GRANTS TO NUNAVUT / SUBVENTIONS AU NUNAVUT

GRANTS TO NUNAVUT / SUBVENTIONS AU NUNAVUT
Provincial and Territorial Profiles, 2004-2005 /
Profils provinciaux et territoriaux, 2004-2005
GRANTS TO NUNAVUT / SUBVENTIONS AU NUNAVUT
Research Unit / Unité de recherche
The Canada Council for the Arts / Le Conseil des Arts du Canada
August 2005 / août 2005
Funding to Nunavut, 2004-2005
•
In 2004-2005, the Canada Council for the Arts provided grants worth $472,350 to the arts in Nunavut.
•
Grant funding to Nunavut has increased by 116% over the past five years, from $218,850 in 2000-2001
to $472,350 in 2004-2005.
•
In addition to grants, $1,683 in payments was provided to 4 authors through the Public Lending Right
Program in 2004-20051. This brings the total funding to Nunavut to just over $474,000.
•
The Council distributed $288,800 in funds to a total of 29 artists while $183,550 was awarded to 5
Nunavut Territory arts organizations.
•
Grants were awarded to Nunavut artists and arts organizations in media arts, visual arts, interdisciplinary
arts, and through the Council’s Aboriginal Arts Secretariat and the Outreach Section. As a result of the
large concentration of media arts activity in Nunavut, the largest amount of funding went to Media Arts
($201,250). Visual arts received the second largest amount of funding ($112,000).
•
Funding to artists and arts organizations in Igloolik totaled $233,750, comprising more than 49% of the
total funding going to Nunavut. This high proportion of funding to Igloolik remains the result of
increased media arts activity in the area over the past decade. Iqaluit received $149,200, or 31% or total
funding, while the community of Rankin Inlet was awarded $57,200 or 12% of total funds. The other
communities supported by the Canada Council in 2004-2005 were Baker Lake, Cape Dorset, Fort Good
Hope, Lake Harbour, Pangnirtung and Pond Inlet.
•
3 artists or arts professionals from Nunavut served as Canada Council peer assessors in 2004-2005.
•
72 applications from Nunavut artists and arts organizations were submitted to Council in 2004-2005,
representing 0.4% of the total number of received applications. The number of applications from
Nunavut Territory has increased by 450% over the last 5 years.
•
Nunavut artists and arts organizations received 0.39% of Canada Council funding in 2004-2005. In
comparison, Nunavut represents 0.1% of the total Canadian population, and 0.2% of Canadian artists.2
•
Close to $7 million was spent on culture by the federal government in Nunavut in 2002-2003.3 Per
capita cultural spending in Nunavut ranks third among provinces/territories in terms of the federal
contribution, with $238.4
The Public Lending Right Program provides payments to authors whose books are held in selected Canadian libraries.
Hill Stategies Research, Artists in Canada’s Provinces, Territories and Metropolitan Areas. (based on Census 2001)
3 Statistics Canada: Government expenditures on culture: data tables, January 2005, catalogue no 87F0001XIE.
4 Statistics Canada: The Daily, Thursday January 27, 2005, Government Expenditure on Culture 2002/03.
1
2
Aide attribuée au Nunavut, 2004-2005
•
En 2004-2005, le Conseil des Arts du Canada a accordé des subventions d’une valeur totale de 472 350 $
aux arts du Nunavut. Depuis cinq ans, le total des subventions accordées au Nunavut est passé de
218 850 $ en 2000-2001 à 472 350 $ en 2004-2005, soit une augmentation de 116 %.
• Un montant de 1 683 $ a en outre été payé à 4 écrivains et écrivaines du Nunavut dans le cadre du
Programme du droit de prêt public5 en 2004-2005, ce qui porte à un peu plus de 474 000 $ le montant
total de l’aide du Conseil au Nunavut.
•
Le Conseil a accordé 288 800 $ en subventions à 29 artistes, ainsi que 183 550 $ à 5 organismes
artistiques du Nunavut.
•
L’aide du Conseil a touché les disciplines des arts interdisciplinaires, médiatiques et visuels. Plusieurs
subventions ont aussi été octroyées par le biais du Secrétariat des arts autochtones et le programme de
Promotion de la diffusion. Le plus gros pourcentage de l’aide est allé aux arts médiatiques (201 250 $).
Les arts visuels ont reçu le deuxième montant en importance (112 000 $).
•
Des subventions de 233 750 $ ont été accordées aux artistes et organismes artistiques de Igloolik, ce qui
représente plus de 49 % de l’aide au territoire. Cette proportion élevée d’aide financière accordée à
Igloolik résulte de l’augmentation de l’activité des arts médiatiques dans la région depuis la dernière
décennie. Iqaluit a reçu 149 200 $, ce qui représente 31 % de l’aide financière totale alors que la
communauté de Rankin Inlet a reçu 57 200 $, soit 12 % du total des fonds. Les autres collectivités du
Nunavut ayant reçu des fonds en 2004-2005 sont Baker Lake, Cape Dorset, Fort Good Hope, Lake
Harbour, Pangnirtung et Pond Inlet.
•
3 artistes ou professionnels des arts du Nunavut ont été engagés comme membres de jury en 2004-2005
par le Conseil des Arts du Canada.
•
72 demandes d’appui ont été soumises au Conseil par des artistes et des organismes artistiques du
Nunavut en 2004-2005, ce qui représente 0,4 % du total des demandes reçues. Le nombre de demandes
provenant du Nunavut a augmenté de 450 % au cours des cinq dernières années.
•
Les artistes et organismes artistiques du Nunavut ont reçu 0.39 % des subventions du Conseil des Arts
du Canada en 2004-2005. Le territoire représente 0,1 % de la population totale du Canada, et 0,2 % des
artistes Canadiens.6
•
Près de 7 millions de dollars ont été consacrés à la culture dans ce territoire par le gouvernement fédéral
en 2002-2003.7 Les dépenses du gouvernement fédéral par personne au chapitre de la culture placent le
Nunavut au troisième rang des provinces/territoires avec 238 $.8
Le Programme du droit de prêt public accorde des paiements aux auteurs dont les livres font partie des collections d’un échantillon de
bibliothèques canadiennes.
6 Hill Stratégies Recherche, Les artistes par province, territoire et région métropolitaine du Canada. (selon le recensement de 2001)
7 Statistique Canada: Dépenses publiques au titre de la culture: tableaux de données, janvier 2005, catalogue 87F0001XIE.
8 Statistique Canada: Le Quotidien, le jeudi 27 janvier 2005, Dépenses publiques au chapitre de la culture, 2002-2003.
5
Nunavut Artists and Arts Organizations Funded by the Canada Council in 2004-2005
Major Organizations
The Canada Council supports the work of major artistic organizations in each of the country’s Provinces
and Territories. In 2004-2005, five Nunavut institutions received funding:
• Lucie Idlout Ensemble ($15,000)
• Nunavut Independent TV Network ($56,250)
• Kangirqlinik Center for Arts and Learning ($35,000)
• Qaggiq Theatre Company ($52,300)
• Nunavut Arts & Crafts Association ($25,000)
Supporting Diversity in Excellence
Council also supports professional artists and artistic organizations’ endeavors through a great diversity of
programs. The following selection illustrates the scope the projects supported by Council in Nunavut.
The Canada Council awarded well-known Igloolik media arts artist Zacharias Kunuk with three grants
totaling $94,500 in 2004-2005. Grants were funded through the following programs: Aboriginal Media Arts
Program, Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange Program: International and the Aboriginal Traditional
Art Forms Program. Kunuk will be collaborating with Greenlandic indigenous peoples to produce his
newest film The Journals of Knud Rasmussen, a documentary on the historical trader Rasmussen’s
expeditions and the Christian-European influence on aboriginal peoples of the pan-arctic regions. Kunuk
will also screen the critically acclaimed Atanarjuat during a one week international summit in Qaanaq,
Greenland and recruit Greenlandic actors for his most recent film. Last but not least, Kunuk will create
Nutaungtut (Things We Used): an authentic collection of handmade artifacts from the 1900s to be used
as movie props.
Igloolik multidisciplinary artist Madeline Ivalu was awarded $60,000 through the Council’s Aboriginal
Media Arts Program to produce the medium-length documentary video Umiaq with Inuit singer Susan
Avingaq in 2004-2005. The documentary will cover the processes of building the umiaq – translated as the
large boat traditionally used by Inuit women, which could host several humans and dogs as passengers. The
steps covered will include hunting ujuq (bearded seals) and walruses, skin preparation, boat frame
fabrication and sewing skins to the frames. For background music, there will be sounds from the sea and
Susan Avingaq will also provide complementary button accordion music.
The Canada Council supported The Kangirqlinik Center for Arts and Learning, established in Rankin
Inlet, with two grants totaling $35,000 through the Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange: National as
well as Project Assistance to Visual Arts and Fine Crafts Organizations programs in 2004-2005. The
Kangirqlinik Center created a website database directory of 40 Kivalliq artists from the remote communities
of Rankin Inlet, Wale Cove and Chesterfield Inlet. Council funds also contributed to Sharing Our
Knowledge, a Kivalliq regional traditional arts and crafts workshop.
Okpik Pitseolak of Iqaluit received $22,000 through the Council’s Grants to Professional Artists in Visual
Arts (including Photography) program to create Scratching the Surface in 2004-2005. Scratching the Surface
will portray the legend of the ptarmigan which involves an aboriginal woman who transforms into a
ptarmigan with a mitt, along with Uinggualiminitt and Pingasut legends. Pitseolak started her arts career as
an assistant to her photographer father Peter Pitseolak in the 1950s, learned to make jewelry and prints and
graduated to the production of soapstone carvings. Pitseolak’s artwork, inspired by Inuit traditions and her
own personal dreams, often portray the significance of women’s roles in Inuit cultures.
Fine crafts artist and printmaker Jolly Atagooyuk of Pangnirtung received a $2,500 grant through the
Council’s Travel Grants to Professional Artists program in 2004-2005. Council funds supported
Atagooyuk’s attendance at the Pikialaarneq Cultural Festival in Uummannaq, Greenland which took place in
July 2004. Atagooyuk has had experience in teaching and working with printmaking, drawing, introductory
jewelry and metalwork, stencil printmaking. Atagooyuk has also participated at The Great Northern Art
Festival in Inuvik for several years and an art festival in Sisimuit, Greenland.
The Canada Council awarded Iqaluit’s Qaggiq Theatre Company a total of $52,300 in two grants through
the Aboriginal Arts and InterArts Sections to produce Nuliajuk and host the Quamaniq
Interdisciplinary Arts Workshops in 2004-2005. Nuliajuk is a two part series which combines drumming,
throatsinging, dance, storytelling, theatre, multimedia and soundscapes to portray the tale of a woman who
became goddess of the temperamental sea. In the first part, Nuliajuk is tricked into marrying a powerful
bird spirit disguised as a man. Nuliajuk’s father secretively rescues her and attempts to escape by boat but
the spirit attacks him. Nuliajuk’s father cuts her fingers and Nuliajuk transforms into objects of the sea such
as anemones and crabs. The second part elaborates on Inuit beliefs about the existence of taboos and
transgressions against nature within Nuliajuk’s hair and the need for a shaman, rare nowadays, to soothe her.
In the Quamaniq program, aboriginal artists will be given the opportunity to work on interdisciplinary
projects. Quamaniq stands for spiritual enlightenment of the shaman or the day of the year which lasts for
24 hours.
In 2004-2005, Lizzie Ittinuar of Rankin Inlet was awarded $20,000 through the Council’s Aboriginal
Traditional Visual Arts Forms Program to create a bordered 4’ x 7’ hamlet map made out of cloth, caribou
and seal skin. Ittinuar works with Inuit beading traditions and designs of the Kivalliq region and her diverse
mediums include clothing, beadwork, soapstone, antler carvings and wall hangings. Ittinuar is an
experienced beading seamstress who teaches beading to children and adults in local areas as well as Ontario
and Quebec.
The Canada Council supported Lake Harbour visual artist Pitseolak Qimirpik’s attendance at his solo
exhibition at Grunder Canadian Arctic Gallery in Basel, Switzerland with a $2,500 grant through the Travel
Grants to Professional Artists program in 2004-2005. Qimirpik is a soapstone and serpentine rock carver
who creates often sought-after sculptures of bald eagles, falcons, owls and human figures.
Well-known visual artist and daughter of the famous Jessie Oonark, Victoria Mamnguqsualuk of Baker
Lake received $11,000 in 2004-2005 through the Council’s Aboriginal Traditional Visual Arts Forms
Program to create innovative wall hangings that incorporate both contemporary and traditional techniques.
Mamnguqsualuk will apply new techniques learned from a collaborative project with Canadian and Indian
artists during a working residency in Toronto. Mamnguqsualuk is known for her interest in depictions of
Inuit myth and her “complex scenes involving multiple figures and vigorous activity”9
9
Janet Berlo – North American Women Artists of the 20th Century: A Biographical Dictionary - 1995
Les artistes et les organisations artistiques du Nunavut financés par le Conseil des Arts
du Canada en 2004-2005
Importantes organisations artistiques
Le Conseil des Arts du Canada appuie le travail d’importantes organisations artistiques dans chacune des
provinces et chacun des territoires. En 2004-2005, cinq institutions du Nunavut ont bénéficié d’un
financement :
• Lucie Idlout Ensemble ($15,000)
• Nunavut Independent TV Network ($56,250)
• Kangirqlinik Center for Arts and Learning ($35,000)
• Qaggiq Theatre Company ($52,300)
• Nunavut Arts & Crafts Association ($25,000)
À l’appui de l’excellence dans toute sa diversité
Le Conseil des Arts appuie en outre les projets d’artistes et d’organismes artistiques professionnels par
l’entremise d’une vaste gamme de programmes. Le texte qui suit illustre bien la diversité des projets appuyés
par le Conseil des Arts du Canada pour le Nunavut.
Le Conseil des Arts du Canada a octroyé trois subventions de 94 500 $ au total à l’artiste des médias de
grande renommée Zacharias Kunuk, pour 2004-2005. Les subventions émanent des programmes suivants :
Subventions aux artistes autochtones des arts médiatiques; Échanges coopératifs entre artistes des Peuples
autochtones – volet international; Aide aux formes d’arts visuels traditionnels autochtones. Kunuk
collaborera avec des Autochtones du Groenland pour la réalisation de The Journals of Knud Rasmussen,
un documentaire sur les expéditions de cet important négociant qui a marqué l’histoire. Le documentaire
traitera également des influences chrétiennes et européennes sur les peuples autochtones des régions
panboréales. Kunuk projettera en outre le film Atanarjuat, acclamé par la critique, au cours d’un sommet
international d’une semaine qui aura lieu à Qaanaq, au Groenland. Il en profitera pour recruter des acteurs
groenlandais pour son tout dernier opus. Finalement, Kunuk créera Nutaungtut (Objets des temps
anciens), une collection d’artéfacts fabriqués à la main au cours du XXe siècle, qui pourront servir
d’accessoires de cinéma.
L’artiste multidisciplinaire Madeline Ivalu, d’Igloolik, a obtenu pour 2004-2005 la somme de 60 000 $ du
programme Subventions aux artistes autochtones des arts médiatiques, afin de produire un moyen métrage
vidéo documentaire intitulé Umiaq, auquel participe la chanteuse inuite Susan Avingaq. Le documentaire
porte sur les étapes de la construction d’un oumiak, une grosse embarcation traditionnelle utilisée par les
Inuites pour le transport de passagers et de chiens. Ces étapes comprennent la chasse au ujuq (phoque
barbu) et au morse, la préparation des peaux, la fabrication de l’ossature du bateau et la couture des peaux
sur l’ossature. La trame sonore sera émaillée des sons de la mer et des airs d’accordéon de Susan Avingaq.
Le Conseil des Arts du Canada a octroyé deux subventions totalisant 35 000 $ au Kangirqliniq Centre for
Arts and Learning, établi à Rankin Inlet, au Nunavut, par l’entremise des programmes Échanges
coopératifs entre artistes des Peuples autochtones – volet national et Aide de projet aux organismes d’arts
visuels et de métiers d’arts pour 2004-2005. Le Kangirqliniq Centre a créé une base de données accessible
sur le Web où sont inscrits 40 artistes de Kivalliq représentant les collectivités éloignées de Rankin Inlet,
Wale Cove et Chesterfield Inlet. Le Conseil a également fourni son aide au projet Sharing Our Knowledge,
un atelier d’arts et de métiers d’arts traditionnels régionaux du Kivalliq.
Okpik Pitseolak, une artiste d’Iqaluit, a reçu 22 000 $ en 2004-2005 du programmes Subventions aux
artistes professionnels en arts visuels (y compris la photographie) en vue de la création de Scratching the
Surface. L’œuvre illustrera la légende du lagopède, laquelle met en scène une Autochtone qui se transforme
en lagopède à mitaine, ainsi que les légendes Uinggualiminitt et Pingasut. Pitseolak a entamé sa carrière
artistique comme assistante de son père, Peter Pitseolak, un photographe, dans les années 1950; elle a
également appris la joaillerie et la gravure, pour finalement s’intéresser à la sculpture sur pierre de savon. Les
œuvres de Pitseolak, inspirées des traditions inuites et de ses propres rêves, rappellent souvent le rôle
prépondérant donné aux femmes à l’intérieur des cultures inuites.
L’artisane et graveuse Jolly Atagooyuk, de Pangnirtung, au Nunavut, a touché une subvention de 2 500 $
du programme Subventions de voyage aux artistes professionnels pour 2004-2005. Grâce à cette aide du
Conseil, Atagooyuk a pu participer au Pikialaarneq Cultural Festival d’Uummannaq, au Groenland, en
juillet 2004. Atagooyuk a notamment enseigné et pratiqué la gravure, le dessin, l’initiation à la joaillerie et à la
ferronnerie, de même que la gravure par stencil. Elle a de plus participé au Great Northern Art Festival
d’Inuvik pendant de nombreuses années, ainsi qu’à un festival d’arts à Sisimuit, au Groenland.
Le Conseil des Arts du Canada a octroyé deux subventions totalisant 52 300 $ à la Qaggiq Theatre
Company d’Iqaluit, par l’entremise de ses sections Arts autochtones et Inter-arts. La compagnie a ainsi pu
produire Nuliajuk et accueillir les ateliers d’arts interdisciplinaires Quamaniq en 2004-2005. Nuliajuk est
une œuvre en deux volets où se marient les percussions, les chants de gorge, la danse, la narration de contes,
le théâtre, le multimédia et la création d’ambiances sonores pour raconter la légende d’une femme devenue
déesse d’une mer indomptable. Dans le premier volet, Nuliajuk se trouve forcée d’épouser un puissant esprit
oiseau déguisé en homme. Le père de Nuliajuk réussit à la sauver, mais lorsqu’il tente de fuir en bateau, il est
attaqué par l’esprit. Après que son père lui eut coupé les doigts, Nuliajuk prend la forme de créatures
marines comme les anémones et les crabes. Le deuxième volet tourne autour des croyances inuites au sujet
des tabous et des transgressions contre nature dans les cheveux de Nuliajuk, de la nécessité de faire
intervenir un shaman, une espèce en voie de disparition, pour l’apaiser. Le programme des ateliers Quamaniq
permettra à des artistes autochtones de collaborer à des projets interdisciplinaires. Quamaniq veut dire « éveil
spirituel du shaman » ou encore « jour de l’année qui dure 24 heures».
En 2004-2005, Lizzie Ittinuar, de Rankin Inlet, au Nunavut, a reçu 20 000 $ du Programme d’aide aux
formes traditionnelles des arts visuels autochtones du Conseil. Cette subvention lui permettra de créer une
carte lisérée de son hameau, de 4 pi sur 7 pi, qu’elle fabriquera avec de la toile ainsi que des peaux de caribou
et de phoque. Ittinuar utilise les techniques et les motifs de perlage inuits traditionnels de la région de
Kivalliq; ses médiums de prédilection sont la toile, les broderies perlées, la pierre de savon, la sculpture sur
bois de cerf et les pièces murales. Artiste chevronnée, Ittinuar pratique la broderie perlée, un art qu’elle
enseigne aux enfants et aux adultes dans sa région aussi bien qu’en Ontario et au Québec.
