Performance Report Solicitor General Canada TES ESTIMA

Performance Report Solicitor General Canada TES ESTIMA
E S T I M AT E S
Solicitor General Canada
Performance Report
For the period ending
March 31, 2002
The Estimates Documents
Each year, the government prepares Estimates in support of its request to Parliament for
authority to spend public monies. This request is formalized through the tabling of
appropriation bills in Parliament.
The Estimates of the Government of Canada are structured in several parts. Beginning with an
overview of total government spending in Part I, the documents become increasingly more
specific. Part II outlines spending according to departments, agencies and programs and
contains the proposed wording of the conditions governing spending which Parliament will be
asked to approve.
The Report on Plans and Priorities provides additional detail on each department and its
programs primarily in terms of more strategically oriented planning and results information
with a focus on outcomes.
The Departmental Performance Report provides a focus on results-based accountability
by reporting on accomplishments achieved against the performance expectations and results
commitments as set out in the spring Report on Plans and Priorities.
The Estimates, along with the Minister of Finance’s Budget, reflect the government’s annual
budget planning and resource allocation priorities. In combination with the subsequent
reporting of financial results in the Public Accounts and of accomplishments achieved in
Departmental Performance Reports, this material helps Parliament hold the government to
account for the allocation and management of funds.
©Minister of Public Works and Government Services Canada — 2002
Available in Canada through your local bookseller or by mail from
Canadian Government Publishing — PWGSC
Ottawa, Canada K1A 0S9
Catalogue No. BT31-4/74-2002
ISBN 0-660-62153-3
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Departmental Performance Reports 2002
Foreword
In the spring of 2000, the President of the Treasury Board tabled in Parliament the document
“Results for Canadians: A Management Framework for the Government of Canada”. This
document sets a clear agenda for improving and modernising management practices in federal
departments and agencies.
Four key management commitments form the basis for this vision of how the Government will
deliver their services and benefits to Canadians in the new millennium. In this vision,
departments and agencies recognise that they exist to serve Canadians and that a “citizen focus”
shapes all activities, programs and services. This vision commits the Government of Canada to
manage its business by the highest public service values. Responsible spending means spending
wisely on the things that matter to Canadians. And finally, this vision sets a clear focus on
results – the impact and effects of programs.
Departmental performance reports play a key role in the cycle of planning, monitoring,
evaluating, and reporting of results through ministers to Parliament and citizens. Departments
and agencies are encouraged to prepare their reports following certain principles. Based on these
principles, an effective report provides a coherent and balanced picture of performance that is
brief and to the point. It focuses on outcomes - benefits to Canadians and Canadian society - and
describes the contribution the organisation has made toward those outcomes. It sets the
department’s performance in context and discusses risks and challenges faced by the
organisation in delivering its commitments. The report also associates performance with earlier
commitments as well as achievements realised in partnership with other governmental and
non-governmental organisations. Supporting the need for responsible spending, it links resources
to results. Finally, the report is credible because it substantiates the performance information
with appropriate methodologies and relevant data.
In performance reports, departments and agencies strive to respond to the ongoing and evolving
information needs of parliamentarians and Canadians. The input of parliamentarians and other
readers can do much to improve these reports over time. The reader is encouraged to assess the
performance of the organisation according to the principles outlined above, and provide
comments to the department or agency that will help it in the next cycle of planning and
reporting.
This report is accessible electronically from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Internet site:
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/dpr/dpre.asp
Comments or questions can be directed to:
Results-based Management Directorate
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
L’Esplanade Laurier
Ottawa, Ontario K1A OR5
OR to this Internet address: [email protected]
Solicitor General Canada
Performance Report
For the
period ending
March 31, 2002
Hon. Lawrence MacAulay, P.C., M.P.
Solicitor General of Canada
Table of Contents
SECTION I: THE MINISTER'S MESSAGE .....................................................................1
SECTION II: PORTFOLIO/DEPARTMENTAL OVERVIEW ........................................3
A. Portfolio Overview .................................................................................................3
B. Departmental Overview ..........................................................................................6
SECTION III: DEPARTMENTAL PERFORMANCE....................................................11
SECTION IV: CONSOLIDATED REPORTING ............................................................29
SECTION V: FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE................................................................36
SECTION VI: OTHER INFORMATION ........................................................................49
INDEX ...............................................................................................................................52
Section I: The Minister’s Message
I am pleased to present the Performance Report for the Department of the Solicitor
General for the period ending March 31, 2002. The objectives of this report are to
describe the Department’s strategic priorities and to provide a clear sense of the results
achieved against our plans for 2001/2002.
The Department is part of the Portfolio of the Solicitor General, which includes the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), the Correctional Service of Canada, the National
Parole Board, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) and three review bodies.
The Portfolio plays a major role in the Canadian criminal justice system in the areas of
law enforcement, national security, corrections and parole. In fulfilling this role, the
Department provides me with strategic advice and promotes and supports policy cohesion
and coordination across the Portfolio and with our key partners across the country.
In looking back, the plans and priorities for the past year were significantly shaped by the
tragic events of September 11th. This defining moment in history necessitated a shift in
priorities; however, the Portfolio never lost sight of its day-to-day responsibilities and its
commitment to public safety and security. I am proud of the way that law enforcement
and national security officials across Canada responded to these challenges and, in
particular how these officials have enabled Canada to be a key player in the global effort
against terrorism.
The Government is committed to maintaining the safety of Canadians and to improving
our cooperation with the United States and the international community by enhancing the
capacity, coordination and collaboration with our partners. A good example is our cross
border cooperation with the United States. This collaborative approach to public safety
will help to maintain the free flow of goods, people and services between our two
countries and ensure a secure border for our two nations.
By working with our partners, Canada will continue to advance the public safety agenda
by developing strategies for fighting terrorism, combating organized crime, sharing
information and intelligence across criminal justice jurisdictions, promoting effective
corrections and maintaining culturally responsive First Nations policing services. The
Portfolio will also continue to play a key role in the Government of Canada’s Drug
Strategy that focuses on reducing the supply as well as the demand for illicit drugs and
through involvement in the National Strategy on Community Safety and Crime
Prevention.
Section I: The Minister’s Message
Page 1
If we are to be successful in building safe communities we need to engage Canadians and
key partners in the development of criminal justice policy through to implementation and
operation of our initiatives. To this end, we will continue to consult Canadians and
enhance our partnerships to maximize our efforts in the fight against crime. The
Department, in collaboration with the Portfolio Agencies and other key federal
departments has established a Public Safety Portal. The portal provides a single window
for Canadians to quickly and easily find information and services relating to public
safety. The portal will be officially launched this fall. The web address will be
www.safecanada.ca.
As always, we welcome your feedback on the report. On page 49 you will find a list of
departmental contacts. I would also draw your attention to our Internet address:
www.sgc.gc.ca where you can obtain further information.
This report also includes an overview of the Portfolio Agencies and organizations that
report to, or through, me to Parliament. Each agency in the Portfolio, with the exception
of CSIS, prepares its own separate performance report, and these reports are tabled in
Parliament. I would encourage you to consult these individual reports for more
information on the agencies and our accomplishments over the past year.
Hon. Lawrence MacAulay, P.C., M.P.
Solicitor General of Canada
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Solicitor General Canada
Section II: Portfolio/Departmental Overview
A. Portfolio Overview
Roles and Responsibilities of the Portfolio of the Solicitor General
The Portfolio of the Solicitor General is responsible within the Government of Canada
for policing and law enforcement (including Aboriginal policing), national security,
corrections and conditional release.
The Portfolio includes the Department and four Agencies: the Royal Canadian Mounted
Police (RCMP), the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), the Correctional
Service of Canada (CSC) and the National Parole Board (NPB). There are also three
review bodies: the RCMP External Review Committee, the Commission for Public
Complaints against the RCMP and the Office of the Correctional Investigator. Together,
these organizations have a combined budget of over $3.5 billion and over 35,000
employees. Each Portfolio Agency, with the exception of CSIS, prepares an individual
Performance Report outlining their individual accomplishments and key results.
The Department, Portfolio Agencies and Review Bodies each contribute, specifically and
collectively, to the public safety agenda as outlined below:
•
The Department provides policy advice and support to the Solicitor General on all
aspects of his mandate that includes providing direction to the Agencies, ensuring
accountability to Parliament for the Agencies and national public safety leadership.
•
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police enforces Canadian laws, prevents crime and
maintains peace, order and security. The RCMP has responsibility to: prevent,
detect and investigate offences against federal statutes; maintain law and order and
prevent, detect and investigate crime in the provinces, territories and municipalities
where the Force has a policing contract; provide investigative and protective
services to other federal departments and agencies; and provide all Canadian law
enforcement agencies with specialized police training and research, forensic
laboratory services, identification services and informatics technology.
•
The Canadian Security Intelligence Service provides security intelligence to the
Government. CSIS collects, analyzes and retains information and intelligence on
activities that may be suspected of constituting threats to the security of Canada;
reports to and advises the Government in relation to these threats; and provides
security assessments.
Section II: Portfolio/Departmental Overview
Page 3
•
The Correctional Service of Canada administers sentences of convicted offenders
sentenced to imprisonment for two or more years. It also prepares offenders for
their return as useful citizens to the community. CSC provides services across the
country to offenders within correctional institutions and in the community.
•
The National Parole Board is an independent administrative body, which grants,
denies and controls the conditional release of inmates from federal penitentiaries
and recommends the exercise of the Royal Prerogative of Mercy and the granting of
pardons. In addition, NPB exercises the same powers and responsibilities, with the
exception of the granting of temporary absences, for provincial inmates in
provinces and territories without their own parole boards.
•
The RCMP External Review Committee reviews certain types of grievances,
formal disciplinary, discharge and demotion appeals referred by the RCMP. This
Committee, which reports annually to Parliament, is a neutral third party providing
an independent and impartial review of cases. The Committee may institute
hearings, summon witnesses, administer oaths and receive and accept such
evidence or other information as the Committee sees fit. The findings and
recommendations of either the Chairman or the Committee are sent to the parties
and to the Commissioner of the RCMP.
•
The Commission for Public Complaints against the RCMP reviews public
complaints regarding the conduct of the RCMP in an open, independent and
objective manner. The Commission provides information to the public regarding
its mandate and services, reviews and investigates complaints regarding the conduct
of RCMP members, holds public hearings, prepares reports, including findings and
recommendations, and conducts research and policy development to improve the
public complaints process.
•
The Office of the Correctional Investigator conducts investigations into
decisions, recommendations, acts or omissions of the Commissioner of Corrections
or any person under the control and management of, or performing services on
behalf of the Commissioner, that affect offenders, either individually or as a group.
The Office of the Correctional Investigator is independent of CSC and may initiate
an investigation upon receipt of a complaint by or on behalf of an offender, at the
request of the Minister or on its own initiative.
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Section II: Portfolio/Departmental Overview
Page 5
B. Departmental Overview
The primary objective of the Department is to contribute to the public safety
of Canadians through the promotion and maintenance of a just, peaceful and
safe society.
The Department is a small, strategic and policy-focused centre. Its primary role is to
support the Solicitor General with strategic policy advice on matters related to public
safety including policing and law enforcement, national security, corrections and parole.
It also has continuing responsibility for First Nations policing. While the Portfolio
Agencies offer operational expertise, the Department develops portfolio-wide strategic
policy advice and provides leadership and facilitation from an overall government
perspective.
To this end, the Department advises, supports and assists the Solicitor General in all of
his responsibilities which include:
• providing effective direction to the Portfolio Agencies;
• exercising national leadership on public safety issues;
• implementing the First Nations Policing Policy through the negotiation,
administration, maintenance and evaluation of tripartite policing agreements with
provincial, territorial and First Nations governments; and
• answering in Parliament for the Portfolio.
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Outputs
Timely and
responsive advice
Public
education
Partnerships/collaborative
approaches
Strategic policy
and legislation
First Nations
policing agreements
Outcomes
Sustained strategic and
legislative policy
framework
Sustainable Aboriginal
Communities that support
future growth
Increased involvement of partners in
policy development
Improved coordination and
enhanced capacity to respond
Increased sharing of criminal justice information
Safe Communities
Enhanced public safety and national security
Section II: Portfolio/Departmental Overview
Page 7
Operating Environment
The tragic events of September 11, 2001 in the United States have heightened public
awareness about security. Although public opinion polls have fluctuated over the past
several months it still ranks as a significant concern for Canadians. For example,
terrorism/national security ranked second at 19% behind healthcare/Medicare in a May
2002 Ipsos–Reid Express survey on policy issues warranting government’s attention. In
the same survey, crime/justice issues were mentioned by 4% of respondents.
There is tremendous pressure on the Government to detect and respond to potential risks
to public safety and national security while at the same time respecting citizens’ civil and
privacy rights. This changing nature of the policy environment presents challenges and
opportunities for the Portfolio to maintain and improve public safety in Canada. The
principal factors to be considered in developing integrated strategies are:
•
Public safety and security are strongly influenced by global developments including
economic, ideological and ethnic disparities. At the same time, national and
international governments are challenged by the unprecedented rate of movement of
goods, services, people, money and information across borders.
•
Organized crime continues to be a threat to public safety and is increasingly complex.
It takes on different forms, uses a variety of tools, including new technologies and
typically its activities cross many jurisdictions. As new technologies are developed,
new forms of crime surface such as bio-terrorism and cyber crime and are exploited
by criminals worldwide. These technologies are used to shield activities ranging
from murder, money laundering, drug trafficking, people smuggling and terrorism.
Effective legislation and regulatory tools are essential to deal with these new crimes
and other emerging issues/threats.
•
Through immigration, Canada is becoming a more ethnically, culturally and
religiously diverse country. This challenges the ability of the policing and
correctional communities to meet the needs of growing ethnic population in terms of
recruitment, enforcement, culturally sensitive service delivery, community
supervision and community involvement.
•
The United Nations predicts that by the year 2050 the number of older persons in the
world will exceed the number of young for the first time in history. Research
indicates that fear of crime increases with age, therefore Canada’s ageing population
will require specialized law enforcement support that meets the needs and responds to
the concerns of the older population.
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•
At the same time, an ageing offender population requires specialized health and
security requirements in correctional facilities. In addition, older offenders require
different programming and activities adapted to their specific needs.
•
Aboriginal people are still over-represented in the justice system. Based on the 1996
Census, the Aboriginal community represents 2% of the Canadian population but
17% of the offenders. It is expected that this situation will worsen over the coming
years with the rapid growth in the Aboriginal youth population.
•
Rural populations are decreasing worldwide leading to increased pressure on many
fronts in urban centres including infrastructure, employment, housing and the
environment.
•
The incompatibility of numerous electronic systems and the need for interoperability
are challenges that are being addressed to facilitate the collection and sharing of
information across all aspects of the criminal justice system.
•
In addition to technological investments there is a growing need for enhanced policy
integration amongst all partners, domestically and internationally, across the criminal
justice sectors.
Section II: Portfolio/Departmental Overview
Page 9
STRATEGIC OUTCOMES AND PRIORITIES
Initiatives to enhance domestic security
measures and strategies and to further
strengthen cross-border and overseas
collaboration against terrorists in the areas of
Effective delivery of criminal justice
programs through faster and better
criminal justice information sharing
through
• Counter-terrorism
• Lawful Access
• Independent advice to the Minister on CSIS’
activities
• Partnerships
• Architecture, Standards and Tools
Establishment and maintenance of
policing services that are professional,
effective and responsive to the needs of
First Nations and Inuit communities
through
• Public Order
• Organized crime
• Crime Prevention
PUBLIC SAFETY
• Enhanced governance and accountability
in First Nations Police services and
governing authorities
• Tripartite policing agreements
• Innovative approaches in First Nations
policing
Page 10
Measures to advance effective
corrections in the interests of
public safety for
• Restorative Justice
• Aboriginal community-based
initiatives
• Legislative and policy
responses
Effective and efficient corporate infrastructure
to support departmental objectives through
•
•
•
•
Innovative strategies and better tools for
law enforcement to respond to organized
crime and other criminal activities in
both the domestic and international
contexts for
Support to Minister & Deputy Solicitor General
Human Resource Management
Government On-Line
Modern Comptrollership
Engagement of citizens, all levels of
government and the voluntary sector
in criminal justice policy development
through
Solicitor General Canada
• Voluntary Sector support and citizen
engagement
• Public Education
Section III: Departmental Performance
Strategic Outcome
Initiatives to enhance domestic security measures and strategies and to further
strengthen cross-border and overseas collaboration against terrorists
$3,607.4K
Results for Canadians
A range of initiatives undertaken by the Department in 2001/2002 resulted in a
strengthened legislative and operational capability to respond to the threat of terrorism;
development of technical solutions to enable national security and law enforcement
agencies to lawfully intercept evolving communications; and the provision of
independent advice to the Minister on CSIS’ activities.
The Department developed in conjunction with partners the proposal to enhance national
counter-terrorism response capability for the threat of chemical, biological, radiological,
nuclear (CBRN) terrorism. This proposal resulted in the allocation of $513M in Budget
2001, to strengthen national response capability for the threat of CBRN terrorism. The
funding will support training, equipment purchases and research and development to
produce better counter-terrorism tools for first responders.
The Department, under its Operational Readiness Program, and in partnership with
federal, provincial and municipal stakeholders, promoted operational readiness of
national counter-terrorism arrangements through training and awareness activities. This
included a major Canada-US tabletop exercise in February 2002, and in January 2002, a
counter-terrorism workshop and tabletop exercise for first responders in Calgary.
The Department was a key participant in implementing the Government’s Anti-Terrorism
Plan including a lead role in developing and implementing certain components of the
Anti-terrorism Act, (e.g., listing entities, Charities Registration (Security Information)
Act) which received Royal Assent on December 18, 2001.
Internationally, the number of joint research and development projects under the
Canada/US bilateral counter-terrorism agreement increased. Discussions by Canada,
United Kingdom and United States, to coordinate efforts and exchange information to
counter chemical and biological terrorism, were enhanced by the inclusion of Australia.
Lawful access is an essential component in maintaining the safety and security of all
Canadians. Lawful interceptions, when employed in criminal investigations, result in a
conviction rate in excess of 90 per cent. To ensure continued intercept capability, the
Department has played a lead role in coordinating law enforcement and national security
agency efforts in the development of technical solutions to maintain lawful access.
Section III: Departmental Performance
Page 11
New technologies allow criminals and terrorists to hide their activities from detection.
The Department has therefore been working with federal partners to ensure that Canada’s
legislative framework continues to support lawful access, while upholding fundamental
rights such as privacy.
The Department provided independent advice to the Minister on proposals and
recommendations submitted by CSIS for his approval. This advice took into account
CSIS’ legal obligations, particularly related to the rights of Canadians and the Minister’s
public safety role especially in light of the increased responsibilities included in the AntiTerrorism Act.
The Office of the Inspector General continued to serve as the Solicitor General’s internal
auditor for CSIS, providing an independent means of assurance that CSIS is complying
with the law, ministerial direction and operational policy.
Risks/Challenges
The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and the follow-on anthrax letters, added
urgency to the initiative led by the Solicitor General to strengthen national counterterrorism response capability and meet a requirement to enhance related programs, which
the Department had been leading on prior to September 11th. Because of groundwork
carried out before September 11th, the Department, on behalf of the Government of
Canada, was able to move quickly to complete the initiative. Results were presented to
Ministers early enough to be reflected in the Federal Budget in December 2001.
The federal Anti-Terrorism Plan, combined with the ongoing threat, required the
Department to move forward quickly with a broad range of legislative initiatives to
disrupt, dismantle and prevent terrorist activities in cooperation with other departments
and agencies. Although the fallout from September 11th did delay progress on certain
program files including a review of the National Counter-Terrorism Plan and renewed
arrangements with the provinces pursuant to the Security Offences Act, the lessons
learned as a result of the post-September 11th initiatives will strengthen the final result of
the postponed initiatives.
Today, wireline providers are joined in the communications market by a variety of
wireless providers and a large number of Internet service providers, resulting in a
complex environment in which law enforcement and national security agencies must
carry out their investigations. It is critical that law enforcement and national security
agencies keep pace with these increasingly diverse technologies to ensure lawful access.
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Partners
As national security involves many levels of government, the Department works closely
with local, regional, national and international organizations in order to effectively
respond to emerging threats.
With respect to counter-terrorism, the Department works with both domestic and
international partners including:
Domestic: Office of Critical Infrastructure Protection and Emergency Preparedness,
RCMP, Canadian Security Intelligence Service, Health Canada, National Defence,
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Citizenship and
Immigration Canada, Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Canada Customs and
Revenue Agency, Environment Canada, Finance, Transport Canada, Department of
Justice, Privy Council Office, provinces/territories and first responders.
International: US Department of State, US Department of Defense, US Department of
Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Secret Service, Federal Aviation
Administration, Office of the Australian Attorney General and United Kingdom Home
Office.
In ensuring there is a sound legislative framework that supports lawful access, the
Department has developed strong partnerships with the RCMP, the Canadian Security
Intelligence Service, Industry Canada, Department of Justice, provincial and municipal
police agencies, police associations and private sector companies and associations from
the high technology and communications sectors.
Evaluations Undertaken
Annually the Department submits a report to Treasury Board that accounts for the
resources spent to develop technical solutions to maintain lawful access and progress on
the review of Canada’s legislative framework to support lawful access.
Linkage to the Speech from the Throne Themes
The work carried out by the Department to strengthen legislative and operational
capability to respond to the threat of terrorism contributed directly to the Government of
Canada objective of building strong and safe communities, particularly its commitment to
respond to “emerging threats to security, such as…terrorism.”
The Government of Canada recognizes that new information and communications
technologies are increasingly challenging the investigative abilities of the police and
national security agencies. This was reflected in the January 2001 Speech from the
Throne, with commitments to provide modern tools to safeguard Canadians from
emerging threats such as cyber-crime, terrorism and organized crime.
Section III: Departmental Performance
Page 13
Strategic Outcome
Innovative strategies and better tools for law enforcement to respond to organized crime
and other criminal activities in both the domestic and international contexts $5,344.3K
Results for Canadians
Fighting organized crime remains a key priority for the Government. The National
Agenda to Combat Organized Crime, endorsed by federal/provincial/territorial Ministers
responsible for justice in September 2000, ensures that there is an ongoing, focused,
collaborative and multidisciplinary approach to addressing the threat posed to Canadians
by organized criminal activity.
The national policy priorities identified include illegal drugs, outlaw motorcycle gangs,
money laundering, high-tech crimes, crimes on the Internet and illegal immigration and
trafficking in human beings. Other emerging pressures include street gangs, intimidation
of persons in the criminal justice system, illegal gaming, auto theft, illegal trading in
diamonds and threat of corruption as an international concern.
Bill C-24, which contained amendments to the Criminal Code designed to strengthen the
abilities of the police against organized crime, received Royal Assent in December 2001.
The Department has worked with Department of Justice and others on implementation
issues for this important addition to the law enforcement toolkit.
The Department undertakes research, evaluation and coordination activities aimed at
increasing overall knowledge and understanding of organized crime. To this end, the
Department in conjunction with its partners initiated the development of a framework for
the collection of data that will measure and assess the scope, trends and impact of
selective organized crime activities in Canada. Upon finalization this framework will
assist in addressing current knowledge gaps and will be used to monitor and analyze
trends.
Funding was also provided to the Akwesasne Mohawk Police under the Government’s
“Measures to Combat Organized Crime Initiative” and the “Tobacco Control Strategy”
that enables them to participate in a joint investigative unit and other multi-agency joint
forces operations in and around the region of Akwesasne. This will contribute to more
effective domestic and international investigations and prosecutions.
A major source of revenue for organized crime groups is producing and supplying illicit
drugs. The government’s strategy is to provide a balance of measures aimed at reducing
the demand and supply through measures focused on prevention, harm reduction,
treatment and enforcement. In support of this, the Department worked with partners in
the development and implementation of drug policies and regulations in support of the
National Drug Strategy, and provided policy advice to the Solicitor General on substance
abuse issues involving institutional and community programming for offenders.
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The Department also participated in the evaluation of the individual and collective drug
control efforts of member states of the Inter–American Drug Abuse Control Commission
(CICAD). Five areas were evaluated: national plans and strategies; prevention and
treatment; reduction of drug production; law enforcement measures; and the cost of the
drug problem. This evaluation established a baseline of hemispheric drug control efforts
using a common set of indicators against which future progress could be measured. The
second evaluation commenced in November 2001 and will be completed in December
2003.
Working with police and police associations, and correctional services associations, the
Department contributes to the building of community capacity to address the needs of
individuals at risk, particularly youth in rural and remote areas and children of offenders.
Through the National Strategy on Community Safety and Crime Prevention, the
Department has funded projects to strengthen and build capacity in the areas of policing
and corrections to address the root causes of crime through initiatives such as crime and
victimization issues in Aboriginal and remote/isolated communities; substance abuse
awareness and prevention; and strategies to deal with youth at risk.
Risks/Challenges
Quantifying the scope and nature of organized crime is an ongoing challenge. Measures
are being put in place to enhance the Government’s ability to meet this challenge, and to
allow greater understanding of the threat posed by organized crime to Canadians.
Measurement and evaluation of the achievement and progress of anti-crime enforcement
initiatives will be a continuing challenge for Portfolio Agencies.
Partners
The Department works with key agencies such as the RCMP and Canadian Security
Intelligence Service, Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Department of Justice,
Canada Customs and Revenue Agency, Health Canada, Citizenship and Immigration
Canada, FINTRAC, Public Works and Government Services Canada as well as
provincial and local governments, and provincial and municipal police forces.
In addition, the Department has been instrumental in establishing mechanisms to
strengthen partnerships and enhance coordination and collaboration in the area of
organized crime through the Canada-U.S. Cross-Border Forum, the National
Coordinating Committee on Organized Crime and the Federal/Provincial/Territorial
Deputy Ministers Steering Committee on Organized Crime.
Section III: Departmental Performance
Page 15
Evaluations Undertaken
The Department plays a policy coordination role for the Integrated Proceeds of Crime
(IPOC) initiative. The IPOC initiative, which began in 1997, is a horizontally integrated
enforcement activity with multidisciplinary teams that target the illicit assets of upper
levels of organized crime, drug trafficking and terrorism. These law enforcement and
investigative abilities are important to the implementation of specialized legislation
designed to deal with money laundering (Bill C-22), organized crime and terrorism. The
contextual objectives within which the IPOC initiative operates (safety of Canadians;
perception that justice is being done; maintenance of law and order; maintenance of the
viability of Canada’s social and economic fabric; reduction of crime; maintenance of
Canada’s credibility in law enforcement internationally) underline the level of
contribution to the safety and security of Canadians as well as international partners that
can be made with innovative enforcement and legislation.
Several countries, including the United Kingdom, Australia, South Africa as well as the
United Nations, have studied the Canadian IPOC model to learn from its success, further
enhancing Canada’s influence in this area internationally.
Working with the various partners in the initiative, including Department of Justice, the
RCMP, the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency, and Public Works and Government
Services Canada, an evaluation of the initiative was completed, covering the period from
April 1999 to March 2001, in February 2002. The Department is now working with
partners to implement related recommendations.
Linkage to the Speech from the Throne Themes
Combating organized crime is a key priority that emanates directly from the 2001 Speech
from the Throne in which the Government made a commitment to take “aggressive steps
to combat organized crime” to meet threats to the public safety through the provision of
enhanced tools to law enforcement officers. An Act to Amend the Criminal Code
(Organized Crime and Law Enforcement) (Bill C-24) and the Anti-Terrorism Act
(Bill C-36) are examples of this commitment to Canadians, including the commitment to
building safe communities.
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Solicitor General Canada
Strategic Outcome
Measures to advance effective corrections in the interests of public safety
$3,622.4K
Results for Canadians
Effective corrections means distinguishing between those offenders who need to be
separated from society, and those who could be better managed in the community. It is a
set of initiatives designed to promote public safety by providing offenders with the best
opportunities to become law-abiding citizens. This includes the development of
community and institutional corrections initiatives designed for and with Aboriginals.
One of these initiatives included Canada-wide consultations with registered victims of
crime and organizations representing victims. The results of these consultations were
published and provided to victims and will form the basis of proposals for legislative
change to improve how victims are treated within the federal corrections and conditional
release system. In collaboration with Portfolio Agencies, the Department also released
an Information Guide to assist victims in matters related to federal corrections and
conditional release.
As well, research has been conducted on the assessment, management and treatment of
offenders. The knowledge gained from the Department’s research on sex offenders is
now being applied in jurisdictions across Canada to train probation and parole officers to
monitor offender characteristics and warning signs most strongly associated with
recidivism. By systematically collecting information on salient risk factors, officers have
an objective basis for determining when and where to intervene in their supervision of
sex offenders.
The Department’s research and development in the field of restorative justice is yielding
information about the application of restorative processes in criminal justice and
corrections. For example, the evaluation of the Collaborative Justice Project operated in
Ottawa by the Church Council on Justice and Corrections found that a very high
percentage of victims and offenders had positive attitudes about the process and
outcomes of this restorative justice program and would choose a restorative justice
approach in the future.
The capacity of Aboriginal people to assume greater responsibility for corrections and
healing processes was enhanced through the provision of targeted information to
Aboriginal communities and support to learning opportunities for community workers.
Healing processes are being tested in an urban area and in the North, which should
enhance the development of appropriate models of community corrections and healing.
Section III: Departmental Performance
Page 17
Community healing strategies tested by the Department demonstrate an efficient, costeffective alternative to addressing the needs of Aboriginal offenders, victims and their
families. Recidivism rates are lower than for offenders sentenced to institutions and
these processes result in several other community benefits that promote personal and
community well being and safety.
Lessons learned from Aboriginal community corrections and healing approaches offer
valuable insights into alternatives that non-Aboriginal communities may choose to
promote for their own communities.
Risks/Challenges
Introducing and exploring the application of restorative justice has presented challenges
for the Department. Since restorative justice is a broad and evolving field there is a need
for more dialogue among criminal justice professionals and communities on what
restorative justice means and how it can best be implemented. For example, there have
been concerns expressed by some victims’ advocates that restorative justice programs
may fail to take into account the rights and interests of victims. The U.N. Basic
Principles on the Use of Criminal Justice Programmes in Criminal Matters are intended
to guide the development of restorative justice policies and programs in a manner that
safeguards the rights and interests of all parties. Nevertheless, more effort will be
required, working with a broad range of governmental and non-governmental partners, to
establish guidelines and standards for the operation of restorative justice programs in the
Canadian context.
The majority of Aboriginal communities continue to rely on the Canadian justice and
corrections systems to address crime in their communities. Communities must be
allowed to advance at their own pace and in a direction that is suitable for them.
Additional effort needs to be placed in providing information and capacity in Aboriginal
communities so that the impact of community healing processes can be adequately tested
and evaluated. The Aboriginal Community Corrections Initiative received additional
funds to support community capacity building and is expanding its work into other
communities as a result.
Partners
The Department is working with a wide range of partners. These include the Portfolio
Agencies (the Correctional Service of Canada, the National Parole Board and the
RCMP), other federal government departments, notably the Department of Justice, Indian
and Northern Affairs Canada and Health Canada, and provincial and territorial
departments with responsibilities for criminal justice and corrections. In addition, the
Department relies on partnerships with various national and local voluntary sector
organizations involved in corrections and Aboriginal justice.
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Solicitor General Canada
For example, through the Government’s Voluntary Sector Initiative, two formal
partnership projects that support the Effective Corrections Initiative have been
established. One project is with the John Howard Society of Canada to develop policy
capacity in corrections and conditional release. The other project involves a partnership
with Conflict Resolution Network Canada to support policy development and
consultation on restorative justice, and is focusing on the U.N. Basic Principles.
As well, the Dynamic Supervision Research Project includes the participation of all
provinces and territories and the states of Alaska and Iowa.
Evaluations Undertaken
The following evaluations have been undertaken to determine the effectiveness of
specific projects under the Aboriginal Community Corrections Initiative:
2000 – Final Evaluation of the Aboriginal Community Corrections Initiative
2001 – Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Hollow Water’s Community Holistic Circle
Healing Process
2002 – Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Biidaaban Community Healing Process on the
Mnjikaning First Nation (to be released in Fall 2002)
Linkage to the Speech from the Throne Themes
The 2001 Speech from the Throne stated that Canadian communities of all sizes –
whether urban or rural, Aboriginal or multicultural face diverse challenges and have
unique needs. The Speech also states: “It is a tragic reality that too many Aboriginal
people are finding themselves in conflict with the law. Canada must take the measures
needed to significantly reduce the percentage of Aboriginal people entering the criminal
justice system, so that within a generation it is no higher than the Canadian average.”
The Department’s initiatives to support victims are consistent with the government’s
commitments to build strong and safe communities. In addition, the work that the
Department has under taken in the area of restorative justice and Aboriginal corrections
are designed to support greater involvement of communities in responding to crime in
their communities.
Section III: Departmental Performance
Page 19
Strategic Outcome
Establishment and maintenance of policing services that are professional, effective and
responsive to the needs of First Nations and Inuit communities
$65,250.0K
Results for Canadians
There are more than 120 communities with tripartite policing agreements under the First
Nations Policing Policy (FNPP), which provides the foundation for culturally
appropriate, community-based policing in First Nation communities. Negotiations to
renew existing agreements and to enter into a limited number of new agreements were
undertaken throughout the year. In addition, where possible and appropriate,
developmental funding was provided to communities to undertake analyses of policing
needs.
These agreements enhance public safety in First Nation communities through improving
quality of life by providing a stable platform from which other goals can be achieved,
such as keeping teachers and nurses in remote communities, and facilitating economic
development to help address social gaps. This initiative also provides meaningful
employment opportunities for police officers and civilians and encourages youth to aspire
to join cadet corps and police services.
Well-developed First Nations police services enjoy high levels of public confidence -not only from the communities they police, but also from other police services that
consider them as key partners in the broader law enforcement agenda. For example, the
Akwesasne Mohawk Police Service was successful in leading a inter-jurisdictional
coalition of police services in diffusing a difficult situation on the Seaway International
Bridge during the April 2001 Summit of the Americas.
Improved accountability, governance, and performance monitoring increase and
strengthen community capacity to address problems of crime, personal safety, public
security and public confidence, and significantly enhance the federal and
provincial/territorial ability to improve and adjust the FNPP as required. This framework
also provides the communities with an opportunity to manage, direct, and participate in
the police service through police governing authorities and community consultative
groups.
Financial controls and community accountability are assured through the requirement for
annual audited financial statements for all self-administered policing agreements, and the
continuing implementation of a minimum five-year audit cycle for major selfadministered police services by Consulting and Audit Canada. Seven audits were
conducted in 2001-02. Follow-up audits ensured the implementation of
recommendations.
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Solicitor General Canada
Recognizing that policing standards are within provincial jurisdiction, a process to
review the application of provincial standards to First Nations policing was begun with
the First Nations Chiefs of Police Association and the Quebec Association of First
Nations Chiefs of Police. Opportunities to discuss key issues relative to the development
of standards were created via a National Aboriginal Summit on Policing in November
2001 and through special meetings with the Associations.
Innovative approaches in the areas of crime prevention, domestic/family violence and
youth crime resulted in improved relationships between police and Aboriginal youth
through the increased availability of social and community activities. As well, due to the
increased police presence and involvement there was a reduced incidence of contact with
the criminal justice system for youth. This contributed to the overall improved social
order, public security and public safety in communities.
Risks/Challenges
One of the key challenges facing the Department over the next few years is to manage the
limited program resources currently available versus the demand for more police
services. In the long run, the lack of additional resources will erode operational police
budgets that could in turn lead to a corresponding decrease in levels of service. This
could increase risks to public safety and could potentially undermine the gains made to
date.
The existing budgets do not take into account the changing context in which the FNPP
operates. There is an increased influence of organized crime, gangs, etc., in First Nations
communities that will need to be addressed in the near future through additional
programs and resources.
The FNPP has been cited as “an excellent example of flexible federalism”, demonstrating
effective partnerships in a complex area of shared jurisdiction. In maintaining these
partnerships the Department must balance the application of various provincial police
acts and related standards for First Nations policing to maximize the effectiveness of the
program.
Section III: Departmental Performance
Page 21
Partners
The Department partners with the following wide range of stakeholders to maximize
access to First Nations policing arrangements and to strengthen governance and
accountability: First Nations police and governing authorities; Band councils;
Community leaders; Elders; RCMP; provinces/territories; provincial/territorial police
services; municipalities; Indian and Northern Affairs Canada; and Public Works and
Government Services Canada.
Evaluations Undertaken
A results-based accountability framework (RMAF) for the FNPP is presently being
developed as the road map for a future evaluation.
Linkage to the Speech from the Throne Themes
The January 2001 Speech from the Throne focused on several commitments that support
the overall objectives of this program including strengthening the relationship with
Aboriginal people; reducing the percentage of Aboriginal people entering the criminal
justice system; and continuing to work with provinces and territories, communities and
all partners to implement a balanced approach to addressing crime. As well, the
objectives of this program are consistent with the government’s overall commitments to
build strong and safe communities.
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Solicitor General Canada
Strategic Outcome
Effective delivery of criminal justice programs through faster and better criminal justice
information sharing
$4,372.6K
Results for Canadians
The Integrated Justice Information (IJI) initiative has been undertaken in response to the
Government of Canada’s commitment to improving public safety and enhancing
Canadians’ confidence in the criminal justice system.
Now in its third year of a five-year development and implementation phase, work is
progressing towards the realization of the first generation of the Canada Public Safety
Information Network (CPSIN). CPSIN is a long-term initiative establishing a modern,
national information sharing capacity in the criminal justice system, while protecting the
privacy of Canadian citizens. Agencies will gain access to accurate and up-to-date
criminal justice information to support decision-making. This improved electronic
information sharing will significantly enhance the effectiveness of the law enforcement
and criminal justice communities as components of CPSIN are implemented and
emerging issues related to a national approach are addressed through collaboration with
key partners. This will streamline the government’s use of resources, reduce duplication
of effort and strengthen the country’s capacity to deliver public safety.
Significant advances have been made with federal criminal justice partners in the policyrelated initiatives, data standards development and other key technology components, all
aimed at establishing a coordinated approach to the management, sharing and use of
information within the criminal justice system.
Risks/Challenges
The administration of criminal justice in Canada consists of many agencies working
within and across a number of jurisdictions, including municipal, provincial/territorial,
federal and international. These agencies are functionally independent yet rely on
information from external sources. This complex jurisdictional landscape presents
numerous challenges in trying to share information between agencies, including privacy
protection, the incompatibility of electronic systems, the lack of resources to develop
linking mechanisms, and systemic and cultural obstacles to sharing information.
This major initiative requires the sustained commitment of many agencies to be
successful. It has been and continues to be, a significant challenge to deal with issues of
effectiveness across jurisdictions and agencies all with their own mandates, funding
levels and priorities. To obtain agreement among so many agencies on critical issues is a
constant challenge for the Department.
Section III: Departmental Performance
Page 23
The tragic events of September 11th illuminated the importance of information sharing in
the interests of public safety and resulted in several key deliverables being initiated,
intensified and fast-tracked. This heightened pressure to deliver Integrated Justice
Information (IJI) projects more quickly, reducing time lines significantly. The
Department increased its efforts and maximized resources to meet these expectations and
produced key policy and technology components required to enable enhanced
information sharing in the criminal justice system.
The potential engagement of other partners and stakeholders was also accelerated,
including the involvement of federal, provincial and territorial agencies. September 11th
also brought about intangible benefits by promoting momentum, consensus, commitment
and visibility, all of which are critical to both the short-term and long-term success of the
IJI initiative.
Partners
The Department continues to lead the coordinated development and implementation of
key federal IJI components related to the establishment of the Canada Public Safety
Information Network. This involves supporting the Deputy-level Steering Committee on
Integrated Justice Information with representatives from the nine federal partners –
Canada Customs and Revenue Agency, Citizenship and Immigration Canada,
Correctional Service of Canada, Department of Justice, National Parole Board, RCMP,
Statistics Canada – Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, and Treasury Board
Secretariat.
The IJI partnership now has links beyond the federal partners to include a
Federal/Provincial/Territorial Leadership Network promoting effective partnerships and
sharing of best practices to ensure harmonization of IJI initiatives in Canada.
Evaluations Undertaken
A performance measurement framework for CPSIN has been established. The collection
of baseline information regarding public attitudes and confidence concerning information
sharing and use by criminal justice agencies has been completed. This will enable
measurement of increased awareness and support for the improved electronic sharing of
criminal justice information. Further development of key indicators is underway and the
first iteration of performance measurement is planned.
Linkage to the Speech from the Throne Themes
This initiative is in response to the Government of Canada’s commitment to improving
public safety and enhancing Canadians’ confidence in the criminal justice system. The
Department’s involvement in this initiative is consistent with the Government of
Canada’s overall commitment to strong and safe communities.
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Solicitor General Canada
Strategic Outcome
Engagement of citizens, all levels of government and the voluntary sector in criminal
justice policy development
$3,867.5K
Results for Canadians
As noted under the various strategic outcomes, the Department of the Solicitor General,
in collaboration with key partners both nationally and internationally, developed
integrated policy responses and effective strategies for key areas of the public safety
agenda, notably with respect to terrorism after the tragic events of September 11th.
These results can be attributed in a large part to effective consultation mechanisms
established with the federal/provincial/territorial governments, voluntary sector and the
international community that enabled the Department to maximize opportunities for
horizontal collaboration and cooperation to advance the public safety agenda.
To this end, the Department continued to provide support to 14 national voluntary
organizations that work with the Portfolio on the fulfillment of public safety objectives
through the provision of policy advice, public education activities, and community
participation in criminal justice service delivery and reform. The Department also
participated in the development and implementation of the Government of Canada –
Voluntary Sector Initiative. This will serve to enhance mechanisms for joint
collaboration with voluntary organizations in the development of Portfolio plans and
priorities.
In addition, the Department continued to participate in Federal/Provincial/Territorial
meetings to share information, consult on major initiatives and to reach consensus on
proposed criminal justice reforms. These meetings provide an opportunity for
consultation and engagement with the provinces/territories to ensure improvements to the
justice system and identify initiatives that aim to protect the Canadian public and
maintain a just, peaceful and safe society.
As part of the Effective Corrections Initiative funding was provided to support new and
innovative activities aimed at involving and informing Canadians on criminal justice
issues. With these resources the Portfolio would work to build Canadians’ confidence in
the criminal justice system and to ensure meaningful public input to the development of
social policies, priorities and programs. Over the past year various projects were
undertaken in the areas of restorative justice, training of volunteers, youth forums, anger
management training and healing strategies for Aboriginal communities.
Section III: Departmental Performance
Page 25
Risks/Challenges
The overarching challenge with respect to these results is to ensure we consult with our
public safety partners in a timely and consistent fashion. The Department has put in
place a number of fora and mechanisms to ensure we attain this goal.
Partners
The Department of the Solicitor General is actively involved with the Portfolio Agencies
(RCMP, Correctional Service of Canada, Canadian Security Intelligence Service and the
National Parole Board), Department of Justice and other key criminal justice partners in
the federal, provincial and territorial governments and the voluntary sector in the
development of a common vision, goals and objectives for public safety in Canada.
Evaluations Undertaken
An audit of the Department’s Sustaining Funding Program for the 14 national voluntary
organizations is currently underway. The scope of the audit includes assessing the
effectiveness and management of the program in support of the mandate and priorities of
the Department and Portfolio.
Linkage to the Speech from the Throne Themes
The Government committed to continue to work with provinces and territories,
communities and all its partners to implement a balanced approach to addressing crime in
the January 2001 Speech from the Throne.
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Solicitor General Canada
Strategic Outcome
Effective and efficient corporate infrastructure to support departmental objectives
$15,226.9K
Human Resource Management: The Department has completed the second year of
the 2000-2003 Human Resource Plan. The plan sets out the framework to ensure that the
Department can continue to attract, develop and retain highly qualified individuals who
are representative of Canadian society and have the skills, attitudes, creativity and values
needed to support the mandate and to address the opportunities and challenges facing the
Department in the future.
The plan will help ensure that the Department is well positioned for recruiting and
retaining employees while maintaining the corporate memory given current projected
attrition rates in the Public Service in general.
As at March 31, 2002, the Department had surpassed the hiring goals established for
women, Aboriginal people and persons with disabilities. With respect to visible
minorities, the Department doubled the representation in 2001/2002 from the previous
year. The Department also has a very active student program that not only provides
direct work experience but also provides various learning activities for the students
including tours of the Portfolio Agencies’ operations and Aboriginal police services.
Students are a wonderful source of potential future public servants.
A mentoring program was launched last spring for all employees including students. The
program will provide participants with exposure to new approaches and perspectives
thereby creating a learning culture within the Department and enhanced working
relationships at all levels of the organization.
There was a focus by management and employees to improve the daily use of both
official languages throughout the workplace to ensure the language of work obligations
continue to be fulfilled. The Department undertook an in-house survey on the use of
official languages in the workplace. The results of this survey will help shape future
initiatives to create a truly bilingual work environment.
Government On-Line (GOL): The Department spearheaded the development of the
Public Safety Portal, a web site that provides single window access for the public to
quickly and easily find information and services relating to public safety from
government and non-government sources.
The first phase of the portal was launched in April 2002 and features information from
the Solicitor General Portfolio and the Department of Justice in several subject areas, e.g.
policing, criminal activity, safety at home, in the workplace and the community.
Section III: Departmental Performance
Page 27
Phase II will be officially launched this fall and will include information and services
from the 25 federal departments and agencies involved in public safety. The web site
will eventually expand to include access to provincial, territorial and non-governmental
information and services. The web address is: www.safecanada.ca.
Modern Comptrollership:
The Department modified existing financial systems and
processes in accordance with the Government’s Financial Information Strategy and is
developing a management framework to ensure that scarce resources are maximized and
balanced with emerging priorities. This involves the integration of management
information with financial data to support effective decision-making.
The Long Range Review Plan is prepared on an annual basis and is approved by senior
management. The plan’s focus is to respond to the review requirements of the
Department, to strengthen management participation in all phases of the review process
and to enhance the operations of the Department through timely follow-up to
recommendations for improvement. To enhance the transparency of the Department’s
contributions programs there was a recent decision by senior management to post all
contribution audits on the departmental web site.
To enhance the sound management of resources and strengthen decision-making, the
Department established a Comptroller position to oversee the development of
performance information, a risk management policy and management control systems.
Public Education: The Internet site continues to provide a cost-effective way of
disseminating information on a wide variety of criminal justice issues. As of
June 30, 2002, the Department’s site had recorded over 7.4 million “hits” since it was
launched in March 1996. The public education section is the most popular area of the
site with Corrections issues continuing to attract the most individual hits. This site is
currently being re-designed to be more user-friendly.
Coordination and Liaison: Continued support was provided to the Deputy Solicitor
General in her responsibility to advise and support the Solicitor General in the
management and control of the Department and Portfolio.
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Solicitor General Canada
Section IV: Consolidated Reporting
Sustainable Development Strategy
The following table identifies the Department’s SD-related accomplishments for the
period ending March 31, 2002.
Goals
Objectives
Highlights of Progress to Date
1.Explore the Department’s understanding of and contribution to the social dimension of
sustainable development at the community level.
Collaborate with provinces
and First Nations to
develop an approach to
national and regional
standards that will assist
First Nations police in
delivering a consistent
level of service in their
communities.
In collaboration with the
First Nations Chiefs of
Police Association
(FNCPA), assemble a
compendium of mandatory
and voluntary items for
inclusion in FNPP
agreements through:
-A preliminary review to be
completed for FNCPA
Annual General Meeting
(2001)
•
•
Completed April 2001
Summit on Aboriginal
Policing (November 2001)
-An initial report on
policies and procedures for
governance
•
Completed December 2001
-Generic financial clauses
to be developed
•
Completed - clauses included
in agreements upon renewal as
appropriate.
-Establishing a forum for
examining the issue of
standards with FNCPA and
Provinces
•
Completed - meetings held in
January 2002 and April 2002.
Presentation to Annual
General Meeting May 2002.
Section IV: Consolidated Reporting
•
Page 29
Develop an information
database and the design of
a research framework to
examine the elements of
effective policing as they
pertain to First Nations
Policing Policy.
Literature review of
relevant materials from
published and unpublished
sources.
-Literature review
•
Completed March 2001.
-Publication of material
•
Completed December 2001
•
Completed in March 2001
Research framework to
establish a solid knowledge
base for interpreting First
Nations police effectiveness
-Development of
methodology
Page 30
-Testing of methodology
•
Pilot projects (case studies
to test measures of
performance, effectiveness
and community satisfaction)
Completed March 2002.
-Presentation of concept to
FNCPA Annual General
Meeting
•
Completed April 2001
Explore the feasibility of
creating a clearing house to
disseminate best practices
•
Ongoing – Policing Governing
Authority Steering Committee
reviewing options for
information sharing.
-Identification of potential
best practices for posting
•
Completed May 2002.
-Linkage of clearinghouse
with Sol Gen portal
•
Work underway to incorporate
Best Practices material onto
Solicitor General website.
Solicitor General Canada
Develop and implement a
five-year study to assess the
level of community
satisfaction of Quebec First
Nations communities with
their police services.
-Pilot Project to test
approach
•
Completed March 2001.
-Report on Pilot to
Colloque
•
Completed May 2001.
•
Ongoing – 3 year project
(2001/2002 to 2003-2004) to
survey communities.
•
Completed April 2001
•
Completed November 2001
-Build on available
material, identify and
address gaps
•
Work with inter-departmental
committee
Define and illustrate the
social and cultural
dimension of sustainable
development and their
policy implications in
course of FNPP policy
development.
•
Ongoing
-Initiate major project to
extend approach to all 32
First Nation police services
in Quebec
Begin to develop a
comprehensive set of
performance indicators
that can be used to
measure First Nations
police effectiveness over
the longer term.
Pursue a horizontal and
collaborative approach to
exploring the board theme
of social and cultural
dimensions of sustainable
development over the next
three years.
Stakeholder consultations
on the means by which
performance can be
measured and effectiveness
assessed.
-Presentation to FNCPA
(AGM)
-Presentation to Provinces
Section IV: Consolidated Reporting
Page 31
Goals
Objectives
Highlights of Progress to Date
2. Deepen the Department’s approach to addressing the environmental impact of its
operations.
(Training & Awareness)
Encourage staff to
incorporate environmental
considerations into their
daily activities by
increasing awareness
related to environmental
and sustainable
development issues.
Page 32
Enhance awareness of
sustainable development in
the Department.
•
One poster campaign
developed for recycling to
target waste reduction in
January 2002.
Update communications
strategy.
•
SD Communications Strategy
updated December 2001
Implement system to track
number of hits on Green
Intranet site annually.
•
System put in place but will
change in 2002/2003 fiscal
year due to a software change.
For 2001/2002 fiscal year,
460 requests were received.
Develop and administer
employee survey.
•
Survey postponed to
2002/2003 fiscal year
Offer relevant and timely
sustainable development
training.
•
80% of training items on the
training plan were
implemented in 2001/2002
fiscal year
Solicitor General Canada
(Solid Waste) Reduce
the negative impacts
of landfills, resource
consumption and
green house gas
emissions by
reducing the amount
of solid waste sent to
landfill from the
Department’s
operations.
Reduce annual amount
of waste generated and
sent to landfill.
Conduct a waste audit
and update waste
reduction and diversion
targets annually, based
on audit results.
•
A waste audit conducted for the
building showed a diversion rate of
72%. The Department will continue to
strive for an 85% diversion rate in
2002/2003.
(Building energy)
Reduce energy
consumption and
associated emissions
in the building
occupied by the
Department
Establish baseline for
purchase of energyefficient office
equipment.
•
Baseline of 39% was established for
2000/2001 fiscal year
Department is targeting 50% for the
2002/2003 fiscal year.
Focus one of the poster
campaigns on personal
energy efficient
initiatives.
•
•
Rescheduled to the 2002/2003 fiscal
year.
The Environmental Coordinator for the Department is Debi Cuerrier, Director
Administration and Security, who can be reached by phone at 993-4348 or by e-mail at
[email protected] for further information. A more detailed progress report is available
upon request.
Section IV: Consolidated Reporting
Page 33
Horizontal/Collective Initiatives
The Department continues to support the spirit and intent of the Social Union Framework
Agreement (SUFA) that was intended to create a climate favouring increased intergovernmental cooperation and citizen engagement regarding major social policy
initiatives. In the criminal justice area, the principles of SUFA are much in evidence, as
Federal/Provincial/Territorial (F/P/T) relationships increasingly emphasize and pursue
joint performance reporting and priority-setting and increased information sharing.
Numerous F/P/T working groups and committees are engaged in seeking solutions for
common problems in corrections, law enforcement, criminal procedures and crime
prevention. These groups provide crucial multi-jurisdictional linkages, which increase
the ability of governments to deal with complex issues such as sharing criminal justice
information from one part of the system to another.
Enhancing collaborative relationships with its partners remains a priority for the
Department. Partners include the Portfolio Agencies, other federal departments,
provinces and territories, and other national and international organizations, including
Canada’s voluntary sector – in order to advance the Government’s public safety agenda.
To this end, the following identifies some examples of initiatives currently underway
with the key partners in support of public safety.
Collective
Initiative
Measures to Combat Organized
Crime Initiative
Tobacco Control Strategy
National Strategy on Community
Safety and Crime Prevention
National Drug Strategy
Integrated Proceeds of Crime
Page 34
List of Partners
RCMP, Correctional Service of
Canada, Department of Justice, Canada
Customs and Revenue Agency,
Citizenship and Immigration Canada,
Environment Canada, CSIS, the
Mohawks of Akwesasne &
provinces/territories
Health Canada, RCMP, Department of
Justice, Canada Customs and Revenue
Agency & Mohawks of Akwesasne
Department of Justice, RCMP, First
Nations & voluntary sector
RCMP, Correctional Service of
Canada, National Parole Board, Health
Canada, provinces/territories,
Organization of American States and
the voluntary sector
RCMP, Department of Justice, Canada
Customs and Revenue Agency, &
Public Works and Government
Services Canada
Page
Reference
14-16
14-16
14-16
14-16
14-16
Solicitor General Canada
Collective
Initiative
Aboriginal Community
Corrections Initiative
Lawful Access
National Counter-Terrorism
Response Capability
Integrated Justice Information
(IJI)
Government On-Line Phase I
Section IV: Consolidated Reporting
List of Partners
Correctional Service of Canada,
Department of Justice, Indian Affairs
and Northern Development &
Aboriginal Healing Foundation
RCMP, CSIS, National Defence,
Industry Canada, Department of
Justice, police associations and the
private sector
National Defence, Office of Critical
Infrastructure Protection and
Emergency Preparedness, Health
Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food
Canada, Transport Canada, Canada
Customs and Revenue Agency,
Citizenship and Immigration Canada,
Department of Justice, Foreign Affairs
and International Trade, Environment
Canada, CSIS, RCMP, Department of
Finance, Privy Council Office,
provinces/territories, first responders,
Australian Attorney General & United
Kingdom Home Office
Canada Customs and Revenue Agency,
Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics,
Citizenship and Immigration Canada,
Correctional Service of Canada,
Department of Justice, National Parole
Board, Treasury Board Secretariat,
RCMP & provinces/territories.
RCMP, Correctional Service of
Canada, CSIS, National Parole Board,
Privy Council Office, Treasury Board
Secretariat, Department of Justice,
Transport Canada, Canada Customs
and Revenue Agency, Citizenship and
Immigration, National Defence, Health
Canada, Foreign Affairs and
International Trade & Office of Critical
Infrastructure Protection and
Emergency Preparedness
Page
Reference
17-19
11-13
11-13
23-24
27
Page 35
Section V: Financial Performance
This section provides an overview of the Department’s financial performance for the
fiscal year 2001/2002.
When reading these financial tables please note the following:
1) The term “Planned Spending” represents the original appropriations as tabled in the
2001/2002 Main Estimates.
2) The term “Total Authorities” represents Planned Spending plus new authorities such
as Supplementary Estimates.
3) The Actual Expenditures reflected in the following tables are based on the
expenditures reflected in the Public Accounts.
4) For accounting purposes, actual and authorized spending for the total Employee
Benefits for the Department are included under the Executive Services and Corporate
Support Business Line. For planned spending, these amounts have been allocated by
business line.
5) Please note that some columns do not add due to rounding.
Business Lines
In support of its mandate and to achieve the results expected, the Department of the
Solicitor General has established four business lines:
• Advice to the Solicitor General Regarding Ministerial Direction to the Agencies,
Portfolio Management and National Policy Leadership
• First Nations Policing Program
• Office of the Inspector General, CSIS
• Executive Services and Corporate Support
Page 36
Solicitor General Canada
Organization
Business Line Titles (BL)
1. Advice to the Solicitor General regarding
Ministerial Direction to the Agencies,
Portfolio Management and National Policy
Leadership.
2. First Nations Policing Program.
3. Office of the Inspector General CSIS
4. Executive Services and Corporate Support.
TOTAL
Section V: Financial Performance
Actual Spending
$ millions
FTEs
20.1
120
65.3
0.8
25
8
60.8
101
147.0
254
Page 37
Financial Table 1
Summary of Voted Appropriations
Authorities for 2001/2002 – Part II of the Estimates
Financial Requirements by Authority (millions of dollars)
Vote
Planned
Spending
2001/2002
Total
Authorities (1)
Actual (2)
1
Program Name
Operating Expenditures
22.3
107.4
94.5
5
Grants and Contributions
61.8
53.8
49.4
(S)
Solicitor General – Salary
and motor car allowance
0.1
0.1
0.1
(S)
Contributions to employee
benefits plans
2.7
3.0
3.0
86.9
164.3
147.0
Total Department
Notes:
1. Total authorities are Main Estimates plus Supplementary Estimates plus other authorities.
2. Summit Security Costs of $45.7 million are reflected under Operating Expenditures.
Page 38
Solicitor General Canada
Financial Table 2
Comparison of Total Planned Spending to Actual Spending
Departmental Planned versus Actual Spending by Business Line (millions of dollars)
Business Line
Advice to the Solicitor General
(total authorities)
(Actual)
First Nations Policing
(total authorities)
(Actual)
FTE’s
100
124
120
Operating
10.9
16.9
15.5
Capital
0.0
0.4
0.4
Grants &
Contributions
3.5
5.0
4.2
Total Gross
Expenditures
14.4
22.3
20.1
Less
Respendable
Revenues
-
Total Net
Expenditures
14.4
22.3
20.1
29
35
25
3.4
20.8
20.0
0.0
0.1
0.1
58.3
48.8
45.2
61.7
69.7
65.3
-
61.7
69.7
65.3
9
9
8
0.9
0.8
0.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.9
0.8
0.8
-
0.9
0.8
0.8
Executive Services and
Corporate Support (total authorities)
(Actual)
100
104
101
9.9
70.5
60.1
0.0
1.0
0.7
0.0
0.0
0.0
9.9
71.5
60.8
-
9.9
71.5
60.8
TOTALS (planned)
(total authorities)
(Actual)
238
272
254
25.1
109.0
96.4
0.0
1.5
1.2
61.8
53.8
49.4
86.9
164.3
147.0
-
86.9
164.3
147.0
Office of the Inspector
General of CSIS (total authorities)
(Actual)
3.0
3.8
3.7
89.9
168.1
150.7
Cost of services by other Departments
Net cost of the Department
Notes:
Operating includes contributions to employee benefit plans and Minister’s allowances.
Summit Security Costs expenditures of $45.7 million and Employee Benefit Plan expenditures of $3.0 million are reflected in the Executive Services and Corporate Support business
line.
Operating expenditure breakdown by business line differs from public accounts but overall total is equal.
Section V: Financial Performance
Page 39
Financial Table 3
Historical Comparison of Total Planned Spending to Actual Spending
Historical Comparison of Departmental Planned versus Actual Spending by Business Line
(millions of dollars)
Actual
2000/2001
Advice to the Solicitor General
10.6
11.2
14.4
22.3
20.1
First Nations Policing
58.1
59.6
61.7
69.7
65.3
0.4
0.7
0.9
0.8
0.8
Executive Services and
Corporate Support
13.7
12.8
9.9
71.5
60.8
TOTALS
82.8
84.3
86.9
164.3
147.0
Business Lines
Office of the Inspector General
of CSIS
Planned
Spending
2001/2002
Total
Authorities
Actual
1999/2000
Actual
Notes:
Resources include contributions to employee benefit plans and Minister’s allowances.
Summit Security Costs expenditures of $45.7 million and Employee Benefit Plan expenditures of $3.0
million are reflected in the Executive Services and Corporate Support business line.
Actual expenditure breakdown by business line in 2001/2002 differs from public accounts but overall
total is equal.
Page 40
Solicitor General Canada
Financial Table 4
Strategic Outcomes and Business lines – Planned Spending
Business lines ($ thousands)
Strategic Outcomes
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
Advice
to the
Solicitor
General
First
Nations
Policing
Program
Office of the
Inspector
General
CSIS
Executive
Services &
Corporate
Support
(2)
Innovative strategies and better tools for
law enforcement to respond to organized
crime and other criminal activities in both
the domestic and international contexts.
(3)
Measures to advance effective
corrections in the interests of public
safety.
Policing and Law Enforcement:
ADSG Strategic Policy and Programs:
Corrections:
431.6
1,462.6
3,751.0
3,751.0
419.1
3,342.3
419.1
3,342.3
Establishment and maintenance of
policing services that are professional,
effective and responsive to the needs of
First Nations and Inuit communities.
61,664.0
61,664.0
Effective delivery of criminal justice
programs through faster and better
criminal justice information sharing
Integrated Justice Information:
(6)
431.6
1,462.6
915.0
915.0
Aboriginal Policing:
(5)
Total
Initiatives to further strengthen and
enhance domestic security measures
and strategies and to further strengthen
cross-border and overseas collaboration
against terrorists.
SADSG National Security:
National Security Directorate:
IG-CSIS:
(4)
(1)
1,208.9
1,208.9
3,851.7
3,851.7
Engagement of citizens, all levels of
government and the voluntary sector in
criminal justice policy development.
Strategic Operations:
(Continued following page)
Section V: Financial Performance
Page 41
Financial Table 4 (continued)
Business lines ($ thousands)
Strategic Outcomes
(7)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
Advice
To the
Solicitor
General
First
Nations
Policing
Program
Office of the
Inspector
General
CSIS
Executive
Services &
Corporate
Support
Total
Effective and efficient corporate
infrastructure to support departmental
objectives.
Corporate Management:
Communications:
Executive Support:
TOTAL
Page 42
14,467.2
61,664.0
915.0
6,772.4
1,327.5
1,795.2
6.772.4
1,327.5
1,795.2
9,895.1
86,941.3
Solicitor General Canada
Financial Table 5
Strategic Outcomes and Business lines – Actuals
Business lines ($ thousands)
Strategic Outcomes
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
Advice
to the
Solicitor
General
First
Nations
Policing
Program
Office of the
Inspector
General
CSIS
Executive
Services &
Corporate
Support
(2)
Innovative strategies and better tools for
law enforcement to respond to organized
crime and other criminal activities in both
the domestic and international contexts.
(3)
Measures to advance effective
corrections in the interests of public
safety.
Policing and Law Enforcement:
ADSG - Strategic Policy and Programs:
Corrections:
494.4
2,352.6
5,344.3
5,344.3
361.9
3,260.5
361.9
3,260.5
Establishment and maintenance of
policing services that are professional,
effective and responsive to the needs of
First Nations and Inuit communities.
65,250.0
65,250.0
Effective delivery of criminal justice
programs through faster and better
criminal justice information sharing
Integrated Justice Information:
(6)
494.4
2,352.6
760.4
760.4
Aboriginal Policing:
(5)
Total
Initiatives to further strengthen and
enhance domestic security measures
and strategies and to further strengthen
cross-border and overseas collaboration
against terrorists.
SADSG National Security:
National Security Directorate:
IG-CSIS:
(4)
(1)
4,372.6
4,372.6
3,867.5
3,867.5
Engagement of citizens, all levels of
government and the voluntary sector in
criminal justice policy development.
Strategic Operations:
(Continued following page)
Section V: Financial Performance
Page 43
Financial Table 5 (continued)
Business lines ($ thousands)
Strategic Outcomes
(7)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
Advice
To the
Solicitor
General
First
Nations
Policing
Program
Office of the
Inspector
General
CSIS
Executive
Services &
Corporate
Support
Total
Effective and efficient corporate
infrastructure to support departmental
objectives.
Corporate Management:
Communications:
Executive Support:
TOTAL
20,053.8
65,250.0
760.4
57,571.7
1,009.7
2,345.5
57,571.7
1,009.7
2,345.5
60,926.9
146,991.1
Note:
Summit Security Costs expenditures of $45.7 million are reflected in Corporate Management.
Page 44
Solicitor General Canada
Financial Table 6
Transfer Payments
Transfer Payments by Business Line (millions of dollars)
Actual
2000/2001
Advice to the Solicitor General
1.8
1.8
1.8
1.8
1.8
Total Grants
1.8
1.8
1.8
1.8
1.8
1.0
1.2
1.7
3.2
2.4
First Nations Policing
41.9
42.1
58.5
48.8
45.2
Total Contributions
Total Transfer Payments
42.9
44.7
43.3
45.1
60.2
62.0
52.0
53.8
47.6
49.4
Business Lines
Planned
Spending
2001/2002
Total
Authorities
Actual
1999/2000
Actual
GRANTS
CONTRIBUTIONS
Advice to the Solicitor General
Section V: Financial Performance
Page 45
Financial Table 7
Resource Requirements by Organization and Business Line
Comparison of 2001/2002 Planned Spending and Total Authorities to Actual Expenditures by Organization and
Business Line ($ millions)
Business Lines
Organization
SADSG
National Security
(Planned)
(Authorized)
(Actual)
Advice to the
Solicitor General
0.5
0.4
0.4
First
Nations
Policing
Office of the
Inspector
General,
CSIS
Executive
Services
and
Corporate
Support
TOTALS
0.5
0.4
0.4
Policing & Law
Enforcement
3.5
5.9
5.3
3.5
5.9
5.3
National Security
1.5
2.7
2.4
1.5
2.7
2.4
ADSG
Strategic Policy &
Programs
0.5
0.4
0.4
0.5
0.4
0.4
Corrections
3.4
3.6
3.3
3.4
3.6
3.3
Aboriginal Policing
61.7
69.7
65.3
61.7
69.7
65.3
Strategic
Operations
3.8
4.3
3.9
3.8
4.3
3.9
Integrated Justice
1.2
4.9
4.4
1.2
4.9
4.4
(Continued following page)
Page 46
Solicitor General Canada
Financial Table 7 (continued)
Business Lines
Organization
Office of the
Inspector General
of CSIS
Advice to the
Solicitor General
First
Nations
Policing
(Planned)
(Authorized)
(Actual)
Office of the
Inspector
General,
CSIS
0.9
0.8
0.8
Executive
Services
and
Corporate
Support
2.9
2.2
2.3
2.9
2.2
2.3
5.3
67.8
57.5
5.3
67.8
57.5
1.7
1.6
1.0
1.7
1.6
1.0
Deputy Solicitor
General/
Executive Support
Corporate
Management
TOTALS
0.9
0.8
0.8
Communications
TOTALS
14.4
22.3
20.1
61.7
69.7
65.3
0.9
0.8
0.8
9.9
71.6
60.8
86.9
164.3
147.0
% of TOTAL
13.7
44.4
0.5
41.4
100
Notes:
Resources include contributions to employee benefit plans and Minister’s allowances.
EBP of $2.8 million in Planned amounts and $3.0 million in Actual and Authorized Spending are included in
Corporate Management in the Departmental Performance Report. In the Report on Plans and Priorities,
these amounts have been allocated by business line.
Summit Security Costs expenditures of $45.7 million are reflected in Corporate Management.
Section V: Financial Performance
Page 47
Financial Table 8
Contingent Liabilities
Contingent Liabilities (millions of dollars)
Amount of Contingent Liability
March 31, 2000
March 31, 2001
Current as of
March 31, 2002
Claims and Pending and Threatened Litigation
Litigation
1.1
1.1
-
Total
1.1
1.1
-
Page 48
Solicitor General Canada
Section VI: Other Information
Contacts for Further Information
Name
Title
Tel. No.
Fax No.
Deputy Solicitor General
Senior Assistant Deputy Solicitor
General, National Security
A/Assistant Deputy Solicitor General,
Strategic Policy and Programs
A/Assistant Deputy Solicitor General,
Policing & Law Enforcement
A/Assistant Deputy Solicitor General,
Corporate Management
A/Director General, Policing and Law
Enforcement
Director General,
National Security
Director General,
Corrections
Director General,
Aboriginal Policing
Director General,
Strategic Operations
Inspector General (CSIS)
(613) 991-2895
(613) 991-2820
(613) 990-8312
(613) 990-8301
(613) 990-2615
(613) 990-8297
(613) 990-2703
(613) 993-5252
(613) 990-2615
(613) 990-8297
(613) 990-6693
(613) 993-5252
(613) 993-4136
(613) 991-4669
(613) 991-2821
(613) 990-8295
(613) 990-2666
(613) 991-0961
(613) 991-2952
(613) 990-7023
(613) 990-3270
(613) 990-8303
Director General
(613) 991-2743
Communications
Greg Wright
Executive Director,
(613) 991-4276
Integrated Justice Information
Secretariat
Elizabeth Van
Director,
(613) 991-2942
Allen
Coordination & Liaison
Richard Fiutowski Legal Services
(613) 991-2886
Departmental Address:
340 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0P8
(613) 993-7062
Nicole Jauvin
Paul Kennedy
Eva Plunkett
Patricia Hassard
Eva Plunkett
Christine Miles
Michel D’Avignon
Richard Zubrycki
Peter Fisher
Mary Campbell
Maurice
Archdeacon
Blaine Harvey
Departmental Website:
(613) 991-3306
(613) 991-4534
(613) 990-8307
http://www.sgc.gc.ca
Library and Reference Centre:
Section VI: Other Information
(613) 991-2787
Page 49
Legislation Administered by the Department of the Solicitor General
The Solicitor General has sole responsibility to Parliament for the following
Acts:
Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act
R.S.C., 1985, c. C-23, as
amended
Corrections and Conditional Release Act
S.C., 1992, c. 20, as amended
Criminal Records Act
R.S.C., c. C-47, as amended
Department of the Solicitor General Act
R.S. C., c. S-13, as amended
DNA Identification Act
S.C., 1998, c. 37, as amended
Prisons and Reformatories Act
R.S.C., 1985, c. P-20,
as amended
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act
R.S.C, 1985, c. R-10
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Pension
Continuation Act
R.S., 1970, c. R-10
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Act
R.S.C., 1985, c. R-11,
as amended
Transfer of Offenders Act
R.S.C., 1985, c. T-15,
as amended
Witness Protection Program Act
S.C., 1996, c. 15
Page 50
Solicitor General Canada
The Solicitor General shares responsibility for the following Acts:
Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal Act
(ss. 7(2))
S.C. 1997, c. 31
Charities Registration (Security Information) Act
S.C., 2001, c. 41, Part 6
Citizenship Act
(s. 19.3)
R.S. C., 1985,c. C-29, as amended
Controlled Drugs and Substances Act
(s. 55(2), 57)
S.C., 1996, c. 19
Criminal Code
(ss. 83.05, 83.07, 83.09, 185, 186, 188, 191,
195, 196, 461, 487.01, 667, 672.68, 672.69,
672.7, 745.6-745.64, 748, 748.1, 749, 760)
R.S.C., 1985, c.C-46, as amended
Employment Equity Act
(ss. 41(6))
S.C. 1995, c.44
Excise Act
(s.66)
R.S. C., 1985, c. E-14, as amended
Extradition Act
(ss. 66,77,78,79)
S.C. 1999, c.18
Firearms Act
(ss. 82, 93)
S.C., 1995, c. 39
Immigration and refugee Protection Act
(ss. 77, 78, 82)
S.C. 2001, c. 27
National Defence Act
(ss. 276.3(2) & (3))
R.S. C., 1985 c. N-5, as amended
Public Sector Pension Investment Board Act
(ss. 4,10,14,25,36,37,39,44,45,47,48)
S.C. 1999, c. 34
Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) Act
(s. 60.1)
S.C. 2000, c. 17 as amended
Security Offences Act
(ss. 6)
R.S., c. S-7
Statistics Act
(s. 29)
R.S.C., 1985 c. S-19, as amended
Section VI: Other Information
Page 51
Index
A
Aboriginal community corrections, 22
Anti-Terrorism Plan, 12, 13
M
Measures to Combat Organized Crime Initiative, 17,
38
Modern Comptrollership, 32
C
Canada Public Safety Information Network, 27, 28
Canadian Security Intelligence Service, 1, 3, 15, 19,
39, 57
CBRN, 12
Commission for Public Complaints against the RCMP,
3, 5
Coordination and Liaison, 32
Correctional Service of Canada, 1, 3, 5, 22, 28, 30, 38,
39
counter-terrorism, 12, 13, 15
CSC, 3, 5
CSIS, 1, 2, 3
E
N
National Drug Strategy, 18, 38
National Parole Board, 1, 3, 5, 22, 28, 30, 38, 39
National Strategy on Community Safety and Crime
Prevention, 1, 19, 38
NPB, 3, 5
O
Office of the Correctional Investigator, 3, 5
Office of the Inspector General, 13, 41, 42, 45, 46, 48,
49, 51, 54
Operational Readiness Program, 12
organized crime, 1, 9, 16, 17, 19, 20, 25, 46, 49
effective corrections, 1, 21, 46, 49
F
First Nations Policing Policy, 7, 24, 34
G
Government On-Line (GOL), 31
P
Public Education, 32
R
RCMP, 1, 3, 5, 15, 19, 20, 26, 28, 30, 38, 39
RCMP External Review Committee, 3, 5
restorative justice, 21, 22, 23, 29
Royal Canadian Mounted Police, 1, 3, 22, 57
H
Human Resource Management, 31
I
Integrated Justice Information initiative, 27
Integrated Proceeds of Crime, 20, 39
L
lawful access, 12
S
sex offenders, 21
Sustainable Development Strategy, 33
Sustaining Funding Program, 30
T
Tobacco Control Strategy, 17, 38
tripartite policing agreements, 7, 24
V
victims, 21, 22, 23
Voluntary Sector Initiative, 23, 29
Page 52
Solicitor General Canada
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