E EARTHQUAK Self-Help Advice Prepare to survive a major

E EARTHQUAK Self-Help Advice Prepare to survive a major
Government of
Canada
Gouvernement du
Canada
Self-Help Advice
Prepare to survive a major
EARTHQUAKE
PE 0262
This publication was produced by the Office of
Critical Infrastructure Protection and Emergency
Preparedness with the assistance of:
Geological Survey of Canada
Canada Mortgage and
Housing Corporation
(CMHC)
Insurance Bureau of Canada
An electronic version is available on the Internet.
This publication is also available in alternate formats
(audio cassette, large print, computer diskette and braille)
through InfoTouch by calling toll-free 1-800-788-8282.
Use the same number for teletypewriter (TTY).
Cette publication est aussi disponible en français.
Elle s’intitule : Tremblement de terre
ISBN 0-662-30530-2
Catalogue no. D82-19/2001-E
© Minister of Public Works and
Government Services 2001
EARTHQUAKES
IN CANADA?
E
arthquakes can happen in virtually any
region of Canada. Seismologists estimate
that more than 2,500 earthquakes are recorded
each year across the country. In fact, a strong
earthquake affecting one of Canada’s major
urban areas is the most destructive natural disaster this country is ever likely to experience.
In the past 100 years, at least nine earthquakes in
or near Canada have registered between 7 and 8
on the Richter scale. A few have caused extensive
damage. Even a magnitude 6 earthquake could
do extensive damage in a built-up area.
Seismologists now know that a major destructive
earthquake can occur at any time along the coast
of British Columbia. Exactly when the earthquake will happen cannot be predicted, but there
is a high probability that inhabitants of the
Canadian West Coast will be shaken by a moderate to strong earthquake during their lifetime.
Moderate earthquakes in the range of 6 on the
Richter scale can also occur in Eastern and
Northern Canada. In these regions, the Canadian
Shield could carry the shock waves from an
earthquake over a wide area, potentially causing
significant damage.
1
WHAT IS AN EARTHQUAKE?
Physically, an earthquake is the result of a sudden movement of two blocks of rock along a
break (fault) deep within the earth’s crust.
WHAT HAPPENS DURING AN
EARTHQUAKE?
If you are near the source of an earthquake,
expect a loud bang followed by shaking. If you
are farther away, the first warning may be a sudden noise, roar or swaying of the building you
are in. Next, you will feel shaking, quickly
followed by a rolling motion that rotates up,
down and sideways. It’s bound to be a frightening experience. A moderate earthquake may last
only a few seconds. A large earthquake could last
several minutes.
EARTHQUAKE MYTHS
An earthquake does not cause the earth to split
open and swallow up people and neighbourhoods. Buildings do not automatically collapse,
either. However, you could be hurt by shattered
glass, falling objects and heavy objects thrown
around by the shaking. Broken gas mains and
fallen chimneys can cause fires. Downed power
lines and broken water mains can also wreak
havoc.
2
AFTERSHOCKS
Aftershocks are smaller earthquakes that happen
when the earth underneath the surface adjusts to
a new position. Aftershocks may happen for
some time after the initial earthquake, Over time,
they generally grow weaker.
TSUNAMIS
A tsunami is a series of travelling waves generated by an earthquake below the ocean floor. The
wave may have sufficient energy to travel across
entire oceans. Tsunamis steepen and increase in
height on approaching shallow water and can
surge over low-lying coastal areas, causing
severe damage.
EARTHQUAKE DAMAGE
Although ground shaking is the major source of
earthquake damage, secondary effects such as
landslides, the liquefaction of saturated sandy
soils, flooding of low-lying areas, and tsunamis
or tidal waves washing over coastlines can also
cause loss of life and massive destruction to
property and the environment.
In recent years, large buildings, roadways and
other infrastructures have been built on
reclaimed land, steep slopes and unstable soils.
Such areas are at high risk of being damaged by a
large earthquake. This also means that in future,
earthquakes in such built-up areas could affect
more people and cause more damage than in the
past.
3
WHAT IS BEING DONE IN CANADA
TO HELP MITIGATE POTENTIAL
EARTHQUAKE DAMAGE?
Ongoing research by scientists, engineers and
emergency preparedness officials means they are
learning more about how earthquakes are produced and what effects they can have on various
structures. This research has resulted in improvements to the National Building Code of Canada
and means modern buildings in earthquakeprone areas have built-in earthquake resistance
to help limit damage and injuries.
Although all levels of government in Canada are
co-operating in the effort to put emergency plans
and response procedures in place in order to mitigate the effects of major disasters on Canadian
communities, individuals and families should
also take responsibility for being prepared for
earthquakes and other major emergencies.
PREPARING FOR AN
EARTHQUAKE
N
o one can predict or prevent an
earthquake. When an earthquake strikes,
you must be ready to act immediately. To help
you survive, you and members of your
household should prepare personal and family
survival plans NOW!
Preparing for an earthquake takes time and
effort. The information provided in this booklet
can help you and your family plan, so you can:
• avoid injury and help others
• minimize damage to your property
• survive at least 72 hours after an earthquake in
your home or workplace without help from
emergency response officials.
4
TIPS ON WHAT TO DO
BEFORE AN EARTHQUAKE
• Prepare an emergency plan for your family
and household.
• If you live alone, develop a plan for yourself
with links to neighbours and friends.
• Take a first aid course, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).
• Know the safe places to be — and where not to
be — in your home during an earthquake.
Practise taking cover in the safe places.
Safe places under heavy tables or desks; inside
hallways; corners of rooms or strong archways.
Dangerous places: near windows or mirrors;
under any heavy objects that can fall; the
kitchen where the stove, refrigerator or contents of cupboards may fall on you; doorways
where the shaking may slam the door on you.
Chances of survival are improved if emergency
plans are prepared and practised together as a
family, now. Start by discussing what could happen and what you should do at home, at school
or at work if an earthquake strikes. Prepare a list
of what needs to be done ahead of time to be prepared. Divide up tasks so that everyone involved
in the plan participates as much as possible.
Write down and exercise your plan. Make sure
everybody has a copy and keeps it close at hand.
5
PREPARE YOUR HOME FOR
EARTHQUAKES
Go through your home, imagining what could
happen to each part of it, if shaken by a violent
earthquake.
• Teach everybody in the family how to turn off
the water and electricity.
• Clearly label the on-off position for the water,
electricity and gas.
• If your home is equipped with natural gas: tie
or tape the appropriate wrench on or near the
pipe, to turn off the gas, if necessary. (Don’t
shut off the gas unless there is a leak or a fire. If the
gas is turned off, don’t turn it on again. That must
be done by a qualified technician.)
If you live in an apartment block or a multistorey building, you may experience more sway
and less shaking than in a smaller, single-storey
building.
Work with your building manager or
condominium board to decide how best to
“quake-safe” your unit. Seek advice from
professionals (building engineers, architects,
emergency preparedness authorities) if you are
unsure about what to do.
CHECK FOR HOME HAZARDS
Previous earthquakes show that you have a better chance of surviving and minimizing damage
to your home if you take the following preventive measures now:
• Make sure the house is bolted to its foundation.
• Make sure the walls are braced.
• Repair loose roof shingles.
• Make sure the chimneys are strong and
well-braced.
• Tie down the water heater and other heavy
appliances (stove, washer, dryer) that could
break gas or water lines if they topple.
• Secure top-heavy furniture and shelving units
to prevent tipping. Keep heavy items on lower
shelves.
6
• Affix mirrors, paintings and other hanging
objects securely, so they won’t fall off hooks.
• Locate beds and chairs away from chimneys
and windows. Don’t hang heavy pictures and
other items over beds. Closed curtains and
blinds will help stop broken window glass
from falling on beds.
• Put anti-skid pads under TVs, VCRs, computers and small appliances or secure them with
Velcro or other such product.
• Use child-proof or safety latches on cupboards
to stop contents from spilling out.
• Keep flammable items and household chemicals away from heat and where they are less
likely to spill.
• Put plywood up in the attic on joists around
each chimney to help prevent bricks and mortar from coming through the ceiling. (Check
clearances with your local fire department.)
Discuss earthquake insurance with your insurance
broker. Check your coverage — it could affect your
financial ability to recover losses after an earthquake.
7
ASSEMBLE A HOME EMERGENCY
SUPPLY KIT
Assemble the essential emergency supplies listed
below, now and keep them in your home emergency kit(s). Store them in secure containers
(such as plastic garbage bins) in a safe place in
your home (under the stairs, in a closet). Supplies
should be in easy-to-carry containers, ready to
take with you.
Store an emergency kit in your car, toolshed or
garage in case you have to evacuate your home
and can’t go back in.
These supplies will help make you self-sufficient
for three to five days.
WATER IS ESSENTIAL FOR
SURVIVAL
Store at least 4 litres of water per person per day.
• store the water you usually drink
• use small-necked plastic bottles that have been
washed, disinfected and are easily carried
• store water in a cool, dark place
• on each bottle, record the date you bottled the
water
• replace stored tap water every six months
• if you have pets, don’t forget to store adequate
water for them. (Approximately 30 millilitres of
water per kilogram of the animal’s weight, per
day.)
Keep a supply of water-purifying tablets and
non-perfumed chlorine bleach in your
8
emergency kit. In an emergency, water can also
be made safe to drink by using water purification
tablets according to directions or by adding one
drop of liquid [non-perfumed] chlorine bleach
per litre of water or three drops per litre of
cloudy water. Stir and let sit for 30 minutes
before drinking.
Water can also be made safe to drink by boiling it
for 10 minutes.
You may be able to get an emergency supply of water
for washing from the hot water heater or toilet tank.
FOOD
Choose foods that require no refrigeration, cooking or preparation, are compact and lightweight.
Choose food that is liked by and familiar to those
most likely to eat it. If food must be cooked,
include a “camp stove” and fuel. Some examples
of food choices include:
• ready-to-eat canned meals: stews, baked
beans, pasta, meat, fish, poultry, fruits, vegetables, cereals, “trail mix,” oatmeal cookies, candies or jellies;
• freeze-dried foods;
• canned milk, juices, coffee, tea;
• staples such as sugar, salt, pepper, powdered
coffee whitener;
• eating utensils;
• any special dietary requirements: such as baby
food and formula;
• if you have pets, don’t forget food for them.
Keep a manual can-opener with the canned
foods.
CLOTHING
Include one change of clothing and footwear per
person: sweaters, woollen socks, hat, scarf, mittens, underwear, rain gear, sturdy, waterproof
shoes or boots, heavy work gloves are a must.
BEDDING
A sleeping bag or two warm blankets per person.
9
SHELTER
A plastic tarpaulin, a small tent, emergency
“space” blankets or even some large garbage
bags.
FIRST AID KIT
• Keep a complete first aid kit and basic first aid
manual in your home and car.
• Include overthe-counter medications such as
pain reliever, antiseptic etc.
• Include a list of the
prescription medications taken by
each family member. List the name of family physician/
specialists, style and serial number of medical
devices such as pacemakers, hearing aids,
eyeglass prescriptions.
• If required, include denture needs, contact
lens liquids, hearing aids, mobility aids and a
few days supply of any essential regular medication such as insulin.
SUPPLIES AND TOOLS
• Keep a batterypowered AM/FM
radio and spare*
batteries at home and
at the workplace
• candles
• flashlight and spare
batteries. Keep a
flashlight (one per person) near your bed, in
your car and at work. Have spare* batteries in
each location
• hammer and nails, crowbar, pry bar, axe (spare
pry bar should also be stored outside in toolshed or garage)
• lantern and fuel
* consider replacing batteries yearly, to keep them fresh
10
• matches (in waterproof container)
• mosquito repellent
• plastic sheeting/tarpaulin
• pliers
• rope, duct tape
• small shovel
• pen, marker, note pad
• pocket knife
• whistle (three short blasts is the recognized
signal for help)
• gasoline-powered generator and appropriately
rated extension cord
Always keep the following items handy
• Class ABC fire extinguisher
(make sure everybody
knows how to use it).
• Wrench (crescent or pipe if
you have to turn off the natural gas). Tie or tape the
appropriate wrench to the
pipe. Remember: Don’t shut
off the gas unless there is a leak
or a fire. If the gas is turned off,
don’t turn it on again. That
must be done by a qualified
technician.)
• Shoes — heavy enough to protect feet from
broken glass and other debris (consider
everybody keeping a pair under the bed).
SANITATION
• toilet paper, moist towelettes, facial tissues,
liquid detergent
• personal items: soap, shampoo, deodorant,
toothpaste, toothbrushes, towel, face cloth,
comb, lip balm, sanitary napkins/tampons
• plastic garbage bags and ties
• chlorine bleach, liquid disinfectant
• portable toilet
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SPECIAL ITEMS
• cards, games, books appropriate to family
interests/ages
• colouring books, crayons, toys, drawing paper
for children
• photos of family members and loved ones
FAMILY RECORDS AND
DOCUMENTS
Store important family documents and records
(such as the following) in waterproof
container(s):
• will, insurance policies, contracts, deeds,
stocks and bonds;
• passports, social insurance cards, health cards,
immunization records;
• cash/coins;
• savings and chequing account numbers;
• credit card account numbers and companies;
• important telephone numbers;
• family records (birth, marriage etc.
certificates).
PUT TOGETHER INDIVIDUAL
EVACUATION PACKS
You should have the items in this list in addition
to the supplies for your home emergency kit.
Each person in your household should have the
items in a tote bag or back-pack, stored in a
secure place with the other emergency supplies.
They should be ready to go if you have to evacuate on short notice.
• food such as dried fruit, high-energy food
bars, candies etc.
• first aid kit and booklet; survival manual
• flashlight and batteries
• money, including coins/phone card
• photographs of family and loved ones
• gloves and other warm clothing
12
• address book with important family phone
numbers, particularly those in another
town/city
Remember to add necessities for babies, small
children, elderly and people with disabilities in
your household.
When you evacuate, supplement the items in
individual evacuation packs with other items
from your store of emergency supplies including:
• bottled water (ideally, 4 litres per person
per day);
• cooking/eating utensils.
Be sure to take prescribed medications such as
heart and high blood pressure medication,
insulin set, with you when you evacuate.
PUT TOGETHER AN
EMERGENCY PACK FOR
YOUR VEHICLE
T
he items in this list are in addition to the
supplies in your home emergency kit. Keep
them in your vehicle in a separate pack (such as a
tote bag) in case you are “on the road” during an
earthquake. Make up a pack for each vehicle in
your household.
13
• booster cables, tools
• bottled water — at least four litres
• canned food/opener, dried fruit, cookies,
crackers
• outdoor clothing and a backpack
• sleeping bag(s), “space” blanket(s)
• first aid kit
• flashlight and
spare batteries
• waterproof
matches, candles
• toilet tissue,
moist towelettes,
small plastic
bags
• cash, coins
• map of the region where you live
• pen/pencil and paper
• consider including playing cards, colouring
books etc. for children
Remember. Fill up your vehicle’s gas tank when it
is about half full. Gas stations are likely to be
inoperable after a major earthquake.
PUT TOGETHER AN
EMERGENCY PACK FOR
YOUR WORKPLACE
K
eep the following items in a separate pack
(such as a tote bag) stored in a convenient
place in your workplace/office ready in case you
have to walk home or to safety.
• gloves, walking shoes, outdoor clothing
• emergency (“space”) blanket
• flashlight, radio and batteries (stored
separately in waterproof bags)
14
• whistle (three short blasts is the recognized
signal for help)
• bottled water
• dried fruit, nuts, high-energy food bars
• small photos of your family loved ones
• paper with your name, address and any
special medical conditions
MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A
FAMILY/HOUSEHOLD
EMERGENCY CONTACT
PLAN
• Make sure each family member knows what to
do if at home, at school or if the quake separates one or more family members from the
others.
• Pre-select an appropriate out-of-the area contact that should be notified about the family’s
status after the earthquake. This contact,
ideally a family member or close family
friend, should also agree to pass on news to
other family members if individuals get separated and call the contact separately. Each
member of the household should memorize
this contact’s phone number and address and
keep it with them at all times.
• Agree on an alternate meeting place if it’s
impossible to get home.
• Become familiar with the emergency plans for
the school(s) your children attend.
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REMINDERS
• Rely on emergency authorities for guidance.
• Listen to radio or television broadcasts for
instructions from emergency authorities after
the earthquake.
• Emergency phone numbers are found on the
inside cover of most telephone books. Phone
them only in an extreme emergency. However,
your telephone may not work after an earthquake, or it may take a while to get a dial tone.
• Learn how to shut off the utilities in your
home — gas, electricity and water. (Don’t shut
off the gas unless there is a leak or a fire. If the
gas is turned off, don’t turn it on again — that
must be done by a qualified technician.)
• Make sure each member of your family knows
how to use a fire extinguisher.
• Take a first-aid course including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).
• Become familiar with the emergency plan for
the school(s) your children attend.
• Share your emergency plan with neighbours.
HOW TO PROTECT
YOURSELF DURING AN
EARTHQUAKE
P
ractising and reading about what you
should do during an earthquake will help
you remain calm, be better prepared to protect
yourself and help others. Identify safe spots in
each room in your home. Reinforce this knowledge by physically placing yourself in the safe
location. This is an especially important step for
children.
Wherever you are when the earthquake starts,
take cover immediately and stay there until the
shaking stops.
16
IF INDOORS
Stay there. Don’t run outside.
Take cover under a heavy table, desk or any
solid furniture and hold on.
If in a hallway, crouch down against an inside
wall.
Avoid doorways. Doors may slam shut and
cause injuries.
Protect your head and face.
Move away from windows, glass partitions,
mirrors, fireplaces, bookcases, tall furniture,
light fixtures.
If in a wheelchair, lock the wheels and protect
the back of neck and head.
If in a hotel, keep shoes under the bed; clothes
close by; consider travelling with a batterypowered radio and flashlight and extra batteries; identify the safest place in your hotel room
to take shelter (such as under a table); read all
material on safety provided in your room and
note the emergency exits on your floor.
Do not use elevators. If you’re in an elevator
during an earthquake, hit the button for every
floor and get out as soon as you can.
17
IF OUTDOORS
Stay there. Try to move to a safe spot away
from windows, buildings, overhead wires or
telephone poles.
IF YOU ARE IN A VEHICLE
Try to pull over to a safe place. Try not to block
the road. Park away from bridges, overpasses
and buildings, if possible. Stay in the vehicle.
IF YOU ARE IN A CROWDED PUBLIC
PLACE
Try to take cover where you won’t get
trampled. If you are inside, don’t run outside
where you may be hit by falling debris.
Sidewalks next to tall buildings are
particularly dangerous. In shopping centres,
try to take cover in the nearest store. Keep
away from windows, skylights, and display
shelves laden with heavy objects.
IF AT SCHOOL
Get under a desk or table and hold on. Face
away from windows.
IF ON A BUS
Stay in your seat until the bus stops.
Wherever you are, expect the ground or floor to move
violently. Take cover. If you can’t take cover, sit down
in a crouched position and protect your head and face
from falling debris and splintering glass. Remain in a
protected place until the shaking stops. Expect
aftershocks — they may occur for some time after the
initial quake.
18
WHAT DO AFTER AN
EARTHQUAKE
I
n the immediate aftermath of the disaster, try
to remain calm. You may find yourself in the
position of taking charge of other people. Take
care of life-threatening situations first.
• Check yourself and others nearby for
injuries — administer first aid.
• Stay off the telephone unless you have to
report a serious, life-threatening emergency.
• Put on sturdy shoes and protective clothing to
help prevent injury from debris, especially
broken glass.
• Check your home for structural damage and
other hazards. If you suspect your home is
unsafe, do not re-enter.
• Do not light matches or turn on light switches
until you are sure there are no gas leaks or
flammable liquids spilled. Use a flashlight to
check utilities and do not shut them off unless
damaged. Leaking gas will smell.
• If tap water is still available immediately after
the earthquake, fill a bathtub and other containers in case the supply gets cut off. If there
is no running water, remember that you may
have water available in a hot water tank and
toilet reservoir.
• Do not flush toilets if you suspect sewer lines
are broken.
• Carefully clean up any spilled hazardous
materials. Wear proper hand and eye
protection.
• If you have to leave your home, take your
evacuation pack and other essential items with
you. Post a message in clear view where you
can be found.
• Place a HELP sign in your window if you need
assistance.
• Listen to your battery-powered radio (or car
radio) for instructions from emergency
officials.
19
• Do not use your vehicle, except in extreme
emergency or unless told to do so by
emergency officials. Keep roads clear for
rescue and emergency vehicles.
• Do not attempt to get out of your car if
downed power lines are across it. Wait to be
rescued.
• Stay at least 10 metres away from downed
power lines.
• Avoid waterfront areas in case of a tsunami. If
a tsunami warning is issued, follow evacuation
instructions immediately.
• If you have pets, try to find and comfort them.
Confine them at home if you have to evacuate.
• Check on your neighbours after looking after
members of your own household. Organize
rescue measures if people are trapped.
• Perishable foods will spoil quickly if the
power is out. These foods, if still cold, should
be cooked first. Foods in the freezer can stay
frozen for a couple of days without power if
the door to the freezer is not opened
frequently.
• If perishable foods are not refrigerated for
24 hours, DO NOT USE. When in doubt, throw
it out.
• Discard cans that are puffed up or leaking.
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Planning for a severe earthquake will also help
prepare you for many other emergencies
For more information on earthquake preparedness, you may wish to contact:
• Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
(CMHC), Canada’s housing agency, has a wide
range of housing-related information. For
details, contact CMHC’s Canadian Housing
Information Centre at 1-800-668-2642.
You can also visit CMHC on the Internet at
www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca
• Your community’s emergency planning
organization (for details on local emergency
plans)
• Your provincial or territorial emergency
measures organization
• The closest regional office of the Office of
Critical Infrastructure Protection and
Emergency Preparedness (there is one in each
provincial capital)
• The Geological Survey of Canada
(for information on earthquakes in Canada)
• Emergency Services Division, Health Canada
For more self-help advice on emergency
preparedness, contact:
OFFICE OF CRITICAL
INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION
AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
Communications
122 Bank St., 2nd Floor
Ottawa, ON K1A 0W6
Phone: (613) 991-7035 1-800-830-3118
Fax: (613) 998-9589
E-mail: [email protected]
Internet: http://www.ocipep-bpiepc.gc.ca
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PROVINCIAL/TERRITORIAL
EMERGENCY MEASURES
ORGANIZATIONS
British Columbia
Provincial Emergency Program (PEP)
Phone: (250) 952-4913
Fax:
(250) 952-4888
Yukon
Emergency Measures Organization
Phone: (867) 667-5220
Fax:
(867) 393-6266
Alberta
Disaster Services Branch
Phone: (780) 422-9000
Fax:
(780) 422-1549
Toll free in Alberta, dial 310-0000-780-427-9000
Northwest Territories
Emergency Measures Organization
Phone: (867) 920-6133
Fax:
(867) 873-8193
Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan Municipal Affairs and Housing
Protection and Emergency Services
Phone: (306) 787-9563
Fax:
(306) 787-1694
Manitoba
Manitoba Emergency Management
Organization (MEMO)
Phone: (204) 945-4772
Fax
(204) 945-4620
Ontario
Emergency Measures Ontario
Phone: (416) 314-3723
Fax:
(416) 314-3758
Quebec
Territorial Directorate
Phone: (418) 646-7950
Fax:
(418) 646-5427
Or one of the regional directorates:
Montréal
Montérégie et Estrie
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(514) 873-1300
(514) 873-1324
Laval, Lanaudière et
Laurentides
(514) 873-1300
Outaouais, Abitibi – Témiscamingue et
Nord du Québec
(819) 772-3737
Bas-Saint-Laurent, Gaspésie et
Îles-de la-Madeleine
(418) 727-3589
Saguenay – Lac-Saint-Jean et
Côte-Nord
(418) 695-7872
Capitale-Nationale, Chaudière-Appalaches et
Nunavik
(418) 643-3244
Mauricie et Centre-duQuébec
(819) 371-6703
Or one of the regional offices:
Sherbrooke
(819) 820-3631
Saint-Jérôme
(450) 569-7565
Joliette
(450) 757-7996
Rouyn-Noranda
(819) 763-3636
Gaspé
(418) 360-8097
Baie-Comeau
(418) 295-4903
Baie-Saint-Paul
(418) 435-2530
New Brunswick
New Brunswick Emergency Measures
Organization
Phone: (506) 453-2133
Fax: (506) 453-5513
Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia Emergency Measures Organization
Phone: (902) 424-5620
Fax:
(902) 424-5376
Prince Edward Island
Emergency Measures Organization
Phone: (902) 888-8050
Fax:
(902) 888-8054
24/7 Inquiry Line: (902) 892-9365
Newfoundland and Labrador
Emergency Measures Division
Phone: (709) 729-3703
Fax:
(709) 729-3857
Nunavut
Nunavut Emergency Management
Phone: (867) 979-6262
Fax:
(867) 979-4221
For more information on emergency preparedness, please contact your provincial/territorial
emergency measures organization.
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SAFE GUARD
Emergency Preparedness Partners in Canada
SAFE GUARD is a national information
program based on partnerships and aimed
at increasing public awareness of
emergency preparedness in Canada.
The SAFE GUARD program brings
together government, private
organizations and voluntary agencies that
are part of the emergency preparedness,
response, recovery and mitigation community.
The triangle depicted in the program logo
is the international symbol of emergency
preparedness. The jagged line evokes the
maple leaf, Canada’s internationally
recognized symbol. The amber yellow
colour is a sign of caution and warning.
is an Office of Critical
Infrastructure Protection and Emergency
Preparedness program.
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