Le Conseil des Arts du Canada a fourni une aide financière à l’artiste visuel Pitseolak Qimirpik, de Lake
Harbour, au Nunavut, afin qu’il puisse assister à l’exposition solo de ses œuvres à la Grunder Canadian
Arctic Gallery, située à Bâle, en Suisse. Le Conseil lui a octroyé une subvention de 2 500 $ au titre du
programme Subventions de voyage aux artistes professionnels. Qimirpik est sculpteur sur pierre de savon et
serpentinite. Ses œuvres très recherchées représentent des pygargues à tête blanche, des faucons, des hiboux
et des personnages.
L’artiste visuelle de grande renommée Victoria Mamnguqsualuk, fille du réputé Jessie Oonark, de Baker
Lake, a reçu 11 000 $ du Programme d’aide aux formes traditionnelles des arts visuels autochtones en 20042005 afin de créer des pièces murales originales intégrant à la fois les techniques contemporaines et
traditionnelles. Mamnguqsualuk appliquera de nouvelles techniques apprises à Toronto lors d’un projet
collectif en résidence réunissant des artistes canadiens et autochtones. Mamnguqsualuk est connue
notamment pour la place prépondérante qu’elle accorde aux mythes inuits dans ses représentations, ainsi
que pour ses « scènes complexes entremêlant personnages multiples et activité intense10 ».
10
Janet Berlo – North American Women Artists of the 20th Century: A Biographical Dictionary – 1995. [Traduction]
Table 1 - Funding to the Arts by Discipline, Nunavut, 2004-2005
Tableau 1 - Aide aux arts par discipline, Nunavut, 2004-2005
Artists /
Artistes
Arts
Organizations /
Organismes
artistiques
Total
Aboriginal Arts Secretariat / Secrétariat des arts autochtones
$46,900
$47,300
$94,200
Art Bank / Banque d'oeuvres d'art
$9,000
$0
$9,000
Dance / Danse
$0
$0
$0
Director's Office / Bureau du Directeur
$0
$0
$0
Director of the Arts Division / Directeur de la Division des arts
$0
$15,000
$15,000
Endowments & Prizes / Prix et dotations
$0
$0
$0
Equity / Équité
$0
$0
$0
Interdisciplinary Arts / Arts interdisciplinaires
$0
$25,000
$25,000
$145,000
$56,250
$201,250
$0
$0
$0
$900
$15,000
$15,900
$0
$0
$0
$87,000
$25,000
$112,000
$0
$0
$0
$288,800
$183,550
$472,350
Media Arts / Arts médiatiques
Music / Musique
Outreach / Promotion de la diffusion
Theatre / Théâtre
Visual Arts / Arts visuels
Writing and Publishing / Lettres et édition
Total - Nunavut Territory / Territoire du Nunavut
Total - Canada
$121,455,742
Grants to Nunavut as a % of Total Canada Council Funding, 2004-2005:
Pourcentage des subventions attribuées au Nunavut par rapport au financement total du Conseil des
Arts du Canada, 2004-2005:
0.39%
Table 2 - List of Grants by Community, Nunavut, 2004-2005
Tableau 2 - Liste des subventions par collectivité, Nunavut, 2004-2005
BAKER LAKE
CAPE DORSET
$11,000
$7,300
IGLOOLIK
$233,750
IQALUIT
$149,200
LAKE HARBOUR
$2,500
PANGNIRTUNG
$6,200
POND INLET
$5,200
RANKIN INLET
Total – Nunavut / Nunavut
Total - Canada
Grants to Nunavut as a % of Total Canada Council Funding, 2004-2005:
Pourcentage des subventions attribuées au Nunavut par rapport au financement total du
Conseil des Arts du Canada, 2004-2005:
$57,200
$472,350
$121,455,742
0.39%
Table 3 - Detailed List of Grants to Nunavut by Discipline, 2004-2005
Tableau 3 - Liste détaillée des subventions au Nunavut, 2004-2005
Grants to Individual Artists / Subventions aux artistes individuels
Aboriginal Arts Secretariat/ Secrétariat des arts autochtones
Allakariallak, Madeleine
Arlooktoo, Kowisa
Arreak, Jolene
Aupilardjuk, Mariano
Cloutier, Sylvia Ipirautaq
Ittusardjuat, Serapio
Kadlutsiak, Johnny
Kunuk, Zacharias
Noah, Pootoogook
Peterloosie, Annie Paingut
Peterloosie, Jayko
Pitseolak, Josie
Pitseolak, Okpik
Qiatsuk, Pootoogook
Tulugarjuk, Lucy
Ukaliannuk, Therese
Ungalaaq, Natar
$46,900
IQALUIT
IQALUIT
IQALUIT
RANKIN INLET
IQALUIT
IQALUIT
IQALUIT
IGLOOLIK
IQALUIT
POND INLET
POND INLET
IQALUIT
IQALUIT
IQALUIT
IGLOOLIK
IQALUIT
IGLOOLIK
Art Bank / Banque d'oeuvres d'art
Ashoona, Ohito
Merkosak, Billy T.
Pitseolak, Okpik
Pitsiulak, Lypa
$9,000
CAPE DORSET
POND INLET
IQALUIT
PANGNIRTUNG
Media Arts / Arts médiatiques
Arnatsiaq, Laurentio Qillaq
Ivalu, Madeline
Kunuk, Zacharias
IGLOOLIK
IGLOOLIK
IGLOOLIK
Total Nunavut Grants to Individual Artists, 2004-2005:
Subventions totales octroyées aux artistes individuels du Nunavut, 2004-2005 :
Grants to Arts Organizations / Subventions aux organismes artistiques
$18,000
$60,000
$67,000
$900
PANGNIRTUNG
Visual Arts / Arts visuels
Ashevak, Arnaqu
Ashevak, Kenojuak
Atagooyuk, Jolly
Ittinuar, Lizzie Lucy
Kunuk, Zacharias
Mamnguqsualuk, Victoria
Pitseolak, Okpik
Qimirpik, Pitseolak Q.
$3,300
$1,000
$1,900
$2,800
$145,000
Outreach / Promotion de la diffusion
Pitsiulak, Annie
$3,000
$3,000
$3,000
$2,200
$3,000
$3,000
$3,000
$2,500
$3,000
$2,100
$2,100
$3,000
$3,000
$3,000
$2,500
$3,000
$2,500
$900
$87,000
CAPE DORSET
CAPE DORSET
PANGNIRTUNG
RANKIN INLET
IGLOOLIK
BAKER LAKE
IQALUIT
LAKE HARBOUR
$2,000
$2,000
$2,500
$20,000
$25,000
$11,000
$22,000
$2,500
$288,800
Aboriginal Arts Secretariat / Secrétariat des arts autochtones
Kangirqlinik Center for Arts and Learning
Qaggiq Theatre Company
$47,300
RANKIN INLET
IQALUIT
Director of the Arts Division / Directeur de la Division des arts
Nunavut Arts & Crafts Association
$15,000
IQALUIT
Inter-Arts Office / Bureau inter-arts
Qaggiq Theatre Company
IQALUIT
IGLOOLIK
Total Nunavut Grants to Arts Organizations, 2004-2005:
Subventions totales octroyées aux organismes artistiques du Nunavut, 2004-2005:
$56,250
$15,000
IQALUIT
Visual Arts / Arts visuels
Kangirqlinik Center for Arts and Learning
Nunavut Arts & Crafts Association
$25,000
$56,250
Outreach / Promotion de la diffusion
Lucie Idlout Ensemble
$15,000
$25,000
Media Arts / Arts médiatiques
Nunavut Independent TV Network
$20,000
$27,300
$15,000
$25,000
RANKIN INLET
IQALUIT
$15,000
$10,000
$183,550
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising