Results From a Seven-year Limnological Study of Shuswap Lake: Part I Phytoplankton

Results From a Seven-year Limnological Study of Shuswap Lake: Part I Phytoplankton
I
Results From a Seven-year Limnological
Study of Shuswap Lake: Part I
Physics, Chemistry, Bacteria, and
Phytoplankton
B.H.
idle 1 and K.S. Shortreed 2
10epartment of Fisheries and Oceans
Science Branch, Pacific Region
504 - 224 W. Esplanade
orth Vancouver, B.C. V7 3H7
20epartment of Fisheries and Oceans
Science Branch, Pacific Region
Cultus Lake Salmon Research Laboratory
4222 Columbia Valley Highway
Cultus Lake, British Columbia V2R 5B6
1996
Canadian Da a Report of
F"sheries and Aqua ic Sciences 993
....... Fisheries and Oceans
Canada
Peches at Oceans
Canada
Cana.~
Canadian Data Report of
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Canadian Data Report of
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 993
1996
RESULTS FROM A SEVEN-YEAR L1MNOLOGICAL STUDY OF SHUSWAP LAKE
PART I
PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY, BACTERIA, AND PHYTOPLANKTON
by
1
B. H. Nidle and K. S. Shortreed 2
1Department
of Fisheries and Oceans
Science Branch, Pacific Region
504 - 224 W. Esplanade
North Vancouver, B. C. V7M 3H7
2 Department
of Fisheries and Oceans
Science Branch, Pacific Region
Cultus Lake Salmon Research Laboratory
4222 Columbia Valley Highway
Cultus Lake, B.C. V2R 5B6
ii
@Ministry of Supply and Services Canada 1996
Cat. No. Fs 97-13/993E
ISSN 0706-6465
Correct citation for this publication:
Nidle, B. H., and K. S. Shortreed. 1996. Results from a seven-year limnologicalstudy of
Shuswap Lake. Part I. Physics, chemistry, bacteria, and phytoplankton. Can. Data
Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 993: 116 p.
iii
ABSTRACT
Nidle, B. H., and K. S. Shortreed. 1996. Results from a seven-year limnological study of
Shuswap Lake. Part I. Physics, chemistry, bacteria, and phytoplankton. Can. Data
Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 993: 116 p.
Results of a limnological investigation on Shuswap Lake are presented. From 1987 to
1993, we sampled a number of locations in all major lake basins for a variety of physical,
chemical and biological variables. Sampling frequency was once or twice monthly from
March-April to November of each year. Summarized data for each station and date are
presented along with selected vertical profiles of in vivo fluorescence and temperature.
RESUME
Nidle, B. H., and K. S. Shortreed. 1996. Results from a seven-year limnological study of
Shuswap Lake. Part I. Physics, chemistry, bacteria, and phytoplankton. Can. Data
Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 993: 116 p.
Nous presentons les resultats d'une etude limnologique du lac Shuswap. De 1987 a
1993, nous avons echantillonne un certain nombre d'emplacements dans les principaux
bassins du lac pour mesurer diverses variables physiques, chimiques et biologiques.
L'echantillonnage a eM effectue une ou deux fois par mois chaque annee, de mars-avril a
novembre. Nous presentons les donnees resumees pour chaque station et date ainsi quo des
profils verticaux selectionnes de la fluorescence et de la temperature in vivo.
INTRODUCTION
Sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) are the most economically valuable species of
salmon harvested in British Columbia, with an annual catch often worth hundreds of millions of
dollars. The Fraser River is the world's largest single producer of sockeye salmon (with adult
returns exceeding 15 million in some years) and Shuswap lake is one of the largest sockeye
producing lakes in the Fraser River system. Adult returns of Shuswap sockeye strongly exhibit
the cyclicity (a 4-yr cycle of abundance, with 1 dominant return, 1 smaller sub-dominant return,
and 2 very small non-dominant returns) common to a number of Fraser system sockeye
stocks. Recent dominant cycle returns of Shuswap sockeye range from 7.3 to 12.3 million.
Our study of Shuswap lake began in 1987 and had two main objectives: 1. to determine the
productivity of various areas of the lake and the factors controlling productivity; and 2. to
determine effects of the highly cyclic sockeye stocks on the lake's phytoplankton and
zooplankton communities. Zooplankton data are given in a separate report (Morton and
Shortreed 1996). These data will then be combined with data on juvenile sockeye salmon
(Mueller and Enzenhofer 1991; Mueller et al. 1991; Maclellan et al. 1995) to determine
spawning escapements which maximize smolt production and subsequent adult returns.
These data are also being used in the development of a rearing capacity model which will
predict optimum escapements and maximum smolt output in other British Columbia sockeye
lakes (Hume et al. 1996).
DESCRIPTION OF SHUSWAP LAKE
Shuswap Lake (50°00' N, 119°05' W) is located in the southeastern portion of the
Fraser River drainage basin (Fig. 1). Prior to entering the South Thompson River, Shuswap
Lake drains into Little Shuswap lake which is used as a rearing area by some Shuswap
sockeye. Since Little Shuswap Lake is small, shallow (mean depth=12.4 m) and has a
2
drainage basin >15,300 km , its water residence time is only 9 days. Little Shuswap Lake is
drained by the South Thompson River, which joins the North Thompson at the city of
Kamloops. The Thompson River then enters the Fraser River at the town of lytton. Distance
from Shuswap Lake to the ocean is 450 km. The lake lies at an elevation of 347 m, has a
2
surface area of 314 km , and a mean depth of 58 m (including Mara Lake). It is divided into an
eastern and a western basin which are joined near their respective mid-points (Fig. 2). Anstey
and Salmon arms comprise the eastern basin and Seymour and Main arms make up the
western basin. Shuswap Lake's drainage basin has an area of 15,335 km 2 . Much of the
eastern portion of the drainage basin lies in the interior western hemlock biogeoclimatic zone
and receives precipitation of 60-145 cm annually, while the western portion of the drainage
basin lies in the interior douglas fir biogeoclimatic zone (35-60 cm y(1 precipitation) (Farley
1979). The large drainage basin results in a water residence time of only 2.1 yr. The climate
consists of cold winters and warm, dry summers. Because the lake does not freeze every
winter, it ranges between being warm dimictic and monomictic. Main tributaries entering the
lake are the Adams, Anstey, Eagle, Salmon, Seymour and Shuswap rivers (Fig. 2). The
majority of adult sockeye returning to Shuswap Lake spawn in the Adams River, with smaller
numbers spawning in various lake tributaries and along the shores of the lake. Recent
escapements in dominant cycle years have ranged from 1.2 to 3.1 million, with escapements in
non-dominant years numbering less than 35,000. Several small towns are located on the
shores of Shuswap Lake, the largest of which are Salmon Arm (population 14,000), situated at
the southeast end of Salmon arm, and Sicamous (population 2,700), located at the junction of
Shuswap and Mara lakes. Shuswap Lake is a popular and well-developed recreational area,
with most campsites and marinas concentrated in Seymour, Main and Salmon arms. Industrial
activity in the area is limited to a small sawmill in the Main arm and a much larger sawmill
o
2
operation at Canoe (on the southeast shore of Salmon arm). The greatest nutrient inputs to
Shuswap Lake come from the Salmon and Shuswap rivers, since the drainage basins of both
rivers support considerable amounts of farming and ranching.
METHODS
We conducted limnological surveys from March or April to October or November of
each year. For most of the study we sampled the lake once monthly, but we carried out twice
monthly sampling in spring for several years. Sampling stations were situated in each arm of
Shuswap Lake and in Mara Lake (Table 1). We did not sample Little Shuswap Lake.
Temperature profiles from the surface to the lake bottom were obtained at most
stations using Applied Microsystems conductivity, temperature and depth meters (Models CTD12 and STD-12). Isotherms were plotted by the SAS procedure Gcontour (SAS Institute Inc.,
1990) from a grid of interpolated and smoothed unsealed data computed by the SAS
procedure G3grid using a bivariate method described by Akima (1978). Contour lines from
linearly interpolated data pass through the data points of the input data set. Li-Cor light meters
(Model 185A) equipped with quantum sensors (Model Li-192S) were used to measure
photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD: 400-700 nm) from the surface to the compensation
depth (1 % of surface intensity) and vertical light extinction coefficients were calculated.
Euphotic zone depth (EZD) was assumed to be equal to the compensation depth. A standard
22-cm white Secchi disk was used to measure water transparency. In vivo fluorescence (IVF)
from the surface to 40 m was measured with an Electro-Optik in situ fluorometer coupled with
a Linear Instruments Model 142 chart recorder.
We used an opaque Van Dorn bottle sterilized with 95% ethanol to collect all water
samples. Sampling took place between 0800 and 1200 h. On each sampling date and station
we partitioned the EZD into 3 layers. Criteria used in establishing boundaries of each layer
included compensation depth, thermocline depth and IVF peaks (if present). Several Van
Dorn bottle casts were made in each layer and this water was integrated into one sample.
Replicate analyses were carried out on each integrated sample. At each station we also
collected a hypolimnetic (40 m) sample. In addition to this integrated sampling, we collected
water samples from discrete vertical profiles at station 4 from 1989-1991, and at station 6 in
1992. Water from discrete samples was collected in 1-L or 2-L polyethylene bottles, while
integrated samples were collected in 20-L Nalge Lowboy carboys. Most chemical analyses
were carried out according to those methods given in Stephens and Brandstaetter (1983).
Acid washed, deionized distilled water (DDW) rinsed, screw-capped test tubes were rinsed and
then filled with sample water from each integrated sampling depth, capped, stored at 4°C, and
later analyzed for total phosphorus using a molybdenum blue method after persulfate
digestion. Water samples for the remaining nutrient analyses and chlorophyll determinations
were kept cool and dark and filtered within 2-4 h. Water for dissolved nutrient analyses was
filtered through 47-mm Whatman GF/F filters which had been previously ashed (460°C for
4 h). Each filter was placed in a 47-mm Swinnex filtering unit (Millipore Corp.), rinsed with
DDW, and then rinsed with approximately 50 mL of sample. An acid washed, DDW-rinsed
borosilicate glass bottle was rinsed and filled with 100 mL of filtered water, capped, stored at
4°C in the dark and later analyzed for nitrate (Stainton et al1977). An additional 100 mL of
sample was filtered into a clean, rinsed polyethylene bottle, stored at 4°C in the dark, and later
analyzed for soluble reactive silicon and total dissolved solids. A 1- or 2-L water sample was
3
filtered through an ashed 47-mm diameter Whatman GF/F filter which was then placed into a
clean scintillation vial and later analyzed for particulate phosphorus using the method of
Stainton et al. 1977. From 1987-1992,250- or 500-mL samples were filtered under subdued
light through 47-mm diameter 0.8-j.Lm Millipore AA filters, 2.0-j.Lm Nuclepore filters and 20-j.Lm
Nitex filters. In 1993, 250-mL samples were filtered through 47-mm diameter 0.8-j.Lm Millipore
AA filters only. Filters were folded in half, placed in aluminum foil dishes, and frozen. They
were later analyzed for chlorophyll using a Turner fluorometer (Model 112) after maceration in
90% acetone.
At stations where photosynthetic rates (PR) were measured, water for alkalinity
determinations was placed in glass bottles which were filled completely (one bottle from each
sampling depth) and sealed. A Cole-Parmer Oigi-Sense pH meter (Model 5986-10) and Ross
combination electrode were used to determine the pH and total alkalinity (mg'L- 1 CaC0 3) of
these samples according to the standard potentiometric method of APHA (1980). Dissolved
inorganic carbon (DIG) concentrations used in the calculation of PR were established indirectly
from pH, temperature, total dissolved solids and bicarbonate alkalinity.
Bacterioplankton numbers were determined by two different methods during the course
of the study. From 1987-88 sterile test tubes were rinsed thoroughly with sample and then
filled. Within a few hours of being collected, 5 mL of water from each tube were filtered
through a 25-mm diameter, 0.2-j.Lm Nuclepore filter counter-stained with Irgalan black. Filters
were removed when just dry, placed in petri dishes lined with absorbent filter paper, and airdried at room temperature. Bacterioplankton numbers were later determined from these
samples using the acridine orange direct count (AODC) method as described by Macisaac et
al. (1981). From 1989-93, sterile scintillation vials were rinsed thoroughly with sample and
then filled. Two drops of formaldehyde were added, and bacterioplankton numbers were later
determined from these samples using the OAPI method as described by Robarts and Sephton
(1981). Comparative tests indicated no significant differences in counts between the AOOC
and DAPI methods (t-test, p<0.05). For each counting method, eight random fields were
counted on each filter and the counts converted to numbers·mL- 1 . Occasional blanks were
prepared to check for significant background bacteria counts in the staining solution and rinse
water.
For phytoplankton enumeration and identification, opaque 125-mL polyethylene bottles
were rinsed with sample and filled. Phototrophic picoplankton (cyanobacteria and eukaryotic
algae <2 j.Lm in diameter) were enumerated using the method described by Macisaac and
Stockner (1985). Within several hours of sample collection, 15 mL of sample water was
filtered through a stained Nuclepore filter as described for AOOC bacteria samples. Care was
taken to minimize exposure of the sample to light during sampling and laboratory processing.
Filters were placed in opaque petri dishes, air-dried and stored in the dark at room temperature
for 1 to 8 months. During analysis, each filter was placed on a wet 40-j.Lm mesh nylon screen
in a filter holder, 1-2 mL of filtered DOW were added to the filter column and the cells on the
filter were rehydrated for 3-5 min. The water was drawn through at a vacuum pressure of
20 cm Hg, and the moist filter was placed on a glass slide with a drop of immersion oil (Cargille
Type B) and a coverslip. The Zeiss epifluorescence microscope used for picoplankton
enumeration was equipped with a 397-nm longwave-pass exciter filter and a 560-nm
shortwave-pass exciter filter, a 580-nm beam-splitter mirror and a 590-nm longwave-pass
barrier filter. Filters were examined at 1250X magnification under oil immersion, and 30
random fields were counted. Phototrophic picoplankton were identified as cyanobacteria or
4
eukaryotic algae, assigned to general categories based on morphological characteristics and
fluorescence colour, and scored into size categories.
Water in the opaque polyethylene bottles was fixed with 1-mL of Lugol's iodine
solution for later identification and enumeration of nano- and microphytoplankton. For
analysis, each sample was gently mixed and a subsample settled overnight in a settling
chamber of 7-, 12- or 27-mL capacity. Transects at 187.5X and 750X magnification were
counted using a Wild M40 inverted microscope equipped with phase contrast optics. Cells
were identified to genus or species and assigned to size classes. Only total cell numbers for
picoplankton (0.2-2.0 f.Lm), nanoplankton (2.0-20 f.Lm) and microplankton (>20 f.Lm) are
reported here.
Photosynthetic rate (PR) was measured at selected stations during the course of the
study. Depending on the year of sampling, 3-5 125-mL light and 2-3 125-mL dark bottles were
filled with water from each integrated sampling depth. Each bottle was inoculated with
approximately 137-kBq of a 14C-bicarbonate stock solution. At each station the activity of the
stock solution was determined by inoculating three scintillation vials containing 0.5 mL of
Scintigest (Fisher Scientific). Bottles were incubated at the mid-point of their respective depth
intervals for 1.5-2 h, generally between 0900 and 1200 h. After incubation, bottles were
placed in dark boxes and transported to the field laboratory where filtration started <2 h after
incubation stopped. 40-mL aliquots were removed from each bottle and filtered at a vacuum
not exceeding 20-cm Hg through 47-mm diameter Nuclepore filters (0.2- and 2.0-f.Lm pore size)
and a 47-mm diameter, 20-f.Lm mesh Nitex filter. When just dry, filters were placed into
scintillation vials containing 0.5 mL Scintigest (Fisher Scientific). All vials were stored cool in
the dark. At the West Vancouver Laboratory, 10 mL of Scintiverse II (Fisher Scientific) was
added to each scintillation vial and the samples were counted in a Packard Tri-Carb 4530
liquid scintillation counter. Quench series composed of the same scintillation cocktail and
filters as used for samples were used to determine counting efficiency and Strickland's (1960)
equation was used to calculate PRo PR was converted from hourly to daily rates using light
data collected with a Li-Cor Model L1-1000 datalogger and LI 1905A quantum sensors.
Seasonal averages for each station were calculated as time-weighted means of
epilimnetic data obtained during the growing season (defined as April1-November 30).
Seasonal whole-lake averages are also presented. To calculate whole-lake averages,
seasonal means for stations within each arm of Shuswap Lake were averaged, weighted by
the area of the arm, and then summed.
5
RESULTS
Raw data are presented for each year and station. Epilimnetic values for biological and
chemical data were calculated as depth-weighted means. Seasonal averages of most data at
each station and year are also presented. As a final summary, whole-lake averages calculated
from seasonal averages of each station are presented.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We are grateful to the considerable number of people who made the Shuswap lake
project a success. In particular, we would like to thank Ken Morton, Steve Maclellan, Timber
Whitehouse, Kiyo Masuda, Mark Gollner and Ray Carrier for participating in both data
collection and analysis. Erl Macisaac supervised the chemistry laboratory where high-quality
analyses were carried out by Tracy Jeffery and others.
6
REFERENCES
Akima, H. 1978. A Method of Bivariate Interpolation and Smooth Surface Fitting for Irregularly
Distributed Data Points. ACM Transaction on Mathematical Software 4: 148-159.
American Public Health Association, American Water Works Association and Water Pollution
Control Federation. 1980. Standard methods for the examination of water and
wastewater. 15th edition. Washington, D.C. 1134 p.
Farley, AL. 1979. Atlas of British Columbia. University of British Columbia Press, Vancouver,
B.C. 136 p.
Hume, J.M.B., K.S. Shortreed, and K.F. Morton. 1996. Juvenile sockeye rearing capacity of
three lakes in the Fraser River system. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 53: 719-733.
Macisaac, E.A, and J.G. Stockner. 1985. Current trophic state and potential impact of coal
mine development on productivity of Middle Quinsam and long lakes. Can. Tech. Rep.
Fish. Aquat. Sci. 1381: 63 p.
Macisaac, E.A, K.S. Shortreed, and J.G. Stockner. 1981. Seasonal distribution of
bacterioplankton numbers and activities in eight fertilized or untreated oligotrophic
British Columbia lakes. Can. Tech. Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 994: 43 p.
Maclellan, S.G., C.W. Mueller, H.J. Enzenhofer, and J.M.B. Hume. 1995. Trawl catch
statistics in Shuswap lake from 1987-1993. Can. Data Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 950:
46 p.
Morton, K.F., and K.S. Shortreed. 1996. Results from a seven-year limnological study of
Shuswap lake. Part II. Zooplankton. Can. Data Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 1005: 132 p.
Mueller, C.W. and H.J. Enzenhofer. 1991. Trawl catch statistics in sockeye rearing lakes
of the Fraser River drainage basin: 1975-1985. Can. Data Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci.
825: 204 p.
Mueller, C.W., H.J. Enzenhofer, and J.M.B. Hume. 1991. Trawl catch statistics from seven
sockeye rearing lakes of the Fraser River drainage basin: 1986-1991. Can. Data Rep.
Fish. Aquat. Sci. 864: 87 p.
Robarts, R.D., and L.M. Sephton. 1981. The enumeration of aquatic bacteria using DAPI. J.
Limnol. Soc. Afr. 7: 72-74.
SAS Institute Inc. 1990. SAS/GRAPH Software: Reference, Version 6, First Edition,
Volume 2. Cary, NC. SAS Institute Inc.: 664 p.
Stainton, M.P., M.J. Capel, and F.AJ. Armstrong. 1977. The chemical analysis of fresh water.
Can. F.M.S. Misc. Spec. Publ. No. 25, 2nd edition. 180 p.
7
Stephens, K., and R. Brandstaetter. 1983. A laboratory manual: collected methods for the
analysis of water. Can. Tech. Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 1159: 68 p.
Strickland, J.D.H. 1960. Measuring the production of marine phytoplankton. Bull. Fish. Res.
Board Can. 122: 173 p.
8
LIST OF TABLES
1. Morphometric data from Shuswap Lake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 9
2. Variation in physical data for each station
10
3. Variation in mean epilimnetic chemical data for each station. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 20
4. Variation in mean epilimnetic biological data for each station ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 29
5. Variation in pH, total alkalinity and photosynthetic rate data for each station
40
6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations
46
7. Seasonal (April-November) averages of physical data for each station
63
8. Seasonal (April-November) averages of chemical data for each station. . . . . . . . . . .. 65
9. Seasonal (April-November) averages of biological data for each station
66
10. Seasonal (April-November) averages of pH, total alkalinity and photosynthetic rate
data
67
11. Whole-lake seasonal averages of physical data
67
12. Whole-lake seasonal averages of chemical data
68
13. Whole-lake seasonal averages of biological data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 68
14. Whole-lake seasonal averages of pH, total alkalinity and photosynthetic rate data .. 68
9
Table 1. Morphometric data from Shuswap Lake.
Arm or
basin
Main
Surface
area (km 2)
Station
number
104
5
Latitude
(oN)
Longitude
(oW)
50°54'15" 119°10'07"
Volume
(km 3 )
Maximum Shoreline
Mean
depth (m) depth (m) length (km)
Length
(km)
4.810
40
110
108
42
6
50°57'03" 119°10'15"
Seymour
47
4
51 °05'30" 119°02'00"
3.940
33
171
70
28
Anstey
56
7
51°02'10" 119°03'10"
4.210
35
132
63
28
Salmon
89
1
50°47'35" 119°10'07"
4.880
41
128
90
32
Mara
18
10
50°47'30" 119°00'12"
0.395
22
47
33
14
West
151
8.750
58
171
178
71
East
163
9.485
58
132
185
74
Total
314
18.235
58
171
364
145
10
Table 2. Variation in physical data for each station.
Year and
station
Date
Surface
temp. (OC)
Mean epil.
temp. (oC)
Therm.
depth (m)
EZD (m)
Ext. coeff.
(·m· l )
Secchi
depth (m)
13.0
0.34
6.0
1987
1.0
5.0
7.0
10.0
30APR
8.5
8.1
26MAY
15.7
14.1
9.0
9.3
0.48
5.9
30JUN
23.3
20.5
10.0
9.4
0.46
5.8
27JUL
22.1
20.9
11.1
9.6
0.46
5.3
25AUG
20.3
20.3
10.4
11.5
0.38
7.6
21SEP
18.5
18.5
13.5
11.8
0.34
9.5
270CT
12.2
12.3
19.4
13.6
0.30
8.9
19NOV
9.4
9.3
16.4
14.4
0.28
8.5
28APR
11.6
8.6
16.4
0.26
11.5
25MAY
11.3
10.7
9.2
12.8
0.34
8.2
28JUN
19.2
16.9
11.0
11.6
0.37
13.7
26JUL
21.0
19.5
12.5
13.5
0.33
10.5
23AUG
18.9
18.8
11.2
13.9
0.31
11.0
20SEP
17.7
17.6
15.7
13.8
0.30
10.8
250CT
12.5
12.6
20.3
16.4
0.28
10.6
17NOV
9.6
9.7
18.0
11.6
0.34
8.6
01MAY
8.2
7.3
8.2
17.3
0.25
8.5
28MAY
14.9
14.1
4.6
11.2
0.40
7.9
01JUL
22.2
18.9
10.0
11.2
0.39
7.0
29JUL
22.3
20.6
14.6
12.1
0.35
8.5
26AUG
19.7
19.5
11.0
14.4
0.29
10.2
23SEP
18.3
18.2
11.8
14.5
0.28
12.7
280CT
12.2
12.1
15.0
14.2
0.30
11.9
20NOV
9.6
9.7
17.4
14.6
0.28
11.3
29APR
12.1
10.0
3.8
11.5
0.37
4.5
27MAY
17.5
14.9
5.0
9.1
0.48
5.0
29JUN
23.1
20.5
12.0
11.0
0.40
7.2
28JUL
23.6
22.4
10.9
12.3
0.36
8.3
24AUG
20.3
20.0
9.9
11.9
0.37
9.2
22SEP
18.8
18.6
10.0
11.4
0.36
8.5
260CT
12.2
12.3
16.6
15.2
0.30
8.9
18NOV
9.2
9.5
18.0
13.2
0.31
9.6
11
Table 2. Variation in physical data for each station.
Year and
station
Date
Surface
temp. (OC)
Mean epil.
temp. (oC)
Therm.
depth (m)
EZD (m)
Ext. coeft.
(-mol)
Secchi
depth (m)
1988
1.0
4.0
5.0
7.0
04MAR
2.9
2.9
16.2
0.26
6.7
13APR
5.2
4.5
13.0
0.31
10.0
05MAY
9.7
8.8
6.8
10.7
0.42
4.6
02JUN
15.4
11.9
7.0
9.3
0.40
5.2
07JUL
18.6
17.0
6.3
9.6
0.44
5.2
04AUG
22.3
21.5
7.4
10.2
0.41
7.5
12.2
0.35
8.5
8.5
01SEP
20.0
20.7
10.9
27SEP
15.5
15.7
12.6
12.2
0.32
14.0
10NOV
9.6
9.8
14.2
0.30
9.8
01MAR
3.4
3.4
16.3
0.26
11.2
14APR
6.3
5.9
11.5
0.34
11.8
04MAY
8.3
7.1
7.0
8.7
0.48
4.8
01JUN
13.6
11.7
8.2
10.7
0.38
6.2
06JUL
17.1
17.2
12.5
12.1
0.35
6.5
03AUG
21.6
21.2
12.0
12.1
0.34
8.5
31AUG
18.5
19.2
13.4
11.5
0.36
10.8
29SEP
15.1
15.5
14.0
15.4
0.27
9.5
09NOV
10.1
10.3
15.1
16.5
0.27
9.5
03MAR
2.6
2.5
16.6
0.26
10.9
12APR
5.3
4.6
14.4
0.29
11.0
03MAY
9.3
8.1
5.3
13.1
0.31
6.5
31MAY
12.8
12.4
7.5
10.6
0.41
6.5
05JUL
16.7
16.8
8.5
11.3
0.37
7.5
02AUG
20.2
18.3
11.5
11.2
0.38
8.2
30AUG
18.0
17.1
7.4
13.8
0.30
8.5
28SEP
14.7
14.7
14.8
14.1
0.29
8.0
18.9
08NOV
10.1
10.4
13.9
0.29
9.0
02MAR
3.2
3.0
16.4
0.25
10.5
15APR
4.5
4.1
14.3
0.28
13.2
06MAY
9.7
7.9
10.0
12.0
0.37
6.0
03JUN
15.8
11.3
10.0
11.8
0.35
7.3
08JUL
17.8
16.8
9.0
9.5
0.44
6.2
05AUG
22.8
22.4
9.3
13.4
0.32
9.8
02SEP
19.0
19.5
9.0
12.6
0.36
10.5
30SEP
15.6
15.6
12.4
13.4
0.30
10.5
11NOV
9.9
10.0
14.5
13.1
0.32
9.0
12
Table 2. Variation in physical data for each station.
Year and
station
10.0
Date
Surface
temp. (OC)
Mean epil.
temp. (oC)
13APR
8.0
5.6
05MAY
10.8
9.7
Therm.
depth (m)
6.8
EZD (m)
Ext. coeft.
(·m· l )
Secchi
depth (m)
11.6
0.36
6.5
8.8
0.52
3.8
3.8
8.5
02JUN
13.9
12.8
5.6
8.3
0.51
07JUL
17.9
16.9
9.5
11.0
0.39
04AUG
23.0
22.2
8.7
11.3
0.37
8.0
01SEP
19.5
20.3
9.1
10.9
0.39
10.2
27SEP
15.8
16.0
12.1
0.33
10NOV
9.7
7.0
9.9
19.2
12.8
9.0
1989
1.0
4.0
5.0
6.0
12APR
3.1
13.2
0.32
9.5
10MAY
14.6
11.4
10.0
10.9
0.40
4.8
15JUN
19.9
18.6
9.4
9.0
0.44
4.5
13JUL
21.7
19.2
7.0
9.2
0.44
6.0
17AUG
20.9
20.5
8.0
11.5
0.35
6.8
14SEP
18.7
18.6
8.8
12.0
0.34
8.0
190CT
12.8
12.8
17.0
10.2
0.38
9.0
22NOV
7.2
7.2
13.4
0.30
9.5
13APR
3.7
15.1
0.28
15.5
11MAY
7.4
7.2
12.3
0.34
4.9
13JUN
20.3
16.7
7.0
10.8
0.40
7.0
11JUL
19.0
17.8
11.0
9.8
0.41
8.9
15AUG
21.3
21.0
11.3
15.1
0.29
9.5
12SEP
17.8
17.7
11.0
13.2
0.32
10.0
170CT
13.3
13.6
15.0
14.2
0.29
11.8
23NOV
7.2
7.5
25.0
12.9
0.33
9.5
13.3
0.32
13.0
16.7
0.26
11.5
11APR
3.5
09MAY
15.0
14JUN
19.4
16.1
4.7
14.6
0.28
6.2
12JUL
19.8
17.9
10.0
10.7
0.41
9.2
16AUG
20.0
20.0
8.0
13.6
0.30
8.9
12.0
13SEP
18.2
18.1
9.2
14.0
0.30
10.1
180CT
13.0
13.0
19.0
15.0
0.28
11.0
24.0
13.4
0.32
9.5
14.5
0.28
10.6
21NOV
8.0
8.1
09MAY
14.0
10.8
14JUN
18.7
16.6
5.2
12.2
0.34
7.5
12JUL
20.4
17.8
11.0
11.4
0.37
8.9
16AUG
20.8
20.5
9.0
13.6
0.30
8.4
13SEP
18.3
18.1
9.6
14.8
0.29
10.5
180CT
12.9
13.0
16.0
14.0
0.28
9.2
21NOV
7.9
8.0
27.0
10.3
0.37
11.0
13
Table 2. Variation in physical data for each station.
Year and
station
6.1
7.0
10.0
Date
09MAY
Surface
temp. (oC)
13.4
Mean epil.
temp. (OC)
Therm.
depth (m)
10.2
EZD (m)
Ext. coeff.
(·m· l )
Secchi
depth (m)
11.3
0.34
9.1
14JUN
18.9
16.2
5.2
16.5
0.28
8.0
12JUL
21.6
18.5
10.3
12.2
0.37
9.0
16AUG
20.8
20.7
8.4
9.0
13SEP
18.4
18.2
10.1
11.5
0.36
11.0
180CT
13.2
13.2
13.5
13.2
0.31
10.0
21NOV
7.8
8.0
12.0
0.34
12.7
14APR
4.0
15.5
0.28
12.8
12MAY
11.3
9.8
0.44
5.0
11.0
7.5
16JUN
17.0
14.1
7.1
9.7
0.41
5.0
14JUL
20.6
18.3
7.0
11.1
0.39
7.5
18AUG
20.0
20.0
10.0
11.0
0.36
8.5
15SEP
18.1
18.0
15.0
12.9
0.31
9.0
200CT
13.1
13.2
17.0
12.0
0.31
12.0
24NOV
6.8
7.1
23.0
14.7
0.28
10.0
12APR
4.0
10.0
0.41
6.2
10MAY
13.0
12.1
6.5
7.5
0.54
3.5
15JUN
19.7
17.3
9.0
9.4
0.45
4.8
13JUL
21.9
19.6
6.1
11.0
0.40
8.0
17AUG
21.2
20.7
11.3
10.6
0.41
10.1
14SEP
18.8
18.2
14.3
11.6
0.37
9.2
190CT
13.2
13.1
18.7
12
0.32
10.1
22NOV
6.8
7.5
9.2
0.42
8.5
1990
1.0
14MAR
3.0
2.7
14.3
0.30
9.5
04APR
3.7
3.6
11.3
0.36
6.9
10APR
4.4
4.0
13.2
0.33
6.8
24APR
8.8
6.8
10.0
15.3
0.27
7.0
09MAY
11.4
8.9
8.0
10.3
0.40
4.5
23MAY
13.4
12.6
8.0
10.5
0.40
12.0
13JUN
14.6
10.6
6.0
10.4
0.36
4.2
11JUL
23.2
18.6
6.0
5.6
0.77
3.0
15AUG
25.0
23.3
12.5
7.2
0.58
5.2
19SEP
19.0
18.7
12.0
8.5
0.82
6.0
170CT
11.6
11.8
16.0
11.7
0.35
8.5
7.3
7.2
19.0
11.3
0.36
7.5
22NOV
14
Table 2. Variation in physical data for each station.
Year and
station
4.0
5.0
6.0
Date
Surface
temp. (oC)
Mean epil.
temp. (oC)
Therm.
depth (m)
EZD (m)
Ext. coell.
(·m· l )
Secchi
depth (m)
16.4
0.25
11.0
15MAR
3.4
3.1
05APR
5.5
4.4
5.0
11.7
0.32
12.1
10APR
5.8
4.9
6.0
14.1
0.30
14.5
24APR
6.5
6.2
11.0
11.9
0.37
10MAY
7.9
7.6
7.5
15.5
0.28
10.0
23MAY
14.2
12.0
8.0
10.0
0.43
8.5
14JUN
14.5
11.8
11.0
9.3
0.41
7.5
13JUL
22.3
17.0
6.0
8.2
0.51
6.5
16AUG
24.6
22.7
10.0
9.6
0.40
9.2
20SEP
18.4
18.0
13.2
10.0
0.40
10.5
15.0
9.0
180CT
12.2
13.0
12.9
0.32
21NOV
7.4
7.4
14.9
0.29
11.5
13MAR
1.3
2.4
13.5
0.31
14.5
03APR
3.7
3.5
11.4
0.31
10.5
09APR
4.3
4.1
15.4
0.28
12.0
23APR
9.4
8.2
8.0
16.2
0.26
12.5
08MAY
7.8
6.3
8.5
15.8
0.27
10.3
22MAY
12.6
12.1
9.0
17.6
0.23
10.5
12JUN
12.4
11.4
10.0
13.3
0.32
7.0
10JUL
21.8
17.2
6.0
9.2
0.46
6.6
14AUG
24.2
22.5
8.0
10.6
0.36
7.3
18SEP
18.8
17.0
7.0
9.0
0.45
9.5
160CT
11.6
11.8
17.0
13.0
0.33
8.5
20NOV
7.7
7.7
26.0
13.2
0.33
8.0
13MAR
2.9
2.8
15.3
0.28
11.0
15MAR
2.6
14.6
0.29
03APR
3.9
3.7
15.5
0.27
12.2
09APR
4.3
4.1
13.3
0.32
11.8
23APR
9.1
7.3
6.0
14.5
0.28
8.0
08MAY
9.2
7.4
9.0
16.7
0.26
11.8
22MAY
12.0
11.2
8.0
16.1
0.26
10.0
12JUN
12.0
11.8
7.5
13.0
0.32
6.0
10JUL
20.6
16.8
8.0
9.0
0.48
6.5
14AUG
24.6
22.1
9.0
10.2
0.42
8.5
18SEP
19.5
18.8
8.2
10.7
0.37
8.5
160CT
12.3
12.0
17.0
13.0
0.34
10.0
20NOV
7.4
7.7
14.8
0.29
9.5
15
Table 2. Variation in physical data for each station.
Year and
station
6.1
7.0
10.0
Date
13MAR
Surface
temp. (oC)
3.1
EZD (m)
Ext. coeff.
(-m- l )
Secchi
depth (m)
2.8
14.7
0.29
10.0
Mean epil.
temp. (oC)
Therm.
depth (m)
03APR
4.3
3.7
14.9
0.28
12.5
08MAY
11.2
7.3
16.8
0.26
11.0
12JUN
12.3
11.6
12.5
0.33
6.5
10JUL
22.5
16.8
9.6
0.46
6.5
14AUG
25.2
22.8
11.1
0.40
7.8
18SEP
19.9
19.0
11.4
0.36
10.1
160CT
12.1
12.0
13.3
0.33
9.5
20NOV
7.7
7.6
10.0
0.39
9.0
16MAR
3.6
3.0
15.5
0.26
14.8
06APR
4.2
3.9
12.8
0.31
13.0
16.1
0.27
13.0
17.5
0.24
9.0
13.6
0.30
8.5
10APR
5.0
4.5
24APR
8.3
7.2
11MAY
9.0
7.4
23MAY
13.7
12.3
9.0
12.2
0.35
13.0
15JUN
15.3
12.7
9.2
7.4
0.60
4.5
5.5
6.0
12JUL
22.2
17.2
6.0
8.6
0.49
17AUG
23.3
22.9
7.3
11.2
0.37
6.5
21SEP
18.8
18.6
10.9
10.2
0.39
9.5
12.0
190CT
11.8
12.2
11.2
0.37
8.0
23NOV
7.6
7.6
14.1
0.32
7.5
04APR
4.5
3.9
11.7
0.35
7.5
10APR
7.2
6.2
7.0
8.2
0.48
4.5
24APR
11.4
10.7
6.0
8.4
0.50
5.0
09MAY
13.7
10.7
10.0
8.4
0.49
5.5
23MAY
13.4
12.5
12.0
11.7
0.38
6.8
13JUN
11.9
11.3
17.0
7.8
0.53
3.0
11JUL
22.6
17.3
17.5
7.0
0.62
4.5
15AUG
25.0
23.9
12.0
10.6
0.42
7.5
19SEP
19.3
18.7
10.4
11.1
0.39
9.5
170CT
12.2
12.6
18.0
11.6
0.35
7.5
22NOV
7.8
7.7
11.8
0.36
6.5
16
Table 2. Variation in physical data for each station.
Year and
station
Date
Surface
temp. (0C)
Mean epil.
temp. (OC)
Therm.
depth (m)
EZD (m)
Ext. coeff.
(-m- l )
Secchi
depth (m)
12.6
0.32
8.5
1991
1.0
4.0
6.0
11APR
3.6
23APR
11.5
7.0
10.0
16.8
0.25
7.5
09MAY
10.4
10.4
13.0
11.7
0.34
5.5
22MAY
15.0
10.1
5.0
7.8
0.46
2.5
3.8
06JUN
16.2
14.3
11.5
9.2
0.44
18JUN
16.0
14.2
10.0
8.2
0.52
4.8
10JUL
22.3
18.9
11.0
9.3
0.50
5.5
31JUL
21.7
20.1
8.0
10.9
0.36
5.6
28AUG
20.7
20.6
9.0
13.0
0.34
7.0
25SEP
17.5
17.4
10.0
12.1
0.35
7.5
230CT
11.4
11.4
12.0
15.0
0.30
8.5
20NOV
7.2
7.1
10APR
3.7
24APR
10.4
7.9
10.7
0.35
9.0
17.1
0.23
12.8
6.0
8.4
0.25
9.5
07MAY
8.1
6.9
5.0
11.6
0.36
6.5
22MAY
12.4
11.5
15.0
11.0
0.37
5.8
05JUN
13.6
13.4
15.0
10.0
0.42
7.5
18JUN
15.4
14.1
13.0
10.8
0.41
6.5
11JUL
21.3
19.2
14.0
10.7
0.41
6.5
01AUG
21.1
19.3
11.5
10.0
0.42
7.5
29AUG
20.2
19.7
7.0
11.0
0.38
8.0
13.5
0.3
8.5
14.5
0.31
8.0
14.5
0.27
6.2
26SEP
17.3
17.2
11.0
240CT
12.0
12.0
26.0
19NOV
7.4
7.4
09APR
3.5
24APR
7.9
16.8
0.25
11.2
6.2
5.0
18.6
0.24
13.0
08MAY
7.6
6.6
9.0
15.5
0.26
9.5
21MAY
13.0
10.5
7.0
14.7
0.27
7.5
04JUN
13.5
12.5
14.0
12.0
0.37
7.8
17JUN
14.4
13.9
9.0
11.6
0.36
6.1
12JUL
22.4
18.7
11.5
11.8
0.39
7.0
02AUG
21.8
20.0
8.0
11.4
0.37
7.2
30AUG
18.9
18.7
10.0
11.0
0.40
6.5
27SEP
16.8
16.8
12.0
13.4
0.30
7.0
250CT
11.3
11.3
18.0
15.2
0.30
8.0
6.3
6.9
12.0
0.32
10.0
21NOV
17
Table 2. Variation in physical data for each station.
Year and
station
6.1
7.0
10.0
Date
Surface
temp. (ec)
09APR
3.4
08MAY
Mean epil.
temp. (ec)
Therm.
depth (m)
EZD (m)
Ext. coeff.
('m")
Secchi
depth (m)
18.7
0.22
11.5
11.0
6.2
5.3
17.0
0.24
04JUN
14.5
14.4
14.0
0.29
12JUL
22.4
02AUG
21.9
20.4
30AUG
19.0
18.7
27SEP
16.8
16.6
250CT
11.4
11.4
21NOV
7.1
7.0
9.3
7.5
7.8
11.7
0.38
7.5
7.5
13.6
0.34
8.5
10.0
12APR
3.2
14.5
0.28
14.0
23APR
9.9
7.7
6.0
15.1
0.28
10.5
10MAY
9.3
8.0
12.0
12.9
0.30
7.0
23MAY
11.8
11.4
14.0
10.3
0.38
6.0
07JUN
16.0
13.9
6.0
12.4
0.32
7.0
19JUN
14.8
12.9
14.0
8.5
0.49
5.5
09JUL
21.2
17.7
11.0
9.7
0.45
5.5
30JUL
18.7
17.0
11.5
9.6
0.44
6.9
27AUG
21.3
21.3
11.0
14.3
0.28
8.0
24SEP
17.4
17.2
10.0
10.4
0.39
9.0
220CT
12.7
12.7
17.0
15.2
0.29
10.5
21NOV
7.4
7.4
19.0
12.8
0.31
10.0
11APR
5.4
8.5
0.47
4.9
23APR
12.8
9.0
7.0
8.6
0.52
3.5
09MAY
9.5
9.0
14.0
9.2
0.42
4.0
22MAY
11.9
11.6
7.0
7.9
0.52
3.5
06JUN
15.2
14.1
12.0
8.2
0.51
3.0
18JUN
14.2
13.8
19.0
8.1
0.53
4.3
16.0
10.4
0.46
5.0
9.6
0.44
6.5
13.0
0.32
9.2
10JUL
22.4
18.5
31JUL
17.4
17.4
28AUG
21.4
21.2
8.0
25SEP
17.9
17.8
13.0
13.8
0.29
10.5
230CT
12.6
12.7
17.0
14.3
0.31
7.0
20NOV
7.6
7.6
11.4
0.35
10.0
18
Table 2. Variation in physical data for each station.
Year and
station
Date
Surface
temp. (OC)
Mean epil.
temp. (0C)
Therm.
depth (m)
EZD (m)
Ext. coeff.
(·m ol )
Secchi
depth (m)
1992
1.0
4.0
6.0
7.0
10MAR
4.0
08APR
7.1
6.9
06MAY
14.2
12.0
12.0
14.7
0.28
11.0
12.7
0.33
8.2
12.1
0.35
7.5
10JUN
19.0
17.3
10.0
10.6
0.42
4.0
08JUL
21.2
20.1
11.0
12.9
0.34
6.5
14AUG
22.9
21.7
10.0
9.9
0.43
8.8
16SEP
15.3
15.7
16.0
13.4
0.31
8.5
150CT
12.3
12.5
16.0
12.1
0.33
7.5
15.0
18NOV
8.2
8.6
10MAR
4.6
4.2
16.8
0.25
8.5
12.6
0.33
9.5
07APR
6.4
5.9
14.3
0.32
9.5
05MAY
12.3
9.8
6.0
10.3
0.42
7.5
10JUN
18.3
16.7
11.5
12.5
0.34
6.5
08JUL
20.5
19.4
6.0
15.6
0.29
8.5
14AUG
23.6
22.0
9.0
14.0
0.32
9.0
16SEP
14.8
15.8
12.0
14.8
0.28
10.8
150CT
12.8
12.7
20.0
14.2
0.28
9.5
17NOV
10.4
8.8
14.0
12.5
0.35
10.5
11MAR
4.6
4.6
14.4
0.29
10.5
07APR
6.8
6.4
16.3
0.25
11.5
05MAY
12.5
10.1
13.0
13.4
0.31
11.0
11JUN
17.6
16.2
12.0
12.7
0.34
7.5
07JUL
20.5
18.7
13.5
15.6
0.28
7.5
13AUG
22.0
21.5
9.0
9.2
0.50
11.0
15SEP
15.2
15.4
18.0
13.7
0.31
9.0
140CT
13.4
12.8
20.0
17NOV
8.5
8.6
10MAR
4.9
13.9
0.31
9.2
22.0
0.17
13.0
15.0
0.27
10.5
14.8
0.29
10.0
11.9
0.35
6.5
5.0
08APR
6.8
6.3
06MAY
14.5
10.1
12.0
10JUN
19.4
18.3
7.0
13.8
0.32
0.26
7.0
0.35
11.5
08JUL
20.8
18.8
6.0
17.1
14AUG
22.8
21.4
10.0
12.7
16SEP
15.3
15.8
11.0
14.4
0.29
10.5
150CT
12.6
12.5
16.0
13.5
0.32
9.2
18NOV
9.2
8.7
19.1
0.20
11.0
19
Table 2. Variation in physical data for each station.
Year and
station
Date
Surface
temp. (OC)
Mean epil.
temp. (oC)
Therm.
depth (m)
EZD (m)
Ext. coeff.
(·m· l )
Secchi
depth (m)
16.0
0.25
8.5
9.8
0.44
6.0
1993
1.0
4.0
6.0
7.0
21APR
3.7
3.5
12MAY
15.7
11.3
8.0
08JUN
21.1
14.5
7.0
6.0
0.64
2.5
06JUL
19.8
18.6
10.0
7.8
0.51
4.2
10AUG
21.7
20.2
6.0
10.4
0.40
5.1
06SEP
21.1
20.2
10.0
10.2
0.44
7.3
050CT
16.1
15.9
12.0
11.2
0.38
8.7
03NOV
10.2
10.2
19.0
16.4
0.25
6.6
21APR
3.3
3.2
15.4
0.26
10.5
12MAY
14.1
8.3
10.2
0.42
6.5
13.5
08JUN
15.0
14.2
15.0
13.2
0.29
5.2
06JUL
19.0
16.5
12.0
11.1
0.40
6.5
10AUG
20.9
20.2
14.0
13.3
0.31
7.8
06SEP
21.8
20.3
11.0
11.1
0.40
9.2
050CT
17.2
16.3
10.0
14.9
0.27
10.4
13.0
03NOV
10.8
10.8
21APR
3.8
3.3
12MAY
10.7
6.8
20.5
0.20
9.2
20.6
0.20
13.0
14.0
15.5
0.26
12.2
08JUN
14.9
14.2
11.0
11.1
0.37
5.8
07JUL
18.6
16.7
11.5
10.0
0.43
6.0
10.0
13.2
0.32
7.8
12AUG
19.8
18.9
08SEP
20.4
19.6
11.0
11.0
0.37
9.2
060CT
16.2
16.0
13.0
18.8
0.20
9.3
04NOV
10.3
10.4
18.0
21APR
3.5
3.5
12MAY
10.0
6.6
08JUN
17.0
06JUL
18.3
10AUG
20.4
13.8
0.28
9.4
18.9
0.20
11.5
10.0
14.4
0.29
8.0
15.9
15.0
10.2
0.42
9.4
15.1
10.0
9.3
0.46
5.1
19.5
8.0
12.4
0.34
5.8
06SEP
21.4
19.7
11.0
12.2
0.37
9.4
050CT
16.7
16.0
9.0
12.8
0.34
9.9
03NOV
11.2
11.2
14.0
16.9
0.24
9.4
20
Table 3. Variation in mean epilimnetic chemical data for each station.
Year and
station
Silica
(mg Si·L,1)
T.O.S.
(mg·L'l)
Nitrate
(lJg N·L,1)
Total P
Part. P
(pg p·L'1)
(pg p·L'1)
30APR
62.2
12.2
1.4
26MAY
29.4
8.9
1.6
1.89
60
30JUN
1.0
9.6
2.44
68
27JUL
2.0
6.3
2.34
59
Date
1987
1
5
7
10
67
25AUG
1.2
5.6
2.44
68
21SEP
5.4
5.6
2.72
72
270CT
7.6
6.5
2.71
19NOV
18.5
5.8
2.75
28APR
99.0
5.5
0.9
25MAY
65.5
3.0
0.6
3.67
51
28JUN
13.2
3.7
2.89
60
67
67
26JUL
2.0
4.0
2.60
55
23AUG
1.0
2.8
2.54
64
20SEP
6.1
2.3
2.71
59
250CT
9.5
2.5
2.49
17NOV
26.4
4.0
2.71
01MAY
77.7
4.7
1.4
2.56
64
28MAY
36.9
5.0
0.9
3.02
59
01JUL
1.5
5.3
2.68
63
53
29JUL
2.0
3.6
2.56
55
26AUG
1.5
3.0
2.45
41
23SEP
5.8
1.8
2.28
55
280CT
8.5
3.5
2.65
20NOV
19.5
3.8
2.71
44
2.66
77
3.14
48
29APR
61.7
8.4
1.9
27MAY
26.8
10.0
0.9
29JUN
8.3
5.0
57
28JUL
2.0
6.2
3.12
51
24AUG
2.3
4.2
3.00
72
52
22SEP
5.2
4.6
2.90
260CT
8.0
4.0
3.14
18NOV
21.5
4.8
3.27
43
21
Table 3. Variation in mean epilimnetic chemical data for each station.
Year and
station
Nitrate
(f.J9 NoL")
Total P
(lJg P·L")
Part. P
(f.Jg P·L")
04MAR
29.7
6.8
5.4
5.8
Date
Silica
(mg Si·L·')
T.D.S.
(mg·L")
1988
1
4
5
57
3.2
4.45
72
68
64
13APR
24.9
05MAY
18.1
6.2
4.6
3.26
02JUN
19.7
6.1
3.5
3.46
07JUL
15.0
6.9
4.7
2.68
65
04AUG
<1.0
3.1
3.4
2.56
56
01SEP
3.2
4.1
1.7
2.87
60
27SEP
2.0
4.6
3.3
4.13
61
10NOV
26.5
5.4
2.9
5.47
64
01MAR
38.2
3.8
4.9
3.12
51
14APR
25.0
5.8
2.1
3.26
57
04MAY
30.9
4.5
2.7
3.30
43
01JUN
26.4
3.7
1.8
3.26
55
06JUL
14.0
2.9
2.1
2.74
57
03AUG
2.4
1.2
1.6
2.50
47
31AUG
1.3
1.7
1.6
2.91
44
29SEP
1.8
2.9
1.8
3.93
51
09NOV
18.9
5.3
2.6
5.10
53
03MAR
33.9
4.3
4.4
3.05
60
12APR
28.6
5.1
2.0
3.14
59
03MAY
20.6
5.4
2.2
3.09
48
31MAY
27.7
4.2
2.3
3.18
57
05JUL
27.0
2.6
1.9
2.99
56
2.3
2.0
2.62
51
02AUG
30AUG
7
3.32
28.2
2.7
1.8
3.03
36
4.15
53
5.18
61
28SEP
3.6
3.5
2.2
08NOV
10.1
5.6
2.6
02MAR
33.1
6.4
3.0
3.35
75
15APR
37.9
5.0
1.9
3.45
52
06MAY
21.9
6.6
3.4
3.44
68
03JUN
21.3
3.7
2.0
3.33
72
08JUL
3.5
5.0
2.7
2.73
81
05AUG
1.3
1.4
1.4
2.55
55
3.03
37
02SEP
3.4
1.9
1.2
30SEP
1.1
5.0
1.7
4.15
60
11NOV
18.4
4.9
2.5
5.50
59
22
Table 3. Variation in mean epilimnetic chemical data for each station.
Year and
station
10
Nitrate
(llg N·L· 1)
Total P
(llg P·L- 1)
Part. P
(llg P·L- 1)
38.7
8.3
3.6
05MAY
13.4
6.8
02JUN
21.5
6.2
07JUL
23.3
5.0
2.2
3.15
68
2.0
2.6
3.04
55
1.2
1.6
3.49
49
Date
13APR
04AUG
01SEP
3.9
Silica
(mg Si·L- 1)
T.D.S.
(mg·L- 1)
3.79
63
4.5
3.71
61
2.9
3.60
67
27SEP
1.9
4.2
2.8
4.89
63
10NOV
17.9
8.1
3.2
6.24
61
12APR
29.2
5.3
2.8
3.62
64
10MAY
25.2
6.5
2.8
3.48
64
15JUN
6.3
7.4
4.1
3.50
68
13JUL
1.5
7.6
5.0
3.01
59
17AUG
<1.0
6.2
2.0
3.13
49
14SEP
1.4
4.0
3.2
3.19
47
190CT
11.5
6.2
3.2
3.31
36
1989
1
4
5
6
22NOV
50.3
4.9
1.8
3.68
64
13APR
28.8
4.2
1.5
3.77
53
11MAY
42.3
4.3
1.4
3.49
56
13JUN
47.6
3.9
3.0
3.20
49
11JUL
5.7
5.3
3.7
2.85
49
15AUG
1.4
3.4
5.1
2.77
45
12SEP
4.5
2.3
1.5
2.78
44
170CT
5.0
4.0
2.2
2.97
48
23NOV
45.6
3.0
1.5
3.42
53
11APR
25.6
4.3
1.7
3.39
52
09MAY
33.9
5.0
1.6
3.49
55
14JUN
42.7
6.9
3.3
3.33
41
12JUL
16.6
3.8
3.3
2.93
39
16AUG
1.8
3.1
1.4
2.82
49
13SEP
5.6
3.0
1.3
2.78
43
180CT
9.6
3.7
1.8
2.93
52
21NOV
36.7
4.4
1.4
3.37
56
09MAY
36.8
5.0
1.2
3.36
37
3.71
52
14JUN
34.3
5.2
3.1
12JUL
14.4
4.6
2.4
2.88
68
16AUG
4.8
3.1
1.5
2.76
40
13SEP
1.5
3.4
1.3
2.85
41
180CT
15.0
5.4
1.6
2.96
57
21NOV
41.3
3.8
1.4
3.39
52
23
Table 3. Variation in mean epilimnetic chemical data for each station.
Year and
station
7
10
Nitrate
(J.lg N·L,l)
Total P
(J.lg p·L'l)
Part. P
(J.lg p·L'l)
14APR
36.6
5.9
1.6
3.68
64
12MAY
28.8
6.1
2.8
3.52
77
16JUN
18.6
5.2
4.0
3.10
53
57
Date
Silica
(mg Si·L,l)
T.D.S.
(mg·L'l)
14JUL
6.1
6.9
3.1
2.89
18AUG
2.8
3.1
2.2
2.93
55
15SEP
2.2
3.9
1.3
2.96
48
200CT
7.9
5.3
1.9
3.10
56
24NOV
55.8
3.8
1.6
3.68
59
12APR
40.5
7.0
4.5
4.20
69
10MAY
7.7
7.9
3.0
3.99
55
15JUN
28.1
8.4
3.8
3.69
65
13JUL
9.2
6.4
3.0
3.47
63
17AUG
5.1
5.5
3.1
3.45
60
14SEP
4.0
5.1
1.9
4.22
49
190CT
19.8
5.3
3.0
3.56
65
22NOV
51.1
5.1
1.6
4.02
44
1990
1
4
5
14MAR
61.1
5.3
3.2
3.69
83
04APR
79.2
4.0
3.2
3.41
77
10APR
45.3
3.7
3.0
3.07
71
24APR
53.9
5.0
3.9
3.46
61
09MAY
47.7
7.4
4.5
3.28
63
23MAY
25.0
7.1
4.3
3.60
79
13JUN
34.8
5.8
4.2
3.51
89
11JUL
9.8
10.9
7.8
2.75
80
15AUG
6.2
12.7
3.3
3.24
75
19SEP
4.2
7.9
4.1
1.65
53
170CT
44.7
7.0
3.6
3.26
64
22NOV
29.2
8.2
2.7
3.13
53
15MAR
68.1
5.8
1.9
3.48
69
05APR
99.4
4.0
1.6
3.33
59
10APR
58.5
3.3
1.7
3.08
55
24APR
74.1
3.9
1.9
3.72
65
10MAY
80.0
5.3
2.5
3.19
62
23MAY
71.4
4.8
2.4
3.60
67
14JUN
50.5
4.2
3.1
3.12
60
13JUL
10.1
4.4
2.7
2.77
62
16AUG
2.1
4.7
1.7
2.54
66
20SEP
2.3
3.6
1.4
3.54
46
180CT
22.1
5.5
2.3
2.71
46
21NOV
23.2
4.7
1.8
2.88
51
13MAR
62.2
4.9
2.2
3.35
61
24
Table 3. Variation in mean epilimnetic chemical data for each station.
Year and
station
Date
03APR
6
7
Nitrate
(f-lQ N·L- 1)
Total P
(f-lg P·L- 1)
Part.P
(f-lg P·L· l )
75.8
3.3
1.8
Silica
(mg Si·L· 1)
3.19
T.D.S.
(mg·L·l )
57
09APR
50.0
2.2
1.4
2.86
49
23APR
56.4
3.4
1.7
3.21
53
08MAY
74.0
4.9
2.0
2.88
55
22MAY
57.1
6.4
1.9
3.40
60
12JUN
48.0
3.4
2.7
3.25
63
10JUL
20.7
5.6
3.4
2.79
57
14AUG
4.6
6.1
2.3
2.59
83
18SEP
2.8
3.9
1.9
3.17
45
160CT
30.0
6.1
1.8
2.88
49
20NOV
33.5
5.5
2.0
2.78
80
15MAR
67.6
4.6
2.1
3.44
56
03APR
85.9
3.8
1.5
3.11
61
09APR
55.0
2.8
1.3
2.94
65
23APR
55.0
3.7
2.5
3.61
55
08MAY
71.4
4.4
1.9
3.21
56
22MAY
60.0
5.7
2.2
3.50
76
12JUN
43.7
3.2
2.4
3.08
57
10JUL
14.8
4.6
3.9
2.32
49
14AUG
1.6
6.3
1.8
2.52
83
18SEP
5.8
4.6
1.9
3.11
36
160CT
31.4
5.9
1.9
2.80
45
20NOV
49.1
4.4
1.7
2.82
56
16MAR
72.7
5.3
2.7
3.71
59
06APR
97.0
4.5
2.2
3.57
73
10APR
61.7
3.9
2.2
3.41
61
24APR
52.1
3.8
2.1
3.63
68
11MAY
67.0
5.7
3.0
3.24
67
23MAY
38.3
5.8
2.2
3.75
60
15JUN
26.5
4.1
3.5
3.21
64
2.79
88
2.82
71
12JUL
4.9
5.5
4.5
17AUG
3.5
5.1
1.9
21SEP
4.7
5.8
2.1
3.46
47
190CT
25.6
4.9
2.3
2.85
49
23NOV
55.0
6.1
2.3
3.23
65
25
Table 3. Variation in mean epilimnetic chemical data for each station.
Year and
station
10
Date
Nitrate
(fl9 N·L· 1)
Total P
(flg P·L· 1)
Part. P
(flg P·L· 1)
Silica
(mg Si·L· 1)
T.D.S.
(mg·L· 1)
04APR
97.8
5.9
3.2
3.95
76
10APR
46.7
5.9
4.5
3.84
89
24APR
9.2
7.1
4.2
3.70
84
09MAY
38.6
10.3
4.0
3.64
69
23MAY
33.0
6.6
3.1
3.69
84
13JUN
42.5
5.3
5.2
3.69
68
11JUL
9.8
8.0
6.5
2.99
92
15AUG
8.2
7.2
2.1
3.61
64
19SEP
5.3
6.0
2.1
3.13
47
170CT
30.0
5.5
3.0
3.09
59
22NOV
73.6
6.5
3.0
4.57
72
3.28
71
1991
1
4
11APR
108.2
6.9
2.9
23APR
95.6
4.6
3.8
3.22
71
09MAY
42.1
5.4
5.9
3.35
68
22MAY
32.5
9.7
8.2
3.78
64
06JUN
19.9
6.0
5.6
3.24
67
18JUN
16.1
6.5
5.2
2.90
64
10JUL
2.1
7.7
5.4
2.58
57
31JUL
1.3
6.0
4.0
2.68
63
28AUG
1.1
4.6
2.9
2.65
25
25SEP
1.9
6.5
3.6
2.67
56
230CT
24.1
4.6
3.0
2.88
51
20NOV
36.2
4.9
3.1
2.99
35
10APR
97.1
3.8
1.6
3.07
24APR
91.7
3.3
2.2
3.06
56
07MAY
83.2
3.2
2.4
3.30
49
22MAY
60.3
5.8
3.0
3.15
43
05JUN
47.6
4.0
2.7
3.06
52
18JUN
38.2
4.5
2.5
2.71
49
11JUL
4.5
4.8
2.8
2.37
53
01AUG
2.0
4.8
2.5
2.39
61
29AUG
3.6
3.4
1.9
2.23
12
26SEP
7.4
4.3
2.0
2.18
43
240CT
13.4
3.3
2.2
2.36
47
19NOV
36.0
3.8
1.9
2.54
29
26
Table 3. Variation in mean epilimnetic chemical data for each station.
Year and
station
6
7
10
Silica
(mg Si·L- 1)
T.D.S.
(mg·L·1)
Nitrate
(IJg N·L- 1)
Total P
(IJg P·L- 1)
Part. P
(IJg P·L- 1)
09APR
91.6
3.7
1.6
2.98
64
24APR
84.5
4.2
1.9
3.01
37
08MAY
71.5
2.5
2.2
3.12
53
21MAY
69.8
3.5
2.4
3.03
45
04JUN
52.0
3.2
2.0
3.01
75
17JUN
46.6
4.5
2.8
2.76
52
12JUL
8.6
4.4
2.7
2.54
52
02AUG
2.5
4.4
2.8
2.41
53
Date
30AUG
1.7
2.6
2.2
2.32
21
27SEP
1.6
3.7
1.8
2.25
44
250CT
18.1
4.2
2.3
2.45
51
21NOV
37.3
3.3
1.9
2.68
31
12APR
105.6
5.0
2.3
3.17
73
23APR
80.7
3.9
2.4
3.18
53
10MAY
73.0
6.2
3.7
3.45
61
23MAY
52.7
5.5
3.6
3.18
49
07JUN
31.0
3.8
3.4
3.04
77
19JUN
35.4
5.5
3.8
2.86
59
09JUL
2.4
6.3
4.4
2.48
55
30JUL
1.6
4.9
3.4
2.43
56
27AUG
1.2
3.6
2.0
2.49
21
24SEP
<1.0
4.8
2.7
2.43
55
220CT
14.2
4.4
2.1
2.58
45
21NOV
37.4
2.2
2.87
43
11APR
116.8
9.6
5.9
3.63
75
23APR
57.4
7.1
4.5
3.69
80
09MAY
75.1
6.5
5.4
3.91
71
22MAY
43.7
8.4
5.0
3.58
67
06JUN
25.2
5.9
4.2
3.58
18JUN
40.5
5.2
4.3
3.32
67
10JUL
9.1
6.0
4.0
3.02
52
31JUL
2.1
5.0
3.4
2.98
52
28AUG
1.3
3.3
2.1
2.81
25
25SEP
2.1
4.9
2.3
2.77
41
230CT
19.9
4.6
2.8
2.99
51
20NOV
38.1
4.5
2.8
3.13
45
27
Table 3. Variation in mean epilimnetic chemical data for each station.
Year and
station
Nitrate
(lJg N·L·')
Total P
(lJg P·L·')
Part.P
(lJg P·L·')
10MAR
128.6
6.7
2.6
Date
Silica
(mg Si·L")
T.D.S.
(mg·L·')
1992
1
4
6
7
3.46
55
08APR
76.4
7.1
4.4
3.50
60
06MAY
38.7
8.3
4.7
3.09
60
10JUN
<1.0
9.0
3.6
2.74
63
08JUL
<1.0
5.5
4.5
2.39
55
14AUG
1.2
5.6
2.7
2.34
65
16SEP
1.0
4.2
2.6
2.59
57
150CT
1.7
5.1
3.1
2.62
59
18NOV
26.4
4.8
2.7
2.78
59
10MAR
107.6
4.0
1.7
3.18
55
07APR
85.5
4.4
2.4
3.36
49
05MAY
73.3
2.7
2.95
45
10JUN
4.9
4.8
2.5
2.44
48
08JUL
3.4
2.6
2.0
2.16
41
14AUG
2.3
2.8
1.2
2.23
49
16SEP
3.6
2.4
2.6
2.22
44
150CT
3.5
3.8
1.8
2.48
45
17NOV
34.6
3.9
1.5
2.46
45
11MAR
99.0
4.6
1.9
3.02
53
07APR
76.3
5.3
2.5
3.14
51
05MAY
63.7
5.3
2.4
2.81
48
11JUN
21.7
5.2
2.4
2.68
56
07JUL
7.0
4.2
2.3
2.40
56
13AUG
2.9
4.1
1.8
2.27
48
15SEP
12.5
3.1
3.4
2.42
39
140CT
2.8
4.0
1.9
2.48
43
17NOV
40.0
6.9
1.8
2.54
51
10MAR
119.4
5.0
2.2
3.44
55
08APR
92.9
6.7
2.7
3.54
61
06MAY
51.1
5.0
3.0
3.01
63
10JUN
1.3
6.4
2.9
2.67
57
08JUL
1.5
3.0
2.2
2.37
56
14AUG
2.3
3.3
1.7
16SEP
5.0
4.0
2.3
2.45
45
150CT
3.0
4.2
2.0
2.55
57
18NOV
34.6
3.8
2.0
2.70
52
29
Table 4. Variation in mean epilimnetic biological data for each station.
Phytoplankton (#·mL- 1)
Chlorophyll (fJg·L-1)
Year and station
Date
Bacteri a
(x10 6 ·mL-1)
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
Pico.
(x10 4 )
Nano.
(x10 3)
Micro.
(x10 2)
1987
1
5
7
10
30APR
1.02
3.52
1.12
1.19
1.44
7.27
2.70
27.3
26MAY
0.55
1.73
0.35
0.33
1.02
2.91
1.31
55.7
30JUN
0.91
2.33
1.33
0.23
0.83
9.01
1.21
66.7
8.69
2.06
72.9
27JUL
0.61
2.65
0.94
0.82
0.58
25AUG
0.85
1.61
0.90
0.34
0.24
9.57
1.45
52.0
21SEP
0.91
1.50
1.17
0.48
0.08
9.26
3.15
25.1
270CT
0.55
2.72
1.31
1.21
0.20
4.00
1.98
14.4
19NOV
0.58
3.52
1.48
1.07
1.29
3.17
2.30
14.2
3.69
2.31
4.8
28APR
0.88
0.89
0.34
0.25
0.47
25MAY
0.46
0.64
0.32
<0.08
0.21
5.19
3.09
11.3
28JUN
0.66
1.39
0.75
0.34
0.31
4.77
1.70
14.6
26JUL
0.37
1.02
0.40
0.30
0.18
6.67
2.62
15.7
23AUG
0.26
1.04
0.70
0.22
<0.08
4.72
1.76
13.1
20SEP
0.45
1.81
0.58
0.26
<0.08
5.18
1.69
13.4
250CT
0.37
1.64
0.69
0.67
0.20
6.57
2.15
16.7
17NOV
0.92
2.24
1.22
0.81
0.26
3.27
2.52
10.2
01MAY
0.54
2.15
1.12
0.22
0.77
4.25
2.65
19.9
28MAY
1.12
1.41
0.45
0.21
0.29
3.22
2.70
28.0
01JUL
0.57
1.72
0.99
0.24
0.34
7.40
2.08
42.3
29JUL
0.47
1.27
0.72
0.23
0.23
6.60
1.60
34.1
26AUG
1.25
1.10
0.80
<0.08
<0.08
5.66
1.40
10.3
23SEP
0.43
1.01
0.70
0.29
<0.08
4.01
2.31
8.3
280CT
0.48
1.50
0.85
0.51
0.19
5.35
1.76
20.2
20NOV
0.53
1.73
0.76
0.70
0.16
3.84
2.05
13.0
29APR
0.77
3.41
1.41
0.95
1.50
5.57
3.30
25.9
27MAY
0.56
1.83
1.60
0.58
0.42
2.63
3.32
20.6
29JUN
0.68
1.51
0.71
0.45
0.38
4.06
2.54
23.6
28JUL
0.54
1.32
0.66
0.16
0.18
4.46
2.12
9.1
24AUG
0.37
1.24
0.70
0.20
0.08
4.45
2.57
17.3
22SEP
0.46
2.02
1.52
0.50
<0.08
5.38
7.66
7.8
260CT
0.52
2.96
0.80
1.94
0.20
5.26
2.87
17.2
18NOV
0.43
2.23
1.43
0.68
0.28
3.50
2.28
9.4
30
Table 4. Variation in mean epilimnetic biological data for each station.
Phytoplankton (#-mL· 1)
Chlorophyll (\Jg-L· 1)
Year and station
Date
Bacteri a
(xi 06· m L- 1)
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
Pico.
(xi 04 )
Nano.
(xi 03)
Micro.
(xi 02)
1988
1
4
5
7
04MAR
0.63
3.13
1.11
1.38
0.70
1.54
1.66
13.5
13APR
0.90
1.81
0.88
0.80
0.19
1.50
1.60
6.4
05MAY
0.77
3.22
1.53
0.85
0.49
8.60
3.87
11.6
02JUN
0.96
2.11
0.93
0.97
0.36
5.66
3.00
12.3
07JUL
1.27
3.66
1.02
0.73
2.47
4.68
2.05
84.6
04AUG
1.25
2.46
1.45
<0.08
1.28
8.20
1.71
33.0
01SEP
1.05
2.39
1.30
0.59
0.39
14.16
2.58
45.9
27SEP
1.00
2.03
0.76
7.76
1.79
27.9
10NOV
0.74
2.28
0.84
1.89
1.28
12.9
01MAR
0.65
0.91
0.59
2.31
1.91
3.2
14APR
0.73
1.34
0.98
3.94
3.03
9.2
04MAY
0.87
1.70
1.04
0.69
0.12
2.24
2.80
10.6
01JUN
0.70
1.78
1.12
0.65
0.18
2.98
3.28
15.3
06JUL
0.73
2.35
1.01
0.99
0.62
2.63
2.88
29.0
03AUG
0.63
1.66
0.91
0.38
0.23
4.43
1.05
21.5
31AUG
0.68
1.74
1.22
0.27
0.33
7.11
1.63
28.2
29SEP
0.45
2.01
1.36
0.49
0.22
9.32
1.65
38.7
09NOV
0.76
2.08
1.26
0.68
0.39
3.24
1.10
16.8
03MAR
0.68
2.06
1.20
0.44
0.46
2.19
1.22
5.4
12APR
0.66
2.38
0.98
3.11
2.29
11.6
03MAY
0.66
2.39
1.16
0.74
0.53
2.21
1.91
16.8
31MAY
0.65
1.93
1.26
0.57
0.15
4.79
3.29
12.6
05JUL
0.68
1.44
0.73
0.45
0.34
2.93
1.88
19.9
02AUG
0.80
2.97
1.38
0.47
1.13
8.87
1.76
34.5
30AUG
0.83
1.53
0.98
0.55
0.32
6.62
1.04
14.8
28SEP
0.83
2.33
1.28
0.54
0.42
6.84
2.18
36.2
08NOV
0.64
2.05
0.67
0.55
0.63
3.85
1.66
24.6
02MAR
0.61
1.95
0.72
1.05
0.18
15APR
0.58
0.93
0.51
06MAY
0.95
1.90
0.99
03JUN
1.18
0.97
08JUL
0.73
2.56
05AUG
0.60
1.35
1.90
1.98
8.5
1.92
1.58
5.2
8.2
0.67
0.23
9.51
3.15
<0.08
0.60
0.14
3.66
2.90
10.4
1.36
<0.08
1.22
4.73
2.30
65.8
0.67
0.27
0.14
4.79
1.14
14.9
1.97
19.6
02SEP
0.92
1.20
0.88
0.24
<0.08
7.18
30SEP
0.99
1.88
1.27
0.45
0.17
11.43
2.18
33.3
11NOV
0.63
2.19
0.56
0.93
0.76
4.39
1.10
13.3
31
Table 4. Variation in mean epilimnetic biological data for each station.
Phytoplankton (#·mL·')
Chlorophyll (fJg·L·')
Year and station
10
Date
Bacteri a
(xi 06· mL·')
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
Pico.
(xi 04)
Nano.
(xi 03)
Micro.
(xi 02)
13APR
0.73
3.69
1.74
1.71
0.42
2.84
2.13
16.2
05MAY
0.83
2.59
1.64
0.26
0.69
5.58
2.96
21.9
02JUN
0.95
2.75
1.49
1.07
0.48
3.50
3.80
15.3
07JUL
0.98
1.73
0.92
0.57
0.22
2.91
2.85
9.9
04AUG
0.79
2.33
1.09
0.62
0.60
4.62
2.26
27.8
01SEP
0.54
2.46
1.23
0.44
0.23
4.62
1.66
74.7
27SEP
0.73
2.81
2.18
0.35
0.42
3.70
1.65
61.1
10NOV
0.52
1.84
0.93
0.53
0.28
3.18
1.23
18.0
1989
1
12APR
1.28
1.57
0.66
0.18
0.74
0.98
1.01
11.9
10MAY
1.10
2.59
1.31
<0.08
1.37
5.28
1.84
44.4
15JUN
1.74
1.93
0.90
0.52
0.52
3.66
1.86
24.6
10.90
2.66
61.0
1.36
3.62
2.42
1.10
0.10
10.36
1.97
47.3
1.42
0.49
0.38
11.37
1.62
21.9
13JUL
17AUG
4
4.38
14SEP
1.05
2.29
190CT
1.02
2.73
1.48
0.81
0.45
6.56
1.04
13.7
22NOV
1.04
1.77
0.21
0.75
0.81
1.65
1.36
6.5
13APR
0.60
0.32
0.15
0.10
<0.08
3.26
0.60
1.4
11MAY
0.51
1.06
0.68
0.30
0.19
3.59
1.39
3.4
13JUN
0.66
1.02
0.56
0.33
0.12
4.08
1.76
15.9
6.82
2.23
31.3
1.81
1.22
0.44
0.10
7.30
1.33
21.9
11JUL
15AUG
5
3.30
0.73
12SEP
0.68
1.31
0.98
0.29
0.10
11.49
1.37
9.0
170CT
0.88
1.70
1.09
0.49
0.24
6.87
1.16
8.8
23NOV
1.01
1.19
0.64
0.42
0.10
2.69
0.76
3.3
11APR
1.11
1.53
1.25
0.21
<0.08
5.19
0.85
3.3
09MAY
0.82
0.60
0.32
0.12
0.15
6.17
1.49
5.4
14JUN
0.46
1.24
0.82
0.25
0.17
4.68
2.48
20.5
8.46
1.52
32.9
1.13
0.77
0.10
3.16
1.32
39.5
12JUL
16AUG
3.59
0.70
2.00
13SEP
0.79
1.47
1.04
0.30
0.13
12.61
1.48
13.6
180CT
0.92
1.40
0.75
0.37
0.28
7.32
0.99
12.8
21NOV
0.90
1.10
0.58
0.27
0.25
2.91
0.68
5.3
32
Table 4. Variation in mean epilimnetic biological data for each station.
Phytoplankton (#'mL- 1)
Chlorophyll (fJg·L-1)
Year and station
6
Date
Bacteri a
(xi 06· m L- 1)
Nano.
Micro.
Pico.
(xi 04 )
Nano.
(xi 03)
Micro.
(xi 02)
1.10
0.56
0.34
0.15
<0.08
5.62
1.22
4.2
14JUN
0.71
1.21
0.72
0.36
0.14
4.82
2.18
20.3
7.48
2.08
23.9
1.16
0.55
0.10
6.26
1.18
27.3
12JUL
3.50
0.61
1.80
13SEP
0.81
1.25
0.91
0.25
0.10
8.58
1.08
11.4
180CT
0.89
1.62
0.97
0.44
0.21
5.18
0.88
8.7
21NOV
0.74
1.07
0.50
0.44
0.13
2.77
0.57
3.0
14APR
0.72
0.97
0.87
<0.08
0.08
2.96
0.68
3.3
12MAY
0.73
2.47
1.18
0.32
0.98
3.80
1.73
21.5
16JUN
0.52
1.88
0.88
0.60
0.41
14JUL
18AUG
10
Pico.
09MAY
16AUG
7
Total
3.46
1.14
2.00
1.36
0.53
0.12
4.89
2.09
24.4
12.34
1.54
29.7
10.74
1.76
38.0
15SEP
0.84
1.54
0.83
0.57
0.13
9.92
1.46
13.1
200CT
0.93
1.27
0.69
0.47
0.12
4.05
1.16
12.2
24NOV
1.01
0.91
0.50
0.31
0.10
2.21
0.71
4.4
12APR
1.59
2.06
0.70
0.58
0.78
1.04
1.08
15.6
10MAY
0.65
3.30
1.68
0.22
1.38
3.84
2.35
32.3
15JUN
0.80
1.07
0.71
0.23
0.13
2.00
1.92
6.4
2.51
1.57
11.2
5.82
2.19
21.3
13JUL
3.76
17AUG
1.01
1.70
1.04
0.56
0.10
14SEP
0.99
1.80
1.22
0.48
0.11
6.12
0.96
4.4
190CT
0.86
1.95
0.93
0.72
0.30
2.20
0.59
4.4
22NOV
0.86
1.97
0.72
0.65
0.60
1.02
0.81
3.9
33
Table 4. Variation in mean epilimnetic biological data for each station.
Phytoplankton (#·mL,l)
Chlorophyll (fJg-L,1)
Year and station
Date
Bacteri a
(xi 06· m L,1)
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
Pico.
(xi 04)
Nano.
(xi 03)
Micro.
(x102 )
1990
1
14MAR
0,85
1.95
0.37
0.63
0.95
1.64
0.90
12.2
04APR
0.82
2.58
0.75
1.21
0.62
1.82
0.92
11.2
30.0
10APR
1.30
3.16
1.52
<0.08
1.90
2.89
0.87
24APR
1.45
2.08
1.18
0.45
0.44
4.59
0.91
14.6
09MAY
1.88
3.89
1.73
<0.08
2.23
8.83
1.02
44.7
23MAY
1.40
3.38
1.43
0.55
1.40
5.27
1.77
25.7
13JUN
2.18
2.38
0.32
0.42
1.84
2.99
0.61
50.6
1.12
9.42
0.78
46.3
11JUL
1.69
1.63
0.35
0.15
15AUG
1.87
2.92
1.80
0.65
0.48
5.24
0.64
35.9
19SEP
1.67
2.17
0.37
1.29
0.53
5.58
1.08
43.7
170CT
1.10
1.22
0.40
0.54
0.28
2.57
0.67
4.8
22NOV
1.28
1.20
0.30
0.48
0.43
1.55
0.55
2.4
34
Table 4. Variation in mean epilimnetic biological data for each station.
Phytoplankton (#·mL,l)
Chlorophyll (\-lg·L,l)
Year and station
4
5
6
Date
Bacteri a
(xi 06· m L,l)
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
Pico.
(xi 04 )
Nano.
(x10 3)
Micro.
(xi 02)
15MAR
0.83
0.44
0.19
0.17
<0.08
2.56
0.36
1.1
05APR
0.36
<0.08
0.34
3.31
0.29
1.0
0.77
0.51
10APR
1.00
0.79
4.46
0.46
1.2
24APR
1.07
1.18
4.92
0.59
2.8
3.53
0.59
5.5
4.04
0.48
5.7
4.97
0.92
11.5
10MAY
1.02
1.29
23MAY
0.93
1.37
14JUN
1.33
1.29
0.77
13JUL
0.84
1.41
0.83
0.35
0.37
6.02
0.63
9.9
16AUG
1.29
0.53
0.35
0.16
0.08
7.47
0.26
4.5
0.79
0.23
0.24
0.33
0.26
20SEP
1.06
1.25
1.01
0.13
0.14
7.66
0.42
10.5
180CT
1.08
0.89
0.30
0.67
<0.08
3.09
0.30
3.6
21NOV
0.95
1.31
0.91
0.41
0.08
1.88
0.45
1.4
13MAR
0.99
0.76
0.32
0.34
0.11
3.17
0.37
2.8
03APR
0.98
0.91
0.47
<0.08
1.32
5.58
0.43
3.3
09APR
1.00
1.01
0.18
<0.08
1.85
4.85
0.43
4.0
23APR
1.17
0.86
0.36
0.40
0.10
5.34
0.50
2.7
08MAY
1.18
0.96
0.51
0.26
0.19
3.33
0.59
3.8
22MAY
1.04
0.77
0.25
0.35
0.17
3.93
0.77
3.5
12JUN
1.09
0.88
0.19
0.62
0.41
5.22
1.05
11.0
10JUL
0.95
1.61
0.94
0.24
0.44
9.99
0.86
10.3
14AUG
1.40
1.02
<0.08
1.96
0.20
15.12
0.53
6.0
18SEP
1.68
1.25
0.94
0.21
0.11
9.90
0.47
10.0
160CT
1.06
0.95
0.59
0.17
0.19
5.58
0.45
4.9
20NOV
1.28
0.55
0.28
0.20
<0.08
1.60
0.27
1.0
15MAR
0.89
0.74
0.37
0.31
<0.08
2.77
0.27
1.6
03APR
0.98
0.53
0.31
<0.08
0.70
3.40
0.28
2.0
09APR
0.88
0.71
0.13
<0.08
0.75
3.82
0.52
3.7
23APR
1.14
1.23
0.51
0.54
0.18
5.86
0.73
2.1
08MAY
1.24
1.04
0.66
0.19
0.19
4.72
0.45
3.1
22MAY
1.05
1.52
0.48
0.31
0.73
5.15
0.73
10.0
12JUN
1.71
1.61
0.71
0.24
0.64
6.12
0.59
10.7
10JUL
1.11
1.81
1.05
0.22
0.55
6.91
0.78
8.6
14AUG
1.74
1.30
0.79
0.37
0.14
8.80
0.40
4.7
18SEP
1.37
0.89
0.55
0.19
0.15
9.59
0.45
9.8
160CT
1.20
0.86
0.50
0.19
0.16
3.97
0.49
3.0
20NOV
1.34
0.49
0.30
0.12
<0.08
2.10
0.27
1.0
35
Table 4. Variation in mean epilimnetic biological data for each station.
Phytoplankton (#'mL' 1)
Chlorophyll (f.Jg·L·1)
Year and station
7
10
Date
Bacteri a
(x10 6 ·mL·1)
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
Pico.
(x10 4 )
Nano.
(x10 3 )
Micro.
(x10 2 )
2.76
0.31
0.9
0.71
5.14
0.34
1.4
1.33
6.13
0.42
1.8
0.22
6.34
0.44
4.1
16MAR
0.84
0.65
0.33
0.25
<0.08
06APR
0.78
0.68
0.44
<0.08
10APR
0.74
0.85
0.45
<0.08
24APR
0.82
1.31
0.64
0.45
11MAY
0.80
2.32
0.61
0.92
0.80
3.72
0.71
7.1
23MAY
0.79
2.42
1.17
0.85
0.40
5.82
1.05
9.7
15JUN
1.51
1.98
0.82
0.49
0.50
3.19
0.72
14.2
12JUL
1.22
2.16
1.36
0.29
0.51
10.48
0.44
13.9
17AUG
0.95
1.41
1.01
0.23
0.17
11.33
0.40
4.9
21SEP
1.01
1.44
0.77
0.37
0.30
7.42
0.36
10.9
190CT
1.24
1.28
0.60
0.49
0.18
3.27
0.43
4.2
23NOV
1.14
0.90
0.39
0.43
0.08
2.56
0.59
2.6
04APR
0.93
1.17
0.80
<0.08
1.35
1.87
0.45
2.3
10APR
1.23
5.18
3.14
1.00
1.04
4.40
1.65
10.6
24APR
1.30
5.38
2.75
1.82
0.80
10.33
3.83
7.8
09MAY
1.25
2.44
1.23
0.73
0.48
6.46
1.54
10.0
23MAY
1.35
2.26
0.81
1.19
0.25
5.45
1.37
4.6
13JUN
1.20
0.93
0.64
0.14
0.15
0.92
1.40
3.8
11JUL
0.96
2.07
1.06
0.61
0.40
3.51
1.34
12.1
15AUG
1.52
1.33
0.91
0.27
0.15
5.78
0.52
3.1
19SEP
1.32
1.47
0.98
0.29
0.19
5.34
0.87
5.7
170CT
1.11
0.99
0.48
0.28
0.24
1.72
0.73
3.8
22NOV
1.15
1.47
0.46
0.30
0.71
1.22
0.45
8.6
11APR
1.08
1.17
0.32
0.37
0.49
1.70
0.70
10.5
0.58
0.23
1.69
1.50
3.3
0.91
7.6
1991
1
23APR
0.90
1.58
0.77
09MAY
1.73
2.73
1.66
0.64
0.44
4.27
22MAY
1.40
4.10
3.14
0.08
0.87
13.73
1.51
19.4
06JUN
1.35
3.30
1.56
0.30
1.42
3.14
0.95
31.7
18JUN
1.21
3.90
0.62
0.98
2.31
3.32
0.88
43.8
10JUL
1.86
4.07
2.73
<0.08
2.08
8.12
0.45
28.6
31JUL
1.07
2.96
1.38
0.67
0.91
7.04
0.64
13.9
28AUG
2.01
2.80
1.75
0.60
0.46
7.15
0.66
4.4
0.85
0.34
6.69
0.64
8.9
25SEP
1.54
1.36
0.19
230CT
0.82
1.71
0.27
0.80
0.64
4.41
0.89
5.7
20NOV
1.08
3.56
1.83
0.96
0.78
2.61
0.62
4.1
36
Table 4. Variation in mean epilimnetic biological data for each station.
Phytoplankton (#·mL· 1 )
Chlorophyll (pg·L· 1)
Year and station
4
6
Date
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
Pico.
{XI 04)
Nano.
(xl0 3 )
Micro.
(XI 02)
10APR
0.87
0.51
0.34
0.13
0.10
1.74
0.39
1.5
24APR
0.92
1.31
0.10
0.11
2.83
0.62
2.4
07MAY
0.83
0.85
0.21
0.16
0.15
3.96
4.4
1.12
0.71
0.28
3.32
0.89
1.64
1.26
0.58
0.57
0.33
3.45
1.05
18.2
0.85
4.20
1.32
25.9
0.34
0.47
0.52
6.45
0.95
13.9
0.78
0.26
0.65
5.42
0.87
9.2
1.95
1.20
0.44
0.63
4.97
0.65
5.6
0.93
0.31
0.28
0.41
5.96
0.70
6.0
<0.08
0.80
0.79
5.34
0.53
4.6
0.78
0.56
2.78
0.66
4.6
0.14
0.11
5.00
0.32
1.8
0.13
0.10
4.65
5.58
0.60
0.72
2.5
4.0
0.59
4.70
1.12
12.2
1.04
1.89
1.36
24.1
22MAY
0.87
0.68
2.30
05JUN
0.93
2.35
18JUN
0.86
1.40
0.21
llJUL
1.31
1.42
01AUG
1.18
1.67
29AUG
1.00
26SEP
1.23
240CT
1.01
1.60
19NOV
09APR
1.07
2.55
1.15
0.78
0.63
0.34
1.08
0.76
1.20
0.91
0.94
0.21
0.09
0.38
1.38
2.87
0.99
0.30
04JUN
1.27
0.84
1.62
17JUN
0.96
1.50
<0.08
0.66
1.07
24APR
08MAY
21MAY
7
Bacteri a
(xl0 6 ·mL· 1 )
1.45
8.7
12JUL
1.31
1.83
0.66
0.37
0.81
6.47
0.78
9.6
02AUG
1.14
1.83
0.82
0.34
0.67
8.21
0.82
7.4
30AUG
1.17
1.52
<0.08
0.14
0.67
0.78
7.62
0.83
6.8
27SEP
1.25
1.06
250CT
0.91
1.66
0.35
0.57
6.18
0.88
6.8
0.51
0.83
4.41
4.0
3.5
21NOV
1.02
2.02
0.33
0.79
0.66
0.57
2.02
0.53
0.44
12APR
0.79
0.54
<0.08
0.24
0.19
4.35
0.56
2.6
23APR
1.14
1.03
0.68
0.23
0.13
4.73
0.92
3.0
2.89
1.47
0.72
0.35
2.63
1.29
6.7
0.46
0.54
6.01
1.35
12.3
10MAY
1.01
3.96
23MAY
0.92
2.46
07JUN
0.94
2.70
1.59
0.35
0.75
5.23
1.11
17.7
19JUN
0.99
3.74
0.21
0.79
2.82
3.72
0.86
35.4
09JUL
1.51
0.19
0.44
0.91
5.66
1.02
30JUL
1.58
1.38
2.62
1.09
0.34
1.20
7.27
0.92
12.3
8.1
27AUG
1.39
1.95
1.01
0.60
0.35
5.38
0.76
5.8
24SEP
1.19
1.65
0.75
0.56
0.32
7.30
0.73
<0.08
1.87
0.84
0.39
7.73
0.62
6.9
6.7
1.02
0.55
3.80
0.43
1.5
220CT
0.90
1.24
21NOV
1.19
3.44
37
Table 4. Variation in mean epilimnetic biological data for each station.
Phytoplankton (#'mL- 1)
Chlorophyll (fJg·L-1)
Year and station
10
Date
Bacteri a
(xi 06· m L- 1)
11APR
0.96
23APR
09MAY
Total
Pico.
Nano.
2.77
Micro.
5.22
0.66
0.94
2.83
0.77
1.24
1.09
1.02
3.12
1.67
0.73
0.72
Pico.
(x10 4 )
Nano.
(xi 03)
Micro.
(xi 02)
1.79
22MAY
1.31
3.91
2.25
0.92
0.74
06JUN
1.34
3.54
2.27
0.43
0.84
18JUN
0.97
1.84
0.74
0.56
0.54
10JUL
1.08
1.99
0.87
0.77
0.35
31JUL
1.31
2.18
1.02
0.93
0.22
28AUG
0.67
1.37
0.45
0.76
0.16
25SEP
1.49
0.95
0.38
0.47
0.10
230CT
1.04
1.31
0.24
0.81
0.25
20NOV
0.97
2.29
1.41
0.70
0.18
10MAR
0.88
0.91
0.30
0.48
0.13
1.70
0.54
1.5
08APR
1.14
1.90
0.95
0.64
0.31
9.04
0.85
2.8
06MAY
1.10
2.95
1.43
1.06
0.46
3.71
1.28
8.5
10JUN
1.65
2.29
1.20
0.32
0.77
2.24
1.61
7.4
08JUL
1.37
2.75
1.69
0.58
0.48
8.43
0.90
10.8
14AUG
1.83
1.57
0.89
0.44
0.25
7.74
0.63
10.7
16SEP
1.35
1.59
0.80
0.54
0.26
6.38
0.57
7.8
150CT
1.76
1.93
0.90
0.71
0.32
6.92
0.47
7.6
1992
1
4
6
18NOV
1.40
1.62
0.81
0.58
0.23
2.35
0.53
7.1
10MAR
1.05
0.85
0.39
0.29
0.17
2.20
0.56
2.5
07APR
0.93
1.30
0.60
0.55
0.15
3.44
0.62
3.5
05MAY
0.74
2.12
1.41
0.63
0.08
2.51
0.63
5.8
10JUN
1.00
2.02
1.12
0.47
0.43
1.60
2.57
5.6
08JUL
0.98
1.25
0.71
0.42
0.13
2.68
0.80
4.1
14AUG
0.84
0.60
0.34
0.20
<0.08
4.07
0.40
3.2
16SEP
0.94
1.15
0.65
0.42
0.08
9.02
0.46
2.4
150CT
1.03
1.45
0.70
0.55
0.21
6.39
0.68
8.8
17NOV
1.35
1.06
0.54
0.41
0.11
6.53
0.67
2.1
11MAR
0.90
0.95
0.39
0.38
0.18
2.05
0.51
2.7
07APR
1.12
0.85
0.26
0.52
0.10
4.37
0.68
3.5
05MAY
0.83
1.22
0.22
0.86
0.18
4.04
0.68
4.5
11JUN
1.00
1.83
0.92
0.63
0.28
3.08
1.45
6.3
07JUL
0.95
1.39
0.67
0.50
0.22
3.22
1.05
7.0
13AUG
1.14
1.24
0.62
0.51
0.11
12.17
0.63
4.6
15SEP
1.16
1.18
0.76
0.29
0.12
7.47
0.44
4.0
140CT
1.01
1.48
0.76
0.48
0.24
6.90
0.73
8.5
17NOV
1.45
1.23
0.61
0.44
0.19
4.09
0.61
5.1
38
Table 4. Variation in mean epilimnetic biological data for each station.
Phytoplankton (#·mL,l)
Chlorophyll (flg·L,1)
Year and station
7
Date
Bacteri a
(xi 06· m L,1)
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
Pico.
(xi 04 )
Nano.
(xi 03 )
Micro.
(x10 2 )
10MAR
1.08
0.98
0.35
0.54
0.09
2.42
0.98
3.2
08APR
1.10
1.57
0.49
0.87
0.22
4.50
0.91
6.8
06MAY
0.81
3.86
2.02
1.18
0.67
6.85
1.25
9.3
10JUN
1.11
1.76
1.04
0.43
0.29
1.37
3.32
6.5
08JUL
1.18
1.31
0.72
0.32
0.26
3.53
0.95
3.3
14AUG
1.01
0.68
0.32
0.28
0.08
3.54
0.62
4.2
16SEP
1.18
1.14
0.67
0.33
0.14
5.90
0.53
3.9
150CT
0.88
1.60
0.73
0.63
0.24
5.30
0.58
8.6
18NOV
1.82
1.38
0.81
0.40
0.18
4.90
0.60
6.2
21APR
1.37
2.35
1.05
0.34
12.5
12MAY
0.94
3.85
2.02
1.12
12.5
08JUN
1.12
10.27
3.70
1.67
169.8
06JUL
1.59
3.88
9.15
1.28
16.5
10AUG
1.95
2.61
2.27
0.24
10.7
06SEP
1.69
2.06
13.98
0.27
11.4
050CT
1.64
1.33
8.83
0.22
2.0
03NOV
1.21
1.42
2.81
0.33
1.1
21APR
0.99
0.51
1.72
0.24
1.8
1993
1
4
6
12MAY
1.06
1.58
2.34
0.84
3.5
08JUN
0.90
2.18
0.40
1.68
13.4
06JUL
1.24
2.50
8.28
1.03
7.2
10AUG
1.36
1.50
11.11
0.15
5.9
06SEP
1.27
1.03
9.00
0.32
1.2
050CT
1.17
0.97
5.58
0.15
0.9
03NOV
1.14
0.80
4.14
0.20
0.9
21APR
0.78
0.72
4.56
0.24
2.2
12MAY
0.89
1.08
6.49
0.30
8.5
08JUN
0.99
2.09
4.82
1.86
14.1
07JUL
1.31
2.82
8.38
0.85
5.8
0.28
6.3
0.19
2.5
12AUG
1.23
1.83
7.78
08SEP
1.21
1.19
9.69
060CT
1.32
1.16
6.53
0.17
2.0
04NOV
1.11
0.92
5.86
0.15
1.0
39
Table 4. Variation in mean epilimnetic biological data for each station.
Phytoplankton (#-mL- 1)
Year and station
7
Date
Bacteri a
(x10 6 ·mL- 1)
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
Pico.
(x104)
Nano.
(x10 3)
Micro.
(x10 2 )
21APR
0.90
1.15
1.06
0.36
5.3
12MAY
1.04
2.73
3.11
0.66
29.4
08JUN
1.27
4.02
4.65
1.07
21.2
06JUL
1.62
3.81
12.03
0.61
16.6
10AUG
1.41
1.60
17.08
0.32
8.0
06SEP
1.21
1.42
13.56
0.20
3.3
050CT
1.17
1.15
6.21
0.18
1.8
03NOV
1.18
0.94
4.94
0.25
1.4
40
Table 5. Variation in pH, total alkalinity and photosynthetic rate for each station.
PR (mg C·m,2·d,l)
Year and
station
Date
pH
T. alk.
(mg·L'1)
Total
Nano.
Pico.
Micro.
1987
1
5
7
10
30APR
135.6
0.0
57.1
142.2
26MAY
7.8
46.1
142.4
24.8
0.0
163.4
30JUN
7.6
46.9
346.2
55.5
144,3
146.4
27JUL
7.6
43.3
425.0
90.8
240.7
93.6
25AUG
8.1
43.6
313.9
126.4
109.9
77.6
21SEP
7.9
41.6
200.4
91.0
45.7
63.8
270CT
7.5
43.1
176.4
33.3
72.1
78.0
19NOV
7.5
43.2
205.8
71.5
49.1
98.4
32.6
0.0
37.6
16.0
25MAY
7.6
39.7
128.2
52.3
44.1
31.8
28JUN
7.7
38.1
206.9
90.5
56.2
60.2
28APR
26JUL
7.3
35.0
190.9
58.7
109.3
22.8
23AUG
7.7
34.2
147.4
55.7
57.2
36.5
20SEP
7.9
35.1
101.5
59.3
32.2
10.1
250CT
7.5
35.4
247.5
97.4
67.6
113.3
17NOV
7.4
35.7
84.7
17.9
60.1
6.8
60.6
11.4
8.6
47.4
28MAY
7.6
40.8
78.1
53.3
34.7
0.0
01JUL
7.4
41.2
346.7
66.2
206.2
74.4
01 MAY
29JUL
7.4
36.7
178.9
75.2
89.5
14.2
26AUG
8.0
36.9
133.3
53.6
46.0
33.7
23SEP
7.9
37.3
122.3
58.0
53.9
10.3
280CT
7.6
37.6
100.1
33.7
49.5
19.0
20NOV
7.5
38.6
102.2
27.9
25.1
50.5
27MAY
7.8
43.6
150.6
54.3
49.6
86.5
29JUN
7.7
40.4
157.4
38.4
123.1
40.0
32.4
0.5
29APR
28JUL
7.4
39.7
188.5
85.3
70.9
24AUG
7.9
41.5
197.8
99.3
98.0
22SEP
8.1
43.0
214.9
94.2
99.5
21.2
260CT
7.6
47.8
201.0
57.7
106.7
37.6
18NOV
7.3
46.8
42.0
10.6
35.2
2.9
41
Table 5. Variation in pH, total alkalinity and photosynthetic rate for each station.
PR (mg C·m-2 ·d· 1)
Year and
station
Date
pH
T. alk.
(mg·L'l)
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
1988
1
4
5
04MAR
7.4
44.2
116.2
16.8
74.2
32.3
13APR
7.3
45.8
168.8
59.1
93.3
16.4
05MAY
7.3
41.7
148.4
54.8
85.1
8.5
02JUN
7.4
41.4
185.4
76.8
65.4
48.4
07JUL
7.8
37.9
423.7
82.5
103.1
238.0
01SEP
7.8
36.4
272.4
91.7
110.9
73.8
27SEP
7.6
36.9
116.8
16.4
64.9
35.6
10NOV
7.2
38.5
40.1
6.0
9.6
01MAR
7.2
36.2
23.3
9.1
14APR
7.2
35.7
86.7
30.1
04MAY
6.9
29.1
157.2
64.1
85.8
01JUN
7.3
33.8
99.3
41.1
31.5
47.3
06JUL
7.4
29.4
239.3
68.4
50.4
168.9
03AUG
7.8
27.8
144.4
51.4
54.9
38.9
31AUG
7.4
30.3
248.4
107.1
74.2
71.9
29SEP
7.3
28.0
213.9
88.2
99.3
83.7
09NOV
7.2
28.3
43.4
14.6
10.4
42.9
03MAR
7.3
37.2
56.2
7.6
19.8
28.8
12APR
7.3
38.4
150.9
16.1
03MAY
7.3
35.5
82.3
31.5
33.3
19.1
31MAY
7.3
33.8
83.3
25.1
45.2
13.0
05JUL
7.6
32.0
95.1
26.3
53.2
23.5
02AUG
7.8
26.6
173.8
47.0
80.6
46.2
130.7
57.7
12.0
74.3
28SEP
7.5
31.4
25.2
13.6
5.3
11.5
08NOV
7.0
31.6
93.0
18.6
59.6
23.9
02MAR
7.4
44.9
202.0
35.9
15APR
7.2
43.0
102.7
50.5
06MAY
7.3
38.8
195.0
75.6
101.5
18.0
61.0
29.9
22.2
18.0
30AUG
7
03JUN
7.3
35.9
08JUL
7.8
33.7
05AUG
7.7
34.5
267.2
35.5
121.4
112.7
02SEP
7.8
33.6
187.2
50.1
86.9
56.7
30SEP
7.4
33.5
28.1
11.6
14.2
2.3
42
Table 5. Variation in pH, total alkalinity and photosynthetic rate for each station.
Year and
station
o2 o1
PR (mg C'm 'd )
1. alk.
Date
pH
(mg·Lo 1)
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
1989
1
4
12APR
6.5
10MAY
7.7
41.8
208.3
15JUN
6.9
40.0
396.6
415.9
42.5
622.9
128.5
450.9
57.2
41.8
109.3
74.9
160.2
161.5
64.4
218.1
135.1
43.5
13JUL
7.6
34.0
17AUG
7.2
37.2
216.0
14.6
195.9
20.1
14SEP
6.9
36.8
323.5
92.2
182.5
48.9
190CT
7.3
38.6
92.2
1.4
44.2
10.1
22NOV
7.7
36.1
67.5
14.5
13.2
42.3
80.6
34.4
13APR
6.3
33.9
187.4
78.2
11MAY
7.5
31.9
90.5
29.4
40.3
25.1
13JUN
6.6
27.3
204.3
77.7
77.1
50.6
11JUL
7.3
28.7
165.1
18.0
104.4
48.2
15AUG
7.1
28.3
119.2
45.9
42.5
30.9
12SEP
6.5
29.4
324.9
128.0
169.1
27.9
170CT
6.5
28.7
52.9
6.9
22.7
24.2
23NOV
7.6
32.6
5
11APR
6.2
36.5
263.8
104.4
77.8
81.6
6
09MAY
7.3
34.5
61.8
21.3
24.8
16.3
14JUN
6.7
35.5
302.3
63.4
178.5
82.0
12JUL
7.4
28.7
201.3
27.1
134.5
39.7
16AUG
7.3
29.2
60.6
20.5
30.2
9.9
13SEP
6.4
30.9
312.8
107.4
175.7
29.7
31.4
44.8
8.7
11.2
24.9
32.0
22.9
5.9
10.6
6.4
99.8
180CT
7
21NOV
7.6
14APR
6.3
40.4
12MAY
7.5
38.0
246.4
59.8
86.8
16JUN
6.6
35.1
272.9
68.0
126.5
80.8
14JUL
7.7
33.7
171.8
50.7
73.4
47.8
18AUG
7.3
31.9
153.4
51.4
92.2
9.8
339.2
148.9
153.9
36.4
15SEP
6.7
34.3
24NOV
7.6
38.2
43
Table 5. Variation in pH, total alkalinity and photosynthetic rate for each station.
PR (mg C·m'2·d'1)
Year and
station
Date
pH
T. alk.
(mg·L'l)
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
1990
1
4
6
7
14MAR
7.5
43.2
203.9
27.8
85.8
93.8
04APR
7.6
41.3
244.5
0.0
33.5
241.1
09MAY
7.4
44.8
195.3
1.3
52.1
152.2
13JUN
7.3
45.0
401.7
35.1
24.0
367.2
257.2
79.7
105.5
72.1
11JUL
7.6
47.6
15AUG
7.7
46.8
19SEP
7.9
43.8
170CT
7.7
41.1
54.9
40.7
22NOV
7.7
42.7
30.3
9.1
9.4
12.9
15MAR
7.4
36.3
78.2
27.6
20.4
56.3
05APR
7.4
33.9
15.1
13.4
12.0
6.0
10MAY
7.0
33.3
166.1
81.2
13.5
101.9
14JUN
7.1
30.3
147.5
19.0
74.9
53.6
13JUL
7.8
28.1
16AUG
7.8
29.2
85.3
29.6
43.7
17.6
20SEP
7.8
28.5
98.7
5.1
89.8
22.9
180CT
7.6
27.9
48.6
12.8
21NOV
7.5
32.7
25.3
3.4
15.7
6.2
15MAR
7.5
37.0
136.1
49.2
54.9
31.9
42.6
16.9
5.5
35.1
03APR
7.5
34.8
08MAY
7.2
36.1
72.3
23.6
6.4
56.2
12JUN
7.1
35.1
116.4
18.2
27.1
72.0
10JUL
7.3
34.4
14AUG
7.8
30.7
183.0
53.6
101.8
27.6
18SEP
7.8
30.5
88.0
18.7
42.0
27.4
160CT
7.6
29.9
122.7
76.3
38.8
7.6
20NOV
7.6
31.8
25.3
6.8
14.3
4.2
78.6
36.4
19.6
23.0
82.8
5.5
39.3
40.7
16MAR
7.6
41.6
06APR
7.7
40.6
11MAY
7.3
39.1
15JUN
7.5
35.8
12JUL
7.9
34.7
17AUG
7.8
35.6
21SEP
7.9
36.8
190CT
7.6
34.4
23NOV
7.7
37.2
44
Table 5. Variation in pH, total alkalinity and photosynthetic rate for each station.
PR (mg C·m,2·d")
Year and
station
Date
pH
T. alk.
(mg·L")
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
1991
1
4
6
7
11APR
7.7
39.9
120.1
34.8
24.9
60.4
09MAY
7.8
41.5
131.0
37.2
22.9
106.9
06JUN
7.9
40.1
330.0
51.0
115.2
163.7
10JUL
8.2
42.0
476.3
56.2
174.4
245.7
57.1
132.0
125.2
23.3
12.7
25.8
31JUL
8.1
39.6
314.2
28AUG
8.0
39.5
60.2
25SEP
7.7
41.0
230CT
7.6
41.4
133.6
42.1
33.2
70.9
20NOV
7.8
42.0
266.1
202.6
53.6
9.9
30.3
57.1
21.8
20.1
17.0
10APR
7.5
07MAY
7.5
27.9
88.5
48.3
7.3
41.9
05JUN
7.7
31.4
233.9
81.6
89.6
62.7
11JUL
8.0
31.3
299.9
87.8
76.5
135.7
01AUG
7.7
28.2
245.4
68.3
70.7
106.4
197.7
77.4
41.1
85.1
437.4
176.8
64.5
218.8
29AUG
7.5
26.7
26SEP
7.7
30.5
240CT
7.4
29.9
19NOV
7.5
31.6
6.9
1.8
0.5
8.5
09APR
7.0
33.1
54.7
30.2
5.6
20.6
08MAY
7.5
32.8
22.2
10.2
5.4
7.8
04JUN
7.7
33.6
251.8
72.4
38.2
141.2
12JUL
7.9
33.0
297.6
96.7
138.0
107.9
02AUG
7.7
32.4
109.9
29.2
37.1
48.6
30AUG
7.8
31.8
146.4
45.1
61.0
40.3
27SEP
7.8
33.4
148.4
0.0
67.9
129.8
250CT
7.5
32.9
198.7
61.5
67.6
69.6
21NOV
7.7
38.5
102.5
34.2
38.9
45.5
166.2
66.8
30.9
73.9
12APR
7.5
37.8
10MAY
7.8
38.9
07JUN
7.6
34.2
09JUL
8.0
35.7
363.4
107.8
78.5
177.1
30JUL
7.7
33.1
383.7
77.8
153.2
152.8
27AUG
7.8
35.2
144.1
61.5
40.0
59.2
24SEP
7.7
33.3
137.0
0.0
87.9
72.3
220CT
7.7
35.7
186.1
77.6
28.0
100.5
21NOV
7.7
33.3
61.4
0.6
25.9
45.0
45
Table 5. Variation in pH, total alkalinity and photosynthetic rate for each station.
PR (mg C·m-2·d- 1)
Year and
station
Date
pH
T. alk.
(mg·L- 1 )
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
1992
6
11MAR
7.5
35.2
90.7
10.0
59.2
23.6
07APR
7.4
34.9
57.5
57.1
0.0
20.0
146.8
67.1
65.5
14.2
98.7
102.8
05MAY
7.6
35.9
11JUN
7.7
35.7
07JUL
6.8
33.6
189.2
6.0
13AUG
6.8
33.0
102.3
40.8
55.1
6.3
15SEP
6.5
32.0
379.7
196.8
112.7
80.4
140CT
6.8
32.6
129.1
13.6
74.7
47.8
17NOV
7.2
32.7
51.3
31.8
19.5
0.0
46
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoplankton (#·mV 1)
Station, date,
and depth (m)
Nitrate
(\Jg N·L- 1)
Total P
(\Jg·L- 1)
Part. P
(\Jg·L- 1)
Bacteria
(xi 06· m L- 1)
Chlorophyll
(\Jg.L- 1)
Pico.
(xi 04 )
Nano.
(xi 03)
Micro.
(xi 02)
STN.4
11MAY89
0.0
54
5
1.4
0.54
1.07
4.12
1.78
4.7
2.5
48
5
1.3
0.69
1.01
3.05
1.52
3.2
5.0
47
4
2.6
0.33
0.92
3.69
1.30
2.9
7.5
46
4
1.9
0.47
0.98
3.19
1.25
3.5
10.0
46
5
1.6
0.53
0.73
3.77
1.58
3.1
0.41
12.5
51
3
1.4
0.54
15.0
49
5
1.4
0.52
17.5
46
3
1.3
0.61
0.24
1.94
1.00
1.4
1.56
0.76
1.7
2.03
0.73
1.8
20.0
39
3
0.8
0.45
0.31
3.97
0.60
1.6
22.5
39
4
0.8
0.45
0.27
2.50
0.99
3.2
25.0
41
3
1.4
0.25
0.19
1.86
0.31
1.5
27.5
41
3
0.6
0.49
0.21
2.08
0.59
2.1
30.0
40
3
0.6
0.39
0.21
1.21
0.41
1.2
40.0
41
9
0.8
0.60
0.13
1.08
0.36
0.8
24.0
13JUN89
0.0
32
3
3.0
0.41
0.58
1.89
1.93
2.5
32
5
2.5
0.54
0.65
3.39
1.39
18.0
5.0
36
3
3.2
0.48
1.70
4.31
1.65
27.7
7.5
61
3
2.7
0.58
1.32
4.39
2.53
18.2
10.0
62
2
3.6
0.78
0.92
5.16
2.35
11.4
12.5
70
4
2.1
0.70
0.75
3.10
1.35
7.9
15.0
78
3
2.9
0.53
1.95
0.74
4.1
17.5
79
3
2.9
0.68
0.39
1.18
1.61
5.1
20.0
84
3
2.5
0.46
0.30
0.95
1.54
6.0
22.5
90
4
2.7
0.83
0.28
0.87
1.30
3.5
25.0
90
3
2.7
0.73
0.22
0.76
0.56
2.0
27.5
90
2
2.5
0.42
0.24
0.64
0.57
1.2
30.0
90
4
2.2
0.44
0.21
1.02
0.46
1.4
40.0
88
2
2.4
0.40
0.90
0.39
0.9
10
4.1
8.62
2.55
41.7
11JUL89
0.0
<1
2.94
2.5
2
8
4.4
3.52
5.65
2.36
38.9
5.0
2
5
4.5
3.80
10.40
2.57
33.8
7.5
8
5
4.0
3.71
6.28
1.69
36.7
4.0
2.60
0.77
1.92
24.1
10.0
19
4
12.5
34
4
3.5
1.71
0.73
1.23
7.5
15.0
64
5
3.7
0.97
0.81
1.11
5.3
17.5
82
6
3.6
0.78
0.44
1.51
6.0
47
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoplankton (#·mL-l)
Station, date,
and depth (m)
Nitrate
(I-Ig N·L- 1)
Total P
(l-Ig·L- 1)
Part. P
(l-Ig·L- 1)
20.0
93
4
3.7
22.5
95
4
25.0
93
4
27.5
84
30.0
75
40.0
Bacteria
(xi 06· mL- 1)
Pico.
(xi 04 )
Nano.
(xi 0 3)
Micro.
(xi 02 )
0.60
6.02
0.91
2.6
3.4
0.50
2.11
0.67
2.1
3.3
0.44
1.11
0.85
5.1
3
3.5
0.35
0.73
0.42
1.3
3
3.0
0.35
0.36
0.41
2.2
78
3
2.1
<0.08
0.38
0.37
1.4
<1
2
1.7
0.48
1.58
6.23
2.25
28.3
2.5
<1
2
8.9
0.52
1.77
6.19
1.93
17.5
5.0
<1
2
3.1
0.82
1.74
9.30
1.30
30.3
7.5
<1
7
2.5
0.71
2.01
7.77
1.58
20.2
Chlorophyll
(l-Ig·L- 1)
15AUG89
0.0
10.0
1
2
3.0
0.70
2.20
7.33
1.09
21.9
12.5
30
3
3.2
0.69
1.58
6.26
1.53
11.5
15.0
48
3
2.7
0.82
1.58
6.93
1.82
5.9
17.5
71
4
3.5
0.64
1.68
7.32
1.41
8.0
20.0
91
8
1.5
0.62
0.81
1.37
0.87
4.1
22.5
93
2
1.8
0.56
0.69
1.05
0.74
2.0
25.0
94
1
1.9
0.60
0.57
0.82
0.59
2.3
27.5
93
2
1.5
0.55
0.53
1.06
0.41
2.8
30.0
93
2
6.5
40.0
91
1
0.0
2_5
<1
2
<1
5.0
7.5
0.56
0.47
0.47
0.45
2.4
0.47
0.20
0.57
0.48
1.6
1.5
0.57
1.24
9.06
1.15
6.9
3
1.2
0.70
1.18
10.29
1.32
10.8
<1
2
1.4
0.74
1.09
11.88
1.06
3.9
<1
2
1.3
0.87
1.27
11.20
2.08
14.0
17
3
1.9
0.79
1.52
16.58
1.62
7.0
12.5
25
2
2.0
0.69
1.21
8.48
1.04
5.4
15.0
48
2
1.8
0.77
0.78
4.42
1.05
4.7
12SEP89
10.0
17.5
82
2
2.2
0.80
0.87
3.29
1.15
2.3
20.0
95
2
1.8
0.71
0.63
2.38
1.11
2.2
22.5
101
3
1.3
0.58
0.35
0.69
0.49
1.9
25.0
102
2
0.9
0.53
0.26
0.65
0.42
1.0
27.5
101
2
0.7
0.34
0.20
1.82
0.79
1.4
30.0
101
2
<0.5
0.35
0.17
0.45
0.40
1.0
40.0
107
2
0.6
0.38
0.17
1.00
0.61
0.8
170CT89
2
5
2.0
0.78
1.61
4.67
1.45
8.9
2.5
3
4
2.4
0.93
1.58
5.64
1.23
6.7
5.0
3
3
2.1
1.05
1.58
7.36
1.72
12.1
0.0
48
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoplankton (#·mV 1)
(xi 04 )
Nano.
(xi 03)
Micro.
(xi 02)
1.61
8.42
1.65
7.7
1.52
8.24
0.95
7.5
Nitrate
(lJg N-L- 1)
Total P
(lJg·L· 1)
Part.P
(lJg·L- 1)
(xi 06· mL- 1)
Chlorophyll
(lJg·L- 1)
7.5
3
3
2.1
0.85
10.0
2
4
2.5
0.86
Station, date,
and depth (m)
Bacteria
Pico.
12.5
2
3
2.9
0.78
1.68
5.52
0.83
5.0
15.0
59
4
2.1
0.74
0.78
4.29
0.97
4.4
17.5
84
5
2.0
0.66
0.69
4.40
0.57
2.5
20.0
104
3
1.6
0.75
0.69
1.92
0.86
2.6
22.5
109
4
1.9
0.68
0.50
0.83
0.66
1.6
25.0
110
4
2.1
0.65
0.38
0.64
0.49
1.3
27.5
111
<1
1.5
0.61
0.32
0.42
0.63
2.6
30.0
111
4
1.6
0.39
0.26
0.92
0.62
1.0
40.0
105
4
1.1
0.40
0.17
0.56
0.33
1.2
0.0
46
3
1.4
0.84
1.37
3.71
1.46
5.1
2.5
46
4
1.3
1.17
1.18
2.22
1.20
4.5
23NOV89
5.0
46
3
1.8
0.91
1.31
2.55
0.74
5.6
7.5
46
3
1.6
0.91
1.18
2.57
0.58
3.4
10.0
47
3
1.3
0.86
1.15
2.13
0.62
2.5
12.5
47
3
2.1
0.88
1.15
2.96
0.39
4.5
15.0
46
3
1.7
0.93
1.18
2.93
1.19
2.9
17.5
47
3
1.5
0.94
1.15
2.03
0.64
2.8
0.78
5.2
0.50
3.8
20.0
46
5
1.9
0.75
1.18
2.51
22.5
47
3
1.5
0.84
1.18
1.85
25.0
70
3
1.6
1.08
0.47
1.44
0.53
2.0
27.5
74
4
1.3
0.81
0.47
1.00
0.65
5.2
30.0
81
3
1.3
0.45
0.35
0.92
0.78
3.2
40.0
86
2
0.8
0.17
0.10
1.62
0.36
1.5
15MAR90
0.0
66
3
2.1
0.43
2.02
0.37
0.9
2.5
67
5
1.9
0.43
2.22
0.30
0.9
5.0
68
10
1.8
0.48
2.55
0.46
1.2
7.5
68
5
2.2
0.46
2.61
0.34
1.3
10.0
68
5
1.9
0.43
3.33
0.43
1.3
12.5
69
6
2.3
0.43
2.69
0.42
1.4
1.7
0.46
2.14
0.34
1.4
15.0
69
8
17.5
68
11
1.8
0.39
3.44
0.47
1.7
20.0
69
4
1.9
0.41
1.50
0.57
1.6
22.5
70
3
1.8
0.41
1.75
0.44
1.6
25.0
71
11
1.6
0.28
1.92
0.35
1.3
0.67
0.33
0.8
0.94
0.32
1.3
27.5
72
3
1.5
0.13
30.0
73
5
1.4
0.09
49
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoplankton (#·mL-1>
Station, date,
and depth (m)
Pico.
(xi 04 )
Nano.
(xi 03)
Micro.
(xi 0 2)
<0.08
0.36
0.11
0.4
0.62
0.39
3.69
0.25
1.3
0.69
0.48
3.08
0.37
0.6
1.6
0.86
0.59
3.47
0.34
0.9
1.6
0.54
0.59
3.52
0.29
1.4
1.6
0.95
0.50
3.30
0.24
0.9
3
1.6
0.84
0.46
3.05
0.26
0.8
3
1.4
0.96
0.39
2.47
0.26
1.0
3
1.2
0.44
0.30
3.38
0.16
0.8
0.9
Nitrate
N·L· 1)
Total P
Part. P
(~g·L·1)
Bacteria
(xi 06·mL· 1)
Chlorophyll
(~g·L·1)
72
8
1.3
0.63
0.0
98
4
1.1
2.5
100
4
1.6
5.0
101
3
7.5
101
5
10.0
104
4
12.5
103
15.0
105
40.0
(~g
(~g·L·1)
05APR90
17.5
105
20.0
107
3
1.5
0.75
0.30
3.10
0.15
22.5
107
4
1.3
0.57
0.26
1.83
0.22
0.8
25.0
107
5
1.3
0.54
0.23
2.00
0.17
1.1
27.5
110
5
1.1
0.77
0.26
1.86
0.20
1.1
30.0
109
7
1.2
0.68
0.37
2.27
0.34
1.0
40.0
108
7
1.2
0.69
0.21
1.66
0.19
0.8
0.0
59
9
1.3
0.98
0.84
4.73
0.66
1.9
2.5
58
2
1.8
1.04
0.88
5.06
0.54
1.0
5.0
58
3
2.0
1.11
0.79
5.15
0.34
1.3
7.5
59
2
1.8
0.91
0.75
2.52
0.35
0.8
10.0
59
2
1.6
0.98
0.70
4.82
0.40
1.2
10APR90
12.5
60
2
1.3
0.96
0.40
4.42
0.28
1.0
15.0
60
2
1.0
1.00
0.48
3.74
0.20
1.0
17.5
59
2
1.1
1.06
0.46
3.66
0.25
0.8
20.0
59
2
1.0
0.93
0.46
4.06
0.17
0.7
22.5
60
3
1.2
0.75
0.48
3.48
0.27
1.4
25.0
0.8
59
2
1.0
0.84
0.46
4.31
0.22
27.5
59
4
1.0
0.86
0.30
3.70
0.18
1.2
30.0
60
2
1.2
0.85
0.28
2.19
0.27
1.1
40.0
62
2
1.1
0.60
0.30
3.44
0.20
1.2
0.0
79
3
1.8
1.04
1.20
5.55
0.49
2.6
24APR90
3.0
77
4
1.8
1.07
1.11
4.24
0.70
2.9
6.0
74
3
2.1
1.12
1.11
4.12
0.59
2.7
9.0
72
4
2.0
1.02
1.24
4.70
0.58
2.5
12.0
69
4
1.6
1.09
1.24
5.99
0.59
3.3
15.0
67
4
1.8
0.83
1.02
9.37
0.30
4.8
18.0
66
3
1.4
1.08
0.84
6.87
0.32
2.5
21.0
68
3
1.4
1.02
0.66
5.86
0.18
1.7
50
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoplankton (#·mL-1)
Station, date,
and depth (m)
24.0
27.0
30.0
40.0
10MAY90
0.0
2.5
5.0
7.5
Nitrate
(1-19 N·L· 1)
Total P
(1-I9· L·1)
Part.P
(l-Ig·L· 1)
(xi 06· mL· 1)
Chlorophyll
(1-I9· L·1)
69
63
4
4
68
68
3
3
2.8
1.4
1.1
3.7
0.91
0.97
0.72
0.87
0.48
0.88
0.39
0.35
77
77
78
83
5
2.0
7
2.1
3.6
3.3
0.98
1.06
1.38
1.03
1.31
1.01
1.29
1.34
Bacteria
15.0
17.5
20.0
79
80
81
82
8
6
4
4
82
6
22.5
25.0
27.5
83
85
85
9
4
30.0
40.0
23MAY90
87
92
0.0
3.0
62
59
6.0
9.0
12.0
15.0
67
82
88
78
18.0
21.0
24.0
73
73
86
27.0
76
30.0
63
40.0
14JUN90
77
0.0
2.5
49
3
1.7
1.09
48
6
2.3
5.0
7.5
10.0
50
50
50
4
2
4
12.5
15.0
50
50
8
4
3.8
3.8
2.6
2.8
0.99
1.26
1.63
1.70
10.0
12.5
3
4
7
5
3.0
3.0
2.1
Pico.
Nano.
(xi 04)
(xi 0 3)
4.48
7.41
0.24
0.24
2.96
1.73
0.53
0.21
Micro.
(xi 02)
1.5
2.7
2.9
1.5
1.06
3.37
0.78
1.28
1.20
1.37
3.56
4.44
2.21
0.61
0.80
0.53
4.65
3.89
3.40
4.09
3.68
0.35
0.42
0.44
6.3
4.7
4.1
0.36
0.46
4.5
3.8
0.37
0.32
4.5
4.1
7.3
5.5
2.0
1.9
1.18
1.28
1.24
1.28
1.20
0.84
1.6
1.7
1.5
0.77
0.91
0.92
0.93
0.79
0.84
3.08
3.92
3.01
0.33
4.3
5.2
3.6
1.6
1.8
0.58
0.94
0.70
0.70
2.06
1.73
0.25
0.21
3.2
3.0
1.9
2.5
0.97
1.08
1.08
4.82
0.64
0.72
4.57
0.64
4.7
5.6
1.96
1.71
1.02
0.57
4.64
3.31
2.86
2.60
0.49
0.37
0.27
0.31
7.7
7.1
3.4
2.7
4
3
4
4
2.7
2.8
1.9
1.7
1.14
0.83
1.00
0.74
3
3
3
4
1.9
1.5
1.7
0.88
1.05
1.24
0.46
0.41
0.66
2.21
1.66
2.21
0.28
0.25
0.31
3.6
2.5
2.4
0.97
3
1.9
1.7
0.46
0.30
1.79
1.41
0.27
0.26
2.5
2.0
5
1.5
0.63
5.94
0.90
6.6
1.20
1.66
1.63
1.48
1.22
6.97
1.19
10.0
5.09
4.40
5.90
5.45
1.04
0.89
0.84
0.80
13.2
14.0
1.29
5.65
0.55
14.1
2.4
0.86
0.99
0.96
1.03
0.26
12.7
14.5
51
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoplankton (#·mL-1)
Station, date,
and depth (m)
Nitrate
(J.1g N·L- 1)
Total P
(J.1g·L- 1)
Part.P
(J.1g·L- 1)
Bacteria
(xi 06· mL- 1)
Chlorophyll
(J.1g·L- 1)
Pico.
(xi 04 )
Nano.
(xi 03)
Micro.
(xi 02)
17.5
53
8
3.1
1.18
0.92
4.12
0.69
15.6
20.0
55
4
2.5
1.14
1.07
2.61
0.71
11.9
22.5
61
4
2.3
1.26
0.89
4.00
0.60
11.1
25.0
64
5
2.4
0.83
0.74
2.74
0.51
7.9
27.5
68
5
2.4
1.17
0.67
1.42
0.54
7.5
30.0
77
3
2.5
0.97
0.70
2.00
0.48
4.4
40.0
86
5
1.2
0.78
0.30
0.62
0.21
1.9
0.0
2
3
3.5
0.78
0.74
4.79
0.62
5.1
2.5
1
3.6
0.90
1.20
5.28
0.58
7.5
13JUL90
5.0
2
5
3.6
1.06
2.14
11.47
0.56
12.1
7.5
20
4
3.5
0.85
1.61
7.72
0.78
9.1
10.0
31
4
2.8
0.79
0.70
1.39
0.50
3.1
12.5
45
4
2.6
0.80
0.52
0.64
0.29
1.9
15.0
60
4
2.5
0.50
0.44
0.59
0.29
1.9
17.5
65
4
2.4
0.47
0.26
0.30
0.33
1.5
20.0
85
4
2.4
0.54
0.28
0.46
0.29
1.7
22.5
88
4
2.2
0.48
0.30
0.37
0.31
1.8
25.0
90
5
1.9
0.70
0.24
0.49
0.24
1.4
27.5
36
4
3.1
0.50
0.56
3.10
0.79
7.4
30.0
93
3
1.9
0.40
0.22
0.70
0.29
1.2
40.0
104
4
1.2
0.50
0.11
0.39
0.13
0.5
16AUG90
0.0
<1
4
1.3
1.07
0.28
6.76
0.21
2.5
2.5
<1
4
1.3
1.08
0.37
5.36
0.33
5.4
6.6
5.0
1
5
1.9
1.35
0.41
5.17
0.30
7.5
1
5
2.0
1.75
0.59
5.08
0.27
3.1
10.0
2
7
3.6
1.47
0.76
15.40
0.41
8.6
12.5
56
5
2.1
1.50
0.87
1.44
0.35
7.6
15.0
76
6
2.2
1.19
0.74
3.94
0.24
3.3
17.5
86
6
1.7
0.99
0.22
0.90
0.26
2.1
20.0
94
5
1.6
0.71
0.15
0.76
0.33
1.7
22.5
102
4
1.3
0.87
0.15
0.73
0.21
0.9
25.0
106
4
1.1
0.82
0.11
0.31
0.25
1.3
27.5
104
4
1.0
0.68
0.11
0.24
0.17
1.0
30.0
102
4
1.0
0.83
0.08
0.13
0.16
0.9
40.0
105
4
<0.5
0.69
<0.08
0.68
0.16
0.9
52
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoplankton (#.mV 1)
Station, date,
and depth (m)
Nitrate
(J.1g N·L-1)
Total P
(J.1g·L- 1)
Part. P
(J.1g·L- 1)
Bacteria
(xi 06· mL- 1)
Chlorophyll
(J.1g·L- 1)
3
5
1.7
1.04
1.11
Pico.
(xi 04 )
Nano.
(xi 0 3)
Micro.
(xi 0 2)
6.61
0.30
11.5
20SEP90
0.0
2.5
3
3
1.6
1.08
1.29
7.82
0.39
12.3
5.0
3
2
1.7
1.32
1.11
8.16
0.46
5.5
7.5
3
3
1.2
1.27
1.44
9.94
0.37
10.9
10.0
5
5
1.4
1.16
1.20
8.68
0.32
6.9
12.5
7
3
1.8
1.41
1.07
7.22
0.31
8.7
15.0
36
4
2.7
1.14
0.89
5.20
0.28
2.8
17.5
59
4
1.6
0.77
0.52
1.41
0.27
2.0
20.0
73
4
1.4
0.79
0.44
0.98
0.32
0.6
22.5
74
3
2.0
0.45
0.26
0.22
0.24
0.5
25.0
76
8
0.9
0.59
0.30
0.47
0.26
0.7
27.5
75
8
1.0
0.66
0.33
0.21
0.41
0.9
30.0
77
3
0.9
0.62
0.22
0.19
0.17
0.7
40.0
69
2
0.9
0.42
0.15
0.30
0.13
0.3
0.0
22
6
2.4
0.98
0.52
3.33
0.38
2.3
2.5
22
6
2.5
0.95
0.92
3.04
0.30
2.3
5.0
23
9
2.2
1.29
0.81
3.75
0.31
3.3
180CT90
7.5
23
4
2.6
1.06
0.74
3.70
0.35
3.8
10.0
22
4
2.5
1.20
0.74
2.67
0.35
5.6
12.5
24
4
2.8
1.08
0.78
2.24
0.50
2.7
15.0
75
6
1.9
0.95
0.37
1.38
0.31
4.6
17.5
92
4
1.6
0.76
0.33
1.02
0.29
1.6
20.0
109
5
1.4
0.90
0.26
0.92
0.28
1.1
1.1
0.6
22.5
110
5
1.5
0.81
0.22
0.70
0.26
25.0
114
4
1.7
0.78
0.19
0.34
0.24
27.5
112
7
1.4
0.79
0.19
0.39
0.24
0.9
30.0
111
4
1.4
0.56
0.15
0.27
0.19
0.7
40.0
109
3
0.9
0.36
0.19
0.34
0.08
0.3
0.0
50
5
2.1
0.96
1.28
1.89
0.51
2.1
2.5
51
5
1.8
0.83
1.55
1.85
0.54
1.8
5.0
50
4
2.0
0.93
1.26
1.53
0.50
1.2
7.5
13
5
1.9
1.02
1.09
3.16
0.57
2.8
10.0
12
4
1.9
0.88
0.98
1.56
0.53
1.8
12.5
13
6
1.9
1.15
1.19
1.88
0.37
1.5
15.0
16
5
1.8
1.09
1.11
3.07
0.40
0.8
2.06
0.43
1.0
1.85
0.39
1.0
21 NOV90
17.5
18
15
1.8
1.05
1.00
20.0
21
5
1.7
0.77
0.96
53
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoplankton (#·mL-1)
Station, date,
and depth (m)
Nitrate
(lJg N·L- 1)
Total P
(lJg· L-1)
Part. P
(lJg· L-1)
Bacteria
(x 106· mL- 1)
Chlorophyll
(lJg·L- 1)
Pico.
(xi 0 4 )
Nano.
(xi 03)
Micro.
(xi 0 2)
1.1
0.8
1.0
0.3
22.5
25.0
27.5
30.0
40.0
10APR91
0.0
2.5
5.0
24
28
30
43
13
6
4
5
5
1.9
1.8
1.6
1.7
0.79
0.81
0.89
0.83
1.02
1.09
0.91
0.22
2.24
2.08
1.38
0.92
3
0.9
0.58
0.11
0.16
0.33
0.37
0.39
0.15
0.13
92
94
94
4
4
5
1.2
1.7
1.8
0.25
0.42
0.53
1.33
1.92
2.02
0.51
0.39
0.30
1.7
1.3
1.6
7.5
94
4
1.7
0.51
0.79
0.89
0.78
0.62
1.78
0.33
1.3
10.0
12.5
15.0
17.5
95
94
92
95
4
1.5
0.47
1.4
1.2
1.6
0.84
0.53
0.48
0.43
0.32
0.31
5
1.6
1.7
1.5
1.64
2.16
0.97
0.40
5
4
0.80
0.90
0.72
1.07
0.33
1.3
20.0
95
3
1.7
0.93
0.25
1.86
1.4
22.5
96
1.5
97
0.74
0.63
0.44
25.0
27.5
4
4
96
94
3
4
1.70
1.66
1.94
0.34
0.37
30.0
40.0
100
60.0
100
80.0
100.0
120.0
100
106
102
140.0
24APR91
101
0.0
2.5
1.4
1.9
1.5
0.85
0.68
0.47
0.42
0.46
0.2
1.3
1.5
1.71
0.40
0.32
0.35
0.9
1.4
0.34
1.2
2.3
3
1.1
0.85
0.35
2.26
83
3
2.3
0.99
1.49
85
85
5
3
2.7
1.00
1.50
1.73
2.43
0.84
0.54
3.1
0.79
1.52
2.54
0.47
0.59
2.8
0.63
0.44
0.42
2.8
2.1
2.1
0.36
5.0
7.5
88
3
2.2
0.77
1.58
3.77
10.0
91
2.0
0.73
1.65
3.66
12.5
94
3
3
1.8
1.7
0.92
0.85
1.6
0.86
0.83
1.45
0.92
1.02
2.18
1.67
1.41
15.0
97
17.5
100
5
3
20.0
99
3
1.5
22.5
25.0
98
98
1.5
1.6
27.5
30.0
40.0
97
99
112
3
3
3
3
2
1.7
1.5
1.2
0.73
0.69
0.98
0.91
0.93
1.7
2.4
0.61
0.96
0.39
1.8
1.1
0.51
0.81
1.42
1.07
1.45
0.35
0.37
0.32
0.37
1.2
1.4
1.5
1.2
0.80
0.63
0.62
0.43
54
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoolankton (#·mV)
Station, date,
and depth (m)
60.0
Nitrate
(lJg N·L'1)
Total P
(lJg·L'1)
Part. P
(lJg·L'1)
Bacteria
(xi 06· mL'1)
Chlorophyll
(lJg·L'1)
3
1.7
0.96
0.64
Pico.
(xi 04 )
Nano.
(xi 03 )
Micro.
(xi 02 )
2.97
0.77
2.8
100
80.0
101
100.0
101
120.0
101
07MAY91
0.0
85
2.5
92
5
2.7
0.85
0.83
3.74
1.44
4.2
5.0
95
7
2.6
0.70
1.14
4.43
1.23
5.7
7.5
96
4
2.5
0.78
0.88
4.65
0.61
4.6
10.0
99
3
2.0
0.85
0.58
4.01
0.41
4.7
12.5
104
5
2.0
1.16
0.68
2.13
0.39
3.0
15.0
104
3
1.7
0.96
0.48
2.02
0.36
2.8
17.5
104
3
1.9
1.14
0.40
3.00
0.28
2.8
20.0
106
4
1.6
0.80
0.37
1.90
0.25
1.8
22.5
110
3
1.6
0.76
0.19
1.12
0.31
1.7
25.0
112
3
1.6
0.67
0.17
0.90
0.23
1.0
27.5
112
4
1.5
0.67
0.15
0.58
0.21
0.9
30.0
114
3
1.5
0.57
0.16
0.62
0.21
0.8
3
1.5
0.60
0.13
0.89
0.21
0.7
58
4
2.6
0.65
2.01
2.74
2.43
11.3
8
40.0
85
60.0
115
80.0
113
100.0
124
120.0
116
140.0
112
22MAY91
0.0
2.5
58
3.3
0.52
2.41
4.10
1.71
6.1
5.0
58
3.4
0.84
2.95
4.18
1.51
9.6
7.5
59
3.1
0.87
2.73
2.29
1.78
9.6
10.0
63
9
2.6
0.77
2.30
3.33
0.77
6.7
12.5
70
8
2.2
0.92
2.09
3.64
0.70
8.2
15.0
62
5
2.4
0.70
2.57
4.47
0.76
4.6
17.5
64
6
2.4
0.54
2.44
4.85
0.92
10.3
20.0
69
6
2.4
0.81
2.25
2.66
0.22
6.0
22.5
74
6
2.0
0.80
1.45
1.49
0.55
7.4
25.0
74
7
1.9
0.96
1.30
27.5
82
5
2.2
0.64
0.65
2.97
0.47
3.2
30.0
80
5
1.9
0.70
0.74
1.88
0.55
2.9
40.0
85
3
2.1
0.75
0.48
0.40
0.42
1.7
60.0
83
55
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoplankton (#·mV)
Station, date,
and depth (m)
Nitrate
(lJg N·L- 1)
80.0
85
100.0
86
87
120.0
05JUN91
Total P
(lJg·L- 1)
Part.P
(lJg·L- 1)
Bacteria
(x10 6 ·mL- 1)
Chlorophyll
(lJg·L-1)
Pico.
(x10 4 )
Nano.
(x10 3)
Micro.
(x10 2)
0.0
44
5
2.5
0.67
2.44
4.61
1.46
12.5
2.5
4
3.3
4.13
1.20
15.8
4
3.4
1.07
1.15
2.46
5.0
43
61
2.41
2.07
0.83
18.6
7.5
44
6
3.3
0.91
2.70
10.0
45
4
2.4
0.89
2.68
2.99
0.70
25.7
12.5
45
4
2.3
0.85
2.62
15.0
49
4
1.3
0.68
2.17
3.56
1.07
14.7
17.5
63
3
2.0
0.56
1.29
2.46
0.81
7.1
20.0
73
4
2.1
0.83
0.75
0.83
0.58
4.0
22.5
72
4
2.0
0.90
0.75
0.56
0.56
2.7
25.0
72
4
1.7
0.90
0.59
1.48
0.54
2.1
27.5
73
4
2.1
1.09
0.56
0.20
0.69
1.6
30.0
2.1
0.98
0.54
0.50
0.62
1.6
1.0
25.2
72
5
40.0
77
2
1.6
0.75
0.27
1.33
0.34
60.0
76
4
1.9
0.83
0.80
5.55
1.19
80.0
75
100.0
76
120.0
76
18JUN91
0.0
34
2.5
31
5
2.6
1.02
0.88
4.70
1.33
23.7
5.0
31
4
2.8
0.89
1.37
3.84
1.85
31.8
7.5
34
6
2.6
0.84
1.59
4.30
1.12
27.3
10.0
49
5
2.9
0.77
1.24
2.58
1.10
21.4
12.5
61
4
2.1
0.92
1.10
4.09
0.60
15.1
15.0
75
5
2.4
0.78
0.65
1.73
0.62
11.0
17.5
84
4
2.0
0.80
0.47
0.96
0.52
4.9
20.0
90
4
2.0
0.74
0.51
0.79
0.70
4.2
22.5
98
4
2.1
0.72
0.51
1.12
0.42
3.5
25.0
91
4
1.6
0.70
0.42
0.45
0.55
3.7
27.5
92
4
1.5
0.68
0.39
0.43
0.40
2.2
30.0
93
3
1.5
0.59
0.28
0.45
0.38
1.7
4.46
0.88
17.0
50.0
70.0
97
90.0
99
100
110.0
56
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoplankton (#·mL-1)
Station, date,
and depth (m)
130.0
Nitrate
(lJg N·L- 1)
Total P
(lJg·L- 1)
Part. P
(lJg·L-1)
(xi 06· mL- 1)
Bacteria
Chlorophyll
(lJg·L- 1)
Pico.
Nano.
(xi 04 )
(xi 03)
Micro.
(xi 02)
97
11JUL91
0.0
1
2.1
1.15
0.70
2.5
1
5
3.3
1.02
1.31
5.0
1
4
2.9
1.31
1.63
3.49
0.74
9.5
7.5
1
6
3.2
1.27
2.14
9.65
1.08
15.8
10.0
18
6
3.2
1.05
1.77
6.22
1.04
16.3
12.5
31
4
2.3
0.96
1.58
6.44
0.77
11.9
15.0
47
4
2.4
0.60
0.80
2.32
0.90
6.8
17.5
57
4
2.0
0.54
0.67
3.57
0.95
5.2
20.0
82
5
1.8
0.74
0.35
0.28
0.90
6.5
22.5
85
4
1.9
0.62
0.24
0.14
0.42
4.1
25.0
86
4
1.9
0.68
0.24
0.79
0.37
3.8
27.5
86
3
1.9
0.56
0.24
0.49
0.47
4.3
30.0
87
3
1.7
0.53
0.24
0.16
0.32
4.1
3
1.1
0.71
0.11
0.18
0.22
0.7
40.0
88
60.0
89
80.0
89
100.0
86
120.0
86
140.0
87
01AUG91
0.0
3
1.8
1.25
0.91
4.72
0.99
6.1
2.5
4
2.1
1.22
0.91
4.31
0.78
7.4
6
2.4
1.09
1.26
3.04
0.81
8.0
5.0
<1
7.5
1
7
3.1
1.14
2.22
7.26
0.95
15.0
10.0
6
4
2.7
1.21
2.89
7.76
0.83
9.3
12.5
31
3
2.4
1.05
1.53
5.50
0.38
4.2
15.0
52
3
2.1
0.90
0.80
1.87
0.36
2.9
17.5
59
3
2.0
0.95
0.75
1.71
0.67
4.5
20.0
70
3
1.8
0.87
0.32
0.90
0.42
2.8
22.5
72
3
1.6
0.72
0.27
0.62
0.38
1.7
25.0
72
3
2.0
0.92
0.21
0.39
0.34
2.8
27.5
72
3
1.4
0.62
0.21
0.37
0.41
2.4
30.0
70
2
1.2
0.57
0.16
0.34
0.30
2.3
40.0
72
2
1.0
0.61
0.13
0.24
0.25
0.9
60.0
68
2
80.0
69
3
100.0
70
3
120.0
71
2
57
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoplankton (#·mL-1)
Station, date,
and depth (m)
Nitrate
(J.lg N·L- 1)
Total P
(J.lg·L- 1)
Part. P
(J.lg·L- 1)
Bacteria
(xi 06· m L- 1)
Chlorophyll
(J.lg·L- 1)
Pico.
(xi 04)
Nano.
(xi 03)
Micro.
(xi 02)
29AUG91
0.0
4
3
1.8
0.98
1.12
4.51
0.80
4.3
2.5
4
2
1.8
0.79
1.39
3.14
0.61
4.2
5.0
3
3
2.0
1.10
1.20
2.50
0.63
4.1
7.5
4
7
2.6
0.82
1.79
6.92
0.63
8.7
10.0
5
3
2.4
0.95
2.65
7.78
0.57
6.7
12.5
33
3
2.0
0.96
1.79
10.07
0.37
5.4
15.0
55
4
2.2
0.79
1.34
5.37
0.30
3.8
2.4
17.5
91
4
1.9
0.64
0.72
1.39
0.25
20.0
92
3
1.8
0.47
0.46
0.77
0.19
1.8
22.5
93
2
1.6
0.58
0.40
0.85
0.26
2.3
25.0
93
2
1.7
0.58
0.27
0.43
0.26
2.4
27.5
93
2
1.3
0.62
0.24
0.90
0.28
2.3
30.0
91
1
1.1
0.68
0.21
0.25
0.25
1.7
40.0
91
2
1.5
0.69
0.27
0.07
0.21
1.4
60.0
89
80.0
89
100.0
90
120.0
90
12
5
2.4
1.07
0.98
6.42
1.00
6.1
2.5
7
4
2.3
1.35
0.92
8.57
0.85
5.4
5.0
5
5
2.3
1.34
0.61
6.32
0.84
6.4
5
1.8
1.38
0.82
5.31
0.39
6.4
26SEP91
0.0
7.5
10.0
32
5
1.8
1.11
0.95
3.20
0.43
5.6
12.5
15
4
2.1
1.18
1.33
7.44
0.36
6.3
15.0
20
6
2.2
1.24
1.79
5.94
0.40
5.0
17.5
63
4
1.9
0.99
1.05
4.35
0.33
5.0
20.0
86
4
1.9
0.85
1.00
1.35
0.43
3.0
22.5
88
6
1.9
0.97
0.40
0.73
0.27
1.9
25.0
89
3
1.5
0.88
0.25
0.57
0.18
2.0
27.5
89
5
1.4
0.72
0.24
0.34
0.22
2.0
30.0
94
3
1.2
0.74
0.25
0.18
0.28
1.3
40.0
113
3
1.4
0.39
0.12
0.19
0.17
0.9
60.0
87
80.0
87
100.0
84
120.0
81
58
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoplankton (#·mL-1)
Station, date,
and depth (m)
Nitrate
(lJg N·L- 1)
Total P
(lJg·L-1)
Part. P
(lJg· L-1)
Bacteria
(xi 06· mL- 1)
Chlorophyll
(lJg· L-1)
13
2
2.0
1.03
1.66
Pico.
(xi 04)
Nano.
(xi 03)
Micro.
(xi 02)
6.38
0.46
4.9
240CT91
0.0
2.5
13
3
2.3
1.02
1.75
6.44
0.54
3.4
5.0
12
3
2.2
0.74
1.64
4.83
0.49
6.4
7.5
12
3
2.1
1.00
1.79
3.52
0.59
4.7
10.0
13
3
2.2
0.96
i .81
5.53
0.59
3.5
12.5
16
3
2.3
1.05
1.79
5.80
0.72
4.2
15.0
17
4
2.4
1.18
i .51
4.67
0.49
4.8
17.5
18
3
2.0
0.81
1.46
5.73
0.50
3.5
20.0
19
4
1.9
0.91
1.73
3.36
0.49
5.6
22.5
21
1.7
0.93
1.55
5.28
0.47
3.6
25.0
24
3
1.7
0.94
1.33
4.95
0.46
4.8
27.5
39
3
1.6
0.72
0.92
2.87
0.33
2.6
30.0
74
5
1.6
0.77
0.74
0.87
0.25
2.2
40.0
82
4
1.1
0.61
0.35
0.14
0.21
1.2
60.0
85
80.0
77
100.0
77
120.0
80
19NOV91
0.0
35
4
2.0
0.70
2.68
2.50
0.65
8.3
2.5
35
3
1.8
1.28
2.76
2.79
0.67
3.8
5.0
34
3
1.8
1.17
2.73
2.82
0.75
4.9
7.5
34
4
2.1
1.05
2.52
2.96
0.69
3.1
10.0
36
7
1.8
1.04
2.36
2.84
0.52
3.0
12.5
57
5
1.6
1.06
1.53
1.11
0.37
3.8
15.0
66
3
1.6
0.96
1.61
0.90
0.33
2.5
1.23
0.74
0.31
2.7
17.5
69
3
1.5
0.82
20.0
72
3
1.6
0.81
1.12
0.62
0.31
2.6
22.5
75
3
1.2
0.57
0.51
0.20
0.20
1.6
25.0
75
3
1.3
0.67
0.67
0.37
0.22
2.3
27.5
75
3
1.3
0.52
0.64
0.52
0.20
1.8
30.0
77
4
1.3
0.63
0.54
0.17
0.21
1.8
40.0
82
2
1.2
0.48
0.48
0.19
0.23
1.0
60.0
79
80.0
79
100.0
79
120.0
78
59
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoplankton (#·mL-1>
Station, date,
and depth (m)
Nitrate
(lJg N·L- 1)
Total P
(lJg·L- 1)
Part. P
(lJg·L- 1)
Bacteria
(xi 06· m L- 1)
Chlorophyll
(lJg·L- 1)
0.0
93
4
2.0
0.85
0.71
3.0
100
5
1.9
0.98
1.04
6.0
100
5
1.8
0.85
1.09
9.0
101
5
1.8
0.82
0.98
Nano.
(xi 03)
Micro.
(xi 02)
2.05
0.49
2.8
1.42
0.54
2.1
2.52
0.46
3.6
2.14
0.48
2.1
Pico.
(xi 0 4 )
STN.6
11MAR92
12.0
102
4
2.0
1.01
0.92
2.11
0.55
3.1
15.0
106
4
1.7
1.00
1.09
2.45
0.50
2.1
18.0
101
6
1.7
0.92
0.90
2.53
0.36
2.0
21.0
102
5
1.6
1.03
0.42
1.78
0.47
3.8
24.0
103
4
1.6
1.05
0.83
1.23
0.49
3.9
27.0
105
4
1.6
0.61
1.05
1.43
0.44
4.4
30.0
106
4
1.6
0.89
0.96
1.12
0.48
3.7
40.0
108
5
1.6
0.89
1.31
0.33
1.9
50.0
110
5
0.42
60.0
111
4
0.56
07APR92
0.0
74
5
1.8
1.18
0.75
3.94
0.94
4.2
3.0
75
6
2.7
1.25
0.56
4.24
0.90
3.4
6.0
76
7
2.8
1.16
1.21
4.86
0.61
2.8
9.0
77
5
2.7
1.05
0.92
3.89
0.56
4.2
12.0
80
5
2.4
0.95
0.83
4.92
0.41
2.7
15.0
84
5
1.8
0.90
0.36
3.89
0.47
2.3
18.0
87
4
1.7
0.84
0.65
4.87
0.32
2.0
21.0
88
5
1.8
0.78
0.60
3.31
0.46
2.5
24.0
90
4
1.8
0.90
0.33
2.58
0.39
3.0
27.0
91
5
1.8
0.81
0.41
2.22
0.32
2.1
2.1
1.03
0.50
1.53
0.35
1.9
30.0
92
5
40.0
92
4
0.33
50.0
95
5
0.35
60.0
98
7
0.28
05MAY92
0.0
64
4
1.5
0.86
1.05
3.40
0.40
4.3
3.0
62
6
2.9
0.95
0.91
2.91
1.00
5.7
6.0
63
4
2.2
1.01
0.76
3.67
0.61
4.7
9.0
63
7
2.6
0.62
1.45
3.65
0.73
4.1
12.0
67
5
2.6
0.70
1.93
6.58
0.69
4.0
15.0
69
5
2.4
0.70
2.28
8.94
0.49
9.4
1.00
9.39
0.62
4.4
0.67
8.26
0.45
2.5
18.0
77
5
2.1
1.12
21.0
80
5
2.0
0.86
60
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoplankton (#·mV)
Station, date,
and depth (m)
Nitrate
(\-lg N·L'1)
Total P
(\-lg·L,1)
24.0
83
27.0
87
Bacteria
Pico.
Nano.
(xi 04 )
(xi 03)
Part. P
(\-lg·L· 1)
(xi 06· mL'1)
Chlorophyll
(\-lg.L· 1)
Micro.
(xi 02)
5
1.9
0.90
0.58
7.96
0.43
2.8
5
2.1
1.04
0.41
5.15
0.40
1.8
2.1
0.99
0.48
3.64
0.34
2.3
30.0
87
5
40.0
91
6
0.48
50.0
94
4
0.41
60.0
100
5
0.24
0.0
13
4
2.0
0.90
1.14
1.16
1.65
4.8
3.0
13
6
1.3
0.88
1.37
1.38
1.39
6.0
6.0
16
5
3.0
0.90
2.12
2.51
1.73
6.8
11JUN92
9.0
27
7
2.9
1.26
2.53
4.01
1.59
8.1
12.0
40
4
2.7
1.08
2.00
6.33
0.90
5.7
15.0
45
4
0.6
1.19
1.65
5.44
0.69
6.0
18.0
52
4
0.7
1.26
1.46
3.64
0.45
4.7
21.0
62
4
0.6
0.90
0.59
0.66
0.42
2.3
24.0
65
4
2.0
0.94
0.47
1.21
0.35
2.3
27.0
67
4
1.7
0.89
0.41
0.61
0.39
2.3
1.6
0.76
0.32
0.55
0.34
1.3
1.98
0.84
6.2
30.0
69
3
40.0
72
3
0.33
50.0
73
4
0.28
60.0
75
4
0.29
07JUL92
0.0
<1
3
3.0
<1
4
6.0
<1
5
1.9
0.98
0.99
1.6
0.81
0.96
2.33
1.02
6.2
2.2
0.98
1.33
5.71
1.12
5.9
9.0
8
5
3.0
1.04
1.94
2.28
1.20
7.2
12.0
25
4
3.0
0.94
1.75
3.81
1.06
9.7
15.0
41
4
2.3
0.93
1.53
2.11
0.88
4.9
18.0
49
4
2.5
0.80
1.06
5.61
0.64
5.2
21.0
51
3
2.5
0.70
0.88
2.15
0.84
4.2
24.0
55
4
2.3
0.83
0.58
1.92
0.56
3.2
0.33
0.96
0.46
2.3
0.42
0.31
0.38
2.0
27.0
60
4
2.0
0.63
30.0
61
4
2.2
0.51
40.0
61
4
0.30
50.0
63
3
0.18
60.0
63
3
0.19
61
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoplankton (#·mL-1)
Station, date,
and depth (m)
Nitrate
Pico.
(xi 04 )
Nano.
(xi 0 3)
Micro.
(xi 02)
0.64
4.52
0.38
3.8
1.00
0.82
6.55
0.50
3.0
(Ilg N·L- 1)
Total P
(llg·L- 1)
Part. P
(llg·L-1)
Bacteria
(xi 06· m L- 1)
Chlorophyll
(llg·L-1)
0.0
3
3
1.1
1.16
3.0
3
4
1.5
6.0
2
4
9.0
2
13AUG92
1.7
1.05
0.99
6.07
0.49
4.2
2.0
1.13
1.34
9.87
0.68
3.9
12.0
5
5
2.9
1.37
2.39
33.84
1.08
8.3
15.0
63
5
2.0
1.91
1.51
12.99
0.62
3.3
18.0
80
4
2.1
1.16
0.80
5.13
0.47
1.7
21.0
88
7
1.7
1.04
0.71
2.41
0.50
2.1
24.0
47
5
2.9
1.67
1.79
26.79
0.70
4.2
27.0
92
4
1.6
0.93
0.53
1.16
0.47
2.1
30.0
93
4
<0.5
1.03
0.34
0.21
0.38
1.2
40.0
95
3
0.21
50.0
100
3
0.18
60.0
104
4
0.17
0.0
5
3
3.4
1.07
1.28
7.13
0.46
3.7
3.0
5
3
3.3
1.29
1.10
8.09
0.42
6.2
6.0
6
3
3.2
1.13
1.46
7.38
0.60
3.5
9.0
18
3
3.1
1.13
1.05
8.37
0.35
3.6
12.0
29
3
4.0
1.20
1.00
6.37
0.37
3.0
0.96
9.53
0.39
2.2
1.01
3.45
0.82
4.0
15SEP92
15.0
33
4
2.4
1.15
18.0
51
4
3.2
1.01
21.0
94
3
2.3
1.02
0.50
2.30
0.35
1.3
24.0
95
3
2.0
0.79
0.43
0.93
0.37
1.2
27.0
99
4
3.2
0.71
0.38
0.91
0.38
1.5
2.6
0.68
0.34
0.47
0.34
0.8
30.0
98
3
40.0
78
3
0.43
50.0
92
4
0.21
60.0
110
4
0.21
140CT92
0.0
3
3
1.9
1.02
1.39
5.63
0.82
6.8
3.0
3
4
2.2
0.97
1.62
4.35
0.76
7.7
6.0
3
5
1.6
0.97
1.54
6.84
0.74
9.2
10.63
0.73
10.0
7.04
0.60
8.8
9.0
3
4
1.7
1.08
1.49
12.0
3
5
1.9
1.02
1.35
15.0
4
9
1.7
1.09
1.19
6.34
0.57
6.0
1.8
1.23
0.93
12.17
0.67
8.0
18.0
5
3
21.0
57
4
1.7
1.00
0.60
2.62
0.37
1.9
24.0
62
3
1.5
0.83
0.52
1.35
0.31
1.3
62
Table 6. Variation in discrete biological and chemical data for selected stations.
Phytoplankton (#·mL-1)
Station, date,
and depth (m)
27.0
Nitrate
(lJg N·L- 1)
Total P
(lJg·L- 1)
Part.P
(lJg·L- 1)
Bacteria
(x10 6·mL- 1)
Chlorophyll
(lJg. L-1)
64
3
1.3
0.79
0.46
1.1
0.90
0.35
Pico.
(x10 4 )
Nano.
(x10 3)
Micro.
(x10 2)
0.82
0.32
1.4
0.40
0.32
2.5
30.0
59
3
40.0
63
3
0.27
50.0
65
3
0.19
60.0
65
3
0.15
0.0
38
13
1.7
1.51
1.24
4.65
0.74
4.3
3.0
38
12
1.9
1.58
1.58
4.39
0.61
5.5
17NOV92
6.0
38
3
1.9
1.51
1.30
3.56
0.49
3.9
9.0
41
3
1.7
1.37
1.09
4.10
0.64
4.5
12.0
45
3
1.7
1.29
0.95
3.76
0.58
7.3
15.0
46
3
1.6
1.32
0.89
3.17
0.56
6.6
18.0
47
3
1.5
1.35
0.80
3.82
0.52
4.5
21.0
51
3
1.5
1.69
0.81
2.19
0.66
6.7
24.0
53
4
1.8
1.68
0.82
2.79
0.47
4.6
27.0
66
3
1.4
1.36
0.74
2.81
0.46
5.4
30.0
106
3
1.3
1.13
0.47
0.82
0.39
4.1
40.0
118
3
0.27
50.0
120
3
0.24
60.0
121
3
0.23
63
Table 7. Seasonal (April-November) averages of physical data for each station.
Year and
station
Ext. coeff.
(·m ol )
Secchi
depth (m)
0.39
7.2
13.7
0.32
10.7
13.3
0.33
9.7
10.6
11.8
0.37
7.7
9.3
11.7
0.36
7.1
Surface
temp.oC)
Mean epil.
temp. (0C)
Thermocline
depth (m)
EZD (m)
1.0
17.5
16.4
12.7
11.2
5.0
16.0
15.2
13.9
7.0
17.1
11.3
10.0
1802
15.9
16.8
1.0
15.6
14.7
1987
1988
4.0
14.8
14.5
12.0
12.6
0.32
8.2
5.0
14.3
13.8
10.7
13.1
0.31
7.9
7.0
15.6
14.5
10.5
12.8
8.7
10.0
15.6
15.1
10.1
10.7
0.33
0.41
16.3
14.9
16.3
9.4
10.9
4.0
15.5
13.2
12.8
0.38
0.34
9.3
5.0
15.9
15.7
12.4
14.0
0.31
9.7
7.1
1989
1.0
7.0
6.0
16.9
15.7
12.6
13.1
0.32
9.2
6.1
17.1
15.8
9.7
12.8
0.34
9.7
7.0
15.1
15.3
12.0
11.7
0.36
8.4
10.0
16.2
16.3
10.7
10.3
0.41
7.6
1990
1.0
15.7
14.0
11.0
10.0
0.46
6.2
4.0
15.4
9.8
11.3
15.0
10.7
12.4
0.38
0.35
9.4
5.0
13.9
13.5
8.7
6.0
15.0
13.7
11.2
12.7
0.35
8.7
6.1
15.5
13.5
12.5
0.35
8.9
7.0
15.4
14.1
8.5
11.6
0.38
7.9
10.0
16.0
14.6
12.9
9.8
0.45
6.3
1.0
15.9
15.0
9.8
11.6
0.38
6.4
4.0
15.1
14.8
12.1
11.9
0.35
7.6
10.5
1991
6.0
14.7
14.3
6.1
14.6
15.1
13.3
0.33
7.9
13.9
0.32
8.8
7.0
15.1
14.5
12.3
12.1
0.36
8.1
10.0
15.4
15.0
12.7
10.9
0.41
6.5
16.2
15.4
12.7
12.2
0.35
7.3
13.5
0.32
8.8
1992
1.0
4.0
16.0
15.0
11.3
6.0
15.7
14.7
13.6
14.0
0.32
9.7
7.0
16.4
15.1
11.7
14.3
0.31
8.6
64
Table 7. Seasonal (April-November) averages of physical data for each station.
Year and
station
Surface
temp. 0C)
Mean epil.
temp. (0C)
Thermocline
depth (m)
EZD (m)
17.8
15.8
9.7
10.1
Ext. coeff.
(-m· l )
Secchi
depth (m)
1993
1.0
0.44
5.8
4.0
16.8
15.1
12.5
13.1
0.33
7.9
6.0
15.8
14.6
12.0
13.6
0.32
8.6
7.0
16.3
14.7
10.5
12.5
0.35
8.2
65
Table 8. Seasonal (April-November) averages of chemical data for each station.
Year and station
Nitrate
(flg N·L· 1)
Total P
(flg P·L· 1)
Part. P
(flg P·L· 1)
Silica
(mg Si·L· 1)
T.D.S.
(mg·L· 1)
1987
1
12.0
7.4
1.5
2.48
66
3.3
0.7
2.75
58
5
22.6
7
14.6
3.8
1.1
2.61
54
10
13.3
5.8
1.4
3.03
57
12.3
5.2
3.5
3.50
63
4
13.5
3.2
2.0
3.33
51
5
21.1
3.7
2.1
3.40
52
7
10.8
4.1
2.1
3.47
62
10
14.8
4.8
2.8
3.96
61
1
12.4
6.1
3.2
3.32
55
4
20.2
3.8
2.6
3.09
49
5
20.2
4.3
2.0
3.09
48
1988
1
1989
6
18.5
4.4
1.9
3.09
50
7
16.1
5.0
2.4
3.17
58
10
17.1
6.4
2.9
3.78
59
26.1
8.2
4.3
3.02
69
3.05
57
1990
1
4
31.1
4.5
2.2
5
31.3
5.0
2.2
2.96
60
6
31.6
4.8
2.2
2.91
57
7
26.2
5.1
2.6
3.16
64
10
26.4
6.7
3.6
3.50
70
1
22.1
6.0
4.3
2.92
55
4
29.5
4.1
2.3
2.58
44
1991
6
29.9
3.7
2.3
2.62
46
7
25.3
4.8
2.9
2.74
51
10
25.4
5.4
3.5
3.17
53
13.0
6.2
3.5
2.69
60
1992
1
4
20.9
3.5
2.1
2.47
46
6
23.7
4.6
2.3
2.55
49
7
17.5
4.4
2.3
2.64
55
1
11.8
3.6
2.84
64
4
5.4
2.1
2.40
45
1993
6
6.2
2.3
2.40
51
7
7.1
2.6
2.61
57
66
Table 9. Seasonal (April-November) averages of biological data for each station.
Year and
station
Bacteria
(xi 06'mL'l)
Chlorophyll (fJg·L'l)
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Phytoplankton (#'mL'l)
Micro.
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
1987
1
0.74
2.25
1.04
0.63
0.60
7.00
1.95
44.3
5
0.48
1.29
0.59
0.32
0.20
5.25
2.20
13.3
7
0.69
1.41
0.78
0.27
0.24
5.19
2.04
23.0
10
0.53
1.95
1.14
0.61
0.31
4.50
3.52
15.8
1988
1
1.03
2.54
1.12
0.65
1.03
7.02
2.28
32.4
4
0.68
1.88
1.12
0.58
0.31
4.73
2.14
23.2
5
0.73
2.10
1.08
0.54
0.48
5.17
2.01
22.5
7
0.86
1.67
0.82
0.41
0.39
6.40
2.11
24.1
10
0.77
2.45
1.40
0.61
0.41
3.92
2.37
32.5
1
1.28
2.74
1.36
0.60
0.56
7.06
1.74
31.5
4
0.72
1.58
0.83
0.36
0.14
6.18
1.41
13.1
1989
5
0.75
1.65
0.84
0.36
0.16
6.63
1.43
18.4
6
0.77
1.68
0.84
0.39
0.13
6.04
1.37
15.5
7
0.83
1.93
0.95
0.46
0.30
6.85
1.49
20.3
10
0.91
2.22
1.02
0.46
0.40
3.35
1.49
12.7
1
1.60
2.24
0.82
0.50
0.94
4.80
0.82
29.2
4
1.07
1.11
0.66
0.28
0.21
5.17
0.49
6.4
6.5
1990
5
1.21
1.04
0.46
0.53
0.31
7.56
0.61
6
1.33
1.19
0.62
0.24
0.33
6.20
0.53
6.1
7
1.08
1.62
0.84
0.43
0.37
6.55
0.52
8.0
10
1.24
1.93
1.04
0.53
0.37
4.18
1.18
6.4
1991
1
1.37
2.74
1.31
0.60
0.90
5.75
0.82
14.4
4
1.04
1.57
0.62
0.46
0.51
4.65
0.84
8.9
6
1.07
1.59
0.55
0.49
0.60
5.44
0.77
7.5
5.71
0.86
9.7
7
1.18
2.19
0.91
0.58
0.71
10
1.10
2.15
0.93
0.80
0.43
1
1.48
2.11
1.11
0.61
0.40
5.87
0.87
8.3
4
0.95
1.39
0.78
0.45
0.16
4.44
0.88
4.7
1992
6
1.06
1.34
0.63
0.54
0.19
5.96
0.80
5.6
7
1.09
1.67
0.87
0.53
0.26
4.44
1.13
6.0
1
1.48
3.67
6.16
0.73
32.4
4
1.16
1.51
5.94
0.62
4.9
1993
6
1.14
1.62
7.07
0.56
5.9
7
1.27
2.27
8.95
0.47
11.6
67
Table 10. Seasonal (April-November) averages of pH, total alkalinity and photosynthetic rate.
Year and
station
T. alk.
(mg·L- 1)
pH
Photosynthetic rate (mg C·m-2·d- 1)
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
1987
1
7.71
43.90
224.3
56.1
83.4
99.6
5
7.59
35.86
134.1
51.9
52.8
35.6
7
7.60
38.18
127.0
43.6
61.2
24.5
10
7.66
42.13
149.7
55.9
72.2
32.9
1
7.43
40.17
198.5
53.8
73.8
71.9
4
7.25
30.01
147.4
55.6
52.0
59.7
5
7.35
32.77
92.4
27.4
36.0
25.9
7
7.39
37.45
115.2
31.4
52.7
33.8
1
7.23
38.13
272.4
44.5
121.6
103.4
4
6.92
29.58
140.0
45.9
66.0
30.1
1988
1989
6
7.02
31.50
132.1
33.5
73.9
27.7
7
7.12
35.50
188.6
63.2
84.4
41.4
1
7.59
44.14
208.9
37.0
52.2
141.7
4
7.49
30.58
93.3
25.2
47.0
35.0
103.7
32.1
39.1
35.8
1990
6
7.47
33.11
7
7.64
36.89
1
7.83
40.69
206.5
52.8
64.5
95.9
4
7.62
29.68
214.1
78.6
48.4
93.4
6
7.66
33.15
151.6
42.5
52.0
70.2
7
7.71
35.20
192.6
55.8
55.0
90.7
7.09
33.92
155.3
53.6
66.4
42.6
1991
1992
6
Table 11. Whole-lake seasonal averages of physical data.
Surface
temp. (0C)
Mean epil.
temp. (0C)
Thermocline
depth (m)
EZO (m)
1987
16.6
15.7
13.1
12.7
0.34
9.5
1988
15.0
14.3
10.4
12.5
0.33
7.9
1989
15.9
15.8
11.6
12.3
0.35
8.5
Year
Ext. coeff.
(-m- l )
Secchi
depth (m)
1990
15.3
13.9
10.3
11.4
0.39
7.9
1991
15.2
14.6
10.9
12.3
0.35
7.5
1992
16.0
15.0
12.6
13.4
0.33
8.6
1993
16.7
15.1
11.1
12.3
0.36
7.6
68
Table 12. Whole-lake seasonal averages of chemical data.
Year
Nitrate
(fJg NoL,1)
Total P
(fJg· L,1)
Part. P
(fJg- L,1)
T.D.S.
(mg·L'1)
Silica
(mg Si·L,1)
1987
17.7
4.6
1.0
2.64
60
1988
15.3
4.1
2.5
3.43
57
1989
16.8
4.9
2.5
3.17
53
1990
28.8
5.9
2.9
3.02
62
1991
26.6
4.7
3.0
2.73
49
1992
18.9
4.9
2.6
2.60
53
7.9
2.7
2.57
55
1993
Table 13. Whole-lake seasonal averages of biological data.
Chlorophyll (lJg·L,l )
Phytoplankton (#·mL,1)
Bacteria
Year
(x10 6·mL,1)
Pico.
Nano.
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
(x10 4 )
(x103)
Micro.
(x10 2)
0.39
0.32
5.62
2.10
24.30
1987
0.60
1.59
0.77
1988
0.84
2.12
1.05
0.55
0.60
5.89
2.13
25.88
1989
0.92
2.02
1.02
0.45
0.30
6.63
1.52
21.34
1990
1.30
1.55
0.70
0.41
0.50
5.92
0.62
13.49
1991
1.18
2.05
0.86
0.54
0.70
5.46
0.81
10.19
1992
1.17
1.64
0.84
0.54
0.26
5.40
0.90
6.35
1993
1.27
2.34
6.97
0.60
14.74
Table 14. Whole-lake seasonal averages of pH, total alkalinity and photosynthetic rate.
Photosynthetic rate (mg C·m,2·d,l)
Year
pH
T. alk.
(mg·L'l )
1987
7.62
38.23
166.4
56.6
63.8
55.5
1988
7.36
35.44
137.4
40.6
53.1
46.6
1989
7.09
33.94
186.2
44.4
89.0
53.4
1990
7.55
37.45
139.9
34.8
45.6
70.4
1991
7.71
35.25
185.9
53.9
55.7
85.5
1992
7.39
34.88
210.4
72.0
81.2
63.5
Total
Pico.
Nano.
Micro.
69
LIST OF FIGURES
1.
2.
3.
4.
Map of British Columbia showing location of Shuswap Lake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Location of sampling stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Variation of IVF with depth
Seasonal variation in thermal structure
70
71
72
100
70
British
Columbia
Vancouver
Island
\
1. Map of British Columbia showing location
Shuswap
Lake
Shuswap Lake.
71
Shuswap
Lake
Little
Shuswap
Lake
I
10 km
Salmon R.
Fig 2. Location of sampling stations.
72
Station 1. 1987.
