SUPREME COURT OF COUR SUPRÊME DU CANADA

SUPREME COURT  OF COUR SUPRÊME DU CANADA
SUPREME COURT OF
CANADA
COUR SUPRÊME DU
CANADA
BULLETIN OF
PROCEEDINGS
BULLETIN DES
PROCÉDURES
This Bulletin is published at the direction of the
Registrar and is for general information only. It
is not to be used as evidence of its content,
which, if required, should be proved by
Certificate of the Registrar under the Seal of the
Court. While every effort is made to ensure
accuracy, no responsibility is assumed for errors
or omissions.
Ce Bulletin, publié sous l'autorité du registraire,
ne vise qu'à fournir des renseignements
d'ordre général. Il ne peut servir de preuve de
son contenu. Celle-ci s'établit par un certificat
du registraire donné sous le sceau de la Cour.
Rien n'est négligé pour assurer l'exactitude du
contenu,
mais
la Cour décline toute
responsabilité pour les erreurs ou omissions.
During Court sessions the Bulletin is usually
issued week ly.
Le Bulletin paraît en principe toutes les
semaines pendant les sessions de la Cour.
Where a judgment has been rendered, requests
for copies should be made to the Registrar, with
a remittance of $15 for each set of reasons. All
remittances should be made payable to the
Receiver General for Canada.
Quand un arrêt est rendu, on peut se procurer
les motifs de jugement en adressant sa
demande au registraire, accompagnée de 15 $
par exemplaire. Le paiement doit être fait à
l'ordre du Receveur général du Canada.
Consult the Supreme Court of Canada website
at www.scc-csc.gc.ca for more information.
Pour de plus amples informations, consulter le
site Web de la Cour suprême du Canada à
l’adresse suivante : www.scc-csc.gc.ca
December 21, 2012
© Supreme Court of Canada (2012)
ISSN 1918-8358 (Online)
1984 - 2050
Le 21 décembre 2012
© Cour suprême du Canada (2012)
ISSN 1918-8358 (En ligne)
CONTENTS
TABLE DES MATIÈRES
Applications for leave to appeal
filed
1984 - 1985
Applications for leave submitted
to Court since last issue
1986
Demandes d'autorisation d'appel
déposées
Demandes soumises à la Cour depuis la
dernière parution
Judgments on applications for
leave
1987 - 2011
Jugements rendus sur les demandes
d'autorisation
Motions
2012 - 2014
Requêtes
Notices of appeal filed since last
issue
2015
Avis d'appel déposés depuis la dernière
parution
Appeals heard since last issue and
disposition
2016
Appels entendus depuis la dernière
parution et résultat
Pronouncements of appeals reserved
2017 - 2019
Jugements rendus sur les appels en
délibéré
Headnotes of recent judgments
2020 - 2049
Sommaires de jugements récents
Agenda
2050
Calendrier
NOTICE
Case summaries included in the Bulletin are prepared by the Office of the Registrar of the
Supreme Court of Canada (Law Branch) for information purposes only.
AVIS
Les résumés de dossiers publiés dans le bulletin sont préparés par le Bureau du registraire
(Direction générale du droit) uniquement à titre d’information.
DEMANDES D’AUTORISATION
D’APPEL DÉPOSÉES
APPLICATIONS FOR LEAVE TO
APPEAL FILED
Roger Edouard Mercier
Roger Edouard Mercier
Dax Richard Mack
Laura K. Stevens
Dawson Stevens Duckett & Shaigec
v. (35120)
v. (35093)
Attorney General of Nova Scotia et al. (N.S.)
Duane Eddy
A.G. of Nova Scotia
Her Majesty the Queen (Alta.)
Susan D. Hughson, Q.C.
A.G. of Alberta
FILING DATE: 19.11.2012
FILING DATE: 23.11.2012
Angelo Piro
Bryan Fromstein
Rosen Fromstein LLP
Jisheng Liu
Jisheng Liu
v. (35108)
v. (35127)
Enbridge Gas Distribution Inc. (Ont.)
Reid Lester
Laishley Reed LLP
McGill University (Que.)
Nathalie Gagnon
McCarthy Tétrault LLP
FILING DATE: 29.11.2012
FILING DATE: 23.11.2012
Gregory P. King
Sean Dewart
Dewart Gleason LLP
Italo Tony Montaldi, also known as Tony
Montaldi, also known as Italo Montaldi
V. Ross Morrison
Morrison Brown Sosnovitch
v. (35109)
v. (35110)
Mario Venezia in his capacity as trustee in
bankruptcy of Sincies Chiementin (Ont.)
Randy A. Pepper
Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP
Enbridge Gas Distribution Inc. (Ont.)
Reid Lester
Laishley Reed LLP
FILING DATE: 29.11.2012
FILING DATE: 29.11.2012
Melanie Anne Lay et al.
Rod Pantony
Her Majesty the Queen
David W. Schermbrucker
Public Prosecution Service of Canada
v. (35112)
v. (35115)
Bradley Lay et al. (Alta.)
Renée V. Reichelt
McCarthy Tétrault LLP
Level Aaron Carvery (N.S.)
Luke A. Craggs
Newton & Associates
FILING DATE: 29.11.2012
FILING DATE: 03.12.2012
- 1984 -
APPLICATIONS FOR LEAVE TO APPEAL
FILED
DEMANDES D'AUTORISATION D'APPEL
DÉPOSÉES
1207192 Ontario Limited
Matthew G. Williams
Thorsteinssons LLP
Pricewaterhousecoopers Inc, in its capacity as
Trustee in Bankruptcy
Eugene .J. Mockler
E.J. Mockler Professional Corporation
v. (35116)
v. (35121)
Her Majesty the Queen (F.C.)
William L. Softley
A.G. of Canada
Cyrenus Joseph Dugas (N.B.)
Charles A. LeBlond, Q.C.
Stewart McKelvey
FILING DATE: 04.12.2012
FILING DATE: 06.12.2012
Gilead Sciences Canada Inc.
Patrick E. Kierans
Norton Rose Canada LLP
v. (35123)
Minister of Health (F.C.)
Eric Peterson
A.G. of Canada
FILING DATE: 07.12.2012
- 1985 -
APPLICATIONS FOR LEAVE
SUBMITTED TO COURT SINCE
LAST ISSUE
DEMANDES SOUMISES À LA COUR
DEPUIS LA DERNIÈRE PARUTION
DECEMB ER 17, 2012 / LE 17 DÉCEMBRE 2012
CORAM: Chief Justice McLachlin and Abella and Cromwell JJ.
La juge en chef McLachlin et les juges Abella et Cromwell
1.
Jorrell Simpson-Rowe (a young person) v. Her Majesty the Queen (Ont.) (Crim.) (By Leave) (35056)
2.
North American Pipe & Steel Ltd. v. Greater Vancouver Water District (B.C.) (Civil) (By Leave) (35031)
3.
D.H. v. D.A. (Que.) (Civil) (By Leave) (35032)
CORAM: LeBel, Karakatsanis and Wagner JJ.
Les juges LeBel, Karakatsanis et Wagner
4.
Attorney General of Canada v. Yuriy Kobzar (Ont.) (Crim.) (By Leave) (34925)
5.
Bank of Nova Scotia v. Teva Canada Limited (Ont.) (Civil) (By Leave) (35000)
6.
Fier Succès c. Caisse populaire Desjardins de Hauterive et autre (Qc) (Civile) (Autorisation) (35007)
CORAM: Fish, Rothstein and Moldaver JJ.
Les juges Fish, Rothstein et Moldaver
7.
Cynthia Michelle Burton v. Her Majesty the Queen (P.E.I.) (Crim.) (By Leave) (35039)
8.
Association of Justice Counsel v. Attorney General of Canada (Ont.) (Civil) (By Leave) (35027)
- 1986 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES
DEMANDES D’AUTORISATION
DECEMB ER 20, 2012 / LE 20 DÉCEMBRE 2012
34943
Corporation of the Township of Scugog and Corporation of the City of Oshawa v. Shannon
Deering, Tony Deering and Deborah Deering AND BETWEEN Corporation of the Township
of Scugog and Corporation of the City of Oshawa v. Erica Deering, Anthony Deering,
Anthony Deering and Deborah Deering AND BETWEEN Corporation of the Township of
Scugog and Corporation of the City of Oshawa v. Alexander Heroux, Maryann Heroux,
Robert Heroux and Amanda Gibson (Ont.) (Civil) (By Leave)
Coram :
LeBel, Karakatsanis and Wagner JJ.
The application for leave to appeal from the judgment of the Court of Appeal for Ontario, Number C52880,
2012 ONCA 386, dated June 7, 2012, is dismissed with costs.
La demande d’autorisation d’appel de l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario, numéro C52880, 2012 ONCA
386, daté du 7 juin 2012, est rejetée avec dépens.
CASE SUMMARY
Torts — Municipal Law — Motor vehicles — Negligence — Highway repair — Liability of municipalities —
Whether there exists a relationship between the statutory duty of road authorities to keep highways in a state of
“repair” and common law negligence principles — What is the proper interpretation of the “ordinary and/or
reasonable user” test under the statutory regimes in various provincial and territorial jurisdictions? — Municipal Act,
2001, S.O. 2001, c. 25
The facts of this case stem from a motor vehicle accident that occurred in Ontario in August 2004. The accident
occurred on an unlit, hilly rural road marking the boundary between the Township of Scugog and the City of Oshawa.
The road, which had recently been resurfaced, had no centre line, no sig nage and no posted speed limit. The stretch of
road on which the accident occurred was situated just before the crest of a hill. At the crest of the hill, there was a
slight curve in the road.
Shannon Deering, 19 and an inexperienced driver, was driving a vehicle in which her younger sister and three friends
were passengers. As she neared the crest of the hill, Shannon was momentarily blinded by the headlights of an
oncoming vehicle which, due to the curve in the road, she believed to be on a collision course with her own vehicle.
Shannon made certain manoeuvres in an attempt to avoid an apprehended head -on collision. Those manoeuvres led
her to lose control of her vehicle. Her vehicle rolled and smashed into a rock culvert. As a result of the acciden t,
Shannon and her sister were rendered quadriplegic. The three other passengers were also injured in the crash.
Four of the five injured parties sued several defendants, including the Corporation of the City of Oshawa and the
Corporation of the Township of Scugog. Because the road on which the accident occurred was a boundary road, both
municipalities shared responsibility for its maintenance.
October 5, 2010
Ontario Superior Court of Justice
(Howden J.)
2010 ONSC 5502
Declarations (i) that Shannon Deering, the Corporation
of the Township of Scugog and the Corporation of the
City of Oshawa are jointly and severally liable for
damages and losses sustained by the plaintiffs, and (ii)
apportioning liability at 1/3 for Shannon Deering and
2/3 for the Corporation of the Township of Scugog and
the Corporation of the City of Oshawa, issued
- 1987 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
June 7, 2012
Court of Appeal for Ontario
(Goudge, MacPherson and Cronk JJ.A.)
2012 ONCA 386
Appeal and cross-appeal dismissed
August 31, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Application for leave to appeal filed
RÉSUMÉ DE L’AFFAIRE
Responsabilité délictuelle — Droit municipal — Véhicules automobiles — Négligence — Réparation des routes —
Responsabilité des municipalités — Existe-t-il un lien entre l'obligation légale des administrations routières
d’entretenir les routes et les principes de common law en matière de négligence? — Quelle est la bonne interprétation
du critère dit de « l'utilisateur ordinaire ou raisonnable » des régimes légaux des divers provinces et territoires? — Loi
de 2001 sur les municipalités, L.O. 2001, ch. 25
Les faits en l'espèce découlent d'un accident de la route qui s'est produit en Ontario en août 2004. L'accident s'est
produit sur une route rurale ondulante non éclairée qui marque la ligne de démarcation entre le canton de Scugog et la
ville d’Oshawa. La route, qui avait été récemment remise en état, n'avait aucune ligne médiane, aucune signalisation
et aucune limite de vitesse affichée. Le tronçon de route sur lequel l'accident s'est produit était situé juste avant la
crête d'une colline. À la crête de la colline, il y avait une légère courbe dans la route.
Shannon Deering, 19 ans, une conductrice inexpérimentée, conduisait le véhicule dans lequel prenaient place sa jeune
sœur et trois amis. Quand elle s'est approchée de la crête de la colline, Shannon a été passagèrement aveuglée par les
phares d'un véhicule circulant en sens inverse qui lui semblait être, en raison de la courbe dans la route, sur une
trajectoire de collision avec son propre véhicule. Shannon a fait certaines manœuvres pour tenter d'éviter la collision
frontale qu'elle appréhendait. Ces manœuvres lui ont fait perdre la maîtrise de son véhicule. Son véhicule a fait un
tonneau et s’est écrasé contre un ponceau de pierre. À la suite de l'accident, Shannon et sa sœur sont devenues
quadriplégiques. Les trois autres passagers ont également été blessés dans l'accident.
Quatre des cinq blessés ont poursuivi plusieurs défendeurs, y compris la Ville d’Oshawa et le Ca nton de Scugog.
Parce que la route sur laquelle l'accident s'est produit constituait une ligne de démarcation, les deux municipalités se
partageaient la responsabilité de son entretien.
5 octobre 2010
Cour supérieure de justice de l'Ontario
(Juge Howden)
2010 ONSC 5502
Jugement déclarant que (i) Shannon Deering, le
Canton de Scugog et la Ville d’Oshawa sont
solidairement responsables des dommages et des pertes
subis par les demandeurs en première instance et (ii)
attribuant la responsabilité pour 1/3 à Shannon Deering
et pour 2/3 au Canton de Scugog et à la Ville
d’Oshawa
7 juin 2012
Cour d'appel de l'Ontario
(Juges Goudge, MacPherson et Cronk)
2012 ONCA 386
Appel et appel incident, rejetés
- 1988 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
31 août 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Demande d'autorisation d'appel, déposée
34948
Mounted Police Association of Ontario / Association de la Police Montée de l'Ontario and
B.C. Mounted Police Professional Association, on their own behalf and on behalf of all
Members and Employees of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police v. Attorney General of
Canada (Ont.) (Civil) (By Leave)
Coram :
LeBel, Karakatsanis and Wagner JJ.
The motion for an extension of time to serve and file the motion for leave to intervene of the Canadian
Police Association is granted. The motions for leave to intervene of the Association des Membres de la Police Montée
du Québec inc., the Mounted Police Members’ Legal Fund, the Confédération des syndicats nationaux and the
Canadian Police Association are dismissed without costs. The application for leave to appeal from the judgment of
the Court of Appeal for Ontario, Number C50475, 2012 ONCA 363, dated June 1, 2012, is granted with costs in the
cause.
La requête en prorogation du délai de signification et de dépôt de la requête pour permission d’intervenir de
l’Association canadienne des policiers est accueillie. Les requêtes pour permission d’intervenir de l’Association des
Membres de la Police Montée du Québec inc., la Mounted Police Members’ Legal Fund, la Confédération des
syndicats nationaux et l’Association canadienne des policiers sont rejetées sans dépens. La demande d’autorisation
d’appel de l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario, numéro C50475, 2012 ONCA 363, daté du 1 er juin 2012, est
accueillie avec dépens suivant l’issue de la cause.
CASE SUMMARY
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms — Labour and employment law — Freedom of association — Collective
bargaining — Regulations imposing a labour relations regime for RCMP members — Whether the freedom of
association protected by s. 2(d) of the Charter includes the right to choose an association independent of management?
— Whether the right to engage in a process of collective bargaining is a right protected by s. 2(d) only if an applicant
can demonstrate need? — Charter, s. 2(d) — Royal Canadian Mounted Police Regulations, 1988 , SOR/88-361
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police Regulations (“Regulations”) impose an employee relations regime for members
of the RCMP. S. 96 of the Regulations stipulates that the Staff Relations Representative Program (“SRRP”) was
created “to provide for representation of the interests of all members [of the RCMP] with respect to staff relations
matters”. The work of the SRRP is carried out by Staff Relations Representatives that are elected by members of the
RCMP.
The Mounted Police Association of Ontario (“MPAO”) and the British Columbia Mounted Police Professional
Association (BCMPPA) are associations that were formed in the hopes of providing a collective means of resolving
employment issues with RCMP management. However, while RCMP members are free to form and participate in
such organizations, s. 96 of the Regulations establishes the SRRP as the only process by which RCMP members can
address labour issues with RCMP management.
The MPAO and BCMPPA brought an application seeking, among other things, a dec laration that s. 96 of the
Regulations unjustifiably infringes the rights of members of the RCMP under s. 2(d) of the Charter by preventing the
formation and maintenance of an independent labour association by members of the RCMP for the purposes of
engaging in collective bargaining.
- 1989 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
April 6, 2009
Ontario Superior Court of Justice
(MacDonnell J.)
2009 CanLII 15149 (ON SC)
S. 96 of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Regulations, 1988 held to be contrary to s. 2(d) of the
Charter and declared of no force or effect; declaration
of invalidity suspended for 18 months;
June 1, 2012
Court of Appeal for Ontario
(Doherty, Rosenberg and Juriansz JJ.A.)
2012 ONCA 363
Appeal allowed; cross-appeal dismissed
August 30, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Application for leave to appeal filed
September 25, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Motion for leave to intervene of the Association des
Membres de la Police Montée du Québec Inc., filed
September 28, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Motion for leave to intervene of the Confédération des
syndicats nationaux, filed
September 28, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Motion for leave to intervene of the Mounted Police
Members’ Legal Fund, filed
October 22, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Motions for an extension of time and for leave to
intervene of the Canadian Police Association, filed
RÉSUMÉ DE L’AFFAIRE
Charte canadienne des droits et libertés — Droit du travail et de l'emploi — Liberté d'association — Négociations
collectives — Règlement imposant un régime de relations du travail aux membres de la GRC — La liberté
d'association protégée par l'al. 2d) de la Charte comprend-elle le droit de choisir une association indépendante de la
direction? — Le droit de s'engager dans un processus de négociations collectives est-il un droit protégé par l’al. 2d)
seulement si le demandeur peut démontrer un besoin? — Charte, al. 2d) — Règlement de la Gendarmerie royale du
Canada (1988), DORS/88-361.
Le Règlement de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada (le « Règlement ») impose aux membres de la GRC un régime de
relations avec les employés. L'art. 96 du Règlement prévoit que le Programme de représentants des relations
fonctionnelles (« PRRF ») a été créé « pour [. . .] assurer la représentation des membres [de la GRC] en matière de
relations fonctionnelles ». Le travail du PRRF est effectué par des représentants des relations fonctionnelles élus par
des membres de la GRC.
L'Association de la Police Montée de l'Ontario (« APMO ») et la British Columbia Mounted Police Professional
Association (BCMPPA) sont des associations qui ont été formées dans le but de fournir un moyen collectif de régler
des questions d'emploi avec la direction de la GRC. Cependant, bien que les membres de la GRC soient libres de
former de telles organisations et d'y participer, l'art. 96 du Règlement établit le PRRF comme le seul processus par
lequel les membres de la GRC peuvent adresser des questions de travail à la direction de la GRC.
L’APMO et le BCMPPA ont présenté une demande sollicitant, entre autres choses, un jugement déclarant que l'art. 96
du Règlement porte atteinte de façon injustifiable aux droits des membres de la GRC garantis par l'al. 2d) de la Charte
- 1990 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
en empêchant la formation et le maintien d'une association de travail indépendante par des membres de la GRC aux
fins d'engager des négociations collectives.
6 avril 2009
Cour supérieure de justice de l'Ontario
(Juge MacDonnell)
2009 CanLII 15149 (ON SC)
L'art. 96 du Règlement de la Gendarmerie royale du
Canada (1988) est jugé contraire à l'al. 2d) de la
Charte et déclaré inopérant; déclaration d'invalidité
suspendue pour une période de 18 mois;
1er juin 2012
Cour d'appel de l'Ontario
(Juges Doherty, Rosenberg et Juriansz)
2012 ONCA 363
Appels accueilli; appel incident rejeté
30 août 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Demande d'autorisation d'appel, déposée
25 septembre 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Requête en autorisation d’intervenir de l’Association
des Membres de la Police Montée du Québec Inc.,
déposée
28 septembre 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Requête en autorisation d’intervenir de
Confédération des syndicats nationaux, déposée
28 septembre 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Requête en autorisation d’intervenir du Fonds de
recours juridique des membres de la Gendarmerie,
déposée
22 octobre 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Requêtes en prorogation de délai et en autorisation
d'intervenir de l'Association canadienne des policiers,
déposées
la
34949
Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services v. Information and Privacy
Commissioner (Ont.) (Civil) (By Leave)
Coram :
Fish, Rothstein and Moldaver JJ.
The application for leave to appeal from the judgment of the Court of Appeal for Ontario, Number C54647,
2012 ONCA 393, dated June 4, 2012, is granted without costs.
La demande d’autorisation d’appel de l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario, numéro C54647, 2012 ONCA
393, daté du 4 juin 2012, est accueillie sans dépens.
CASE SUMMARY
(SEALING ORDER)
Access to information ― Access to records ― Exemptions ― Minister refusing to disclose records relating to location
- 1991 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
and number of sexual offenders in community ― Information and Privacy Commissioner (“IPC”) ordering release of
requested information ― Whether the IPC exercised the statutory authority to grant a right of access for purposes that
are not consistent with Christopher’s Law ― Whether the IPC erred by applying an unreasonable burden and standard
of proof to establish a future harm to public safety when deciding whether the Freedom of Information and Protection
of Privacy Act law enforcement exemptions applied ― Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, R.S.O.
1990, c. F.31, ss. 14 14(1)(e) and 14(1)(l) ― Christopher’s Law (Sex Offender Registry), 2000, S.O. 2000, c. 1.
A request was made under the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. F.31, for
disclosure of a record containing a list of the first three characters of Ontario's postal codes in one column with a
second corresponding column of figures representing the number of individuals residing in each area who are listed in
the Ontario Sex Offender Registry. The Ministry resisted the request based on its assertion that the information in the
record may lead to the identification of the whereabouts of registered offenders. The Information and Privacy
Commissioner ordered that the record be disclosed.
The Divisional Court dismissed the Ministry’s application for judicial review. The Ministry obtained leave to appeal
to the Court of Appeal. The Court of Appeal dismissed the appeal.
June 7, 2011
Ontario Superior Court of Justice
(Aston, Low and Hourigan JJ.)
2011 ONSC 3525
Application for judicial review dismissed.
June 4, 2012
Court of Appeal for Ontario
(Laskin, Sharpe and Epstein JJ.A.)
2012 ONCA 393
Order of the
dismissed.
September 4, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Application for leave to appeal filed.
Divisional Court
upheld;
appeal
RÉSUMÉ DE L’AFFAIRE
(ORDONNANCE DE MISE SOUS SCELLÉS)
Accès à l'information ― Accès aux documents ― Exemptions ― Le ministre refuse de communiquer des documents
relatifs aux lieux où se trouvent des délinquants sexuels et à leur nombre dans la collectivité ― Le Commissaire à
l'information et à la protection de la vie privée (« le CIPVP ») ordonne la communication des renseignements
demandés ― Le CIPVP a-t-il exercé le pouvoir légal d'accorder un droit d'accès à des fins qui ne sont pas compatibles
avec la Loi Christopher? ― Le CIPVP a-t-il eu tort d'imposer un fardeau et une norme de preuve déraisonnables pour
établir le préjudice éventuel pour la sécurité publique en statu ant sur la question de savoir si les exceptions relatives à
l’exécution de la loi prévues par la Loi sur l'accès à l'information et la protection de la vie privée s'appliquaient? ―
Loi sur l'accès à l'information et la protection de la vie privée, L.R.O. 1990, ch. F.31, art. 14, 14(1)e) et 14(1)(l) ―
Loi Christopher de 2000 sur le registre des délinquants sexuels, 2000, L.O. 2000, ch. 1.
Une demande a été faite en vertu de la Loi sur l'accès à l'information et la protection de la vie privée, L.R.O. 1990,
ch. F.31, pour que soit communiqué un document renfermant une liste des trois premiers caractères des codes postaux
de l’Ontario dans une colonne vis -à-vis d'une deuxième colonne de chiffres représentant le nombre d'individus qui
habitent chaque région et qui sont inscrits sur le registre des délinquants sexuels de l'Ontario. Le ministère a rejeté la
- 1992 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
demande, soutenant que les renseignements dans le document pouvaient mener à l'identification des lieux où se
trouvent les délinquants inscrits. Le Commissaire à l'information et à la protection de la vie privée a ordonné la
communication du document.
La Cour divisionnaire a rejeté la demande de contrôle judiciaire présentée par le ministère. Le ministère a obtenu
l'autorisation d'appel à la Cour d'appel. La Cour d'appel a rejeté l'appel.
7 juin 2011
Cour supérieure de justice de l'Ontario
(Juges Aston, Low et Hourigan)
2011 ONSC 3525
Demande de contrôle judiciaire, rejetée.
4 juin 2012
Cour d'appel de l'Ontario
(Juges Laskin, Sharpe et Epstein)
2012 ONCA 393
Ordonnance de la Cour divisionnaire, confirmée; appel
rejeté.
4 septembre 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Demande d'autorisation d'appel, déposée.
34957
Dale William Armstrong, Darin Lee Chung, Winch "Chuck" Chung, Wayne Mark
Crawford, Leonard Frederick Goakes, George E. Houvenin, Russell Thomas Jacobson,
Leonard A. Koyanagi, James Allan Mercer, Brent Alexander Mowat, Scott Ronald Nichols,
Bobby Kanao Nishi, Bruce F. Probert, Stephen Henry Rawlings, Joseph D. Smith, Dan Bertel
Sundvick, Douglas Michio Suto, William Arnold David Wheeler, Robert Joseph Woof,
Donald Michael Carter, John Martin Cummins, Phillip Ivar Eidsvik, Gordon David Johnson,
Derrick James Wigglesworth, Michael David Wigglesworth v. Her Majesty the Queen (B.C.)
(Civil) (By Leave)
Coram :
Fish, Rothstein and Moldaver JJ.
The application for leave to appeal from the judgment of the Court of Appeal for British Columbia
(Vancouver), Numbers CA038757 and CA038758, 2012 BCCA 242, dated June 5, 2012, is dismissed without costs.
La demande d’autorisation d’appel de l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel de la Colombie -Britannique (Vancouver),
numéros CA038757 et CA038758, 2012 BCCA 242, daté du 5 juin 2012, est rejetée sans dépens.
CASE SUMMARY
Charter — Right to equality — Discrimination based on race — Fisheries — Rule of law — Abuse of process —
Constitutional questions — Procedure — Fishing during closed season — Allegation that Department of Fisheries and
Oceans is not prosecuting Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal fishers alike for violations of fishing licences — Whether
there is a Charter or other remedy available for an accused put before a criminal court because of a prosecution policy
that exempts one group from prosecution because of race or class — Whether the Crown may bring a motion to strike
the defence case and enter a conviction without hearing evidence in a criminal or quasi-criminal court — If so, what
the proper procedure is and what the applicable test will be — Whether laying multiple charges, resulting in multiple
convictions, violates the principle set out in Kienapple v. R., [1975] 1 SCR 729.
- 1993 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
The applicants engaged in a “protest fishery”, fishing for salmon in a closed time, to show their displeasure with the
Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ allocation of fish and the non -enforcement of regulations concerning the
Aboriginal fishery. They were charged with unlawfully fishing for salmon during a close time contrary to the Pacific
Fishery Regulations, S.O.R. 93/54, s. 53, unlawfully setting fishing gear during a close time contrary to s. 25(1) of the
Fisheries Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. F-14, with unlawful possession of salmon contrary to s. 33 of the Fisheries Act. The
applicants sought a judicial stay of the charges. In the Provincial Court, the applicants submitted a Notice of
Constitutional Question setting out eight proposed questions. The Crown applied to the Provincial Court for a
determination of whether an evidentiary hearing was necessary to decide the constitutional issues, submitting that the
alleged facts, if proven, would not entitle the applicants to a stay for abuse of process. The Provincial Court judge
declined to hold an evidentiary hearing to determine the constitutional issues and convicted the applicants on all
counts. Appeals of the convictions were dismissed in the Supreme Court of British Columbia and the Court of Appeal.
December 7, 2009
Provincial Court of British Columbia
(Wingham J.)
Determination that no evidentiary hearing is required
to determine the constitutional issues raised in Notice
of Constitutional Question
December 7, 2009
Provincial Court of British Columbia
(Wingham J.)
Convictions on three counts under Pacific Fishery
Regulations, SOR 93/54, s. 53, and Fisheries Act,
R.S.C. 1985, c. F-14, s. 25(1)
July 26, 2010
Supreme Court of British Columbia
(Gray J.)
2010 BCSC 1041
Appeals dismissed
June 5, 2012
Court of Appeal for British Columbia (Vancouver)
(Newbury, Hall, Chiasson JJ.A.)
2012 BCCA 242
Appeal dismissed
August 30, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Application for leave to appeal filed
RÉSUMÉ DE L’AFFAIRE
Charte — Droit à l’égalité — Discrimination fondée sur la race — Pêche — Primauté du droit — Abus de procédure
— Questions constitutionnelles — Procédure — Pêche pendant la saison de pêche interdite — Allégation selon
laquelle le ministère des Pêches et des Océans ne poursuit pas au même titre les pêcheurs autochtones et les pêcheurs
non autochtones pour des violations de permis de pêche — Existe-t-il une réparation fondée sur la Charte ou une autre
réparation à la disposition d’un accusé qui se trouve en cour criminelle en raison d’une politique de poursuite qui
soustrait un groupe de la poursuite à cause de la race ou de la catégorie? — Le ministère public peut-il présenter une
requête en radiation de la défense et en inscription d’une déclaration de culpabilité sans avoir entendu la preuve dans
une cour criminelle ou quasi criminelle? — Dans l’affirmative, quelle est la bonne procédure et quel sera le critère
applicable? — Le fait de porter des accusations multiples, donnant lieu à une multiplicité de déclarations de
culpabilité, viole-t-il le principe énoncé dans l’arrêt Kienapple c. R., [1975] 1 R.C.S. 729?
Les demandeurs se sont livrés à une « pêche de contestation », pêchant le saumon pendant une période de fermeture,
pour manifester leur mécontentement à l’égard de la répartition du poisson et de la non application du règlement par le
- 1994 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
ministère des Pêches et des Océans relativement à la pêche des Autochtones. Ils ont été accusés de pêche illégale du
saumon pendant une période de fermeture, infraction prévue à l’art. 53 du Règlement de pêche du Pacifique, D.O.R.S.
93/54, d’avoir illégalement placé des engins de pêche en période d’interdiction contrairement au par. 25(1) de la Loi
sur les pêches, L.R.C. 1985, ch. F-14, et de possession illégale de saumon contrairement à l’art. 33 de la Loi sur les
pêches. Les demandeurs ont sollicité une suspension judiciaire des accusations. En Cour provinciale, les demandeurs
ont présenté un Avis de question constitutionnelle énonçant huit questions proposées. Le ministère public a demandé à
la Cour provinciale de statuer sur la question de savoir si une audition de la preuve était nécessaire pour trancher les
questions constitutionnelles, plaidant que les faits allégués, s’ils étaient prouvés, ne donneraient pas aux demandeurs le
droit à une suspension pour abus de procédure. La Cour provinciale a refusé d’entendre des témoin s pour trancher les
questions constitutionnelles et a déclaré les demandeurs coupables sous tous les chefs. La Cour suprême de la
Colombie-Britannique et la Cour d’appel ont rejeté les appels de la déclaration de culpabilité.
7 décembre 2009
Cour provinciale de la Colombie-Britannique
(Juge Wingham)
Il est statué qu’aucune audition de la preuve n’est
nécessaire
pour
trancher
les
questions
constitutionnelles soulevées dans l’Avis de question
constitutionnelle
7 décembre 2009
Cour provinciale de la Colombie-Britannique
(Juge Wingham)
Déclarations de culpabilité sous trois chefs en vertu de
l’art. 53 du Règlement sur la pêche du Pacifique,
DORS 93/54, et du par. 25(1) de la Loi sur les pêches,
L.R.C. 1985, ch. F-14
26 juillet 2010
Cour suprême de la Colombie-Britannique
(Juge Gray)
2010 BCSC 1041
Appels rejetés
5 juin 2012
Cour d’appel de la Colombie-Britannique (Vancouver)
(Juges Newbury, Hall et Chiasson)
2012 BCCA 242
Appel rejeté
30 août 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Demande d’autorisation d’appel, déposée
34979
Gilbert Fournier c. Autorité des marchés financiers (Qc) (Civile) (Autorisation)
Coram :
Les juges LeBel, Karakatsanis et Wagner
La demande d’autorisation d’appel de l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel du Québec (Montréal), numéro 500-10004721-104, 2012 QCCA 1179, daté du 22 juin 2012, est rejetée avec dépens.
The application for leave to appeal from the judgment of the Court of Appeal of Quebec (Montréal), Number
500-10-004721-104, 2012 QCCA 1179, dated June 22, 2012, is dismissed with costs.
CASE SUMMARY
Securities — Investigation procedure — Refusal to testify — Whether Court of Appeal erred in holding that individual
- 1995 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
summoned to testify in course of investigation under Securities Act, R.S.Q. c. V-1.1 (“Act”) not entitled to object to
impropriety of questions asked by respondent’s investigator — Whether Court of Appeal erred in holding that
lawfulness of questions asked by investigator during examination not reviewable by Superior Court judge — Whether
Court of Appeal erred in holding that individual who agrees to testify and answer certain questions by investigator but
who, on advice of advocate, objects to other questions and asks judge to rule on objections has “refused to testify”,
thus committing actus reus of offence under s. 195(4) of Act — Whether Court of Appeal erred in holding that
defence of due diligence to offence under s. 195(4) of Act is not applicable to individual relying in good faith on
advice of advocate and requires proof that ad vocate’s advice legally sound — Securities Act, R.S.Q. c. V-1.1,
ss. 195(4), 239, 240, 241, 242, 244, 245, 246.
In 2006, the respondent ordered an investigation under ss. 239 et seq. of the Act with regard to the dealer or adviser
activities and the transactions conducted by the officers, employees, representatives and mandataries of various
companies. On January 14, 2008, the applicant was summoned to appear before an investigator d esignated to carry
out the investigation. The applicant, who was not the target of the investigation, appeared before the investigator with
his advocate as specified in the summons. When the investigator asked the first question during the examination, the
applicant’s advocate objected on the ground of irrelevance. The investigator stated that the advocate could not object
and that the applicant had to answer the question asked. Objections were subsequently made to other questions,
prompting the investigator to end the examination. On March 12, 2008, the respondent served a statement of offence
on the applicant under s. 195(4) of the Act for refusing to testify in the course of an investigation.
October 28, 2009
Court of Québec (Judge Millette)
No. 500-61-244607-082
Applicant acquitted of charge laid against him by
respondent under s. 195(4) of Act for refusing to
testify in course of investigation
June 16, 2010
Quebec Superior Court (Paul J.)
No. 500-36-005255-099
Appeal dismissed
June 22, 2012
Quebec Court of Appeal (Montréal) (Duval Hessler,
Pelletier and Dufresne JJ.A.)
No. 500-10-004721-104
2012 QCCA 1179
Appeal allowed; judgments of Court of Québec and
Superior Court set aside, applicant convicted of
offence under s. 195(4) of Act and matter remitted to
Court of Quebec for judge to determine penalty
September 20, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Application for leave to appeal filed
RÉSUMÉ DE L’AFFAIRE
Valeurs mobilières – Procédure d’enquête – Refus de témoigner – La Cour d’appel a-t-elle erré en décidant qu’un
justiciable assigné à témoigner dans le cadre d’une enquête instituée en vertu de la Loi sur les valeurs mobilières,
L.R.Q. chapitre V-1.1 (la « Loi ») n’a pas le droit de s’objecter aux irrégularités des questions posées par un enquêteur
de l’intimée? – La Cour d’appel a-t-elle erré en décidant que la légalité des questions posées par l’enquêteur lors d’un
interrogatoire n’est pas révisable par un juge de la Cour supérieure? – La Cour d’appel a-t-elle erré en décidant qu’un
justiciable qui accepte de témoigner et de répondre à certaines questions d’un enquêteur, mais qui, sur les conseils de
son avocat, s’objecte à d’autres et demande à ce qu’un juge tranche ces objections, a « refusé de témoigner »,
commettant ainsi l’actus reus au sens de l’article 195(4) de la Loi? – La Cour d’appel a-t-elle erré en décidant que la
défense de diligence raisonnable à l’infraction prévue à l’article 195(4) de la Loi est inapplicable à un justiciable se
fiant de bonne foi aux conseils de son avocat et requiert la démonstration que les conseils de l’avocat sont
- 1996 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
juridiquement fondés? – Loi sur les valeurs mobilières, L.R.Q. chapitre V-1.1, art. 195(4), 239, 240, 241, 242, 244,
245, 246.
En 2006, l’intimée institue une enquête en vertu des art. 239 et suivants de la Loi eu égard aux activités de courtier ou
de conseiller et aux transactions effectuées par les dirigeants, les employés, les représentants et les mandataires de
diverses sociétés. Le 14 janvier 2008, le demandeur est assigné à comparaître devant un enquêteur désigné pour
mener ladite enquête. Le demandeur, qui n’est pas la cible de cette enquête, se présente devant l’enquêteur avec son
avocat conformément à l’assignation. À la première question posée par l’enquêteur lors de l’interrogatoire, l’avocat
du demandeur formule une objection au motif de non -pertinence. L’enquêteur affirme alors que l’avocat ne peut
formuler d’objections et que le demandeur doit donner une réponse à la question posée. D’autres questions ont, par la
suite, également fait l’objet d’objections, amenant l’enquêteur à mettre fin à l’interrogatoire. Le 12 mars 2008,
l’intimée signifie un constat d’infraction contre le demandeur en vertu de l’article 195(4) de la Loi pour refus de
témoigner au cours d’une enquête.
Le 28 octobre 2009
Cour du Québec (Le juge Millette)
No. 500-61-244607-082
Acquittement du demandeur de l’infraction portée
contre lui par l’intimée en vertu de l’article 195(4) de
la Loi pour refus de témoigner au cours d’une enquête.
Le 16 juin 2010
Cour supérieure du Québec (Le juge Paul)
No. 500-36-005255-099
Appel rejeté.
Le 22 juin 2012
Cour d’appel du Québec (Montréal) (Les juges Duval
Hessler, Pelletier et Dufresne)
No. 500-10-004721-104
2012 QCCA 1179
Appel accueilli, jugements de la Cour du Québec et de
la Cour supérieure infirmés, demandeur déclaré
coupable de l’infraction édictée par l’article 195(4) de
la Loi, et dossier retourné en Cour du Québec pour
qu’un juge décide de la peine.
Le 20 septembre 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Demande d’autorisation d’appel déposée.
34982
H.H.R. v. Her Majesty the Queen (Ont.) (Criminal) (By Leave)
Coram :
LeBel, Karakatsanis and Wagner JJ.
The motion for an extension of time to serve and file the application for leave to appeal from the judgment
of the Court of Appeal for Ontario, Number C48463, dated November 18, 2010, is dismissed. In any event, had such
motion been granted, the application for leave to appeal would have been dismissed without costs.
La requête en prorogation du délai de signification et de dépôt de la demande d’autorisation d’appel de
l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario, numéro C48463, daté du 18 novembre 2010, est rejetée. Quoi qu’il en soit,
même si la requête avait été accueillie, la demande d’autorisation d ’appel aurait été rejetée sans dépens.
CASE SUMMARY
(PUBLICAT ION BAN IN CASE) (PUBLICAT ION BAN ON PART Y)
- 1997 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
Criminal Law — Sexual offences — Accused convicted of three counts of indecent assault and two counts of gross
indecency — Accused sentenced to nine years’ imprisonment — Whether convictions were against weight of evidence
or in absence of any evidence.
The accused was convicted of three counts of indecent assault and two counts of gross indecency for prolonged and
aggravated sexual abuse. However, Crown counsel stayed the two counts of gross indecency on the basis of the
Kineapple principle that an accused should not be convicted twice for a single criminal act. Therefore, the accused
was sentenced to nine years’ imprisonment for the three in decent assault convictions only. The accused was
represented by counsel at trial and duty counsel in his written appeal submissions. On appeal, the accused argued that
the convictions were against the weight of the evidence. The Court of Appeal unanimou sly dismissed his appeal.
The Court of Appeal did not call upon Crown counsel.
September 16, 2007
Ontario Superior Court of Justice
(Bryant J.)
Accused convicted of three counts of indecent assault
and two counts of gross indecency. Accused sentenced
to nine years’ imprisonment.
November 18, 2010
Court of Appeal for Ontario
(Goudge, Sharpe and Gillese JJ.A.)
Appeals against convictions and sentence dismissed.
September 13, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Application for leave to appeal filed.
October 23, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Motion for an extension of time to serve and file the
application for leave to appeal filed.
RÉSUMÉ DE L’AFFAIRE
(ORDONNANCE DE NON -PUBLICAT ION DANS LE DOSSIER) (ORDONNANCE DE NON-PUBLICAT ION VISANT UNE PART IE)
Droit criminel — Infractions sexuelles — Accusé déclaré coupable sous trois chefs d'attentat à la pudeur et deux chefs
de grossière indécence — Accusé condamné à une peine d'emprisonnement de neuf ans — Les déclarations de
culpabilité étaient-elles contraires à la prépondérance de la preuve ou ont-elles été prononcées en l'absence de toute
preuve?
L'accusé a été déclaré coupable sous trois chefs d'attentat à la pudeur et deux chefs de grossière indécence pour abus
sexuels prolongés et graves. Toutefois, l'avocat de la Couronne a suspendu les deux chefs de grossière indécence en
s'appuyant sur le principe de l'arrêt Kineapple selon lequel un accusé ne doit pas être déclaré coupable deux fois pour
seul acte criminel. Par conséquent, l'accusé a été condamné à une peine d'emprisonnement de neuf ans pour les trois
déclarations de culpabilité d'attentat à la pudeur seulement. L'accusé était représenté par un avocat au procès et par un
avocat de service pour la rédaction de son mémoire d’appel. En appel, l'accusé a plaidé que les déclarations de
culpabilité étaient contraires à la prépondérance de la preuve. La Cour d'appel a rejeté son appel à l'unanimité.
La Cour d'appel n'a pas entendu l'avocat de la Couronne.
16 septembre 2007
Cour supérieure de justice de l'Ontario
(Juge Bryant)
Accusé déclaré coupable sous trois chefs d'attentat à la
pudeur et deux chefs de grossière indécence. Accusé
condamné à une peine d'emprisonnement de neuf ans.
- 1998 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
18 novembre 2010
Cour d'appel de l'Ontario
(Juges Goudge, Sharpe et Gillese)
Appels des déclarations de culpabilité et de la peine,
rejetés.
13 septembre 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Demande d'autorisation d'appel, déposée.
23 octobre 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Requête en prorogation du délai de signification et de
dépôt de la demande d'autorisation d'appel, déposée.
34984
Canadian Society of Immigration Consultants v. Minister of Citizenship and Immigration
(F.C.) (Civil) (By Leave)
Coram :
Fish, Rothstein and Moldaver JJ.
The application for leave to appeal from the judgment of the Federal Court of Appeal, Number A -22-12,
2012 FCA 194, dated June 25, 2012, is dismissed with costs.
La demande d’autorisation d’appel de l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel fédérale, numéro A -22-12, 2012 CAF 194,
daté du 25 juin 2012, est rejetée avec dépens.
CASE SUMMARY
Administrative law — Judicial Review — Natural Justice — Procedural fairness — Regulations by
Governor-in-Council and respondent Minister of Citizenship and Immigration removing and replacing applicant as
regulator of immigration consultants — Whether duty of procedural fairness applied to decision of respondent
Minister to remove and replace applicant as regulator — Whether a duty of fairness is owed when implementing
administrative decisions through use of subordinate legislation.
The applicant, Canadian Society of Immigration Consu ltants (the “Society”), acted as the sole regulatory body of
immigration consultants in Canada from April 2004 to June 2011. In June 2011, its status as regulator was revoked
and the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council was put in its plac e by regulations made by the
Governor-in-Council and the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration. The Society filed an application for judicial
review arguing, among other things, that the process leading up to the enactment of the regulations was procedu rally
unfair. The Federal Court dismissed the application for judicial review. The Federal Court of Appeal dismissed the
appeal.
December 8, 2011
Federal Court
(Martineau J.)
2011 C 1435
Application for judicial review dismissed
June 25, 2012
Federal Court of Appeal
(Noël, Evans and Sharlow JJ.A.)
2012 FCA 194
Appeal dismissed
- 1999 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
September 24, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Application for leave to appeal filed
RÉSUMÉ DE L’AFFAIRE
Droit administratif — Contrôle judiciaire — Justice naturelle — Équité procédurale — Règlements du gouverneur en
conseil et du ministre de la Citoyenneté et de l'Immigration intimé qui démet et remplace la demanderesse comme
organisme de réglementation des consultants en immigration — L'obligation d'équité procédurale s’appliquait-elle à la
décision du ministre intimé de démettre et de remplacer la demanderesse comme organisme de réglementation? — Y
a-t-il une obligation d'agir équitablement dans la mise en œuvre de décisions administratives par le recours à un
règlement?
La demanderesse, la Société canadienne de consultants en immigration (la « Societé »), était le seul organisme de
réglementation des consultants en immigration au Canada d'avril 2004 à juin 2011. En juin 2011, sa désignation
comme organisme de réglementation a été révoquée et le Conseil de réglementation des consultants en immigration du
Canada a été désigné à sa place par règlements pris par le gouverneur en conseil et le ministre de la Citoyenneté et de
l'Immigration. La Société a dépos é une demande de contrôle judiciaire, plaidant notamment que le processus qui avait
mené à l'adoption des règlements était inéquitable sur le plan de la procédure. La Cour fédérale a rejeté la demande de
contrôle judiciaire. La Cour d'appel fédérale a rejeté l'appel.
8 décembre 2011
Cour fédérale
(Juge Martineau)
2011 CF 1435
Demande de contrôle judiciaire, rejetée
25 juin le 2012
Cour d'appel fédérale
(Juges Noël, Evans et Sharlow)
2012 CAF 194
Appel rejeté
24 septembre 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Demande d'autorisation d'appel, déposée
34989
Sobeys Québec Inc. c. Commission de la santé et de la sécurité du travail (Qc) (Civile)
(Autorisation)
Coram :
Les juges LeBel, Karakatsanis et Wagner
La demande d’autorisation d’appel de l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel du Québec (Québec), numéro 200-10002690-118, 2012 QCCA 1329, daté du 25 juillet 2012, est rejetée sans dépens.
The application for leave to appeal from the judgment of the Court of Appeal of Quebec (Québec), Number
200-10-002690-118, 2012 QCCA 1329, dated July 25, 2012, is dismissed without costs.
- 2000 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
CASE SUMMARY
Workers’ compensation — Penal offence — Whether s. 51(1) of Act respecting occupational health and safety
(“Act”) requires employer to ensure protection of contractor’s worker performing work at its establishment even
though employer’s own workers not exposed to any danger — Act respecting occupational health and safety, R.S.Q.,
c. S-21, ss. 51(1), 236, 237.
On June 4, 2009, a professional refrigerationist employed by a third party went to the applicant’s establishment with a
coworker to check the refrigeration system. After gaining access to a cold room, the refrigerationist fell some
three metres through a suspended ceiling beside the roof of the cold room and sustained serious injuries. An inspector
from the respondent went to the scene of the accident the same day and found that there was no demarcation between
the roof of the cold room and the suspended ceiling, so he ordered the applicant to install visual indicators for that
purpose. On August 31, 2009, a statement of offence was issued against the applicant for contravening s. 51(1) of the
Act, which requires establishments to be so equipped and laid out as to ensure the protection of workers. Any failure
to do so constitutes an offence under s. 236 of the Act.
December 23, 2010
Court of Québec
(Judge Émond)
No. 200-63-002632-093
2010 QCCQ 11989
Applicant convicted of charge laid against it under
s. 51(1) of Act for failing to take necessary measures to
protect health and ensure safety and physical
well-being of worker
July 12, 2011
Quebec Superior Court
(Moreau J.)
No. 200-36-001720-119
2011 QCCS 3513
Appeal dismissed
July 25, 2012
Quebec Court of Appeal (Québec)
(Forget, Doyon and Bouchard JJ.A.)
No. 200-10-002690-118
2012 QCCA 1329
Appeal dismissed
September 25, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Application for leave to appeal filed
RÉSUMÉ DE L’AFFAIRE
Accidents du travail — Infraction pénale — Un employeur doit-il, en vertu du premier alinéa de l’art. 51 de la Loi sur
la santé et la sécurité du travail (la « Loi »), assurer la protection du travailleur d’un entrepreneur qui exécute des
travaux dans son établissement, alors que les propres travailleurs de cet employeur ne sont exposés à aucun danger? —
Loi sur la santé et la sécurité du travail, L.R.Q., c. S-21, art. 51(1), 236, 237.
Le 4 juin 2009, un frigoriste de métier à l’emploi d’une tierce partie se rend, avec un collègue, à l’établissement de la
demanderesse afin d’y effectuer une vérification du système de réfrigération. Après avoir accéder à une chambre
froide, le frigoriste fait une chute d’environ trois mètres en passant au travers un plafond suspendu juxtaposé au toit de
la chambre froide, subissant d’importantes blessures. Un inspecteur de l’intimée se rend sur les lieux de l’accident le
- 2001 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
jour même et constate qu’il n’y a aucune délimitation entre le toit de la chambre froide et le plafond suspendu, et
ordonne du coup à la demanderesse d’installer des repères visuels à cette fin. Le 31 août 2009, un constat d’infraction
est émis contre la demanderesse pour avoir contreven u à l’art. 51(1) de la Loi, lequel exige qu’un établissement soit
équipé et aménagé de façon à assurer la protection d’un travailleur. Tout manquement à cet égard constitue une
infraction en vertu de l’art. 236 de la Loi.
Le 23 décembre 2010
Cour du Québec
(La juge Émond)
No. 200-63-002632-093
2010 QCCQ 11989
La demanderesse est déclarée coupable de l’infraction
portée contre elle en vertu de la l’art. 51(1) de la Loi
pour avoir omis de prendre les mesures nécessaires
afin de protéger la santé et assurer la sécurité et
l’intégrité physique d’un travailleur.
Le 12 juillet 2011
Cour supérieure du Québec
(La juge Moreau)
No. 200-36-001720-119
2011 QCCS 3513
Appel rejeté.
Le 25 juillet 2012
Cour d’appel du Québec (Québec)
(Les juges Forget, Doyon et Bouchard)
No. 200-10-002690-118
2012 QCCA 1329
Appel rejeté.
Le 25 septembre 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Demande d’autorisation d’appel déposée.
34996
Robert Michael Bennight v. Her Majesty the Queen (B.C.) (Criminal) (By Leave)
Coram :
Fish, Rothstein and Moldaver JJ.
The motion for an extension of time to serve and file the application for leave to appeal is granted. The
application for leave to appeal from the judgment of the Court of Appeal for British Columbia (Vancouver), Number
CA038479, 2012 BCCA 190, dated May 3, 2012, is dismissed without costs.
La requête en prorogation du délai de signification et dépôt de la demande d’autorisation d’appel est
accueillie. La demande d’autorisation d’appel de l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel de la Colombie-Britannique (Vancouver),
numéro CA038479, 2012 BCCA 190, daté du 3 mai 2012, est rejetée sans dépens.
CASE SUMMARY
Criminal law – Second degree murder – What standard of proof is an accused required to meet in order to challenge
jurors for cause on the basis of bias against the mentally ill – Whether a trial judge is required to give jurors a limiting
instruction when the Crown tenders and then discredits a mentally disordered accused’s post -offence statements.
Mr. Bennight’s medical history includes frontal lobe brain injury from a car accident that left him with cognitive
deficits, although he is of average intelligence. He was found fit to stand trial and an assessment did not support a
- 2002 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
diagnosis of not criminally responsible due to mental disorder.
Following a jury trial, Mr. Bennight was convicted of the second degree murder of Denise Fabbro. On appeal, he
submitted that he should have been permitted to challenge the jury for cause based on bias against those who suffer or
are perceived to suffer from mental illness. Mr. Bennight also challenged the trial judge’s ruling on a voir dire
admitting statements he made as evidence in the trial. In addition, Mr. Bennight impugned the trial judge’s instruction
to the jury on post-offence conduct. The Crown’s case against Mr. Bennight was based on circumstantial evidence
and his statements to the police. The actus reus for culpable homicide was not in issue. The issues at trial had been
the identity of the person who beat the victim and whether that person possessed the subjective mens rea required to
found a conviction for murder. The Court of Appeal concluded that no reversible error was made by the trial judge
and the appeal was dismissed.
May 8, 2010
Supreme Court of British Columbia
(Grauer J.)
Applicant convicted of second degree murder
May 3, 2012
Court of Appeal for British Columbia (Vancouver)
(Lowry, Groberman and Bennett JJ.A.)
2012 BCCA 190; CA038479
Appeal dismissed
September 28, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Motion for extension of time to serve and file the
application for leave to appeal and Application for
leave to appeal filed
November 20, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Amended notice of application for leave to appeal filed
RÉSUMÉ DE L’AFFAIRE
Droit criminel — Meurtre au deuxième degré — À quelle norme de preuve un accusé doit-il satisfaire pour récuser des
jurés pour cause de préjugés qu'ils auraient contre les personnes atteintes de maladie mentale? — Le juge du procès
est-il tenu de donner aux jurés une directive limitative lorsque le ministère public présente, puis discrédite les
déclarations postérieures à l'infraction faites par un accusé souffrant de troubles mentaux?
Les antécédents médicaux de M. Bennight comprennent un traumatisme crânien au lobe frontal subi dans un accident
de voiture qui l’a laissé avec des déficits cognitifs, bien qu'il soit d'intelligence moyenne. Il a été jugé apte à subir so n
procès et une évaluation n'a pas permis d’étayer un diagnostic de non -responsabilité criminelle pour cause de troubles
mentaux.
Au terme d'un procès devant jury, M. Bennight a été déclaré coupable du meurtre au deuxième degré de Denise
Fabbro. En appel, il a soutenu qu’on aurait dû lui permettre de récuser le jury pour cause de préjugé à l'égard de ceux
qui souffrent de maladies mentales ou de ceux que l'on perçoit comme tels. Monsieur Bennight a également contesté
la décision du juge du procès, rendue au terme d’un voir-dire, d'admettre en preuve au procès des déclarations qu'il a
faites. En outre, M. Bennight a attaqué les directives données au jury par le juge du procès relativement au
comportement postérieur à l'infraction. La preuve du ministère public contre M. Bennight était constituée d’une
preuve circonstancielle et de ses déclarations à la police. L’actus reus de l'homicide coupable n'était pas en cause.
Les questions en cause au procès étaient l'identité de la personne qui avait battu la victime et la question de savoir si
cette personne possédait la mens rea subjective nécessaire pour étayer une déclaration de culpabilité pour meurtre. La
- 2003 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
Cour d'appel a conclu que le juge du procès n'avait pas commis d'erreur justifiant l'infirmation de la décision et l'appel
a été rejeté.
8 mai 2010
Cour suprême de la Colombie-Britannique
(Juge Grauer)
Demandeur déclaré coupable de meurtre au deuxième
degré
3 mai 2012
Cour d'appel de la Colombie-Britannique (Vancouver)
(Juges Lowry, Groberman et Bennett)
2012 BCCA 190; CA038479
Appel rejeté
28 septembre 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Requête en prorogation du délai de signification et de
dépôt de la demande d'autorisation d'appel et demande
d’autorisation d'appel, déposées
20 novembre 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Avis modifié de demande d'autorisation d'appel,
déposé
34998
Gusman Alexandre c. Sa Majesté la Reine (Qc) (Criminelle) (Autorisation)
Coram :
Les juges LeBel, Karakatsanis et Wagner
La demande d’autorisation d’appel de l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel du Québec (Montréal), numéros 500-10004677-108 et 500-10-004678-106, 2012 QCCA 1355, daté du 12 juillet 2012, est rejetée sans dépens.
The application for leave to appeal from the judgment of the Court of Appeal of Quebec (Montréal),
Numbers 500-10-004677-108 and 500-10-004678-106, 2012 QCCA 1355, dated July 12, 2012, is dismissed without
costs.
CASE SUMMARY
Criminal law — Sentencing — Sentence to be similar to other sentences imposed in similar circumstances — Whether
Court of Appeal erred in concluding that court authorized to override principle in Criminal Code that sentence to be
similar to other sentences imposed in similar circumstances — Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, s. 718.2(b)
In March 2008, there was a shooting at a strip club in Longueuil. The applicant and his accomplice fired shots at a
single victim. The applicant fired five shots at the victim, but none of them struck the victim. His accomplice fired
three shots, one of which hit the victim in the chest.
The applicant and his accomplice were charged with attempted murder and discharging a firearm with intent. Both
men were convicted following separate trials. The judge who presided over the accomplice’s trial sentenc ed him to
80 months in prison.
- 2004 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
October 15, 2009
Quebec Superior Court
(David J.)
Guilty verdicts returned by jury on one count of
attempt to commit murder with firearm (s. 239(a)
Cr.C.) and one count of discharging firearm with intent
(s. 244(a) Cr.C.)
May 6, 2010
Quebec Superior Court
(David J.)
2010 QCCS 2567
Applicant sentenced to 16 years in prison
July 12, 2012
Quebec Court of Appeal (Montréal)
(Duval Hesler C.J. and Dalphond and Giroux JJ.A.)
2012 QCCA 1355
Appeal from sentence dismissed
September 28, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Application for leave to appeal filed
RÉSUMÉ DE L’AFFAIRE
Droit criminel — Détermination de la peine — Harmonisation des peines — La Cour d’appel a-t-elle erré en
concluant qu’un tribunal est autorisé à écarter le principe de l’harmonisation des peines prévu au Code criminel? —
Code criminel, L.R.C. 1985, ch. C-46, art. 718.2b)
En mars 2008, une fusillade a éclaté dans un bar de danseuses à Longueuil. Le demandeur et son complice ont tiré des
coups de feu en direction d’une seule et même victime. Le demandeur tira cinq coups de feu en direction de la
victime, sans jamais l’atteindre. Son complice tira trois coups de feu. Un de ces coups de feu a atteint la victime au
thorax.
Le demandeur et son complice furent accusés de tentative de meurtre et d’avoir déchargé une arme à feu avec une
intention particulière. Suite à des procès distincts, les deux hommes furent reconnus coupables. Le juge ayant présidé
le procès du complice imposa à ce dernier une peine d’emprisonnement de 80 mois.
Le 15 octobre 2009
Cour supérieure du Québec
(Le juge David)
Verdicts de culpabilité prononcés par un jury sur un
chef d’accusation de tentative de meurtre avec une
arme à feu (art. 239a) C. cr.) et un chef d’avoir
déchargé une arme à feu avec une intention particulière
(art. 244a) C. cr.)
Le 6 mai 2010
Cour supérieure du Québec
(le juge David)
2010 QCCS 2567
Demandeur condamné à 16 ans d’emprisonnement
- 2005 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
Le 12 juillet 2012
Cour d’appel du Québec (Montréal)
(La juge en chef Duval Hesler et les juges Dalphond et
Giroux)
2012 QCCA 1355
Appel de la peine rejeté
Le 28 septembre 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Demande d'autorisation d'appel déposée
35010
Feuiltault Solutions Systems Inc. v. Zurich Canada (F.C.) (Civil) (By Leave)
Coram :
LeBel, Karakatsanis and Wagner JJ.
The application for leave to appeal from the judgment of the Federal Court of Appeal, Number A-141-11,
2012 FCA 215, dated July 30, 2012, is dismissed with costs.
La demande d’autorisation d’appel de l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel fédérale, numéro A -141-11, 2012 CAF 215,
daté du 30 juillet 2012, est rejetée avec dépens .
CASE SUMMARY
Insurance — Marine insurance — Burden of proof — Merchandise shipped to Europe and declared total loss at its
arrival — Insurer denying coverage — Was the burden on the insured to prove the occurrence of a fortuity despite the
existence of a contractual clause of exclusion benefiting the insurer? — Was the contractual exclusion applicable? —
Had the Court of Appeal the duty to reconsider all evidence after ruling that the burden applied by the trial judge on
the main question was faulty?
Feuiltault sold forty book binding machines to a customer in Germany. The goods were packed with treated pressed
wood pieces. The cargo left the Port of Montreal on May 23, 2005, was off-loaded at Bremerhaven on June 3 and
trucked to the customer’s premises in Gütersloh on June 7. When the containers were opened, all of the machines
were rusted and later declared a total loss. The customer refused the goods. Feuiltault’s insurer, Zurich Canada,
refused to pay.
March 4, 2011
Federal Court
(Gauthier J.)
2011 FC 260
Applicant’s action in rem dismissed.
July 30, 2012
Federal Court of Appeal
(Létourneau, Pelletier and Mainville JJ.))
2012 FCA 215
Appeal dismissed.
September 28, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Application for leave to appeal filed.
- 2006 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
RÉSUMÉ DE L’AFFAIRE
Assurance — Assurance maritime — Fardeau de la preuve — Marchandises expédiées en Europe déclarées perte
totale à leur arrivée — L'assureur refuse de payer — L'assurée avait-elle le fardeau de prouver la survenance d'un
événement fortuit malgré l'existence d'une clause contractuelle d'exclusion qui profitait à l'assureur? — L'exclusion
contractuelle était-elle applicable? — La Cour d'appel avait-elle l’obligation d'examiner de nouveau toute la preuve
après avoir statué que le fardeau imposé par le juge de première instance sur la question principale était non fondé?
Feuiltault a vendu quarante machines à relier à un client en Allemagne. Les marchandises ont été emballées avec des
morceaux de bois traité sous pression. Les marchandises ont quitté le port de Montréal le 23 mai 2005, ils ont été
déchargés à Bremerhaven le 3 juin et transportés par camion aux locaux du client à Gütersloh le 7 juin. Lorsque les
conteneurs ont été ouverts, toutes les machines étaient rouillées et on t été déclarées perte totale par la suite. Le client a
refusé les marchandises. L'assureur de Feuiltault, Zurich Canada, a refusé de payer.
4 mars 2011
Cour fédérale
(Juge Gauthier)
2011 CF 260
Action réelle de la demanderesse, rejetée.
30 juillet 2012
Cour d'appel fédérale
(Juges Létourneau, Pelletier et Mainville)
2012 CAF 215
Appel rejeté.
28 septembre 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Demande d'autorisation d'appel, déposée.
35016
S.P. v. Her Majesty the Queen (Ont.) (Criminal) (By Leave)
Coram :
Fish, Rothstein and Moldaver JJ.
The motion for an extension of time to serve and file an application for leave to appeal from the judgment of
the Court of Appeal for Ontario, Number C52209, 2011 ONCA 335, dated April 27, 2011, is dismissed. In any event,
had such motion been granted, the application for leave to appeal would have been dismissed without costs.
La requête en prorogation du délai de signification et de dépôt de la demande d’autorisation d’appel de
l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario, numéro C52209, 2011 ONCA 335, daté du 27 avril 2011, est rejetée. Quoi
qu’il en soit, même si la requête avait été accueillie, la demande d’autorisation d’appel aurait été rejetée sans dépens.
CASE SUMMARY
(PUBLICAT ION BAN IN CASE) (PUBLICAT ION BAN ON PART Y) (COURT FILE CONT AINS INFORMAT ION THAT IS NOT
A VAILABLE FOR INSPECT ION BY T HE PUBLIC)
Criminal Law — Appeals — Sentencing — Standards of Review — Young offender sentenced as an adult for second
degree murder — Whether, if a court of appeal finds the sentencing judge erred in principle, the sentence should be
considered anew or deference should be owed to the sentencing judge.
- 2007 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
The applicant was 16 years and 9 months old when he stabbed a drug dealer. He was convicted by a jury of second
degree murder. At the sentencing hearing, the defence requested sentencing under s. 42(2)(q)(ii) of the Youth
Criminal Justice Act, S.C. 2002, c. 1, which allows a sentence to a maximum of four years committal to custody and
three years conditional supervision in the community. The Crown requested sentencing as an adult under s. 745.1(c)
of the Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, which would result in a mandatory sentence of life imprisonment with
parole ineligibility for 7 years. By the time of sentencing, the applicant already had served 2 years and 5 months in
custody. In his reasons for sentencing, the trial judge compared an adult sentence under the Criminal Code to a
sentence under the Youth Criminal Justice Act with credit for time served. He did not compare an adult sentence
under the Criminal Code to a sentence under the Youth Criminal Justice Act without credit for time served. The
applicant was sentenced to life imprisonment with parole ineligibility for 7 years. The Court of Appeal upheld the
sentence.
December 10, 2008
Ontario Superior Court of Justice
(McMahon J.)
Conviction by jury for second degree murder
November 6, 2009
Ontario Superior Court of Justice
(McMahon J.)
Sentence to life imprisonment with parole ineligibility
for 7 years
April 27, 2011
Court of Appeal for Ontario
(MacPherson, Blair, Epstein JJ.A.)
2011 ONCA 335; C52209
Appeal from sentence dismissed
October 1, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Application for extension of time to serve and file
application for leave to appeal and Application for
leave to appeal filed
RÉSUMÉ DE L’AFFAIRE
(ORDONNANCE DE NON -PUBLICAT ION DANS LE DOSSIER) (ORDONNANCE NON-PUBLICAT ION VISANT UNE PART IE ) (LE
DOSSIER DE LA COUR RENFERME DES DONNÉES QUE LE PUBLIC N 'EST PAS AUT ORISÉ À CONSULT ER)
Droit criminel — Appels — Détermination de la peine — Normes de contrôle — Un jeune contrevenant a été
condamné à une peine applicable aux adultes pour meurtre au deuxième de gré — Si une cour d'appel conclut que le
juge qui a imposé la peine a commis une erreur de principe, la cour devrait -elle considérer la peine de nouveau ou
devrait-elle faire preuve de déférence à l'égard du juge?
Le demandeur était âgé de 16 ans et 9 mois lorsqu'il a poignardé un trafiquant de drogue. Il a été déclaré coupable par
un jury de meurtre au deuxième degré. À l'audience de détermination de la peine, la défense a demandé une peine en
application du sous-al. 42(2)q)(ii) de la Loi sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents, L.C. 2002, ch. 1, qui
permet une peine maximale de quatre ans de placement sous garde et de trois ans de liberté sous condition au sein de
la collectivité. Le ministère public a demandé une peine applicable aux adultes en vertu de l'al. 745.1c) du Code
criminel, L.R.C. 1985, ch. C-46, ce qui donnerait lieu à une peine obligatoire d'emprisonnement à perpétuité assortie
d’une période d’inadmissibilité à une libération conditionnelle de sept ans. Au moment de la dé termination de la
peine, le demandeur avait déjà passé deux ans et cinq mois sous garde. Dans ses motifs de détermination de la peine,
- 2008 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
le juge du procès a comparé la peine applicable aux adultes en vertu du Code criminel à une peine en vertu de la Loi
sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents avec prise en compte de la période passée sous garde. Il n'a pas
comparé la peine applicable aux adultes en vertu du Code criminel à une peine en vertu de la Loi sur le système de
justice pénale pour les adolescents sans prise en compte de la période passée sous garde. Le demandeur a été
condamné à une peine d'emprisonnement à perpétuité assortie d’une période d’inadmissibilité à une libération
conditionnelle de sept ans. La Cour d'appel a confirmé la peine.
10 décembre 2008
Cour supérieure de justice de l'Ontario
(Juge McMahon)
Déclaration de culpabilité par un jury de meurtre au
deuxième degré
6 novembre 2009
Cour supérieure de justice de l'Ontario
(Juge McMahon)
Peine d'emprisonnement à perpétuité assortie d’une
période
d’inadmissibilité
à
une
libération
conditionnelle de sept ans
27 avril 2011
Cour d'appel de l'Ontario
(Juges MacPherson, Blair et Epstein)
2011 ONCA 335; C52209
Appel de la peine, rejeté
1er octobre 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Demande de prorogation du délai de signification et de
dépôt de la demande d'autorisation d'appel et demande
autorisation d'appel, déposées
35019
Gusman Alexandre c. Sa Majesté la Reine (Qc) (Criminelle) (Autorisation)
Coram :
Les juges LeBel, Karakatsanis et Wagner
La requête en prorogation du délai de signification et de dépôt de la demande d’autorisation d’appel est
accueillie. La demande d’autorisation d’appel de l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel du Québec (Montréal), numéros 500-10004512-099, 500-10-004677-108 et 500-10-004678-106, 2012 QCCA 935, daté du 17 mai 2012, est rejetée sans
dépens.
The motion for an extension of time to serve and file the application for leave to appeal is granted. The
application for leave to appeal from the judgment of the Court of Appeal of Quebec (Montréal), Numbers 500-10004512-099, 500-10-004677-108 and 500-10-004678-106, 2012 QCCA 935, dated May 17, 2012, is dismissed
without costs.
CASE SUMMARY
Criminal law — Charge to jury — Attempt to commit murder — Requisite intent — Non-disclosure of evidence —
Stay of proceedings — Reasonable verdict — Discharging firearm with intent — Whether Court of Appeal erred in
law in concluding that judge had properly instructed jury on concept of requisite intent for attempted murder —
Whether Court of Appeal erred in law in concluding that there was no reasonable possibility that non -disclosure of
evidence affected overall fairness of trial such that appellant’s right to make full answer and defence infring ed —
Whether Court of Appeal erred in law in concluding that guilty verdict returned by jury on count of discharging
firearm with intent was not unreasonable in total absence of evidence that applicant had caused bodily harm by
discharging firearm at someone — Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, ss. 239(a), 244(a).
- 2009 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
In March 2008, there was a shooting at a strip club in Longueuil. The applicant and his accomplice fired shots at a
single victim. The applicant fired five shots at the victim, but none of them struck the victim. His accomplice fired
three shots, one of which hit the victim in the chest.
The applicant and his accomplice were charged with attempted murder and discharging a firearm with intent. The
applicant was convicted of both counts following a jury trial.
After the jury’s verdict but before the applicant was sentenced by the trial judge, his attorney learned of the existence
of evidence that had not been disclosed to him, namely recordings of telephone conversations concerning the sh ooting.
The recordings had been obtained by the police during an organized crime investigation not targeting the applicant.
Four of the six conversations implicated the applicant directly and had been recorded shortly before and shortly after
the shooting. The Crown attorneys of record had not known of the existence of those recordings at the time of the
trial.
The applicant moved for a stay of proceedings. In the alternative, he sought a mistrial. The Crown conceded the
relevance of the evidence and its own duty of disclosure.
October 15, 2009
Quebec Superior Court
(David J.)
Guilty verdicts returned by jury on one count of
attempt to commit murder with firearm (s. 239(a)
Cr.C.) and one count of discharging firearm with intent
(s. 244(a) Cr.C.)
April 30, 2010
Quebec Superior Court
(David J.)
2010 QCCS 2640
Motions for stay of proceedings and mistrial dismissed
May 17, 2012
Quebec Court of Appeal (Montréal)
(Duval Hesler C.J. and Dalphond and Giroux JJ.A.)
2012 QCCA 935
Appeals from guilty verdict and dismissal of motions
for stay of proceedings and mistrial dismissed
September 28, 2012
Supreme Court of Canada
Motion to extend time and application for leave to
appeal filed
RÉSUMÉ DE L’AFFAIRE
Droit criminel — Directives au jury — Tentative de meurtre — Intention requise — Non divulgation de preuve —
Arrêt des procédures — Verdict raisonnable — Décharge d’une arme à feu avec une intention particulière — La Cour
d’appel a-t-elle erré en droit en concluant que les directives au jury su r la notion de l’intention requise pour commettre
une tentative du meurtre étaient adéquates? — La Cour d’appel a-t-elle erré en droit en concluant qu’il n’existait pas
une possibilité raisonnable que la non-divulgation de preuve ait eu un impact sur l’équité globale du procès de telle
sorte qu’il aurait existé une violation du droit de l’appelant à une défense pleine et entière? — La Cour d’appel a-t-elle
erré en droit en concluant que le verdict de culpabilité rendu par le jury sur le chef d’accusation d’avoir déchargé une
arme à feu dans une intention spécifique ne constitue pas un verdict déraisonnable, en l’absence totale de preuve que
le demandeur a causé des lésions corporelles en déchargeant une arme à feu contre quelqu’un? — Code criminel,
L.R.C. 1985, ch. C-46, art. 239a), 244a).
- 2010 -
JUDGMENTS ON APPLICATIONS
FOR LEAVE
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES DEMANDES
D'AUTORISATION
En mars 2008, une fusillade a éclaté dans un bar de danseuses à Longueuil. Le demandeur et son complice ont tiré des
coups de feu en direction d’une seule et même victime. Le demandeur tira cinq coups de feu en direction de la
victime, sans jamais l’atteindre. Son complice tira trois coups de feu. Un de ces coups de feu a atteint la victime au
thorax.
Le demandeur et son complice furent accusés de tentative de meurtre et d’avoir déchargé une arme à feu avec une
intention particulière. Suite à un procès avec jury, le demandeur a été reconnu coupable des deux chefs d’accusation.
Après le prononcé du verdict par le jury mais avant que le juge du procès ne prononce la peine, le procureur du
demandeur a appris l’existence de preuve qui ne lui avait pas ét é divulguée. Il s’agissait d’enregistrements de
conversations téléphoniques concernant la fusillade. Ces enregistrements avaient été obtenus par la police dans le
cadre d’une enquête sur le crime organisé qui ne visait pas le demandeur. Quatre de ces six conversations
impliquaient directement le demandeur et ont été enregistrées peu avant et peu après la fusillade. Les procureurs de la
Couronne au dossier ignoraient l’existence de ces enregistrements au moment du procès.
Le demandeur présenta une requête demandant l’arrêt des procédures. Subsidiairement, il rechercha l’avortement de
son procès. La Couronne concéda la pertinence de la preuve et l’obligation de divulgation qui lui incombait.
Le 15 octobre 2009
Cour supérieure du Québec
(Le juge David)
Verdicts de culpabilité prononcés par un jury sur un
chef d’accusation de tentative de meurtre avec une
arme à feu (art. 239a) C. cr.) et un chef d’avoir
déchargé une arme à feu avec une intention particulière
(art. 244a) C. cr.)
Le 30 avril 2010
Cour supérieure du Québec
(Le juge David)
2010 QCCS 2640
Requêtes en arrêt des procédures et en avortement de
procès, rejetées
Le 17 mai 2012
Cour d’appel du Québec (Montréal)
(La juge en chef Duval Hesler et les juges Dalphond et
Giroux)
2012 QCCA 935
Appels du verdict de culpabilité et du rejet des requêtes
en arrêt des procédures et en avortement de procès,
rejetés
Le 28 septembre 2012
Cour suprême du Canada
Requête en prorogation de
d'autorisation d'appel, déposées
- 2011 -
délai et
demande
MOTIONS
REQUÊTES
05.12.2012
Before / Devant : THE REGISTRA R / LE REGISTRAIRE
Motion to extend the time to serve and file the
applicant’s reply
Requête en prorogation du délai de signification
et de dépôt de la réplique de la demanderesse
Jacynthe Deschênes
c. (34969)
Banque canadienne impériale de commerce (Qc)
GRANTED / ACCORDÉE
À LA SUITE DE LA DEMANDE présentée par la demanderesse pour obtenir la prorogation du délai pour la
signification et le dépôt de sa réplique au 21 novembre 2012;
ET APRÈS EXAMEN des documents déposés;
IL EST ORDONNÉ CE QUI SUIT :
La requête est accueillie.
UPON APPLICATION by the applicant for an order extending the time within which she may serve and file her reply
to November 21, 2012;
AND THE MATERIAL FILED having been read;
IT IS HEREB Y ORDERED THAT:
The motion is granted.
10.12.2012
Before / Devant : WAGNER J. / LE JUGE WAGNER
Motion to file a reply factum on appeal
Requête en vue de déposer un mémoire en
réplique concernant l’appel
Marine Services International Limited et al.
v. (34429)
Estate of Joseph Ryan, by its Administratrix,
Yvonne Ryan et al. (N.L.)
- 2012 -
MOTIONS
REQUÊTES
GRANTED / ACCORDÉE
UPON APPLICATION by the appellants for an order permitting the appellants to serve and file a reply factum not
exceeding 5 pages to address arguments raised by the respondent Attorney General of Canada and permitting the
appellants to add to their record and to make reference in their reply to excerpts from Hansard debates in the House of
Commons and Senate in response to the Hansard excerpts referred to at paragraphs 48-53 of the Respondent Attorney
General of Canada’s factum and contained in its Book of Authorities;
AND THE MATERIAL FILED having been read;
IT IS HEREB Y ORDERED THAT:
The motion is granted without costs. The appellants shall serve and file the reply factum and Hansard excerpts within
two (2) days of this order.
IT IS HEREB Y FURTHER ORDERED THAT:
The request by the Attorney General of Canada for an additional fifteen (15) minutes for oral argument at the hearing of
the appeal is denied.
À LA SUITE DE LA DEMANDE présentée par les appelants en vue de signifier et déposer un mémoire en réplique
d’au plus 5 pages pour répondre aux arguments soulevés par l’intimé, le procureur général du Canada, et en vue
d’ajouter à leur dossier des extraits des débats de la Chambre des communes et du Sénat et d’y faire référence dans leur
réplique afin de répondre aux extraits du Hansard mentionnés aux paragraphes 48 à 53 du mémoire de l’intimé, le
procureur général du Canada, et inclus dans son recueil de sources;
ET APRÈS EXAMEN des documents déposés;
IL EST ORDONNÉ CE QUI SUIT :
La requête est accueillie sans dépens. Les appelants signifieront et déposeront leur mémoire en réplique et les extraits
des débats dans les deux (2) jours suivant la présente ordonnance.
IL EST EN OUTRE ORDONNÉ QUE :
La demande du procureur général du Canada visant à faire prolonger de quinze (15) minutes le temps qui lui est alloué
pour présenter sa plaidoirie orale lors de l’audition de l’appel est rejetée.
- 2013 -
MOTIONS
REQUÊTES
13.12.2012
Before / Devant : THE REGISTRA R / LE REGISTRAIRE
Motion to extend the time to serve the
respondents, Ministry of Children and Family
Development and Attorney General of British
Columbia, response to November 28, 2012
Requête en prorogation du délai de signification
de la réponse des intimés Ministry of Children
and Family Development et procureur général
de la Colombie-Britannique jusqu’au 28
novembre 2012
Robert Glen Harrison
v. (35043)
Ministry of Children and Family Development and
Attorney General of British Columbia et al. (B.C.)
GRANTED / ACCORDÉE
- 2014 -
NOTICES OF APPEAL FILED SINCE
LAST ISSUE
AVIS D’APPEL DÉPOSÉS DEPUIS LA
DERNIÈRE PARUTION
11.12.2012
14.12.2012
Elizabeth Bernard
Information and Privacy Commissioner of
Ontario (Diane Smith, Adjudicator)
v. (34819)
v. (34828)
Attorney General of Canada et al. (F.C.)
Minister of Finance for the Province of Ontario
(Ont.)
(By Leave)
(By Leave)
17.12.2012
Her Majesty the Queen
v. (34914)
Erin Lee MacDonal d (N.S.)
(By Leave)
- 2015 -
APPEALS HEARD SINCE LAST ISSUE
AND DISPOSITION
APPELS ENTENDUS DEPUIS LA
DERNIÈRE PARUTION ET RÉSULTAT
14.12.2012
Coram: McLachlin C.J. and LeBel, Fish, Abella, Rothstein, Cromwell, Moldaver, Karakatsanis and Wagner JJ.
IBM Canada Limited
D. Geoffrey Cowper, Q.C. and Lorene A. Novakowski
for the appellant.
v. (34472)
Christopher J. Watson and Matthew G. Siren for the
respondent.
Richard Waterman (B.C.) (Civil) (By Leave)
RESERVED / EN DÉLIB ÉRÉ
Nature of the case:
Nature de la cause :
Employment law - Unjust dismissal - Damages Pensions - Whether pension benefits received by the
respondent during his wrongful dismissal notice
period should be deducted from his wrongful
dismissal damages award.
Droit de l’emploi - Congédiement injustifié Dommages-intérêts - Pensions - Les prestations de
retraite reçues par l’intimé durant la période de préavis
de son congédiement injustifié devraient-elles être
déduites des dommages -intérêts qui lui ont été accordés
par jugement au titre de son congédiement injustifié?
- 2016 -
PRONOUNCEMENTS OF APPEALS
RESERVED
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES
APPELS EN DÉLIBÉRÉ
Reasons for judgment are available
Les motifs de jugement sont disponibles
DECEMB ER 19, 2012 / LE 19 DÉCEMBRE 2012
33968
Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada, Canadian Merchant Service Guild,
Federal Government Dockyard Trades and Labour Council (East), International Brotherhood
of Electrical Workers, Federal Government Dockyard Chargehands Association, Research
Council Employees’ Association, Association of Public Service Financial Administrators,
Professional Association of Foreign Service Officers, Federal Government Dockyard Trades
and Labour Council (West), Canadian Association of Professional Radio Operators, Canadian
Air Traffic Control Association, Canadian Military Colleges Faculty Association and Federal
Superannuates National Association v. Attorney General of Canada – and between – Public
Service Alliance of Canada v. Attorney General of Canada – and between – Armed Forces
Pensioners’/ Annuitants’ Association of Canada, Association des membres de la police Montée
du Québec, British Columbia Mounted Police Professional Association, Mounted Police
Association of Ontario and Canadian Association of Professional Employees v. Attorney
General of Canada – and – Attorney General of British Columbia (Ont.)
2012 SCC 71 / 2012 CSC 71
Coram:
McLachlin C.J. and LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein, Cromwell, Moldaver and
Karakatsanis JJ.
The appeal from the judgment of the Court of Appeal for Ontario, Numbers C48157, C48158 and C48161, 2010 ONCA
657, dated October 8, 2010, heard on February 9, 2012, is dismissed with costs.
L’appel interjeté contre l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario, numéros C48157, C48158 et C48161, 2010 ONCA 657,
en date du 8 octobre 2010, entendu le 9 février 2012, est rejeté avec dépens.
DECEMB ER 20, 2012 / LE 20 DÉCEMBRE 2012
33989
N.S. v. Her Majesty the Queen, M---d S. and M---l S. – and – Ontario Human Rights
Commission, Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic, Criminal Lawyers’ Association
(Ontario), Muslim Canadian Congress, South Asian Legal Clinic of Ontario, Barreau du
Québec, Canadian Civil Liberties Association, Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund and
Canadian Council on American-Islamic Relations (Ont.)
2012 SCC 72 / 2012 CSC 72
Coram:
McLachlin C.J. and LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein and Cromwell JJ.
The appeal from the judgment of the Court of Appeal for Ontario, Numbers C50534 and C50892, 2010 ONCA 670,
dated October 13, 2010, heard on December 8, 2011, is dismissed. The matter should be remitted to the preliminary
inquiry judge to be decided in accordance with these reasons. Abella J. is dissenting.
L’appel interjeté contre l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario, numéros C50534 et C50892, 2010 ONCA 670, en date
du 13 octobre 2010, entendu le 8 décembre 2011, est rejeté. L’affaire doit être renvo yée au juge présidant l’enquête
préliminaire pour qu’il la tranche conformément aux présents motifs. La juge Abella est dissidente.
- 2017 -
PRONOUNCEM ENTS OF APPEALS
RESERVED
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES APPELS EN
DÉLIBÉRÉ
DECEMB ER 21, 2012 / LE 21 DÉCEMBRE 2012
34090
Ibrahim Yumnu v. Her Majesty the Queen – and – Canadian Civil Liberties Association,
British Columbia Civil Liberties Association, Ontario Crown Attorneys’ Association,
Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario, David Asper Centre for Constitutional
Rights and Criminal Lawyers’ Association (Ont.)
2012 SCC 73 / 2012 CSC 73
Coram:
McLachlin C.J. and LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein, Cromwell, Moldaver and
Karakatsanis JJ.
The appeal from the judgment of the Court of Appeal for Ontario, Number C44836, 2010 ONCA 637, dated
October 5, 2010, heard on March 14 and 15, 2012, is dismissed.
L’appel interjeté contre l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario, numéro C44836, 2010 ONCA 637, en date du
5 octobre 2010, entendu les 14 et 15 mars 2012, est rejeté.
34091
Vinicio Cardoso v. Her Majesty the Queen – and – Canadian Civil Liberties Association, British
Columbia Civil Liberties Association, Ontario Crown Attorneys’ Association, Information and
Privacy Commissioner of Ontario, David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights and Criminal
Lawyers’ Association (Ont.)
2012 SCC 73 / 2012 CSC 73
Coram:
McLachlin C.J. and LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein, Cromwell, Moldaver and
Karakatsanis JJ.
The appeal from the judgment of the Court of Appeal for Ontario, Number C45403, 2010 ONCA 637, dated October 5,
2010, heard on March 14 and 15, 2012, is dismissed.
L’appel interjeté contre l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario, numéro C45403, 2010 ONCA 637, en date du 5 octobre
2010, entendu les 14 et 15 mars 2012, est rejeté.
34340
Tung Chi Duong v. Her Majesty the Queen – and – Canadian Civil Liberties Association,
British Columbia Civil Liberties Association, Ontario Crown Attorneys’ Association,
Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario, David Asper Centre for Constitutional
Rights, Criminal Lawyers’ Association and Attorney General of Alberta (Ont.)
2012 SCC 73 / 2012 CSC 73
Coram:
McLachlin C.J. and LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein, Cromwell, Moldaver and
Karakatsanis JJ.
The appeal from the judgment of the Court of Appeal for Ontario, Number C46206, 2010 ONCA 637, dated October 5,
2010, heard on March 14 and 15, 2012, is dismissed.
L’appel interjeté contre l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario, numéro C46206, 2010 ONCA 637, en date du 5 octobre
2010, entendu les 14 et 15 mars 2012, est rejeté.
- 2018 -
PRONOUNCEM ENTS OF APPEALS
RESERVED
JUGEMENTS RENDUS SUR LES APPELS EN
DÉLIBÉRÉ
34087
James Peter Emms v. Her Majesty the Queen – and – Canadian Civil Liberties Association,
British Columbia Civil Liberties Association, Ontario Crown Attorneys’ Association,
Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario, David Asper Centre for Constitutional
Rights and Criminal Lawyers’ Association (Ont.)
2012 SCC 74 / 2012 CSC 74
Coram:
McLachlin C.J. and LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein, Cromwell, Moldaver and
Karakatsanis JJ.
The appeal from the judgment of the Court of Appeal for Ontario, Number C50049, 2010 ONCA 817, dated December
3, 2010, heard on March 14 and 15, 2012, is dismissed.
L’appel interjeté contre l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario, numéro C50049, 2010 ONCA 817, en date du 3
décembre 2010, entendu les 14 et 15 mars 2012, est rejeté.
34179
Troy Gilbert Davey v. Her Majesty the Queen – and – Canadian Civil Liberties Association,
British Columbia Civil Liberties Association, Information and Privacy Commissioner of
Ontario, David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights, Criminal Lawyers’ Association (Ont.)
2012 SCC 75 / 2012 CSC 75
Coram:
McLachlin C.J. and LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein, Cromwell, Moldaver and
Karakatsanis JJ.
The appeal from the judgment of the Court of Appeal for Ontario, Number C48091, 2010 ONCA 818, dated December
3, 2010, heard on March 14 and 15, 2012, is dismissed.
L’appel interjeté contre l’arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario, numéro C48091, 2010 ONCA 818, en date du 3
décembre 2010, entendu les 14 et 15 mars 2012, est rejeté.
- 2019 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada et al. v. Attorney General of Canada et al. (Ont.) (33968)
Indexed as: Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada v. Canada (Attorney General) /
Répertorié : Institut professionnel de la fonction publique du Canada c. Canada (Procureur général)
Neutral citation: 2012 SCC 71 / Référence neutre : 2012 CSC 71
Hearing: February 9, 2012 / Judgment: December 19, 2012
Audition : Le 9 février 2012 / Jugement : Le 19 décembre 2012
Present: McLachlin C.J. and LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein, Cromwell, Moldaver and Karakatsanis JJ.
Pensions ― Pension plans ― Surplus ― Public sector pension plans administered by government ―
Government amortizing actuarial surpluses in Superannuation Accounts ― New legislation coming into force on
April 1, 2000 amending Superannuation Acts ― Government debiting over $28 billion directly from Superannuation
Accounts on basis of new legislation ― Whether Superannuation Accounts contain assets ― Whether government owes
fiduciary duty to Plan members ― Whether constructive trust should be imposed over balances in Sup erannuation
Accounts as of March 31, 2000 ― Whether new legislation authorizing government to debit actuarial surpluses in
Superannuation Accounts ― Public Service Superannuation Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. P-36 ― Canadian Forces
Superannuation Act, R.S.C. 1985 c. C-17 ― Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. R-11
― Public Sector Pension Investment Board Act, S.C. 1999, c. 34.
There are three pension plans involved in this appeal (the “Plans”). They were established by statute for each
of three groups: substantially all those who are employed in the federal public service; the members of the RCMP; and
the regular force of the Canadian Forces (the “Plan members”). Each Plan is administered by the Government of
Canada, and each is a contributory, defined benefit plan. The statutes governing the Plans establish for each one a
“Superannuation Account”, which records payments into and out of the Plan. In the 1990s, the credits to the
Superannuation Accounts began to reflect actuarial surpluses (meaning that the credits exceeded the estimated cost of
providing pension benefits).
By March 1999, the total surpluses of the three Plans had reached
approximately $30.9 billion. There are two relevant time periods in this appeal. The first period is up to and including
March 31, 2000. It precedes the coming into force of the Public Sector Pension Investment Board Act, S.C. 1999, c. 34
(“Bill C-78”), legislation that amended the Superannuation Acts (PSSA; CFSA and RCMPSA) and, thus, the Plans. The
second period begins on April 1, 2000, when Bill C-78 came into effect.
Beginning with the 1990-91 Public Accounts (Canada’s annual financial reports), the government began to
“amortize” the actuarial surpluses in the Superannuation Accounts. The effect of this “amortization” was twofold: it
reduced the government’s annual budget deficit (or increas ed the annual budget surplus) by reducing annual pension
expenditures, and it brought the government’s net debt down by reducing the net pension liabilities to an amount closer
to the actuarial estimates of the government’s future pension obligations.
In 1999, the government introduced Bill C-78, which came into force on April 1, 2000. It made significant
changes to the Superannuation Acts and changed the way in which contributions to the Plans were collected, managed
and distributed. It established a Pension Fund in each of the Superannuation Acts that replaced the Superannuation
Accounts for post-March 31, 2000 service. Since April 1, 2000, employee and government contributions in respect of
current service have been made to the Pension Funds. All b enefits for pensionable service prior to April 1, 2000, when
paid, are charged to the appropriate Superannuation Account. However, benefits paid for service thereafter are paid
from the appropriate Pension Fund. Bill C-78 also required the Minister to debit from the Superannuation Account
certain amounts in excess of specified actuarial surplus ceilings. Unlike the effect of the prior amortization practice, on
the basis of Bill C-78, the government debited over $28 billion directly from the Superannuation Accounts, thereby
reducing the actuarial surplus in those accounts.
Various unions and associations filed suit, seeking relief that would require the government to return
$28 billion to the Plans. The trial judge dismissed the claims and the Ontario Court of Appeal upheld the decision. In
their appeal in this Court, they seek a declaration that the Plan members have an equitable interest in the outstanding
balance in the Superannuation Accounts as of March 31, 2000. They also seek a declaration that Bill C-78 does not
- 2020 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
authorize the reduction from the Superannuation Accounts of any amount in which Plan members have an equitable
interest without compensation. They seek an order that the Superannuation Accounts be credited with all amounts that
were removed following Bill C-78 in which the Plan members have an equitable interest, together with interest.
Held: The appeal should be dismissed.
The Superannuation Accounts are legislated records and do not contain assets in which the Plan members have
a legal or equitable interest. The Plan members’ interests are limited to their interest in the defined benefits to which
they are entitled under the Plans. The Superannuation Acts created the Accounts to track Plan-related Consolidated
Revenue Fund (“CRF”) transactions and to estimate the government’s pension liabilities to Plan members. In this way,
they are accounting records, not funded and segregated pools of assets. When the word “assets” is used in the
legislation in reference to the Superannuation Accounts, it merely signifies their credit balances, not anything of value
to which the Plan members could have an interest. Even if reference to extrinsic aids was appropriate, the extrinsic
evidence available is inconclusive. Nor does it afford insight into the intention of Parliament when creating the
Superannuation Accounts.
The courts below were correct to reject the theory that the government borrowed from the Accounts, placing in
them promises to pay by the government (the purported assets in the Accounts). This theory is inconsistent with the
legislation in that it assumes that the government was required to contribute property into the Accounts in the first
place. As the Accounts are no more than accounting records, this would have been impossible. Prior to April 1, 2000,
all of the real money associated with Canada’s pension scheme remained unsegregated in the CRF, until benefits were
actually paid — out of the CRF — to Plan members. The superannuation scheme reflects “internal borrowin g” only in
the sense that it avoids, by design, the need for the external borrowing that would otherwise be required to finance the
government’s pension obligations. The Superannuation Accounts are just accounting records and they are not funds,
nor are they “trust-like”, such that it is possible to borrow from them.
As the Superannuation Accounts do not contain assets there was no property in respect of which Plan members
can have a legal or equitable interest. However, even if the Accounts did contain assets, it has not been established that
the Plan members have a proprietary interest in either their contributions made or in the government credits under the
Superannuation Acts. On a plain reading of the Superannuation Acts, there is no suggestion that the Plan members
have a proprietary interest in their contributions. Contributing employees can claim no continuing property interest in
these amounts. In exchange for their contributions, and with each year of pensionable service, employees gain a leg al
entitlement to a future benefit. It has been asserted that employees have an interest in both the employee and employer
contributions, plus interest, on the basis that they form part of employees’ total compensation. Even if it were to be
assumed that employees have an interest in the contributions at the point in time at which their salaries are to be paid to
them, no interest in these amounts could survive the requirement in the Superannuation Acts that they be paid into the
CRF and credited to the Accounts. Rather, this is the “cost” paid by employees for the future legal entitlement to their
statutorily defined benefits. The Superannuation Acts also do not establish that employees have an equitable interest in
the amounts credited to the Accounts. They provide only a legal entitlement to statutorily defined pension benefits.
Nor was the government subject to a fiduciary obligation in favour of the Plan members with respect to the
actuarial surplus. In this case, the government does not fall int o any of the per se fiduciary relationships. It is
contended the government is in a recognized fiduciary role in its capacity as a pension plan administrator; however, it is
not necessary to decide the precise ambit of any potential fiduciary duty that might arise between the government, as
pension plan administrator, and the beneficiaries of the plan, or whether the relationship inherently carries with it some
set of fiduciary obligations. It is clear that the government had no fiduciary duty to the plan members with respect to
the actuarial surplus. There was no ad hoc fiduciary relationship between the government and the Plan members with
respect to the actuarial surplus reflected in the Superannuation Accounts. Most importantly, the government did no t
undertake, either expressly or impliedly, to act in the best interests of the Plan members with respect to the actuarial
surplus. Without such an undertaking of loyalty in favour of these particular stakeholders, the government’s duty was to
act in the best interests of society as a whole. This is inconsistent with the existence of a fiduciary duty. Moreover,
while the government exercised discretion in its accounting treatment of the surpluses in the Superannuation Accounts,
the Plan members were not vulnerable to that discretion, nor did they have any legal or practical interest at stake. The
effect of the amortization was to disclose more accurately Canada’s actual pension obligations, not to affect Plan
members’ statutory entitlements under the Plans.
- 2021 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
Further, a constructive trust should not be imposed over the balances in the Superannuation Accounts as of
March 31, 2000. There was no enrichment and corresponding deprivation, and a prima facie case of unjust enrichment
has not been established. As the Superannuation Accounts are mere accounting records, and do not contain assets in
which the Plan members have an interest, no enrichment and corresponding deprivation can be found in either (1) the
government’s decision prior to April 1, 2000, to amortize the surpluses for accounting purposes, or (2) Parliament’s
decision to enact Bill C-78 to require the debiting of a portion of the surplus directly from the Accounts.
Bill C-78 authorized the government to debit the actuarial surpluses in the Superannuation Accounts. The
courts below did not err in determining that the Plan members have no equitable interest in the surpluses in the
Superannuation Accounts. Bill C-78 thus could not have expropriated the Plan members’ property. Further, the
Superannuation Acts are unambiguous in establishing that the Minister may debit any actuarial surplus and must debit
all amounts exceeding 110 percent of the estimated liability under the Plans. Moreover, it is “extremely clear” that
Parliament did not intend any compensation to be given to the Plan members for these debits, whether or not this
constituted expropriation. It would be absurd to read Bill C-78 as requiring the government to debit excess amounts
and then compensate the Plan members for the amounts d ebited. Such an interpretation would be to convert the relevant
provisions of Bill C-78 into a distribution mechanism — where the surpluses would be reduced and the Plan members
would receive some form of compensation in lieu of having surpluses in the Acc ounts — which was quite clearly not
Parliament’s intent.
APPEAL from a judgment of the Ontario Court of Appeal (Laskin, Gillese and Juriansz JJ.A.), 2010 ONCA
657, 102 O.R. (3d) 241, 275 O.A.C. 40, 84 C.C.P.B. 161, [2010] O.J. No. 4248 (QL), 2010 CarswellOnt 7532,
affirming a decision of Panet J. (2007), 66 C.C.P.B. 54, 2007 CanLII 50603, [2007] O.J. No. 4577 (QL), 2007
CarswellOnt 7541. Appeal dismissed.
Paul J. J. Cavalluzzo, Hugh O’Reilly and Amanda Darrach, for the appellants the Professional Institute of the
Public Service of Canada et al.
James Cameron, Andrew Raven and Andrew Astritis, for the appellants the Public Service Alliance of Canada,
the Armed Forces Pensioners’/Annuitants’ Association of Canada et al.
Peter Southey, Dale Yurka and Christine Mohr, for the respondent.
Written submissions only by J. Gareth Morley, for the intervener.
Solicitors for the appellants the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada et al.: Cavalluzzo
Hayes Shilton McIntyre & Cornish, Toronto.
Solicitors for the appellants the Public Service Alliance of Canada, the Armed Forces Pensioners’/Annuitants’
Association of Canada et al.: Raven, Cameron, Ballantyne & Yazbeck, Ottawa.
Solicitor for the respondent: Attorney General of Canada, Toronto.
Solicitor for the intervener: Attorney General of British Columbia, Victoria.
________________________
Présents : La juge en chef McLachlin et les juges LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein, Cromwell, Moldaver et
Karakatsanis.
Pensions ― Régimes de pension ― Surplus ― Régimes de pension du secteur public administrés par le
gouvernement ― Amortissement par le gouvernement de surplus actuariels dans les comptes de pension de retraite ―
Lois sur les pensions modifiées par de nouvelles disp ositions législatives entrées en vigueur le 1 er avril 2000 ―
Gouvernement ayant porté plus de 28 milliards de dollars directement au débit des comptes de pension de retraite en
application des nouvelles dispositions ― Les comptes de pension de retraite con tiennent-ils des éléments d’actif? ― Le
gouvernement a-t-il une obligation fiduciaire envers les membres des régimes? ― Une fiducie par interprétation
- 2022 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
devrait-elle être imposée relativement aux soldes des comptes de pension de retraite au 31 mars 2000? ― Les
nouvelles dispositions législatives autorisaient-elles le gouvernement à porter les surplus actuariels au débit des
comptes de pension de retraite? ― Loi sur la pension de la fonction publique, L.R.C. 1985, ch. P-36 ― Loi sur la
pension de retraite des Forces canadiennes, L.R.C. 1985, ch. C-17 ― Loi sur la pension de retraite de la Gendarmerie
royale du Canada, L.R.C. 1985, ch. R-11 ― Loi sur l’Office d’investissement des régimes de pensions du secteur
public, L.C. 1999, ch. 34.
Trois régimes de pension sont en cause dans le pourvoi (les « régimes »). Ils ont été créés par le législateur
pour chacun des trois groupes suivants : essentiellement tous les membres de la fonction publique fédérale; les
membres de la GRC; les membres de la force régulière des Forces canadiennes (les « membres des régimes »). Les
trois régimes sont administrés par le gouvernement du Canada et sont des régimes contributifs à prestations
déterminées. Les lois régissant ces régimes prévoient pour chacun la constitution d’un « compte de pension de
retraite », où sont inscrits les montants versés dans le régime et ceux qui en sont retirés. Pendant les années 1990, ces
comptes ont commencé à afficher des surplus actuariels (c’est-à-dire que les montants portés à leur crédit excédaient les
coûts estimatifs du versement des prestations). Au mois de mars 1999, le total des surplus accumulés par les trois
régimes atteignait plus ou moins 30,9 milliards de dollars. Deux périodes sont visées par le pourvoi. La première va
jusqu’au 31 mars 2000 inclusivement, soit la période précédant l’entrée en vigueur de la Loi sur l’Office
d’investissement des régimes de pensions du secteur public, L.C. 1999, ch. 34 (le « projet de loi C-78 »), qui a modifié
les lois sur les pensions (LPFP; LPRFC et LPRGRC) et, par conséquent, les régimes . La seconde commence le 1er avril
2000, date d’entrée en vigueur du projet de loi C-78.
Dans les Comptes publics (les rapports financiers annuels du Canada) de 1990-1991, le gouvernement a
commencé à « amortir » les surplus actuariels des comptes de pension de retraite. Cet « amortissement » a eu un
double effet : il a réduit le déficit budgétaire annuel du gouvernement (ou accru le surplus budgétaire annuel), en
abaissant les charges de retraite annuelles, et il a ramené à un niveau inférieur la dette nette du gouvernement en
rabaissant le montant net du passif au titre des pensions de retraite à un niveau plus près des estimations actuarielles des
engagements à venir du gouvernement au titre des pensions .
En 1999, le gouvernement a présenté le projet de loi C-78, entré en vigueur le 1er avril 2000, qui a apporté des
changements substantiels aux lois sur les pensions et changé le mode de perception, de gestion et de distribution des
contributions aux régimes . En remplacement de chacun des comptes de pension de retraite prévus par les lois sur les
pensions, il a établi une caisse de retraite à l’égard du service postérieur au 31 mars 2000. Depuis le 1er avril 2000, les
contributions des employés et du gouvernement relativement au service courant sont versées aux caisses de retraite.
Les prestations afférentes au service ouvrant droit à pension antérieur au 1 er avril 2000 sont payées sur le compte de
pension de retraite approprié, mais les prestations afférentes au service postérieur à cette date sont imputées à la caisse
de retraite appropriée. Le projet de loi C-78 obligeait le ministre à débiter les comptes de pension de retraite de certains
montants excédant le plafond établi pour les surplus actuariels . En application du projet de loi C-78, qui produisait des
effets différents de la méthode d’amortissement antérieure, le gouvernement a porté plus de 28 milliards de dollars
directement au débit des comptes de pension de retraite, réduisant ainsi leurs surplu s actuariels.
Des syndicats et des associations ont poursuivi le gouvernement pour obtenir la restitution des 28 milliards de
dollars aux régimes de pension. Le juge de première instance a rejeté leurs demandes et la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario a
confirmé sa décision. Dans leur pourvoi, ils demandent à notre Cour de rendre un jugement déclaratoire portant que les
membres des régimes possèdent un intérêt en equity dans le solde des comptes de pension de retraite au 31 mars 2000.
Ils demandent également à la Cour de déclarer que le projet de loi C-78 ne permet pas de réduire sans indemnisation
quelque montant que ce soit des comptes de pension de retraite dans lequel les membres des régimes ont un intérêt en
equity. Ils demandent aussi que soient portés au crédit des comptes de pension de retraite tout montant dans lequel les
membres des régimes ont un intérêt en equity et qui en a été retiré à la suite du projet de loi C-78, ainsi que les intérêts
y afférents.
Arrêt : Le pourvoi est rejeté.
Les comptes de pension de retraite sont des livres comptables prescrits par la loi, et ils ne contiennent pas
d’éléments d’actif dans lesquels les appelants possèderaient un intérêt en common law ou en equity . L’intérêt des
membres des régimes ne va pas au-delà de leur droit aux prestations déterminées prévues par les régimes . Les lois sur
- 2023 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
les pensions ont établi ces comptes pour suivre les opérations effectuées dans le Trésor à l’égard des régimes et pour
estimer les engagements du gouvernement envers les membres des régimes au titre des pensions . Ils constituent donc
des documents comptables, et non des portefeuilles d’éléments d’actif capitalisés et distincts . Le mot « actif », employé
dans les dispositions législatives à l’égard des comptes de pension de ret raite, s’entend simplement du solde créditeur
des comptes, et non d’une chose de valeur dans laquelle les appelants pourraient posséder un intérêt . Même si le
recours à des moyens extrinsèques était approprié pour déterminer si, en l’espèce, les comptes d e pension de retraite
contiennent des éléments d’actif, la preuve extrinsèque n’est pas concluante . Elle ne nous éclaire pas non plus sur
l’intention que poursuivait le législateur en créant les comptes de pension de retraite .
C’est à bon droit que les juridictions inférieures ont rejeté la théorie selon laquelle le gouvernement avait
emprunté aux comptes contre des promesses de remboursement (les éléments d’actif censés s’y trouver). Cette théorie
ne cadre pas avec les dispositions législatives, car elle postule que le gouvernement était tenu de contribuer aux
comptes en y plaçant des biens . Les comptes n’étant que des documents comptables, cela aurait été impossible. Avant
le 1er avril 2000, les fonds réels liés au système de pension du gouvernement étaient indistinctement incorporés au
Trésor, jusqu’au paiement — sur le Trésor — des prestations aux membres des régimes . On ne peut parler d’« emprunt
interne » à l’égard du régime de pension qu’au sens où le régime, tel qu’il est conçu, évite le recou rs aux emprunts
externes qui seraient autrement nécessaires pour financer les obligations du gouvernement au titre des pensions . Les
comptes de pension de retraite ne sont que des documents comptables et non des caisses et ils ne s’« apparente[nt] » pas
à des fiducies, de sorte qu’il n’est pas possible d’emprunter à ces comptes .
Comme les comptes de pension de retraite ne contiennent pas d’éléments d’actif, il n’existait aucun bien dans
lequel les membres des régimes peuvent avoir un intérêt en common law ou en equity. Toutefois, même en supposant
que les comptes contiennent des éléments d’actif, il n’a pas été établi que les membres des régimes ont un intérêt
propriétal dans les contributions qu’ils ont versées ou les crédits gouvernementaux prévus par les lois sur les pensions.
Selon le sens ordinaire des lois sur les pensions, celles -ci n’indiquent pas que les membres des régimes possèdent un
intérêt propriétal dans leurs contributions. Les fonctionnaires qui ont contribué aux régimes ne peuvent revendiquer
aucun intérêt propriétal toujours existant dans ces montants. En contrepartie de leurs contributions, et de chacune de
leurs années de service ouvrant droit à pension, ils acquièrent le droit à des prestations futures. On a soutenu que les
employés possèdent un intérêt dans leurs contributions et celles de l’employeur, ainsi que dans les intérêts qu’elles
produisent, car ces sommes font partie de leur rémunération totale. Même en supposant qu’un tel intérêt existe à la date
où les employés doivent toucher leur salaire, il ne saurait survivre à l’exigence établie dans les lois sur les pensions que
ces contributions soient versées au Trésor et portées au crédit des comptes . En fait, les contributions représentent le
« coût » assumé par les employés pour leur droit futur aux prestations déterminées prévues par la loi. Les lois sur les
pensions n’établissent pas non plus que les employés ont un intérêt en equity dans les sommes portées au crédit des
comptes. Elles confèrent uniquement un droit aux prestations déterminées qui y sont prévues .
Le gouvernement n’avait aucune obligation fiduciaire envers les membres des régimes à l’égard des surplus
actuariels. La relation en cause en l’espèce ne fait partie d’aucune des catégories de relations fiduciaires par nature. On
affirme que le gouvernement, en tant qu’administrateur des régimes, exerce des fonctions fiduciaires reconnues . Il
n’est toutefois pas nécessaire de déterminer quelle serait l’étendue précise d’une obligation fiduciaire suscep tible
d’exister entre le gouvernement, en qualité d’administrateur des régimes de pension, et les bénéficiaires des régimes, ni
si leur relation emporte intrinsèquement certaines obligations fiduciaires . Il est clair que le gouvernement n’avait
aucune obligation fiduciaire envers les membres des régimes à l’égard des surplus actuariels . Il n’existait pas de
relation fiduciaire ad hoc entre le gouvernement et les membres des régimes à l’égard des surplus actuariels
qu’affichaient les comptes de pension de retraite. Point plus important, le gouvernement ne s’est pas engagé, de façon
expresse ni implicite, à agir dans l’intérêt des membres relativement aux surplus actuariels . Le devoir du
gouvernement, en l’absence d’un tel engagement de loyauté envers ce g roupe particulier, consistait à agir dans l’intérêt
de la société en général, ce qui n’est pas compatible avec l’existence d’une obligation fiduciaire . De plus, bien que le
gouvernement ait exercé un pouvoir discrétionnaire à l’égard du traitement comptab le des surplus des comptes de
pension de retraite, les membres des régimes n’étaient pas en position de vulnérabilité face à ce pouvoir et ils n’avaient
aucun intérêt juridique ou pratique en jeu. L’amortissement avait pour effet de présenter avec plus d’exactitude à
combien se chiffraient les engagements réels du Canada au titre des pensions, et non de modifier les droits conférés par
la loi aux membres des régimes .
- 2024 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
De plus, il n’y a pas lieu d’imposer une fiducie par interprétation relativement aux soldes des comptes de
pension de retraite au 31 mars 2000. Il n’y a pas eu enrichissement et appauvrissement corrélatif, et la preuve prima
facie de l’enrichissement injustifié n’a pas été établie. Les comptes de pension de retraite étant de simples documen ts
comptables qui ne contiennent pas d’éléments d’actif dans lesquels les appelants pourraient avoir un intérêt, ni (1) la
décision prise par le gouvernement avant le 1er avril 2000 d’amortir les surplus à des fins comptables, ni (2) la décision
du législateur d’édicter le projet de loi C-78 exigeant qu’une partie des surplus soit portée directement au débit des
comptes ne peuvent donner lieu à un enrichissement et à un appauvrissement corrélatif.
Le projet de loi C-78 autorisait le gouvernement à porter les surplus actuariels au débit des comptes de pension
de retraite. Les juridictions inférieures n’ont pas commis d’erreur en statuant que les membres des régimes n’avaient
pas d’intérêt en equity dans les surplus des comptes de pension de retraite . Il s’ensuit que le projet de loi C-78 ne peut
avoir exproprié les membres d’un bien. En outre, les lois sur les pensions établissent de façon non équivoque que le
ministre peut porter un surplus actuariel au débit des comptes et qu’il doit porter au débit tout montant dépassant
110 pour 100 du passif estimatif au titre des pensions . Qui plus est, il est « très clair » que le législateur ne prévoyait
pas que ces débits, qu’ils constituent ou non une expropriation, donnent lieu au versement d’une indemnité aux
membres des régimes. Il serait absurde de considérer que le projet de loi C-78 exige que le gouvernement porte les
sommes excédentaires au débit des comptes et lui impose ensuite de verser une indemnité aux membres des régimes
pour les montants ainsi débités. Une telle interprétation convertirait les dispositions pertinentes du projet de loi C-78 en
un mécanisme de distribution — pourvoyant à la réduction des surplus et à une forme d’indemnisation des membres
des régimes pour remplacer les surplus — alors que cela n’était clairement pas l’intention du législateur.
POURVOI contre un arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario (les juges Laskin, Gillese et Juriansz), 2010 ONCA
657, 102 O.R. (3d) 241, 275 O.A.C. 40, 84 C.C.P.B. 161, [2010] O.J. No. 4248 (QL), 2010 CarswellOnt 7532, qui a
confirmé une décision du juge Panet (2007), 66 C.C.P.B. 54, 2007 CanLII 50603, [2007] O.J. No. 4577 (QL), 2007
CarswellOnt 7541. Pourvoi rejeté.
Paul J. J. Cavalluzzo, Hugh O’Reilly et Amanda Darrach, pour les appelants l’Institut professionnel de la
fonction publique du Canada et autres.
James Cameron, Andrew Raven et Andrew Astritis, pour les appelantes l’Alliance de la Fonction publique du
Canada, l’Association canadienne des pensionnés et rentiers militaires et autres.
Peter Southey, Dale Yurka et Christine Mohr, pour l’intimé.
Argumentation écrite seulement par J. Gareth Morley, pour l’intervenant.
Procureurs des appelants l’Institut professionnel de la fonction publique du Canada et autres : Cavalluzzo
Hayes Shilton McIntyre & Cornish, Toronto.
Procureurs des appelantes l’Alliance de la Fonction publique du Canada, l’Association canadienne des
pensionnés et rentiers militaires et autres : Raven, Cameron, Ballantyne & Yazbeck, Ottawa.
Procureur de l’intimé : Procureur général du Canada, Toronto.
Procureur de l’intervenant : Procureur général de la Colombie-Britannique, Victoria.
- 2025 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
N.S. v. Her Majesty the Queen et al. (Ont.) (33989)
Indexed as: R. v. N.S. / Répertorié : R. c. N.S.
Neutral citation: 2012 SCC 72 / Référence neutre : 2012 CSC 72
Hearing: December 8, 2011 / Judgment: December 20, 2012
Audition : Le 8 décembre 2011 / Jugement : Le 20 décembre 2012
Present: McLachlin C.J. and LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein and Cromwell JJ.
Charter of Rights — Freedom of religion — Right to fair hearing — Right to make full answer and defence —
Muslim witness at preliminary hearing in sexual assault trial wanting to testify with her face covered by niqab —
Whether requiring witness to remove the niqab while testifying would interfere with her religious freedom — Whether
permitting her to wear niqab while testifying would create a serious risk to trial fairness — Whether both rights could
be accommodated to avoid conflict between them — If not, whether salutary effects of requiring the witness to remove
niqab outweigh deleterious effects — Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, ss. 2(a), 7 and 11(d).
Criminal law — Evidence — Cross-examination — Muslim witness at preliminary hearing in sexual assault
trial wanting to testify with her face covered by niqab — Whether permitting her to wear niqab while testifying would
create a serious risk to trial fairness.
The accused, M---d S. and M---l S., stand charged with sexually assaulting N.S. N.S. was called by the Crown
as a witness at the preliminary inquiry. N.S., who is a Muslim, indicated that for religious reasons she wished to testify
wearing her niqab. The preliminary inquiry judge held a voir dire, concluded that N.S’s religious belief was “not that
strong,” and ordered her to remove her niqab. On appeal, the Court of Appeal held that if the witness’s freedom of
religion and the accused’s fair trial interests were both engaged on the facts an d could not be reconciled, the witness
may be ordered to remove the niqab, depending on the context. The Court of Appeal returned the matter to the
preliminary inquiry judge. N.S. appealed.
Held (Abella J. dissenting): The appeal should be dismissed, and the matter remitted to the preliminary
inquiry judge.
Per McLachlin C.J. and Deschamps, Fish and Cromwell JJ.: The issue is when, if ever, a witness who wears
a niqab for religious reasons can be required to remove it while testifying. Two sets of Charter rights are potentially
engaged — the witness’s freedom of religion and the accused’s fair trial rights, including the right to make full answer
and defence. An extreme approach that would always require the witness to remove her niqab while testifying, or one
that would never do so, is untenable. The answer lies in a just and proportionate balance between freedom of religion
and trial fairness, based on the particular case before the court. A witness who for sincere religious reasons wishes to
wear the niqab while testifying in a criminal proceeding will be required to remove it if (a) this is necessary to prevent a
serious risk to the fairness of the trial, because reasonably available alternative measures will not prevent the risk; and
(b) the salutary effects of requiring her to remove the niqab outweigh the deleterious effects of doing so.
Applying this framework involves answering four questions. First, would requiring the witness to remove the
niqab while testifying interfere with her religious freedom? To rely on s. 2(a) of the Charter, N.S. must show that her
wish to wear the niqab while testifying is based on a sincere religious belief. The preliminary inquiry judge concluded
that N.S.’s beliefs were not sufficiently strong. However, at this stage the focus is on sincerity rather than strength of
belief.
The second question is: would permitting the witness to wear the niqab while testifying create a serious risk to
trial fairness? There is a deeply rooted presumption in our legal s ystem that seeing a witness’s face is important to a
fair trial, by enabling effective cross -examination and credibility assessment. The record before us has not shown this
presumption to be unfounded or erroneous. However, whether being unable to see th e witness’s face threatens trial
fairness in any particular case will depend on the evidence that the witness is to provide. Where evidence is
uncontested, credibility assessment and cross -examination are not in issue. Therefore, being unable to see the witness’s
face will not impinge on trial fairness. If wearing the niqab poses no serious risk to trial fairness, a witness who wishes
to wear it for sincere religious reasons may do so.
- 2026 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
If both freedom of religion and trial fairness are engaged on the facts, a third question must be answered: is
there a way to accommodate both rights and avoid the conflict between them? The judge must consider whether there
are reasonably available alternative measures that would conform to the witness’s religious convic tions while still
preventing a serious risk to trial fairness.
If no accommodation is possible, then a fourth question must be answered: do the salutary effects of requiring
the witness to remove the niqab outweigh the deleterious effects of doing so? Deleterious effects include the harm done
by limiting the witness’s sincerely held religious practice. The judge should consider the importance of the religious
practice to the witness, the degree of state interference with that practice, and the actual situation in the courtroom –
such as the people present and any measures to limit facial exposure. The judge should also consider broader societal
harms, such as discouraging niqab-wearing women from reporting offences and participating in the justice sy stem.
These deleterious effects must be weighed against the salutary effects of requiring the witness to remove the niqab.
Salutary effects include preventing harm to the fair trial interest of the accused and safeguarding the repute of the
administration of justice. When assessing potential harm to the accused’s fair trial interest, the judge should consider
whether the witness’s evidence is peripheral or central to the case, the extent to which effective cross -examination and
credibility assessment of the witness are central to the case, and the nature of the proceedings. Where the liberty of the
accused is at stake, the witness’s evidence central and her credibility vital, the possibility of a wrongful conviction must
weigh heavily in the balance. The judge must assess all these factors and determine whether the salutary effects of
requiring the witness to remove the niqab outweigh the deleterious effects of doing so.
A clear rule that would always, or one that would never, permit a witness to wear the niqab while testifying
cannot be sustained. Always permitting a witness to wear the niqab would offer no protection for the accused’s fair
trial interest and the state’s interest in maintaining public confidence in the administration of justice. Howe ver, never
permitting a witness to testify wearing a niqab would not comport with the fundamental premise underlying the Charter
that rights should be limited only to the extent that the limits are shown to be justifiable. The need to accommodate and
balance sincerely held religious beliefs against other interests is deeply entrenched in Canadian law.
Competing rights claims should be reconciled through accommodation if possible, and if a conflict cannot be
avoided, through case-by-case balancing. The Charter, which protects both freedom of religion and trial fairness,
demands no less.
Per LeBel and Rothstein JJ.: This appeal illustrates the tension and changes caused by the rapid evolution of
contemporary Canadian society and by the growing presence in Canada of new cultures, religions, traditions and social
practices. This case is not purely one of conflict and reconciliation between a religious right and the protection of the
right of the accused to make full answer and defence, but engages basic values of the Canadian criminal justice system.
The Charter protects freedom of religion in express words at s. 2(a). But fundamental too are the rights of the accused
to a fair trial, to make full answer and defence to the charges brought against him, t o benefit from the constitutional
presumption of innocence and to avert wrongful convictions. Since cross -examination is a necessary tool for the
exercise of the right to make full answer and defence, the consequences of restrictions on that right weigh more heavily
on the accused, and the balancing process must work in his or her favour. A defence that is unduly and improperly
constrained might impact on the determination of the guilt or innocence of the accused.
The Constitution requires an openness to new differences that appear within Canada, but also an acceptance of
the principle that it remains connected with the roots of our contemporary democratic society. A system of open and
independent courts is a core component of a democratic state, ruled by law and a fundamental Canadian value. From
this broader constitutional perspective, the trial becomes an act of communication with the public at large. The public
must be able to see how the justice system works. Wearing a niqab in the courtroom doe s not facilitate acts of
communication. Rather, it shields the witness from interacting fully with the parties, their counsel, the judge and the
jurors. Wearing the niqab is also incompatible with the rights of the accused, the nature of the Canadian pub lic
adversarial trials, and with the constitutional values of openness and religious neutrality in contemporary democratic,
but diverse, Canada. Nor should wearing a niqab be dependent on the nature or importance of the evidence, as this
would only add a new layer of complexity to the trial process. A clear rule that niqabs may not be worn at any stage of
the criminal trial would be consistent with the principle of public openness of the trial process and would safeguard the
integrity of that process as one of communication.
- 2027 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
Per Abella J. (dissenting): The harmful effects of requiring a witness to remove her niqab, with the result that
she will likely not testify, bring charges in the first place, or, if she is the accused, be unable to testify in her own
defence, is a significantly more harmful consequence than the accused not being able to see a witness’s whole face.
Unless the witness’s face is directly relevant to the case, such as where her identity is in issue, she should not be
required to remove her niqab.
There is no doubt that the assessment of a witness’s demeanour is easier if it is based on being able to
scrutinize the whole demeanour package — face, body language, or voice. That, however, is different from concluding
that unless the entire package is available for scrutiny, a witness’s credibility cannot adequately be weighed. Courts
regularly accept the testimony of witnesses whose demeanour can only be partially observed and there are many
examples of courts accepting evidence from witnesses who are unable to testify under ideal circumstances because of
visual, oral, or aural impediments. The use of an interpreter, for example, may well have an impact on how the
witness’s demeanour is understood, but it is beyond dispute that interpre ters render the assessment of demeanour
neither impossible nor impracticable. A witness may also have physical or medical limitations that affect a judge’s or
lawyer’s ability to assess demeanour. A stroke may interfere with facial expressions; an illnes s may affect body
movements; and a speech impairment may affect the manner of speaking. All of these are departures from the
demeanour ideal, yet none has ever been held to disqualify the witness from giving his or her evidence on the grounds
that the accused’s fair trial rights are impaired. Witnesses who wear niqabs should not be treated any differently.
Since not being able to see a witness’s whole face is only a partial interference with what is, in any event, only
one part of an imprecise measuring tool of credibility, there is no reason to demand full “demeanour access” where
religious belief prevents it. A witness wearing a niqab may still express herself through her eyes, body language, and
gestures. Moreover, the niqab has no effect on the witness’s verbal testimony, including the tone and inflection of her
voice, the cadence of her speech, or, mos t significantly, the substance of the answers she gives. Defence counsel still
has the opportunity to rigorously cross -examine the witness.
A witness who is not permitted to wear her niqab while testifying is prevented from being able to act in
accordance with her religious beliefs. This has the effect of forcing her to choose between her religious beliefs and her
ability to participate in the justice system. As a result, complainants who sincerely believe that their religion requires
them to wear the niqab in public, may choose not to bring charges for crimes they allege have been committed against
them, or, more generally, may resist being a witness in someone else’s trial. Where the witness is the accused, she will
be unable to give evidence in her own defence. The majority’s conclusion that being unable to see the witness’s face is
acceptable from a fair trial perspective if the evidence is “uncontested”, essentially means that sexual assault
complainants, whose evidence will inevitably be contested, will be forced to choose between laying a complaint and
wearing a niqab, which may be no meaningful choice at all.
APPEAL from a judgment of the Ontario Court of Appeal (Doherty, Moldaver and Sharpe JJ.A.), 2010 ONCA
670, 102 O.R. (3d) 161, 326 D.L.R. (4th) 523, 269 O.A.C. 306, 262 C.C.C. (3d) 4, 80 C.R. (6th) 84, 220 C.R.R. (2d)
146, [2010] O.J. No. 4306 (QL), 2010 CarswellOnt 7640, setting aside in part a decision of Marrocco J. (2009), 95 O.R.
(3d) 735, 191 C.R.R. (2d) 228, 2009 CanLII 21203, [2009] O.J. No. 1766 (QL), 2009 CarswellOnt 2268, quashing the
order of Weisman J. of the Ontario Court of Justice, dated October 16, 2008. Appeal dismissed, Abella J. dissenting.
David B. Butt, for the appellant.
Elise Nakelsky and Benita Wassenaar, for the respondent Her Majesty The Queen.
Douglas Usher and Michael Dineen, for the respondent M---d S.
No one appeared for the respondent M---l S.
Written submissions only by Anthony D. Griffin and Reema Khawja, for the intervener the Ontario Human
Rights Commission.
- 2028 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
Rahool P. Agarwal, Michael Kotrly, Vasuda Sinha and Brydie Bethell, for the intervener the Barbra Schlifer
Commemorative Clinic.
Frank Addario and Emma Phillips, for the intervener the Criminal Lawyers’ Association (Ontario).
Tyler Hodgson, Heather Pessione and Ewa Krajewska, for the intervener the Muslim Canadian Congress.
Written submissions only by Ranjan K. Agarwal and Daniel T. Holden, for the intervener the South Asian
Legal Clinic of Ontario.
Written submissions only by Babak Barin and Sylvie Champagne, for the intervener Barreau du Québec.
Written submissions only by Bradley E. Berg and Rahat Godil, for the intervener the Canadian Civil Liberties
Association.
Written submissions only by Susan M. Chapman and Joanna Birenbaum, for the intervener the Women’s
Legal Education and Action Fund.
Faisal Bhabha, for the intervener the Canadian Council on American-Islamic Relations.
Solicitor for the appellant: David B. Butt, Toronto.
Solicitor for the respondent Her Majesty the Queen: Attorney General of Ontario, Toronto.
Solicitor for the respondent M---d S.: Michael Dineen, Toronto.
Solicitor for the intervener the Ontario Human Rights Commission: Ontario Human Rights Commission,
Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic: Norton Rose OR, Toronto; Simcoe
Chambers, Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the Criminal Lawyers’ Association (Ontario): Sack Goldblatt Mitchell, Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the Muslim Canadian Congress: Borden Ladner Gervais, Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the South Asian Legal Clinic of Ontario: Bennett Jones, Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener Barreau du Québec: BCF, Montréal; Barreau du Québec, Montréal.
Solicitors for the intervener the Canadian Civil Liberties Association: Blake, Cassels & Graydon, Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund: Green & Chercover, Toronto;
Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund, Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the Canadian Council on American -Islamic Relations: Peggy Smith Law Office,
Kingston.
________________________
Présents : La juge en chef McLachlin et les juges LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein et Cromwell.
Charte des droits — Liberté de religion — Procès équitable — Droit de présenter une défense pleine et
entière — À l’enquête préliminaire dans un procès pour agression sexuelle, musulmane voulant témoigner en
conservant le niqab qui lui recouvre le visage — L’obligation faite au témoin d’enlever son niqab pour témoigner
porte-t-elle atteinte à sa liberté de religion? — Permettre au témoin de porter son niqab pendant son témoignage
- 2029 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
poserait-il un risque sérieux pour l’équité du procès? — Les deux droits peuvent-ils être conciliés de façon à éviter le
conflit qui les oppose? — Dans la négative, les effets bénéfiques de l’obligation faite au témoin d’enlever son niqab
sont-ils plus importants que ses effets préjudiciables — Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, art. 2a), 7 et 11d).
Droit criminel — Preuve — Contre-interrogatoire — À l’enquête préliminaire dans un procès pour agression
sexuelle, musulmane voulant témoigner en conservant le niqab qui lui recouvre le visage — Permettre au témoin de
porter son niqab pendant son témoignage poserait-il un risque grave pour l’équité du procès?
Les intimés M---d S. et M---l S. sont accusés d’aggression sexuelle à l’endroit de N.S. Le ministère public a
assigné N.S. à témoigner à l’enquête préliminaire. N.S., une musulmane, a indiqué que, pour des motifs religieux, elle
voulait témoigner en portant son niqab. À l’issue d’un voir-dire, le juge présidant l’enquête préliminaire a conclu que
la conviction religieuse de N.S. n’était « pas tellement forte » et lui a ordonné d’enlever son niqab. En appel, la cour
d’appel a conclu que si, en raison des faits, la liberté de religion du témoin et le droit de l’accusé à un procès équitable
sont en jeu et ne peuvent être conciliés, il peut être ordonné au témoin, selon les circonstances, d’enlever son niqab. La
Cour d’appel a renvoyé l’affaire au juge présidant l’enquête préliminaire. N.S. a fait appel de cette décision.
Arrêt (la juge Abella est dissidente) : Le pourvoi est rejeté et l’affaire est renvoyée au juge présidant l’enquête
préliminaire.
La juge en chef McLachlin et les juges Deschamps, Fish et Cromwell : Il s’agit de déterminer dans quel cas,
s’il en est, la personne qui porte un niqab pour des motifs religieux peut être requise de l’enlever pendant son
témoignage. Deux catégories de droits garantis par la Charte sont susceptibles d’entrer en jeu — la liberté de religion
du témoin et le droit de l’accusé à un procès équitable, y compris le droit de présenter une défense pleine et entière .
Une mesure extrême, qui obligerait toujours, ou n’obligerait jamais, le témoin à enlever son niqab durant son
témoignage serait indéfendable. La solution consiste à trouver un équilibre juste et proportionnel entre la liberté de
religion et l’équité du procès, eu égard à l’affaire particulière dont la cour est saisie. La personne appelée à témoigner
qui souhaite, pour des motifs religieux sincères, porter le niqab pendant son témoignage dans une procédure criminelle
sera obligée de l’enlever si deux conditions sont respectées : (a) cette mesure est nécessaire pour écarter un risque
sérieux que le procès soit inéquitable, vu l’absence d’autres mesures raisonnables pouvant écarter ce risque; et (b) les
effets bénéfiques de l’obligation d’enlever le niqab sont plus importants que ses effets préjudiciables.
L’application de ce cadre d’analyse suppose que l’on réponde à quatre questions. Premièrement, le fait
d’obliger le témoin à enlever le niqab pendant son témoignage porterait -il atteinte à sa liberté de religion? Pour se
prévaloir de l’al. 2a) de la Charte, N.S. doit établir que sa volonté de porter le niqab pendant son témoignage est fondée
sur une croyance religieuse sincère. Le juge présidant l’enquête préliminaire a conclu que la croyance religie use de
N.S. n’était pas assez forte. À cette étape toutefois, l’examen doit porter sur la sincérité de la croyance plutôt que sur s a
force.
La seconde question est la suivante : le fait d’autoriser le témoin à porter le niqab pendant son témoignage
poserait-il un risque sérieux pour l’équité du procès? Suivant une présomption profondément enracinée dans notre
système juridique, il importe pour la tenue d’un procès équitable que l’on puisse voir le visage du témoin, ce qui
favorise un contre-interrogatoire efficace et une appréciation exacte de la crédibilité. Le dossier qui nous a été présenté
ne démontre pas l’absence de fondement ou le caractère erroné de cette présomption. Toutefois, la question de savoir si
l’impossibilité d’observer le visage d’un témoin met en danger l’équité du procès dans un cas en particulier dépendra de
la déposition que doit faire le témoin. Si le témoignage n’est pas contesté, l’appréciation de la crédibilité ainsi que
l’efficacité du contre-interrogatoire ne sont pas en cause. Par conséquent, l’impossibilité de voir le visage du témoin ne
portera pas atteinte au droit à un procès équitable. Si le port du niqab ne présente pas de risque sérieux pour l’équité du
procès, le témoin qui souhaite le porter pour des motifs religieux sincères peut le faire.
Si, en raison des faits en cause, la liberté de religion et l’équité du procès entrent en jeu, il faut répondre à une
troisième question : y a-t-il moyen de réaliser les deux droits et d’éviter le conflit qui les oppose? Le juge doit se
demander s’il existe d’autres mesures raisonnables qui permettraient de respecter les convictions religieuses du témoin
tout en prévenant un risque sérieux pour l’équité du procès.
- 2030 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
Si aucun accommodement n’est possible, il faut répondre à une quatrième question : les effets bénéfiques de
l’obligation faite au témoin de retirer le niqab sont-ils plus importants que ses effets préjudiciables? Le préjudice causé
par la restriction de la pratique religieuse sincère du témoin constitue un des effets préjudiciables. Le juge doit
examiner l’importance que la personne accorde à sa pratique religieuse, la mesure dans laquelle l’État intervient dans
cette pratique ainsi que la situation dans la salle d’audience — les personnes présentes et les mes ures en place pour
limiter la visibilité du visage. Le juge doit également prendre en considération l’ensemble des préjudices causés à la
société, par exemple décourager les femmes qui portent le niqab de signaler les infractions et de participer au systè me
de justice. Les effets préjudiciables de l’obligation d’enlever le niqab doivent être évalués en fonction de ses effets
bénéfiques. Ces derniers incluent la prévention du préjudice au droit de l’accusé à un procès équitable et la
préservation de la considération dont jouit l’administration de la justice. Dans son examen du préjudice possible au
droit de l’accusé à un procès équitable, le juge devrait déterminer si la déposition est essentielle à la poursuite ou si elle
porte sur des points secondaires , la mesure dans laquelle l’efficacité du contre-interrogatoire du témoin et l’appréciation
de la crédibilité de son témoignage est cruciale dans l’affaire, ainsi que la nature de l’instance. Lorsque la liberté de
l’accusé est en jeu, que la déposition du témoin est capitale pour la poursuite et que sa crédibilité est cruciale, le risque
d’une erreur judiciaire doit peser lourd dans la balance. Le juge doit évaluer tous ces facteurs et décider si les effets
bénéfiques de l’obligation faite au témoin d’enlever le niqab pour témoigner sont plus importants que ses effets
préjudiciables.
Une règle claire selon laquelle le témoin devrait toujours, ou ne devrait jamais, être autorisé à porter un niqab
pendant son témoignage ne peut être retenue. Toujours au toriser le témoin à porter un niqab en cour n’offrirait aucune
protection du droit de l’accusé à un procès équitable et de l’intérêt de l’État à maintenir la confiance du public dans
l’administration de la justice. Toutefois, ne jamais autoriser un témoin à porter un niqab pendant son témoignage ne
respecterait pas le principe fondamental sous -tendant la Charte selon lequel les droits ne doivent être restreints que par
une mesure dont la justification est démontrée. La nécessité de respecter les croyances religieuses sincères et de les
mettre en balance avec d’autres intérêts est profondément enracinée en droit canadien.
Il convient de concilier les droits qui s’opposent au moyen d’un accommodement si possible, et si le conflit ne
peut être évité, au moyen d’une pondération au cas par cas. La Charte, qui protège à la fois la liberté de religion et le
droit à un procès équitable, n’exige rien de moins.
Les juges LeBel et Rothstein : Le présent pourvoi illustre les tensions et les changements que suscitent
l’évolution rapide de la société canadienne contemporaine et la présence croissante au Canada de nouvelles cultures,
religions, traditions et pratiques sociales. Il ne s’agit pas en l’espèce d’une pure question de conflit et de conciliation
entre un droit religieux et la protection du droit de l’accusé de présenter une défense pleine et entière ; le litige fait
intervenir des valeurs fondamentales du système canadien de justice pénale. La Charte garantit expressément la liberté
de religion en son al. 2a). Par contre, le droit de l’accusé à un procès équitable, son droit d’opposer une défense pleine
et entière aux accusations portées contre lui, de bénéficier de la présomption d’inno cence garantie par la Constitution et
la nécessité d’éviter les déclarations de culpabilité injustifiées constituent aussi des considérations fondamentales.
Puisque le contre-interrogatoire constitue un outil nécessaire à l’exercice du droit de présenter une défense pleine et
entière, les restrictions de ce droit sont plus lourdes de conséquences pour l’accusé, et la mise en balance doit favoriser
ce dernier. Une défense indûment et irrégulièrement restreinte risque d’avoir une incidence sur l’appréciatio n de la
culpabilité ou de l’innocence de l’accusé.
La Constitution exige une ouverture aux nouvelles différences qui apparaissent au Canada, mais aussi
l’acceptation du principe qu’elle reste en contact avec les racines de notre société démocratique co ntemporaine. Un
appareil judiciaire transparent et indépendant constitue une composante essentielle d’un État démocratique fondé sur le
droit et une valeur fondamentale au Canada. Dans cette perspective constitutionnelle plus large, le procès devient un
acte de communication avec le grand public. Ce dernier doit être en mesure de voir comment fonctionne le système de
justice. Le port du niqab dans la salle d’audience ne favorise pas les actes de communication. Le niqab soustrait le
témoin à une interaction complète avec les parties, leurs avocats, le juge et les jurés. Le port du niqab est également
incompatible avec les droits de l’accusé, avec la nature des procès publics contradictoires au Canada et avec la
transparence et la neutralité religieuse — des valeurs constitutionnelles — dans cette démocratie contemporaine mais
diversifiée qu’est le Canada. Le port du niqab ne devrait pas non plus dépendre de la nature ou de l’importance de la
déposition, ce qui rendrait encore plus complexe la procédure du procès. Une interdiction claire de porter le niqab à
- 2031 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
toutes les étapes du procès criminel respecterait le principe de la publicité du procès et préserverait l’intégrité de
celui-ci en tant qu’acte de communication.
La juge Abella (dissidente) : Les effets préjudiciables de l’imposition, à la personne appelée à témoigner, de
l’obligation d’enlever son niqab, avec la conséquence qu’elle ne témoignera probablement pas, qu’elle ne portera pas
d’accusation en premier lieu ou, si elle est accusée, qu’elle ne sera pas en mesure de témoigner pour sa propre défense,
sont beaucoup plus importants que ceux de l’impossibilité, pour l’accusé, de voir tout le visage d’un témoin. À moins
que le visage de la personne qui témoigne soit directement pertinent à l’inst ance, notamment lorsque son identité est en
cause, cette dernière ne devrait pas être tenue d’enlever son niqab.
Il ne fait aucun doute qu’on peut évaluer plus facilement le comportement d’un témoin lorsqu’on est à même
d’en examiner l’ensemble des éléments - le visage, le langage corporel ou la voix. Cela ne revient cependant pas à
conclure qu’il est impossible de bien apprécier la crédibilité d’un témoin si l’on ne peut pas observer l’ensemble des
éléments de son comportement. Les tribunaux acceptent régulièrement les dépositions des témoins dont ils ne peuvent
observer le comportement que partiellement et il existe nombre d’exemples où les tribunaux acceptent les dépositions
de personnes qui ne peuvent témoigner dans des conditions idéales à cause d’un handicap visuel, oral ou auditif. Le
recours à un interprète, par exemple, peut fort bien avoir une incidence sur l’appréciation du comportement du témoin,
mais il ne fait aucun doute que les interprètes ne rendent ni impossible, ni impraticable cette appréciation. Il arrive
aussi que la déficience physique ou les restrictions médicales du témoin influent sur la capacité du juge ou des avocats
d’évaluer son comportement. Un accident vasculaire cérébral peut nuire à l’expression du visage; une maladie peut
avoir une incidence sur les mouvements du corps; et un trouble de la parole peut influer sur l’expression orale. Tous
ces problèmes constituent des écarts par rapport aux circonstances idéales pour l’évaluation du comportement, mais
aucun d’entre eux n’a été considéré comme rendant le témoin inhabile à témoigner au motif qu’ils portent atteinte au
droit de l’accusé à un procès équitable. Les personnes qui portent un niqab ne devraient pas être traitées différemment.
Puisque l’impossibilité d’observer tout le visage d’un témoin ne nuit que partiellement à ce qui constitue, de
toute façon, un simple élément d’un outil imprécis d’appréciation de la crédibilité, rien ne justifie que l’on exige que
tout le comportement puisse être observé dans les cas où une croyance religieuse s’y oppose. Le témoin portant un
niqab peut néanmoins s’exprimer par son regard, son langage corporel et ses gestes. De plus, le niqab n’a aucune
incidence sur la déposition orale du témoin, y compris le ton et l’inflexion de sa voix, le rythme de ses propos ou, plus
important encore, la teneur de ses réponses. Il est toujours loisible à l’avocat de la défense de contre -interroger
rigoureusement le témoin.
Une femme à qui l’on interdit de porter son niqab au cours de sa dépos ition ne peut pas se conformer à ses
croyances religieuses. Cette situation a pour effet d’obliger un témoin à choisir entre ses croyances religieuses et sa
faculté de participer au système de justice. En conséquence, les plaignantes qui croient sincèrement que leur religion
les oblige à porter le niqab en public peuvent choisir de ne pas porter d’accusations contre des personnes qui auraient
commis des infractions à leur endroit ou, de façon plus générale, de ne pas accepter de témoigner au procès d’une autre
personne. Si le témoin est l’accusée, elle ne sera pas en mesure de témoigner pour sa propre défense. La conclusion de
la majorité que l’impossibilité de voir le visage du témoin est acceptable du point de vue de l’équité du procès si le
témoignage « n’est pas contesté » force essentiellement la plaignante dans un cas d’agression sexuelle, dont le
témoignage sera inévitablement contesté, à choisir entre le dépôt d’une plainte et le port du niqab, ce qui ne constitue
peut-être pas du tout un véritable choix.
POURVOI contre un arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario (les juges Doherty, Moldaver et Sharpe), 2010
ONCA 670, 102 O.R. (3d) 161, 326 D.L.R. (4th) 523, 269 O.A.C. 306, 262 C.C.C. (3d) 4, 80 C.R. (6th) 84, 220 C.R.R.
(2d) 146, [2010] O.J. No. 4306 (QL), 2010 CarswellOnt 7640, qui a infirmé en partie une décision du juge Marrocco
(2009), 95 O.R. (3d) 735, 191 C.R.R. (2d) 228, 2009 CanLII 21203, [2009] O.J. No. 1766 (QL), 2009 CarswellOnt
2268, qui a annulé l’ordonnance du juge Weisman de la Cour de justice de l’Ontario en date du 16 octobre 2008.
Pourvoi rejeté, la juge Abella est dissidente.
David B. Butt, pour l’appelante.
- 2032 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
Elise Nakelsky et Benita Wassenaar, pour l’intimée Sa Majesté la Reine.
Douglas Usher et Michael Dineen, pour l’intimé M---d S.
Personne n’a comparu pour l’intimé M---l S.
Argumentation écrite seulement par Anthony D. Griffin et Reema Khawja, pour l’intervenante la Commission
ontarienne des droits de la personne.
Rahool P. Agarwal, Michael Kotrly, Vasuda Sinha et Brydie Bethell, pour l’intervenante Barbra Schlifer
Commemorative Clinic.
Frank Addario et Emma Phillips, pour l’intervenante Criminal Lawyers’ Association (Ontario).
Tyler Hodgson, Heather Pessione et Ewa Krajewska, pour l’intervenant Muslim Canadian Congress.
Argumentation écrite seulement par Ranjan K. Agarwal et Daniel T. Holden, pour l’intervenante South Asian
Legal Clinic of Ontario.
Argumentation écrite seulement par Babak Barin et Sylvie Champagne, pour l’intervenant le Barreau du
Québec.
Argumentation écrite seulement par Bradley E. Berg et Rahat Godil, pour l’intervenante l’Association
canadienne des libertés civiles.
Argumentation écrite seulement par Susan M. Chapman et Joanna Birenbaum, pour l’intervenant le Fonds
d’action et d’éducation juridiques pour les femmes.
Faisal Bhabha, pour l’intervenant Canadian Council on American-Islamic Relations.
Procureur de l’appelante : David B. Butt, Toronto.
Procureur de l’intimée Sa Majesté la Reine : Procureur général de l’Ontario, Toronto.
Procureur de l’intimé M---d S. : Michael Dineen, Toronto.
Procureur de l’intervenante la Commission ontarienne des droits de la personne : Commission ontarienne des
droits de la personne, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenante Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic : Norton Rose OR, Toronto; Simcoe
Chambers, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenante Criminal Lawyers’ Association (Ontario) : Sack Goldblatt Mitchell, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenant Muslim Canadian Congress : Borden Ladner Gervais, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenante South Asian Legal Clinic of Ontario : Bennett Jones, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenant le Barreau du Québec : BCF, Montréal; Barreau du Québec, Montréal.
Procureurs de l’intervenante l’Association canadienne des libertés civiles : Blake, Cassels & Graydon,
Toronto.
- 2033 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
Procureurs de l’intervenant le Fonds d’action et d’éducation juridiques pour les femmes : Green &
Chercover, Toronto; Fonds d’action et d’éducation juridiques pour les femmes, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenant Canadian Council on American -Islamic Relations : Peggy Smith Law Office,
Kingston.
- 2034 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
Ibrahim Yumnu v. Her Majesty the Queen (Ont.) (34090)
Vinicio Cardoso v. Her Majesty the Queen (Ont.) (34091)
Tung Chi Duong v. Her Majesty the Queen (Ont.) (34340)
Indexed as: R. v. Yumnu / Répertorié : R. c. Yumnu
Neutral citation: 2012 SCC 73 / Référence neutre : 2012 CSC 73
Hearing: March 14 and 15, 2010 / Judgment: December 21, 2012
Audition : Les 14 et 15 mars 2012 / Jugement : Le 21 décembre 2012
Present: McLachlin C.J. and LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein, Cromwell, Moldaver and Karakatsanis JJ.
Criminal law — Jurors — Selection — Appellants convicted of first degree murder and conspiracy to commit
murder — Prior to jury selection, Crown requesting that police conduct criminal record checks of prospective jurors
and also provide comments on whether any prospective jurors were “disreputable persons” — None of the information
received in response by Crown disclosed to defence — Whether it was appropriate to seek such information — Whether
there should have been disclosure of same — Whether there is a reasonable possibility that such conduct affected trial
fairness or gave rise to an appearance of unfairness, such that a miscarriage of justice occurred .
Following a trial in Barrie, Ontario, each of the appellants was convicted of two counts of first degree murder
and two counts of conspiracy to commit murder. They appealed from the ir convictions, raising grounds relating to the
adequacy of the trial judge’s charge to the jury. While the appeals were under reserve, the appellants became aware of
a “jury vetting” practice in the Barrie area, consisting of inquiries conducted by the p olice, at the behest of the Crown
Attorney’s office, as to whether potential jurors had a criminal record or whether they were otherwise “disreputable
persons” who would be undesirable as jurors. It was ascertained that in the present case, vetting of the jury lists by the
police in response to the Crown’s request netted information about ten individuals who remained in the pool of
prospective jurors at the peremptory challenge stage of the proceedings. None of this information was shared with the
defence. The appeals were reopened to consider evidence and arguments concerning the propriety of the vetting
practice and its impact on the appellants’ trial. The Court of Appeal dismissed all three appeals. With respect to the
ground of appeal related to jury vetting, the Court of Appeal found that the Crown had failed to disclose information
obtained from the jury vetting process that might have assisted the appellants in the exercise of their peremptory
challenges, but it was not satisfied that the appellan ts suffered any prejudice from the Crown’s failure to meet its
disclosure obligations. The Court of Appeal held that there was no basis to conclude that the Crown’s failure to
disclose caused actual unfairness in the peremptory challenge process, or that the jury vetting practice created an
appearance of unfairness.
Held: The appeals should be dismissed.
Jury vetting by the Crown and police gives rise to a number of concerns. First is the prospect of the Crown
and police joining forces to obtain a jury favourable to their cause. Second is the fundamental precept of our justice
system that “justice should not only be done, but should manifestly and undoubtedly be seen to be done”. Third is juror
privacy. There are, however, countervailing interests at play that warrant some limited checking and some minimal
intrusions into the private lives of potential jurors. Only those persons eligible to serve as jurors should be permitted to
participate in the process. Under provincial statutes and the Criminal Code, a potential juror’s criminal antecedents,
and in some provinces his or her pending charges, may render that person ineligible for jury duty or result in his or her
removal from the jury pool following a successful challenge for cause. Self-reporting is one way of screening potential
jurors, but it has proved to be less than satisfactory. Accordingly, absent legislation to the contrary, the authorities
should be permitted to do criminal record checks on potential jurors to determine whether they are eligible to serve as
jurors. In addition, in those provinces where the eligibility criteria cover persons who have been charged with a
criminal offence, this is also something the authorities may properly check for. It is thus permissible for the Crown ,
with the assistance of the police, to do limited background checks using multiple police databases to identify potential
jurors who, by virtue of their criminal conduct, are not eligible for jury duty. The imbalance resulting from the
defence’s inability to conduct such searches is overcome by the disclosure obligations placed on the Crown.
Information received by the Crown that is relevant to the jury selection process must be turned over to the defence,
thereby restoring the balance. In return, defence counsel, as officers of the court, must make disclosure to both the
court and Crown counsel where they know or have good reason to believe that a potential juror has engaged in criminal
- 2035 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
conduct that renders him or her ineligible for jury duty or cannot serve on a particular case due to matters of obvious
partiality.
When it is discovered at the appeal stage that information about prospective jurors which should have been
disclosed at trial was not disclosed, persons who seek a new trial on the basis th at this non-disclosure of information
deprived them of their s. 7 Charter right to a fair trial must, at a minimum, establish that: (1) the Crown failed to
disclose information relevant to the selection process that it was obliged to disclose; and (2) had the requisite disclosure
been made, there is a reasonable possibility that the jury would have been differently constituted. In addition to these
two steps, in the event the jury would have been differently constituted, it may be that the Crown should th en have the
opportunity to show, on balance, that the jury was nonetheless impartial.
With respect to the appearance of unfairness, there must be conduct on the part of the Crown and the police,
within and surrounding the jury selection process, that wou ld constitute a serious interference with the administration of
justice and offend the community’s sense of fair play and decency. When conduct of that nature is found to exist, it
matters not that the accused may otherwise have had a fair trial; nor is it necessary to find that the accused may have
been wrongfully convicted. It is the conduct itself that gives rise to a miscarriage of justice and demands that a new
trial be ordered.
In the case at bar, the Court of Appeal acted as a court of first inst ance in respect of the jury vetting issue. In
these circumstances, its findings, like those of a trial court, are entitled to deference. On the issue of trial fairness, t here
is no basis for interfering with the findings of the Court of Appeal on the imp act — or the lack of impact — that the
jury vetting practice had on the jury selection process. Although the Crown failed in its disclosure obligations, as found
by the Court of Appeal, there was no reasonable possibility that the jury would have been differently constituted had
the pertinent information obtained from the vetting process been disclosed. The appellants received a fair trial by an
impartial jury.
As for the appearance of unfairness and the suggestion that the verdicts are the product of a miscarriage of
justice, although aspects of the Crown’s conduct were improper and should not be repeated, what occurred here did not
constitute a serious interference with the administration of justice, nor was it so offensive to the community’s sense of
fair play and decency that the proceedings should be set aside as a miscarriage of justice. The record checks were
carried out in good faith and there was no attempt on the part of the police or the Crown to obtain a favourable jury.
There is no basis for ordering a new trial.
APPEALS from a judgment of the Ontario Court of Appeal (Weiler, Gillese and Watt JJ.A.), 2010 ONCA
637, 269 O.A.C. 48, 260 C.C.C. (3d) 421, [2010] O.J. No. 4163 (QL), 2010 CarswellOnt 7383, upholding the
convictions of the three accused for first degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder. Appeals dismissed.
Gregory Lafontaine, Vincenzo Rondinelli and Lori Anne Thomas, for the appellant Ibrahim Yumnu.
Catriona Verner and Kristin Bailey, for the appellant Vinicio Cardoso.
Timothy E. Breen, for the appellant Tung Chi Duong.
Michal Fairburn, Deborah Krick , John S. McInnes and Susan Magotiaux, for the respondent.
Frank Addario, for the intervener the Canadian Civil Liberties Association.
Nader R. Hasan and Gerald Chan, for the intervener the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association.
Paul J. J. Cavalluzzo and Shaun O’Brien, for the intervener the Ontario Crown Attorneys’ Association.
William S. Challis and Stephen McCammon, for the intervener the Information and Privacy Commissioner of
Ontario.
- 2036 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
Cheryl Milne and Lisa Austin, for the intervener the David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights.
Anthony Moustacalis and Peter Thorning, for the intervener the Criminal Lawyers’ Association.
Maureen McGuire, for the intervener the Attorney General of Alberta (34340).
Solicitors for the appellant Ibrahim Yumnu: Lafontaine & Associates, Toronto.
Solicitors for the appellant Vinicio Cardoso: Hicks Adams, Toronto.
Solicitors for the appellant Tung Chi Duong: Fleming, Breen, Toronto.
Solicitor for the respondent: Attorney General of Ontario, Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the Canadian Civil Liberties Association: Addario Law Group, Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association: Ruby Shiller Chan Hasan,
Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the Ontario Crown Attorneys’ Association: Cavalluzzo Hayes Shilton McIntyre &
Cornish, Toronto.
Solicitor for the intervener the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario: Information and Privacy
Commissioner of Ontario, Toronto.
Solicitor for the intervener the David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights: University of Toronto, Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the Criminal Lawyers’ Asso ciation: Anthony Moustacalis, Toronto; Brauti
Thorning Zibarras, Toronto.
Solicitor for the intervener the Attorney General of Alberta: Attorney General of Alberta, Edmonton.
________________________
Présents : La juge en chef McLachlin et les juges LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein, Cromwell, Moldaver et
Karakatsanis.
Droit criminel — Jurés — Sélection — Appelants déclarés coupables de meurtre au premier degré et de
complot en vue de commettre un meurtre — Demande de la Couronne présentée à la police avant la sélection du jury
pour que cette dernière procède à la vérification du casier judiciaire des candidats jurés et précise s’il s’agissait de
« personnes peu recommandables » — Aucun des renseignements reçus par le ministère public n’a été communiqué à
la défense — Une telle demande était-elle acceptable? — Ces renseignements auraient-ils dû être communiqués? —
Existait-il une possibilité raisonnable qu’une telle conduite ait nui à l’équité du procès ou ait donné lieu à une
apparence d’iniquité entraînant une erreur judiciaire?
À la suite d’un procès instruit à Barrie, en Ontario, chacun des appelants a été déclaré coupable sur deux chefs
de meurtre au premier degré et sur deux chefs de complot en vue de commettre un meurtre. Ils ont inte rjeté appel de
leur déclaration de culpabilité, faisant valoir des moyens fondés sur le caractère adéquat de l’exposé du juge du procès
au jury. Alors que les appels étaient en délibéré, les appelants ont pris connaissance d’une pratique d’« évaluation des
candidats jurés » ayant cours dans la région de Barrie, qui consistait en des vérifications effectuées par la police, à la
demande du bureau des procureurs de la Couronne, pour savoir si les candidats jurés avaient un casier judiciaire ou s’il
s’agissait de « personnes peu recommandables » dont le ministère public ne voudrait pas comme jurés. Il a été
déterminé que l’évaluation des tableaux des jurés effectuée en l’espèce par la police en réponse à la demande de la
Couronne avait permis d’obtenir des renseignements au sujet de dix personnes qui demeuraient inscrites au tableau des
candidats jurés à l’étape des récusations péremptoires du processus. Ces renseignements n’ont pas été communiqués à
- 2037 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
la défense. Les appels ont été rouverts pour que soient examinés des éléments de preuve et des arguments concernant la
légitimité de la pratique de l’évaluation et son incidence sur le procès des appelants. La Cour d’appel a rejeté les trois
appels. Quant au moyen d’appel fondé sur l’évaluation, elle a conclu qu e le ministère public avait omis de
communiquer des renseignements, obtenus lors de l’évaluation des candidats jurés, qui auraient pu aider les appelants à
exercer leur droit de récusation péremptoire, mais elle n’était pas convaincue que les appelants ava ient subi un
préjudice du fait que le ministère public ne s’était pas acquitté de ses obligations de communication. Selon la Cour
d’appel, il n’y avait pas de raison de conclure que l’omission du ministère public de communiquer des renseignements
avait entraîné l’iniquité du processus de récusation péremptoire ou que la pratique de l’évaluation des candidats jurés
créait une apparence d’iniquité.
Arrêt : Les pourvois sont rejetés.
L’évaluation des candidats jurés par le ministère public et la police su scite certaines préoccupations.
Premièrement, il y a la perspective que le ministère public et la police unissent leurs efforts afin d’obtenir un jury
favorable à leur cause. Deuxièmement, il y a le précepte fondamental de notre système de justice selon lequel « il est
essentiel que non seulement justice soit rendue, mais également que justice paraisse manifestement et indubitablement
être rendue ». Troisièmement, il y a la vie privée des jurés. Cependant, des intérêts opposés entrent en jeu et justifie nt
quelques vérifications limitées et une intrusion minime dans la vie privée des candidats jurés. Seules les personnes
habiles à remplir les fonctions de juré devraient être autorisées à participer au processus. Aux termes de lois
provinciales et du Code criminel, les antécédents criminels d’un candidat juré — et, dans certaines provinces, les
accusations qui pèsent contre lui — peuvent le rendre inhabile à remplir les fonctions de juré ou entraîner son retrait du
bassin des candidats jurés par suite d’une récusation motivée. La déclaration volontaire est une manière d’écarter des
candidats jurés, mais elle ne s’est pas révélée très satisfaisante. Par conséquent, sauf disposition contraire de la loi, le s
autorités devraient pouvoir vérifier le casier judiciaire des candidats jurés afin de déterminer s’ils sont habiles à remplir
les fonctions de juré. En outre, dans les provinces où les critères d’admissibilité visent les personnes qui ont été
accusées d’une infraction criminelle, les autorités peuvent également vérifier ce fait à juste titre. Le ministère public est
donc autorisé à effectuer, avec l’aide de la police, des vérifications limitées des antécédents au moyen de multiples
bases de données de cette dernière afin d’identifier les candidats jurés qui, en raison de leur conduite criminelle, sont
inhabiles à remplir les fonctions de juré. Tout déséquilibre engendré par l’impossibilité pour la défense de procéder à
pareilles vérifications est compensé par les obligations de communication qui incombe nt au ministère public. Les
renseignements reçus par le ministère public qui sont pertinents pour le processus de sélection des jurés doivent être
transmis à la défense, ce qui rétablit l’équilibre. Pour sa part, l’avocat de la défense, en tant qu’auxiliaire judiciaire,
communique les renseignements qu’il détient à la cour ainsi qu’au ministère public s’il sait ou a de bonnes raisons de
croire qu’un candidat juré s’est livré à des activités criminelles qui le rendent inhabile à remplir les fonctions de ju ré ou
ne peut siéger à l’instruction d’un procès donné pour des raisons de partialité évidente.
Lorsqu’on découvre à l’étape de l’appel que des renseignements concernant des candidats jurés n’ont pas été
communiqués lors du procès alors qu’ils auraient dû l’être, ceux qui sollicitent la tenue d’un nouveau procès au motif
que la non-communication les a privés de leur droit à un procès équitable garanti par l’art. 7 de la Charte doivent
établir, à tout le moins, 1) que le ministère public n’a pas communiqué des renseignements pertinents pour le processus
de sélection qu’il était tenu de communiquer; 2) que si la communication avait été faite dans les règles, il existe une
possibilité raisonnable que le jury ait été composé différemment. Outre ces deux éta pes, dans l’éventualité où le jury
aurait été composé différemment, le ministère public se verrait alors accorder l’occasion de démontrer, suivant la
prépondérance des probabilités, que le jury a néanmoins été impartial.
Quant à l’apparence d’iniquité, il faut de la part du ministère public et de la police une conduite, tant dans le
cadre du processus de sélection des jurés que dans tout ce qui le concerne, qui constituerait une entrave sérieuse à
l’administration de la justice et heurterait le sens du franc-jeu et de la décence qu’a la société. Lorsque les tribunaux
concluent à l’existence d’une telle conduite, il importe peu que l’accusé ait subi un procès équitable; il n’est pas non
plus nécessaire qu’ils concluent que l’accusé a été déclaré coupable à tort. C’est la conduite même qui est à l’origine de
l’erreur judiciaire et qui commande la tenue d’un nouveau procès.
En l’espèce, la Cour d’appel a agi comme un tribunal de première instance relativement à la question de
l’évaluation des candidats jurés. Dans ce contexte, ses conclusions, à l’instar de celles d’un tribunal de première
instance, commandent la déférence. En ce qui concerne l’équité du procès, il n’y a aucune raison de modifier les
- 2038 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
conclusions de la Cour d’appel relatives à l’incidence — ou à l’absence d’incidence — que l’évaluation des candidats
jurés a eue sur le processus de sélection des jurés. Bien que le ministère public ait manqué à ses obligations de
communication, il n’existait, selon la Cour d’appel, aucune possibilité raison nable que le jury ait été composé
différemment si les renseignements pertinents issus de l’évaluation avaient été fournis à la défense. Les appelants ont
bénéficié d’un procès équitable devant un jury impartial.
Quant à l’apparence d’iniquité et à l’argument selon lequel les verdicts sont le fruit d’une erreur judiciaire,
bien que certains aspects de la conduite du ministère public étaient inappropriés et ne devraient pas être répétés, ce qui
s’est passé en l’espèce ne constituait pas une entrave sérieus e à l’administration de la justice, ni ne heurtait le sens du
franc-jeu et de la décence qu’a la société au point où la procédure devrait être annulée pour cause d’erreur judiciaire.
La vérification des dossiers a été menée de bonne foi et ni la police ni le ministère public n’ont tenté d’obtenir un jury
favorable. Il n’y a aucune raison d’ordonner la tenue d’un nouveau procès.
POURVOIS contre un arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario (les juges Weiler, Gillese et Watt), 2010 ONCA
637, 269 O.A.C. 48, 260 C.C.C. (3d) 421, [2010] O.J. No. 4163 (QL), 2010 CarswellOnt 7383, qui a confirmé les
déclarations de culpabilité prononcées contre les trois accusés pour meurtre au premier degré et complot en vue de
commettre un meurtre. Pourvois rejetés.
Gregory Lafontaine, Vincenzo Rondinelli et Lori Anne Thomas, pour l’appelant Ibrahim Yumnu.
Catriona Verner et Kristin Bailey, pour l’appelant Vinicio Cardoso.
Timothy E. Breen, pour l’appelant Tung Chi Duong.
Michal Fairburn, Deborah Krick , John S. McInnes et Susan Magotiaux, pour l’intimée.
Frank Addario, pour l’intervenante l’Association canadienne des libertés civiles.
Nader R. Hasan et Gerald Chan, pour l’intervenante l’Association des libertés civiles de la
Colombie-Britannique.
Paul J. J. Cavalluzzo et Shaun O’Brien, pour l’intervenante Ontario Crown Attorneys’ Association.
William S. Challis et Stephen McCammon, pour l’intervenant le Commissaire à l’information et à la protection
de la vie privée de l’Ontario,
Cheryl Milne et Lisa Austin, pour l’intervenant David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights.
Anthony Moustacalis et Peter Thorning, pour l’intervenant Criminal Lawyers’ Association.
Maureen McGuire, pour l’intervenant le procureur général de l’Alberta (34340).
Procureurs de l’appelant Ibrahim Yumnu : Lafontaine & Associates, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’appelant Vinicio Cardoso : Hicks Adams, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’appelant Tung Chi Duong : Fleming, Breen, Toronto.
Procureur de l’intimée : Procureur général de l’Ontario, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenante l’Association canadienne des libertés civiles : Addario Law Group, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenante l’Association des libertés civiles de la Colombie -Britannique : Ruby Shiller Chan
Hasan, Toronto.
- 2039 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
Procureurs de l’intervenante Ontario Crown Attorneys’ Association : Cavalluzzo Hayes Shilton McIntyre &
Cornish, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenant le Commissaire à l’information et à la protection de la vie privée de
l’Ontario : Commissaire à l’information et à la protection de la vie privée de l’Ontario, Toronto.
Procureur de l’intervenant David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights : Université de Toronto, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenante Criminal Lawyers’ Association : Anthony Moustacalis, Toronto; Brauti
Thorning Zibarras, Toronto.
Procureur de l’intervenant le procureur général de l’Alberta : Procureur général de l’Alberta, Edmonton.
- 2040 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
James Peter Emms v. Her Majesty the Queen (Ont.) (34087)
Indexed as: R. v. Emms / Répertorié : R. c. Emms
Neutral citation: 2012 SCC 74 / Référence neutre : 2012 CSC 74
Hearing: March 14 and 15, 2012 / Judgment: December 21, 2012
Audition : Le 14 et 15 mars 2012 / Jugement : Le 21 décembre 2012
Present: McLachlin C.J. and LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein, Cromwell, Moldaver and Karakatsanis JJ.
Criminal law — Jurors — Selection — Appellant convicted of fraud — Prior to jury selection, Crown
requesting that police conduct criminal record checks of prospective jurors and also provide comments on whether any
prospective jurors were “disreputable persons” — None of the information received in response by Crown disclosed to
defence — Whether it was appropriate to seek such information — Whether there should have been disclosure of same
— Whether there is a reasonable possibility that such conduct affected trial fairness or gave rise to an appearance of
unfairness, such that a miscarriage of justice occurred.
In 2008, following a trial in Barrie, Ontario, E was convicted of three counts of fraud. His appeal from
conviction alleged as one of the grounds of appeal that there had been improper jury vetting by the Crown Attorney’s
office in conjunction with the police. Prior to the jury selection in E’s trial, the Crown Attorney’s office had requested
that the police conduct inquiries as to whether potential jurors had a criminal record or whether they were otherwise
“disreputable persons” who would be undesirable as jurors. Information obtained from these checks was provided to
Crown counsel, who used it when exercising peremptory challenges. The information was not disclosed to the defence,
despite a practice memorandum distributed to Crown offices in Ontario in 2006 directing that any jury vetting carried
out by the police was to be restricted to criminal record checks and that any information obtained was to be disclosed to
the defence. In dismissing E’s appeal, the Court of Appeal found that the Crown had failed to meet its disclosure
obligations, but concluded that there was no reasonable possibility that the non-disclosure had any impact on the
partiality of the jury or on the verdict. The court was satisfied that the selection process had not compromised the
overall fairness of the trial. It also held that the conduct of the Crown and the police did not impact on the appearance
of fairness of the trial and therefore had not occasioned a miscarriage of justice.
Held: The appeal should be dismissed.
The principles governing the propriety of jury vetting and the use of police databases to che ck the criminal
antecedents of prospective jurors have been canvassed in R. v. Yumnu, 2012 SCC 73. They apply equally to the present
appeal. The Crown was entitled to have the police check the antecedents of prospective jurors for ineligibility and
challenge for cause purposes. It was not entitled to have the police go further and use their databases to determine if a
prospective juror was, or might be, a person of disreputable character, but, if information of that nature came to light
during a valid criminal record search, it was to be brought to the Crown’s attention. If the Crown considered it to be
relevant to the jury selection process, it was obliged to disclose the information to the defence.
With respect to trial fairness, as stated in Yumnu, persons seeking a new trial must establish, at a minimum,
that: (1) the Crown failed to disclose information relevant to the selection process that it was obliged to disclose; and
(2) had the requisite disclosure been made, there is a reasonable possibility that the jury would have been differently
constituted. In the case at bar, although the Crown failed to disclose information that was relevant to the defence in the
selection process, E has failed to show that there is a reasonable possibility that th e jury would have been differently
composed had the Crown met its disclosure obligations.
With respect to appearance of unfairness, this case is more troublesome than Yumnu because at the time of E’s
trial, all Crown offices across the Province of Ontario had received the practice memorandum on criminal record checks
and disclosure. However, while the conduct of the police and the Crown was in some respects improper and sho uld not
be repeated, there is no basis for concluding that they conspired to obtain a favourable jury. What occurred did not
constitute a serious interference with the administration of justice, nor was it so offensive to the community’s sense of
fair play and decency that the proceedings should be set aside as a miscarriage of justice.
- 2041 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
APPEAL from a judgment of the Ontario Court of Appeal (Rosenberg, Blair and Juriansz JJ.A.), 2010 ONCA
817, 104 O.R. (3d) 201, 264 C.C.C. (3d) 402, 81 C.R. (6th) 267, 272 O.A.C. 248, [2010] O.J. No. 5195, 2010
CarswellOnt 9069, upholding the accused’s conviction on three counts of fraud. Appeal dismissed.
Mark C. Halfyard and Daniel Brown, for the appellant.
Michal Fairburn, Deborah Krick , John S. McInnes and Susan Magotiaux, for the respondent.
Frank Addario, for the intervener the Canadian Civil Liberties Association.
Nader R. Hasan and Gerald Chan, for the intervener the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association.
Paul J. J. Cavalluzzo and Shaun O’Brien, for the intervener the Ontario Crown Attorneys’ Association.
William S. Challis and Stephen McCammon, for the intervener the Information and Privacy Commissioner of
Ontario.
Cheryl Milne and Lisa Austin, for the intervener the David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights.
Anthony Moustacalis and Peter Thorning, for the intervener the Criminal Lawyers’ Association.
Solicitors for the appellant: Rusonik, O’Connor, Robbins, Ross, Gorham & Angelini, Toronto; Daniel Brown
Law Office, Toronto.
Solicitor for the respondent: Attorney General of Ontario, Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the Canadian Civil Liberties Association: Addario Law Group, Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association: Ruby Shiller Chan Hasan,
Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the Ontario Crown Attorneys’ Association: Cavalluzzo Hayes Shilton McIntyre &
Cornish, Toronto.
Solicitor for the intervener the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario: Information and Privacy
Commissioner of Ontario, Toronto.
Solicitor for the intervener the David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights: University of Toronto, Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the Criminal Lawyers’ Association: Anthony Moustacalis, Toronto; Brauti
Thorning Zibarras, Toronto.
________________________
Présents : La juge en chef McLachlin et les juges LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein, Cromwell, Moldaver et
Karakatsanis.
Droit criminel — Jurés — Sélection — Appelant déclaré coupable de fraude — Demande de la Couronne
présentée à la police avant la sélection du jury pour que cette dernière procède à la vérification du casier judiciaire
des candidats jurés et précise s’il s’agissait de « personnes peu recommandables » — Aucun des renseignements reçus
par le ministère public n’a été communiqué à la défense — Une telle demande était-elle acceptable? — Ces
renseignements auraient-ils dû être communiqués? — Existait-il une possibilité raisonnable qu’une telle conduite ait
nui à l’équité du procès ou ait donné lieu à une apparence d’iniquité entraînant une erreur judiciaire?
En 2008, à la suite d’un procès s’étant tenu à Barrie, en Ontario, E a été déclaré coupable sur trois chefs
d’accusation de fraude. Dans l’appel qu’il a interjeté de sa déclaration de culpabilité, il a fait valoir notamment
- 2042 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
l’irrégularité de l’évaluation des candidats jurés par le bureau des procureurs de la Couronne de concert avec la police.
Avant la sélection du jury dans le procès de E, le bureau des procureurs de la Couronne a demandé à la police de
vérifier si des candidats jurés avaient un casier judiciaire ou si certains étaient « peu recommandables » et indésirables à
titre de jurés. Les renseignements recueillis lors de ces vérifications ont été transmis à la pro cureure de la Couronne,
qui s’en est servie lorsqu’elle a exercé son droit à des récusations péremptoires. Les renseignements n’ont pas été
communiqués à la défense, malgré l’avis de pratique transmis aux bureaux des procureurs de la Couronne de l’Ontario
en 2006 selon lequel les évaluations des candidats jurés par la police doivent se limiter à la vérification du casier
judiciaire et les renseignements obtenus doivent être communiqués à la défense. La Cour d’appel, qui a rejeté l’appel, a
reconnu que le ministère public ne s’était pas acquitté de ses obligations de communication, mais a conclu qu’il
n’existait aucune possibilité raisonnable que la non-communication ait eu une incidence sur la partialité du jury ou sur
le verdict. La cour était convaincue que le processus de sélection n’avait pas compromis l’équité globale du procès et a
conclu que la conduite du ministère public et de la police n’avait eu aucune incidence sur l’apparence d’équité du
procès et n’avait donc pas entraîné d’erreur judiciaire.
Arrêt : Le pourvoi est rejeté.
Les principes régissant la légitimité de l’évaluation des candidats jurés et l’utilisation des bases de données de
la police pour vérifier les antécédents criminels des candidats jurés ont été examinés dans R. c. Yumnu, 2012 CSC 73.
Ils s’appliquent également en l’espèce. Le ministère public avait le droit de demander à la police de vérifier les
antécédents des candidats jurés pour savoir s’ils étaient habiles ou non à occuper cette fonction et sujets à une
récusation motivée. Il n’avait pas le droit de demander à la police d’aller plus loin et d’utiliser ses bases de données
afin de déterminer si un candidat juré était, ou pouvait être, un individu peu recommandable, mais si des
renseignements de cette nature devaient être dévoilés lors d’une vérification valide du casier judiciaire, il y aurait lieu
de les porter à l’attention du ministère public. Si celui-ci estimait qu’ils sont pertinents pour le processus de sélection
des jurés, il serait tenu de communiquer ces renseignements à la défense.
Quant à l’équité du procès, comme la Cour l’explique dans Yumnu, ceux qui sollicitent la tenue d’un nouveau
procès doivent, à tout le moins, établir : 1) que le ministère public n’a pas communiqué des renseignements pertinents
pour le processus de sélection qu’il était tenu de communiquer; 2) que si la communication avait été faite dans les
règles, il existe une possibilité raisonnable que le jury ait été composé différemment. En l’espèce, même si le ministère
public a omis de communiquer des renseignements qui auraient pu être utiles à la défense durant le processus de
sélection, E n’a pas démontré qu’il existe une possibilité raisonnable que le jury ait été composé différemment si le
ministère public s’était acquitté de ses obligations de communication.
Quant à l’apparence d’iniquité, la présente affaire est plus troublante que Yumnu puisque, au moment du
procès de E, tous les bureaux des procureurs de la Couronne de la province d’Ontario avaient reçu l’avis de pratique
relatif à la vérification du casier judiciaire et à la communication. Cela dit, bien que la conduite de la police et du
ministère public fût inappropriée à certains égards et ne doive pas se reproduire, rien ne permet de conclure qu’ils ont
comploté pour obtenir un jury qui leur serait favorable. Ce qui s’est passé en l’espèce ne constituait pas une entrave
sérieuse à l’administration de la justice, ni ne heurtait le sens du franc-jeu et de la décence qu’a la société au point où la
procédure devrait être annulée pour cause d’erreur judiciaire.
POURVOI contre un arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario (les juges Rosenberg, Blair et Juriansz), 2010
ONCA 817, 104 O.R. (3d) 201, 264 C.C.C. (3d) 402, 81 C.R. (6th) 267, 272 O.A.C. 248, [2010] O.J. No. 5195, 2010
CarswellOnt 9069, qui a confirmé la déclaration de culpabilité de l’accusé sur trois chefs de fraude. Pourvoi rejeté.
Mark C. Halfyard et Daniel Brown, pour l’appelant.
Michal Fairburn, Deborah Krick , John S. McInnes et Susan Magotiaux, pour l’intimée.
Frank Addario, pour l’intervenante l’Association canadienne des libertés civiles.
Nader R. Hasan et Gerald Chan, pour l’intervenante l’Association des libertés civiles de la
Colombie-Britannique.
- 2043 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
Paul J. J. Cavalluzzo et Shaun O’Brien, pour l’intervenante Ontario Crown Attorneys’ Association.
William S. Challis et Stephen McCammon, pour l’intervenant le Commissaire à l’information et à la protection
de la vie privée de l’Ontario.
Cheryl Milne et Lisa Austin, pour l’intervenant David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights.
Anthony Moustacalis et Peter Thorning, pour l’intervenante Criminal Lawyers’ Association.
Procureurs de l’appelant : Rusonik, O’Connor, Robbins, Ross, Gorham & Angelini, Toronto; Daniel Brown
Law Office, Toronto.
Procureur de l’intimée : Procureur général de l’Ontario, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenante l’Association canadienne des libertés civiles : Addario Law Group, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenante l’Association des libertés civiles de la Colombie -Britannique : Ruby Shiller Chan
Hasan, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenante Ontario Crown Attorneys’ Association : Cavalluzzo Hayes Shilton McIntyre &
Cornish, Toronto.
Procureur de l’intervenant le Commissaire à l’information et à la protection de la vie privée de
l’Ontario : Commissaire à l’information et à la protection de la vie privée de l’Ontario, Toronto.
Procureur de l’intervenant David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights : Université de Toronto, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenante Criminal Lawyers’ Association : Anthony Moustacalis, Toronto; Brauti
Thorning Zibarras, Toronto.
- 2044 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
Troy Gilbert Davey v. Her Majesty the Queen (Ont.) (34179)
Indexed as: R. v. Davey / Répertorié : R. c. Davey
Neutral citation: 2012 SCC 75 / Référence neutre : 2012 CSC 75
Hearing: March 14 and 15, 2012 / Judgment: December 21, 2012
Audition : Le 14 et 15 mars 2012 / Jugement : Le 21 décembre 2012
Present: McLachlin C.J. and LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein, Cromwell, Moldaver and Karakatsanis JJ.
Criminal law — Jurors — Selection — Appellant convicted of first degree murder for killing police officer —
Prior to trial, Crown seeking personal opinions of local police officers as to the “suitability” of prospective jurors for
use in exercise of peremptory challenges — Neither annotated jury panel lists setting out opinions of local police
officers nor fact that inquiries had been made was disclosed to defence — Whether it was appropriate to seek such
opinions — Whether there should have been disclosure of same — Whether there is a reasonable possibility that such
conduct affected trial fairness or gave rise to an appearance of unfairness, such that a miscarriage of justice occurred
— Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, s. 686(1)(a)(iii).
D killed a police officer by slashing his throat. The only issue at trial was whether D had the requisite intent
for murder, or whether he was guilty of manslaughter. D was convicted of first degree murder.
Approximately three weeks before trial, the jury panel lists were provided to both the Crown and the defence.
The Crown sought the personal opinions of police officers from local police services regarding the suitability of
prospective jurors, including any potential partiality for or against the Crown, for the purpose of exercising peremptory
challenges. It was understood that police databases would not be used to check the lists, and that the comments were to
be based on the officers’ knowledge of potential jurors in the community. One or two officers at each police service
would review the lists and make general comments, such as “good”, “yes”, “ok” or “no”, or brief specific comments
regarding relationships or roles in the community. The responses were compiled in a master list by an employee of the
Crown office. Neither this list, nor the fact that inquiries had been made, was disclosed to the defence. Two of the
jurors ultimately selected were noted as “good” and “ok” by the police services.
D appealed his conviction, alleging errors in the charge to the jury. While the appeal was pending, D
requested and received the annotated jury panel lists. The Court of Appeal allowed the fresh evidence on the jury
vetting issue, but ultimately dismissed the appeal, concluding that the police opinions were not “information” that was
required to be disclosed; that the early release of the jury panel lists did not impact trial fairness; that the privacy righ ts
of prospective jurors were not breached; and that the jury would not have been differently constituted if there had been
disclosure of the police comments. Only the jury vetting issue has been appealed to this Court.
Held: The appeal should be dismissed.
Informal consultation with police officers must be approached with caution and the Crown should not engage
in systematic consultations with police services regarding the suitability of jurors given the real risk that such inquiries
could represent access to an informal database of the contacts a prospective juror has had with the po lice services and
the criminal justice system. However, for the purpose of exercising its discretion in the peremptory challenge process,
the Crown is permitted to ask the opinion of someone who is part of the prosecution team, or to consult with those
assisting the prosecution, including individual police officers, regarding concerns relating to partiality, eligibility, or
suitability of any prospective juror. Provided that any relevant information is disclosed, consultation that is limited to a
few individual police officers does not, in itself, create an imbalance or an appearance of unfairness. Nor does it
represent an unjustified invasion of juror privacy. It is consistent with the duty to uphold an impartial and competent
jury. It is consistent with the right to exercise discretionary challenges. It is consistent with the rules of professional
conduct. And it is consistent with consultation conducted by the defence.
If the Crown seeks the opinion of a police officer, any information received relevant to the selection process
(touching on a potential juror’s eligibility, suitability, or ability to remain impartial) must be disclosed. However,
general impressions, personal or public knowledge in the community, rumours or hunches, need not be disclosed. To
the extent that the underlying information is readily ascertainable by members of the community, it is not linked to the
- 2045 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
prosecution’s role as an agent of the state, or to the Crown’s disproportionate access to resources, and there is no onus
on the Crown to bring forward information that is readily obtainable elsewhere. This is not to say that the Crown is
required to disclose the opinions of police along with the information on which those opinions are based. So long as
the underlying information is disclosed, the defence will have access to the material on which the opinion is based, and
can draw its own inferences for the purpose of exercising its peremptory challenges. However, where a police officer
has knowledge, whether derived from her role as an officer or as a member of the community, that is relevant to the
jury selection process, she must disclose it.
The assessment of the impact of a failure to disclose required under the Dixon test should be modified when
the undisclosed information bears upon the choice of the trier of fact, rather than the merits of the case. Where the
integrity of the choice of the trier of fact is at stake, the court must ask: first, whether the information ought to have
been disclosed; and second, had the information been disclosed, whether there is a reasonable possibility that the jury
would have been differently constituted. If not, trial fairness has not been compromised and the defence has not been
prejudiced. Where non-disclosure interferes with the accused’s use of his peremptory challenges to the extent that there
is a reasonable possibility that the jury would have been differently constituted, this safeguard is undermined and the
presumption that the jury is impartial may be displaced. The Crown would then have the opportunity to show, on
balance, that the jury was impartial.
In the present case, the Crown should not have canvassed the three local police services for their opinion on
the suitability of prospective jurors. These opinions clearly reflected information obtained as police officers and as
residents in the community. In light of the broad nature of the inquiry conducted by the court officers, the numerous
notations for which no basis was disclosed, and the fact that information obtain ed in the course of police activity may
have played a role in the formation of the bald opinions provided, the Crown ought to have erred on the side of caution
and disclosed the annotated panel jury lists to the defence.
It was nonetheless open to the Court of Appeal to find that there was no reasonable possibility that defence
counsel would have exercised its peremptory challenges differently and that the jury would have been the same had the
comments been disclosed. Absent any reasonable possibility th at the defence was prejudiced or the trial was unfair,
this finding is entitled to deference. Furthermore, the Crown’s request for the police opinions and the failure to disclose
those opinions were not so offensive to the community’s sense of fair play an d decency that the proceedings should be
set aside as a miscarriage of justice. There was no appearance of unfairness that would shake the public’s confidence in
the administration of justice.
APPEAL from a judgment of the Ontario Court of Appeal (Rosen berg, Blair and Juriansz JJ.A.), 2010 ONCA
818, 103 O.R. (3d) 161, 272 O.A.C. 108, 264 C.C.C. (3d) 465, 81 C.R. (6th) 254, [2010] O.J. No. 5194 (QL), 2010
CarswellOnt 9068, upholding the accused’s conviction for first degree murder. Appeal dismissed.
Christopher Hicks and Theodore Sarantis, for the appellant.
Michal Fairburn, Deborah Krick , John S. McInnes and Susan Magotiaux, for the respondent.
Frank Addario, for the intervener the Canadian Civil Liberties Association.
Nader R. Hasan and Gerald J. Chan, for the intervener the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association.
William S. Challis and Stephen McCammon, for the intervener the Information and Privacy Commissioner of
Ontario.
Cheryl Milne and Lisa Austin, for the intervener the David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights.
Anthony Moustacalis and Peter Thorning, for the intervener the Criminal Lawyers’ Association.
Solicitors for the appellant: Hicks Adams, Toronto.
- 2046 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
Solicitor for the respondent: Attorney General of Ontario, Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the Canadian Civil Liberties Association: Addario Law Group, Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association: Ruby Shiller Chan Hasan,
Toronto.
Solicitor for the intervener the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario: Information and Privacy
Commissioner of Ontario, Toronto.
Solicitor for the intervener the David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights: University of Toronto, Toronto.
Solicitors for the intervener the Criminal Lawyers’ Association: Anthony Moustacalis, Toronto; Peter
Thorning Zibarras, Toronto.
________________________
Présents : La juge en chef McLachlin et les juges LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Rothstein, Cromwell, Moldaver et
Karakatsanis.
Droit criminel — Jurés — Sélection —– Appelant déclaré coupable du meurtre au premier degré d’un policier
— Demande adressée par la Couronne à des policiers de l’endroit avant le procès et sollicitant leur opinion
personnelle sur l’« aptitude » des candidats jurés en vue de l’utilisation de ses récusations péremptoires — Ni les
tableaux des jurés annotés faisant état des opinions des policiers de l’endroit, ni le fait que des demandes de
renseignements avaient été présentées n’ont été communiqués à l a défense — Était-il acceptable de solliciter de telles
opinions? — Les opinions obtenues auraient-elles dû être communiquées? — Existe-t-il une possibilité raisonnable
qu’une telle conduite ait nuit à l’équité du procès ou ait donné lieu à une apparence d ’iniquité entraînant une erreur
judiciaire? — Code criminel, L.R.C. 1985, ch. C-46, art. 686(1)a)(iii).
D a tué un agent de police en lui tranchant la gorge. La seule question en litige au procès était celle de savoir
si D avait eu l’intention requise pour commettre un meurtre ou s’il était coupable d’homicide involontaire coupable. Il
a été déclaré coupable de meurtre au premier degré.
Environ trois semaines avant le procès, les tableaux des jurés ont été remis à la fois à la Couronne et à la
défense. En vue de l’utilisation de ses récusations péremptoires, la Couronne a demandé à des policiers de services de
police régionaux de lui faire part de leur opinion personnelle sur l’aptitude des candidats jurés, notamment sur
l’existence d’une possible partialité en sa faveur ou à son encontre. Il était entendu que les bases de données de la
police ne seraient pas utilisées pour vérifier les tableaux et que les commentaires devaient être basés sur ce que ces
policiers eux-mêmes savaient au sujet des candidats jurés au sein de la communauté. Un ou deux agents de chacun des
services de police examineraient les tableaux et y inscriraient une mention générale comme « bon », « oui », « ok »,
« non », ou de brefs commentaires précis sur les liens qu’avaient les candidats jurés dans la communauté ou les rôles
qu’ils y jouaient. Les réponses ont été rassemblées sur une liste maîtresse par un employé du bureau des procureurs de
la Couronne. Ni cette liste ni le fait que des demandes de renseignements avaien t été présentées n’ont été communiqués
à la défense. Deux des jurés qui ont finalement été choisis avaient été qualifiés de « bon » et « ok » respectivement par
les services de police.
D a interjeté appel de sa déclaration de culpabilité, invoquant la p résence d’erreurs dans les directives au jury.
Avant l’audition de l’appel, l’appelant a demandé et reçu les tableaux des jurés annotés. La Cour d’appel a autorisé la
présentation des nouveaux éléments de preuve sur la question de l’évaluation des jurés, mais elle a finalement rejeté
l’appel, concluant que les opinions des policiers n’étaient pas des « renseignements » qui devaient être communiqués,
que la communication anticipée des tableaux des jurés n’avait eu aucune incidence sur l’équité du procès, q ue le droit à
la vie privée des candidats jurés n’avait pas été violé et que le jury n’aurait pas été constitué différemment s’il y avait e u
communication des commentaires des policiers. Seule la question de l’évaluation des jurés fait l’objet du pourvoi
devant notre Cour.
- 2047 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
Arrêt : Le pourvoi est rejeté.
La prudence s’impose en ce qui concerne les consultations officieuses menées auprès d’agents de police, et la
Couronne ne devrait pas consulter systématiquement les services de police au sujet de l’ap titude des jurés, étant donné
le risque véritable que de telles demandes de renseignements aient pour effet de donner accès à des sources
d’information officieuses concernant les contacts qu’a eus un candidat juré avec les services policiers et le système de
justice pénale. Toutefois, afin d’exercer son pouvoir discrétionnaire en matière de récusations péremptoires, la
Couronne est autorisée à solliciter l’opinion d’une personne qui fait partie de l’équipe chargée des poursuites ou à
consulter les personnes qui assistent la poursuite, y compris des agents de police individuellement, à propos de doutes
quant à la partialité, l’habilité ou l’aptitude d’un candidat juré. Pourvu que tout renseignement pertinent soit
communiqué, une consultation limitée à un petit nombre de policiers ne crée pas en soi un déséquilibre ou une
apparence d’iniquité. Elle ne constitue pas non plus une atteinte injustifiée à la vie privée des jurés. Cette façon de
faire est compatible avec l’obligation de veiller à la constitution d’un jury impartial et compétent. Elle concourt à
l’exercice du droit de procéder à des récusations péremptoires. Elle est conforme aux règles de déontologie
professionnelle. Et elle est logique, compte tenu des consultations auxquelles se livre de son côté la défense.
Si la Couronne sollicite l’opinion d’un policier, elle doit communiquer tout renseignement pertinent dans le
cadre du processus de sélection (relativement à l’habilité d’un candidat juré, à son aptitude ou à sa capacité à demeurer
impartial) qu’elle reçoit de ce policier. Cependant, des impressions générales, des faits possédant un caractère notoire
dans la communauté ou relevant d’une connaissance personnelle, des rumeurs ou des intuitions n’ont pas à être
communiqués. Dans la mesure où l’information à la base de tels renseignements peut être aisément trouvée par des
membres de la communauté, elle n’est pas liée au rôle que joue la poursuite en qualité d’agent de l’État ou à l’accès
disproportionné de la Couronne à certaines ressources, et cette dernière n’est pas tenue de communiquer de
l’information qu’il est facile d’obtenir autrement. Cela ne veut pas dire que la Couronne a l’obligation de communiquer
les opinions exprimées par les policiers en plus de l’information sur laquelle ces opinions sont fondées. Tant que
l’information à la base des opinions est communiquée, la défense a alors accès aux éléments sur lesquels repose
l’opinion et elle pourra en tirer ses propres inférences en vue de l’utilisation de ses récusations péremptoires. Toutefois,
lorsqu’une policière possède des renseignements pertinents pour le processus de sélection du jury — qu’elle les ait
obtenus dans son rôle de policière ou en tant que membre de la communauté concernée —, elle doit les communiquer.
L’appréciation de l’effet d’une omission de communiquer que requiert l’analyse élaborée dans Dixon devrait
être modifiée lorsque les renseignements non communiqués influent sur la sélection du juge des faits, plutôt que sur le
fond de la cause. Dans les cas où l’intégrité du choix du juge des faits est en jeu, le tribunal doit répondre à deux
questions : Premièrement, les renseignements auraient-ils dû être communiqués? Deuxièmement, si les renseignements
avaient été communiqués, existe-t-il une possibilité raisonnable que le jury aurait été constitué différemment? Si la
réponse est non, l’équité du procès n’a pas été compromise, et la défense n’a pas subi de préjudice. Lorsque la
non-communication nuit à l’utilisation par l’accusé de ses récusations péremptoire s dans une mesure telle qu’il existe
une possibilité raisonnable que le jury aurait été constitué différemment, cette garantie est compromise et la
présomption d’impartialité du jury peut avoir été repoussée. La Couronne se verrait alors accorder l’occasion de
démontrer, suivant la prépondérance des probabilités, que le jury a été impartial.
En l’espèce, la Couronne n’aurait pas dû s’adresser aux trois services de police régionaux afin de recueillir
l’opinion de leurs membres sur l’aptitude des candidats jurés. Ces opinions reflétaient clairement des renseignements
obtenus à titre de policiers et à titre de résidents de la communauté. Compte tenu des consultations étendues menées
par les policiers désignés, des nombreuses annotations dont le fondement n ’était pas communiqué et du fait que des
renseignements obtenus dans le cours d’activités policières ont pu influencer les opinions laconiques formulées, la
Couronne aurait dû pécher par excès de prudence et communiquer à la défense les tableaux des jurés annotés.
Il était néanmoins loisible à la Cour d’appel de conclure qu’il n’existait aucune possibilité raisonnable que
l’avocat de la défense aurait utilisé différemment ses récusations péremptoires, et que le jury aurait été identique même
si les commentaires avaient été communiqués. En l’absence de possibilité raisonnable que la défense ait subi un
préjudice ou que le procès ait été inéquitable, cette conclusion commande la déférence. En outre, la demande de la
Couronne afin d’obtenir l’opinion des policiers et son omission de communiquer les opinions ainsi obtenues n’ont pas
porté une atteinte telle au sens du franc-jeu et de la décence de la communauté que le procès devrait être annulé pour
- 2048 -
HEADNOTES OF RECENT
JUDGMENTS
SOMMAIRES DE JUGEMENTS
RÉCENTS
cause d’erreur judiciaire. Il n’y a eu aucune apparence d’iniquité qui ébranlerait la confiance de la population dans
l’administration de la justice.
POURVOI contre un arrêt de la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario (les juges Rosenberg, Blair et Juriansz), 2010
ONCA 818, 103 O.R. (3d) 161, 272 O.A.C. 108, 264 C.C.C. (3d) 465, 81 C.R. (6th) 254, [2010] O.J. No. 5194 (QL),
2010 CarswellOnt 9068, qui a confirmé la déclaration de culpabilité pour meurtre au premier degré prononcée contre
l’accusé. Pourvoi rejeté.
Christopher Hicks and Theodore Sarantis, pour l’appelant.
Michal Fairburn, Deborah Krick , John S. McInnes et Susan Magotiaux, pour l’intimée.
Frank Addario, pour l’intervenante l’Association canadienne des libertés civiles.
Nader R. Hasan et Gerald J. Chan, pour l’intervenante l’Association des libertés civiles de la
Colombie-Britannique.
William S. Challis et Stephen McCammon, pour l’intervenant le Commissaire à l’information et à la protection
de la vie privée de l’Ontario.
Cheryl Milne et Lisa Austin, pour l’intervenant David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights.
Anthony Moustacalis et Peter Thorning, pour l’intervenante Criminal Lawyers’ Association.
Procureurs de l’appelant : Hicks Adams, Toronto.
Procureur de l’intimée : Procureur général de l’Ontario, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenante l’Association canadienne des libertés civiles : Addario Law Group, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenante l’Association des libertés civiles de la Colombie -Britannique : Ruby Shiller Chan
Hasan, Toronto.
Procureur de l’intervenant le Commissaire à l’information et à la protection de la vie privée de
l’Ontario : Commissaire à l’information et à la protection de la vie privée de l’Ontario, Toronto.
Procureur de l’intervenant David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights : Université de Toronto, Toronto.
Procureurs de l’intervenante Criminal Lawyers’ Association : Anthony Moustacalis, Toronto; Peter Thorning
Zibarras, Toronto.
- 2049 -
AGENDA FOR JANUARY 2013
CALENDRIER DE JANVIER 2013
The next session of the Supreme Court of Canada commences on January 14, 2013.
La prochaine session de la Cour suprême du Canada débute le 14 janvier 2013.
The next Bulletin of Proceedings will be published on January 4, 2013 .
La prochaine Bulletin des procédures sera publié le 4 janvier 2013.
SEASON’S GREETINGS!
MEILLEURS VOEUX !
- 2050 -
SUPREME COURT OF CANADA SCHEDULE / CALENDRIER DE LA COUR SUPREME
- 2012 OCTOBER - OCTOBRE
S
D
NOVEMBER - NOVEMBRE
M
L
T
M
W
M
T
J
F
V
S
S
S
D
M
L
T
M
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
H
8
M
9
10
11
12
13
4
M
5
6
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
11
H
12
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
18
28
29
30
31
25
W
M
DECEMBER - DÉCEMBRE
T
J
F
V
S
S
S
D
M
L
T
M
W
M
T
J
F
V
S
S
1
2
3
7
8
9
10
2
M
3
4
5
6
7
8
13
14
15
16
17
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
19
20
21
22
23
24
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
26
27
28
29
30
23
30
24
31
H
25
26
27
28
29
F
V
S
S
1
2
1
- 2013 JANUARY - JANVIER
S
D
M
L
FEBRUARY - FÉVRIER
T
M
W
M
T
J
F
V
S
S
H
1
2
3
4
5
S
D
M
L
T
M
W
M
T
J
MARCH - MARS
F
V
S
S
1
2
S
D
M
L
T
M
W
M
T
J
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
13
M
14
15
16
17
18
19
10
M
11
12
13
14
15
16
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
17
M
18
19
20
21
22
23
27
28
29
30
31
24
25
26
27
28
24
31
25
26
27
28
H
29
30
APRIL - AVRIL
S
D
MAY - MAI
M
L
T
M
W
M
T
J
F
V
S
S
H
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
5
6
14
M
15
16
17
18
19
20
12
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Sittings of the court:
Séances de la cour :
Motions:
Requêtes :
Holidays:
Jours fériés :
M
H
S
D
18
87
9
3
M
L
T
M
JUNE - JUIN
W
M
T
J
F
V
S
S
S
D
M
L
T
M
W
M
T
J
F
v
s
s
1
2
3
4
7
8
9
10
11
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
M
13
14
15
16
17
18
9
M
10
11
12
13
14
15
19
H
20
21
22
23
24
25
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
26
27
28
29
30
31
23
30
24
25
26
27
28
29
1
sitting weeks/semaines séances de la cour
sitting days/journées séances de la cour
m otion and conference days/ journées des requêtes et des conférences
holidays during sitting days/ jours fériés durant les sessions
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising