House of Commons Debates Friday, October 3, 2014 VOLUME 147 NUMBER 122

House of Commons Debates Friday, October 3, 2014 VOLUME 147 NUMBER 122
House of Commons Debates
VOLUME 147
●
NUMBER 122
●
2nd SESSION
OFFICIAL REPORT
(HANSARD)
Friday, October 3, 2014
Speaker: The Honourable Andrew Scheer
●
41st PARLIAMENT
CONTENTS
(Table of Contents appears at back of this issue.)
8207
HOUSE OF COMMONS
Friday, October 3, 2014
The House met at 10 a.m.
Prayers
GOVERNMENT ORDERS
● (1005)
[English]
PROTECTION OF COMMUNITIES AND EXPLOITED
PERSONS ACT
Hon. Steven Blaney (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency
Preparedness, CPC) moved that Bill C-36, An Act to amend the
Criminal Code in response to the Supreme Court of Canada decision
in Attorney General of Canada v. Bedford and to make consequential
amendments to other Acts, be read the third time and passed.
Mrs. Joy Smith (Kildonan—St. Paul, CPC): Mr. Speaker, as I
rise today, I am pleased to say that we are in third reading on Bill
C-36, one of the most important bills this country has ever had in this
Parliament. I will tell you why. It is because so many innocent
victims are being lured into the sex trade under human trafficking.
We have numerous cases all across this country.
Last Christmas, Canadians got a Christmas present. While they
were busy packaging their presents, while they were busy doing
things around the house, getting ready for Christmas preparations,
the Supreme Court of Canada deemed all the laws around
prostitution unconstitutional.
What happened after that? One wise thing the Supreme Court did
was to give the government a year, until December 20 this year, to
respond to that proclamation. Having done that, our government has
put together Bill C-36. It is the first of its kind that Canada has ever
seen. For the first time in Canadian history, those who buy sex will
be brought to justice. It will be against the law to do that.
Second, the thing that is so unique about Bill C-36 is that there is
help for the victims of human trafficking. Many in this Parliament do
not understand human trafficking. They talk about prostitutes, the
rights of others to set up shop and control a bunch of women, and
young men now, in Canada, control and force them into the sex
trade. It is the most devious, under-the-surface kind of crime that
people now, finally, are starting to understand.
In this country right now it has been accepted that the buying of
sex is just fine, because that is what women do. However, women do
not want to service up to 40 men a night. Women do not want to be
coerced into the sex trade. Women do not want to give their money
to people who beat them if they do not. This is not what women
want.
What women want in this country is to be safe. They want to be
able to grow up. They want to be able to have a life they can be
proud of, and grow and prosper like anybody else.
In this House, I have heard so many speeches, but what I need to
tell my colleagues is that Bill C-36 has to be supported. It has to be
supported because all of Canada is watching what is going on in this
country right now. All of Canada, Canadians all across this country,
have sent numerous emails to me, numerous petitions, numerous
postcards, and what they have said is that they want their children to
be safe. The majority of trafficked victims are underage, and we are
finding that now. We know that now.
If members put human trafficking in a Google search, they would
see how many human trafficking cases have come to the forefront,
from coast to coast to coast across this country.
I have to tell my colleagues in the House what I have done with all
those petitions, all those postcards and all those emails. I have
categorized them. I know every single part of what is happening in
this country, because of all the compilation we have done over 10
years. I know what the people are saying in each of the
constituencies across this country.
I am going to be making sure that trafficked victims and their
parents are very well aware in every constituency of what all the
parliamentarians are saying and doing as far as it relates to Bill C-36.
There is no reason now to do archaic thinking. There is no reason
now to say, “I am confused.” Quite frankly, that is a very stupid
comment. It does not matter who they are or on what side of the
House, right now, in this country, Bill C-36 is a bill that
parliamentarians from all sides of the House should embrace.
8208
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Government Orders
● (1010)
As I said, for the first time in Canadian history, the buying of sex
will be illegal. For the first time in Canadian history, there is
significant money being put in to help the victims of human
trafficking. For the first time in Canadian history, the advertising of
sex, those big ads for fresh Asian girls, any size, any age, anything
people want, will be illegal. It does not take a rocket scientist to
figure out that it is not the girls putting that kind of advertisement in
the newspaper. It is predators who are making between $260,000 to
$280,000 per year, per victim.
In this Parliament, a mom, who members would know but I
cannot name right now, came to see me because her 16-year-old
daughter was trafficked. When I met her, she was a typical staffer, a
typical person, well-dressed, well-educated, well-respected. She sat
on my couch in my office with tears rolling down her face when she
said, “Why don't the parliamentarians in this country stand up for the
victims of human trafficking?”
I have heard some of the speeches in the House. They are all in
Hansard and everyone knows what members are saying. Parliamentarians ought to know more than the average citizen about
human trafficking. It is the right of every single young person to be
safe in this country. I heard a speech the other day by a member who
talked about how we are taking away the rights of a person to set up
a brothel. Basically what the member said was that it is a woman's
right to exploit other women. Meanwhile right in her riding there is a
trafficking ring going through to the U.S. It has not hit the papers
yet, but it will.
However, I am going to take that speech and I will personally put
my feet in that constituency and get the parents and the trafficked
victims together and tell them what their MP said and ask them what
they think about that.
In Parliament it seems that all of us think that we are wonderful,
learned people. We are here for one thing. We are here to serve the
people of Canada. We are here to listen to what is going on in our
country and everyone here knows about human trafficking. Some
members on all sides of the House have really taken up the torch.
There are members from the NDP, the Liberals and from our side
who have taken up the torch. Unfortunately, many members and
leaders have suppressed the voices of members who want to support
Bill C-36.
Today is the last time I will have a chance to speak to the bill.
Over summer, we came to Parliament to sit on the justice committee
and we brought in the most dynamic people, the survivors. I say
survivors, not victims, because these victims now have a voice. They
have become the survivors and they are listening to everything that is
happening in Parliament. Members should choose their words
carefully and choose their vote carefully because their voices will go
across. The voices of parents, grandparents, victims and organizations that take care of victims, my dear colleagues, are far stronger
than anyone else who has a vested interest.
When we hear people saying this is a right to legalize prostitution;
it is an industry. Members should shake their heads. It is not an
industry and it is not what the elected people in this Parliament of
Canada should be professing. They should not do that. If they dare to
do it, I promise I am going to make sure I will go to every city, every
town, every constituency and I will let their constituents know. They
can decide whether they want to elect them to the Parliament of
Canada with that kind of attitude.
● (1015)
We have to do something in this Parliament to suppress the human
trafficking that is happening across this country.
All we have to do is talk about the victims. All we have to do is
talk about what happens to them. Predators come on as the victim's
friend to get their confidence and lure them. It can even be a family
member. It can be a friend. It can be a woman. It is not just men.
I had one case very recently where a boyfriend said to this young
girl, “We'll get married. I love you”. He was her knight in shining
armour. What she did not know was that behind the scenes he was
part of a little gang that were targeting young girls, getting their
confidence, taking away all their support systems through their
families, their schools, their churches, all their supports, my beloved
colleagues, and he sold her. She serviced up to 40 men a night before
we got her out of that ring.
This is something we cannot be silent about. This kind of crime
has been below the radar screen for so many years here in Canada.
Everybody talks about every other country but Canada. In Canada,
predators are making between $250,000 to $280,000 a year off their
victims. That is tax-free money. That is why they do it. Mostly, it is
because they follow the cash.
Unfortunately, in this country, we have had films like Pretty
Woman. We have had films glorifying prostitution. It is not
prostitution; it is human trafficking. This is where people do not
have a choice, where they are being targeted and are mostly
underage victims. What happens is that these victims just give up
after a while. They get post-traumatic stress. They sort of look to
their predators because that is where they get their one meal a day.
That is where they have some semblance of security. This is how
they look at it. It is a very sick kind of crime in our nation.
If we look at the trafficking cases in Vancouver Island, the
Nanaimo newspaper and the people who work with the trafficking
victims say that this ring has been undisturbed for years. We know
that.
In Ottawa, 10 minutes from Parliament Hill, we have had
trafficking cases.
What is happening in this country, now, is that police officers are
beginning to become schooled in human trafficking. Some police
officers who used to think it was just part of a daily occurrence that
they did not need to pay attention to, are starting to understand now
that behind those young women and young boys on the street is a
very sad story where they are being brutalized on a daily basis and
huge money is being made off them.
In the country right now “herds of girls”, as they call them, are
actually tattooed by the person who owns them.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8209
Government Orders
Years ago, long before the Speaker and I came to Parliament,
Wilberforce said that once you know, “you can never again say you
did not know”. The other part of that is: what are you going to do
about it?
Every parliamentarian in this Parliament knows that human
trafficking is happening. Every parliamentarian knows that it is
basically our young people. This is not about politics. This is about
doing the right thing. This is about representing our constituencies so
that our children, our young people, are safe and they are not
targeted, because this trafficking has grown to epidemic proportions
at this point in time.
We had a nanny in Ottawa who was caught up in human
trafficking. They are people who are often in a position of trust, a
position where they can have access.
● (1020)
It happens everywhere. It happens in our communities, in our
schools, in our churches—everywhere—and the victims have been
silent. They are silent no longer, and they will not be silent during
the next election, no matter what happens on any side of the House.
Bill C-36 is one of the most important bills we have ever put
through Parliament. It makes a statement about our country. When
the bill goes through, parliamentarians, on all sides of this House,
can say that we will not allow our children to be bought and sold in
this country.
When one talks about the pornography and everything around
human trafficking, that is a conditioning of a society. A 10-year-old
boy wrote to me about being addicted to porn. I was interviewed at
the National Post, and the next day the National Post stated that this
parliamentarian did not know a 10-year-old who was addicted to
porn. The parents read this and called the National Post, and said,
“We're the parents. I'll tell you about what happened”.
They came to visit me in Ottawa. I met the little boy, and we
found out that a whole school division, and other school divisions all
across this country, had porn popping up on their computers. It was
not because they wanted it, but because the system is set up in a way
that porn inadvertently pops up at random. It has happened on
everybody's computer. It is a type of conditioning, a type of
acceptance.
We should not accept, in any way, shape, or form, the exploitation
of our youth. We should not do that. However, let us be careful. The
world is watching what we are doing as parliamentarians here in the
Parliament of Canada, on all sides of the House. They all know. It is
not a partisan thing.
We have talked about human trafficking, and I have to commend
you, Mr. Speaker. You are a man of great honour and you have given
much support for this human trafficking. You stood by me a long
time ago, when I first introduced Bill C-268. I honour the set of
standards you have for what you feel is good for Canada.
There are people on all sides of the House who have done that,
but there are too many today who are resisting Bill C-36 and are
making statements in this Parliament that they will live to regret.
I have been in Montreal a great deal. I have worked with the head
of the vice squad there, Dominic Monchamp. I have worked with
and rescued victims of trafficking around that area. I do not speak
French. Two of my children speak French very well. I wish I did. I
try. I love French. However, I have not had the time to speak it
eloquently, like most of the people do here. However, I have done a
lot of work, and it does not matter what language we have, people
know. Some of the most courageous people have come from
Montreal, in terms of the human trafficking initiative. They are
amazing people. I want each parliamentarian here to be able to leave
this place knowing that their lives made a difference in the life of
someone who has no voice.
I look forward to the speeches, and I would implore members to
get behind Bill C-36. It is the right thing to do. If they have anything
to say, they will hear it again in the subsequent months. I will ensure
that happens in each constituency that each one of us lives in.
[Translation]
Ms. Françoise Boivin (Gatineau, NDP): Mr. Speaker, I would
like to thank the hon. member for her work on human trafficking. I
encourage her to visit my riding. I could translate what she is saying
because most people in my riding speak French. As an MP, I spend
time with my constituents to make sure I am on the right track.
I have a few questions for my colleague opposite. She began her
speech by saying that, for the first time in Canadian history, it will be
against the law to buy sexual services. First, I would like her to tell
me what is meant by sexual services, since no one—not the minister
nor the committee members—will tell me. Second, how does the
member explain the fact that her government refused to also make
the sale of sexual services illegal?
There is a dichotomy in the Conservative rhetoric. Even my
colleague from Ahuntsic, who was probably one of the biggest
Conservative government supporters when it came to Bill C-36, said
that she could not support the bill after the committee had finished its
work. She introduced an amendment to make prostitution completely
illegal because that is what this government wanted to do.
How does the member explain this dichotomy? In this context,
why object to removing the criminal records of the victims, the
survivors of prostitution?
● (1025)
[English]
Mrs. Joy Smith: Mr. Speaker, it is quite simple. People are now
discovering that when people in prostitution rings get arrested—I
call them the victims—they are revictimized.
I will take the member to the case of Samantha. She was trafficked
by her boyfriend and was arrested and re-arrested. In fact, statistics
tell us that 60% of the women are arrested, as opposed to the johns
who actually purchase sex, because the law has not passed yet. She
was revictimized. She had two children at home. It did her no good.
8210
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Government Orders
Through Bill C-36, as it is right now, she would be counselled.
She would be helped out of that dilemma, which is like a black hole
in which the women lose everything. They lose their dignity, their
confidence. They lose everything. That is why we should not be
arresting the victims.
Hon. Scott Brison (Kings—Hants, Lib.): Mr. Speaker, I want to
assure the hon. member that all members of the House are opposed
to human trafficking, the exploitation of any Canadian, the
exploitation of women. We are all pro-victim. We are not antivictim, as the government likes to say.
The member alleged that an opposition member of Parliament in
the House, who holds a different opinion from the member on some
of this legislation, has a human trafficking ring in her riding, that I
believe the member said is funnelling women to the U.S. She has
alleged this. She also said that she intended, once this became public,
to go to the member's riding to seek political advantage against the
member as a result of this human trafficking ring that she alleges is
occurring.
I would urge the member, if she is aware of this kind of criminal
activity in anyone's riding, to report it to the police. I would urge that
she approach the member to whom she referred to discuss this issue
in a constructive way. If she cares about victims, which I am certain
she does based on her long-standing work in the House on this issue,
she should not try to seek political advantage on the backs of victims
in this case. That is what she said in her own words that she intended
to do. I would suggest that she try to help with the situation and work
with the other members of the House, as opposed to trying to seize
political advantage in some member's riding.
● (1030)
Mrs. Joy Smith: Mr. Speaker, I have to say categorically that it is
the member opposite who is trying to twist the words. I know of
many cases of human trafficking, and I have worked with the police.
Nothing can be said publicly until they have all of the evidence and
it comes to fruition.
When I came to Parliament, in 2004, we did not hear about human
trafficking. Now we have cases all over the place. How does that
happen? I heard a very good comment from the member on TV last
night, and I admired him. He was admonishing a reporter who made
an inappropriate comment. The member mentioned that he had twin
daughters. I think we are all victim oriented, in a way, but we have to
put our feet to the ground and support Bill C-36. Everyone will
know the outcome of what every parliamentarian says about this bill.
[Translation]
Hon. Steven Blaney (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency
Preparedness, CPC): Mr. Speaker, I would like to pay tribute to my
colleague, the hon. member for Kildonan—St. Paul. I have a great
deal of respect for her because she is a passionate woman who tells it
like it is. Because of her, I discovered something that I did not
believe existed in Canada and that is modern slavery or human
trafficking.
Perhaps the hon. member does not speak French, but a few years
ago, she went to Quebec to speak out against human trafficking and
make Quebeckers aware of this issue. I had an opportunity to be
there with her. Today, I am very proud of that because I have seen
her introduce a number of bills that would punish those who
victimize the most vulnerable members of our society. Because of
that, I have great respect for my colleague. What she is doing goes
beyond party lines and has great historical significance for our
country.
I had the opportunity to meet with groups that help victims of
prostitution. I heard some heart-wrenching stories from young
aboriginal people. Unfortunately, this is happening on our streets.
That is why it is important to develop strategies to help victims of
prostitution and human trafficking, who are exploited and stripped of
their dignity. They need help breaking the cycle of dependence and
constant violation of their dignity.
My question is very simple. Governments may put measures in
place and organizations may be there to help, but as long as society
feels it is acceptable to exploit people by choosing to ignore these
issues, there will be a problem. This is then my question:
[English]
Does the member believe we can bring about a change of
mentality, a paradigm shift, to raise awareness and make it criminal?
It would be criminal to buy sex in this country, if this law is adopted.
However, socially it is totally unacceptable to purchase sex from
victims of exploitation. How does she feel with respect to that? As a
society, we were successful at making impaired driving socially
unacceptable. Can we do something about the purchasers of sex who
are luring young victims?
Mrs. Joy Smith: Mr. Speaker, I am thankful to my colleague who
has been supportive of this issue. Parliamentarians must take
leadership in making this socially unacceptable. I will help any
member on any side of the House who has it in their heart to support
Bill C-36 for the good of Canada and the good of our children.
We have to stop being partisan. There are good people on all sides
of this House. This bill is very important. We cannot mess around
with it. I am paying attention and will move forward if I see other
things happening. I know the victims. I know the police officers who
work with them. I know the families who have to endure the
aftermath of human trafficking. Parliamentarians on all sides of this
House can rise up, in a non-partisan manner, to stop this terrible
crime.
● (1035)
[Translation]
Ms. Françoise Boivin (Gatineau, NDP): Mr. Speaker, the debate
surrounding Bill C-36 is really not that simple. Nevertheless, we can
and should make it simpler, by focusing carefully. With that in mind,
I would like to start by making certain things very clear.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8211
Government Orders
Bill C-36 does not address the issue of human trafficking. The
Bedford decision, handed down by the Supreme Court of Canada in
December 2013, focused on three specific provisions of the Criminal
Code, namely sections 210, 212 and 213. Those three sections of the
Criminal Code are found in part VII, titled “Disorderly Houses,
Gaming and Betting”. Human trafficking is not even covered in part
VIII, titled “Offences Against the Person and Reputation”.
I wholeheartedly agree with the member for Kildonan—St. Paul
when it comes to the issues regarding sexual exploitation and human
trafficking. I even supported legislation in this area when it was
being studied by the Standing Committee on Justice and Human
Rights, since I was actually a member of that committee.
However, it is important to not confuse the issue. Yes, people—
especially people who want to abolish prostitution in Canada—
sometimes call on us to prohibit the purchase of such services. There
is a certain logic behind that. I see where the government is headed.
However, it is also important that they stop trying to fool us and stop
pretending that they are fixing every problem on the planet. The
government is following a certain logic by saying that if we prevent
the sale of such services by making it an offence, then there will be
no sexual exploitation or prostitution.
I would like to come back to the Bedford decision, which is
important, because the Conservatives are claiming that Bill C-36
responds to the concerns raised in that case. Bill C-36 is an act to
amend the Criminal Code in response to the Supreme Court of
Canada decision in Attorney General of Canada v. Bedford and to
make consequential amendments to other Acts. The Bedford case
was about three prostitutes, or former prostitutes, who argued that
the three provisions I mentioned earlier should be struck down.
Those provisions were in part VII of the Criminal Code, under
“Disorderly Houses, Gaming and Betting”, which criminalizes
various prostitution-related activities.
Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
Ms. Françoise Boivin: Mr. Speaker, I respected my colleague and
listened when she was speaking. I do not mind if my colleagues wish
to have their conversations elsewhere, but we are under a gag order,
so we have very little time to say our piece.
[English]
The Deputy Speaker: Order, please. Could I ask all members, if
carrying on conversations, to move outside the chamber.
The hon. member for Gatineau.
[Translation]
Ms. Françoise Boivin: Mr. Speaker, the three prostitutes, or
former prostitutes, were seeking a ruling declaring that three
Criminal Code provisions—provisions that criminalize various
prostitution-related activities—infringe on the rights guaranteed
under section 7 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
Section 210 of the Criminal Code makes it an offence to keep a
common bawdy-house or being found in one. Section 212(1)(j)
makes it an offence to live wholly or in part on the avails of
prostitution of another person. Finally, section 213(1)(c) makes it an
offence to communicate in public for the purpose of engaging in
prostitution.
The three people involved argued that these restrictions on
prostitution put the safety and lives of prostitutes at risk by
preventing them from implementing certain safety measures that
could protect them from violence, including hiring security guards or
screening potential clients.
They also alleged that section 213 (1)(c) infringes on the freedom
of expression guaranteed under section 2(b) of the Charter of Rights
and Freedoms, and that none of the provisions are saved under
section 1. They won. The Supreme Court ruled in their favour.
Do not think that the Canadian government sat back and did
nothing. It was quite the case and it took more than a year to hear it,
present it, prove it, and so on and so forth. There was social evidence
to consider.
The Supreme Court focused specifically on the subjects in
question. At the end of the day, it found that the act of driving this
activity underground put the lives of these people at risk. All those
who support Bill C-36 call these people victims. In this context, the
risk could not be justified by the clauses in question. The Supreme
Court therefore decided to strike them down.
The Supreme Court found that this compromised the right
guaranteed under section 7 of the charter. The court ruled that the
restrictions increased all the risks to which the claimants expose
themselves when they engage in prostitution, an activity that in and
of itself is legal.
My heart ached when I heard the stories shared by some victims of
human trafficking, which is covered by section 279 and subsequent
sections in the Criminal Code. Police officers came to testify in
committee and I asked them questions. Absolutely nothing prevented
them from conducting the necessary investigations, finding the
traffickers, arresting them and prosecuting them to the full extent of
the Criminal Code. If we need longer sentences for human
trafficking, then that is something to work on. In fact, that is being
done with some of the bills introduced by the member opposite,
which I fully support. That is the real problem.
Street prostitution, which is what we are discussing, perhaps
started with human trafficking. We need to give resources to police
officers. Instead, the government is choosing to lecture everyone. It
is making cuts to police forces and border services, and it is asking
the various police forces to reduce their budget, but this comes at a
high cost to our country. The government is not making any sense.
All of the police officers told me that the tools were there. The
only tool they thought they could use was the power to give an
exemption. That is what they do. We cannot be blind or stupid here.
They stopped short of saying what constitutes prostitution as a
whole. Even I do not know what it means. Are we talking about the
sale of sexual services? Is it the act itself? Does it include escort
agencies? Strip clubs? I have so many questions that they did not
want to answer.
8212
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Government Orders
I heard the member opposite say that she took note of what we
were saying. I am taking note of what the government is or is not
doing. I am taking note of the fact that statistics were hidden from us
for months. The government did not want to tell us what Canadians
thought about this issue, even though Canadians themselves paid for
the survey. I am taking note of the fact that, according to the
minister, a consultation was conducted on the Internet. However, we
do not know how many people responded. A hundred? Two
hundred? I am also taking note of the fact that most of the people the
minister had more personal consultations with felt the same way he
did.
● (1040)
That is understandable; however, we are talking about the
Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada and an
unequivocal decision by the Supreme Court that clearly explains
the situation and what it entails. Parliament was not given carte
blanche and told that it had a year to introduce Bill C-36 or the court
would do it for us.
That is not at all what the Supreme Court said. The court stated
that the government had a year to introduce a bill, if it so wished, but
that the bill must comply with the decision that was handed down. In
other words, if the life of even one person were endangered, that
would be enough to conclude that the proposed provisions are
illegal.
Numerous experts told us that there was a problem. The minister
himself came to tell us that he expected his bill would be brought
before the Supreme Court. I have lost count of the number of times I
asked the minister if it would not make more sense to refer Bill C-36
to the Supreme Court. Given what even the hon. member for
Kildonan—St. Paul said, we cannot risk making a mistake and then
realizing, a few years down the road, that we have created a
quagmire.
The Manitoba minister came to tell us that he would not enforce
the legislation this way. We create laws, but it is the provinces and
territories and the police that then enforce them. How will they do
that?
A whole variety of people came to talk to us. There were members
of feminist groups and police officers. They came from all walks of
life. Their problems are different, and that is understandable. Time
and again we heard about the Nordic model, and I thought it would
be discussed here. I think that most of the groups I spoke to before
Bill C-36 was introduced expected that the Nordic model would be
proposed. Many think that it is the solution to the issue of
prostitution and that it has an impact on human trafficking.
quarters of these people, the vast majority, do not enter it willingly
and do not really consent to it. The two main problems are poverty
and drug addiction.
It is inconceivable that a person starving on the streets is going to
jump for joy and say she is getting out of prostitution because of Bill
C-36. She is not going to do that. She will not even know that the bill
exists. Only the Conservatives believe that a criminal commits a
crime with the Criminal Code close at hand. For goodness' sake, that
is not what happens.
I am saying that the Conservatives do not have the courage of
their convictions. I would like to trust them, but they voted against
an amendment that would have made all prostitution illegal and a
criminal offence. I told my colleague from Ahuntsic that she was
wasting her time because they really do not believe in it.
The Conservatives want to pass moral judgment on consenting
people. Even my colleague opposite said that a small percentage of
people are in the profession voluntarily. She and I may have
difficulty understanding this—in fact we may not understand it at all
—but if there is consent, it is none of our business.
However, we have put these people at risk. There could be court
challenges to Bill C-36. We proposed more than a dozen serious
amendments to improve this bill. We constantly heard the word
“victim”.
● (1045)
The Conservatives are smart; I will give them that. They realized
that they cannot criminalize victims, since one cannot be both a
criminal and a victim at the same time.
I therefore introduced an amendment that I thought made sense,
based on the premise that all these individuals are victims, and that
was to have all their criminal records erased. A victim should not
have a criminal record for something she did while she was being
victimized.
However, when the time came to walk the walk, the Conservatives
voted against it. When you believe in what you are doing and you
really want to eliminate prostitution, you do not vote against an
amendment that calls on the minister, who is proposing a tiny
investment of $20 million over five years, to report back to the
House.
I want to believe that. That is what everyone was telling us. It was
unanimous. However, we cannot forget that the government is
aiming to completely eradicate prostitution one day. While I hope
that does happen, I also wish the government good luck. If that is
what the government wants to do, I would suggest that it put its
money where its mouth is.
The Manitoba justice minister told us in committee that that was
peanuts for his province. It is not enough to get people out of poverty
and give them any hope of getting out of that despicable human
trafficking situation.
In other words, the government is going to have to put some
money toward this because it has been proven, even by those who
support Bill C-36, that there are two main reasons why people enter
this profession. I agree with my colleague that more than three-
Nor is it enough to solve the problems of substance abuse. The
vast majority of people working in this industry, including aboriginal
women, are not there because they want to be. Those issues need to
be resolved.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8213
Government Orders
For anyone who believed in the Nordic model, an expert from
Sweden appeared before the committee and said that that model
could not be implemented without a huge financial investment.
Opinions varied widely on that. This is not the easiest file I have ever
had to deal with as the justice critic for the official opposition.
Everyone, however, whether they were for or against Bill C-36, said
that $20 million was a ridiculously low amount.
This makes me wonder whether the government truly believes in
what it is doing. The Conservatives' speeches on Bill C-36, which is
supposed to be the response to Bedford, are not the legal speeches
they should be. Our Conservative colleagues are not talking about
the fact that under Bedford, the Criminal Code sections in question
will be declared completely unconstitutional in December.
These are awful, heartbreaking stories of human trafficking. It is a
scourge around the world. My colleague across the way is going on a
crusade, but that is okay. I will open the doors to Gatineau for her. I
talked to the people of Gatineau about this. When people find out
that Criminal Code provisions on sexual exploitation, including
section 279 of the Criminal Code, exist without Bill C-36, that
changes things.
We do not want to put the lives of sex trade workers at risk.
Everyone sees eye to eye on that, and I doubt the Conservatives are
any different. If someone says it is not serious, then I have a problem
with that. We have to be realistic and logical and strengthen the laws,
as my colleague across the way has done with a number of bills that
address human trafficking. That is what we have to focus on.
We must also give our police officers the tools they need. Do we
want them to arrest the woman on Murray Street in Ottawa? Do we
want them to investigate the cases my colleague mentioned without
naming the riding? I hope it is not my riding. It was as though she
was telling us in a roundabout way to be careful what we say.
● (1050)
I am speaking off the cuff, like it or not, but I am weighing my
words carefully. This comes from the heart, with great feeling. I
worked for months on this file while trying to remain as neutral as
possible. There were good arguments on both sides. Feminist groups
were saying that prostitution should not be criminalized under any
circumstances because it is a form of exploitation. Other groups,
such as Maggie's, Stella, the Pivot Legal Society and POWER, told
me that many women are in positions of control in this industry and
that this was a choice they had made. They were asking who we
were to impose something else on them.
From my perspective, the role of the police is to ensure that this
consent is real. They need to have the means to do that, and they do
under the Criminal Code. Beyond that, this is none of our business.
We certainly should not change the fact that people can, according to
what they say, voluntarily choose to work in this trade and do so in
safety. Now, under Bill C-36, there will be no exceptions. The
purchase of sexual services will always be a criminal offence.
There are serious problems associated with this issue. The
government is using sound bites and shocking stories about human
trafficking, which are true, by the way, to try to tell us that Bill C-36
addresses that. However, this bill does not respond to the ruling in
Bedford, and that is unfortunate.
● (1055)
[English]
Mr. Bob Dechert (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Justice, CPC): Mr. Speaker, my honourable friend talked about the
courage of convictions of parties with respect to the issue of
prostitution and referred to the Supreme Court decision in the
Bedford case. She will know that the Chief Justice said that it will be
for Parliament, should it choose to do so, to devise a new approach
reflecting different elements of the existing regime.
Our government is taking a courageous stand. For the first time in
Canadian history, we are saying that prostitution victimizes people. It
victimizes vulnerable women and girls and young men, it drives the
demand for human trafficking, and for the first time, we are making
the purchase of the sexual services of another person illegal. That is a
courageous stand.
When that hon. member last stood in this House to speak to Bill
C-36, I asked her very specifically what the NDP would do if the
NDP were in our shoes and had the opportunity to bring in a bill in
response to the Bedford decision. How would it address the Chief
Justice's request that Parliament do something that is within its
purview? How would New Democrats be courageous in helping to
reduce the scourge of prostitution that victimizes people in our
country?
Ms. Françoise Boivin: Two things, Mr. Speaker, because there
are two elements in the question from my esteemed colleague.
The first one is about the Supreme Court of Canada.
[Translation]
I would like to clarify something, because the Conservatives
always fail to mention it. When the Conservatives talk about how the
Supreme Court found that “[c]oncluding that each of the challenged
provisions violates the Charter does not mean that Parliament is
precluded from imposing limits on where and how prostitution may
be conducted”, they always fail to mention that this is true “as long
as it does so in a way that does not infringe the constitutional rights
of prostitutes”. That is clear.
The Conservatives have asked me twice what the NDP would do
in these circumstances. We will spell it out when we form the
government. Hopefully that will happen soon because we are tired of
listening to this type of rhetoric. What I can say is that we will not
hide important statistics on such a major issue as prostitution. We
will not hold bogus consultations and we will not hide crucial
information about such an important issue. When a government
makes decisions like that, claiming they are in people's best interests,
it loses all credibility. When you do something in people's best
interests, you do not have to hide things from them.
8214
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Statements by Members
Ms. Ève Péclet (La Pointe-de-l'Île, NDP): Mr. Speaker, I would
like to give my colleague the opportunity to say more about the
mixed messages the minister is sending. He introduced a bill in the
House of Commons and said that his legal experts studied the bill
and everything was fine. However, a number of experts appeared
before the committee and said that there were constitutional issues
and that the bill failed to comply with the Supreme Court ruling. The
minister is saying, in essence, that the bill may not comply with the
ruling and may be unconstitutional.
new year's galas, as well as the Tastes of the Hill multicultural
festival and Heritage Village festival allow everyone to share and
experience Richmond Hill's rich culture and history.
My colleague spoke about that. Was the bill constitutional or not,
and why was the minister unable to give a clear answer?
WORLD TEACHERS' DAY
Mrs. Anne-Marie Day (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles,
NDP): Mr. Speaker, we will never forget the excellent teachers we
had, from kindergarten through university.
The Deputy Speaker: The hon. member for Gatineau has one
minute to answer the question.
Ms. Françoise Boivin: Mr. Speaker, as a lawyer who will be
celebrating 30 years of legal practice in November, I would venture
that we cannot say that it is completely unconstitutional or
completely constitutional.
The minister says that he is convinced that this will end up in the
Supreme Court of Canada. I got a minor amendment passed. I do not
really boast about it because I find that ridiculous. Once again, the
Conservatives do not want to be clear and transparent.
We asked the minister to report on prostitution and human
trafficking two years after the passage of the bill. They amended my
amendment to increase the time period to five years. With Bill C-13,
they increased it to seven years. We all know that this will be before
the courts well before that.
I would like to reiterate that this is a health and safety issue. We
must not put the lives of people who work in a very dangerous
environment at risk. This is very serious.
● (1100)
The Deputy Speaker: When we resume debate, the member will
have approximately five minutes for questions and comments.
STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS
[English]
RICHMOND HILL
Mr. Costas Menegakis (Richmond Hill, CPC): Mr. Speaker, the
Conference Board of Canada has named Richmond Hill as one of
Canada's most desirable places in which to live.
I am proud of the residents who have chosen Richmond Hill as
their home, and I congratulate Mayor Dave Barrow and council for a
job well done.
***
[Translation]
I come from a family of five teachers, so it is an honour for me to
talk about World Teachers' Day. We all know that teachers play a
very important role in our education system, helping our children
become educated, responsible adults. Good educators listen to our
children, respect them and help them make life and career choices so
that they can become members of society. They are the pillars of our
education system.
I want to thank the teachers in my riding of Charlesbourg—HauteSaint-Charles, at all schools and grade levels, for their excellent
work. I also want to take this opportunity to mention the Chabot
school in Charlesbourg, which is educating students about politics
and democracy. This public school offers an international education
program, and students learn about the workings of our political
institutions. Without our hard-working teachers, these kinds of
initiatives would never be possible.
Thank you to all teachers across the country.
***
[English]
HONG KONG
Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of Canadians, can trace
their roots back to Hong Kong, my family included, and more
Canadians live in Hong Kong than live in Prince Edward island,
some 300,000 citizens.
The ties that bind Canada and Hong Kong are broad and deep, and
we have a duty to those Canadian citizens in Hong Kong and an
interest in the future of that great city.
Leadership and innovation, a strong local economy, a highly
educated workforce and a high quality of life all contributed to
Richmond Hill being ranked one of the top six communities chosen
by Canada's mobile populations.
In 1997, Canada endorsed the one country, two systems formula
because it protected Hong Kong's independent judiciary, affirmed
the rule of law, secured personal liberties and provided a path to
universal suffrage.
As the member of Parliament for Richmond Hill, I can say first
hand that there is no friendlier or more welcoming community that is
also the third most diverse in Canada.
Protests in Hong Kong recently have demonstrated that many
have concerns about the continuing independence of the judiciary,
freedom of the press and the upcoming 2017 elections.
The secret to its success is respecting, embracing and celebrating
our history, heritage and diversity. Well-attended events, such as the
Royal Canadian Legion's annual Remembrance Day parade, the
Santa Claus parade, the mayor's annual Nowruz, Eid and Chinese
I urge all parties to this dispute to resolve their differences
peacefully. I also urge all parties to uphold the letter and spirit of an
independent judiciary, rule of law, personal liberties and democratic
elections.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8215
Statements by Members
JAMES MCCONNELL MEMORIAL LIBRARY
Hon. Mark Eyking (Sydney—Victoria, Lib.): Mr. Speaker, I
recently had the opportunity to tour the largest library in my riding,
which was built back in 1960.
The James McConnell Memorial Library is the feeder library to 11
other outlets and 2 book mobiles. Over 500 people visit the Sydney
library every day. My first visit to a library was when the
bookmobile came to our community of Millville.
It is a great service for all ages in rural areas. Some people say that
libraries are passé, but the need for these facilities has only grown
over the years. The service we receive from our libraries is
invaluable. Many people use the library as a place to study, research
assignments and meet for group projects. Whether it is preschool
children or those needing public access to computers, libraries are
important.
I would like to recognize the Jewish people of my riding of
Parkdale—High Park and all Jewish Canadians celebrating Yom
Kippur beginning at sundown today.
Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the Jewish year, focuses on
atonement and repentance. It is also a time for families to come
together, to reconnect and reflect on the past year and the year to
come. It is a time for prayer, for reflection and for family.
As Jewish families observe this solemn holiday, let us all commit
to working together to build a better future.
Tzom Kal.
***
PROPERTY RIGHTS
Our library in Sydney is indeed ready for a new chapter; the other
libraries in Cape Breton cannot survive without it. The community
and other levels of government are stepping up to the plate and I
encourage the federal government to also come forward.
Mr. Jim Hillyer (Lethbridge, CPC): Mr. Speaker, property
rights should be included in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
Unfortunately any attempts to amend the Constitution through the
general amending formula have failed.
I would like to remind all members of the House to visit their local
libraries and see the great things that happen there.
However, the fight for property rights is still a fight worth
fighting. More important, it is still a fight worth winning.
***
● (1105)
COMMUNITY SERVICE
Mr. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, I would like to recognize two individuals from northeastern
British Columbia in my riding, Ernie and Mary.
Mary came from a small town, Dawson Creek, in northeastern B.
C. She was born and raised in Dawson Creek, came off a farm and
continued to work in the area. She worked with seniors all her life,
and recently retired.
Ernie came from northern Manitoba. He came to northeastern
British Columbia and worked as a carpenter all his life. He still
works as a carpenter to this day, and he is 80 years old.
I would also like to recognize their service to our community.
Both have served in many capacities in our local church for the last
50 years. They still serve in various capacities with Gideons,
distributing bibles. Mary serves in the local museum, volunteering
her time on a weekly basis to serve our constituents.
These people, Ernie and Mary, happen to be my mom and dad.
They are with us today. I would like to recognize my mom and dad
for their contributions to Canada.
I have taken on the giant of constitutionally protecting property
rights by means of the smooth stone of section 43, which requires
only the approval of a single province if the amendment applies only
to that province.
That is why on June 11, I introduced Motion No. 520 to
Parliament, a resolution that would add property rights to the Charter
of Rights and Freedoms in Alberta.
I am working closely with Alberta MLAs on this Alberta-led
initiative. I have consulted with property rights and constitutional
experts who agree that this approach is constitutionally valid and
would be a major victory for the cause of property rights in Alberta
and lead the way for the rest of Canada.
***
EKSPERIMENTA
Mr. Rick Dykstra (St. Catharines, CPC): Mr. Speaker, Canada
will be taking part in the 2014 edition of Eksperimenta, which is
gearing up to host 11 countries from around the world and which
will be showcasing artworks created by youth between the ages of 16
and 23.
***
The Canadian exhibition in Eksperimenta 2014 will consist of
approximately 50 works of art representing 10 high schools from
across Canada, from British Columbia to Nova Scotia. These
artworks range in media, including digital photography, video
animation, mixed media and a virtual reality environment.
YOM KIPPUR
Ms. Peggy Nash (Parkdale—High Park, NDP): Mr. Speaker,
tonight members of the Jewish faith in Canada and around the world
will gather to observe Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement.
Manitoba teacher Ann Donald and Brock University's Dr. Peter
Vietgen will be travelling to Estonia during the week of October 20
to 25 to install the Canadian exhibition of youth art and deliver
presentations about teaching contemporary art in high schools.
The Deputy Speaker: It is my responsibility to point out that we
are not supposed to do that, but under the circumstances, it is well
deserved.
8216
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Statements by Members
I would like to commend Dr. Vietgen for his work and
congratulate St. Catharine's students Briun Pol, Tim Williamson
and Jasmine Singleton who have been selected to exhibit their art to
the word in Estonia.
***
EID AL-ADHA
Ms. Chris Charlton (Hamilton Mountain, NDP): Mr. Speaker,
starting tomorrow, over one billion Muslims worldwide will begin to
celebrate Eid al-Adha. This special holiday is a reminder to Muslims
of Abraham's sacrifice of his son as an act of devotion to God. It is
about giving of what is best of oneself, giving that which is most
precious of oneself, to God. It is a celebration of generosity and
charity.
Eid al-Adha also marks the end of the annual holy pilgrimage to
Mecca. We welcome back all those who are returning from the Hajj
and thank them for their deep commitment to the values of unity and
peace.
These values of peace, charity, family and friendship are dear to
Muslims and non-Muslims alike, and they reinforce our common
bonds of humanity. They speak to our shared belief in fundamental
social justice.
As Muslims come together in the days ahead to pray, feast and
give back to their communities, I want to wish them a joyful
celebration among family and friends.
On behalf of the entire NDP caucus, I want to thank Canada's
Muslim community for its contribution and commitment toward
creating a stronger fabric of respect and understanding in our
country. In the spirit of peace and friendship, Eid Mubarak.
***
● (1110)
YOM KIPPUR
Mr. Randy Hoback (Prince Albert, CPC): Mr. Speaker, this
evening at sunset, the Jewish community across Canada and around
the world will gather together to observe Yom Kippur, the Jewish
Day of Atonement. Yom Kippur is the most sacred and solemn day
in the Jewish calendar.
Those observing seek to atone for their wrongdoings of the past
year through fasting, prayer and repentance, they seek forgiveness
for the sins they have committed toward their fellow man and against
God.
On this sacred day, the Jewish community comes together to
reflect on the year that has passed and to look ahead with hope and
optimism at the year to come, seeking this as an opportunity to start
with a clean slate.
On behalf of the Prime Minister and the Canadian government, I
would like to extend my sincere wishes to all those in Canada and
around the world observing this most holy day to have an easy and
meaningful fast, and may they be inscribed in the book of life.
G'mar Chatimah Tova.
[Translation]
CANADA POST
Ms. Ève Péclet (La Pointe-de-l'Île, NDP): Mr. Speaker, on
September 21, I held a public meeting in my riding of La Pointe-del'Île about the cuts to Canada Post.
Over 100 people attended the meeting and several thousand have
signed the petition to date. It is therefore imperative that the
government listen to reason and cancel the cuts to home mail
delivery. We are talking about a service that is vital to seniors, people
with reduced mobility and community organizations in my riding. It
is a service that helps make their daily lives a little bit easier. We are
also talking about thousands of quality jobs that contribute to our
economy.
Mail delivery is not a privilege. It is a service that our government
has an obligation to provide. We will be the only G7 country that no
longer provides home mail delivery. Once again, the Conservatives
are showing their contempt for the most vulnerable members of our
society. They do not deserve to be in power. I sincerely hope that, in
2015, Canadians will show the Conservatives how dissatisfied they
are.
***
[English]
NATIONAL CYBER SECURITY AWARENESS MONTH
Mr. Royal Galipeau (Ottawa—Orléans, CPC): Mr. Speaker,
during National Cyber Security Awareness Month, held every
October in Canada and in the United States, Canadians are reminded
how to protect themselves against cyber threats.
[Translation]
Central to that effort is the Get Cyber Safe initiative, a national
cybersecurity awareness campaign and a key component of Canada's
cybersecurity strategy.
[English]
Almost half of all Canadian adults have been a victim of
cybercrime and nearly one in five Canadian youth do not know how
to use the privacy settings on their social media accounts.
[Translation]
We all have a role to play in cybersecurity in Canada. That is
exactly what we are doing in Orléans with VENUS Cybersecurity.
[English]
Therefore, it is with pleasure and urgency that I encourage
everyone to visit “getcybersafe.ca” to ensure that they are as safe in
the virtual world as they are in their communities.
***
EID AL-ADHA
Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.): Mr.
Speaker, I rise today to wish Eid Mubarak to all Muslims across
Canada and throughout the world celebrating the end of Eid al-Adha.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8217
Oral Questions
I have the honour of hosting this year's Eid dinner on Parliament
Hill with the Association of Progressive Muslims, organized by the
tireless efforts of Mobeen Khaja.
As one of the oldest Islamic celebrations, Eid al-Adha
commemorates not only the end of the Hajj, but it also
commemorates the great trials of faith and triumph in the life of
the prophet Abraham. Eid al-Adha, the Festival of Sacrifice, is also a
time of forgiveness and compassion when Muslims in Canada and
around the world take time to consider the most disadvantaged
members of society, to donate to the poor and share a meal with less
advantaged members.
Eid al-Adha is also an occasion for Canadians of different
backgrounds to see first hand the rich cultural and religious mosaic
of Canada, which is one of its defining features.
On this blessed occasion, I wish each member peace, happiness,
prosperity and a happy Eid.
***
INTERNATIONAL TRADE
Mr. LaVar Payne (Medicine Hat, CPC): Mr. Speaker, no
government in Canada's history has been more committed to the
creation of jobs and prosperity for Canadian businesses, workers and
their families.
If the Liberals believe that hope and hard work mean giving the
Conservatives a blank cheque and making off-colour jokes about a
potential war, they are sadly mistaken.
The NDP will continue to demand accountability. We will provide
a real alternative in 2015, and we will put an end to the status quo.
***
THE ECONOMY
Mr. Jacques Gourde (Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière,
CPC): Mr. Speaker, Canadians understand the importance of living
within their means, and they expect the government to do the same
thing. That is why we are working so hard to spend taxpayers'
money responsibly and to balance the budget in 2015.
Yesterday the Prime Minister announced that our approach is
working. In fact, is it working so well that the deficit for the most
recent fiscal year was just a little over $5 billion, which is much
lower than the forecasted amount. This is good news for Canadians
and for the economy. Balanced budgets allow us to cut taxes and still
guarantee long-term sustainable government services for Canadians.
Last month was the most successful month for trade and
investment in Canadian history. We saw the release of the complete
text of the Canada-EU trade agreement and the signing of the
Canada-Korea free trade agreement.
While the NDP and the Liberals continue to call for reckless
spending, the Conservative government remains committed to
ensuring that every taxpayer dollar is spent effectively. Unlike the
leader of the Liberal Party, we know that budgets do not balance
themselves.
However, the Minister of International Trade is not done yet. In
just a few weeks, the minister will be leading a trade and investment
mission to India, where he will continue to advance Canada's
economic interests.
ORAL QUESTIONS
The Liberal record of neglecting trade, however, is just shameful.
In 13 long years, it signed agreements with a measly three countries.
That is shameful.
***
● (1115)
[Translation]
CONSERVATIVE AND LIBERAL PARTIES OF CANADA
Ms. Françoise Boivin (Gatineau, NDP): Mr. Speaker, seeing
what the Conservatives are doing to the environment, the economy,
employment insurance, justice and foreign policy only reinforces our
belief that we need to replace this tired old government in 2015 and
change course.
However, we cannot just switch lanes, we need to make a U-turn.
When we take a closer look at the issues championed by the
Conservatives, it is clear that there is no real difference between the
Conservatives and the Liberals: for the Keystone pipeline, the
Conservatives got Liberal support; for the 30-day mission in Iraq, the
Conservatives got Liberal support; for invading Canadians' privacy
with Bill C-13, the Conservatives got Liberal support; and for
destroying the belugas' breeding grounds at Cacouna, the Conservatives got Liberal support.
[English]
HEALTH
Ms. Libby Davies (Vancouver East, NDP): Mr. Speaker, Canada
has the most promising vaccine for Ebola in the world, but despite
government promises two months ago, it is not getting to scientists
and patients.
Yesterday the parliamentary secretary said “consent needs to be
provided”, but whose consent did she mean? We know that the
World Health Organization is not the problem, so whose consent is
she referring to? Is it the pharmaceutical company the Conservatives
gave the licensing rights to?
Ms. Eve Adams (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Health, CPC): Mr. Speaker, as I have been very clear in the
chamber and on a number of panels with this critic, the vaccines
have been donated to the World Health Organization. Canada owns
these vaccines. We have 1,500 doses. We have donated up to 1,000
to the World Health Organization. It is up to the World Health
Organization to deploy these vaccines as efficiently, ethically, and
quickly as possible.
8218
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Oral Questions
Ms. Libby Davies (Vancouver East, NDP): Mr. Speaker, the
parliamentary secretary and the government have not been clear at
all. They keep passing the buck to the WHO, which is not the
problem. The American pharmaceutical company NewLink Genetics
said it wants to “be in control” of clinical trials. Because of the deal
the Conservatives signed with the company in 2010, now the
lawyers are holding it up.
The situation is very dire, and Canada's vaccine could help now.
Will the government tell NewLink Genetics to allow this vaccine to
move, or will it cancel the deal today so that we can get this
lifesaving vaccine to where it is needed?
Ms. Eve Adams (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Health, CPC): Mr. Speaker, the opposition is confusing issues. Let
me very clear about this. Canada owns the doses. We own the
intellectual property rights to these doses. We have fully and
completely donated up to 1,000 of these doses to the World Health
Organization. It is up to it to manage the logistics and to dispense
them as quickly and as efficiently as possible.
● (1120)
[Translation]
Ms. Nycole Turmel (Hull—Aylmer, NDP): Mr. Speaker, Africa
has been hard hit by the Ebola crisis. In Liberia alone, 2,000 people
have died from the virus. The President of Liberia is urging Canada
and the international community to do more to stop this terrible
disease. She is making a plea for skilled people, screening centres
and trainers for health care workers. In short, the country is in need
of everything, and fast.
When will the minister provide assistance to truly help in this
crisis?
[English]
Ms. Eve Adams (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Health, CPC): Mr. Speaker, Canada has been at the forefront of
responding to the Ebola crisis. We have been there since day one. We
have offered $35 million to leading international humanitarian
groups such as the Red Cross, the World Health Organization, and
Médecins Sans Frontières. We are dispensing equipment, we are
dispensing much-needed expertise, and we have the scientific lab on
the ground where we have scientists rotating in and out.
Canada has always shown extreme compassion, and we are ready
to help those who are affected.
***
[Translation]
NATIONAL DEFENCE
Ms. Nycole Turmel (Hull—Aylmer, NDP): Mr. Speaker, the
Conservatives' 30-day mission in Iraq, supported by the Liberals,
ends tomorrow. Now the Conservatives want to increase Canada's
military involvement, but we still have not received an account of the
first 30 days, and many questions remain unanswered. Why do the
Conservatives want to send Canada into a new war in Iraq when they
cannot even account for what has happened in the past 30 days?
[English]
Hon. Rob Nicholson (Minister of National Defence, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, we have been forthright about what has happened in these
last 30 days. We have said that we have been on the ground to
provide strategic and tactical advice, but the NDP does not get it.
The Leader of the Opposition yesterday mumbled something
about nobody being there until September 26, which was completely
wrong. Right from the start, the Canadian military has been on the
ground and assisting in giving advice. What is the problem with the
NDP?
[Translation]
Ms. Nycole Turmel (Hull—Aylmer, NDP): Mr. Speaker, while
only 26 of the 69 soldiers that we promised were needed,
humanitarian aid is not forthcoming. In other words, what we are
offering is not needed and what is needed is not being offered. While
the Conservatives are getting ready to send Canada into the third war
in Iraq in 20 years, what account have they given of the first 30 days
of the mission and how does that justify significantly increasing our
military involvement?
[English]
Hon. Rob Nicholson (Minister of National Defence, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, ISIL poses a terrible threat to regional security and to the
security of this country. The NDP should not need a briefing to know
what a terrible organization this has been and the horrors that it has
perpetrated on the people there. We have been forthright. We have
told New Democrats this and we have indicated that we are putting
people on the ground to provide advice to the Iraqis.
I know they do not get it, but again I would urge her to listen to
what the Prime Minister has to say after question period today.
[Translation]
Ms. Joyce Murray (Vancouver Quadra, Lib.): Mr. Speaker,
today the Prime Minister will be moving his motion on a combat
mission in Iraq. According to news reports, the Prime Minister wants
to limit debate on his combat mission in Iraq to five hours.
Does the Prime Minister really think that five hours is enough
time to debate sending our Canadian Forces to war?
[English]
Hon. Rob Nicholson (Minister of National Defence, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, I understand that these issues are being discussed among
House leaders, but again I point out to the hon. member that under
the Liberals there was no discussion on these things—no debate, no
votes, no nothing. We have been very clear that any matter of this
nature will be put to a vote in Parliament.
Again, I am looking forward to the Prime Minister's comments.
Ms. Joyce Murray (Vancouver Quadra, Lib.): Mr. Speaker, the
minister seems to have forgotten that we did not go into Iraq, thanks
to a Liberal prime minister.
The Prime Minister will put forward a motion on a combat
mission in Iraq today. Media reports indicate that the Prime Minister
wants to limit debate on his combat mission to a mere five hours on
Monday.
Does the Prime Minister really believe that five hours is sufficient
time to debate sending the Canadian Armed Forces to war?
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8219
Oral Questions
Hon. Rob Nicholson (Minister of National Defence, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, I appreciate the changes this government has brought in so
that any type of military mission will be subject to a discussion and a
vote in Parliament. Again, I never agreed with the approach of the
Liberals when we went into Afghanistan that there would be no
discussion, no votes, no nothing.
We will never go back to the way things were with the Liberals.
This is a step in the right direction.
● (1125)
Ms. Joyce Murray (Vancouver Quadra, Lib.): Mr. Speaker,
there are a range of issues that need to be debated.
Will the government do more on humanitarian aid and protection?
Are CF-18s really the most appropriate military contribution that
Canada can make? What alternatives could be considered, including
signals intelligence, reconnaissance, airlift capacity, medical support,
training? Canadians deserve to have their voices heard and respected
in such a very important set of questions.
Will the Prime Minister listen to the alternatives, or will the debate
on Monday simply be window dressing?
Hon. Rob Nicholson (Minister of National Defence, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, I think most people are just trying to figure out where the
Liberal Party stands on all these issues. I said yesterday that I think
they had about three positions. One of my colleagues said that he
thinks it is four. I do not want to get into that debate.
That said, we are doing those functions, as we always do. We are
reaching out with humanitarian aid.
Again I would encourage the member to listen very carefully to
what the Prime Minister has to say today.
***
[Translation]
FOREIGN AFFAIRS
Ms. Élaine Michaud (Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, NDP): Mr.
Speaker, the Conservatives are asking Canadians to just trust them
on a combat mission in Iraq, except that in return they are incapable
of being transparent and honest about their plan. They are rushing
things and dragging us into a mission that could go on indefinitely. It
seems that they are forgetting the real victims: the people who have
suffered the atrocities committed by the Islamic State armed group.
What about the humanitarian aid so desperately needed by the
civilians affected by this violence?
[English]
Hon. Rob Nicholson (Minister of National Defence, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, assisting the people who are the victims of ISIL is exactly
what this government has been doing. We have been consistent in
that. This is what our 30-day operation was a part of. Again, it is
coming to a conclusion, and we were very helpful in providing that
advice because we want to assist the people of that area. It is the
right thing to do.
I encourage the member to listen to the Prime Minister.
Mr. Paul Dewar (Ottawa Centre, NDP): Mr. Speaker, Canada's
involvement in Iraq is not combat or nothing. We can take steps to
save lives right now. The minister knows this because he saw,
alongside me, the desperate need for humanitarian assistance for
displaced people in Iraq. We met children in refugee camps in Erbil
who are looking urgently for Canada's help to survive this coming
winter. They are still waiting.
The question is, why has the government failed to step up with
new aid so that we can provide support for these kids, these families,
right now?
Hon. Christian Paradis (Minister of International Development and Minister for La Francophonie, CPC): Mr. Speaker,
nothing is further from the truth.
Canada is the seventh-largest donor assisting people in need
during this crisis. Our contribution will allow for those most
desperately in need to receive food, hygiene kits, cooking materials,
blankets, tents, medical supplies, and other essential supplies, as well
as making emergency repairs to essential water and sanitation
facilities. This is being implemented right now.
We will continue to work closely with our allies to make sure that
we can continue to support the needs of Iraqi civilians, particularly
religious minorities.
Mr. Paul Dewar (Ottawa Centre, NDP): Mr. Speaker, make no
mistake. No one disagrees about the threat of ISIL and what it poses.
It is the civilians in Iraq and Syria who are suffering the most.
When the minister came to committee a month ago, I asked him
the following questions: Will they support immediate steps to
support the set-up of refugee camps? Will they support the protection
of minorities? Will they support victims of sexual violence and help
for investigating and prosecuting war crimes?
The minister said yes to all four asks. The problem is that nearly a
month later there has been no action on these four asks. Why?
Hon. Christian Paradis (Minister of International Development and Minister for La Francophonie, CPC): Mr. Speaker, this
is not true. The member is not correct in saying that.
Canada is very active on the ground. As I said, we are the seventhlargest donor. We have an approach to ensure we can reach people in
need. There is capacity there, and this why we work with credible
organizations like Red Cross, Save the Children, Mercy Corps, and
Development and Peace, because they help us to reach the people in
need.
This is action. This is exactly what we are doing right now.
***
VETERANS AFFAIRS
Mr. Jack Harris (St. John's East, NDP): Mr. Speaker, this week
the Minister of Veterans Affairs tabled a response to a unanimous
committee report on a review of the veterans charter. The minister's
response is extremely disappointing. His answers were vague. There
is no new money and the government says it needs more time to
study the problem. The committee heard heartbreaking testimony
about the challenges veterans and their families face.
8220
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Oral Questions
Why is the minister dragging his heels instead of urgently
addressing the needs of Canadian veterans?
● (1130)
Mr. Parm Gill (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Veterans Affairs, CPC): Mr. Speaker, our government is taking
action.
First and foremost, I would like to thank that member and all
opposition members for working in a very non-partisan way to come
up with a unanimous report. Let us not forget all sides agree that the
new veterans charter is a great foundation upon which Canadian
veterans can be supported, while the benefits and investments for
veterans are being increased by more than $4.7 billion since 2006.
Our government agrees with the vast majority of the recommendations, both in spirit and intent.
Mr. Jack Harris (St. John's East, NDP): Mr. Speaker, we have
seen study after study identifying ways to improve the veterans
charter, from the parliamentary committee, from the Veterans
Ombudsman and from many veterans organizations. The studies
are done. Now is the time for action to assist veterans and their
families who need help. Our veterans should not have to fight to
receive benefits.
How much longer will Canadian veterans and their families have
to wait for the current government to take real action?
Mr. Parm Gill (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Veterans Affairs, CPC): Mr. Speaker, I would encourage that
member to get his facts in order.
Let me just read a quote from Tim Laidler, who is an Afghanistan
war veteran and executive director of the Veterans Transition
Network. He said, “It is a step in the right direction.... Veterans...
need the changes [the minister] is bringing in”.
[Translation]
Mr. Sylvain Chicoine (Châteauguay—Saint-Constant, NDP):
Mr. Speaker, the government's response to the unanimous report of
the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs is disappointing to say
the least. The minister has postponed the implementation of major
recommendations to help veterans. Yesterday, the Veterans Ombudsman said that he, too, was very concerned about the timeline for
implementing the recommendations.
Will the minister quickly find the money to address the plight of
veterans or would he rather save a few dollars at veterans' expense?
[English]
Mr. Parm Gill (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Veterans Affairs, CPC): Mr. Speaker, our government is taking
action. It has a strong record when it comes to providing benefits and
services for Canada's veterans.
Let me read another quote from Tom Eagles, dominion president
of the Royal Canadian Legion. He said, “we appreciate that these
issues are complex and require considerable time, effort and
financial resources to implement”.
I would encourage the member opposite to stop playing political
games when it comes to Canada's veterans, get on board with the
government and support us if he really cares about them.
[Translation]
HEALTH
Ms. Alexandrine Latendresse (Louis-Saint-Laurent, NDP):
Mr. Speaker, despite what the parliamentary secretary said yesterday,
and despite what we heard earlier today, it is not true that the World
Health Organization is blocking the shipment of vaccines to Africa.
In fact, the WHO said yesterday:
Given the public health need...WHO regards the expedited evaluation of all Ebola
vaccines...as a high priority.
The WHO says that the Canadian vaccine is one of the most
promising. Why is the Conservative government still dragging its
feet?
[English]
Ms. Eve Adams (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Health, CPC): Mr. Speaker, we are particularly proud of this very
promising vaccine. That is why since day one Canada has been at the
forefront of responding to the Ebola crisis. Not only are we
contributing $35 million to assist those on the ground, to assist them
on general humanitarian grounds, to assist them with nutrition and to
provide them with treatment, we are also contributing, of the 1,500
doses that we fully own, up to 1,000 doses to the World Health
Organization.
It is up to the World Health Organization to decide how it thinks it
can best use these doses. Whether it is going to trials or whether it is
directly dispensing them, the World Health Organization is in the
driver's seat when it comes to those doses.
Ms. Chris Charlton (Hamilton Mountain, NDP): Mr. Speaker,
yesterday the President of Liberia urged Canada to do more as the
Ebola outbreak continues to devastate her country. She said there is
an urgent need for highly skilled health workers, testing centres and
training. The WHO cites that the situation in Liberia in particular
continues to deteriorate. Liberia needs strong international support to
bring the outbreak under control.
Will the Canadian government respond to the plea from the
Liberian president?
● (1135)
Ms. Eve Adams (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Health, CPC): Mr. Speaker, there is no question that this is a very
serious international health crisis and Canada has been showing
international leadership. We have contributed $35 million in
equipment, direct food and expertise. We have scientific labs on
the ground and scientists that rotate through. It is very difficult to put
a financial value to that type of humanitarian assistance, and it is
very needed. Canada is one of the top 10 contributors throughout the
entire crisis to the Ebola response in West Africa and we will
continue to show international leadership.
Mr. Pat Martin (Winnipeg Centre, NDP): Mr. Speaker, the
whole country is very proud of our national microbiology lab in
Winnipeg, most recently because of the role that it is playing in the
Ebola outbreak. It is a world-class centre for excellence and
scientific research, due largely in part to the outstanding performance
and directorship of the outgoing national director, Dr. Frank
Plummer. However, that was in March.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8221
Oral Questions
Can the minister tell us why it is taking so long to fill this
important position in this important institution and why the job
posting looks like the government is contemplating hiring a midlevel bureaucrat instead of a top-notch scientist like Dr. Plummer?
Ms. Eve Adams (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Health, CPC): Mr. Speaker, we are very proud of the work that is
being conducted there at the lab. The job has been posted and as
soon as I have an update for the House, members will be hearing
about it.
Hon. Rob Nicholson (Minister of National Defence, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, I do not agree, obviously, with the analysis of the hon.
member. The mission that we are a part of right now is to provide
strategic and tactical advice to the Iraqis at this particular time. This
is in co-operation with our other allies.
***
***
NATIONAL DEFENCE
Hon. Ralph Goodale (Wascana, Lib.): Mr. Speaker, its various
important missions have extracted a large toll from the financial and
human resources of the Canadian Forces. Some senior military
commanders have argued for a pause in the tempo of deployments.
The budget has been cut and procurements have been postponed.
Even ammunition is in short supply. In dollars and in personnel,
what will Canada's maximum exposure be in Iraq over the next five
years? Will there be a new and extra appropriation in this fall's fiscal
update?
Hon. Rob Nicholson (Minister of National Defence, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, first of all, the mission that has just been completed was
included as part of the estimate process. Again, we will use existing
mechanisms to report on all these matters to Parliament.
I would like the Liberals to concentrate on the human cost of
what is taking place in that part of the world. This is a huge tragedy
and Canada will respond.
Hon. Ralph Goodale (Wascana, Lib.): Mr. Speaker, complexities in the Middle East are daunting. We could soon be bombing
people in Libya who we were trying to defend not long ago. Even
some misguided Canadians who have run amok could soon be
among our enemies. In Turkey, which is a NATO ally, there is a
long-running fight with the Kurds, but the Kurds are currently a
major source of local resistance against ISIL.
Has this conundrum been carefully explored with the Turkish
government? Is it clear who is on what side in the combat Canadians
are about to get into in Iraq?
Hon. Rob Nicholson (Minister of National Defence, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, as an analysis of who is onside, the member will find that
all of our main allies are onside and are joining this coalition to resist
what is taking place in that part of the world. Again, even within
Europe, liberal and social democratic parties across Europe are
supportive of taking action against ISIL. It would be nice if the
Liberals could unequivocally come on side with that.
Hon. Ralph Goodale (Wascana, Lib.): Mr. Speaker, there are, of
course, many different ways in which Canada can do its part in
rooting out the evil that is ISIL. How then has the government
weighed all of the alternatives, the costs, benefits and effectiveness,
for example, of strategic airlift or training, signals intelligence,
reconnaissance, medical support, critical infrastructure engineering,
all in addition to massive humanitarian relief and all to do our part
against ISIL?
How has the government calculated that the highest and best use
of limited Canadian resources are air strikes, potentially crowding
out all of the rest?
I would urge the hon. member to keep an open mind and listen
carefully to what the Prime Minister has to say today.
● (1140)
[Translation]
CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION
Mrs. Sadia Groguhé (Saint-Lambert, NDP): Mr. Speaker, the
role of the government is to guarantee fair treatment for everyone
who lives in Canada. However, this Conservative government does
not think that refugees are worthy of being treated humanely. That is
shameful.
The Federal Court ruled that refugees, and in particular children,
were being subjected to cruel and unusual treatment by being denied
access to health care. True to form, the Conservative government is
appealing this decision to try to save some money at refugees'
expense.
Will the government finally act humanely and withdraw its appeal
of that decision?
Hon. Chris Alexander (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, CPC): Mr. Speaker, the hon. member should be ashamed of
suggesting that a single refugee in Canada is not benefiting from
generous health care programs, because that is the truth. We believe
that the Federal Court ruling was flawed, which is why we will
appeal it. We announced our intention to do so, and in the meantime
we will continue to protect refugees and Canadian taxpayers.
Mrs. Sadia Groguhé (Saint-Lambert, NDP): Mr. Speaker,
because of the Conservatives, refugees no longer have access to
health care. That is an inhumane decision that has an impact on the
health of the least fortunate. What will happen to pregnant women,
sick children and seniors who cannot pay for the care they need?
Why does the government not admit its mistake? Why does it not
withdraw its appeal of the decision?
Hon. Chris Alexander (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, CPC): Mr. Speaker, once again, the hon. member is misleading
the House.
There is not a single refugee in Canada who does not benefit from
generous health care programs. Even the Federal Court ruling did not
say that there were no refugees receiving health care. This is about
other categories of asylum seekers.
We will appeal the decision, and we will continue to protect the
interests of refugees and Canadian taxpayers.
8222
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Oral Questions
[English]
Ms. Peggy Nash (Parkdale—High Park, NDP): Mr. Speaker, he
should actually talk to some refugees, like people on this side of the
House do.
It fell to the Federal Court to defend Canadian values, and the
court found the Conservatives' policy with respect to refugees “cruel
and unusual”. Instead of respecting our shared values and instead of
showing compassion for refugees, the government is appealing the
decision.
It is unbelievable. The result of the government's intransigence is
that desperate parents will put off help for their kids until they are
very sick. Pregnant women will go without prenatal care.
Why will the government not show some humanity and drop the
appeal?
Hon. Chris Alexander (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, CPC): Mr. Speaker, the member should know better. Refugees
in this country continue to benefit from very generous health care
programs.
This was a flawed decision. We are appealing it. We are standing
up for refugees. We are standing up for taxpayers.
One way that all members of the House could stand up for
refugees in Iraq and elsewhere is agreeing to do more to face down
the menace of ISIL. Why does the NDP refuse to consider the
revocation of passports and the revocation of citizenship for those
who take up arms against refugees and kill innocent minorities in
cold blood? Why does it exclude all military options to help to
protect—
The Deputy Speaker: Order, please.
The hon. member for Parkdale—High Park.
Ms. Peggy Nash (Parkdale—High Park, NDP): Mr. Speaker,
back to the topic at hand, we already know that the consequence of
their appeal will be more kids being hospitalized for serious
illnesses.
The Federal Court said that the impact of the government's policy
on vulnerable and innocent children “shocks the conscience and
outrages [Canadian] standards of decency”.
Yet, the Conservatives have the gall to stand there and say it is
about saving money. No Canadian parent thinks that saving money
by making children suffer is a good thing.
Will the Conservatives instead do the right thing and withdraw
their appeal?
Hon. Chris Alexander (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, CPC): Mr. Speaker, this is a flawed decision. We are going to
appeal it. I am not going to comment in any detail any further on
matters that are before a court.
However, what I will comment on is that Canada has opened its
doors to 18,500 Iraqi refugees since 2009. They are benefiting from
health care. They are benefiting from Canada's generosity. They
come from areas where people want the international community to
act with humanitarian action, with military action to end the menace
ISIL, which has created one of the biggest displacements of
humanity and humanitarian crises in our lifetime.
Why does the NDP refuse to do anything to help millions of
people in Iraq—
● (1145)
The Deputy Speaker: Order, please.
The hon. member for Sault Ste. Marie.
***
EMPLOYMENT
Mr. Bryan Hayes (Sault Ste. Marie, CPC): Mr. Speaker, like
their comrades in the NDP, the Liberals continue to aimlessly attack
the government's overhaul of the temporary foreign worker program,
which includes tougher penalties for abusers and reduces the use of
the program.
Would the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Employment
and Social Development update this House on why the government
overhauled the program and how this position differs from the
Liberals'?
Mr. Scott Armstrong (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister
of Employment and Social Development, CPC): Mr. Speaker, we
have overhauled the program to ensure that employers have to give
Canadians first crack at all available jobs. We have had a consistent
position on this. That is not the case for the Liberal Party. Yesterday,
the Liberal candidate in Edmonton Centre publicly asked for a
regional relaxation of the rules so they could bring more temporary
foreign workers into Canada. Yet, in the Toronto Star, the Liberal
leader argued that the temporary foreign worker program needs to be
scaled back dramatically. Which way do they want it?
The Liberals are shamelessly saying one thing in western Canada
and the exact opposite in eastern Canada.
Our position is consistent: Canadians must always come first, for
every available job.
***
[Translation]
RAIL TRANSPORTATION
Mrs. Anne-Marie Day (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles,
NDP): Mr. Speaker, since the Lac-Mégantic tragedy, there have been
three other major rail explosions in the United States. That proves
that when it comes to rail safety, we can always do better.
Yesterday, the president of Canadian Pacific said that the LacMégantic accident was one person's fault and that additional
regulations were unnecessary.
Does the Minister of Transport agree with that, or does she intend
to improve safety measures?
[English]
Mr. Jeff Watson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Transport, CPC): Mr. Speaker, Mr. Harrison's comments that the
government somehow overreacted are disappointing. Of course, our
government disagrees with them. We take the health and safety of
Canadians as a top priority.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8223
Oral Questions
That is why we have taken a number of very important measures
to strengthen rail safety since 2006, especially with respect to the
transportation of dangerous goods. We have information sharing
with municipalities, which is a first; tough action on DOT-111
tankers; improving regulations on testing and classification; hiring
more inspectors for the oversight; a $100-million investment over
the last number of years in rail safety; stiff penalities for those who
break the rules, and if they break the rules, we will not hesitate to
enforce them.
Mr. Claude Gravelle (Nickel Belt, NDP): Mr. Speaker, freight
trains roll through my riding of Nickel Belt day and night. Residents
want to know that their safety is put first when it comes to the
shipment of hazardous materials.
The Transportation Safety Board's report condemns the Conservatives' failure to monitor and enforce safety practices of railway
companies.
How will the minister fix these serious gaps and ensure the safety
of northern Ontario residents?
Mr. Jeff Watson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Transport, CPC): Mr. Speaker, what the Transportation Safety
Board in fact concluded is that the rules were not followed.
Immediately following this tragedy, though, our government took
additional actions, decisive actions, to ensure the safety and integrity
of Canada's rail system, and it will implement every recommendation made by the Transportation Safety Board.
● (1150)
[Translation]
HOUSING
Ms. Laurin Liu (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, NDP): Mr. Speaker, he
did not answer the question. Shame.
The fact that the federal government has announced that it will be
pulling out of and no longer investing in social housing means that
low-income households will have less access to this type of housing.
In some cases, rent can go up by as much as $200 to $500.
Much like the NDP, the Association de promotion et d'éducation
en logement de Saint-Eustache is calling for renewed subsidies.
Housing is a right. Why is the government turning its back on those
with inadequate housing?
[English]
Mr. Scott Armstrong (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister
of Employment and Social Development, CPC): Mr. Speaker, in
terms of housing, we have initiated a new program: housing first.
This is an evidenced-based program, which delivers for low-income
Canadians who need housing.
Just think how difficult it must be to try to apply for a job when an
individual has no address that they can fill in on the form.
***
Housing first gives someone a place to live that allows them to
participate in employment and get a job. That is what we are doing.
It is evidenced-based. It is working. The opposition should get
behind it.
SENIORS
***
Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP): Mr. Speaker, more than 260,000 seniors across the country are living below the
poverty line. As more Canadians retire, that number will rise, but the
government seems to content to sit back and watch.
New Democrats are calling for action. We have proposed a
workable and effective national seniors strategy, a plan that calls for
government investment in affordable housing so that all seniors can
age in dignity.
Will the minister support our intelligent plan?
Mr. Scott Armstrong (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister
of Employment and Social Development, CPC): Mr. Speaker, no
government in the history of this country has done more for seniors
in Canada than the Conservative Party of Canada.
We have introduced income splitting. We have doubled the
pension income credit. We have increased the maximum GIS
earnings exemption to $3,500; automatic GIS renewal when the filed
annual income tax was 96% last year. We have increased the age
credit twice. There have been tax savings of $2.2 million. There are
many other things that we have done.
We stand behind the seniors in this country.
INFRASTRUCTURE
Ms. Chrystia Freeland (Toronto Centre, Lib.): Mr. Speaker, an
IMF report this week confirms what Liberals have been saying for
months, “in countries with infrastructure needs, the time is right for
an infrastructure push”.
My constituents in Toronto Centre do not need the IMF to tell
them that Canada has an urgent infrastructure deficit.
The good news is that IMF has confirmed that thanks to our low
interest rates, infrastructure investments are an excellent way to
deliver growth without “increasing the debt-to-GDP ratio”.
When will the government take this sound advice and invest more
in infrastructure?
[Translation]
Mr. Jacques Gourde (Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime
Minister, for Official Languages and for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, since we came to power, we have tripled investments in
infrastructure. The new building Canada plan, with an envelope of
$53 billion over 10 years, is operational. Numerous projects have
been announced, and we are working with the provinces and
territories on their priorities.
8224
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Oral Questions
● (1155)
[English]
HEALTH
With Ebola cases and deaths tripling since August, West Africa
needs personal protective equipment urgently, but Canada has failed
to fulfill its September pledge.
Mr. Randy Kamp (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Fisheries and Oceans, CPC): Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for
his question and for his interest in this issue. He might recall that in
May 2012 our government made an investment of $17.5 million in
the Asian carp program. Also in 2012, we made changes to the
Fisheries Act that allowed our department to work with the
provinces and territories to develop a regulatory framework to
include prohibitions against import, transport, and possession of
specific invasive species. In fact, we are working on that now. I do
wish the member had voted for both of those initiatives.
I will ask again: What is the minister doing to ensure that the
promised supplies get to where they are needed now?
***
Ms. Kirsty Duncan (Etobicoke North, Lib.): Mr. Speaker, the
Ebola outbreak ravaging West Africa is the most severe and acute
public health emergency in modern times. Never in recent history
has such a dangerous pathogen infected so many people so quickly
over such a wide geographical area for so long.
Ms. Eve Adams (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Health, CPC): Mr. Speaker, we are examining our options to get the
protective gear there as efficiently as possible.
As I have indicated, Canada has been showing international
leadership when it comes to helping the West African countries deal
with this mass Ebola crisis. We have invested $35 million to help on
general humanitarian assistance, provide nutrition, provide resources
on the ground, and to provide much-needed expertise.
Canada is showing international leadership.
***
[Translation]
FISHERIES AND OCEANS
Mr. Philip Toone (Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine, NDP): Mr.
Speaker, the Cap-des-Rosiers lighthouse, the tallest in Canada, was
designated as a national historic site in 1974. In addition, the
government implemented the Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act in
2010. Now, the government is neglecting it. We cannot let such a
gem slip away. The lighthouse desperately needs repairs. Water is
seeping in through the cracks.
What is the government going to do to preserve the Cap-desRosiers lighthouse?
[English]
Mr. Randy Kamp (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Fisheries and Oceans, CPC): Mr. Speaker, of course, the member
will know that under the Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act, there
was a process in place for local groups to take over the ownership
and maintenance of lighthouses that are surplus to the needs of the
Canadian Coast Guard. I assume that is what is happening in this
situation.
Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP): Mr. Speaker, invasive
carp pose a threat to the ecological and economic health of the Great
Lakes and inland waters. If they are allowed to get a foothold, the
effects will be irreversible. That is why I introduced a bill to ban the
import of live invasive carp into Canada and to give the powers and
tools to the CBSA officers to keep these fish out.
Will the Conservatives recognize the seriousness of the invasive
carp threat and commit to passing my bill?
INTERGOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS
Mr. Ryan Leef (Yukon, CPC): Mr. Speaker, Canada's north is a
fundamental part of our heritage, our future, and our identity as a
country. Our government is taking action to ensure that the north
realizes its full potential, and there has been significant progress
made. The Yukon Territory has had the capability of managing its
land and resources for over 11 years now, and just this spring the
Northwest Territories realized its devolution agreement by the
signing of that with the Government of Canada.
Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Aboriginal
Affairs and Northern Development please update the House on the
progress we are making to make sure the north realizes its full
potential by administering its own fate and its own future?
Mr. Mark Strahl (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, our government is committed to providing the people of
Nunavut with more control over their economic and political future,
including negotiating the transfer of land and resource management
responsibilities. That is why today our government was pleased to
announce the appointment of Mr. Brian Dominique as the chief
federal negotiator, to begin working on a devolution agreement in
principle. This clearly demonstrates our commitment to Canada's
north. With devolution comes the power for the people of Nunavut
to make their own decisions in the area of resource management, to
reach out and take control of their own destiny, and to build a strong
and prosperous territory for future generations.
***
ABORIGINAL AFFAIRS
Hon. Carolyn Bennett (St. Paul's, Lib.): Mr. Speaker, tomorrow
Canadians from coast to coast to coast will attend vigils for missing
and murdered indigenous women and girls and stand in solidarity
with their families. The premiers, indigenous leadership, and the
international community all understand the need to deal with the
sociological root causes. They have demanded a national inquiry.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8225
Oral Questions
Could the Prime Minister finally admit that he was wrong, get on
the right side of history, and call a national public inquiry now?
Hon. K. Kellie Leitch (Minister of Labour and Minister of
Status of Women, CPC): Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has
acted. We have moved forward with a national action plan to make
sure that these victims of crime are being supported, protected, and
we are putting in place preventive measures. Unlike the Liberals who
vote against matrimonial property rights and those unique things that
aid these women, we are focused on making sure that these victims
of crimes are supported. We encourage the Liberals to do exactly that
and get on board with our action plan right now.
***
THE ENVIRONMENT
Mr. Dennis Bevington (Northwest Territories, NDP): Mr.
Speaker, the Northwest Territories has experienced the worst forest
fire season in memory, destroying 3.5 million hectares of boreal
forest. In comparison, the average area of burn per year in all of
Canada over the last 10 years was 2 million hectares.
Northerners know that this disaster is directly related to climate
change. Will the Conservatives finally admit the reality of climate
change and take action? Will the government be helping the people
of the Northwest Territories deal with the overwhelming costs of this
year's forest fire season?
Mr. Colin Carrie (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
the Environment, CPC): Mr. Speaker, our government's record is
clear. We have taken decisive action on the environment while
protecting our economy. Everyone internationally has to do their fair
share, and Canada is doing its part. We emit only 2% of global
greenhouse gas emissions. Building on that record, the Minister of
the Environment announced a number of actions to reduce
greenhouse gas emissions and pollution from vehicles a couple of
weeks ago. We have announced our intent to regulate HFCs, one of
the fastest growing greenhouse gases in the world. We are
accomplishing this without a job-killing carbon tax, which would
raise the price of everything.
***
PUBLIC SAFETY
Mr. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, yesterday, two men were convicted on six counts of first
degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder in the October
2007 killings of six men at an apartment building in Surrey, B.C.
These so-called Surrey six killings were part of a violent gang war
that included multiple drive-by shootings and assassinations in the
Vancouver area over several years.
Could the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
please tell the House what our Conservative government is doing to
keep Canadians safe from violent gang turf wars?
● (1200)
[Translation]
Hon. Steven Blaney (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency
Preparedness, CPC): Mr. Speaker, Canadians absolutely refuse to
be held hostage in their own communities by thugs and criminals
who are members of street gangs.
[English]
While I cannot comment on this specific case, our government is
moving along with making murders committed for organized crime
an automatic first-degree murder charge and eliminating the
sentencing discount for multiple murders, which will allow for
longer parole ineligibility. We will bring forward legislation to make
life sentences truly mean life behind bars.
The people of Surrey and across Canada can count our
government to make our streets safe.
***
[Translation]
FOREIGN AFFAIRS
Mr. André Bellavance (Richmond—Arthabaska, Ind.): Mr.
Speaker, the Prime Minister is about to announce details about
Canada's involvement in Iraq. While military intervention to fight
terrorism may be necessary, that alone is never enough if it is not
combined with sufficient humanitarian aid, as we saw during the war
against Saddam Hussein's regime, which is what gave rise to the
fanaticism we are fighting today.
What concrete action does the Prime Minister plan to take to
address the root causes of the conflict, such as the lack of democracy
and the extreme poverty that are fertile ground for terrorism and
fanaticism to grow, as we have seen recently?
[English]
Hon. Rob Nicholson (Minister of National Defence, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, we have always been clear. In that part of the world, we are
one of the leaders in providing humanitarian assistance. Certainly,
that will continue as we conclude our 30-day mission and have a
look at that.
I think all of us are waiting in anticipation and eagerness for the
words of the Prime Minister.
***
NATIONAL DEFENCE
Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP): Mr. Speaker,
brutality and atrocities of all sorts of religious extremists and
sectarian violence offend every Canadian and are deeply troubling to
every citizen. However, we have seen five million killed in the
Democratic Republic of the Congo. We have seen Boko Haram
kidnap schoolgirls.
8226
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Routine Proceedings
Are we particularly motivated to send fighter bombers because
ISIL puts its barbaric acts on YouTube? Will we ask ourselves why
do they do that? Are we falling into a trip in which these religious
extremists want the U.S. and Canada to bomb?
unanimously expressed its indignation and concern over the rise of
the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant.
Would we not be better off to work with allies, Turkey, Jordan,
Lebanon and potentially even Iran—
ISIL has established a self-proclaimed caliphate, at present
stretching over a vast territory, roughly from Alepo to near Baghdad,
from which it intends to launch a terrorist jihad not merely against
the region, but on a global basis. Indeed, it has specifically targeted
Canada and Canadians, urging supporters to attack “disbelieving
Canadians in any manner”, vowing that we should not feel secure,
even in our homes.
The Deputy Speaker: Order, please. The hon. Minister of
Defence.
Hon. Rob Nicholson (Minister of National Defence, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, in fact, we are working with our allies. The number of allies
that are engaged in this process is growing on a daily basis.
I would just point out for the hon. member that the brutality and
extremism that is experienced by the people in that part of the world
is also a direct threat to Canada.
Mr. Bruce Hyer (Thunder Bay—Superior North, GP): Mr.
Speaker, our Prime Minister is about to send Canadian soldiers to
war in Iraq. He will give us just one day to debate a motion that
would put the lives of Canadians at risk. This decision could engage
Canada in a costly and unwinnable war with no end in sight.
Will our Prime Minister allow the House to have a full debate?
Will he agree to not limit debate?
Hon. Rob Nicholson (Minister of National Defence, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, I have been very supportive of the actions this government
has taken when combat military missions have been undertaken.
We put this matter before Parliament. We have been forthcoming.
Again, we are committed to doing something in this area.
I would urge the hon. member to keep an open mind. I would
remind him again that we will not go back to the ways of the
Liberals, implementing these things with no discussion in Parliament.
ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
[English]
[Translation]
It would be easy to downplay such statements and tell ourselves
that these are merely the words of some fanatic fringe; however, this
terrorist organization does more than just talk.
[English]
More shockingly, ISIL's words are matched by its actions. In the
territory ISIL has occupied, it has conducted a campaign of
unspeakable atrocities against the most innocent of people. It has
tortured and beheaded children. It has raped and sold women into
slavery. It has slaughtered minorities, captured prisoners and
innocent civilians whose only crime is being or thinking differently
from ISIL. Indeed, by late last summer, ISIL stood on the brink of
committing large scale genocide in Northern Iraq.
[Translation]
This is why Canada's allies in the international community, led by
President Obama, decided to intervene, and why our country,
Canada, became part of that intervention.
[English]
On September 5, I announced that members of the Canadian army,
in a non-combat role, would advise and assist security forces in Iraq
battling the terrorists.
[Translation]
[English]
TELEFILM CANADA
Mr. Rick Dykstra (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Canadian Heritage, CPC): Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to table, in
both official languages, and for referral to the Standing Committee
on Canadian Heritage, Telefilm Canada's 2013-14 annual report, as
per section 23(2) of the Telefilm Canada Act.
We have already begun, and the Royal Canadian Air Force is
transporting weapons and equipment sent from our allies to the
security forces in Northern Iraq.
In 2013-14, the success of the Canadian audiovisual industry
radiated beyond our borders into new markets. Telefilm Canada,
along with an array of partners, ensured that Canadian talent was
front and centre, gaining new fans throughout the world.
Today, we are bringing forward a motion asking the House to
confirm its confidence for a government decision to join our allies
and partners, the United States, the United Kingdom, France,
Australia, Denmark, the Netherlands, Belgium, Jordan, Saudi
Arabia, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, and likely others, in
launch air strikes against ISIL.
***
● (1205)
[Translation]
CANADIAN MILITARY MISSION IN IRAQ
Right Hon. Stephen Harper (Prime Minister, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, in recent months, the international community has almost
[English]
We also indicated that Canada was prepared to do more.
[Translation]
In addition to these air strikes, the Government of Canada, at the
request of the Iraqi authorities and other allies and partners, will
continue to provide assistance in other non-combat anti-terrorism
roles.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8227
Routine Proceedings
[English]
[Translation]
We will also contribute one air-to-air refuelling aircraft, two
Aurora surveillance aircraft and the necessary air crews and support
personnel. In addition, we are extending the deployment in a noncombat role of the up to 69 members of the Canadian army advising
and assisting security forces in Iraq.
[Translation]
The actions we have announced are actions that will be relatively
easy to end.
[English]
There will be no ground combat mission, which is explicitly ruled
out in the resolution.
[English]
These contributions are for a period of up to six months.
Indeed, we and our allies are acting now precisely to avoid a
situation that was clearly headed to a wider, protracted and much
more dangerous conflict.
The military measures we are taking do not in any way preclude
humanitarian actions. There is no either/or here.
[Translation]
Let me be clear on the objectives of this intervention. We intend to
significantly degrade the capabilities of ISIL, specifically, its ability
to either engage in military movements of scale, or to operate bases
in the open.
[Translation]
We are horrified by the human suffering and are already providing
emergency shelter and emergency medical care to thousands of
civilians in Iraq in support of humanitarian organizations on the
ground. We are also providing substantial assistance to the
Government of Iraq.
[English]
This mission will stem the spread of ISIL in the region and will
significantly degrade its ability to conduct terrorist attacks outside
the region.
This is in addition to large scale financial assistance already being
furnished to the significant number of countries in the region that
have been impacted by the humanitarian catastrophe in Syria.
To be clear, let us say that this intervention will not eliminate this
terrorist organization or automatically guarantee that our style of
governance will take its place in Iraq or Syria. However, it will
provide the opportunity for others to do so.
● (1210)
[English]
Let me also assure Canadians that the government will continue to
be seized with the broader terrorist threats against Canada. We have
strengthened laws in this country to deal with the issue of so-called
Canadian foreign fighters.
[Translation]
But again to be clear, while ISIL will not be eliminated, the risks
presented from the territory in which it operates will be significantly
reduced to those of other similar ungoverned spaces in the broader
region.
There are two other matters on which I wish to elaborate.
First, the resolution confirms the Government of Canada's
intention to strike ISIL and its allies.
[Translation]
We will strike ISIL where—and only where—Canada has the
clear support of the government of the country in question.
[English]
At present, this is only true in Iraq. If it were to become the case in
Syria, then we will participate in air strikes against ISIL in that
country also.
[Translation]
The Government of Canada will not hide its disgust at the actions
of the Assad regime. What we are doing is taking part in an antiterrorist operation against ISIL and its allies. We do not want to wage
war on any government in the region.
[English]
Second, let me assure Canadians that the government is seized
with the necessity of avoiding a prolonged quagmire in this part of
the world.
We have broadened the grounds for revoking the passports of
people who take part in terrorist activities, and we have taken
measures to revoke the citizenship of such individuals who have dual
citizenship.
[English]
We will soon bring forward additional measures to strengthen the
ability of our security services to monitor aspiring terrorists to, where
possible, prevent their return to Canada or to, where that is not
possible, give greater tools to be able to charge and prosecute.
To return to the matter before us today, I urge all members to
consider and to support the motion we have presented. I do this in
recognizing that in a democracy, especially one approaching an
election, there is rarely political upside in supporting any kind of
military action and little risk in opposing it.
[Translation]
Nonetheless, this intervention is necessary to ensure regional and
global security and, of course, the security of Canadians.
[English]
The evidence of the necessity of this is none better than the fact
that the mission has been launched by President Obama, the leader
who had withdrawn American troops and proudly ended the war in
Iraq.
Of course, one could say that while the mission is evidently
necessary, we do not have to be the ones doing it because others will.
But throughout our history, that has never been the Canadian way.
8228
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Routine Proceedings
● (1215)
It has never been the Canadian way to do only the most easy and
praiseworthy of actions and to leave the tough things for others.
Indeed, we should be under no illusion. If Canada wants to keep its
voice in the world—and we should, since so many of our challenges
are global—being a free rider means not being taken seriously.
[Translation]
ISIL presents a very real threat. It is serious and explicitly directed
against our country, among others.
[English]
Left unchecked, this terrorist threat can only grow, and grow
quickly. As a government, we know our ultimate responsibility is to
protect Canadians and to defend our citizens from those who would
do harm to us or our families.
[Translation]
We also know that our country, and it allies, share the obligation
and the burden that is incumbent on all free peoples: that of rising up
against global threats when it is in our power to do so.
[English]
When our allies recognize and respond to a threat that would also
harm us, we Canadians do not stand on the sidelines. We do our part.
[Translation]
On Monday, the House will debate the motion moved in favour of
an air-strike campaign against ISIL.
[English]
I call on all members of the House to show their support for this
mission and for the brave men and women of the Canadian Armed
Forces who are now and always ready and willing to answer the call
of their country.
[Translation]
Hon. Thomas Mulcair (Leader of the Opposition, NDP): Mr.
Speaker, first, I would like to thank the Prime Minister for coming to
the House of Commons today to make this important announcement.
This should be a given in a democracy such as ours, because the
Prime Minister has just decided the fate of many courageous young
men and women who will risk their lives serving their country.
[English]
There is no more important decision that we make in the House,
no more sacred trust for a Prime Minister, than sending young
Canadian women and men to fight and risk making the ultimate
sacrifice in a foreign war.
The Prime Minister is asking for the support of Parliament. He is
asking for Canadians' support, but the Prime Minister has refused to
answer their questions.
Let me quote the Prime Minister. He stated:
Mr. Speaker, as you can understand, I neither have the will nor the desire to get
into detailed discussions of military operations here.
He said “neither the will nor the desire”. “Here” was this
Parliament, and it was not just about the details: the Prime Minister
has not outlined a broad strategic blueprint for the mission. He
cannot even answer basic questions about the breadth or cost of
Canada's military deployment.
When did Canadian Forces arrive in Iraq, and how many? There
was no answer.
What contribution have our American allies requested? There was
no answer.
How much will this mission cost? What are the rules of
engagement? What is our exit strategy? There was no answer, no
answer, no answer.
These are not hypothetical questions.
[Translation]
Canada just completed its mission in Afghanistan. That too began
as a short mission with a small contingent of soldiers but wound up
being the longest war we have ever been involved in. Twelve years,
$30 billion, over 40,000 veterans, 160 deaths, thousands of soldiers
injured and thousands more with post-traumatic stress disorder: is
that what the Conservatives consider a successful mission?
As in this case, the mission in Afghanistan started out with only a
few dozen soldiers. Twenty-nine days ago, the Conservatives were
adamant that Canada was getting involved in a non-combat mission
for only one month with just a few dozen soldiers. The NDP had its
doubts. Canadians had their doubts. The Prime Minister's only ally
was the Liberal Party, which fully supported a mission that, without
a shadow of a doubt, would lead us to where we are today.
● (1220)
[English]
However, now that Canadian troops are committed, Conservatives
are telling us the mission will be expanded to air strikes, refuelling
capabilities, and aerial surveillance, and now the Prime Minister is
specifically opening the door to bombing in Syria. We have gone
from mission creep to mission leap.
The United States has been in this conflict for over 10 years. It has
been fighting ISIS under one name or another for over 10 years.
While ISIS has renamed itself several times since 2004—al Qaeda in
Iraq, the Mujahideen Shura Council and the Islamic State of Iraq and
al-Sham in Syria—it is literally the same insurgent group that U.S.
forces have been battling for over a decade.
Even the Minister of Foreign Affairs, in a moment of rare candour
for the Conservative government, admitted that there are no quick
fixes in Iraq. He called the fight against ISIS and groups like it “...the
struggle of our generation”. That may well prove to be an
understatement.
In one of the Prime Minister's few real answers about this mission,
he said that Canada would be in Iraq until ISIS no longer has the
capability to launch attacks in Iraq, Syria, or anywhere else. Now he
claims it will be only six months. It cannot be both.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8229
Routine Proceedings
The defeat of the insurgency in Iraq is a goal that the United States
has been trying, without success, to achieve since the wrong-headed
invasion of 2003. All of the horrors unfolding before our eyes are as
a result of that failed mission.
Let us remember that back in 2003, it was the current Prime
Minister, at the time leader of the opposition, who went to the
Americans to berate the Canadian government for not getting
involved in what he considered a just and noble cause. Their
nostalgia is such that during the emergency debate in this House just
a few days ago, his immigration minister actually dusted off the
canard of “weapons of mass destruction” to try to justify this war.
The Prime Minister insists that this mission in Iraq will not be
allowed to become a quagmire, but is that not precisely what our
American allies have been facing in Iraq for the last 10 years? A
decade from now, will Canada still be mired in a war we wisely
avoided entering a decade ago?
Do we have a plan for the war? Do we have a plan for the
thousands or tens of thousands of veterans for whom we have the
sacred responsibility to fully support in the years afterward?
[Translation]
We hope that we will get some answers during Monday's debate
and that, unlike what we see in emergency debates, the ministers
responsible will be in attendance and will be able to tell Canadians
what is going on.
[English]
It is not only New Democrats who feel these questions have not
been answered. Here a few examples.
In The Globe and Mail, we read “The case for Canada to go to war
in Iraq has not been made”.
[Translation]
In La Presse, André Pratte writes about the courage to say “no”.
[English]
A Toronto Star editorial says “[The Prime Minister] fails to make
the case for Canadian combat role in Iraq”.
There are dozens of editorials and opinions like that across our
country.
[Translation]
Military intervention is not the only tool at Canada's disposal, and
Iraq is not the only place where acts of unspeakable violence are
being committed. In the Congo, 5 million are dead after 15 years of
slaughter, but the Prime Minister has never considered military
intervention there. In Darfur, hundreds of thousands of people have
been killed and millions have had to flee, but the Prime Minister has
never considered military intervention there. Why?
● (1225)
[Translation]
Why does the Prime Minister think that he can use military force
to accomplish what others have been trying unsuccessfully to do
since 2003?
[English]
ISIS has thrived in Iraq and Syria precisely because those
countries lack stable, well-functioning governments capable of
maintaining peace and security within their own borders.
Canada's first contribution should be to use every diplomatic,
humanitarian, and financial resource at our disposal to respond to the
overwhelming human tragedy unfolding on the ground and to
strengthen political institutions in both those countries.
With the well-deserved credibility Canada earned by rejecting the
initial ill-advised invasion of Iraq, we are in a position to take on that
task.
However, the tragedy in Iraq and Syria will not end with another
western-led invasion in that region. It will end by helping the people
of Iraq and Syria to build the political institutions and security
capabilities they need to oppose these threats themselves.
[Translation]
We believe that Canada should not rush into this war.
Mr. Justin Trudeau (Papineau, Lib.): Mr. Speaker, with this
motion, the Prime Minister has finally said in Canada what he said in
New York City more than a week ago. He is intent on taking Canada
to war in Iraq.
[English]
ISIL is a threat both to the region and to global security. ISIL
murders ethnic and religious minorities across Iraq and Syria. It
murders innocent civilians, humanitarian workers, and journalists.
These awful acts have been documented, often by the perpetrators
themselves.
This is why the Liberal Party supported a 30-day non-combat role
in good faith. It was a mission on which we were briefed. This time,
instead of briefings, there has been only overheated rhetoric.
[Translation]
The Liberals will take the following core principles into the
debate. The first principle is that Canada does have a role to play to
confront humanitarian crises and security threats in the world.
The second is that when a government considers deploying our
men and women in uniform, there must be a clear mission overall
and a clear role for Canada within that mission.
The third is that the case for deploying our forces must be made
openly and transparently, based on clear and reliable, dispassionately
presented facts.
[English]
[English]
Why is military action supposedly our only choice in Iraq when it
is not even considered elsewhere?
The fourth principle is that Canada's role must reflect the broad
scope of Canada's capabilities and how best we can help.
8230
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Routine Proceedings
Unlike the Prime Minister, Liberals believe that Canada can make
a more helpful contribution to the international effort to combat ISIL
than a few aging warplanes. Canadians have a lot more to offer than
that.
the end of every decision to enter combat is a brave Canadian in
harm’s way. We owe them clarity. We owe them a plan.
We can be resourceful. There are significant, substantial noncombat roles that Canada can play, and we can play some of those
roles better than many, or perhaps any, of our allies. Whether in
strategic airlift, training, or medical support, we have the capability
to meaningfully assist in a non-combat role in a well-defined
international mission.
Most of all, we owe them the truth. The Prime Minister has
offered none of those.
The fact remains that the Prime Minister has not been up front
with Canadians about his plans.
● (1230)
[Translation]
The Prime Minister and the government have given us no reason
to believe that once in combat they will be able to limit our role.
[English]
The overheated and moralistic rhetoric is being used to justify
more than just air strikes; it is an attempt to justify a war.
For Canadians, it is all too familiar, particularly from the
Conservative Prime Minister.
[Translation]
The 2003 Iraq war was waged on false pretenses and flawed
intelligence. It was a mission that destabilized the region, sowed
further conflict, cost our allies around three trillion dollars, and cost
thousands of people their lives.
[English]
The world is still dealing with the consequences of that mistake.
Let us never forget how that mission was sold to the public.
[Translation]
Back in 2003, this Prime Minister called President Bush’s Iraq war
a matter of “freedom, democracy and civilization itself”.
[English]
We know the Iraq fiasco haunts the choices we have to make
today, but we cannot make the wrong decision now because the
wrong decision was made then.
Canada has asked a lot of our men and women in uniform over the
past decade and too often they have returned home only to be let
down. If we are to ask more of them now, our deliberations in the
House should be honest and forthright to show ourselves worthy of
the valour and strength we know our Canadian Forces will always
show in the field. We owe them that.
We know there is a role for Canada to be involved in the fight
against ISIL, but there is a clear line between non-combat and
combat roles. It is much easier to cross that line than to cross back. It
is always easier to get into a war than to get out of one.
[Translation]
The Prime Minister has a sacred responsibility to be honest and
truthful with people, especially about matters of life and death. At
[English]
● (1235)
[Translation]
The Liberal Party of Canada cannot and will not support this
Prime Minister's motion to go to war in Iraq.
[English]
The Speaker: The hon. member for Saanich—Gulf Islands is
rising on a point of order.
Ms. Elizabeth May: Mr. Speaker, I was hoping to rise to respond
to the Prime Minister's remarks very briefly.
The Speaker: Does the hon. member for Saanich—Gulf Islands
have the unanimous consent of the House to respond to the Prime
Minister's statement?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP): Mr. Speaker,
with that, let me convey my thanks to all members of the House for
the rare unanimous consent to allow a member from an unrecognized
party to respond, although I do stand here recognized as a member of
Parliament for the Green Party.
I want to reflect very briefly on the fact that in June 2011, I was
the only member of the House to vote against the continued
bombardment of Libya, recognizing at the time, as I said in Debates,
I was deeply troubled by the fact that among the rebel forces we
were supporting was al Qaeda and there were warehouses full of
arms that could easily end up in the hands of extremists and
inadvertently fuel terrorism.
I do not stand here to say for one moment that I was right and all
members were wrong. That is not my point at all. We were united in
our concern as Canadians to do the right thing. However, in this
region of the world, if there was ever proof for the adage that the
road to hell was paved with good intentions, we have it in spades
from the U.S. deciding it would be a bright idea to recruit a
millionaire named Osama Bin Laden to take on the threat of the
Soviet presence in Afghanistan, create al Qaeda, and hope that when
they went through somehow Afghanistan could hold it together.
Then we went back into Afghanistan, and then we had the
ongoing crisis of terrorist organizations. We had what happened in
Libya.
In June 2011, the Minister of Foreign Affairs said, “Obviously no
government can be worse than the Gadhafi regime”. I think the road
to hell was paved with good intentions again in Libya because we
meant well, but in turning down peace offers and peace talks and
pursuing a bombardment we inadvertently increased the strength of
terrorists.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8231
Routine Proceedings
I just wanted to add this one thought because I know we are all
pressed for time and I appreciate the opportunity and the honour to
speak with all members.
I completely support what the Prime Minister said. Canada cannot
stand on the sidelines. In every single town hall meeting I had earlier
in September, my constituents and residents of my communities
opened by saying, “What do we do about this terrorist threat of ISIL?
What about ISIS? It is horrific”. My response to them was this. We
need to sign the arms trade treaty. We need to stem the flow of
conventional arms to terrorists. We need to track the money. We need
to find out who is fuelling these people. We need sensible plans. We
need to make sure that there are not vast numbers, cohorts of
unemployed young men, who feel alienated within their societies. If
this is called practising sociology, consider me guilty of it. I call it
thinking. We need to think.
I completely support all of the Prime Minister's intentions. We
cannot allow these horrific crimes to go unanswered but we must
make sure whatever we do does not make matters worse. That is why
I hope we will have a fuller debate for more than just one day so that
we can bring to bear the collective knowledge and wisdom of
Canadians, every single one of us in this place representing
constituents who want Canada to do the right thing. I do not think
we are there yet.
Without disrespect to any of us, bombings have never ended an
Islamic or any religious extremist terrorist threat. Time after time it
has made matters worse. Let us try to look to the lessons of history
before we go to war again.
***
● (1240)
The Speaker: The question is on the motion. Is it the pleasure of
the House to adopt the motion?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: On division.
The Speaker: I declare the motion carried.
(Motion agreed to)
***
PETITIONS
IRAQ
Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP): Mr. Speaker, I have two petitions to present today.
The first petition is from Londoners, from both the Christian and
Muslim communities, who are very upset, concerned and dismayed
by the brutal arrival of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria in northern
Iraq, which has seen the further marginalization of Christians. In
Mosul, all Christians were given an ultimatum to leave or face death
or conversion. They have abandoned their homes. Those unable to
leave for health reasons have been forced to convert.
These Canadians are calling on the Government of Canada to
highlight the plight of Iraqi Christians, and use all diplomatic and
humanitarian efforts to assist them in their plight. They are also
calling on the Government of Canada to assist other like-minded
governments and organizations engaged in this effort to stop the
suffering of Iraqis, and to work with all governments and
organizations currently engaged in humanitarian and diplomatic
assistance.
PALESTINE
COMMITTEES OF THE HOUSE
PROCEDURE AND HOUSE AFFAIRS
Mr. Joe Preston (Elgin—Middlesex—London, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages,
the 21st report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House
Affairs in relation to Motion No. 489, the election of the Speaker.
Mr. Speaker, if the House gives its consent, I move that the 18th
report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs,
presented to the House earlier this week, be concurred in.
The Speaker: Does the hon. member have the unanimous consent
of the House to propose the motion?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: No.
NATURAL RESOURCES
Mr. Peter Julian (Burnaby—New Westminster, NDP) moved
that the third report of the Standing Committee on Natural
Resources, presented on Thursday, November 28, 2013, be
concurred in.
The Speaker: Is the House ready for the question?
Some hon. members: Question.
Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP): Mr. Speaker, the second petition is in regard to the civilian casualties in Gaza.
The petitioners respectfully support the call by the UN human
rights commission for an independent, international commission of
inquiry to investigate the conflict in the occupied Palestinian
territories, and whether it has been conducted in accordance with
international law, including the Geneva conventions.
Palestinians are still recovering from the carnage of 2008 and
2012, and ask all MPs to speak up about this issue.
CIGARETTE LITTER
Ms. Peggy Nash (Parkdale—High Park, NDP): Mr. Speaker, I
rise to present petitions signed by hundreds of students in my riding
who are concerned about the toxic litter of cigarette butts in their
community. They have launched a campaign to clean up the
neighbourhood to make it clear of cigarette litter.
The petitioners are calling on the Government of Canada to
provide guidance and support for all other levels of government to
establish funding for the mandatory installation of cigarette butt
disposal bins in high traffic areas and to address the issue by
establishing comprehensive guidelines and a strategy for both
intervention and prevention of the litter's toxic impacts on our
environment, such as finding an alternative environmentally friendly
way of disposing of this litter.
8232
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Government Orders
Mr. Maurice Vellacott (Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, I rise to present these petitions.
literally tens of thousands of Canadians, who call upon Parliament
and the House of Commons here assembled to take note that
asbestos is the greatest industrial killer that the world has ever
known.
In view of the fact we now no longer have a law, or the law
relating to prostitution has been declared unconstitutional by the
Supreme Court, the petitioners are calling on the House to legislate
that it is a criminal offence to purchase sex with a woman, a man or a
child, and that it also be a criminal offence for pimps, madams and
others to profit from the proceeds of the sex trade.
● (1245)
The petitioners further point out that more Canadians now die
from asbestos than all other industrial and occupational causes
combined. They point out that Canada has not banned asbestos and
still allows it to be used in construction materials, textile products,
and, shockingly, even in children's toys.
PROSTITUTION
THE ENVIRONMENT
Mr. Bruce Hyer (Thunder Bay—Superior North, GP): Mr.
Speaker, this summer I got to paddle for a week through the islands,
shoals and riptides of the west coast of B.C., so I can understand this
petition signed by people from all over Canada.
The petitioners are calling on the Government of Canada to
establish a permanent ban on crude oil tankers on the west coast to
protect fisheries, tourism, coastal communities and natural ecosystems.
FALUN GONG
Ms. Libby Davies (Vancouver East, NDP): Mr. Speaker, it is a
pleasure to rise in the House today to present a petition that is signed
by a number of people in Vancouver.
The petition draws our attention to the fact that Falun Gong
practitioners have been the largest and most severely persecuted
group in China since 1999 for their spiritual beliefs in truth,
compassion, forbearance.
The petitioners also point out that Canadian investigators, David
Matas and David Kilgour, a former member of Parliament, have
compiled more than 50 pieces of evidence and concluded that the
Chinese regime and its agencies have put to death a large number of
Falun Gong prisoners of conscience. They also tell us that
democratic nations have a responsibility to condemn such atrocities.
The petitioners are calling on the Government of Canada to
condemn these practices and to publicly call for an end to the
persecution of the Falun Gong in China.
MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS
Therefore, the petitioners call upon Parliament to ban asbestos in
all of its forms, end all government subsidies to asbestos, both in
Canada and abroad, and to stop blocking international health and
safety conventions designed to protect workers from asbestos, such
as the Rotterdam Convention.
***
QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Mr. Tom Lukiwski (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of
the Government in the House of Commons, CPC): Mr. Speaker, I
ask that all questions be allowed to stand.
The Deputy Speaker: Is that agreed?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
The Deputy Speaker: I wish to inform the House that because of
the ministerial statement, government orders will be extended by 35
minutes.
GOVERNMENT ORDERS
[Translation]
PROTECTION OF COMMUNITIES AND EXPLOITED
PERSONS ACT
The House resumed consideration of the motion that Bill C-36,
An Act to amend the Criminal Code in response to the Supreme
Court of Canada decision in Attorney General of Canada v. Bedford
and to make consequential amendments to other Acts, be read the
third time and passed.
Ms. Kirsty Duncan (Etobicoke North, Lib.): Mr. Speaker, it has
been almost five years since Canadians began travelling overseas for
treatment for chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency, and almost
five years since they have gone without follow-up care following
treatment for CCSVI.
Mr. Philip Toone (Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine, NDP): Mr.
Speaker, I believe that we have to continue debate on this extremely
important issue.
Canadians with MS are wondering when there might be an update
on the government's clinical trials and when there might be an update
on the government's MS registry.
The member for Gatineau highlighted some issues and wanted to
elaborate on them during questions and comments. Could she have
the time now to comment further?
The petitioners call upon the Minister of Health to undertake
phase III clinical trials on an urgent basis in multiple centres across
Canada and to require follow-up care.
[English]
ASBESTOS
Mr. Pat Martin (Winnipeg Centre, NDP): Thank you, Mr.
Speaker, for this opportunity to introduce a petition signed by
Ms. Françoise Boivin (Gatineau, NDP): That is probably the
best question ever, especially for me.
[Translation]
I wanted to speak more about the amendments that we presented.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8233
Government Orders
We often feel that the government opposite rejects outright the
amendments that we put forward and believes we propose
amendments just for fun. That is not at all the case. We take our
role as legislators seriously.
I am still wondering why the government rejected these
amendments given its philosophy and its basic principles with
respect to Bill C-36. In one of our first amendments, I made
suggestions about the application of the Criminal Records Act and
the criminal records of individuals—the same people the government
called victims—convicted of offences for which they will no longer
be prosecuted but exempted. Why would the government not
suspend their criminal records?
I also do not understand why the government refused an
amendment to make an addition to the preamble. Although we
often say that the preambles are not the law, they convey the spirit of
the law. Our suggestion seemed to be in keeping with the
government's comments.
We suggested that the following be added to the preamble:
Whereas the Supreme Court of Canada decided in Attorney General of Canada v.
Bedford that certain provisions of the Criminal Code have a grossly disproportionate
effect on persons who engage in prostitution by putting their health and safety at risk
and making them more vulnerable to violence;
That was the whole point of the Bedford decision. We thought it
was important to highlight that and once again underscore how
important it is to look at issues such as poverty, housing, health care
needs and other socio-economic problems affecting women who are
in the sex trade because they lack other options.
These amendments were not dangerous. They reflected exactly
what we heard from witnesses, who testified because the government
asked them to.
That is where it becomes clear that Bill C-36 is, sadly, part of the
Conservatives' ideology. It does not address human trafficking.
Frankly, it brings a proverbial sledgehammer down on those who are
already vulnerable.
● (1250)
Mr. Tarik Brahmi (Saint-Jean, NDP): Mr. Speaker, about a year
ago, when the former member for Bourassa joined the mayoral race
in Montreal, his election platform included a plan to close all of the
massage parlours that were basically brothels and employed minors.
When he was elected mayor, people asked if he was going to
follow through, and he said that he would only shut down the ones
that employed minors. In the end, none of them were closed because
the authorities could not find any that employed minors.
Is that the same argument that we are hearing from the other side
—that no one should trade sex for money, in order to protect
children? Is that argument not indicative of the deception hidden in
this bill? Is the government using children to justify the religious
Conservative ideology, according to which it is wrong to pay for
sex?
Ms. Françoise Boivin: Mr. Speaker, this excellent question is
worthy of a full dissertation. Clearly, no one has an simple answer.
Indeed, there are a few problems related to my colleague's
question. First of all, I still do not know how this bill defines the
concept of sexual services. How does that affect the things my
colleague mentioned? This is not yet clear. The minister has not
provided a clear answer to these questions.
The example of Montreal is typical of the promises that the current
mayor made during the election campaign. This just goes to show
that words can sometimes be a far cry from reality. When our
intentions are sincere we provide the necessary means to back them
up, in other words, in this case, more police officers and a lot more
than $20 million over five years. This requires a firm commitment. It
is not enough to announce an investment of $20 million at the end of
a press conference.
The government needs to walk the talk, which it does not always
do.
● (1255)
[English]
Mr. Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg North, Lib.): Mr. Speaker, it
is a pleasure that I rise to speak today on what is no doubt an
important piece of legislation. I will talk about the issue for the first
part of my debate, and then the second part will be more specifically
with respect to the bill and why the Liberal Party has expressed so
much concern about it.
As a number of members might be aware, I have been a
parliamentarian, whether in this House or in the Manitoba
legislature, for well over 20 years. There are a number of issues
that come into play every so often on which I feel compelled to
speak. This is one of those issues.
If members are familiar with Winnipeg North or the riding I used
to represent at the Manitoba legislature, they would be aware that to
drive to work I would drive down Burrows Avenue, from roughly
the 1900 block all the way down to Salter Street, which is at the 300
block of Burrows Avenue. I would then turn right and head straight
to the legislative building.
If there is a heart of this social dilemma that we find ourselves in, I
was driving through it virtually every day that the Manitoba
legislature sat. When the Manitoba legislature sat, I drove through
the core of Winnipeg North, in particular the older neighbourhood of
Winnipeg North.
I think of the streets where there are serious issues of prostitution,
and everything around it. We are talking about streets, from
Mcgregor , Salter, square blocks to Main Street, and streets like
Pritchard Avenue, in part. These streets are part of a community
which at one time were the pride of Winnipeg. There is so much
richness and cultural diversity there today.
However, there are also some very strong social needs there. What
I have witnessed over the last couple of decades is a sense of
desperation, a community that in many ways is in need of
government attention. When I say government attention, I am not
just talking about attention from Ottawa or the province; I am
referring to the different levels of government and the many different
stakeholders.
8234
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Government Orders
There are many different non-profit groups in that little box, if I
can put it that way, from Arlington Street to Main Street, from the
tracks almost all of the way up to Inkster, and definitely up to
Mountain, that do fabulous work in terms of trying to deal with the
social issues there.
Over the years, I have observed first-hand the seriousness of
prostitution and how that has destroyed the lives of our young
people. I have seen prostitutes who would appear to be in the early
teens, and when I say early teens, that is even questionable. I know
12-year-olds and 13-year-olds, and even younger, who get engaged
in prostitution. Even though it is predominantly females or young
girls, there are also males who get engaged in prostitution. It is not
by choice that this is taking place; it is a destructive force that needs
to be recognized.
I have always felt that the best way to deal with this social issue is
to see a higher sense of co-operation from the different stakeholders,
and in particular from the different levels of government.
● (1300)
When this bill came before the House of Commons, I was
intrigued. Winnipeg North is not unique. There might be a dozen or
more other constituencies similar in nature, so I thought this would
be a wonderful opportunity for us to exchange ideas, because many
of the issues that need to be dealt with when it comes to prostitution
go far beyond the Criminal Code.
I have heard a lot of discussion through this process. I appreciate
the time various individuals put in over the summer to sit on the
committee. I would often tune in from Winnipeg to catch up on what
was taking place in Ottawa, and there has been a lot of debate about
the criminal element of prostitution. However, not only is there a role
for criminal law to play in this issue; there is also a far greater role
for us to play in dealing with prostitution and human trafficking by
looking beyond our criminal laws.
I have had first-hand experience and heard sad stories. A family in
Tyndall Park had a young lady torn from their lives. She was
murdered. She was enticed by drugs and was sucked into
prostitution. From what I understand, this particular young lady
was drawn into prostitution through crystal meth and the criminal
element present at the time. She even had children.
Thank goodness for her parents, who were able to provide a
loving, nurturing family. They never lost hope for their daughter, but
sadly, she was brutally murdered.
There is no doubt in my mind and in the minds of others that the
system failed that young lady. There is this sense that we,
collectively, need to do more. When I say “we”, it goes beyond
members of Parliament, beyond elected officials at all levels, beyond
bureaucrats at all levels. It goes to the non-profit groups that we refer
to and to the core of our communities themselves. I saw first-hand
the impact on a family and in part on a community.
Another individual I have known for a number of years tried to
provide care to a foster girl. As much as this individual wanted to
provide protection for the girl, the system did not allow him to
provide the type of protection that he and his wife and his family
wanted to provide. That foster child ultimately ended up falling
victim to the criminal element and was roped in to prostitution.
I could relate endless stories that I have heard through the years. I
can recall one touching one. A family overseas thought they could
get their daughter over to Canada. She was told that she would be
able to work in the hospitality industry. The family thought, of
course, of a restaurant or a hotel or something of that nature. Once
this young lady arrived, she was brought into the criminal element,
which included prostitution among many other things.
● (1305)
There are numerous stories. I like to believe that we as a whole
will do what we can to ensure that we are protecting the vulnerable
people in the communities we represent.
I am a very strong advocate for the Marymound centre, which is a
wonderful north end care facility that is, in essence, run by
volunteers and some paid staff. They take some very troubled
individuals into their care and under their tutelage to try to get them
out of the rut of the dark side, out of criminality, including
prostitution.
I had the opportunity to tour that facility years ago. In the
Manitoba legislature and here in Ottawa I have had the opportunity
to talk about Marymound as an organization that assists young girls
in proving an opportunity to succeed in life. In many cases, they are
taken right from the street or from dysfunctional families and
brought into a situation where they can feel safe and, hopefully, get
on a track that ultimately leads to a much more positive outcome for
many of them.
We need to look at how we can build upon organizations with
proven track records of success. When I get into discussions on
crime bills, I talk a lot about how we can come up with progressive
ideas that would enable governments at whatever level to support
initiatives that would prevent crimes from occurring in the first
place.
I would apply that very same principle here. Can government do
more than it is currently doing to prevent young girls and boys from
becoming prostitutes? What can government do to assist individuals
who have already been captured by the criminal prostitution element
and are currently in the system? What can we do to assist them in
getting out of it? This is where my interest really lies, and I think
government can make a difference.
I cited two specific examples. The first example I talked about
was the prostitute with the crystal meth. This is someone who was
already in the system. The parents had a tremendous amount of
frustration in trying to find ways to get her out of the system. That
was the first example that I gave.
The second example that I gave was the loving, caring family that
realized their foster child was sneaking out late at night and being
drawn into the system. The social services system failed, and no one
was able to prevent this particular individual from falling into this
brutal system.
That is where I believe we can do more. That is why I brought up
the Marymound system. If we have resources like Marymound,
which I am using as an example, they can help individuals who are
currently involved with the criminal element and hopefully pull them
out.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8235
Government Orders
● (1310)
There are so many other things that we could be doing, such as
providing educational opportunities, providing basic life skills that
would ultimately lead to alternative forms of employment, and
providing hope in many ways. We could look at ways to develop
programs that would build self-confidence. There are all of these
things.
I know the member for Kildonan—St. Paul is very much aware of
the impact of the system on what could be a wonderful, bright young
lady with all sorts of hope and future, and how individuals try to
keep a person down through the enticement of drugs or often the
beatings that take place. They are used to keep individuals in a place
where they should not be.
Governments and non-profit agencies do have a role to counter
that. I have made a few suggestions as to how we could move in that
direction, and I would challenge the government to work in cooperation on other initiatives that will make a tangible difference.
When I was first elected, I remember Vic Toews saying to me that
he wanted to see more community policing. He believed we needed
to have more policing in our communities. He actually assigned a
significant amount of money to ensure that there would be more
police hired, but when I looked into it, I found that there was some
money, but it was tied. When it was sent to my province of
Manitoba, the provincial government sat on that money. For different
reasons, It did not want to use it for policing, but the point is that it
was sitting on that money, and in my last few days as an MLA,
community police offices were actually being shut down.
Community police officers would go into schools and try to make
a difference in the lives of individual young people who found it
challenging to be out on the street in the first place. What was
missing was the sense that we have not just a responsibility, but a
higher responsibility to start working together to make sure that the
job is actually getting done. That is something that is very lacking.
If there is anything I can contribute to this debate on Bill C-36, I
believe it is to emphasize is a very significant point, and it is this: it
is more than Ottawa and more than the provincial and municipal
governments. It includes the stakeholders and so many others who
need to get involved on this issue.
I would like to indicate the primary concern that the Liberal Party
has with this legislation. It can be referred to as 200-plus lawyers. It
is the constitutionality of the legislation.
The government has not been able to provide, outside of its own
department, official legal opinions that the bill would stand a chance
with the charter, and the reason we have the legislation before us
today is that the current laws themselves have failed the charter. That
led to the legislation before us today, but from everything we are
being told, this legislation will not be able to meet the charter either.
● (1315)
Mrs. Joy Smith (Kildonan—St. Paul, CPC): Mr. Speaker, the
member skated around the issue four times from Sunday. Two weeks
ago, the leader of the Liberal Party tweeted, “The days when old men
get to decide what a woman does with her body are long gone. Times
have changed for the better. #LPC defends rights”.
The Liberal Party is not supporting Bill C-36. We heard the
member speak over and over again about human trafficking in
Winnipeg North. Will that member toe the party line or will he vote
“yes” to Bill C-36?
Mr. Kevin Lamoureux: Mr. Speaker, it is important to recognize
that we have legal experts from all over Canada who are challenging
this legislation's ability to even clear the charter. The reason we have
the legislation before us today is because of the Bedford decision.
There have been many commentaries throughout this whole process
regarding that. It is one of the reasons I wanted to try to personalize
it.
There is much more that we could be doing outside of criminal
law. It is more important that when we pass criminal law, we ensure
we have it right. The government has not been successful
demonstrating that it has it right.
It is not just the Liberal Party or the NDP saying that. We are
talking about hundreds of lawyers and different stakeholders that go
beyond lawyers.
Mr. Philip Toone (Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine, NDP): Mr.
Speaker, the examples my colleague brought forth from his riding
were well taken.
I will remind him that we are in third reading, so it is unfortunately
a little late for all of the suggested improvements. We are now at the
point where we will be voting to accept or defeat the legislation. On
this side, we will be voting against it.
Having brought all of these great ideas and knowing that they
cannot be brought forward anymore, what is member for Winnipeg
North going to be doing regarding this legislation as far as
supporting it further down the road? What are we going to be
looking at as far as bringing this forward in the community?
Specifically, I would like to know from him if it is a good idea to
be passing legislation like this without giving the opportunity and the
tools to those who are disenfranchised and have fewer resources in
the country to bring forward legislation to the courts. This
legislation, from so many experts that I have spoken to, is almost
certainly going to be challenged in the courts. It is almost certainly
going to be defeated, because it does not actually address the single
most important issue that the courts brought up, which is harm
reduction.
Could the member please give some comments on how the
community groups that he spoke to are going to be able to challenge
this on the ground?
Mr. Kevin Lamoureux: Mr. Speaker, my attempt in delivering
my comments was to try to emphasize that the Liberal Party believes
we have a very serious social issue in facing human trafficking and
prostitution. We need to recognize that government has a role to play
that goes beyond the Criminal Code.
What we have before us today is a direct result of a ruling from the
Supreme Court. We have been advised, as others have been.
Let me quote a letter that was addressed to the Prime Minister and
authored by, from what I understand, well over 200 lawyers. It says:
8236
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Government Orders
We are concerned about the direction your government is taking with respect to
adult prostitution in Canada. Bill C-36, also known as the Protection of Communities
and Exploited Persons Act, proposes a legal regime that criminalizes many aspects of
adult prostitution, including the purchase of sexual services, the advertisement of
sexual services, and most communication in public for the purpose of prostitution.
As the Supreme Court of Canada unanimously held in Canada...three of Canada’s
current adult prostitution laws are an unjustifiable infringement of sex workers’ right
to security of the person, pursuant to s. 7 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and
Freedoms...These laws were found to create and exacerbate dangerous conditions
and prevent sex workers from taking action to reduce or mitigate the risks they face.
We are concerned that, for the very same reasons that caused the Court to strike down
these prostitution laws, the criminal regime proposed by Bill C-36 is likely to offend
the Charter as well.
● (1320)
Mr. Bob Dechert (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Justice, CPC): Mr. Speaker, the member has just mentioned that the
government did not present any witnesses who were, outside of
government, legal experts who would support the constitutionality of
Bill C-36. I am happy to have the opportunity to stand and correct
him.
The member said that he watched the House of Commons
proceedings in the summer. I hope he had a chance to hear the
testimony of Professor Benedet of the University of British
Columbia, not a government lawyer, at both the House of Commons
and the Senate committee hearings.
I would like to read for him the transcript from Professor
Benedet's appearance before the Senate proceedings where she was
asked a question by Senator Plett.
Senator Plett said:
My question is whether you believe that this proposed law is, in fact, in
accordance with the Bedford ruling. If so, how? Do you believe that, in fact, it will
stand the test of a challenge to the Supreme Court?
Professor Benedet answered:
Yes, I do. I do believe both that the law is a genuine attempt to respond to the
restrictions put on Parliament by the decision in Bedford, and it does seem to me, that
the law is crafted in a way that it meets the demands of the Charter.
She further went on to say:
Overall, I see here a bill that is largely attuned to the concerns that the court
raised. If the argument that is being made is that criminalizing the purchase of sex is
inherently unconstitutional, we have to recognize what is being asserted then is that
there is a constitutional right to buy women in prostitution. My reading of the Charter
of Rights, particularly in light of the equality provisions, doesn't support that
conclusion.
Could the member comment on Professor Benedet's analysis and
at least acknowledge that in fact there are legal experts who support
the constitutionality of this bill?
Mr. Kevin Lamoureux: Mr. Speaker, I would defer to the Liberal
Party critic on the issue. I was present when he made the speech
indicating that it was very clear that the overwhelming response from
the legal community was that this would not pass the charter.
A Winnipeg Free Press story, written on June 10, states:
Shawna Ferris, a founding member of the WWG, said the bill would put sex
workers in danger. Apart from the overall criminalization of purchasing, she said
other proposed changes make it harder for sex workers to do their jobs safely.
My understanding is this was the attitude in part that ultimately
led to the Supreme Court to make some sort of a decision.
At the end of the day, it is the vast majority of the legal
community. When I say “the vast majority”, we are probably talking,
outside of the ones who maybe work for the department, 95% plus
who would have said that this would not pass a charter test. People
should be concerned about it.
[Translation]
Mrs. Sadia Groguhé (Saint-Lambert, NDP): Mr. Speaker, I
would like to commend all the hard work done by our colleague, the
member for Gatineau, on this file.
She highlighted two important priorities of the NDP, specifically,
the safety of sex workers and the constitutionality of this bill.
Clearly, this bill does not address either priority.
I would like to come back to something my colleague said.
Women who resort to prostitution are usually very poor, and
unfortunately, many of them have substance abuse problems. What
concrete measures does she think the government could take to
address the root causes of prostitution, specifically, poverty among
women?
● (1325)
[English]
Mr. Kevin Lamoureux: Mr. Speaker, one of the things the
government can do is demonstrate leadership and work with the
different stakeholders to make a difference at the ground level within
our communities. It can build upon things such as the Marymound
association. It can look at ways in which to encourage these young
people to upgrade their education or to get back into school. It can
look at ways to find alternative forms of employment, or support
them through child care, as an example, or look at drug addiction
issues.
If we had a strong leadership coming from Ottawa to work with
the different provinces and the other stakeholders, there is a
multitude of different programs that could be put into place that
would have a profound positive impact. However, there has to be the
political will and the sense of need to work with everyone from the
community groups within the small communities to the different
levels of government.
If we achieve this and we are successful at doing it, then we will
be able to deal with some of the literally hundreds or thousands of
cases that occur every year where young boys and girls are being
exploited of which a vast majority are female.
Mr. Bob Dechert (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Justice, CPC): Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to participate in the
third reading debate on Bill C-36, the protection of communities and
exploited persons act.
Bill C-36 is the government's response to the Supreme Court of
Canada's decision in December 2013 in the Bedford case, a decision
that will result in the decriminalization of most adult prostitution
related activities if this bill is not enforced before expiry of the
court's one-year suspension, on December 20 of this year.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8237
Government Orders
The House of Commons Standing Committee on Justice and
Human Rights studied the bill in July 2014 and a Senate committee
on legal and constitutional affairs pre-studied it in early September.
Both committees heard from many witnesses, reflecting a wide range
of views. That evidence also included consideration of the available
research evaluating different approaches to prostitution taken in
different jurisdictions.
The government has always maintained that failing to respond to
the Bedford decision is not an option and that the testimony before
these two committees reaffirms this position.
At committee, the Hon. Andrew Swan, minister of justice and
attorney general for the Government of Manitoba, stated the
following:
The Manitoba government does not support the legalization of prostitution, it
does not support the full decriminalization of prostitution or a de facto
decriminalization of prostitution, which would occur if there was no response to
the Bedford decision. All those options would continue to allow the purchase of
others for sex, devalue human life, and enable tragedies associated with prostitution
to continue to occur.
I acknowledge that there are some individuals who will say that
they have freely chosen to sell their sexual services. The two
committees heard from some witnesses who wanted the law to
recognize a profession that they called “sex work”, who wanted the
law to help them earn a living selling their own sexual services. They
wanted the law to allow them to run commercial enterprises in which
sexual services would be sold so they could capitalize on the
prostitution of others.
These witnesses told the committees that existing laws
prohibiting assault, sexual assault, forceable confinement and human
trafficking provided them with sufficient protection and that they
were not victims, that they freely chose what they referred to as “sex
work” and that the state had no right to tell them that they could not
earn a living doing what they chose to do.
Conversely, so many of the witnesses who appeared before the
two committees spoke of their tragic stories of pain, suffering and
victimization, stories of johns who had abused and degraded them
for their own sexual pleasure and pimps who had harmed and
exploited them to maximize their own profits.
These stories are also supported by statistics that clearly show that
prostitution targets the marginalized, the disenfranchised and the
vulnerable, including those who suffer disadvantages because of
gender, poverty, race, youth and a history of abuse for addiction. We
do not accept that this group should have to wait until a violent
offence is committed against them to avail themselves of the law's
protection. Make no mistake about it, Bill C-36 is for them.
Even if in some cases prostitution involves some who identify
themselves as consenting adults, that does not detract from the
validity of Bill C-36 objectives. Some times it is necessary to
prohibit conduct that produces harm or risk of harm to individuals or
society, even if not in every case. The courts have recognized that the
liberty of some to engage in certain conduct can be constrained to
protect others who are vulnerable to the harms associated with that
conduct. This includes polygamy, incest, possession and trafficking
of drugs and the trade in human organs and tissues. These are
practices that so often involve a power imbalance between the
participants. That imbalance often results in the more powerful party
taking advantage of the less powerful party.
The criminal law has an important role to play in protecting the
less powerful and the vulnerable. Even if in some cases a power
imbalance is not present, the elevated risk that the vulnerable could
be targeted, that the vulnerable could suffer if the activity is allowed
to persist, warrants prohibition of the activity itself because harm
results to everyone when a practice that targets the vulnerable is
allowed to flourish.
Prostitution is a case in point. We know that women are
disproportionately and negatively impacted by prostitution. We
know that indicators of socio-economic disadvantage are risk factors
for entry into and remaining subjected to prostitution. We know that
involvement in prostitution results in the experience of high levels of
violence, both physical and sexual, and emotional trauma, regardless
of venue or legal regime. The individual and societal risks of
validating this activity are simply too high.
● (1330)
Simply put, we cannot condone this so-called industry for the
benefit of those individuals who claim to freely choose it, because
doing so would exacerbate the harm experienced by that vulnerable
group who are most at risk of subjection to prostitution, and
importantly, do not choose it. Facilitating this industry would also
harm communities, including through proliferation of associated
criminality such as drug-related offences and human trafficking, as
well as society at large by reinforcing gender inequalities and
normalizing the treatment of primarily women's bodies as bought
and sold.
Make no mistake, this is not a business like any other. It is not an
industry like any other, or work like any other. It is exploitation of
our most vulnerable and our law must say no, this is not acceptable.
If that means that some who would like to profit from the trade in
sexual services can no longer do so, then that result is necessary to
prevent the ongoing and future victimization of others.
I have focused thus far on the vulnerability of so many of those
who sell their own sexual services, but what about those who
purchase those same services? Some have asked why Bill C-36
would label this group “exploiters” when some are not.
We must take into account a variety of societal factors when
determining whether the criminal law should apply to certain
conduct, including when that conduct can be engaged in consensually. If allowing that conduct results in a reasonable
apprehension of harm to some, particularly the vulnerable, the
application of the criminal law is justified.
Bill C-36 recognizes that the act of purchasing sexual services,
regardless of the circumstances, contributes to a serious societal
problem that implicates the equality of rights of marginalized and
vulnerable groups. That practice must be stopped to protect the
dignity and equality of those vulnerable groups and indeed every
member of our society. This approach reflects one of the
fundamental roles of criminal law, which is to protect the vulnerable.
8238
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Government Orders
These are the reasons Bill C-36 proposes a fundamental paradigm
shift toward treatment of prostitution as sexual exploitation. These
are the reasons Bill C-36 proposes to continue to criminalize those
who capitalize upon the exploitation of the prostitution of others.
These are the reasons Bill C-36 proposes to criminalize those who
fuel the demand for prostitution.
I would like to recap. The important objectives of Bill C-36 are to
reduce the incidence of prostitution, a practice that targets the
vulnerable; to discourage entry into it; to deter participation in it; and
ultimately, to abolish it to the greatest extent possible.
For the first time in Canadian criminal law, Bill C-36 would make
the purchase of sexual services a criminal offence. Although the sale
of sexual services would not be prohibited, criminalizing the demand
for sexual services in fact makes prostitution an illegal activity.
Some have said that an approach involving asymmetrical
criminalization of a consensual activity is unprecedented, but the
purchasing offence is almost identical to the existing offence that
prohibits the purchase of sexual services from minors. That offence
has been on the books for years and is the basis for widespread
agreement on the fact that our existing law makes child prostitution
illegal.
Here we see the very same power imbalance to which I have
already alluded, and Bill C-36 recognizes that this power imbalance
does not cease to exist simply when a person turns 18 years old. The
law also treats sexual activity with minors asymmetrically. The
consent of persons under the age of 16 to such activity is not valid.
In several instances, the criminal law applies asymmetrically to
ensure that the person who has less power, who is considered to be
vulnerable, is not held criminally liable for engaging in illegal
activities.
I come to the critical question that seems to have caused a great
deal of confusion. How does Bill C-36 make prostitution illegal?
The Supreme Court of Canada has defined prostitution as the
exchange of sexual services of one person in return for payment by
another. Criminalizing the purchase of sexual services invalidates the
entire prostitution transaction.
This is no different from the criminal law's approach to child
prostitution, and research shows that there is good reason to treat
child prostitution and adult prostitution as activities that exist along
the same continuum rather than separate activities, warranting
suppression in one case and facilitation in the other. In far too many
cases, there is no practical difference in warranting differential
treatment by the law.
Professor Benedet's testimony before the Senate committee drives
this point home. Although long, I would like to quote her fully.
● (1335)
She said:
It is a crime to buy a young person for sex, and no one seems to be disputing the
continued existence of that provision or questioning its constitutionality. No one is
going to come to you and ask you to repeal that provision because it makes kids
unsafe by pushing prostitution underground, even though exactly the same argument
ought to apply.
The reason they will not argue it is that it is generally accepted that buying a
young person is exploitation because of the inequality of power based on age, even if
the kid says yes.
She goes on to say:
Of course, there are usually many other inequalities at work, including some
combination of gender, colonialism, poverty and addiction. Yet, when the inequality
of age is no longer present, people refuse to see any of the other inequalities that are
so prevalent in the prostitution industry, even when that prostitute, now an adult,
started as a child, which was true of many of the witnesses in the Bedford case.
I submit that it is time to stop ignoring those inequalities and that Bill C-36 does
something very important in recognizing that there are other inequalities beyond age
that make the prostitution industry exploitative and worthy of the criminal law's
attention.
That is the end of the quote.
As I have said, Bill C-36 does not propose to criminalize the sale
of sexual services, instead it proposes to immunize sellers from
prosecution for the part they play in the illegal prostitution
transaction.
This immunity does not, however, make that transaction legal.
The approach does not in any way allow, authorize, facilitate or
condone the selling of sexual services. Rather, it recognizes the
power imbalance that so often manifests itself in this transaction.
The solution is to assist, not punish, the less powerful party to that
transaction. I stress that so many sellers, some who courageously
appeared before the two committees, rarely freely choose prostitution. For many, their choices were constrained, whether by the brute
force of those who would profit from their exploitation or by the lack
of meaningful options from which to choose.
This is the reason the bill proposes to immunize them from
prosecution for the part that they play in the illegal prostitution
transaction.
It is also why the government has dedicated $20 million in
addition to other existing federal initiatives to assist sellers in leaving
prostitution. Protecting those who are so vulnerable to the dangers
and risks posed by prostitution involve preventing entry into it,
helping those involved leave it, and directing the full force of the
criminal law at those who fuel this trade, as well as those who
capitalize on it.
I want to read to the House the words of a very courageous
woman who appeared before the House of Commons justice
committee in July this year. Her name is Bridget Perrier and I have
to say that I was moved by her testimony. I think all who hear it will
be equally moved. I want people to hear this. I think it is important
that my colleagues here in the House hear it and that Canadians
across the country hear it. She said:
I was lured and debased into prostitution at the age of 12 from a child welfare-run
group home. I remained enslaved for 10 years in prostitution. I was sold to men who
felt privileged to steal my innocence and invade my body. I was paraded like cattle in
front of men who were able to purchase me, and the acts that I did were something no
little girl should ever have to endure here in Canada, the land of the free.
Because of the men, I cannot have a child normally, because of trauma towards
my cervix. Also, still to this day I have nightmares, and sometimes I sleep with the
lights on. My trauma is deep, and I sometimes feel as though I'm frozen—or even
worse, I feel damaged and not worthy.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8239
Government Orders
I was traded in legal establishments, street corners, and strip clubs. I even had a
few trips across the Great Lakes servicing shipmen at the age of 13. The scariest
thing that happened to me was being held captive for a period of 43 hours and raped
and tortured repeatedly at 14 years of age by a sexual predator who preyed on
exploited girls.
My exploiters made a lot of money and tried to break me, but I fought for my life.
My first pimp was a woman who owned a legal brothel, where I was groomed to say
that I was her daughter's friend, if the police ever asked. My second pimp was
introduced to me when I was in Toronto. I had to prostitute for money. He was
supposed to be a bodyguard, but that turned out to be one big lie.
Both are out there still, doing the same thing to more little girls somewhere here in
Canada.
clubs? Does it touch escort agencies? That is a very important
question.
On the review and report, why did the government push back to
five years our motion to get a review and report in two years?
Mr. Bob Dechert: Mr. Speaker, it is pretty clear I think to
everyone, to the courts, that sexual services means the sexual
gratification of the other person. There are many cases heard on the
definition of that particular phrase, and I would suggest to my hon.
friend that she take a look at some of those cases.
In my view, if there is one more little girl like Bridget Perrier
anywhere in Canada, we need to do something about it. We cannot
stand idly by.
● (1340)
We need to take this opportunity, which was presented to us by the
Supreme Court, to finally address this terrible trade that is enslaving
far too many people in our country.
The Supreme Court said it is for us as parliamentarians to do
something about this. It is within our jurisdiction to do something
about this. She did not talk about legalizing brothels and bringing in
municipal bylaws to regulate their hours of operation. She talked
about using the laws for which Parliament is responsible, the
criminal laws, to bring in a new way of responding to what is a
horrible practice in our country.
The hon. member asked why we would want to review the law in
five years rather than two. The reason is that we need time to see
how the law is being enforced and to have evidence come forward.
Two years is a very narrow amount of time for that evidence to
become available, but in five years we think it will be sufficient time.
That was why I was pleased to support her suggestion for a
mandatory review of the bill going forward, and with that small
amendment to make it a five-year review as opposed to two.
We must aspire to a society free from the exploitive practices that
target our most vulnerable members, a society that prioritizes dignity
and equality of all. For Bridget Perrier, for Timea Nagy, for Katarina
MacLeod, and for the dozens and hundreds of others out there, we
must do this.
I hope my colleagues on the other side of the House, especially the
Liberals, who do not seem to be able to make up their minds, will
choose to support Bill C-36. Do the right thing and recognize the
women who are trapped in this business as victims and help them to
bring an end to this awful practice that has enslaved far too many in
our society.
[Translation]
Ms. Françoise Boivin (Gatineau, NDP): Mr. Speaker, like the
Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice, we were deeply
moved by the testimony we heard in committee, especially that of
Bridget Perrier.
I was at least happy to know that the Criminal Code still has very
strict provisions regarding human trafficking and sexual exploitation.
I would like to repeat that, because the Conservatives would have
people believe that without Bill C-36, Canada would have no such
protections, when in fact those provisions provide an excellent
framework.
Since this will probably be my only opportunity to do so, I would
like to ask the same question.
[English]
If at first we do not succeed, try, try again.
I will ask this again to the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister
of Justice. Can somebody please define for me what Bill C-36 means
when it talks about sexual services? It is not an idle question. It is
important. Does it cover sexual acts that are done that are pretty
close to—whatever, I will not qualify it—but that happen in some
● (1345)
Mrs. Joy Smith (Kildonan—St. Paul, CPC): Mr. Speaker, today
we heard many things about the bill not being constitutionally sound.
I would ask the parliamentary secretary to go over the reasons
why we believe very strongly that the bill will survive any court
challenges that happen.
Mr. Bob Dechert: Mr. Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague from
Kildonan—St. Paul for her question. I want to take this opportunity
to acknowledge the tremendous work she has done over many years
to fight for the rights of trafficked persons in Canada and around the
world. She deserves a lot of credit for that.
The Liberal member said earlier that he had a letter from 200
lawyers saying they thought the bill was unconstitutional and did not
live up to the test in the Bedford decision. I practise in a law firm of
over 950 lawyers, and there are 14,000 lawyers practising in the city
of Toronto, if my memory serves me correctly. I think there are
plenty of lawyers who agree with the constitutionality of this bill,
and I am one of them.
The bill was crafted to directly respond to what was requested by
the three litigants in the Bedford case. They asked for the right to
carry on their trade from a fixed indoor location where they could
adequately screen their clients and protect themselves, and Bill C-36
provides exactly for that. It allows them to get off the streets, to do it
in a fixed indoor location, a safe place which has a receptionist and
bodyguard, paid for on reasonable commercial terms which are not
exploitive.
I believe those things, coupled with the statement of the purpose
of the bill, which is to reduce prostitution and the harm done to both
society and communities by prostitution, would ensure that the bill is
found constitutional by the Supreme Court if it is ever tested in the
future.
8240
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Private Members' Business
I want to say one further thing. Criminal lawyers know that if they
cannot defend their clients on the facts, they always challenge the
constitutionality of a bill. That is just common law practice.
[Translation]
Ms. Ève Péclet (La Pointe-de-l'Île, NDP): Mr. Speaker, my
question is quite simple.
I would like my colleague to tell us precisely what new tools
Bill C-36 adds to the law. The minister's proposed money and
programs aside, what section of the Criminal Code affected by the
bill does not already deal with human trafficking and human
exploitation? Sections 279 and 279.01 are clear: human trafficking
and human exploitation are offences that, committed together with
violence, assault or confinement, are punishable to life in prison.
What tools does Bill C-36 add to existing legislation?
[English]
Mr. Bob Dechert: Mr. Speaker, I am surprised that she missed it.
What is new and exciting about this bill is that for the first time in
Canadian history it makes the purchase of sexual services of another
person illegal. It would allow us to reduce the demand for the
prostitution of other people, which reduces the demand for human
trafficking. If there are less people trying to buy those services, there
will be less young girls trafficked.
We do not have to wait until they are trafficked, harmed, or
abused; we can reduce the demand and make sure it does not happen
in the first place. That is what is so very important about this bill, and
that is why it is important that we pass it as soon as possible.
[Translation]
The Deputy Speaker: Order. It being 1:50 p.m., pursuant to order
made on Thursday, September 25, it is my duty to interrupt the
proceedings, and put forthwith every question necessary to dispose
of the report stage of the bill now before the House.
● (1350)
[English]
The question is on the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to
adopt the motion?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: No.
The Deputy Speaker: All those in favour of the motion will
please say yea.
Some hon. members: Yea.
The Deputy Speaker: All those opposed will please say nay.
Some hon. members: Nay.
The Deputy Speaker: In my opinion the yeas have it.
And five or more members having risen:
The Deputy Speaker: Pursuant to Standing Order 45, the
recorded division stands deferred until Monday, October 6, 2014, at
the ordinary hour of daily adjournment.
Mr. Dave MacKenzie: Mr. Speaker, I would ask that you seek
consent to see the clock as 2:05 p.m.
The Deputy Speaker: Does the hon. member have unanimous
consent to see the clock at 2:05 p.m.?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
The Deputy Speaker: It being 2:05 p.m., the House will now
proceed to the consideration of private members' business as listed
on today's order paper.
PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS
[Translation]
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND GOVERNMENT
SERVICES ACT
Mr. Claude Patry (Jonquière—Alma, BQ) moved that
Bill C-574, An Act to amend the Department of Public Works and
Government Services Act (use of wood), be read the second time
and referred to a committee.
He said: Mr. Speaker, today I am pleased to begin debate on my
bill to promote the use of wood in the construction of federal public
buildings.
Bill C-574, An Act to amend the Department of Public Works and
Government Services Act (use of wood) is quite simple. It reads as
follows:
1. Section 7 of the Department of Public Works and Government Services Act is
amended by adding the following after subsection (1):
(1.1) Despite subsection (1), before soliciting bids for the construction,
maintenance or repair of public works, federal immovables and federal real property,
the Minister shall give preference to the concept that promotes the use of wood, while
taking into account the factors of cost and greenhouse gas emissions.
My bill amends the Department of Public Works and Government
Services Act and calls on the federal government to give preference
to projects that increase the use of wood products in construction. A
number of governments have realized that using more wood in their
buildings is not only a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but
it also provides direct support to the industry. The long list of
governments that have their own policies on wood use includes
Quebec, France, Sweden, Norway, Austria and Finland.
Bill C-574 was introduced by the Bloc Québécois, which would
like to see the House of Commons pass it. A similar bill introduced
by the Bloc Québécois in 2010 passed second reading stage in the
House. Only the Conservatives refused to support it.
The forestry industry needs help to adjust to changes in the pulp
and paper market. The Conservative government must stop stalling
and follow the lead of other countries that have adopted a policy to
use wood as a building material in public buildings.
Given the Conservative government's failure to support the
Quebec forestry industry, the Government of Quebec had to be
proactive by putting in place a wood charter. With the adoption of
that charter, construction projects that are funded wholly or in part by
the Government of Quebec must now systematically demonstrate
that a wood solution was evaluated.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8241
Private Members' Business
Not only will this strategy help revitalize the forestry industry, but
it will be an excellent way to combat greenhouse gas emissions,
something that is of little consequence to the Conservative
government. Renewing our forests will also help with carbon
capture and improve Quebec's record in that regard and, by
extension, that of the federal government, which prefers to promote
the expansion of the oil sands industry.
The Quebec forestry industry is in need of urgent help. To date,
the Conservative government has given forestry companies nothing
but crumbs. Meanwhile, it has given billions of dollars to the Ontario
automotive industry.
It is imperative that the House support Quebec's initiative in this
regard and pass Bill C-574 in order to follow suit in the construction
of its public buildings.
The bill that we are proposing would provide immediate
assistance to forestry companies and reduce greenhouse gas
emissions. The use of wood in federal buildings would help our
businesses develop new secondary and tertiary products and find
new markets for local products.
Furthermore, given that timber products are alternatives to energy
inefficient products, such as steel, which takes a lot of energy to
process, the use of wood is a tangible way of reducing greenhouse
gas emissions. In addition to capturing carbon dioxide, wood is also
a green alternative to energy-intensive construction materials.
In 2011, Canada's forestry industry represented approximately
$23.7 billion of the Canadian economy, which is about 1.9% of the
total gross domestic product.
Canada is the second largest exporter of raw forest products in the
world, after the United States. It is the fourth largest exporter of all
the wood products considered. Canada is the largest exporter of pulp
and paper, newsprint and softwood lumber in the world and the
fourth largest exporter of wood panels.
A total of 65% of Canadian forestry products are exported to the
United States. China is an increasingly important market for
Canadian forestry products, particularly pulp and softwood lumber.
In 2011, the forestry industry generated approximately 233,900 direct jobs for Canadians. If we include indirect jobs, such as those in
construction, engineering and transport, the forestry industry is
responsible for almost 600,000 direct and indirect jobs across the
country.
● (1355)
The forestry industry is important to Quebec. Quebec has 2% of
the world's forests, an area of 760,000 square kilometres—the
equivalent of Sweden and Norway combined.
The industry provides 50,500 manufacturing jobs—26,800 in
wood processing and 23,700 in pulp and paper—and more than
10,500 forestry jobs. There are also 630 engineers who work in
forest management and logging operations.
The forestry industry generates more than $7 billion in sales
outside Quebec, which is about 13% of all Quebec exports. The
forestry industry is currently the economic driver of 140 Quebec
municipalities. Forests represent the heritage of all Quebeckers, and
90% of them are public land, while 10% belong to private interests
—more than 130,000 owners. In Quebec, the potential for public
forests is 29 million cubic metres a year, and it is 12 million cubic
metres a year for private forests.
For years, the forestry industry has been going from one crisis to
the next. First, there was the softwood lumber conflict with the
United States from May 2002 to fall 2006. During that period,
Quebec's forestry industry lost more than 10,000 jobs.
Even though the Conservatives promised during the 2005 election
campaign to create a loan guarantee program for forestry companies
that were suffering as a result of the conflict, they reneged on their
promise once they came to power. The Prime Minister, who wanted
to sign a softwood lumber agreement with the Americans, chose
instead to starve the industry to ensure that it would accept any old
agreement. Since the industry was short of cash during that period, it
was not able to invest money to improve its productivity, and it
emerged from the conflict substantially weakened and ill-equipped
to face challenges. The consequences are still being felt today.
Then, there was the rising dollar. Boosted by Alberta oil, the
Canadian dollar rose by about 60% in four years, compared to the
American dollar. Forestry companies lost their competitive edge on
foreign markets, especially the American market. PricewaterhouseCoopers estimates that Canada's forestry industry loses $500 million
in revenue for every 1¢ increase in the value of the dollar. The
Quebec Forest Industry Council estimates that loss at $150 million in
Quebec.
In addition, the paper market is saturated and in slow but steady
decline, partly because of improved communication technologies.
What is more, companies are being hit with higher oil prices, which
increase their production and transportation costs. To top it all off,
the construction market in the United States collapsed because of the
financial and housing crisis. Not only are sales down, but prices are
down and companies are in poor financial shape, which diminishes
their ability to invest, innovate, modernize and develop new
products. Today, while the higher dollar should allow forestry
companies to buy new equipment at a reasonable price to improve
and diversify their production, they are often unable to invest
because they emerged from the crisis crippled with debt.
The forestry crisis that hit Quebec was very serious. From 2005 to
2011, the forestry industry lost nearly 30% of its workforce. The
industry went from 130,000 workers in 2005 to 99,659 in 2011.
From 2004-05 to 2012-13, there was a 38.7% drop in jobs in
silviculture and timber harvesting, which reduced job numbers to a
little more than 10,000 in those areas. Approximately 26,000 direct
jobs were lost in the wood product manufacturing sector from 2005
to 2010. Just over 3,000 more were lost in 2011 and 2012. In total,
there was a 29% decrease. At the same time, the pulp and paper
industry lost 33% of its jobs.
8242
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Private Members' Business
In 2011, Quebec's softwood lumber production dropped by 10%
and deliveries were down by nearly 6%.
and steel with wood, could allow the country to meet nearly 14% of
its target under the Kyoto protocol.
Quebec and Canada have a long history of using wood in housing
construction. Most single family homes are built of wood.
Commercial and industrial buildings, however, are usually built
out of concrete and steel. Recent technological breakthroughs in
engineered wood like finger-jointed wood and glued laminated
timber have helped facilitate the development of wood construction.
At the same time, many government building codes allow the use of
wood in a wider range of situations. For instance, British Columbia
allows the construction of buildings of up to six storeys in wood,
compared to past norms, which allowed for only three or four
storeys. Sweden has buildings of up to 10 storeys with wooden
frames.
● (1400)
Under its carbon neutral public service program, the New Zealand
government requires wood and wood products to be considered as
the main construction materials for new government buildings of
three stories or less in height.
What have other governments done to encourage the use of wood
to build public buildings?
Quebec is already relying on increased use of wood in
construction in the province, particularly in public buildings, other
non-residential buildings and multi-family dwellings. This strategy
aims to maximize Quebec's dominant position in high value-added
products.
On April 30, 2013, the Government of Quebec passed its wood
charter, which compels contractors to consider using wood in any
project paid from public funds. In its own projects, the Government
of Quebec is setting an example by promoting the increased use of
wood in the construction of large-scale buildings.
By changing the rules in the Régie du bâtiment du Québec, the
wood charter allows five and six storey buildings to be built out of
wood. In general, this new tool aims to increase the use of wood in
construction in Quebec, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and
develop higher value-added wood products.
The wood charter also seeks to promote the use of a combination
of wood and other materials and the use of appearance wood. To
achieve that goal, educational institutions and centres of expertise
will be called upon to provide training related to the use of wood in
structures. These institutions will also promote this use so that
professionals, such as architects and engineers, will have the latest
information on the use of wood as a structural component.
Wood products can be substituted for products with high
embodied energy that are at the mercy of rising fuel costs.
Environmental concerns have led a number of countries to develop
a strategy for the use of wood products, which is an important part of
their strategy to combat greenhouse gas emissions.
In Norway, the strategy to increase the use of wood involves
promoting and showing the possibilities for the increased use of
wood.
The use of wood can help combat climate change. Forest renewal
makes it possible to capture and store carbon. Once mature trees are
harvested, young trees absorb more carbon as they grow than trees
that are at the end of their life cycle. Moreover, wood products will
continue to store carbon throughout their useful life.
As long as the carbon remains stored in the wood, any increase in
the overall volume of timber supply will reduce the amount of
carbon in the atmosphere. Thus, an increased use of wood in
construction is a simple way to combat climate change.
Since wood products store carbon, the atmosphere will remain
free of that carbon as long as the wood product is being used and
even after, if the product is re-used or recycled as a secondary raw
material or for energy production.
The use of wood materials in construction can reduce CO2
emissions because they require less energy to manufacture than other
building materials.
The use of wood will kick-start the forestry and wood industry.
We are seeing more and more buildings made of wood. Furthermore,
wood is also being used together with steel and concrete. In my
riding, an increasing number of tourism buildings are being built
with concrete, steel and wood, which is becoming more popular. It
will revitalize the wood industry.
The minister, my colleague from Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean, has
already said in an interview that more federal government buildings
should be built with wood in order to revitalize the wood industry.
● (1405)
Mr. Mathieu Ravignat (Pontiac, NDP): Mr. Speaker, I would
like to congratulate my esteemed colleague for introducing his bill.
He and I are no doubt in similar situations. In Quebec, the forestry
industry is obviously in trouble. I congratulate him for this bill,
which may open new, although limited, markets. It is nonetheless a
good initiative.
British Columbia would like to develop the domestic wood market
by requiring all new public buildings to use British Columbia wood,
if possible, and by making changes to the Building Code that would
allow for the construction of six-storey wooden buildings.
British Columbia worked with the other provinces to make the
same changes.
I would like to know what more the government could have done
since coming to power to improve the situation of the forestry
industry.
France's Wood, Construction, Environment plan is designed to
increase the market share of wood in the construction industry by
25%. This increase, achieved by replacing products such as concrete
This has been talked about since 2005 or 2006 and bills were
introduced in 2010. However, nothing has been done. The
government should invest more.
Mr. Claude Patry: Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my
colleague for his question.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8243
Private Members' Business
It is a good thing that they invested heavily in the automobile
industry in Ontario, but they should also have invested heavily in the
forestry industry. In fact, they invested very little in this area.
Mrs. Sadia Groguhé (Saint-Lambert, NDP): Mr. Speaker, I
congratulate my colleague on his bill. I have a simple question for
him.
If they invested more and there was more development, we could
have secondary and tertiary processing, which would allow the
industry to get back on its feet and rest a little easier.
What is he hearing from his constituents who use wood to keep
the industry going in his riding?
Mr. Jacques Gourde (Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime
Minister, for Official Languages and for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec, CPC): Mr.
Speaker, my esteemed colleague should go see an eye doctor
because in recent years, our government has invested more than
$632 million in Quebec's forestry industry to help it be more
competitive and more effective.
Could the hon. member talk about at least one initiative that our
government has taken in his region? There have been many, but I am
sure that he cannot even acknowledge a single one.
Mr. Claude Patry: Mr. Speaker, I do not need to have my vision
checked. The government invested billions in Ontario's automotive
industry, while Quebec and the rest of Canada received just a few
million dollars. That is not very much.
The Conservative government abandoned the forestry sector and
we are paying for it now. The mills are barely hanging on. There is a
mill in my Liberal colleague's area that is closing its doors. In the
Saguenay, there is a mill that is still for sale because there are no
takers for the sawmill.
If the government made investments, I am not sure where. It must
be in Ontario.
[English]
Mr. Bruce Hyer (Thunder Bay—Superior North, GP): Mr.
Speaker, I am very pleased to support this bill by my friend, the
member for Jonquière—Alma.
This bill seeks to require preference be given to the concept that
promotes the use of wood while taking into account the factors of
cost and greenhouse gas emissions. The forestry sector has been in a
huge decline for the last half a decade and Canada has shed over
130,000 jobs in that time.
I commend the hon. member on his excellent bill, and I will give
him the opportunity to respond further, if he so chooses.
● (1410)
[Translation]
Mr. Claude Patry: Mr. Speaker, indeed, Canada has lost a lot of
jobs in this industry. I have a list here and it is frightening.
Between 2009 and 2012, nearly 8,600 jobs were lost in Quebec
alone, and between 2003 and 2008, more than 11,329 jobs were lost.
In British Columbia, more than 6,000 jobs were lost. I did not just
make these figures up. They come from Natural Resources Canada.
These jobs were lost and nothing was done to create diversity,
invest in these companies and help them through the crisis. We are
not just talking about conflicts over stumpage fees. We need to invest
in research into new processes, build and give people jobs.
Mr. Claude Patry: Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for her
question.
I think it is really difficult to do anything back home. A sawmill
has been up for sale for six months, and no one is buying. There are
closures all over the place. For example, a few years ago, we lost
machine No. 6 at the Kénogami mill. They are looking at starting the
machine up again.
Furthermore, there is a conflict over stumpage fees and other
details, but that is another complex issue. I think that we should do
secondary and tertiary processing. With this new engineered wood,
companies are making wood beams that are just as solid as steel
beams. That is what we need to develop.
People back home are starting to do it, but it is not easy.
[English]
Mr. Bernard Trottier (Parliamentary Secretary to the
Minister of Public Works and Government Services, CPC):
Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise on behalf of the government to
speak to Bill C-574, an act to amend the Department of Public
Works and Government Services Act (use of wood).
Let me begin by saying that I appreciate the intent of the bill,
which is to strengthen the forestry sector. No one would dispute that
seeking to strengthen various economic sectors of our country is a
laudable goal. That is precisely why our government is so focused on
jobs, economic growth, and prosperity for all sectors and all regions
of our country.
That said, however, members who were present for the debate in
2010 on Bill C-429, which was identical to this legislation and which
was defeated, will know that there are several reasons that this bill is
fundamentally flawed. In fact, there is no evidence to suggest that,
even if passed, this legislation would strengthen the Canadian
forestry sector it claims to help.
While I could elaborate at length on the problems with this
proposed legislation, I will limit my remarks to the key reasons that
our government cannot support the bill.
First, the proposed bill contravenes Canada's legal obligation
under the procurement provisions within our country's international
and domestic trade agreements.
[Translation]
These agreements prohibit discrimination and unnecessary
barriers to trade. Any legislation that were to amend the contract
tendering requirements to encourage the use of forestry products or
to give preference to a supplier who makes it a policy to use them
would contravene Canada's trade obligations under NAFTA, the
WTO Agreement on Government Procurement and our free trade
agreements with Chile and Peru.
8244
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Private Members' Business
This bill does not just contravene international trade agreements.
In fact, under the Agreement on Internal Trade, government tender
documents cannot require the use of specific materials unless they
are needed for technical or operational reasons.
[English]
IFIT funding, for example, to the Tolko Industries Ltd. mill in
Meadow Lake, Saskatchewan, helped the company develop
innovative technology that allowed it to become the first in North
America to produce different types of oriented strand board on a
single production line.
The Agreement on Internal Trade prohibits the introduction of a
bias in the form of technological specifications in favour of, or
against, particular goods or services, including those goods and
services included in construction contracts.
Under Canada's economic action plan 2014, IFIT was renewed for
four more years to the tune of $90.4 million so that it can help
support more breakthroughs like this one across the country.
Bill C-574 would also impair the capacity of the Minister of
Public Works and Government Services to fulfill her mandate as
stipulated in her own legislation, the Department of Public Works
and Government Services Act.
[Translation]
By giving preference to the use of wood in the construction and
renovation of federal buildings, the bill indirectly promotes one
sector over other, also essential, sectors of the Canadian economy.
This would, by extension, favour the economies of some regions
over others, in direct conflict with the mandate of Public Works and
Government Services Canada, which has procurement processes in
place to ensure openness, fairness, and transparency in order to
obtain best value for the crown.
Let me also note that most PWGSC projects are large office
buildings of more than four storeys, and the current national building
code does not easily permit the use of combustible materials for the
construction of buildings higher than four storeys.
● (1415)
[Translation]
That said, PWGSC already uses a large quantity of wood when
fulfilling its responsibility to maintain buildings owned by the
federal government and provide office space for public servants. The
department spends approximately $160 million a year on office
space and furnishings, and approximately 15% of that amount is put
towards wood products.
[English]
While the Department of Public Works remains an important
consumer of wood, our government also recognizes the importance
of the forestry industry. It provides, and continues to provide,
significant support to the forestry sector.
Given its long-standing importance to our country and to many
communities, particularly smaller ones, the forestry sector has
received a great deal of government attention in recent years.
Since 2006, our government has supported the forestry sector to
the level of $1.8 billion, and it continues to invest in innovative new
products, maintaining existing markets and pursuing new markets
for Canadian forest products.
To cite some examples, in 2010 the investments in forestry
industry transformation program, or IFIT, was created to enable
Canadian forest companies to lead the world in developing
innovative technologies that improve efficiency, reduce environmental impacts, and create non-traditional, high-value products from
Canada's world-class forest resources, and there have been some
tremendous successes.
The 2012 and 2013 economic action plans provided the forest
innovation program with $197 million over four years. That program
helps forestry companies innovate and adopt new technology. For
example, the tall wood demonstration project initiative helped
increase the export potential for forestry companies in both
traditional markets and emerging onces, including China, India
and the Middle East.
On the trade side, in 2012, the government announced the
extension of the softwood lumber agreement between Canada and
the United States through to the end of October 2015. That
guaranteed that Canada's softwood lumber producers would have
stable access to and fair market value in U.S. markets. That
agreement came into effect in October 2006 and meant that more
than $5 billion in U.S. tariffs went back into the pockets of Canadian
producers.
[English]
It is also important to consider the possible unforeseen
consequences if the bill were to pass. Greater demand for wood
could lead to greater imports of wood products and that would
certainly be of no help to the Canadian forest sector.
As I said earlier, the bill poses many legal and procurement issues
that make it impossible for our government to support. In fact, in
2010 when the previous version of the bill was being debated, it is
interesting to note that both opposition parties could not agree on a
unified position when it came to the bill. The votes were split along
regional and provincial lines and even many opposition members
could see that the bill was fundamentally flawed and did not support
it.
Of note, let me quote the current NDP critic for Public Works, the
member for Winnipeg North, who during consideration of the
previous identical version of the bill at committee said:
We really shouldn't be seized of the issue of what kind of flooring we're going to
put into the next public building that we build. It's almost insulting, frankly, for us to
be using our time on this. I mean, are we going to have a private members' bill to
dictate what kind of curtains we put in the next building we build? I'm starting to get
frustrated with this.
While most of the NDP caucus voted against the bill, the current
leader of the NDP, the member for Outremont, supported it.
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8245
Private Members' Business
Interestingly enough, the Liberal Party was also deeply divided
on this legislation, with the current Liberal Finance and National
Revenue critic, the member for Kings—Hants, voting against the bill
and the current Liberal leader, the member for Papineau, supporting
it.
sustainable and renewable resource that compares favourably to
other building materials, specifically regarding greenhouse gas
emissions, I think this alternative needs to be explored.
It will be interesting to see if the current NDP and Liberal leaders
will continue to support this flawed legislation, which clearly seeks
to unfairly favour one sector over the others and, by extension, seeks
to unfairly favour one province and region at the expense of others.
By using more wood, the government could also save a lot of
money, not only when public buildings are being built, but also in
the long term. Operating and maintenance costs for buildings made
of wood are 55% lower than for buildings made of other materials.
I would like to reiterate that the legislation and its fundamental
flaws will not allow our government to support the bill. Today we
are seeing Canada's forest sector evolve into a modern, innovative
industry with its sights set on new markets, new ways of using wood
and new ways to maximize value from forest fibre. Our government
is happy and proud to continue playing an important role in
supporting these exciting new developments and we do just that
because we recognize how important it is to our economy and to our
country.
● (1420)
[Translation]
Ms. Élaine Michaud (Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, NDP): Mr.
Speaker, I am very pleased to speak to today's debate on Bill C-574.
Contrary to what my Conservative colleague just said, this bill is
proposing a rather interesting idea that deserves to be explored
further in the House.
The idea is to require that the Minister of Public Works and
Government Services, before soliciting bids for the construction,
maintenance or repair of public works, federal buildings and federal
real property, give preference to the concept that promotes the use of
wood while taking into account the factors of cost and greenhouse
gas emissions.
This idea is part of a sustainable development approach, which
might partly explain why the Conservative government does not
seem to want to support it. Sustainable development does not seem
to be on its radar. We see how the government allows the haphazard
and unrestricted development of our natural resources at the expense
of a number of economic sectors and the lives of Canadians.
Sustainable development is important to the NDP. It is with that in
mind that I am supporting Bill C-574 at second reading, in the hope
that we continue to study it in committee. If there are any problems
with the bill, that would be the best time to discuss it and propose
amendments that might be needed. However, to do so, we need to
study the bill more closely. The bill therefore needs to be referred to
committee.
The use of wood in construction is a concept that is starting to take
off, especially in Quebec, but also in other regions of Canada. Last
year, the Government of Quebec adopted a wood charter, in order to
have public works managers assess, for each publicly funded project,
the possibility of using wood as construction material. This would
also include calculating the greenhouse gas emissions in comparison
with other types of materials.
Because that charter was adopted, contractors in Quebec can now
build buildings up to six storeys high out of wood, as well as other
kinds of infrastructure, such as bridges, for example. Since wood is a
Never mind the issue of sustainable development, I will speak a
language that the Conservatives understand: economics. Saving 55%
on operating and maintenance costs is significant, to say nothing of
the savings that can be had at the time of construction by using
wood. These factors should not be dismissed out of hand when new
federal building projects are assessed.
Furthermore, the new opportunities that would arise from the
increased use of wood in various construction projects could
definitely help create more good jobs in rural or remote regions of
Quebec, of course, but also many other areas of Canada. This is very
important.
The Canadian forest products industry is one of Canada's largest
employers. It provides 230,000 direct jobs in 200 communities
across Canada. The benefits of using more wood in federal buildings
would be visible from coast to coast to coast. We must bear that in
mind when evaluating this kind of legislation. This could mean
economic benefits for every province and territory. This is very
important.
Among the 200 communities that boast jobs directly related to the
forestry industy, several are municipalities in my riding of Portneuf
—Jacques-Cartier, where the forestry industry has always played a
very important role in the regional economy. For instance, in the
Portneuf RCM, which includes 18 municipalities, over 1,400 people
are employed in the forestry industry, mainly in wood processing.
● (1425)
In addition to veneer, door and window plants, there are also many
sawmills in the Portneuf RCM. The forestry industry also played a
major role in first attracting people to live in the Portneuf RCM.
The situation is similar in the Jacques-Cartier RCM, which
includes nine municipalities. In addition to its historic role in the
settlement and development of the Jacques-Cartier region, the
forestry industry continues to be important to the regional economy,
mainly because of the businesses working in secondary and tertiary
processing of wood products.
8246
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Private Members' Business
By passing a bill such as Bill C-574, we could create good jobs in
ridings such as mine and in a sector that has experienced major
difficulties in recent years. My riding was not spared by the crises in
the manufacturing and forestry industries. A few years ago, the
AbitibiBowater plant in Donnacona closed its doors, leaving
employees without jobs, resources or pensions. The Conservative
government of the day refused to take action, which was very
unfortunate. The MP at the time—I cannot remember if he was an
independent or a Conservative—was not of much help to the people
of Donnacona, who were directly affected by the AbitibiBowater
plant closure.
That is why members introduce bills such as Bill C-574. They do
so to address some of the problems in remote rural regions where it
can be difficult to create good jobs that provide adequate income for
households in the area.
At present, in my riding of Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, municipalities have used wood in a number of commercial buildings. The
results are quite interesting. This was made possible by the
leadership of the municipal councils, but also with the support of
the Province of Quebec, which strongly supports the use of wood as
a construction material in public buildings and public works.
I would like to give an example that is quite beautiful to see. I
invite you to come and visit this building. In 2010, the Fédération
québécoise des chasseurs et pêcheurs built its head office in SaintAugustin-de-Desmaures in my riding. It decided to use wood for
both the interior and the exterior of the building. The result is
beautiful, and the building blends in well with its natural
surroundings. In 2011, this building and the Fédération québécoise
des chasseurs et pêcheurs even received a cecobois award of
excellence. The Centre d'expertise sur la construction commerciale
en bois or cecobois is an organization that seeks to promote and
support the use of wood in multi-family and non-residential
construction in Quebec. Of course, it also promotes the use of local
resources, such as wood, and tries to reduce greenhouse gas
emissions, while supporting more responsible economic development based on the principles of sustainable development. An
organization that demonstrated this type of leadership can be found
in Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures.
More recently, on September 24, the Centre d'expertise sur la
construction commerciale en bois also presented two awards of
excellence to municipalities in the Portneuf RCM: Cap-Santé and
Portneuf. Cap-Santé built a multi-purpose facility, called the Maison
des générations, which will be used by various organizations in the
community. A lot of wood was used, and the results are
extraordinary. In Portneuf, Bishop Bridge is a wonderful structure
made predominantly of wood.
These two municipalities are good models, and the government
should look at what was done and how the communities benefited
from these projects. It should play a leadership role to try to ensure
that the principles of sustainable development are upheld, to help
Canadians save money and to promote development in a sector that
has lost a lot of jobs in recent years.
That is why I support Bill C-574. I hope that we will have the
opportunity to take this bill further and at least examine it in
committee so that we can seriously discuss and study it.
● (1430)
Ms. Lise St-Denis (Saint-Maurice—Champlain, Lib.): Mr.
Speaker, we need to once again address the difficulties that
producers and processors in the forestry industry are grappling
with. Bill C-574 is fundamentally related to the ongoing crisis in one
of our country's oldest industries. We have been helplessly watching
the demise of our forestry industry in forests from British Columbia
to New Brunswick. Paper mills are dropping like flies and the recent
announcement of the mill closures in East Angus and Shawinigan, in
Quebec, confirm this strong trend that is undermining our industry.
Forestry producers are not only required to go further to get raw
materials, but they also have to compete with new technologies and
other replacement products in the construction industry.
As we know, the need for paper is dropping. Research and
development in Canada is at a standstill, despite the importance of
the forestry industry to our economy. Tens of thousands of jobs
depend on this industry, which is hundreds of years old. In Mauricie,
entire communities depend on wood—from logging to its transport,
processing and marketing.
We are still shocked by the slow erosion of our forestry industry
and especially by the inaction of governments in response to the
disappearance of thousands of specialized jobs in Canada. Since the
first lumber camps opened in Mauricie, forestry has fed families and
communities and has been a part of the region's social and economic
fabric.
Much like other regions of Canada that rely on forestry, we are
still waiting for concrete action to revitalize these companies that are
being threatened by changing technologies and globalization.
However, using more wood is a realistic solution to address the
economic problems of the regions, if only because of the diversity of
production and our expertise.
From timber to softwood lumber, there are many possible
solutions to address today's industrial needs. We have been blessed
with all this wood around us, but considering that the government's
efforts have been largely symbolic, we cannot say that we are out of
the woods.
Legislation on the use of wood in federal building projects is a nobrainer, but why is it that we have not already developed the instinct
to include our own primary resources in our infrastructure? These
days, many young people are leaving the regions because there are
no jobs. The federal government, with its employment insurance
system, sends them a clear message that they should leave rather
than invest in their communities.
It is strange, to say the least, that we have to convince this
government of the regenerating capacity of our forests. Logs from
our forests are fueling softwood lumber industries all around the
world. When will we get a real lumber policy that will make a
difference here at home, in our communities?
October 3, 2014
COMMONS DEBATES
8247
Private Members' Business
The time has come to take action in response to the plant closures
that are tearing our industrial base apart. We need forestry policies
right now to save an industry that operates in many regions across
Canada. Our country has always had these vast forests that, over the
centuries, have helped us prosper around the world. What kind of
policies can we create now to develop this industry in the context of
globalization and bilateral and multilateral agreements?
The resource is there, and as new technologies emerge, we need to
take action. Sustainable development and air pollution are the focus
of public debate, and without a doubt, our forestry resources are part
of the solution.
● (1435)
At the local level, municipalities and business owners support
including wood and wood waste in the economic cycle of production
and consumption. Efforts such as using biomass to heat institutional
facilities are starting to pay off.
We are at the dawn of a wood revolution, and we are seeing wood
included in new technologies. We need to give ourselves the chance
to continue to prosper, with the help of these industries that are the
backbone of our regions. Let us be forward thinking and develop
policies to promote the forestry industry, not just because it has
economic value, but also because these products have environmental
value and have no equivalent in the construction industry.
It goes without saying that we should incorporate wood into our
federal infrastructure, but the ultimate goal is for the government to
promote wood production at the national level. We are distressed by
the recent closure of paper mills in Quebec, and we urge decisionmakers to agree on a national wood policy in order to put an end to
the demolition of an industry that helped build our nation. Jobs are
being lost and communities are dying. When will the government
react and invest in research and development?
We are not asking for government funds to be allocated without
any kind of coordination or planning. We are looking for a national
policy that will include solutions that come from the industry itself.
[English]
Mr. Bernard Trottier: Mr. Speaker, I want to make a point of
order.
In my remarks earlier, I quoted the NDP critic for public works
and I indicated he was the member for Winnipeg North. I should
have said he is the member for Winnipeg Centre.
The Deputy Speaker: I thank the member, and that is so noted.
Resuming debate, the hon. Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister
of Natural Resources.
Mrs. Kelly Block (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Natural Resources, CPC): Mr. Speaker, as we know, forestry is part
of our history and identity as Canadians, and I would like to thank
the member for Jonquière—Alma for introducing the bill. It provides
me with an opportunity to discuss our country's vital forest sector.
While the bill is problematic, and I will touch on some of my
concerns later on in my remarks, I can appreciate the desire to
support our forestry industry. Our government shares this appreciation, and is in fact already acting upon this in significant ways.
Further to the points previously raised by the Parliamentary
Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services,
allow me to describe in greater detail some of the ways that our
government has demonstrated consistent support for the forestry
sector.
Economic action plan 2014 continues to make unprecedented
investments to innovate Canada's forestry sector and to protect it
from the threat of pests. Today this sector provides direct employment for over 235,000 workers in every part of our country, and it is
a particularly important employer in rural and remote communities.
In fact, in 200 communities, it accounts for at least half of the
economic base.
However, the forestry sector has faced some challenges over the
last decade. These challenges have come about due to a variety of
factors, including the worldwide economic downturn, the stronger
Canadian dollar, a structural decline in North American newsprint
demand, and increased competition from other forest products.
Yet, the tide is turning. I am pleased to report that forestry sector
markets are rebounding and market expansion efforts are proving
successful. Jobs and the economy are the top priorities of this
government, and since 2006 our government has provided over $1.8
billion in various initiatives to support the economic competitiveness
and environmental sustainability of Canada's forestry sector. This
includes investments in developing new markets, supporting
innovation, and reducing the industry's environmental footprint.
Thanks in part to this support, Canada's forestry industry is
reinventing itself, by becoming more innovative, more environmentally friendly, and more global in reach. It is adopting innovation as
part of its new business model.
How is all of this happening? A main hub of the forest sector
innovation system in Canada is the not-for-profit organization
FPInnovations, which our government helped to create in 2007.
Today, FPInnovations is the world's largest public-private forest
products research institute. Comprised of Canada's three national
research institutes and Natural Resources Canada's Canadian Wood
Fibre Centre, FPInnovations focuses on the development of
emerging and breakthrough technologies, such as biomass harvesting and conversion, and nanotechnology. It conducts forest products
research under NRCan's forest innovation program and is a partner
in deploying promising new technologies into the forest products
industry.
The investments in the forest industry transformation program, or
IFIT, go another step forward. Through this program, our
government is helping to see that new first-of-their-kind products,
technologies, and processes with demonstrated value are brought to
market. Our government has already supported 14 world-class or
Canada-first projects, and economic action plan 2014 has committed
more than $90 million to the program over the next four years.
8248
COMMONS DEBATES
October 3, 2014
Private Members' Business
A great example of a project that has benefited from IFIT is the
one at Lauzon, in Papineauville, Quebec, a collaboration with the
Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec and FPInnovations. In a
global first, Lauzon is piloting Canadian-developed scanning
technology that allows it to classify and sort logs in order to
increase the amount of wood fibre recovered to 70%, compared to
the current industry standard of 40%.
The capacity to convert low-quality wood fibre into customized
unfinished flooring planks greatly increases the value that Lauzon
obtains from each log. This technology could potentially be
replicated in other hardwood flooring mills, thus benefiting the
wider industry.
● (1440)
In another great project, Kruger Biomaterials Inc. is building a
demonstration plant in Trois-Rivières for the commercialization of
cellulose filaments, which are used in papermaking to soften,
strengthen, and brighten paper. This Canadian innovation is another
exciting world first, and as such will provide Canada with an
immediate competitive advantage.
Strong, light, recyclable, and made without effluents, cellulose
filaments have such a wide array of non-traditional uses that they
have the potential to radically transform Canada's forestry sector.
Last December, Natural Resources Canada announced a $15
million investment in the commercialization facility, complementing
earlier investments in R and D undertaken by FPinnovations. It is
investments like these that are helping to shape the forestry sector of
tomorrow.
Other investments have helped develop and expand markets.
In economic action plan 2012, $105 million over two years was
announced to support forestry sector innovation and market
development.
In economic action plan 2013, our government committed to an
additional $92 million over two years, starting in 2014-15, to
develop innovative new products and to diversify our markets. This
market diversification strategy has helped Canada's wood products
sector increase its exports in some rapidly growing Asian economies
over the last decade.
For example, our government's focus on expanding export
markets has resulted in a 1,000% increase of Canadian softwood
lumber exports to China. Further, the value of Canadian wood
products exports to China increased almost 24-fold between 2002
and 2012 to $1.4 billion.
In other trade-related activities, in 2012 our government
announced the extension of the Canada-U.S. Softwood Lumber
Agreement until October 2015, providing stable access to the U.S.
market, and under the Canada-European Union Comprehensive
Economic and Trade Agreement announced last fall, our world-class
wood products would enjoy preferential access to, and increased
demand from, the EU's member states.
It is no secret that expanding markets mean more jobs for
Canadians, and that is good news for the economy and good news
for Canadian families.
There are many other initiatives I could mention. However, with
my limited time remaining, let me just mention the $18 million over
four years announced in economic action plan 2014 for an action
plan to assist eastern Canada in combatting the spruce budworm
outbreak. Along with our government's other strategic investments,
this investment is intended to help the industry and communities
maintain their recovery momentum
I would now like to turn my attention to the reasons that I cannot
support the bill.
While I certainly appreciate the desire to assist the forestry
industry, this legislation has fundamental flaws that make it very
problematic. If passed, Bill C-574 would contravene Canada's
obligations under its international and domestic trade agreements,
such as NAFTA, WTO, and the Agreement on Internal Trade.
Furthermore, by advocating an amendment to the Department of
Public Works and Government Services Act to mandate the use of
wood in the construction, maintenance, or repair of public works real
property, the bill is in effect introducing an untenable bias into the
procurement process.
Government contracting and procurement processes are in place to
ensure openness, fairness, and transparency. Mandating the drafting
of tender requirements to include a preference for wood products
would grant an unfair advantage to suppliers proposing wood
solutions at the expense of other important sectors of our economy,
such as the steel industry and the concrete industry, for example.
In closing, our government's top priority is to create jobs,
economic growth, and long-term prosperity for all sectors of our
economy, including the forestry industry. That is why we are making
significant investments in forest industry innovation and expanding
markets for Canada's wood products sector, and it is why we are
committed to continuing to support the forest sector and to achieve
real results for Canadians, something the bill fails to do.
● (1445)
[Translation]
The Deputy Speaker: The time provided for the consideration of
private members' business has now expired and the order is dropped
to the bottom of the order of precedence on the order paper.
[English]
It being 2:50 p.m., the House stands adjourned until next Monday
at 11 a.m., pursuant to Standing Order 24(1).
(The House adjourned at 2:50 p.m.)
APPENDIX
ALPHABETICAL LIST OF MEMBERS WITH THEIR
CONSTITUENCIES, PROVINCE OF CONSTITUENCY
AND POLITICAL AFFILIATIONS;
COMMITTEES OF THE HOUSE,
THE MINISTRY AND PARLIAMENTARY SECRETARY
CHAIR OCCUPANTS
The Speaker
HON. ANDREW SCHEER
The Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole
MR. JOE COMARTIN
The Deputy Chair of Committees of the Whole
MR. BARRY DEVOLIN
The Assistant Deputy Chair of Committees of the Whole
MR. BRUCE STANTON
BOARD OF INTERNAL ECONOMY
HON. ANDREW SCHEER
MRS. STELLA AMBLER
HON. JOHN DUNCAN
HON. DOMINIC LEBLANC
MR. PHILIP TOONE
MS. NYCOLE TURMEL
HON. PETER VAN LOAN
3
ALPHABETICAL LIST OF MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS
Second Session—Forty-first Parliament
Province of
Constituency
Political
Affiliation
Name of Member
Constituency
Ablonczy, Hon. Diane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adams, Eve, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health. . . . .
Adler, Mark. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Aglukkaq, Hon. Leona, Minister of the Environment, Minister of the
Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency and Minister
for the Arctic Council. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Albas, Dan, Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury
Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Albrecht, Harold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alexander, Hon. Chris, Minister of Citizenship and Immigration . . .
Allen, Malcolm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Allen, Mike . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Allison, Dean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ambler, Stella . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ambrose, Hon. Rona, Minister of Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Anders, Rob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Anderson, David, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign
Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Andrews, Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calgary—Nose Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Mississauga—Brampton South Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
York Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Angus, Charlie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Armstrong, Scott, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Employment and Social Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ashfield, Hon. Keith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ashton, Niki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Aspin, Jay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Atamanenko, Alex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Aubin, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ayala, Paulina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Baird, Hon. John, Minister of Foreign Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Barlow, John. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bateman, Joyce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bélanger, Hon. Mauril . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bellavance, André. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bennett, Hon. Carolyn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Benoit, Leon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Benskin, Tyrone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bergen, Hon. Candice, Minister of State (Social Development) . . . . .
Bernier, Hon. Maxime, Minister of State (Small Business and
Tourism, and Agriculture) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bevington, Dennis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bezan, James, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National
Defence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Blanchette, Denis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Blanchette-Lamothe, Lysane. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Blaney, Hon. Steven, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency
Preparedness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nunavut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nunavut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Okanagan—Coquihalla . . . . . . . . .
Kitchener—Conestoga . . . . . . . . . .
Ajax—Pickering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Welland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tobique—Mactaquac . . . . . . . . . . .
Niagara West—Glanbrook . . . . .
Mississauga South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edmonton—Spruce Grove . . . . .
Calgary West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New Brunswick. . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
NDP
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
Cypress Hills—Grasslands . . . . . Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . .
Newfoundland and
Avalon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Labrador. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Timmins—James Bay . . . . . . . . . . Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cumberland—Colchester—
Musquodoboit Valley . . . . . . . . . . . Nova Scotia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fredericton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Brunswick. . . . . . . . . .
Churchill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manitoba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nipissing—Timiskaming . . . . . . . Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia Southern
Interior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Trois-Rivières . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Honoré-Mercier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ottawa West—Nepean. . . . . . . . . . Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Macleod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Winnipeg South Centre . . . . . . . . . Manitoba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ottawa—Vanier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Richmond—Arthabaska . . . . . . . . Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
St. Paul's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vegreville—Wainwright . . . . . . . . Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Jeanne-Le Ber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Portage—Lisgar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manitoba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
Lib.
NDP
CPC
CPC
NDP
CPC
NDP
NDP
NDP
CPC
CPC
CPC
Lib.
Ind.
Lib.
CPC
NDP
CPC
Beauce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Northwest Territories . . . . . . . . . . . Northwest Territories . . . . NDP
Selkirk—Interlake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manitoba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Louis-Hébert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
Pierrefonds—Dollard . . . . . . . . . . . Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
Lévis—Bellechasse . . . . . . . . . . . . . Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
4
Name of Member
Block, Kelly, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural
Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Boivin, Françoise. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Borg, Charmaine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Boughen, Ray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Boulerice, Alexandre. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Boutin-Sweet, Marjolaine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brahmi, Tarik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Braid, Peter, Parliamentary Secretary for Infrastructure and Communities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Breitkreuz, Garry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brison, Hon. Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brosseau, Ruth Ellen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brown, Gordon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brown, Lois, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International
Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brown, Patrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bruinooge, Rod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Butt, Brad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Byrne, Hon. Gerry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calandra, Paul , Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and
for Intergovernmental Affairs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calkins, Blaine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cannan, Hon. Ron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Carmichael, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Caron, Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Carrie, Colin, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the
Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Casey, Sean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cash, Andrew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chan, Arnold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Charlton, Chris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chicoine, Sylvain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chisholm, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chisu, Corneliu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chong, Hon. Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choquette, François . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Christopherson, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clarke, Rob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Constituency
Province of
Constituency
Political
Affiliation
Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar
Gatineau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terrebonne—Blainville . . . . . . . . .
Palliser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie . . . .
Hochelaga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saint-Jean. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
NDP
NDP
CPC
NDP
NDP
NDP
Kitchener—Waterloo . . . . . . . . . . .
Yorkton—Melville . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kings—Hants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Berthier—Maskinongé . . . . . . . . . .
Leeds—Grenville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nova Scotia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
Lib.
NDP
CPC
Newmarket—Aurora . . . . . . . . . . . .
Barrie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Winnipeg South . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mississauga—Streetsville. . . . . . .
Humber—St. Barbe—Baie
Verte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manitoba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Newfoundland and
Labrador. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
Oak Ridges—Markham . . . . . . . .
Wetaskiwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kelowna—Lake Country . . . . . . .
Don Valley West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rimouski-Neigette—
Témiscouata—Les Basques . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
Oshawa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Charlottetown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Davenport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scarborough—Agincourt . . . . . . .
Hamilton Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Châteauguay—Saint-Constant. .
Dartmouth—Cole Harbour . . . . .
Pickering—Scarborough East . .
Wellington—Halton Hills . . . . . .
Drummond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hamilton Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Desnethé—Missinippi—
Churchill River. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prince Edward Island. . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nova Scotia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
Lib.
NDP
Lib.
NDP
NDP
NDP
CPC
CPC
NDP
NDP
Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . .
Newfoundland and
Labrador. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
CPC
Cleary, Ryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clement, Hon. Tony, President of the Treasury Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Comartin, Joe, The Deputy Speaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Côté, Raymond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cotler, Hon. Irwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crockatt, Joan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crowder, Jean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cullen, Nathan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
St. John's South—Mount Pearl
Parry Sound—Muskoka . . . . . . . .
Windsor—Tecumseh . . . . . . . . . . . .
Beauport—Limoilou . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mount Royal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calgary Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nanaimo—Cowichan . . . . . . . . . . .
Skeena—Bulkley Valley. . . . . . . .
Lib.
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
NDP
CPC
NDP
NDP
Lib.
CPC
NDP
NDP
5
Province of
Constituency
Political
Affiliation
Nova Scotia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Lib.
CPC
CPC
NDP
NDP
Name of Member
Constituency
Cuzner, Rodger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Daniel, Joe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Davidson, Patricia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Davies, Don . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Davies, Libby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Day, Anne-Marie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cape Breton—Canso . . . . . . . . . . .
Don Valley East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sarnia—Lambton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vancouver Kingsway . . . . . . . . . . .
Vancouver East. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Charlesbourg—Haute-SaintCharles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mississauga—Erindale. . . . . . . . . .
Peterborough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—
Brock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ottawa Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saint-Laurent—Cartierville . . . . .
Rivière-du-Nord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New Westminster—Coquitlam .
Alfred-Pellan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Red Deer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chambly—Borduas . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bourassa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vancouver Island North . . . . . . . .
Etobicoke North. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edmonton—Strathcona . . . . . . . . .
Sherbrooke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
NDP
Lib.
NDP
NDP
NDP
CPC
NDP
Lib.
CPC
Lib.
NDP
NDP
St. Catharines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Malpeque . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sydney—Victoria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Provencher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vaughan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Abbotsford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Delta—Richmond East . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prince Edward Island. . . .
Nova Scotia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manitoba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
CPC
Lib.
Lib.
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
Haldimand—Norfolk . . . . . . . . . . . Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Charleswood—St. James—
Assiniboia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manitoba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Newfoundland and
Random—Burin—St. George's Labrador. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Haute-Gaspésie—La Mitis—
Matane—Matapédia . . . . . . . . . . . . Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Toronto Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Argenteuil—Papineau—
Mirabel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vancouver Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Ottawa—Orléans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Renfrew—Nipissing—
Pembroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Westmount—Ville-Marie . . . . . . . Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca . . . . . . British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Shefford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manicouagan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Marc-Aurèle-Fortin . . . . . . . . . . . . . Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
Dechert, Bob, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice . . .
Del Mastro, Dean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Devolin, Barry, The Acting Speaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dewar, Paul. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dion, Hon. Stéphane, Saint-Laurent—Cartierville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dionne Labelle, Pierre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Donnelly, Fin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Doré Lefebvre, Rosane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dreeshen, Earl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dubé, Matthew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dubourg, Emmanuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Duncan, Hon. John, Minister of State and Chief Government Whip
Duncan, Kirsty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Duncan, Linda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dusseault, Pierre-Luc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dykstra, Rick, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian
Heritage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Easter, Hon. Wayne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Eyking, Hon. Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Falk, Ted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fantino, Hon. Julian, Minister of Veterans Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fast, Hon. Ed, Minister of International Trade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Findlay, Hon. Kerry-Lynne D., Minister of National Revenue . . . . . .
Finley, Hon. Diane, Minister of Public Works and Government
Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fletcher, Hon. Steven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Foote, Judy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fortin, Jean-François . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Freeland, Chrystia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Freeman, Mylène . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fry, Hon. Hedy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Galipeau, Royal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gallant, Cheryl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Garneau, Marc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Garrison, Randall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Genest, Réjean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Genest-Jourdain, Jonathan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Giguère, Alain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cons. Ind.
CPC
Lib.
Ind.
Lib.
NDP
Lib.
CPC
CPC
Lib.
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
6
Name of Member
Gill, Parm, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans
Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Glover, Hon. Shelly, Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official
Languages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Godin, Yvon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Goguen, Robert, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice
Goldring, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Goodale, Hon. Ralph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Goodyear, Hon. Gary, Minister of State (Federal Economic
Development Agency for Southern Ontario) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gosal, Hon. Bal, Minister of State (Sport) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gourde, Jacques, Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister, for
Official Languages and for the Economic Development Agency of
Canada for the Regions of Quebec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gravelle, Claude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grewal, Nina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Groguhé, Sadia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Harper, Right Hon. Stephen, Prime Minister. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Harris, Dan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Harris, Jack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Harris, Richard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hassainia, Sana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hawn, Hon. Laurie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hayes, Bryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hiebert, Russ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hillyer, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hoback, Randy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Holder, Hon. Ed, Minister of State (Science and Technology) . . . . . .
Hsu, Ted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hughes, Carol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Constituency
Province of
Constituency
Political
Affiliation
Brampton—Springdale . . . . . . . . . Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Saint Boniface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Acadie—Bathurst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe
Edmonton East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wascana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manitoba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New Brunswick. . . . . . . . . .
New Brunswick. . . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
NDP
CPC
CPC
Lib.
Cambridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Bramalea—Gore—Malton. . . . . . Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Lotbinière—Chutes-de-laChaudière . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nickel Belt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fleetwood—Port Kells . . . . . . . . .
Saint-Lambert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calgary Southwest . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scarborough Southwest. . . . . . . . .
St. John's East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cariboo—Prince George . . . . . . .
Verchères—Les Patriotes . . . . . . .
Edmonton Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sault Ste. Marie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
South Surrey—White Rock—
Cloverdale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lethbridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prince Albert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
London West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kingston and the Islands . . . . . . .
Algoma—Manitoulin—
Kapuskasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Thunder Bay—Superior North .
Brome—Missisquoi . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hyer, Bruce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Jacob, Pierre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
James, Roxanne, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public
Safety and Emergency Preparedness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scarborough Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Jones, Yvonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Labrador . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Julian, Peter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burnaby—New Westminster . . .
Kamp, Randy, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—
and Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keddy, Gerald, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National
Revenue and for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency . . . . . . South Shore—St. Margaret's . . .
Kellway, Matthew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Beaches—East York . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kenney, Hon. Jason, Minister of Employment and Social Development and Minister for Multiculturalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Calgary Southeast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kent, Hon. Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thornhill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kerr, Greg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Nova . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Komarnicki, Ed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Souris—Moose Mountain . . . . . .
Kramp, Daryl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prince Edward—Hastings . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Newfoundland and
Labrador. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
NDP
CPC
NDP
CPC
NDP
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
Lib.
NDP
CPC
Ind.
CPC
CPC
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GP
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Newfoundland and
Labrador. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lib.
British Columbia . . . . . . . . NDP
British Columbia . . . . . . . . CPC
Nova Scotia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nova Scotia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
7
Name of Member
Constituency
Lake, Hon. Mike, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry Edmonton—Mill Woods—
Beaumont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lamoureux, Kevin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Winnipeg North . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lapointe, François . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montmagny—L'Islet—
Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup
Larose, Jean-François . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Repentigny . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Latendresse, Alexandrine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louis-Saint-Laurent . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lauzon, Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stormont—Dundas—South
Glengarry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Laverdière, Hélène . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laurier—Sainte-Marie . . . . . . . . . .
Lebel, Hon. Denis, Minister of Infrastructure, Communities and
Intergovernmental Affairs and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec . . . . . . . . . . . . Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean . . . . . .
LeBlanc, Hon. Dominic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Beauséjour. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LeBlanc, Hélène. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LaSalle—Émard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Leef, Ryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yukon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Leitch, Hon. K. Kellie, Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of
Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Simcoe—Grey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lemieux, Pierre, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Glengarry—Prescott—Russell .
Leslie, Megan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Halifax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Leung, Chungsen, Parliamentary Secretary for Multiculturalism . . . . Willowdale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Liu, Laurin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rivière-des-Mille-Îles . . . . . . . . . . .
Lizon, Wladyslaw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mississauga East—Cooksville .
Lobb, Ben . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Huron—Bruce. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lukiwski, Tom, Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the
Regina—Lumsden—Lake
Government in the House of Commons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lunney, James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nanaimo—Alberni . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MacAulay, Hon. Lawrence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cardigan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MacKay, Hon. Peter, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of
Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Central Nova . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MacKenzie, Dave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oxford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maguire, Larry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brandon—Souris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mai, Hoang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brossard—La Prairie . . . . . . . . . . .
Marston, Wayne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hamilton East—Stoney Creek .
Martin, Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Winnipeg Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Masse, Brian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Windsor West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mathyssen, Irene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . London—Fanshawe. . . . . . . . . . . . .
May, Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saanich—Gulf Islands . . . . . . . . . .
Mayes, Colin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Okanagan—Shuswap . . . . . . . . . . .
McCallum, Hon. John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Markham—Unionville . . . . . . . . . .
McColeman, Phil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
McGuinty, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ottawa South . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
McKay, Hon. John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scarborough—Guildwood . . . . . .
McLeod, Cathy, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Labour Kamloops—Thompson—
and for Western Economic Diversification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cariboo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Menegakis, Costas, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Citizenship and Immigration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Richmond Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Michaud, Élaine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier . . . . . .
Miller, Larry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound . . .
Moore, Christine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Abitibi—Témiscamingue . . . . . . .
Province of
Constituency
Political
Affiliation
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Manitoba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lib.
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New Brunswick. . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Yukon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
Lib.
NDP
CPC
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nova Scotia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
NDP
CPC
NDP
CPC
CPC
Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
British Columbia . . . . . . . . CPC
Prince Edward Island. . . . Lib.
Nova Scotia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manitoba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manitoba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
GP
CPC
Lib.
CPC
Lib.
Lib.
British Columbia . . . . . . . . CPC
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
NDP
CPC
NDP
8
Name of Member
Constituency
Moore, Hon. James, Minister of Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Port Moody—Westwood—Port
Coquitlam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moore, Hon. Rob, Minister of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities
Agency) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fundy Royal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Morin, Dany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chicoutimi—Le Fjord . . . . . . . . . .
Morin, Isabelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—
Lachine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Morin, Marc-André . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laurentides—Labelle . . . . . . . . . . .
Morin, Marie-Claude. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot . . . . . . . .
Mourani, Maria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ahuntsic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mulcair, Hon. Thomas, Leader of the Opposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Outremont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Murray, Joyce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vancouver Quadra . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nantel, Pierre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Longueuil—Pierre-Boucher . . . .
Nash, Peggy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkdale—High Park . . . . . . . . . . .
Nicholls, Jamie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vaudreuil-Soulanges . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nicholson, Hon. Rob, Minister of National Defence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Niagara Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Norlock, Rick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Northumberland—Quinte West
Nunez-Melo, José . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Obhrai, Hon. Deepak, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of
Foreign Affairs and for International Human Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Calgary East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
O'Connor, Hon. Gordon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carleton—Mississippi Mills. . . .
Oliver, Hon. Joe, Minister of Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eglinton—Lawrence . . . . . . . . . . . .
O'Neill Gordon, Tilly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miramichi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opitz, Ted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Etobicoke Centre. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
O'Toole, Erin, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Durham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pacetti, Massimo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel . .
Papillon, Annick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Québec. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Paradis, Hon. Christian, Minister of International Development and
Minister for La Francophonie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mégantic—L'Érable. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Patry, Claude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jonquière—Alma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Payne, LaVar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Medicine Hat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Péclet, Ève . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . La Pointe-de-l'Île . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Perreault, Manon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montcalm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pilon, François . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laval—Les Îles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plamondon, Louis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bas-Richelieu—Nicolet—
Bécancour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Poilievre, Hon. Pierre, Minister of State (Democratic Reform) . . . . . . Nepean—Carleton . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preston, Joe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elgin—Middlesex—London . . .
Quach, Anne Minh-Thu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Beauharnois—Salaberry . . . . . . . .
Rafferty, John. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thunder Bay—Rainy River . . . .
Raitt, Hon. Lisa, Minister of Transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Halton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rajotte, James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Edmonton—Leduc . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rankin, Murray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Victoria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rathgeber, Brent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Edmonton—St. Albert . . . . . . . . . .
Ravignat, Mathieu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pontiac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Raynault, Francine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joliette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Regan, Hon. Geoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Halifax West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reid, Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lanark—Frontenac—Lennox
and Addington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Province of
Constituency
Political
Affiliation
British Columbia . . . . . . . . CPC
New Brunswick. . . . . . . . . . CPC
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NDP
NDP
NDP
Ind.
NDP
Lib.
NDP
NDP
NDP
CPC
CPC
NDP
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New Brunswick. . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lib.
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
BQ
CPC
NDP
Ind.
NDP
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nova Scotia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BQ
CPC
CPC
NDP
NDP
CPC
CPC
NDP
Ind.
NDP
NDP
Lib.
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
9
Name of Member
Rempel, Hon. Michelle, Minister of State (Western Economic
Diversification) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Richards, Blake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rickford, Hon. Greg, Minister of Natural Resources and Minister for
the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario
Ritz, Hon. Gerry, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food. . . . . . . . . . . .
Rousseau, Jean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saganash, Romeo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sandhu, Jasbir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saxton, Andrew, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance
Scarpaleggia, Francis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scheer, Hon. Andrew, Speaker of the House of Commons . . . . . . . . . .
Schellenberger, Gary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scott, Craig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Seeback, Kyle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sellah, Djaouida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sgro, Hon. Judy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shea, Hon. Gail, Minister of Fisheries and Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shipley, Bev . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shory, Devinder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Simms, Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sims, Jinny Jogindera. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sitsabaiesan, Rathika. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Smith, Joy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sopuck, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Constituency
Province of
Constituency
Political
Affiliation
Calgary Centre-North . . . . . . . . . . . Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Wild Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Kenora . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Battlefords—Lloydminster . . . . .
Compton—Stanstead . . . . . . . . . . .
Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik
—Eeyou . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Surrey North . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
North Vancouver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lac-Saint-Louis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Regina—Qu'Appelle . . . . . . . . . . . .
Perth—Wellington . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Toronto—Danforth. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brampton West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saint-Bruno—Saint-Hubert . . . . .
York West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Egmont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lambton—Kent—Middlesex. . .
Calgary Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bonavista—Gander—Grand
Falls—Windsor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Newton—North Delta . . . . . . . . . .
Scarborough—Rouge River . . . .
Kildonan—St. Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dauphin—Swan River—
Marquette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crowfoot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Simcoe North . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saint-Maurice—Champlain. . . . .
Burnaby—Douglas. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sackville—Eastern Shore . . . . . .
Westlock—St. Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sorenson, Hon. Kevin, Minister of State (Finance) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stanton, Bruce, The Acting Speaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
St-Denis, Lise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stewart, Kennedy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stoffer, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Storseth, Brian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Strahl, Mark, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Aboriginal
Affairs and Northern Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon . . . .
Sullivan, Mike . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . York South—Weston . . . . . . . . . . .
Sweet, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ancaster—Dundas—
Flamborough—Westdale . . . . . . .
Thibeault, Glenn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sudbury. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tilson, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dufferin—Caledon . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Toet, Lawrence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elmwood—Transcona . . . . . . . . . .
Toone, Philip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine
Tremblay, Jonathan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montmorency—Charlevoix—
Haute-Côte-Nord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trost, Brad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saskatoon—Humboldt . . . . . . . . . .
Trottier, Bernard, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public
Works and Government Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Etobicoke—Lakeshore . . . . . . . . . .
Trudeau, Justin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Papineau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Truppe, Susan, Parliamentary Secretary for Status of Women . . . . . . . London North Centre . . . . . . . . . . .
Turmel, Nycole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hull—Aylmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prince Edward Island. . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Newfoundland and
Labrador. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manitoba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NDP
NDP
CPC
Lib.
CPC
CPC
NDP
CPC
NDP
Lib.
CPC
CPC
CPC
Manitoba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Nova Scotia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
Lib.
NDP
NDP
CPC
Lib.
NDP
NDP
CPC
British Columbia . . . . . . . . CPC
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manitoba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
NDP
CPC
CPC
NDP
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
Lib.
CPC
NDP
10
Province of
Constituency
Political
Affiliation
Name of Member
Constituency
Uppal, Hon. Tim, Minister of State (Multiculturalism). . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Valcourt, Hon. Bernard, Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern
Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Valeriote, Frank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Van Kesteren, Dave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Van Loan, Hon. Peter, Leader of the Government in the House of
Commons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vaughan, Adam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vellacott, Maurice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wallace, Mike . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Warawa, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Warkentin, Chris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Watson, Jeff, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport .
Weston, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edmonton—Sherwood Park. . . . Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Weston, Rodney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wilks, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Williamson, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wong, Hon. Alice, Minister of State (Seniors) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Woodworth, Stephen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Yelich, Hon. Lynne, Minister of State (Foreign Affairs and Consular)
Young, Terence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Young, Wai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Yurdiga, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Zimmer, Bob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VACANCY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VACANCY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Madawaska—Restigouche . . . . . New Brunswick. . . . . . . . . . CPC
Guelph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lib.
Chatham-Kent—Essex . . . . . . . . . . Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
York—Simcoe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trinity—Spadina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saskatoon—Wanuskewin . . . . . . .
Burlington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Langley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peace River. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Essex. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
West Vancouver—Sunshine
Coast—Sea to Sky Country . . . .
Saint John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kootenay—Columbia . . . . . . . . . . .
New Brunswick Southwest. . . . .
Richmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kitchener Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Blackstrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oakville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vancouver South . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fort McMurray—Athabasca . . .
Prince George—Peace River . . .
Whitby—Oshawa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Yellowhead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
Lib.
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
New Brunswick. . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
New Brunswick. . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia . . . . . . . .
Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
N.B.: Under Political Affiliation: CPC - Conservative; NDP - New Democratic Party; Lib. - Liberal; BQ - Bloc Quebecois; GP
- Green Party; Ind. - Independent
11
ALPHABETICAL LIST OF MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS BY PROVINCE
Second Session—Forty-first Parliament
Name of Member
Constituency
Political
Affiliation
Calgary—Nose Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edmonton—Spruce Grove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calgary West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Macleod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vegreville—Wainwright . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wetaskiwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calgary Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Red Deer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edmonton—Strathcona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edmonton East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calgary Southwest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edmonton Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lethbridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
NDP
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
ALBERTA (27)
Ablonczy, Hon. Diane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ambrose, Hon. Rona, Minister of Health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Anders, Rob. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Barlow, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Benoit, Leon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calkins, Blaine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crockatt, Joan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dreeshen, Earl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Duncan, Linda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Goldring, Peter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Harper, Right Hon. Stephen, Prime Minister . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hawn, Hon. Laurie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hillyer, Jim. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kenney, Hon. Jason, Minister of Employment and Social Development and Minister
for Multiculturalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lake, Hon. Mike, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Obhrai, Hon. Deepak, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and
for International Human Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Payne, LaVar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rajotte, James. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rathgeber, Brent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rempel, Hon. Michelle, Minister of State (Western Economic Diversification) . . . . . .
Richards, Blake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shory, Devinder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sorenson, Hon. Kevin, Minister of State (Finance) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Storseth, Brian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Uppal, Hon. Tim, Minister of State (Multiculturalism) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Warkentin, Chris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Yurdiga, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VACANCY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calgary Southeast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont . . . . CPC
Calgary East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Medicine Hat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edmonton—Leduc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edmonton—St. Albert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calgary Centre-North . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wild Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calgary Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crowfoot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Westlock—St. Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edmonton—Sherwood Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peace River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fort McMurray—Athabasca . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Yellowhead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
Ind.
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
Okanagan—Coquihalla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
British Columbia Southern Interior . . . . . . .
Kelowna—Lake Country . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nanaimo—Cowichan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Skeena—Bulkley Valley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vancouver Kingsway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vancouver East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New Westminster—Coquitlam . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vancouver Island North . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Abbotsford. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Delta—Richmond East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vancouver Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
NDP
CPC
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
CPC
CPC
CPC
Lib.
BRITISH COLUMBIA (36)
Albas, Dan, Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board . . . . . . . . .
Atamanenko, Alex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cannan, Hon. Ron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crowder, Jean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cullen, Nathan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Davies, Don . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Davies, Libby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Donnelly, Fin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Duncan, Hon. John, Minister of State and Chief Government Whip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fast, Hon. Ed, Minister of International Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Findlay, Hon. Kerry-Lynne D., Minister of National Revenue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fry, Hon. Hedy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
Name of Member
Constituency
Political
Affiliation
Garrison, Randall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grewal, Nina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Harris, Richard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hiebert, Russ. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Julian, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kamp, Randy, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans . . . . .
Lunney, James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
May, Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mayes, Colin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
McLeod, Cathy, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Labour and for Western
Economic Diversification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moore, Hon. James, Minister of Industry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fleetwood—Port Kells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cariboo—Prince George . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
South Surrey—White Rock—Cloverdale
Burnaby—New Westminster . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission . .
Nanaimo—Alberni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saanich—Gulf Islands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Okanagan—Shuswap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NDP
CPC
CPC
CPC
NDP
CPC
CPC
GP
CPC
Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo. . . . . . . . .
Port Moody—Westwood—Port
Coquitlam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vancouver Quadra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Victoria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Surrey North . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
North Vancouver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Newton—North Delta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Burnaby—Douglas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
Murray, Joyce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rankin, Murray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sandhu, Jasbir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saxton, Andrew, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sims, Jinny Jogindera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stewart, Kennedy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Strahl, Mark, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and
Northern Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Warawa, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Langley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Weston, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea
to Sky Country . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wilks, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kootenay—Columbia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wong, Hon. Alice, Minister of State (Seniors) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Richmond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Young, Wai. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vancouver South . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Zimmer, Bob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prince George—Peace River . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
Lib.
NDP
NDP
CPC
NDP
NDP
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
MANITOBA (14)
Ashton, Niki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bateman, Joyce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bergen, Hon. Candice, Minister of State (Social Development) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bezan, James, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence . . . . . . . . .
Bruinooge, Rod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Falk, Ted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fletcher, Hon. Steven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Glover, Hon. Shelly, Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages. . . . . . . . .
Lamoureux, Kevin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maguire, Larry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Martin, Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Smith, Joy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sopuck, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Toet, Lawrence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Churchill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Winnipeg South Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Portage—Lisgar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selkirk—Interlake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Winnipeg South . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Provencher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia . . . .
Saint Boniface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Winnipeg North . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brandon—Souris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Winnipeg Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kildonan—St. Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dauphin—Swan River—Marquette . . . . . . .
Elmwood—Transcona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NDP
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
Lib.
CPC
NDP
CPC
CPC
CPC
Tobique—Mactaquac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fredericton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Acadie—Bathurst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
NDP
CPC
NEW BRUNSWICK (10)
Allen, Mike . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ashfield, Hon. Keith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Godin, Yvon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Goguen, Robert, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13
Name of Member
Constituency
Political
Affiliation
LeBlanc, Hon. Dominic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moore, Hon. Rob, Minister of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency) . . . . . . .
O'Neill Gordon, Tilly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Valcourt, Hon. Bernard, Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development .
Weston, Rodney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Williamson, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Beauséjour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fundy Royal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Miramichi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Madawaska—Restigouche. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saint John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New Brunswick Southwest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lib.
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
Avalon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Humber—St. Barbe—Baie Verte . . . . . . . . .
St. John's South—Mount Pearl . . . . . . . . . . .
Random—Burin—St. George's . . . . . . . . . . .
St. John's East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Labrador . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bonavista—Gander—Grand Falls—
Windsor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lib.
Lib.
NDP
Lib.
NDP
Lib.
NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR (7)
Andrews, Scott. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Byrne, Hon. Gerry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cleary, Ryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Foote, Judy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Harris, Jack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Jones, Yvonne. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Simms, Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lib.
NORTHWEST TERRITORIES (1)
Bevington, Dennis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Northwest Territories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NDP
NOVA SCOTIA (11)
Armstrong, Scott, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Employment and Social
Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brison, Hon. Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chisholm, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cuzner, Rodger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Eyking, Hon. Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keddy, Gerald, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Revenue and for
the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kerr, Greg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Leslie, Megan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MacKay, Hon. Peter, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada . . . . . . . . . . .
Regan, Hon. Geoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stoffer, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cumberland—Colchester—
Musquodoboit Valley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kings—Hants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dartmouth—Cole Harbour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cape Breton—Canso . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sydney—Victoria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
Lib.
NDP
Lib.
Lib.
South Shore—St. Margaret's . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
West Nova . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Halifax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Central Nova . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Halifax West. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sackville—Eastern Shore. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
NDP
CPC
Lib.
NDP
NUNAVUT (1)
Aglukkaq, Hon. Leona, Minister of the Environment, Minister of the Canadian
Northern Economic Development Agency and Minister for the Arctic Council . . . . Nunavut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
ONTARIO (105)
Adams, Eve, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adler, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Albrecht, Harold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alexander, Hon. Chris, Minister of Citizenship and Immigration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Allen, Malcolm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Allison, Dean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ambler, Stella . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Angus, Charlie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Aspin, Jay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mississauga—Brampton South. . . . . . . . . . . .
York Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kitchener—Conestoga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ajax—Pickering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Welland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Niagara West—Glanbrook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mississauga South . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Timmins—James Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nipissing—Timiskaming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
NDP
CPC
CPC
NDP
CPC
14
Name of Member
Constituency
Political
Affiliation
Baird, Hon. John, Minister of Foreign Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bélanger, Hon. Mauril. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bennett, Hon. Carolyn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Braid, Peter, Parliamentary Secretary for Infrastructure and Communities . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brown, Gordon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brown, Lois, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Development
Brown, Patrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Butt, Brad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calandra, Paul , Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and for Intergovernmental Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Carmichael, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Carrie, Colin, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment . . . . . . . . . . .
Cash, Andrew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chan, Arnold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Charlton, Chris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chisu, Corneliu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chong, Hon. Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Christopherson, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clement, Hon. Tony, President of the Treasury Board. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Comartin, Joe, The Deputy Speaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Daniel, Joe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Davidson, Patricia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dechert, Bob, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Del Mastro, Dean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Devolin, Barry, The Acting Speaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dewar, Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Duncan, Kirsty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dykstra, Rick, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage . . . . . . . .
Fantino, Hon. Julian, Minister of Veterans Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finley, Hon. Diane, Minister of Public Works and Government Services. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Freeland, Chrystia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Galipeau, Royal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gallant, Cheryl. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gill, Parm, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Goodyear, Hon. Gary, Minister of State (Federal Economic Development Agency for
Southern Ontario) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gosal, Hon. Bal, Minister of State (Sport) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gravelle, Claude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Harris, Dan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hayes, Bryan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Holder, Hon. Ed, Minister of State (Science and Technology) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hsu, Ted. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hughes, Carol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hyer, Bruce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
James, Roxanne, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety and
Emergency Preparedness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kellway, Matthew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kent, Hon. Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kramp, Daryl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lauzon, Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ottawa West—Nepean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ottawa—Vanier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
St. Paul's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kitchener—Waterloo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Leeds—Grenville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Newmarket—Aurora . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Barrie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mississauga—Streetsville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
Lib.
Lib.
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
Oak Ridges—Markham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Don Valley West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oshawa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Davenport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scarborough—Agincourt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hamilton Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pickering—Scarborough East . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wellington—Halton Hills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hamilton Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parry Sound—Muskoka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windsor—Tecumseh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Don Valley East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sarnia—Lambton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mississauga—Erindale. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peterborough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock . . . .
Ottawa Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Etobicoke North. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
St. Catharines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vaughan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Haldimand—Norfolk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Toronto Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ottawa—Orléans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke . . . . . . . . .
Brampton—Springdale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
NDP
Lib.
NDP
CPC
CPC
NDP
CPC
NDP
CPC
CPC
CPC
Cons. Ind.
CPC
NDP
Lib.
CPC
CPC
CPC
Lib.
CPC
CPC
CPC
Cambridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bramalea—Gore—Malton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nickel Belt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scarborough Southwest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sault Ste. Marie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
London West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kingston and the Islands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing . . . . .
Thunder Bay—Superior North . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
NDP
NDP
CPC
CPC
Lib.
NDP
GP
Scarborough Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Beaches—East York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Thornhill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prince Edward—Hastings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry . . .
CPC
NDP
CPC
CPC
CPC
15
Name of Member
Constituency
Political
Affiliation
Leitch, Hon. K. Kellie, Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women . . . . . . .
Lemieux, Pierre, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Leung, Chungsen, Parliamentary Secretary for Multiculturalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lizon, Wladyslaw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lobb, Ben . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MacKenzie, Dave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Marston, Wayne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Masse, Brian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mathyssen, Irene. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
McCallum, Hon. John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
McColeman, Phil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
McGuinty, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
McKay, Hon. John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Menegakis, Costas, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and
Immigration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Miller, Larry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nash, Peggy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nicholson, Hon. Rob, Minister of National Defence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Norlock, Rick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
O'Connor, Hon. Gordon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oliver, Hon. Joe, Minister of Finance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opitz, Ted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
O'Toole, Erin, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade . . . . . . . .
Poilievre, Hon. Pierre, Minister of State (Democratic Reform) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preston, Joe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rafferty, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Raitt, Hon. Lisa, Minister of Transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reid, Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Simcoe—Grey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Glengarry—Prescott—Russell. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Willowdale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mississauga East—Cooksville . . . . . . . . . . . .
Huron—Bruce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oxford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hamilton East—Stoney Creek . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windsor West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
London—Fanshawe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Markham—Unionville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ottawa South . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scarborough—Guildwood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
NDP
NDP
NDP
Lib.
CPC
Lib.
Lib.
Richmond Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parkdale—High Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Niagara Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Northumberland—Quinte West . . . . . . . . . . .
Carleton—Mississippi Mills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Eglinton—Lawrence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Etobicoke Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Durham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nepean—Carleton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Elgin—Middlesex—London . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Thunder Bay—Rainy River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Halton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lanark—Frontenac—Lennox and
Addington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
NDP
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
NDP
CPC
Kenora . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Perth—Wellington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Toronto—Danforth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brampton West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
York West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lambton—Kent—Middlesex . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scarborough—Rouge River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Simcoe North . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
York South—Weston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—
Westdale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Thibeault, Glenn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sudbury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tilson, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dufferin—Caledon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trottier, Bernard, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and
Government Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Etobicoke—Lakeshore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Truppe, Susan, Parliamentary Secretary for Status of Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . London North Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Valeriote, Frank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guelph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Van Kesteren, Dave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chatham-Kent—Essex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Van Loan, Hon. Peter, Leader of the Government in the House of Commons . . . . . . . York—Simcoe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vaughan, Adam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trinity—Spadina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
NDP
CPC
Lib.
CPC
NDP
CPC
NDP
Rickford, Hon. Greg, Minister of Natural Resources and Minister for the Federal
Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Schellenberger, Gary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scott, Craig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Seeback, Kyle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sgro, Hon. Judy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shipley, Bev . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sitsabaiesan, Rathika . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stanton, Bruce, The Acting Speaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sullivan, Mike . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sweet, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
NDP
CPC
CPC
CPC
Lib.
CPC
CPC
Lib.
16
Political
Affiliation
Name of Member
Constituency
Wallace, Mike. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Watson, Jeff, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Woodworth, Stephen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Young, Terence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VACANCY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Burlington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Essex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kitchener Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oakville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Whitby—Oshawa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
Charlottetown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Malpeque . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cardigan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Egmont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lib.
Lib.
Lib.
CPC
Trois-Rivières . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Honoré-Mercier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Richmond—Arthabaska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Jeanne-Le Ber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NDP
NDP
Ind.
NDP
Beauce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Louis-Hébert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pierrefonds—Dollard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lévis—Bellechasse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gatineau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terrebonne—Blainville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hochelaga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saint-Jean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Berthier—Maskinongé . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les
Basques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Châteauguay—Saint-Constant. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drummond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Beauport—Limoilou . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mount Royal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles . . . . . .
Saint-Laurent—Cartierville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rivière-du-Nord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alfred-Pellan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chambly—Borduas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bourassa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sherbrooke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Haute-Gaspésie—La Mitis—Matane—
Matapédia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel . . . . . . . . . .
Westmount—Ville-Marie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shefford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manicouagan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Marc-Aurèle-Fortin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
NDP
NDP
CPC
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND (4)
Casey, Sean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Easter, Hon. Wayne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MacAulay, Hon. Lawrence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shea, Hon. Gail, Minister of Fisheries and Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
QUÉBEC (75)
Aubin, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ayala, Paulina. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bellavance, André . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Benskin, Tyrone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bernier, Hon. Maxime, Minister of State (Small Business and Tourism, and
Agriculture) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Blanchette, Denis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Blanchette-Lamothe, Lysane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Blaney, Hon. Steven, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness . . . . . . .
Boivin, Françoise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Borg, Charmaine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Boulerice, Alexandre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Boutin-Sweet, Marjolaine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brahmi, Tarik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brosseau, Ruth Ellen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Caron, Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chicoine, Sylvain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choquette, François . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Côté, Raymond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cotler, Hon. Irwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Day, Anne-Marie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dion, Hon. Stéphane, Saint-Laurent—Cartierville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dionne Labelle, Pierre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Doré Lefebvre, Rosane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dubé, Matthew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dubourg, Emmanuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dusseault, Pierre-Luc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fortin, Jean-François . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Freeman, Mylène . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Garneau, Marc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Genest, Réjean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Genest-Jourdain, Jonathan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Giguère, Alain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
Lib.
NDP
Lib.
NDP
NDP
NDP
Lib.
NDP
Ind.
NDP
Lib.
NDP
NDP
NDP
17
Name of Member
Gourde, Jacques, Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister, for Official
Languages and for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions
of Quebec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Groguhé, Sadia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hassainia, Sana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Jacob, Pierre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lapointe, François . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Constituency
Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière . . . . . .
Saint-Lambert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verchères—Les Patriotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brome—Missisquoi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—
Rivière-du-Loup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Larose, Jean-François . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Repentigny . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Latendresse, Alexandrine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louis-Saint-Laurent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Laverdière, Hélène. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laurier—Sainte-Marie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lebel, Hon. Denis, Minister of Infrastructure, Communities and Intergovernmental
Affairs and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the
Regions of Quebec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LeBlanc, Hélène . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LaSalle—Émard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Liu, Laurin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rivière-des-Mille-Îles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mai, Hoang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brossard—La Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Michaud, Élaine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moore, Christine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Abitibi—Témiscamingue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Morin, Dany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chicoutimi—Le Fjord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Morin, Isabelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine . . . . . . . . . .
Morin, Marc-André . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laurentides—Labelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Morin, Marie-Claude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mourani, Maria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ahuntsic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mulcair, Hon. Thomas, Leader of the Opposition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Outremont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nantel, Pierre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Longueuil—Pierre-Boucher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nicholls, Jamie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vaudreuil-Soulanges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nunez-Melo, José. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pacetti, Massimo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Papillon, Annick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Paradis, Hon. Christian, Minister of International Development and Minister for La
Francophonie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mégantic—L'Érable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Patry, Claude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jonquière—Alma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Péclet, Ève . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . La Pointe-de-l'Île . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Perreault, Manon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montcalm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pilon, François . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laval—Les Îles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plamondon, Louis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bas-Richelieu—Nicolet—Bécancour . . . . .
Quach, Anne Minh-Thu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Beauharnois—Salaberry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ravignat, Mathieu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pontiac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Raynault, Francine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joliette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rousseau, Jean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Compton—Stanstead. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saganash, Romeo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou .
Scarpaleggia, Francis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lac-Saint-Louis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sellah, Djaouida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saint-Bruno—Saint-Hubert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
St-Denis, Lise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saint-Maurice—Champlain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Toone, Philip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine . . . . . . . . . . .
Tremblay, Jonathan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montmorency—Charlevoix—HauteCôte-Nord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trudeau, Justin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Papineau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Turmel, Nycole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hull—Aylmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Political
Affiliation
CPC
NDP
Ind.
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
CPC
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
Ind.
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
Lib.
NDP
CPC
BQ
NDP
Ind.
NDP
BQ
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
NDP
Lib.
NDP
Lib.
NDP
NDP
Lib.
NDP
18
Name of Member
Constituency
Political
Affiliation
Cypress Hills—Grasslands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar . . . . . . . . . . .
Palliser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Yorkton—Melville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River .
Wascana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prince Albert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Souris—Moose Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
Lib.
CPC
CPC
Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre . . . . . . . . .
Battlefords—Lloydminster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Regina—Qu'Appelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saskatoon—Humboldt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saskatoon—Wanuskewin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Blackstrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
CPC
SASKATCHEWAN (14)
Anderson, David, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs . . . . . . . .
Block, Kelly, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources . . . . . . . . .
Boughen, Ray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Breitkreuz, Garry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clarke, Rob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Goodale, Hon. Ralph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hoback, Randy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Komarnicki, Ed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lukiwski, Tom, Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the
House of Commons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ritz, Hon. Gerry, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scheer, Hon. Andrew, Speaker of the House of Commons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trost, Brad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vellacott, Maurice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Yelich, Hon. Lynne, Minister of State (Foreign Affairs and Consular) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
YUKON (1)
Leef, Ryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yukon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC
19
LIST OF STANDING AND SUB-COMMITTEES
(As of October 3, 2014 — 2nd Session, 41st Parliament)
ABORIGINAL AFFAIRS AND NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT
Chair:
Ray Boughen
Rob Clarke
Chris Warkentin
Earl Dreeshen
Jonathan Genest-Jourdain
Vice-Chairs:
Carol Hughes
Kyle Seeback
Carolyn Bennett
Jean Crowder
Mark Strahl
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Charlie Angus
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Niki Ashton
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
Dennis Bevington
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Joan Crockatt
Nathan Cullen
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Mathieu Ravignat
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Romeo Saganash
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
20
ACCESS TO INFORMATION, PRIVACY AND ETHICS
Chair:
Charmaine Borg
Paul Calandra
Pat Martin
Jacques Gourde
Laurie Hawn
Vice-Chairs:
Scott Andrews
Patricia Davidson
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Mathieu Ravignat
Bob Zimmer
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
David Christopherson
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Pierre-Luc Dusseault
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Nina Grewal
Richard Harris
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
Anne Minh-Thu Quach
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Craig Scott
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
(10)
21
AGRICULTURE AND AGRI-FOOD
Chair:
Denis Blanchette
Earl Dreeshen
Bev Shipley
Randy Hoback
Pierre Lemieux
Vice-Chairs:
LaVar Payne
Francine Raynault
Ruth Ellen Brosseau
Mark Eyking
Bob Zimmer
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Malcolm Allen
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Niki Ashton
Jay Aspin
Alex Atamanenko
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Linda Duncan
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Ed Holder
Carol Hughes
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Pat Martin
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
(10)
22
CANADIAN HERITAGE
Chair:
Ray Boughen
Rick Dykstra
Gordon Brown
Ted Falk
Jim Hillyer
Vice-Chairs:
Irene Mathyssen
Kennedy Stewart
Stéphane Dion
Pierre Nantel
John Weston
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Charlie Angus
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
Tyrone Benskin
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Charmaine Borg
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Andrew Cash
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Nathan Cullen
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Matthew Dubé
Steven Fletcher
Mylène Freeman
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
23
CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION
Chair:
Joe Daniel
Chungsen Leung
David Tilson
Costas Menegakis
Ted Opitz
Vice-Chairs:
Jasbir Sandhu
Devinder Shory
Lysane Blanchette-Lamothe
John McCallum
Rathika Sitsabaiesan
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Andrew Cash
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Patricia Davidson
Don Davies
Libby Davies
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Alain Giguère
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Jinny Jogindera Sims
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
24
ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
Chair:
Dennis Bevington
Colin Carrie
Harold Albrecht
Mylène Freeman
Robert Sopuck
Vice-Chairs:
Brian Storseth
Lawrence Toet
François Choquette
John McKay
Stephen Woodworth
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Robert Aubin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Robert Chisholm
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Nathan Cullen
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Linda Duncan
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Megan Leslie
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
25
FINANCE
Chair:
Mark Adler
Mike Allen
James Rajotte
Guy Caron
Gerald Keddy
Vice-Chairs:
Murray Rankin
Andrew Saxton
Scott Brison
Nathan Cullen
Dave Van Kesteren
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Raymond Côté
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Emmanuel Dubourg
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Hoang Mai
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
26
FISHERIES AND OCEANS
Chair:
Ryan Cleary
Patricia Davidson
Rodney Weston
Randy Kamp
François Lapointe
Vice-Chairs:
Ryan Leef
Robert Sopuck
Robert Chisholm
Lawrence MacAulay
John Weston
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Bob Dechert
Fin Donnelly
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Yvon Godin
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Peter Stoffer
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Philip Toone
Jonathan Tremblay
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
27
FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Chair:
David Anderson
Lois Brown
Dean Allison
Peter Goldring
Nina Grewal
Vice-Chairs:
Hélène Laverdière
Romeo Saganash
Paul Dewar
Marc Garneau
Gary Schellenberger
(10)
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
Tyrone Benskin
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Irwin Cotler
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Don Davies
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Jacques Gourde
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Pierre Jacob
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Laurin Liu
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Wayne Marston
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Marc-André Morin
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Ève Péclet
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
SUBCOMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS
Chair:
Tyrone Benskin
Scott Reid
Nina Grewal
Vice-Chairs:
Gary Schellenberger
Irwin Cotler
Wayne Marston
David Sweet
(7)
28
GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS AND ESTIMATES
Chair:
Diane Ablonczy
Mark Adler
Pierre-Luc Dusseault
Jay Aspin
Anne-Marie Day
Vice-Chairs:
Jim Hillyer
Pat Martin
Gerry Byrne
Gordon O'Connor
Bernard Trottier
Associate Members
Eve Adams
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Denis Blanchette
Kelly Block
Françoise Boivin
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Paul Dewar
Earl Dreeshen
Linda Duncan
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Mathieu Ravignat
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Susan Truppe
Nycole Turmel
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
29
HEALTH
Chair:
Eve Adams
Claude Gravelle
Ben Lobb
Wladyslaw Lizon
James Lunney
Vice-Chairs:
Dany Morin
David Wilks
Libby Davies
Hedy Fry
Terence Young
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Carol Hughes
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Megan Leslie
Chungsen Leung
Tom Lukiwski
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Wayne Marston
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Christine Moore
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Manon Perreault
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Djaouida Sellah
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Jinny Jogindera Sims
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
Mike Sullivan
David Sweet
Glenn Thibeault
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
30
HUMAN RESOURCES, SKILLS AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT AND THE STATUS OF PERSONS WITH
DISABILITIES
Chair:
Phil McColeman
Scott Armstrong
Tarik Brahmi
Brad Butt
Sadia Groguhé
Vice-Chairs:
Larry Maguire
Colin Mayes
Rodger Cuzner
Jinny Jogindera Sims
Cathy McLeod
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Lysane Blanchette-Lamothe
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Alexandre Boulerice
Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Chris Charlton
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Matthew Dubé
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Mylène Freeman
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Alain Giguère
Parm Gill
Yvon Godin
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Dan Harris
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Irene Mathyssen
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Manon Perreault
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Rathika Sitsabaiesan
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
Mike Sullivan
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Jonathan Tremblay
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
31
INDUSTRY, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Chair:
Joyce Bateman
Raymond Côté
David Sweet
Cheryl Gallant
Mike Lake
Vice-Chairs:
Peggy Nash
Judy Sgro
Brian Masse
Dave Van Kesteren
Mark Warawa
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Malcolm Allen
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Charlie Angus
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Mauril Bélanger
Leon Benoit
Tyrone Benskin
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Charmaine Borg
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Dan Harris
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Guy Lauzon
Hélène LeBlanc
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
Anne Minh-Thu Quach
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
Glenn Thibeault
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
32
INTERNATIONAL TRADE
Chair:
Ron Cannan
Russ Hiebert
Randy Hoback
Laurin Liu
Rob Merrifield
Vice-Chairs:
Marc-André Morin
Erin O'Toole
Don Davies
Massimo Pacetti
Devinder Shory
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Paul Dewar
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Chrystia Freeland
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Jim Hillyer
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Hélène Laverdière
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Brian Masse
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Mathieu Ravignat
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Jinny Jogindera Sims
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
33
JUSTICE AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Chair:
Patrick Brown
Bob Dechert
Mike Wallace
Robert Goguen
Pierre Jacob
Vice-Chairs:
Ève Péclet
Kyle Seeback
Françoise Boivin
Sean Casey
David Wilks
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Randall Garrison
Parm Gill
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Jack Harris
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Matthew Kellway
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Wayne Marston
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Murray Rankin
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
34
LIAISON
Chair:
Dean Allison
Vice-Chair:
Randy Hoback
Greg Kerr
Daryl Kramp
Hélène LeBlanc
Ben Lobb
Pat Martin
Harold Albrecht
Leon Benoit
Gordon Brown
Chris Charlton
Michael Chong
Pierre-Luc Dusseault
David Christopherson
Phil McColeman
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Bev Shipley
David Sweet
David Tilson
Mike Wallace
Chris Warkentin
Rodney Weston
(25)
Associate Members
Scott Andrews
Mauril Bélanger
Carolyn Bennett
Lysane Blanchette-Lamothe
Françoise Boivin
Garry Breitkreuz
Scott Brison
Ruth Ellen Brosseau
Gerry Byrne
John Carmichael
Sean Casey
Robert Chisholm
François Choquette
Jean Crowder
Nathan Cullen
Rodger Cuzner
Patricia Davidson
Don Davies
Libby Davies
Paul Dewar
Stéphane Dion
Kirsty Duncan
Wayne Easter
Mark Eyking
Hedy Fry
Marc Garneau
Randall Garrison
Yvon Godin
Jack Harris
Kevin Lamoureux
Alexandrine Latendresse
Lawrence MacAulay
Hoang Mai
John McCallum
David McGuinty
John McKay
Joyce Murray
Pierre Nantel
Peggy Nash
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Massimo Pacetti
Geoff Regan
Judy Sgro
Scott Simms
Jinny Jogindera Sims
Lise St-Denis
Peter Stoffer
Frank Valeriote
SUBCOMMITTEE ON COMMITTEE BUDGETS
Chair:
David Christopherson
Pat Martin
Dean Allison
Phil McColeman
Larry Miller
Vice-Chair:
Joe Preston
Chris Warkentin
(7)
35
NATIONAL DEFENCE
Chair:
James Bezan
Corneliu Chisu
Rick Norlock
Cheryl Gallant
Peter Kent
Vice-Chairs:
Jean-François Larose
Élaine Michaud
Jack Harris
Joyce Murray
John Williamson
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Tarik Brahmi
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Randall Garrison
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Megan Leslie
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Christine Moore
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Peter Stoffer
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
36
NATURAL RESOURCES
Chair:
Kelly Block
Blaine Calkins
Leon Benoit
Joan Crockatt
Linda Duncan
Vice-Chairs:
Ryan Leef
Christine Moore
Chris Charlton
Geoff Regan
Brad Trost
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Charlie Angus
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
James Bezan
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Nathan Cullen
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Yvon Godin
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Claude Gravelle
Nina Grewal
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Carol Hughes
Roxanne James
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
John Rafferty
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Romeo Saganash
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Kennedy Stewart
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
Glenn Thibeault
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
37
OFFICIAL LANGUAGES
Chair:
Joyce Bateman
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Joe Daniel
Jacques Gourde
Vice-Chairs:
Yvon Godin
Lise St-Denis
Jamie Nicholls
Nycole Turmel
John Williamson
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Robert Aubin
Leon Benoit
Tyrone Benskin
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Stéphane Dion
Pierre Dionne Labelle
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Nina Grewal
Dan Harris
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Alexandrine Latendresse
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
38
PROCEDURE AND HOUSE AFFAIRS
Chair:
David Christopherson
Tom Lukiwski
Joe Preston
Dave MacKenzie
Ted Opitz
Vice-Chairs:
Kevin Lamoureux
Alexandrine Latendresse
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Craig Scott
(10)
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Chris Charlton
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Nathan Cullen
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Yvon Godin
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Sadia Groguhé
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
James Lunney
Larry Maguire
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
James Rajotte
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Philip Toone
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Nycole Turmel
Frank Valeriote
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
SUBCOMMITTEE ON PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS
Chair:
Brad Butt
Dave MacKenzie
Philip Toone
Vice-Chair:
Frank Valeriote
(4)
39
PUBLIC ACCOUNTS
Chair:
David Christopherson
Dan Albas
Malcolm Allen
Jay Aspin
Ted Falk
Vice-Chairs:
Alain Giguère
Bryan Hayes
John Carmichael
Yvonne Jones
Stephen Woodworth
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Lysane Blanchette-Lamothe
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Pierre-Luc Dusseault
Rick Dykstra
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Dan Harris
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
Glenn Thibeault
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
40
PUBLIC SAFETY AND NATIONAL SECURITY
Chair:
Rosane Doré Lefebvre
Roxanne James
Daryl Kramp
Larry Maguire
Rick Norlock
Vice-Chairs:
LaVar Payne
Blake Richards
Wayne Easter
Randall Garrison
Jean Rousseau
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Charmaine Borg
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Don Davies
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Jack Harris
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
François Pilon
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Murray Rankin
Scott Reid
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
41
STATUS OF WOMEN
Chair:
Hélène LeBlanc
Stella Ambler
Niki Ashton
Joan Crockatt
Djaouida Sellah
Vice-Chairs:
Susan Truppe
Terence Young
Kirsty Duncan
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Wai Young
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Lysane Blanchette-Lamothe
Kelly Block
Françoise Boivin
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Jean Crowder
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Libby Davies
Anne-Marie Day
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Mylène Freeman
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Sadia Groguhé
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Megan Leslie
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Irene Mathyssen
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
Annick Papillon
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Bob Zimmer
(10)
42
TRANSPORT, INFRASTRUCTURE AND COMMUNITIES
Chair:
Peter Braid
Ed Komarnicki
Larry Miller
Isabelle Morin
Mike Sullivan
Vice-Chairs:
Lawrence Toet
Jeff Watson
Hoang Mai
David McGuinty
Wai Young
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Robert Aubin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Alexandre Boulerice
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Guy Caron
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Pierre Nantel
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
43
VETERANS AFFAIRS
Chair:
Sylvain Chicoine
Royal Galipeau
Greg Kerr
Parm Gill
Laurie Hawn
Vice-Chairs:
Bryan Hayes
Wladyslaw Lizon
Peter Stoffer
Frank Valeriote
John Rafferty
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Mylène Freeman
Cheryl Gallant
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Jack Harris
Richard Harris
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Pat Martin
Irene Mathyssen
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Manon Perreault
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(10)
44
STANDING JOINT COMMITTEES
LIBRARY OF PARLIAMENT
Joint Chairs:
Marie-P. Charette-Poulin
Richard Harris
Representing the Senate:
The Honourable Senators
Anne C. Cools
Nicole Eaton
Terry M. Mercer
Michel Rivard
Joint Vice-Chairs:
Carol Hughes
Scott Simms
Representing the House of Commons:
Tyrone Benskin
Rod Bruinooge
Blaine Calkins
Réjean Genest
Guy Lauzon
Dave MacKenzie
Colin Mayes
José Nunez-Melo
Brian Storseth
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Dan Albas
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Garry Breitkreuz
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Patrick Brown
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
David Christopherson
Rob Clarke
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Larry Maguire
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Maurice Vellacott
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(17)
45
SCRUTINY OF REGULATIONS
Joint Chairs:
Denise Batters
Chris Charlton
Joint Vice-Chairs:
Representing the Senate:
The Honourable Senators
Céline Hervieux-Payette
Don Meredith
Wilfred P. Moore
Bob Runciman
David P. Smith
Mauril Bélanger
Garry Breitkreuz
Representing the House of Commons:
Dan Albas
Stella Ambler
Rob Anders
Paulina Ayala
Patrick Brown
Rob Clarke
François Pilon
Anne Minh-Thu Quach
Maurice Vellacott
Associate Members
Diane Ablonczy
Eve Adams
Mark Adler
Harold Albrecht
Mike Allen
Dean Allison
David Anderson
Scott Armstrong
Keith Ashfield
Jay Aspin
Joyce Bateman
Leon Benoit
James Bezan
Kelly Block
Ray Boughen
Peter Braid
Gordon Brown
Lois Brown
Rod Bruinooge
Brad Butt
Paul Calandra
Blaine Calkins
Ron Cannan
John Carmichael
Colin Carrie
Corneliu Chisu
Michael Chong
Joan Crockatt
Joe Daniel
Patricia Davidson
Bob Dechert
Earl Dreeshen
Rick Dykstra
Ted Falk
Steven Fletcher
Royal Galipeau
Cheryl Gallant
Parm Gill
Robert Goguen
Peter Goldring
Jacques Gourde
Nina Grewal
Richard Harris
Laurie Hawn
Bryan Hayes
Russ Hiebert
Jim Hillyer
Randy Hoback
Ed Holder
Roxanne James
Peter Julian
Randy Kamp
Gerald Keddy
Peter Kent
Greg Kerr
Ed Komarnicki
Daryl Kramp
Mike Lake
Guy Lauzon
Ryan Leef
Pierre Lemieux
Chungsen Leung
Wladyslaw Lizon
Ben Lobb
Tom Lukiwski
James Lunney
Dave MacKenzie
Larry Maguire
Brian Masse
Colin Mayes
Phil McColeman
Cathy McLeod
Costas Menegakis
Rob Merrifield
Larry Miller
Rick Norlock
Deepak Obhrai
Gordon O'Connor
Tilly O'Neill Gordon
Ted Opitz
Erin O'Toole
LaVar Payne
Joe Preston
James Rajotte
Scott Reid
Blake Richards
Andrew Saxton
Gary Schellenberger
Kyle Seeback
Bev Shipley
Devinder Shory
Joy Smith
Robert Sopuck
Brian Storseth
Mark Strahl
David Sweet
David Tilson
Lawrence Toet
Brad Trost
Bernard Trottier
Susan Truppe
Dave Van Kesteren
Mike Wallace
Mark Warawa
Chris Warkentin
Jeff Watson
John Weston
Rodney Weston
David Wilks
John Williamson
Stephen Woodworth
Terence Young
Wai Young
Bob Zimmer
(18)
46
Panel of Chairs of Legislative Committees
The Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole
MR. JOE COMARTIN
The Deputy Chair of Committees of the Whole
MR. BARRY DEVOLIN
The Assistant Deputy Chair of Committees of the Whole
MR. BRUCE STANTON
MR. MIKE ALLEN
MR. BLAINE CALKINS
MS. JEAN CROWDER
MR. DON DAVIES
MR. BRYAN HAYES
MS. HÉLÈNE LAVERDIÈRE
MS. IRENE MATHYSSEN
MS. JOYCE MURRAY
MR. BLAKE RICHARDS
MR. BRIAN STORSETH
MR. DAVE VAN KESTEREN
MR. BOB ZIMMER
47
THE MINISTRY
According to precedence
Right Hon. Stephen Harper
Hon. Bernard Valcourt
Hon. Rob Nicholson
Hon. Peter MacKay
Hon. Rona Ambrose
Hon. Diane Finley
Hon. John Baird
Hon. Tony Clement
Hon. Peter Van Loan
Hon. Jason Kenney
Hon. Gerry Ritz
Hon. Christian Paradis
Hon. James Moore
Hon. Denis Lebel
Hon. Leona Aglukkaq
Hon. Lisa Raitt
Hon. Gail Shea
Hon. Julian Fantino
Hon. Steven Blaney
Hon. Ed Fast
Hon. Joe Oliver
Hon. Kerry-Lynne D. Findlay
Hon. Shelly Glover
Hon. Chris Alexander
Hon. K. Kellie Leitch
Hon. Greg Rickford
Hon. Maxime Bernier
Hon. Lynne Yelich
Hon. Gary Goodyear
Hon. Rob Moore
Hon. John Duncan
Hon. Tim Uppal
Hon. Alice Wong
Hon. Bal Gosal
Hon. Kevin Sorenson
Hon. Pierre Poilievre
Hon. Candice Bergen
Hon. Michelle Rempel
Hon. Ed Holder
Prime Minister
Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development
Minister of National Defence
Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada
Minister of Health
Minister of Public Works and Government Services
Minister of Foreign Affairs
President of the Treasury Board
Leader of the Government in the House of Commons
Minister of Employment and Social Development and Minister for
Multiculturalism
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food
Minister of International Development and Minister for La Francophonie
Minister of Industry
Minister of Infrastructure, Communities and Intergovernmental Affairs and
Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of
Quebec
Minister of the Environment, Minister of the Canadian Northern Economic
Development Agency and Minister for the Arctic Council
Minister of Transport
Minister of Fisheries and Oceans
Minister of Veterans Affairs
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Minister of International Trade
Minister of Finance
Minister of National Revenue
Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration
Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women
Minister of Natural Resources and Minister for the Federal Economic
Development Initiative for Northern Ontario
Minister of State (Small Business and Tourism, and Agriculture)
Minister of State (Foreign Affairs and Consular)
Minister of State (Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern
Ontario)
Minister of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency)
Minister of State and Chief Government Whip
Minister of State (Multiculturalism)
Minister of State (Seniors)
Minister of State (Sport)
Minister of State (Finance)
Minister of State (Democratic Reform)
Minister of State (Social Development)
Minister of State (Western Economic Diversification)
Minister of State (Science and Technology)
48
PARLIAMENTARY SECRETARIES
Hon. Mike Lake
Mr. Gerald Keddy
Hon. Deepak Obhrai
Mr. David Anderson
Mr. James Bezan
Mr. Colin Carrie
Mr. Randy Kamp
Mr. Tom Lukiwski
Mr. Jeff Watson
Mr. Rick Dykstra
Mr. Jacques Gourde
Mr. Pierre Lemieux
Mrs. Kelly Block
Mr. Peter Braid
Ms. Lois Brown
Mr. Paul Calandra
Mr. Bob Dechert
Mrs. Cathy McLeod
Mr. Andrew Saxton
Mr. Scott Armstrong
Ms. Eve Adams
Mr. Dan Albas
Mr. Parm Gill
Mr. Robert Goguen
Ms. Roxanne James
Mr. Chungsen Leung
Mr. Costas Menegakis
Mr. Mark Strahl
Mr. Bernard Trottier
Mrs. Susan Truppe
Mr. Erin O'Toole
to the Minister of Industry
to the Minister of National Revenue and for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities
Agency
to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and for International Human Rights
to the Minister of Foreign Affairs
to the Minister of National Defence
to the Minister of the Environment
to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans
to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons
to the Minister of Transport
to the Minister of Canadian Heritage
to the Prime Minister, for Official Languages and for the Economic
Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec
to the Minister of Agriculture
to the Minister of Natural Resources
for Infrastructure and Communities
to the Minister of International Development
to the Prime Minister and for Intergovernmental Affairs
to the Minister of Justice
to the Minister of Labour and for Western Economic Diversification
to the Minister of Finance
to the Minister of Employment and Social Development
to the Minister of Health
to the President of the Treasury Board
to the Minister of Veterans Affairs
to the Minister of Justice
to the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
for Multiculturalism
to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration
to the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development
to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services
for Status of Women
to the Minister of International Trade
CONTENTS
Friday, October 3, 2014
GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act
Mr. Blaney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bill C-36. Third reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mrs. Smith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Boivin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Brison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Blaney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Boivin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Dechert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Péclet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ORAL QUESTIONS
8207
8207
8207
8209
8210
8210
8210
8213
8214
STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS
Richmond Hill
Mr. Menegakis
............................................
8214
World Teachers' Day
Mrs. Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8214
Hong Kong
Mr. Chong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8214
James McConnell Memorial Library
Mr. Eyking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8215
Community Service
Mr. Zimmer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8215
Yom Kippur
Ms. Nash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8215
Property Rights
Mr. Hillyer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8215
Eksperimenta
Mr. Dykstra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8215
Eid al-Adha
Ms. Charlton
..............................................
8216
Yom Kippur
Mr. Hoback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8216
Canada Post
Ms. Péclet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8216
National Cyber Security Awareness Month
Mr. Galipeau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8216
Eid al-Adha
Mr. McKay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8216
International Trade
Mr. Payne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8217
Conservative and Liberal Parties of Canada
Ms. Boivin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8217
The Economy
Mr. Gourde . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8217
Health
Ms. Davies (Vancouver East) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Adams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Davies (Vancouver East) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Adams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Turmel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Adams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8217
8217
8218
8218
8218
8218
National Defence
Ms. Turmel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Nicholson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Turmel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Nicholson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Murray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Nicholson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Murray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Nicholson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Murray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Nicholson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8218
8218
8218
8218
8218
8218
8218
8219
8219
8219
Foreign Affairs
Ms. Michaud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Nicholson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Dewar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Paradis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Dewar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Paradis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8219
8219
8219
8219
8219
8219
Veterans Affairs
Mr. Harris (St. John's East) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Gill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Harris (St. John's East) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Gill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Chicoine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Gill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8219
8220
8220
8220
8220
8220
Health
Ms. Latendresse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Adams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Charlton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Adams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Adams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8220
8220
8220
8220
8220
8221
National Defence
Mr. Goodale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Nicholson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Goodale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Nicholson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Goodale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Nicholson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8221
8221
8221
8221
8221
8221
Citizenship and Immigration
Mrs. Groguhé. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Alexander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8221
8221
Mrs. Groguhé. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Alexander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Nash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Alexander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Nash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Alexander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Employment
Mr. Hayes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Armstrong. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rail Transportation
Mrs. Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Watson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Gravelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Watson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Seniors
Ms. Mathyssen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Armstrong. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Housing
Ms. Liu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Armstrong. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Infrastructure
Ms. Freeland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Gourde . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Health
Ms. Duncan (Etobicoke North) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Adams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8221
8221
8222
8222
8222
8222
8222
8222
8222
8222
8223
8223
8223
8223
8223
8223
8223
8223
Mr. Harper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8226
Mr. Mulcair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8228
Mr. Trudeau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8229
Ms. May . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8230
Procedure and House Affairs
Mr. Preston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8231
Natural Resources
Mr. Julian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8231
Motion for concurrence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8231
(Motion agreed to)
.......................................
8231
Ms. Mathyssen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8231
Petitions
Palestine
8231
Cigarette Litter
Ms. Nash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8231
Prostitution
8224
8224
8224
8224
Aboriginal Affairs
Ms. Bennett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ms. Leitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8224
8225
National Defence
Ms. May . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Nicholson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Hyer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Nicholson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8226
Canadian Military Mission in Iraq
Ms. Mathyssen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Intergovernmental Affairs
Mr. Leef . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Strahl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Foreign Affairs
Mr. Bellavance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Nicholson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Dykstra. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Iraq
8224
8224
8224
8224
Public Safety
Mr. Zimmer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Blaney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Telefilm Canada
Committees of the House
Fisheries and Oceans
Mr. Toone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Kamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Masse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Kamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Environment
Mr. Bevington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Carrie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Mr. Vellacott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8232
The Environment
Mr. Hyer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8232
Falun Gong
Ms. Davies (Vancouver East) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8232
Multiple Sclerosis
Ms. Duncan (Etobicoke North) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8232
Asbestos
Mr. Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8232
Questions on the Order Paper
Mr. Lukiwski . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8232
GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act
8225
8225
8225
8225
8225
8225
8225
8226
8226
8226
Bill C-36. Third reading
Mr. Toone
..................................
8232
.................................................
8232
Ms. Boivin
................................................
8232
Mr. Brahmi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8233
Mr. Lamoureux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8233
Mrs. Smith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8235
Mr. Toone
.................................................
8235
Mr. Dechert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8236
Mrs. Groguhé. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8236
Mr. Dechert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8236
Ms. Boivin
................................................
8239
Mrs. Smith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8239
Ms. Péclet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8240
Division on motion deferred . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8240
PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS
Department of Public Works and Government Services
Act
Mr. Patry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bill C-574. Second reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Ravignat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Gourde . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mr. Hyer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8240
8240
8242
8243
8243
Mrs. Groguhé. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8243
Mr. Trottier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8243
Ms. Michaud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8245
Ms. St-Denis
..............................................
8246
................................................
8247
Mrs. Block
APPENDIX
Published under the authority of the Speaker of
the House of Commons
Publié en conformité de l’autorité
du Président de la Chambre des communes
SPEAKER’S PERMISSION
PERMISSION DU PRÉSIDENT
Reproduction of the proceedings of the House of Commons
and its Committees, in whole or in part and in any medium, is
hereby permitted provided that the reproduction is accurate
and is not presented as official. This permission does not
extend to reproduction, distribution or use for commercial
purpose of financial gain. Reproduction or use outside this
permission or without authorization may be treated as
copyright infringement in accordance with the Copyright Act.
Authorization may be obtained on written application to the
Office of the Speaker of the House of Commons.
Il est permis de reproduire les délibérations de la Chambre et
de ses comités, en tout ou en partie, sur n’importe quel
support, pourvu que la reproduction soit exacte et qu’elle ne
soit pas présentée comme version officielle. Il n’est toutefois
pas permis de reproduire, de distribuer ou d’utiliser les
délibérations à des fins commerciales visant la réalisation d'un
profit financier. Toute reproduction ou utilisation non permise
ou non formellement autorisée peut être considérée comme
une violation du droit d’auteur aux termes de la Loi sur le
droit d’auteur. Une autorisation formelle peut être obtenue sur
présentation d’une demande écrite au Bureau du Président de
la Chambre.
Reproduction in accordance with this permission does not
constitute publication under the authority of the House of
Commons. The absolute privilege that applies to the
proceedings of the House of Commons does not extend to
these permitted reproductions. Where a reproduction includes
briefs to a Committee of the House of Commons, authorization for reproduction may be required from the authors in
accordance with the Copyright Act.
La reproduction conforme à la présente permission ne
constitue pas une publication sous l’autorité de la Chambre.
Le privilège absolu qui s’applique aux délibérations de la
Chambre ne s’étend pas aux reproductions permises. Lorsqu’une reproduction comprend des mémoires présentés à un
comité de la Chambre, il peut être nécessaire d’obtenir de
leurs auteurs l’autorisation de les reproduire, conformément à
la Loi sur le droit d’auteur.
Nothing in this permission abrogates or derogates from the
privileges, powers, immunities and rights of the House of
Commons and its Committees. For greater certainty, this
permission does not affect the prohibition against impeaching
or questioning the proceedings of the House of Commons in
courts or otherwise. The House of Commons retains the right
and privilege to find users in contempt of Parliament if a
reproduction or use is not in accordance with this permission.
La présente permission ne porte pas atteinte aux privilèges,
pouvoirs, immunités et droits de la Chambre et de ses comités.
Il est entendu que cette permission ne touche pas l’interdiction
de contester ou de mettre en cause les délibérations de la
Chambre devant les tribunaux ou autrement. La Chambre
conserve le droit et le privilège de déclarer l’utilisateur
coupable d’outrage au Parlement lorsque la reproduction ou
l’utilisation n’est pas conforme à la présente permission.
Also available on the Parliament of Canada Web Site at the
following address: http://www.parl.gc.ca
Aussi disponible sur le site Web du Parlement du Canada à
l’adresse suivante : http://www.parl.gc.ca
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Related manuals

Download PDF

advertisement