IVF (mV)
N
N
N
N
VI
00000
0
0
0
o
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
o +--............................_,+---r--....................~-+--- ........I:.............L..~-i-- .........I:..................~+'-'r-'~-+""""'t"' ........""""-t~'""""'\"~ ...............
o
Cltn
(I)
'9.
-
N
:::To
.aN
tn
24MAY
26MAY
30JUN
27JUN
Station 1. 1987.
IVF (mV)
0
0
0
0
N
0
0
0
N
0
0
0
0
tn
0
CI
(I)
tn
"'ON
-
go
3
N
_tn
VI
0
VI
tn
~
0
21SEP
240CT
270CT
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
19NOV
N
0
VI
0
22AUG 25AUG
19SEP
73
Station 1. 1988.
IVF (mV)
o
o
0
0
N
0
0
0
N
~
000
N
000
N
000
~
0
(J1
0
--
CD
"0
::T
3
.......
N
0
N
(J1
~
0
~
~
~
0
05MAY
l.3APR
04MAR
02JUN
Station 1. 1988.
o
o
N
o
IV~ (mV)
000
0
o
o
o
04AUG
J
01 SEP 27SEP 10NOV
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
N
o
~
~
000
07JUL
m
0
74
Station 1. 1989.
IVF (mV)
a
a
a
N
a
~
a
~
a
a
0
N
a
~
~
~
000
0
a
N
0
a
a
0
0
a
0
o
o
o
~
CJ)N
"9.
::::r
0
3
N
-
-~
~
o 10MAY
15JUN
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
13JUL
17AUG
14SEP
190CT
22NOV
N
a
75
Station 1. 1990.
IVF (mV)
o
o
0
N
0
~
0
N
000
~
0
~
0
0
0
N
0
~
0
~
0
~
~
N
0
000
0
o
OUI
(\)
"'ON
-
:fO
3
N
........ (JI
24APR
10APR
04APR
14MAR
Station 1. 1990.
IVF (mV)
N
o
000
~
0
~
0
0
0
N
0
~
0
~
0
~
0
~
0
~
~
000
0
N
0
~
0
~
0
N
000
(JI
0
(JI
0
~N
-
:fo
3
N
........ (JI
~
0
~
(JI
~
0
09MAY
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
23MAY
13JUN
22NOV
76
Station 1. 1991.
IVF (mY)
N
o
000
0
N
0
0
~
0
0
N
~
000
0
0
N
0
~
0
~
~
0
0
~
U1
(J1
o
O(J1
(l)
-
"5tN
::ro
3
N
-~
11 APR
23APR
22MAY
09MAY
Station 1. 1991.
IVF (mY)
o
o
0
N
0
~
0
~
000
N
0
~
0
~
~
000
N
~
000
(J1
o
o(J1
(l)
"ON
:TO
3N
-U1
-
~
o
06JUN
18JUN
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
~
000
10JUL
~
0
00
0
77
Station 1. 1992.
IVF (mV)
o
0
N
0
0
0
N
0
0
0
N
0
Vol
~
000
N
Vol
000
~
0
U1
0
0
N
Vol
000
U1
o
CUI
(I)
"ON
:TO
_
3
U1
N
Vol
U1
10MAR
08APR
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
06MAY
10JUN
18NOV
~
0
78
Station 4. 1988.
IVF (mV)
o
000
0
N
0
0
0
N
0
0
0
N
0
0
0
N
0
~
0
0
0
N
0
U1
0
(J1
0(I)
.....
N
3
N
"0
--
0
'::T
(J1
~
0
~
(J1
~
0
OHAAR
14APR
04MAY
Station 4. 1988.
IVF (mV)
N
o
0000000
o
o
U1
CD
"0
N
3
N
-
g.o
-
(J1
~
o
31AUG 29SEP 09NOV
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
01 JUN
06JUL
03AUG
~
0
79
Station 4. 1989.
IVF (mV)
0
0
0
0
N
0
0
0
N
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N
0
0
0
o
OUI
(I)
"C
N
:;:0
3
N
-UI
~
o
11 MAY
15AUG
11JUL
13JUN
12SEP
170CT
23NOV
Station 4. 1990.
IVF (mV)
o
o
I N N
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
a
0
0
0
000
0
N
0
0
UI
o
o
U1
(I)
-
'9,.N
:;ro
3
N
-UI
Vol
o
~
o
15MAR
05APR
10APR
24APR
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
10MAY
23MAY
14JUN
21NOV
0
80
Station 4. 1991.
IVF (mV)
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
N
a
a
o(J'l
CD
~~
3 N
-(J'I
-
10APR
05JUN
22MAY
24APR 07MAY
l8JUN
llJUL
Station 4. 1992.
IVF (mV)
a
a
N
a
a
a
N
a
a
a
N
a
~
a
~
a
a
0
N
0
~
0
~
0
(J'I
0
0
a
N
a
a
o
~
o
10MAR
07APR
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
05MAY
10JUN
l7NOV
~
0
81
Station 5. 1987.
o
0
0
000
0
0
IVF (mV)
o
0
N
000
0
0
N
o
VI
o
~
o
24MAY· 25MAY
27JUN
28JUN
Station 5. 1987.
IVF (mV)
0
0
0
0
N
0
a
0
0
()1
0
()1
CJ
(I)
"E.
::T
3
_
N
o
()1
N
VI
0
VI
U1
~
0
240CT
250CT
17NOV
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
N
0
22AUG
23AUG
19SEP
VI
~
000
20SEP
82
Station 5. 1988.
IVF (mV)
o
o
0
o
0
N
0
~
0
0
0
N
0
~
0
0
0
N
0
0
0
N
0
~
0
0
N
U!
0
a
--
U!
('l)
"'0
::r
3
N
0
N
U!
~
0
~
U!
.f:>.
0
12APR
03MAR
03MAY
Station 5. 1988.
IVF (mV)
0
0
N
0
o
N
000
0
0
U!
0
0
--
CD
"'0
U!
::r N
0
3
N
U!
~
0
~
(Jl
.f>.J
0
30AUG
28SEP
D8NOV
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
N
0
31 MAY
05JUL
~
000
02AUG
83
Station 5. 1989.
IVF (mV)
0
0
N
0
0
0
0
N
0
0
VI
0
N
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N
0
o
01
0(\)
"0
N
-
01
-
:TO
3 N
A
12JUL
o 09MAY 14JUN
Station 5.
16AUG
180CT
13SEP
21 NOV
1990.
IVF (mV)
o
o
0
0
0
0
0
000
0
000
09APR
23APR
08MAY
22MAY
0
N
0
0
0
U1
o
CJ01
(\)
"E.N
=ro
3
N
-01
VI
o
VI
U1
.j>.
o
13MAR
03APR
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
12JUN
20NOV
N
0
84
Station 6. 1989.
IVF (mV)
o
a
a
°
N
a
~
°
a
°
N
a
°
a
a
N
0
0
0
0
0
o
U1
o
(l)N
"So
::r
-
-N
3U1
~
o 09MAY
14JUN
12JUl
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
16AUG
13SEP
180er
21 NOV
0
85
Station 6. 1990.
IVF (mV)
o
o
N
0
000
0
000
0
000
13MAR
15MAR
03APR
09APR
23APR
08MAY
VI
000
~
UI
0
0
o
....
CUI
(0
"'C
N
::To
-
2.N
UI
~
o
Station 6. 1990.
IVF (mV)
0
0
N
0
0
0
N
0
VI
0
0
UI
0
0(0
--"0
Ui
N
::T 0
3
N
UI
VI
0
VI
UI
~
0
12JUN
d
20NOV
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
22MAY
m
0
"-J
00
\0
0
0
0
86
Station 6. 1991.
IVF (mV)
o
000
0
0
0
N
000
0
NO."",
000
o
oU'!
CTI
'"S.N
:TO
3
N
-(Jl
09APR
24APR
D8MAY
21MAY
D4JUN
Station 6. 1991.
0
0
N
0
0.
0
IVF (mV)
o
0
0
~
N
0
0.
0
(Jl
0
0
U'I
":T
N
--CTI
3
0
N
U'!
0.
0
0.
U'!
~
0
17JUN
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
~
(Jl
000
12JUL
0
(Jl
0
0'1
0
87
Station 6. 1992.
IVF (mV)
0
0
N
0
0
0
N
0
0
N
0
0
V4
0
0
0
N
0
V4
0
0
0
N
0
0
U1
0
C
---
U1
(I)
"0
';j'
3
N
0
N
U1
V4
0
V4
U1
~
0
11 MAR
07APR
OSMAY
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
11JUN
17NOV
V4
0
88
Station 7. 1987.
IVF (mV)
o
a
0
N
a
a
0
N
0
a
0
N
0
a
a
N
0
a
a
0
0
0
0
0
0(1)
--
"0
::::T
3
.....,
(Jl
N
0
N
(Jl
(;.I
0
(;.I
(Jl
~
0
28MAY
24MAY
Station 7.
27JUN
01JUL
1987.
IVF (mV)
N
a
000
a
0
000
0
240CT
280CT
20NOV
(Jl
o
o
(1)
(Jl
N
'9.0
::::T
-N
3
.....,
(Jl
(;.I
(Jl
23SEP
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
N
0
22AUG
26AUG
19SEP
N
0
89
Station 7. 1988.
IVF (mV)
N
o
000
0
0
0
0
N
0
0
0
N
0
0
0
N
~
0
~
a
(1)
....
"0 N
::T 0
-3
N
~
~
0
~
~
~
0
02MAR
15APR
06MAY
03JUN
Station 7. 1988.
IVF (mV)
o
N
~
000
000
0
N
000
o
o
05AUG
02SEP
30SEP
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
llNOV
~
000
08JUL
~
0
90
Station 7. 1989.
IVF (mV)
o
o
0
0
N
0
~
000
N
0
~
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Cl
UI
"0
N
-(1)
::r 0
3
N
U1
~
0
~
U1
.;..
o 12MAY
16JUN
14JUL
Fi9 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
18AUG
15SEP
200CT 24NOV
N
0
91
Station 7. 1990.
IVF (mV)
o
o
0
0
0
0
a
a
000
N
(JoI
~
0
0
0
(Jl
a
a
(J1
0
CD
"0 N
::J a
....
-3
N
(J1
Vl
a
Vl
(Jl
16MAR - 06APR
~
a
10APR
11 MAY
24APR
Station 7. 1990.
IVF (mV)
o
o
0
N
0
(JoI
0
~
0
(Jl
0
m
0
~
00
WON
000
000
0
a
0
(Jl
0
0
(Jl
.-
N
0
CD
"0
-::J
3
N
(Jl
Vl
0
Vl
(Jl
~
0
23MAY
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
15JUN
23NOV
N
a
92
Station 7. 1991.
IVF (mV)
N
o
000
0
0
N
0
~
0
0
0
N
0
0
N
o
0'"
U'I
~
"'C
-
-N
=r
o
3
-N
U'I
12APR
10MAY
23APR
07JUN
23MAY
Station 7. 1991.
IVF (mV)
0
0
N
0
~
0
.;...
0
0
0
N
0
~
0
0
U1
0
0
---
U1
~
"'C
=r
3
N
0
N
U1
~
0
VJ
U1
.;...
0
19JUN
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
09JUL
.;...
0
U1
0
0'1
0
.......
0
~
000
93
Station 7. 1992.
IVF (mV)
N
00000
o
N
~
000
0
N
0
~
~
U'1
000
0
0
N
0
~
0
~
0
0
N
U'1
o
o~
-
CD
"'C
U'1
: ::TN
_0
3
-
N
U'1
~
U'1
10MAR
08APR
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
06MAY
10JUN
~
000
laNOV
94
Station 10. 1987.
IVF (mV)
N
000
0
0
N
000
N
0
o
OU'l
(I)
-
"2.N
'::1'0
3
N
-U'I
27MAY
24MAY
22AUG
29JUN
27JUN
Station 10. 1987.
IVF (mV)
0
0
N
0
0
0
N
0
0
0
N
0
0
0
N
0
0
U'I
0
OU'l
(I)
"C N
:;:0
3
_
N
U'I
VI
0
VI
U'I
~
0
22SEP
240CT
260CT
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
l8NOV
VI
0
24AUG
19SEP
95
Station 10. 1988.
IVF (mV)
o
N
000
~
0
~
0
0
0
N
0
~
0
~
0
a
0
N
a
~
a
~
a
a
a
N
a
o
ClUl
l'!l
"'0
N
:::ro
3'
_
N
Ul
13APR
07JUL
02JUN
05MAY
Station 10. 1988.
o
a
0
N
0
~
0
~
0
U'!
0
IVF (mV)
m ~
0
0
a
0
N
a
0
a
a
a
Ul
o
aU'!
CD N
"':::r
E. o
3
N
_U'!
~
a
04AUG
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
01SEP
27SEP 10NOV
N
a
~
a
96
Station 10. 1989.
IVF (mV)
o
0
o
N
0
o
0
N
o
~
0
.j'>.
0
0
0
N
0
000
0
14SEP
190CT
N
000
Oh-t~--t-~.........'-"i"~""""'r-'''''''''''''''''''~''''''''''--+-''''''''''''+'-''''''''''''~+""''"''""t.:L......'-+~.,f..--t-'-'-'"T'-''''''''''''
0
0(I)
U1
"0
N
-::r
3
0
N
U1
~
0
~
U1
-I>-
o 10MAY 15JUN
l3JUL
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
17AUG
22NOV
97
Station 10. 1990.
IVF (mV)
o
a
a
a
a
N
a
~
a
~
a
a
a
N
a
~
a
~
a
~
a
m
a
~
a
U1
0
CJ
(l)
U1
"0
N
-
-;:r
3
0
N
U1
~
a
~
U1
~
a
24APR
10APR
04APR
Station 10. 1990.
IVF (mV)
a
a
a
N
a
~
a
~
a
a
a
N
a
a
a
N
a
a
a
N
a
U1
a
OU1
(l)
-
"'E.N
;:ro
3
N
-U1
~
a
~
U1
~
a
09MAY
23MAY
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
13JUN
22NOV
~
a
00
0
WON
a
a
a
a
~
a
98
Station 10. 1991.
IVF (mV)
0
0
N
0
tN
0
."..
0
(JI
0
Ol
0
'-J
0
0
0
N
0
tN
0
."..
0
(JI
Ol
0
0
'-J
0
00
0
1.0
0
0
0
0
0
N
0
0
0
OUl
(\)
"'C N
:70
3
-
N
Ul
tN
0
tN
Ul
."..
11 APR
0
09MAY
23APR
Station 10. 1991.
IVF (mV)
o
o
N
tN
000
."..
0
0
0
N
tN
000
0
N
0
tN
0
0
0
N
0
(JI
o
O(JI
CD
:aN
-
::TO
3
N
-Ul
tN
Ul
22MAY
06JUN
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
18JUN
10JUL
~
0
."..
0
(JI
0
tN
0
99
Station 1,4,6 and 7. April 23, 1993.
IVF (mV)
o
o
0
N
0
~
0
0
0
N
0
N
000
N
000
(J1
0
(J1
0(1)
-"0
';j
3
N
0
N
(J1
~
0
~
(J1
~
0
Station=l
Station=4
Fig 3. Variation of IVF with depth.
Station=6
Station=7
~
0
100
Station= 1 YEAR= 1987
0
,
....
~
11'
~
10
,.......
E
.........
20
..r:.
c..
QJ
a
30
40
50
+----.----..----.----.-----~--_,_--_r_--~--__f
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sap
Oct
Nov
Date
Station= 1 YEAR= 1988
O.,.---------r--r----r----~...,__r_--,.._,.._....-_,_----__,
10
20
..r:.
0+-
0QJ
a
30
40
50
+----.-----.----..,.---.-----.,.----r---_,_---.-----i
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Date
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
101
Station= 1 YEAR= 1989
o -r--------......----,r--~--------,.__-.,__...,._-----__,
10
20
30
40
50
+---......-----..----,---,.----..,.---...,._----,...----..,.----1
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Oct
Sap
Nov
Date
Station= 1 YEAR= 1990
O-r----------......--......,....,...,.-------..-........--r-.,.------,
10
12--
.'~
20
-
.J:
0...
Q)
o
-
6
30
40
50 +-----r-----,...----,---.,.---.,.----r-----,...--......,----j
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Date
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
102
Station= 1 YEAR= 1991
0
<D
~
10
,.-...
E
-
20
"-"
..c
6'
0...
Q)
Cl
30
40
50 +----,---......- - - - - , . - - - , - - - - r - - - - - r - - - . . . , . - - - - , - - - - i
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Date
Station= 1 YEAR= 1992
O...----------...---...,...----r---,~-__,.-_,..--r'---__.
10
20
-
..c
0...
Q)
Cl
30
40
50 + - - - . . . , - - - - r - - - - , - - - - , - - - - , - - - . . , . - - - - , - - - - - r - - - j
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Date
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
103
Station=1 YEAR=1993
O-r---------:~:_'""'==-~------...__,-r_----_,
~/
~
~
:!
10
20
.!:
0W
o
30
40
50 +----.-----r--==:,.-----,r----.....----r---....,-----.-----!
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sap
Oct
Nov
Date
Station=4 YEAR= 1988
O.,..----------,.-r-----r-...,.......,..--__,r---,--.,..---,.----_,
10
20
.!:
0..
(])
o
30
40
50 +----r-----r----.---r----.......- - - r - - - . . . . , - - - - - , . . - - - - !
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Date
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
104
Station=4 YEAR= 1989
0,..--------T"""T""T"""T""1""'"'t""--r--......,.-----,------,------,
o
<0
N
10
20
..c
.-
CL
Q)
a
30
40
50
4
-+---...,....---..----.----..-..:::-..::::::::....,..----r-:........~--__r--___j
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Aug
Jul
Sap
Oct
Nov
Date
Station=4 YEAR= 1990
0-r--------.....,..---~~'\'""""'1~----r__......--r-_r___r----___,
J
10
15
______
,0 _
':2 ~_::..:4:..=====:=:-..-
B
20
- - -_ _
6
.r:
__...
c..
Q)
a
30
40
50
.......---,..----r---__r--___1
+----r-----,r---""-~--_r_--
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Dote
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
105
Station=4 YEAR= 1991
0
ID
~
20
10
,......
E
........,
-c
-
20
0Q)
0
30
4
40
50 +----r---......---..,.J---~--.___-a=r===;i==--___,r__-___1
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sap
Oct
Nov
Date
Station=4 YEAR= 1992
__
O~----------'"'I"-- r----~--,.....,--.--,--.,.-....,.-----,
10
20
30
40
5 0 4 - - - . . , . - - - - r - - - - , - - - - , - - - - , - - - - , - - -....- - - - - y - - - i
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Date
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
106
Station=4 YEAR= 1993
O-r---------~-~~--o::__---~::__..,...-_r_---.......,
10
20
...c:
c..
Q)
o
30
40
'------4---'
50 - f - - - , - - - , - - - - , - - - - r - - - - r - - - . . , . . - - - - r - - - - r - - - - - j
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Date
Station=5 YEAR= 1987
0T"""--------""T""'T~~""1"r'"--,------...,..---.--,.._---__,
18
10
20
...c:
0Q)
o
30
40
50
+----r-----r----..,.---.-----...----r-----r-----,.--~
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Date
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
107
Station=5 YEAR= 1988
o .,...-------------r-----"T""---.,.-----r--------,
. . . . \ - \. /
c:S'
t..>.Io>
J
-u>
I
~
10
~:~
20
..c
0+-
0..
Ql
o
30
40
50
+----.-----.-----.---,...-,--...-.--",,---,...---..,--,---1
Mar
Apr
Jun
Jul
May
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Date
Station=5 YEAR= 1989
0
E
j
~.
~t~--=-~
10
.-...
_\1
?5~
20
6 ____________
'--'
..c
0+-
0..
Ql
0
30
40
50
+-----,,_--...--,--....----.-----.----,---,...---..,--.---1
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Ode
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
108
Station=5 YEAR= 1990
.-
0
10
-..
20
-
30
E
........,
..c
Q..
Q)
0
40
50 +-----r------.------.---,----.,----,----r---...,.-----j
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sap
Oct
Nov
Date
Station=6 YEAR= 1989
0
~
-..
E
........,
-
20
..c
Q..
Q)
0
~
~:~
10
30
40
• of
50
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Date
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
109
Station=6 YEAR= 1990
0 .......- - - - - - - - . - - - - - . - - . -.......-.------.---..--..-.--.-......- - - -
10
14---
12. - - - - - - " '
10-_------
B____
20
6~
...c:
Ci.
QJ
o
30
40
50 -+----,-----,-----.---...---.,..---.......--....,-----..----1
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sap
Oct
Nov
Date
Station=6 YEAR= 1991
0 .......----------...-.,....,...,.-.,...."."...,..--.---.......-....,..-.-_-----.
10
20
...c:
.-
c...
QJ
o
30
40
50
4---_----r-----.---..----...---....---....,..---..--~
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Date
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
110
Station=6 YEAR= 1992
..r::
c..
Q)
o
30
40
50 -t---...,-----,-----,.---..----..----.,----...,...----r----I
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Date
Station=6 YEAR= 1993
O.,......----------~-~---~,...--_r_--r-.....-..-----___,
10
-E
........
20
..r::
....
a..
Q)
0
\»-
30
40
50 +-----,--__._--..,.-~::::::,;::====r===,-.-__,--__._-__1
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Date
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
111
Station=7 YEAR=1987
O-r---------,..-'""""('""----.,.----....".--.-----..,.--.,---------,
1'8
10
20
30
40
50 +---....,..-----,:-----r----....,..----,---,-----r-----,----l
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Aug
Jul
Sap
Oct
Nov
Date
Station=7 YEAR= 1988
O-r---------...,.-........---.---.--....--.-...,.--.....--..,.----.-----.,
o
10
C'l
10
'2
10~
~
8
~
6 _______
20
.!:
+-
Q..
I1l
o
30
40
50
+----r-----r----r----,--~=::;=--__r--_r--___,,--__{
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Date
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
112
Station=7 YEAR= 1989
0
~
~
~;O--=::::::::-::= :
10
18
8 _____
,.......
E
.........
-
~&---------
20
..c
c..
(l)
0
30
4
40
50
-+---..,.-----r---::;:=---,,.---,.----~--_,_-=-__r--_l
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Sap
oct
Nov
Sep
Oct
Nov
Aug
Date
Station=7 YEAR= 1990
30
40
/4
50
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
~
Jul
Date
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
113
Station=7 YEAR= 1991
o -r----------.. . . . -~~~~r_-__,.--.....-__r_--,.._---__,
10
,-....
--
20
Il>
30
E
..c
Ci
0
4
40
50
.......
+---..,...---r----r-~-..__--...._-- --_r"~-__r--___4
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
oct
Nov
Date
Station=7 YEAR=1992
-
..c
0-
Il>
o
30
40
~4~
50 +---....,..-----r-----r---..---'f====r===:::.--....-,--""T,----1
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Date
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
114
Station=7 YEAR= 1993
O-r----------...............---.....",--......---'"':""--::~-_r_---__,
10
20
-
..c
0W
o
30
40
50
-t---..,----,------.---,.-----r----,-----r-----,.---;
Mar
Apr
Jun
Aug
Sep
Nov
May
Jul
Oct
Date
Station= 10 YEAR= 1987
0
'6
E
20
'--"
-
..c
w
-....
<z
~6~
0-
0
~
~~~
10
,-."
...
30
40
50 -t---..,----,----,---...----.---..,.----,------.-----i
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Date
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
115
Station= 10 YEAR= 1988
O_r_------........,:--~-~--..~~--.,.._--_r_..,...__r----_,
N
o
10
20
..c
Cl.
(lJ
Cl
30
40
50 +----r----,----.---,.---_r_--.,----r----,.----;
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sap
Oct
Nov
Date
Station= 10 YEAR= 1989
0
~2~
10
-..
E
~\:~
20
'-/
..c
a..
Q)
Cl
-'"
30
-------
~4
40
50 -l----r----.,...-----,---,.-..J.--...---.,----r-----,.----!
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Date
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
116
Station= 10 YEAR= 1990
0
~,\<y
10
16
\8.
----.
E
~~~
20
......"
-
...c
c..
(I)
a
~
<I
40
50
.
'\
30
+---.....-----r------r---r---.,..---~--_r_--__r--_I
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sap
Oct
Nov
Date
Station= 10 YEAR= 1991
O.......----------r.......,.--~~-----~-__r-r__,.._---__.
10
20
-
...c
c..
(I)
a
30
40
50
+---.....-----r-----r---.---.,..---~--_,_--__r--_I
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Date
Fig 4. Seasonal variation in thermal structure.
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
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