GRANTS TO YUKON TERRITORY SUBVENTIONS AU TERRITOIRE DU YUKON

GRANTS TO YUKON TERRITORY SUBVENTIONS AU TERRITOIRE DU YUKON
Provincial and Territorial Profiles, 2002-2003 /
Profils provinciaux et territoriaux, 2002-2003
GRANTS TO YUKON TERRITORY
SUBVENTIONS AU TERRITOIRE DU YUKON
Research Unit / Unité de recherche
The Canada Council for the Arts / Le Conseil des Arts du Canada
August 2003 / août 2003
Funding to Yukon Territory, 2002-2003
• In 2002-2003, the Canada Council for the Arts provided $495,000 in grants to artists and
arts organizations in the Yukon. Over the past six years, Canada Council funding to the
Yukon increased by $350,000, an increase of 249%.
• In addition to grants, $5,550 in payments was provided to 20 authors through the Public
Lending Right Program1.
• This brings the total amount of Canada Council funding to the Yukon to $500,000 in
2002-2003.
• The Council awarded $255,866 to 17 arts organizations in the Yukon, and $239,090 to 16
Yukon artists in 2002-2003. The number of individual artists funded increased
significantly from 5 in 2001-2002 to 16 in 2002-2003, representing an increase of 220%.
•
Grants were awarded in many disciplines - dance, media arts, music, theatre, visual arts,
and writing and publishing. The largest amounts of funding went to media arts
($139,400), followed by theatre ($129,000) and visual arts ($74,600).
• In 2002-2003, artists and arts organizations in Dawson City, Old Crow, Teslin and
Whitehorse received funds, with 78% of funds awarded to Whitehorse.
• 3 Yukon artists and arts professionals served as peer assessors in 2002-2003, making up
0.5% of all peer assessors.
•
Yukon artists and arts organizations received just under 0.4% of Canada Council funding
in 2002-2003. As of January 2003, the population of the Yukon made up less than 0.1%
of the Canadian population, and 0.19% of Canadian artists.
•
70 applications from Yukon artists and arts organizations were assessed in 2002-2003,
representing 0.5% of the total number of assessed applications.
1
The Public Lending Right Program provides payments to authors whose books are held in selected Canadian libraries.
Aide attribuée au Territoire du Yukon, 2002-2003
•
En 2002-2003, le Conseil des Arts du Canada a accordé 495 000 $ aux arts du Yukon.
Depuis six ans, l’aide financière du Conseil des Arts au Yukon a augmenté de
350 000 $, soit 249%.
•
Un montant de 5 550 $ a en outre été payé à 20 écrivains et écrivaines du Yukon dans le
cadre du Programme du droit de prêt public2, ce qui porte à 500 000 $ l’aide attribuée au
Yukon en 2002-2003.
•
Le Conseil a accordé 239 090 $ en paiements à 16 artistes de Yukon, ainsi que 255 866 $
à 17 organismes artistiques de cette province en 2002-2003. Le nombre d’artistes
subventionnés a augmenté considérablement, passant de 5, en 2001-2002, à 16, en 20022003, ce qui représente une augmentation de 22 p. 100.
•
L’aide du Conseil a touché toutes les disciplines - danse, musique, théâtre, arts visuels,
arts médiatiques, lettres et édition et art interdisciplinaire. Le plus gros pourcentage de
l’aide est allé aux arts médiatiques (139 400 $), puis au théâtre (129 000 $) et aux arts
visuels (74 600 $).
•
En 2002-2003, des artistes et organismes artistiques à Dawson City, à Old Crow, à Teslin
et à Whitehorse ont reçu du soutien financier: 78 p. 100 de ces fonds ont été accordés
aux artistes et organismes artistiques de Whitehorse.
•
3 artistes et professionnels des arts ont été engagés comme membres de jurys,
évaluateurs et conseillers en 2002-2003, ce qui répresente 0,5 p. 100 de tous les membres
de jurys auxquels le Conseil fait appel.
•
Les artistes et organismes artistiques du Yukon ont reçu 0,4 p. 100 des subventions du
Conseil des Arts du Canada en 2002-2003. Le territoire répresente 0,1 p. 100 de la
population canadienne, et 0,19% des artistes Canadiens.
•
70 demandes d’appui présentées par des artistes et des organismes artistiques du Yukon
ont été évaluées en 2002-2003, ce qui représente 0,5 p. 100 du total des demandes
évaluées.
Le Programme du droit de prêt public accorde des paiements aux auteurs dont les livres font partie des
collections d’un échantillon de bibliothèques canadiennes.
2
Yukon Artists and Arts Organizations Funded by the Canada Council,
2002-2003
Whitehorse’s Moving Words - Poetry in Transit project was supported with a $4,500 grant
in 2002-2003, through the Canada Council’s Co-operative Projects in Writing and Publishing
Program. Poetry in Transit published thirteen poems by eleven Whitehorse poets, in both
English and French. As Northern publishing opportunities for writers are limited, Poetry in
Transit provides a solution to this dilemma. It is a venue where poets can gain recognition
from transit riders from all walks of life. The project also benefits the transit riders, who
find their days brightened and rides less dreary as they can enjoy a variety of elaborate
poems. While bus poetry projects are funded in many provinces by the Council, it is the first
time that this unique poetry initiative has been supported in the North.
The Dawson City Music Festival Association was awarded a $12,500 grant through the
Music Festivals Programming Projects Grants program, in 2002-2003, towards their
multicultural festival, How the West Was REALLY Won: Redefining Western Music
Within The Canadian Mosaic. The Dawson City Music Festival is one of Canada’s
pioneer community-based festivals, which recently expanded its audience from local to
provincial visitors. It is very unique in the sense that revenue generated is disbursed and
invested back into the community, which in turn increases living standards. The festival
features culturally diverse music, including a combination of modern and traditional
influences: French Canadian, European, Middle Eastern, Aboriginal, Jewish, jazz, punk,
rock, and much more.
Gwaandak Theatre Adventures, a Whitehorse theatre company, received a $9,000 grant in
2002-2003 through the Council’s Theatre Production Project Grants: Established Artists
Creation/Development Program to produce West Edmonton Mall, a play for young
audiences. West Edmonton Mall is a soliloquy piece about a newcomer to Whitehorse
who desires to escape the winter blues of the frozen North by fleeing to the glamorous
paradise of the West Edmonton Mall. The main character, Christine, reflects on modern
issues in the Yukon through her monologues, including: “cyclical resource industries, high
unemployment, large gaps between the rich and poor, a population of young newcomers
mixing with First Nations and other long term residents, extremes of weather and
isolation.”3 While many artistic productions in the Yukon cater to the ancient legends of
First Nations people, West Edmonton Mall is a mirror into the world of a modern thirty
year old white woman, and her perspectives on Yukon life.
Teslin filmmaker Carol Geddes was the recipient of funds totalling $64,900 in 2002-2003
through the Outreach and Media Arts Sections. The Council grants enabled Geddes to
network with several aboriginal artists in Vancouver, to participate in the Australian Film
Television and Radio School’s workshop on Use of Media and Storytelling by Indigenous
Filmmakers, and to produce a short animated video. In Australia, Geddes presented
information on access to funding, barriers and challenges faced by artists, and arts and
cultural policies. She inspired many Australian arts organizations with her workshops by
describing Canadian arts programs and funding opportunities, including the Canada Council.
3
Project Description – September 15, 2001
Kim Barlow of Whitehorse received a $5,100 grant in 2002-2003 through the Council’s
Music Festivals Travel Grants Program that enabled her to perform and participate in
workshops at the Hillside Music Festival during July 2002. Canada Council funds also
allowed Barlow to present her work to a new and larger audience. Barlow a classical music
graduate, plays acoustic and electric guitar, banjo and cello, and creates “a world of fairy tales
… engaging stories of people, love, and grand adventures, all grounded in the magical
Yukon landscape.” 4 Her newest album, Gingerbread, recounts newcomers’ experiences of
ethereal Yukon summers, and is inspired not only by her own observations, but through
conversations with the many transients who travel in the Yukon territory.
Whitehorse’s Longest Night Society was awarded a $7,500 grant in 2002-2003 through the
Canada Council’s Concert Production and Rehearsal Program for Aboriginal, Classical, Folk,
Jazz and World Music to present two concerts at the Yukon Arts Centre in December 2002.
The Longest Night Society produces multidisciplinary performances and an annual
concert on the nights of December 20th and 21st, 2002, the winter solstice. These
performances had a homecoming theme as the winter solstice is a time when many Yukon
artists return home from national or international tours. The Longest Night Society
attributes success of these concerts to the availability of Canada Council funding: “The event
would not have been possible without the support of the Canada Council Concert
Production and Rehearsal Program. The funding allowed us to extend our rehearsal period,
to pay our musicians, to promote the event, and to present a tight and electrifying event to
the Whitehorse audience. Longest Night is now a fixture in the Yukon Arts calendar, due
in large part to your support.” 5
John Kobayashi of Whitehorse was supported by a $2,500 grant in 2002-2003 through the
Visual Arts Section’s Travel Grants to Professional Artists Program, to showcase
architectural models of the Yukon’s Mayo School at the Sustainable Building 2002
Conference in Oslo, Norway in September 2002. The Mayo School is situated in a small
community of five hundred residents, and “it serves many additional roles including as a
centre for the community and first nations ceremonies, disaster relief, and recreation.” 6
Kobayashi developed a model for the Mayo School which adhered to green building and
energy conservation design principles, a challenging project for Northern architectural
designers.
In 2002-2003, Whitehorse’s Society of Yukon Artists of Native Ancestry received a
$2,900 grant through the Aboriginal Peoples’ Collective Exchange – International Program.
The grant enabled First Nations dancer Daystar to collaborate with the Yukon First
Nations Dancers on Daystar’s play No Home But The Heart for a public performance
at the Yukon Art Centre. Daystar is one of the pioneer First Nations dancer and has several
decades’ worth of dance experience. The collaboration will also include workshops in
Storytelling Through Dance and choreography, and consultation in cross-cultural training
with the Northern Lights Dancers. As stated in the publicity brochure for No Home But
The Heart “Daystar has drawn from selected events in the lives of her great-grandmother,
4
Festival Distribution Publicity Sheet – Caribou Records
Final Report – April 10, 2002
6
Online website description of Mayo School project – http://www.kza.yk.ca/HTML/project/mayo.html
5
grandmother, and mother, and tied these episodes to historical events which affected the
settlement of native peoples in the Northern Plains of the United States and Canada.” 7
In 2002-2003, Dawson City community group Tron’dëk Hwëch’in First Nation received
a $7,700 grant through Canada Council’s Artist and Community Collaboration Fund, which
funded the development of Michelle Olson and Kim Tuson’s interdisciplinary piece Songs
for Shär Cho. Funds enabled the Tron’dëk Hwëch’in First Nation to present workshops
in movement and creation for adults, and songs of the Hän elders and physical
theatre/storytelling for children and youth. These workshops, along with the improved
production of Songs for Shär Cho took place at the Dänojà Zho Cultural Centre. “Songs
for Shär Cho is a twenty minute multi-media piece that reflects the power of the river and
the traditional songs and stories of the Hän people.” 8
7
8
No Home But The Heart Brochure – November 24, 2002
Project Proposal – From the Perspective of Dance Artist – November 15, 2002
Artistes et organismes artistiques du Yukon financés par le Conseil des
Arts du Canada en 2002-2003
Le projet Moving Words - Poetry in Transit, de Whitehorse, a été financé par une
subvention de 4500 $ en 2002-2003, dans le cadre du programme de Projets collectifs
d’écrivains et d’éditeurs, du Conseil des Arts du Canada. Poetry in Transit a publié treize
poèmes écrits par onze poètes de Whitehorse, en anglais et en français. Comme les écrivains
du Nord ont des possibilités de publication limitées, Poetry in Transit leur offre une
solution à ce dilemme. Ainsi, les poètes peuvent être appréciés à leur juste valeur par des
voyageurs de tous les horizons empruntant les transports en commun. Le projet présente
également des avantages pour les voyageurs, dont les journées sont égayées et les
déplacements rendus moins ennuyeux grâce au plaisir qu’ils ont à lire de très beaux poèmes.
Bien que le Conseil ait financé des projets d’affichage de poèmes dans les autobus de
plusieurs provinces, c’est la première fois qu’il en subventionne un dans le Nord.
La Dawson City Music Festival Association a obtenu une subvention de 12 500 $ au titre
du programme d’Aide à la programmation des festivals de musique en 2002-2003, en vue de
financer son festival multiculturel How the West Was REALLY Won: Redefining
Western Music Within The Canadian Mosaic. Le Dawson City Music Festival est l’un
des festivals communautaires pionniers du Canada, qui a récemment élargi son public en
recevant des visiteurs venant non seulement des environs, mais de toute la province. C’est un
cas tout à fait unique en ce sens que les recettes sont dispersées et réinvesties dans la
collectivité, ce qui élève, à son tour, le niveau de vie. Le festival a réuni des populations de
cultures diverses, avec une combinaison d’influences modernes et traditionnelles :
canadiennes-françaises, européennes, moyen-orientales, autochtones, juives, jazz, punk, rock,
et encore beaucoup d’autres.
Gwaandak Theatre Adventures, compagnie de théâtre de Whitehorse, a reçu une
subvention de 9000 $ en 2002-2003 dans le cadre du programme de Subventions de projet
de production en théâtre pour la création/le développement pour artistes établis en vue de
produire West Edmonton Mall, pièce pour un public de jeunes. West Edmonton Mall est
le monologue d’une nouvelle venue à Whitehorse, qui désire échapper aux blues de l’hiver
dans le Nord gelé en s’enfuyant dans le paradis enchanteur du centre commercial
d’Edmonton Ouest. Le personnage principal, Christine, soliloque sur les problèmes
modernes du Yukon, dont « les industries cycliques des ressources, le taux de chômage élevé,
les grands écarts entre riches et pauvres, une population de jeunes nouveaux venus se
mélangeant aux Autochtones et à d’autres résidents de longue date, les extrêmes du climat et
l’isolement9. » De nombreuses productions artistiques du Yukon puisent, bien sûr, dans les
anciennes légendes des Premières nations, mais West Edmonton Mall reflète le monde
d’une femme blanche moderne d’une trentaine d’années, qui a son propre point de vue sur la
vie au Yukon.
En 2002-2003, la cinéaste de Teslin, Carol Geddes, a été la bénéficiaire de fonds totalisant
64 900 $ octroyés par le Bureau de promotion de la diffusion et le Service des arts
médiatiques. Les fonds du Conseil ont permis à Carol Geddes d’établir des contacts avec
plusieurs artistes autochtones de Vancouver, de participer à l’atelier de la Australian Film
9
Description du projet – 15 septembre 2001
Television and Radio School sur l’utilisation des médias et des contes par les cinéastes
autochtones, et de produire une courte vidéo d’animation. En Australie, Carol Geddes a fait
un exposé sur l’accès au financement, les obstacles et problèmes rencontrés par les artistes et
les politiques artistiques et culturelles. Elle a inspiré de nombreux organismes artistiques
australiens avec ses ateliers en décrivant les programmes artistiques et moyens de
financement canadiens, dont ceux du Conseil des Arts du Canada.
Kim Barlow, de Whitehorse, a eu une subvention de 5100 $ en 2002-2003 au titre de l’Aide
aux déplacements pour les festivals de musique, du Conseil des Arts du Canada, qui lui a
permis de participer à des ateliers du Hillside Music Festival en juillet 2002 et de s’y produire.
Les fonds du Conseil ont également permis à Kim Barlow de présenter son œuvre à un
nouveau public plus vaste. Kim Barlow est diplômée en musique classique; elle joue de la
guitare acoustique et électrique, du banjo et du violoncelle, et elle crée « un monde de contes
de fées … de plaisantes histoires de gens, d’amour et de grandes aventures, qui se déroulent
dans les paysages magiques du Yukon10. » Son dernier album, Gingerbread, raconte
comment quelques nouveaux venus ont vécu les sublimes étés du Yukon; l’auteur est inspiré
non seulement par ses propres observations, mais aussi par les conversations avec les
nombreux voyageurs transitant par le Territoire du Yukon.
La Longest Night Society, de Whitehorse, s’est vu accorder une subvention de 7500 $ en
2002-2003, dans le cadre du Programme de répétition et de production de concerts de
musique autochtone, classique, folk, jazz et de musiques du monde en vue de donner deux
concerts au Yukon Arts Centre en décembre 2002. La Longest Night Society produit des
spectacles multidisciplinaires et a donné son concert annuel les nuits du 20 et du
21 décembre 2002, lors du solstice d’hiver. Ces spectacles tournaient autour du thème du
retour au pays, étant donné que le solstice d’hiver est une période où de nombreux artistes
du Yukon rentrent chez eux à la fin de leurs tournées nationales ou internationales. La
Longest Night Society attribue le succès de ces concerts aux fonds du Conseil des Arts du
Canada : « Ces concerts n’auraient pas été possibles sans l’aide du Programme de répétition
et de production de concerts du Conseil. Les fonds alloués nous ont permis de prolonger
notre période de répétition, de payer nos musiciens, d’assurer la promotion des concerts et
de faire vivre au public de Whitehorse un événement électrisant et bien réglé. Longest
Night est à présent un élément immuable du calendrier des arts du Yukon, ce qui est dû en
grande partie à votre aide11. »
John Kobayashi, de Whitehorse, a obtenu une aide sous la forme d’une subvention de
2500 $ en 2002-2003, dans le cadre du programme de Subventions de voyage aux artistes
professionnels offert par le Service des arts visuels en vue d’aller présenter des modèles
architecturaux de la Mayo School du Yukon à la Conférence de 2002 sur les bâtiments
durables, qui a eu lieu à Oslo (Norvège) en septembre 2002. La Mayo School se trouve dans
une petite collectivité de cinq cents résidents et « elle joue de multiples rôles supplémentaires,
dont celui de centre de cérémonie de la collectivité et des Premières nations, de distribution
de secours et de loisirs12. » John Kobayashi a mis au point un modèle pour la Mayo School,
10
Feuille publicitaire distribuée au festival – « Caribou Records »
Rapport final – 10 avril 2002
12
Description sur le Web du projet pour la Mayo School – http://www.kza.yk.ca/HTML/project/mayo.html
11
qui respecte les principes de la conception des bâtiments écologiques et de l’économie
d’énergie, projet passionnant pour les concepteurs en architecture du Nord.
En 2002-2003, la Society of Yukon Artists of Native Ancestry, de Whitehorse, a eu une
subvention de 2900 $ dans le cadre du programme d’Échanges coopératifs entre artistes des
Peuples autochtones – Internationaux. Cette subvention a permis à la ballerine des Premières
nations, Daystar, de collaborer avec les Yukon First Nations Dancers à sa pièce No
Home But The Heart, en vue d’une représentation publique au Yukon Art Centre.
Daystar est l’une des pionnières des Premières nations en ballet et elle a plusieurs décennies
d’expérience. Cette collaboration se poursuivra avec des ateliers traitant de l’art de conter par
la danse et la chorégraphie, et une consultation en formation interculturelle avec les
Northern Lights Dancers. Comme il est dit dans la brochure publicitaire de No Home But
The Heart, « Daystar a puisé dans une série d’événements survenus dans la vie de son
arrière-grand-mère, de sa grand-mère et de sa mère et elle a rattaché ces épisodes à des
événements historiques déterminants pour la sédentarisation des peuples autochtones des
plaines du Nord des États-Unis et du Canada13. »
En 2002-2003, le groupe communautaire de Dawson City, Tron’dëk Hwëch’in First
Nation, a eu une subvention de 7700 $ au titre du Fonds de collaboration entre les artistes
et la communauté du Conseil des Arts du Canada, qui a permis de financer la pièce
interdisciplinaire Songs for Shär Cho de Michelle Olson et de Kim Tuson. Grâce à ces
fonds, le groupe Tron’dëk Hwëch’in First Nation a pu tenir des ateliers pour adultes sur
le mouvement et la création et présenter des chants d’aînés Hän ainsi que des pièces de
théâtre gestuel et des contes pour enfants et jeunes. Ces ateliers, ainsi que la production
améliorée de Songs for Shär Cho, ont été présentés au Dänojà Zho Cultural Centre.
« Songs for Shär Cho est une pièce multimédia de vingt minutes qui témoigne du pouvoir
de la rivière et présente les chants et contes traditionnels du peuple Hän14. »
13
14
No Home But The Heart Brochure – 24 novembre 2002
Projet – From the Perspective of Dance Artist – 15 novembre 2002
Table 1 - Funding to the Arts by Discipline, Yukon Territory, 2002-2003
Tableau 1 - Aide aux arts par discipline, Territoire du Yukon, 2002-2003
Artists/
Artistes
Arts Organizations/
Organismes
Total
artistiques
Aboriginal Arts Secretariat/Secrétariat des arts autochtones
$4,900
$6,100
$11,000
Art Bank/Banque d'oeuvres d'art
$4,190
$0
$4,190
Dance/Danse
$11,500
$5,000
$16,500
Director's Office/Bureau de la directrice
$0
$0
$0
Director of the Arts Division/Directrice de la Division des arts
$0
$17,700
$17,700
Endowments & Prizes/Prix et dotations
$0
$0
$0
Equity/Équité
$0
$0
$0
Interdisciplinary Arts/Arts interdisciplinaires
$0
$0
$0
Media Arts/Arts médiatiques
$139,400
$0
$139,400
Music/Musique
$21,600
$25,000
$46,600
Outreach/Promotion de la diffusion
$2,000
$6,791
$8,791
Theatre/Théâtre
$16,500
$112,500
$129,000
Visual Arts/Arts visuels
$39,000
$35,600
$74,600
$0
$47,175
$47,175
$239,090
$255,866
$494,956
Writing and Publishing/Lettres et édition
Total - Yukon Territory/Territoire du Yukon
Total - Canada
$129,467,062
Grants to Yukon Territory as a % of Total canada Council Funding, 2002-2003:
0.4%
Pourcentage des subventions attribuées au Territoire du Yukon par rapport
au financement total du Conseil des Arts du Canada, 2002-2003:
0.4%
Table 2 - List of Grants by Community, Yukon Territory, 2002-2003
Tableau 3 - Liste des subventions par collectivité, Territoire du Yukon, 2002-2003
DAWSON CITY
$26,631
OLD CROW
$18,400
TESLIN
$64,900
WHITEHORSE
$385,025
Total - Yukon Territory/Territoire du Yukon
$494,956
Total – Canada
$129,467,062
Grants to Yukon Territory as a % of Total Canada Council Funding,
0.4%
2002-2003:
Pourcentage des subventions attribuées au Territoire du Yukon par rapport au financement
total du Conseil des Arts du Cannada, 2002-2003:
Table 3 - Detailed List of Grants to the Yukon by Territory, 2002-2003
Tableau 3 - Liste detaillée des subventions au Territoire du Yukon, 2002-2003
Grants to Artists/Subventions aux artistes
Art Bank
$4,190
Banque d'oeuvres d'art
De Repentigny, Halin
DAWSON CITY
$1,990
Peters, Christina
WHITEHORSE
$2,200
Outreach
$2,000
Promotion de la diffusion
Geddes, Carol
TESLIN
Aboriginal Arts Secretariat
$2,000
$4,900
Secrétariat des arts autochtones
Geddes, Carol
TESLIN
$2,900
Van Kampen, Ukjese
WHITEHORSE
$2,000
Dance
$11,500
Danse
Lotenberg, Gail M.
WHITEHORSE
Media Arts
$11,500
$139,400
Arts médiatiques
Code, Allan R.
WHITEHORSE
Code, Mary Ila
WHITEHORSE
$19,000
Geddes, Carol
TESLIN
$60,000
Moses, Mary Jane
OLD CROW
$18,400
Music
$42,000
$21,600
Musique
Barlow, Kim Anne
WHITEHORSE
$11,100
Genest, Anne Louise
WHITEHORSE
$2,500
Janke, Daniel Jacob
WHITEHORSE
$8,000
Theatre
$16,500
Théâtre
Hamson, Leslie Marilyn
WHITEHORSE
$2,000
Miyagawa, Mitchell Hisao
WHITEHORSE
$14,500
Visual Arts
$39,000
Arts visuels
Anderson, Ken Ingemund
WHITEHORSE
$750
Kobayashi, John
WHITEHORSE
$2,500
Steins, John Leopold
DAWSON
Van Kampen, Ukjese
WHITEHORSE
Total Yukon Grants to Individual Artists, 2002-2003:
$750
$35,000
$239,090
Subventions totales octroyées aux artistes individuels au Yukon, 2002-2003:
Grants to Arts Organizations/Subventions aux organismes artistiques
Outreach
$6,791
Promotion de la diffusion
Odd Gallery
DAWSON
Yukon Arts Centre
WHITEHORSE
$2,700
Yukon International Storytelling Festival
WHITEHORSE
$3,000
Aboriginal Arts Secretariat
$1,091
$6,100
Secrétariat des arts autochtones
Arctic Athabaskan Council
WHITEHORSE
$3,200
The Society of Yukon Artists of Native Ancestry
WHITEHORSE
$2,900
Director of the Arts Division
$17,700
Yukon Public Libraries
WHITEHORSE
Trondek Hwechin First Nation
DAWSON CITY
Dance
$10,000
$7,700
$5,000
Danse
LINK Dance Foundation
WHITEHORSE
Music
$5,000
$25,000
Musique
Dawson City Music Festival Association
DAWSON CITY
$12,500
Longest Night Society
WHITEHORSE
$7,500
Undertakin' Daddies
WHITEHORSE
$5,000
Theatre
$112,500
Théâtre
Gwaandak Theatre Adventures
WHITEHORSE
$9,000
Nakai Theatre Ensemble
WHITEHORSE
$91,300
Wet Womens Experimental Theatre
WHITEHORSE
$12,200
Visual Arts
$35,600
Arts visuels
Dawson City Arts Society
DAWSON
Yukon Arts Centre
WHITEHORSE
Writing and Publishing
$2,600
$33,000
$47,175
Lettres et édition
Department of Business, Tourism & Culture
WHITEHORSE
$4,500
Longest Night Society
WHITEHORSE
$8,000
Lost Moose Publishing
WHITEHORSE
$7,500
Yukon International Storytelling Festival
WHITEHORSE
$23,500
Yukon Public Libraries, Dept. of Community Services, Gov't of Yukon
WHITEHORSE
$3,675
Total Yukon Grants to Arts Organizations, 2002-2003:
Subventions totales octroyées aux artistes individuels au Yukon, 2002-2003:
$255,866
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising