)
Students must complete a minimum of 24 credit hours of upper level
courses. These courses must include:
a.
International Studies 3501: Seminar in International Studies (3
credit hours).
b.
International Studies 4501: Research Project in International
Studies (3 credit hours). This course is limited to students with 15
ch in IS courses or permission of instructor.
c.
A minimum of 9 credit hours, selected from the list of International
Studies electives and 9 credit hours from related disciplinary
electives determined in consultation with the International Studies
program advisor(s). Students will be advised in their first and
second year that many of the upper level related disciplinary
electives have specific prerequisites that must be completed for
these upper level courses to be selected.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
153
SECTION E
For the double Major in a discipline, students will be required to meet the
double Majors requirement for one of the existing Faculty of Arts
disciplines. These requirements vary - please consult the calendar for
further details.
MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS
Minor in International Studies
Mathematics Major
The minor in International Studies will consist of 6 ch of lower level IS
courses and 6 ch of course in a language other than English, and a
minimum of 12 ch of upper level courses in IS. A grade of C or better is
required in all courses to be counted for the minor in IS. A minor must be
declared at the same time as the major.
Majors and Minors
A student in the BA degree who wishes to major in Mathematics must
complete a minimum of 48 ch in Mathematics or approved substitutes as
follows:
a.
MATH 1003 , 1013 , 1703 , 2003 , 2013 , 2213
b.
MATH 3713 , 3733 , STAT 3083 , 3093
c.
At least six upper level mathematics courses. A maximum of two
courses from CS 3113 , DA 4123 an upper level Statistics course
may count toward the six courses.
Suggested elective for the first year is STAT 1793 (or equivalent).
_____________________________________________
At least two courses in Computer Science are required.
Statistics Major
LAW IN SOCIETY
Double Majors Program
Law in Society is an interdepartmental and inter-faculty majors program
involving the departments of Anthropology, Economics, History,
Philosophy, Politics, Psychology and Sociology in the Arts Faculty, the
Law Faculty, and the Faculty of Business Administration, on the
Fredericton campus. A number of UNB Saint John courses are eligible
for credit for the Law in Society Double Major. Please consult the
Fredericton Bachelor of Arts programs section for more information.
A student in the BA degree who wishes to major in Statistics must
complete a minimum of 48 ch in Statistics or approved substitutes as
follows:
a.
MATH 1003 , 1013 , 1703 , 2003 , 2013 , 2213 , STAT 1793
b.
MATH 3713 , 3733 , STAT 3083 , 3093
c.
At least five upper level Statistics courses. A maximum of two
courses from DA 4203 , 4243 and an upper level Mathematics
course may count toward the five courses.
At least two courses in Computer Science are required.
Minor in Mathematics
A student who intends to pursue a Minor in Mathematics is required to
take 24 ch in Mathematics, with a maximum of 6 ch Statistics courses.
The Minor must be declared at the same time as the Major.
Minor in Statistics
A student who intends to pursue a Minor in Statistics is required to take
24 ch in Statistics. A maximum of 9 ch from Mathematics may be
selected. The Minor must be declared at the same time as the Major.
154
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
SECTION E
PHILOSOPHY
POLITICS
Major and Minor
Honours, Majors and Minor
Major
Honours
Students in the BA degree program who wish to take a Major in
Philosophy, either alone or with some other subject, should consult with
a Faculty advisor in Philosophy on successful completion of 60 ch of
courses.
Students interested in an Honours degree in Politics must apply to the
Department of History and Politics after they complete 60 ch of studies.
To be eligible to apply students must have a minimum grade point
average of 3.0 in Politics courses and a minimum cumulative grade point
average of 3.0. These minimums must be maintained for the duration of
the program. No grade lower than C in a Politics course will count for
credit towards the required credits in Politics for an Honours degree.
A single Major in Philosophy will consist of at least 48 ch in Philosophy,
passed with a grade of C or better, including:
a.
at least 6 ch of logic;
b.
at least 3 ch of ethics;
c.
at least 24 ch of advanced level courses.
A double Major in Philosophy will consist of at least 30 ch in Philosophy,
passed with a grade of C or better, of which at least 24 ch must be at the
advanced level.
Minor
The Minor in Philosophy will consist of a maximum of 12 ch in
Philosophy at the lower level and a minimum of 12 ch at the upper level
for a total of 24 ch. A grade of C or better is required in all courses. The
Minor must be declared at the same time as the Major.
The Honours Politics programme consists of 54 ch of Political Science
courses. This shall be comprised of the 42 ch required for a Major in
Politics, plus an additional 12 ch of upper level Political Science courses
which must include POLS 4001 Honours Seminar in Politics and POLS
4002 Honours Thesis, as well as 3 ch in another 4000 level course.
Major
Students choosing the discipline major must complete a minimum of 42
credit hours of Politics courses, including POLS 1201 , POLS 2401 ,
POLS 2501 , and at least 3 credit hours chosen from either POLS 1301
or POLS 2601 . The remaining credit hours must be upper level courses
selected by the student in consultation with the faculty advisor in Politics.
No grade lower than a C in a Politics course will count for credit towards
a Majors degree in Politics.
Unless otherwise noted:
1.
the required prerequisite for entry into any upper-level course in
Canadian Politics (any course with the number 1, 2 or 5 as its
second digit) is POLS 1201 ;
2.
the required prerequisites for entry into any upper-level courses in
Comparative Politics (any course with the number 3 as its second
digit) and International Politics (any course with the number 6 as
its second digit) are POLS 1301 and/or POLS 2601 .
3.
the required prerequisites for entry into any upper-level courses in
Political Theory (any course with the number 4 as its second digit)
is POLS 2401 .
Exceptions are subject to approval by the Chair of the Department, in
consultation with the Politics faculty.
Double Major
Double major students in Politics and in another discipline must
complete 36 credit hours in Politics, as follows: - POLS 1201 , 2401 ,
2501 , and at least 3 credit hours of courses from either POLS 1301 or
2601 . The remaining 24 credit hours must be upper level courses
selected by the student in consultation with the faculty advisor in Politics.
No grade lower than a C in a Politics course will count towards a Double
Majors in Politics.
Minor
A Minor in Politics requires the completion of 9 credit hours from any of
the lower level courses in Politics and 15 credit hours of upper level
courses. No grade lower than a C in a Politics course will count towards
a Minor in Politics.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
155
SECTION E
PSYCHOLOGY
PSYCHOSOCIAL DIMENSIONS OF SPORT MINOR
General Information and Curriculum
General Information
Successful completion of PSYC 1003 or an equivalent is necessary
before taking PSYC 1004 . Both PSYC 1003 and PSYC 1004 must be
completed before taking any of the remaining psychology courses.
The Psychosocial Dimensions of Sport Minor provides an academic
opportunity for systematic study in the fields of Sport Psychology and
Sport Sociology.
Major and Honours
MAJOR
To qualify for a Major degree a student must accumulate 42 ch of
approved psychology courses. Fifteen ch of courses are compulsory as
follows: PSYC 1003 , 1004 , 2102 , 2901 , 4053 .
HONOURS
The Honours program in Psychology provides a broad knowledge of this
field and its research methods. Students planning to pursue graduate
studies in psychology are advised to consider this program.
Of the 51 ch of approved Psychology courses, the following 24 ch are
compulsory: PSYC 1003 , 1004 , 2102 , 2901 , 3913 , 4053 , 4143 ,
4145.
An additional 27 ch derived from a selection of 9 ch from each of the
following 3 groups is necessary.
Eligibility
Admission to the Psychosocial Dimensions of Sport Minor is open to any
Arts student. Students majoring in Psychology or Sociology may find the
program to be of particular interest. Students must select the Minor in
consultation with a Faculty advisor, and this should normally be done at
the same time as they declare a major.
Program of Study
The Minor Programme in the Psychosocial Dimensions of Sport shall
consist of at least 24 credit hours of instruction. The three courses listed
below are mandatory. A grade of at least B- is necessary in each of the
mandatory courses to qualify for the Minor. Prerequisites are noted in
brackets.
The Minor will be jointly administered by the Departments of Psychology
and Social Science.
Mandatory Courses
KIN 2021 (3 ch)
Group I: Biological/Cognitive Basis of Behaviour I
Youth in Sport
PSYC 3343 , 3383 , 3503 , 3603 , 3632 , 3693 , 3711 , 3723 , 4583 ,
4693 , 4733 , 4833
KIN 2023 (3 ch)
Group II: Social/Personality
KIN 2032 (3 ch)
PSYC 2201 , 2401 , 3222 , 3263 , 3293 , 3343 , 3412 , 3461 , 3752 ,
4463.
Group III: Clinical/Applied
PSYC 3263 , 3313 , 3323 , 3362 , 3393 , 3493 , 3553 , 3724 , 3725 ,
3803 , 4213 , 4214 , 4233 , 4493.
The remaining 3 credits of psychology courses may be selected by the
student. All Psychology courses taken for the Honours degree must be
passed with at least a C (2.0).
Students may apply to the Honours program at the start of the third or
fourth year. To be eligible to apply they must have a minimum cumulative
grade point average of 3.3 (B+). Preferably, students should apply at the
beginning of the third year.
After admission, an Honours student must maintain a cumulative grade
point average of 3.0 during each year of study within the program.
To graduate with an Honours degree in Psychology a cumulative grade
point average of 3.3 (B+) is necessary in all required Psychology
courses. For first class Honours, a grade point average of 3.6 is required
in such Psychology courses. For second class Honours a grade point
average of 3.3 is required in such Psychology courses.
The remaining 27 ch may be selected by the student.
A student who wishes to do a double major in Psychology and another
discipline must complete 36 ch including 24 ch in upper level courses
and all compulsory courses for the single Major in psychology. A
minimum grade of C (2.0) is required for all Psychology courses taken to
meet the Majors requirement.
(PSYC1003 , PSYC 1004 , SOCI 1001 , and one of SOCI
1002 , 1003 , 1004 , 1005 , 1006.)
Introduction to the
Sociology of Sport
(SOCI 1001, and one of SOCI 1002 , 1003 , 1004 , 1005 ,
1006)
Introduction to Sport
Psychology
(PSYC 1003 , PSYC 1004)
Students must choose the remaining 15 ch from the following groups of
courses, some of which may have prerequisites.
Group A - Kinesiology (6 ch) Choose two (2) courses:
KIN 3031
KIN 3032
KIN 3123
KIN 4021
KIN 4022
KIN 4904
KIN 4993
KIN 4994
Exercise Psychology
Sport Psychology
Careers of Elite Athletes: A Sociological Analysis
Aggression & Violence Perspectives in Sport
Sociological Analysis of Sport
Directed Studies in Exercise & Sport Science
Selected Topics in Kinesiology
Selected Topics in Kinesiology
Group B - Psychology (3 ch) Choose one (1) course:
PSYC 3412
PSYC 3461
PSYC 3493
PSYC 3632
Advanced Social Psychology
Theories of Personality
Changing Behaviour
Motivation
Group C - Sociology (3 ch) Choose one (1) course:
SOCI 2533
SOCI 2203
SOCI 2603
SOCI 3103
SOCI 3543
Social Movements and Social Revolutions
Interpersonal Relations
Sociology of Deviance
Strategies of Sociological Research
Sociology of Gender Relations
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
Note: SOCI 1001 and one of SOCI 1002 , 1003 , 1004 , 1005 , OR 1006 are a
prerequisite for all courses in Sociology.
KIN
PSYC
SOCI
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
Note: PSYC 1003 is a prerequisite for PSYC 1004 , and PSYC 1004 is a
prerequisite for all remaining Psychology courses.
Group D - Group A, B or C (3 ch) Choose one (1) course
156
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
(3 ch)
SECTION E
SOCIOLOGY
General Information and Curriculum
Unless otherwise indicated, students must complete Sociology 1001 and
one of Sociology 1002 , 1003 , 1004 , 1005 or 1006 before taking any
sociology courses at the 2000 level or above. Sociology 1001 is a
prerequisite for SOCI 10021006. Students may receive credit for only
one of Sociology 1002 , 1003 , 1004 , 1005 , 1006 . Students are
required to complete at least 9 credit hours of sociology courses at the
lower level (10002000 courses) before enrolling in any upper level
sociology courses. A minimum grade of C (2.0) is required for all
sociology courses taken to meet the Majors or Honours requirements or
prerequisites.
Students choosing to Honour in Sociology must have their program
approved by the Department, and must complete a minimum of 48 ch in
Sociology including the following required 36 ch:
*
SOCI 1001
*
One of:
SOCI 1002
Major, Double Major and Honours Options
Students apply for permission to Major in Sociology in the term in which
they complete 60 ch of study. Courses in the 4000 series are specialized
courses intended mainly for Majors and Honours students. Students who
are not majoring or honouring in Sociology will be admitted to a 4000
level course only if they have completed 18ch of Sociology and have
consulted with the instructor. Students must satisfy the prerequisite
requirements of upper level courses. In addition to SOCI 1001 and one
of SOCI 1002 , 1003 , 1004 , 1005 , or 1006 , students intending to Major
or Honour in Sociology must have completed at least six credit hours in
Sociology with a grade of C or better prior to admission into the program.
NOTE: Most courses have a prerequisite; students are responsible for
ensuring they have completed the appropriate prerequisites.
Introduction to Sociology
Introduction to Social Problems and Issues
SOCI 1003
Making Sense of Modern Life
SOCI 1004
Collective Behaviour, Youth Cultures and
Rationalism
SOCI 1005
Critical Sociologies: Feminism, Ethnomethodology, Marxism
SOCI 1006
Exercising the Social Imagination
*
SOCI 3000
Theoretical Foundations of Sociology
*
SOCI 3100
Statistical Analysis of Social Data
*
SOCI 3103
Strategies of Sociological Research
*
SOCI 4013
Contemporary Sociological Theory
*
SOCI 4014
Designing Research Proposals
*
SOCI 4015
*
Honours Thesis
Six additional ch of 4000 level SOCI courses.
An honours thesis is required in the Final Year.
Students choosing Sociology as a Major must have their program
approved by the Department, and must complete a minimum of 42 ch in
Sociology, including the following required 24 ch:
*
SOCI 1001
*
One of:
SOCI 1002
Introduction to Sociology
Introduction to Social Problems and Issues
SOCI 1003
Making Sense of Modern Life
SOCI 1004
Collective Behaviour, Youth Cultures and
Rationalism
SOCI 1005
Critical Sociologies: Feminism, Ethnomethodology, Marxism
SOCI 1006
Exercising the Social Imagination
*
SOCI 3000
Theoretical Foundations of Sociology
*
SOCI 3100
Statistical Analysis of Social Data
*
SOCI 3103
Strategies of Sociological Research
*
SOCI 4013
Contemporary Sociological Theory
A student who wishes to do a double major in sociology and another
discipline must complete 36ch of sociology, including all compulsory
courses for the single major in sociology.
Students apply to the Department for permission to honour in Sociology
in the term in which they complete 60 ch of studies. Only under
exceptional circumstances will students be permitted to enter the
Honours program after this time.
To be eligible to apply for the Honours program in Sociology, a student
must meet the requirements for admission to the major and have a
minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.3. The decision to admit a
student to the Honours program rests with the Sociology faculty.
For the award of a first-class Honours degree, a grade point average of
3.6 is required in Sociology courses above the introductory level. For a
second-class Honours degree an average of 3.3 is required in these
courses. In both cases a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.3
is required.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
157
SECTION E
SPORT AND EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY
GENERAL INFORMATION
The Sport and Exercise Psychology Major provides an academic
opportunity for systematic study in the fields of Kinesiology and
Psychology.
Kinesiological Characteristics
OR
CS 1803
CS 1713
BIOL 1551
BIOL 1012
Electives
Introduction to Computers and Systems
Multimedia and the Information Highway
Principles of Biology
Biological Principles, Part II
6 credit hours of elective courses
TOTAL
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
6 ch
30 ch
Second, Third and Fourth Years (90 ch):
Kinesiological analysis of sport assumes the study of human beings from
a movement science and physical activity perspective. Sport and
physical activity provide the environmental setting for this analysis.
Psychological Characteristics
Psychological characteristics of the participant are studied from
theoretical and conceptual approaches such as body image, selfconcept, exercise adherence, risk-taking, situational specificity of
behaviour, aggression, motivation, self-efficacy, need achievement,
anxiety, arousal, kinesthetic satisfaction, and general personality and
performance relationships.
Required Courses (18 ch):
KIN 2021
KIN 2023
KIN 2032
PSYC 2102
PSYC 2901
One of:
PSYC 3313
PSYC 4233
Eligibility
Youth in Sport
Introduction to the Sociology of Sport
Introduction to Sport Psychology
Research Methods in Psychology
Introduction to Statistical Analysis for
Psychologists
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
Introduction to Psychological Testing
Programme Evaluation
TOTAL
3 ch
3 ch
18 ch
Admission to the Sport and Exercise Psychology Major is open to any
Arts student. Students interested in the Psychological and/or
Kinesiological aspects of sport may find the program to be of particular
interest. Students should indicate their interest in the program in their
first year of study and must select the major no later than the start of
their third year.
Upper Level Electives in Sport and Exercise Psychology (21 ch):
PROGRAM OF STUDY
List A: Kinesiology Group (6 ch) - Choose a minimum of two (2)
electives from:
To qualify for the interdisciplinary Major degree, a student must complete
fifty-one (51) credit hours of approved courses from the disciplines of
Kinesiology and Psychology. Students who are seeking to complete a
Double Major should select their courses in consultation with a faculty
advisor. A minimum grade of C (2.0) is required for all courses taken to
meet the interdisciplinary Major's requirement with the exception of KIN
2021 , 2023 and 2032 where a minimum grade of B- is required. A
student majoring in Sports and Exercise Psychology must complete 27
credit hours of compulsory lower level credits in Kinesiology and
Psychology. They must also complete a minimum of 21 credit hours of
upper level courses in Kinesiology and Psychology, of which three credit
hours must be PSYC 3313 or PSYC 4233 . These courses must be
selected in consultation with a faculty advisor and must include at least 6
credit hours in upper level kinesiology and 6 credit hours in upper level
pshychology.
From List A and List B, a minimum of 21 credit hours of upper level
courses in Psychology and Kinesiology must be chosen. Courses must
include six (6) credit hours from each of the disciplines of Kinesi ology
and Psychology. Substitutions are allowed with the approval of program
coordinators.
KIN 3031
KIN 3032
KIN 3123
KIN 4021
KIN 4022
KIN 4904
KIN 4993
KIN 4994
List B: Psychology Group (6 ch) - Choose a minimum of two (2)
electives from:
First Year (30 ch):
Required Courses (24 ch):
PSYC 4233
Administration
The Sport and Exercise Psychology Major will be jointly administered by
the Departments of Psychology and Social Science.
Curriculum
KIN 1001
KIN 1012
OR
PSYC 2201
PSYC 1003
PSYC 1004
CS 1703
158
Introduction to Kinesiology
Kinesiological Aspects of Lifespan Development
3 ch
3 ch
Child Development
Introduction to Psychology I
Introduction to Psychology II
Introduction to Computer Concepts
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
Note: KIN 1000 is a prerequisite for all courses in Kinesiology.
PSYC 3222
PSYC 3293
PSYC 3313
PSYC 3343
PSYC 3362
PSYC 3383
PSYC 3412
PSYC 3461
PSYC 3493
PSYC 3503
PSYC 3553
PSYC 3603
PSYC 3632
PSYC 3752
PSYC 3913
A student who wishes to do a double major in Sport and Exercise
Psychology and another discipline must complete 3 credit hours of
upper-level courses in each of Kinesiology and Psychology. Students
must also complete all compulsory courses for the single major in Sport
and Exercise Psychology.
Exercise Psychology
Sport Psychology
Careers of Elite Athletes: A Sociological Analysis
Aggression and Violence Perspectives in Sport
Sociological Analysis of Sport
Directed Studies in Exercise and Sport Science
Selected Topics in Kinesiology
Selected Topics in Kinesiology
Sex Differences
The Psychology of Aging
Introduction to Psychological Testing
Human Sexuality
Introduction to Guidance and Counselling
Perception
Advanced Social Psychology
Theories of Personality
Changing Behaviour
Learning
Psychopathology
Selective Attention and Memory
Motivation
Drugs and Behaviour
Introduction to Statistical Inference and Experimental
Design in Psychology
Programme Evaluation
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
Note: PSYC 1003 is a prerequisite for PSYC 1004 , and PSYC 1004 is a
prerequisite for all remaining Psychology courses.
Electives (2nd, 3rd and 4th years):
15 credit hours lower level, 36 credit hours upper level.
SECTION E
BACHELOR OF BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION
GENERAL INFORMATION
The Faculty of Business offers a four-year program (equally accessible
to part-time students) leading to the degree of Bachelor of Business
Administration. The objectives of the program are to provide all students
with a solid basic understanding of the fundamental human, physical and
conceptual relationships that underlie the organization and management
of profit and non-profit organizations; to provide individual students with
an opportunity to study, in greater depth, those areas of business they
find most interesting; to give students the opportunity to obtain the
breadth of background in the Arts and Sciences required to appreciate
the environment in which organizations must function; and above all, to
develop problem-solving abilities and flexibility in students to help them
cope with the challenges presented by a rapidly changing society.
I. Cooperative Education Option
The Faculty of Business offers a 4-year Cooperative Education option
within the BBA program. Consistent with the philosophy of Cooperative
education, the program is designed to alternate study terms and
meaningful work terms. The number of positions is limited and,
therefore, restricted to students with a B- average or higher after their
first year. Students may apply for the Co-op program during their second
semester. Co- op students are also required to maintain a B- GPA or
higher throughout their academic terms.
II. Opportunities for Graduates
The program has been designed to prepare its graduates, by means of a
well-rounded theoretical and practical education, to enter the
administrative levels of private and public corporations, institutions, and
agencies. It also prepares students interested in a career in accountancy
to undertake on-the-job training leading to professional certification in
the fields of public or management accounting. Holders of the BBA
degree will normally be exempt from part of the required term of service,
part of the course of study, and some of the examinations prescribed by
the organizations awar ding the professional designations "Chartered
Accountant (CA)", "Certified Management Accountant (CMA)", and
"Certified General Accountant (CGA)". Students interested in the
accounting profession should discuss their interest with their faculty
advisor, or consult the Accounting Associations directly. Inquiries may be
directed to The Atlantic School of Chartered Accountancy, P.O. Box 489,
Halifax, N. S. B3J 2R7; The Society of Management Accountants of New
Brunswick, call (toll free) 1-800- 565-7198; The Certified General
Accountants Association of New Brunswick, P. O. Box 5100, Moncton,
N. B. E1C 8R2.
Operational Research is the professional discipline that deals with the
application of analytical and numerical techniques as well as information
technology to understand and tackle complex decision situations.
Operational Research specialists may work in areas such as consulting,
business process analysis and logistic analysis. Operational Research
techniques can also be effectively combined with specializations in other
areas such as electronic commerce, finance, and marketing. The CORS
Diploma is awarded by the Canadian Operational Research Society
(CORS), in association with recognized Canadian universities, to
students who have completed a program of studies with significant
Operational Research content. For the official requirements for the
CORS Diploma, see the CORS website (www.cors.ca/).
III. Business Administration and Law
BBA students who have completed three years of the BBA program may
be admitted to the UNB Faculty of Law and may qualify for the BBA
degree by successfully completing the first year of the Law program. To
qualify for the BBA, such students must have credit for all of the
REQUIRED courses specified for the BBA degree (except BA 4101 , and
BA 4173 ) and must have a session grade point average of at least 2. 0.
Students must apply to and be accepted by the Faculty of Law. The
current regulations of that Faculty require a minimum grade point
average of 3. 5 (on a 4. scale) before a student without a degree will be
considered for admission. The final grade-point average for degree
purposes will be determined by including the results in the first year of
the Law program as part of the "final" credit hours used.
IV. Certificate Programs in Administration
The University of New Brunswick, Saint John Campus offers five
certificate programs in Administration. This includes a certificate
program in Business Administration Level I and Level II, Accounting,
Electronic Commerce and Human Resource Management.
These certificate programs are designed to provide individuals;
especially working adults, with an opportunity to engage in systematic
and co-ordinated study directed towards an academic goal. Participants
enrolled in the certificate programs will have an opportunity to study the
basic principles of administration and management; to improve their
analytical skills; to increase their awareness of the various factors
contributing to effective decision-making and to understand the basic
functions of organizations.
The certificate programs will be of particular interest to individuals who
are engaged in administration, contemplating a career in administration
or management and wish to expand their knowledge in the related
subject areas.
The courses in the certificate programs are presented at the
undergraduate level of study and provide a framework for theoretical
analysis of general principles of administration through lectures,
discussions and individual study. By combining accumulated work
experience and formal classroom learning, participants will be able to
relate theory and practice as part of their continuing development.
All courses for the certificates are degree-credit courses. Individuals who
successfully complete certificate courses and subsequently are admitted
to a degree program will receive credit towards a degree. Credit will be
granted for those courses accepted by the particular degree program.
Individuals admitted to a BBA degree program will normally be able to
apply certificate courses completed successfully to their degree
program.
For further information on these Certificate Programs please see the
section entitled Certificate Programs in Business Administration, in the
Saint John Programs Section of this Calendar.
V. Graduate Studies in Business
The Faculty of Business offers graduate studies in Business leading to
the Master of Business Administration (MBA) on a full-time or part-time
basis. Students may concentrate in international business or electronic
commerce at the graduate level. Applicants who have previously
received an undergraduate degree and who want to study business
should contact the Faculty of Business at 648-5746 to receive
information on the entrance requirements of the MBA. The full-time
program is a very intensive 12-month, co-op MBA. Part-time students
may choose their courses from evening and Saturday offerings.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
159
SECTION E
VI. University Regulations on Admission and Academic
Regulations
Students are strongly advised to read the General University
Regulations, Section B of this Calendar, and in particular the subsection
headed "Grading and Classification". The General University
Regulations will govern any point not covered in the regulations that
follow. Questions concerning the application of regulations should be
directed to the Registrar.
3.
D.
Course credits may only be transferred from another university
when the grade is equivalent to at least a C at UNB.
At least half the credit hours for the BBA degree must be taken at
UNB and must normally include all the required courses in the
BBA degree program. (Students may be permitted to take some
of these courses elsewhere with the prior permission of the
Faculty of Business and the Registrar.)
E.
Grading and Classification
The regulations in respect to the BBA degree and the Certificates
are expressed in terms of letter grades, credit hours and grade
point averages. These are explained in Section B of the Calendar.
In order to take a Business Administration (BA) course that has a
prerequisite, students must earn a C or better in the prerequisite
course(s), regardless of the program in which the student is
registered.
B.
F.
G.
2.
C.
160
For purposes of the BBA degree, any course taught
outside of the Faculty of Business, which has a course
number ending in and which is taught over the full
academic year, will receive the number of credit hours
normally assigned by the Faculty in which the course is
taught, up to a maximum of 6.
For purposes of the BBA degree, any course taught
outside of the Faculty of Business, which has a course
number ending in other than and which is offered in one
term of the academic year, will receive the number of credit
hours normally assigned by the Faculty in which the course
is taught, up to a maximum of 3.
Grade Point Average
1.
See Section B of this Calendar for detailed regulations on
standing and promotion requirements.
2.
A student who has been registered in the BBA program
and who withdrew while on probation or who was required
to withdraw from the program will not be eligible to re-enter
the program without the approval of the Faculty of
Business.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Normal Course Load
The normal course load for students in the BBA program will be
five courses per term. Students with a cumulative gpa of at least
2. 5 may, with the written permission of the Director of
Undergraduate Studies or the Dean of the Faculty of Business,
take a maximum of six courses in a given term. The normal
course load for studnets accepted into the co-op program is six
courses per term.
Due to differences in the methods used by the various Faculties in
the calculation of credit hours, students who elect to register for
courses taught outside of the Faculty of Business should note the
following:
1.
Changes in Degree Requirements
Improvements in the BBA program may lead to changes in the
requirements for the degree. The University reserves the right to
require candidates already enrolled to meet the revised
requirements.
Credit Hours
The number of credit hours assigned each course is stated in
Section F of this Calendar. (In most cases the Faculty of Business
assigns a 6 ch weight to a two-term course and a 3 ch weight to a
term course.)
The BBA as a Second Degree
Graduates of UNB are required to successfully complete a
minimum of 30 additional credit hours at UNB; graduates of other
recognized universities must successfully complete a minimum of
60 ch at UNB. All graduates must have credit for all the required,
elective and option courses (or their equ ivalent) in the BBA
program, and must comply with the regulations in Section C
above.
VIII. BBA Regulations for Full-time and Part-time Students in
the Degree Program
A.
Transfer Students
The University regulations in respect to students transferring to
the BBA degree program from another UNB degree program and
students transferring to UNB from another university or postsecondary institution are as stated in the General Regulations of
the University.
VII. Graduate of a Community College or Equivalent System
Graduates in Business Technology from the New Brunswick Community
College with a 65% average or equivalent standing over the normal two
years (or equivalent standing from comparable institutions), may be
granted up to 30 ch toward the BBA degree. They will be required to
successfully complete, including any transfer credits, a total of 120 ch in
order to qualify for the BBA degree. Students who have partially
completed such programs may be granted some credit towards the BBA.
Entering students will be advised of their status as provided for in the
General Regulations of the University,Section B of this Calendar. Also,
please consult the calendar section for the Bachelor of Applied
Management Programs.
To earn the BBA degree, a student must successfully
complete at least 120 ch in approved courses and must
achieve a minimum grade of C in all courses designated as
required or elective.
H.
Repeating Courses
A student who fails to obtain a grade of C or better in a required
course must retake the course as soon as it becomes available
during a session in which the student is in attendance.
I.
Majors and Concentrations
1.
See Section XI, regarding the BBA with a major in
Economics.
2.
See Section XII regarding the BBA with a major in French.
3.
See Section XIII regarding the BBA with a minor in French.
4.
See Section XIV regarding the BBA with a major in Human
Resource Management.
5.
See Section XV regarding the BBA with a major in
Accounting.
6.
See Section XVI regarding the BBA with a major in
Electronic Commerce.
SECTION E
7.
8.
A student qualifying for the BBA degree who has met the
requirements for a Single or a Double Major in the
Bachelor of Arts program may request the Registrar to
note on the student's transcript that the Major requirement
in the external discipline has been met. Students are
advised that the Faculty of Business must approve their
entire program with the Major requirement approved by the
external discipline. Note: Students persuing minors or
double majors either within or outside the Faculty of
Business may not double count any course or courses
which may be common to more than one program.
Majors in specific Business disciplines other than HRM,
Accounting and Electronic Commerce are not offered
although a student may concentrate in a particular
Business area (Business and Public Policy, Finance,
Industrial Relations, Marketing, Operations Research or
Organizational Behaviour) or in Computer Science by
selecting appropriate option courses. Students should note
that not all elective or optional courses are offered each
year. The timetable should be consulted for current
offerings.
IX. Degree Standing on Graduation
At graduation all successful candidates for the degree of Bachelor of
Business Administration shall be listed in alphabetical order within the
appropriate degree category as stated below:
a.
Distinction A student who attains a cumulative grade point
average of at least 3. 8 over the final 60 credit hours of course
work and no grade less than C (2. 0) over the final 90 ch of course
work shall graduate with Distinction.
b.
First Division A student who attains a cumulative grade point
average of at least 3. 5 shall graduate in First Division.
c.
Second Division A student who attains a cumulative grade point
average of at least 2. 5 but less than 3. 5 shall graduate in Second
Division.
d.
Third Division A student who attains a cumulative grade point
average of less than 2. 5 shall graduate in Third Division.
X. Business Administration Curriculum and Degree
Requirements
1.
2.
3.
Students must successfully complete at least 120 ch of course
work and must obtain a grade of at least C in all required and
elective courses specifically required for the degree.
The normal course load for students in the BBA program will be
five courses per term. Students with a cumulative gpa of at least
2. 5 may, with the written permission of the Director of
Undergraduate Studies or the Dean of the Faculty of Business,
take a maximum of six courses in a given term.
It is the responsibility of students to ascertain that their elective
and option courses are acceptable for BBA degree credit. Credit
will not be granted for FREN 1103 , CS 1703 , ECON 1004 ,
PSYC 1273 or MATH 1863 in the BBA program. Credit will be
granted for only one of MATH 1003 and MATH 2853 .
Students enrolled in a degree or certificate program under the
aegis of the Faculty of Business are not to register in the following
courses or similar courses without prior permission of the Faculty
of Business. (The content of these courses is similar to required
or option BBA courses.)
PSYC 2901 , PSYC 3913 , STAT 1793 , STAT 3093 .
Note: Students should contact the Faculty of Business at the
beginning of each regular academic year for a revised list of
courses in this category. Courses listed elsewhere in this
Calendar as service courses by other Faculties or Departments
are normally not credits for the BBA degree.
4.
Candidates for the degree must successfully complete the
following credit hours: a) 51 required, b) 18 Business electives, c)
6 Social Science electives, d) 6 Humanities and Languages
electives, e) 39 options, of which a maximum of 18 may be
chosen from Business and a maximum of 12 of the 39 may be at
the introductory level. An elective course is one chosen from a
specified group of courses, e.g. "from Social Science or
Business". An option course is an approved course chosen by the
student from any approved discipline.
Course Requirements
Students are responsible for ensuring that they meet all the requirements
specified for the degree. These include the minimum credit hour
requirements, minimum grade point averages, minimum grades in
specified courses, successful completion of all specifically required
courses and compliance with the restrictions on elective and option
courses as in regulation X. 3. and 4. above.
Students are advised to consult Section F of this Calendar for detailed
course descriptions, including the number of credit hours assigned to
each course.
Example of a Typical Student's Program
(15 ch per term, total 120 ch)
FIRST YEAR: Fall Term
MATH 1853
Math for Business I
ECON 1013
Intro to Economics-Micro
BA 1504
Intro to Organizational Behaviour
Social Science elective*
Humanities or Language Elective*
Winter Term
BA 1605
Business Decision Analysis I
ECON 1023
Intro to Economics-Macro
BA 1216
Accounting for Managers I
Social Science Elective
Humanities or Language Elective
SECOND YEAR:
Fall Term
BA 2858
Personnel Administration
BA 2672
Introduction to Management Information Systems
BA 2217
Accounting for Managers II
BA 2606
Business Decision Analysis II
Business Elective/Option
Winter Term
BA 2303
Principles of Marketing
BA 3623
Management Science: Deterministic Models
Business Electives or Option Courses - 9 ch**
THIRD YEAR
Fall Term
BA 3425
Managerial Finance
Business electives or option courses - 12 ch
Winter Term
BA 3304
Marketing Management
BA 3653
Inroduction & Operations Management
BA 3705
Business Law
Business Electives or Option Courses - 6 ch
FOURTH YEAR
Fall Term
BA 4101
Competitive Strategy
Business Electives or Option Courses - 12 ch
Winter Term
Business Electives or Option Courses - 15 ch
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
161
SECTION E
Notes: * All students must include Math 1853 within their first 30 ch; 6 ch
from the Social Science disciplines of Anthropology, Politics, Psychology
or Sociology within their first 60 ch, and 6 ch from the Humanities and
Languages disciplines of Classics, English, French, German, History,
Humanities, Latin, Philosophy or Spanish within their first 60 ch. **
Option courses may be selected from the offerings of any faculty
provided that the selections are in accord with regulations X. 3 and 4
above, and provided they are approved by the Faculty of Business.
XI. BBA with a Major in Economics
In addition to complying with the existing curriculum requirements and
regulations governing the award of a BBA degree, BBA students wishing
to major in Economics must also comply with the following regulations
and requirements of the Faculty of Business and the Economics
discipline:
a.
Students electing to major in Economics should declare the major
by the beginning of their third year. The Faculty of Business must
approve all courses taken to comply with the major requirement.
b.
In order to earn the major in Economics BBA students must
complete the following:
i.
earn a minimum grade of C in the following compulsory
courses: ECON 2013 , 2023 , 3013 and 3023 ; and
ii.
successfully complete with a grade of C or better 15 ch of
elective Economics courses or approved substitutes from
disciplines other than Economics up to a maximum of 6 ch.
Many upper-level business courses qualify as approved
substitutes; a current list is available from the Faculty of
Business or the Economics discipline.
XIII. BBA with a Minor in French Communication and
Culture
Students completing a French Minor are required to complete at least 12
ch of upper level courses in French Communication and Culture, with a
maximum of 12 ch at the lower level (FR 1203 , 1204 and 2203 , 2204 ).
FR 3203 and FR 3204 will be required; the remaining 6 ch will be chosen
from advanced courses. A minimum grade of C, in lower level courses,
and C, in upper level courses, is required. The Minor must be declared at
the same time as the Major. Students who have completed FR 1304 and
FR 2304 and are admitted into FR 3203 will also do 12 ch in upper level
courses.
XIV. BBA with a Major in Human Resource Management
In addition to complying with the existing curriculum requirements and
regulations governing the award of a BBA degree, BBA students wishing
to major in Human Resource Management must also comply with the
following regulations and requirements.
a.
Students electing to major in Human Resource Management
should declare the major by the beginning of their third year. The
Faculty of Business must approve all courses taken to comply
with the major requirement.
b.
In order to earn the major in Human Resource Management, BBA
students must:
Note: Students may not double count courses required for the
general BBA.
i.
maintain a minimum 3.0 (B) grade point average in the 24
ch of courses (ii, iii), whether completed at UNB or their
approved equivalents taken elsewhere. Relevant courses
transferred from elsewhere will be assessed for purposes
of averaging by the Faculty involved at the time the major
is applied for; and
ii.
earn a minimum grade of C in the following compulsory
courses: BA 1504 , 2758 , 2858 , 3813 , 4129 , and 4898 ;
and
iii.
earn a minimum grade of C in six credit hours of electives
chosen from the following: BA 4813 , 3715 , 4853 , 4854 ,
4855 , 4856 , 4858 and 4866 .
XII. BBA with a Major in French Communication and Culture
In addition to complying with the existing curriculum requirements and
regulations governing the award of a BBA degree, BBA students wishing
to major in French must also comply with the following regulations and
requirements of the Faculty of Business and the French discipline:
a.
b.
Students electing to major in French Communication and Culture
should declare the major by the beginning of their third year. All
courses taken to comply with the major requirement must be
approved by the Department of Humanities and Languages and
by the Faculty of Business.
i. A BBA student who wishes to major in French Communication
and Culture will normally have completed 12 ch in French (FR
1203 , 1204 and 2203 , 2204 ) and have received a grade of C or
above. A student who has successfully completed a school
French immersion program may begin a major in French
Communication and Culture following completion of FR 1304 and
2304 with a grade of B or above. Students receiving a grade
between C and B- in FR 2304 and would normally proceed to FR
2203 and 2204 . A BBA with a major including French
Communication and Culture will consist of at least 24 ch of upper
level French courses.
ii. All students must earn a grade of C in FR 3203 , FR 3204 , FR
4204 and one of 3704 , 3714 , 3724 and 12 ch of approved
French Communication and Culture upper-level electives, six
from Group A, six from Group B. (Please consult the Bachelor of
Arts degree, major in French, for a complete listing of Groups A
and B courses.)
162
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
XV. BBA with a Major in Accounting
In addition to complying with the existing curriculum requirements and
regulations governing the award of a BBA degree, BBA students wishing
to major in Accounting must also comply with the following regulations
and requirements.
a.
Students electing to major in Accounting should declare the major
by the beginning of their third year. The Faculty of Business must
approve all courses taken to comply with the major requirement.
b.
In order to earn the major in Accounting, BBA students must in
addition to the general requirements of the BBA degree:
i.
earn a minimum grade of C in the following compulsory
courses: BA 1218 , 3224 , 3235 , 3236 , 4207 , 4221 ,
4223 , 4229 ; and
ii.
earn a minimum grade of C in one of the following elective
courses: BA 4237 , 4238 , 4242 ;
iii.
earn a minimum grade of C in one of the following elective
courses: BA 4418 , 4437 , 4448 , ECON 3114 or other
approved finance course.
SECTION E
XVI. BBA with a Major in Electronic Commerce
In addition to complying with the existing curriculum requirements and
regulations governing the award of a BBA degree, BBA students wishing
to major in electronic Commerce must also comply with the following
regulations and requirements.
a.
b.
Students electing to major in Electronic Commerce should declare
the major by the beginning of their third year. The Faculty of
Business must approve all courses taken to comply with the
major.
In order to earn the major in Electronic Commerce, BBA students
must:
i.
earn a minimum grade of C in the following compulsory
courses: BA2123 , BA2663 , BA3125 , BA3305 , BA3718
and BA4506 ;
ii.
earn a minimum grade of C in six credit hours of elective
courses chosen from the following: BA3126 , BA3328 ,
BA4108 , BA4109 , BA4126 , BA4223 , BA4866 , CS2773 ,
ICS2001 or any other 6 credit hours on approval of the
Faculty.
SECOND YEAR
Fall Term (September - December)
BA 2858
Personnel Administration
BA 2672
Introduction to Management Information Systems
BA 2217
Accounting for Managers II
BA 2606
Business Decision Analysis II
Business Electives or Optional Courses - 6 ch
Winter Term (January - April)
Work Term I
Spring/Summer Term (May - August)
BA 2303
Principles of Marketing
BA 2903
Work Term Report I
BA 3623
Management Science: Deterministic Models
BA 3425
Managerial Finance
Business Electives or Option Courses - 9 ch
BBA CO-OP OPTION
THIRD YEAR
Fall Term (September - December)
Work Term II
The Curriculum
Winter Term (January - April)
The Faculty of Business offers a Co-operative Education option within
the BBA program. While the program is designed to be completed in four
years, students may take longer to complete the program. Students may
also major and take the Co-op option. Consistent with the philosophy of
Co-operative education, the program is designed to alternate study
terms and relevant work terms, as follows:
Co-op Program Academic / Work Term Sequence
Fall
Winter
Spring/Summer
May-Aug
Sept-Dec
Jan-April
Year 1
Academic Term 1
Academic Term 2
Year 2
Academic Term 3
Work Term 1
Academic Term 4
Year 3
Work Term 2
Academic Term 5
Work Term 3
Year 4
Academic Term 6
Academic Term 7
Every co-op student shall complete three work terms with full-time
academic semesters directly before and after each work term. The co-op
program considers students full-time if they are enrolled in at least 12
credit-hours of course-work, not including the work term reports: BA
2903 , BA 3903 or BA 4903 . Academic course requirements and work
terms are listed in Table A.
TABLE A: Example of a typical student's program:
FIRST YEAR
Fall Term (September - December)
BA 1504
Intro to Organizational Behavior
MATH 1853
Math for Business I
ECON 1013
Intro to Economics - Micro
Social Science elective*
Humanities or Language Elective*
Winter Term (January - April)
BA 1605
Business Decision Analysis I
ECON 1023
Intro to Economics - Macro
BA 1216
Accounting for Managers I
Social Science elective*
Humanities or Language Elective*
BA 3304
Marketing Management
BA 3653
Production and Operations Management
BA 3705
Business Law
BA 3903
Work Term Report II
Business Electives or Option Courses - 9 ch
Summer Term (May - August)
Work Term III
FOURTH YEAR
Fall Term (September - December)
BA 4101
Competitive Strategy
BA 4903
Work Term Report III
Business Electives or Option Courses - 15 ch
Winter Term (January - April)
Business Electives or Option Courses
Notes:
* All students must include Math 1853 within their first 30 ch; 6 ch chosen
from the Social Science disciplines of Anthropology, Political Science,
Psychology or Sociology within their first 60 ch, and 6 ch from the
Humanities and Languages disciplines of Classics, English, French,
German, History, Humanities, Latin, Philosophy or Spanish within their
first 60 ch.
** Option courses may be selected from the offerings of any faculty
provided that the selections are in accord with regulations X. (3) and (4)
of the Business Administration Curriculum and Degree Requirements of
the university calendar, and provided they are approved by the Faculty of
Business.
The sequence of academic terms and work terms outlined above is not
flexible. Only in unusual circumstances will the Director or Coordinator of
the Co-op Program approve deviation from the regular sequence.
If students' course selections deviate from the schedule above they are
responsible for obtaining academic advising from either a Faculty of
Business or Co-op advisor. Students are responsible for their own
academic planning and course selection.
Each work term is normally 12 to 16 weeks in duration.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
163
SECTION E
Admission
Students must apply for the Co-op program during their second
semester. Entrance to the Co-op program is a four-step process, as
follows:
Step One: Academic Achievement - Obtain a B- (2.7) average* or higher
after their first year to be eligible for the entry-level Professional
Development Workshop Series.
Step Two: Professional Development - Successfully complete all
required elements of the entry-level professional development seminars.
Step Three: Mock Job Interview - Pass a mock job interview
Step Four: The Job Competition - Obtain a position for Work Term One.
Students who are unsuccessful in any one of the four steps will remain in
the traditional BBA program.To remain eligible for each Co-op work term,
students must attend and complete assignments for all mandatory
professional develop seminars in academic terms three, four and five.
For additional details and for information pertaining to transfer students,
please read the Co-op students' handbook available from the Faculty of
Business, P.O. Box 5050, Saint John, N.B., E2L 4L5. Web address:
www.business.unbsj.ca
Admissions Policy for International Students Entering the
BBA Co-op Program
In addition to the above criteria, students require a TOEFL score of 550
to enter the BBA Co-op program if English is not their first language.
Advancement
To complete the program and earn a Co-op designation, students must
•
•
•
•
maintain a minimum GPA of 2.7 (B-) throughout the program
successfully complete all PDSs
perform satisfactorily in all three work terms
obtain a grade of C or higher on three work term reports
If a student's GPA falls below 2.7 but not lower than 2.5 in any academic
semester directly before or after the work terms, he/she will be placed on
co-op program probation. For additional information, please refer to the
co-op students' handbook.
Work Term Reports
The work term report plays a pivotal role in the success of our Cooperative Education Program. Work term reports BA 2903 , BA 3903 and
BA 4903 are written during the first, second and third work terms
respectively. They are required courses carrying 1 credit hour each and
requiring a minimum grade of C.
5.
6.
Students who do not abide by Co-op Program regulations set out in the
calendar and the Co-op Students' Handbook, available from the Co-op
Office, will be asked to withdraw from the Co-op Program.
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The University of New Brunswick, Saint John Campus offers five
certificate programs. This includes a certificate program in Business
Administration Level I and Level II, Accounting, Electronic Commerce
and Human Resource Management.
These certificate programs are designed to provide individuals;
especially working adults, with an opportunity to engage in systematic
and co-ordinated study directed towards an academic goal. Participants
enrolled in the certificate programs will have an opportunity to study the
basic principles of administration and management; to improve their
analytical skills; to increase their awareness of the various factors
contributing to effective decision-making and to understand the basic
functions of organizations.
The certificate programs will be of particular interest to individuals who
are engaged in administration, contemplating a career in administration
or management and wish to expand their knowledge in the related
subject areas.
The courses in the certificate programs are presented at the
undergraduate level of study and provide a framework for theoretical
analysis of general principles of administration through lectures,
discussions and individual study. By combining accumulated work
experience and formal classroom learning, participants will be able to
relate theory and practice as part of their continuing development.
All courses for the certificates are degree-credit courses. Individuals who
successfully complete certificate courses and subsequently are admitted
to a degree program will receive credit towards a degree. Credit will be
granted for those courses accepted by the particular degree program.
Individuals admitted to a BBA degree program will normally be able to
apply certificate courses completed successfully to their degree
program.
GENERAL REGULATIONS
The following regulations apply to the certificate programs in business:
1.
Students must achieve a grade of C on BA 2903 , BA 3903 and BA 4903
to be allowed to continue in the program.
Students who withdraw or are required to withdraw from the co-op
program before they have completed BA 2903 , BA 3903 and BA 4903
may not use the credit from BA 2903 and/or BA 3903 and/or BA 4903 in
conjunction with a lab credit toward their BBA degree.
1.
2.
3.
4.
164
Professional Development Seminars
Providing feedback to students in order to help them improve
performance
Employer recruitment
Organizing job interviews with employers
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
a.Certificate in Business Administration Level I, Certificate in
Accounting, Certificate in Electronic Commerce and
Certificate in Human Resource Management:
A maximum of 50% of total program requirements may be
transferred from another degree, certificate or similar program
whether taken at the University of New Brunswick or elsewhere.
However, 50% of the required business courses must be taken at
the University of New Brunswick. Courses taken more than five
years ago will be approved on an individual basis.
b. Business Administration Certificate Level II:
A maximum of 75% of total program requirements may be
transferred from another degree, certificate or similar program
taken at the University of New Brunswick. For students
transferring credits from outside the University of New Brunswick,
only 50% of total program credits will be transferable. However,
50% of the required business courses must be taken at the
University of New Brunswick. Courses taken more than five years
ago will be approved on an individual basis.
The Co-op Fee
A comprehensive Co-operative Education Program includes many
important components. Each component provides tangible benefits
which are not offered to students in the traditional BBA program.
Information on fees may be found in Section C of this calendar. Cooperative Education fees are used to develop and support the following
areas:
Mid-Work term performance evaluations
Heightening the profile of our co-op program with schools,
businesses, and community
2.
Each student entering a certificate program on a full-time basis
must have the prior approval of the Faculty of Business.
3.
A certificate will not be awarded to a student enrolled for a
degree, but students who have withdrawn from an undergraduate
degree program may apply for the appropriate certificate.
SECTION E
4.
To earn the Certificate in Business Administration Level I, Level II,
the Certificate in Accounting, or the Certificate in Electronic
Commerce a student must successfully complete the number of
credit hours in approved courses specified for the certificate,
achieve a grade of at least C in all specifically required courses
and achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0.
5.
To earn the Certificate in Human Resource Management, a
student must achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least
3.0 (B) over 24 credit hours required, (excluding BA 1605 and BA
2606), whether completed at the University of New Brunswick or
elsewhere. Relevant courses transferred from elsewhere will be
assessed for purposes of averaging by the Faculty involved at the
time the certificate is applied for.
6.
There is no minimum age and no specific prerequisites for
entrance into the Business Administration Certificate Level I,
Level II or the Certificate in Accounting. Admission information
concerning the Certificate in Electronic Commerce is shown on
page 7 and the Certificate in Human Resource Management on
page 9. Although, there are no specific entrance requirements for
the Business Administration Certificate Level I, Level II or the
Certificate in Accounting students will undertake university-level
study and assignments demanded in degree-credit courses.
Some courses such as Finance, Computer Science and
Quantitative Methods require at least a background knowledge of
high school mathematics.
GENERAL INFORMATION
Admission::
The certificate programs are open to all interested individuals. With the
exception of the Certificate in Electronic Commerce and the Certificate in
Human Resource Management, there are no specific academic
prerequisites for students enrolled in the business certificate programs
on a part-time basis, only a desire and willingness on the part of the
student to engage in learning at a university level. However, students
engaged in full-time study must receive Faculty approval to be admitted
to the program.
Application forms are available from the Admissions Office
(506-648-5674).
Additional Information:
A brochure entitled Certificate Programs in Administration provides full
information on regulations and course requirements and can be obtained
by dialing (506)648-5570 or 1-800-50-UNBSJ or by writing to The
Faculty of Business, University of New Brunswick, P.O. Box 5050, Saint
John, NB, E2L 4L5, or emailing business@unbsj.ca.
Business Administration Certificate Level I
NOTES:
A.
Students wishing to proceed to the degree in Business
Administration (BBA) should select ECON 1013 and 1023 as part
of their Business Administration Certificate Level I requirements.
B.
Although, the usual math prerequisites are waived for certificate
students, it is recommended that students planning to proceed
with the following: Business Administration Certificate Level II,
Human Resource Management Certificate or the BBA or BAM
degrees choose Math 1853 as an elective before studying BA
1216 and BA 1605 . Most business courses have prerequisites.
Students who do not have credit for grade 12 academic math and
who intend to continue on to the BBA degree are urged to take
MATH 1863 as one of their Business Administration Certificate
Level I electives.
Please note that although MATH 1863 is a credit towards the Certificate,
it cannot be used as a credit towards the BBA, or BAM degrees.
Business Administration Certificate Level II
REQUIREMENTS:
The requirements for the Business Administration Certificate Level II are
stated in terms of cumulative credit hours. The 30 credit hours required
for the Business Administration Certificate Level I are included as part of
the stated requirement of 60 credit hours for the Business Administration
Certificate Level II.
A Business Administration Certificate Level II will be awarded to
individuals who:
a.
b.
achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 over the
60 credit hours required, and
successfully complete (with a C or better):
BA 1216
Accounting for Managers I
BA 1504
Introduction to Organizational Behaviour
BA 1605
Business Decision Analysis I (Note C)
BA 2217
Accounting for Managers II
BA 2303
Principles of Marketing
BA 2606
Business Decision Analysis II
BA 2858
Personnel Administration
BA 3425
Managerial Finance
Plus six credit hours in Economics
( ECON 1013 and 1023 or ECON 2103 and 3114 )
(See Note A.)
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
6 ch
Plus a total of 30 credit hours in Arts (Humanities, Social Science,
Languages and Mathematics), Business Administration, Computer
Science, Data Analysis, Engineering or Science. (See Notes A & B).
30 ch
60 ch
REQUIREMENTS:
NOTES:
A Business Administration Certificate Level I will be awarded to
individuals who:
A.
Students who plan to enrol in the Business Administration degree
program (BBA) after completing the Business Administration
Certificate Level II are advised to elect MATH 1863 (if necessary),
MATH 1853 , ECON 1013 and ECON 1023 as part of their
certificate program.
B.
Six (6) credit hours in Humanities or Languages and six (6) credit
hours from Psychology, Sociology or Political Science must be
completed within the Business Administration Certificate Level I
requirements and/or the 30 optional credit hours of Business
Administration Certificate Level II.
C.
The normal prerequisite will be waived for students registered in
this program.
a.
b.
achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 over the
30 credit hours required, and
successfully complete (with a C or better):
BA 1216
Accounting for Managers I (See note B)
BA 1504
Introduction to Organizational Behaviour
BA 2217
Accounting for Managers II
BA 2303
Principles of Marketing
BA 3425
Managerial Finance
Plus six credit hours in Economics
( ECON 1013 and 1023 or ECON 2103 and 3114 )
Business elective
Plus six credit hours of non-business courses to be approved
by the Faculty of Business (See note B).
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
6 ch
3 ch
6 ch
30 ch
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
165
SECTION E
Certificate in Accounting
Certificate in Human Resource Management
REQUIREMENTS:
Admission to the Certificate in Human Resource Management program
will require a minimum of either:
A Certificate in Accounting will be awarded to individuals who:
a.
achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 over the
34 credit hours required, and
b.
successfully complete (with a C or better):
BA 1216
BA 1218
BA 1605
BA 2217
BA 3224
BA 3235
BA 3236
BA 3425
BA 4221
BA 4223
BA 4229
BA 4238
Accounting for Managers I
Accounting Lab
Business Decision Analysis I (Note C above)
Accounting for Managers II
Accounting for Managers III
Intermediate Accounting I
Intermediate Accounting II
Managerial Finance
Advanced Management Accounting
Accounting Information Systems
Advanced Accounting
Auditing
3 ch
1 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
34 ch
Certificate in Electronic Commerce
1.
30 credit hours at a recognized postsecondary institution with a
minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.7 (B-) or
2.
At least two years' relevant work experience in the human
resource area to be approved on an individual basis by the Dean
in consultation with Human Resource Management faculty.
Because the courses offered in this program are largely upper level, the
above admission criteria will be waived only in the most exceptional
circumstances.
REQUIREMENTS:
The Certificate in Human Resource Management will require the
successful completion of 10 term courses (30 credit hours) as detailed
below. For those candidates who have already received credit for more
than fifteen credit hours of required courses, course selections may be
made from the list of electives as replacements for any credit hours
above fifteen.
A Certificate in Human Resource Management will be awarded to
individuals who:
a.
achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 (B) over
24 credit hours required, (excluding BA 1605 and BA 2606),
whether completed at University of New Brunswick or elsewhere.
Relevant courses transferred from elsewhere will be assessed for
purposes of averaging by the Faculty involved at the time the
certificate is applied for; and
b.
successfully complete (with C or better):
Admission to the Certificate in Electronic Commerce program will require
a minimum of either:
1.
30 credit hours at a recognized post secondary institution with a
minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.7 (B-) or
2.
At least one year's relevant work experience in the electronic
commerce area to be approved on an individual basis by the
Dean in consultation with the Electronic Commerce faculty.
Because the courses offered in this program are largely upper level, the
above admission criteria will be waived only in the most exceptional
circumstances.
REQUIREMENTS:
A Certificate in Electronic Commerce will be awarded to individuals who:
a.
achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 over the
33 credit hours required, and
b.
successfully complete (with a C or better):
BA 1216
BA 1504
BA 2123
BA 2303
BA 2663
BA 2672
BA 3125
BA 3305
BA 3718
BA 4506
Plus
BA 3126
BA 3328
BA 4108
BA 4109
BA 4223
BA 4866
CS 2773
ICS 2001
166
Accounting for Managers
Introduction to Organizational Behaviour
Introduction to Electronic Commerce
Principles of Marketing
Technology Fundamentals of Electronic Commerce
Introduction to Management Information Systems
Industry Impact of Electronic Commerce
Marketing on the Internet
Legal, Privacy and Security Issues in Electronic
Commerce
Organizations and Electronic Commerce
3 credit hours of electives chosen from the following:
Frontiers in E-Commerce I
Consumer Behaviour
Management of New Enterprise
Management of Online Business
Accounting Information Systems
Management of Technology
Java Programming for the Internet
Introduction to Information and Communication
Studies
Or any other three hours on approval
Total elective credit hours
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
BA 1504
BA 1605
BA 2606
BA 2758
BA 2858
BA 3813
BA 4129
BA 4898
Plus 6 credit hours of electives chosen from the following:
BA 4813
Negotiations and Dispute Resolution
BA 4853
Recruitment and Selection
BA 4854
Training and Development
BA 4855
Compensation Structure Development
BA 4856
Evaluating and Rewarding Employee
Performance
BA 4858
International Human Resource
Management
BA 4866
Management of Technology
Total elective credit hours
3 ch
NOTES:
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
A.
3 ch
3 ch
33 ch
Introduction to Organizational Behaviour
Business Decision Analysis I (See Note A)
Business Decision Analysis II
Employment Law
Personnel Administration
Introduction to Industrial Relations
Research Methodology
Strategic Human Resource Policy
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
6 ch
30 ch
The normal prerequisite will be waived for students registered in
this program.
SECTION E
BACHELOR OF COMPUTER SCIENCE BACHELOR OF DATA ANALYSIS
BCS students taking Computer Science should refer to the Fredericton
Degree Programs section of this Calendar, Bachelor of Computer
Science. First and second year courses for the degree are available on
the Saint John campus; a limited section of third and fourth year courses
are also available. A typical first year course load would include five
courses per term as follows:
CS 1073
General Information
The Data Analysis program is by design an interdisciplinary program
involving core courses taken primarily from Mathematics, Statistics,
Computer Science and Data Analysis. The core subjects are particularly
relevant to the collection, treatment and analysis of data encountered in
other academic disciplines as well as in business, industry, government
and other areas. Emphasis is placed on the statistical methods and
modern computing techniques of handling these data and the design
and application of mathematical models.
Intro to computer Programming in
Java
(1st term)
CS 1083
Computer Science Concepts (Java)
(2nd term)
MATH 1003
Intro to Calculus I
(1st term)
MATH 1013
Intro to Calculus II
(2nd term)
CS 1303
Discrete Structures I
(1st term)
General Regulations
One
1000 level science course chosen
from:
(both terms)
It is recommended that students read the General University
Regulations, Section B of the calendar, and in particular the subsection
headed 'Grading System and Classification.
Biology, Chemistry, Geology or
Physics
One
One
1-2000 level course chosen from:
This four year degree program is offered in cooperation and in
conjunction with other Departments on the campus.
Curriculum
Humanities, Social Sciences or
Business Admin
(both terms)
Elective
(both terms)
The basic curriculum of the degree consists of a specified set of core
courses and a set of regulations governing the choice of others. A
student's program is chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor.
I. Required Courses
MATH 1003 , 1013 , 2003 ; at least one of MATH 2013 , 2213 ; STAT
1793 , 3083 , 3093 ; DA 4993 ; CS 1073 , 1083 , 1303 , 2013 , 3113 ; at
least one of CS 2113 , DA 3053 .
II. Regulations Governing Course Selection
1.
At least 12 ch of courses selected from CS 3033 , 3323 , 3513 ,
3813 , 3913 , 4033 .
2.
At least 6 ch of courses selected from DA 4203 , 4243 , STAT
3703 , 4043 , 4703 .
3.
At least 6 ch of courses selected from DA 4123 , MATH 3703 ,
3303 , 3343 .
4.
At least 9 ch of additional credits chosen from upper level
Computer Science, Data Analysis, Mathematics and Statistics
courses.
5.
At least 6 ch from each of two disciplines' offerings excluding
Mathematics, Computer Science, Statistics, and Data Analysis.
6.
At least 12 ch of upper level courses in a single discipline other
than Mathematics, Computer Science, Statistics, and Data
Analysis.
7.
At least 30 ch of additional credits, chosen in consultation with the
Department of Computer Science and Applied Statistics or the
Department of Mathematical Sciences.
8.
For students admitted to the programme before May 2003, a
grade of C or better is required in any CS, MATH, STAT, or DA
course used as a prerequisite. Effective for students admitted to
the programme in May 2003 or after, a grade of C or better is
required in all required courses, all courses selected under II.1 II.6, all courses used toward a major, and all CS, MATH, STAT, or
DA courses.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
167
SECTION E
An example of what would typically be taken by a student in the
first year of the degree program follows:
MATH 1003
Intro to Calculus I
(1st term)
MATH 1013
Intro to Calculus II
(2nd term)
CS 1303
Discrete Structures I
(1st term)
CS 1073
Intro to Computer Programming in Java
(1st term)
CS 1083
Computer Science Concepts (Java)
(2nd Term)
Plus electives equivalent to 5 term courses.
prerequisites, but only a desire and willingness on the part of each
student to engage in learning at a university level.
All courses in the certificate program (with the exception of MATH 1863 )
are degree credit courses and, subject to any minimum grade
requirements, can be used as credit courses in the Bachelor of Data
Analysis degree.
A certificate will be awarded to a student upon successful completion of
the program.
General Regulations
Computer Science Major
A student in the BDA degree who wishes to major in Computer Science
must complete the following courses:
a.
b.
c.
MATH 2213
CS 2003 , 2303 , 2403 , 2803 , 3323 , 3513 , 3813 , 3913 , 4613
Three upper-level CS or DA courses chosen in consultation with
the Department of Computer Science and Applied Statistics.
These courses are in addition to those in (a)-(b). CS 3893 and CS
4525 highly recommended.
Economics Major
1.
Each person entering the program must have the approval of the
Department of Computer Science and Applied Statistics or the
Department of Mathematical Sciences.
2.
A maximum of 12 ch or the equivalent may be transferred from
another degree or similar program, whether taken at this
university or elsewhere.
3.
A certificate will not be awarded to a student enrolled for a degree
but students who have withdrawn from an undergraduate degree
program may apply for the certificate.
4.
Normally a student must have grade 12 mathematics to enter the
program. Math 1863 may be taken as one of the optional courses
in the certificate program by those students who do not have
grade 12 mathematics from high school or feel that they are weak
in the subject. It should be noted that MATH 1863 does not count
as a credit course in the BDA degree.
5.
To earn a certificate a student must successfully complete 34 ch
in approved courses specified for the certificate and must achieve
a grade point average of at least 2.0. It should be noted that
students must obtain a grade of C or better in certain courses if
they are to be used as prerequisites for subsequent courses.
A student in the BDA degree who wishes to major in Economics must
complete a minimum of 36 ch in Economics as follows:
a.
b.
ECON 1013 , 1023 , 2013 , 2023 , 3013 , 3023
At least 18 ch in additional upper level Economics courses, to be
chosen in consultation with the Department of Social Sciences.
Mathematics Major
A student in the BDA degree who wishes to major in Mathematics must
complete a minimum of 48 ch in Mathematics or approved substitutes as
follows:
a.
b.
c.
MATH 1003 , 1013 , 2003 , 2013 , 2203 , 2213
MATH 3213 , 3713 , 3733 , STAT 3083 , 3093
At least five upper level Mathematics courses. A maximum of two
courses from CS 3113 , DA 4123 , and an upper level Statistics
course may count toward the five courses.
Requirements
Students must complete at least 34 ch as follows:
1.
MATH 1003 :
Intro to Calculus I
STAT 1793 :
Intro to Applied Statistics
3 ch
CS 1073 :
Intro to Computer Programming in
Java
4 ch
Suggested elective for first year is STAT 1793 (or equivalent).
2.
3 ch
One of:
At least two courses in Computer Science are required.
CS 2513 :
Intro to Information Systems
4 ch
Statistics Major
DA 2503 :
Packaged Software Decision Aids
4 ch
3.
A student in the BDA degree who wishes to major in Statistics must
complete a minimum of 48 ch in Statistics or approved substitutes as
follows:
a.
b.
c.
MATH 1003 , 1013 , 1703 , 2003 , 2013 , 2213 , STAT 1793
MATH 3713 , 3733 , STAT 3083 , 3093
At least five upper level Statistics courses. A maximum of two
courses from DA 4203 , 4243 and an upper level Mathematics
course may count towards the five courses.
4.
The Certificate in Data Analysis is offered to afford individuals an
opportunity to study the basic skills in mathematics, statistics, computer
science and data analysis. The program will be of particular interest to
those who wish to gain an insight into the way in which computer
programs are developed and how they can be used effectively in the
analysis of both scientific and business data.
Subject to the General Regulations listed below, the certificate program
is open to all interested individuals. There are no specific academic
168
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
MATH 1013 :
Intro to Calculus II
3 ch
MATH 1703 :
Discrete Structures I
4 ch
CS 1083 :
Computer Science Concepts (Java)
4 ch
CS 2013 :
Software Engineering I
4 ch
CS 2503 :
Intro to Information Processing
4 ch
Other choices may be approved in consultation with the
Department of Computer Science and Applied Statistics or the
Department of Mathematical Sciences.
At least two courses in Computer Science are required.
Certificate in Data Analysis
At least 9 ch
chosen from
Sufficient additional credits, chosen in consultation with the
Department of Computer Science and Applied Statistics or the
Department of Mathematical Sciences, to bring the total to 34 ch.
Further information may be obtained by contacting the Department of
Computer Science and Applied Statistics or the Department of
Mathematical Sciences.
SECTION E
BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCES
BACHELOR OF NURSING DEGREE
To enrol in the Bachelor of Health Sciences (BHS) degree, students
must be enrolled in a Canadian Medical Association (CMA) accredited
program in Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Therapy, Respiratory Therapy
or Radiography or have completed such an accredited program.
Program Goal
Note: 75 credit hours are required to be taken at UNB and 75 credit
hours are allotted on successful completion of the accredited program.
Proof of acceptance to or completion of the accredited program must be
submitted to the Registrars Office before entrance to the BHS program
will be granted.
Students entering the University who have not yet been admitted to an
accredited program should enrol in the B.Sc. program.
Required Courses:
YEAR 1:
•
•
•
•
•
MATH 1003 / 1013 ,
BIOL 1001 / 1012 / 1017 ,
CHEM 1041 / 1046 / 1072 / 1077 ,
PHYS 1000 ,
PSYC 1003 / 1004 .
YEARS 2, 3, and 4:
In addition to the requirements of the appropriate accredited program,
students must complete the following University courses:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BA 1504
one of NURS 2031 , CPW 1001 or CPW 1002
one of CS 1703 or CS 1803
STAT 2263
one of PSYC 3383 , PSYC 3692 , PSYC 3711 , PSYC 3723 ,
PSYC 3724 or PSYC 3752 (PSYC 3711 is strongly
recommended)
NURS 3144
PHIL 3133 and PHIL 3134
HSCI 4091 and HSCI 4092
one (3ch) elective of 3000 level PSYC courses listed above, or
3ch of 3000/4000 level NURS courses, or 3ch of 3000/4000 level
BIOL courses
one (3ch) elective (any level)
Bachelor of Health Sciences Post Diploma Program
This program is open only to students who hold a diploma from an
appropriate accredited program and are qualified to practice (as
recognized by the appropriate national and provincial bodies) in an area
of health sciences in which a BHS is offered.
Course requirements are the same as for the regular BHS degree,
however students who have previously completed a first year of
university studies at an Association of Universities and Colleges of
Canada (AUCC) recognized university may apply for credit toward the
BHS degree. Credit will be granted only for those courses which are
essentially equivalent to Year 1 BHS courses as listed above.
Students must begin in the program by Fall 2004 and complete all of the
program requirements by Spring 2010.
The goal of the Nursing Programs at UNBSJ is to educate caring
professional nurses. Faculty believe that professional nursing
encompasses three interrelated areas of competency: utilization of
knowledge (knowing); accountable actions (doing); and atti tudes and
ethics expected of a nurse beginning to practice (being).
Basic BN Program
In 1989, the membership of the Nurses' Association of New Brunswick
(NANB) voted to establish a baccalaureate degree in Nursing as the
entry level to the profession by the year 2000. On December 15th, 1994,
the Minister of Advanced Education and Labor announced the
government's support of this goal by transferring the total responsibility
for nursing education in New Brunswick to the universities. In the Fall of
1995, the Basic Nursing Program at the Saint John campus of UNB
admitted its first students.
The basic degree program spans four years of general and professional
education. On completion of the program, graduates are eligible to write
the Canadian Nurses Association Testing examinations to procure
registration in the Province of New Brunswick. Those who are successful
are eligible to obtain registration across Canada and in other countries
through reciprocal agreements.
UNBSJ's four-year basic Baccalaureate Program in Nursing includes a
majority of course work in nursing, and courses from the liberal arts and
sciences. Many nursing courses provide opportunities for clinical
practice. Students work with individuals, families, groups and
communities, and with persons at various stages of the life cycle and in a
variety of settings.
Costs
There are costs in addition to those listed in Section C of this Calendar.
For example, costs associated with intersession, preceptorship and
room and board for off-campus placements may be incurred. Uniforms,
equipment, nursing pin, registration examination fees, CPR Certifications, and travel costs to and from practice areas are expenses unique to
the Nursing program.
Credit Hour Requirements for Nursing Programs
Basic Degree Program
Minimum 146 ch
BN/RN Program
Minimum 66 ch
University Regulations
It is advisable to read carefully Section B of this Calendar, General
University Regulations, and in particular the subsection headed Grading
and Classification.
Transfer and mature students are particularly advised to consult Section
B. Students applying for a second undergraduate degree will take
Nursing courses and the required Arts and Science courses in the
program, if they have not already taken them. Questions concerning the
application of re gulations must be made to the Registrar in writing.
Any point not covered in the following regulations will be governed by the
General University Regulations.
General Regulations
1.
A student whose session assessment grade point average (the
May/ April period; for definition, see Standing and Promotion
Requirements in Section B of this Calendar) falls:
a.
b.
below 2.0 but above 1.6 will be placed on academic
probation; if in any subsequent session the grade point
average falls below 2.0 the student will be required to
withdraw from the program.
below 1.7 will, subject to review by the Nursing
Department, be required to withdraw from the program.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
169
SECTION E
2.
3.
A student who twice fails to achieve at least a "C" grade in any
Nursing course will be required to withdraw from the Nursing
program.
A student must receive at least a "C" grade or a clinical "pass"
a.
b.
in each required Nursing course before proceeding to
ensuing Nursing courses and
in all required non-nursing courses, except electives,
before proceeding to the next year of Nursing courses.
4.
A student repeating a Nursing course may, at the discretion of the
Nursing Department, also be required to repeat the Nursing
course that immediately preceded it. and
5.
Basic degree students must complete the program within 6 years
of enrolment. and
6.
The requirements for the Basic degree are 100 ch in courses
taught by Nursing Faculty and 46 ch in courses provided by other
faculties. and
Curriculum for BN (Basic) Students
(See Section H for descriptions of these courses.)
Year I
Term 1: PSYC 1003 (3 ch); NURS 1011 (3 ch); NURS 1032 (4 ch);
NURS 1042 (3 ch); BIOL 1411 (3 ch); BIOL 1416 (2 ch).
Term 2: PSYC 1273 (3 ch); NURS 1022 (3 ch); NURS 1023 (3 ch);
BIOL 1412 (3 ch); BIOL 1417 (2 ch) Open Elective* (3 ch).
Year II
Term 1: BIOL 2831 (3 ch); Writing Designated Course (3 ch);
NURS 2020 (3 ch); NURS 2030 (3 ch); NURS 2041 (4 ch).
Term 2: BIOL 2852 (3 ch); Writing Designated Course (3 ch); NURS
2132 (3 ch); NURS 2020 (3 ch); NURS 2030 (3 ch); NURS 2031 (4 ch).
Following Term 2: NURS 2063 (5 ch).
Year III
Term 1: STAT 2263 (4 ch); BIOL 3251 (3 ch); NURS 3072 (3 ch); NURS
3073 (3 ch); NURS 3092 (3 ch).
Term 2: Open Elective* (3 ch); NURS 4111 (3 ch); NURS 4121 (3 ch);
NURS 4123 (6 ch).
Following Term 2: NURS 3103 (5 ch).
Year IV
Term 1: Open Elective* (3 ch); Open Elective* (3 ch); NURS 3061 (3 ch);
NURS 3062 (3 ch); NURS 3144 (3 ch); NURS 4142 (3 ch).
Term 2: NURS 4132 (3 ch); NURS 4133 (2 ch); NURS 4152 (7 ch);
Nursing Elective (3 ch).
*At least 3 ch must be beyond an introductory level. Only 3 of the 4
electives may be chosen from the same discipline.
170
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Bachelor of Nursing Degree for Registered Nurses
This program is for graduates of two- and three-year diploma programs.
Requirements for admission are as stated in the University Regulations
for Nursing. Applicants must have successfully completed a diploma
program in nursing and be eligible for active registration with the Nurses
Associ ation of New Brunswick prior to being admitted to the Post-RN
(BN/ RN) Program.
Many students choose to pursue this degree on a part-time basis. Parttime students are advised to apply for admission to the BN/RN program
as soon as they take their first university course.Part-time students will
normally be required to complete 3 ch of university course work with a
cumul ative grade point average of 2.0 or better before enrolling in the
introductory Nursing course. Full time BN/RN students must complete
the Program within 6 years of enrollment. Part-time BN/ RN students
must complete the Program within 10 years of enrolling in the first
nursing course.
Required Non-Nursing Courses (15 ch)
BIOL 2831 , 2852 (6 ch); Faculty approved Writing course(s) (6 ch);
STAT 2263 or equivalent (3 ch).
Electives (18 ch)
At least 3ch of these electives must be a nursing elective, and at least 9
ch must be non-nursing electives.
Required Nursing Courses (33 ch)
(See Section H of the Calendar for course descriptions)
NURS 2011 (3 ch); NURS 2031 (4 ch); NURS 3144 (3 ch); NURS 3092
(3ch); NURS 4142 (3 ch); NURS 4111 (3 ch); NURS 4112 (3 ch); NURS
3061 (3ch); NURS 3062 (3 ch); NURS 4132 (3 ch); NURS 4133 (2ch).
Nursing Electives (available in the BN and the BN/RN Programs):
A series of electives in both clinical and non-clinical areas will be
developed based on faculty expertise and societal trends. (Subject to
enrolment limitations, faculty resources, and prior faculty approval, thes
e Nursing electives may be open to students not enrolled in the BN or
BN/RN programs.)
Students may choose from the following (additional Nursing Electives
are listed in the Fredericton section of the Calendar). Only select nursing
electives will be available in any academic year.
NURS 4184
Professional Values/Ethical Issues
NURS 4234
Independent Study
NURS 4254
Issues in Transcultural Health
Certificate Programs
The Faculty of Nursing offers certificates in Mental Health Nursing and
Critical Care Nursing which are open to BN/RN students and BN
graduates. For further information contact the Department of Nursing.
SECTION E
BACHELOR OF RECREATION AND
SPORTS STUDIES
NOTE: This calendar copy has been revised based on changes to the
Kinesiology degree programs approved by the Fredericton Senate (See
Section G of this Calendar). At the time of printing of this calendar it is
subject to approval by the Saint John Senate. Students are advised to
contact the Department of Social Science for details.
•
Bachelor of Recreation and Sport Studies
•
•
•
•
•
General Information
English 122 (minimum grade of 60%)
Advanced Math 120
One of: Biology 120, Chemistry 122, Physics 122
3 electives
Minimum Admission Average: 65 per cent
Transfer Students
The Faculty of Kinesiology on the Fredericton campus offers two, fouryear degree programs: Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology and a
Bachelor of Recreation and Sport Studies. In addition, each degree
program offers second year students an opportunity to apply for a
concurrent degree in Education (five-year duration). The Faculty of Arts
on the Saint John campus offers the first year of the four-year program
for both of these programs. The Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology
[BScKin] has one concentration, while the Bachelor of Recreation and
Sport Studies [BRSS], offers five concentrations: recreation and sport
studies, recreation and sport management, outdoor recreation, tourism,
and recreation and aging. Each curriculum is designed to prepare
students for a variety of vocational careers and/or further study at the
graduate level. The programs will prepare students for career
opportunities in coaching, sport management, recreation management
and program services, outdoor recreation and tourism, health related
professions (e.g. fitness and wellness consulting), teaching physical
education and related careers, as well as for further study in kinesiology.
Students interested in becoming elementary or secondary physical
education teachers and coaches in school systems, can select either the
BScKin or BRSS degree program. The BScKin degree program is
intended for those students who are interested in having their teachable
minor in Science, while the BRSS degree program is intended for those
students who are interested in a teachable minor in Arts or Humanities.
Students apply to the Faculty of Education for the concurrent program
during their first year. The application deadline for the concurrent
BScKin/BEd program is January 31 of each year. If students are not
accepted into the concurrent program or they decide they wish to teach
after they graduate, they may apply to the consecutive Education degree
program. The BEd degree program taken after the BScKin or BRSS
degree normally requires 60 ch of study at UNB.
University Regulations
Any point not covered in the following regulations will be governed by the
General University Regulations as stated in Section B of this Calendar.
Questions concerning the application of regulations should be directed
to the Registrar in writing.
Conditions Regarding Admission to the BScKin Program
All admissions are on a competitive basis; satisfaction of minimum
requirements does not guarantee admission. Normally, no more than
100 students will be admitted to first year in the Faculty of Kinesiology in
any academic year. This figure provides for the accommodation of up to
20 students at the Saint John campus.
Effective for admission September 2002 -- MINIMUM requirements
for admission to the first year, required academic subjects from New
Brunswick schools. Please refer to UNB calendar for other regulations.
•
Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology
•
English 122 (minimum grade of 60%)
•
Advanced Math 120
•
Chemistry 122
•
Biology 120 or Physics 122
•
2 electives
•
Minimum Admission Average: 65 per cent
1.
A minimum session grade point average of 2.0 is required for a
student to be considered for transfer into one of the Faculty's
programs.
2.
Normally a student will not be allowed to transfer into the Faculty
mid-way through the academic year.
3.
In addition to scholastic record, a transfer applicant's record of
participation and interest in the "Kinesiology", "Recreation", and
"Sport Science" field is also considered for admission.
4.
Students presently registered in the Faculty will continue to be
governed by the regulations in effect when they first registered.
Students who were formerly in the Faculty and apply for readmission, if accepted, will be governed by the regulations in
effect at the time of their re-admission.
Time Limitation
The maximum time period permitted between the first registration in the
BScKin degree program and the completion of the BScKin degree shall
be eight (8) years. Normally, BScKin students who are re-admitted within
this time frame must complete the degree requirements in effect at the
last re-admission. Effective for incoming students, 1993.
BScKin as a Second Degree
In addition to the University's regulations for a second undergraduate
bachelor's degree as specified in the UNB Undergraduate Calendar, the
Faculty of Kinesiology requires that any student accepted into the
BScKin degree program as a second undergraduate bachelor's degree
be required to: (a) Complete at least thirty-six (36) credit hours of
courses, and (b) Complete the requirements of the BScKin program.
The Faculty of Kinesiology, in cooperation with other campus academic
units, offers a comprehensive selection of curricular programs and
courses to meet the needs of students interested in: sport science,
recreation and leisure, exercise science, sport management, wellness,
coaching, gerontology and physical education teacher preparation.
For more information about attending UNB, send an email to: Director of
Undergraduate Studies, Jeffrey J. Burkard (mailto: jb@unb.ca); or Stella
Keays, Coordinator of the Faculty's Undergraduate Student Support
Services at 506-453-4575 (mailto: skeays@unb.ca) or Dean,
Christopher L. Stevenson mailto: cls@unb.ca.
General Regulations
Grade Point Averages
1.
The method of calculating grade point averages is explained in
Section B (Grading System and Classification) of this Calendar.
2.
To earn a BScKin degree, a student must have successfully
completed a minimum 134 ch of approved courses.
3.
Students should refer to Section B of this Calendar for regulations
regarding academic probation and withdrawal.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
171
SECTION E
Policy on Grades
YEAR 1 (36 ch) [FOR STUDENTS AT THE SAINT JOHN CAMPUS]
BScKin students must obtain a grade of "C" or better in required degree
program courses. These courses include:
A. CORE PROGRAM (total 75 ch)
a.
all first year required courses
First Year (36 ch)
b.
all required core courses
c.
Exercise and Sport Science Advanced Electives
Note: Kin1001 is considered to be pre-requisites or co-requisites to all
other KIN and RSS courses. Students receiving a final grade of "D" in
KIN1001 may repeat KIN1001 as a co-requisite to other second year
KIN and RSS courses.
Repeating Courses
1.
2.
Regulations pertaining to repeating courses can be found in
Section B of this Calendar.
Any required courses not successfully completed during a given
year must be attempted not later than the next academic year,
except by special permission of the Director of Undergraduate
Studies.
Intersession / Summer Session Courses
BScKin students who wish to take Intersession and/or Summer Session
courses that are to be credited towards their degree should first consult
with their Faculty Advisor and then must obtain permission in advance of
course registration from the Faculty's Director of Undergraduate Studies
or designate.
Practica and Directed Studies
1.
Normally, students may elect a maximum of twelve (12) ch from
practica/internship courses, i.e., KIN 3900 (12), KIN 3913 (3), KIN
3914 (3), KIN 3923 (3), KIN 3953 (3), KIN 3954 (3), KIN 4900
(12), KIN 4910 (6), KIN 4950 (6), and RSS 3100 (12).
2.
Normally, students may elect a maximum of six (6) ch from
directed study courses, i.e., KIN 4903 (3), KIN 4904 (3), and from
Special Activity courses, i.e., KIN 2831 (1), KIN 2832 (1), KIN
3831 (2), KIN 3832 (2), and from Leadership courses, i.e., KIN
2861 (1), KIN 2862 (1), KIN 3861 (2), and KIN 3862 (2).
Approval of Elective Courses
Advice concerning elective courses will be provided by members of the
Faculty. All elective courses require approval of the Faculty.
Normal Workload
A "normal" student workload is considered to be 19-20 ch per term, or
38-40 ch per year (not including Intersession and Summer School).
Permission from the Director of Undergraduate Studies is required to
exceed 20 ch per term or 40 ch in any given academic year.
BScKin Year Designation Based On Credit Hours
For the purposes of on-line registration and administrative operations
BScKin students shall be considered as in:
1.
Second year after the student has successfully completed 27 ch
toward their BScKin
2.
Third year BScKin after the student has successfully completed
57 ch toward their BScKin
3.
Fourth year BScKin after the student has successfully completed
87 ch towards their BScKin
CURRICULUM
General Notes
1.
The minimum credit hour total to graduate with a BRSS is 133 ch.
2.
Students must complete at least 48 ch of KIN/RSS 3000-4000
level (including required and elective) courses in order to
graduate with the BRSS degree.
172
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
KIN 1001
BIOL
ENGL
Non RSS/KIN
Introduction to Kinesiology
1551 / 1012 / 1711 / 1752 / 2025
1200 / 1500
Psychology/Sociology/Philosophy
Electives
3 ch
6 ch
6 ch
6 ch
15 ch
Note: Upon transferring to Fredericton for the second year of the BRSS
degree program, students from the Saint John campus must select the
following courses to complete their first year requirements:
2 of
KIN 2081 / 2093 / 2002 ( RSS 2042 )
6 ch
KIN/RSS
Activities
1 ch
YEARS 2 - 4 (32 ch)
1 of
KIN 2023
KIN 2032
RSS 2062
KIN 2011
RSS 2032
RSS 4092
KIN
KIN 3001
STAT 2043
STAT 3043
KIN 2081 / 2093 / 2022 ( RSS 2042 )
Intro to Sociology of Sport
Intro to Psychology of Sport 3ch
Psycho-Social Aspects of Leisure
Intro Sport & Rec Management
Recreation Program Planning
Senior Seminar in Recreation and Leisure
Studies
Activity Labs
Introduction to Research Methods in
Kinesiology
Statistics for Social Scientists I
Statistics for Social Scientists II
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
2 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
B. PROGRAM / MINORS: (each program / minor is 66 ch)
BRSS students select either the Recreation/Sport Studies Program OR
one of the following Minors: Recreation & Sport Management, Outdoor
Recreation, Tourism, and Recreation and Aging.
RECREATION/SPORT STUDIES PROGRAM
Select 1 course from each of the following categories:
15 ch
Category 1 KIN 3002
Sport History in Canada
RSS 3042 History of Parks and Recreation in
Canada
KIN 3011
Comparative Programs in Physical
Education, Recreation and Sport
KIN 3093
Introduction to Ethics of Sport and
Recreation
Category 2 KIN 3031
Exercise Psychology
RSS 3062 Psychological Aspects of Leisure
KIN 3032
Sport Psychology
Category 3 KIN 3022
Power & Ideology in Recreation
and Sport Institutions
RSS 3021 Sociology of Leisure
KIN 3123
Careers of Elite Athletics:
Sociological Analysis
KIN 3223
Sport & Religion: A Sociological
Perspective
KIN 4242
Gender, Sport and Leisure
Category 4 KIN 4011
Facility Planning and Design for
Physical Education and
Recreation
KIN 4412
Leadership Principles and
Practices
RSS 2052 Foundations of Tourism
RSS 2302 Outdoor Recreation
RSS 3072 Planning Principles and Processes
SECTION E
RSS 4311
KIN 3111 /
RSS 3052
RSS 3061
Category 5 KIN 3041
KIN 3141
KIN 3242
KIN 4041
TOURISM MINOR
Outdoor Recreation: Facility
Planning & Design
Recreation, Sport and the Law
Required
Courses
ADM 2313
RSS 3051
RSS 3061
RSS 3072
KIN 4412
Recreation Delivery Systems
Adapted Physical Activity
Wellness in Aging: An Holistic
Approach
Physical Activity & the Older Adult
Developmental Coordination
Disorders in Children
RSS/KIN ELECTIVES
NON RSS/KIN ELECTIVES
Either RSS/KIN ELECTIVES or NON RSS/KIN ELECTIVES
TOTAL:
18 ch
15 ch
18 ch
132 ch
RECREATION & SPORT MANAGEMENT (Business Minor)
Required Courses:
ADM 2313
RSS 3051
RSS 3061
RSS 3072
KIN 4412
RSS 3100
RSS 4081
RSS 4053
RSS 3052
BUSINESS MINOR
RSS/KIN or NON RSS/
36 ch
Principles of Marketing
Advanced Management
Delivery Systems
Planning Process
Leadership Principles &
Practices
Internship
Marketing
Financial Mgt. of Rec &
Sport Org
Recreation. Sport & Law
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
18 ch
KIN Electives
9 ch
132 ch
RSS 3100
KIN 4093
Principles of Marketing
Advanced Management
Delivery Systems
Planning Processes
Leadership Principles &
Practices
Internship
Seminar on Health Care
Ethics
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
12 ch
3 ch
Minor
Courses
KIN 3141
KIN 3242
GERO 2013
GERO 2023
GERO/SOCI/
PSYCH
RSS/KIN or NON RSS/
TOTAL:
Wellness & Aging
Phys Act & Older Adult
Approved Electives
3 ch
3 ch
3h
3 ch
12 ch
KIN Electives
12 ch
132 ch
12 ch
Honours Program : BRSS
3 ch
3 ch
Students with a minimum CGPA of 3.5 may apply to enter the Honours
program in the BRSS degree after completing at least 57 ch of their
degree program.
Minor
Courses
Outdoor Recreation
Parks & Protected
Spaces
RSS 4311 Facilities
RSS 4331 Interpretation
BIOL 2113 Ecology
FOR/BIOL/ ECON / ENV
Approved Electives
RSS/KIN or NON RSS / KIN Electives
TOTAL:
Intro to Economics: Macro
Foundations of Tourism
at UNBSJ
54 ch
ADM 2313
RSS 3051
RSS 3061
RSS 3072
KIN 4412
51 ch
RSS 2302
RSS 3303
12ch
3 ch
3 ch
Required
Courses
OUTDOOR RECREATION MINOR
RSS 3100
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
RECREATION AND AGING MINOR
132 ch
Principles of Marketing
Advanced Management
Delivery Systems
Planning Processes
Leadership Principles &
Practices
Internship
ECON 1023
RSS 2052
Tourism
Courses
RSS/KIN or NON RSS/
TOTAL:
21 ch
9 ch
Required
Courses
Principles of Marketing
Advanced Management
Delivery Systems
Planning Processes
Leadership Principles &
Practices
Internship
Marketing
Financial Mgt of Rec &
Sport Org
Minor
Courses
3.ch
TOTAL
ADM 2313
RSS 3051
RSS 3061
RSS 3072
KIN 4412
RSS 3100
RSS 4081
RSS 4053
12 ch
3 ch
3 ch
KIN ELECTIVES
57 ch
To graduate with a BRSS Honours students must meet the following
requirements:
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
9 ch
15 ch
132 ch
1.
Maintain a minimum CGPA of 3.5 in all required courses in the
BRSS, and
2.
Maintain a minimum CGPA of 3.5 in all advanced (3000 & 4000)
level courses, and
3.
Complete RSS 4900 : Honours Research Project, and
4.
Complete a minimum of 48 ch of courses at or above the 3000
level (KIN /RSS and/or non-KIN/RSS courses).
5.
Complete KIN 3001 as a prerequisite, or as a co-requisite to
RSS4900 .
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
173
SECTION E
Concurrent Bachelor of Recreation and Sport Studies/
Bachelor of Education Program (BRSS/BEd)
The BRSS and BEd Concurrent program is designed as a five year
program to allow students to complete a degree program in Recreation/
Sport Studies and Education that prepares them to teach physical
education in a variety of learning environments. This program is based
on the integration of the BRSS and BEd programs. Students should
complete a teachable minor in addition to Recreation and Sport Studies
with the appropriate selection of elective courses.
Admission Procedures
1.
2.
KIN 1001
Introduction to Kinesiology
3 ch
BIOL
1711 and 2792
4 ch
ENGL
1200 / 1500
6 ch
Psychology/Sociology/Philosophy
6 ch
Electives*
15 ch
Non RSS/KIN
Note: Upon transferring to Fredericton for the second year of the BRSS
degree program, students from the Saint John campus must select the
following courses to complete their first year requirements:
2 of
KIN 2081 / 2093 / 2002 ( RSS 2042 )
6 ch
BIOL
2792
4 ch
Students may apply to the Faculty of Education Concurrent
Program during their second term (deadline is January 31) and,
upon successful completion of at least 30 ch, may be admitted to
the concurrent BRSS/BEd degree program. Students should be
able to complete both degrees within five years.
KIN/RSS
Activities
1 ch
Concurrent Program Requirements
2.
First Year (34 ch)
Students apply for entry to the BRSS degree program upon
completion of their high school program.
3.
Students may enter the Concurrent program later in their
academic program, however, late entry may require more than five years
to complete both degrees.
1.
REQUIRED BRSS CORE: (total 81 ch)
Students in the BRSS/BEd concurrent program will follow the
BRSS (Sport/Recreation Studies Concentration), and in addition
will complete 60 ch of Education courses. Fifteen (15) ch of
Education courses may be Non-RSS/Kin Elective courses.
A student cannot receive a BEd degree by itself in this program. If
a student withdraws from the concurrent program back into the
BRSS degree a maximum of 15 ch of education courses may be
transferred for BRSS credit.
YEARS 2 - 4 (36 ch)
1 of
KIN 2081 / 2093 / 2022 ( RSS 2042 )
(remaining course not taken in 1st yr)
3 ch
KIN 2023
Intro to Sociology of Sport
3 ch
Intro to Psychology of Sport 3ch
3 ch
RSS 2062
Psycho-Social Aspects of Leisure
3 ch
KIN 2011
Intro Sport & Rec Management
3 ch
RSS 2032
Recreation Program Planning
3 ch
KIN 3001
Introduction to Reserach Methods in
Kinesiology
3 ch
STATS 2043
Statistics for Social Scientists I
3 ch
STATS 3043
Statistics for Social Scientists II
3 ch
RSS/KIN
Restricted Electives
(for Recreation/Sport Studies Concentration)
Required BRSS/KIN & BEd Courses (total 120 ch)
YEARS 2 - 4
KIN 2051
Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries
KIN 2062
Introductory Biomechanics
4ch
3ch
KIN 2072
Introduction to Motor Control and
Learning
3ch
KIN 3081
Introductory Exercise Physiology
3ch
KIN 3041
Adapted Physical Activity
3ch
RSS/KIN
Activity Labs
8ch
Non KIN/RSS
Electives*
36ch
Education
Courses
60ch
Note: *24 ch of the 45 ch of Non-RSS/KIN courses must be teachable
courses.
174
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
SECTION E
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Students are strongly encouraged to read Section B of the Calendar for
general regulations governing the degree. General information on the
B.Sc. degree can also be found in Section G. of the Calendar.
In the Faculty of Science, Applied Science and Engineering, the
minimum acceptable grade in a required course or course being used as
a prerequisite is normally a grade of "C". Any student who fails to obtain
a "C" or better in such a course must repeat the course (at the next
regular session) until a grade of "C" or better is attained. Students will not
be eligible for graduation until such deficiencies are removed, unless the
course is a normal part of the final year of the program, and is being
taken for the first time in the final year.
Students in the degree programs of Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of
Science in Computer Science, Bachelor of Data Analysis, and Bachelor
of Nursing, who complete the requirements for approved minor
programs at UNB, will receive recognition of the minor upon completion
of the respective degree program.
BIOLOGY, ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY, AND MARINE
BIOLOGY OPTIONS
Honours and Majors Programs
Students planning on specializing in Biology, Environmental Biology or
Marine Biology are requested to seek counselling within the Department
of Biology. Courses required in the second year should normally be
taken before the third year, and must be completed by the end of the
third year. Students honouring in Biology, Environmental Biology or
Marine Biology must take BIOL 4090 as one of their advanced Biology
courses.
Students should note that courses offered by other disciplines form an
important complementary part of the overall course of studies.
BIOLOGY OPTION
CURRICULUM
The following courses are required for all Biology, Majors and Honours
students:
First Year
First Year
All properly qualified students entering the first year of the BSc program
will normally complete the following courses:
1.
2.
CHEM 1041 , 1046 , 1072 , 1077 , MATH 1003 , 1013 , PHYS
1000* .
Two of: BIOL 1001 , 1012 , 1017 , GEOL 1044 , GEOL 1074 , a
minimum of 6ch in approved electives.
* PHYS 1000 is not required for B.Sc. Biology, Marine Biology,
Environmental Biology, Psychology or Biology-Psychology degrees.
Note 1: All BIOL and GEOL courses listed above must be completed
before graduation except for Saint John Majors in Marine Biology,
Mathematics, Statistics, Psychology and Biology-Psychology.
Note 2: Students transferring to the Fredericton campus who have
successfully completed BIOL 1001 , 1012 , 1017 and who will be taking
no further Biology courses beyond first year will be allowed to complete
the first year Fredericton Biology requirements by enrolling in BIOL
1006.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Second Year
1.
2.
3.
BIOL 2125 , 2485 , 2585 , 2615 , Plus one of either 2015 , 2065 or
2245 .
CHEM 2401 or 2441 , STAT 2264 .
A minimum of 9 ch in approved electives.
It is expected that students will take a minimum of 36 ch during their
second year.
Third and Fourth Years
1.
42 ch of advanced Biology courses. This can include BIOL 4090
and the two remaining second year elective Biology courses (
BIOL 2015 , 2065 or 2245 ).
2.
18 ch of approved electives with at least a minimum 12 ch being
from non-Biology electives.
3.
A total of at least 136 ch is required for graduation.
Second and Succeeding Years
In the second and succeeding years sixteen options are available to the
students. Eight of these, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Biology,
Geology, Marine Biology, Physics, Psychology, Mathematics and/ or
Statistics lead naturally to specialization. Six interdepartmental
programs, Biology-Chemistry, Biology-Mathematics/ Statistics, BiologyPsychology, Chemistry-Geology, Chemistry-Mathematics, and
Chemistry-Physics are available. The remaining option, General
Science, avoids specialization by providing a variety of choice in both
Science and Arts electives.
BIOL 1001 , 1012 , 1017 .
CHEM 1041 , 1046 , 1072 , 1077 .
MATH 1003 , 1013 .
GEOL 1044 , 1074 .
And a minimum of 6 ch in approved electives, for a total of 40 ch.
Biology Majors can specialize in General Studies or Zoology. Information
on the specific courses required for each of these specializations is
available from the Department of Biology. Biology Majors completing
more than 50 ch of upper level Biology courses must add these extra
credit hours to the total required for graduation.
Note: Students should note that the full four years required for a Major in
Mathematics, Statistics, Psychology, Biology, Marine Biology,
Environmental Biology, Biology - Psychology, Data Analysis and
Computer Science, may be completed on the Saint John campus and
that the Environmental Biology and Marine Biology programs are offered
only on the Saint John campus. The full four years of a General Science
option are also offered at Saint John.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
175
SECTION E
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY OPTION
CHEMISTRY OPTION
All properly qualified students entering the first year of the BSc
Environmental Major program will normally complete the following
courses:
Three program are offered: Major, Honours and Honours Co-op. All
three programs have national accreditation under the Chemical Institute
of Canada and are acceptable for graduate work in Chemistry and/or
Chemistry related fields.
First Year
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
BIOL 1001 , 1012 , 1017 , 1302
CHEM 1041 , 1046 , 1072 , 1077
GEOL 1044
ECON 1013 , 1023
MATH 1003
A minimum of 3 ch in approved electives, for a total of 38 ch. 3
Second Year
1.
2.
3.
4.
BIOL 2125 , 2485 , 2585 , 2615 , plus one of BIOL 2015 , 2065 ,
2245
CHEM 2401 , 2416 , 2422 , 2457
STAT 2264
ECON 3755
Third and Fourth Years
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
BIOL 3055 , 3565 , 4825 , 4855 , 4861 , 4875
SOCI 1000
13 ch upper level Biology Grouped Electives
6 ch electives non-Biology science courses, 6 ch electives Arts or
Business, 12 ch electives.
A total of at least 141 ch is required for graduation.
The minimum credit hour requirements beyond first year are:
Major:
67 ch Chemistry, 6 ch Mathematics,
21 ch approved electives (total 94 ch)
Honours:
73 ch Chemistry, 6 ch Mathematics,
21 ch approved electives (total 100 ch)
Honours Co-Op: 73 ch Chemistry, 6 ch Mathematics,
21 ch approved electives (total 100 ch) and two
work terms
Note: A minimum of 12 ch of the 21 ch of electives must be from the
Faculty of Arts. 6 ch of the Faculty of Arts courses must be chosen from
English 1200 , English 1500 Philosophy 2110 , 3241 , 3242 , Psychology
3752 or equivalents.
Major and Honours Program Second Year
CHEM 2201 / 2222 , 2237
Inorganic Chemistry
CHEM 2401 / 2422 / 2416
Organic Chemistry
CHEM 2601 / 2622 / 2637
Physical Chemistry
MATH 2003
Intermediate Math I or equiv.
MATH 2213
Linear Algebra or equiv.
Plus approved electives.
MARINE BIOLOGY OPTION
All properly qualified students entering the first year of the BSc Marine
Biology program will normally complete the following courses:
First Year
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
BIOL 1001 , 1012 , 1017 , 1202 .
CHEM 1041 , 1046 , 1072 , 1077 .
MATH 1003 , STAT 2264 .
GEOL 1044 .
A minimum of 6 ch in approved electives, for a total of 38 ch.
Second Year
1.
2.
3.
BIOL 2125 , 2485 , 2585 , 2615 , plus one of BIOL 2015 , 2065 or
2245 .
CHEM 2401 or CHEM 2441 .
STAT 3264.
It is expected that students will take a minimum of 36 ch during their
second year.
Third and Fourth Years
1.
BIOL 3173 plus 42 ch from advanced Biology courses. This can
include BIOL 4090 and the two remaining second year elective
Biology courses (BIOL 2015, 2065 or 2245). 30 ch must be from
courses designated as having a marine content including BIOL
3165 , 3215 , 3605 , 3645 , 3663 , 3685 , 3755 , 4765 , 3955 ,
4215 , 4565 , 4592 , 4645 , 4775 .
2.
18 ch of approved electives with at least a minimum 12 ch being
from non-Biology electives.
3.
A total of at least 138 ch is required for graduation.
Note Concerning Transfer to the Fredericton Campus
Students are strongly advised to seek academic advising from a member
of the Biology Department on the Fredericton Campus prior to
commencing the transfer process.
176
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Honours Program
Entry to the Honours program in second year is allowed, provided the
prerequisite content has been met and a minimum cgpa of 3.0 has been
obtained for all subjects taken within the degree program. A sessional
gpa of 3.5 must be maintained in subsequent years. A student may be
permitted to continue in the Honours program with a cgpa of 3.0 to 3.5
on a provisional basis, with the permission of the Department. The
graduating Honours student must obtain a minimum cgpa of 3.5 for
Division I standing and a minimum of 3.0 for Division II standing.
Students should apply in writing to the Chair, Physical Sciences
Department, no later than August 15th in any given year.
Honours Co-Op Second Year
In addition to courses listed above in Second Year, CHEM 2909
Workterm I (Summer after second year) is required.
Note: It is strongly recommended that Honours Co-Op students choose
CHE 1004 , 2004 , 2503 and CS 1003 among their electives.
SECTION E
GEOLOGY OPTION
MATHEMATICS AND ECONOMICS OPTIONS
Major Program
The Geology major program requires concentration in Geology courses
in the second, third, and fourth years. The second year program exposes
the student to a broad spectrum of Geology courses and lays a common
groundwork for all students. In the third and fourth years, further
specialization in one of the sub-disciplines is allowed, but not mandatory.
Students must consult with the Department prior to registration in the
major program.
Honours Program
The minimum requirements are the same as the Geology majors
program, with the addition of a Thesis Project GEOL 4900 .
Second Year
The motivation for the program is to equip students with the necessary
analytical skill to pursue a graduate degree in either Economics or
Mathematics. The combination of mathematics in their economics
courses and the rigorous techniques from mathematics will aid students
in their problem -solving skills.
First Year (Minimum 39 ch)
As required under the B.Sc. General regulations.
Students are strongly advised to take the required courses ECON 1013/
1023 in their first year.
Second Year (30 ch)
GEOL 2201 , 2212 , 2131 , 2142 , 2321 , 2703 ; MATH 2003 , 2013 or
2503 , 2513 ; CHEM 2601 / 2622 .
MATH 1703 , 2003 , 2013 , 2213 , ECON 2013 , 2023 , plus approved
electives ( STAT 1793 recommended) including a first-level course in
computer programming.
A minimum of one half course (3 ch) approved by the Department.
Third and Fourth Years (69 ch)
GENERAL SCIENCE OPTION
Students taking the General Science option as offered on the Saint John
campus are subject to all the general regulations which apply to students
in the BSc program (except that the requirements for the first two years
are considered as one unit).
First Two Years (Minimum 72 ch)
During the first two years of the program (or their equivalent), students
must successfully complete a minimum of 72 credit hours as follows:
BIOL 1001 , 1012 , 1017 or GEOL 1044/1074 (see Note 1); CHEM 1041
, 1046 , 1072 , 1077 , MATH 1003 , 1013 ; PHYS 1000 ; CS 1803 (or
equivalent); plus an additional minimum of 24 ch from BIOL, CHEM,
GEOL, MATH, PHYS, PSYC or STAT (see Note 2); plus 9 ch selected
from Arts, Business, Computer Science or Data Analysis.
Final Two Years (Minimum 72 ch)
During the third and fourth years of the program (or their equivalent),
students must successfully complete a minimum of 72 ch as follows: A
minimum of 48 ch at the upper level (courses at the 3 or 4 level) selected
from BIOL, CHEM, MATH, PSYC and STAT, with at least 12 ch from
each of two disciplines but no more than 24 ch in any one discipline. A
minimum of 24 ch of approved electives, at any level, of which 12 ch
must be selected from Arts, Business, Computer Science or Data
Analysis. Suggested elective courses: PHIL 1053 , PHIL 2110 , PHIL
3241 , PHIL 3242 .
Note 1: Both the BIOL 1001 , 1012 , 1017 combination and
GEOL 1044 , 1074 must be completed before graduation. The course
not taken as part of the compulsory requirements in the first two years
can be used to fulfil part of the approved electives at any time in the
program.
Note 2: Courses in the first two years should be selected in a manner
which allows progression to the areas of concentration planned for the
upper years.
For graduation, students will be listed in three divisions as for other BSc
students, but a student achieving a cumulative grade point average of
3.5 or better will graduate with distinction.
Note 3: The General Science options offered on the two campuses differ
from one another. The regulations governing the General Science option
offered at UNBF are given in Section G.
Economics Requirements:
ECON 3013 , 3023 plus 21 chs of economics courses or approved
substitutes. ECON 3665 is highly recommended.
Mathematics Requirements:
MATH 3713 , 3303 , STAT 3083 , 3093 ;
Three chosen from: MATH 3073 , 3243 , 3503 , 3733 , CS 3113.
Three chosen from: DA4203 , 4243 , STAT 3383 , 3713 , 4043 , 4703 .
Plus an additional 12 ch of electives at any level.
Note:
1.
2.
Credit will not be given for both STAT 4703 and ECON 4645 .
Students who are interested in pursuing graduate work in
Mathematics must take MATH 3733 .
MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS OPTIONS
MATHEMATICS MAJOR
First Year (Minimum 39 ch)
As required under the BSc general regulations. Students are strongly
advised to take MATH 1703 in first year.
Second Year (Minimum 30 ch)
MATH 2003 , 2013 , 2213 plus electives equivalent to seven term
courses.
Third Year and Fourth Year (Minimum 69 ch)
MATH 3713 , 3733 , STAT 3083 , 3093 plus 18 ch of upper level MATH
courses. A maximum of two courses from CS 3113 , DA 4123 , and an
upper level STATS course may contribute to these 18 ch.
Plus 30 ch of upper level (3-4000 level) elective courses approved by the
department.
Plus an additional 9 ch of electives at any level.
NOTE:
a.
Suggested elective for first year is, STAT 1793 .
b.
At least 6 ch of Computer Science are required in the program.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
177
SECTION E
STATISTICS MAJOR
PSYCHOLOGY OPTION
First Year (Minimum 39 ch)
General Information and Curriculum
As required under the BSc general regulations. Students are strongly
advised to take CS 1303 and STAT 1793 as the electives in first year.
Third Year and Fourth Year (Minimum 69 ch)
The Psychology discipline offers Majors and Honours Bachelor of
Science degrees. Course requirements common to the Majors and
Honours BSc degree are as follows:
•
PSYC 1003 , 1004
•
PSYC 2102
•
PSYC 2901
•
PSYC 3913 (in second or third year)
•
PSYC 4503 (in third or fourth year)
MATH 3713 , 3733 , STAT 3083 , 3093 plus 15 ch of upper level STATS
courses A maximum of two courses from DA 4203 , 4243 and an upper
level MATH course may contribute to these 15 ch.
Each degree program requires the equivalent total of 20 full courses and
course selection for each program should conform to the following
pattern.
Plus 33 ch of upper level (3-4000 level) elective courses approved by the
department.
First and Second Year
•
BIOL 1001 , 2615
•
CHEM 1041 , 1046 , 1072 , 1077
•
MATH 1003 , 1013
•
PSYC 1003 , 1004 , 2102 , 2901 (or equivalent)
•
1 additional full course equivalent in Psychology.
•
2 full course equivalents from list A.
•
1 1/2 full course equivalents as electives.
Second Year (Minimum 30 ch)
MATH 2003 , 2013 , 2213 plus electives equivalent to seven term
courses.
Plus an additional 9 ch of electives at any level.
Note: At least 6 ch of Computer Science are required in the program.
PHYSICS OPTION
Two programs are offered:
Third and Fourth Year
•
5 1/2 full course equivalents in Psychology .
•
2 full course equivalents from List A (1 full course equivalent must
be from either the third or fourth year).
•
2 1/2 full course equivalents as electives from either the third or
fourth year.
1.
Honours: This program is designed primarily for qualified
students intending to pursue a postgraduate education. The
Honours program requires more specialization and a greater
overall course load than the Major program.
2.
Major: The Major program allows a wider choice of courses
outside the Physics Department and a somewhat reduced course
load.
Biology
In addition a student may specialize in Physics or Applied Physics. The
Applied Physics program may be entered by any student with a
satisfactory record in either first year Science or first year Engineering. It
is recommended that students in Applied Physics take, CS 1003 in the
first year. The Applied Physics program is not an Engineering program
and does not satisfy the requirements for a P.Eng. qualification.
Second Year
The normal second year program requires the following: PHYS 2011 ,
PHYS 2022 , PHYS 2041 , PHYS 2055 , PHYS 2975 , MATH 2003 2013
or equivalent, MATH 2213 , plus approved electives totalling at least 4
ch. Recommended electives include CS 3113 and STAT 3083 . Students
at the Saint John Campus may defer PHYS 2041 (which is not normally
offered at Saint John) until their third year, or may take CHEM 2601 2622
in lieu. Students entering second year from Engineering will be required
to complete, prior to graduation, BIOL 1001 1012 1017 and GEOL 1044 /
1074 or approved equivalents. Students who have taken CHEM 1882
will be required to complete CHEM 1041 and CHEM 1046 . Applied
Physics students must choose MATH 2503 / 2513 and take CS 1003 (if it
has not been taken in first year). Electives for Applied Physics students
should include approved Engineering courses.
List A:
Chemistry
Computer Science
Data Analysis
Geology
Mathematics
Physics
Statistics
BSc Major Program
A student must successfully complete the equivalent of 20 full courses
conforming to the above pattern and all required psychology courses
must be passed with at least a C (2.0).
BSc Honours Program
An Honours BSc has requirements beyond those outlined above. PSYC
4143 , 4145 must be taken. In addition 27 ch of elective psychology
courses must be chosen in the following manner. At least 9 ch must be
successfully completed from each of the three groups outlined below:
1.
2.
3.
Biological/Cognitive Basis of Behaviour: PSYC 3343 , 3383 ,
3503 , 3603 , 3632 , 3693 , 3711 , 3723 , 4583 , 4693 , 4733 ,
4833 ;
Social Personality: PSYC 2201 , 2401 , 3222 , 3232 , 3263 ,
3412 , 3461 ; 4463 ,
Clinical/Applied Psychology: PSYC 3313 , 3323 , 3362 , 3393 ,
3493 , 3553 , 3724 , 3803 , 4213 , 4214 , 4233 , 4493 .
An Honours student must successfully complete an Honours Thesis
( PSYC 4143 and 4155 ). This typically requires that a student conceive,
plan, perform and report an experiment under t he supervision of a
Faculty advisor. Normally, the thesis research is completed during the
student's final year of study.
Applicants to the Honours program should apply in writing to the
Coordinator of the Honours program. To be eligible for admission to the
program a student should have a minimum cumulative grade point
average of 3.3 (B+). After admission, a cumulative grade point average
of 3.3 must be maintained. To graduate with an honours degree, a grade
point average of 3.3 is needed in all required Psychology courses.
178
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
SECTION E
BIOLOGY-PSYCHOLOGY OPTION
PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS IN SCIENCE
Honours and Majors Program
Students intending to apply to professional schools, such as schools of
medicine, dentistry, or veterinary medicine, should consult the
admissions information for the individual school they intend to apply to.
Students may be required to complete a specific entrance test for a
particular profession, e.g. the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) in
the case of schools of medicine.
This interdepartmental program is intended to meet the needs of
students who are interested in the interdisciplinary areas covered by
both psychology and zoology.
First Year
CHEM 1041 , 1046 , 1072 , 1077 , BIOL 1001 , 1012 , 1017 , MATH
1003 , 1013 , PSYC 1003 / 1004 , 6 ch of approved electives (total 39
ch).
Second Year
BIOL 2015 , 2065 , 2615 , CHEM 2401 or CHEM 2441 , PSYC 2102 ,
PSYC 2901 (or equivalent), plus 11 ch of approved electives (total 33
ch).
Third and Fourth Years
BIOL 4935 , PSYC 3913 , 4053 , plus approved electives equivalent to
51 ch (total 60 ch). The electives in years 2, 3 and 4 must contain at least
24 ch in psychology courses and at least 24 ch in biology courses. At
least 132 approved credits are required to complete the program of
which a minimum of 46 ch must be beyond the second year level.
To register for the honours program, students must have a cumulative
grade point average of at least 3.0 at the end of the third year and must
take BIPS4000 in addition to the above requirements.
INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS
Note Concerning Transfer to the Fredericton Campus The first two
years of the 4 interdepartmental programs listed below are offered. For
details see Section G of this calendar.
Biology-Chemistry; Chemistry-Geology; Biology-Mathematics;
Chemistry-Mathematics.
Students should select a B.Sc. program and ensure that they complete
all core requirements for the selected program. In addition, the courses
indicated below are strongly recommended. Students are also strongly
advised to take courses in English and the Humanities and Social
Sciences.
FIRST YEAR
•
BIOL 1001 , 1012 / 1017 , CHEM 1041 , 1046 , 1072 / 1077 ,
MATH 1003 , 1013 , PHYS 1000 , ENGL 1200 or 1500
SECOND, THIRD & FOURTH YEARS
Pre-Dentistry
•
•
•
BIOL 2065 , 2245 , 2485 , 3055 , 3635
CHEM 2401 , 2416 , 2422 , 2457
12 ch Humanities and/or Social Sciences
Pre-Medicine
•
•
•
•
BIOL 2065 , 2245 , 2485 , 3055 , 3635
CHEM2401 , 2416 , 2422 , 2457
STAT 2263 (or equivalent)
Humanities and Social Sciences electives
Pre-Veterinary Medicine
•
•
•
•
BIOL 2015 , 2485
CHEM 2401 , 2416
STAT 2263 (or equivalent)
9 ch Humanities and/or Social Sciences
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
179
SECTION E
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
COMPUTER SCIENCE
This is a four year undergraduate program leading to a Bachelor of
Science in Computer Science. Both honours and majors are available
through the specializations. A set of core courses and some student
selected courses comprise the requirements for the degree. For general
regulations on admission, please consult the appropriate section of the
University calendar.
Arts Core Requirements:
At least fifteen credit hours of Arts electives (at least 3ch beyond firstyear level).
Science/Engineering Electives:
Nine credit hours normally taken in the first two years of the programme.
Regulations:
1.
The total curriculum consists of a minimum of 141 credit hours.
2.
For students admitted to the programme before May 2003, a
grade of C or better is required for prerequisite programme
courses. Students who fail to attain a C or better in such a course
must repeat it until that grade level is attained. For students
admitted to the programme in May 2003 or after, a grade of C or
better is required in all required core courses, all courses offered
for specializations or honours, and all CS courses.
3.
Mathematics and Statistics Core Requirement:
At least one three credit hour upper-level MATH/STAT elective
Overall, a minimum of 50 ch of upper-level courses are required.
Other Programme Requirements:
Twenty eight credit hours of free electives.
Areas of Specialization:
The basic degree is obtained by satisfying the basic curriculum outlined
above. In addition to the basic degree, two specializations or curriculum
options are described:
1.
Specialization in High-Performance Scientific Computing,
and
Specialization in Software Engineering
Curriculum:
2.
The basic degree curriculum consists of a set of core requirements plus
elective courses. It is expected that students will take four (4) years of
study at 5 term courses per term to complete the program. The specific
requirements are listed below:
To obtain a specialized degree, students must complete all required core
courses and all courses in the chosen area of specialization, and they
must obtain a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or greater.
MATH 1003
MATH 1013
MATH 2213
STAT 1793
BA 2123
BA 3718
CS 1073
CS 1083
CS 1303
CS 2003
CS 2013
CS 2113
CS 2303
CS 2403
CS 2803
CS 3323
CS 3813
CS 3913
CS 3983
CS 4613
CS 4983
Intro to Calculus I
Intro to Calculus II
Linear Algebra
Intro to Applied Statistics
Intro to Electronic Commerce
Legal, Privacy, and Security Issues in Electronic
Commerce
Intro to Computer Programming in Java
Computer Science Concepts (Java)
Discrete Structures I
Computer Architecture and Assembly
Programming
Software Engineering I
Scientific Computing
Discrete Structures II
Operating Systems Principles I
Switching Theory and Logical Design
Intro to Data Structures
Computer Organization and Architecture
Algorithms I
Technical Report I
Programming Languages
Technical Report II
One of:
CS 2503
CS 2513
CS 3123
Intro to Information Processing
Intro to Information Systems
High-Speed Numerical Computation
Two of:
CS 3033
CS 3513
CS 4103
CS 4113
CS 4913
CS 5065
180
Software Design and Development
Database Management Systems I
Parallel Processing Numerical Algorithms
Advanced Scientific Computing
Theory of Computation
Introduction to Functional Programming
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
SPECIALIZATION IN HIGH-PERFORMANCE
SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING
Required Courses
CS 3113
Introduction to Numerical Methods
CS 3123
High-Speed Numerical Computation
CS 4103
Parallel Processing Numerical Algorithms
CS 4113
Advanced Scientific Computing
CS 4123
Topics in High-Performance Scientific Computing and
Visualization
SPECIALIZATION IN SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
Required Courses
CS 4525
Database Management Systems II
STAT 3093
Probability and Mathematical Statistics II
In addition, at least three (3) of the following four (4) courses must be
completed.
CS 4033
Software Project Management and Quality Assurance
CS 4073
Software Process Improvement
CS 4083
Leading-edge Technology in Software Development
CS 4093
Team Software Development Project
Note: The following courses have to be selected from the core studies in
order to meet the prerequisites:
CS 3033
Software Design and Development
CS 3513
Database Management Systems I
STAT 3083
Probability and Mathematical Statistics I
NOTE: The Specialization in Software Engineering is not an accredited
engineering program and does not lead to registration as a Professional
Engineer.
SECTION E
Honours Degree Curriculum, Basic and Specialized
Certificate in Computing
Students in the BScCS degree programme may elect, after their first or
second year, an Honours degree programme, with or without a specialization. Students who satisfy the requirements for an honours and/or
specialized degree will have that designation on their final transcript. The
honours degrees are designed to meet international ACM/IEEE
standards, preparing students for graduate work at most North American
institutions.
This certificate programme is designed to provide individuals, especially
working adults, with an opportunity to acquire the formal background
necessary to become effective participants in the Information Technology
Industry. Since the courses taken in the Certificate are also appropriate
for the BScCS, students who later decide to pursue a BScCS will
normally be able to transfer their credits into that programme.
The requirements for the basic BScCS degree must be met. Within the
constraints of those basic requirements, the student must complete:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
CS 4913: Theory of Computation
CS 3113: Introduction to Numerical Methods
15 ch in Science
CS 4xxx (4ch) A fourth year CS elective, excluding CS 4613 , CS
4993 , and CS 4913 .
CS 4993 with a grade of B or better, in lieu of CS 4983.
It is recommended that Physics 1000 or the EE 1713 /Physics 1917 pair
be chosen.
Although the scheduling of courses cannot be guaranteed, it is likely that
the Certificate can be completed on a part-time basis in five terms.
Typically, the 1000-level courses are available in the evening.
The Certificate is also available to students who do not meet the
entrance requirements of the BScCS; in fact, there are no specific
entrance requirements except the formal approval of the Department of
Computer Science & Applied Statistics. However, students who do not
have NB Advanced Math 120 will have to pass Math 1863 before they
take the required CS courses.
Core Courses
CS 1073
Introduction to Computing in Java
An honours degree with specialization requires that the student meet the
requirements of both the honours degree and the specialization. It
further requires:
CS 1083
Computer Science Concepts (Java)
CS 1303
Discrete Structures I
CS 2013
Software Engineering I
Honours in High-Performance Scientific Computing: MATH 2503 , STAT
3083 , and STAT 3093 .
CS 2513
Introduction to Information Systems
CS 2617
C/C++ for Programmers (1ch)
Honours in Software Engineering: STAT 3703 .
CS 2618
Fortran for Programmers (1ch)
CS 3323
Introduction to Data Structures
ICS 2001
Introduction to Information and Communication
Studies
A cumulative grade point average greater than or equal to 3.0 is required
to achieve the honours degree. Students who satisfy the requirements
for an Honours degree will receive "First Class Honours" if their CGPAs
are greater than or equal to 3.5. If their CGPAs are greater than or equal
to 3.0 and less than 3.5, they will receive "Second Class Honours".
Electives :(At least 12ch required)
Electives may be chosen from any of the 2000-, 3000-, or 4000-level
Computer Science courses. CS 2773 is an acceptable elective, although
it cannot be credited toward a later BScCS or BCS or BDA degree.
A grade of C or better is required in all courses credited toward the
Certificate.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
181
SECTION E
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
ENGINEERING
The Engineering programs are based on Department course credit
requirements established by the Faculty of Engineering as detailed in
Section G of this Calendar. The courses available will satisfy up to onehalf of the total course requirements for Chemical, Civil, Computer,
Electrical, Mechanical, and Software Engineering. Geological, Forest
and Surveying Engineering students may obtain approximately onequarter of their total course requirements.
Elective courses should be chosen to satisfy specific Department
program requirements. See Section G of this Calendar.
The total number of terms required to complete an Engineering program
depends on the course load taken by the student. Students who follow
approved programs, and who obtain at least 85 credit hours of approved
courses at UNBSJ, will have the opportunity to complete the Bachelor's
degree req uirements in Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical and
Mechanical Engineering at UNBF in two additional fall and two additional
winter terms. Students in Surveying, Geological and Forest Engineering
will require six or more terms at UNBF in addition to the program credits
they obtain at UNBSJ.
For information on the Co-op Program, Professional Experience
Program (PEP) and the Diploma in Technology Management and Entrepreneurship (TME), refer to Section G of this Calendar.
Engineering practice and environmental concerns cannot be separated;
they are fundamental to all engineering disciplines. Engineering students
with a particular interest in environmental issues are encouraged to
choose the discipline most closely related to their interest. The following
list indicates disciplines associated with various areas of environmental
concern
Chemical Engineering:
Civil Engineering:
Computer Engineering:
Electrical Engineering:
Forest Engineering:
Geological Engineering:
Mechanical Engineering:
Geodesy & Geomatics
Engineering:
182
air and water quality
pollution control
hydrology
groundwater
solid waste management
water and wastewater treatment
environmental geotechnics
digital hardware
automotive and vehicle control
process industries and power systems
instrumentation and communication
instrumentation and control
energy conversion and utilization
electromagnetic interference and
compatibility
forest dynamics
silviculture
integrated renewable resource
management
machine/environment interactions
hydrology
conservation and management of
resources
waste disposal
environmental geotechnics
alternative energy systems
recycling systems and design for
recycling
energy conservation and utilization
emote sensing of the environment
mapping of land and water resources
monitoring of topographic change
hazard mapping
environmental information systems
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
At UNBSJ the following courses are equivalent to the same courses at
UNBF and/or to the other UNBF courses listed opposite:
PHYS 1917 = PHYS 1913/18 ;
PHYS 2055 = PHYS 2962/67 ;
PHYS 2975 = PHYS 2872/77 or PHYS 2972/77 ;
CHE 2503 = ME 2503 ;
CE 2023 = ME 2121 ;
ME 3413 = CHE 2102 ;
GEOL 1044 + 1074 = GEOL 1021 + GEOL 1022 ;
ME 3232 = CE 3963 ;
ME 3413 = ME 3413 + ME 3415 ;
ME 3482 = FE 3313 ;
ME 3513 = ME 3511 + ME 3515 ;
CE 2703 = CHE 2703 .
Note: A C grade minimum is required for all prerequisite and all
core and technical elective courses used for credit towards the
B.Sc.(Eng.) degree.
Standard Engineering Programs
Courses are arranged by priority for each major program, with high
priority courses on the left. Most programs are designed to be completed
in eight terms of study. Students electing to spread their studies over
nine or ten terms can defer low-priority courses to later terms and thus
balance their workload. Students should consult their faculty advisors
before selecting courses.
Chemical Engineering
Term 1:
MATH1003 , CE1013 , CHEM1041 , CHEM1046 ,
PHYS1917 , EE1713 , CS1003 .
Term 2:
MATH1013 , CHEM1072 , CHEM1077 , CHE1004 ,
ME1113 , ECON1073 , PSYC 1004 .
Term 3:
MATH2503 , CHEM2601 , CHEM2886 , CHE2503 ,
CHEM2401 , ME1003 , CE2023 .
Term 4:
MATH2513 , ME3413 , CHEM2622, CHEM2897 ,
CE2703 , CHE2412 , ME3232 .
Term 5:
Complete Term 1 & 3 requirements + STAT2593 and
up to 3 CSE's*.
Term 6:
Complete Term 2 & 4 requirements,
MATH3503 , CS3113 .
Civil Engineering
Term 1:
CE1013 , MATH1003 , PHYS1917 , SE1001 ,
CE1003 , GEOL1044 .
Term 2:
CHEM1882 , CS1003 , MATH1013 , ME1113 ,
ECON1073 , CPW1001 .
Spring Camp:
GGE1803
Term 3:
CE2023 , CHE2503 , ME1003 , MATH2503 ,
STAT2593 , EE1713 or CSE.
Term 4:
CE3033 , CE2703 , CE2953 , ME3232 , MATH2513
, ME1013 or CSE.
SECTION E
Computer Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Term 1:
MATH1003 , EE1713 , CE1013 , CS1073 ,
PHYS1917 , CS1303 or ME1003 .
Term 1:
CE1013 , MATH1003 , ME1003 , PHYS1917,
EE1713 , CSE*.
Term 2:
MATH1013 , CS1083 , CHEM1882 , ME1113 ,
ECON1073 , CSE*.
Term 2:
CHEM1882 , MATH1013 , CS1003 , ME1013,
ME1113 , ECON1073 .
Term 3:
MATH2503 , EE2773 , CS2013 , STAT 2593 ,
CMPE2013 , CSE*.
Term 3:
CE2023 , CHE2503 , MATH2503 , ME232 ,
ME2143 , STAT2593 .
Term 4:
MATH2513 , MATH3503 , EE2213 , EE2783 ,
EE2703 , ME3232 .
Term 4:
MATH2513 , ME2332 , ME3413 , ME2613,
ME2222 , ME3513 .
Term 5:
Complete Term 1 & 3 requirements + EE2773 and up
to 3 CSE's*.
Term 6:
Complete Term 2 & 4 requirements + ME3232,
MATH3503 , PHYS2975 , CS3113 .
Joint Computer Science/Survey Engineering
Term 1:
CE1013 , MATH1003 , PHYS1917 , SE1001 ,
CS1073 , ME1003 , EE1713
Term 2:
CS1083 , CHEM1882 , MATH1013 , ME1013 ,
CS2513 , ECON1013 , ME1113
Spring Camp:
GGE1003 .
Electrical Engineering
Software Engineering
Students may take the following courses towards completion of the
Bachelor of Science in Software Engineering (see Section G. of this
calendar). The Bachelor of Science in Software Engineering (BScSWE)
is a different program than the Specialization in Software Engineering
offered as part of the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science on the
Saint John Campus.
Term 1:
MATH1003 , EE1713 , CE1013 , CS1073 ,
PHYS1917 , ME1003
Term 1:
Term 2:
MATH1013 , CS1083 , ME1113 , CHEM1882 ,
ECON1073 , CSE*
MATH1003 , EE1713 , CE1013 , CS1073 ,
PHYS1917 , CS1303 .
Term 2:
Term 3:
MATH2503 , EE2773 , CS2013 , STAT2593 ,
CMPE2013 , CHE2503 .
MATH1013 , CS1083 , CHEM1882 , ME1113 ,
ECON1073 , CSE*.
Term 3:
Term 4:
MATH2513 , MATH3503 , EE2783 , EE2213 ,
EE2703 , ME3232 .
MATH2503 , CS2013 , STAT2593 , CMPE2013 ,
CS2303 , Basic Science or CSE*.
Term 4:
CS2513 , EE2213 , ME3232 , ME2613 , PHYS2975
or basic science, CSE*.
Forest Engineering
Term 1:
CE1013 , MATH1003 , ME1003 , PHYS1917 ,
SE1001 , EE1713 , CSE*
Term 2:
CS1003 , CHEM1882 , MATH1013 , ME1113 , CSE*
Geological Engineering
No Major
Most students select their major (Civil, Computer, Electrical, Mechanical,
etc.) on entry to the first year of their studies. Students who are unsure of
their choice are strongly advised to select courses from the following list
to ensure maximum flexibility when they make their final decision on
their program. All of these courses are creditable to existing programs,
but students following this path may require extra time to complete their
degree.
Term 1:
CE1013 , GEOL1044 , MATH1003 , ME1003 ,
PHYS1917 , SE1001 , EE1713 .
Term 1:
MATH1003 , CE1013 , PHYS1917 , EE1713 ,
ME1003 , CS1073 .
Term 2:
CHEM1882 , GEOL1074 , MATH1013 , ME1113 ,
ECON1073 .
Term 2:
MATH1013 , ME1113 , CHEM1882 , ECON1073 ,
CSEs.
Spring Camp:
GGE1803 .
Note: CSE* = Complimentary studies elective.
Geodesy & Geometics Engineering
Term 1:
CE1013 , MATH1003 , ME1003 , PHYS1917 ,
SE1001 , CS1073 , ME1003 .
Term 2:
CS1083 , CHEM1882 , MATH1013 , ME1013 ,
ME1113 , ECON1073 .
Spring Camp:
GGE1003
.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
183
SECTION E
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
KINESIOLOGY
NOTE: This calendar copy has been revised based on changes to the
Kinesiology degree programs approved by the Fredericton Senate (See
Section G of this Calendar). At the time of printing of this calendar it is
subject to approval by the Saint John Senate. Students are advised to
contact the Department of Social Science for details.
•
Bachelor of Recreation and Sport Studies
•
English 122 (minimum grade of 60%)
•
Advanced Math 120
•
One of: Biology 120, Chemistry 122, Physics 122
•
3 electives
•
Minimum Admission Average: 65 per cent
General Information
Transfer Students
The Faculty of Kinesiology on the Fredericton campus offers two, fouryear degree programs: Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology and a
Bachelor of Recreation and Sport Studies. In addition, each degree
program offers second year students an opportunity to apply for a
concurrent degree in Education (five-year duration). The Faculty of Arts
on the Saint John campus offers the first year of the four-year program
for both of these programs. The Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology
[BScKin] has one concentration, while the Bachelor of Recreation and
Sport Studies [BRSS], offers five concentrations: recreation and sport
studies, recreation and sport management, outdoor recreation, tourism,
and recreation and aging. Each curriculum is designed to prepare
students for a variety of vocational careers and/or further study at the
graduate level. The programs will prepare students for career
opportunities in coaching, sport management, recreation management
and program services, outdoor recreation and tourism, health related
professions (e.g. fitness and wellness consulting), teaching physical
education and related careers, as well as for further study in kinesiology.
1.
A minimum session grade point average of 2.0 is required for a
student to be considered for transfer into one of the Faculty's
programs.
2.
Normally a student will not be allowed to transfer into the Faculty
mid-way through the academic year.
3.
In addition to scholastic record, a transfer applicant's record of
participation and interest in the "Kinesiology", "Recreation", and
"Sport Science" field is also considered for admission.
4.
Students presently registered in the Faculty will continue to be
governed by the regulations in effect when they first registered.
Students who were formerly in the Faculty and apply for readmission, if accepted, will be governed by the regulations in
effect at the time of their re-admission.
Students interested in becoming elementary or secondary physical
education teachers and coaches in school systems, can select either the
BScKin or BRSS degree program. The BScKin degree program is
intended for those students who are interested in having their teachable
minor in Science, while the BRSS degree program is intended for those
students who are interested in a teachable minor in Arts or Humanities.
Students apply to the Faculty of Education for the concurrent program
during their first year. The application deadline for the concurrent
BScKin/BEd program is January 31 of each year. If students are not
accepted into the concurrent program or they decide they wish to teach
after they graduate, they may apply to the consecutive Education degree
program. The BEd degree program taken after the BScKin or BRSS
degree normally requires 60 ch of study at UNB.
University Regulations
Any point not covered in the following regulations will be governed by the
General University Regulations as stated in Section B of this Calendar.
Questions concerning the application of regulations should be directed
to the Registrar in writing.
Conditions Regarding Admission to the BScKin Program
All admissions are on a competitive basis; satisfaction of minimum
requirements does not guarantee admission. Normally, no more than
100 students will be admitted to first year in the Faculty of Kinesiology in
any academic year. This figure provides for the accommodation of up to
20 students at the Saint John campus.
Effective for admission September 2002 -- MINIMUM requirements
for admission to the first year, required academic subjects from New
Brunswick schools. Please refer to UNB calendar for other regulations.
•
184
Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology
•
English 122 (minimum grade of 60%)
•
Advanced Math 120
•
Chemistry 122
•
Biology 120 or Physics 122
•
2 electives
•
Minimum Admission Average: 65 per cent
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Time Limitation
The maximum time period permitted between the first registration in the
BScKin degree program and the completion of the BScKin degree shall
be eight (8) years. Normally, BScKin students who are re-admitted within
this time frame must complete the degree requirements in effect at the
last re-admission. Effective for incoming students, 1993.
BScKin as a Second Degree
In addition to the University's regulations for a second undergraduate
bachelor's degree as specified in the UNB Undergraduate Calendar, the
Faculty of Kinesiology requires that any student accepted into the
BScKin degree program as a second undergraduate bachelor's degree
be required to: (a) Complete at least thirty-six (36) credit hours of
courses, and (b) Complete the requirements of the BScKin program.
The Faculty of Kinesiology, in cooperation with other campus academic
units, offers a comprehensive selection of curricular programs and
courses to meet the needs of students interested in: sport science,
recreation and leisure, exercise science, sport management, wellness,
coaching, gerontology and physical education teacher preparation.
For more information about attending UNB, send an email to: Director of
Undergraduate Studies, Jeffrey J. Burkard (mailto: jb@unb.ca); or Stella
Keays, Coordinator of the Faculty's Undergraduate Student Support
Services at 506-453-4575 (mailto: skeays@unb.ca) or Dean,
Christopher L. Stevenson mailto: cls@unb.ca.
General Regulations
Grade Point Averages
1.
The method of calculating grade point averages is explained in
Section B (Grading System and Classification) of this Calendar.
2.
To earn a BScKin degree, a student must have successfully
completed a minimum 134 ch of approved courses.
3.
Students should refer to Section B of this Calendar for regulations
regarding academic probation and withdrawal.
SECTION E
Policy on Grades
Curriculum
BScKin students must obtain a grade of "C" or better in required degree
program courses. These courses include:
a.
all first year required courses
b.
all required core courses
c.
Exercise and Sport Science Advanced Electives
Effective: Admission to Program, September 2003
1.
It is the students responsibility to complete the degree program
curriculum for the year in which they enrol.
Note: Kin1001 is considered to be pre-requisites or co-requisites to all
other KIN and RSS courses. Students receiving a final grade of "D" in
KIN1001 may repeat KIN1001 as a co-requisite to other second year
KIN and RSS courses.
2.
In the BScKin degree program activity lab courses are not
required but may be taken as General KIN/RSS Electives up to a
maximum of 6 credit hours.
3.
The minimum credit hour total to graduate with a BScKin would
be 134.
4.
Of the 42 ch of KIN and Non KIN Electives in 3rd and 4th year at
least 27 ch must be at the 3000-4000 level.
Repeating Courses
1.
Regulations pertaining to repeating courses can be found in
Section B of this Calendar.
2.
Any required courses not successfully completed during a given
year must be attempted not later than the next academic year,
except by special permission of the Director of Undergraduate
Studies.
Intersession / Summer Session Courses
General Notes
Year 1: (36 ch): [FOR STUDENTS AT THE SAINT JOHN CAMPUS]
Required Core
KIN 1001
Introduction to Kinesiology
3ch
BIOL 1551
Principles of Biology, Part I
3ch
2ch
BIOL 1006
Applications in Biology, Part I
BScKin students who wish to take Intersession and/or Summer Session
courses that are to be credited towards their degree should first consult
with their Faculty Advisor and then must obtain permission in advance of
course registration from the Faculty's Director of Undergraduate Studies
or designate.
BIOL 1012
Biological Principles Part II
3ch
BIOL 1017
Applications in Biology, Part II
2ch
BIOL 1711
Human Anatomy I
4ch
BIOL 1752
Human Anatomy II
4ch
ENGL
1200 / 1500
6ch
Practica and Directed Studies
MATH 1003
Introduction to Calculus I
3ch
1.
Choose 6 ch of the following:
2.
Normally, students may elect a maximum of twelve (12) ch from
practica/internship courses, i.e., KIN 3900 (12), KIN 3913 (3), KIN
3914 (3), KIN 3923 (3), KIN 3953 (3), KIN 3954 (3), KIN 4900
(12), KIN 4910 (6), KIN 4950 (6), and RSS 3100 (12).
Normally, students may elect a maximum of six (6) ch from
directed study courses, i.e., KIN 4903 (3), KIN 4904 (3), and from
Special Activity courses, i.e., KIN 2831 (1), KIN 2832 (1), KIN
3831 (2), KIN 3832 (2), and from Leadership courses, i.e., KIN
2861 (1), KIN 2862 (1), KIN 3861 (2), and KIN 3862 (2).
6ch
PSYC 1003 - 1004
SOCI 1001 - SOCI 1002
Note: Upon transferring to Fredericton for the second year of the BScKin
degree program, students from the Saint John campus must select one
(1) of the following three (3) courses to complete the first year
requirements:
KIN 2002
History of Sport and Recreation
KIN 2081:
Introduction to Wellness and Active Living
3ch
KIN 2093
Introduction to Philosophy of Sport &
Recreation
3ch
BIOL 2721
Human Physiology I
5ch
BIOL 2782
Human Physiology II
5ch
KIN 2023
Introduction to Sociology of Sport
3ch
BScKin Year Designation Based On Credit Hours
KIN 2032
Introduction to Sport Psychology
3ch
KIN 2051
Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries
4ch
For the purposes of on-line registration and administrative operations
BScKin students shall be considered as in:
KIN 2062
Introductory Biomechanics
3ch
KIN 2072
Introduction to Motor Control and Learning
3ch
1.
Choose 1 of the following:
Approval of Elective Courses
Advice concerning elective courses will be provided by members of the
Faculty. All elective courses require approval of the Faculty.
Normal Workload
A "normal" student workload is considered to be 19-20 ch per term, or
38-40 ch per year (not including Intersession and Summer School).
Permission from the Director of Undergraduate Studies is required to
exceed 20 ch per term or 40 ch in any given academic year.
2.
3.
Second year after the student has successfully completed 27 ch
toward their BScKin
Third year BScKin after the student has successfully completed
57 ch toward their BScKin
Fourth year BScKin after the student has successfully completed
87 ch towards their BScKin
3ch
Year 2 (36 ch)
Required Core
or
CHEM 1001 / 1006 and CHEM 1012 /
1017
10ch
PHYS 1940 / 1945
10ch
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
185
SECTION E
3.
Year 3 and 4 (60 ch)
Required Core to be completed in 3rd year
KIN 3001
KIN 3081
KIN 3282
KIN 3482
STAT 2043
STAT 3043
KIN Electives
Non-Kin Electives
Introduction to Research Methods in
Kinesiology
Introductory Exercise Physiology
Physical Activity, Health and Wellness
Bioenergetics of Exercise
Statistics for Social Scientists I
Statistics for Social Scientists II
(Choose 27 ch)
(see Note 1, 2 & 3 below)
(Choose 27 ch)
(see Note 1, 2 & 3 below)
TOTAL
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
27 ch
Note 2:
Note 3:
of the 42 ch of KIN and NON-KIN electives in 3rd and 4th
year at least 27 must be at the 3000/4000 level
see advisor for suggested KIN and NON-KIN electives.
Laboratory Requirement - for the 4 core areas of
Biomechanics, Exercise Physiology, Motor Learning/
Control, and Psychology of Physical Activity, students
must take a minimum of 2 courses in 2 core areas.
Honours Program : BSc.Kin.
Students with a minimum CGPA of 3.5 may apply to enter the Honours
program in the BScKin Degree after completing at least 57ch of their
degree program.
To graduate with a BScKin Honours, students must meet the following
requirements:
3.
4.
5.
Maintain a minimum CGPA of 3.5 in all required courses in the
B.Sc. Kin., and
Maintain a minimum CGPA of 3.5 in all advanced (3000 & 4000)
level courses,and
Complete KIN 4900 : Honours Research Project in Kinesiology,
and
Complete a minimum of 48 ch of courses at or above the 3000
level (KIN /RSS and/or non-KIN/RSS courses).
Complete KIN 3001 as a prerequisite, or as a co-requisite to KIN
4900 .
CONCURRENT BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
KINESIOLOGY / BACHELOR OF EDUCATION
PROGRAM (BScKin/BEd)
Effective: Admission to Program, September 2003
The BScKin and BEd Concurrent program is designed as a five year
program to allow students to complete a degree program in Kinesiology
and Education that prepares them to teach physical education in a
variety of learning environments. This program is based on the
integration of the BScKin and BEd programs. Students may complete an
area of concentration in addition to Kinesiology with the appropriate
selection of elective courses.
Admissions Procedures
1.
Students apply for entry to the BScKin degree program upon
completion of their high school program.
2.
Students may apply to the Faculty of Education Concurrent
Program during their second term (deadline is January 31) at
UNB and, upon successful completion of at least 30 ch, may be
admitted to the concurrent BScKin/BEd degree program.
Students should be able to complete both degrees within five
years.
186
1.
Students in the BScKin/BEd concurrent program will follow the
BScKin curriculum and in addition will complete 60 ch of
Education courses. Fifteen (15) ch of Education courses may be
Non-Kin/RSS elective courses.
2.
A student cannot receive a BEd degree by itself in this program. If
a student withdraws from the concurrent program back into the
BKin degree a maximum of 15 ch of education courses may be
transferred for BKin credit.
YEAR 1 (36 ch): [FOR STUDENTS AT THE SAINT JOHN CAMPUS]
Note 1:
2.
Concurrent Program Requirements
135 ch
Notes:
1.
Students may enter the Concurrent program later in their
academic program, however, late entry may require more than
five years to complete both degrees.
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Required Core
KIN 1001
Introduction to Kinesiology
BIOL 1006
Applications in Biology, Part I
BIOL 1012
Biological Principles Part II
BIOL 1017
Applications in Biology, Part II
BIOL 1551
Principles of Biology Principles, Part I
BIOL 1711
Human Anatomy I
BIOL 1752
Human Anatomy II
ENGL
1200 / 1500
MATH 1003
Introduction to Calculus I
Choose 6 ch of the following:
PSYC 1003 - 1004
SOCI 1001 - SOCI 1002
3 ch
2 ch
3 ch
2 ch
3 ch
4 ch
4 ch
6 ch
3 ch
6 ch
Note: Upon transferring to Fredericton for the second year of the BScKin
degree program, students from the Saint John campus must select one
(1) of the following three (3) courses to complete the first year
requirements:
KIN 2002
KIN 2081
KIN 2093
History of Sport and Recreation 3ch
Introduction to Wellness and Active Living
Introduction to Philosophy of Sport &
Recreation
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
YEAR 2 (38 ch)
Required Core
BIOL 2721
BIOL 2782
KIN 2023
KIN 2032
KIN 2051
KIN 2062
KIN 2072
or
KIN
Human Physiology I
Human Physiology II
Introduction to Sociology of Sport
Introduction to Sport Psychology
Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries
Introductory Biomechanics
Introduction to Motor Control and Learning
Choose 1 the following:
CHEM 1001 / 1006 and CHEM 1012 / 1017
PHYS 1940 / 1945
Activity Labs: (2x1ch)
5 ch
5 ch
3 ch
3 ch
4 ch
3 ch
3 ch
10 ch
2 ch
YEAR 3, 4 AND 5 (118 ch)
Required Core to be completed in 3rd year
KIN 3001
KIN 3081
STATS 2043
STATS 3043
Introduction to Research Methods in
Kinesiology
Introductory Exercise Physiology
Statistics for Social Scientists I
Statistics for Social Scientists II
KIN Activity Labs
KIN Electives
Non-Kin Electives
Education Courses
TOTAL
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
3 ch
7 ch
1 5ch
24 ch
60 ch
195 ch
SECTION E
DIPLOMAS OF ADVANCED
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
The DAUS is a 36 ch program designed for students with a first degree
in Education but who are not qualified or who do not wish to enter the
MEd program. While this program is only offered on the Fredericton
Campus, it is possible to take courses at UNBSJ, contact the Education
Coordinator at 648- 5593. To register for the DAUS Program, students
should contact the appropriate department at UNBF:
Chair, Curriculum and Instruction Telephone: 506-453-3500 Fax: 506453-3569
Chair, Educational Foundations & Learning Centre: Telephone: 506453-3513 Fax: 506-453-4765
Chair, Adult and Vocational Education: Telephone: 506-453-3508
Fax: 506-453-3569
Faculty of Education University of New Brunswick Bag Service No.
45333 Fredericton, N.B. E3B 6E3
SAINT JOHN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
187
SECTION F
SAINT JOHN
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Biology
BIOL
Biology & Psychology Joint Honours
Program
BIPS
Business Administration
BA
Chemical Engineering
CHE
Chemistry
CHEM
Civil Engineering
CE
Classics and Ancient History
CLAS
The course numbers are designated by four digits.
Computer Engineering
CMPE
First Digit designates the level of the course:
Computer Science
CS
Data Analysis
DA
Economics
ECON
Education
ED
Electrical Engineering
EE
English
ENGL
French
FR
Gender Studies
GEND
Geology
GEOL
German
GER
Greek
GRK
Health Science
HSCI
History & English-Joint Honours Program
HENG
History
HIST
Hospitality and Tourism Management
HTM
Humanities
HUM
Information and Communication Studies
ICS
International Studies
IS
Kinesiology
KIN
Latin
LAT
Linguistics
LING
Mathematics
MATH
Mechanical Engineering
ME
Nursing
NURS
Philosophy
PHIL
Physics
PHYS
Politics
Psychology
Science
SCI
Social Science
SOCS
Course Numbers
Although the University is on a course credit system and has tended to
move away from the idea of a rigid specification with respect to which
year courses should be taken, yet there is some need to provide information as to the level of the course.
The various disciplines and the courses which they offer are pre-sented
in alphabetical order.
1
Introductory level course
2
Intermediate level course which normally has
prerequisites.
3, 4 and 5
Advanced level course which requires a
substantial back-ground.
6
Postgraduate level course
Second and Third Digits designate the particular course in the Department, Division or Faculty.
Fourth Digit designates the duration of the course:
0
Year (or full) course normally offered over two
terms.
1-9
Other than full year courses.
Departments may assign specific meanings to these digits; consult the
departmental listings.
Students should consult the official Web Timetable
(http://www.unbsj.ca/schedules/timetable/) to find when courses are
offered in a particular year and when they are scheduled. Not all courses
listed are given every year.
Codes
The following codes are used in course descriptions:
alternate years
R-
reading course
ch -
credit hours
S-
seminar
C-
class lecture
T-
tutorial
L-
laboratory
W-
English writing
component
POLS
LE
limited enrollment
WS
PSYC
O-
occasionally given
*-
Sociology
SOCI
Spanish
SPAN
Statistics
STAT
A-
workshop
alternate weeks
For example, 6 ch(3C 1T, 2C 2T) designates a course with 6 credit
hours: 3 class lecture hours and 1 tutorial hour per week in the first term;
2 class lecture hours and 2 tutorial hours per week in the second term.
Combinations of class lectures, laboratories, seminars, etc., are indicated by a slash line, e.g., 5C/L/S.
Before registration, check all course offerings in the official Timeta-ble.
Not all courses listed are given every year
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
189
SECTION F
BIOLOGY
BIOL 1412
In the four digit number description of Biology courses taught on the
Saint John campus the following code applies:
A continuation of BIOL 1411, basic concepts in human anatomy and
physiology, with emphasis on the normal condition. Prerequisite: BIOL
1411. For Nursing students only, or permission of instructor.
1st digit
specifies year in which course is normally taken.
2nd and 3rd
digits designate the particular course.
4th digit
designates the duration of the course as follows:
BIOL 1416
Course extends over both terms
1
Term course offered in first term
2
Term course offered in second term
3
Field course offered outside normal session
5
Term course offered in either first or second term
Prerequisites All prerequisite courses must be passed with a minimum
grade of C. BIOL 1001 or equivalent is a prerequisite for all courses in
Biology except 1202, 1411, 1412, 1416, 1417, 1551, 2831 and 2852.
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
Biological Principles
3 ch (3C)
Introduces biological principles and processes. Considers the
chemistry of life, maintenance of cells and organisms, energy
utilization, genetic information, reproductive continuity and
mechanisms of evolution. Prerequisite: Grade 12 Chemistry and Grade
12 Physics or equivalent.
BIOL 1012
Biological Principles, Part II
3 ch (3C)
Surveys the structure, function and evolution of selected plants and
animals. Topics include ecosystems and ecological interactions. Note:
Students intending to major in Biology must take BIOL 1017 as a corequisite. BIOL 1001 or equivalent BIOL 1017
BIOL 1017
Applications in Biology, Part II
2 ch (3L)
Instruction and laboratory work dealing with the applications of Biology
at the level of organisms and the ecological interactions. Prerequisite:
BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1551 Co-requisite: BIOL 1012
BIOL 1202
Introductory Marine Science
3 ch (3C)
An introduction to the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of
marine environments. Marine management issues and laws will be
discussed.
BIOL 1302
Introduction to Environmental
Biology
3 ch (3C)
Introduction to issues in environmental biology, including ecosystem
health, sustainable development, environmental law, multi-stakeholder
decision-making, etc. The course will use a case study method to
examine local and global effects of human activity on the earths
ecology and human society, focussing on environmental concerns of
coastal regions. Prerequisites: BIOL 1001, ECON 1013.
BIOL 1411
Anatomy & Physiology I
3 ch (3C)
Basic concepts in human anatomy and physiology, with emphasis on
the normal condition. Prerequisite: Chem 122 and Biology 122. For
Nursing students only, or permission of instructor
190
2 ch (3L)
Anatomy & Physiology
Laboratory II
2 ch (3L)
A selection of laboratory exercises to accompany BIOL 1412. Corequisite: BIOL 1412 intended for Nursing students only.
* indicates laboratory sessions are given on alternate weeks.
BIOL 1001
Anatomy & Physiology
Laboratory I
3 ch (3C)
A selection of laboratory exercises to accompany BIOL 1411. Corequisite: BIOL 1411 intended for Nursing students only.
BIOL 1417
0
Anatomy & Physiology II
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
BIOL 1551
Principles of Biology, Part I
3 ch (3C)
Part I deals with cell structure and function, nutrition, metabolism,
classical and molecular genetics and reproduction. Designed for
students in the Faculties of Education, Kinesiology and those students
in the Faculty of Arts not planning on majoring in Biology. A background
knowledge of elementary chemistry is recommended. Note: Credit
cannot be obtained for both BIOL 1001 and BIOL 1551.
BIOL 2015
Introductory Genetics
4 ch (3C 3L*)
(WR)
History of genetics, Mendelian genetics, chromosome theory of
inheritance, sex determination and linkage, extensions of Mendelian
analysis, genetic linkage, crossing-over, genetic mapping, extranuclear
genetics, quantitative and population genetics. Prerequisite: BIOL 1001
or BIOL 1551 with a grade of B or higher.
BIOL 2065
Introductory Biochemistry
4 ch (3C 3L*)
(WR)
Protein structure and function, techniques for protein analysis,
examples of important proteins, mechanisms and regulations of
enzymatic activity, metabolism (basic concepts and design, followed by
the study of a few pathways). Prerequisite: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1551
with a grade of B or higher.
BIOL 2125
Introductory Botany
4 ch (3C 3L*)
Introduces botanical principles and processes. Includes basic anatomy
and morphology on a range of scales: cellular structure and processes,
tissues, organs, and their functions. Prerequisite: BIOL 1001 or BIOL
1551 with a grade of B or higher.
BIOL 2245
Introductory Molecular Cell
Biology
4 ch (3C 3L*)
Studies cell membranes, motility and sensory systems; gene regulation
and molecular embryology; DNA, RNA, protein synthesis, viruses and
molecular genetics. Prerequisite: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1551 with a grade
of B or higher.
BIOL 2485
Introduction To Microbiology
4 ch (3C 3L*)
Covers the occurrence, distribution and importance of the major groups
of bacteria; bacterial metabolism, growth, structure and function;
introduces the role of microbes in the environment, microbial
interactions, biological cycles and exploitation of microbes by industry.
Labs stress techniques for observation, cultivation and characterization
of bacteria and experimental concepts of the discipline. Prerequisite:
BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1551 with a grade of B or higher.
BIOL 2585
Introductory Ecology
4 ch (3C 4L*)
Introduces concepts of ecology common to terrestrial, fresh water and
marine ecosystems. Provides a basis for further ecological or
environmental studies. Introduces mans influence on ecosystems.
Prerequisite: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1551 with a grade of B or higher.
SECTION F
BIOL 2615
Introductory Zoology
5 ch (3C 3L)
Classification, functional morphology, development and evolution of the
major animal groups. Prerequisite: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1551 with a
grade of B or higher.
BIOL 2831
Pathophysiology I
3 ch (3C)
A review of the normal physiological mechanisms for maintaining
homeostasis. This is followed by a consideration of how various
perturbations (such as environmental or life style factors) and disease
can disrupt the normal balance and lead to pathology. Prerequisite:
BIOL 1410. For Nursing students only.
BIOL 2852
Pathophysiology II
3 ch (3C)
A continuation of BIOL 2831. Prerequisite: BIOL 2831. For Nursing
students only.
BIOL 3275
Economic Botany (A)
3 ch (3C 1S)
Considers the range of ways in which plants are used by humans for
food, medicine, shelter, etc. Discusses the impact of plants on humans
and vice versa, including the possible origins and impacts of
agriculture, importance of plants in various cultures, and selection of
desirable plant features by humans. Students will research an area of
particular interest and present a seminar on it.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2125.
BIOL 3285
Mycology (A)
5 ch (3C 3L)
Introduces students to the taxonomy, physiology and industrial uses of
the fungi. Prerequisite: BIOL 2485.
BIOL 3353
Flora of New Brunswick (A)
5 ch (3C 3L)
A physiological approach to organismic function in animals, focussing
on homeostasis and nervous, muscular, and cardiovascular systems.
Prerequisites: BIOL 2615.
A practical taxonomy course dealing with a range of vascular plants:
ferns, fern allies, gymnosperms and flowering plants; consideration of
taxonomic concepts, literature and methods used to identify various
groups. Laboratory emphasis will be on features of important plant
families and identification of students plant collections. Prerequisite:
BIOL 2125.
BIOL 3075
BIOL 3355
BIOL 3055
Animal Physiology I (A)
Microscopy of Animal Cells &
Tissues (A)
4 ch (3C 3L*)
4 ch (2C/4L)
Practical aspects of various techniques of light microscopy and the
preparation of animal cells and tissues for examination by light
microscopy; introductory animal histology. Prerequisites: BIOL 2065
and permission of instructor.
BIOL 3132
Advanced Biochemistry
3 ch (3C)
Emphasizes the molecular underpinnings of the healthy and diseased
states by extending and integrating essential molecular concepts
introduced in Introductory Biochemistry - BIOL 2065. Prerequisite:
BIOL 2065.
BIOL 3140
Independent Studies
3 ch (WR)
Gives academically strong Biology Major students an opportunity to
write a library research report. The student should discuss the topic
with the staff member best qualified to give approval to the subject
matter and to give guidance during the year. Students must have a
cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better.
BIOL 3165
Marine Ecology (A)
4 ch (3C 3L*)
An introduction to the interrelationships between organism and
environment in marine ecosystems. Limited enrollment: preference will
be given to Marine Biology Majors, then other students based on
C.G.P.A. Pre-requisite: BIOL 2585.
BIOL 3173
Marine Biology Field Course
4 ch
An introduction to the study of the seashore and coastal waters with
emphasis on the nature and ecology of the littoral flora and fauna and
on practical methods of study. Held immediately after spring
examinations. Enrollment is limited; preference will be given to Marine
Biology Majors. Prerequisite: BIOL 2585.
BIOL 3215
Biology of Algae (A)
4 ch (3C 3L*)
(WR)
General characteristics and diversity of Algae: classification, lightharvesting pigments, reserve carbohydrates, cellular organizations,
morphology, levels of organization, reproduction and life cycles,
morphogenesis, evolution and phylogeny. Limited enrollment:
preference will be given to Marine Biology Majors, then other students
based on C.G.P.A. Prerequisite: BIOL 2125.
BIOL 3251
Introductory Microbiology
3 ch (3C)
Introduction to the fundamental concepts of infectious disease
microbiology. Discusses bacteria, fungi, viruses, protozoa, helminths
and arthropods. For Nursing students only (or with permission of
Instructor).
Survey of the Plant Kingdom (A)
5 ch (3C/3L)
Explores diversity in form, structure and function in major plant groups,
and how these organisms live and reproduce in their particular
environments. Probable homologies and evolutionary relationships are
discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 2125.
BIOL 3541
Plant Ecology (A)
5 ch (3C/3L)
A course on the factors affecting the distribution and abundance of
plants, how patterns and structure at the levels of populations and
communities can be described quantitatively, and how these arise from
the interaction of abiotic (climate, fire, soil) and biotic (competition,
herbivory) factors.
Prerequisites: BIOL 2125 and BIOL 2585.
BIOL 3565
Conservation Biology (A)
4 ch (2C 3L)
Emphasizes the management of environmental and ecological
resources in such a way as to maintain ecosystem resources for the
protection of species. Focus will be on methods of determining
population habitat requirements, community interactions, impacts of
habitat change, cumulative effects of environmental pressures, etc. in
coastal systems. Issues such as biodiversity, habitat protection,
endangered species protection, politics of conservation, etc. will also
be discussed. Prerequisites: BIOL 2585, STAT 2264.
BIOL 3605
Invertebrate Morphology (A)
5 ch (3C 3L)
In-depth study of invertebrate structure, development and phylogeny.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2615.
BIOL 3625
Functions of Invertebrate Animals 3 ch (3C)
(A)
Studies the functions and behaviour of selected invertebrate phyla,
emphasizing the organismic approach. Prerequisite: BIOL 2615.
BIOL 3635
Animal Physiology II (A)
4 ch (2C 4L)
A physiological approach to organismic function in animals, focussing
on endocrine and temperature effects on homeostasis; osmoregulation;
and the respiratory and urinary systems. Prerequisites: BIOL 3055.
BIOL 3663
Biology and Ecology of
Elasmobranchs
4 ch
The course will look at the evolution, taxonomy, ecology and physiology
of elasmobranch fishes, with an emphasis on sharks. The course will
consist of lectures, laboratory sessions, and field trips, beginning with 3
days at UNBSJ followed by 6 days at the BBS, Bahamas. Prerequisites:BIOL 2615 and BIOL 3055.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
191
SECTION F
BIOL 3685
Crustacean Biology (A)
3 ch (2C 3L*)
A discussion of the general biology of the Crustacea, with special
emphasis on marine representatives. Comparative aspects of anatomy,
physiology, behaviour, and life histories are considered. Limited
enrollment: preference will be given to Marine Biology Majors, then
other students based on C.G.P.A. Prerequisite: BIOL 2615.
BIOL 3715
Biology of Vertebrates
5 ch (3C 3L)
A comparative account, principally of the physiology and functional
anatomy of the higher vertebrates. Prerequisite: BIOL 2615.
BIOL 3755
Fish Biology (A)
5 ch (3C 3L)
A study of the anatomy, physiology, and classification of Recent fishes.
In classification and geographical distribution, emphasis is placed on
the marine northwest Atlantic fishes and freshwater fishes of New
Brunswick. Limited enrollment: preference will be given to Marine
Biology Majors, then other students based on C.G.P.A. Prerequisite:
BIOL 2615.
BIOL 3765
Fisheries Ecology (A)
3 ch (2C 3L*)
This course takes an ecological approach to fisheries management.
Topics include: age and growth, life history analysis, bioenergetics,
functional ecology, social behaviour, population estimates, recruitment
dynamics and management. Limited enrollment: preference will be
given to Marine Biology Majors, then other students based on C.G.P.A.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2615.
BIOL 3955
Biological Oceanography (A)
4 ch (3C 3L*)
A synopsis of descriptive physical and biological oceanography of the
world's oceans with special emphasis on Canadian coastal waters.
Laboratories emphasize techniques for measurement of oceanogrphic
parameters and include some field studies. Limited enrollment;
preference will be given to Marine Biology Majors, then other students
based on C.G.P.A. Prerequisites: BIOL 2585.
BIOL 4090
Honours Project
(4159). Current Topics in Biology
3 ch (2C)
A lecture/seminar course to acquaint students with some of the
outstanding recent developments in various fields. Restricted to
students majoring in Biology or Marine Biology. Prerequisite:
Permission of Instructor.
BIOL 4215
Ecophys. and Biochem. of
Seaweeds (A)
4 ch (3C 3L*)
(WR)
A brief description of the general characteristics of seaweeds and their
environment, followed by the study of the major factors affecting
seaweeds: physical, chemical, biological and human parameters.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2125.
BIOL 4295
Principles of Plant Pathology (A)
4 ch (2C 3L)
Introduces students with basic concepts of interactions between plant
hosts and fungal, bacterial and viral pathogens. Considers the roles of
phytotoxins, resistant mechanisms, and cellular metabolism during
pathogenesis. Prerequisite: BIOL 2125.
BIOL 4373
Tropical Marine Biology Field
Course
3 ch
An examination of tropical coastal ecosystems. The course will focus
on the ecology of coral reefs, tropical fish ecology and physiology,
tropical seaweed biology and mangrove ecology. The course consists
of lectures, fieldwork and laboratory work. Prerequisite: BIOL 3173 or
equivalent; or permission of instructor.
192
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Quantitative Ecology (A)
3 ch (2C 2T)
The development and application of fundamental models in ecology.
Topics include: population dynamics, competition, predator-prey
relationships and community models (both mechanistic and systems
approaches). Prerequisite: BIOL 2585.
BIOL 4592
Aquaculture (A)
4 ch (2C 3L)
The history, practice and future of aquaculture, with particular emphasis
on development of finfish aquaculture in Atlantic Canada. Topics
include: biology of growth, culture of live feed, hatchery techniques,
health, nutrition, engineering and economics. Limited enrollment;
preference will be given to Marine Biology Majors, then other students
based on C.G.P.A. Prerequisite: BIOL 2585.
BIOL 4645
Biology and Conservation of
Marine Mammals (A)
3 ch (3C) (WR)
The biology of seals, whales, and sea-cows. Life histories, behaviour,
reproduction, and population estimation techniques will receive special
emphasis. The biological, economic, and moral aspects of mans direct
and indirect influence on, and utilization of marine mammals will be
discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 2615.
BIOL 4693
Diversity and Systematics of
Marine Invertebrates
Introduces basic techniques for invertebrate identification, monitoring
and biodiversity assessment in rich and diverse invertebrate fauna of
the Quoddy Region. Practical work includes shipboard sampling, field
trips to coastal sites and laboratory exercises that present a broad
overview of invertebrates of intertidal, plankton and subtidal benthic
communities. The course is held at the Huntsman Marine Science
Centre, St. Andrews, and is twelve days in length. A charge of tuition,
full board and lodging is required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 2615 or equivalent.
BIOL 4775
9 ch (WR)
A Biology Honours student must undertake a thesis project with
permission of the Department. Students who intend to apply for this
elective are advised to consult with their intended faculty supervisor at
the beginning of their third year. Students should have a cumulative
grade point average of 3.5 or better.
BIOL 4155
BIOL 4585
Physiology of Marine Vertebrates
(A)
3 ch (3C)
A course on selected aspects of the comparative physiology of marine
fishes, reptiles, birds and mammals. Prerequisite: BIOL 3055.
BIOL 4825
Introduction to Ecotoxicology
4 ch (2C 3L)
A theoretical and applied approach to the science of ecotoxicology,
including application of the tools and procedures used to understand
toxicant fate and effects in ecosystems. Both field (eg. community level
environmental "effects" monitoring) and laboratory (eg. LC50 tests)
methods for understanding contaminant fates and effects will be
examined. Prerequisites: CHEM 2422, CHEM 2457.
BIOL 4855
Biometrics
3 ch (2C 2T)
Students are introduced to methods of statistical analysis relevant to
biological questions. Topics of study will include: experimental design,
how to deal with noisy data (transformations); parametric and nonparametric tests; how to deal with missing data; regression (linear &
non linear); statistical packages; and introduction to multivariate
statistics (PCA and DFA).
Prerequisite:STAT 2263 or equivalent.
BIOL 4861
Advanced Environmental Biology
(A)
4 ch (5C/L/S)
Continuation of BIOL 1302. The course will use case studies to explore
environmental issues, focussing on the role of biologists in
environmental studies and decision-making. Emphasis will be on the
types of interactions required of biologists, economists, community
members, activists, industrialists, lawyers, regulators, etc. in areas of
environmental law, policy, and economics for integrated environmental
and coastal zone management. Prerequisites: BIOL 1302,
ECON 2775.
SECTION F
BIOL 4875
Environmental Techniques (A)
4 ch (3C 3L*)
A techniques course, in which students will have practical experience in
sampling and analytical techniques, including: water, air and soil
sampling; plant and animal sampling in field and lab; and chemical
analyses of tissues and water, air and soil. Appropriate study design
and statistical analyses of collected data will be emphasized.
BIOL 4935
Comparative Animal Behaviour
3 ch (3C)
Physiological bases of behaviour, the animal in relation to its
environment, the animal in its social context, and the evolution of
behavioural displays and activities. Emphasizes the adaptive
significance of behavioural activities (ethology) rather than
experimental psychology. Prerequisite: BIOL 2615.
BIOLOGY-PSYCHOLOGY
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
BIPS 4000
Biology-Psychology Joint MajorHonours Project
6 ch
A Biology-Psychology student must complete a thesis project to
satisfy the requirements of the Honours program. A C.G.P.A. of 3.0 or
better at the end of the third year and the permission of the
Departments of Biology and Psychology are required for entry into the
program. The thesis is supervised and examined jointly by the two
Departments. The project will be assessed simply as a pass or fail.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
193
SECTION F
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
BA 1605
Course Numbering System
Basic probability concepts, random variables, descriptive measures,
properties of distributions, statistical decision theory and Bayesian
approaches are introduced. Discrete and continuous probability models
and their applications to business problems are also covered.
Prerequisite: Math 1853 or equivalent
The Faculty of Business uses the following numbering system for
courses offered by the School.
BA 2001
A first digit of:
Verbal Communications
3 ch
3 ch(3C)
Introduces students to topics related to business communications,
including preparing and delivering presentations, interviewing, basic
speaking and listening skills, and running business meetings. Emphasis
on experiential learning. Prerequisite: open only to BBA students with at
least 30 ch completed.
1
designates an introductory level course.
2
designates an intermediate level course which normally
has a prerequisite specified in the course designation.
3
designates an advanced level course which has one or
more prerequisites specified in the course description.
BA 2123
4
designates an advanced level course which normally
has prerequisites. These courses are intended for
senior students.
This is an introductory course that examines all facets of Internet
commerce. Topics covered include, creating and marketing products on
the Internet, electronic money and third party payments, virtual
organizations, security on the Internet, and the use of the Internet for
creating management information systems. Prerequisite: successful
completion of 24 ch of BBA, CS, or DA program or admission to the
Certificate in Electronic Commerce.
The second digit identifies the nature of the course, as follows:
1
general,
2
accounting,
3
marketing,
4
finance,
5
organizational behaviour and management,
6
quantitative analysis,
7
law,
8
industrial relations and human resource
management.
BA 2217
All courses listed in this section will not be offered each year. The official
timetable must be consulted for courses offered each year.
Note: In order to take a Business Administration (BA) course that has a
prerequisite, students must earn a C or better in the prerequisite
course(s), regardless of the program in which the student is registered.
See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and coding.
BA 1216
Accounting for Managers I
3 ch (3C)
Examines the uses of accounting information within and outside
organizations. Focuses on the impact of business events on the
financial statements. Introduces case studies, oral and written
presentations, group problem solving, and unstructured problems.
Prerequisite: Math 1853.
BA 1218
Accounting Lab
1 ch
A self-paced course that introduces the procedural aspects of
accounting. Students will receive a grade of either pass or fail.
Prerequisite: BA 1216
BA 1504
Intro. to Organizational Behaviour
3 ch (3C) [W]
An introduction to the contributions of the applied behavioural sciences
to the study of people at work in organizations. The fundamentals of
individual and group behaviour are covered as well as selected topics in
motivation, leadership, communication, conflict and organizational
change.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Accounting for Managers II
3 ch (3C)
3 ch (3C)
Principles of Marketing
3 ch (3C) [W]
A basic foundation of marketing theory and analysis, providing the
basic analytical framework from which to approach the decision-making
process and issues related to the marketing function. Prerequisites: BA
1216, 1504
BA 2606
COURSE OFFERINGS
Introduction to Electronic
Commerce
Continues the study of accounting by examining the uses of accounting
information within the organization. Case studies will be used
extensively. Emphasis placed on solving unstructured problems
through the use of cases and other materials. Oral and written
presentation skills are also emphasized. Credit will not be granted for
both BA2217 and HTM 2217. Prerequisite: BA 1216
BA 2303
The third and fourth digits distinguish different courses in the same field.
194
Business Decision Analysis I
Business Decision Analysis II
3 ch
Introduction to statistics, statistical techniques used in business
situations, sampling theory, estimation, hypothesis testing, Chi-square,
t and F distributions, Bayesian inference, association and trend
analysis, and their applications. Prerequisite: BA 1605.
BA 2663
Technology Fundamentals of
Electronic Commerce
3 ch (3C)
This course examines the technological basis of electronic commerce.
The computer-based network enabling electronic commerce is the
focus. Data and voice networks, Internet and telephony, bandwidth,
architecture, software strategies, and the Internet and WWW supplier
industries will be discussed with relevance to e-commerce
implementation planning. Prerequisites: BA2672.
BA 2672
Introduction to Management
Information Systems
3 ch (3C)
This course provides an introduction to the essential concepts of
management information systems. Students will focus on the
information needs to conduct business analysis and make decisions in
different business functions. How information technology and
information systems can contribute to the analysis and decision-making
processes will also be considered. Prerequisites: 30 credit hours or
admission to the Certificate in Electronic Commerce.
SECTION F
BA 2738
Administrative Law (O)
3 ch (3C)
Begins with a brief introduction to our Constitutional system. Then the
distinctions between judicial, quasi-judicial, and purely discretionary
power are developed through cases followed by a study of law relating
to notice, the right to a hearing, and the nature of hearings before
tribunals. Concludes with an examination of the interposition of judicial
review of administrative action and the legal remedies available to
protect individual rights adversely affected by the administrative
process.
BA 2758
Employment Law
3 ch (3C)
This course examines Canadian employment legislation and its
application. Includes a study of laws governing union-management
relations, work standards, employment equity, and relevant laws
governing recruitment, selection, and employment of personnel,
Differences in federal and provincial employment laws will be
discussed.
BA 2858
Introduction to Human Resource
Management
3 ch (3C)
BA 3224
Accounting for Managers III
3 ch (3C)
Continues the study of accounting for managerial planning and control.
Topics include measuring divisional performance, transfer pricing,
short-term decision models and revenue variance analysis.
Prerequisite: BA 2217 and BA 1218
BA 3235
Intermediate Accounting I
3 ch (3C)
Gives a more detailed understanding of accounting principles and
practices than is available in an introductory course. Topics to be
discussed include the definition and measurement of assets and of
income. This course combined with BA 3236 generally constitutes a
credit in the programs of the professional accounting organizations.
Prerequisite: BA 1218 and 2217
BA 3236
Intermediate Accounting II
3 ch (3C)
Includes an examination of the problems involved in the definition and
measurement of liabilities and stockholders equity, income taxes and
funds flow. Prerequisite: BA 3235.
BA 3304
Marketing Management
3 ch (3C) [W]
A study of the personnel function within an organization and its
relationship to the employees and to the labour market. Includes human
resource planning, recruitment and selection, training, performance
measurement, wage and salary administration, and job satisfaction.
Concludes with a discussion of current issues that affect personnel
administration. Prerequisite: BA 1504
Covers the application of theory and analytical tools from the marketing
management viewpoint. This integrated study will focus upon the
analysis and solution of complex marketing problems for a
contemporary environment. Topics include industrial, international, notfor-profit marketing; marketing of services, images and causes; and
ethical issues. Prerequisite: BA 2217, 2303
BA 2903
BA 3305
Work Term Report I
1 ch
Marketing on the Internet
3 ch (3C)
Identifies an opportunity or problem in the workplace, analyzes its
source and development, addresses key issues to be considered,
offers alternatives and makes recommendations including clear
provisions for implementation.
This course examines the integration of Internet in an organizations
marketing strategy. Topics include, goals for online marketing, customer
communications, interactive Internet pages, and customer service
issues. Prerequisites: BA 2123 and BA 2303 and BA 2663
BA 3123
BA 3328
Issues in Business and Society (O)
3 ch (3C)
Uses the applied social sciences as a theoretical framework for
analyzing the contemporary business organization in its environment.
Such topics as business ethics, the social responsibility of business,
pluralism, foreign ownership, consumerism, and the multinational
organization are examined. Trends are extrapolated to predict future
business and other institutional forms. Examines the many new
demands made on business by various groups e.g. consumers,
ecologists, employees, minorities, young people, anti-technology
groups, etc., and how they affect business decision making. Normally
open only to third and fourth year students. Prerequisite: BA 1504.
BA 3125
Industry Impact of Electronic
Commerce
3 ch (3C)
This courses addresses the implications of electronic commerce with a
broad industry level perspective. Students will develop the profile of
electronic commerce in a particular industry and will identify electronic
commerce opportunities for the industry and its member organizations.
Prerequisites: BA2123 and BA2663.
Consumer Behaviour
3 ch (3C) [W]
Designed to expose a variety of concepts, explain their interrelationships, and develop an understanding of consumer decision making
processes. Includes basic individual determinants of consumer
behaviour, environmental influences on consumers, purchase
processes, post-purchase processes, market segmentation, brand
loyalty and message appeals. Prerequisite: BA 2303.
BA 3339
Marketing Communications (A)
3 ch (3C) [W]
Examines forms of marketing communications, emphasizing their role
in the Canadian environment. Includes basic communications theory
related to basic consumer behaviour theory, media availability and
selection, promotion channels, personal selling, industry self-regulation,
role of government regulation. Prerequisite: BA 2303.
BA 3371
Marketing of Services
3 ch (3C)[W]
Introduction to current issues in electronic commerce, with emphasis on
the management of these issues. Prerequisites: BA2123 and BA2663.
This course builds on the basic marketing elements to enable the
student to contend with marketing problems and opportunities that
present themselves in the service industries. The marketing plan and
research techniques are applied to actual situations and marketing
issues. Cases, industry events and guest lecturers will supplement
class lectures and seminars. Prerequisite: BA 2303 or admission to the
BAM-HT degree.
BA 3134
BA 3425
BA 3126
Frontiers of E-Commerce I
Government and Business (A)
3 ch (3C)
3 ch (3C)
Examines the technological structure of major industries in order to
understand the basis for government intervention. Consideration is
given to anti-trust policy, subsidization, utility regulation and
government ownership in Canada. The strengths and weaknesses of
these techniques are considered. Open to third and fourth year
students who have appropriate background in the social sciences.
Managerial Finance
3 ch
An introduction to the foundations of financial management. Content
includes analysis of the financial environment and its components;
security valuation; capital budgeting and the cost of capital; working
capital management and financial planning. Prerequisite: BA 2217.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
195
SECTION F
BA 3547
Organizational Communication (A)
3 ch (3C) [W]
The communication process is explored from the individual, small
group, and organizational levels. Topic areas include perception and
communication, patterns of miscommunication, the motivational base of
communications, and organizational climate and communications. The
student is exposed to a variety of communication exercises and cases
in order to experience some of the issues and problems in
organizational communications. Prerequisite: BA 1504.
BA 3557
The Management of Planned Change 3 ch (3C)
(A)
Complex organizations in todays society find themselves immersed in a
world of social, political and economic change in which their survival
depends on innovation and adaptation. The course familiarizes the
student with techniques for diagnosing the need for organization
change, ways of designing adaptive organization systems, and the
methods and problems of persons functioning as change agents within
organizations. Prerequisite: BA 1504.
BA 3615
Managerial Forecasting (O)
3 ch (3C)
Considers forecasting functions in an enterprise, quantitative and
qualitative techniques and their characteristics, and selection and
implementation of forecasting techniques. Emphasizes the basic
concepts underlying different techniques and their suitability to various
decision-making situations. Prerequisite: BA 2606 or equivalent.
BA 3616
Special Topics in Managerial
Forecasting (O)
3 ch (3C)
An extension of BA 3615. A critical evaluation of forecasting practices in
a selected industry. A project is required of all students registered for
credit. Prerequisite: BA 3615.
BA 3623
Management Science: Deterministic
Models
3 ch (3C)
Deterministic models and solution methods applicable to business
systems. Linear programming, network analysis, dynamic
programming, and inventory models are included. Prerequisite: BA
1605 or the equivalent, Math 1853 or the equivalent.
BA 3624
Management Science: Probabilistic
Models (O)
3 ch(3C)
Stochastic inventory models, queuing theory and computer simulation
are considered. Prerequisite: BA 3623 or the equivalent.
BA 3645
Management Systems Analysis I (O) 3 ch (3C)
Planning and control problems within an organization are studied using
a systems approach. Systems representation for the purpose of
analysis and improvement. Includes systems definition, description,
classification, hierarchies, controls, memories and simplification.
Prerequisite: BA 3623 or equivalent.
BA 3646
Management Systems Analysis II (O) 3 ch (3C)
Systems design and simulation and techniques of analysis and
improvement are considered. Case studies from business and social
systems demonstrate the techniques and their applicability.
Prerequisite: BA 3645.
BA 3653
Production and Operations
Management I
3 ch (3C)
Discusses the design and implementation of production and operations
systems in manufacturing and non-manufacturing environments. Topics
include process design and development, facilities layout, production
and operations planning, capacity planning, materials management,
information flow and quality control. A systems approach is utilized
throughout this course. Prerequisite: BA 3623 and 2606.
196
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
BA 3654
Production and Operations
Management II (O)
3 ch (3C)
A continuation of BA 3653 with an emphasis on contemporary
developments in the field.
BA 3705
Business Law
3 ch (3C)
Introduction to the Law of Torts, contracts; particularly those relevant to
businesses such as debtor/creditor, sale of goods, mortgages, leases,
forms of business organizations. Credit will not be granted for BA 2703/
BA 2704 or BA 2705 and BA3705.
BA 3715
Labour Law (O)
3 ch (3C)
Examines Canadian labour legislation and its application. Includes a
study of the law governing: union-management relations, collective
bargaining, certification, Labour Relations Boards, the legal application
of economic pressure, injunctions, strikes, picketing, appeals, and all
related remedies. Includes an examination of constitutional differences
between Federal and Provincial legislation. Prerequisite: BA 3813.
BA 3718
Legal, Privacy, and Security Issues
in Electronic Commerce
3 ch (3C)
This course deals with the various systems that provide privacy and
security on the Internet, as well as the legal issues that arise in
electronic commerce. Includes an examination of encryption, fire walls,
user authentication, as well as copyright of intellectual property and
contracts. Prerequisite: BA 2123 and BA 2663; or BA 2123 and CS
2803, CS 2403, and CS 2513
BA 3813
Introduction to Industrial Relations
3 ch (3C)
Provides a general introduction to the field of industrial relations. The
objectives and values of the various parties involved in collective
bargaining in the private and the public sectors are identified.
Consideration is given to how these are modified in the bargaining
process. The role of industrial conflict and dispute settlement
procedures are examined. Prerequisite: BA 1504.
BA 3817
Contemporary Industrial Relations
(O)
3 ch (3C)
Designed for students who wish to develop a better understanding of
some of the major problems confronting labour and management in
Canada today. Includes such issues as the structure and philosophy of
the labour movement, international unionism, public policy and
grievance arbitration, collective bargaining in the private and public
sectors, union democracy and incomes policy. Prerequisite: BA 3813.
BA 3903
Co-op Work Term Report II
1 ch
Identifies an opportunity or problem in the workplace, analyzes its
source and development, addresses key issues to be considered,
offers alternatives and makes recommendations including clear
provisions for implementation.
BA 4003
Independent Study - Electronic
Commerce
3 ch
This course will provide the student with a deepening knowledge in the
Electronic Commerce area. Under the supervision of a Faculty member,
the student will explore topics not available in the regular course
offerings. The course may consist of written assignments, oral
examinations and written examinations. Students must identify a faculty
member who is willing to supervise the course and apply to the Director,
Undergraduate Studies for approval at least 30 days prior to the term in
which they wish to undertake the work. Applications are normally
approved for students who are in their senior year and who have
obtained a grade point average of at least 3.0 in the work of the second
and third years.
SECTION F
BA 4101
Competitive Strategy I
3 ch (3C) [W]
Integrates material from other courses from a top management
perspective, including factors that influence decision makers and the
decision making process. Defines strategy. Concentrates on
development of strategies for organizations competing in a single
industry. Analyzes industry structure and dynamics and resources and
processes that enable an organization to develop and sustain
competitive advantages. NOTE: credit will not be granted for both
BA4101 and HTM 4101. Prerequisites: Credit in all courses required for
the BBA except BA 3705.
BA 4103
Independent Study - Management
3 ch
This course will provide the student with a deepening knowledge in the
Management area. Under the supervision of a Faculty member, the
student will explore topics not available in the regular course offerings.
The course may consist of written assignments, oral examinations and
written examinations. Students must identify a faculty member who is
willing to supervise the course and apply to the Director, Undergraduate
Studies for approval at least 30 days prior to the term in which they wish
to undertake the work. Applications are normally approved for students
who are in their senior year and who have obtained a grade point
average of at least 3.0 in the work of the second and third years.
BA 4107
Studies in Small Business (A)
3 ch (3C LE) [W]
A seminar course designed to acquaint students with the problems of
starting and operating a small business. Class discussions focus on
actual small business successes and failures. Frequently, local
business owners join in discussions. Emphasis is on written and videotaped cases and on a high degree of student participation.
BA 4108
Management of New Enterprise (A)
Management of Online Business
3 ch (3C)
A project course in which students prepare a proposal for (a)launching
a new product or service on the Internet (b) extending an existing
business onto the Internet. The proprosal will include a plan for an
online business. Students cannot receive credit for both BA 4108 and
BA 4109. Prerequisites: BA 2123, BA 2663, BA 3305 and BA 3425.
Research Report (O)
3 ch (3C) [W]
These courses involve planning and carrying out a research project or a
theoretical investigation under the supervision of a faculty member.
Wide latitude is given in the selection of topics and in the methods for
investigation but all projects must be approved by the Undergraduate
Studies Committee before the last day for adding courses in the term.
Students must present written reports and defend them before a
committee from the Faculty. Applications are normally approved for
students who are in their senior year and who have obtained a grade
point average of at least 3.0 in the work of the second and third years.
Prerequisite: BA 4129 or the equivalent.
BA 4173
Strategic Management and
Information
3 ch (3C)
An integrative course on strategy relevant to top managers of
businesses. Emphasizes the acquisition and exchange of information
within and among organizations and their environments. Topics include
diversification, competition and resource allocation in complex and
turbulent economic, technological, international, political and social
situations. Examines corporate forms and transformations appropriate
to various strategies, including virtual organizations. Prerequisites: All
courses specifically required for the BBA degree except BA 3705.
BA 4177
Advanced Topics in Government (O) 3 ch (3C)
An advanced course which examines a number of issues in the fields of
business, government and society. Special emphasis on current
problems. Prerequisite: BA 3123.
BA 4193
3 ch (3C LE) [W]
A project course designed to allow students to prepare a proposal for
starting a new business or to write a case study of an existing
enterprise. In the latter case, the business people involved frequently
participate in the classroom discussion. Students cannot receive credit
for both BA4108 and BA4109. Prerequisites: BA 1216, 2303 and 4107.
BA 4109
BA 4147/
BA 4148
International and Comparative
Management (O)
3 ch(3C)
Introduces and surveys international business and management.
Examines the environment in which international business occurs; the
role of culture, political systems and level of economic development in
differentiation of management patterns; and formation and
implementation of global business strategies in the international
environment, focusing on political, social and cultural issues.
BA 4203
Independent Study - Accounting
3 ch
In-depth examination of current issues in electronic commerce, with
emphasis on the management of these issues. Prerequisites: BA2123,
BA2663, and one of BA3718, BA3126, or BA3305. Students should be
in their final 30 credit hours of BBA program.
This course will provide the student with a deepening knowledge in the
Accounting area. Under the supervision of a Faculty member, the
student will explore topics not available in the regular course offerings.
The course may consist of written assignments, oral examinations and
written examinations. Students must identify a faculty member who is
willing to supervise the course and apply to the Director, Undergraduate
Studies for approval at least 30 days prior to the term in which they wish
to undertake the work. Applications are normally approved for students
who are in their senior year and who have obtained a grade point
average of at least 3.0 in the work of the second and third years.
BA 4129
BA 4207
BA 4126
Frontiers of E-Commerce II
Research Methodology
3 ch (3C)
3 ch (SLE)
A discussion of measurement issues as they pertain to the human
resources function. This course will focus on reliability, validity, and
other measurement issues within the context of personnel selection,
performance appraisal, and other human resources topics. Normally a
prerequisite for research projects to be undertaken under BA 4147 and
4148. Prerequisites: BA 2606 and 2858.
Current Accounting Issues
3 ch (3C)
Concentrates on the application of accounting theory to controversial
areas in financial reporting. Topics covered vary according to the
changing importance of current accounting issues. Coverage includes
price level accounting and human resource accounting. Prerequisite:
BA 3236.
BA 4221
Advanced Management Accounting
3 ch (3C)
Cost accounting information and its use in managerial control. Deals in
detail with cost accumulation, job and process costing, standard
costing, and variance analysis. Supplements the material contained in
BA 3224. Examines uses of costing techniques in other than
manufacturing situations. Uses case material extensively. Prerequisite:
BA 3224.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
197
SECTION F
BA 4223
Accounting Information Systems
3 ch (3C)
Introduces the important role that accounting information systems play
in todays business world. Emphasizes the accounting information
systems function of collecting, recording, and storing business data in
order to produce the information for sound business decisions.
Prerequisite: BA 2217.
BA 4227
Contemporary Issues in
Management Accounting (O)
3 ch(3C)
Students knowledge of the role of accountants in managerial planning
and control is expanded. The interface between accounting and
management science is emphasized.
BA 4229
Advanced Accounting
3 ch (3C)
Selected topics in advanced accounting including branch office
accounting and governmental accounting. Consolidated financial
statements are covered in detail. Prerequisite: BA 3236.
BA 4237
Income Taxation
3 ch (3C)
Examines the effects of government policies on determining the level of
business income tax in Canada. Emphasis is on corporate taxation.
Examines the concepts of the Canadian income tax system with a
critical review of existing practices, combined with some study of
current income tax laws and practices. Prerequisite: BA 2217
BA 4238
Auditing
3 ch (3C)
Examines the roles, responsibilities and legal liabilities of internal and
external auditors in Canada and their professional organizations. Topics
developed include internal control systems and their evaluation; audit
evidence and problems related to the audit of particular assets,
liabilities, capital and income accounts. A brief study is also made of
audit procedures and priorities. Prerequisite: BA 3236 and one of BA
4223 or BA 2672.
BA 4242
Accounting Theory (A)
3 ch (3C)
Focuses on accounting literature, especially with respect to financial
reporting and accounting standard setting. Prerequisite: BA 3235
BA 4303
Independent Study - Marketing
3 ch
This course will provide the student with a deepening knowledge in the
Marketing area. Under the supervision of a Faculty member, the
student will explore topics not available in the regular course offerings.
The course may consist of written assignments, oral examinations and
written examinations. Students must identify a faculty member who is
willing to supervise the course and apply to the Director, Undergraduate
Studies for approval at least 30 days prior to the term in which they wish
to undertake the work. Applications are normally approved for students
who are in their senior year and who have obtained a grade point
average of at least 3.0 in the work of the second and third years.
BA 4319
Marketing Research (A)
3 ch (3C)
A course on how to design, conduct and analyze the results of research
for marketing decisions. Includes problem formulation, data issues such
as obtaining and organizing data, advanced analytic techniques,
questionnaire design, market testing. Prerequisites: BA 3304, 3328 and
2604.
BA 4334
Public and Non-Profit Marketing (O)
3 ch (3C) [W]
Focuses on the application of traditional marketing concepts to the non
business sector. Types of organizations studied include government,
universities, performing arts groups, charities, political groups and
health care facilities. Students are encouraged to specialize in one or
two areas of interest through a major project. Class time will be divided
among lecture, case discussion and student presentations.
Prerequisite: Credit in BA 3304.
198
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
BA 4398
International Marketing
3 ch (3C) [W]
Examines planning marketing strategies for international markets
including operations of multinational firms. The main purpose is to show
how companies entering the global market should analyze international
marketing environment, identify different kinds of international
opportunities, decide which particular markets to enter, decide how to
enter the chosen market, develop marketing mix strategies for the
chosen market and develop an effective organization for pursuing
international marketing. Prerequisite: BA 3304.
BA 4418
Advanced Financial Management
(O)
3 ch (3C)
Primarily a case course designed to give students experience in
applying the knowledge acquired in BA 3413, supplemented with
readings to expand their knowledge. Attention is given to problems of
measuring the efficiency of operations, valuation, mergers,
reorganization and liquidation. Of interest to those concerned with
utilization of accounting and financial information. Prerequisite: BA
3425.
BA 4437
Investment Analysis and Portfolio
Management (0)
3 ch (3C)
Introduces students to a basic knowledge of investment media, security
markets, security analysis and the role of financial intermediaries in the
investment process. Emphasis on the interpretation of economic
indicators and analysis of published financial information in order to
select superior investment opportunities. Technical analysis, random
walk theory and optimal portfolio selection are covered. Application of
quantitative techniques is an essential component of the course.
Prerequisite: BA 3425.
BA 4448
Canadian Financial Institutions (O)
3 ch (3C)
Examines the various financial institutions both federal and provincial
with attention to their role as suppliers of capital to the market, including
the chartered banks, finance companies, trust companies, insurance
companies, mutual funds, mortgage loan companies, pension funds,
credit unions and caisses populaires. Attention is given to other
functions of these institutions. Prerequisite: BA 3425
BA 4455
Derivatives: Options and Futures
3 ch
This course will examine the evolution of the derivative markets, market
micro-structure, trading strategies, pricing models, and risk
management using derivative instruments such as futures, options and
swaps. Prerequisite: BA 3425.
BA 4501
Organization Theory and Design (O)
3 ch (3C)[W]
An intensive study of the construction and management of complex
organizations. Appropriate structural configurations for various market
and technology combinations are discussed. In addition, the function
and limitations of various structural components are presented.
Prerequisite: BA 1504.
BA 4506
Organizations and Electronic
commerce
3 ch (3C)
This courses focuses on the internal changes that happen in an
organization when it implements electronic commerce. Redesign of
organizational structures, jobs, processes and workflow will be
considered. Intranets, extranets, and enterprise integration will also be
explored. Prerequisites: BA2123, BA2663, BA2672, and one of
BA3718, BA3125, or BA3305.
SECTION F
BA 4519
The Corporation, the Union, and
Society (O)
3 ch (S)
BA 4813
Negotiations and Dispute
Resolutions
3 ch (3C)
Development of the large corporation and the large union pose new
problems both for the individual and for society. Examines the reasons
for this growth and how the problems created might be dealt with within
the framework of a basically private enterprise economy. The changing
concept of property rights and its significance together with the
problems being created by the multinational corporation are
examined.Open to senior students in Business and to senior students in
Arts who have an appropriate background in the social sciences.
The aim of this course is to provide an in-depth examination of conflict,
negotiation and dispute resolution principles. The course has four
specific objectives: to increase students understanding of the causes
and consequences of conflict, to explore various methods of reducing
or resolving conflict, to develop an understanding of the different levels
and sources of conflict and to apply negotiation and dispute resolution
principles to various aspects of industrial relations. Prerequisite: BA
3813.
BA 4557
BA 4827
Organizational Development (O)
3 ch (3C) [W]
Explores a variety of organizational development techniques designed
to improve the effectiveness of organizations: job enrichment, team
building, process consultation, role analysis and confrontation
meetings. On completing the course the student should be able to
discuss the basic characteristics of a wide range of organizational
development techniques and evaluate the potential application of these
strategies for solving organizational problems. Particularly helpful to
those who intend to work in the personnel, management development
or organizational development functions within professional or
administrative organizations. Prerequisite: BA 1504.
BA 4603
Independent Study - Quantitative
Methods
3 ch
This course will provide the student with a deepening knowledge in the
Quantitative Methods area. Under the supervision of a Faculty member,
the student will explore topics not available in the regular course
offerings. The course may consist of written assignments, oral
examinations and written examinations. Students must identify a faculty
member who is willing to supervise the course and apply to the Director,
Undergraduate Studies for approval at least 30 days prior to the term in
which they wish to undertake the work. Applications are normally
approved for students who are in their senior year and who have
obtained a grade point average of at least 3.0 in the work of the second
and third years.
BA 4644
Project Management (O)
3 ch (3C)
Presents and explores a project management framework. Also
illustrates general principles and concepts in the context of information
systems development projects.
BA 4673
Management Information Systems I
3 ch (3C) [W]
Manager-user oriented, this course focuses on the information needs of
managers and the satisfaction of these needs through the design and
implementation of information systems for operations, management
and strategic planning and control. Prerequisites: BA 2672.
BA 4803
Independent Study - Human
Resource Management & Industrial
Relations
3 ch
This course will provide the student with a deepening knowledge in the
Human Resource Management & Industrial Relations area. Under the
supervision of a Faculty member, the student will explore topics not
available in the regular course offerings. The course may consist of
written assignments, oral examinations and written examinations.
Students must identify a faculty member who is willing to supervise the
course and apply to the Director, Undergraduate Studies for approval at
least 30 days prior to the term in which they wish to undertake the work.
Applications are normally approved for students who are in their senior
year and who have obtained a grade point average of at least 3.0 in the
work of the second and third years.
(4522). Public Policy and Labour
Management Relations (O)
3 ch
Examines the influence of labour law on the development and growth of
trade unionism in Canada and the United States. Emphasizes the role
of public policy with regard to labour-management relations. Topics
include certification, unfair labour practices, collective agreements,
disputes settlements and picketing. Designed for students with a strong
interest in the field of industrial relations.Limited enrollment. May be
taken only with the approval of the instructor.
BA 4839
Collective Bargaining (O)
3 ch (S)
A detailed examination of the institution and process of collective
bargaining. Topics include the evolution of bargaining, theories of
bargaining power and behaviour, and the relevant legislative framework
in Canada and in the United States. Students interested in how
collective bargaining decisions are made have an opportunity to
participate in a bargaining simulation. Prerequisite: BA 3817.
BA 4847
Collective Bargaining in the Public
Sector (O)
3 ch (S)
A study of unionization and collective bargaining among federal and
provincial employees. Includes the nature of public sector employer and
employee associations, bargaining processes and issues, relevant
federal and provincial legislation, the public sector dispute and the
application of various impasse procedures. Enables students to
compare the practice of collective bargaining in the public and private
sectors. Prerequisite: BA 3817.
BA 4853
Recruitment and Selection
3 ch (3C)
This course is designed to acquaint students with important issues in
the recruitment and selection of employees. The roles of job analysis in
the development of selection programs will be stressed. Strategies for
effective recruitment will be discussed as will the various selection
devices available to organizations. In all cases, the legal context of
recruitment and selection will be considered. Prerequisite: BA 2858
BA 4854
Training and Development
3 ch (3C)
This course is designed to familiarize students with issues and
techniques of training in organizations. Emphasis will be placed on an
assessment of training needs, instructional methods, and evaluation of
training outcomes. Prerequisite: BA 2858.
BA 4855
Compensation Structure
Development
3 ch (3C) [W]
Explores the theory and practice of compensation structure
development based on concepts of internal and external equity. Internal
equity focuses on assessing the relative worth of different jobs in an
organization through job evaluation. External equity involves assigning
pay levels to different jobs in an organization based on data collected
from wage and salary surveys of competitors. Students are required to
apply concepts and techniques discussed in class within a goup project
that entails developing a compensation structure for a hypothetical
company. Prerequisite: BA 2858.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
199
SECTION F
BA 4856
Evaluating and Rewarding
Employee Performance
3 ch (3C) [W]
Explores the theory and practice of performance appraisal and
performance-based pay. Performance appraisal topics include
appraisal instruments, sources of appraisal, increasing appraisal
accuracy, and conducting appraisal interviews. Performance-based pay
topics include traditional merit pay as well as incentive plans, gain
sharing, and profit sharing. Students are required to apply concepts and
techniques discussed in class within several assignements and/or
exercises. Prerequisite: BA 2858.
BA 4858
International Human Resource
Management
3 ch (3C)
Provides a comparative study of human resource practices and policies
in countries with which Canada has major trade relations. Emphasis is
placed on examining the efficacy of Canadian practices in other
countries such as Western and Eastern Europe, South America, and
Asia. Prerequisite: BA 2858
BA 4866
Management of Technology (0)
3 ch (3C)
A study of the critical role that technology, particularly information
technology, plays in competition. The emphasis will be on aligning
human resources practices and technological and organizational
strategies. Prerequisite: BA 2858
BA 4893
International Industrial Relations (O) 3 ch (3C)
This course is concerned with the analysis of industrial relations in the
worlds developed economies. It will focus on those institutions, policies,
and practices which cross national boundaries, such as the
employment relations aspects of multinational companies, employers
associations and labour organizations. In the process, the course will
analyze the factors which have shaped industrial relations in selected
countries, with particular attention being paid to Canada, Australia,
Britain, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden and the USA. Prerequisite:
BA 3813.
BA 4898
Strategic HRM Policy
3ch(3C) [W]
Explores the formulation and implementation of HRM strategies
designed to facilitate the effective and efficient operations of
organizations. Students are expected to integrate the material learned
in other HRM courses and apply their accumulated knowledge to HRM
issues posed in numerous case studies. The course will be taught
primarily via case analyses and extensive class discussion. All other
courses required for the HRM major, including the five compulsory
courses BA 1504, BA 2758, BA 2858, BA 3813, and BA 4129 as well as
six chs of HRM electives selected from the following courses: BA 4813,
BA 4853, BA 4854, BA 4855, BA 4856, BA 4866.
BA 4903
Work Term Report III.
1 ch
Identifies an opportunity or problem in the workplace, analyzes its
source and development, addresses key issues to be considered,
offers alternatives and makes recommendations including clear
provisions for implementation.
200
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SECTION F
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
A grade of C or higher is required in all Chemical Engineering courses.
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
CHE 1004
Introduction to Chemical
Engineering
3 ch (2C 1L*)
An introduction to the nature of the chemical industry. The basis for
systems of units and the concept of fundamental units. The basic
principles and calculations required to systematically perform material
balances on industrial chemical processes. Computer self-teaching
programs will be used. A description of some major chemical industries
such as petroleum, pulp and paper, sulfuric acid and caustic chlorine
will be presented. Note: the subsequent course, CHE 2004, is taken in
Year 3 at UNBF.
CHE 2412
Chemical Engineering Laboratory I 3 ch (1C 3L)[W]
Bomb and flow calorimetry, material and energy balance study of the
University heating plant, fluid mechanics experiments including
flowmeter calibrations and pressure drop measurements in pipes and
fittings. Report writing is emphasized. Co-requisite: CE 2703.
CHE 2503
Materials Science
4 ch (3C 3L*)
The principles relating the properties and behaviour of engineering
materials to their structure; atomic bonding forces and strength of
interatomic and intermolecular bonding forces, atomic arrangements in
solids, structural imperfections and atom movements in solids;
principles of phase diagrams and their application to multiphase
materials, with particular reference to the iron-carbon system;
mechanical and electrical properties of engineering materials, metals,
semiconductors, polymers and ceramics, and their relation to internal
structure. Laboratory experiments are conducted to illustrate behaviour
of materials. Prerequisite: CHEM 1882 or each of CHEM 1041, CHEM
1046, CHEM 1072, CHEM 1077.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
201
SECTION F
CHEMISTRY
CHEM 2237
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and coding.
CHEM 1041
General Chemistry I
3 ch (3C 1T)
Introductory course designed primarily for BSc students. Prerequisite:
Grade 12 Chemistry or equivalent. Corequisite: MATH 1003.
CHEM 1046
Introductory Chemistry Laboratory 2 ch (3L)
I
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
2 ch (3L)
Introduction to preparative techniques in inorganic chemistry.
Emphasis on Main Group and Transition Element coordination
chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 1041, CHEM 1046, CHEM 1072,
CHEM 1077, CHEM 2201; Co-requisite: CHEM 2222.
CHEM 2401
Organic Chemistry I
3 ch (3C)
An introductory course. Topics include bonding, elementary stereochemistry, optical isomerism, functional groups, structure
determination, reactions of alkenes and alkynes. Prerequisite: CHEM
1072.
A selection of experiments to accompany CHEM 1041. Corequisite:
CHEM 1041 or equivalent.
CHEM 2416
CHEM 1072
Introduction to experimental (organic) chemistry. Part I. Prerequisite:
CHEM 1077. Corequisite: CHEM 2401.
General Chemistry II
3 ch (3C 1T)
A continuation of CHEM 1041. Prerequisite: CHEM 1041. Corequisite:
MATH 1013 or MATH 1003 repeated.
CHEM 1077
Introductory Chemistry
Laboratory II
2 ch (3L)
A selection of experiments to accompany CHEM 1072. Prerequisite:
CHEM 1046 or equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 1072.
CHEM 1831
Chemistry for Non-Scientists
Chemistry for Health Sciences
3 ch (3C)
An introduction to organic chemistry, including classification,
nomenclature, and reactivity; biochemistry and metabolism of
carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins; aspects of body fluids, enzymes
and nucleic acids. Prerequisite: A mark of 70% or greater in grade 12
chemistry or CHEM 1831.
CHEM 1882
General Chemistry-Physical and
Inorganic
5 ch (3C 3L)
CHEM 2111
Introductory Analytical Chemistry
CHEM 2441
5 ch (3C 3L)
3 ch (3C)
Organic Chemistry for Biological
Sciences
3 ch (3C)
An introductory course intended primarily for students requiring a one
term course in organic chemistry. Topics covered include all principal
functional groups including carboxylic acids, amines and amides, as
well as specialized topics such as stereochemistry, carbohydrates and
lipids. It is a survey course designed to provide a broader coverage
than in CHEM 2401. It is not suitable as a prerequisite to CHEM 2422.
Credit will not be given for both CHEM 2401 and 2441.
Prequisite: CHEM 1072.
CHEM 2457
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
2 ch (3L) (WR)
A laboratory course involving synthesis and purification of organic
compounds, stereochemistry, isolation and structure elucidation of
natural compounds (by both qualitative and spectroscopic methods).
Prerequisite: CHEM 2416. Corequisite CHEM 2422.
CHEM 2601
Intended primarily for Engineering (other than chemical) students who
require an introduction to physical and inorganic chemistry. Covers
states of matter, chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, thermodynamics
and chemical kinetics. Prerequisite: Grade 12 Chemistry (70%) or
CHEM 1041.
Organic Chemistry I
2 ch (3L) (WR)
A continuation of CHEM 2401. Topics include stereochemistry,
structure determination, alkyl halides, nucleophilic substitution and
elimination reactions and their synthetic utility. Prerequisite: CHEM
2401.
3 ch (3C)
An introduction to basic concepts of chemistry. Covers aspects of
atomic and molecular structure, periodic table, forces between
particles, bonding, chemical reactions, radiation, stoichiometry,
oxidation and reduction, solutions, reaction rates and equilibrium, acidbase reactions. An introduction to organic chemistry. Prerequisite(s):
None.
CHEM 1842
CHEM 2422
Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
Chemical Thermodynamics
3 ch (3C)
The three laws of thermodynamics, thermochemical calculations,
chemical equilibria, introduction to phase rule. Prerequisites: CHEM
1072 and MATH 1003/1013. Corequisite: MATH 2003 or equivalent.
CHEM 2622
Electrochemistry and Chemical
Kinetics
3 ch (3C)
Theory and practice. Topics include concepts of acid-base, redox,
precipitation and solvent extraction equilibria; sample handling and
preparation; calibration techniques; error analysis and regression
analysis; titrimetric and spectrophometric analysis. Prerequisites:
CHEM 1072/1077.
Elementary electrochemistry, electrochemical cells, electrolysis,
electromotive forces, applications of EMF measurements. Reaction
kinetics and mechanisms, uni-, bi-, and termomolecular reactions,
catalysis, enzyme catalysis, chain reactions, reaction dynamics, steric
effects and transition state theory. Prerequisite: CHEM 2601.
Corequisite: MATH 2213, 2513, or equivalent.
CHEM 2201
CHEM 2637
Introduction to Inorganic
Chemistry I
3 ch (3C)
Bonding, structures, and reactions of compounds of both main group
and transition elements. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in
CHEM 1041 and CHEM 1072.
CHEM 2222
Introduction to Inorganic
Chemistry II
3 ch (3C)
Bonding, structures, and reactions of compounds of both main group
and transition elements. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in
CHEM 2201.
202
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Physical Chemistry Laboratory
2 ch (3L)
Introduction to experimental physical chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM
1077. Corequisite: CHEM 2622.
CHEM 2886
Chemistry Laboratory for
Chemical Engineers I
2 ch (3L)
Consists of experiments in conventional and instrumental analysis.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1072, CHEM 1077.
SECTION F
CHEM 2897
Chemistry Laboratory for
Chemical Engineers II
2 ch (3L)
Consists of a selection of experiments in conventional and instrumental
analysis and physical chemistry. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2601, CHEM
2886, Co-requisite: CHEM 2662.
CHEM 3202
Inorganic Chemistry I
Inorganic Chemistry II
3 ch (3C)
Structure and chemistry of the elements; both main groups and
transition metals and their compounds. Prerequisite: A grade of C or
better CHEM 3202.
CHEM 3236
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
2 ch (3L)
Preparative, analytical, and instrumental techniques in Main Group and
Transition Metal; organic, organometallic and coordination chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 2237; Co-requisite: CHEM 3202.
CHEM 3401
Organic Chemistry III
3 ch (3C)
Spectroscopic methods in organic chemistry, background and
application to structure determination. Organic stereochemistry,
symmetry elements and operations, stereoisomerism. Principles of
stereochemical methodology. Prerequisite: CHEM 2422.
CHEM 3416
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
A grade of C or higher is required in all Civil Engineering courses.
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
3 ch (3C)
Structure and chemistry of the elements; both main groups and
transition metals and their compounds. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or
better in CHEM 2201 and CHEM 2222.
CHEM 3221
CIVIL ENGINEERING
2 ch (4L)
CE 1003
Introduction to Civil Engineering
3 ch (3C) [W]
An introduction to the many aspects of the field of civil engineering,
including key concepts and case histories. Application of basic
engineering principles to the solution of civil engineering problems.
Team problem solving and design. Prerequisites: None
CE 1013
Applied Mechanics I : Statistics
4 ch (3C 1T)
This course is designed to introduce first year engineering students to
the fundamental concepts of two- and three-dimensional force
systems. Related concepts such as centroids and moments of inertia
are also introduced. Practical applications include frames, machines,
trusses and beams. Prerequisite: None
CE 2023
Mechanics of Materials
5 ch (3C 3L)
Analysis of stress and strain; torsion; shear and moment in beams;
deflection of beams; behaviour of columns; pressure vessels; energy
methods; shear centre. Prerequisite: CE 1013. Corequisite: MATH
1013.
CE 2603
Construction Engineering I
3 ch (2C 1T)
Application of UV, IR, and NMR spectroscopy, special synthetic
methods, isolation of naturally occurring compounds. Prerequisite:
CHEM 2416. Corequisite: CHEM 3401.
Responsibilities and relationships of participants in the construction
industry. Standard contract documents, contractor resources and
project control. Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 45 credit
hours.
CHEM 3422
CE 2703
Organic Chemistry IV
3 ch (3C)
Chemistry of carbonyl group, carbonion chemistry, pericyclic reactions,
aromatic substitution, organic synthesis, special topics. Prerequisite:
CHEM 3401.
CHEM 3437
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
2 ch (4L)
Resolution of enantiomers; advanced synthetic methods - Grignard,
Diels-Alder, Wittig, etc. Prerequisite: CHEM 2416. Corequisite: CHEM
3422.
Fluid Mechanics
3 ch (3C)
Physical properties of liquids and gases, fluid statics, kinematics of
fluid flow, energy considerations in steady flow, momentum and
dynamic forces in fluid flow, fluid measurements, introduction to forces
on immersed bodies. Prerequisite: CE 1013, MATH 1013.
CE 2953
Civil Engineering Systems
Analysis
4 ch (3C 1T)
Modeling system response with multiple linear regression and stepwise regression. Time series analysis and forecasting; sampling
techniques; quality control; non-parametric tests. An introduction to
optimization and the application of applied probability to the design and
operation of civil engineering systems. Prerequisite: STAT 2593.
CE 3033
Structural Analysis
5 ch (3C 3L)
Influence lines for beams and trusses; analyses of indeterminate
structures including approximate, classical, moment distribution, and
numerical methods. Prerequisite: CE 2023.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
203
SECTION F
CLASSICS AND ANCIENT HISTORY
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
See also Greek and Latin.
CLAS 1005
Ancient History: Greek and Roman 3ch [W]
People
An introduction to the history of ancient Greece and Rome through
famous and lesser known individuals. This course is designed to
introduce students to historical inquiry and techniques through the
study of antiquity.
CLAS 1501
Greek Myth and Religion
3 ch [W]
An introduction to the divine and heroic myths and to the religion of the
Greek world. There will also be consideration of the various
approaches to the interpretation of myths.
CLAS 1502
Roman Myth and Religion
3 ch [W]
An introduction to the divine and heroic myths and to the religion of the
Roman world. There will also be consideration of the various
approaches to the interpretation of myths.
CLAS 2501
Ancient History: The Greeks
3ch [W]
A survey of the social, cultural, intellectual, and political history of the
ancient Greek world from the Bronze age to the death of Alexander the
Great. Prerequisite: CLAS 1005 or any 1000 level HIST course.
CLAS 2601
Ancient History: The Romans
3ch [W]
A survey of the social, cultural, intellectual, and political history of the
ancient Roman world from the founding of Rome to the fall of the
western empire. Prerequisite: CLAS 1005 or any 1000 level HIST
course.
CLAS 3201
Ancient History: The Athenian
Empire
3 ch
The social, cultural, intellectual, and political history of the "Golden
Age" of Athens. Prerequisite: CLAS 2501
CLAS 3202
Ancient History: Alexander and
the Hellenistic World
3 ch
The social, cultural, intellectual, and political history of the age of
Alexander the Great and his successors down to the death of Cleopatra
VII. Prerequisite: CLAS 2501 or 2601
CLAS 3203
Ancient History: Cicero and the
Late Republic
3 ch
An examination of the social, cultural, intellectual, and political history
of the late Roman republic through the life of one of its most famous
citizens. Prerequisite: CLAS 2601
CLAS 3204
Ancient History: The JulioClaudian Dynasty
3 ch
The social, cultural, intellectual, and political history of the Roman
empire under Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero. Prerequisite:
CLAS 2601
CLAS 3205
Ancient History: Jewish Palestine
(Maccabees to Masada)
3 ch
The social, cultural, intellectual, and political history of the Jewish
people from the Maccabean revolt to the fall of Masada. Prerequisite:
CLAS 2501 or 2601
CLAS 3206
Ancient History: Women in the
Roman World
3 ch
The status and role of women in the Roman world as reflected in
literary, historical, legal, and archaeological sources. Prerequisite:
CLAS 2601
204
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLAS 3207
Ancient History: Augustus and the
Roman Revolution
3ch[W]
An examination of the career of Caesar Augustus from his unexpected
rise to power to his establishment of the imperial system of government
at Rome. Prerequisite: CLAS 2601. Credit may be obtained for only
one of CLAS 3207 and CLAS 3063.
SECTION F
COMMUNICATION AND
PROFESSIONAL WRITING
COMPUTER ENGINEERING
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
CMPE 2013
CPW 1001
Writing in the Disciplines I
(3 ch W)
Introductory strategies for effective scholarly writing in different
disciplines. No prerequisite.
CPW 1002
Effective Oral Communication I
(3 ch)
This courses emphasizes on oral communication in the classroom and
workplace, and public speaking. It will introduce students to organizing
and making presentations and encourage them to develop confidence
and clarity. No prerequisite.
CPW 2001
Writing in the Disciplines II
Simulation and Engineering
Analysis
4ch (3C 3L*)
An introduction to modelling and numerical methods as applied in the
solution of engineering problems. Linear equations, polynomials,
statistical tools, numerical integration and difference equations.
Simulation tools such as MATLAB will be used. Prerequisite: CS1073
or equivalent, EE1713, MATH1013. Co-requisite: MATH 2503.
(3 ch W)
Develops knowledge of the features and conventions of academic
communication. Prerequisite: CPW 1001
CPW 2002
Effective Oral Communication II
3 ch
Develops the practice and theory of oral communication in the
classroom and workplace, public speaking, and introduces more
advanced topics, such as working with the press, as well as working
with a wider range of media in presentations. Prerequisite: CPW 1002
CPW 2003
Theory and Practice of Technical
and Professional Communication I
3 ch [W]
This course is a broad-based introduction to theories of workplace
communication. It also introduces the practice of workplace and other
professional communication (technical writing, editing, proof-reading,
document design, on-line publishing). Prerequisite: CPW 1001
CPW 3003
Theory and Practice of Technical
and Professional Communication II
3 ch [W]
Develops students understanding of current theory and research in
workplace communication, and given them the opportunity to pursue
workplace and other professional communication, such as editing,
proof- reading, document design, on-line-publishing, and technical
writing, in more depth. Prerequisite: CPW 2003
CPW 3004
History and Application of
Communication
3 ch [W]
History of rhetoric and communication from the Classical period to the
current day, and its practical applications for contemporary spoken and
written discourse. Emphasis on the development of theories in
response to changes in social, political, and philosophical climate.
Prerequisite: CPW 2001
CPW 4005
The Rhetoric of Text and Image
3 ch [W]
This course introduces students to the interaction of texts and images
in such professional writing fields as advertising, book illustration,
technical documentation, journalism, and public relations. Issues may
includes visual and textual literacy, the semiotics and rhetoric of
design, and the ideological basis of social communication.
Prerequisite: CPW 3003
CPW 4006
Writing Strategies: Theory and
Practice
3 ch [W]
This is an advanced course for proficient writers who wish to become
excellent. Emphasis on persuasive, reader-oriented, non-academic
writing and genres, both communicative and creative. Students can
expect to improve their writing, as well as their theoretical
understanding of composing and its contexts. Prerequisites: CPW 2001
or CPW 3003.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
205
SECTION F
COMPUTER SCIENCE
CS 1803
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
CS 1003
Introduction to Computer
Programming
4 ch (3C 1T 2L)
Intended for Science, Applied Science and Engineering students.
Introduces the use of digital computers. Includes: problem analysis;
algorithm design, and program structure. Use of procedures, loops, and
arrays. Debugging and verification of programs. Note: Credit will be
granted for only one of CS 1003 or CS 1073. Prerequisite: High School
Mathematics.
CS 1023
Algorithms and Languages
4 ch (3C 1L)
Intended for Civil Engineering students. Introduces algorithms; in
particular how to devise and implement algorithms and how to convert
a problem into a computer-based notation. This course will introduce
essential aspects of writing and reading APL and Fortran. Equal
emphasis will be placed on the three components: Algorithms, APL,
and Fortran.Note: This course may not be taken for credit by Computer
Science and Data Analysis students. Note: Credit will not be given for
both CS 1003 and CS 1023.
CS 1073
Introduction to Computer
Programming in Java
4 ch (3C 1L)
Includes problem analysis, algorithm design, and program structure.
Covers the use of loops, arrays, objects, and methods. Debugging and
verification of programs. Note: Credit will be granted for only one of CS
1003 or 1073. Prerequisite: MATH 120.
CS 1083
Computer Science Concepts
(Java)
4 ch (3C 1L)
Continues CS 1073. Advanced language features. Use of libraries.
Data abstraction, encapsulation, simple data structures. recursion.
Prerequisite: CS 1073 with a "C" or better.
CS 1303
Discrete Structures I
4 ch (3C/1T)
Introduces topics in discrete mathematics important in Computer
Science, including propositional logic, predicate logic, proofs, sigma
notation, mathematical induction, elementary set theory and asymptotic
analysis. Note: Credit will not be given for both Math 1703 and CS
1303. Prerequisites: NB Advanced Math 120, Math 1863 or its
equivalent.
CS 1703
Introduction to Computing
Concepts
3 ch (3C)
Introduction to Computers and
Systems
3 ch (3C)
An introduction to the essential features of computers, computing
systems and computer-based information systems. Includes:
microcomputer operating systems, word processing and spreadsheets.
This course is intended for students in Business, Education and
Physical Education and cannot be taken for credit by CS, DA or
Engineering students. Credit will not be given for both CS 1803 and CS
1703.
CS 2003
Comp. Architecture and
Assembly Programming
4 ch (3C)
Computer Architecture including instruction formats, addressing and
input/output schemes. Machine representation of numbers and
symbols. Assembly language notation and programming, including
macros. Prerequisite: CS 1083.
CS 2013
Software Engineering I
4 ch (3C)
Introduction to the discipline of software engineering. Examines all
phases of the software development life cycle, from initial planning
through implementation and maintenance. Particular emphasis is
placed on designing, producing, and testing well-structured programs.
Introduces selected advanced features of the Java programming
language. Prerequisite: CS 1083.
CS 2113
Scientific Computing
4 ch (3 C)
An introduction to numerical techniques for solving scientific problems.
Topics to include sequences, series, structured linear systems,
polynomial models, quadrature, differential/difference equations and
root finding. Use of existing numerical software packages and a basic
introduction to scientific programming using a high-level language.
Prerequisites: MATH 1013 and one of CS 1073, CS 2773 or CS 1003.
CS 2303
Discrete Structures II
4 ch (3C/1T)
Continues CS 1303. Topics covered include: advanced set theory,
functions, relations, elementary permutations and combinations, graph
theory, and finite state machines. Prerequisites: Math 1703 or CS 1303.
CS 2403
Operating Systems Principles I
4 ch (3C)
An introduction to computer operating systems. Processes: synchronization, communication. Processor allocation. Primary and secondary
storage management, resource sharing, security, user interfaces.
Illustrated with examples from contemporary operating systems.
Prerequisite: CS 2003, CS 2013.
CS 2503
Introduction to Information
Processing
4 ch (3C)
An introduction to the essential concepts of computers, computing
systems and computer-based information systems. Topics also include
microcomputer operating systems and word processing. This course
may not be taken for credit by BBA, CS, DA and Engineering students.
Credit will not be given for CS 1803 and CS 1703.
Introduction to COBOL language, file organization, sequential file
processing, sorting and merging, balance line algorithm, report
generation, relative and index file processing, and ISAM and VSAM file
organizations. Introduction to random access files and database
management systems. Prerequisites: CS 1073.
CS 1713
CS 2513
Multimedia and the Information
Highway
3 ch (3C)
An introduction to current computer technology. Selected topics from
current applications, networks, communication software, the internet,
email, FTP, World Wide Web, multimedia hardware and software,
hypertext/hypermedia, desktop publishing and graphics. Specific
software packages selected will depend on current availability.
Prerequisite: CS 1703 or CS 1803 with a "C" or better. Note: This
course may not be taken for credit by Computer Science and Data
Analysis students.
206
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Introduction to Information
Systems
4 ch (3C)
Concentrates on developing information system applications. Topics
include: event-driven programming, file processing, relational database
systems, user interface design, database design, and component
architecture. The development environment is Visual Basic. Prerequisite: CS 1083, or (CS 1073 with "B" or better and CS 1083 as corequisite).
SECTION F
CS 2616
Java for Programmers
1 ch (3C)
for 4 weeks only
Basic language constructs (input/output, variables and types, control
structures). Object oriented concepts, such as classes, objects,
attributes and methods. Programming with multiple classes. Note:
Credit will not be given for both CS 1083 and CS 2616. Prerequisites: 2
term courses in programming, excluding CS 1083.
CS 2617
C/C++ for Java Programmers
1 ch (3C)
for 4 weeks only
Basic language constructs (input/output, variables and types, control
structures), classes, pointers, and preprocessor. Prerequisites: CS
1083 or CS 2616, or equivalent.
CS 2618
Fortran for Programmers
1 ch (3C)
for 4 weeks only
Basic language constructs (input/output, variables and types, control
structures), libraries and modules, file processing and arrays.
Prerequisites: 2 term courses in programming.
CS 2773
Java Programming for the
Internet
3 ch (3C)
Intended for students in Arts, Business, and Science interested in
pursuing further courses in computer science. The course will cover
algorithm design and programming techniques using Java with
applications and applets related to practical examples. An introduction
to the World Wide Web and HTML included. This course may not be
used towards the requirements of the BScCS or BCS or BDA degrees.
Prerequisites: 30 credit hours of university courses including one of CS
1703, CS 1803 or equivalent; or permission of the instructor.
CS 2803
Switching Theory and Logical
Design
4 ch (3C 2L)
Switching algebra and its application in analysis and synthesis of
combinational and clocked sequential circuits; minimization and
realization methods. Universal logic gates, error detection and
correction and register and counter operations and memory systems.
Prerequisite: CS 1003 or CS 1073. Note: For the CS and DA programs,
CS 2803 is equivalent to EE 2213 Digital Systems I; credit will not be
given for both.
CS 3033
Software Design and
Development
4 ch (3C 1T)
Presents major approaches and specific techniques for object oriented,
structured and real-time design. Includes related topics such as quality,
reusability, and CASE tools. Prerequisite: CS 2013. Co-requisite: CS
2403, CS 2617.
CS 3113
Introduction to Numerical
Methods
4 ch (3C)
Error analysis, convergence and stability. Approximation of functions by
polynominals. Numerical quadrature and differentiation. The solution of
linear and non-linear equations and the solution of ordinary differential
equations. Emphasizes the development of computer algorithms and
stresses the influence of finite precision and arithmetic on
computational results. Prerequisites: CS 2113 or Math 2503 plus either
CS2618 or CS 1003 OR CS2618 or CS1003 and MATH2113 as a corequisite.
CS 3123
High Speed Numerical
Computation
4 ch (3C)
This course will discuss the building blocks required for undertaking
parallel computation. Differences between programming on shared
memory multiprocessors and distributed memory processors will be
discussed. Software will include performance analysis tools and
message passing libraries such as MPI and/or PVM. Prerequisites: CS
2113, CS 2003.
CS 3323
Introduction to Data Structures
4 ch (3C)
Presents major techniques in representing and manipulating data
structures: lists, trees, stacks, queues, strings, arrays, graphs, sets and
symbol tables. Covers sorting, searching and dynamic storage
handling. Formal specification of data structures. Prerequisites: CS
2013 and either Math 1703 or CS 1303.
CS 3423
Data Management
4 ch (3C)
Discussion of selected topics at an advanced level concerning the
storage and manipulation of data. The use of an advanced operating
system (e.g. UNIX) for shell programming. Regular expressions and
their use in data manipulation utilities. A very high-level language (e.g.
Perl) suited for data manipulation. Handling data over the Internet (e.g.
CGI). Prerequisite: CS 2013 or equivalent programming experience.
CS 3513
Database Management Systems I
4 ch (3C 2L)
File structures including relative and indexed file processing; indexstructures; introduction to database concepts; the relational data
model; interactive and embedded query languages; client-server
systems; database administration. Introduces transaction processing
and management. Co-requisites: CS 3323, CS 2403.
CS 3813
Computer Organization and
Architecture
4 ch (3C 1T)
Computer elements, system organization, performance measurement,
instruction sets and assembly-language programming, floating-point
and integer representation and operations, cache and virtual memory
systems, buses, I/O subsystems and interfacing, introduction to
processor design. Coverage is intended to supply background for
systems programming and performance tuning, rather than lead to
further courses in hardware design. Note: Credit will not be given for
both DA 3603 and CS 3813. Prerequisites: CS 2003, CS 2013.
CS 3893
Computer Networking
4 ch (3C)
This course provides an in-depth look at the hardware and software
behind the Internet and other computer networks. Topics include UDP
and TCP, socket programming, common application-level protocols,
congestion control, routing, IPV4 and IPV6, link layer services and
hardware, network security, multimedia networking, SNMP.
Prerequisites: CS 2003 and CS 2303, or permission of the instructor.
CS 3913
Algorithms I
4 ch (3C 1T)
This course examines the characteristics of algorithms that lead to
efficient computer solutions of discrete problems, and analytical and
experimental techniques for comparing algorithms. Several advanced
topics are chosen from the following areas: algorithmic problems
arising in artificial intelligence, state spaces and search strategies,
parallel and distributed algorithms, computational complexity.
Prerequisites: CS 3323, and either MATH 3703 or CS 2303.
CS 3983
Technical Report I
2 ch (2C) [W]
Instructs students in the preparation of technical reports in Computer
Science. Involves an independent study component resulting in a
technical report, typically a survey paper. Covers basic writing, oral
presentation and library skills. Prerequisites: 70 ch completed.
CS 4033
Software Project Management
and Quality Assurance
4 ch (3C 1T)
Introduces the general software life-cycle models and software
processes. Discusses the "umbrella" activities in software
development: project planning and monitoring, risk management,
quality assurance through reviews and testing (including reliability and
safety), configuration management. Prerequisite: CS 3033.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
207
SECTION F
CS 4073
Software Process Improvement
4 ch (3C)
Discusses the identification of improvement opportunities, and
verification of changes made to the process, through the use of process
measurement and software metrics. Includes the analysis of past data
for improving resource estimation. Prerequisites: CS 3033 and STAT
3093.
CS 4083
Leading-Edge Technology in
Software Development
4ch (3C)
Selected topics at an advanced level. Content will vary. Potential topics:
software evolution, formal methods, system engineering, program
visualization. Prerequisites: CS 3033, CS 3913.
CS 4093
Team Software Development
Project
4ch (3C)
The application of sound software engineering techniques to a problem
in a practical setting. This course involves a relatively large software
project, done in a team (with proper team management). A real "client"
shall be involved, from whom the requirements have to be gathered,
and to whom quality product and documentation have to be delivered.
This course is normally completed during the student's final year of
study. Prerequisite: CS 3033 and permission of instructor.
CS 4103
Parallel Processing Numerical
Algorithms
4 ch (3C)
Explores the design and analysis of parallel algorithms with numerical
applications. The course will involve a written report and presentation
based on current research topics in the area. Prerequisites: CS 3113,
CS 3123.
CS 4113
Advanced Scientific Computing
4 ch (3C)[W]
Topics to be discussed include: systems with banded, sparse,
diagonally dominant, Toeplitz, positive definite or symmetric coefficient
matrices. Methods of solution include both direct and iterative,
factorization, perturbation, relaxation and projection. Additional topics
may include eigenvalue problems and nonlinear systems with
applications taken from differential and integro-differential equations.
Prerequisites: CS 2113, CS 3113.
CS 4123
Topics in High-Performance
Scientific Computing and
Visualization
4ch (3C)[W]
Advanced level discussions chosen from current research topics in
computation techniques, high-performance computing or visualization.
The course will involve presentations and written reports. Prerequisites:
CS 4103 or CS 4113.
CS 4525
Database Management Systems II 4 ch (3C 2L)
Relational theory. Normalization. Advanced query languages. Query
optimization. Concurrency control and recovery. Security and integrity.
Overview of hierarchical, network, and object-oriented data models.
Prerequisites: CS 3323, CS 3513.
CS 4613
Programming Languages
4 ch (3C)
Structure and major characteristics of programming languages; formal
definition, syntax, semantics. Comparative study of principal language
concepts and their treatment in imperative, functional, logic, and objectoriented languages. Prerequisites: CS 2013, CS 2303, and 90 ch
completed.
CS 4713
Fundamentals of Simulation
4 ch (3C 1T)
Systems and model. The simulation process. Random number
generation. Introduction to queues, computer modelling of discrete
systems using appropriate languages, computer modelling of
continuous systems, model validation and experiment planning. Case
studies from a variety of disciplines. Prerequisites: CS 1083, CS 3113,
STAT 3083.
208
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CS 4913
Theory of Computation
4 ch (3C)
Models of sequential and parallel computation, automata theory, formal
languages, the Chomsky hierarchy, decidability and computability,
sequential and parallel complexity theory. Prerequisites: CS 3913, CS
2303.
CS 4983
Technical Report II
2 ch (2C) [W]
Builds on the skills developed in CS 3983, through the preparation and
presentation of a technical report, which is typically a critical analysis
paper. Prerequisite: CS 3983.
CS 4993
Honours Project
4 ch (2S) [W]
The student submits a detailed proposal, schedule, progress reports
and written report to the thesis coordinator with the supervisor's
approval. A seminar is required. Planning of the thesis is done in the
term prior to completion. Detailed guidelines are available from the
Department. Prerequisite: CS 3983.
CS 5065
Introduction to Functional
Programming
4 ch (3C)
This course examines strict (standard ML) and lazy (Haskell) functional
languages and their uses. Topics include lists, user defined data types,
laziness, recursive and infinite data objects, pattern matching, types,
type classes, parametric polymorphism, and techniques for I/O.
Theoretical topics include a quick introduction to the lamda calculus
and transformational programming. Unconventional uses of functional
languages will be examined. Note: Credit will not be granted for both
CS 5065 and CS 6065 (See Graduate Calendar). Prerequisites: 110 ch
in BScCS/BDA/BCS and gpa of 3.0 or above. Co-requisite: CS 4613.
SECTION F
DATA ANALYSIS
DA 2503
Packaged Software Decision Aids
DA 4803/
DA 4813
4 ch (3C 1T)
Examines typical software packages present in information centres
and other business environments. Includes selected topics from the
following areas: operating systems; network administration;
communication software; wordprocessing; spreadsheets; database
management systems and graphics. Prerequisites: 30 ch of university
courses including one of CS 1803, CS 1003, or CS 1073.
DA 3053
Mathematical Software
4 ch (3C 1T)
Independent Studies in Data
Analysis
4 ch (3C 1T)
Discussion of Data Analysis topics at an advanced level chosen jointly
by student, advisor and Department Chair. Topic of course to be
entered on the students transcript.
DA 4993
Project in Data Analysis
4 ch (3C 1T) [W]
Application of correct and appropriate methods of data analysis in one
or more areas. A project proposal is required with a final report in which
the student describes clearly and concisely the work done, the results
obtained, and a careful interpretation of the results in form and
language meaningful to workers in the subject area. Prerequisite:
Permission of Program Director.
Advanced software packages and programming languages developed
for mathematical computations: symbolic, graphical, numerical and
combinatorial. Students will be involved in implementing and testing
various algorithms. Prerequisites: Math 2003, Math 1703, or CS 1073.
DA 3123
Numerical Treatment of Geometric
Modeling
4 ch (3C 1T)
Presents the nature, development and application of the basic
concepts of geometric modeling. The parametric geometry is
considered primarily for curves including analytical properties,
intersections and transformation. Emphasizes numerical methods and
analysis with applications being drawn from such areas as image
processing, graphics and computer-aided design. Prerequisite: CS
3113.
DA 3203
Data Analysis Using Statistical
Software Packages
4 ch (3C )
This is a case-studies based course in which students learn to analyse
data in a modern statistical computing environment. The course
promotes the use of graphical and other exploratory techniques as a
crucial first step in data analysis. Students will be exposed to practical
problems often encountered during the data analysis process. The
importance of summarizing and communicating results effectively will
be emphasized through the strong project-oriented component of the
course. Prerequisite: 3 ch in each of three subjects: Mathematics,
Statistics, and Computer Science.
DA 4123
Numerical Solution of Systems
4 ch (3C 1T)
Emphasis on linear systems with discussion on topics as large, small;
sparse, full; square, nonsquare systems. Methods of solution involve a
survey of direct and interactive techniques. As time permits, the
discussions will be extended to include nonlinear systems. Applications
drawn from statistics and operations research. Both writing computer
programs and working with stored computer programs form an integral
part of the course. Prerequisites: CS 3113.
DA 4203
Introduction to Multivariate Data
Analysis
4 ch (3C 1T)
Multivariate normal distribution; multivariate regression and the
analysis of variance; canonical correlations; principal components;
classification procedures; factor analysis; computer applications.
Prerequisites: 6 ch in Statistics, 3 ch in Computer Science and some
exposure to matrix algebra.
DA 4243
Statistical Computing
4 ch (3C 1T)
The contents will include random number generation, simulation of
random variables and processes, Monte Carlo techniques and integral
estimation, the computation of percentage points and percentiles,
resampling methods. Prerequisites: STAT 3703, a course in computer
programming.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
209
SECTION F
ECONOMICS
ECON 2213
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
Definition, extent and causes of poverty. Distribution of income and
wealth in Canada and abroad. Rationales for and effectiveness of
income redistribution policies. Prerequisite: 3 ch of economics
ECON 3013
ECON 1004
Economics and Society
3 ch
Designed for students who do not intend to major in economics.
Examines the working of the market system, competition policy, price
supports and regulation, labour markets and unions, and social issues.
Note: BBA students cannot take this course for credit. Students with
credit for ECON 1013 or ECON 1073 or taking those courses, cannot
take this course for credit.
ECON 1013
Introduction to Microeconomics
3 ch (3C)
Concerned with how modern mixed economies operate. Behaviour of
consumers and business firms. Theory of the firm, production, costs
and market structures, and distribution .
ECON 1023
Introduction to Macroeconomics
3 ch (3C)
Concerned with the causes of unemployment and inflation, the
determination of total output, investment, and interest rates.
Stablilization policies, exchange rates and balance of payments.
ECON 1073
Economics for Engineers
3 ch (3C)
An introductory course for students in Engineering and Computer
Science. Topics include theory of markets, production, costs,
externalities, and the macroeconomics of aggregate output
determination and growth. Note: Credit will not be given for both ECON
1073 and ECON 1013/1023
ECON 2013
Intermediate Microeconomics
3 ch (3C)
This course develops material from ECON 1013. Applications of
microeconomic theory are emphasized. Prerequisite: ECON 1013.
ECON 2023
Intermediate Macroeconomics
3 ch (3C)
This course develops material from ECON 1023. Applications of
macroeconomic theory are emphasized. Prerequisite: ECON 1023.
ECON 2051
Political Economy of Regions I
3 ch (3C)
Considers the general theory of regional development within the
framework of the national economy.
ECON 2052
Political Economy of Regions II
3 ch (3C)
Concerned with regional development policies. Special attention given
to the Atlantic provinces.
ECON 2091
Contemp. Issues in the Cdn Econ I 3 ch (3C)
ECON 3023
ECON 3091
ECON 3092
3 ch
Examines the New Brunswick economy; sources and analysis of data;
evaluation of trends and policies. Prerequisites: ECON 1013 and
ECON 1023.
ECON 2103
Financial Institutions and Markets
3 ch (3C)
An introduction to the microeconomic aspects of monetary theory and
policy. Topics include how money is defined and measured, portfolio
theory, theories of the interest rate, the determination of the money
supply, and bank regulation. Prerequisite: 3 ch of Economics
recommended.
210
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
3 ch (3C)
Urban Economics I
3 ch (3S)
Urban Economics II
3 ch (3S)
Examines problems of and policies for urban areas. Emphasizes urban
problems particularly relevant to Saint John.
ECON 3099
History of Economic Thought
3 ch (3C)
A study of the major contributions to economic analysis from Adam
Smith to Alfred Marshall. Prerequisite: 6 chs of Economics.
ECON 3114
International Financial Institutions
and Markets
3 ch (3C)
An introduction to the Macroeconomic aspects of monetary theory and
policy. Topics include how the Central Bank influences the interest rate
and inflation rate, the demand and supply for money, international
financial markets, and international banking. Prerequisite: ECON 2103
or permission of the instructor.
ECON 3203
Public Sector Economics I
3 ch (3C)
The principles of taxation and government expenditures, with emphasis
on Canadian institutions and issues. Prerequisite: ECON 1013
ECON 3233
Public Sector Economics II
3 ch (3C)
Examines such topics as the economics of democracy, the principles
and experience of Canadian fiscal federalism, public pensions,
employment insurance, and other public policy issues. Prerequisite:
ECON 1013
ECON 3401
The New Brunswick Economy
Macroeconomics I
The objective is to analyze the development of urban areas. Topics
include the evolutionary development of cities, the location of cities and
of activities within them, and theories of urban growth.
ECON 2092
ECON 2095
3 ch (3C)
A study of the standard macroeconomic models of closed and open
economies. Macroeconomic problems, such as unemployment,
inflation, and balance of payment disequilibria are examined.
Alternative stabilization policies are evaluated with reference to the
Canadian economy. Prerequisite: ECON 2023.
ECON 3375
Analysis of specific economic phenomena in Canada.
Microeconomics I
3ch
The theory of consumer demand and of production costs. The
elementary theory of the firm: pure competition and pure monopoly; an
introduction to monopolistic competition and oligopoly. Prerequisite:
ECON 2013.
Concerned with the study of the Canadian economy. Specifically, public
policy towards unemployment and inflation, regional development, the
labour market, economic growth, foreign investment, and income
distribution. Prerequisite: 3 ch of Economics.
Contemp. Issues in the Cdn Econ II 3 ch (3C)
Poverty, Inequality and Income
Redistribution
Labour Economics
3 ch (3C)
Determinants of labour supply and demand. Includes structure of
wages, male-female earnings differentials, employment insurance,
unions, strikes, and labour relations. Prerequisite: ECON 1013.
International Trade & Trade Policy
3 ch (3C)
The principles of international trade, and issues in trade policy; NAFTA
and other trade agreements. Prerequisite: ECON 1013, or ECON 1073.
ECON 3412
International Macroeconomics and 3 ch (3C)
Finance
The economics of exchange rate determination, the balance of
payments, international borrowing and lending. Role of international
financial insititutions. Prerequisite: ECON 2023.
SECTION F
ECON 3531
International Development
3 ch
Development theory at both sectoral and aggregate level; analysis of
growth, employment, distribution of income, intersectoral investment
allocation, and investment in human capital. Prerequisite: 6 ch of
Economics or ECON 1073.
ECON 3542
Topics in International
Development
ECON 4999
Topics in Economics II
3 ch
Directed study/reading programs. Workshops or seminars will be held
as required. Students should apply to the Department in September or
January for permission to take this course. Prerequisite: 12 ch in
Economics.
3 ch
An analysis of the international dimension of economic problems faced
and policies adopted by developing countries of Asia, Latin America,
and Africa. Topics include: international trade, direct foreign
incestment, technology transfer, regional economic blocks, structural
liberalization, debt and development financing, high rate of population
growth and exhausting of natural resources. Prerequisite: 6 ch of
Economics.
ECON 3665
Mathematical Economics
3 ch (3C)
A course in economic theory concerned with topics in micro- and macroeconomics. Emphasis is on the use of mathematics in the
development of economic theory, particularly calculus and matrix
algebra. Prerequisites: ECON 2013, 2023. Also, Mathematics
requirement for Majors must be completed before a student is
admitted.
ECON 3702
Cost Benefit Analysis
3 ch (3S)
Comparative study of costs and benefits and the impact of public
projects and policy initiatives. Prerequisite: ECON 1013 and 1023 or
ECON 1073.
ECON 3755
Environmental Economics
3 ch (3C)
Examines interaction of ecological and economic systems, considering
population growth, food supply, non-renewable resources.
Prerequisite: ECON 1013, ECON 1023.
ECON 3835
Market Strategies and
Organization
3 ch (3C)
The analysis of market structure, firm strategy and performance, and
public policy issues. Prerequisite: ECON 1013.
ECON 4035
Macroeconomics II
3 ch (3C)
Advanced course in macroeconomic theory and analysis, with
emphasis on the theory of investment, consumption, money and
employment. Neoclassical monetary equilibrium, and the Keynesian
and post-Keynesian models. Prerequisite: ECON 3023.
ECON 4045
Microeconomics II
3 ch (3C)
Topics may include theories of imperfect competition, search and
information, market failures, property rights, simple general equilibrium
models. Prerequisite: ECON 3013.
ECON 4645
Introduction to Applied
Econometrics
3 ch (3S)
The objective of the course is to explain the problems and issues
associated with empirical measurement of economic relationships, and
an assessment of the techniques by which those problems may be
solved. Prerequisites: BA 1605 (or equivalent), BA 2606, and 12 chs of
economics.
ECON 4990
Honours Thesis
6 ch
An honours student in the final year may elect to write a thesis under
the supervision of faculty members in Economics. The student must
submit a formal proposal to the department prior to final year
registration.
ECON 4998
Topics in Economics I
3 ch
Directed study/reading programs. Workshops or seminars will be held
as required. Students should apply to the Department in September or
January for permission to take this course. . Prerequisite: 12 ch in
Economics.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
211
SECTION F
EDUCATION
ED 3621
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers,
and coding.
Consideration of the history of social studies, debates about the
content of social studies and the current state of social studies in
Canada.
ED 4164
ED 3021
Human Development and
Learning: An Overview
3 ch
Developmental perspectives on human growth and learning.
ED 3031
The Education of Exceptional
Learners
3 ch (3C) (O)
ED 3041
The Theory and Practice of
Education
3 ch (3C) (O)
A study of dominant theories which influence and shape educational
thinking and practice today. Key ideas, their origins, their current representatives, and the transposition of ideas into educational applications
will be discussed.
Techniques of Teaching
3 ch (3C) (O)
3 ch
Students will learn to design lessons to meet a variety of teaching
situations. Classroom skills will be learned and practised in miniteaching sessions in front of peers and a supervising faculty member.
Causes of student behaviour problems will be analyzed and strategies
for dealing with disruptive students developed.
ED 4211
Provides the student with an introduction to the field of knowledge
associated with exceptional learners.
Introduction to the Social Studies
Integrated Learning Through Art
3 ch (3C) (O)
Art education theories and practices as they apply to learning across
the curriculum.
ED 4354
Literacy Learning in Early Years
3 ch (3C) (O)
Current theories of the nature of literacy learning and their relationship
to instructional practices in the early years.
ED 4451
Health Education
3 ch (3C) (O)
An overview of the legal, organizational, financial and professional
aspects of schools and school systems.
Examines curriculum and pedagogy in a range of elementary, middle
and secondary school programs that come under the rubric of health
education. Includes analyses of underlying assumptions, the
organization of knowledge, and pedagogical approaches to this subject
area.
ED 3063
ED 4562
ED 3051
School Law and Organization
Health Promotion in Schools
3 ch (3C) (O)
3 ch (3C) (O)
Examines concepts and inter-relationships among nutrition, exercise,
and well-being within educational contexts.
ED 3241
Music for the Classroom Teacher
3 ch (3C) (O)
Outlines the materials in the music curriculum that the classroom
teacher might be expected to teach, plus a study of various ways to
integrate music into the general classroom curriculum.
ED 3361
Internet Literacy
3 ch (3C) (LE) (O)
Theoretical issues arising from Internet, along with practical skills
needed to gain familiarity with this network. How Internet challenges
the way we create, disseminate, acquire and own knowledge.
ED 3415
Developing Numeracy
ED 3416
Developing Geometrical Concepts 3 ch
The study of geometric relationships and approaches to developing
spatial sense in children and adults.
ED 3424
Teaching Elementary School
Mathematics
3 ch (3C) (O)
Movement Education for the
Elementary Teacher
3 ch (3C) (O)
Overview of physical education program in elementary schools.
Program planning, practical work.
ED 3511
Introduction to Science Education 3 ch (3C) (O)
An introduction to the teaching of science across and for particular
learner levels.
ED 3561
Introduction to Second Language
Education
3 ch
An overview of the theories of learning and teaching in a second
language context with particular emphasis on the multi-dimensional
and multi-resource methodology 6 ch approved Arts and/or Education
courses: advanced written and spoken English language skills.
212
ED 4791
Basic and Applied Nutrition
3 ch (3C) (O)
Basic concepts in nutrition across the lifespan; nutritional assessment;
nutrition information, education and other change strategies; and
current nutrition issues.
ED 5000
Field Studies Practicum for
Consecutive/Concurrent BEd
Program 1
5 ch
Fifteen weeks of school and classroom experience. Additional
regulations are included in Education General Regulations under Field
Experience Practicum, Section F. Pre-requisites: (1) Admission to the
BEd (Consecutive or Concurrent); (2) 30 ch in BEd courses, including
12 ch in Subject Areas/Methodologies courses; (3) GPA 2.0.
ED 5021
Field Experience in TESL
3 ch
Supervised field experience for students in an environment in which
they can both observe qualified instructors and participate in planning
and teaching English as a second language. ED 3561 and ED 4562
Teaching Mathematics, Grades K-3 emphasis.
ED 3475
3 ch
Examines communicative language teaching in the context of
classrooms. Emphasizes various teaching methods, curriculum
development and evaluation of second language learning. ED 3561 or
ED 3560 or equivalent
3 ch
The study of number relationships and approaches to developing
number sense in children and adults.
Advanced Studies in ESL
Education
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ED 5053
Middle Level Education
3 ch (3C) (O) W
Of interest to both experienced and student teachers, this course will
focus on the physical, intellectual, psychological, and social characteristics of 10 to 14 year olds and the implications for effective instruction.
Additional topics will include middle school organization, curriculum
integration, and teaming.
ED 5175
Classroom Assessment
3 ch (3C) (O)
Concepts and principles: teacher made tests, standardized tests, test
construction, selection, administration and interpretation across the
curriculum.
ED 5314
Drama Across the Curriculum
3 ch (3C) (O)
Group process drama will be employed to study in any curriculum
subject, such as history, mathematics, science and social studies. No
experience necessary.
SECTION F
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
A grade of C or higher is required in all Electrical Engineering courses.
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
EE 1713
Electricity and Magnetism
4 ch (3C 1T 3L*)
An introductory course in basic circuit analysis techniques for all
Engineering students. Electric charge, electric energy sources, current,
voltage, power and energy. Resistors, resistance and the application of
Ohm's Law, Kirchoff's voltage and current laws, D.C. circuit analysis
using equivalent resistor techniques, voltage and current division, loop
analysis, mesh analysis, nodal analysis, superposition, and the
application of Thevenin's and Norton's theorems. Capacitors,
capacitance, and analysis of RC networks. Magnetic circuits, magnetic
forces in current carrying conductors. Faraday's and Lenz's laws.
Inductors, inductance, and analysis of RL networks. Introduction to
A.C. Circuits.
EE 2213
Digital Logic I
4 ch (3C 1T 3L*)
Introduces the design of digital systems. Combinatorial and sequential
logic and computer-based designs. Prerequisite: CS 1073 or
equivalent
EE 2703
Introduction to Electrical Design
4 ch (3C/2L)
The electrical design process, group projects, simulation and
construction, laboratory measurement techniques. Project
management. Economic, safety and environmental aspects. Oral
presentations and written report. Co-requisites: EE 2773, EE 2213,
CMPE 2013
EE 2773
Electric Circuits
4 ch (3C 1T 3L*)
A.C. circuits. Phasors. Network analysis. Network theorems and
polyphase systems. Prerequisites: MATH 1013, a grade of C or higher
in EE 1713.
EE 2783
Networks
4 ch (3C 1T 3L*)
Topics include Laplace transform methods, network functions,
frequency response, filters, one-port networks, dependent sources.
Prerequisites:EE 2773, MATH 2503 or equivalent. Co-requisites:
MATH 2513 and MATH 3503 or equivalents.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
213
SECTION F
ENGLISH
ENGL 3008
The prerequisite for upper-level courses in English is six credit hours of
English at the lower level unless otherwise indicated or unless special
permission is obtained from the instructor Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviation, course numbers and coding. The prerequisite for
upper-level courses in English is nine credit hours of English at the lower
level, 6 ch of which must be 1200 or 1500, or equivalent, unless special
permission is obtained from the instructor.
Introduction to Modern Literature
in English
6 ch [W]
An introduction to the development of major literary movements since
1800. A study of poetry, drama, short stories, essays and novels written
in English.
ENGL 1500
Introduction to World Literature
6 ch [W]
An introduction to the development of major literary movements and
forms in world literature. A study of epics, folk tales, romances, short
stories, novels and poetry.
ENGL 2001
Introduction to Poetry
3ch (3C)
An introduction to poetic forms, language and theme within an
historical context. Students will be encouraged to participate in the
critical analysis of the poems in the course. There will be a special
emphasis on written assignments.
ENGL 2002
Introduction to Drama
3ch (3C)
Introduces dramatic genres, language, theoretical approaches and
staging within an historical context. Note: this is a course in reading
drama and not in acting. There will be a special emphasis on written
assignments.
ENGL 2003
Introduction to Fiction
3ch (3C)
An introduction to the critical analysis of fictionshort stories, novellas,
novelswithin an historical context. There will be a special emphasis on
written assignments
ENGL 2201
Drama Production I
3 ch (3C)
An introduction to acting, with an emphasis on script analysis and
rehearsal techniques. Prerequisite: 6 ch lower level and permission of
the instructor.
ENGL 2202
Drama Production II
3 ch (3C)
A practical introduction to methods of production. Students will
participate in any of several possible capacities, in the production of at
least one play. Prerequisite: 6 ch lower level and permission of the
instructor.
ENGL 3003
Medieval Drama
3 ch (3C) [W]
3 ch (3C)
A study of Chaucers major literary achievement and its relevance to the
concerns of the 21st century.
ENGL 3105
Shakespeares Earlier Plays
3 ch [W]
This course is a study of a selection of Shakespeare's earlier plays
(pre-1500) in context. This course will also examine early theatres,
genre, and possible dramatizations.
ENGL 3106
ENGL 1200
Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales
Shakespeares Later Plays
3 ch [W]
This course is a study of a selection of Shakespeare's later plays (post1600) in context. This course will also examine early theatres, genre,
and possible dramatizations. .
ENGL 3107
Renaissance Drama (NonShakespearian)
3 ch [W]
This course is an introduction of Elizabethan and Jacobean plays in
context. This course will also examine early theatres, genre, and
possible dramatizations.
ENGL 3108
Studies in Early Renaissance
Literature
3 ch [W]
This course is an introduction to prose and poetry of the early
Renaissance (within 1510-1640), studied in the context of the periods
wide-ranging literary, political, religious and social changes.
ENGL 3109
Studies in Later Renaissance
Literature
3 ch [W]
This course is an introduction to prose and poetry of the later
Renaissance (within 1590-1670), studied in the context of the periods
wide-ranging literary, political, religious and social changes.
ENGL 3203
Restoration and 18th Century
Drama
3 ch [W]
Traces British Drama from its bawdy rebirth in 1660, through the
sentimental domesticity of the early eighteenth century, to the laughing
comedy of Sheridan and Goldsmith at the centuryís end. Also
considers the history of the London theatre and the fate of
Shakespeare during the period.
ENGL 3204
18th Century Prose and Poetry
3 ch [W]
Examines the literature of the 18th century, excluding the drama.
ENGL 3205
The Novel Before Austen
3 ch (3S/C) [W]
This course examines the development of the novel genre in the 18th
Century.
ENGL 3301
Romantic Poetry
3 ch (3C) [W]
Studies the major poets of the British Romantic period.
ENGL 3302
Romantic Novel
3 ch (3C) [W]
Explores the literary and theatrical dimensions of the English drama
from its origins in the 10th century through to (but not including)
Shakespeare.
A study of the development of the novel in Romantic Britain. Topics
studied may include the novel of sensibility, the Gothic novel, the
English Jacobin novel, the historical novel, and the national tale.
ENGL 3004
ENGL 3303
The Medieval Legends of King
Arthur
3 ch [W]
Romantic and Victorian Drama
3 ch [W]
A study of the Arthuriad of Sir Thomas Malory and some of Malorys
source material
Explores both the literary and theatrical dimensions of the nineteenth
century. Studies closet drama, melodrama, comedy, farce, pantomime,
burlesque, extravaganza, and spectacular entertainment.
ENGL 3007
ENGL 3304
Chaucer and his Contemporaries
3 ch (3C) [W]
A study of the major themes and literary forms of the English Middle
Ages, with particular emphasis on the lyric, the Breton Lay, the
Romance, and the drama vision.
Studies in the Romantic Age
This course will study a selection of texts from the period of 1789 to
1832.
ENGL 3311
Victorian Poetry
Studies the major poets of Victorian Britain.
214
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
3ch (3C) [W]
3 ch (3C) [W]
SECTION F
ENGL 3312
Victorian Novel
3 ch (3C)
A study of a selection of Victorian novels from the period 1832 to the
end of the nineteenth century.
ENGL 3313
The Earlier Victorian Age
3 ch (3C) [W]
ENGL 3515
20th Century American Novel
3 ch (3C) [W]
A study of 20th Century American novels.
ENGL 3601
Introduction to Literary Theory
3 ch (3C) [W]
A historical survey of literary theory.
This course will study a selection of texts from the period of 1832 to
1870.
ENGL 3602
ENGL 3314
The application of one or more critical approaches (feminist, psychoanalytic, Marxist, reader-response, structural, etc.) to a body of works.
The Later Victorian Age
3 ch (3C) [W]
Studies in Literary Theory
3 ch [W]
This course will study a selection of texts from the period of 1870 to
1901.
ENGL 3621
ENGL 3401
A study of texts in a variety of genres by women to the mid-eighteenth
century.
Modern British Poetry
3 ch [W]
A study of selected modern poetry.
ENGL 3402
Modern British Novel
ENGL 3622
3 ch [W]
A study of selected novels.
ENGL 3403
Modern English and Irish Drama
3 ch [W]
Deals with the major dramatic developments of this century, beginning
with the pioneering efforts of such figures as Galsworthy, Shaw and
Yeats, and concluding with the trends of the present day.
ENGL 3404
Irish Literature
ENGL 3405
Studies in Modern British
Literature
3 ch [W]
ENGL 3501
Canadian Poetry
3 ch [W]
Canadian Novel
3 ch [W]
A study of selected novels.
ENGL 3503
English Canadian Drama
ENGL 3702
Studies in Gender and Genre
3 ch [W]
The Women of The Arthurian
Legend
3 ch [W]
The course examines the representation of women in 19th and 20th
Century retelling of the Arthurian legend.
Literature of the West Indies,
Africa and India
3ch (3C) [W]
A study of selected literature written in English in the West Indies ,
Africa and India.
Experimental Modern Theatre
3 ch (3C) [W]
A study of the development of modern and postmodern drama as a
series of reactions against realism.
ENGL 3707
3 ch (3C) [W]
3 ch [W]
This course is an examination of the development of masculinities and/
or femininities in the context of a particular or several literary genre(s).
ENGL 3706
A study of Canadian poetry.
ENGL 3502
ENGL 3631
ENGL 3705
A study of selected British short fiction, poetry, essays, and novels of
the 20th century.
Writing by Women II
3 ch [W]
A study of texts in a variety of genres by women since the mideighteenth century.
3 ch [W]
A study of the literature of Ireland, excluding drama.
Writing by Women I
Utopian Fiction
3 ch (3C) [W]
A survey of English-Canadian drama from its beginning to the present.
A study of the major literary utopias from Plato's Republic to
contemporary dystopian fiction.
ENGL 3504
ENGL 3709
Canadian Short Fiction
3 ch [W]
Maritime Poetry
3 ch [W]
A study of Maritime poetry from its beginnings, with an emphasis on
20th century developments.
ENGL 3506
Maritime Fiction
3 ch (3C) [W]
An overview of the variety of genres in Maritime fiction.
ENGL 3508
Canadian Literature to WWII
3 ch [W]
A study of Canadian poetry, short fiction, criticism, and novels written
before the Second World War.
ENGL 3509
Canadian Literature after WWII
3 ch [W]
A study of Canadian short fiction, poetry, novels, and criticism written
after the World War II. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200, 1500 or equivalent.
ENGL 3511
American Poetry
3 ch (3C) [W]
An overview of modern American poetry.
ENGL 3512
American Short Fiction
3 ch (3C) [W]
An overview of children's literature.
A study of selected short fiction.
ENGL 3505
Children's Literature
ENGL 3711
3 ch (3C [W]
This course will study a particular author or group of authors.
ENGL 3712
Special Authors II
3 ch (3C [W]
This course will study a particular author or group of authors.
ENGL 3713
Special Topics I
3 ch [W]
This course focuses on specialized areas of interest.
ENGL 3714
Special Topics II
3 ch [W]
This course focuses on specialized areas of interest.
ENGL 3721
Literature of the Fantastic Before
the 20th Century
3 ch (3S/C) [W]
This course examines the development of fantastic literature from the
early modern period to the beginning of the 20th Century.
ENGL 3722
3 ch (3S) [W]
Special Authors I
Contemporary Science Fiction
3 ch (3C) [W]
A study of 19th and 20th Century American short fiction.
This course examines specific themes, movements, and/or authors of
science fiction and/or fantasy from the early 20th Century.
ENGL 3513
ENGL 3751
American Drama
3 ch (3S) [W]
A study of the work of major American playwrights of the 20th Century.
ENGL 3514
The 19th Century American Novel
The Bible as Literature
3 ch [W]
A study of selections from the Old and New Testament as literary texts.
3 ch (3C) [W]
A study of the 19th Century American novel.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
215
SECTION F
ENGL 3801
From Script to Performance
3 ch (3C) [W]
This course integrates the study of drama as literature with the practical
elements of theatrical production.
ENGL 3802
Reading Film
3 ch [W]
This course will explore various ways of analyzing a variety of films.
ENGL 3803
American Film
3 ch [W]
A study of major trends in American film.
ENGL 3812
Postmodern Literature
3 ch [W]
Postmodern Literature is a study of the theory behind, and the practise
of, postmodern literature. Works from several genre including poetry,
prose, drama, and film will be studied.
ENGL 3903
The Development of Western
Drama
3 ch [W]
Studies a range of plays to illustrate the development of the dramatic
tradition in the western world.
ENGL 3913
Writing Poetry
3 ch
A workshop seminar in which a variety of poetic styles and forms are
studied and practised: weekly assignments.
ENGL 4801
Honours Essay: Reading and
Research
3 ch [W]
This course is devoted to the research portion of the honours project.
ENGL 4802
Honours Essay
3 ch[W]
An honours essay to be attempted upon completion of ENGL 4801.
Prerequisites: ENGL 4801.
HENG 4000
Joint Honours Thesis
6 ch [W]
Honours thesis for Joint Honours Program in English and History.
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Joint Honours Program in English
and History.
216
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SECTION F
FRENCH
FR 1304
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
The first half of a course designed to meet the particular needs of
students coming from immersion schools. The course offers a
systematic review of French grammar. Graduates of high schools
where French is the first language of instruction must register for this
course.
FR 1203/
Communication en français I
FR 1203 LB
3 ch
Français de base pour étudiants ayant au plus le Grade 10. Les
étudiants ayant les Grades 11 ou 12 doivent se soumettre à un test de
placement. Des preuves d'éligibilité aux cours seront exigées du
bureau de Régistraire avant l'inscription aux cours et au test. FR 1203
L'est obligatoire.
FR 1203/
Communicating in French I
FR 1203 LB
3 ch
Basic French course for students with no more than Grade 10 core
French. Students with Grade 11 or 12 must write a placement test
before registration. Proof of qualification must be presented to
Registrar's Office before registration to course and placement test. FR
1203 L is compulsory.
FR 1204/
Communication en français II
FR 1204 LB
3 ch
Suite de FR 1203. Développement et exploration de la communication
linguistique et des différences culturelles. FR 1204 LB est obligatoire.
Prérequis: FR 1203, 1203 L et FR 1205.
FR 1204/
Communicating in French II
FR 1204 LB
3 ch
FR 2200
French for Immersion Students I
3 ch
Communicating in French III and IV 6 ch
This course is the equivalent of FR 2203 and 2204. It will be offered on
an intensive basis in one term. Students may not receive credit for both
FR 2203 and FR 2204 and FR 2200.
FR 2203/
Communication en français III
FR 2203 LB
4 ch
Exploration du langage médiatique; présentation déléments de
grammaire avancés, révision des noms et des verbes. Destiné à
améliorer les connaissances du français et à renforcer la
compréhension orale et écrite. FR 2203 LB est obligatoire. Prérequis:
FR 1203 LB ou FR 1205, FR 1206.
FR 2203/
Communicating in French III
FR 2203 LB
4 ch
Students are exposed to the language of the media; more advanced
grammar is presented and nouns and verb forms are reviewed.
Designed to improve French communication skills by strengthening
oral and written comprehension. FR 2203 LB is compulsory.
Prerequisites: FR 1203 LB or FR 1205, FR 1206.
FR 2204
Communication en français IV
3 ch (3C)
Continuation of FR 1203. Develops and explores language
communication and culture differences. FR 1204 L is compulsory.
Prerequisite: FR 1203, 1203 L AND FR 1205.
Destiné à améliorer les outils de communication par le renforcement de
lexpression orale et écrite. Conversation sur différents sujets et
exercices pratiques de diverses formes de styles, appuyés par la
révision des principales structures de la phrase. Prérequis : FR 2203,
2205 ou équivalent.
FR 1205
FR 2204
Module de la laboratoire I
1 ch (3C 1L)
Communicating in French IV
3 ch (3C)
Destiné à la revue et au renforcement de la grammaire française et de
ses structures par le biais de logiciels informatiques spécialisés. Le
module I est obligatoire pour les étudiants inscrits en FR 1203. Le
module de laboratoire est accessible aux autres étudiants du Niveau I
de loption Soutien du français.
Designed to improve French communication skills by strengthening
oral and written expression. Conversation on a variety of topics and
practice of different writing styles is supported by grammatical
background and a review of sentence building rules. Prerequisites: FR
2203, 2205 or equivalent.
FR 1205
FR 2205
Laboratory Module I
1 ch (3C 1L)
Module de laboratoire III
1 ch (3C)
This course is designed to review and reinforce French grammar and
structures be means of student-centered learning in the computer lab
using a variety of software. Module I is compulsory for students in FR
1203. The Laboratory Module is open to other students as Level I of the
French Maintenance option.
Suite de FR 1206. Introduction de structures plus complexes de la
phrase et développement accru de lexpression. Exercices pratiques de
composition de courts paragraphes et dapplication des connaissances
acquises. Obligatoire pour les étudiants de FR 2203. Niveau III de
loption Soutien du français. Prérequis : Fr 1206 ou équivalent.
FR 1206
FR 2205
Module de laboratoire II
1 ch (3C 1L)
Laboratory Module III
1 ch (3C)
Suite de FR 1205. Destiné à renforcer les connaissances de létudiant
en grammaire française et en qualité de lexpression. Exercices
pratiques de composition de courts paragraphes où létudiant est invité
à appliquer les concepts acquis. Obligatoire pour les étudiants de FR
1204. Niveau II de loption Soutien du français. Prérequis: FR 1205.
Continuation of FR 1206. Intended to expose students to more complex
sentence structure and further develop accuracy of speech. Students
will practise writing short paragraphs in which they will apply the
acquired concepts. Compulsory for students in FR 2203. Level III of the
French Maintenance option. Prerequisites: FR 1206 or equivalent.
FR 1206
FR 2206
Laboratory Module II
1 ch (3C 1L)
Continuation of FR 1205. Intended to strengthen the students
knowledge of French grammar and accuracy of expression. Students
will practise writing short paragraphs in which they will apply the
acquired concepts. Compulsory for students in FR 1204. Level II of the
French Maintenance option. Prerequisite: FR 1205.
FR 1304
Français pour étudiants de
limmersion I
3 ch
Première partie dun cours destiné à satisfaire les besoins particuliers
des étudiants issus des écoles dimmersion. Revue systématique de la
grammaire française. Ouvert aux étudiants issus d'écoles dont la
langue première d'ensignement est le français.
Développement de lexpression
orale
3 ch (3C)
Destiné au développement du vocabulaire et de la communication
orale. Composante orale de loption de Soutien du français. Prérequis :
FR 2205 ou équivalent.
FR 2206
Developing Oral Skills
3 ch (3C)
Designed to develop vocabulary and strategies for oral communication.
Oral component of the French Maintenance option. Prerequisites: FR
2205 or equivalent.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
217
SECTION F
FR 2304
Français pour étudiants de
limmersion II
3 ch
FR 3412
Principes fondmentaus de
l'acquisition du langage.
3 ch
Deuxième partie dun cours destiné à satisfaire les besoins particuliers
des étudiants issus des écoles dimmersion. Suite de FR 1304, ce cours
offre une revue systématique de la grammaire française. Ouvert aux
étudiants issus d'écoles dont la langue première d'ensignement est le
français.
(3C)Approche chomskyenne de la compétence linguistique chez lêtre
humain. Étude des concepts fondamentaux de lapprentissage dune
langue maternelle et seconde, suivie de discussions sur les
mécanismes dapprentissage. Prérequis : FR 2204 ou 2304, ou
équivalent.
FR 2304
FR 3412
French for Immersion Students II
3 ch
Fundamentals of Language
Learning
3 ch (3C)
Second half of a course designed to meet the particular needs of
students coming from immersion schools. As a continuation of FR
1304, this course provides a systematic review of French grammar.
Graduates of high schools where French is the first language of
instruction must register for this course.
A Chomskyan approach to linguistic competence in humans. Basic
concepts cover first and second language acquisition and are followed
by discussions on learning mechanisms. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or
2304, or equivalent.
FR 3084
FR 3422
Le monde des affaires en français
3 ch (3C)
Par le biais de textes divers et détudes de cas, ce cours améliore les
connaissances de létudiant en français des affaires. La rédaction de
lettres, de mémos, de procès-verbaux et de rapports sont étudiés. Ce
cours prépare aussi les étudiants qui désirent écrire lexamen de la
Chambre de Commerce et dIndustrie de Paris. Prérequis : FR 2204 ou
équivalent.
FR 3084
Conducting Business French
FR 3203
Communication avancée
3 ch (3C)
Destiné à familiariser létudiant aux structures complexes du langage et
à lapplication efficace de ces concepts dans leur expression orale et
écrite. Prérequis : FR 2204 ou 2304 (avec le permission du
professeur), ou équivalent.
FR 3203
Advanced Communication
3 ch (3C)
Designed to familiarize students with complex language structures and
to prepare them to apply these concepts effectively in their oral and
written expression. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or 2304 (with permission of
the instructor), or equivalent.
FR 3204
Français écrit avancé
3 ch (3C)
Destiné au développement plus particulier des connaissances de
structures complexes et de leur usage dans lexpression orale et écrite en particulier la dissertation, le rapport, la lettre. Prérequis : FR 2204,
ou 2304, 3203 ou équivalent.
FR 3204
Effective Writing in French
3 ch (3C)
3 ch (3C)
Lévolution du français, du latin au français actuel. Étude des équences
dialectales et de leur évolution historique, inspirée principalement des
origines et du développement des français acadien et québécois.
Prérequis : FR 2204 ou 2304, ou équivalent.
FR 3422
3 ch (3C)
Through various texts and case studies, students will be shown the
different approaches used in a francophone environment and learn to
communicate more effectively. Formats for letters, memos, minutes
and reports will be studied. This course also prepares students who
wish to write the examination sest by the Chambre de Commerce et
dIndustrie de Paris. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or equivalent.
Évolution langagière et
classification génétique
Language Change and Genetic
Classification
3 ch (3C)
The evolution of the French language from Latin to present day French.
Dialectal branching and their historical motivations, with special
emphasis on the origins and evolution of Acadian and Quebec French
will be considered. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or 2304, or equivalent.
FR 3432
Variation langagière I : Concepts
de base
3 ch (3C)
Étude des variations entre les langues selon leurs paramètres morphologiques. Illustrations et applications inspirées des dialectiques du
français et de langlais, des pidgins et des créoles. Prérequis : FR 2204,
2304, ou équivalent.
FR 3432
Dialect Variation I: Basic Concepts
3 ch (3C)
Study of variations among languages as rooted in the setting of
morphological parameters. Illustrations and applications from French
and English dialects, pidgins and creoles. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or
2304, or equivalent.
FR 3434
Les mots et leurs sens
3 ch (3C)
Quest-ce quun lexique, quest-ce quun dictionnaire? Le mot (son sens,
son évolution, ses variations et sa formation) sont au coeur de cette
étude sur limpact quotidien de loral et de lécrit dans la communication.
Prérequis : FR 2204 ou 2304, ou équivalent.
FR 3434
Words and Meaning
3 ch (3C)
Designed to further develop the knowledge of complex structures and
their use in oral and written expression - particularly essays, reports
and letters. Prerequisite: FR 2204, or 2304, 3203 or equivalent.
What is a lexicon and what is a dictionary? Words (meaning, evolution,
variants and formation) are the central topic of this study which looks at
the impact of spoken and written words on daily communication.
Prerequisite: FR 2204 or 2304, or equivalent.
FR 3324
FR 3442
Traduction I
3 ch (3C)
Destiné à familiariser létudiant aux principes fondamentaux de la
traduction. Pratique de traduction de textes en français avec accent sur
les diverses formes de traduction de mêmes concepts en anglais et en
français. Prérequis : FR 2204 ou 2304, 3203 ou équivalent.
FR 3324
Cross-Linguistic Communication I
3 ch (3C)
Designed to familiarize the students with the fundamentals of
translation theory. Students will practise translating text into French with
emphasis on the different ways of expressing the same concept in
English and French - micro level. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or 2304, 3203
or equivalent.
218
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Variation langagière II: le français
acadien
3 ch (3C)
Étude des différences entre le français standard et le français acadien
dans la perspective de leur variation paramétrique en morphologie.
Une vue densemble de la grammaire française acadienne sert de
fondement à létude. Prérequis : FR 2204 ou 2304, ou équivalent.
FR 3442
Dialect Variation II: Acadian
French
3 ch (3C)
Differences between Standard French and Acadian French are
approached from the perspective of parametric variation in morphology.
An overview of Acadian French grammar provides the basis for this
study. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or 2304, 3422, 3432 or equivalent.
SECTION F
FR 3464
La pensée et la phrase
3 ch (3C)
Pourquoi les usagers dune langue construisent-ils leurs phrases de la
même manière? Explication du don inné de lapprentissage dune
langue et description de modèles mentaux de création de phrases.
Prérequis : FR 2204 ou 2304, ou équivalent.
FR 3464
Mind and Sentence
3 ch (3C)
Why do speakers of a language construct their sentences in the same
way? An investigation of the innate ability to learn a language is
proposed. Mental models for creating sentences are considered.
Prerequisite: FR 2204 or 2304, or equivalent.
FR 3514
Communication et expression
littéraire
3 ch (3C)
Exploration de la littérature comme mode de communication et comme
effets de sens particuliers selon les usages de la prose fictive, de la
non-fiction, de la poésie ou du théâtre. Étude de textes dauteurs
français du dix-neuvième et du vingtième siècle. Prérequis : FR 2204
ou 2304, ou équivalent.
FR 3514
Communication and Literary Form
3 ch (3C)
An exploration of literature as communication, and of the significance
inherent in the choice of literary form whether prose fiction, non-fiction,
poetry or drama. A variety of texts by French authors of the 19th and
20th centuries will serve as illustration. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or 2304,
or equivalent.
FR 3524
Cultures françaises dAfrique et
des Caraïbes
3 ch
Ce cours compare certains courants esthétiques et idéologiques
propres aux littératures de France, dAfrique et des Caraïbes, dans une
perspective post-coloniale. Prérequis : FR 2204, FR 2304 ou
équivalent.
FR 3524
Contemporary French African and
Caribbean Literatures
3 ch
Examines in a comparative perspective some ideological and aesthetic
trends in French, African and Caribbean literatures from a post-colonial
point of view. Prerequisite(s): FR 2204 or FR 2304, or equivalent.
FR 3704
Aspects des cultures
francophones internationales
3 ch (3C)
Ce cours décrit les changements récents dans les cultures
francophones d'Afrique et des Caraibes dans contexte post-colonial de
leurs rapports avec la France. Prérequis : FR 2204 ou 2304, ou
équivalent.
FR 3704
Aspects of World Francophone
Cultures
3 ch (3C)
This course will exporte recent changes in Francophone countries,
mainly African and Caribbean, and their cultural relationships with
France in the post-colonial context. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or 2304, or
equivalent.
FR 3714
Aspects des cultures acadienne et
franco-ontarienne
3 ch (3C)
À titre de cultures minoritaires au Canada, acadiens et franco-ontariens
ont développé des identités distinctes. Des origines à nos jours, ce
cours porte une attention particulière sur les réalités historiques,
sociales et artistiques de ces cultures. Prérequis : FR 2204 ou 2304, ou
équivalent.
FR 3714
Aspects of Acadian and FrancoOntarian Cultures
3 ch (3C)
As French cultural minorities in Canada, Acadians and FrancoOntarians have developed distinctive identifies. From their origins to
the present, attention will be given to the historical, social and artistic
expressions of these cultures. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or 2304, or
equivalent.
FR 3724
Aspects de la culture québécoise
3 ch (3C)
Ce cours porte sur de multiples aspects de la culture québécoise, en
particulier lhistoire, la géographie, la langue, la religion, le folklore, la
musique, la chanson, léducation, le mouvement des idées et la
littérature. Attention spéciale portée sur les grandes questions dans le
Québec contemporain. Prérequis : FR 2204 ou 2304, ou équivalent.
FR 3724
Aspects of Quebec Culture
3 ch (3C)
Étude de textes représentatifs de quelques auteurs français importants
du dix-huitième siècle. Prérequis: FR 2204 ou 2304, ou équivalent.
This course examines the multiple aspects of Quebec culture focusing
on the history, geography, language, religion, folklore, music, songs,
education, intellectual movements and literary works. Special attention
will be given to contemporary issues in the Quebec society.
Prerequisite: FR 2204 or 2304, or equivalent.
FR 3614
FR 3734
FR 3614
Auteurs du dix-huitième siècle
Selected 18th Century Authors
3 ch (3C)
3 ch (3C)
A study of selected important works representative of one or two major
French authors from the 18th century. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or 2304,
or equivalent.
FR 3615
Auteurs du dix-neuvième siècle
3 ch (3C)
Étude de textes représentatifs de quelques auteurs français importants
du dix-neuvième siècle. Prérequis : FR 2204 ou 2304, ou équivalent.
FR 3615
Selected 19th Century Authors
3 ch (3C)
A study of selected important works representative of one or two major
French authors from the 19th century. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or 2304,
or equivalent.
FR 3616
Auteurs du vingtième siècle
3 ch (3C)
Étude de textes représentatifs de quelques auteurs français importants
du vingtième siècle. Prérequis : FR 2204 ou 2304, ou équivalent.
FR 3616
Selected 20th Century Authors
3 ch (3C)
A study of selected important works representative of one or two major
French authors from the 20th century. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or 2304,
or equivalent.
Cinéma et litérature
3 ch (3C)
Ce cours porte sur les interactions entre loeuvre littéraire et son
adaptation cinématographique. Analyse comparative des séquences
narratives, de la représentation et de linterprétation. Une sélection de
films français et canadien-français, et leur version cinématographique
sert de base au cours. Prérequis : FR 2204 ou 2304, ou équivalent.
FR 3734
Language of Cinema and
Literature
3 ch (3C)
This course examines the correlation between literary works and their
cinematographic adaption. Particular attention is given to the
comparative analysis of narrative sequences, representation and interpretation. A selection of French and/or French Canadian movies and
novels will serve as a basis for the course. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or
2304, or equivalent.
FR 3744
Media Texts and the Francophone
World
3 ch
Based on a corpus of study combining journal articles gleaned from the
French press and samplings taken from French television and radio
broadcasting, the course proposes an examination of Francophone
cultures through analysis of media language, communication strategies
and socio-ideological/aesthetic tendencies.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
219
SECTION F
FR 3814
Lexpression littéraire au Canada
français
3 ch (3C)
Étude dauteurs canadiens-français, principalement de romanciers.
Analyse de lévolution historique, sociale et idéologique des procédés
narratifs et du contenu des oeuvres, de 1950 à nos jours. Initiation à la
narratologie. Prérequis : FR 2204 ou 2304, ou équivalent.
FR 3814
Language of French Canadian
Fiction
3 ch (3C)
A study of selected French Canadian authors, particularly novelists.
The course proposes to analyze the historical, sociological and
ideological evolution of literary content and narrative process, language
strategies, from 1950 to the present. Basic concepts in narratology will
be introduced. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or 2304, or equivalent.
FR 3824
Le théâtre au Canada français
3 ch (3C)
De Gratien Gélinas a Robert Lepage, le théâtre canadien-français a
évolué dune expression de lidentité collective vers une recherche plus
orientée sur le langage dramatique. Dans ce contexte, les oeuvres des
principaux dramaturges seront analysées. Prérequis : FR 2204 ou
2304, ou équivalent.
FR 3824
Language of French Canadian
Drama
3 ch (3C)
From Gratien Gélinas to Robert Lepage, French Canadian drama has
evolved from the expression of cultural identity to research into the
language of drama, gradually emphasizing the relationship of dramatic
language and content. In this context, the works of major dramatists will
be reviewed. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or 2304, or equivalent.
FR 3844
Michel Tremblay et son temps
3 ch (3C)
Auteur reconnu internationalement, Michel Tremblay a consacré
limportance de la culture populaire dans la littérature québécoise dans
les années 60. Du Cycle des Belles-Soeurs aux Chroniques du Plateau
Mont-Royal, ce cours analyse la consécration de ce jeune classique et
son influence dans la société. Prérequis : FR 2204 ou 2304, ou
équivalent.
FR 3844
Michel Tremblay and His Time
3 ch (3C)
Internationally acclaimed for Les Belles-Soeurs, Michel Tremblay
consecrated the cultural importance of « joual» (popular language) in
the «quebecois» literature of the late 1960's. Through a selection of his
works in drama, autobiography, short stories, movies and novels, this
course will review the making of this young «classic» and the influence
of this author on society. Prerequisite: FR 2204 or 2304, or equivalent.
FR 4204
Parfaire loral et lécrit
3 ch (3C)
Destiné à développer une connaissance plus authentique du français
par ses expressions idiomatiques et ses vocabulaires spécifiques. Ce
cours sadresse particulièrement aux étudiants désireux de faciliter leur
intégration dans un environnement bilingue. Prérequis : FR 3203 ou
3204, ou équivalent.
FR 4204
Perfecting Oral and Written Skills
3 ch (3C)
Designed to develop a more idiomatic and authentic knowledge of
French through active learning and application of more specific
vocabulary. This course will prepare students to function effectively in a
bilingual work place. Prerequisite: FR 3203, 3204 or equivalent.
FR 4324
Traduction II
3 ch (3C)
Exploration avancée des différences linguistiques par la traduction de
documents authentiques de langlais vers le français. Prérequis : FR
3324 ou équivalent
FR 4324
Cross-Linguistic Communication II 3 ch (3C)
Intended to explore cross-communication differences by translation of
authentic texts into French - macro level. Prerequisite: FR 3324 or
equivalent.
220
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SECTION F
GENDER STUDIES
GEOLOGY
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
GEND 2001
Introduction to Gender Studies
3 ch
An introduction to Gender Studies with an emphasis on interdisciplinary perspectives. Examines basic concepts, approaches, and
methods pertinent to understanding gender relations and divisions in
a global and historical context. Prerequisite: Successful completion of
30 ch or admission to the Certificate in Gender Studies programme.
GEND 4001
Directed Studies
GEOL 1044
Basic geological concepts, geological time, material of the earth's crust,
igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, earthquakes, evolution
of continents and ocean basins, sea-floor spreading and plate
tectonics, coastlines.
GEOL 1074
3 ch
Supervised study in some area of Gender Studies to be determined
by the student and instructor in consultation with the Gender Studies
Coordinator. Prerequisites: GEND 2001 and 9 additional ch of GENDeligible courses.
The Earth: Its Origin and Evolution 5 ch (3C 3L)
Earth Processes, Resources and
the Environment
5 ch (3C 3L)
Structural geology, origin and evolution of life from fossils,
geomorphology of landforms, mineral resources and fossil fuels,
environmental geology, hydrology, engineering geology. Prerequisite:
GEOL 1044.
GEOL 2131
Crystallography and Mineralogy
5 ch (2C 4L)
Fundamentals of crystallography and the classification, identification,
occurrence and origin of the major rock and ore-forming minerals.
Concludes by defining sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks in
terms of mineral assemblages. Prerequisites: GEOL 1044/1074.
GEOL 2142
Optical Mineralogy and
Petrography
5 ch (2C 4L)
Fundamental polarizing microscope techniques as applied to the
identification of crystalline materials. Systematic study of the
composition, phase relations and occurrence of rock-forming minerals
with an emphasis on their identification in thin section as individuals
and as members of mineral assemblages. Prerequisite: GEOL 2131.
GEOL 2201
Biogeology I
(Systematic Paleontology)
5 ch (3C 2L)
Morphology, paleoecology and biostratigraphy of selected groups of
marine invertebrates represented in the fossil record; comparisons with
modern invertebrates in present-day oceans stressed.
GEOL 2212
Sedimentology I
5 ch (3C 2L)
Sedimentary structures, principles of sedimentation, selected
sedimentary environments, with emphasis on marine environments,
comparison of present-day models with occurrences in the geological
record.
GEOL 2321
Structural Geology I
5 ch (3C 3L)
Emphasis on the description and classification of folds, cleavages,
lineations, joints and faults. Presentation of structural data. Use of
primary structures. Salt tectonics. Structure of igneous rocks.
Laboratories include stereographic projection, interpretation of
geological maps and preparation of geological cross sections.
GEOL 2703
Field School
6 ch
Principles of stratigraphic mapping. Prerequisite: GEOL 1044/1074.
GEOL 3222
Biota-Substrate Relationships
3 ch (3C)
Relationships between various substrate types, mainly in subtidal
marine environments, and benthic biotas they support, with examples
drawn mainly from Atlantic (temperate and sub-tropical) and
Mediterranean areas. Comparisons between present-day relationships
and those from fossil record are made.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
221
SECTION F
GERMAN
GREEK
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
GER 1003
Basic German
3 ch
How Germans pronounce and order their words in questions,
answers, commands and various sentence structures. Original
German videos and Canadian content improve understanding and
motivation.
GER 1004
Improving Basic German
3 ch
Continues the study of the basic elements of German with a
Canadian emphasis. Creative oral and written work on subjects
chosen by the students is strongly encouraged. Extensive use of
audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: GER 1003 or equivalent.
GER 1063
Spoken German
3 ch
Concentrates on the development of conversational skills appropriate
to students stated needs. Extensive use of audio-visual materials.Note: Similar to UNBF course GER 1013 Spoken German I.
GER 2003
Creative German
3 ch
Continues to develop the students ability to read, write, speak and
understand German. Emphasises oral and written production on
subjects chosen by students. Uses shorter German original texts and
audio-visual materials. Taught in German and English. Prerequisite:
GER 1003 and one of GER 1004, 1063, 1133 or equivalent.
GER 2004
Reading German Literature in
German
3 ch
Selected short stories in German, e.g., Ebner-Eschenbach, Kafka,
Brecht, Böll, Dürrenmatt and students choices. Taught mainly in
German. Prerequisite: GER 2003 or equivalent.
GER 2133
The Contributions of GermanSpeaking People
3 ch
Examines the contributions to arts, culture, literature science and
ideas of selected German-speaking individuals from past and present
times. Taught in English.
GER 3003
Literature in German in Translation 3ch
I (18th/19th Century)
Examines selected works of the enlightenment and the storm and
stress, classical, romantic and realistic periods, and their contribution
to world literature. Taught in English.
GER 3004
Lit. in German in Translation II
(20th Century)
3ch
Examines important Swiss, Austrian, and German authors and their
contribution to world literature. This includes Hesse, Kafka, Brecht,
Böll Grass, Hochhuth, Dürrenmatt and Frisch and film versions of the
works whenever possible. Taught in English.
222
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
GRK 1001
Introductory Ancient Greek I
3 ch
A beginners course in Ancient Greek. No previous knowledge of
Greek is required.
GRK 1002
Introductory Ancient Greek II
A continuation of GRK 1001.
3 ch
SECTION F
HEALTH SCIENCES
HISTORY
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
coding.
HSCI 4091
Health Science Research I
3ch (3C)
The role of research in the health sciences, recent advances through
research, fundamental and applied research, evaluation of research,
research proposal development and evaluation, ethics issues in
research. (For Health Science (BHS) students only.) Co-requisite:
STAT 2263
HSCI 4092
Health Science Research II
3ch (3C)
A research project course in Health Sciences. Students will complete a
research project (normally) in the area of health sciences in which they
are taking the BHS. (For Health Science (BHS) students only.)
Prerequisite: HSCI4091.
HIST 1101
The European Experience
3 ch
This semester course will introduce students to the history of
continental Europe and the goals and methods of historical studies. A
flexible set of lectures, discussion periods and assignments will explore
social, cultural, economic and political issues illustrative of a wide
range of European experiences, as well as the central role of this
continent in the shaping of our contemporary world.
HIST 1201
British Experience
3 ch
Introduces British history of the period 1480 to the present using a
biographical approach. From the high and mighty to the low and
powerless, the lives of several individuals of various social ranks will be
examined. The successes and limitations of biography as a means of
historical understanding will be explored.
HIST 1301
Canadian Historical Issues
3 ch
This course is designed to introduce students to the methodology and
techniques of historical study. It will focus on the historical background
to current issues in Canadian society, culture and politics.
HIST 1401
The American Experience
3 ch
HIST 1401 is an introductory course focusing on American Social
History. Through lecture, discussion and written assignments, students
will examine questions about how men and women make history, as
well as questions about how history is shaped by those writing it. This
course will offer students an opportunity to do historical research,
improve communication skills, and develop a critical scholarly
approach.
HIST 1501
The Latin American Experience
3 ch
Introduces students to the methodology and techniques of historical
study through a thematic introduction to Latin American history, society
and culture.
HIST 2000
World History
6 ch (3C) [W]
Will examine the distinctive achievements of major world civilizations,
such as China, India, Egypt and the Mediterranean World, Islam, East
and West Africa, Western Europe and the Americas. Emphasis will be
given to cross cultural interactions such as trade, slavery, religion, war,
disease, technological exchange and imperialism.
HIST 2010
Comp. Colonial Settlements
1450-1763
6 ch (3C) [W]
Intended as an introduction to more intensive studies of empires and
imperialism, this course includes some study of the civilizations of the
world prior to the European impact upon them, surveys the overseas
empires of Spain, Portugal, France, Holland and Britain and the
overland empire of Russia, and concludes with a consideration of the
impact of the overseas world on Europe.
HIST 2101
European History: French
Revolution to the Great War
3 ch [W]
A survey of political, social, economic and cultural developments in
modern Europe from 1789 to 1919. Topics examined include the
French Revolution and Napoleon, the Restoration, Nation-building,
colonial rivalry and the Great War of 1914-1918.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
223
SECTION F
HIST 2102
European History: Great War to
European Union
3ch [W]
A survey of the political, social, economic and cultural development of
Modern Europe from the Great War to the emergence of the European
Union. Topics examined will include: the rise of Fascism and Nazism;
the Russian Revolution and Stalinism; Antisemitism and the Holocaust;
and the Re-birth of Europe since 1945.
HIST 2207
England and Scotland: 1483-1708
3ch [W]
A political history of these two countries in the early modern era.
Prerequisite: Any 3 ch of 1000 level History or Classics
HIST 2208
Great Britain: 1707 to Present
3ch [W]
The political, social and economic history of Great Britain in the modern
era. Prerequisite: HIST 2207
HIST 2301
Canadian History Before
Confederation
3 ch [W]
A survey of Canadian history from the age of exploration through the
Colonial era to the British North American Act of 1867. Prerequisite:
HIST 1301 or equivalent
HIST 2302
Canadian History Since
Confederation
HIST 3102
Racism in Europe: Science, Myth
and Politics
3 ch
Traces the rise and fall of Fascist racism in 20th century Europe. Topics
include the background and genesis of Fascist racial doctrines, and the
political rationale legitimizing genocide in the period between 1922 and
1945. Special attention will be given to Fascist eugenics, racial
propaganda, antisemitism and the Holocaust, the impact of survivor
testimony in oral history, and the political significance of war crimes
tribunals. Prerequisites: HIST 2101 and HIST 2102 or permission of the
Instructor.
HIST 3105
Fascism on Film
3 ch
Explores the work of film makers who have used the medium of feature
film to interpret the rise and fall of the European Fascist experience in
the years between the two World Wars. Lectures, discussions, film
screenings, and critical film reviews will measure the extent to which
these film makers created cinematic historical documents designed to
meet the needs of a devastated and defeated continental society
embarking on a path of rebirth and renewal. Prerequisites: HIST 2101
and HIST 2102 or permission of the Instructor.
HIST 3106
3 ch
The Rise of Fascism and Nazism in 3ch [W]
Europe 1890s to 1945
A survey of Canadian history from 1867 through western expansion,
the growth of an industrial society, the wars of the 20th century and into
the re-examination of Confederation of the late 20th century.
Prerequisite: HIST 2301 or equivalent
Examines the crises faced by European nations from the 1890s to
1945 that produced fascist movements. Using primary sources the
course explores the relation between fascism and other tendencies
such as nationalism, imperialism, antisemitism and biological racism.
Prerequisites: Two of the following: HIST 2101, 2102, 2207, 2208
HIST 2407
HIST 3107
U.S. History: Colony to Nation
3ch [W]
A general survey of political, economic, and social developments from
the colonial period to the 19th century. Themes examined will include:
Puritan New England, native peoples and colonists, slavery, the
American Revolution, and nationalism. Prerequisites: 3ch of (any) 1000
level history course
HIST 2408
U.S. History: Since Independence
3ch [W]
A general survey of political, economic, and social developments from
the Revolution to the present. Themes examined will include: territorial
expansion, the Civil War, the rise of corporate America, protest and
reform movements, and the US in international affairs. Prerequisites:
HIST 2407
HIST 3003
Women in European History
3 ch (3C) [W]
A survey of the changing roles of women from the Middle Ages through
modern industrialization. Studies major texts defining womans place in
European society. Specific topics include attitudes to women, family
and work patterns, education, and emerging public roles.
HIST 3041
Global Issues in the 20th Century
3 ch
Propaganda, Politics and Film in
Modern Europe
3 ch [W]
This course explores the political and social dynamics of film in modern
Europe between 1918 and 1945. The experiences of Britain, France,
Italy, Germany and Russia in the period between the two World Wars in
using film for communication and propaganda will be examined.
Prerequisites: Two of the following: HIST 2101, 2102, 2207, 2208
HIST 3174
Nation-States in Modern Europe:
France, Germany and Italy in
Comparative Perspective
3ch [W]
This course will provide a comparative survey of the political, social,
economic and cultural aspects of important liberal democracies of
continental Western Europe: France, Germany and Italy. Topics
include: governmental functions and structures; modernization;
democracy; supra-nationalism; sovereignty and the European Union.
Prerequisites: Two of the following: HIST 2101, 2102, 2207, 2208
HIST 3185
Britain, 1688-1760: The Age of
Oligarchy
3ch(3C) [W]
This course examines a series of contemporary global issues in
historical perspective. It will take a thematic approach to a variety of
key 20th century subjects and will cover such topics as women's rights,
anti-Semitism, the origins of the environmental movement, economic
integration and globalization, indigenous land rights, urbanization,
trends in popular culture, technological innovations, and militarization.
Analyzes the Glorious Revolution and its consequences, the
intellectual revolution of the late 17th century, the emergence of Britain
as a military power under William and Anne and the union with
Scotland, the roots and course of the Agricultural Revolution, the
beginnings of the Industrial Revolution, the rule of the Whig oligarchy
and the social development and the cultural transformation of the
period. Prerequisites: Two of HIST 2101, 2102, 2207, 2208
HIST 3101
HIST 3195
European Personalities, Power
and Politics
3 ch
Explores 19th and 20th century Europe from the perspective of the
political lives and exploits of such notables as Napoleon, Metternich,
Cavour, Bismarck, Mussolini, Hitler and Stalin. Topics will include the
role of biography in historiography, the dynamics of centralized power,
and the cult of personality. Prerequisites: HIST 2101 and HIST 2102 or
permission of the Instructor.
224
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Britain in the Age of Revolution,
1760-1832
3 ch (3C) [W]
Studies Great Britain and Ireland in the years of transition from the age
of classicism and aristocracy to the age of romanticism and liberal
reform. Emphasis on political history and on the modernization of
government in response to the problems of war, the dramatic increase
in population and the agricultural and industrial revolutions. Attention is
also paid to the treatment of convicts and slaves in an increasingly
humanitarian age, and the development of new economic, social and
political ideologies. Prerequisites: Two of HIST 2101, 2102, 2207,
2208.
SECTION F
HIST 3202
England Under the Tudors
3 ch
HIST 3303
Women in Canadian History
3 ch (3C) [W]
An examination of the events and conditions in England during the
Tudor dynasty, 1485-1603. Attention will be paid to political, religious,
intellectual, economic and social issues. Prerequisites: Two of HIST
2101, 2102, 2207, 2208
A survey of changing roles of women in Canadian History. Studies
major texts on the condition of women in Canadian history. Specific
topics include: attitudes to women, education, work patterns, family and
public roles.
HIST 3205
HIST 3305
Victorian and Edwardian Britain,
1833-1910
3 ch (3C) [W]
Considers the political, economic and social structures of Victorian and
Edwardian Britain. Topics incude religion, the family, trade unionism,
imperialism, Darwinism and urbanization. Prerequisites: Two of HIST
2101, 2102, 2207, 2208.
HIST 3212
England Under the Stuarts
3 ch
An examination of the changing political, intellectual, religious and
social conditions in England during the tumultuous period dating from
the reign of James I in 1603 to the end of the Glorious Revolution in
1688-89. Prerequisites: Two of HIST 2101, 2102, 2207, 2208.
HIST 3255
Anglo-Irish Relations
3 ch (3C) [W]
This course will examine the history of Ireland and the United Kingdom
between 1780-1980. It will seek to discover the sources of Anglo-Irish
conflict and the various steps taken to resolve that conflict. Credit
cannot be obtained for both this course and HIST 3290. This course
together with HIST 3265 will replace HIST 3290. Prerequisites: Two of
HIST 2101, 2102, 2207, 2208.
HIST 3265
Ireland: Conquest and
Subordination 1500-1800
3 ch (3C) [W]
Canadian Nationalism
3 ch (3C) [W]
Course will examine the phenomenon of nationalism, its role in
Canadian development in the nineteenth century and such alternate
movements as French Canadian nationalism, provincial rights, Continentalism, and Imperialism. Writings of major political and cultural
leaders will be studied.Credit will not be granted for both HIST 3305
and HIST 3320. This course with HIST 3315 will replace HIST 3320.
HIST 3311
Canada-U.S. Relations 1867-1945
3ch [W]
This course examines the major themes in Canada-United States
relations from Confederation until the end of World War II. Specific
areas include trade, diplomacy, military relations, cultural issues and
how Americans and Canadians viewed each others societies.
Prerequisite: HIST 2301
HIST 3312
Canada-United States Relations
Since 1945
3ch [W]
This course examines Canadian-American Relations from 1945 to the
Mulroney-Reagan era. It explores diplomatic, defence, economic,
cultural and environmental issues. Prerequisite: HIST 2302
HIST 3315
Twentieth Century Canada
3 ch (3C) [W]
A survey of Ireland from the rise of the Tudor Monarchy to the Act of
Union with Britain.Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both this course
and HIST 3290. This course, together with HIST 3295 and HIST 3255,
will replace HIST 3290. Prerequisites: Two of HIST 2101, 2102, 2207,
2208.
Course will investigate the quest for Canadian autonomy in politics,
foreign affairs, constitutional reform and cultural expression since
1914. The efforts of the central government to foster national unity in
the face of sustained regional and ethnic tension will be studied. Credit
will not be granted for HIST 3315 and HIST 3320. This course with
HIST 3305 will replace HIST 3320.
HIST 3275
HIST 3316
History of Scotland I
3 ch (3C) [W]
This course will examine the emergence of a Scottish Kingdom, the
Knoxian Reformation, the union with England, the Jacobite rebellions,
the Scottish Enlightenment and Industrial Revolution, the Highland
Clearances, and the attainment of Parliamentary democracy.
HIST 3285
Social History of Modern Scotland
3 ch (3C) [W]
This course takes a topical approach and assumes a background
knowledge of Scottish history on the part of the student. Topics to be
considered include the Highland-Lowland division, the changing
linguistic pattern, the cause of emigration, urbanization, the rise of
trade union and labour movements, and the emergence of an
independence movement. Prerequisite: HIST 3275.
HIST 3290
An Intro to the History of Ireland
6 ch (3C) [W]
A survey of the development of the history of the Irish people from the
mythological origin, early Christianity, the Norse invasions, the Norman
conquest, the Gaelic revival, the Tudor wars, the Plantations,
Cromwell, the Penal Period, the rise of the Protestant Nation, the
Union, Catholic Emancipation, the Famine, the struggle for political
reform, to the rise of the modern political state of Ireland. Credit will not
be granted for both HIST 3290, HIST 3255 and HIST 3295
Prerequisite: HIST 1150 or Instructors permission.
HIST 3295
Medieval and Norman Ireland, 500- 3 ch (3C) [W]
1500
A survey of early Irish history from the introduction of Christianity to the
establishment of control by Tudor England.Note: Credit cannot be
obtained for both this course and HIST 3290. This course, together with
HIST 3265 and HIST 3255, will replace HIST 3290. Prerequisites: Two
of HIST 2101, 2102, 2207, 2208.
Immigration and Identity in
Canadian History
3ch [W]
Examines the changing pattern of immigration to Canada from the
early seventeenth century to the present, and the contribution of the
various immigrant groups to the creation of a sense of Canadian
identity. Prerequisite: HIST 2302
HIST 3321
Canadian Colonial Society
3ch [W]
Examines the formation and nature of community in pre-industrial
English Canada. Particular attention given to demography, immigrant
and religious traditions, economic and environmental factors, poverty,
social structure and the growth of towns. Prerequisite: HIST 2302
HIST 3333
History: Theory and Practice
3ch [W]
This course introduces all majors and honours students to historical
methodology, the process of historical research, and the influences on
selected major historical studies. Prerequisite: Honours or Majors
admission
HIST 3361
Atlantic Provinces 1497 - 1784
3 ch
A history of the Atlantic region of Canada from the time of earliest
European explorations to the formation of the second Empire in North
America. Prerequisite: HIST 2302 or equivalent
HIST 3362
Atlantic Provinces 1784 - 1867
3 ch
A history of the Atlantic region of Canada from the formation of the
Second Empire to Confederation with Canada. Prerequisite: HIST
2302 or equivalent
HIST 3363
History of the Atlantic Provinces
After Confederation
3 ch
A history of the region after Confederation to the present day with focus
on movements for social, economic, and political reform. Equivalent to
HIST 4342 UNBF. Prerequisite: HIST 2302 or equivalent
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
225
SECTION F
HIST 3365
The Formation of Loyalist Canada
3 ch (3C) [W]
HIST 3473
Native People in the United States
since the American Revolution.
3 ch (3C) [W]
Traces the settlement of the Loyalists in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick,
Quebec, and Upper Canada after the American Revolution. Particular
attention is paid to Loyalist ideology and the types of communities and
institutions they established in British North America and to the
subsequent impact of the Loyalist myth on Canadian history.
This course will focus on government policies pertaining to Native
People, beginning in the early National period. The history of Natives
and Newcomers in the nineteenth century will be emphasized,
although twentieth century issues will also be examined.
HIST 3381
HIST 3475
The Family and the State in North
America
3 ch (3C)
Examines the economic and social functions of the family in the
transition from pre-industrial to industrial society. Topics include the
religious underpinnings of the family, gender relations, the role of laws
and state regulation, the impact of social policy and the emergence of a
North American politics of the family. Prerequisite: one of HIST 2301,
HIST2302, HIST2403, HIST2405 or 15 ch of History courses.
HIST 3383
Police and Society in North
America
3 ch (3C)
Examines the development of the new Police and its relationship to
19th and 20th century North American society. Themes will include the
European origins of policing, police reform, professionalization, labour
relations, relations with minorities, political policing and private security.
Prerequisite: one of HIST 2301, HIST2302, HIST2403, HIST2405 or 15
ch of History courses.
HIST 3385
Social History of Crime in Canada
3 ch
An examination of how Canadian society has perceived and reacted to
crime and criminals from early Colonial times to the mid-twentieth
century. Prerequisite: HIST 1301 or equivalent
HIST 3386
Canadian Criminal Justice System
3 ch
An examination of the Canadian criminal justice system with an
emphasis on criminal law, courts, police and corrections from the
Colonial era to the mid-twentieth century. Prerequisite: HIST 2302 or
equivalent
HIST 3403
Women in American History
3 ch (3C) [W]
Survey of the changing roles of women from colonial times until today.
Studies major texts on the condition of women. Specific topics include
education, work patterns, the suffragette movement and feminist
theory.
HIST 3421
From the Age of Discovery to the
Atomic Age: Science in America
3 ch(3C) [W]
America's position as a world superpower has many sources, none
more important than science. This course will focus on the American
fascination with science. Social and political themes will be examined,
in addition to intellectual developments in science.
HIST 3455
Colonial America
3 ch (3C) [W]
Deals with the exploration, settlement and development of America
from the beginning until the 18th century both in the context of local
history and the broad European-American background, focusing on the
original thirteen colonies that became the United States.
HIST 3465
The American Revolution
3 ch (3C) [W]
Deals with the causes, results and nature of the American Revolution.
Themes include imperial relations, the internal development of the
colonies and states, the development of revolutionary ideas, and the
formation of the federal government. Attention given to the conflicting
interpretations of these themes.
HIST 3471
Indigenous Peoples in America
before 1800
3 ch (3C) [W]
This course will focus on the history of Native People in the postcontact period. Relationships based on missions, the fur trade, and
colonization will be examined.
226
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
The American South
3ch (1.5C,1.5S)
Beginning with the arrival of the first settlers and their relationship with
aboriginal peoples, through the development of a distinctive culture
and society based on slavery, HIST 3475 will focus on social,
intellectual, economic and political themes in southern history.
Prerequisites: HIST 2407 and HIST 2408
HIST 3481
American Society, 1830-1900
3 ch (3C) [W]
With the Revolution and its aftermath consolidated, the United States
embarked on nation-building and continental expansion, profoundly
altering the economic, social and political character of revolutionary
America. The course traces these changes and seeks to assess how
well Americans and American society adapted to them. Prerequisite:
HIST 2400 or permission of the instructor.
HIST 3485
American History & the Mass
Media
3 ch
This is an advanced course in American history focusing on how
history has been presented and promoted to an increasingly numerous
and educated audience. Analysis of media used for entertainment or
propaganda will be based on studies of the historical literature, as well
as theoretical literature in film and media studies. Must be a History
Major, or by permission of the Instructor.
HIST 3491
American Society, 1900-1980
3 ch (3C) [W]
Examines how the United States came to terms with the legacy of
nineteenth-century growth and development as it transformed itself into
a mature nation and society. Considers the impact of the depression,
World War I and World War II on the United States, along with its
growing impact on the world. Prerequisite: HIST 2400 or permission of
the instructor.
HIST 3505
History of Reform in Modern
America
3 ch (3C) [W]
The political and social struggle of Populists, Progressives, New
Dealers and Radicals are the focal points of this survey. Prerequisite:
HIST 1400 or permission of the instructor.
HIST 3525
US Diplomatic History in the 20th
Century
3 ch (3C) [W]
The growth of the great power from isolation to world leadership. The
basic premises of American policy are studied as well as the United
States role in the great confrontations of the century from World War
One to the Cold War, the American withdrawal from Vietnam and the
reorientation of US policy. Prerequisite: HIST 1400 or permission of the
instructor.
HIST 3555
History of the Atlantic World
3ch (3C)
History of the Atlantic slave trade, plantation societies in the Caribbean
region, Atlantic trade networks, the abolition of Atlantic slavery, and
emancipation. Prerequisite: 15 credit hours of History
HIST 3560
American Intellectual History
6 ch (3C) [W]
A study of the major developments in American political, religious, and
social thought from the Federalist Era to the Counter Culture of the late
1960s. Emphasis on the relationship between ideas and the formation
of public institutions, economic structures, and cultural movements.
Prerequisite: HIST 2400 or permission of the instructor.
SECTION F
HIST 3567
The Colonial History of Latin
America
3 ch
The objective of the course is to provide a broad social, political, and
economic overview of Latin America under Spanish and Portuguese
colonial rule. Prerequisites: At least 6 ch of lower level history or
permission of the Instructor.
HIST 3588
Modern Latin American
Revolutions
3ch (3C)
Origins, course, and development of the Mexican Revolution (1910-40)
and the Cuban Revolution (1959-present). Prerequisite: 15 credit hours
of History
HIST 3715
European Union: Historical Roots,
Obstacles and Achievements
3 ch (3C) [W]
Over the last fifty years, many European countries have embarked on a
slow and complex attempt to build a European Union. While the shape
of this entity remains very much in question, substantial achievements
have already transformed Europe to a degree that would have been
difficult to imagine in the aftermath of the Second World War. This
course will search for historical antecedents to the current efforts,
analyze the fundamental questions raised by unification, and evaluate
the impact of existing common structures on European states and
societies.
HIST 3945
Women, Science and Medicine
3 ch (3C) [W]
This course will focus on the relationship between gender and science.
Women's participation in science and medicine will be examined, as
well as the philosophical and empirical underpinnings of science and
medicine. Contemporary issues will be discussed, but the focus is
historical, beginning with Aristotelian science and Hippocratic
medicine.
HIST 4361
Studies in the Historical Sociology
of Saint John: Community
3 ch
Drawing upon the intellectual structures of both history and sociology,
aspects of the community of Saint John will be explored. Consideration
will be given to the community as space, as people, as shared
institutions, and a social system. Prerequisite: Must be a History major,
or by permission of the Instructor.
HIST 4362
Studies in the Historical Sociology
of Saint John: Religion
3 ch
HIST 4475
The American South: From
Jamestown to Jimmy Carter
3 ch
Beginning with the arrival of the first settlers and their relationships with
aboriginal peoples through the development of a distinctive culture and
society based on slavery, to the "New South" of the late 19th century
and the industrialized south of the 20th century, HIST 4475 will focus
on social, intellectual, economic and political themes in southern
history. Must be a History Major, or by permission of the Instructor.
HIST 4900
Honours Thesis
6 ch [W]
HENG 4000. Honours Thesis for Joint Honours Program in English and
History 6 ch [W]
HIST 4906
Honours Seminar I
3ch [W]
Selected topics for Honours History students. Prerequisite: Honours
admission.
HIST 4907
Honours Seminar II
3ch [W]
Selected topics for Honours History students. Prerequisite: Honours
admission and HIST 4906.
HENG4000
Joint Honours Thesis
6 ch [W]
Honours thesis for Joint Honours Program in English and History.
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Joint Honours Program in English &
History.
HISTORY & ENGLISH Joint Honours Program
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
HENG 4000
Honours Thesis
6 ch [W]
Honours thesis for Joint Honours Programme in English and History.
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Joint Honours Programme in
English & History.
Drawing upon the intellectual structures of both history and sociology,
aspects of the role of religion in Saint John will be explored.
Consideration will be given to religion as an institution, religion in
politics, and religion and gender. Prerequisites: Must be a History
Major, or by permission of the Instructor.
HIST 4451
The US as a Great Power,
1900-1939
3 ch (3C) [W]
During the years 1900-1939 the United States was forced to come to
terms with its new international status. The course examines how this
took place and explores the reaction of American society to its new
role. Prerequisite: HIST 2400 or permission of the instructor.
HIST 4461
The US as a Great Power,
1945-Present
3 ch (3C) [W]
Considers the role of the United States as a great power after World
War II. Examines intensively the interplay of domestic policies and
politics with international affairs. Prerequisite: HIST 2400 or permission
of the instructor.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
227
SECTION F
HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM
HTM 4161
Note: In order to take a Hospitality and Tourism (HTM) course that has a
prerequisite, students must earn a C or better in the prerequisite
course(s), regardless of the program in which the student is registered.
See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
HTM 1503
Introduction to Tourism
3ch
This course is designed to acquaint students with the broad topic of
tourism. Emphasis is placed on the socio-cultural, environmental and
economic impacts of tourism. In addition, the course focuses on the
interdisciplinary nature of tourism, with pertinent elements drawn from
business, economics, sociology, psychology, recreation and geography.
HTM 2217
Management Accounting For The
Hospitality Industries
3 ch (3C)
This course examines the use of accounting information for planning
and control in hospitality and tourism operations. Topics to be covered
include cost-volume-profit analysis, budget planning and control, ABC
costing, and performance evaluation all geared to the industry. Also
included will be an introduction to measuring the costs of quality and to
yield management. NOTE: Credit will not be granted for both HTM
2217 and BA2217.
HTM 2858
Human Resource Management In
the Hospitality Industry
3 ch (3C)
An analysis of the human resource management problems involved in
the delivery of services including recruitment, selection, training and
development, motivation, compensation, communication, unionism and
labour market issues. Emphasis will be placed on the particular human
resource challenges that present themselves in the service industries
and the linkages between human resources overall business
objectives. NOTE: Credit will not be granted for both HTM 2858 and BA
2858.
HTM 2903
Workterm Report I
1 ch
Identifies an opportunity or problem in the workplace, analyzes its
sources and development, addresses key issues to be considered,
offers alternatives and makes recommendations, including clear
provisions for implementation.
HTM 3903
Workterm Report II
1 ch
Identifies an opportunity or problem in the workplace, analyzes its
sources and development, addresses key issues to be considered,
offers alternatives and makes recommendations, including clear
provisions for implementation.
HTM 4101
Advanced Management,
Hospitality And Tourism
Operations
HTM 4129
Tourism Research Methods
3 ch (3C)
This course focuses on the knowledge and skills required to
understand the importance of research in successful businesses. The
course emphasizes the interpretation and evaluation of existing
research. Prerequisites: BA1605 and BA2606.
228
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
3 ch (3C)
This course examines the nature and scope of tourism planning and
development from the perspective of markets, attractions, services,
transportation suppliers, natural resources and government policy
makers. Emphasis will be placed on community and regional tourism
planning, with attention paid to economic, physical, environmental and
social considerations of planning for tourism entities and destinations.
Open to 3rd and 4th year HTM students or permission of instructor.
HTM 4165
Heritage Tourism
3 ch (3C)
This course explores the nature of heritage tourism. It surveys the
issues that influence the development of heritage for tourism.
Perspectives on heritage provisions for tourism will be examined in the
context of social, cultural, tourism policies at the provincial, national,
and international levels. Prerequisite: HTM 1503
HTM 4503
Independent Study - Hospitality
and Tourism
3 ch
This course will provide the student with a deepening knowledge in the
Hospitality and Tourism area. Under the supervision of a Faculty
member, the student will explore topics not available in the regular
course offerings. The course may consist of written assignments, oral
examinations and written examinations. Students must identify a faculty
member who is willing to supervise the course and apply to the
Director, Undergraduate Studies for approval at least 30 days prior to
the term in which they wish to undertake the work. Applications are
normally approved for students who are in their senior year and who
have obtained a grade point average of at least 3.0 in the work of the
second and third years.
HTM 4505
Resort And Recreation
Management
3 ch (3C)
This course considers concepts and methods of resort planning,
management and marketing, including recreational and event
management for the resort environment. Case studies of real and
proposed resorts from different environments will be used. Field visits
to one or more resorts will be an essential part of the course.
HTM 4515
International Tourism
3 ch (3C)
This course studies the structure, environment, and special characteristics of international tourism. Topics include the nature, importance
and measurement of country/destination image; host/visitor
interactions; factors motivating, facilitating and constraining
international travel; and, types of international travelers and their
needs. Also included will be the measurement, forecasting and
promotion of international travel.
HTM 4525
3 ch (3C)
This is an integrative course dealing with the many interdepartmental
and interdisciplinary problems confronting the management team in
addressing organizations with opportunities and problems. Extensive
use will be made of case studies and on-site assignments or projects.
Emphasis will be placed on productivity and the delivery of a quality
product within a competitive environment. Note: credit will not be
granted for both HTM 4101 and BA 4101.
Planning & Development of
Sustainable Tourism
Profit And Control In Hospitality
And Tourism Operations
3 ch (3C)
A study of the information systems useful in examining value-added
processes within the industry. Interpretive, analytical and judgmental
skills will be applied in the study of environmental and quality costs;
ABC costing; performance evaluation and other topics at an advanced
level. Considerable emphasis will be given to the development of yield
management philosophies which were developed in the travel sector
and are now being adopted throughout the industry.
HTM 4535/
HTM 4545
Special Topics In Hospitality
Management/Tourism And Travel
3 ch (3C)
These courses survey various issues and events that influence the
hospitality and tourism industries. Topics will vary from year to year
reflecting contemporary issues and events.
SECTION F
HTM 4555
Adventure And Leisure Tourism
Development
3 ch (3C)
This course will explore issues related to entrepreneurial small
business development in the growing adventure and leisure sector of
the Tourism Industry. Participants will have the opportunity to research
emerging trends and issues related to the feasibility of creating service
products to serve this market. Small business models which allow for
the creation of stable enterprises in an often seasonal market will be
examined.
HTM 4903
Workterm Report III
1 ch
Identifies an opportunity or problem in the workplace, analyzes its
sources and development, addresses key issues to be considered,
offers alternatives and makes recommendations, including clear
provisions for implementation.
HUMANITIES
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
HUM 1401
Introduction to Music
3 ch [W]
An introduction to the development of music from the origins of musical
performance and compositions to the relationships of music with
present computer technology, and to the appreciation of music.
HUM 1903
Introduction to Art and
Architecture I
3 ch (3C) [W]
A comprehensive review of the elements, terminology, methods and
concepts underlying the History of Art and Architecture from prehistoric times to the present. This course is part one of two and covers
the periods from Pre-history tothe end of the Middle Ages. Prerequisite
to upper-level Art History courses.
HUM 1904
Introduction to Art and
Architecture II
3 ch (3C) [W]
A comprehensive review of the elements, terminology, methods and
concepts underlying the History of Art and Architecture from prehistoric times to the present. This course is part two of two and covers
the periods from Renaissance to the present day. Prerequisite to
upper-level Art History courses.
HUM 2120
Effective Writing
6 ch [W]
Examines various aspects of effective writing in English including
vocabulary, sentence structure, organization of material, and essays of
a descriptive, comparative, expository, critical and argumentative
nature. Includes numerous written exercises.
HUM 3205
Baroque and Rococo Art
3 ch [W]
A study of the history of Art and Architecture in Europe during the 17th
and 18th centuries. Prerequisites: HUM 1903, HUM 1904
HUM 3208
Renaissance Art
3 ch [W]
Examines developments in painting, sculpture and architecture during
the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in Italy and in the rest of Europe.
Prerequisites: HUM 1903, HUM 1904
HUM 3223
Writing Short Fiction
3 ch [W]
A workshop-seminar in which notable examples of short fiction are
studied and the writing of short stories is practised: weekly
assignments.
HUM 3924
History of Modern Art
3 ch (3C) [W]
A study of major movements in the art of the 19th and early 20th
centuries from Neo-classicism to Surrealism.
HUM 3953
American Painting
3 ch (3C) [W]
A history of painting in the United States from the time of the Revolution
to the 1960s, including Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art.
HUM 3964
Canadian Painting
3 ch (3C) [W]
A history of Canadian Painting, emphasizing developments in the
twentieth century.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
229
SECTION F
INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION
STUDIES
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
IS 1001
ICS 2001
Introduction to Information and
Communication Studies
3 ch
This course is a basic introduction to the social, cultural, political,
economic and technological aspects of the information and
communication revolution.
ICS 3001
Theories of Information and
Communication
3 ch
This focuses on theoretical issues regarding the political and social
implications of the information and communication revolution. Specific
themes to be covered include society and technological change,
communication technologies, globalization and the digital revolution.
Prerequisites: ICS 2001
ICS 3003
Electronic Research
3 ch
This course provides students with an advanced introduction to
conducting web-based research and the use of electronic research
tools. Prerequisites: ICS 2001
ICS 3004
Media Production I
3ch (3C)
Introduction to production and scripting techniques for Radio and Print.
Students will explore aspects of production through individual and
group projects as well as in class presentations. A strong writing
component is required. Prerequisite: ICS 2001
ICS 3005
The Digital Revolution
3 ch
This course provides a historical, political, social and economic
perspective on how digital technologies influence practices of
communication and information distribution. Prerequisite: ICS 2001
ICS 3006
Media Production II
3ch (3C)
Introduction to production techniques for Television, Film and Web.
Students will explore aspects of production through individual and
group projects as well as in class presentations. A strong writing
component is required. Prerequisite: ICS 2001
ICS 3007
Digital Democracy
3 ch
This course examines technologically mediated political practices in
liberal democracies. Prerequisite: ICS 2001
ICS 4001
Research Seminar in ICS
3 ch
This seminar provides majors with the opportunity to do basic research
in an area of special interest. Prerequisites: ICS 2001, ICS 3001, ICS
3003
230
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Introduction to International
Studies
3 ch
An interdisciplinary introduction to the regional approach to
International Studies. The course examines the political, social and
economic aspects of developing and developed regions.
IS 1002
Global Issues
3 ch
An interdisciplinary examination of issues and problems relating to
the environment, human rights gender and inequality, migration, and
povverty in a global perspective. Prerequisite: IS 1001
IS 3301
The Contemporary Mediterranean
Region
3 ch
Interdisciplinary examination of the basic features of the
contemporary Mediterranean. Prerequisites: IS 1001, IS 1002
IS 3401
Contemporary Latin America
3 ch
Interdisciplinary examination of the basic features of contemporary
Latin America. Prerequisites: IS 1001, IS 1002
IS 3501
Seminar in International Studies
3 ch
Interdisciplinary advanced seminar on International Studies topics,
and global issues. Prerequisites: IS 1001, IS 1002
IS 4501
Research Project in International
Studies
3 ch
A seminar requirement of the International Studies Program to
enable students to do research. Prerequisites: IS 1001, IS 1002 and
9 ch in IS courses, or permission of the instructor
SECTION F
KINESIOLOGY
KIN 4021
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
KIN 1001
Introduction to Kinesiology
6 ch (3C)
This course is presented in three modules covering the following areas
of study: recreation and leisure studies; sport management, coaching,
wellness, and theoretical foundations; and exercise and sport science.
KIN 1012
Kinesiological Aspects of Lifespan 3 ch (3C)
Development
Introductory study of physical growth and motor development of the
human organism from conception to maturity.
KIN 2021
Youth in Sport
3 ch (3C) [W]
Examines the influence of sport experiences on the total development
of youth. Includes an analysis of the nature and impact of youth sport
programs to determine the major psychological, physiological,
sociological and moral considerations surrounding youth involvement in
sport. Prerequisites: PSYC 1004, SOCI 1001, SOCI 1002 or
permission of instructor.
KIN 2023
Introduction to the Sociology of
Sport
3 ch (3C) [W]
Considers sport as a social institution and studies various topics which
have occupied sport sociologists. Prerequisite: SOCI 1001, SOCI 1002
or permission of instructor.
KIN 2032
Introduction to Sport Psychology
3 ch (3C) [W]
Examines selected topics which have implications for performance in
sport and physical activity. Emphasis is on the application of theory to
developmental coaching practice. Prerequisite: PSYC 1004 or
permission of instructor.
KIN 3031
Exercise Psychology
Aggression and Violence
Perspectives in Sport
3 ch (3C) [W]
The study of aggression and violence in sport. Topics include:
behavioral theories of aggression, frequency of occurrence, and
behavioral modification programs to reduce aggression and violence in
sport. Prerequisites: KIN 2021, KIN 2023, and KIN 2032 (grade of B- or
better in each).
KIN 4022
Sociological Analysis of Sport
3 ch (3C) [W]
Advanced reading course in selected topics. Prerequisites: KIN 2021,
KIN 2023, and KIN 2032 (grade of B- or better in each).
KIN 4904
Directed Studies in Exercise and
Sport
3 ch (3C) [W]
Provides opportunities for students to explore a number of special
areas in physical education and sport. Faculty approval is required prior
to registration. Title of the topic will appear on the students transcript.
Open only to students in third year and above. Prerequisites: KIN 2021,
KIN 2023, and KIN 2032 (grade of B- or better in each).
KIN 4993
Selected Topics in Kinesiology
3 ch (3C) [W]
Selected topics of special interest from the areas of physical education,
fitness and sport are examined in detail. Topics will be specified by the
Faculty. Title of topic chosen will appear on the students transcript.
Open only to students in third year and above. Prerequisites: KIN 2021,
KIN 2023, and KIN 2032 (grade of B- or better in each).
KIN 4994
Selected Topics in Kinesiology
3 ch (3C) [W]
Selected topics of special interest from the areas of physical education,
fitness and sport are examined in detail. Topics will be specified by the
Faculty. Title of topic chosen will appear on the students transcript.
Open only to students in third year and above. Prerequisites: KIN 2021,
KIN 2023, and KIN 2032 (grade of B- or better in each).
3 ch (3C)[W]
An introduction to the study of behaviour in the exercise environment.
The course will focus on how psychological factors affect physical
performance, how exercise affects psychological development, and on
the development of strategies to encourage exercise participation and/
or adherence. Prerequisites: KIN 2021, KIN 2023 and KIN 2032 (grade
of B- or better in each)
KIN 3032
Sport Psychology
3 ch (3C) [W]
Examines contemporary trends in sport psychology. Topics covered
include: personality, motivation, arousal, stress, anxiety, competition,
cooperation, imagery, self-efficacy, goal setting, concentration, burnout,
and gender issues. Prerequisites: KIN 2021, KIN 2023, and KIN 2032
(grade of B- or better in each).
KIN 3123
Careers of Elite Athletes:
Sociological Analysis
3 ch (3C) [W]
This course will take a sociological perspective, primarily interactionist
and career-oriented, on the involvement of individuals in sports
practices. An attempt will be made to provide an overview of such
involvements, from the initial exposure and introduction to sport
practice, through the deepening commitments and obligations to the
ultimate withdrawal. Such an overview will be examined in the context
of the variety of contingencies which influence each phase of the
athletic career. While the focus will be upon those individuals who have
made it through the sports system to some sort of elite status, the
analysis by its very nature will not ignore the experiences of those who
disengage from involvements in sports practices at earlier stages.
Material will be drawn from both the theoretical and empirical literature,
and will be critiqued in terms of its usefulness for understanding the
phenomenon of the individuals involvement in athletic career.
Prerequisites: KIN 2021, KIN 2023, and KIN 2032 (grade of B- or better
in each).
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
231
SECTION F
LATIN
LINGUISTICS
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
LAT 1001
Introductory Latin I
3 ch
A beginners course in Latin. No previous knowledge of Latin is
required.
LAT 1002
Introductory Latin II
Intermediate Latin I
LING 2101
3 ch
It presents that basic concepts in the areas of morpho-syntax,
semantics and phonology. Prerequisite: 6 ch of any first year course.
Emphasis on developing fluency in reading Latin. By the end of the
term students will be reading unaltered Latin texts.
LAT 2002
Intermediate Latin II
For Linguistics taught in French, see FR 3412, FR 3432, FR 3434, FR
3442, FR 3464 under the French section.
3 ch
A continuation of LAT 1001.
LAT 2001
Note: See beginning for Section F for abbreviations, course numbers
and coding.
3 ch
Reading of selections from Caesar, Cicero, and Ovid.
LING 3202
Linguistics I
Linguistics II
3 ch
3 ch
It presents the basic concepts in the areas of dialectical variation,
language acquisition, artificial language, and language change.
Prerequisite: LING 2102.
LING 3212
The History of the English
Language
3ch (3C)
A generative grammar approach to diachronic linguistics with
application to English. Topics: changes in consonant and vowel
systems, transition to a non-case system, parametric changes in
syntax.
232
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SECTION F
MATHEMATICS
MATH 2013
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
Infinite series and power series, line and surface integrals. Theorems
of Green and Stokes, the divergence theorem, differential equations.
See note following MATH 2003. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in
MATH 2003.
MATH 1003
Introduction to Calculus I
3 ch (4C)
Functions and graphs, limits, derivatives of polynominal, log,
exponential and trigonometric functions. Curve sketching and extrema
of functions. Prerequisite: New Brunswick Advanced Math 120 or Math
1863 or its equivalent.Note: Credit will not be given for both MATH
1003 and 1823.
MATH 1013
Introduction to Calculus II
3 ch (4C)
Definition of the integral, fundamental theorem of calculus, techniques
of integration, l'Hopital's rule, improper integrals, 1st order differential
equations, complex numbers. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in
either MATH 1003 or 1823.
MATH 1703
Algebraic and Discrete Structures
4ch (3C/1T)
Introduces topics in discrete Mathematics important in computer
Science, including propositional logic, predicate logic, proofs, sigma
notation, mathematical induction, elementary set theory, asymptotic
analysis. Note: Credit will not be given for both Math 1703 and CS
1303 Prerequisite: New Brunswick Advanced Math 120 or Math 1863
or its equivalent.
MATH 1823
Calculus for Business
3 ch (4C)
Polynominal, logarithmic and exponential functions. Limits and
derivatives. Extreme values and related rates. Simple integration.
Difference and differential equations. Throughout, applications to
business and economics will be stressed. Prerequisite: New Brunswick
Advanced Math 120 or Math 1863 or its equivalent.Note: Credit may
not be obtained for both MATH 1823 and 1003.
MATH 1833
Finite Mathematics for Business
3 ch (3C)
Matrices and systems of linear equations. Linear programing concepts;
graphical solution of two-variable problems. Permutations and
combinations. Elementary probability. Prerequisites: New Brunswick
Math 112 and 122 or equivalent.
MATH 1853
Mathematics for Business I
3 ch (3C)
A brief review of pre-calculus math, logarithmic and exponential
functions, limits, introduction to derivatives. Linear systems, matrices,
systems of linear inequalities, difference equations, arithmetic and
geometric sequences, annuities and instalment buying. Applications to
Business and Economics will be emphasized throughout the course.
Note: Credit will not be given for both MATH 1833 and MATH 1853.
Prerequisite(s): New Brunswick Advanced Math 120 or MATH1863 or
its equivalent.
MATH 1863
Precalculus Mathematics
3 ch (3C)
A review of high school Mathematics topics, particularly those covered
in the Advanced Math 120 course. Topics include: linear and quadratic
functions, absolute value, the exponential and logarithm functions, the
concept of inverse functions, graphing, basic sequences and series,
and the binomial theorem. Note: Students who have passed Advanced
Math 120 New Brunswick Mathematics (or equivalent) should not elect
this course; they should enrol in MATH 1003 or Math 1853. MATH 1863
is designed only to serve as preparation for MATH 1003 or 1853.
MATH 2003
Intermediate Mathematics I
3 ch (3C 1T)
Analytic geometry and vectors, differential calculus of several variables
including partial derivatives, max-min, multiple integrals, parametric
equations and polar coordinates, surface area. Note: Credit will be
given for courses in only one of the sequences MATH2003/2013 or
MATH2503/2513. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in MATH 1013.
MATH 2213
Intermediate Mathematics II
Linear Algebra
3 ch (3C 1T)
3 ch (3C)
Vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors,
complex vector spaces, inner product spaces, diagonalization of
Hermitian matrices, quadratic forms. Prerequisite: MATH 1013 or both
MATH 1823 and MATH 1833.
MATH 2503
Calculus and Linear Algebra for
Engineers I
3 ch (3C 1T)
Ordinary differential equations, infinite series and linear algebra. See
note following MATH 2003. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in
MATH 1013.
MATH 2513
Calculus and Linear Algebra for
Engineers II
3 ch (3C 1T)
Polar coordinates, parametric equations, analytic geometry and
vectors, differential calculus of functions of several variables, multiple
integrals. See note following MATH 2003. Prerequisite: A grade of C or
higher in MATH 1013.
MATH 2853
Mathematics for Business II
3 ch (3C)
Derivatives, marginal analysis, optimization problems with applications
in business, anti-derivative, definite integrals and applications,
techniques of integration, simple differential equations, functions of
several variables, partial derivatives, unconstrained and constrained
optimization, Lagrange multipliers. Applications to Business and
Economics will be emphasized throughout the course. Note: Credit will
be given for only one of MATH 1003, MATH 1823 or MATH 2853.
Prerequisite: MATH 1853.
MATH 3073
Partial Differential Equations
3 ch (3C)
Methods of solution for first order equations. Classification of second
order equations. Characteristics. Analytic and numerical methods of
solution for hyperbolic, elliptic, and parabolic equations. Prerequisite:
MATH 2003 and MATH 2013, or equivalent.
MATH 3093
Elementary Number Theory
3 ch (3C)
Primes, unique factorization, congruences, Diophantine equations,
basic number theoretic functions.Recommended for Education
Students or prospective Mathematics teachers.
MATH 3243
Complex Analysis
3 ch (3C)
Complex analytic functions, contour integrals and Cauchys Theorem;
Taylors, Laurents series and Liouvilles Theorem; residue calculus.
Prerequisite: MATH 2003 and MATH 2013, or equivalent.
MATH 3303
Operations Research I
3 ch (3C)
Linear programming models, simplex method, duality theory, postoptimality analysis, network simplex method and special cases,
introduction to interior point methods. Credit will not be granted for both
MATH 3303 and BA 3623. Prerequisite: MATH 2213.
MATH 3343
Networks and Graphs
3 ch (3C)
Graphs, Euler paths, tournaments, factors, spanning trees,
applications; electric networks and Kirchhoffs laws, matroids; kernels,
Grundy function and application to game theory; Mengers theorem,
flows in networks, flow algorithms. Prerequisites: MATH 1003 or 1823
and 1833.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
233
SECTION F
MATH 3503
Differential Equations for
Engineers
3 ch (3C 1T)
Systems of 1st and 2nd order ordinary differential equations, Laplace
transforms, power series solutions and elementary properties of
Lagendre polynomials and the Bessel functions Jn, Fourier series,
boundary value problems. Prerequisite: A minimum of grade C in
MATH 2503, with MATH 2513 to be taken concurrently; or equivalent.
MATH 3703
Algebraic and Discrete
Structures II
3 ch (3C)
Sets, relations, semi-groups, groups, rings, partially ordered sets,
boolean algebra, logic, recurrence relations and graphs. Applications
from automata, switching theory, and language development in
Computer Science. Prerequisite: MATH 1703.Corequisite: MATH2003.
MATH 3713
Analysis I
3 ch (3C)
The real number system. Elementary set theory. Metric spaces.
Sequences and series. Continuity. Prerequisites: MATH 2013, 2213.
MATH 3733
Abstract Algebra
3 ch (3C)
An introduction to the elementary theory of groups. Rings and Fields.
Applications to number theory. Prerequisite: MATH 3703 and MATH
2213.
MATH 3753
Applications of Mathematical
Models
3 ch (3C)
This course provides an overview of mathematical modelling for
particular applications. It is intended to introduce students in a variety
of disciplines to Mathematical Modelling based problem solving.
General concepts such as stochastic vs. deterministic modelling are
discussed and case studies of specific applications are presented.
Case studies may include models of survival, models of cognition,
models of population growth and financial models. Students develop
case studies in the areas of their major or their own expertise.
Prerequisites: One of: STAT 3093, PSYC 3913, MATH2013, MATH
2503, or permission of the instructor.
MATH 4303
Operations Research II
3 ch (3C)
Integer programming, non-linear programming, inventory theory, game
theory, planning under uncertainty and stochastic linear programs.
Prerequisite: MATH 2003 and MATH 3303.
MATH 4703
Topics in Mathematics
3 ch (3C)
Selected topics at an advanced level. Content varies from year to year.
Topic of course will be entered on students transcript. Prerequisite:
Consent of instructor.
234
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SECTION F
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
ME 2321
A grade of C or higher is required in all Mechanical Engineering courses.
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
Engineering Graphics
4 ch (2C 3L)
Engineering drafting is introduced through technical sketching,
instrument drawing, and computer aided methods. Fundamentals of
manual drafting: use of instruments, scales, lettering, and line styles.
Standard drawing types, multiviews, isometrics, pictorials, assembly
drawings, cross-sections. Graphics symbols for fasteners, welding,
tolerancing and surface finish specification; dimensioning. Use of a
commercial CAD software package. The link between manual methods
and computer methods is developed. Descriptive geometry and spatial
analysis to establish relationships between three-dimensional objects,
lines, points or planes.
ME 1013
Descriptive Geometry with
Computer Graphics
4 ch (2C 3L)
An introductory course in descriptive geometry using interactive
computer graphics. Topics include computer graphics hardware and
software systems. Descriptive geometry topics including spatial
relationships of points, lines and planes, etc., geometrical transformations, 3D geometric modelling and graphical mathematics. Prerequisite: ME 1003. Co-requisite: CS 1003 or other introductory
programming course.
ME 1113
Applied Mechanics II : Dynamics
4 ch (3C 1T)
4 ch (3C 2L)
Engineering comunications, problem solving and design philosophy are
stressed. Lab periods will be used for group work, presentations, guest
lectures and individual consultation on design projects. Design topics
include: concepts of safety, working drawings, fits and tolerances, fluid
power, logic control, and power transmission. Prerequisites: CE 1013.
ME 2332
ME 1003
Communications and Introduction
to Design
Design of Machine Elements
4 ch (3C 2L)
Review of strength of materials; stresses, deflections and material
properties. Static strength: failure criteria and stress concentration.
Fatigue strength. Probabilistic design. Computer assisted design of
shafts, mechanical springs, power screws and threaded fasteners.
Prerequisites: ME 1113, ME 2121 (or CE 2023), ME 2321.
ME 2613
System Dynamics
4 ch (3C 2L)
System concept, dynamic system elements; mechanical, electrical, fluid
and thermal. Systems of elements and their differential equations;
analysis of systems of first and second order by various methods;
industrial applications: modelling of physical systems on the analog
computer. Prerequisites: CS 1003 or other introductory programming
course, MATH 1013, ME 1113. Recommended: EE 1713. Corequisite:
MATH 2503.
ME 3232
Engineering Economics
3 ch (3C)
Application of engineering economic analysis to mechanical and
industrial engineering systems. Major emphasis will be given to
decision-making based on the comparison of worth of alternative
courses of action with respect to their costs. Topics include: discounted
cash flow mechanics, economic analyses, management of money,
economic decisions. Restricted to students with at least 60 ch in their
program.
Vector analysis is introduced and applied to the kinematics and
dynamics of particle motion along straight and curved paths. Newtons
second and third laws, work, energy and momentum of particles are
reviewed. Moment of inertia for areas and masses. Rotation of a rigid
body around a fixed axis. Motion of a rigid body in a plane. Energy,
momentum and angular momentum of a rigid body in plane motion.
Simple harmonic motion. Prerequisites: CE 1013, MATH 1917 or
equivalent. Co-requisite: MATH 1013.
ME 3413
ME 2143
Laboratory experiments and measurements related to
Thermodynamics I. Laboratory reports and readings are assigned. Corequisite: ME3413
Kinematics and Dynamics of
Machines
4 ch (3C 2L)
Fundamental concepts, kinematic linkages, model construction;
displacement analysis; instant centers; velocities and accelerations in
mechanism, Coriollis acceleration; design of cams; analysis of ordinary
and planetary gear trains; simple linkage synthesis. Transmission of
forces in machines, inertia forces in machines; dynamic force analysis;
dynamically equivalent systems. Prerequisites: ME 1113.Recommended: CS 1003 or other introductory programming course.
ME 2222
Manufacturing Engineering
4 ch (3C 2L)
Basic concepts of Materials Science are applied to the selection of
common engineering materials used in important manufacturing.
Material properties inportant to processing design are emphasized.
Strengthening due to such microstructural features as dislocations,
grain boundaries, transformation products, and precipitates will be
introduced. Both ferrous and non-ferrous alloys will be studied in detail.
Industrial applications of plastics, composites and ceramics are
emphasized. The laboratory exercises are: metallography, heat
treating, precipitate strengthening, jominy, and impact toughness
testing. Prerequisite: CHE 2503 or equivalent.
Thermodynamics I
3 ch (3C )
Properties of a pure substance -- work and heat. First law and
applications in non-flow and flow processes. Second law and
reversibility: entropy, applications of the second law to non-flow and
flow processes. Analysis of thermodynamic cycles. Thermodynamic
relationships. Prerequisites: CHEM 1882, MATH 2503.
ME 3415
ME 3482
Thermodynamics I Laboratory
Thermal Engineering
1 ch (3L*) [W]
3 ch (3C)
Elementary engineering thermodynamics, steam and gas power cycles,
heat transfer, psychrometry, air conditioning and refrigeration.
Prerequisites: MATH 1013, ME 1113.
ME 3513
Fluid Mechanics I
3 ch (3C)
Describes the properties and kinematics of fluids, and some techniques
of flow measurement. Extends the basic principles of mechanics (mass,
momentum and energy) to describe the fluid motion using a control
volume approach. Introduces dimensional analysis and similarity. The
flow through pipes is studied in detail. Prerequisites: ME 1113, MATH
2503, MATH 2513. Recommended: ME 3413.
ME 3515
Fluid Mechanics I Laboratory
1 ch (3L*) [W]
Laboratory experiments and measurements related to Fluid Mechanics
I. Laboratory reports and readings are assigned. Co-requisite: ME3513
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
235
SECTION F
NURSING
NURS 2031
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
NURS 1011
Introduction to Nursing
3 ch [W]
Orientation to the nursing program, nursing roles and values, student/
faculty relationships, communication skills, study skills and choices.
The course is intended to lay the foundation for the development of the
student as a professional nurse and as a lifelong learner.
NURS 1022
Health Across the Lifespan I
3 ch [W]
Focuses on health promotion issues across the lifespan. Includes
concepts such as teaching and learning theory, primary health care,
critical thinking and human responses. Provides theoretical content
required for NURS 1023, Clinical Practicum.
NURS 1023
Clinical Practicum: Health Across
the Life Span I
3 ch (3L)
Complements and supplements NURS 1022. Involves 9 hours of
nursing practice weekly. The main focus of the learning activities in
each section is health promotion/disease prevention. However, the
actual practice experience and the client growth and developmental
stage will vary depending on the practice area assigned.
NURS 1032
Caring Relationships I
4 ch (3C 1L)
The major emphasis of this course will be on exploring the personal
meaning of caring within the context of the nurse-client relationship.
Students will have an opportunity to explore the theoretical
underpinnings of communication and caring and will examine the interdependence of such concepts as self, caring, mutuality, empowerment,
and caring relationships. The lab component of the course will provide
the student with an opportunity to develop a beginning level of skill in
working with clients, especially in the orientation phase of the caring
relationship.
NURS 1042
Health Assessment I
3 ch [W]
Includes the concepts of self, community, health and health promotion.
Focuses on health assessment, lifestyle choices and population health.
NURS 2011
Concepts for Professional Nursing 3 ch [W]
Practice
Includes core concepts (health, client, environment, nursing), nursing
standards, professional issues (ethics, legal, collaboration) and primary
health care with particular emphasis on health promotion and disease
prevention. For BN/RN students only.
NURS 2020
Health Across the Lifespan II
6 ch
The major focus of this course will be on supportive/rehabilitative care.
Students will examine concepts and topics such as change, chronicity,
nursing diagnosis and pharmacology. Interwoven throughout
discussion will be various aspects of growth and development,
nutrition, assessment, teaching/learning areas, professional/ethical
responsibilities and health promotion/disease prevention. Students will
be encouraged to examine the similarities and differences in relation to
stressors and events which impact at these different stages of lifespan
development.
NURS 2030
Clinical Practicum: Health Across
the Lifespan II
236
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
4 ch (3C 1L)
The major emphasis of this course will be on exploring the personal
and professional meaning of caring within nursing practice. Students
will have the opportunity to explore caring from the perspective of client
as individual, family, group, and community. Social and cultural factors
that influence the caring/helping process will be considered as well as
such concepts as mutual problem-solving, conflict resolution, values
clarification, and group process. The lab component will provide
students with the opportunity to develop competencies in the use of
more advanced communication skills within the working and
termination phases of the caring/helping relationship.
NURS 2041
Health Assessment II
4 ch (3C 1L)
Includes physical and psycho-social assessment of adults. Lab
experiences provide opportunities for students to develop competence
in the areas of collecting and documenting health histories, conducting
focused system assessments, and condensed health examinations.
NURS 2063
Concentrated Clinical Practice I
5 ch (5L)
This practice concentration occurs within a five week period. It is
designed to provide students with opportunities to practically apply
theory and acquired skills from previous learning experiences. Practice
will take place in a variety of settings, guided by principles of
prevention: primary (health promotion and illness prevention),
secondary (care-giving and client advocacy); and tertiary (rehabilitation
and support). Specifically, learning experiences for care-giving will take
place in acute care and in community settings (including mental health
services).
NURS 2132
Pharmacology
3 ch (3C)
Includes theory and application of pharmacological principles and
terminology, the biopsychosocial aspects of pharmacology and current
issues in pharmacology. The course will focus on pharmacology as a
science for improving health and on the application of the content to
patient/client education. Prerequisites: BIOL 1410, BIOL2831. Corequisite: BIOL 2852, Open to Health Sciences students with
instructor's approval.
NURS 3061
Community Development I
3 ch
Focuses on community assessment and program planning in
institutional and non-institutional settings. Students assess primary
health care needs of a community, and are involved with planning,
implementing, and evaluating health care programs for target groups.
Prerequisite: NURS 3103, may be open to Health Sciences students
with Instructor's approval.
NURS 3062
Clinical Practicum: Community
Development I
3 ch (3L)
Complements and supplements NURS 3061. Emphasis is placed on
applying program development skills in community settings. Corequisite: NURS 3061, may be open to Health Sciences students with
Instructor's approval.
NURS 3072
Nursing in Complex Situations I
3 ch
Introduces students to curative nursing care practice in an acute care
institutional setting. Perpares students to care for clients and their
families experiencing acute illness. Major health challenges examined
using a curative pratice model. Prerequisite: NURS 2063.
NURS 3073
6 ch (6L)
Complements and supplements NURS 2020. Co-requisite: NURS
2020.
Caring Relationships II
Clinical Practicum: Nursing in
Complex Situations
6 ch (6L)
Complements and supplements NURS 3072.
NURS 3092
Nursing Research
3 ch
Introduces the purpose, process and utilization of nursing research.
Introduces an exploration of the interrelationship between theory and
practice and critique of published reports. Prerequisite or co-requisite:
STAT 2263 or approved substitute.
SECTION F
NURS 3103
Concentrated Clinical Practice II
5 ch (5L)
This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to
practice acquired and new nursing skills in institutional settings.
Practice will be in complex situations. Issues arising from clinical
practice will be examined.
NURS 3114
Client Teaching
3 ch [W]
This elective course addresses individual client teaching within the
steps of the nursing process and looks at development and marketing
of client education programs.
NURS 3144
Issues in the Canadian Health Care 3 ch
System
This course focuses on the history and organization of the Canadian
Health Care System and discusses current health care issues.
Prerequisite: Open to non-nursing students with Instructor's approval.
NURS 4111
Nursing of Families
3 ch (3C)
Using a research-based problem classification scheme and drawing on
selected theories, the student will explore the role of the nurse in
empowering family members toward greater responsibility for their
health. Prerequisites: NURS 3072, NURS 3073, and NURS 3092 as
pre- or co-requisite.
NURS 4112
Clinical Practicum: The Family as
Client
3 ch (3L)
NURS 4142
Trends and Issues in Professional
Nursing Practice
3 ch
Historical development of nursing as a profession, current and future
trends in nursing practice, education, administration and research.
Mandates of the national professional association, local professional
associations, unions, and special interest groups as well as nurses
professional commitments are examined.
NURS 4152
Concentrated Clinical Practice III
7 ch (7L)
Provides a concentrated period of clinical studies in a setting of choice
involving mentoring by advanced practitioners.
NURS 4184
Professional Values, Ethical
Issues, and Nursing Practice
3 ch (3C)
This course encourages reflection on and discussion about: personal
and professional ethical values; components of ethical reasoning in
professional contexts; value systems inherent in past, current, and
future practice contexts; professional ethical decision-making. In
addition, students will develop skills that foster ethical nursing action in
the face of opposition and assist in overcoming barriers to ethicallysensitive health care practices. Prerequisites: NURS 2063
NURS 4234
Independent Study
3 ch
An elective independent study program under the guidance of a faculty
member is pursued on the basis of student interest in any area of
nursing. Faculty approval required.
Complements and supplements NURS 4111. For BN/RN students only.
Co-requisite: NURS 4111.
NURS 4254
NURS 4121
This elective course examines cultural influences on perceptions of
health and their implications for health practices.
Nursing in Complex Situations II
3 ch (3C)
Issues in Transcultural Health
3 ch
Builds upon previous learning in preparing students to assume greater
independence and autonomy primarily in curative nursing practice.
Allows for continued development in acute nursing practice generally,
within the context of primary health care. Emphasis is given to the
integration and application of knowledge in complex client situations
encountered in an acute care setting with a focus on the family as the
unit of care. Prerequisite: NURS 3072, NURS 3073, and NURS 3092
as pre- or co-requisite.
NURS 4123
Clinical Practicum: Nursing
Families in Complex Situations
6 ch (6L)
Complements and supplements NURS 4111 and NURS 4121.
Designed to provide students with the opportunity to care for families
who have at least one member experiencing an acute illness, or an
acute episode of a chronic illness. Students will be expected to provide
curative and/or palliative are for clients and families in multiple settings,
including home and hospital. Pre- or Co-requisites: NURS 4111,
NURS4121.
NURS 4132
Community Development II
3 ch
Builds upon the community program development skills students
studied in NURS 3061 and NURS 3062. Emphasis is placed on the
nurse's responsibility in building public policy, creating environments
that support health, strengthening community resources, developing
people's health-determining skills and reorienting health services.
Prerequisite: NURS 3061, NURS 3062, may be open to Health
Sciences students with Instructor's approval.
NURS 4133
Clinical Practicum: Community
Development II
2 ch (2L)
Complements and supplements NURS 3061, NURS 3062 and NURS
4132. Involves 6 hours of clinical practice weekly. Emphasis is placed
on community health with aggregates. Co-requisite: NURS 4132, may
be open to Health Sciences students with Instructor's approval.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
237
SECTION F
PHILOSOPHY
PHIL 3033
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
An examination of early forms of Greek thought from the pre-Socrates
to Socrates and Plato. The Platonic tradition will also be surveyed and
assessed. Prerequisite: 3 ch course in Philosophy or permission of
instructor
PHIL 3034
PHIL 1000
Introduction to Philosophy
6 ch (3C) [W]
Introduces students to some of the main issues of Philosophy today;
whether questions of value can be resolved; what forms of knowledge
are attainable; whether there is a divine force in the world; whether the
mind is independent of the body. Aims to assist students in clarifying
and expressing their beliefs and ideas, and to develop their capacities
for thought through critical study of philosophical writings of both the
past and the present.
PHIL 1053
Introduction to Logic
3 ch (3C)
A first course in logic, including a study of various fallacies in
reasoning, as well as certain techniques, both traditional and
contemporary, for determining the validity of arguments.(This course is
not a prerequisite for other courses in logic at UNBF.)
PHIL 2003
Introduction to Moral, Social and
Political Philosophy
3 ch [W]
An historical investigation into such moral and socio-political concepts
as goodness, virtue, happiness, justice, choice, duty, custom, natural
and civil law, the state, freedom and the individual.
PHIL 2014
Metaphysics and Epistemology
3 ch (3C) [W]
An examination of the nature and conditions of knowledge and reality.
Questions of time, immortality, freedom, the nature of causality,
certainty and doubt, memory and perception, imagination and reason,
existence and dread will be discussed through historical as well as
contemporary writings.
PHIL 2034
Religion and Ethics
3 ch (3C) [W]
An examination of such notions as good and evil, compassion and
social justice, divine and natural authority, community and society, from
the perspectives of religious affirmation and moral reasoning.
PHIL 2063
Introduction to Language and
Semantics
3 ch (3C)
A study of some of the basic concepts of argument and reasoning,
such as truth and falsity, analyticity, validity, agreement, stating and
questioning.
PHIL 2111
Symbolic Logic I
3 ch (3C)
A study of the principles of symbolic logic and the standard notations
and methods used in determining the validity and invalidity of
arguments.
PHIL 2112
Symbolic Logic II
3 ch (3C)
A continuation of the principles of symbolic logic and the standard
notations and methods used in determining the validity and invalidity of
arguments.
PHIL 2124
Contemporary Moral Problems
3 ch (3C) [W]
Pre-Socratics and Plato
Aristotle and Hellenistic
Philosophies
3 ch
3 ch
A study of Aristotelian thought and of the diverse philosophies of the
Hellenistic period. Prerequisite: 3 ch course in Philosophy or
permission of instructor
PHIL 3075
Philosophy of Art
3 ch
This course examines the principles and concepts of art, as developed
by philosophers and artists themselves, from ancient aesthetic theory,
through essays on taste, to more recent views of aesthetic perception
and the function of art in society. Prerequisite: 3 chs in Philosophy and/
or Art History or the permission of the instructor.
PHIL 3110
Contemporary Philosophy
6 ch (3C) [W]
An examination of the major philosophical trends of the 20th centuryanalytic philosophy, existentialism, and pragmatism. Prerequisite: 3 ch
in Philosophy or permission of instructor.
PHIL 3133
Health Care Ethics I
3ch [W]
Examines major problems in contemporary medical practice, including
confidentiality, informed consent and paternalism, compulsory
sterilization and blood transfusions, contraception, abortion and
genetic engineering, euthanasia, allocation of scarce resources, moral
aspects involved in strikes of medical personnel, and conflict of duty
situations. Prerequisite: 3 ch in philosophy or permission of the
instructor.
PHIL 3134
Health Care Ethics II
3ch [W]
A continuation of Health Care Ethics I. Examines major problems in
contemporary medical practice, including confidentiality, informed
consent and paternalism, compulsory sterilization and blood
transfusions, contraception, abortion and genetic engineering,
euthanasia, allocation of scarce resources, moral aspects involved in
strikes of medical personnel, and conflict of duty situations.
Prerequisite: PHIL 3133.
PHIL 3141
Philosophy of Mind
3 ch (3C) [W]
A study of various philosophical approaches to the nature and concept
of mind. Topics to be covered include: Cartesian Dualism, Freudian
Psychology, Behaviourism, Cognitive Psychology and Artificial
Intelligence. Prerequisite: PHIL 1000 or permission of the instructor.
PHIL 3145
Chinese Philosophy
3 ch
An examination of Chinese schools of thought, the incursion and
growth of Buddhism in China, Neo-Confucian revivals and syntheses,
and the Chinese encounter with Western forms of thinking in the past
two centuries. Prerequisite: 3 chs in Philosophy of permission of the
instructor.
PHIL 3171
Philosophy of Religion I
3 ch (3C) [W]
A wide-ranging look at a variety of claims and issues perplexing moral
agents in contemporary society.
A critical examination of the central philosophical issues in the Western
Religious Tradition. Prerequisite: PHIL 1000 or permission of the
instructor.
PHIL 2153
PHIL 3172
Business Ethics
3 ch (3C) [W]
An evaluation of a selection of moral problems in business enterprises
and analysis of various possible economic structures. The course will
attempt to refine ethical concepts through a case-study method. Topics
will include: social responsibility, the state and business; bluffing,
deception and bribery; discrimination in hiring; business and the Third
World; the profit motive; free-enterprise, mixed economies and
Communism. Prerequisite: 3 ch in Philosophy or permission of
instructor.
238
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Philosophy of Religion II
3 ch (3C) [W]
A further analysis and elaboration of issues raised in PHIL 3171.
Prerequisite: PHIL 3171 or permission of the instructor.
PHIL 3181
Philosophy of History I
3 ch (3C) [W]
A critical examination of historical knowledge. An attempt to answer the
question: What is history? Prerequisite: 3 ch course in Philosophy or
History.
SECTION F
PHIL 3182
Philosophy of History II
3 ch (3C) [W]
PHYSICS
A critical analysis of historical understanding. Prerequisite: PHIL 3181.
PHIL 3241
Philosophy of Natural Science
3 ch (3C) [W]
An analysis of such scientific concepts as explanation, theory, and law,
with special attention to the implications of recent scientific theories.
PHIL 3242
Philosophy of Human Science
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
3 ch (3C) [W]
An analysis of the methods, theories and presuppositions of such
human sciences as economics, psychology, history, and anthropology.
PHYS 1000
Elements of Physics
9 ch (3C 1T 3L/S)
A study of the philosophical doctrine of Man, from the decline of Greek
thought and the appearance of Mediaeval Christian philosophers, to
the emergence of Renaissance studia Humanitatis and Bacons
instauration of the human sciences.
Scalar and vector quantities. Kinematics of motion for straight and
curved paths. Newtons laws of motion. Conservation of linear
momentum. Conservation of energy. Gravitation. Simple harmonic
motion. Wave motion, properties of sound and light waves, including
interference and diffraction. Optics. Coulombs law, electric field and
potential. Electric current and resistance. Magnetic fields. Quantum
theory and the atom. The nucleus. Prerequisite: Grade 12 Physics or
equivalent. Corequisite: MATH 1003/1013.
PHIL 3630
PHYS 1917
PHIL 3530
Mediaeval, Renaissance, and Early 6 ch (3C) [W]
Modern Philosophy
Phenomenology and
Existentialism
6 ch (3C) [W]
A study of the relationship between phenomenological method and
existential inquiries concerning human existence. In this connection,
some of the main features of Husserls phenomenology and
Heideggers analysis of existence are examined, pointing out their
similarities and differences in dealing with such issues as philosophical
method, human existence, freedom, intersubjectivity, how
understanding and moods disclose ones existence in the world.
Discussion and student participation encouraged.
PHIL 3785
Philosophers of the Scottish
Enlightenment
3 ch
Physics for Engineering
5 ch (4C 2T/3L)
Vectors, kinematics, momentum, force, potential and kinetic energy.
Kinetic theory of gases, circular motion, charge, field and potential,
gravitation, electrostatics, optics, sound. Prerequisite: Grade 12
Physics or equivalent.
PHYS 2011
Mechanics
5 ch (3C 3L)
Scalar and vector quantities, statics, kinematics, dynamics, work,
energy, power, rotational motion, impulse and momentum, vibratory
motion. Prerequisites: MATH 1003/1013 and PHYS 1000.
PHYS 2022
Electricity and Magnetism
5 ch (3C 3L)
A study of selected thinkers in Scotland whose ideas radically
transformed both social and philosophical movements in the 18th and
19th centuries. Prerequisite: 3 ch course in Philosophy or permission of
instructor
Current, resistance and DC circuit analysis. Transients in LCR circuits.
AC circuit analysis, phasors, resonance in series and parallel LCR
circuits. Electrostatics; electric fields, Gauss' Theorem, potential,
capacitance. Magnetic fields, induced e.m.f. Prerequisites: MATH
1003/1013 and PHYS 1000.
PHIL 3841
PHYS 2041
Descartes and Locke
3 ch (3C) [W]
A study of the Rationalist and empiricist traditions of the seventeenth
century. Emphasis will be on the theory of knowledge.
PHIL 3852
Hume and Kant
3 ch (3C) [W]
A study of the Epistemology of David Hume and of the resolution of the
problems arising from Hume's analysis proposed in Kant's Critique of
Pure Reason.
PHIL 4193-9.
Selected Topics in Philosophy
3 ch [W]
Courses of independent studies of specified texts or topics on
Philosophy under the supervision of a member of the Discipline.
Prerequisite: Permission of the Discipline.
Mechanical and Thermal
Properties of Matter
3 ch(3C)
Intermolecular forces, elementary thermodynamics and kinetic theory;
applications (gases). Imperfect gases; solid and liquid state; elastic and
thermal properties of solids; fluid flow. Prerequisites: MATH 1003/1013
and PHYS 1000.
PHYS 2055
Survey of Modern Physics
5 ch (3C 3L)
Relativity, quantization in nature, photoelectric effect, Compton effect,
x-rays, x-ray diffraction, deBroglie waves, phase and group velocities,
the uncertainty principle, energy levels and atomic structure, nuclear
structure, nuclear reactions, radioactivity, fission, fusion, elementary
particles of physics. Prerequisites: MATH 1003/1013 and PHYS 1000.
PHYS 2975
Light and Sound
5 ch (3C 3L)
Periodic motions and their linear superposition, free and forced
damped harmonic motion, resonance, normal modes, vibrating strings.
Transverse and longitudinal waves in various media, acoustics,
reflection and refraction of waves at boundaries. Topics selected from
the following list: geometrical optics, interference, diffraction,
polarization, wave-particle duality, dispersion, coherence.
Prerequisites: MATH 1003/1013 and PHYS 1917.
Corequisite: MATH 2513.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
239
SECTION F
POLITICS
POLS 3241
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
Canadian Voting Behavior
3 ch (3S/T) [W]
A study of the electoral system, representation, and voting behavior in
Canada.
POLS 3252
Canadian Political Parties
3 ch (3S/T) [W]
Directed at a systematic study of the structure and functions of political
parties in Canada.
POLS 1201
Introduction to Canadian Politics
3ch (3c/t) [W]
Survey course focusing on Canadian government and politics at the
national level.
POLS 1301
Introduction to Comparative
Politics
3ch (3c/t) [W]
Researching Politics I
Interest Groups and Social
Movements
3 ch
Explores the development, goals, strategies and political impact of
interest groups and social movements.
POLS 3261
Summary comparisons of the political systems, cultures, and structures
of various states, derived from European and non-European examples.
POLS 2401
POLS 3255
Canadian Federalism
3 ch (3C/S) [W]
Advanced analysis of specific issues affecting the federation.
POLS 3273
3 ch
Canadian Intergovernmental
Relations
3 ch (3C/S) [W]
An introduction to the ideas and principles that serve as the foundation
for Political Science. 3 ch of Political Science at the 1000' level
Considers the relationships between federal, provincial and municipal
governments, and their impacts on current issues.
POLS 2501
POLS 3277
Researching Politics II
3 ch
Political Leadership in Canada
3ch (3S/T)[W]
An introduction to some of the majors approaches and techniques used
to research and analyze politics.
Focuses on various aspects of political leadership at the federal level
Prerequisite: POLS 1201
POLS 2601
POLS 3283
Introduction to International
Politics
3ch (3c/t) [W]
Politics in French Canada
3 ch (3S/T) [W]
General introduction to the historic and contemporary practices of
international relations.
The politics and institutions of French Canada; in particular, the nature
and sources of relevant political changes within French Canadian
society in Quebec and Acadian society in New Brunswick.
POLS 3007
POLS 3291
Digital Democracy
3 ch
This course examines technologically mediated political practices in
liberal democracies.
POLS 3101
Constitutional Politics in Canada
3 ch (3S/T) [W]
Examines the structure and process of constitution-making, and
conflicting visions of constitutional change.
POLS 3112
Political Economy of Canada
3 ch (3S/T) [W]
Examines the political economy of Canada, with a focus on the
contribution of the political economy tradition to an understanding of
Canadas political, social and economic development.
POLS 3201
New Brunswick Politics
3 ch (3S/T) [W]
An overview of the history and development of New Brunswick politics.
POLS 3205
Canadian Provincial Politics
3 ch (3C/S)
Designed to provide the student with an overview of the nature of
government and political processes in the Canadian provinces.
POLS 3211
Contemporary New Brunswick
Politics
3 ch (3S/T) [W]
Specialized study of current or selected issues in New Brunswick
provincial politics.
First Nations Government in
Canada
3 ch (3C/S)
Examines the politics and administration of the relationship between
aboriginal peoples and the Canadian state.
POLS 3292
Politics of Aboriginal
Self-Government
3 ch (3C/S)
A systematic analysis of the principles, structures and institutions of
traditional and contemporary aboriginal self-government in Canada.
POLS 3303
Politics of the Developing World
3 ch (3C) [W]
Political tendencies and trends, nature of and rationale for political
processes and systems in selected developing states.
POLS 3311
Government of the United States
3 ch (3C/L)
An analysis of contemporary issues in American politics, derived from
an understanding of the concepts and structures of the national
governmental system.
POLS 3322
The United States Presidency
3 ch (3C/L)
An emphasis on the power relationships of the office of the Chief
Executive.
POLS 3325
Gender and Comparative Politics
3 ch
Emphasis on current problem areas in Canadian Politics.
Comparative study of gender issues in selected countries, including
womens political organizations, political participation and social policies
affecting women. Prerequisites: POLS 1301 or GEND 2001
POLS 3222
POLS 3333
POLS 3221
Canadian Political Issues I
Canadian Political Issues II
3 ch (3C/S)
3 ch (3C/S)
Emphasis on a selected problem area in Canadian Politics.
POLS 3225
Gender and Canadian Politics
3 ch
Examines the role of gender in Canadian social movements, political
parties and political institutions, including Parliament, the courts and
the media. Prerequisites: POLS 1201 or GEND 2001
POLS 3232
Language Issues in Canada
3 ch (3S/T) [W]
Study of linguistic duality in Canada, with particular attention to conflicts
over language rights.
240
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Comparative European States
3 ch (3S/T)
A comparative examination of selected European states, their political
institutions, political cultures and recent political issues.
POLS 3335
The Circumpolar North
3 ch (3C/S) [W]
A comparative analysis of political change and development in the
Arctic region. Examples drawn from the Soviet Union, Alaska, Canada,
Greenland, and Nordic Europe; pan-national movements; and
Canadian Arctic policy.
SECTION F
POLS 3341
Comparative Federalisms
3 ch (3C/S) [W]
A comparison of selected federal state structures. Definition of the
problems and prospects of federation in Canada, the United States,
Russia and other examples.
POLS 3345
Political Behaviour
3 ch
An examination of the foundations of political behaviour, public opinion,
political participation and political elites.
POLS 3355
Politics of the Environment
3 ch (3C/S) [W]
Focus on the public sensitivity to environmental/ecological issues,
political responses to this phenomena, and consequences of those
responses. Uses a case-study approach.
POLS 3372
The State and Economic Interests
3 ch (3 S/T) [W]
Examines the role of the Canadian state in economic development,
with emphasis on the political dimensions of economic policy. Issues
include the deficit, industrial policy, and foreign elements.
POLS 3375
The Political Economies of Asia
3ch (3S/T) [W]
Examines the political structures, decisions and processes underlying
Asia's role in the global economy. Prerequisite: POLS 1301
POLS 3401
Modern Political Thought
3 ch
Examines a selection of major texts from the late modern period of
Western political theory, encompassing classic statements of
conservative, feminist, liberal, and socialist thought.
POLS 3421
Selected Topics in the History
of Ideas
3 ch (3C/S) [W]
POLS 3483
Theories of Rights
3 ch (3S/T) [W]
The concept of right and differing perspectives on rights discourse.
POLS 3494
Democracy
3 ch (S/T) [W]
Examines the concept, and the various theories, of democracy.
POLS 3501
Contemporary Issues in Public
Policy
3 ch (3S/T)[W]
Examines the major approaches explaining and understanding
Canadian public policy, and applies them to a study of major public
policy fields.
POLS 3601
Contemporary Issues in World
Politics
3 ch (3S) [W]
Deals with current trends on the international scene including the global
balance of power, relations between superpowers, ideological conflicts,
the developing world, war, revolution, etc.
POLS 3622
International Organization and Law 3 ch (3S/T) [W]
Study of supra-national organizations, and structures of international
conduct; the effect of both on inter-state relationships.
POLS 3625
Gender and International Politics
3 ch
Introduction to the gender aspects of international relations including
militarism, nationalism, international political economy, the environment
and human rights. Prerequisites: POLS 2601 or GEND 2001
POLS 3631
Survey of Global Issues.
3 ch (3S/L) [W]
A comparison of various political thinkers on specific themes: natural
law from Cicero to Rousseau, social contract theory from Locke to
Marx, etc.
Current global issues such as war, militarism, the arms race, human
rights and social justice, ecological imbalance, economic inequalities,
and alternative world organizational structures, considered from
international and interdisciplinary perspectives. General-interest
course.
POLS 3425
POLS 3683
Canadian Political Ideas
3ch (3S/T) [W]
This course surveys the tradition of Canadian political thought from
Confederation to the present. Prerequisite: POLS 2401
POLS 3433
Montesquieu and the
Enlightenment
3 ch (3S) [W]
The examination of his influence on the Enlightenment.
POLS 3445
Rousseau and the Enlightenment
3 ch (3S) [W]
The examination of his influence on the Enlightenment.
POLS 3451
Marxism
3 ch (3S/T) [W]
A focus on the writings of Karl Marx. Other Marxist theorists may also
be examined.
POLS 3456
Politics Through Film
3 ch (3C/S) [W]
Seeks to examine political principles through the medium of film.
Tyranny, censorship, totalitarianism, utopia, and liberty will be
discussed through an analysis of a variety of films.
POLS 3463
Liberalism
3 ch (3S/T) [W]
Focuses on the core values and the exponents of liberal ideology.
POLS 3471
Study of Politics Through
Literature
3 ch (3S) [W]
A multi-disciplinary analysis of the exposition of political ideas in works
of classical and contemporary literature.
POLS 3473
Politics and Media in Canada
3 ch
Examines the role of the press as critics and opposition to government
& the role of government in regulating media. Designed as an upper
level course for students majoring in politics or with a background in
media or communications studies.
Human Rights
3 ch (3S/T)
An examination of human rights in an international context, including
international human rights instruments, and enforcement and the
implications of economic, political and cultural globalization for human
rights standards.
POLS 4001
Honours Seminar in Politics
3ch (3S/T) [W]
A compulsory seminar course for fourth year Honours students.
Provides a broad overview of key debates and some of the most
influential writings in the field of political science. Prerequisite:
Permission of the Instructor
POLS 4002
Honours Thesis
3ch[W]
Under the direction of a supervisor, an Honours student completes a
major research paper. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honours
programme
POLS 4211
Special Topics in Canadian Politics 3 ch (3S/T) [W]
Advanced study of a specific subject in Canadian politics. Course
topics will change annually.
POLS 4226
Directed Reading in Canadian
Politics
3 ch [W]
Open to students desiring further specialization, the course requires a
research paper in Canadian politics, supervised by an instructor in the
subject area.
POLS 4311
Special Topics in Comparative
Politics
3 ch (3S/T) [W]
Advanced study of a specific subject in comparative politics. Course
topics change annually.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
241
SECTION F
POLS 4336
Directed Reading in Comparative
Politics
3 ch [W]
Open to students desiring further specialization, the course requires a
research paper in comparative politics, supervised by an instructor in
the subject area.
POLS 4411
Special Topics in Political Theory
3 ch (3S/T) [W]
Advanced study of a specific subject in political theory. Course topics
change annually.
POLS 4416
Directed Reading in Political
Theory
3 ch [W]
The course is open to 4th-year students with a sufficient background
and a special interest in political theory. It can be taken only with
permission of the relevant instructor.
POLS 4611
Special Topics in International
Politics
3 ch (3S/T) [W]
Advanced study of a specific subject in international politics. Course
topics change annually.
POLS 4646
Directed Readings in International
Politics
3 ch [W]
Work on a research essay pertinent to specialized areas in international
or comparative politics, under an instructor assigned by the discipline.
PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC1003 is a prerequisite for PSYC1004 and PSYC1004 is a prerequisite for
all remaining Psychology courses.
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
PSYC 1003
Introductory Psychology I
3 ch (3C)
An overview of psychology as well as an introduction to the biological
basis of behavior, motivation, learning, sensation, perception, memory,
thinking and language. Students may be requested to participate in
research and some course credit may be earned in this way.
PSYC 1004
Introductory Psychology II
3 ch (3C)
Examines social behavior, personality, assessment, abnormal
psychology, and psychological therapy. Students may be requested to
participate in research and some course credit may be earned in this
way.
PSYC 1273
Life Span Development
3 ch (3C)
An introduction to theory, methods, and research finding in lifespan
developmental psychology. The life cycle as a whole and basic
processes in socialization, cognition, and personality development will
be examined. This course is designed primarily for Nursing students.
Enrollment of other students is by permission of the instructor. Students
currently enrolled in the BN programme are exempt from the Psyc 1004
requirement. Note: Students who take Psyc 1273 may not take Psyc
2201
PSYC 2102
Research Methods in Psychology
3 ch (3C 1L)
An introduction to the methods and theory of empirical and
experimental research in psychology. The logic of hypothesis
construction and testing in relation to various areas of psychology are
examined. Students will be required to complete an experiment. This
course is intended for students who plan to major or honour in either
Psychology or Biopsychology. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in
PSYC 2901
PSYC 2201
Child Development
3 ch (3C)
A study of theory, methods and research findings in infancy and
childhood. Examines social, cognitive, emotional and physical
development.
PSYC 2401
Fundamentals of Social
Psychology
3 ch (3C)
The scientific study of how people think about, influence, and relate to
one another. The course examines methods and findings related to
such topics as the self in society, judging others, attitudes, persuasion,
social thinking processes and conformity.
PSYC 2901
Introduction to Statistical Analysis
for Psychologists
3 ch (3C)
Designed to acquaint the student with the basic tools of statistics which
are used to summarize and analyze psychological data.
PSYC 3222
Sex Differences
3 ch (3C)
Focuses on biological and behavioural differences between females
and males. Examines the psychological implications from conception to
maturity of both physical sex differences and differential treatment by
family and society.
PSYC 3232
Socialization
3 ch (1C 2S)
The major theoretical and empirical approaches to the nature of the
child, the socialization processes, and the development of personality
are dealt with in lectures and discussions. Prerequisite: PSYC 2201.
242
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SECTION F
PSYC 3263
The Psychology of Criminal
Behavior
3 ch (3C)
Examines psychological contributions to theories of crime and
incarceration and addresses specific topics such as: how media and
political forces affect criminal justice policies; the effectiveness of
offender treatment and punishment programmes; the prevention of
crime; the effects of incarceration on prisoners; the prediction of
criminal behaviour.
PSYC 3293
The Psychology of Aging
3 ch (3C)
Focuses on changes in learning ability, memory, perception, physical
development, personality and social development associated with
aging, beginning in young adulthood and extending to late adulthood.
Prerequisite: PSYC 2201 or PSYC 1273
PSYC 3313
Introduction to Psychological
Testing
3 ch (3C/L)
An introduction to principles of psychological testing as they arise in
consideration of relevant statistical concepts and methods and of
historical experience in development and use of tests for general
intelligence, differential abilities and personality traits. Prerequisite:
PSYC 2102.
PSYC 3323
Community Psychology and
Mental Health
3 ch (2C 1S)
Provides a detailed examination of how to evaluate programs in the
community. Areas covered are mental health, criminal justice, and
other systems that provide human services.
PSYC 3343
Human Sexuality
3 ch (3C)
Provides an introduction to the psychology of human sexuality,
including examination of topics such as sexual anatomy, sexual
behaviour, sexual response, sexual dysfunction and therapy, sexual
variation and other topics of interest.
PSYC 3352
Developmentally Handicapped
Children and Adults
3 ch (3C)
Introduction to Guidance and
Counselling
3 ch (3C)
PSYC 3503
3 ch (3C)
Learning
3 ch (3C)
A survey of principles of both instrumental and classical conditioning
focusing on animal subjects. Such topics as biological constraints on
learning, cognitive interpretations of learning, and memory processes
will be included. There will be various demonstrations throughout the
course.
PSYC 3553
Psychopathology
3 ch (3C)
This course will provide the student with a comprehensive picture of
maladaptive behaviour from a biological and psychosocial perspective.
Problems associated with diagnostic systems, the role of stress, and
other causative factors implicated in the traditional clinical syndromes
will be discussed.
PSYC 3603
Selective Attention and Memory
3 ch (3C/SL)
Open to 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students who have completed PSYC
1004. An examination of the processes involved in the reception,
election and storage of information.
PSYC 3632
Motivation
3 ch (3C)
A critical examination of the concept of motivation in terms of its power
to explain findings in the experimental literature and its capacity to
generate research.
PSYC 3693
Cognitive Processes
3 ch (3C)
The scientific study of higher mental processes. This course examines
experimental methods and findings related to attention, memory,
mental imagery, the organization of general knowledge, language,
problem solving and creativity.
Physiological Psychology
3 ch (3C)
An introduction to the anatomy and physiology of nervous systems with
a special emphasis on behavioural indices of function. Illustrative
examples of both human and animal research are surveyed.
PSYC 3723
A survey of the concepts, theories, and resources involved in the
guidance and counselling area.
Changing Behaviour
An examination of the application of basic principles of learning to
human behavioural processes. A study of the treatment techniques
and assessment procedures employed in behaviour modification
programs.
PSYC 3711
A survey of sensory, physical and intellectual dysfunction in interaction
with developmental processes.
PSYC 3362
PSYC 3493
Introduction to Human
Neuropsychology
3 ch (3C)
Provides a broad introduction to visual and auditory perception. Topics
include the structure and neural functioning of auditory and visual
systems and contemporary approaches to traditional problems of
perception. The course may include reviews of other sense modalities.
A review of human neuroanatomy with a focus on recent theories and
findings regarding the functional organization of the brain. The
principles of cerebral asymmetry, disconnection syndromes, and the
functions of the occipital, parietal, temporal, and frontal lobes are
examined. A special emphasis is placed on the role of brain systems in
sensory motor skills, higher order cognitive functions and personality.
Prerequisite: PSYC 3711
PSYC 3393
PSYC 3724
PSYC 3383
Perception
Systems of Therapy
3 ch (3C)
3 ch (3C)
The array of contemporary psychotherapeutic techniques is examined
with emphasis on the relationship that exists between the theoretical
and historical background of a therapy and the form it assumes when
put into practice.
PSYC 3412
Advanced Social Psychology
3 ch (3C)
Further examines the scientific methods and findings that pertain to the
functioning of individuals in social contexts. Topics include advanced
methods used to study groups, aggression, prejudice, attraction and
altruism.
PSYC 3461
Theories of Personality
Introduction to Clinical
Neuropsychology
3 ch (3C)
Explores the neuropsychological sequelae of the most common
neurological and psychiatric disorders seen in the practice of clinical
neuropsychology , including vascular disorders, traumatic head
injuries, epilepsy, tumours, multiple sclerosis, anxiety, depression,
schizophrenia, dementia, and neuro-degenerative conditions, such as
Alzheimer's Disease. Prerequisite: PSYC 3723
3 ch (3C)
Theory formation is greatly influenced by the assumptions, beliefs and
experience of the theorist. In surveying formal theories of personality,
an attempt is made to demonstrate the influence of personal-subjective
factors in the development of theory.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
243
SECTION F
PSYC 3725
The Dementias
3 ch (3C)
An introduction to a devastating group of diseases which cause
irreversible decline in cognitive functioning and for which the incidence
is expected to triple by the year 2031. The etiological models,
cognitive, emotional, and behavioral changes, treatment, care, and
management issues of the most common types of dementias are
explored including cortical (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, Vascular
Dementia, Frontal Lobe Diseases) and subcortical (e.g., Parkinson's
Disease, Huntington's Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, and AIDS)
dementias. Prerequisites: PSYC 1003 and PSYC 1004.
PSYC 3743
Comparative Psychology
3 ch (3C)
Development of psychological theory by the comparison of data from
different species. Emphasizes the evolution and adaptive significance
of behaviour. Prerequisites: PSYC 1003 & PSYC 1004.
PSYC 3752
Drugs and Behaviour
3 ch (3C)
A survey of all classes of psychoactive drugs, their effects on human
and animal physiology and behaviour, their history of use, and various
drug-related issues such as abuse, dependency, and legality.
PSYC 3752
Drugs and Behaviour
3 ch (3C)
PSYC 4143
Designing Research Proposals
3 ch
Under the direction of a supervisor a student develops a proposal
which is assessed and approved by the Department. Prerequisite:
Eligibility for the Honours programme.
PSYC 4145
Honours Thesis
3 ch
Under the direction of a supervisor a student conducts, completes and
defends the research. Prerequisite: PSYC 4143.
PSYC 4213
Practicum in Child Studies I
3 ch (4C/S)
This practicum is designed to provide students with experience in the
school setting. The major emphasis is on field placement, where
students will gain practical experience working with children. This
course has limited enrolment, and is open to fourth year Psychology
majors and honours students. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2201, PSYC
3493, and permission of instructor
PSYC 4214
Practicum in Child Studies II
3 ch (4C/S)
A continuation of PSYC 4213. Prerequisite: PSYC 4213
PSYC 4233
Programme Evaluation
3 ch (3C)
A survey of all classes of psychoactive drugs, their effects on human
and animal physiology and behaviour, their history of use, and various
drug-related issues such as abuse, dependency, and legality.
A review of the principles and methods used in planning and
conducting programme evaluations. A basic introduction to the review
and assessment of applied/clinical research using meta-analytic
methods. Prerequisites: PSYC 2102, PSYC 2901 (or SOCI 3100).
PSYC 3803
PSYC 4463
Industrial Psychology
3 ch (3C)
Application of psychological knowledge to business and industrial
problems. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1003, PSYC 1004
PSYC 3913
Introduction to Statistical
Inference and Experimental Design
in Psychology
3 ch (3C)
This course provides an introduction to research design and statistical
inference in psychology. Topics covered are computational procedures
and theory up to analysis of variance, including multiple comparisons
and multiple regression. Students will also learn how to analyse data
using one or more statistical packages.
PSYC 4021
Psychophysiological Research
3 ch (2C 1L)
Deals with measurement techniques of the autonomic and central
nervous systems of humans functioning under cognitive or situational
challenges. The measurements reflect processes and conditions
related to stress, cognitive functioning, motivation and individual
differences.
PSYC 4053
History of Psychology
3 ch (3C)
This course traces the origins and development of modern psychology
from its roots in ancient Greece through the philosophical and scientific
developments in Europe that have culminated in the broad polymorphic
discipline of today.
PSYC 4111
Basic Research
3 ch (3S)
The purpose is to enable students to become actively involved in basic
research. This involvement will take the form of participation in
research, reading and discussion of research topics, and development
of research skills.
PSYC 4122
Basic Research II
3 ch (3S)
Continuation of PSYC 4111.
PSYC 4131
Honours Research Seminar
0 ch (3S)
A non-credit seminar for Honours students. Topics include problems of
research design and discussions of student Honours research projects.
PSYC 4142
Honours Research Seminar
0 ch (3S)
A non-credit seminar for Honours students. Topics include problems of
research design and discussions of student Honours research projects.
Prerequisite: PSYC 4131.
244
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Special Topics in Personality
3 ch (C/S)
A seminar course focusing on an in-depth analysis of selected topics in
personality theory and research. Possible topics include attachment,
interpersonal relations and communication, intimacy, loneliness,
solitude, and issues in personality assessment. Prerequisite: PSYC
3461
PSYC 4493
Developmental Psychopathology
3 ch (3C/S)
Introduces students to the literature of maladaptive behavior within the
developmental perspective. Specific disorders of childhood and
adolescence will be included in the seminar topics. Prerequisites:
PSYC 2201 and 3553 or permission of instructor.
PSYC 4583
Advanced Perception
3 ch (3C)
Provides an in-depth discussion and analysis of selected problems in
perception. Topics may include temporal factors in perception, optical
illusions, spatial frequency representation, perceptual development,
motion perception. Prerequisite: PSYC 3383.
PSYC 4693
Learning Theory
3 ch (3S) (3C/S)
An examination of some of the persistent theoretical questions in
learning. Prerequisite: PSYC 3503.
PSYC 4733
Cognitive Neuroscience
3ch (3C/S)
This course deals with contemporary neurological models of perception
and cognition. Topics will be selected to reflect the expertise of faculty.
They may include computational networks, blindsight, prosopagnosia,
lateralization, etc. Prerequisites: Psyc 3711 and either Psyc 3383 or
Psyc 3693.
PSYC 4833
Psychopharmacology
3 ch (3C)
A seminar course focusing on the drugs used in the treatment of
depression, anxiety, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder,
phobias, schizophrenia, dementias, and related disorders. The
emphasis is on the biological bases of these syndromes and the pharmacological agents used to alleviate them. Prerequisite: PSYC 3711.
SECTION F
SCIENCE
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
SCI 1862
Shaping the Earth's Surface
3 ch (3C)
Designed for the non-scientist. Examines the basic geological forces
that shape the earth's surface and our environment. Subjects include
volcanism, earthquakes, erosion, soils, groundwater, rivers, coastlines,
deserts, landslides, and the earth's past, present and possible future
climates. Prerequisite(s): None.
SCI 3155
Women and Science
3ch (3C)
SOCS 4000
Twentieth-Century Personalities
6 ch (3C/S)
A study of major contributions to contemporary thought.
SOCS 4100
Patterns of Twentieth-Century
Thought
6 ch (3C/S)
An analysis of important social, political and cultural movements in this
century.
An overview of womens historical and contemporary participation in
science, issues in science and math education, feminist critiques and
theories on science and gender, and the impact of technology on
womens lives. Prerequisites: GEND 2001 (pre or co ) or 30 ch of any
SASE program.
SCI 3255
Women, Development and the
Environment
3ch (3C)
An examination of the effects of the status of women, poverty,
population growth and economics on the state of the environment and
conservation in developing nations. Environmental issues to be
discussed include: over cultivation and deforestation, over fishing,
poaching, antibiotic resistance, migration, biodiversity, extinction and
resource depletion. Prerequisites: GEND 2001 (pre or co ) or 30 ch of
any SASE program.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
245
SECTION F
SOCIOLOGY
SOCI 2533
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
An analysis of social movements and revolutions from a sociological
perspective. Emphasis is on critical understanding of why they arise,
why some fail and why others succeed.
SOCI 2603
SOCI 1001
Introduction to Sociology
3ch (3C)
Surveys the basic concepts, theories and analytical methods of
sociology and introduces students to sociology as a way of thinking.
SOCI 1002
Introduction to Social Problems
and Issues
3ch (3C)
Social Movements and Social
Revolutions
Sociology of Deviance
3 ch (3C/O)
3 ch (3C) [W]
Examines the elements and patterns of deviance, basic principles of
both normative and deviant behaviour, and the institutionalization of
each. Studies examples of specific areas and types of deviance in
some detail.
SOCI 2611
Language, Crime and Human
Agency
3ch (3C)
Provides a broad overview of the major social problems of Canada and
the world, in general. Introduces students to topics such as gender
inequality, socio-economic disparities, problems of race and ethnicity,
crime and violence, environmental problems and problems of human
development.
Introduces students to the field of qualitative criminology. Focuses on
criminological developments since the work of Becker in the 1950s.
Emphases will be placed on interactionist, ethnomethodological,
feminist, and other micro-level analyses of crime in Western societies.
SOCI 1003
SOCI 2614
Making sense of Modern Life
3 ch (3C)
Encourages students to make sense of the societies they inhabit by
applying sociological concepts to selected aspects of modern life.
SOCI 1004
Collective Behaviour, Youth
Cultures and Rationalization
3ch (3C)
Examines issues of collective behaviour, rationalization, subcultures
and race within contemporary society.
SOCI 1005
Criticial Sociologies: Feminism,
Ethnomethodology, Marxism
3ch (3C)
Introduces students to the critical sociologies of feminism, ethnomethodology and (Neo-)Marxism and their application to
contemporary social life.
SOCI 1006
Exercising the Social Imagination
3ch (3C)
Provides students with an opportunity to develop, apply and test out
their sociological insights in order to examine ad assess how
sociological approaches help us to understand social life.
SOCI 2250
Sociology of the Media
3 ch
Examines the place of media (such as film, television and newspapers)
in contemporary social life. Analyzes how media have emerged and
developed, the organizational forms they have taken, and how they
reflect and influence shared social experience.
SOCI 2251
Film and Society
3ch
This course examines the rise of the North American film industry, its
organization and its current cultural influence. It investigates the history
of early film, the rise of the studio system, the star as celebrity, the
emergence of a number of film aesthetics, and it analyses how film has
represented social issues especially those of class, gender and race.
SOCI 2253
From TV to the Internet
3 ch
This course provides a broad-based introduction to the interdisciplinary
field of the sociology of the media. It explores the political, economic,
ideological and organizational settings within which the media operates
and charts its growing importance in many aspects of contemporary
life.
SOCI 2323
Sociology of Work
3 ch
This course will examine the changing nature and organization of work
within the context of regional, national and international developments.
SOCI 2413
Canadian Society
3 ch (3C) [W]
Examines the historical preconditions, current processes in and
structure of Canadian society. This may include French-English
relations, regionalism, native rights, Canadian mosaic and position in
the world system. No prerequisite required.
246
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Culture, Criminal Justice & Social
Structure
3 ch (3C)
Advanced study in the field of qualitative criminology. Focuses on
developments in the field since the emergence of the New Criminology
in the 1970s. Emphasis will be placed on Marxist, post-structuralist and
other macro-level analyses of crime in Western Societies. Prerequisite:
Sociology 2611
SOCI 2615
Historical Sociology 1
3 ch
Introduction to historical and sociological understanding of modern and
post-modern societies. Particular emphasis will be placed on Canada
and Europe.
SOCI 2703
Population Studies
3 ch (3C) [W]
Examines world and Canadian population variation and change
through consideration of underlying fertility, mortality and migration
patterns. Also explores the rise and development of modern population
theories, models and policies. No prerequisite required.
SOCI 2803
Sociology of the Family
3 ch (3C)
Introduction to theory and research on marriage and the contemporary
family. Forms and functions of the family in Western society; industrialization and the growth of the symmetrical family; the effect of feminism
on marital and sexual roles; the dynamics of family formation and
dissolution; evaluation of prospects for the family in post-industrial
society.
SOCI 3000
Theoretical Foundations of
Sociology
6 ch
An overview of the origins and development of sociology. Considers
major theorists such as Marx, Durkheim and Weber, and examines
readings from original works. Prerequisite: Twelve credit hours of
sociology
SOCI 3003/
ECON 3099
Sociology of Economic Ideas
3ch (3C)
Explores the relationships between the evolution of economic ideas
and the prevailing socio-historical conditions. Also examines broader
implications of economic ideas for the formulation of economic and
social policy.
SOCI 3100
Statistical Analysis of Social Data
6 ch (3S)
Emphasizes the process of analyzing social data, focusing on
probability, sampling, and the proper selection, use and interpretation
of statistical techniques. Stresses use of the SPSS-X computer library.
Prerequisite: SOCI 3103.
SECTION F
SOCI 3103
Strategies of Sociological
Research
3 ch (3C)
SOCI 3703
Social Demography
3 ch (3C)
Introduction to the logic of sociological research, covering conceptualization, theory construction, measurement, principal data sources,
methods of qualitative and quantitative data collection.
An examination in both historical and contemporary settings of the
demographic correlates of urbanization and industrialization. Gives
attention to how patterns of fertility, mortality and migration both reflect
and influence social change.
SOCI 3105
SOCI 3813
Qualitative Methods in the Social
Sciences
3 ch
Sociology of Work
3 ch (3C) [W]
Introduces students to the inter-disciplinary emergence of qualitative
methods (e.g., feminist, interactionist, textual) in recent years.
Emphasis will be on the epistemological, philosophical and reflexive
concerns which undergird these recent approaches.
A sociological analysis into the nature of contemporary work and the
division of labour. Topics include the meaning of work, theory of
alienation, evolving patterns of industrialization and labour relations,
occupational culture, the deskilling of work and solutions to alienated
labour.
SOCI 3214
SOCI 3822
Sociology of Communications
3 ch (3C)
Sociology of Modernization
3ch (3C)
A sociological examination of the principal ways communication can be
understood. It will analyze both theoretical considerations and applied
issues in communication studies.
Course explores the transition from traditional to modern society.
Emphasis is on the structures of everyday life before and after
modernization
SOCI 3503
SOCI 3843
Social Organization
3 ch (3C/O)
Models of social organization; the units of social structure; the bases of
social integration; social control and social change.
SOCI 3523
Sociology of Third World
Development
3ch (3C)
A comparative historical study of the wealth and poverty of nations.
Emphasizes how the environment, culture and politics affect economic
development.
SOCI 3543
Sociology of Gender Relations
3 ch
Examines gender as an organizing principle in social life, exploring how
particular patterns of gender relations shape and are shaped by key
areas of human activity (e.g., work, education, communication,
sexuality, family violence) in ways that generate and perpetuate gender
inequalities.
SOCI 3544
Gender and Technology
3 ch
Explores the processes through which gender relations and
assumptions about gender enter into the design and use of
technologies, the extent to which the social relations of technology are
implicated in the generation of gender inequalities, and the impacts of
technology on the lives of women and men.
SOCI 3610
Criminology
6 ch (3C) [W]
A basic course consisting of an examination of the historical
development of criminological theory, and the causes of crime and the
methods of investigation into criminal behaviour.
SOCI 3611
Socio-Legal Studies
3 ch
Examines the complex relations between law and Western societies.
Emphasis will be on qualitative, historical and critical interpretations of
the field. Wherever possible, empirical analysis will be used to highlight
theoretical concerns. Prerequisites: Sociology 2614.
SOCI 3615
Historical Sociology 2
3ch
Advanced study of socio-cultural and socio-historical transformations in
Western societies. Emphasis will be placed on the critical literature in
this field, and the detailed analysis of specific empirical transformations. Course topics change annually. Prerequisite: Sociology 2615
SOCI 3700
Studies in Urban Sociology
6 ch (3C) [W]
Analyzes the evolution and structure of the urban community as a
socio-spatial system. An introduction to the study of urban social and
ecological structures, with particular attention given to the Canadian
urban system.
Sociology of the Arts
3 ch (3C)
Investigates the social contexts of artistic endeavour and consumption
of such art forms as painting, music, literature, theatre, film and
architecture. Explores the role of both amateur and professional artists
as well as their products and publics.
SOCI 3883
Sociology of Health and Welfare
3 ch (3C)
Analyzes the development of organized social welfare as a component
of modern industrialized societies.Pays attention to the rise of the
welfare state in historical and comparative perspectives. Also
investigates contemporary problems which confront both the welfare
state itself and individuals within the system.
SOCI 3901
Sociology of Policing
3 ch
Examines the evolution of policing and police forces throughout the
past century, recent changes in the nature of urban and rural policing,
police-minority groups interaction, new initiatives in modes of policing,
and the impact of technology.
SOCI 3921
Sociology of Knowledge
3ch (3C)
This course examines the social construction of knowledge. Explores
the social and historical processes by which we have come to accept
certain claims to knowledge as valid. Also examines controversies
about the progressiveness and rationality of knowledge.
SOCI 4013
Contemporary Sociological Theory 3 ch (3C)
An overview of twentieth century developments in sociological theory:
concepts, recent contributions, theoretical issues and controversies.
Considers major theorists such as Parsons, Giddens and Habermas
and selects readings from original works. Prerequisite: SOCI 3000.
SOCI 4014
Designing Research Proposals
3 ch
Under the direction of a supervisor, an Honours student develops a
proposal which is approved by the Discipline.
SOCI 4015
Honours Thesis
3 ch
Under the direction of a supervisor, a student conducts, completes and
defends a thesis. Prerequisite: Sociology 4014
SOCI 4023
Special Topics in Sociological
Theory
3 ch (3S)
Intensive study of a selected theorist, theory group or issue in
sociological theory. Prerequisite: SOCI 4013.
SOCI 4263
Discourse and Text
3 ch
Advanced studies in discourse and textual analysis. Topics may vary
from year to year, but will typically cover a selection from the following
intellectual schools: phenomenology, ethnomethodology, conversation
analysis, discourse analysis, cultural studies, post-structuralism,
deconstruction, and feminism. Prerequisite: Sociology 3105
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
247
SECTION F
SOCI 4315
Cultural Studies in Sociology
3 ch (3C)
Examines cultural texts and practices in society. It will analyze the
historical emergence of culture and how it is related to assumptions
about class, gender, politics and history.
SOCI 4363
Political Sociology
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
3ch (3S)
A comprehensive historical study of the political routes the major
countries of the East and the West took to reach modern industrial
society. Emphasis is on the interrelations of state power, class,
ideology, and industrialization.
SOCI 4403
SPANISH
Special Topics in Canadian Society 3 ch (3S)
SPAN 1203
SPAN 1204
SOCI 4503
SPAN 2010
3 ch
This course examines the daily cultural artifacts that surround us, their
multitude of meanings, and their use by social actors. This course will
provide a historical background for understanding contemporary
popular culture, and will investigate current theoretical debates on
mass culture, popular culture and postmodernism. Prerequisite: Twelve
credit hours of sociology
SOCI 4555
Gender and Organization
3 ch (3S)
An advanced level focus on how organizations are viewed and
explained as gendered, sexualized entities. Examines feminist critiques
of traditional approaches to organization; feminist conceptualizations of
gender and organization; empirical studies of men and women in
particular organizations; organizations, gender and violence; and
gender and military organization. Prerequisites: Either (a) Sociology
1000 or (b) Gender Studies 2001 and permission of the instructor
SOCI 4603
Special Topics in Criminological
Theory
3 ch
Intensive examination of selected recent developments in the field with
an emphasis on feminist, critical, post-structural and interactionist
literature. Prerequisite: Sociology 2614
SOCI 4613
Special Topics in Socio-Legal
Studies
3 ch
In-depth examination of selected topics in the field. Theoretical
emphases will vary from year to year, but insights from phenomenological, ethnomethodological, post-structural, feminist and other discursive
approaches will be stressed. Substantive topics also vary from year to
year, but historical and contemporary concerns regarding social rights
and welfare law will be prioritized. Prerequisites: Sociology 3611
SOCI 4910
Readings in Special Areas
6 ch (R)
Provides Majors and Honours students with the opportunity to pursue a
special area of interest on an individualized basis. Requires a
substantial essay, based on library research. Course offering depends
on the consent and availability of Sociology faculty.
SOCI 4920
Research in Special Areas
6 ch (R)
Provides Majors and Honours students with the opportunity to do basic,
hands-on research in an area of special interest. Requires a substantial
essay, based on the students directed research. Prerequisite: SOCI
3103. Corequisite: SOCI 3100. Course offering depends on the
consent and availability of Sociology faculty.
248
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
3 ch
Designed to give beginners a sound basic knowledge of Spanish.
Explains fundamentals of grammar with some reading at the
elementary level. Language laboratory available for oral practice.
Intensive examination of one or more selected topics. Prerequisite:
SOCI 2403 or 2413.
Research Seminar in Popular
Culture
Introductory Spanish I
Introductory Spanish II
3 ch
Continuation of SPAN 1203. Prerequisite: SPAN 1203 or equivalent.
The Civilization of Spain
6 ch (3C)
Given in English and based upon texts and reference works in English,
and requires no knowledge of Spanish. Various aspects of Spanish
civilization are examined, including geography, history, art, literature,
society and contemporary problems.
SPAN 2203
Intermediate Spanish I
3 ch
Designed to consolidate and to develop language skills acquired in
SPAN 1203 and SPAN 1204. Fundamentals of grammar will be
completed and modern Spanish and Spanish American authors read.
Audio-visual materials are also used. Prerequisite: SPAN 1204 or
equivalent.
SPAN 2204
Intermediate Spanish II
3 ch
Continuation of SPAN 2203. Prerequisite: SPAN 2203 or equivalent.
SPAN 3974
Contemporary Spanish American
Prose Fiction
3 ch
Representative novels and short stories by Spanish American
renowned writers like Borges, Vargas, Llosa, Garcia Marquez, Octavio
Paz et al. whose works exemplify the social conflicts and ideological
contradictions of the region. Taught in English. Prerequisite: none.
SECTION F
STATISTICS
STAT 3093
Probability and Mathematical
Statistics II
3 ch (3C)
Descriptive statistics. Binomial and Normal models. Sampling
techniques. Confidence intervals. Tests of hypotheses. Linear
regression and correlation. Analysis of variance. Prerequisite(s): Grade
12 Mathematics.
The second half of a two part sequence covering various topics in
probability and statistics. This course provides an introduction to
essential techniques of statistical inference. Samples and statistics
versus population and parameters. Brief introduction to method of
moments and maximum likelihood. Tests and intervals for means,
variances and proportions (one and two sample). Multiple regression,
residual plots. Analysis of variance. Brief introduction to experimental
design. Chi-squared tests. Examples drawn from engineering,
computing science and business. Use of a statistical computer
package. Prerequisite: STAT 3083.
STAT 2263
STAT 3264
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
STAT 1793
Introduction to Applied Statistics
Statistics for Health Sciences
3 ch (4C)
3 ch (3C)
Statistics for Biology II
3 ch (3C)
An introductory course in statistics. Probability, application of Bayes'
Theorem. Binomial and Normal random variables. Confidence intervals
for means and proportions. Prediction intervals. Tests of hypotheses.
Paired data versus two independent samples. Brief introduction to
analysis of variance. Regression, correlation. Contingency tables.
Examples drawn from the health sciences. Use of a statistical
computer package. Prerequisites: New Brunswick Mathematics 112
and 122 or equivalent. NOTE: Credit can be obtained for only one of
STAT 1793, 2263, 2264, 2593, PSYC 2901.
Experimental design, analysis of variance, regression, non-parametric
statistics, the use of BMDP, SAS or SPSS computer packages.
Prerequisite: STAT 2264.
STAT 2264
Experimental Design methods and theory, one-way and two-way
classification models, split plot designs, incomplete blocks, response
surface designs. Special emphasis on applications. Prerequisite: STAT
1793.
Statistics for Biology I
3 ch (3C)
An introductory course in statistics. Probability, Bayes' Theorem,
applications of probability to genetics. Random variable, expectation.
Binomial and Normal random variables. Confidence intervals for
means and proportions. Prediction intervals. Tests of hypotheses.
Paired data versus two independent samples. Brief introduction to
analysis of variance. Regression, correlation. Contingency variables.
Examples drawn from biology. Use of a statistical computer package.
Prerequisites: New Brunswick Mathematics 112 and 122 or equivalent.
NOTE: Credit can be obtained for only one of STAT 1793, 2263, 2264,
2593, PSYC 2901.
STAT 2593
Probability and Statistics for
Engineers
3 ch (3C 1T)
Elementary probability, discrete and continuous distributions, characteristics of distributions. Statistics, sampling, estimation and hypothesis
testing, curve fitting, quality control. Prerequisite: MATH 1013.Note:
Credit can be obtained for only one of STAT 1793, 2263, 2593.
STAT 2783
Introduction to Non-parametric
Methods
3 ch (3C)
An introduction to the ideas and techniques of non-parametric analysis.
Included are studies of the one, two and K samples problems,
goodness of fit tests, randomness tests, and correlation. Prerequisite:
STAT 1793.
STAT 3083
Probability and Mathematical
Statistics I
3 ch (3C)
The first half of a two-part sequence covering various topics in
probability and statistics. This course provides an introduction to
probability theory and the theory of random variables and their
distributions. Probability laws. Discrete and continuous random
variables. Means, variances and moment generating functions. Sums
of random variables. Joint discrete distributions. Central Limit
Theorem. Examples drawn from engineering, science, computer
science and business. Prerequisites: MATH 1013. Also, STAT 1793 is
strongly recommended as preparation for the sequence STAT 3083/
3093.
STAT 3383
Introduction to Stochastic
Processes
3 ch (3C)
Poisson processes, Markov chains, renewal theory, and queuing
theory. Prerequisite: STAT 3093.
STAT 3703
STAT 3713
Experimental Design
3 ch (3C)
Introduction to Statistical Decision 3 ch (3C)
Theory
Concept of a strategy, utility theory, Bayes Theorem and decision
making, min-max theorem and introduction to game theory. Use of a
statistical computer package. Prerequisite: 6 ch in Statistics.
STAT 4043
Sample Survey Theory
3 ch (3C)
Simple random sampling; stratified sampling; systematic sampling;
multistage sampling; double sampling, ratio and regression estimates;
sources of error in surveys. Prerequisite: 6 ch in Statistics.
STAT 4703
Regression Analysis
3 ch (3C)
Simple and multiple linear regression, least squares estimates and
their properties, tests of hypotheses, F-test, general linear model,
prediction and confidence intervals. Orthogonal and non-orthogonal
designs. Weighted least squares. Use of a statistical computer
package. Prerequisite: 6 ch in Statistics, 3 ch in Computer Science and
some exposure to matrix algebra.
STAT 4803
Topics in Statistics
3 ch (3C)
Selected topics at an advanced level. Content will vary. Topic of course
will be entered on students transcript. Course will be considered as an
upper level elective for Data Analysis students and for Mathematics
and Statistics Majors. Prerequisite: STAT 3093 or consent of instructor.
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
249
SECTION F
SURVEYING ENGINEERING
A grade of C or higher is required in all Surveying Engineering courses.
Note: See beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and
coding.
SE 1001
Surveying I
5 ch (3C 3L)
Basic instrumentation, techniques and computations for plane
surveying and small area topographic surveys. Introduction to
electronic distance measurement and total stations; basic curves, area
and volume computations.
250
SAINT JOHN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SECTION G
FREDERICTON ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Undergraduate Degree Programs
The University offers courses of undergraduate instruction leading to the
degrees of:
•
Bachelor of Arts
•
Bachelor of Applied Arts (Craft and Design)
•
Bachelor of Arts and Science
•
Bachelor of Business Administration
•
Bachelor of Computer Science
•
Bachelor of Education
•
Bachelor of Laws
•
Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science
•
Bachelor of Nursing
•
Bachelor of Philosophy in Interdisciplinary Leadership
•
Bachelor of Recreation and Sports Studies
•
Bachelor of Science
•
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
•
Bachelor of Science in Forestry
•
Bachelor of Science in Forest Engineering
•
Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology
•
Bachelor of Science in Software Engineering
Honorary Degrees
The degrees of Doctor of Science, Doctor of Letters, Doctor of Civil Law
and Doctor of Laws are the Honorary degrees conferred from time to
time by the University upon persons who have achieved distinction in
scholastic or public service.
Other Programs
•
Art and Design: University courses, completed at a level above a
'D' grade, may be transferred toward and in accordance with the
academic and/or elective requirements of the degree programs
offered by the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design.
•
Certificate of Academic Proficiency in Hydrographic
Surveying: See description under Geomatics Engineering.
•
Certificate in Adult Education: See description under
Education.
•
Certificate in Computer Telephony Integration: See
description under Computer Science
•
Certificate in Critical Care Nursing: See Description under
Nursing
•
Certificate in Family Violence Issues: See description under
Arts.
•
Certificate in Film Production: See description under Arts.
•
First Nations Business Administration Certificate: See
description under Business Administration ).
•
Certificate in French Immersion Teaching: See description
under Education.
•
Certificate Programs in Geomatics: To provide technologists
with an opportunity to gain a thorough understanding of the theory
and principles of specific applications of new technology, oneyear certificate programs (thirty credit-hours in length) in five
specialized areas of Geomatics are offered. Contact the
Admissions Office for appropriate application forms and details.
Post-Graduate Bachelor's Degree Programs
•
Management Certificates: See description under Business
Administration (Section G).
•
•
Certificate in Mental Health Nursing: See description under
Faculty of Nursing.
•
Certificate in Mi'kmaq Linguistics: See description under
Education.
•
Certificate of Proficiency in French: Awarded after four years of
French language study. See description under Arts .
•
Certificate of Proficiency in Spanish: See description under
Culture and Language Studies.
•
Certificate in Software Development: See description under
Computer Science.
•
Certificate in Software Development: See description under
Computer Science.
•
Certificate in Teaching English as a Second Language: See
description under Education.
•
Diploma in Advanced Undergraduate Studies: See description
under Education.
•
Diploma in Construction: See description under Civil
Engineering.
•
Diploma in Geomatics Engineering: See description under
Engineering.
•
Diploma in Technology Management and Entrepreneurship:
See description under Engineering.
Concurrent Undergraduate Degree Programs
The University offers a number of concurrent degree options:
•
Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science
•
Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Computer Science
•
Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Education
•
Bachelor of Business Administration/Bachelor of Education
•
Bachelor of Computer Science/Bachelor of Education
•
Bachelor of Computer Science/Bachelor of Science in
Engineering (Geodesy & Geomatics Engineering)
•
Bachelor of Computer Science/Bachelor of Science
•
Bachelor of Recreation and Sport Studies / Bachelor of Education
•
Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Education
•
Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology/Bachelor of Education
Bachelor of Education (60ch program)
Degree and Diploma Programs within the School of
Graduate Studies
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Doctor of Philosophy
Master of Arts
Master of Arts in Sport and Recreation Administration
Master of Business Administration
Master of Computer Science
Master of Education
Master of Engineering
Master of Forestry
Master of Forest Engineering
Master of Nursing
Master of Philosophy
Master of Science
Master of Science in Forest Engineering
Master of Science in Forestry
Master of Science in Engineering
Master of Science in Exercise and Sports Science
Postgraduate Diploma in Land Information Management
Postgraduate Diploma in French
FREDERICTON ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
251
SECTION G
BACHELOR OF ARTS
Disciplines
The Faculty of Arts offers programs in the following disciplines:
Humanities
Languages
Social Sciences
Interdisciplinary Studies
Fine Arts Minors
Classics and Ancient
History
French
Anthropology
Law in Society
Music
English
German
Economics
Linguistics
Theatre
History
Greek
Political Science
International Development
Studies
Visual Arts
Philosophy
Latin
Psychology
Women's Studies
Film/Video
World Literature and
Culture Studies
Russian
Sociology
Multimedia Studies
Creative Writing
Spanish
Russian and Eurasian
Studies
German Studies
In order to graduate with Honours or Majors in these disciplines, a
student must enrol in the Bachelor of Arts program.
particular, are encouraged to look beyond the Departments in which they
are majoring when deciding on their elective courses.
The Arts curriculum is designed to enlarge students' understanding of
themselves, society and the world, by acquainting them with the results
of scholarly inquiry in the humanities and social sciences. The strengths
of a good Arts graduate are communication skills, flexibility and
adaptability, and the ability to relate the findings of specialists and to
evaluate their usefulness. Students enrolled in other faculties are
encouraged to take Arts courses as electives. Students intending to
make their career in the creative arts, education, medicine, dentistry, the
civil service, administration, business, librarianship or journalism will find
that some acquaintance with the Humanities and Social Sciences
broadens their general background in a beneficial way. See also the note
on Certificate programs at the end of this section.
A BA student may choose among a number of different disciplines, listed
above. It is also possible to earn a BA degree by specializing in a
Science: Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, Statistics or
Physics. (For details of programs in the Sciences, interested students
should direct their inquiries to the Department concerned.)
General Information
Courses offered by Departments in the Faculty of Arts generally have a
rating of 3 ch per term. For a detailed description of the credit hour
system, see Section B of the Calendar. The course weighting is based
on assumptions concerning the total amount of time each course can
reasonably be expected to take up in a working week. In the Faculty of
Arts most courses are given a weighting of 3 ch per term, so that a oneterm course will count for 3 ch, and a full-year course for 6 ch. In both
these cases, students should plan to devote a total of nine hours to the
subject (class meetings and private study) each week. "Private study"
means study undertaken outside the regular class hours: reading,
preparation of assignments, assimilation of information, etc.
Some courses have a stated prerequisite. This means that in order to
enrol, a student must have successfully completed the prerequisite
course. Unless the Department specifically requires a grade of C, it can
be assumed that a grade of D satisfies the requirement.
Students who enrol in the four-year Bachelor of Arts program are
exposed to a wide variety of disciplines in their first two years. There the
emphasis falls on the Western cultural inheritance, on the different ways
we have of understanding the world in which we live, and on acquiring
some of the communicative skills necessary in the modern world. In the
last two years of the program, students concentrate on one or two
disciplines, identified as the "Major." Students with consistently high
grades specialize more intensely, with a view to earning a Bachelor's
degree with Honours. Such students are identified as Honours students,
as distinct from Major students. Most students at this level do, however,
have room in their program for "elective" courses; that is, courses which
are not an obligatory part of the specialized program. Majors, in
252
FREDERICTON ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
In planning their program of study, students should note that programs at
the Junior and Senior levels are greatly dependent on their choice of
subjects at the First Year and, more particularly, at the Sophomore
levels. They should note also that in order to enrol in some courses, they
must have successfully completed a stated prerequisite course.
Students should therefore read carefully the regulations in the following
pages of the entitled Description of Courses, and should make full use of
opportunities for consultation with the faculty members concerned.
All programs of study must have the approval of the Dean.
General Regulations
Any point not covered by the General Regulations of the Arts Faculty will
be governed by the General University Regulations stated in Section B
of this Calendar. In particular, these Regulations should be noted by
students who fail to complete the work associated with a course (with
regard to the regulations concerning the notation of incomplete (INC), by
students applying for a second undergraduate bachelor's degree, by
students transferring from other institutions, and by students changing
degree program. Questions concerning the application of regulations
should be directed in writing to the Registrar.
The 120 credit hours to be successfully completed for the degree are
organized in the following manner.
Lower Level
First Level: credit hours 1-30
Upper Level
Credit hours 61-120
Second Level: credit hours 31-60
1.
To earn a BA degree, a student must successfully complete a
minimum of 120 ch and must have a session grade point average
of at least 2.0 (C).
SECTION G
The normal credit hour load for a student is 15 ch each term or 30
ch each academic year. In order to maintain full-time standing a
student must enroll for at least 12 ch in each term. The maximum
number of credit hours for which a student may normally register
is 18 each term. Course loads outside of the range of 12 to 18 ch
in a term may be permitted only with the approval of the Dean.
Second Level Regulations (31-60 Credit Hours)
1.
Students must take 6 ch in each of 3 disciplines, and at least 3 ch
in a fourth discipline.
Normally, students shall not enroll in any course to meet the
requirements of any level of the degree program unless they
enroll at the same time in every course that they still need to
complete the requirements of all the preceding levels of the
program. For example, First Year students who have successfully
completed 24 of the 30 ch required for First Year must register for
the course or courses necessary to complete the first year
requirements at the same time that they register for courses
associated with the second year requirements.
2.
No more than 12 ch may be taken in a single discipline.
3.
Courses for the second level may be chosen from the disciplines
listed under the first level regulations, as well as Geography
(Education) and courses from Interdisciplinary programs,
including: Fine Arts, Linguistics, Multimedia Studies, Russian and
Eurasian Studies, International Development Studies, Women's
Studies, and Environmental Studies.
4.
Students who elect to register for courses taught outside the
Faculty of Arts should note that, for purposes of the BA degree,
courses receive either a 3 or a 6 credit hour weighting, for term
and full-year courses respectively. Exceptions to these credit hour
designations in the BA program may be made under the authority
of the Dean of Arts and the Registrar.
Students may take for credit any appropriate courses in the Faculties of
Science and Computer Science. A list of approved courses from the
other faculties (Administration, Education, Engineering, Forestry,
Kinesiology, Law and Nursing) is available in the Dean's office. Students
may take no more than 12 ch (total) from this list toward the completion
of the 120 ch program.
5.
Students transferring from other institutions should note that at
least one-half of the credit hours required for the BA degree must
be taken at UNB and must normally include at least 30 ch toward
completion of the Junior and Senior level regulations.
Upper Level Regulations (61-120 Credit Hours)
2.
3.
6.
These regulations are designed for the Fredericton campus of the
University of New Brunswick. Students from the Saint John
campus wishing to transfer to Fredericton after the first year
(credit hours 1-30) shall have their full first year accepted as
equivalent to that offered in Fredericton. Normally, UNBSJ
students transferring to UNBF will take their final 60 ch at
Fredericton.
Students must successfully complete courses equalling a total of 30 ch.
Note:
General Information
1.
First Level Regulations ( 1 - 30 Credit Hours)
In most cases students can choose to take either one or two
subjects for their specialization. The exceptions are noted below,
in Regulation 2 (BA Major) and Regulation 2 (BA Honours).
Students must successfully complete courses equalling 30 ch. No more
than 6 ch can be taken in any discipline.
Students must successfully meet the following requirements:
1.
Arts 1000 (6 ch).
2.
Six credit hours in each of three other disciplines. Three of the
four groups of disciplines (A, B, C, D) listed below must be
represented (18 ch).
3.
The remaining six credit hours may be taken in one discipline, or
taken as three credit hours in each of two disciplines, including
multimedia. (6 ch).
A1
French
German
Greek
B
C
Classics
English
History
Latin
Philosophy
Anthropology
Economics
Political
Science
Psychology
Russian
Spanish
WLCS
Sociology
Notes:
1.
Other languages such as Maliseet, Micmac, Arabic, Chinese,
Italian and Japanese (when available), may, with permission of
the Dean's Office, be taken to satisfy the requirements of Group A.
2.
Programs also exist in interdisciplinary areas: Fine Arts,
Linguistics, Russian and Eurasian Studies, Law in Society,
International Development Studies, Women's Studies,
Environmental Studies. In what follows, the word "Department" is
used to cover both Departments and the committees that
administer these interdisciplinary programs.
2.
Advanced level courses available: Normally, all courses taken
to fulfill the last 60 ch of the BA degree will be advanced level
courses. (Advanced level courses have 3, 4 or 5 as the first digit
of the course number.) Advanced level courses are available in:
Anthropology, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry,
Classics, Computer Science, Economics, Education, English,
Fine Arts, French, Geology, German, Greek, History, International
Development Studies, Latin, Linguistics, Mathematics,
Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Russian,
Russian and Eurasian Studies, Sociology, Spanish, Statistics,
Women's Studies, World Literature and Culture Studies.
3.
Courses in the Major or Honours subject: Honours and Majors
programs are available in most, but not all, the subjects listed in
(2) above. For the exceptions, see below, Regulation 2 (BA Major)
and Regulation 2 (BA Honours). A Department may accept as
part of its Major and Honours programs courses outside the
Department and Faculty, including courses in subjects which are
not listed above (2) as being normally available in the BA
program.
D2
Astronomy
Biology
Chemistry
Computer
Science
Geology
Mathematics
Physics
Statistics
a) Students electing CHEM 1001 / 1012 / 1006 / 1017 / 1045 must
also take MATH 1003 and 1013 . Students may take CHEM 1801
or CHEM 1882 without taking Mathematics.
Choice of program: For Upper level students two programs are
available: BA Major and BA Honours. Students entering the
Junior level must elect to follow one or the other of these two
programs. Their decisions should be made in consultation with
the appropriate Departments, and with their Academic Advisors.
The Honours program is designed for students with a high level of
ability who wish to undertake intensive study of one or two
subjects, especially in preparation for postgraduate work.
b) The lower level laboratory courses will not be counted in the ch
total or in the calculation of the grade point average.
FREDERICTON ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
253
SECTION G
4.
Courses for the upper level may be chosen from the disciplines
listed under either the first or second level regulations. Students
may, on approval of the Dean of Arts, be granted permission to
take up to 9 ch of the last 60 from courses with the first digit 1 or
2. Program directors may recommend exceptions in the case of
specifically designed programs.
5.
Approval of Courses: All the courses for which a student enrolls
must be elected in consultation with the Department or
Departments in which the student is majoring or honouring, and
the final selection of courses must be approved by the Dean.
6.
Minors: Students should consider the possibility of taking a Minor
concentration in another discipline or another Faculty. A Minor
comprises 24 ch, forming a coherent set or sequence, so
designated by the Department concerned. Departments which
offer a Minor specify details in the departmental listings in Section
F of the Calendar. A Minor may not be taken in the department
with which the student is majoring or honouring. See Section B for
university regulations regarding Minors.
BA Majors Program
1.
A Major in a given subject shall consist of the successful
completion of not less than 30 ch in that subject, 24 of which must
be in advanced level courses. Departments may require Single
Major students to take up to 42 ch in advanced courses and
Double Major students to take up to 30 ch in advanced courses.
2.
Students may not major in Business Administration, Computer
Science, Fine Arts, Environmental Studies, or Education.
Students may major in Women's Studies, Law in Society or
International Development Studies only as part of a Double Major.
3.
Not more than 12 ch in Education are permitted for the degree of
BA and these courses must be approved by the Dean of Arts.
4.
Students should consult the sections of the Calendar which
pertain to the Department or Departments in which they are
majoring to determine whether grades higher than D are required
to meet Major requirements.
5.
Candidates for the degrees of BA (Major) are listed with divisions
based on the cumulative grade point averages of all courses
taken. See Section B of this Calendar, "Listing of Graduates."
6.
A student who attains a grade point average equal to or greater
than 3.75 over credit hours 61 -120 and no grades less than C
over the last 90 ch shall be awarded a Distinction upon
graduation.
BA Honours Program
1.
Admission to Honours will normally occur after the completion of
60 ch, although application for Honours may be made after
completing 30 ch. Only under exceptional circumstances will
Senior level students be permitted to enter an Honours program.
The basic requirement for entrance into Honours is that the
student shall have demonstrated a high level of ability in previous
work in the subject in which Honours is proposed. Departments
may refuse to admit to Honours students whose cumulative grade
point average is below 2.5 at the completion of 60 ch.
Students wishing to be admitted to Honours should apply in
writing to the Chair of the Department concerned, who will make
recommendations to the Dean of Arts. In the case of application
for a Joint Honours program, a single recommendation will be
made by the Departments acting in collaboration. Applications
should be received by the Chairs before 1 September of the year
in which the student attains Junior status, although applications
will be considered up to 1 October.
2.
In most subjects, Honours may be taken singly or jointly with
Honours in another subject. These subjects are: Anthropology,
Chemistry, Classics, Economics, English, French, German,
Greek, History, Latin, Linguistics, Philosophy, Physics, Political
Science, Psychology, Sociology, Spanish, World Literature and
Culture Studies.
Honours in Biology cannot be taken jointly with Honours in
another subject.
Honours in Geology and International Development Studies must
be taken jointly with Honours in another subject.
3.
Single Honours students are required to take at least 36 ch in
advanced level courses. Individual Departments may require up
to 48 advanced level ch.
Joint Honours students must take at least 24 ch in advanced level
courses from each Department. Departments may require up to
30 advanced level ch.
4.
Honours students who are able to fulfill the requirements laid
down for a Double Majors student, in a discipline outside the
Department in which they are honouring may, if they choose,
register for a supplementary Major. Such students will not be
placed in a division, but their transcript will record that they have
fulfilled the requirements for a Major in that subject. Registration
for the supplementary Major shall normally be completed no later
than the beginning of the student's Senior year.
5.
For the award of a first-class Honours degree, a grade point
average of 3.6 is required in the courses of the Honours subject or
subjects excluding those courses which the Department
considers to be introductory in scope. For a second-class
Honours degree an average of 3.0 is required in these courses.
Averages in the Honours subjects are calculated on the basis of
the minimum number of credit hours required by individual
Departments, and credit hours successfully completed above this
minimum are treated as "non-required" courses. Students are
required to sustain a grade point average of 2.5 in "non-required"
courses taken for credit hours 31 -120. Courses which Honours
students are obliged to take must be counted as part of the
minimum number of credit hours for the purpose of calculating the
grade point average in the Honours courses.
The recommendation to award a student an Honours degree will
be made by the Department or Departments concerned to the
Dean of Arts. In the case of Joint Honours, the class is
determined by the overall average in the courses required to fulfill
the minimum requirements in both disciplines, and is subject to
the agreement of both Departments concerned.
254
FREDERICTON ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
SECTION G
PROGRAMS OF STUDY
ANTHROPOLOGY
General Information
Anthropology is the global study of the human condition, including
biological and cultural similarities and differences in the past and the
present. The discipline encompasses four sub-fields:
Include modern capitalist economies, so economics has extended its
orbit to include social and political interactions. The commonality of the
endeavour suggests that a rich cross-fertilisation is not only possible, but
desirable.
Students may minor in Culture and Economy by completing 24ch of
courses offered by the Department of Economics and the Department of
Anthropology. Students must achieve a grade of C or better in each
course for it to be counted as part of the Minor and are required to
complete 24ch as follows:
1.
social and cultural anthropology examines contemporary and
recent cultures around the world;
2.
archaeology is the study of human cultures through material
remains;
3.
physical anthropology explores human evolution and biological
diversity;
a.
6ch of Economics chosen from: ECON 1001 , ECON 1002 ,
ECON 2515 , ECON 2505 , ECON 2705 , ECON 2905 .
4.
linguistics is the study of how languages are constructed and the
ways language affects thought.
b.
6ch of introductory Anthropology (ANTH) courses chosen from:
ANTH 1001 , ANTH 2114 , ANTH 2144 .
c.
6ch of advanced economics (ECON) courses chosen from:
ECON 3055 , ECON 3504 , ECON 3702 , ECON 3724 , ECON
3845 , ECON 3361 , ECON 3633 , ECON 4775 .
d.
6 ch of advanced anthropology (ANTH) courses, chosen from:
ANTH 3204 , ANTH 3244 , ANTH 3284 , ANTH 3434 , ANTH
3714 , ANTH 4011 , ANTH 4012 , ANTH 4214 .
Courses in Area Ethnographies
ANTH3604 through ANTH3724 are intended to provide a general
knowledge of the societies and cultures of selected geographical
regions. These courses are designed for non-Majors as well as for
Anthropology Majors and Honours students. Note that there are no
prerequisites for these courses.
Prerequisites
Courses beyond the second level frequently require both ANTH1001
and 1002 as well as second year courses as a prerequisite (see course
listings for specifics).
Majors and Honours Programs
Major To Major in Anthropology, a student must complete ANTH1001
and 1002 , and 12 ch of third-level and 12 ch in fourth- and/or fifth-level
anthropology courses, with a grade of C or better in each course.
Double Major To do a Double Major in Anthropology and another
discipline, a student must complete ANTH1001 and 1002 , and 12 ch of
third-level and 12 ch of fourth- and/or fifth-level anthropology courses,
with a grade of C or better in each course.
Honours Students wishing to be admitted to Honours should apply in
writing to the Director of Undergraduate Studies of the Department.
•
Single Honours To earn an Honours degree in Anthropology, a
student must complete ANTH 1001 and 1002 , 18 ch of thirdlevel, and 18 ch of fourth- and fifth-level anthropology courses,
including ANTH5701 and ANTH5702 .
•
Joint Honours To graduate with Joint Honours in Anthropology
and another discipline, a student must complete ANTH1001 and
1002, and 24 ch of advanced-level anthropology courses (third,
fourth and fifth), including ANTH5701 and ANTH5702.
Minor in Culture and Economy
This is a joint minor proposed by the departments of economics and
anthropology. The minor is open to all students including those majoring
in economics and anthropology.
Economics and anthropology overlap in so far as both disciplines seek to
understand humankinds myriad social customs, institutions and
behaviour as being the outcome of a rational attempt to avoid costs and
reap benefits. Just as anthropology has extended its field of study to i
FREDERICTON ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
255
SECTION G
CLASSICS AND ANCIENT HISTORY
General Information
The Department of Classics and Ancient History offers courses in three
disciplines: Latin [LAT], Greek [GRK] and Classics [CLAS]. The
designation LAT or GRK indicates a course in which students are taught
[in English] how to read and write Classical Latin or Ancient Greek. The
designation CLAS indicates a course in which students are introduced to
the social, political and cultural life of the Greeks and/or Romans through
reading the ancient authors in English translation.
Courses in Latin or Greek
Students without previous experience in classical languages are
encouraged to begin the study of Latin with LAT 1103 and of Greek with
GRK 1203. These courses assume no knowledge of the language and
are taught in English. In order to take advanced language courses,
students must complete each of the appropriate introductory and
intermediate courses with a grade of C or better.
Courses in Classics
Students are encouraged to begin the study of Classical Civilization by
enrolling in two of the Introductory courses: CLAS 1003 , 1303 , 1323 ,
1403 , 1413 , 1503 or 1903 . Advanced offerings in Classics include
courses in history, archaeology, art history, mythology, philosophy and
literature. Though specific prerequisites have not always been stated,
the Department does not advise students to attempt advanced Classics
courses in the first year of this program.
Students may take courses in Classics, Greek or Latin as part of a
degree program [Honours, Major or Minor] or for general interest.
The following Classics courses may be counted for advanced credit in
the Department of History up to a maximum of 12 ch: Greek History
[CLAS 3003 , 3013 ], Roman History [ 3033 / 3043 ], Roman Army [ 3053
], Caesar Augustus [ 3063 ], Jewish Civilization [ 3073 ],Graeco-Roman
Background of the New Testament [ 3803 ], The Early Church [ 3813 ],
and Topics in Greek/Roman History [ 5003 / 5013 ].
European history will find in the study of Greece and Rome a useful
complement to their primary discipline. Therefore, students who do not
intend to pursue Classics beyond the Baccalaureate degree, but who do
wish to continue their study of ancient Greece and Rome as an adjunct
to another field, or who are intending to enter professional training [such
as law or journalism or education] for which a general humanities
Baccalaureate degree would be appropriate preparation are directed to
the program in Classical Studies.
Note: Students who begin in the program of Classical Studies may enter
the program of Classics on the basis of a language study program
approved by the Department.
Honours, Majors and Minors
HONOURS
Students may apply to the Department for admission to Honours
Programs in either Classics or Classical Studies after completing 60 ch
of university study. Admission to an Honours program normally requires
the completion of at least 12 ch of courses taught in the Department of
Classics and Ancient History, including at least 6 ch of a Classical
language for those students choosing the CLASSICS option. Students
considering the Classics option should begin their language training as
early as possible in the program.
Honours in Classics
Students reading for an Honours degree in Classics must successfully
complete 66 ch of courses as follows:
a.
Latin and Greek -- at least 9 ch of advanced language courses,
with a minimum grade of C in each course. With the permission of
the Department, additional courses of advanced language study
above 9 ch may be counted among the required Classics
courses. [Students must complete 12 ch at the introductory and
intermediate levels in each of the classical languages.]
b.
Classics -- at least 27 ch of advanced Classics courses, with a
minimum grade of C in each course. [Students must complete 6
ch of Classics courses at the introductory or intermediate level.]
Program of Study
The Department of Classics and Ancient History offers students two
programs for the study of Classical Antiquity: CLASSICS and
CLASSICAL STUDIES. Students should be aware of the differences
between these two options.
Classics
The key to the study of Greece and Rome is a critical knowledge of the
works of ancient authors in their original languages. The study of Latin
and Greek has always been a fundamental element in the Western
tradition. It continues to be a necessary component in the education of
anyone seriously contemplating advanced professional standing, or
even graduate work, in any area of Classics. Therefore, students
intending to pursue the study of ancient Greece or Rome beyond the
Baccalaureate level are directed to the program in Classics, which
includes the study of both Latin and Greek, and are strongly advised to
commence their language study at the earliest possible stage of the
degree.
[Students fulfilling the requirements for Joint Honours in Classics may
reduce the required number of advanced language ch by 3 and the
number of advanced Classics courses by 9 for a total of 24 ch of
advanced courses, with a minimum grade of C in each course.]
Honours in Classical Studies
Students reading for an Honours degree in Classical Studies must
successfully complete 60 ch of courses as follows:
a.
Latin and Greek -- Students must complete at least 12 ch of
introductory and/or intermediate language courses. With the
permission of the Department, courses of advanced language
study may be counted among the required Classics courses
below.
Classical Studies
b.
The written and manufactured remains of the Classical cultures of
Greece and Rome provide a rich heritage for our modern western
culture. One finds in the work of classical authors and artisans the first
thorough treatment of a number of current political, social and personal
issues. Moreover, since a number of modern academic disciplines trace
their ancestry to the Classical Mediterranean, students investigating
such diverse fields as English literature, philosophy, sociology and
Classics -- 36 ch of advanced Classics courses with a minimum
grade of C in each course. [Students must complete at least 12 ch
at the introductory and/or intermediate level in Classics.]
[Students fulfilling the requirements for Joint Honours in Classical
Studies may reduce the number of advanced Classics courses by 12 ch,
for a total of 24 ch of advanced courses with a minimum grade of C in
each course. A total of 6 ch of language courses is required for Joint
Honours in Classical Studies.]
256
FREDERICTON ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
SECTION G
MAJORS
Students may enter a Major program in either Classics or Classical
Studies after completing 60 ch of university study, which must include at
least 6 ch of courses in Classics, Latin or Greek at the introductory level.
Major in Classics
Students in a Major program in Classics are required to complete 54 ch
of courses in Latin, Greek and Classics as follows:
a.
Latin and Greek -- at least 3 ch of advanced level Greek or Latin
courses. [Students must complete at least 6 ch at the introductory
level in the other classical language.]
b.
Classics -- at least 27 ch of advanced Classics courses.
[Students must complete at least 6 ch at the introductory level in
Classics.]
[Students fulfilling the requirements for Classics as part of a Double
Major may reduce the number of advanced Classics courses by 6 ch, for
a total of 24 ch of advanced courses.]
Major in Classical Studies
Students in a Major program in Classical Studies are required to
complete 42 ch of courses in Classics as follows:
a.
Latin and Greek -- Though there is no language requirement in
this program, the Department encourages each student to
attempt the study of the classical languages.
b.
Classics -- at least 30 ch of advanced Classics courses.
[Students must complete at least 12 ch of courses at the
introductory and/or intermediate level in Classics.]
[Students fulfilling the requirements for Classical Studies as part of a
Double Major may reduce the number of advanced Classics courses by
6 ch, for a total of 24 ch.]
MINORS
Students may minor in Classics by completing 24 ch of courses offered
by the Department of Classics and Ancient History, including at least 12
ch of a classical language and 12 ch of advanced courses in Latin,
Greek or Classics.
Students may minor in Classical Studies by completing 24 ch of
courses offered by the Department of Classics and Ancient History,
including at least 6 ch at the introductory level, and at least 12 ch of
advanced courses in Latin, Greek or Classics.
Minor in Ancient Philosophy
Students may minor in Ancient Philosophy by completing 24ch of
courses offered by the Department of Classics & Ancient History and the
Department of Philosophy. For Philosophy (PHIL) departmental course
descriptions, please consult that departments calendar listing.
Students are required to complete 24ch as follows:
a.
6ch of introductory philosophy chosen from PHIL 1001 , PHIL
1002 , PHIL 1003 , PHIL 1004 , and PHIL 1005
b.
6ch of ancient language: GRK 1203 / 1213 or LAT 1103 / 1113 or
any other 6ch of Greek and/or Latin
c.
6ch of advanced philosophy (PHIL) courses, including at least
one of PHIL 3033 and PHIL 3034
d.
6 ch of advanced classics (CLAS) courses, including at least one
of CLAS 3703 , CLAS 3723 and CLAS 3733
Credit Courses from Cognate Disciplines
CULTURE AND LANGUAGE STUDIES
The Department of Culture and Language Studies welcomes students of
all disciplines to participate in the quest for cultural literacy and
multilingual communication.
Globalization, democratization, and post-colonial forces continue to
powerfully shape our increasingly complex and interconnected world,
requiring each one of us to respond to new challenges and opportunities
by increasing our understanding of diverse cultures and our competence
in foreign languages.
The Department of Culture and Language Studies houses a variety of
specialists in languages, literatures, and cultures. We are dedicated to
the teaching of cultural literacy, which can best be achieved through the
long-term development of linguistic competence and the study of literary
and social texts. In the spirit of diversity and understanding, we are
committed to our students, to the exploration of innovative teaching and
research modes that draw upon common interests among our languages
and disciplines, and to the strengthening of our links to the greater
academic community and the community at large.
The Department of Culture and Language Studies offers the following
academic programs:
German: Minor, Major, Honours;
German Studies: Minor, Major;
Linguistics: Double Major, Joint Honours;
Russian and Eurasian Studies: Minor, Major;
Spanish: Minor, Major, Honours; and
World Literature and Culture Studies: Minor, Major, Honours
The Department also offers courses in Japanese and Chinese.
For course listings consult Section H of this calendar or visit the
Departmental website at http://www.unbf.ca/arts/Culture_Lang.
GERMAN
GENERAL INFORMATION
Language Acquisition
A variety of language acquisition courses is offered at all four
undergraduate years. Students with no previous experience of German
will normally enroll in GER1001 / 1002 . GER 1033 is also a first-year
course requiring no previous knowledge of German, and is designed
primarily to help students to read German texts in their particular fields of
interest. The total sequence of language courses aims at reaching a
level of proficiency that would enable a student to be linguistically
competent in a German-speaking environment.
Literature and Culture
Students who are not primarily drawn to German language courses, but
who still retain a lively interest in the German contribution to Western
civilization, may take one of several literature or culture courses in which
texts and instruction are in English, and for which no knowledge of
German is required. These courses focus on various writers,
movements, and aspects of German literature, culture, or film. Students
specializing in German will attain a wider knowledge of different cultural
models and theories, and will also study a variety of literary
masterpieces.
Programs of Study:
Majors
Students majoring in German (single or double majors), are required to
complete 24 advanced ch in German, with no grades below C.
The Department of Classics and Ancient History will accept for Classics
credit courses in ancient philosophy [ PHIL 3033 , PHIL 3034 ], and
archaeological methods and practice [ ANTH 3340 , ANTH 3350 ] to a
maximum of 12 ch.
FREDERICTON ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
257
SECTION G
Honours and Joint Honours
Students in Single Honours are required to complete 36 advanced ch in
German with no grades below B-. Students in Joint Honours are required
to complete 24 advanced ch in German with no grades below B-.
Note: Students majoring or honouring in German normally spend one
academic year at a university in a German-speaking country, preferably
in their third or fourth year of study. Interested students should consult
the undergraduate advisor for German before November 30 of the year
prior to the time of departure.
Minors
Students in Minors are required to complete 24 ch in German, taken in
the following sequence: GER 1001 / 1002 ; GER 2001 / 2002 ; GER
3011 , and 3022 , and 6 ch from advanced literature, film, or culture
courses.
Study in Germany.
A student who attends language or literature courses either at one of the
Goethe Institutes in the Federal Republic of Germany or at a university in
a German-speaking country will be awarded up to 12 ch upon
departmental recommendation. Students attending the Canadian
Summer School in Germany may be awarded up to 6 ch upon
departmental recommendation. Students who participate in the Workand-Study program (Werkstudentenprogramm) may receive 3
advanced-level ch, subject to a departmental evaluation upon return.
For further information on a variety of other summer language programs,
consult the undergraduate advisor for German. For a description of study
abroad programs (summer term and full year) consult the Departmental
website.
GERMAN STUDIES
Program Requirements
Note: Students in the German Studies Program must successfully
complete a total of four term courses (12 ch) in German language
acquisition at the first and second year levels or otherwise demonstrate
proficiency in spoken and written German.
1.
two term courses (6 ch) of third- or fourth-year German language
acquisition courses or equivalent (selected from Group A);
2.
one term course (3 ch) in the area of German literature,
civilization, cultural topics, or linguistics (selected from Group B);
3.
one term course (3 ch) in the area of German history (selected
from Group C);
4.
one term course (3 ch) in the area of German and European
politics (selected from Group D);
5.
five term courses (15 ch) from any of the five areas of
concentration listed below; however, students are encouraged to
choose these five courses from only one or two areas of
concentration.
Areas of Concentration
A. German Language Courses:
GER/GS 3011
GER/GS 3022
GER/GS 4013
GER/GS 4023
B. German Literature, Civilization, Cultural Topics, or Linguistics:
ENGL 3563
GER/GS 1113
General Information
GER/GS 1061
GER/GS 1071
GER/GS 3043
GER/GS 3045
German Studies is an Interdisciplinary Minor and Major Program offered
jointly by the University of New Brunswick and St. Thomas University.
GER/GS 3053
GER/GS 3055
The German Studies Program provides the opportunity to combine the
study of the language, literature, history, political science, and various
socio-cultural aspects of the German-speaking peoples within the
context of a larger Europe. The attainment of proficiency in the German
language is an integral part of German Studies at all levels.
GER/GS 3063
GER/GS 3072
GER/GS 3073
GER/GS 3083
GER/GS 4053
GER/GS 4073
The program is administered by a committee drawn from the
departments involved in the program. Interested students should contact
the Director, who is normally the Chair of the Department of Culture and
Language Studies.
Program of Study: Minor and Majors
Minor in German Studies
A Minor in German Studies (24 ch) consists of:
1.
four term courses (12 ch) of first and second year German
language acquisition courses;
2.
one term course (3 ch) in German Culture: GER/GS 1061
German Culture I or GER/GS 1071 German Culture II;
3.
one term course (3 ch) in German history;
4.
two term courses (6 ch) from any of the five areas of
concentration listed below.
Major in German Studies
A Major in German Studies consists of 42 ch with a minimum of ten term
courses (30 ch) mostly, but not exclusively, at the third- and fourth-year
levels.
258
FREDERICTON ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Modern German Usage I
Modern German Usage II
Advanced German Usage I
Advanced German Usage II
Ficton, Drama and Film: Study in Narrative II
Introduction to Modern German Literature in
Translation
German Culture I
German Culture II
Introduction to German Literature I
Introduction to 20th-C German Literature in Translation
I
Introduction to German Literature II
Introduction to 20th-C German Literature in Translation
II
Literature of the Holocaust
Studeis in Contemporary German Cinema
Narrative Forms
Seminar I: Genre
Seminar II: Author
Literary Texts
C. German History
(+ = offered at St. Thomas University)
HIST 3006
HIST 3085
HIST 3095
HIST 3775
HIST 3785
HIST 3795
HIST 3796
HIST 4015
HIST 4101
HIST 5010
HIST 5015
HIST 5026
HIST 5027
HIST 5035
HIST 5080
+HIST 2206
+HIST 3223
+HIST 3333
+HIST 3363
+HIST 3373
+HIST 4313
+HIST 4323
The Protestant Reformation
Germany 1900-1945
Thr Germanies, 1945 to the Present
History of Music in the Late Baroque and Classical
Period
History of Music in the Romantic Era
A History of Music in the Twentieth Century
History of the Music Dramas of Richard Wagner
The Origin of the Second World War
Fascism and Film: Studies of European Fascism and
the Holocaust
Reformation and Revolution in 16th Century Europe
Reformation and Revolution in 16th Century Europe
Fascist Movements
Fascist Regimes
The Holocaust
Aspects of German History
Medieval Europe
The Medieval Church
Totalitarianism Extended: The Age of Dictators
Germany 1871-1945
The Germanies Since 1945
Aspects of German History I (Seminar)
Aspects of German History II (Seminar)
SECTION G
D. German and European Politics
(+ = offered at St. Thomas University)
POLS 3113
POLS 3343
POLS 3363
POLS 3432
POLS 3483
+POLS 3363
+POLS 3403
+POLS 3413
The Foreign Policies of East European States
The European Union in Transition
Contemporary Germany
Europe: East and West
Hegel and Marx
Contemporary Germany
Government and Politics of Western Europe
Contemporary Germany
E. German Thought
(+ = offered at St. Thomas University)
PHIL 2023
PHIL 2024
PHIL 3633
PHIL 3634
PHIL 4053
+PHIL 2233
+PHIL 3163
+PHIL 3543
+PHIL 4563
Introduction to 19th Century Existential Thought
Introduction to 20th Century Existential Thought
Phenomenology
Phenomenology of Existence
Introduction to the Philosophy of Kant
Contempory Moral Philiosophy
Modern Philosophy II
Existential Philosophy
Martin Heidegger
Course selections must be made in consultation with the Program
Director.
LINGUISTICS
General Information
The Linguistics Program combines courses in the traditional areas of
linguistics and in related disciplines. It is administered by a committee
drawn from the departments involved. Interested students should contact
the Director of Linguistics or the Student Advisor.
Requirements
Linguistics is offered as part of a Double Major or a Joint Honours in
conjunction with another Major or Honours program.
Program of Study.
Double Majors:
1.
9 ch from the three Required Courses.
2.
18 ch from Group A and Group B Courses, with not more than 6
ch from Group B.
3.
The courses chosen to fulfil prerequisites or major requirements
must be completed with a mark of C or better, and may not count
towards the other subject of the Double Majors Program.
Joint Honours:
1.
9 ch from the three Required Courses.
2.
24 ch from Group A and Group B Courses, with not more than 6
ch from Group B.
3.
The courses chosen to fulfil prerequisites or honours
requirements must be completed with a mark of C or better, and
may not count towards the other subject of the Joint Honours
Program.
COURSES
Note: For course descriptions refer to the appropriate department
listings.
Required Courses
LING2401
LING3411
LING3422
Introduction to Language
Phonetics and Phonemics
Morphology and Syntax
Optional Courses
Group A
ED 5078
ENGL/LING 3006
ENGL/LING 3010
FR/LING 3404
FR/LING 3414
FR/LING 3424
FR/LING 3444
FR/LING 3454
FR/LING 3464
FR/LING 3484
FR/LING 4414
FR/LING 4464
FR/LING 4465
LING 3903
LING 3904
MATH/LING 4903
PHIL 2113
PHIL 3144
PSYC 3213
PSYC 4215
Foundations of Speech and Language
Linguistic Introduction to Canadian English
History of the English Language
Introduction à la linguistique
Sociolinguistique
Phonétique et phonologie
La créativité lexicale
Histoire de la langue française
Syntaxe
Questions de psycholinguistique
Français canadien
Théorie linguistique
Morphologie générative
Independent Studies in Linguistics I
Independent Studies in Linguistics II
Formal Languages
Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Set Theory and Logic
Language Development
Individuals with Disabilities
FREDERICTON ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
259
SECTION G
RUSSIAN AND EURASIAN STUDIES
Group B
ABRG
ABRG or NATI
ANTH 3412
ANTH 3434
CHNS
CS 4613
CS 5905
ED 3560
ED 3561
ED 4568
ENGL 3003
ENGL 3004
ENGL 3040
FR
FR 3044
FR 3204
GER/GS
GRK
JPNS
LAT
LING 3803
LING 3804
PHIL 3083
PSYC 2203
PSYC 3243
PSYC 3623
RUSS
SPAN 3205
SPAN
SPAN 4204
(Micmac language courses at any level)
(Maliseet language courses at any level)
Language and Culture
Cross-Cultural Communication
(Chinese language courses at any level)
Programming Languages
Topics in the Theory of Computing
Introduction à la didactique du français
langue seconde
Introduction to Second Language
Education
Le développement langagier en classe de
langue seconde
Old English I
Old English II
Chaucer and Co.
(French language courses at any level)
Grammaire et stylistique
Stylistique comparée du français et de
l'anglais
(German language courses at any level)
(Ancient Greek language courses at any
level)
(Japanese language courses at any level)
(Latin language courses at any level)
Independent Studies in Language I
Independent Studies in Language II
Syntax and Semantics of Formal Systems
Foundations of Developmental
Psychology
Cognitive Development
Cognition
(Russian language courses at any level)
Advanced Translation
(Spanish language courses at any level)
Spanish Language of the Americas
Note: Language improvement courses may not be counted for
Linguistics credit by native speakers.
For more information consult URL: http://www.unb.ca/web/arts/IDS/Lin/
or contact: Wladyslaw Cichocki, Director of Linguistics, Phone: 447-3236
Fax: 453-3565 Email: cicho@unb.ca
General Information
Russian and Eurasian Studies is an interdisciplinary major and minor
program offered jointly by the University of New Brunswick and Saint
Thomas University. It is administered by a committee drawn from the
departments involved in the program. Interested students should first
contact the Director who is the representative from the Russian section
of the Department of Culture and Language Studies.
Program of Study
Major in Russian and Eurasian Studies
A major in Russian and Eurasian Studies shall consist of a minimum of
30 ch of advanced level courses relating to Russia and the former Soviet
Union and Eastern Europe. To qualify to enter this program, students
must first have satisfactorily completed 6 ch in the Russian language at
the introductory level (RUSS 1013 and 1023 ) and 6 ch at the
intermediate level (RUSS 2013 and 2023 ). The 30 ch for the Major will
be selected from the list below and must meet the following
requirements:
1.
6 ch in the Russian language (RUSS 3013, 3023)
2.
two of: 6 ch in Russian or East European literature, 6 ch in
Political Science of Russia, the former USSR and Eastern Europe
6 ch in the History of Russia, the former USSR, and Eastern
Europe
3.
12 additional ch (3 ch each):
RUSS 1043
RUSS 1053
RUSS 3013
RUSS 3023
RUSS 3051
RUSS 3052
RUSS 3083
RUSS 4053
POLS 3110
POLS 3113
POLS 3361
POLS 3431
POLS 3432
POLS 3831
HIST 2-350*
HIST 2-351*
HIST 2-352*
HIST 2-353*
HIST 2-354*
HIST 356*
HIST 357*
HIST 358*
HIST 359*
HIST 450*
HIST 3185
HIST 3186
HIST 3045
HIST 4075
GEOG 5644
Russian Culture I
Russian Culture II
Advanced Russian I
Advanced Russian II
Introduction to 19th Century Russian Literature in
Translation
Introduction to 20th Century Russian Literature in
Translation
Seminar I: Genre
Seminar II: Author
Politics in Russia and Ukraine
The Foreign Policies of East European States
Politics in Eastern Europe
Nations and Nationalism in the USSR
Europe: East and West
Politics and Society in Contemporary China
Russian Civilization: Sources and Interpretations,
from Pre-Christian Times to the Twentieth Century
Early Russia: Kiev and Muscovy
Early Modern Russia: The Seventeenth and
Eighteenth Centuries
Modern Russia: The Nineteenth Century
Revolutionary Russia: The Twentieth Century
Early Russian Imperialism
Modern Russian Imperialism
Religion and the Church in Early Russia
Religion and the Church in Early Modern and
Modern Russia
The Russian Golden and Silver Ages
Early Russia: Sources and Interpretations
Modern Russia: Sources and Interpretations
Eastern Europe in the 20th Century
The History of European Jews
Geography of the USSR
Courses marked with an asterisk are offered by STU.
Minor in Russian and Eurasian Studies
A minor in Russian and Eurasian Studies will consist of 12 ch of Russian
language (RUSS 1013 , 1023 , 2013 , 2023 ), as well as 6 ch each in two
of political science, history or literature from the above listed courses.
Access to the upper year political science and history courses will be
contingent upon departmental consent where students in the Russian
and Eurasian Studies Program do not have the necessary prerequisites.
260
FREDERICTON ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
SECTION G
SPANISH AND LATIN AMERICAN CULTURES
General Information
Minors
Texts
Students wishing to take a minor in Spanish may opt for any one of the
following:
Full listings of texts required in every course for the following academic
year will be available early in the Spring.
1.
A Minor in Spanish Language, consisting of SPAN 1203 ; 1204 or
1304 ; 2203 ; 2204 ; and 12 additional ch in Spanish language
courses ( SPAN 3203 , SPAN 3204 , SPAN 3205 , SPAN 3563 ,
SPAN 3564 , SPAN 4203 , SPAN 4204 ).
2.
A Minor in Spanish Civilization, consisting of SPAN 1203 ; 1204 or
1304 ; 2203 ; 2204 ; and 12 ch in Spanish Civilization ( SPAN
2013 , SPAN 3014 , SPAN 3015 , SPAN 3113 , SPAN 3563 or
SPAN 3564 ).
3.
A Minor in Spanish Literature, consisting of SPAN 1203 ; 1204 or
1304 ; 2203 ; 2204 ; and 12 additional ch in Spanish and Latin
American literature ( SPAN 3113 , SPAN 3413 , SPAN 3414 ,
SPAN 3423 , SPAN 3424 , SPAN 3563 , SPAN 3564 , SPAN 3673
, SPAN 3774 , SPAN 3954 , SPAN 3973 , SPAN 3974 , SPAN
3983 , SPAN 3984 , SPAN 3974 , WLCS / SPAN / RUSS 4043 ).
Counselling And Guidance
During registration and after, students are urged to consult the Chair and
the other members of the Department on any matters concerning their
individual programs.
Prerequisites
There are no prerequisites for Introductory Spanish language course
SPAN 1203 , nor for courses offered in English, such as courses in
Civilization ( SPAN 2013 , SPAN 3014 , SPAN 3015 ) nor SPAN 3113 ,
SPAN 3973 , SPAN 3983 and SPAN 3984 . SPAN 2204 is the
prerequisite for third year language and literature courses. SPAN 3204 is
the prerequisite for SPAN 4203 . Equivalent courses will be considered
by the Department.
The Department also offers one course in Business Spanish, SPAN 1304
. SPAN 1304 may be taken any time after SPAN 1203 has been
successfully completed, and SPAN 2203 is the prerequisite for SPAN
2204 .
Introductory And Intermediate Level Courses:
Language:
The language courses are a continuous series and must be taken in the
normal sequence. Students with some prior knowledge of Spanish
should have this assessed in order to be placed at their proper level. The
first two years provide students with a solid working knowledge of
Spanish. Students may change streams in consultation with the
Department.
Civilization:
Courses in Spanish and Spanish American civilization ( SPAN 2013 ,
SPAN 3014 , and SPAN 3015 ) are offered in English and are open to
any student.
Advanced Level Courses
Language:
SPAN 3203 , SPAN 3204 , SPAN 3205 , SPAN 4203 , and SPAN 4204
provide a greater degree of proficiency and specialization in writing,
reading, tra
nslation and spoken fluency.
Literature:
All literature courses are offered at the 3000 level and may be taken in
either the third or fourth year. These deal with Spanish and Spanish
American literature and are offered either annually or in alternate years.
This should be taken into account when planning the junior and senior
years. Advanced level course classes are, for the most part, conducted
in Spanish to help students achieve oral fluency.
Minors, Majors And Honours
Students must have their programs approved by the Department.
Students in Minors and Majors must obtain a grade of C or higher in all
required Spanish courses. Honours students must obtain a grade of Bor higher in all required Spanish courses.
Majors
Students in Single or Double Majors are required to successfully
complete SPAN 3203 and 3204, plus six other advanced Spanish
courses, for a total of 24 advanced-level ch in Spanish.
Honours
Students in Single Honours are required to successfully complete SPAN
3203 and 3204 , plus ten other advanced Spanish courses, for a total of
36 advanced-level ch in Spanish. Students in Joint Honours are required
to successfully complete SPAN 3203 and 3204 , plus six other advanced
Spanish courses, for a total of 24 advanced-level ch in Spanish.
Certificate of Proficiency in Spanish
Persons who are not majoring or honouring in Spanish and who would
like to have official recognition of their competence in the language may
apply for admission to this program, which is administered for the
University by the Department of Culture and Language Studies on the
Fredericton campus. The goal of the program is to enable students to
acquire a functional command of Spanish, by upgrading, over a four-year
period, the five basic language skills: speaking, listening, reading,
writing, and translation and interpretation.
The program normally consists of 12 ch of Spanish courses at the
Introductory and Intermediate levels, followed by 12 ch at the Advanced
level. These will normally be SPAN 1203 or SPAN 1003 , SPAN 1204 ,
SPAN 1304 or SPAN 1004 , SPAN 2203 , SPAN 2204 , SPAN 3203 ,
SPAN 3204 , SPAN 3205 , SPAN 4203 , SPAN 4204 . In all of these
courses the student is to attain a mark of C or higher, and the certificate
is awarded on the basis of a comprehensive examination upon
termination of the last course in the sequence. A maximum of six credit
hours may be transferred from another program upon consultation with
the Department.
Students interested in being considered for the Certificate must seek the
approval of the Department of Culture and Language Studies.
Full-time students may take these courses as part of their undergraduate
program. Persons not working towards a degree may enroll for the
courses as part-time students.
Students must attempt the comprehensive examination within two years
of completing the course requirements. Students who fail the
comprehensive examination on their first attempt will be allowed to sit
again in the following session.
The Certificate of Proficiency in Spanish will be awarded by the
University through the Registrar's Office. The student's transcript will
bear a separate entry, showing that the Certificate has been awarded,
and will record the grades obtained in the four areas of language
FREDERICTON ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
261
SECTION G
competence (speaking, listening comprehension, reading
comprehension and writing).
These grades are A (very good); B (good); and C (satisfactory) and they
may be interpreted as follows:
Speaking:
A:
the candidate can converse with ease
B:
the candidate can converse with some difficulty
C:
the candidate can make himself/herself understood
Listening Comprehension:
A:
can understand lectures in a job-related context, radio,
TV, etc
B:
can understand lectures on non-technical subjects and
group conversations
C:
can understand what is said to him/her by another
person
Translation and Interpretation:
A:
the candidate can correctly translate a text in writing
and act as a fluent interpreter in a conversation
between two other persons
B:
can translate a text in writing with a few errors and
convey ideas between two speakers with a few
hesitations
C:
can translate a text in writing with a few more errors
and convey ideas between two speakers but
occasionally must ask the speakers to explain what
they meant
Reading Comprehension:
WORLD LITERATURE AND CULTURE STUDIES
General Information
The Program in World Literature and Culture Studies is dedicated to the
study of literature and cultures in a broad interlingual, intercultural and
interdisciplinary framework. It offers students the opportunity to explore
various cultures and literatures through the study of texts, either in their
original language or in translation and to develop a more global
consciousness and awareness. World Literature and Culture Studies
introduces students to:
1.
2.
3.
The literatures of two or more languages and cultures
Questions and theories about literatures and cultures
Contemporary and/or historical perspectives on two or more
cultures
The study of different texts and cultures will enrich and enhance students
understanding of their own as well as of other cultures. This process is
facilitated by the systematic comparison of such questions as literary
genres, periods, movements, and dominant themes and motifs, or in the
context of the mutual impact of two or more national or regional cultures.
Why World Literature and Culture Studies?
Globalization, democratization, and post-colonial forces continue to
powerfully shape our increasingly complex and interconnected world.
World Literature and Culture Studies provides a valuable opportunity to
study these relationships as expressed in literary and other cultural texts
from a variety of perspectives.
Those who would otherwise choose to study one national or regional
literature may find here a broader frame of reference for their interest.
Students have the opportunity to read intriguing and challenging texts
from around the world while discovering the connections between
literature and other disciplines and among the various literatures studied
in the program; this program offers students the possiblity of exploring
the relations between literature and such areas as ideology, colonialism,
film and other visual arts, gender studies, political thought, and
International Development Studies.
A:
can understand the main ideas in books, magazines
and newspapers without the aid of a dictionary
B:
can read printed material of personal interest with
occasional help from a dictionary
C:
can read, with the aid of a dictionary, standard texts
written without stylistic difficulties on subjects within
his/her interest
World Literature and Culture Studies allows students to improve their
analytical and critical thinking skills, develop their abilities in expository
writing and oral communications, expand the context of functionality in a
second or even third language. Finally, students not only gain
perspective on the world, but also deeper insights into their own culture.
A:
can write papers, essays, etc., which are acceptable
in form and format
Programs of Study
B:
can write acceptable resumes, letters, compositions
which need only some revision
General Program Requirements
C:
can write sentences and short paragraphs which are
grammatically acceptable
Writing:
Students planning to major in World Literature and Culture Studies will
normally take the following sequence of courses, with adjustments for
Honours or combined programs:
Year I
A brochure containing further details is obtainable from the Department
of Culture and Language Studies on the Fredericton campus and the
Division of Humanities and Languages on the Saint John campus.
•
Either 6 ch in World Literature (WLCS 1001 and 1002) or 6 ch in
Introductory Culture courses. (Both alternatives count as
Humanities for first-year Arts requirements)
•
6ch in a second language (Introductory level)
Year II
262
FREDERICTON ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
•
Either 6 ch in World Literature (WLCS 1001 and 1002) or 6 ch in
Introductory WLCS Culture courses (depending on which of the
two were taken in Year I)
•
6 ch in a second language (Intermediate level)
•
3-6 ch recommended (but not required) in related courses, incl
ANTH1001, CLAS 1003, 1403, 1413, 1503; HIST 2015; IDS 2001
SECTION G
GROUP B
Year III/IV
•
30 upper level credit hours including at least 6 ch WLCS, 18 ch
from Group A, drawn from at least three disciplines, plus 6 ch
from Group B. In addition, students are strongly encouraged to
continue in the study of at least one second language
Majors and Honours
Approved courses (listed below) from other university departments.
Individual departmental prerequisites must be met. Other courses may
be appropriate for this group as well. Course selection should be
discussed with the Chair of the Department of Culture and Language
Studies.
ANTH 3412
Language and Culture
Majors
ED 5361
Challenging the Authority of Texts
•
WLCS 1001/1002
PHIL 2703
Introduction to Issues in Aesthetics
•
6 credit hours in Introductory Culture courses
PHIL 2704
Introduction to Classics in Aesthetics
•
12 credit hours in a second language
PHIL 3634
Phenomenology of Existence (Heidegger)
30 credit hours in advanced-level courses including: 6-9ch WLCS
courses 15-18 ch from Group A 6 ch from Group B
SOCI 3243
Sociology and Culture
•
Double Majors
SOCI 3253
Sociology of the Media
SOCI 4225
Language and Society
The same as for majors except:
•
24 credit hours in advanced-level courses including: 6-9 ch WLCS
courses 9-12 ch from Group A 6 ch from Group B
Honours
The same as for majors except:
•
36 credit hours in advanced-level courses including: 12 ch WLCS
courses including WLCS 5000 (Honours Thesis) 18 ch from
Group A 6 ch from Group B
Joint Honours
The same as for majors except:
•
30 credit hours in advanced-level courses including: 12 ch WLCS
courses including WLCS 5000 (Honours Thesis) 12 ch from
Group A 6 ch from Group B
World Literature and Culture Studies (WLCS) Courses.
Notes:
1.
All readings and lectures are in English.
2.
1000-level courses are open to all students, and have no
prerequisites.
3.
Upper level courses are open to all students who have completed
at least 30 credit hours of university or by permission of the
instructor.
INTRODUCTORY CULTURE COURSES
(See under German, Russian, Spanish for course descriptions)
WLCS 1013 / SPAN1013
The Culture of Spain
and Latin America I
3 ch (3C) [w]
WLCS 1014 / SPAN1014
The Culture of Spain
and Latin America II
3 ch (3C) [w]
WLCS 1043 / RUSS1043
Russian Culture I
3 ch (3C) [w]
WLCS 1053 / RUSS1053
Russian Culture II
3 ch (3C) [w]
WLCS / GER/ GS 1061
German Culture I
3 ch (3C) [w]
WLCS / GER /GS 1071
German Culture II
3 ch (3C) [w]
GROUP A
Any advanced-level literature courses from the following disciplines:
Classics, English, French, German, Greek, Latin, Russian and Spanish
as well as courses in film studies. Individual departmental prerequisites
must be met. Course selection should be discussed with and approved
by the Chair of the Department of Culture and Language Studies.
FREDERICTON ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
263
SECTION G
ECONOMICS
Programs of Study
Majors and Honours
The Department of Economics offers two programs: a major in
ECONOMICS STUDIES and majors and honours in ECONOMICS.
Majors
Economic Studies Program
The Economic Studies Program is appropriate for those who want a
liberal arts background in economics for its own sake, as preparation for
professional schools (such as Law), or as a useful complement to
related disciplines (such as Anthropology, Education, History, Political
Science, Psychology or Sociology), or related programs (such as the
Law and Society Program). There is less emphasis in Economic Studies
on economic theory, and statistics, and more on policy and applications.
Students contemplating graduate work in Economics should take the
Economics program rather than Economic Studies. The usual entry level
courses are ECON 1001 and ECON 1002 although ECON 1013 and
ECON 1023 may be substituted for these courses.
The Economic Studies Program is available to students in the Faculty of
Arts and to students pursuing joint (or concurrent) Arts degrees with
other faculties. It consists of a minimum of 30 ch in Economics with no
restrictions on course selection.
Economics Program
The defining feature of the Economics Program are core courses in
microeconomic theory, macroeconomic theory and statistics. Honours
students are also required to complete courses in mathematical
economics, econometrics and advanced theory. The program is
designed to provide a grounding in the fundamentals of economics and
to introduce students to modern economic issues and problems. It is
especially appropriate for those students wishing to pursue graduate
studies or employment in economics.
The Economics Program is available to students in the Arts,
Administration and Science Faculties and to students pursuing
concurrent degrees in Arts and Education and Arts and Computer
Science. The usual entry level courses are Economics 1013 and 1023 .
The Economics Program is offered at 3 levels of specialization in the
Faculties of Arts and Administration: Major level, Major "A" level and
Honours. Majors programs combining Economics with Geology or
Mathematics are also available in the Science Faculty. (Please see
Science Faculty Programs). Majors programs for BBA/ADM students
are discussed below.
Students following the Major "A" level or Honours must satisfy a
mathematics requirement consisting of MATH 1823 and 1833 or MATH
1003 and 1013 . The Mathematics Department requires MATH 1003 and
MATH 1013 for those who plan to take advanced courses in
Mathematics. Students who intend to become professional economists
are strongly advised to take Mathematics courses beyond the first year
level.
Students