Human Resources and Skills Development Canada 2004-2005

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada  2004-2005
Human Resources and Skills Development
Canada
2004-2005
Estimates
A Report on Plans and Priorities
Approved by:
__________________________________________
The Honourable Joseph Volpe, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
______________________________________________
The Honourable Joseph Frank Fontana, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Labour and Housing
HRSDC • Messages
I am pleased to present the 2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
and present our agenda for the forthcoming years.
As you know, the Government of Canada is committed to strengthening
Canada’s social foundations, building a 21st-century economy, and to
ensuring Canada’s role in the world. Human Resources and Skills
Development Canada (HRSDC) plays a key role in meeting these
commitments by creating opportunities for skills development, learning
and employment to support the economic advancement of Canadians,
their families and communities.
These efforts will result in a better quality of life for all Canadians. HRSDC is working with the
provinces and territories, as well as business and labour, so that all Canadians have the
opportunity to develop skills and succeed.
We recognize that we need to take steps to build a lifelong learning culture that ensures
Canadians have the foundation skills they require, affordable access to learning opportunities, a
learning system that is responsive to their needs and that of the economy, and have the
information they need to make learning decisions. A series of enhancements to the Canada
Student Loans Program (CSLP) and the Canada Education Savings Grant Program (CESG)
were announced to ensure that all Canadians who want to learn will have this opportunity.
The Government of Canada also announced improvements to the CESG that will help
low-income families save for the post-secondary education of their children and will introduce
the new Canada Learning Bond, an incentive to help low-income families kick-start saving for
their children's education.
The 2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities demonstrates that HRSDC will work strategically
to meet the needs of Canadians. For example, we will improve service delivery to Canadians,
renew our strategy for Aboriginal human resources development, develop a workplace skills
framework to strengthen the partnership between industry, employers and workers, and develop
a pan-Canadian framework for literacy and related strategies. We will be reshaping government
policies and programs to address the real needs of Canadians.
We are also committed to continuous improvement in the administration of our programs. For
example, we will continue our work to strengthen the management and financial stewardship of
our grants and contributions programs. This year, we will also table departmental legislation in
Parliament to establish the new department.
These are just some of our priorities outlined in this report. Canada is stronger when its citizens
fully contribute their skills and talents to the labour market and our society. We are proud of the
fact that we at HRSDC are united in our dedication to advance the government’s goal of human
capital development.
The Honourable Joseph Volpe, P.C., M.P
Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development
HRSDC • Messages
I am pleased to present our ambitious agenda for the coming year,
particularly with my new responsibilities which now include Labour
and the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation together with the
National Homelessness Initiative.
The Government of Canada recognizes homelessness as a priority and
encourages practical, local solutions – offering a strong validation of the
community-driven approach of the National Homelessness Initiative.
Partnerships enhance the capacity of Canadian communities to address
homelessness in a sustainable way. Together all levels of government, the
private sector, unions and non-governmental organizations are working at
the local level to provide an array of services to meet the needs of homeless individuals and families
and those at risk of becoming homeless. To help break the cycle of homelessness, we look forward
to the strengthened integration between homelessness and housing initiatives.
The Labour Program promotes a safe, fair, healthy, stable and cooperative workplace both in
Canada and abroad. We will continue to modernize our labour legislation and explore new ways
of improving the administration of our labour law to support fair, safe, healthy, flexible and
productive workplaces. Through the work of our conciliators and mediators, we will continue to
support the industrial relations system by assisting employers and unions in the collective
bargaining process. We will also continue to demonstrate federal leadership through research on
workplace practices and labour related issues. The Labour Program will promote work-life
balance through its research and information sharing activities in order to reduce work-life
conflict and contribute to improved productivity. In support of the Government of Canada’s
commitments to Aboriginal people, the Labour Program is committed to developing an
Aboriginal labour affairs strategy.
The Government of Canada is also committed to seeing the benefits of global interdependence
spread more fairly throughout the world. This calls for multilateral institutions that work, and
for greater collaboration among nations to ensure that economic policies go hand-in-hand with
stronger social programs to alleviate hunger, poverty and disease, and to help raise the standard
of living in developing countries.
Last fall, in the Americas, we took a major step forward to meet this commitment when the
Labour Ministers of Canada, Brazil and Mexico presented a report that highlighted that
economic integration is key to the future of workers in this hemisphere, and that modern
effective labour policies are critical to the success of a global economy.
Our agenda for 2004-2005 is challenging. We are committed to improving the lives of
Canadians by building on our efforts to date.
The Honourable Joseph Frank Fontana, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Labour and Housing
HRSDC • Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Messages
Ministers’ Messages
Management Representation Statements .......................................................................9
HRSDC Overview
Our Mandate ................................................................................................................11
Our Business .......................................................................................................14
Our Strategic Outcomes......................................................................................14
Planning Overview.......................................................................................................16
The Demographic and Economic Environment..................................................16
Policy Environment ............................................................................................19
Management Challenges.....................................................................................20
Corporate Risks...................................................................................................22
Plans and Priorities by Strategic Outcomes .................................................................23
Introduction.........................................................................................................23
Policy Renewal and Program Leadership ...........................................................24
Service Transformation.......................................................................................25
Strengthening Management Practices and Expenditure Review ........................25
Organizational Effectiveness ..............................................................................27
Detailed Priorities by Strategic Outcome:
• Efficient and effective income support and labour market transitions .........28
• Enhanced competitiveness of Canadian workplaces by supporting
investment in and recognition and utilization of skills .................................30
• Through access to learning, Canadians can participate fully in a
knowledge-based economy and society........................................................31
• Safe, healthy, fair, stable, cooperative and productive workplaces ..............32
• Enhanced community capacity to contribute to the reduction
of homelessness ............................................................................................33
• Seamless, integrated and multi-channel service delivery that ensures
client satisfaction ..........................................................................................34
Performance Measurement Framework.......................................................................35
Sustainable Development.............................................................................................40
Special Responsibilities of the Minister ......................................................................41
Fact Sheet - Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative ...............................42
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Table of Contents
Organization
Strategic Outcomes and Business Lines ......................................................................43
Accountability – Organizational Structure ..................................................................44
Departmental Planned Spending..................................................................................45
2004-2005 Planned Expenditure Profile.............................................................46
Financial Highlights............................................................................................47
Annexes
Annex 1: Division of Responsibilities of the Former Human Resources
Development Canada ................................................................................51
Annex 2: Human Resources and Skills Development 2004-2005
Corporate Risk Profile and Mitigating Strategies .....................................54
Annex 3: Summary of Transfer Payments................................................................57
Annex 4: Details on Transfer Payments Programs ...................................................58
• Fact Sheet #1 – Youth Employment Strategy......................................61
• Fact Sheet #2 – National Literacy Program.........................................62
• Fact Sheet #3 – National Homelessness Initiative...............................63
• Fact Sheet #4 – Aboriginal Human Resources Development
Strategy ..........................................................................................64
• Fact Sheet #5 – Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships
and Voisey’s Bay ...........................................................................65
• Fact Sheet #6 – Foreign Credential Recognition .................................66
• Fact Sheet #7 – Sector Council Program .............................................67
• Fact Sheet #8 – Official Language Minority Communities
Support Fund........................................................................................68
• Fact Sheet #9 – Older Workers Pilot Projects .....................................70
Annex 5: Foundations (Conditional Grants).............................................................71
• Peter Gzowski Foundation for Literacy...............................................71
• Frontier College Learning Foundation.................................................71
• The Canada Millenium, Scholarships Foundation...............................72
• Canadian Council on Learning ............................................................73
Annex 6: Major Initiatives and/or Programs ............................................................74
Annex 7: Source of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue...........................78
Annex 8: Net Cost of Program(s) for the Estimates Year ........................................79
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Table of Contents
Annex 9: Specified Purpose Accounts......................................................................81
• Employment Insurance Account .........................................................82
• Government Annuities Account .........................................................90
• Civil Service Insurance Fund ..............................................................91
Annex 10: Employment Insurance Part II- 2004-2005 Expenditure Plan ..................92
Annex 11: Loans (Non Budgetary).............................................................................96
Annex 12: Consolidated Report on Canada Student Loans........................................97
Financial Tables .................................................................................101
Annex 13: Major Regulatory Initiatives ...................................................................104
Annex 14: Horizontal Initiatives...............................................................................109
Website References....................................................................................................110
Index ..........................................................................................................................112
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Management Representation Statements
Management Representation Statement
I submit, for tabling in Parliament, the 2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities for
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada.
This report has been prepared to meet the reporting principles and disclosure
requirements contained in the Guide to the preparation of the 2004-2005 Report on
Plans and Priorities.
Š It accurately portrays the organisation’s plans and priorities.
Š The planned spending information is consistent with the directions provided in the
Minister of Finance’s Budget for 2004 and by the Treasury Board Secretariat.
Š It is comprehensive and accurate.
Š It is based on sound departmental information and management systems.
The reporting structure on which this report is based has been approved by Treasury
Board Ministers and is the basis by which we can be held to account for the results
achieved with the resources and authorities provided.
Wayne G. Wouters
Deputy Minister
Human Resources and Skills Development
Date
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 9
HRSDC • Management Representation Statements
Management Representation Statement
On July 20, 2004, the Prime Minister announced the Minister of Labour and Housing
as part of the new Cabinet. In addition to Labour and the Canada Mortgage and
Housing Corporation portfolios, the Minister is also responsible for the National
Homelessness Initiative.
The plans, priorities, planned spending and performance measures in support of the
Labour program and National Homelessness Initiative are presented in the 2004-2005
Report on Plans and Priorities for Human Resources and Skills Development Canada.
Maryantonett Flumian
Associate Deputy Minister and Deputy Minister for Labour
Date
Page 10
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC OVERVIEW
Our Mandate
On December 12, 2003, the Government of Canada restructured departments to achieve
demonstrable progress in three key areas:
•
•
•
Strengthening Canada’s social foundations;
Building a 21st century economy; and
Ensuring Canada’s role in the world.
As part of this change, the Prime Minister created the new departments of Human Resources and
Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) and Social Development Canada (SDC) from the former
department of Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC).a
HRSDC’s vision is to build a country where everyone has the opportunity to learn, and to
contribute to Canada’s success by participating fully in a well-functioning and efficient labour
market. HRSDC’s mission is to improve the standard of living and quality of life of all
Canadians by promoting a highly skilled and mobile labour force and an efficient and inclusive
labour market. This means the department has a central role in helping build a 21st century
economy for Canada and in strengthening Canada’s social foundations. Diagram 1 portrays
HRSDC’s vision and mission as well as its business lines and the strategic outcomes it has
established.
The department contributes to meeting its vision and mission by supporting human capital
development, enhancing access to post-secondary education, supporting workplace skills
development, and encouraging lifelong learning for Canadians. The department works toward
enhancing Canadian communities’ capacity to overcome homelessness. It also promotes a safe,
healthy, fair, stable, cooperative and productive work environment. HRSDC is also taking steps
to modernize the way benefits and services are delivered, to improve its capacity to reach,
engage and serve Canadians.
Good relations with the provinces and territories are an integral component of HRSDC’s
mandate. The department works closely with provinces and territories on learning,
homelessness, labour market and workplace issues.
As part of its mandate, HRSDC is responsible for a national in-person service network to support
the delivery of programs and services, those of Social Development Canada, and for Service
Canada. As part of this regional network, HRSDC is responsible for the management of
105 Employment Insurance Processing Centres and eleven Income Security Programs Processing
Centres which are managed through an agreement with Social Development Canada.
These centres are components of the mail channel for service delivery. Social Development
a
Annex 1 provides a detailed outline of the allocation of programs, services and activities from the former
HRDC to the new departments of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and Social
Development Canada.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 11
HRSDC • Overview
Canada’s network of call centres and on-line services supports the delivery of HRSDC programs
including Employment Insurance and the Canada Student Loans Program, as well as its own
programs. This shared service delivery model ensures that Canadians receive seamless,
single window in-person service for local services and benefits delivery, and maximizes the
cost-effectiveness and resource-efficiency of the two new departments.
On March 8, 2004 by Order-in-Council, Minister Volpe assumed responsibility for the Toronto
Waterfront Revitalization Initiative.
Finally, on July 20, 2004, the Prime Minister announced the new Cabinet including the
Minister of Labour and Housing. In addition to the responsibilities associated with the
Labour and Homelessness programs, the Minister is also responsible for the Canada
Mortgage and Housing Corporation.
Page 12
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Overview
Diagram 1
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 13
HRSDC • Overview
Our Business
HRSDC is a large government department. The department has over 14,000 employees, and is
responsible for over $20 billion in spending to benefit Canadians. Annex 6 provides an overview
of the programs and services delivered by the department.
HRSDC’s responsibility for direct service delivery to Canadians is anchored in an in-person
network of approximately 320 Human Resource Centres of Canada (HRCC), as well as regional
offices in each of the provinces. In addition, HRSDC is responsible for operation of the
Government of Canada's in-person network of Service Canada access centres. The Service
Canada network includes 76 access centres across Canada, of which 73 are directly managed by
HRSDC, and three are operated by the Department of Canadian Heritage. Of the 73 HRSDC
locations, 66 are located within HRCCs, and seven are operated from the premises of third party
organizations.
Our Strategic Outcomes
HRSDC has developed new strategic outcomes. These strategic outcomes reflect the results the
department is expected to achieve through its broad array of programs and as part of the
Government of Canada’s service delivery network. The strategic outcomes provide the structure
against which results will be reported and the framework for the development of departmental
performance measurement. The department’s strategic outcomes are:
- Efficient and effective income support and labour market transitions;
- Enhanced competitiveness of Canadian workplaces by supporting investment in and
recognition and utilization of skills;
- Through access to learning, Canadians can participate fully in a knowledge-based
economy and society;
- Safe, healthy, fair, stable, cooperative and productive workplaces;
- Enhanced community capacity to contribute to the reduction of homelessness; and
- Seamless, integrated and multi-channel service delivery that ensures client satisfaction.
To deliver on its mandate and meet these strategic outcomes, HRSDC has established new
business lines:
Employment Insurance Benefits – provide temporary financial assistance to unemployed
Canadians who qualify under the Employment Insurance Act, while they look for work, as well
as assisting families in balancing work and family responsibilities during periods of
unemployment as a result of sickness or injury, pregnancy, parental leave, and caring for gravely
ill or dying family members.
Employment Programs – assist unemployed participants to prepare for, find and maintain
employment. Some employment programs (those funded under Part II of Employment Insurance
Act) are delivered through Labour Market Development Agreements with the provinces and
territories (five agreements are co-managed, while seven are fully devolved – there is no
agreement with Ontario) as well as with Aboriginal partners through 79 Aboriginal Human
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2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Overview
Resources Development Agreements, and thirteen other government departments and agencies in
support of the Youth Employment Strategy.
Workplace Skills – work with sector councils and other partners to promote workplace-related
learning and skills development; prepare and disseminate labour market information; facilitate
the entry of skilled and temporary foreign workers and address issues of immigrant labour
market integration.
Learning – support the Government of Canada’s significant investments in skills and learning to
enable Canadians to acquire and improve their skills over a lifetime. Programs within this
business line include the Canada Student Loans Program, Canada Education Savings Grant,
and a number of learning and literacy programs.
Labour – promote a safe, healthy, fair, stable, cooperative and productive workplace and is
responsible for the Canada Labour Code, the Employment Equity Act, the Government
Employees’ Compensation Act, as well as other legislation on wages and working conditions.
Homelessness – assist communities, through partnerships, in implementing measures that help
homeless individuals and families to move towards self-sufficiency, thereby contributing to
society and the economy.
Policy, Program and Service Delivery Support – provide direct service to clients for both the
departments of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and Social Development
Canada. Work undertaken in this business line also includes Policy and Communications.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 15
HRSDC • Overview
Planning Overview
As a new and large department that includes management of a national service delivery network,
HRSDC faces a range of policy, program, service delivery and management challenges and risks.
The following sections set out the context for the department’s work and its priorities.
The Demographic and Economic Environment
The current context for HRSDC is a resilient economy which has resumed healthy growth after
the shocks of the past few years (such as the stock market collapse of 2001, the Severe Acute
Respiratory Syndrome crisis of 2003, the ban on beef export and the pronounced appreciation of
the Canadian dollar) with comparatively healthy labour markets by the standards of the last
quarter century, but which now faces prospective declines in population and potential labour
force growth.
Canada’s population growth rate has been decreasing during the last few years and will
continue to slow in coming years, as the natural population increase (births less deaths)
continues to slow. Net immigration has already become the main source of population growth.
Slower population growth will inevitably be accompanied by slower labour force growth, which
will be exacerbated as population ageing lowers labour force participation rates.
Population Growth in Canada
(as proportion of total population)
Net immigration
Natural increase
Total
1.5
1.3
1.0
0.8
0.5
0.3
0.0
1976
1981
1986
1991
1996
2001
2006
2011
2016
2021
2026
2031
2036
2041
2046
-0.3
-0.5
Source: (1976-2003) Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey; (2004-2046) HRSD-PRC, based on MEDS
The context for the expected slowing in labour force growth is one of labour markets at a high
level of employment. Canada’s economy continues to rebound from the slowdown of 2002.
This has led to a continued healthy labour market, with ongoing solid job growth and an
employment ratio (employed Canadians as a share of the population aged 15 and over)
that attained record levels in 2003.
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2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Overview
Growth in Labour Force and Source Population
(percent)
3.5
3.0
Labour Force
2.5
2.0
1.5
Population, 15+
1.0
0.5
0.0
1976
1980
1984
1988
1992
1996
2000
2004
2008
2012
Source: (1976-2003) Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey; (2004-2030) HRSD-PRC, Population from LFPR Model
Ref 2003, Labour Force and Employment from Horizon 2030 Scenario
Driving the high employment ratio has been ongoing increases in the labour force participation
rate, also at a record level, with recent gains especially evident among older workers. There is
still room for further gains as the unemployment rate remains above the recent low set in 2000,
but the expected acceleration of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth from two percent in
2003 to nearer to three percent in 2004 and even higher in 2005b will help drive such gains.
Participation and Employment Rates and Proportion
Unemployed Among Adults
(percent)
70
Proportion Unemployed
Participation Rate
Employment Rate
68
66
64
62
60
58
56
1976
1979
1982
1985
1988
1991
1994
1997
2000
Source: Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey
Thus the central labour market challenge of the 1980s and early 1990s - creating enough jobs for
Canadian workers - is starting to transform into a challenge of finding enough workers for the
jobs and sustaining a solid rate of growth in the economy.
b
«Private sector economists expect the Canadian economy to grow by an average of 2.7 percent in 2004, and
they expect a further pickup in growth to 3.3 percent in 2005» (Budget in Brief 2004, Finance Canada).
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 17
HRSDC • Overview
Key to this will be better productivity growth. Since the mid-nineties Canada has seen gains in
productivity growth. Combined with the record employment ratio, this has led to solid gains in
GDP per person. Nonetheless, Canada’s productivity growth remains generally below the
strong performance observed in the U.S. with the result that the gap in output per hour worked
between the two countries has widened to levels not seen since the early 1960s.
Labour force quality is a key contributor to productivity and standards of living. Higher levels of
education and skills contribute to stronger growth both directly, in terms of worker productivity,
and indirectly in terms of the new knowledge embedded in both technology and how the economy
is organized. Higher education and skills also lead to better labour market outcomes: higher rates
of labour market participation and employment, and higher wage and salary rates. They also help
stimulate a ‘virtuous circle’ of even higher labour quality: better educated workers retain their
skills better, especially literacy, they get greater access to employer-sponsored learning, and the
kinds of jobs they get confer more on-the-job skills development so that their wage gains with
years of work experience are higher.
In the past several decades Canada has seen major gains in the average educational attainment of
its workforce, as older workers with lower attainment have retired and been replaced by highereducated, younger cohorts. While overall population growth will increasingly depend on
immigration in the future, Canadian ‘school leavers’ (those who complete their schooling in
Canada) will continue for the foreseeable future to remain the main source of new workers,
although they will be increasingly offset by retirement of existing, baby-boom generation workers.
Here the news is good: Canada continues to see rising levels of participation in post-secondary
education. But this will, in and of itself, not generate the same strong gains in labour force
educational attainment seen in previous decades, as the higher educational achievement of the
children of baby-boomers relative to their baby-boomer parents will be less than the much higher
educational attainment of the boomers relative to their parents. Thus further gains in overall
human capital quality will increasingly have to come via lifelong learning rather than just the
formal schooling of youth.
Average Annual Job Growth by Education Usually Required
(1989-2003)
3.5%
3.0%
2.5%
2.0%
1.5%
1.0%
0.5%
0.0%
Management Occupations Occupations Occupations Occupations
usually
usually
usually
usually
requiring
requiring
requiring
requiring
university
college
high school
less than
high school
Total
Source: Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey
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2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Overview
In such a labour market, a key challenge is ensuring that labour market entrants have – and labour
force participants maintain through lifelong learning – the skills to meet employers’ needs, now and
as they evolve. This requires a mix of skills, both higher and lower, obtained through a continuum of
educational attainment encompassing high school, community college, trades apprenticeships and
university and post-graduate degrees. Although the highest job growth will occur in occupations
requiring the higher levels of education, as has been the case for years, there will also continue to be
growth in the number of jobs requiring less than high school education. The skills also have to match
the specific kinds of jobs that are opening: biochemist jobs require biochemists. Currently, shortages
are appearing and are anticipated in a number of specific occupations such as high-skilled computer
specialists, some trades, university professors in some disciplines, and nurses. There are also
shortages in specific regions, reflecting their specific economic circumstances (such as construction
workers in Ontario). At the same time, labour market surpluses continue to exist, although they tend
to be concentrated among low skill occupations (e.g. clerical) and in declining sectors. As well,
employment and unemployment rates will continue to vary widely across regions.
It will also be important to ensure the better integration of specific groups into the labour market.
The difficulties experienced by recent immigrants in finding employment suitable to their skill
level, and the continued problems older workers have finding new work following a job loss
constitute two examples of the type of structural labour market challenges that remain and need
to be solved. This is especially so given that recent immigrants and older workers are accounting
for a larger and larger proportion of the labour force. As well, the levels of labour market
participation of marginalized groups such as persons with disabilities, Aboriginal peoples and
homeless people continue to be low. Increasing labour market participation among these groups
will help attain important social policy objectives, such as promoting inclusion.
Policy Environment
Through the Speech from the Throne and Budget 2004, the Government has made commitments
that have a direct bearing on the work of HRSDC in creating new strategic approaches to
respond to the emerging economic, labour market and learning needs of Canadians.
In the area of learning, the Government committed to:
- improving the Canada Student Loans Program (CSLP) to help overcome financial
barriers to post-secondary education; and
- Creating new incentives to encourage low-income families to begin investing in children
for their long-term education. These measures include the introduction of a Canada
Learning Bond and enhancements to the Canada Education Savings Grant on Registered
Education Savings Plan, providing some 20,000 students from low-income families with
new grants and increasing the loan ceiling and modernizing eligible expenses under
CSLP.
In support of workplace and skills development, the government committed to:
- Refining and enhancing its programs to encourage skills upgrading, in concert with sector
councils, unions, and employers; and
- Improving recognition of foreign credentials.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 19
HRSDC • Overview
In the area of labour market and employment programs, the Government announced that
it would:
- Work with provinces to update labour market programming to better reflect the realities
of work in the 21st century, including the growth in self-employment and the need for
continuous skills upgrading;
- Renew the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy;
- Work with communities to find solutions to the issues Aboriginal people face through the
Urban Aboriginal Strategy; and
- Ensure that minority language communities have the tools that enable their members to
contribute fully to the development of Canadian society.
In the area of Employment Insurance Benefits, the Minister announced that the Government of
Canada will implement new measures, totalling between $229 million over three fiscal years, to
help seasonal workers. Further, the Prime Minister announced the renewed mandate of the
Task Force on Seasonal Work. The Task Force will evaluate the challenges born by seasonal
industries while looking into the needs of workers and communities that depend on them and
provide advice on areas for possible action in the future.
In the area of homelessness, the Government of Canada also confirmed that “tackling
homelessness” is a national priority. The Speech from the Throne provides support for
addressing homelessness, emphasizing the need to strengthen social and economic outcomes for
all Canadians, implement a new deal for communities, and work in partnership to respond to
complex issues such as Aboriginal homelessness. At the Canada-Aboriginal Peoples Roundtable
held on April 19, 2004, the Prime Minister committed to a national strategy to deal with housing
issues off-reserve and to a new partnership with Aboriginal peoples, which will have a direct
impact on Aboriginal housing and homelessness issues.
The Minister signed an Agreement in Principle on Quebec's Parental Insurance Plan with the
Government of Quebec. The Government of Canada and the Government of Quebec committed
to concluding a final agreement by February 1, 2005, that meets the principles in the Agreement
as well as providing for the administrative, financial and other provisions under which Quebec's
plan would be established.
On behalf of the Government of Canada, the Minister also signed a memorandum of agreement
with the Government of Ontario that commits the two governments to explore collaboration in
the delivery of public services, particularly reintegration of labour market programs and
service delivery.
The Prime Minister created the Minister of Labour and Housing as part of his announcement of
the new Cabinet on July 20, 2004. The department will be assessing the implications of this
announcement in terms of housing and will provide more detailed and fulsome reporting in the
2005-2006 Report on Plans and Priorities.
Management Challenges
Canadians, as taxpayers, as clients of services and as citizens, expect accountability, openness,
transparency and value-for-money from their governments. All Government of Canada
departments and agencies are working to improve their organizational effectiveness and
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2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Overview
strengthen public sector management. In Strengthening Public Sector Management, the
Government announced plans to transform and strengthen public sector management including
measures to:
- Strengthen comptrollership and oversight;
- Review government expenditures and modernize management practices;
- Assure accountability, transparency, good governance, and an enhanced role for
Parliament; and
- Build capacity across the federal public service.
The Treasury Board Secretariat has launched a series of initiatives to transform and strengthen public
sector management and financial accountability within the Government of Canada. These initiatives
are intended to increase oversight, ensure effective public spending in areas of government priority,
support accountability, transparency, good governance and an enhanced role for Parliament.
These initiatives include the following:
Strengthen Comptrollership and Oversight
-
Strengthening internal audit and evaluation capacity across the public sector.
-
Publicly disclosing all contracts entered into by the government of Canada for amounts
over $10,000 with limited exceptions.
Expenditure Review
- Spending and operational review of the 30 largest departments and agencies.
- Government operations reviews (e.g. capital assets management; public sector
compensation and comparability; corporate and administrative services; service delivery
infrastructure; use of information technology and its management).
Accountability, Good Governance and an enhanced role for Parliament
- Review of the Financial Administration Act.
- Review of Accountabilities of Ministers and Senior Public Servants.
Building Public Service Capacity
- Creating a core learning curriculum for public servants.
- Developing specialized programs for advanced financial management and other core
management functions.
- Introducing enterprise-wide financial and human resource information systems.
The Prime Minister announced in December 2003 that democratic reform was a priority for his
government. One of the fundamental principles identified in the government’s action plan to
support democratic reform is “Parliament should have the tools to hold the government to
account for the good stewardship of public resources.”c This plan commits Deputy Ministers and
c
http://www.pco-bcp.gc.ca/default.asp?Language=E&Page=Publications&doc=dr-rd/drrd_doc_e.htm#Messages
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
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HRSDC • Overview
departments to using the government’s recently released Management Accountability
Framework to report to Treasury Board on their stewardship of public resources.
In her November 2003 report to Parliament, the Auditor General of Canada included a chapter on
measuring and reporting the performance of the Employment Insurance Income Benefits
Program. While the Auditor General acknowledged considerable effort goes into measuring the
performance of this program, she made recommendations for improvement. The Auditor
General of Canada also made recommendations to improve the provision of information to
Parliament with respect to the impact of the 1996 changes to the Employment Insurance Act.
In their response to the report, the Department and the Canada Employment Insurance
Commission agreed with the recommendations and the areas identified by the audit and indicated
that these issues would be addressed as a matter of priority.
The Standing Committee on Human Resources Development and the Status of Persons with
Disabilities presented two reports in 2003 that are within the responsibilities of HRSDC
addressing issues related to literacy and urban Aboriginal people. Departmental commitments in
response to these reports have been integrated into the priorities for 2004-2005.
Corporate Risks
Risk assessment is an integral part of the departmental planning and priority process.
The department reviewed its corporate level risks in light of its mandate and operating
environment and has identified three key risk areas for 2004-2005:
- Service and benefits delivery support to Canadians, and support to the Government and
Ministers during a process of organizational restructuring and internal re-organization;
- Diligent accountability for results, stewardship of resources and transparency of decisionmaking in light of rising public concern and mistrust directed toward governments and
public servants over the use and management of taxpayers’ money; and
- Demonstrating policy and program leadership within the context of fiscal restraint,
internal reallocation and expenditure review across government.
HRSDC must ensure that service and benefits delivery disruptions do not occur during this
period of transition and transformation. The department must also ensure that provision of
service and advice to the government and the Minister is likewise not impeded.
The department is entrusted with responsibility for the administration and delivery of billions of
dollars through its many programs and services. Public expectations for the integrity of
management processes and accountability for results are rising.
Equally, the department must maintain and build its capacity to provide policy and program
leadership to address the current and emerging economic and social issues facing Canadians in
an increasingly complex environment, including fiscal restraint.
These priorities and the results HRSDC expects to achieve aim to address the challenges of its
operating environment and to mitigate the risks. A detailed outline of the department’s risks and
its mitigation strategies is presented in Annex 2.
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HRSDC • Overview
Plans and Priorities by Strategic Outcomes
Introduction
As a new department, HRSDC undertook to set new priorities and new strategic outcomes for the
results to be achieved from its programs and services. HRSDC priorities for 2004-2005 relating
to its policies, programs and services have been established for each business line to align with
specific strategic outcomes. Taken together, the department’s priorities fall into one of four
strategic areas:
- Policy Renewal and Program Leadership;
- Service Transformation;
- Strengthened Management Practices and Expenditure Review; and
- Organizational Effectiveness.
Diagram 2 demonstrates the interconnectedness of each of these strategic areas. In each, the
department has identified where it will need to make progress, and how it proposes to do so.
In addition, the department has identified the key deliverables for its work – what it must achieve
over the course of the planning year.
Diagram 2
Policy Renewal
and Program
Leadership
ORGANIZATIONAL
EFFECTIVENESS
Service
Transformation
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Strengthened
Management
Practices &
Expenditure
Review
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HRSDC • Overview
The priorities and associated deliverables represent the department’s support for government
commitments, the response to important issues facing Canadians and areas for strengthened
management practices. They also represent how, in addition to daily provision of services and
benefits delivery, the department will achieve results to the benefit of Canadians as identified by
the strategic outcomes. The achievement of its strategic outcomes does not rest with the
department only. Without partners, the department alone cannot reach its goals. Success can
only happen with the active participation of all players. Ensuring Canadians have the tools they
need to participate fully in the labour market and society requires the active participation of a
multitude of partners. The department will act as a catalyst.
First, cooperation with provinces and territories is required given their responsibility for education
and labour market training. HRSDC will work closely with its provincial and territorial partners
building on established relationships, through existing multilateral forums and bilaterally.
Employers and unions have an important role for workplace-based training; learning partners,
not-for-profit organizations and community groups play an important role in providing
information and services; and finally individuals are responsible to make personal decisions
regarding the upgrading of their skills. They will all have to play their role for HRSDC to fully
meet its objectives.
The complex nature of homelessness demands a multi-faceted approach with a variety of
stakeholders, including all levels of government and partners such as the voluntary and private
sectors. The National Homelessness Initiative works to bring them together, in a community-based
approach, to provide a seamless array of services to meet the needs of homeless individuals
and families.
Policy Renewal and Program Leadership
Canada continues to enjoy a relatively high standard of living. Countries that continue to prosper
in the future will be those equipped with a highly skilled, adaptable and productive workforce.
Globalization, the emerging knowledge economy and slowing labour force growth are powerful
drivers that are currently shaping Canada’s labour market challenges. In addition, while Canada
has one of the most educated workforces in the world, there are emerging skills gaps in three
principal areas: Canada lags behind most other Organization for Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD) countries in terms of conferring advanced research degrees; Canada is
experiencing shortages in many skilled trades; and many Canadians fail to gain the basic literacy
and other essential skills they need to succeed in the knowledge-based economy. Meeting these
challenges requires that HRSDC move forward on a human capital agenda based on two key
pillars: 1) A lifelong learning agenda; and 2) An employment and skills strategy.
HRSDC’s lifelong learning agenda will be aimed at building a culture of learning throughout
the life course with a focus on expanding learning opportunities for Canadians. HRSDC’s
employment and skills strategy will focus on modernizing employment programs to help
workers acquire the skills and support they need during periods of unemployment and other job
transitions. A key focus of this work will be at the level of the workplace where developing the
skills of adult workers would form a key element for achieving results for Canada both now and
in the future. The agenda involves the development of a workplace skills strategy that will
begin by focusing on more effective immigrant integration, strengthened skills development and
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2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Overview
labour market attachment of Aboriginal people, re-invigorate the Sector Council model and
develop initiatives to increase the number of successful apprentices.
Delivering on the department’s human capital agenda requires the active involvement of
provinces and territories, as well as other key learning partners. As a result, HRSDC will work
collaboratively with provinces and territories, along with employers, labour, learning partners
and community organizations to ensure a concerted and coordinated policy effort that is based on
the involvement and support of all key players in Canadian society.
Service Transformation
HRSDC is committed to renewing its services and service delivery by focusing on citizen’s
needs. Modernizing Service for Canadians was initiated in 2002 and the department will work
with Social Development Canada to make progress on modernization efforts. While continuing
to develop transformation concepts and strategies, significant progress was achieved over the
past year in specific areas:
- Harmonization of call centres;
- Improvements to the management of Social Insurance Number and the
Social Insurance Registry;
- National implementation of Interdec, the on-line bi-weekly reporting system for
Employment Insurance recipients; and
- Receiving more than 50% of EI applications via Appli-Web thereby improving the
completeness of information and speed of processing.
In 2004-2005, HRSDC will continue to collaborate with Social Development Canada and other
partners to improve services and service delivery on behalf of Canadians. The department is
working to strengthen the quality and cost-effectiveness of the programs and services it delivers
by making them client-centred, seamless, timely and integrated. Throughout this process of
modernization and transformation, and given the importance of departmental programs and
services to individuals, business, communities and community groups, HRSDC is committed to
ensuring that Canadians receive uninterrupted service.
HRSDC has three key deliverables in this strategic area:
1. To undertake, with Social Development Canada, major transformation steps in delivering
the Service Vision for Canadians and providing the foundation for improved service and
benefits delivery;
2. To finalize plans for the delivery of Employment Insurance in line with the
Service Vision; and
3. To develop options on service delivery and service transformation.
Strengthening Management Practices and Expenditure Review
The department is committed to management practices that:
- ensure financial stewardship;
- strengthen effective management;
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
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HRSDC • Overview
- strengthen the integrity of service and benefits delivery;
- support the achievement and accountability for results; and
- ensure programs, services and policies undergo thorough review.
Grant and contribution program administration is a fundamental element of the department’s
efforts to strengthen financial stewardship. The department has initiated, in collaboration with
the Treasury Board Secretariat, an independent third party review of grant and contribution
programs which will provide advice on the most appropriate business model(s) for program
delivery that meets the highest standards of administration and accountability.
The department is also proceeding with full implementation of the Specialization and
Concentration initiative that could lead to the specialization of specific delivery steps.
In support of strengthening effective management, HRSDC will also work to strengthen the
department’s audit and evaluation function through the Audit and Evaluation Committee and
developing, for example, risk-based audit and evaluation plans. Additionally, the department
will implement the government’s strategy to upgrade and certify the financial management skills
of its managers and comptrollers. As part of government-wide initiatives, HRSDC is working to
reinforce the importance of public sector values and ethics. One important element of this work
has been the establishment of the departmental Office for Internal Disclosure to allow employees
the opportunity to bring forward information concerning wrongdoing in the workplace without
fear of reprisal.
In an effort to improve the integrity of services and benefits delivery, HRSDC has developed,
in partnership with Social Development Canada, an enterprise-wide approach to managing the
integrity of service and benefits delivery, to strengthen integrity across programs in a consistent
way and with a common goal: to ensure that the right client receives the right benefit at the right
time, and for the intended purpose.
HRSDC will also be working on three priority initiatives that will significantly enhance the
integrity of service and benefit delivery:
- The first is Social Insurance Number/Social Insurance Registry (SIN/SIR) Integrity and
Identity Management that will continue the process of improving the integrity of the
SIN/SIR and will simplify identity related processes and tools used to access programs
and services;
- The second is Vital Events Integration that see the implementation of a national model
for linking the SIR and the vital events data of federal departments and
provinces/territories with a focus on birth, marriage and death data (from provinces and
territories) and landing data (from Citizenship and Immigration Canada); and
- The third is Risk Management and Integrity Operations that will ensure the integrity of
program delivery through the introduction of proactive, enterprise-wide measures to
improve the detection of integrity issues. At the same time, the focus will be on
consistency to ensure fairness and transparency of program decisions.
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2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Overview
A key component of supporting achievement and accountability for results is the improvement
of the quality of reporting to Parliament and to the public. To ensure that Parliament has
consistent and comprehensive information, efforts are being made to align departmental business
lines with strategic outcomes, resources and performance measures.
A key aspect of organizational effectiveness and good governance is the continual
re-examination of programs, policies and services to ensure they reflect government priorities,
achieve the desired results and are delivered in an efficient manner. The department has
identified expenditure reallocation commitments for 2004-2005 and will participate in the
government-wide expenditure review processes as required.
Organizational Effectiveness
Effective organizations demonstrate high organizational performance within a sound governance
framework. HRSDC is committed to being an effective organization and has undertaken a
number of activities to support this priority, including:
- Putting in place a new organizational structure to support Ministers;
- Setting up a committee structure to ensure effective decision-making by senior executives
and mechanisms to address issues of joint interest with Social Development Canada;
- Developing strategic outcomes and supporting detailed program activity architecture;
- Developing the departmental mandate; and
- Identifying priorities in support of the Management Accountability Framework.
One of the most important elements of departmental governance is legislation to establish the
department and to set out the powers, duties and functions of the Ministers; it is from
departmental legislation that its mandate is derived. HRSDC currently operates under the
authority of the Department of Human Resources Development Act. The department will work
to develop proposed legislation to reflect its new role and mandate.
In addition to implementing changes that arose as a result of restructuring, the department
continued its efforts to demonstrate effective management practices to promote an effective,
informed, adaptable and capable workforce:
- Informing and engaging employees about values and ethics that as public servants they
are obliged to understand, respect and apply;
- Implementing an internal communications strategy to support change management;
- Developing a corporate Human Resource Plan that will include upgrading the
management skills of HRSDC managers and executives; and
–
Meeting or exceeding targets with respect to official languages and diversity
of employees.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
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HRSDC • Overview
Detailed Priorities by Strategic Outcome
The following table aligns HRSDC’s priorities for each of its business lines by strategic outcome.
STRATEGIC OUTCOME
Efficient and effective income support and labour market transitions
Business Lines
Priorities
Employment
Insurance Benefits
•
•
•
•
•
Employment
Programs
Improve service delivery to Canadians by standardizing, simplifying
and automating processes via the Internet with specific emphasis on
self-service and interactive, automated options and services for
individuals and the ability for employers to complete Records of
Employment on the Web.
Provide timely and meaningful performance information to
Parliamentarians using indicators that are inclusive and client based.
Improve the accuracy of Employment Insurance payments by
improving quality of claims processing.
Enhance the integrity of the Employment Insurance program by
protecting client information and reviewing control activities to
ensure payments are made to the correct individuals.
Provide support to Canadians in regions of high unemployment
by implementing and monitoring a two-year pilot project to
increase EI benefit entitlement in these areas to address seasonal
workers needs.a
Active Employment Measures
• Improve the effectiveness of Active Employment Measuresb in
assisting Canadians to prepare for, obtain and keep work and
supporting employers in meeting their labour market needs.
• Work with provinces and territories to develop a shared labour
market vision in light of the current and emerging labour market
challenges.
• Work closely with Treasury Board Secretariat to renew the terms
and conditions for Employment Benefits and Support Measures.
Youth Employment Strategy (YES)
• Complete implementation of Individual Skills Enhancement and a
horizontal reporting structure for the 13 other Government of
Canada partners delivering YES programs.
a Funding for this initiative was announced after Budget 2004 and is not included in the planned spending figures.
b Active Employment Measures consist of Employment Benefits and Support Measures (EBSM) under Part II of the Employment
Insurance (EI) Act and targeted strategies for groups disadvantaged in the labour market or outside the EI system.
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2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Overview
Business Lines
Priorities
Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy (AHRDS)
• Work with stakeholders on proposed new policy directions for a
renewed Strategy to be implemented by April 1, 2005.
• As part of the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative, work
with Social Development Canada, Health Canada and Indian and
Northern Affairs Canada to develop a horizontal approach to
Aboriginal Early Childhood Development program delivery.
Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships (ASEP)
• Enter into contribution agreements with the five ASEP project
sponsors that have received approval and negotiate with eight more
project sponsors.
Official Language Minority Communities (OLMC)
• Implement policies to ensure continuity of Support Fund program
activities, in support of human resources development, economic
growth and job creation/maintenance in OLMC.
• Lead an interdepartmental and community engagement process to
develop models for horizontal program delivery for longer term
support to the OLMC.
Planned Spending
Authority
Funding
(millions of dollars)
a
Planned Spending
(Restated)
2003-2004
2004-2005
2005-2006
2006-2007
Gross Operating Expenditures
782.8
854.9
845.6
834.8
Non-Statutory Grants & Contributions
507.8
535.1
517.4
520.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
1,355.2
Statutory Transfer Payments
Total Gross Expenditures
EI Part I – Income Benefits
EI Part II – Employment Benefits and
Support Measures
1,290.8
1,390.2
1,363.2
13,381.0
b
13,527.8
13,897.8
n/a
c
2,053.2
b
2,092.9
2,092.9
n/a
c
Total EI Benefits
15,434.2
15,620.7
15,990.7
Government Annuities and Civil
Service Insurance payments
Total
58.4
16,783.4
55.2
17,066.1
52.0
17,405.9
9,340
10,214
10,127
Full Time Equivalents
9,670
a Restated authority as a result of December 12, 2003 restructure of HRDC into SDC and HRSDC.
b EI Benefits for 2003-2004 represent the Budget 2004 forecasts.
c Forecasted expenditures for EI Benefits are available only for the planning years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
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HRSDC • Overview
STRATEGIC OUTCOME
Enhanced competitiveness of Canadian workplaces by supporting investment in
and recognition and utilization of skills
Business Line
Priorities
Workplace Skills
•
•
•
•
Develop Workplace Skills Strategy Policy Framework,
including objectives, strategic directions and actions to meet
current and emerging skills needs of the Canadian labour
market and workplaces around the country.
Work with Sector Councils, unions and the learning system to
ensure that employers’ skills requirements are met and that they
have access to a broad pool of talented and skilled workers.
Promote apprenticeship and skilled trades training with
employers, unions, and potential participants to increase
numbers of successful apprentices and to facilitate mobility
among all parts of Canada.
Support occupational groups working on a Pan-Canadian
basis to develop fair and equitable assessment and recognition
tools and processes to facilitate the entry of foreign-trained
individuals into the Canadian labour market.
Planned Spending
Authority
Funding
(millions of dollars)
a
Planned Spending
(Restated)
2003-2004
2004-2005
2005-2006
2006-2007
Gross Operating Expenditures
43.0
44.7
45.0
45.2
Non-Statutory Grants & Contributions
15.1
30.9
50.6
50.5
Total Gross Expenditures
58.1
75.6
95.6
95.7
EI Part II – Employment Benefits and
Support Measures
42.9
64.7
64.7
101.0
140.3
160.3
519
521
526
Total
Full Time Equivalents
b
n/a
c
526
a Restated authority as a result of December 12, 2003 restructure of HRDC into SDC and HRSDC.
b EI Benefits for 2003-2004 represent the Budget 2004 forecasts.
c Forecasted expenditures for EI Benefits are available only for the planning years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006.
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2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Overview
STRATEGIC OUTCOME
Through access to learning, Canadians can participate fully in a knowledgebased economy and society
Business Line
Priorities
Learning
•
•
•
Implement enhancements to the Canada Student
Loans Program including required legislative or regulatory
amendments.
Enhance the Canada Education Savings Grant and implement
the Canada Learning Bond (CLB) including required
regulatory amendments.
Enhance support for adult learners by supporting new literacy
partnerships, expanding Community Learning Networks and
piloting innovative approaches to address non-financial
barriers to learning.
Planned Spending
Authority
Funding
(millions of dollars)
a
Planned Spending
(Restated)
2003-2004
2004-2005
2005-2006
2006-2007
Gross Operating Expenditures
96.1
148.7
183.5
Non-Statutory Grants & Contributions
36.7
29.8
30.1
30.1
Statutory Transfer Payments
804.5
821.8
930.3
956.3
Total Gross Expenditures
937.3
1,000.3
1,143.9
1,188.1
14.3
14.3
1,374.1
2,320.9
1,254.7
2,269.3
1,130.2
2,288.4
892.0
463
408
408
408
EI Part II – Employment Benefits and
Support Measures
Loans disbursed under the Canada Student
Financial Assistance Act
Total
Full Time Equivalents
9.5
b
201.7
n/a
c
a Restated authority as a result of December 12, 2003 restructure of HRDC into SDC and HRSDC.
b EI Benefits for 2003-2004 represent the Budget 2004 forecasts.
c Forecasted expenditures for EI Benefits are available only for the planning years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
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HRSDC • Overview
STRATEGIC OUTCOME
Safe, healthy, fair, stable, cooperative and productive workplaces
Business Line
Priorities
Labour
•
•
•
•
•
Review Part III (Labour Standards) of the Canada Labour
Code to identify ways the legislation can support modern,
flexible, productive and fair workplaces.
Develop a Workplace Equity Integration Strategy for both
Aboriginal people and persons with disabilities to increase the
representation, upward mobility and retention in employment
of these two designated groups.
Develop an Aboriginal Labour Affairs Strategy to support
federal government policy directed at Aboriginal communities
in the areas of self-government negotiations, community
capacity building and good governance.
Develop an International Labour Affairs Strategy as a part of
Canada's foreign and trade policy, to guide the policy, process
and support for developing and implementing labour agreements
as part of mulitlateral and bilateral trade initiatives.
Develop policy options for a modernized Government
Employees' Compensation system for workplace accidents
and injuries, in support of public service modernization and
sound administrative and financial principles.
Planned Spending
Authority
Funding
(millions of dollars)
Gross Operating Expenditures
a
Planned Spending
(Restated)
2003-2004
2004-2005
2005-2006
2006-2007
56.6
57.9
51.6
52.2
Non-statutory Transfer Payments
Workers' Compensation Payments
3.3
120.9
3.9
125.0
3.9
128.0
3.9
132.0
Total Gross Expenditures
180.8
186.8
183.5
188.1
0.7
0.7
187.5
184.2
EI Part II – Employment Benefits and
Support Measures
Total
Full Time Equivalents
0.3
181.1
667
b
632
572
n/a
c
574
a Restated authority as a result of December 12, 2003 restructure of HRDC into SDC and HRSDC.
b EI Benefits for 2003-2004 represent the Budget 2004 forecasts.
c Forecasted expenditures for EI Benefits are available only for the planning years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006.
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2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Overview
STRATEGIC OUTCOME
Enhanced community capacity to contribute to the reduction
of homelessness
Business Line
Priorities
Homelessness
•
•
•
Strengthen community capacity to address gaps in the
continuum of supports at the local level.
Foster collaboration among communities, all orders of
government, private sector, unions and non-governmental
organizations in addressing homelessness.
Increase knowledge and understanding of homelessness issues
and trends to develop effective solutions.
Planned Spending
Authority
Funding
(millions of dollars)
Gross Operating Expenditures
Planned Spending
2004-2005
2005-2006
2006-2007
22.2
26.5
26.5
0.0
Non-Statutory Grants & Contributions
137.3
169.1
106.3
0.0
Total
159.5
195.6
132.8
0.0
241
278
275
0
Full Time Equivalents
a
a
(Restated)
2003-2004
Restated authority as a result of December 12, 2003 restructure of HRDC into SDC and HRSDC.
Note: The National Homelessness Initiative has been renewed for 2003-2004 to 2005-2006 only.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
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HRSDC • Overview
STRATEGIC OUTCOME
Seamless, integrated and multi-channel service delivery that ensures
client satisfaction
Business Line
Priorities
Policy, Program and
Service Delivery Support
•
•
Provide uninterrupted service and benefits delivery.
Develop a human capital framework based on evidence that
guides the department’s policy priorities.
• Develop communications strategies to support Ministers.
Planned Spending
Authority
Funding
(millions of dollars)
a
Planned Spending
(Restated)
2003-2004
Gross Operating Expenditures
Non-Statutory Grants & Contributions
Total Gross Expenditures
EI Part II – Employment Benefits and
Support Measures
286.2
88.3
374.5
Total
Full Time Equivalents
2004-2005
2005-2006
216.5
115.9
332.4
217.3
111.2
328.5
14.6
14.6
392.6
347.0
343.1
2,680
1,784
1,783
18.1
b
2006-2007
218.1
111.2
329.3
n/a
c
1,783
a Restated authority as a result of December 12, 2003 restructure of HRDC into SDC and HRSDC.
b EI Benefits for 2003-2004 represent the Budget 2004 forecasts.
c Forecasted expenditures for EI Benefits are available only for the planning years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006.
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2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
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Performance Measurement Framework
Performance measurement is a critical tool to enable a department to focus on achieving results and
demonstrating how programs and services benefit Canadians. With a new mandate and business
lines, HRSDC has undertaken a comprehensive review to establish a new departmental performance
measurement framework. This framework will facilitate both monitoring and reporting of results.
The department is working to identify long, medium and shorter-term indicators that reflect its
mandate and are aligned with its strategic outcomes, policies and programs.
HRSDC has identified the key elements that will comprise its performance measurement
framework. Diagram 3 below sets out these elements.
Diagram 3
First, to measure performance, it is important to understand the environment in which the
department delivers its programs and services. Contextual indicators describe the
demographic, economic, labour market and social environment and are found in the Planning
Overview section of this document. Contextual indicators, such as population growth and level
of economic activity, are outside of HRSDC’s sphere of influence, but serve to frame HRSDC’s
environment and influence the set of policy and delivery options available.
Secondly, a set of indicators is needed to measure progress toward the strategic outcomes of the
department. Strategic outcomes are the enduring benefits HRSDC is working to achieve on
behalf of Canadians, in conjunction with other parties. Strategic outcome indicators, such as
the percentage of unemployed Canadians looking for work for more than one year, are broad
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
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HRSDC • Overview
measures that help to track progress toward achieving the identified strategic outcomes over the
medium to long term. HRSDC policies and programs will be assessed in light of their
contribution toward achieving these strategic outcomes. HRSDC is not the only influence on these
outcomes – governments, along with key stakeholders and external factors play an important role.
For example, the percentage of Canadians 18-24 years-old who attend university or community
college is not only dependent on a range of HRSDC programs; it is also significantly influenced by
the economy, employment and interest rates, as well as policies and programs of provinces and the
actions of universities, colleges and individuals. Likewise, the labour programs of the department,
while directly impacting workplaces under federal jurisdiction such as transportation and financial
institutions, only form a small component of the overall Canadian workplace. HRSDC will
continue to work on this set of indicators over the next year.
Finally, HRSDC needs to renew the program indicators used in the former HRDC department
to demonstrate that HRSDC is effectively managing programs and services. The program
indicators are intended to provide detailed, shorter-term results used for monitoring and
improving programs and services – for instance, the percentage of accurate EI payments. The
department is relying on the existing set of program indicators for this report, but will
substantially review them over the coming year.
Below is the initial list of HRSDC strategic outcome and program indicators. Sources and more
information on HRSDC’s performance indicators can be found at
(http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/ppr.shtml).
STRATEGIC OUTCOME
Efficient and effective income support and labour market transitions
Strategic Outcome Indicators:
► Average percentage of unemployed looking for
work (2003-2004):
• 3 months or less (at most 13 weeks): 66.3%
• From 4 to 6 months (14 to 26 weeks): 16.2%
• From 7 to 9 months (27 to 38 weeks): 5.1%
• From 10 to 12 months (39 to 51 weeks): 2.3%
• One year or more (52 weeks and up): 10.1%
► Percent of unemployed targeted by Employment
Insurance program potentially eligible to collect
employment insurance: 2003 = 83.7%
► Increased duration of employment for participants
in active employment measures: actual results to
be reported when data becomes available.
► Increased earnings for participants in active
employment measures: actual results to be
reported when data becomes available.
► Average proportion of young Canadians
(15-24 years-old) who are in school or in
employment = 90%
Page 36
Program Indicators:
Employment Insurance Benefits
• Percentage of initial and renewal claims
finalized within 21 days from date of filing
and 21 days of registration for revised
claims. Objective: 85%
• Percentage of initial and renewal claims for
which a payment or a non-payment
notification is given to the claimant within
28 days from date of filing. Objective: 80%
• Percentage of appeals scheduled to be heard
by the Board of Referees within 30 days of
receipt of the appeal. Objective: 90%
• Percentage of client appeal dockets received
at the office of the Umpire within 60 days
from date of appeal filing (date of receipt).
Objective: 100%
• Percentage of accurate EI payments as
measured by the Comprehensive Tracking
System calculated on a 12 month moving
average nationally. Objective: 95%
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Overview
Strategic Outcome Indicators:
Program Indicators:
• Savings from EI detection activities and from
deterrence and prevention activities.
Objective: $539 million
Employment Programs
• Number of employment programs clients
served. Objective: 527,400
• Number of clients employed or selfemployed following an employment program
intervention (Consolidated Revenue Fund
and Employment Insurance funded).
Objective: 245,700
• Unpaid Benefits (EI Part I) resulting from EI
claimants employed following an EI Part II
intervention. Objective: $887M
• Number of Youth and Aboriginal clients who
return to school following an employment
program intervention. Objective: 58,100
STRATEGIC OUTCOME
Enhanced competitiveness of Canadian workplaces by supporting investment in
and recognition and utilization of skills
Strategic Outcome Indicators:
► Fiscal year 2003-2004, unit labour cost increased
by 0.8%, labour productivity remained constant,
hourly compensation increased 0.8%
► Percent of adult work force that participated in
job-related formal training: (2002) = 34.7%
Program Indicators:
Workplace Skills
• Percentage of labour market covered by
National Sector Councils. Objective: 40%
• Number of trades people who receive Red
Seal designation. Objective: 13,000 per year
► Percent of adult work force that participated in
employer supported job-related training:
(2002) = 25.0%
► Wages and salary earnings of university graduate
recent immigrant men and women as a
percentage of wages and salaries earnings of
Canadian-born university graduates in 2000 =
women 64%, men 62%, overall 65%
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 37
HRSDC • Overview
STRATEGIC OUTCOME
Through access to learning, Canadians can participate fully in a knowledgebased economy and society
Strategic Outcome Indicators:
Program Indicators:
► Percent population with post-secondary
diplomas/degrees (2003):
25-34 year-olds = 52.8%
25-64 year-olds = 44.0%
Learning
• Number of Canadians who benefit from the
Canada Student Loans Program:
(515,500 students/borrowers in 2002-2003)
► Percent of adult population (aged 25-64) that
participated in adult learning opportunities:
2002 = 36.7%
► Percent of 18-24 year olds who attended university
or community college by family income (1997):
University
$25,000 or less
= 19%
$25,001 to $50,000 = 21%
$50,001 to $75,000 = 23%
$75,001 to $100,000 = 24%
$100,000 +
= 38%
Overall
= 22%
Community College*
$25,000 or less
= 22%
$25,001 to $50,000 = 28%
$50,001 to $75,000 = 29%
$75,001 to $100,000 = 27%
$100,000 +
= 23%
Overall
= 27%
* Includes community college, CEGEP, tradevocational school.
► Number of adults who attended university or
college (aged 25-34) = 8.4%
• Percentage of Canadians aged birth to 17
who are beneficiaries of a Registered
Education Savings Plan (RESP) and who
receive a Canada Education Savings Grant:
(CESG) Objective: 32%
• Number of Canadians who access learning
opportunities as a result of the Canada
Education Savings Grant:
Objective: 120,000
• Number of Community Learning Networks
in place: Objective: 160 by December 2004
• Percentage of all Canada Student Loan
applications processed following receipt of
complete documentation:
Objective:
80% within 1 day
100% within 2 days
STRATEGIC OUTCOME
Safe, healthy, fair, stable, cooperative and productive workplaces
Strategic Outcome Indicators:
► Hours lost as a proportion of the usual
weekly hours of all full-time employees
(in percentage) = 3.6% (2003).
► Injury incidence rates per 100 workers,
all federal jurisdiction employees = 5.79
(2002).
► Percentage of total working days lost due
to work stoppages = 0.05% (2003).
Program Indicators:
Labour
• Percentage of collective bargaining disputes settled
under Part I (Industrial Relations) of the Canada
Labour Code without work stoppage:
Objective: 90%
• Percentage of Unjust Dismissal Complaints settled
by inspectors (Part III (Labour Standards) of the
Canada Labour Code): Objective: 75%
• Disabling Injury Incidence Rate (DIIR) measuring
the change in the rate of time-loss injuries, illnesses
and fatalities within the federal jurisdiction
industries from year to year. Objective: reduce the
disabling injury incidence rate by 10% over
five years in those high risk industries where we
are targeting proactive interventions
Page 38
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Overview
STRATEGIC OUTCOME
Enhanced community capacity to contribute to the reduction of homelessness
Strategic Outcome Indicators:
► Number of National Homelessness
Initiative (NHI) funding partners (2003):
2058 partners.
► Percentage of NHI funding partners by
Sectors (2003):
• Non-profit: 50%
• All levels of government
(e.g. Federal/Agencies, Provincial/
Territorial, Regional/Municipal): 27%
• Private Sector: 9%
• Others (such as Faith Communities,
Unions, etc.): 14%
► Emergency Shelters in Canada (2003):
316
► Transitional Housing in Canada (2003):
250
Program Indicators:
Homelessness
• 61 completed community plan assessments for
1999-2003. Objective: 100%
• 61 completed community plan updates for
2003-2006. Objective: 100%
• Percentage of investments directed toward the
continuum of supports and services based on
priorities established by the community.
Objective: At least 75% invested in
community priorities
• Ratio of total NHI investment versus leveraged
funding by type of partners for each province/
territory for 1999-2003 and 2003-2006.
Objective: Ratio 1:5
• Increase in accessible sources of information/data
on homelessness. Objective: Evidence of uptake
of data/information
STRATEGIC OUTCOME
Seamless, integrated and multi-channel service delivery that ensures
client satisfaction
Strategic Outcome Indicators:
► 2001-2002 client satisfaction survey
results, by HRSDC program:
• Insurance – 77%
• Employment – 83% (Employment
Benefits and Support Measures)
• Learning – 71% (Canada Student
Loans)
• Labour Program – 69%
(Occupational Safety and Health and
Labour Standards)
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Program Indicators:
Note: Modernizing Service for Canadians indicators
to measure service delivery are being developed.
Page 39
HRSDC • Overview
Departmental Human Resources
In addition to the indicators listed in the above strategic outcomes, HRSDC will also report
actual results for the following HRSDC workforce indicators:
- Visible Minority Representation percentage;
- Aboriginal Representation percentage;
- Persons with Disabilities Representation percentage;
- Women Representation percentage;
- Official Language Complaints – Service to the public; and
- Official Language Complaints – Language of work.
Sustainable Development
As articulated in the 2004 Speech from the Throne, Sustainable Development remains a priority
for the Government of Canada. Departmental sustainable development strategies are updated
every three years, and in February 2004 the Ministers for HRSDC, Social Development, and
Labour and Homelessness jointly tabled a third-generation Sustainable Development Strategy in
Parliament. Due to the reorganization of HRDC, separate departmental strategies will be
developed for tabling in 2006.
HRSDC is moving ahead to achieve the commitments outlined in the HRDC sustainable
development strategies, while reviewing it in the context of HRSDC’s mandate. Targets
scheduled to be completed this year include:
- Development of a vision for Sustainable Development in HRSDC;
- Development of a tool for implementing sustainable development in new projects; and
- Implementing Internet service for transmission of medical certificates or medical
information required for compassionate care benefits and sickness benefits.
For detailed information on the current Sustainable Development Strategy, including specific
goals and targets, a copy of the Strategy may be accessed at the following departmental website:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/fas/as/sds/sdd.shtml.
Page 40
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Overview
Special Responsibilities of the Minister
STRATEGIC OUTCOME
Sustainable urban development and infrastructure renewal in the Toronto
Waterfront area
Business Lines
Priorities
Toronto Waterfront
Revitalization Initiative
•
•
•
Funding development of parks and green spaces
(e.g. planning development of Commissioners Park and
Lake Ontario Park)
Funding development of urban infrastructure
(e.g. construction of Toronto Transit Commission transit
improvements and development of precinct plans for the West
Don Lands)
Funding other projects to revitalize and rebuild Toronto’s
waterfront with a view to creating and enhancing public
spaces (e.g. projects related to culture, sports and
recreational facilities)
Planned Spending
Authority
a
Funding
(millions of dollars)
Non-Statutory Grants & Contributions
Planned Spending
(Restated)
2003-2004
b
Total
Full Time Equivalents
2004-2005
2005-2006
2006-2007
0.0
115.7
110.9
110.9
0.0
115.7
110.9
110.9
0
0
0
0
a Restated authority as a result of December 12, 2003 restructure of HRDC into SDC and HRSDC.
b In 2003-2004, $6.2 million was spent by Transport Canada on behalf of HRSDC for this initiative. Resources for 2004-2005,
2005-2006 and 2006-2007 are also included under the strategic outcome Seamless, integrated and multi-channel service
delivery that ensures client satisfaction.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 41
HRSDC • Overview
FACT SHEET
Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative (TWRI)
(2004-2005 Planned Spending: $115.7M)
Objectives
Expected Results and
Outcomes
The purpose of the TWRI is to revitalize the Toronto Waterfront through
investments in both traditional city-building infrastructure, such as local
transportation and sewers, and more contemporary urban development,
including tourism related facilities and the rebirth of underutilized
post-industrial areas. It is expected that investments in these areas will result
in both social and economic benefits for the Toronto region.
The expected outcomes of the TWRI are:
a) Increased accessibility to:
• Public transit;
• Affordable housing;
• Recreation and tourism; and
• Commercial space.
b)
Revitalized urban infrastructure including:
• New or improved recreation facilities;
• Enhanced or expanded transportation system;
• Enhanced or expanded water and sewage treatment; and
• New or improved commercial and residential developments.
c)
Increased economic opportunities such as:
• New employment opportunities;
• Increased private sector investment;
• Enhanced marketability of land; and
• Increased tourism.
d)
Better environment management, for example:
• Land reclamation;
• Soil and general remediation;
• Increased or enhanced parkland or green space; and
• Increased or enhanced storm water management/flood protection.
• Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Corporation
• Government of Ontario (Ministry of Public Infrastructure Renewal)
• City of Toronto (Urban Development Services)
Milestones for Achievement:
Partners
Renewal Date
N/A
Evaluation Performed
None to date
Evaluation Scheduled
The scope of the audit and evaluation work to be undertaken is subject
to discussion and development as Audit and Evaluation develops its
long-term plans.
Page 42
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
ORGANIZATION
Strategic Outcomes and Business Lines
During 2004-2005 and beyond, HRSDC will focus on realizing its strategic outcomes by
pursuing the most relevant and important initiatives, with a demonstrated focus on results.
The department’s efforts will make a difference in the lives of Canadians who can expect the
high quality service that they deserve. Those efforts will be guided by HRSDC’s commitment
to effective and efficient use of fiscal and human resources.
The table below identifies the six strategic outcomes that HRSDC endeavours to provide for
Canadians, and the links between business lines (i.e., Employment Insurance Benefits,
Employment Programs, Workplace Skills, Learning, Labour, Homelessness, and Policy,
Program and Service Delivery Support) and those strategic outcomes.
Strategic Outcomes and Business Lines
2004-2005 Planned Spending
Strategic Outcomes
Enhanced
competitiveness of Through access to
Seamless,
Efficient and
Enhanced
Canadian
learning,
Safe, healthy, fair,
integrated and
effective
community
workplaces by
Canadians can
stable,
multi-channel
capacity to
income support
supporting
participate fully in a cooperative and
and labour
contribute to the service delivery
investment in and knowledge-based
productive
that ensures client
reduction of
market
recognition and
economy and
workplaces
satisfaction
transitions
homelessness
utilization
society
of skills
Business Lines
Employment
Insurance Benefits
FTE's
Employment
Programs
FTE's
Workplace Skills
Learning
Labour
Homelessness
Policy, Program and
Service Delivery
Support
Total
$M
Total
7,502
7,502
$14,140.8
$14,140.8
$M
2,712
2,712
$2,925.3
$2,925.3
FTE's
$M
521
521
$140.3
$140.3
FTE's
$M
408
408
$2,269.3
$2,269.3
FTE's
$M
632
632
$187.5
$187.5
FTE's
$M
278
278
$195.6
$195.6
FTE's
1,784
1,784
$M
$347.0
$347.0
FTE's
$M
10,214
521
408
632
278
1,784
13,837
$17,066.1
$140.3
$2,269.3
$187.5
$195.6
$347.0
$20,205.8
Other Costs
EI Costs (Other Government Departments Administrative Costs and Doubtful Accounts)
$709.9
Workers Compensation Recoveries
($73.3)
Total Other Costs
Total HRSDC
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
$636.6
$20,842.4
Page 43
HRSDC • Organization
Accountability
ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE
Minister of
Human Resources and
Skills Development
Minister of Labour and
Housing
- Commissioner for Employers
- Commissioner for Workers
Minister of State
Human Resources Development
Senior Assistant Deputy Minister,
Service Delivery
Deputy Minister
Associate Deputy Minister
and Deputy Minister of Labour
Employment
Programs
Policy & Design
Employment
Insurance
Operations
Employment
Programs
Operations
$17,066.1 Million
10,214 FTEs
Workplace
Learning
Labour and
Homelessness
$140.3 Million
521 FTEs
$2,269.3 Million
408 FTEs
$383.1 Million
910 FTEs
Strategic
Policy and
Planning
Ministerial and
Communications
Services
Regions
$347.0 Million
1,784 FTEs
Planned Spending and Resources
Total 2004-2005 Planned Spending and Resources
Other Costs:
EI Costs (OGD Administrative Costs and Doubtful Accounts)
Workers Compensation Recoveries
TOTAL HRSDC
Page 44
($M)
20,205.8
FTEs
13,837
709.9
(73.3)
20,842.4
13,837
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Organization
Departmental Planned Spending
2004-2005 Planned Expenditure Profile
HRSDC has expenditures of more than $20 billion, of which $17 billion or 85% are direct
benefits to Canadians through Employment Insurance, Loans disbursed under the Canada
Student Financial Assistance Act (CSFAA) and other statutory transfer payments.
Consolidated Total: $20,842.4M
Loans Disbursed
under CSFAA
$1,254.7M
6.0%
Employment Insurance
$15,715.0M
Other
$636.6M
75.4%
3.1%
Voted Grants and
Contributions
$884.7M
4.2%
Gross Operating
Costs
$1,474.2M
7.1%
Other
Statutory
Payments
$877.2M
4.2%
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 45
HRSDC • Organization
2004-2005 Planned Expenditure Profile
(in millions of dollars)
HRSDC’s Total Planned Expenditures
Budgetary
Net Operating Costs
Add Recoveries in relation to:
Employment Insurance Account
Workers Compensation
Canada Pension Plan
579.0
Sub-total
Gross Operating Costs
Voted Grants and Contributions
812.6
73.3
9.3
895.2
Sub-total
Total Planned Expenditures
Sub-total
620.2
89.7
709.9
Workers Compensation Recoveries
b
709.9
Non-Budgetary
Loans disbursed under Canada Student
Financial Assistance Act (CSFAA)
1,254.7
Total Non-Budgetary
1,254.7
Sub-total
331.8
405.0
85.0
0.2
822.0
822.0
Sub-total
13,527.8
2,187.2
15,715.0
15,715.0
Employment Insurance benefits
Part I
Part II
c
55.2
d
Total Statutory Transfer Payments
16,592.2
c
Consolidated Total
20,842.4
Other Specified Purpose Accounts
d
1,474.2
884.7
636.6
Statutory Transfer Payments
Grants and Contributions:
Other Statutory Payments:
Canada Student Loans
Canada Education Savings Grant
Canada Learning Bond
Others
c
1,474.2
(73.3)
Total Others
b
895.2
2,358.9
Others
EI Administrative Costs (OGD)
Estimated Doubtful Accounts
a
a
The Canada Pension Plan (CPP) is under the portfolio of Social Development Canada (SDC) but HRSDC recovers costs for
services related to the CPP program.
Total operating costs exclude shared corporate services costs (Financial and Administrative Services, Human Resources,
Legal and Systems) that are provided by SDC.
These two amounts directly benefit Canadians.
Includes payments related to Government Annuities Account and Civil Service Insurance Fund.
Page 46
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Organization
Departmental Planned Spending
Authority
a
Business Lines (millions of dollars)
Budgetary
Employment Insurance Benefits
Employment Programs
Workplace Skills
Learning
Labour
Homelessness
Policy, Program and Service Delivery Support
Gross Budgetary
Respendable revenue
Net Budgetary
Non-Budgetary
Loans disbursed under Canada Student Financial
Assistance Act
Specified Purpose Accounts
Employment Insurance
Other Specified Purpose Accounts
Departmental Recoveries charged to the CPP
Departmental Employee Benefit Plan recoverable
from EI Account and CPP
Total HRSDC
Full Time Equivalents
(Restated)
2003-2004
2004-2005
Planned Spending
2005-2006
2006-2007
517.1
773.7
58.1
937.3
180.8
159.5
374.5
3,001.0
(884.6)
2,116.4
557.8
832.4
75.6
1,000.3
186.8
195.6
332.4
3,180.9
(895.2)
2,285.7
553.4
809.8
95.6
1,143.9
183.5
132.8
328.5
3,247.5
(892.6)
2,354.9
552.9
802.3
95.7
1,188.1
188.1
329.3
3,156.4
(897.7)
2,258.7
1,374.1
1,254.7
1,130.2
892.0
17,344.2
55.2
9.3
17,707.9
52.0
9.3
n/a
n/a
n/a
(106.7)
20,842.4
(106.0)
21,148.3
n/a
17,159.8
58.4
10.1
b
(96.3)
20,622.5
13,910
13,837
13,691
c
12,961
a Restated authority as a result of December 12, 2003 restructure of HRDC into SDC and HRSDC.
b EI Benefits for 2003-2004 represent the Budget 2004 forecasts.
c Forecasted expenditures for EI Benefits are available only for the planning years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006.
Financial Highlights:
The department expects to spend $20,842.4 million in 2004-2005. This represents an increase of
$219.9 million over the 2003-2004 restated authorities of $20,622.5 million. The variance is
mainly due to the following:
- An increase of $67 million in statutory payments related to the introduction of the new
Canada Learning Bond ($85 million) and for the enhancement of the Canada Education
Savings Grant ($20 million) as announced in the Budget 2004, and the decrease in Canada
Student Loans as a result of legislative changes that occurred during the year ($38 million);
- A net increase of $96 million in grants and contributions, mainly due to increases of
$116 million in support of the Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative (transfer of
responsibility from Transport Canada), $35 million for the continuation of Phase II of the
National Homelessness Initiative, $23 million for Aboriginal programs, and a major decrease
of $85 million related to a 2003-2004 grant to the Canadian Council on Learning to promote
and support evidence-based decision making in all areas of lifelong learning;
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 47
HRSDC • Organization
- An increase of $184 million for the Employment Insurance Account. The increase in
benefits is due to a 2.5% increase in average weekly benefits partially offset by a 1.4%
decline in the number of beneficiaries; and
- A decrease of $119 million due to the impact of loan reimbursements from borrowers on the
loan portfolio under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act.
For 2005-2006, the department planned spending is anticipated to be $21,148.3 million, which
represents an increase of $305.9 million from the 2004-2005 planned spending. The major
changes are as follows:
- An increase of $119 million in statutory payments which is mainly the results of the
Budget 2004 announcements for the Enhancement of the Canada Education Savings Grant
(additional $60 million), the Canada Student Loans Program (additional $59 million);
- A decrease of $63 million in grants and contributions which represents the reprofiling of
contribution funds from 2003-2004 to 2004-2005 for the National Homelessness Initiative;
- A decrease of $125 million due to the impact of loan reimbursements from borrowers on the
loan portfolio under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act; and
- An increase of $364 million for the Employment Insurance Account. This growth in
expenditures reflects the projected increase in the number of people eligible for benefits and
increases in average benefits.
For 2006-2007, the net departmental planned spending excluding the Special Purpose Accounts
is anticipated to be $3,150.7 million which represents a decrease of $334.4 million from the
2005-2006 net planned spending. The variance is mainly due to the following:
- An increase of $22 million in statutory payments related to the Budget 2004 announcements
for the Canada Learning Bond (additional $15 million) and for the Canada Student Loans
(additional $7 million);
- A decrease of $133 million in operating and grants and contributions for the National
Homelessness Initiative as the Initiative has been renewed from 2003-2004 to 2005-2006
only; and
- A decrease of $238 million due to the impact of loan reimbursements from borrowers on the
loan portfolio under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act.
Page 48
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annexes
ANNEXES
Annex 1:
Division of Responsibilities of the Former Human Resources
Development Canada
Annex 2:
Human Resources and Skills Development 2004-2005 Corporate Risk Profile
and Mitigating Strategies
Annex 3:
Summary of Transfer Payments
Annex 4:
Details on Transfer Payments Programs (Grants and Contributions)
Transfer Payments Fact Sheets:
Fact sheet #1: Youth Employment Strategy
Fact sheet #2: National Literacy Program
Fact sheet #3: National Homelessness Initiative
Fact sheet #4: Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy (AHRDS)
Fact sheet #5: Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships (ASEP)
Fact sheet #6: Foreign Credential Recognition
Fact sheet #7: Sector Council Program
Fact sheet #8: Official Language Minority Communities Support Fund
Fact sheet #9: Older Workers Pilot Projects
Annex 5:
Foundations (Conditional Grants)
•
•
•
•
Frontier College
The Peter Gzowski Foundation
Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation
Canadian Council on Learning
Annex 6:
Major Initiatives and/or Programs
Annex 7:
Source of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue
Annex 8:
Net Cost of Program(s) for the Estimates Year
Annex 9:
Specified Purpose Accounts
•
•
•
Employment Insurance Account
Government Annuities Account
Civil Service Insurance Fund
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 49
HRSDC • Annexes
Annex 10: Employment Insurance Part II- 2004-2005 Expenditure Plan
Annex 11: Loans (Non Budgetary)
Annex 12: Consolidated Report on Canada Student Loans
Annex 13: Major Regulatory Initiatives
Annex 14: Horizontal Initiatives
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Page 50
Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy
Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership Program
Youth Employment Strategy
Labour Market Development Agreements
Sector Council Program
Foreign Credential Recognition
Older Workers Pilot Projects Initiative
Canada Student Loans Program
National Literacy Program
National Homelessness Initiative
Service Canada
Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 1
Annex 1: Division of Responsibilities of the Former Human Resources
Development Canada
Following the governmental reorganization announced on December 12, 2003, Human Resources
Development Canada (HRDC) was split into two new departments: Human Resources and Skills
Development Canada (HRSDC) and Social Development Canada (SDC). The following table shows the
division of responsibilities of the former HRDC into the new departments.
HRDC Responsibilities
HRSDC Responsibilities
SDC Responsibilities
Insurance Branch
• Policy Development
• Program Design
• Claims Processing
• Appeals
• Investigation and Control
• Operational and Program
Maintenance and
Improvement
• Social Insurance Number/
Social Insurance Registration
Employment Programs
Branch
• Policy Development
• Program Design
• Foreign Worker Program
• Labour Exchange
• Labour Market Information
• Employment Benefits and
Support Measures
• Labour Market Development
Agreements
• Aboriginal Human Resources
Development Strategy
• Aboriginal Skills and
Employment Partnerships
• Youth Employment Strategy
• Labour Market Adjustments
• Opportunities Fund
Employment Insurance
Operations
• Claims Processing
• Appeals
• Investigation and Control
• Operational and Program
Maintenance and Improvement
Modernizing Services for
Canadians
• Social Insurance Number/
Social Insurance Registration
Employment Programs Policy
and Design
• Employment Insurance Policy
and Employment Programs
Policy Development
• Program Design
• Aboriginal Skills and
Employment Partnerships
Income Security Programs
• Opportunities Fund
Workplace
• Foreign Worker Program
• Labour Exchange
• Labour Market Information
Employment Programs
Operations
• Employment Benefits and
Support Measures
• Labour Market Development
Agreements
• Aboriginal Human Resources
Development Strategy
• Youth Employment Strategy
• Labour Market Adjustments
and Official Language Minority
Communities
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 51
HRSDC • Annex 1
HRDC Responsibilities
HRSDC Responsibilities
SDC Responsibilities
Human Investment Programs
• Human Resources
Partnerships
• Student Financial Assistance
• Canada Education Savings
Grant
• National Literacy Secretariat
• Office of Learning
Technologies
• Office for Disabilities Issues
• Social Development
• Voluntary Sector Initiative
• Official Language Minority
Communities
• Learning Initiatives Program
• International Academic
Mobility Program
Income Security Programs
• Old Age Security Program
• Canada Pension Plan
Labour Program
• Federal Mediation and
Conciliation Service
• Labour Operations
• Strategic Policy and
International Labour Affairs
• Workplace Information
• Aboriginal Labour Affairs
Workplace
• Human Resources Partnerships
Income Security Programs
• Office for Disabilities Issues
• Voluntary Sector Initiative
• Social Development
Homelessness
• National Secretariat on
Homelessness
Strategic Policy
• Social Policy
• Labour Market Policy
• Learning Policy
• Intergovernmental Relations
• Strategy and Coordination
• Knowledge Directorate
Page 52
Learning
• Student Financial Assistance
• Canada Education Savings
Grant
• National Literacy Secretariat
• Office of Learning
Technologies
• Learning Initiatives Program
• International Academic
Mobility Program
Income Security Programs
• Old Age Security Program
• Canada Pension Plan
Labour and Homelessness
• Federal Mediation and
Conciliation Service
• National Labour Operations
• Intergovernmental Affairs
• International Labour Affairs
• Workplace Information
• Aboriginal Labour Affairs
Labour and Homelessness
• National Secretariat on
Homelessness
Strategic Policy and Planning
• Labour Market Policy
• Learning Policy
• Intergovernmental Relations
• Strategy and Coordination
• Policy Research and
Co-ordination (formerly
Knowledge Directorate)
Strategic Direction
• Social Policy
• Intergovernmental Relations
• Strategy and Coordination
• Knowledge Directorate
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 1
HRDC Responsibilities
HRSDC Responsibilities
SDC Responsibilities
Corporate Affairs
and Planning
• Corporate Planning
• Performance Measurement
and Accountability
• Internal Audit
• Evaluation
• Briefing, Cabinet and
Parliamentary Affairs
• Ministerial Correspondence
• Executive Committees
Strategic Policy and Planning
• Corporate Planning
• Performance Measurement
and Accountability
• Internal Audit
• Evaluation
Strategic Direction
• Corporate Planning
• Performance Measurement and
Accountability
• Internal Audit
• Evaluation
Ministerial Affairs and
Communication
• Briefing, Cabinet and
Parliamentary Affairs
• Ministerial Correspondence
• Executive Committees
Public and Ministerial Affairs
• Briefing, Cabinet and
Parliamentary Affairs
• Ministerial Correspondence
• Executive Committees
Communications
• Communications
Ministerial Affairs and
Communication
• Communications
Public and Ministerial Affairs
• Communications
Human Resources
Human Resourcesa
Financial and Administrative
Services
Financial and Administrative
Servicesa
Systems
Systemsa
Modernizing Service
for Canadians
• Modernizing Service for
Canadians
Modernizing Service
for Canadians
• Modernizing Service
for Canadians
Service Delivery
• Enterprise-wide Service
Delivery (Internet and
Telephone)
• Service and Benefits In
Person Delivery
• Regional and local program
and service delivery,
including Human Resources
Centres of Canada
a
b
c
Service and Benefits Delivery
• Service and Benefits In Person
Deliveryb
• Regional and local program
and service delivery, including
Human Resources Centres of
Canadab
Modernizing Service for
Canadians
• Enterprise-wide Service
Delivery (Internet and
Telephone)c
These services reside in Social Development Canada, which provides services to both departments.
These responsibilities have been assigned to Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, which provides
services on behalf of both departments.
This responsibility has been assigned to Social Development Canada, which provides services on behalf of
both departments.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 53
HRSDC • Annex 2
Annex 2: Human Resources Skills Development 2004-2005 Corporate Risk
Profile and Mitigating Strategies
Key Corporate Risk Areas
Mitigation Strategies
Providing service and benefit delivery
support to Canadians, and support to the
Government and Ministers during a process
of organizational restructuring and internal
re-organization
To maintain the provision of service and benefit
delivery to Canadians and support the
Government and the Ministers:
• Provide uninterrupted service and
benefits delivery;
• Implement service transformation strategy;
• Develop with Social Development Canada and
the Canada Revenue Agency options on service
delivery and service transformation;
• Finalize plans to incorporate more automation
into Employment Insurance delivery in line with
the Service Vision;
• Provide timely and meaningful performance
information to Parliamentarians on Employment
Insurance;
• Improve accuracy of Employment insurance
payments;
• Put in place a new organizational structure;
• Set up committee structure to ensure effective
decision-making by senior executives and
mechanisms to address issues of joint interest
with Social Development Canada;
• Development of strategic outcomes and
supporting detailed program activity architecture;
• Develop the departmental mandate;
• Identification of priorities in support of the
Management Accountability Framework;
• Launching work on new departmental legislation;
• Implement internal communications strategy to
support change management; and
• Develop a Human Resources Plan.
Risk Context
• Service disruptions while pursuing business
transformation continue to be at risk with
the added challenge of simultaneously
undergoing organizational change.
• Ongoing resource constraints and potential
new restraint measures resulting from
Expenditure Review.
• Potential disruptions due to a PSAC labour
dispute.
Challenges
• Maintaining effective, efficient and consistent
delivery of benefits and entitlements to clients
within an environment of service
transformation and organizational change.
• Client expectations for modern systems and
services and high quality services are
increasing.
• Building effective partnerships with other
departments, other level of governments,
institutions, employers and community
organizations observing principles of
accountability, openness and transparency.
• Adjusting to the changing environment and
concurrently addressing competing priorities.
Demonstrating accountability for results,
stewardship of resources and transparency of
decision-making in light of rising public
concern and skepticism directed toward
governments and public servants over the use
and management of taxpayer’s money
Risk context
• Building and maintaining public support
continues to be at risk.
• The department is responsible for the
administration and delivery of billions of
dollars of public funds.
Page 54
To meet public expectations for greater
accountability and integrity:
• Continue implementation of Specialization and
Concentration initiative;
• Develop recommendations following a
comprehensive third party review of grants and
contributions programs;
• Develop risk-based audit and evaluation plans;
• Implement a strategy to upgrade the financial
skills of managers and staff;
• Reinforce with staff the importance of public
sector values and ethics;
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 2
Key Corporate Risk Areas
•
•
Integrity issues have impacted the federal
government on several fronts including
government finances, service delivery and
privacy. The risk has possibly increased as
a result of government-wide issues.
Increased public expectations for service
quality and accountability for results.
Mitigation Strategies
• Improve integrity of services and
benefits delivery;
• Improve quality of reporting to Parliament and to
the public; and
• Re-examine programs, policies and services.
Challenges
• Meeting citizens’ expectations around
modern systems and services, maintaining
integrity and financial stewardship, and the
handling and protection of personal
information.
• Strengthening the department’s program and
financial management capacity.
• Ensuring employees understand and respect
public service values and ethics.
Providing policy and program leadership
within the context of fiscal restraint,
internal reallocation and expenditure review
across government
Risk Context
•
Creation of a new department.
•
An increasingly complex environment,
including fiscal restraint
•
Loss of corporate knowledge and memory
with the splitting of resources between
HRSDC and SDC.
•
Reliance on SDC for shared corporate
services.
Challenges
•
Stabilizing the operations of new
organization through a transition period
while advancing the department’s policy
agenda and transforming
programs/initiatives.
• Aligning objectives, resources and
accountabilities to the department’s new
mandate and priorities.
•
Mobilizing, supporting, training and
developing employees through business
transformation.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
To provide the leadership required to ensure
fiscal responsibility and corporate knowledge:
• Develop human capital framework;
• Improve the effectiveness of Active
Employment Measures;
• Work with provinces and territories to develop a
shared labour market vision in light of the current
and emerging labour market challenges;
• Implement and monitor a two-year pilot project
to increase Employment Insurance benefit
entitlement in regions of high unemployment to
address seasonal workers needs;
• Complete implementation of Individual Skills
Enhancement and a horizontal reporting structure
for the 13 other government department partners
delivery YES programs;
• Work with stakeholders on proposed new policy
directions for a renewed Aboriginal Human
Resources Development Strategy for April 1, 2005;
• Implement horizontal approach to
Aboriginal Early Childhood Development
program delivery;
• Negotiate and enter into contribution agreements
with the five ASEP project sponsors that have
received approval;
• Implement policies to ensure continuity of
OLMC Support Fund;
• Lead an interdepartmental and community
engagement process to develop models for
horizontal program delivery for longer-term
support to OLMC;
Page 55
HRSDC • Annex 2
Key Corporate Risk Areas
Page 56
Mitigation Strategies
• Develop workplace skills strategy policy
framework
• Work with sector councils, unions and
learning system;
• Promote apprenticeship and skilled trades
training with employers, unions and potential
participants;
• Work on pan-Canadian priorities to develop fair
and equitable assessment and recognition tools
and process to facilitate the entry of foreigntrained individuals into Canadian labour market;
• Implement enhancements to CSLP;
• Enhance the Canada Savings Grant and
implement the Canada Learning Bond;
• Enhance support for adult learners;
• Review Part III of Canada Labour Code;
• Develop Workplace Equity Integration Strategy;
• Develop Aboriginal Labour Strategy;
• Develop International Labour Affairs Strategy;
• Develop policy options for a modernized
Government Employees’ Compensation system;
• Strengthen community capacity to address gaps
in the homelessness supports;
• Foster collaboration on homelessness; and
• Increase knowledge and understanding of
homelessness issues.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 3
Annex 3: Summary of Transfer Payments
Summary of Transfer Payments by Business Line
(millions of dollars)
Employment Insurance Benefits
(S) Civil Service Insurance actuarial liability adjustment
Employment Programs
Grants and Contributions
Workplace Skills
Grants and Contributions
Authority
a
(Restated)
2003-2004
Planned Spending
2004-2005 2005-2006
2006-2007
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
507.8
535.1
517.4
520.2
15.1
30.9
50.6
50.5
0.0
394.1
66.8
0.0
85.0
405.0
79.8
0.0
85.0
468.0
126.4
0.0
100.0
470.0
131.2
0.0
266.3
0.2
(28.1)
157.2
0.5
18.9
179.3
0.2
10.4
199.9
0.1
5.3
105.2
36.7
841.2
75.4
29.8
851.6
61.0
30.1
960.4
49.8
30.1
986.4
3.3
3.9
3.9
3.9
137.3
169.1
106.3
0.0
88.3
115.9
111.2
111.2
1,593.2
1,706.7
1,750.0
1,672.4
Learning
(S)
(S)
(S)
(S)
(S)
Canadian Learning Bond
Canada Education Savings Grant
Canada Study Grants
Labour Adjustment Benefits
Direct financing arrangement under the Canada Student
Financial Assistance Act
(S) Interest payments under the Canada Student Loans Act
(S) Liabilities under the Canada Student Loans Act
(S) Interest payments and liabilities under the Canada Student
Financial Assistance Act
Grants and Contributions
Labour
Grants, Contributions and Statutory Payments
Homelessness
Grants and Contributions
Policy, Programs and Service Delivery Support
Grants and Contributions
Total Transfer Payments
a
Restated authority as a result of December 12, 2003 restructure of HRDC into SDC and HRSDC.
Note: Grants and Contributions exclude Employment Benefits and Support Measures authorized under Part II of
the Employment Insurance Act.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 57
HRSDC • Annex 4
Annex 4: Details on Transfer Payments Programs
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) has a substantial number of transfer
payment programs. These support individuals, communities, labour, other orders of government and
Aboriginal organizations in the achievement of shared human development goals. HRSDC is subject to
the revised policy on Transfer Payments, which was introduced on June 1, 2000. That policy requires
departments to report on those transfer payment programs that are worth at least $5 million. In so doing,
the department is helping to demonstrate sound management of, control over, and accountability for
transfer payments.
Consistent with this policy, descriptive material on each program funded from the Consolidated Revenue
Fund, including stated objectives, expected results and outcomes, and milestones for achievement has
been developed. The following table provides a list of the active transfer payments programs. A fact
sheet for each program over $5 million is also provided.
Planned spending figures reflect estimated program costs and exclude operating resources necessary to
deliver the program.
Non-Statutory Transfer Payments by Business Line
(2004-2005 Planned Spending: $884.7 million)
Associated Programs (Terms and Conditions)
Planned
Spending
GRANTS
Employment Programs
Grants to individuals, organizations and corporations to assist individuals
to improve their employability and to promote employment opportunities
by assisting local entrepreneurial development
Workplace Skills
Named Grants to the Organization For Economic Co-Operation and
Development
Learning
Grants to voluntary sectors, professional organizations, universities and
post-secondary institutions and to provincial and territorial governments
for literacy
– National Literacy Program
Homelessness
Grants to not-for-profit organizations, individuals, municipal
governments, Band/tribal councils and other Aboriginal organizations,
public health and educational institutions, Régies régionales, for-profit
enterprises, research organizations and research institutes to carry out
research on homelessness to help communities better understand and
more effectively address homelessness issues
Labour Program
Canadian Joint Fire Prevention Publicity Committee ($7,000)
Fire Prevention Canada ($19,000)
To support activities which contribute to occupational safety and health
program objectives ($15,000)
To support Standards-writing associations ($12,000)
Page 58
For more
details, see
$1M Fact Sheet #1
$0.3M
$28.4M
Fact Sheet #2
$1.2M Fact Sheet #3
$0.0M
$0.0M
$0.0M
$0.0M
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 4
CONTRIBUTIONS
Employment Programs
Payments to provinces, territories, municipalities, other public bodies,
organizations, groups, communities, employers and individuals for the
provision of training and/or work experience, the mobilization of community
resources, and human resource planning and adjustment measures necessary
for the efficient functioning of the Canadian labour market
– Youth Employment Strategy
– Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy a
– Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships (ASEP) and
Voisey’s Bay
– Older Workers Pilot Projects
Workplace Skills
Payments to provinces, territories, municipalities, other public bodies,
organizations, groups, communities, employers and individuals for the
provision of training and/or work experience, the mobilization of community
resources, and human resource planning and adjustment measures necessary
for the efficient functioning of the Canadian labour market
– Foreign Credential Recognitionb
– Sector Council Program
Learning
Payments to provinces, territories, municipalities, other public bodies,
organizations, groups, communities, employers and individuals for the
provision of training and/or work experience, the mobilization of community
resources, and human resource planning and adjustment measures necessary
for the efficient functioning of the Canadian labour market
Contributions to voluntary sectors, professional organizations,
universities and post-secondary institutions and to provincial and
territorial governments for literacy
– Official Languages Plan c
Labour Program
Labour-Management Partnerships Program
Labour Commission d
Homelessness
Contributions to not-for-profit organizations, individuals, municipal
governments, Band/tribal councils and other Aboriginal organizations,
public health and educational institutions, Régies régionales, for-profit
enterprises, research organizations and research institutes to support
activities to help alleviate homelessness across Canada and carry out
research on homelessness to help communities better understand and
more effectively address homelessness issues
Policy Program and Service Delivery Support
Payments to provinces, territories, municipalities, other public bodies,
organizations, groups, communities, employers and individuals for the
provision of training and/or work experience, the mobilization of community
resources, and human resource planning and adjustment measures necessary
for the efficient functioning of the Canadian labour market
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Planned
Spending
For more
details, see
$526.1M
Fact Sheet #1
Fact Sheet #4
Fact Sheet #5
Fact Sheet #9
$25.6M
Fact Sheet #6
Fact Sheet #7
$0.5M
$0.9M
Fact Sheet #2
$1.6M
$2.2M
$167.9M Fact Sheet #3
$0.2M
Page 59
HRSDC • Annex 4
Planned
Spending
CONTRIBUTIONS (Continued)
New Initiative announced in Budget 2004
– Implementing a new Workplace Skills Strategy (Workplace Skills)
Other New Initiatives
– Official Language Minority Communities Support (Employment
Programs)
– Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative (Policy Program and
Service Delivery Support)
a
b
c
d
For more
details, see
$5M
$8M Fact Sheet #8
$115.7M See page 42
Resources announced in Budget 2004 for “Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy” are included in
Fact Sheet #4 ($22.5M).
Resources announced in Budget 2003 for “Foreign Credential Recognition” are included in Fact Sheet #6
($7.7M).
Resources announced in Budget 2003 for “Official Languages Plan” are included in Fact sheet #2 ($0.9M).
These grants and contributions have been approved by the Treasury Board and will be submitted for
parliamentary approval during the first Supplementary Estimates of 2004-2005:
- Grants to international and domestic organizations for technical assistance and international cooperation
on labour issues ($0.9M)
- Grants to international labour institutions for addressing the labour dimension of globalization ($1.0M)
- Contributions to Canadian business, labour and not-for-profit organizations for social dialogue and
Canadian-based cooperative activities related to Canada's international labour initiatives ($0.3M)
Page 60
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 4
FACT SHEET #1
Youth Employment Strategy
(2004-2005 Planned Spending: $244.7M)
Objectives
The objective of the Strategy will be to assist youth in enhancing their
employability skills, while increasing the number of skilled young Canadians
in the workforce.
Expected Results and
Outcomes
The common key results commitments for all initiatives receiving funding
under the Youth Employment Strategy (YES) over the period 2003-2008 are:
• Participants will gain enhanced employability skills from work experience
or tailored interventions; and
• A portion of youth participants will return to school to further their
education/skills development and/or become employed or self-employed.
Partners
YES programs are delivered through the collective efforts of fourteen federal
departments and agencies with HRSDC in the lead role: Agriculture and
Agri-Food Canada; Canadian Food Inspection Agency; Canadian Heritage;
Canadian International Development Agency; Canadian Mortgage and
Housing Corporation; Department of Fisheries and Oceans; Department of
Foreign Affairs & International Trade; Environment Canada; Indian and
Northern Affairs Canada; Industry Canada; National Research Council
Canada; Natural Resources Canada; and Parks Canada.
Milestones for Achievement:
Renewal Date
March 2008
Evaluation Performed
(on previous programs)
1997
Summer Career Placements Summative Evaluation
1998-1999
Youth Service Canada Summative Evaluation
Youth Employment Strategy: A Formative Evaluation of Youth
Internship Canada and Other HRDC Youth Initiatives
Interdepartmental Evaluation of the YES
2000-2001
A Synthesis Report:
– Youth Service Canada Evaluation (Longitudinal Study);
– Summative Evaluation of HRDC's Youth Internship
Programs under the Youth Employment Strategy; and
– YES Interdepartmental Evaluation Phase I.
2001-2002
A Synthesis Report:
– Youth Internship Canada Program Evaluation Phases II
and III; and
– YES Interdepartmental Evaluation Phase II
(consolidates YES with other federal youth programs).
Evaluation Scheduled
2003-2004
Detailed design of Formative Interdepartmental evaluation
of YES
2004-2005
Implementation of Formative YES Evaluation
2007-2008
Interdepartmental Summative Evaluation
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 61
HRSDC • Annex 4
FACT SHEET #2
National Literacy Program
(2004-2005 Planned Spending: $29.3M)a
Objectives
• To increase literacy opportunities and take-up, so that people improve their
literacy skills.
• To work towards making Canada’s social, economic and political life more
accessible to those with weak literacy skills.
Planned Results
•
•
•
•
•
Partnerships
• Provinces and territories, non-governmental organizations, business, labour,
voluntary sector, other government departments
Increased public awareness and understanding of literacy issues
Improved information sharing and co-ordination
Increased evidence base and gap identification
Enhanced capacity of Secretariat partners to address literacy issues
The integration of literacy and plain language considerations into related
policy and institutional life
• More literacy opportunities for Canadians with low literacy skills
Milestones for Achievement:
a
Renewal Date
March 31, 2005
Develop Evaluation
Framework
To be completed by September, 2004
Evaluation Performed
Evaluation Report completed January 2003
Evaluation Scheduled
Formative Evaluation in 2005-2006; Summative Evaluation in 2007-2008
Includes planned spending announced in Budget 2003 for “Official Languages Plan” ($0.9M).
Page 62
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 4
FACT SHEET #3
National Homelessness Initiative (NHI)
(2004-2005 Planned Spending: $169.1M)
Objectives
• To develop a comprehensive continuum of supports to help homeless
Canadians move out of the cycle of homelessness and prevent those at-risk
from falling into homelessness. This will be done by providing communities
with the tools to develop a range of interventions to: stabilize the living
arrangements of homeless individuals and families – encouraging
self-sufficiency where possible; and prevent those at-risk from falling into
homelessness.
• To ensure sustainable capacity of communities to address homelessness by
enhancing community leadership and broadening ownership – by the public,
non-profit and private sectors – on the issue of homelessness in Canada.
Planned Results
By March 31, 2006, the NHI aims to achieve the following outcomes:
• Enhanced supports and services available to meet the needs of homeless
individuals and families and those at-risk of homelessness by facilitating
integrated community responses to: help improve their living conditions;
and help them access and maintain secure accommodation.
• Increased knowledge and understanding of homelessness at the local,
regional and national levels through: data collection; research; the review
and assessment of the effectiveness of interventions; and support for the
dissemination and sharing of this information.
• Broader engagement of partners to address homelessness by strengthening
partnerships and collaboration with: other federal departments; all orders of
government; and the private and not-for-profit sectors.
Partnerships
• The complex nature of homelessness necessitates the involvement of a
range of partners: no one player can address the issue alone.
• Partnerships across government and the private and not for-profit sectors at
the local, regional and national levels are essential to responding to
homelessness and helping communities sustain their efforts.
• Partnerships across the various sectors can: increase community access to
resources, programs and funding; diversify the resource base available to
communities; and create stronger linkages among existing programs for
more sustainable solutions.
Milestones for Achievement:
Renewal Date
March 31, 2006
Evaluation Performed
Formative Evaluation of the National Homelessness Initiative completed
March 2003
Evaluation Scheduled
Summative Evaluation of the National Homelessness Initiative (for the period
2003-2006) scheduled for March 2006
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 63
HRSDC • Annex 4
FACT SHEET #4
Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy (AHRDS)
(2004-2005 Planned Spending: $243.2M)a
Objectives
To support Aboriginal organizations to develop and implement labour market,
youth and child care programs that are designed to address the local and
regional needs of Aboriginal people. This programming will:
• assist Aboriginal individuals to prepare for, obtain and maintain
employment, thereby resulting in savings to income support programs;
• assist Aboriginal youth (a person normally from 15 to 30 years of age) in
preparing for, obtaining and maintaining employment and in making a
successful transition into the labour market, thereby resulting in increased
employment; and
• increase the supply of quality child care services in First Nations and Inuit
communities, thereby raising the availability of distinct and diverse services
in these communities towards a level comparable to that of the general
population.
Expected Results and
Outcomes b
Assist 58,000 Aboriginal clients, of whom 20,000 are expected to find and
keep work or become self-employed, and approximately 7,000 will return to
school. Approximately, 7,500 child care spaces will continue to be supported
and occupied.
Partners
Under the AHRDS, HRSDC has signed 79 Aboriginal Human Resources
Development Agreements (AHRDA) with Aboriginal organizations.
Milestones for Achievement:
a
b
Renewal Date
April 1, 2005
Evaluation
Performed
Phase I Review of the AHRDS is due to be released in the Winter of 2005.
This Review examines the Aboriginal Human Resources Development
Agreements in year four of their five year mandate (1999-2004). The scope of
the Review covers AHRDS planning activities, partnerships, horizontal
management, and capacity building.
Evaluation
Scheduled
HRSDC, working closely with its partners, plans to carry out further review
and evaluation of the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Agreements
in the future, with the objective of developing a more comprehensive
perspective on results achieved and lessons learned. Work on Phase II of the
review is planned to begin in the fall of 2004.
Resources of $22.5M announced in Budget 2004 for “Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy” are
included in figure above.
These results and outcomes are based on total program funding through the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF) and
EI Part II. Specific results derived from the CRF funding only are unavailable.
Page 64
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 4
FACT SHEET #5
Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships (ASEP)
and Voisey’s Bay
(2004-2005 Planned Spending: $30.5M)
Objectives
Expected Results
and Outcomes
Partners
• The overall objective of the ASEP initiative is sustainable employment for
Aboriginal people leading to lasting benefits for Aboriginal communities,
families and individuals.
• The initiative aims to promote maximum employment for Aboriginal people on
major economic developments through a collaborative partnership approach.
• The Voisey’s Bay initiative will provide Aboriginal people with the skills
needed to take advantage of employment opportunities at the mine as well as
opportunities related to any spin-off activities.
• Increased skills level in the Aboriginal workforce
• Increased direct and indirect employment for Aboriginals across Canada
• Decreased Aboriginal unemployment and dependency on social assistance
• Improved education levels (i.e. literacy, numeracy, computer skills, post
secondary certification)
• Increased Aboriginal business opportunities
• A more diversified workforce within communities
As a pilot for ASEP, HRSDC has helped develop a partnership between the
Voisey’s Bay Nickel Company, the Innu Nation, the Labrador Inuit Association,
the Labrador Metis Nation and the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador for
the implementation of programs and services to prepare Aboriginal people for
long term jobs associated with the Voisey’s Bay project. These groups have
established a partnership entitled the Joint Voisey’s Bay Employment and
Training Authority (JETA). Each of the ASEP projects will involve several
partners including the private sector, Aboriginal Organizations and the Province
or Territory.
Milestones for Achievement:
Renewal Date
Currently not applicable
Evaluation Performed
None to date
Evaluation Scheduled
Each ASEP project will have an evaluation framework, clearly outlining to all
partners how HRSDC will evaluate the project; which data needs to be collected
and the timeline for reporting on the data.
The evaluation methodology will consist of environmental scans of communities
and collection of baseline data before ASEP projects start, on-going review of
ASEP monitoring data, surveys of ASEP clients, project and community case
studies, informant interviews and focus groups.
Annual interim reports will be completed, starting in year 2005-2006. The final
evaluation report will be completed in 2008.
Project and community case studies at the end of the 2nd and 4th year of the
program will be completed, with a formative evaluation scheduled in the
program’s 2nd year and the summative evaluation in the final year.
The evaluation process for Voisey’s Bay has begun with JETA. A Memorandum
of Understanding between HRSDC and JETA has been signed, outlining the
evaluation framework. HRSDC entered into a contribution agreement with JETA
in 2003 to deliver programming to assist the Aboriginal people of Labrador to
obtain long term employment at the Voisey’s Mine/Mill site when it is operational
in 2006.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 65
HRSDC • Annex 4
FACT SHEET #6
Foreign Credential Recognition
(2004-2005 Planned Spending: $7.7M)
Objectives
The ultimate goal of the Foreign Credential Recognition Program is to enhance
labour market outcomes in targeted occupations and sectors of foreign trained
individuals.
The Program will focus on working towards the achievement of two broad,
long-range objectives:
• Reduced barriers to entry into the labour market; and
• Improved ability of sectors/employers to assess, recognize and recruit
foreign-trained individuals.
Planned Results
The Foreign Credential Recognition Program will continue to build on current
partnerships with representatives in regulated occupations and Sector Councils
representing non-regulated occupations toward the achievement of the
following objective in the short-term:
• Increased consensus and commitment on issues and potential solutions
related to foreign credential recognition impacting on the labour market.
Partnerships
• Work bilaterally with interested provinces and territories to improve foreign
credential supports (regulated and non-regulated professions) and work
multi-laterally through F/P/T fora such as the Forum of Labour Market
Ministers to develop systemic and consistent FCR processes (regulated).
• Work with other government departments at the federal level to co-ordinate
efforts with regard to foreign credential recognition.
• Work in partnership with sector councils, regulatory bodies, professional
associations and other organizations to advance the foreign credential
recognition process.
Milestones for Achievement:
Renewal Date
March 2009
Evaluation
Performed
No formal evaluation as of this date.
Evaluation
Scheduled
Summative Evaluation of Program in 2006-2007.
Page 66
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 4
FACT SHEET #7
Sector Council Program
(2004-2005 Planned Spending: $17.9M)
Objectives
The ultimate goal of Sector Council Program is two-pronged; the Program will
continue build on current partnerships and establish new relationships towards:
• Ensuring that Canadians have access to, and can obtain the skills and
knowledge required to participate in an ever-changing, skills-oriented
labour market; and
• Developing/fostering an efficient and effective functioning labour market in
targeted sectors of the Canadian economy.
The Program remains focused on working towards the achievement of four
broad, long-range objectives:
• Increased industry learning and skills development;
• More informed and responsive learning system to industry needs;
• Enhanced ability of industry to recruit, retain and address human resources
issues; and
• Reduced barriers to labour mobility.
Planned Results
The Sector Council Program will continue to build on current partnerships
with Sector Councils toward the achievement of the following objectives in the
short-term:
• Enhanced collaboration, action and investment by industry;
• Increased consensus and understanding of skills, occupational needs and
labour market issues;
• Increased availability and use of products and services to help industry
address their human resources issues; and
• Increased availability of products and mechanisms to facilitate labour
market entry and career progression.
Partnerships
The Sector Council Program achieves results through sector councils
(comprised of representatives from business, labour, education, government
and other professional groups).
Milestones for Achievement:
Renewal Date
March 2007
Evaluation
Performed
No formal evaluation as of this date.
Evaluation
Scheduled
The formative evaluation of the Sector Council Program is commencing and is
expected to be completed by December 2006. Interim reports are anticipated
August 2005 and March 2006.
Summative Evaluation of Sector Partnerships in 2006-2007.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 67
HRSDC • Annex 4
FACT SHEET #8
Official Language Minority Communities Support Fund
(2004-2005 Planned Spending: $8.0M)
Objectives
• The Support Fund for Official Language Minority Communities is delivered
under the authority of Section 6 of the Department of Human Resources
Development Act, which provides the Minister with authority relating to the
development of Canada’s human resources to enhance employment,
encourage equality and promote social inclusion.
• The objective of the Support Fund is to ensure continuity of activities and
funding for the organizations that foster the development of human
resources, economic growth, and job creation and retention in official
language minority communities.
Expected Results
and Outcomes
Short Term
• Continued viability of the infrastructures and networks as mechanisms for
government supporting official language minority communities (OLMCs).
• Improved knowledge of official language minority communities from
community profiles; the information will be used to guide funding
decisions, benchmarking and assessing progress and future evaluation.
• Increased official language minority community capacity, at the
organization and network levels, to produce community development plans
and projects.
• Through networking, promotion and communication, increased awareness
and understanding among the national committee and the federal
government departments that have signed the Memorandum of
Understanding with the national committee about the issues of official
language minority community development and approaches to strengthen
the communities.
• Increased capacity of the Secretariat and regional coordinators with
Section 41 responsibilities to advise and support the funded committees.
Medium term
• Increased leverage, within federal government departments and agencies
that have signed the Memorandum of Understanding and from external
bodies, of financial and other support for official language minority
communities for community development projects.
• Federal departments and agencies taking into account the needs of OLMCs
during the development and delivery of their policies and programs,
particularly those of human resources and economic development.
Long term
• Critical mass of local human resources in official language minority
communities capable of promoting and implementing their own
development.
• Increased diversity of funding bases for the national committees, the
Regroupements de développement économique et d’employabilité and
Community Economic Development and Employability Committees.
• Increased economic and job growth in official language minority
communities.
Page 68
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 4
FACT SHEET #8 (Continued)
Partners
HRSDC works closely with the National Committee for Canadian
Francophonie Human Resources Development and the National Human
Resources Development Committee for the English Linguistic Minority.
Milestones for Achievement:
Renewal Date
Not applicable until TB approval of authorities and resources for the new
Consolidated Revenue Fund Support Fund has been obtained.
Evaluation
Performed
Formative evaluation has been completed and is in final stages of approval and
publication. This evaluation examined the Support Fund provided as a Labour
Market Partnerships (LMP) initiative under the Part II Employment Benefits
and Support Measures (EBSM) of the Employment Insurance Act.
Evaluation
Scheduled
An evaluation has not been scheduled for the new CRF funded program for
Support Fund as Treasury Board approval of authorities and resources has not
yet been obtained
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 69
HRSDC • Annex 4
FACT SHEET #9
Older Workers Pilot Projects (OWPP)
(2004-2005 Planned Spending: $5.0M)
Objectives
To test employability approaches for older workers by funding pilot projects
designed to re-integrate displaced older workers into sustainable employment,
or maintain in employment older workers threatened with displacement.
This objective supports HRSDC’s human resources investment priorities
aimed at helping clientele with particular labour market needs and issues,
broadening partnerships to enhance and integrate programming and focusing
on prevention.
Expected Results
and Outcomes
The main program outcomes will focus on enhanced employability and long
term employment of older workers and the level to which the program helped
them achieve greater employability and obtain and sustain employment.
These projects will provide both orders of government with a better
understanding of what works for this particular client group and how HRSDC
and/or the provinces and territories might wish to proceed in advancing
eventual policies and programs for older workers.
Partners
The OWPP Initiative is a federal-provincial/territorial initiative.
Provincial and territorial governments include: Government of Newfoundland
and Labrador; Government of Nova Scotia; Government of Prince Edward
Island; Government of New Brunswick; Government of Quebec; Government
of Manitoba; Government of Saskatchewan; Government of British
Columbia; Government of the Yukon; Government of the Northwest
Territories; and Government of Nunavut.
(Ontario and Alberta are not participating in the Initiative)
Milestones for Achievement:
Renewal Date
Program to end on May 20, 2005
Evaluation Performed
Evaluations of pilot projects that ended on or before March 31, 2004 are
ongoing, with some evaluations nearing completion.
For projects undertaken during the 2004-2005 fiscal year each participating
jurisdiction will submit to HRSDC two employment outcome reports. The
first will consist of a 30-day follow-up survey; the second will consist of a 12
month follow-up survey. These results will supplement the overall evaluation.
Evaluation Scheduled
Final evaluations for projects that ended on or before March 31, 2004, to be
received by HRSDC by March 31, 2005.
30 day follow-up survey to be received by HRSDC by May 15, 2005.
12 month follow-up survey to be received by HRSDC by April 30, 2006.
Page 70
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 5
Annex 5: Foundations (Conditional Grants)
Peter Gzowski Foundation for Literacy
Purpose of the
Foundation
The purpose of this
foundation is to provide
one time funding and a
vehicle for corporations
and private citizens, who
supported Peter
Gzowski’s work in
literacy, to make
donations in his name.
Amount and Timing
of Funding Provided
$5 million on
March 31, 2003.
Projected Use
of Funds
Literacy activities which
support the national
coordination of the
Peter Gzowski
Golf Tournament
for Literacy.
Literacy activities which
support the raising of
funds and public
awareness for literacy at
the local level.
Literacy activities that
support the promotion of
literacy and leverage
funds for literacy
throughout Canada.
Expected Results
•
Increased public
awareness of, and
support for, literacy
issues
•
Leveraged funds
•
Promotion of
literacy and its
importance
•
Literacy activities
that support the
promotion of literacy
and leverage funds
for literacy
throughout Canada.
Frontier College Learning Foundation
Purpose of the
Foundation
Frontier College
Learning Foundation
provides financial
support for the work of
Frontier College.
Frontier College is a
Canada-wide, volunteerbased, literacy
organization which
teaches people to read
and write and nurtures an
environment favourable
to lifelong learning. It
reaches out to people
wherever they are and
responds to their
particular learning needs.
Amount and Timing
of Funding Provided
$12 million on
March 31, 2000.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Projected Use
of Funds
The endowment assists
Frontier College to
increase the number of
university chapters, the
number of student tutors
and the establishment of
tutor-training
partnerships with
national youth servicing
agencies in Canada.
Expected Results
The endowment is
expected to result in the
growth of Frontier
College’s presence and
services across Canada
which in turn results in
increased access to their
program.
Page 71
HRSDC • Annex 5
The Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation
The Budget Implementation Act, 1998, provides for the creation of the Canada Millennium Scholarship
Foundation. The Act establishes that the Minister of Human Resources Development Canada
(which has become Human Resources and Skills Development Canada) is responsible for tabling
Foundation reports to Parliament, including the Foundation’s annual report.
The endowment is managed in accordance with the Funding Agreement between the Foundation and the
Government of Canada, as represented by the Ministers of Finance and Human Resources Development
Canada (which has become Human Resources and Skills Development Canada).
For further information on the Foundation, see www.millenniumscholarships.ca.
Purpose of the
Foundation
Amount and Timing
of Funding Provided
Projected Use
of Funds
To increase access to
post-secondary
education by granting
scholarships to students
who are in financial
need and who
demonstrate merit.
Created in 1998 as an
autonomous body
with a $2.5 billion
endowment to
administer
scholarships to
students for a period
of ten years, starting
in the year 2000.
Annually award
bursaries averaging
$3,000 to postsecondary students
based on financial need.
Approximately 90,000
students with
demonstrated financial
need benefit from
millennium bursaries
annually.
Distribute annual
millennium entrance
excellence awards,
valued at $4,000 or
$5,000 depending on the
type of award, to
students beginning
post-secondary studies
for the first time who
demonstrate exceptional
merit.
Over 900 post-secondary
students benefit from
millennium entrance
excellence awards
annually.
Beginning in September
2003, distribute annual
national in-course
excellence awards,
valued at $4,000 or
$5,000 depending on the
type of award, to upperyear post-secondary
students.
Starting in 2003, up to
1,200 post-secondary
students benefit from
annual national incourse excellence
awards.
Undertake a research
program into the
determinants of access
to higher education and
the effect of current
student financial
assistance programs on
students' behaviour.
Improve access to postsecondary education so
that Canadians can
acquire the skills needed
to participate in a
changing economy and
society.
Page 72
Expected Results
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 5
Canadian Council on Learning
As per the terms and conditions of the funding agreement governing the grant, the foundation will
provide Human Resources and Skills Development Canada with an annual business plan and make
public an annual report. The initial work of the Canadian Council on Learning will focus on learning
outcomes in areas of federal jurisdiction, such as First Nations' education. The Council will develop
collaborative relationships that build on and complement existing efforts and avoid duplication and will
work in partnership with existing mechanisms, such as the Canadian Education Statistics Council.
Expected long-term results are detailed below.
Purpose of the
Foundation
Amount and Timing
of Funding Provided
Projected Use
of Funds
To promote and support
evidence-based decision
making in all areas of
lifelong learning by
informing Canadians
regularly on Canada’s
progress on learning
outcomes, and
promoting knowledge
and information
exchange among
learning partners.
The foundation
received a grant of
$85 million in
March 2004 to cover
activities for the
fiscal years from
2004-2005 to
2008-2009.
Build a framework of
indicators that measure
learning outcomes
across lifelong learning.
An integrated panCanadian set of
indicators for reporting
on outcomes across the
continuum of lifelong
learning.
Fill key learning
knowledge, information
and data gaps.
Improved data and
information on learning
to address learning
priorities.
Prepare and disseminate
learning information
and reports.
Improved evidencebased decision making
by users of learning
information, including
individual Canadians
and learning system
administrators, and
improved learning
outcomes for Canadians.
Partner with existing
organizations to improve
knowledge exchange by
building networks, and
supporting effective
practices and access to
data and information.
Strengthened
collaboration amongst
organizations involved
in learning information
across Canada, greater
use of effective practices
by learning system
decision makers and
improved access to data
and information.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Expected Results
Page 73
HRSDC • Annex 6
Annex 6: Major Initiatives and/or Programs
The following annex provides a brief overview of the department’s major programs and initiatives as well
as a web address to which the reader may refer in order to obtain more information.
Programs and Initiatives
Strategic Outcome:
Efficient and Effective Income Support and Labour Market Transitions
Employment Insurance Benefits
•
Employment Insurance provides temporary financial assistance for unemployed Canadians while
they look for work, as well as Canadians who are sick, pregnant or caring for a newborn or adopted
child, or need to take a temporary absence from work to provide care or support to a gravely ill
family member with a significant risk of death.
Website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/ei.shtml
Employment Benefits and Support Measures (EBSM) and Labour Market Development
Agreements (LMDA)
•
Part II of the Employment Insurance Act authorizes the design and implementation of Employment
Benefits and Support Measures to help unemployed participants to prepare for, obtain and maintain
employment and to support organizations, businesses and communities that provide employment
assistance services.
Website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/gc.shtml
•
Within the authority of the Employment Insurance Act, LMDAs have been signed with all provinces
and territories with the exception of Ontario. Seven of these agreements are in the form of a transfer
agreement under which five provinces and two territories have assumed responsibility for the design
and delivery of provincial/territorial programs and services similar to EBSMs. HRSDC delivers
EBSMs in four provinces and one territory under co-managed LMDAs, and in Ontario. Pan
Canadian programs maintained under federal jurisdiction are available to address labour market
activities and challenges that are national or multi-regional in scope. These activities are delivered
under the authority of Treasury Board approved terms and conditions for EBSMs and for the
LMDAs pursuant to section 63 of the EI Act.
Website: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/eppi-ibdrp/hrdb-rhbd/h004_e.asp
Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy (AHRDS)
•
The AHRDS is designed to assist Aboriginal people to prepare for, find and keep employment and
builds Aboriginal capacity for human resources development. The AHRDS integrates most of
HRSDC's Aboriginal programming.
Websites:
http://www17.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/ARO-BRA/ARO.cfm
http://www.socialunion.gc.ca/ecd_e.html
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/english/media/releases/2002/2002_72bk.htm
Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships (ASEP)
•
The ASEP is a nationally managed program geared to supporting collaboration between Aboriginal
groups and the private sector and governments to ensure that Aboriginal people can participate in
major economic opportunities.
Website: http://www17.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/ARO-BRA/ARO.cfm
Page 74
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 6
Programs and Initiatives
Youth Employment Strategy (YES)
•
The YES programs ensure that Canada’s youth are well prepared to participate and succeed in
today’s changing labour market. This national strategy offers a broad range of initiatives under
three programs: Skills Link, Summer Work Experience and Career Focus.
Website: http://www.youth.gc.ca
Labour Market Adjustments and Official Language Minority Communities
•
Official Language Minority Communities – The Secretariat, Official Language Minority
Communities (SOLMC) is responsible for the implementation of Part VII, Section 41 of the Official
Languages Act for HRSDC. SOLMC also supports the Government’s Action Plan on Official
Languages by contributing to the integration of French Immigrants to the labour market and
supporting future horizontal planning exercises.
Website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/solmc.shtml
•
Work Sharing – Work Sharing (WS) is a voluntary program that enables employers to face
temporary cutbacks and still avoid layoffs. The program is used when a reduction of the normal
level of business activity is beyond the control of the employer and the employer is able to
demonstrate that the business will be able to fully resume normal production levels at the end of the
WS agreement.
Website: http://www.hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca/en/epb/sid/cia/grants/ws/desc_ws.shtml
Strategic Outcome:
Enhanced Competitiveness of Canadian Workplaces by Supporting Investment in and
Recognition and Utilization of Skills
Human Resources Partnerships (HRP)
•
HRP advances partnerships with industry and the learning system to ensure that Canadians have the
skills and knowledge required for the workplace. HRP has three core activities: working with
sector councils and on sectoral initiatives; developing and maintaining skills information; and
supporting apprenticeship and labour mobility.
Websites:
The Sector Council Program
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/spi.shtml
National Occupation Classification (NOC)
http://www23.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/2001/e/generic/welcome.shtml
Apprenticeship and Labour Mobility Initiatives
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/almi.shtml
The Foreign Worker Program
•
The Foreign Worker Program seeks to improve the Canadian labour market by ensuring that
qualified foreign workers are admitted to work in Canada for jobs or vacancies that cannot readily
be filled by Canadians.
Website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/fw.shtml
Labour Market Information (LMI)
•
LMI is a service that assists job seekers, people choosing a career, workers, career practitioners,
employment service providers, employers and community development organizations in making
labour market related decisions.
Website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/lmi.shtml
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 75
HRSDC • Annex 6
Programs and Initiatives
Strategic Outcome:
Through Access to Learning, Canadians Can Participate Fully in a
Knowledge-Based Economy and Society
Student Financial Assistance (Canada Student Loans Program) (CSLP)
•
The CSLP promotes accessibility to post-secondary education for those with demonstrated financial
need by lowering financial barriers through the provision of loans and grants.
Websites: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/topics/cxp-gxr.shtml
http://www.canlearn.ca
Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG)
•
The CESG program encourages Canadians to save for the post-secondary education of children
through Registered Education Savings Plans (RESPs).
Website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/topics/cgs-gxr.shtml
National Literacy Program
• The National Literacy Secretariat works in partnership with the provinces and territories, other
government departments, business and labour, the voluntary sector and non-governmental
organizations to build capacity for literacy opportunities across Canada.
Website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/topics/lxa-gxr.shtml
Learning Initiatives Program (LIP)
•
The objective of Learning Initiatives is to support a lifelong learning culture and to support
partnership initiatives that will contribute to the development of a more results-oriented, accessible,
relevant and accountable learning system.
Website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/topics/lxi-gxr.shtml
International Academic Mobility (IAM)
•
The IAM program advances the development of international skills, knowledge and understanding
among students and promotes academic cooperation and institutional linkages among colleges and
universities.
Website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/iam.shtml
Office of Learning Technologies (OLT)
•
OLT promotes and facilitates the development and evolution of Community Learning Networks
(CLN) as key features of a community-based approach to learning opportunities through the use of
existing network technologies and strong partnerships.
Website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/hip/lld/olt/01_index.shtml
Strategic Outcome:
Safe, Healthy, Fair, Stable, Cooperative and Productive Workplaces
The Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service (FMCS)
•
The FMCS is responsible for providing dispute resolution and dispute prevention assistance to trade
unions and employers under the jurisdiction of Part I (Industrial Relations) of the Canada Labour Code.
Website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/asp/gateway.asp?hr=/en/lp/fmcs/02About.shtml&hs=mxm
Page 76
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 6
Programs and Initiatives
National Labour Operations
•
National Labour Operations ensures consistent and cost-effective implementation of Parts II
(Occupational Health and Safety) and III (Labour Standards) of the Canada Labour Code, as well as
the Employment Equity Act, Federal Contractors Program, Fair Wages and Hours of Labour Act,
and the Non-smokers' Health Act. National Labour Operations is also responsible for administering
the Government Employees’ Compensation Act and the Merchant Seamen Compensation Act.
National Labour Operations also administers Fire Protection Services on behalf of Treasury Board.
Website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/labour.shtml
International Labour Affairs (ILA)
•
International Labour Affairs works to defend and project Canadian values and interests by
promoting respect for fundamental labour rights, negotiating and implementing innovative
international labour agreements, and by representing Canadian interests in key international fora.
Website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/business/cluster/category/ilaa.shtml
Workplace Policy and Information
•
Workplace Policy and Information researches key workplace and labour law issues, develops policy
options, and disseminates research findings and information key stakeholders.
Website: Work-life Balance and Ageing Workforce
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/topics/wnc-gxr.shtml
Strategic Outcome:
Enhanced Community Capacity to Contribute to the Reduction of Homelessness
The National Homelessness Initiative (NHI)
•
The NHI is a community-led initiative that engages all levels of government, community
stakeholders and private and voluntary sector partners to work together to strengthen existing
service capacity and to develop new community-based responses to homelessness that reflect
local circumstances and assist homeless individuals and families in achieving and maintaining
self-sufficiency.
Website: http://www.homelessness.gc.ca/home/index_e.asp
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 77
HRSDC • Annex 7
Annex 7: Source of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue
Details of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue by Business Line
Authority
(Restated) a
(millions of dollars)
Planned Spending
2003-2004
2004-2005
2005-2006
2006-2007
455.8
124.3
37.6
15.1
73.7
0.0
178.1
884.6
480.6
149.8
38.2
13.7
74.0
0.0
138.9
895.2
479.5
146.6
38.2
13.7
76.0
0.0
138.6
892.6
479.0
149.2
38.2
13.7
79.0
0.0
138.6
897.7
65.9
10.7
5.3
71.2
14.8
5.4
70.9
14.4
5.4
70.9
11.6
5.4
101.0
51.3
2.1
154.4
107.5
55.2
2.2
164.9
126.3
64.4
2.2
192.9
134.2
67.6
2.2
204.0
1.8
0.0
1.8
0.0
1.8
0.0
1.8
0.0
14.1
252.2
14.9
273.0
14.9
300.3
14.9
308.6
b
Respendable Revenues
Employment Insurance Benefits
Employment Programs
Workplace Skills
Learning
Labour
Homelessness
Policy, Program and Service Delivery Support
Total Respendable Revenues
Non-respendable Revenues
Employment Insurance Benefits - Recovery of Employee
Benefit Plan (EBP) costs
Employment Programs - Recovery of EBP
Workplace Skills - Recovery of EBP
Learning
Student loan recoveries
Set-offs of income tax refunds
Recovery of EBP
Labour - Service Fees
Homelessness - Recovery of EBP
Policy, Program and Service Delivery Support Recovery
of EBP
Total Non-Respendable Revenues
a
b
Restated authority as a result of December 12, 2003 restructure of HRDC into SDC and HRSDC.
The respendable revenues include administrative costs recovered from the EI Account and CPP.
Page 78
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 8
Annex 8: Net Cost of Programs for the Estimates Year
Financial Table Part I
Net Cost of Programs for the Estimates Year (TABLE PART I)
Authority
a
(Restated)
(millions of dollars)
a
Budgetary Main Estimates
a
Less: Respendable revenues
a
Total Main Estimates
Adjustments to Planned Spending
Budget 2003
Foreign Credential Recognition
Official Languages Plan
Sub-Total Budget 2003
Planned Spending
2003-2004
2004-2005
2005-2006
2006-2007
3,001.0
(884.6)
2,116.4
2,887.6
(894.2)
1,993.4
2,845.5
(891.9)
1,953.6
2,738.9
(897.4)
1,841.5
b
-
8.8
1.2
10.0
9.8
1.5
11.3
8.8
1.4
10.2
Budget 2004
Canada Learning Bond
Enhancement to Canada Education Savings Grant
Easing transition to Post-Secondary School
Enhancing Student Loans
Canada Learning Bond (Administration)
Implementing new Workplace Skills Strategy
Foreign Credential Recognition
Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy
Sub-Total Budget 2004
-
85.0
20.0
15.0
5.0
25.0
150.0
85.0
80.0
45.0
14.0
15.0
10.0
4.9
25.0
278.9
100.0
80.0
48.0
18.0
10.0
10.0
4.9
25.0
295.9
Others
Minority Official Languages Community
Minister's Salary & Car Allowance
Toronto Waterfront Revitalization
Canada's Action Plan Against Racism
Older Workers Pilot Projects Initiative
Employment Insurance Pilot Project
Sub-Total Others
-
9.0
115.7
2.0
5.5
0.1
132.3
0.1
110.9
0.1
111.1
0.1
110.9
111.0
2,116.4
292.3
2,285.7
401.3
2,354.9
417.1
2,258.6
1,526.1
1,254.7
1,052.2
807.0
(152.0)
1,374.1
3,490.5
1,254.7
3,540.4
78.0
1,130.2
3,485.1
85.0
892.0
3,150.6
Total Adjustments to Planned Spending
b
Non-Budgetary Main Estimates
Adjustments to Planned Spending
b
NET PLANNED SPENDING
a. The 2003-2004 figures reflect the restated authority as a result of December 12, 2003 restructure of HRDC into SDC and HRSDC.
b. The adjustments for 2003-2004 represent the items approved through the Supplementary Estimates. The adjustments to the Planned
Spending for 2004-2005, 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 reflect the impact of the Budget 2003 and Budget 2004 as well as approvals to
date which are not included in the Main Estimates.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 79
HRSDC • Annex 8
Financial Table Part II
Net Cost of Programs for the Estimates Year (TABLE PART II)
Authority
a
(Restated)
(millions of dollars)
NET PLANNED SPENDING (Total reported from Table-Part I)
Specified Purpose Accounts
Employment Insurance
Other Specified Purpose Accounts
Departmental Recoveries charged to the CPP
Departmental Employee Benefit Plan recoverable from
EI Account and CPP
Total HRSDC Consolidated
d
Less: Non-respendable Revenues
Student Loans recovery
Set-offs of income tax refunds
Others
Plus: Services Received without Charge
Contributions covering employers' share of employees' insurance
premiums and costs paid by Treasury Board Secretariat
Salary and associated costs of legal services provided by the
Department of Justice
TOTAL NET DEPARTMENTAL COST
Full Time Equivalents
a.
b.
c.
d.
Planned Spending
2003-2004
2004-2005
3,490.5
17,159.8
58.4
10.1
(96.3)
b
2005-2006
3,540.4
3,485.1
3,150.6
17,344.2
55.2
9.3
17,707.9
52.0
9.3
n/a
n/a
n/a
(106.7)
(106.0)
20,622.5
20,842.4
21,148.3
101.0
51.3
1.8
154.1
107.5
55.2
1.8
164.5
126.3
64.4
1.8
192.5
11.8
12.4
12.1
4.4
16.2
3.2
15.6
3.3
15.4
20,484.6
20,693.5
20,971.2
13,910
2006-2007
13,837
13,691
c
n/a
12,961
The 2003-2004 figures reflect the restated authority as a result of December 12, 2003 restructure of HRDC into SDC and HRSDC.
EI Benefits for 2003-2004 represent the Budget 2004 forecasts.
Forecasted expenditures for EI Benefits are available only for the planning years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006.
Non-Respendable Revenues: Revenues against Non-Budgetary or loans. These revenues exclude recoveries associated with the
Employee Benefit Plan recoverable from EI Account and CPP.
Page 80
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 9
Annex 9: Specified Purpose Accounts
Specified Purpose Accounts (SPA) are special categories of revenues and expenditures. They report
transactions of certain accounts where enabling legislation requires that revenues be earmarked and that
related payments and expenditures be charged against such revenues. The transactions of these accounts
are to be accounted for separately.
HRSDC is responsible for the stewardship of three such accounts:
•
the Employment Insurance (EI) Account;
•
the Government Annuities Account; and
•
the Civil Service Insurance Fund.
The EI Account is a consolidated SPA and is included in the financial reporting of the Government of
Canada. Consolidated SPAs are used principally where the activities are similar in nature to departmental
activities and the transactions do not represent liabilities to third parties but, in essence, constitute
Government revenues and expenditures.
The Government Annuities Account is a consolidated SPA and is included in the financial reporting of
the Government of Canada. It was established by the Government Annuities Act, and modified by the
Government Annuities Improvement Act, which discontinued sales of annuities in 1975. The account is
valued on an actuarial basis each year, with the deficit or surplus charged or credited to the Consolidated
Revenue Fund.
The Civil Service Insurance Fund is a consolidated SPA and is included in the financial reporting of the
Government of Canada. It was established by the Civil Service Insurance Act. Pursuant to subsection
16(3) of the Civil Service Insurance Regulations, the amount of actuarial deficits are transferred from the
Consolidated Revenue Fund to the Civil Service Insurance Account in order to balance the assets and
liabilities of the program.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 81
HRSDC • Annex 9
Employment Insurance Account
Description
The Employment Insurance (EI) Account was established in the Accounts of Canada by the Employment
Insurance Act (EI Act) to record all amounts received or paid out under that Act. The EI Act provides
short-term financial relief and other assistance to eligible workers. The program covers all workers in an
employer-employee relationship. Self-employed fishers are also included under special regulation of the
EI Act. In 2002, 15.2 million Canadians contributed to the Program and 2.6 million received benefits.
Employment Insurance provides:
•
Income Benefits under Part I of the EI Act as a temporary income replacement to claimants,
including self-employed fishers, while they look for work. This includes work-sharing agreements for
temporary work shortages to allow employees to receive pro-rated EI benefits while working for part
of a week, thus avoiding layoffs. EI also provides four types of special benefits: maternity benefits,
payable to biological mothers for work missed as a result of pregnancy and childbirth; parental
benefits, payable to both biological and adoptive parents for the purpose of caring for a new born or
adopted child; sickness benefits, payable to claimants who are too ill to work; and newly
implemented compassionate care benefits, payable to claimants who provide care to a gravely ill or
dying child, parent or spouse.
•
Employment Benefits and Support Measures under Part II of the EI Act can be tailored to meet
the needs of individuals and local circumstances. The Government of Canada has Labour Market
Development Agreements with all provinces and territories with the exception of Ontario. These enable
provincial and territorial governments to assume direct responsibility for the design and delivery of these
benefits or to take part in co-management arrangements with the federal government.
Employers and workers pay all costs associated with EI through premiums. Benefits and administrative costs
are paid out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund and charged to the EI Account. A surplus in the Account
generates interest at a rate established by the Minister of Finance, which is currently set at 90% of the monthly
average of the three-month Treasury bill rate.
Financial Summary
In 2004-2005, total revenues are expected to exceed total costs by $1.4 billion, which will increase the
cumulative surplus to $47.2 billion as of March 31, 2005. The changes in benefits and premium are
explained as follows:
•
Benefits are expected to increase by 1.4% to $15.7 billion. This is due to a 2.5% expected increase in the
average weekly benefits partially offset by a 1.4% expected decline in the number of beneficiaries; and
•
Premium revenue is expected to decrease to $17.5 billion, as the reduction in premium rates to 1.98%
in 2004 is partially offset by rising employment and earnings.
Page 82
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 9
The following chart summarizes trends in total costs and revenues of the EI Account from 1992-1993 to
2004-2005.
EI Account – Cost and Revenues Trend
25
Billions of dollars
20
15
10
5
Total Costs
2004-2005
2003-2004
2002-2003
2001-2002
2000-2001
1999-2000
1998-1999
1997-1998
1996-1997
1995-1996
1994-1995
1993-1994
1992-1993
0
Total Revenues
The table below summarizes the financial results for the EI Account from 2001-2002 to 2004-2005. In
2002-2003, the Government of Canada changed its basis of accounting from the modified accrual
accounting to the full accrual basis of accounting. This change in accounting policy has been applied
retroactively and the financial statements have been restated accordingly
EI Account – Summary
(millions of dollars)
Actual
2001-2002
2002-2003
Forecast
2003-2004
Planned
Spending
2004-2005
Expenditures
Benefits
Administrative Costs
Doubtful Accounts
Total Costs
13,694
1,476
73
15,242
14,501
1,519
81
16,101
15,505
1,571
84
17,160
15,715
1,539
90
17,344
Revenues
Premium Revenue
Penalties
Interest
Total Revenues
17,999
65
1,087
19,152
18,243
71
1,055
19,369
17,887
72
1,181
19,140
17,484
74
1,165
18,723
Surplus
Current Year
Cumulative
3,909
40,544
3,268
43,812
1,980
45,792
1,379
47,171
Note:
1. The EI premiums reported in the summary financial statements of the Government of Canada exclude the premium
contributions made by the Government of Canada as an employer.
2. 2001-2002 figures have been re-stated to reflect changes in accounting policies in 2002-2003.
3. Totals may not add due to rounding.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 83
HRSDC • Annex 9
Benefit Payments
Benefits in 2004-2005 are expected to reach $15.7 billion, consisting of $13.5 billion for Income Benefits
and $2.2 billion for Employment Benefits and Support Measures.
Income Benefits
EI Income Benefits include regular, special, work sharing and fishers' benefits.a Major aspects of these
benefits are as follows:
Regular Benefits
Amount of Work Required to Qualify for Benefits
•
- Most claimants require 420 to 700 hours of work during their qualifying period, regardless of
whether from full-time or part-time work, or whether the work is with one employer or several.
The exact number of hours required is called the “variable entrance requirement”. It is determined
by the rate of unemployment in a claimant’s region at the time he or she applies for benefits. In
general, the higher the rate of unemployment, the fewer hours of work required to qualify.
- People who have just entered the labour market (“new entrants”) and those returning to the labour
force after an absence (“re-entrants”) require 910 hours of work. However, if they worked at least
490 hours in the 12 months preceding the qualifying period, or received at least one week of
maternity or parental benefits in the four years before that, they will be eligible under normal
rules the following year.
- Claimants who commit EI fraud are subject to higher entrance requirements. The degree of
violation – minor, serious, very serious or repeat violation – increases the minimum number
of hours required to establish a claim to 1.25, 1.5, 1.75 or 2 times the normal minimum hours
of work required.
- Analysis of the employed population indicates that access to EI remains high with 88% of
individuals in paid employment being eligible for EI benefits.b
Determining the Benefit Rate and Entitlement
•
- Claimants for regular benefits may receive benefits for 14 to 45 weeks, depending upon their
hours of insurable employment and the regional unemployment rate.
- Claimants' weekly benefits are 55% of their average insurable earnings during the last 26 weeks.
The average insurable earnings are based on the actual weeks of work, subject to a minimum
14 to 22 divisor that is tied to the regional rate of unemployment.
- Claimants with a combined family income of less than $25,921 and who qualify for the Canada
Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) receive a Family Supplement based upon:
•
The net family income;
•
The number of dependent children; and
•
The ages of those dependent children.
a
For more details refer to the EI website at http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/ae-ei/employment_insurance.shtml
b
For further information, see http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/ae-ei/loi-law/eimar.shtml
Page 84
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 9
- The benefit rate for claimants who receive a Family Supplement can be increased to a maximum
of 80% of the claimant's average weekly insurable earnings. However, the actual weekly amount
of benefits cannot exceed the maximum weekly rate noted below.
- The maximum weekly benefit rate stays at $413 (55% of the maximum weekly insurable earnings
of $750). The Maximum Yearly Insurable Earnings (MYIE) remain at $39,000 until they are
exceeded by 52 times the projected average weekly industrial wages.
Special Benefits
Claims for sickness, maternity, parental, or compassionate care benefits require 600 hours of work, and
are not affected by the new entrant/re-entrant rule. All claimants may receive sickness benefits for up to
15 weeks. Parental benefits of 35 weeks are available for biological and adoptive parents in addition to
the 15 weeks of maternity benefits available to biological mothers. Compassionate care benefits of 6
weeks are available for those providing care for a gravely ill or dying child, parent or spouse.
Work Sharing
Claimants may receive benefits while on work-sharing agreements. These agreements between HRSDC,
employees and employers attempt to avoid temporary layoffs by combining partial EI benefits with
reduced work weeks. They normally last from 6 to 26 weeks.
Fishers’ Benefits
Fisher claims have a duration and benefit rate that depend on the earnings from fishing and the regional
rate of unemployment. All fisher claims have a 31-week maximum qualifying period and a maximum
entitlement of 26 weeks of benefits. These can be claimed from October 1st to June 15th for summer
fishers’ benefits and April 1st to December 15th for winter fishers’ benefits.
Benefit rates for fisher claims are determined by a minimum of 14 to 22 divisor that depends on the
regional rate of unemployment, not actual weeks worked.
Benefit Repayments
When the net annual income of EI claimants exceeds 1.25 times the maximum yearly insurable earnings
(“the repayment threshold”), they have to repay the lesser of 30% (“the repayment rate”) of the benefits
received that make up the excess or 30% of the amount of regular or fishers benefits paid. This does not
apply to claimants who did not receive EI regular or fishers benefits in the last 10 years, to recipients of
special EI benefits nor to recipients of employment benefits.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 85
HRSDC • Annex 9
EI Income Benefits – Expenditures
(millions of dollars)
Actual
2001-2002
2002-2003
Income Benefits
Regular
Sickness
Maternity
Parental
Compassionate Care
Fishing
Work Sharing
Benefit Repayments
Total Income Benefits
8,555
648
848
1,311
290
48
(99)
11,602
8,676
691
845
1,880
309
23
(100)
12,325
Forecast
2003-2004
9,453
757
893
1,968
48
341
24
(103)
13,381
Planned
Spending
2004-2005
9,297
786
932
2,053
190
363
20
(113)
13,528
Note:
Totals may not add due to rounding.
Factors Affecting Income Benefit
Income Benefits ($ million)
Average Monthly Beneficiaries (000's)
Benefit Rate ($/week)
Actual
2001-2002 2002-2003
11,602
12,325
783
818
284
290
Planned
Forecast Spending
2003-2004 2004-2005 % change
13,381
1.1%
13,528
862
(1.4%)
850
294
2.5%
301
Employment Benefits and Support Measures
The Employment Benefits include Skills Development, Job Creation Partnerships, Self-Employment and
Targeted Wage Subsidies.
The Support Measures include Employment Assistance Services, Labour Market Partnerships and
Research and Innovation.
Part II of the EI Act also authorizes the federal government to make payments to the governments of the
provinces and territories for implementing programs similar to Employment Benefits and Support
Measures. The planned federal contribution to provinces and territories (i.e., New Brunswick, Quebec,
Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Northwest Territories and Nunavut) under transfer Labour Market
Development Agreements is $892 million for 2004-2005.
The total planned spending for Employment Benefits and Support Measures in 2004-2005 is set at
approximately $2.2 billion or 0.6% of the total estimated insurable earnings of $382.876 billion. This is
below the 0.8% ceiling set under Section 78 of the EI Act.
Page 86
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 9
Employment Benefits and Support Measures
Planned
Actual
(millions of dollars)
2001-2002
Job Creation Partnerships
Skills Development
Self-Employment
Targeted Wage Subsidies
Employment Assistance
Labour Market Partnerships
Research & Innovation
Total HRSDC Programs
Transfers to Provinces and Territories
Total
a
2002-2003
Forecast
2003-2004
58
453
82
44
300
237
26
68
436
93
44
339
271
34
65
418
89
42
325
259
32
1,199
893
2,092
1,284
893
2,177
1,230
894
2,124
a
Spending
2004-2005
1,295
892
2,187
Breakdown by component is not available, as spending will be guided by local labour market needs. Breakdown by
provinces/territories is provided in the EI Part II – 2004-2005 Expenditure Plan.
Note:
1. 2001-2002 figures have been re-stated to reflect changes in accounting policies in 2002-2003.
2. Totals may not add due to rounding.
Premiums
Premiums are collected from insured employees and their employers to cover the program costs over a
business cycle, based on a yearly premium rate and employees' insurable earnings. The factors affecting
the premiums are further explained below:
Premium Rate: As indicated in the chart, the
premium rate has been gradually reduced from its peak
level of 3.07% of insurable earnings in 1994 to 2.10%
in 2003 and 1.98% in 2004, for employees. The
corresponding employer rates at 1.4 times the
employee rate are 2.94% for 2003 and 2.77% for 2004.
The government’s objective on setting EI premium
rates is to develop a more transparent and sustainable
process. Budget 2003 launched public consultations on
a new rate-setting regime for 2005 and beyond, the
results of which the Government is currently
reviewing. The summaries of these EI rate-setting
consultations can be found on the Department of
Finance website;
http://www.fin.gc.ca/activty/consult/eirates_e.html.
Legislation to implement the results of this process will
be introduced in time to have the new regime in place
for 2005.
For planning purposes, the premium revenue forecast
for 2004-2005 is based on a premium rate of 1.98%
for the employee and 2.77% for the employer in the
first three months of 2005.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
EMPLOYEE PREMIUM RATE TREND
(% OF INSURABLE EARNINGS)
3.50
3.00
2.50
2.00
1.50
1.00
0.50
0.00
1994
1996
1998
2000
2002
2004
Page 87
HRSDC • Annex 9
Maximum Yearly Insurable Earnings (MYIE): Premiums are paid on all employment earnings of insured
employees up to the MYIE. Section 4 of the EI Act provides that the MYIE will be $39,000 until the projected
value of the average weekly earnings in Canada times 52 exceeds that threshold. Thereafter, the MYIE will be
set equal to such projected value times 52, rounded down to the nearest $100. For 2004, the projected value
(times 52) was calculated to be $36,200 and, therefore, the MYIE was left at $39,000.c
Premium Reduction: Employers with qualified wage-loss insurance plans are entitled to premium
reductions. They are required to share this reduction with their employees.d
Premium Refund:
•
Workers with annual earnings of $2,000 or less can receive a refund of their EI premiums through the
income tax system.
•
EI premiums are refunded to employees when their insurable earnings are in excess of the maximum
yearly insurable earnings.
Factors Affecting Premium Revenue
Actual
2001-2002
Fiscal Year Factors
Premium Revenue ($ million)
Total Insurable Earnings ($ million)
Calendar Year Factors
a
Employee Premium Rate
(% of insurable earnings)
Maximum Insurable Earnings ($)
Planned
Revenue
2004-2005
17,999
351,615
18,243
364,502
17,887
373,548
17,484
382,876
2001
2002
2003
2004
2.25%
39,000
2.20%
39,000
2.10%
39,000
1.98%
39,000
(515)
(513)
(527)
(542)
(185)
(17)
(170)
(11)
(176)
-
(169)
-
Premium Reduction ($ million)
Premium Refunds ($ million)
Employee
Employer (New Hires/Youth Hires)
a
2002-2003
Forecast
2003-2004
%
Change
(2.3%)
2.5%
(5.7%)
The employers’ portion is 1.4 times the employee rate.
Note:
1. The premium rate reduction from 2.10% to 1.98%, as set by Bill C-28 for the calendar year 2004, represents an ongoing
annual savings to employers and employees of $9.7 billion in 2004, compared to the 1994 rate. The 5.7% reduction in
premium rate should result in lower premium revenue in 2004-2005, as the total insurable earnings are expected to increase
by 2.5%.
2. 2001-2002 figures have been re-stated to reflect changes in accounting policies in 2002-2003.
Interest Earned
Section 76 of the EI Act stipulates that the Minister of Finance may authorize the payment of interest on
the balance in the Employment Insurance Account in accordance with such terms and conditions and at
such rates as the Minister of Finance may establish, and the interest, which is currently set at 90% of the
monthly average of the three-month Treasury bill rate, shall be credited to the Employment Insurance
Account and charged to the Consolidated Revenue Fund. Interest is calculated monthly, based on the
30-day average of the daily balance in the Account.
c
d
For further information, see http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/ae-ei/loi-law/max2003.pdf
For further information, see http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/asp/gateway.asp?hr=en/cs/prp/010.shtml&hs=eyp
Page 88
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 9
Effective July 1, 2002, interest is charged on overdue accounts receivable, caused through
misrepresentation, in accordance with Treasury Board regulations. The interest rate used in this
calculation is the average Bank of Canada discount rate for the previous month plus 3%.
Interest Earned
Actual
2001-2002
2002-2003
Sources
Account Balance
Accounts Receivable
Total
1,087
0
1,087
1,036
19
1,055
Forecast
2003-2004
1,151
30
1,181
Planned
Revenue
2004-2005
1,129
36
1,165
Interest earned is expected to remain at $1.2 billion, as the decrease in the interest rate is offset by the
higher cumulative surplus.
Administrative Costs
Section 77 of the EI Act specifies that the costs of administering the Act are to be charged to the EI
Account. The charges to the Employment Insurance Account are solely those directly related to the
program and administration expenses under the Employment Insurance Act.
The Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development is responsible for reporting on the EI Program
to Parliament. However, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), which collects premiums and benefit
repayments and provides decisions on insurability under the Act, shares the administration of the
Program. The Department of Social Development, Treasury Board Secretariat and the Department of
Justice all supply services that support management and delivery of programs under the EI Act.
The administrative costs that provincial and territorial governments incur to administer Employment
Benefits and Support Measures under the Labour Market Development Agreements are also charged to
the EI Account.
Administrative Costs
(millions of dollars)
Federal
EI Income Benefits
Premium Collection
Service Delivery Support
Corporate Services
Human Resources Investment
Subtotal
Provincial
Recovery
Total
Actual
2001-2002
2002-2003
464
107
347
303
173
1,395
91
(10)
1,476
484
103
380
300
165
1,433
91
(5)
1,519
Forecast
2003-2004
1,489
92
(10)
1,571
Planned
Spending
2004-2005
1,453
92
(6)
1,539
Note:
Totals may not add due to rounding.
The $1,539 million in EI administrative costs represents the initial requirements for 2004-2005, which are
$32 million less than the forecast for 2003-2004.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 89
HRSDC • Annex 9
Government Annuities Account
This account was established by the Government Annuities Act, and modified by the Government
Annuities Improvement Act, which discontinued sales of annuities in 1975. The account is valued on an
actuarial basis each year, with the deficit charged or surplus credited to the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
The purpose of the Government Annuities Act was to assist Canadians to provide for their later years, by
the purchase of Government annuities. The Government Annuities Improvement Act increased the rate of
return and flexibility of Government annuity contracts.
Income consists of premiums received, funds reclaimed from the Consolidated Revenue Fund for
previously untraceable annuitants, earned interest and any transfer needed to cover the actuarial deficit.
Payments and other charges represent matured annuities, the commuted value of death benefits, premium
refunds and withdrawals, and actuarial surpluses and unclaimed items transferred to non-tax revenues.
The amounts of unclaimed annuities, related to untraceable annuitants, are transferred to non-tax
revenues.
As of March 31, 2004, there were 3,558 outstanding deferred annuities, the last of which will come into
payment around 2030.
Government Annuities Account - Receipts and Disbursements
Actual
(millions of dollars)
2001-2002
2002-2003
2003-2004
Planned
Spending
2004-2005
Expenditures
Actuarial Liabilities –
Balance at beginning of year
Income
Payments and other charges
Excess of Payments and other
charges over income for the year
Actuarial Surplus
Actuarial Liabilities –
Balance at end of the year
Page 90
507.8
33.3
65.2
471.4
30.8
61.3
437.6
28.5
57.8
405.8
26.4
54.6
31.9
4.5
30.5
3.3
29.3
2.5
28.2
1.9
471.4
437.6
405.8
375.7
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 9
Civil Service Insurance Fund
This account was established by the Civil Service Insurance Act, under which the Minister of Finance
could contract with permanent employees in the public service for the payment of certain death benefits.
No new contracts have been entered into since 1954 when the Supplementary Death Benefit Plan for the
Public Service and Canadian Forces was introduced as part of the Public Service Superannuation Act and
the Canadian Forces Superannuation Act, respectively. As of April 1997, the Department of Human
Resources Development assumed the responsibility for the administration and the actuarial valuation of
the Civil Service Insurance Act.
The number of policies in force as of March 31, 2004 was 1,653 and the average age of the policy holders
was 85.6 years. Receipts and other credits consist of premiums and an amount (charged to expenditures)
which is transferred from the Consolidated Revenue Fund in order to balance the assets and actuarial
liabilities of the program. Payments and other charges consist of death benefits, settlement annuities paid
to beneficiaries and premium refunds.
Pursuant to subsection 16(3) of the Civil Service Insurance Regulations, any deficit will be credited to the
Account from the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
Civil Service Insurance Fund - Receipts and Disbursements
Planned
Spending
Actual
(millions of dollars)
2001-2002
2002-2003
a
2003-2004
2004-2005
Revenue
a
Opening Balance
8.0
7.7
7.5
7.1
Receipts and other credits
Payments and other charges
0.1
0.4
0.3
0.5
0.2
0.6
0.2
0.6
Excess of payments and other
charges over income for the year
0.3
0.2
0.4
0.4
Closing Balance
7.7
7.5
7.1
6.7
The receipts and other credits in 2002-2003 were increased to account for the balancing credit of $0.1 as of March 31, 2003 that
was made.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 91
HRSDC • Annex 10
Annex 10: Employment Insurance Part II - 2004-2005 Expenditure Plan
a
Background
Part II of the Employment Insurance (EI) Act commits the federal government to work in concert with
provinces and territories in designing and implementing active employment programs that would be more
effective in helping unemployed Canadians integrate into the labour market. These programs are called
Employment Benefits and Support Measures (EBSMs).
In accordance with the Government of Canada's 1996 offer to provinces and territories to enter into
bilateral partnerships on labour market activities, Labour Market Development Agreements (LMDAs)
have been concluded with nine provinces and the three territories. The LMDAs involve two types of
arrangements:
•
Co-management agreements where Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC),
formerly Human Resources Development Canada, and the province or territory jointly assume
responsibility for the planning and design of EBSMs, while HRSDC continues to deliver programs
and services through its service delivery network. Such agreements have been concluded with
Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, British Columbia and the Yukon. There is also a
strategic partnership agreement that is a variation of co-management in Nova Scotia. Furthermore,
HRSDC delivers EBSMs in Ontario where there is no LMDA.
•
Transfer agreements where the province or territory assumes responsibility for the design and
delivery of active employment programs similar to EBSMs. Such agreements have been concluded
with New Brunswick, Quebec, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, the Northwest Territories and
Nunavut.
In addition to locally and regionally delivered EBSMs and similar programs, pan-Canadian activities that
are national or multi-regional in scope or purpose are delivered by HRSDC in any of the provinces
through EBSMs. Pan-Canadian activities include programming similar to EBSMs delivered by
Aboriginal organizations under Aboriginal Human Resources Development Agreements.
Employment Benefits and Support Measures
The five Employment Benefits are:
•
Targeted Wage Subsidies – to encourage employers to hire individuals whom they would not
normally hire in the absence of a subsidy;
•
Self-Employment – to help individuals to create jobs for themselves by starting a business;
•
Job Creation Partnerships – to provide individuals with opportunities through which they can gain
work experience which leads to on-going employment;
•
Skills Development – to help individuals to obtain skills for employment, ranging from basic to
advanced skills through direct assistance to individuals, and, where applicable, contributions to
provinces/territories or provincially/territorially funded training institutions to cover costs not
included in tuition fees; and
•
Targeted Earnings Supplements – to encourage individuals to accept employment by offering them
financial incentives.
a
The following information is extracted from the approved Employment Insurance Expenditure Plan and does not reflect
developments subsequent to the approval.
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2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 10
It should be noted that of the Employment Benefits listed above, Targeted Earnings Supplements has not
yet been implemented. Pilot research projects were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Targeted
Earnings Supplements but HRSDC has not yet arrived at a feasible design.
Eligibility to receive assistance under the Employment Benefits extends to persons who are insured
participants as defined in Section 58 of the EI Act, i.e., active claimants and former claimants (individuals who
have received regular benefits in the past three years or maternity or parental benefits in the past five years).
Part II of the legislation also authorizes the establishment of Support Measures in support of the National
Employment Service. The three measures are:
•
Employment Assistance Services – to assist organizations in the provision of employment services
to unemployed persons;
•
Labour Market Partnerships – to encourage and support employers, employee and/or employer
associations and communities to improve their capacity for dealing with human resource
requirements and implementing labour force adjustments; and
•
Research and Innovation – to support activities which identify better ways of helping persons
prepare for or keep employment and be productive participants in the labour force.
Financial Data
2004-2005 Employment Insurance Plan
(millions of dollars)
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova Scotia
New Brunswick
Prince Edward Island
Quebec
Ontario
Manitoba
Saskatchewan
Alberta
Northwest Territories
Nunavut
British Columbia
Yukon
Pan-Canadian Responsibilitiesa
Funds available for Employment Benefits and
Support Measures
Base
Re-Investment
Total Plan
57.8
50.9
50.1
16.2
348.1
340.6
37.7
29.1
74.3
2.0
1.7
139.6
2.0
1,150.0
73.1
30.3
42.1
10.0
248.1
184.1
10.2
9.9
35.9
1.6
1.0
151.7
2.0
800.0
130.9
81.2
92.2
26.2
596.2
524.7
47.9
39.0
110.2
3.5
2.6
291.3
4.0
1,950.0
237.2
0.0
237.2
1,387.2
800.0
2,187.2
a. Funds earmarked for Pan-Canadian priorities, such as Aboriginal programming, youth programming, sectoral and innovations
projects. The amount is net of $12.8M funds converted into HRSDC operating costs.
For 2004-2005, the EI Part II expenditure authority of $2.2 billion represents 0.57% of total estimated
insurable earnings of $382.876 billion. This represents a lower level of expenditures than the 0.8% ceiling
imposed under the Act, which is estimated at $3.06 billion.
Some of the savings from Part I income benefits generated by the EI reform are included in these funds to
provide job opportunities and help Canadians get back to work more quickly. The amount of
re-investment reached maturity at $800 million in 2000-2001.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
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HRSDC • Annex 10
Expected Results
An accountability framework has been developed that respects the legal responsibility of the Minister of
Human Resources and Skills Development for the EI Account. Key indicators will measure both the
short and long term outcomes of EBSMs.
It is expected that 393,000 active claimants and an estimated 75,000 former claimants will be assisted in
2004-2005. These estimates may change, depending on labour market conditions and agreements
achieved with provinces and territories.
EBSM (EI Part II Activities)
Clients Employed/
Self-employed
200,828
Unpaid Benefits
($M)
$657.97M
Actual Results 2002-2003
221,943b
$814.52Mb
392,644c
Targeted Results 2003-2004
210,059
$752.09M
353,609
Forecasted Results 2003-2004
222,792
$851.94M
392,598
Anticipated Results 2004-2005
223,000
$852.00M
393,000
Targeted Results 2002-2003
Active Claimants
Assisted
295,272a
Note:
1. Exclusive of Employment Information Services and Pan-Canadian results.
2. The targeted results for Clients Employed and Unpaid Benefits for 2002-2003 and 2003-2004 are the totals as submitted by
the regions, provinces and territories. However, the target for Active Claimants Served is the result of a combination of
targets received from the regions plus 80% of Quebec’s target for EI Clients Served. The Quebec agreement requires that
the province report on the number of EI clients served.
3. Forecasted Results for 2003-2004 are based on historical data and the most current 2003-2004 data. As a result of SARS,
BSE and issues surrounding softwood lumber, some jurisdictions used a conservative approach to target setting. Further,
data capture continued to improve. As such, the forecasted results are higher than the targets submitted by provinces and
territories.
4. The 2004-2005 Anticipated Results are national projections developed by NHQ (based on historical client and program
data) that assume a pattern of results similar to that observed in the previous year. A further target setting exercise will be
undertaken with provinces/territories and regions in March and April of 2004.
Explanation of Variances:
a. This number differs slightly from the 299,000 active clients served which appeared in the EI Expenditure Plan for
2003-2004. This is the result of a target submission from New Brunswick which represented 65% of all EI clients served.
At the time of the 2003-2004 submission the target for New Brunswick was based on historical information which showed
that 80% of EI clients served were active.
b. Actual results for “Employed” and “Unpaid Benefits” are higher than that which was targeted. This variance relates to
robust labour market performance during the reporting period. In addition, some provinces used a conservative approach to
target setting.
c. Active Claimants Served exceeded the established target as a result of an increase in the number of regular claims
established when compared to the previous year. This increase relates to improved data capture and a change to
Employment Group Services which acted to increase the number of active EI claimants served. In addition, some provinces
used a conservative approach to target setting.
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2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 10
Of the thirteen formative evaluations scheduled to take place, twelve are completed. A formative/
summative evaluation of the Nunavut LMDA is underway and planned for completion by fiscal
2004-2005. Summative evaluations of the LMDAs, which will provide reliable and valid information
concerning a program’s impacts and effectiveness, are near completion in three provinces, namely
British Columbia, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Quebec (in Quebec, the province is leading the
evaluation, in consultation with HRSDC). General findings of these studies will be published in the 2003
Employment Insurance Monitoring and Assessment Report. Summative evaluations are well underway in
Ontario, Alberta, and Saskatchewan. Findings for these evaluations will be due in fiscal 2004-2005.
The process will be launched in the Northwest Territories and the Yukon in early 2004. The remaining
provinces/territories have begun early discussions and hope to have completed evaluations by 2005.
The Medium-Term Indicator (MTI) pilot project has completed a first phase in British Columbia.
The MTI pilot is designed to test the feasibility of using operational data to monitor and report on EBSM
effectiveness on an ongoing basis. Preliminary findings of this project will also be reported in the
Monitoring and Assessment Report. A second pilot project has commenced in Alberta. This project
continues to support the department’s commitment to monitor and report upon the effectiveness of EBSM
programs delivered under the LMDAs.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
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HRSDC • Annex 11
Annex 11: Loans (Non Budgetary)
Loans (Non Budgetary)
Authority
a
(millions of dollars)
Learning
Loans disbursed under the Canada Student Financial
Assistance Act
Total
(Restated)
2003-2004
b
Planned Spending
2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007
1,374.1
1,254.7
1,130.2
892.0
1,374.1
1,254.7
1,130.2
892.0
a.
Restated authority as a result of December 12, 2003 restructure of HRDC into SDC and HRSDC.
b.
The reduction in the planned spending for the loans is due to the impact of loan reimbursements from borrowers on the
loan portfolio.
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HRSDC • Annex 12
Annex 12: Consolidated Report on Canada Student Loans
In August 2000, the Canada Student Loans Program (CSLP) was shifted from the risk-shared financing
arrangements that had been in place with financial institutions between 1995 and July 2000 to a direct
student loan financing plan.a
This meant that the Program had to redesign the delivery mechanism in order to directly finance student
loans. In the new arrangement, the Government of Canada provides the necessary funding to students and
two service providers have contracts to administer the loans.
It also meant that the Program had to enter into interim contracts with the former risk-shared loan lenders
in order to ensure uninterrupted delivery of federal student financial assistance until the Direct Loans
program could be fully implemented. These contracts ended February 28, 2001.
Reporting Entity
The entity detailed in this report is the Canada Student Loans Program only and does not include
departmental operations related to the delivery of the CSLP. Expenditures in the figures are primarily
statutory in nature, made under the authority of the Canada Student Loans Act and the Canada Student
Financial Assistance Act.
Basis of Accounting
The financial figures are prepared in accordance with accounting policies and concepts generally accepted
in Canada and as reflected in the Public Sector Accounting Handbook of the Canadian Institute of
Chartered Accountants.
Specific Accounting Policies
Revenues
Two sources of revenue are reported: interest revenue on Direct Loans and recoveries on Guaranteed and
Put Back Loans. Government accounting practices require that recoveries from both sources be credited
to the government’s Consolidated Revenue Fund. They do not appear along with the expenditures in the
CSLP accounts, but are reported separately in the financial statements of Human Resources and Skills
Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Government.
•
Interest Revenue on Direct Loans – Student borrowers are required to pay simple interest on their
student loans once they leave full-time studies. At the time they leave school, students have the option
of selecting a variable (prime + 2.5%) or fixed (prime + 5%) interest rate. The amounts in the figures
represent the interest accrued on the outstanding balance of the government-owned Direct Loans.
Borrowers continue to pay the interest accruing on the guaranteed and risk-shared loans directly to the
private lender holding these loans.
•
Recoveries on Guaranteed Loans – The government reimburses the private lenders for any loans
issued prior to August 1, 1995 that go into default (i.e., lenders claim any amount of principal and
interest not repaid in full). The amounts in the figures represent the recovery of principal and interest
on these defaulted loans.
•
Recoveries on Put-back Loans – Under the risk-shared agreements, the government will purchase
from the participating financial institutions any loans issued between August 1, 1995 to July 31, 2000
that are in default of payments for at least twelve months after the period of study, that in aggregate,
do not exceed 3% of the average monthly balance of the lender's outstanding student loans in
a
For further information on the Canada Student Loans Program, see
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/cslp.shtml
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
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HRSDC • Annex 12
repayments. The amount paid is set at 5% of the value of the loans in question. The recoveries
amounts in the figures represent the recovery of principal and interest on these loans.
Canada Study Grants
Canada Study Grants improve access to post-secondary education by providing non-repayable
financial assistance to post-secondary students with particularly high levels of need. Five types of
grants are available to assist: (1) students with permanent disabilities in order to meet disabilityrelated educational expenses (up to $8,000 annually); (2) students with dependants
(up to $3,120 annually); (3) high-need part-time students (up to $1,200 annually); (4) women in
certain fields of Ph.D. studies (up to $3,000 annually for up to three years); and (5) high-need
students with permanent disabilities (up to $2,000 annually).
Collection Costs
These amounts represent the cost of using private collection agencies to collect defaulted Canada
Student Loans. The loans being collected include: risk-shared and guaranteed loans that have gone
into default and for which the government has reimbursed the private lender; and Direct Loans issued
after July 31, 2000, that are returned to HRSDC by the third party service provider as having
defaulted.
Interim Arrangements
As noted in the introduction to this section, interim contracts were entered into with the former riskshared loan lenders to disburse full-time Direct Loans on the government’s behalf until
February 28, 2001. At that time, the government reimbursed the lenders 85% of the loan principal they
had advanced during the interim period. The remaining 15% was reimbursed to the lenders later. These
contracts also called for remuneration in the form of transaction fees and the interest on funds advanced
on behalf of the government. Another contract was entered into with Canada Post for the delivery of
Direct Loans to part-time students. The Interest Cost to Financial Institutions (Interim) and Transition
fees to Financial Institutions (Interim) items identify the cost of these interim arrangements.
•
Interest Cost to Financial Institutions (Interim) – This expense represents the interest costs,
calculated at prime, paid by CSLP on a monthly basis to the lending institutions on the outstanding
advances made to full-time students with Direct Loans.
•
Transition Fees to Financial Institutions (Interim) – This expense represents the cost of
transaction fees paid by CSLP during the interim period for each fully completed full-time loan made
to the student by the participating lending institutions. Transition fees also include payments made to
Canada Post for each fully completed part-time loan made during the interim period. The cost is
calculated on the basis of certificates of eligibility negotiated by the student.
Service Bureau Costs
As of March 1, 2001, CSLP uses third party service providers to administer Direct Loans disbursement,
in-study loan management and post-studies repayment activities. This item represents the cost associated
with these contracted services.
Risk Premium
Risk premium represents part of the remuneration offered to lending institutions participating in the riskshared program from August 1, 1995 to July 31, 2000. The risk premium was 5% of the value of loans
being consolidated (normally the value of loans issued to students), being calculated and paid at the time
students leave studies and go into repayment. In return, the lenders assumed risk associated with nonrepayment of these loans.
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2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 12
Put-Back
Subject to the provisions of the contracts with lending institutions, the government will purchase from a
lender the student loans that are in default of payment for at least twelve months and that, in aggregate, do
not exceed 3% of the average monthly balance of the lender’s outstanding student loans in repayments.
The amount paid is set at 5% of the value of the loans in question. The figures also include any refund
made to participating financial institutions on the recoveries.
Administrative Fees to Provinces and Territories
Pursuant to the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act (CSFA Act), the government has entered into
arrangements with participating provinces and Yukon Territory to facilitate the administration of the
CSLP. They administer the application and needs assessment activities associated with federal student
financial assistance and in return they are paid an administrative fee.
In-Study Interest Borrowing Expense
The capital needed to issue the Direct Loans is raised through the Department of Finance’s general
financing activities. The cost of borrowing this capital is recorded in the Department of Finance’s overall
financing operations. The amounts in the figures represent the cost attributed to CSLP in support of Direct
Loans while students are considered in study status.
In Repayment Interest Borrowing Expense
The capital needed to issue the Direct Loans is raised through the Department of Finance’s general
financing activities. The cost of borrowing this capital is recorded in the Department of Finance’s overall
financing operations. The amounts in the figures represent the cost of interest while students are in
repayment of their Canada Student Loans.
In-Study Interest Subsidy
A central feature of federal student assistance is that student borrowers are not required to pay the interest
on their student loans as long as they are in full-time study and, in the case of loans negotiated prior to
August 1, 1993, for six months after the completion of studies. Under the guaranteed and risk-shared
programs, the Government paid the interest to the lending institutions on behalf of the student.
Interest Relief
Assistance may be provided to cover loan interest for up to 54 months for borrowers who have
difficulty repaying their loans. The shift from Guaranteed and Risk-Shared Loans to Direct Loans did
not alter interest relief for loans in distress from the borrower's perspective; however, the method of
recording associated costs changed. For loans issued prior to August 1, 2000, CSLP compensates
lending institutions for lost interest equal to the accrued interest amount on loans under interest
relief. For loans issued after August 1, 2000, an interest relief expense is recorded to offset the
accrued interest on direct loans.
Debt Reduction in Repayment
Debt Reduction in Repayment (DRR) assists borrowers in severe financial hardship. DRR is a federal
repayment assistance program through which the Government of Canada reduces a qualifying student’s
outstanding Canada Student Loans principal to an affordable amount after all other interest relief
measures are exhausted. The maximum amount of the reduction is $10,000 or 50% of the loan principal,
whichever is less. For loans issued prior to August 1, 2000, CSLP pays the lending institutions the
amount of student debt principal reduced by the Government of Canada under DRR. For loans issued
after August 1, 2000, the Government of Canada forgives a portion of the loan principal.
Claims Paid and Loans Forgiven
From the beginning of the program in 1964 until July 31, 1995, the Government fully guaranteed all loans
issued to students by private lenders. The Government reimburses private lenders for any of these loans
that go into default (i.e., lenders claim any amount of principal and interest not repaid in full, after which
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
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HRSDC • Annex 12
the department of Social Development Canada’s Collection Services will attempt to recover
these amounts).b The risk-shared arrangements also permitted loans issued from August 1, 1995 to
July 31, 2000 to be guaranteed under specific circumstances. This item represents the costs associated
with loan guarantees.
Pursuant to the Canada Student Loans Act and the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act, the
government incurs the full amount of the unpaid principal plus accrued interest in the event of the death
of the borrower or if the borrower becomes permanently disabled and cannot repay the loan without
undue hardship.
Bad Debt Expense
Under Direct Loans, the government owns the loans issued to students and must record them as assets. As
a result, Generally Accepted Accounting Principles require a provision be made for potential future losses
associated with these loans. The provision must be made in the year the loans are issued even though the
losses may occur many years later. The amounts in the figures represent the annual expense against the
provisions for Bad Debt and Debt Reduction in Repayment on Direct Loans.
Alternative Payments to Non-participating Provinces
Provinces and territories may choose not to participate in the CSLP. These provinces and territories
receive an alternative payment to assist in the cost of delivering a similar student financial assistance
program.
Commitments
As at March 31, 2004 the department had the following commitments for Service Provider contracts:
$76.6 million. The current end date for the Service Provider contracts is February 28, 2005.
b
An announcement was made on December 12, 2003 which split Human Resources Development Canada into two new
departments – Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and Social Development Canada (SDC). It was
subsequently determined that collection services would be shared between the two departments and housed in SDC.
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2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 12
Consolidated Canada Student Loans Programs – Financial Tables
Consolidated CSL Programs – Combined Programs
Actual
Planned Spending
Actual
2001-2002
2002-2003
2003-2004
Total Revenues
44.2
123.7
4.2
172.1
103.9
111.1
7.7
222.7
174.3
91.3
9.6
275.2
226.8
93.5
12.5
332.8
308.6
84.7
16.3
409.6
390.9
75.6
21.4
487.9
Total Transfer Payments
69.7
69.7
54.5
54.5
66.8
66.8
79.8
79.8
126.4
126.4
131.2
131.2
(millions of dollars)
2004-2005
2005-2006
e
2006-2007
Revenues
Interest Revenue on Direct Loans
Recoveries on Guaranteed Loans
Recoveries on Put-Back Loans
Expenses
Transfer Payments
Canada Study Grants
Loan Administration
Collection Costs
Interim Arrangements
- Interest Costs to Financial Institutions
- Transition Fees to Financial Institutions
Service Bureau Costs
Risk Premium
Put-Back
Administrative Fees to Provinces and Territories
Total Loan Administration Expenses
14.3
12.8
13.4
12.5
13.7
14.5
13.7
0.3
27.9
51.0
2.7
9.0
118.9
0.0
0.0
41.2
23.0
5.8
8.4
91.3
0.0
0.0
41.0
11.7
4.3
8.8
79.2
0.0
0.0
83.3
10.6
13.0
9.6
129.0
0.0
0.0
104.0
6.5
15.4
15.6
155.2
0.0
0.0
127.3
3.7
18.6
15.6
179.7
Cost of Government Support
Benefits Provided to Students
a
In-Study Interest Borrowing Expense (Class A)
a
In Repayment Interest Borrowing Expense (Class B)
In-Study Interest Subsidy
105.7
12.7
77.8
138.6
41.3
39.8
148.6
68.1
27.4
163.9
140.2
14.1
176.7
189.2
6.9
185.4
239.9
2.7
86.5
4.2
76.0
74.6
7.4
40.7
73.8
10.7
34.8
54.4
8.7
24.0
63.2
9.8
16.1
67.3
11.1
11.5
10.6
171.4
10.8
175.7
11.5
193.3
12.0
194.3
12.1
195.0
12.0
194.0
544.9
733.5
561.4
144.9
706.3
529.0
674.7
451.9
76.0
527.9
568.2
714.2
439.0
244.8
683.8
611.6
820.4
487.6
127.2
614.8
669.0
950.6
541.0
132.9
673.9
723.9
1,034.8
546.9
137.2
684.1
b
Interest Relief
Debt Reduction in Repayment
Claims Paid & Loans Forgiven
Bad Debt Expense
c
Debt Reduction in Repayment Expense
Bad Debt Expense
Total Cost of Government Support Expenses
Total Expenses
Net Operating Results
d
Alternative Payments to Non-Participating Provinces
Final Operating Results
a
b
c
d
e
These costs are related to Canada Student Direct Loans but reported by the Department of Finance.
The 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 actuals are restated to reflect the change of valuation accounting method of the Interest
Relief allowance.
This represents the annual expense against the Provisions for Bad Debt and Debt Reduction in Repayment as required under
Accrual Accounting. The Bad Debt Expense figure for 2002-2003 has been revised (from $173.8M to $175.7M) to include
the expense against the Provision on Outstanding Interest on Impaired Loans, which is in accordance with the Actuarial
Report on CSLP.
For 2003-2004, the total amount disbursed as Alternative Payments is $160.0M only. Starting in 2003-2004, the
corresponding accrual ($84.8M) is now recorded at the departmental level instead, as in the past, being recorded centrally.
This change in methodology explains the increase of the expenditure shown for that fiscal year.
The 2005-06 and 2006-07 planned spending figures include the incremental costs related to the Budget 2004
announcements, which measures are expected to be effective August 1, 2005.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
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HRSDC • Annex 12
Consolidated CSL Programs – Risk Shared and Guaranteed Loans Only
Actual
Actual
(millions of dollars)
Revenue
Recoveries on Guaranteed Loans
Recoveries on Put-Back Loans
Total Revenues
Expenses
Transfer Payments
Canada Study Grants
Total Transfer Payments
Planned Spending
2001-2002
2002-2003
2003-2004
2004-2005
123.7
4.2
127.9
111.1
7.7
118.8
91.3
9.6
100.9
93.5
12.5
106.0
N/A
0.0
N/A
0.0
N/A
0.0
N/A
0.0
2005-2006 2006-2007
84.7
16.3
101.0
N/A
0.0
75.6
21.4
97.0
N/A
0.0
Loan Administration
Collection Costs
Risk Premium
Put-Back
Administrative Fees to Provinces and Territories
Total Loan Administration Expenses
14.3
51.0
2.7
0.0
68.0
12.0
23.0
5.8
0.0
40.8
9.3
11.7
4.3
0.0
25.3
9.0
10.6
13.0
0.0
32.6
8.6
6.5
15.4
0.0
30.5
8.2
3.7
18.6
0.0
30.5
Cost of Government Support
Benefits Provided to Students
In-Study Interest Subsidy
Interest Relief
Debt Reduction in Repayment
Claims Paid & Loans Forgiven
77.8
85.6
4.2
76.0
39.8
65.3
7.4
40.0
27.4
53.8
10.7
33.3
14.1
27.0
8.7
21.4
6.9
20.4
9.8
12.6
2.7
12.2
11.1
7.0
243.6
311.6
183.7
110.0
293.7
152.6
193.4
74.6
0.0
74.6
125.2
150.5
49.6
0.0
49.6
71.2
103.8
(2.2)
0.0
(2.2)
49.7
80.2
(20.8)
0.0
(20.8)
33.0
63.5
(33.5)
0.0
(33.5)
Total Cost of Government Support Expenses
Total Expenses
Net Statutory Operating Results
Alternative Payments to Non-Participating Provinces
Final Statutory Operating Results
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2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 12
Consolidated CSL Programs – Direct Loans Only
Actual
Actual
Planned Spending
e
2001-2002
2002-2003
2003-2004
2004-2005
Total Revenue
44.2
44.2
103.9
103.9
174.3
174.3
226.8
226.8
308.6
308.6
390.9
390.9
Total Transfer Payments
69.7
69.7
54.5
54.5
66.8
66.8
79.8
79.8
126.4
126.4
131.2
131.2
0.0
0.8
4.1
3.5
5.1
6.3
13.7
0.3
27.9
9.0
50.9
0.0
0.0
41.2
8.4
50.5
0.0
0.0
41.0
8.8
53.9
0.0
0.0
83.3
9.6
96.4
0.0
0.0
104.0
15.6
124.7
0.0
0.0
127.3
15.6
149.2
105.7
12.7
138.6
41.3
148.6
68.1
163.9
140.2
176.7
189.2
185.4
239.9
0.9
-
9.3
0.7
20.0
1.5
27.4
2.6
42.8
3.5
55.1
4.5
10.6
171.4
10.8
175.7
11.5
193.3
12.0
194.3
12.1
195.0
12.0
194.0
301.3
421.9
377.7
34.9
412.6
376.3
481.3
377.4
76.0
453.4
443.0
563.7
389.4
244.8
634.2
540.4
716.6
489.8
127.2
617.0
619.3
870.4
561.8
132.9
694.7
690.9
971.3
580.4
137.2
717.6
(millions of dollars)
2005-2006 2006-2007
Revenue
Interest Revenue on Direct Loans
Expenses
Transfer Payments
Canada Study Grants
Loan Administration
Collection Costs
Interim Arrangements
- Interest Costs to Financial Institutions
- Transition Fees to Financial Institutions
Service Bureau Costs
Administrative Fees to Provinces and Territories
Total Loan Administration Expenses
Cost of Government Support
Benefits Provided to Students
a
In-Study Interest Borrowing Expense (Class A)
a
In Repayment Interest Borrowing Expense (Class B)
b
Interest Relief
Claim Payments and Loans Forgiven
c
Bad Debt Expense
Debt Reduction in Repayment Expense
Bad Debt Expense
Total Cost of Government Support Expenses
Total Expenses
Net Operating Results
d
Alternative Payments to Non-Participating Provinces
Final Operating Results
a
b
c
d
e
These costs are related to Canada Student Direct Loans but reported by the Department of Finance.
The 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 actuals are restated to reflect the change of valuation accounting method of the Interest
Relief allowance.
This represents the annual expense against the Provisions for Bad Debt and Debt Reduction in Repayment as required under
Accrual Accounting. The Bad Debt Expense figure for 2002-2003 has been revised (from $173.8M to $175.7M) to include
the expense against the Provision on Outstanding Interest on Impaired Loans, which is in accordance with the Actuarial
Report on CSLP.
For 2003-2004, the total amount disbursed as Alternative Payments is $160.0M only. Starting in 2003-2004, the
corresponding accrual ($84.8M) is now recorded at the departmental level instead, as in the past, being recorded centrally.
This change in methodology explains the increase of the expenditure shown for that fiscal year.
The 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 planned spending figures include the incremental costs related to the Budget 2004
announcements, which measures are expected to be effective August 1, 2005.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 103
HRSDC • Annex 13
Annex 13: Major Regulatory Initiatives
Strategic Outcome:
Efficient and Effective Income Support and Labour Market Transitions
Regulations
Planned Results
Employment Insurance (EI) Regulation 89 Social Insurance Number (SIN)
•
By December 2004, an amendment to EI Regulation 89 to
recognize the use of 900-series SIN for purposes of the
payment of EI benefits to which claimants are legally
entitled, despite being out of Canada.
Employment Insurance Regulations 79 and
85(2) -Appeals to Boards of Referees and to
the Umpire
•
By March 2005, an amendment to EI Regulations 79 and
85(2) to allow appeals to Boards of Referees and to the
Umpire to be filed in locations other than the HRSDC local
offices that issue the decision being appealed.
New EI Regulation 55.1 – PIPEDA and EI
voluntary verification programs.
•
By October 2004, an addition to the EI regulation to reflect
the impact of PIPEDA on requests sent to employers for
personal information on employees for purposes of EI
voluntary verification programs.
EI Collection of Premiums Regulation 10
Impact of Tax Court decision in the case of an
appellant, Ms. Mulvena on the insurability of
payments under employer paid Supplemental
Unemployment Benefit Plans (SUB).
•
By March 2005, an amendment to EI Collection of
Premiums Regulation 10 to more clearly state the, longunderstood, exemption of employer SUB payments from
earnings to be considered insurable earnings.
Modernization of Benefits and Obligations Act
•
By March 2005, the EI Regulations will be amended so that
parental benefits can be made available to common-law
couples where one adopts the child of the other (step-parents
adoptions) whether the couple are common-law partners of
the opposite sex or same sex.
Page 104
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 13
Strategic Outcome:
Through Access to Learning, Canadians Can Participate Fully in a Knowledge-Based
Economy and Society
Regulations
Planned Results
Debt Reduction in Repayment
Debt Reduction in Repayment (DRR) is a debt
management measure which provides students who are
experiencing long-term financial difficulty in repaying
their student loans with a reduction in loan principal.
The 2004 Federal Budget announced an increase in the
total amount available for reduction under DRR from
$20,000 to $26,000.
•
To provide more assistance for borrowers who are
experiencing exceptional long-term financial
difficulties in repaying their student loans.
•
To coincide with increased loan limits announced in
the 2004 Federal Budget.
•
An increase in loan limits will decrease financial
barriers to post-secondary study, respond to the
rising costs of post-secondary education, help meet
current unfunded financial need and help reduce
reliance on costly private borrowing.
•
To strengthen assistance for low and middle income
families that wish to save for their children’s postsecondary education.
•
To ensure a guaranteed source of savings for the
post-secondary education of children from lowincome families.
Amendments to the Canada Student Financial
Assistance Regulations and the Canada Student Loans
Regulations are required to implement this
announcement.
Weekly Loan Limits
The 2004 Federal Budget announced an increase in
federal weekly loan limits under the Canada Student
Loans Program, from the current $165 per week to
$210 per week. An amendment to section 10 of the
Canada Student Financial Assistance Regulations is
required to implement this announcement.
Canada Education Savings Grant
The Canada Education Savings Grant is a 20%
matching grant paid on education savings made in a
registered education savings plan for a child under 18.
The 2004 Federal Budget announced increases to the
match rate on the first $500 of annual savings to 40%
for low-income families and to 30% for middle income
families.
Amendments to the Canada Education Savings Grant
Regulations are required to implement this
announcement. They are likely to be combined with
new regulations for the Canada Learning Bond
(below).
Canada Learning Bond
The Canada Learning Bond is a new initiative
announced in the 2004 Federal Budget which provides
up to $2.000 of education savings over 16 years for
low-income families. New regulations will be required
to implement this announcement. They will likely be
combined with the Canada Education Savings Grant
Regulations above.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 105
HRSDC • Annex 13
Regulations
Planned Results
New Canada Study Grant
The 2004 Federal Budget announced that the Canada
Student Loans Program would provide a new nonrepayable grant for first-time, first-year students from
low-income families who are entering post-secondary
education. Regulatory amendments to Part VI of the
Canada Student Financial Assistance Regulations are
required in order to introduce this new grant.
Canada Study Grant for High-need Students with
Permanent Disabilities
The 2004 Federal Budget announced that the current
Canada Study Grant for High-need Students with
Permanent Disabilities will be replaced with a new upfront non-repayable access grant for post-secondary
students with permanent disabilities.
•
This grant will provide incentives for students from
low-income families to participate in postsecondary education, decrease barriers to postsecondary studies, and offset the costs of tuition
incurred in the first year of study.
•
This grant will also align post-secondary education
policy with Canada’s broader social policy via the
provision of targeted assistance to students who
need additional support.
•
The new access grant for post-secondary students
with permanent disabilities will provide increased
incentive to students with permanent disabilities to
participate in post-secondary studies, decrease
financial barriers, reduce reliance on student loans,
and provide targeted assistance to those who need
additional support.
•
Ensure that adequate funding is available to the
provinces for the provision of Canada Study Grants
to eligible students.
•
These measures will assist in simplifying the
administrative requirements for borrowers and will
lead to a better understanding of their loan
obligations and responsibilities.
Regulatory amendments to the Canada Student
Financial Assistance Regulations are required in order
to introduce this new grant.
Provincial Allocation Formula for Canada Study
Grants
Regulatory amendments to the Canada Student
Financial Assistance Regulations are required to
amend the provincial allocation formula for funding
Canada Study Grants.
Harmonization Activities for Integration Agreements
Regulatory amendments to the Canada Student
Financial Assistance Regulations are required to
harmonize across all loan regimes Permanent
Disability Benefit criteria, recognition of provincial
restrictions, providing more flexibility on time frames
to confirm enrolment and adjusting the requirement for
prescribed documents.
Page 106
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 13
Strategic Outcome:
Safe, Healthy, Fair, Stable, Cooperative and Productive Workplaces
Regulations
Planned Results
Canada Labour Code, Part II – Canada Occupational
Health and Safety Regulations (COHSR).
This will fulfill the Labour Program’s obligation to
make regulations prescribing steps to prevent and
protect against violence in the workplace.
Violence in the Workplace: Regulations are being
developed as a result of the September 2000
amendments to Part II.
Canada Labour Code, Part II – Canada Occupational
Health and Safety Regulations.
This will fulfill the Labour Program’s obligation to
make regulations for a prescribed program for the
prevention of hazards in the workplace.
Prevention Program Regulations are being developed
as a result of the September 2000 amendments to
Part II.
Canada Labour Code, Part II – Canada Occupational
Health and Safety Regulations.
This will fulfill the Labour Program’s obligation to
make regulations to prescribe ergonomics standards in
workplaces.
Ergonomics standards are being developed as a result
of the September 2000 amendments to Part II.
Canada Labour Code, Part II – Safety and Health
Committees and Representatives Regulations.
Amending the existing regulations to bring them up to
date with the September 2000 amendments to Part II.
Canada Labour Code, Part II – Aviation Occupational
Safety and Health Regulations.
This will bring the existing regulations up to date with
the Code amendments pertaining to policy committees,
training of health and safety committee members, and
with the terminology of the amended Code.
This will bring the existing regulations up to date with
the COHSR and with current standards and work
practices in the aviation industry.
Working in concert with Transport Canada to amend
the existing regulations.
Canada Labour Code, Part II – Onboard Trains
Occupational Safety and Health Regulations.
This will bring the existing regulations up to date with
the COHSR and with current standards and work
practices in the rail industry.
Working in concert with Transport Canada to amend
the existing regulations.
Canada Labour Code, Part II – Marine Occupational
Safety and Health Regulations.
This will bring the existing regulations up to date with
the COHSR and with current standards and work
practices in the marine industry.
Working in concert with Transport Canada to amend
the existing regulations.
Canada Labour Code, Part II – Oil and Gas
Occupational Safety and Health Regulations.
This will bring the existing regulations up to date with
the COHSR and with current standards and work
practices in the oil and gas industry.
Working in concert with the National Energy Board to
amend the existing regulations.
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 107
HRSDC • Annex 13
Regulations
Planned Results
Employment Equity Act -- Employment Equity
Regulations.
In the process of updating and making consequential
changes that will:
•
update the census Metropolitan Areas to 2002
Statistics Canada publication;
•
update the National Occupational Classification to
the 2001 codes;
•
introduce the North American Industry
Classification System; and
•
make administrative and consequential changes
(i.e. changing dates and department name).
Statutory Instrument: Minister of Labour will be asked
to make a Ministerial Order pursuant to the Personal
Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act.
Following the Ministerial Order amending Schedule 2 of
that Act, a federally-regulated employer will be
authorized to issue to employees a pay statement using
electronic means.
Canada Labour Code, Part III – Canada Labour
Standards Regulations.
Following the regulatory amendment, Bell Canada and
Canadian Pacific Limited will have their own distinct
lists of industrial establishments for the purpose of
group termination.
Page 108
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Annex 14
Annex 14: Horizontal Initiatives
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is the lead on the following horizontal initiatives.
A Horizontal Results Database detailing each initiative is available at the following internet address:
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/eppi-ibdrp/hrdb-rhbd/profil_e.asp
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy
Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership Program
Youth Employment Strategy
Labour Market Development Agreements
Sector Council Program
Foreign Credential Recognition
Older Workers Pilot Projects Initiative
Canada Student Loans Program
National Literacy Program
National Homelessness Initiative
Service Canada
Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 109
HRSDC • Website References
Website References
HRSDC Website
http://www.hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
The Honourable Joseph Volpe, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
http://www1.hrsdc.gc.ca/menu/home.shtml
The Honourable Joseph Frank Fontana
Minister of Labour and Housing
http://www.pm.gc.ca/eng/bio.asp?id=29
The Honourable Claudette Bradshaw
Minister of State (Human Resources Development)
http://www.pm.gc.ca/eng/bio.asp?id=20
Acts and Regulations Governing Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and
Social Development Canada
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/fas/as/contact/acts.shtml
HRSDC Overview
¾ Speech from the Throne, February 2, 2004
http://www.news.gc.ca/cfmx/CCP/view/en/index.cfm?articleid=76349&categoryid=4
¾ The Budget Speech 2004
http://www.fin.gc.ca/budget04/speech/speeche.htm
¾ Statistics Canada, The Daily, October 30, 2002
¾ HRSDC Programs and Services
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/ps.shtml
¾ About HRSDC
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/comm/hrsd/about_us.shtml
Efficient and Effective Income Support and Labour Market Transitions
¾ Employment Insurance Benefits
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/ei.shtml
¾ Employment Benefits and Support Measures
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/gc.shtml
¾ Labour Market Development Agreements
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/eppi-ibdrp/hrdb-rhbd/h004_e.asp
¾ Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy
http://www17.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/ARO-BRA/ARO.cfm
http://www.socialunion.gc.ca/ecd_e.html
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/english/media/releases/2002/2002_72bk.htm
¾ Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships
http://www17.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/ARO-BRA/ARO.cfm
¾ Youth Employment Strategy
http://www.youth.gc.ca
¾ Official Language Minority Communities
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/solmc.shtml
¾ Work Sharing
http://www.hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca/en/epb/sid/cia/grants/ws/desc_ws.shtml
Page 110
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
HRSDC • Website References
Enhanced Competitiveness of Canadian Workplaces by Supporting Investment in and Recognition
and Utilization of Skills
¾ The Sector Council Program
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/spi.shtml
¾ National Occupation Classification
http://www23.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/2001/e/generic/welcome.shtml
¾ Apprenticeship and Labour Mobility Initiatives
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/almi.shtml
¾ The Foreign Worker Program
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/fw.shtml
¾ Labour Market Information
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/lmi.shtml
Through Access to Learning, Canadians Can Participate Fully in a Knowledge-Based Economy and
Society
¾ Student Financial Assistance (Canada Student Loans Program)
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/topics/cxp-gxr.shtml
http://www.canlearn.ca
¾ Canada Education Savings Grant
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/topics/cgs-gxr.shtml
¾ National Literacy Program
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/topics/lxa-gxr.shtml
¾ Learning Initiatives Program
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/topics/lxi-gxr.shtml
¾ International Academic Mobility
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/iam.shtml
¾ Office of Learning Technologies
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/hip/lld/olt/01_index.shtml
Safe, Healthy, Fair, Stable, Cooperative and Productive Workplaces
¾ The Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/asp/gateway.asp?hr=/en/lp/fmcs/02About.shtml&hs=mxm
¾ National Labour Operations
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/program/labour.shtml
¾ International Labour Affairs
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/business/cluster/category/ilaa.shtml
¾ Work-life Balance and Ageing Workforce
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/topics/wnc-gxr.shtml
Enhanced Community Capacity to Contribute to the Reduction of Homelessness
¾ The National Homelessness Initiative
http://www.homelessness.gc.ca/home/index_e.asp
Questions and Public Enquiries
If you have questions about departmental programs and services, you may contact your nearest Human
Resource Centre of Canada office listed in the Government of Canada pages of the telephone book or
through the HRSDC website at http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/our_offices.shtml.
To obtain HRSDC publications, please contact the Public Enquiries Centre at
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/left_nav/publications.shtml
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
Page 111
HRSDC • Index
Index
A
Aboriginal 14, 19, 20, 22, 25, 29, 32, 37, 40, 47, 49, 50, 51,
52, 55, 56, 58, 59, 60, 64, 65, 74, 92, 93, 109, 110
Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy
20,
29, 49, 50, 51, 55, 59, 60, 64, 74, 109, 110
Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships 29, 49, 51,
59, 65, 74, 110
Active Employment Measures
28, 36, 55
B
Budget 2004 19, 29, 30, 31, 32, 34, 47, 48, 60, 64, 79, 80,
101, 103
Business Lines
11,14,27, 28, 41, 43
C
Canada Education Savings Grant 15, 19, 31, 38, 47, 48, 52,
76, 105, 111
Canada Labour Code
15, 32, 38, 56, 76, 77, 107, 108
Canada Student Loans 12, 15, 19, 31, 38, 39, 47, 48, 50, 76,
97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 105, 106, 109, 111
Canada Study Grants
98, 106
Canadian Council on Learning
47, 49, 73
Civil Service Insurance Fund
46, 49, 81, 91
Communities
20,25,29,32,33,39,58,59,60,63,64,65,
74,75,93
Conditional Grants
49,71
Corporate Risks
22
E
Employment Benefits and Support Measures
28, 39, 51,
57, 69, 74, 82, 84, 86, 87, 89, 92, 110
Employment Equity Act
15, 77, 108
Employment Insurance Account
48, 49, 82, 88, 89
Employment Insurance Benefits 14, 20, 28, 36, 43, 74,110
Employment Insurance Part II
50, 92
Expenditure Profile
45, 46
Expenditure Review
21,22,25,27,54,55
F
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service
Foundations
52, 76, 111
49, 71
G
Government Annuities Account
Grants and Contributions
46, 49, 81, 90
26,47,48,49,57,60
H
Health and Safety
77, 107
Homelessness
12, 14,15,20,24, 33, 39, 40, 43, 47,48,52,
56,58, 59, 77, 108,111
Horizontal Initiatives
50, 109
I
Income Support
International Academic Mobility
L
28,36,64,74, 104, 110
52, 76, 111
Labour Force
16, 17, 18,19,24,84,93
Labour Market Information
15,51, 75, 111
Labour Mobility
67,75, 111
Learning 15, 19, 31, 38, 39, 43, 47, 48, 52, 55, 58, 59, 71,
76, 105, 111
M
Major Regulatory Initiatives
50, 104
Management Practices
21, 23, 25
Mandate
11,14,20,22,27,35,40,54,55,64
Modernizing Services for Canadians
51
N
National Homelessness Initiative 24, 33, 39, 47, 48, 49, 50,
63, 77, 109, 111
National Literacy Program
49, 50, 58, 62, 76, 109, 111
O
Office of Learning Technologies
52, 76, 111
Official Language Minority Communities 29, 49, 51, 52,
60, 68, 75, 110
Official Languages
27,59, 60, 62, 75
Older Workers
17, 49, 50, 59, 70, 109
Organizational Effectiveness
20, 23, 27
Organizational Structure
44
P
Performance Measurement Framework
Peter Gzowski Foundation for Literacy
Plans and Priorities
Policy, Program and Service Delivery Support
35
71
20, 23
15, 34, 43
R
Risk
22, 26, 49, 54, 55, 98, 102
S
Sector Councils
15,30, 37,56, 66, 67,75
Service Delivery
11,12,14,53, 59, 60
Service Transformation
23, 25,54
Social Insurance Number
25, 26, 51, 104
Specified Purpose Accounts
49, 81
Strategic Outcomes
14, 23, 24,27,35,36,40,43,54
Students
19,38,72,76,97,98,99,100,105,106
Sustainable Development Strategy
40
T
Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative 12, 41, 42, 47,
50, 60, 109
Transfer Payments
45, 49, 57, 58
W
Workplace Skills
15, 24,30, 37, 43, 56,58, 59, 60
Y
Youth
15, 28, 36, 49, 50, 51, 59, 61, 75, 109, 110
Youth Employment Strategy 15, 28, 49, 50, 51, 59, 61, 75,
109, 110
Labour , 10, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 32, 38, 39, 40, 43,
50, 51, 52, 55, 58, 59, 66, 69, 74, 75, 77, 82, 86, 89, 92,
93, 104, 107, 108, 109, 111
Page 112
2004-2005 Report on Plans and Priorities
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