Performance Report Solicitor General Canada TES ESTIMA

Performance Report Solicitor General Canada TES ESTIMA
E S T I M AT E S
Solicitor General Canada
Performance Report
For the period ending
March 31, 2001
Improved Reporting to Parliament
Pilot Document
Each year, the government prepares Estimates in support of its request to Parliament for
authority to spend public monies. This request is formalized through the tabling of
appropriation bills in Parliament.
The Estimates of the Government of Canada are structured in several parts. Beginning with an
overview of total government spending in Part I, the documents become increasingly more
specific. Part II outlines spending according to departments, agencies and programs and
contains the proposed wording of the conditions governing spending which Parliament will be
asked to approve.
The Report on Plans and Priorities provides additional detail on each department and its
programs primarily in terms of more strategically oriented planning and results information
with a focus on outcomes.
The Departmental Performance Report provides a focus on results-based accountability
by reporting on accomplishments achieved against the performance expectations and results
commitments as set out in the spring Report on Plans and Priorities.
The Estimates, along with the Minister of Finance’s Budget, reflect the government’s annual
budget planning and resource allocation priorities. In combination with the subsequent
reporting of financial results in the Public Accounts and of accomplishments achieved in
Departmental Performance Reports, this material helps Parliament hold the government to
account for the allocation and management of funds.
©Minister of Public Works and Government Services Canada — 2001
Available in Canada through your local bookseller or by mail from
Canadian Government Publishing — PWGSC
Ottawa, Canada K1A 0S9
Catalogue No. BT31-4/74-2001
ISBN 0-660-61729-3
Foreword
In the spring of 2000 the President of the Treasury Board tabled in Parliament the document
“Results for Canadians: A Management Framework for the Government of Canada”. This
document sets a clear agenda for improving and modernising management practices in federal
departments and agencies.
Four key management commitments form the basis for this vision of how the Government will
deliver their services and benefits to Canadians in the new millennium. In this vision,
departments and agencies recognise that they exist to serve Canadians and that a “citizen focus”
shapes all activities, programs and services. This vision commits the government of Canada to
manage its business by the highest public service values. Responsible spending means spending
wisely on the things that matter to Canadians. And finally, this vision sets a clear focus on
results – the impact and effects of programs.
Departmental performance reports play a key role in the cycle of planning, monitoring,
evaluating, and reporting of results through ministers to Parliament and citizens. Earlier this year,
departments and agencies were encouraged to prepare their reports following certain principles.
Based on these principles, an effective report provides a coherent and balanced picture of
performance that is brief and to the point. It focuses on results – benefits to Canadians – not on
activities. It sets the department’s performance in context and associates performance with
earlier commitments, explaining any changes. Supporting the need for responsible spending, it
clearly links resources to results. Finally the report is credible because it substantiates the
performance information with appropriate methodologies and relevant data.
In performance reports, departments strive to respond to the ongoing and evolving information
needs of parliamentarians and Canadians. The input of parliamentarians and other readers can do
much to improve these reports over time. The reader is encouraged to assess the performance of
the organization according to the principles outlined above, and provide comments to the
department or agency that will help it in the next cycle of planning and reporting.
This report is accessible electronically from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Internet site:
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/dpr/dpre.asp
Comments or questions can be directed to this Internet site or to:
Results Management and Reporting Directorate
Treasury Board Secretariat
L’Esplanade Laurier
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
K1A 0R5
Tel.: (613) 957-7167 – Fax: (613) 957-7044
Solicitor General Canada
Performance Report
For the
period ending
March 31, 2001
Hon. Lawrence MacAulay, P.C., M.P.
Solicitor General of Canada
Table of Contents
SECTION I: THE MINISTER'S MESSAGE..................................................................1
SECTION II: PORTFOLIO/DEPARTMENTAL OVERVIEW......................................3
A. Portfolio .................................................................................................................3
B. Departmental ..........................................................................................................6
SECTION III: DEPARTMENTAL PERFORMANCE .................................................12
SECTION IV: CONSOLIDATED REPORTING .........................................................30
SECTION V: FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE..............................................................32
SECTION VI: OTHER INFORMATION ......................................................................40
INDEX ...............................................................................................................................44
Section I: The Minister’s Message
I am pleased to present the Performance Report for the Department of the Solicitor
General for the period ending March 31, 2001. The objectives of this report are to
describe the Department’s strategic priorities and to provide a clear sense of the results
achieved against our plans in 2000/2001.
The Department is part of the Portfolio of the Solicitor General, which includes the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), the Correctional Service of Canada, the National
Parole Board, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) and three review bodies.
The Portfolio plays a major role in the Canadian criminal justice system in the areas of
law enforcement, national security, corrections and parole. In fulfilling this role, the
Department provides me with strategic advice and promotes and supports policy cohesion
and coordination across the Portfolio and with our other key partners across the country.
The attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon demonstrate clearly why public
safety must remain a top priority of the Government of Canada. Terrorism is a global
phenomenon and Canada cannot consider itself immune. While this report deals with
accomplishments achieved against our plans last fiscal year, I know that next year I shall
be able to report, as will other Ministers, many more actions taken to maintain the safety
of Canadians and improve our cooperation with the United States and international
partners on security intelligence and law enforcement.
Over the past year the Government has invested in many key initiatives in support of the
public safety agenda. Some of the results of these investments include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Continuing the concerted work with the provinces/territories to combat organized
crime
New money laundering legislation and the creation of the new Financial
Transaction and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
A new law that makes criminal records of pardoned sex offenders available for
background checks, giving further protection to children
Opening of the national DNA Data Bank, a major new investigative tool for law
enforcement
Development of an action plan in support of law enforcement and national security
agencies’ capabilities to continue to lawfully intercept evolving communications
New joint measures with the United States to improve security along our common
border
Initiatives aimed at greater Aboriginal involvement in corrections in their
communities
Section I: The Minister’s Message
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It is important to note that these accomplishments could not have been achieved without
the continuing involvement and support of our partners. These partners include other
federal departments and organizations, provincial, territorial and municipal governments,
international partners and the private and voluntary sectors.
In this, the International Year of the Volunteer, I would like to take the opportunity to
thank the volunteers who work tirelessly across the country to support and promote the
public safety agenda on behalf of the government and all Canadians. We could not
succeed without your dedication. I look forward to building on this work together over
the coming years as we continue to work hard to build safe, secure and healthy
communities.
There are and always will, be challenges for the criminal justice system but as noted in
the Speech from the Throne, this Government is committed to ensuring strong and safe
communities for all Canadians. The results included in this report, and the reports for the
Portfolio Agencies, lay the foundation for further enhancements and move us closer to
our objectives.
I welcome feedback on the report. On page 41 you will find a list of departmental
contacts. I would also draw your attention to our Internet address: http://www.sgc.gc.ca
where you can obtain further information.
This report also includes an overview of the Portfolio agencies and organizations that
report to, or through, me to Parliament. Each agency in the Portfolio, with the exception
of CSIS, prepares its own separate performance report, and these reports are tabled in
Parliament. I would encourage you to consult these individual reports for more
information on the agencies and our accomplishments over the past year.
Hon. Lawrence MacAulay, P.C., M.P.
Solicitor General of Canada
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Section II: Portfolio/Departmental Overview
A. Portfolio Overview
Roles and Responsibilities of the Portfolio of the Solicitor General
The Portfolio of the Solicitor General is responsible within the Government of Canada
for policing and law enforcement (including Aboriginal policing), national security,
corrections and conditional release.
The Portfolio includes the Department and four Agencies: the Royal Canadian Mounted
Police (RCMP), the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), the Correctional
Service of Canada (CSC) and the National Parole Board (NPB). There are also three
review bodies: the RCMP External Review Committee, the Commission for Public
Complaints against the RCMP and the Office of the Correctional Investigator. Together,
these organizations have a combined budget of over $3.2 billion and over 35,000
employees. Each Portfolio Agency, with the exception of CSIS, prepares an individual
Performance Report outlining their individual accomplishments and key results.
The Department, Portfolio Agencies and Review Bodies each contribute, specifically and
collectively, to the public safety agenda as outlined below:
•
The Department provides policy advice and support to the Solicitor General on all
aspects of his mandate which includes providing direction to the Agencies, ensuring
accountability to Parliament for the Agencies and national public safety leadership.
•
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police enforces Canadian laws, prevents crime and
maintains peace, order and security. The RCMP has responsibility to: prevent,
detect and investigate offences against federal statutes; maintain law and order and
prevent, detect and investigate crime in the provinces, territories and municipalities
where the Force has a policing contract; provide investigative and protective
services to other federal departments and agencies; and provide all Canadian law
enforcement agencies with specialized police training and research, forensic
laboratory services, identification services and informatics technology.
•
The Canadian Security Intelligence Service provides security intelligence to the
Government. CSIS collects, analyzes and retains information and intelligence on
activities that may be suspected of constituting threats to the security of Canada;
reports to and advises the Government in relation to these threats; and provides
security assessments.
Section II: Portfolio/Departmental Overview
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•
The Correctional Service of Canada administers sentences of convicted offenders
sentenced to imprisonment for two or more years. It also prepares offenders for
their return as useful citizens to the community. CSC provides services across the
country to offenders within correctional institutions and in the community.
•
The National Parole Board is an independent administrative body, which grants,
denies and controls the conditional release of inmates from federal penitentiaries
and recommends the exercise of the Royal Prerogative of Mercy and the granting of
pardons. In addition, NPB exercises the same powers and responsibilities, with the
exception of the granting of temporary absences, for provincial inmates in
provinces and territories without their own parole boards.
•
The RCMP External Review Committee reviews certain types of grievances,
formal disciplinary, discharge and demotion appeals referred by the RCMP. This
Committee, which reports annually to Parliament, is a neutral third party providing
an independent and impartial review of cases. The Committee may institute
hearings, summon witnesses, administer oaths and receive and accept such
evidence or other information as the Committee sees fit. The findings and
recommendations of either the Chairman or the Committee are sent to the parties
and to the Commissioner of the RCMP.
•
The Commission for Public Complaints against the RCMP reviews public
complaints regarding the conduct of the RCMP in an open, independent and
objective manner. The Commission provides information to the public regarding
its mandate and services, reviews and investigates complaints regarding the conduct
of RCMP members, holds public hearings, prepares reports, including findings and
recommendations, and conducts research and policy development to improve the
public complaints process.
•
The Office of the Correctional Investigator conducts investigations into
decisions, recommendations, acts or omissions of the Commissioner of Corrections
or any person under the control and management of, or performing services on
behalf of the Commissioner, that affect offenders, either individually or as a group.
The Office of the Correctional Investigator is independent of CSC and may initiate
an investigation upon receipt of a complaint by or on behalf of an offender, at the
request of the Minister or on its own initiative.
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Section II: Portfolio/Departmental Overview
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B. Departmental Overview
Roles and Responsibilities
The Government Organization Act (1966) established the Department of the Solicitor
General. The Department of the Solicitor General Act provides for the appointment of a
Solicitor General with responsibilities for the management of the Department. This Act
stipulates that the Solicitor General’s powers, duties and functions extend to and include
all matters over which Parliament has jurisdiction, and that are not assigned to any other
department, relating to: a) reformatories, prisons and penitentiaries; b) parole, remissions,
statutory release and long term supervision, within the meaning of the Corrections and
Conditional Release Act; c) the Royal Canadian Mounted Police; and d) the Canadian
Security Intelligence Service.
The mission of the Portfolio is public safety. In support of this, the primary objective of
the Department is to contribute to the public safety of Canadians through the promotion
and maintenance of a just, peaceful and safe society.
To this end, the Department advises, supports and assists the Solicitor General in all of
his responsibilities which include:
• providing effective direction to the Portfolio Agencies;
• exercising national leadership on public safety issues;
• implementing the First Nations Policing Policy through the negotiation,
administration, maintenance and evaluation of tripartite policing agreements with
provincial, territorial and First Nations governments; and
• answering in Parliament for the Portfolio.
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The public safety agenda starts and ends in Canadian communities. The Portfolio
Agencies offer operational expertise and exercise direct influence on Canadian
communities in support of their mandate in the areas of crime prevention, law
enforcement, security, corrections and reintegration. The Department exercises indirect
influence through the development of portfolio-wide strategic policy advice and by
providing leadership and facilitation from an overall government perspective.
Section II: Portfolio/Departmental Overview
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Operating Environment
In the 2001 Speech from the Throne, the Government committed to continue to work
with provinces, territories, communities and all its partners to implement a balanced
approach to addressing crime focusing on prevention as much as punishment,
strengthening penalties for serious crime and considering the needs of victims. As well,
the Government committed to taking aggressive steps to combat organized crime and to
providing enhanced law enforcement tools to deal with emerging threats to security such
as cyber crime and terrorism.
Further, the Department continues to support the spirit and intent of the Social Union
Framework Agreement (SUFA) that was intended to create a climate favouring increased
inter-governmental cooperation and citizen engagement regarding major social policy
initiatives. In the criminal justice area, the principles of SUFA are much in evidence, as
Federal/Provincial/Territorial (F/P/T) relationships increasingly emphasize and pursue
joint performance reporting and priority-setting and increased information sharing.
Numerous F/P/T working groups and committees are engaged in seeking solutions for
common problems in corrections, law enforcement, criminal procedures and crime
prevention. These groups provide crucial multi-jurisdictional linkages, which increase
the ability of governments to deal with complex issues such as sharing criminal justice
information from one part of the system to another.
Internationally, Canada and its G8 partners are actively collaborating on all levels – from
information and intelligence sharing to coordination of security and law enforcement
activities – to deal with threats to public safety. Among the priorities for action and
cooperation are efforts to combat the global challenges posed by terrorism and organized
crime. The federal government continues to take concrete measures to enhance Canada’s
counter-terrorism readiness and response capacity and to fulfill its international
commitments. Canada has played a prominent role in the negotiation of international
counter-terrorism instruments and holds bilateral discussions with other countries to
coordinate counter-terrorism efforts. To date, Canada has signed all twelve of the United
Nations counter-terrorism conventions and has ratified ten.
Similarly, the changing face of organized crime demands that international partners
continue to strengthen their working relationships to respond to criminal activities that do
not respect boundaries. This has been demonstrated by the continuing success of the
Canada-United States Cross-Border Crime Forum in putting in place mechanisms to
assist law enforcement.
The Department’s ability to respond to the new and emerging challenges is influenced by
many factors including:
•
Aboriginal people are still over-represented in the justice system. Based on the 1996
Census, the Aboriginal community represents 2% of the Canadian population but
17% of the offenders. It is expected that this situation will worsen over the coming
years with the rapid growth in the Aboriginal youth population.
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Solicitor General Canada
•
Canada’s ageing population requires specialized support that meets the needs and
responds to the concerns of the older population. Telemarketing fraud is one area
where seniors are particularly vulnerable. In addition, an ageing offender population
will lead to specialized health and security requirements in correctional facilities.
•
Although there has been a steady drop in the crime rate since the early 1990’s there is
still concern over violent and youth crime. Early intervention will be required to
prevent at-risk youth from becoming involved in criminal activity.
•
As of 1996, immigration has outpaced Canada’s natural birth rate. Cultural diversity
can create tensions and lead to potential conflict as a result of different traditions and
beliefs.
•
Organized crime is ever-changing as technologies are developed resulting in new
forms of crime such as bio-terrorism and cyber threats and exploited by criminals
worldwide. These technologies are used to shield activities ranging from murder,
money laundering, drug trafficking, people smuggling and terrorism.
•
At the same time, the new DNA databank is one example of how advances in
technology are applied by the Department and its Portfolio partners. With more than
53 matches made from over 12,000 samples already in the databank, the benefits of
capitalizing on technology are apparent.
•
Goods, services, people, money and information are now moving across international
borders at an unprecedented rate. This continues to challenge national and
international public safety and security systems.
•
The incompatibility of numerous electronic systems, the lack of resources to develop
linking mechanisms and systems and cultural obstacles are challenges that must be
addressed to facilitate the collection and sharing of information across all aspects of
the criminal justice system.
The Strategic Outcomes on the following chart outline the performance expectations for
the Department and are directly linked to these commitments and support the Minister’s
Public Safety leadership role. These shared, collective outcomes cannot be achieved
without a commitment and contribution from all of our partners.
Section II: Portfolio/Departmental Overview
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Chart of Strategic Outcomes
To Advance the Public Safety Agenda, the Solicitor General Canada is Committed
To provide Canadians with:
To be demonstrated by:
A strategic and legislative policy
framework in support of the Government’s
priority of ensuring Canada’s communities
are safe
• Innovative strategies and better tools for
law enforcement to respond to organized
crime and changing crime patterns
• Measures to advance effective
corrections in the interests of public
safety
• Coordination of the development of
technical solutions that will enable
national security and law enforcement
agencies to continue to lawfully
intercept evolving communications
• Counter-terrorism initiatives to
strengthen domestic preparedness and to
further strengthen cross-border and
overseas collaboration against terrorists
• Effective delivery of criminal justice
programs through faster and better
criminal justice information sharing
• Promotion of the public safety agenda to
ensure that Canadians feel safe and
secure in their communities
Resources included under Business Line 1
First Nations policing and corrections
policy contributing to the improvement of
social order, public security, personal
safety and justice in First Nations
Communities
Resources included under Business Line 1
and 2
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• Enhanced governance and
accountability in First Nations police
services and police governing authorities
• Tripartite policing agreements with First
Nations Communities
• Innovative approaches in First Nations
policing strategies in the areas of crime
prevention, domestic/family violence
and youth crime
• Policy models that support agreements
and arrangements for Aboriginal control
of corrections within Aboriginal
communities
Solicitor General Canada
The following results are shared, collective results that cannot be achieved without a
commitment and contribution from the Department’s key partners at the federal,
provincial, territorial, municipal, and international levels and the private and voluntary
sectors.
At the federal level the key partners include:
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Canadian Security Intelligence Service
Correctional Service of Canada
National Parole Board
Department of Justice
Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Health Canada
Canada Customs and Revenue Agency
National Defence
Indian Affairs and Northern Development
Human Resources Development Canada
Industry Canada
Department of Finance
Privy Council Office
Treasury Board Secretariat
Section II: Portfolio/Departmental Overview
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Section III: Departmental Performance
Strategic Outcome
Innovative strategies and better tools for law enforcement to respond to organized crime
and changing crime patterns
Why is this a priority?
Organized crime is a national problem that threatens public safety. Areas of concern
include drug trafficking, migrant smuggling, securities frauds, environmental crime,
Internet crime and cross border crime. To effectively respond to these issues, law
enforcement agencies must continue to be provided with the appropriate tools and
resources to develop effective responses both nationally and internationally.
The Strategic Outcome has been advanced by the following:
•
The Department spearheaded Federal/Provincial/Territorial efforts in preparing the
National Agenda to Combat Organized Crime, which was endorsed by FPT
Ministers Responsible for Justice in September 2000. Through this Agenda,
Ministers declared organized crime a national priority to be dealt with through a
multi-disciplinary approach. Ministers also endorsed a number of national law
enforcement priorities, including illegal drugs, outlaw motorcycle gangs, economic
crime and high-tech crime.
Bill C-24, An Act to Amend the Criminal Code (Organized Crime and Law
Enforcement) will give police the tools they have asked for to bolster their ability
to infiltrate, destabilize and dismantle criminal organizations.
•
The National Coordinating Committee on Organized Crime (NCC), a coordinating
body in the overall anti-organized crime strategy, met in January 2001. The
meeting was devoted to discussing the national priorities that had been identified in
the National Agenda. Federal, provincial and territorial officials, as well as
representatives from the police community, participated in the discussions. Given
its broad membership, the NCC is a valuable forum for sharing information and
enhancing inter-jurisdictional cooperation. The annual meeting provided a unique
opportunity for policy makers and law enforcement officials to engage in
discussions on matters of mutual concern.
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Solicitor General Canada
•
A Status Report on Telemarketing Fraud was issued chronicling the full range of
enforcement, legislative, prevention and prosecutorial measures taken in Canada to
combat telemarketing fraud. The report shows that a broad spectrum of Canadian
officials from all levels of government, policing jurisdictions and the private sector
have come together to address recommendations outlined in the 1997 Report of the
Canada/United States Working Group on “Cooperation against Cross-Border
Telemarketing Fraud”. Initial results of the RCMP and provincial police efforts to
crack down on international fraud schemes based in Canada have been encouraging.
•
A joint threat assessment of the cross-border flow of illicit drugs was undertaken in
partnership with the United States, the RCMP and Canada Customs and Revenue
Agency.
•
In collaboration with other federal departments and agencies, the Department
provided assistance in drafting new anti-money laundering legislation (Bill C-22).
In addition, the Department worked with federal and provincial counterparts and
the private sector to develop a practical implementation regime. This led to the
creation of the new Financial Transaction and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada.
•
The Department organized and co-hosted, with the Winnipeg Police, the Second
National Youth Forum on the Prevention of Violence and Gangs, which brought
together over 100 participants including police, government, community
organizations, academics and youth groups to discuss how to address the
prevention of violence and gangs on a multi-sectoral level. This information will
be used to inform future policy development.
•
In partnership with the National Crime Prevention Centre, the Department
supported the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police Crime Prevention
Committee in piloting innovations such as an evaluation toolkit designed to assist
police and their communities in the internal evaluation of local crime prevention
projects and activities.
•
The five-year review of the contract policing arrangements for RCMP services in
collaboration with eight provinces and three territories was successfully completed.
This partnership effort will provide a sound foundation for the provision of policing
services that support the goal of safe communities for Canadians.
•
In cooperation with other federal partners and the World Health Organization, the
Department participated in the ongoing development of the Framework Convention
on Tobacco Control, an international treaty on all aspects of the tobacco trade,
including illicit production and distribution.
Section III: Departmental Performance
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•
The Department collaborated with federal partners and the United Nations on
international initiatives leading to the proclamation of the UN Convention against
Transnational Organized Crime and two related protocols – migrant smuggling and
trafficking in human beings. The Convention included limited criminal law and
other measures against corruption, which will be the next instrument, developed by
the UN.
•
A framework on security costs was developed for the Third Summit of the
Americas and similar events held in Canada. This framework mechanism is
designed to ensure that the RCMP has the necessary support from provincial and
municipal law enforcement partners and emergency agencies during these events to
assure the safety and security of international delegations, observers, law
enforcement officers and the general public.
Resources: $2,613.8K (Business Line 1)
For more information on policing initiatives, please refer to the Departmental
Performance Report for the RCMP.
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Strategic Outcome
Measures to advance effective corrections in the interests of public safety.
Why is this a priority?
Public dissatisfaction with traditional justice approaches have resulted in pressures for
restorative approaches that address the well being of the victim, community and the
offender.
The focus is on developing the infrastructure and programs that will support the release
of offenders back into the communities when they can be safely managed.
The Strategic Outcome has been advanced by the following:
•
Amendments to the Criminal Records Act and Regulations were drafted to allow
the disclosure of relevant pardoned records to enhance the protection of children
and other vulnerable Canadians from known offenders who seek to undertake
positions of trust.
•
The Department coordinated the Government response to the Parliamentary
Review of the Corrections and Conditional Release Act. The sub-committee of the
Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights made a number of
recommendations on victims' rights in May 2000. Action will be taken on these
recommendations to provide additional and timelier information to victims as well
as allowing victims to play a larger role in the process if desired. As a first step,
the Government has undertaken consultations with victims of federal offenders to
gain additional input as to what is needed to make the corrections and conditional
release process more responsive to victims' needs.
•
Research was undertaken on the impact of treatment delivered to moderately highrisk offenders. The community-based intervention consisted of an intensive,
cognitive-behavioural treatment program that addressed specific needs (e.g.,
substance abuse, anger management). The results showed that this treatment was
more effective in reducing recidivism in these offenders than for low-risk
offenders. Also, low-risk offenders who attended the intensive treatment program
had a higher rate of recidivism than low-risk offenders who did not participate in
treatment. These findings support the CSC policy of allocating treatment resources
to moderately high-risk offenders, who benefit most from treatment, rather than
low-risk offenders.
Section III: Departmental Performance
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•
A sex offender assessment measure that incorporates dynamic risk factors (i.e.,
factors related to risk that can change over time) was developed and validated.
This measure, the Sex Offender Need Assessment Rating (SONAR) includes such
items as problems in sexual self-regulation, negative social influences,
anger/hostility and victim access. SONAR provides an important tool for probation
and parole officers in their supervision of sex offenders in the community.
•
A study of the relationship between age and sexual offence recidivism was
conducted. The study found that the rate of recidivism for sexual offenders
decreases with age, and the pattern of age and recidivism varies according to the
type of sex offender (i.e., rapists, extrafamilial child molesters and incest
offenders). The findings have policy implications for the assessment, treatment and
management of sex offenders.
•
The Department, in collaboration with CSC, NPB and the Canadian Centre for
Justice Statistics (Statistics Canada), produced the Corrections and Conditional
Release Statistical Overview (November 2000) that summarizes key statistical
information on criminal justice and corrections. The document is posted on the
Department’s Web site and is used by a wide audience of practitioners and the
public to obtain up-to-date statistics on corrections and conditional release.
•
The Department developed a handbook entitled “Sentence Calculation: How Does
it Work?” to provide information to victims of crime, victims’ organizations and
other interested individuals or organizations about how sentences are calculated.
As well, a second edition of a similar publication for use by judges and lawyers
was issued. The handbook answers basic questions and provides practical
examples to explain sentence calculation rules, including parole eligibility dates
that apply to offenders serving penitentiary sentences (two years or more).
Resources: $1,746.4K (Business Line 1)
For more information on corrections and parole initiatives, please refer to the
Departmental Performance Reports for Correctional Service Canada and the National
Parole Board.
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Solicitor General Canada
Strategic Outcome
Policy models that support agreements and arrangements for Aboriginal control of
corrections within Aboriginal communities.
Why is this a priority?
With the current over-representation of Aboriginal people in the criminal justice system,
as noted in the Speech from the Throne, there is an acute need for the development of
culturally appropriate community-based alternatives. A key focus is to develop
innovative options to offender treatment designed with and for Aboriginal people and
operated by Aboriginal communities.
The Strategic Outcome has been advanced by the following:
•
The Department sponsored participants from Aboriginal communities to attend two
intensive Aboriginal-specific anger management training sessions for CSC staff
and Aboriginal community members. This training, provided by Native
Counselling Services of Alberta, helps build the capacity of communities to work
with offenders after they have been released from institutions.
•
With support from Justice Canada, the Department initiated a project with the
Winnipeg Native Alliance to test and evaluate a healing process for Aboriginal
young and adult offenders and their families in an urban community. Working
with offenders and their support structures in the community will assist both in
healthier lifestyles and fosters a positive, supportive environment upon release.
This pilot was initiated in September 2000 and runs until March 31, 2002.
•
The Department supported innovative projects that explored different healing
processes with the Mnjikaning First Nation (Ontario) and Waseskun Healing
Centre (Quebec). Biidaaban, the project with Mnjikaning First Nation, has worked
with 44 offenders and to date, only one has reoffended. This community-based
process works with victims, offenders and their families. Victim consent is
mandatory before an offender can enter the process.
•
The Department continued to disseminate knowledge through its Aboriginal
Peoples Collection (APC). More than 2,000 copies were distributed in fiscal year
2000-01 and an evaluation of the APC concluded that it was an important tool for
Aboriginal communities.
Resources: $994.1K (Business Line 1)
Section III: Departmental Performance
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Strategic Outcome
Coordination of the development of technical solutions that will enable national security
and law enforcement agencies to continue to lawfully intercept evolving communications.
Why is this a priority?
Rapid developments in telecommunication technologies are challenging conventional
lawful access methods and have also provided a new avenue for traditional crimes.
The Strategic Outcome has been advanced by the following:
•
In cooperation with other government departments and agencies, the Department
successfully implemented an action plan to design and deploy technical solutions
necessary to maintain a lawful access capability. Lawful access solutions were
developed and shared with police services across the country.
•
The Department and its lawful access partners also began work on a review of the
legislative framework for lawful access. Consultations on the framework will be
undertaken with various stakeholder groups including law enforcement, private
industry (information and communication technology sector), provinces/territories
and interest groups (i.e. civil liberties groups and privacy advocates). Information
sessions are tentatively scheduled for the fall with formal consultations in late
winter/early spring 2002.
Resources: $183.1K (Business Line 1)
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Solicitor General Canada
Strategic Outcome
Counter-terrorism initiatives to strengthen domestic preparedness and to further
strengthen cross-border and overseas collaboration against terrorists.
Why is this a priority?
Recent experiences involving high profile terrorism and organized crime cases illustrate
the nature of the challenge that law enforcement and national security authorities around
the world are required to deal with: highly-motivated, highly skilled individuals with
access to technology, resources and partners which allow them to change their identities
and locations to elude authorities.
The Government of Canada, like every other nation, recognizes that it must continually
adapt and improve its methods and processes. Departments and agencies across the
federal government and within other jurisdictions continue to work together in reviewing
procedures to better share information and coordinate enforcement activities. Lessons
learned from case experiences contribute to this process of continuous improvement.
The Strategic Outcome has been advanced by the following:
•
As part of the Operational Readiness Program, the Department, together with the
RCMP, CSIS and National Defence, conducted a series of information seminars
and exercises. These served to promote awareness of national counter-terrorism
arrangements, resources and the threat of chemical, biological, radiological and
nuclear terrorism. These sessions were particularly beneficial for first responders
such as fire fighters, ambulance and medical personnel and police officers.
Seminars and exercises were held in Sydney, Quebec City and Ottawa. A CanadaUnited States counter-terrorism tabletop exercise was also held in Ottawa to
explore how both countries could better collaborate to mutual advantage in the
event of a cross-border chemical or biological incident.
•
The Charities Registration (Security Information) Act, Bill C-16, was drafted to
help fight terrorist fund-raising and strengthen the integrity of the charities
registration system by preventing organizations that support terrorist activities from
obtaining registered charity status. Bill C-16, which was tabled in the House of
Commons on March 15, 2001, will establish a process whereby sensitive security
information can be used in the determination of whether to grant or to revoke
charitable status. The legislation balances the need for fairness and transparency
with the need to protect classified security and intelligence information. The
legislation mirrors provisions contained in the Immigration Act. The Bill is
currently before the Commons Finance Committee for review.
Section III: Departmental Performance
Page.-19-
•
In partnership with the United States, the Department coordinated and co-chaired
Canada’s participation in bilateral arrangements devoted to research and
development projects related to counter-terrorism. This work has resulted in the
development of new or improved technology to help fight terrorism.
Resources: $994.1K (Business Line 1)
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Solicitor General Canada
Strategic Outcome
Strengthened partnerships across the criminal justice system to enhance the sharing of
offender and crime-related information
Why is this a priority?
Strengthened national cooperation and information sharing is needed to establish a
Canada Public Safety Information Network (CPSIN) to ensure that all jurisdictions and
agencies can disseminate and exchange all the required offender and crime-related
information to support their decision-making.
The Strategic Outcome has been advanced by the following:
•
The Department worked with Integrated Justice Information (IJI) partners, and in
support of the RCMP, in the drafting of consultation documents relating to the
development of the National Criminal Justice Index. This is a key component for
improved electronic information sharing in the criminal justice system. It is
expected that consultations with provinces/territories will be completed prior to
February 2002.
•
The implementation of the IJI outreach strategy continued, with the IJI Secretariat
working with Provincial/Territorial jurisdictions to identify specific areas of
collaborative ventures and potential for a national approach to IJI and the
development of CPSIN. In addition, over 30 presentations to various criminal
justice stakeholder groups were delivered to expand interest and involvement in IJI.
•
A CPSIN Performance Measurement Model was developed to monitor improved
information sharing among federal agencies when all IJI components are
implemented. An initial set of performance indicators was identified and will be
reviewed and refined before full implementation.
•
The Department completed a number of studies related to the federal legislative
and policy framework required to support planned electronic information-sharing
and completed consultations with stakeholders on the challenges and obstacles to
information-sharing relating to information management, information culture and
information technology in the criminal justice system. As a result, the development
of policy and legal strategies, including an IJI Information Management Policy
framework, were initiated.
Section III: Departmental Performance
Page.-21-
•
A design and approval process for defining data standards for federal agencies and
stakeholder communities in the criminal justice system was developed. This led to
the development of an electronic tool for mapping and comparing existing data
definitions. Consultations to date have led to agreement regarding common data
naming conventions and data classification systems. One third of the federal core
dictionary (containing definitions that are shared by two or more participating
agencies) has been completed.
•
The Department published a number of its research documents, including its annual
report - IJI Progress Report 2000, and continued its work to establish an IJI web
site to support information-sharing efforts and inform the public. Further
information can be obtained through the Department’s Internet site
http://www.sgc.gc.ca.
Resources: $867.9K (Business Line 1)
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Solicitor General Canada
Strategic Outcome
Effective engagement of citizens, all levels of government and the voluntary sector in
criminal justice policy development
Why is this a priority?
The Department is committed to collaborative relationships with its partners to advance
the Government’s public safety priorities. Our partners include the Portfolio agencies, all
levels of government, international organizations and the private and voluntary sector.
The Strategic Outcome has been advanced by the following:
• Environmental scanning and priorities planning processes are undertaken on a regular
basis to support coordinated public policy development across the Portfolio and to
provide direction for Portfolio initiatives. A major achievement over the reporting
period involved the collaboration of the Department and Portfolio Agencies with
other federal partners in the development of a Public Safety Progress Report for
Cabinet in May 2000 that took stock of federal accomplishments and planned
initiatives, as well as the continuing public safety-related challenges and pressures.
• The Department actively supports 14 national voluntary organizations (NVOs) that
work in partnership with the Portfolio to fulfil objectives through the provision of
policy advice, public education activities and community participation in criminal
justice service delivery and reform.
• The Department, along with the Portfolio Agencies, is involved in annual
consultative meetings with the National Joint Committee, National Associations
Active in Criminal Justice, the Corrections Roundtable with NVOs and other NVO
workshops to discuss ways of strengthening relationships and further engaging the
voluntary sector.
Resources: $3,182.0K (Business Line 1)
Section III: Departmental Performance
Page.-23-
Strategic Outcome
Enhanced governance and accountability in First Nations police services and police
governing authorities
Why is this a priority?
With more than 120 policing agreements for First Nations police services which are at
various stages of development, there is a need to provide enhanced technical, policy and
research support to these police services and their police governing authorities to ensure
their continued viability, effectiveness and accountability.
The Strategic Outcome has been advanced by the following:
•
The continuation of the process launched in 1999-2000 to establish standards for
First Nations policing with the First Nations Chiefs of Police Association and the
Quebec Association of First Nations Chiefs of Police through ongoing national and
regional dialogue. This builds on the desire of First Nations police to ensure that
they deliver the best service possible and will include an assessment of whether
community expectations are being met. This is a multi-year process during which
time community consultations, drafting and testing of indicators and establishment
of benchmarks will be undertaken.
As part of this process, an analysis of all self-administered policing agreements was
undertaken to determine similarities and differences that will lead to a more
standardized approach.
•
The establishment of a process to determine the level of community satisfaction
with First Nations police services in Quebec that is being managed by an
intergovernmental and interdisciplinary committee led by the Quebec Association
of First Nations Chiefs of Police.
•
The development of a proposed research framework to determine the effectiveness
of police services. The validity of the proposed approach will be tested with a
small number of First Nations communities that will subsequently participate in an
in-depth study on effectiveness.
•
The launch in November 2000 of a national three-week training program at the
Canadian Police College for police chiefs and senior police managers that
recognizes the special circumstances of those responsible for delivering policing
services to First Nations communities.
Resources: $59,547.8K (Total for Business Line 2)
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Solicitor General Canada
Strategic Outcome
Tripartite policing agreements with First Nations Communities.
Why is this a priority?
Demands for new policing agreements, as well as policing infrastructure, are growing.
One of the key reasons is growing recognition and acceptance that a well-established
police service is crucial to the health and integrity of a community.
The Strategic Outcome has been advanced by the following:
•
The negotiation of one new policing agreement with First Nations and provinces and
the renewal or extension of 38 existing agreements to ensure the delivery of
culturally sensitive policing services in First Nations communities. The total of
signed agreements as of March 31, 2001, is 124.
Resources: Included under Business Line 2 (Total: $59,547.8K)
Section III: Departmental Performance
Page.-25-
Strategic Outcome
Innovative approaches in First Nations policing strategies in the areas of crime
prevention, domestic/family violence and youth crime.
Why is this a priority?
Demographically, Aboriginal youth are, and will remain a significant force. It is
projected that, by 2011, the 20-24 age group will be the largest segment of the Aboriginal
population, with the 15-19 age group as the second largest. In light of these trends, First
Nations police services have an important role in implementing proactive approaches to
crime prevention.
The Strategic Outcome has been advanced by the following:
•
Various off-reserve projects were funded to enhance relationships between police
and urban Aboriginal people to reduce conflict and promote mutual understanding.
For example, funding was provided for the Vancouver Police and Native Liaison
Society’s Reality Check for Indigenous People project that brings Aboriginal
youth-at-risk together with Vancouver police officers to learn the realities of
substance abuse and life on “skid row”.
•
The Department participated in discussions with Aboriginal communities on crime
prevention, victimization, youth justice and restorative justice. Such participation
ensured that the benefits of First Nations policing were taken into account in
broader policy discussions with our partners.
•
The first annual anti-family violence for First Nations police officers was held to
increase police awareness and sensitivity leading to appropriate and culturally
sensitive responses to family violence crimes.
Resources: Included under Business Line 2 (Total: $59,547.8K)
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Solicitor General Canada
Inspector General of CSIS.
In 1984 the proclamation of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) Act
established the Office of the Inspector General of CSIS. Pursuant to the Act, the Office
of the Inspector General serves as the Solicitor General’s internal auditor for CSIS
operational activities and has the right of access to CSIS information.
The Strategic Outcome has been advanced by the following:
•
The Inspector General issued a Certificate for CSIS’ 1999-2000 annual report. The
Certificate states the extent to which the Inspector General is satisfied with the
Director of CSIS’ annual report.
•
The Solicitor General was provided with an independent means of assurance that
the operational activities of the Service comply with the CSIS Act, ministerial
directions and CSIS operational policy.
Resources: $731.0K (Business Line 3)
Section III: Departmental Performance
Page.-27-
Executive Services and Corporate Support
This includes Coordination and Liaison, Communications, Corporate Services and the
Legal Services Unit. These organizations support the Deputy Solicitor General in
advising and supporting the Solicitor General on Portfolio-wide issues ranging from
communications, corporate management, legal issues, parliamentary business, Cabinet
liaison, ministerial correspondence, Access to Information and Privacy as well as
ministerial briefings.
The Strategic Outcome has been advanced by the following:
Government On-Line (GOL): GOL aims to make all key government services available
on-line by year 2004. To this end, the Department has created a Portfolio Working
Group, chaired by the Director General, Corporate Services to coordinate GOL activities
and report requirements across the Portfolio. GOL presents opportunities to advance
Portfolio-wide coordination and consolidation of services.
The Deputy Solicitor General has been identified as the Deputy Minister "Champion" for
the development of a Public Safety Cluster as part of GOL. This cluster will provide
single-window access to the on-line information and services from the fifteen or so
federal departments involved in public safety, without the need for the public to know
which department is responsible for the different aspects of this area. The site will also
provide innovative on-line forums for public and stakeholder consultations, citizen
engagement and public education. The scope of the portal will eventually be expanded to
also provide seamless access to related on-line resources from provincial government
sites and NGOs who also share responsibilities for public safety in Canada.
Human Resource Management: The Department has completed the first year of the
2000-2003 Human Resource Plan. The plan sets out the framework to ensure that the
Department can continue to attract, develop and retain highly qualified individuals who
have the skills, attitudes, creativity and values needed to support the mandate and to
address the opportunities and challenges facing the Department over the next three years.
The plan includes the following five components:
1. Public Service wide change: This includes the Universal Classification System
(UCS), staffing reform and values and ethics. While there have been delays,
primarily due to the implementation of UCS, the remainder of the initiatives
identified have been completed.
2. Career Management: Initially, the Skills and Education Data Bank was undertaken as
a pilot project to gather information on the education, skills, current and future career
interests of employees at the senior officer level. The database is currently being
expanded to include all employees and will be used to match employee skills and
career aspirations with development opportunities.
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Solicitor General Canada
3. Continuous Learning/Development: The Department is currently developing a core
curriculum of formal training requirements to ensure that employees have the
knowledge and skills required to meet the objectives of the Department.
4. Recruitment/Succession: The Department recently participated in the Employment
Equity Job Fair organized by the Public Service Commission. Since June 2000,
approximately 27% of the hiring within the Department has been through the
Employment Equity program.
5. Work Environment/Organizational Health: The Department is currently in the midst
of a major building refit project. The Department has worked with both the
employees and other partners in the refit to balance the Government’s requirements
with the requirements of the Department to ensure that the office accommodation is
fully functional and supportive.
Audit and Evaluation: The departmental 2000-2005 Long Range Review Plan was
approved by the Management Review Committee. The plan’s focus is to respond to the
review requirements of the Department, to strengthen management participation in all
phases of the review process and to enhance the operation of the Department through
timely follow-up to recommendations for improvement.
Public Education: The Department’s public Internet site continues to provide a costeffective way of disseminating information on a wide variety of criminal justice issues.
As of June 30, 2001, the Department’s site had recorded over 4.7 million “hits” since it
was launched in March 1996. The public education section is the most popular area of
the site with Corrections issues continuing to attract the most individual hits.
Coordination and Liaison: Continued support was provided to the Deputy Solicitor
General in her responsibility to advise and support the Solicitor General in the
management and control of the Department and Portfolio.
Financial Information Strategy: In November 1995, Treasury Board approved the
overall scope, objectives and implementation approach for FIS (Financial Information
Strategy). FIS is a government-wide initiative to enhance the government’s decisionmaking and accountability and to improve organizational performance through the
strategic use of financial information. The Financial Information Strategy was fully
implemented in the Department on April 1, 2001.
Resources: $12,831.6K (Business Line 4)
Section III: Departmental Performance
Page.-29-
Section IV: Consolidated Reporting
Sustainable Development Strategy (SDS)
The following table identifies the Department’s SD-related accomplishments for the
period ending March 31, 2001.
Goals
Objectives
Highlights of Progress to Date
Deepen the Department’s approach to addressing the environmental impact of its operations.
(Training &
Awareness)
Encourage staff to
incorporate
environmental
considerations into
their daily activities
by increasing
awareness related to
environmental and
sustainable
development issues.
Enhance awareness of
sustainable
development in the
Department.
Offer relevant and
timely sustainable
development training.
(Solid Waste) Reduce Reduce annual amount
of waste generated and
the negative impact
of landfills, resource sent to landfill.
consumption and
green house gas
emissions by
reducing the amount
of solid waste sent to
landfill from the
Department’s
operations.
Page.-30-
•
Preliminary work done to prepare
for poster campaign in 01/02 fiscal
year including consultations with
other departments to potentially
share information.
ƒ
Criteria established for identifying
“green” office equipment.
•
Waste audit conducted in March
2001 showed a 62% diversion rate –
significantly lower than the
Department’s target of 85%.
Training and awareness activities
will focus on recycling to improve
this rate.
Solicitor General Canada
Goals
(Building energy)
Reduce energy
consumption and
associated emissions
in the building
occupied by the
Department.
Objectives
Replace end-of-life
office equipment with
energy efficient
models.
Highlights of Progress to Date
•
Baseline information was collected.
•
Procurement policy reviewed and
updated to reflect policy to purchase
“green” office equipment.
The Environmental Coordinator for the Department is Debi Cuerrier, Director
Administration, who can be reached by phone at 993-4348 or by e-mail at
[email protected] for further information. A more detailed progress report is available
upon request.
Section IV: Consolidated Reporting
Page.-31-
Section V: Financial Performance
This section provides an overview of the Department’s financial performance for the
fiscal year 2000/2001.
The Department’s financial resources include salaries, operating and maintenance and
grants and contributions. As noted on the chart below, 54% of the actual expenditures in
2000/2001 were for grants and contributions with the largest share of grants and
contributions (94%) relating to the First Nations Policing Program.
When reading these financial tables please note the following:
1) The term “Planned Spending” represents the original appropriations as tabled in the
2000/2001 Main Estimates.
2) The term “Total Authorities” represents Planned Spending plus new authorities such
as Supplementary Estimates.
3) The Actual Expenditures reflected in the following tables are based on the
expenditures reflected in the Public Accounts.
4) For accounting purposes, the total Employee Benefits for the Department are
included under the Executive Services and Corporate Support Business Line.
5) Please note that some columns do not add due to rounding.
Business Lines
In support of its mandate and to achieve the results expected, the Department of the
Solicitor General has established four business lines:
• Advice to the Solicitor General Regarding Ministerial Direction to the Agencies,
Portfolio Management and National Policy Leadership
• First Nations Policing Program
• Office of the Inspector General, CSIS
• Executive Services and Corporate Support
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Solicitor General Canada
Financial Table 1
Summary of Voted Appropriations
Authorities for 2000-01 – Part II of the Estimates
Financial Requirements by Authority (millions of dollars)
Vote
Planned
Spending
2000-01
Total
Authorities (1)
1
Program Name
Operating Expenditures
19.6
39.5
36.4
5
Grants and Contributions
60.6
45.9
45.0
(S)
Solicitor General – Salary
and motor car allowance
0.1
0.1
0.1
(S)
Contributions to employee
benefits plans
2.5
2.8
2.8
82.7
88.3
84.3
Total Department
Actual
Notes:
1. Total authorities are Main Estimates plus Supplementary Estimates plus other authorities.
Section V: Financial Performance
Page.-33-
Financial Table 2
Comparison of Total Planned Spending to Actual Spending
Departmental Planned versus Actual Spending by Business Line (millions of dollars)
Business Line
Advice to the Solicitor General
(total authorities)
(Actual)
First Nations Policing
(total authorities)
(Actual)
FTE’s
81
92
90
Operating
8.2
9.1
7.7
Capital
0.0
0.5
0.5
Grants &
Contributions
3.0
3.4
3.0
Total Gross
Expenditures
11.2
13.0
11.2
Less
Respendable
Revenues
-
Total Net
Expenditures
11.2
13.0
11.2
29
29
25
3.3
17.8
17.4
0.0
0.1
0.1
57.6
42.5
42.1
60.9
60.4
59.6
-
60.9
60.4
59.6
9
9
9
0.9
0.8
0.7
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.9
0.8
0.7
-
0.9
0.8
0.7
Executive Services and
Corporate Support (total authorities)
(Actual)
100
102
110
9.7
13.5
12.2
0.0
0.6
0.6
0.0
0.0
0.0
9.7
14.1
12.8
-
9.7
14.1
12.8
TOTALS (planned)
(total authorities)
(Actual)
219
236
234
22.1
41.2
38.0
0.0
1.2
1.2
60.6
45.9
45.1
82.7
88.3
84.3
-
82.7
88.3
84.3
Office of the Inspector
General of CSIS (total authorities)
(Actual)
2.4
2.4
2.4
85.1
90.7
86.7
Cost of services by other Departments
Net cost of the Department
Notes:
1. Operating includes contributions to employee benefit plans and Minister’s allowances.
2. Employee Benefit Plan expenditures of $2.8 million are reflected in the Executive Services and Corporate Support business line.
Page.-34-
Solicitor General Canada
Financial Table 3
Historical Comparison of Total Planned Spending to Actual Spending
Historical Comparison of Departmental Planned versus Actual Spending by Business Line
(millions of dollars)
Business Lines
Actual
1998-99
Advice to the Solicitor General
Actual
1999-00
Planned
Spending
2000-01
Total
Authorities
Actual
9.0
10.6
11.2
13.0
11.2
55.8
58.1
60.9
60.4
59.6
0.6
0.4
0.9
0.8
0.7
Executive Services and
Corporate Support
13.0
13.7
9.7
14.1
12.8
TOTALS
78.4
82.8
82.7
88.3
84.3
First Nations Policing
Office of the Inspector General
of CSIS
Notes:
Resources include contributions to employee benefit plans and Minister’s allowances.
Section V: Financial Performance
Page.-35-
Financial Table 4
Resource Requirements by Organization and Business Line
Comparison of 2000-01 Planned Spending and Total Authorities to Actual Expenditures by Organization and
Business Line ($ millions)
Business Lines
Organization
Senior Assistant
Deputy Solicitor
General
Policing & Security
(Planned)
(Authorized)
(Actual)
Advice to the
Solicitor General
0.4
0.4
0.4
First
Nations
Policing
Office of the
Inspector
General,
CSIS
Executive
Services
and
Corporate
Support
TOTALS
0.4
0.4
0.4
Policing & Law
Enforcement
3.0
3.2
2.6
3.0
3.2
2.6
National Security
1.1
1.3
1.2
1.1
1.3
1.2
Assistant Deputy
Solicitor General
Corrections &
Aboriginal Policing
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
Corrections
2.1
3.1
2.7
2.1
3.1
2.7
Aboriginal Policing
60.9
60.4
59.6
60.9
60.4
59.6
Strategic
Operations
3.3
3.7
3.1
3.3
3.7
3.1
Integrated Justice
1.0
1.0
0.9
1.0
1.0
0.9
(Continued following page)
Page.-36-
Solicitor General Canada
Financial Table 4 (continued)
Business Lines
Organization
Office of the
Inspector General
of CSIS
Advice to the
Solicitor General
First
Nations
Policing
(Planned)
(Authorized)
(Actual)
Office of the
Inspector
General,
CSIS
0.9
0.8
0.7
Executive
Services
and
Corporate
Support
TOTALS
0.9
0.8
0.7
Deputy Solicitor
General/
Executive
Services
2.6
4.0
3.1
2.6
4.0
3.1
Corporate
Services
6.3
9.2
9.1
6.3
9.2
9.1
Communications
0.8
0.9
0.6
0.8
0.9
0.6
9.7
14.1
12.8
82.7
88.3
84.3
15.2%
100%
TOTALS
% of TOTAL
11.2
13.0
11.2
60.9
60.4
59.6
13.3%
70.7%
0.9
0.8
0.7
0.8%
1. Resources include contributions to employee benefit plans and Minister’s allowances.
2. EBP of $2.5 million in Planned amounts and $2.8 million in Actual and Authorized Spending
are included in Corporate Services in the Departmental Performance Report. In the Report
on Plans and Priorities, these amounts have been allocated by business line.
Section V: Financial Performance
Page.-37-
Financial Table 5
Transfer Payments
Transfer Payments by Business Line (millions of dollars)
Actual
1999-00
Advice to the Solicitor General
1.8
1.8
1.8
1.8
1.8
Total Grants
1.8
1.8
1.8
1.8
1.8
0.9
1.0
1.2
1.6
1.2
First Nations Policing
39.5
41.9
57.6
42.5
42.1
Total Contributions
Total Transfer Payments
40.5
42.3
42.9
44.7
58.8
60.6
44.1
45.9
43.3
45.1
Business Lines
Planned
Spending
2000-01
Total
Authorities
Actual
1998-99
Actual
GRANTS
CONTRIBUTIONS
Advice to the Solicitor General
Page.-38-
Solicitor General Canada
Financial Table 6
Contingent Liabilities
Contingent Liabilities (millions of dollars)
Amount of Contingent Liability
March 31, 1999
March 31, 2000
Current as of
March 31, 2001
Claims and Pending and Threatened Litigation
Litigation
1.1
1.1
1.1
Total
1.1
1.1
1.1
Section V: Financial Performance
Page.-39-
Section VI: Other Information
Business Line Titles (BL)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Advice to the Solicitor General regarding
Ministerial Direction to the Agencies,
Portfolio Management and National Policy
Leadership.
First Nations Policing Program.
Office of the Inspector General CSIS
Executive Services and Corporate Support.
Page.-40-
($ millions)
(FTE)
11.2
90
59.6
.7
12.8
25
9
110
Solicitor General Canada
Contacts for Further Information
Name
Nicole Jauvin
Paul Kennedy
Kristine Burr
Patricia Hassard
Michel
D’Avignon
Richard
Zubrycki
Peter Fisher
Mary Campbell
Maurice
Archdeacon
Blaine Harvey
Greg Wright
Eva Plunkett
Janis Gardiner
Title
Tel. No.
Fax No.
Deputy Solicitor General
Senior Assistant Deputy Solicitor
General, Policing and Security
Assistant Deputy Solicitor General,
Corrections and Aboriginal
Policing
Director General,
Policing & Law Enforcement
Director General,
National Security
Director General,
Corrections
Director General,
Aboriginal Policing
Director General,
Strategic Operations
Inspector General (CSIS)
(613) 991-2895
(613) 991-2820
(613) 990-8312
(613) 990-8301
(613) 993-4325
(613) 991-4769
(613) 990-2703
(613) 993-5252
(613) 993-4136
(613) 991-4669
(613) 991-2821
(613) 990-8295
(613) 990-2666
(613) 991-0961
(613) 991-2952
(613) 990-7023
(613) 990-3270
(613) 990-8303
Director
Communications
Executive Director,
Integrated Justice
Director General,
Corporate Services
Director,
Coordination & Liaison
Legal Services
(613) 991-2800
(613) 993-7062
(613) 991-4276
(613) 991-3306
(613) 990-2615
(613) 990-8297
(613) 991-2942
(613) 991-4534
(613) 991-2886
(613) 990-8307
Richard
Fiutowski
Departmental Address:
340 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0P8
Departmental Home Page Address: http://www.sgc.gc.ca
Library and Reference Centre: (613) 991-2787
Section VI: Other Information
Page.-41-
Legislation Administered by the Department of the Solicitor General
The Solicitor General has sole responsibility to Parliament for the following Acts:
Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act
Corrections and Conditional Release Act
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Act
Transfer of Offenders Act
Witness Protection Program Act
R.S., c. C-23, as amended
S.C., 1992, c. 20,
as amended
R.S., c. C-47, as amended
R.S., c. S-13, as amended
S.C., 1998, c. 37,
as amended
R.S., c. P-20, as amended
R.S., c. R-10, as amended
R.S.C., 1970, c. R-10,
as amended
R.S., c. R-11, as amended
R.S., c. T-15, as amended
S.C., 1996, c. 15
Page.-42-
Solicitor General Canada
Criminal Records Act
Department of the Solicitor General Act
DNA Identification Act
Prisons and Reformatories Act
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Pension Continuation Act
The Solicitor General shares responsibility to Parliament for the following Acts:
Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal Act
(ss. 7(2))
Citizenship Act
(s. 19.3)
Controlled Drugs and Substances Act
(s. 55(2), 57)
Criminal Code
(ss. 185, 186, 188, 191, 195, 196,
461, 487.01, 667, 672.68, 672.69,
672.7, 745.6-745.64, 748, 748.1, 749, 760)
Employment Equity Act
(ss. 41(6))
Excise Act
(s. 66)
Extradition Act
(ss. 66,77,78,79)
Firearms Act
(ss. 82, 93)
Immigration Act
(ss. 9, 39, 39.2, 39.3, 40.1, 81, 81.3)
National Defence Act
(ss. 276.3(2) & (3)
Public Sector Pension Investment Board Act
(ss. 4,10,14,25,36,37,39,44,45,47,48)
Security Offences Act
(ss. 6)
Statistics Act
(s. 29)
Section VI: Other Information
S.C. 1997, c. 31
R.S., c. C-29, as amended
S.C., 1996, c. 19
R.S., c.C-46, as amended
S.C. 1995, c.44
R.S., c. E-14, as amended
S.C. 1999, c.18
S.C., 1995, c. 39
R.S., c. I-2, as amended
R.S., c. N-5, as amended
S.C. 1999, c.34
R.S., c. S-7
R.S., c. S-19, as amended
Page.-43-
Index
Inspector General of CSIS, 27
A
Aboriginal communities, 10, 17, 26
Aboriginal Peoples Collection, 17
Aboriginal youth, 8, 26
anti-money laundering legislation, 13
L
lawful access, 18
low-risk offenders, 15
N
C
Canada Public Safety Information Network, 21
Canadian Security Intelligence Service, 1, 3, 6, 11, 27,
42
Charities Registration, 19
Commission for Public Complaints against the RCMP,
3, 4
Correctional Service of Canada, 1, 3, 4, 11
Corrections and Conditional Release Act, 6, 15, 42
Corrections and Conditional Release Statistical
Overview, 16
counter-terrorism, 10, 19
crime prevention, 10
Criminal Records Act, 15, 42
CSC, 3, 4, 15, 16, 17
CSIS, 1, 2, 3, 19, 27
E
effective corrections, 10, 15
F
First Nations police services, 10, 24, 26
Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, 13
G
Government On-Line, 28
H
healing processes, 17
high-risk offenders, 15
Human Resource Management, 28
I
illicit drugs, 13
Page.-44-
National Agenda to Combat Organized Crime, 12
National Crime Prevention Centre, 13
National Parole Board, 1, 3, 4, 11, 16
national voluntary organizations, 23
National Youth Forum on the Prevention of Violence
and Gangs, 13
NPB, 3, 4, 16
O
Office of the Correctional Investigator, 3, 4
off-reserve projects, 26
Operational Readiness Program, 19
organized crime, 1, 8, 10, 12
P
public education, 23, 28, 29
public safety priorities, 23
Public Safety Progress Report, 23
R
RCMP, 1, 3, 13, 14, 19, 21
RCMP External Review Committee, 3, 4
Royal Canadian Mounted Police, 1, 3, 6, 11, 42
S
sex offenders, 1, 16
sexual offence recidivism, 16
Social Union Framework Agreement, 8
Speech from the Throne, 2, 8, 17
T
telemarketing fraud, 9
Transnational Organized Crime, 14
tripartite policing agreements, 6
Solicitor General Canada
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