GRANTS TO YUKON TERRITORY SUBVENTIONS AU TERRITOIRE DU YUKON

GRANTS TO YUKON TERRITORY  SUBVENTIONS AU TERRITOIRE DU YUKON
Provincial and Territorial Profiles, 2004-2005 /
Profils provinciaux et territoriaux, 2004-2005
GRANTS TO YUKON TERRITORY
SUBVENTIONS AU TERRITOIRE DU YUKON
Research Unit / Unité de recherche
The Canada Council for the Arts / Le Conseil des Arts du Canada
August 2005 / août 2005
Funding to Yukon Territory, 2004-2005
• In 2004-2005, the Canada Council for the Arts provided $346,000 in grants to artists and arts
organizations in the Yukon.
• In addition to grants, $6,202 in payments was provided to 22 authors through the Public Lending Right
Program1. This brings the total amount of Canada Council funding to the Yukon to over $352,000 in
2004-2005.
• The Council awarded $274,200 to 10 arts organizations in the Yukon, and $71,700 to 10 Yukon artists in
2004-2005.
•
Grants were awarded in many disciplines - dance, media arts, music, theatre, visual arts, and writing and
publishing. The largest amounts of funding went to theatre ($126,400), followed by visual arts ($65,800)
and media arts ($43,500).
• In 2004-2005, artists and arts organizations in Dawson City, Old Crow, Pelly Crossing, Watson Lake and
Whitehorse received funds, with 93% of funds awarded to Whitehorse.
• 4 Yukon artists and arts professionals served as peer assessors in 2004-2005, making up 0.6% of all peer
assessors.
•
Yukon artists and arts organizations received 0.3% of Canada Council funding in 2004-2005. As of
January 2005, the population of the Yukon made up less than 0.1% of the Canadian population, and
0.2% of Canadian artists.2
•
69 applications from Yukon artists and arts organizations were submitted to Council in 2004-2005,
representing 0.4% of the total number of received applications.
•
Close to $28 million was spent on culture by all levels of government in the Yukon in 2002-2003.3 Per
capita cultural spending in the Yukon ranks second among provinces/territories in terms of the federal
contribution ($497) and first in terms of the provincial/territorial investment ($406). 4
The Public Lending Right Program provides payments to authors whose books are held in selected Canadian libraries.
Hill Stategies Research, Artists in Canada’s Provinces, Territories and Metropolitan Areas. (based on Census 2001)
3 Statistics Canada: Government expenditures on culture: data tables, January 2005, catalogue no 87F0001XIE.
4 Statistics Canada: The Daily, Thursday January 27, 2005, Government Expenditure on Culture 2002/03.
1
2
Aide attribuée au Territoire du Yukon, 2004-2005
•
En 2004-2005, le Conseil des Arts du Canada a accordé 346 000 $ aux arts du Yukon.
•
Un montant de 6 202 $ a en outre été payé à 22 écrivains et écrivaines du Yukon dans le cadre du
Programme du droit de prêt public5, ce qui porte à plus de 352 000 $ l’aide attribuée au Yukon en 20042005.
•
Le Conseil a accordé 71 700 $ en paiements à 10 artistes du Yukon, ainsi que 274 200 $ à 10 organismes
artistiques de ce territoire en 2004-2005.
•
L’aide du Conseil a touché toutes les disciplines - danse, musique, théâtre, arts visuels, arts médiatiques,
et lettres et édition. Le plus gros pourcentage de l’aide est allé au théâtre (126 400 $), puis aux arts
visuels (65 800 $) et aux arts médiatiques (43 500 $).
•
En 2004-2005, des artistes et organismes artistiques à Dawson City, Old Crow, Pelly Crossing, Watson
Lake et à Whitehorse ont reçu du soutien financier: 93 % de ces fonds ont été accordés aux artistes et
organismes artistiques de Whitehorse.
•
4 artistes et professionnels des arts ont été engagés comme membres de jurys, évaluateurs et conseillers
en 2004-2005, ce qui représente 0,6 % de tous les membres de jurys auxquels le Conseil fait appel.
•
Les artistes et organismes artistiques du Yukon ont reçu 0,3 % des subventions du Conseil des Arts du
Canada en 2004-2005. Le territoire représente un peu moins de 0,1 % de la population canadienne, et
0,2 % des artistes Canadiens.6
•
69 demandes d’appui ont été soumises au Conseil par des artistes et des organismes artistiques du
Yukon en 2004-2005, ce qui représente 0,4 % des demandes reçues.
•
Près de 28 millions de dollars ont été consacrés à la culture dans ce territoire par tous les paliers de
gouvernement en 2002-2003.7 Les dépenses du gouvernement fédéral par personne au chapitre de la
culture placent le Yukon au second rang des provinces/territoires avec 497 $. Le Yukon se place au
premier rang au niveau des dépenses des gouvernements provinciaux/territoriaux avec 406 $ par
personne.8
Le Programme du droit de prêt public accorde des paiements aux auteurs dont les livres font partie des collections d’un échantillon de
bibliothèques canadiennes.
6 Hill Stratégies Recherche, Les artistes par province, territoire et région métropolitaine du Canada. (selon le recensement de 2001)
7 Statistique Canada: Dépenses publiques au titre de la culture: tableaux de données, janvier 2005, catalogue 87F0001XIE
8 Statistique Canada: Le Quotidien, le jeudi 27 janvier 2005, Dépenses publiques au chapitre de la culture, 2002-2003.
5
Yukon Territory Artists and Arts Organizations Funded by the Canada Council in 20042005
Major Organizations
The Canada Council supports the work of major artistic organizations in each of the country’s Provinces
and Territories. In 2004-2005, among other Yukon institutions to receive funding were:
• Nakai Theatre ($68,400)
• Gwaandak Theatre Adventures ($40,000)
• Yukon Arts Centre Public Art Gallery ($58,800)
• Yukon International Storytelling Festival ($37,600)
Supporting Diversity in Excellence
Council also supports professional artists and artistic organizations’ endeavors through a great diversity of
programs. The following selection illustrates the scope the projects supported by Council in the Yukon.
The Dawson City Arts Society’s contemporary visual arts centre Odd Gallery was awarded a total of
$8,000 in grants through the Council’s Project Assistance to Visual Arts and Fine Crafts Organizations in
2004-2005 for two exhibitions. Odd Gallery invited Montreal-based artist Pierre Dalpé to showcase his
digitally manipulated works on the themes of identity, gender and visual perception. Costuming, disguises,
and fabrication were used to portray ambiguousness with the purpose of making people think twice about
gender assumptions based on visual features. Council funds also contributed to The Natural and the
Manufactured Residency and Site-Specific Exhibition Project which showcased Vancouver artist
Shirley Wiebe and Demmitt, AB artist Peter von Tisenhausen’s work using natural, found and manufactured
objects. This project provides “a reinterpretation of regional geography and the relationship between
various cultural and economic uses of land and resources and will explore new political, social, economic
and aesthetic agendas and their impact on the landscape and social infrastructure.”9
In 2004-2005, former Juno nominee Kim Barlow, of Whitehorse, received a $2,800 grant through the
Music Festival Travel Grants program for main stage performances and workshops at the Lunenburg Folk
Harbour Festival in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia. Barlow is a nationally acclaimed musician who has a solid fan
base, however was least familiar in her hometown of Lunenburg, hence this opportunity allowed her to
reach a wider audience, including people who knew her and “who were curious to hear what ‘little Kimmy
Barlow is up to these days.’”10 Barlow released her third full length CD luckyburden, an interesting
“collection of songs about work, love, and mixed blessings in Keno City, the centre of Yukon silver mining
from 1914 to 1989.”11
The Canada Council supported emerging and small press Lost Moose Publishing, established in
Yellowknife, with grants totaling $10,800 through the Book Publishing Support: Emerging Publisher Grants
and Book Publishing Support: Author Promotion Tours programs in 2004-2005. Council funds contributed
to the publication and promotion of Yukon’s most accomplished poet Erling Friis-Baastad’s Wood
Dawson City Arts Society Project Description – September 13th, 2004
Kim Barlow Final Report – January 24th, 2005
11 Kim Barlow Luckyburden promotional sheet – January 24th, 2005
9
10
Spoken: New and Selected Poems. Lost Moose Publishing has put out two literary anthologies of
northern writers and publishes works of literary fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction by local authors on
regional subjects. In 2004, Lost Moose Publishing commissioned pieces for an anthology series slated for
publication in 2005 which includes: “encounter stories, tales, legends, memoir and poetry on the subject of
bears and their role as figures of symbolic power, inspirers of fear and awe and representations of
wilderness.”12
Two Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation media artists, Tracy Kassi and Mary Jane Moses, of Old Crow, were
able to present their thirty-five minute documentary Imprints of Our Ancestors at the Tromso
International “Films from the North” Film Festival in Norway with $3,000 each in grants through the
Council’s Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange: International program in 2004-2005. The educational
film describes elements of the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation people including the significance of oral
storytelling, places and history. Through the film festival, both Kassi and Moses had the opportunity to
exchange ideas on film-making techniques with female filmmakers of the Saami, a Norwegian aboriginal
culture.
Gwaandak Theatre Adventures, established in Whitehorse, was supported by the Council through a total
of $40,000 in several grants through the Aboriginal Arts Secretariat and Theatre Sections in 2004-2005.
Council funds contributed to the production of Where the River Meets the Sea, tour of West Edmonton
Mall throughout the Yukon, Northwest Territories and British Columbia, operating costs and travel to
Montreal to connect with Teesri Duniya Theatre and see CentaurTheatre’s production of Tiger Heart. The
play Where The River Meets the Sea questions conventional wisdom pertaining to race, heritage, relationships,
ethnicity and land claim rights. Single mother and urbanite Lu-Anne tries hard to suppress memories of her
old life. However, her teenage daughter discovers secrets and spirits among the shore where Lu-Anne’s
urban developer boyfriend is planning the construction of a new set of condos. The play provokes the
question of: “Will secrets of the shore, and within Lu herself, destroy her ties with the people she loves?”13
David Connors of Whitehorse was awarded a $36,000 grant through the Council’s Grants to Film and
Video Artists: Production Grants program to produce the 15 minute long documentary style film Artifacts
in 2004-2005. Artifacts is an unique film in which an elderly man with unusual habits named Milos who lives
in the derelict town of Keno City (current population of 12!) - once a flourishing mining community during
the Gold Rush, meets Greg, a young visitor with a connection to the ghost town. Artifacts is one of the few
films which deal with “the contemporary reality of the Yukon and the after-effects of both personal and
cultural obsessions with the North’s romantic past.”14
The Canada Council supported Watson Lake Music Festival’s invitation of Fairbanks, Alaska group
Nak’atista with a $3,000 grant through the Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange: International
program in 2004-2005. Nak’atista, translated as “love”, is an upbeat country rock group which plays both
original and traditional music in their native language. Nak’atista also provided a half-day music workshop
for festival attendees. Set in a remote Yukon community, the Watson Lake Music Festival encourages
interactive and diverse music styles: folk, contemporary Christian gospel, traditional rock, fiddle, country
and once even featured the Rajasthani, a South Asian folk dance. Festival attendees are often invited to
interact in sing-alongs with the musicians.
Lost Moose Publishing – Report on the Publishing Program – October 30th, 2003
Gwaandak Theatre Adventures – Where the River Meets the Sea Project Description - February 29th, 2004
14 Andrew Connors – Artifacts Artistic Concept – March 1st, 2004
12
13
Artistes et organisations artistiques du Territoire du Yukon subventionnés par le
Conseil des Arts du Canada, 2004-2005
Importantes organisations artistiques
Le Conseil des Arts du Canada appuie le travail d’importantes organisations artistiques dans chacune des
provinces et chacun des territoires. En 2004-2005, parmi les institutions du Territoire du Yukon qui ont
bénéficié d’un financement on trouve:
• Nakai Theatre ($68,400)
• Gwaandak Theatre Adventures ($40,000)
• Yukon Arts Centre Public Art Gallery ($58,800)
• Yukon International Storytelling Festival ($37,600)
À l’appui de l’excellence dans toute sa diversité
Le Conseil des Arts appuie en outre les projets d’artistes et d’organismes artistiques professionnels par
l’entremise d’une vaste gamme de programmes. Le texte qui suit illustre bien la diversité des projets appuyés
par le Conseil des Arts du Canada pour le Territoire du Yukon.
La Odd Gallery, un centre d’arts visuels contemporains affilié à la Dawson City Arts Society, a reçu des
subventions totalisant 8 000 $ du programme Aide de projet aux organismes d’arts visuels et de métiers d’art
pour la tenue de deux expositions en 2004-2005. La Odd Gallery a invité Pierre Dalpé, artiste montréalais, à
présenter ses œuvres numérisées sur les thèmes de l’identité, des questions liées aux sexes et de la perception
visuelle. Il utilise des costumes, des déguisements et des éléments fabriqués pour illustrer l’ambiguïté et
amener les visiteurs à remettre en cause les a priori sur les sexes qui sont fondés sur de simples éléments
visuels. Les subventions du Conseil ont également servi à la mise sur pied de l’événement The Natural and
the Manufactured Residency and Site-Specific Exhibition Project, qui a servi de vitrine aux artistes
Shirley Wiebe, de Vancouver, et Peter von Tisenhausen, de Demmitt, en Alberta, qui travaillent à partir
d’éléments naturels, recyclés et industriels. Le projet propose une « interprétation revue et corrigée de la
géographie régionale et de la relation entre les diverses utilisations culturelles et économiques des sols et des
ressources, en plus de poser un regard neuf sur les questions de l’heure dans les domaines politique, social,
économique ou esthétique et de leurs impacts sur l’aménagement du territoire et l’infrastructure sociale15.
En 2004-2005, l’artiste de Whitehorse Kim Barlow, finaliste aux Prix Juno, a reçu une subvention de
2 800 $ du programme Aide aux déplacements pour les festivals de musique. Les fonds ont permis à l’artiste
de se produire sur la grande scène et à divers ateliers du Lunenburg Folk Harbour Festival, en NouvelleÉcosse. Comme nul n’est prophète en son pays, cette artiste reconnue et très populaire partout au pays était
peu connue dans sa ville natale de Lunenburg. Ce fut donc pour elle une occasion en or d’élargir son public
et d’y accueillir notamment ceux qui « la connaissent depuis toujours et qui ont été ravis d’entendre ce que la
petite Barlow avait à leur dire16 ». Barlow a lancé un troisième CD pleine longueur, Luckyburden, un
intéressant « recueil de chansons sur des sujets aussi variés que le travail, l’amour et les grâces parfois subtiles
de Keno City, le centre névralgique de l’exploitation des gisements d’argent du Yukon entre 1914 et 198917
Description fournie par le Dawson City Arts Society Project – le 13 septembre 2004. [Traduction]
Rapport final sur Kim Barlow – le 24 janvier 2005. [Traduction]
17 Dossier promotionnel de l’album Luckyburden, de Kim Barlow – le 24 janvier 2005. [Traduction]
15
16
Le Conseil des Arts du Canada a donné son appui à une nouvelle maison d’édition de petite envergure, Lost
Moose Publishing, établie à Yellowknife, en lui octroyant des subventions totalisant 10 800 $ par
l’entremise des programme Aide à l'édition de livres - Subventions aux nouveaux éditeurs et Subventions
globales : Tournées de promotion pour les auteurs 2004-2005. Le Conseil a ainsi contribué à la publication
et à la promotion de New and Selected Poems, un recueil du plus grand poète du Yukon, Erling FriisBaastad’s Wood Spoken. Lost Moose Publishing a publié deux anthologies littéraires d’écrivains du Nord
ainsi que des œuvres de fiction littéraire, de la poésie et des ouvrages créatifs non romanesques sur des sujets
régionaux, écrits par des auteurs de la région. En 2004, Lost Moose Publishing a demandé à des auteurs de
lui proposer des œuvres en vue de la publication de pièces choisies en 2005. Les thèmes retenus sont « les
récits de rencontre avec des ours, les contes, les légendes, les mémoires et la poésie inspirés par la puissance
d’évocation symbolique de ces créatures qui suscitent autant la crainte que l’émerveillement et qui
représentent de véritables icônes de l’immensité sauvage18 ».
Au titre du volet international du programme Échanges coopératifs entre artistes des Peuples autochtones
pour 2004-2005, le Conseil a versé des subventions de 3 000 $ aux artistes médiatiques Tracy Kassi et
Mary Jane Moses, membres de la Première nation des Vuntut Gwitchin et vivant à Old Crow. Cette aide
leur a permis de présenter Imprints of Our Ancestors, un documentaire de 35 minutes, au Festival
international de cinéma nordique de Tromso, en Norvège. Ce film éducatif dépeint certains aspects de la
Première nation Vuntut Gwitchin, notamment l’importance accordée à la transmission orale des contes, les
lieux et l’histoire. Le Festival a été l’occasion d’un échange sur les techniques cinématographiques entre
Kassi et Moses et des consoeurs cinéastes lapones, des Autochtones de la Norvège.
Gwaandak Theatre Adventures, compagnie de théâtre établie à Whitehorse, a reçu au total 40 000 $ en
subventions des sections Arts autochtones et Théâtre pour la saison 2004-2005. Ces fonds du Conseil ont
servi à la production de Where the River Meets the Sea, à la tournée West Edmonton Mall partout au
Yukon, dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest et en Colombie-Britannique, en plus de couvrir les frais
d’exploitation et d’un voyage à Montréal pour établir des liens avec le Teesri Duniya Theatre et voir le
spectacle Tiger’s Heart au Théâtre Centaur. La pièce Where The River Meets the Sea met en cause les idées reçues
sur les questions de race, de patrimoine, de relations, d’ethnicité et de droits en matière de revendications
territoriales. Lu-Anne est une mère vivant seule dans un contexte urbain. Elle tente par tous les moyens de
réprimer les souvenirs de son ancienne vie. Cependant, sa fille adolescente découvre les secrets et l’esprit du
littoral où l’ami de coeur de Lu-Anne, un promoteur de l’expansion urbaine, envisage de construire un îlot
de logements en copropriété. Au coeur de l’œuvre se trouve la question suivante : « Les secrets du littoral,
enfouis par Lu en son for intérieur, finiront-ils par détruire ses liens avec les gens qu’elle aime19? »
David Connors, de Whitehorse, a reçu en 2004-2005 une bourse de 36 000 $ du programme Subventions
aux artistes du cinéma et de la vidéo : Production pour la réalisation du court-métrage documentaire
Artifacts, d’une durée de 15 minutes. De facture unique, le film raconte l’histoire d’une rencontre, celle de
Milos, un aîné très original qui habite, avec 11 concitoyens, la ville fantôme de Keno City, ville minière
prospère au temps de la ruée vers l’or, et de Greg, un jeune visiteur ayant des liens avec cette ville
abandonnée. Artifacts est l’un des rares films qui traite de la « réalité contemporaine du Yukon et des
empreintes laissées dans le Nord par l’obsession, à la fois personnelle et culturelle, d’un passé romantique
révolu20
Lost Moose Publishing – Rapport du programme Aide à l’édition – le 30 octobre 2003.
Gwaandak Theatre Adventures – Description du projet Where the River Meets the Sea – le 29 février 2004. [Traduction]
20 Andrew Connors – Concept artistique Artifacts – le 1er mars 2004. [Traduction]
18
19
Le Conseil des Arts du Canada a aidé le Watson Lake Music Festival à accueillir le groupe Nak’atista, de
Fairbanks en Alaska, en lui versant une subvention de 3 000 $ du volet international du programme
Échanges coopératifs entre artistes des Peuples autochtones pour 2004-2005. Nak’atista – Amour en français
– est un groupe country rock joyeux qui propose un mélange de chansons de son cru et traditionnelles dans
sa langue maternelle. Nak’atista a également animé un atelier musical d’une demi-journée à l’intention des
festivaliers. Déployé dans une collectivité éloignée du Yukon, le Watson Lake Music Festival fait la part belle
à des styles de musique interactifs et diversifiés : folk, gospel chrétien contemporain, rock traditionnel,
folklore de violoneux, country – il a même déjà accueilli le groupe Rajasthani, spécialisé dans la musique de
danse traditionnelle de l’Asie du Sud. Les spectateurs sont souvent invités à participer aux prestations des
musiciens.
