Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada
Public Safety and
Emergency Preparedness
Canada
Report on Plans and Priorities
2006-2007
The Honourable Stockwell Day , P.C., M.P
Minister of Public Safety
Table of Contents
Section I: Overview
The Minister’s Message
Management Representation Statement
Portfolio Overview
Portfolio Resource Summary
Portfolio of Public Safety
Departmental Organizational Chart
Summary Information
• Strategic Outcome
• Resource Summary
• Operating Environment
• RPP Plans and Priorities
• Management Priorities
• Contributing to Canada’s Performance
Section II: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome
Emergency Management and National Security
• Emergency Management Foundation
• Effective Emergency Management
• Strong National Security Framework
• Cyber Security
Policing, Law Enforcement and Interoperability
• Law Enforcement and Border Strategies
• Policing Policy
• Public Safety Interoperability
Community Safety and Partnerships
• Effective Corrections
• First Nations Policing Policy
• National Crime Prevention
Section III: Supplementary Information
Table 1: Departmental Planned Spending and Full Time Equivalent
Table 2: Program by Activity
Table 3: Voted and Statutory Items Listed in Main Estimates
Table 4: Services Received without Charge
Table 5: Resource Requirement by Branch or Sector
Table 6: Details of Transfer Payment Programs
Section IV: Other Items of Interest
Grant and Contribution Programs Administered by PSEPC
Sustainable Development Strategy
Legislation Administered by the Department and Portfolio Agencies
Contacts for Further Information
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SECTION I – OVERVIEW
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The Minister's Message
I am pleased to have this opportunity to provide Parliament with my first Report on Plans
and Priorities as Minister of Public Safety.
The Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is part of the Public
Safety Portfolio. The Portfolio also includes the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the
Canada Border Services Agency, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the
Correctional Service of Canada, the National Parole Board, and three review bodies.
Working collectively in an integrated fashion, the Department and the Portfolio Agencies
are dedicated to protecting Canadian families and their communities, to securing our
borders and to increasing our preparedness to address public emergencies.
To help meet these safety and security needs, in Budget 2006, the new Government
provided $1.4 billion over two years. This funding is being provided to the Portfolio for
such initiatives as increasing the number of police officers; preventing youth crime with a
focus on guns, gangs and drugs; arming border officers and eliminating "work-alone"
posts; and, enhancing our capacity to deal with catastrophes and other emergencies.
An additional focus will be on Canada’s relationship with the United States. A safe,
reliable and secure border is critical to Canada’s continued economic and social
prosperity. To this end, I will continue to work closely with my colleagues from the
United States and Mexico to implement the Security and Prosperity Partnership of North
America.
I am confident that the Public Safety Portfolio will continue to fulfill its mandate of
protecting Canadians from threats to their safety, while maintaining the rights and
freedoms on which our open society depends.
__________________________________________
The Honourable Stockwell Day, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety
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Management Representation Statement
I submit for tabling in Parliament, the 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP)
for Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada.
This document has been prepared based on the reporting principles contained in the
Guide to the preparation of Part III of the Estimates: Reports on Plans and Priorities.
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It adheres to the specific reporting requirements outlined in the TBS guidance;
•
It is based on the department’s approved Program Activity Architecture structure
as reflected in the MRRS;
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It presents consistent, comprehensive, balanced and reliable information;
•
It provides a basis of accountability for the results achieved with the resources
and authorities entrusted to it; and
•
It reports finances based on approved planned spending numbers from the
Treasury Board Secretariat.
______________________________________
Suzanne Hurtubise
Deputy Minister of Public Safety
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Portfolio Overview
The Public Safety portfolio is responsible within the Government of Canada for public
safety - policing and law enforcement, corrections and conditional release of federal
offenders, emergency management, national security, crime prevention and the
protection of Canada’s borders.
The Portfolio consists of the Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Canada and five agencies: the Canada Border Services Agency, the Canadian Security
Intelligence Service, the Correctional Service of Canada, the National Parole Board, and
the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
The Portfolio also includes three review bodies: the Commission for Public Complaints
Against the RCMP, the Office of the Correctional Investigator and the RCMP External
Review Committee.
The Portfolio’s organizations have just over 52,000 employees and a total annual budget
of over $6.0 billion. Each Portfolio agency, with the exception of CSIS, prepares an
individual Report on Plans and Priorities. Owing to national security concerns CSIS
does not publicly report on its plans and priorities, although information on the reports of
the other Portfolio Agencies can be found on each organization’s website.
The Department, Portfolio agencies and review bodies contribute individually and
collectively to the public safety agenda outlined in the 2006-2007 RPP.
•
The Department provides strategic policy advice in such areas as border security,
policing, and national law enforcement. It also delivers a broad range of national
emergency preparedness, critical infrastructure protection and community safety
programs. Additionally, the Department supports the Minister in all aspects of his
mandate, providing national public safety leadership and strategic direction to the
agencies while promoting the agencies’ accountability to the Minister. Also situated
within the Department is the Office of the Inspector General of CSIS, which does
internal audits of CSIS’s compliance with the law, Ministerial direction and
operational policy. www.psepc.gc.ca
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The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) manages the nation’s borders by
administering and enforcing domestic laws that govern trade and travel, as well as
international agreements and conventions. CBSA brings together all the major
players involved in facilitating legitimate cross-border traffic and supporting economic
development while stopping people and goods that pose a potential threat to
Canada. CBSA processes commercial goods, travelers and conveyances, conducts
secondary inspections of food and agricultural products imported by travelers at
airports and marine facilities, conducts intelligence, engages in enforcement
activities, supports free trade negotiations and conducts compliance audit reviews
and dumping and subsidy investigations. www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca
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The Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) investigates and reports on
activities that may reasonably be suspected of constituting threats to the security of
Canada. CSIS also provides security assessments, on request, to all federal
departments and agencies. www.csis-scrs.gc.ca
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The Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) contributes to the protection of society
by actively encouraging offenders to become law-abiding citizens while exercising
reasonable, safe, secure and humane control. CSC is responsible for managing
offenders in federal correctional institutions and under community supervision,
sentenced to two years or more. www.csc-scc.gc.ca
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The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) enforces Canadian federal laws,
prevents crime and maintains peace, order and security. This includes the following
responsibilities: to prevent, detect and investigate offences against federal statutes;
to maintain law and order and prevent, detect and investigate crime in provinces,
territories and municipalities where the Force has a policing contract; to provide
investigative and protective services to other federal departments and agencies; and
to provide Canadian and international law enforcement agencies with specialized
police training and research, forensic laboratory services, identification services and
informatics technology. www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca
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The National Parole Board (NPB) is an independent, quasi-judicial, decisionmaking body that has exclusive jurisdiction and absolute discretion to grant, deny,
cancel, terminate or revoke parole. The Board’s mission is to contribute to the
protection of society by facilitating the timely reintegration of offenders into society as
law-abiding citizens. The Board also makes conditional release decisions for
offenders in provincial institutions for provinces without their own parole board.
www.npb-cnlc.gc.ca
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The Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP (CPC) receives and
reviews public complaints regarding the conduct of members of the RCMP in an
open, independent and objective manner. The Commission informs the public of its
mandate and services, reviews and investigates complaints about the conduct of
RCMP members, holds public hearings, prepares reports, including findings and
recommendations, and conducts research and policy development to improve the
public complaints process. www.cpc-cpp.gc.ca
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The RCMP External Review Committee (RCMP ERC) is an independent and
impartial agency that aims to promote fair and equitable labour relations within the
RCMP, in accordance with applicable principles of law. To this end the Committee
conducts an independent review of appeals in disciplinary and discharge and
demotion matters, as well as certain categories of grievances, in accordance with the
RCMP Act. www.erc-cee.gc.ca
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The Office of the Correctional Investigator (OCI) is mandated by legislation to act
as the Ombudsman for federal corrections. Its main function is to conduct
independent, thorough and timely investigations, regarding decisions,
recommendations, acts or omissions of the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC),
that affect offenders either individually or as a group. It may initiate an investigation
upon receipt of a complaint by or on behalf of an offender, at the request of the
Minister of Public Safety, or on its own initiative. www.oci-bec.gc.ca
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Portfolio Resource Summary
2006-2007 to 2008-2009
(Millions of dollars)
Net Planned
Spending
2006-2007
Net Planned
Spending
2007-2008
Net Planned
Spending
2008-2009
$ 498.1
$ 323.8
$ 286.2
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
$ 2,328.0
$ 2,387.7
$ 2,446.8
Correctional Services Canada
$ 1,715.6
$ 1,716.3
$ 1,768.4
Canadian Border Services Agency
$ 1,467.0
$ 1,461.0
$ 1,513.4
$ 346.1
$ 345.3
$ 352.0
National Parole Board
$ 43.1
$ 43.1
$ 43.1
Commission for Public Complaints against the RCMP
$ 6.3
$ 5.2
$ 5.1
Office of Correctional Investigator
$ 3.1
$ 3.1
$ 3.1
RCMP External Review Committee
$ 0.9
$ 0.9
$ 0.9
$ 6,408.2
$ 6,286.4
$ 6,419.0
Public Safety & Emergency Preparedness Canada
Canadian Security and Intelligence Service
TOTAL
Note: CSIS does not use planned spending numbers for its financial resources. These
numbers were taken from Main Estimates.
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Portfolio of Public Safety
Parliament
Minister of Public Safety
Stockwell Day
Deputy Minister
of Public Safety
Associate Deputy
Minister of Public
Safety
Suzanne Hurtubise
William J.S. Elliott
Office of the Inspector
General of CSIS
Eva Plunkett
Canada Border
Services Agency
National Parole
Board
Alain Jolicoeur
Mario Dion
Canadian Security
Intelligence Service
Commission for
Public Complaints
Against the RCMP
Jim Judd
Paul Kennedy
Correctional Service
of Canada
RCMP External
Review Committee
Keith Coulter
Catherine Ebbs
Royal Canadian
Mounted Police
Office of the
Correctional
Investigator
Giuliano Zaccardelli
Howard Sapers
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PSEPC Departmental Organizational Structure
Deputy Minister
of Public Safety
Associate Deputy Minister
of Public Safety
Suzanne Hurtubise
William J.S. Elliott
Inspector General,
CSIS
Director,
Legal Services
Eva Plunkett
Richard Fiutowski
ADM, Portfolio
Relations &
Public Affairs
ADM, Policing,
Law
Enforcement &
Interoperability
SADM,
Emergency
Management &
National
Security
ADM,
Community
Safety &
Partnerships
ADM,
Corporate
Management
Marc Whittingham
Diane MacLaren
Patricia Hassard
Chantal Bernier
Elisabeth Nadeau
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Summary Information
The Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada provides policy
advice and support to the Minister of Public Safety on issues related to public safety,
including national security, and emergency management, policing and law enforcement,
interoperability and information sharing, corrections and conditional release, Aboriginal
policing and crime prevention. The Department also plays a key role in encouraging
cohesion, integration and information-sharing across the Portfolio to help ensure that the
Minister is provided with timely and comprehensive advice, that the Portfolio’s strategic
policy and legislative framework remains current and effective, and that public safety
threats are thoroughly assessed and addressed in a way that reflects Canadian values
and maintains the integrity of the criminal justice and national security systems. This
leadership role is integral to the provision of sound policy advice supporting decisionmaking.
The Department advises, supports and assists the Minister in his responsibilities as they
relate to:
• exercising his function as the lead cabinet minister for public safety;
• co-ordinating the activities and providing effective direction to the Portfolio
agencies;
• developing policies, programs and procedures to protect Canada’s national
security and capacity to prevent, prepare for, respond to and recover from natural
and human-induced disasters;
• providing advice in relation to emerging developments in national security
matters and their impact on Canada’s diverse and pluralistic society through the
Cross-Cultural Roundtable on Security
• exercising his national leadership role in policing, law enforcement, and
strategies to combat priority aspects of criminal activity, such as organized crime
and drugs;
• leading the integration and interoperability of public safety and security agencies
to facilitate information sharing across Canadian jurisdictions and organizations.
• implementing the First Nations Policing Policy through the negotiation,
administration, maintenance and monitoring of tripartite policing agreements with
provincial, territorial and First Nations governments; and,
• administering the National Crime Prevention Strategy in order to focus on the
root causes of crime and enable communities to develop local solutions to crime
and victimization.
Strategic Outcome
Enhancing public safety, security and emergency preparedness of
Canadians in an open society
Consistent with the government’s priority of protecting Canadian families and
communities by strengthening the criminal justice system, the Department’s Strategic
Outcome is reflected in our key role of providing effective leadership across both the
Department and Portfolio agencies.
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Principles that will guide the Department in achieving this strategic outcome include:
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•
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Departmental activities will be focused on achieving and sustaining our long-term
outcome. Success will be dependent on effective long-term planning and
priority-setting. For the coming year, the Department will be pursuing strategic
priorities that are critical to addressing immediate concerns in our ability to
protect Canadian families and their communities.
Portfolio-wide cohesion and integrated information-sharing are essential to the
safety and security of Canada and Canadians and are critical if the Portfolio is to
be successful in achieving its priorities. The Department will continue to
strengthen its governance and collective planning mechanisms.
Management priorities will focus on enhancing the Department’s planning and
reporting framework, establishing an integrated risk management framework and
integrated human resource planning.
Strategic Priorities for the coming year will focus on:
•
•
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Protecting the security of Canada and Canadians
Fighting serious and organized crime
Enhancing community safety and security
Resource Summary
Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada
Financial Resources ($000's):
2006-2007
$ 498,113
2007-2008
$ 323,844
2008-2009
$ 286,164
2007-2008
968 FTE
2008-2009
872 FTE
Human Resources:
2006-2007
999 FTE
The reason for the significant drop in year-to-year funding is a consequence of the way
that funds are allocated to the Department for the Disaster Financial Assistance
Arrangements contribution program. Financial resources for this program are allocated to
the Department on an annual basis only; consequently, there is the appearance of a ‘drop’
in overall funding when financial resources to the Department are provided for several
fiscal periods at a time.
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Departmental Priorities to Support Strategic Outcome
Enhance the Public Safety, Security and Emergency Preparedness of Canadians
in an Open Society
Planned Spending ($000’s)
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
Emergency
Management
and National
Security
267,013
94,434*
94,894
Policing and
Law
Enforcement
38,717
31,636
21,909
Community
Safety and
Partnerships
192,375
197,774
169,361
Strategic Priority
Strategic
Priority Type
Program
Activity
Protecting the
security of Canada
and Canadians
New
Fighting serious
and organized
crime
New
Enhancing
community safety
and security
New
* See footnote under “Resource Summary” table on page 11.
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Operating Environment
The operating environment of the Portfolio and Department is a complex one, as the
issues impacting public safety and security are varied and ever changing.
As one of the primary roles of government is to protect its citizens, the Government of
Canada is pursuing an ever-more integrated approach to national security and
emergency preparedness. Circumstances demand a comprehensive approach to
identifying and assessing potential threats, and to instituting a comprehensive approach
to responding to incidents.
At the local level, violence committed by street gangs in our urban centres, particularly
with respect to the use of illegal firearms, is of significant concern. The continued
increase in indoor marijuana growing operations and clandestine crystal
methamphetamine labs, particularly within residential neighbourhoods challenges law
enforcement in many Canadian communities.
The reach and sophistication of organized gangs and criminal networks has expanded to
take advantage of the globalization of legitimate trade, and some of these networks have
become increasingly advanced in their ability to use technology to commit crimes and
launder the proceeds of their crimes.
The implementation of the Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP) between Canada,
the United States and Mexico, is a key component of our approach to border security.
Canada's continued economic and social prosperity is impacted by the national security
measures we adopt, both individually and collectively. Furthermore, these measures
must respect new obligations and duties towards the safety and security of international
partners. It is essential that immediate border security priorities in the areas of
emergency preparedness, law enforcement cooperation and border security be
achieved.
The past several years have seen an increase in emergencies caused by terrorism, the
environment or humans. Events, such as the June 2006 arrests of seventeen
individuals in the Greater Toronto Area on terrorism-related offences, the 2004 SARS
outbreak in Toronto, and the continuing global spread of Avian influenza, all remind us
that there are persistent and credible threats to the safety and health of Canadians.
These threats reinforce the importance of working with all jurisdictions to enhance
national response capabilities. Public safety is a shared responsibility that must involve
all members of civil society, both domestically and internationally. This includes the
private citizen, the voluntary and private sectors, and all levels of government. Reaching
out and engaging these stakeholders presents challenges of capacity, education, and
communication.
The Portfolio operates within an environment that includes close public scrutiny. It is
committed to ensuring that in protecting Canadians and Canadian assets from harm
through policies, national security measures and preparedness programs, its agencies
respect the rule of law and act in a manner that reflects the values contained in the
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Accountability measures are evolving to
ensure continuing public trust and confidence in the manner in which the Portfolio
responds to the public safety needs of Canadians. Parliamentary committees and
review bodies also play an important role in guiding the Portfolio's activities.
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Report on Plans and Priorities
The Department’s strategic priorities are consistent and coherent with the priorities
established for the Portfolio of Public Safety and Government priorities. These strategic
priorities contribute toward the achievement of the Department’s strategic outcome - to
enhance the public safety, security and emergency preparedness of Canadians in
an open society.
For the planning period, the achievement of this strategic outcome is supported by three
strategic priorities:
•
•
•
Protecting the Security of Canada and Canadians
Fighting Serious and Organized Crime
Enhancing community safety and security
Collectively, the plans and initiatives articulated in this report provide a foundation to
help ensure safe and secure communities. Key, for the Department, are the policy
development and Portfolio leadership activities required to advance these priorities
internally in the Department and across the Portfolio.
Strategic Priorities
Protecting the Security of Canada and Canadians
There is no role more fundamental to government than the protection of its citizens.
Public safety is essential to socio-economic stability; to our macro-economic interests;
and to meeting our global responsibilities. It is imperative that governments plan and
take action to protect citizens and their communities.
The current threat environment facing the country is complex. Extreme natural disasters,
such as the Pakistan earthquake and South Asian Tsunami, and hurricanes like Katrina,
can have catastrophic consequences, destroying communities and countless lives.
Terrorist attacks continue on western targets, as evidenced in London, Bali and Madrid.
Health experts from around the world warn that influenza pandemic continues to be a
grave possibility.
Government has a responsibility to assess and work to manage these risks, and to
remain vigilant, prepared and ready to respond to hazards. The Department will
continue to move forward with the following initiatives:
Strategic Priority
Protecting the Security
of Canada and
Canadians
Expected Result
Policies and programs that
ensure appropriate and
measured responses to
protect the security of
Canada and Canadians.
•
•
•
Portfolio Partners: RCMP, CBSA, CSIS
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Key Initiatives
Updated Emergency Management
legislation.
Development of the National Emergency
Response System.
Ensuring a strong national security
framework.
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Fighting Serious and Organized Crime
The environment within which federal policing and public safety organizations operate
has changed significantly in recent years. Organized criminal activity is increasingly
complex, sophisticated and global in nature. Most federal investigations of serious and
organized crime activities cross international borders, creating significant jurisdictional,
cost and information-sharing burdens. The Internet is facilitating new forms of criminal
activity (cyber-crime), such as identity theft and fraud, child pornography and sexual
luring of minors.
Addressing these issues, the Department plans to undertake policy development and
coordination activities to pursue the following initiatives:
Strategic Priority
Fighting Serious and
Organized Crime
Expected Result
Policies and programs
developed and
implemented across the
portfolio contributing to safe
communities both urban
and rural.
•
•
•
•
Initiatives
National Agenda to combat organized
crime.
Strategy to combat gun violence.
Increasing RCMP Policing Capacity.
Developing correctional policy to better
address challenges of reintegrating
offenders.
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Portfolio Partners: RCMP, CBSA, CSC
Enhancing community safety and security
The work of public safety and security agencies rests on the support and confidence of
all Canadians and is intimately tied to issues of accountability, transparency and public
trust. That trust cannot be assumed or taken for granted, especially when dealing with
newcomers to Canada in the context of increasing pluralism and diversity of Canadian
society. A more coordinated, strategic and focused citizen engagement and public
awareness strategy to ensure and sustain public confidence is required.
Addressing these issues, the Department plans to undertake policy and co-ordination
activities to pursue the following initiatives:
Strategic Priority
Enhancing safety and
security
Expected Result
Public confidence that the
Government of Canada’s
public safety and security
regime is responsive,
robust and decisive in a
national crisis and
accommodating in a time of
peace
•
•
•
•
Initiatives
Address over-representation of Aboriginal
Canadians in the criminal justice system.
Disseminating knowledge on crime
prevention and corrections.
Supporting provincial and municipal
efforts to address gang-related problems.
Directing a portion of crime prevention
funds to children and youth at high risk of
coming into conflict with the law, in areas
of high youth crime.
Portfolio Partners: RCMP, CBSA, CSIS, CSC, NPB
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Management Priorities
The Department places a high priority on management excellence and continuously
strives to implement and improve its management practices. Much has been
accomplished to provide leadership across the Department and Portfolio to manage
policy development and implementation in a challenging and complex horizontal
environment. In 2006-2007, the Department will focus its attention on the following
areas of management practice in the coming year:
•
•
Effective and efficient Portfolio leadership through the provision of strategic direction
and policy advice and strategic communications.
Improved accountability and stewardship through:
o Integration of human resource planning with departmental business
planning;
o Development of a strategic planning and performance measurement
capacity; and,
o Development of an integrated risk management framework.
These areas of management practice are challenging and cannot be brought about in
isolation. A measured approach to development and implementation in achieving an
effective balance among the risks and resources available is necessary to ensure a solid
foundation of accountability in the future. Below, is a description of the management
priority and the plans and expected results of the actions to be taken.
Effective and Efficient Portfolio Leadership
Integral to its mandate, the Department plays a vital role in effective policy co-ordination
and communication across the Portfolio. This is key to developing well-founded advice
and making evidence-based information available to decision-makers. Over the coming
year, two specific areas have been targeted: 1) provision of a unified strategic direction
and policy advice; and, 2) strategic communications.
Strategic Direction and Policy Advice
The Department will expand the development of horizontal policy advice on public safety
issues. The Department will bring together issues of emergency management, national
security, community safety, policing, law enforcement, corrections, criminal justice and
the protection of human rights, to develop policy advice with a horizontal perspective. In
seeking to do this, the Department will increase its engagement with civil society,
academia and non-governmental organizations. The Cross-Cultural Roundtable on
Security will also enhance its current dialogue with the Government and senior officials
by playing a key role in fostering communication between the Government and our
diverse communities on security-related issues.
Expected result
Increased scope and depth in the policy development process, linking public safety
strategies more closely to broad federal direction and to key strategic partners, leading
to better-informed decision-making.
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Plan
Over the planning period for this report the Department will:
•
•
•
•
Increase capacity for thorough policy consideration and development;
Develop a research capacity for public safety issues;
Create a network of public, pan-governmental representatives, academics and
NGOs on public safety issues: and,
Engage Canadians in greater dialogue around issues of public safety and
security, in particular through the Cross-Cultural Roundtable on Security.
Improving Accountability and Stewardship Through
Integrated Human Resource Planning
The Department is committed to developing an integrated Human Resource (HR) and
Business Planning Process that is aligned with the Department's strategic outcomes.
This integrated Human Resources Strategy will combine resourcing needs as identified
in the business plans with a departmental workforce analysis, to identify present and
future needs. To address these needs, effective recruitment and retention strategies,
succession planning strategies, and learning and diversity plans will all be applied to
promote a genuinely strategic approach to integrated HR and Business Planning in the
organization.
Expected Result
Effective alignment of the Department’s human resources with business planning to
ensure that informed decisions are made and resources are appropriately targeted and
optimized to achieve agreed outcomes.
Plan
Over the course of the upcoming planning cycle, the Human Resources Directorate will
focus on five specific activities to accomplish its goals:
•
•
•
•
•
Conduct a complete workforce analysis of the Department;
Implement the new Treasury Board Learning, Training and Development Policy
throughout the Department;
Implement and deliver the training on sub-delegation for managers under the new
Public Service Employment Act;
Develop and implement a departmental employment equity plan; and,
Develop of departmental policies to further support the Public Service Modernization
Act implementation.
Improving Accountability and Stewardship Through
Strategic Planning and Performance Measurement
Effective strategic planning and performance measurement is key to demonstrating the
sound stewardship and accountability for the resources provided to the Department to
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fulfill its mandate. The Department will develop and implement an approach to planning
and performance measurement that takes into consideration the risks and challenges of
a complex environment and the governance arrangements necessary to ensure
accountability for its actions. In the coming year, efforts will focus on ensuring the
strategic priorities for the Department are effectively communicated, monitored and
reported on. It should be noted that the Portfolio agencies are responsible and
accountable for reporting against their own established priorities. The Department will
not duplicate these efforts, but rather work with the Portfolio agencies to provide a
strategic overview and alignment across the Department and Portfolio.
Expected Result
More effective planning and reporting tools to support increased transparency and
accountability with regard to the use of resources allocated to the Department’s key
activities.
Plan
A Strategic Planning and Performance Measurement Framework will be developed in
consultation with Portfolio agencies to establish a consistent and comprehensive
approach to the establishment, monitoring and reporting of performance against
strategic priorities.
Efforts to establish this framework will include:
•
•
•
Establishing and communicating common priorities and performance measures;
Meeting the requirements of the Treasury Board‘s Management Resources and
Results Structure Policy; and,
Assessing the Program Activity Architecture (see note below) against which the
Department receives its funding to ensure planned resource allocations are
linked to the key activities and outcomes expected.
Note: The Program Activity Architecture serves as a basis for the funding allocations of
Parliament and improving accountability for the results and the resources required to
achieve them by linking resource decisions to the key activities undertaken by the
Department.
Improving Accountability and Stewardship Through
An Information Management / Information Technology Strategic Plan
While the business activities of most federal departments require direct involvement with
the public – both individuals and organizations - in order to pursue their mandate,
PSEPC is an information brokering Department. The department not only delivers
programs but fulfils a policy advice and monitoring role. It relies heavily on reliable,
credible, timely, accessible and secure information. To do this effectively, it is essential
that optimal IM/IT procedures and processes be established. To meet this requirement,
the Department will develop and implement an IM/IT Strategic Plan that is consistent
with TBS policy requirements.
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Expected Result:
Effective management and resourcing of IM/IT-enabled projects through a governance
structure that includes program and regional representation and sets priorities for IM/IT
investments. The department will develop and implement key Government of Canada
policies, such as the Management of Government Information (MGI) and Management
of IT Security (MITS).
Plan:
An IM/IT Advisory Committee (DG-level) has been established that will provide the
governance framework for IM/IT strategic decision-making within PSEPC. The
Committee will address the following priorities within the upcoming planning cycle:
•
•
•
Streamline IT procurement and lifecycle management within PSEPC;
Update the IS Security Policy and work towards compliance with the MITS standard;
and,
Implement the revised TBS Management of Government Information (MGI) policy.
Improving Accountability and Stewardship Through
Integrated Risk Management
Risk management is an essential ingredient of public sector operations and corporate
governance. As such, it should be integrated into all strategic and business planning,
policy development, program management and decision-making, and monitoring and
reporting activities. While risks cannot be prevented or avoided completely, they can be
mitigated through the implementation of a well-developed integrated risk management
strategy.
Expected Result
Risks are identified, analyzed, prioritized and communicated to ensure that informed
decisions are made and resources are appropriately targeted and optimized to manage
risks and achieve desired outcomes.
Plan
Over the three-year planning period, an Integrated Risk Management Framework will be
developed setting out a consistent and comprehensive approach to risk management
that is integrated with departmental planning, decision-making, monitoring and reporting
activities. It will:
•
•
•
Establish, department-wide, a common risk language;
Ensure that all significant decisions are supported by systematic, integrated and
continuous risk assessments which are annually documented in a Corporate Risk
Profile that is communicated throughout the Department to foster an open
dialogue on risks; and
Promote an environment in which employees can be innovative while applying
due diligence in protecting the public interest and maintaining the public trust.
19
The Integrated Risk Management Framework will support accountability to stakeholders
by demonstrating that the levels of risk are understood and that resources to mitigate
risks are allocated to areas where risks are greatest.
Contributing to Canada’s Performance
The Public Safety Portfolio contributes to government-wide priorities, as expressed in
the Government of Canada’s annual Canada’s Performance report. The Department’s
strategic focus on protecting Canadian families and communities is directly linked to the
government-wide outcome of promoting safe and secure communities, an essential
element in supporting Canada’s social foundations. As well, the Department also
contributes to the Canada’s Place in the World chapter through security-related
commitments made in the Department’s strategic outcome of protecting Canada and
Canadians.
20
SECTION II
ANALYSIS OF PROGRAM ACTIVITIES
21
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AND NATIONAL SECURITY
The Emergency Management and National Security Branch conducts activities that
contribute to Protecting the security of Canada and Canadians.
There are four strategic areas of focus related to Emergency Management and National
Security in the coming fiscal year:
•
•
•
•
building a stronger emergency management foundation;
establishing effective emergency management machinery;
assuring a strong national security framework; and,
cyber security.
The resources associated with Emergency Management and National Security are:
Financial Resources ($000's):
2006-2007
$ 267,013
2007-2008
$ 94,434
2008-2009
$ 94,894
2007-2008
547 FTE
2008-2009
547 FTE
Human Resources:
2006-2007
575 FTE
This section provides additional information concerning these activities as well as major
activities in the ongoing operation of EMNS.
From natural disasters such as earthquakes and floods, to human-caused emergencies
such as industrial accidents or terrorist attacks, Canadians live in an increasingly
dangerous and complex threat environment. As recently witnessed in the aftermath of
Hurricane Katrina in the US, disasters have enormous social and economic costs. Most
emergencies in Canada are managed at the local level. However, factors such as
increased urbanization, critical infrastructure interdependencies, international terrorist
groups, severe weather events, and the steady flow of people and trade across borders
increase the potential for catastrophes in Canada that transcend geographic and
jurisdictional boundaries. All levels of government have an obligation to their citizens to
analyze risks, prevent or mitigate where possible, and continuously improve their ability
to work together to prepare for, respond to, and recover from the consequences of
disasters.
The Department is developing an integrated all-hazards national emergency
management system to address the challenges of the current risk environment. The
goal of these activities is to save lives, preserve the environment and protect property
and the economy. The national emergency management system is comprised of four
interdependent, risk-based functions, or “pillars”: prevention/mitigation, preparedness,
response and recovery. The Department is focusing on strategic investments, policies
22
and programs, and legislative/regulatory initiatives to encourage a balanced approach
across these four pillars. Recently-approved increases in developing our core capacity
will contribute to stronger, more resilient Canadian communities.
Canada needs a comprehensive emergency management and national security
foundation that ensures readiness and a coordinated response to safeguard its social
and economic framework and that contributes to risk reduction activities through
mitigation and recovery. Key initiatives towards this objective include:
•
The development of a solid foundation for progress on emergency management,
including a comprehensive, robust legal, regulatory and policy framework;
•
The establishment of effective emergency management machinery that facilitates a
coordinated federal response to national emergencies as well as integration with
local, provincial/territorial and international jurisdictions; and
•
The assurance of a national security framework that leverages interagency
cooperation and improves overall effectiveness in addressing the terrorist and other
threats facing Canada and our allies.
A Solid Foundation – To safeguard its social and economic framework, Canada needs
a comprehensive emergency management foundation through legal and policy
measures that ensure coordinated readiness and response.
•
Updated Emergency Management Legislation – Progress in Canada’s system of
emergency management, government machinery changes and lessons learned
over the last 20 years highlight the importance of updating Canada’s emergency
management legislation, particularly the Emergency Preparedness Act (1988). A
new Emergency Management Act was tabled as Bill C-12 on May 8, 2006. If
adopted by Parliament, this Bill will repeal and replace the Emergency
Preparedness Act. This new legislation has been drafted to provide the necessary
authorities for the Government of Canada to address not only the challenges of its
own preparedness and a coordinated federal response, but also the requirement for
collaboration with other jurisdictions and key stakeholders and the protection of
sensitive critical infrastructure and emergency management information. The
passage of new emergency management legislation is a priority.
•
National Disaster Mitigation Measures – The prevention and mitigation of disasters
such as floods, wildfires, earthquakes and tsunamis could potentially save lives,
prevent suffering and protect billions in economic losses. Public Safety is
developing a national approach to disaster mitigation that could consist of
Government of Canada hazard risk assessment processes; grants and
contributions; knowledge and capacity building; and a cost-shared program with the
provinces and territories to leverage investments toward strategic and urgent
structural and non-structural disaster risk reduction priorities at the local level.
•
Pandemic Influenza Preparedness – To ensure coordination across the federal
system to address gaps in pandemic influenza preparedness, a Deputy Minister
committee and interdepartmental working groups are working to elaborate a
multifaceted approach to pandemic influenza planning. Public Safety is working in
full partnership with the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Canadian Food
Inspection Agency to coordinate this initiative, which involves the whole spectrum of
23
federal departments and agencies, provinces and territories, the private sector and
non-governmental organizations.
Emergency Management Activity
Updating of Canada’s emergency
management legislation, particularly the
Emergency Preparedness Act (1988).
Development of national disaster
mitigation measures.
Development of a cross-sectoral, multijurisdictional approach to pandemic
influenza planning.
Expected Results
Improved preparedness and response of
federal government in times of emergency.
Increased capability to protect lives and
prevent economic losses in the event of a
disaster.
Coordinated national pandemic influenza
preparedness strategy.
Effective Emergency Management – It is a public safety priority to establish and
maintain effective emergency management machinery to provide the base for
coordination of a federal response in an emergency. PSEPC is advancing the following
three initiatives that guide the development, implementation and measurement of this
commitment.
•
National Emergency Response System – PSEPC is leading the development of
a new national emergency response framework, the National Emergency
Response System (NERS). NERS is designed to ensure a more strategic,
responsive and harmonized federal and national response to all types of
emergencies. Work continues to develop NERS in partnership with other
federal government departments and agencies with public safety roles, key
international allies like the US, the provinces and territories, the voluntary
sector, and the private sector, especially critical infrastructure owners and
operators.
•
Government Operations Centre – The National Security Policy recognized the
need to connect effectively with provincial and territorial emergency
preparedness networks. It also committed the Government of Canada to
address the highest priority gaps in the Government’s capacity to manage
emergencies in the area of overall strategic coordination. Public Safety was
mandated to build a centralized Government Operations Centre (GOC) to
provide stable, round-the-clock coordination and to provide support and
leadership in emergencies of national importance. In strengthening our
connectivity with key partners, enhancing our data and information management
systems, and through participating in national and international-level exercises,
we will continue to ensure the Government Operations Centre has the systems
and capacity in place to address all hazards, thereby allowing for a more
integrated Government of Canada response to all kinds of events. Furthermore,
the Government of Canada will continue to work with provinces, territories, the
private and voluntary sectors, and key international allies toward accomplishing
its goal of seamless emergency coordination.
•
Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre – As part of the Government
Operations Centre, the Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre (CCIRC)
focuses on reducing risks to national critical infrastructure from cyber security
threats. The CCIRC monitors the cyber threat environment on a 24/7 basis and
24
is responsible for coordinating the national response to cyber security incidents.
CCIRC will continue to deliver timely warnings of cyber security vulnerabilities
and regular analyses of cyber threats to its current partners, forge new
relationships with organizations in Canada and abroad, and continue to develop
and expand its monitoring and analysis capabilities. CCIRC is also the
international point of contact for cyber incidents. CCIRC will continue to build
and strengthen federal, provincial and territorial, private sector and international
partnerships to enable real-time exchange of information on threats and
vulnerabilities.
Emergency Management Activity
Provide around the clock coordination,
support and leadership during
emergencies of national importance.
Monitoring of cyber threat environment,
and issuing warnings and information on
potential, imminent or actual threats,
vulnerabilities or incidents affecting
Canada’s critical infrastructure.
Expected Results
Improved preparedness and well
coordinated response of federal
government in times of emergency.
National critical infrastructure less
vulnerable to cyber attacks.
Strong National Security Framework - The terrorist attacks in London, Bali and
Madrid are evidence that the threat of terrorist attacks on Western targets persists,
and in June of 2006, in the Greater Toronto Area, seventeen individuals were
arrested and charged with terrorism-related offences under the Criminal Code.
The Government of Canada has a duty to its citizens to be aware of the risk
environment, to take appropriate measures to prevent attacks wherever possible,
and to be prepared to respond to the consequences, if needed. Canada’s approach
to national security must be strategic and proactive, while embracing the values of
democracy, human rights, respect for the rule of law and pluralism. Work is ongoing
to ensure that the existing framework is adequate to safeguard against threats to
national security, and to propose changes where required.
•
Listed Entities – The Department will continue to review the Criminal Code list of
entities associated with terrorism. The listing of an entity is a public means of
identifying a group or individual as being associated with terrorism. The definition
of an entity includes a person, group, trust, partnership or fund, or an
unincorporated association or organization. It is an offence to knowingly
participate in or contribute to, directly or indirectly, any activity of a terrorist group.
•
Modernization of Investigative Techniques Initiative – The modernization of
legislation is required to ensure that law enforcement and national security
agencies maintain their ability to lawfully detect, prevent and investigate terrorism
and organized crime in the face of new and emerging technologies.
National Security Activity
Review of the Criminal Code list of
terrorist entities.
Expected Results
Limit participation in, and funding of,
terrorist groups by residents of Canada.
25
National Security Activity
Modernization of the legislative framework
to maintain law enforcement and national
security agencies’ ability to lawfully
investigate criminal and terrorist acts
perpetrated through the illicit use of new
technologies.
Coordination and collaboration with
agencies and departments on issues
concerning national security and the
intelligence community.
Support the Parliamentary review of the
Anti-Terrorism Act.
Participate in governmental inquiries and
commissions (i.e. Air India, O’Connor)
concerning national security matters.
Expected Results
The ongoing effectiveness of
investigations and intelligence gathering
efforts of law enforcement and national
security agencies.
Ensure the legal foundation for counterterrorism and national security efforts
continues to be appropriate and effective.
Ensure the existing framework for
coordinated action is adequate to
safeguard against threats to national
security, and propose changes where
required.
Represent departmental position on issues
involving statutory responsibilities of the
Minister and PSEPC agencies in order to
effectively contribute to the mandate of
these reviews.
Cyber security – The development and implementation of a comprehensive approach
to protecting Canada’s critical infrastructure, or CI is a priority. CI sectors include
everything from banking and financial services, the generation and distribution of energy,
communications and information technology infrastructure, transportation, government
and services, to infrastructure that maintains the safety of our food and water.
These critical sectors are heavily dependent on automated systems and interconnected
networks. Moreover, the interconnectedness of, and our dependence on, information
and communications technology infrastructure is of critical importance to emergency
management programs and activities. As Canada’s communications and information
technology networks are vulnerable to deliberate cyber attacks and unintentional
disruptions, cyber security must be an integral component of maintaining the integrity of
Canada’s critical infrastructure.
The Department will establish a Cyber Security Task Force (CSTF) to make
recommendations on a cyber security strategy for Canada. The action plan that is
expected as part of this strategy, will result in activities that contribute to Protecting the
Security of Canada and Canadians. The Secretariat to support the Task Force was
established in the Spring of 2006.
For 2006-2007 fiscal year, the priorities of the CSTF will be oriented toward laying the
governance and knowledge groundwork for achieving its long-term outcomes.
CSTF Activity
Selection of Task Force including the
Chair and establishment of a Secretariat
to support the Task Force.
26
Expected Results
A Task Force with cross-sectoral reach
and representation, composed of
members of both the private and public
sectors.
CSTF Activity
Initiation and completion of two major
studies to determine key information
regarding Canadian critical infrastructure,
as it pertains to cyber security.
Combined, these studies will provide
insight into the management and control of
cyber security risks, identify CI
interdependencies across sectors, and
recommend mitigative measures and
identify their costs.
27
Expected Results
Increase in knowledge throughout the
CI sectors of the cyber security risks they
face.
Increase in awareness throughout the CI
sector of the mitigation strategies that can
be adopted to address cyber security risks.
POLICING, LAW ENFORCEMENT AND INTEROPERABILTY
An integrated and enhanced approach to public safety requires not only the timely
provision of appropriate policy advice, but also the sharing of information among all
those with a mandate to ensure safe communities. Accordingly, the Department has
combined its policy capacity on law enforcement and border strategy issues with its
efforts to integrate critical public safety information across relevant jurisdictions and
among key public agencies. This approach enables the Minister to exercise national
leadership on key issues in law enforcement and facilitates information sharing to
promote public safety objectives.
The Policing, Law Enforcement and Interoperability Branch (PLEIB) supports activities
that contribute to all three of the Strategic Priorities identified in section 1.
The following section organizes the details of these activities by:
• Law Enforcement and Border Strategies;
• Policing Policy; and,
• Public Safety Interoperability.
This section provides additional information concerning these activities as well as major
activities in the ongoing operation of PLEIB.
The resources associated with Policing, Law Enforcement and Interoperability are:
Financial Resources ($000's):
2006-2007
$ 38,717
2007-2008
$ 31,636
2008-2009
$ 21,909
2007-2008
145 FTE
2008-2009
134 FTE
Human Resources:
2006-2007
148 FTE
Law Enforcement and Border Strategies – The Law Enforcement and Border
Strategies Directorate is responsible for providing leadership and strategic policy advice
with respect to border security and national law enforcement issues/initiatives.
Major initiatives include:
•
National Agenda to Combat Organized Crime – The National Agenda (an
Federal/Provincial/Territorial initiative) recognizes that the fight against
organized crime is a national priority that requires governments, the law
enforcement community and other partners to work together. The National
Agenda identifies four main components to be addressed: national and regional
coordination; legislative and regulatory tools; research and evaluation; and,
communications and public education. The National Coordinating Committee is
28
the governance body that supports the National Agenda and assists with the
development and implementation of anti-organized crime policies, legislation,
and initiatives.
•
Cross-Border Crime Forum (CBCF) – This forum addresses the law
enforcement and national security elements of the Security and Prosperity
Partnership (SPP). The CBCF brings together senior officials from Canada and
the United States to develop joint solutions to common cross-border crime
issues, such as: human smuggling, organized crime, mass-marketing fraud,
cyber crime and terrorism.
•
DNA Initiatives – The Department coordinates policy development and advice
on a range of very active issues respecting the use of DNA in the criminal
justice system – including the National DNA Data Bank, cost-sharing
agreements with the provinces/ territories, and Federal-Provincial-Territorial
efforts to examine the establishment of a national DNA-based Missing Persons
Index.
Law Enforcement & Border Strategies
Activity
Portfolio policy development and
coordination on border policy issues
including the SPP, marine security,
customs, immigration and trade.
Coordination of policy development,
planning and governance support for the
National DNA Data Bank and broader
DNA policy issues.
Expected Results
Coordinated, strategic approach for key
government initiatives to promote and
ensure border security.
Effective policy and program analysis in
partnership with the Portfolio and other
partners to enhance border enforcement
operations at and between ports of entry.
Strategic approach to policy development
on the National DNA Data Bank;
demonstrated leadership for FPT efforts
examining the establishment of a Missing
Persons Index.
Implementation and governance for FPT
Biology Casework Analysis Agreements,
and review of the Agreements to support
their renegotiation.
Policy development/ coordination and
information sharing with key government,
police and prosecutorial stakeholders
involved in the fight against serious and
organized crime.
Enhancement and/or creation of key
strategies to combat serious and
organized crime – including coordination
of, and policy support for, the National
Coordinating Committee to Combat
Organized Crime.
Law Enforcement and Border Strategies Directorate contributes to the following
Strategic Priorities:
• Fighting serious and organized crime; and,
• Enhancing community safety and security.
29
Policing Policy – The Policing Policy Directorate is responsible for providing strategic
independent advice on a variety of policy and management issues of relevance to the
RCMP and supporting the Minister in his responsibility and accountability for the RCMP.
Major initiatives include:
•
Strategy to Combat Gun Violence – The Department is coordinating a
comprehensive, national strategy to combat gun violence. This strategy entails
enhancing the intelligence and investigative capacity of Canada’s law
enforcement agencies and working with all partners, domestic and international,
to share firearm intelligence and to evaluate and research the effectiveness of
enforcement and prevention measures aimed at combating firearm crime.
•
RCMP Capacity – The Department is working closely with the RCMP to
enhance federal policing capacity to adequately carry out increasingly complex
and more costly policing functions and fulfill national policing obligations.
International Police Peacekeeping capacity is another initiative to ensure the
RCMP has the capacity to support Canadian foreign policies in failed and fragile
states. To complement the capacity building, the Department is reviewing
proposals to refurbish and expand the capacity of the RCMP Training Academy
(“Depot”).
Policing Policy Activity
Support for the Investments to Combat the
Criminal Use of Firearms (ICCUF)
Initiative, which focuses on improving the
national collection, analysis and sharing of
firearms-related intelligence.
Restoring the effectiveness of RCMP
Federal Policing by addressing resource
shortfalls and expanding and refurbishing
the RCMP Training Academy, to meet
increasing demands for RCMP officers.
Implementation of effective Canadian
Police Arrangement (CPA) Management
Framework, in collaboration with Foreign
Affairs and CIDA, to guide and support
RCMP involvement in international police
peacekeeping missions.
Expected Results
Enhanced criminal intelligence capacity of
the RCMP and CBSA for improved
criminal investigations, and strategic
national assessments of the illegal
movement of firearms.
Resolve current resource and capacity
gaps, enable the RCMP to keep pace with
federal statute requirements and allow
better targeting of emerging priorities, such
as technologically sophisticated crimes
and new crime organizations.
Effective management of Canada’s police
peacekeeping efforts.
Policing Policy contributes to the following Strategic Priorities:
• Fighting serious and organized crime; and
• Enhancing community safety and security.
Public Safety Interoperability – Interoperability is an environment where people,
procedures, policies and systems work in a collaborative fashion to share information
that is both required and appropriate. This ensures that government organizations can
and do share critical information with the right people at the right time, strengthening the
ability of these organizations to address threats to the safety and security of Canadians.
The absence of interoperability was clearly evident in the wake of events such as the
30
Toronto SARS outbreak.
The Department is developing a framework for interoperability, including a long-term
vision and strategic design to enable a fully coordinated approach to public safety and
security that ensures effective information sharing while respecting the privacy of
Canadians and the principle of accountability. This work builds on the accomplishments
of the Integrated Justice Information initiative, which advanced the delivery of the
Canada Public Safety Information Network to improve information sharing among
criminal justice and law enforcement agencies in support of public safety and security.
Interoperability Activity
Developing a strategic framework for
public safety interoperability, including:
ƒ
Development of a national strategy for
interoperable radio communications
(amongst first responders) in Canada
and with the U.S.
ƒ
Development of an electronic
communications system capable of
transmitting classified information
amongst public safety and security
federal partners.
Creating a centre of excellence for
biometrics across the public safety sector.
Completing a feasibility study on the
implementation of an automated air
passenger assessment system.
Expected Results
An interoperable information sharing
environment across government
addressing issues in the following
domains:
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement;
Border;
National Security and Intelligence; and,
Public Health and First Responders
This environment will yield an increased
ability to fight crime and threats to national
security and public health and safety.
Coordination on biometrics standards, best
practices, and domestic/international
policy integration.
Provision of recommendations for the
implementation of an efficient and effective
air passenger assessment system to
assess threats to aviation transportation
and national security.
Interoperability contributes to the following Strategic Priorities:
•
•
Fighting serious and organized crime; and,
Protecting the security of Canada and Canadians.
31
COMMUNITY SAFETY AND PARTNERSHIPS
Historically, the Department sought to integrate various areas of community safety:
crime prevention, based on community projects to address local factors of crime and
victimization; corrections research and policy to ensure safe reintegration of offenders in
the community; and, Aboriginal policing in First Nations communities. This approach
has endeavoured to support sustainable partnerships between government and
communities for greater public safety, tailored to the reality and needs of each
community. Improvements are planned to further enhance public safety in Canadian
communities.
The Community Safety and Partnerships Branch (CSPB) supports activities contributing
to the “Fighting serious and organized crime,” and “Enhancing community safety and
security,” strategic priorities. Improvements are planned to further enhance public safety
in Canadian communities.
The following section organizes the details of these activities by:
• Effective Corrections;
• First Nations Policing Policy; and,
• The National Crime Prevention Centre.
This section provides additional information concerning these priorities as well as major
activities in the ongoing operation of CSPB.
The resources associated with Community Safety and Partnership are:
Financial Resources ($000's):
2006-2007
$ 192,375
2007-2008
$ 197,774
2008-2009
$ 169,361
2007-2008
276 FTE
2008-2009
191 FTE
Human Resources:
2006-2007
276 FTE
Operational Priorities:
•
•
•
Ongoing provision of evidence-based, research-supported correctional policies
Strong partnerships with provinces and First Nations for police services in First
Nations communities
Provision of tools, knowledge and support to communities to address the root
causes of crime at the local level
32
Effective Corrections – Aims to improve public safety by enhancing strategies to
support the safe custody and reintegration of offenders who are eligible for return to the
community.
Corrections Activity
Support research, evaluation and policy
development that strengthen effective
corrections and promote successful
reintegration of offenders who are
eligible for return to the community.
Develop, implement, review and
evaluate measures targeting high-risk
offenders.
Address over-representation of
Aboriginal Canadians in the criminal
justice system through the development
of culturally relevant healing models of
justice and corrections in Aboriginal
communities.
Expected Results
More successful reintegration of
offenders and protection of society
against chronic offenders.
Canadians gain confidence in a more
effective corrections and
justice system that is responsive to the
needs of victims and the general public.
Focused and firm responses to serious
and violent offences.
Better control and treatment of sex
offenders will lead to improvements in
community safety.
Increased community capacity to work
with victims, offenders and families
through dissemination of knowledge
gained through pilot projects in
Aboriginal communities.
Coordinated federal support for
community healing through the
Assistant Deputy Minister Steering
Committee on Community Stability and
Wellness and other venues.
Publication of research and technical
reports on issues relating to Aboriginal
people and corrections and criminal
justice.
Effective corrections contributes to the following Strategic Priorities:
•
•
Fighting serious and organized crime; and,
Enhancing community safety and security.
First Nations Policing Policy – Facilitates the negotiation and implementation of
tripartite agreements with provinces and First Nations for First Nations policing services.
The First Nations policing services are culturally appropriate and responsive to the
particular needs of First Nations and Inuit communities and are cost shared 52% by
Canada and 48% by the Province/Territory.
33
First Nations Policing Policy Activity
Enhance public stability in First Nations
communities by negotiating culturally
appropriate First Nations policing
agreements.
Review and consideration of specific
policing options for the territories with
partners.
Develop with partners, a vision to
achieve sustainability for First Nations
Policing Policy.
Conduct research and policy reviews of
Aboriginal public safety options and
service delivery alternatives.
Incorporate indicators of community
stability and well-being into overall
performance measurement strategy.
Strengthen professional capacity of
Aboriginal policing service providers.
Expected Results
Increased access to culturally
appropriate police services for First
Nations communities.
Develop models for policing and public
safety in the Territories.
Modernized First Nations Policing
Policy that responds to current
demographic, environmental, and
political realities with respect to First
Nations policing, and community needs.
Development of policy decisions and
public safety interventions based on
community needs, improved
accountability, and balanced funding
arrangements.
Improved performance indicators
reflecting broader community context,
resulting in informed policy decisions
and resource allocations driven by risk
and need.
Improved management capacity and
enhanced service delivery of
professional, effective and culturally
appropriate policing.
First Nations Policing Policy contributes to the following Strategic Priority:
•
Enhancing community safety and security.
The National Crime Prevention Strategy (NCPS) – Develops, funds and evaluates
strategies and programs targeted to enhance community safety by focusing on crime
reduction strategies designed to achieve measurable results.
The National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC) is responsible for implementing the
National Crime Prevention Strategy.
As part of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada, the NCPC works to
increase community action to prevent crime, develop and share knowledge of effective
crime reduction strategies and coordinate multi-level support for crime reduction.
NCPS Activity
Carefully evaluating the success of
projects in reducing crime in particular
communities.
Expected Results
Improved evaluation of current
practices. Evidence-based policy and
program development.
34
NCPS Activity
Supporting provincial and municipal
efforts to address gang-related
problems.
Expected Results
Increase in protective factors against
gang activity.
Development and implementation of
integrated anti-gang measures and
strategies.
Directing a portion of crime prevention
funds to children and youth at high risk
of coming into conflict with the law, in
areas of high youth crime.
Better understanding of the youth-gang
phenomenon and strategies to respond
to it.
Targeted funding and tailored
programming to the specific needs of
children and youth at risk.
Situations created where children and
youth are provided supportive and
accessible alternatives to crime.
Directing a portion of crime prevention
funds to fighting the problem of drugrelated crime.
Potential reduction in local crime rates
in the medium to longer term.
Assistance to communities most
affected by drug-related crime.
Strengthened measures to assist
individuals afflicted by drug addiction.
More comprehensive and thorough
assessment of local crime problems
leading to more effective interventions.
Facilitating the engagement of all
players in the development of
comprehensive and integrated
approaches to crime reduction, with a
particular emphasis on communities
with high crime rates.
Supporting initiatives that strengthen
and increase the capacity of
communities to fight and reduce local
crime and victimization.
Sustainable crime reduction initiatives.
Greater community ownership of public
safety issues.
Enhanced community capacity to
combat crime.
Reductions in local crime rates in the
medium to long term.
Effective crime prevention contributes to the following Strategic Priorities:
•
Enhancing community safety and security.
35
SECTION III
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION
36
Table 1 : Departmental Planned Spending and Full Time Equivalents
Forecast
Spending
2005-2006
($ millions)
Emergency Management and National Security
Planned
Spending
2006-07
Planned
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
258.2
235.0
65.4
65.3
25.7
38.3
31.2
21.2
Community Safety and Partnerships
180.2
184.8
189.1
160.7
Budgetary Main Estimates (Gross)
430.8
458.1
285.6
247.1
430.8
458.1
285.6
247.1
National Security Policy - Government Operations Centre
7.4
2.6
2.6
2010 Olympic Vancouver Security
0.2
0.2
0.3
Policing and Law Enforcement
Non Budgetary Main Estimates (Gross)
Total Main Estimates
Adjustments:
Governor General Special Warrant request :
2nd request
3rd request
20.0
24.0
Procurement Savings
(0.3)
(0.4)
Compensation for Collective Agreements RM/CM Salaries
Action Plan to enhance Passenger, Rail, Mass Transit and Ferry
Security
1.2
1.4
1.4
1.2
1.9
2.5
Cyber Security Task Force
0.5
Reduce cost of the new Ministry - smaller Cabinet
(0.6)
(0.6)
(0.6)
Reduced cost of the new Ministry - Regional Responsibilities
(0.2)
(0.2)
(0.2)
Advertising Campaign: Public Safety and Security
Arming of Canada Border Services Agency Officer at the Border
and Addressing Work-Alone Situations - Armed Border
Presence
(2.0)
0.2
0.2
0.2
Critical Infrastructure Vulnerability Assessments
1.0
1.0
1.0
National Training and Exercises
5.0
5.0
5.0
National Counterfeit Enforcement Strategy
0.1
0.2
0.1
Youth Crime Prevention
7.5
7.5
7.5
19.0
19.0
19.0
0.2
43.7
40.0
38.2
39.0
474.5
498.1
323.8
286.2
12.9
13.0
12.8
12.3
487.4
511.1
336.6
298.5
727
999
968
872
Core Emergency Response
Strengthening enforcement Budget 2003
Total adjustments
Total Planned Spending
Plus: Cost of Services received without charges
Net Cost of the Program
Full Time Equivalents
37
Table 2: Program by Activities
2006-2007
($ 000's)
Program Activity
Emergency
Management and
National Security
Policing and Law
Enforcement
Community Safety
and Partnerships
Total
Budgetary
Operating
Grants
Contributions
Gross
Revenue
64,979
654
169,348
234,981
-
37,314
-
975
38,289
-
57,126
21,256
106,440
184,822
159,419
21,910
276,763
458,092
38
Net
Adjustments
Total
Total Main
(planned
Planned
Estimates spending not in
Spending
Main Estimates)
234,981 234,981
32,032
267,013
38,289
428
38,717
-
184,822 184,822
7,553
192,375
-
458,092 458,092
40,013
498,105
38,289
Table 3: Voted and Statutory Items listed in Main Estimates
2006-2007
Vote or
Statuory
Item
1
5
(S)
(S)
($ 000's)
Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Operating expenditures
Grants and contributions
Minister of PSEPC salary and motor car
allowance
Contributions to employee benefit plans
Total Department
39
Previous
Current
Main Estimates Main Estimates
147,890
298,673
85,968
335,437
73
70
11,456
458,092
9,343
430,818
Table 4 : Services Received Without Charge
($ 000's)
2006-2007
Accommodation provided by Public Works and Government
Services Canada (PWGSC)
7,105.7
Contributions covering employers' share of employees' insurance
premiums and expenditures paid by Treasury Board of Canada
Secretariat (excluding revolving fun). Employer's contribution to
employee's insured benefits plans and expenditures paid by TBS.
4,521.7
Workman's compensation coverage provided by Social
Development Canada
Salary and associated expenditures of legal services provided by
the Department of Justice Canada.
2006-2007 Services received without charge
40
17.4
1,310.6
12,955.4
Table 5: Resource Requirement by Branch
2006-2007
($ millions)
Emergency
Management and
National Security
IG CSIS
Policing, Law
Enforcement and
Interoperability
Emergency
Management and
National Security
Policing, Law
Enforcement and
Interoperability
Community Safety
and Partnerships
Total
Planned Spending
245.3
-
-
245.3
1.0
-
-
1.0
-
31.5
-
31.5
Community Safety
and Partnerships
177.2
177.2
Corporate
Management
9.8
3.6
7.3
20.7
Porfolio Relations
and Public Affairs
9.0
3.1
6.6
18.6
Executive Branch
1.9
0.6
1.3
3.7
267.0
38.7
192.4
498.1
TOTAL
41
Table 6: Details of Transfer Payments Programs
($ 000's)
2005-2006
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
Grants
Emergency Management and National Security
Joint Infrastructure Interdependencies Research
Program
Fellowships Program in Honour of Stuart Nesbitt
White (OCIPEP)
500
500
500
500
54
154
154
154
554
654
654
654
1,796
1,796
1,796
1,796
19,460
21,256
21,810
19,460
21,256
21,910
19,460
21,256
21,910
19,460
21,256
21,910
877
877
887
887
8,512
8,471
8,471
200,000
209,389
160,000
169,348
9,358
9,358
975
975
975
975
92,223
78,457
Total Contributions
11,040
103,263
313,627
27,983
106,440
276,763
27,983
112,040
122,373
7,440
91,497
101,830
Total Grants and contributions
335,437
298,673
144,283
123,740
Community Safety and Partnerships
National Voluntary Organizations active in the
criminal justice sector
Grants in support of the Safer Communities
Initiative
Total Grants
Contributions
Emergency Management and National Security
Payments to the provinces, territories, public and
private bodies in support of activities
complementary to those of the Minister
Contribution to Provinces and Municipalities Pursuant to
Emergency Preparedness Act (JEPP)
Contribution to Provinces for Assistance Related to Natural
Disasters (DFAA)
8,471
Policing and Law Enforcement
Payments to the provinces, territories, public and
private bodies in support of activities
complementary to those of the Minister
Community Safety and Partnerships
Payments to the provinces, territories, municipalities, Indian
band councils and recognized authorities representing
Indians on- reserve, Indian communities on Crown land and
Inuit communities for the First Nations Policing Program.
Contributions in support of the Safer
Communities Initiative
42
84,057
84,057
SECTION IV
OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST
43
Grant and Contribution Programs Administered by PSEPC
1. Under the First Nations Policing Policy (FNPP), PSEPC negotiates, implements,
administers and monitors tripartite agreements for First Nations policing services.
The First Nations policing services are culturally appropriate and responsive to the
particular needs of First Nations and Inuit communities and are cost-shared 52% by
Canada and 48% by the province/territory.
2. The Joint Emergency Preparedness Program (JEPP) was established to enhance
the national capability to manage all types of emergencies and ensure a reasonably
uniform emergency response and recovery capacity across Canada. National
capabilities are enhanced through training activities, the purchase of emergency
response equipment and joint emergency planning.
3. The Crime Prevention Action Fund (CPAF) supports crime prevention initiatives in
communities large and small. It aims to build partnerships between sectors (such as
policing, community health, voluntary and private sectors) to enhance community
capacity to prevent crime through social development. It is a federal program that is
delivered regionally in partnerships with the provincial and territorial governments,
and nationally for those projects involving more than one jurisdiction.
4. The Policing, Corrections and Communities Fund (PCCF) supports projects
where community partners work together to prevent crime, primarily through social
development. It is intended for law enforcement agencies, community corrections
groups/organizations, Aboriginal communities, community-based organizations and
the municipalities in which they work.
5. The Research and Knowledge Development Fund (RKDF) supports a range of
research activities, demonstration projects, knowledge transfer initiatives and
evaluations that: identify and analyze gaps in the current body of knowledge relating
to crime prevention in Canada; create new knowledge in areas where gaps have
been identified; synthesize the results of existing research; and contribute to a
growing awareness and recognition of promising practices and models for
community-based crime prevention.
6. Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA) assist provinces and
territories to offset the costs of response and of returning infrastructure and personal
property to pre-disaster condition.
7. The Joint Infrastructure Interdependencies Research Program (JIIRP) is jointly
funded with the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC). The
ultimate outcome of the JIIRP is to produce new science-based knowledge and
practices to better assess, manage and mitigate risks to Canadians from critical
infrastructure interdependencies by funding innovative research projects with an
emphasis on cross-disciplinary research.
8. The Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada Research Fellowship
Program in Honour of Stuart Nesbitt White seeks to encourage Ph.D. research in
two key areas:
44
•
•
cyber security relating to critical infrastructure protection, preferably in disciplines
such as computer/software/electrical/mechanical engineering, computer science,
and/or areas such as systems science, and risk modeling and management; and,
disaster and emergency management, and physical critical infrastructure studies,
preferably in disciplines such as urban and regional planning, geography, sociology,
economics, engineering, environmental sciences, and/or areas such as risk
assessment and modeling.
9. The Departmental Contributions Program supports policy development through
allocations to public not-for-profit organizations in support of PSEPC priorities under
the following categories:
•
•
•
communication / information exchange projects;
projects to test innovative approaches for improved and more cost effective program
delivery or projects that support cross-sectoral and inter-jurisdictional policy and
legislative initiatives; and,
research and evaluation projects in support of public policy issues.
10. The Sustaining Funding Program (SFP) for National Voluntary Organizations
(NVOs) provides grants to thirteen NVOs in order to cover core operating expenses
and to maintain a national structure. These organizations provide policy advice to the
Department and Portfolio agencies, and also provide public education activities and
participate in community public safety initiatives.
45
Sustainable Development Strategy
In February of 2004, the Department tabled its last Sustainable Development Strategy,
covering the years 2003-2006. This report was tabled under the Department’s previous
organization as the Solicitor General; shortly after the tabling, the Department underwent
a significant organizational change, to become the Department of Public Safety and
Emergency Preparedness. The 2003-2006 strategy was comprised of corporate
greening initiatives (e.g. waste reductions) and some policy initiatives intended to
promote sustainable Aboriginal policing.
In 2006, the Department will be developing a Sustainable Development Strategy to
cover the fiscal years from 2007-2010. The Sustainable Development Strategy for the
Department will be based on a foundation that Canada’s quality of life and well-being is
determined by several interdependent factors – such as income, health, education, the
quality of the environment, and the safety of communities.
The Department is committed to developing an integrated approach to planning and
decision-making, in order to ensure that the three main dimensions of a sound
sustainable development strategy – namely, the social, economic, and environmental –
are recognized and considered in policy development and implementation.
For the upcoming fiscal year, the Department will:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Conduct an assessment of the 2003-2006 sustainable development strategy;
Develop a Sustainable Development Strategy for 2007-2010;
Enhance the Department’s capacity to take sustainable development into
account in its programs and activities;
Incorporate “lessons learned” from the 2003-2006 strategy;
Align the departmental business planning process with the SDS; and,
Identify measurable targets corresponding to broader government objects related
to sustainable development.
SD principles and values will be addressed through the DG policy committee, which will
oversee the creation and implementation of the SDS at the policy, operational, and
corporate levels.
Previous SDS targets were focused on two areas – waste reduction and Aboriginal
policing. With respect to waste reduction, measuring for the new fiscal year will prove to
be a challenge because the Department will be moving into a new building from several
separate locations around the city. Thus, basing future targets in this area on past
models will not be feasible, although such alternatives as benchmarking against
organizations of a similar size may prove to be feasible. We will be building on past
accomplishments in such areas as First Nations Policing, and continue to build on the
social dimension of sustainable development particularly at the community level.
46
Legislation Administered by the Department and Portfolio Agencies
The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness has sole responsibility
to Parliament for the following Acts:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Canadian Security Intelligence
Service Act
Corrections and Conditional
Release Act
Criminal Records Act
Customs Act
Department of Public Safety and
Emergency Preparedness Act
DNA Identification Act
Emergency Preparedness Act
Firearms Act
Prisons and Reformatories Act
•
•
•
•
•
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Act
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Pension Continuation Act
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Superannuation Act
Sex Offender Information
Registration Act
International Transfer of Offenders
Act
Witness Protection Program Act
PSEP or its Agencies administer the following Acts in whole or in part. Some
contain specific functions of the Minister that the Minister exercises solely or in
conjunction with other Ministers:
PSEP Department∗
• Department of Public Safety and
Emergency Preparedness Act
• Emergency Preparedness Act
National Parole Board
• Corrections and Conditional
Release Act
• Criminal Code
• Criminal Records Act
Canadian Security Intelligence Service
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Correctional Services of Canada
• Corrections and Conditional
Release Act
• Criminal Code
• Extradition Act
• Old Age Security Act
• Prisons and Reformatories Act
Canadian Security Intelligence
Service Act
Charities Registration (Security
Information) Act
Citizenship Act
Employment Equity Act
Immigration and Refugee
Protection Act
Proceeds of Crime (Money
Laundering) and Terrorist
Financing Act
∗
The First Nations Policing Program and National Crime Prevention Centre do not administer specific
legislation.
47
•
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Canadian Peacekeeping Service
Medal Act
Controlled Drugs and Substances
Act
Criminal Code
Criminal Records Act
DNA Identification Act
Excise Act
Export and Import Permits Act
Firearms Act
Foreign Missions and International
Organizations Act
•
•
•
•
•
International Transfer of Offenders
Act
National Defence Act
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Act
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Pension Continuation Act
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Superannuation Act
Security Offences Act
Sex Offender Information
Registration Act
Witness Protection Program Act
Canada Border Services Agency
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Aeronautics Act
Anti-Personnel Mines Convention
Implementation Act (through EIPA)
Blue Water Bridge Authority Act
Bretton Woods and Related
Agreements Act
Canada Agricultural Products Act
Canada Border Services Agency
Act
Canada Customs and Revenue
Agency Act
Canada Grain Act
Canada Post Corporation Act
Canada Shipping Act
Canada-Chili Free Trade
Agreement Implementation Act
Canada-Costa Rica Free Trade
Agreement Implementation Act
Canada-Israel Free Trade
Agreement Implementation Act
Canada-United States Free Trade
Agreement Implementation Act
Canadian Dairy Commission Act
Canadian Environmental Protection
Act, 1999
Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Act
Canadian International Trade
Tribunal Act
Canadian Wheat Board Act
Carriage by Air Act
Chemical Weapons Convention
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
48
Federal-Provincial Fiscal
Arrangements Act
Feeds Act
Fertilizers Act
Firearms Act
Fish Inspection Act
Fisheries Act
Foods and Drugs Act
Foreign Missions and International
Organizations Act
Freshwater Fish Marketing Act
Hazardous Products Act
Health of Animals Act
Immigration and Refugee
Protection Act
Importation of Intoxicating Liquors
Act
Integrated Circuit Topography Act
International Boundary Commission
Act
Manganese-based Fuel Additives
Act
Meat Inspection Act
Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption
Standards Act (not in force)
Motor Vehicle Safety Act
National Energy Board Act
Navigable Waters Protection Act
North American Free Trade
Agreement Implementation Act
Nuclear Energy Act
Nuclear Safety and Control Act
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Implementation Act (though EIPA)
Civil International Space Station
Agreement Implementation Act
Coastal Fisheries Protection Act
Coasting Trade Act
Consumer Packaging and Labelling
Act
Controlled Drug and Substances
Act
Convention on International Trade
in Endangered Species of Wild
Fauna and Flora
Copyright Act
Criminal Code
Cultural Property Export and Import
Act
Customs Act
Customs and Excise Offshore
Application Act
Customs Tariff
Defence Production Act
Department of Health Act
Department of Industry Act
Energy Administration Act
Energy Efficiency Act
Excise Act
Excise Act, 2001
Excise Tax Act
Explosives Act
Export Act
Export and Import of Rough
Diamonds Act
Export and Import Permits Act
Other
•
Canadian Centre on Substance
Abuse Act
49
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Pest Control Products Act
Pilotage Act
Plant Breeders’ Rights Act
Plant Protection Act
Precious Metals Marking Act
Preclearance Act
Privacy Act
Privileges and Immunities (North
Atlantic Organization) Act
Proceeds of Crime (Money
Laundering) and Terrorist
Financing Act
Quarantine Act
Quebec Harbour, Port Warden Act
Radiation Emitting Devices Act
Radiocommunication Act
Seeds Act
Special Economic Measures Act
Special Import Measures Act
Statistics Act
Telecommunications Act
Textile Labelling Act
Trade-Marks Act
Transportation of Dangerous
Goods Act, 1992
United Nations Act
United States Wreckers Act
Visiting Forces Act
Wild Animals and Plant Protection
and Regulation of International and
Interprovincial Trade Act
Provincial Trade Act
Contacts for Further Information
Name
Suzanne Hurtubise
William J.S. Elliott
Patricia Hassard
Chantal Bernier
Elisabeth Nadeau
Diane MacLaren
Marc Whittingham
Daniel Lavoie
Eva Plunkett
Title
Deputy Minister of Public Safety
Associate Deputy Minister of Public Safety
Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Emergency Management
and National Security
Assistant Deputy Minister, Community Safety and
Partnerships
Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Management
Assistant Deputy Minister, Policing, Law Enforcement and
Interoperability
Assistant Deputy Minister, Portfolio Relations and Public
Affairs
Director General, Communications
Inspector General of CSIS
50
Telephone
(613) 991-2895
(613) 990-2633
(613) 991-2820
(613) 993-4325
(613) 990-2615
(613) 990-2703
(613) 949-6435
(613) 990-2743
(613) 949-0675
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