10 Using the Service Configuration Editor: Additional Options Introduction

10 Using the Service Configuration Editor: Additional Options Introduction
CH A P T E R
10
Using the Service Configuration Editor:
Additional Options
Revised: August 08, 2013, OL-26821-06
Introduction
This chapter explains how to use additional, advanced functionality available in the Service
Configuration Editor.
This chapter consists of these sections:
•
The Service Security Dashboard, page 10-2
•
Filtering the Traffic Flows, page 10-23
•
Managing Subscriber Notifications, page 10-41
•
Managing the System Settings, page 10-56
•
Managing VAS Settings, page 10-66
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The Service Security Dashboard
The Service Security Dashboard
The Service Security Dashboard allows you to view and control all Cisco SCA BB security functionality.
The Dashboard is a gateway to a set of features that help you protect your network from security threats
such as worms, DDoS attacks, and spam zombies. It allows configuration of the detection mechanisms
(for example, attack thresholds) and of the actions to be taken when an attack is detected.
The Dashboard also allows you to access malicious traffic reports in the Reporter tool.
Caution
If anomaly-based detection of malicious traffic is enabled, any access control list (ACL) that is
configured on the Cisco Service Control Engine (Cisco SCE) platform but is not applied to anything (for
example, an interface, an access map, or an SNMP community string) might be deleted when a service
configuration is applied to the platform.
Workaround:
Disable anomaly-based detection of malicious traffic. (Clear the Enable anomaly detection check box.)
•
How to View the Service Security Dashboard, page 10-3
•
Managing Worm Detection, page 10-3
•
Managing Anomaly Detection, page 10-4
•
Managing Spam Detection, page 10-17
•
Viewing Malicious Traffic Reports, page 10-21
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How to View the Service Security Dashboard
How to View the Service Security Dashboard
Step 1
In the Network Traffic tab, select Service Security.
Step 2
The Service Security Dashboard is displayed in the right pane (Figure 10-1).
Figure 10-1
Service Security Dashboard
Managing Worm Detection
Cisco SCA BB uses three mechanisms for detecting worms:
•
Signature-based detection—The stateful Layer 7 capabilities of the Cisco SCE platform can detect
malicious activity that is not easily detectable by other mechanisms. You can add signatures for new
worms.
•
Anomaly-based detection—Overall traffic analysis can detect anomalies that might indicate worm
activity. See “Managing Anomaly Detection” section on page 10-4.
•
Mass-mailing based detection—E-mail traffic analysis can detect anomalies that might indicate
e-mail-based worms. See “How to Configure Spam Detection Settings” section on page 10-18.
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How to View Supported Worm Signatures
Step 1
In the Service Security Dashboard, click View Signatures.
The Signatures Settings dialog box appears, with Worm Signatures selected in the Signature Type
drop-down list.
All supported worm signatures are listed.
Step 2
Click Close.
The Signatures Settings dialog box closes.
How to Add New Worm Signatures to a Service Configuration
Either import the latest DSS or SPQI file provided by Cisco or create a DSS file containing any worm
signatures that you wish to add to the service configuration.
Related Information
For more information, see “Managing Protocol Signatures” section on page 7-46.
Managing Anomaly Detection
The most comprehensive threat detection method is anomaly detection.
•
Anomaly Detection, page 10-4
•
Anomaly Detection Parameters, page 10-5
•
How to View Anomaly Detection Settings, page 10-7
•
How to Add Anomaly Detectors, page 10-9
•
Editing Anomaly Detectors, page 10-13
•
How to Delete Anomaly Detectors, page 10-17
Anomaly Detection
The basic principle of anomaly detection is monitoring successful (correctly established for TCP,
bidirectional for other protocols) and unsuccessful (not properly established for TCP, unidirectional for
other protocols) connection rates both to and from any IP address viewed by the system, and triggering
an anomaly detection condition based of one of the following criteria:
•
The total connection rate exceeds a predefined threshold.
•
The suspicious connection rate exceeds a predefined threshold and the ratio of suspicious to
unsuspicious connections exceeds a predefined threshold.
The ratio metric is a robust indicator of malicious activity, and together with a rate qualifier it serves as
a reliable identifier for malicious activity.
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Managing Anomaly Detection
Anomaly detection is divided into three categories based on the directional nature of the detected
anomaly condition. The concepts used for the three categories are identical, but the nature of the detected
malicious activity is different for each category.
Note
•
Scan/Sweep detector—Detects malicious activity based on an anomaly in connection rates from an
IP address.
•
DoS detector—Detects an anomaly in the connection rate between a pair of IP addresses: one of
them is attacking the other. This can be either an isolated attack or part of a larger scale DDoS attack.
•
DDoS detector—Detects an anomaly in the connection rate coming to an IP address, which means
that it is being attacked. The attack can be by either a single IP address (DoS) or multiple IP
addresses.
When the IP address common to all flows of an attack is on the network side, the Cisco SCE may require
more flows (than the configured threshold) to detect the attack. For example, on Cisco SCE 2000, if the
configured threshold is 100 flows per second, these type of attacks are detected only if there are more
than 300 flows per second.
For all kinds of anomaly detection conditions, maximum flexibility is provided by the ability to define
detection thresholds and the trigger actions to be taken for each:
Note
•
Flow direction
•
Flow protocol
•
(Optional) Port uniqueness for TCP and UDP
The GUI configuration described here replaces the CLI command set for configuring the Attack Filtering
Module of the Cisco SCE platform, which was available in previous releases.
Anomaly Detection Parameters
For each anomaly detector category (Scan/Sweep, DoS, DDoS) there is one default detector. You can
add additional detectors of each category. Detectors in each category are checked in order; the first match
(according to the threshold settings of the detector) triggers detection. You set the order in which
detectors are checked; the default detector is checked last.
Anomaly detectors can contain up to 12 anomaly types associated with malicious traffic:
•
Network initiated—Malicious traffic initiated from the network side:
– TCP—Aggregate TCP traffic on all ports
– TCP Specific Ports—TCP traffic on any single port
– UDP—Aggregate UDP traffic on all ports
– UDP Specific Ports—UDP traffic on any single port
– ICMP—Aggregate ICMP traffic on all ports
– Other—Aggregate traffic using other protocol types on all ports
•
Subscriber initiated—Malicious traffic initiated from the subscriber side:
– TCP
– TCP Specific Ports
– UDP
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– UDP Specific Ports
– ICMP
– Other
Note
ICMP and Other anomaly types are not available for DoS attack detectors.
Each anomaly type on a detector has the following attributes associated with it:
•
Detection thresholds—There are two thresholds, crossing either of them means that an attack is
defined to be in progress:
– Session Rate threshold—The number of sessions (per second) over specified ports for a single
IP address that trigger the anomaly detection condition.
– Suspected sessions threshold—Suspected sessions are sessions that are not properly established
(for TCP), or that are unidirectional sessions (for other protocols). Exceeding both the
Suspected Session Rate and the Suspected Session Ratio triggers the anomaly detection
condition. (A relatively high session rate with a low response rate typically indicates malicious
activity.)
Suspected Session Rate—The number of suspected sessions (per second) over specified ports
for a single IP address.
Suspected Session Ratio—The ratio (as a percentage) between the suspected session rate and
the total session rate. A high ratio indicates that many sessions received no response, an
indication of malicious activity.
•
Note
Actions—Zero or more of the following actions may be taken when an anomaly detection condition
is triggered (by default, no action is enabled):
Logging of the anomaly to an on-device log file and generation of RDRs is not configurable per anomaly
type.
– Alert User—Generate an SNMP trap indicating the beginning and end of an anomaly. For
details on SNMP traps, see the “SCA BB Proprietary MIB Reference” chapter of Cisco Service
Control Application for Broadband Reference Guide for information about the Cisco
proprietary MIB.
– Notify Subscriber—Notify the relevant subscriber of the malicious activity by redirecting the
browsing sessions to a captive portal. To configure network attack subscriber notification, see
“Managing Subscriber Notifications” section on page 10-41.
– Block Attack—Block the relevant sessions. Blocking is performed based on the specification of
the malicious traffic that triggered the anomaly detection condition. If subscriber notification is
enabled for the anomaly type, blocking is not applied to the port relevant for browsing (by
default, this is TCP port 80; see “Managing Advanced Service Configuration Options” section
on page 10-58).
User-defined detectors can also have one or more of the following attributes:
•
IP address list—Limit detection to the listed IP address ranges. This applies to the source IP when
detecting IP sweeps and port scans. It applies to the destination IP when detecting DoS and DDoS
attacks.
•
TCP port list—Limit detection to the listed destination TCP ports. This list is applied to TCP
Specific Ports anomaly types only.
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•
UDP port list—Limit detection to the listed destination UDP ports. This list is applied to UDP
Specific Ports anomaly types only.
How to View Anomaly Detection Settings
You can view a list of all anomaly detectors. The anomaly detectors are displayed in a tree, grouped
according to detector category (Scan/Sweep, DoS, or DDoS).
For each anomaly detector, you can view its associated parameters and see a list of all anomaly types
included in the detector, together with their parameters.
Step 1
In the Service Security Dashboard, in the Anomaly Based Detection of Malicious Traffic pane, click
Configure.
The Anomaly Detection Settings dialog box appears.
The detector tree is displayed in the left area of the dialog box; the right area is empty (Figure 10-2).
Figure 10-2
Step 2
Detector Tree
In the detector tree, select a detector.
The detector parameters are displayed in the upper right area of the dialog box (Figure 10-3).
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Figure 10-3
Detector Parameters
The anomaly types defined for a detector are listed in the lower right area of the dialog box, together
with the value of each parameter. The following screen capture shows the default parameter values for
the Scan/Sweep default detector (Figure 10-4).
Figure 10-4
Detector Defined Anomaly Types
If unidirectional classification is enabled, the Suspected Session Rate is set equal to the Session Rate,
which effectively disables anomaly detection by the suspected session trigger (Figure 10-5).
Figure 10-5
Step 3
Session Rate to Suspected Session Rate Comparison
Click OK.
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The Anomaly Detection Settings dialog box closes.
How to Add Anomaly Detectors
You can add new anomaly detectors. A service configuration can contain up to 100 anomaly detectors.
You define IP address ranges and TCP and UDP ports for the new detector, and one anomaly type.
After you have defined the detector, you can add other anomaly types (see “Editing Anomaly Detectors”
section on page 10-13).
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Managing Anomaly Detection
Step 1
In the Service Security Dashboard, in the Anomaly Based Detection of Malicious Traffic pane, click
Configure.
The Anomaly Detection Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
In the detector tree, select a detector category.
Step 3
Click the Add (
) icon.
The Anomaly Detector Creation wizard appears (Figure 10-6), open to the Malicious Traffic Detector
page.
Figure 10-6
Anomaly Detector Creation Wizard - Malicious Traffic Detector
Step 4
In the Name field, enter a meaningful name for the detector.
Step 5
Check one or more of the check boxes to limit the scope of the detector.
The relevant fields are enabled.
Step 6
Enter lists of IP addresses or ports in the relevant fields.
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Step 7
Click Next.
The Malicious Traffic Characteristics for a WORM attack page of the Anomaly Detector Creation
wizard opens (Figure 10-7).
Figure 10-7
Step 8
Step 9
Malicious Traffic Characteristics for a Worm Attack
Depending on the detector type that you are defining, select the originating side or the target side.
•
If you are defining a Scan/Sweep detector or a DoS detector, select the originating side for the
anomaly type you are defining.
•
If you are defining a DDoS detector, select the target side for the anomaly type you are defining.
Select a transport type for the anomaly type that you are defining.
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Step 10
Click Next.
The Anomaly Detection Thresholds page of the Anomaly Detector Creation wizard opens (Figure 10-8).
Figure 10-8
Step 11
Anomaly Detection Thresholds
Set the detector settings for this anomaly type.
Do one of the following:
•
To use the setting for the default detector, check the Use the Default Detector’s settings check box.
•
Enter values in the Flow Open Rate, Suspected Flows Rate, and Ratio of Suspected Flow Rate fields.
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Step 12
Click Next.
The Anomaly Detection Action Settings page of the Anomaly Detector Creation wizard opens
(Figure 10-9).
Figure 10-9
Anomaly Detection Action Settings
Step 13
Select Block, Alert, and Notify Subscriber actions.
Step 14
Click Finish.
The Anomaly Detector Creation wizard closes.
The new detector is added to the detector tree.
What to Do Next
You can now add additional anomaly types to the detector. (See “Editing Anomaly Detectors” section
on page 10-13.)
Editing Anomaly Detectors
You can perform the following actions on a user-defined anomaly detector:
•
Edit detector parameters.
•
Edit anomaly types.
•
Add anomaly types.
•
Delete anomaly types.
•
Change the order of the detectors in the detector tree.
For each detector category, detectors are checked, bottom-up, in the order that they are listed in the
detector tree; the default detector is checked last.
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Managing Anomaly Detection
You can edit the anomaly types of the three default detectors.
How to Edit Detector Parameters
Step 1
In the Service Security Dashboard, in the Anomaly Based Detection of Malicious Traffic pane, click
Configure.
The Anomaly Detection Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
In the detector tree, select a detector.
The detector parameters are displayed in the upper right area of the dialog box.
Step 3
In the Name field, enter a new name for the detector.
Step 4
Check or uncheck the IP address range and ports check boxes.
Step 5
Enter or modify lists of IP addresses or ports in the relevant fields.
Step 6
Click OK.
The Anomaly Detection Settings dialog box closes.
Your changes are saved.
How to Edit Anomaly Types
Step 1
In the Service Security Dashboard, in the Anomaly Based Detection of Malicious Traffic pane, click
Configure.
The Anomaly Detection Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
In the detector tree, select a detector.
Information about the anomaly types is displayed in the lower right area of the dialog box.
Step 3
Double-click an anomaly type.
The Anomaly Detector Creation wizard appears, open to the Anomaly Detection Thresholds page (see
“How to Add an Anomaly Type” section on page 10-15).
Step 4
Set the detector settings for this anomaly type.
Do one of the following:
Step 5
•
To use the setting of the default detector, check the Use the Default Detector’s settings check box.
•
Change the values in the Flow Open Rate, Suspected Flows Rate, and Ratio of Suspected Flow Rate
fields.
Click Next.
The Anomaly Detection Action Settings page of the Anomaly Detector Creation wizard opens.
Step 6
Change Block, Alert, and Notify Subscriber actions.
Step 7
Click Finish.
The Anomaly Detector Creation wizard closes.
The anomaly type is updated with your changes.
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Step 8
Repeat Steps 3 to 7 (or Steps 2 to 7) for other anomaly types.
Step 9
Click OK.
The Anomaly Detection Settings dialog box closes.
How to Add an Anomaly Type
Step 1
In the Service Security Dashboard, in the Anomaly Based Detection of Malicious Traffic pane, click
Configure.
The Anomaly Detection Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
In the detector tree, select a detector.
The anomaly types are listed in the lower right area of the dialog box.
Step 3
Click the Create New Detector Item Under Detector Items Feature (
) icon.
The Anomaly Detector Creation wizard appears, open to the Malicious Traffic Characteristics for a
WORM attack page (see “How to Add Anomaly Detectors” section on page 10-9).
Step 4
Select an origin for the anomaly type you are defining.
Step 5
Select a transport type for the anomaly type you are defining.
Step 6
Click Next.
The Anomaly Detection Thresholds page of the Anomaly Detector Creation wizard opens.
Step 7
Set the detector settings for this anomaly type.
Do one of the following:
Step 8
•
To use the settings of the default detector, check the Use the Default Detector’s settings check box.
•
Enter values in the Flow Open Rate, Suspected Flows Rate, and Ratio of Suspected Flow Rate fields.
Click Next.
The Anomaly Detection Action Settings page of the Anomaly Detector Creation wizard opens.
Step 9
Select Block, Alert, and Notify Subscriber actions.
Step 10
Click Finish.
The Anomaly Detector Creation wizard closes.
The new anomaly type is added to the anomaly type list.
Step 11
Repeat Steps 3 to 10 (or Steps 2 to 10) for other anomaly types.
Step 12
Click OK.
The Anomaly Detection Settings dialog box closes.
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How to Delete an Anomaly Type
Step 1
In the Service Security Dashboard, in the Anomaly Based Detection of Malicious Traffic pane, click
Configure.
The Anomaly Detection Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
In the detector tree, select a detector.
The anomaly types are listed in the lower right area of the dialog box.
Step 3
In the anomaly type list, select an anomaly type.
Step 4
Click the Delete (
) icon.
The selected anomaly type is deleted from the anomaly type list.
Step 5
Repeat Steps 3 and 4 (or Steps 2 to 4) for other anomaly types.
Step 6
Click OK.
The Anomaly Detection Settings dialog box closes.
How to Change the Order in which Detectors are Checked
Step 1
In the Service Security Dashboard, in the Anomaly Based Detection of Malicious Traffic pane, click
Configure.
The Anomaly Detection Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
In the detector tree, select a detector.
The move up arrow, the move down arrow, or both are enabled, depending on the detectors location in
the tree (Figure 10-10).
Figure 10-10
Detector Tree
Step 3
Using these navigation arrows, move the detector to its desired location.
Step 4
Repeat Steps 2 and 3 for other detectors.
Step 5
Click OK.
The Anomaly Detection Settings dialog box closes.
Your changes are saved.
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Managing Spam Detection
How to Delete Anomaly Detectors
You can delete any or all user-defined detectors.
You cannot delete the three default detectors.
Step 1
In the Service Security Dashboard, in the Anomaly Based Detection of Malicious Traffic pane, click
Configure.
The Anomaly Detection Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
In the detector tree, select one or more user-defined detectors.
Step 3
Click the Delete (
) icon.
A Confirm Delete message appears (Figure 10-11).
Figure 10-11
Step 4
Confirm Delete
Click OK.
The selected detectors are deleted and are no longer displayed in the detector tree.
Step 5
Click OK.
The Anomaly Detection Settings dialog box closes.
Managing Spam Detection
The anomalous e-mail detection method monitors SMTP session rates for individual subscribers. A high
rate of SMTP sessions from an individual subscriber is usually an indicator of malicious activity that
involves sending e-mail (either mail-based viruses or spam-zombie activity).
This method works only if the system is configured in subscriber-aware or anonymous subscriber mode.
This allows the Cisco SCE to accurately account the number of SMTP sessions generated per subscriber.
The detection method is based on the following:
•
Typical broadband subscribers generate few SMTP sessions (at most a single session each time they
send an e-mail message).
•
Typical broadband subscribers normally use the SMTP server of the ISP (as configured in their mail
client) as their only mail relay, and do not communicate with off-net SMTP servers.
•
Spam zombies create many SMTP sessions, mainly to off-net servers (the mail servers of the
destined recipient of the messages).
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Managing Spam Detection
When configuring spam detection, you select an appropriate service to monitor. By default, this is the
built-in SMTP service.
How to Configure Spam Detection Settings
Step 1
In the Service Security Dashboard, in the Spam Zombies and Email Viruses Detection pane, click
Configure.
The Spam Detection and Mitigation settings dialog box appears (Figure 10-12).
Figure 10-12
Step 2
Spam Detection and Mitigation Settings
(Optional) To disable spam detection, uncheck the Enable Spam detection and mitigation check box.
All other fields are disabled. If you are disabling spam detection, continue at Step 6.
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Step 3
For each package, do the following:
a.
Define the quota to be used for indicating anomalous e-mail activity. We recommend that the values
for these fields should be based on some baseline monitoring of subscriber activity.
– Click in the Detection threshold column. A More (
) button appears.
– Click the More button. The Spam Detection Threshold window appears (Figure 10-13).
– Define when to consider the subscriber as a spammer.
– Define whether to mark non-RFC compliant sessions as spam.
– Click OK.
Figure 10-13
b.
Spam Detection Threshold
Define one or more actions to be taken upon detecting mass-mailing activity. Available actions are:
– Send RDR—Sends a Raw Data Record (RDR) to the Collection Manager (CM). A second RDR
is sent when the status of the subscriber as a spammer is removed. The Collection Manager
collects these RDRs in CSV files for logging purposes. Alternatively, you can implement your
own RDR collectors to receive these RDRs and respond in real-time.
– Block—Blocks SMTP as a classified service.
– Block TCP/25—Blocks only the TCP port 25.
– TCP blocking duration (Mins)—Defines the duration for which the TCP port 25 should be
blocked.
– Notify Subscriber (HTTP)—Redirects the subscriber browsing sessions to a captive portal
presenting a message from the operator. This is done using “subscriber notification”. Options
are None, Default Notification, Default Redirection.
– Mirror SMTP traffic—Diverts spam SMTP traffic to an inline spam detection service.
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Note
For the send RDR action, one RDR is sent when the subscriber is marked as a spammer and a
second RDR is sent once the subscriber is no longer considered a spammer. However, when
using the block and mirror actions, the action begins when the subscriber is marked as a
spammer and is maintained until the subscriber is no longer considered a spammer.
Note
Block SMTP Traffic and Mirror SMTP traffic cannot both be selected. If you select one, the
other is disabled.
Step 4
If you selected Notify Subscriber (HTTP), choose or enter a notify subscriber.
Step 5
If you selected Mirror SMTP traffic, choose a server group.
Step 6
Click Finish.
The Spam Detection and Mitigation settings dialog box closes.
How to Configure Outgoing Spam Mitigation Settings per Package from Subscriber Policies
To configure the outgoing spam mitigation settings per package from subscriber policies, complete
these steps:
Step 1
In the Service Configuration Editor Policies tab, select a Package from the Subscriber Policies.
Step 2
Right-click on the Package and select Edit Package. The Package Settings window appears.
Step 3
Click Spam Settings tab to view the Spam Detection Settings and Spam Action Settings.
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Viewing Malicious Traffic Reports
Step 4
Select the Consider Subscriber a spammer when: check box to enable the spam detection.
Step 5
Define when to consider the subscriber a spammer and the actions to be taken.
Step 6
Click OK.
For more details on spam mitigation, see the Cisco Service Control Service Security: Outgoing Spam
Mitigation Solution Guide.
Viewing Malicious Traffic Reports
Information about detected traffic anomalies is stored in the Collection Manager database. You can use
this information for network trending, detection of new threats, and tracking of malicious hosts or
subscribers.
•
Malicious Traffic Reports, page 10-21
•
How to View a Service Security Report, page 10-22
Malicious Traffic Reports
A number of reports dealing with malicious traffic can be displayed in the SCA Reporter tool:
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•
Global reports:
– Global Scan or Attack Rate
– Global DoS Rate
– Infected Subscribers
– Infected Subscribers versus Active Subscribers
– DoS Attacked Subscribers
– Top Scanned or Attacked ports
•
Individual subscriber or hosts reports:
– Top Scanning or Attacking hosts
– Top DoS Attacked hosts
– Top DoS Attacked Subscribers
– Top Scanning or Attacking Subscribers
How to View a Service Security Report
Step 1
In the Service Security Dashboard, in the relevant pane, click View Report.
A Choose a report dialog box appears, displaying a tree of relevant reports.
Step 2
Select a report from the report tree.
Step 3
Click OK.
The Choose a report dialog box closes.
The Reporter tool opens in the Console, and displays the requested report.
Step 4
For information about manipulating and saving the report, see the “Working with Reports” chapter of
Cisco Service Control Application Reporter User Guide.
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Filtering the Traffic Flows
Filtering the Traffic Flows
Filter rules are part of service configurations. They allow you to instruct the Cisco SCE platform, based
on a flow’s Layer 3 and Layer 4 properties, to:
•
Bypass—Ignore the flow and transmit it unchanged.
•
Quick forward—Duplicate the flow and send one copy directly to the transmit queue to ensure
minimal delay. The second copy goes through the normal packet path.
When a traffic flow enters the Cisco SCE platform, the platform checks whether a filter rule applies to
this flow.
If a filter rule applies to this traffic flow, the Cisco SCE platform passes the traffic flow to its transmit
queues. No RDR generation or service configuration enforcement is performed; these flows do not
appear in any records generated for analysis purposes and are not controlled by any rule belonging to the
active service configuration.
It is recommended that you add filter rules for OSS protocols (such as DHCP) and routing protocols
(such as BGP) that might traverse the Cisco SCE platform. These protocols usually should not be
affected by policy enforcement, and their low volume makes them insignificant for reporting.
A number of predefined filter rules are included in every new service configuration.
Note
By default, some, but not all, of the predefined filter rules are active.
Flows of certain protocols can also be filtered according to the Layer 7 characteristics of the flow (see
“Managing Advanced Service Configuration Options” section on page 10-58). Like other filtered flows,
Layer 7 filtered flows are not controlled, but can be classified and reported. The flows of the protocols
that can be filtered are typically short and their overall volume is negligible. So filtering these protocols
has little effect on network bandwidth and on the accuracy of the Cisco SCA BB reports.
•
Information About Traffic Filtering, page 10-23
•
How to View Filter Rules for a Package, page 10-26
•
How to Add Filter Rules, page 10-27
•
How to Add Filter Rules for IPv6 Configuration, page 10-33
•
How to Edit Filter Rules, page 10-39
•
How to Delete Filter Rules, page 10-39
•
How to Activate and Deactivate Filter Rules, page 10-40
Information About Traffic Filtering
For certain types of traffic, service providers may need to reduce the latency and jitter introduced by the
Cisco SCE platform or even to bypass the Cisco SCE platform to avoid traffic control as well. Typically,
such decisions are made for a portion of the traffic, to reduce latency for delay sensitive applications,
such as voice, and to bypass mission-critical traffic, such as routing protocols. The Cisco SCA BB
Filtered Traffic mechanism is used to address this need.
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Information About Traffic Filtering
Note
To reduce latency, Cisco SCE platform automatically handles most voice traffic. For details, see
“Automatic Quick Forwarding of Media Flows” section on page 10-26.
•
The Cisco SCA BB Filtered Traffic Mechanism, page 10-24
•
Filter Rule Actions, page 10-25
•
Filter Rules and Service Rules, page 10-25
•
Automatic Quick Forwarding of Media Flows, page 10-26
The Cisco SCA BB Filtered Traffic Mechanism
The Cisco SCA BB Filtered Traffic mechanism reduces latency or completely bypasses portions of the
traffic by defining filter rules that match relevant flows and assign the correct action to them. A filter
rule matches a packet according to its Layer 3 and Layer 4 properties, such as IP address, port number,
and DSCP ToS, as well as the Cisco SCE platform interface (subscriber or network) from which the
packet arrived. For packets that match a filter rule, the following actions can be applied:
•
Bypass the current packet (to reduce latency and avoid traffic control).
When this action is applied, the current packet is directly transmitted from the Cisco SCE platform
without going through any service configuration processing or reporting. You must map the
bypassed packet to a Class of Service (CoS) to assign it to one of the transmit queues of the Cisco
SCE platform.
Possible values for CoS are BE, AF1, AF2, AF3, AF4, and EF; where EF implies high processing
priority and the other classes imply normal processing priority.
•
Quick forward the flow (to reduce latency).
When this action is applied, the current packet and all subsequent packets belonging to the same
flow are duplicated and sent through two different paths: the original packet goes directly to the
transmit queue, and thus has only a minimal delay, while a copy of the packet goes through the
normal service configuration processing path for classification and reporting, and is then discarded.
•
Note
Assign the flow to the high priority processing input queue (to reduce latency).
Not all platforms support this option.
When this action is applied, the current packet and all subsequent packets belonging to the same
flow enter the high priority processing input queue. They go through the normal service
configuration processing path ahead of other packets that arrive simultaneously. You should map the
flow to the EF CoS to assign it to the high processing priority transmit queue of the Cisco SCE
platform.
Note
In an MPLS environment, the Cisco SCE platform does not map the DSCP bits to the EXP bits of the
MPLS header.
A filter rule can perform DSCP ToS marking (by changing the DSCP ToS field of the packet) of the
matched traffic with any of the above actions.
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Information About Traffic Filtering
Note
DSCP ToS marking and the assignment to CoS only take place when the operational mode of the system
is Full Functionality (see “System Operational Mode” section on page 10-56).
The Cisco SCE processes the traffic based on the Class of Service (CoS). Possible values for CoS are
BE, AF1, AF2, AF3, AF4, and EF; where EF implies high processing priority and the other classes imply
normal processing priority.
In SCE 8000, if there are 4 output queues—EF, AFn,AF1, and BE, this is how the queues are prioritized:
•
EF—Gets the highest priority and strictly gets priority over all other queues.
•
AF1 and AFn (AF2, AF3, AF4)—Gets the weighted priority on top of AF1. For each n packets of
AFn, one packet is sent for AF1. The value of n can be configured from the FPGA. The default value
is 3.
•
BE—Gets lowest priority. BE packets are transmitted only if packets for transmission are not
available in other queues.
The Cisco SCE transmits only the received packet and do not generate the traffic internally; other than
rarely transmit inject for reset or redirect. So, there can never be a long time in which lower priority
queues are starved.
When there are only buckets—EF and the rest. In CoS other than EF (AF1,AF2,AF3,AF4,BE), the order
of priority would be AF1 > AF2 > and so on. However, the bandwidth is allocated in the order
EF > AFn > AF1 > BE. Queues AF2, AF3, and AF4 would have the same weight.
Filter Rule Actions
The Bypass and Quick forward actions apply to different scopes of traffic:
•
The Bypass action only bypasses the current packet; every subsequent packet of the same flow goes
through the Filtered Traffic mechanism. This means, for example, that when traffic is to be bypassed
based on its destination port number, two rules should be created to match packets from both sides
of a bidirectional flow.
For example, to bypass all traffic to destination port 23, two filter rules are needed, one for packets
arriving from the subscriber side addressed to network side port 23, and another for packets arriving
from the network side addressed to subscriber side port 23.
•
The Quick forward action is applied to the entire flow; once identified, all subsequent packets do
not go through the filter rule mechanism, instead going through normal service configuration
processing.
A packet may match more than one filter rule. If both Bypass and Quick forward are matched, the
packet/flow is bypassed with minimum delay. Furthermore, if only Bypass is matched, the packet/flow
is also be bypassed with minimum delay.
Filter Rules and Service Rules
Filter rule actions to reduce latency allow the flow to be controlled by the Cisco SCE platform. This
means that the flow can be blocked or given limited bandwidth if it matches a service rule. For example,
if a filter rule is applied to reduce latency, but a service configuration rule is applied to block the same
traffic, the traffic is blocked.
The Bypass action is designed to avoid service configuration processing; bypassed traffic is not affected
by service rules.
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How to View Filter Rules for a Package
Automatic Quick Forwarding of Media Flows
The Cisco SCE platform reduces the latency of delay-sensitive voice and video media flows by applying
the quick-forwarding action to SIP, MGCP, H323, Skinny, and RTSP media flows during classification.
That is, when a media flow is classified as being of one of these types, it is subjected to quick forwarding
immediately. The Cisco SCE platform does this automatically, regardless of filter rule configuration.
These media flows might still be blocked or given limited bandwidth if they match a service rule.
Filtering L2TP Traffic
If you know the version of the L2TP tunnel that is being used, configure the relevant filters. If you do
not know the version, enable filter for both type of tunnels (L2TPv2 and L2TPv3).
Note
The L2TPv3 data encapsulation is done directly over IP with protocol ID 115. Cisco SCA BB provides
a filter for this type of traffic and you can enable it from Cisco SCA BB.
However, L2TPv2 protocol data encapsulation is done over UDP protocol at Layer 4 with default
destination port 1701. Cisco SCA BB does not provide any filter for this type of traffic. To filter L2TPv2
traffic, create a new filter with the transport type as UDP and destination UDP port value as 1701.
How to View Filter Rules for a Package
You can view a list of the filter rules included in a service configuration.
The listing for each filter rule includes the name, the status, and a brief description (generated by the
system) of the rule.
To see more information about a filter rule, open the Edit Filter Rule dialog box (see “How to Edit Filter
Rules” section on page 10-39).
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How to Add Filter Rules
Step 1
In the Policies tab, select the Filtered Traffic node.
A list of all filter rules is displayed in the right (Rule) pane (Figure 10-14).
Figure 10-14
Filter Rules
How to Add Filter Rules
The Add Filter Rule wizard guides you through the process of adding a filter rule.
Step 1
In the Policies tab of Service Configuration Editor window, select the Filtered Traffic node.
Step 2
Click
(Add Rule) in the right (Rule) pane.
The Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-15).
Figure 10-15
Add Filter Rule
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How to Add Filter Rules
Step 3
Click Next.
The Transport Type and Direction screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-16).
Figure 10-16
Step 4
Transport Type and Direction
Select the transport type and initiating side and click Next.
The Subscriber-Side IP Address screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-17).
Figure 10-17
Subscriber-Side IP Address
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How to Add Filter Rules
Step 5
Define the subscriber-side IP address and click Next.
The Network-Side IP Address screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-18).
Figure 10-18
Step 6
Network-Side IP Address
Define the network-side IP address and click Next.
If the transport type selected in Step 4 was not TCP or UDP, the ToS screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard
appears. Go to Step 9.
If the transport type selected in Step 4 was TCP or UDP, the Subscriber-Side Port screen of the Add Filter
Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-19).
Figure 10-19
Subscriber-Side Port
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How to Add Filter Rules
Step 7
Define the subscriber-side port and click Next.
The Network-Side Port screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-20).
Figure 10-20
Step 8
Network-Side Port
Define the network-side port and click Next.
The Type of Service (ToS) screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-21).
Figure 10-21
ToS
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How to Add Filter Rules
Step 9
Note
Define the ToS and click Next.
The acceptable values for ToS are 0 to 63.
The Action and Class-of-Service screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-22).
Figure 10-22
Step 10
Step 11
Action and Class-of-Service
Select the radio button for the required action.
•
Bypass —Packets that match this filter rule are not passed to Cisco SCA BB.
•
Quick Forward —The Cisco SCE platform ensures low latency for packets that match this filter
rule (use for delay sensitive flows). Packets are duplicated and passed to Cisco SCA BB for
processing.
Select a Class-of-Service value, and click Next.
The ToS Marking screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-23).
Figure 10-23
ToS Marking
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How to Add Filter Rules
Step 12
(Optional) To change the DSCP ToS marker of packets in the filtered traffic, check the Remark
Upstream ToS with ToS Marker and Remark Downstream ToS with ToS Marker check boxes, as
required, select the required ToS marker from the drop-down list, and click Next.
•
Disabling directional DSCP ToS marking in the ToS Marking Settings dialog box (see “How to
Manage DSCP ToS Marker Values” section on page 9-81) overrides DSCP ToS marking in that
direction by a filter (that is, the DSCP ToS value are not changed). In this case, the Problems View
displays a Warning.
•
If you filter for a flow in one direction in Step 4 but select ToS marking in the other direction in this
Step, the filter rule is created, but no DSCP ToS remarking occurs. In this case, the Problems View
displays a Warning.
•
If you select Quick Forward in the previous Step, Cisco SCA BB receives the original package and
processes it. That is, the application see the original DSCP ToS value regardless of the ToS marking
action selected in the filter rule.
The Finish page of the Add Filter Rule wizard opens (Figure 10-24).
Figure 10-24
Step 13
Finish
In the Rule Name field, enter a unique name for the new filter rule.
Note
You can use the default name for the filter rule. It is recommended that you enter a meaningful name.
Step 14
(Optional) To activate the filter rule, check the Activate this rule check box. Traffic is filtered according
to the rule only when it is activated.
Step 15
Click Finish.
The Add Filter Rule wizard closes. The filter rule is added and is displayed in the Filter Rule table.
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How to Add Filter Rules for IPv6 Configuration
How to Add Filter Rules for IPv6 Configuration
The Add Filter Rule wizard guides you through the process of adding a filter rule for IPv6 configuration.
Step 1
In the Policies tab of Service Configuration Editor window, select the Filtered Traffic node.
Step 2
Click
(Add Rule) in the right (Rule) pane.
The Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-25).
Figure 10-25
Add Filter Rule Wizard
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How to Add Filter Rules for IPv6 Configuration
Step 3
Select the Is IPv6 Configuration check box and click Next.
The Transport Type and Direction screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-26).
Figure 10-26
Step 4
Transport Type and Direction
Select the transport type and the initiating side and click Next.
The Subscriber-Side IP Address screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-27).
Note
The transport type drop-down will contain only the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and User
Datagram Protocol (UDP) values.
Figure 10-27
Subscriber-Side IP Address
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How to Add Filter Rules for IPv6 Configuration
Step 5
Define the subscriber-side IP address and click Next.
The Network-Side IP Address screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-28).
Figure 10-28
Step 6
Network-Side IP Address
Define the network-side IP address and click Next.
If the transport type selected in Step 4 was not TCP or UDP, the ToS screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard
appears. Go to Step 9.
If the transport type selected in Step 4 was TCP or UDP, the Subscriber-Side Port screen of the Add Filter
Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-29).
Figure 10-29
Step 7
Subscriber-Side Port
Define the network-side IP address and click Next.
The Network-Side Port screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-30).
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How to Add Filter Rules for IPv6 Configuration
Figure 10-30
Step 8
Network-Side Port
Define the network-side port and click Next.
The ToS screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-31).
Figure 10-31
ToS
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How to Add Filter Rules for IPv6 Configuration
Step 9
Note
Define the ToS and click Next.
The acceptable values for ToS are 0 to 63.
The Action and Class-of-Service screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-32).
Figure 10-32
Step 10
Action and Class-of-Service
Select the following radio button for the corresponding action:
Bypass —Packets that match this filter rule are not passed to Cisco SCA BB.
Note
Step 11
By default, the Quick Forward radio button is disabled.
Select a Class-of-Service value, and click Next.
The ToS Marking screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-33).
Figure 10-33
Step 12
ToS Marking
(Optional) To change the DSCP ToS marker of packets in the filtered traffic, check the Remark
Upstream ToS with ToS Marker and Remark Downstream ToS with ToS Marker check boxes, select
the required ToS marker from the drop-down list, and click Next.
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How to Add Filter Rules for IPv6 Configuration
•
Disabling the directional DSCP ToS marking in the ToS Marking Settings dialog box (see “How to
Manage DSCP ToS Marker Values” section on page 9-81) overrides the DSCP ToS marking in that
direction by a filter (that is, the DSCP ToS value is not changed). In this scenario, the Problems View
displays a warning message.
•
If you apply a filter for a flow in one direction in Step 4, but select ToS marking in the other direction
in this step, the filter rule is created, but no DSCP ToS remarking occurs. In this scenario, the
Problems View displays a warning message.
The Finish screen of the Add Filter Rule wizard appears (Figure 10-34).
Figure 10-34
Step 13
Note
Finish
In the Rule Name field, enter a unique name for the new filter rule.
You can use the default name for the filter rule. We recommend that you enter a meaningful name.
Step 14
(Optional) To activate the filter rule, check the Activate this rule check box. Traffic is filtered according
to the rule only when it is activated.
Step 15
Click Finish.
The Add Filter Rule wizard closes. The Filter Rule Warning message is displayed, as shown in
Figure 10-35. The filter rule that has been added is displayed in the Filter Rule table.
Figure 10-35
Filter Rule Warning Message
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How to Edit Filter Rules
How to Edit Filter Rules
You can view and edit the parameters of a filter rule.
Step 1
In the Policies tab of Service Configuration Editor window, select the Filtered Traffic node.
A list of all filter rules is displayed in the right (Rule) pane.
Step 2
Select a rule in the Filter Rule table.
Step 3
Click the Edit Rule (
) icon.
The Introduction page of the Edit Filter Rule wizard appears.
The Edit Filter Rule wizard is the same as the Add Filter Rule wizard.
Step 4
Follow the instructions in the section How to Add Filter Rules, Steps 4 to 14.
Step 5
Click Finish.
The filter rule is changed and the corresponding changes are displayed in the Filter Rule table.
How to Delete Filter Rules
You can delete filter rules. This is useful, for example, when you want the system to resume handling
the IP addresses and their attributes according to the individual rules that were previously defined for
each subscriber IP address.
Step 1
In the Policies tab, select the Filtered Traffic node.
A list of all filter rules is displayed in the right (Rule) pane.
Step 2
Select a rule in the Filter Rule table.
Step 3
Click the Delete Rule (
) icon.
A Filter Rule Warning message is displayed (Figure 10-36).
Figure 10-36
Step 4
Filter Rule Warning
Click Yes.
The filter rule is deleted and is no longer displayed in the Filter Rule table.
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Chapter 10 Using the Service Configuration Editor: Additional Options
How to Activate and Deactivate Filter Rules
How to Activate and Deactivate Filter Rules
You can activate or deactivate filter rules at any time. Deactivating a filter rule has the same effect as
deleting it, but the parameters are retained in the service configuration, and you can reactivate the filter
rule at a later date.
Step 1
In the Policies tab, select the Filtered Traffic node.
A list of all filter rules is displayed in the right (Rule) pane.
Step 2
Select a rule in the Filter Rule table.
Step 3
To activate the rule, check the Active check box.
Step 4
To deactivate the rule, uncheck the Active check box.
Step 5
Repeat Steps 3 and 4 for other rules.
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Managing Subscriber Notifications
Managing Subscriber Notifications
The subscriber notification feature pushes web-based messages to a subscriber by redirecting the
subscriber HTTP traffic to relevant web pages. These web pages contain information relevant to the
subscriber, such as notifications of quota depletion. HTTP redirection starts when the subscriber
notification is activated and ceases when the notification is dismissed.
Note
Subscriber notification is not supported when unidirectional classification is enabled.
Each set of subscriber redirection parameters comprises a notification redirect profile. The Cisco
SCA BB supports a maximum of 128 redirect profiles, including notification and redirect profiles. There
are 3 default redirect profiles that cannot be deleted: Default Notification, Network Attack Notification,
and Default Redirection. You configure which notification redirect profile to use when defining rules.
•
Subscriber Notification Parameters, page 10-41
•
Network Attack Notification, page 10-42
•
How to Add a Notification Redirect Profile, page 10-44
•
How to Add a Set of Redirection URLs, page 10-52
Subscriber Notification Parameters
Each redirect profile of type notification contains the following subscriber notification parameters:
Note
The Activation trigger configuration options are only available for redirect profile of type redirect.
•
Note
Name—Each profile must have a unique name.
You cannot change the name of the Default Notification or the Network Attack Notification.
•
Redirect profile type—Each profile must be one of two types:
– Notification
– Redirect
•
Set of Redirection URLs—A configurable set of destination URLs, to which the HTTP flows of the
subscriber are redirected after redirection is activated. This web page usually contains the message
that needs to be conveyed to the subscriber. The redirection set can optionally include one, or several
parameters appended to the destination URL including the redirect reason and subscriber ID.
The destination web server can use these parameters to carry a more purposeful message to the
subscriber.
•
Note
•
Activation frequency—Indicates when to activate the notification redirect. The activation frequency
is one of the following:
The Periodically option is only available for redirect profile of type redirect.
Only once—The subscriber is redirected to the notification only the first time the conditions are met.
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Network Attack Notification
For example, if a quota was exceeded, the subscriber browses to the destination URL that informs
them of this fact, only once (even though the subscriber remains in a breach state).
•
Always—The subscriber is redirected to the notification every time the conditions are met.
For example, if a quota was exceeded, the subscriber is continuously redirected to the notification
until the subscriber completes the procedure to refresh their quota.
•
Until the subscriber browses to—Every time the conditions are met, the subscriber is redirected to
the notification, until the subscriber proceeds from the destination URL to a different, final URL.
For example, if a quota was exceeded, the web page at the destination URL may ask the subscriber
to press an Acknowledge button after reading the message. The acknowledge URL would be defined
as the dismissal URL and would deactivate further notifications.
The dismissal URL is composed of the URL hostname and the URL path, separated by a colon, in
the following format:
[*]<hostname>:<path>[*]
– <hostname> may optionally be preceded by a wildcard (*), to match all hostnames with the
same suffix.
– The path element must always start with “/”.
– <path> may be followed by a wildcard (*), to match all paths with a common prefix.
For example, the entry *.some-isp.net:/redirect/* matches all the following URLs:
• www.some-isp.net/redirect/index.html
• support.some-isp.net/redirect/info/warning.asp
• noquota.some-isp.net/redirect/acknowledge.aspx?ie=UTF-8
•
List of Allowed URLs—A list of URLs that are not blocked and redirected even though redirection
is activated.
After redirection is activated, all HTTP flows, except flows to the destination URL and to the
dismissal URL, are blocked and redirected to the destination URL. However, subscribers can be
permitted to access an additional set of URLs. This is useful, for example, to give subscribers access
to additional support information.
Allowed URLs have the same format as the dismissal URL.
These parameters are defined when you add a new notification redirect profile (see “How to Add a Set of
Redirection URLs” section on page 10-52). You can modify them at any time.
Network Attack Notification
Subscriber notification informs a subscriber in real-time about current attacks involving IP addresses
mapped to that subscriber. (Enabling these notifications is described in “The Service Security
Dashboard” section on page 10-2.) Cisco SCA BB notifies the subscriber about the attack by redirecting
HTTP flows originating from the subscriber to a server that supplies information about the attack.
One subscriber notification, Network Attack Notification, is dedicated to providing these notifications;
it cannot be deleted. A Network Attack Notification is not dismissed at the end of an attack; subscribers
must respond to it.
To allow redirection when blocking traffic, the system is configured to leave open one specified TCP
port (by default, port 80). See “Managing Advanced Service Configuration Options” section on
page 10-58.
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Network Attack Notification
Caution
In earlier releases of Cisco SCA BB, configuring network attack notifications was performed using CLI
commands. CLI commands should no longer be used for this purpose.
•
Network Attack Notification Parameters, page 10-43
•
Example of URL with Description Tail, page 10-44
Network Attack Notification Parameters
When a network attack is detected, HTTP flows of the subscriber are redirected to a configurable
destination URL. This web page should display the warning that needs to be conveyed to the subscriber.
Optionally, the destination URL can include a query part containing notification parameters. The
destination web server can use these parameters to create a more specific warning to the subscriber.
The query part of the URL has the following format:
?ip=<ip>&side=<side>&dir=<dir>&prot=<protocol>&no=<open-flows>&nd=<suspected-flows>&to=<op
en-flows-threshold>&td=<suspected-flows-threshold>&ac=<action>&nh=>handled-flows>
The meaning of each field in the tail is described in Table 10-1:
Table 10-1
Description Tail Fields
Field
Description
ip
Detected IP address
side
—
dir
protocol
—
—
Possible Values
•
s—Subscriber
•
n—Network
•
s—Source
•
d—Destination
•
TCP
•
UDP
•
ICMP
•
OTHER
open-flows
Number of open flows
—
suspected flows
Number of attack-suspected
flows
—
open-flows-threshold
Threshold for open flows
—
suspected-flows-threshold
Threshold for attack-suspected
flows
—
action
—
handled-flows
Number of flows handled since
the attack began
•
R—Report
•
B—Block and report
—
(Non-zero only during and at the
end of an attack)
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How to Add a Notification Redirect Profile
Example of URL with Description Tail
http://www.some-isp.net/warning?ip=80.178.113.222&side=s&proto=TCP&no=34&nd=4&to=34&td=10&
ac=B&nh=100
How to Add a Notification Redirect Profile
Note
Creating a notification redirect profile does not activate the subscriber notification feature. After the
notification redirect profile is defined, it must be activated for a particular package
Step 1
From the Policies tab in the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > Subscriber Redirection.
The Redirect Actions Settings dialog box appears (Figure 10-37).
Figure 10-37
Step 2
Redirect Action Settings - General Tab
Click Add.
A new redirection profile containing the default redirection URL set is added to the redirection profile
list.
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How to Add a Notification Redirect Profile
Step 3
Note
Step 4
In the Name field, enter a unique name for the new notification redirect profile.
You can use the default name for the notification redirect profile. It is recommended that you enter a
meaningful name
In the Select redirection profile type field, select Notification.
Do not skip this step or a redirect profile is created instead of a notification redirect profile.
Step 5
Choose a URL set.
Step 6
Click the Activation tab.
The Activation tab opens (Figure 10-38).
Figure 10-38
Step 7
Step 8
Activation Tab
Configure the frequency in which the redirection is triggered. Choose one of the Activation frequency
radio buttons:
•
Only once
•
Always
•
Periodically
•
Until the subscriber browses to:
If you chose the Until the subscriber browses to: radio button, enter the dismissal URL host-suffix and
path-prefix in the fields provided.
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How to Add a Notification Redirect Profile
Note
Step 9
We recommend that you avoid configuring the same host for redirection URL and redirection
dismissal URL.
The redirection is done based on the first GET request in a flow. If the same host is configured,
with the changes in the URL path, the GET request corresponding the dismissal URL may use
the same flow that was created for the redirect URL. This is the expected behavior with the
default configuration.
You can change the default configuration by increasing the number of HTTP GET detections in
the flow. To modify the number of HTTP GET detections from the Cisco SCA BB, use the
Advanced Service Configuration Options. Note that increasing the number of HTTP GET
detections may impact the peformance of the Cisco SCE.
Click the Allowed URLs tab.
The Allowed URLs tab opens (Figure 10-39).
Figure 10-39
Allowed URLs Tab
Step 10
(Optional) Enter any allowed URLs, one per line.
Step 11
Click OK.
The Redirect Actions Settings dialog box closes.
The notification redirect profile is added to the profile list.
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Managing Subscriber Redirection
Managing Subscriber Redirection
The rules for a package may deny access to selected protocols. When a subscriber to the package tries
to access a blocked protocol, the traffic flow can be redirected to a server where a posted web page
explains the reason for the redirection (for example, a “Silver” subscriber trying to access a service
available only to “Gold” subscribers). This web page can offer subscribers the opportunity to upgrade
their packages. You configure which redirection profile to use when defining rules.
Note
Redirection is not supported when unidirectional classification is enabled.
Each redirect profile consists of a set of redirect parameters. The Cisco SCA BB supports a maximum
of 128 redirect profiles, including notification redirect and redirect profiles.
Subscriber Redirect Parameters
Each redirect profile of type redirect contains the following parameters:
•
Note
Name—Each profile must have a unique name.
You cannot change the name of the Default Redirection Profile.
•
Redirect profile type—Each profile must be one of two types:
– Notification
– Redirect
•
Set of Redirection URLs—A configurable set of destination URLs, to which the subscriber’s HTTP
flows are redirected after redirection is activated. The redirection set can optionally include one, or
several parameters appended to the destination URL including the redirect reason or subscriber ID.
•
Activation trigger—The action that initiates the redirect. The activation trigger is one of the
following:
– Subscriber clicks—When the redirect is activated through a subscriber clicking a link.
– Browse to a new site—When the redirect is activated through browsing.
– Any—When the redirect is activated either via a link or browsing.
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Subscriber Redirect Parameters
•
Activation frequency—Indicates when to activate the redirect. The activation frequency is one of the
following:
– Only once—The subscriber is redirected only the first time the conditions are met.
– Always—The subscriber is redirected every time the conditions are met.
– Periodically—The redirection is based on a periodic counter and the counter is reset after the
redirection is complete.
– Triggering events
– KBytes
– Until the subscriber browses to—Every time the conditions are met, the subscriber is redirected,
until the subscriber proceeds from the destination URL to a different, final URL.
The dismissal URL is composed of the URL hostname and the URL path, separated by a colon,
in the following format:
[*]<hostname>:<path>[*]
– <hostname> may optionally be preceded by a wildcard (*), to match all hostnames with the
same suffix.
– The path element must always start with “/”.
– <path> may be followed by a wildcard (*), to match all paths with a common prefix.
For example, the entry *.some-isp.net:/redirect/* matches all the following URLs:
• www.some-isp.net/redirect/index.html
• support.some-isp.net/redirect/info/warning.asp
• noquota.some-isp.net/redirect/acknowledge.aspx?ie=UTF-8
•
List of Allowed URLs—A list of URLs that are not blocked and redirected even though redirection
is activated.
After redirection is activated, all HTTP flows, except flows to the destination URL and to the
dismissal URL, are blocked and redirected to the destination URL. However, subscribers can be
permitted to access an additional set of URLs. This is useful, for example, to give subscribers access
to additional support information.
Allowed URLs have the same format as the dismissal URL. But, for Allowed URLs, you must
specify the HTTP port and the port must be 80. If the URL contains any port other than 80, the URL
is considered as a normal URL and is redirected.
These parameters are defined when you add a new notification redirect profile. You can modify them at
any time.
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How to Add a Redirect Profile
How to Add a Redirect Profile
A redirect profile contains a set of redirection URLs as well as conditions in which to use the redirect
feature, such as the action that triggers the redirect, or the frequency in which the redirect occurs.
Step 1
From the Policies tab in the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > Subscriber Redirection.
The Redirect Actions Settings dialog box appears (Figure 10-40).
Figure 10-40
Step 2
Redirect Actions Settings - General Tab
Click Add.
A new redirect profile containing the default redirection URL set is added to the redirect profile list.
Step 3
Note
Step 4
In the Name field, enter a unique name for the new redirect profile.
You can use the default name for the redirect profile, but it is recommended that you enter a meaningful
name.
Choose a URL set.
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How to Add a Redirect Profile
Step 5
Click the Activation tab.
The Activation tab opens (Figure 10-41).
Figure 10-41
Step 6
Step 7
Activation Tab
Configure the activity that triggers the redirection. Choose one of the Activation trigger radio buttons:
•
Subscriber clicks
•
Browse to a new site
•
Any
Configure the frequency in which the redirection is triggered. Select one of the Activation frequency
radio buttons:
•
Only once
•
Always
•
Periodically
•
Until the subscriber browses to
Step 8
If you selected the Periodically radio button, enter a number and an increment in the Every fields, to
specify the frequency in which the redirection occurs.
Step 9
If you selected the Until the subscriber browses to: radio button, enter the dismissal URL in the fields
provided.
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How to Delete a Redirection Profile
Step 10
Click the Allowed URLs tab.
The Allowed URLs tab opens (Figure 10-42).
Tip
Enter all configured redirection URLs to the Allowed URLs list to prevent a redirection loop.
Figure 10-42
Step 11
(Optional) Enter a URL, or multiple URLs (with HTTP port 80), that can be browsed, overriding the
redirect conditions.
Note
Step 12
Allowed URLs Tab
All URLs with HTTP port other than 80 is redirected.
Click OK.
The Redirect Actions Settings dialog box closes.
The Redirection profile is added to the redirection profile list.
How to Delete a Redirection Profile
You cannot delete the Default Redirection Profile.
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How to Add a Set of Redirection URLs
Step 1
From the Policies tab in the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > Subscriber Redirection.
The Redirect Actions Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
Click the name of the profile.
Step 3
Click Remove.
Step 4
Click OK.
The Redirect Actions Settings dialog box closes.
The Redirection settings are saved.
How to Add a Set of Redirection URLs
The Console Redirection feature supports only three protocols:
•
HTTP Browsing
•
HTTP Streaming
•
RTSP Streaming
Each redirection set contains one redirection option for each of these three protocols. The system
provides a default redirection set, which cannot be deleted. You can add up to 127 additional sets.
Each redirection URL includes the URL specified name, the Subscriber ID, and the Service ID in the
following format:
<URL>?n=<subscriber-ID>&s=<service-ID>
Optionally, the URL can contain one or multiple parameters appended to it.
Step 1
From the Policies tab of the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > Subscriber Redirection.
The Redirect Actions Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
In the General tab, click Edit.
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How to Add a Set of Redirection URLs
The Redirect Set Settings dialog box appears (Figure 10-43).
Figure 10-43
Step 3
Redirect Set Settings
Click Add.
A new redirection set containing the default redirection URLs is added.
Step 4
Note
In the Redirection Set Name field, enter unique name for the new redirection set.
You can use the default name for the redirection set, but it is recommended that you provide a meaningful
name.
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How to Add a Set of Redirection URLs
Step 5
Timesaver
Enter new values in the Redirection destination URLs section of the new redirection set.
Enter all configured redirection URLs to the Allowed URLs list to prevent a redirection loop.
Step 6
(Optional) To include a response code, check the Response code check box, and choose a response code
from the drop-down list. see Table 10-2 for a listing and description of the redirection parameters.
Step 7
(Optional) To include a cookie, check the Cookie check box, and enter a value. see Table 10-2 for a
listing and description of the redirection parameters.
Step 8
(Optional) Check the check boxes of any parameters you wish to append to the destination URL see
Table 10-2 for a listing and description of the redirection parameters.
If you check the Free text to append check box, enter text into the text box to append to the URL. see
Table 10-2 for a listing and description of the redirection parameters. The examples in Table 10-2 is
based on the following URL redirection:
http://<URL>?n=N/A&reason=2&s=119&id=0:10&ts=1327285422&str=this is free text to append
content&referer=&cookie=&host=<URL>&url=/p-cube.htm&params=
Note
“<” and “>” do not appear in redirect URL.
Maximum length of destination URL including parameters is 500 characters.
Cookie and Referer parameters are allowed only for HTTP traffic.
Table 10-2
Redirection Parameters
Parameter
Description
Example
Redirect Reason
In case of notification—notification number.
2
In case of DDOS attack—DDOS attack ID.
In case of redirect—not valid.
Service ID
The ID of the service as was classified by the Cisco
SCE.
119
Subscriber ID
Subscriber name as it appears in Cisco SCE.
—
Distinct Number
Unique identifier of redirected flow, in format
<redirected flow number:cpu number>.
0:10
Time Stamp
Time in seconds, in UNIX format.
1327285422
Referer
Referer as it appears in the original flow request. If
the referer parameter is not set then ““ appears.
—
Original Cookie
Cookie string as it appears in the original flow
request. If the cookie parameter is not set then ““
appears.
—
Original Host
Host name as it appears in the original flow request.
<URL>
Original URL
URL as it appears in the original flow request.
/p-cube.htm
Original Parameters URL parameters as they appear in the original flow
request. If the URL parameters are not set then ““
appears.
—
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Table 10-2
Step 9
Redirection Parameters (continued)
Parameter
Description
Example
Original Port
Server port number that is added to the redirect host
parameter.
—
Free text to append
Free text.
this is free text to append
content
Click OK.
Your settings are saved and the Redirect Set Settings dialog box closes.
Note
Keep the total number of characters appended to the redirect URL below 1200. To keep it below
1200, we recommend that you enable only the required parameters under the Parameters to
append to the estination URL pane.
How to Delete a Set of Redirection URLs
Step 1
From the Policies tab of the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > Subscriber Redirection.
The Redirect Actions Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
In the General tab, click Edit.
The Redirect Set Settings dialog box appears.
Step 3
Click the name of the redirection set.
Step 4
Click Remove.
Step 5
Click OK.
The Redirect Set Settings dialog box closes.
The Redirection settings are saved.
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Managing the System Settings
Managing the System Settings
The Console allows you to determine various system parameters that control:
•
The operational state of the system
•
Enabling and disabling asymmetric routing classification mode
•
Advanced service configuration options
Setting the System Modes
From the Console, you can select:
•
The operational mode of the system
•
Asymmetric routing classification mode
Information About the System Modes
•
System Operational Mode, page 10-56
•
Asymmetric Routing Classification Mode, page 10-56
System Operational Mode
The operational mode of the system defines how the system handles network traffic.
Note
Each rule has its own operational mode (state). If this differs from the system mode, the “lower” of the
two modes is used. For example, if a rule is enabled, but the system mode is report-only, the rule
generates only RDRs.
The three operational modes are:
•
Full Functionality—The system enforces active rules on the network traffic and performs reporting
functions (that is, generates RDRs).
•
Report Only—The system generates RDRs only. No active rule enforcement is performed on the
network traffic.
•
Transparent—The system does not generate RDRs and does not enforce active rules on the network
traffic.
Asymmetric Routing Classification Mode
Enabling unidirectional classification significantly improves classification accuracy when the Cisco
SCE platform is deployed in an environment with a high rate of unidirectional flows.
•
Unsupported Features, page 10-57
•
Protocol Classification, page 10-57
•
Switching to Asymmetric Routing Classification Mode, page 10-57
•
Switching from Asymmetric Routing Classification Mode, page 10-57
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Setting the System Modes
Unsupported Features
The following Cisco SCA BB features are not supported when unidirectional classification is enabled:
•
Flavors
•
External quota provisioning
•
Subscriber notification
•
Redirection
•
Flow Signaling RDRs
•
Content filtering
•
VAS traffic forwarding
When unidirectional classification is enabled, the service configuration editor indicates (in the Problems
View) if the service configuration is consistent with the features that are supported in this mode.
The following features, which are not part of the service configuration, are also affected when
unidirectional classification is enabled:
•
Subscriber-Aware Mode (a mode in which subscriber information is dynamically bound to the IP
address currently in use by the subscriber) is not supported.
•
Enhanced flow open mode must be enabled.
The system gives no indication if the state of the above features is consistent with the state of the routing
classification mode.
Protocol Classification
When unidirectional classification is enabled, protocol classification is performed in the normal way
except for unidirectional UDP flows. Because it is impossible to know the server side of a unidirectional
UDP flow, Cisco SCA BB tries to classify the protocol using the destination port of the first packet; if
no exact match is found, Cisco SCA BB tries to classify the protocol using the source port.
Switching to Asymmetric Routing Classification Mode
If you create a service configuration in symmetric mode and switch to asymmetric routing classification
mode:
•
Flavors are not used for classification.
•
Periodic quota management mode is used.
•
Data is not lost when you switch to asymmetric routing classification mode, but you cannot apply
the service configuration to a Cisco SCE platform until all unsupported features are removed from
the service configuration.
Switching from Asymmetric Routing Classification Mode
If you create a service configuration in asymmetric routing classification mode:
•
The Suspected Session Rate is set equal to the Session Rate for all anomaly detectors.
•
No flavors are created in the default service configuration, and no service elements have specified
flavors.
•
The quota management mode is periodic, with a daily aggregation period.
•
Asymmetric routing classification mode limitations remain if you switch to symmetric mode. To
change them, you must edit the service configuration.
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Managing Advanced Service Configuration Options
How to Set the Operational and Topological Modes of the System
Step 1
From the Policies tab of the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > System Settings.
The System Settings dialog box appears (Figure 10-44).
Figure 10-44
Step 2
System Settings
Select one of the System Operational Mode radio buttons:
•
Transparent
•
Report Only
•
Full Functionality
Step 3
To change the routing classification mode, check or uncheck the Enable the Asymmetric Routing
Classification Mode check box.
Step 4
Click OK.
The System Settings dialog box closes.
The new System Mode setting is saved.
Managing Advanced Service Configuration Options
Advanced service configuration options control the more sophisticated and less frequently changed
attributes of the system. It is recommended that you do not change these options.
•
The Advanced Service Configuration Properties, page 10-59
•
How to Edit Advanced Service Configuration Options, page 10-64
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Managing Advanced Service Configuration Options
The Advanced Service Configuration Properties
Table 10-3 lists the advanced service configuration properties:
Table 10-3
Advanced Service Configuration Properties
Property
Default Value Description
Bandwidth Management
Level of BWC enforcement
on networking flows of P2P
and IM applications.
SCE to use
Default
Service
BWCs
Use Global Bandwidth
FALSE
Management in Virtual Links
Mode
Specifies the level of BWC enforcement on networking flows of P2P and IM
applications.
Specifies whether to use the Global Bandwidth Management in Virtual Links
Mode.
Classification
Apply this order of priority
between different criteria for
service classification
Zone > Flavor Specifies the order of priority between different criteria for service
> Protocol > classification. Values are:
Init-Side
• Flavor > Protocol > Zone > Init-Side
•
Zone > Flavor > Protocol > Init-Side
ClickStream Event
recognition
TRUE
Specifies whether to recognize ClickStream Events.
Enable sending ‘404, Page
Not Found’ upon blocking
FALSE
Specifies whether to send ‘404, Page Not Found’ upon blocking.
Guruguru detailed inspection
mode enabled
FALSE
The Guruguru protocol is used by the Guruguru file-sharing application
popular in Japan. Cisco SCA BB provides two inspection modes for
classification of this protocol:
Kuro detailed inspection
mode enabled
Number of HTTP GET
detections
FALSE
1
•
Default—Suitable for networks where little Guruguru traffic is expected.
This mode is usual in all countries except Japan.
•
Detailed—Suitable for networks where Guruguru traffic is expected to be
common. This mode is used in Japanese networks only.
The Kuro protocol is used by the Kuro file-sharing application popular in
Japan. Cisco SCA BB provides two inspection modes for classification of this
protocol:
•
Default—Suitable for networks where little Kuro traffic is expected. This
is usual in all countries except Japan.
•
Detailed—Suitable for networks where Kuro traffic is expected to be
common. This mode is used in Japanese networks only.
Specifies the number of HTTP GET detections. The Cisco SCE classifies the
HTTP based on the number of GET requests configured.
Range is 1 to 65535, and the default value is 1.
Note
Since the Deep HTTP Inspection feature examines all packets in a
single HTTP stream until the configured number of requests has been
found, any value higher than 1 may impact the performance of the
Cisco SCE.
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Managing Advanced Service Configuration Options
Table 10-3
Advanced Service Configuration Properties (continued)
Property
Default Value Description
Soribada detailed inspection
mode enabled
FALSE
TCP destination port
signatures
1720:H323
The Soribada protocol is used by the Soribada file-sharing application
popular in Japan. Cisco SCA BB provides two inspection modes for
classification of this protocol:
•
Default—Suitable for networks where little Soribada traffic is expected.
This is usual in all countries except Japan.
•
Detailed—Suitable for networks where Soribada traffic is expected to be
common. This mode is used in Japanese networks only.
TCP destination port numbers for signatures that require a port hint for
correct classification.
Valid values are comma-separated items, each item in the form
<port-number>:<signature-name>.
Applicable signature names are: H323, Radius Access, Radius Accounting,
and DHCP.
UDP destination port
signatures
67:DHCP,
68:DHCP,
1812:Radius
Access,
1645:Radius
Access,
1813:Radius
Accounting,
1646:Radius
Accounting
UDP destination port numbers for signatures that require a port hint for
correct classification.
Valid values are comma-separated items, each item in the form
<port-number>:<signature-name>.
Applicable signature names are: H323, Radius Access, Radius Accounting,
and DHCP.
5060, 5061,
UDP ports for which flow
should be opened on first IPv6 69, 546, 547,
2427, 2727,
packet
9201, 9200,
123, 1900,
5190, 10000
Enhanced flow-open mode is disabled on the specified UDP ports to allow the
classification according to the first IPv6 packet of the flow.
UDP ports for which flow
should be opened on first
packet
5060, 5061,
67, 68, 69,
1812, 1813,
1645, 1646,
2427, 2727,
9201, 9200,
123, 1900,
5190, 10000
Enhanced flow-open mode is disabled on the specified UDP ports to allow the
classification according to the first packet of the flow.
UDP source port signatures
1812:Radius
Access,
1645:Radius
Access,
1813:Radius
Accounting,
1646:Radius
Accounting
UDP source port numbers for signatures that require a port hint for correct
classification.
Valid values are comma-separated items, each item in the form
<port-number>:<signature-name>.
Applicable signature names are: H323, Radius Access, Radius Accounting,
and DHCP.
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Managing Advanced Service Configuration Options
Table 10-3
Advanced Service Configuration Properties (continued)
Property
Default Value Description
V-Share detailed inspection
mode enabled
FALSE
Winny detailed inspection
mode enabled
WinnyP aggressive
classification enabled
FALSE
The V-Share protocol is used by the V-Share file-sharing application popular
in Japan. Cisco SCA BB provides two inspection modes for classification of
this protocol:
•
Default—Suitable for networks where little V-Share traffic is expected.
This mode is usual in all countries except Japan.
•
Detailed—Suitable for networks where V-Share traffic is expected to be
common. This mode is used in Japanese networks only.
The Winny P2P protocol is used by the Winny file-sharing application
popular in Japan. Cisco SCA BB provides two inspection modes for
classification of this protocol:
•
Default—Suitable for networks where little Winny traffic is expected.
This is usual in all countries except Japan.
•
Detailed—Suitable for networks where Winny traffic is expected to be
common. This mode is used in Japanese networks only.
FALSE
WinnyP classification enabled FALSE
Malicious Traffic
Malicious Traffic RDRs
enabled
TRUE
Specifies whether to generate Malicious Traffic RDRs.
Number of seconds between
Malicious Traffic RDRs on
the same attack
60
A Malicious Traffic RDR is generated when an attack is detected. Malicious
Traffic RDRs are then generated periodically, at user-configured intervals, for
the duration of the attack.
TCP port that should remain
open for Subscriber
Notification
80
You can choose to block flows that are part of any detected network attack,
but this may hinder subscriber notification of the attack.
The specified TCP port is not blocked to allow notification of the attack to be
sent to the subscriber.
Multi Stage Classification
Blocking
FALSE
Specifies whether to block the sub services under the main service.
Enable
TRUE
Specifies whether to enable the sub service classification of a service.
Multi stage classification describes the application level services that can be
enabled or disabled. By default sub service classification of the services is
enabled.
For example, Google talk service contains Google talk file transfer, Google
talk Networking, Google talk VoIP as sub services.
Policy Check
Ongoing policy check mode
enabled
TRUE
Specifies whether policy changes affect flows that are already open.
Time to bypass between
policy checks (seconds)
30
Maximum time (in seconds) that may pass before policy changes affect flows
that are already open.
Quota Management
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Managing Advanced Service Configuration Options
Table 10-3
Advanced Service Configuration Properties (continued)
Property
Default Value Description
Grace period before first
breach (seconds)
2
The time (in seconds) to wait after a quota limit is breached before the breach
action is performed.
Policy servers should use this period to provision quota to a subscriber that
just logged in.
Length of the time frame for
quota replenish scatter
(minutes)
0
The size of the window across which to scatter the periodic quota
replenishment randomly.
Time to bypass between
policy checks for quota
limited flows
30
Maximum time (in seconds) that may pass before a quota breach affects flows
that are already open.
Volume to bypass between
policy checks for quota
limited flows
0
Maximum flow volume (in bytes) that may pass before a quota breach affects
flows that are already open.
A value of zero means that unlimited volume may pass.
Redirection
Adds original host to
redirection URL
FALSE
Specifies whether to add the original host to the redirection URL.
Adds original URL to redirect FALSE
URL
Specifies whether to add the original URL to the redirection URL.
Maximum redirect URL
Length
Specifies the maximum length of the redirect URL.
500
Specifies the redirect subscriber ID format to be configured.
Redirect subscriber ID format Complete n=<user>@< Valid Options are:
realm>
• Complete - n=<user>@<realm> (default)
•
User only - n=<user>
•
Realm only - r=<realm>
•
Separately -n<user>&r=<realm>
If the subscriber name does not match the format of <user>@<realm>, the
full subscriber name is appended to the URL, regardless of the redirect
subscriber format configured.
Reporting
Extract Full User Agent
details
FALSE
Specifies whether to extract full user agent details.
Flow Accounting RDRs
enabled
FALSE
Specifies whether to generate Flow Accounting RDRs.
Flow Accounting RDRs
interval for each Service (in
seconds)
60
Specifies the interval at which the Flow Accounting RDRs are generated for
each service.
Flow Accounting RDRs limit
per second
100
Specifies the limit of Flow Accounting RDRs to be generated each second.
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Managing Advanced Service Configuration Options
Table 10-3
Advanced Service Configuration Properties (continued)
Property
Default Value Description
Hide Subscriber IP and ID in
RDRs
FALSE
Specifies whether to hide the IP address and Subscriber ID in the following
RDRs:
•
Transaction RDR
•
Transaction Usage RDR
•
HTTP Transaction Usage RDR
•
RTSP Transaction Usage RDR
•
VoIP Transaction Usage RDR
•
Video Transaction Usage RDR
•
Blocking RDR
•
Flow Start RDR
•
Flow End RDR
•
Flow Ongoing RDR
•
Media Flow RDR
•
Spam RDR
See the Cisco Service Control for Broadband Reference Guide for details on
the RDRs.
Media Flow RDRs enabled
TRUE
Specifies whether to generate Media Flow RDRs.
Minimal volume for
0
generating HTTP Transaction
Usage RDR (bytes)
Specifies the minimum volume for generating HTTP Transaction Usage
RDR.
Minimal volume for
generating RTSP Transaction
Usage RDR (bytes)
Specifies the minimum volume for generating RTSP Transaction Usage RDR.
0
Minimal volume for
1024000
generating Video Transaction
Usage RDR (bytes)
Specifies the minimum volume for generating Video Transaction Usage
RDRs.
Video Transaction Usage
RDRs enabled
FALSE
Specifies whether to generate Video Transaction Usage RDRs.
Enable VSA Fields for
Subscriber, HTTP
Transaction, and Video
Transaction RDRs
FALSE
Specifies whether to generate VSA fields for Subscriber, HTTP Transaction,
and Video Transaction RDRs.
Subscriber Accounting RDR
enabled
FALSE
Specifies whether to generate Subscriber Accounting RDRs.
The Subscriber Accounting RDR is used for SM-ISG integration. For more
information, see either the ISG documentation in the “Managing the SCMP”
chapter of Cisco SCE8000 10GBE Software Configuration Guide or the
“Managing the SCMP” chapter of Cisco SCE8000 10GBE Software
Configuration Guide.
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Managing Advanced Service Configuration Options
How to Edit Advanced Service Configuration Options
Step 1
From the Policies tab of the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > System Settings.
The System Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
Click the Advanced Options tab.
The Advanced Options tab opens (Figure 10-45).
Figure 10-45
Advanced Options Tab
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Step 3
Click Advanced Service Configuration Options.
The Advanced Service Configuration Options dialog box opens (Figure 10-46).
Figure 10-46
Advanced Service Configuration Options
Step 4
Make your changes to the configuration options.
Step 5
Click OK.
The Advanced Service Configuration Options dialog box closes.
The changes to the advanced options are saved.
Step 6
Click OK.
The System Settings dialog box closes.
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Managing VAS Settings
Managing VAS Settings
Value Added Service (VAS) settings includes the following features:
•
Traffic mirroring—Traffic mirroring allows using the Cisco SCE to mirror a portion of the traffic
based on its application and subscriber awareness. Traffic to be mirrored continues forwarding as is,
and copies of the packets are sent to the corresponding VAS VLAN, thereby minimizing traffic.
•
Traffic forwarding—Traffic forwarding servers allows you to use an external expert system (VAS
server) for additional traffic processing, such as intrusion detection and content filtering to
subscribers. After processing, flows are sent back to the Cisco SCE platform, which then sends them
to their original destinations.
The flows to be forwarded are selected based on the subscriber package and the flow type (IP
protocol type and destination port number).
VAS mirroring has the following limitations:
•
The Cisco SCE 2000 and Cisco SCE 8000 both support traffic mirroring.
•
Traffic mirroring is supported on any Cisco SCE platform that has at least 2 ports.
•
A Cisco SCE 8000 can contain 64 distinct VLANs.
•
A Cisco SCE 2000 supports 8 distinct VLANs.
VAS forwarding has the following limitations:
Note
•
Only the Cisco SCE 2000 4xGBE and Cisco SCE 8000 platforms support VAS traffic forwarding.
•
A single Cisco SCE platform can support up to eight VAS servers.
•
A service configuration can contain up to 64 traffic-forwarding tables.
•
A traffic-forwarding table can contain up to 64 table parameters.
•
VAS traffic forwarding is not supported when unidirectional classification is enabled.
Because of the complexity of the VAS settings features, VAS flows are not subject to global bandwidth
control.
To use VAS traffic forwarding:
– You must configure VAS services on the Cisco SCE platform. Additional information is
available in the “Value Added Services (VAS) Traffic Forwarding” chapter of the Cisco
SCE2000, SCE1000Software Configuration Guide and “Intelligent Traffic Mirroring” chapter
of the Cisco SCE8000 GBE Software Configuration Guide and Cisco SCE8000 10GBE Software
Configuration Guide.
– You must also assign the VAS traffic-forwarding tables to packages in the Advanced tab of the
Edit Packages dialog. VAS traffic-forwarding is based on per-package configuration of where
to forward what traffic. To set a VAS traffic-forwarding table for a package, see the “How to Set
Advanced Package Options” section on page 9-57.
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Chapter 10 Using the Service Configuration Editor: Additional Options
How to Enable VAS Traffic Forwarding
•
How to Enable VAS Traffic Forwarding, page 10-67
•
How to Rename VAS Server Groups, page 10-70
•
How to View VAS Traffic-Forwarding Tables, page 10-72
•
How to Delete VAS Traffic-Forwarding Tables, page 10-73
•
How to Add VAS Traffic-Forwarding Tables, page 10-73
•
Managing VAS Table Parameters, page 10-74
How to Enable VAS Traffic Forwarding
By default, VAS traffic forwarding is disabled. You can enable it at any time.
Note
Step 1
VAS traffic forwarding is not supported when unidirectional classification is enabled.
From the Policies tab of the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > VAS Settings.
The VAS Settings dialog box appears (Figure 10-47).
Figure 10-47
VAS Settings - Enable Traffic Forwarding
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How to Enable VAS Traffic Forwarding
Step 2
Note
Click the Enable Traffic Forwarding radio button.
VAS traffic forwarding is not supported in asymmetric routing classification mode. If you try to check
the Enable Traffic Forwarding radio button when asymmetric routing classification mode is enabled, a
VAS Error message appears.
Click OK, and continue at Step 4.
A VAS warning message appears.
Step 3
Click OK.
Step 4
Click Close.
The VAS Settings dialog box closes.
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How to Enable VAS Traffic Mirroring
How to Enable VAS Traffic Mirroring
Traffic Mirroring in enabled and configured in the VAS Setting dialog box. However, you configure
which server group to use when defining rules.
Step 1
From the Policies tab of the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > VAS Settings.
The VAS Settings dialog box appears (Figure 10-48).
Figure 10-48
Step 2
VAS Settings - Enable Traffic Mirroring
Choose the Enable Traffic Mirroring radio button.
A VAS warning message appears.
Step 3
Click OK.
Step 4
Click Close.
The VAS Settings dialog box closes.
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Chapter 10 Using the Service Configuration Editor: Additional Options
How to Rename VAS Server Groups
How to Rename VAS Server Groups
A Cisco SCE platform can forward flows to up to eight different VAS server groups. By default, the eight
server groups are named “Server Group n”, where n takes a value from 0 to 7. Give the server groups
meaningful names; the names you give appears in the drop-down list in the Control and Breach Handling
tabs of the Add Rule to Package dialog box (see “How to Set Advanced Package Options” section on
page 9-57) and in the Server Group field of the table parameters added to each traffic-forwarding table
(see “Managing VAS Table Parameters” section on page 10-74).
Step 1
From the Policies tab of the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > VAS Settings.
The VAS Settings dialog box appears (Figure 10-49).
Step 2
In the table in the Server Groups Table area, double-click in a cell containing a server group name.
Step 3
Enter a meaningful name in the cell.
Step 4
Repeat Step 2 and Step 3 for other server groups you wish to rename.
Figure 10-49
Step 5
Traffic Forwarding Groups Tab
Click Close.
The VAS Settings dialog box closes.
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How to Configure VAS Traffic-Mirroring
How to Configure VAS Traffic-Mirroring
Step 1
From the Policies tab of the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > VAS Settings.
The VAS Settings dialog box appears (Figure 10-50).
Figure 10-50
Traffic Mirroring Groups Tab
Step 2
Click the Enable Traffic Forwarding radio button.
Step 3
For each server group, in the Flow Volume to Mirror (KB) column, enter the maximum amount of
volume to mirror, in KB.
Step 4
Click Close.
The VAS Settings dialog box closes.
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How to View VAS Traffic-Forwarding Tables
How to View VAS Traffic-Forwarding Tables
Cisco SCA BB decides whether a flow passing through a Cisco SCE platform should be forwarded to a
VAS server group based on a traffic-forwarding table. Each entry (table parameter) in a
traffic-forwarding table defines to which VAS server group the specified flows should be forwarded.
Step 1
From the Policies tab of the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > VAS Settings.
The VAS Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
Click the Enable Traffic Forwarding radio button.
Step 3
Click the Traffic Forwarding Tables tab.
The Traffic Forwarding Tables tab opens.
A list of all traffic-forwarding tables is displayed in the Traffic Forwarding Tables area.
Step 4
Click a table in the list of traffic-forwarding tables to display its table parameters.
A list of all table parameters defined for this traffic-forwarding table opens in the Table Parameters tab
(Figure 10-51).
Figure 10-51
Step 5
Traffic Forwarding Tables Tab
Click Close.
The VAS Settings dialog box closes.
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Chapter 10 Using the Service Configuration Editor: Additional Options
How to Delete VAS Traffic-Forwarding Tables
How to Delete VAS Traffic-Forwarding Tables
You can delete all user-created traffic-forwarding tables. The default traffic-forwarding table cannot be
deleted.
Note
Step 1
A traffic-forwarding table cannot be deleted while it is associated with a package.
From the Policies tab of the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > VAS Settings.
The VAS Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
Click the Enable Traffic Forwarding radio button.
Step 3
Click the Traffic Forwarding Tables tab.
The Traffic Forwarding Tables tab opens.
Step 4
From the list of traffic-forwarding tables in the Traffic Forwarding Tables area, select a table.
Step 5
Click the Delete (
) icon.
A VAS Warning message appears (Figure 10-52).
Figure 10-52
Step 6
VAS Warning
Click Yes.
The selected table is deleted and is no longer displayed in the list of traffic-forwarding tables.
Step 7
Click Close.
The VAS Settings dialog box closes.
How to Add VAS Traffic-Forwarding Tables
A default traffic-forwarding table is included in the service configuration. You can add up to 63 more
traffic-forwarding tables, and then assign different traffic-forwarding tables to different packages.
Step 1
From the Policies tab in the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > VAS Settings.
The VAS Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
Click the Enable Traffic Forwarding radio button.
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Managing VAS Table Parameters
Step 3
Click the Traffic Forwarding Tables tab.
The Traffic Forwarding Tables tab opens (Figure 10-53).
Figure 10-53
Step 4
VAS Settings - Add VAS Traffic-Forwarding Tables
In the Traffic Forwarding Tables area, click the Add (
) icon.
A new table named Table (n), where n is a value from 1 through 63, is added to the list of
traffic-forwarding tables in the Traffic Forwarding Tables area.
The table name is also displayed in the Item Name box in the Table Parameters tab.
Step 5
In the Item Name field, enter a unique and relevant name for the traffic-forwarding table.
You can now add table parameters to the new traffic-forwarding table, see “How to Add VAS Table
Parameters” section on page 10-75.
Managing VAS Table Parameters
A table parameter is an IP protocol type, an associated TCP/UDP port (where applicable), and a VAS
server group or a range of IP addresses.
A traffic-forwarding table is a collection of related table parameters.
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Managing VAS Table Parameters
A traffic-forwarding table can contain up to 64 table parameters.
•
How to Add VAS Table Parameters, page 10-75
•
How to Edit VAS Table Parameters, page 10-75
•
How to Delete VAS Table Parameters, page 10-77
How to Add VAS Table Parameters
You can add up to 64 table parameters to a traffic-forwarding table.
Step 1
From the Policies tab in the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > VAS Settings.
The VAS Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
Click the Enable Traffic Forwarding radio button.
Step 3
Click the Traffic Forwarding Tables tab.
The Traffic Forwarding Tables tab opens.
Step 4
From the list of traffic-forwarding tables in the Traffic Forwarding Tables area, select a table.
Step 5
In the Traffic Parameters tab, click the Add (
) icon.
A new table parameter is added to the list of table parameters in the Table Parameters tab.
Note
Each new table parameter has the default values as listed in Table 10-4.
Table 10-4
Table Parameter Default Values
Parameter
Default value
IP Protocol
TCP Port
TCP/UDP Port Range
80
Server Group
Server Group 0
You can now edit the new table parameter, as described in the following section.
Step 6
Click Close.
The VAS Settings dialog box closes.
How to Edit VAS Table Parameters
Step 1
From the Policies tab in the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > VAS Settings.
The VAS Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
Click the Enable Traffic Forwarding radio button.
Step 3
Click the Traffic Forwarding Tables tab.
The Traffic Forwarding Tables tab opens.
Step 4
From the list of traffic-forwarding tables in the Traffic Forwarding Tables area, select a table.
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Managing VAS Table Parameters
Step 5
In the table in the Table Parameters tab select a protocol, port, and server group.
a.
Click in a cell in the IP Protocol column, and, from the drop-down list that opens, select an IP
protocol type (Figure 10-54).
Figure 10-54
Table Parameters Tab
If you select All, All TCP, All UDP, or All Non TCP/UDP, “N/A” appears in the TCP/UDP Port cell
when you move to another cell in the table.
b.
If you selected TCP Port or UDP Port, double-click in the cell in the TCP/UDP Port Range column,
and enter the port number or a range of ports.
c.
Click in the cell in the Server Group column, and, from the drop-down list that opens, select a server
group (Figure 10-55).
Figure 10-55
Step 6
Tables Parameters Tab
Click Close.
The VAS Settings dialog box closes.
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Managing VAS Table Parameters
How to Delete VAS Table Parameters
Step 1
From the Policies tab in the left pane, choose Configuration > Policies > VAS Settings.
The VAS Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2
Click the Enable Traffic Forwarding radio button.
Step 3
Click the Traffic Forwarding Tables tab.
The Traffic Forwarding Tables tab opens.
Step 4
From the list of traffic-forwarding tables in the Traffic Forwarding Tables area, select a table.
Step 5
From the list of table parameters in the Table Parameters tab, select a table parameter.
Step 6
Click the Delete (
) icon.
The selected table parameter is deleted and is no longer displayed in the list of table parameters.
Step 7
Click Close.
The VAS Settings dialog box closes.
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Managing the Protected URL Database
Managing the Protected URL Database
The Cisco SCE Protected URL Database is a database that contains a “blacklist,” a list of websites that
are considered off limits or dangerous. You can configure the Cisco SCE to apply a specific action, such
as blocking a site, when a subscriber attempts to access a site listed on the blacklist.
The database is encrypted so that no one, including the operator, can view the blacklist. The blacklist is
managed on the Cisco SCE and cannot be withdrawn to the management PC.
RDRs are created when a subscriber attempts to access a link included in the blacklist. However, the
RDRs do not contains the URL or Host information of the site.
To enable the blacklist feature, you must do the following:
•
Define an HTTP flavor
•
Create a blacklist service
•
Assign the HTTP flavor to the blacklist service
•
Create a rule for the blacklist service
•
Assign black list entries to the flavor, using the CLI
For more information about the Protected URL Database, see the Cisco Service Control URL
Blacklisting Solution Guide.
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