Table 1 - Funding to the Arts by Discipline, Yukon Territory, 2004-2005
Tableau 1 - Aide aux arts par discipline, Territoire du Yukon, 2004-2005
Artists /
Artistes
Arts
Organizations /
Organismes
artistiques
Total
Aboriginal Arts Secretariat / Secrétariat des arts autochtones
$11,400
$9,000
$20,400
Art Bank / Banque d'oeuvres d'art
$2,000
$0
$2,000
Dance / Danse
$0
$15,000
$15,000
Director's Office / Bureau du Directeur
$0
$0
$0
Director of the Arts Division / Directeur de la Division des arts
$0
$6,000
$6,000
Endowments & Prizes / Prix et dotations
$0
$4,800
$4,800
Equity / Équité
$0
$0
$0
Interdisciplinary Arts / Arts interdisciplinaires
$0
$0
$0
Media Arts / Arts médiatiques
$43,500
$0
$43,500
Music / Musique
$2,800
$7,500
$10,300
$0
$9,300
$9,300
$2,000
$124,400
$126,400
$0
$65,800
$65,800
Writing and Publishing / Lettres et édition
$10,000
$32,415
$42,415
Total - Yukon Territory / Territoire du Yukon
$71,700
$274,215
$345,915
Outreach / Promotion de la diffusion
Theatre / Théâtre
Visual Arts / Arts visuels
Total - Canada
$121,455,742
Grants to Yukon Territory as a % of Total Canada Council Funding, 2004-2005:
Pourcentage des subventions attribuées au Territoire du Yukon par rapport au financement total du
Conseil des Arts du Canada, 2004-2005:
0.3%
Table 1 - List of Grants by Community, Yukon Territory, 2004-2005
Tableau 2 - List des subventions par collectivité, Territoire du Yukon, 2004-2005
DAWSON
OLD CROW
$8,000
$11,000
PELLY CROSSING
$2,000
WATSON LAKE
$3,000
WHITEHORSE
$321,915
Total - Yukon Territory / Territoire du Yukon
$345,915
Total - Canada
$121,455,742
Grants to Yukon Territory as a % of Total Canada Council Funding, 2004-2005:
Pourcentage des subventions attribuées au Territoire du Yukon par rapport au financement total
du Conseil des Arts du Canada, 2004-2005:
0.3%
Table 3 - Detailed List of Grants to the Yukon Territory by Discipline, 2004-2005
Tableau 3 - Liste détaillée des subventions au Territoire du Yukon par discipline, 2004-2005
Grants to Individual Artists / Subventions aux artistes individuels
Aboriginal Arts Secretariat / Secrétariat des arts autochtones
$11,400
Edzerza, Gerald
WATSON LAKE
$3,000
Kassi, Tracy
OLD CROW
$3,000
Linklater, Leonard A.
WHITEHORSE
$1,400
Moses, Mary Jane
OLD CROW
$3,000
Shorty, Sharon Jean
WHITEHORSE
$1,000
Art Bank / Banque d'œuvres d'art
Alfred, Eugene
$2,000
PELLY CROSSING
Media Arts / Art médiatiques
$2,000
$43,500
Connors, Andrew David
WHITEHORSE
$36,000
Davis, Paul
WHITEHORSE
$2,500
Kassi, Tracy
OLD CROW
$2,500
Moses, Mary Jane
OLD CROW
$2,500
Music / Musique
Barlow, Kimberly Anne
$2,800
WHITEHORSE
Theatre / Théâtre
Clark, Michael Scott
$2,000
WHITEHORSE
Writing and Publishing / Lettres et édition
Robertson, Patricia Anne
$2,800
$2,000
$10,000
WHITEHORSE
$10,000
Total Yukon Grants to Individual Artists, 2004-2005:
Subventions totales octroyées aux artistes individuels au Territoire du Yukon, 2004-2005:
$71,700
Grants to Arts Organizations / Subventions aux organismes artistiques
Aboriginal Arts Secretariat / Secrétariat des arts autochtones
Yukon International Storytelling Festival
$9,000
WHITEHORSE
Dance / Danse
Yukon Arts Centre Public Art Gallery
$9,000
$15,000
WHITEHORSE
$15,000
Director of the Arts Division / Directeur de la Division des arts
Yukon Arts Centre Public Art Gallery
$6,000
WHITEHORSE
Endowments and Prizes / Prix et dotations
Yukon International Storytelling Festival
$4,800
WHITEHORSE
Music / Musique
Longest Night Society
$6,000
$4,800
$7,500
WHITEHORSE
Outreach / Promotion de la diffusion
$7,500
$9,300
Frostbite Music Society
WHITEHORSE
$2,800
Yukon International Storytelling Festival
WHITEHORSE
$6,500
Theatre / Théâtre
$124,400
Gwaandak Theatre Adventures
WHITEHORSE
$40,000
Nakai Theatre Ensemble
WHITEHORSE
$68,400
The Society of Yukon Artists of Native Ancestry
WHITEHORSE
$16,000
Visual Arts / Arts visuels
$65,800
Dawson City Arts Society
DAWSON
The Society of Yukon Artists of Native Ancestry
WHITEHORSE
$20,000
Yukon Arts Centre Public Art Gallery
WHITEHORSE
$37,800
Writing and Publishing / Lettres et édition
$8,000
$32,415
Lost Moose Publishing
WHITEHORSE
$10,800
Yukon International Storytelling Festival
WHITEHORSE
$17,300
Yukon Public Libraries, Dept. of Community Services, Gov't of Yukon
WHITEHORSE
$4,315
Total Yukon Territory Grants to Arts Organizations, 2004-2005:
Subventions totales octroyées aux organismes artistiques au Territoire du Yukon, 2004-2005:
$274,215
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising